Science.gov

Sample records for microdissected tissue samples

  1. Laser microdissection of small tissue samples--application to chronic pancreatitis tissues.

    PubMed

    Heinmöller, Ernst; Bockholt, Anke; Werther, Meike; Ziemer, Maria; Müller, Annegret; Ghadimi, B Michael; Rüschoff, Josef

    2003-01-01

    Laser microdissection is considered to be the gold standard of tissue sampling, especially if a defined small tissue area consisting of single or few cells within a heterogeneous tissue compartment is of interest. This sophisticated technique offers the opportunity of rapid and contamination-free tissue sampling for RNA- or DNA-based molecular genetic studies. We have applied laser microdissection to a molecular genetic study of pancreatic intraductal lesions (PanINs) in tissues of chronic pancreatitis, where an exact microdissection of small ducts within a dense fibrous tissue is of paramount importance for following analysis. From nine patients suffering from chronic pancreatitis, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue specimens were laser microdissected, and a total of 202 normal ducts and PanINs of grade PanIN-1A to grade PanIN-2 were harvested. After whole genome amplification by improved primer extension and preamplification PCR (I-PEP-PCR), microsatellite-PCR based loss of heterozygosity analysis (LOH) of the tumor suppressor gene loci TP53, p16INK4, and DPC4 was performed. One of 85 informative duct lesions (1.2%) had LOH of TP53, 1 of 76 duct lesions (1.3%) had LOH of DPC4, and 2/29 duct lesions (6.9%) showed LOH of p16INK4. Microsatellite instability (MSI) was seen in 2 of 178 duct lesions (1.1%). Immunohistochemical staining of p53 protein and DPC4 protein revealed no aberrant expression. These preliminary data indicate that LOH of tumor suppressor genes, important in pancreatic cancer genesis or MSI, can be found in chronic pancreatitis tissues, but their incidence is low. PMID:12924436

  2. Measurement of Inflammatory Chemokines in Micro-dissected Tissue Biopsy Samples by Chip-Based Immunoaffinity Capillary Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Terry M; Wellner, Edward; McMohan, Shane; Kalish, Heather

    2016-01-01

    To aid in the biochemical analysis of human skin biopsies, a chip-based immunoaffinity capillary electrophoresis (ICE) system has been developed for measuring inflammatory chemokines in micro-dissected areas of the biopsy. Following isolation of the areas of interest, the tissue was solubilized and the analytes of interest were isolated by the immunoaffinity disk within the chip. The captured analytes were labeled in situ with a 635 nm light-emitting laser dye and electro-eluted into the chip separation channel. Electrophoretic separation of all of the analytes was achieved in 2.5 min with quantification of each peak being performed by online LIF detection and integration of each peak area. The degree of accuracy and precision achieved by the chip-based system is comparable to conventional immunoassays and the system is robust enough to be applied to the analysis of clinical samples. Further, with the expanding array of antibodies that are commercially available, this chip-based system can be applied to a wide variety of different biomedical and clinical analyses. PMID:27473486

  3. Laser capture microdissection in the tissue biorepository.

    PubMed

    Liu, Angen

    2010-09-01

    An important need of many cancer research projects is the availability of high-quality, appropriately selected tissue. Tissue biorepositories are organized to collect, process, store, and distribute samples of tumor and normal tissue for further use in fundamental and translational cancer research. This, in turn, provides investigators with an invaluable resource of appropriately examined and characterized tissue specimens and linked patient information. Human tissues, in particular, tumor tissues, are complex structures composed of heterogeneous mixtures of morphologically and functionally distinct cell types. It is essential to analyze specific cell types to identify and define accurately the biologically important processes in pathologic lesions. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) is state-of-the-art technology that provides the scientific community with a rapid and reliable method to isolate a homogeneous population of cells from heterogeneous tissue specimens, thus providing investigators with the ability to analyze DNA, RNA, and protein accurately from pure populations of cells. This is particularly well-suited for tumor cell isolation, which can be captured from complex tissue samples. The combination of LCM and a tissue biorepository offers a comprehensive means by which researchers can use valuable human biospecimens and cutting-edge technology to facilitate basic, translational, and clinical research. This review provides an overview of LCM technology with an emphasis on the applications of LCM in the setting of a tissue biorepository, based on the author's extensive experience in LCM procedures acquired at Fox Chase Cancer Center and Hollings Cancer Center.

  4. Evaluation of two-dimensional electrophoresis and liquid chromatography – tandem mass spectrometry for tissue-specific protein profiling of laser-microdissected plant samples

    SciTech Connect

    Schad, Martina; Lipton, Mary S.; Giavalisco, Patrick; Smith, Richard D.; Kehr, Julia

    2005-07-14

    Laser microdissection (LM) allows the collection of homogeneous tissue- and cell specific plant samples. The employment of this technique with subsequent protein analysis has thus far not been reported for plant tissues, probably due to the difficulties associated with defining a reasonable cellular morphology and, in parallel, allowing efficient protein extraction from tissue samples. The relatively large sample amount needed for successful proteome analysis is an additional issue that complicates protein profiling on a tissue- or even cell-specific level. In contrast to transcript profiling that can be performed from very small sample amounts due to efficient amplification strategies, there is as yet no amplification procedure for proteins available. In the current study, we compared different tissue preparation techniques prior to LM/laser pressure catapulting (LMPC) with respect to their suitability for protein retrieval. Cryosectioning was identified as the best compromise between tissue morphology and effective protein extraction. After collection of vascular bundles from Arabidopsis thaliana stem tissue by LMPC, proteins were extracted and subjected to protein analysis, either by classical two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), or by high-efficiency liquid chromatography (LC) in conjunction with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Our results demonstrate that both methods can be used with LMPC collected plant material. But because of the significantly lower sample amount required for LC-MS/MS than for 2-DE, the combination of LMPC and LC-MS/MS has a higher potential to promote comprehensive proteome analysis of specific plant tissues.

  5. SCOMP is superior to degenerated oligonucleotide primed-polymerase chain reaction for global amplification of minute amounts of DNA from microdissected archival tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Stoecklein, Nikolas H; Erbersdobler, Andreas; Schmidt-Kittler, Oleg; Diebold, Joachim; Schardt, Julian A; Izbicki, Jakob R; Klein, Christoph A

    2002-07-01

    Global genome amplification from formalin-fixed tissues is still problematic when performed with low cell numbers. Here, we tested a recently developed method for whole genome amplification termed "SCOMP" (single cell comparative genomic hybridization) on archival tissues of different ages. We show that the method is very well suited for formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples obtained by nuclei extraction or laser microdissection. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products can be used for subsequent comparative genomic hybridization, loss of heterozygosity studies, and DNA sequencing. To control for PCR-induced artifacts we amplified genomic DNA isolated from 20 nuclei of archival formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded nonpathological lymph nodes. Subsequent comparative genomic hybridization revealed the expected balanced profiles. For loss of heterozygosity analysis by microsatellite PCR 60 to 160 cells were sufficient. In comparative experiments the approach turned out to be superior to published degenerated oligonucleotide-primed-PCR protocols. The method provides a robust and valuable tool to study very small cell samples, such as the genomes of dysplastic cells or the clonal evolution within heterogeneous tumors.

  6. DNA from microdissected tissues may be extracted and stored on microscopic slides.

    PubMed

    Korabecna, M; Steiner, P; Jirkovska, M

    2016-01-01

    With regard to complex structure of tissues, laser capture microdissection represents an important step in analytical workflow streaming to proper molecular characterization of different cell types in examined samples. Therefore the simple method for simultaneous processing of higher numbers of microdissected tissues leading not only to rapid and efficient DNA isolation but allowing also the repeated sampling and easy storage may be useful in the practice of histopathological laboratories. We elaborated such a methodology applicable downstream after the microdissection from formalin-fixed paraffin embedded tissues.The tissues for examination are microdissected directly into the circular areas having the diameter 2 mm and marked on the microscopic slide. In this way, one slide is able to accommodate multiple samples. The DNA extraction is performed in low volume of buffer with Proteinase K in a droplet covered by mineral oil just on the slide. Mineral oil in the quality for molecular biology not only avoids evaporation during DNA extraction, but it helps to position the microdisssected tissue, to control the level of cell lysis microscopically and to protect the DNA sample during subsequent manipulations. We provided the evidence that DNA isolated by our methodology remains in the positions on microscopic slide for months without any changes in the lengths of available fragments and that it may be removed from each position repetitively for different kinds of analysis. The new methodological approach presented by us can be practically applied in broad spectrum of laboratories performing routinely genetic analysis on microdissected tissues. PMID:27268914

  7. DNA from microdissected tissues may be extracted and stored on microscopic slides.

    PubMed

    Korabecna, M; Steiner, P; Jirkovska, M

    2016-01-01

    With regard to complex structure of tissues, laser capture microdissection represents an important step in analytical workflow streaming to proper molecular characterization of different cell types in examined samples. Therefore the simple method for simultaneous processing of higher numbers of microdissected tissues leading not only to rapid and efficient DNA isolation but allowing also the repeated sampling and easy storage may be useful in the practice of histopathological laboratories. We elaborated such a methodology applicable downstream after the microdissection from formalin-fixed paraffin embedded tissues.The tissues for examination are microdissected directly into the circular areas having the diameter 2 mm and marked on the microscopic slide. In this way, one slide is able to accommodate multiple samples. The DNA extraction is performed in low volume of buffer with Proteinase K in a droplet covered by mineral oil just on the slide. Mineral oil in the quality for molecular biology not only avoids evaporation during DNA extraction, but it helps to position the microdisssected tissue, to control the level of cell lysis microscopically and to protect the DNA sample during subsequent manipulations. We provided the evidence that DNA isolated by our methodology remains in the positions on microscopic slide for months without any changes in the lengths of available fragments and that it may be removed from each position repetitively for different kinds of analysis. The new methodological approach presented by us can be practically applied in broad spectrum of laboratories performing routinely genetic analysis on microdissected tissues.

  8. Optimizing Frozen Sample Preparation for Laser Microdissection: Assessment of CryoJane Tape-Transfer System®.

    PubMed

    Golubeva, Yelena G; Smith, Roberta M; Sternberg, Lawrence R

    2013-01-01

    Laser microdissection is an invaluable tool in medical research that facilitates collecting specific cell populations for molecular analysis. Diversity of research targets (e.g., cancerous and precancerous lesions in clinical and animal research, cell pellets, rodent embryos, etc.) and varied scientific objectives, however, present challenges toward establishing standard laser microdissection protocols. Sample preparation is crucial for quality RNA, DNA and protein retrieval, where it often determines the feasibility of a laser microdissection project. The majority of microdissection studies in clinical and animal model research are conducted on frozen tissues containing native nucleic acids, unmodified by fixation. However, the variable morphological quality of frozen sections from tissues containing fat, collagen or delicate cell structures can limit or prevent successful harvest of the desired cell population via laser dissection. The CryoJane Tape-Transfer System®, a commercial device that improves cryosectioning outcomes on glass slides has been reported superior for slide preparation and isolation of high quality osteocyte RNA (frozen bone) during laser dissection. Considering the reported advantages of CryoJane for laser dissection on glass slides, we asked whether the system could also work with the plastic membrane slides used by UV laser based microdissection instruments, as these are better suited for collection of larger target areas. In an attempt to optimize laser microdissection slide preparation for tissues of different RNA stability and cryosectioning difficulty, we evaluated the CryoJane system for use with both glass (laser capture microdissection) and membrane (laser cutting microdissection) slides. We have established a sample preparation protocol for glass and membrane slides including manual coating of membrane slides with CryoJane solutions, cryosectioning, slide staining and dissection procedure, lysis and RNA extraction that facilitated

  9. Quantitative gene expression analysis in microdissected archival formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tumor tissue.

    PubMed

    Specht, K; Richter, T; Müller, U; Walch, A; Werner, M; Höfler, H

    2001-02-01

    Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue is the most widely available material for retrospective clinical studies. In combination with the potential of genomics, these tissues represent an invaluable resource for the elucidation of disease mechanisms and validation of differentially expressed genes as novel therapeutic targets or prognostic indicators. We describe here an approach that, in combination with laser-assisted microdissection allows quantitative gene expression analysis in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded archival tissue. Using an optimized RNA microscale extraction procedure in conjunction with real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction based on fluorogenic TaqMan methodology, we analyzed the expression of a panel of cancer-relevant genes, EGF-R, HER-2/neu, FGF-R4, p21/WAF1/Cip1, MDM2, and HPRT and PGK as controls. We demonstrate that expression level determinations from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues are accurate and reproducible. Measurements were comparable to those obtained with matching fresh-frozen tissue and neither fixation grade nor time significantly affected the results. Laser microdissection studies with 5-microm thick sections and defined numbers of tumor cells demonstrated that reproducible quantitation of specific mRNAs can be achieved with only 50 cells. We applied our approach to HER-2/neu quantitative gene expression analysis in 54 microdissected tumor and nonneoplastic archival samples from patients with Barrett's esophageal adenocarcinoma and showed that the results matched those obtained in parallel by fluorescence in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Thus, the combination of laser-assisted microdissection and real-time TaqMan reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction opens new avenues for the investigation and clinical validation of gene expression changes in archival tissue specimens.

  10. Promoter methylation analysis on microdissected paraffin-embedded tissues using bisulfite treatment and PCR-SSCP.

    PubMed

    Bian, Y S; Yan, P; Osterheld, M C; Fontolliet, C; Benhattar, J

    2001-01-01

    Methylation-sensitive single-strand conformation analysis (MS-SSCA) is a new method of screening for DNA methylation changes. The combination of bisulfite modification and PCR results in the conversion of unmethylated cytosines to thymines, whereas methylated cytosines remain unchanged. This sequence conversion can lead to methylation-dependent alterations of single-strand conformation, which can be detected by SSCA. An analysis of mixtures of methylated and unmethylated DNA at known ratios revealed that the relative intensities of the corresponding bands following MS-SSCA were maintained. MS-SSCA was applied for methylation analysis of human p16 promoter region using genomic DNA obtained from either frozen, fixed, or microdissected fixed tissue sections. MS-SSCA is a rapid, specific, and semiquantitative approach that allows the detection of methylation of the p16 gene promoter. In reconstruction experiments, the method permits the detection of 10% or less of cells harboring a methylated p16 promoter. We have been successful in analyzing by MS-SSCA almost all (96%) tumor samples microdissected from archival paraffin-embedded fixed tissue sections and obtaining reproducible results. In addition, when microdissection was performed, the clonality of this genetic alteration could be identified.

  11. Laser capture microdissection: Big data from small samples

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Soma; Malhotra, Lavina; Dickerson, Ryan; Chaffee, Scott; Sen, Chandan K.; Roy, Sashwati

    2015-01-01

    Any tissue is made up of a heterogeneous mix of spatially distributed cell types. In response to any (patho) physiological cue, responses of each cell type in any given tissue may be unique and cannot be homogenized across cell-types and spatial co-ordinates. For example, in response to myocardial infarction, on one hand myocytes and fibroblasts of the heart tissue respond differently. On the other hand, myocytes in the infarct core respond differently compared to those in the peri-infarct zone. Therefore, isolation of pure targeted cells is an important and essential step for the molecular analysis of cells involved say in the progression of disease. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) is powerful to obtain a pure targeted cell subgroup, or even a single cell, quickly and precisely under the microscope, successfully tackling the problem of tissue heterogeneity in molecular analysis. This review presents an overview of LCM technology, the principles, advantages and limitations and its down-stream applications in the fields of proteomics, genomics and transcriptomics. With powerful technologies and appropriate applications, this technique provides unprecedented insights into cell biology from cells grown in their natural tissue habitat as opposed to those cultured in artificial petri dish conditions. PMID:25892148

  12. Targeting hepatocytes from liver tissue by laser capture microdissection and proteomics expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Marko-Varga, György; Berglund, Magnus; Malmström, Johan; Lindberg, Henrik; Fehniger, Thomas E

    2003-11-01

    A tissue proteomics process is presented where hepatocyte cell isolation in combination with two-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometric identification were used to annotate the liver proteome. Laser microdissection of 8 microm liver tissue sections was performed and protein expression profiling was compared using a variety of quantities of input cells, and gel separation conditions. The 30 microm diameter laser generated the highest protein yields from the polymer coated caps following microsolubilization. We found that 6000 laser pulses (approximately 7200 hepatocytes) were required in order to generate high-resolution gel maps. Within homogeneous tissue samples, this could be accomplished in a total cycle time of 20 min using an automated dissection procedure. Close to 1000 high-quality gel annotations were generated from the corresponding 2-D gel expression profiles which matched closely the corresponding patterns of analytical-scale liver preparations detected by silver staining.

  13. Immunoguided Laser Assisted Microdissection Techniques for DNA Methylation Analysis of Archival Tissue Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Eberle, Franziska C.; Hanson, Jeffrey C.; Killian, J. Keith; Wei, Lai; Ylaya, Kris; Hewitt, Stephen M.; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Emmert-Buck, Michael R.; Rodriguez-Canales, Jaime

    2010-01-01

    Altered DNA methylation is a fundamental characteristic of carcinogenesis. The analysis of DNA methylation in tumor cells may help to better understand tumor pathogenesis and more importantly may be used as diagnostic tool with therapeutic consequences. To detect targets relevant in tumorigenesis, it is essential to separate neoplastic cells from nonneoplastic cells. An excellent method for isolating specific cells is laser-assisted microdissection (LAM). Target cell identification for immunoguided LAM (ILAM) requires immunohistochemistry (IHC). Yet, it is unclear whether IHC for ILAM influences DNA methylation. The goals of this study were to establish an optimized protocol for antigen retrieval and IHC of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) specimens suitable for ILAM and to evaluate its effect on the DNA methylome using a high throughput array. Using ten archival FFPE specimens, we showed specific staining suitable for ILAM. Extracted DNA from microdissected cells of immunohistochemically or H&E-stained tissue sections showed identical DNA quality and a strong correlation (r = 0.94 to 0.98) for CpG target methylation of 1505 analyzed sites in a series of five paired samples. No differential methylation between H&E and IHC was detected in 1501 of 1505 CpG targets (99.7%; P < 0.05). These results demonstrate the validity and utility of the herein described protocol, which allows the application of ILAM for large-scale genomic and epigenetic analyses of archival tissue specimens. PMID:20413681

  14. Alteration with dietary state of the activity and zonal distribution of adenylate cyclase stimulated by glucagon, fluoride and forskolin in microdissected rat liver tissue.

    PubMed

    Zierz, S; Jungermann, K

    1984-12-17

    Adenylate cyclase activated by glucagon, fluoride and forskolin was measured in liver homogenates and microdissected periportal and perivenous tissue of fed and fasted rats. A radiochemical microtest, more sensitive by 2-3 orders of magnitude as compared with the usual assay, was established for the determination of the activity in liver samples corresponding to 200-600 ng dry weight. In liver homogenates from fasted as compared to fed animals the glucagon-stimulated and fluoride-stimulated activity was increased by 1.65-fold, while the basal and the forskolin-stimulated activity remained the same. In microdissected tissue of both fed and fasted animals the activity was stimulated in about 60% of the samples by glucagon, fluoride and forskolin (responsive samples). However, in about 40% of the microdissected tissue samples the activity could not be stimulated by any of the above activators (non-responsive samples). In responsive microdissected tissue of fasted as compared to fed animals, the glucagon-stimulated and fluoride stimulated activity but not the basal and the forskolin-activated activity was increased by 2-3-fold. In responsive microdissected samples of fed animals neither the basal nor the stimulated activities showed a significant periportal to perivenous gradient. In samples of fasted animals, however, a zonal gradient was observed for the glucagon-stimulated activity exhibiting a 1.5-fold higher rate in the perivenous zone.

  15. A simple method for fixation and microdissection of frozen fresh tissue sections for molecular cytogenetic analysis of cancers.

    PubMed

    Huang, Q; Sacks, P G; Mo, J; McCormick, S A; Iacob, C E; Guo, L; Schaefer, S; Schantz, S P

    2005-01-01

    Microdissection has been widely used for procuring DNA from specific microscopic regions of formalin fixed, paraffin embedded tissue sections. We have developed a method for fixation and microdissection of frozen fresh biopsy tissue sections. Five micrometer frozen fresh tissue sections were fixed with ethanol and stored at room temperature. Well defined regions from hematoxylin and eosin (H & E) stained or unstained sections were briefly steamed and microdissected using a needle. The dissected tissue was digested with proteinase K and DNA was isolated. Whole genome amplifications were obtained by degenerate oligonucleotide primed polymerase chain reaction (DOP-PCR) from these samples. The reliability of this technique was demonstrated by comparing conventional comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) with DOP-PCR-CGH. The advantages of this method are that frozen fresh sections can be fixed easily and stored for more than 4 years, it is easy to microdissect and pick-up very minute regions (0.1 mm(2)), and it is rapid; microdissection and purification can be accomplished within 3 h. Using DNA from microdissected sections, DOP-PCR-CGH revealed genetic abnormalities more accurately than conventional CGH. Although this novel method was demonstrated using DOP-PCR-CGH, we believe that it will be useful for other genetic analyses of specific small regions and cell populations. We also observed whether storage time, H & E staining and crude DNA extracts affected the quality of amplified DNA. DNA integrity was maintained for at least 49 months in ethanol fixed sections that were stored at room temperature, but DNA was gradually degraded after one month if the ethanol fixed sections had been H & E stained and stored. When crude DNA extracts from H & E stained sections were used, the size of the DOP-PCR product was reduced. Our study suggests that ethanol fixed tissue sections may be stored at room temperature for at least 4 years without DNA degradation, the H & E stains may

  16. Amplification of multiple genomic loci from single cells isolated by laser micro-dissection of tissues

    PubMed Central

    Frumkin, Dan; Wasserstrom, Adam; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Harmelin, Alon; Rechavi, Gideon; Shapiro, Ehud

    2008-01-01

    Background Whole genome amplification (WGA) and laser assisted micro-dissection represent two recently developed technologies that can greatly advance biological and medical research. WGA allows the analysis of multiple genomic loci from a single genome and has been performed on single cells from cell suspensions and from enzymatically-digested tissues. Laser micro-dissection makes it possible to isolate specific single cells from heterogeneous tissues. Results Here we applied for the first time WGA on laser micro-dissected single cells from stained tissue sections, and developed a protocol for sequentially performing the two procedures. The combined procedure allows correlating the cell's genome with its natural morphology and precise anatomical position. From each cell we amplified 122 genomic and mitochondrial loci. In cells obtained from fresh tissue sections, 64.5% of alleles successfully amplified to ~700000 copies each, and mitochondrial DNA was amplified successfully in all cells. Multiplex PCR amplification and analysis of cells from pre-stored sections yielded significantly poorer results. Sequencing and capillary electrophoresis of WGA products allowed detection of slippage mutations in microsatellites (MS), and point mutations in P53. Conclusion Comprehensive genomic analysis of single cells from stained tissue sections opens new research opportunities for cell lineage and depth analyses, genome-wide mutation surveys, and other single cell assays. PMID:18284708

  17. Laser-capture microdissection of developing barley seeds and cDNA array analysis of selected tissues.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Johannes; Weier, Diana; Weschke, Winfriede

    2011-01-01

    Laser microdissection provides a useful method for isolating specific cell types from complex biological samples for downstream applications. In contrast to the texture of mammalian cells, most plant tissues exhibit a cell organization with hard, cellulose-containing cell walls, large vacuoles, and air spaces, thus complicating tissue preparation and extraction of macromolecules such as DNA and RNA. Especially, barley seeds show cell types with enormous differences in osmolarity (degenerating and differentiating tissues) and contain high amounts of the main storage product starch, thus requiring specific procedures for morphological preservation and RNA extraction. In this study, we report about methods allowing tissue-specific gene expression profiling of developing barley seeds. Details on aspects of tissue preparation, including fixation and embedding procedures, laser-capture microdissection, RNA isolation, and linear mRNA amplification to produce high-quality labelled probes for large-scale expression analysis are provided. Particular emphasis is placed on the fidelity of transcript data obtained by the developed methods in relation to the in vivo transcriptome.

  18. Tissue Microdissection and Degenerate Oligonucleotide Primed-Polymerase Chain Reaction (DOP-PCR) Is an Effective Method to Analyze Genetic Aberrations in Invasive Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Hirose, Yuichi; Aldape, Kenneth; Takahashi, Michelle; Berger, Mitchel S.; Feuerstein, Burt G.

    2001-01-01

    We amplified various amounts of DNA derived from frozen SF210 and U251NCI human glioblastoma cells, carried out comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) using degenerate oligonucleotide primed-PCR (DOP-PCR) products as test probes, and compared results to analyses performed with probes prepared by standard nick translation. Next we extracted DNA from hematoxylin-eosin (HE)- and methyl green (MG)-stained, microdissected sections of formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded U251NCI cells, amplified and labeled it by DOP-PCR, and subjected it to CGH. Finally, we used the same methods in multiple samples from a single human mixed glioma tissue. DOP-PCR products from 50 pg to 250 ng of DNA were equally effective in generating the same CGH profiles as the standard method. DOP-PCR products from microdissected pieces of MG-stained cells were effective probes for CGH, but HE-stained samples were not desirable. As the proportion of HE-stained sample increased, CGH profiles deteriorated. DOP-PCR products from microdissected pieces of MG-stained paraffin sections of glioma tissue produced CGH profiles compatible with their histological features. CGH performed with DOP-PCR products from microdissected paraffin blocks allows for the accurate investigation of the cytogenetic characteristics from invasive tumors and of cytogenetic heterogeneity within neoplastic tissue. PMID:11333301

  19. Application of array CGH on archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues including small numbers of microdissected cells.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Nicola A; Hamoudi, Rifat A; Ichimura, Koichi; Liu, Lu; Pearson, Danita M; Collins, V Peter; Du, Ming-Qing

    2006-09-01

    Array-based comparative genomic hybridisation (aCGH) has diverse applications in cancer gene discovery and translational research. Currently, aCGH is performed primarily using high molecular weight DNA samples and its application to formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues remains to be established. To explore how aCGH can be reliably applied to archival FFPE tissues and whether it is possible to apply aCGH to small numbers of cells microdissected from FFPE tissue sections, we have systematically performed aCGH on 15 pairs of matched frozen and FFPE astrocytic tumour tissues using a well-established in-house human 1 Mb BAC/PAC genomic array. By spiking tumour DNA with normal DNA, we demonstrated that at least 70% of tumour DNA was required for reliable aCGH analysis. Using aCGH data from frozen tissue as a reference, it was found that only FFPE astrocytic tumour tissues that supported PCR amplification of >300 bp DNA fragment provided high quality, reproducible aCGH data. The presence of necrosis in a tissue specimen had an adverse effect on the quality of aCGH, while fixation in formalin for up to 96 h of fresh tissue did not appear to affect the quality of the result. As little as 10-20 ng DNA from frozen or FFPE tissues could be readily used for aCGH analysis following whole genome amplification (WGA). Furthermore, as few as 2000 microdissected cells from haematoxylin-stained slides of archival FFPE tissues could be successfully used for aCGH investigations when WGA was used. By careful assessment of DNA integrity and review of histology, to exclude necrosis and select specimens with a high proportion of tumour cells, it is feasible to preselect archival FFPE tissues adequate for aCGH analysis. With the help of microdissection and WGA, it is also possible to apply aCGH to histologically defined lesions, such as carcinoma in situ.

  20. Cell-Type-Specific Genome-wide Expression Profiling after Laser Capture Microdissection of Living Tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, F; Manohar, C F

    2005-02-09

    The purpose of this technical feasibility study was to develop and evaluate robust microgenomic tools for investigations of genome-wide expression of very small numbers of cells isolated from whole tissue sections. Tissues contain large numbers of cell-types that play varied roles in organ function and responses to endogenous and exogenous toxicants whether bacterial, viral, chemical or radiation. Expression studies of whole tissue biopsy are severely limited because heterogeneous cell-types result in an averaging of molecular signals masking subtle but important changes in gene expression in any one cell type(s) or group of cells. Accurate gene expression analysis requires the study of specific cell types in their tissue environment but without contamination from surrounding cells. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) is a new technology to isolate morphologically distinct cells from tissue sections. Alternative methods are available for isolating single cells but not yet for their reliable genome-wide expression analyses. The tasks of this feasibility project were to: (1) Develop efficient protocols for laser capture microdissection of cells from tissues identified by antibody label, or morphological stain. (2) Develop reproducible gene-transcript analyses techniques for single cell-types and determine the numbers of cells needed for reliable genome-wide analyses. (3) Validate the technology for epithelial and endothelial cells isolated from the gastrointestinal tract of mice.

  1. Laser Capture Microdissection of Archival Kidney Tissue for qRT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Hewitson, Tim D; Christie, Michael; Smith, Edward R

    2016-01-01

    Whole-organ molecular analysis of the kidney potentially misses important factors involved in the pathogenesis of disease in glomeruli and tubules. Organ wide analysis can however be augmented by using laser capture microdissection (LCM) to isolate morphologically similar cells and nephron structures from a heterogeneous tissue section via direct visualization of the cells. The protocol here provides a practical approach utilizing LCM in combination with RNA isolation techniques for downstream analysis. This technique is readily applicable to study mRNA expression in isolated glomeruli and tubules in both experimental animal models and human kidney biopsy material.

  2. Comparative Tissue Proteomics of Microdissected Specimens Reveals Novel Candidate Biomarkers of Bladder Cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chien-Lun; Chung, Ting; Wu, Chih-Ching; Ng, Kwai-Fong; Yu, Jau-Song; Tsai, Cheng-Han; Chang, Yu-Sun; Liang, Ying; Tsui, Ke-Hung; Chen, Yi-Ting

    2015-01-01

    More than 380,000 new cases of bladder cancer are diagnosed worldwide, accounting for ∼150,200 deaths each year. To discover potential biomarkers of bladder cancer, we employed a strategy combining laser microdissection, isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation labeling, and liquid chromatography-tandem MS (LC-MS/MS) analysis to profile proteomic changes in fresh-frozen bladder tumor specimens. Cellular proteins from four pairs of surgically resected primary bladder cancer tumor and adjacent nontumorous tissue were extracted for use in two batches of isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation experiments, which identified a total of 3220 proteins. A DAVID (database for annotation, visualization and integrated discovery) analysis of dysregulated proteins revealed that the three top-ranking biological processes were extracellular matrix organization, extracellular structure organization, and oxidation-reduction. Biological processes including response to organic substances, response to metal ions, and response to inorganic substances were highlighted by up-expressed proteins in bladder cancer. Seven differentially expressed proteins were selected as potential bladder cancer biomarkers for further verification. Immunohistochemical analyses showed significantly elevated levels of three proteins—SLC3A2, STMN1, and TAGLN2—in tumor cells compared with noncancerous bladder epithelial cells, and suggested that TAGLN2 could be a useful tumor tissue marker for diagnosis (AUC = 0.999) and evaluating lymph node metastasis in bladder cancer patients. ELISA results revealed significantly increased urinary levels of both STMN1 and TAGLN2 in bladder cancer subgroups compared with control groups. In comparisons with age-matched hernia urine specimens, urinary TAGLN2 in bladder cancer samples showed the largest fold change (7.13-fold), with an area-under-the-curve value of 0.70 (p < 0.001, n = 205). Overall, TAGLN2 showed the most significant

  3. Micro-dissected tumor tissues on chip: an ex vivo method for drug testing and personalized therapy.

    PubMed

    Astolfi, M; Péant, B; Lateef, M A; Rousset, N; Kendall-Dupont, J; Carmona, E; Monet, F; Saad, F; Provencher, D; Mes-Masson, A-M; Gervais, T

    2016-01-21

    In cancer research and personalized medicine, new tissue culture models are needed to better predict the response of patients to therapies. With a concern for the small volume of tissue typically obtained through a biopsy, we describe a method to reproducibly section live tumor tissue to submillimeter sizes. These micro-dissected tissues (MDTs) share with spheroids the advantages of being easily manipulated on-chip and kept alive for periods extending over one week, while being biologically relevant for numerous assays. At dimensions below ~420 μm in diameter, as suggested by a simple metabolite transport model and confirmed experimentally, continuous perfusion is not required to keep samples alive, considerably simplifying the technical challenges. For the long-term culture of MDTs, we describe a simple microfluidic platform that can reliably trap samples in a low shear stress environment. We report the analysis of MDT viability for eight different types of tissues (four mouse xenografts derived from human cancer cell lines, three from ovarian and prostate cancer patients, and one from a patient with benign prostatic hyperplasia) analyzed by both confocal microscopy and flow cytometry over an 8-day incubation period. Finally, we provide a proof of principle for chemosensitivity testing of human tissue from a cancer patient performed using the described MDT chip method. This technology has the potential to improve treatment success rates by identifying potential responders earlier during the course of treatment and providing opportunities for direct drug testing on patient tissues in early drug development stages.

  4. Laser capture microdissection of intestinal tissue from sea bass larvae using an optimized RNA integrity assay and validated reference genes

    PubMed Central

    Schaeck, M.; De Spiegelaere, W.; De Craene, J.; Van den Broeck, W.; De Spiegeleer, B.; Burvenich, C.; Haesebrouck, F.; Decostere, A.

    2016-01-01

    The increasing demand for a sustainable larviculture has promoted research regarding environmental parameters, diseases and nutrition, intersecting at the mucosal surface of the gastrointestinal tract of fish larvae. The combination of laser capture microdissection (LCM) and gene expression experiments allows cell specific expression profiling. This study aimed at optimizing an LCM protocol for intestinal tissue of sea bass larvae. Furthermore, a 3′/5′ integrity assay was developed for LCM samples of fish tissue, comprising low RNA concentrations. Furthermore, reliable reference genes for performing qPCR in larval sea bass gene expression studies were identified, as data normalization is critical in gene expression experiments using RT-qPCR. We demonstrate that a careful optimization of the LCM procedure allows recovery of high quality mRNA from defined cell populations in complex intestinal tissues. According to the geNorm and Normfinder algorithms, ef1a, rpl13a, rps18 and faua were the most stable genes to be implemented as reference genes for an appropriate normalization of intestinal tissue from sea bass across a range of experimental settings. The methodology developed here, offers a rapid and valuable approach to characterize cells/tissues in the intestinal tissue of fish larvae and their changes following pathogen exposure, nutritional/environmental changes, probiotic supplementation or a combination thereof. PMID:26883391

  5. Subtissue-Specific Evaluation of Promoter Efficiency by Quantitative Fluorometric Assay in Laser Microdissected Tissues of Rapeseed[W

    PubMed Central

    Jasik, Jan; Schiebold, Silke; Rolletschek, Hardy; Denolf, Peter; Van Adenhove, Katrien; Altmann, Thomas; Borisjuk, Ljudmilla

    2011-01-01

    β-Glucuronidase (GUS) is a useful reporter for the evaluation of promoter characteristics in transgenic plants. Here, we introduce an original technique to quantify the strength of promoters at subtissue resolution of cell clusters. The method combines cryotomy, laser microdissection, and improved fluorometric analysis of GUS activity using 6-chloro-4-methylumbelliferyl-β-d-glucuronide as an efficient fluorogenic substrate for kinetic studies in plants. The laser microdissection/6-chloro-4-methylumbelliferyl-β-d-glucuronide method is robust and reliable in a wide range of GUS expression levels and requires extremely low (few cells) tissue amounts. Suitability of the assay was demonstrated on rapeseed (Brassica napus) plants transformed with a P35S2::GUS construct. GUS expression patterns were visualized and quantified in approximately 30 tissues of vegetative and generative organs. Considerable differences in promoter activity within the tissues are discussed in relation to the cell type and developmental state. PMID:21825109

  6. Sensitive method for determination of picogram amounts of epinephrine and other catecholamines in microdissected samples of rat brain using liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection.

    PubMed

    Opacka-Juffry, J; Tacconelli, F; Coen, C W

    1988-12-01

    Liquid chromatography with high-sensitivity electrochemical detection has been employed to measure picogram amounts of epinephrine and other catecholamines in microdissected samples of the rat hypothalamus. Tissue catecholamines are purified by solvent extraction; this provides better selectivity and recovery than methods involving alumina. The solvent extraction technique has been modified in order to eliminate its major disadvantage, the presence of electroactive substances separating with catecholamines. Detection limits of below 1 pg allow for analysis of catecholamines including epinephrine in very small brain samples such as micropunches.

  7. Proteomic analysis of human papillomavirus-related oral squamous cell carcinoma: identification of thioredoxin and epidermal-fatty acid binding protein as upregulated protein markers in microdissected tumor tissue.

    PubMed

    Melle, Christian; Ernst, Günther; Winkler, Robert; Schimmel, Bettina; Klussmann, Jens Peter; Wittekindt, Claus; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando; von Eggeling, Ferdinand

    2009-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has been identified as an etiologic agent for a subset of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) with increasing incidence. HPV DNA-positivity may confer better prognosis but the related oncogenic mechanisms are unknown. For the identification of HPV relevant proteins, we analyzed microdissected cells from HPV DNA-positive (n = 17) and HPV DNA-negative (n = 7) OSCC tissue samples. We identified 18 proteins from tumor tissues by peptide fingerprint mapping and SELDI MS that were separated using 2-DE. Among a number of signals that were detected as significantly different in the protein profiling analysis, we identified thioredoxin (TRX) and epidermal-fatty acid binding protein as upregulated in HPV related tumor tissue. This study, investigating for the first time proteomic changes in microdissected HPV infected tumor tissue, provides an indication on the oncogenic potential of viruses. PMID:19337991

  8. Application of laser microdissection ICP-MS for high resolution elemental mapping in mouse brain tissue: a comparative study with laser ablation ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Sussulini, Alessandra; Becker, J Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Mapping of elements in biological tissue by laser induced mass spectrometry is a fast growing analytical methodology in life sciences. This method provides a multitude of useful information of metal, nonmetal, metalloid and isotopic distribution at major, minor and trace concentration ranges, usually with a lateral resolution of 12-160 µm. Selected applications in medical research require an improved lateral resolution of laser induced mass spectrometric technique at the low micrometre scale and below. The present work demonstrates the applicability of a recently developed analytical methodology - laser microdissection associated to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LMD ICP-MS) - to obtain elemental images of different solid biological samples at high lateral resolution. LMD ICP-MS images of mouse brain tissue samples stained with uranium and native are shown, and a direct comparison of LMD and laser ablation (LA) ICP-MS imaging methodologies, in terms of elemental quantification, is performed. PMID:25476347

  9. Necessity of Microdissecting Different Tumor Components in Pulmonary Tumor Pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhong; Shen, Shanxiang; Smith, Prudence; Khalil, Farah K.

    2016-01-01

    Microdissection is a useful method in tissue sampling prior to molecular testing. Tumor heterogeneity imposes new challenges for tissue sampling. Different microdissecting methods have been employed in face of such challenge. We improved our microdissection method by separately microdissecting the morphologically different tumor components. This improvement helped the pyrosequencing data analysis of two specimens. One specimen consisted of both adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine components. When both tumor components were sequenced together for KRAS (Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog) gene mutations, the resulting pyrogram indicated that it was not a wild type, suggesting that it contained KRAS mutation. However, the pyrogram did not match any KRAS mutations and a conclusion could not be reached. After microdissecting and testing the adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine components separately, it was found that the adenocarcinoma was positive for KRAS G12C mutation and the neuroendocrine component was positive for KRAS G12D mutation. The second specimen consisted of two morphologically different tumor nodules. When microdissected and sequenced separately, one nodule was positive for BRAF (v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1) V600E and the other nodule was wild type at the BRAF codon 600. These examples demonstrate that it is necessary to microdissect morphologically different tumor components for pyrosequencing.

  10. Necessity of Microdissecting Different Tumor Components in Pulmonary Tumor Pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhong; Shen, Shanxiang; Smith, Prudence; Khalil, Farah K.

    2016-01-01

    Microdissection is a useful method in tissue sampling prior to molecular testing. Tumor heterogeneity imposes new challenges for tissue sampling. Different microdissecting methods have been employed in face of such challenge. We improved our microdissection method by separately microdissecting the morphologically different tumor components. This improvement helped the pyrosequencing data analysis of two specimens. One specimen consisted of both adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine components. When both tumor components were sequenced together for KRAS (Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog) gene mutations, the resulting pyrogram indicated that it was not a wild type, suggesting that it contained KRAS mutation. However, the pyrogram did not match any KRAS mutations and a conclusion could not be reached. After microdissecting and testing the adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine components separately, it was found that the adenocarcinoma was positive for KRAS G12C mutation and the neuroendocrine component was positive for KRAS G12D mutation. The second specimen consisted of two morphologically different tumor nodules. When microdissected and sequenced separately, one nodule was positive for BRAF (v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1) V600E and the other nodule was wild type at the BRAF codon 600. These examples demonstrate that it is necessary to microdissect morphologically different tumor components for pyrosequencing. PMID:27597976

  11. Necessity of Microdissecting Different Tumor Components in Pulmonary Tumor Pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Qin, Dahui; Zheng, Zhong; Shen, Shanxiang; Smith, Prudence; Khalil, Farah K

    2016-01-01

    Microdissection is a useful method in tissue sampling prior to molecular testing. Tumor heterogeneity imposes new challenges for tissue sampling. Different microdissecting methods have been employed in face of such challenge. We improved our microdissection method by separately microdissecting the morphologically different tumor components. This improvement helped the pyrosequencing data analysis of two specimens. One specimen consisted of both adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine components. When both tumor components were sequenced together for KRAS (Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog) gene mutations, the resulting pyrogram indicated that it was not a wild type, suggesting that it contained KRAS mutation. However, the pyrogram did not match any KRAS mutations and a conclusion could not be reached. After microdissecting and testing the adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine components separately, it was found that the adenocarcinoma was positive for KRAS G12C mutation and the neuroendocrine component was positive for KRAS G12D mutation. The second specimen consisted of two morphologically different tumor nodules. When microdissected and sequenced separately, one nodule was positive for BRAF (v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1) V600E and the other nodule was wild type at the BRAF codon 600. These examples demonstrate that it is necessary to microdissect morphologically different tumor components for pyrosequencing. PMID:27597976

  12. Microdissection specimens of connective, chondrous, or Bone Tissue of human osteosarcomas and chondrosarcomas transplanted to athymic nude mice.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, O S; Lindholm, T S; Nilsonne, U

    1982-01-01

    Five osteosarcomas and two chondrosarcomas were microdissected to separate tumor compartments of calcified, chondrous, and connective tissue. The compartments were lyophilized separately and transplanted subcutaneously or intramuscularly into nude mice for three, four, and five weeks, respectively. In three of the osteosarcomas and in one of the chrondrosarcomas, calcified tissue induced ectopic bone formation by the host, while cartilaginous tissue induced ectopic bone formation in one of the osteosarcomas and in one of the chondrosarcomas. The tumor-derived connective tissue did not induce osteogenic response in the host tissue. Thus, the ability to develop an osteoinductive response and to produce bone morphogenetic protein seems to be restricted to the population of cells that eventually will, or have, differentiated into bone or cartilage.

  13. Distribution of cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase in microdissected periportal and perivenous rat liver tissue with different dietary states.

    PubMed

    Runge, D; Jungermann, K

    1991-01-01

    Cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase was measured in liver homogenates and microdissected periportal and perivenous liver tissue from rats in different dietary states under different conditions of substrate saturation and effector stimulation. A radiochemical microtest, more sensitive by 2-3 orders of magnitude than the usual assay, was established for the determination of the activity in liver samples corresponding to 200-800 ng dry weight. At saturating cyclic AMP concentrations (46 microM) phosphodiesterase was homogeneously distributed within the liver acinus of fed rats. Starvation for 48 h led to a decrease in the overall activity and to a heterogenous distribution with slightly higher activities in the perivenous zone. At physiological cyclic AMP concentrations (1.8 microM) phosphodiesterase showed a flat zonal gradient in livers of fed rats with higher levels in the periportal zone; after 48 h starvation it was homogeneously distributed. In the presence of cyclic GMP (2 microM) the basal activity at physiological substrate concentrations was stimulated to a greater extent in the perivenous zone. This led to a homogeneous activity distribution in the fed state and to a heterogenous pattern with a slight perivenous maximum in the fasted state. Thus there was no or only a small zonal heterogeneity of signal transmitting enzymes such as cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase and glucagon-stimulated adenylate cyclase (Zierz and Jungermann 1984). This similar signal transducing capacity in the periportal and the perivenous area will contribute to maintain the zonation of signal input due to the hormone concentration gradients across the liver acinus.

  14. Direct polymerase chain reaction amplification of formalin-fixed, paraffin-wax-embedded tissue after automated sequential laser microdissection and pressure catapulting.

    PubMed

    O'Kane, S L; Garimella, V; Sivarajasingham, N; Drew, P J; Cawkwell, L

    2007-02-01

    A robust method to facilitate rapid laser microdissection and pressure catapulting (LMPC) coupled with direct polymerase chain reaction (dPCR) to eliminate the need for extraction of DNA before a PCR-based assay is described. This sequential LMPC-dPCR method is rapid and decreases the number of processing steps, reducing the chance of tissue loss and contamination.

  15. Tissue-specific laser microdissection of the Brassica napus funiculus improves gene discovery and spatial identification of biological processes.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ainsley C; Khan, Deirdre; Girard, Ian J; Becker, Michael G; Millar, Jenna L; Sytnik, David; Belmonte, Mark F

    2016-05-01

    The three primary tissue systems of the funiculus each undergo unique developmental programs to support the growth and development of the filial seed. To understand the underlying transcriptional mechanisms that orchestrate development of the funiculus at the globular embryonic stage of seed development, we used laser microdissection coupled with RNA-sequencing to produce a high-resolution dataset of the mRNAs present in the epidermis, cortex, and vasculature of the Brassica napus (canola) funiculus. We identified 7761 additional genes in these tissues compared with the whole funiculus organ alone using this technology. Differential expression and enrichment analyses were used to identify several biological processes associated with each tissue system. Our data show that cell wall modification and lipid metabolism are prominent in the epidermis, cell growth and modification occur in the cortex, and vascular tissue proliferation and differentiation occur in the central vascular strand. We provide further evidence that each of the three tissue systems of the globular stage funiculus are involved in specific biological processes that all co-ordinate to support seed development. The identification of genes and gene regulators responsible for tissue-specific developmental processes of the canola funiculus now serves as a valuable resource for seed improvement research. PMID:27194740

  16. Tissue-specific laser microdissection of the Brassica napus funiculus improves gene discovery and spatial identification of biological processes

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Ainsley C.; Khan, Deirdre; Girard, Ian J.; Becker, Michael G.; Millar, Jenna L.; Sytnik, David; Belmonte, Mark F.

    2016-01-01

    The three primary tissue systems of the funiculus each undergo unique developmental programs to support the growth and development of the filial seed. To understand the underlying transcriptional mechanisms that orchestrate development of the funiculus at the globular embryonic stage of seed development, we used laser microdissection coupled with RNA-sequencing to produce a high-resolution dataset of the mRNAs present in the epidermis, cortex, and vasculature of the Brassica napus (canola) funiculus. We identified 7761 additional genes in these tissues compared with the whole funiculus organ alone using this technology. Differential expression and enrichment analyses were used to identify several biological processes associated with each tissue system. Our data show that cell wall modification and lipid metabolism are prominent in the epidermis, cell growth and modification occur in the cortex, and vascular tissue proliferation and differentiation occur in the central vascular strand. We provide further evidence that each of the three tissue systems of the globular stage funiculus are involved in specific biological processes that all co-ordinate to support seed development. The identification of genes and gene regulators responsible for tissue-specific developmental processes of the canola funiculus now serves as a valuable resource for seed improvement research. PMID:27194740

  17. Assessment of the Microbiota in Microdissected Tissues of Crohn's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    De Hertogh, Gert; Lemmens, Bart; Verhasselt, Peter; de Hoogt, Ronald; Sagaert, Xavier; Joossens, Marie; Van Assche, Gert; Rutgeerts, Paul; Vermeire, Severine; Aerssens, Jeroen

    2012-01-01

    The microbiota of the gastrointestinal tract is frequently mentioned as one of the key players in the etiopathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD). Four hypotheses have been suggested: the single, still unknown bacterial pathogen, an abnormal overall composition of the bowel microbiota (“dysbiosis”), an abnormal immunological reaction to an essentially normally composed microbiota, and increased bacterial translocation. We propose that laser capture microdissection of selected microscopic structures, followed by broad-range 16S rRNA gene sequencing, is an excellent method to assess spatiotemporal alterations in the composition of the bowel microbiota in CD. Using this approach, we demonstrated significant changes of the composition, abundance, and location of the gut microbiome in this disease. Some of these abnormal findings persisted even after macroscopic mucosal healing. Further investigations along these lines may lead to a better understanding of the possible involvement of the bowel bacteria in the development of clinical Crohn's disease. PMID:22191064

  18. Laser capture microdissection technology.

    PubMed

    Espina, Virginia; Heiby, Michael; Pierobon, Mariaelena; Liotta, Lance A

    2007-09-01

    Deciphering the cellular and molecular interactions that drive disease within the tissue microenvironment holds promise for discovering drug targets of the future. In order to recapitulate the in vivo interactions through molecular analysis, one must be able to analyze specific cell populations within the context of their heterogeneous tissue microecology. Laser capture microdissection is a method to procure subpopulations of tissue cells under direct microscopic visualization. Laser capture microdissection technology can harvest the cells of interest directly or can isolate specific cells by cutting away unwanted cells to give histologically pure enriched cell populations. A variety of downstream applications exist: DNA genotyping and loss-of-heterozygosity analysis, RNA transcript profiling, cDNA library generation, mass spectrometry proteomics discovery and signal pathway profiling.

  19. Laser Capture Microdissection of Cervical Human Papillomavirus Infections: Copy Number of the Virus in Cancerous and Normal Tissue and Heterogeneous DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Kalantari, Mina; Garcia-Carranca, Alejandro; Morales-Vazquez, Claudia Dalia; Zuna, Rosemary; Montiel, Delia Perez; Calleja-Macias, Itzel E.; Johansson, Bo; Andersson, Sonia; Bernard, Hans-Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    Research on the pathogenicity of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) during cervical carcinogenesis often relies on the study of homogenized tissue or cultured cells. This approach does not detect molecular heterogeneities within the infected tissue. It is desirable to understand molecular properties in specific histological contexts. We asked whether Laser Capture Microdissection (LCM) of archival cervical tumors in combination with real-time polymerase chain reaction and bisulfite sequencing permits (i) sensitive DNA diagnosis of small clusters of formalin fixed cells, (ii) quantification of HPV DNA in neoplastic and normal cells, and (iii) analysis of HPV DNA methylation, a marker of tumor progression. We analyzed 26 tumors containing HPV-16 or 18. We prepared DNA from LCM dissected thin sections of 100 to 2000 cells, and analyzed aliquots corresponding to between nine and 70 cells. We detected nine to 630 HPV-16 genome copies and one to 111 HPV-18 genome copies per tumor cell, respectively. In 17 of the 26 samples, HPV DNA existed in histologically normal cells distant from the margins of the tumors, but at much lower concentrations than in the tumor, suggesting that HPVs can infect at low levels without pathogenic changes. Methylation of HPV DNA, a biomarker of integration of the virus into cellular DNA, could be measured only in few samples due to limited sensitivity, and indicated heterogeneous methylation patterns in small clusters of cancerous and normal cells. LCM is powerful to study molecular parameters of cervical HPV infections like copy number, latency and epigenetics. PMID:19497607

  20. DETECTION OF K-RAS AND P53 MUTATIONS IN SPUTUM SAMPLES OF LUNG CANCER PATIENTS USING LASER CAPTURE MICRODISSECTION MICROSCOPE AND MUTATION ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Detection of K-ras and p53 Mutations in Sputum Samples of Lung Cancer Patients Using Laser Capture Microdissection Microscope and Mutation Analysis

    Phouthone Keohavong a,*, Wei-Min Gao a, Kui-Cheng Zheng a, Hussam Mady b, Qing Lan c, Mona Melhem b, and Judy Mumford d.
    <...

  1. Gene Expression Analysis of Neurons and Astrocytes Isolated by Laser Capture Microdissection from Frozen Human Brain Tissues.

    PubMed

    Tagliafierro, Lidia; Bonawitz, Kirsten; Glenn, Omolara C; Chiba-Falek, Ornit

    2016-01-01

    Different cell types and multiple cellular connections characterize the human brain. Gene expression analysis using a specific population of cells is more accurate than conducting analysis of the whole tissue homogenate, particularly in the context of neurodegenerative diseases, where a specific subset of cells is affected by the different pathology. Due to the difficulty of obtaining homogenous cell populations, gene expression in specific cell-types (neurons, astrocytes, etc.) has been understudied. To leverage the use of archive resources of frozen human brains in studies of neurodegenerative diseases, we developed and calibrated a method to quantify cell-type specific-neuronal, astrocytes-expression profiles of genes implicated in neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. Archive human frozen brain tissues were used to prepare slides for rapid immunostaining using cell-specific antibodies. The immunoreactive-cells were isolated by Laser Capture Microdissection (LCM). The enrichment for a particular cell-type of interest was validated in post-analysis stage by the expression of cell-specific markers. We optimized the technique to preserve the RNA integrity, so that the RNA was suitable for downstream expression analyses. Following RNA extraction, the expression levels were determined digitally using nCounter Single Cell Gene Expression assay (NanoString Technologies®). The results demonstrated that using our optimized technique we successfully isolated single neurons and astrocytes from human frozen brain tissues and obtained RNA of a good quality that was suitable for mRNA expression analysis. We present here new advancements compared to previous reported methods, which improve the method's feasibility and its applicability for a variety of downstream molecular analyses. Our new developed method can be implemented in genetic and functional genomic research of neurodegenerative diseases and has the potential to significantly

  2. Gene Expression Analysis of Neurons and Astrocytes Isolated by Laser Capture Microdissection from Frozen Human Brain Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Tagliafierro, Lidia; Bonawitz, Kirsten; Glenn, Omolara C.; Chiba-Falek, Ornit

    2016-01-01

    Different cell types and multiple cellular connections characterize the human brain. Gene expression analysis using a specific population of cells is more accurate than conducting analysis of the whole tissue homogenate, particularly in the context of neurodegenerative diseases, where a specific subset of cells is affected by the different pathology. Due to the difficulty of obtaining homogenous cell populations, gene expression in specific cell-types (neurons, astrocytes, etc.) has been understudied. To leverage the use of archive resources of frozen human brains in studies of neurodegenerative diseases, we developed and calibrated a method to quantify cell-type specific—neuronal, astrocytes—expression profiles of genes implicated in neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. Archive human frozen brain tissues were used to prepare slides for rapid immunostaining using cell-specific antibodies. The immunoreactive-cells were isolated by Laser Capture Microdissection (LCM). The enrichment for a particular cell-type of interest was validated in post-analysis stage by the expression of cell-specific markers. We optimized the technique to preserve the RNA integrity, so that the RNA was suitable for downstream expression analyses. Following RNA extraction, the expression levels were determined digitally using nCounter Single Cell Gene Expression assay (NanoString Technologies®). The results demonstrated that using our optimized technique we successfully isolated single neurons and astrocytes from human frozen brain tissues and obtained RNA of a good quality that was suitable for mRNA expression analysis. We present here new advancements compared to previous reported methods, which improve the method's feasibility and its applicability for a variety of downstream molecular analyses. Our new developed method can be implemented in genetic and functional genomic research of neurodegenerative diseases and has the potential to

  3. A pilot study on the expression of microRNAs resident on chromosome 21 in laser microdissected FFPE prostate adenocarcinoma samples.

    PubMed

    Mihala, Adrian; Alexa, Andreea Anda; Samoilă, Corina; Dema, Alis; Vizitiu, Anda Cornelia; Anghel, Andrei; Tămaş, Liviu; Marian, Cătălin Valer; Sîrbu, Ioan Ovidiu

    2015-01-01

    The tremendous research effort of the last decades added a new, epigenetic layer of complexity to the already complex image of prostate cancer pathogenesis. Here we use quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) to investigate the expression of the microRNAs resident on chromosome 21 (miR-ch21) in laser capture microdissected (LCM) tissues from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) archived, prostate adenocarcinoma samples. We show a strong, specific down-regulation of miR-ch21 in tumoral epithelia and stromae as compared to normal counterparts, results at odd with the current paradigm on the involvement of these microRNAs in prostate oncogenesis. By comparing this result with the expression of two well-known pluripotency associated microRNA, hsa-miR-372 and miR-373, we suggest that miR-ch21 down-regulation might be the result of specific silencing of miR genes mapped to chromosome 21. Further studies, of larger sample size are needed to confirm our preliminary data.

  4. Gene Expression Profiles of Beta-Cell Enriched Tissue Obtained by Laser Capture Microdissection from Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Marselli, Lorella; Thorne, Jeffrey; Dahiya, Sonika; Sgroi, Dennis C.; Sharma, Arun; Bonner-Weir, Susan; Marchetti, Piero; Weir, Gordon C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Changes in gene expression in pancreatic beta-cells from type 2 diabetes (T2D) should provide insights into their abnormal insulin secretion and turnover. Methodology/Principal Findings Frozen sections were obtained from cadaver pancreases of 10 control and 10 T2D human subjects. Beta-cell enriched samples were obtained by laser capture microdissection (LCM). RNA was extracted, amplified and subjected to microarray analysis. Further analysis was performed with DNA-Chip Analyzer (dChip) and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) software. There were changes in expression of genes linked to glucotoxicity. Evidence of oxidative stress was provided by upregulation of several metallothionein genes. There were few changes in the major genes associated with cell cycle, apoptosis or endoplasmic reticulum stress. There was differential expression of genes associated with pancreatic regeneration, most notably upregulation of members of the regenerating islet gene (REG) family and metalloproteinase 7 (MMP7). Some of the genes found in GWAS studies to be related to T2D were also found to be differentially expressed. IGF2BP2, TSPAN8, and HNF1B (TCF2) were upregulated while JAZF1 and SLC30A8 were downregulated. Conclusions/Significance This study made possible by LCM has identified many novel changes in gene expression that enhance understanding of the pathogenesis of T2D. PMID:20644627

  5. Analysis of laser-microdissected prostate cancer tissues reveals potential tumor markers.

    PubMed

    Shaikhibrahim, Zaki; Lindstrot, Andreas; Buettner, Reinhard; Wernert, Nicolas

    2011-10-01

    Prostate cancer (PCA) is a clinically heterogeneous and often multifocal disease with a clinical outcome difficult to predict. A deeper knowledge of the molecular basis of the disease may lead to a better prediction of prognosis. Therefore, in this study we investigated the molecular basis of PCA by identifying potential tumor markers in laser-microdisected PCA tissues. Among a group of PCA patients, quantitative RT-PCR analysis was performed to compare the expression of 70 genes. These genes were selected from the results of two microarrays which investigated the gene expression profile differences between moderately or poorly differentiated prostate carcinoma glands and the corresponding normal glands. Among the genes examined, CDKN2A, GATA3, CREBBP, ITGA2, NBL1 and TGM4 were down-regulated in the prostate carcinoma glands compared to the corresponding normal glands, whereas TFF3, TMPRSS2 and ERG were up-regulated. Our findings indicate that these genes may play roles as tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes in PCA, and may serve as potential tumor markers and novel therapeutic targets.

  6. Online, Absolute Quantitation of Propranolol from Spatially Distinct 20- and 40-μm Dissections of Brain, Liver, and Kidney Thin Tissue Sections by Laser Microdissection-Liquid Vortex Capture-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cahill, John F; Kertesz, Vilmos; Weiskittel, Taylor M; Vavrek, Marissa; Freddo, Carol; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2016-06-01

    Spatial resolved quantitation of chemical species in thin tissue sections by mass spectrometric methods has been constrained by the need for matrix-matched standards or other arduous calibration protocols and procedures to mitigate matrix effects (e.g., spatially varying ionization suppression). Reported here is the use of laser "cut and drop" sampling with a laser microdissection-liquid vortex capture electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LMD-LVC/ESI-MS/MS) system for online and absolute quantitation of propranolol in mouse brain, kidney, and liver thin tissue sections of mice administered with the drug at a 7.5 mg/kg dose, intravenously. In this procedure either 20 μm × 20 μm or 40 μm × 40 μm tissue microdissections were cut and dropped into the flowing solvent of the capture probe. During transport to the ESI source drug related material was completely extracted from the tissue into the solvent, which contained a known concentration of propranolol-d7 as an internal standard. This allowed absolute quantitation to be achieved with an external calibration curve generated from standards containing the same fixed concentration of propranolol-d7 and varied concentrations of propranolol. Average propranolol concentrations determined with the laser "cut and drop" sampling method closely agreed with concentration values obtained from 2.3 mm diameter tissue punches from serial sections that were extracted and quantified by HPLC/ESI-MS/MS measurements. In addition, the relative abundance of hydroxypropranolol glucuronide metabolites were recorded and found to be consistent with previous findings. PMID:27214103

  7. Online, absolute quantitation of propranolol from spatially distinct 20-μm and 40-μm dissections of brain, liver, and kidney thin tissue sections by laser microdissection – liquid vortex capture – mass spectrometry

    DOE PAGES

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Vavrek, Marissa; Freddo, Carol; Van Berkel, Gary J.; Cahill, John F.; Weiskittel, Taylor M.

    2016-05-23

    Here, spatial resolved quantitation of chemical species in thin tissue sections by mass spectrometric methods has been constrained by the need for matrix-matched standards or other arduous calibration protocols and procedures to mitigate matrix effects (e.g., spatially varying ionization suppression). Reported here is the use of laser cut and drop sampling with a laser microdissection-liquid vortex capture electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LMD-LVC/ESI-MS/MS) system for online and absolute quantitation of propranolol in mouse brain, kidney, and liver thin tissue sections of mice administered with the drug at a 7.5 mg/kg dose, intravenously. In this procedure either 20 μm x 20more » μm or 40 μm x 40 μm tissue microdissections were cut and dropped into the flowing solvent of the capture probe. During transport to the ESI source drug related material was completely extracted from the tissue into the solvent, which contained a known concentration of propranolol-d7 as an internal standard. This allowed absolute quantitation to be achieved with an external calibration curve generated from standards containing the same fixed concentration of propranolold-d7 and varied concentrations of propranolol. Average propranolol concentrations determined with the laser cut and drop sampling method closely agreed with concentration values obtained from 2.3 mm diameter tissue punches from serial sections that were extracted and quantified by HPLC/ESI-MS/MS measurements. In addition, the relative abundance of hydroxypropranolol glucuronide metabolites were recorded and found to be consistent with previous findings.« less

  8. Microdissection approaches in tuberculosis research

    PubMed Central

    Hudock, Teresa A.; Lackner, Andrew A.; Kaushal, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a globally significant pathogen, results in active or latent tuberculosis. The granuloma is the characteristic lesion that offers insight into host-pathogen interactions in these distinct states. Microdissection provides a way to isolate and consequently investigate specific tissue sections. We review various techniques available and in use. PMID:25164280

  9. Laser-capture microdissection.

    PubMed

    Espina, Virginia; Wulfkuhle, Julia D; Calvert, Valerie S; VanMeter, Amy; Zhou, Weidong; Coukos, George; Geho, David H; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Liotta, Lance A

    2006-01-01

    Deciphering the cellular and molecular interactions that drive disease within the tissue microenvironment holds promise for discovering drug targets of the future. In order to recapitulate the in vivo interactions thorough molecular analysis, one must be able to analyze specific cell populations within the context of their heterogeneous tissue microecology. Laser-capture microdissection (LCM) is a method to procure subpopulations of tissue cells under direct microscopic visualization. LCM technology can harvest the cells of interest directly or can isolate specific cells by cutting away unwanted cells to give histologically pure enriched cell populations. A variety of downstream applications exist: DNA genotyping and loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH) analysis, RNA transcript profiling, cDNA library generation, proteomics discovery and signal-pathway profiling. Herein we provide a thorough description of LCM techniques, with an emphasis on tips and troubleshooting advice derived from LCM users. The total time required to carry out this protocol is typically 1-1.5 h.

  10. Laser-based microdissection of single cells from tissue sections and PCR analysis of rearranged immunoglobulin genes from isolated normal and malignant human B cells.

    PubMed

    Küppers, Ralf; Schneider, Markus; Hansmann, Martin-Leo

    2013-01-01

    Normal and malignant B cells carry rearranged immunoglobulin (Ig) variable region genes, which due to their practically limitless diversity represent ideal clonal markers for these cells. We describe here an approach to isolate single cells from frozen tissue sections by microdissection using a laser-based method. From the isolated cells rearranged IgH and Igκ genes are amplified in a semi-nested PCR approach, using a collection of V gene family-specific primers recognizing nearly all V gene segments together with primers for the J gene segments. By sequence analysis of V genes from distinct cells, the clonal relationship of the B lineage cells can unequivocally be determined and related to the histological distribution of the cells. The approach is also useful to determine V, D, and J gene usage. Moreover, the presence and pattern of somatic Ig V gene mutations give valuable insight into the stage of differentiation of the B cells.

  11. CpG Methylation Analysis of HPV16 in Laser Capture Microdissected Archival Tissue and Whole Tissue Sections from High Grade Anal Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions: A Potential Disease Biomarker.

    PubMed

    Molano, Monica; Tabrizi, Sepehr N; Garland, Suzanne M; Roberts, Jennifer M; Machalek, Dorothy A; Phillips, Samuel; Chandler, David; Hillman, Richard J; Grulich, Andrew E; Jin, Fengyi; Poynten, I Mary; Templeton, David J; Cornall, Alyssa M

    2016-01-01

    Incidence and mortality rates of anal cancer are increasing globally. More than 90% of anal squamous cell carcinomas (ASCC) are associated with human papillomavirus (HPV). Studies on HPV-related anogenital lesions have shown that patterns of methylation of viral and cellular DNA targets could potentially be developed as disease biomarkers. Lesion-specific DNA isolated from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues from existing or prospective patient cohorts may constitute a valuable resource for methylation analysis. However, low concentrations of DNA make these samples technically challenging to analyse using existing methods. We therefore set out to develop a sensitive and reproducible nested PCR-pyrosequencing based method to accurately quantify methylation at 10 CpG sites within the E2BS1, E2BS2,3,4 and Sp1 binding sites in the viral upstream regulatory region of HPV16 genome. Methylation analyses using primary and nested PCR-pyrosequencing on 52 FFPE tissue [26 paired whole tissue sections (WTS) and laser capture microdissected (LCM) tissues] from patients with anal squamous intraepithelial lesions was performed. Using nested PCR, methylation results were obtained for the E2BS1, E2BS2,3,4 and Sp1 binding sites in 86.4% of the WTS and 81.8% of the LCM samples. Methylation patterns were strongly correlated within median values of matched pairs of WTS and LCM sections, but overall methylation was higher in LCM samples at different CpG sites. High grade lesions showed low methylation levels in the E2BS1 and E2BS2 regions, with increased methylation detected in the E2BS,3,4/Sp1 regions, showing the highest methylation at CpG site 37. The method developed is highly sensitive in samples with low amounts of DNA and demonstrated to be suitable for archival samples. Our data shows a possible role of specific methylation in the HPV16 URR for detection of HSIL.

  12. CpG Methylation Analysis of HPV16 in Laser Capture Microdissected Archival Tissue and Whole Tissue Sections from High Grade Anal Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions: A Potential Disease Biomarker.

    PubMed

    Molano, Monica; Tabrizi, Sepehr N; Garland, Suzanne M; Roberts, Jennifer M; Machalek, Dorothy A; Phillips, Samuel; Chandler, David; Hillman, Richard J; Grulich, Andrew E; Jin, Fengyi; Poynten, I Mary; Templeton, David J; Cornall, Alyssa M

    2016-01-01

    Incidence and mortality rates of anal cancer are increasing globally. More than 90% of anal squamous cell carcinomas (ASCC) are associated with human papillomavirus (HPV). Studies on HPV-related anogenital lesions have shown that patterns of methylation of viral and cellular DNA targets could potentially be developed as disease biomarkers. Lesion-specific DNA isolated from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues from existing or prospective patient cohorts may constitute a valuable resource for methylation analysis. However, low concentrations of DNA make these samples technically challenging to analyse using existing methods. We therefore set out to develop a sensitive and reproducible nested PCR-pyrosequencing based method to accurately quantify methylation at 10 CpG sites within the E2BS1, E2BS2,3,4 and Sp1 binding sites in the viral upstream regulatory region of HPV16 genome. Methylation analyses using primary and nested PCR-pyrosequencing on 52 FFPE tissue [26 paired whole tissue sections (WTS) and laser capture microdissected (LCM) tissues] from patients with anal squamous intraepithelial lesions was performed. Using nested PCR, methylation results were obtained for the E2BS1, E2BS2,3,4 and Sp1 binding sites in 86.4% of the WTS and 81.8% of the LCM samples. Methylation patterns were strongly correlated within median values of matched pairs of WTS and LCM sections, but overall methylation was higher in LCM samples at different CpG sites. High grade lesions showed low methylation levels in the E2BS1 and E2BS2 regions, with increased methylation detected in the E2BS,3,4/Sp1 regions, showing the highest methylation at CpG site 37. The method developed is highly sensitive in samples with low amounts of DNA and demonstrated to be suitable for archival samples. Our data shows a possible role of specific methylation in the HPV16 URR for detection of HSIL. PMID:27529629

  13. CpG Methylation Analysis of HPV16 in Laser Capture Microdissected Archival Tissue and Whole Tissue Sections from High Grade Anal Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions: A Potential Disease Biomarker

    PubMed Central

    Molano, Monica; Tabrizi, Sepehr N.; Garland, Suzanne M.; Roberts, Jennifer M.; Machalek, Dorothy A.; Phillips, Samuel; Chandler, David; Hillman, Richard J.; Grulich, Andrew E.; Jin, Fengyi; Poynten, I. Mary; Templeton, David J.; Cornall, Alyssa M.

    2016-01-01

    Incidence and mortality rates of anal cancer are increasing globally. More than 90% of anal squamous cell carcinomas (ASCC) are associated with human papillomavirus (HPV). Studies on HPV-related anogenital lesions have shown that patterns of methylation of viral and cellular DNA targets could potentially be developed as disease biomarkers. Lesion-specific DNA isolated from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues from existing or prospective patient cohorts may constitute a valuable resource for methylation analysis. However, low concentrations of DNA make these samples technically challenging to analyse using existing methods. We therefore set out to develop a sensitive and reproducible nested PCR-pyrosequencing based method to accurately quantify methylation at 10 CpG sites within the E2BS1, E2BS2,3,4 and Sp1 binding sites in the viral upstream regulatory region of HPV16 genome. Methylation analyses using primary and nested PCR-pyrosequencing on 52 FFPE tissue [26 paired whole tissue sections (WTS) and laser capture microdissected (LCM) tissues] from patients with anal squamous intraepithelial lesions was performed. Using nested PCR, methylation results were obtained for the E2BS1, E2BS2,3,4 and Sp1 binding sites in 86.4% of the WTS and 81.8% of the LCM samples. Methylation patterns were strongly correlated within median values of matched pairs of WTS and LCM sections, but overall methylation was higher in LCM samples at different CpG sites. High grade lesions showed low methylation levels in the E2BS1 and E2BS2 regions, with increased methylation detected in the E2BS,3,4/Sp1 regions, showing the highest methylation at CpG site 37. The method developed is highly sensitive in samples with low amounts of DNA and demonstrated to be suitable for archival samples. Our data shows a possible role of specific methylation in the HPV16 URR for detection of HSIL. PMID:27529629

  14. A Cross-Platform Comparison of Genome-Wide Expression Changes of Laser Microdissected Lung Tissue of C-Raf Transgenic Mice Using 3′IVT and Exon Array

    PubMed Central

    Londhe, Kishor Bapu; Borlak, Juergen

    2012-01-01

    Microarrays are widely used to study genome-wide gene expression changes in different conditions most notably disease, growth, or to investigate the effects of drugs on entire genomes. While the number and gene probe sequences to investigate individual gene expression changes differs amongst manufactures, the design for all of the probes is biased towards the 3′ region. With the advent of exon arrays, transcripts of any known or predicted exon can be investigated to facilitate the study of genome-wide alternative splicing events. Thus, the use of exon arrays provides unprecedented opportunities in gene expression studies. However, it remains a major challenge to directly compare gene expression data derived from oligonucleotide to exon arrays. In the present study, genome-wide expression profiling of Laser Micro-dissected Pressure Catapulted (LMPC) samples of c-Raf mouse lung adenocarcinoma, dysplasia, unaltered transgenic and non-transgenic tissues was performed using the Affymetrix GeneChip Mouse Genome 430 2.0 Array and whole genome Mouse Exon 1.0 ST Array. Based on individual group comparisons 52 to 83% of regulated genes were similar in direction, but fold changes of regulated genes disagreed when data amongst the two platforms were compared. Furthermore, for 27 regulated genes opposite direction of gene expression was observed when the two platforms were compared pointing to the need to assess alternative splicing events at the 3′ end. Taken collectively, exon arrays can be performed even with laser microdissected samples but fold change gene expression changes differ considerably between 3′IVT array and exon arrays with alternative splicing events contributing to apparent differences in gene expression changes. PMID:22815814

  15. [Fixation of cells for analysis by laser microdissection--comparative studies in forensic trace material].

    PubMed

    Fischer, Elisabeth J; Laberke, Patrick J; Kübler, Eric; Balitzki, Beate

    2012-01-01

    This paper is focused on the preparation of samples for laser microdissection (LM) in forensic casework. In forensic genetics, it is essential to preserve and separate cellular traces during sample preparation, as they are usually gathered in very small amounts and are often contaminated with undesired cells. This is made possible by laser microdissection, a technique developed to cut cells or tissue of a certain type from a microscopical specimen by UV laser and catapult them directly into a PCR reactor. This method minimizes the risk of getting inconclusive, mixed DNA profiles due to contamination by foreign DNA and also supplies information about the cellular origin of a DNA profile. A method for optimized fixation and staining of spermatozoa for laser microdissection was established. Four different fixation methods combined with two staining methods were tested on two different microscope slides. Moreover, the effect of a blocker pen to contain the specimen on the slide was investigated.

  16. Tissue-specific metabolite profiling of Turmeric by using laser micro-dissection, ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time of fight-mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Yogini; Liang, Zhitao; Ho, Alan; Chen, Hubiao; Zhao, Zhongzhen

    2014-01-01

    Curcuma longa L. is recognized for its therapeutic and culinary uses both in Ayurveda and traditional Chinese medicine and is considered to be a boon to mankind. It has been extensively studied for its benefits and still continues to be an important drug with continued potential for further exploration and research. We studied the tissue-specific distribution of secondary metabolites to establish the validity of the use of rhizome samples from India and China, as substitutes for each other, based upon their metabolite profiles and curcumin contents. Laser microdissection was used for the isolation of microscopic tissues, such as cork, cortex and leaf-trace vascular bundles from rhizomes. Metabolite profiling was carried out by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time of fight-mass spectrometry and curcumin content was estimated by a method validated as per the Harmonized Tripartite Guidelines. The cortex and cork revealed the presence of a higher number of secondary metabolites than in the leaf-trace vascular bundles. The curcumin contents in rhizome samples from both the countries, estimated with the help of a precise and accurate validated method, were found to be comparable. Based on the results, we conclude that turmeric rhizomes grown in India and China are qualitatively and quantitatively indistinguishable and therefore can be used as substitutes. The developed method can be widely applied for microscopic identification, authentication and analysis of the distribution of phytoconstituents in other botanical species of interest or of species with a significant commercial and therapeutic value. PMID:25707128

  17. Beyond laser microdissection technology: follow the yellow brick road for cancer research

    PubMed Central

    Legres, Luc G; Janin, Anne; Masselon, Christophe; Bertheau, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Normal biological tissues harbour different populations of cells with intricate spacial distribution patterns resulting in heterogeneity of their overall cellular composition. Laser microdissection involving direct viewing and expertise by a pathologist, enables access to defined cell populations or specific region on any type of tissue sample, thus selecting near-pure populations of targeted cells. It opens the way for molecular methods directed towards well-defined populations, and provides also a powerful tool in studies focused on a limited number of cells. Laser microdissection has wide applications in oncology (diagnosis and research), cellular and molecular biology, biochemistry and forensics for tissue selection, but other areas have been gradually opened up to these new methodological approaches, such as cell cultures and cytogenetics. In clinical oncology trials, molecular profiling of microdissected samples can yield global “omics” information which, together, with the morphological analysis of cells, can provide the basis for diagnosis, prognosis and patient-tailored treatments. This remarkable technology has brought new insights in the understanding of DNA, RNA, and the biological functions and regulation of proteins to identify molecular disease signatures. We review herein the different applications of laser microdissection in a variety of fields, and we particularly focus attention on the pre-analytical steps that are crucial to successfully perform molecular-level investigations. PMID:24482735

  18. Laser Capture Microdissection as a Tool to Study Tumor Stroma.

    PubMed

    Bertos, Nicholas R; Park, Morag

    2016-01-01

    Laser capture microdissection (or LCM) allows for isolation of cells from specific tissue compartments, which can then be followed by DNA, RNA, and/or protein isolation and downstream characterization. Unlike other methods for cell isolation, LCM can be directed towards cells situated in specific anatomical contexts, and is therefore of significant value when investigating the tumor microenvironment, where localization is often key to function. Here, we present a summary of ways in which LCM can be utilized, as well as protocols for the isolation of tumor and tumor-associated stromal elements from frozen breast cancer samples, with a focus on preparation of samples for RNA characterization. PMID:27581011

  19. Western blot analysis of a limited number of cells: a valuable adjunct to proteome analysis of paraffin wax-embedded, alcohol-fixed tissue after laser capture microdissection.

    PubMed

    Martinet, Wim; Abbeloos, Vanessa; Van Acker, Nathalie; De Meyer, Guido R Y; Herman, Arnold G; Kockx, Mark M

    2004-03-01

    In recent years, laser capture microdissection (LCM) has been used successfully to obtain distinct populations of cells for subsequent molecular analysis. Because of the limited sample availability and the absence of in vitro amplification steps for proteins, the use of LCM for proteome analysis largely depends on highly sensitive protein detection methods. In this study, a western blot protocol was developed and validated for the detection of beta-actin and the moderately expressed cell death protein caspase-3 in small numbers of cells. Initially, cultured human U937 monocytes and whole sections of paraffin wax-embedded, alcohol-fixed human tonsils were used to optimize protein electrophoresis and western blotting conditions. High-performance NuPAGE Bis-Tris gels in combination with high-quality transfer membranes, optimized antibody concentrations, and a sensitive chemiluminescent substrate provided a strong signal for beta-actin with approximately 500 U937 cells. In the same way, procaspase-3 could be identified with approximately 1000 cells. Similar results were obtained with germinal centre cells that were procured from paraffin wax-embedded, alcohol-fixed human tonsils by LCM. Treatment of U937 cells with etoposide rapidly induced cell death and allowed the detection of active caspase-3 with approximately 2500 cells (0.8 pg of protein). The findings of this study suggest that western blotting is a valuable adjunct to proteome analysis of LCM procured cells.

  20. Microfluidic sampling system for tissue analytics

    PubMed Central

    Hokkanen, A.; Stuns, I.; Schmid, P.; Kokkonen, A.; Gao, F.; Steinecker, A.; Budczies, J.; Heimala, P.; Hakalahti, L.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a microfluidics based sampling system for tissue analytics. The proof-of-concept of the sampling system was demonstrated by extracting lipid samples from tissue biopsies. The sample collection system consists of a disposable silicon based multiport microneedle integrated with polymer microfluidics. The polymethyl methacrylate polymer microfluidic chip has a 10 μl sample reservoir and actuation membranes for liquid pumping. A special automated robotic system was developed to control the positioning of the needle and the sampling procedure on preselected spots on the tissue. Real breast cancer tissue samples were used to test the feasibility of the sampling system. We successfully measured indicative cancer biomarkers from the tissue surface. Phosphatidylcholine and phosphoethanolamine were extracted from the tissue membrane with methyl tert-butyl ether solvent and detected by mass spectrometry. In the future, this tool could be used in characterization of preoperative biopsies and tumour tissues removed during surgery. PMID:26421088

  1. Comparative transcriptional survey between laser-microdissected cells from laminar abscission zone and petiolar cortical tissue during ethylene-promoted abscission in citrus leaves

    PubMed Central

    Agustí, Javier; Merelo, Paz; Cercós, Manuel; Tadeo, Francisco R; Talón, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Background Abscission is the cell separation process by which plants are able to shed organs. It has a great impact on the yield of most crop plants. At the same time, the process itself also constitutes an excellent model to study cell separation processes, since it occurs in concrete areas known as abscission zones (AZs) which are composed of a specific cell type. However, molecular approaches are generally hampered by the limited area and cell number constituting the AZ. Therefore, detailed studies at the resolution of cell type are of great relevance in order to accurately describe the process and to identify potential candidate genes for biotechnological applications. Results Efficient protocols for the isolation of specific citrus cell types, namely laminar abscission zone (LAZ) and petiolar cortical (Pet) cells based on laser capture microdissection (LCM) and for RNA microextraction and amplification have been developed. A comparative transcriptome analysis between LAZ and Pet from citrus leaf explants subjected to an in-vitro 24 h ethylene treatment was performed utilising microarray hybridization and analysis. Our analyses of gene functional classes differentially represented in ethylene-treated LAZ revealed an activation program dominated by the expression of genes associated with protein synthesis, protein fate, cell type differentiation, development and transcription. The extensive repertoire of genes associated with cell wall biosynthesis and metabolism strongly suggests that LAZ layers activate both catabolic and anabolic wall modification pathways during the abscission program. In addition, over-representation of particular members of different transcription factor families suggests important roles for these genes in the differentiation of the effective cell separation layer within the many layers contained in the citrus LAZ. Preferential expression of stress-related and defensive genes in Pet reveals that this tissue is likely to be reprogrammed to

  2. Laser capture microdissection for protein and NanoString RNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Golubeva, Yelena; Salcedo, Rosalba; Mueller, Claudius; Liotta, Lance A; Espina, Virginia

    2013-01-01

    Laser capture microdissection (LCM) allows the precise procurement of enriched cell populations from a heterogeneous tissue, or live cell culture, under direct microscopic visualization. Histologically enriched cell populations can be procured by harvesting cells of interest directly or isolating specific cells by ablating unwanted cells. The basic components of laser microdissection technology are (a) visualization of cells via light microscopy, (b) transfer of laser energy to a thermolabile polymer with either the formation of a polymer-cell composite (capture method) or transfer of laser energy via an ultraviolet laser to photovolatize a region of tissue (cutting method), and (c) removal of cells of interest from the heterogeneous tissue section. The capture and cutting methods (instruments) for laser microdissection differ in the manner by which cells of interest are removed from the heterogeneous sample. Laser energy in the capture method is infrared (810 nm), while in the cutting mode the laser is ultraviolet (355 nm). Infrared lasers melt a thermolabile polymer that adheres to the cells of interest, whereas ultraviolet lasers ablate cells for either removal of unwanted cells or excision of a defined area of cells. LCM technology is applicable to an array of applications including mass spectrometry, DNA genotyping and loss-of-heterozygosity analysis, RNA transcript profiling, cDNA library generation, proteomics discovery, and signal kinase pathway profiling. This chapter describes LCM using an Arcturus(XT) instrument for downstream protein sample analysis and using an mmi CellCut Plus® instrument for RNA analysis via NanoString technology.

  3. ADAM12 and ADAM17 gene expression in laser-capture microdissected and non-microdissected breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Narita, Diana; Seclaman, Edward; Ilina, Razvan; Cireap, Natalia; Ursoniu, Sorin; Anghel, Andrei

    2011-06-01

    ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease)12 and ADAM17 are multidomain transmembrane proteins involved in ectodomain shedding of cytokines, growth factors and adhesion molecules, with pivotal activities in the tumor microenvironment. The aim of this study was to confirm the up-regulation of ADAM17 and ADAM12 gene splicing variants in breast tumors and to delineate their expression between laser-capture microdissected (LCM) and non-microdissected breast tumors. The gene expression was analyzed by quantitative-reverse transcription-PCR in a total sample of 109 breast tumors paired with corresponding non-neoplastic breast tissues. ADAM12 and 17 proteins expression for corresponding tissue samples was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. ADAM12S, 12L and 17 genes were significantly up-regulated in either malign or benign LCM samples when compared to non-tumor controls. For non-LCM samples, it was obtained also an increased expression for ADAM12 and 17 genes in cancers, while in benign tumors only ADAM12 variants were significantly up-regulated compared to controls. When benign versus malignant tumors were compared, in LCM samples all investigated genes displayed a higher expression in cancers, whereas in non-LCM, ADAM12 variants were overexpressed in benign samples. The increased expression of ADAM12 protein in the tumor cells and stroma of benign breast diseases was immunohistochemically confirmed. These differences between LCM and non-LCM samples were explained by the contribution of the stroma to the expression of this marker. This study underlines the accuracy conferred by homogenous LCM samples on gene expression profiles and confers further evidence regarding the role of ADAM12 and 17 in the breast tumorigenesis and progression.

  4. Laser Capture Microdissection for Protein and NanoString RNA analysis

    PubMed Central

    Golubeva, Yelena; Salcedo, Rosalba; Mueller, Claudius; Liotta, Lance A.; Espina, Virginia

    2013-01-01

    Laser capture microdissection (LCM) allows the precise procurement of enriched cell populations from a heterogeneous tissue, or live cell culture, under direct microscopic visualization. Histologically enriched cell populations can be procured by harvesting cells of interest directly, or isolating specific cells by ablating unwanted cells. The basic components of laser microdissection technology are a) visualization of cells via light microscopy, b) transfer of laser energy to a thermolabile polymer with either the formation of a polymer-cell composite (capture method) or transfer of laser energy via an ultraviolet laser to photovolatize a region of tissue (cutting method), and c) removal of cells of interest from the heterogeneous tissue section. The capture and cutting methods (instruments) for laser microdissection differ in the manner by which cells of interest are removed from the heterogeneous sample. Laser energy in the capture method is infrared (810nm), while in the cutting mode the laser is ultraviolet (355nm). Infrared lasers melt a thermolabile polymer that adheres to the cells of interest, whereas ultraviolet lasers ablate cells for either removal of unwanted cells or excision of a defined area of cells. LCM technology is applicable to an array of applications including mass spectrometry, DNA genotyping and loss-of-heterozygosity analysis, RNA transcript profiling, cDNA library generation, proteomics discovery, and signal kinase pathway profiling. This chapter describes laser capture microdissection using an ArcturusXT instrument for protein LCM sample analysis, and using a mmi CellCut Plus® instrument for RNA analysis via NanoString technology. PMID:23027006

  5. Optimised laser microdissection of the human ocular surface epithelial regions for microarray studies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The most important challenge of performing insitu transcriptional profiling of the human ocular surface epithelial regions is obtaining samples in sufficient amounts, without contamination from adjacent tissue, as the region of interest is microscopic and closely apposed to other tissues regions. We have effectively collected ocular surface (OS) epithelial tissue samples from the Limbal Epithelial Crypt (LEC), limbus, cornea and conjunctiva of post-mortem cadaver eyes with laser microdissection (LMD) technique for gene expression studies with spotted oligonucleotide microarrays and Gene 1.0 ST arrays. Methods Human donor eyes (4 pairs for spotted oligonucleotide microarrays, 3 pairs for Gene 1.0 ST arrays) consented for research were included in this study with due ethical approval of the Nottingham Research Ethics Committee. Eye retrieval was performed within 36 hours of post-mortem period. The dissected corneoscleral buttons were immersed in OCT media and frozen in liquid nitrogen and stored at −80°C till further use. Microscopic tissue sections of interest were taken on PALM slides and stained with Toluidine Blue for laser microdissection with PALM microbeam systems. Optimisation of the laser microdissection technique was crucial for efficient and cost effective sample collection. Results The starting concentration of RNA as stipulated by the protocol of microarray platforms was taken as the cut-off concentration of RNA samples in our studies. The area of LMD tissue processed for spotted oligonucleotide microarray study ranged from 86,253 μm2 in LEC to 392,887 μm2 in LEC stroma. The RNA concentration of the LMD samples ranged from 22 to 92 pg/μl. The recommended starting concentration of the RNA samples used for Gene 1.0 ST arrays was 6 ng/5 μl. To achieve the desired RNA concentration the area of ocular surface epithelial tissue sample processed for the Gene 1.0 ST array experiments was approximately 100,0000 μm2 to 130,0000 μm2. RNA

  6. Tissue Sampling Guides for Porcine Biomedical Models.

    PubMed

    Albl, Barbara; Haesner, Serena; Braun-Reichhart, Christina; Streckel, Elisabeth; Renner, Simone; Seeliger, Frank; Wolf, Eckhard; Wanke, Rüdiger; Blutke, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    This article provides guidelines for organ and tissue sampling adapted to porcine animal models in translational medical research. Detailed protocols for the determination of sampling locations and numbers as well as recommendations on the orientation, size, and trimming direction of samples from ∼50 different porcine organs and tissues are provided in the Supplementary Material. The proposed sampling protocols include the generation of samples suitable for subsequent qualitative and quantitative analyses, including cryohistology, paraffin, and plastic histology; immunohistochemistry;in situhybridization; electron microscopy; and quantitative stereology as well as molecular analyses of DNA, RNA, proteins, metabolites, and electrolytes. With regard to the planned extent of sampling efforts, time, and personnel expenses, and dependent upon the scheduled analyses, different protocols are provided. These protocols are adjusted for (I) routine screenings, as used in general toxicity studies or in analyses of gene expression patterns or histopathological organ alterations, (II) advanced analyses of single organs/tissues, and (III) large-scale sampling procedures to be applied in biobank projects. Providing a robust reference for studies of porcine models, the described protocols will ensure the efficiency of sampling, the systematic recovery of high-quality samples representing the entire organ or tissue as well as the intra-/interstudy comparability and reproducibility of results.

  7. mRNA expression profiling of laser microbeam microdissected cells from slender embryonic structures.

    PubMed

    Scheidl, Stefan J; Nilsson, Sven; Kalén, Mattias; Hellström, Mats; Takemoto, Minoru; Håkansson, Joakim; Lindahl, Per

    2002-03-01

    Microarray hybridization has rapidly evolved as an important tool for genomic studies and studies of gene regulation at the transcriptome level. Expression profiles from homogenous samples such as yeast and mammalian cell cultures are currently extending our understanding of biology, whereas analyses of multicellular organisms are more difficult because of tissue complexity. The combination of laser microdissection, RNA amplification, and microarray hybridization has the potential to provide expression profiles from selected populations of cells in vivo. In this article, we present and evaluate an experimental procedure for global gene expression analysis of slender embryonic structures using laser microbeam microdissection and laser pressure catapulting. As a proof of principle, expression profiles from 1000 cells in the mouse embryonic (E9.5) dorsal aorta were generated and compared with profiles for captured mesenchymal cells located one cell diameter further away from the aortic lumen. A number of genes were overexpressed in the aorta, including 11 previously known markers for blood vessels. Among the blood vessel markers were endoglin, tie-2, PDGFB, and integrin-beta1, that are important regulators of blood vessel formation. This demonstrates that microarray analysis of laser microbeam micro-dissected cells is sufficiently sensitive for identifying genes with regulative functions.

  8. Laser microdissection and its application to analyze gene expression in arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Gomez, S Karen; Harrison, Maria J

    2009-05-01

    Phosphorus is essential for plant growth, and in many soils phosphorus availability limits crop production. Most plants in natural ecosystems obtain phosphorus via a symbiotic partnership with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. While the significance of these associations is apparent, their molecular basis is poorly understood. Consequently, the potential to harness the mycorrhizal symbiosis to improve phosphorus nutrition in agriculture is not realized. Transcript profiling has recently been used to investigate gene expression changes that accompany development of the AM symbiosis. While these approaches have enabled the identification of AM-symbiosis-associated genes, they have generally involved the use of RNA from whole mycorrhizal roots. Laser microdissection techniques allow the dissection and capture of individual cells from a tissue. RNA can then be isolated from these samples and cell-type specific gene expression information can be obtained. This technology has been applied to obtain cells from plants and more recently to study plant-microbe interactions. The latter techniques, particularly those developed for root-microbe interactions, are of relevance to plant-parasitic weed research. Here, laser microdissection, its use in plant biology and in particular plant-microbe interactions are discussed. An overview of the AM symbiosis is then provided, with a focus on recent advances in understanding development of the arbuscule-cortical cell interface. Finally, the recent applications of laser microdissection for analyses of AM symbiosis are discussed.

  9. Calibration of redox scanning for tissue samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, He N.; Wu, Baohua; Nioka, Shoko; Chance, Britton; Li, Lin Z.

    2009-02-01

    The fluorescence properties of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and oxidized flavoproteins (Fp) such as flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) in the respiratory chain are sensitive indicators of intracellular redox states and have been applied to the studies of mitochondrial function with energy-linked processes. The redox scanner, a threedimensional (3D) redox cryo-imager previously developed by Chance et al., can quantitatively determine the metabolic properties of tissue samples by acquiring the fluorescence images of NADH and Fp. The redox ratios, i.e., Fp/(Fp+NADH) and NADH/(Fp+NADH), obtained on the basis of relative signal intensity ratios, provide a sensitive index of steady-state of the mitochondrial metabolism that has been determined for a variety of biological tissues. This paper presents the further development of the instrument by establishing a calibration method to quantify the concentration of the fluorophores and facilitate the comparison of redox images obtained at different time or with different instrument functions. Calibration curves of both NADH and Fp have been obtained using snap-frozen standard references with NADH concentration ranging from 150-1400 μM and Fp from 80-720 μM. Snap-freeze tissue samples such as human breast tumors xenografted in mice, normal mouse pancreases and spleens were imaged. The NADH and Fp concentrations as well as the redox ratios in the tissue samples were quantified based on the adjacent solution standards of NADH and Fp. The obtained multi-slice redox images revealed high heterogeneity of the tissue samples which can be quantitatively interpreted.

  10. Live cell isolation by laser microdissection with gravity transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgorny, Oleg V.

    2013-05-01

    Laser microdissection by pulsing ultraviolet laser allows the isolation and recultivation of live cells based on morphological features or/and fluorescent labelling from adherent cell cultures. Previous investigations described only the use of the laser microdissection and pressure catapulting (LMPC) for live cell isolation. But LMPC requires complex manipulations and some skill. Furthermore, single-cell cloning using laser microdissection has not yet been demonstrated. The first evidence of successful application of laser microdissection with gravity transfer (LMDGT) for capturing and recultivation of live cells is presented. A new strategy for LMDGT is presented because of the failure to reproduce the manufacturer's protocol. Using the new strategy, successful capturing and recultivation of circle-shaped samples from confluent monolayer of HeLa cells was demonstrated. It was found that LMDGT is easier than LMPC because it doesn't require personal participation of investigator in transferring of isolated samples to final culture dishes. Moreover, for the first time, the generation of clonal colonies from single live cells isolated by laser microdissection was demonstrated. Data obtained in this study confirm that LMDGT is a reliable and high-yield method allowing isolation and expansion of both cell clusters and single cells from adherent cell cultures.

  11. Advances in isolation and characterization of homogeneous cell populations using laser microdissection.

    PubMed

    Mizuarai, S; Takahashi, K; Kobayashi, T; Kotani, H

    2005-01-01

    The isolation and characterization of homogeneous cell populations are of great importance for the analysis of gene expression, because normal tissues contain various types of cells, and the differences in the populations of isolated cells exert significant effects on gene expression analysis. Researchers have attempted to develop methods for the isolation of homogeneous cell populations, such as flow cytometry and mechanical dissection. However, the recent emergence of laser-assisted microdissection has revolutionized the isolation of single-cell populations from solid tissues. With the help of a cutting laser, laser microdissection can isolate tissues (cells) of interest without contamination from surrounding tissues with the microscopic visualization field. By combining laser microdissection and subsequent microarray technology, several studies have resulted in the identification of disease-related genes. In this review, we summarize the principle of laser microdissection and provide several successful examples of target-gene identification using the conventional method combining laser microdissection and microarray. Next, we discuss the practical drawbacks of the combinational method, such as the need for a large number of cells and the disturbance of the relative abundance of transcripts during RNA amplification. We introduce our modifications to combined laser microdissection and microarray for detection of disease-related genes; the technique is simple, yet practical and accurate. Finally, versatile applications of laser microdissection, not only to transcript expression analysis, but also to other genomics and proteomics analyses are, also presented.

  12. Whole transverse section and specific-tissue analysis of secondary metabolites in seven different grades of root of Paeonia lactiflora using laser microdissection and liquid chromatography-quadrupole/time of flight-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiuling; Liang, Zhitao; Peng, Yong; Hou, Jun Ling; Wei, Sheng Li; Zhao, Zhong Zhen; Wang, Wen Quan

    2015-01-25

    The root of Paeonia lactiflora Pall. is widely used in the pharmaceutical, food and cosmetic industries. For these purposes, roots are graded according to diameter, with larger roots considered to be of better quality. To assess the inherent quality of different grades and of different tissues in roots of P. lactiflora, here laser microdissection coupled with UPLC-Q/TOF-MS was applied. The results show the quantity of pharmaceutically important components decreased with increase in root diameter from 0.3cm to 0.7cm. Above 0.7cm of diameter, quantity and diversity of these components increased proportionally with increase in root diameter. The tissue-specific study indicated that the high content of paeoniflorin and albiflorin are mainly distributed in the cork and cortex. According to the results of this study, the roots of P. lactiflora greater than 1.7cm in diameter are of better quality medicinal use than smaller, and the commercial grades chose was best cutoff points. The fine roots and the outer bank of roots, which besides the commercial grades, contain such significant amounts of chemical components too. This study provides a new and practical method for evaluating the different grades of P. lactiflora. PMID:25462115

  13. Improved Protocol For Laser Microdissection Of Human Pancreatic Islets From Surgical Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, Dorothée; Marselli, Lorella; Ehehalt, Florian; Richter, Daniela; Distler, Marius; Kersting, Stephan; Grützmann, Robert; Bokvist, Krister; Froguel, Philippe; Liechti, Robin; Jörns, Anne; Meda, Paolo; Baretton, Gustavo Bruno; Saeger, Hans-Detlev; Schulte, Anke M.; Marchetti, Piero; Solimena, Michele

    2013-01-01

    microdissection, four sections were dehydrated each time: two were placed into a foil-wrapped 50 ml tube, to protect the tissue from moisture and bleaching; the remaining two were immediately microdissected. This procedure was performed using a PALM MicroBeam instrument (Zeiss) employing the Auto Laser Pressure Catapulting (AutoLPC) mode. The completion of beta cell/islet dissection from four cryosections required no longer than 40-60 min. Cells were collected into one AdhesiveCap and lysed with 10 μl lysis buffer. Each single RNA specimen for transcriptomic analysis was obtained by combining 10 cell microdissected samples, followed by RNA extraction using the Pico Pure RNA Isolation Kit (Arcturus). This protocol improves the intrinsic autofluorescence of human beta cells, thus facilitating their rapid and accurate recognition and collection. Further improvement of this procedure could enable the dissection of phenotypically different beta cells, with possible implications for better understanding the changes associated with type 2 diabetes. PMID:23329157

  14. Epigenetic Analysis of Laser Capture Microdissected Fetal Epithelia1

    PubMed Central

    Seelan, Ratnam S.; Warner, Dennis R.; Mukhopadhyay, Partha M.; Andres, Sarah A.; Smolenkova, Irina A.; Wittliff, James L.; Pisano, M. Michele; Greene, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Laser capture microdissection (LCM) is a superior method for non-destructive collection of specific cell populations from tissue sections. While DNA, RNA and protein have been analyzed from LCM-procured samples, epigenetic analyses, particularly of fetal, highly hydrated tissue, have not been attempted. A standardized protocol with quality assurance measures was established to procure cells by LCM of the medial edge epithelia (MEE) of the fetal palatal processes for isolation of intact microRNA for expression analyses and genomic DNA for CpG methylation analyses. MicroRNA preparations, obtained using the RNAqueous® Micro kit (Life Technologies), exhibited better yields and higher quality than those obtained using the Arcturus® PicoPure® RNA Isolation kit (Life Technologies). The approach was validated using real-time PCR to determine expression of selected microRNAs (miR-99a and miR-200b) and pyrosequencing to determine CpG methylation status of selected genes (Aph1a and Dkk4) in the MEE. These studies describe an optimized approach for employing LCM of epithelial cells from fresh frozen fetal tissue that enables quantitative analyses of miRNA expression levels and CpG methylation. PMID:23911529

  15. High-Throughput Microdissection for Next-Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Avi Z.; Armani, Michael D.; Fetsch, Patricia A.; Xi, Liqiang; Pham, Tina Thu; Raffeld, Mark; Chen, Yun; O’Flaherty, Neil; Stussman, Rebecca; Blackler, Adele R.; Du, Qiang; Hanson, Jeffrey C.; Roth, Mark J.; Filie, Armando C.; Roh, Michael H.; Emmert-Buck, Michael R.; Hipp, Jason D.; Tangrea, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Precision medicine promises to enhance patient treatment through the use of emerging molecular technologies, including genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics. However, current tools in surgical pathology lack the capability to efficiently isolate specific cell populations in complex tissues/tumors, which can confound molecular results. Expression microdissection (xMD) is an immuno-based cell/subcellular isolation tool that procures targets of interest from a cytological or histological specimen. In this study, we demonstrate the accuracy and precision of xMD by rapidly isolating immunostained targets, including cytokeratin AE1/AE3, p53, and estrogen receptor (ER) positive cells and nuclei from tissue sections. Other targets procured included green fluorescent protein (GFP) expressing fibroblasts, in situ hybridization positive Epstein-Barr virus nuclei, and silver stained fungi. In order to assess the effect on molecular data, xMD was utilized to isolate specific targets from a mixed population of cells where the targets constituted only 5% of the sample. Target enrichment from this admixed cell population prior to next-generation sequencing (NGS) produced a minimum 13-fold increase in mutation allele frequency detection. These data suggest a role for xMD in a wide range of molecular pathology studies, as well as in the clinical workflow for samples where tumor cell enrichment is needed, or for those with a relative paucity of target cells. PMID:26999048

  16. Laser Microdissection and Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry Coupled for Multimodal Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, Matthias; Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the coupling of ambient laser ablation surface sampling, accomplished using a laser capture microdissection system, with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry for high spatial resolution multimodal imaging. A commercial laser capture microdissection system was placed in close proximity to a modified ion source of a mass spectrometer designed to allow for sampling of laser ablated material via a transfer tube directly into the ionization region. Rhodamine 6G dye of red sharpie ink in a laser etched pattern as well as cholesterol and phosphatidylcholine in a cerebellum mouse brain thin tissue section were identified and imaged from full scan mass spectra. A minimal spot diameter of 8 m was achieved using the 10X microscope cutting objective with a lateral oversampling pixel resolution of about 3.7 m. Distinguishing between features approximately 13 m apart in a cerebellum mouse brain thin tissue section was demonstrated in a multimodal fashion including co-registered optical and mass spectral chemical images.

  17. Spectroscopic imaging system for high-throughput viability assessment of ovarian spheroids or microdissected tumor tissues (MDTs) in a microfluidic chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St-Georges-Robillard, A.; Masse, M.; Kendall-Dupont, J.; Strupler, M.; Patra, B.; Jermyn, M.; Mes-Masson, A.-M.; Leblond, F.; Gervais, T.

    2016-02-01

    There is a growing effort in the biomicrosystems community to develop a personalized treatment response assay for cancer patients using primary cells, patient-derived spheroids, or live tissues on-chip. Recently, our group has developed a technique to cut tumors in 350 μm diameter microtissues and keep them alive on-chip, enabling multiplexed in vitro drug assays on primary tumor tissue. Two-photon microscopy, confocal microscopy and flow cytometry are the current standard to assay tissue chemosensitivity on-chip. While these techniques provide microscopic and molecular information, they are not adapted for high-throughput analysis of microtissues. We present a spectroscopic imaging system that allows rapid quantitative measurements of multiple fluorescent viability markers simultaneously by using a liquid crystal tunable filter to record fluorescence and transmittance spectra. As a proof of concept, 24 spheroids composed of ovarian cancer cell line OV90 were formed in a microfluidic chip, stained with two live cell markers (CellTrackerTM Green and Orange), and imaged. Fluorescence images acquired were normalized to the acquisition time and gain of the camera, dark noise was removed, spectral calibration was applied, and spatial uniformity was corrected. Spectral un-mixing was applied to separate each fluorophore's contribution. We have demonstrated that rapid and simultaneous viability measurements on multiple spheroids can be achieved, which will have a significant impact on the prediction of a tumor's response to multiple treatment options. This technique may be applied as well in drug discovery to assess the potential of a drug candidate directly on human primary tissue.

  18. [Laser microdissection in the molecular oncology of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Wernert, N

    2004-06-01

    Nearly all diseases, including prostate cancer (PCA), occur in mixed tissues with different cell types interconnected by multiple interactions. Laser microdissection permits a separate analysis of specific cell types necessary to understand tumorigenesis. Microdissection can be combined with different molecular methods for analyses at the levels of the genome, the transcriptome or the proteome. With respect to the molecular pathogenesis of PCA, normal glands can be compared to preneoplasias, and these in turn to the carcinoma. Different malignancy grades, as well as intra- and extraprostatic tumor parts, can be specifically analysed and molecular markers of aggressiveness can be identified. The molecular signatures obtained provide the basis for functional studies. New prognostic markers and therapeutic targets can be expected from such approaches in the near future. A far reaching goal is the computer representation of multiple molecular components and their interactions, "E-cell in cyberspace", in which prognostic behaviour and therapeutic responsiveness can be approximately predicted. PMID:15098090

  19. Laser capture microdissection for gene expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Bidarimath, Mallikarjun; Edwards, Andrew K; Tayade, Chandrakant

    2015-01-01

    Laser capture microdissection (LCM) is an excellent and perhaps the only platform to isolate homogeneous cell populations from specific microscopic regions of heterogeneous tissue section, under direct microscopic visualization. The basic operations of the LCM system are based on (a) microscopic visualization of phenotypically identified cells of interest, (b) selective adherence of cells to a melting thermolabile film/membrane using a low-energy infrared laser (IR system) or photovolatization of cells within a selected region (UV system), (c) capturing or catapulting of structurally intact cells from a stained tissue section. RNA/DNA or protein can be extracted from the cell or tissue fragments for downstream applications to quantitatively study gene expression. This method can be applied to many downstream analyses including but not limited to quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), microarray, DNA genotyping, RNA transcript profiling, generation of cDNA library, mass spectrometry analysis, and proteomic discovery.The application of LCM is described here to specifically and reliably obtain a homogeneous cell population in order to extract RNA to study microRNA expression by quantitative real-time PCR.

  20. Laser capture microdissection for gene expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Bidarimath, Mallikarjun; Edwards, Andrew K; Tayade, Chandrakant

    2015-01-01

    Laser capture microdissection (LCM) is an excellent and perhaps the only platform to isolate homogeneous cell populations from specific microscopic regions of heterogeneous tissue section, under direct microscopic visualization. The basic operations of the LCM system are based on (a) microscopic visualization of phenotypically identified cells of interest, (b) selective adherence of cells to a melting thermolabile film/membrane using a low-energy infrared laser (IR system) or photovolatization of cells within a selected region (UV system), (c) capturing or catapulting of structurally intact cells from a stained tissue section. RNA/DNA or protein can be extracted from the cell or tissue fragments for downstream applications to quantitatively study gene expression. This method can be applied to many downstream analyses including but not limited to quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), microarray, DNA genotyping, RNA transcript profiling, generation of cDNA library, mass spectrometry analysis, and proteomic discovery.The application of LCM is described here to specifically and reliably obtain a homogeneous cell population in order to extract RNA to study microRNA expression by quantitative real-time PCR. PMID:25308266

  1. The Chromosome Microdissection and Microcloning Technique.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying-Xin; Deng, Chuan-Liang; Hu, Zan-Min

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome microdissection followed by microcloning is an efficient tool combining cytogenetics and molecular genetics that can be used for the construction of the high density molecular marker linkage map and fine physical map, the generation of probes for chromosome painting, and the localization and cloning of important genes. Here, we describe a modified technique to microdissect a single chromosome, paint individual chromosomes, and construct single-chromosome DNA libraries. PMID:27511173

  2. Identification of specific protein markers in microdissected hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Melle, Christian; Ernst, Günther; Scheibner, Olaf; Kaufmann, Roland; Schimmel, Bettina; Bleul, Annett; Settmacher, Utz; Hommann, Merten; Claussen, Uwe; von Eggeling, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    At present, the molecular mechanisms of hepatocellular carcinogenesis are not well-understood, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) stays one of the most frequent and high-risk metastatic visceral neoplasms worldwide. For the identification of tumor-relevant proteins, we analyzed microdissected cells from nontumorous liver tissue (n = 28) and tissue derived from hepatic tumor center (n = 25), as well as tumor margin (n = 23). We unequivocally identified 53 proteins from hepatic tumor tissues by peptide fingerprint mapping and SELDI mass spectrometry that were separated using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Among a number of signals that were detected as significantly different in the protein profiling analysis, we identified for the first time ferritin light subunit (FLS) and adenylate kinase 3 alpha-like 1 (AK3), showing decreased expressions in hepatic tumor, as well as biliverdin reductase B (BVRB) that was upregulated in HCC. The use of ProteinChip technology in combination with tissue microdissection gives insight of the complex changes occurring at the protein level in hepatocellular cancer associated with tumor development and progression and resulted in three new potential diagnostically useful markers. PMID:17203974

  3. Research Techniques Made Simple: Laser Capture Microdissection in Cutaneous Research.

    PubMed

    Chen Gonzalez, Estela; McGee, Jean Suh

    2016-10-01

    In cutaneous research, we aim to study the molecular signature of a diseased tissue. However, such a study is met with obstacles due to the inherent heterogeneous nature of tissues because multiple cell types reside within a tissue. Furthermore, there is cellular communication between the tissue and the neighboring extracellular matrix. Laser capture microdissection is a powerful technique that allows researchers to isolate cells of interest from any tissue using a laser source under microscopic visualization, thereby circumventing the issue of tissue heterogeneity. Target cells from fixed preparations can be extracted and examined without disturbing the tissue structure. In live cultures, a subpopulation of cells can be extracted in real time with minimal disturbance of cellular communication and molecular signatures. Here we describe the basic principles of the technique, the different types of laser capture microdissection, and the subsequent downstream analyses. This article will also discuss how the technique has been employed in cutaneous research, as well as future directions. PMID:27664715

  4. Technical note: Alternatives to reduce adipose tissue sampling bias.

    PubMed

    Cruz, G D; Wang, Y; Fadel, J G

    2014-10-01

    Understanding the mechanisms by which nutritional and pharmaceutical factors can manipulate adipose tissue growth and development in production animals has direct and indirect effects in the profitability of an enterprise. Adipocyte cellularity (number and size) is a key biological response that is commonly measured in animal science research. The variability and sampling of adipocyte cellularity within a muscle has been addressed in previous studies, but no attempt to critically investigate these issues has been proposed in the literature. The present study evaluated 2 sampling techniques (random and systematic) in an attempt to minimize sampling bias and to determine the minimum number of samples from 1 to 15 needed to represent the overall adipose tissue in the muscle. Both sampling procedures were applied on adipose tissue samples dissected from 30 longissimus muscles from cattle finished either on grass or grain. Briefly, adipose tissue samples were fixed with osmium tetroxide, and size and number of adipocytes were determined by a Coulter Counter. These results were then fit in a finite mixture model to obtain distribution parameters of each sample. To evaluate the benefits of increasing number of samples and the advantage of the new sampling technique, the concept of acceptance ratio was used; simply stated, the higher the acceptance ratio, the better the representation of the overall population. As expected, a great improvement on the estimation of the overall adipocyte cellularity parameters was observed using both sampling techniques when sample size number increased from 1 to 15 samples, considering both techniques' acceptance ratio increased from approximately 3 to 25%. When comparing sampling techniques, the systematic procedure slightly improved parameters estimation. The results suggest that more detailed research using other sampling techniques may provide better estimates for minimum sampling.

  5. Specimen Sample Preservation for Cell and Tissue Cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meeker, Gabrielle; Ronzana, Karolyn; Schibner, Karen; Evans, Robert

    1996-01-01

    The era of the International Space Station with its longer duration missions will pose unique challenges to microgravity life sciences research. The Space Station Biological Research Project (SSBRP) is responsible for addressing these challenges and defining the science requirements necessary to conduct life science research on-board the International Space Station. Space Station will support a wide range of cell and tissue culture experiments for durations of 1 to 30 days. Space Shuttle flights to bring experimental samples back to Earth for analyses will only occur every 90 days. Therefore, samples may have to be retained for periods up to 60 days. This presents a new challenge in fresh specimen sample storage for cell biology. Fresh specimen samples are defined as samples that are preserved by means other than fixation and cryopreservation. The challenge of long-term storage of fresh specimen samples includes the need to suspend or inhibit proliferation and metabolism pending return to Earth-based laboratories. With this challenge being unique to space research, there have not been any ground based studies performed to address this issue. It was decided hy SSBRP that experiment support studies to address the following issues were needed: Fixative Solution Management; Media Storage Conditions; Fresh Specimen Sample Storage of Mammalian Cell/Tissue Cultures; Fresh Specimen Sample Storage of Plant Cell/Tissue Cultures; Fresh Specimen Sample Storage of Aquatic Cell/Tissue Cultures; and Fresh Specimen Sample Storage of Microbial Cell/Tissue Cultures. The objective of these studies was to derive a set of conditions and recommendations that can be used in a long duration microgravity environment such as Space Station that will permit extended storage of cell and tissue culture specimens in a state consistent with zero or minimal growth, while at the same time maintaining their stability and viability.

  6. Analysis of chemical components from plant tissue samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laseter, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Information is given on the type and concentration of sterols, free fatty acids, and total fatty acids in plant tissue samples. All samples were analyzed by gas chromatography and then by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry combination. In each case the mass spectral data was accumulated as a computer printout and plot. Typical gas chromatograms are included as well as tables describing test results.

  7. Multivariate classification of infrared spectra of cell and tissue samples

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, David M.; Jones, Howland D. T.; Thomas, Edward V.

    1997-01-01

    Multivariate classification techniques are applied to spectra from cell and tissue samples irradiated with infrared radiation to determine if the samples are normal or abnormal (cancerous). Mid and near infrared radiation can be used for in vivo and in vitro classifications using at least different wavelengths.

  8. Laser capture microdissection of gonads from juvenile zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Investigating gonadal gene expression is important in attempting to elucidate the molecular mechanism of sex determination and differentiation in the model species zebrafish. However, the small size of juvenile zebrafish and correspondingly their gonads complicates this type of investigation. Furthermore, the lack of a genetic sex marker in juvenile zebrafish prevents pooling gonads from several individuals. The aim of this study was to establish a method to isolate the gonads from individual juvenile zebrafish allowing future investigations of gonadal gene expression during sex determination and differentiation. Methods The laser capture microdissection technique enables isolation of specific cells and tissues and thereby removes the noise of gene expression from other cells or tissues in the gene expression profile. A protocol developed for laser microdissection of human gonocytes was adjusted and optimised to isolate juvenile zebrafish gonads. Results The juvenile zebrafish gonad is not morphologically distinguishable when using dehydrated cryosections on membrane slides and a specific staining method is necessary to identify the gonads. The protocol setup in this study allows staining, identification, isolation and subsequent RNA purification and amplification of gonads from individual juvenile zebrafish thereby enabling gonadal gene expression profiling. Conclusion The study presents a protocol for isolation of individual juvenile zebrafish gonads, which will enable future investigations of gonadal gene expression during the critical period of sex differentiation. Furthermore, the presented staining method is applicable to other species as it is directed towards alkaline phosphatase that is expressed in gonocytes and embryonic stem cells, which is conserved among vertebrate species. PMID:19747405

  9. Solid phase microextraction fills the gap in tissue sampling protocols.

    PubMed

    Bojko, Barbara; Gorynski, Krzysztof; Gomez-Rios, German Augusto; Knaak, Jan Matthias; Machuca, Tiago; Spetzler, Vinzent Nikolaus; Cudjoe, Erasmus; Hsin, Michael; Cypel, Marcelo; Selzner, Markus; Liu, Mingyao; Keshavjee, Shaf; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2013-11-25

    Metabolomics and biomarkers discovery are an integral part of bioanalysis. However, untargeted tissue analysis remains as the bottleneck of such studies due to the invasiveness of sample collection, as well as the laborious and time-consuming sample preparation protocols. In the current study, technology integrating in vivo sampling, sample preparation and global extraction of metabolites--solid phase microextraction was presented and evaluated during liver and lung transplantation in pig model. Sampling approaches, including selection of the probe, transportation, storage conditions and analyte coverage were discussed. The applicability of the method for metabolomics studies was demonstrated during lung transplantation experiments. PMID:24216199

  10. Using tissue samples for proteomic studies-critical considerations.

    PubMed

    Becker, Karl-Friedrich

    2015-04-01

    From my experience of 22 years working in a pathology research laboratory and overseeing dozens of collaborations with research groups from basic sciences and industry, I have the impression that researchers are rarely aware of the special issues related to acquisition and processing of frozen or formalin-fixed tissue samples for proteomic analysis. While challenges are expected for formalin-fixed tissues because of the cross-linking activities of formaldehyde, researchers believe when using frozen tissue samples they are safe and always have excellent material to analyze-but this is not always the case. It is alarming that many researchers do not question the quality of the tissue samples they are analyzing and focus only on their analytical technique. Standardization of the entire workflow from test ordering to the report of the proteomic assay, with special emphasis on the preanalytical phase, is crucial for successful integration of proteomic studies in the clinic as protein profiles may change due to sample processing before the proteomic analysis is performed. The aim of this review is to discuss the progress of proteomic studies with human tissues and to highlight the challenges that must be understood and addressed for successful translation of proteomic methods to clinical practice.

  11. Preparation of tissue samples for X-ray fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chwiej, Joanna; Szczerbowska-Boruchowska, Magdalena; Lankosz, Marek; Wojcik, Slawomir; Falkenberg, Gerald; Stegowski, Zdzislaw; Setkowicz, Zuzanna

    2005-12-01

    As is well-known, trace elements, especially metals, play an important role in the pathogenesis of many disorders. The topographic and quantitative elemental analysis of pathologically changed tissues may shed some new light on processes leading to the degeneration of cells in the case of selected diseases. An ideal and powerful tool for such purpose is the Synchrotron Microbeam X-ray Fluorescence technique. It enables the carrying out of investigations of the elemental composition of tissues even at the single cell level. The tissue samples for histopathological investigations are routinely fixed and embedded in paraffin. The authors try to verify the usefulness of such prepared tissue sections for elemental analysis with the use of X-ray fluorescence microscopy. Studies were performed on rat brain samples. Changes in elemental composition caused by fixation in formalin or paraformaldehyde and embedding in paraffin were examined. Measurements were carried out at the bending magnet beamline L of the Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor HASYLAB in Hamburg. The decrease in mass per unit area of K, Br and the increase in P, S, Fe, Cu and Zn in the tissue were observed as a result of the fixation. For the samples embedded in paraffin, a lower level of most elements was observed. Additionally, for these samples, changes in the composition of some elements were not uniform for different analyzed areas of rat brain.

  12. Tissue sampling methods and standards for vertebrate genomics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The recent rise in speed and efficiency of new sequencing technologies have facilitated high-throughput sequencing, assembly and analyses of genomes, advancing ongoing efforts to analyze genetic sequences across major vertebrate groups. Standardized procedures in acquiring high quality DNA and RNA and establishing cell lines from target species will facilitate these initiatives. We provide a legal and methodological guide according to four standards of acquiring and storing tissue for the Genome 10K Project and similar initiatives as follows: four-star (banked tissue/cell cultures, RNA from multiple types of tissue for transcriptomes, and sufficient flash-frozen tissue for 1 mg of DNA, all from a single individual); three-star (RNA as above and frozen tissue for 1 mg of DNA); two-star (frozen tissue for at least 700 μg of DNA); and one-star (ethanol-preserved tissue for 700 μg of DNA or less of mixed quality). At a minimum, all tissues collected for the Genome 10K and other genomic projects should consider each species’ natural history and follow institutional and legal requirements. Associated documentation should detail as much information as possible about provenance to ensure representative sampling and subsequent sequencing. Hopefully, the procedures outlined here will not only encourage success in the Genome 10K Project but also inspire the adaptation of standards by other genomic projects, including those involving other biota. PMID:23587255

  13. Translational research in pediatrics: tissue sampling and biobanking.

    PubMed

    Brisson, Alayne R; Matsui, Doreen; Rieder, Michael J; Fraser, Douglas D

    2012-01-01

    Translational research is expanding and has become a focus of National Research funding agencies, touted as the primary avenue to improve health care practice. The use of human tissues for research on disease etiology is a pillar of translational research, particularly with innovations in research technologies to investigate the building blocks of disease. In pediatrics, translational research using human tissues has been hindered by the many practical and ethical considerations associated with tissue procurement from children and also by a limited population base for study, by the increasing complexities in conducting clinical research, and by a lack of dedicated child-health research funding. Given these obstacles, pediatric translational research can be enhanced by developing strategic and efficient biobanks that will provide scientists with quality tissue specimens to render accurate and reproducible research results. Indeed, tissue sampling and biobanking within pediatric academic settings has potential to impact child health by promoting bidirectional interaction between clinicians and scientists, helping to maximize research productivity, and providing a competitive edge for attracting and maintaining high-quality personnel. The authors of this review outline key issues and practical solutions to optimize pediatric tissue sampling and biobanking for translational research, activities that will ultimately reduce the burden of childhood disease. PMID:22144705

  14. Analysis of neuronal gene expression with laser capture microdissection.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Valerie A M; DeVoss, Jason J; Ryan, Heather S; Murphy, Greer M

    2002-09-01

    The brain is a heterogeneous tissue in which the numbers of neurons, glia, and other cell types vary among anatomic regions. Gene expression studies performed on brain homogenates yield results reflecting mRNA abundance in a mixture of cell types. Therefore, a method for quantifying gene expression in individual cell populations would be useful. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) is a new technique for obtaining pure populations of cells from heterogeneous tissues. Most studies thus far have used LCM to detect DNA sequences. We developed a method to quantify gene expression in hippocampal neurons from mouse brain using LCM and real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). This method was optimized to permit histochemical or immunocytochemical visualization of nerve cells during LCM while minimizing RNA degradation. As an example, gene expression was quantified in hippocampal neurons from the Tg2576 mouse model for Alzheimer's disease.

  15. The influence of immunohistochemistry on mRNA recovery from microdissected frozen and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections.

    PubMed

    Gjerdrum, Lise Mette; Abrahamsen, Helene N; Villegas, Berta; Sorensen, Boe S; Schmidt, Henrik; Hamilton-Dutoit, Stephen J

    2004-12-01

    Laser-assisted microdissection (LAM) is now widely used to obtain specific cell populations from heterogeneous tissues. A major disadvantage of LAM is poor tissue morphology during microscopy, in part because coverslips are not used. Immunohistochemical labeling can improve identification of target cells but may affect the subsequent analysis of the microdissected tissue. We studied the effect of immunohistochemistry (IHC) on mRNA recovery from labeled cells after microdissection from both frozen and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) sections, using Melan-A and Ki-67 staining in lymph nodes with metastatic melanoma as a model. We developed rapid protocols for immunostaining in an attempt to limit loss of mRNA during procedures. A sensitive real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR was used to measure mRNA. We found a marked decrease in the mRNA yield from 500 microdissected cells from frozen and paraffin sections after immunostaining for both markers. Recovery of mRNA decreased by up to 89%, comparing the immunostained with the routinely stained sections. Interestingly, the ratio between mRNA for the two markers was similar in all stains, indicating that immunostained sections may be used for mRNA analysis. We also investigated the effect of storing membrane-mounted sections for microdissection under different conditions. Slides mounted with paraffin sections could be stored at room temperature for up to 90 days with no significant decrease in mRNA recovery.

  16. Assessment of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) signaling in paired colorectal cancer and normal colon tissue samples using computer-aided immunohistochemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Messersmith, Wells; Oppenheimer, Darin; Peralba, Josep; Sebastiani, Valeria; Amador, Maria; Jimeno, Antonio; Embuscado, Erlinda; Hidalgo, Manuel; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine

    2005-12-01

    The Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) plays a role in multiple tumor cell processes and is targeted by several anticancer therapies. Although EGFR mutations may determine tumor susceptibility in a small proportion of patients, knowledge of the EGFR signaling pathway status in tumors may help guide further drug development and hypothesis-driven combination studies. We aimed to validate and apply a novel computer-aided immunohistochemical (IHC) technique to characterize the status of EGFR signaling in matched colorectal tumor and normal colon tissue samples. Tissue Microarrays (TMA)were made from both cancerous and normal colorectal tissue in 18 patients and stained with antibodies against EGFR, phospho-EGFR (pEGFR), Akt, pAkt, MAPK, and pMAPK. TMA's were quantitatively scored using the Automated Cellular Imaging System (ACIS II, Chromavision, Inc). ACIS was compared against cell line Western blotting, ELISA, and visual scoring (0-3+) by a pathologist. We found that ACIS analysis was highly reproducible and results were well correlated with other techniques. A post-scan "image microdissection" technique of analyzing heterogeneous human samples showed good correlation between paired human samples [Pearson correlation for tumors, 0.922 (p < .001)]. Cancer samples had markedly higher staining of pEGFR, Akt, pAkt, MAPK, and pMAPK. We conclude that ACIS IHC of human tissue samples is quantitative, reproducible, and correlates with Western blots and ELISA in cell line pellets as well as pathologist's scores of human samples. Colorectal tumors show higher staining of pEGFR and downstream effectors compared to matched normal colorectal tissues.

  17. Semiautomated Device for Batch Extraction of Metabolites from Tissue Samples

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Metabolomics has become a mainstream analytical strategy for investigating metabolism. The quality of data derived from these studies is proportional to the consistency of the sample preparation. Although considerable research has been devoted to finding optimal extraction protocols, most of the established methods require extensive sample handling. Manual sample preparation can be highly effective in the hands of skilled technicians, but an automated tool for purifying metabolites from complex biological tissues would be of obvious utility to the field. Here, we introduce the semiautomated metabolite batch extraction device (SAMBED), a new tool designed to simplify metabolomics sample preparation. We discuss SAMBED’s design and show that SAMBED-based extractions are of comparable quality to extracts produced through traditional methods (13% mean coefficient of variation from SAMBED versus 16% from manual extractions). Moreover, we show that aqueous SAMBED-based methods can be completed in less than a quarter of the time required for manual extractions. PMID:22292466

  18. Tissue-specific metabolite profiling of Cyperus rotundus L. rhizomes and (+)-nootkatone quantitation by laser microdissection, ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry techniques.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Yogini; Liang, Zhitao; Guo, Ping; Ho, Hing-Man; Chen, Hubiao; Zhao, Zhongzhen

    2014-07-23

    Cyperus rotundus L. is a plant species commonly found in both India and China. The caused destruction of this plant is of critical concern for agricultural produce. Nevertheless, it can serve as a potential source of the commercially important sesquiterpenoid (+)-nootkatone. The present work describes comparative metabolite profiling and (+)-nootkatone content determination in rhizome samples collected from these two countries. Laser dissected tissues, namely, the cortex, hypodermal fiber bundles, endodermis, amphivasal vascular bundles, and whole rhizomes were analyzed by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QTOF MS). Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis was used for profiling of essential oil constituents and quantitation of (+)-nootkatone. The content of (+)-nootkatone was found to be higher in samples from India (30.47 μg/10 g) compared to samples from China (21.72 μg/10 g). The method was validated as per International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) guidelines (Q2 R1). The results from this study can be applied for quality control and efficient utilization of this terpenoid-rich plant for several applications in food-based industries. PMID:24938835

  19. Piffalls in diagnostic molecular pathology--significance of sampling error.

    PubMed

    Heinmöller, E; Renke, B; Beyser, K; Dietmaier, W; Langner, C; Rüschoff, J

    2001-10-01

    Today, molecular diagnostic tests are widely used in clinical medicine with polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based techniques being of particular interest. In tissue specimens, however, false-positive and false-negative results can be obtained if pathomorphological and processing aspects are not considered. We therefore studied the impact of tissue sampling in three widely used diagnostic tests: (1) assessment of clonality in B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, (2) analysis of microsatellite instability (MSI) in colorectal neoplasia, and (3) demonstration of mycobacterium tuberculosis. Tissue sections of routinely formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded diagnostic specimens were taken, and the significance of sampling was systematically investigated using laser microdissection or processing of the entire section. PCR analyses were done according to standard protocols. False-positive pseudo-monoclonality was obtained in small gastrointestinal biopsies and in laser microdissected lymph follicles of non-neoplastic tonsils. False negativity (pseudo-stability) could be demonstrated in a case with hereditary rectal adenoma if whole tissue sections were taken without microdissection of the most dysplastic subareas. Demonstration of mycobacteria failed in tissue sections of a formalin-fixed lymph node that was positive after complete digestion or in fresh frozen material of the same patient. In diagnostic molecular pathology, sampling error is an important source of false-positive and false-negative results, particularly if disease- and tissue-specific morphological features, such as sample size, type of fixation, and intralesional heterogeneity, are ignored.

  20. An adapted tissue microarray for the development of a matrix arrangement of tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Gurgel, Daniel C; Dornelas, Conceição A; Lima-Júnior, Roberto C P; Ribeiro, Ronaldo A; Almeida, Paulo R C

    2012-03-15

    The arrangement of tissue samples in a matrix, known as the tissue microarray (TMA) method, is a well-recognized method worldwide. This technique makes it possible to assess the expression of molecular markers on a large scale with high yields in terms of time, costs, and archived material. Some researchers are trying to adapt the technique to expand the research possibilities. This study proposes an adaptive simplification of low-cost instruments for obtaining samples that will be used in the construction of the TMA. The use of a manual leather puncher, which has a very low cost and a long expected life and eliminates the need to use a press machine, is a simple and effective alternative to building blocks of tissue microarrays.

  1. Quantitative Proteomics in Laser Capture Microdissected Sleep Nuclei From Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Ronald A.; Winrow, Christopher J.; Spellman, Daniel S.; Song, Qinghua; Reiss, Duane R.; Conway, James P.; Taylor, Rhonda R.; Coleman, Paul J.; Hendrickson, Ronald C.

    2014-01-01

    The combination of stable isotope labeling of amino acids in mammals (SILAM) and laser capture microdissection (LCM) for selective proteomic analysis of the targeted tissues holds tremendous potential for refined characterization of proteome changes within complex tissues such as the brain. The authors have applied this approach to measure changes in relative protein abundance in ventral tegmental area (VTA) of the rat brain that correlate to pharmacological perturbations. Enriched 13C6 15N2-lysine was introduced in vivo via diet. These animals were sacrificed during the middle of the 12-hour light period to extract isotopically “heavy” proteins, which were then used as a reference for extracts from dosed, unlabeled rats. Animals were administered an orexin peptide (Ox-B), an orexin receptor antagonist (ORA), or a mixture of both (Ox-B + ORA). All samples were obtained at same phase of the sleep cycle. Labeled-pair identification and differential quantitation provided protein identification and expression ratio data. Five proteins were found to exhibit decreased relative abundance after administration of an ORA, including α-synuclein and rat myelin basic protein. Conversely, six proteins showed increased relative abundance upon antagonist treatment, including 2’,3’-cyclic nucleotide 3’-phosphodiesterase. PMID:24579665

  2. Recovery of high-quality RNA from laser capture microdissected human and rodent pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Alexandra E.; Matveyenko, Aleksey V.; Kirakossian, David; Park, Johanna; Gurlo, Tatyana; Butler, Peter C.

    2016-01-01

    Laser capture microdissection (LCM) is a powerful method to isolate specific populations of cells for subsequent analysis such as gene expression profiling, for example, microarrays or ribonucleic (RNA)-Seq. This technique has been applied to frozen as well as formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) specimens with variable outcomes regarding quality and quantity of extracted RNA. The goal of the study was to develop the methods to isolate high-quality RNA from islets of Langerhans and pancreatic duct glands (PDG) isolated by LCM. We report an optimized protocol for frozen sections to minimize RNA degradation and maximize recovery of expected transcripts from the samples using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) by adding RNase inhibitors at multiple steps during the experiment. This technique reproducibly delivered intact RNA (RIN values 6–7). Using quantitative RT-PCR, the expected profiles of insulin, glucagon, mucin6 (Muc6), and cytokeratin-19 (CK-19) mRNA in PDGs and pancreatic islets were detected. The described experimental protocol for frozen pancreas tissue might also be useful for other tissues with moderate to high levels of intrinsic ribonuclease (RNase) activity. PMID:27231405

  3. Automatic detection of spermatozoa for laser capture microdissection.

    PubMed

    Vandewoestyne, Mado; Van Hoofstat, David; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip; Deforce, Dieter

    2009-03-01

    In sexual assault crimes, differential extraction of spermatozoa from vaginal swab smears is often ineffective, especially when only a few spermatozoa are present in an overwhelming amount of epithelial cells. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) enables the precise separation of spermatozoa and epithelial cells. However, standard sperm-staining techniques are non-specific and rely on sperm morphology for identification. Moreover, manual screening of the microscope slides is time-consuming and labor-intensive. Here, we describe an automated screening method to detect spermatozoa stained with Sperm HY-LITER. Different ratios of spermatozoa and epithelial cells were used to assess the automatic detection method. In addition, real postcoital samples were also screened. Detected spermatozoa were isolated using LCM and DNA analysis was performed. Robust DNA profiles without allelic dropout could be obtained from as little as 30 spermatozoa recovered from postcoital samples, showing that the staining had no significant influence on DNA recovery.

  4. Immunoelectron microscopic localization of elastic tissue components in archival tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Fanning, J C; White, J F; Polewski, R; Cleary, E G

    1991-06-01

    Tissue samples that have been stored for many years, in different media and under a variety of conditions, have been examined by modern techniques of immunoelectron microscopy, using antibodies against elastic tissue components. A range of postembedding restorative procedures has been identified, which will allow reliable immunolocalization of antibodies against the elastic tissue component of such specimens. These methods have been applied successfully to autopsy-derived material, fixed in buffered formaldehyde, to archival material stored frozen at -70 or -20 degrees C, to specimens fixed for electron microscopy and stored for many years in buffer, and even to archival material from formaldehyde-fixed, paraffin-embedded blocks, reprocessed for electron microscopic examination. The successful restorative methods included pre-treatment of the sections with 6 M guanidine hydrochloride, or 1 M Tris/saline, each containing 100 mM dithiothreitol (a reducing agent) followed by alkylation with 220 mM iodoacetamide. The application of these techniques allowed reliable study of elastic tissue antibody distributions in archival tissues that could not be obtained again, as well as comparative studies with tissues processed many years previously.

  5. Laser capture microdissection: Arcturus(XT) infrared capture and UV cutting methods.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Rosa I; Blakely, Steven R; Liotta, Lance A; Espina, Virginia

    2012-01-01

    Laser capture microdissection (LCM) is a technique that allows the precise procurement of enriched cell populations from a heterogeneous tissue under direct microscopic visualization. LCM can be used to harvest the cells of interest directly or can be used to isolate specific cells by ablating the unwanted cells, resulting in histologically enriched cell populations. The fundamental components of laser microdissection technology are (a) visualization of the cells of interest via microscopy, (b) transfer of laser energy to a thermolabile polymer with either the formation of a polymer-cell composite (capture method) or transfer of laser energy via an ultraviolet laser to photovolatize a region of tissue (cutting method), and (c) removal of cells of interest from the heterogeneous tissue section. Laser energy supplied by LCM instruments can be infrared (810 nm) or ultraviolet (355 nm). Infrared lasers melt thermolabile polymers for cell capture, whereas ultraviolet lasers ablate cells for either removal of unwanted cells or excision of a defined area of cells. LCM technology is applicable to an array of applications including mass spectrometry, DNA genotyping and loss-of-heterozygosity analysis, RNA transcript profiling, cDNA library generation, proteomics discovery, and signal kinase pathway profiling. This chapter describes the unique features of the Arcturus(XT) laser capture microdissection instrument, which incorporates both infrared capture and ultraviolet cutting technology in one instrument, using a proteomic downstream assay as a model.

  6. Heterogeneous rpoS and rhlR mRNA levels and 16S rRNA/rDNA (rRNA gene) ratios within Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms, sampled by laser capture microdissection.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Osorio, Ailyn C; Williamson, Kerry S; Franklin, Michael J

    2010-06-01

    The local environmental conditions in biofilms are dependent on the impinging aqueous solution, chemical diffusion, and the metabolic activities of cells within the biofilms. Chemical gradients established in biofilms lead to physiological heterogeneities in bacterial gene expression. Previously, we used laser capture microdissection (LCM) and quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR to target defined biofilm subpopulations for gene expression studies. Here, we combined this approach with quantitative PCR of bacterial DNA to normalize the amount of gene expression per cell. By comparing the ratio of 16S rRNA to 16S rDNA (rRNA gene), we demonstrated that cells at the top of thick Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms have 16S rRNA/genome ratios similar to those of cells in a transition from the exponential phase to the stationary phase. Cells in the middle and bottom layers of these biofilms have ratios that are not significantly different from those of stationary-phase planktonic cultures. Since much of each biofilm appeared to be in a stationary-phase-like state, we analyzed the local amounts of the stationary-phase sigma factor rpoS gene and the quorum-sensing regulator rhlR gene per cell. Surprisingly, the amount of rpoS mRNA was largest at the top of the biofilms at the air-biofilm interface. Less than one rpoS mRNA transcript per cell was observed in the middle or base of the biofilms. The rhlR mRNA content was also greatest at the top of the biofilms, and there was little detectable rhlR expression at the middle or bottom of the biofilms. While the cell density was slightly greater at the bottom of the biofilms, expression of the quorum-sensing regulator occurred primarily at the top of the biofilms, where the cell metabolic activity was greatest, as indicated by local expression of the housekeeping gene acpP and by expression from a constitutive P(trc) promoter. The results indicate that in thick P. aeruginosa biofilms, cells in the 30 microm adjacent to the

  7. Gene expression profiling of neurochemically-defined regions of the human brain by in situ hybridization-guided laser capture microdissection

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, René; Kerman, Ilan A.; Meng, Fan; Evans, Simon J.; Amrein, Irmgard; Jones, Edward G.; Bunney, William E.; Akil, Huda; Watson, Stanley J.; Thompson, Robert C.

    2009-01-01

    Laser capture microdissection (LCM) permits isolation of specific cell types and cell groups based upon morphology, anatomical landmarks and histochemical properties. This powerful technique can be used for region-specific dissection if the target structure is clearly delineated. However, it is difficult to visualize anatomical boundaries in an unstained specimen, while histological staining can complicate the microdissection process and compromise downstream processing and analysis. We now introduce a novel method in which in situ hybridization (ISH) signal is used to guide LCM on adjacent unstained sections to collect tissue from neurochemically-defined regions of the human postmortem brain to minimize sample manipulation prior to analysis. This approach was validated in nuclei that provide monoaminergic inputs to the forebrain, and likely contribute to the pathophysiology of mood disorders. This method was used successfully to carry out gene expression profiling and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) confirmation from the dissected material. When compared to traditional micropunch dissections, our ISH-guided LCM method provided enhanced signal intensity for mRNAs of specific monoaminergic marker genes as measured by genome-wide gene expression microarrays. Enriched expression of specific monoaminergic genes (as determined by microarrays and qPCR) was detected within appropriate anatomical locations validating the accuracy of microdissection. Together these results support the conclusion that ISH-guided LCM permits acquisition of enriched nucleus-specific RNA that can be successfully used for downstream gene expression investigations. Future studies will utilize this approach for gene expression profiling of neurochemically-defined regions of postmortem brains collected from mood disorder patients. PMID:19070632

  8. Laser Capture Microdissection of Embryonic Cells and Preparation of RNA for Microarray Assays

    PubMed Central

    Redmond, Latasha C.; Pang, Christopher J.; Dumur, Catherine; Haar, Jack L.; Lloyd, Joyce A.

    2014-01-01

    In order to compare the global gene expression profiles of different embryonic cell types, it is first necessary to isolate the specific cells of interest. The purpose of this chapter is to provide a step-by-step protocol to perform laser capture microdissection (LCM) on embryo samples and obtain sufficient amounts of high-quality RNA for microarray hybridizations. Using the LCM/microarray strategy on mouse embryo samples has some challenges, because the cells of interest are available in limited quantities. The first step in the protocol is to obtain embryonic tissue, and immediately cryoprotect and freeze it in a cryomold containing Optimal Cutting Temperature freezing media (Sakura Finetek), using a dry ice–isopentane bath. The tissue is then cryosectioned, and the microscope slides are processed to fix, stain, and dehydrate the cells. LCM is employed to isolate specific cell types from the slides, identified under the microscope by virtue of their morphology. Detailed protocols are provided for using the currently available ArcturusXT LCM instrument and CapSure® LCM Caps, to which the selected cells adhere upon laser capture. To maintain RNA integrity, upon removing a slide from the final processing step, or attaching the first cells on the LCM cap, LCM is completed within 20 min. The cells are then immediately recovered from the LCM cap using a denaturing solution that stabilizes RNA integrity. RNA is prepared using standard methods, modified for working with small samples. To ensure the validity of the microarray data, the quality of the RNA is assessed using the Agilent bioanalyzer. Only RNA that is of sufficient integrity and quantity is used to perform microarray assays. This chapter provides guidance regarding troubleshooting and optimization to obtain high-quality RNA from cells of limited availability, obtained from embryo samples by LCM. PMID:24318813

  9. Measurement of phthalates in small samples of mammalian tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Acott, P.D.; Murphy, M.G.; Ogborn, M.R.; Crocker, J.F.S.

    1987-03-01

    Di-(2-ethylhexyl)-phthalate (DEHP) is a phthalic acid ester that is used as a plasticizer in polyvinyl chloride products, many of which have widespread medical application. DEHP has been shown to be leached from products used for storage and delivery of blood transfusions during procedures such as plasmaphoresis, hemodialysis and open heart surgery. Results of studies in this laboratory have suggested that there is an association between the absorption and deposition of DEHP (and/or related chemicals) in the kidney and the acquired renal cystic disease (ACD) frequently seen in patients who have undergone prolonged dialysis treatment. In order to determine the relationship between the two, it has been necessary to establish a method for extracting and accurately quantitating minute amounts of these chemicals in small tissue samples. The authors have now established such a method using kidneys from normal rats and from a rat model for ACD.

  10. Proteomic analysis of microdissected facial nuclei of the rat following facial nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Melle, Christian; Ernst, Günther; Grosheva, Maria; Angelov, Doychin N; Irintchev, Andrey; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando; von Eggeling, Ferdinand

    2009-12-15

    Recent studies using molecular and genetic techniques just have started to elucidate the complex process that drives successful peripheral nerve regeneration. Introducing proteomics to this field, we unilaterally performed a facial nerve axotomy in 13 adult Wistar rats. Seven days later, a total of 40 20-microm coronary cryostat sections of the operated and contralateral unoperated nucleus facialis were microdissected. On the one hand, microdissected areas were pooled for each side, lysed and applied to ProteinChip Arrays. On the other hand, one microdissected area from the right and left facial nucleus each was directly placed on the affinity chromatographic array. Facial motoneurons were lysed in situ and released their proteins to spatially defined points. 215 laser addressable distinct positions across the surface of the spot enabled a high spatial resolution of measured protein profiles for the analysed tissue area. Protein profiles of the single positions were plotted over the used tissue section to visualize their distribution. The comparative analysis of the protein lysates from operated and normal nuclei facialis revealed, for both approaches used, differentially expressed proteins. Although by direct application of one cryostat section only a few hundred motoneurons were analysed, results comparable to these using lysates were obtained. Additionally, the applied technique revealed differences in the intensity distribution of several proteins of unknown function in the lesioned in comparison to the contralateral normal facial nucleus. This proteomic analysis with ultra high sensitivity paired with potential for a spatial resolution is a promising methodology for peripheral nerve regeneration studies. PMID:19748522

  11. Proteomic Analysis of Laser Microdissected Melanoma Cells from Skin Organ Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Hood, Brian L.; Grahovac, Jelena; Flint, Melanie S.; Sun, Mai; Charro, Nuno; Becker, Dorothea; Wells, Alan; Conrads, Thomas P

    2010-01-01

    Gaining insights into the molecular events that govern the progression from melanoma in situ to advanced melanoma, and understanding how the local microenvironment at the melanoma site influences this progression, are two clinically pivotal aspects that to date are largely unexplored. In an effort to identify key regulators of the crosstalk between melanoma cells and the melanoma-skin microenvironment, primary and metastatic human melanoma cells were seeded into skin organ cultures (SOCs), and grown for two weeks. Melanoma cells were recovered from SOCs by laser microdissection and whole-cell tryptic digests analyzed by nanoflow liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with an LTQ-Orbitrap. The differential protein abundances were calculated by spectral counting, the results of which provides evidence that cell-matrix and cell-adhesion molecules that are upregulated in the presence of these melanoma cells recapitulate proteomic data obtained from comparative analysis of human biopsies of invasive melanoma and a tissue sample of adjacent, non-involved skin. This concordance demonstrates the value of SOCs for conducting proteomic investigations of the melanoma microenvironment. PMID:20459140

  12. Optimization of Evans blue quantitation in limited rat tissue samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hwai-Lee; Lai, Ted Weita

    2014-10-01

    Evans blue dye (EBD) is an inert tracer that measures plasma volume in human subjects and vascular permeability in animal models. Quantitation of EBD can be difficult when dye concentration in the sample is limited, such as when extravasated dye is measured in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) intact brain. The procedure described here used a very small volume (30 µl) per sample replicate, which enabled high-throughput measurements of the EBD concentration based on a standard 96-well plate reader. First, ethanol ensured a consistent optic path length in each well and substantially enhanced the sensitivity of EBD fluorescence spectroscopy. Second, trichloroacetic acid (TCA) removed false-positive EBD measurements as a result of biological solutes and partially extracted EBD into the supernatant. Moreover, a 1:2 volume ratio of 50% TCA ([TCA final] = 33.3%) optimally extracted EBD from the rat plasma protein-EBD complex in vitro and in vivo, and 1:2 and 1:3 weight-volume ratios of 50% TCA optimally extracted extravasated EBD from the rat brain and liver, respectively, in vivo. This procedure is particularly useful in the detection of EBD extravasation into the BBB-intact brain, but it can also be applied to detect dye extravasation into tissues where vascular permeability is less limiting.

  13. A B-cell lymphoma diagnosed in "floater" tissue: implications of the diagnosis and resolution of a laboratory error.

    PubMed

    Mosse, Claudio A; Stumph, Jennifer R; Best, D Hunter; Vnencak-Jones, Cindy L

    2009-09-01

    Contamination of a paraffin-embedded tissue block with another patient's tissue can lead to an incorrect diagnosis. We report the use of short tandem repeats for the analysis of DNA extracted from microdissected tissue from unstained slides prepared from a decalcified block from a 33-year-old woman who was previously diagnosed with a low-grade B-cell lymphoma. This diagnosis was based on a single fragment of tissue found among bone fragments taken during orthopedic surgery at a referring hospital. Our results confirm that the B-cell lymphoma tissue was not derived from our patient. Furthermore, we suggest that in cases for which the definitive identification of a tissue contaminant can resolve clinically, therapeutically, and prognostically significant questions, short tandem repeat analysis of DNA derived from microdissected surgical pathology samples should be considered to minimize errors and enhance the quality of care. PMID:19745614

  14. Long-term room temperature preservation of corpse soft tissue: an approach for tissue sample storage

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Disaster victim identification (DVI) represents one of the most difficult challenges in forensic sciences, and subsequent DNA typing is essential. Collected samples for DNA-based human identification are usually stored at low temperature to halt the degradation processes of human remains. We have developed a simple and reliable procedure for soft tissue storage and preservation for DNA extraction. It ensures high quality DNA suitable for PCR-based DNA typing after at least 1 year of room temperature storage. Methods Fragments of human psoas muscle were exposed to three different environmental conditions for diverse time periods at room temperature. Storage conditions included: (a) a preserving medium consisting of solid sodium chloride (salt), (b) no additional substances and (c) garden soil. DNA was extracted with proteinase K/SDS followed by organic solvent treatment and concentration by centrifugal filter devices. Quantification was carried out by real-time PCR using commercial kits. Short tandem repeat (STR) typing profiles were analysed with 'expert software'. Results DNA quantities recovered from samples stored in salt were similar up to the complete storage time and underscored the effectiveness of the preservation method. It was possible to reliably and accurately type different genetic systems including autosomal STRs and mitochondrial and Y-chromosome haplogroups. Autosomal STR typing quality was evaluated by expert software, denoting high quality profiles from DNA samples obtained from corpse tissue stored in salt for up to 365 days. Conclusions The procedure proposed herein is a cost efficient alternative for storage of human remains in challenging environmental areas, such as mass disaster locations, mass graves and exhumations. This technique should be considered as an additional method for sample storage when preservation of DNA integrity is required for PCR-based DNA typing. PMID:21846338

  15. Gene-expression analysis of single cells-nested polymerase chain reaction after laser microdissection

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xin; Kleeff, JÖrg; Zhu, Zhao-Wen; Schmied, Bruno; Tang, Wen-Hao; Zimmermann, Arthur; BÜchler, Markus W.; Friess, Helmut

    2003-01-01

    AIM: The structural and functional characteristics of cells are dependent on the specific gene expression profile. The ability to study and compare gene expression at the cellular level will therefore provide valuable insights into cell physiology and pathophysiology. METHODS: Individual cells were isolated from frozen colon tissue sections using laser microdissection. DNA as well as RNA were extracted, and total RNA was reversely transcribed to complementary DNA (cDNA). Both DNA and cDNA were analyzed by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The quality of isolated DNA and RNA was satisfactory. RESULTS: Single cells were successfully microdissected using an ultraviolet laser micromanipulator. Nested PCR amplification products of DNA and cDNA of single cells could clearly be visualized by agarose gel electrophoresis. CONCLUSION: The combined use of laser microdissection and nested-PCR provides an opportunity to analyze gene expression in single cells. This method allows the analysis and identification of specific genes which are involved in physiological and pathophysiological processes in a complex of variable cell phenotypes. PMID:12800252

  16. Variation in glycogen concentrations within mantle and foot tissue in Amblema plicata plicata: Implications for tissue biopsy sampling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naimo, T.J.; Monroe, E.M.

    1999-01-01

    With the development of techniques to non-lethally biopsy tissue from unionids, a new method is available to measure changes in biochemical, contaminant, and genetic constituents in this imperiled faunal group. However, before its widespread application, information on the variability of biochemical components within and among tissues needs to be evaluated. We measured glycogen concentrations in foot and mantle tissue in Amblema plicata plicata (Say, 1817) to determine if glycogen was evenly distributed within and between tissues and to determine which tissue might be more responsive to the stress associated with relocating mussels. Glycogen was measured in two groups of mussels: those sampled from their native environment (undisturbed mussels) and quickly frozen for analysis and those relocated into an artificial pond (relocated mussels) for 24 months before analysis. In both undisturbed and relocated mussels, glycogen concentrations were evenly distributed within foot, but not within mantle tissue. In mantle tissue, concentrations of glycogen varied about 2-fold among sections. In addition, glycogen varied significantly between tissues in undisturbed mussels, but not in relocated mussels. Twenty-four months after relocation, glycogen concentrations had declined by 80% in mantle tissue and by 56% in foot tissue relative to the undisturbed mussels. These data indicate that representative biopsy samples can be obtained from foot tissue, but not mantle tissue. We hypothesize that mantle tissue could be more responsive to the stress of relocation due to its high metabolic activity associated with shell formation.

  17. Automated Classification of Glandular Tissue by Statistical Proximity Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Azar, Jimmy C.; Simonsson, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Due to the complexity of biological tissue and variations in staining procedures, features that are based on the explicit extraction of properties from subglandular structures in tissue images may have difficulty generalizing well over an unrestricted set of images and staining variations. We circumvent this problem by an implicit representation that is both robust and highly descriptive, especially when combined with a multiple instance learning approach to image classification. The new feature method is able to describe tissue architecture based on glandular structure. It is based on statistically representing the relative distribution of tissue components around lumen regions, while preserving spatial and quantitative information, as a basis for diagnosing and analyzing different areas within an image. We demonstrate the efficacy of the method in extracting discriminative features for obtaining high classification rates for tubular formation in both healthy and cancerous tissue, which is an important component in Gleason and tubule-based Elston grading. The proposed method may be used for glandular classification, also in other tissue types, in addition to general applicability as a region-based feature descriptor in image analysis where the image represents a bag with a certain label (or grade) and the region-based feature vectors represent instances. PMID:25685143

  18. Studying Genes in Tissue Samples From Younger and Adolescent Patients With Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-13

    Childhood Alveolar Soft-part Sarcoma; Childhood Angiosarcoma; Childhood Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Childhood Epithelioid Sarcoma; Childhood Fibrosarcoma; Childhood Leiomyosarcoma; Childhood Liposarcoma; Childhood Malignant Mesenchymoma; Childhood Neurofibrosarcoma; Childhood Synovial Sarcoma; Chordoma; Desmoid Tumor; Metastatic Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Nonmetastatic Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma

  19. PCR artifacts in LOH and MSI analysis of microdissected tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Sieben, N L; ter Haar, N T; Cornelisse, C J; Fleuren, G J; Cleton-Jansen, A M

    2000-11-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis to study loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and microsatellite instability (MSI) in tumors is widely used. Microdissection techniques are applied to obtain tumor-specific tissue cells. By microdissection, however, the amount of template DNA extracted may vary considerably and interfere with optimal PCR amplification. To circumvent LOH and MSI misinterpretations due to low DNA input, we have assessed the critical level of DNA input for reliable PCR analysis. PCR analysis was performed by using 18 polymorphic markers (mono-, di-, tri-, and tetranucleotide) on DNA derived from both paraffin-embedded, formalin-fixed, and fresh frozen tumor specimens at template input levels ranging from 0.05 to 25.0 ng. We show a highly significant relation between DNA input and the occurrence of LOH and MSI artifacts. Furthermore, for DNA extracted from paraffin-embedded material, the percentage of LOH artifacts is significantly higher compared with DNA extracted from frozen tissue. For reliable PCR analyses using a mono-, di-, tri-, or tetranucleotide marker, a minimum of 10.0 ng DNA is required when DNA is isolated from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue and 5.0 ng when isolated from fresh frozen tissue. HUM PATHOL 31:1414-1419.

  20. Robust and artifact-free mounting of tissue samples for atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Joshua T; Raghunathan, Vijay Krishna; Thomasy, Sara M; Murphy, Christopher J; Russell, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Immobilization of tissue-samples for atomic for microscopy (AFM) is typically done using either semi-dry tissue or by gluing the tissue sample down, both of which can introduce artifacts. Here, we describe the design of a Soft- Clamping Immobilizing Retainer of Tissue (SCIRT) for consistent and nondestructive immobilization of tissues for AFM analysis. We compare the performance of our SCIRT method with glue-immobilization for two difficult to handle tissue types: human trabecular meshwork (HTM) and rabbit cornea (RC). Our results demonstrate that the SCIRT method has several advantages, including: (i) allowing for small sample sizes, (ii) enabling continuous hydration, (iii) eliminating contact with glue or associated solvents, (iv) permitting sample recovery following measurement, and (v) ease of use. In conclusion, the SCIRT method is a simple and effective means of immobilizing soft, hydrated tissue samples consistently and without artifacts.

  1. Robust and artifact-free mounting of tissue samples for atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Joshua T.; Raghunathan, Vijay Krishna; Thomasy, Sara M.; Murphy, Christopher J.; Russell, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Immobilization of tissue-samples for atomic for microscopy (AFM) is typically done using either semi-dry tissue or by gluing the tissue sample down, both of which can introduce artifacts. Here, we describe the design of a Soft-Clamping Immobilizing Retainer of Tissue (SCIRT) for consistent and nondestructive immobilization of tissues for AFM analysis. We compare the performance of our SCIRT method with glue-immobilization for two difficult to handle tissue types: human trabecular meshwork (HTM) and rabbit cornea (RC). Our results demonstrate that the SCIRT method has several advantages, including: (i) allowing for small sample sizes, (ii) enabling continuous hydration, (iii) eliminating contact with glue or associated solvents, (iv) permitting sample recovery following measurement, and (v) ease of use. In conclusion, the SCIRT method is a simple and effective means of immobilizing soft, hydrated tissue samples consistently and without artifacts. PMID:24447138

  2. Functional relationships among selenium concentrations in the diet, target tissues, and nondestructive tissue samples of two species of snakes.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, William A; Snodgrass, Joel W; Baionno, Jennifer A; Roe, John H; Staub, Brandon P; Jackson, Brian P

    2005-02-01

    Nondestructive sampling methods, such as removal of feathers for contaminant analysis, are desirable in ecological monitoring programs that seek to minimize the impacts of harvesting organisms. Although many reptiles are declining worldwide, nondestructive sampling techniques seldom have been employed for assessing contaminant exposure in these organisms. In this study, we examined the utility of nondestructive tissue sampling for assessing Se exposure in reptiles. We describe the functional relationships among dietary Se concentrations, target tissue Se concentrations, and Se concentrations in nondestructive tissue samples (blood and tail tissue biopsy) in two species of snakes that had been exposed to Se under very different experimental protocols. Using nonlinear regression, we found strong positive correlations (r2 > 0.92) in all comparisons among Se concentrations in nondestructive tissues, diet, and target tissues. Moreover, equations describing these relationships can be used to estimate concentrations of Se in diet and target organs, from known concentrations of Se in nondestructive tissue samples. Although the current paucity of toxicity data on reptiles precludes tests of our models, we demonstrate how the equations describing these relationships might be used to make predictions about Se accumulation in target organs for risk assessment. Future studies on reptiles that examine these relationships under different Se exposure conditions, and those that document physiological responses of reptiles to various concentrations of Se, will help to refine our models and test their efficacy for predicting health risk.

  3. Laser capture microdissection to identify septum-associated proteins in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Fischer, Reinhard; Teichert, Ines; Kück, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    To spatially resolve genetic differences at the cellular level, the laser-capture microdissection technique was developed. With this method cells can be cut from tissues with a laser beam and analyzed for DNA, RNA or protein composition. Here we adapted the technique to isolate septal microtubule-organizing center (MTOC)-associated proteins in Aspergillus nidulans About 3000 septa were collected and subjected to peptide fingerprinting by mass-spectrometric analysis. We identified the microtubule polymerase AlpA and found it interacts with ApsB specifically at sMTOCs, suggesting that AlpA might be involved in the assembly or the functioning of this protein complex. PMID:26951366

  4. Microdissection and microcloning of mid-chromosome 4: Genetic mapping of 41 microdissection clones

    SciTech Connect

    Bahary, N.; McGraw, D.E.; Shilling, R.; Friedman, J.M. )

    1993-04-01

    Available genetic information places the mouse db (diabetes) gene approximately 5 cM distal to Ifa on mid/distal mouse chromosome 4. These data have indicated that there is a relevant paucity of genetic markers that map to this region of chromosome 4. To increase the density of the genetic map on mid-chromosome 4, the authors have applied the techniques of microdissection and microcloning of the mid-portion of mouse chromosome 4. A total of 47 RFLPs from the microdissection library were used to type the progeny of three C57BL/6J Mus spretus backcrosses. The resulting composite genetic map positions seven known genes, 41 microclones, and three other anonymous markers to a region of approximately 21 cM on mid-chromosome 4 extending from b to Lck. The density of markers in this region of chromosome 4 should be sufficient to initiate the physical mapping of this subchromosomal segment, facilitating efforts to clone the db gene, as well as other uncloned mutant loci in this region of chromosome 4. 30 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Principles of laser microdissection and catapulting of histologic specimens and live cells.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Alfred; Horneffer, Verena; Lorenz, Kathrin; Linz, Norbert; Hüttmann, Gereon; Gebert, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Rapid contact- and contamination-free procurement of specific samples of histologic material for proteomic and genomic analysis as well as separation and transport of living cells can be achieved by laser microdissection (LMD) of the sample of interest followed by a laser-induced forward transport process [laser pressure "catapulting," (LPC)] of the dissected material. We investigated the dynamics of LMD and LPC with focused and defocused laser pulses by means of time-resolved photography. The working mechanism of microdissection was found to be plasma-mediated ablation. Catapulting is driven by plasma formation, when tightly focused pulses are used, and by ablation at the bottom of the sample for moderate and strong defocusing. Driving pressures of several hundred megapascals accelerate the specimen to initial velocities of 100-300 m/s before it is rapidly slowed down by air friction. With strong defocusing, driving pressure and initial flight velocity decrease considerably. On the basis of a characterization of the thermal and optical properties of the histologic specimens and supporting materials used, we calculated the temporal evolution of the heat distribution in the sample. After laser microdissection and laser pressure catapulting (LMPC), the samples were inspected by scanning electron microscopy. Catapulting with tightly focused or strongly defocused pulses results in very little collateral damage, while slight defocusing involves significant heat and UV exposure of up to about 10% of the specimen volume, especially if samples are catapulted directly from a glass slide. Time-resolved photography of live-cell catapulting revealed that in defocused catapulting strong shear forces originate from the flow of the thin layer of culture medium covering the cells. By contrast, pulses focused at the periphery of the specimen cause a fast rotational movement that makes the specimen wind its way out of the culture medium, thereby undergoing much less shear stresses

  6. Ethical use of tissue samples in genetic research.

    PubMed

    Azarow, Kenneth S; Olmstead, Francis L; Hume, Roderick F; Myers, Jerome; Calhoun, Bryon C; Martin, Laura S

    2003-06-01

    Many centrally based cancer protocols have begun to address the ethical issues concerning tissue banking for genetic research. A multidisciplinary subcommittee of the Madigan Army Medical Center Institutional Review Board was established to determine the scope of the problem and offer a concise, user-friendly policy with guidelines on how to control and monitor the use of stored tissue for future genetic and molecular research. Our institution participates in 69 Southern Oncology Group or National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project protocols and 47 Children's Oncology Group protocols. Of these protocols, 22 of 69 and 36 of 47, respectively, asked for tissue to be stored for future biologic study. Only 4 of 69 and 3 of 47, respectively, deal with specific consent for future genetic/biologic research. The multidisciplinary committee developed a policy that dealt with the following areas: exempt status, waived consent, informed consent, deceased status, family studies, and information flow. An algorithm was created to establish a system of checks and balances concerning privacy, protection and an appeals process.

  7. Laser microdissection and microarray analysis of the hippocampus of Ras-GRF1 knockout mice reveals gene expression changes affecting signal transduction pathways related to memory and learning.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Medarde, A; Porteros, A; de las Rivas, J; Núñez, A; Fuster, J J; Santos, E

    2007-04-25

    We used manual macrodissection or laser capture microdissection (LCM) to isolate tissue sections of the hippocampus area of Ras-GRF1 wild type and knockout mice brains, and analyzed their transcriptional patterns using commercial oligonucleotide microarrays. Comparison between the transcriptomes of macrodissected and microdissected samples showed that the LCM samples allowed detection of significantly higher numbers of differentially expressed genes, with higher statistical rates of significance. These results validate LCM as a reliable technique for in vivo genomic studies in the brain hippocampus, where contamination by surrounding areas (not expressing Ras-GRF1) increases background noise and impairs identification of differentially expressed genes. Comparison between wild type and knockout LCM hippocampus samples revealed that Ras-GRF1 elimination caused significant gene expression changes, mostly affecting signal transduction and related neural processes. The list of 36 most differentially expressed genes included loci concerned mainly with Ras/G protein signaling and cytoskeletal organization (i.e. 14-3-3gamma/zeta, Kcnj6, Clasp2) or related, cross-talking pathways (i.e. jag2, decorin, strap). Consistent with the phenotypes shown by Ras-GRF1 knockout mice, many of these differentially expressed genes play functional roles in processes such as sensory development and function (i.e. Sptlc1, antiquitin, jag2) and/or neurological development/neurodegeneration processes affecting memory and learning. Indeed, potential links to neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease (AD) or Creutzfeldt-Jacobs disease (CJD), have been reported for a number of differentially expressed genes identified in this study (Ptma, Aebp2, Clasp2, Hebp1, 14-3-3gamma/zeta, Csnk1delta, etc.). These data, together with the previously described role of IRS and insulin (known Ras-GRF1 activators) in AD, warrant further investigation of a potential functional link of Ras-GRF1 to

  8. Molecular analysis of cell type-specific gene expression profile during mouse spermatogenesis by laser microdissection and qRT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Esakky, Prabagaran; Hansen, Deborah A; Drury, Andrea M; Moley, Kelle H

    2013-03-01

    Laser microdissection (LMD) is a selective cell isolation technique that enables the separation of desired homogenous cell subpopulations from complex tissues such as the testes under direct microscopic visualization. The LMD accompanied by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) represents an indispensable tool in quantifying messenger RNA (mRNA) expression among defined cell populations. Gene expression is temporally and spatially regulated at 3 sequential phases of mitotic, meiotic, and postmeiotic stages of spermatogenesis. The present study demonstrates a short modified LMD protocol based upon hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. Stage-specific LMD success was validated by the use of mRNA profiling of "marker genes" which are conserved across species and are known to be differentially expressed during spermatogenesis. Magea4, Hspa2, Cox6b2, Tnp1, Prm1, and Prm2 are used to differentiate among the microdissected cell populations, namely spermatogonia (group I), spermatocytes (group II), round and condensing spermatids (group III), and elongated and condensed spermatids (group IV), respectively. The LMD combined with qRT-PCR is further extended to assess the cell stage-specific distribution of selected stress response genes such as Hsp90aa1, Gpx4, Ucp2, Sod1, and Sod2. The germ cell-specific mRNA profiles are suitably complemented by Western blot of the LMD samples, immunohistochemistry, and confocal localization of the corresponding proteins. The current study suggests that LMD can successfully isolate cell subpopulations from the complex tissues of the testes; and establish cell stage-specific basal expression patterns of selected stress response genes and proteins. It is our hypothesis that the baseline expression of stress response genes will differ by cell stage to create discrete stage-specific vulnerabilities to reproductive toxicants.

  9. Functional genomics of a generalist parasitic plant: Laser microdissection of host-parasite interface reveals host-specific patterns of parasite gene expression

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Orobanchaceae is the only plant family with members representing the full range of parasitic lifestyles plus a free-living lineage sister to all parasitic lineages, Lindenbergia. A generalist member of this family, and an important parasitic plant model, Triphysaria versicolor regularly feeds upon a wide range of host plants. Here, we compare de novo assembled transcriptomes generated from laser micro-dissected tissues at the host-parasite interface to uncover details of the largely uncharacterized interaction between parasitic plants and their hosts. Results The interaction of Triphysaria with the distantly related hosts Zea mays and Medicago truncatula reveals dramatic host-specific gene expression patterns. Relative to above ground tissues, gene families are disproportionally represented at the interface including enrichment for transcription factors and genes of unknown function. Quantitative Real-Time PCR of a T. versicolor β-expansin shows strong differential (120x) upregulation in response to the monocot host Z. mays; a result that is concordant with our read count estimates. Pathogenesis-related proteins, other cell wall modifying enzymes, and orthologs of genes with unknown function (annotated as such in sequenced plant genomes) are among the parasite genes highly expressed by T. versicolor at the parasite-host interface. Conclusions Laser capture microdissection makes it possible to sample the small region of cells at the epicenter of parasite host interactions. The results of our analysis suggest that T. versicolor’s generalist strategy involves a reliance on overlapping but distinct gene sets, depending upon the host plant it is parasitizing. The massive upregulation of a T. versicolor β-expansin is suggestive of a mechanism for parasite success on grass hosts. In this preliminary study of the interface transcriptomes, we have shown that T. versicolor, and the Orobanchaceae in general, provide excellent opportunities for the

  10. Final LDRD report : development of sample preparation methods for ChIPMA-based imaging mass spectrometry of tissue samples.

    SciTech Connect

    Maharrey, Sean P.; Highley, Aaron M.; Behrens, Richard, Jr.; Wiese-Smith, Deneille

    2007-12-01

    The objective of this short-term LDRD project was to acquire the tools needed to use our chemical imaging precision mass analyzer (ChIPMA) instrument to analyze tissue samples. This effort was an outgrowth of discussions with oncologists on the need to find the cellular origin of signals in mass spectra of serum samples, which provide biomarkers for ovarian cancer. The ultimate goal would be to collect chemical images of biopsy samples allowing the chemical images of diseased and nondiseased sections of a sample to be compared. The equipment needed to prepare tissue samples have been acquired and built. This equipment includes an cyro-ultramicrotome for preparing thin sections of samples and a coating unit. The coating unit uses an electrospray system to deposit small droplets of a UV-photo absorbing compound on the surface of the tissue samples. Both units are operational. The tissue sample must be coated with the organic compound to enable matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) and matrix enhanced secondary ion mass spectrometry (ME-SIMS) measurements with the ChIPMA instrument Initial plans to test the sample preparation using human tissue samples required development of administrative procedures beyond the scope of this LDRD. Hence, it was decided to make two types of measurements: (1) Testing the spatial resolution of ME-SIMS by preparing a substrate coated with a mixture of an organic matrix and a bio standard and etching a defined pattern in the coating using a liquid metal ion beam, and (2) preparing and imaging C. elegans worms. Difficulties arose in sectioning the C. elegans for analysis and funds and time to overcome these difficulties were not available in this project. The facilities are now available for preparing biological samples for analysis with the ChIPMA instrument. Some further investment of time and resources in sample preparation should make this a useful tool for chemical imaging applications.

  11. New method for the treatment of sperm samples for ultrastructural study based on the use of animal tissues as biological containers.

    PubMed

    Junquera, Concepción; Colás, Carmen; Martínez-Ciriano, Carmen; Serrano, Pedro; Castiella, Tomás; Cebrian-Perez, José A; Muiño-Blanco, Teresa

    2007-08-01

    The study of the ultrastructure of spematozoa by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) often presents with problems of interpretation according to the method employed, depending on whether samples are either centrifuged previously to the fixation or immersed in viscous gels. The major problems of interpretation are changes in the location of vesicles originated during the maturation process and modifications in the adsorption of seminal plasma proteins to the sperm membrane surface. The aim of our study is to communicate an original new method for the treatment of spermatozoa for ultrastructural study. Our method is based on the use of animal tissues as biological containers, inside which the spermatic suspensions are included. We developed this method using fresh sperm samples taken from mature Rasa Aragonesa rams. As biological container, we used 2.5-cm long segments of the intestine of 1-week-old chickens (Gallus gallus) (diameter around 4 mm). In order to avoid any influence of digestive enzymes of the mucosa on the sperm surface, we put each intestine fragment inside out by means of microdissection forceps under a bifocal optical microscope and cold light. One of the edges was tied with thin suture silk. The sperm suspension was injected in the optimal experimental condition and amount. Finally, the still-open edge of the intestine segment was tied with silk in the same way as the other segment edge. By using this technique, we can perform a suitable morphological study at an ultrastructural level. In addition, the functional relationship of the ultrastructural components of the target cells is correctly preserved.

  12. A new method for the treatment of sperm samples for ultrastructural study based on the use of animal tissues as biological containers.

    PubMed

    Junquera, Concepción; Colás, Carmen; Martínez-Ciriano, Carmen; Serrano, Pedro; Castiella, Tomás; Cebrian-Perez, José Alvaro; Muiño-Blanco, Teresa

    2007-09-01

    The study of the ultrastructure of spematozoa by means of transmission electron microscopy often presents with problems of interpretation according to the method employed, depending on whether samples are either centrifuged previously to the fixation or immersed in viscous gels. The major problems of interpretation are: changes in the location of vesicles originated during the maturation process and modifications in the adsorption of seminal plasma proteins to the sperm membrane surface. The aim of our study is to communicate an original new method for the treatment of spermatozoa for ultrastructural study. Our method is based on the use of animal tissues as biological containers, inside which the spermatic suspensions are included. We developed this method using fresh sperm samples taken from mature Rasa aragonesa rams. As biological container, we used 2.5-cm long segments of the intestine of 1-week-old chickens (Gallus gallus) (diameter around 4 mm). To avoid any influence of digestive enzymes of the mucosa on the sperm surface, we put each intestine fragment inside out by means of microdissection forceps under bifocal optical microscope and cold light. One of the edges was tied with thin suture silk. The sperm suspension was injected in the optimal experimental condition and amount. Finally, the still open edge of the intestine segment was tied with silk in the same way as the other segment edge. By using this technique, we can perform a suitable morphological study at an ultrastructural level. In addition, the functional relationship of the ultrastructural components of the target cells is correctly preserved.

  13. Micro-organisms isolated from cadaveric samples of allograft musculoskeletal tissue.

    PubMed

    Varettas, Kerry

    2013-12-01

    Allograft musculoskeletal tissue is commonly used in orthopaedic surgical procedures. Cadaveric donors of musculoskeletal tissue supply multiple allografts such as tendons, ligaments and bone. The microbiology laboratory of the South Eastern Area Laboratory Services (SEALS, Australia) has cultured cadaveric allograft musculoskeletal tissue samples for bacterial and fungal isolates since 2006. This study will retrospectively review the micro-organisms isolated over a 6-year period, 2006-2011. Swab and tissue samples were received for bioburden testing and were inoculated onto agar and/or broth culture media. Growth was obtained from 25.1 % of cadaveric allograft musculoskeletal tissue samples received. The predominant organisms isolated were coagulase-negative staphylococci and coliforms, with the heaviest bioburden recovered from the hemipelvis. The rate of bacterial and fungal isolates from cadaveric allograft musculoskeletal tissue samples is higher than that from living donors. The type of organism isolated may influence the suitability of the allograft for transplant.

  14. Elemental distribution and sample integrity comparison of freeze-dried and frozen-hydrated biological tissue samples with nuclear microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavpetič, P.; Vogel-Mikuš, K.; Jeromel, L.; Ogrinc Potočnik, N.; Pongrac, P.; Drobne, D.; Pipan Tkalec, Ž.; Novak, S.; Kos, M.; Koren, Š.; Regvar, M.; Pelicon, P.

    2015-04-01

    The analysis of biological samples in frozen-hydrated state with micro-PIXE technique at Jožef Stefan Institute (JSI) nuclear microprobe has matured to a point that enables us to measure and examine frozen tissue samples routinely as a standard research method. Cryotome-cut slice of frozen-hydrated biological sample is mounted between two thin foils and positioned on the sample holder. The temperature of the cold stage in the measuring chamber is kept below 130 K throughout the insertion of the samples and the proton beam exposure. Matrix composition of frozen-hydrated tissue is consisted mostly of ice. Sample deterioration during proton beam exposure is monitored during the experiment, as both Elastic Backscattering Spectrometry (EBS) and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM) in on-off axis geometry are recorded together with the events in two PIXE detectors and backscattered ions from the chopper in a single list-mode file. The aim of this experiment was to determine differences and similarities between two kinds of biological sample preparation techniques for micro-PIXE analysis, namely freeze-drying and frozen-hydrated sample preparation in order to evaluate the improvements in the elemental localisation of the latter technique if any. In the presented work, a standard micro-PIXE configuration for tissue mapping at JSI was used with five detection systems operating in parallel, with proton beam cross section of 1.0 × 1.0 μm2 and a beam current of 100 pA. The comparison of the resulting elemental distributions measured at the biological tissue prepared in the frozen-hydrated and in the freeze-dried state revealed differences in elemental distribution of particular elements at the cellular level due to the morphology alteration in particular tissue compartments induced either by water removal in the lyophilisation process or by unsatisfactory preparation of samples for cutting and mounting during the shock-freezing phase of sample preparation.

  15. Monitoring the marine environment using marine mammal tissue samples

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, P.D.; Hannah, D.J.; Day, P.J.

    1995-12-31

    Marine environments, both inshore and open ocean, receive numerous inputs of anthropogenic chemicals. Cetaceans provide a valuable resource for monitoring the low level contamination of marine environments with persistent organic contaminants. Comparative studies using inshore and offshore southern ocean cetaceans have revealed significant differences in the types of contamination in these two environments. The polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) deposited in the southern oceans are characterized by an abundance of lower chlorinated congeners. Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/F) are not present at significant concentrations in cetaceans from the open southern ocean. In contrast significant concentrations of PCDD/F congeners are detected in the blubber of the inshore living Hector`s dolphin. This species lives close to the shore and has a very small home range (approximately 30 km) for a cetacean. Analysis of tissue PCDD/F and PCB profiles from different populations and their food sources will be presented. The data are being used to determine if there are local variations in the contamination of the New Zealand inshore marine environment.

  16. Olfactory Neurons Obtained through Nasal Biopsy Combined with Laser-Capture Microdissection: A Potential Approach to Study Treatment Response in Mental Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Soumya; McLean, Charlee; Sawa, Akira; Lin, Sandra Y.; Rai, Narayan; Hipolito, MariaMananita S.; Cascella, Nicola; Nurnberger, John J.I.; Koko, Ishizuka; Nwulia, Evaristus A.

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a severe neuropsychiatric disorder with poorly understood pathophysiology and typically treated with the mood stabilizer, lithium carbonate. Animal studies as well as human genetic studies indicate that lithium affects molecular targets that are involved in neuronal growth, survival and maturation, and notably molecules involved in Wnt signaling. Given the ethical challenge to obtaining brain biopsies for investigating dynamic molecular changes associated with lithium-response in the central nervous system (CNS), one may consider the use of neurons obtained from olfactory tissues to achieve this goal.The olfactory epithelium contains olfactory receptor neurons at different stages of development and glial-like supporting cells. This provides a unique opportunity to study dynamic changes in the CNS of patients with neuropsychiatric diseases, using olfactory tissue safely obtained from nasal biopsies. To overcome the drawback posed by substantial contamination of biopsied olfactory tissue with non-neuronal cells, a novel approach to obtain enriched neuronal cell populations was developed by combining nasal biopsies with laser-capture microdissection. In this study, a system for investigating treatment-associated dynamic molecular changes in neuronal tissue was developed and validated, using a small pilot sample of BD patients recruited for the study of the molecular mechanisms of lithium treatment response. PMID:25549156

  17. Adaptation of Laser Microdissection Technique for the Study of a Spontaneous Metastatic Mammary Carcinoma Mouse Model by NanoString Technologies.

    PubMed

    Castro, Nadia P; Merchant, Anand S; Saylor, Karen L; Anver, Miriam R; Salomon, David S; Golubeva, Yelena G

    2016-01-01

    Laser capture microdissection (LCM) of tissue is an established tool in medical research for collection of distinguished cell populations under direct microscopic visualization for molecular analysis. LCM samples have been successfully analyzed in a number of genomic and proteomic downstream molecular applications. However, LCM sample collection and preparation procedure has to be adapted to each downstream analysis platform. In this present manuscript we describe in detail the adaptation of LCM methodology for the collection and preparation of fresh frozen samples for NanoString analysis based on a study of a model of mouse mammary gland carcinoma and its lung metastasis. Our adaptation of LCM sample preparation and workflow to the requirements of the NanoString platform allowed acquiring samples with high RNA quality. The NanoString analysis of such samples provided sensitive detection of genes of interest and their associated molecular pathways. NanoString is a reliable gene expression analysis platform that can be effectively coupled with LCM. PMID:27077656

  18. Adaptation of Laser Microdissection Technique for the Study of a Spontaneous Metastatic Mammary Carcinoma Mouse Model by NanoString Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Saylor, Karen L.; Anver, Miriam R.; Salomon, David S.; Golubeva, Yelena G.

    2016-01-01

    Laser capture microdissection (LCM) of tissue is an established tool in medical research for collection of distinguished cell populations under direct microscopic visualization for molecular analysis. LCM samples have been successfully analyzed in a number of genomic and proteomic downstream molecular applications. However, LCM sample collection and preparation procedure has to be adapted to each downstream analysis platform. In this present manuscript we describe in detail the adaptation of LCM methodology for the collection and preparation of fresh frozen samples for NanoString analysis based on a study of a model of mouse mammary gland carcinoma and its lung metastasis. Our adaptation of LCM sample preparation and workflow to the requirements of the NanoString platform allowed acquiring samples with high RNA quality. The NanoString analysis of such samples provided sensitive detection of genes of interest and their associated molecular pathways. NanoString is a reliable gene expression analysis platform that can be effectively coupled with LCM. PMID:27077656

  19. Microdissection of black widow spider silk-producing glands.

    PubMed

    Jeffery, Felicia; La Mattina, Coby; Tuton-Blasingame, Tiffany; Hsia, Yang; Gnesa, Eric; Zhao, Liang; Franz, Andreas; Vierra, Craig

    2011-01-01

    case threads] and pyriform [produces attachment disc silk]. This approach is based upon anesthetizing the spider with carbon dioxide gas, subsequent separation of the cephalothorax from the abdomen, and microdissection of the abdomen to obtain the silk-producing glands. Following the separation of the different silk-producing glands, these tissues can be used to retrieve different macromolecules for distinct biochemical analyses, including quantitative real-time PCR, northern- and western blotting, mass spectrometry (MS or MS/MS) analyses to identify new silk protein sequences, search for proteins that participate in the silk assembly pathway, or use the intact tissue for cell culture or histological experiments. PMID:21248709

  20. Tissue Microarray Technology for Molecular Applications: Investigation of Cross-Contamination between Tissue Samples Obtained from the Same Punching Device

    PubMed Central

    Vassella, Erik; Galván, José A.; Zlobec, Inti

    2015-01-01

    Background: Tissue microarray (TMA) technology allows rapid visualization of molecular markers by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. In addition, TMA instrumentation has the potential to assist in other applications: punches taken from donor blocks can be placed directly into tubes and used for nucleic acid analysis by PCR approaches. However, the question of possible cross-contamination between samples punched with the same device has frequently been raised but never addressed. Methods: Two experiments were performed. (1) A block from mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) positivetissue and a second from an uninfected patient were aligned side-by-side in an automated tissue microarrayer. Four 0.6 mm punches were cored from each sample and placed inside their corresponding tube. Between coring of each donor block, a mechanical cleaning step was performed by insertion of the puncher into a paraffin block. This sequence of coring and cleaning was repeated three times, alternating between positive and negative blocks. A fragment from the 6110 insertion sequence specific for mycobacterium tuberculosis was analyzed; (2) Four 0.6 mm punches were cored from three KRAS mutated colorectal cancer blocks, alternating with three different wild-type tissues using the same TMA instrument (sequence of coring: G12D, WT, G12V, WT, G13D and WT). Mechanical cleaning of the device between each donor block was made. Mutation analysis by pyrosequencing was carried out. This sequence of coring was repeated manually without any cleaning step between blocks. Results/Discussion: In both analyses, all alternating samples showed the expected result (samples 1, 3 and 5: positive or mutated, samples 2, 4 and 6: negative or wild-type). Similar results were obtained without cleaning step. These findings suggest that no cross-contamination of tissue samples occurs when donor blocks are punched using the same device, however a cleaning step is nonetheless recommended. Our result supports

  1. Experimental implementation of coded aperture coherent scatter spectral imaging of cancerous and healthy breast tissue samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmanan, Manu N.; Greenberg, Joel A.; Samei, Ehsan; Kapadia, Anuj J.

    2015-03-01

    A fast and accurate scatter imaging technique to differentiate cancerous and healthy breast tissue is introduced in this work. Such a technique would have wide-ranging clinical applications from intra-operative margin assessment to breast cancer screening. Coherent Scatter Computed Tomography (CSCT) has been shown to differentiate cancerous from healthy tissue, but the need to raster scan a pencil beam at a series of angles and slices in order to reconstruct 3D images makes it prohibitively time consuming. In this work we apply the coded aperture coherent scatter spectral imaging technique to reconstruct 3D images of breast tissue samples from experimental data taken without the rotation usually required in CSCT. We present our experimental implementation of coded aperture scatter imaging, the reconstructed images of the breast tissue samples and segmentations of the 3D images in order to identify the cancerous and healthy tissue inside of the samples. We find that coded aperture scatter imaging is able to reconstruct images of the samples and identify the distribution of cancerous and healthy tissues (i.e., fibroglandular, adipose, or a mix of the two) inside of them. Coded aperture scatter imaging has the potential to provide scatter images that automatically differentiate cancerous and healthy tissue inside of ex vivo samples within a time on the order of a minute.

  2. Mitochondrial Respiration Chain Enzymatic Activities in the Human Brain: Methodological Implications for Tissue Sampling and Storage.

    PubMed

    Ronsoni, Marcelo Fernando; Remor, Aline Pertile; Lopes, Mark William; Hohl, Alexandre; Troncoso, Iris H Z; Leal, Rodrigo Bainy; Boos, Gustavo Luchi; Kondageski, Charles; Nunes, Jean Costa; Linhares, Marcelo Neves; Lin, Kátia; Latini, Alexandra Susana; Walz, Roger

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes enzymatic (MRCCE) activities were successfully evaluated in frozen brain samples. Epilepsy surgery offers an ethical opportunity to study human brain tissue surgically removed to treat drug resistant epilepsies. Epilepsy surgeries are done with hemodynamic and laboratory parameters to maintain physiology, but there are no studies analyzing the association among these parameters and MRCCE activities in the human brain tissue. We determined the intra-operative parameters independently associated with MRCCE activities in middle temporal neocortex (Cx), amygdala (AMY) and head of hippocampus (HIP) samples of patients (n = 23) who underwent temporal lobectomy using multiple linear regressions. MRCCE activities in Cx, AMY and HIP are differentially associated to trans-operative mean arterial blood pressure, O2 saturation, hemoglobin, and anesthesia duration to time of tissue sampling. The time-course between the last seizure occurrence and tissue sampling as well as the sample storage to biochemical assessments were also associated with enzyme activities. Linear regression models including these variables explain 13-17 % of MRCCE activities and show a moderate to strong effect (r = 0.37-0.82). Intraoperative hemodynamic and laboratory parameters as well as the time from last seizure to tissue sampling and storage time are associated with MRCCE activities in human samples from the Cx, AMYG and HIP. Careful control of these parameters is required to minimize confounding biases in studies using human brain samples collected from elective neurosurgery. PMID:26586405

  3. Culture methods of allograft musculoskeletal tissue samples in Australian bacteriology laboratories.

    PubMed

    Varettas, Kerry

    2013-12-01

    Samples of allograft musculoskeletal tissue are cultured by bacteriology laboratories to determine the presence of bacteria and fungi. In Australia, this testing is performed by 6 TGA-licensed clinical bacteriology laboratories with samples received from 10 tissue banks. Culture methods of swab and tissue samples employ a combination of solid agar and/or broth media to enhance micro-organism growth and maximise recovery. All six Australian laboratories receive Amies transport swabs and, except for one laboratory, a corresponding biopsy sample for testing. Three of the 6 laboratories culture at least one allograft sample directly onto solid agar. Only one laboratory did not use a broth culture for any sample received. An international literature review found that a similar combination of musculoskeletal tissue samples were cultured onto solid agar and/or broth media. Although variations of allograft musculoskeletal tissue samples, culture media and methods are used in Australian and international bacteriology laboratories, validation studies and method evaluations have challenged and supported their use in recovering fungi and aerobic and anaerobic bacteria.

  4. Heavy Metal Content in Thoracic Tissue Samples from Patients with and without NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Tran, Jessica Q; Dranikov, Alexandra; Iannucci, Anita; Wagner, Walter P; LoBello, Janine; Allen, Jeffrey; Weiss, Glen J

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Environmental factors expose an individual to heavy metals that may stimulate cancer growth preclinically including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Here, we examine the prevalence of four heavy metals present in postsurgical tissues from individuals with and without NSCLC. Materials and Methods. Thoracic tissue samples from two separate sample sets were analyzed for cadmium (Cd), arsenic (As), mercury (Hg), and lead (Pb) content. Results. In the first sample set, there was no significant measurable amount of Pb and Hg found in either NSCLC tissue or nonmalignant lung tissue samples. Cd was the most prevalent heavy metal and As was present in moderate amounts. In the second sample set, Cd was measurable across all tissue types taken from 28 NSCLC patients and significantly higher Cd was measurable in noncancer benign lung (n = 9). In the NSCLC samples, As was measurable in moderate amounts, while Hg and Pb amounts were negligible. Conclusion. Cd and As are present in lung tissues for patients with NSCLC. With existing preclinical evidence of their tumorigenecity, it is plausible that Cd and/or As may have an impact on NSCLC development. Additional studies examining the prevalence and association between smokers and nonsmokers are suggested. PMID:26316947

  5. Laser Capture Microdissection Revisited as a Tool for Transcriptomic Analysis: Application of an Excel-Based qPCR Preparation Software (PREXCEL-Q)

    PubMed Central

    Sow, Fatoumata B.; Gallup, Jack M.; Sacco, Randy E.; Ackermann, Mark R.

    2009-01-01

    The ability to reliably analyze cellular and molecular profiles of normal or diseased tissues is frequently complicated by the inherent heterogeneous nature of tissues. Laser Capture Microdissection (LCM) is an innovative technique that allows the isolation and enrichment of pure subpopulations of cells from tissues under direct microscopic examination. Material obtained by LCM can be used for downstream assays including gene microarrays, western blotting, cDNA library generation and DNA genotyping. We describe a series of LCM protocols for cell collection, RNA extraction and qPCR gene expression analysis. Using reagents we helped develop commercially, we focus on two LCM approaches: laser cutting and laser capture. Reagent calculations have been pre-determined for 10 samples using the new PREXCEL-Q assay development and project management software. One can expect the entire procedure for laser cutting coupled to qPCR to take approximately 12.5-15 h, and laser capture coupled to qPCR to take approximately 13.5-17.5 h. PMID:20556230

  6. Ex vivo confocal microscopy imaging to identify tumor tissue on freshly removed brain sample.

    PubMed

    Forest, Fabien; Cinotti, Elisa; Yvorel, Violaine; Habougit, Cyril; Vassal, François; Nuti, Christophe; Perrot, Jean-Luc; Labeille, Bruno; Péoc'h, Michel

    2015-09-01

    Confocal microscopy is a technique able to realize "optic sections" of a tissue with increasing applications. We wondered if we could apply an ex vivo confocal microscope designed for dermatological purpose in a routine use for the most frequent brain tumors. The aim of this work was to identify tumor tissue and its histopathological hallmarks, and to assess grading criteria used in neuropathological practice without tissue loss on freshly removed brain tissue. Seven infiltrating gliomas, nine meningiomas and three metastases of carcinomas were included. We compared imaging results obtained with the confocal microscope to frozen sections, smears and tissue sections of formalin-fixed tissue. Our results show that ex vivo confocal microscopy imaging can be applied to brain tumors in order to quickly identify tumor tissue without tissue loss. It can differentiate tumors and can assess most of grading criteria. Confocal microscopy could represent a new tool to identify tumor tissue on freshly removed sample and could help in selecting areas for biobanking of tumor tissue.

  7. Efficient and scalable serial extraction of DNA and RNA from frozen tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Mathot, Lucy; Lindman, Monica; Sjöblom, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    Advances in cancer genomics have created a demand for scalable sample processing. We here present a process for serial extraction of nucleic acids from the same frozen tissue sample based on magnetic silica particles. The process is automation friendly with high recoveries of pure DNA and RNA suitable for analysis.

  8. Terahertz spectroscopy and detection of brain tumor in rat fresh-tissue samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, S.; Fukushi, Y.; Kubota, O.; Itsuji, T.; Yamamoto, S.; Ouchi, T.

    2015-03-01

    Terahertz (THz) spectroscopy and imaging of biomedical samples is expected to be an important application of THz analysis techniques. Identification and localization of tumor tissue, imaging of biological samples, and analysis of DNA by THz spectroscopy have been reported. THz time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) is useful for obtaining the refractive index over a broad frequency range. However, THz-TDS spectra of fresh tissue samples are sensitive to procedures such as sample preparation, and a standardized measurement protocol is required. Therefore, in this work, we establish a protocol for measurements of THz spectra of fresh tissue and demonstrate reliable detection of rat brain tumor tissue. We use a reflection THz-TDS system to measure the refractive index spectra of the samples mounted on a quartz plate. The tissue samples were measured immediately after sectioning to avoid sample denaturalization during storage. Special care was taken in THz data processing to eliminate parasitic reflections and reduce noise. The error level in our refractive index measurements was as low as 0.02 in the frequency range 0.8-1.5 THz. With increasing frequency, the refractive index in the tumor and normal regions monotonically decreased, similarly to water, and it was 0.02 higher in the tumor regions. The spectral data suggest that the tumor regions have higher water content. Hematoxylin-eosin stained images showed that increased cell density was also responsible for the observed spectral features. A set of samples from 10 rats showed consistent results. Our results suggest that reliable tumor detection in fresh tissue without pretreatment is possible with THz spectroscopy measurements. THz spectroscopy has the potential to become a real-time in vivo diagnostic method.

  9. Sample Preparation for Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Plant Tissues: A Review.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yonghui; Li, Bin; Malitsky, Sergey; Rogachev, Ilana; Aharoni, Asaph; Kaftan, Filip; Svatoš, Aleš; Franceschi, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is a mass spectrometry based molecular ion imaging technique. It provides the means for ascertaining the spatial distribution of a large variety of analytes directly on tissue sample surfaces without any labeling or staining agents. These advantages make it an attractive molecular histology tool in medical, pharmaceutical, and biological research. Likewise, MSI has started gaining popularity in plant sciences; yet, information regarding sample preparation methods for plant tissues is still limited. Sample preparation is a crucial step that is directly associated with the quality and authenticity of the imaging results, it therefore demands in-depth studies based on the characteristics of plant samples. In this review, a sample preparation pipeline is discussed in detail and illustrated through selected practical examples. In particular, special concerns regarding sample preparation for plant imaging are critically evaluated. Finally, the applications of MSI techniques in plants are reviewed according to different classes of plant metabolites. PMID:26904042

  10. Sample Preparation for Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Plant Tissues: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yonghui; Li, Bin; Malitsky, Sergey; Rogachev, Ilana; Aharoni, Asaph; Kaftan, Filip; Svatoš, Aleš; Franceschi, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is a mass spectrometry based molecular ion imaging technique. It provides the means for ascertaining the spatial distribution of a large variety of analytes directly on tissue sample surfaces without any labeling or staining agents. These advantages make it an attractive molecular histology tool in medical, pharmaceutical, and biological research. Likewise, MSI has started gaining popularity in plant sciences; yet, information regarding sample preparation methods for plant tissues is still limited. Sample preparation is a crucial step that is directly associated with the quality and authenticity of the imaging results, it therefore demands in-depth studies based on the characteristics of plant samples. In this review, a sample preparation pipeline is discussed in detail and illustrated through selected practical examples. In particular, special concerns regarding sample preparation for plant imaging are critically evaluated. Finally, the applications of MSI techniques in plants are reviewed according to different classes of plant metabolites. PMID:26904042

  11. A tissue fixative that protects macromolecules (DNA, RNA, and protein) and histomorphology in clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Vincek, Vladimir; Nassiri, Mehdi; Nadji, Mehrdad; Morales, Azorides R

    2003-10-01

    Preservation of macromolecules (DNA, RNA, and proteins) in tissue is traditionally achieved by immediate freezing of the sample. Although isolation of PCR-able RNA has been reported from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues, the process has not been shown to be reproducible because high molecular weight RNA is usually degraded. We investigated the potential value of a new universal molecular fixative (UMFIX, Sakura Finetek USA, Inc., Torrance, California) in preservation of macromolecules in paraffin-embedded tissue. Mouse and human tissues were fixed in UMFIX from 1 hour to 8 weeks. They were then processed by a rapid tissue processing (RTP) system, embedded in paraffin, and evaluated for routine histology as well as for the quality and quantity of DNA, RNA, and proteins. Formalin-fixed tissues were processed by RTP and evaluated in a similar manner. Fresh-frozen samples were used as controls. The morphology of UMFIX-exposed tissue was comparable to that fixed in formalin. High molecular weight RNA was preserved in tissue that was immediately fixed in UMFIX and stored from 1 hour to 8 weeks at room temperature. There were no significant differences between UMFIX-exposed and frozen tissues on PCR, RT-PCR, real-time PCR, and expression microarrays. Similarly, physical and antigenic preservation of proteins in UMFIX tissue was similar to fresh state. Both RNA and proteins were substantially degraded in formalin-fixed and similarly processed specimens. We concluded that it is now possible to preserve histomorphology and intact macromolecules in the same archival paraffin-embedded tissue through the use of a novel fixative and a rapid processing system.

  12. MALDI direct analysis and imaging of frozen versus FFPE tissues: what strategy for which sample?

    PubMed

    Wisztorski, Maxence; Franck, Julien; Salzet, Michel; Fournier, Isabelle

    2010-01-01

    Significant advances have been made in the past decade in the field of mass spectrometry imaging with MALDI ion sources (MALDI-MSI). While MALDI-MSI has high potential in the field of biology and in the clinic, a challenge for MALDI-MSI has been to adapt itself to a greater range of sample types. In particular, much of the biological archived materials for pathology studies are tissue biopsies fixed with paraformaldehyde and embedded in paraffin (FFPE tissues) because of the high stability of such samples. Thus, there has been a need to develop strategies for analyzing FFPE samples as this would allow retrospective studies of past clinical cases on large cohorts of existing samples. Obviously, PAF fixation, by inducing protein cross-linking, causes problems for molecular analysis by MS. We developed on tissue digestion strategies for overcoming these difficulties and allowing molecular data to be retrieved from FFPE samples no matter how long they have been stored. These digestion strategies preserve localization from digested proteins making MALDI-MSI of proteins possible by monitoring the resulting peptides. We present methods and protocols for FFPE samples. These strategies have proven to be valuable for all tested FFPE samples and have opened archived tissues from hospital banks to MALDI-MSI.

  13. Broth versus solid agar culture of swab samples of cadaveric allograft musculoskeletal tissue.

    PubMed

    Varettas, Kerry

    2013-12-01

    As part of the donor assessment protocol, bioburden assessment must be performed on allograft musculoskeletal tissue samples collected at the time of tissue retrieval. Swab samples of musculoskeletal tissue allografts from cadaveric donors are received at the microbiology department of the South Eastern Area Laboratory Services (Australia) to determine the presence of bacteria and fungi. This study will review the isolation rate of organisms from solid agar and broth culture of swab samples of cadaveric allograft musculoskeletal tissue over a 6-year period, 2006-2011. Swabs were inoculated onto horse blood agar (anaerobic, 35 °C) and chocolate agar (CO2, 35 °C) and then placed into a cooked meat broth (aerobic, 35 °C). A total of 1,912 swabs from 389 donors were received during the study period. 557 (29.1 %) swabs were culture positive with the isolation of 713 organisms, 249 (34.9 %) from solid agar culture and an additional 464 (65.1 %) from broth culture only. This study has shown that the broth culture of cadaveric allograft musculoskeletal swab samples recovered a greater amount of organisms than solid agar culture. Isolates such as Clostridium species and Staphylococcus aureus would not have been isolated from solid agar culture alone. Broth culture is an essential part of the bioburden assessment protocol of swab samples of cadaveric allograft musculoskeletal tissue in this laboratory.

  14. Isolation of single Chlamydia-infected cells using laser microdissection.

    PubMed

    Podgorny, Oleg V; Polina, Nadezhda F; Babenko, Vladislav V; Karpova, Irina Y; Kostryukova, Elena S; Govorun, Vadim M; Lazarev, Vassili N

    2015-02-01

    Chlamydia are obligate intracellular parasites of humans and animals that cause a wide range of acute and chronic infections. To elucidate the genetic basis of chlamydial parasitism, several approaches for making genetic modifications to Chlamydia have recently been reported. However, the lack of the available methods for the fast and effective selection of genetically modified bacteria restricts the application of genetic tools. We suggest the use of laser microdissection to isolate of single live Chlamydia-infected cells for the re-cultivation and whole-genome sequencing of single inclusion-derived Chlamydia. To visualise individual infected cells, we made use of the vital labelling of inclusions with the fluorescent Golgi-specific dye BODIPY® FL C5-ceramide. We demonstrated that single Chlamydia-infected cells isolated by laser microdissection and placed onto a host cell monolayer resulted in new cycles of infection. We also demonstrated the successful use of whole-genome sequencing to study the genomic variability of Chlamydia derived from a single inclusion. Our work provides the first evidence of the successful use of laser microdissection for the isolation of single live Chlamydia-infected cells, thus demonstrating that this method can help overcome the barriers to the fast and effective selection of Chlamydia.

  15. An antigen trapping ELISA for the detection of capripoxvirus in tissue culture supernatant and biopsy samples.

    PubMed

    Carn, V M

    1995-01-01

    A trapping ELISA for the detection of capripoxvirus antigen in tissue culture supernatant and biopsy material was developed, using a guinea-pig polyclonal detector antiserum raised against a recombinant capripoxvirus specific antigen, expressed in Escherichia coli using the plasmid vector pGEX-2T. The ELISA detected antigen in tissue culture samples that on virus titration contained equal to or in excess of 10(2.8) TCID50/ml. Virus isolation and ELISA were compared for the detection of capripoxvirus in skin biopsy samples from sheep, goats and cattle. The ELISA compared well with virus isolation, and has applications as a diagnostic test. This assay reduces the reliance of diagnostic laboratories on tissue culture facilities, and can be used to confirm the presence of capripoxvirus in tissue culture.

  16. Detection of Slit2 promoter hypermethylation in tissue and serum samples from breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ga-Eon; Lee, Kyung Hwa; Choi, Yoo Duk; Lee, Ji Shin; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Nam, Jong Hee; Choi, Chan; Park, Min Ho; Yoon, Jung Han

    2011-10-01

    Promoter hypermethylation has been shown to be a common mechanism for inactivation of tumor suppressor genes in breast cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of Slit2 promoter hypermethylation in both the tumor and serum samples of breast cancer patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) or invasive breast carcinoma (IBC). The methylation status of Slit2 was investigated in 210 tissue samples (15 breast with no pathological findings, 26 DCIS, and 169 IBC samples) and 123 corresponding serum samples (15 breast with no pathological findings, 26 DCIS, and 82 IBC samples) using methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction. Immunohistochemical staining for Slit2 was also performed using tissue microarray blocks to determine whether Slit2 promoter hypermethylation correlated with loss of Slit2 expression. Slit2 promoter hypermethylation was not detected in breast tissue and serum samples from patients with no pathological findings. DCIS or IBC showed a statistically higher frequency of Slit2 promoter hypermethylation compared to breast with no pathological findings in both the tissue and serum samples; however, there were no statistically significant differences between DCIS and IBC samples. Similar Slit2 promoter hypermethylation patterns were seen in the tissue samples and corresponding serum specimens (p < 0.001). Slit2 promoter hypermethylation was associated with loss of Slit2 expression. These results suggest that Slit2 promoter hypermethylation appears to be responsible for functionally silencing Slit2 expression. Slit2 promoter hypermethylation may be considered as a possible serum marker for early detection of breast cancer.

  17. X-ray scattering for the characterization of lyophilized breast tissue samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elshemey, Wael M.; Mohamed, Fayrouz S.; Khater, Ibrahim M.

    2013-09-01

    This work investigates the possibility of characterizing breast cancer by measuring the X-ray scattering profiles of lyophilized excised breast tissue samples. Since X-ray scattering from water-rich tissue is dominated by scattering from water, the removal of water by lyophilization would enhance the characterization process. In the present study, X-ray scattering profiles of 22 normal, 22 malignant and 10 benign breast tissue samples are measured. The cut-offs of scatter diagrams, sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy of three characterization parameters (full width at half maximum (FWHM) for the peak at 1.1 nm-1, area under curve (AUC), and ratio of 1st to 2nd scattering peak intensities (I1/I2%)) are calculated and compared to the data from non-lyophilized samples. Results show increased sensitivity (up to 100%) of the present data on lyophilized breast tissue samples compared to previously reported data for non-lyophilized samples while the specificity (up to 95.4%), diagnostic accuracy (up to 95.4%) and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve values (up to 0.9979) for both sets of data are comparable. The present study shows significant differences between normal samples and each of malignant and benign samples. Only subtle differences exist between malignant and benign lyophilized breast tissue samples where FWHM=0.7±0.1 and 0.8±0.3, AUC=1.3±0.2 and 1.4±0.2 and I1/I2%=44.9±11.0 and 52.4±7.6 for malignant and benign samples respectively.

  18. Effects of formalin fixation on tissue optical properties of in-vitro brain samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Suresh; Cicchi, Riccardo; Martelli, Fabrizio; Giordano, Flavio; Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Guerrini, Renzo; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2015-03-01

    Application of light spectroscopy based techniques for the detection of cancers have emerged as a promising approach for tumor diagnostics. In-vivo or freshly excised samples are normally used for point spectroscopic studies. However, ethical issues related to in-vivo studies, rapid decay of surgically excised tissues and sample availability puts a limitation on in-vivo and in-vitro studies. There has been a few studies reported on the application of formalin fixed samples with good discrimination capability. Usually formalin fixation is performed to prevent degradation of tissues after surgical resection. Fixing tissues in formalin prevents cell death by forming cross-linkages with proteins. Previous investigations have revealed that washing tissues fixed in formalin using phosphate buffered saline is known to reduce the effects of formalin during spectroscopic measurements. But this could not be the case with reflectance measurements. Hemoglobin is a principal absorbing medium in biological tissues in the visible range. Formalin fixation causes hemoglobin to seep out from red blood cells. Also, there could be alterations in the refractive index of tissues when fixed in formalin. In this study, we propose to investigate the changes in tissue optical properties between freshly excised and formalin fixed brain tissues. The results indicate a complete change in the spectral profile in the visible range where hemoglobin has its maximum absorption peaks. The characteristic bands of oxy-hemoglobin at 540, 580 nm and deoxy-hemoglobin at 555 nm disappear in the case of samples fixed in formalin. In addition, an increased spectral intensity was observed for the wavelengths greater than 650 nm where scattering phenomena are presumed to dominate.

  19. Comparison of organochlorine residues in human adipose tissue autopsy samples from two Ontario municipalities

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D.T.; LeBel, G.L.; Junkins, E.

    1984-01-01

    Human adipose tissue samples obtained during autopsies in a Canadian Great Lakes community, Kingston, Ontario, and a second community, Ottawa, Ontario, were analyzed for organochlorine pesticides, polychlorobiphenyls, chlorobenzenes, and chlorophenols. Significantly different levels of Dichlorodiphenyl-dichlorethane, mirex, hexachlorobenzene, and 2,3,4,6-tetrachlorophenol were found in Kingston adipose tissues compared to Ottawa tissues. Residue levels of oxychlordane, mirex, and polychlorinated biphenyls were significantly different in Kingston males versus Kingston females. The means and ranges of residue levels were contrasted with those reported in previous Canadian surveys.

  20. Characteristics of electrically injured skin from human hand tissue samples using Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Shi-Ying; Zou, Dong-Hua; Luo, Yi-Wen; Sun, Qi-Ran; Deng, Kai-Fei; Chen, Yi-Jiu; Huang, Ping

    2014-01-01

    This technical note describes a method for distinguishing normal skin tissue samples from those electrically injured by Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIR MSP). Furthermore, the infrared spectral features of electrically injured cells and tissues were evaluated to identify molecular changes in epidermal cells. In the present study, 20 human hand tissue samples were evaluated macroscopically and histopathologically. The electrically injured skin samples were subdivided into 2 regions [normal cell regions (NCRs) and polarized cell regions (PCRs)] and 14 major spectral absorption bands were selected. The spectral results showed that the band absorbance at 1080, 1126, 1172, 1242, 1307, 1403, 1456, 1541, 2852, 2925, 2957, 3075, and 3300cm(-1) increased significantly both in the stratum and non-stratum corneum of the PCRs in electrically injured skin tissues samples. No significant difference was found between normal skin and the NCR of the electrically injured skin samples. The band absorbance ratios of A1172/A1126, A1456/A1403, and A2925/A2957 were significantly increased, whereas the A1652/A1541 ratio was decreased in the PCR of the stratum corneum and non-stratum corneum. Baseline changes from 4000 to near 1737cm(-1) were observed in the spectra of the electrically injured skin samples, which were interpreted in terms of the pathological process involved in electrical injury. FTIR-MSP presents a useful method to provide objective spectral markers for the assisted diagnosis of electrical marks.

  1. Quantitative mapping of collagen fiber alignment in thick tissue samples using transmission polarized-light microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yakovlev, Dmitry D; Shvachkina, Marina E; Sherman, Maria M; Spivak, Andrey V; Pravdin, Alexander B; Yakovlev, Dmitry A

    2016-07-01

    Immersion optical clearing makes it possible to use transmission polarized-light microscopy for characterization of thick (200 to 2000  μm) layers of biological tissues. We discuss polarization properties of thick samples in the context of the problem of characterization of collagen fiber alignment in connective tissues such as sclera and dermis. Optical chirality caused by azimuthal variations of the macroscopic (effective) optic axis of the medium across the sample thickness should be considered in polarization mapping of thick samples of these tissues. We experimentally evaluate to what extent the optical chirality affects the measurement results in typical situations and show under what conditions it can be easily taken into account and does not hinder, but rather helps, in characterization of collagen fiber alignment.

  2. Quantitative mapping of collagen fiber alignment in thick tissue samples using transmission polarized-light microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovlev, Dmitry D.; Shvachkina, Marina E.; Sherman, Maria M.; Spivak, Andrey V.; Pravdin, Alexander B.; Yakovlev, Dmitry A.

    2016-07-01

    Immersion optical clearing makes it possible to use transmission polarized-light microscopy for characterization of thick (200 to 2000 μm) layers of biological tissues. We discuss polarization properties of thick samples in the context of the problem of characterization of collagen fiber alignment in connective tissues such as sclera and dermis. Optical chirality caused by azimuthal variations of the macroscopic (effective) optic axis of the medium across the sample thickness should be considered in polarization mapping of thick samples of these tissues. We experimentally evaluate to what extent the optical chirality affects the measurement results in typical situations and show under what conditions it can be easily taken into account and does not hinder, but rather helps, in characterization of collagen fiber alignment.

  3. Isolation of high quality protein samples from punches of formalin fixed and paraffin embedded tissue blocks.

    PubMed

    Kroll, J; Becker, K F; Kuphal, S; Hein, R; Hofstädter, F; Bosserhoff, A K

    2008-04-01

    In general, it is believed that the extraction of proteins from formalin-fixed paraffin embedded samples is not feasible. However, recently a new technique was developed, presenting the extraction of non-degraded, full length proteins from formalin fixed tissues, usable for western blotting and protein arrays. In the study presented here, we applied this technique to punch biopsies of formalin fixed tissues embedded in paraffin to reduce heterogeneity of the tissue represented in sections, and to ensure analysing mainly defined cellular material. Successful extraction was achieved even from very small samples (0.7 mm(3)). Additionally, we were able to detect highly glycosylated proteins and protein modification, such as phosphorylation. Interestingly, with this technique it is feasible to extract high quality proteins from 14 year old samples. In summary, the new technique makes a great pool of material now usable for molecular analysis with high throughput tools. PMID:18228195

  4. Method for the detection of desmethylbromethalin in animal tissue samples for the determination of bromethalin exposure.

    PubMed

    Filigenzi, Michael S; Bautista, Adrienne C; Aston, Linda S; Poppenga, Robert H

    2015-06-01

    Bromethalin, a potent neurotoxin, is widely available for use as a rodenticide. As access to other rodenticides is reduced due to regulatory pressure, the use of bromethalin is likely to increase with a concomitant increase in poisonings in nontarget animals. Analytical methods for the detection of bromethalin residues in animals suspected to have been exposed to this rodenticide are needed to support post-mortem diagnosis of toxicosis. This paper describes a novel method for the analysis of desmethylbromethalin (DMB), bromethalin's toxic metabolite, in tissue samples such as liver, brain, and adipose. Samples were extracted with 5% ethanol in ethyl acetate, and an aliquot of the extract was evaporated dry, reconstituted, and analyzed by reverse phase ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The mass spectrometer utilized electrospray ionization in negative ion mode with multiple reaction monitoring. This method was qualitatively validated at a level of 1.0 ng/g in liver tissue. The quantitative potential of the method was also evaluated, and a method detection limit of 0.35 ng/g wet weight was determined in fat tissue. DMB was detected in tissue samples from animals suspected to have been poisoned by this compound. To the authors' knowledge, there have been no other methods reported for analysis of DMB in tissue samples using LC-MS/MS. PMID:25688571

  5. Sample processing considerations for detecting copy number changes in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Sharoni

    2012-11-01

    The Whole Genome Sampling Analysis (WGSA) assay in combination with Affymetrix GeneChip Mapping Arrays is used for copy number analysis of high-quality DNA samples (i.e., samples that have been collected from blood, fresh or frozen tissue, or cell lines). Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples, however, represent the most prevalent form of archived clinical samples, but they provide additional challenges for molecular assays. FFPE processing usually results in the degradation of FFPE DNA and in the contamination and chemical modification of these DNA samples. Because of these issues, FFPE DNA is not suitable for all molecular assays designed for high-quality DNA samples. Strategies recommended for processing FFPE DNA samples through WGSA and to the Mapping arrays are described here. PMID:23118355

  6. Sample processing considerations for detecting copy number changes in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Sharoni

    2012-11-01

    The Whole Genome Sampling Analysis (WGSA) assay in combination with Affymetrix GeneChip Mapping Arrays is used for copy number analysis of high-quality DNA samples (i.e., samples that have been collected from blood, fresh or frozen tissue, or cell lines). Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples, however, represent the most prevalent form of archived clinical samples, but they provide additional challenges for molecular assays. FFPE processing usually results in the degradation of FFPE DNA and in the contamination and chemical modification of these DNA samples. Because of these issues, FFPE DNA is not suitable for all molecular assays designed for high-quality DNA samples. Strategies recommended for processing FFPE DNA samples through WGSA and to the Mapping arrays are described here.

  7. Improved method for extraction and detection of Helicobacter pylori DNA in formalin-fixed paraffin embedded gastric biopsies using laser micro-dissection

    PubMed Central

    Loayza, María Fernanda; Villavicencio, Fernando Xavier; Santander, Stephanie Carolina; Baldeón, Manuel; Ponce, Lourdes Karina; Salvador, Iván; Vivar Díaz, Nicolás

    2014-01-01

    To assess the molecular events exerted by Helicobacter pylori interacting directly with gastric epithelial cells, an improved procedure for microbial DNA isolation from stained hematoxilin-eosin gastric biopsies was developed based on laser micro-dissection (LM) [1]. Few articles have described the use of LM to select and detect H. pylori genome from formalin-fixed paraffin embedded gastric tissue [2]. To improve the yield and quality of DNA isolated from H. pylori contacting intestinal epithelial cells, the following conditions were established after modification of the QIAamp DNA Micro kit. • Use of at least 25 cut sections of 10–20 μm of diameter and 3 μm thick with more than 10 bacteria in each cut. • Lysis with 30 μL of tissue lysis buffer and 20 μL of proteinase K (PK) with the tube in an upside-down position. • The use of thin purification columns with 35 μL of elution buffer. The mean of DNA concentration obtained from 25 LM cut sections was 1.94± 0 .16 ng/μL, and it was efficiently amplified with qPCR in a Bio Rad iCycler instrument. The LM can improve the sample selection and DNA extraction for molecular analysis of H. pylori associated with human gastric epithelium. PMID:26150965

  8. Improved method for extraction and detection of Helicobacter pylori DNA in formalin-fixed paraffin embedded gastric biopsies using laser micro-dissection.

    PubMed

    Loayza, María Fernanda; Villavicencio, Fernando Xavier; Santander, Stephanie Carolina; Baldeón, Manuel; Ponce, Lourdes Karina; Salvador, Iván; Vivar Díaz, Nicolás

    2015-01-01

    To assess the molecular events exerted by Helicobacter pylori interacting directly with gastric epithelial cells, an improved procedure for microbial DNA isolation from stained hematoxilin-eosin gastric biopsies was developed based on laser micro-dissection (LM) [1]. Few articles have described the use of LM to select and detect H. pylori genome from formalin-fixed paraffin embedded gastric tissue [2]. To improve the yield and quality of DNA isolated from H. pylori contacting intestinal epithelial cells, the following conditions were established after modification of the QIAamp DNA Micro kit. •Use of at least 25 cut sections of 10-20 μm of diameter and 3 μm thick with more than 10 bacteria in each cut.•Lysis with 30 μL of tissue lysis buffer and 20 μL of proteinase K (PK) with the tube in an upside-down position.•The use of thin purification columns with 35 μL of elution buffer. The mean of DNA concentration obtained from 25 LM cut sections was 1.94± 0 .16 ng/μL, and it was efficiently amplified with qPCR in a Bio Rad iCycler instrument. The LM can improve the sample selection and DNA extraction for molecular analysis of H. pylori associated with human gastric epithelium.

  9. Collecting and Storing Tissue, Blood, and Bone Marrow Samples From Patients With Rhabdomyosarcoma or Other Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-23

    Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma; Childhood Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Chordoma; Desmoid Tumor; Metastatic Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Nonmetastatic Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Previously Untreated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage I Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage II Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

  10. Automated MALDI matrix coating system for multiple tissue samples for imaging mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mounfield, William P; Garrett, Timothy J

    2012-03-01

    Uniform matrix deposition on tissue samples for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) is key for reproducible analyte ion signals. Current methods often result in nonhomogenous matrix deposition, and take time and effort to produce acceptable ion signals. Here we describe a fully-automated method for matrix deposition using an enclosed spray chamber and spray nozzle for matrix solution delivery. A commercial air-atomizing spray nozzle was modified and combined with solenoid controlled valves and a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) to control and deliver the matrix solution. A spray chamber was employed to contain the nozzle, sample, and atomized matrix solution stream, and to prevent any interference from outside conditions as well as allow complete control of the sample environment. A gravity cup was filled with MALDI matrix solutions, including DHB in chloroform/methanol (50:50) at concentrations up to 60 mg/mL. Various samples (including rat brain tissue sections) were prepared using two deposition methods (spray chamber, inkjet). A linear ion trap equipped with an intermediate-pressure MALDI source was used for analyses. Optical microscopic examination showed a uniform coating of matrix crystals across the sample. Overall, the mass spectral images gathered from tissues coated using the spray chamber system were of better quality and more reproducible than from tissue specimens prepared by the inkjet deposition method.

  11. Rapid mass spectrometric conversion of tissue biopsy samples into permanent quantitative digital proteome maps

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Tiannan; Kouvonen, Petri; Koh, Ching Chiek; Gillet, Ludovic C; Wolski, Witold E; Röst, Hannes L; Rosenberger, George; Collins, Ben C; Blum, Lorenz C; Gillessen, Silke; Joerger, Markus; Jochum, Wolfram; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2015-01-01

    Clinical specimens are each inherently unique, limited and non-renewable. As such, small samples such as tissue biopsies are often completely consumed after a limited number of analyses. Here we present a method that enables fast and reproducible conversion of a small amount of tissue (approximating the quantity obtained by a biopsy) into a single, permanent digital file representing the mass spectrometry-measurable proteome of the sample. The method combines pressure cycling technology (PCT) and SWATH mass spectrometry (MS), and the resulting proteome maps can be analyzed, re-analyzed, compared and mined in silico to detect and quantify specific proteins across multiple samples. We used this method to process and convert 18 biopsy samples from 9 renal cell carcinoma patients into SWATH-MS fragment ion maps. From these proteome maps we detected and quantified more than 2,000 proteins with a high degree of reproducibility across all samples. The identified proteins clearly separated tumorous kidney tissues from healthy tissue, and differentiated distinct histomorphological kidney cancer subtypes. PMID:25730263

  12. Automated MALDI Matrix Coating System for Multiple Tissue Samples for Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mounfield, William P.; Garrett, Timothy J.

    2012-03-01

    Uniform matrix deposition on tissue samples for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) is key for reproducible analyte ion signals. Current methods often result in nonhomogenous matrix deposition, and take time and effort to produce acceptable ion signals. Here we describe a fully-automated method for matrix deposition using an enclosed spray chamber and spray nozzle for matrix solution delivery. A commercial air-atomizing spray nozzle was modified and combined with solenoid controlled valves and a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) to control and deliver the matrix solution. A spray chamber was employed to contain the nozzle, sample, and atomized matrix solution stream, and to prevent any interference from outside conditions as well as allow complete control of the sample environment. A gravity cup was filled with MALDI matrix solutions, including DHB in chloroform/methanol (50:50) at concentrations up to 60 mg/mL. Various samples (including rat brain tissue sections) were prepared using two deposition methods (spray chamber, inkjet). A linear ion trap equipped with an intermediate-pressure MALDI source was used for analyses. Optical microscopic examination showed a uniform coating of matrix crystals across the sample. Overall, the mass spectral images gathered from tissues coated using the spray chamber system were of better quality and more reproducible than from tissue specimens prepared by the inkjet deposition method.

  13. Capillary separations enabling tissue proteomics-based biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Guo, Tong; Lee, Cheng S; Wang, Weijie; DeVoe, Don L; Balgley, Brian M

    2006-09-01

    Development of the capability to enable large-scale proteome studies, analogous to comprehensive gene expression analysis, will clearly have far-reaching impacts on protein biomarker investigations of human diseases such as cancer through interrogation of the archived fresh frozen and formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue collections. This review therefore focuses on the most recent advances in microdissection techniques and proteome platforms for procuring homogeneous subpopulations of tumor cells or structures and performing comprehensive analysis of protein profiles within tissue specimens, respectively. Developments in capillary separations capable of providing extremely high resolving power and selective analyte enrichment are particularly highlighted for their roles within the broader context of a state-of-the-art integrated tissue proteome effort. The capabilities of CIEF-based multidimensional separations for performing proteome analysis from minute samples create new opportunities in the pursuit of biomarker discovery using enriched and selected cell populations procured from tissue specimens. These proteome technological advances combined with recently developed tissue microdissection techniques provide powerful tools for those seeking to gain a greater understanding at the global level of the cellular machinery associated with human diseases such as cancer.

  14. Rapid quantification of inflammation in tissue samples using perfluorocarbon emulsion and fluorine-19 nuclear magnetic resonance

    PubMed Central

    Ahrens, Eric T.; Young, Won-Bin; Xu, Hongyan; Pusateri, Lisa K.

    2016-01-01

    Quantification of inflammation in tissue samples can be a time-intensive bottleneck in therapeutic discovery and preclinical endeavors. We describe a versatile and rapid approach to quantitatively assay macrophage burden in intact tissue samples. Perfluorocarbon (PFC) emulsion is injected intravenously, and the emulsion droplets are effectively taken up by monocytes and macrophages. These ‘in situ’ labeled cells participate in inflammatory events in vivo resulting in PFC accumulation at inflammatory loci. Necropsied tissues or intact organs are subjected to conventional fluorine-19 (19F) NMR spectroscopy to quantify the total fluorine content per sample, proportional to the macrophage burden. We applied these methods to a rat model of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) exhibiting extensive inflammation and demyelination in the central nervous system (CNS), particularly in the spinal cord. In a cohort of EAE rats, we used 19F NMR to derive an inflammation index (IFI) in intact CNS tissues. Immunohistochemistry was used to confirm intracellular colocalization of the PFC droplets within CNS CD68+ cells having macrophage morphology. The IFI linearly correlated to mRNA levels of CD68 via real-time PCR analysis. This 19F NMR approach can accelerate tissue analysis by at least an order of magnitude compared with histological approaches. PMID:21548906

  15. Fertilization of C57BL/6 mouse sperm collected from cauda epididymides after preservation or transportation at 4 degrees C using laser-microdissected oocytes.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Takehito; Fukumoto, Kiyoko; Haruguchi, Yukie; Kondo, Tomoko; Machida, Hiromi; Koga, Mika; Nakagawa, Yoshiko; Tsuchiyama, Shuuji; Saiki, Kiyora; Noshiba, Shiho; Nakagata, Naomi

    2009-08-01

    The C57BL/6 mouse is commonly used to produce transgenic and knockout strains for biomedical research. However, the motility and fertility of its sperm decrease markedly with freezing. Short-term preservation of sperm without freezing can avoid this. Furthermore, such samples can be transported safety without the special skills or equipment needed for the transportation of live animals or frozen products. We evaluated the motility and fertility of sperm collected from cauda epididymides after preservation or transportation at 4 degrees C. Oocytes with the zona pellucida subjected to laser-microdissection were used to assist fertilization in vitro. Although the motility of sperm gradually decreased with storage (P<0.05), no disruption of the sperm plasma membrane was seen. The proportion of zona-intact oocytes fertilized with sperm preserved for 0, 24, 48 and 72h were 70, 14, 5 and 1%, respectively. On the other hand, 45, 20 and 14% of laser-microdissected oocytes were fertilized by sperm preserved for 24, 48 and 72h, respectively (P<0.05). The fertility of sperm collected from cauda epididymides of two transgenic strains after transportation at 4 degrees C were also significantly increased using laser-microdissected oocytes rather than zona-intact oocytes (57 and 68% vs. 5%, P<0.05). Efficient production of offspring from sperm preserved or transported at 4 degrees C was achieved using laser-microdissected oocytes. Thus the fertility of sperm preserved or transported at 4 degrees C could be maintained, although motility gradually decreased with storage. Laser-microdissected oocytes will contribute to the efficient production of embryos and offspring using such preserved sperm samples.

  16. Semiquantitative determination of polychlorinated biphenyls in tissue samples by thin layer chromatography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mulhern, B.M.; Cromartie, E.; Reichel, W.L.; Belisle, A.A.

    1971-01-01

    A method is described for the analysis of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) compounds in tissue samples. Cleanup by hexane-aceto-nitrile partitioning and Florisil column chromatography are performed on samples before oxidative treatment to convert DDE to DCBP. PCB components are then determined semi-quantitatively by TLC. No prior separation of PCB from chlorinated pesticides is required. The lower limit of sensitivity is 0.2 ?g.

  17. Three Dimensional Imaging of Paraffin Embedded Human Lung Tissue Samples by Micro-Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Anna E.; Vasilescu, Dragos M.; Seal, Katherine A. D.; Keyes, Samuel D.; Mavrogordato, Mark N.; Hogg, James C.; Sinclair, Ian; Warner, Jane A.; Hackett, Tillie-Louise; Lackie, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Understanding the three-dimensional (3-D) micro-architecture of lung tissue can provide insights into the pathology of lung disease. Micro computed tomography (µCT) has previously been used to elucidate lung 3D histology and morphometry in fixed samples that have been stained with contrast agents or air inflated and dried. However, non-destructive microstructural 3D imaging of formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissues would facilitate retrospective analysis of extensive tissue archives of lung FFPE lung samples with linked clinical data. Methods FFPE human lung tissue samples (n = 4) were scanned using a Nikon metrology µCT scanner. Semi-automatic techniques were used to segment the 3D structure of airways and blood vessels. Airspace size (mean linear intercept, Lm) was measured on µCT images and on matched histological sections from the same FFPE samples imaged by light microscopy to validate µCT imaging. Results The µCT imaging protocol provided contrast between tissue and paraffin in FFPE samples (15mm x 7mm). Resolution (voxel size 6.7 µm) in the reconstructed images was sufficient for semi-automatic image segmentation of airways and blood vessels as well as quantitative airspace analysis. The scans were also used to scout for regions of interest, enabling time-efficient preparation of conventional histological sections. The Lm measurements from µCT images were not significantly different to those from matched histological sections. Conclusion We demonstrated how non-destructive imaging of routinely prepared FFPE samples by laboratory µCT can be used to visualize and assess the 3D morphology of the lung including by morphometric analysis. PMID:26030902

  18. Phase-contrast Hounsfield units of fixated and non-fixated soft-tissue samples

    SciTech Connect

    Willner, Marian; Fior, Gabriel; Marschner, Mathias; Birnbacher, Lorenz; Schock, Jonathan; Braun, Christian; Fingerle, Alexander A.; Noël, Peter B.; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Pfeiffer, Franz; Herzen, Julia; Rozhkova, Elena A.

    2015-08-31

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging is a novel technology that achieves high soft-tissue contrast. Although its clinical impact is still under investigation, the technique may potentially improve clinical diagnostics. In conventional attenuation-based X-ray computed tomography, radiological diagnostics are quantified by Hounsfield units. Corresponding Hounsfield units for phase-contrast imaging have been recently introduced, enabling a setup-independent comparison and standardized interpretation of imaging results. Thus far, the experimental values of few tissue types have been reported; these values have been determined from fixated tissue samples. This study presents phase-contrast Hounsfield units for various types of non-fixated human soft tissues. A large variety of tissue specimens ranging from adipose, muscle and connective tissues to liver, kidney and pancreas tissues were imaged by a grating interferometer with a rotating-anode X-ray tube and a photon-counting detector. In addition, we investigated the effects of formalin fixation on the quantitative phase-contrast imaging results.

  19. Evaluation of frozen tissue-derived prognostic gene expression signatures in FFPE colorectal cancer samples

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jing; Deane, Natasha G.; Lewis, Keeli B.; Padmanabhan, Chandrasekhar; Washington, M. Kay; Ciombor, Kristen K.; Timmers, Cynthia; Goldberg, Richard M.; Beauchamp, R. Daniel; Chen, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Defining molecular features that can predict the recurrence of colorectal cancer (CRC) for stage II-III patients remains challenging in cancer research. Most available clinical samples are Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded (FFPE). NanoString nCounter® and Affymetrix GeneChip® Human Transcriptome Array 2.0 (HTA) are the two platforms marketed for high-throughput gene expression profiling for FFPE samples. In this study, to evaluate the gene expression of frozen tissue-derived prognostic signatures in FFPE CRC samples, we evaluated the expression of 516 genes from published frozen tissue-derived prognostic signatures in 42 FFPE CRC samples measured by both platforms. Based on HTA platform-derived data, we identified both gene (99 individual genes, FDR < 0.05) and gene set (four of the six reported multi-gene signatures with sufficient information for evaluation, P < 0.05) expression differences associated with survival outcomes. Using nCounter platform-derived data, one of the six multi-gene signatures (P < 0.05) but no individual gene was associated with survival outcomes. Our study indicated that sufficiently high quality RNA could be obtained from FFPE tumor tissues to detect frozen tissue-derived prognostic gene expression signatures for CRC patients. PMID:27623752

  20. Comparison of Microdialysis Sampling Perfusion Fluid Components on the Foreign Body Reaction in Rat Subcutaneous Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Keeler, Geoffrey D.; Durdik, Jeannine M.; Stenken, Julie A.

    2013-01-01

    Microdialysis sampling is a commonly used technique for collecting solutes from the extracellular space of tissues in laboratory animals and humans. Large molecular weight solutes can be collected using high molecular weight cutoff (MWCO) membranes (100 kDa or greater). High MWCO membranes require addition of high molecular weight dextrans or albumin to the perfusion fluid to prevent fluid loss via ultrafiltration. While these perfusion fluid additives are commonly used during microdialysis sampling, the tissue response to the loss of these compounds across the membrane is poorly understood. Tissue reactions to implanted microdialysis sampling probes containing different microdialysis perfusion fluids were compared over a 7-day time period in rats. The base perfusion fluid was Ringer’s solution supplemented with either bovine serum albumin (BSA), rat serum albumin (RSA), Dextran-70, or Dextran-500. A significant inflammatory response to Dextran-70 was observed. No differences in the tissue response between BSA and RSA were observed. Among these agents, the BSA, RSA, and Dextran-500 produced a significantly reduced inflammatory response compared to the Dextran-70. This work demonstrates that use of Dextran-70 in microdialysis sampling perfusion fluids should be eliminated and replaced with Dextran-500 or other alternatives. PMID:24239995

  1. Evaluation of frozen tissue-derived prognostic gene expression signatures in FFPE colorectal cancer samples.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jing; Deane, Natasha G; Lewis, Keeli B; Padmanabhan, Chandrasekhar; Washington, M Kay; Ciombor, Kristen K; Timmers, Cynthia; Goldberg, Richard M; Beauchamp, R Daniel; Chen, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Defining molecular features that can predict the recurrence of colorectal cancer (CRC) for stage II-III patients remains challenging in cancer research. Most available clinical samples are Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded (FFPE). NanoString nCounter® and Affymetrix GeneChip® Human Transcriptome Array 2.0 (HTA) are the two platforms marketed for high-throughput gene expression profiling for FFPE samples. In this study, to evaluate the gene expression of frozen tissue-derived prognostic signatures in FFPE CRC samples, we evaluated the expression of 516 genes from published frozen tissue-derived prognostic signatures in 42 FFPE CRC samples measured by both platforms. Based on HTA platform-derived data, we identified both gene (99 individual genes, FDR < 0.05) and gene set (four of the six reported multi-gene signatures with sufficient information for evaluation, P < 0.05) expression differences associated with survival outcomes. Using nCounter platform-derived data, one of the six multi-gene signatures (P < 0.05) but no individual gene was associated with survival outcomes. Our study indicated that sufficiently high quality RNA could be obtained from FFPE tumor tissues to detect frozen tissue-derived prognostic gene expression signatures for CRC patients. PMID:27623752

  2. Tissue sampling from live blue mussels, Mytilus edulis. A field study from the Swedish west coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svärdh, Lillemor

    2003-05-01

    Histological techniques are often used to study environmental effects on mussels, but since these techniques include killing of the individuals, rare or endangered populations cannot be studied using conventional tissue sampling. This study is an attempt to find a method that can be used repeatedly with the same mussel individual and which does not affect growth and survival. From 200 mussels, Mytilus edulis, tissue was sampled in different ways, such as drilling a hole in the shell or prising apart the shell valves. Two kind of instruments were used, an injection needle and surgery forceps. Some of the drilled mussels had their holes sealed again with cement. Drilling a hole in the shell, removing tissue sample with surgical forceps and then leaving the holes open did not seriously harm the mussels during the two months the experiment lasted. But if the holes were sealed with cement, both length and weight growth were negatively affected (35% lower length growth and 36% lower weight growth compared to the control mussels). Mortality was highest among the drilled and sealed mussels (80% higher than among the other treatments). The vulnerability of the population, the aim of the study and the duration of the experiment should decide what method to use for tissue sampling. For long-term experiments and repeated sampling, opening the mussels by prizing apart the valves is a better alternative than drilling holes in the shells, but depending on the morphology of the species it could be difficult to sample the anterior part of the mussel body. For a short experiment and to sample anterior parts, drilling the shells, leaving the holes open and using surgical forceps, seems to be an acceptable compromise between the different treatments used.

  3. Laser microdissection-based expression analysis of key genes involved in muscle regeneration in mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Marotta, Mario; Sarria, Yaris; Ruiz-Roig, Claudia; Munell, Francina; Roig-Quilis, Manuel

    2007-10-01

    We have used the mdx mice strain (C57BL/10ScSn-mdx) as an experimental subject for the study of reiterative skeletal muscle necrosis-regeneration with basement membrane preservation. In young mdx muscle, by means of Hematoxylin-Eosin staining, different types of degenerative-regenerative groups (DRG) can be recognized and assigned to a defined muscle regeneration phase. To evaluate the expression of known key-regulatory genes in muscle regeneration, we have applied Laser Capture Microdissection technique to obtain tissue from different DRGs encompassing the complete skeletal muscle regenerative process. The expression of MyoD, Myf-5 and Myogenin showed a rapid increase in the first two days post-necrosis, which were followed by MRF4 expression, when newly regenerating fibers started to appear (3-5days post-necrosis). MHCd mRNA levels, undetectable in mature non-injured fibers, increased progressively from the first day post-necrosis and reached its maximum level of expression in DRGs showing basophilic regenerating fibers. TGFbeta-1 mRNA expression showed a prompt and strong increase following fiber necrosis that persisted during the inflammatory phase, and progressively decreased when new regenerating fibers began to appear. In contrast, IGF-2 mRNA expression decreased during the first days post-necrosis but was followed by a progressive rise in its expression coinciding with the appearance of the newly formed myofibers, reaching the maximum expression levels in DRGs composed of medium caliber basophilic regenerating myofibers (5-7 days post-necrosis). mdx degenerative-regenerative group typing, in conjunction with laser microdissection-based gene expression analysis, opens up a new approach to the molecular study of skeletal muscle regeneration.

  4. The Novel Application of Non-Lethal Citizen Science Tissue Sampling in Recreational Fisheries.

    PubMed

    Williams, Samuel M; Holmes, Bonnie J; Pepperell, Julian G

    2015-01-01

    Increasing fishing pressure and uncertainty surrounding recreational fishing catch and effort data promoted the development of alternative methods for conducting fisheries research. A pilot investigation was undertaken to engage the Australian game fishing community and promote the non-lethal collection of tissue samples from the black marlin Istiompax indica, a valuable recreational-only species in Australian waters, for the purpose of future genetic research. Recruitment of recreational anglers was achieved by publicizing the project in magazines, local newspapers, social media, blogs, websites and direct communication workshops at game fishing tournaments. The Game Fishing Association of Australia and the Queensland Game Fishing Association were also engaged to advertise the project and recruit participants with a focus on those anglers already involved in the tag-and-release of marlin. Participants of the program took small tissue samples using non-lethal methods which were stored for future genetic analysis. The program resulted in 165 samples from 49 participants across the known distribution of I. indica within Australian waters which was a sufficient number to facilitate a downstream population genetic analysis. The project demonstrated the potential for the development of citizen science sampling programs to collect tissue samples using non-lethal methods in order to achieve targeted research objects in recreationally caught species. PMID:26376487

  5. The Novel Application of Non-Lethal Citizen Science Tissue Sampling in Recreational Fisheries.

    PubMed

    Williams, Samuel M; Holmes, Bonnie J; Pepperell, Julian G

    2015-01-01

    Increasing fishing pressure and uncertainty surrounding recreational fishing catch and effort data promoted the development of alternative methods for conducting fisheries research. A pilot investigation was undertaken to engage the Australian game fishing community and promote the non-lethal collection of tissue samples from the black marlin Istiompax indica, a valuable recreational-only species in Australian waters, for the purpose of future genetic research. Recruitment of recreational anglers was achieved by publicizing the project in magazines, local newspapers, social media, blogs, websites and direct communication workshops at game fishing tournaments. The Game Fishing Association of Australia and the Queensland Game Fishing Association were also engaged to advertise the project and recruit participants with a focus on those anglers already involved in the tag-and-release of marlin. Participants of the program took small tissue samples using non-lethal methods which were stored for future genetic analysis. The program resulted in 165 samples from 49 participants across the known distribution of I. indica within Australian waters which was a sufficient number to facilitate a downstream population genetic analysis. The project demonstrated the potential for the development of citizen science sampling programs to collect tissue samples using non-lethal methods in order to achieve targeted research objects in recreationally caught species.

  6. The Novel Application of Non-Lethal Citizen Science Tissue Sampling in Recreational Fisheries

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Samuel M.; Holmes, Bonnie J.; Pepperell, Julian G.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing fishing pressure and uncertainty surrounding recreational fishing catch and effort data promoted the development of alternative methods for conducting fisheries research. A pilot investigation was undertaken to engage the Australian game fishing community and promote the non-lethal collection of tissue samples from the black marlin Istiompax indica, a valuable recreational-only species in Australian waters, for the purpose of future genetic research. Recruitment of recreational anglers was achieved by publicizing the project in magazines, local newspapers, social media, blogs, websites and direct communication workshops at game fishing tournaments. The Game Fishing Association of Australia and the Queensland Game Fishing Association were also engaged to advertise the project and recruit participants with a focus on those anglers already involved in the tag-and-release of marlin. Participants of the program took small tissue samples using non-lethal methods which were stored for future genetic analysis. The program resulted in 165 samples from 49 participants across the known distribution of I. indica within Australian waters which was a sufficient number to facilitate a downstream population genetic analysis. The project demonstrated the potential for the development of citizen science sampling programs to collect tissue samples using non-lethal methods in order to achieve targeted research objects in recreationally caught species. PMID:26376487

  7. Non-lethal sampling of walleye for stable isotope analysis: a comparison of three tissues

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chipps, Steven R.; VanDeHey, J.A.; Fincel, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis of fishes is often performed using muscle or organ tissues that require sacrificing animals. Non-lethal sampling provides an alternative for evaluating isotopic composition for species of concern or individuals of exceptional value. Stable isotope values of white muscle (lethal) were compared with those from fins and scales (non-lethal) in walleye, Sander vitreus (Mitchill), from multiple systems, size classes and across a range of isotopic values. Isotopic variability was also compared among populations to determine the potential of non-lethal tissues for diet-variability analyses. Muscle-derived isotope values were enriched compared with fins and depleted relative to scales. A split-sample validation technique and linear regression found that isotopic composition of walleye fins and scales was significantly related to that in muscle tissue for both δ13C and δ15N (r2 = 0.79–0.93). However, isotopic variability was significantly different between tissue types in two of six populations for δ15N and three of six populations for δ13C. Although species and population specific, these findings indicate that isotopic measures obtained from non-lethal tissues are indicative of those obtained from muscle.

  8. Imaging of Proteins in Tissue Samples Using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Cheng-Chih; Chou, Pi-Tai; Zare, Richard N

    2015-11-17

    Chemical maps of tissue samples provide important information on biological processes therein. Recently, advances in tissue imaging have been achieved using ambient ionization techniques, such as desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS), but such techniques have been almost exclusively confined to the mapping of lipids and metabolites. We report here the use of nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nanoDESI) that allows us to image proteins in tissue samples in a label-free manner at atmospheric pressure with only minimum sample preparation. Multiply charged proteins with masses up to 15 kDa were successfully detected by nanoDESI using an LTQ Orbitrap mass spectrometer. In an adult mice brain section, expression of proteins including ubiquitin, β-thymosin, myelin basic protein, and hemoglobin were spatially mapped and characterized. We also determined the location of methylation on myelin basic protein. This imaging modality was further implemented to MYC-induced lymphomas. We observed an array of truncated proteins in the region where normal thymus cells were infiltrated by tumor cells, in contrast to healthy tissue.

  9. Phase-contrast Hounsfield units of fixated and non-fixated soft-tissue samples

    DOE PAGES

    Willner, Marian; Fior, Gabriel; Marschner, Mathias; Birnbacher, Lorenz; Schock, Jonathan; Braun, Christian; Fingerle, Alexander A.; Noël, Peter B.; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Pfeiffer, Franz; et al

    2015-08-31

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging is a novel technology that achieves high soft-tissue contrast. Although its clinical impact is still under investigation, the technique may potentially improve clinical diagnostics. In conventional attenuation-based X-ray computed tomography, radiological diagnostics are quantified by Hounsfield units. Corresponding Hounsfield units for phase-contrast imaging have been recently introduced, enabling a setup-independent comparison and standardized interpretation of imaging results. Thus far, the experimental values of few tissue types have been reported; these values have been determined from fixated tissue samples. This study presents phase-contrast Hounsfield units for various types of non-fixated human soft tissues. A large variety of tissuemore » specimens ranging from adipose, muscle and connective tissues to liver, kidney and pancreas tissues were imaged by a grating interferometer with a rotating-anode X-ray tube and a photon-counting detector. In addition, we investigated the effects of formalin fixation on the quantitative phase-contrast imaging results.« less

  10. MicroRNA Stability in FFPE Tissue Samples: Dependence on GC Content

    PubMed Central

    Kakimoto, Yu; Tanaka, Masayuki; Kamiguchi, Hiroshi; Ochiai, Eriko; Osawa, Motoki

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs responsible for fine-tuning of gene expression at post-transcriptional level. The alterations in miRNA expression levels profoundly affect human health and often lead to the development of severe diseases. Currently, high throughput analyses, such as microarray and deep sequencing, are performed in order to identify miRNA biomarkers, using archival patient tissue samples. MiRNAs are more robust than longer RNAs, and resistant to extreme temperatures, pH, and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedding (FFPE) process. Here, we have compared the stability of miRNAs in FFPE cardiac tissues using next-generation sequencing. The mode read length in FFPE samples was 11 nucleotides (nt), while that in the matched frozen samples was 22 nt. Although the read counts were increased 1.7-fold in FFPE samples, compared with those in the frozen samples, the average miRNA mapping rate decreased from 32.0% to 9.4%. These results indicate that, in addition to the fragmentation of longer RNAs, miRNAs are to some extent degraded in FFPE tissues as well. The expression profiles of total miRNAs in two groups were highly correlated (0.88 tissues instead of miR-1, which was predominant before fixation. Subsequent quantitative PCR (qPCR) analyses revealed that miRNAs with GC content of less than 40% are more degraded than GC-rich miRNAs (p<0.0001). We showed that deep sequencing data obtained using FFPE samples cannot be directly compared with that of fresh frozen samples. The combination of miRNA deep sequencing and other quantitative analyses, such as qPCR, may improve the utility of archival FFPE tissue samples. PMID:27649415

  11. MicroRNA Stability in FFPE Tissue Samples: Dependence on GC Content.

    PubMed

    Kakimoto, Yu; Tanaka, Masayuki; Kamiguchi, Hiroshi; Ochiai, Eriko; Osawa, Motoki

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs responsible for fine-tuning of gene expression at post-transcriptional level. The alterations in miRNA expression levels profoundly affect human health and often lead to the development of severe diseases. Currently, high throughput analyses, such as microarray and deep sequencing, are performed in order to identify miRNA biomarkers, using archival patient tissue samples. MiRNAs are more robust than longer RNAs, and resistant to extreme temperatures, pH, and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedding (FFPE) process. Here, we have compared the stability of miRNAs in FFPE cardiac tissues using next-generation sequencing. The mode read length in FFPE samples was 11 nucleotides (nt), while that in the matched frozen samples was 22 nt. Although the read counts were increased 1.7-fold in FFPE samples, compared with those in the frozen samples, the average miRNA mapping rate decreased from 32.0% to 9.4%. These results indicate that, in addition to the fragmentation of longer RNAs, miRNAs are to some extent degraded in FFPE tissues as well. The expression profiles of total miRNAs in two groups were highly correlated (0.88 tissues instead of miR-1, which was predominant before fixation. Subsequent quantitative PCR (qPCR) analyses revealed that miRNAs with GC content of less than 40% are more degraded than GC-rich miRNAs (p<0.0001). We showed that deep sequencing data obtained using FFPE samples cannot be directly compared with that of fresh frozen samples. The combination of miRNA deep sequencing and other quantitative analyses, such as qPCR, may improve the utility of archival FFPE tissue samples. PMID:27649415

  12. Optimizing gene expression analysis in archival brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Van Deerlin, Vivianna M D; Gill, Lisa H; Nelson, Peter T

    2002-10-01

    Analysis of gene expression in the brain is a valuable tool to study the function of the brain under normal and pathological conditions. Although there are many techniques used to measure gene expression the validity of any such experiment is directly related to the quality of the RNA in the samples. The most readily available source of human brain tissue is post-mortem and while frozen tissue is sometimes available, most archived tissue is fixed and paraffin-embedded. The use of fixed tissue for expression analysis introduces variables, which must be considered in the experimental design. In addition, factors associated with clinical variability of the patient and with tissue procurement can affect RNA transcript levels. In order to illustrate the effects of two common tissue fixatives, formalin and ethanol, on the quality of RNA for expression analysis we compare RNA extracted from these fixed tissues to the gold standard, flash-frozen tissue. We describe RNA extraction from fixed tissue and ways to assess the quality or intactness of the RNA using reverse transcription combined with polymerase chain reaction amplification. An advantage of using archived tissue is the ease with which single cells or subpopulations of cells can be obtained by laser microdissection. The successful isolation of RNA from microdissected cells is also presented. From our results and a review of the literature we conclude that RNA from fixed tissues is a viable source of RNA for expression analysis which should enable new experimental approaches and discoveries as long as attention is given to variables that can affect RNA at all levels of analysis.

  13. Tabletop magnetic resonance elastography for the measurement of viscoelastic parameters of small tissue samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ipek-Ugay, Selcan; Drießle, Toni; Ledwig, Michael; Guo, Jing; Hirsch, Sebastian; Sack, Ingolf; Braun, Jürgen

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of low-cost tabletop MR elastography (MRE) for quantifying the complex shear modulus G∗ of small soft biological tissue samples as provided by pathologists. The MRE system was developed based on a tabletop MRI scanner equipped with a 0.5 T permanent magnet and a tissue sample holder mounted to a loudspeaker. A spin echo sequence was enhanced with motion-encoding gradients of 250 mT/m amplitude synchronized to acoustic vibration frequencies. Shear wave images suitable for elastography were acquired between vibration frequencies of 0.5 and 1 kHz in agarose, ultrasound gel, porcine liver, porcine skeletal muscle, and bovine heart with a spatial resolution of 234 μm pixel edge length. The measured frequency dependence of G∗ agreed well with previous work based on high-field MR systems. The ratio between loss and storage moduli was highest in liver and ultrasound gel, followed by muscle tissue and agarose gel while ultrasound gel and liver showed similarly low storage moduli compared to the other samples. The shear wave to noise ratio is an important imaging criteria for MRE and was about 4.2 times lower for the preliminary setup of the 0.5 T tabletop system compared to a 7 T animal scanner. In the future, the new tabletop MRE system may serve as a low cost device for preclinical research on the correlation of viscoelastic parameters with histopathology of biological samples.

  14. Screening of Viral Pathogens from Pediatric Ileal Tissue Samples after Vaccination

    DOE PAGES

    Hewitson, Laura; Thissen, James B.; Gardner, Shea N.; McLoughlin, Kevin S.; Glausser, Margaret K.; Jaing, Crystal J.

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, researchers reported that the two US-licensed rotavirus vaccines contained DNA or DNA fragments from porcine circovirus (PCV). Although PCV, a common virus among pigs, is not thought to cause illness in humans, these findings raised several safety concerns. In this study, we sought to determine whether viruses, including PCV, could be detected in ileal tissue samples of children vaccinated with one of the two rotavirus vaccines. A broad spectrum, novel DNA detection technology, the Lawrence Livermore Microbial Detection Array (LLMDA), was utilized, and confirmation of viral pathogens using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was conducted. The LLMDAmore » technology was recently used to identify PCV from one rotavirus vaccine. Ileal tissue samples were analyzed from 21 subjects, aged 15–62 months. PCV was not detected in any ileal tissue samples by the LLMDA or PCR. LLMDA identified a human rotavirus A from one of the vaccinated subjects, which is likely due to a recent infection from a wild type rotavirus. LLMDA also identified human parechovirus, a common gastroenteritis viral infection, from two subjects. Additionally, LLMDA detected common gastrointestinal bacterial organisms from the Enterobacteriaceae , Bacteroidaceae , and Streptococcaceae families from several subjects. This study provides a survey of viral and bacterial pathogens from pediatric ileal samples, and may shed light on future studies to identify pathogen associations with pediatric vaccinations.« less

  15. Swine infectious agents in Tayassu pecari and Pecari tajacu tissue samples from Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Alessandra Marnie Martins Gomes; Brombila, Talita; Bersano, Josete Garcia; Soares, Herbert Sousa; Silva, Sheila Oliveira de Souza; Minervino, Antonio Humberto Hamad; Ogata, Renato Akio; Gennari, Solange Maria; Richtzenhain, Leonardo Jose

    2014-04-01

    Peccaries and pigs, Tayassuidae and Suidae respectively, diverged approximately one million years ago from a common ancestor. Because these families share some pathogens, peccaries can act as reservoirs of infectious pathogens for domestic and wild swine. We evaluated the presence of swine infectious agents in the spleen and lung tissues of white-lipped peccaries (WLP; Tayassu pecari) and collared peccaries (CP; Pecari tajacu) in Brazil. Samples from 10 adult CP and three WLP, which had been hunted by locals or hit by motor vehicles, were obtained from two free-ranging Brazilian populations. The samples were tested by PCR for Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Bordetella bronchiseptica, Pasteurella multocida, porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2), Suid herpesvirus 1 (SuHV-1), and porcine parvovirus (PPV). Positive samples were sequenced. Both species were negative for PPV and B. bronchiseptica and positive for PCV2 and SuHV-1. The lungs of two animals were positive for M. hyopneumoniae and P. multocida. This report is the first demonstration of PCV2 and SuHV-1 swine viruses and of M. hyopneumoniae and P. multocida bacteria in peccaries. One factor contributing to this detection was access to tissue samples, which is uncommon. The role of these infectious agents in peccaries is unknown and further epidemiologic studies should be performed. This study identified several infectious agents in peccaries and highlighted the importance of the tissue type used to detect pathogens.

  16. In situ hybridization method for studies of cell wall deficient M. paratuberculosis in tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Hulten, K; Karttunen, T J; El-Zimaity, H M; Naser, S A; Almashhrawi, A; Graham, D Y; El-Zaatari, F A

    2000-12-20

    Cell wall deficient forms of mycobacteria may be important in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease and sarcoidosis. However, no method has been available to localize this type of organisms in tissue sections. We developed an in situ hybridization method for the demonstration of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis spheroplasts (cell wall deficient forms) in paraffin embedded tissue sections.M. paratuberculosis spheroplasts were prepared by treatment with glycine and lysozyme. Pieces of beef were injected with the prepared spheroplasts. The samples were fixed in buffered formalin and paraffin embedded. A M. paratuberculosis-specific probe derived from the IS900 gene was used. Specificity was controlled by using an irrelevant probe and by hybridizing sections with spheroplasts from other bacteria. Beef samples injected with M. paratuberculosis spheroplasts were the only samples that hybridized with the probe. Beef samples containing acid-fast or spheroplast forms of M. smegmatis and M. tuberculosis as well as the acid-fast forms of M. paratuberculosis did not hybridize with the probe. Unrelated bacterial controls, i.e. Helicobacter pylori and Escherichia coli were also negative in the assay. In situ hybridization with the IS900 probe provides a specific way to localize M. paratuberculosis spheroplasts in tissue sections and may be useful for studies of the connection between M. paratuberculosis and Crohn's disease and sarcoidosis. The assay may also be valuable for studies on Johne's diseased animals. PMID:11118736

  17. Targeted or whole genome sequencing of formalin fixed tissue samples: potential applications in cancer genomics

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yue; Cottrell, Joseph; Klotzle, Brandy; Godwin, Andrew K.; Koestler, Devin; Beyerlein, Peter; Fan, Jian-Bing; Bibikova, Marina; Chien, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Current genomic studies are limited by the poor availability of fresh-frozen tissue samples. Although formalin-fixed diagnostic samples are in abundance, they are seldom used in current genomic studies because of the concern of formalin-fixation artifacts. Better characterization of these artifacts will allow the use of archived clinical specimens in translational and clinical research studies. To provide a systematic analysis of formalin-fixation artifacts on Illumina sequencing, we generated 26 DNA sequencing data sets from 13 pairs of matched formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) and fresh-frozen (FF) tissue samples. The results indicate high rate of concordant calls between matched FF/FFPE pairs at reference and variant positions in three commonly used sequencing approaches (whole genome, whole exome, and targeted exon sequencing). Global mismatch rates and C·G > T·A substitutions were comparable between matched FF/FFPE samples, and discordant rates were low (<0.26%) in all samples. Finally, low-pass whole genome sequencing produces similar pattern of copy number alterations between FF/FFPE pairs. The results from our studies suggest the potential use of diagnostic FFPE samples for cancer genomic studies to characterize and catalog variations in cancer genomes. PMID:26305677

  18. Targeted or whole genome sequencing of formalin fixed tissue samples: potential applications in cancer genomics.

    PubMed

    Munchel, Sarah; Hoang, Yen; Zhao, Yue; Cottrell, Joseph; Klotzle, Brandy; Godwin, Andrew K; Koestler, Devin; Beyerlein, Peter; Fan, Jian-Bing; Bibikova, Marina; Chien, Jeremy

    2015-09-22

    Current genomic studies are limited by the poor availability of fresh-frozen tissue samples. Although formalin-fixed diagnostic samples are in abundance, they are seldom used in current genomic studies because of the concern of formalin-fixation artifacts. Better characterization of these artifacts will allow the use of archived clinical specimens in translational and clinical research studies. To provide a systematic analysis of formalin-fixation artifacts on Illumina sequencing, we generated 26 DNA sequencing data sets from 13 pairs of matched formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) and fresh-frozen (FF) tissue samples. The results indicate high rate of concordant calls between matched FF/FFPE pairs at reference and variant positions in three commonly used sequencing approaches (whole genome, whole exome, and targeted exon sequencing). Global mismatch rates and C · G > T · A substitutions were comparable between matched FF/FFPE samples, and discordant rates were low (<0.26%) in all samples. Finally, low-pass whole genome sequencing produces similar pattern of copy number alterations between FF/FFPE pairs. The results from our studies suggest the potential use of diagnostic FFPE samples for cancer genomic studies to characterize and catalog variations in cancer genomes.

  19. Targeted or whole genome sequencing of formalin fixed tissue samples: potential applications in cancer genomics.

    PubMed

    Munchel, Sarah; Hoang, Yen; Zhao, Yue; Cottrell, Joseph; Klotzle, Brandy; Godwin, Andrew K; Koestler, Devin; Beyerlein, Peter; Fan, Jian-Bing; Bibikova, Marina; Chien, Jeremy

    2015-09-22

    Current genomic studies are limited by the poor availability of fresh-frozen tissue samples. Although formalin-fixed diagnostic samples are in abundance, they are seldom used in current genomic studies because of the concern of formalin-fixation artifacts. Better characterization of these artifacts will allow the use of archived clinical specimens in translational and clinical research studies. To provide a systematic analysis of formalin-fixation artifacts on Illumina sequencing, we generated 26 DNA sequencing data sets from 13 pairs of matched formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) and fresh-frozen (FF) tissue samples. The results indicate high rate of concordant calls between matched FF/FFPE pairs at reference and variant positions in three commonly used sequencing approaches (whole genome, whole exome, and targeted exon sequencing). Global mismatch rates and C · G > T · A substitutions were comparable between matched FF/FFPE samples, and discordant rates were low (<0.26%) in all samples. Finally, low-pass whole genome sequencing produces similar pattern of copy number alterations between FF/FFPE pairs. The results from our studies suggest the potential use of diagnostic FFPE samples for cancer genomic studies to characterize and catalog variations in cancer genomes. PMID:26305677

  20. Simultaneous sampling of tissue oxygenation and oxygen consumption in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Nugent, William H; Song, Bjorn K; Pittman, Roland N; Golub, Aleksander S

    2016-05-01

    Under physiologic conditions, microvascular oxygen delivery appears to be well matched to oxygen consumption in respiring tissues. We present a technique to measure interstitial oxygen tension (PISFO2) and oxygen consumption (VO2) under steady-state conditions, as well as during the transitions from rest to activity and back. Phosphorescence Quenching Microscopy (PQM) was employed with pneumatic compression cycling to achieve 1 to 10 Hz sampling rates of interstitial PO2 and simultaneous recurrent sampling of VO2 (3/min) in the exteriorized rat spinotrapezius muscle. The compression pressure was optimized to 120-130 mmHg without adverse effect on the tissue preparation. A cycle of 5s compression followed by 15s recovery yielded a resting VO2 of 0.98 ± 0.03 ml O2/100 cm(3)min while preserving microvascular oxygen delivery. The measurement system was then used to assess VO2 dependence on PISFO2 at rest and further tested under conditions of isometric muscle contraction to demonstrate a robust ability to monitor the on-kinetics of tissue respiration and the compensatory changes in PISFO2 during contraction and recovery. The temporal and spatial resolution of this approach is well suited to studies seeking to characterize microvascular oxygen supply and demand in thin tissues. PMID:26683232

  1. Analysis of dissected tissues with digital holographic microscopy: quantification of inflammation mediated tissue alteration, influence of sample preparation, and reliability of numerical autofocusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemper, Björn; Lenz, Philipp; Bettenworth, Dominik; Krausewitz, Philipp; Domagk, Dirk; Ketelhut, Steffi

    2015-03-01

    Quantitative phase imaging with digital holographic microscopy (DHM) allows label-free imaging of tissue sections and quantification of the spatial refractive index distribution, which is of interest for applications in digital pathology. We show that DHM allows quantitative imaging of different layers in unstained tissue samples by detection of refractive index changes. In addition, we evaluate the automated refocussing feature of DHM for application on dissected tissues and could achieve highly reproducible holographic autofocusing for unstained and moderately stained samples. Finally, it is demonstrated that in human ulcerative colitis patients the average tissue refractive index is reduced significantly in all parts of the inflamed colonic wall in comparison to patients in remission.

  2. A pilot study of sampling subcutaneous adipose tissue to examine biomarkers of cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Kristin L; Makar, Karen W; Kratz, Mario; Foster-Schubert, Karen E; McTiernan, Anne; Ulrich, Cornelia M

    2009-01-01

    Examination of adipose tissue biology may provide important insight into mechanistic links for the observed association between higher body fat and risk of several types of cancer, in particular colorectal and breast cancer. We tested two different methods of obtaining adipose tissue from healthy individuals. Ten overweight or obese (body mass index, 25-40 kg/m(2)), postmenopausal women were recruited. Two subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue samples were obtained per individual (i.e., right and left lower abdominal regions) using two distinct methods (method A: 14-gauge needle with incision, versus method B: 16-gauge needle without incision). Gene expression was examined at the mRNA level for leptin, adiponectin, aromatase, interleukin 6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in flash-frozen tissue, and at the protein level for leptin, adiponectin, IL-6, and TNF-alpha following short-term culture. Participants preferred biopsy method A and few participants reported any of the usual minor side effects. Gene expression was detectable for leptin, adiponectin, and aromatase, but was below detectable limits for IL-6 and TNF-alpha. For detectable genes, relative gene expression in adipose tissue obtained by methods A and B was similar for adiponectin (r = 0.64, P = 0.06) and leptin (r = 0.80, P = 0.01), but not for aromatase (r = 0.37,P = 0.34). Protein levels in tissue culture supernatant exhibited good intra-assay agreement [coefficient of variation (CV), 1-10%], with less agreement for intraindividual agreement (CV, 17-29%) and reproducibility, following one freeze-thaw cycle (CV, >14%). Subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsies from healthy, overweight individuals provide adequate amounts for RNA extraction, gene expression, and other assays of relevance to cancer prevention research. PMID:19139016

  3. Effects of sample preparation on the optical properties of breast tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, Fay A.

    1996-04-01

    The optical properties of biological tissue should be determined in vivo whenever possible. However, for those instances when in vivo studies are impractical, too expensive or inappropriate, and when blood flow is not an issue, the ability to perform in vitro studies then becomes invaluable. Optical absorption spectroscopy shows that it may be possible to obtain meaningful information about the optical properties of human breast tissue from in vitro samples if strict preparation and measuring protocols are used. That a strict protocol for storing and handling tissue is critical can be seen from our observations of changes in the optical absorption spectra that occur in response to formalin fixation, the passage of time, application of stains and dyes, and storage in growth medium of the excised tissue. In vivo optical absorption spectroscopy measurements have been made on human breast cancer xenografts and compared with in vitro measurements on breast biopsies prepared according to precise collection and treatment protocols. There is a 'window of opportunity' before time dependent changes in the UV optical absorption spectra of the excised tissue specimens occur. This time window of opportunity widens at longer wavelengths with the least changes occurring in the optical spectra in the NIR.

  4. Transgenic zebrafish reveal tissue-specific differences in estrogen signaling in response to environmental water samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gorelick, Daniel A.; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Hung, Alice L.; Blazer, Vicki; Halpern, Marnie E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Environmental endocrine disruptors (EED) are exogenous chemicals that mimic endogenous hormones, such as estrogens. Previous studies using a zebrafish transgenic reporter demonstrated that the EEDs bisphenol A and genistein preferentially activate estrogen receptors (ER) in the larval heart compared to the liver. However, it was not known whether the transgenic zebrafish reporter was sensitive enough to detect estrogens from environmental samples, whether environmental estrogens would exhibit similar tissue-specific effects as BPA and genistein or why some compounds preferentially target receptors in the heart. Methods: We tested surface water samples using a transgenic zebrafish reporter with tandem estrogen response elements driving green fluorescent protein expression (5xERE:GFP). Reporter activation was colocalized with tissue-specific expression of estrogen receptor genes by RNA in situ hybridization. Results: Selective patterns of ER activation were observed in transgenic fish exposed to river water samples from the Mid-Atlantic United States, with several samples preferentially activating receptors in embryonic and larval heart valves. We discovered that tissue-specificity in ER activation is due to differences in the expression of estrogen receptor subtypes. ERα is expressed in developing heart valves but not in the liver, whereas ERβ2 has the opposite profile. Accordingly, subtype-specific ER agonists activate the reporter in either the heart valves or the liver. Conclusion: The use of 5xERE:GFP transgenic zebrafish has revealed an unexpected tissue-specific difference in the response to environmentally relevant estrogenic compounds. Exposure to estrogenic EEDs in utero is associated with adverse health effects, with the potentially unanticipated consequence of targeting developing heart valves.

  5. Molecular classification of cancer with the 92-gene assay in cytology and limited tissue samples

    PubMed Central

    Brachtel, Elena F.; Operaña, Theresa N.; Sullivan, Peggy S.; Kerr, Sarah E.; Cherkis, Karen A.; Schroeder, Brock E.; Dry, Sarah M.; Schnabel, Catherine A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Detailed molecular evaluation of cytology and limited tissue samples is increasingly becoming the standard for cancer care. Reproducible and accurate diagnostic approaches with reduced demands on cellularity are an ongoing unmet need. This study evaluated the performance of a 92-gene assay for molecular diagnosis of tumor type/subtype in cytology and limited tissue samples. Methods Clinical validation of accuracy for the 92-gene assay in limited tissue samples such as cytology cell blocks, core biopsies and small excisions was conducted in a blinded multi-institutional study (N = 109, 48% metastatic, 53% grade II and III). Analytical success rate and diagnostic utility were evaluated in a consecutive series of 644 cytology cases submitted for clinical testing. Results The 92-gene assay demonstrated 91% sensitivity (95% CI [0.84, 0.95]) for tumor classification, with high accuracy maintained irrespective of specimen type (100%, 92%, and 86% in FNA/cytology cell blocks, core biopsies, and small excisions, respectively; p = 0.26). The assay performed equally well for metastatic versus primary tumors (90% vs 93%, p = 0.73), and across histologic grades (100%, 90%, 89%, in grades I, II, and III, respectively; p = 0.75). In the clinical case series, a molecular diagnosis was reported in 87% of the 644 samples, identifying 23 different tumor types and allowing for additional mutational analysis in selected cases. Conclusions These findings demonstrate high accuracy and analytical success rate of the 92-gene assay, supporting its utility in the molecular diagnosis of cancer for specimens with limited tissue. PMID:27034010

  6. Collection of Epithelial Cells from Rodent Mammary Gland Via Laser Capture Microdissection Yielding High-Quality RNA Suitable for Microarray Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Laser capture microdissection (LCM) enables collection of cell populations highly enriched for specific cell types that have the potential of yielding critical information about physiological and pathophysiological processes. One use of cells collected by LCM is for gene expression profiling. Samples intended for transcript analyses should be of the highest quality possible. RNA degradation is an ever-present concern in molecular biological assays, and LCM is no exception. This paper identifies issues related to preparation, collection, and processing in a lipid-rich tissue, rodent mammary gland, in which the epithelial to stromal cell ratio is low and the stromal component is primarily adipocytes, a situation that presents numerous technical challenges for high-quality RNA isolation. Our goal was to improve the procedure so that a greater probe set present call rate would be obtained when isolated RNA was evaluated using Affymetrix microarrays. The results showed that the quality of RNA isolated from epithelial cells of both mammary gland and mammary adenocarcinomas was high with a probe set present call rate of 65% and a high signal-to-noise ratio. PMID:21406068

  7. Quantitative laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis of calcified tissue samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samek, O.; Beddows, D. C. S.; Telle, H. H.; Kaiser, J.; Liška, M.; Cáceres, J. O.; Gonzáles Ureña, A.

    2001-06-01

    We report on the application of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to the analysis of important minerals and the accumulation of potentially toxic elements in calcified tissue, to trace e.g. the influence of environmental exposure, and other medical or biological factors. This theme was exemplified for quantitative detection and mapping of Al, Pb and Sr in representative samples, including teeth (first teeth of infants, second teeth of children and teeth of adults) and bones (tibia and femur). In addition to identifying and quantifying major and trace elements in the tissues, one- and two-dimensional profiles and maps were generated. Such maps (a) provide time/concentration relations, (b) allow to follow mineralisation of the hydroxyapatite matrix and the migration of the elements within it and (c) enable to identify disease states, such as caries in teeth. In order to obtain quantitative calibration, reference samples in the form of pressed pellets with calcified tissue-equivalent material (majority compound of pellets is CaCO 3) were used whose physical properties closely resembled hydroxyapatite. Compounds of Al, Sr and Pb were added to the pellets, containing atomic concentrations in the range 100-10 000 ppm relative to the Ca content of the matrix. Analytical results based on this calibration against artificial samples for the trace elements under investigation agree with literature values, and with our atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) cross-validation measurements.

  8. Distribution of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in Japanese autopsy tissue and body fluid samples.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Tetsuya; Fujimine, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Shaw; Nakano, Takeshi

    2012-09-01

    Brominated flame retardants are components of many plastics and are used in products such as cars, textiles, televisions, and personal computers. Human exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants has increased exponentially during the last three decades. Our objective was to measure the body burden and distribution of PBDEs and to determine the concentrations of the predominant PBDE congeners in samples of liver, bile, adipose tissue, and blood obtained from Japanese autopsy cases. Tissues and body fluids obtained from 20 autopsy cases were analyzed. The levels of 25 PBDE congeners, ranging from tri- to hexa-BDEs, were assessed. The geometric means of the sum of the concentrations of PBDE congeners having detection frequencies >50 % (ΣPBDE) in the blood, liver, bile, and adipose tissue were 2.4, 2.6, 1.4, and 4.3 ng/g lipid, respectively. The most abundant congeners were BDE-47 and BDE-153, followed by BDE-100, BDE-99, and BDE-28+33. These concentrations of PBDE congeners were similar to other reports of human exposure in Japan but were notably lower than concentrations than those reported in the USA. Significant positive correlations were observed between the concentrations of predominant congeners and ΣPBDE among the samples analyzed. The ΣPBDE concentration was highest in the adipose tissue, but PBDEs were distributed widely among the tissues and body fluids analyzed. The PBDE levels observed in the present study are similar to those reported in previous studies in Japan and significantly lower than those reported in the USA. PMID:22544599

  9. Optimal transport time and conditions for cartilage tissue samples and expanded chondrocyte suspensions.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Banu Coskun; Yilmaz, Cengiz; Yilmaz, Necat S; Balli, Ebru; Tasdelen, Bahar

    2010-01-01

    For autologous chondrocyte implantation, the chondral tissue obtained is transferred from the operating room to the laboratory using specialized carrier systems within 24 hours. Similar expenses are used for the transport of cultured chondrocytes. The purpose of this study was to find the optimal temperature, size of tissue, and time that the chondrocytes can stand without losing viability and proliferative capacity. Fresh calf cartilage was harvested and divided into 24 groups. Half of the samples were diced into 1- to 2-mm(3) pieces. All 12 groups were kept at either 4 degrees C, 25 degrees C, or 37 degrees C for 1, 3, 5, or 7 days and were seeded for cell culture. Times to reach confluence values were compared. Produced cell suspensions were grouped similarly and tested similarly. Neither the temperature nor the waiting days caused any difference in the proliferative capacity of the cells. Diced tissues yielded a shorter time to reach confluence values. Chondral tissue obtained from the patient can be transferred to the laboratory at temperatures ranging from 4 degrees C to 37 degrees C in up to 7 days. These conditions did not affect the proliferative capacity or the viability of the chondrocytes. Dicing the tissue prior to transport will shorten total culturing time. The expanded cell suspensions should be transferred at temperatures from 4 degrees C to 25 degrees C within 3 days. Specialized carrier systems to get the chondral tissue from the operating room to the laboratory and to take the expanded chondrocytes back to the operating room within hours may not be necessary.

  10. Threshold-dependent sample sizes for selenium assessment with stream fish tissue

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hitt, Nathaniel P.; Smith, David

    2013-01-01

    Natural resource managers are developing assessments of selenium (Se) contamination in freshwater ecosystems based on fish tissue concentrations. We evaluated the effects of sample size (i.e., number of fish per site) on the probability of correctly detecting mean whole-body Se values above a range of potential management thresholds. We modeled Se concentrations as gamma distributions with shape and scale parameters fitting an empirical mean-to-variance relationship in data from southwestern West Virginia, USA (63 collections, 382 individuals). We used parametric bootstrapping techniques to calculate statistical power as the probability of detecting true mean concentrations up to 3 mg Se/kg above management thresholds ranging from 4-8 mg Se/kg. Sample sizes required to achieve 80% power varied as a function of management thresholds and type-I error tolerance (α). Higher thresholds required more samples than lower thresholds because populations were more heterogeneous at higher mean Se levels. For instance, to assess a management threshold of 4 mg Se/kg, a sample of 8 fish could detect an increase of ∼ 1 mg Se/kg with 80% power (given α = 0.05), but this sample size would be unable to detect such an increase from a management threshold of 8 mg Se/kg with more than a coin-flip probability. Increasing α decreased sample size requirements to detect above-threshold mean Se concentrations with 80% power. For instance, at an α-level of 0.05, an 8-fish sample could detect an increase of ∼ 2 units above a threshold of 8 mg Se/kg with 80% power, but when α was relaxed to 0.2 this sample size was more sensitive to increasing mean Se concentrations, allowing detection of an increase of ∼ 1.2 units with equivalent power. Combining individuals into 2- and 4-fish composite samples for laboratory analysis did not decrease power because the reduced number of laboratory samples was compensated by increased precision of composites for estimating mean

  11. Threshold-dependent sample sizes for selenium assessment with stream fish tissue.

    PubMed

    Hitt, Nathaniel P; Smith, David R

    2015-01-01

    Natural resource managers are developing assessments of selenium (Se) contamination in freshwater ecosystems based on fish tissue concentrations. We evaluated the effects of sample size (i.e., number of fish per site) on the probability of correctly detecting mean whole-body Se values above a range of potential management thresholds. We modeled Se concentrations as gamma distributions with shape and scale parameters fitting an empirical mean-to-variance relationship in data from southwestern West Virginia, USA (63 collections, 382 individuals). We used parametric bootstrapping techniques to calculate statistical power as the probability of detecting true mean concentrations up to 3 mg Se/kg above management thresholds ranging from 4 to 8 mg Se/kg. Sample sizes required to achieve 80% power varied as a function of management thresholds and Type I error tolerance (α). Higher thresholds required more samples than lower thresholds because populations were more heterogeneous at higher mean Se levels. For instance, to assess a management threshold of 4 mg Se/kg, a sample of eight fish could detect an increase of approximately 1 mg Se/kg with 80% power (given α=0.05), but this sample size would be unable to detect such an increase from a management threshold of 8 mg Se/kg with more than a coin-flip probability. Increasing α decreased sample size requirements to detect above-threshold mean Se concentrations with 80% power. For instance, at an α-level of 0.05, an 8-fish sample could detect an increase of approximately 2 units above a threshold of 8 mg Se/kg with 80% power, but when α was relaxed to 0.2, this sample size was more sensitive to increasing mean Se concentrations, allowing detection of an increase of approximately 1.2 units with equivalent power. Combining individuals into 2- and 4-fish composite samples for laboratory analysis did not decrease power because the reduced number of laboratory samples was compensated for by increased precision of composites

  12. Determination of benzophenones in human placental tissue samples by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Vela-Soria, F; Jiménez-Díaz, I; Rodríguez-Gómez, R; Zafra-Gómez, A; Ballesteros, O; Navalón, A; Vílchez, J L; Fernández, M F; Olea, N

    2011-09-30

    Benzophenones (BPs) are a family of compounds widely used to protect the skin and hair from UV irradiation. Despite human exposure to BPs through dermal application of products containing sunscreen agents and the increasing evidence that BPs are able to interfere with endocrine systems, few studies have examined the occurrence of BPs in humans. In this work, we propose a new liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method to determine six BPs, namely, benzophenone-1 (BP-1), benzophenone-2 (BP-2), benzophenone-3 (BP-3), benzophenone-6 (BP-6), benzophenone-8 (BP-8) and 4-hydroxybenzophenone (4-OH-BP) in human placental tissue samples. The method involves an extraction step of the analytes from the samples using ethyl acetate, followed by a clean-up step using centrifugation prior to their quantification by LC-MS/MS using an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) interface in the positive mode. Benzophenone-d(10) (BP-d(10)) was used as surrogate. Found detection limits (LOD) ranged from 0.07 to 0.3 ng g(-1) and quantification limits (LOQ) from 0.3 to 1.0 ng g(-1), while inter- and intra-day variability was under 5%. The method was validated using standard addition calibration and a recovery assay. Recovery rates for spiked samples ranged from 98 to 104%. This method was satisfactorily applied for the determination of BPs in 16 placental tissue samples collected from women who live in Granada (Spain).

  13. The relationship between decorrelation time and sample thickness in acute rat brain tissue slices (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brake, Joshua; Jang, Mooseok; Yang, Changhuei

    2016-03-01

    The optical opacity of biological tissue has long been a challenge in biomedical optics due to the strong scattering nature of tissue in the optical regime. While most conventional optical techniques attempt to gate out multiply scattered light and use only unscattered light, new approaches in the field of wavefront shaping exploit the time reversible symmetry of optical scattering in order to focus light inside or through scattering media. While these approaches have been demonstrated effectively on static samples, it has proven difficult to apply them to dynamic biological samples since even small changes in the relative positions of the scatterers within will cause the time symmetry that wavefront shaping relies upon to decorrelate. In this paper we investigate the decorrelation curves of acute rat brain slices for thicknesses in the range 1-3 mm (1/e decorrelation time on the order of seconds) using multi-speckle diffusing wave spectroscopy (MSDWS) and compare the results with theoretical predictions. The results of this study demonstrate that the 1/L^2 relationship between decorrelation time and thickness predicted by diffusing wave spectroscopy provides a good rule of thumb for estimating how the decorrelation of a sample will change with increasing thickness. Understanding this relationship will provide insight to guide the future development of biophotonic wavefront shaping tools by giving an estimate of how fast wavefront shaping systems need to operate to overcome the dynamic nature of biological samples.

  14. A single lysis solution for the analysis of tissue samples by different proteomic technologies.

    PubMed

    Gromov, Pavel; Celis, Julio E; Gromova, Irina; Rank, Fritz; Timmermans-Wielenga, Vera; Moreira, José M A

    2008-12-01

    Cancer, being a major healthcare concern worldwide, is one of the main targets for the application of emerging proteomic technologies and these tools promise to revolutionize the way cancer will be diagnosed and treated in the near future. Today, as a result of the unprecedented advances that have taken place in molecular biology, cell biology and genomics there is a pressing need to accelerate the translation of basic discoveries into clinical applications. This need, compounded by mounting evidence that cellular model systems are unable to fully recapitulate all biological aspects of human dissease, is driving scientists to increasingly use clinically relevant samples for biomarker and target discovery. Tissues are heterogeneous and as a result optimization of sample preparation is critical for generating accurate, representative, and highly reproducible quantitative data. Although a large number of protocols for preparation of tissue lysates has been published, so far no single recipe is able to provide a "one-size fits all" solubilization procedure that can be used to analyse the same lysate using different proteomics technologies. Here we present evidence showing that cell lysis buffer 1 (CLB1), a lysis solution commercialized by Zeptosens [a division of Bayer (Schweiz) AG], provides excellent sample solubilization and very high 2D PAGE protein resolution both when using carrier ampholytes and immobilized pH gradient strips. Moreover, this buffer can also be used for array-based proteomics (reverse-phase lysate arrays or direct antibody arrays), allowing the direct comparison of qualitative and quantitative data yielded by these technologies when applied to the same samples. The usefulness of the CLB1 solution for gel-based proteomics was further established by 2D PAGE analysis of a number of technically demanding specimens such as breast carcinoma core needle biopsies and problematic tissues such as brain cortex, cerebellum, skeletal muscle, kidney cortex and

  15. Determination of optical properties of oxidative bleaching human dental tissue samples using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Y. R.; Guo, Z. Y.; Shu, S. Y.; Zeng, C. C.; Zhong, H. Q.; Chen, B. L.; Liu, Z. M.; Bao, Y.

    2011-10-01

    Oxidative bleaching changes of human teeth induced changes in the optical properties of dental tissue. We introduced 1310 nm wavelengths of optical coherence tomography (OCT) attenuation coefficient method which is a relatively novel and rarely reported methodology to measure the correlation coefficient during the teeth oxidative bleaching procedure. And the quantitative parameters of enamel optical thickness and disruption of the entrance signal (DES) were extracted from the OCT images. The attenuation coefficient of the bleached tissue is 6.2 mm-1 which is significant (p < 0.001) higher than that unbleached sample is 1.4 mm-1. But attenuation coefficient varied significantly (p < 0.001) between 5.9 and 1.5 mm-1 in dentine which is downtrend. Furthermore, the persistence of bleaching oxidation in 35% hydrogen peroxide-induced optical thickness of enamel is similar with unbleached tissue which may indicate the refractive index of enamel is unchanged. Moreover, disruption of the entrance signal (DES) analysis showed that remarkable difference was appeared at enamel surface. The results indicate that optical properties of oxidative bleaching human dental tissue can be determined by attenuation coefficient using OCT system.

  16. Molecular strain identification of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in archival tissue samples

    PubMed Central

    Zink, A R; Nerlich, A G

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To investigate the use of different molecular analyses that can identify distinct strains of human pathogenic mycobacteria in formalin fixed and paraffin wax embedded archival tissue samples to see whether it is possible to differentiate between the members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (M tuberculosis, M bovis, M africanum, M microti, or M canettii) and/or substrains in a high number of samples. This would be of interest for identifying individual infection traits and superinfection by different mycobacterial strains. Methods: Forty nine archival tissue samples with clinically and/or histologically suspected tuberculosis infection were subjected to molecular DNA analysis. Results: The molecular analysis revealed the presence of M tuberculosis complex DNA in 20 samples, whereas acid fast bacilli could be detected by Ziehl-Neelsen staining in only eight samples. All IS6110 positive samples were further characterised by spoligotyping and seven cases provided M tuberculosis specific signatures, whereas M bovis specific signatures were obtained in four cases. The analysis of mtp40, oxyR, and pncA partial gene sequences confirmed the presence of M tuberculosis in six cases and M bovis in one case. The amplification and sequencing of four further genetic regions (katG, gyrA, TbD1, RD9) characterised six “modern” M tuberculosis strains belonging to genetic groups 2 or 3. Conclusion: This study provides clear evidence that archival paraffin wax embedded material can be used for further studies on the strain identification of M tuberculosis complex strains and can therefore unequivocally be used for the study of the epidemiology and evolution of tuberculosis pathogens. PMID:15509681

  17. Laser Capture Microdissection of Feline Streptomyces spp Pyogranulomatous Dermatitis and Cellulitis.

    PubMed

    Traslavina, R P; Reilly, C M; Vasireddy, R; Samitz, E M; Stepnik, C T; Outerbridge, C; Affolter, V K; Byrne, B A; Lowenstine, L J; White, S D; Murphy, B

    2015-11-01

    Suspected Streptomyces spp infections were identified in 4 cats at UC Davis Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital between 1982 and 2011. Three had ulcerated, dark red mycetomas involving the dermis, subcutis, and fascia with fistulous tracts and/or regional lymphadenopathy. One cat had pyogranulomatous mesenteric lymphadenitis. Granulomatous inflammation in all cats contained colonies of Gram-positive, non-acid-fast organisms. All 4 cats failed to respond to aggressive medical and surgical treatment and were euthanized. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) was used to selectively harvest DNA from the affected formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues. Cloned amplicons from LCM-derived tissue confirmed the presence of Streptomyces spp in the dermatitis cases. Amplicons from the remaining cat with peritoneal involvement aligned with the 16S ribosomal RNA gene for Actinomycetales. Usually considered a contaminant, Streptomyces spp can be associated with refractory pyogranulomatous dermatitis and cellulitis in cats with outdoor access. LCM is useful in the diagnosis of bacterial diseases where contamination may be an issue.

  18. Laser Capture Microdissection of Feline Streptomyces spp Pyogranulomatous Dermatitis and Cellulitis.

    PubMed

    Traslavina, R P; Reilly, C M; Vasireddy, R; Samitz, E M; Stepnik, C T; Outerbridge, C; Affolter, V K; Byrne, B A; Lowenstine, L J; White, S D; Murphy, B

    2015-11-01

    Suspected Streptomyces spp infections were identified in 4 cats at UC Davis Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital between 1982 and 2011. Three had ulcerated, dark red mycetomas involving the dermis, subcutis, and fascia with fistulous tracts and/or regional lymphadenopathy. One cat had pyogranulomatous mesenteric lymphadenitis. Granulomatous inflammation in all cats contained colonies of Gram-positive, non-acid-fast organisms. All 4 cats failed to respond to aggressive medical and surgical treatment and were euthanized. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) was used to selectively harvest DNA from the affected formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues. Cloned amplicons from LCM-derived tissue confirmed the presence of Streptomyces spp in the dermatitis cases. Amplicons from the remaining cat with peritoneal involvement aligned with the 16S ribosomal RNA gene for Actinomycetales. Usually considered a contaminant, Streptomyces spp can be associated with refractory pyogranulomatous dermatitis and cellulitis in cats with outdoor access. LCM is useful in the diagnosis of bacterial diseases where contamination may be an issue. PMID:25516065

  19. A workflow to preserve genome-quality tissue samples from plants in botanical gardens and arboreta1

    PubMed Central

    Gostel, Morgan R.; Kelloff, Carol; Wallick, Kyle; Funk, Vicki A.

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Internationally, gardens hold diverse living collections that can be preserved for genomic research. Workflows have been developed for genomic tissue sampling in other taxa (e.g., vertebrates), but are inadequate for plants. We outline a workflow for tissue sampling intended for two audiences: botanists interested in genomics research and garden staff who plan to voucher living collections. Methods and Results: Standard herbarium methods are used to collect vouchers, label information and images are entered into a publicly accessible database, and leaf tissue is preserved in silica and liquid nitrogen. A five-step approach for genomic tissue sampling is presented for sampling from living collections according to current best practices. Conclusions: Collecting genome-quality samples from gardens is an economical and rapid way to make available for scientific research tissue from the diversity of plants on Earth. The Global Genome Initiative will facilitate and lead this endeavor through international partnerships. PMID:27672517

  20. A workflow to preserve genome-quality tissue samples from plants in botanical gardens and arboreta1

    PubMed Central

    Gostel, Morgan R.; Kelloff, Carol; Wallick, Kyle; Funk, Vicki A.

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Internationally, gardens hold diverse living collections that can be preserved for genomic research. Workflows have been developed for genomic tissue sampling in other taxa (e.g., vertebrates), but are inadequate for plants. We outline a workflow for tissue sampling intended for two audiences: botanists interested in genomics research and garden staff who plan to voucher living collections. Methods and Results: Standard herbarium methods are used to collect vouchers, label information and images are entered into a publicly accessible database, and leaf tissue is preserved in silica and liquid nitrogen. A five-step approach for genomic tissue sampling is presented for sampling from living collections according to current best practices. Conclusions: Collecting genome-quality samples from gardens is an economical and rapid way to make available for scientific research tissue from the diversity of plants on Earth. The Global Genome Initiative will facilitate and lead this endeavor through international partnerships.

  1. Liquid microjunction surface sampling of acetaminophen, terfenadine and their metabolites in thin tissue sections

    SciTech Connect

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Paranthaman, Nithya; Moench, Paul; Catoire, Alexandre; Flarakos, Jimmy; Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this paper was to evaluate the analytical performance of a fully automated droplet-based surface-sampling system for determining the distribution of the drugs acetaminophen and terfenadine, and their metabolites, in rat thin tissue sections. The following are the results: The rank order of acetaminophen concentration observed in tissues was stomach > small intestine > liver, while the concentrations of its glucuronide and sulfate metabolites were greatest in the liver and small intestine. Terfenadine was most concentrated in the liver and kidney, while its major metabolite, fexofenadine, was found in the liver and small intestine. In conclusion, the spatial distributions of both drugs and their respective metabolites observed in this work were consistent with previous studies using radiolabeled drugs.

  2. Liquid microjunction surface sampling of acetaminophen, terfenadine and their metabolites in thin tissue sections

    DOE PAGES

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Paranthaman, Nithya; Moench, Paul; Catoire, Alexandre; Flarakos, Jimmy; Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this paper was to evaluate the analytical performance of a fully automated droplet-based surface-sampling system for determining the distribution of the drugs acetaminophen and terfenadine, and their metabolites, in rat thin tissue sections. The following are the results: The rank order of acetaminophen concentration observed in tissues was stomach > small intestine > liver, while the concentrations of its glucuronide and sulfate metabolites were greatest in the liver and small intestine. Terfenadine was most concentrated in the liver and kidney, while its major metabolite, fexofenadine, was found in the liver and small intestine. In conclusion, the spatialmore » distributions of both drugs and their respective metabolites observed in this work were consistent with previous studies using radiolabeled drugs.« less

  3. Determination of /sup 35/S-aminoacyl-transfer ribonucleic acid specific radioactivity in small tissue samples

    SciTech Connect

    Samarel, A.M.; Ogunro, E.A.; Ferguson, A.G.; Lesch, M.

    1981-11-15

    Rate determination of protein synthesis utilizing tracer amino acid incorporation requires accurate assessment of the specific radioactivity of the labeled precursor aminoacyl-tRNA pool. Previously published methods presumably useful for the measurement of any aminoacyl-tRNA were unsuccessful when applied to (/sup 35/S)methionine, due to the unique chemical properties of this amino acid. Herein we describe modifications of these methods necessary for the measurement of /sup 35/S-aminoacyl-tRNA specific radioactivity from small tissue samples incubated in the presence of (/sup 35/S)methionine. The use of (/sup 35/S)methionine of high specific radioactivity enables analysis of the methionyl-tRNA from less than 100 mg of tissue. Conditions for optimal recovery of /sup 35/S-labeled dansyl-amino acid derivatives are presented and possible applications of this method are discussed.

  4. Laser microdissection coupled with RNA-seq analysis of porcine enterocytes infected with an obligate intracellular pathogen (Lawsonia intracellularis)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lawsonia intracellularis is an obligate intracellular bacterium and the etiologic agent of proliferative enteropathy. The disease is endemic in pigs, emerging in horses and has been described in various other species including nonhuman primates. Cell proliferation is associated with bacterial replication in enterocyte cytoplasm, but the molecular basis of the host-pathogen interaction is unknown. We used laser capture microdissection coupled with RNA-seq technology to characterize the transcriptional responses of infected enterocytes and the host-pathogen interaction. Results Proliferative enterocytes was associated with activation of transcription, protein biosynthesis and genes acting on the G1 phase of the host cell cycle (Rho family). The lack of differentiation in infected enterocytes was demonstrated by the repression of membrane transporters related to nutrient acquisition. The activation of the copper uptake transporter by infected enterocytes was associated with high expression of the Zn/Cu superoxide dismutase by L. intracellularis. This suggests that the intracellular bacteria incorporate intracytoplasmic copper and express a sophisticated mechanism to cope with oxidative stress. Conclusions The feasibility of coupling microdissection and RNA-seq was demonstrated by characterizing the host-bacterial interactions from a specific cell type in a heterogeneous tissue. High expression of L. intracellularis genes encoding hypothetical proteins and activation of host Rho genes infers the role of unrecognized bacterial cyclomodulins in the pathogenesis of proliferative enteropathy. PMID:23800029

  5. Evaluation of sample holders designed for long-lasting X-ray micro-tomographic scans of ex-vivo soft tissue samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudak, J.; Zemlicka, J.; Krejci, F.; Karch, J.; Patzelt, M.; Zach, P.; Sykora, V.; Mrzilkova, J.

    2016-03-01

    X-ray microradiography and microtomography are imaging techniques with increasing applicability in the field of biomedical and preclinical research. Application of hybrid pixel detector Timepix enables to obtain very high contrast of low attenuating materials such as soft biological tissue. However X-ray imaging of ex-vivo soft tissue samples is a difficult task due to its structural instability. Ex-vivo biological tissue is prone to fast drying-out which is connected with undesired changes of sample size and shape producing later on artefacts within the tomographic reconstruction. In this work we present the optimization of our Timepix equipped micro-CT system aiming to maintain soft tissue sample in stable condition. Thanks to the suggested approach higher contrast of tomographic reconstructions can be achieved while also large samples that require detector scanning can be easily measured.

  6. A Smart Haptic Hand-Held Device for Neurosurgical Microdissection.

    PubMed

    Payne, Christopher J; Marcus, Hani J; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2015-09-01

    Microneurosurgery requires dexterity, precision and delicate force application in order to be carried out safely and effectively. Neurosurgeons must apply sufficient force in order to carry out microsurgical procedures effectively but not excessive force such that iatrogenic injury occurs. This paper presents a smart hand-held microsurgical instrument that indicates to the surgeon when a force-threshold has been exceeded by providing vibrotactile feedback. Many existing haptic-feedback systems, particularly master-slave robotic platforms, are large, highly complex, and costly. By comparison, the proposed device is compact, fail-safe and low cost. Two psychophysical user studies were carried out to assess the proposed vibrotactile force-threshold feedback system. A cadaveric pilot study was carried out to evaluate the device in a microdissection task. In all the studies performed, the haptic dissector device has shown to be effective in providing real-time feedback in terms of force application during microsurgical tasks. PMID:25631207

  7. UV-laser microdissection system - A novel approach for the preparation of high-resolution stable isotope records (δ13C/δ18O) from tree rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schollaen, Karina; Helle, Gerhard

    2013-04-01

    Intra-annual stable isotope (δ13C and δ18O) studies of tree rings at various incremental resolutions have been attempting to extract valuable seasonal climatic and environmental information or assessing plant ecophysiological processes. For preparing high-resolution isotope samples normally wood segments or cores are mechanically divided in radial direction or cut in tangential direction. After mechanical dissection, wood samples are ground to a fine powder and either cellulose is extracted or bulk wood samples are analyzed. Here, we present a novel approach for the preparation of high-resolution stable isotope records from tree rings using an UV-laser microdissection system. Firstly, tree-ring cellulose is directly extracted from wholewood cross-sections largely leaving the wood anatomical structure intact and saving time as compared to the classical procedure. Secondly, micro-samples from cellulose cross-sections are dissected with an UV-Laser dissection microscope. Tissues of interest from cellulose cross-sections are identified and marked precisely with a screen-pen and dissected via an UV-laser beam. Dissected cellulose segments were automatically collected in capsules and are prepared for stable isotope (δ13C and δ18O) analysis. The new techniques facilitate inter- and intra-annual isotope analysis on tree-ring and open various possibilities for comparisons with wood anatomy in plant eco-physiological studies. We describe the design and the handling of this novel methodology and discuss advantages and constraints given by the example of intra-annual oxygen isotope analysis on tropical trees.

  8. Microscopy and elemental analysis in tissue samples using computed microtomography with synchrotron x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Spanne, P.; Rivers, M.L.

    1988-01-01

    The initial development shows that CMT using synchrotron x-rays can be developed to ..mu..m spatial resolution and perhaps even better. This creates a new microscopy technique which is of special interest in morphological studies of tissues, since no chemical preparation or slicing of the sample is necessary. The combination of CMT with spatial resolution in the ..mu..m range and elemental mapping with sensitivity in the ppM range results in a new tool for elemental mapping at the cellular level. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Assessment of bioburden on human and animal tissues: part 2--results of testing of human tissue and qualification of a composite sample for routine bioburden determination.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, John B; Merritt, Karen; Gocke, David; Osborne, Joel

    2012-08-01

    A quantitative method was developed and validated to assess bioburden on tissue from human donors and to compare bioburden determination results to swab culture results from the same donor. An initial study with allograft tissue from 101 donors showed a wide range of bioburden levels; values from no colony-forming units (CFU) detected to >28,000 CFU were observed. Tissues from donors that had swab cultures negative for objectionable microorganisms generally had lower bioburden than tissues from donors where objectionable microorganisms were recovered by swab culturing. In a follow-up study with 1,445 donors, a wide range of bioburden levels was again observed on tissues from donors that were swab culture negative for objectionable microorganisms. Tissues from 885 (61%) of these donors had no recoverable bioburden (<2 CFU). Importantly, tissues from 560 (39%) of the donors had recoverable bioburden which ranged from 1 to >24,000 CFU. Identification of bioburden isolates showed a diversity of genera and species. In compliance with the recent revision of the American Association of Tissue Banks K2.210 Standard, the quantitative bioburden determination method was validated with a composite tissue sample that contains bone and soft tissue sections tested together in one extraction vessel. A recovery efficiency of 68% was validated and the composite sample was shown to be representative of all of the tissues recovered from a donor. The use of the composite sample in conjunction with the quantitative bioburden determination method will facilitate an accurate assessment of the numbers and types of contaminating microorganisms on allografts prior to disinfection/sterilization. This information will ensure that disinfection/sterilization processes are properly validated and the capability of the overall allograft process is understood on a donor by donor basis.

  10. METHODS FOR USING 3-D ULTRASOUND SPECKLE TRACKING IN BIAXIAL MECHANICAL TESTING OF BIOLOGICAL TISSUE SAMPLES

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Choon Hwai; Park, Dae Woo; Dutta, Debaditya; Simon, Marc; Kim, Kang

    2014-01-01

    Being multilayered and anisotropic, biological tissues such as cardiac and arterial walls are structurally complex, making full assessment and understanding of their mechanical behavior challenging. Current standard mechanical testing uses surface markers to track tissue deformations and does not provide deformation data below the surface. In the study described here, we found that combining mechanical testing with 3-D ultrasound speckle tracking could overcome this limitation. Rat myocardium was tested with a biaxial tester and was concurrently scanned with high-frequency ultrasound in three dimensions. The strain energy function was computed from stresses and strains using an iterative non-linear curve-fitting algorithm. Because the strain energy function consists of terms for the base matrix and for embedded fibers, spatially varying fiber orientation was also computed by curve fitting. Using finite-element simulations, we first validated the accuracy of the non-linear curve-fitting algorithm. Next, we compared experimentally measured rat myocardium strain energy function values with those in the literature and found a matching order of magnitude. Finally, we retained samples after the experiments for fiber orientation quantification using histology and found that the results satisfactorily matched those computed in the experiments. We conclude that 3-D ultrasound speckle tracking can be a useful addition to traditional mechanical testing of biological tissues and may provide the benefit of enabling fiber orientation computation. PMID:25616585

  11. Persistent synthetic chlorinated hydrocarbons in albatross tissue samples from Midway Atoll

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, P.D.; Hannah, D.J.; Buckland, S.J.

    1996-10-01

    Anthropogenic organic contaminants have been found in even the most remote locations. To assess the global distribution and possible effects of such contaminants, the authors examined the tissues of two species of albatross collected from Midway Atoll in the central North Pacific Ocean. These birds have an extensive feeding range covering much of the subtropical and northern Pacific Ocean. Anthropogenic contaminants were found at relatively great concentrations in these birds. The sum of 19 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners ranged from 177 ng/g wet weight in eggs to 2,750 ng/g wet weight in adult fat. Total toxic equivalents (TEQs) derived from polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and dibenzofurans (PCDFs) ranged from 17.2 to 297 pg/g wet weight in the same tissues, while the inclusion of TEQs from PCBs increased these values to 48.4 and 769 pg/g wet weight, respectively. While contaminant concentrations varied between species and tissues, the contaminant profile was relatively uniform. The profile of contaminants detected was unusual in that much of the TEQs was contributed by two pentachlorinated congeners (2,3,4,7,8-pentachlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin), and the profiles of PCB congeners did not match known sources. When compared to other studies the concentrations detected in the Midway Atoll samples were near or above the thresholds known to cause adverse effects in other fish-eating bird species.

  12. MicroRNA Profiling from RSV-Infected Biofluids, Whole Blood, and Tissue Samples.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Lydia; Jorquera, Patricia A; Tripp, Ralph A

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have shown that respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) can modulate the host innate immune response by dysregulation of host microRNAs (miRNAs) related to the antiviral response, a feature that also affects the memory immune response to RSV (Thornburg et al. MBio 3(6), 2012). miRNAs are small, endogenous, noncoding RNAs that function in posttranscriptional gene regulation. Here, we explain a compilation of methods for the purification, quantification, and characterization of miRNA expression profiles in biofluids, whole blood samples, and tissue samples obtained from in vivo studies. In addition, this chapter describes methods for the isolation of exosomal miRNA populations. Understanding alterations in miRNA expression profiles and identifying miRNA targets genes, and their contribution to the pathogenesis of RSV, may help elucidate novel mechanism of host-virus interaction (Rossi et al., Pediatr Pulmonol, 2015). PMID:27464696

  13. Variable ploidy of ovarian clear cell carcinomas. Implications for adequacy of tissue sampling.

    PubMed

    Listinsky, C M; Bonfiglio, T A; Leary, J

    1988-02-01

    Ten cases of clear cell (mesonephroid) adenocarcinoma of the ovary were examined for (1) variations of morphology within each tumor and its metastases, (2) ploidy of each morphologic region and (3) clinical behavior. Correlations were sought among these factors. Analysis of the ploidy in up to six morphologic regions per tumor showed variations in the ploidy in seven of the ten cases, with all seven having both diploid and nondiploid regions. The presence or absence of abnormal ploidy was not predictable based on the histomorphologic appearance of a given section. These results suggest that (1) the evaluation of a single random tissue sample may not discover aneuploidy that is present and (2) future ploidy studies on malignant tumors may require extensive tumor sampling in order to definitively exclude the presence of aneuploid populations.

  14. Rapid microarray-based genotyping of Chlamydia spp. strains from clinical tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Sachse, Konrad; Ruettger, Anke

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic Chlamydia (C.) psittaci and C. trachomatis strains can be genotyped based on variations in the ompA genomic locus. In the present chapter, we describe rapid genotyping assays for both chlamydial agents using the ArrayStrip™ (AS) microarray platform. The test is targeting multiple discriminatory sites in the variable domains of the ompA gene by using 35 (C. psittaci) and 61 (C. trachomatis) oligonucleotide probes representing genotype-specific polymorphisms. In addition to discrimination among the established genotypes, this approach allows identification of atypical strains that were not accessible to typing using previously established techniques, such as PCR-RFLP or serotyping. The present DNA microarray assay can be conducted directly on clinical tissue samples and is suitable for tracing epidemiological chains and exploring the dissemination of particular genotypes. The procedure is easy to handle and economically affordable, and it allows genotyping of up to 32 clinical samples per day, thus lending itself for routine diagnosis as well.

  15. Tissue proteomics using capillary isoelectric focusing-based multidimensional separations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yueju; Balgley, Brian M; Lee, Cheng S

    2005-10-01

    The capabilities of capillary isoelectric focusing-based multidimensional separations for performing proteome analysis from minute samples create new opportunities in the pursuit of biomarker discovery using enriched and selected cell populations procured from tissue specimens. In this article, recent advances in online integration of capillary isoelectric focusing with nano-reversed phase liquid chromatography for achieving high-resolution peptide and protein separations prior to mass spectrometry analysis are reviewed, along with its potential application to tissue proteomics. These proteome technological advances combined with recently developed tissue microdissection techniques, provide powerful tools for those seeking to gain a greater understanding at the global level of the cellular machinery associated with human diseases such as cancer.

  16. Feasibility of direct digital sampling for diffuse optical frequency domain spectroscopy in tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roblyer, Darren; O'Sullivan, Thomas D.; Warren, Robert V.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2013-04-01

    Frequency domain optical spectroscopy in the diffusive regime is currently being investigated for biomedical applications including tumor detection, therapy monitoring, exercise metabolism and others. Analog homodyne or heterodyne detection of sinusoidally modulated signals has been the predominant method for measuring phase and amplitude of photon density waves that have traversed through tissue. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing direct digital sampling of modulated signals using a 3.6 gigasample/second 12 bit analog to digital converter. Digitally synthesized modulated signals between 50 MHz and 400 MHz were measured on tissue-simulating phantoms at six near-infrared wavelengths. An amplitude and phase precision of 1% and 0.6° were achieved during drift tests. Amplitude, phase, scattering and absorption values were compared with a well-characterized network analyzer-based diffuse optical device. Optical properties measured with both systems were within 3.6% for absorption and 2.8% for scattering over a range of biologically relevant values. Direct digital sampling represents a viable method for frequency domain diffuse optical spectroscopy and has the potential to reduce system complexity, size and cost.

  17. Evaluation of convenient pretreatment protocols for RNA virus metagenomics in serum and tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Rosseel, Toon; Ozhelvaci, Orkun; Freimanis, Graham; Van Borm, Steven

    2015-09-15

    Viral metagenomic approaches are increasingly being used for viral discovery. Various strategies are applied to enrich viral sequences, but there is often a lack of knowledge about their effective influence on the viral discovery sensitivity. We evaluate some convenient and widely used approaches for RNA virus discovery in clinical samples in order to reveal their sensitivity and potential bias introduced by the enrichment or amplifications steps. An RNA virus was artificially spiked at a fixed titer in serum and lung tissue, respectively, low and high nucleic acid content matrices. For serum, a simple DNase treatment on the RNA extract gave the maximum gain in proportion of viral sequences (83×), and a subsequent ribosomal RNA removal nearly doubled once more the proportion of viral sequences. For lung tissue, a ribosomal RNA depletion step on the RNA extract had the biggest gain in proportion of viral sequences (32×). We show also that direct sequencing of cDNA is recommended above an extra random PCR amplification step, and a that the virion enrichment strategy (filtration and nuclease treatment) has a beneficial effect for sequencing-based virus discovery. Our findings provide sample-dependent guidelines for targeted virus discovery strategies.

  18. Protocol: High-throughput and quantitative assays of auxin and auxin precursors from minute tissue samples

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The plant hormone auxin, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), plays important roles in plant growth and development. The signaling response to IAA is largely dependent on the local concentration of IAA, and this concentration is regulated by multiple mechanisms in plants. Therefore, the precise quantification of local IAA concentration provides insights into the regulation of IAA and its biological roles. Meanwhile, pathways and genes involved in IAA biosynthesis are not fully understood, so it is necessary to analyze the production of IAA at the metabolite level for unbiased studies of IAA biosynthesis. Results We have developed high-throughput methods to quantify plant endogenous IAA and its biosynthetic precursors including indole, tryptophan, indole-3-pyruvic acid (IPyA), and indole-3-butyric acid (IBA). The protocol starts with homogenizing plant tissues with stable-labeled internal standards added, followed by analyte purification using solid phase extraction (SPE) tips and analyte derivatization. The derivatized analytes are finally analyzed by selected reaction monitoring on a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS/MS) to determine the precise abundance of analytes. The amount of plant tissue required for the assay is small (typically 2–10 mg fresh weight), and the use of SPE tips is simple and convenient, which allows preparation of large sets of samples within reasonable time periods. Conclusions The SPE tips and GC-MS/MS based method enables high-throughput and accurate quantification of IAA and its biosynthetic precursors from minute plant tissue samples. The protocol can be used for measurement of these endogenous compounds using isotope dilution, and it can also be applied to analyze IAA biosynthesis and biosynthetic pathways using stable isotope labeling. The method will potentially advance knowledge of the role and regulation of IAA. PMID:22883136

  19. Identification of fungal pathogens in Formalin-fixed, Paraffin-embedded tissue samples by molecular methods.

    PubMed

    Rickerts, Volker

    2016-02-01

    The etiology of invasive fungal infections (IFI) is incompletely understood due to diagnostic limitations including insensitivity of cultures and failure of histopathology to discriminate between different species. This diagnostic gap precludes the optimal use of antifungals, leading to adverse patient outcomes. The identification of fungal pathogens from Formalin-fixed, Paraffin-embedded tissue (FFPE) blocks by molecular methods is emerging as an alternative approach to study the etiology of IFI. PCR assays, including species specific- and broadrange fungal tests are used with FFPE samples from patients with proven IFI. Fungal species identification is achieved in 15-90% of the samples. This heterogeneity may be explained by the samples studied. However, comparison of different studies is impaired, as controls ruling out false positive-, false negative test results or PCR inhibition are frequently not reported. Studies using in situ hybridization also vary in the clinical samples included and the targeted fungi. In addition, target sequences, the probe chemistry and the detection of hybridization signals also account for the differences in diagnostic sensitivity. Using both approaches in parallel yields additive insights, potentially leading to a superior identification of fungal etiology and awareness of the limitations of both molecular diagnostic approaches.

  20. Liquid Microjunction Surface Sampling Probe Electrospray Mass Spectrometry for Detection of Drugs and Metabolites in Thin Tissue Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Van Berkel, Gary J; Kertesz, Vilmos; Koeplinger, Kenneth A.; Vavek, Marissa; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony

    2008-01-01

    A self-aspirating, liquid micro-junction surface sampling probe/electrospray emitter mass spectrometry system was demonstrated for use in the direct analysis of spotted and dosed drugs and their metabolites in thin tissue sections. Proof-of-principle sampling and analysis directly from tissue without the need for sample preparation was demonstrated first by raster scanning a region on a section of rat liver onto which reserpine was spotted. The mass spectral signal from selected reaction monitoring was used to develop a chemical image of the spotted drug on the tissue. The probe was also used to selectively spot sample areas of sagittal whole mouse body tissue sections that had been dosed orally (90 mg/kg) with R,S-sulforaphane 3 hrs prior to sacrifice. Sulforaphane and its glutathione and N-acetyl cysteine conjugates were monitored with selected reaction monitoring and detected in the stomach and various other tissues from the dosed mouse. No signal for these species was observed in the tissue from a control mouse. The same dosed tissue section was used to illustrate the possibility of obtaining a line scan across the whole body section. In total these results illustrate the potential for rapid screening of the distribution of drugs and metabolites in tissue sections with the micro-liquid junction surface sampling probe/electrospray mass spectrometry approach.

  1. MicroRNA Profiling of Laser-Microdissected Hepatocellular Carcinoma Reveals an Oncogenic Phenotype of the Tumor Capsule123

    PubMed Central

    Peveling-Oberhag, Jan; Seiz, Anna; Döring, Claudia; Hartmann, Sylvia; Köberle, Verena; Liese, Juliane; Zeuzem, Stefan; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; Piiper, Albrecht

    2014-01-01

    Several microRNAs (miRNAs) are associated with the molecular pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, previous studies analyzing the dysregulation of miRNAs in HCC show heterogeneous results. We hypothesized that part of this heterogeneity might be attributable to variations of miRNA expression deriving from the HCC capsule or the fibrotic septa within the peritumoral tissue used as controls. Tissue from surgically resected hepatitis C–associated HCC from six well-matched patients was microdissected using laser microdissection and pressure catapulting technique. Four distinct histologic compartments were isolated: tumor parenchyma (TP), fibrous capsule of the tumor (TC), tumor-adjacent liver parenchyma (LP), and cirrhotic septa of the tumor-adjacent liver (LC). MiRNA expression profiling analysis of 1105 mature miRNAs and precursors was performed using miRNA microarray. Principal component analysis and consecutive pairwise supervised comparisons demonstrated distinct patterns of expressed miRNAs not only for TP versus LP (e.g., intratumoral down-regulation of miR-214, miR-199a, miR-146a, and miR-125a; P< .05) but also for TC versus LC (including down-regulation within TC of miR-126, miR-99a/100, miR-26a, and miR-125b; P< .05). The tumor capsule therefore demonstrates a tumor-like phenotype with down-regulation of well-known tumor-suppressive miRNAs. Variations of co-analyzed fibrotic tissue within the tumor or in controls may have profound influence on miRNA expression analyses in HCC. Several miRNAs, which are proposed to be HCC specific, may indeed be rather associated to the tumor capsule. As miRNAs evolve to be important biomarkers in liver tumors, the presented data have important translational implications on diagnostics and treatment in patients with HCC. PMID:25500075

  2. Biomarker discovery and identification in laser microdissected head and neck squamous cell carcinoma with ProteinChip technology, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, tandem mass spectrometry, and immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Melle, Christian; Ernst, Gunther; Schimmel, Bettina; Bleul, Annett; Koscielny, Sven; Wiesner, Andreas; Bogumil, Ralf; Moller, Ursula; Osterloh, Dirk; Halbhuber, Karl-Jurgen; von Eggeling, Ferdinand

    2003-07-01

    Head and neck cancer is a frequent malignancy with a complex, and up to now not clear etiology. Therefore, despite of improvements in diagnosis and therapy, the survival rate with head and neck squamous-cell carcinomas is poor. For a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind the process of tumorigenesis and tumor progression, we have analyzed changes of protein expression between microdissected normal pharyngeal epithelium and tumor tissue by ProteinChip technology. For this, cryostat sections from head and neck tumors (n = 57) and adjacent mucosa (n = 44) were laser-microdissected and analyzed on ProteinChip arrays. The derived mass spectrometry profiles exhibited numerous statistical differences. One peak significantly higher expressed in the tumor (p = 0.000029) was isolated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and identified as annexin V by in-gel proteolytic digestion, peptide mapping, tandem mass spectrometry analysis, and immuno-deplete assay. The relevance of this single marker protein was further evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Annexin-positive tissue areas were re-analyzed on ProteinChip arrays to confirm the identity of this protein. In this study, we could show that biomarker in head and neck cancer can be found, identified, and assessed by combination of ProteinChip technology, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and immunohistochemistry. In our experience, however, such studies only make sense if a relatively pure microdissected tumor tissue is used. Only then minute changes in protein expression between normal pharyngeal epithelium and tumor tissue can be detected, and it will become possible to educe a tumor-associated protein pattern that might be used as a marker for tumorigenesis and progression. PMID:12824440

  3. Mapping international practice patterns in EUS-guided tissue sampling: outcome of a global survey

    PubMed Central

    van Riet, Priscilla A.; Cahen, Djuna L.; Poley, Jan-Werner; Bruno, Marco J.

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Although Endoscopic Ultrasound (EUS)-guided tissue sampling is widely used, the optimal sampling strategy remains subject of debate. We evaluated practice patterns within the international endosonographic community. Patients and methods: An online questionnaire was sent to 400 endosonographers from the United States, Europe, and Asia. Results: A total of 186 (47 %) endosonographers participated: United States 54 (29 %), Europe 85 (46 %), and Asia 47 (25 %). European (75 %) and Asian (84 %) respondents routinely check coagulation status, whereas US respondents only check on indication (64 %, P = 0.007). While propofol sedation is standard in the United States (83 %), conscious sedation is still widely used in Europe (52 %) and Asia (84 %, P < 0.001). Overall, the 22-gauge needle is most commonly used (52 %). For fine-needle aspiration (FNA) of solid pancreatic lesions, 22-gauge (45 %) and 25-gauge (49 %) needles are used equally. For fine-needle biopsy (FNB) of solid masses, the 25-gauge device is less favored than the 22-gauge FNA device (49 % versus 21 %). The 19-gauge needle is generally used for FNB of submucosal masses (62 %). Rapid on-site pathological evaluation (ROSE) is utilized more often by US (98 %) than by European and Asian respondents (51 %, P < 0.001). Cytolyt (52 %), formalin (15 %) and alcohol (15 %) are used for FNA specimen preservation in the United States and Europe, while saline (27 %) and alcohol (38 %) are widely used in Asia (P < 0.001). Conclusions: EUS-guided tissue sampling practices vary substantially within the international endosonographic community and differ considerably from recommendations expressed in guidelines. Because the clinical relevance of these variations is largely unknown, the outcome of this survey suggests a need for further studies. PMID:27227103

  4. Early transcriptomic events in microdissected Arabidopsis nematode-induced giant cells.

    PubMed

    Barcala, Marta; García, Alejandra; Cabrera, Javier; Casson, Stuart; Lindsey, Keith; Favery, Bruno; García-Casado, Gloria; Solano, Roberto; Fenoll, Carmen; Escobar, Carolina

    2010-02-01

    Root-knot nematodes differentiate highly specialized feeding cells in roots (giant cells, GCs), through poorly characterized mechanisms that include extensive transcriptional changes. While global transcriptome analyses have used galls, which are complex root structures that include GCs and surrounding tissues, no global gene expression changes specific to GCs have been described. We report on the differential transcriptome of GCs versus root vascular cells, induced in Arabidopsis by Meloidogyne javanica at a very early stage of their development, 3 days after infection (d.p.i.). Laser microdissection was used to capture GCs and root vascular cells for microarray analysis, which was validated through qPCR and by a promoter-GUS fusion study. Results show that by 3 d.p.i., GCs exhibit major gene repression. Although some genes showed similar regulation in both galls and GCs, the majority had different expression patterns, confirming the molecular distinctiveness of the GCs within the gall. Most of the differentially regulated genes in GCs have no previously assigned function. Comparisons with other transcriptome analyses revealed similarities between GCs and cell suspensions differentiating into xylem cells. This suggests a molecular link between GCs and developing vascular cells, which represent putative GC stem cells. Gene expression in GCs at 3 d.p.i. was also found to be similar to crown galls induced by Agrobacterium tumefaciens, a specialized root biotroph. PMID:20003167

  5. Cupula-receptor cell relationships with evidence provided by SEM microdissection.

    PubMed

    Barber, V C; Emerson, C J

    1979-01-01

    Ampullae from the inner ear of the skate, Raja ocellata, were examined by SEM to further elucidate the relationships of the sensory hairs of the receptor cells to the overlying cupula. Specimens were prepared by a variety of methods and were fractured to visualize these relationships. Critical point drying resulted in good cellular and sensory hair preservation, but the cupulae were grossly shrunken. Freeze-dried cupulae, in contrast, more closely approximated the in vivo condition. Although tissues suffered freezing damage, sensory hair bundles were readily discerned. In both critical point dried and freeze-dried ampullae, the peripheral hair cell bundles and the kinocilia of most of the central hair cells, extended across the subcupular space and contacted the cupular material. Some of the specimens were further investigated by dissection in the SEM, the process being viewed in real time stereo. Microdissection confirmed that most kinocilia were attached to the cupula. When the cupula was displaced, sensory hair bundles remained attached to it and broke preferentially at their base from the receptor cells.

  6. Contact-free isolation of sperm and epithelial cells by laser microdissection and pressure catapulting.

    PubMed

    Seidl, Stephan; Burgemeister, Renate; Hausmann, Roland; Betz, Peter; Lederer, Thomas

    2005-06-01

    With the PALM MicroBeam system, precise laser microdissection of single cells from cell smears or tissue preparations is possible. Furthermore, this system uses a contact-free and therefore contamination-free laser pressure catapulting technique in which high energy generated by a focused laser pulse catapults single dissected cells into a collecting vessel. In this study, this technique was tested for forensic purposes with smear preparations from postcoital vaginal swabs, sperm swabs, and buccal cell swabs on different types of microscopic slides. Apart from super-frosted slides, cutting and catapulting of selected cells was possible in all cases. Subsequent polymerase chain reaction was performed using the genRES MPX-2 Amplification Kit. In the case of sperm cells stained with hematoxylin and eosin, fragments larger than approximately 200 bp could not be detected. Partial genetic profiles were obtained for DNA amounts originating from only two cell equivalents. Complete profiles, however, were observed with all preparations of a minimum of 10 epithelial cells, demonstrating a potential benefit of this technique for the contamination-free forensic analysis of extremely small specimens or mixed stains. PMID:25869953

  7. Contact-free isolation of sperm and epithelial cells by laser microdissection and pressure catapulting.

    PubMed

    Seidl, Stephan; Burgemeister, Renate; Hausmann, Roland; Betz, Peter; Lederer, Thomas

    2005-06-01

    With the PALM MicroBeam system, precise laser microdissection of single cells from cell smears or tissue preparations is possible. Furthermore, this system uses a contact-free and therefore contamination-free laser pressure catapulting technique in which high energy generated by a focused laser pulse catapults single dissected cells into a collecting vessel. In this study, this technique was tested for forensic purposes with smear preparations from postcoital vaginal swabs, sperm swabs, and buccal cell swabs on different types of microscopic slides. Apart from super-frosted slides, cutting and catapulting of selected cells was possible in all cases. Subsequent polymerase chain reaction was performed using the genRES MPX-2 Amplification Kit. In the case of sperm cells stained with hematoxylin and eosin, fragments larger than approximately 200 bp could not be detected. Partial genetic profiles were obtained for DNA amounts originating from only two cell equivalents. Complete profiles, however, were observed with all preparations of a minimum of 10 epithelial cells, demonstrating a potential benefit of this technique for the contamination-free forensic analysis of extremely small specimens or mixed stains.

  8. Multimodal Raman-fluorescence spectroscopy of formalin fixed samples is able to discriminate brain tumors from dysplastic tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Suresh; Cicchi, Riccardo; Giordano, Flavio; Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Pavone, Francesco Saverio

    2014-05-01

    In the recent years, there has been a considerable surge in the application of spectroscopy for disease diagnosis. Raman and fluorescence spectra provide characteristic spectral profile related to biochemical and morphological changes when tissues progress from normal state towards malignancy. Spectroscopic techniques offer the advantage of being minimally invasive compared to traditional histopathology, real time and quantitative. In biomedical optical diagnostics, freshly excised specimens are preferred for making ex-vivo spectroscopic measurements. With regard to fresh tissues, if the lab is located far away from the clinic it could pose a problem as spectral measurements have to be performed immediately after dissection. Tissue samples are usually placed in a fixative agent such as 4% formaldehyde to preserve the samples before processing them for routine histopathological studies. Fixation prevents the tissues from decomposition by arresting autolysis. In the present study, we intend to investigate the possibility of using formalin fixed samples for discrimination of brain tumours from dysplastic tissue using Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy. Formalin fixed samples were washed with phosphate buffered saline for about 5 minutes in order to remove the effects of formalin during spectroscopic measurements. In case of fluorescence spectroscopy, changes in spectral profile have been observed in the region between 550-670 nm between dysplastic and tumor samples. For Raman measurements, we found significant differences in the spectral profiles between dysplasia and tumor. In conclusion, formalin fixed samples can be potentially used for the spectroscopic discrimination of tumor against dysplastic tissue in brain samples.

  9. One-step labeling of degenerative neurons in unfixed brain tissue samples using Fluoro-Jade C.

    PubMed

    Gu, Qiang; Schmued, Larry C; Sarkar, Sumit; Paule, Merle G; Raymick, Bryan

    2012-06-30

    Neurodegeneration is the underlying cause of a vast majority of neurological disorders and often a result of brain trauma, stroke, or neurotoxic insult. Here we describe a simple method for labeling degenerating neurons in unfixed brain tissue samples. This method could provide a new avenue for identifying and harvesting degenerative neurons from unfixed brain tissues for subsequent molecular analyses.

  10. Sources of Technical Variability in Quantitative LC-MS Proteomics: Human Brain Tissue Sample Analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Piehowski, Paul D.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Orton, Daniel J.; Xie, Fang; Moore, Ronald J.; Ramirez Restrepo, Manuel; Engel, Anzhelika; Lieberman, Andrew P.; Albin, Roger L.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Myers, Amanda J.

    2013-05-03

    To design a robust quantitative proteomics study, an understanding of both the inherent heterogeneity of the biological samples being studied as well as the technical variability of the proteomics methods and platform is needed. Additionally, accurately identifying the technical steps associated with the largest variability would provide valuable information for the improvement and design of future processing pipelines. We present an experimental strategy that allows for a detailed examination of the variability of the quantitative LC-MS proteomics measurements. By replicating analyses at different stages of processing, various technical components can be estimated and their individual contribution to technical variability can be dissected. This design can be easily adapted to other quantitative proteomics pipelines. Herein, we applied this methodology to our label-free workflow for the processing of human brain tissue. For this application, the pipeline was divided into four critical components: Tissue dissection and homogenization (extraction), protein denaturation followed by trypsin digestion and SPE clean-up (digestion), short-term run-to-run instrumental response fluctuation (instrumental variance), and long-term drift of the quantitative response of the LC-MS/MS platform over the 2 week period of continuous analysis (instrumental stability). From this analysis, we found the following contributions to variability: extraction (72%) >> instrumental variance (16%) > instrumental stability (8.4%) > digestion (3.1%). Furthermore, the stability of the platform and its’ suitability for discovery proteomics studies is demonstrated.

  11. Application of laser microdissection to identify the mycorrhizal fungi that establish arbuscules inside root cells.

    PubMed

    Berruti, Andrea; Borriello, Roberto; Lumini, Erica; Scariot, Valentina; Bianciotto, Valeria; Balestrini, Raffaella

    2013-01-01

    Obligate symbiotic fungi that form arbuscular mycorrhizae (AMF; belonging to the Glomeromycota phylum) are some of the most important soil microorganisms. AMFs facilitate mineral nutrient uptake from the soil, in exchange for plant-assimilated carbon, and promote water-stress tolerance and resistance to certain diseases. AMFs colonize the root by producing inter- and intra-cellular hyphae. When the fungus penetrates the inner cortical cells, it produces a complex ramified structure called arbuscule, which is considered the preferential site for nutrient exchange. Direct DNA extraction from the whole root and sequencing of ribosomal gene regions are commonly carried out to investigate intraradical AMF communities. Nevertheless, this protocol cannot discriminate between the AMFs that actively produce arbuscules and those that do not. To solve this issue, the authors have characterized the AMF community of arbusculated cells (AC) through a laser microdissection (LMD) approach, combined with sequencing-based taxa identification. The results were then compared with the AMF community that was found from whole root DNA extraction. The AMF communities originating from the LMD samples and the whole root samples differed remarkably. Five taxa were involved in the production of arbuscules, while two taxa were retrieved inside the root but not in the AC. Unexpectedly, one taxon was found in the AC, but its detection was not possible when extracting from the whole root. Thus, the LMD technique can be considered a powerful tool to obtain more precise knowledge on the symbiotically active intraradical AMF community.

  12. Cellulase activity screening using pure carboxymethylcellulose: application to soluble cellulolytic samples and to plant tissue prints.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, Hanne R; Krause, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    Reliable, rapid and inexpensive detection of cellulolytic enzymes that can be used for a wide variety of biological and environmental samples are currently in high demand. Here, a new cellulase detection protocol is described that circumvents problems observed with popular agar-based methods by exploiting the ability of carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) to form gel-like surfaces on its own. These pure CMC-layers are sensitive to cellulolytic degradation and stainable by Gram's iodine without showing unwelcome reactions with other enzymes. The staining intensity negatively correlates with the enzyme activity and can be used for quantification. Cellulase activities are not obstructed by high sugar contents (e.g., in plant material) which limit the applicability of other quantification methods, making our new method particularly attractive for screening of plant extracts. A useful variant of this new method is its applicability to plant tissue prints for spatial mapping of the cellulolytic activity in a zymogram-like fashion. PMID:24413752

  13. In vivo optical detection of pH in microscopic tissue samples of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kašík, Ivan; Podrazký, Ondřej; Mrázek, Jan; Martan, Tomáš; Matějec, Vlastimil; Hoyerová, Klára; Kamínek, Miroslav

    2013-12-01

    Minimally invasive in vivo measurement of pH in microscopic biological samples of μm or μl size, e.g. plant cells, tissues and saps, may help to explain complex biological processes. Consequently, techniques to achieve such measurements are a focus of interest for botanists. This paper describes a technique for the in vivo measurement of pH in the range pH5.0 to pH7.8 in microscopic plant tissue samples of Arabidopsis thaliana based on a ratiometric fluorescence method using low-loss robust tapered fiber probes. For this purpose tapered fiber probes were prepared and coated with a detection layer containing ion-paired fluorescent pH-transducer 8-hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid trisodium salt (c-HPTS). A fluorescence ratiometric approach was employed based on excitation at 415 nm and 450 nm and on the comparison of the fluorescence response at 515 nm. The suitability of tapered fiber probes for local detection of pH between 5.0 and 7.8 was demonstrated. A pH sensitivity of 0.15 pH units was achieved within the pH ranges 5.0-5.9 and 7.1-7.8, and this was improved to 0.04 pH units within the pH range 5.9-7.1. Spatial resolution of the probes was better than 20 μm and a time response within 15-20s was achieved. Despite the minute dimensions of the tapered fiber probes the setup developed was relatively robust and compact in construction and performed reliably. It has been successfully employed for the in vivo local determination of pH of mechanically resistant plant tissues of A. thaliana of microscopic scale. The detection of momentary pH gradients across the intact plant seems to be a good tool for the determination of changes in pH in response to experimental treatments affecting for example enzyme activities, availability of mineral nutrients, hormonal control of plant development and plant responses to environmental cues.

  14. The stage-specific testicular germ cell apoptotic response to low-dose X-irradiation and 2,5-hexanedione combined exposure. I: Validation of the laser capture microdissection method for qRT-PCR array application.

    PubMed

    Catlin, Natasha R; Huse, Susan M; Boekelheide, Kim

    2014-12-01

    Over the past decade, laser capture microdissection (LCM) has grown as a tool for gene expression profiling of small numbers of cells from tumor samples and of specific cell populations in complex tissues. LCM can be used to study toxicant effects on selected cell populations within the testis at different stages of spermatogenesis. There are several LCM-related hurdles to overcome, including issues inherent to the method itself, as well as biases that result from amplifying the LCM-isolated RNA. Many technical issues associated with the LCM method are addressed here, including increasing RNA yield and obtaining more accurate quantification of RNA yields. We optimized the LCM method optimized to generate RNA quantities sufficient for quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) array analysis without amplification and were able to validate the method through direct comparison of results from unamplified and amplified RNA from individual samples. The addition of an amplification step for gene expression studies using LCM RNA resulted in a bias, especially for low abundance transcripts. Although the amplification bias was consistent across samples, researchers should use caution when comparing results generated from amplified and unamplified LCM RNA. Here, we have validated the use of LCM-derived RNA with the qRT-PCR array, improving our ability to investigate cell-type and stage-specific responses to toxicant exposures.

  15. Elastic moduli of normal and pathological human breast tissues: an inversion-technique-based investigation of 169 samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samani, Abbas; Zubovits, Judit; Plewes, Donald

    2007-03-01

    Understanding and quantifying the mechanical properties of breast tissues has been a subject of interest for the past two decades. This has been motivated in part by interest in modelling soft tissue response for surgery planning and virtual-reality-based surgical training. Interpreting elastography images for diagnostic purposes also requires a sound understanding of normal and pathological tissue mechanical properties. Reliable data on tissue elastic properties are very limited and those which are available tend to be inconsistent, in part as a result of measurement methodology. We have developed specialized techniques to measure tissue elasticity of breast normal tissues and tumour specimens and applied them to 169 fresh ex vivo breast tissue samples including fat and fibroglandular tissue as well as a range of benign and malignant breast tumour types. Results show that, under small deformation conditions, the elastic modulus of normal breast fat and fibroglandular tissues are similar while fibroadenomas were approximately twice the stiffness. Fibrocystic disease and malignant tumours exhibited a 3-6-fold increased stiffness with high-grade invasive ductal carcinoma exhibiting up to a 13-fold increase in stiffness compared to fibrogalndular tissue. A statistical analysis showed that differences between the elastic modulus of the majority of those tissues were statistically significant. Implications for the specificity advantages of elastography are reviewed.

  16. Laser microdissection-based analysis of plant sex chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Hobza, Roman; Vyskot, Boris

    2007-01-01

    A recent progress in plant molecular biology has led to enormous available data of DNA sequences, including complete nuclear genomes of Arabidopsis, rice, and poplar. On the other hand, in plant species with more complex genomes, containing widespread repetitive sequences, it is important to establish genomic resources that help us to focus on particular part of genomes. Laser technology enables to handle with specific subcellular structures or even individual chromosomes. Here we present a comprehensive protocol to isolate and characterize DNA sequences derived from the sex chromosomes of white campion (Silene latifolia). This dioecious plant has become the most favorite model to study the structure, function, and evolution of plant sex chromosomes due to a large and distinguishable size of both the X and Y chromosomes. The protocol includes a versatile technique to prepare metaphase chromosomes from either germinating seeds or in vitro cultured hairy roots. Such slides can be used for laser chromosome microdissection, fluorescence in situ-hybridization mapping, and immunostaining. Here we also demonstrate some applications of the laser-dissected chromosome template, especially a modified FAST-FISH technique to paint individual chromosomes, and construction and screening of chromosome-specific DNA libraries.

  17. Alaska Marine Mammal Tissue Archival Project: Sample inventory and results of analyses of selected samples for organic compounds and trace elements

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, P.R.; Wise, S.A.; Schantz, M.M.; Koster, B.J.; Zeisler, R.

    1992-02-01

    In 1987, the Alaska Marine Mammal Tissue Archival Project (AMMTAP) was established as part of the National Biomonitoring Specimen Bank (NBSB) program at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).The purpose of the AMMTAP was to establish a representative collection of Alaska marine mammal tissues for future contaminant analyses and documentation of long-term trends in environmental quality. Since 1987, specimens have been collected from 65 animals (seven species) from six different sites. The report contains the current sample inventory and the results of the analysis of selected samples for the measurement of inorganic and organic compounds.

  18. Analysis of protein biomarkers in human clinical tumor samples: critical aspects to success from tissue acquisition to analysis.

    PubMed

    Warren, Madhuri V; Chan, W Y Iris; Ridley, John M

    2011-04-01

    There has been increased interest in the analysis of protein biomarkers in clinical tumor tissues in recent years. Tissue-based biomarker assays can add value and aid decision-making at all stages of drug development, as well as being developed for use as predictive biomarkers and for patient stratification and prognostication in the clinic. However, there must be an awareness of the legal and ethical issues related to the sourcing of human tissue samples. This article also discusses the limits of scope and critical aspects on the successful use of the following tissue-based methods: immunohistochemistry, tissue microarrays and automated image analysis. Future advances in standardization of tissue biobanking methods, immunohistochemistry and quantitative image analysis techniques are also discussed. PMID:21473728

  19. Proteomic analysis of RCL2 paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Bellet, V; Boissière, F; Bibeau, F; Desmetz, C; Berthe, M L; Rochaix, P; Maudelonde, T; Mangè, A; Solassol, J

    2008-10-01

    Histopathological diagnosis in most of the world's hospitals is based upon formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues. Although this standard fixation and embedding procedure keeps the tissue in excellent form for morphological and immunohistological analysis, FFPE is inappropriate for nucleic acids and protein studies. We investigated the potential value of RCL2, a new non-toxic fixative, for sparing proteins preserved in paraffin-embedded tissues. Normal colonic mucosa tissue was fixed in RCL2 prior to paraffin embedding (RCL2P), and then processed for quality and quantity of protein conservation, as compared to frozen and FFPE tissues using complementary proteomic analysis approaches. Using 4 different protein extraction protocols, RCL2P tissue consistently showed the highest protein yield. Similar protein patterns were observed with RCL2P and frozen tissues using mono and bi-dimensional electrophoresis. Moreover, membrane, cytoplasmic and nuclear proteins, as well as phosphorylated proteins, were successfully detected using western-blot. Furthermore, protein patterns observed by mass spectrometry analysis after laser-captured microdissection were found to be identical for frozen and RCL2-fixed tissues. At last, immunohistochemistry using various antibodies showed comparable results between both tissue storage methods. We concluded that RCL2 has great potential for performing both morphological and molecular analyses on the same archival paraffin-embedded tissue sample, and can be a new method for investigating protein biomarkers.

  20. Proteomic analysis of RCL2 paraffin-embedded tissues

    PubMed Central

    Bellet, V; Boissière, F; Bibeau, F; Desmetz, C; Berthe, M L; Rochaix, P; Maudelonde, T; Mangè, A; Solassol, J

    2008-01-01

    Histopathological diagnosis in most of the world's hospitals is based upon formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues. Although this standard fixation and embedding procedure keeps the tissue in excellent form for morphological and immunohistological analysis, FFPE is inappropriate for nucleic acids and protein studies. We investigated the potential value of RCL2, a new non-toxic fixative, for sparing proteins preserved in paraffin-embedded tissues. Normal colonic mucosa tissue was fixed in RCL2 prior to paraffin embedding (RCL2P), and then processed for quality and quantity of protein conservation, as compared to frozen and FFPE tissues using complementary proteomic analysis approaches. Using 4 different protein extraction protocols, RCL2P tissue consistently showed the highest protein yield. Similar protein patterns were observed with RCL2P and frozen tissues using mono and bi-dimensional electrophoresis. Moreover, membrane, cytoplasmic and nuclear proteins, as well as phosphorylated proteins, were successfully detected using western-blot. Furthermore, protein patterns observed by mass spectrometry analysis after laser-captured microdissection were found to be identical for frozen and RCL2-fixed tissues. At last, immunohistochemistry using various antibodies showed comparable results between both tissue storage methods. We concluded that RCL2 has great potential for performing both morphological and molecular analyses on the same archival paraffin-embedded tissue sample, and can be a new method for investigating protein biomarkers. PMID:19012729

  1. Low invasive in vivo tissue sampling for monitoring biomarkers and drugs during surgery.

    PubMed

    Bojko, Barbara; Gorynski, Krzysztof; Gomez-Rios, German A; Knaak, Jan M; Machuca, Tiago; Cudjoe, Erasmus; Spetzler, Vinzent N; Hsin, Michael; Cypel, Marcelo; Selzner, Markus; Liu, Mingyao; Keshjavee, Shaf; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2014-05-01

    The techniques currently used for drug, metabolite, and biomarker determination are based on sample collection, and therefore they are not suitable for repeated analysis because of the high invasiveness. Here, we present a novel method of biochemical analysis directly in organ during operation without need of a separate sample collection step: solid-phase microextraction (SPME). The approach is based on flexible microprobe coated with biocompatible extraction phase that is inserted to the tissue with no damage or disturbance of the organ. The method was evaluated during lung and liver transplantations using normothermic ex vivo liver perfusion (NEVLP) and ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP). The study demonstrated feasibility of the method to extract wide range of endogenous compounds and drugs. Statistical analysis allowed observing metabolic changes of lung during cold ischemic time, perfusion, and reperfusion. It was also demonstrated that the level of drugs and their metabolites can be monitored over time. Based on the methylprednisolone as a selected example, the impairment of enzymatic properties of liver was detected in the injured organs but not in healthy control. This finding was supported by changes in pathways of endogenous metabolites. The SPME probe was also used for analysis of perfusion fluid using stopcock connection. The evaluation of biochemical profile of perfusates demonstrated potential of the approach for monitoring organ function during ex vivo perfusion. The simplicity of the device makes it convenient to use by medical personnel. With the microprobe, different areas of the organ or various organs can be sampled simultaneously. The technology allows assessment of organ function by biochemical profiling, determination of potential biomarkers, and drug monitoring. The use of this method for preintervention analysis could enhance the decision-making process for the best possible personalized approach, whereas post-transplantation monitoring would be

  2. Effects of MRTI sampling characteristics on estimation of HIFU SAR and tissue thermal diffusivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillon, C. R.; Todd, N.; Payne, A.; Parker, D. L.; Christensen, D. A.; Roemer, R. B.

    2013-10-01

    While the non-invasive and three-dimensional nature of magnetic-resonance temperature imaging (MRTI) makes it a valuable tool for high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatments, random and systematic errors in MRTI measurements may propagate into temperature-based parameter estimates used for pretreatment planning. This study assesses the MRTI effects of zero-mean Gaussian noise (SD = 0.0-2.0 °C), temporal sampling (tacq = 1.0-8.0 s), and spatial averaging (Res = 0.5-2.0 mm isotropic) on HIFU temperature measurements and temperature-based estimates of the amplitude and full width half maximum (FWHM) of the HIFU specific absorption rate and of tissue thermal diffusivity. The ultrasound beam used in simulations and ex vivo pork loin experiments has lateral and axial FWHM dimensions of 1.4 mm and 7.9 mm respectively. For spatial averaging simulations, beams with lateral FWHM varying from 1.2-2.2 mm are also assessed. Under noisy conditions, parameter estimates are improved by fitting to data from larger voxel regions. Varying the temporal sampling results in minimal changes in measured temperatures (<2% change) and parameter estimates (<5% change). For the HIFU beams studied, a spatial resolution of 1 × 1 × 3 mm3 or smaller is required to keep errors in temperature and all estimated parameters less than 10%. By quantifying the errors associated with these sampling characteristics, this work provides researchers with appropriate MRTI conditions for obtaining estimates of parameters essential to pretreatment modeling of HIFU thermal therapies.

  3. Laser-assisted Microdissection (LAM) as a Tool for Transcriptional Profiling of Individual Cell Types.

    PubMed

    Florez Rueda, Ana Marcela; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Schmidt, Anja

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of developmental processes at the molecular level requires insights into transcriptional regulation, and thus the transcriptome, at the level of individual cell types. While the methods described here are generally applicable to a wide range of species and cell types, our research focuses on plant reproduction. Plant cultivation and seed production is of crucial importance for human and animal nutrition. A detailed understanding of the regulatory networks that govern the formation of the reproductive lineage (germline) and ultimately of seeds is a precondition for the targeted manipulation of plant reproduction. In particular, the engineering of apomixis (asexual reproduction through seeds) into crop plants promises great improvements, as it leads to the formation of clonal seeds that are genetically identical to the mother plant. Consequently, the cell types of the female germline are of major importance for the understanding and engineering of apomixis. However, as the corresponding cells are deeply embedded within the floral tissues, they are very difficult to access for experimental analyses, including cell-type specific transcriptomics. To overcome this limitation, sections of individual cells can be isolated by laser-assisted microdissection (LAM). While LAM in combination with transcriptional profiling allows the identification of genes and pathways active in any cell type with high specificity, establishing a suitable protocol can be challenging. Specifically, the quality of RNA obtained after LAM can be compromised, especially when small, single cells are targeted. To circumvent this problem, we have established a workflow for LAM that reproducibly results in high RNA quality that is well suitable for transcriptomics, as exemplified here by the isolation of cells of the female germline in apomictic Boechera. In this protocol, procedures are described for tissue preparation and LAM, also with regard to RNA extraction and quality control

  4. Laser capture microdissection for analysis of macrophage gene expression from atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed

    Feig, Jonathan E; Fisher, Edward A

    2013-01-01

    Coronary artery disease, resulting from atherosclerosis, is the leading cause of death in the Western world. Most previous studies have subjected atherosclerotic arteries, a tissue of mixed cellular composition, to homogenization in order to identify the factors in plaque development, thereby obscuring information relevant to specific cell types. Because macrophage foam cells are critical mediators in atherosclerotic plaque advancement, we reasoned that performing gene analysis on those cells would provide specific insight in novel regulatory factors and potential therapeutic targets. We demonstrated for the first time in vascular biology that foam cell-specific RNA can be isolated by laser capture microdissection (LCM) of plaques. As expected, compared to whole tissue, a significant enrichment in foam cell-specific RNA transcripts was observed. Furthermore, because regression of atherosclerosis is a tantalizing clinical goal, we developed and reported a transplantation-based mouse model. This involved allowing plaques to form in apoE-/- mice and then changing the plaque's plasma environment from hyperlipidemia to normolipidemia. Under those conditions, rapid regression ensued in a process involving emigration of plaque foam cells to regional and systemic lymph nodes. Using LCM, we were able to show that under regression conditions, there was decreased expression in foam cells of inflammatory genes, but an up-regulation of cholesterol efflux genes. Interestingly, we also found that increased expression of chemokine receptor CCR7, a known factor in dendritic cell migration, was required for regression. In conclusion, the LCM methods described in this chapter, which have already lead to a number of striking findings, will likely further facilitate the study of cell type-specific gene expression in animal and human plaques during various stages of atherosclerosis, and after genetic, pharmacologic, and environmental perturbations.

  5. Freezing skeletal muscle tissue does not affect its decomposition in soil: evidence from temporal changes in tissue mass, microbial activity and soil chemistry based on excised samples.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Kathryn L; Forbes, Shari L; Tibbett, Mark

    2009-01-10

    The study of decaying organisms and death assemblages is referred to as forensic taphonomy, or more simply the study of graves. This field is dominated by the fields of entomology, anthropology and archaeology. Forensic taphonomy also includes the study of the ecology and chemistry of the burial environment. Studies in forensic taphonomy often require the use of analogues for human cadavers or their component parts. These might include animal cadavers or skeletal muscle tissue. However, sufficient supplies of cadavers or analogues may require periodic freezing of test material prior to experimental inhumation in the soil. This study was carried out to ascertain the effect of freezing on skeletal muscle tissue prior to inhumation and decomposition in a soil environment under controlled laboratory conditions. Changes in soil chemistry were also measured. In order to test the impact of freezing, skeletal muscle tissue (Sus scrofa) was frozen (-20 degrees C) or refrigerated (4 degrees C). Portions of skeletal muscle tissue (approximately 1.5 g) were interred in microcosms (72 mm diameter x 120 mm height) containing sieved (2mm) soil (sand) adjusted to 50% water holding capacity. The experiment had three treatments: control with no skeletal muscle tissue, microcosms containing frozen skeletal muscle tissue and those containing refrigerated tissue. The microcosms were destructively harvested at sequential periods of 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, 16, 23, 30 and 37 days after interment of skeletal muscle tissue. These harvests were replicated 6 times for each treatment. Microbial activity (carbon dioxide respiration) was monitored throughout the experiment. At harvest the skeletal muscle tissue was removed and the detritosphere soil was sampled for chemical analysis. Freezing was found to have no significant impact on decomposition or soil chemistry compared to unfrozen samples in the current study using skeletal muscle tissue. However, the interment of skeletal muscle tissue had a

  6. Detection of Cryptococcus neoformans DNA in Tissue Samples by Nested and Real-Time PCR Assays

    PubMed Central

    Bialek, Ralf; Weiss, Michael; Bekure-Nemariam, Kubrom; Najvar, Laura K.; Alberdi, Maria B.; Graybill, John R.; Reischl, Udo

    2002-01-01

    Two PCR protocols targeting the 18S rRNA gene of Cryptococcus neoformans were established, compared, and evaluated in murine cryptococcal meningitis. One protocol was designed as a nested PCR to be performed in conventional block thermal cyclers. The other protocol was designed as a quantitative single-round PCR adapted to LightCycler technology. One hundred brain homogenates and dilutions originating from 20 ICR mice treated with different azoles were examined. A fungal burden of 3 × 101 to 2.9 × 104 CFU per mg of brain tissue was determined by quantitative culture. Specific PCR products were amplified by the conventional and the LightCycler methods in 86 and 87 samples, respectively, with products identified by DNA sequencing and real-time fluorescence detection. An analytical sensitivity of 1 CFU of C. neoformans per mg of brain tissue and less than 10 CFU per volume used for extraction was observed for both PCR protocols, while homogenates of 70 organs from mice infected with other fungi were PCR negative. Specificity testing was performed with genomic DNA from 31 hymenomycetous fungal species and from the ustilaginomycetous yeast Malassezia furfur, which are phylogenetically related to C. neoformans. Twenty-four strains, including species of human skin flora like M. furfur and Trichosporon spp., were PCR negative. Amplification was observed with Cryptococcus amylolentus, Filobasidiella depauperata, Cryptococcus laurentii, and five species unrelated to clinical specimens. LightCycler PCR products from F. depauperata and Trichosporon faecale could be clearly discriminated by melting curve analysis. The sensitive and specific nested PCR assay as well as the rapid and quantitative LightCycler PCR assay might be useful for the diagnosis and monitoring of human cryptococcal infections. PMID:11874894

  7. Preservation of nucleic acids and tissue morphology in paraffin-embedded clinical samples: comparison of five molecular fixatives.

    PubMed

    Staff, Synnöve; Kujala, Paula; Karhu, Ritva; Rökman, Annika; Ilvesaro, Joanna; Kares, Saara; Isola, Jorma

    2013-09-01

    Formalin fixation preserves tissue morphology at the expense of macromolecule integrity. Freshly frozen samples are the golden standard for DNA and RNA analyses but require laborious deep-freezing and frozen sectioning for morphological studies. Alternative tissue stabilisation methods are therefore needed. We analysed the preservation of nucleic acids, immunohistochemical staining properties and tissue morphology in paraffin-embedded clinical tissue samples fixed with Z7, RCL2, PAXgene, Allprotect and RNAlater. Formalin-fixed and deep-frozen samples were used as controls. Immunohistochemical analyses showed good preservation of antigenicity in all except Allprotect and RNAlater-fixed samples. RNA quality, based on RNA integrity number value by Bioanalyzer, was comparable with freshly frozen samples only in PAXgene-fixed samples. According to quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analyses, RNA from PAXgene samples yielded results similar to freshly frozen samples. No difference between fixatives was seen in DNA analyses (PCR and real-time PCR). In conclusion, PAXgene seems to be superior to other molecular fixatives and formaldehyde.

  8. Design and implementation of coded aperture coherent scatter spectral imaging of cancerous and healthy breast tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Lakshmanan, Manu N; Greenberg, Joel A; Samei, Ehsan; Kapadia, Anuj J

    2016-01-01

    A scatter imaging technique for the differentiation of cancerous and healthy breast tissue in a heterogeneous sample is introduced in this work. Such a technique has potential utility in intraoperative margin assessment during lumpectomy procedures. In this work, we investigate the feasibility of the imaging method for tumor classification using Monte Carlo simulations and physical experiments. The coded aperture coherent scatter spectral imaging technique was used to reconstruct three-dimensional (3-D) images of breast tissue samples acquired through a single-position snapshot acquisition, without rotation as is required in coherent scatter computed tomography. We perform a quantitative assessment of the accuracy of the cancerous voxel classification using Monte Carlo simulations of the imaging system; describe our experimental implementation of coded aperture scatter imaging; show the reconstructed images of the breast tissue samples; and present segmentations of the 3-D images in order to identify the cancerous and healthy tissue in the samples. From the Monte Carlo simulations, we find that coded aperture scatter imaging is able to reconstruct images of the samples and identify the distribution of cancerous and healthy tissues (i.e., fibroglandular, adipose, or a mix of the two) inside them with a cancerous voxel identification sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 92.4%, 91.9%, and 92.0%, respectively. From the experimental results, we find that the technique is able to identify cancerous and healthy tissue samples and reconstruct differential coherent scatter cross sections that are highly correlated with those measured by other groups using x-ray diffraction. Coded aperture scatter imaging has the potential to provide scatter images that automatically differentiate cancerous and healthy tissue inside samples within a time on the order of a minute per slice. PMID:26962543

  9. Rapid generation of whole chromosome painting probes (WCPs) by chromosome microdissection

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, X.Y.; Meltzer, P.S.; Trent, J.M.

    1994-07-01

    A strategy for rapid construction of whole chromosome painting probes (WCPs) by chromosome microdissection has recently been developed. WCPs were prepared from 20 copies of each target chromosome microdissected from normal human metaphase chromosomes and then directly amplified by PCR using a universal primer. Fifteen WCPs, including chromosomes 1, 3, 6, 7, 9, 12, 13, 14, 15, 17, 19, 20, 21, 22, and X, have been generated using this strategy. The probe complexity and hybridization specificity of these WCPs have been characterized by gel electrophoresis and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Analysis of WCPs constructed by chromosome microdissection indicated that microdissected WCPs invariably provide strong and uniform signal intensity with no cytologically apparent cross-hybridization. To demonstrate the application of WCPs generated from microdissection, the authors have used these probes to detect complex chromosome rearrangements in a melanoma cell line, UM93-007. Two different translocations involving three chromosomes [t(1;3;13) and t(1;7;13)] have been identified, both of which were undetectable by conventional banding analysis. Further application of these WCPs (including generation of WCPs from mouse and other species) should greatly facilitate the cytogenetic analysis of complex chromosome rearrangements. 35 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Using laser micro-dissection and qRT-PCR to analyze cell type-specific gene expression in Norway spruce phloem.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Nina E; Sikora, Katarzyna; Krokene, Paal; Hietala, Ari M; Solheim, Halvor; Fossdal, Carl Gunnar

    2014-01-01

    The tangentially oriented polyphenolic parenchyma (PP) and radially organized ray parenchyma in the phloem are central in the defense of conifer stems against insects and pathogens. Laser micro-dissection enables examination of cell-specific defense responses. To examine induced defense responses in Norway spruce stems inoculated with the necrotrophic blue-stain fungus Ceratocystis polonica, RNA extracted from laser micro-dissected phloem parenchyma and vascular cambium was analyzed using real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) to profile transcript levels of selected resistance marker genes. The monitored transcripts included three pathogenesis-related proteins (class IV chitinase (CHI4), defensin (SPI1), peroxidase (PX3), two terpene synthesis related proteins (DXPS and LAS), one ethylene biosynthesis related protein (ACS), and a phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL). Three days following inoculation, four genes (CHI4, PAL, PX3, SPI1) were differentially induced in individual cell and tissue types, both close to the inoculation site (5 mm above) and, to a lesser degree, further away (10 mm above). These resistance marker genes were all highly induced in ray parenchyma, supporting the important role of the rays in spruce defense propagation. CHI4 and PAL were also induced in PP cells and in conducting secondary phloem tissues. Our data suggests that different cell types in the secondary phloem of Norway spruce have overlapping but not fully redundant roles in active host defense. Furthermore, the study demonstrates the usefulness of laser micro-dissection coupled with qRT-PCR to characterize gene expression in different cell types of conifer bark.

  11. Critical comparison of sample preparation strategies for shotgun proteomic analysis of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples: insights from liver tissue

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The growing field of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue proteomics holds promise for improving translational research. Direct tissue trypsinization (DT) and protein extraction followed by in solution digestion (ISD) or filter-aided sample preparation (FASP) are the most common workflows for shotgun analysis of FFPE samples, but a critical comparison of the different methods is currently lacking. Experimental design DT, FASP and ISD workflows were compared by subjecting to the same label-free quantitative approach three independent technical replicates of each method applied to FFPE liver tissue. Data were evaluated in terms of method reproducibility and protein/peptide distribution according to localization, MW, pI and hydrophobicity. Results DT showed lower reproducibility, good preservation of high-MW proteins, a general bias towards hydrophilic and acidic proteins, much lower keratin contamination, as well as higher abundance of non-tryptic peptides. Conversely, FASP and ISD proteomes were depleted in high-MW proteins and enriched in hydrophobic and membrane proteins; FASP provided higher identification yields, while ISD exhibited higher reproducibility. Conclusions These results highlight that diverse sample preparation strategies provide significantly different proteomic information, and present typical biases that should be taken into account when dealing with FFPE samples. When a sufficient amount of tissue is available, the complementary use of different methods is suggested to increase proteome coverage and depth. PMID:25097466

  12. CLINICAL AND MICRODISSECTION GENOTYPING ANALYSES OF THE EFFECT OF INTRA-ARTERIAL CYTOREDUCTIVE CHEMOTHERAPY IN THE TREATMENT OF LACRIMAL GLAND ADENOID CYSTIC CARCINOMA

    PubMed Central

    Tse, David T

    2005-01-01

    Purpose To determine the effect of intra-arterial cytoreductive chemotherapy (IACC) as an adjunct of a multimodality protocol for the treatment of lacrimal gland adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC). Methods This was a retrospective, comparative, consecutive case series. Nine consecutive patients with lacrimal gland ACC were treated with IACC, followed by orbital exenteration and chemoradiotherapy. This case series was compared with a series of seven patients treated by conventional local therapies. Clinical records, imaging studies, histologic sections, and archival specimens from all 16 patients were reviewed. Information analyzed included site of disease, histologic characteristics, extent of disease, local-regional recurrence or distant metastases, and disease-free survival time. Gene analysis was performed on microdissected tissue samples. Mutational allelotyping targeting nine genomic loci using 15 polymorphic microsatellite markers situated in proximity to known tumor suppressor genes serve as markers for the presence of gene deletion. The effect of IACC was assessed by the radiographic response and survival outcome in comparison to a historical cohort of patients managed by conventional local therapies. A fractional mutation index was used to compare the acquired mutational load between different tumors having nonidentical patterns of microsatellite informativeness. Results The carcinoma cause-specific death rates between the two treatment groups was significant (P = .029, log-rank test). The cumulative 5-year carcinoma cause-specific death rate was 16.7% in the IACC-treated group compared with 57.1% in the conventional treatment group. 1p36 was the single most common site affected by allelic loss for microsatellite markers in this series. Conclusions The preliminary data suggest that IACC as an integral component of a multimodal treatment strategy is potentially effective in improving local disease control and overall disease-free survival in lacrimal gland ACC

  13. Integrated genome-wide analysis of genomic changes and gene regulation in human adrenocortical tissue samples

    PubMed Central

    Gara, Sudheer Kumar; Wang, Yonghong; Patel, Dhaval; Liu-Chittenden, Yi; Jain, Meenu; Boufraqech, Myriem; Zhang, Lisa; Meltzer, Paul S.; Kebebew, Electron

    2015-01-01

    To gain insight into the pathogenesis of adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) and whether there is progression from normal-to-adenoma-to-carcinoma, we performed genome-wide gene expression, gene methylation, microRNA expression and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analysis in human adrenocortical tissue (normal, adrenocortical adenomas and ACC) samples. A pairwise comparison of normal, adrenocortical adenomas and ACC gene expression profiles with more than four-fold expression differences and an adjusted P-value < 0.05 revealed no major differences in normal versus adrenocortical adenoma whereas there are 808 and 1085, respectively, dysregulated genes between ACC versus adrenocortical adenoma and ACC versus normal. The majority of the dysregulated genes in ACC were downregulated. By integrating the CGH, gene methylation and expression profiles of potential miRNAs with the gene expression of dysregulated genes, we found that there are higher alterations in ACC versus normal compared to ACC versus adrenocortical adenoma. Importantly, we identified several novel molecular pathways that are associated with dysregulated genes and further experimentally validated that oncostatin m signaling induces caspase 3 dependent apoptosis and suppresses cell proliferation. Finally, we propose that there is higher number of genomic changes from normal-to-adenoma-to-carcinoma and identified oncostatin m signaling as a plausible druggable pathway for therapeutics. PMID:26446994

  14. Integrated genome-wide analysis of genomic changes and gene regulation in human adrenocortical tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Gara, Sudheer Kumar; Wang, Yonghong; Patel, Dhaval; Liu-Chittenden, Yi; Jain, Meenu; Boufraqech, Myriem; Zhang, Lisa; Meltzer, Paul S; Kebebew, Electron

    2015-10-30

    To gain insight into the pathogenesis of adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) and whether there is progression from normal-to-adenoma-to-carcinoma, we performed genome-wide gene expression, gene methylation, microRNA expression and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analysis in human adrenocortical tissue (normal, adrenocortical adenomas and ACC) samples. A pairwise comparison of normal, adrenocortical adenomas and ACC gene expression profiles with more than four-fold expression differences and an adjusted P-value < 0.05 revealed no major differences in normal versus adrenocortical adenoma whereas there are 808 and 1085, respectively, dysregulated genes between ACC versus adrenocortical adenoma and ACC versus normal. The majority of the dysregulated genes in ACC were downregulated. By integrating the CGH, gene methylation and expression profiles of potential miRNAs with the gene expression of dysregulated genes, we found that there are higher alterations in ACC versus normal compared to ACC versus adrenocortical adenoma. Importantly, we identified several novel molecular pathways that are associated with dysregulated genes and further experimentally validated that oncostatin m signaling induces caspase 3 dependent apoptosis and suppresses cell proliferation. Finally, we propose that there is higher number of genomic changes from normal-to-adenoma-to-carcinoma and identified oncostatin m signaling as a plausible druggable pathway for therapeutics.

  15. Stable isotope analysis of 1987-1991 zooplankton samples and bowhead whale tissues. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schell, D.M.

    1992-06-01

    Stable isotope analyses of bowhead whale tissue samples and bowhead whale prey organisms collected over the years 1987 to 1991 were used to provide detail on the isotope ratio gradients evident in the arctic Alaskan zooplankton and to verify previous findings regarding the growth rates and age determination techniques developed for bowhead whales. Zooplankton of the Bering and Chukchi seas are enriched in (13)C relative to the eastern Beaufort Sea. The analysis of baleen from bowhead whales taken between 1987 to 1990 indicate that the whales are slow-growing and the young animals between year one and about six to seven years of age, undergo a period of little or no linear growth. The authors estimate that bowheads require 16-18 years to reach the length of sexual maturity, i.e., 13-14 m. From baleen Delta(13C) cycles, a 20 year record of the isotope ratios in the phytoplankton of the northern Bering and Chukchi seas was constructed. The long-term record has been compared with the temperature anomalies in surface waters of the Bering Sea. The Delta(13C) of the zooplankton is inversely correlated with temperature and refutes current models attempting to relate ocean temperature, and atmospheric carbon dioxide levels with the Delta(13C) of ocean sediment organic matter.

  16. Gene expression profiling of human breast tissue samples using SAGE-Seq.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhenhua Jeremy; Meyer, Clifford A; Choudhury, Sibgat; Shipitsin, Michail; Maruyama, Reo; Bessarabova, Marina; Nikolskaya, Tatiana; Sukumar, Saraswati; Schwartzman, Armin; Liu, Jun S; Polyak, Kornelia; Liu, X Shirley

    2010-12-01

    We present a powerful application of ultra high-throughput sequencing, SAGE-Seq, for the accurate quantification of normal and neoplastic mammary epithelial cell transcriptomes. We develop data analysis pipelines that allow the mapping of sense and antisense strands of mitochondrial and RefSeq genes, the normalization between libraries, and the identification of differentially expressed genes. We find that the diversity of cancer transcriptomes is significantly higher than that of normal cells. Our analysis indicates that transcript discovery plateaus at 10 million reads/sample, and suggests a minimum desired sequencing depth around five million reads. Comparison of SAGE-Seq and traditional SAGE on normal and cancerous breast tissues reveals higher sensitivity of SAGE-Seq to detect less-abundant genes, including those encoding for known breast cancer-related transcription factors and G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). SAGE-Seq is able to identify genes and pathways abnormally activated in breast cancer that traditional SAGE failed to call. SAGE-Seq is a powerful method for the identification of biomarkers and therapeutic targets in human disease.

  17. Apicomplexa primers amplify Proteromonas (Stramenopiles, Slopalinida, Proteromonadidae) in tissue and blood samples from lizards.

    PubMed

    Maia, João P M C; Gómez-Díaz, Elena; Harris, D James

    2012-12-01

    Microscopy has traditionally been the most common method in parasitological studies, but in recent years molecular screening has become increasingly frequent to detect protozoan parasites in a wide range of vertebrate hosts and vectors. During routine molecular screening of apicomplexan parasites in reptiles using the 18S rRNA gene, we have amplified and sequenced Proteromonas parasites from three lizard hosts (less than 1% prevalence). We conducted phylogenetic analysis to confirm the taxonomic position and infer their relationships with other stramenopiles. Although our phylogeny is limited due to scarcity of molecular data on these protists, our results confirm they are closely related to Proteromonas lacertae. Our findings show that unexpected parasites can be amplified from host samples (blood and tissue) using general procedures to detect hemoparasites, and stress that positive PCR amplifications alone should not be considered as definitive proof of infection by particular parasites. Further validation by sequence confirmation and thorough phylogenetic assessment will not only avoid false positives and biased prevalence estimates but also provide valuable information on the biodiversity and phylogenetic relationships of other parasitic organisms. More generally, our results illustrate the perils of general diagnosis protocols in parasitological studies and the need of cross-validation procedures.

  18. Laser capture microdissection of uredinia formed by Melampsora larici-populina revealed a transcriptional switch between biotrophy and sporulation.

    PubMed

    Hacquard, Stéphane; Delaruelle, Christine; Legué, Valérie; Tisserant, Emilie; Kohler, Annegret; Frey, Pascal; Martin, Francis; Duplessis, Sébastien

    2010-10-01

    The foliar rust caused by the basidiomycete Melampsora larici-populina is the main disease affecting poplar plantations in Europe. The biotrophic status of rust fungi is a major limitation to study gene expression of cell or tissue types during host infection. At the uredinial stage, infected poplar leaves contain distinct rust tissues such as haustoria, infection hyphae, and uredinia with sporogenous hyphae and newly formed asexual urediniospores. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) was used to isolate three areas corresponding to uredinia and subjacent zones in the host mesophyll for expression analysis with M. larici-populina whole-genome exon oligoarrays. Optimization of tissue preparation prior to LCM allowed isolation of RNA of good integrity for genome-wide expression profiling. Our results indicate that the poplar rust uredinial stage is marked by distinct genetic programs related to biotrophy in the host palisade mesophyll and to sporulation in the uredinium. A strong induction of transcripts encoding small secreted proteins, likely containing rust effectors, is observed in the mesophyll, suggesting a late maintenance of suppression of host defense in the tissue containing haustoria and infection hyphae. On the other hand, cell cycle and cell defense rescue transcripts are strongly accumulated in the sporulation area. This combined LCM-transcriptomic approach brings new insights on the molecular mechanisms underlying urediniospore formation in rust fungi.

  19. Transcriptomic Analysis of Trout Gill Ionocytes in Fresh Water and Sea Water Using Laser Capture Microdissection Combined with Microarray Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Leguen, Isabelle; Le Cam, Aurélie; Montfort, Jérôme; Peron, Sandrine; Fautrel, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Fish gills represent a complex organ composed of several cell types that perform multiple physiological functions. Among these cells, ionocytes are implicated in the maintenance of ion homeostasis. However, because the ionocyte represents only a small percent of whole gill tissue, its specific transcriptome can be overlooked among the numerous cell types included in the gill. The objective of this study is to better understand ionocyte functions by comparing the RNA expression of this cell type in freshwater and seawater acclimated rainbow trout. To realize this objective, ionocytes were captured from gill cryosections using laser capture microdissection after immunohistochemistry. Then, transcriptome analyses were performed on an Agilent trout oligonucleotide microarray. Gene expression analysis identified 108 unique annotated genes differentially expressed between freshwater and seawater ionocytes, with a fold change higher than 3. Most of these genes were up-regulated in freshwater cells. Interestingly, several genes implicated in ion transport, extracellular matrix and structural cellular proteins appeared up-regulated in freshwater ionocytes. Among them, several ion transporters, such as CIC2, SLC26A6, and NBC, were validated by qPCR and/or in situ hybridization. The latter technique allowed us to localize the transcripts of these ion transporters in only ionocytes and more particularly in the freshwater cells. Genes involved in metabolism and also several genes implicated in transcriptional regulation, cell signaling and the cell cycle were also enhanced in freshwater ionocytes. In conclusion, laser capture microdissection combined with microarray analysis allowed for the determination of the transcriptional signature of scarce cells in fish gills, such as ionocytes, and aided characterization of the transcriptome of these cells in freshwater and seawater acclimated trout. PMID:26439495

  20. Laser capture microdissection and multiplex-tandem PCR analysis of proximal tubular epithelial cell signaling in human kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Ray; Wang, Xiangju; Kassianos, Andrew J; Zuryn, Steven; Roper, Kathrein E; Osborne, Andrew; Sampangi, Sandeep; Francis, Leo; Raghunath, Vishwas; Healy, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Interstitial fibrosis, a histological process common to many kidney diseases, is the precursor state to end stage kidney disease, a devastating and costly outcome for the patient and the health system. Fibrosis is historically associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) but emerging evidence is now linking many forms of acute kidney disease (AKD) with the development of CKD. Indeed, we and others have observed at least some degree of fibrosis in up to 50% of clinically defined cases of AKD. Epithelial cells of the proximal tubule (PTEC) are central in the development of kidney interstitial fibrosis. We combine the novel techniques of laser capture microdissection and multiplex-tandem PCR to identify and quantitate "real time" gene transcription profiles of purified PTEC isolated from human kidney biopsies that describe signaling pathways associated with this pathological fibrotic process. Our results: (i) confirm previous in-vitro and animal model studies; kidney injury molecule-1 is up-regulated in patients with acute tubular injury, inflammation, neutrophil infiltration and a range of chronic disease diagnoses, (ii) provide data to inform treatment; complement component 3 expression correlates with inflammation and acute tubular injury, (iii) identify potential new biomarkers; proline 4-hydroxylase transcription is down-regulated and vimentin is up-regulated across kidney diseases, (iv) describe previously unrecognized feedback mechanisms within PTEC; Smad-3 is down-regulated in many kidney diseases suggesting a possible negative feedback loop for TGF-β in the disease state, whilst tight junction protein-1 is up-regulated in many kidney diseases, suggesting feedback interactions with vimentin expression. These data demonstrate that the combined techniques of laser capture microdissection and multiplex-tandem PCR have the power to study molecular signaling within single cell populations derived from clinically sourced tissue.

  1. Transcriptomic Analysis of Trout Gill Ionocytes in Fresh Water and Sea Water Using Laser Capture Microdissection Combined with Microarray Analysis.

    PubMed

    Leguen, Isabelle; Le Cam, Aurélie; Montfort, Jérôme; Peron, Sandrine; Fautrel, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Fish gills represent a complex organ composed of several cell types that perform multiple physiological functions. Among these cells, ionocytes are implicated in the maintenance of ion homeostasis. However, because the ionocyte represents only a small percent of whole gill tissue, its specific transcriptome can be overlooked among the numerous cell types included in the gill. The objective of this study is to better understand ionocyte functions by comparing the RNA expression of this cell type in freshwater and seawater acclimated rainbow trout. To realize this objective, ionocytes were captured from gill cryosections using laser capture microdissection after immunohistochemistry. Then, transcriptome analyses were performed on an Agilent trout oligonucleotide microarray. Gene expression analysis identified 108 unique annotated genes differentially expressed between freshwater and seawater ionocytes, with a fold change higher than 3. Most of these genes were up-regulated in freshwater cells. Interestingly, several genes implicated in ion transport, extracellular matrix and structural cellular proteins appeared up-regulated in freshwater ionocytes. Among them, several ion transporters, such as CIC2, SLC26A6, and NBC, were validated by qPCR and/or in situ hybridization. The latter technique allowed us to localize the transcripts of these ion transporters in only ionocytes and more particularly in the freshwater cells. Genes involved in metabolism and also several genes implicated in transcriptional regulation, cell signaling and the cell cycle were also enhanced in freshwater ionocytes. In conclusion, laser capture microdissection combined with microarray analysis allowed for the determination of the transcriptional signature of scarce cells in fish gills, such as ionocytes, and aided characterization of the transcriptome of these cells in freshwater and seawater acclimated trout.

  2. Grinding and polishing instead of sectioning for the tissue samples with a graft: Implications for light and electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mukhamadiyarov, Rinat A; Sevostyanova, Victoria V; Shishkova, Daria K; Nokhrin, Andrey V; Sidorova, Olga D; Kutikhin, Anton G

    2016-06-01

    A broad use of the graft replacement requires a detailed investigation of the host-graft interaction, including both histological examination and electron microscopy. A high quality sectioning of the host tissue with a graft seems to be complicated; in addition, it is difficult to examine the same tissue area by both of the mentioned microscopy techniques. To solve these problems, we developed a new technique of epoxy resin embedding with the further grinding, polishing, and staining. Graft-containing tissues prepared by grinding and polishing preserved their structure; however, sectioning frequently required the explantation of the graft and led to tissue disintegration. Moreover, stained samples prepared by grinding and polishing may then be assessed by both light microscopy and backscattered scanning electron microscopy. Therefore, grinding and polishing outperform sectioning when applied to the tissues with a graft. PMID:27023831

  3. [Bacteria isolated from urine and renal tissue samples and their relation to renal histology].

    PubMed

    Gökalp, A; Gültekin, E Y; Bakici, M Z; Ozdeşlik, B

    1988-01-01

    The bacteria from the urine and renal biopsy specimens of 40 patients undergoing renal surgery were isolated and their relations with renal histology investigated. The urine cultures were positive in 14 patients, the same organisms being isolated from the renal tissue in 7 cases. In 6 patients with negative urine cultures, bacteria were isolated from renal tissues. Of the 28 cases pathologically diagnosed as chronic pyelonephritis, bacteria were isolated from the renal tissue in 13 cases, the urine cultures being positive in only 11 cases. E. coli was the most commonly encountered bacteria in both the urine and renal tissues.

  4. Comparison between whole mount tissue preparations and virtual tissue microarray samples for measuring Ki-67 and apoptosis indices in human bladder cancer: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Oshiro, Hisashi; Czerniak, Bogdan A; Sakamaki, Kentaro; Tsuta, Koji; Bondaruk, Jolanta; Keyhani, Afsaneh; Dinney, Colin P; Nagai, Takeshi; Kamat, Ashish M

    2016-08-01

    Recent tissue microarray (TMA)-based studies have shown that cell proliferation- and apoptosis-related biomarkers are associated with clinical outcomes in patients with bladder urothelial carcinoma. However, little is known about the differences in these biomarker measurements between whole mount tissue preparations and TMAs. This study aimed to elucidate the discrepancy in the measurements of Ki-67 indices (KIs) and apoptosis indices (AIs) between whole mount tissue preparations and TMAs of bladder urothelial carcinoma samples.Whole mount tissue preparations for Ki-67 immunohistochemistry and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling were made from 30 patients who underwent transurethral resection of bladder urothelial carcinoma. Digital microscopy-assisted virtual TMAs, consisting of 3 small round areas (1 or 0.6 mm in diameter), were generated from the same whole mount tissue preparations. The measurement results in highly reactive areas of biomarkers were compared between the whole mount tissue preparation- and the TMA-based methods. Bland-Altman plot analysis, regression analysis, and Kendall τ were performed to investigate differences in the measurement results, systematic biases, and correlations between biomarkers.Although the Bland-Altman plot analysis demonstrated that almost all the plots were within the limits of agreement, fixed biases were detected in the 1- and 0.6-mm TMAs for the KI (0.181 and 0.222, respectively) and the AI (0.055 and 0.063, respectively). Proportional biases were also detected in the 1- and 0.6-mm TMAs for the AI (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively). Furthermore, positive correlations between KIs and AIs were observed in whole mount tissue preparations (r = 0.260, P = 0.044) and in the 1 mm TMAs (r = 0.375, P = 0.004); however, no such correlation was observed in the 0.6 mm TMAs.Our study suggests that the measurement results for certain biomarkers of bladder urothelial

  5. Comparison between whole mount tissue preparations and virtual tissue microarray samples for measuring Ki-67 and apoptosis indices in human bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Oshiro, Hisashi; Czerniak, Bogdan A.; Sakamaki, Kentaro; Tsuta, Koji; Bondaruk, Jolanta; Keyhani, Afsaneh; Dinney, Colin P.; Nagai, Takeshi; Kamat, Ashish M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recent tissue microarray (TMA)-based studies have shown that cell proliferation- and apoptosis-related biomarkers are associated with clinical outcomes in patients with bladder urothelial carcinoma. However, little is known about the differences in these biomarker measurements between whole mount tissue preparations and TMAs. This study aimed to elucidate the discrepancy in the measurements of Ki-67 indices (KIs) and apoptosis indices (AIs) between whole mount tissue preparations and TMAs of bladder urothelial carcinoma samples. Whole mount tissue preparations for Ki-67 immunohistochemistry and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling were made from 30 patients who underwent transurethral resection of bladder urothelial carcinoma. Digital microscopy-assisted virtual TMAs, consisting of 3 small round areas (1 or 0.6 mm in diameter), were generated from the same whole mount tissue preparations. The measurement results in highly reactive areas of biomarkers were compared between the whole mount tissue preparation- and the TMA-based methods. Bland–Altman plot analysis, regression analysis, and Kendall τ were performed to investigate differences in the measurement results, systematic biases, and correlations between biomarkers. Although the Bland–Altman plot analysis demonstrated that almost all the plots were within the limits of agreement, fixed biases were detected in the 1- and 0.6-mm TMAs for the KI (0.181 and 0.222, respectively) and the AI (0.055 and 0.063, respectively). Proportional biases were also detected in the 1- and 0.6-mm TMAs for the AI (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively). Furthermore, positive correlations between KIs and AIs were observed in whole mount tissue preparations (r = 0.260, P = 0.044) and in the 1 mm TMAs (r = 0.375, P = 0.004); however, no such correlation was observed in the 0.6 mm TMAs. Our study suggests that the measurement results for certain biomarkers of bladder

  6. Gene expression profiling of gastric cancer by microarray combined with laser capture microdissection

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ming-Shiang; Lin, Yi-Shing; Chang, Yu-Ting; Shun, Chia-Tung; Lin, Ming-Tsan; Lin, Jaw-Town

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To examine the gene expression profile of gastric cancer (GC) by combination of laser capture microdissection (LCM) and microarray and to correlate the profiling with histological subtypes. METHODS: Using LCM, pure cancer cells were procured from 45 cancerous tissues. After procurement of about 5 000 cells, total RNA was extracted and the quality of RNA was determined before further amplification and hybridization. One microgram of amplified RNA was converted to cDNA and hybridized to cDNA microarray. RESULTS: Among 45 cases, only 21 were qualified for their RNAs. A total of 62 arrays were performed. These included 42 arrays for cancer (21 cases with dye-swab duplication) and 20 arrays for non-tumorous cells (10 cases with dye-swab duplication) with universal reference. Analyzed data showed 504 genes were differentially expressed and could distinguish cancerous and non-cancerous groups with more than 99% accuracy. Of the 504 genes, trefoil factors 1, 2, and 3 were in the list and their expression patterns were consistent with previous reports. Immunohistochemical staining of trefoil factor 1 was also consistent with the array data. Analyses of the tumor group with these 504 genes showed that there were 3 subgroups of GC that did not correspond to any current classification system, including Lauren’s classification. CONCLUSION: By using LCM, linear amplification of RNA, and cDNA microarray, we have identified a panel of genes that have the power to discriminate between GC and non-cancer groups. The new molecular classification and the identified novel genes in gastric carcinogenesis deserve further investigations to elucidate their clinicopathological significance. PMID:16437709

  7. An Unsupervised MVA Method to Compare Specific Regions in Human Breast Tumor Tissue Samples Using ToF-SIMS

    PubMed Central

    Bluestein, Blake M.; Morrish, Fionnuala; Graham, Daniel J.; Guenthoer, Jamie; Hockenbery, David; Porter, Peggy; Gamble, Lara J.

    2016-01-01

    Imaging time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and principal component analysis (PCA) were used to investigate two sets of pre- and post-chemotherapy human breast tumor tissue sections to characterize lipids associated with tumor metabolic flexibility and response to treatment. The micron spatial resolution imaging capability of ToF-SIMS provides a powerful approach to attain spatially-resolved molecular and cellular data from cancerous tissues not available with conventional imaging techniques. Three ca. 1 mm2 areas per tissue section were analyzed by stitching together 200 μm × 200 μm raster area scans. A method to isolate and analyze specific tissue regions of interest by utilizing PCA of ToF-SIMS images is presented, which allowed separation of cellularized areas from stromal areas. These PCA-generated regions of interest were then used as masks to reconstruct representative spectra from specifically stromal or cellular regions. The advantage of this unsupervised selection method is a reduction in scatter in the spectral PCA results when compared to analyzing all tissue areas or analyzing areas highlighted by a pathologist. Utilizing this method, stromal and cellular regions of breast tissue biopsies taken pre- versus post-chemotherapy demonstrate chemical separation using negatively-charged ion species. In this sample set, the cellular regions were predominantly all cancer cells. Fatty acids (i.e. palmitic, oleic, and stearic), monoacylglycerols, diacylglycerols and vitamin E profiles were distinctively different between the pre- and post-therapy tissues. These results validate a new unsupervised method to isolate and interpret biochemically distinct regions in cancer tissues using imaging ToF-SIMS data. In addition, the method developed here can provide a framework to compare a variety of tissue samples using imaging ToF-SIMS, especially where there is section-to-section variability that makes it difficult to use a serial hematoxylin and

  8. Optical coherence tomography detection of shear wave propagation in inhomogeneous tissue equivalent phantoms and ex-vivo carotid artery samples

    PubMed Central

    Razani, Marjan; Luk, Timothy W.H.; Mariampillai, Adrian; Siegler, Peter; Kiehl, Tim-Rasmus; Kolios, Michael C.; Yang, Victor X.D.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we explored the potential of measuring shear wave propagation using optical coherence elastography (OCE) in an inhomogeneous phantom and carotid artery samples based on a swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. Shear waves were generated using a piezoelectric transducer transmitting sine-wave bursts of 400 μs duration, applying acoustic radiation force (ARF) to inhomogeneous phantoms and carotid artery samples, synchronized with a swept-source OCT (SS-OCT) imaging system. The phantoms were composed of gelatin and titanium dioxide whereas the carotid artery samples were embedded in gel. Differential OCT phase maps, measured with and without the ARF, detected the microscopic displacement generated by shear wave propagation in these phantoms and samples of different stiffness. We present the technique for calculating tissue mechanical properties by propagating shear waves in inhomogeneous tissue equivalent phantoms and carotid artery samples using the ARF of an ultrasound transducer, and measuring the shear wave speed and its associated properties in the different layers with OCT phase maps. This method lays the foundation for future in-vitro and in-vivo studies of mechanical property measurements of biological tissues such as vascular tissues, where normal and pathological structures may exhibit significant contrast in the shear modulus. PMID:24688822

  9. Single-pixel hyperspectral imaging for real-time cancer detection: detecting damage in ex vivo porcine tissue samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peller, Joseph; Farahi, Faramarz; Trammell, Susan R.

    2016-03-01

    We are developing a single-pixel hyperspectral imaging system based on compressive sensing that acquires spatial and spectral information simultaneously. Our spectral imaging system uses autofluorescencent emission from collagen (400 nm) and NAD(P)H (475 nm), as well as, differences in the optical reflectance spectra as diagnostics for differentiating between healthy and diseased tissue. In this study, we demonstrate the ability of our imaging system to discriminate between healthy and damaged porcine epidermal tissue. Healthy porcine epidermal tissue samples (n=11) were imaged ex vivo using our hyperspectral system. The amount of NAD(P)H emission and the reflectance properties were approximately constant across the surface of healthy tissue samples. The tissue samples were then thermally damaged using an 1850 nm thulium fiber laser and re-imaged after laser irradiation. The damaged regions were clearly visible in the hyperspectral images as the thermal damage altered the fluorescent emission of NAD(P)H and changed the scattering properties of the tissue. The extent of the damaged regions was determined based on the hyperspectral images and these estimates were compared to damage extents measured in white light images acquired with a traditional camera. The extent of damage determined via hyperspectral imaging was in good agreement with estimates based on white light imaging indicating that our system is capable of differentiating between healthy and damaged tissue. Possible applications of our single pixel hyperspectral imaging system range from real-time determination of tumor margins during surgery to the use of this technique in the pathology lab to aid with cancer diagnosis and staging.

  10. Characterization and antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella isolated from internal tissues, ceca and rinse samples from commercial broiler chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The presence, serotype, and antimicrobial resistance profile of Salmonella from internal tissues (spleen, liver/gall bladder, thymus, Meckel’s diverticulum, and free floating yolk), ceca and carcass rinse samples were determined from six-week-old (n=30) and eight-week-old (n=40) commercial broilers ...

  11. Comparative evaluation of specific methods for labeling of Encephalitozoon cuniculi in paraffin wax-embedded tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Habenbacher, Bettina; Klang, Andrea; Fragner, Karin; Dinhopl, Nora; Künzel, Frank; Weissenböck, Herbert

    2012-03-01

    Detection of the microsporidian Encephalitozoon cuniculi in tissue samples is considered difficult. The aim of the current study was to determine whether immunohistochemistry (IHC) and in situ hybridization (ISH) represent reliable methods for the detection of E. cuniculi in postmortem tissue samples of rabbits. Paraffin-embedded tissue sections of brain and kidneys of 48 naturally infected pet rabbits, 10 negative controls, and the eyes of 3 further rabbits were used for all investigations. By IHC in 19 animals (37.3%), spores could be clearly detected and were all equally stained. By ISH using a digoxigenin-labeled oligonucleotide probe, only 6 animals (11.8%) proved undoubtedly positive. In these cases, many parasite-like objects revealed strong typical purple-black positive signals. However, several of the examined samples showed only partial staining of the pathogen or unclear results. Thus, in order to find an explanation for these inconsistent ISH results and to take a more detailed look at the different developmental stages of the organism, electron microscopy was applied. Empty spores, which had already discharged their polar filaments, prevailed in total number. Taken together, both techniques are rather insensitive, but under the condition that sufficient numbers of microsporidia are present, IHC can be recommended for specific identification of E. cuniculi in tissue samples. In contrast, ISH failed to detect some developmental stages of the organism, and, as such, ISH is therefore considered an inappropriate diagnostic method.

  12. Development and application of specific cytokine assays in tissue samples from a bottlenose dolphin with hyperinsulinemia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic inflammation has been associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes in humans. Postmortem hepatic and splenic tissue from a 46-year old geriatric male bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) with insulin resistance (chronic hyperinsulinemia with hyperglycemia) , chronic = inflamma...

  13. An exploratory survey of professionals on the use of stored tissue samples from minors for genetic research.

    PubMed

    Hens, K; Snoeck, J; Nys, H; Cassiman, J-J; Dierickx, K

    2010-01-01

    he ethical aspects of the use of stored tissue samples collected from minors are of topical interest. However, the views of professionals working in the field of genetics have not been investigated in depth anywhere. We conducted a survey among 194 such professionals in Belgium. This list was composed of the members of the High Council for Anthropogenetics, supplemented with all professionals working in the field of genetics that we found on the websites of the eight Belgian centers of human genetics and of the associated university registries. We achieved a response rate of 35.5%. The vast majority (92%) think that research on stored tissue samples is useful. Most respondents stated that parental consent is valid (82.5%), and 76.5% thought that children should also be given the right to assent when they are able to comprehend the implications of the storage of biological samples and of genetic research. Slightly more than half put the age at which young people can understand storage or research rather high: 16-18 years (51 and 53.1%, respectively). Although there is some consensus in the literature that donors should be allowed to give broad consent for future research on their biological samples, only 47.6% in our survey thought that parents should be allowed to consent to any future research on their children's samples. The aim of our study was to give some basis for future ethical reflections and policies on the subject of stored tissue samples from minors for genetic research. We concluded that a large majority of Belgian researchers and clinicians in the field of genetic research think research on stored tissue samples from minors is useful. They also think that parental consent for such research is valid, but that children should be allowed to assent as they grow older.

  14. Simultaneous determination of perfluorinated compounds and their potential precursors in mussel tissue and fish muscle tissue and liver samples by liquid chromatography-electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zabaleta, I; Bizkarguenaga, E; Prieto, A; Ortiz-Zarragoitia, M; Fernández, L A; Zuloaga, O

    2015-03-27

    An analytical method for the simultaneous determination in fish liver and muscle tissue and mussel samples of 14 perfluorinated compounds (PFCs), including three perfluoroalkylsulfonates (PFSAs), seven perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs), three perfluorophosphonic acids (PFPAs) and perfluorooctanesulfonamide (PFOSA), and 10 potential precursors, including four polyfluoroalkyl phosphates (PAPs), four fluorotelomer saturated acids (FTCAs) and two fluorotelomer unsaturated acids (FTUCAs), was developed in the present work. Different clean-up strategies by means of solid-phase extraction (SPE) using a mix-mode weak anion exchanger (WAX), reverse phase Envi-Carb or a combination of them was optimized and evaluated for the clean-up of focused ultrasonic solid-liquid (FUSLE) extracts before the analysis by liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Mix-mode WAX coupled in-line to Envi-Carb was finally selected since it rendered the cleanest extracts and minimum matrix effect. The FUSLE-SPE-LC-MS/MS methodology was validated in terms of recovery, precision and method detection limits (MDLs). Apparent recovery values in the 65-116%, 59-119% and 67-126% range and MDLs in the 0.1-2.7 ng/g, 0.1-3.8 ng/g and 0.2-3.1ng/g range were obtained for liver, mussel and fish muscle tissue samples, respectively. The method developed was applied to the analysis of grey mullet liver (Chelon labrosus) and mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis) samples from the Basque Coast (North of Spain) and Yellowfin tuna muscle tissue (Thunnus albacares) samples from the Indian Ocean. To the best of our knowledge this is the first method that describes the simultaneous determination of 14 PFCs and 10 potential precursors in fish liver, fish muscle tissue and mussel samples. Besides, this is the first time that 8:2 monosubstituted polyfluorodecyl phosphate (8:2 monoPAP) and 8:2 disubstituted polyfluorodecyl phosphate (8:2 diPAP) were detected in mussel and tuna samples

  15. Measurement of characteristic prompt gamma rays emitted from oxygen and carbon in tissue-equivalent samples during proton beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polf, Jerimy C.; Panthi, Rajesh; Mackin, Dennis S.; McCleskey, Matt; Saastamoinen, Antti; Roeder, Brian T.; Beddar, Sam

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to characterize how prompt gamma (PG) emission from tissue changes as a function of carbon and oxygen concentration, and to assess the feasibility of determining elemental concentration in tissues irradiated with proton beams. For this study, four tissue-equivalent water-sucrose samples with differing densities and concentrations of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen were irradiated with a 48 MeV proton pencil beam. The PG spectrum emitted from each sample was measured using a high-purity germanium detector, and the absolute detection efficiency of the detector, average beam current, and delivered dose distribution were also measured. Changes to the total PG emission from 12C (4.44 MeV) and 16O (6.13 MeV) per incident proton and per Gray of absorbed dose were characterized as a function of carbon and oxygen concentration in the sample. The intensity of the 4.44 MeV PG emission per incident proton was found to be nearly constant for all samples regardless of their carbon concentration. However, we found that the 6.13 MeV PG emission increased linearly with the total amount (in grams) of oxygen irradiated in the sample. From the measured PG data, we determined that 1.64 × 107 oxygen PGs were emitted per gram of oxygen irradiated per Gray of absorbed dose delivered with a 48 MeV proton beam. These results indicate that the 6.13 MeV PG emission from 16O is proportional to the concentration of oxygen in tissue irradiated with proton beams, showing that it is possible to determine the concentration of oxygen within tissues irradiated with proton beams by measuring 16O PG emission.

  16. Measurement of characteristic prompt gamma rays emitted from oxygen and carbon in tissue-equivalent samples during proton beam irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Polf, Jerimy C; Panthi, Rajesh; Mackin, Dennis S; McCleskey, Matt; Saastamoinen, Antti; Roeder, Brian T; Beddar, Sam

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to characterize how prompt gamma (PG) emission from tissue changes as a function of carbon and oxygen concentration, and to assess the feasibility of determining elemental concentration in tissues irradiated with proton beams. For this study, four tissue-equivalent water-sucrose samples with differing densities and concentrations of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen were irradiated with a 48 MeV proton pencil beam. The PG spectrum emitted from each sample was measured using a high-purity germanium detector, and the absolute detection efficiency of the detector, average beam current, and delivered dose distribution were also measured. Changes to the total PG emission from 12C (4.44 MeV) and 16O (6.13 MeV) per incident proton and per Gray of absorbed dose were characterized as a function of carbon and oxygen concentration in the sample. The intensity of the 4.44 MeV PG emission per incident proton was found to be nearly constant for all samples regardless of their carbon concentration. However, we found that the 6.13 MeV PG emission increased linearly with the total amount (in grams) of oxygen irradiated in the sample. From the measured PG data, we determined that 1.64 × 107 oxygen PGs were emitted per gram of oxygen irradiated per Gray of absorbed dose delivered with a 48 MeV proton beam. These results indicate that the 6.13 MeV PG emission from 16O is proportional to the concentration of oxygen in tissue irradiated with proton beams, showing that it is possible to determine the concentration of oxygen within tissues irradiated with proton beams by measuring 16O PG emission. PMID:23920051

  17. Gene recovery microdissection (GRM) a process for producing chromosome region-specific libraries of expressed genes

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, A T; Coleman, M A; Tucker, J D

    2001-02-08

    Gene Recovery Microdissection (GRM) is a unique and cost-effective process for producing chromosome region-specific libraries of expressed genes. It accelerates the pace, reduces the cost, and extends the capabilities of functional genomic research, the means by which scientists will put to life-saving, life-enhancing use their knowledge of any plant or animal genome.

  18. Pathology Tissue-quantitative Mass Spectrometry Analysis to Profile Histone Post-translational Modification Patterns in Patient Samples*

    PubMed Central

    Noberini, Roberta; Uggetti, Andrea; Pruneri, Giancarlo; Minucci, Saverio

    2016-01-01

    Histone post-translational modifications (hPTMs) generate a complex combinatorial code that has been implicated with various pathologies, including cancer. Dissecting such a code in physiological and diseased states may be exploited for epigenetic biomarker discovery, but hPTM analysis in clinical samples has been hindered by technical limitations. Here, we developed a method (PAThology tissue analysis of Histones by Mass Spectrometry - PAT-H-MS) that allows to perform a comprehensive, unbiased and quantitative MS-analysis of hPTM patterns on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples. In pairwise comparisons, histone extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues showed patterns similar to fresh frozen samples for 24 differentially modified peptides from histone H3. In addition, when coupled with a histone-focused version of the super-SILAC approach, this method allows the accurate quantification of modification changes among breast cancer patient samples. As an initial application of the PAThology tissue analysis of Histones by Mass Spectrometry method, we analyzed breast cancer samples, revealing significant changes in histone H3 methylation patterns among Luminal A-like and Triple Negative disease subtypes. These results pave the way for retrospective epigenetic studies that combine the power of MS-based hPTM analysis with the extensive clinical information associated with formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded archives. PMID:26463340

  19. Probing focal cortical dysplasia in formalin fixed samples using tissue optical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Suresh; Cicchi, Riccardo; Giordano, Flavio; Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Conti, Valerio; Guerrini, Renzo; Pavone, Francesco Saverio

    2016-03-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) is one of most common causes of intractable epilepsy in pediatric population and these are often insensitive to anti-epileptic drugs. FCD is characterized by a disarray in localized regions of the cerebral cortex and abnormal neurons which results them to misfire with incorrect signals. Resective neurosurgery to remove or disconnect the affected parts from the rest of the brain seems to be a viable option to treat FCD. Before neurosurgery the subject could undergo imaging studies including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) scans. On the downside FCD could be elusive in MRI images and may be practically invisible in CT scans. Furthermore, unnecessary removal of normal tissues is to be taken into consideration as this could lead to neurological defects. In this context, optical spectroscopy have been widely investigated as an alternative technique for the detection of abnormal tissues in different organ sites. Disease progression is accompanied by a number of architectural, biochemical and morphological changes. These variations are reflected in the spectral intensity and line shape. Here, in this proof of concept study we propose to investigate the application of tissue optical spectroscopy based on fluorescence excitation at two wavelength 378 and 445 nm coupled along with Raman spectroscopy for the detection of FCD on formalin fixed tissue specimens from pediatric subjects. For fluorescence at both the excitation wavelengths FCD showed a decreased intensity at longer wavelength when compared to normal tissues. Also, differences exist in the Raman spectral profiles of normal and FCD.

  20. How You Can Help Medical Research: Donating Your Blood, Tissue, and Other Samples

    MedlinePlus

    ... sample to make sure the proposed research is ethical, useful, and based on good science. After the ... discuss further? • Am I comfortable with experts making decisions about how my samples will be used in ...

  1. Optical parameter measurement of highly diffusive tissue body phantoms with specifically designed sample holder for photo diagnostic and PDT applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, A.; Rehman, K.; Anwar, S.; Firdous, S.; Nawaz, M.

    2015-12-01

    Knowledge of optical properties (absorption coefficients, scattering Coefficients, and anisotropy) is necessary for understanding light tissue interactions. Optical parameters define the behavior of light in the tissues. Intralipid and Indian ink are well-established tissue body phantoms. Quantitative characterization of biological tissues in terms of optical properties is achieved with integrating sphere. However, samples having significantly higher scattering and absorption coefficients such as malignant tissues potentially reduce the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and accuracy of integrating sphere. We have measured the diffuse reflection and transmission of these phantoms by placing them in integrating sphere at 632.8 nm and then applied IAD method to determine the optical properties tissue phantoms composed of Indian ink (1.0%) and Intralipid (20%). We have fabricated a special sample holder with thin microscopic cover slips which can be used to measure signal from highly concentrated intralipid and Indian ink solutions. Experiments conducted with various phantoms reveal significant improvement of SNR for a wide range of optical properties. This approach opens up a field for potential applications in measurement of optical properties of highly diffusive biological tissues. For 20% intralipid μa =0.112+/-0.046 cm-1 and μs =392.299+/-10.090 cm-1 at 632.8 nm and for 1.0% Indian ink μa =9.808+/-0.490 cm-1 and μs =1.258+/-0.063 cm-1 at same wavelength. System shows good repeatability and reproducibility within 4.9% error. Work may have important biomedical applications in photo-diagnosis and Photodynamic therapy.

  2. Towards a minimally invasive sampling tool for high resolution tissue analytical mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottardi, R.

    2015-09-01

    Multiple spatial mapping techniques of biological tissues have been proposed over the years, but all present limitations either in terms of resolution, analytical capacity or invasiveness. Ren et al (2015 Nanotechnology 26 284001) propose in their most recent work the use of a picosecond infrared laser (PIRL) under conditions of ultrafast desorption by impulsive vibrational excitation (DIVE) to extract small amounts of cellular and molecular components, conserving their viability, structure and activity. The PIRL DIVE technique would then work as a nanobiopsy with minimal damage to the surrounding tissues, which could potentially be applied for high resolution local structural characterization of tissues in health and disease with the spatial limit determined by the laser focus.

  3. Measurement of intravenously administered γ-Fe2O3 particle amount in mice tissues using vibrating sample magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Mikio; Miyamoto, Ryoichi; Oda, Tatsuya; Ohara, Yusuke; Yanagihara, Hideto; Ohkohchi, Nobuhiro; Kita, Eiji

    2014-12-01

    Dispersions of platelet γ-Fe2O3 particles 30-50nm in size were intravenously administered to mice and the amount of particles accumulated in each tissue was obtained by magnetization measurement using a vibrating sample magnetometer. Background noise was greatly reduced by measuring dried tissues under a magnetic field of 500 Oe so that the effect of diamagnetism was slight. Remarkable particle accumulation was observed in the liver and spleen. Considerable particle accumulation was observed in the lung when a large quantity of γ-Fe2 O3 particles was administered. There was no significant particle accumulation in the kidney and heart.

  4. Comparison of Accuracy of Whole-Exome Sequencing with Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded and Fresh Frozen Tissue Samples

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Mi Jeong; Kim, Ryong Nam; Kim, Yu Jin; Song, Ji-Young; Jung, Kyung Soo; Shin, Young Kee

    2015-01-01

    Formalin fixing with paraffin embedding (FFPE) has been a standard sample preparation method for decades, and archival FFPE samples are still very useful resources. Nonetheless, the use of FFPE samples in cancer genome analysis using next-generation sequencing, which is a powerful technique for the identification of genomic alterations at the nucleotide level, has been challenging due to poor DNA quality and artificial sequence alterations. In this study, we performed whole-exome sequencing of matched frozen samples and FFPE samples of tissues from 4 cancer patients and compared the next-generation sequencing data obtained from these samples. The major differences between data obtained from the 2 types of sample were the shorter insert size and artificial base alterations in the FFPE samples. A high proportion of short inserts in the FFPE samples resulted in overlapping paired reads, which could lead to overestimation of certain variants; >20% of the inserts in the FFPE samples were double sequenced. A large number of soft clipped reads was found in the sequencing data of the FFPE samples, and about 30% of total bases were soft clipped. The artificial base alterations, C>T and G>A, were observed in FFPE samples only, and the alteration rate ranged from 200 to 1,200 per 1M bases when sequencing errors were removed. Although high-confidence mutation calls in the FFPE samples were compatible to that in the frozen samples, caution should be exercised in terms of the artifacts, especially for low-confidence calls. Despite the clearly observed artifacts, archival FFPE samples can be a good resource for discovery or validation of biomarkers in cancer research based on whole-exome sequencing. PMID:26641479

  5. Comparison of Accuracy of Whole-Exome Sequencing with Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded and Fresh Frozen Tissue Samples.

    PubMed

    Oh, Ensel; Choi, Yoon-La; Kwon, Mi Jeong; Kim, Ryong Nam; Kim, Yu Jin; Song, Ji-Young; Jung, Kyung Soo; Shin, Young Kee

    2015-01-01

    Formalin fixing with paraffin embedding (FFPE) has been a standard sample preparation method for decades, and archival FFPE samples are still very useful resources. Nonetheless, the use of FFPE samples in cancer genome analysis using next-generation sequencing, which is a powerful technique for the identification of genomic alterations at the nucleotide level, has been challenging due to poor DNA quality and artificial sequence alterations. In this study, we performed whole-exome sequencing of matched frozen samples and FFPE samples of tissues from 4 cancer patients and compared the next-generation sequencing data obtained from these samples. The major differences between data obtained from the 2 types of sample were the shorter insert size and artificial base alterations in the FFPE samples. A high proportion of short inserts in the FFPE samples resulted in overlapping paired reads, which could lead to overestimation of certain variants; >20% of the inserts in the FFPE samples were double sequenced. A large number of soft clipped reads was found in the sequencing data of the FFPE samples, and about 30% of total bases were soft clipped. The artificial base alterations, C>T and G>A, were observed in FFPE samples only, and the alteration rate ranged from 200 to 1,200 per 1M bases when sequencing errors were removed. Although high-confidence mutation calls in the FFPE samples were compatible to that in the frozen samples, caution should be exercised in terms of the artifacts, especially for low-confidence calls. Despite the clearly observed artifacts, archival FFPE samples can be a good resource for discovery or validation of biomarkers in cancer research based on whole-exome sequencing.

  6. Comparison of Accuracy of Whole-Exome Sequencing with Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded and Fresh Frozen Tissue Samples.

    PubMed

    Oh, Ensel; Choi, Yoon-La; Kwon, Mi Jeong; Kim, Ryong Nam; Kim, Yu Jin; Song, Ji-Young; Jung, Kyung Soo; Shin, Young Kee

    2015-01-01

    Formalin fixing with paraffin embedding (FFPE) has been a standard sample preparation method for decades, and archival FFPE samples are still very useful resources. Nonetheless, the use of FFPE samples in cancer genome analysis using next-generation sequencing, which is a powerful technique for the identification of genomic alterations at the nucleotide level, has been challenging due to poor DNA quality and artificial sequence alterations. In this study, we performed whole-exome sequencing of matched frozen samples and FFPE samples of tissues from 4 cancer patients and compared the next-generation sequencing data obtained from these samples. The major differences between data obtained from the 2 types of sample were the shorter insert size and artificial base alterations in the FFPE samples. A high proportion of short inserts in the FFPE samples resulted in overlapping paired reads, which could lead to overestimation of certain variants; >20% of the inserts in the FFPE samples were double sequenced. A large number of soft clipped reads was found in the sequencing data of the FFPE samples, and about 30% of total bases were soft clipped. The artificial base alterations, C>T and G>A, were observed in FFPE samples only, and the alteration rate ranged from 200 to 1,200 per 1M bases when sequencing errors were removed. Although high-confidence mutation calls in the FFPE samples were compatible to that in the frozen samples, caution should be exercised in terms of the artifacts, especially for low-confidence calls. Despite the clearly observed artifacts, archival FFPE samples can be a good resource for discovery or validation of biomarkers in cancer research based on whole-exome sequencing. PMID:26641479

  7. Evaluation of a novel tagging and tissue preservation system for potential use in forensic sample collection.

    PubMed

    Grassberger, Martin; Stein, Christina; Hanslik, Stefan; Hochmeister, Manfred

    2005-07-16

    The authors describe a new, easy-to-use barcode-based tissue collection, preservation and body tracking system, which might prove instrumental in the containment of mass fatalities such as aircraft accidents, war related accidents, environmental disasters (e.g. earthquakes, hurricanes, and floods) terrorist bombings or mass murders.

  8. A novel approach in personal identification from tissue samples undergone different processes through STR typing.

    PubMed

    Staiti, N; Di Martino, D; Saravo, L

    2004-12-01

    Short tandem repeats (STRs) or microsatellites have been recognized worldwide as a powerful tool for human identification. They have become widely used in human identification especially in criminal cases and mass disasters. Police departments are often interested in cases where tissues are already decomposed and only do bones remain to let them perform laboratory analyses. Bone is the most resistant tissue in animal body to time depending degradation and putrefaction, but it is often hard to extract DNA from it because of its highly mineralized structure, which makes DNA extraction and/or amplification hard to carry out. We have performed human nuclear DNA extraction and STR typing in three different cases, on bones and bone fragments from long time dead persons found buried, in the sea, almost completely burnt and whose tissues were already decomposed. We report these caseworks as we would like to show how forensic scientists are improving their skill in identifying people whose corps have undergone several kinds of processes, even independently on the time passed and the level of putrefaction of their tissues.

  9. Evaluation of a novel tagging and tissue preservation system for potential use in forensic sample collection.

    PubMed

    Grassberger, Martin; Stein, Christina; Hanslik, Stefan; Hochmeister, Manfred

    2005-07-16

    The authors describe a new, easy-to-use barcode-based tissue collection, preservation and body tracking system, which might prove instrumental in the containment of mass fatalities such as aircraft accidents, war related accidents, environmental disasters (e.g. earthquakes, hurricanes, and floods) terrorist bombings or mass murders. PMID:15939157

  10. The focus on sample quality: Influence of colon tissue collection on reliability of qPCR data

    PubMed Central

    Korenkova, Vlasta; Slyskova, Jana; Novosadova, Vendula; Pizzamiglio, Sara; Langerova, Lucie; Bjorkman, Jens; Vycital, Ondrej; Liska, Vaclav; Levy, Miroslav; Veskrna, Karel; Vodicka, Pavel; Vodickova, Ludmila; Kubista, Mikael; Verderio, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Successful molecular analyses of human solid tissues require intact biological material with well-preserved nucleic acids, proteins, and other cell structures. Pre-analytical handling, comprising of the collection of material at the operating theatre, is among the first critical steps that influence sample quality. The aim of this study was to compare the experimental outcomes obtained from samples collected and stored by the conventional means of snap freezing and by PAXgene Tissue System (Qiagen). These approaches were evaluated by measuring rRNA and mRNA integrity of the samples (RNA Quality Indicator and Differential Amplification Method) and by gene expression profiling. The collection procedures of the biological material were implemented in two hospitals during colon cancer surgery in order to identify the impact of the collection method on the experimental outcome. Our study shows that the pre-analytical sample handling has a significant effect on the quality of RNA and on the variability of qPCR data. PAXgene collection mode proved to be more easily implemented in the operating room and moreover the quality of RNA obtained from human colon tissues by this method is superior to the one obtained by snap freezing. PMID:27383461

  11. Identification of immune cell infiltration in hematoxylin-eosin stained breast cancer samples: texture-based classification of tissue morphologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkki, Riku; Linder, Nina; Kovanen, Panu E.; Pellinen, Teijo; Lundin, Johan

    2016-03-01

    The characteristics of immune cells in the tumor microenvironment of breast cancer capture clinically important information. Despite the heterogeneity of tumor-infiltrating immune cells, it has been shown that the degree of infiltration assessed by visual evaluation of hematoxylin-eosin (H and E) stained samples has prognostic and possibly predictive value. However, quantification of the infiltration in H and E-stained tissue samples is currently dependent on visual scoring by an expert. Computer vision enables automated characterization of the components of the tumor microenvironment, and texture-based methods have successfully been used to discriminate between different tissue morphologies and cell phenotypes. In this study, we evaluate whether local binary pattern texture features with superpixel segmentation and classification with support vector machine can be utilized to identify immune cell infiltration in H and E-stained breast cancer samples. Guided with the pan-leukocyte CD45 marker, we annotated training and test sets from 20 primary breast cancer samples. In the training set of arbitrary sized image regions (n=1,116) a 3-fold cross-validation resulted in 98% accuracy and an area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.98 to discriminate between immune cell -rich and - poor areas. In the test set (n=204), we achieved an accuracy of 96% and AUC of 0.99 to label cropped tissue regions correctly into immune cell -rich and -poor categories. The obtained results demonstrate strong discrimination between immune cell -rich and -poor tissue morphologies. The proposed method can provide a quantitative measurement of the degree of immune cell infiltration and applied to digitally scanned H and E-stained breast cancer samples for diagnostic purposes.

  12. Bisulfite-Based DNA Methylation Analysis from Recent and Archived Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin Embedded Colorectal Tissue Samples.

    PubMed

    Kalmár, Alexandra; Péterfia, Bálint; Hollósi, Péter; Wichmann, Barnabás; Bodor, András; Patai, Árpád V; Schöller, Andrea; Krenács, Tibor; Tulassay, Zsolt; Molnár, Béla

    2015-09-01

    We aimed to test the applicability of formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples for gene specific DNA methylation analysis after using two commercially available DNA isolation kits. Genomic DNA was isolated from 5 colorectal adenocarcinomas and 5 normal adjacent tissues from "recent", collected within 6 months, and "archived", collected more than 5 years ago, FFPE tissues using either High Pure FFPET DNA Isolation kit or QIAamp DNA FFPE Tissue kit. DNA methylation analysis of MAL, SFRP1 and SFRP2 genes, known to be hypermethylated in CRC, was performed using methylation-sensitive high resolution melting (MS-HRM) analysis and sequencing. QIAamp (Q) method resulted in slightly higher recovery in archived (HP: 1.22 ± 3.18 μg DNA; Q: 3.00 ± 4.04 μg DNA) and significantly (p < 0.05) higher recovery in recent samples compared to High Pure method (HP) (HP: 4.10 ± 2.91 μg DNA; Q: 11.51 ± 7.50 μg DNA). Both OD260/280 and OD260/230 ratios were lower, but still high in the High Pure isolated archived and recent samples compared to those isolated with QIAamp. Identical DNA methylation patterns were detected for all 3 genes tested by MS-HRM with both isolation kits in the recent group. However, despite of higher DNA recovery in QIAamp slightly more reproducible methylation results were obtained from High Pure isolated archived samples. Sequencing confirmed DNA hypermethylation in CRCs. In conclusion, reproducible DNA methylation patterns were obtained from recent samples using both isolation kits. However, long term storage may affect the reliability of the results leading to moderate differences between the efficiency of isolation kits.

  13. Bisulfite-Based DNA Methylation Analysis from Recent and Archived Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin Embedded Colorectal Tissue Samples.

    PubMed

    Kalmár, Alexandra; Péterfia, Bálint; Hollósi, Péter; Wichmann, Barnabás; Bodor, András; Patai, Árpád V; Schöller, Andrea; Krenács, Tibor; Tulassay, Zsolt; Molnár, Béla

    2015-09-01

    We aimed to test the applicability of formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples for gene specific DNA methylation analysis after using two commercially available DNA isolation kits. Genomic DNA was isolated from 5 colorectal adenocarcinomas and 5 normal adjacent tissues from "recent", collected within 6 months, and "archived", collected more than 5 years ago, FFPE tissues using either High Pure FFPET DNA Isolation kit or QIAamp DNA FFPE Tissue kit. DNA methylation analysis of MAL, SFRP1 and SFRP2 genes, known to be hypermethylated in CRC, was performed using methylation-sensitive high resolution melting (MS-HRM) analysis and sequencing. QIAamp (Q) method resulted in slightly higher recovery in archived (HP: 1.22 ± 3.18 μg DNA; Q: 3.00 ± 4.04 μg DNA) and significantly (p < 0.05) higher recovery in recent samples compared to High Pure method (HP) (HP: 4.10 ± 2.91 μg DNA; Q: 11.51 ± 7.50 μg DNA). Both OD260/280 and OD260/230 ratios were lower, but still high in the High Pure isolated archived and recent samples compared to those isolated with QIAamp. Identical DNA methylation patterns were detected for all 3 genes tested by MS-HRM with both isolation kits in the recent group. However, despite of higher DNA recovery in QIAamp slightly more reproducible methylation results were obtained from High Pure isolated archived samples. Sequencing confirmed DNA hypermethylation in CRCs. In conclusion, reproducible DNA methylation patterns were obtained from recent samples using both isolation kits. However, long term storage may affect the reliability of the results leading to moderate differences between the efficiency of isolation kits. PMID:25991403

  14. AB127. The value of diagnostic micro-dissection testicular sperm extraction before start of IVF cycles for couples with non-obstructive azoospermia male factor

    PubMed Central

    Huang, William J.; Huang, Shen; Wei, Tzu-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Objective Micro-dissection testicular sperm extraction (mTESE) nowadays has been the major sperm retrieval method for patients with non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA) in assisted reproduction technology (ART). However, there are still 40% to 50% chances that no sperm can be found after the procedure, and the ICSI cycles are then aborted. Therefore the couples need to take the significant physical, psychological and financial risks, including ovulation induction, eggs retrieval and costs for procedures. We introduce the concept of diagnostic mTESE for men with NOA to determine the decision to initiate ovulation cycles. Methods From 2012 to 2014, 152 men received diagnostic mTESE procedures. This study had excluded patients with obstructive azoospermia and needle biopsy-confirmed hypospermatogenesis cases. Patients with undescended testis, Klinefelter’s syndrome, or Y microdeletion were included. The procedure was performed by Schlegel’s method, the testicular tissues were examined under operative microscope up to 24 X. The procedures were started from right testicle, if no sperm found from right side, then left side was opened consequently. The tubules larger than 300 μm were sampled for immediate table side touch print smear examination and the tissues were transferred to Bouin’s fixatives for further pathological examination. The whole procedure was video-taped for future review. The location of sperm-positive areas was recorded in operation note. The testis wound at tunica albuginea was closed using intra-tunical zipper suture with 6-0 Prolene. Results Among the 152 patients, the mean sperm retrieval rate was 45.3%. If we included the patients with biopsy-confirmed hypospermatogenesis receiving only therapeutic mTESE, the overall sperm retrieval rate was about 61%. For the patients with positive results at diagnostic mTESE, the sperm retrieval rate at later therapeutic mTESE for ICSI cycle was 100%. For patients who had no sperm found at diagnostic m

  15. Limit of Detection in X-ray Diffraction Measurements of Tissue Equivalent Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y.; Vassiljev, N.; Konstantinidis, A.; Griffiths, J.; Speller, R.

    2015-09-01

    There is a suggestion of a new approach to mammography whereby following a conventional mammogram, the radiologist could interrogate suspicious regions using X-ray diffraction whilst the patient is still present and to establish the true extent of disease. A starting point for this work is to quantify the minimum detectable amount of breast cancer within a realistic thickness phantom. Perspex has a similar diffraction pattern to healthy breast tissue whilst water is similar to breast tumour, hence these two materials are used as tissue equivalent test objects for X-ray diffraction measurements. The preliminary results show linear agreement between the ratio of Perspex to water and the ratio of the diffraction peak intensities at 0.7 nm-1 and 1.5 nm-1. The minimum detectable limit for a component of the two ‘tissue’ mix was found to be 4.1%. This suggests that X-ray diffraction can be used to quantify tissue like mixtures down to the 4.1% / 95.9% mix level and hence has a strong potential for delineating the extent of infiltration disease.

  16. Aspergillus PCR-Based Investigation of Fresh Tissue and Effusion Samples in Patients with Suspected Invasive Aspergillosis Enhances Diagnostic Capabilities

    PubMed Central

    Reinwald, M.; Spiess, B.; Heinz, W. J.; Heussel, C. P.; Bertz, H.; Cornely, O. A.; Hahn, J.; Lehrnbecher, T.; Kiehl, M.; Laws, H. J.; Wolf, H. H.; Schwerdtfeger, R.; Schultheis, B.; Burchardt, A.; Klein, M.; Dürken, M.; Claus, B.; Schlegel, F.; Hummel, M.; Hofmann, W.-K.

    2013-01-01

    Although it is a severe complication in immunocompromised patients, diagnosing invasive fungal disease (IFD), especially invasive aspergillosis (IA), remains difficult. In certain clinical scenarios, examining tissue samples for identification of the infectious organism becomes important. As culture-based methods rarely yield results, the performance of an Aspergillus-specific nested PCR in fresh tissue or pleural effusion samples was evaluated. Fresh tissue (n = 59) and effusion (n = 47) specimens from 79 immunocompromised patients were subjected to an Aspergillus-specific PCR assay. Twenty-six patients had proven (n = 20) or probable (n = 6) IFD, according to the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Invasive Fungal Infections Cooperative Group and National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Mycoses Study Group (EORTC/MSG) criteria, while the remaining patients were classified as having either possible IFD (n = 30) or no IFD (n = 23). IA was identified as the underlying IFD in 21/26 proven/probable cases. PCR positivity was observed for 18/21 proven/probable and 6 possible IA cases; cases classified as no IA did not show positive signals. Patients with proven IFD (n = 5) with cultures positive for non-Aspergillus molds also had negative Aspergillus PCR results. Aspergillus PCR performance analysis yielded sensitivity and specificity values of 86% (95% confidence interval [CI], 65% to 95%) and 100% (95% CI, 86% to 100%), respectively, thus leading to a diagnostic odds ratio of >200. In this analysis, good diagnostic performance of the PCR assay for detection of IA was observed for tissue samples, while effusion samples showed lower sensitivity rates. PCR testing represents a complementary tool; a positive PCR result strengthens the likelihood of IA, whereas IA seems unlikely in cases with negative results but findings could indicate non-Aspergillus IFD. Thus, PCR testing of these specimens enhances the diagnostic capabilities. PMID

  17. Storage and shipping of tissue samples for DNA analyses: A case study on earthworms☆

    PubMed Central

    Straube, Daniela; Juen, Anita

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, molecular analyses play an important role in studies of soil dwelling animals, for example in taxonomy, phylogeography or food web analyses. The quality of the DNA, used for later molecular analyses, is an important factor and depends on collection and preservation of samples prior to DNA extraction. Ideally, DNA samples are frozen immediately upon collection, but if samples are collected in the field, suitable preservation methods might be limited due to unavailability of resources or remote field sites. Moreover, shipping samples over long distances can cause loss of DNA quality e.g. by thawing or leaking of preservation liquid. In this study we use earthworms, a key organism in soil research, to compare three different DNA preservation methods – freezing at −20 °C, storing in 75% ethanol, and freeze drying. Samples were shipped from the United States of America to Austria. The DNA of the samples was extracted using two different extraction methods, peqGOLD™ and Chelex® 100. The DNA amplification success was determined by amplifying four DNA fragments of different length. The PCR amplification success is significantly influenced by preservation method and extraction method and differed significantly depending on the length of the DNA fragment. Freeze drying samples was the best preservation method when samples were extracted using the silica based extraction method peqGOLD™. For samples that were extracted with Chelex® 100, storage in ethanol was the best preservation method. However, the overall amplification success was significantly lower for the extraction procedure based on Chelex® 100. The detection of the small DNA fragments was higher and independent from the extraction method, while the amplification success was significantly reduced for the longer DNA fragments. We recommend freeze drying of DNA samples, especially when they have to be shipped for longer distances. No special packaging or declaration is needed for freeze dried

  18. Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, dibenzofurans, and polychlorinated biphenyls in human tissues, meat, fish, and wildlife samples from India.

    PubMed

    Kumar, K S; Kannan, K; Paramasivan, O N; Shanmuga Sundaram, V P; Nakanishi, J; Masunaga, S

    2001-09-01

    Concentrations of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), dibenzofurans (PCDFs), and non- and mono-ortho-substituted polychlorinated biphenyls (dioxin-like PCBs) were measured in tissues of humans, fishes, chicken, lamb, goat, predatory birds, and Ganges River dolphins collected from various locations in India. PCDDs/DFs were found in most of the samples analyzed with the liver of spotted owlet containing the highest concentration of 3,300 pg/g, fat wt. 2,3,7,8-Substituted PCDDs and PCDFs were found in human fattissues at concentrations ranging from 170 to 1,300 pg/g, fat wt. Concentrations of PCDDs were generally greaterthan those of PCDFs in human tissues, fishes, animal fat, and dolphin. Among fishes, meat, and wildlife samples analyzed, concentrations of PCDDs/DFs were found in the following order: country chicken < goat/lamb fat < fishes < river dolphins < predatory birds. Hepta-CDDs and OCDD were the major PCDD homologues found in humans, fishes, meat products, and dolphins. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin equivalents of PCDDs/DFs were greater than those of PCBs in selected fish, dolphin, and human samples. To our knowledge, this is the first report of PCDDs and PCDFs in human tissues, fishes, meat, and wildlife collected from India. PMID:11563645

  19. Incidence of mycobacterial infections in cats in Great Britain: estimate from feline tissue samples submitted to diagnostic laboratories.

    PubMed

    Gunn-Moore, D A; Gaunt, C; Shaw, D J

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the incidence of mycobacterial infections in cats in Great Britain (GB). This was performed using the proxy measure of feline tissue samples submitted to diagnostic laboratories in GB that were found to have histopathological changes typical of mycobacterial infection ('MYC'). Sixteen primary diagnostic laboratories were asked for information on the number of feline samples submitted in 2009, the number with MYC, the number undergoing Ziehl-Neelsen (ZN) staining and, for comparison, the number diagnosed with lymphoma. Eight laboratories provided full data for the whole year: 11,782 samples; lymphoma 3.2% (mean, 95% CI: 2.89, 3.5), MYC 1.16% (0.98; 1.37) and ZN-positive 0.31% (0.22; 0.43). Data on 1569 samples from seven laboratories that provided partial data on samples for the whole year revealed similar results, although all changes were more frequent: lymphoma 5.42% (4.35; 6.66), MYC 2.36% (1.66; 3.23) and ZN-positive 0.77% (0.40; 1.33). One laboratory only provided data for part of the year (4.5 months), reporting all three types of histopathology less frequently: 18,232 samples; lymphoma 0.2% (0.18; 0.32), MYC 0.07% (0.04; 0.12) and ZN-positive 0.05% (0.02; 0.09). The reasons for low reporting rates in this high-throughput laboratory are unclear. In total, 187 samples were reported as having MYC. Five Reference laboratories were also contacted, reporting 174 feline tissue submissions in 2009, with mycobacteria being cultured from 90. The study shows that MYC are frequently reported in tissue samples from cats in GB, being reported in ~1% of samples, with confirmation as ZN-positive in ~0.3%. Lymphoma is recognized as a common disease in cats, being seen in ~3% of samples in this study. When compared against MYC, lymphoma was reported only twice as frequently. This confirms that far from being rare, clinically significant mycobacterial infections occur commonly in cats in GB.

  20. A low dimensional entropy-based descriptor of several tissues in skin cancer histopathology samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez, Pablo; Corredor, Germán.; García-Arteaga, Juan D.; Romero, Eduardo

    2015-12-01

    The use of low-level visual features to assign high level labels in datasets of histopathology images is a possible solution to the problems derived from manual labeling by experts. However, in many cases, the visual cues are not enough. In this article we propose the use of features derived exclusively from the spatial distribution of the cell nuclei. These features are calculated using the weight of k-nn graphs constructed from the distances between cells. Results show that there are k values with enhanced discriminatory power, especially when comparing cancerous and non-cancerous tissue.

  1. Comparing paraffined and deparaffinized breast cancer tissue samples and an analysis of Raman spectroscopy and infrared methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depciuch, J.; Kaznowska, E.; Szmuc, K.; Zawlik, I.; Cholewa, M.; Heraud, P.; Cebulski, J.

    2016-05-01

    Breast cancer makes up a quarter of all cancer in women, which is why research into new diagnostic methods and sample preparations need to be developed at an accelerated pace. Researchers are looking for diagnostic tools to detect when an individual has cancer cells and use that information to see what measurements and approaches can be used to take further diagnostic steps. The most common method of sample preparation is the imbibing of tumor tissue in paraffin, which can produce a background for spectroscopic measurements in the range of 500-3500 cm-1. In this study we demonstrated that proper preparation of paraffin-embedded specimens and the measurement methodology can eliminate paraffin vibration, as was done in the work Depciuch et al. 2015. Thanks to this spectroscopic technique there may become a reliable and accurate method of diagnosing breast cancer based on the evidence found from the prepared samples. The study compared the results obtained through Raman spectroscopy and FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared) measurements of healthy and cancerous breast tissues that were either embedded in paraffin or deparaffinized. The resulting spectrum and accurate analysis led to the conclusion that the appropriate measurement of the background and the elimination of peaks from the paraffin had the greatest impact on the reliability of results. Furthermore, after the accurate, detailed studies FTIR and Raman spectroscopy on samples of breast tissue that were deparaffinized or embedded in paraffin, including a complete analysis of the peak after transformation Kramers-Kröning (KK), it was found that sample preparation did not affect the result obtained by measuring the reflectance in the mid-infrared range, and that this only had a minimal effect relating to the intensity obtained by the measurement of the Raman peak. Only in special cases, when Raman spectroscopic methods are used for research to find the peculiarities of the spectra, are deparaffinization recommended

  2. Pathologic evaluation of a new endoscopic ultrasound needle designed to obtain core tissue samples: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Douglas G.; Witt, Benjamin; Chadwick, Barbara; Wells, Jason; Taylor, Linda Jo; Dimaio, Christopher; Schmidt, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Standard endoscopic ultrasound-fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) needles are in widespread use. Meaningful differences between the available needles have been difficult to identify. Recently, a new EUS needle (Shark Core®, Covidien, Dublin, Leinster, Ireland), has been introduced in an attempt to improve diagnostic accuracy, tissue yield, and to potentially obtain a core tissue sample. We performed a pilot study prospectively to evaluate this new needle when compared to a standard EUS-FNA needle. Materials and Methods: Analysis of the first 15 patients undergoing EUS-FNA with the Shark Core needle was performed and it was compared to EUS-FNA in 15 patients who underwent EUS-FNA with a standard needle. Results: The Shark Core needle required fewer needle passes to obtain diagnostic adequacy than the standard needle [(χ2(1) = 11.3, P < 0.001]. The Shark Core needle required 1.5 passes to reach adequacy, whereas the standard needle required three passes. For cases with cell blocks, the Shark Core needle produced diagnostic material in 85% of cases [95% confidence interval (CI): 54–98], whereas the standard needle produced diagnostic material in 38% of the cases (95% CI: 9-76). The Shark Core needle produced actual tissue cores 82% of the time (95% CI: 48–98) and the standard needle produced no tissue cores (95% CI: 0-71) (P = 0.03). Conclusion: This pilot study found that the Shark Core needle had a high rate of producing adequate cytologic material for the diagnosis of pancreatic and peri-pancreatic lesions sampled by EUS with fewer passes required to obtain a definitive diagnosis and with a high rate of tissue cores being obtained when compared to a standard FNA needle. PMID:27386475

  3. Reproducibility of protein identification of selected cell types in Barrett's esophagus analyzed by combining laser-capture microdissection and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Stingl, Christoph; van Vilsteren, Frederike G I; Guzel, Coskun; Ten Kate, Fiebo J W; Visser, Mike; Krishnadath, Kausilia K; Bergman, Jacques J; Luider, Theo M

    2011-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is associated with increased risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) and characterized by replacement of normal esophageal squamous epithelium by columnar epithelium. These alterations are also reflected in changes in the protein-expression profiles of the cell types involved. To separately investigate the proteomes of selected cell-types we combined laser-capture microdissection (LCM) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Aims were to determine the sensitivity, specificity, and technical reproducibility of the sampling method, and the biological variability within and between biopsies and patients. Frozen biopsies were cryo-sectioned, samples of around 2000 epithelial or stroma cells microdissected, digested and measured by Orbitrap LC-MS. Proteins were then identified by MS/MS database search and quantified by label-free analysis. An average of 366 protein-groups were identified per sample, and more protein-groups were found in epithelial samples than in stromal samples (442 vs 301, p < 0.0001). Altogether, 1254 distinct protein-groups were found, 289 and 88 of them significantly more often in epithelial and stroma samples, respectively. We assessed five different types of reproducibilities (run-to-run, intrabiopsy, biopsy-to-biopsy, experiment-to-experiment, and patient-to-patient) for protein identification and protein quantification. Reproducibility of protein identification ranged from 78 to 57%, and standard deviation of protein quantification was on patient-to-patient level four times higher than for run-to-run. We conclude that sampling around 2000 cells requires groups of 32 samples to detect significant, over 10-fold differences in protein abundances and thus creates a successful compromise between throughput and quality of results. We therefore believe that this method is suitable for investigating protein-expression profiles during carcinogenesis.

  4. Evidence of presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in bovine tissue samples by multiplex PCR: possible relevance to reverse zoonosis.

    PubMed

    Mittal, M; Chakravarti, S; Sharma, V; Sanjeeth, B S; Churamani, C P; Kanwar, N S

    2014-04-01

    Bovine tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium bovis, remains one of the most important zoonotic health concerns worldwide. The transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from humans to animals also occurs especially in countries where there is close interaction of humans with the animals. In the present study, thirty bovine lung tissue autopsy samples from an organized dairy farm located in North India were screened for the presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex by smear microscopy, histopathological findings and PCR. Differential diagnosis of M. tuberculosis and M. bovis was made based on the deletion of mce-3 operon in M. bovis. The present study found eight of these samples positive for M. tuberculosis by multiplex PCR. Sequencing was performed on two PCR-positive representative samples and on annotation, and BLAST analysis confirmed the presence of gene fragment specific to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The presence of M. tuberculosis in all the positive samples raises the possibility of human-to-cattle transmission and possible adaptation of this organism in bovine tissues. This study accentuates the importance of screening and differential diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in humans and livestock for adopting effective TB control and eradication programmes.

  5. Simulating an investigative study of clinical cancer samples: use of tissue slides and PCR-based promoter-hypermethylation analysis.

    PubMed

    Chew, Yuan Yuan; Chin, Cheen Fei; Yeong, Foong May

    2015-01-01

    Topics on the molecular basis underlying cancer are quite popular among students. Also, excellent textbooks abound that provide interesting materials for discussion during lectures and tutorials about major events leading to cancer formation and progression. However, much less is available for students to conduct experiments for the analysis of cancer samples in undergraduate modules where there is a limited time-frame. Given the difficulty of working with cancer samples and the scarcity of good samples even in the clinical laboratories, it is impossible to run large-class practicals using patients' samples. Here, we describe the use of tissue slides in combination with polymerase-chain reaction (PCR) as a means of simulating an investigative approach to supplement students' learning of clinical research. By using tissue slides for histo-pathological examinations and specific budding yeast genomic DNA and primers adapted to demonstrate methylation-specific PCR, we designed an inquiry-based lab session to simulate the clinical investigation of a cohort of biopsies that students could analyze in a one-session practical.

  6. Determination of protein carbonyls in plasma, cell extracts, tissue homogenates, isolated proteins: Focus on sample preparation and derivatization conditions

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Daniela; Davies, Michael J.; Grune, Tilman

    2015-01-01

    Protein oxidation is involved in regulatory physiological events as well as in damage to tissues and is thought to play a key role in the pathophysiology of diseases and in the aging process. Protein-bound carbonyls represent a marker of global protein oxidation, as they are generated by multiple different reactive oxygen species in blood, tissues and cells. Sample preparation and stabilization are key steps in the accurate quantification of oxidation-related products and examination of physiological/pathological processes. This review therefore focuses on the sample preparation processes used in the most relevant methods to detect protein carbonyls after derivatization with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine with an emphasis on measurement in plasma, cells, organ homogenates, isolated proteins and organelles. Sample preparation, derivatization conditions and protein handling are presented for the spectrophotometric and HPLC method as well as for immunoblotting and ELISA. An extensive overview covering these methods in previously published articles is given for researchers who plan to measure protein carbonyls in different samples. PMID:26141921

  7. MicroRNA Stability in Postmortem FFPE Tissues: Quantitative Analysis Using Autoptic Samples from Acute Myocardial Infarction Patients.

    PubMed

    Kakimoto, Yu; Kamiguchi, Hiroshi; Ochiai, Eriko; Satoh, Fumiko; Osawa, Motoki

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are very short (18-24 nucleotides) nucleic acids that are expressed in a number of biological tissues and have been shown to be more resistant to extreme temperatures and pH compared to longer RNA molecules, like mRNAs. As miRNAs contribute to diverse biological process and respond to various kinds of cellular stress, their utility as diagnostic biomarkers and/or therapeutic targets has recently been explored. Here, we have evaluated the usefulness of miRNA quantification during postmortem examination of cardiac tissue from acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients. Cardiac tissue was collected within one week of the patient's death and either frozen (19 samples) or fixed in formalin for up to three years (36 samples). RNA integrity was evaluated with an electropherogram, and it appears that longer RNAs are fragmented after death in the long-term fixed samples. Quantitative PCR was also performed for seven miRNAs and three other small RNAs in order to determine the appropriate controls for our postmortem analysis. Our data indicate that miR-191 and miR-26b are more suitable than the other types of small RNA molecules as they are stably detected after death and long-term fixation. Further, we also applied our quantitation method, using these endogenous controls, to evaluate the expression of three previously identified miRNA biomarkers, miR-1, miR-208b, and miR-499a, in formalin-fixed tissues from AMI patients. Although miR-1 and miR-208b decreased (1.4-fold) and increased (1.2-fold), respectively, in the AMI samples compared to the controls, the significance of these changes was limited by our sample size. In contrast, the relative level of miR-499a was significantly decreased in the AMI samples (2.1-fold). This study highlights the stability of miRNAs after death and long-term fixation, validating their use as reliable biomarkers for AMI during postmortem examination. PMID:26046358

  8. Production of high quality brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB) RNA from isolated populations of rat spinal cord motor neurons obtained by Laser Capture Microdissection (LCM).

    PubMed

    Mehta, Prachi; Premkumar, Brian; Morris, Renée

    2016-08-01

    The mammalian central nervous system (CNS) is composed of multiple cellular elements, making it challenging to segregate one particular cell type to study their gene expression profile. For instance, as motor neurons represent only 5-10% of the total cell population of the spinal cord, meaningful transcriptional analysis on these neurons is almost impossible to achieve from homogenized spinal cord tissue. A major challenge faced by scientists is to obtain good quality RNA from small amounts of starting material. In this paper, we used Laser Capture Microdissection (LCM) techniques to identify and isolate spinal cord motor neurons. The present analysis revealed that perfusion with paraformaldehyde (PFA) does not alter RNA quality. RNA integrity numbers (RINs) of tissue samples from rubrospinal tract (RST)-transected, intact spinal cord or from whole spinal cord homogenate were all above 8, which indicates intact, high-quality RNA. Levels of mRNA for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) or for its tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB) were not affected by rubrospinal tract (RST) transection, a surgical procedure that deprive motor neurons from one of their main supraspinal input. The isolation of pure populations of neurons with LCM techniques allows for robust transcriptional characterization that cannot be achieved with spinal cord homogenates. Such preparations of pure population of motor neurons will provide valuable tools to advance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying spinal cord injury and neuromuscular diseases. In the near future, LCM techniques might be instrumental to the success of gene therapy for these debilitating conditions.

  9. Determination of five nitroimidazole residues in artificial porcine muscle tissue samples by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yingyun; Su, Yan; Liao, Xiulin; Yang, Na; Yang, Xiupei; Choi, Martin M F

    2012-01-15

    A capillary electrophoresis (CE) method with ultraviolet detection has been developed for simultaneous detection and quantification of five nitroimidazoles including benzoylmetronidazole, dimetridazole, metronidazole, ronidazole, and secnidazole in porcine muscles. Nitroimidazoles in samples were extracted by ethyl acetate with subsequent clean-up by a strong cation exchange solid phase extraction column. The clean extracts were subjected to CE separation with optimal experimental conditions: pH 3.0 running buffer containing 25mM sodium phosphate and 0.10mM tetrabutylammonium bromide, 5s hydrodynamic injection at 0.5psi and 28kV separation voltage. The nitroimidazoles could be monitored and detected at 320nm within 18min. The limits of detection were below 1.0μg/kg and limits of quantification were lower than 3.2μg/kg for all nitroimidazoles in the muscle samples. The recoveries and relative standard deviations were 85.4-96.0, 83.5-92.5, 1.3-3.9, and 1.1-4.2%, respectively for the intra-day and inter-day analyses. The proposed CE method has been successfully applied to determine nitroimidazoles in artificial porcine muscle samples with good accuracy and recovery, demonstrating that it has potential for detection and quantification of multi-nitroimidazole residue in real muscle samples. PMID:22265553

  10. Biodistribution Analysis of Oncolytic Adenoviruses in Patient Autopsy Samples Reveals Vascular Transduction of Noninjected Tumors and Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Koski, Anniina; Bramante, Simona; Kipar, Anja; Oksanen, Minna; Juhila, Juuso; Vassilev, Lotta; Joensuu, Timo; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli

    2015-01-01

    In clinical trials with oncolytic adenoviruses, there has been no mortality associated with treatment vectors. Likewise, in the Advanced Therapy Access Program (ATAP), where 290 patients were treated with 10 different viruses, no vector-related mortality was observed. However, as the patient population who received adenovirus treatments in ATAP represented heavily pretreated patients, often with very advanced disease, some patients died relatively soon after receiving their virus treatment mandating autopsy to investigate cause of death. Eleven such autopsies were performed and confirmed disease progression as the cause of death in each case. The regulatory requirement for investigating the safety of advanced therapy medical products presented a unique opportunity to study tissue samples collected as a routine part of the autopsies. Oncolytic adenoviral DNA was recovered in a wide range of tissues, including injected and noninjected tumors and various normal tissues, demonstrating the ability of the vector to disseminate through the vascular route. Furthermore, we recovered and cultured viable virus from samples of noninjected brain metastases of an intravenously treated patient, confirming that oncolytic adenovirus can reach tumors through the intravascular route. Data presented here give mechanistic insight into mode of action and biodistribution of oncolytic adenoviruses in cancer patients. PMID:26156245

  11. IHC Profiler: An Open Source Plugin for the Quantitative Evaluation and Automated Scoring of Immunohistochemistry Images of Human Tissue Samples

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Renu; De, Abhijit

    2014-01-01

    In anatomic pathology, immunohistochemistry (IHC) serves as a diagnostic and prognostic method for identification of disease markers in tissue samples that directly influences classification and grading the disease, influencing patient management. However, till today over most of the world, pathological analysis of tissue samples remained a time-consuming and subjective procedure, wherein the intensity of antibody staining is manually judged and thus scoring decision is directly influenced by visual bias. This instigated us to design a simple method of automated digital IHC image analysis algorithm for an unbiased, quantitative assessment of antibody staining intensity in tissue sections. As a first step, we adopted the spectral deconvolution method of DAB/hematoxylin color spectra by using optimized optical density vectors of the color deconvolution plugin for proper separation of the DAB color spectra. Then the DAB stained image is displayed in a new window wherein it undergoes pixel-by-pixel analysis, and displays the full profile along with its scoring decision. Based on the mathematical formula conceptualized, the algorithm is thoroughly tested by analyzing scores assigned to thousands (n = 1703) of DAB stained IHC images including sample images taken from human protein atlas web resource. The IHC Profiler plugin developed is compatible with the open resource digital image analysis software, ImageJ, which creates a pixel-by-pixel analysis profile of a digital IHC image and further assigns a score in a four tier system. A comparison study between manual pathological analysis and IHC Profiler resolved in a match of 88.6% (P<0.0001, CI = 95%). This new tool developed for clinical histopathological sample analysis can be adopted globally for scoring most protein targets where the marker protein expression is of cytoplasmic and/or nuclear type. We foresee that this method will minimize the problem of inter-observer variations across labs and further help in

  12. Redistribution of Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors Detected by Laser Microdissection of the Rat Dentate Gyrus 48 h following LTP Induction In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kennard, Jeremy T. T.; Guévremont, Diane; Mason-Parker, Sara E.; Abraham, Wickliffe C.; Williams, Joanna M.

    2014-01-01

    The persistence and input specificity of long-term potentiation (LTP) make it attractive as a mechanism of information storage. In its initial phase, both in vivo and in vitro studies have shown that LTP is associated with increased membrane localization of AMPA receptor subunits, but the molecular basis of LTP maintenance over the long-term is still unclear. We have previously shown that expression of AMPA and NMDA receptor subunits is elevated in whole homogenates prepared from dentate gyrus 48 h after LTP induction in vivo. In the present study, we utilized laser microdissection (LMD) techniques to determine whether AMPA and NMDA receptor upregulation occurs specifically in the stimulated regions of the dentate gyrus dendritic arbor. Receptor proteins GluN1, GluA1 and GluA2, as well as postsynaptic density protein of 95 kDa and tubulin were detected by Western blot analysis in microdissected samples. Gradients of expression were observed for GluN1 and GluA2, decreasing from the inner to the outer zones of the molecular layer, and were independent of LTP. When induced at medial perforant path synapses, LTP was associated with an apparent specific redistribution of GluA1 and GluN1 to the middle molecular layer that contains these synapses. These data indicate that glutamate receptor proteins are delivered specifically to dendritic regions possessing LTP-expressing synapses, and that these changes are preserved for at least 48 h. PMID:24667777

  13. Global Proteomic Analysis of Functional Compartments in Immature Avian Follicles Using Laser Microdissection Coupled to LC-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Nepomuceno, Angelito I.; Muddiman, David C.; Petitte, James N.

    2015-01-01

    Laser microdissection (LMD) was utilized for the separation of the yolk, follicular wall and surrounding stromal cells of small white follicles (SWF) obtained from reproductively active domestic fowl. Herein, we provide an in-situ proteomics based approach to studying follicular development through the use of LMD and mass spectrometry. This study resulted in a total of 2,889 proteins identified from the three specific isolated compartments. White yolk from the smallest avian follicles resulted in the identification of 1,984 proteins, while isolated follicular wall and ovarian stroma yielded 2,470 and 2,456 proteins, respectively. GO annotations highlighted the functional differences between the compartments. Among the three compartments examined, the relative abundance of vitellogenins, steroidogenic enzymes, anti-Mullerian hormone, transcription factors, and proteins involved in retinoic acid receptors/retinoic acid synthesis, transcription factors and cell surface receptors such as EGFR and their associated signaling pathways reflected known cellular function of the ovary. This study has provided a global proteome for SWF, white yolk and ovarian stroma of the avian ovary that can be used as a baseline for future studies and verifies that the coupling of LMD with proteomic analysis can be used to evaluate proteins from small, physiologically functional compartments of complex tissue. PMID:26211554

  14. Microdissection and Chromosome Painting of the Alien Chromosome in an Addition Line of Wheat - Thinopyrum intermedium

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Weibo; Zhang, Yingxin; Chen, Yuhong; Wang, Richard R.-C.; Zhang, Xiangqi; Han, Fangpu; Hu, Zanmin

    2013-01-01

    In this study, chromosome painting was developed and used to identify alien chromosomes in TAi-27, a wheat - Thinopyrumintermedium addition line, and the chromosomes of the three different genomes of Th. Intermedium. The smallest alien chromosome of TAi-27 was microdissected and its DNA amplified by DOP-PCR was used as a probe to hybridize with metaphase chromosomes of TAi-27 and Th. intermedium. Results showed that hybridization signals were observed in all regions of a pair of the smallest alien chromosomes and the pericentromeric area of another pair of alien chromosomes in TAi-27, indicating that the probe from microdissected chromosome is species specific. In Th. intermedium, 14 chromosomes had wide and strong hybridization signals distributed mainly on the pericentromere area and 9 chromosomes with narrow and weak signals on the pericentromere area. The remaining chromosomes displayed a very weak or no signal. Sequential FISH/GISH on Th. intermedium chromosomes using the DNAs of microdissected chromosome, Pseudoroegneriaspicata (St genome) and pDbH12 (a Js genome specific probe) as the probes indicated that the microdissected chromosome belonged to the St genome, three genomes (Js, J and St) in Th. intermedium could be distinguished, in which there is no hybridization signal on J genome that is similar to the genome of Th. bessarabicum. Our results showed that the smallest alien chromosomes may represent a truncated chromosome and the repetitive sequence distribution might be similar in different chromosomes within the St genome. However, the repetitive sequence distributions are different within the Js genome, within a single chromosome, and among different genomes in Th. intermedium. Our results suggested that chromosome painting could be feasible in some plants and useful in detecting chromosome variation and repetitive sequence distribution in different genomes of polyploidy plants, which is helpful for understanding the evolution of different genomes in

  15. Can the rapid identification of mature spermatozoa during microdissection testicular sperm extraction guide operative planning?

    PubMed

    Alrabeeah, K; Doucet, R; Boulet, E; Phillips, S; Al-Hathal, N; Bissonnette, F; Kadoch, I J; Zini, A

    2015-05-01

    The minimum sperm count and quality that must be identified during microdissection testicular sperm extraction (micro-TESE) to deem the procedure successful remains to be established. We conducted a retrospective study of 81 consecutive men with non-obstructive azoospermia who underwent a primary (first) micro-TESE between March 2007 and October 2013. Final assessment of sperm recovery [reported on the day of (intracytoplasmic sperm injection) ICSI] was recorded as (i) successful (available spermatozoa for ICSI) or (ii) unsuccessful (no spermatozoa for ICSI). The decision to perform a unilateral (with limited or complete microdissection) or bilateral micro-TESE was guided by the intra-operative identification of sperm recovery (≥5 motile or non-motile sperm) from the first testicle. Overall, sperm recovery was successful in 56% (45/81) of the men. A unilateral micro-TESE was performed in 47% (38/81) of the men (based on intra-operative identification of sperm) and in 100% (38/38) of these men, spermatozoa was found on final assessment. In 42% (16/38) of the unilateral cases, a limited microdissection was performed (owing to the rapid intra-operative identification of sperm). The remaining 43 men underwent a bilateral micro-TESE and 16% (7/43) of these men had sperm identified on final assessment. The cumulative ICSI pregnancy rates (per cycle started and per embryo transfer) were 47% (21/45) and 60% (21/35), respectively, with a mean (±SD) of 1.9 ± 1.0 embryos transferred. The data demonstrate that intra-operative assessment of sperm recovery can correctly identify those men that require a unilateral micro-TESE. Moreover, the rapid identification of sperm recovery can allow some men to undergo a limited unilateral micro-TESE and avoid the need for complete testicular microdissection.

  16. Microdissection and visualization of individual hair follicles for lineage tracing studies.

    PubMed

    Sequeira, Inês; Legué, Emilie; Capgras, Suzanne; Nicolas, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    In vivo lineage tracing is a valuable technique to study cellular behavior. Our lab developed a lineage tracing method, based on the Cre/lox system, to genetically induce clonal labelling of cells and follow their progeny. Here we describe a protocol for temporally controlled clonal labelling and for microdissection of individual mouse hair follicles. We further present staining and visualization techniques used in our lab to analyze clones issued from genetically induced labelling. PMID:24281870

  17. Microdissection and chromosome painting of X and B chromosomes in Locusta migratoria.

    PubMed

    Teruel, María; Cabrero, Josefa; Montiel, Eugenia E; Acosta, Manuel J; Sánchez, Antonio; Camacho, Juan Pedro M

    2009-01-01

    Acquisition of knowledge of the nature and DNA content of B chromosomes has been triggered by a collection of molecular techniques, one of which, microdissection, has provided interesting results in a number of B chromosome systems. Here we provide the first data on the molecular composition of B chromosomes in Locusta migratoria, after microdissection of the B and X chromosomes, DNA amplification by one (B) or two (X) different methods, and chromosome painting. The results showed that B chromosomes share at least two types of repetitive DNA sequences with the A chromosomes, suggesting that Bs in this species most likely arose intraspecifically. One of these repetitive DNAs is located on the heterochromatic distal half of the B chromosome and in the pericentromeric regions of about half of the A chromosomes, including the X. The other type of repetitive DNA is located interspersedly over the non-centromeric euchromatic regions of all A chromosomes and in an interstitial part of the proximal euchromatic half of the B chromosome. Chromosome painting, however, did not provide results sufficiently reliable to determine, in this species, which A chromosome gave rise to the B; this might be done by detailed analysis of the microdissected DNA sequences.

  18. Characterization of Glomerular Diseases Using Proteomic Analysis of Laser Capture Microdissected Glomeruli

    PubMed Central

    Satoskar, AA; Shapiro, JP; Bott, C; Song, H; Nadasdy, GM; Brodsky, SV; Hebert, L; Birmingham, DJ; Nadasdy, T; Freitas, M; Rovin, BH

    2012-01-01

    The application of molecular techniques to characterize clinical kidney biopsies has the potential to provide insights into glomerular diseases that cannot be revealed by traditional renal pathology. The present work is a proof-of-concept approach to test whether proteomic analysis of glomeruli isolated from clinical biopsies by laser capture microdissection can provide unique information regarding differentially-expressed proteins relevant to disease pathogenesis. The proteomes of glomeruli isolated by laser capture microdissection from biopsies of normal kidneys (living-related donor kidneys) were compared to those from patients with diabetic nephropathy, lupus nephritis, and fibronectin glomerulopathy. Glomerular proteins were extracted, trypsin digested and subjected to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for identification and quantitation. Relative to normal glomeruli, all disease-associated glomeruli showed an increased presence of complement components, a marked decline in podocyte-associated proteins, and a decrease in proteins associated with cellular metabolism. Additionally, fibronectin glomerulopathy glomeruli differed from all the other glomeruli because of a significant accumulation of fibronectin and fibulin. This study demonstrates that our method acquires reproducible and quantitative proteomic information from laser capture microdissection isolates that can be used to characterize the molecular features of glomerular diseases. PMID:22282304

  19. Micro-scaled high-throughput digestion of plant tissue samples for multi-elemental analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Thomas H; Laursen, Kristian H; Persson, Daniel P; Pedas, Pai; Husted, Søren; Schjoerring, Jan K

    2009-01-01

    Background Quantitative multi-elemental analysis by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) spectrometry depends on a complete digestion of solid samples. However, fast and thorough sample digestion is a challenging analytical task which constitutes a bottleneck in modern multi-elemental analysis. Additional obstacles may be that sample quantities are limited and elemental concentrations low. In such cases, digestion in small volumes with minimum dilution and contamination is required in order to obtain high accuracy data. Results We have developed a micro-scaled microwave digestion procedure and optimized it for accurate elemental profiling of plant materials (1-20 mg dry weight). A commercially available 64-position rotor with 5 ml disposable glass vials, originally designed for microwave-based parallel organic synthesis, was used as a platform for the digestion. The novel micro-scaled method was successfully validated by the use of various certified reference materials (CRM) with matrices rich in starch, lipid or protein. When the micro-scaled digestion procedure was applied on single rice grains or small batches of Arabidopsis seeds (1 mg, corresponding to approximately 50 seeds), the obtained elemental profiles closely matched those obtained by conventional analysis using digestion in large volume vessels. Accumulated elemental contents derived from separate analyses of rice grain fractions (aleurone, embryo and endosperm) closely matched the total content obtained by analysis of the whole rice grain. Conclusion A high-throughput micro-scaled method has been developed which enables digestion of small quantities of plant samples for subsequent elemental profiling by ICP-spectrometry. The method constitutes a valuable tool for screening of mutants and transformants. In addition, the method facilitates studies of the distribution of essential trace elements between and within plant organs which is relevant for, e.g., breeding programmes aiming at improvement of the

  20. Use of Curcuma longa L. extract to stain various tissue samples for histological studies

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sachin; Singh, Narendra Nath; Singh, Arun; Singh, Neelakshi; Sinha, Raman Kant

    2014-01-01

    Background: Curcuma longa L. is a perennial herb and a member of the Zingiberaceae (ginger) family, which is used extensively in foods as well as in Ayurvedic and Chinese systems of medicine. Current researches have focused on its antioxidant, hepatoprotective, anti-inflammatory, anticarcinogenic and antimicrobial properties. Until now, very few studies suggested its role as a histological stain. Aim: To ascertain its efficacy to be used as a counterstain after hematoxylin, to compare it's staining ability with that of routinely used eosin dye and also to ascertain its role in various collagen diseases. Materials and Methods: Turmeric rhizomes were cut into small pieces and were dried. These dried turmeric rhizomes were milled to form fine powder, which was then processed to form dye for staining tissue structures. Results: It revealed that turmeric can be used as a counterstain after hematoxylin, its staining ability was also good and comparable to that of eosin dye with a special affinity for collagen and muscle fibers. Conclusion: Turmeric dye can be used as a histological stain, which stains similar to eosin dye and its specific affinity for collagen and muscle fibers authenticates its role in the treatment of collagen and muscle disorders. PMID:26195911

  1. Localization of ginsenosides in the rhizome and root of Panax ginseng by laser microdissection and liquid chromatography-quadrupole/time of flight-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhitao; Chen, Yujie; Xu, Liang; Qin, Minjian; Yi, Tao; Chen, Hubiao; Zhao, Zhongzhen

    2015-02-01

    The root and rhizome of Panax ginseng C.A. Mey, known as ginseng, is a commonly used medicinal plant. Ginsenosides are the major active components responsible for the tonic effects of this herb. Here, the combination of laser microdissection and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography quadrupole/time of flight-mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QTOF-MS) was applied to investigate the localization of ginsenosides in root and rhizome of P. ginseng. Five kinds of tissue cells were separated from the rhizome, main root and branch root of ginseng. Fifty-nine ginsenosides were identified and the results showed that the cork contained more kinds of ginsenosides than did the cortex, phloem, xylem and resin canals. It is interesting that the phloem, xylem and resin canals from branch root contained a greater number of ginsenosides than did from main root. This study provides solid evidence on the accumulation of ginsenosides in cork, cortex, phloem and xylem.

  2. Non-lethal sampling of liver tissue for toxicologic evaluation of Florida cottonmouths snakes, Agkistrodon piscivorus conanti.

    PubMed

    Quesada, Rolando J; McCleary, Ryan J R; Heard, Darryl J; Lillywhite, Harvey B

    2014-01-01

    Due to their longevity, strong site tenure, poikilothermic metabolism, and low-energy specializations, reptiles might serve as excellent environmental sentinels. Cottonmouth snakes are generalist predators and scavengers, and as such, may have higher exposure to persistent environmental contaminants as a result of bioaccumulation. Traditionally, assessment and monitoring of contaminant exposure in reptiles have involved lethal sampling techniques. In this paper, we describe a non-destructive technique for sampling liver tissue in live anesthetized Florida cottonmouths. Wild-caught snakes (n = 21) were anesthetized with propofol, and a liver wedge biopsy was obtained by clamping the edge of the organ with two small hemostatic mosquito forceps via right-sided coeliotomy incision. A minimum required tissue sample weighing >100 mg was harvested from all except one of the animals. No mortalities occurred during the procedures or recovery from anesthesia, and all snakes were released back into the field after the animal had consumed prey and defecated, usually within 2 weeks following surgery. Hemorrhage was a minor complication in most snakes, especially those with friable discolored livers. The procedure appeared to have no short-term deleterious effects, and two biopsied individuals were captured after being released into the field and appeared to be normal and healthy. However, follow-up studies and recapture of more snakes are needed to assess long-term survivability. Our non-destructive liver sampling technique might be implemented in toxicological studies of other squamates and could help to minimize the lethal sampling of threatened species. PMID:24197420

  3. Museums and disease: using tissue archive and museum samples to study pathogens.

    PubMed

    Tsangaras, Kyriakos; Greenwood, Alex D

    2012-01-20

    Molecular studies of archival and fossil samples have traditionally focused on the nucleic acids derived from the host species. However, there has recently been an increase in ancient DNA research on the identification and characterization of infectious agents within the hosts. The study of pathogens from the past provides great opportunities for discovering the causes of historical infection events, characterizing host-microorganism co-evolution and directly investigating the evolution of specific pathogens. Several research teams have been able to isolate and characterize a variety of different bacterial, parasite and viral microorganisms. However, this emerging field is not without obstacles. The diagenetic processes that make ancient DNA research generally difficult are also impediments to ancient pathogen research and perhaps more so given that their DNA may represent an even rarer proportion of the remaining nucleic acids in a fossil sample than host DNA. However, studies performed under controlled conditions and following stringent ancient DNA protocols can and have yielded reliable and often surprising results. This article reviews the advantages, problems, and failures of ancient microbiological research.

  4. Genome-wide detection of DNase I hypersensitive sites in single cells and FFPE tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Jin, Wenfei; Tang, Qingsong; Wan, Mimi; Cui, Kairong; Zhang, Yi; Ren, Gang; Ni, Bing; Sklar, Jeffrey; Przytycka, Teresa M; Childs, Richard; Levens, David; Zhao, Keji

    2015-12-01

    DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHSs) provide important information on the presence of transcriptional regulatory elements and the state of chromatin in mammalian cells. Conventional DNase sequencing (DNase-seq) for genome-wide DHSs profiling is limited by the requirement of millions of cells. Here we report an ultrasensitive strategy, called single-cell DNase sequencing (scDNase-seq) for detection of genome-wide DHSs in single cells. We show that DHS patterns at the single-cell level are highly reproducible among individual cells. Among different single cells, highly expressed gene promoters and enhancers associated with multiple active histone modifications display constitutive DHS whereas chromatin regions with fewer histone modifications exhibit high variation of DHS. Furthermore, the single-cell DHSs predict enhancers that regulate cell-specific gene expression programs and the cell-to-cell variations of DHS are predictive of gene expression. Finally, we apply scDNase-seq to pools of tumour cells and pools of normal cells, dissected from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue slides from patients with thyroid cancer, and detect thousands of tumour-specific DHSs. Many of these DHSs are associated with promoters and enhancers critically involved in cancer development. Analysis of the DHS sequences uncovers one mutation (chr18: 52417839G>C) in the tumour cells of a patient with follicular thyroid carcinoma, which affects the binding of the tumour suppressor protein p53 and correlates with decreased expression of its target gene TXNL1. In conclusion, scDNase-seq can reliably detect DHSs in single cells, greatly extending the range of applications of DHS analysis both for basic and for translational research, and may provide critical information for personalized medicine. PMID:26605532

  5. In situ assessment of mRNA accessibility in heterogeneous tissue samples using elongation factor-1 alpha (EF-1 alpha).

    PubMed

    Gruber, A D; Levine, R A

    1997-05-01

    Elongation factor-1 alpha (EF-1 alpha) is an evolutionarily highly conserved universal cofactor of protein synthesis in all living cells. In this study, its use as a positive control in situ hybridization assays for specific detection of mRNA sequences was evaluated. Northern blot analysis of various non-neoplastic and neoplastic cultured cells of different stages of confluence, cell shape, and cell cycle status revealed that EF-1 alpha had a lower and more homogeneous expression than did beta-actin. In situ hybridization assays using digoxigenin-labeled riboprobes for the detection of EF-1 alpha mRNA in routinely formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections showed that EF-1 alpha is a suitable positive control in all types of cells. However, variation of protease pretreatments demonstrated distinct and sometimes mutually exclusive digestion conditions for different cell types within the same tissue sample. Our results indicate that detection of EF-1 alpha mRNA is an appropriate internal standard for in situ hybridization assays and that it is useful to control artifacts such as false negatives caused by inappropriate protease pretreatments. The observed variability of optimal protease pretreatments for different cell types within the same tissue section strengthens the importance of a positive control in in situ hybridization assays.

  6. Development of a remote laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy system for investigation of calcified tissue samples

    SciTech Connect

    Hrdlicka, Ales; Prokes, Lubomir; Stankova, Alice; Novotny, Karel; Vitesnikova, Anna; Kanicky, Viktor; Otruba, Vitezslav; Kaiser, Jozef; Novotny, Jan; Malina, Radomir; Palenikova, Katerina

    2010-05-01

    The development of a remote laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) setup with an off-axis Newtonian collection optics, Galilean-based focusing telescope, and a 532 nm flattop laser beam source is presented. The device was tested at a 6 m distance on a slice of bone to simulate its possible use in the field, e.g., during archaeological excavations. It is shown that this setup is sufficiently sensitive to both major (P, Mg) and minor elements (Na, Zn, Sr). The measured quantities of Mg, Zn, and Sr correspond to the values obtained by reference laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) measurements within an approximately 20% range of uncertainty. A single point calibration was performed by use of a bone meal standard . The radial element distribution is almost invariable by use of LA-ICP-MS, whereas the LIBS measurement showed a strong dependence on the sample porosity. Based on these results, this remote LIBS setup with a relatively large (350 mm) collecting mirror is capable of semiquantitative analysis at the level of units of mg kg{sup -1}.

  7. The problem with medical research on tissue and organ samples taken in connection with forensic autopsies in France.

    PubMed

    Rougé-Maillart, C; Dupont, V; Jousset, N

    2016-02-01

    Currently, in France, it is legally impossible to conduct scientific research on tissue and organ samples taken from forensic autopsies. In fact, the law schedules the destruction of such samples at the end of the judicial investigation, and the common law rules governing cadaver research cannot be applied to the forensic context. However, nothing seems in itself to stand in the way of such research since, despite their specific nature, these samples from forensic autopsies could be subject, following legislative amendments, to common law relating to medical research on samples taken from deceased persons. But an essential legislative amendment, firstly to allow the Biomedicine Agency to become authorized to issue a research permit and secondly, to change the research conditions in terms of the non-opposition of the deceased to said research. Such an amendment would be a true breakthrough because it would allow teams to continue to move forward calmly in research, and allow this research to be placed within a legal framework, which would promote international exchanges.

  8. The problem with medical research on tissue and organ samples taken in connection with forensic autopsies in France.

    PubMed

    Rougé-Maillart, C; Dupont, V; Jousset, N

    2016-02-01

    Currently, in France, it is legally impossible to conduct scientific research on tissue and organ samples taken from forensic autopsies. In fact, the law schedules the destruction of such samples at the end of the judicial investigation, and the common law rules governing cadaver research cannot be applied to the forensic context. However, nothing seems in itself to stand in the way of such research since, despite their specific nature, these samples from forensic autopsies could be subject, following legislative amendments, to common law relating to medical research on samples taken from deceased persons. But an essential legislative amendment, firstly to allow the Biomedicine Agency to become authorized to issue a research permit and secondly, to change the research conditions in terms of the non-opposition of the deceased to said research. Such an amendment would be a true breakthrough because it would allow teams to continue to move forward calmly in research, and allow this research to be placed within a legal framework, which would promote international exchanges. PMID:26694871

  9. Isolating RNA from precursor and mature melanocytes from human vitiligo and normal skin using laser capture microdissection.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Nathaniel B; Koster, Maranke I; Hoaglin, Laura G; Wright, Michael J; Robinson, Steven E; Robinson, William A; Roop, Dennis R; Norris, David A; Birlea, Stanca A

    2016-10-01

    To characterize the gene expression profile of regenerated melanocytes in the narrow band UVB (NBUVB)-treated vitiligo epidermis and their precursors in the hair follicle, we present here a strategy of RNA isolation from in situ melanocytes using human frozen skin. We developed a rapid immunostaining protocol using the NKI-beteb antibody, which labels differentiated and precursor melanocytes, followed by fluorescent laser capture microdissection. This technique enabled the direct isolation, from melanocyte and adjacent keratinocyte populations, of satisfactory quality RNA that was successfully amplified and analysed by qRT-PCR. The melanocyte-specific gene transcripts TYR, DCT, TYRP1 and PMEL were significantly upregulated in our NBUVB-treated melanocyte samples as compared with the keratinocyte samples, while keratinocyte-specific genes (KRT5 and KRT14) were expressed significantly higher in the keratinocyte samples as compared with the melanocyte samples. Furthermore, in both NBUVB-treated vitiligo skin and normal skin, when bulge melanocytes were compared with epidermal melanocytes, we found significantly lower expression of melanocyte-specific genes and significantly higher expression of three melanocytic stem cell genes (SOX9, WIF1 and SFRP1), while ALCAM and ALDH1A1 transcripts did not show significant variation. We found significantly higher expression of melanocyte-specific genes in the epidermis of NBUVB-treated vitiligo, as compared to the normal skin. When comparing bulge melanocyte samples from untreated vitiligo, NBUVB-treated vitiligo and normal skin, we did not find significant differences in the expression of melanocyte-specific genes or melanocytic stem cell genes. These techniques offer valuable opportunities to study melanocytes and their precursors in vitiligo and other pigmentation disorders.

  10. Restructuring the Vocal Fold Lamina Propria with Endoscopic Microdissection

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, Rebecca S.; Hoffman, Henry T.; Dailey, Seth H.; Bock, Jonathan M.; Klemuk, Sarah A.; Askeland, Ryan W.; Ahlrichs-Hanson, Jan S.; Heaford, Andrew C.; Thibeault, Susan L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis The purposes of this preclinical study were to investigate histologic and rheologic outcomes of Microendoscopy of Reinke’s space (MERS)-guided minithyrotomy and to assess its instrumentation. Study Design Human cadaveric and in vivo animal study. Methods Three human cadaveric larynges were treated with MERS-guided placement of Radiesse VoiceGel and immediately evaluated histologically for biomaterial location. In the second part of this investigation, two scarred porcine larynges were treated with MERS-guided placement of HyStem-VF and rheologically evaluated 6 weeks later. Student t tests determined differences in viscoelastic properties of treated/untreated vocal folds. Sialendoscopes and microendoscopes were subjectively compared for their visualization capacity. Results MERS imaged the subepithelial area and vocal ligament, guiding both tissue dissection and biomaterial positioning. Sialendoscopes provided adequate visualization and feature incorporated working channels. Enhanced image clarity was created in a gas-filled rather than saline-filled environment, per rater judgment. Histological analysis revealed desirable biomaterial positioning with MERS. Per rheological analysis, viscoelastic properties of the MERS-treated porcine vocal folds compared to uninjured vocal folds 6 weeks following treatment did not statistically differ. Conclusions MERS-guided laryngoplasty using sialendoscopes yielded satisfactory biomaterial positioning in the short-term and normalized rheologic tissue properties in the long-term, contributing to proof of concept for MERS in the treatment of scarring. Strengths of MERS include direct, real-time visualization of Reinke’s space and an ability to manipulate surgical instruments parallel to the vocal fold edge while maintaining an intact epithelium. Future work will explore the clinical utility of MERS for addressing scarring, sulcus vocalis, and other intracordal processes. PMID:23959803

  11. Mediastinitis after cardiac surgery: improvement of bacteriological diagnosis by use of multiple tissue samples and strain typing.

    PubMed

    Tammelin, Ann; Hambraeus, Anna; Ståhle, Elisabeth

    2002-08-01

    The diagnosis of postsurgical mediastinitis (PSM) among patients with sternal wound complication (SWC) after cardiac surgery is sometimes difficult, as fever, elevated C-reactive protein levels, and chest pain can be caused by a general inflammatory reaction to the operative trauma and/or sternal dehiscence without infection. The definitions of PSM usually used emphasize clinical signs and symptoms easily observed by the surgeon. The aim of the study was to investigate whether the use of standardized multiple tissue sampling, optimal culturing methods, and strain typing, together with a microbiological criterion for infection, could identify more infected patients than clinical assessment alone. Patients reexplored due to SWC after cardiac artery bypass grafting (CABG) or heart valve replacement (HVR) with or without CABG performed at the Department for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery at the Uppsala University Hospital between 10 March 1998 and 9 September 2000 were investigated prospectively. Tissue samples were taken from the sternum or adjacent mediastinal tissue, preferably before the administration of antibiotics. Culturing was performed both directly (on agar plates) and using enrichment broth. Species identification was performed by standard methods, and strain typing was performed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. A total of 41 cases with at least five tissue samples each were included in the study group. Of these patients, 32 were infected according to the microbiological criterion (i.e., the same strain was found in >/=50% of the samples). Staphylococcus epidermidis was the primary pathogen in 38% of the cases (12/32), S. aureus was the primary pathogen in 31% (10/32), P. acnes was the primary pathogen in 25% (8/32), and S. simulans and S. haemolyticus were the primary pathogens in 3% (1/32) each. All cases of S. aureus infection and 86% (12/14) of coagulase-negative staphylococcus (CoNS) infections were identified from primary cultures. All cases fulfilling

  12. A New Sample Substrate for Imaging and Correlating Organic and Trace Metal Composition in Biological Cells and Tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Miller,L.; Wang, Q.; Smith, R.; Zhong, H.; Elliott, D.; Warren, J.

    2007-01-01

    Many disease processes involve alterations in the chemical makeup of tissue. Synchrotron-based infrared (IR) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microscopes are becoming increasingly popular tools for imaging the organic and trace metal compositions of biological materials, respectively, without the need for extrinsic labels or stains. Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIRM) provides chemical information on the organic components of a material at a diffraction-limited spatial resolution of 2-10 {mu}m in the mid-infrared region. The synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) microprobe is a complementary technique used to probe trace element content in the same systems with a similar spatial resolution. However to be most beneficial, it is important to combine the results from both imaging techniques on a single sample, which requires precise overlap of the IR and X-ray images. In this work, we have developed a sample substrate containing a gold grid pattern on its surface, which can be imaged with both the IR and X-ray microscopes. The substrate consists of a low trace element glass slide that has a gold grid patterned on its surface, where the major and minor parts of the grid contain 25 and 12 nm gold, respectively. This grid pattern can be imaged with the IR microscope because the reflectivity of gold differs as a function of thickness. The pattern can also be imaged with the SXRF microprobe because the Au fluorescence intensity changes with gold thickness. The tissue sample is placed on top of the patterned substrate. The grid pattern's IR reflectivity image and the gold SXRF image are used as fiducial markers for spatially overlapping the IR and SXRF images from the tissue. Results show that IR and X-ray images can be correlated precisely, with a spatial resolution of less than one pixel (i.e., 2-3 microns). The development of this new tool will be presented along with applications to paraffin-embedded metalloprotein crystals, Alzheimer's disease, and hair

  13. Paralytic shellfish poisoning: post-mortem analysis of tissue and body fluid samples from human victims in the Patagonia fjords.

    PubMed

    García, Carlos; del Carmen Bravo, María; Lagos, Marcelo; Lagos, Néstor

    2004-02-01

    In July 5, 2002 fishermen working in harvesting sea urchin (Loxechinus albus) in the Patagonia Chilean fjords were intoxicated by consumption of filter-feeder bivalve Aulacomya ater. After the ingestion of 7-9 ribbed mussel, two fishermen died 3-4 h after shellfish consumption. The forensic examination in both victims did not show pathological abnormalities with the exception of the lungs conditions, crackling to the touch, pulmonary congestion and edema. The toxic mussel sample showed a toxicity measured by mouse bioassay of 8575 microg of STX (saxitoxin) equivalent by 100 g of shellfish meat. Using post-column derivatization HPLC method with fluorescent on line detection was possible to measure mass amount of each paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxin yielding individual toxin concentrations. These PSP toxins were identified in the gastric content, body fluids (urine, bile and cerebrospinal fluid) and tissue samples (liver, kidney, lung, stomach, spleen, heart, brain, adrenal glands, pancreas and thyroids glands). The toxin profiles of each body fluid and tissue samples and the amount of each PSP toxin detected are reported. The PSP toxins found in the gastric content, were STX and the gonyautoxins (GTX4, GTX1, GTX5, GTX3 and GTX2) which showed to be the major amount of PSP toxins found in the victims biological samples. The PSP toxin composition in urine and bile showed as major PSP toxins neoSaxitoxin (neoSTX) and GTX4/GTX1 epimers, both STX analogues with an hydroxyl group (-OH) in the N(1) of the tetrahydropurine nucleus. The neoSTX was not present in the gastric content sample, indicating that the oxidation of N(1) in the STX tetrahydropurine nucleus resulted neoSTX, in a similar way that GTX3/GTX2 epimers were transformed in GTX4/GTX1 epimers. Beside this metabolic transformation, also the hydrolysis of carbamoyl group from STX to form its decarbomoyl analogue decarbamoylsaxitoxin was detected in liver, kidney and lung. These two findings show that PSP

  14. Routine sample preparation and HPLC analysis for ascorbic acid (vitamin C) determination in wheat plants and Arabidopsis leaf tissues.

    PubMed

    Szalai, Gabriella; Janda, T; Pál, Magda

    2014-06-01

    Plants have developed various mechanisms to protect themselves against oxidative stress. One of the most important non-enzymatic antioxidants is ascorbic acid. There is thus a need for a rapid, sensitive method for the analysis of the reduced and oxidised forms of ascorbic acid in crop plants. In this paper a simple, economic, selective, precise and stable HPLC method is presented for the detection of ascorbate in plant tissue. The sensitivity, the short retention time and the simple isocratic elution mean that the method is suitable for the routine quantification of ascorbate in a high daily sample number. The method has been found to be better than previously reported methods, because of the use of an economical, readily available mobile phase, UV detection and the lack of complicated extraction procedures. The method has been tested on Arabidopsis plants with different ascorbate levels and on wheat plants during Cd stress.

  15. Gas-liquid chromatographic and gas-liquid-mass spectometric determination of fenvalerate and permethrin residues in grasshoppers and duck tissue samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reichel, W.L.; Kolbe, E.J.; Stafford, C.J.

    1981-01-01

    A procedure is described for determining fenvalerate and permethrin residues in grasshoppers and duck tissues. Samples are Soxhlet-extracted with hexane and cleaned up by gel permeation chromatography with an in-line alumina column. Samples are analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography with electron capture detection, and confirmed by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The average recovery from fortified tissues was 97%.

  16. Analysis of cannabinoids in laser-microdissected trichomes of medicinal Cannabis sativa using LCMS and cryogenic NMR.

    PubMed

    Happyana, Nizar; Agnolet, Sara; Muntendam, Remco; Van Dam, Annie; Schneider, Bernd; Kayser, Oliver

    2013-03-01

    Trichomes, especially the capitate-stalked glandular hairs, are well known as the main sites of cannabinoid and essential oil production of Cannabis sativa. In this study the distribution and density of various types of Cannabis sativa L. trichomes, have been investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Furthermore, glandular trichomes were isolated over the flowering period (8 weeks) by laser microdissection (LMD) and the cannabinoid profile analyzed by LCMS. Cannabinoids were detected in extracts of 25-143 collected cells of capitate-sessile and capitate stalked trichomes and separately in the gland (head) and the stem of the latter. Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinolic acid [THCA (1)], cannabidiolic acid [CBDA (2)], and cannabigerolic acid [CBGA (3)] were identified as most-abundant compounds in all analyzed samples while their decarboxylated derivatives, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol [THC (4)], cannabidiol [CBD (5)], and cannabigerol [CBG (6)], co-detected in all samples, were present at significantly lower levels. Cannabichromene [CBC (8)] along with cannabinol (CBN (9)) were identified as minor compounds only in the samples of intact capitate-stalked trichomes and their heads harvested from 8-week old plants. Cryogenic nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) was used to confirm the occurrence of major cannabinoids, THCA (1) and CBDA (2), in capitate-stalked and capitate-sessile trichomes. Cryogenic NMR enabled the additional identification of cannabichromenic acid [CBCA (7)] in the dissected trichomes, which was not possible by LCMS as standard was not available. The hereby documented detection of metabolites in the stems of capitate-stalked trichomes indicates a complex biosynthesis and localization over the trichome cells forming the glandular secretion unit.

  17. Balanced-PCR amplification allows unbiased identification of genomic copy changes in minute cell and tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang; Brennan, Cameron; Rook, Martha; Wolfe, Jia Liu; Leo, Christopher; Chin, Lynda; Pan, Hongjie; Liu, Wei-Hua; Price, Brendan; Makrigiorgos, G Mike

    2004-05-21

    Analysis of genomic DNA derived from cells and fresh or fixed tissues often requires whole genome amplification prior to microarray screening. Technical hurdles to this process are the introduction of amplification bias and/or the inhibitory effects of formalin fixation on DNA amplification. Here we demonstrate a balanced-PCR procedure that allows unbiased amplification of genomic DNA from fresh or modestly degraded paraffin-embedded DNA samples. Following digestion and ligation of a target and a control genome with distinct linkers, the two are mixed and amplified in a single PCR, thereby avoiding biases associated with PCR saturation and impurities. We demonstrate genome-wide retention of allelic differences following balanced-PCR amplification of DNA from breast cancer and normal human cells and genomic profiling by array-CGH (cDNA arrays, 100 kb resolution) and by real-time PCR (single gene resolution). Comparison of balanced-PCR with multiple displacement amplification (MDA) demonstrates equivalent performance between the two when intact genomic DNA is used. When DNA from paraffin-embedded samples is used, balanced PCR overcomes problems associated with modest DNA degradation and produces unbiased amplification whereas MDA does not. Balanced-PCR allows amplification and recovery of modestly degraded genomic DNA for subsequent retrospective analysis of human tumors with known outcomes.

  18. Activity assays of mammalian thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase: fluorescent disulfide substrates, mechanisms, and use with tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Montano, Sergio J; Lu, Jun; Gustafsson, Tomas N; Holmgren, Arne

    2014-03-15

    Thioredoxin (Trx) is a protein disulfide reductase that, together with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR), controls oxidative stress or redox signaling via thiol redox control. Human cytosolic Trx1 has Cys32 and Cys35 as the active site and three additional cysteine residues (Cys62, Cys69, and Cys73), which by oxidation generates inactive Cys62 to Cys69 two-disulfide Trx. This, combined with TrxR with a broad substrate specificity, complicates assays of mammalian Trx and TrxR. We sought to understand the autoregulation of Trx and TrxR and to generate new methods for quantification of Trx and TrxR. We optimized the synthesis of two fluorescent substrates, di-eosin-glutathione disulfide (Di-E-GSSG) and fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled insulin (FiTC-insulin), which displayed higher fluorescence on disulfide reduction. Di-E-GSSG showed a very large increase in fluorescence quantum yield but had a relatively low affinity for Trx and was also a weak direct substrate for TrxR, in contrast to GSSG. FiTC-insulin was used to develop highly sensitive assays for TrxR and Trx. Reproducible conditions were developed for reactivation of modified Trx, commonly present in frozen or oxidized samples. Trx in cell extracts and tissue samples, including plasma and serum, were subsequently analyzed, showing highly reproducible results and allowing measurement of trace amounts of Trx.

  19. Cell type-specific transcriptome of Brassicaceae stigmatic papilla cells from a combination of laser microdissection and RNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Osaka, Masaaki; Matsuda, Tomoki; Sakazono, Satomi; Masuko-Suzuki, Hiromi; Maeda, Shunsuke; Sewaki, Misato; Sone, Mikako; Takahashi, Hirokazu; Nakazono, Mikio; Iwano, Megumi; Takayama, Seiji; Shimizu, Kentaro K; Yano, Kentaro; Lim, Yong Pyo; Suzuki, Go; Suwabe, Keita; Watanabe, Masao

    2013-11-01

    Pollination is an early and critical step in plant reproduction, leading to successful fertilization. It consists of many sequential processes, including adhesion of pollen grains onto the surface of stigmatic papilla cells, foot formation to strengthen pollen-stigma interaction, pollen hydration and germination, and pollen tube elongation and penetration. We have focused on an examination of the expressed genes in papilla cells, to increase understanding of the molecular systems of pollination. From three representative species of Brassicaceae (Arabidopsis thaliana, A. halleri and Brassica rapa), stigmatic papilla cells were isolated precisely by laser microdissection, and cell type-specific gene expression in papilla cells was determined by RNA sequencing. As a result, 17,240, 19,260 and 21,026 unigenes were defined in papilla cells of A. thaliana, A. halleri and B. rapa, respectively, and, among these, 12,311 genes were common to all three species. Among the17,240 genes predicted in A. thaliana, one-third were papilla specific while approximately half of the genes were detected in all tissues examined. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that genes related to a wide range of reproduction and development functions are expressed in papilla cells, particularly metabolism, transcription and membrane-mediated information exchange. These results reflect the conserved features of general cellular function and also the specific reproductive role of papilla cells, highlighting a complex cellular system regulated by a diverse range of molecules in these cells. This study provides fundamental biological knowledge to dissect the molecular mechanisms of pollination in papilla cells and will shed light on our understanding of plant reproduction mechanisms.

  20. Cell type-specific transcriptome of Brassicaceae stigmatic papilla cells from a combination of laser microdissection and RNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Osaka, Masaaki; Matsuda, Tomoki; Sakazono, Satomi; Masuko-Suzuki, Hiromi; Maeda, Shunsuke; Sewaki, Misato; Sone, Mikako; Takahashi, Hirokazu; Nakazono, Mikio; Iwano, Megumi; Takayama, Seiji; Shimizu, Kentaro K; Yano, Kentaro; Lim, Yong Pyo; Suzuki, Go; Suwabe, Keita; Watanabe, Masao

    2013-11-01

    Pollination is an early and critical step in plant reproduction, leading to successful fertilization. It consists of many sequential processes, including adhesion of pollen grains onto the surface of stigmatic papilla cells, foot formation to strengthen pollen-stigma interaction, pollen hydration and germination, and pollen tube elongation and penetration. We have focused on an examination of the expressed genes in papilla cells, to increase understanding of the molecular systems of pollination. From three representative species of Brassicaceae (Arabidopsis thaliana, A. halleri and Brassica rapa), stigmatic papilla cells were isolated precisely by laser microdissection, and cell type-specific gene expression in papilla cells was determined by RNA sequencing. As a result, 17,240, 19,260 and 21,026 unigenes were defined in papilla cells of A. thaliana, A. halleri and B. rapa, respectively, and, among these, 12,311 genes were common to all three species. Among the17,240 genes predicted in A. thaliana, one-third were papilla specific while approximately half of the genes were detected in all tissues examined. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that genes related to a wide range of reproduction and development functions are expressed in papilla cells, particularly metabolism, transcription and membrane-mediated information exchange. These results reflect the conserved features of general cellular function and also the specific reproductive role of papilla cells, highlighting a complex cellular system regulated by a diverse range of molecules in these cells. This study provides fundamental biological knowledge to dissect the molecular mechanisms of pollination in papilla cells and will shed light on our understanding of plant reproduction mechanisms. PMID:24058146

  1. In Situ Staining and Laser Capture Microdissection of Lymph Node Residing SIV Gag-Specific CD8+ T cells--A Tool to Interrogate a Functional Immune Response Ex Vivo.

    PubMed

    Tjernlund, Annelie; Burgener, Adam; Lindvall, Jessica M; Peng, Tao; Zhu, Jia; Öhrmalm, Lars; Picker, Louis J; Broliden, Kristina; McElrath, M Juliana; Corey, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    While a plethora of data describes the essential role of systemic CD8+ T cells in the control of SIV replication little is known about the local in situ CD8+ T cell immune responses against SIV at the intact tissue level, due to technical limitations. In situ staining, using GagCM9 Qdot 655 multimers, were here combined with laser capture microdissection to detect and collect SIV Gag CM9 specific CD8+ T cells in lymph node tissue from SIV infected rhesus macaques. CD8+ T cells from SIV infected and uninfected rhesus macaques were also collected and compared to the SIV GagCM9 specific CD8+ T cells. Illumina bead array and transcriptional analyses were used to assess the transcriptional profiles and the three different CD8+ T cell populations displayed unique transcriptional patterns. This pilot study demonstrates that rapid and specific immunostaining combined with laser capture microdissection in concert with transcriptional profiling may be used to elucidate phenotypic differences between CD8+ T cells in SIV infection. Such technologies may be useful to determine differences in functional activities of HIV/SIV specific T cells.

  2. In Situ Staining and Laser Capture Microdissection of Lymph Node Residing SIV Gag-Specific CD8+ T cells—A Tool to Interrogate a Functional Immune Response Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Tjernlund, Annelie; Burgener, Adam; Lindvall, Jessica M.; Peng, Tao; Zhu, Jia; Öhrmalm, Lars; Picker, Louis J.; Broliden, Kristina; McElrath, M. Juliana; Corey, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    While a plethora of data describes the essential role of systemic CD8+ T cells in the control of SIV replication little is known about the local in situ CD8+ T cell immune responses against SIV at the intact tissue level, due to technical limitations. In situ staining, using GagCM9 Qdot 655 multimers, were here combined with laser capture microdissection to detect and collect SIV Gag CM9 specific CD8+ T cells in lymph node tissue from SIV infected rhesus macaques. CD8+ T cells from SIV infected and uninfected rhesus macaques were also collected and compared to the SIV GagCM9 specific CD8+ T cells. Illumina bead array and transcriptional analyses were used to assess the transcriptional profiles and the three different CD8+ T cell populations displayed unique transcriptional patterns. This pilot study demonstrates that rapid and specific immunostaining combined with laser capture microdissection in concert with transcriptional profiling may be used to elucidate phenotypic differences between CD8+ T cells in SIV infection. Such technologies may be useful to determine differences in functional activities of HIV/SIV specific T cells. PMID:26986062

  3. In Situ Staining and Laser Capture Microdissection of Lymph Node Residing SIV Gag-Specific CD8+ T cells--A Tool to Interrogate a Functional Immune Response Ex Vivo.

    PubMed

    Tjernlund, Annelie; Burgener, Adam; Lindvall, Jessica M; Peng, Tao; Zhu, Jia; Öhrmalm, Lars; Picker, Louis J; Broliden, Kristina; McElrath, M Juliana; Corey, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    While a plethora of data describes the essential role of systemic CD8+ T cells in the control of SIV replication little is known about the local in situ CD8+ T cell immune responses against SIV at the intact tissue level, due to technical limitations. In situ staining, using GagCM9 Qdot 655 multimers, were here combined with laser capture microdissection to detect and collect SIV Gag CM9 specific CD8+ T cells in lymph node tissue from SIV infected rhesus macaques. CD8+ T cells from SIV infected and uninfected rhesus macaques were also collected and compared to the SIV GagCM9 specific CD8+ T cells. Illumina bead array and transcriptional analyses were used to assess the transcriptional profiles and the three different CD8+ T cell populations displayed unique transcriptional patterns. This pilot study demonstrates that rapid and specific immunostaining combined with laser capture microdissection in concert with transcriptional profiling may be used to elucidate phenotypic differences between CD8+ T cells in SIV infection. Such technologies may be useful to determine differences in functional activities of HIV/SIV specific T cells. PMID:26986062

  4. A Simple Protocol for High Efficiency Protein Isolation After RNA Isolation from Mouse Thyroid and Other Very Small Tissue Samples.

    PubMed

    Ziros, Panos G; Chartoumpekis, Dionysios V; Sykiotis, Gerasimos P

    2016-01-01

    As a dedicated hormone-secreting organ, the thyroid gland possesses a complement of proteostatic systems, including antioxidant, unfolded protein, and autophagic responses. The vast majority of animal investigations of thyroid physiology and, more recently, proteostasis, have utilized as model the rat, rather than the mouse. This is due to the very small size of the thyroid gland in the latter, with a total weight of ~2 mg (~1 mg per thyroid lobe). However, this strategy has limited the utilization of genetic approaches, such as taking advantage of the various transgenic and knockout mouse models. Here, we describe a simple and highly efficient protocol for the simultaneous isolation of mRNA, micro-RNA and 150-200 μg of protein from as little as 1 mg of mouse thyroid tissue, the average weight of one of the two thyroid lobes, thus preserving the other lobe for immunohistochemical or other analyses. While our workflow is similar to other protocols published in the literature and/or proposed by commercial reagent providers, we have introduced a key modification that addresses efficiently the most challenging step of the protein isolation process: the solubilization of the protein pellet after RNA extraction and protein precipitation. We demonstrate the feasibility of our approach and its utility for downstream analyses (including Western blotting) that facilitate the comparative study of proteostatic pathways in the mouse thyroid. We have also successfully applied this protocol on samples from mouse liver, brown and white adipose tissue, as well as from rodent cell lines. PMID:27613051

  5. Exploring the cellular and tissue uptake of nanomaterials in a range of biological samples using multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Helinor J; Mouras, Rabah; Brown, David M; Elfick, Alistair; Stone, Vicki

    2015-12-18

    The uptake of nanomaterials (NMs) by cells is critical in determining their potential biological impact, whether beneficial or detrimental. Thus, investigation of NM internalization by cells is a common consideration in hazard and efficacy studies. There are currently a number of approaches that are routinely used to investigate NM-cell interactions, each of which have their own advantages and limitations. Ideally, imaging modalities used to investigate NM uptake by cells should not require the NM to be labelled (e.g. with fluorophores) to facilitate its detection. We present a multimodal imaging approach employing a combination of label-free microscopies that can be used to investigate NM-cell interactions. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy was used in combination with either two-photon photoluminescence or four-wave mixing (FWM) to visualize the uptake of gold or titanium dioxide NMs respectively. Live and fixed cell imaging revealed that NMs were internalized by J774 macrophage and C3A hepatocyte cell lines (15-31 μg ml(-1)). Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to NMs (intratracheal instillation, 62 μg) and NMs were detected in blood and lung leucocytes, lung and liver tissue, demonstrating that NMs could translocate from the exposure site. Obtained data illustrate that multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy may help overcome current challenges in the assessment of NM cellular uptake and biodistribution. It is therefore a powerful tool that can be used to investigate unlabelled NM cellular and tissue uptake in three dimensions, requires minimal sample preparation, and is applicable to live and fixed cells. PMID:26584818

  6. Exploring the cellular and tissue uptake of nanomaterials in a range of biological samples using multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Helinor J.; Mouras, Rabah; Brown, David M.; Elfick, Alistair; Stone, Vicki

    2015-12-01

    The uptake of nanomaterials (NMs) by cells is critical in determining their potential biological impact, whether beneficial or detrimental. Thus, investigation of NM internalization by cells is a common consideration in hazard and efficacy studies. There are currently a number of approaches that are routinely used to investigate NM-cell interactions, each of which have their own advantages and limitations. Ideally, imaging modalities used to investigate NM uptake by cells should not require the NM to be labelled (e.g. with fluorophores) to facilitate its detection. We present a multimodal imaging approach employing a combination of label-free microscopies that can be used to investigate NM-cell interactions. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy was used in combination with either two-photon photoluminescence or four-wave mixing (FWM) to visualize the uptake of gold or titanium dioxide NMs respectively. Live and fixed cell imaging revealed that NMs were internalized by J774 macrophage and C3A hepatocyte cell lines (15-31 μg ml-1). Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to NMs (intratracheal instillation, 62 μg) and NMs were detected in blood and lung leucocytes, lung and liver tissue, demonstrating that NMs could translocate from the exposure site. Obtained data illustrate that multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy may help overcome current challenges in the assessment of NM cellular uptake and biodistribution. It is therefore a powerful tool that can be used to investigate unlabelled NM cellular and tissue uptake in three dimensions, requires minimal sample preparation, and is applicable to live and fixed cells.

  7. In situ phosphorylation of proteins in MCTs microdissected from rat kidney: Effect of AVP

    SciTech Connect

    Homma, S.; Gapstur, S.M.; Yusufi, N.K.; Dousa, T.P. )

    1988-04-01

    Adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein phosphorylation is considered a key step in the cellular action of vasopressin (AVP) to regulate water permeability in collecting tubules. However, the proteins serving as a substrate(s) for phosphorylation in undisrupted cells have not yet been identified. In the present study, the authors developed a method for investigation of in situ phosphorylation of microdissected segments of medullary collecting tubules (MCT) from rat kidney. Incubation of microdissected MCT segments with low concentrations of saponin, semipermeabilization, increased permeability of the membrane for ATP but did not allow leakage of macromolecules such as lactate dehydrogenase. This treatment also did not cause major disruption of cell structure, or impairment of AVP-sensitive adenylate cyclase. Incubation of semipermeabilized MCT with {gamma}-({sup 32}P)ATP resulted in corporation of {sup 32}P{sub i} into two major protein bands detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and subsequent autoradiography. Similar incubation of tubules disrupted by hyposmotic solutions and a stronger detergent Triton X-100 resulted in {sup 32}P{sub i} incorporation into multiple protein bands. These findings demonstrate a novel method for identification of endogenous protein substrate(s) for cAMP-dependent protein kinase and other protein kinases and phosphatases that are probably involved in post-cAMP steps in the cellular action of AVP in the intact cells of collecting tubules.

  8. Targeting pancreatic islets with phage display assisted by laser pressure catapult microdissection.

    PubMed

    Yao, Virginia J; Ozawa, Michael G; Trepel, Martin; Arap, Wadih; McDonald, Donald M; Pasqualini, Renata

    2005-02-01

    Heterogeneity of the microvasculature in different organs has been well documented by multiple methods including in vivo phage display. However, less is known about the diversity of blood vessels within functionally distinct regions of organs. Here, we combined in vivo phage display with laser pressure catapult microdissection to identify peptide ligands for vascular receptors in the islets of Langerhans in the murine pancreas. Protein database analyses of the peptides, CVSNPRWKC and CHVLWSTRC, showed sequence identity to two ephrin A-type ligand homologues, A2 and A4. Confocal microscopy confirmed that most immunoreactivity of CVSNPRWKC and CHVLWSTRC phage was associated with blood vessels in pancreatic islets. Antibodies recognizing EphA4, a receptor for ephrin-A ligands, were similarly associated with islet blood vessels. Importantly, binding of both islet-homing phage and anti-EphA4 antibody was strikingly increased in blood vessels of pancreatic islet tumors in RIP-Tag2 transgenic mice. These results indicate that endothelial cells of blood vessels in pancreatic islets preferentially express EphA4 receptors, and this expression is increased in tumors. Our findings show in vivo phage display and laser pressure catapult microdissection can be combined to reveal endothelial cell specialization within focal regions of the microvasculature.

  9. Laser Microdissection of Narrow Sheath Mutant Maize Uncovers Novel Gene Expression in the Shoot Apical Meristem

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaolan; Madi, Shahinez; Borsuk, Lisa; Nettleton, Dan; Elshire, Robert J; Buckner, Brent; Janick-Buckner, Diane; Beck, Jon; Timmermans, Marja; Schnable, Patrick S; Scanlon, Michael J

    2007-01-01

    Microarrays enable comparative analyses of gene expression on a genomic scale, however these experiments frequently identify an abundance of differentially expressed genes such that it may be difficult to identify discrete functional networks that are hidden within large microarray datasets. Microarray analyses in which mutant organisms are compared to nonmutant siblings can be especially problematic when the gene of interest is expressed in relatively few cells. Here, we describe the use of laser microdissection microarray to perform transcriptional profiling of the maize shoot apical meristem (SAM), a ~100-μm pillar of organogenic cells that is required for leaf initiation. Microarray analyses compared differential gene expression within the SAM and incipient leaf primordium of nonmutant and narrow sheath mutant plants, which harbored mutations in the duplicate genes narrow sheath1 (ns1) and narrow sheath2 (ns2). Expressed in eight to ten cells within the SAM, ns1 and ns2 encode paralogous WUSCHEL1-like homeobox (WOX) transcription factors required for recruitment of leaf initials that give rise to a large lateral domain within maize leaves. The data illustrate the utility of laser microdissection-microarray analyses to identify a relatively small number of genes that are differentially expressed within the SAM. Moreover, these analyses reveal potentially conserved WOX gene functions and implicate specific hormonal and signaling pathways during early events in maize leaf development. PMID:17571927

  10. Region-specific cosmids and STRPs identified by chromosome microdissection and FISH

    SciTech Connect

    Flejter, W.L.; Bennett-Baker, P.; Barcroft, C.L.

    1995-01-20

    A strategy for identifying short tandem repeat (STR)-containing cosmid clones from a specific chromosomal region is described. The approach is based an the use of uncloned, PCR-amplified DNA derived from chromosome microdissection and pooled groups of STR sequences as hybridization probes to screen a cosmid library. Cosmid clones that display a positive signal common to both hybridizations are then characterized for repeat length polymorphisms. This method has been applied to chromosome bands 17q12-q21, a region that includes a gene (BRCA1) involved in early onset familial breast and ovarian cancer. Of 1536 chromosome 17-specific cosmid clones tested, 38 were identified by the dual screening procedure. Fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed that 19 cosmids originated from the microdissected target region. Thirteen of the 19 cosmids were mapped between markers flanking the BRCA1 region and selected for further characterization. Tetranucleotide repeats were identified in 10 of these 13 cosmids. Primers designed for each marker were tested on a panel of 80 CEPH parents for allele sizes, frequencies, and observed heterozygosities. From these studies six polymorphic and one nonpolymorphic STRs were identified. A similar approach should be applicable for screening whole genomic or chromosome-specific cosmid libraries in efforts to isolate new polymorphic markers from any chromosomal region of interest. 32 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Detection of CCND1 amplification using laser capture microdissection coupled with real-time polymerase chain reaction in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chen; Yang, Lin; Li, Zhongfang; Yang, Jun; Zhao, Junjie; Dehui, Xu; Liu, Liying; Wang, Quanli; Song, Tusheng

    2007-05-01

    Several methods have been used to detect CCND1 amplification or overexpression in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), but problems remain, associated with heterogeneity of tumor tissue and quantification of gene copies. Laser capture microdissection coupled with real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a reliable method for the molecular analysis of gene profiles in specific tissues. All 35 specimens of ESCC studied were paraffin-embedded, cut into tissue slides, and stained by hematoxylin-eosin. The pure ESCC cell and normal squamous epithelia populations were separated by LCM and then genomic DNA was extracted from the dissected cells. CCND1 amplification was detected with real-time FQ-PCR and with PCR. Amplification was calculated by the formula X = 2(-DeltaDeltaCt) and R = (CCND1/ACTB) CANCER/(CCND1/ACTB) NORMAL. Twenty (57%) of primary ESCC cancer cell groups had a detectable CCND1 amplification (range, 2.06-fold to 25.9-fold) with real-time FQ-PCR, but only 2 of 15 primary ESCC cancer cell groups had detectable CCND1 amplification by PCR. CCND1 amplification was not correlated with age, sex, size of tumor, histological grade, and lymph node metastasis. In conclusion, LCM coupled with real-time fluorescence quantitative-PCR technique is more precise than PCR for the identifying amplified oncogenes; The role of CCND1 amplification in ESCC development and progression needs more extensive study.

  12. A novel method for single sample multi-axial nanoindentation of hydrated heterogeneous tissues based on testing great white shark jaws.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Toni L; Boughton, Philip; Slavich, Eve; Wroe, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Nanomechanical testing methods that are suitable for a range of hydrated tissues are crucial for understanding biological systems. Nanoindentation of tissues can provide valuable insights into biology, tissue engineering and biomimetic design. However, testing hydrated biological samples still remains a significant challenge. Shark jaw cartilage is an ideal substrate for developing a method to test hydrated tissues because it is a unique heterogeneous composite of both mineralized (hard) and non-mineralized (soft) layers and possesses a jaw geometry that is challenging to test mechanically. The aim of this study is to develop a novel method for obtaining multidirectional nanomechanical properties for both layers of jaw cartilage from a single sample, taken from the great white shark (Carcharodon carcharias). A method for obtaining multidirectional data from a single sample is necessary for examining tissue mechanics in this shark because it is a protected species and hence samples may be difficult to obtain. Results show that this method maintains hydration of samples that would otherwise rapidly dehydrate. Our study is the first analysis of nanomechanical properties of great white shark jaw cartilage. Variation in nanomechanical properties were detected in different orthogonal directions for both layers of jaw cartilage in this species. The data further suggest that the mineralized layer of shark jaw cartilage is less stiff than previously posited. Our method allows multidirectional nanomechanical properties to be obtained from a single, small, hydrated heterogeneous sample. Our technique is therefore suitable for use when specimens are rare, valuable or limited in quantity, such as samples obtained from endangered species or pathological tissues. We also outline a method for tip-to-optic calibration that facilitates nanoindentation of soft biological tissues. Our technique may help address the critical need for a nanomechanical testing method that is applicable

  13. A Novel Method for Single Sample Multi-Axial Nanoindentation of Hydrated Heterogeneous Tissues Based on Testing Great White Shark Jaws

    PubMed Central

    Ferrara, Toni L.; Boughton, Philip; Slavich, Eve; Wroe, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Nanomechanical testing methods that are suitable for a range of hydrated tissues are crucial for understanding biological systems. Nanoindentation of tissues can provide valuable insights into biology, tissue engineering and biomimetic design. However, testing hydrated biological samples still remains a significant challenge. Shark jaw cartilage is an ideal substrate for developing a method to test hydrated tissues because it is a unique heterogeneous composite of both mineralized (hard) and non-mineralized (soft) layers and possesses a jaw geometry that is challenging to test mechanically. The aim of this study is to develop a novel method for obtaining multidirectional nanomechanical properties for both layers of jaw cartilage from a single sample, taken from the great white shark (Carcharodon carcharias). A method for obtaining multidirectional data from a single sample is necessary for examining tissue mechanics in this shark because it is a protected species and hence samples may be difficult to obtain. Results show that this method maintains hydration of samples that would otherwise rapidly dehydrate. Our study is the first analysis of nanomechanical properties of great white shark jaw cartilage. Variation in nanomechanical properties were detected in different orthogonal directions for both layers of jaw cartilage in this species. The data further suggest that the mineralized layer of shark jaw cartilage is less stiff than previously posited. Our method allows multidirectional nanomechanical properties to be obtained from a single, small, hydrated heterogeneous sample. Our technique is therefore suitable for use when specimens are rare, valuable or limited in quantity, such as samples obtained from endangered species or pathological tissues. We also outline a method for tip-to-optic calibration that facilitates nanoindentation of soft biological tissues. Our technique may help address the critical need for a nanomechanical testing method that is applicable

  14. Computational deconvolution of genome wide expression data from Parkinson's and Huntington's disease brain tissues using population-specific expression analysis

    PubMed Central

    Capurro, Alberto; Bodea, Liviu-Gabriel; Schaefer, Patrick; Luthi-Carter, Ruth; Perreau, Victoria M.

    2015-01-01

    The characterization of molecular changes in diseased tissues gives insight into pathophysiological mechanisms and is important for therapeutic development. Genome-wide gene expression analysis has proven valuable for identifying biological processes in neurodegenerative diseases using post mortem human brain tissue and numerous datasets are publically available. However, many studies utilize heterogeneous tissue samples consisting of multiple cell types, all of which contribute to global gene expression values, confounding biological interpretation of the data. In particular, changes in numbers of neuronal and glial cells occurring in neurodegeneration confound transcriptomic analyses, particularly in human brain tissues where sample availability and controls are limited. To identify cell specific gene expression changes in neurodegenerative disease, we have applied our recently published computational deconvolution method, population specific expression analysis (PSEA). PSEA estimates cell-type-specific expression values using reference expression measures, which in the case of brain tissue comprises mRNAs with cell-type-specific expression in neurons, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and microglia. As an exercise in PSEA implementation and hypothesis development regarding neurodegenerative diseases, we applied PSEA to Parkinson's and Huntington's disease (PD, HD) datasets. Genes identified as differentially expressed in substantia nigra pars compacta neurons by PSEA were validated using external laser capture microdissection data. Network analysis and Annotation Clustering (DAVID) identified molecular processes implicated by differential gene expression in specific cell types. The results of these analyses provided new insights into the implementation of PSEA in brain tissues and additional refinement of molecular signatures in human HD and PD. PMID:25620908

  15. Confidentiality, informed consent, and children's participation in research involving stored tissue samples: interviews with medical professionals from the Middle East.

    PubMed

    Alahmad, Ghiath; Al Jumah, Mohammed; Dierickx, Kris

    2015-01-01

    Ethical issues regarding research biobanks continue to be a topic of intense debate, especially issues of confidentiality, informed consent, and child participation. Although considerable empirical literature concerning research biobank ethics exists, very little information is available regarding the opinions of medical professionals doing genetics research from the Middle East, especially Arabic speaking countries. Ethical guidelines for research biobanks are critically needed as some countries in the Middle East are starting to establish national research biobanks. Islam is the dominant religion in these countries, and it affects people's behavior and influences their positions. Moreover, communities in these countries enjoy a set of customs, traditions and social norms, and have social and familial structures that must be taken into account when developing research policies. We interviewed 12 medical professionals from the Middle East currently working with stored tissue samples to document their opinions. We found general agreement. Participants' primary concerns were similar to the views of researchers internationally. Since children tend to represent a high percentage of Middle Eastern populations, and because children's bodies are not just small adult bodies, the interviewed professionals strongly believed that it is imperative to include children in biobank research. Participants generally believed that protecting confidentiality is socially very important and that informed consent/assent must be obtained from both adult and child participants. This study provides a starting point for additional studies.

  16. [Detection of B-lymphocyte clonality in samples of salivary gland tissue in patients with primary Sjogren syndrome].

    PubMed

    Vojvodic, D; Magic, Z; Stefanovic, D; Cikota, B; Ilic, V; Jovic, M; Tatic, V; Colic, M

    2001-01-01

    Intensive lymphoplasmocytic infiltration with atrophy of glandular tissue structures is the dominant patohistological feature found in exocrine glands of patients with Sjögren syndrome (SS). The infiltrates consist of T and B lymphocyte clusters that make the structures resembling germinal centers, and numerous plasmocytes that are secreting imunoglobulines locally, including autoantibodies. By applying the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in our study we have shown the existence of dominant B cell clone in salivary glands samples of 4 out of 6 patients with SS, in the absence of clinical, routine laboratory, and patohistological signs of the lymphoma. B lymphocyte clones were detected upon the amplification of gene segment that encoded variable heavy chain immunoglobulin CDR3 region. Finding of single, dominant B lymphocyte clone could be of predictive significance, because these patients are predisposed to non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) for which there is an assumption that it originates out of salivary glands from one of the clusters of proliferating B lymphocytes. PMID:11769416

  17. Application of a Liquid Extraction Based Sealing Surface Sampling Probe for Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Dried Blood Spots and Mouse Whole-Body Thin Tissue Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Van Berkel, Gary J; Kertesz, Vilmos

    2009-01-01

    The utility of a liquid extraction based sealing surface sampling probe (SSSP) for the direct mass spectrometric analysis of targeted drugs and metabolites in dried blood spots (DBSs) and whole mouse thin tissue sections was demonstrated. The accuracy and precision for the quantitative analysis of a minimum of 50 ng/mL sitamaquine or acetaminophen in DBSs on paper were well within the required 15% dictated by internationally recognized acceptance criteria for assay validations. Analysis of whole-body mouse thin tissue sections from animals dosed with propranolol, adhered to an adhesive tape substrate, provided semi-quantitative information for propranolol and its hydroxyproranolol glucuronide metabolite within specific organs of the tissue. The relative abundances recorded for the two compounds in the brain, lung, kidney and liver were in nominal agreement with previously reported amounts based on analysis using a liquid microjunction surface sampling probe (LMJ-SSP), and whole-body autoradiography (WBA) and HPLC-MS analysis. The ability to sample and analyze from tape-adhered tissue samples, which are generally employed in WBA analysis, presents the possibility of consecutive WBA and SSSP-MS analysis of the same tissue section. This would facilitate assignment, and possibly quantitation, of the different molecular forms of total drug related material detected in the WBA analysis. The flexibility to sample larger or smaller spot sizes, alternative probe sealing mechanisms, and a reduction in internal volumes and associated sample carryover issues will be among the first simple improvements necessary to make the SSSP-MS method a practical DBS and/or thin tissue section analysis tool or to expand its use to other surface sampling applications.

  18. Diagnosis of four chromosome abnormalities of unknown origin by chromosome microdissection and subsequent reverse and forward painting

    SciTech Connect

    Coelho, K.E.F.A. de; Egashira, M.; Kato, R.

    1996-06-14

    A molecular cytogenetic method consisting of chromosome microdissection and subsequent reverse/forward chromosome painting is a powerful tool to identify chromosome abnormalities of unknown origin. We present 4 cases of chromosome structural abnormalities whose origins were ascertained by this method. In one MCA/MR patient with an add(5q)chromosome, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), using probes generated from a microdissected additional segment of the add(5q) chromosome and then from a distal region of normal chromosome 5, confirmed that the patient had a tandem duplication for a 5q35-qter segment. Similarly, we ascertained that an additional segment of an add(3p) chromosome in another MCA/MR patient had been derived from a 7q32-qter segment. In a woman with a history of successive spontaneous abortions and with a minute marker chromosome, painting using microdissected probes from the whole marker chromosome revealed that it was i(15)(p10) or psu dic(15;15)(q11;q11). Likewise, a marker observed in a fetus was a ring chromosome derived from the paracentromeric region of chromosome 19. We emphasize the value of the microdissection-based chromosome painting method in the identification of unknown chromosomes, especially for marker chromosomes. The method may contribute to a collection of data among patients with similar or identical chromosome abnormalities, which may lead to a better clinical syndrome delineation. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Laser-capture microdissection of oropharyngeal epithelium indicates restriction of Epstein-Barr virus receptor/CD21 mRNA to tonsil epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ru; Gu, Xin; Nathan, Cherie-Ann; Hutt-Fletcher, Lindsey

    2008-01-01

    Background: Epstein-Barr virus colonizes the oropharynx of a majority of individuals. It infects B lymphocytes and epithelial cells and can contribute to the development of both lymphoid and epithelial tumors. The virus uses CD21 for attachment to B cells which constitutively express the protein. Infection of epithelial cells in vitro is also more efficient if CD21 is available. However, its potential contribution to infection in vivo has been difficult to evaluate as discrepant results with antibodies have made it difficult to determine which, if any, epithelial cells in the oropharynx express CD21. Methods: To reevaluate CD21 expression by an alternative method, epithelial cells were isolated by laser-capture microdissection from formalin-fixed sections of tissues from various parts of the oropharynx and mRNA was amplified with primers specific for the exons of CD21 which code for the Epstein-Barr virus binding site. Results: CD21 mRNA was expressed in tonsil epithelium, but not in epithelium from buccal mucosa, uvula, soft palate or tongue. Conclusions: CD21 does not contribute to infection of most normal epithelial tissues in the oropharynx, but may contribute to infection of epithelial cells in the tonsil, where virus has been demonstrated in healthy carriers. PMID:18710421

  20. Evaluation of cytokeratin-19 in breast cancer tissue samples: a comparison of automatic and manual evaluations of scanned tissue microarray cylinders

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Digital image (DI) analysis avoids visual subjectivity in interpreting immunohistochemical stains and provides more reproducible results. An automated procedure consisting of two variant methods for quantifying the cytokeratin-19 (CK19) marker in breast cancer tissues is presented. Methods The first method (A) excludes the holes inside selected CK19 stained areas, and the second (B) includes them. 93 DIs scanned from complete cylinders of tissue microarrays were evaluated visually by two pathologists and by the automated procedures. Results and conclusions There was good concordance between the two automated methods, both of which tended to identify a smaller CK19-positive area than did the pathologists. The results obtained with method B were more similar to those of the pathologists; probably because it takes into account the entire positive tumoural area, including the holes. However, the pathologists overestimated the positive area of CK19. Further studies are needed to confirm the utility of this automated procedure in prognostic studies. PMID:26329009

  1. Influence of sample preparation and reliability of automated numerical refocusing in stain-free analysis of dissected tissues with quantitative phase digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemper, Björn; Lenz, Philipp; Bettenworth, Dominik; Krausewitz, Philipp; Domagk, Dirk; Ketelhut, Steffi

    2015-05-01

    Digital holographic microscopy (DHM) has been demonstrated to be a versatile tool for high resolution non-destructive quantitative phase imaging of surfaces and multi-modal minimally-invasive monitoring of living cell cultures in-vitro. DHM provides quantitative monitoring of physiological processes through functional imaging and structural analysis which, for example, gives new insight into signalling of cellular water permeability and cell morphology changes due to toxins and infections. Also the analysis of dissected tissues quantitative DHM phase contrast prospects application fields by stain-free imaging and the quantification of tissue density changes. We show that DHM allows imaging of different tissue layers with high contrast in unstained tissue sections. As the investigation of fixed samples represents a very important application field in pathology, we also analyzed the influence of the sample preparation. The retrieved data demonstrate that the quality of quantitative DHM phase images of dissected tissues depends strongly on the fixing method and common staining agents. As in DHM the reconstruction is performed numerically, multi-focus imaging is achieved from a single digital hologram. Thus, we evaluated the automated refocussing feature of DHM for application on different types of dissected tissues and revealed that on moderately stained samples highly reproducible holographic autofocussing can be achieved. Finally, it is demonstrated that alterations of the spatial refractive index distribution in murine and human tissue samples represent a reliable absolute parameter that is related of different degrees of inflammation in experimental colitis and Crohn's disease. This paves the way towards the usage of DHM in digital pathology for automated histological examinations and further studies to elucidate the translational potential of quantitative phase microscopy for the clinical management of patients, e.g., with inflammatory bowel disease.

  2. Sorbin and SH3 Domain‐Containing Protein 2 Is Released From Infarcted Heart in the Very Early Phase: Proteomic Analysis of Cardiac Tissues From Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kakimoto, Yu; Ito, Shinji; Abiru, Hitoshi; Kotani, Hirokazu; Ozeki, Munetaka; Tamaki, Keiji; Tsuruyama, Tatsuaki

    2013-01-01

    Background Few proteomic studies have examined human cardiac tissue following acute lethal infarction. Here, we applied a novel proteomic approach to formalin‐fixed, paraffin‐embedded human tissue and aimed to reveal the molecular changes in the very early phase of acute myocardial infarction. Methods and Results Heart tissue samples were collected from 5 patients who died within 7 hours of myocardial infarction and from 5 age‐ and sex‐matched control cases. Infarcted and control myocardia were histopathologically diagnosed and captured using laser microdissection. Proteins were extracted using an originally established method and analyzed using liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. The label‐free quantification demonstrated that the levels of 21 proteins differed significantly between patients and controls. In addition to known biomarkers, the sarcoplasmic protein sorbin and SH3 domain‐containing protein 2 (SORBS2) was greatly reduced in infarcted myocardia. Immunohistochemical analysis of cardiac tissues confirmed the decrease, and Western blot analysis showed a significant increase in serum sorbin and SH3 domain‐containing protein 2 in acute myocardial infarction patients (n=10) compared with control cases (n=11). Conclusions Our advanced comprehensive analysis using patient tissues and serums indicated that sarcoplasmic sorbin and SH3 domain‐containing protein 2 is released from damaged cardiac tissue into the bloodstream upon lethal acute myocardial infarction. The proteomic strategy presented here is based on precise microscopic findings and is quite useful for candidate biomarker discovery using human tissue samples stored in depositories. PMID:24342996

  3. Different Hormonal Regulation of Cellular Differentiation and Function in Nucellar Projection and Endosperm Transfer Cells: A Microdissection-Based Transcriptome Study of Young Barley Grains1[W

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, Johannes; Weier, Diana; Sreenivasulu, Nese; Strickert, Marc; Weichert, Nicola; Melzer, Michael; Czauderna, Tobias; Wobus, Ulrich; Weber, Hans; Weschke, Winfriede

    2008-01-01

    Nucellar projection (NP) and endosperm transfer cells (ETC) are essential tissues in growing barley (Hordeum vulgare) grains, responsible for nutrient transfer from maternal to filial tissues, endosperm/embryo nutrition, and grain development. A laser microdissection pressure catapulting-based transcriptome analysis was established to study NP and ETC separately using a barley 12K macroarray. A major challenge was to isolate high-quality mRNA from preembedded, fixed tissue while maintaining tissue integrity. We show that probes generated from fixed and embedded tissue sections represent largely the transcriptome (>70%) of nonchemically treated and nonamplified references. In NP, the top-down gradient of cellular differentiation is reflected by the expression of C3HC4-type ubiquitin ligases and different histone genes, cell wall biosynthesis and expansin/extensin genes, as well as genes involved in programmed cell death-related proteolysis coupled to nitrogen remobilization, indicating distinct areas simultaneously undergoing mitosis, cell elongation, and disintegration. Activated gene expression related to gibberellin synthesis and function suggests a regulatory role for gibberellins in establishment of the differentiation gradient. Up-regulation of plasmalemma-intrinsic protein and tonoplast-intrinsic protein genes indicates involvement in nutrient transfer and/or unloading. In ETC, AP2/EREBP-like transcription factors and ethylene functions are transcriptionally activated, a response possibly coupled to activated defense mechanisms. Transcriptional activation of nucleotide sugar metabolism may be attributed to ascorbate synthesis and/or cell wall biosynthesis. These processes are potentially controlled by trehalose-6-P synthase/phosphatase, as suggested by expression of their respective genes. Up-regulation of amino acid permeases in ETC indicates important roles in active nutrient uptake from the apoplastic space into the endosperm. PMID:18784282

  4. A statistical model and national data set for partioning fish-tissue mercury concentration variation between spatiotemporal and sample characteristic effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wente, Stephen P.

    2004-01-01

    Many Federal, Tribal, State, and local agencies monitor mercury in fish-tissue samples to identify sites with elevated fish-tissue mercury (fish-mercury) concentrations, track changes in fish-mercury concentrations over time, and produce fish-consumption advisories. Interpretation of such monitoring data commonly is impeded by difficulties in separating the effects of sample characteristics (species, tissues sampled, and sizes of fish) from the effects of spatial and temporal trends on fish-mercury concentrations. Without such a separation, variation in fish-mercury concentrations due to differences in the characteristics of samples collected over time or across space can be misattributed to temporal or spatial trends; and/or actual trends in fish-mercury concentration can be misattributed to differences in sample characteristics. This report describes a statistical model and national data set (31,813 samples) for calibrating the aforementioned statistical model that can separate spatiotemporal and sample characteristic effects in fish-mercury concentration data. This model could be useful for evaluating spatial and temporal trends in fishmercury concentrations and developing fish-consumption advisories. The observed fish-mercury concentration data and model predictions can be accessed, displayed geospatially, and downloaded via the World Wide Web (http://emmma.usgs.gov). This report and the associated web site may assist in the interpretation of large amounts of data from widespread fishmercury monitoring efforts.

  5. The Y chromosome of the Atelidae family (Platyrrhini): study by chromosome microdissection.

    PubMed

    Gifalli-Iughetti, C; Koiffmann, C P

    2009-01-01

    In order to study the intergeneric variability of the Y chromosome, we describe the hybridization of the Y chromosome of Brachytelesarachnoides, obtained by microdissection, to metaphases of Atelesbelzebuthmarginatus, Lagothrixlagothricha, and Alouatta male specimens. Brachytelesarachnoides (Atelinae) has 62 chromosomes and a very small Y chromosome. Our results showed that the Brachytelesarachnoides Y chromosome probe hybridized to Lagothrixlagothricha metaphases yielding one hybridization signal on only the tiny Y chromosome, and when hybridized with Atelesbelzebuthmarginatus metaphases it yielded one hybridization signal on two thirds of the small acrocentric Y chromosome. However, no hybridization signal was observed in Alouatta metaphases (subfamily Alouattinae), a closely related genus in the Atelidae family. Furthermore, our data support a close phylogenetic relationship among Brachyteles, Ateles, and Lagothrix and their placement in the Atelinae subfamily, but exclude Alouatta from this group indicating its placement as basal to this group.

  6. Determination of EGFR mutations in single cells microdissected from enriched lung tumor cells in peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Ran, Ran; Li, Longyun; Wang, Mengzhao; Wang, Shulan; Zheng, Zhi; Lin, Peter Ping

    2013-09-01

    A minimally invasive and repeatable approach for real-time epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation surveillance would be highly beneficial for individualized therapy of late stage lung cancer patients whose surgical specimens are often not available. We aim to develop a viable method to detect EGFR mutations in single circulating tumor cells (CTCs). Using a model CTC system of spiked tumor cells in whole blood, we evaluated EGFR mutation determination in single tumor cells enriched from blood. We used magnetic beads labeled with antibody against leukocyte surface antigens to deplete leukocytes and enrich native CTCs independent of epithelial marker expression level. We then used laser cell microdissection (LCM) to isolate individual CTCs, followed by whole-genome amplification of the DNA for exon 19 microdeletion, L858R and T790M mutation detection by PCR sequencing. EGFR mutations were successfully measured in individual spiked tumor cells enriched from 7.5 ml whole blood. Whole-genome amplification provided sufficient DNA for mutation determination at multiple sites. Ninety-five percent of the single CTCs microdissected by LCM (19/20) yielded PCR amplicons for at least one of the three mutation sites. The amplification success rates were 55 % (11/20) for exon 19 deletion, 45 % (9/20) for T790M, and 85 % (17/20) for L858R. Sequencing of the amplicons showed allele dropout in the amplification reactions, but mutations were correctly identified in 80 % of the amplicons. EGFR mutation determination from single captured tumor cells from blood is feasible with the approach described here. However, to overcome allele dropout and to obtain reliable information about the tumor's EGFR status, multiple individual tumor cells should be assayed. PMID:23828210

  7. Comparison of Nanostring nCounter® Data on FFPE Colon Cancer Samples and Affymetrix Microarray Data on Matched Frozen Tissues.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Deane, Natasha G; Lewis, Keeli B; Li, Jiang; Zhu, Jing; Washington, M Kay; Beauchamp, R Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The prognosis of colorectal cancer (CRC) stage II and III patients remains a challenge due to the difficulties of finding robust biomarkers suitable for testing clinical samples. The majority of published gene signatures of CRC have been generated on fresh frozen colorectal tissues. Because collection of frozen tissue is not practical for routine surgical pathology practice, a clinical test that improves prognostic capabilities beyond standard pathological staging of colon cancer will need to be designed for formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues. The NanoString nCounter® platform is a gene expression analysis tool developed for use with FFPE-derived samples. We designed a custom nCounter® codeset based on elements from multiple published fresh frozen tissue microarray-based prognostic gene signatures for colon cancer, and we used this platform to systematically compare gene expression data from FFPE with matched microarray array data from frozen tissues. Our results show moderate correlation of gene expression between two platforms and discovery of a small subset of genes as candidate biomarkers for colon cancer prognosis that are detectable and quantifiable in FFPE tissue sections. PMID:27176004

  8. Breaking the stalemate: a prospective regulatory framework for unforseen research uses of human tissue samples and health information.

    PubMed

    Greely, H T

    1999-01-01

    The legal and ethical issues raised by new research uses of previously collected human tissues and health information are increasingly important to genetics research. This Article discusses and criticizes current positions on such uses, including the recent report of the National Bioethics Advisory Commission, Research Involving Human Biological Materials. It then proposes a new regulatory framework for tissue and information collected in the future that would better protect the interests of the people who provide them. It ends by suggesting a resolution for the problems of previously collected tissue and information.

  9. High-resolution MALDI-FT-ICR MS imaging for the analysis of metabolites from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded clinical tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Buck, Achim; Ly, Alice; Balluff, Benjamin; Sun, Na; Gorzolka, Karin; Feuchtinger, Annette; Janssen, Klaus-Peter; Kuppen, Peter J K; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Weirich, Gregor; Erlmeier, Franziska; Langer, Rupert; Aubele, Michaela; Zitzelsberger, Horst; Aichler, Michaela; Walch, Axel

    2015-09-01

    We present the first analytical approach to demonstrate the in situ imaging of metabolites from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) human tissue samples. Using high-resolution matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-FT-ICR MSI), we conducted a proof-of-principle experiment comparing metabolite measurements from FFPE and fresh frozen tissue sections, and found an overlap of 72% amongst 1700 m/z species. In particular, we observed conservation of biomedically relevant information at the metabolite level in FFPE tissues. In biomedical applications, we analysed tissues from 350 different cancer patients and were able to discriminate between normal and tumour tissues, and different tumours from the same organ, and found an independent prognostic factor for patient survival. This study demonstrates the ability to measure metabolites in FFPE tissues using MALDI-FT-ICR MSI, which can then be assigned to histology and clinical parameters. Our approach is a major technical, histochemical, and clinicopathological advance that highlights the potential for investigating diseases in archived FFPE tissues. PMID:25965788

  10. Analytical procedure for mapping the distribution of 10B and 99Tc markers in cryo-sections of animal tissue samples by secondary ion mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, Ilaria; Menichetti, Luca; Kusmic, Claudia; de las Heras, Laura Aldave; Salvadori, Piero; Fuoco, Roger; Belloni, Fabio; L'Abbate, Antonio; Betti, Maria

    2009-09-01

    The development of a complete, standard analytical procedure for a quantitative use of secondary ion mass spectrometry to map the distribution in animal tissues of exogenous isotopes presents difficulties inherently related to sample preparation and preservation, as well as to the specific application being considered. We have tested in two very different cases a procedure based on the cryo-preparation of samples and calibration standards. The applications under investigation were the mapping of 10B in mouse brain tissue, with relevance to the boron neutron capture therapy, and of the perfusion tracer 99Tc in mouse heart tissue, with relevance to the study of microcirculation and cardiovascular pathologies. Scanning electron microscopy and inductively coupled mass spectrometry analysis were used as reference techniques for secondary ion mass spectrometry images and analyte measurements, respectively. Cryo-preparation of tissue sections for ion microscopy proved to be simple and efficient (in terms of structural and chemical integrity) for both brain and heart samples derived from fresh organs. This technique, however, turned out to be reliable only on the brain tissue when applied to the preparation of standards, which required chemical fixation of portions of organs. Brain and heart tissues showed a totally different response to chemical fixation, from both a structural and an analytical point of view. On the one hand, we were able to estimate a relative sensitivity factor for 10B in the cryo-sectioned brain matrix; on the other hand, even without the possibility of an absolute quantification of the 99Tc signal and notwithstanding the presence of an isobaric interference, secondary ion mass spectrometry mapping however proved to be capable to resolve the specific response of the cardiac tissue to the perfusion mechanism.

  11. Influence of parasite density and sample storage time on the reliability of Entamoeba histolytica-specific PCR from formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Frickmann, Hagen; Tenner-Racz, Klara; Eggert, Petra; Schwarz, Norbert G; Poppert, Sven; Tannich, Egbert; Hagen, Ralf M

    2013-12-01

    We report on the reliability of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of Entamoeba histolytica from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue in comparison with microscopy and have determined predictors that may influence PCR results. E. histolytica-specific and Entamoeba dispar-specific real-time PCR and microscopy from adjacent histologic sections were performed using a collection of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue specimens obtained from patients with invasive amebiasis. Specimens had been collected during the previous 4 decades. Association of sample age, parasite density, and reliability of PCR was analyzed. E. histolytica PCR was positive in 20 of 34 biopsies (58.8%); 2 of these 20 were microscopically negative for amebae in neighboring tissue sections. PCR was negative in 9 samples with visible amebae in neighboring sections and in 5 samples without visible parasites in neighboring sections. PCR was negative in all specimens that were older than 3 decades. Low parasite counts and sample ages older than 20 years were predictors for false-negative PCR results. All samples were negative for E. dispar DNA. PCR is suitable for the detection of E. histolytica in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples that are younger than 2 decades and that contain intermediate to high parasite numbers. Negative results in older samples were due to progressive degradation of DNA over time as indicated by control PCRs targeting the human 18S rRNA gene. Moreover, our findings support previous suggestions that only E. histolytica but not E. dispar is responsible for invasive amebiasis.

  12. Some Physical, Chemical, and Biological Parameters of Samples of Scleractinium Coral Aquaculture Skeleton Used for Reconstruction/Engineering of the Bone Tissue.

    PubMed

    Popov, A A; Sergeeva, N S; Britaev, T A; Komlev, V S; Sviridova, I K; Kirsanova, V A; Akhmedova, S A; Dgebuadze, P Yu; Teterina, A Yu; Kuvshinova, E A; Schanskii, Ya D

    2015-08-01

    Physical and chemical (phase and chemical composition, dynamics of resorption, and strength properties), and biological (cytological compatibility and scaffold properties of the surface) properties of samples of scleractinium coral skeletons from aquacultures of three types and corresponding samples of natural coral skeletons (Pocillopora verrucosa, Acropora formosa, and Acropora nobilis) were studied. Samples of scleractinium coral aquaculture skeleton of A. nobilis, A. formosa, and P. verrucosa met the requirements (all study parameters) to materials for osteoplasty and 3D-scaffolds for engineering of bone tissue.

  13. Evaluation of sample preparation and chromatographic separation for the parallel determination of taurine and edaravone in rat tissues using HILIC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Li, Yin-jie; Li, Zheng; Zheng, Xiao-xiao; Wu, Xiao-wen; Wang, Shi-rui; Guo, Hao; Yu, Yan-yan; Guo, Meng-zhe; Yan, Dong-zhi; Tang, Dao-quan

    2015-05-01

    The quantitative analysis of taurine and edaravone in biological sample is critical in pharmaceutical studies. Although each of them can be individually analyzed by different approaches, concurrent quantification is still a highly challenging task with respect to their great polarity variation and the complex composition of tissue sample. In the present study, to simultaneously determine taurine and edaravone in rat tissue, the sample preparation and chromatographic separation conditions were evaluated and discussed in detail. As for the sample preparation, four kinds of solvent and the volume ratio of the optimal solvent to biological sample were both tested and evaluated based on the chromatographic profile, extraction recovery, and matrix effect (ME). The chromatographic separation was performed in a reverse phase (RP) and two hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) modes, and the corresponding separation efficiencies were assessed using chromatographic parameters like half-width (W 1/2 ), tailing factor (f t), theoretical plates number (N), and ME. Furthermore, adopted composition of two mobile phase systems and the concentrations of the additives in the optimum buffer system were also investigated on an Atlantis HILIC silica column according to the resultant chromatographic profiles and peak areas of the analytes. The optimal results were obtained when the biological samples were deproteined by 4-fold volume of methanol/acetonitrile (1:3, v/v) and separated on a HILIC column with a gradient elution of acetonitrile/water containing 0.2 % formic acid and 10 mM ammonium formate. The proposed approach was validated and successfully applied to the parallel determination of the tissue distribution of edaravone and taurine in rat tissues.

  14. Radioimmunoassay of met-enkephalin in microdissected areas of paraformaldehyde-fixed rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Correa, F.M.A.; Saavedra, J.M.

    1984-02-27

    The effects were studied of various sample preparation procedures on rat brain met-enkephalin content, measured by radioimmunoassay. Whole brain met-enkephalin content of rats killed by decapitation followed by immediate tissue freezing was similar to that of rats killed by microwave irradiation and to those of rats anesthetized with pentobarbital or halothane before killing, whether previously perfused with paraformaldehyde or not. In contrast, a decrease (up to 80%) in met-enkephalin concentrations was observed when brain samples were frozen and thawed to mimic the procedure utilized in the ''punch'' technique for analysis of discrete brain nuclei. This decrease was totally prevented by paraformaldehyde perfusion of the brain prior to sacrifice. Brain perfusion did not alter the amount of immunoassayable met-enkephalin extracted from tissue or its profile after Sephadex chromatography. Paraformaldehyde perfusion results in better morphological tissue preservation and facilitates the ''punch'' dissecting technique. Paraformaldehyde perfusion may be the procedure of choice for the measurement of neuropeptides in specific brain nuclei dissected by the ''punch'' technique.

  15. Fine mapping of tissue properties on excised samples of melanoma and skin without the need for histological staining.

    PubMed

    Tittmann, Bernhard R; Miyasaka, Chiaki; Maeva, Elena; Shum, David

    2013-02-01

    This paper develops a novel two-frequency approach for noninvasive evaluation of cancerous tissue with optimum depth and resolution. Frequencies of about 50 MHz are used in thickly sliced tissue to detect differences of the relative attenuation (C-scan mode scanning) with relatively limited resolution. Thus, suspect zones can be identified according to a quantitative criterion. These suspect zones are then selected for preparation of thin, transversal slices from within the original thick slices. Very-high-resolution (1-μm) visualization of cells is obtained at around 600 MHz on these transversal sections and adjacent sections are prepared for histological study in parallel. The technique's feasibility and potential are demonstrated on both normal and cancerous (melanoma) skin tissue. Isotropy of the specimens is experimentally verified to ensure that conditions were coherent for use of a 5-layer, angular spectrum model made to simulate longitudinal velocity, allowing estimation of longitudinal velocity from semiquantitative V(z) data.

  16. Virus isolation vs RT-PCR: which method is more successful in detecting VHSV and IHNV in fish tissue sampled under field conditions?

    PubMed

    Knüsel, R; Bergmann, S M; Einer-Jensen, K; Casey, J; Segner, H; Wahli, T

    2007-09-01

    This study compared the results of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and traditional virus isolation on cell culture in detection of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) and infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV). RT-PCR was used for 172 tissue sample pools (total of 859 fish) originating from a field survey on the occurrence of VHSV and IHNV in farmed and wild salmonids in Switzerland. These samples represented all sites with fish that were either identified as virus-positive by means of virus isolation (three sites, four positive tissue sample pools) and/or demonstrated positive anti-VHSV-antibody titres (83 sites, 121 positive blood samples) in a serum plaque neutralization test (SPNT). The RT-PCR technique confirmed the four VHSV-positive tissue sample pools detected by virus isolation and additionally identified one VHSV-positive sample that showed positive anti-VHSV-AB titres, but was negative in virus isolation. With IHNV, RT-PCR detected two positive samples not identified by virus isolation while in these fish the SPNT result had been questionable. One of the IHNV-positive samples represents the first detection of IHNV-RNA in wild brown trout in Switzerland. Compared to SPNT, the RT-PCR method detected, as with virus isolation, a much lower number of positive cases; reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. Our results indicate that RT-PCR can not only be successfully applied in field surveys, but may also be slightly more sensitive than virus isolation. However, in a titration experiment under laboratory conditions, the sensitivity of RT-PCR was not significantly higher when compared with virus isolation.

  17. Mercury concentrations in water and hybrid striped bass (Morone saxatilis × M. chrysops) muscle tissue samples collected from the Ohio River, USA.

    PubMed

    Emery, Erich B; Spaeth, John P

    2011-04-01

    We report on long-term aqueous mercury (Hg) measurements collected at fixed locations along the Ohio River, offer insights into patterns of water and fish tissue Hg levels, and calculate site-specific bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) along an extensive longitudinal basis. We examined the relationship between total recoverable Hg concentrations in water and fish samples collected from 12 locations on the mainstem Ohio River. Water samples were collected on a bimonthly basis from each location over a 6-year period preceding the collection of fish tissue samples. This abundance of data enabled us to calculate the long-term average aqueous Hg concentrations and approximate the lifetime aqueous Hg exposure experienced by fish, enabling the calculation of appropriate BAFs. Hybrid striped bass (HSB; Morone saxatilis × M. chrysops) were collected from the Ohio River, composited (three fish), and analyzed for Hg in muscle tissue from each location. Concentrations ranged from 0.2 to 0.4 mg/kg and 41.7% of all samples collected were higher than the US Environmental Protection Agency regulatory threshold of 0.3 mg Hg/kg wet weight. Hg levels generally increased with fish weight, length, and age. However, Hg concentration in the water was the strongest predictor of tissue concentrations. We found that both water and tissue concentrations increased with drainage area, albeit at different rates. This discrepancy in spatial patterns revealed that the bioaccumulation rate of methylmercury might not be consistent throughout the Ohio River mainstem. BAFs calculated at each location supported this finding, as values decreased with increasing drainage area. Our study serves to fill critical, previously identified data gaps and provides decision-makers with the information necessary to develop more appropriate BAF development and risk-management strategies.

  18. Genetic association between chromosome 8 microsatellite (MS8-134) and Werner syndrome (WRN): Chromosome microdissection and homozygosity mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Lin; Nakura, Jun; Mitsuda, Noriaki; Miki, Tetsuro

    1995-08-10

    Werner syndrome (WRN) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by premature aging that has been mapped to the short arm of chromosome 8, 8p11.2-p12. To refine the genetic map around the WRN region, we have isolated eight microsatellites for this region from a microdissection library. We typed members of Japanese families with WRN on the basis of homozygosity mapping analysis. There was no obligate recombination between the WRN locus and microsatellite clone, MS8-134 (D8S1055). The maximum lod score was 20.28 at {theta} = 0.00. Alleles for MS8-134 showed association with WRN in a case-control study (OR = 3.55, 95% CI 1.56-8.07, P < 0.01). Such microsatellites from a microdissection library of the definite chromosome region may be useful for positional cloning of the WRN gene. 23 refs., 1 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Distribution of 3-hydroxy iC17:0 in subgingival plaque and gingival tissue samples: relationship to adult periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Nichols, F C

    1994-09-01

    Gram-negative organisms incorporate hydroxy fatty acids into the lipid A moiety of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and in the case of some members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, hydroxy fatty acids are incorporated exclusively into lipid A. However, a limited number of Bacteroides species have been shown to incorporate several classes of 3-hydroxy fatty acids, particularly 3-hydroxy iC17:0, into constitutive lipids as well as LPS. The present study examined the distribution of hydroxy fatty acids in two periodontal pathogens, Prevotella intermedia and Porphyromonas gingivalis, by employing a phospholipid extraction procedure (E. G. Bligh and W. J. Dyer, Can. J. Biochem. Physiol. 37:911-917, 1959) which partitioned constitutive lipids into the organic solvent phase and LPS into the aqueous phase. The distribution of hydroxy fatty acids within organic solvent and aqueous extracts of these bacterial species was then compared with the distribution in subgingival plaque samples isolated from either gingivitis or severe periodontitis sites as well as the distribution in gingival tissue samples. The organic solvent and aqueous extracts were hydrolyzed under strong alkaline conditions, and the free fatty acids were treated to form pentafluorobenzyl-ester, trimethylsilyl-ether derivatives. Hydroxy fatty acid levels were quantified by using gas chromatography-negative-ion chemical ionization-mass spectrometry. By using this approach, the mean values of the 3-hydroxy iC17:0 recovered within organic solvent extracts of P. gingivalis strains ranged from 56 to 63% of total 3-hydroxy iC17:0. Substantially less 3-hydroxy iC17:0 (< 5%) was recovered in organic solvent extracts of P. intermedia. By comparison, 75% of the 3-hydroxy iC17:0 in periodontitis subgingival plaque samples was recovered in organic solvent extracts, while only 43% of the 3-hydroxy iC17:0 in gingivitis plaque samples from the same patients was recovered in organic solvent extracts. However, 3-hydroxy iC17:0 was

  20. Collecting and Studying Blood and Tissue Samples From Patients With Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Prostate or Bladder/Urothelial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-06

    Healthy Control; Localized Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Bone; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Soft Tissues; Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Recurrent Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  1. Detection of Ki-ras mutations in tissue and plasma samples of patients with pancreatic cancer using PNA-mediated PCR clamping and hybridisation probes

    PubMed Central

    Däbritz, J; Hänfler, J; Preston, R; Stieler, J; Oettle, H

    2005-01-01

    In the present study, we combined the PCR-clamping approach with melting curve analysis using mutant specific hybridisation probes and wild-type specific peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) to determine the genotypes of the most frequent point mutation in codon 12 of the proto-oncogene Ki-ras in tissue and plasma samples of patients with pancreatic cancer. The sensitivity of our assay was 1–5 × 10−5. The melting curve analysis of tissue samples of four patients revealed two valine mutations, one none-valine mutation and one wild-type sequence. Ki-ras alterations were found in 28% of DNAs (18 out of 64) of nonrelated plasma samples of 10 patients with ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. The valine mutation was the predominantly detected gene alteration (83%). Out of ten patients investigated, four patients (40%) became positive during clinical observation with respect to Ki-ras mutation. All four patients exhibited progressive disease and high levels of tumour marker CA 19-9. In conclusion, the one-step procedure discribed may be a useful clinical tool for analysing Ki-ras point mutations in tissue and plasmas samples. In addition, this method can be adapted for simultanous detection of multiple mutations and quantitation. PMID:15655549

  2. Investigation of false positives associated with loop-mediated isothermal amplification assays for detection of Toxoplasma gondii in archived tissue samples of captive felids.

    PubMed

    Suleman, Essa; Mtshali, Moses Sibusiso; Lane, Emily

    2016-09-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a ubiquitous protozoan parasite that infects humans and many different animals, including felids. Many molecular and serologic tests have been developed for detection of T. gondii in a wide range of hosts. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is a field-friendly technique that lacks the practical drawbacks of other molecular and serologic tests, and LAMP assays have been successfully developed for detection of T. gondii in fresh tissue samples. In the current study, both a previously published and a de-novo designed LAMP assay were compared to a quantitative real-time (q)PCR assay, for the detection of T. gondii in archived formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples from captive wildlife. The LAMP assays produced conflicting results, generating both false positives and false negatives. Furthermore, the LAMP assays were unable to positively identify samples with low levels of parasites as determined by qPCR and histopathology. Therefore, these LAMP assays may not be the most suitable assays for detection of T. gondii in archived FFPE and frozen tissue samples. PMID:27449130

  3. A strategy for extending the applicability of a validated plasma calibration curve to quantitative measurements in multiple tissue homogenate samples: a case study from a rat tissue distribution study of JI-101, a triple kinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Gurav, Sandip Dhondiram; Jeniffer, Sherine; Punde, Ravindra; Gilibili, Ravindranath Reddy; Giri, Sanjeev; Srinivas, Nuggehally R; Mullangi, Ramesh

    2012-04-01

    A general practice in bioanalysis is that, whatever the biological matrix the analyte is being quantified in, the validation is performed in the same matrix as per regulatory guidelines. In this paper, we are presenting the applicability of a validated LC-MS/MS method in rat plasma for JI-101, to estimate the concentrations of JI-101 in various tissues that were harvested in a rat tissue distribution study. A simple protein precipitation technique was used to extract JI-101 and internal standard from the tissue homogenates. The recovery of JI-101 in all the matrices was found to be >70%. Chromatographic separation was achieved using a binary gradient using mobile phase A (acetonitrile) and B (0.2% formic acid in water) at a flow rate of 0.30 mL/min on a Prodigy ODS column with a total run time of 4.0 min. The MS/MS ion transitions monitored were 466.1 → 265 for JI-101 and 180.1 → 110.1 for internal standard. The linearity range was 5.02-4017 ng/mL. The JI-101 levels were quantifiable in the various tissue samples harvested in this study. Therefore, the use of a previously validated JI-101 assay in plasma circumvented the tedious process of method development/validation in various tissue matrices.

  4. Laser microdissection-based analysis of the Y sex chromosome of the Antarctic fish Chionodracohamatus (Notothenioidei, Channichthyidae).

    PubMed

    Cocca, Ennio; Petraccioli, Agnese; Morescalchi, Maria Alessandra; Odierna, Gaetano; Capriglione, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Microdissection, DOP-PCR amplification and microcloning were used to study the large Y chromosome of Chionodracohamatus, an Antarctic fish belonging to the Notothenioidei, the dominant component of the Southern Ocean fauna. The species has evolved a multiple sex chromosome system with digametic males showing an X1YX2 karyotype and females an X1X1X2X2 karyotype. Fluorescence in situ hybridization, performed with a painting probe made from microdissected Y chromosomes, allowed a deeper insight on the chromosomal rearrangement, which underpinned the fusion event that generated the Y. Then, we used a DNA library established by microdissection and microcloning of the whole Y chromosome of Chionodracohamatus for searching sex-linked sequences. One clone provided preliminary information on the presence on the Y chromosome of the CHD1 gene homologue, which is sex-linked in birds but in no other vertebrates. Several clones from the Y-chromosome mini-library contained microsatellites and transposable elements, one of which mapped to the q arm putative fusion region of the Y chromosome. The findings confirm that interspersed repetitive sequences might have fostered chromosome rearrangements and the emergence of the Y chromosome in Chionodracohamatus. Detection of the CHD1 gene in the Y sex-determining region could be a classical example of convergent evolution in action.

  5. Directed isolation and mapping of microsatellites from swine Chromosome 1q telomeric region through microdissection and RH mapping.

    PubMed

    Sarker, N; Hawken, R J; Takahashi, S; Alexander, L J; Awata, T; Schook, L B; Yasue, H

    2001-07-01

    Several quantitative trait loci (QTLs) (vertebrate number, birth weight, age at puberty, growth rate, gestation length, and backfat depth) have been independently mapped to the distal region of swine Chromosome (SSC) 1q in several resource populations. In order to improve the map resolution and refine these QTLs more precisely on SSC1q, we have isolated and mapped additional microsatellites (ms), using chromosome microdissection and radiation hybrid (RH) mapping. Five copies of the telomeric region of SSC1q were microdissected from metaphase spreads and pooled. The chromosomal fragment DNA was randomly amplified by using degenerate oligonucleotide primed polymerase chain reaction (DOP-PCR), enriched for ms, and subcloned into a PCR vector. Screening of subsequent clones with ms probes identified 23 unique ms sequences. Fifteen of these (65%) were subjected to radiation hybrid (RH) mapping by using the INRA-University of Minnesota porcine RH panel (IMpRH); and the remaining eight were not suited for the RH mapping. Twelve microsatellites were assigned to SSC1q telomeric region of IMpRH map (LOD >6), and three remain unlinked (LOD <6). Out of the 15 microsatellite markers, 9 were polymorphic in NIAI reference population based on the Meishan and Göttingen miniature pig. In summary, we have used microdissection and radiation hybrid mapping to clone and map 12 new microsatellites to the swine gene map to increase the resolution of SSC1q in the region of known QTLs.

  6. Rapid generation of region-specific probes by chromosome microdissection: Application to the identification of chromosomal rearrangements

    SciTech Connect

    Trent, J.M.; Guan, X.Y.; Zang, J.; Meltzer, P.S. )

    1993-01-01

    The authors present results using a novel strategy for chromosome microdissection and direct in vitro amplification of specific chromosomal regions, to identify cryptic chromosome alterations, and to rapidly generate region-specific genomic probes. First, banded chromosomes are microdissected and directly PCR amplified by a procedure which eliminates microchemistry (Meltzer, et al., Nature Genetics, 1:24, 1992). The resulting PCR product can be used for several applications including direct labeling for fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) to normal metaphase chromosomes. A second application of this procedure is the extremely rapid generation of chromosome region-specific probes. This approach has been successfully used to determine the derivation of chromosome segments unidentifiable by standard chromosome banding analysis. In selected instances these probes have also been used on interphase nuclei and provides the potential for assessing chromosome abnormalities in a variety of cell lineages. The microdissection probes (which can be generated in <24 hours) have also been utilized in direct library screening and provide the possibility of acquiring a significant number of region-specific probes for any chromosome band. This procedure extends the limits of conventional cytogenetic analysis by providing an extremely rapid source of numerous band-specific probes, and by enabling the direct analysis of essentially any unknown chromosome region.

  7. Laser microdissection-based analysis of the Y sex chromosome of the Antarctic fish Chionodraco hamatus (Notothenioidei, Channichthyidae)

    PubMed Central

    Cocca, Ennio; Petraccioli, Agnese; Morescalchi, Maria Alessandra; Odierna, Gaetano; Capriglione, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Microdissection, DOP-PCR amplification and microcloning were used to study the large Y chromosome of Chionodraco hamatus, an Antarctic fish belonging to the Notothenioidei, the dominant component of the Southern Ocean fauna. The species has evolved a multiple sex chromosome system with digametic males showing an X1YX2 karyotype and females an X1X1X2X2 karyotype. Fluorescence in situ hybridization, performed with a painting probe made from microdissected Y chromosomes, allowed a deeper insight on the chromosomal rearrangement, which underpinned the fusion event that generated the Y. Then, we used a DNA library established by microdissection and microcloning of the whole Y chromosome of Chionodraco hamatus for searching sex-linked sequences. One clone provided preliminary information on the presence on the Y chromosome of the CHD1 gene homologue, which is sex-linked in birds but in no other vertebrates. Several clones from the Y-chromosome mini-library contained microsatellites and transposable elements, one of which mapped to the q arm putative fusion region of the Y chromosome. The findings confirm that interspersed repetitive sequences might have fostered chromosome rearrangements and the emergence of the Y chromosome in Chionodraco hamatus. Detection of the CHD1 gene in the Y sex-determining region could be a classical example of convergent evolution in action. PMID:25893071

  8. Plant tissue-based chemiluminescence flow biosensor for determination of unbound dopamine in rabbit blood with on-line microdialysis sampling.

    PubMed

    Li, Baoxin; Zhang, Zhujun; Jin, Yan

    2002-06-01

    A novel plant tissue-based chemiluminescence (CL) biosensor for dopamine combined with flow injection analysis is presented in this paper. The potato roots act as molecular recognition elements. Dopamine is oxidized by oxygen under the catalysis of polyphenol oxidase in the tissue column to produce hydrogen peroxide, which can react with luminol in the presence of peroxidase of potato tissue to generate CL signal. The CL emission intensity was linear with dopamine concentration in the range of 1x10(-5)-1x10(-7) g/ml and the detection limit was 5.3x10(-8) g/ml (3sigma) with a relative standard deviation of 1.7%. Combined with microdialysis sampling, the biosensor was applied to monitor the variation of dopamine level in the blood of rabbit after the administration of dopamine to demonstrate the favorable resolution and reliability of the system for in vivo on-line monitoring. PMID:11959481

  9. Application of non-lethal stable isotope analysis to assess feeding patterns of juvenile pallid sturgeon Scaphirhynchus albus: a comparison of tissue types and sample preservation methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andvik, R.T.; VanDeHey, J.A.; Fincel, M.J.; French, William E.; Bertrand, K.N.; Chipps, Steven R.; Klumb, R.A.; Graeb, B.D.S.

    2010-01-01

    Traditional techniques for stable isotope analysis (SIA) generally require sacrificing animals to collect tissue samples; this can be problematic when studying diets of endangered species such as the pallid sturgeon Scaphirhynchus albus. Our objectives were to (i) determine if pectoral fin tissue (non-lethal) could be a substitute for muscle tissue (lethal) in SIA of juvenile pallid sturgeon, and (ii) evaluate the influence of preservation techniques on stable isotope values. In the laboratory, individual juvenile pallid sturgeon were held for up to 186 day and fed chironomids, fish, or a commercially available pellet diet. Significant, positive relationships (r² ≥ 0.8) were observed between fin and muscle tissues for both δ15N and δ13C; in all samples isotopes were enriched in fins compared to muscle tissue. Chironomid and fish based diets of juvenile pallid sturgeon were distinguishable for fast growing fish (0.3 mm day−1) using stable δ15N and δ13C isotopes. Frozen and preserved fin tissue δ15N isotopes were strongly related (r2 = 0.89) but δ13C isotopes were weakly related (r2 = 0.16). Therefore, freezing is recommended for preservation of fin clips to avoid the confounding effect of enrichment by ethanol. This study demonstrates the utility of a non-lethal technique to assess time integrated food habits of juvenile pallid sturgeon and should be applicable to other threatened or endangered species.

  10. Proteomics analysis of tissue samples from patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the penis and positive to human papillomavirus

    PubMed Central

    Koifman, Leandro; Ornellas, Paulo; Ornellas, Antonio Augusto; Pereira, Denise de Abreu; Zingali, Benedeta Russolina; Cavalcanti, Silvia Maria Baeta; Afonso, Larissa Alves; Sandim, Vanessa; Alves, Gilda

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: The aim of this study was to identify possible protein biomarkers and/or candidates for therapeutic targets in tissues of patients with SCCP, infected by HPV, applying one dimensional electrophoresis (1DE), followed by direct mass spectrometry (MS) analysis. Materials and Methods: Tissues from 10 HPV positive patients with SCCP and from 10 patients with HPV negative non-tumorous penile foreskins were analyzed applying 1D electrophoresis, followed by analysis with direct mass spectrometry (MS). Results: Sixty-three different proteins were identified in the first group and 50 in the second group. Recognition was possible for 28 proteins exclusively detected in Group 1 and 21 proteins presented only in Group 2. Conclusion: Some proteins in the first group are directly involved in the development of other types of cancer, and therefore, suitable for analysis. Complement C3 protein is a strong candidate for evaluating SCCP patients. PMID:26401855

  11. Maintaining Breast Cancer Specimen Integrity and Individual or Simultaneous Extraction of Quality DNA, RNA, and Proteins from Allprotect-Stabilized and Nonstabilized Tissue Samples

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Paul; Donatello, Simona; Connolly, Elizabeth; Griffin, Mairead; Dunne, Barbara; Burke, Louise; Flavin, Richard; Rizkalla, Hala; Ryan, Ciara; Hayes, Brian; D'Adhemar, Charles; Banville, Niamh; Faheem, Nazia; Muldoon, Cian; Gaffney, Eoin F.

    2011-01-01

    The Saint James's Hospital Biobank was established in 2008, to develop a high-quality breast tissue BioResource, as a part of the breast cancer clinical care pathway. The aims of this work were: (1) to ascertain the quality of RNA, DNA, and protein in biobanked carcinomas and normal breast tissues, (2) to assess the efficacy of AllPrep® (Qiagen) in isolating RNA, DNA, and protein simultaneously, (3) to compare AllPrep with RNEasy® and QIAamp® (both Qiagen), and (4) to examine the effectiveness of Allprotect® (Qiagen), a new tissue stabilization medium in preserving DNA, RNA, and proteins. One hundred eleven frozen samples of carcinoma and normal breast tissue were analyzed. Tumor and normal tissue morphology were confirmed by frozen sections. Tissue type, tissue treatment (Allprotect vs. no Allprotect), extraction kit, and nucleic acid quantification were analyzed by utilizing a 4 factorial design (SPSS PASW 18 Statistics Software®). QIAamp (DNA isolation), AllPrep (DNA, RNA, and Protein isolation), and RNeasy (RNA isolation) kits were assessed and compared. Mean DNA yield and A260/280 values using QIAamp were 33.2 ng/μL and 1.86, respectively, and using AllPrep were 23.2 ng/μL and 1.94. Mean RNA yield and RNA Integrity Number (RIN) values with RNeasy were 73.4 ng/μL and 8.16, respectively, and with AllPrep were 74.8 ng/μL and 7.92. Allprotect-treated tissues produced higher RIN values of borderline significance (P=0.055). No discernible loss of RNA stability was detected after 6 h incubation of stabilized or nonstabilized tissues at room temperature or 4°C or in 9 freeze-thaw cycles. Allprotect requires further detailed evaluation, but we consider AllPrep to be an excellent option for the simultaneous extraction of RNA, DNA, and protein from tumor and normal breast tissues. The essential presampling procedures that maintain the diagnostic integrity of pathology specimens do not appear to compromise the quality of molecular isolates. PMID

  12. Maintaining Breast Cancer Specimen Integrity and Individual or Simultaneous Extraction of Quality DNA, RNA, and Proteins from Allprotect-Stabilized and Nonstabilized Tissue Samples.

    PubMed

    Mee, Blanaid C; Carroll, Paul; Donatello, Simona; Connolly, Elizabeth; Griffin, Mairead; Dunne, Barbara; Burke, Louise; Flavin, Richard; Rizkalla, Hala; Ryan, Ciara; Hayes, Brian; D'Adhemar, Charles; Banville, Niamh; Faheem, Nazia; Muldoon, Cian; Gaffney, Eoin F

    2011-12-01

    The Saint James's Hospital Biobank was established in 2008, to develop a high-quality breast tissue BioResource, as a part of the breast cancer clinical care pathway. The aims of this work were: (1) to ascertain the quality of RNA, DNA, and protein in biobanked carcinomas and normal breast tissues, (2) to assess the efficacy of AllPrep(®) (Qiagen) in isolating RNA, DNA, and protein simultaneously, (3) to compare AllPrep with RNEasy(®) and QIAamp(®) (both Qiagen), and (4) to examine the effectiveness of Allprotect(®) (Qiagen), a new tissue stabilization medium in preserving DNA, RNA, and proteins. One hundred eleven frozen samples of carcinoma and normal breast tissue were analyzed. Tumor and normal tissue morphology were confirmed by frozen sections. Tissue type, tissue treatment (Allprotect vs. no Allprotect), extraction kit, and nucleic acid quantification were analyzed by utilizing a 4 factorial design (SPSS PASW 18 Statistics Software(®)). QIAamp (DNA isolation), AllPrep (DNA, RNA, and Protein isolation), and RNeasy (RNA isolation) kits were assessed and compared. Mean DNA yield and A(260/280) values using QIAamp were 33.2 ng/μL and 1.86, respectively, and using AllPrep were 23.2 ng/μL and 1.94. Mean RNA yield and RNA Integrity Number (RIN) values with RNeasy were 73.4 ng/μL and 8.16, respectively, and with AllPrep were 74.8 ng/μL and 7.92. Allprotect-treated tissues produced higher RIN values of borderline significance (P=0.055). No discernible loss of RNA stability was detected after 6 h incubation of stabilized or nonstabilized tissues at room temperature or 4°C or in 9 freeze-thaw cycles. Allprotect requires further detailed evaluation, but we consider AllPrep to be an excellent option for the simultaneous extraction of RNA, DNA, and protein from tumor and normal breast tissues. The essential presampling procedures that maintain the diagnostic integrity of pathology specimens do not appear to compromise the quality of molecular isolates.

  13. Numerical and structural genomic aberrations are reliably detectable in tissue microarrays of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor samples by fluorescence in-situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Horn, Heike; Bausinger, Julia; Staiger, Annette M; Sohn, Maximilian; Schmelter, Christopher; Gruber, Kim; Kalla, Claudia; Ott, M Michaela; Rosenwald, Andreas; Ott, German

    2014-01-01

    Few data are available regarding the reliability of fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH), especially for chromosomal deletions, in high-throughput settings using tissue microarrays (TMAs). We performed a comprehensive FISH study for the detection of chromosomal translocations and deletions in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumor specimens arranged in TMA format. We analyzed 46 B-cell lymphoma (B-NHL) specimens with known karyotypes for translocations of IGH-, BCL2-, BCL6- and MYC-genes. Locus-specific DNA probes were used for the detection of deletions in chromosome bands 6q21 and 9p21 in 62 follicular lymphomas (FL) and six malignant mesothelioma (MM) samples, respectively. To test for aberrant signals generated by truncation of nuclei following sectioning of FFPE tissue samples, cell line dilutions with 9p21-deletions were embedded into paraffin blocks. The overall TMA hybridization efficiency was 94%. FISH results regarding translocations matched karyotyping data in 93%. As for chromosomal deletions, sectioning artefacts occurred in 17% to 25% of cells, suggesting that the proportion of cells showing deletions should exceed 25% to be reliably detectable. In conclusion, FISH represents a robust tool for the detection of structural as well as numerical aberrations in FFPE tissue samples in a TMA-based high-throughput setting, when rigorous cut-off values and appropriate controls are maintained, and, of note, was superior to quantitative PCR approaches.

  14. Pre-Analytical Considerations for Successful Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS): Challenges and Opportunities for Formalin-Fixed and Paraffin-Embedded Tumor Tissue (FFPE) Samples

    PubMed Central

    Arreaza, Gladys; Qiu, Ping; Pang, Ling; Albright, Andrew; Hong, Lewis Z.; Marton, Matthew J.; Levitan, Diane

    2016-01-01

    In cancer drug discovery, it is important to investigate the genetic determinants of response or resistance to cancer therapy as well as factors that contribute to adverse events in the course of clinical trials. Despite the emergence of new technologies and the ability to measure more diverse analytes (e.g., circulating tumor cell (CTC), circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA), etc.), tumor tissue is still the most common and reliable source for biomarker investigation. Because of its worldwide use and ability to preserve samples for many decades at ambient temperature, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor tissue (FFPE) is likely to be the preferred choice for tissue preservation in clinical practice for the foreseeable future. Multiple analyses are routinely performed on the same FFPE samples (such as Immunohistochemistry (IHC), in situ hybridization, RNAseq, DNAseq, TILseq, Methyl-Seq, etc.). Thus, specimen prioritization and optimization of the isolation of analytes is critical to ensure successful completion of each assay. FFPE is notorious for producing suboptimal DNA quality and low DNA yield. However, commercial vendors tend to request higher DNA sample mass than what is actually required for downstream assays, which restricts the breadth of biomarker work that can be performed. We evaluated multiple genomics service laboratories to assess the current state of NGS pre-analytical processing of FFPE. Significant differences in pre-analytical capabilities were observed. Key aspects are highlighted and recommendations are made to improve the current practice in translational research. PMID:27657050

  15. Development of an indirect immunofluorescence assay for diagnosis of bovine viral diarrhoea virus on ear notch tissue samples in cattle infected persistently.

    PubMed

    Bedeković, Tomislav; Lemo, Nina; Lojkić, Ivana; Cvetnić, Zeljko; Cač, Zeljko; Madić, Josip

    2011-12-01

    Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) causes a disease that has a wide range of clinical symptoms in domestic and wild ruminants. It is a major problem in cattle and causes significant economic losses in the cattle industry. The virus infects bovines of all ages and causes both immunosuppression and reproductive, respiratory and digestive disorders. Cattle infected persistently, as a continuing source of the virus and the main factor in transmission of the disease between and among herds, are the main source of BVDV and a primary factor in the epidemiology of the disease. To determine whether a BVDV infection is persistent, two samples should be taken at 3-4 week intervals and tested for the virus antigen. Animal sera, whole blood, organ and ear notch tissue samples can be used for BVDV diagnosis. In ear notch tissue, viral antigen can be detected by an antigen enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (antigen ELISA), immunohistochemistry (IHC) and reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). This paper describes the development and implementation of an indirect immunofluorescence (IF) method using ear notch tissue samples for diagnosis of cattle infected persistently. Results obtained by this method show that IF is a good alternative to RT-PCR and antigen ELISA and can be a quick and accurate method in diagnosis of BVDV in cattle infected persistently with this virus.

  16. Gene expression profiling of reproductive meristem types in early rice inflorescences by laser microdissection.

    PubMed

    Harrop, Thomas W R; Ud Din, Israr; Gregis, Veronica; Osnato, Michela; Jouannic, Stefan; Adam, Hélène; Kater, Martin M

    2016-04-01

    In rice, inflorescence architecture is established at early stages of reproductive development and contributes directly to grain yield potential. After induction of flowering, the complexity of branching, and therefore the number of seeds on the panicle, is determined by the activity of different meristem types and the timing of transitions between them. Although some of the genes involved in these transitions have been identified, an understanding of the network of transcriptional regulators controlling this process is lacking. To address this we used a precise laser microdissection and RNA-sequencing approach in Oryza sativa ssp. japonica cv. Nipponbare to produce quantitative data that describe the landscape of gene expression in four different meristem types: the rachis meristem, the primary branch meristem, the elongating primary branch meristem (including axillary meristems), and the spikelet meristem. A switch in expression profile between apical and axillary meristem types followed by more gradual changes during transitions in axillary meristem identity was observed, and several genes potentially involved in branching were identified. This resource will be vital for a mechanistic understanding of the link between inflorescence development and grain yield. PMID:26932536

  17. Selective capture of endothelial and perivascular cells from brain microvessels using laser capture microdissection.

    PubMed

    Kinnecom, Katie; Pachter, Joel S

    2005-12-01

    Laser capture microdissection (LCM) of the major cell types comprising brain microvessels offers a powerful technology to explore the molecular basis of the blood-brain barrier in health and disease. However, the ability to selectively retrieve endothelial or perivascular cells, without cross-contamination from the other, has proven difficult. Additionally, histochemical methods previously described for use with LCM have not allowed for identification of all the different size branches of the microvascular tree. Here, we describe a double immunostaining method, combining bright-field and fluorescence microscopy, and using an extensive dehydration with xylene, to clearly identify and spatially resolve endothelial from perivascular cells within all size microvascular branches in frozen brain sections. LCM of these sections, coupled with RNA analysis by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, revealed that captured endothelial cells show endothelial markers but no detectable markers for astrocytes or smooth muscle cells/pericytes. Conversely, captured astrocytes or smooth muscle cells/pericytes demonstrate their respective markers, but not those of endothelial cells. This approach has applicability to microarray analysis, thereby enabling global gene profiling of the different cell types along the entirety of the brain microvascular tree.

  18. Microdissection and painting of the Y chromosome in spinach (Spinacia oleracea).

    PubMed

    Deng, Chuan-Liang; Qin, Rui-Yun; Cao, Ying; Gao, Jun; Li, Shu-Fen; Gao, Wu-Jun; Lu, Long-Dou

    2013-07-01

    Spinach has long been used as a model for genetic and physiological studies of sex determination and expression. Although trisomic analysis from a cross between diploid and triploid plants identified the XY chromosome as the largest chromosome, no direct evidence has been provided to support this at the molecular level. In this study, the largest chromosomes of spinach from mitotic metaphase spreads were microdissected using glass needles. Degenerate oligonucleotide primed polymerase chain reaction was used to amplify the dissected chromosomes. The amplified products from the Y chromosome were identified using the male-specific marker T11A. For the first time, the largest spinach chromosome was confirmed to be a sex chromosome at the molecular level. PCR products from the isolated chromosomes were used in an in situ probe mixture for painting the Y chromosome. The fluorescence signals were mainly distributed on all chromosomes and four pair of weaker punctate fluorescence signal sites were observed on the terminal region of two pair of autosomes. These findings provide a foundation for the study of sex chromosome evolution in spinach.

  19. Gene expression profiling of reproductive meristem types in early rice inflorescences by laser microdissection.

    PubMed

    Harrop, Thomas W R; Ud Din, Israr; Gregis, Veronica; Osnato, Michela; Jouannic, Stefan; Adam, Hélène; Kater, Martin M

    2016-04-01

    In rice, inflorescence architecture is established at early stages of reproductive development and contributes directly to grain yield potential. After induction of flowering, the complexity of branching, and therefore the number of seeds on the panicle, is determined by the activity of different meristem types and the timing of transitions between them. Although some of the genes involved in these transitions have been identified, an understanding of the network of transcriptional regulators controlling this process is lacking. To address this we used a precise laser microdissection and RNA-sequencing approach in Oryza sativa ssp. japonica cv. Nipponbare to produce quantitative data that describe the landscape of gene expression in four different meristem types: the rachis meristem, the primary branch meristem, the elongating primary branch meristem (including axillary meristems), and the spikelet meristem. A switch in expression profile between apical and axillary meristem types followed by more gradual changes during transitions in axillary meristem identity was observed, and several genes potentially involved in branching were identified. This resource will be vital for a mechanistic understanding of the link between inflorescence development and grain yield.

  20. Analysis of microdissected neurons by 18O mass spectrometry reveals altered protein expression in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Masakazu; Bogdanovic, Nenad; Nakagawa, Hiroyuki; Volkmann, Inga; Aoki, Mikio; Winblad, Bengt; Sakai, Jun; Tjernberg, Lars O

    2012-01-01

    Abstract It is evident that the symptoms of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are derived from severe neuronal damage, and especially pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus are affected pathologically. Here, we analysed the proteome of hippocampal neurons, isolated from post-mortem brains by laser capture microdissection. By using 18O labelling and mass spectrometry, the relative expression levels of 150 proteins in AD and controls were estimated. Many of the identified proteins are involved in transcription and nucleotide binding, glycolysis, heat-shock response, microtubule stabilization, axonal transport or inflammation. The proteins showing the most altered expression in AD were selected for immunohistochemical analysis. These analyses confirmed the altered expression levels, and showed in many AD cases a pathological pattern. For comparison, we also analysed hippocampal sections by Western blot. The expression levels found by this method showed poor correlation with the neuron-specific analysis. Hence, we conclude that cell-specific proteome analysis reveals differences in the proteome that cannot be detected by bulk analysis. PMID:21883897

  1. Altered p53 in microdissected, metachronous, premalignant and malignant oral lesions from the same patients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Y-Q; Pavelic, Z P; Wang, L-J; McDonald, J S; Gleich, L; Munck-Wikland, E; Dacic, S; Danilovic, Z; Pavelic, L J; Wilson, K M; Gluckman, J L; Stambrook, P J

    1995-01-01

    Aims—To determine whether mutant p53 alleles harboured by malignant tumours of the oral cavity were also present in previous premalignant lesions at the same site. Methods—Paraffin embedded tumour specimens along with their premalignant counterparts were analysed for p53 alterations using immunohistochemistry, microdissection, polymerase chain reaction amplification, and DNA sequencing. Results—Malignant lesions from five of eight patients showed overexpression of p53 protein by immunohistochemistry. Upon DNA sequencing, two of these five specimens had p53 mutations. Of the five patients whose cancers showed p53 overexpression by immunohistochemistry, three had previous premalignant lesions that also had immunohistochemically detectable p53 protein. However, DNA sequencing showed that none of these three had mutations in the p53 gene. The remaining five premalignant lesions had no immunohistochemically detectable p53 protein. Conclusions—Some premalignant lesions have increased p53 protein which can be detected by staining with antibody to p53. This staining is not caused by mutations in p53 that are found in subsequent tumours at the same site. Images PMID:16696020

  2. Molecular Analysis of the B Microchromosome in Steindachnerina insculpta (Characiformes: Curimatidae) by Microdissection.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, Tatiane R; Gouveia, Juceli G; da Silva, Carlos R M; Dias, Ana L; da Rosa, Renata

    2015-01-01

    B chromosomes are additional elements to standard karyotypes observed in different species of fishes, especially in Curimatidae. However, despite studies demonstrating the occurrence of Bs, little is known about their origin and evolution. To better understand the genomic composition and evolutionary processes involving B chromosomes, microdissection of B microchromosomes in Steindachnerina insculpta was conducted. Chromosome painting revealed the totally hybridized B and markings on A chromosomes both in S. in sculpta and in Cyphocharax spilotus, demonstrating a strong homology between these different species. In specimens of C. modestus, which do not have Bs, the signals were observed on A chromosomes. Cloning and sequencing of some B fragments revealed that the B microchromosome in S. insculpta is composed of repetitive elements, homologous to the DIRS-4 LTR retrotransposon of Xenopus (Silurana) tropicalis. FISH with clone pSi48 with the DIRS-4 retroelement revealed signals on all A chromosomes in the 2 species and also on the B, suggesting the insertion of repetitive elements in these species. PMID:25999244

  3. Microdissection, microchip arrays, and molecular analysis of tumor cells (primary and metastases).

    PubMed

    Pappalardo, P A; Bonner, R; Krizman, D B; Emmert-Buck, M R; Liotta, L A

    1998-07-01

    Advances in biotechnology and bioinformatics are offering promise for new breakthroughs in gene discovery and elucidation of gene function. At present, many candidate genes related to cancer pathogenesis have been identified in several types of human cancer, yet frequently their function remains elusive. This is particularly true as it relates to the progression of human cancer. This landscape could change dramatically, however, as technological innovations and improvements continue to revolutionize these fields. High-throughput molecular approaches are emerging, which may become accurate, automated, and cost-effective. For example, DNA arrays on microchips are under development with numerous applications, including the ability to screen genes rapidly for mutations and to study patterns of gene expression on a large scale. Automated systems for microdissection and sequencing are also in their implementation stages. Commensurate with their integration and evolution, these information and technological tools have the potential to offer a more comprehensive understanding of multiple genetic and cellular alterations occurring during cancer initiation, development, and progression. Ultimately, this fundamental knowledge can provide strategies for intervention, prevention, and early diagnosis. This is a US government work. There are no restrictions on its use.

  4. Primer-extension pre-amplification of DNA from paraffin-embedded tissue: Analysis of concurrent breast lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Pekkel, V.; Schmitz, M.; Allred, D.C.

    1994-09-01

    We are examining concurrent breast lesions (proliferative disease, in situ cancers and invasive cancers) that co-exist in the same breast for clonality studies of breast cancer evolution. The archival tissue samples with concurrent breast lesions suitable for these analyses are formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue blocks. We have successfully implemented microdissection and DNA extraction protocols from lesion/normal tissue sets from breast cancer patients. These preparations permit the efficient polymerase chain reaction amplification of highly polymorphic simple sequence repeat polymorphisms (SSRPs) for the genetic analysis. However, the unequal yield of DNA from particularly small lesions and/or the paucity of normal breast ductal epithelium has made extensive testing of these samples difficult. In order to equalize the recovery of DNA from the various morphologically defined lesions and normal tissue, we have implemented the method of primer-extension pre-amplification (PEP). In order to demonstrate the fidelity of the PEP technique in this application, we selected a series of 16 paired normal-lesion DNAs from lysates of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues. These samples had been previously analyzed for loss-of-heterozygosity by direct PCR amplification with SSRPs. The PEP products were re-amplified with the locus specific SSRPs to determine whether the genetic characteristics of the tumor and normal samples were preserved. For the eight SSRP loci tested thus far, all of the samples amplified and showed the same patterns of LOH as seen before. These results suggest that PEP may be a generally useful technique for genetic analysis of microscopic neoplastic lesions. At least 20-fold amplification of template DNA was observed in our experiments. We expect that this technique will also permit analysis of DNA from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue by comparative genomic hybridization.

  5. Multi-scale occupancy approach to estimate Toxoplasma gondii prevalence and detection probability in tissues: an application and guide for field sampling.

    PubMed

    Elmore, Stacey A; Huyvaert, Kathryn P; Bailey, Larissa L; Iqbal, Asma; Su, Chunlei; Dixon, Brent R; Alisauskas, Ray T; Gajadhar, Alvin A; Jenkins, Emily J

    2016-08-01

    Increasingly, birds are recognised as important hosts for the ubiquitous parasite Toxoplasma gondii, although little experimental evidence exists to determine which tissues should be tested to maximise the detection probability of T. gondii. Also, Arctic-nesting geese are suspected to be important sources of T. gondii in terrestrial Arctic ecosystems, but the parasite has not previously been reported in the tissues of these geese. Using a domestic goose model, we applied a multi-scale occupancy framework to demonstrate that the probability of detection of T. gondii was highest in the brain (0.689, 95% confidence interval=0.486, 0.839) and the heart (0.809, 95% confidence interval=0.693, 0.888). Inoculated geese had an estimated T. gondii infection probability of 0.849, (95% confidence interval=0.643, 0.946), highlighting uncertainty in the system, even under experimental conditions. Guided by these results, we tested the brains and hearts of wild Ross's Geese (Chen rossii, n=50) and Lesser Snow Geese (Chen caerulescens, n=50) from Karrak Lake, Nunavut, Canada. We detected 51 suspected positive tissue samples from 33 wild geese using real-time PCR with melt-curve analysis. The wild goose prevalence estimates generated by our multi-scale occupancy analysis were higher than the naïve estimates of prevalence, indicating that multiple PCR repetitions on the same organs and testing more than one organ could improve T. gondii detection. Genetic characterisation revealed Type III T. gondii alleles in six wild geese and Sarcocystis spp. in 25 samples. Our study demonstrates that Arctic nesting geese are capable of harbouring T. gondii in their tissues and could transport the parasite from their southern overwintering grounds into the Arctic region. We demonstrate how a multi-scale occupancy framework can be used in a domestic animal model to guide resource-limited sample collection and tissue analysis in wildlife. Secondly, we confirm the value of traditional occupancy in

  6. Multi-scale occupancy approach to estimate Toxoplasma gondii prevalence and detection probability in tissues: an application and guide for field sampling.

    PubMed

    Elmore, Stacey A; Huyvaert, Kathryn P; Bailey, Larissa L; Iqbal, Asma; Su, Chunlei; Dixon, Brent R; Alisauskas, Ray T; Gajadhar, Alvin A; Jenkins, Emily J

    2016-08-01

    Increasingly, birds are recognised as important hosts for the ubiquitous parasite Toxoplasma gondii, although little experimental evidence exists to determine which tissues should be tested to maximise the detection probability of T. gondii. Also, Arctic-nesting geese are suspected to be important sources of T. gondii in terrestrial Arctic ecosystems, but the parasite has not previously been reported in the tissues of these geese. Using a domestic goose model, we applied a multi-scale occupancy framework to demonstrate that the probability of detection of T. gondii was highest in the brain (0.689, 95% confidence interval=0.486, 0.839) and the heart (0.809, 95% confidence interval=0.693, 0.888). Inoculated geese had an estimated T. gondii infection probability of 0.849, (95% confidence interval=0.643, 0.946), highlighting uncertainty in the system, even under experimental conditions. Guided by these results, we tested the brains and hearts of wild Ross's Geese (Chen rossii, n=50) and Lesser Snow Geese (Chen caerulescens, n=50) from Karrak Lake, Nunavut, Canada. We detected 51 suspected positive tissue samples from 33 wild geese using real-time PCR with melt-curve analysis. The wild goose prevalence estimates generated by our multi-scale occupancy analysis were higher than the naïve estimates of prevalence, indicating that multiple PCR repetitions on the same organs and testing more than one organ could improve T. gondii detection. Genetic characterisation revealed Type III T. gondii alleles in six wild geese and Sarcocystis spp. in 25 samples. Our study demonstrates that Arctic nesting geese are capable of harbouring T. gondii in their tissues and could transport the parasite from their southern overwintering grounds into the Arctic region. We demonstrate how a multi-scale occupancy framework can be used in a domestic animal model to guide resource-limited sample collection and tissue analysis in wildlife. Secondly, we confirm the value of traditional occupancy in

  7. LCM assisted biomarker discovery from archival neoplastic gastrointestinal tissues.

    PubMed

    Meitner, Patricia A; Resnick, Murray B

    2011-01-01

    Expression array analysis of epithelial mRNA to identify biomarkers of premalignant and malignant conditions in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is an area of intense study. Archived formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues documenting these changes are readily available and should be a valuable resource for retrospective analysis. Laser capture microdissection of defined areas of epithelial cells at different stages of neoplastic progression is described together with methods for prequalification of RNA in FFPE tissue blocks selected for analysis. Paradise reagents specifically designed for isolation and amplification of RNA from FFPE archival tissue specimens are used to prepare probes for the human X3P microarray from Affymetrix.

  8. Genotyping of human papillomavirus in paraffin embedded cervical tissue samples from women in Ethiopia and the Sudan.

    PubMed

    Abate, Ebba; Aseffa, Abraham; El-Tayeb, Muntasir; El-Hassan, Ibrahim; Yamuah, Lawrence; Mihret, Wude; Bekele, Liku; Ashenafi, Senait; El-Dawi, Nadia; Belayneh, Meseret; El-Hassan, Ahmed; Engers, Howard

    2013-02-01

    Cervical cancer is the most frequent female malignancy in most developing countries. Previous studies have demonstrated a strong association of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection with dysplasia and carcinoma of the uterine cervix. The objective of this study was to identify the prevailing HPV genotypes responsible for the development of cervical cancer among women in Ethiopia and the Sudan. A molecular characterization of HPV was done on 245 paraffin embedded cervical biopsy samples collected from the two countries. Amplification of HPV and subsequent genotyping was done using SPF10 primers and Line probe assay. Of samples collected from Ethiopian patients, 93% (149/160) and 13% (21/160) had high risk and low risk HPV genotypes, respectively. Among samples collected from the Sudan, 94% (80/85) harbored high risk and 11.7% (10/85) low risk HPV genotypes. Human papillomavirus 16 was the most frequent genotype identified in samples from Ethiopia (91%, 136/149) and the Sudan (82.5%, 66/80). HPV 52, 58, and 18 were the second, third and fourth common genotypes identified in Ethiopia, whereas HPV 18, 45, and 52 were the second, third, and fourth genotypes identified in samples collected from the Sudan. Thus, individuals living in different geographical localities should receive vaccines based on the specific genotypes circulating in the area and a vaccine targeting HPV 16, 18, 45, 52, and 58 may be optimal for the control of cervical cancer in the two countries.

  9. High-throughput RNA sequencing of a formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded autopsy lung tissue sample from the 1918 influenza pandemic

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yong-Li; Kash, John C; Beres, Stephen B; Sheng, Zong-Mei; Musser, James M; Taubenberger, Jeffery K

    2013-01-01

    Most biopsy and autopsy tissues are formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE), but this process leads to RNA degradation that limits gene expression analysis. The RNA genome of the 1918 pandemic influenza virus was previously determined in a 9-year effort by overlapping RT-PCR from post-mortem samples. Here, the full genome of the 1918 virus at 3000× coverage was determined in one high-throughput sequencing run of a library derived from total RNA of a 1918 FFPE sample after duplex-specific nuclease treatments. Bacterial sequences associated with secondary bacterial pneumonias were also detected. Host transcripts were well represented in the library. Compared to a 2009 pandemic influenza virus FFPE post-mortem library, the 1918 sample showed significant enrichment for host defence and cell death response genes, concordant with prior animal studies. This methodological approach should assist in the analysis of FFPE tissue samples isolated over the past century from a variety of diseases. PMID:23180419

  10. Evaluation of a digestion assay and determination of sample size and tissue for the reliable detection of Trichinella larvae in walrus meat.

    PubMed

    Leclair, Daniel; Forbes, Lorry B; Suppa, Sandy; Gajadhar, Alvin A

    2003-03-01

    A digestion assay was validated for the detection of Trichinella larvae in walrus (Odobenus rosmarus) meat, and appropriate samples for testing were determined using tissues from infected walruses harvested for food. Examination of muscles from 3 walruses showed that the tongue consistently contained approximately 2-6 times more larvae than the pectoral and intercostal muscles. Comparison of numbers of larvae in the root, body, and apex of the tongue from 3 walruses failed to identify a predilection site within the tongue, but the apex was considered an optimal tissue because of the high larval density within the tongue and the ease of collection. All 31 spiked samples weighing 50 g each and containing between 0.1 and 0.4 larvae per gram (lpg) were correctly identified as infected, indicating that the sensitivity of this procedure is adequate for diagnostic use. A sample size of 10 g consistently detected larvae in 2 walrus tongues containing > or = 0.3 lpg (n = 40), and until additional data are available, sample sizes from individual walrus tongues should be a minimum of 10 g. This study provides the preliminary data that were used for the development of a food safety analytical protocol for the detection of Trichinella in walrus meat in arctic communities.

  11. Genetic Characterization of Echinococcus granulosus from a Large Number of Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Tissue Samples of Human Isolates in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Rostami, Sima; Torbaghan, Shams Shariat; Dabiri, Shahriar; Babaei, Zahra; Mohammadi, Mohammad Ali; Sharbatkhori, Mitra; Harandi, Majid Fasihi

    2015-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE), caused by the larval stage of Echinococcus granulosus, presents an important medical and veterinary problem globally, including that in Iran. Different genotypes of E. granulosus have been reported from human isolates worldwide. This study identifies the genotype of the parasite responsible for human hydatidosis in three provinces of Iran using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples. In this study, 200 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples from human CE cases were collected from Alborz, Tehran, and Kerman provinces. Polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequencing of the partial mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene were performed for genetic characterization of the samples. Phylogenetic analysis of the isolates from this study and reference sequences of different genotypes was done using a maximum likelihood method. In total, 54.4%, 0.8%, 1%, and 40.8% of the samples were identified as the G1, G2, G3, and G6 genotypes, respectively. The findings of the current study confirm the G1 genotype (sheep strain) to be the most prevalent genotype involved in human CE cases in Iran and indicates the high prevalence of the G6 genotype with a high infectivity for humans. Furthermore, this study illustrates the first documented human CE case in Iran infected with the G2 genotype. PMID:25535316

  12. Automated Liquid Microjunction Surface Sampling-HPLC-MS/MS Analysis of Drugs and Metabolites in Whole-Body Thin Tissue Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2013-01-01

    A fully automated liquid extraction-based surface sampling system utilizing a commercially available autosampler coupled to high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) detection is reported. Discrete spots selected for droplet-based sampling and automated sample queue generation for both the autosampler and MS were enabled by using in-house developed software. In addition, co-registration of spatially resolved sampling position and HPLC-MS information to generate heatmaps of compounds monitored for subsequent data analysis was also available in the software. The system was evaluated with whole-body thin tissue sections from propranolol dosed rat. The hands-free operation of the system was demonstrated by creating heatmaps of the parent drug and its hydroxypropranolol glucuronide metabolites with 1 mm resolution in the areas of interest. The sample throughput was approximately 5 min/sample defined by the time needed for chromatographic separation. The spatial distributions of both the drug and its metabolites were consistent with previous studies employing other liquid extraction-based surface sampling methodologies.

  13. A correlative method for imaging identical regions of samples by micro-CT, light microscopy, and electron microscopy: imaging adipose tissue in a model system.

    PubMed

    Sengle, Gerhard; Tufa, Sara F; Sakai, Lynn Y; Zulliger, Martin A; Keene, Douglas R

    2013-04-01

    We present a method in which a precise region of interest within an intact organism is spatially mapped in three dimensions by non-invasive micro-computed X-ray tomography (micro-CT), then further evaluated by light microscopy (LM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Tissues are prepared as if for TEM including osmium fixation, which imparts soft tissue contrast in the micro-CT due to its strong X-ray attenuation. This method may therefore be applied to embedded, archived TEM samples. Upon selection of a two-dimensional (2-D) projection from a region of interest (ROI) within the three-dimensional volume, the epoxy-embedded sample is oriented for microtomy so that the sectioning plane is aligned with the micro-CT projection. Registration is verified by overlaying LM images with 2-D micro-CT projections. Structures that are poorly resolved in the micro-CT may be evaluated at TEM resolution by observing the next serial ultrathin section, thereby accessing the same ROI by all three imaging techniques. We compare white adipose tissue within the forelimbs of mice harboring a lipid-altering mutation with their littermate controls. We demonstrate that individual osmium-stained lipid droplets as small as 15 µm and separated by as little as 35 µm may be discerned as separate entities in the micro-CT, validating this to be a high-resolution, non-destructive technique for evaluation of fat content.

  14. The determination of 22 natural brassinosteroids in a minute sample of plant tissue by UHPLC-ESI-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Tarkowská, Danuše; Novák, Ondřej; Oklestkova, Jana; Strnad, Miroslav

    2016-09-01

    The triterpenoid plant hormones brassinosteroids (BRs) are believed to influence almost every aspect of plant growth and development. We have developed a sensitive mass spectrometry-based method for the simultaneous profiling of twenty-two naturally occurring brassinosteroids including biosynthetic precursors and the majority of biologically active metabolites. Using ultra-high performance liquid chromatographic (UHPLC) analysis, the run time was reduced up to three times (to 9 min) in comparison to standard HPLC BRs analyses, the retention time stability was improved to 0.1-0.2 % RSD and the injection accuracy was increased to 1.1-4.9 % RSD. The procedures for extraction and for two-step purification based on solid-phase extraction (SPE) were optimised in combination with subsequent UHPLC analysis coupled to electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) using Brassica flowers and Arabidopsis plant tissue extracts. In multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode, the average detection limit for BRs analysed was close to 7 pg, and the linear range covered up to 3 orders of magnitude. The low detection limits for this broad range of BR metabolites enabled as little as 50 mg of plant tissue to be used for quantitative analyses. The results of determinations exploiting internal standards showed that this approach provides a high level of practicality, reproducibility and recovery. The method we have established will enable researchers to gain a better understanding of the dynamics of the biosynthesis and metabolism of brassinosteroids and their modes of action in plant growth and development. PMID:27531032

  15. The determination of 22 natural brassinosteroids in a minute sample of plant tissue by UHPLC-ESI-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Tarkowská, Danuše; Novák, Ondřej; Oklestkova, Jana; Strnad, Miroslav

    2016-09-01

    The triterpenoid plant hormones brassinosteroids (BRs) are believed to influence almost every aspect of plant growth and development. We have developed a sensitive mass spectrometry-based method for the simultaneous profiling of twenty-two naturally occurring brassinosteroids including biosynthetic precursors and the majority of biologically active metabolites. Using ultra-high performance liquid chromatographic (UHPLC) analysis, the run time was reduced up to three times (to 9 min) in comparison to standard HPLC BRs analyses, the retention time stability was improved to 0.1-0.2 % RSD and the injection accuracy was increased to 1.1-4.9 % RSD. The procedures for extraction and for two-step purification based on solid-phase extraction (SPE) were optimised in combination with subsequent UHPLC analysis coupled to electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) using Brassica flowers and Arabidopsis plant tissue extracts. In multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode, the average detection limit for BRs analysed was close to 7 pg, and the linear range covered up to 3 orders of magnitude. The low detection limits for this broad range of BR metabolites enabled as little as 50 mg of plant tissue to be used for quantitative analyses. The results of determinations exploiting internal standards showed that this approach provides a high level of practicality, reproducibility and recovery. The method we have established will enable researchers to gain a better understanding of the dynamics of the biosynthesis and metabolism of brassinosteroids and their modes of action in plant growth and development.

  16. Results of quality-control sampling of water, bed sediment, and tissue in the Western Lake Michigan Drainages study unit of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fitzgerald, S.A.

    1997-01-01

    This report contains the quality control results of the Western Lake Michigan Drainages study unit of the National Water Quality Assessment Program. Quality control samples were collected in the same manner and contemporaneously with environmental samples during the first highintensity study phase in the unit (1992 through 1995) and amounted to approximately 15 percent of all samples collected. The accuracy and precision of hundreds of chemical analyses of surface and ground-water, bed sediment, and tissue was determined through the collection and analysis of field blanks, field replicates and splits, matrix spikes, and surrogates. Despite the several detections of analytes in the field blanks, the concentrations of most constituents in the environmental samples will likely be an order of magnitude or higher than those in the blanks. However, frequent detections, and high concentrations, of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in several surface and ground-water blanks are probably significant with respect to commonly measured environmental concentrations, and the environmental data will have to be qualified accordingly. The precision of sampling of water on a percent basis, as determined from replicates and splits, was generally proportional to the concentration of the constituents, with constituents present in relatively high concentrations generally having less sampling variability than those with relatively low concentrations. In general, analytes with relatively high variability between replicates were present at concentrations near the reporting limit or were associated with relatively small absolute concentration differences, or both. Precision of replicates compared to that for splits in bed sediment samples was similar, thus eliminating sampling as a major source of variability in analyte concentrations. In the case the phthalates in bed sediment, contamination in either the field or laboratory could have caused the relatively large variability between replicate

  17. Impact of tissue type and content of neoplastic cells of samples on the quality of epidermal growth factor receptor mutation analysis among patients with lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    PALIOGIANNIS, PANAGIOTIS; ATTENE, FEDERICO; COSSU, ANTONIO; DEFRAIA, EFISIO; PORCU, GIUSEPPE; CARTA, ANNAMARIA; SOTGIU, MARIA IGNAZIA; PAZZOLA, ANTONIO; CORDERO, LORENZO; CAPELLI, FRANCESCA; FADDA, GIOVANNI MARIA; ORTU, SALVATORE; SOTGIU, GIOVANNI; PALOMBA, GRAZIA; SINI, MARIA CRISTINA; PALMIERI, GIUSEPPE; COLOMBINO, MARIA

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutational status has become crucial in recent years in the molecular classification of patients with lung cancer. The impact of the type and quantity of malignant cells of the neoplastic specimen on the quality of mutation analysis remains to be elucidated, and only empirical and sporadic data are available. The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of tissue type and content of neoplastic cells in the specimen on the quality of EGFR mutation analysis among patients with lung adenocarcinoma. A total of 515 patients with histologically-confirmed disease were included in the present study. Formalin-fixed paraffin embedded tissue samples were used for the mutation analysis and the content of the neoplastic cells was evaluated using light microscopy. Genomic DNA was isolated using a standard protocol. The coding sequences and splice junctions of exons 18, 19 and 21 in the EGFR gene were then screened for mutations by direct automated sequencing. The mean age of the patients examined was 64.9 years and 357 (69.3%) were male. A total of 429 tissue samples (83.3%) were obtained by biopsy and the remaining samples were obtained by surgery. A total of 456 samples (88.5%) were observed from primary lung adenocarcinomas, while 59 (11.5%) were from metastatic lesions. EGFR mutations occurred in 59 cases (11.5%); exon 18 mutations were detected in one case (1.7%), whereas exon 19 and 21 mutations were detected in 30 (51%) and 28 (47.3%) cases, respectively. EGFR mutations were more frequent in females and patients that had never smoked. The distribution of the mutations among primary and metastatic tissues exhibited no significant differences in the proportions of EGFR mutations detected. However, a statistically significant difference in the number of mutations detected was found between samples with at least 50% of neoplastic cells (450 cases-57 mutations; 12.7%) and those with <50% of neoplastic

  18. Sample Preparation for Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Protein-Protein Interactions in Cancer Cell Lines and Tissues.

    PubMed

    Beigbeder, Alice; Vélot, Lauriane; James, D Andrew; Bisson, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    A precisely controlled network of protein-protein interactions constitutes the basis for functional signaling pathways. This equilibrium is more often than not disrupted in cancer cells, by the aberrant expression or activation of oncogenic proteins. Therefore, the analysis of protein interaction networks in cancer cells has become crucial to expand our comprehension of the molecular underpinnings of tumor formation and progression. This protocol describes a sample preparation method for the analysis of signaling complexes by mass spectrometry (MS), following the affinity purification of a protein of interest from a cancer cell line or a solid tumor. In particular, we provide a spin tip-based protease digestion procedure that offers a more rapid and controlled alternative to other gel-based and gel-free methods. This sample preparation protocol represents a useful strategy to identify protein interactions and to gain insight into the molecular mechanisms that contribute to a given cancer phenotype. PMID:27581032

  19. Selective Extraction and Effective Separation of Galactosylsphingosine (Psychosine) and Glucosylsphingosine from Other Glycosphingolipids in Pathological Tissue Samples

    PubMed Central

    Li, Su-Chen; Buck, Wayne R.; Haskins, Mark E.; Wu, Sz-Wei; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Sidransky, Ellen; Bunnell, Bruce A.

    2012-01-01

    To facilitate the study of the chemical pathology of galactosylsphingosine (psychosine, GalSph) in Krabbe disease and glucosylsphingosine (GlcSph) in Gaucher disease, we have devised a facile method for the effective separation of these two glycosylsphingosines from other glycosphingolipids (GSLs) in Krabbe brain and Gaucher spleen samples. The procedure involves the use of acetone to selectively extract GalSph and GlcSph, respectively, from Krabbe brain and Gaucher spleen samples. Since acetone does not extract other GSLs except modest amounts of galactosylceramide, sulfatide, and glucosylceramide, the positively charged GalSph or GlcSph in the acetone extract can be readily separated from other GSLs by batchwise cation-exchange chromatography using a Waters Accell Plus CM Cartridge. GalSph or GlcSph enriched by this simple procedure can be readily analyzed by thin-layer chromatography or high-performance liquid chromatography. PMID:21136152

  20. Direct online HPLC-CV-AFS method for traces of methylmercury without derivatisation: a matrix-independent method for urine, sediment and biological tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Brombach, Christoph-Cornelius; Gajdosechova, Zuzana; Chen, Bin; Brownlow, Andrew; Corns, Warren T; Feldmann, Jörg; Krupp, Eva M

    2015-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a global pollutant which occurs in different species, with methylmercury (MeHg) being the critical compound due to its neurotoxicity and bioaccumulation through the food chain. Methods for trace speciation of MeHg are therefore needed for a vast range of sample matrices, such as biological tissues, fluids, soils or sediments. We have previously developed an ultra-trace speciation method for methylmercury in water, based on a preconcentration HPLC cold vapour atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HPLC-CV-AFS) method. The focus of this work is mercury speciation in a variety of sample matrices to assess the versatility of the method. Certified reference materials were used where possible, and samples were spiked where reference materials were not available, e.g. human urine. Solid samples were submitted for commonly used digestion or extraction processes to obtain a liquid sample for injection into the analytical system. For MeHg in sediment samples, an extraction procedure was adapted to accommodate MeHg separation from high amounts of Hg(2+) to avoid an overload of the column. The recovery for MeHg determination was found to be in the range of 88-104% in fish reference materials (DOLT-2, DOLT-4, DORM-3), lobster (TORT-2), seaweed (IAEA-140/TM), sediments (ERM(®)-CC580) and spiked urine and has been proven to be robust, reliable, virtually matrix-independent and relatively cost-effective. Applications in the ultra-trace concentration range are possible using the preconcentration up to 200 mL, while for higher MeHg-containing samples, lower volumes can be applied. A comparison was carried out between species-specific isotope dilution gas chromatography inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SSID-GC-ICP-MS) as the gold standard and HPLC-CV-AFS for biological tissues (liver, kidney and muscle of pilot whales), showing a slope of 1.008 and R (2) = 0.97, which indicates that the HPLC-CV-AFS method achieves well-correlated results for MeHg in

  1. Direct online HPLC-CV-AFS method for traces of methylmercury without derivatisation: a matrix-independent method for urine, sediment and biological tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Brombach, Christoph-Cornelius; Gajdosechova, Zuzana; Chen, Bin; Brownlow, Andrew; Corns, Warren T; Feldmann, Jörg; Krupp, Eva M

    2015-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a global pollutant which occurs in different species, with methylmercury (MeHg) being the critical compound due to its neurotoxicity and bioaccumulation through the food chain. Methods for trace speciation of MeHg are therefore needed for a vast range of sample matrices, such as biological tissues, fluids, soils or sediments. We have previously developed an ultra-trace speciation method for methylmercury in water, based on a preconcentration HPLC cold vapour atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HPLC-CV-AFS) method. The focus of this work is mercury speciation in a variety of sample matrices to assess the versatility of the method. Certified reference materials were used where possible, and samples were spiked where reference materials were not available, e.g. human urine. Solid samples were submitted for commonly used digestion or extraction processes to obtain a liquid sample for injection into the analytical system. For MeHg in sediment samples, an extraction procedure was adapted to accommodate MeHg separation from high amounts of Hg(2+) to avoid an overload of the column. The recovery for MeHg determination was found to be in the range of 88-104% in fish reference materials (DOLT-2, DOLT-4, DORM-3), lobster (TORT-2), seaweed (IAEA-140/TM), sediments (ERM(®)-CC580) and spiked urine and has been proven to be robust, reliable, virtually matrix-independent and relatively cost-effective. Applications in the ultra-trace concentration range are possible using the preconcentration up to 200 mL, while for higher MeHg-containing samples, lower volumes can be applied. A comparison was carried out between species-specific isotope dilution gas chromatography inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SSID-GC-ICP-MS) as the gold standard and HPLC-CV-AFS for biological tissues (liver, kidney and muscle of pilot whales), showing a slope of 1.008 and R (2) = 0.97, which indicates that the HPLC-CV-AFS method achieves well-correlated results for MeHg in

  2. Persistent organochlorine pesticides detected in blood and tissue samples of vultures from different localities in South Africa.

    PubMed

    van Wyk, E; Bouwman, H; van der Bank, H; Verdoorn, G H; Hofmann, D

    2001-07-01

    Gas chromatography was used to establish the presence of quantifiable residues of 14 persistent chlorinated hydrocarbon pollutants in whole blood, clotted blood, heart, kidney, liver and muscle samples obtained from individual African whitebacked (Pseudogyps africanus), Cape griffon (Gyps coprotheres) and Lappetfaced (Torgos tracheliotos) vultures from different localities in South Africa. The levels of pesticides measured in whole blood samples of live specimens were compared between nestlings from two natural breeding colonies, adults from a wildlife area and birds held in captivity. Statistically significant (P<0.05) differences between populations were detected in geometric means calculated for gamma-BHC (lindane), alpha(cis)-chlordane and alpha-endosulfan. Five of the organochlorine contaminants displayed significant variations between concentrations detected in the clotted blood, organs and muscles excised from vulture carcasses. This includes residues of gamma-BHC, alpha-chlordane, dieldrin, beta-endosulfan and heptachlor epoxide. Values of the respective biocides measured in vulture samples were generally low in comparison to results documented for a number of avian species. Although no threat is posed by any of the organochloride pesticides, continual monitoring of especially breeding colonies is recommended. Furthermore, the suitability of African whitebacked vulture nestlings as basic bioindicators is highly advocated. PMID:11461840

  3. Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM) Analysis of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) in Formalin Fixed Tumor Tissue

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Analysis of key therapeutic targets such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in clinical tissue samples is typically done by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and is only subjectively quantitative through a narrow dynamic range. The development of a standardized, highly-sensitive, linear, and quantitative assay for EGFR for use in patient tumor tissue carries high potential for identifying those patients most likely to benefit from EGFR-targeted therapies. Methods A mass spectrometry-based Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM) assay for the EGFR protein (EGFR-SRM) was developed utilizing the Liquid Tissue®-SRM technology platform. Tissue culture cells (n = 4) were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to establish quantitative EGFR levels. Matching formalin fixed cultures were analyzed by the EGFR-SRM assay and benchmarked against immunoassay of the non-fixed cultured cells. Xenograft human tumor tissue (n = 10) of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) origin and NSCLC patient tumor tissue samples (n = 23) were microdissected and the EGFR-SRM assay performed on Liquid Tissue lysates prepared from microdissected tissue. Quantitative curves and linear regression curves for correlation between immunoassay and SRM methodology were developed in Excel. Results The assay was developed for quantitation of a single EGFR tryptic peptide for use in FFPE patient tissue with absolute specificity to uniquely distinguish EGFR from all other proteins including the receptor tyrosine kinases, IGF-1R, cMet, Her2, Her3, and Her4. The assay was analytically validated against a collection of tissue culture cell lines where SRM analysis of the formalin fixed cells accurately reflects EGFR protein levels in matching non-formalin fixed cultures as established by ELISA sandwich immunoassay (R2 = 0.9991). The SRM assay was applied to a collection of FFPE NSCLC xenograft tumors where SRM data range from 305amol/μg to 12,860amol/μg and are consistent

  4. Isolation, characterization, and regional mapping of microclones from a human chromosome 21 microdissection library

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, J.; Hartz, J.; Yisheng Xu; Gemmill, R.M.; Patterson, D.; Kao, Faten ); Gemmill, R.M.; Patterson, D.; Kao, Fa-Ten ); Korenberg, J.R. )

    1992-08-01

    Thirty-four unique-sequence microclones were isolated from a previously described microdissection library of human chromosome 21 and were regionally mapped using a cell hybrid mapping panel which consists of six cell hybrids and divides chromosome 21 into eight regions. The mapping results showed that the microclones were unevenly distributed along chromosome 21, with the majority of microclones located in the distal half portion of the long arm, between 21q21.3 and 21qter. The number of unique-sequence clones began to decrease significantly from 21q21.2 to centromere and extending to the short arm. This finding is consistent with those reported in other chromosome 21 libraries. Thus, it may be inferred that the proximal portion of the long arm of chromosome 21 contains higher proportions of repetitive sequences, rather than unique sequences of genes. The microclones were also characterized for insert size and were used to identify the corresponding genomic fragments generated by HindIII. In addition, the authors demonstrated that the microclones with short inserts can be efficiently used to identify YAC (yeast artificial chromosome) clones with large inserts, for increased genomic coverage for high-resolution physical mapping. They also used 200 unique-sequence microclones to screen a human liver cDNA library and identified two cDNA clones which were regionally assigned to the 21q21.3-q22.1 region. Thus, generation of unique-sequence microclones from chromosome 21 appears to be useful to isolate and regionally map many cDNA clones, among which will be candidate genes for important diseases on chromosome 21, including Down syndrome, Alzheimer disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and one form of epilepsy.

  5. A molecular map of G protein alpha chains in microdissected rat nephron segments.

    PubMed Central

    Senkfor, S I; Johnson, G L; Berl, T

    1993-01-01

    Membrane-associated guanine nucleotide binding proteins regulate many receptor-mediated signals. Heterogeneity of biochemical and functional properties in nephron segments could be due to differences in G protein expression. To ascertain whether such heterogeneity of G proteins is present in various nephron segments, this study examines the distribution and relative abundance of G protein alpha chains in microdissected medullary thick ascending limb, cortical collecting tubules, outer medullary collecting tubules, proximal inner medullary tubules, and distal inner medullary tubules. Reverse transcription and polymerase chain reactions were employed using oligonucleotides encoding highly conserved regions of all known alpha chains. The cDNA was sequenced for alpha chain identification. The alpha i2 versus alpha s distribution was different in the outer medullary collecting tubules, when compared with the medullary thick ascending limb (P < 0.001) or the cortical collecting tubule, the proximal inner medullary tubules, and the distal inner medullary tubules (P < 0.05). These latter four segments did not significantly differ from each other. A similar analysis was applied to the frequently used line of kidney cells, LLC-PK1, whose exact cellular origin remains unclear. Interestingly, we detected both alpha i2 and alpha i3, while only alpha i2 was detected in the rat distal nephron. No alpha o or alpha z reverse transcription PCR products were detected. In contrast alpha 11 and alpha 14 members of the more recently described alpha q family were detected in the outer medullary collecting tubules and the proximal inner medullary tubules, respectively. We conclude that the majority of nephron segments have a relatively constant distribution of G protein alpha chains. Images PMID:8349818

  6. Microarray Cluster Analysis of Irradiated Growth Plate Zones Following Laser Microdissection

    SciTech Connect

    Damron, Timothy A. Zhang Mingliang; Pritchard, Meredith R.; Middleton, Frank A.; Horton, Jason A.; Margulies, Bryan M.; Strauss, Judith A.; Farnum, Cornelia E.; Spadaro, Joseph A.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: Genes and pathways involved in early growth plate chondrocyte recovery after fractionated irradiation were sought as potential targets for selective radiorecovery modulation. Materials and Methods: Three groups of six 5-week male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent fractionated irradiation to the right tibiae over 5 days, totaling 17.5 Gy, and then were killed at 7, 11, and 16 days after the first radiotherapy fraction. The growth plates were collected from the proximal tibiae bilaterally and subsequently underwent laser microdissection to separate reserve, perichondral, proliferative, and hypertrophic zones. Differential gene expression was analyzed between irradiated right and nonirradiated left tibia using RAE230 2.0 GeneChip microarray, compared between zones and time points and subjected to functional pathway cluster analysis with real-time polymerase chain reaction to confirm selected results. Results: Each zone had a number of pathways showing enrichment after the pattern of hypothesized importance to growth plate recovery, yet few met the strictest criteria. The proliferative and hypertrophic zones showed both the greatest number of genes with a 10-fold right/left change at 7 days after initiation of irradiation and enrichment of the most functional pathways involved in bone, cartilage, matrix, or skeletal development. Six genes confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction to have early upregulation included insulin-like growth factor 2, procollagen type I alpha 2, matrix metallopeptidase 9, parathyroid hormone receptor 1, fibromodulin, and aggrecan 1. Conclusions: Nine overlapping pathways in the proliferative and hypertrophic zones (skeletal development, ossification, bone remodeling, cartilage development, extracellular matrix structural constituent, proteinaceous extracellular matrix, collagen, extracellular matrix, and extracellular matrix part) may play key roles in early growth plate radiorecovery.

  7. Combining laser microdissection and RNA-seq to chart the transcriptional landscape of fungal development

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background During sexual development, filamentous ascomycetes form complex, three-dimensional fruiting bodies for the protection and dispersal of sexual spores. Fruiting bodies contain a number of cell types not found in vegetative mycelium, and these morphological differences are thought to be mediated by changes in gene expression. However, little is known about the spatial distribution of gene expression in fungal development. Here, we used laser microdissection (LM) and RNA-seq to determine gene expression patterns in young fruiting bodies (protoperithecia) and non-reproductive mycelia of the ascomycete Sordaria macrospora. Results Quantitative analysis showed major differences in the gene expression patterns between protoperithecia and total mycelium. Among the genes strongly up-regulated in protoperithecia were the pheromone precursor genes ppg1 and ppg2. The up-regulation was confirmed by fluorescence microscopy of egfp expression under the control of ppg1 regulatory sequences. RNA-seq analysis of protoperithecia from the sterile mutant pro1 showed that many genes that are differentially regulated in these structures are under the genetic control of transcription factor PRO1. Conclusions We have generated transcriptional profiles of young fungal sexual structures using a combination of LM and RNA-seq. This allowed a high spatial resolution and sensitivity, and yielded a detailed picture of gene expression during development. Our data revealed significant differences in gene expression between protoperithecia and non-reproductive mycelia, and showed that the transcription factor PRO1 is involved in the regulation of many genes expressed specifically in sexual structures. The LM/RNA-seq approach will also be relevant to other eukaryotic systems in which multicellular development is investigated. PMID:23016559

  8. Tissue and serum samples of patients with papillary thyroid cancer with and without benign background demonstrate different altered expression of proteins

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Mardiaty Iryani; Lee, Ching Chin; Mat Junit, Sarni; Ng, Khoon Leong

    2016-01-01

    Background Papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) is mainly diagnosed using fine-needle aspiration biopsy. This most common form of well-differentiated thyroid cancer occurs with or without a background of benign thyroid goiter (BTG). Methods In the present study, a gel-based proteomics analysis was performed to analyse the expression of proteins in tissue and serum samples of PTC patients with (PTCb; n = 6) and without a history of BTG (PTCa; n = 8) relative to patients with BTG (n = 20). This was followed by confirmation of the levels of proteins which showed significant altered abundances of more than two-fold difference (p < 0.01) in the tissue and serum samples of the same subjects using ELISA. Results The data of our study showed that PTCa and PTCb distinguish themselves from BTG in the types of