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Sample records for microdomains controlling carbohydrate-dependent

  1. Functional role of glycosphingolipids and gangliosides in control of cell adhesion, motility, and growth, through glycosynaptic microdomains.

    PubMed

    Regina Todeschini, Adriane; Hakomori, Sen-itiroh

    2008-03-01

    At cell surface microdomains, glycosyl epitopes, carried either by glycosphingolipids, N- or O-linked oligosaccharides, are recognized by carbohydrate-binding proteins or complementary carbohydrates. In both cases, the carbohydrate epitopes may be clustered with specific signal transducers, tetraspanins, adhesion receptors or growth factor receptors. Through this framework, carbohydrates can mediate cell signaling leading to changes in cellular phenotype. Microdomains involved in carbohydrate-dependent cell adhesion inducing cell activation, motility, and growth are termed "glycosynapse". In this review a historical synopsis of glycosphingolipids-enriched microdomains study leading to the concept of glycosynapse is presented. Examples of glycosynapse as signaling unit controlling the tumor cell phenotype are discussed in three contexts: (i) Cell-to-cell adhesion mediated by glycosphingolipids-to-glycosphingolipids interaction between interfacing glycosynaptic domains, through head-to-head (trans) carbohydrate-to-carbohydrate interaction. (ii) Functional role of GM3 complexed with tetraspanin CD9, and interaction of such complex with integrins, or with fibroblast growth factor receptor, to control tumor cell phenotype and its reversion to normal cell phenotype. (iii) Inhibition of integrin-dependent Met kinase activity by GM2/tetraspanin CD82 complex in glycosynaptic microdomain. Data present here suggest that the organizational status of glycosynapse strongly affects cellular phenotype influencing tumor cell malignancy.

  2. Lipid Microdomains in Cell Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Cascianelli, Giacomo; Villani, Maristella; Tosti, Marcello; Marini, Francesca; Bartoccini, Elisa; Viola Magni, Mariapia

    2008-01-01

    It is known that nuclear lipids play a role in proliferation, differentiation, and apoptotic process. Cellular nuclei contain high levels of phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin, which are partially linked with cholesterol and proteins to form lipid–protein complexes. These lipids are also associated with transcription factors and newly synthesized RNA but, up to date, their organization is still unknown. The aim of the present work was to study if these specific lipid–protein interactions could be nuclear membrane microdomains and to evaluate their possible role. The results obtained demonstrate for the first time the existence of nuclear microdomains characterized by a specific lipid composition similar to that of intranuclear lipid–protein complexes previously described. Nuclear microdomain lipid composition changes during cell proliferation when the content of newly synthesized RNA increases. Because previous data show a correlation between nuclear lipids and transcription process, the role of nuclear microdomains in cellular functions is discussed. PMID:18923143

  3. Spatio-temporal Remodeling of Functional Membrane Microdomains Organizes the Signaling Networks of a Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Johannes; Klein, Teresa; Mielich-Süss, Benjamin; Koch, Gudrun; Franke, Christian; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Kovács, Ákos T.; Sauer, Markus; Lopez, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Lipid rafts are membrane microdomains specialized in the regulation of numerous cellular processes related to membrane organization, as diverse as signal transduction, protein sorting, membrane trafficking or pathogen invasion. It has been proposed that this functional diversity would require a heterogeneous population of raft domains with varying compositions. However, a mechanism for such diversification is not known. We recently discovered that bacterial membranes organize their signal transduction pathways in functional membrane microdomains (FMMs) that are structurally and functionally similar to the eukaryotic lipid rafts. In this report, we took advantage of the tractability of the prokaryotic model Bacillus subtilis to provide evidence for the coexistence of two distinct families of FMMs in bacterial membranes, displaying a distinctive distribution of proteins specialized in different biological processes. One family of microdomains harbors the scaffolding flotillin protein FloA that selectively tethers proteins specialized in regulating cell envelope turnover and primary metabolism. A second population of microdomains containing the two scaffolding flotillins, FloA and FloT, arises exclusively at later stages of cell growth and specializes in adaptation of cells to stationary phase. Importantly, the diversification of membrane microdomains does not occur arbitrarily. We discovered that bacterial cells control the spatio-temporal remodeling of microdomains by restricting the activation of FloT expression to stationary phase. This regulation ensures a sequential assembly of functionally specialized membrane microdomains to strategically organize signaling networks at the right time during the lifespan of a bacterium. PMID:25909364

  4. Calcium release microdomains and mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Kohlhaas, Michael; Maack, Christoph

    2013-05-01

    The processes of excitation-contraction (EC) coupling consume large amounts of energy that need to be replenished by oxidative phosphorylation in the mitochondria. Since Ca(2+) activates key enzymes of the Krebs cycle in the mitochondrial matrix, it is important to understand the mechanisms and kinetics of mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake to delineate how in cardiac myocytes, energy supply is efficiently matched to demand. In recent years, the identification of various proteins involved in mitochondrial Ca(2+) signalling and the tethering of mitochondria to the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) has considerably advanced the field and supported the concept of a mitochondrial Ca(2+) microdomain, in which Ca(2+) concentrations are high enough to overcome the low Ca(2+) affinity of the principal mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake mechanism, the Ca(2+) uniporter. Furthermore, defects in EC coupling that occur in heart failure disrupt SR-mitochondrial Ca(2+) crosstalk and may cause energetic deficit and oxidative stress, both factors that are thought to be causally involved in the initiation and progression of the disease.

  5. Single-molecule tracking study of the permeability and transverse width of individual cylindrical microdomains in solvent-swollen polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene oxide) films

    SciTech Connect

    Sapkota, Dol Raj; Tran-Ba, Khanh-Hoa; Elwell-Cuddy, Trevor; Higgins, Daniel A.; Ito, Takashi

    2016-11-04

    Understanding the properties of solvent-swollen block copolymer (BCP) microdomains is important for better solvent-based control of microdomain morphology, orientation, and permeability. In this study, single-molecule tracking (SMT) was explored to assess the permeability and transverse width of individual cylindrical microdomains in solvent-swollen polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene oxide) (PS-b-PEO) films. PS-b-PEO films comprising shear-elongated cylindrical PEO microdomains were prepared by sandwiching its benzene or tetrahydrofuran (THF) solution between two glass substrates. In this paper, SMT measurements were performed at different drying times to investigate the effects of solvent evaporation on the microdomain properties. SMT data showed one-dimensional (1D) motions of single fluorescent molecules (sulforhodamine B) based on their diffusion within the cylindrical microdomains. Microdomain permeability and transverse width were assessed from the single-molecule diffusion coefficients (DSMT) and transverse variance of the 1D trajectories (σδ2), respectively. The DSMT and σδ2 values from individual 1D trajectories were widely distributed with no evidence of correlation on a single molecule basis, possibly because the individual microdomains in a film were swollen to different extents. On average, microdomain permeability (D) and effective radius (r) gradually decreased within the first 3 days of drying due to solvent evaporation, and changed negligibly thereafter. PS-b-PEO films prepared from THF solutions exhibited larger changes in D and r as compared with those from benzene solutions due to the better swelling of the PEO microdomains by THF. Importantly, changes in D were more prominent than those in r, suggesting that the permeability of the PEO microdomains is very susceptible to the presence of solvent. Finally, these results reveal the unique capability of SMT to assess the

  6. Single-molecule tracking study of the permeability and transverse width of individual cylindrical microdomains in solvent-swollen polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene oxide) films

    DOE PAGES

    Sapkota, Dol Raj; Tran-Ba, Khanh-Hoa; Elwell-Cuddy, Trevor; ...

    2016-11-04

    Understanding the properties of solvent-swollen block copolymer (BCP) microdomains is important for better solvent-based control of microdomain morphology, orientation, and permeability. In this study, single-molecule tracking (SMT) was explored to assess the permeability and transverse width of individual cylindrical microdomains in solvent-swollen polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene oxide) (PS-b-PEO) films. PS-b-PEO films comprising shear-elongated cylindrical PEO microdomains were prepared by sandwiching its benzene or tetrahydrofuran (THF) solution between two glass substrates. In this paper, SMT measurements were performed at different drying times to investigate the effects of solvent evaporation on the microdomain properties. SMT data showed one-dimensional (1D) motions of single fluorescent molecules (sulforhodaminemore » B) based on their diffusion within the cylindrical microdomains. Microdomain permeability and transverse width were assessed from the single-molecule diffusion coefficients (DSMT) and transverse variance of the 1D trajectories (σδ2), respectively. The DSMT and σδ2 values from individual 1D trajectories were widely distributed with no evidence of correlation on a single molecule basis, possibly because the individual microdomains in a film were swollen to different extents. On average, microdomain permeability (D) and effective radius (r) gradually decreased within the first 3 days of drying due to solvent evaporation, and changed negligibly thereafter. PS-b-PEO films prepared from THF solutions exhibited larger changes in D and r as compared with those from benzene solutions due to the better swelling of the PEO microdomains by THF. Importantly, changes in D were more prominent than those in r, suggesting that the permeability of the PEO microdomains is very susceptible to the presence of solvent. Finally, these results reveal the unique capability of SMT to assess the properties of individual cylindrical microdomains in a solvent

  7. Electron Propagation within Redox-Active Microdomains in Thin Films of Ferrocene-Containing Diblock Copolymers.

    PubMed

    Ghimire, Govinda; Yi, Yi; Derylo, Maksymilian A; Baker, Lane A; Ito, Takashi

    2015-11-10

    This paper reports the electrochemical behavior of redox-active microdomains in thin films of ferrocene-containing diblock copolymers, polystyrene-block-poly(2-(acryloyloxy)ethyl ferrocenecarboxylate) (PS-b-PAEFc). PS-b-PAEFc with different PAEFc volume fractions (PS154-b-PAEFc51, PS154-b-PAEFc26, and PS154-b-PAEFc12, where the subscripts represent the polymerization degree of each block; f(PAEFc) = 0.47, 0.30, and 0.17, respectively) was synthesized by sequential atom transfer radical polymerization. PS-b-PAEFc films of controlled thicknesses (20-160 nm) were prepared on gold substrates via spin-coating and characterized by ellipsometry. Microdomains were observed via atomic force microscopy on the surfaces of PS154-b-PAEFc51 and PS154-b-PAEFc26 thin films but not on the surfaces of PS154-b-PAEFc12 thin films. Electrochemical behavior of films was assessed by cyclic voltammetry and chronocoulometry in acetonitrile solution. The redox potential of ferrocene moieties was similar (ca. + 0.29 V vs Fc(+)/Fc) regardless of fPAEFc and film thickness. For PS154-b-PAEFc51 and PS154-b-PAEFc26, thicker films afforded larger faradaic peak currents and exhibited diffusion-controlled voltammograms at faster sweep rates. PS154-b-PAEFc26 produced voltammograms less influenced by solvent-induced swelling than PS154-b-PAEFc51, reflecting the improved morphological stability of PAEFc microdomains by redox-inert PS frameworks. In contrast, PS154-b-PAEFc12 films yielded similar faradaic peak currents regardless of film thickness and exhibited voltammograms indicative of surface-confined species. These observations suggest that PS154-b-PAEFc51 and PS154-b-PAEFc26 films contain continuous PAEFc microdomains extending from the electrode to the surface, in contrast to the PS154-b-PAEFc12 films which contain isolated PAEFc microdomains buried within the PS matrix. Electron propagation took place only through PAEFc microdomains that could electrically communicate with the underlying

  8. Mechanotransduction and Metabolism in Cardiomyocyte Microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Nesmith, Alexander P.; Horton, Renita E.; Sheehy, Sean P.; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2016-01-01

    Efficient contractions of the left ventricle are ensured by the continuous transfer of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) from energy production sites, the mitochondria, to energy utilization sites, such as ionic pumps and the force-generating sarcomeres. To minimize the impact of intracellular ATP trafficking, sarcomeres and mitochondria are closely packed together and in proximity with other ultrastructures involved in excitation-contraction coupling, such as t-tubules and sarcoplasmic reticulum junctions. This complex microdomain has been referred to as the intracellular energetic unit. Here, we review the literature in support of the notion that cardiac homeostasis and disease are emergent properties of the hierarchical organization of these units. Specifically, we will focus on pathological alterations of this microdomain that result in cardiac diseases through energy imbalance and posttranslational modifications of the cytoskeletal proteins involved in mechanosensing and transduction. PMID:28044126

  9. Dystrophic skeletal muscle fibers display alterations at the level of calcium microdomains

    PubMed Central

    DiFranco, Marino; Woods, Christopher E.; Capote, Joana; Vergara, Julio L.

    2008-01-01

    The spatiotemporal properties of the Ca2+-release process in skeletal muscle fibers from normal and mdx fibers were determined using the confocal-spot detection technique. The Ca2+ indicator OGB-5N was used to record action potential-evoked fluorescence signals at consecutive locations separated by 200 nm along multiple sarcomeres of FDB fibers loaded with 10- and 30-mM EGTA. Three-dimensional reconstructions of fluorescence transients demonstrated the existence of microdomains of increased fluorescence around the Ca2+-release sites in both mouse strains. The Ca2+ microdomains in mdx fibers were regularly spaced along the fiber axis, displaying a distribution similar to that seen in normal fibers. Nevertheless, both preparations differed in that in 10-mM EGTA Ca2+ microdomains had smaller amplitudes and were wider in mdx fibers than in controls. In addition, Ca2+-dependent fluorescence transients recorded at selected locations within the sarcomere of mdx muscle fibers were not only smaller, but also slower than their counterparts in normal fibers. Notably, differences in the spatial features of the Ca2+ microdomains recorded in mdx and normal fibers, but not in the amplitude and kinetics of the Ca2+ transients, were eliminated in 30-mM EGTA. Our results consistently demonstrate that Ca2+-release flux calculated from release sites in mdx fibers is uniformly impaired with respect to those normal fibers. The Ca2+-release reduction is consistent with that previously measured using global detection techniques. PMID:18787128

  10. Identification of mRNA splicing factors as the endothelial receptor for carbohydrate-dependent lung colonization of cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Hatakeyama, Shingo; Sugihara, Kazuhiro; Nakayama, Jun; Akama, Tomoya O.; Wong, Shuk-Man Annie; Kawashima, Hiroto; Zhang, Jianing; Smith, David F.; Ohyama, Chikara; Fukuda, Minoru; Fukuda, Michiko N.

    2009-01-01

    Cell surfaces of epithelial cancer are covered by complex carbohydrates, whose structures function in malignancy and metastasis. However, the mechanism underlying carbohydrate-dependent cancer metastasis has not been defined. Previously, we identified a carbohydrate-mimicry peptide designated I-peptide, which inhibits carbohydrate-dependent lung colonization of sialyl Lewis X-expressing B16-FTIII-M cells in E/P-selectin doubly-deficient mice. We hypothesized that lung endothelial cells express an unknown carbohydrate receptor, designated as I-peptide receptor (IPR), responsible for lung colonization of B16-FTIII-M cells. Here, we visualized IPR by in vivo biotinylation, which revealed that the major IPR is a group of 35-kDa proteins. IPR proteins isolated by I-peptide affinity chromatography were identified by proteomics as Ser/Arg-rich alternative pre-mRNA splicing factors or Sfrs1, Sfrs2, Sfrs5, and Sfrs7 gene products. Bacterially expressed Sfrs1 protein bound to B16-FTIII-M cells but not to parental B16 cells. Recombinant Sfrs1 protein bound to a series of fucosylated oligosaccharides in glycan array and plate-binding assays. When anti-Sfrs antibodies were injected intravenously into mice, antibodies labeled a subset of lung capillaries. Anti-Sfrs antibodies inhibited homing of I-peptide-displaying phage to the lung colonization of B16-FTIII-M cells in vivo in the mouse. These results strongly suggest that Sfrs proteins are responsible for fucosylated carbohydrate-dependent lung metastasis of epithelial cancers. PMID:19218444

  11. Dynein Clusters into Lipid Microdomains on Phagosomes to Drive Rapid Transport toward Lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Ashim; Pathak, Divya; Thakur, Shreyasi; Singh, Shampa; Dubey, Alok Kumar; Mallik, Roop

    2016-01-01

    Summary Diverse cellular processes are driven by motor proteins that are recruited to and generate force on lipid membranes. Surprisingly little is known about how membranes control the force from motors and how this may impact specific cellular functions. Here, we show that dynein motors physically cluster into microdomains on the membrane of a phagosome as it matures inside cells. Such geometrical reorganization allows many dyneins within a cluster to generate cooperative force on a single microtubule. This results in rapid directed transport of the phagosome toward microtubule minus ends, likely promoting phagolysosome fusion and pathogen degradation. We show that lipophosphoglycan, the major molecule implicated in immune evasion of Leishmania donovani, inhibits phagosome motion by disrupting the clustering and therefore the cooperative force generation of dynein. These findings appear relevant to several pathogens that prevent phagosome-lysosome fusion by targeting lipid microdomains on phagosomes. PMID:26853472

  12. Lck, Membrane Microdomains, and TCR Triggering Machinery: Defining the New Rules of Engagement

    PubMed Central

    Filipp, Dominik; Ballek, Ondrej; Manning, Jasper

    2012-01-01

    In spite of a comprehensive understanding of the schematics of T cell receptor (TCR) signaling, the mechanisms regulating compartmentalization of signaling molecules, their transient interactions, and rearrangement of membrane structures initiated upon TCR engagement remain an outstanding problem. These gaps in our knowledge are exemplified by recent data demonstrating that TCR triggering is largely dependent on a preactivated pool of Lck concentrated in T cells in a specific type of membrane microdomains. Our current model posits that in resting T cells all critical components of TCR triggering machinery including TCR/CD3, Lck, Fyn, CD45, PAG, and LAT are associated with distinct types of lipid-based microdomains which represent the smallest structural and functional units of membrane confinement able to negatively control enzymatic activities and substrate availability that is required for the initiation of TCR signaling. In addition, the microdomains based segregation spatially limits the interaction of components of TCR triggering machinery prior to the onset of TCR signaling and allows their rapid communication and signal amplification after TCR engagement, via the process of their coalescence. Microdomains mediated compartmentalization thus represents an essential membrane organizing principle in resting T cells. The integration of these structural and functional aspects of signaling into a unified model of TCR triggering will require a deeper understanding of membrane biology, novel interdisciplinary approaches and the generation of specific reagents. We believe that the fully integrated model of TCR signaling must be based on membrane structural network which provides a proper environment for regulatory processes controlling TCR triggering. PMID:22701458

  13. The ER/PM microdomain, PI(4,5)P2 and the regulation of STIM1-Orai1 channel function

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xu; Choi, Seok; Maléth, Jozsef J.; Park, Seonghee; Ahuja, Malini; Muallem, Shmuel

    2015-01-01

    All forms of cell signaling occur in discreet cellular microdomains in which the ER is the main participant and include microdomains formed by the ER with lysosomes, endosomes, the nucleus, mitochondria and the plasma membrane. In the microdomains the two opposing organelles transfer and exchange constituents including lipids and ions. As is the case for other forms of signaling pathways, many components of the receptor-evoked Ca2+ signal are clustered at the ER/PM microdomain, including the Orai1-STIM1 complex. This review discusses recent advances in understanding the molecular components that tether the ER and plasma membrane to form the ER/PM microdomains in which PI(4,5)P2 is enriched, and how dynamic targeting of the Orai1-STIM1 complex to PI(4,5)P2-poor and PI(4,5)P2-rich microdomains controls the activity of Orai1 and its regulation by Ca2+ that is mediated by SARAF. PMID:25843208

  14. Carbohydrate-dependent binding of langerin to SodC, a cell wall glycoprotein of Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Jin; Brennan, Patrick J; Heaslip, Darragh; Udey, Mark C; Modlin, Robert L; Belisle, John T

    2015-02-01

    Langerhans cells participate in the immune response in leprosy by their ability to activate T cells that recognize the pathogen, Mycobacterium leprae, in a langerin-dependent manner. We hypothesized that langerin, the distinguishing C-type lectin of Langerhans cells, would recognize the highly mannosylated structures in pathogenic Mycobacterium spp. The coding region for the extracellular and neck domain of human langerin was cloned and expressed to produce a recombinant active trimeric form of human langerin (r-langerin). Binding assays performed in microtiter plates, by two-dimensional (2D) Western blotting, and by surface plasmon resonance demonstrated that r-langerin possessed carbohydrate-dependent affinity to glycoproteins in the cell wall of M. leprae. This lectin, however, yielded less binding to mannose-capped lipoarabinomannan (ManLAM) and even lower levels of binding to phosphatidylinositol mannosides. However, the superoxide dismutase C (SodC) protein of the M. leprae cell wall was identified as a langerin-reactive ligand. Tandem mass spectrometry verified the glycosylation of a recombinant form of M. leprae SodC (rSodC) produced in Mycobacterium smegmatis. Analysis of r-langerin affinity by surface plasmon resonance revealed a carbohydrate-dependent affinity of rSodC (equilibrium dissociation constant [KD] = 0.862 μM) that was 20-fold greater than for M. leprae ManLAM (KD = 18.69 μM). These data strongly suggest that a subset of the presumptively mannosylated M. leprae glycoproteins act as ligands for langerin and may facilitate the interaction of M. leprae with Langerhans cells.

  15. Endothelial tetraspanin microdomains regulate leukocyte firm adhesion during extravasation.

    PubMed

    Barreiro, Olga; Yáñez-Mó, María; Sala-Valdés, Mónica; Gutiérrez-López, María Dolores; Ovalle, Susana; Higginbottom, Adrian; Monk, Peter N; Cabañas, Carlos; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2005-04-01

    Tetraspanins associate with several transmembrane proteins forming microdomains involved in intercellular adhesion and migration. Here, we show that endothelial tetraspanins relocalize to the contact site with transmigrating leukocytes and associate laterally with both intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). Alteration of endothelial tetraspanin microdomains by CD9-large extracellular loop (LEL)-glutathione S-transferase (GST) peptides or CD9/CD151 siRNA oligonucleotides interfered with ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 function, preventing lymphocyte transendothelial migration and increasing lymphocyte detachment under shear flow. Heterotypic intercellular adhesion mediated by VCAM-1 or ICAM-1 was augmented when expressed exogenously in the appropriate tetraspanin environment. Therefore, tetraspanin microdomains have a crucial role in the proper adhesive function of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 during leukocyte adhesion and transendothelial migration.

  16. Lipid rafts/caveolae as microdomains of calcium signaling

    PubMed Central

    Pani, Biswaranjan; Singh, Brij B

    2009-01-01

    Summary Ca2+ is a major signaling molecule in both excitable and non-excitable cells, where it serves critical functions ranging from cell growth to differentiation to cell death. The physiological functions of these cells are tightly regulated in response to changes in cytosolic Ca2+ that is achieved by the activation of several plasma membrane (PM) Ca2+ channels as well as release of Ca2+ from the internal stores. One such channel is referred to as store-operated Ca2+ channel that is activated by the release of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+ which initiates store operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE). Recent advances in the field suggest that some members of TRPCs and Orai channels function as SOCE channels. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate channel activity and the exact nature of where these channels are assembled and regulated remain elusive. Research from several laboratories has demonstrated that key proteins involved in Ca2+ signaling are localized in discrete PM lipid rafts/caveolar microdomains. Lipid rafts are cholesterol and sphingolipid enriched microdomains that function as unique signal transduction platforms. In addition lipid rafts are dynamic in nature which tends to scaffold certain signaling molecules while excluding others. By such spatial segregation, lipid rafts not only provide a favorable environment for intra-molecular cross talk but also aid to expedite the signal relay. Importantly, Ca2+ signaling is shown to initiate from these lipid raft microdomains. Clustering of Ca2+ channels and their regulators in such microdomains can provide an exquisite spatiotemporal regulation of Ca2+ mediated cellular function. Thus in this review we discuss PM lipid rafts and caveolae as Ca2+ signaling microdomains and highlight their importance in organizing and regulating SOCE channels. PMID:19324409

  17. Unraveling the role of membrane microdomains during microbial infections.

    PubMed

    Bagam, Prathyusha; Singh, Dhirendra P; Inda, Maria Eugenia; Batra, Sanjay

    2017-03-09

    Infectious diseases pose major socioeconomic and health-related threats to millions of people across the globe. Strategies to combat infectious diseases derive from our understanding of the complex interactions between the host and specific bacterial, viral, and fungal pathogens. Lipid rafts are membrane microdomains that play important role in life cycle of microbes. Interaction of microbial pathogens with host membrane rafts influences not only their initial colonization but also their spread and the induction of inflammation. Therefore, intervention strategies aimed at modulating the assembly of membrane rafts and/or regulating raft-directed signaling pathways are attractive approaches for the. management of infectious diseases. The current review discusses the latest advances in terms of techniques used to study the role of membrane microdomains in various pathological conditions and provides updated information regarding the role of membrane rafts during bacterial, viral and fungal infections.

  18. Spatiotemporal Analysis of Differential Akt Regulation in Plasma Membrane Microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xinxin

    2008-01-01

    As a central kinase in the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway, Akt has been the subject of extensive research; yet, spatiotemporal regulation of Akt in different membrane microdomains remains largely unknown. To examine dynamic Akt activity in membrane microdomains in living cells, we developed a specific and sensitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based Akt activity reporter, AktAR, through systematic testing of different substrates and fluorescent proteins. Targeted AktAR reported higher Akt activity with faster activation kinetics within lipid rafts compared with nonraft regions of plasma membrane. Disruption of rafts attenuated platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-stimulated Akt activity in rafts without affecting that in nonraft regions. However, in insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF)-1 stimulation, Akt signaling in nonraft regions is dependent on that in raft regions. As a result, cholesterol depletion diminishes Akt activity in both regions. Thus, Akt activities are differentially regulated in different membrane microdomains, and the overall activity of this oncogenic pathway is dependent on raft function. Given the increased abundance of lipid rafts in some cancer cells, the distinct Akt-activating characteristics of PDGF and IGF-1, in terms of both effectiveness and raft dependence, demonstrate the capabilities of different growth factor signaling pathways to transduce differential oncogenic signals across plasma membrane. PMID:18701703

  19. Tonoplast of Beta vulgaris L. contains detergent-resistant membrane microdomains.

    PubMed

    Ozolina, Natalia V; Nesterkina, Irina S; Kolesnikova, Ekaterina V; Salyaev, Ryurik K; Nurminsky, Vadim N; Rakevich, Alexander L; Martynovich, Evgueni F; Chernyshov, Michael Yu

    2013-03-01

    The experiments conducted on tonoplast of Beta vulgaris L. roots were performed to identify detergent-resistant lipid-protein microdomains (DRMs, interpreted as lipid rafts).The presence of DRMs can be found when dynamic clustering of sphingolipids, sterols, saturated fatty acids is registered, and the insolubility of these microdomains in nonionic detergents at low temperatures is proven. The elucidation of tonoplast microdomains has been based on results obtained with the aid of high-speed centrifuging in the sucrose gradient. The experiments have shown that tonoplast microdomains are rich in sphingolipids, free sterols and saturated fatty acids (such a lipid content is also typical of lipid-protein microdomains of other membranes), while only few phospholipids are present in tonoplast microdomains. The presence of microdomains has been confirmed by fluorescence and confocal microscopy using filipin and Laurdan as fluorescent probes. The experiments with Laurdan have shown that tonoplast microdomains are characterized by a high order compared to characteristics of the rest of the tonoplast. Thus, the presence of detergent-resistant lipid-protein microdomains in the tonoplast has been demonstrated.

  20. Glutamate Receptor Dynamics in Dendritic Microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Newpher, Thomas M.; Ehlers, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    Among diverse factors regulating excitatory synaptic transmission, the abundance of postsynaptic glutamate receptors figures prominently in molecular memory and learning-related synaptic plasticity. To allow for both long-term maintenance of synaptic transmission and acute changes in synaptic strength, the relative rates of glutamate receptor insertion and removal must be tightly regulated. Interactions with scaffolding proteins control the targeting and signaling properties of glutamate receptors within the postsynaptic membrane. In addition, extrasynaptic receptor populations control the equilibrium of receptor exchange at synapses and activate distinct signaling pathways involved in plasticity. Here, we review recent findings that have shaped our current understanding of receptor mobility between synaptic and extrasynaptic compartments at glutamatergic synapses, focusing on AMPA and NMDA receptors. We also examine the cooperative relationship between intracellular trafficking and surface diffusion of glutamate receptors that underlies the expression of learning-related synaptic plasticity. PMID:18498731

  1. White matter rafting--membrane microdomains in myelin.

    PubMed

    Debruin, Lillian S; Harauz, George

    2007-02-01

    The myelin membrane comprises a plethora of regions that are compositionally, ultrastructurally, and functionally distinct. Biochemical dissection of oligodendrocytes, Schwann cells, and central and peripheral nervous system myelin by means such as cold-detergent extraction and differential fractionation has led to the identification of a variety of detergent-resistant membrane assemblies, some of which represent putative signalling platforms. We review here the different microdomains that have hitherto been identified in the myelin membrane, particularly lipid rafts, caveolae, and cellular junctions such as the tight junctions that are found in the radial component of the CNS myelin sheath.

  2. Review: Placental syncytiotrophoblast membranes--domains, subdomains and microdomains.

    PubMed

    Riquelme, G

    2011-03-01

    Human placental syncytiotrophoblast (STB) is an epithelium responsible for materno-fetal exchange. Ions play multiple roles in STB, as in other transport epithelia. We have been interested in the character and functional expression of ion channels in STB membrane fractions. Characterization of ion channels and their relationship with different domains, subdomains and microdomains of STB membranes is important to explain the intracellular mechanisms operating in the placental barrier. The aim of this paper is to summarize our work on this subject. We isolated and purified basal membrane (BM) and two fractions from the apical membrane, a classical fraction (MVM) and a light fraction (LMVM). They were used either for reconstitution into giant liposomes or for transplantation into Xenopus oocyte membranes followed by electrophysiological recordings to characterize chloride and cationic channels in STB from term human placenta. In addition, Western blot analysis, using ion channel antibodies, was performed on purified apical and basal membrane fractions. We also reported the presence of two functional microdomains (lipid rafts) in LMVM and MVM, using detergent resistant membranes (DRMs) and cholesterol-sensitive depletion. Moreover we found evidence of cytoskeletal participation in lipid rafts of different composition. Our results contribute to knowledge of the ion channels present in STB membranes and their participation in the physiology of this epithelium in normal and pathological pregnancies.

  3. Regulation of Ras signaling and function by plasma membrane microdomains.

    PubMed

    Goldfinger, Lawrence E; Michael, James V

    2017-02-07

    Together H-, N- and KRAS mutations are major contributors to ~30% of all human cancers. Thus, Ras inhibition remains an important anti-cancer strategy. The molecular mechanisms of isotypic Ras oncogenesis are still not completely understood. Monopharmacological therapeutics have not been successful in the clinic. These disappointing outcomes have led to attempts to target elements downstream of Ras, mainly targeting either the Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3K) or Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) pathways. While several such approaches are moderately effective, recent efforts have focused on preclinical evaluation of combination therapies to improve efficacies. This review will detail current understanding of the contributions of plasma membrane microdomain targeting of Ras to mitogenic and tumorigenic signaling and tumor progression. Moreover, this review will outline novel approaches to target Ras in cancers, including targeting schemes for new drug development, as well as putative re-purposing of drugs in current use to take advantage of blunting Ras signaling by interfering with Ras plasma membrane microdomain targeting and retention.

  4. Correlative infrared nanospectroscopic and nanomechanical imaging of block copolymer microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Intermolecular interactions and nanoscale phase separation govern the properties of many molecular soft-matter systems. Here, we combine infrared vibrational scattering scanning near-field optical microscopy (IR s-SNOM) with force–distance spectroscopy for simultaneous characterization of both nanoscale optical and nanomechanical molecular properties through hybrid imaging. The resulting multichannel images and correlative analysis of chemical composition, spectral IR line shape, modulus, adhesion, deformation, and dissipation acquired for a thin film of a nanophase separated block copolymer (PS-b-PMMA) reveal complex structural variations, in particular at domain interfaces, not resolved in any individual signal channel alone. These variations suggest that regions of multicomponent chemical composition, such as the interfacial mixing regions between microdomains, are correlated with high spatial heterogeneity in nanoscale material properties. PMID:27335750

  5. A theoretical study of calcium microdomains in turtle hair cells.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Y C; Tucker, T; Fettiplace, R

    1996-01-01

    Confocal imaging has revealed microdomains of intracellular free Ca2+ in turtle hair cells evoked by depolarizing pulses and has delineated factors affecting the growth and dissipation of such domains. However, imaging experiments have limited spatial and temporal resolution. To extend the range of the results we have developed a three-dimensional model of Ca2+ diffusion in a cylindrical hair cell, allowing part of the Ca2+ influx to occur over a small circular region (radius 0.125-1.0 micron) representing a high-density array of voltage-dependent channels. The model incorporated experimental information about the number of channels, the fixed and mobile Ca2+ buffers, and the Ca2+ extrusion mechanism. A feature of the calculations was the use of a variable grid size depending on the proximity to the Ca2+ channel cluster. The results agreed qualitatively with experimental data on the localization of the Ca2+ transients, although the experimental responses were smaller and slower, which is most likely due to temporal and spatial averaging in the imaging. The model made predictions about 1) the optimal Ca2+ channel number and density within a cluster, 2) the conditions to ensure independence of neighboring clusters, and 3) the influence of the Ca2+ buffers on the kinetics and localization of the microdomains. We suggest that an increase in the mobile Ca2+ buffer concentration in high-frequency hair cells (which possess a larger number of release sites) would allow lower amplitude and faster Ca2+ responses and promote functional independence of the sites. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 PMID:8913569

  6. Occurrence of a bacterial membrane microdomain at the cell division site enriched in phospholipids with polyunsaturated hydrocarbon chains.

    PubMed

    Sato, Sho; Kawamoto, Jun; Sato, Satoshi B; Watanabe, Bunta; Hiratake, Jun; Esaki, Nobuyoshi; Kurihara, Tatsuo

    2012-07-13

    In this study, we found that phospholipids containing an eicosapentaenyl group form a novel membrane microdomain at the cell division site of a Gram-negative bacterium, Shewanella livingstonensis Ac10, using chemically synthesized fluorescent probes. The occurrence of membrane microdomains in eukaryotes and prokaryotes has been demonstrated with various imaging tools for phospholipids with different polar headgroups. However, few studies have focused on the hydrocarbon chain-dependent localization of membrane-resident phospholipids in vivo. We previously found that lack of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), a polyunsaturated fatty acid found at the sn-2 position of glycerophospholipids, causes a defect in cell division after DNA replication of S. livingstonensis Ac10. Here, we synthesized phospholipid probes labeled with a fluorescent 7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl (NBD) group to study the localization of EPA-containing phospholipids by fluorescence microscopy. A fluorescent probe in which EPA was bound to the glycerol backbone via an ester bond was found to be unsuitable for imaging because EPA was released from the probe by in vivo hydrolysis. To overcome this problem, we synthesized hydrolysis-resistant ether-type phospholipid probes. Using these probes, we found that the fluorescence localized between two nucleoids at the cell center during cell division when the cells were grown in the presence of the eicosapentaenyl group-containing probe (N-NBD-1-oleoyl-2-eicosapentaenyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine), whereas this localization was not observed with the oleyl group-containing control probe (N-NBD-1-oleoyl-2-oleyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine). Thus, phospholipids containing an eicosapentaenyl group are specifically enriched at the cell division site. Formation of a membrane microdomain enriched in EPA-containing phospholipids at the nucleoid occlusion site probably facilitates cell division.

  7. Detection of cholesterol-rich microdomains in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Masami; Shimada, Yukiko; Inomata, Mitsushi; Ohno-Iwashita, Yoshiko . E-mail: iwashita@tmig.or.jp

    2006-12-22

    The C-terminal domain (D4) of perfringolysin O binds selectively to cholesterol in cholesterol-rich microdomains. To address the issue of whether cholesterol-rich microdomains exist in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane, we expressed D4 as a fusion protein with EGFP in MEF cells. More than half of the EGFP-D4 expressed in stable cell clones was bound to membranes in raft fractions. Depletion of membrane cholesterol with {beta}-cyclodextrin reduced the amount of EGFP-D4 localized in raft fractions, confirming EGFP-D4 binding to cholesterol-rich microdomains. Subfractionation of the raft fractions showed most of the EGFP-D4 bound to the plasma membrane rather than to intracellular membranes. Taken together, these results strongly suggest the existence of cholesterol-rich microdomains in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane.

  8. Increased Gsα within Blood Cell Membrane Lipid Microdomains in Some Depressive Disorders: An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, John J.; Samson, Jacqueline A.; McHale, Nancy L.; Pappalarado, Kathleen M.; Alpert, Jonathan E.; Schildkraut, Joseph J.

    2013-01-01

    The stimulatory guanine nucleotide binding protein Gs couples many cellular receptors to adenylate cyclase, and the Gsα subunit activates all 9 isoforms of the adenylate cyclase catalytic unit to produce the enzyme product cyclicAMP or cAMP. In prefrontal cortex and cerebellum of unipolar depressive suicides, Rasenick and colleagues have found increased concentrations of Gsα in membrane lipid microdomains (Donati et al, 2008), where the ensconced Gsα is less likely to activate adenylate cyclase by receptor and postreceptor pathways (Allen et al, 2005 & 2009). We report that a group of 7 depressed patients (DP-1) had (1) reduced activation of platelet receptor-stimulated adenylate cyclase by both prostaglandins E2 and D2 compared to controls, and (2) reduced postreceptor stimulation of adenylate cyclase by aluminum fluoride ion in both platelets and mononuclear leukocytes when compared to both another group of depressed patients (DP-2, n=17) and to controls (n=21). Our observations in the blood cells of the group DP-1 support the findings of Donati et al (2008), and they reflect the importance of this interaction between the activated Gsα subunit and membrane lipid microdomains in the pathophysiology and treatment of some major depressive disorders. PMID:23490066

  9. Molecular microdomains in a sensory terminal, the vestibular calyx ending.

    PubMed

    Lysakowski, Anna; Gaboyard-Niay, Sophie; Calin-Jageman, Irina; Chatlani, Shilpa; Price, Steven D; Eatock, Ruth Anne

    2011-07-06

    Many primary vestibular afferents form large cup-shaped postsynaptic terminals (calyces) that envelope the basolateral surfaces of type I hair cells. The calyceal terminals both respond to glutamate released from ribbon synapses in the type I cells and initiate spikes that propagate to the afferent's central terminals in the brainstem. The combination of synaptic and spike initiation functions in these unique sensory endings distinguishes them from the axonal nodes of central neurons and peripheral nerves, such as the sciatic nerve, which have provided most of our information about nodal specializations. We show that rat vestibular calyces express an unusual mix of voltage-gated Na and K channels and scaffolding, cell adhesion, and extracellular matrix proteins, which may hold the ion channels in place. Protein expression patterns form several microdomains within the calyx membrane: a synaptic domain facing the hair cell, the heminode abutting the first myelinated internode, and one or two intermediate domains. Differences in the expression and localization of proteins between afferent types and zones may contribute to known variations in afferent physiology.

  10. Molecular microdomains in a sensory terminal, the vestibular calyx ending

    PubMed Central

    Lysakowski, Anna; Gaboyard-Niay, Sophie; Calin-Jageman, Irina; Chatlani, Shilpa; Price, Steven D.; Eatock, Ruth Anne

    2011-01-01

    Many primary vestibular afferents form large cup-shaped postsynaptic terminals (calyces) that envelope the basolateral surfaces of type I hair cells. The calyceal terminals both respond to glutamate released from ribbon synapses in the type I cells and initiate spikes that propagate to the afferent’s central terminals in the brainstem. The combination of synaptic and spike initiation functions in these unique sensory endings distinguishes them from the axonal nodes of central neurons and peripheral nerves, such as the sciatic nerve, which have provided most of our information about nodal specializations. We show that rat vestibular calyces express an unusual mix of voltage-gated Na and K channels and scaffolding, cell adhesion, and extracellular matrix proteins, which may hold the ion channels in place. Protein expression patterns form several microdomains within the calyx membrane: a synaptic domain facing the hair cell, the heminode abutting the first myelinated internode, and one or two intermediate domains. Differences in the expression and localization of proteins between afferent types and zones may contribute to known variations in afferent physiology. PMID:21734302

  11. GSK3β regulates oligodendrogenesis in the dorsal microdomain of the subventricular zone via Wnt-β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Azim, Kasum; Rivera, Andrea; Raineteau, Olivier; Butt, Arthur M

    2014-05-01

    Oligodendrocytes, the myelinating cells of the CNS, are derived postnatally from oligodendrocyte precursors (OPs) of the subventricular zone (SVZ). However, the mechanisms that regulate their generation from SVZ neural stem cells (NSC) are poorly understood. Here, we have examined the role of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β), an effector of multiple converging signaling pathways in postnatal mice. The expression of GSK3β by rt-qPCR was most prominent in the SVZ and in the developing white matter, around the first 1–2 weeks of postnatal life, coinciding with the peak periods of OP differentiation. Intraventricular infusion of the GSK3β inhibitor ARA-014418 in mice aged postnatal day (P) 8–11 significantly increased generation of OPs in the dorsal microdomain of the SVZ, as shown by expression of cell specific markers using rt-qPCR and immunolabelling. Analysis of stage specific markers revealed that the augmentation of OPs occurred via increased specification from earlier SVZ cell types. These effects of GSK3β inhibition on the dorsal SVZ were largely attributable to stimulation of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway over other pathways. The results indicate GSK3β is a key endogenous factor for specifically regulating oligodendrogenesis from the dorsal SVZ microdomain under the control of Wnt-signaling.

  12. Proteomic analysis of membrane microdomains derived from both failing and non-failing human hearts.

    PubMed

    Banfi, Cristina; Brioschi, Maura; Wait, Robin; Begum, Shajna; Gianazza, Elisabetta; Fratto, Pasquale; Polvani, Gianluca; Vitali, Ettore; Parolari, Alessandro; Mussoni, Luciana; Tremoli, Elena

    2006-03-01

    Eukaryotic cells plasma membranes are organized into microdomains of specialized function such as lipid rafts and caveolae, with a specific lipid composition highly enriched in cholesterol and glycosphingolipids. In addition to their role in regulating signal transduction, multiple functions have been proposed, such as anchorage of receptors, trafficking of cholesterol, and regulation of permeability. However, an extensive understanding of their protein composition in human heart, both in failing and non-failing conditions, is not yet available. Membrane microdomains were isolated from left ventricular tissue of both failing (n = 15) and non-failing (n = 15) human hearts. Protein composition and differential protein expression was explored by comparing series of 2-D maps and subsequent identification by LC-MS/MS analysis. Data indicated that heart membrane microdomains are enriched in chaperones, cytoskeletal-associated proteins, enzymes and protein involved in signal transduction pathway. In addition, differential protein expression profile revealed that 30 proteins were specifically up- or down-regulated in human heart failure membrane microdomains. This study resulted in the identification of human heart membrane microdomain protein composition, which was not previously available. Moreover, it allowed the identification of multiple proteins whose expression is altered in heart failure, thus opening new perspectives to determine which role they may play in this disease.

  13. Adaptive ferroelectric states in systems with low domain wall energy: Tetragonal microdomains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Y. M.; Wang, Y. U.; Khachaturyan, A. G.; Li, J. F.; Viehland, D.

    2003-09-01

    Ferroelectric and ferroelastic phases with very low domain wall energies have been shown to form miniaturized microdomain structures. A theory of an adaptive ferroelectric phase has been developed to predict the microdomain-averaged crystal lattice parameters of this structurally inhomogeneous state. The theory is an extension of conventional martensite theory, applied to ferroelectric systems with very low domain wall energies. The case of ferroelectric microdomains of tetragonal symmetry is considered. It is shown for such a case that a nanoscale coherent mixture of microdomains can be interpreted as an adaptive ferroelectric phase, whose microdomain-averaged crystal lattice is monoclinic. The crystal lattice parameters of this monoclinic phase are self-adjusting parameters, which minimize the transformation stress. Self-adjustment is achieved by application of the invariant plane strain to the parent cubic lattice, and the value of the self-adjusted parameters is a linear superposition of the lattice constants of the parent and product phases. Experimental investigations of Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-PbTiO3 and Pb(Zn1/3Nb2/3)O3-PbTiO3 single crystals confirm many of the predictions of this theory.

  14. Regulation of Cellular Communication by Signaling Microdomains in the Blood Vessel Wall

    PubMed Central

    Billaud, Marie; Lohman, Alexander W.; Johnstone, Scott R.; Biwer, Lauren A.; Mutchler, Stephanie; Isakson, Brant E.

    2014-01-01

    It has become increasingly clear that the accumulation of proteins in specific regions of the plasma membrane can facilitate cellular communication. These regions, termed signaling microdomains, are found throughout the blood vessel wall where cellular communication, both within and between cell types, must be tightly regulated to maintain proper vascular function. We will define a cellular signaling microdomain and apply this definition to the plethora of means by which cellular communication has been hypothesized to occur in the blood vessel wall. To that end, we make a case for three broad areas of cellular communication where signaling microdomains could play an important role: 1) paracrine release of free radicals and gaseous molecules such as nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species; 2) role of ion channels including gap junctions and potassium channels, especially those associated with the endothelium-derived hyperpolarization mediated signaling, and lastly, 3) mechanism of exocytosis that has considerable oversight by signaling microdomains, especially those associated with the release of von Willebrand factor. When summed, we believe that it is clear that the organization and regulation of signaling microdomains is an essential component to vessel wall function. PMID:24671377

  15. Dynamic and coordinated single-molecular interactions at TM4SF5-enriched microdomains guide invasive behaviors in 2- and 3-dimensional environments.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Jin; Kwon, Sojung; Nam, Seo Hee; Jung, Jae Woo; Kang, Minkyung; Ryu, Jihye; Kim, Ji Eon; Cheong, Jin-Gyu; Cho, Chang Yun; Kim, Somi; Song, Dae-Geun; Kim, Yong-Nyun; Kim, Tai Young; Jung, Min-Kyo; Lee, Kyung-Min; Pack, Chan-Gi; Lee, Jung Weon

    2017-04-01

    Membrane proteins sense extracellular cues and transduce intracellular signaling to coordinate directionality and speed during cellular migration. They are often localized to specific regions, as with lipid rafts or tetraspanin-enriched microdomains; however, the dynamic interactions of tetraspanins with diverse receptors within tetraspanin-enriched microdomains on cellular surfaces remain largely unexplored. Here, we investigated effects of tetraspan(in) TM4SF5 (transmembrane 4 L6 family member 5)-enriched microdomains (T5ERMs) on the directionality of cell migration. Physical association of TM4SF5 with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and integrin α5 was visualized by live fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy and higher-resolution microscopy at the leading edge of migratory cells, presumably forming TM4SF5-enriched microdomains. Whereas TM4SF5 and EGFR colocalized at the migrating leading region more than at the rear, TM4SF5 and integrin α5 colocalized evenly throughout cells. Cholesterol depletion and disruption in TM4SF5 post-translational modifications, including N-glycosylation and palmitoylation, altered TM4SF5 interactions and cellular localization, which led to less cellular migration speed and directionality in 2- or 3-dimensional conditions. TM4SF5 controlled directional cell migration and invasion, and importantly, these TM4SF5 functions were dependent on cholesterol, TM4SF5 post-translational modifications, and EGFR and integrin α5 activity. Altogether, we showed that TM4SF5 dynamically interacted with EGFR and integrin α5 in migratory cells to control directionality and invasion.-Kim, H.-J., Kwon, S., Nam, S. H., Jung, J. W., Kang, M., Ryu, J., Kim, J. E., Cheong, J.-G., Cho, C. Y., Kim, S., Song, D.-G., Kim, Y.-N., Kim, T. Y., Jung, M.-K., Lee, K.-M., Pack, C.-G., Lee, J. W. Dynamic and coordinated single-molecular interactions at TM4SF5-enriched microdomains guide invasive behaviors in 2- and 3-dimensional environments.

  16. FRET-Based Nanobiosensors for Imaging Intracellular Ca2+ and H+ Microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Zamaleeva, Alsu I.; Despras, Guillaume; Luccardini, Camilla; Collot, Mayeul; de Waard, Michel; Oheim, Martin; Mallet, Jean-Maurice; Feltz, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) or quantum dots (QDs) are luminous point emitters increasingly being used to tag and track biomolecules in biological/biomedical imaging. However, their intracellular use as highlighters of single-molecule localization and nanobiosensors reporting ion microdomains changes has remained a major challenge. Here, we report the design, generation and validation of FRET-based nanobiosensors for detection of intracellular Ca2+ and H+ transients. Our sensors combine a commercially available CANdot®565QD as an energy donor with, as an acceptor, our custom-synthesized red-emitting Ca2+ or H+ probes. These ‘Rubies’ are based on an extended rhodamine as a fluorophore and a phenol or BAPTA (1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetra-acetic acid) for H+ or Ca2+ sensing, respectively, and additionally bear a linker arm for conjugation. QDs were stably functionalized using the same SH/maleimide crosslink chemistry for all desired reactants. Mixing ion sensor and cell-penetrating peptides (that facilitate cytoplasmic delivery) at the desired stoichiometric ratio produced controlled multi-conjugated assemblies. Multiple acceptors on the same central donor allow up-concentrating the ion sensor on the QD surface to concentrations higher than those that could be achieved in free solution, increasing FRET efficiency and improving the signal. We validate these nanosensors for the detection of intracellular Ca2+ and pH transients using live-cell fluorescence imaging. PMID:26404317

  17. Composite Hydrogels with Engineered Microdomains for Optical Glucose Sensing at Low Oxygen Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Bornhoeft, Lindsey R.; Biswas, Aniket; McShane, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    There is a growing need for advanced tools that enable frequent monitoring of biomarkers for precision medicine. In this work, we present a composite hydrogel-based system providing real-time optical bioanalyte monitoring. The responsive material, alginate-in-alginate (AnA), is comprised of an alginate hydrogel with embedded bioactive, nanofilm-coated phosphorescent microdomains; palladium tetracarboxyphenylporphyrin serves as an optical indicator, glucose oxidase as a model enzyme, and layer-by-layer deposited polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) as the diffusion barrier. Glutaraldehyde crosslinking of the nanofilms resulted in a dramatic reduction in glucose diffusion (179%) while oxygen transport was not significantly affected. The responses of the AnA hydrogels to step changes of glucose at both ambient and physiological oxygen levels were evaluated, revealing controlled tuning of sensitivity and dynamic range. Stability, assessed by alternately exposing the responsive AnA hydrogels to extremely high and zero glucose concentrations, resulted in no significant difference in the response over 20 cycles. These AnA hydrogels represent an attractive approach to biosensing based on biocompatible materials that may be used as minimally-invasive, implantable devices capable of optical interrogation. The model glucose-responsive composite material studied in this work will serve as a template that can be translated for sensing additional analytes (e.g., lactate, urea, pyruvate, cholesterol) and can be used for monitoring other chronic conditions. PMID:28117762

  18. Composite Hydrogels with Engineered Microdomains for Optical Glucose Sensing at Low Oxygen Conditions.

    PubMed

    Bornhoeft, Lindsey R; Biswas, Aniket; McShane, Michael J

    2017-01-22

    There is a growing need for advanced tools that enable frequent monitoring of biomarkers for precision medicine. In this work, we present a composite hydrogel-based system providing real-time optical bioanalyte monitoring. The responsive material, alginate-in-alginate (AnA), is comprised of an alginate hydrogel with embedded bioactive, nanofilm-coated phosphorescent microdomains; palladium tetracarboxyphenylporphyrin serves as an optical indicator, glucose oxidase as a model enzyme, and layer-by-layer deposited polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) as the diffusion barrier. Glutaraldehyde crosslinking of the nanofilms resulted in a dramatic reduction in glucose diffusion (179%) while oxygen transport was not significantly affected. The responses of the AnA hydrogels to step changes of glucose at both ambient and physiological oxygen levels were evaluated, revealing controlled tuning of sensitivity and dynamic range. Stability, assessed by alternately exposing the responsive AnA hydrogels to extremely high and zero glucose concentrations, resulted in no significant difference in the response over 20 cycles. These AnA hydrogels represent an attractive approach to biosensing based on biocompatible materials that may be used as minimally-invasive, implantable devices capable of optical interrogation. The model glucose-responsive composite material studied in this work will serve as a template that can be translated for sensing additional analytes (e.g., lactate, urea, pyruvate, cholesterol) and can be used for monitoring other chronic conditions.

  19. The Glycosylation Pattern of Common Allergens: The Recognition and Uptake of Der p 1 by Epithelial and Dendritic Cells Is Carbohydrate Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ghouleh, Abeer; Johal, Ramneek; Sharquie, Inas K.; Emara, Mohammed; Harrington, Helen; Shakib, Farouk; Ghaemmaghami, Amir M.

    2012-01-01

    Allergens are initiators of both innate and adaptive immune responses. They are recognised at the site of entry by epithelial and dendritic cells (DCs), both of which activate innate inflammatory circuits that can collectively induce Th2 immune responses. In an attempt to have a better understanding of the role of carbohydrates in the recognition and uptake of allergens by the innate immune system, we defined common glycosylation patterns in major allergens. This was done using labelled lectins and showed that allergens like Der p 1 (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus group 1), Fel d 1 (Felis domisticus), Ara h 1 (Arachis hypogaea), Der p 2 (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus group 2), Bla g 2 (Blattella germanica) and Can f 1 (Canis familiaris) are glycosylated and that the main dominant sugars on these allergens are 1–2, 1–3 and 1–6 mannose. These observations are in line with recent reports implicating the mannose receptor (MR) in allergen recognition and uptake by DCs and suggesting a major link between glycosylation and allergen recognition. We then looked at TSLP (Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin) cytokine secretion by lung epithelia upon encountering natural Der p 1 allergen. TSLP is suggested to drive DC maturation in support of allergic hypersensitivity reactions. Our data showed an increase in TSLP secretion by lung epithelia upon stimulation with natural Der p 1 which was carbohydrate dependent. The deglycosylated preparation of Der p 1 exhibited minimal uptake by DCs compared to the natural and hyperglycosylated recombinant counterparts, with the latter being taken up more readily than the other preparations. Collectively, our data indicate that carbohydrate moieties on allergens play a vital role in their recognition by innate immune cells, implicating them in downstream deleterious Th2 cell activation and IgE production. PMID:22479478

  20. Nonlinear optical properties of gold nanoparticles selectively introduced into the periodic microdomains of block copolymers.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Kosuke; Nagayasu, Satoshi; Okamoto, Shigeru; Hayakawa, Tomokatsu; Hihara, Takehiko; Yamamoto, Katsuhiro; Takumi, Ichi; Hara, Shigeo; Hasegawa, Hirokazu; Akasaka, Satoshi; Kosikawa, Naokiyo

    2008-04-14

    Nonlinear-optical nanocomposite materials with a photonic crystal structure were fabricated using block copolymers and gold nanoparticles. By dispersing the gold nanoparticles into the selective microdomains of the block copolymers, we could achieve the enhancement of nonlinear optical properties as revealed by the Z-scan technique. The optical nonlinearities were enhanced by the local field effect and the effect of the periodic distribution of the microdomains filled with gold nanoparticles. Furthermore, the highest optical nonlinearity was achieved by matching the domain spacing of the copolymers with the frequency of the surface plasmon resonance peak of the gold.

  1. Universal growth of microdomains and gelation transition in agar hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Boral, Shilpi; Saxena, Anita; Bohidar, H B

    2008-03-27

    Investigations were carried out on aqueous sols and gels of agar (extracted from red seaweed Gelidiella acerosa) to explore the growth of microdomains en route to gelation. Isothermal frequency sweep studies on gel samples revealed master plots showing power-law dependence of gel elastic modulus, |G*|, on oscillation frequency, omega as |G*| approximately omegan, independent of temperature, with 0.5Tg). The S(q,t) behavior close to the gel transition point (Tg approximately (38+/-3 degrees C determined from rheology) followed a stretched exponential function: S(t)=A exp(-t/ts)beta. The beta factor increased from 0.25 to 1 as the gel temperature approached 25 degrees C from Tg, and relaxation time, ts, showed a peak at T approximately 30 degrees C. The SLS data (in the sol state) suggested the scaling of scattered intensity, Is(q) approximately epsilon(-gamma) (epsilon=(T/Tg-1), T>Tg) with gamma=0.13+/-0.03, and the presence of two distinct domains characterized by a Guinier regime (low q) and a power-law regime (high q). Close to and above Tg (+2 degrees C), IS(q) scaled with q as Is(q) approximately q(-alpha) with alpha=2.2+/-0.2, which decreased to 1.4+/-1 just below Tg (-2 degrees C), implying a coil-helix transition for 0.2% (w/v) and 0.3% (w/v) samples. For a 0.01% sample, alpha=3.5+/-0.5 which

  2. Formation and preservation of biotite-rich microdomains in high-temperature rocks from the Antananarivo Block, Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cenki-Tok, Bénédicte; Berger, Alfons; Gueydan, Frédéric

    2016-07-01

    Highly restitic rocks from the Antananarivo Block in northern Madagascar are investigated in this study in order to unravel processes of H2O-rich biotite formation in HT rocks. Polyphase metamorphism and melt migration occurred at 0.6 GPa and 850 °C. Biotite remains stable together with orthopyroxene and makes up to 45 vol% of the rock. In addition, three well-characterised and delimited microdomains having different textural, chemical and petrological characteristics are preserved. Thermodynamic models using the specific bulk compositions of the domains are in agreement with petrological observations. These rocks provide evidence that the lower crust may be strongly heterogeneous, locally associated to the formation of hydrous restites controlled by episodes of melt production and melt escape. This has significant consequences for understanding of the lower crust.

  3. Assembly of arenavirus envelope glycoprotein GPC in detergent-soluble membrane microdomains.

    PubMed

    Agnihothram, Sudhakar S; Dancho, Brooke; Grant, Kenneth W; Grimes, Mark L; Lyles, Douglas S; Nunberg, Jack H

    2009-10-01

    The family Arenaviridae includes a number of highly pathogenic viruses that are responsible for acute hemorrhagic fevers in humans. Genetic diversity among arenavirus species in their respective rodent hosts supports the continued emergence of new pathogens. In the absence of available vaccines or therapeutic agents, the hemorrhagic fever arenaviruses remain a serious public health and biodefense concern. Arenaviruses are enveloped virions that assemble and bud from the plasma membrane. In this study, we have characterized the microdomain organization of the virus envelope glycoprotein (GPC) on the cell surface by using immunogold electron microscopy. We find that Junín virus (JUNV) GPC clusters into discrete microdomains of 120 to 160 nm in diameter and that this property of GPC is independent of its myristoylation and of coexpression with the virus matrix protein Z. In cells infected with the Candid#1 strain of JUNV, and in purified Candid#1 virions, these GPC microdomains are soluble in cold Triton X-100 detergent and are thus distinct from conventional lipid rafts, which are utilized by numerous other viruses for assembly. Virion morphogenesis ultimately requires colocalization of viral components, yet our dual-label immunogold staining studies failed to reveal a spatial association of Z with GPC microdomains. This observation may reflect either rapid Z-dependent budding of virus-like particles upon coassociation or a requirement for additional viral components in the assembly process. Together, these results provide new insight into the molecular basis for arenavirus morphogenesis.

  4. CLN3 Loss Disturbs Membrane Microdomain Properties and Protein Transport in Brain Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tecedor, Luis; Stein, Colleen S.; Schultz, Mark L.; Farwanah, Hany; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2013-01-01

    Juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (JNCL) is a fatal childhood-onset neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in ceroid lipofuscinosis neuronal-3 (CLN3), a hydrophobic transmembrane protein of unresolved function. Previous studies indicate blood–brain barrier (BBB) defects in JNCL, and our earlier report showed prominent Cln3 expression in mouse brain endothelium. Here we find that CLN3 is necessary for normal trafficking of the microdomain-associated proteins caveolin-1, syntaxin-6, and multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1) in brain endothelial cells. Correspondingly, CLN3-null cells have reduced caveolae, and impaired caveolae- and MDR1-related functions including endocytosis, drug efflux, and cell volume regulation. We also detected an abnormal blood–brain barrier response to osmotic stress in vivo. Evaluation of the plasma membrane with fluorescent sphingolipid probes suggests microdomain destabilization and enhanced fluidity in CLN3-null cells. In further work we found that application of the glycosphingolipid lactosylceramide to CLN3-deficient cells rescues protein transport and caveolar endocytosis. Last, we show that CLN3 localizes to the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and partitions with buoyant microdomain fractions. We propose that CLN3 facilitates TGN-to-plasma membrane transport of microdomain-associated proteins. Insult to this pathway may underlie BBB dysfunction and contribute to JNCL pathogenesis. PMID:24227717

  5. Microdomain organization and frequency-dependence of CREB-dependent transcriptional signaling in heart cells

    PubMed Central

    Kobrinsky, Evgeny; Duong, Son Q.; Sheydina, Anna; Soldatov, Nikolai M.

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated Cav1.2 calcium channels couple membrane depolarization to cAMP response-element-binding protein (CREB)-dependent transcriptional activation. To investigate the spatial and temporal organization of CREB-dependent transcriptional nuclear microdomains, we combined perforated patch-clamp technique and FRET microscopy for monitoring CREB and CREB-binding protein interaction in the nuclei of live cells. The experimental approach to the quantitative assessment of CREB-dependent transcriptional signaling evoked by cAMP- and Cav1.2-dependent mechanisms was devised in COS1 cells expressing recombinant Cav1.2 calcium channels. Using continuous 2-dimensional wavelet transform and time series analyses, we found that nuclear CREB-dependent transcriptional signaling is organized differentially in spatially and temporally separated microdomains of 4 distinct types. In rat neonatal cardiomyocytes, CREB-dependent transcription is mediated by the cAMP-initiated CaMKII-sensitive and Cav1.2-initiated CaMKII-insensitive mechanisms. The latter microdomains show a tendency to exhibit periodic behavior correlated with spontaneous contraction of myocytes suggestive of frequency-dependent CREB-dependent transcriptional regulation in the heart.—Kobrinsky, E., Duong, S.Q., Sheydina, A., Soldatov, N. M. Microdomain organization and frequency-dependence of CREB-dependent transcriptional signaling in heart cells. PMID:21248242

  6. Palmitoylation at Cys595 is essential for PECAM-1 localisation into membrane microdomains and for efficient PECAM-1-mediated cytoprotection.

    PubMed

    Sardjono, Caroline T; Harbour, Stacey N; Yip, Jana C; Paddock, Cathy; Tridandapani, Susheela; Newman, Peter J; Jackson, Denise E

    2006-12-01

    The Ig-ITIM superfamily member, PECAM-1 acts as a negative regulator of ITAM-signalling pathways in platelets involving GPVI/FcR gamma chain and Fc?RIIa. This negative feedback loop involves regulation of collagen and GPVI-dependent aggregation events, platelet-thrombus-growth on immobilised collagen under flow and Fc?RIIa-mediated platelet responses. In this study, we show that PECAM-1 is selectively palmitoylated involving a thioester linkage with an unpaired cysteine residue at amino acid position 595 in its cytoplasmic domain. As palmitoylation is known to target proteins to membrane microdomains, we investigated the microdomain localisation for PECAM-1 in platelets and nucleated cells. In unstimulated platelets, approximately 20% of PECAM-1 is localised to Triton-insoluble microdomain fractions and it does not increase with platelet activation by collagen, collagen-related peptide, thrombin- or human-aggregated IgG. PECAM-1 is in close physical proximity with GPVI in platelet microdomains. Removal of platelet cytoskeleton prior to sucrose-density-gradient separation showed that PECAM-1 was associated with both the Triton-soluble and membrane skeleton in microdomain-associated fractions. Disruption of microdomains by membrane-cholesterol depletion resulted in loss of PECAM-1 localisation to membrane microdomains. Mutational analysis of juxtamembrane cysteine residue to alanine (C595A) of human PECAM-1 resulted in loss of palmitoylation and a sixfold decrease in association with membrane microdomains. Functionally, the palmitoylated cysteine 595 residue is required, in part, for efficient PECAM-1-mediated cytoprotection. These results show that cysteine 595 is required for constitutive association of PECAM-1 with membrane microdomains and PECAM-1-mediated cytoprotection, where it may act as a crucial regulator of signaling and apoptosis events.

  7. Out-of-plane Block Copolymer Microdomains in High Aspect-Ratio Templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadelrab, Karim; Bai, Wubin; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo; Ross, Caroline

    The use of directed self-assembly DSA of block copolymers BCP proved to be a power approach for nanoscale fabrication. It combines the ability of BCPs to self-assemble into nanoscale features with the use of lithographic tools to create controlled long range order. In addition, BCP with highly incompatible blocks (high Flory-Huggins interaction parameter (χ)) offer improvement in resolution, and line edge fluctuations of the self-assembled patterns. Unfortunately, high- χ BCPs usually exhibit large differences in surface affinity between the two blocks, leading to the formation of a surface layer of the lower surface energy block and favoring in-plane orientation of lamellae or cylindrical microdomains. Here, we explore the conditions under which a high χ BCP creates an out-of-plane lamellar structure using functionalized high aspect ratio trenches with preferential walls. We employ the free energy analysis of self-consistent field theory SCFT to identify whether an in-plane or out-of-plane structure is stable for a particular trench width. In addition, we employ the single mode expansion of Ginzburg-Landau free energy expression in the weak segregation limit to analytically construct a phase diagram of the in-plane and out-of-plane lamellae as a function of aspect ratio and surface attraction strength. It is found that achieving an out of plane lamellar structure necessitates a coupling between aspect ratio and surface functionality. In particular, strong side wall attraction results in out-of-plane lamellae when the trench aspect ratio is greater than unity. The results are validated for a lamellar forming polystyrene-block-polydimethylsiloxane (PS-b-PDMS) within trenches made using interference lithography.

  8. Adsorption of phthalic acid esters (PAEs) by amphiphilic polypropylene nonwoven from aqueous solution: the study of hydrophilic and hydrophobic microdomain.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiangyu; Wei, Junfu; Zhang, Huan; Liu, Kai; Wang, Han

    2014-05-30

    A kind of amphiphilic polypropylene nonwoven with hydrophilic and hydrophobic microdomain was prepared through electron beam induced graft polymerization and subsequent ring opening reaction and then utilized in the adsorption of phthalic acid esters (PAEs). To elucidate the superiority of such amphiphilic microdomain, a unique structure without hydrophilic part was constructed as comparison. In addition, the adsorption behaviors including adsorption kinetics, isotherms and pH effect were systematically investigated. The result indicated that the amphiphilic structure and the synergy between hydrophilic and hydrophobic microdomain could considerably improve the adsorption capacities, rate and affinity. Particularly the existence of hydrophilic microdomain could reduce the diffusion resistance and energy barrier in the adsorption process. These adsorption results showed that the amphiphilic PP nonwoven have the potential to be used in environmental application.

  9. A novel floor plate boundary defined by adjacent En1 and Dbx1 microdomains distinguishes midbrain dopamine and hypothalamic neurons.

    PubMed

    Nouri, Navid; Awatramani, Rajeshwar

    2017-03-01

    The mesodiencephalic floor plate (mdFP) is the source of diverse neuron types. Yet, how this structure is compartmentalized has not been clearly elucidated. Here, we identify a novel boundary subdividing the mdFP into two microdomains, defined by engrailed 1 (En1) and developing brain homeobox 1 (Dbx1). Utilizing simultaneous dual and intersectional fate mapping, we demonstrate that this boundary is precisely formed with minimal overlap between En1 and Dbx1 microdomains, unlike many other boundaries. We show that the En1 microdomain gives rise to dopaminergic (DA) neurons, whereas the Dbx1 microdomain gives rise to subthalamic (STN), premammillary (PM) and posterior hypothalamic (PH) populations. To determine whether En1 is sufficient to induce DA neuron production beyond its normal limit, we generated a mouse strain that expresses En1 in the Dbx1 microdomain. In mutants, we observed ectopic production of DA neurons derived from the Dbx1 microdomain, at the expense of STN and PM populations. Our findings provide new insights into subdivisions in the mdFP, and will impact current strategies for the conversion of stem cells into DA neurons.

  10. Lipid rafts in epithelial brush borders: atypical membrane microdomains with specialized functions.

    PubMed

    Danielsen, E Michael; Hansen, Gert H

    2003-10-31

    Epithelial cells that fulfil high-throughput digestive/absorptive functions, such as small intestinal enterocytes and kidney proximal tubule cells, are endowed with a dense apical brush border. It has long been recognized that the microvillar surface of the brush border is organized in cholesterol/sphingolipid-enriched membrane microdomains commonly known as lipid rafts. More recent studies indicate that microvillar rafts, in particular those of enterocytes, have some unusual properties in comparison with rafts present on the surface of other cell types. Thus, microvillar rafts are stable rather than transient/dynamic, and their core components include glycolipids and the divalent lectin galectin-4, which together can be isolated as "superrafts", i.e., membrane microdomains resisting solubilization with Triton X-100 at physiological temperature. These glycolipid/lectin-based rafts serve as platforms for recruitment of GPI-linked and transmembrane digestive enzymes, most likely as an economizing effort to secure and prolong their digestive capability at the microvillar surface. However, in addition to microvilli, the brush border surface also consists of membrane invaginations between adjacent microvilli, which are the only part of the apical surface sterically accessible for membrane fusion/budding events. Many of these invaginations appear as pleiomorphic, deep apical tubules that extend up to 0.5-1 microm into the underlying terminal web region. Their sensitivity to methyl-beta-cyclodextrin suggests them to contain cholesterol-dependent lipid rafts of a different type from the glycolipid-based rafts at the microvillar surface. The brush border is thus an example of a complex membrane system that harbours at least two different types of lipid raft microdomains, each suited to fulfil specialized functions. This conclusion is in line with an emerging, more varied view of lipid rafts being pluripotent microdomains capable of adapting in size, shape, and content to

  11. Nuclear lipid microdomain as resting place of dexamethasone to impair cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Cataldi, Samuela; Codini, Michela; Cascianelli, Giacomo; Tringali, Sabina; Tringali, Anna Rita; Lazzarini, Andrea; Floridi, Alessandro; Bartoccini, Elisa; Garcia-Gil, Mercedes; Lazzarini, Remo; Ambesi-Impiombato, Francesco Saverio; Curcio, Francesco; Beccari, Tommaso; Albi, Elisabetta

    2014-10-31

    The action of dexamethasone is initiated by, and strictly dependent upon, the interaction of the drug with its receptor followed by its translocation into the nucleus where modulates gene expression. Where the drug localizes at the intranuclear level is not yet known. We aimed to study the localization of the drug in nuclear lipid microdomains rich in sphingomyelin content that anchor active chromatin and act as platform for transcription modulation. The study was performed in non-Hodgkin's T cell human lymphoblastic lymphoma (SUP-T1 cell line). We found that when dexamethasone enters into the nucleus it localizes in nuclear lipid microdomains where influences sphingomyelin metabolism. This is followed after 24 h by a cell cycle block accompanied by the up-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (CDKN1A), cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (CDKN1B), growth arrest and DNA-damage 45A (GADD45A), and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) genes and by the reduction of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and phospho signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (phoshoSTAT3) proteins. After 48 h some cells show morphological changes characteristic of apoptosis while the number of the cells that undergo cell division and express B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) is very low. We suggest that the integrity of nuclear lipid microdomains is important for the response to glucocorticoids of cancer cells.

  12. A novel biotinylated lipid raft reporter for electron microscopic imaging of plasma membrane microdomains[S

    PubMed Central

    Krager, Kimberly J.; Sarkar, Mitul; Twait, Erik C.; Lill, Nancy L.; Koland, John G.

    2012-01-01

    The submicroscopic spatial organization of cell surface receptors and plasma membrane signaling molecules is readily characterized by electron microscopy (EM) via immunogold labeling of plasma membrane sheets. Although various signaling molecules have been seen to segregate within plasma membrane microdomains, the biochemical identity of these microdomains and the factors affecting their formation are largely unknown. Lipid rafts are envisioned as submicron membrane subdomains of liquid ordered structure with differing lipid and protein constituents that define their specific varieties. To facilitate EM investigation of inner leaflet lipid rafts and the localization of membrane proteins therein, a unique genetically encoded reporter with the dually acylated raft-targeting motif of the Lck kinase was developed. This reporter, designated Lck-BAP-GFP, incorporates green fluorescent protein (GFP) and biotin acceptor peptide (BAP) modules, with the latter allowing its single-step labeling with streptavidin-gold. Lck-BAP-GFP was metabolically biotinylated in mammalian cells, distributed into low-density detergent-resistant membrane fractions, and was readily detected with avidin-based reagents. In EM images of plasma membrane sheets, the streptavidin-gold-labeled reporter was clustered in 20–50 nm microdomains, presumably representative of inner leaflet lipid rafts. The utility of the reporter was demonstrated in an investigation of the potential lipid raft localization of the epidermal growth factor receptor. PMID:22822037

  13. A novel biotinylated lipid raft reporter for electron microscopic imaging of plasma membrane microdomains.

    PubMed

    Krager, Kimberly J; Sarkar, Mitul; Twait, Erik C; Lill, Nancy L; Koland, John G

    2012-10-01

    The submicroscopic spatial organization of cell surface receptors and plasma membrane signaling molecules is readily characterized by electron microscopy (EM) via immunogold labeling of plasma membrane sheets. Although various signaling molecules have been seen to segregate within plasma membrane microdomains, the biochemical identity of these microdomains and the factors affecting their formation are largely unknown. Lipid rafts are envisioned as submicron membrane subdomains of liquid ordered structure with differing lipid and protein constituents that define their specific varieties. To facilitate EM investigation of inner leaflet lipid rafts and the localization of membrane proteins therein, a unique genetically encoded reporter with the dually acylated raft-targeting motif of the Lck kinase was developed. This reporter, designated Lck-BAP-GFP, incorporates green fluorescent protein (GFP) and biotin acceptor peptide (BAP) modules, with the latter allowing its single-step labeling with streptavidin-gold. Lck-BAP-GFP was metabolically biotinylated in mammalian cells, distributed into low-density detergent-resistant membrane fractions, and was readily detected with avidin-based reagents. In EM images of plasma membrane sheets, the streptavidin-gold-labeled reporter was clustered in 20-50 nm microdomains, presumably representative of inner leaflet lipid rafts. The utility of the reporter was demonstrated in an investigation of the potential lipid raft localization of the epidermal growth factor receptor.

  14. Mutation of a NCKX Eliminates Glial Microdomain Calcium Oscillations and Enhances Seizure Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Melom, Jan E.; Littleton, J. Troy

    2013-01-01

    Glia exhibit spontaneous and activity-dependent fluctuations in intracellular Ca2+, yet it is unclear whether glial Ca2+ oscillations are required during neuronal signaling. Somatic glial Ca2+ waves are primarily mediated by the release of intracellular Ca2+ stores, and their relative importance in normal brain physiology has been disputed. Recently, near-membrane microdomain Ca2+ transients were identified in fine astrocytic processes and found to arise via an intracellular store-independent process. Here, we describe the identification of rapid, near-membrane Ca2+ oscillations in Drosophila cortex glia of the CNS. In a screen for temperature-sensitive conditional seizure mutants, we identified a glial-specific Na+/Ca2+, K+ exchanger (zydeco) that is required for microdomain Ca2+ oscillatory activity. We found that zydeco mutant animals exhibit increased susceptibility to seizures in response to a variety of environmental stimuli, and that zydeco is required acutely in cortex glia to regulate seizure susceptibility. We also found that glial expression of calmodulin is required for stress-induced seizures in zydeco mutants, suggesting a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent glial signaling pathway underlies glial–neuronal communication. These studies demonstrate that microdomain glial Ca2+ oscillations require NCKX-mediated plasma membrane Ca2+ flux, and that acute dysregulation of glial Ca2+ signaling triggers seizures. PMID:23325253

  15. Tritrichomonas foetus displays classical detergent-resistant membrane microdomains on its cell surface.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Ivone de Andrade; Atella, Georgia; Benchimol, Marlene

    2014-05-01

    Tritrichomonas foetus is a serious veterinary parasite that causes bovine trichomoniasis, a sexually transmitted disease that results in reproductive failure and considerable economic losses in areas that practice natural breeding. T. foetus is an extracellular parasite, which initially adheres to and infects the urogenital tract using a diverse array of surface glycoconjugates, including adhesins and extracellular matrix-binding molecules. However, the cellular mechanisms by which T. foetus colonizes mucosal surfaces and causes tissue damage are not well defined. Several studies have demonstrated the involvement of pathogen or host lipid rafts in cellular events that occur during pathogenesis, including adhesion, invasion and evasion of the immune response. In this study, we demonstrate that detergent-resistant membranes are present in the plasma membrane of T. foetus. We further demonstrate that microdomains are cholesterol-enriched and contain ganglioside GM1-like molecules. In addition, we demonstrate that lipid microdomains do not participate in T. foetus adhesion to host cells. However, the use of agents that disrupt and disorganize the plasma membrane indicated the involvement of the T. foetus lipid microdomains, in cell division and in the formation of endoflagellar forms. Our results suggest that trophozoites and endoflagellar forms present a different plasma membrane organization.

  16. SNX-1 and RME-8 oppose the assembly of HGRS-1/ESCRT-0 degradative microdomains on endosomes.

    PubMed

    Norris, Anne; Tammineni, Prasad; Wang, Simon; Gerdes, Julianne; Murr, Alexandra; Kwan, Kelvin Y; Cai, Qian; Grant, Barth D

    2017-01-17

    After endocytosis, transmembrane cargo reaches endosomes, where it encounters complexes dedicated to opposing functions: recycling and degradation. Microdomains containing endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT)-0 component Hrs [hepatocyte growth factor-regulated tyrosine kinase substrate (HGRS-1) in Caenorhabditis elegans] mediate cargo degradation, concentrating ubiquitinated cargo and organizing the activities of ESCRT. At the same time, retromer associated sorting nexin one (SNX-1) and its binding partner, J-domain protein RME-8, sort cargo away from degradation, promoting cargo recycling to the Golgi. Thus, we hypothesized that there could be important regulatory interactions between retromer and ESCRT that balance degradative and recycling functions. Taking advantage of the naturally large endosomes of the C. elegans coelomocyte, we visualized complementary ESCRT-0 and RME-8/SNX-1 microdomains in vivo and assayed the ability of retromer and ESCRT microdomains to regulate one another. We found in snx-1(0) and rme-8(ts) mutants increased endosomal coverage and intensity of HGRS-1-labeled microdomains, as well as increased total levels of HGRS-1 bound to membranes. These effects are specific to SNX-1 and RME-8, as loss of other retromer components SNX-3 and vacuolar protein sorting-associated protein 35 (VPS-35) did not affect HGRS-1 microdomains. Additionally, knockdown of hgrs-1 had little to no effect on SNX-1 and RME-8 microdomains, suggesting directionality to the interaction. Separation of the functionally distinct ESCRT-0 and SNX-1/RME-8 microdomains was also compromised in the absence of RME-8 and SNX-1, a phenomenon we observed to be conserved, as depletion of Snx1 and Snx2 in HeLa cells also led to greater overlap of Rme-8 and Hrs on endosomes.

  17. A plasma membrane microdomain compartmentalizes ephrin-generated cAMP signals to prune developing retinal axon arbors

    PubMed Central

    Averaimo, Stefania; Assali, Ahlem; Ros, Oriol; Couvet, Sandrine; Zagar, Yvrick; Genescu, Ioana; Rebsam, Alexandra; Nicol, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    The development of neuronal circuits is controlled by guidance molecules that are hypothesized to interact with the cholesterol-enriched domains of the plasma membrane termed lipid rafts. Whether such domains enable local intracellular signalling at the submicrometre scale in developing neurons and are required for shaping the nervous system connectivity in vivo remains controversial. Here, we report a role for lipid rafts in generating domains of local cAMP signalling in axonal growth cones downstream of ephrin-A repulsive guidance cues. Ephrin-A-dependent retraction of retinal ganglion cell axons involves cAMP signalling restricted to the vicinity of lipid rafts and is independent of cAMP modulation outside of this microdomain. cAMP modulation near lipid rafts controls the pruning of ectopic axonal branches of retinal ganglion cells in vivo, a process requiring intact ephrin-A signalling. Together, our findings indicate that lipid rafts structure the subcellular organization of intracellular cAMP signalling shaping axonal arbors during the nervous system development. PMID:27694812

  18. Arabidopsis mutants in sphingolipid synthesis as tools to understand the structure and function of membrane microdomains in plasmodesmata

    PubMed Central

    González-Solís, Ariadna; Cano-Ramírez, Dora L.; Morales-Cedillo, Francisco; Tapia de Aquino, Cinthya; Gavilanes-Ruiz, Marina

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodesmata—intercellular channels that communicate adjacent cells—possess complex membranous structures. Recent evidences indicate that plasmodesmata contain membrane microdomains. In order to understand how these submembrane regions collaborate to plasmodesmata function, it is necessary to characterize their size, composition and dynamics. An approach that can shed light on these microdomain features is based on the use of Arabidopsis mutants in sphingolipid synthesis. Sphingolipids are canonical components of microdomains together with sterols and some glycerolipids. Moreover, sphingolipids are transducers in pathways that display programmed cell death as a defense mechanism against pathogens. The study of Arabidopsis mutants would allow determining which structural features of the sphingolipids are important for the formation and stability of microdomains, and if defense signaling networks using sphingoid bases as second messengers are associated to plasmodesmata operation. Such studies need to be complemented by analysis of the ultrastructure and the use of protein probes for plasmodesmata microdomains and may constitute a very valuable source of information to analyze these membrane structures. PMID:24478783

  19. Effect of fish oil on lateral mobility of prostaglandin F2α (FP) receptors and spatial distribution of lipid microdomains in bovine luteal cell plasma membrane in vitro.

    PubMed

    Plewes, M R; Burns, P D; Graham, P E; Hyslop, R M; Barisas, B G

    2017-01-01

    Lipid microdomains are ordered regions on the plasma membrane of cells, rich in cholesterol and sphingolipids, ranging in size from 10 to 200 nm in diameter. These lipid-ordered domains may serve as platforms to facilitate colocalization of intracellular signaling proteins during agonist-induced signal transduction. It is hypothesized that fish oil will disrupt the lipid microdomains, increasing spatial distribution of these lipid-ordered domains and lateral mobility of the prostaglandin (PG) F2α (FP) receptors in bovine luteal cells. The objectives of this study were to examine the effects of fish oil on (1) the spatial distribution of lipid microdomains, (2) lateral mobility of FP receptors, and (3) lateral mobility of FP receptors in the presence of PGF2α on the plasma membrane of bovine luteal cells in vitro. Bovine ovaries were obtained from a local abattoir and corpora lutea were digested using collagenase. In experiment 1, lipid microdomains were labeled using cholera toxin subunit B Alexa Fluor 555. Domains were detected as distinct patches on the plasma membrane of mixed luteal cells. Fish oil treatment decreased fluorescent intensity in a dose-dependent manner (P < 0.01). In experiment 2, single particle tracking was used to examine the effects of fish oil treatment on lateral mobility of FP receptors. Fish oil treatment increased microdiffusion and macrodiffusion coefficients of FP receptors as compared to control cells (P < 0.05). In addition, compartment diameters of domains were larger, and residence times were reduced for receptors in fish oil-treated cells (P < 0.05). In experiment 3, single particle tracking was used to determine the effects of PGF2α on lateral mobility of FP receptors and influence of fish oil treatment. Lateral mobility of receptors was decreased within 5 min following the addition of ligand for control cells (P < 0.05). However, lateral mobility of receptors was unaffected by addition of ligand for fish oil-treated cells

  20. KIF13B establishes a CAV1-enriched microdomain at the ciliary transition zone to promote Sonic hedgehog signalling

    PubMed Central

    Schou, Kenneth B.; Mogensen, Johanne B.; Morthorst, Stine K.; Nielsen, Brian S.; Aleliunaite, Aiste; Serra-Marques, Andrea; Fürstenberg, Nicoline; Saunier, Sophie; Bizet, Albane A.; Veland, Iben R.; Akhmanova, Anna; Christensen, Søren T.; Pedersen, Lotte B.

    2017-01-01

    Ciliary membrane composition is controlled by transition zone (TZ) proteins such as RPGRIP1, RPGRIPL and NPHP4, which are vital for balanced coordination of diverse signalling systems like the Sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway. Activation of this pathway involves Shh-induced ciliary accumulation of Smoothened (SMO), which is disrupted by disease-causing mutations in TZ components. Here we identify kinesin-3 motor protein KIF13B as a novel member of the RPGRIP1N-C2 domain-containing protein family and show that KIF13B regulates TZ membrane composition and ciliary SMO accumulation. KIF13B is upregulated during ciliogenesis and is recruited to the ciliary base by NPHP4, which binds to two distinct sites in the KIF13B tail region, including an RPGRIP1N-C2 domain. KIF13B and NPHP4 are both essential for establishment of a CAV1 membrane microdomain at the TZ, which in turn is required for Shh-induced ciliary SMO accumulation. Thus KIF13B is a novel regulator of ciliary TZ configuration, membrane composition and Shh signalling. PMID:28134340

  1. FRET-Based Nanobiosensors for Imaging Intracellular Ca²⁺ and H⁺ Microdomains.

    PubMed

    Zamaleeva, Alsu I; Despras, Guillaume; Luccardini, Camilla; Collot, Mayeul; de Waard, Michel; Oheim, Martin; Mallet, Jean-Maurice; Feltz, Anne

    2015-09-23

    Semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) or quantum dots (QDs) are luminous point emitters increasingly being used to tag and track biomolecules in biological/biomedical imaging. However, their intracellular use as highlighters of single-molecule localization and nanobiosensors reporting ion microdomains changes has remained a major challenge. Here, we report the design, generation and validation of FRET-based nanobiosensors for detection of intracellular Ca(2+) and H⁺ transients. Our sensors combine a commercially available CANdot(®)565QD as an energy donor with, as an acceptor, our custom-synthesized red-emitting Ca(2+) or H⁺ probes. These 'Rubies' are based on an extended rhodamine as a fluorophore and a phenol or BAPTA (1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetra-acetic acid) for H⁺ or Ca(2+) sensing, respectively, and additionally bear a linker arm for conjugation. QDs were stably functionalized using the same SH/maleimide crosslink chemistry for all desired reactants. Mixing ion sensor and cell-penetrating peptides (that facilitate cytoplasmic delivery) at the desired stoichiometric ratio produced controlled multi-conjugated assemblies. Multiple acceptors on the same central donor allow up-concentrating the ion sensor on the QD surface to concentrations higher than those that could be achieved in free solution, increasing FRET efficiency and improving the signal. We validate these nanosensors for the detection of intracellular Ca(2+) and pH transients using live-cell fluorescence imaging.

  2. Magnesium-induced lipid bilayer microdomain reorganizations: implications for membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Zachary D; Pazos, Ileana M; McNeil-Watson, Fraser K; Lewis, E Neil; Levin, Ira W

    2009-07-23

    Interactions between dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylserine (DPPS), combined both as binary lipid bilayer assemblies and separately, under the influence of divalent Mg2+, a membrane bilayer fusogenic agent, are reported. Infrared vibrational spectroscopic analyses of the lipid acyl chain methylene symmetric stretching modes indicate that aggregates of the two phospholipid components exist as domains heterogeneously distributed throughout the binary bilayer system. In the presence of Mg2+, DPPS maintains an ordered orthorhombic subcell gel phase structure through the phase transition temperature, while the DPPC component is only minimally perturbed with respect to the gel to liquid crystalline phase change. The addition of Mg2+ induces a reorganization of the lipid domains in which the gel phase acyl chain planes rearrange from a hexagonal configuration toward a triclinic, parallel chain subcell. Examination of the acyl chain methylene deformation modes at low temperatures allows a determination of DPPS microdomain sizes, which decrease upon the addition of DPPC-d62 in the absence of Mg2+. On adding Mg2+, a uniform DPPS domain size is observed in the binary mixtures. In either the presence or absence of Mg2+, DPPC-d62 aggregates remain in a configuration for which microdomain sizes are not spectroscopically measurable. Analysis of the acyl chain methylene deformation modes for DPPC-d62 in the binary system suggests that clusters of the deuterated lipids are distributed throughout the DPPS matrix. Light scattering and fluorescence measurements indicate that Mg2+ induces both the aggregation and the fusion of the lipid assemblies as a function of the ratio of DPPS to DPPC. The structural reorganizations of the lipid microdomains within the DPPS-DPPC bilayer are interpreted in the context of current concepts regarding lipid bilayer fusion.

  3. Magnetic alignment of block copolymer microdomains by intrinsic chain anisotropy

    DOE PAGES

    Rokhlenko, Yekaterina; Yager, Kevin G.; Gopinadhan, Manesh; ...

    2015-12-18

    We examine the role of intrinsic chain susceptibility anisotropy in magnetic field directed self-assembly of a block copolymer using in situ x-ray scattering. Alignment of a lamellar mesophase is observed on cooling across the disorder-order transition with the resulting orientational order inversely proportional to the cooling rate. We discuss the origin of the susceptibility anisotropy, Δχ, that drives alignment and calculate its magnitude using coarse-grained molecular dynamics to sample conformations of surface-tethered chains, finding Δχ ≈ 2×10–8. From field-dependent scattering data, we estimate that grains of ≈ 1.2 μm are present during alignment. Furthermore, these results demonstrate that intrinsic anisotropymore » is sufficient to support strong field-induced mesophase alignment and suggest a versatile strategy for field control of orientational order in block copolymers.« less

  4. Magnetic alignment of block copolymer microdomains by intrinsic chain anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Rokhlenko, Yekaterina; Yager, Kevin G.; Gopinadhan, Manesh; Osuji, Chinedum O.; Zhang, Kai; O'Hern, Corey S.; Larson, Steven R.; Gopalan, Padma; Majewski, Pawel W.

    2015-12-18

    We examine the role of intrinsic chain susceptibility anisotropy in magnetic field directed self-assembly of a block copolymer using in situ x-ray scattering. Alignment of a lamellar mesophase is observed on cooling across the disorder-order transition with the resulting orientational order inversely proportional to the cooling rate. We discuss the origin of the susceptibility anisotropy, Δχ, that drives alignment and calculate its magnitude using coarse-grained molecular dynamics to sample conformations of surface-tethered chains, finding Δχ ≈ 2×10–8. From field-dependent scattering data, we estimate that grains of ≈ 1.2 μm are present during alignment. Furthermore, these results demonstrate that intrinsic anisotropy is sufficient to support strong field-induced mesophase alignment and suggest a versatile strategy for field control of orientational order in block copolymers.

  5. Magnetic Alignment of Block Copolymer Microdomains by Intrinsic Chain Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokhlenko, Yekaterina; Gopinadhan, Manesh; Osuji, Chinedum O.; Zhang, Kai; O'Hern, Corey S.; Larson, Steven R.; Gopalan, Padma; Majewski, Paweł W.; Yager, Kevin G.

    2015-12-01

    We examine the role of intrinsic chain susceptibility anisotropy in magnetic field directed self-assembly of a block copolymer using in situ x-ray scattering. Alignment of a lamellar mesophase is observed on cooling across the disorder-order transition with the resulting orientational order inversely proportional to the cooling rate. We discuss the origin of the susceptibility anisotropy, Δ χ , that drives alignment and calculate its magnitude using coarse-grained molecular dynamics to sample conformations of surface-tethered chains, finding Δ χ ≈2 ×1 0-8. From field-dependent scattering data, we estimate that grains of ≈1.2 μ m are present during alignment. These results demonstrate that intrinsic anisotropy is sufficient to support strong field-induced mesophase alignment and suggest a versatile strategy for field control of orientational order in block copolymers.

  6. In vivo model with targeted cAMP biosensor reveals changes in receptor-microdomain communication in cardiac disease.

    PubMed

    Sprenger, Julia U; Perera, Ruwan K; Steinbrecher, Julia H; Lehnart, Stephan E; Maier, Lars S; Hasenfuss, Gerd; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O

    2015-04-28

    3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is an ubiquitous second messenger that regulates physiological functions by acting in distinct subcellular microdomains. Although several targeted cAMP biosensors are developed and used in single cells, it is unclear whether such biosensors can be successfully applied in vivo, especially in the context of disease. Here, we describe a transgenic mouse model expressing a targeted cAMP sensor and analyse microdomain-specific second messenger dynamics in the vicinity of the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA). We demonstrate the biocompatibility of this targeted sensor and its potential for real-time monitoring of compartmentalized cAMP signalling in adult cardiomyocytes isolated from a healthy mouse heart and from an in vivo cardiac disease model. In particular, we uncover the existence of a phosphodiesterase-dependent receptor-microdomain communication, which is affected in hypertrophy, resulting in reduced β-adrenergic receptor-cAMP signalling to SERCA.

  7. Single-molecule tracking studies of flow-induced microdomain alignment in cylinder-forming polystyrene-poly(ethylene oxide) diblock copolymer films.

    PubMed

    Tran-Ba, Khanh-Hoa; Higgins, Daniel A; Ito, Takashi

    2014-09-25

    Flow-based approaches are promising routes to preparation of aligned block copolymer microdomains within confined spaces. An in-depth characterization of such nanoscale morphologies within macroscopically nonuniform materials under ambient conditions is, however, often challenging. In this study, single-molecule tracking (SMT) methods were employed to probe the flow-induced alignment of cylindrical microdomains (ca. 22 nm in diameter) in polystyrene-poly(ethylene oxide) diblock copolymer (PS-b-PEO) films. Films of micrometer-scale thicknesses were prepared by overlaying a benzene solution droplet on a glass coverslip with a rectangular glass plate, followed by solvent evaporation under a nitrogen atmosphere. The microdomain alignment was quantitatively assessed from SMT data exhibiting the diffusional motions of individual sulforhodamine B fluorescent probes that preferentially partitioned into cylindrical PEO microdomains. Better overall microdomain orientation along the flow direction was observed near the substrate interface in films prepared at a higher flow rate, suggesting that the microdomain alignment was primarily induced by shear flow. The SMT data also revealed the presence of micrometer-scale grains consisting of highly ordered microdomains with coherent orientation. The results of this study provide insights into shear-based preparation of aligned cylindrical microdomains in block copolymer films from solutions within confined spaces.

  8. Microdomain Structure of Cr-Doped Manganites: Nd 1/2Ca 1/2(Mn,Cr)O 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, Akihiko; Moritomo, Yutaka; Nishibori, Eiji; Takata, Masaki; Sakata, Makoto; Ohoyama, Kenji; Mori, Shigeo; Yamamoto, Naoki; Nakamura, Arao

    2000-11-01

    Crystal and magnetic structures of Cr-doped manganites, Nd1/2Ca1/2Mn1-yCryO3 (y=0.00 and 0.03), have been investigated by synchrotron radiation (SR) x-ray powder diffraction as well as neutron powder diffraction measurements.A detailed analysis of the high-resolution x-ray profile has revealed that the Cr-doped compound exhibits broad extra reflections, suggesting the formation of microdomains below the charge-ordering temperature T CO.The origin of the microdomain structure is discussed in terms of the charge separation.

  9. Where Biology Meets Physics--A Converging View on Membrane Microdomain Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Destainville, Nicolas; Schmidt, Thomas H; Lang, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    For several decades, the phenomenon of membrane component segregation into microdomains has been a well-known and highly debated subject, and varying concepts including the raft hypothesis, the fence-and-picket model, hydrophobic-mismatch, and specific protein-protein interactions have been offered as explanations. Here, we review the level of insight into the molecular architecture of membrane domains one is capable of obtaining through biological experimentation. Using SNARE proteins as a paradigm, comprehensive data suggest that several dozens of molecules crowd together into almost circular spots smaller than 100 nm. Such clusters are highly dynamical as they constantly capture and lose molecules. The organization has a strong influence on the functional availability of proteins and likely provides a molecular scaffold for more complex protein networks. Despite this high level of insight, fundamental open questions remain, applying not only to SNARE protein domains but more generally to all types of membrane domains. In this context, we explain the view of physical models and how they are beneficial in advancing our concept of micropatterning. While biological models generally remain qualitative and descriptive, physics aims towards making them quantitative and providing reproducible numbers, in order to discriminate between different mechanisms which have been proposed to account for experimental observations. Despite the fundamental differences in biological and physical approaches as far as cell membrane microdomains are concerned, we are able to show that convergence on common points of views is in reach.

  10. Monte Carlo simulation of the effects of vesicle geometry on calcium microdomains and neurotransmitter release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limsakul, Praopim; Modchang, Charin

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the effects of synaptic vesicle geometry on Ca2+ diffusion dynamics in presynaptic terminals using MCell, a realistic Monte Carlo algorithm that tracks individual molecules. By modeling the vesicle as a sphere and an oblate or a prolate spheroid with a reflective boundary, we measure the Ca2+ concentration at various positions relative to the vesicle. We find that the presence of a vesicle as a diffusion barrier modifies the shape of the [Ca2+] microdomain in the vicinity of the vesicle. Ca2+ diffusion dynamics also depend on the distance between the vesicle and the voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) and on the shape of the vesicle. The oblate spheroidal vesicle increases the [Ca2+] up to six times higher than that in the absence of a vesicle, while the prolate spheroidal vesicle can increase the [Ca2+] only 1.4 times. Our results also show that the presence of vesicles that have different geometries can maximally influence the [Ca2+] microdomain when the vesicle is located less than 50 nm from VGCCs.

  11. Metabolically Biotinylated Reporters for Electron Microscopic Imaging of Cytoplasmic Membrane Microdomains.

    PubMed

    Krager, Kimberly J; Koland, John G

    2016-01-01

    The protein and lipid substituents of cytoplasmic membranes are not in general homogeneously distributed across the membrane surface. Many membrane proteins, including ion channels, receptors, and other signaling molecules, exhibit a profound submicroscopic spatial organization, in some cases clustering in submicron membrane subdomains having a protein and lipid composition distinct from that of the bulk membrane. In the case of membrane-associated signaling molecules, mounting evidence indicates that their nanoscale organization, for example the colocalization of differing signaling molecules in the same membrane microdomains versus their segregation into distinct microdomain species, can significantly impact signal transduction. Biochemical membrane fractionation approaches have been used to characterize membrane subdomains of unique protein and lipid composition, including cholesterol-rich lipid raft structures. However, the intrinsically perturbing nature of fractionation methods makes the interpretation of such characterization subject to question, and indeed the existence and significance of lipid rafts remain controversial. Electron microscopic (EM) imaging of immunogold-labeled proteins in plasma membrane sheets has emerged as a powerful method for visualizing the nanoscale organization and colocalization of membrane proteins, which is not as perturbing of membrane structure as are biochemical approaches. For the purpose of imaging putative lipid raft structures, we recently developed a streamlined EM membrane sheet imaging procedure that employs a unique genetically encoded and metabolically biotinylated reporter that is targeted to membrane inner leaflet lipid rafts. We describe here the principles of this procedure and its application in the imaging of plasma membrane inner leaflet lipid rafts.

  12. VMP1 Establishes ER-Microdomains that Regulate Membrane Contact Sites and Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Tábara, Luis-Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) regulates organelle dynamics through the formation of membrane contact sites (MCS). Here we describe that VMP1, a multispanning ER-resident protein involved in autophagy, is enriched in ER micro-domains that are in close proximity to diverse organelles in HeLa and Cos-7 cells. These VMP1 puncta are highly dynamic, moving in concert with lipid droplets, mitochondria and endosomes. Some of these micro-domains are associated with ER sliding events and also with fission events of mitochondria and endosomes. VMP1-depleted cells display increased ER-mitochondria MCS and altered mitochondria morphology demonstrating a role in the regulation of MCS. Additional defects in ER structure and lipid droplets size and distribution are consistent with a more general function of VMP1 in membrane remodeling and organelle function. We hypothesize that in autophagy VMP1 is required for the correct morphogenesis of the omegasome by regulating MCS at the site of autophagosome formation. PMID:27861594

  13. Chemically-activatable alkyne-tagged probe for imaging microdomains in lipid bilayer membranes

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Matsushita, Taku; Izuta, Shin; Katada, Sumika; Ura, Manami; Ikeda, Taro; Hayashi, Gosuke; Suzuki, Yuta; Kobayashi, Koya; Tokunaga, Kyoya; Ozeki, Yasuyuki; Okamoto, Akimitsu

    2017-01-01

    A chemically-activatable alkynyl steroid analogue probe has been synthesized for visualizing the lipid raft membrane domains by Raman microscopy. The Raman probe, in which ring A of its steroid backbone is replaced with an alkynyl group, was designed to enable activation of the alkyne signal through the Eschenmoser-Tanabe fragmentation reaction of the oxidized cholesterol precursor in lipid bilayer membranes. The alkynyl steroid analogue was observed to form liquid-ordered raft-like domains on a model giant-liposome system in a similar manner as cholesterol, and the large alkyne signal of the accumulated probe at 2120 cm−1 was mapped on the microdomains with a Raman microscope. The alkyne moiety of the probe was confirmed to be converted from the α,β-epoxy ketone group of its precursor by reaction with p-toluensulfonyl hydrazine under a mild condition. Through the reaction, the alkyne signal of the probe was activated on the lipid bilayer membrane of liposomes. Furthermore, the signal activation of the probe was also detected on living cells by stimulated Raman scattering microscopy. The ring-A-opened alkyne steroid analogue, thus, provides a first chemically-activatable Raman probe as a promising tool for potentially unravelling the intracellular formation and trafficking of cholesterol-rich microdomains. PMID:28117375

  14. Mass spectrometric analysis of the glycosphingolipid-enriched microdomains of rat natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Man, Petr; Novák, Petr; Cebecauer, Marek; Horváth, Ondrej; Fiserová, Anna; Havlícek, Vladimír; Bezouska, Karel

    2005-01-01

    Glycosphingolipid-enriched microdomains (GEM) are membrane entities that concentrate glycosylphosphatiolylinositol(GPI)-anchored, acylated and membrane proteins important for immune receptor signaling. Using rat leukemic cell line RNK-16 we have initiated proteomic studies of microdomains in natural killer (NK) cells. Isolated plasma membranes were treated with Brij 58, or Nonidet-P40, or sodium carbonate. Extracts were separated by sucrose density gradient centrifugation into very light membrane, medium light membrane and heavy fractions, and a complete protein profile was analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry. Up to 250 proteins were unambiguously identified in each analyzed fraction. The first study of the proteome of NK cell GEM revealed several new aspects including identification of molecules not expected to be expressed in rat NK cells (e.g., NAP-22) or associated with GEM (e.g., NKR-P1, CD45, CD2). Moreover, it provided clear data consolidating controversial views concerning the occurrence of major histcompatibility complex glycoproteins and RT6.1/CD73/CD38 complex in NK cells. Our results also identified a large number of receptors as candidates for future functional studies.

  15. oxLDL and eLDL Induced Membrane Microdomains in Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wallner, Stefan; Grandl, Margot; Liebisch, Gerhard; Peer, Markus; Orsó, Evelyn; Sigrüner, Alexander; Sobota, Andrzej; Schmitz, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    ), dodecasaccharide-ceramide (CD65s) and GM1 ganglioside upon oxLDL loading. ApoE in contrast to apoA-I preferentially bound to the ceramide enriched surfaces of oxLDL loaded cells. Confocal microscopy showed a co-localization of acid sphingomyelinase with ceramide rich membrane microdomains. Conclusion eLDL leads to the formation of lipid droplets and preferentially induces cholesterol/sphingomyelin rich membrane microdomains while oxLDL promotes the development of cholesterol/ceramide rich microdomains via activation of the salvage pathway. PMID:27870891

  16. The Role of Type 4 Phosphodiesterases in Generating Microdomains of cAMP: Large Scale Stochastic Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Rodrigo F.; Terrin, Anna; Di Benedetto, Giulietta; Cannon, Robert C.; Koh, Wonryull; Kim, MyungSook; Zaccolo, Manuela; Blackwell, Kim T.

    2010-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) and its main effector Protein Kinase A (PKA) are critical for several aspects of neuronal function including synaptic plasticity. Specificity of synaptic plasticity requires that cAMP activates PKA in a highly localized manner despite the speed with which cAMP diffuses. Two mechanisms have been proposed to produce localized elevations in cAMP, known as microdomains: impeded diffusion, and high phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity. This paper investigates the mechanism of localized cAMP signaling using a computational model of the biochemical network in the HEK293 cell, which is a subset of pathways involved in PKA-dependent synaptic plasticity. This biochemical network includes cAMP production, PKA activation, and cAMP degradation by PDE activity. The model is implemented in NeuroRD: novel, computationally efficient, stochastic reaction-diffusion software, and is constrained by intracellular cAMP dynamics that were determined experimentally by real-time imaging using an Epac-based FRET sensor (H30). The model reproduces the high concentration cAMP microdomain in the submembrane region, distinct from the lower concentration of cAMP in the cytosol. Simulations further demonstrate that generation of the cAMP microdomain requires a pool of PDE4D anchored in the cytosol and also requires PKA-mediated phosphorylation of PDE4D which increases its activity. The microdomain does not require impeded diffusion of cAMP, confirming that barriers are not required for microdomains. The simulations reported here further demonstrate the utility of the new stochastic reaction-diffusion algorithm for exploring signaling pathways in spatially complex structures such as neurons. PMID:20661441

  17. Convenient and rapid removal of detergent from glycolipids in detergent-resistant membrane microdomains.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yusuke; Kabayama, Kazuya

    2012-03-01

    Although detergents are often essential in protocols, they are usually incompatible with further biochemical analysis. There are several methods for detergent removal, but the procedures are complicated or suffer from sample loss. Here, we describe a convenient and rapid method for detergent removal from sialic acid-containing glycosphingolipids (gangliosides) and neutral glycolipids in detergent-resistant membrane (DRM) microdomain. It is based on selective detergent extraction, in which the sample is dried on a glass tube, followed by washing with organic solvent. We investigated 18 organic solvents and used high performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization quadrupole ion trap time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-QIT-TOF MS) to confirm that dichloroethane (DCE) was the most suitable solvent and completely removed the nonionic detergent Triton X-100. Furthermore, DCE extraction effectively removed interference caused by other nonionic, zwitterionic, or ionic detergents in MALDI-QIT-TOF MS analysis.

  18. Diffusing Polymers in Confined Microdomains and Estimation of Chromosomal Territory Sizes from Chromosome Capture Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amitai, A.; Holcman, D.

    2013-06-01

    Is it possible to extract the size and structure of chromosomal territories (confined domain) from the encounter frequencies of chromosomal loci? To answer this question, we estimate the mean time for two monomers located on the same polymer to encounter, which we call the mean first encounter time in a confined microdomain (MFETC). We approximate the confined domain geometry by a harmonic potential well and obtain an asymptotic expression that agrees with Brownian simulations for the MFETC as a function of the polymer length, the radius of the confined domain, and the activation distance radius ɛ at which the two searching monomers meet. We illustrate the present approach using chromosome capture data for the encounter rate distribution of two loci depending on their distances along the DNA. We estimate the domain size that restricts the motion of one of these loci for chromosome II in yeast.

  19. The sensing of membrane microdomains based on pore-forming toxins.

    PubMed

    Skočaj, M; Bakrač, B; Križaj, I; Maček, P; Anderluh, G; Sepčić, K

    2013-01-01

    Membrane rafts are transient and unstable membrane microdomains that are enriched in sphingolipids, cholesterol, and specific proteins. They are involved in intracellular trafficking, signal transduction, pathogen entry, and attachment of various ligands. Increasing experimental evidence on the crucial biological roles of membrane rafts under normal and pathological conditions require new techniques for their structural and functional characterization. In particular, fluorescence-labeled cytolytic proteins that interact specifically with molecules enriched in rafts are of increasing interest. Cholera toxin subunit B interacts specifically with raft-residing ganglioside G(M1), and it has long been the lipid probe of choice for membrane rafts. Recently, four new pore-forming toxins have been proposed as selective raft markers: (i) equinatoxin II, a cytolysin from the sea anemone Actinia equina, which specifically recognizes free and membrane-embedded sphingomyelin; (ii) a truncated non-toxic mutant of a cytolytic protein, lysenin, from the earthworm Eisenia foetida, which specifically recognizes sphingomyelin-enriched membrane domains; (iii) a non-toxic derivative of the cholesterol-dependent cytolysin perfringolysin O, from the bacterium Clostridium perfringens, which selectively binds to membrane domains enriched in cholesterol; and (iv) ostreolysin, from the mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus, which does not bind to a single raft-enriched lipid component, but requires a specific combination of two of the most important raft-residing lipids: sphingomyelin and cholesterol. Nontoxic, raft-binding derivatives of cytolytic proteins have already been successfully used to explore both the structure and function of membrane rafts, and of raft-associated molecules. Here, we review these four new derivatives of pore-forming toxins as new putative markers of these membrane microdomains.

  20. Clostridium difficile Toxins Disrupt Epithelial Barrier Function by Altering Membrane Microdomain Localization of Tight Junction Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Nusrat, A.; von Eichel-Streiber, C.; Turner, J. R.; Verkade, P.; Madara, J. L.; Parkos, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    The anaerobic bacterium Clostridium difficile is the etiologic agent of pseudomembranous colitis. C. difficile toxins TcdA and TcdB are UDP-glucosyltransferases that monoglucosylate and thereby inactivate the Rho family of GTPases (W. P. Ciesla, Jr., and D. A. Bobak, J. Biol. Chem. 273:16021–16026, 1998). We utilized purified reference toxins of C. difficile, TcdA-10463 (TcdA) and TcdB-10463 (TcdB), and a model intestinal epithelial cell line to characterize their influence on tight-junction (TJ) organization and hence to analyze the mechanisms by which they contribute to the enhanced paracellular permeability and disease pathophysiology of pseudomembranous colitis. The increase in paracellular permeability induced by TcdA and TcdB was associated with disorganization of apical and basal F-actin. F-actin restructuring was paralleled by dissociation of occludin, ZO-1, and ZO-2 from the lateral TJ membrane without influencing the subjacent adherens junction protein, E-cadherin. In addition, we observed decreased association of actin with the TJ cytoplasmic plaque protein ZO-1. Differential detergent extraction and fractionation in sucrose density gradients revealed TcdB-induced redistribution of occludin and ZO-1 from detergent-insoluble fractions constituting “raft-like” membrane microdomains, suggesting an important role of Rho proteins in maintaining the association of TJ proteins with such microdomains. These toxin-mediated effects on actin and TJ structure provide a mechanism for early events in the pathophysiology of pseudomembranous colitis. PMID:11179295

  1. Multimodal SHG-2PF Imaging of Microdomain Ca2+-Contraction Coupling in Live cardiac myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Awasthi, Samir; Izu, Leighton T.; Mao, Ziliang; Jian, Zhong; Landas, Trevor; Lerner, Aaron; Shimkunas, Rafael; Woldeyesus, Rahwa; Bossuyt, Julie; Wood, Brittani; Chen, Yi-Je; Matthews, Dennis L.; Lieu, Deborah K.; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Lam, Kit S.; Chen-Izu, Ye; Chan, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale cardiac myocyte contraction is caused by Ca2+ binding to troponin C, which triggers the cross-bridge power stroke and myofilament sliding in sarcomeres. Synchronized Ca2+ release causes whole cell contraction and is readily observable with current microscopy techniques. However, it is unknown whether localized Ca2+ release, such as Ca2+ sparks and waves, can cause local sarcomere contraction. Contemporary imaging methods fall short of measuring microdomain Ca2+-contraction coupling in live cardiac myocytes. Objective To develop a method for imaging sarcomere-level Ca2+-contraction coupling in healthy and disease-model cardiac myocytes. Methods and Results Freshly isolated cardiac myocytes were loaded with the Ca2+-indicator Fluo-4. A confocal microscope equipped with a femtosecond-pulsed near-infrared laser was used to simultaneously excite second harmonic generation (SHG) from A-bands of myofibrils and two-photon fluorescence (2PF) from Fluo-4. Ca2+ signals and sarcomere strain correlated in space and time with short delays. Furthermore, Ca2+ sparks and waves caused contractions in subcellular microdomains, revealing a previously underappreciated role for these events in generating subcellular strain during diastole. Ca2+ activity and sarcomere strain were also imaged in paced cardiac myocytes under mechanical load, revealing spontaneous Ca2+ waves and correlated local contraction in pressure overload-induced cardiomyopathy. Conclusions Multi-modal SHG-2PF microscopy enables the simultaneous observation of Ca2+ release and mechanical strain at the sub-sarcomere level in living cardiac myocytes. The method benefits from the label-free nature of SHG, which allows A-bands to be imaged independently of T-tubule morphology and simultaneously with Ca2+ indicators. SHG-2PF imaging is widely applicable to the study of Ca2+-contraction coupling and mechano-chemo-transduction in both health and disease. PMID:26643875

  2. MAL Is a Regulator of the Recruitment of Myelin Protein PLP to Membrane Microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Bijlard, Marjolein; de Jonge, Jenny C.; Klunder, Bert; Nomden, Anita; Hoekstra, Dick; Baron, Wia

    2016-01-01

    In oligodendrocytes (OLGs), an indirect, transcytotic pathway is mediating transport of de novo synthesized PLP, a major myelin specific protein, from the apical-like plasma membrane to the specialized basolateral-like myelin membrane to prevent its premature compaction. MAL is a well-known regulator of polarized trafficking in epithelial cells, and given its presence in OLGs it was therefore of interest to investigate whether MAL played a similar role in PLP transport in OLGs, taking into account its timely expression in these cells. Our data revealed that premature expression of mCherry-MAL in oligodendrocyte progenitor cells interfered with terminal OLG differentiation, although myelin membrane formation per se was not impaired. In fact, also PLP transport to myelin membranes via the cell body plasma membrane was unaffected. However, the typical shift of PLP from TX-100-insoluble membrane domains to CHAPS-resistant, but TX-100-soluble membrane domains, seen in the absence of MAL expression, is substantially reduced upon expression of the MAL protein. Interestingly, not only in vitro, but also in developing brain a strongly diminished shift from TX-100 resistant to TX-100 soluble domains was observed. Consistently, the MAL-expression mediated annihilation of the typical membrane microdomain shift of PLP is also reflected by a loss of the characteristic surface expression profile of conformation-sensitive anti-PLP antibodies. Hence, these findings suggest that MAL is not involved in vesicular PLP trafficking to either the plasma membrane and/or the myelin membrane as such. Rather, we propose that MAL may regulate PLP’s distribution into distinct membrane microdomains that allow for lateral diffusion of PLP, directly from the plasma membrane to the myelin membrane once the myelin sheath has been assembled. PMID:27171274

  3. DJ-1, a causative gene product of a familial form of Parkinson's disease, is secreted through microdomains.

    PubMed

    Tsuboi, Yumi; Munemoto, Haruko; Ishikawa, Shizuma; Matsumoto, Ken-ichi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2008-07-23

    DJ-1 is secreted into the serum and plasma of patients with various diseases. In this study, DJ-1 was found to be secreted into culture media of various cells and the amount of wild-type DJ-1 secreted was two-fold greater than that of mutant DJ-1 of cysteine at 106 (C106). Furthermore, the oxidative status of more than 90% of the DJ-1 secreted from HeLa cells was SOH and SO2H forms of C106. A portion of DJ-1 in cells was localized in microdomains of the membrane. These findings suggest that DJ-1 is secreted through microdomains and that oxidation of DJ-1 at C106 facilitates the secretion.

  4. Platelet Activating Factor-Induced Ceramide Micro-Domains Drive Endothelial NOS Activation and Contribute to Barrier Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Predescu, Sanda; Knezevic, Ivana; Bardita, Cristina; Neamu, Radu Florin; Brovcovych, Viktor; Predescu, Dan

    2013-01-01

    The spatial and functional relationship between platelet activating factor-receptor (PAF-R) and nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in the lateral plane of the endothelial plasma membrane is poorly characterized. In this study, we used intact mouse pulmonary endothelial cells (ECs) as well as endothelial plasma membrane patches and subcellular fractions to define a new microdomain of plasmalemma proper where the two proteins colocalize and to demonstrate how PAF-mediated nitric oxide (NO) production fine-tunes ECs function as gatekeepers of vascular permeability. Using fluorescence microscopy and immunogold labeling electron microscopy (EM) on membrane patches we demonstrate that PAF-R is organized as clusters and colocalizes with a subcellular pool of eNOS, outside recognizable vesicular profiles. Moreover, PAF-induced acid sphingomyelinase activation generates a ceramide-based microdomain on the external leaflet of plasma membrane, inside of which a signalosome containing eNOS shapes PAF-stimulated NO production. Real-time measurements of NO after PAF-R ligation indicated a rapid (5 to 15 min) increase in NO production followed by a > 45 min period of reduction to basal levels. Moreover, at the level of this new microdomain, PAF induces a dynamic phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of Ser, Thr and Tyr residues of eNOS that correlates with NO production. Altogether, our findings establish the existence of a functional partnership PAF-R/eNOS on EC plasma membrane, at the level of PAF-induced ceramide plasma membrane microdomains, outside recognized vesicular profiles. PMID:24086643

  5. Deep-apical tubules: dynamic lipid-raft microdomains in the brush-border region of enterocytes.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Gert H; Pedersen, Jens; Niels-Christiansen, Lise-Lotte; Immerdal, Lissi; Danielsen, E Michael

    2003-07-01

    The brush border of small intestinal enterocytes is highly enriched in cholesterol- and glycosphingolipid-containing membrane microdomains, commonly termed as lipid 'rafts'. Functionally, transcytosis of IgA and exocytosis of newly made brush-border proteins in enterocytes occur through apical lipid raft-containing compartments, but little is otherwise known about these raft microdomains. We therefore studied in closer detail apical lipid-raft compartments in enterocytes by immunogold electron microscopy and biochemical analyses. Novel membrane structures, deep-apical tubules, were visualized by the non-permeable surface marker Ruthenium Red in the brush-border region of the cells. The surface-connected tubules were labelled by antibodies to caveolin-1 and the glycolipid asialo G(M1), and they were sensitive to cholesterol depletion by methyl-beta-cyclodextrin, indicating the presence of raft microdomains. Deep-apical tubules were positioned close to the actin rootlets of adjacent microvilli in the terminal web region, which had a diameter of 50-100 nm, and penetrated up to 1 microm into the cytoplasm. Markers for transcytosis, IgA and the polymeric immunoglobulin receptor, as well as the resident brush-border enzyme aminopeptidase N, were present in these deep-apical tubules. We propose that deep-apical tubules are a specialized lipid-raft microdomain in the brush-border region functioning as a hub in membrane trafficking at the brush border. In addition, the sensitivity to cholesterol depletion suggests that deep-apical tubules function as a cell-surface membrane reservoir for cholesterol and for rapid adaptive changes in the size of microvilli at the brush border.

  6. Microdomain [Ca(2+)] Fluctuations Alter Temporal Dynamics in Models of Ca(2+)-Dependent Signaling Cascades and Synaptic Vesicle Release.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Seth H

    2016-03-01

    Ca(2+)-dependent signaling is often localized in spatially restricted microdomains and may involve only 1 to 100 Ca(2+) ions. Fluctuations in the microdomain Ca(2+) concentration (Ca(2+)) can arise from a wide range of elementary processes, including diffusion, Ca(2+) influx, and association/dissociation with Ca(2+) binding proteins or buffers. However, it is unclear to what extent these fluctuations alter Ca(2+)-dependent signaling. We construct Markov models of a general Ca(2+)-dependent signaling cascade and Ca(2+)-triggered synaptic vesicle release. We compare the hitting (release) time distribution and statistics for models that account for [Ca(2+)] fluctuations with the corresponding models that neglect these fluctuations. In general, when Ca(2+) fluctuations are much faster than the characteristic time for the signaling event, the hitting time distributions and statistics for the models with and without Ca(2+) fluctuation are similar. However, when the timescale of Ca(2+) fluctuations is on the same order as the signaling cascade or slower, the hitting time mean and variability are typically increased, in particular when the average number of microdomain Ca(2+) ions is small, a consequence of a long-tailed hitting time distribution. In a model of Ca(2+)-triggered synaptic vesicle release, we demonstrate the conditions for which [Ca(2+)] fluctuations do and do not alter the distribution, mean, and variability of release timing. We find that both the release time mean and variability can be increased, demonstrating that Ca(2+) fluctuations are an important aspect of microdomain Ca(2+) signaling and further suggesting that Ca(2+) fluctuations in the presynaptic terminal may contribute to variability in synaptic vesicle release and thus variability in neuronal spiking.

  7. Microdomain texture and oxygen excess in the calcium-lanthanum ferrite: Ca 2LaFe 3O 8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alario-Franco, Miguel A.; Henche, María Jesús R.; Vallet, María; Calbet, JoséM. G.; Grenier, Jean-Claude; Wattiaux, Alain; Hagenmuller, Paul

    1983-01-01

    The analysis by TEM and electron diffraction of the anion-deficient perovskite Ca 2LaFe 3O 8 confirms the model previously proposed by J. C. Grenier et al. ( Mater. Res. Bull.11, 1219 (1976) ) with a structure intermediate between perovskite and brownmillerite. The unit cell parameters are ˜√2 ac, 3 ac, √2 ac (where ac is the cubic perovskite unit cell parameter). However, the unit cell is sometimes doubled along the b axis. When the sample is treated in air at temperatures around 1400°C, an oxidation process is observed and the unit cell becomes cubic ( ac = 3.848(3) Å). Nevertheless, electron diffraction investigations suggest the existence of a much more complex situation in which three-dimensional microdomains intergrow within one crystal. Each of these microdomains appears to have a structure clearly related to the low-temperature sample, but the superstructure is randomly found along each of the three cubic subcell directions (i.e., the unit cell √2 ac, √2 ac, 3 ac alternates randomly with 3 ac, √2 ac, √2 a, and with √2 ac, 3 ac, √2 ac). High-resolution electron microscopy allows one to ascertain this microdomain texture of the real crystal.

  8. Effects of Vanadium-Containing Compounds on Membrane Lipids and on Microdomains Used in Receptor-Mediated Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Roess, Deborah A.; Smith, Steven M. L.; Winter, Peter; Zhou, Jun; Dou, Ping; Baruah, Bharat; Trujillo, Alejandro M.; Levinger, Nancy E.; Yang, Xioda; Barisas, B. George; Crans, Debbie C.

    2011-01-01

    There is increasing evidence for the involvement of plasma membrane microdomains in insulin receptor function. Moreover, disruption of these structures, which are typically enriched in sphingomyelin and cholesterol, results in insulin resistance. Treatment strategies for insulin resistance include the use of vanadium compounds which have been shown in animal models to enhance insulin responsiveness. One possible mechanism for insulin-enhancing effects might involve direct effects of vanadium compounds on membrane lipid organization. These changes in lipid organization promote the partitioning of insulin receptors and other receptors into membrane microdomains where receptors are optimally functional. To explore this possibility, we have used several strategies involving vanadium complexes such as [VO2dipic]− (pyridin-2,6-dicarboxylatodioxovanadium(V)), decavanadate (V10O286−, V10), BMOV (bis(maltolato)oxovanadium(IV)) and [VO(saltris)]2 (2-salicylideniminato-2-(hydroxymethyl)-1,3-dihydroxypropane-oxovanadium(V)). Our strategies include an evaluation of interactions between vanadium-containing compounds and model lipid systems, an evaluation of the effects of vanadium compounds on lipid fluidity in erythrocyte membranes, and studies of the effects of vanadium-containing compounds on signaling events initiated by receptors known to use membrane microdomains as signaling platforms. PMID:18729092

  9. Effects of vanadium-containing compounds on membrane lipids and on microdomains used in receptor-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Roess, Deborah A; Smith, Steven M L; Winter, Peter; Zhou, Jun; Dou, Ping; Baruah, Bharat; Trujillo, Alejandro M; Levinger, Nancy E; Yang, Xioda; Barisas, B George; Crans, Debbie C

    2008-08-01

    There is increasing evidence for the involvement of plasma membrane microdomains in insulin receptor function. Moreover, disruption of these structures, which are typically enriched in sphingomyelin and cholesterol, results in insulin resistance. Treatment strategies for insulin resistance include the use of vanadium (V) compounds which have been shown in animal models to enhance insulin responsiveness. One possible mechanism for insulin-enhancing effects might involve direct effects of V compounds on membrane lipid organization. These changes in lipid organization promote the partitioning of insulin receptors and other receptors into membrane microdomains where receptors are optimally functional. To explore this possibility, we have used several strategies involving V complexes such as [VO(2)(dipic)](-) (pyridin-2,6-dicarboxylatodioxovanadium(V)), decavanadate (V(10)O(28)(6-), V(10)), BMOV (bis(maltolato)oxovanadium(IV)), and [VO(saltris)](2) (2-salicylideniminato-2-(hydroxymethyl)-1,3-dihydroxypropane-oxovanadium(V)). Our strategies include an evaluation of interactions between V-containing compounds and model lipid systems, an evaluation of the effects of V compounds on lipid fluidity in erythrocyte membranes, and studies of the effects of V-containing compounds on signaling events initiated by receptors known to use membrane microdomains as signaling platforms.

  10. HTLV-1 Tax deregulates autophagy by recruiting autophagic molecules into lipid raft microdomains.

    PubMed

    Ren, T; Takahashi, Y; Liu, X; Loughran, T P; Sun, S-C; Wang, H-G; Cheng, H

    2015-01-15

    The retroviral oncoprotein Tax from human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), an etiological factor that causes adult T-cell leukemia and lymphoma, has a crucial role in initiating T-lymphocyte transformation by inducing oncogenic signaling activation. We here report that Tax is a determining factor for dysregulation of autophagy in HTLV-1-transformed T cells and Tax-immortalized CD4 memory T cells. Tax facilitated autophagic process by activating inhibitor of κB (IκB) kinase (IKK) complex, which subsequently recruited an autophagy molecular complex containing Beclin1 and Bif-1 to the lipid raft microdomains. Tax engaged a crosstalk between IKK complex and autophagic molecule complex by directly interacting with both complexes, promoting assembly of LC3+ autophagosomes. Moreover, expression of lipid raft-targeted Bif-1 or Beclin1 was sufficient to induce formation of LC3+ autophagosomes, suggesting that Tax recruitment of autophagic molecules to lipid rafts is a dominant strategy to deregulate autophagy in the context of HTLV-1 transformation of T cells. Furthermore, depletion of autophagy molecules such as Beclin1 and PI3 kinase class III resulted in impaired growth of HTLV-1-transformed T cells, indicating a critical role of Tax-deregulated autophagy in promoting survival and transformation of virally infected T cells.

  11. Ankyrin-B structurally defines terminal microdomains of peripheral somatosensory axons.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, Maren; Vorwald, Silke; Sobotzik, Jürgen-Markus; Bennett, Vann; Schultz, Christian

    2013-07-01

    Axons are subdivided into functionally organized microdomains, which are required for generation and propagation of action potentials (APs). In the central nervous system (CNS), APs are generated near the soma in the axon initial segment (AIS) and propagated by nodes of Ranvier (noR). The crucial role of the membrane adapter proteins ankyrin-B and ankyrin-G as organizers of AIS and noR is now well established. By comparison, little is known on the localization and function of these proteins in sensory axon terminals of the peripheral nervous systems (PNS). Here, we tested the hypothesis that somatosensory PNS terminals are organized by distinct members of the ankyrin protein family. We discovered a specific distribution of ankyrin-B in somatosensory axon terminals of skin and muscle. Specifically, ankyrin-B was localized along the membrane of axons innervating Meissner corpuscles, Pacinian corpuscles and hair follicle receptors. Likewise, proprioceptive terminals of muscle spindles exhibited prominent ankyrin-B expression. Furthermore, ankyrin-B expression extended into nociceptive and thermoceptive intraepidermal nerve fibers. Interestingly, all studied somatosensory terminals were largely devoid of ankyrin-G, indicating that this scaffolding protein does not contribute to organization of mechanoelectric transduction zones in peripheral somatosensory neurons. Instead, we propose that ankyrin-B serves as a major membrane organizer in mechanoreceptive and nociceptive terminals of the PNS.

  12. Out-of-plane Block Copolymer Microdomains in High Aspect-Ratio Templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadelrab, Karim; Bai, Wubin; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo; Ross, Caroline

    Directed self-assembly DSA of block copolymers BCP proved to be a power approach for nanoscale fabrication. In addition, BCP with highly incompatible blocks (high Flory-Huggins interaction parameter (χ)) offer improvement in resolution of the BCP patterns. Unfortunately, high- χ BCPs usually exhibit large differences in surface affinity between the two blocks, forming a surface layer of the lower surface energy block and favoring in-plane orientation of lamellae or cylindrical microdomains. Here, we explore the conditions under which a high χ BCP creates an out-of-plane lamellar structure using high aspect ratio trenches with preferential walls. We employ self-consistent field theory SCFT and single mode expansion of Ginzburg-Landau free energy expression in the weak segregation limit to analytically construct a phase diagram of the in- and out-of-plane lamellae as a function of aspect ratio and surface affinity. It is found that achieving an out of plane lamellar structure necessitates a coupling between aspect ratio and surface functionality. In particular, strong side wall attraction results in out-of-plane lamellae when the trench aspect ratio is greater than unity. The results are validated for a polystyrene-block-polydimethylsiloxane (PS-b-PDMS) system within trenches made using interference lithography.

  13. Continuity of Monolayer-Bilayer Junctions for Localization of Lipid Raft Microdomains in Model Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Yong-Sang; Wittenberg, Nathan J.; Suh, Jeng-Hun; Lee, Sang-Wook; Sohn, Youngjoo; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Parikh, Atul N.; Lee, Sin-Doo

    2016-01-01

    We show that the selective localization of cholesterol-rich domains and associated ganglioside receptors prefer to occur in the monolayer across continuous monolayer-bilayer junctions (MBJs) in supported lipid membranes. For the MBJs, glass substrates were patterned with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) oligomers by thermally-assisted contact printing, leaving behind 3 nm-thick PDMS patterns. The hydrophobicity of the transferred PDMS patterns was precisely tuned by the stamping temperature. Lipid monolayers were formed on the PDMS patterned surface while lipid bilayers were on the bare glass surface. Due to the continuity of the lipid membranes over the MBJs, essentially free diffusion of lipids was allowed between the monolayer on the PDMS surface and the upper leaflet of the bilayer on the glass substrate. The preferential localization of sphingomyelin, ganglioside GM1 and cholesterol in the monolayer region enabled to develop raft microdomains through coarsening of nanorafts. Our methodology provides a simple and effective scheme of non-disruptive manipulation of the chemical landscape associated with lipid phase separations, which leads to more sophisticated applications in biosensors and as cell culture substrates. PMID:27230411

  14. Continuity of monolayer-bilayer junctions for localization of lipid raft microdomains in model membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Yong -Sang; Wittenberg, Nathan J.; Suh, Jeng -Hun; Lee, Sang -Wook; Sohn, Youngjoo; Oh, Sang -Hyun; Parikh, Atul N.; Lee, Sin -Doo

    2016-05-27

    We show that the selective localization of cholesterol-rich domains and associated ganglioside receptors prefer to occur in the monolayer across continuous monolayer-bilayer junctions (MBJs) in supported lipid membranes. For the MBJs, glass substrates were patterned with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) oligomers by thermally-assisted contact printing, leaving behind 3 nm-thick PDMS patterns. The hydrophobicity of the transferred PDMS patterns was precisely tuned by the stamping temperature. Lipid monolayers were formed on the PDMS patterned surface while lipid bilayers were on the bare glass surface. Due to the continuity of the lipid membranes over the MBJs, essentially free diffusion of lipids was allowed between the monolayer on the PDMS surface and the upper leaflet of the bilayer on the glass substrate. The preferential localization of sphingomyelin, ganglioside GM1 and cholesterol in the monolayer region enabled to develop raft microdomains through coarsening of nanorafts. Furthermore, our methodology provides a simple and effective scheme of non-disruptive manipulation of the chemical landscape associated with lipid phase separations, which leads to more sophisticated applications in biosensors and as cell culture substrates.

  15. Cell wall polysaccharide synthases are located in detergent-resistant membrane microdomains in oomycetes.

    PubMed

    Briolay, Anne; Bouzenzana, Jamel; Guichardant, Michel; Deshayes, Christian; Sindt, Nicolas; Bessueille, Laurence; Bulone, Vincent

    2009-04-01

    The pathways responsible for cell wall polysaccharide biosynthesis are vital in eukaryotic microorganisms. The corresponding synthases are potential targets of inhibitors such as fungicides. Despite their fundamental and economical importance, most polysaccharide synthases are not well characterized, and their molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. With the example of Saprolegnia monoica as a model organism, we show that chitin and (1-->3)-beta-d-glucan synthases are located in detergent-resistant membrane microdomains (DRMs) in oomycetes, a phylum that comprises some of the most devastating microorganisms in the agriculture and aquaculture industries. Interestingly, no cellulose synthase activity was detected in the DRMs. The purified DRMs exhibited similar biochemical features as lipid rafts from animal, plant, and yeast cells, although they contained some species-specific lipids. This report sheds light on the lipid environment of the (1-->3)-beta-d-glucan and chitin synthases, as well as on the sterol biosynthetic pathways in oomycetes. The results presented here are consistent with a function of lipid rafts in cell polarization and as platforms for sorting specific sets of proteins targeted to the plasma membrane, such as carbohydrate synthases. The involvement of DRMs in the biosynthesis of major cell wall polysaccharides in eukaryotic microorganisms suggests a function of lipid rafts in hyphal morphogenesis and tip growth.

  16. Dynamic Monte Carlo simulations of double crystallization accelerated in microdomains of diblock copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Ma, Yu; Li, Juan; Jiang, Xiaoming; Hu, Wenbing

    2012-03-01

    We report dynamic Monte Carlo simulations of microphase separated diblock copolymers, to investigate how crystallization of one species could accelerate the subsequent crystallization of another species. Although the lattice copolymer model brings a boundary constraint to the long periods of microdomains, the single-molecular-level force balance between two blocks and its change can be revealed in this simple approach. We found two contrastable acceleration mechanisms: (1) the metastable lamellar crystals of one species become thicker at higher crystallization temperatures, sacrificing its microphase interfacial area to make a larger coil-stretching of another amorphous species and hence to accelerate subsequent crystallization of the latter with a more favorable conformation. (2) While in the case allowing chain-sliding in the crystal, the equilibrated lamellar crystals of one species become thinner at higher temperatures, sacrificing its thermal stability to gain a higher conformational entropy of another amorphous species and hence to accelerate subsequent crystallization of the latter with a stronger tension at the block junction. Parallel situations of experiments have been discussed.

  17. Continuity of monolayer-bilayer junctions for localization of lipid raft microdomains in model membranes

    DOE PAGES

    Ryu, Yong -Sang; Wittenberg, Nathan J.; Suh, Jeng -Hun; ...

    2016-05-27

    We show that the selective localization of cholesterol-rich domains and associated ganglioside receptors prefer to occur in the monolayer across continuous monolayer-bilayer junctions (MBJs) in supported lipid membranes. For the MBJs, glass substrates were patterned with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) oligomers by thermally-assisted contact printing, leaving behind 3 nm-thick PDMS patterns. The hydrophobicity of the transferred PDMS patterns was precisely tuned by the stamping temperature. Lipid monolayers were formed on the PDMS patterned surface while lipid bilayers were on the bare glass surface. Due to the continuity of the lipid membranes over the MBJs, essentially free diffusion of lipids was allowed betweenmore » the monolayer on the PDMS surface and the upper leaflet of the bilayer on the glass substrate. The preferential localization of sphingomyelin, ganglioside GM1 and cholesterol in the monolayer region enabled to develop raft microdomains through coarsening of nanorafts. Furthermore, our methodology provides a simple and effective scheme of non-disruptive manipulation of the chemical landscape associated with lipid phase separations, which leads to more sophisticated applications in biosensors and as cell culture substrates.« less

  18. Endogenous Ca2+ buffer concentration and Ca2+ microdomains in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Müller, Andreas; Kukley, Maria; Stausberg, Pia; Beck, Heinz; Müller, Wolfgang; Dietrich, Dirk

    2005-01-19

    Ca2+-binding proteins are ubiquitously expressed throughout the CNS and serve as valuable immunohistochemical markers for certain types of neurons. However, the functional role of most Ca2+-binding proteins has to date remained obscure because their concentration in central neurons is not known. In this study, we investigate the intracellular concentration of the widely expressed Ca2+-binding protein calbindin-D28k in adult hippocampal slices using patch-clamp recordings and immunohistochemistry. First, we show that calbindin-D28k freely exchanges between patch pipette and cytoplasm during whole cell patch-clamp recordings with a time constant of approximately 10 min. Substituting known concentrations of recombinant calbindin-D28k in patch pipettes enabled us to determine the endogenous calbindin-D28k concentration by postrecording immunohistochemistry. Using this calibration procedure, we find that mature granule cells (doublecortin-) contain approximately 40 microm, and newborn granule cells (doublecortin+) contain 0-20 microm calbindin-D28k. CA3 stratum radiatum interneurons and CA1 pyramidal cells enclose approximately 47 and approximately 45 microm calbindin-D28k, respectively. Numerical simulations showed that 40 microm calbindin-D28k is capable of tuning Ca2+ microdomains associated with action potentials at the mouth of single or clustered Ca2+ channels: calbindin-D28k reduces the increment in free Ca2+ at a distance of 100 and 200 nm by 20 and 35%, respectively, and strongly accelerates the collapse of the Ca2+ gradient after cessation of Ca2+ influx. These data suggest that calbindin-D28k equips hippocampal neurons with approximately 160 microm mobile, high-affinity Ca2+-binding sites (kappa(S) approximately 200) that slow and reduce global Ca2+ signals while they enhance the spatiotemporal fidelity of submicroscopic Ca2+ signals.

  19. Caveolae/lipid rafts in fibroblast-like synoviocytes: ectopeptidase-rich membrane microdomains.

    PubMed Central

    Riemann, D; Hansen, G H; Niels-Christiansen, L; Thorsen, E; Immerdal, L; Santos, A N; Kehlen, A; Langner, J; Danielsen, E M

    2001-01-01

    Membrane peptidases play important roles in cell activation, proliferation and communication. Human fibroblast-like synoviocytes express considerable amounts of aminopeptidase N/CD13, dipeptidyl peptidase IV/CD26, and neprilysin/CD10, transmembrane proteins previously proposed to be involved in the regulation of intra-articular levels of neuropeptides and chemotactic mediators as well as in adhesion and cell-cell interactions. Here, we report these peptidases in synoviocytes to be localized predominantly in glycolipid- and cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains known as 'rafts'. At the ultrastructural level, aminopeptidase N/CD13 and dipeptidyl peptidase IV/CD26 were found in caveolae, in particular in intracellular yet surface-connected vesicle-like structures and 'rosettes' made up of several caveolae. In addition, clusters of peptidases were seen at the cell surface in flat patches ranging in size from about 60 to 160 nm. Cholesterol depletion of synoviocytes by methyl-beta-cyclodextrin disrupted >90% of the caveolae and reduced the raft localization of aminopeptidase N/CD13 without affecting Ala-p-nitroanilide-cleaving activity of confluent cell cultures. In co-culture experiments with T-lymphocytes, cholesterol depletion of synoviocytes greatly reduced their capability to induce an early lymphocytic expression of aminopeptidase N/CD13. We propose caveolae/rafts to be peptidase-rich 'hot-spot' regions of the synoviocyte plasma membrane required for functional cell-cell interactions with lymphocytes. The peptidases may act in concert with other types of proteins such as receptors and signal transducers localized in these specialized membrane domains. PMID:11171078

  20. Identification of detergent-resistant plasma membrane microdomains in dictyostelium: enrichment of signal transduction proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Z; Devreotes, P N

    1997-01-01

    Unlike most other cellular proteins, the chemoattractant receptor, cAR1, of Dictyostelium is resistant to extraction by the zwitterionic detergent, CHAPS. We exploited this property to isolate a subcellular fraction highly enriched in cAR1 by flotation of CHAPS lysates of cells in sucrose density gradients. Immunogold electron microscopy studies revealed a homogeneous preparation of membrane bilayer sheets. This preparation, designated CHAPS-insoluble floating fraction (CHIEF), also contained a defined set of 20 other proteins and a single uncharged lipid. Cell surface biotinylation and preembedding immunoelectron microscopy both confirmed the plasma membrane origin of this preparation. The cell surface phosphodiesterase (PDE) and a downstream effector of cAR1, adenylate cyclase (ACA), were specifically localized in these structures, whereas the cell adhesion molecule gp80, most of the major cell surface membrane proteins, cytoskeletal components, the actin-binding integral membrane protein ponticulin, and G-protein alpha- and beta-subunits were absent. Overall, CHIFF represents about 3-5% of cell externally exposed membrane proteins. All of these results indicate that CHIFF is derived from specialized microdomains of the plasma membrane. The method of isolation is analogous to that of caveolae. However, we were unable to detect distinct caveolae-like structures on the cell surface associated with cAR1, which showed a diffuse staining profile. The discovery of CHIFF facilitates the purification of cAR1 and related signaling proteins and the biochemical characterization of receptor-mediated processes such as G-protein activation and desensitization. It also has important implications for the "fluid mosaic" model of the plasma membrane structures. Images PMID:9168471

  1. Utilization of monensin for detection of microdomains in cholesterol containing membrane.

    PubMed

    Bransburg-Zabary, S; Nachliel, E; Gutman, M

    1996-12-04

    The effect of cholesterol on the monensin mediated proton-cation exchange reaction was measured in the time-resolved domain. The experimental system consisted of a black lipid membrane equilibrated with monensin (Nachliel, E., Finkelstein, Y. and Gutman, M. (1996) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1285, 131-145). The membrane separated two compartments containing electrolyte solutions and pyranine (8-hydroxypyrene 1,3,6-trisulfonate) was added on to one side of the membrane. A short laser pulse was used to cause a brief transient acidification of the pyranine-containing solution and the resulting electric signal, derived from proton-cation exchange, was measured in the microsecond time domain. Incorporation of cholesterol had a clear effect on the electric transients as measured with Na+ or K+ as transportable cations. The measured transients were subjected to rigorous analysis based on numeric integration of coupled, non-linear, differential rate equations which correspond with the perturbed multi-equilibria state between all reactants present in the system. The various kinetic parameters of the reaction and their dependence on the cholesterol content had been determined. On the basis of these observations we can draw the following conclusions: (1) Cholesterol perturbed the homogeneity of the membrane and microdomains were formed, having a composition that differed from the average value. The ionophore was found in domains which were practically depleted of phosphatidylserine. (2) The diffusivity of the protonated monensin (MoH) was not affected by the presence of cholesterol, indicating that the viscosity of the central layer of the membrane was unaltered. (3) The diffusivity of the monensin metal complexes (MoNa and MoK) was significantly increased upon addition of cholesterol. As the viscosity along the cross membranal diffusion route is unchanged, the enhanced motion of the MoNa and MoK is attributed to variations of the electrostatic potential within the domains.

  2. Daptomycin inhibits cell envelope synthesis by interfering with fluid membrane microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Anna; Wenzel, Michaela; Strahl, Henrik; Grein, Fabian; Saaki, Terrens N. V.; Kohl, Bastian; Siersma, Tjalling; Bandow, Julia E.; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Schneider, Tanja; Hamoen, Leendert W.

    2016-01-01

    Daptomycin is a highly efficient last-resort antibiotic that targets the bacterial cell membrane. Despite its clinical importance, the exact mechanism by which daptomycin kills bacteria is not fully understood. Different experiments have led to different models, including (i) blockage of cell wall synthesis, (ii) membrane pore formation, and (iii) the generation of altered membrane curvature leading to aberrant recruitment of proteins. To determine which model is correct, we carried out a comprehensive mode-of-action study using the model organism Bacillus subtilis and different assays, including proteomics, ionomics, and fluorescence light microscopy. We found that daptomycin causes a gradual decrease in membrane potential but does not form discrete membrane pores. Although we found no evidence for altered membrane curvature, we confirmed that daptomycin inhibits cell wall synthesis. Interestingly, using different fluorescent lipid probes, we showed that binding of daptomycin led to a drastic rearrangement of fluid lipid domains, affecting overall membrane fluidity. Importantly, these changes resulted in the rapid detachment of the membrane-associated lipid II synthase MurG and the phospholipid synthase PlsX. Both proteins preferentially colocalize with fluid membrane microdomains. Delocalization of these proteins presumably is a key reason why daptomycin blocks cell wall synthesis. Finally, clustering of fluid lipids by daptomycin likely causes hydrophobic mismatches between fluid and more rigid membrane areas. This mismatch can facilitate proton leakage and may explain the gradual membrane depolarization observed with daptomycin. Targeting of fluid lipid domains has not been described before for antibiotics and adds another dimension to our understanding of membrane-active antibiotics. PMID:27791134

  3. The HIV coat protein gp120 promotes forward trafficking and surface clustering of NMDA receptors in membrane microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hangxiu; Bae, Mihyun; Tovar-y-Romo, Luis B.; Patel, Neha; Bandaru, Veera Venkata Ratnam; Pomerantz, Daniel; Steiner, Joseph; Haughey, Norman J.

    2011-01-01

    Infection by the Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can result in debilitating neurological syndromes collectively known as HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). While the HIV coat protein gp120 has been identified as a potent neurotoxin that enhances NMDA receptor function, the exact mechanisms for effect are not known. Here we provide evidence that gp120 activates two separate signaling pathways that converge to enhance NMDA-evoked calcium flux by clustering NMDA receptors in modified membrane microdomains. HIV gp120 enlarged, and stabilized the structure of lipid rafts on neuronal dendrites by mechanisms that involved a redox-regulated translocation of a sphingomyelin hydrolase (neutral sphingomyelinase-2; nSMase2) to the plasma membrane. A concurrent pathway was activated that enhanced the forward traffic of NMDA receptors by promoting a PKA-dependent phopshorylation of the NR1 C-terminal serine 897 (that masks an ER retention signal), followed by a PKC-dependent phosphorylation of serine 896 (important for surface expression). NMDA receptors were preferentially targeted to synapses, and clustered in modified membrane microdomains. In these conditions, NMDA receptors were unable to laterally disperse, and did not internalize, even in response to strong agonist induction. Focal NMDA-evoked calcium bursts were enhanced three-fold in these regions. Inhibiting membrane modification or NR1 phosphorylation prevented gp120 from enhancing the surface localization and clustering of NMDA receptors, while disrupting the structure of membrane microdomains restored the ability of NMDA receptors to disperse and internalize following gp120. These findings demonstrate that gp120 contributes to synaptic dysfunction in the setting of HIV-infection by interfering with the traffic of NMDA receptors. PMID:22114277

  4. ATP-binding cassette transporters and sterol O-acyltransferases interact at membrane microdomains to modulate sterol uptake and esterification

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Sonia; Balderes, Dina; Kim, Christine; Guo, Zhongmin A.; Wilcox, Lisa; Area-Gomez, Estela; Snider, Jamie; Wolinski, Heimo; Stagljar, Igor; Granato, Juliana T.; Ruggles, Kelly V.; DeGiorgis, Joseph A.; Kohlwein, Sepp D.; Schon, Eric A.; Sturley, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    A key component of eukaryotic lipid homeostasis is the esterification of sterols with fatty acids by sterol O-acyltransferases (SOATs). The esterification reactions are allosterically activated by their sterol substrates, the majority of which accumulate at the plasma membrane. We demonstrate that in yeast, sterol transport from the plasma membrane to the site of esterification is associated with the physical interaction of the major SOAT, acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT)-related enzyme (Are)2p, with 2 plasma membrane ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters: Aus1p and Pdr11p. Are2p, Aus1p, and Pdr11p, unlike the minor acyltransferase, Are1p, colocalize to sterol and sphingolipid-enriched, detergent-resistant microdomains (DRMs). Deletion of either ABC transporter results in Are2p relocalization to detergent-soluble membrane domains and a significant decrease (53–36%) in esterification of exogenous sterol. Similarly, in murine tissues, the SOAT1/Acat1 enzyme and activity localize to DRMs. This subcellular localization is diminished upon deletion of murine ABC transporters, such as Abcg1, which itself is DRM associated. We propose that the close proximity of sterol esterification and transport proteins to each other combined with their residence in lipid-enriched membrane microdomains facilitates rapid, high-capacity sterol transport and esterification, obviating any requirement for soluble intermediary proteins.—Gulati, S., Balderes, D., Kim, C., Guo, Z. A., Wilcox, L., Area-Gomez, E., Snider, J., Wolinski, H., Stagljar, I., Granato, J. T., Ruggles, K. V., DeGiorgis, J. A., Kohlwein, S. D., Schon, E. A., Sturley, S. L. ATP-binding cassette transporters and sterol O-acyltransferases interact at membrane microdomains to modulate sterol uptake and esterification. PMID:26220175

  5. Crystallization around solid-like nanosized docks can explain the specificity, diversity, and stability of membrane microdomains

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Rodrigo F. M.; Joly, Etienne

    2014-01-01

    To date, it is widely accepted that microdomains do form in the biological membranes of all eukaryotic cells, and quite possibly also in prokaryotes. Those sub-micrometric domains play crucial roles in signaling, in intracellular transport, and even in inter-cellular communications. Despite their ubiquitous distribution, and the broad and lasting interest invested in those microdomains, their actual nature and composition, and even the physical rules that regiment their assembly still remain elusive and hotly debated. One of the most often considered models is the raft hypothesis, i.e., the partition of lipids between liquid disordered and ordered phases (Ld and Lo, respectively), the latter being enriched in sphingolipids and cholesterol. Although it is experimentally possible to obtain the formation of microdomains in synthetic membranes through Ld/Lo phase separation, there is an ever increasing amount of evidence, obtained with a wide array of experimental approaches, that a partition between domains in Ld and Lo phases cannot account for many of the observations collected in real cells. In particular, it is now commonly perceived that the plasma membrane of cells is mostly in Lo phase and recent data support the existence of gel or solid ordered domains in a whole variety of live cells under physiological conditions. Here, we present a model whereby seeds comprised of oligomerised proteins and/or lipids would serve as crystal nucleation centers for the formation of diverse gel/crystalline nanodomains. This could confer the selectivity necessary for the formation of multiple types of membrane domains, as well as the stability required to match the time frames of cellular events, such as intra- or inter-cellular transport or assembly of signaling platforms. Testing of this model will, however, require the development of new methods allowing the clear-cut discrimination between Lo and solid nanoscopic phases in live cells. PMID:24634670

  6. Non-selective distribution of isomeric cholesterol hydroperoxides to microdomains in cell membranes and activation of matrix metalloproteinase activity in a model of dermal cells.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Toshiyuki; Noma, Ayako; Shimada, Sachiko; Ishii, Nanase; Bando, Noriko; Kawai, Yoshichika; Terao, Junji

    2013-09-01

    Cholesterol hydroperoxides (ChOOHs) are included as lipid peroxidation products in the skin exposed to ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation. They may exert physicochemical actions affecting biomembrane rigidity because cholesterol is one of the major components of cell membranes. We investigated the distribution of isomeric ChOOHs in heterogeneous cell membranes with different lipid profiles using mouse fibroblast NIH-3T3 cells as a model of the dermis. Before and after UVA irradiation in the presence of hematoporphyrin, cell membranes were partitioned to microdomains (lipid rafts and caveolae) containing a higher amount of cholesterol and non-microdomains (containing a lower amount of cholesterol) by ultracentrifugation. By a combination of diphenylpyrenylphosphine-thin-layer chromatography blotting analyses and gas chromatography-electron ionization-mass spectrometry/selected ion monitoring analyses, ChOOH isomers were determined as their trimethylsilyloxyl derivatives. Cholesterol 5α-, 7α- and 7β-hydroperoxide were found as isomeric ChOOHs before irradiation. The amounts of the three ChOOH isomers increased significantly after photoirradiation for 2h. No difference was observed between microdomains and non-microdomains with regard to the ratio of the amounts of isomeric ChOOHs to that of cholesterol, suggesting that these ChOOH isomers were distributed equally in both parts depending on cholesterol content. When cells were treated with a purified mixture of ChOOH isomers, cell membranes incorporated ChOOHs into microdomains as well as non-microdomains evenly. Cellular matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity was elevated by treatment with the purified mixture of ChOOH isomers. These results strongly suggest that ChOOHs accumulate in cell membranes irrespective of the heterogeneous microstructure and promote MMP activity if dermal cells are exposed to photodynamic actions.

  7. ATP-binding cassette transporters and sterol O-acyltransferases interact at membrane microdomains to modulate sterol uptake and esterification.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Sonia; Balderes, Dina; Kim, Christine; Guo, Zhongmin A; Wilcox, Lisa; Area-Gomez, Estela; Snider, Jamie; Wolinski, Heimo; Stagljar, Igor; Granato, Juliana T; Ruggles, Kelly V; DeGiorgis, Joseph A; Kohlwein, Sepp D; Schon, Eric A; Sturley, Stephen L

    2015-11-01

    A key component of eukaryotic lipid homeostasis is the esterification of sterols with fatty acids by sterol O-acyltransferases (SOATs). The esterification reactions are allosterically activated by their sterol substrates, the majority of which accumulate at the plasma membrane. We demonstrate that in yeast, sterol transport from the plasma membrane to the site of esterification is associated with the physical interaction of the major SOAT, acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT)-related enzyme (Are)2p, with 2 plasma membrane ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters: Aus1p and Pdr11p. Are2p, Aus1p, and Pdr11p, unlike the minor acyltransferase, Are1p, colocalize to sterol and sphingolipid-enriched, detergent-resistant microdomains (DRMs). Deletion of either ABC transporter results in Are2p relocalization to detergent-soluble membrane domains and a significant decrease (53-36%) in esterification of exogenous sterol. Similarly, in murine tissues, the SOAT1/Acat1 enzyme and activity localize to DRMs. This subcellular localization is diminished upon deletion of murine ABC transporters, such as Abcg1, which itself is DRM associated. We propose that the close proximity of sterol esterification and transport proteins to each other combined with their residence in lipid-enriched membrane microdomains facilitates rapid, high-capacity sterol transport and esterification, obviating any requirement for soluble intermediary proteins.

  8. High resolution structural evidence suggests the Sarcoplasmic Reticulum forms microdomains with Acidic Stores (lysosomes) in the heart

    PubMed Central

    Aston, Daniel; Capel, Rebecca A.; Ford, Kerrie L.; Christian, Helen C.; Mirams, Gary R.; Rog-Zielinska, Eva A.; Kohl, Peter; Galione, Antony; Burton, Rebecca A. B.; Terrar, Derek A.

    2017-01-01

    Nicotinic Acid Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate (NAADP) stimulates calcium release from acidic stores such as lysosomes and is a highly potent calcium-mobilising second messenger. NAADP plays an important role in calcium signalling in the heart under basal conditions and following β-adrenergic stress. Nevertheless, the spatial interaction of acidic stores with other parts of the calcium signalling apparatus in cardiac myocytes is unknown. We present evidence that lysosomes are intimately associated with the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) in ventricular myocytes; a median separation of 20 nm in 2D electron microscopy and 3.3 nm in 3D electron tomography indicates a genuine signalling microdomain between these organelles. Fourier analysis of immunolabelled lysosomes suggests a sarcomeric pattern (dominant wavelength 1.80 μm). Furthermore, we show that lysosomes form close associations with mitochondria (median separation 6.2 nm in 3D studies) which may provide a basis for the recently-discovered role of NAADP in reperfusion-induced cell death. The trigger hypothesis for NAADP action proposes that calcium release from acidic stores subsequently acts to enhance calcium release from the SR. This work provides structural evidence in cardiac myocytes to indicate the formation of microdomains between acidic and SR calcium stores, supporting emerging interpretations of NAADP physiology and pharmacology in heart. PMID:28094777

  9. Rafts and the battleships of defense: the multifaceted microdomains for positive and negative signals in immune cells.

    PubMed

    Szöor, Arpád; Szöllosi, János; Vereb, György

    2010-05-04

    Recognition of the heterogeneity of the cell membrane was one of the most important scientific achievements in the last decades. Since coining the term "lipid rafts", continuous development of advanced microscopic and spectroscopic techniques has vastly expanded our view on these cell membrane microdomains that appear to have almost as many faces as researchers that look at them; they are variable in stability, size and composition that can change in a highly dynamic manner both by recruiting and expelling components as well as by coalescing and breaking up into smaller units. They have, however, one common feature: all eukaryotic cells present some variation of lipid rafts. Cells of the immune system are not exception to this, regardless of their lymphoid or myeloid origin their membranes show a domain structure and these domains serve to condense or reject particular transmembrane, GPI-linked and intracellularly membrane-anchored proteins as function requires. Here we provide a concise overview about the various weapons and shields that immune cells concentrate into their rafts, which have come into sight during the past years. The positive and negative regulatory roles of these microdomains are essential both in the functions of innate immunity and processes concatenated in the adaptive immune response.

  10. Heterogeneous distribution of exocytotic microdomains in adrenal chromaffin cells resolved by high-density diamond ultra-microelectrode arrays

    PubMed Central

    Gosso, Sara; Turturici, Marco; Franchino, Claudio; Colombo, Elisabetta; Pasquarelli, Alberto; Carbone, Emilio; Carabelli, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe the ability of a high-density diamond microelectrode array targeted to resolve multi-site detection of fast exocytotic events from single cells. The array consists of nine boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond ultra-microelectrodes (9-Ch NCD-UMEA) radially distributed within a circular area of the dimensions of a single cell. The device can be operated in voltammetric or chronoamperometric configuration. Sensitivity to catecholamines, tested by dose–response calibrations, set the lowest detectable concentration of adrenaline to ∼5 μm. Catecholamine release from bovine or mouse chromaffin cells could be triggered by electrical stimulation or external KCl-enriched solutions. Spikes detected from the cell apex using carbon fibre microelectrodes showed an excellent correspondence with events measured at the bottom of the cell by the 9-Ch NCD-UMEA, confirming the ability of the array to resolve single quantal secretory events. Subcellular localization of exocytosis was provided by assigning each quantal event to one of the nine channels based on its location. The resulting mapping highlights the heterogeneous distribution of secretory activity in cell microdomains of 12–27 μm2. In bovine chromaffin cells, secretion was highly heterogeneous with zones of high and medium activity in 54% of the cell surface and zones of low or no activity in the remainder. The ‘non-active’ (‘silent’) zones covered 24% of the total and persisted for 6–8 min, indicating stable location. The 9-Ch NCD-UMEA therefore appears suitable for investigating the microdomain organization of neurosecretion with high spatial resolution. PMID:24879870

  11. The membrane-associated form of α(s1)-casein interacts with cholesterol-rich detergent-resistant microdomains.

    PubMed

    Le Parc, Annabelle; Honvo Houéto, Edith; Pigat, Natascha; Chat, Sophie; Leonil, Joëlle; Chanat, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Caseins, the main milk proteins, interact with colloidal calcium phosphate to form the casein micelle. The mesostructure of this supramolecular assembly markedly influences its nutritional and technological functionalities. However, its detailed molecular organization and the cellular mechanisms involved in its biogenesis have been only partially established. There is a growing body of evidence to support the concept that α(s1)-casein takes center stage in casein micelle building and transport in the secretory pathway of mammary epithelial cells. Here we have investigated the membrane-associated form of α(s1)-casein in rat mammary epithelial cells. Using metabolic labelling we show that α(s1)-casein becomes associated with membranes at the level of the endoplasmic reticulum, with no subsequent increase at the level of the Golgi apparatus. From morphological and biochemical data, it appears that caseins are in a tight relationship with membranes throughout the secretory pathway. On the other hand, we have observed that the membrane-associated form of α(s1)-casein co-purified with detergent-resistant membranes. It was poorly solubilised by Tween 20, partially insoluble in Lubrol WX, and substantially insoluble in Triton X-100. Finally, we found that cholesterol depletion results in the release of the membrane-associated form of α(s1)-casein. These experiments reveal that the insolubility of α(s1)-casein reflects its partial association with a cholesterol-rich detergent-resistant microdomain. We propose that the membrane-associated form of α(s1)-casein interacts with the lipid microdomain, or lipid raft, that forms within the membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum, for efficient forward transport and sorting in the secretory pathway of mammary epithelial cells.

  12. The Membrane-Associated Form of αs1-Casein Interacts with Cholesterol-Rich Detergent-Resistant Microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Le Parc, Annabelle; Honvo Houéto, Edith; Pigat, Natascha; Chat, Sophie; Leonil, Joëlle; Chanat, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Caseins, the main milk proteins, interact with colloidal calcium phosphate to form the casein micelle. The mesostructure of this supramolecular assembly markedly influences its nutritional and technological functionalities. However, its detailed molecular organization and the cellular mechanisms involved in its biogenesis have been only partially established. There is a growing body of evidence to support the concept that αs1-casein takes center stage in casein micelle building and transport in the secretory pathway of mammary epithelial cells. Here we have investigated the membrane-associated form of αs1-casein in rat mammary epithelial cells. Using metabolic labelling we show that αs1-casein becomes associated with membranes at the level of the endoplasmic reticulum, with no subsequent increase at the level of the Golgi apparatus. From morphological and biochemical data, it appears that caseins are in a tight relationship with membranes throughout the secretory pathway. On the other hand, we have observed that the membrane-associated form of αs1-casein co-purified with detergent-resistant membranes. It was poorly solubilised by Tween 20, partially insoluble in Lubrol WX, and substantially insoluble in Triton X-100. Finally, we found that cholesterol depletion results in the release of the membrane-associated form of αs1-casein. These experiments reveal that the insolubility of αs1-casein reflects its partial association with a cholesterol-rich detergent-resistant microdomain. We propose that the membrane-associated form of αs1-casein interacts with the lipid microdomain, or lipid raft, that forms within the membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum, for efficient forward transport and sorting in the secretory pathway of mammary epithelial cells. PMID:25549363

  13. CDw78 defines MHC class II-peptide complexes that require Ii chain-dependent lysosomal trafficking, not localization to a specific tetraspanin membrane microdomain.

    PubMed

    Poloso, Neil J; Denzin, Lisa K; Roche, Paul A

    2006-10-15

    MHC class II molecules (MHC-II) associate with detergent-resistant membrane microdomains, termed lipid rafts, which affects the function of these molecules during Ag presentation to CD4+ T cells. Recently, it has been proposed that MHC-II also associates with another type of membrane microdomain, termed tetraspan microdomains. These microdomains are defined by association of molecules to a family of proteins that contain four-transmembrane regions, called tetraspanins. It has been suggested that MHC-II associated with tetraspanins are selectively identified by a mAb to a MHC-II determinant, CDw78. In this report, we have re-examined this issue of CDw78 expression and MHC-II-association with tetraspanins in human dendritic cells, a variety of human B cell lines, and MHC-II-expressing HeLa cells. We find no correlation between the expression of CDw78 and the expression of tetraspanins CD81, CD82, CD53, CD9, and CD37. Furthermore, we find that the relative amount of tetraspanins bound to CDw78-reactive MHC-II is indistinguishable from the amount bound to peptide-loaded MHC-II. We found that expression of CDw78 required coexpression of MHC-II together with its chaperone Ii chain. In addition, analysis of a panel of MHC-II-expressing B cell lines revealed that different alleles of HLA-DR express different amounts of CDw78 reactivity. We conclude that CDw78 defines a conformation of MHC-II bound to peptides that are acquired through trafficking to lysosomal Ag-processing compartments and not MHC-II-associated with tetraspanins.

  14. Characterization of Xenopus egg membrane microdomains containing uroplakin Ib/III complex: roles of their molecular interactions for subcellular localization and signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Mahbub Hasan, A K M; Ou, Zhize; Sakakibara, Keiichi; Hirahara, Shino; Iwasaki, Tetsushi; Sato, Ken-ichi; Fukami, Yasuo

    2007-02-01

    A single-transmembrane protein uroplakin III (UPIII) and its tetraspanin binding-partner uroplakin Ib (UPIb) are members of the UP proteins that were originally identified in mammalian urothelium. In Xenopus laevis eggs, these proteins: xUPIII and xUPIb, are components of the cholesterol-enriched membrane microdomains or "rafts" and involved in the sperm-egg membrane interaction and subsequent egg activation signaling via Src tyrosine kinase at fertilization. Here, we investigate whether the xUPIII-xUPIb complex is in close proximity to CD9, a tetraspanin that has been implicated in the sperm-egg fusion in the mouse and GM1, a ganglioside typically enriched in egg rafts. Preparation of the egg membrane microdomains using different non-ionic detergents (Brij 98 and Triton X-100), chemical cross-linking, co-immunoprecipitation, in vitro kinase assay and in vitro fertilization experiments demonstrated that GM1, but not CD9, is in association with the xUPIII-xUPIb complex and contributes to the sperm-dependent egg activation. Transfection experiments using HEK293 cells demonstrated that xUPIII and xUPIb localized efficiently to the cholesterol-dependent membrane microdomains when they were co-expressed, whereas co-expression of xUPIII and CD9, instead of xUPIb, did not show this effect. Furthermore, xUPIII and xUPIb were shown to suppress kinase activity of the wild type, but not a constitutively active form of, Xenopus Src protein co-expressed in HEK293 cells. These results provide novel insight into the molecular architecture of the egg membrane microdomains containing xUPIII, xUPIb and Src, which may contribute to the understanding of sperm-egg interaction and signaling during Xenopus fertilization.

  15. Recruitment of activating NK-cell receptors 2B4 and NKG2D to membrane microdomains in mammalian cells is dependent on their transmembrane regions.

    PubMed

    Gütgemann, Stephan A; Sandusky, Mina M; Wingert, Sabine; Claus, Maren; Watzl, Carsten

    2015-04-01

    Membrane microdomains play an important role in the regulation of natural killer (NK) cell activities. These cholesterol-rich membrane domains are enriched at the activating immunological synapse and several activating NK-cell receptors are known to localize to membrane microdomains upon receptor engagement. In contrast, inhibitory receptors do not localize in these specialized membrane domains. In addition, the functional competence of educated NK cells correlates with a confinement of activating receptors in membrane microdomains. However, the molecular basis for this confinement is unknown. Here, we investigate the structural requirements for the recruitment of the human-activating NK-cell receptors NKG2D and 2B4 to detergent-resistant membrane fractions in the murine BA/F3 cell line and in the human NK-cell line NKL. This stimulation-dependent recruitment occurred independently of the intracellular domains of the receptors. However, either interfering with the association between NKG2D and DAP10, or mutating the transmembrane region of 2B4 impacted the recruitment of the receptors to detergent-resistant membrane fractions and modulated the function of 2B4 in NK cells. Our data suggest a potential interaction between the transmembrane region of NK-cell receptors and membrane lipids as a molecular mechanism involved in determining the membrane confinement of activating NK-cell receptors.

  16. G protein-membrane interactions I: Gαi1 myristoyl and palmitoyl modifications in protein-lipid interactions and its implications in membrane microdomain localization.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, Rafael; López, David J; Casas, Jesús; Lladó, Victoria; Higuera, Mónica; Nagy, Tünde; Barceló, Miquel; Busquets, Xavier; Escribá, Pablo V

    2015-11-01

    G proteins are fundamental elements in signal transduction involved in key cell responses, and their interactions with cell membrane lipids are critical events whose nature is not fully understood. Here, we have studied how the presence of myristic and palmitic acid moieties affects the interaction of the Gαi1 protein with model and biological membranes. For this purpose, we quantified the binding of purified Gαi1 protein and Gαi1 protein acylation mutants to model membranes, with lipid compositions that resemble different membrane microdomains. We observed that myristic and palmitic acids not only act as membrane anchors but also regulate Gαi1 subunit interaction with lipids characteristics of certain membrane microdomains. Thus, when the Gαi1 subunit contains both fatty acids it prefers raft-like lamellar membranes, with a high sphingomyelin and cholesterol content and little phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine. By contrast, the myristoylated and non-palmitoylated Gαi1 subunit prefers other types of ordered lipid microdomains with higher phosphatidylserine content. These results in part explain the mobility of Gαi1 protein upon reversible palmitoylation to meet one or another type of signaling protein partner. These results also serve as an example of how membrane lipid alterations can change membrane signaling or how membrane lipid therapy can regulate the cell's physiology.

  17. Rituximab antiproliferative effect in B-lymphoma cells is associated with acid-sphingomyelinase activation in raft microdomains.

    PubMed

    Bezombes, Christine; Grazide, Solène; Garret, Céline; Fabre, Claire; Quillet-Mary, Anne; Müller, Sabina; Jaffrézou, Jean-Pierre; Laurent, Guy

    2004-08-15

    Rituximab is a chimeric human immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody with significant activity against CD20+ malignant B cells. Rituximab is currently used with success in the treatment of B-cell-derived lymphoid neoplasias either alone or in combination with chemotherapy. However, the predominant mechanism by which rituximab exerts its antitumor properties in vivo remains unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that in Daudi and RL B-lymphoma cells, rituximab (without cross-linking) used at the saturating dose of 10 microg/mL induced moderate accumulation in G1 phase, growth inhibition, and significant loss in clonogenic potential. However, in these cells, rituximab induced no apoptosis. Furthermore, we observed that treatment with rituximab resulted in a rapid and transient increase in acid-sphingomyelinase (A-SMase) activity and concomitant cellular ceramide (CER) generation in raft microdomains. We also observed that rituximab-treated cells externalized both A-SMase and CER that colocalized with the CD20 receptor. Finally, we present evidence that rituximab-induced growth inhibition may be mediated through a CER-triggered signaling pathway, leading to the induction of cell cycle-dependent kinase inhibitors such as p27Kip1 through a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent mechanism.

  18. Highly enhanced dynamics of microdomains ordering by solvent vapor annealing of thin block copolymer films on polymer network supports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsarkova, Larisa; Stenbock-Fermor, Anja; Böker, Alexander; Knoll, Armin; IBM Reserach Collaboration; DWI Team

    2014-03-01

    We studied the solvent driven ordering dynamics of block copolymer films supported by a densely cross-linked organic hard mask (HM) designed for lithographic fabrication. We found that the ordering of microphase separated domains on the HM layer proceeds significantly faster as compared to similar films on silicon wafers. This leads to a pronounced enhancement of the dynamics of both the terrace-formation as well as the long-range lateral ordering of the microdomains. The effect is independent on the chemical structure and volume composition of the studied block copolymers (cylinder-/ lamella-forming). Importantly, enhanced ordering is achieved even at a reduced degree of swelling corresponding to an intermediate to strong segregation regime, when similar films on conventional substrate show very limited ordering. In-situ ellipsometric measurements of the swollen films revealed an insignificant increase by 1-3 vol. % in the solvent up-take by HM-supported films. Therefore we attribute the enhanced dynamics to reduced interactions at the block copolymer/HM-support interface. Apart from immediate technological impact in block copolymer-assisted nanolithography, our findings convey novel insight into effects of molecular architecture on polymer-solvent interactions. Forckenbeckstr. 50 52056 Aachen, Germany.

  19. HSL-knockout mouse testis exhibits class B scavenger receptor upregulation and disrupted lipid raft microdomains[S

    PubMed Central

    Casado, María Emilia; Huerta, Lydia; Ortiz, Ana Isabel; Pérez-Crespo, Mirian; Gutiérrez-Adán, Alfonso; Kraemer, Fredric B.; Lasunción, Miguel Ángel; Busto, Rebeca; Martín-Hidalgo, Antonia

    2012-01-01

    There is a tight relationship between fertility and changes in cholesterol metabolism during spermatogenesis. In the testis, class B scavenger receptors (SR-B) SR-BI, SR-BII, and LIMP II mediate the selective uptake of cholesterol esters from HDL, which are hydrolyzed to unesterified cholesterol by hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL). HSL is critical because HSL knockout (KO) male mice are sterile. The aim of the present work was to determine the effects of the lack of HSL in testis on the expression of SR-B, lipid raft composition, and related cell signaling pathways. HSL-KO mouse testis presented altered spermatogenesis associated with decreased sperm counts, sperm motility, and infertility. In wild-type (WT) testis, HSL is expressed in elongated spermatids; SR-BI, in Leydig cells and spermatids; SR-BII, in spermatocytes and spermatids but not in Leydig cells; and LIMP II, in Sertoli and Leydig cells. HSL knockout male mice have increased expression of class B scavenger receptors, disrupted caveolin-1 localization in lipid raft plasma membrane microdomains, and activated phospho-ERK, phospho-AKT, and phospho-SRC in the testis, suggesting that class B scavenger receptors are involved in cholesterol ester uptake for steroidogenesis and spermatogenesis in the testis. PMID:22988039

  20. Caveolae from luminal plasmalemma of rat lung endothelium: microdomains enriched in caveolin, Ca(2+)-ATPase, and inositol trisphosphate receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Schnitzer, J E; Oh, P; Jacobson, B S; Dvorak, A M

    1995-01-01

    A distinctive feature of many endothelia is an abundant population of noncoated plasmalemmal vesicles, or caveolae. Caveolae have been implicated in many important cellular processes, including transcytosis, endocytosis, potocytosis, and even signal transduction. Because caveolae have not been purified from endothelial cell surfaces, little is known directly about their structure and function in the endothelium. To delineate the transport role of these caveolae, we purified them from isolated luminal endothelial plasma membranes of rat lung. The rat lung luminal endothelial cell surfaces were isolated after coating them, in situ, with positively charged colloidal silica. The caveolae were then separated from these coated membranes and purified to yield a homogeneous population of morphologically distinct vesicles enriched in the structural protein caveolin. As with caveolae found on the endothelial cell surface in vivo, these highly purified caveolae contained the plasmalemmal Ca(2+)-ATPase and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate surface receptors. By contrast, other plasma membrane proteins were excluded from the caveolae, including angiotensin-converting enzyme, beta-actin, and band 4.1. The purified caveolae appeared to represent specific microdomains of the cell surface with their own unique molecular topography. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 5 PMID:7878055

  1. Multimodal second harmonic generation and two photon fluorescence imaging of microdomain calcium contraction coupling in single cardiomyocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, James; Awasthi, Samir; Izu, Leighton; Mao, Ziliang; Jian, Zhong; Landas, Trevor; Lerner, Aaron; Shimkunas, Rafael; Woldeyesus, Rahwa; Bossuyt, Julie; Wood, Brittani; Chen, Yi-Je; Matthews, Dennis; Lieu, Deborah; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Lam, Kit; Chen-Izu, Ye

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a method for simultaneously measuring the calcium and contraction dynamics of single, live cardiomyocytes at high spatial resolutions. Such measurements are important to investigate local calcium release and the mechanical response at the sarcomere level (i.e. the basic unit of contraction), which have important implications in cardiac dysfunction and arrhythmias in conditions such as hypertension, atrial fibrillation, and myocardial infarction. Here, we describe a multimodal second harmonic generation (SHG) and two photon fluorescence (2PF) microscopy technique that is used to simultaneously measure subsarcomere calcium and contraction events at high spatial and temporal resolutions. The method takes advantage of the label-free nature of SHG for imaging the sarcomeres and the high spatial colocalization of the SHG signal and the fluorescence signal excited from calcium indicators. This microscope was used to measure calcium sparks and waves and associated contractions in subcellular microdomains, leading to the generation of subcellular strain. We anticipate this new imaging tool will play an important role in studying mechanical stress-induced heart disease.

  2. Simulated GABA synaptic input and L-type calcium channels form functional microdomains in hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons.

    PubMed

    Hemond, Peter J; O'Boyle, Michael P; Roberts, Carson B; Delgado-Reyes, Alfonso; Hemond, Zoe; Suter, Kelly J

    2012-06-27

    Hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons integrate the multiple internal and external cues that regulate sexual reproduction. In contrast to other neurons that exhibit extensive dendritic arbors, GnRH neurons usually have a single dendrite with relatively little branching. This largely precludes the integration strategy in which a single dendritic branch serves as a unit of integration. In the present study, we identify a gradient in L-type calcium channels in dendrites of mouse GnRH neurons and its interaction with GABAergic and glutamatergic inputs. Higher levels of L-type calcium channels are in somata/proximal dendrites (i.e., 0-26 μm) and distal dendrites (∼130 μm dendrite length), but intervening midlengths of dendrite (∼27-130 μm) have reduced L-type calcium channels. Using uncaging of GABA, there is a decreasing GABAergic influence along the dendrite and the impact of GABA(A) receptors is dependent on activation of L-type calcium channels. This results in amplification of proximal GABAergic signals and attenuation of distal dendritic signals. Most interestingly, the intervening dendritic regions create a filter through which only relatively high-amplitude, low-frequency GABAergic signaling to dendrites elicits action potentials. The findings of the present study suggest that GnRH dendrites adopt an integration strategy whereby segments of single nonbranching GnRH dendrites create functional microdomains and thus serve as units of integration.

  3. Molecularly designed lipid microdomains for solid dispersions using a polymer/inorganic carrier matrix produced by hot-melt extrusion.

    PubMed

    Adler, Camille; Schönenberger, Monica; Teleki, Alexandra; Kuentz, Martin

    2016-02-29

    Amorphous solid dispersions have for many years been a focus in oral formulations, especially in combination with a hot-melt extrusion process. The present work targets a novel approach with a system based on a fatty acid, a polymer and an inorganic carrier. It was intended to adsorb the acidic lipid by specific molecular interactions onto the solid carrier to design disorder in the alkyl chains of the lipid. Such designed lipid microdomains (DLM) were created as a new microstructure to accommodate a compound in a solid dispersion. Vibrational spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, atomic force microscopy as well as electron microscopic imaging were employed to study a system of stearic acid, hydroxypropylcellulose and aluminum magnesium silicate. β-carotene was used as a poorly water-soluble model substance that is difficult to formulate with conventional solid dispersion formulations. The results indicated that the targeted molecular excipient interactions indeed led to DLMs for specific compositions. The different methods provided complementary aspects and important insights into the created microstructure. The novel delivery system appeared to be especially promising for the formulation of oral compounds that exhibit both high crystal energy and lipophilicity.

  4. Pre-embedding immunogold labeling to optimize protein localization at subcellular compartments and membrane microdomains of leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Rossana C N; Morgan, Ellen; Monahan-Earley, Rita; Dvorak, Ann M; Weller, Peter F

    2014-01-01

    Precise immunolocalization of proteins within a cell is central to understanding cell processes and functions such as intracellular trafficking and secretion of molecules during immune responses. Here we describe a protocol for ultrastructural detection of proteins in leukocytes. The method uses a pre-embedding approach (immunolabeling before standard processing for transmission electron microscopy (TEM)). This protocol combines several strategies for ultrastructure and antigen preservation, robust blocking of nonspecific binding sites, as well as superior antibody penetration for detecting molecules at subcellular compartments and membrane microdomains. A further advantage of this technique is that electron microscopy (EM) processing is quick. This method has been used to study leukocyte biology, and it has helped demonstrate how activated leukocytes deliver specific cargos. It may also potentially be applied to a variety of different cell types. Excluding the initial time required for sample preparation (15 h) and the final resin polymerization step (16 h), the protocol (immunolabeling and EM procedures) can be completed in 8 h. PMID:25211515

  5. Analysis of the Poisson-Nernst-Planck equation in a ball for modeling the Voltage-Current relation in neurobiological microdomains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartailler, J.; Schuss, Z.; Holcman, D.

    2017-01-01

    The electro-diffusion of ions is often described by the Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) equations, which couple nonlinearly the charge concentration and the electric potential. This model is used, among others, to describe the motion of ions in neuronal micro-compartments. It remains at this time an open question how to determine the relaxation and the steady state distribution of voltage when an initial charge of ions is injected into a domain bounded by an impermeable dielectric membrane. The purpose of this paper is to construct an asymptotic approximation to the solution of the stationary PNP equations in a d-dimensional ball (d = 1 , 2 , 3) in the limit of large total charge. In this geometry the PNP system reduces to the Liouville-Gelfand-Bratú (LGB) equation, with the difference that the boundary condition is Neumann, not Dirichlet, and there is a minus sign in the exponent of the exponential term. The entire boundary is impermeable to ions and the electric field satisfies the compatibility condition of Poisson's equation. These differences replace attraction by repulsion in the LGB equation, thus completely changing the solution. We find that the voltage is maximal in the center and decreases toward the boundary. We also find that the potential drop between the center and the surface increases logarithmically in the total number of charges and not linearly, as in classical capacitance theory. This logarithmic singularity is obtained for d = 3 from an asymptotic argument and cannot be derived from the analysis of the phase portrait. These results are used to derive the relation between the outward current and the voltage in a dendritic spine, which is idealized as a dielectric sphere connected smoothly to the nerve axon by a narrow neck. This is a fundamental microdomain involved in neuronal communication. We compute the escape rate of an ion from the steady density in a ball, which models a neuronal spine head, to a small absorbing window in the sphere. We

  6. Human bronchial smooth muscle cells express adenylyl cyclase isoforms 2, 4, and 6 in distinct membrane microdomains.

    PubMed

    Bogard, Amy S; Xu, Congfeng; Ostrom, Rennolds S

    2011-04-01

    Adenylyl cyclases (AC) are important regulators of airway smooth muscle function, because β-adrenergic receptor (AR) agonists stimulate AC activity and increase airway diameter. We assessed expression of AC isoforms in human bronchial smooth muscle cells (hBSMC). Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and immunoblot analyses detected expression of AC2, AC4, and AC6. Forskolin-stimulated AC activity in membranes from hBSMC displayed Ca(2+)-inhibited and G(βγ)-stimulated AC activity, consistent with expression of AC6, AC2, and AC4. Isoproterenol-stimulated AC activity was inhibited by Ca(2+) but unaltered by G(βγ), whereas butaprost-stimulated AC activity was stimulated by G(βγ) but unaffected by Ca(2+) addition. Using sucrose density centrifugation to isolate lipid raft fractions, we found that only AC6 localized in lipid raft fractions, whereas AC2 and AC4 localized in nonraft fractions. Immunoisolation of caveolae using caveolin-1 antibodies yielded Ca(2+)-inhibited AC activity (consistent with AC6 expression), whereas the nonprecipitated material displayed G(βγ)-stimulated AC activity (consistent with expression of AC2 and/or AC4). Overexpression of AC6 enhanced cAMP production in response to isoproterenol and beraprost but did not increase responses to prostaglandin E(2) or butaprost. β(2)AR, but not prostanoid EP(2) or EP(4) receptors, colocalized with AC5/6 in lipid raft fractions. Thus, particular G protein-coupled receptors couple to discreet AC isoforms based, in part, on their colocalization in membrane microdomains. These different cAMP signaling compartments in airway smooth muscle cells are responsive to different hormones and neurotransmitters and can be regulated by different coincident signals such as Ca(2+) and G(βγ).

  7. In vitro assessment of the biological response of Ti6Al4V implants coated with hydroxyapatite microdomains.

    PubMed

    Clavell, R Salvador; de Llano, J J Martín; Carda, C; Ribelles, J L Gómez; Vallés-Lluch, A

    2016-11-01

    Dental implantology is still an expanding field of scientific study because of the number of people that receive dental therapies throughout their lives worldwide. Recovery times associated to dental surgery are still long and demand strategies to improve integration of metallic devices with hard tissues. In this work, an in vitro ceramic coating is proposed to improve and accelerate osseointegration of titanium surfaces conceived to be used as dental implants or hip or knee prosthesis, shaped either as dishes or screws. Such coating consists of hydroxyapatite microdomains on the implant surfaces obtained in vitro by immersion of titanium alloy samples (Ti6Al4V) in a simulated body fluid. This titanium alloy is highly used in implant dentistry and trauma surgery, among other fields. Once the immersion times under physiological conditions yielding to different ceramic topographies on this alloy were set, the acellular coating time of major interest so as to optimize its biological development was determined. For this purpose, dental pulp mesenchymal cells were cultured on titanium coated surfaces with different hydroxyapatite outline, and cell adhesion, proliferation and morphology were followed through histological techniques and scanning electron microscopy. It was found that 4 days of acellular hydroxyapatite coating led to a significant cell adhesion on the titanium alloys at an early stage (6 h). Cells tended although to detach from the surface of the coating over time, but those adhered on domains of intricated topography or hydroxyapatite cauliflowers proliferated on them, leading to isolated large cell clusters. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2723-2729, 2016.

  8. Shiga toxin glycosphingolipid receptors of Vero-B4 kidney epithelial cells and their membrane microdomain lipid environment.

    PubMed

    Steil, Daniel; Schepers, Catherine-Louise; Pohlentz, Gottfried; Legros, Nadine; Runde, Jana; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich; Karch, Helge; Müthing, Johannes

    2015-12-01

    Shiga toxins (Stxs) are produced by enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC), which cause human infections with an often fatal outcome. Vero cell lines, derived from African green monkey kidney, represent the gold standard for determining the cytotoxic effects of Stxs. Despite their global use, knowledge about the exact structures of the Stx receptor glycosphingolipids (GSLs) and their assembly in lipid rafts is poor. Here we present a comprehensive structural analysis of Stx receptor GSLs and their distribution to detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs), which were prepared from Vero-B4 cells and used as lipid raft equivalents. We identified globotriaosylceramide (Gb3Cer) and globotetraosylceramide (Gb4Cer) as the GSL receptors for Stx1a, Stx2a, and Stx2e subtypes using TLC overlay detection combined with MS. The uncommon Stx receptor, globopentaosylceramide (Gb5Cer, Galβ3GalNAcβ3Galα4Galβ4Glcβ1Cer), which was specifically recognized (in addition to Gb3Cer and Gb4Cer) by Stx2e, was fully structurally characterized. Lipoforms of Stx receptor GSLs were found to mainly harbor ceramide moieties composed of sphingosine (d18:1) and C24:0/C24:1 or C16:0 fatty acid. Moreover, co-occurrence with lipid raft markers, SM and cholesterol, in DRMs suggested GSL association with membrane microdomains. This study provides the basis for further exploring the functional impact of lipid raft-associated Stx receptors for toxin-mediated injury of Vero-B4 cells.

  9. Palmitoylated claudin7 captured in glycolipid-enriched membrane microdomains promotes metastasis via associated transmembrane and cytosolic molecules

    PubMed Central

    Schnölzer, Martina; Zöller, Margot

    2016-01-01

    In epithelial cells claudin7 (cld7) is a major component of tight junctions, but is also recovered from glycolipid-enriched membrane microdomains (GEM). In tumor cells, too, cld7 exists in two stages. Only GEM-located cld7, which is palmitoylated, promotes metastasis. Searching for the underlying mechanism(s) revealed the following. The metastatic capacity of the rat pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line ASML is lost by a knockdown (kd) of cld7 and is not regained by rescuing cld7 with a mutated palmitoylation site (cld7mPalm). ASML-cld7kd and ASML-cld7mPalm cells show reduced motility and invasiveness. This is due to cld7, but not cld7mPalm associating with α6β4, ezrin, uPAR and MMP14, which jointly support motility and invasion. Palmitoylated cld7 also is engaged in drug resistance by repressing Pten, allowing activation of the antiapoptotic PI3K/Akt pathway. An association of cld7mPalm with the major Pten phosphorylating kinases does not restore apoptosis resistance as phosphorylated Pten is not guided towards GEM to compete with non-phosphorylated Pten. The pathway whereby palmitoylated cld7 supports expression of several EMT genes and nuclear translocation of EMT transcription factors remains to be unraveled. An association with Notch, reduced in ASML-cld7mPalm cells, might be the starting point. Finally, GEM-located, palmitoylated cld7 associates with several components of vesicle transport machineries engaged in exosome biogenesis. Taken together, prerequisites for cld7 acting as a cancer-initiating cell marker are GEM location and palmitoylation, which support a multitude of associations and integration into exosomes. The latter suggests palmitoylated cld7 contributing to message transfer via exosomes. PMID:27120791

  10. Large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels in purkinje cell plasma membranes are clustered at sites of hypolemmal microdomains.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Walter A; Ferraguti, Francesco; Fukazawa, Yugo; Kasugai, Yu; Shigemoto, Ryuichi; Laake, Petter; Sexton, Joseph A; Ruth, Peter; Wietzorrek, Georg; Knaus, Hans-Günther; Storm, Johan F; Ottersen, Ole Petter

    2009-07-10

    Calcium-activated potassium channels have been shown to be critically involved in neuronal function, but an elucidation of their detailed roles awaits identification of the microdomains where they are located. This study was undertaken to unravel the precise subcellular distribution of the large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (called BK, KCa1.1, or Slo1) in the somatodendritic compartment of cerebellar Purkinje cells by means of postembedding immunogold cytochemistry and SDS-digested freeze-fracture replica labeling (SDS-FRL). We found BK channels to be unevenly distributed over the Purkinje cell plasma membrane. At distal dendritic compartments, BK channels were scattered over the plasma membrane of dendritic shafts and spines but absent from postsynaptic densities. At the soma and proximal dendrites, BK channels formed two distinct pools. One pool was scattered over the plasma membrane, whereas the other pool was clustered in plasma membrane domains overlying subsurface cisterns. The labeling density ratio of clustered to scattered channels was about 60:1, established in SDS-FRL. Subsurface cisterns, also called hypolemmal cisterns, are subcompartments of the endoplasmic reticulum likely representing calciosomes that unload and refill Ca2+ independently. Purkinje cell subsurface cisterns are enriched in inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptors that mediate the effects of several neurotransmitters, hormones, and growth factors by releasing Ca2+ into the cytosol, generating local Ca2+ sparks. Such increases in cytosolic [Ca2+] may be sufficient for BK channel activation. Clustered BK channels in the plasma membrane may thus participate in building a functional unit (plasmerosome) with the underlying calciosome that contributes significantly to local signaling in Purkinje cells.

  11. Super Resolution Fluorescence Microscopy and Tracking of Bacterial Flotillin (Reggie) Paralogs Provide Evidence for Defined-Sized Protein Microdomains within the Bacterial Membrane but Absence of Clusters Containing Detergent-Resistant Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Dempwolff, Felix; Schmidt, Felix K.; Hervás, Ana B.; Stroh, Alex; Rösch, Thomas C.; Riese, Cornelius N.; Dersch, Simon; Heimerl, Thomas; Lucena, Daniella; Hülsbusch, Nikola; Stuermer, Claudia A. O.; Takeshita, Norio; Fischer, Reinhard; Graumann, Peter L.

    2016-01-01

    Biological membranes have been proposed to contain microdomains of a specific lipid composition, in which distinct groups of proteins are clustered. Flotillin-like proteins are conserved between pro—and eukaryotes, play an important function in several eukaryotic and bacterial cells, and define in vertebrates a type of so-called detergent-resistant microdomains. Using STED microscopy, we show that two bacterial flotillins, FloA and FloT, form defined assemblies with an average diameter of 85 to 110 nm in the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis. Interestingly, flotillin microdomains are of similar size in eukaryotic cells. The soluble domains of FloA form higher order oligomers of up to several hundred kDa in vitro, showing that like eukaryotic flotillins, bacterial assemblies are based in part on their ability to self-oligomerize. However, B. subtilis paralogs show significantly different diffusion rates, and consequently do not colocalize into a common microdomain. Dual colour time lapse experiments of flotillins together with other detergent-resistant proteins in bacteria show that proteins colocalize for no longer than a few hundred milliseconds, and do not move together. Our data reveal that the bacterial membrane contains defined-sized protein domains rather than functional microdomains dependent on flotillins. Based on their distinct dynamics, FloA and FloT confer spatially distinguishable activities, but do not serve as molecular scaffolds. PMID:27362352

  12. Sigma-1 receptors (sigma(1) binding sites) form raft-like microdomains and target lipid droplets on the endoplasmic reticulum: roles in endoplasmic reticulum lipid compartmentalization and export.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Teruo; Su, Tsung-Ping

    2003-08-01

    The brain sigma-1 receptors can bind neurosteroids and psychotropic drugs, including neuroleptics and cocaine and are implicated in schizophrenia, depression, and drug dependence. In this study, we found that sigma-1 receptors specifically target lipid storage sites (lipid droplets) on the endoplasmic reticulum by forming a distinct class of lipid microdomains. Both endogenously expressing sigma-1 receptors and transfected C-terminally enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP)-tagged sigma-1 receptors (Sig-1R-EYFP) target unique "ring-like" structures associated with endoplasmic reticulum reticular networks in NG108-15 cells. The ring-like structures contain neutral lipids and are enlarged by the oleate treatment, indicating that they are endoplasmic reticulum-associated lipid droplets (ER-LDs). sigma-1 receptors colocalize with caveolin-2, a cholesterol-binding protein in lipid rafts on the ER-LDs, but not with adipocyte differentiation-related protein (ADRP), a cytosolic lipid droplet (c-LD)-specific protein. When the double-arginine ER retention signal on the N terminus of sigma-1 receptors is truncated, sigma-1 receptors no longer exist on ER-LDs, but predominantly target c-LDs, which contain ADRP. sigma-1 receptors on ER-LDs form detergent-resistant raft-like lipid microdomains, the buoyancy of which is different from that of plasma membrane lipid rafts. (+)-Pentazocine causes sigma-1 receptors to disappear from the microdomains. N-Terminally EYFP-tagged sigma-1 receptors (EYFP-Sig-1R) failed to target ER-LDs. EYFP-Sig-1R-transfected cells showed an unrestricted distribution of neutral lipids all over the endoplasmic reticulum network, decreases in c-LDs and cholesterol in plasma membranes, and the bulbous aggregation of endoplasmic reticulum. Thus, sigma-1 receptors are unique endoplasmic reticulum proteins that regulate the compartmentalization of lipids on the endoplasmic reticulum and their export from the endoplasmic reticulum to plasma membrane and c-LDs.

  13. Insights into the Role of Specific Lipids in the Formation and Delivery of Lipid Microdomains to the Plasma Membrane of Plant Cells1[W

    PubMed Central

    Laloi, Maryse; Perret, Anne-Marie; Chatre, Laurent; Melser, Su; Cantrel, Catherine; Vaultier, Marie-Noëlle; Zachowski, Alain; Bathany, Katell; Schmitter, Jean-Marie; Vallet, Myriam; Lessire, René; Hartmann, Marie-Andrée; Moreau, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    The existence of sphingolipid- and sterol-enriched microdomains, known as lipid rafts, in the plasma membrane (PM) of eukaryotic cells is well documented. To obtain more insight into the lipid molecular species required for the formation of microdomains in plants, we have isolated detergent (Triton X-100)-resistant membranes (DRMs) from the PM of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and leek (Allium porrum) seedlings as well as from Arabidopsis cell cultures. Here, we show that all DRM preparations are enriched in sterols, sterylglucosides, and glucosylceramides (GluCer) and depleted in glycerophospholipids. The GluCer of DRMs from leek seedlings contain hydroxypalmitic acid. We investigated the role of sterols in DRM formation along the secretory pathway in leek seedlings. We present evidence for the presence of DRMs in both the PM and the Golgi apparatus but not in the endoplasmic reticulum. In leek seedlings treated with fenpropimorph, a sterol biosynthesis inhibitor, the usual Δ5-sterols are replaced by 9β,19-cyclopropylsterols. In these plants, sterols and hydroxypalmitic acid-containing GluCer do not reach the PM, and most DRMs are recovered from the Golgi apparatus, indicating that Δ5-sterols and GluCer play a crucial role in lipid microdomain formation and delivery to the PM. In addition, DRM formation in Arabidopsis cells is shown to depend on the unsaturation degree of fatty acyl chains as evidenced by the dramatic decrease in the amount of DRMs prepared from the Arabidopsis mutants, fad2 and Fad3+, affected in their fatty acid desaturases. PMID:17114270

  14. Evidence for phospholipid microdomain formation in liquid crystalline liposomes reconstituted with Escherichia coli lactose permease.

    PubMed Central

    Lehtonen, J Y; Kinnunen, P K

    1997-01-01

    The well-characterized integral membrane protein lactose (lac) permease from Escherichia coli was reconstituted together with trace amounts (molar fraction X = 0.005 of the total phospholipid) of different pyrene-labeled phospholipid analogs into 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-sn-glycero-3-phospho-rac'-glycerol (POPG) liposomes. Effects of lac permease on bilayer lipid dynamics were investigated by measuring the excimer-to-monomer fluorescence intensity ratio IE/IM. Compared to control vesicles, the presence of lac permease (at a protein:phospholipid stoichiometry P/L of 1:4.000) increased the rate of excimer formation by 1-palmitoyl-2[6-(pyren-1-yl)]decanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PPDPC) by approximately fivefold. Decreasing P/L from approximately 1:4.000 to 1:7.600 decreased the IE/IM for PPDPC from 0.16 to 0.05, respectively. An increase in bilayer fluidity due to permease is unlikely, thus implying that the augmented IE/IM should arise from partial lateral segregation of PPDPC in the vesicles. This notion is supported by the further 38% increase in IE/IM observed for the pyrene-labeled Cys-148 lac permease reconstituted into POPG vesicles at P/L 1:4000. The importance of the length of the lipid-protein boundary is implicated by the reduction in IE/IM resulting from the aggregation of the lac permease in vesicles by a monoclonal antibody. Interestingly, excimer formation by 1-palmitoyl-2[6-(pyren-1-yl)hexanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PPHPC) was enhanced only fourfold in the presence of lac permease. Results obtained with the corresponding pyrenyl phosphatidylglycerols and -methanols were qualitatively similar to those above, thus indicating that lipid headgroup-protein interactions are not involved. Inclusion of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamino-N-(5-fluoresce inthio- carbamoyl) (DPPF, X = 0.005) into reconstituted lactose permease vesicles containing PPDPC caused a nearly 90% decrease in excimer fluorescence, whereas in control

  15. Carbohydrate-Dependent, Exercise-Induced Gastrointestinal Distress

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Erick Prado; Burini, Roberto C.

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) problems are a common concern of athletes during intense exercise. Ultimately, these symptoms can impair performance and possibly prevent athletes from winning or even finishing a race. The main causes of GI problems during exercise are mechanical, ischemic and nutritional factors. Among the nutritional factors, a high intake of carbohydrate and hyperosmolar solutions increases GI problems. A number of nutritional manipulations have been proposed to minimize gastrointestinal symptoms, including the use of multiple transportable carbohydrates. This type of CHO intake increases the oxidation rates and can prevent the accumulation of carbohydrate in the intestine. Glucose (6%) or glucose plus fructose (8%–10%) beverages are recommended in order to increase CHO intake while avoiding the gastric emptying delay. Training the gut with high intake of CHO may increase absorption capacity and probably prevent GI distress. CHO mouth rinse may be a good strategy to enhance performance without using GI tract in exercises lasting less than an hour. Future strategies should be investigated comparing different CHO types, doses, and concentration in exercises with the same characteristics. PMID:25314645

  16. Chemical-physical changes in cell membrane microdomains of breast cancer cells after omega-3 PUFA incorporation.

    PubMed

    Corsetto, Paola A; Cremona, Andrea; Montorfano, Gigliola; Jovenitti, Ilaria E; Orsini, Francesco; Arosio, Paolo; Rizzo, Angela M

    2012-09-01

    Epidemiologic and experimental studies suggest that dietary fatty acids influence the development and progression of breast cancer. However, no clear data are present in literature that could demonstrate how n - 3 PUFA can interfere with breast cancer growth. It is suggested that these fatty acids might change the structure of cell membrane, especially of lipid rafts. During this study we treated MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells with AA, EPA, and DHA to assess if they are incorporated in lipid raft phospholipids and are able to change chemical and physical properties of these structures. Our data demonstrate that PUFA and their metabolites are inserted with different yield in cell membrane microdomains and are able to alter fatty acid composition without decreasing the total percentage of saturated fatty acids that characterize these structures. In particular in MDA-MB-231 cells, that displays the highest content of Chol and saturated fatty acids, we observed the lowest incorporation of DHA, probably for sterical reasons; nevertheless DHA was able to decrease Chol and SM content. Moreover, PUFA are incorporated in breast cancer lipid rafts with different specificity for the phospholipid moiety, in particular PUFA are incorporated in PI, PS, and PC phospholipids that may be relevant to the formation of PUFA metabolites (prostaglandins, prostacyclins, leukotrienes, resolvines, and protectines) of phospholipids deriving second messengers and signal transduction activation. The bio-physical changes after n - 3 PUFA incubation have also been highlighted by atomic force microscopy. In particular, for both cell lines the DHA treatment produced a decrease of the lipid rafts in the order of about 20-30 %. It is worth noticing that after DHA incorporation lipid rafts exhibit two different height ranges. In fact, some lipid rafts have a higher height of 6-6.5 nm. In conclusion n - 3 PUFA are able to modify lipid raft biochemical and biophysical features leading to decrease of

  17. The Cholesterol-Dependent Cytolysin Pneumolysin from Streptococcus pneumoniae Binds to Lipid Raft Microdomains in Human Corneal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Sidney D.; Sanders, Melissa E.; Tullos, Nathan A.; Stray, Stephen J.; Norcross, Erin W.; McDaniel, Larry S.; Marquart, Mary E.

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is an opportunistic bacterial pathogen responsible for causing several human diseases including pneumonia, meningitis, and otitis media. Pneumococcus is also a major cause of human ocular infections and is commonly isolated in cases of bacterial keratitis, an infection of the cornea. The ocular pathology that occurs during pneumococcal keratitis is partly due to the actions of pneumolysin (Ply), a cholesterol-dependent cytolysin produced by pneumococcus. The lytic mechanism of Ply is a three step process beginning with surface binding to cholesterol. Multiple Ply monomers then oligomerize to form a prepore. The prepore then undergoes a conformational change that creates a large pore in the host cell membrane, resulting in cell lysis. We engineered a collection of single amino acid substitution mutants at residues (A370, A406, W433, and L460) that are crucial to the progression of the lytic mechanism and determined the effects that these mutations had on lytic function. Both PlyWT and the mutant Ply molecules (PlyA370G, PlyA370E, PlyA406G, PlyA406E, PlyW433G, PlyW433E, PlyW433F, PlyL460G, and PlyL460E) were able to bind to the surface of human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs) with similar efficiency. Additionally, PlyWT localized to cholesterol-rich microdomains on the HCEC surface, however, only one mutant (PlyA370G) was able to duplicate this behavior. Four of the 9 mutant Ply molecules (PlyA370E, PlyW433G, PlyW433E, and PlyL460E) were deficient in oligomer formation. Lastly, all of the mutant Ply molecules, except PlyA370G, exhibited significantly impaired lytic activity on HCECs. The other 8 mutants all experienced a reduction in lytic activity, but 4 of the 8 retained the ability to oligomerize. A thorough understanding of the molecular interactions that occur between Ply and the target cell, could lead to targeted treatments aimed to reduce the pathology observed during pneumococcal keratitis. PMID:23577214

  18. Compartmentalized Cyclic Adenosine 3′,5′-Monophosphate at the Plasma Membrane Clusters PDE3A and Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator into Microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Penmatsa, Himabindu; Zhang, Weiqiang; Yarlagadda, Sunitha; Li, Chunying; Conoley, Veronica G.; Yue, Junming; Bahouth, Suleiman W.; Buddington, Randal K.; Zhang, Guangping; Nelson, Deborah J.; Sonecha, Monal D.; Manganiello, Vincent; Wine, Jeffrey J.

    2010-01-01

    Formation of multiple-protein macromolecular complexes at specialized subcellular microdomains increases the specificity and efficiency of signaling in cells. In this study, we demonstrate that phosphodiesterase type 3A (PDE3A) physically and functionally interacts with cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channel. PDE3A inhibition generates compartmentalized cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP), which further clusters PDE3A and CFTR into microdomains at the plasma membrane and potentiates CFTR channel function. Actin skeleton disruption reduces PDE3A–CFTR interaction and segregates PDE3A from its interacting partners, thus compromising the integrity of the CFTR-PDE3A–containing macromolecular complex. Consequently, compartmentalized cAMP signaling is lost. PDE3A inhibition no longer activates CFTR channel function in a compartmentalized manner. The physiological relevance of PDE3A–CFTR interaction was investigated using pig trachea submucosal gland secretion model. Our data show that PDE3A inhibition augments CFTR-dependent submucosal gland secretion and actin skeleton disruption decreases secretion. PMID:20089840

  19. Control points within the cell cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Van't Hof, J.

    1984-01-01

    Evidence of the temporal order of chromosomal DNA replication argues favorably for the view that the cell cycle is controlled by genes acting in sequence whose time of expression is determined by mitosis and the amount of nuclear DNA (2C vs 4C) in the cell. Gl and G2 appear to be carbohydrate dependent in that cells starved of either carbohydrate of phosphate fail to make these transitions. Cells deprived of nitrate, however, fail only at Gl to S transition indicating that the controls that operate in G1 differ from those that operate in G2. 46 references, 5 figures.

  20. Targeted Labeling of Neurons in a Specific Functional Micro-domain of the Neocortex by Combining Intrinsic Signal and Two-photon Imaging

    PubMed Central

    O'Herron, Philip; Shen, Zhiming; Lu, Zhongyang; Schramm, Adrien E.; Levy, Manuel; Kara, Prakash

    2012-01-01

    In the primary visual cortex of non-rodent mammals, neurons are clustered according to their preference for stimulus features such as orientation1-4, direction5-7, ocular dominance8,9 and binocular disparity9. Orientation selectivity is the most widely studied feature and a continuous map with a quasi-periodic layout for preferred orientation is present across the entire primary visual cortex10,11. Integrating the synaptic, cellular and network contributions that lead to stimulus selective responses in these functional maps requires the hybridization of imaging techniques that span sub-micron to millimeter spatial scales. With conventional intrinsic signal optical imaging, the overall layout of functional maps across the entire surface of the visual cortex can be determined12. The development of in vivo two-photon microscopy using calcium sensitive dyes enables one to determine the synaptic input arriving at individual dendritic spines13 or record activity simultaneously from hundreds of individual neuronal cell bodies6,14. Consequently, combining intrinsic signal imaging with the sub-micron spatial resolution of two-photon microscopy offers the possibility of determining exactly which dendritic segments and cells contribute to the micro-domain of any functional map in the neocortex. Here we demonstrate a high-yield method for rapidly obtaining a cortical orientation map and targeting a specific micro-domain in this functional map for labeling neurons with fluorescent dyes in a non-rodent mammal. With the same microscope used for two-photon imaging, we first generate an orientation map using intrinsic signal optical imaging. Then we show how to target a micro-domain of interest using a micropipette loaded with dye to either label a population of neuronal cell bodies or label a single neuron such that dendrites, spines and axons are visible in vivo. Our refinements over previous methods facilitate an examination of neuronal structure-function relationships with sub

  1. Ethanol Enhances TGF-β Activity by Recruiting TGF-β Receptors From Intracellular Vesicles/Lipid Rafts/Caveolae to Non-Lipid Raft Microdomains.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shuan Shian; Chen, Chun-Lin; Huang, Franklin W; Johnson, Frank E; Huang, Jung San

    2016-04-01

    Regular consumption of moderate amounts of ethanol has important health benefits on atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). Overindulgence can cause many diseases, particularly alcoholic liver disease (ALD). The mechanisms by which ethanol causes both beneficial and harmful effects on human health are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that ethanol enhances TGF-β-stimulated luciferase activity with a maximum of 0.5-1% (v/v) in Mv1Lu cells stably expressing a luciferase reporter gene containing Smad2-dependent elements. In Mv1Lu cells, 0.5% ethanol increases the level of P-Smad2, a canonical TGF-β signaling sensor, by ∼ 2-3-fold. Ethanol (0.5%) increases cell-surface expression of the type II TGF-β receptor (TβR-II) by ∼ 2-3-fold from its intracellular pool, as determined by I(125) -TGF-β-cross-linking/Western blot analysis. Sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation and indirect immunofluorescence staining analyses reveal that ethanol (0.5% and 1%) also displaces cell-surface TβR-I and TβR-II from lipid rafts/caveolae and facilitates translocation of these receptors to non-lipid raft microdomains where canonical signaling occurs. These results suggest that ethanol enhances canonical TGF-β signaling by increasing non-lipid raft microdomain localization of the TGF-β receptors. Since TGF-β plays a protective role in ASCVD but can also cause ALD, the TGF-β enhancer activity of ethanol at low and high doses appears to be responsible for both beneficial and harmful effects. Ethanol also disrupts the location of lipid raft/caveolae of other membrane proteins (e.g., neurotransmitter, growth factor/cytokine, and G protein-coupled receptors) which utilize lipid rafts/caveolae as signaling platforms. Displacement of these membrane proteins induced by ethanol may result in a variety of pathologies in nerve, heart and other tissues.

  2. A Localized Complex of Two Protein Oligomers Controls the Orientation of Cell Polarity.

    PubMed

    Perez, Adam M; Mann, Thomas H; Lasker, Keren; Ahrens, Daniel G; Eckart, Michael R; Shapiro, Lucy

    2017-02-28

    Signaling hubs at bacterial cell poles establish cell polarity in the absence of membrane-bound compartments. In the asymmetrically dividing bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, cell polarity stems from the cell cycle-regulated localization and turnover of signaling protein complexes in these hubs, and yet the mechanisms that establish the identity of the two cell poles have not been established. Here, we recapitulate the tripartite assembly of a cell fate signaling complex that forms during the G1-S transition. Using in vivo and in vitro analyses of dynamic polar protein complex formation, we show that a polymeric cell polarity protein, SpmX, serves as a direct bridge between the PopZ polymeric network and the cell fate-directing DivJ histidine kinase. We demonstrate the direct binding between these three proteins and show that a polar microdomain spontaneously assembles when the three proteins are coexpressed heterologously in an Escherichia coli test system. The relative copy numbers of these proteins are essential for complex formation, as overexpression of SpmX in Caulobacter reorganizes the polarity of the cell, generating ectopic cell poles containing PopZ and DivJ. Hierarchical formation of higher-order SpmX oligomers nucleates new PopZ microdomain assemblies at the incipient lateral cell poles, driving localized outgrowth. By comparison to self-assembling protein networks and polar cell growth mechanisms in other bacterial species, we suggest that the cooligomeric PopZ-SpmX protein complex in Caulobacter illustrates a paradigm for coupling cell cycle progression to the controlled geometry of cell pole establishment.IMPORTANCE Lacking internal membrane-bound compartments, bacteria achieve subcellular organization by establishing self-assembling protein-based microdomains. The asymmetrically dividing bacterium Caulobacter crescentus uses one such microdomain to link cell cycle progression to morphogenesis, but the mechanism for the generation of this

  3. Impact of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway on the subproteome of detergent-resistant microdomains of colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Recktenwald, Christian V; Lichtenfels, Rudolf; Wulfaenger, Jens; Müller, Anja; Dressler, Sven P; Seliger, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Lipid rafts play a key role in the regulation of fundamentally important cellular processes, including cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival. The composition of such detergent-resistant microdomains (DRMs) is altered under pathologic conditions, including cancer. Although DRMs have been analyzed in colorectal carcinoma little information exists about their composition upon treatment with targeted drugs. Hence, a quantitative proteomic profiling approach was performed to define alterations within the DRM fraction of colorectal carcinoma cells upon treatment with the drug U0126, an inhibitor of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Comparative expression profilings resulted in the identification of 300 proteins, which could partially be linked to key oncogenic signaling pathways and tumor-related cellular features, such as cell proliferation, adhesion, motility, invasion, and apoptosis resistance. Most of these proteins were downregulated upon inhibitor treatment. In addition, quantitative proteomic profilings of cholesterol-depleted versus intact lipid rafts were performed to define, which U0126-regulated target structures represent bona fide raft proteins. Selected differentially abundant raft proteins were validated at the mRNA and/or protein level using U0126- or Trametinib-treated cells. The presented data provide insights into the molecular mechanisms associated with the response to the treatment with MEK inhibitors and might also lead to novel candidates for therapeutic interventions.

  4. Involvement of the mannose receptor and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway of the microdomain of the integral membrane protein after enteropathogenic Escherichia coli infection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhihua; Ma, Yanlei; Moyer, Mary Pat; Zhang, Peng; Shi, Chenzhang; Qin, Huanlong

    2012-04-01

    The microdomain of the integral membrane protein (MIMP) has been shown to adhere to mucin and to antagonize the adhesion of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) to epithelial cells; however, the mechanism has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we further identified the receptor of MIMP on NCM460 cells and investigated the mechanism (the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase [MAPK] pathway) following the interaction of MIMP and its corresponding receptor, mannose receptor. We first identified the target receptor of MIMP on the surfaces of NCM460 cells using immunoprecipitation-mass spectrometry technology. We also verified the mannose receptor and examined the degradation and activation of the p38 MAPK signaling pathway. The results indicated that MIMP adhered to NCM460 cells by binding to the mannose receptor and inhibited the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK stimulated after EPEC infection via inhibition of the Toll-like receptor 5 pathway. These findings indicated that MIMPs relieve the injury of NCM460 cells after enteropathogenic E. coli infection through the mannose receptor and inhibition of the p38 MAPK signaling pathway, both of which may therefore be potential therapeutic targets for intestinal diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease.

  5. Constitutive exclusion of Csk from Hck-positive membrane microdomains permits Src kinase-dependent proliferation of Theileria-transformed B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Martin; Angelisová, Pavla; Setterblad, Niclas; Mooney, Nuala; Werling, Dirk; Horejsí, Václav; Langsley, Gordon

    2003-03-01

    Infection of bovine T cells and B cells with the intracellular protozoan parasite Theileria parva induces a transformed phenotype with characteristics comparable to leukemic cells. The transformed phenotype reverts on drug-induced parasite death, and the cured lymphocytes acquire a resting phenotype and eventually die by apoptosis if not further stimulated. Here, we show that both lymphocyte proliferation and activation of the transcription factor AP-1 are mediated by Src-family protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) in a parasite-dependent fashion. Src-family PTKs are known to be present in glycolipid-enriched microdomains (GEMs), also called lipid rafts, and to be negatively regulated by PTK Csk complexed to tyrosine-phosphorylated transmembrane adapter protein PAG (phosphoprotein associated with GEMs) also called Cbp (Csk-binding protein). We, therefore, purified GEMs from proliferating infected B cells and from growth-arrested cells that had been drug-cured of parasites. Proliferation arrest led to a striking increase of PAG/Cbp expression; correspondingly, the amount of Csk associated with PAG/Cbp in GEMs increased markedly, whereas PTK Hck accumulation in GEM fractions did not alter on growth arrest. We propose that Theileria-induced lymphocyte proliferation and permanent activation of Hck stems from down-regulation of PAG/Cbp and the concomitant constitutive loss of the negative regulator Csk from the GEMs of transformed B cells.

  6. A neutral sphingomyelinase resides in sphingolipid-enriched microdomains and is inhibited by the caveolin-scaffolding domain: potential implications in tumour necrosis factor signalling.

    PubMed Central

    Veldman, R J; Maestre, N; Aduib, O M; Medin, J A; Salvayre, R; Levade, T

    2001-01-01

    Sphingomyelinases hydrolyse sphingomyelin to ceramide, a process involved in signal-transduction routes leading to apoptosis and various other cellular responses. In the present study, we investigated the sphingomyelinase content of caveolae, invaginated plasma-membrane microdomains that contain a variety of signalling molecules. These structures are highly enriched in sphingomyelin as well as in ceramide, which suggests that metabolism of these lipids might, to some extent, occur locally. By cell fractionation, we demonstrate that, in addition to a previously reported minute amount of acidic sphingomyelinase activity, a substantial amount of neutral sphingomyelinase activity resides in caveolae of human skin fibroblasts. This caveolar neutral sphingomyelinase activity was also detected in Niemann-Pick disease type A fibroblasts, which are completely devoid of functional acidic sphingomyelinase. Neutral (but not acidic) sphingomyelinase activity was specifically inhibited by a peptide that corresponds to the scaffolding domain of caveolin, which suggests a direct molecular interaction between the two proteins. In addition, this finding implies a cytosolic orientation of the caveolar neutral sphingomyelinase. Interestingly, stimulation of fibroblasts with tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) resulted in a partial shift of its p55 receptor to caveolin-enriched membrane fractions and the appearance of caveolin-sensitive neutral sphingomyelinase activity in the non-caveolar fractions. These results suggest that (part of) the presently identified caveolar neutral sphingomyelinase activity is involved in TNFalpha signalling. PMID:11311151

  7. Selective control of SNARE recycling by Golgi retention.

    PubMed

    Fukasawa, Masayoshi; Cornea, Anda; Varlamov, Oleg

    2013-08-02

    Two distinct sets of soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNARE) catalyze membrane fusion in the cis-Golgi and trans-Golgi. The mechanism that controls Golgi localization of SNAREs remains largely unknown. Here we tested three potential mechanisms, including vesicle recycling between the Golgi and the endoplasmic reticulum, partitioning in Golgi lipid microdomains, and selective intra-Golgi retention. Recycling rates showed a linear relationship with intra-Golgi mobility of SNAREs. The cis-Golgi SNAREs had higher mobility than intra-Golgi SNAREs, whereas vesicle SNAREs had higher mobility than target membrane SNAREs. The differences in SNARE mobility were not due to preferential partitioning into detergent-resistant membrane microdomains. We propose that intra-Golgi retention precludes entropy-driven redistribution of SNAREs to the endoplasmic reticulum and endocytic compartments.

  8. Definition of Arabidopsis Sterol-rich Membrane Microdomains by Differential Treatment with Methyl-β-cyclodextrin and Quantitative Proteomics*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Kierszniowska, Sylwia; Seiwert, Bettina; Schulze, Waltraud X.

    2009-01-01

    Plasma membranes are dynamic compartments with key functions in solute transport, cell shape, and communication between cells and the environment. In mammalian cells and yeast, the plasma membrane has been shown to be compartmented into so-called lipid rafts, which are defined by their resistance to treatment with non-ionic detergents. In plants, the existence of lipid rafts has been postulated, but the precise composition of this membrane compartment is still under debate. Here we were able to experimentally clearly distinguish (i) true sterol-dependent “raft proteins” and (ii) sterol-independent “non-raft” proteins and co-purifying “contaminants” in plant detergent-resistant membranes. We used quantitative proteomics techniques involving 15N metabolic labeling and specific disruption of sterol-rich membrane domains by methyl-β-cyclodextrin. Among the sterol-dependent proteins we found an over-representation of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins. A large fraction of these proteins has functions in cell wall anchoring. We were able to distinguish constant and variable components of plant sterol-rich membrane microdomains based on their responsiveness to the drug methyl-β-cyclodextrin. Predominantly proteins with signaling functions, such as receptor kinases, G-proteins, and calcium signaling proteins, were identified as variable members in plant lipid rafts, whereas cell wall-related proteins and specific proteins with unknown functions make up a core set of sterol-dependent plant plasma membrane proteins. This allows the plant to maintain a balance between static anchoring of cell shape forming elements and variable adjustment to changing external conditions. PMID:19036721

  9. The influence of Ca²⁺ buffers on free [Ca²⁺] fluctuations and the effective volume of Ca²⁺ microdomains.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Seth H; Smith, Gregory D

    2014-06-17

    Intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) plays a significant role in many cell signaling pathways, some of which are localized to spatially restricted microdomains. Ca(2+) binding proteins (Ca(2+) buffers) play an important role in regulating Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]). Buffers typically slow [Ca(2+)] temporal dynamics and increase the effective volume of Ca(2+) domains. Because fluctuations in [Ca(2+)] decrease in proportion to the square-root of a domain's physical volume, one might conjecture that buffers decrease [Ca(2+)] fluctuations and, consequently, mitigate the significance of small domain volume concerning Ca(2+) signaling. We test this hypothesis through mathematical and computational analysis of idealized buffer-containing domains and their stochastic dynamics during free Ca(2+) influx with passive exchange of both Ca(2+) and buffer with bulk concentrations. We derive Langevin equations for the fluctuating dynamics of Ca(2+) and buffer and use these stochastic differential equations to determine the magnitude of [Ca(2+)] fluctuations for different buffer parameters (e.g., dissociation constant and concentration). In marked contrast to expectations based on a naive application of the principle of effective volume as employed in deterministic models of Ca(2+) signaling, we find that mobile and rapid buffers typically increase the magnitude of domain [Ca(2+)] fluctuations during periods of Ca(2+) influx, whereas stationary (immobile) Ca(2+) buffers do not. Also contrary to expectations, we find that in the absence of Ca(2+) influx, buffers influence the temporal characteristics, but not the magnitude, of [Ca(2+)] fluctuations. We derive an analytical formula describing the influence of rapid Ca(2+) buffers on [Ca(2+)] fluctuations and, importantly, identify the stochastic analog of (deterministic) effective domain volume. Our results demonstrate that Ca(2+) buffers alter the dynamics of [Ca(2+)] fluctuations in a nonintuitive manner. The finding that Ca(2

  10. Metabolic labelling of membrane microdomains/rafts in Jurkat cells indicates the presence of glycerophospholipids implicated in signal transduction by the CD3 T-cell receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Rouquette-Jazdanian, Alexandre K; Pelassy, Claudette; Breittmayer, Jean-Philippe; Cousin, Jean-Louis; Aussel, Claude

    2002-01-01

    Cell membranes contain sphingolipids and cholesterol, which cluster together in distinct domains called rafts. The outer-membrane leaflet of these peculiar membrane domains contains glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins, while the inner leaflet contains proteins implicated in signalling, such as the acylated protein kinase p56(lck) and the palmitoylated adaptator LAT (linker for activation of T-cells). We present here an approach to study the lipid composition of rafts and its change upon T-cell activation. Our method is based on metabolic labelling of Jurkat T-cells with different precursors of glycerophospholipid synthesis, including glycerol and fatty acids with different lengths and degrees of saturation as well as phospholipid polar head groups. The results obtained indicate that lipid rafts isolated by the use of sucrose density-gradient centrifugation after Triton X-100 extraction in the cold, besides sphingolipids and cholesterol, contain unambiguously all classes of glycerophospholipids: phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine. Fatty acid labelling shows that lipid rafts are labelled preferentially with saturated fatty acids while the rest of the plasma membrane incorporates mostly long-chained polyunsaturated fatty acids. To see whether the raft composition as measured by metabolic labelling of phospholipids is involved in T-cell activation, we investigated the production of sn-1,2-diacylglycerol (DAG) in CD3-activated cells. DAG production occurs within rafts, confirming previous demonstration of protein kinase C translocation into membrane microdomains. Our data demonstrate that raft disorganization by methyl-beta-cyclodextrin impairs both CD3-induced DAG production and changes in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration. These lines of evidence support the conclusion that the major events in T-cell activation occur within or due to lipid rafts. PMID:11964165

  11. Akt-mediated transactivation of the S1P1 receptor in caveolin-enriched microdomains regulates endothelial barrier enhancement by oxidized phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Singleton, Patrick A; Chatchavalvanich, Santipongse; Fu, Panfeng; Xing, Junjie; Birukova, Anna A; Fortune, Jennifer A; Klibanov, Alexander M; Garcia, Joe G N; Birukov, Konstantin G

    2009-04-24

    Endothelial cell (EC) barrier dysfunction results in increased vascular permeability, leading to increased mass transport across the vessel wall and leukocyte extravasation, the key mechanisms in pathogenesis of tissue inflammation and edema. We have previously demonstrated that OxPAPC (oxidized 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) significantly enhances vascular endothelial barrier properties in vitro and in vivo and attenuates endothelial hyperpermeability induced by inflammatory and edemagenic agents via Rac and Cdc42 GTPase dependent mechanisms. These findings suggested potential important therapeutic value of barrier-protective oxidized phospholipids. In this study, we examined involvement of signaling complexes associated with caveolin-enriched microdomains (CEMs) in barrier-protective responses of human pulmonary ECs to OxPAPC. Immunoblotting from OxPAPC-treated ECs revealed OxPAPC-mediated rapid recruitment (5 minutes) to CEMs of the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor (S1P(1)), the serine/threonine kinase Akt, and the Rac1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor Tiam1 and phosphorylation of caveolin-1, indicative of signaling activation in CEMs. Abolishing CEM formation (methyl-beta-cyclodextrin) blocked OxPAPC-mediated Rac1 activation, cytoskeletal reorganization, and EC barrier enhancement. Silencing (small interfering RNA) Akt expression blocked OxPAPC-mediated S1P(1) activation (threonine phosphorylation), whereas silencing S1P(1) receptor expression blocked OxPAPC-mediated Tiam1 recruitment to CEMs, Rac1 activation, and EC barrier enhancement. To confirm our in vitro results in an in vivo murine model of acute lung injury with pulmonary vascular hyperpermeability, we observed that selective lung silencing of caveolin-1 or S1P(1) receptor expression blocked OxPAPC-mediated protection from ventilator-induced lung injury. Taken together, these results suggest Akt-dependent transactivation of S1P(1) within CEMs is important for Ox

  12. Heterogeneity of Raft-Type Membrane Microdomains Associated with VP4, the Rotavirus Spike Protein, in Caco-2 and MA 104 Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Delmas, Olivier; Breton, Michelyne; Sapin, Catherine; Le Bivic, André; Colard, Odile; Trugnan, Germain

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that rotavirus virions, a major cause of infantile diarrhea, assemble within small intestinal enterocytes and are released at the apical pole without significant cell lysis. In contrast, for the poorly differentiated kidney epithelial MA 104 cells, which have been used extensively to study rotavirus assembly, it has been shown that rotavirus is released by cell lysis. The subsequent discovery that rotavirus particles associate with raft-type membrane microdomains (RTM) in Caco-2 cells provided a simple explanation for rotavirus polarized targeting. However, the results presented here, together with those recently published by another group, demonstrate that rotavirus also associates with RTM in MA 104 cells, thus indicating that a simple interaction of rotavirus with rafts is not sufficient to explain its apical targeting in intestinal cells. In the present study, we explore the possibility that RTM may have distinct physicochemical properties that may account for the differences observed in the rotavirus cell cycle between MA 104 and Caco-2 cells. We show here that VP4 association with rafts is sensitive to cholesterol extraction by methyl-β-cyclodextrin treatment in MA 104 cells and insensitive in Caco-2 cells. Using the VP4 spike protein as bait, VP4-enriched raft subsets were immunopurified. They contained 10 to 15% of the lipids present in total raft membranes. We found that the nature and proportion of phospholipids and glycosphingolipids were different between the two cell lines. We propose that this raft heterogeneity may support the cell type dependency of virus assembly and release. PMID:17135322

  13. The egg membrane microdomain-associated uroplakin III-Src system becomes functional during oocyte maturation and is required for bidirectional gamete signaling at fertilization in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Mahbub Hasan, A K M; Hashimoto, Aki; Maekawa, Yuka; Matsumoto, Takashi; Kushima, Shota; Ijiri, Takashi W; Fukami, Yasuo; Sato, Ken-ichi

    2014-04-01

    In Xenopus laevis, sperm-egg interaction promotes partial proteolysis and/or tyrosine phosphorylation of uroplakin III (UPIII) and the tyrosine kinase Src, which both localize to the cholesterol-enriched egg membrane microdomains (MDs). Here we show that sperm promote proteolysis and/or tyrosine phosphorylation of UPIII and Src in MDs isolated from ovulated and unfertilized eggs (UF-MDs). An antibody against the extracellular domain of UPIII interferes with these events. Inhibition of fertilization by anti-UPIII antibody is rescued by co-incubation with UF-MDs. This suggests that, like MDs in intact eggs, the isolated UF-MDs are capable of interacting with sperm, an interaction that does not interfere with normal fertilization but rather augments the ability of sperm to fertilize eggs pretreated with anti-UPIII antibody. This unexpected effect of UF-MDs on sperm requires UPIII function in UF-MDs and protein kinase activity in sperm. MDs isolated from progesterone-treated mature oocytes, but not ovarian immature oocytes, are similarly functional as UF-MDs. The anti-UPIII extracellular domain antibody binds more effectively to the surface of mature than immature ovarian oocytes. We propose that the structural and functional competency of the UPIII-Src signaling system in MDs is strictly regulated during oocyte maturation and subsequently in sperm-mediated egg activation and fertilization. The fertilization-related signaling properties seen in UF-MDs can be partially reconstituted in MDs of human embryonic kidney 293 cells (293-MDs) expressing UPIII, Src and uroplakin Ib. However, 293-MDs expressing a proteolysis-resistant mutant of UPIII are less functional, suggesting that the availability of UPIII to protease action is important for MD function.

  14. Crystallization in organo-mineral micro-domains in the crossed-lamellar layer of Nerita undata (Gastropoda, Neritopsina).

    PubMed

    Nouet, Julius; Baronnet, Alain; Howard, Lauren

    2012-02-01

    Crossed-lamellar shell microstructure consists of a sophisticated arrangement of interspersed lamellae, which is very commonly found in Gastropoda or Bivalvia shell layers. Its smallest constitutive microstructural units are usually described as sub-micrometric fibers, or rods, and form very ordered and regular patterns. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging confirms the presence of even smaller building units in the form of organo-mineral granules, and we further investigate their internal structure within aragonite crossed-lamellar internal layer of Nerita undata (Gastropoda, Neritopsina) shell. Their coalescence may have controlled anisotropically the propagation of the crystallographic coherence through this complex microstructure, as suggested by the propagation of the microtwinning pattern between neighboring granules.

  15. Activity-induced convergence of APP and BACE-1 in acidic microdomains via an endocytosis-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Das, Utpal; Scott, David A; Ganguly, Archan; Koo, Edward H; Tang, Yong; Roy, Subhojit

    2013-08-07

    The convergence of APP (substrate) and BACE-1 (enzyme) is a rate-limiting, obligatory event triggering the amyloidogenic pathway-a key step in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. However, as both APP/BACE-1 are highly expressed in brain, mechanisms precluding their unabated convergence are unclear. Exploring dynamic localization of APP/BACE-1 in cultured hippocampal neurons, we found that after synthesis via the secretory pathway, dendritic APP/BACE-1-containing vesicles are largely segregated in physiologic states. While BACE-1 is sorted into acidic recycling endosomes, APP is conveyed in Golgi-derived vesicles. However, upon activity induction-a known trigger of the amyloidogenic pathway-APP is routed into BACE-1-positive recycling endosomes via a clathrin-dependent mechanism. A partitioning/convergence of APP/BACE-1 vesicles is also apparent in control/AD brains, respectively. Considering BACE-1 is optimally active in an acidic environment, our experiments suggest that neurons have evolved trafficking strategies that normally limit APP/BACE-1 proximity and also uncover a pathway routing APP into BACE-1-containing organelles, triggering amyloidogenesis.

  16. Proteomic Identification of VEGF-dependent Protein Enrichment to Membrane Caveolar-raft Microdomains in Endothelial Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chillà, Anastasia; Magherini, Francesca; Margheri, Francesca; Laurenzana, Anna; Gamberi, Tania; Bini, Luca; Bianchi, Laura; Danza, Giovanna; Mazzanti, Benedetta; Serratì, Simona; Modesti, Alessandra; Del Rosso, Mario; Fibbi, Gabriella

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial cell caveolar-rafts are considered functional platforms that recruit several pro-angiogenic molecules to realize an efficient angiogenic program. Here we studied the differential caveolar-raft protein composition of endothelial colony-forming cells following stimulation with VEGF, which localizes in caveolae on interaction with its type-2 receptor. Endothelial colony-forming cells are a cell population identified in human umbilical blood that show all the properties of an endothelial progenitor cell and a high proliferative rate. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis analysis was coupled with mass spectrometry to identify candidate proteins. The twenty-eight differentially expressed protein spots were grouped according to their function using Gene Ontology classification. In particular, functional categories relative to cell death inhibition and hydrogen peroxide metabolic processes resulted enriched. In these categories, Peroxiredoxin-2 and 6, that control hydrogen peroxide metabolic processes, are the main enriched molecules together with the anti-apoptotic 78 kDa glucose regulated protein. Some of the proteins we identified had never before identified as caveolar-raft components. Other identified proteins include calpain small subunit-1, known to mediates angiogenic response to VEGF, gelsolin, which regulates stress fiber assembly, and annexin A3, an angiogenic mediator that induces VEGF production. We validated the functional activity of the above proteins, showing that the siRNA silencing of these resulted in the inhibition of capillary morphogenesis. Overall, our data show that VEGF stimulation triggers the caveolar-raft recruitment of proteins that warrant a physiological amount of reactive oxygen species to maintain a proper angiogenic function of endothelial colony-forming cells and preserve the integrity of the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:23572564

  17. Proteomic identification of VEGF-dependent protein enrichment to membrane caveolar-raft microdomains in endothelial progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Chillà, Anastasia; Magherini, Francesca; Margheri, Francesca; Laurenzana, Anna; Gamberi, Tania; Bini, Luca; Bianchi, Laura; Danza, Giovanna; Mazzanti, Benedetta; Serratì, Simona; Modesti, Alessandra; Del Rosso, Mario; Fibbi, Gabriella

    2013-07-01

    Endothelial cell caveolar-rafts are considered functional platforms that recruit several pro-angiogenic molecules to realize an efficient angiogenic program. Here we studied the differential caveolar-raft protein composition of endothelial colony-forming cells following stimulation with VEGF, which localizes in caveolae on interaction with its type-2 receptor. Endothelial colony-forming cells are a cell population identified in human umbilical blood that show all the properties of an endothelial progenitor cell and a high proliferative rate. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis analysis was coupled with mass spectrometry to identify candidate proteins. The twenty-eight differentially expressed protein spots were grouped according to their function using Gene Ontology classification. In particular, functional categories relative to cell death inhibition and hydrogen peroxide metabolic processes resulted enriched. In these categories, Peroxiredoxin-2 and 6, that control hydrogen peroxide metabolic processes, are the main enriched molecules together with the anti-apoptotic 78 kDa glucose regulated protein. Some of the proteins we identified had never before identified as caveolar-raft components. Other identified proteins include calpain small subunit-1, known to mediates angiogenic response to VEGF, gelsolin, which regulates stress fiber assembly, and annexin A3, an angiogenic mediator that induces VEGF production. We validated the functional activity of the above proteins, showing that the siRNA silencing of these resulted in the inhibition of capillary morphogenesis. Overall, our data show that VEGF stimulation triggers the caveolar-raft recruitment of proteins that warrant a physiological amount of reactive oxygen species to maintain a proper angiogenic function of endothelial colony-forming cells and preserve the integrity of the actin cytoskeleton.

  18. Lipid Rafts Are Physiologic Membrane Microdomains Necessary for the Morphogenic and Developmental Functions of Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Cynthia C; Gabreski, Nicole A; Hein, Sarah J; Pierchala, Brian A

    2015-09-23

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) promotes PNS development and kidney morphogenesis via a receptor complex consisting of the glycerophosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored, ligand binding receptor GDNF family receptor α1 (GFRα1) and the receptor tyrosine kinase Ret. Although Ret signal transduction in vitro is augmented by translocation into lipid rafts via GFRα1, the existence and importance of lipid rafts in GDNF-Ret signaling under physiologic conditions is unresolved. A knock-in mouse was produced that replaced GFRα1 with GFRα1-TM, which contains a transmembrane (TM) domain instead of the GPI anchor. GFRα1-TM still binds GDNF and promotes Ret activation but does not translocate into rafts. In Gfrα1(TM/TM) mice, GFRα1-TM is expressed, trafficked, and processed at levels identical to GFRα1. Although Gfrα1(+/TM) mice are viable, Gfrα1(TM/TM) mice display bilateral renal agenesis, lack enteric neurons in the intestines, and have motor axon guidance deficits, similar to Gfrα1(-/-) mice. Therefore, the recruitment of Ret into lipid rafts by GFRα1 is required for the physiologic functions of GDNF in vertebrates. Significance statement: Membrane microdomains known as lipid rafts have been proposed to be unique subdomains in the plasma membrane that are critical for the signaling functions of multiple receptor complexes. Their existence and physiologic relevance has been debated. Based on in vitro studies, lipid rafts have been reported to be necessary for the function of the Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family of neurotrophic factors. The receptor for GDNF comprises the lipid raft-resident, glycerophosphatidylinositol-anchored receptor GDNF family receptor α1 (GFRα1) and the receptor tyrosine kinase Ret. Here we demonstrate, using a knock-in mouse model in which GFRα1 is no longer located in lipid rafts, that the developmental functions of GDNF in the periphery require the translocation of the GDNF receptor complex

  19. Segregation of CD4 and CXCR4 into distinct lipid microdomains in T lymphocytes suggests a mechanism for membrane destabilization by human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Susan L; Heard, Jean Michel; Kabat, David

    2002-02-01

    Recent evidence has suggested that plasma membrane sphingolipids and cholesterol spontaneously coalesce into raft-like microdomains and that specific proteins, including CD4 and some other T-cell signaling molecules, sequester into these rafts. In agreement with these results, we found that CD4 and the associated Lck tyrosine kinase of peripheral blood mononuclear cells and H9 leukemic T cells were selectively and highly enriched in a low-density lipid fraction that was resistant at 0 degrees C to the neutral detergent Triton X-100 but was disrupted by extraction of cholesterol with filipin or methyl-beta-cyclodextrin. In contrast, the CXCR4 chemokine receptor, a coreceptor for X4 strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), was almost completely excluded from the detergent-resistant raft fraction. Accordingly, as determined by immunofluorescence with confocal microscopy, CD4 and CXCR4 did not coaggregate into antibody-induced cell surface patches or into patches of CXCR4 that formed naturally at the ruffled edges of adherent cells. The CXCR4 fluorescent patches were extracted with cold 1% Triton X-100, whereas the CD4 patches were resistant. In stringent support of these data, CD4 colocalized with patches of cholera toxin bound to the raft-associated sphingoglycolipid GM1, whereas CXCR4 did not. Addition of the CXCR4-activating chemokine SDF-1 alpha did not induce CXCR4 movement into rafts. Moreover, binding of purified monomeric gp120 envelope glycoproteins from strains of HIV-1 that use this coreceptor did not stimulate detectable redistributions of CD4 or CXCR4 between their separate membrane domains. However, adsorption of multivalent gp120-containing HIV-1 virion particles appeared to destabilize the local CD4-containing rafts. Indeed, adsorbed HIV-1 virions were detected by immunofluorescence microscopy and were almost all situated in nonraft regions of the cell surface. We conclude that HIV-1 initially binds to CD4 in a raft domain and that its

  20. Ganglioside contained in the neuronal tissue-enriched acidic protein of 22 kDa (NAP-22) fraction prepared from the detergent-resistant membrane microdomain of rat brain inhibits the phosphatase activity of calcineurin.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yuumi; da Silva, Ronan; Kumanogoh, Haruko; Miyata, Shinji; Sato, Chihiro; Kitajima, Ken; Nakamura, Shun; Morita, Mistuhiro; Hayashi, Fumio; Maekawa, Shohei

    2015-09-01

    Neurons have well-developed membrane microdomains called "rafts" that are recovered as a detergent-resistant membrane microdomain fraction (DRM). Neuronal tissue-enriched acidic protein of 22 kDa (NAP-22) is one of the major protein components of neuronal DRM. To determine the cellular function of NAP-22, interacting proteins were screened with an immunoprecipitation assay, and calcineurin (CaN) was detected. Further studies with NAP-22 prepared from DRM and CaN expressed in bacteria showed the binding of these proteins and a dose-dependent inhibitory effect of the NAP-22 fraction on the phosphatase activity of CaN. On the other hand, NAP-22 expressed in bacteria showed low binding to CaN and a weak inhibitory effect on phosphatase activity. To solve this discrepancy, identification of a nonprotein component that modulates CaN activity in the DRM-derived NAP-22 fraction was attempted. After lyophilization, a lipid fraction was extracted with chloroform/methanol. The lipid fraction showed an inhibitory effect on CaN without NAP-22, and further fractionation of the extract with thin-layer chromatography showed the presence of several lipid bands having an inhibitory effect on CaN. The mobility of these bands coincided with that of authentic ganglioside (GM1a, GD1a, GD1b, and GT1b), and authentic ganglioside showed an inhibitory effect on CaN. Treatment of lipid with endoglycoceramidase, which degrades ganglioside to glycochain and ceramide, caused a diminution of the inhibitory effect. These results show that DRM-derived NAP-22 binds several lipids, including ganglioside, and that ganglioside inhibits the phosphatase activity of CaN.

  1. Reconstituted B cell receptor signaling reveals carbohydrate-dependent mode of activation

    PubMed Central

    Villar, Rina F.; Patel, Jinal; Weaver, Grant C.; Kanekiyo, Masaru; Wheatley, Adam K.; Yassine, Hadi M.; Costello, Catherine E.; Chandler, Kevin B.; McTamney, Patrick. M.; Nabel, Gary J.; McDermott, Adrian B.; Mascola, John R.; Carr, Steven A.; Lingwood, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Activation of immune cells (but not B cells) with lectins is widely known. We used the structurally defined interaction between influenza hemagglutinin (HA) and its cell surface receptor sialic acid (SA) to identify a B cell receptor (BCR) activation modality that proceeded through non-cognate interactions with antigen. Using a new approach to reconstitute antigen-receptor interactions in a human reporter B cell line, we found that sequence-defined BCRs from the human germline repertoire could be triggered by both complementarity to influenza HA and a separate mode of signaling that relied on multivalent ligation of BCR sialyl-oligosaccharide. The latter suggested a new mechanism for priming naïve B cell responses and manifested as the induction of SA-dependent pan-activation by peripheral blood B cells. BCR crosslinking in the absence of complementarity is a superantigen effect induced by some microbial products to subvert production of antigen-specific immune responses. B cell superantigen activity through affinity for BCR carbohydrate is discussed. PMID:27796362

  2. Altering fatty acid availability does not impair prolonged, continuous running to fatigue: evidence for carbohydrate dependence.

    PubMed

    Leckey, Jill J; Burke, Louise M; Morton, James P; Hawley, John A

    2016-01-15

    We determined the effect of suppressing lipolysis via administration of nicotinic acid (NA) on fuel substrate selection and half-marathon running capacity. In a single-blinded, Latin square design, 12 competitive runners completed four trials involving treadmill running until volitional fatigue at a pace based on 95% of personal best half-marathon time. Trials were completed in a fed or overnight fasted state: 1) carbohydrate (CHO) ingestion before (2 g CHO·kg(-1)·body mass(-1)) and during (44 g/h) [CFED]; 2) CFED plus NA ingestion [CFED-NA]; 3) fasted with placebo ingestion during [FAST]; and 4) FAST plus NA ingestion [FAST-NA]. There was no difference in running distance (CFED, 21.53 ± 1.07; CFED-NA, 21.29 ± 1.69; FAST, 20.60 ± 2.09; FAST-NA, 20.11 ± 1.71 km) or time to fatigue between the four trials. Concentrations of plasma free fatty acids (FFA) and glycerol were suppressed following NA ingestion irrespective of preexercise nutritional intake but were higher throughout exercise in FAST compared with all other trials (P < 0.05). Rates of whole-body CHO oxidation were unaffected by NA ingestion in the CFED and FAST trials, but were lower in the FAST trial compared with the CFED-NA trial (P < 0.05). CHO was the primary substrate for exercise in all conditions, contributing 83-91% to total energy expenditure with only a small contribution from fat-based fuels. Blunting the exercise-induced increase in FFA via NA ingestion did not impair intense running capacity lasting ∼85 min, nor did it alter patterns of substrate oxidation in competitive athletes. Although there was a small but obligatory use of fat-based fuels, the oxidation of CHO-based fuels predominates during half-marathon running.

  3. Dynamin 2 and c-Abl are novel regulators of hyperoxia-mediated NADPH oxidase activation and reactive oxygen species production in caveolin-enriched microdomains of the endothelium.

    PubMed

    Singleton, Patrick A; Pendyala, Srikanth; Gorshkova, Irina A; Mambetsariev, Nurbek; Moitra, Jaideep; Garcia, Joe G N; Natarajan, Viswanathan

    2009-12-11

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, particularly by the endothelial NADPH oxidase family of proteins, plays a major role in the pathophysiology associated with lung inflammation, ischemia/reperfusion injury, sepsis, hyperoxia, and ventilator-associated lung injury. We examined potential regulators of ROS production and discovered that hyperoxia treatment of human pulmonary artery endothelial cells induced recruitment of the vesicular regulator, dynamin 2, the non-receptor tyrosine kinase, c-Abl, and the NADPH oxidase subunit, p47(phox), to caveolin-enriched microdomains (CEMs). Silencing caveolin-1 (which blocks CEM formation) and/or c-Abl expression with small interference RNA inhibited hyperoxia-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation and association of dynamin 2 with p47(phox) and ROS production. In addition, treatment of human pulmonary artery endothelial cells with dynamin 2 small interfering RNA or the dynamin GTPase inhibitor, Dynasore, attenuated hyperoxia-mediated ROS production and p47(phox) recruitment to CEMs. Using purified recombinant proteins, we observed that c-Abl tyrosine-phosphorylated dynamin 2, and this phosphorylation increased p47(phox)/dynamin 2 association (change in the dissociation constant (K(d)) from 85.8 to 6.9 nm). Furthermore, exposure of mice to hyperoxia increased ROS production, c-Abl activation, dynamin 2 association with p47(phox), and pulmonary leak, events that were attenuated in the caveolin-1 knock-out mouse confirming a role for CEMs in ROS generation. These results suggest that hyperoxia induces c-Abl-mediated dynamin 2 phosphorylation required for recruitment of p47(phox) to CEMs and subsequent ROS production in lung endothelium.

  4. Cell Shape and Negative Links in Regulatory Motifs Together Control Spatial Information Flow in Signaling Networks

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Susana R.; Tsokas, Panayiotis; Sarkar, Anamika; Grace, Elizabeth A.; Rangamani, Padmini; Taubenfeld, Stephen M.; Alberini, Cristina M.; Schaff, James C.; Blitzer, Robert D.; Moraru, Ion I.; Iyengar, Ravi

    2009-01-01

    Summary The role of cell size and shape in controlling local intracellular signaling reactions, and how this spatial information originates and is propagated, is not well understood. We have used partial differential equations to model the flow of spatial information from the β-adrenergic receptor to MAPK1,2 through the cAMP/PKA/B-Raf/MAPK1,2 network in neurons using real geometries. The numerical simulations indicated that cell shape controls the dynamics of local biochemical activity of signal-modulated negative regulators, such as phosphodiesterases and protein phosphatases within regulatory loops to determine the size of microdomains of activated signaling components. The model prediction that negative regulators control the flow of spatial information to downstream components was verified experimentally in rat hippocampal slices. These results suggest a mechanism by which cellular geometry, the presence of regulatory loops with negative regulators, and key reaction rates all together control spatial information transfer and microdomain characteristics within cells. PMID:18485874

  5. Characterization of electron-beam recorded microdomain patterns on the nonpolar surface of LiNbO3 crystal by nondestructive methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokhanchik, L. S.; Gainutdinov, R. V.; Mishina, E. D.; Lavrov, S. D.; Volk, T. R.

    2014-10-01

    We report on characterization of the electron-beam fabricated planar domain gratings on the nonpolar (Y-) surface of LiNbO3 crystals performed with the use of AFM and confocal second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy. The dependence of domain formation on the irradiation conditions was investigated. The relation of domain thicknesses to the electron penetration depth is experimentally proved. In particular, the possibility of controlling the thickness of planar domains by varying acceleration electron-beam voltages is demonstrated. The observed specificity of SHG is analyzed in the framework of the Kleinman-Boyd theory [G. D. Boyd and D. A. Kleinman, J. Appl. Phys. 39, 3597 (1968)] and Uesu approach [Kaneshiro et al., J. Appl. Phys. 104, 054112 (2008); Kaneshiro et al., J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 27, 888 (2010)] extended in our case to reflection geometry. The calculations performed predict the dependence of SHG conversion efficiency η on the domain thickness, which is in a qualitative agreement with the experiment. It is shown that planar domains on top of the nonpolar surface always enhance the value of η as compared with the bare surface.

  6. Bio-inspired direct patterning functional nanothin microlines: controllable liquid transfer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qianbin; Meng, Qingan; Wang, Pengwei; Liu, Huan; Jiang, Lei

    2015-04-28

    Developing a general and low-cost strategy that enables direct patterning of microlines with nanometer thickness from versatile liquid-phase functional materials and precise positioning of them on various substrates remains a challenge. Herein, with inspiration from the oriental wisdom to control ink transfer by Chinese brushes, we developed a facile and general writing strategy to directly pattern various functional microlines with homogeneous distribution and nanometer-scale thickness. It is demonstrated that the width and thickness of the microlines could be well-controlled by tuning the writing method, providing guidance for the adaptation of this technique to various systems. It is also shown that various functional liquid-phase materials, such as quantum dots, small molecules, polymers, and suspensions of nanoparticles, could directly write on the substrates with intrinsic physicochemical properties well-preserved. Moreover, this technique enabled direct patterning of liquid-phase materials on certain microdomains, even in multiple layered style, thus a microdomain localized chemical reaction and the patterned surface chemical modification were enabled. This bio-inspired direct writing device will shed light on the template-free printing of various functional micropatterns, as well as the integrated functional microdevices.

  7. Local structure of Rb{sub 2}Li{sub 4}(SeO{sub 4}){sub 3}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O by the modeling of X-ray diffuse scattering - from average-structure to microdomain model

    SciTech Connect

    Komornicka, Dorota; Wolcyrz, Marek; Pietraszko, Adam

    2012-08-15

    Local structure of dirubidium tetralithium tris(selenate(VI)) dihydrate - Rb{sub 2}Li{sub 4}(SeO{sub 4}){sub 3}{center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O has been determined basing on the modeling of X-ray diffuse scattering. The origin of observed structured diffuse streaks is SeO{sub 4} tetrahedra switching between two alternative positions in two quasi-planar layers existing in each unit cell and formation of domains with specific SeO{sub 4} tetrahedra configuration locally fulfilling condition for C-centering in the 2a Multiplication-Sign 2b Multiplication-Sign c superstructure cell. The local structure solution is characterized by a uniform distribution of rather large domains (ca. thousand of unit cells) in two layers, but also monodomains can be taken into account. Inside a single domain SeO{sub 4} tetrahedra are ordered along ab-diagonal forming two-string ribbons. Inside the ribbons SeO{sub 4} and LiO{sub 4} tetrahedra share the oxygen corners, whereas ribbons are bound to each other by a net of hydrogen bonds and fastened by corner sharing SeO{sub 4} tetrahedra of the neighboring layers. - Graphical abstract: Experimental sections of the reciprocal space showing diffraction effects observed for RLSO. Bragg spots are visible on sections with integer indices (1 kl section - on the left), streaks - on sections with fractional ones (1.5 kl section - on the right). At the center: resulting local structure of the A package modeled as a microdomain: two-string ribbons of ordered oxygen-corners-sharing SeO{sub 4} and LiO{sub 4} terahedra extended along ab-diagonal are seen; ribbons are bound by hydrogen bonds (shown in pink); the multiplied 2a Multiplication-Sign 2b unit cell is shown. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer X-ray diffuse scattering in RLSO was registered and modeled. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The origin of diffuse streaks is SeO{sub 4} tetrahedra switching in two structure layers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The local structure is characterized by a uniform

  8. Identification of key residues in virulent canine distemper virus hemagglutinin that control CD150/SLAM-binding activity.

    PubMed

    Zipperle, Ljerka; Langedijk, Johannes P M; Orvell, Claes; Vandevelde, Marc; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Plattet, Philippe

    2010-09-01

    Morbillivirus cell entry is controlled by hemagglutinin (H), an envelope-anchored viral glycoprotein determining interaction with multiple host cell surface receptors. Subsequent to virus-receptor attachment, H is thought to transduce a signal triggering the viral fusion glycoprotein, which in turn drives virus-cell fusion activity. Cell entry through the universal morbillivirus receptor CD150/SLAM was reported to depend on two nearby microdomains located within the hemagglutinin. Here, we provide evidence that three key residues in the virulent canine distemper virus A75/17 H protein (Y525, D526, and R529), clustering at the rim of a large recessed groove created by beta-propeller blades 4 and 5, control SLAM-binding activity without drastically modulating protein surface expression or SLAM-independent F triggering.

  9. Controlled antiseptic release by alginate polymer films and beads.

    PubMed

    Liakos, Ioannis; Rizzello, Loris; Bayer, Ilker S; Pompa, Pier Paolo; Cingolani, Roberto; Athanassiou, Athanassia

    2013-01-30

    Biodegradable polymeric materials based on blending aqueous dispersions of natural polymer sodium alginate (NaAlg) and povidone iodine (PVPI) complex, which allow controlled antiseptic release, are presented. The developed materials are either free standing NaAlg films or Ca(2+)-cross-linked alginate beads, which properly combined with PVPI demonstrate antibacterial and antifungal activity, suitable for therapeutic applications, such as wound dressing. Glycerol was used as the plasticizing agent. Film morphology was studied by optical and atomic force microscopy. It was found that PVPI complex forms well dispersed circular micro-domains within the NaAlg matrix. The beads were fabricated by drop-wise immersion of NaAlg/PVPI/glycerol solutions into aqueous calcium chloride solutions to form calcium alginate beads encapsulating PVPI solution (CaAlg/PVPI). Controlled release of PVPI was possible when the composite films and beads were brought into direct contact with water or with moist media. Bactericidal and fungicidal properties of the materials were tested against Escherichia coli bacteria and Candida albicans fungi. The results indicated very efficient antibacterial and antifungal activity within 48 h. Controlled release of PVPI into open wounds is highly desired in clinical applications to avoid toxic doses of iodine absorption by the wound. A wide variety of applications are envisioned such as external and internal wound dressings with controlled antiseptic release, hygienic and protective packaging films for medical devices, and polymer beads as water disinfectants.

  10. A Localized Complex of Two Protein Oligomers Controls the Orientation of Cell Polarity

    PubMed Central

    Lasker, Keren; Ahrens, Daniel G.; Eckart, Michael R.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Signaling hubs at bacterial cell poles establish cell polarity in the absence of membrane-bound compartments. In the asymmetrically dividing bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, cell polarity stems from the cell cycle-regulated localization and turnover of signaling protein complexes in these hubs, and yet the mechanisms that establish the identity of the two cell poles have not been established. Here, we recapitulate the tripartite assembly of a cell fate signaling complex that forms during the G1-S transition. Using in vivo and in vitro analyses of dynamic polar protein complex formation, we show that a polymeric cell polarity protein, SpmX, serves as a direct bridge between the PopZ polymeric network and the cell fate-directing DivJ histidine kinase. We demonstrate the direct binding between these three proteins and show that a polar microdomain spontaneously assembles when the three proteins are coexpressed heterologously in an Escherichia coli test system. The relative copy numbers of these proteins are essential for complex formation, as overexpression of SpmX in Caulobacter reorganizes the polarity of the cell, generating ectopic cell poles containing PopZ and DivJ. Hierarchical formation of higher-order SpmX oligomers nucleates new PopZ microdomain assemblies at the incipient lateral cell poles, driving localized outgrowth. By comparison to self-assembling protein networks and polar cell growth mechanisms in other bacterial species, we suggest that the cooligomeric PopZ-SpmX protein complex in Caulobacter illustrates a paradigm for coupling cell cycle progression to the controlled geometry of cell pole establishment. PMID:28246363

  11. Probing Lipid Membrane Rafts (Microdomains) with Fluorescent Phospholipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yongwen; Mitchel, Drake

    2011-10-01

    Membrane rafts are enriched in sphingolipids and cholesterol, they exist in a more ordered state (the liquid-ordered phase; lo) than the bulk membrane (the liquid-disordered phase; ld). Ternary mixtures of palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphocholine (POPC; 16:0,18:1 PC), sphingomyelin (SPM), and cholesterol (Chol) form membrane rafts over a wide range of molar ratios. We are examining the ability of two fluorescent probes, NBD linked to di-16:0 PE which partitions into the lo phase, and NBD linked to di-18:1 PE which partitions into the ld phase, to detect these two phases. We are also examining the effect of the highly polyunsaturated phospholipid stearoyl-docosahexanoyl-phosphocholine (SDPC; 18:0, 22:6 PC) on the size and stability of POPC/SPM/Chol membrane rafts. We report on the fluorescence lifetime and anisotropy decay dynamics of two fluorescent probes. Data were acquired via frequency-domain measurements from 5 to 250 MHz.

  12. Protein- protein interaction detection system using fluorescent protein microdomains

    DOEpatents

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2010-02-23

    The invention provides a protein labeling and interaction detection system based on engineered fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins that require fused interacting polypeptides to drive the association of the fragments, and further are soluble and stable, and do not change the solubility of polypeptides to which they are fused. In one embodiment, a test protein X is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 10, amino acids 198-214), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. A second test protein Y is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 11, amino acids 215-230), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. When X and Y interact, they bring the GFP strands into proximity, and are detected by complementation with a third GFP fragment consisting of GFP amino acids 1-198 (strands 1-9). When GFP strands 10 and 11 are held together by interaction of protein X and Y, they spontaneous association with GFP strands 1-9, resulting in structural complementation, folding, and concomitant GFP fluorescence.

  13. High-Fat Diet Changes Hippocampal Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) in a Genotype- and Carbohydrate-Dependent Manner in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lane-Donovan, Courtney; Herz, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is a currently incurable neurodegenerative disease affecting millions of individuals worldwide. Risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease include genetic risk factors, such as possession of ε4 allele of apolipoprotein E (ApoE4) over the risk-neutral ApoE3 allele, and lifestyle risk factors, such as diet and exercise. The intersection of these two sources of disease risk is not well understood. We investigated the impact of diet on ApoE levels by feeding wildtype, ApoE3, and ApoE4 targeted replacement (TR) mice with chow, high-fat, or ketogenic (high-fat, very-low-carbohydrate) diets. We found that high-fat diet affected both plasma and hippocampal levels of ApoE in an isoform-dependent manner, with high-fat diet causing a surprising reduction of hippocampal ApoE levels in ApoE3 TR mice. Conversely, the ketogenic diet had no effect on hippocampal ApoE. Our findings suggest that the use of dietary interventions to slow the progression AD should take ApoE genotype into consideration. PMID:26828652

  14. High-Fat Diet Changes Hippocampal Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) in a Genotype- and Carbohydrate-Dependent Manner in Mice.

    PubMed

    Lane-Donovan, Courtney; Herz, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a currently incurable neurodegenerative disease affecting millions of individuals worldwide. Risk factors for Alzheimer's disease include genetic risk factors, such as possession of ε4 allele of apolipoprotein E (ApoE4) over the risk-neutral ApoE3 allele, and lifestyle risk factors, such as diet and exercise. The intersection of these two sources of disease risk is not well understood. We investigated the impact of diet on ApoE levels by feeding wildtype, ApoE3, and ApoE4 targeted replacement (TR) mice with chow, high-fat, or ketogenic (high-fat, very-low-carbohydrate) diets. We found that high-fat diet affected both plasma and hippocampal levels of ApoE in an isoform-dependent manner, with high-fat diet causing a surprising reduction of hippocampal ApoE levels in ApoE3 TR mice. Conversely, the ketogenic diet had no effect on hippocampal ApoE. Our findings suggest that the use of dietary interventions to slow the progression AD should take ApoE genotype into consideration.

  15. Simple orientational control over cylindrical organic-inorganic block copolymer domains for etch mask applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanathan, M.; Nettleton, E.; Darling, S. B.

    2009-02-01

    Bottom-up patterning methodologies, predicated on chemical self-assembly, have the potential to transcend limitations associated with more traditional lithographies. By controlling the domain orientation of a cylinder-forming organic-inorganic block copolymer, poly(styrene-block-ferrocenyldimethylsilane), it is possible to straightforwardly fabricate massive arrays of either nanoscale dots or wires out of a film composed of a wide variety of materials. In the work reported here, orientational control is achieved by manipulating the polymer film thickness in concert with the annealing treatment. For films much thinner than the equilibrium periodicity of the microdomains, the cylinders spontaneously orient themselves perpendicular to the substrate. Films with thickness close to the equilibrium periodicity exhibit the more common in-plane orientation following thermal annealing. Solvent annealing leads to an in-plane orientation for the full range of film thicknesses studied. As a demonstration of the effectiveness of this method, semiconductor substrates were patterned with arrays of posts and wires, respectively, using the same starting polymeric material as the etch mask. Compatibility of this polymer with various substrate materials is also demonstrated.

  16. Birth Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... girlshealth.gov/ Home Body Your sexuality Birth control Birth control Birth control (also called contraception) may seem confusing ... more. What do I need to know about birth control? top The more you know about birth control, ...

  17. Electric-Field Control of Magnetism in Co40Fe40B20/(1-x)Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-xPbTiO3 Multiferroic Heterostructures with Different Ferroelectric Phases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Zhao, Yonggang; Li, Peisen; Zhang, Sen; Li, Dalai; Wu, Hao; Chen, Aitian; Xu, Yang; Han, X F; Li, Shiyan; Lin, Di; Luo, Haosu

    2016-02-17

    Electric-field control of magnetism in multiferroic heterostructures composed of Co40Fe40B20 (CoFeB) and (1-x)Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-xPbTiO3 (PMN-xPT) with different ferroelectric phases via changing composition and temperature is explored. It is demonstrated that the nonvolatile looplike bipolar-electric-field-controlled magnetization, previously found in the CoFeB/PMN-xPT heterostructures with PMN-xPT in the rhombohedral (R) phase around the morphotropic phase boundary (MPB), also occurs for PMN-xPTs with both R phase (far away from MPB) and monoclinic (M) phase, suggesting that the phenomenon is the common feature of CoFeB/PMN-xPT multiferroic heterostructures for PMN-xPT with different phases. The magnitude of the effect changes with increasing temperature and volatile bipolar-electric-field-controlled magnetization with a butterflylike behavior occurs when the ferroelectric phase changes to the tetragonal phase (T). Moreover, for the R-phase sample with x = 0.18, an abrupt and giant increase of magnetization is observed at a characteristic temperature in the temperature dependence of magnetization curve. These results are discussed in terms of coupling between magnetism and ferroelectric domains including macro- and microdomains for different ferroelectric phases. This work is helpful for understanding the phenomena of electric-field control of magnetism in FM/FE multiferroic heterostructures and is also important for applications.

  18. Dream controller

    DOEpatents

    Cheng, George Shu-Xing; Mulkey, Steven L; Wang, Qiang; Chow, Andrew J

    2013-11-26

    A method and apparatus for intelligently controlling continuous process variables. A Dream Controller comprises an Intelligent Engine mechanism and a number of Model-Free Adaptive (MFA) controllers, each of which is suitable to control a process with specific behaviors. The Intelligent Engine can automatically select the appropriate MFA controller and its parameters so that the Dream Controller can be easily used by people with limited control experience and those who do not have the time to commission, tune, and maintain automatic controllers.

  19. Protein assemblies of sodium and inward rectifier potassium channels control cardiac excitability and arrhythmogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Willis, B. Cicero; Ponce-Balbuena, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    The understanding of how cardiac ion channels function in the normal and the diseased heart has greatly increased over the last four decades thanks to the advent of patch-clamp technology and, more recently, the emergence of genetics, as well as cellular and molecular cardiology. However, our knowledge of how these membrane-embedded proteins physically interact with each other within macromolecular complexes remains incomplete. This review focuses on how the main cardiac inward sodium channel (NaV1.5) and the strong inward rectifier potassium channel (Kir2.1) function within macromolecular complexes to control cardiac excitability. It has become increasingly clear that these two important ion channel proteins physically interact with multiple other protein partners and with each other from early stages of protein trafficking and targeting through membrane anchoring, recycling, and degradation. Recent findings include compartmentalized regulation of NaV1.5 channel expression and function through a PDZ (postsynaptic density protein, Drosophila disc large tumor suppressor, and zonula occludens-1 protein) domain-binding motif, and interaction of caveolin-3 with Kir2.1 and ankyrin-G as a molecular platform for NaV1.5 signaling. At the cardiomyocyte membrane, NaV1.5 and Kir2.1 interact through at least two distinct PDZ domain-scaffolding proteins (synapse-associated protein-97 and α1-syntrophin), thus modulating reciprocally their cell-surface expression at two different microdomains. Emerging evidence also shows that inheritable mutations in plakophilin-2, ankyrin-G, dystrophin, syntrophin, synapse-associated protein-97, and caveolin-3, among others, modify functional expression and/or localization in the cardiac cell of NaV1.5, Kir2.1 or both to give rise to arrhythmogenic diseases. Unveiling the mechanistic underpinnings of macromolecular interactions should increase our understanding of inherited and acquired arrhythmogenic cardiac diseases and may lead to advances

  20. Protein assemblies of sodium and inward rectifier potassium channels control cardiac excitability and arrhythmogenesis.

    PubMed

    Willis, B Cicero; Ponce-Balbuena, Daniela; Jalife, José

    2015-06-15

    The understanding of how cardiac ion channels function in the normal and the diseased heart has greatly increased over the last four decades thanks to the advent of patch-clamp technology and, more recently, the emergence of genetics, as well as cellular and molecular cardiology. However, our knowledge of how these membrane-embedded proteins physically interact with each other within macromolecular complexes remains incomplete. This review focuses on how the main cardiac inward sodium channel (NaV1.5) and the strong inward rectifier potassium channel (Kir2.1) function within macromolecular complexes to control cardiac excitability. It has become increasingly clear that these two important ion channel proteins physically interact with multiple other protein partners and with each other from early stages of protein trafficking and targeting through membrane anchoring, recycling, and degradation. Recent findings include compartmentalized regulation of NaV1.5 channel expression and function through a PDZ (postsynaptic density protein, Drosophila disc large tumor suppressor, and zonula occludens-1 protein) domain-binding motif, and interaction of caveolin-3 with Kir2.1 and ankyrin-G as a molecular platform for NaV1.5 signaling. At the cardiomyocyte membrane, NaV1.5 and Kir2.1 interact through at least two distinct PDZ domain-scaffolding proteins (synapse-associated protein-97 and α1-syntrophin), thus modulating reciprocally their cell-surface expression at two different microdomains. Emerging evidence also shows that inheritable mutations in plakophilin-2, ankyrin-G, dystrophin, syntrophin, synapse-associated protein-97, and caveolin-3, among others, modify functional expression and/or localization in the cardiac cell of NaV1.5, Kir2.1 or both to give rise to arrhythmogenic diseases. Unveiling the mechanistic underpinnings of macromolecular interactions should increase our understanding of inherited and acquired arrhythmogenic cardiac diseases and may lead to advances

  1. Rodent Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indian Journal of Adult Education, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Strategies for rodent control in crop fields, threshing yards, and rural residential areas are presented together with an operational plan for implementing a program for rodent control at the national level. Training personnel in rodent control procedures and procedures for educating the public in the necessity for control are covered. (EC)

  2. Propulsion controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harkney, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    Increased system requirements and functional integration with the aircraft have placed an increased demand on control system capability and reliability. To provide these at an affordable cost and weight and because of the rapid advances in electronic technology, hydromechanical systems are being phased out in favor of digital electronic systems. The transition is expected to be orderly from electronic trimming of hydromechanical controls to full authority digital electronic control. Future propulsion system controls will be highly reliable full authority digital electronic with selected component and circuit redundancy to provide the required safety and reliability. Redundancy may include a complete backup control of a different technology for single engine applications. The propulsion control will be required to communicate rapidly with the various flight and fire control avionics as part of an integrated control concept.

  3. Characteristics of microdomains and microdomain patterns recorded by electron beam irradiation on Y-cut LiNbO3 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokhanchik, L. S.; Gainutdinov, R. V.; Lavrov, S. D.; Volk, T. R.

    2015-08-01

    We present the results of investigations of planar domain patterns (isolated domains and domain gratings) fabricated by irradiation of the nonpolar Y-surface of LiNbO3 crystals by an electron beam (EB) incident normally onto the surface. The EB recorded domains were investigated using atomic force microscopy, confocal second harmonic generation microscopy, and chemical etching as an auxiliary method. The dependence of the domain characteristics on irradiation conditions (acceleration voltage U, EB current I, and irradiation time tirr) were determined. The length Ld of both isolated domains and domain gratings along the polar axis Z grows linearly with tirr (at U, I = const) with no tending to saturation. The plots Ld(tirr) obtained for U = 10 and 15 kV are practically identical, whereas the values of Ld for U = 5 kV are essentially lower. The domain thickness Td along the Y-direction, i.e., the depth of the switched layer grows with acceleration voltage U. These results are discussed in terms of space-charge fields formation arising under EB irradiation of insulators. The linearity of Ld(tirr) is accounted for by the frontal domain growth via the viscous friction law. The experimental dependence of Td on U supports the suggestion that the domain thickness is determined by the penetration depth Re of primary electrons, which in turn is governed by U. The difference in Ld(tirr) plots for different U is accounted for by different electron emission σ. Indirect evidences of a defect structure modification in a thin surface layer with respect to the crystal bulk are obtained.

  4. Restructurable Controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montoya, R. J. (Compiler); Howell, W. E. (Compiler); Bundick, W. T. (Compiler); Ostroff, A. J. (Compiler); Hueschen, R. M. (Compiler); Belcastro, C. M. (Compiler)

    1983-01-01

    Restructurable control system theory, robust reconfiguration for high reliability and survivability for advanced aircraft, restructurable controls problem definition and research, experimentation, system identification methods applied to aircraft, a self-repairing digital flight control system, and state-of-the-art theory application are addressed.

  5. Controlling Fertility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donnay, France

    1991-01-01

    Recent developments in fertility control are presented in relation to the global demographic situation. Discussion focuses on changes in scientific knowledge and concepts that have shifted the focus from birth control to planned parenthood to the notion of controlled fertility. The place of family planning programs, including their socioeconomic…

  6. Control Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Real-Time Innovations, Inc. (RTI) collaborated with Ames Research Center, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Stanford University to leverage NASA research to produce ControlShell software. RTI is the first "graduate" of Ames Research Center's Technology Commercialization Center. The ControlShell system was used extensively on a cooperative project to enhance the capabilities of a Russian-built Marsokhod rover being evaluated for eventual flight to Mars. RTI's ControlShell is complex, real-time command and control software, capable of processing information and controlling mechanical devices. One ControlShell tool is StethoScope. As a real-time data collection and display tool, StethoScope allows a user to see how a program is running without changing its execution. RTI has successfully applied its software savvy in other arenas, such as telecommunications, networking, video editing, semiconductor manufacturing, automobile systems, and medical imaging.

  7. Voltage Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Power Efficiency Corporation, specifically formed to manufacture and develop products from NASA technology, has a license to a three-phase power factor controller originally developed by Frank Nola, an engineer at Marshall Space Flight Center. Power Efficiency and two major distributors, Performance Control and Edison Power Technologies, use the electronic control boards to assemble three different motor controllers: Power Commander, Performance Controller, and Energy Master. The company Power Factor Controller reduces excessive energy waste in AC induction motors. It is used in industries and applications where motors operate under variable loads, including elevators and escalators, machine tools, intake and exhaust fans, oil wells, conveyors, pumps, die casting, and compressors. Customer lists include companies such as May Department Stores, Caesars Atlantic City, Ford Motors, and American Axle.

  8. Mosquito Control

    MedlinePlus

    Jump to main content US EPA United States Environmental Protection Agency Search Search Share Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us Mosquito Control About Mosquitoes General Information Life ...

  9. Power Controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1983-01-01

    The power factor controller (PFC) senses shifts in the relationship between voltage and current, and matches them with a motor's need. This prevents waste as motors do not need a high voltage when they are not operating at full load conditions. PFC is manufactured by Nordic Controls Company, among others, and has proved extremely cost effective.

  10. CONTROL ROD

    DOEpatents

    Walker, D.E.; Matras, S.

    1963-04-30

    This patent shows a method of making a fuel or control rod for a nuclear reactor. Fuel or control material is placed within a tube and plugs of porous metal wool are inserted at both ends. The metal wool is then compacted and the tube compressed around it as by swaging, thereby making the plugs liquid- impervious but gas-pervious. (AEC)

  11. Environmental Controls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneiderman, Helen, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    Environmental control units, or ECUs, are devices or systems which allow for alternate access to electronic or electrical devices and those objects, like draperies and doors, which may be adapted for use with electricity. Such devices offer the person with a mobility limitation the opportunity to control his or her environment, thus enhancing the…

  12. Symptom control.

    PubMed

    Chang, Victor T; Ingham, Jane

    2003-01-01

    Symptom control has become increasingly recognized as an important goal in patient care. In this article, advances in symptom assessment, and various definitions of symptom improvement are reviewed. Theoretical concepts underlying symptom control and clinically significant change are presented, as well as the role of symptom control as an endpoint in clinical trials. Symptom control is then surveyed in two broad categories for selected symptoms. The first area is therapy related symptoms, secondary to chemotherapy, radiation, hormonal therapy, and surgery. Symptoms reviewed include chemotherapy related mucositis, emesis, fatigue; hot flashes; and radiation related dermatitis, xerostomia, and mucositis. The second area is palliative oncologic approaches to disease-related symptoms. Results in palliative chemotherapy, palliative radiation therapy, cancer pain, and lack of appetite are summarized. Areas requiring further research are noted. Findings are presented in both a clinical and research context to help guide the reader with interpreting symptom control studies.

  13. Detonation control

    SciTech Connect

    Mace, Jonathan L.; Seitz, Gerald J.; Bronisz, Lawrence E.

    2016-10-25

    Detonation control modules and detonation control circuits are provided herein. A trigger input signal can cause a detonation control module to trigger a detonator. A detonation control module can include a timing circuit, a light-producing diode such as a laser diode, an optically triggered diode, and a high-voltage capacitor. The trigger input signal can activate the timing circuit. The timing circuit can control activation of the light-producing diode. Activation of the light-producing diode illuminates and activates the optically triggered diode. The optically triggered diode can be coupled between the high-voltage capacitor and the detonator. Activation of the optically triggered diode causes a power pulse to be released from the high-voltage capacitor that triggers the detonator.

  14. Aiming Control.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-01

    positive definite solution of A1Qy+QyAo+I--QyBBTQY=O (5.2) The logarithmic residence time of system (3.1) with the stabilizing control (5.1) in a I...a bounded is E bou,,,,dby, ii I)-2=(6 2 This completes the prooof the necesity. Suffidency: The proof is by conatnction. Select a stabilizing control u...a - . Q.LD. Proof of Theorem 3.3: It follows from the results of [151, [21] that for each y > 0, K? defined by (3.4) is a stabilizing control and

  15. REACTOR CONTROL

    DOEpatents

    Fortescue, P.; Nicoll, D.

    1962-04-24

    A control system employed with a high pressure gas cooled reactor in which a control rod is positioned for upward and downward movement into the neutron field from a position beneath the reactor is described. The control rod is positioned by a coupled piston cylinder releasably coupled to a power drive means and the pressurized coolant is directed against the lower side of the piston. The coolant pressure is offset by a higher fiuid pressure applied to the upper surface of the piston and means are provided for releasing the higher pressure on the upper side of the piston so that the pressure of the coolant drives the piston upwardly, forcing the coupled control rod into the ncutron field of the reactor. (AEC)

  16. Under Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Rich

    2001-01-01

    Offers advice on how school administrators can properly plan and monitor school construction projects to contain costs. Cost control tips discussed include project scope definition, contract bidding and awarding practice, and project management techniques. (GR)

  17. CONTROL ROD

    DOEpatents

    Zinn, W.H.; Ross, H.V.

    1958-11-18

    A control rod is described for a nuclear reactor. In certaln reactor designs it becomes desirable to use a control rod having great width but relatively llttle thickness. This patent is addressed to such a need. The neutron absorbing material is inserted in a triangular tube, leaving volds between the circular insert and the corners of the triangular tube. The material is positioned within the tube by the use of dummy spacers to achleve the desired absorption pattern, then the ends of the tubes are sealed with suitable plugs. The tubes may be welded or soldered together to form two flat surfaces of any desired width, and covered with sheetmetal to protect the tubes from damage. This design provides a control member that will not distort under the action of outside forces or be ruptured by gases generated within the jacketed control member.

  18. Drug Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leviton, Harvey S.

    1975-01-01

    This article attempts to assemble pertinent information about the drug problem, particularily marihuana. It also focuses on the need for an educational program for drug control with the public schools as the main arena. (Author/HMV)

  19. CONTROL SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Shannon, R.H.; Williamson, H.E.

    1962-10-30

    A boiling water type nuclear reactor power system having improved means of control is described. These means include provisions for either heating the coolant-moderator prior to entry into the reactor or shunting the coolantmoderator around the heating means in response to the demand from the heat engine. These provisions are in addition to means for withdrawing the control rods from the reactor. (AEC)

  20. Statins Attenuate Helicobacter pylori CagA Translocation and Reduce Incidence of Gastric Cancer: In Vitro and Population-Based Case-Control Studies.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun-Jung; Liao, Wei-Chih; Lin, Hwai-Jeng; Hsu, Yuan-Man; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chen, Yu-An; Feng, Chun-Lung; Chen, Chih-Jung; Kao, Min-Chuan; Lai, Chih-Ho; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. The correlation of Helicobacter pylori and the etiology of gastric cancer was substantially certain. Cholesterol-rich microdomains (also called lipid rafts), which provide platforms for signaling, are associated with H. pylori-induced pathogenesis leading to gastric cancer. Patients who have been prescribed statins, inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl glutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, have exhibited a reduced risk of several types of cancer. However, no studies have addressed the effect of statins on H. pylori-associated gastric cancer from the antineoplastic perspective. In this study, we showed that treatment of gastric epithelial cells with simvastatin reduced the level of cellular cholesterol and led to attenuation of translocation and phosphorylation of H. pylori cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA), which is recognized as a major determinant of gastric cancer development. Additionally, a nationwide case-control study based on data from the Taiwanese National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) was conducted. A population-based case-control study revealed that patients who used simvastatin exhibited a significantly reduced risk of gastric cancer (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 0.76, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.70-0.83). In patients exhibiting H. pylori infection who were prescribed simvastatin, the adjusted OR for gastric cancer was 0.25 (95% CI = 0.12-0.50). Our results combined an in vitro study with a nationwide population analysis reveal that statin use might be a feasible approach to prevent H. pylori-associated gastric cancer.

  1. Airspace Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-02

    it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1 . REPORT DATE 02 FEB 2011 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4...each other; select the best course of action; and produce a joint operation plan or order (JP 1 - 02 ). A major element of the JOPP is campaign planning... 1 - 02 ). Airspace control should be integrated throughout the JOPP and campaign planning to ensure joint air operations support the JFC‘s plan.60

  2. Controlling turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühnen, Jakob; Hof, Björn

    2015-11-01

    We show that a simple modification of the velocity profile in a pipe can lead to a complete collapse of turbulence and the flow fully relaminarises. The annihilation of turbulence is achieved by a steady manipulation of the streamwise velocity component alone, greatly reducing control efforts. Several different control techniques are presented: one with a local modification of the flow profile by means of a stationary obstacle, one employing a nozzle injecting fluid through a small gap at the pipe wall and one with a moving wall, where a part of the pipe is shifted in the streamwise direction. All control techniques act on the flow such that the streamwise velocity profile becomes more flat and turbulence gradually grows faint and disappears. In a smooth straight pipe the flow remains laminar downstream of the control. Hence a reduction in skin friction by a factor of 8 and more can be accomplished. Stereoscopic PIV-measurements and movies of the development of the flow during relaminarisation are presented.

  3. Motor Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Kollmorgen Corporation's Mermaid II two person submersible is propeller-driven by a system of five DC brushless motors with new electronic controllers that originated in work performed in a NASA/DOE project managed by Lewis Research Center. A key feature of the system is electric commutation rather than mechanical commutation for converting AC current to DC.

  4. Dynamics & Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-06

    This project takes the first steps towards a “Compressive Information Extraction” paradigm: Unmanned vehicles Flight and perch sensors Human in the...the program has solid efforts in control of MAVs, hypersonic vehicles , smart materials and biological systems. • Support of fundamental research...BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF PORTFOLIO: Developing mathematical theory and algorithms based on the interplay of dynamical systems and

  5. Birth Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... your health, frequency of sexual activity, number of sexual partners and desire to have children in the future. Your health care provider can help you select the best form of birth control for you. NIH: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

  6. Soluble klotho binds monosialoganglioside to regulate membrane microdomains and growth factor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, George; An, Sung-Wan; Al-Juboori, Saif I.; Nischan, Nicole; Yoon, Joonho; Dobrinskikh, Evgenia; Hilgemann, Donald W.; Xie, Jian; Luby-Phelps, Kate; Kohler, Jennifer J.; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Huang, Chou-Long

    2017-01-01

    Soluble klotho, the shed ectodomain of the antiaging membrane protein α-klotho, is a pleiotropic endocrine/paracrine factor with no known receptors and poorly understood mechanism of action. Soluble klotho down-regulates growth factor-driven PI3K signaling, contributing to extension of lifespan, cardioprotection, and tumor inhibition. Here we show that soluble klotho binds membrane lipid rafts. Klotho binding to rafts alters lipid organization, decreases membrane’s propensity to form large ordered domains for endocytosis, and down-regulates raft-dependent PI3K/Akt signaling. We identify α2-3-sialyllactose present in the glycan of monosialogangliosides as targets of soluble klotho. α2-3-Sialyllactose is a common motif of glycans. To explain why klotho preferentially targets lipid rafts we show that clustering of gangliosides in lipid rafts is important. In vivo, raft-dependent PI3K signaling is up-regulated in klotho-deficient mouse hearts vs. wild-type hearts. Our results identify ganglioside-enriched lipid rafts to be receptors that mediate soluble klotho regulation of PI3K signaling. Targeting sialic acids may be a general mechanism for pleiotropic actions of soluble klotho. PMID:28069944

  7. Human Prostate Cancer Infiltrating Lymphocytes: Raft Microdomains, Signaling and Activation in Organ Cultures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    reality. Nat. Rev. Immunol. 3:630–641. 2. Van Der Bruggen, P., Y. Zhang, P. Chaux , V. Stroobant, C. Pani- chelli, E.S. Schultz, J. Chapiro, B.J. Van...References [1] Finn OJ. Cancer vaccines: between the idea and the reality. Nat Rev Immunol 2003;3:630–41. [2] Van Der Bruggen P, Zhang Y, Chaux P, Stroobant V

  8. Identification of microdomains involved in association of "Arabidopsis" Ca(2+)/H(+) exchangers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In planta, high capacity tonoplast Ca2+/H+ antiport is mediated in part by a family of CAtion Exchangers (CAX). Each CAX can be divided into two weakly homologous halves (N- and C-) at the negatively charged loop between transmembrane (TM) 6 and TM7. Some CAX halves (N+C) co-expressed in yeast cells...

  9. Human Prostate Cancer Infiltrating Lymphocytes: Raft Microdomains, Signaling and Activation in Organ Cultures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    NKG2D, and CD94 CXCR1 - 4 (Table I). CXCR2 - 4 CXCR3 + + 4 Tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte activation in prostate CXCR4 ++ 4 carcinoma organ cultures... CXCR3 and CCR7 obtained posal of nitrogenous waste. Arginase inhibitors might thus from R&D Systems; CD137 obtained from Ancell Corporation; NKp30

  10. Influence of irradiation-induced disorder on the Peierls transition in TTF-TCNQ microdomains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovyeva, Vita; Cmyrev, Anastasia; Sachser, Roland; Reith, Heiko; Huth, Michael

    2011-09-01

    The combined influence of electron irradiation-induced defects, substrate-induced strain and finite size effects on the electronic transport properties of individual micron-sized thin film growth domains of the organic charge transfer compound tetrathiafulvalene- tetracyanoquinodimethane (TTF-TCNQ) have been studied. The TTF-TCNQ domains have been isolated and electrically contacted by focused ion beam etching and focused ion and electron-beam-induced deposition, respectively. This allowed us to measure the temperature-dependent resistivity and the current-voltage characteristics of individual domains. The dependence of the resistivity on temperature follows a variable-range hopping behaviour which shows a crossover of the exponents as the Peierls transition is approached. The low temperature behaviour is analysed within the segmented rod model of Fogler, Teber and Shklovskii which was developed for charge-ordered quasi one-dimensional electron crystals (Fogler et al 2004 Phys. Rev. B 69 035413). The effect of substrate-induced biaxial strain on the Peierls transition temperature is discussed with regard to its interplay with the defect-induced changes.

  11. Asymptotic controllability and optimal control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motta, M.; Rampazzo, F.

    We consider a control problem where the state must approach asymptotically a target C while paying an integral cost with a non-negative Lagrangian l. The dynamics f is just continuous, and no assumptions are made on the zero level set of the Lagrangian l. Through an inequality involving a positive number p and a Minimum Restraint FunctionU=U(x) - a special type of Control Lyapunov Function - we provide a condition implying that (i) the system is asymptotically controllable, and (ii) the value function is bounded by U/p. The result has significant consequences for the uniqueness issue of the corresponding Hamilton-Jacobi equation. Furthermore it may be regarded as a first step in the direction of a feedback construction.

  12. COPD - control drugs

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - control drugs; Bronchodilators - COPD - control drugs; Beta agonist inhaler - COPD - control drugs; Anticholinergic inhaler - COPD - control drugs; Long-acting inhaler - COPD - control drugs; ...

  13. Vehicle Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    UNISTICK is an airplane-like joystick being developed by Johnson Engineering under NASA and VA sponsorship. It allows a driver to control a vehicle with one hand, and is based upon technology developed for the Apollo Lunar Landings of the 1970's. It allows severely handicapped drivers to operate an automobile or van easily. The system is expected to be in production by March 1986.

  14. Autonomous control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Barbara

    1990-01-01

    KSC has been developing the Knowledge-Based Autonomous Test Engineer (KATE), which is a tool for performing automated monitoring, diagnosis, and control of electromechanical devices. KATE employs artificial intelligence computing techniques to perform these functions. The KATE system consists of a generic shell and a knowledge base. The KATE shell is the portion of the system which performs the monitoring, diagnosis, and control functions. It is generic in the sense that it is application independent. This means that the monitoring activity, for instance, will be performed with the same algorithms regardless of the particular physical device being used. The knowledge base is the portion of the system which contains specific functional and behavorial information about the physical device KATE is working with. Work is nearing completion on a project at KSC to interface a Texas Instruments Explorer running a LISP version of KATE with a Generic Checkout System (GCS) test-bed to control a physical simulation of a shuttle tanking system (humorously called the Red Wagon because of its color and mobility). The Autonomous Control System (ACS) project supplements and extends the KATE/GCS project by adding three other major activities. The activities include: porting KATE from the Texas Instruments Explorer machine to an Intel 80386-based UNIX workstation in the LISP language; rewriting KATE as necessary to run on the same 80386 workstation but in the Ada language; and investigating software and techniques to translate ANSI Standard Common LISP to Mil Standard Ada. Primary goals of this task are as follows: (1) establish the advantages of using expert systems to provide intelligent autonomous software for Space Station Freedom applications; (2) determine the feasibility of using Ada as the run-time environment for model-based expert systems; (3) provide insight into the advantages and disadvantagesof using LISP or Ada in the run-time environment for expert systems; and (4

  15. REACTOR CONTROL

    DOEpatents

    Ruano, W.J.

    1957-12-10

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which utilize elongited rod type fuel elements immersed in a liquid moderator and shows a design whereby control of the chain reaction is obtained by varying the amount of moderator or reflector material. A central tank for containing liquid moderator and fuel elements immersed therein is disposed within a surrounding outer tank providing an annular space between the two tanks. This annular space is filled with liquid moderator which functions as a reflector to reflect neutrons back into the central reactor tank to increase the reproduction ratio. Means are provided for circulating and cooling the moderator material in both tanks and additional means are provided for controlling separately the volume of moderator in each tank, which latter means may be operated automatically by a neutron density monitoring device. The patent also shows an arrangement for controlling the chain reaction by injecting and varying an amount of poisoning material in the moderator used in the reflector portion of the reactor.

  16. Signature control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyati, Vittal P.

    The reduction of vehicle radar signature is accomplished by means of vehicle shaping, the use of microwave frequencies-absorbent materials, and either passive or active cancellation techniques; such techniques are also useful in the reduction of propulsion system-associated IR emissions. In some anticipated scenarios, the objective is not signature-reduction but signature control, for deception, via decoy vehicles that mimic the signature characteristics of actual weapons systems. As the stealthiness of airframes and missiles increases, their propulsion systems' exhaust plumes assume a more important role in detection by an adversary.

  17. Thermal control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haslett, B.

    1984-02-01

    There are basically three key ingredients to the thermal control system for any large space platform or space station. These are heat rejection (from a centralized radiator or from body mounted radiators), heat acquisition (from payloads), and heat transport (via a transport loop to the radiator). The echnical approach in the heat rejection area is to construct the radiator from individual elements so that it can be built on-orbit, is very insensitive to meteoroid and debris hazards, and is repairable. In the area of thermal acquisition and transport an added effort to better understand two phase flow in zero gravity by analysis and testing is suggested.

  18. Heliostat control

    DOEpatents

    Kaehler, James A.

    1984-01-01

    An improvement in a system and method of controlling heliostat in which the heliostat is operable in azimuth and elevation by respective stepper motors and including the respective steps or means for calculating the position for the heliostat to be at a commanded position, determining the number of steps in azimuth and elevation for each respective motor to get to the commanded position and energizing both the azimuth and elevation stepper motors to run in parallel until predetermined number of steps away from the closest commanded position in azimuth and elevation so that the closest position has been achieved, and thereafter energizing only the remaining motor to bring it to its commanded position. In this way, the heliostat can be started from a stowed position in the morning and operated by a computer means to its commanded position and kept correctly oriented throughout the day using only the time of the day without requiring the usual sensors and feedback apparatus. A computer, or microprocessor, can then control a plurality of many heliostats easily and efficiently throughout the day.

  19. [Controlled hypernatremia].

    PubMed

    Petit, L; Masson, F; Cottenceau, V; Sztark, F

    2006-08-01

    Hypernatremia exerts its main effect on the brain through the osmotic gradient it creates on either side of the blood brain barrier, which is impermeable to sodium. This generates a transfer of water from the intracellular to the vascular sector leading to temporary cell shrinkage. Osmoregulation permits cerebral cells to accumulate osmoactive molecules in order to restore their initial volume. It has been demonstrated in animals with brain injury that intracellular dehydration occurs essentially in the nonlesioned hemisphere. In most experimental studies, the reduction in cerebral volume obtained by hypertonic saline (HS) perfusion is accompanied by an intracranial pressure decrease, even under hemorrhagic shock conditions. Initially, clinical studies successfully used HS, as an alternative to mannitol, in the treatment of acute and refractory intracranial hypertension. Then continuous infusion of HS, with the objective of inducing hypernatremia, had produced encouraging effects on intracranial pressure control. However, these results were limited to non-randomized studies, without control groups and mainly in pediatric patients. Nevertheless, the use of HS on intracranial hypertension, refractory to conventional treatments, could be reasonable under strict monitoring of natremia as well as its adverse effects.

  20. T-Type Calcium Channel: A Privileged Gate for Calcium Entry and Control of Adrenal Steroidogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rossier, Michel F.

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular calcium plays a crucial role in modulating a variety of functions such as muscle contraction, hormone secretion, gene expression, or cell growth. Calcium signaling has been however shown to be more complex than initially thought. Indeed, it is confined within cell microdomains, and different calcium channels are associated with different functions, as shown by various channelopathies. Sporadic mutations on voltage-operated L-type calcium channels in adrenal glomerulosa cells have been shown recently to be the second most prevalent genetic abnormalities present in human aldosterone-producing adenoma. The observed modification of the threshold of activation of the mutated channels not only provides an explanation for this gain of function but also reminds us on the importance of maintaining adequate electrophysiological characteristics to make channels able to exert specific cellular functions. Indeed, the contribution to steroid production of the various calcium channels expressed in adrenocortical cells is not equal, and the reason has been investigated for a long time. Given the very negative resting potential of these cells, and the small membrane depolarization induced by their physiological agonists, low threshold T-type calcium channels are particularly well suited for responding under these conditions and conveying calcium into the cell, at the right place for controlling steroidogenesis. In contrast, high threshold L-type channels are normally activated by much stronger cell depolarizations. The fact that dihydropyridine calcium antagonists, specific for L-type channels, are poorly efficient for reducing aldosterone secretion either in vivo or in vitro, strongly supports the view that these two types of channels differently affect steroid biosynthesis. Whether a similar analysis is transposable to fasciculata cells and cortisol secretion is one of the questions addressed in the present review. No similar mutations on L-type or T-type channels

  1. Control apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Derkacs, Thomas (Inventor); Fetheroff, Charles W. (Inventor); Matay, Istvan M. (Inventor); Toth, Istvan J. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    Although the method and apparatus of the present invention can be utilized to apply either a uniform or a nonuniform covering of material over many different workpieces, the apparatus (20) is advantageously utilized to apply a thermal barrier covering (64) to an airfoil (22) which is used in a turbine engine. The airfoil is held by a gripper assembly (86) while a spray gun (24) is effective to apply the covering over the airfoil. When a portion of the covering has been applied, a sensor (28) is utilized to detect the thickness of the covering. A control apparatus (32) compares the thickness of the covering of material which has been applied with the desired thickness and is subsequently effective to regulate the operation of the spray gun to adaptively apply a covering of a desired thickness with an accuracy of at least plus or minus 0.0015 inches (1.5 mils) despite unanticipated process variations.

  2. Custom controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butell, Bart

    1996-02-01

    Microsoft's Visual Basic (VB) and Borland's Delphi provide an extremely robust programming environment for delivering multimedia solutions for interactive kiosks, games and titles. Their object oriented use of standard and custom controls enable a user to build extremely powerful applications. A multipurpose, database enabled programming environment that can provide an event driven interface functions as a multimedia kernel. This kernel can provide a variety of authoring solutions (e.g. a timeline based model similar to Macromedia Director or a node authoring model similar to Icon Author). At the heart of the kernel is a set of low level multimedia components providing object oriented interfaces for graphics, audio, video and imaging. Data preparation tools (e.g., layout, palette and Sprite Editors) could be built to manage the media database. The flexible interface for VB allows the construction of an infinite number of user models. The proliferation of these models within a popular, easy to use environment will allow the vast developer segment of 'producer' types to bring their ideas to the market. This is the key to building exciting, content rich multimedia solutions. Microsoft's VB and Borland's Delphi environments combined with multimedia components enable these possibilities.

  3. Birth Control Methods

    MedlinePlus

    ... Z Health Topics Birth control methods Birth control methods > A-Z Health Topics Birth control methods fact ... Publications email updates Enter email Submit Birth control methods Birth control (contraception) is any method, medicine, or ...

  4. CONTROL ROOM WITH SPRINKLER SYSTEM CONTROLS, INCLUDING MANUAL CONTROL BOXES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONTROL ROOM WITH SPRINKLER SYSTEM CONTROLS, INCLUDING MANUAL CONTROL BOXES FOR THE VENTILATION SYSTEM AND A PLC SWITCH FOR AUTOMATIC CO (CARBON MONOXIDE) SYSTEM. THE AIR TESTING SYSTEM IS FREE STANDING AND THE FANS ARE COMPUTER-OPERATED. - Alaskan Way Viaduct and Battery Street Tunnel, Seattle, King County, WA

  5. Contact Control, Version 1

    SciTech Connect

    von Sternberg, Alex

    2016-07-21

    The contact control code is a generalized force control scheme meant to interface with a robotic arm being controlled using the Robot Operating System (ROS). The code allows the user to specify a control scheme for each control dimension in a way that many different control task controllers could be built from the same generalized controller. The input to the code includes maximum velocity, maximum force, maximum displacement, and a control law assigned to each direction and the output is a 6 degree of freedom velocity command that is sent to the robot controller.

  6. Neural control: Chaos control sets the pace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöll, Eckehard

    2010-03-01

    Even simple creatures, such as cockroaches, are capable of complex responses to changes in their environment. But robots usually require complicated dedicated control circuits to perform just a single action. Chaos control theory could allow simpler control strategies to realize more complex behaviour.

  7. Superconducting fault current controller/current controller

    DOEpatents

    Cha, Yung S.

    2004-06-15

    A superconducting fault current controller/current controller employs a superconducting-shielded core reactor (SSCR) with a variable impedance in a secondary circuit to control current in a primary circuit such as an electrical distribution system. In a second embodiment, a variable current source is employed in a secondary circuit of an SSCR to control current in the primary circuit. In a third embodiment, both a variable impedance in one secondary circuit and a variable current source in a second circuit of an SSCR are employed for separate and independent control of current in the primary circuit.

  8. Vehicle Dynamics and Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajamani, Rajesh

    Vehicle Dynamics and Control provides a comprehensive coverage of vehicle control systems and the dynamic models used in the development of these control systems. The control system topics covered in the book include cruise control, adaptive cruise control, ABS, automated lane keeping, automated highway systems, yaw stability control, engine control, passive, active and semi-active suspensions, tire models and tire-road friction estimation. In developing the dynamic model for each application, an effort is made to both keep the model simple enough for control system design but at the same time rich enough to capture the essential features of the dynamics.

  9. Controllability of asynchronous Boolean multiplex control networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Chao; Wang, Xingyuan; Liu, Hong

    2014-09-01

    In this article, the controllability of asynchronous Boolean multiplex control networks (ABMCNs) is studied. First, the model of Boolean multiplex control networks under Harvey' asynchronous update is presented. By means of semi-tensor product approach, the logical dynamics is converted into linear representation, and a generalized formula of control-depending network transition matrices is achieved. Second, a necessary and sufficient condition is proposed to verify that only control-depending fixed points of ABMCNs can be controlled with probability one. Third, using two types of controls, the controllability of system is studied and formulae are given to show: (a) when an initial state is given, the reachable set at time s under a group of specified controls; (b) the reachable set at time s under arbitrary controls; (c) the specific probability values from a given initial state to destination states. Based on the above formulae, an algorithm to calculate overall reachable states from a specified initial state is presented. Moreover, we also discuss an approach to find the particular control sequence which steers the system between two states with maximum probability. Examples are shown to illustrate the feasibility of the proposed scheme.

  10. Malagasy Backward Object Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potsdam, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Backward control is an obligatory interpretational dependency between an overt controller and a nonovert controllee in which the controllee is structurally superior to the controller: "Meg persuaded [Delta]i" ["Roni to give up"]. It contrasts with ordinary forward control, in which the controller is structurally higher: "Meg persuaded Roni"…

  11. PID controllers' fragility.

    PubMed

    Alfaro, Víctor M

    2007-10-01

    In this paper, an index for measuring fragility of proportional integral derivative (PID) controllers is proposed. This index relates the losses of robustness of the control loop when controller parameters change, to the nominal robustness of the control loop. Furthermore, it defines when a PID controller is fragile, nonfragile or resilient.

  12. Directions in propulsion control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed here is research at NASA Lewis in the area of propulsion controls as driven by trends in advanced aircraft. The objective of the Lewis program is to develop the technology for advanced reliable propulsion control systems and to integrate the propulsion control with the flight control for optimal full-system control.

  13. Structural Pest Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, M. S.; Hoffman, W. M.

    This manual is designed for those who seek certification as pesticide applicators for industrial, institutional, structural, and health-related pest control. It is divided into six sections covering general pest control, wood-destroying organisms, bird control, fumigation, rodent control, and industrial weed control. The manual gives information…

  14. Radiation damage-controlled localization of alteration haloes in albite: implications for alteration types and patterns vis-à-vis mineralization and element mobilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, D. C.; Chaudhuri, T.

    2016-12-01

    Uraninite, besides occurring in other modes, occurs as inclusions in albite in feldspathic schist in the Bagjata uranium deposits, Singhbhum shear zone, India. The feldspathic schist, considered the product of Na-metasomatism, witnessed multiple hydrothermal events, the signatures of which are preserved in the alteration halo in albite surrounding uraninite. Here we report radiation damage-controlled localization of alteration halo in albite and its various geological implications. Microscopic observation and SRIM/TRIM simulations reveal that the dimension of the alteration halo is dependent collectively on the zone of maximum cumulative α dose that albite was subjected to and by the extent of dissolution of uraninite during alteration. In well-preserved alteration haloes, from uraninite to the unaltered part of albite, the alteration minerals are systematically distributed in different zones; zone-1: K-feldspar; zone-2: chlorite; zone-3: LREE-phase/pyrite/U-Y-silicate. Based on textures of alteration minerals in the alteration microdomain, we propose a generalized Na+➔K+➔H+ alteration sequence, which is in agreement with the regional-scale alteration pattern. Integrating distribution of ore and alteration minerals in the alteration zone and their geochemistry, we further propose multiple events of U, REE, and sulfide mineralization/mobilization in the Bagjata deposit. The alteration process also involved interaction of the hydrothermal fluid with uraninite inclusions resulting in resorption of uraninite, redistribution of elements, including U and Pb, and resetting of isotopic clock. Thus, our study demonstrates that alteration halo is a miniature scale-model of the regional hydrothermal alteration types and patterns vis-à-vis mineralization/mobilization. This study further demonstrates that albite is vulnerable to radiation damage and damage-controlled fluid-assisted alteration, which may redistribute metals, including actinides, from radioactive minerals

  15. AIR POLLUTION CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a chapter for John Wiley & Son's Mechanical Engineers' Handbook, and covers issues involving air pollution control. Various technologies for controlling sulfur oxides is considered including fuel desulfurization. It also considers control of nitrogen oxides including post...

  16. Xenon International Automated Control

    SciTech Connect

    2016-08-05

    The Xenon International Automated Control software monitors, displays status, and allows for manual operator control as well as fully automatic control of multiple commercial and PNNL designed hardware components to generate and transmit atmospheric radioxenon concentration measurements every six hours.

  17. OPTIMUM SYSTEMS CONTROL,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Variational calculus and continuous optimal control, (4) The maximum principle and Hamilton Jacobi theory, (5) Optimum systems control examples, (6...Discrete variational calculus and the discrete maximum principle, (7) Optimum control of distributed parameter systems, (8) Optimum state estimation in

  18. Essure Permanent Birth Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Prosthetics Essure Permanent Birth Control Essure Permanent Birth Control Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... Essure System Essure is a a permanently implanted birth control device for women (female sterilization). Implantation of Essure ...

  19. Gross motor control

    MedlinePlus

    Gross motor control is the ability to make large, general movements (such as waving an arm or lifting a ... Gross motor control is a milestone in the development of an infant. Infants develop gross motor control before they ...

  20. Integrated Control Using the SOFFT Control Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halyo, Nesim

    1996-01-01

    The need for integrated/constrained control systems has become clearer as advanced aircraft introduced new coupled subsystems such as new propulsion subsystems with thrust vectoring and new aerodynamic designs. In this study, we develop an integrated control design methodology which accomodates constraints among subsystem variables while using the Stochastic Optimal Feedforward/Feedback Control Technique (SOFFT) thus maintaining all the advantages of the SOFFT approach. The Integrated SOFFT Control methodology uses a centralized feedforward control and a constrained feedback control law. The control thus takes advantage of the known coupling among the subsystems while maintaining the identity of subsystems for validation purposes and the simplicity of the feedback law to understand the system response in complicated nonlinear scenarios. The Variable-Gain Output Feedback Control methodology (including constant gain output feedback) is extended to accommodate equality constraints. A gain computation algorithm is developed. The designer can set the cross-gains between two variables or subsystems to zero or another value and optimize the remaining gains subject to the constraint. An integrated control law is designed for a modified F-15 SMTD aircraft model with coupled airframe and propulsion subsystems using the Integrated SOFFT Control methodology to produce a set of desired flying qualities.

  1. Dynamic power flow controllers

    DOEpatents

    Divan, Deepakraj M.; Prasai, Anish

    2017-03-07

    Dynamic power flow controllers are provided. A dynamic power flow controller may comprise a transformer and a power converter. The power converter is subject to low voltage stresses and not floated at line voltage. In addition, the power converter is rated at a fraction of the total power controlled. A dynamic power flow controller controls both the real and the reactive power flow between two AC sources having the same frequency. A dynamic power flow controller inserts a voltage with controllable magnitude and phase between two AC sources; thereby effecting control of active and reactive power flows between two AC sources.

  2. Biological Control in Agroecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batra, Suzanne W. T.

    1982-01-01

    Living organisms are used as biological pest control agents in (i) classical biological control, primarily for permanent control of introduced perennial weed pests or introduced pests of perennial crops; (ii) augmentative biological control, for temporary control of native or introduced pests of annual crops grown in monoculture; and (iii) conservative or natural control, in which the agroecosystem is managed to maximize the effect of native or introduced biological control agents. The effectiveness of biological control can be improved if it is based on adequate ecological information and theory, and if it is integrated with other pest management practices.

  3. CONTROL LIMITER DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    DeShong, J.A.

    1960-03-01

    A control-limiting device for monltoring a control system is described. The system comprises a conditionsensing device, a condition-varying device exerting a control over the condition, and a control means to actuate the condition-varying device. A control-limiting device integrates the total movement or other change of the condition-varying device over any interval of time during a continuum of overlapping periods of time, and if the tothl movement or change of the condition-varying device exceeds a preset value, the control- limiting device will switch the control of the operated apparatus from automatic to manual control.

  4. Integrated blending control system

    SciTech Connect

    Cogbill, R.B.; Dodd, T.J.; Heilman, P.W.; Heronemus, D.L.; Sears, L.R.; Berryman, L.N.; Baker, R.L.; Guffee, L.E.; Prucha, D.A.; Roberts, D.M.

    1989-07-25

    This patent describes a proppant control system. It comprises: storage bin means for storing particulate material; surge bin means for receiving a flow of the particulate material from the storage bin means; first conveyor means for providing a flow of particulate material to the surge bin means from the storage bin means; second conveyor means for transferring a controllable quantity of the particulate material from the surge bin means; and proppant control means. The control means include: first speed control means for remotely controlling the speed of the first conveyor means; and second speed control means for remotely controlling the speed of the second conveyor means.

  5. Space Digital Controller for Improved Motor Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves-Nunes, Samuel; Daras, Gaetan; Dehez, Bruno; Maillard, Christophe; Bekemans, Marc; Michel, Raymond

    2014-08-01

    Performing digital motor control into space equipment is a new challenge. The new DPC (Digital Programmable Controller) is the first chip that we can use as a micro-controller, allowing us to drive motors with digital control schemes. In this paper, the digital control of hybrid stepper motors is considered. This kind of motor is used for solar array rotation and antenna actuation. New digital control technology brings a lot of advantages, allowing an important reduction of thermal losses inside the motor, and a reduction of thermal constraints on power drive electronic components. The opportunity to drive motors with a digital controller also brings many new functionalities like post-failure torque analysis, micro- vibrations and cogging torque reduction, or electro- mechanical damping of solar array oscillations. To evaluate the performance of the system, Field-Oriented Control (FOC) is implemented on a hybrid stepper motor. A test-bench, made of an active load, has been made to emulate the mechanical behaviour of the solar array, by the use of a torsionally-compliant model. The experimental results show that we can drastically reduce electrical power consumption, compared with the currently used open-loop control scheme.

  6. Improving Control of Two Motor Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toland, Ronald W.

    2004-01-01

    A computer program controls motors that drive translation stages in a metrology system that consists of a pair of two-axis cathetometers. This program is specific to Compumotor Gemini (or equivalent) motors and the Compumotor 6K-series (or equivalent) motor controller. Relative to the software supplied with the controller, this program affords more capabilities and is easier to use. Written as a Virtual Instrument in the LabVIEW software system, the program presents an imitation control panel that the user can manipulate by use of a keyboard and mouse. There are three modes of operation: command, movement, and joystick. In command mode, single commands are sent to the controller for troubleshooting. In movement mode, distance, speed, and/or acceleration commands are sent to the controller. Position readouts from the motors and from position encoders on the translation stages are displayed in marked fields. At any time, the position readouts can be recorded in a file named by the user. In joystick mode, the program yields control of the motors to a joystick. The program sends commands to, and receives data from, the controller via a serial cable connection, using the serial-communication portion of the software supplied with the controller.

  7. Adaptive Cruise Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winner, Hermann; Danner, Bernd; Steinle, Joachim

    Mit Adaptive Cruise Control, abgekürzt ACC, wird eine Fahrgeschwindigkeitsregelung bezeichnet, die sich an die Verkehrssituation anpasst. Synonyme Bezeichnungen sind Aktive Geschwindigkeitsregelung, Automatische Distanzregelung oder Abstandsregeltempomat. Im englischen Sprachraum fnden sich die weiteren Bezeichnungen Active Cruise Control, Automatic Cruise Control oder Autonomous Intelligent Cruise Control. Als markengeschützte Bezeichnungen sind Distronic und Automatische Distanz-Regelung (ADR) eingetragen.

  8. Programable Multicrate Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mook, G. L.; Phillips, M. R.

    1985-01-01

    High-speed, environmentally hardened controller developed for use with commercially available system crates for both experiment control and data handling. Programable crate controller consists of three functional areas: control section utilizes high-speed bit-slice circuitry, memory, and data way interface.

  9. Robot Manipulator Control.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-07

    This report presents a synthetic approach for calculating the control of robot manipulators. The initial control problem is broken down into linear ... control and modelling problems. The approach allows derivation of numerous schemes (adaptive or not) of control proposed in the literature and suggests

  10. Aircraft adaptive learning control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, P. S. T.; Vanlandingham, H. F.

    1979-01-01

    The optimal control theory of stochastic linear systems is discussed in terms of the advantages of distributed-control systems, and the control of randomly-sampled systems. An optimal solution to longitudinal control is derived and applied to the F-8 DFBW aircraft. A randomly-sampled linear process model with additive process and noise is developed.

  11. Microprocessor control for standardized power control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, D. G.; Perry, E.

    1978-01-01

    The use of microcomputers in space-oriented power systems as a replacement for existing inflexible analog type controllers has been proposed. This study examines multiprocessor systems, various modularity concepts and presents a conceptualized power system incorporating a multiprocessor controller as well as preliminary results from a breadboard model of the proposed system.

  12. Switching Systems: Controllability and Control Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-25

    observations motivates the necessity to search for other methods in order to obtain a useful algorithm that might test controllability in the sign...Contributions to the theory of optimal control,” Boletin de la Sociedad Matematica Mexicana, vol. 5, pp. 102–119, 1960. [38] Kellett, Christopher M. and Andrew R

  13. Control of space stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, K. Y.

    1983-01-01

    A study is made to develop controllers for the NASA-JSC Triangular Space Station and evaluate their performances to make recommendations for structural design and/or control alternatives. The control system design assumes the rigid body of the Space Station and developes the lumped parameter control system by using the Inverse Optimal Control Theory. In order to evaluate the performance of the control system, a Parameter Estimation algorithm is being developed which will be used in modeling an equivalent but simpler Space Station model. Finally, a scaled version of the Space Station is being built for the purpose of physical experiments to evaluate the control system performance.

  14. An intelligent traffic controller

    SciTech Connect

    Kagolanu, K.; Fink, R.; Smartt, H.; Powell, R.; Larsen, E.

    1995-12-01

    A controller with advanced control logic can significantly improve traffic flows at intersections. In this vein, this paper explores fuzzy rules and algorithms to improve the intersection operation by rationalizing phase changes and green times. The fuzzy logic for control is enhanced by the exploration of neural networks for families of membership functions and for ideal cost functions. The concepts of fuzzy logic control are carried forth into the controller architecture. Finally, the architecture and the modules are discussed. In essence, the control logic and architecture of an intelligent controller are explored.

  15. Nuclear reactor control apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Sridhar, Bettadapur N.

    1983-11-01

    Nuclear reactor core safety rod release apparatus comprises a control rod having a detent notch in the form of an annular peripheral recess at its upper end, a control rod support tube for raising and lowering the control rod under normal conditions, latches pivotally mounted on the control support tube with free ends thereof normally disposed in the recess in the control rod, and cam means for pivoting the latches out of the recess in the control rod when a scram condition occurs. One embodiment of the invention comprises an additional magnetically-operated latch for releasing the control rod under two different conditions, one involving seismic shock.

  16. HYDRAULIC SERVO CONTROL MECHANISM

    DOEpatents

    Hussey, R.B.; Gottsche, M.J. Jr.

    1963-09-17

    A hydraulic servo control mechanism of compact construction and low fluid requirements is described. The mechanism consists of a main hydraulic piston, comprising the drive output, which is connected mechanically for feedback purposes to a servo control piston. A control sleeve having control slots for the system encloses the servo piston, which acts to cover or uncover the slots as a means of controlling the operation of the system. This operation permits only a small amount of fluid to regulate the operation of the mechanism, which, as a result, is compact and relatively light. This mechanism is particuiarly adaptable to the drive and control of control rods in nuclear reactors. (auth)

  17. Engine roughness control means

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuura, M.; Doi, N.; Yoshioka, S.; Okimoto, H.; Veda, K.

    1987-08-04

    This patent describes a control system for a vehicle engine comprising engine condition detecting means for detecting an engine operating condition and producing an engine condition signal representing the engine operating condition, engine combustion control means for controlling a condition of combustion in the engine; and a control factor storage means for storing control factors for controlling the engine combustion. A modifying means connect the comparator means to receive the output signal and to modify the control factor from the storage means by the output of the comparator means so that the combustion control means is controlled by the modified control factor in a direction that the engine vibrations are suppressed. A reference signal changes means connected with the engine condition detecting means to change the reference roughness signal in accordance with the engine operating condition so that the reference signal is decreased when the engine is in idling operation.

  18. TFTR diagnostic vacuum controller

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, D.; Persons, R.

    1981-01-01

    The TFTR diagnostic vacuum controller (DVC) provides in conjunction with the Central Instrumentation Control and Data Acquisition System (CICADA), control and monitoring for the pumps, valves and gauges associated with each individual diagnostic vacuum system. There will be approximately 50 systems on TFTR. Two standard versions of the controller (A and B) wil be provided in order to meet the requirements of two diagnostic manifold arrangements. All pump and valve sequencing, as well as protection features, will be implemented by the controller.

  19. Fuzzy and neural control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berenji, Hamid R.

    1992-01-01

    Fuzzy logic and neural networks provide new methods for designing control systems. Fuzzy logic controllers do not require a complete analytical model of a dynamic system and can provide knowledge-based heuristic controllers for ill-defined and complex systems. Neural networks can be used for learning control. In this chapter, we discuss hybrid methods using fuzzy logic and neural networks which can start with an approximate control knowledge base and refine it through reinforcement learning.

  20. SODR Memory Control Buffer Control ASIC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodson, Robert F.

    1994-01-01

    The Spacecraft Optical Disk Recorder (SODR) is a state of the art mass storage system for future NASA missions requiring high transmission rates and a large capacity storage system. This report covers the design and development of an SODR memory buffer control applications specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The memory buffer control ASIC has two primary functions: (1) buffering data to prevent loss of data during disk access times, (2) converting data formats from a high performance parallel interface format to a small computer systems interface format. Ten 144 p in, 50 MHz CMOS ASIC's were designed, fabricated and tested to implement the memory buffer control function.

  1. Boiler control systems engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, J.

    2005-07-01

    The book provides in-depth coverage on how to safely and reliably control the firing of a boiler. Regardless of the capacity or fuel, certain fundamental control systems are required for boiler control. Large utility systems are more complex due to the number of burners and the overall capacity and equipment. This book covers engineering details on control systems and provides specific examples of boiler control including configuration and tuning. References to requirements are based on the 2004 NFPA 85 along with other ISA standards. Detailed chapters cover: Boiler fundamentals including piping and instrument diagrams (P&IDs) and a design basis checklist; Control of boilers, from strategies and bumpless transfer to interlock circuitry and final control elements; Furnace draft; Feedwater; Coal-fired boilers; Fuel and air control; Steam temperature; Burner management systems; Environment; and Control valve sizing. 2 apps.

  2. Digital Optical Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, David H.; Tipton, Charles A.; Christmann, Charles E.; Hochhausler, Nils P.

    1988-09-01

    We describe the digital optical control system (DOGS), a state-of-the-art controller for electrical feedback in an optical system. The need for a versatile optical controller arose from a number of unique experiments being performed by the Air Force Weapons Laboratory. These experiments use similar detectors and actuator-controlled mirrors, but the control requirements vary greatly. The experiments have in common a requirement for parallel control systems. The DOGS satisfies these needs by allowing several control systems to occupy a single chassis with one master controller. The architecture was designed to allow upward compatibility with future configurations. Combinations of off-the-shelf and custom boards are configured to meet the requirements of each experiment. The configuration described here was used to control piston error to X/80 at a wavelength of 0.51 Am. A peak sample rate of 8 kHz, yielding a closed loop bandwidth of 800 Hz, was achieved.

  3. Constrained control allocation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durham, Wayne C.

    1992-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of the allocation of several flight controls to the generation of specified body-axis moments. The number of controls is greater than the number of moments being controlled, and the ranges of the controls are constrained to certain limits. The controls are assumed to be individually linear in their effect throughout their ranges of motion, and independent of one another in their effects. The geometries of the subset of the constrained controls and of its image in moment space are examined. A direct method of allocating these several controls is presented, that guarantees the maximum possible moment is generated within the constraints of the controls. The results are illustrated by an example problem involving three controls and two moments.

  4. Control rod drive

    SciTech Connect

    Hawke, Basil C.

    1986-01-01

    A control rod drive uses gravitational forces to insert one or more control rods upwardly into a reactor core from beneath the reactor core under emergency conditions. The preferred control rod drive includes a vertically movable weight and a mechanism operatively associating the weight with the control rod so that downward movement of the weight is translated into upward movement of the control rod. The preferred control rod drive further includes an electric motor for driving the control rods under normal conditions, an electrically actuated clutch which automatically disengages the motor during a power failure and a decelerator for bringing the control rod to a controlled stop when it is inserted under emergency conditions into a reactor core.

  5. Spacecraft stability and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barret, Chris

    1992-01-01

    The Earth's first artificial satellite, Sputnik 1, slowly tumbled in orbit. The first U.S. satellite, Explorer 1, also tumbled out of control. Today, satellite stability and control has become a higher priority. For a satellite design that is to have a life expectancy of 14 years, appropriate spacecraft flight control systems will be reviewed, stability requirements investigated, and an appropriate flight control system recommended in order to see the design process. Disturbance torques, including aerodynamic, magnetic, gravity gradient, solar, micrometeorite, debris, collision, and internal torques, will be assessed to quantify the disturbance environment so that the required compensating torques can be determined. The control torques, including passive versus active, momentum control, bias momentum, spin stabilization, dual spin, gravity gradient, magnetic, reaction wheels, control moment gyros, inertia augmentation techniques, three-axis control, and reaction control systems (RCSs), will be considered. Conditions for stability will also be considered.

  6. Industrial linguistic control

    SciTech Connect

    King, R.E.; Karonis, F.

    1983-01-01

    The use of various types of controllers and control techniques for industrial process is discussed. An ongoing research and development project is reported on the application of intelligent linguistic controllers to processes in the cement industry in Greece which have, in the past, been controllable only by human operators. Prototype linguistic controllers using fuzzy logic have been implemented and tested on a rotary kiln precalciner flash furnace (3-input 3-output) and on a cement mill separator (3-input 2-output) with good results. Originally implemented on a supervisory minicomputer, the algorithms have been transferred to microcomputers which form the heart of this class of intelligent linguistic controllers. 6 references.

  7. Aircraft control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, Greg T. (Inventor); Morgan, Walter R. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A span-loaded, highly flexible flying wing, having horizontal control surfaces mounted aft of the wing on extended beams to form local pitch-control devices. Each of five spanwise wing segments of the wing has one or more motors and photovoltaic arrays, and produces its own lift independent of the other wing segments, to minimize inter-segment loads. Wing dihedral is controlled by separately controlling the local pitch-control devices consisting of a control surface on a boom, such that inboard and outboard wing segment pitch changes relative to each other, and thus relative inboard and outboard lift is varied.

  8. Robot welding process control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romine, Peter L.

    1991-01-01

    This final report documents the development and installation of software and hardware for Robotic Welding Process Control. Primary emphasis is on serial communications between the CYRO 750 robotic welder, Heurikon minicomputer running Hunter & Ready VRTX, and an IBM PC/AT, for offline programming and control and closed-loop welding control. The requirements for completion of the implementation of the Rocketdyne weld tracking control are discussed. The procedure for downloading programs from the Intergraph, over the network, is discussed. Conclusions are made on the results of this task, and recommendations are made for efficient implementation of communications, weld process control development, and advanced process control procedures using the Heurikon.

  9. Control system design method

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, David G [Tijeras, NM; Robinett, III, Rush D.

    2012-02-21

    A control system design method and concomitant control system comprising representing a physical apparatus to be controlled as a Hamiltonian system, determining elements of the Hamiltonian system representation which are power generators, power dissipators, and power storage devices, analyzing stability and performance of the Hamiltonian system based on the results of the determining step and determining necessary and sufficient conditions for stability of the Hamiltonian system, creating a stable control system based on the results of the analyzing step, and employing the resulting control system to control the physical apparatus.

  10. CONTROL ROD DRIVE

    DOEpatents

    Chapellier, R.A.; Rogers, I.

    1961-06-27

    Accurate and controlled drive for the control rod is from an electric motor. A hydraulic arrangement is provided to balance a piston against which a control rod is urged by the application of fluid pressure. The electric motor drive of the control rod for normal operation is made through the aforementioned piston. In the event scramming is required, the fluid pressure urging the control rod against the piston is relieved and an opposite fluid pressure is applied. The lack of mechanical connection between the electric motor and control rod facilitates the scramming operation.

  11. Programmable Digital Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wassick, Gregory J.

    2012-01-01

    An existing three-channel analog servo loop controller has been redesigned for piezoelectric-transducer-based (PZT-based) etalon control applications to a digital servo loop controller. This change offers several improvements over the previous analog controller, including software control over proportional-integral-derivative (PID) parameters, inclusion of other data of interest such as temperature and pressure in the control laws, improved ability to compensate for PZT hysteresis and mechanical mount fluctuations, ability to provide pre-programmed scanning and stepping routines, improved user interface, expanded data acquisition, and reduced size, weight, and power.

  12. Propulsion Controls, 1979. [air breathing engine control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The state of the art of multivariable engine control is examined in order to determine future needs and problem areas and to establish the appropriate roles of government, industries, and universities in addressing these problems.

  13. Supervisory Control of Networked Control Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-15

    consisting of 3 Koala robots [Lem06b]. The robots are controlled by MICA2 wireless processor modules. The robots communicate over the MICA2’s...preliminary documentation of a wireless autonomous robotic testbed. The system consists of 3 Koala (K-team Inc.) robots that are controlled by the MICA2...by this project. MICA-KoalaBot Hardware: The Koala robot is an autonomous wheeled vehicle that has 16 infrared (IR) proximity sensors around its

  14. MPC improves reformer control

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, C.S.; Noh, K.K.; Yi, S.; Kim, J.S.; Song, H.K.; Hyun, J.C.

    1995-04-01

    A model predictive control strategy was applied to a synthesis gas reformer of Samsung-BP Chemicals in Korea that produces carbon monoxide and hydrogen from naphtha. A strongly endothermic reaction occurs in a catalytic reformer, and reformer outlet temperature is considered to have the most significant effect on product composition. The newly developed reformer is known to be a cost-effective process operating at high reaction temperatures and low steam-to-carbon ratio, but its drawback is temperature control difficulty due to the use of offgas as a part of the fuel. Without smooth control of the reformer outlet temperature, stable operation of the downstream separation units cannot be expected. Therefore, it is a great challenge to apply a model predictive control technique for tight control of reformer outlet temperature. The paper describes model predictive control, the process advanced control project, computer system architecture, analysis of operating condition, control structure, sampling rate, and disturbance estimation.

  15. Multivariable Control Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1968-01-01

    one). Examples abound of systems with numerous controlled variables, and the modern tendency is toward ever greater utilization of systems and plants of this kind. We call them multivariable control systems (MCS).

  16. Consciousness and cognitive control

    PubMed Central

    Kunde, Wilfried; Reuss, Heiko; Kiesel, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    The implementation or change of information processing routines, known as cognitive control, is traditionally believed to be closely linked to consciousness. It seems that we exert control over our behavior if we know the reasons for, and consequences of, doing so. Recent research suggests, however, that several behavioral phenomena that have been construed as instances of cognitive control can be prompted by events of which actors are not aware. Here we give a brief review of this research, discuss possible reasons for inconsistencies in the empirical evidence, and suggest some lines of future research. Specifically, we suggest to differentiate cognitive control evoked either because of explicit or because of implicit control cues. While the former type of control seems to work outside of awareness, the latter type of control seems to be restricted to consciously registered events that call for control. PMID:22419962

  17. Insensitive control technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, C. A.; Pope, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    THe investigation of two insensitive controller synthesis techniques was reported. The finite dimensional inverse approach produces a time varying insensitive controller and/or parameter identifier by constructing inverse functions derived from a finite number of input output pair relationships. The MD/IM concept relies on the information matrix theory that was developed in the estimation and identification field. The MD/IM synthesis technique is based on the hypothesis that minimizing the information matrix will reduce system identifiability and consequently system sensitivity to uncertain parameters. The controllers designed with both techniques were evaluated on a realistic C-5A aircraft flight control problem. Results indicate that the FDI controller is more suited to trajectory type problems because of its time varying nature. The MD/IM controller performed as well as the top-rated controllers of the initial effort and has direct application to aircraft flight control problems.

  18. Aeroelastic structural acoustic control.

    PubMed

    Clark, R L; Frampton, K D

    1999-02-01

    Static, constant-gain, output-feedback control compensators were designed to increase the transmission loss across a panel subjected to mean flow on one surface and a stationary, acoustic half-space on the opposite surface. The multi-input, multi-output control system was based upon the use of an array of colocated transducer pairs. The performance of the static-gain, output-feedback controller was compared to that of the full state-feedback controller using the same control actuator arrays, and was found to yield comparable levels of performance for practical limitations on control effort. Additionally, the resulting static compensators proved to be dissipative in nature, and thus the design varied little as a function of the aeroelastic coupling induced by the fluid-structure interaction under subsonic flow conditions. Several parametric studies were performed, comparing the effects of control-effort penalty as well as the number of transducer pairs used in the control system.

  19. Birth control pill - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100108.htm Birth control pill - series—Normal female anatomy To use the ... to produce a successful pregnancy. To prevent pregnancy, birth control pills affect how these organs normally function. Review ...

  20. Nutrient Control Seminars

    EPA Science Inventory

    These Nutrient Control Seminars will present an extensive state-of-the-technology review of the engineering design and operation of nitrogen and phosphorous control technologies and techniques applied at municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). These seminars will present ...

  1. Nutrient Control Design Manual

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Nutrient Control Design Manual will present an extensive state-of-the-technology review of the engineering design and operation of nitrogen and phosphorous control technologies and techniques applied at municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). This manual will present ...

  2. Controlling quantum bits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-08-01

    Can excitons be used to achieve scalable control of quantum light? Steffen Michaelis de Vasconcellos explained to Nature Photonics that the optoelectrical control of exciton qubits in quantum dots offers great promise.

  3. Solar Control design package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Information used in the evaluation of design of Solar Control's solar heating and cooling system controller and the Solarstat is given. Some of the information includes system performance specifications, design data brochures, and detailed design drawings.

  4. Scabies: Prevention and Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diagnostic Assistance [DPDx] Error processing SSI file Prevention & Control Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir When a ... avoid outbreaks. Institutional outbreaks can be difficult to control and require a rapid, aggressive, and sustained response. ...

  5. Adaptive Decentralized Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-04-01

    computational requirements and response time provide strong incentives for the use of distributed control architectures. The basic focus of our research is on...ADCON (for Adaptive Decentralized CONtrol) comes from the following observations about the current status of control theory . An important aspect of...decentralized control of completely known systems still has many unresolved issues and some basic problems are yet to be answered. Under these conditions

  6. Microtron Modelling and Control

    SciTech Connect

    Krist, Pavel; Bila, Jiri

    2010-01-05

    The article describes the design of the mathematical model and automatic control system of the microtron (high frequency cyclic electron accelerator). This type of accelerator was controlled manually till now. The critical values have been set up empirically on the basis of the previous operational experiences. The designed automatic control system with fuzzy controller should increase the accelerated electrons current value and improve the beam stability.

  7. System for controlling apnea

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F

    2015-05-05

    An implanted stimulation device or air control device are activated by an external radar-like sensor for controlling apnea. The radar-like sensor senses the closure of the air flow cavity, and associated control circuitry signals (1) a stimulator to cause muscles to open the air passage way that is closing or closed or (2) an air control device to open the air passage way that is closing or closed.

  8. Microfabricated microengine for use as a mechanical drive and power source in the microdomain and fabrication process

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, E.J.; Sniegowski, J.J.

    1994-12-31

    A microengine uses two synchronized linear actuators as a power source and converts oscillatory motion from the actuators into rotational motion via direct linkage connection to an output gear or wheel. The microengine provides output in the form of a continuously rotating output gear that is capable of delivering drive torque to a micromechanism. The microengine can be operated at varying speeds and its motion can be reversed. Linear actuators are synchronized in order to provide linear oscillatory motion to the linkage means in the X and Y directions according to a desired position, rotational direction and speed of said mechanical output means. The output gear has gear teeth on its outer perimeter for directly contacting a micromechanism requiring mechanical power. The gear is retained by a retaining means which allows said gear to rotate freely. The microengine is microfabricated of polysilicon on one wafer using surface micromachining batch fabrication.

  9. Diblock copolymers of polystyrene-b-poly(1,3-cyclohexadiene) exhibiting unique three-phase microdomain morphologies

    DOE PAGES

    Misichronis, Konstantinos; Chen, Jihua; Kahk, Jong K.; ...

    2016-03-29

    Here, the synthesis and molecular characterization of a series of conformationally asymmetric polystyrene-block-poly(1,3-cyclohexadiene) (PS-b-PCHD) diblock copolymers (PCHD: ~90% 1,4 and ~10% 1,2), by sequential anionic copolymerization high vacuum techniques, is reported. A wide range of volume fractions (0.27 ≤ ΦPS ≤ 0.91) was studied by transmission electron microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering in order to explore in detail the microphase separation behavior of these flexible/semiflexible diblock copolymers. Unusual morphologies, consisting of PCHD core(PCHD-1,4)–shell(PCHD-1,2) cylinders in PS matrix and three-phase (PS, PCHD-1,4, PCHD-1,2) four-layer lamellae, were observed suggesting that the chain stiffness of the PCHD block and the strong dependence ofmore » the interaction parameter χ on the PCHD microstructures are important factors for the formation of this unusual microphase separation behavior in PS-b-PCHD diblock copolymers. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Polym. Sci., Part B: Polym. Phys. 2016, 54, 1564–1572« less

  10. The Effect of Hydrogen Bonding on the interfacial width of PS-b-PMMA Block Copolymer Microdomains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyuseong; Han, Sunghyun; Jang, Sangshin; Park, Jicheol; Kwak, Jongheon; Kim, Jin Kon

    2015-03-01

    Sharp interface between two blocks in block copolymer nano pattern is one of the important issues because of strong demand in industrial applications to nano-patterning. We utilized hydrogen bonding between N-(4-aminomethyl-benzyl)-4-hydroxymethyl-bezamide (BA) and urea (U) at the interface of polystyrene-block-poly(methyl methacrylate) copolymer (PS-PMMA). For this purpose, we first synthesized PS by ATRP method, then the end group was converted to amino group. Next, it was reacted with BA, followed by reaction with 4-pentynoic acid, resulting in alkyne-terminated group (PS-U-BA-alkyne). Also, azide-terminated PMMA was prepared by anionic polymerization followed by end functionalization. Finally, by the azide-alkyne click reaction between PS-U-BA-alkyne and PMMA-azide, PS-U-BA-PMMA was synthesized. We investigated, via small angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy, phase behavior of PS-U-BA-PMMA. Corresponding author.

  11. Interaction of syncollin with GP-2, the major membrane protein of pancreatic zymogen granules, and association with lipid microdomains.

    PubMed Central

    Kalus, Ina; Hodel, Alois; Koch, Annett; Kleene, Ralf; Edwardson, J Michael; Schrader, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Syncollin, a novel pancreatic zymogen granule protein, is present on the luminal side of the granule membrane. To address the function of syncollin, we searched for putative binding partners. Cross-linking experiments with purified syncollin, and granule content and membrane proteins revealed a direct interaction between syncollin and GP-2, a major glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored membrane glycoprotein. An interaction was also observed when cross-linking was performed with recombinant GP-2. In addition, syncollin could be cross-linked to itself, supporting the suggestion that it exists as a homo-oligomer. Cleavage of the GPI anchor of GP-2 by treatment of granule membranes with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C had no effect on the membrane attachment of syncollin, indicating that it is not mediated exclusively via an interaction with GP-2. Syncollin was found to be associated with detergent-insoluble cholesterol/glycolipid-enriched complexes. These complexes floated to the lighter fractions of sucrose-density gradients and also contained GP-2, the lectin ZG16p, sulphated matrix proteoglycans and the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) syntaxin 3 and synaptobrevin 2. Our results indicate that membrane-associated syncollin is a component of lipid rafts, where it interacts both with GP-2 and membrane lipids. We suggest that the syncollin-GP-2 complex might play a role in signal transduction across the granule membrane. PMID:11853552

  12. Diblock copolymers of polystyrene-b-poly(1,3-cyclohexadiene) exhibiting unique three-phase microdomain morphologies

    SciTech Connect

    Misichronis, Konstantinos; Chen, Jihua; Kahk, Jong K.; Imel, Adam; Dadmun, Mark; Hong, Kunlun; Hadjichristidis, Nikos; Mays, Jimmy W.; Avgeropoulos, Apostolos

    2016-03-29

    Here, the synthesis and molecular characterization of a series of conformationally asymmetric polystyrene-block-poly(1,3-cyclohexadiene) (PS-b-PCHD) diblock copolymers (PCHD: ~90% 1,4 and ~10% 1,2), by sequential anionic copolymerization high vacuum techniques, is reported. A wide range of volume fractions (0.27 ≤ ΦPS ≤ 0.91) was studied by transmission electron microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering in order to explore in detail the microphase separation behavior of these flexible/semiflexible diblock copolymers. Unusual morphologies, consisting of PCHD core(PCHD-1,4)–shell(PCHD-1,2) cylinders in PS matrix and three-phase (PS, PCHD-1,4, PCHD-1,2) four-layer lamellae, were observed suggesting that the chain stiffness of the PCHD block and the strong dependence of the interaction parameter χ on the PCHD microstructures are important factors for the formation of this unusual microphase separation behavior in PS-b-PCHD diblock copolymers. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Polym. Sci., Part B: Polym. Phys. 2016, 54, 1564–1572

  13. Detergent-Resistant Membrane Microdomains Facilitate Ib Oligomer Formation and Biological Activity of Clostridium perfringens Iota-Toxin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-04-01

    Activity of Clostridium perfringens Iota-Toxin Martha L. Hale,1* Jean -Christophe Marvaud,2 Michel R. Popoff,2 and Bradley G. Stiles1 Toxinology...are not necessarily endorsed by the U.S. Army. REFERENCES 1. Abrami, L., M. Fivaz , P. Glauser, N. Sugimoto, C. Zurzolo, and F. G. van der Goot. 2003...273:2355–2360. 10. Fivaz , M., L. Abrami, and F. G. van der Goot. 1999. Landing on lipid rafts. Trends Cell Biol. 9:212–213. 11. Gibert, M., L. Petit

  14. Microfabricated microengine for use as a mechanical drive and power source in the microdomain and fabrication process

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, E.J.; Sniegowski, J.J.

    1997-05-20

    A microengine uses two synchronized linear actuators as a power source and converts oscillatory motion from the actuators into rotational motion via direct linkage connection to an output gear or wheel. The microengine provides output in the form of a continuously rotating output gear that is capable of delivering drive torque to a micromechanism. The microengine can be operated at varying speeds and its motion can be reversed. Linear actuators are synchronized in order to provide linear oscillatory motion to the linkage means in the X and Y directions according to a desired position, rotational direction and speed of said mechanical output means. The output gear has gear teeth on its outer perimeter for directly contacting a micromechanism requiring mechanical power. The gear is retained by a retaining means which allows said gear to rotate freely. The microengine is microfabricated of polysilicon on one wafer using surface micromachining batch fabrication. 30 figs.

  15. Microfabricated microengine for use as a mechanical drive and power source in the microdomain and fabrication process

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Ernest J.; Sniegowski, Jeffry J.

    1997-01-01

    A microengine uses two synchronized linear actuators as a power source and converts oscillatory motion from the actuators into rotational motion via direct linkage connection to an output gear or wheel. The microengine provides output in the form of a continuously rotating output gear that is capable of delivering drive torque to a micromechanism. The microengine can be operated at varying speeds and its motion can be reversed. Linear actuators are synchronized in order to provide linear oscillatory motion to the linkage means in the X and Y directions according to a desired position, rotational direction and speed of said mechanical output means. The output gear has gear teeth on its outer perimeter for directly contacting a micromechanism requiring mechanical power. The gear is retained by a retaining means which allows said gear to rotate freely. The microengine is microfabricated of polysilicon on one wafer using surface micromachining batch fabrication.

  16. Dynamic Na+-H+ exchanger regulatory factor-1 association and dissociation regulate parathyroid hormone receptor trafficking at membrane microdomains.

    PubMed

    Ardura, Juan A; Wang, Bin; Watkins, Simon C; Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre; Friedman, Peter A

    2011-10-07

    Na/H exchanger regulatory factor-1 (NHERF1) is a cytoplasmic PDZ (postsynaptic density 95/disc large/zona occludens) protein that assembles macromolecular complexes and determines the localization, trafficking, and signaling of select G protein-coupled receptors and other membrane-delimited proteins. The parathyroid hormone receptor (PTHR), which regulates mineral ion homeostasis and bone turnover, is a G protein-coupled receptor harboring a PDZ-binding motif that enables association with NHERF1 and tethering to the actin cytoskeleton. NHERF1 interactions with the PTHR modify its trafficking and signaling. Here, we characterized by live cell imaging the mechanism whereby NHERF1 coordinates the interactions of multiple proteins, as well as the fate of NHERF1 itself upon receptor activation. Upon PTHR stimulation, NHERF1 rapidly dissociates from the receptor and induces receptor aggregation in long lasting clusters that are enriched with the actin-binding protein ezrin and with clathrin. After NHERF1 dissociates from the PTHR, ezrin then directly interacts with the PTHR to stabilize the PTHR at the cell membrane. Recruitment of β-arrestins to the PTHR is delayed until NHERF1 dissociates from the receptor, which is then trafficked to clathrin for internalization. The ability of NHERF to interact dynamically with the PTHR and cognate adapter proteins regulates receptor trafficking and signaling in a spatially and temporally coordinated manner.

  17. Adaptive, predictive controller for optimal process control

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.K.; Baum, C.C.; Bowling, P.S.; Buescher, K.L.; Hanagandi, V.M.; Hinde, R.F. Jr.; Jones, R.D.; Parkinson, W.J.

    1995-12-01

    One can derive a model for use in a Model Predictive Controller (MPC) from first principles or from experimental data. Until recently, both methods failed for all but the simplest processes. First principles are almost always incomplete and fitting to experimental data fails for dimensions greater than one as well as for non-linear cases. Several authors have suggested the use of a neural network to fit the experimental data to a multi-dimensional and/or non-linear model. Most networks, however, use simple sigmoid functions and backpropagation for fitting. Training of these networks generally requires large amounts of data and, consequently, very long training times. In 1993 we reported on the tuning and optimization of a negative ion source using a special neural network[2]. One of the properties of this network (CNLSnet), a modified radial basis function network, is that it is able to fit data with few basis functions. Another is that its training is linear resulting in guaranteed convergence and rapid training. We found the training to be rapid enough to support real-time control. This work has been extended to incorporate this network into an MPC using the model built by the network for predictive control. This controller has shown some remarkable capabilities in such non-linear applications as continuous stirred exothermic tank reactors and high-purity fractional distillation columns[3]. The controller is able not only to build an appropriate model from operating data but also to thin the network continuously so that the model adapts to changing plant conditions. The controller is discussed as well as its possible use in various of the difficult control problems that face this community.

  18. Reflective Database Access Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Lars E.

    2009-01-01

    "Reflective Database Access Control" (RDBAC) is a model in which a database privilege is expressed as a database query itself, rather than as a static privilege contained in an access control list. RDBAC aids the management of database access controls by improving the expressiveness of policies. However, such policies introduce new interactions…

  19. Finite Control in Korean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Kum Young

    2009-01-01

    This thesis explores finite control in Korean. An overview of the previous studies of control shows that the mainstream literature on control has consistently argued that referential dependence between an overt matrix argument and an embedded null subject is characteristic of non-finite clauses which contain a PRO subject. Moreover, although some…

  20. Birth Control Pill

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Birth Control Pill KidsHealth > For Teens > Birth Control Pill A A A What's in this article? ... español La píldora anticonceptiva What Is It? The birth control pill (also called "the Pill") is a daily ...

  1. Birth Control Patch

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Birth Control Patch KidsHealth > For Teens > Birth Control Patch A A A What's in this article? ... Much Does It Cost? What Is It? The birth control patch is a thin, beige, 1¾-inch (4½- ...

  2. Birth Control Shot

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Birth Control Shot KidsHealth > For Teens > Birth Control Shot A A A What's in this article? ... español La inyección anticonceptiva What Is It? The birth control shot is a long-acting form of progesterone, ...

  3. Numerical methods in control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrmann, Volker; Xu, Hongguo

    2000-11-01

    We study classical control problems like pole assignment, stabilization, linear quadratic control and H[infinity] control from a numerical analysis point of view. We present several examples that show the difficulties with classical approaches and suggest reformulations of the problems in a more general framework. We also discuss some new algorithmic approaches.

  4. Spacecraft nonlinear control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheen, Jyh-Jong; Bishop, Robert H.

    1992-01-01

    The feedback linearization technique is applied to the problem of spacecraft attitude control and momentum management with control moment gyros (CMGs). The feedback linearization consists of a coordinate transformation, which transforms the system to a companion form, and a nonlinear feedback control law to cancel the nonlinear dynamics resulting in a linear equivalent model. Pole placement techniques are then used to place the closed-loop poles. The coordinate transformation proposed here evolves from three output functions of relative degree four, three, and two, respectively. The nonlinear feedback control law is presented. Stability in a neighborhood of a controllable torque equilibrium attitude (TEA) is guaranteed and this fact is demonstrated by the simulation results. An investigation of the nonlinear control law shows that singularities exist in the state space outside the neighborhood of the controllable TEA. The nonlinear control law is simplified by a standard linearization technique and it is shown that the linearized nonlinear controller provides a natural way to select control gains for the multiple-input, multiple-output system. Simulation results using the linearized nonlinear controller show good performance relative to the nonlinear controller in the neighborhood of the TEA.

  5. Control of Extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuromskii, V. M.

    2016-03-01

    The principle and engineering of a system for automatic control of the tension of the thread and the productivity of the process of extrusion of polyacrylonitrile fibers have been presented. The control system is based on the use of functional features of a modern frequency controlled electric drive.

  6. Birth Control Patch

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Birth Control Patch KidsHealth > For Teens > Birth Control Patch Print A A A What's in this ... Much Does It Cost? What Is It? The birth control patch is a thin, beige, 1¾-inch (4½- ...

  7. Birth Control Shot

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Birth Control Shot KidsHealth > For Teens > Birth Control Shot Print A A A What's in this ... español La inyección anticonceptiva What Is It? The birth control shot is a long-acting form of progesterone, ...

  8. Birth Control Pill

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Birth Control Pill KidsHealth > For Teens > Birth Control Pill Print A A A What's in this ... español La píldora anticonceptiva What Is It? The birth control pill (also called "the Pill") is a daily ...

  9. Birth Control Ring

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Birth Control Ring KidsHealth > For Teens > Birth Control Ring Print A A A What's in this ... español Anillo vaginal anticonceptivo What Is It? The birth control ring is a soft, flexible, doughnut-shaped ring ...

  10. CAS. Controlled Access Security

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, B.; Pomeroy, G.

    1989-12-01

    The Security Alarm System is a data acquisition and control system which collects data from intrusion sensors and displays the information in a real-time environment for operators. The Access Control System monitors and controls the movement of personnel with the use of card readers and biometrics hand readers.

  11. Lithography overlay controller formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bode, Christopher A.; Toprac, Anthony J.; Edwards, Richard D.; Edgar, Thomas F.

    2000-08-01

    Lithography overlay refers to the measurement of the alignment of successive patterns within the manufacture of semiconductor devices. Control of overlay has become of great importance in semiconductor manufacturing, as the tolerance for overlay error is continually shrinking in order to manufacture next-generation semiconductor products. Run-to-run control has become an attractive solution to many control problems within the industry, including overlay. The term run-to-run control refers to any automated procedure whereby recipe settings are updated between successive process runs in order to keep the process under control. The following discussion will present the formulation of such a controller by examining control of overlay. A brief introduction of overlay will be given, highlighting the control challenge overlay presents. A data management methodology that groups like processes together in order to improve controllability, referred to as control threads, will then be presented. Finally, a discussion of linear model predictive control will show its utility in feedback run-to-run control.

  12. Intermittent Control Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Thomas L.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    The technique of intermittent control systems for air quality control as developed and used by the Tennessee Valley Authority is investigated. Although controversial, all Tennessee Valley Authority sulfur dioxide elimination programs are scheduled to be operational this year. Existing or anticipated intermittent control systems are identified. (BT)

  13. Controls Considerations for Turbine Active Clearance Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melcher, Kevin J.

    2004-01-01

    This presentation discusses active control of turbine tip clearance from a control systems perspective. It is a subset of charts that were presented at the 2003 meeting of the International Society of Air Breathing Engines which was held August 31 through September 5 in Cleveland, Ohio. The associated reference paper is cited at the end of the presentation. The presentation describes active tip clearance control research being conducted by NASA to improve turbine engine systems. The target application for this effort is commercial aircraft engines. However, it is believed that the technologies developed as part of this research will benefit a broad spectrum of current and future turbomachinery. The first part of the presentation discusses the concept of tip clearance, problems associated with it, and the benefits of controlling it. It lays out a framework for implementing tip clearance controls that enables the implementation to progress from purely analytical to hardware-in-the-loop to fully experimental. And it briefly discusses how the technologies developed will be married to the previously described ACC Test Rig for hardware-in-the-loop demonstrations. The final portion of the presentation, describes one of the key technologies in some detail by presenting equations and results for a functional dynamic model of the tip clearance phenomena. As shown, the model exhibits many of the clearance dynamics found in commercial gas turbine engines. However, initial attempts to validate the model identified limitations that are being addressed to make the model more realistic.

  14. Arbitrating Control of Control and Display Units

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugden, Paul C.

    2007-01-01

    The ARINC 739 Switch is a computer program that arbitrates control of two multi-function control and display units (MCDUs) between (1) a commercial flight-management computer (FMC) and (2) NASA software used in research on transport aircraft. (MCDUs are the primary interfaces between pilots and FMCs on many commercial aircraft.) This program was recently redesigned into a software library that can be embedded in research application programs. As part of the redesign, this software was combined with software for creating custom pages of information to be displayed on a CDU. This software commands independent switching of the left (pilot s) and right (copilot s) MCDUs. For example, a custom CDU page can control the left CDU while the FMC controls the right CDU. The software uses menu keys to switch control of the CDU between the FMC or a custom CDU page. The software provides an interface that enables custom CDU pages to insert keystrokes into the FMC s CDU input interface. This feature allows the custom CDU pages to manipulate the FMC as if it were a pilot.

  15. Control of wastewater using multivariate control chart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugraha, Jaka; Fatimah, Is; Prabowo, Rino Galang

    2017-03-01

    Wastewater treatment is a crucial process in industry cause untreated or improper treatment of wastewater may leads some problems affecting to the other parts of environmental aspects. For many kinds of wastewater treatments, the parameters of Biological Oxygen Demand (BOD), Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD), and the Total Suspend Solid (TSS) are usual parameters to be controlled as a standard. In this paper, the application of multivariate Hotteling T2 Individual was reported to control wastewater treatment. By using wastewater treatment data from PT. ICBP, east Java branch, while the fulfillment of quality standards are based on East Java Governor Regulation No. 72 Year 2013 on Standards of Quality of Waste Water Industry and / or Other Business Activities. The obtained results are COD and TSS has a correlation with BOD values with the correlation coefficient higher than 50%, and it is is also found that influence of the COD and TSS to BOD values are 82% and 1.9% respectively. Based on Multivariate control chart Individual T2 Hotteling, it is found that BOD-COD and BOD-TSS are each one subgroup that are outside the control limits. Thus, it can be said there is a process that is not multivariate controlled, but univariately the variables of BOD, COD and TSS are within specification (standard quality) that has been determined.

  16. Magnetically Controlled Variable Transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleiner, Charles T.

    1994-01-01

    Improved variable-transformer circuit, output voltage and current of which controlled by use of relatively small current supplied at relatively low power to control windings on its magnetic cores. Transformer circuits of this type called "magnetic amplifiers" because ratio between controlled output power and power driving control current of such circuit large. This ratio - power gain - can be as large as 100 in present circuit. Variable-transformer circuit offers advantages of efficiency, safety, and controllability over some prior variable-transformer circuits.

  17. Intelligent Control Systems Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loparo, Kenneth A.

    1994-01-01

    Results of a three phase research program into intelligent control systems are presented. The first phase looked at implementing the lowest or direct level of a hierarchical control scheme using a reinforcement learning approach assuming no a priori information about the system under control. The second phase involved the design of an adaptive/optimizing level of the hierarchy and its interaction with the direct control level. The third and final phase of the research was aimed at combining the results of the previous phases with some a priori information about the controlled system.

  18. Control and optimization system

    DOEpatents

    Xinsheng, Lou

    2013-02-12

    A system for optimizing a power plant includes a chemical loop having an input for receiving an input parameter (270) and an output for outputting an output parameter (280), a control system operably connected to the chemical loop and having a multiple controller part (230) comprising a model-free controller. The control system receives the output parameter (280), optimizes the input parameter (270) based on the received output parameter (280), and outputs an optimized input parameter (270) to the input of the chemical loop to control a process of the chemical loop in an optimized manner.

  19. STOVL Control Integration Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, C.; Mcdowell, P.; Watts, S.

    1994-01-01

    An integrated flight/propulsion control for an advanced vector thrust supersonic STOVL aircraft, was developed by Pratt & Whitney and McDonnell Douglas Aerospace East. The IFPC design was based upon the partitioning of the global requirements into flight control and propulsion control requirements. To validate the design, aircraft and engine models were also developed for use on a NASA Ames piloted simulator. Different flight control implementations, evaluated for their handling qualities, are documented in the report along with the propulsion control, engine model, and aircraft model.

  20. Water heater control module

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerstrom, Donald J

    2013-11-26

    An advanced electric water heater control system that interfaces with a high temperature cut-off thermostat and an upper regulating thermostat. The system includes a control module that is electrically connected to the high-temperature cut-off thermostat and the upper regulating thermostat. The control module includes a switch to open or close the high-temperature cut-off thermostat and the upper regulating thermostat. The control module further includes circuitry configured to control said switch in response to a signal selected from the group of an autonomous signal, a communicated signal, and combinations thereof.

  1. Recursive Deadbeat Controller Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Phan, Minh Q.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a recursive algorithm for a deadbeat predictive controller design. The method combines together the concepts of system identification and deadbeat controller designs. It starts with the multi-step output prediction equation and derives the control force in terms of past input and output time histories. The formulation thus derived satisfies simultaneously system identification and deadbeat controller design requirements. As soon as the coefficient matrices are identified satisfying the output prediction equation, no further work is required to compute the deadbeat control gain matrices. The method can be implemented recursively just as any typical recursive system identification techniques.

  2. Intelligent Welding Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, George E.; Kumar, Ramaswamy; Prasad, Tanuji; Andersen, Kristinn; Barnett, Robert J.

    1989-01-01

    Control system adapts to changing design requirements and operating conditions. Proposed control system for gas/tungsten arc welding requires only that operator specifies such direct parameters of welds as widths and depths of penetration. In control system for robotic welder, components and functions intimately connected with welding process assigned to controller domain. More general functions assigned to supervisor domain. Initial estimate of indirect parameters of welding process applied to system only at beginning of weld (t=0); after start of welding, outputs from multivariable controller takes place of estimate.

  3. Intelligent flight control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengel, Robert F.

    1993-01-01

    The capabilities of flight control systems can be enhanced by designing them to emulate functions of natural intelligence. Intelligent control functions fall in three categories. Declarative actions involve decision-making, providing models for system monitoring, goal planning, and system/scenario identification. Procedural actions concern skilled behavior and have parallels in guidance, navigation, and adaptation. Reflexive actions are spontaneous, inner-loop responses for control and estimation. Intelligent flight control systems learn knowledge of the aircraft and its mission and adapt to changes in the flight environment. Cognitive models form an efficient basis for integrating 'outer-loop/inner-loop' control functions and for developing robust parallel-processing algorithms.

  4. Controls and guidance research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homaifar, Abdollah; Dunn, Derome; Song, Yong-Duan; Lai, Steven H.-Y.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives of the control group are concentrated on research and education. The control problem of the hypersonic space vehicle represents an important and challenging issue in aerospace engineering. The work described in this report is part of our effort in developing advanced control strategies for such a system. In order to achieve the objectives stated in the NASA-CORE proposal, the tasks were divided among the group based upon their educational expertise. Within the educational component we are offering a Linear Systems and Control course for students in electrical and mechanical engineering. Also, we are proposing a new course in Digital Control Systems with a corresponding laboratory.

  5. [Controlling instruments in radiology].

    PubMed

    Maurer, M

    2013-10-01

    Due to the rising costs and competitive pressures radiological clinics and practices are now facing, controlling instruments are gaining importance in the optimization of structures and processes of the various diagnostic examinations and interventional procedures. It will be shown how the use of selected controlling instruments can secure and improve the performance of radiological facilities. A definition of the concept of controlling will be provided. It will be shown which controlling instruments can be applied in radiological departments and practices. As an example, two of the controlling instruments, material cost analysis and benchmarking, will be illustrated.

  6. SPS antenna pointing control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    The pointing control of a microwave antenna of the Satellite Power System was investigated emphasizing: (1) the SPS antenna pointing error sensing method; (2) a rigid body pointing control design; and (3) approaches for modeling the flexible body characteristics of the solar collector. Accuracy requirements for the antenna pointing control consist of a mechanical pointing control accuracy of three arc-minutes and an electronic phased array pointing accuracy of three arc-seconds. Results based on the factors considered in current analysis, show that the three arc-minute overall pointing control accuracy can be achieved in practice.

  7. Conscious Control over Action.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Joshua

    2015-06-01

    The extensive involvement of nonconscious processes in human behaviour has led some to suggest that consciousness is much less important for the control of action than we might think. In this article I push against this trend, developing an understanding of conscious control that is sensitive to our best models of overt (that is, bodily) action control. Further, I assess the cogency of various zombie challenges-challenges that seek to demote the importance of conscious control for human agency. I argue that though nonconscious contributions to action control are evidently robust, these challenges are overblown.

  8. CONTROL FOR NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Lichtenberger, H.V.; Cameron, R.A.

    1959-03-31

    S>A control rod operating device in a nuclear reactor of the type in which the control rod is gradually withdrawn from the reactor to a position desired during stable operation is described. The apparatus is comprised essentially of a stop member movable in the direction of withdrawal of the control rod, a follower on the control rod engageable with the stop and means urging the follower against the stop in the direction of withdrawal. A means responsive to disengagement of the follower from the stop is provided for actuating the control rod to return to the reactor shut-down position.

  9. Conscious Control over Action

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    The extensive involvement of nonconscious processes in human behaviour has led some to suggest that consciousness is much less important for the control of action than we might think. In this article I push against this trend, developing an understanding of conscious control that is sensitive to our best models of overt (that is, bodily) action control. Further, I assess the cogency of various zombie challenges—challenges that seek to demote the importance of conscious control for human agency. I argue that though nonconscious contributions to action control are evidently robust, these challenges are overblown. PMID:26113753

  10. Modeling and control of thermostatically controlled loads

    SciTech Connect

    Backhaus, Scott N; Sinitsyn, Nikolai; Kundu, S.; Hiskens, I.

    2011-01-04

    As the penetration of intermittent energy sources grows substantially, loads will be required to play an increasingly important role in compensating the fast time-scale fluctuations in generated power. Recent numerical modeling of thermostatically controlled loads (TCLs) has demonstrated that such load following is feasible, but analytical models that satisfactorily quantify the aggregate power consumption of a group of TCLs are desired to enable controller design. We develop such a model for the aggregate power response of a homogeneous population of TCLs to uniform variation of all TCL setpoints. A linearized model of the response is derived, and a linear quadratic regulator (LQR) has been designed. Using the TCL setpoint as the control input, the LQR enables aggregate power to track reference signals that exhibit step, ramp and sinusoidal variations. Although much of the work assumes a homogeneous population of TCLs with deterministic dynamics, we also propose a method for probing the dynamics of systems where load characteristics are not well known.

  11. Integrated Biological Control

    SciTech Connect

    JOHNSON, A.R.

    2003-10-09

    Biological control is any activity taken to prevent, limit, clean up, or remediate potential environmental, health and safety, or workplace quality impacts from plants, animals, or microorganisms. At Hanford the principal emphasis of biological control is to prevent the transport of radioactive contamination by biological vectors (plants, animals, or microorganisms), and where necessary, control and clean up resulting contamination. Other aspects of biological control at Hanford include industrial weed control (e.g.; tumbleweeds), noxious weed control (invasive, non-native plant species), and pest control (undesirable animals such as rodents and stinging insects, and microorganisms such as molds that adversely affect the quality of the workplace environment). Biological control activities may be either preventive (a priori) or in response to existing contamination spread (a posteriori). Surveillance activities, including ground, vegetation, flying insect, and other surveys, and a priori control actions, such as herbicide spraying and placing biological barriers, are important in preventing radioactive contamination spread. If surveillance discovers that biological vectors have spread radioactive contamination, a posteriori control measures, such as fixing contamination, followed by cleanup and removal of the contamination to an approved disposal location are typical response functions. In some cases remediation following the contamination cleanup and removal is necessary. Biological control activities for industrial weeds, noxious weeds and pests have similar modes of prevention and response.

  12. Integrated Biological Control

    SciTech Connect

    JOHNSON, A.R.

    2002-09-01

    Biological control is any activity taken to prevent, limit, clean up, or remediate potential environmental, health and safety, or workplace quality impacts from plants, animals, or microorganisms. At Hanford the principal emphasis of biological control is to prevent the transport of radioactive contamination by biological vectors (plants, animals, or microorganisms), and where necessary, control and clean up resulting contamination. Other aspects of biological control at Hanford include industrial weed control (e.g.; tumbleweeds), noxious weed control (invasive, non-native plant species), and pest control (undesirable animals such as rodents and stinging insects; and microorganisms such as molds that adversely affect the quality of the workplace environment). Biological control activities may be either preventive (apriori) or in response to existing contamination spread (aposteriori). Surveillance activities, including ground, vegetation, flying insect, and other surveys, and apriori control actions, such as herbicide spraying and placing biological barriers, are important in preventing radioactive contamination spread. If surveillance discovers that biological vectors have spread radioactive contamination, aposteriori control measures, such as fixing contamination, followed by cleanup and removal of the contamination to an approved disposal location are typical response functions. In some cases remediation following the contamination cleanup and removal is necessary. Biological control activities for industrial weeds, noxious weeds and pests have similar modes of prevention and response.

  13. Controlling chaos faster

    SciTech Connect

    Bick, Christian; Kolodziejski, Christoph; Timme, Marc

    2014-09-01

    Predictive feedback control is an easy-to-implement method to stabilize unknown unstable periodic orbits in chaotic dynamical systems. Predictive feedback control is severely limited because asymptotic convergence speed decreases with stronger instabilities which in turn are typical for larger target periods, rendering it harder to effectively stabilize periodic orbits of large period. Here, we study stalled chaos control, where the application of control is stalled to make use of the chaotic, uncontrolled dynamics, and introduce an adaptation paradigm to overcome this limitation and speed up convergence. This modified control scheme is not only capable of stabilizing more periodic orbits than the original predictive feedback control but also speeds up convergence for typical chaotic maps, as illustrated in both theory and application. The proposed adaptation scheme provides a way to tune parameters online, yielding a broadly applicable, fast chaos control that converges reliably, even for periodic orbits of large period.

  14. On the Switching Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balas, Valentina E.; Balas, Marius M.

    2009-04-01

    The paper is discussing the measures able to reject the instability that may unexpectedly appear in particular conditions, in switching controllers applications. The switching controllers' effect is explained by the combined effects of the unsuitable choice of the switching moments (in the first or third quadrants of the phase trajectory of the switching error) and of the temporal aliasing that can distort the digital control systems when the sampling rate is close to the frequency of the oscillations that are produced by the commutation. The correct switching moments are located into the second and fourth quadrants of the phase trajectory of the switching error, but an active preparation of the commutation may be simply achieved by using a tracking controller, that is driving the output of open loop controller to follow the output of the close loop controller, permanently minimizing the switching error. Simulations issued from a dc driver speed controller and from an aircraft are provided.

  15. CRUCIFORM CONTROL ROD JOINT

    DOEpatents

    Thorp, A.G. II

    1962-08-01

    An invention is described which relates to nuclear reactor control rod components and more particularly to a joint between cruciform control rod members and cruciform control rod follower members. In one embodiment this invention provides interfitting crossed arms at adjacent ends of a control rod and its follower in abutting relation. This holds the members against relative opposite longitudinal movement while a compression member keys the arms against relative opposite rotation around a common axis. Means are also provided for centering the control rod and its follower on a common axis and for selectively releasing the control rod from its follower for the insertion of a replacement of the control rod and reuse of the follower. (AEC)

  16. Controlling chaos faster.

    PubMed

    Bick, Christian; Kolodziejski, Christoph; Timme, Marc

    2014-09-01

    Predictive feedback control is an easy-to-implement method to stabilize unknown unstable periodic orbits in chaotic dynamical systems. Predictive feedback control is severely limited because asymptotic convergence speed decreases with stronger instabilities which in turn are typical for larger target periods, rendering it harder to effectively stabilize periodic orbits of large period. Here, we study stalled chaos control, where the application of control is stalled to make use of the chaotic, uncontrolled dynamics, and introduce an adaptation paradigm to overcome this limitation and speed up convergence. This modified control scheme is not only capable of stabilizing more periodic orbits than the original predictive feedback control but also speeds up convergence for typical chaotic maps, as illustrated in both theory and application. The proposed adaptation scheme provides a way to tune parameters online, yielding a broadly applicable, fast chaos control that converges reliably, even for periodic orbits of large period.

  17. Robust Control Design for Flight Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-01

    to achieve desired performance over the full flight envelope when linear feedback is employed. Exact linearization methods [48] provide means for...designing nonlinear feedback laws which satisfy these requirements. However, exact linearization is not always compatible with control authority...specific situations. The most promising approaches appear to be those associated with methods of exact linearization . This procedure is based on some

  18. Flight control actuation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Gaines, Louie T. (Inventor); Evans, Paul S. (Inventor); Kern, James I. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A flight control actuation system comprises a controller, electromechanical actuator and a pneumatic actuator. During normal operation, only the electromechanical actuator is needed to operate a flight control surface. When the electromechanical actuator load level exceeds 40 amps positive, the controller activates the pneumatic actuator to offset electromechanical actuator loads to assist the manipulation of flight control surfaces. The assistance from the pneumatic load assist actuator enables the use of an electromechanical actuator that is smaller in size and mass, requires less power, needs less cooling processes, achieves high output forces and adapts to electrical current variations. The flight control actuation system is adapted for aircraft, spacecraft, missiles, and other flight vehicles, especially flight vehicles that are large in size and travel at high velocities.

  19. Unpacking Self-Control

    PubMed Central

    Duckworth, Angela; Steinberg, Laurence

    2014-01-01

    Self-controlled behavior refers to actions aligned with valued, longer-term goals in the face of conflicting impulses to seek immediate gratification. In this article, we argue that the psychological processes that contribute to self-controlled behavior can be grouped into two functionally distinct categories: Volitional processes facilitate self-controlled behavior and include executive functions as well as learned metacognitive strategies like planning, attention deployment, and psychological distancing. In contrast, impulsigenic processes undermine self-controlled behavior and include reward sensitivity, sensation seeking, and domain-specific cravings. A disproportionate amount of research has addressed the former at the expense of understanding individual and developmental differences in the latter. This imbalance is now being rectified. Distinguishing between self-controlled behavior and its antecedent psychological processes helps illuminate normative developmental changes in self-control and points to directions for measurement and intervention. PMID:25821515

  20. Advanced Aerodynamic Control Effectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.

    1999-01-01

    A 1990 research program that focused on the development of advanced aerodynamic control effectors (AACE) for military aircraft has been reviewed and summarized. Data are presented for advanced planform, flow control, and surface contouring technologies. The data show significant increases in lift, reductions in drag, and increased control power, compared to typical aerodynamic designs. The results presented also highlighted the importance of planform selection in the design of a control effector suite. Planform data showed that dramatic increases in lift (greater than 25%) can be achieved with multiple wings and a sawtooth forebody. Passive porosity and micro drag generator control effector data showed control power levels exceeding that available from typical effectors (moving surfaces). Application of an advanced planform to a tailless concept showed benefits of similar magnitude as those observed in the generic studies.

  1. Fuzzy logic controller optimization

    DOEpatents

    Sepe, Jr., Raymond B; Miller, John Michael

    2004-03-23

    A method is provided for optimizing a rotating induction machine system fuzzy logic controller. The fuzzy logic controller has at least one input and at least one output. Each input accepts a machine system operating parameter. Each output produces at least one machine system control parameter. The fuzzy logic controller generates each output based on at least one input and on fuzzy logic decision parameters. Optimization begins by obtaining a set of data relating each control parameter to at least one operating parameter for each machine operating region. A model is constructed for each machine operating region based on the machine operating region data obtained. The fuzzy logic controller is simulated with at least one created model in a feedback loop from a fuzzy logic output to a fuzzy logic input. Fuzzy logic decision parameters are optimized based on the simulation.

  2. Designing Genetic Feedback Controllers.

    PubMed

    Harris, Andreas W K; Dolan, James A; Kelly, Ciarán L; Anderson, James; Papachristodoulou, Antonis

    2015-08-01

    By incorporating feedback around systems we wish to manipulate, it is possible to improve their performance and robustness properties to meet pre-specified design objectives. For decades control engineers have been successfully implementing feedback controllers for complex mechanical and electrical systems such as aircraft and sports cars. Natural biological systems use feedback extensively for regulation and adaptation but apart from the most basic designs, there is no systematic framework for designing feedback controllers in Synthetic Biology. In this paper we describe how classical approaches from linear control theory can be used to close the loop. This includes the design of genetic circuits using feedback control and the presentation of a biological phase lag controller.

  3. Flight control actuation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Gaines, Louie T. (Inventor); Evans, Paul S. (Inventor); Kern, James I. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A flight control actuation system comprises a controller, electromechanical actuator and a pneumatic actuator. During normal operation, only the electromechanical actuator is needed to operate a flight control surface. When the electromechanical actuator load level exceeds 40 amps positive, the controller activates the pneumatic actuator to offset electromechanical actuator loads to assist the manipulation of flight control surfaces. The assistance from the pneumatic load assist actuator enables the use of an electromechanical actuator that is smaller in size and mass, requires less power, needs less cooling processes, achieves high output forces and adapts to electrical current variations. The flight control actuation system is adapted for aircraft, spacecraft, missiles, and other flight vehicles, especially flight vehicles that are large in size and travel at high velocities.

  4. Chimpanzee Cognitive Control

    PubMed Central

    Beran, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive control processes are a feature of human cognition. Recent comparative tests have shown that some nonhuman animals also might share aspects of cognitive control with humans. Two of the executive processes that constitute cognitive control are metacognition and self-control, and recent experiments with chimpanzees are described that demonstrate metacognitive monitoring and control when these animals engage in an information-seeking task. Chimpanzees also show strategic responding in a self-control task by exhibiting self-distraction as an aid to delay of gratification. These demonstrations indicate continuity with similar human cognitive capacities, and the performances of chimpanzees in these kinds of tests have implications for considering the nature of the intelligence of these animals. PMID:26478660

  5. Nuclear reactor control

    DOEpatents

    Cawley, William E.; Warnick, Robert F.

    1982-01-01

    1. In a nuclear reactor incorporating a plurality of columns of tubular fuel elements disposed in horizontal tubes in a mass of graphite wherein water flows through the tubes to cool the fuel elements, the improvement comprising at least one control column disposed in a horizontal tube including fewer fuel elements than in a normal column of fuel elements and tubular control elements disposed at both ends of said control column, and means for varying the horizontal displacement of the control column comprising a winch at the upstream end of the control column and a cable extending through the fuel and control elements and attached to the element at the downstream end of the column.

  6. Computer aided manipulator control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bejczy, A. K.; Zawacki, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes the hardware and software system of a dedicated mini- and microcomputer network developed at the JPL teleoperator project to aid the operator in real-time control of remote manipulators. The operator can be in series or in parallel with the control computer during operation. The purpose of the project is to develop, demonstrate and evaluate advanced supervisory control concepts and techniques for space applications. The paper concludes with a brief outline of future development plans and issues.

  7. Adaptive hierarchical fuzzy controller

    SciTech Connect

    Raju, G.V.S.; Jun Zhou

    1993-07-01

    A methodology for designing adaptive hierarchical fuzzy controllers is presented. In order to evaluate this concept, several suitable performance indices were developed and converted to linguistic fuzzy variables. Based on those variables, a supervisory fuzzy rule set was constructed and used to change the parameters of a hierarchical fuzzy controller to accommodate the variations of system parameters. The proposed algorithm was used in feedwater flow control to a steam generator. Simulation studies are presented that illustrate the effectiveness of the approach

  8. Supervisory control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheridan, T. B.

    1974-01-01

    The various functions of a computer are considered that serve in connecting the man, with his displays and controls, to an external environment, manipulator activators and the interoceptors that are in the actuators, and to the interosensors and the motors or the actuators to drive the sensors. Projected is an improved exoskeleton mechanism with computer control and some supervisory control that may give a quadriplegic the ability to walk and run around.

  9. Modular Battery Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Button, Robert M (Inventor); Gonzalez, Marcelo C (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Some embodiments of the present invention describe a battery including a plurality of master-less controllers. Each controller is operatively connected to a corresponding cell in a string of cells, and each controller is configured to bypass a fraction of current around the corresponding cell when the corresponding cell has a greater charge than one or more other cells in the string of cells.

  10. Rotor control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradford, Michael P. (Inventor); Maciolek, Joseph R. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A helicopter rotor control system (13) including a stop azimuth controller (32) for establishing the value of a deceleration command (15') to a deceleration controller (23), a transition azimuth predictor (41) and a position reference generator (55), which are effective during the last revolution of said rotor (14) to establish a correction indication (38) to adjust the deceleration command (15') to ensure that one of the rotor blades (27) stops at a predetermined angular position.

  11. JPRS Report, Arms Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    dangerous because the measure of control by central political organs of the state over conventional weapons and their military use is substan...It is always under the control and guidance of governments of the interested parties, it is the most manageable and has the least inertia. It...JPRS-TAC-89-001 10 JANUARY 1989 —JPRS Report— Arms Control nTSTRJBUTlON STATEMfcwTA Approved for public release; Distribution Unlimited n

  12. Innovation for Pollution Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Kinetic Controls Inc.'s refuse-fired steam generating facility led to the development of an air pollution equipment control device. The device is currently marketed by two NASA/Langley Research Center employees. It automatically senses and compensates for the changes in smoke composition when refuse is used as a fuel by adjusting the precipitator's voltage and current to permit maximum collection of electrically charged dust particles. The control adapts to any electrostatic precipitator and should have extensive commercial applications.

  13. Bimodality in Network Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Tao; Liu, Yang-Yu; Posfai, Marton; Slotine, Jean-Jacques; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo

    2013-03-01

    Controlling complex systems is a fundamental challenge of network science. Recent tools enable us to identify the minimum driver nodes, from which we can control a system. They also indicate a multiplicity of minimum driver node sets (MDS's): multiple combinations of the same number of nodes can achieve control over the system. This multiplicity allows us to classify individual nodes as critical if they are involved in all control configurations, intermittent if they occasionally act as driver nodes and redundant if they do not play any role in control. We develop computational and analytical framework analyzing nodes in each category in both model and real networks. We find that networks with identical degree distribution can be in two distinct control modes, ``centralized'' or ``distributed'', with drastic change on the role of each node in maintaining the controllability and orders of magnitude difference in the number of MDS's. In analyzing both model and real networks, we find that the two modes can be inferred directly from the network's degree distribution. Finally we show that the two control modes can be switched by small structural perturbations, leading to potential applications of control theory in real systems.

  14. Control system design guide

    SciTech Connect

    Sellers, David; Friedman, Hannah; Haasl, Tudi; Bourassa, Norman; Piette, Mary Ann

    2003-05-01

    The ''Control System Design Guide'' (Design Guide) provides methods and recommendations for the control system design process and control point selection and installation. Control systems are often the most problematic system in a building. A good design process that takes into account maintenance, operation, and commissioning can lead to a smoothly operating and efficient building. To this end, the Design Guide provides a toolbox of templates for improving control system design and specification. HVAC designers are the primary audience for the Design Guide. The control design process it presents will help produce well-designed control systems that achieve efficient and robust operation. The spreadsheet examples for control valve schedules, damper schedules, and points lists can streamline the use of the control system design concepts set forth in the Design Guide by providing convenient starting points from which designers can build. Although each reader brings their own unique questions to the text, the Design Guide contains information that designers, commissioning providers, operators, and owners will find useful.

  15. Detonation command and control

    DOEpatents

    Mace, Jonathan L.; Seitz, Gerald J.; Echave, John A.; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves

    2015-11-10

    The detonation of one or more explosive charges and propellant charges by a detonator in response to a fire control signal from a command and control system comprised of a command center and instrumentation center with a communications link therebetween. The fire control signal is selectively provided to the detonator from the instrumentation center if plural detonation control switches at the command center are in a fire authorization status, and instruments, and one or more interlocks, if included, are in a ready for firing status. The instrumentation and command centers are desirably mobile, such as being respective vehicles.

  16. Optimal control computer programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, F.

    1992-01-01

    The solution of the optimal control problem, even with low order dynamical systems, can usually strain the analytical ability of most engineers. The understanding of this subject matter, therefore, would be greatly enhanced if a software package existed that could simulate simple generic problems. Surprisingly, despite a great abundance of commercially available control software, few, if any, address the part of optimal control in its most generic form. The purpose of this paper is, therefore, to present a simple computer program that will perform simulations of optimal control problems that arise from the first necessary condition and the Pontryagin's maximum principle.

  17. The ISOLDE control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deloose, I.; Pace, A.

    1994-12-01

    The two CERN isotope separators named ISOLDE have been running on the new Personal Computer (PC) based control system since April 1992. The new architecture that makes heavy use of the commercial software and hardware of the PC market has been implemented on the 1700 geographically distributed control channels of the two separators and their experimental area. Eleven MSDOS Intel-based PCs with approximately 80 acquisition and control boards are used to access the equipment and are controlled from three PCs running Microsoft Windows used as consoles through a Novell Local Area Network. This paper describes the interesting solutions found and discusses the reduced programming workload and costs that have been obtained.

  18. SSRF Beamline Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, L. F.; Liu, P.; Zhang, Z. H.; Hu, C.; Mi, Q. R.; Wu, Y. F.; Gong, P. R.; Zhu, Z. X.; Li, Z.

    2010-06-23

    There are seven beamlines in the Phase-I of SSRF. Five of them are equipped with Insertion Devices, while two with Bending Magnets. The beamline control system is based on the standard hardware and software architecture. The VME(PowerPC) with VxWorks is used for motion control, while the personal computers with Scientific Linux are the front end controllers of equipment protection and personnel safety systems. The control software is developed under EPICS which makes various experimental programs of Blu-Ice, LabView, VC and SPEC conveniently access Monochromators, mirror chambers and other optical components.

  19. Cooled, temperature controlled electrometer

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, John P.

    1992-08-04

    A cooled, temperature controlled electrometer for the measurement of small currents. The device employs a thermal transfer system to remove heat from the electrometer circuit and its environment and dissipate it to the external environment by means of a heat sink. The operation of the thermal transfer system is governed by a temperature regulation circuit which activates the thermal transfer system when the temperature of the electrometer circuit and its environment exceeds a level previously inputted to the external variable temperature control circuit. The variable temperature control circuit functions as subpart of the temperature control circuit. To provide temperature stability and uniformity, the electrometer circuit is enclosed by an insulated housing.

  20. Cooled, temperature controlled electrometer

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, John P.

    1992-01-01

    A cooled, temperature controlled electrometer for the measurement of small currents. The device employs a thermal transfer system to remove heat from the electrometer circuit and its environment and dissipate it to the external environment by means of a heat sink. The operation of the thermal transfer system is governed by a temperature regulation circuit which activates the thermal transfer system when the temperature of the electrometer circuit and its environment exceeds a level previously inputted to the external variable temperature control circuit. The variable temperature control circuit functions as subpart of the temperature control circuit. To provide temperature stability and uniformity, the electrometer circuit is enclosed by an insulated housing.

  1. MOSFET Power Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, J.; Jones, K.

    1986-01-01

    High current and voltage controlled remotely. Remote Power Conroller includes two series-connected banks of parallel-connected MOSFET's to withstand high current and voltage. Voltage sharing between switch banks, low-impedance, gate-drive circuits used. Provided controlled range for turn on. Individually trimmable to insure simultaneous switching within few nanoseconds during both turn on and turn off. Control circuit for each switch bank and over-current trip circuit float independently and supplied power via transformer T1 from inverter. Control of floating stages by optocouplers.

  2. Satellite attitude control simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debra, D. B.; Powell, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    Work was conducted to develop an extremely low drift rate gyroscope and a very precise star tracker. A proposed relativity satellite will measure very accurately the theoretically predicted 'relativistic' precession of the gyroscope relative to an inertial reference frame provided by the star tracker. Aspects of precision spinning attitude control are discussed together with questions of gyro operation, and the hopping mode for lunar transportation. For the attitude control system of the lunar hopper, a number of control laws were investigated. The studies indicated that some suboptimal controls should be adequate for the system.

  3. Optimal Linear Control.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    OPTIMAL LINEAR CONTROL C.A. HARVEY M.G. SAFO NOV G. STEIN J.C. DOYLE HONEYWELL SYSTEMS & RESEARCH CENTER j 2600 RIDGWAY PARKWAY j [ MINNEAPOLIS...RECIPIENT’S CAT ALC-’ W.IMIJUff’? * J~’ CR2 15-238-4F TP P EI)ŕll * (~ Optimal Linear Control ~iOGRPR UBA m a M.G Lnar o Con_ _ _ _ _ _ R PORT__ _ _ I RE...Characterizations of optimal linear controls have been derived, from which guides for selecting the structure of the control system and the weights in

  4. Helicopter high gain control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, T. B.; Nunn, E. C.

    1979-01-01

    High gain control is explored through a design study of the CH-47B helicopter. The plans are designed to obtain the maximum bandwidth possible given the hardware constraints. Controls are designed with modal control theory to specific bandwidths and closed loop mode shapes. Comparisons are made to an earlier complementary filter approach. Bandwidth improvement by removal of limitations is explored in order to establish hardware and mechanization options. Improvements in the pitch axis control system and in the rate gyro sensor noise characteristics in all axes are discussed. The use of rotor state feedback is assessed.

  5. Controlled wind motor

    SciTech Connect

    Boswell, F.A.

    1983-12-27

    A mechanical sail including a rotatable mast, the mast including a top vane mount and a bottom vane mount, the mounts being spaced from each other on the mast and rotatable therewith, a series of rotatable vanes spaced from and surrounding the mast and supported by and between the mounts, cam operaters extending between the mounts and connected to the vanes for controlling the rotation of the vanes, a first controller associated with the mast below the bottom vane mount for controlling the cam operators, the first controller being movable vertically with respect to the mast, a second controller for moving the first controller vertically with respect to the mast, the vanes being flexible and bowed outwardly, the bottom vane mount being movable with respect to the mast and connected to the second controller whereby when the second controller is operated, the bottom vane mount will move toward the top vane mount causing the vanes to bow outwardly at a desired arc and whereby when the first controller is moved, the vanes are caused to rotate to the desired angle of attack with respect to wind velocity and direction. When the sail is connected to a motor drive, the vessel may be driven forward or rearward depending on the angle of attack of the vanes through 180/sup 0/.

  6. Detonation command and control

    DOEpatents

    Mace, Jonathan L.; Seitz, Gerald J.; Echave, John A.; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves

    2016-05-31

    The detonation of one or more explosive charges and propellant charges by a detonator in response to a fire control signal from a command and control system comprised of a command center and instrumentation center with a communications link there between. The fire control signal is selectively provided to the detonator from the instrumentation center if plural detonation control switches at the command center are in a fire authorization status, and instruments, and one or more interlocks, if included, are in a ready for firing status. The instrumentation and command centers are desirably mobile, such as being respective vehicles.

  7. Device Oriented Project Controller

    SciTech Connect

    Dalesio, Leo; Kraimer, Martin

    2013-11-20

    This proposal is directed at the issue of developing control systems for very large HEP projects. A de-facto standard in accelerator control is the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS), which has been applied successfully to many physics projects. EPICS is a channel based system that requires that each channel of each device be configured and controlled. In Phase I, the feasibility of a device oriented extension to the distributed channel database was demonstrated by prototyping a device aware version of an EPICS I/O controller that functions with the current version of the channel access communication protocol. Extensions have been made to the grammar to define the database. Only a multi-stage position controller with limit switches was developed in the demonstration, but the grammar should support a full range of functional record types. In phase II, a full set of record types will be developed to support all existing record types, a set of process control functions for closed loop control, and support for experimental beam line control. A tool to configure these records will be developed. A communication protocol will be developed or extensions will be made to Channel Access to support introspection of components of a device. Performance bench marks will be made on both communication protocol and the database. After these records and performance tests are under way, a second of the grammar will be undertaken.

  8. Control of robot dynamics using acceleration control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, G. L.; Prateru, S.; Li, W.; Hinman, Elaine

    1992-01-01

    Acceleration control of robotic devices can provide improvements to many space-based operations using flexible manipulators and to ground-based operations requiring better precision and efficiency than current industrial robots can provide. This paper reports on a preliminary study of acceleration measurement on robotic motion during parabolic flights on the NASA KC-135 and a parallel study of accelerations with and without gravity arising from computer simulated motions using TREETOPS software.

  9. Controls for space structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balas, Mark

    1991-11-01

    Assembly and operation of large space structures (LSS) in orbit will require robot-assisted docking and berthing of partially-assembled structures. These operations require new solutions to the problems of controls. This is true because of large transient and persistent disturbances, controller-structure interaction with unmodeled modes, poorly known structure parameters, slow actuator/sensor dynamical behavior, and excitation of nonlinear structure vibrations during control and assembly. For on-orbit assembly, controllers must start with finite element models of LSS and adapt on line to the best operating points, without compromising stability. This is not easy to do, since there are often unmodeled dynamic interactions between the controller and the structure. The indirect adaptive controllers are based on parameter estimation. Due to the large number of modes in LSS, this approach leads to very high-order control schemes with consequent poor stability and performance. In contrast, direct model reference adaptive controllers operate to force the LSS to track the desirable behavior of a chosen model. These schemes produce simple control algorithms which are easy to implement on line. One problem with their use for LSS has been that the model must be the same dimension as the LSS - i.e., quite large. A control theory based on the command generator tracker (CGT) ideas of Sobel, Mabins, Kaufman and Wen, Balas to obtain very low-order models based on adaptive algorithms was developed. Closed-loop stability for both finite element models and distributed parameter models of LSS was proved. In addition, successful numerical simulations on several LSS databases were obtained. An adaptive controller based on our theory was also implemented on a flexible robotic manipulator at Martin Marietta Astronautics. Computation schemes for controller-structure interaction with unmodeled modes, the residual mode filters or RMF, were developed. The RMF theory was modified to compensate

  10. Controls for space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balas, Mark

    1991-01-01

    Assembly and operation of large space structures (LSS) in orbit will require robot-assisted docking and berthing of partially-assembled structures. These operations require new solutions to the problems of controls. This is true because of large transient and persistent disturbances, controller-structure interaction with unmodeled modes, poorly known structure parameters, slow actuator/sensor dynamical behavior, and excitation of nonlinear structure vibrations during control and assembly. For on-orbit assembly, controllers must start with finite element models of LSS and adapt on line to the best operating points, without compromising stability. This is not easy to do, since there are often unmodeled dynamic interactions between the controller and the structure. The indirect adaptive controllers are based on parameter estimation. Due to the large number of modes in LSS, this approach leads to very high-order control schemes with consequent poor stability and performance. In contrast, direct model reference adaptive controllers operate to force the LSS to track the desirable behavior of a chosen model. These schemes produce simple control algorithms which are easy to implement on line. One problem with their use for LSS has been that the model must be the same dimension as the LSS - i.e., quite large. A control theory based on the command generator tracker (CGT) ideas of Sobel, Mabins, Kaufman and Wen, Balas to obtain very low-order models based on adaptive algorithms was developed. Closed-loop stability for both finite element models and distributed parameter models of LSS was proved. In addition, successful numerical simulations on several LSS databases were obtained. An adaptive controller based on our theory was also implemented on a flexible robotic manipulator at Martin Marietta Astronautics. Computation schemes for controller-structure interaction with unmodeled modes, the residual mode filters or RMF, were developed. The RMF theory was modified to compensate

  11. Compact, Reliable EEPROM Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Richard; Kleyner, Igor

    2010-01-01

    A compact, reliable controller for an electrically erasable, programmable read-only memory (EEPROM) has been developed specifically for a space-flight application. The design may be adaptable to other applications in which there are requirements for reliability in general and, in particular, for prevention of inadvertent writing of data in EEPROM cells. Inadvertent writes pose risks of loss of reliability in the original space-flight application and could pose such risks in other applications. Prior EEPROM controllers are large and complex and do not provide all reasonable protections (in many cases, few or no protections) against inadvertent writes. In contrast, the present controller provides several layers of protection against inadvertent writes. The controller also incorporates a write-time monitor, enabling determination of trends in the performance of an EEPROM through all phases of testing. The controller has been designed as an integral subsystem of a system that includes not only the controller and the controlled EEPROM aboard a spacecraft but also computers in a ground control station, relatively simple onboard support circuitry, and an onboard communication subsystem that utilizes the MIL-STD-1553B protocol. (MIL-STD-1553B is a military standard that encompasses a method of communication and electrical-interface requirements for digital electronic subsystems connected to a data bus. MIL-STD- 1553B is commonly used in defense and space applications.) The intent was to both maximize reliability while minimizing the size and complexity of onboard circuitry. In operation, control of the EEPROM is effected via the ground computers, the MIL-STD-1553B communication subsystem, and the onboard support circuitry, all of which, in combination, provide the multiple layers of protection against inadvertent writes. There is no controller software, unlike in many prior EEPROM controllers; software can be a major contributor to unreliability, particularly in fault

  12. NUCLEAR REACTOR CONTROL SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Epler, E.P.; Hanauer, S.H.; Oakes, L.C.

    1959-11-01

    A control system is described for a nuclear reactor using enriched uranium fuel of the type of the swimming pool and other heterogeneous nuclear reactors. Circuits are included for automatically removing and inserting the control rods during the course of normal operation. Appropriate safety circuits close down the nuclear reactor in the event of emergency.

  13. Computationally efficient control allocation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durham, Wayne (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A computationally efficient method for calculating near-optimal solutions to the three-objective, linear control allocation problem is disclosed. The control allocation problem is that of distributing the effort of redundant control effectors to achieve some desired set of objectives. The problem is deemed linear if control effectiveness is affine with respect to the individual control effectors. The optimal solution is that which exploits the collective maximum capability of the effectors within their individual physical limits. Computational efficiency is measured by the number of floating-point operations required for solution. The method presented returned optimal solutions in more than 90% of the cases examined; non-optimal solutions returned by the method were typically much less than 1% different from optimal and the errors tended to become smaller than 0.01% as the number of controls was increased. The magnitude of the errors returned by the present method was much smaller than those that resulted from either pseudo inverse or cascaded generalized inverse solutions. The computational complexity of the method presented varied linearly with increasing numbers of controls; the number of required floating point operations increased from 5.5 i, to seven times faster than did the minimum-norm solution (the pseudoinverse), and at about the same rate as did the cascaded generalized inverse solution. The computational requirements of the method presented were much better than that of previously described facet-searching methods which increase in proportion to the square of the number of controls.

  14. Asthma - control drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Asthma - control drugs URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000005.htm Asthma - control ...

  15. Demand-controlled lighting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, L. J.

    1977-01-01

    Automatic lighting is controlled by photocell that measures intensity of available light. Photocell drives motor which operates mercury switches controlling indoor illumination sources. Device effects increase in indoor illumination intensity when illumination input to cell is insufficient. Reverse is true if input is too great.

  16. Fiber optics for controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seng, Gary T.

    1987-01-01

    The challenge of those involved in control-system hardware development is to accommodate an ever-increasing complexity in aircraft control, while limiting the size and weight of the components and improving system reliability. A technology that displays promise towards this end is the area of fiber optics for controls. The primary advantages of employing optical fibers, passive optical sensors, and optically controlled actuators are weight and volume reduction, immunity from electromagnetic effects, superior bandwidth capabilities, and freedom from short circuits and sparking contacts. Since 1975, NASA Lewis has performed in-house, contract, and grant research in fiber optic sensors, high-temperature electro-optic switches, and fly-by-light control-system architecture. Passive optical sensor development is an essential yet challenging area of work and has therefore received much attention during this period. A major effort to develop fly-by-light control-system technology, known as the Fiber-Optic Control System Integration (FOCSI) program, was initiated in 1985 as a cooperative effort between NASA and DOD. Phase 1 of FOCSI, completed in 1986, was aimed at the design of a fiber-optic integrated propulsion/flight control system. Phase 2, yet to be initiated, will provide subcomponent and system development, and a system engine test. In addition to a summary of the benefits of fiber optics, the FOCSI program, sensor advances, and future directions in the NASA Lewis program will be discussed.

  17. Advanced Formation Flight Control.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-12-01

    stabilizes the time dependent linearized plant (7.9) than it is to synthesize a control law which stabilizes the LTI plant (7.5). However, if a stabilizing ... control law is available, Lyapunov’s stabilizability result can also be applied to non LTI scenarios which arise from the application of linearization to

  18. Control of Nonlinear Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-26

    above papers shows how the "finite horizon time" feedback stabilization technique discussed in Section Ill-A can be extended to derive stabilizing ... control laws for the linear differential system with delayed controls: x = Ax(t) - 0 u(t) + B 1u(t - h). The second of the above papers shows how the

  19. Fluid delivery control system

    SciTech Connect

    Hoff, Brian D.; Johnson, Kris William; Algrain, Marcelo C.; Akasam, Sivaprasad

    2006-06-06

    A method of controlling the delivery of fluid to an engine includes receiving a fuel flow rate signal. An electric pump is arranged to deliver fluid to the engine. The speed of the electric pump is controlled based on the fuel flow rate signal.

  20. Duct Flow Control System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    is ejected under pressure tangentially of local duct surfaces through Coanda affected slots at the trailing edge of the duct from which only the...channel passages in order to modify the flow stream through the duct so as to perform certain functions such as thrust control and steerage control effects enhancing vehicle maneuverability.

  1. Police Robbery Control Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Richard H.; And Others

    The manual was designed as a practical guide for police department personnel in developing robbery control programs. An introductory chapter defines types of robberies and suggests administrative and operational uses of the manual. Research and control strategies are reported according to five robbery types: street (visible and non-visible),…

  2. Birth Control Ring

    MedlinePlus

    ... It? The birth control ring is a soft, flexible, doughnut-shaped ring about 2 inches (5 centimeters) in diameter. It is inserted into the vagina, where it slowly releases hormones — the chemicals the body makes to control organ function — through the vaginal wall into the ...

  3. Avian influenza control strategies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Control strategies for avian influenza in poultry vary depending on whether the goal is prevention, management, or eradication. Components used in control programs include: 1) education which includes communication, public awareness, and behavioral change, 2) changes to production and marketing sys...

  4. Command and Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thwaites, Donald

    1992-01-01

    Provides background information as an introduction to three articles on command and control simulations that involve police and fire departments. Elements of command and control situations are discussed, including leadership, management of people and resources, communication, and coordination; the effectiveness of simulations is considered; and…

  5. Liquid Level Control System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A system for controlling liquid flow from an inlet into a tank comprising a normally closed poppet valve controlled by dual pressure chambers each...containing a diaphragm movable by the pressure of the liquid in the inlet to cause the valve to close. Pressure against the diaphragms is relieved by

  6. Control without Wires.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobart, Jordan

    2002-01-01

    Describes how modern lighting systems, such as wireless lighting, which come complete with user-friendly controls and audio/video interfaces, enhance the educational process and cut costs. Discusses evaluating a building's lighting situation, lighting controls, and such systems' flexibility for future needs. (EV)

  7. Rethinking Coercive Control.

    PubMed

    Stark, Evan

    2009-12-01

    The critical appraisals of Coercive Control focus largely on what my analysis implies for intervention, a matter to which the book devotes only limited space. In this reply, I reiterate core concepts in the book and acknowledge that much more work is needed to translate the realities of coercive control into practical legal and advocacy strategies. I review how coercive control differs from partner assaults and so why it merits a distinct response; the extent to which coercive control targets gender identity; the wisdom of complementing the focus on violence with an emphasis on male domination, sexual inequality and personal liberty; what this implies for shelters and the law; why sexual inequality differentiates coercive control from female partner abuse of men; how sexual equality can be both cause and antidote for coercive control; why I think an affirmative concept of freedom is essential to grasp the human rights violations inflicted by coercive control; and what it means to "story" coercive control by integrating women into the larger liberty narrative on which our national identity rests.

  8. Readings in program control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoban, Francis T. (Editor); Lawbaugh, William M. (Editor); Hoffman, Edward J. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    Under the heading of Program Control, a number of related topics are discussed: cost estimating methods; planning and scheduling; cost overruns in the defense industry; the history of estimating; the advantages of cost plus award fee contracts; and how program control techniques led to the success of a NASA development project.

  9. QUALITY CONTROLS FOR PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this presentation is to present an overview of the quality control (QC) sections of a draft EPA document entitled, "Quality Assurance/Quality Control Guidance for Laboratories Performing PCR Analyses on Environmental Samples." This document has been prepared by th...

  10. Programmable Logic Controllers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Insolia, Gerard; Anderson, Kathleen

    This document contains a 40-hour course in programmable logic controllers (PLC), developed for a business-industry technology resource center for firms in eastern Pennsylvania by Northampton Community College. The 10 units of the course cover the following: (1) introduction to programmable logic controllers; (2) DOS primer; (3) prerequisite…

  11. What Is Numerical Control?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goold, Vernell C.

    1977-01-01

    Numerical control (a technique involving coded, numerical instructions for the automatic control and performance of a machine tool) does not replace fundamental machine tool training. It should be added to the training program to give the student an additional tool to accomplish production rates and accuracy that were not possible before. (HD)

  12. Counseling for Pain Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espin, Olivia M.; Ganikos, Mary L.

    1975-01-01

    New techniques are being developed that enhance the effectiveness of psychological forces in controlling bodily reactions. All of them are powerful tools for the psychological control of pain. This article reviews such techniques and addresses itself to the contributions that counselors can make to alleviate physical pain. (Author)

  13. Contamination Control Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    EBY, J.L.

    2000-05-16

    Welcome to a workshop on contamination Control techniques. This work shop is designed for about two hours. Attendee participation is encouraged during the workshop. We will address different topics within contamination control techniques; present processes, products and equipment used here at Hanford and then open the floor to you, the attendees for your input on the topics.

  14. Multipath star switch controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, T. O.

    1980-01-01

    Device concept permits parallel computers to scan several commonnetwork-connected data stations at maximum rate. Sequencers leap-frog to bypass ports already being serviced by another computer. Two-path system for 16-port star switch controller is cost effective if added bandwidth or increased reliability is desired. Triple-path system would be cost effective for 32-port controller.

  15. Encyclopedia of Birth Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rengel, Marian

    This encyclopedia brings together in more than 200 entries, arranged in A-to-Z format, a portrait of the complex modern issue that birth control has become with advances in medicine and biochemistry during the 20th century. It is aimed at both the student and the consumer of birth control. Entries cover the following topics: birth control…

  16. Control-structure interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Joseph K.; Ianculescu, George D.; Kenney, Charles S.; Laub, Alan J.; Ly, Jason H. Q.; Papadopoulos, Philip M.

    1992-01-01

    The feasibility of using conventional proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control and an alternative optimal control to perform the pointing and tracking functions of the Space Station solar dynamic power module is investigated. A very large state model of 6 rigid body modes and 272 flexible modes is used in conjunction with classical linear-quadratic-Gaussian (LQG) optimal control to produce a full-order controller that satisfies the requirements. The results are compared with a classically designed PID controller that was implemented for a much smaller (6 rigid body, 40 flexible modes) model. The conventional control design approach is shown to be very much influenced by the order reduction of the plant model, i.e., the number of retained elastic modes from the full-order model, suggesting that for a complex, large space structure, such as the Space Station Freedom solar dynamic module, application of conventional control system design methods may not be adequate. The use of LQG control is recommended, and method for solving the large matrix. Riccati equation that arises from the optimal formulation is provided.

  17. Plating Tank Control Software

    SciTech Connect

    Krafcik, John

    1998-03-01

    The Plating Tank Control Software is a graphical user interface that controls and records plating process conditions for plating in high aspect ratio channels that require use of low current and long times. The software is written for a Pentium II PC with an 8 channel data acquisition card, and the necessary shunt resistors for measuring currents in the millampere range.

  18. DIESEL NOX CONTROL APPLICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a project to design, develop, and demonstrate a diesel engine nitrogen oxide (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) control package that will meet the U.S. Navy's emission control requirements. (NOTE: In 1994, EPA issued a Notice for Proposed Rule Making (NP...

  19. Public Health Pest Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Univ., Tucson. Cooperative Extension Service.

    This manual supplies information helpful to individuals wishing to become certified in public health pest control. It is designed as a technical reference for vector control workers and as preparatory material for structural applicators of restricted use pesticides to meet the General Standards of Competency required of commercial applicators. The…

  20. Hair follicle growth controls.

    PubMed

    Stenn, K S; Combates, N J; Eilertsen, K J; Gordon, J S; Pardinas, J R; Parimoo, S; Prouty, S M

    1996-10-01

    Research in hair biology has embarked in the pursuit for molecules that control hair growth. Many molecules already have been associated with the controls of hair patterning, hair maturation, and hair cycling and differentiation. Knowing how these molecules work gives us the tools for understanding and treating patients with hair disorders.

  1. Nonlinear and adaptive control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athans, Michael

    1989-01-01

    The primary thrust of the research was to conduct fundamental research in the theories and methodologies for designing complex high-performance multivariable feedback control systems; and to conduct feasibiltiy studies in application areas of interest to NASA sponsors that point out advantages and shortcomings of available control system design methodologies.

  2. Who Controls the Video?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanna, Jack C.

    Television plays a monumentally large role in U.S. society; no one is immune from its effects. The government does not control television, but it is not far from the truth to say that television controls the political life of this country. This paper analyzes the democratic objectives and effects of television in the United States. A brief history…

  3. Resisting Mind Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Susan M.; Zimbardo, Philip G.

    1980-01-01

    Provides conceptual analyses of mind control techniques along with practical advice on how to resist these techniques. The authors stress that effective mind control stems more from everyday social relations than from exotic technological gimmicks. Suggestions are given for resisting persuasion, resisting systems, and challenging the system.…

  4. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CONTROL

    DOEpatents

    Untermyer, S.; Hutter, E.

    1959-08-01

    This patent relates to "shadow" control of a nuclear reactor. The control means comprises a plurality ot elongated rods disposed adjacent and parallel to each other, The morphology and effects of gases generated within sections of neutron absorbing materials and equal length sections of neutron permeable materials together with means for longitudinally pcsitioning the rcds relative to each other.

  5. Controlled Stochastic Dynamical Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-18

    the existence of value functions of two-player zero-sum stochastic differential games Indiana Univ. Math. Journal, 38 (1989), pp 293-314. [6] George ...control problems, Adv. Appl. Prob., 15, (1983) pp 225-254. [10] Karatzas, I. Ocone, D., Wang, H. and Zervos , M., Finite fuel singular control with

  6. Stepping motor controller

    DOEpatents

    Bourret, Steven C.; Swansen, James E.

    1984-01-01

    A stepping motor is microprocessingly controlled by digital circuitry which monitors the output of a shaft encoder adjustably secured to the stepping motor and generates a subsequent stepping pulse only after the preceding step has occurred and a fixed delay has expired. The fixed delay is variable on a real-time basis to provide for smooth and controlled deceleration.

  7. Stepping motor controller

    DOEpatents

    Bourret, S.C.; Swansen, J.E.

    1982-07-02

    A stepping motor is microprocessor controlled by digital circuitry which monitors the output of a shaft encoder adjustably secured to the stepping motor and generates a subsequent stepping pulse only after the preceding step has occurred and a fixed delay has expired. The fixed delay is variable on a real-time basis to provide for smooth and controlled deceleration.

  8. Automotive Pollution Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raudenbush, David B.

    Intended for a 1- or 2-month curriculum in auto mechanics, this student manual on automotive pollution control was developed by a subject matter specialist at an area vocational school and tested in a vocational auto shop. Intended either for use in an integrated curriculum or for use in teaching pollution control as a separate course, these 12…

  9. Guidance and Control Software,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    FACILITIES Integration Facilities exist for each project and consist of laboratory hot mockups of the actual military computers with realistic...PCIN Al. WEP I AND CONTROL AND CONTRI IF S TO R ESI I I I AIR-SURFACE ASGW WEAPONS I CONTROL L - - L - - - - - - - J L J FIG. 2a 3. HARDWARE

  10. Digital flight control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caglayan, A. K.; Vanlandingham, H. F.

    1977-01-01

    The design of stable feedback control laws for sampled-data systems with variable rate sampling was investigated. These types of sampled-data systems arise naturally in digital flight control systems which use digital actuators where it is desirable to decrease the number of control computer output commands in order to save wear and tear of the associated equipment. The design of aircraft control systems which are optimally tolerant of sensor and actuator failures was also studied. Detection of the failed sensor or actuator must be resolved and if the estimate of the state is used in the control law, then it is also desirable to have an estimator which will give the optimal state estimate even under the failed conditions.

  11. Estimation in satellite control.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debra, D. B.

    1971-01-01

    The use of estimators or observers is discussed as applied to satellite attitude control and the control of drag-free satellites. The practical problems of implementation are discussed, and the relative advantages of full and reduced state estimators are compared, particularly in terms of their effectiveness and bandwidth as filters. Three applications are used to illustrate the principles. They are: (1) a reaction wheel control system, (2) a spinning attitude control system, and (3) a drag-free satellite translational control system. Fixed estimator gains are shown to be adequate for these (and many other) applications. Our experience in the hardware realization of estimators has led to categorize the error sources in terms of those that improve with increased estimator gains and those that get worse with increased estimator gains.

  12. Autorotation flight control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachelder, Edward N. (Inventor); Lee, Dong-Chan (Inventor); Aponso, Bimal L. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention provides computer implemented methodology that permits the safe landing and recovery of rotorcraft following engine failure. With this invention successful autorotations may be performed from well within the unsafe operating area of the height-velocity profile of a helicopter by employing the fast and robust real-time trajectory optimization algorithm that commands control motion through an intuitive pilot display, or directly in the case of autonomous rotorcraft. The algorithm generates optimal trajectories and control commands via the direct-collocation optimization method, solved using a nonlinear programming problem solver. The control inputs computed are collective pitch and aircraft pitch, which are easily tracked and manipulated by the pilot or converted to control actuator commands for automated operation during autorotation in the case of an autonomous rotorcraft. The formulation of the optimal control problem has been carefully tailored so the solutions resemble those of an expert pilot, accounting for the performance limitations of the rotorcraft and safety concerns.

  13. Remotely controllable mixing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belew, Robert R. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A remotely controllable mixing system (210) in which a plurality of mixing assemblies (10a-10e) are arranged in an annular configuration, and wherein each assembly (10) employs a central chamber (16) and two outer, upper and lower, chambers (12, 14). Valves (18, 20) are positioned between chambers, and these valves (18, 20) for a given mixing assembly (10) are operated by upper and lower control rotors (29), which in turn are driven by upper and lower drive rotors (270, 270b). Additionally, a hoop (278) is compressed around upper control rotors (29) and a hoop (278b) is compressed around lower control rotors (29) to thus insure constant frictional engagement between all control rotors (29) and drive rotors (270, 270b). The drive rollers (270, 270b) are driven by a motor (213).

  14. Intelligent Flow Control Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Anthony R (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention is an intelligent flow control valve which may be inserted into the flow coming out of a pipe and activated to provide a method to stop, measure, and meter flow coming from the open or possibly broken pipe. The intelligent flow control valve may be used to stop the flow while repairs are made. Once repairs have been made, the valve may be removed or used as a control valve to meter the amount of flow from inside the pipe. With the addition of instrumentation, the valve may also be used as a variable area flow meter and flow controller programmed based upon flowing conditions. With robotic additions, the valve may be configured to crawl into a desired pipe location, anchor itself, and activate flow control or metering remotely.

  15. CAVITY CONTROL ALGORITHM

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasz Plawski, J. Hovater

    2010-09-01

    A digital low level radio frequency (RF) system typically incorporates either a heterodyne or direct sampling technique, followed by fast ADCs, then an FPGA, and finally a transmitting DAC. This universal platform opens up the possibilities for a variety of control algorithm implementations. The foremost concern for an RF control system is cavity field stability, and to meet the required quality of regulation, the chosen control system needs to have sufficient feedback gain. In this paper we will investigate the effectiveness of the regulation for three basic control system algorithms: I&Q (In-phase and Quadrature), Amplitude & Phase and digital SEL (Self Exciting Loop) along with the example of the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV cavity field control system.

  16. Discrete Variational Optimal Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Fernando; Kobilarov, Marin; Martín de Diego, David

    2013-06-01

    This paper develops numerical methods for optimal control of mechanical systems in the Lagrangian setting. It extends the theory of discrete mechanics to enable the solutions of optimal control problems through the discretization of variational principles. The key point is to solve the optimal control problem as a variational integrator of a specially constructed higher dimensional system. The developed framework applies to systems on tangent bundles, Lie groups, and underactuated and nonholonomic systems with symmetries, and can approximate either smooth or discontinuous control inputs. The resulting methods inherit the preservation properties of variational integrators and result in numerically robust and easily implementable algorithms. Several theoretical examples and a practical one, the control of an underwater vehicle, illustrate the application of the proposed approach.

  17. Shock absorber control system

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, Y.; Ohira, M.; Ushida, M.; Miyagawa, T.; Shimodaira, T.

    1987-01-13

    A shock absorber control system is described for controlling a dampening force of a shock absorber of a vehicle comprising: setting means for setting a desired dampening force changeable within a predetermined range; drive means for driving the shock absorber to change the dampening force of the shock absorber linearly; control means for controlling the drive means in accordance with the desired dampening force when the setting of the desired dampening force has been changed; detecting means for detecting an actual dampening force of the shock absorber; and correcting means for correcting the dampening force of the shock absorber by controlling the drive means in accordance with a difference between the desired dampening force and the detected actual dampening force.

  18. Cyclic control stick

    DOEpatents

    Whitaker, Charles N.; Zimmermann, Richard E.

    1989-01-01

    A cyclic control stick of the type used in helicopters for reducing the safety hazards associated with such a mechanism in the event of a crewman being thrown violently into contact with the cyclic control stick resulting from a crash or the like. The cyclic control stick is configured to break away upon the exertion of an impact force which exceeds a predetermined value and/or is exerted for more than a momentary time duration. The cyclic control stick is also configured to be adjustable so as to locate the grip thereof as far away from the crewman as possible for safety reasons without comprising the comfort of the crewman or the use of the control stick, and a crushable pad is provided on the top of the grip for impact energy absorbing purposes.

  19. 3. EAGLE ROCK CONTROL CENTER, OPERATIONS CONTROL. AS SYSTEM BECOMES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. EAGLE ROCK CONTROL CENTER, OPERATIONS CONTROL. AS SYSTEM BECOMES INCREASINGLY AUTOMATED, EAGLE ROCK WILL BECOME MORE AND MORE THE CENTRAL CONTROL SYSTEM OF THE METROPOLITAN WATER DISTRICT. - Eagle Rock Operations Control Center, Pasadena, Los Angeles County, CA

  20. Neural Flight Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gundy-Burlet, Karen

    2003-01-01

    The Neural Flight Control System (NFCS) was developed to address the need for control systems that can be produced and tested at lower cost, easily adapted to prototype vehicles and for flight systems that can accommodate damaged control surfaces or changes to aircraft stability and control characteristics resulting from failures or accidents. NFCS utilizes on a neural network-based flight control algorithm which automatically compensates for a broad spectrum of unanticipated damage or failures of an aircraft in flight. Pilot stick and rudder pedal inputs are fed into a reference model which produces pitch, roll and yaw rate commands. The reference model frequencies and gains can be set to provide handling quality characteristics suitable for the aircraft of interest. The rate commands are used in conjunction with estimates of the aircraft s stability and control (S&C) derivatives by a simplified Dynamic Inverse controller to produce virtual elevator, aileron and rudder commands. These virtual surface deflection commands are optimally distributed across the aircraft s available control surfaces using linear programming theory. Sensor data is compared with the reference model rate commands to produce an error signal. A Proportional/Integral (PI) error controller "winds up" on the error signal and adds an augmented command to the reference model output with the effect of zeroing the error signal. In order to provide more consistent handling qualities for the pilot, neural networks learn the behavior of the error controller and add in the augmented command before the integrator winds up. In the case of damage sufficient to affect the handling qualities of the aircraft, an Adaptive Critic is utilized to reduce the reference model frequencies and gains to stay within a flyable envelope of the aircraft.

  1. Extended cooperative control synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, John B.; Schmidt, David K.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reports on research for extending the Cooperative Control Synthesis methodology to include a more accurate modeling of the pilot's controller dynamics. Cooperative Control Synthesis (CCS) is a methodology that addresses the problem of how to design control laws for piloted, high-order, multivariate systems and/or non-conventional dynamic configurations in the absence of flying qualities specifications. This is accomplished by emphasizing the parallel structure inherent in any pilot-controlled, augmented vehicle. The original CCS methodology is extended to include the Modified Optimal Control Model (MOCM), which is based upon the optimal control model of the human operator developed by Kleinman, Baron, and Levison in 1970. This model provides a modeling of the pilot's compensation dynamics that is more accurate than the simplified pilot dynamic representation currently in the CCS methodology. Inclusion of the MOCM into the CCS also enables the modeling of pilot-observation perception thresholds and pilot-observation attention allocation affects. This Extended Cooperative Control Synthesis (ECCS) allows for the direct calculation of pilot and system open- and closed-loop transfer functions in pole/zero form and is readily implemented in current software capable of analysis and design for dynamic systems. Example results based upon synthesizing an augmentation control law for an acceleration command system in a compensatory tracking task using the ECCS are compared with a similar synthesis performed by using the original CCS methodology. The ECCS is shown to provide augmentation control laws that yield more favorable, predicted closed-loop flying qualities and tracking performance than those synthesized using the original CCS methodology.

  2. On identified predictive control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bialasiewicz, Jan T.

    1993-01-01

    Self-tuning control algorithms are potential successors to manually tuned PID controllers traditionally used in process control applications. A very attractive design method for self-tuning controllers, which has been developed over recent years, is the long-range predictive control (LRPC). The success of LRPC is due to its effectiveness with plants of unknown order and dead-time which may be simultaneously nonminimum phase and unstable or have multiple lightly damped poles (as in the case of flexible structures or flexible robot arms). LRPC is a receding horizon strategy and can be, in general terms, summarized as follows. Using assumed long-range (or multi-step) cost function the optimal control law is found in terms of unknown parameters of the predictor model of the process, current input-output sequence, and future reference signal sequence. The common approach is to assume that the input-output process model is known or separately identified and then to find the parameters of the predictor model. Once these are known, the optimal control law determines control signal at the current time t which is applied at the process input and the whole procedure is repeated at the next time instant. Most of the recent research in this field is apparently centered around the LRPC formulation developed by Clarke et al., known as generalized predictive control (GPC). GPC uses ARIMAX/CARIMA model of the process in its input-output formulation. In this paper, the GPC formulation is used but the process predictor model is derived from the state space formulation of the ARIMAX model and is directly identified over the receding horizon, i.e., using current input-output sequence. The underlying technique in the design of identified predictive control (IPC) algorithm is the identification algorithm of observer/Kalman filter Markov parameters developed by Juang et al. at NASA Langley Research Center and successfully applied to identification of flexible structures.

  3. Velocity vector control system augmented with direct lift control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tisdale, H. F., Sr.; Kelly, W. W. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A pilot-controlled stability control system that employs direct lift control (spoiler control) with elevator control to control the flight path angle of an aircraft is described. A computer on the aircraft generates an elevator control signal and a spoiler control signal, using a pilot-controlled pitch control signal and pitch rate, vertical velocity, roll angle, groundspeed, engine pressure ratio and vertical acceleration signals which are generated on the aircraft. The direct lift control by the aircraft spoilers improves the response of the aircraft flight path angle and provides short term flight path stabilization against environmental disturbances.

  4. Load Control System Reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Trudnowski, Daniel

    2015-04-03

    This report summarizes the results of the Load Control System Reliability project (DOE Award DE-FC26-06NT42750). The original grant was awarded to Montana Tech April 2006. Follow-on DOE awards and expansions to the project scope occurred August 2007, January 2009, April 2011, and April 2013. In addition to the DOE monies, the project also consisted of matching funds from the states of Montana and Wyoming. Project participants included Montana Tech; the University of Wyoming; Montana State University; NorthWestern Energy, Inc., and MSE. Research focused on two areas: real-time power-system load control methodologies; and, power-system measurement-based stability-assessment operation and control tools. The majority of effort was focused on area 2. Results from the research includes: development of fundamental power-system dynamic concepts, control schemes, and signal-processing algorithms; many papers (including two prize papers) in leading journals and conferences and leadership of IEEE activities; one patent; participation in major actual-system testing in the western North American power system; prototype power-system operation and control software installed and tested at three major North American control centers; and, the incubation of a new commercial-grade operation and control software tool. Work under this grant certainly supported the DOE-OE goals in the area of “Real Time Grid Reliability Management.”

  5. Gemini Scout Control Software

    SciTech Connect

    Clinton Hobart, Justin Garretson

    2010-11-23

    The Gemini Scout Control Software consists of two Windows applications that allow the Gemini Scout vehicle to be controlled by an operator. The Embedded application runs on the vehicle's Gemini Scout Control Software onboard computer and controls the vehicle's various motors and sensors. This application reports the vehicle's status and receives vehicle commands overthe local-area-network. The Embedded applicationalso allows the user to control the vehicle using a USB game-pad connected directly to the vehicle. The Operator Control Unit (OCU) application runs on an external PC and communicates with the vehicle via an Ethernet connection. The OCU application sends commands to and receives data from the Embedded application running on the vehicle. The OCU application also communicates directly with the digital video encoders and radios in order to display video from the vehicle's cameras and the status of the radio link. The OCU application has a graphical user interface (GUI) that displays the vehicle's status and allows the user to change various vehicle settings. Finally, the OCU application receives input from a USB game-pad connected to the PC in order to control the vehicle's functions.

  6. Control of vortex dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hsiao-Lung

    Discrete vortex methods are used to provide computationally efficient simulations of vortex dynamics in fluid flows. An adaptive LQG controller is applied to reduce the oscillations in the wake caused by the vortex dynamics. The controller design is based on a discrete-time input/output model rather than the nonlinear differential equations of the discrete vortex model. The control philosophy is to identify time-varying parameters in the input/output model adaptively and use the identified parameters to update the control law. For numerically stable identification, an adaptive algorithm based on inverse QR decomposition is introduced. The derivation shows that this algorithm is a square-root implementation of recursive least squares estimation. For a preliminary test of the control strategy, the adaptive LQG controller is applied to a vortex street model simulated by discrete vortices. The identification shows that the stability of the identified zeros depends on whether the sensor is upstream or downstream of the actuator. Flow past a flat plate is another important application of the discrete vortex method. A control problem is studied and simulated in which suction at the back face of the plate is used to trap vortices behind the plate. Qualitatively, the results obtained with the discrete-vortex method used here agree with earlier results for a substantially different vortex method involving a small number of differential equations.

  7. Fiber optics for controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seng, Gary T.

    1990-01-01

    The design, development, and testing of a fiber optic integrated propulsion/flight control system for an advanced supersonic dash aircraft (flies at supersonic speeds for short periods of time) is the goal of the joint NASA/DOD Fiber Optic Control System Integration (FOCSI) program. Phase 1 provided a comparison of electronic and optical control systems, identified the status of current optical sensor technology, defined the aircraft sensor/actuator environment, proposed architectures for fully optical control systems, and provided schedules for development. Overall, it was determined that there are sufficient continued efforts to develop such a system. It was also determined that it is feasible to build a fiber optic control system for the development of a data base for this technology, but that further work is necessary in sensors, actuators, and components to develop an optimum design, fully fiber optic integrated control system compatible with advanced aircraft environments. Phase 2 is to design, construct, and ground test a fly by light control system. Its first task is to provide a detailed design of the electro-optic architecture.

  8. Controllability of flow turbulence.

    PubMed

    Guan, Shuguang; Wei, G W; Lai, C-H

    2004-06-01

    In this paper, we study the controllability of real-world flow turbulence governed by the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations, using strategies developed in chaos control. A case of control/synchronization of turbulent dynamics is observed when only one component of the velocity field vector is unidirectionally coupled to a target state, while the other component is uncoupled. Unlike previous results, it is shown that the dynamics of the whole velocity field cannot be completely controlled/synchronized to the target, even in the limit of long time and strong coupling strength. It is further revealed that the controlled component of the velocity field can be fully controlled/synchronized to the target, but the other component, which is not directly coupled to the target, can only be partially controlled/synchronized to the target. By extending an auxiliary method to distributed dynamic systems, the partial synchronization of two turbulent orbits in the present study can be categorized in the domain of generalized synchronization of spatiotemporal dynamics.

  9. IGISOL control system modernization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koponen, J.; Hakala, J.

    2016-06-01

    Since 2010, the IGISOL research facility at the Accelerator laboratory of the University of Jyväskylä has gone through major changes. Comparing the new IGISOL4 facility to the former IGISOL3 setup, the size of the facility has more than doubled, the length of the ion transport line has grown to about 50 m with several measurement setups and extension capabilities, and the accelerated ions can be fed to the facility from two different cyclotrons. The facility has evolved to a system comprising hundreds of manual, pneumatic and electronic devices. These changes have prompted the need to modernize also the facility control system taking care of monitoring and transporting the ion beams. In addition, the control system is also used for some scientific data acquisition tasks. Basic guidelines for the IGISOL control system update have been remote control, safety, usability, reliability and maintainability. Legacy components have had a major significance in the control system hardware and for the renewed control system software the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) has been chosen as the architectural backbone.

  10. Deadbeat Predictive Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Phan, Minh

    1997-01-01

    Several new computational algorithms are presented to compute the deadbeat predictive control law. The first algorithm makes use of a multi-step-ahead output prediction to compute the control law without explicitly calculating the controllability matrix. The system identification must be performed first and then the predictive control law is designed. The second algorithm uses the input and output data directly to compute the feedback law. It combines the system identification and the predictive control law into one formulation. The third algorithm uses an observable-canonical form realization to design the predictive controller. The relationship between all three algorithms is established through the use of the state-space representation. All algorithms are applicable to multi-input, multi-output systems with disturbance inputs. In addition to the feedback terms, feed forward terms may also be added for disturbance inputs if they are measurable. Although the feedforward terms do not influence the stability of the closed-loop feedback law, they enhance the performance of the controlled system.

  11. Fault tolerant control laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ly, U. L.; Ho, J. K.

    1986-01-01

    A systematic procedure for the synthesis of fault tolerant control laws to actuator failure has been presented. Two design methods were used to synthesize fault tolerant controllers: the conventional LQ design method and a direct feedback controller design method SANDY. The latter method is used primarily to streamline the full-state Q feedback design into a practical implementable output feedback controller structure. To achieve robustness to control actuator failure, the redundant surfaces are properly balanced according to their control effectiveness. A simple gain schedule based on the landing gear up/down logic involving only three gains was developed to handle three design flight conditions: Mach .25 and Mach .60 at 5000 ft and Mach .90 at 20,000 ft. The fault tolerant control law developed in this study provides good stability augmentation and performance for the relaxed static stability aircraft. The augmented aircraft responses are found to be invariant to the presence of a failure. Furthermore, single-loop stability margins of +6 dB in gain and +30 deg in phase were achieved along with -40 dB/decade rolloff at high frequency.

  12. Model based manipulator control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosky, Lyman J.; Oppenheim, Irving J.

    1989-01-01

    The feasibility of using model based control (MBC) for robotic manipulators was investigated. A double inverted pendulum system was constructed as the experimental system for a general study of dynamically stable manipulation. The original interest in dynamically stable systems was driven by the objective of high vertical reach (balancing), and the planning of inertially favorable trajectories for force and payload demands. The model-based control approach is described and the results of experimental tests are summarized. Results directly demonstrate that MBC can provide stable control at all speeds of operation and support operations requiring dynamic stability such as balancing. The application of MBC to systems with flexible links is also discussed.

  13. Moving Object Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A method is provided for controlling two objects relatively moveable with respect to each other. A plurality of receivers are provided for detecting a distinctive microwave signal from each of the objects and measuring the phase thereof with respect to a reference signal. The measured phase signal is used to determine a distance between each of the objects and each of the plurality of receivers. Control signals produced in response to the relative distances are used to control the position of the two objects.

  14. Shaft speed control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, A. G.

    1979-01-01

    Simple mechanism controls rotation of heavy-duty shaft by mechanical comparison with rotation of small, precise, stepper motor. Mechanism can be used to limit winding and unwinding speeds of large spools and reels and to control speed of other rotating shafts. Setup incorporates reference shaft geared down from stepper motor and feedback shaft geared up from shaft to be controlled. Feedback and reference shafts are coupled with brake assembly inside stationary cylinder. When work shaft speeds up, brakes are activated automatically to slow it down.

  15. Flash protection controller

    DOEpatents

    Galbraith, Lee K.

    1981-01-01

    A controller provides a high voltage to maintain an electro-optic shutter in a transparent condition until a flash of light which would be harmful to personnel is sensed by a phototransistor. The controller then shorts the shutter to ground to minimize light transmission to the user and maintains light transmission at the pre-flash level for a predetermined time to allow the flash to subside. A log converter and differential trigger circuit keep the controller from being triggered by other light flashes which are not dangerous.

  16. Temperature-Controlling Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temple, Gerald

    1987-01-01

    Simple circuit switches current to electrical heater on and off to maintain temperature of room at 25 plus or minus 0.5 degree C. Lightweight, compact, reliable, insensitive to electrical noise, and uses single 5-Vdc power supply. Handles ac loads of 10 A. Designed to operate outside temperature controlled environment over range of -55 to +85 degree C. Thermistor provides input signal for simple temperature controller. Output of controller applied to solid-state relay, which in turn switches current to resistance heater.

  17. Analyzing Feedback Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Frank H.; Downing, John P.

    1987-01-01

    Interactive controls analysis (INCA) program developed to provide user-friendly environment for design and analysis of linear control systems, primarily feedback control. Designed for use with both small- and large-order systems. Using interactive-graphics capability, INCA user quickly plots root locus, frequency response, or time response of either continuous-time system or sampled-data system. Configuration and parameters easily changed, allowing user to design compensation networks and perform sensitivity analyses in very convenient manner. Written in Pascal and FORTRAN.

  18. Surface controlled blade stabilizer

    DOEpatents

    Russell, Larry R.

    1983-01-01

    Drill string stabilizer apparatus, controllable to expand and retract entirely from the surface by control of drill string pressure, wherein increase of drill string pressure from the surface closes a valve to create a piston means which is moved down by drill string pressure to expand the stabilizer blades, said valve being opened and the piston moving upward upon reduction of drill string pressure to retract the stabilizer blades. Upward and downward movements of the piston and an actuator sleeve therebelow are controlled by a barrel cam acting between the housing and the actuator sleeve.

  19. Optical controlled keyboard system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budzyński, Łukasz; Długosz, Dariusz; Niewiarowski, Bartosz; Zajkowski, Maciej

    2011-06-01

    Control systems of our computers are common devices, based on the manipulation of keys or a moving ball. Completely healthy people have no problems with the operation of such devices. Human disability makes everyday activities become a challenge and create trouble. When a man can not move his hands, the work becomes difficult or often impossible. Controlled optical keyboard is a modern device that allows to bypass the limitations of disability limbs. The use of wireless optical transmission allows to control computer using a laser beam, which cooperates with the photodetectors. The article presents the construction and operation of non-contact optical keyboard for people with disabilities.

  20. Advanced Wavefront Control Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S S; Brase, J M; Avicola, K; Thompson, C A; Kartz, M W; Winters, S; Hartley, R; Wihelmsen, J; Dowla, F V; Carrano, C J; Bauman, B J; Pennington, D M; Lande, D; Sawvel, R M; Silva, D A; Cooke, J B; Brown, C G

    2001-02-21

    Programs at LLNL that involve large laser systems--ranging from the National Ignition Facility to new tactical laser weapons--depend on the maintenance of laser beam quality through precise control of the optical wavefront. This can be accomplished using adaptive optics, which compensate for time-varying aberrations that are often caused by heating in a high-power laser system. Over the past two decades, LLNL has developed a broad capability in adaptive optics technology for both laser beam control and high-resolution imaging. This adaptive optics capability has been based on thin deformable glass mirrors with individual ceramic actuators bonded to the back. In the case of high-power lasers, these adaptive optics systems have successfully improved beam quality. However, as we continue to extend our applications requirements, the existing technology base for wavefront control cannot satisfy them. To address this issue, this project studied improved modeling tools to increase our detailed understanding of the performance of these systems, and evaluated novel approaches to low-order wavefront control that offer the possibility of reduced cost and complexity. We also investigated improved beam control technology for high-resolution wavefront control. Many high-power laser systems suffer from high-spatial-frequency aberrations that require control of hundreds or thousands of phase points to provide adequate correction. However, the cost and size of current deformable mirrors can become prohibitive for applications requiring more than a few tens of phase control points. New phase control technologies are becoming available which offer control of many phase points with small low-cost devices. The goal of this project was to expand our wavefront control capabilities with improved modeling tools, new devices that reduce system cost and complexity, and extensions to high spatial and temporal frequencies using new adaptive optics technologies. In FY 99, the second year of

  1. Flash protection controller

    DOEpatents

    Galbraith, L.K.

    1979-12-07

    A controller provides a high voltage to maintain an electro-optic shutter in a transparent condition until a flash of light which would be harmful to personnel is sensed by a phototransistor. The controller then shorts the shutter to ground to minimize light transmission to the user and maintains light transmission at the pre-flash level for a predetermined time to allow the flash to subside. A log converter and differential trigger circuit keep the controller from being triggered by other light flashes which are not dangerous.

  2. Splines and control theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Zhimin; Tomlinson, John; Martin, Clyde

    1994-01-01

    In this work, the relationship between splines and the control theory has been analyzed. We show that spline functions can be constructed naturally from the control theory. By establishing a framework based on control theory, we provide a simple and systematic way to construct splines. We have constructed the traditional spline functions including the polynomial splines and the classical exponential spline. We have also discovered some new spline functions such as trigonometric splines and the combination of polynomial, exponential and trigonometric splines. The method proposed in this paper is easy to implement. Some numerical experiments are performed to investigate properties of different spline approximations.

  3. Radiological Control Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    This manual has been prepared by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements, and clarifications to the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is based on the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, DOE Order 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The topics covered are (1) excellence in radiological control, (2) radiological standards, (3) conduct of radiological work, (4) radioactive materials, (5) radiological health support operations, (6) training and qualification, and (7) radiological records.

  4. Infection prevention and control.

    PubMed

    Pegram, Anne; Bloomfield, Jacqueline

    2015-03-18

    All newly registered graduate nurses are required to have the appropriate knowledge and understanding to perform the skills required for patient care, specifically the competencies identified in the Nursing and Midwifery Council's essential skills clusters. This article focuses on the third essential skills cluster - infection prevention and control. It provides an overview and discussion of the key skills and behaviours that must be demonstrated to meet the standards set by the Nursing and Midwifery Council. In doing so, it considers the key principles of infection prevention and control, including local and national policies, standard infection control precautions, risk assessment, standard isolation measures and asepsis.

  5. Optimized joystick controller.

    PubMed

    Ding, D; Cooper, R A; Spaeth, D

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to develop an optimized joystick control interface for electric powered wheelchairs and thus provide safe and effective control of electric powered wheelchairs to people with severe physical disabilities. The interface enables clinicians to tune joystick parameters for each individual subject through selecting templates, dead zones, and bias axes. In terms of hand tremor usually associated with people with traumatic brain injury, cerebral palsy, and multiple sclerosis, fuzzy logic rules were applied to suppress erratic hand movements and extract the intended motion from the joystick. Simulation results were presented to show the graphical tuning interface as well as the performance of the fuzzy logic controller.

  6. Cockpit control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesnewski, David; Snow, Russ M.; Paufler, Dave; Schnieder, George; Athousake, Roxanne; Combs, Lisa

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to provide a detail design for the cockpit control system of the Viper PFT. The statement of work for this project requires provisions for control of the ailerons, elevator, rudder, and elevator trim. The system should provide adjustment for pilot stature, rigging, and maintenance. MIL-STD-1472 is used as a model for human factors criterion. The system is designed to the pilot limit loading outlined in FAR part 23.397. The general philosophy behind this design is to provide a simple, reliable control system which will withstand the daily abuse that is experienced in the training environment without excessive cost or weight penalties.

  7. Asthma Triggers: Gain Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Page Additional resources An Introduction to Indoor Air Quality: Biological Pollutants Help Your Child Gain Control Over ... exhaust, smoke, road dust and factory emissions. Outdoor air quality is also affected by pollen from plants, crops ...

  8. Digital numerically controlled oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cellier, A.; Huey, D. C.; Ma, L. N. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    The frequency and phase of an output signal from an oscillator circuit are controlled with accuracy by a digital input word. Positive and negative alterations in output frequency are both provided for by translating all values of input words so that they are positive. The oscillator reference frequency is corrected only in one direction, by adding phase to the output frequency of the oscillator. The input control word is translated to a single algebraic sign and the digital 1 is added thereto. The translated input control word is then accumulated. A reference clock signal having a frequency at an integer multiple of the desired frequency of the output signal is generated. The accumulated control word is then compared with a threshold level. The output signal is adjusted in a single direction by dividing the frequency of the reference clock signal by a first integer or by an integer different from the first integer.

  9. Engineering of metabolic control

    DOEpatents

    Liao, James C.

    2004-03-16

    The invention features a method of producing heterologous molecules in cells under the regulatory control of a metabolite and metabolic flux. The method can enhance the synthesis of heterologous polypeptides and metabolites.

  10. Engineering of metabolic control

    DOEpatents

    Liao, James C.

    2006-10-17

    The invention features a method of producing heterologous molecules in cells under the regulatory control of a metabolite and metabolic flux. The method can enhance the synthesis of heterologous polypeptides and metabolites.

  11. Odor Control Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turk, Amos; And Others

    1972-01-01

    Dispersion, chemical oxidation, and masking are reviewed as techniques primarily employed for odor control. Devices and systems, costs, and problems of measurement are considered in light of environmental agencies' efforts to curb smelly emissions. (BL)

  12. Controlling Cholesterol with Statins

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Controlling Cholesterol with Statins Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... not, the following tips can help keep your cholesterol in check: Talk with your healthcare provider about ...

  13. Riot Control Agents

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC.gov . Specific Hazards Bioterrorism A-Z Anthrax (Bacillus anthracis) Arenaviruses Treatment & Infection Control Specimen Submission & Lab Testing Education & Training Related Bioterrorism Resources Bacillus anthracis (Anthrax) Botulism (Clostridium botulinum toxin) Brucella species ( ...

  14. Monitoring by Control Technique

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Stationary source emissions monitoring is required to demonstrate that a source is meeting the requirements in Federal or state rules. This page links to different control techniques used to reduce pollutant emissions.

  15. CHLORINATED SOLVENT PLUME CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This lecture will cover recent success in controlling and assessing the treatment of shallow ground water plumes of chlorinated solvents, other halogenated organic compounds, and methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE).

  16. Uncertainty and Cognitive Control

    PubMed Central

    Mushtaq, Faisal; Bland, Amy R.; Schaefer, Alexandre

    2011-01-01

    A growing trend of neuroimaging, behavioral, and computational research has investigated the topic of outcome uncertainty in decision-making. Although evidence to date indicates that humans are very effective in learning to adapt to uncertain situations, the nature of the specific cognitive processes involved in the adaptation to uncertainty are still a matter of debate. In this article, we reviewed evidence suggesting that cognitive control processes are at the heart of uncertainty in decision-making contexts. Available evidence suggests that: (1) There is a strong conceptual overlap between the constructs of uncertainty and cognitive control; (2) There is a remarkable overlap between the neural networks associated with uncertainty and the brain networks subserving cognitive control; (3) The perception and estimation of uncertainty might play a key role in monitoring processes and the evaluation of the “need for control”; (4) Potential interactions between uncertainty and cognitive control might play a significant role in several affective disorders. PMID:22007181

  17. Odor control in lagoons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X L; Yan, S; Tyagi, R D; Surampalli, R Y

    2013-07-30

    Lagoons are widely used in rural area for wastewater treatment; however, the odor problem has hampered its application. The root of odor emission from lagoons varies from one to another. The key of controlling the odor is to find out the cause and accordingly provide strategies. Various physical, chemical, and biological methods have been reported and applied for odor control. Physical technologies such as masking, capturing and sorption are often employed to mitigate the pressure from compliant while not to cut off the problem. Chemical technologies which act rapidly and efficiently in odor control, utilize chemicals to damage the odorant production root or convert odorant to odorless substances. Biological methods such as aeration, biocover and biofiltration control the odor by enhancing aerobic condition or developing methanogens in lagoon, and biologically decomposing the odorants. Comparing to physical and chemical methods, biological methods are more feasible.

  18. ELECTRONIC PHASE CONTROL CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Salisbury, J.D.; Klein, W.W.; Hansen, C.F.

    1959-04-21

    An electronic circuit is described for controlling the phase of radio frequency energy applied to a multicavity linear accelerator. In one application of the circuit two cavities are excited from a single radio frequency source, with one cavity directly coupled to the source and the other cavity coupled through a delay line of special construction. A phase detector provides a bipolar d-c output signal proportional to the difference in phase between the voltage in the two cavities. This d-c signal controls a bias supply which provides a d-c output for varying the capacitnce of voltage sensitive capacitors in the delay line. The over-all operation of the circuit is completely electronic, overcoming the time response limitations of the electromechanical control systems, and the relative phase relationship of the radio frequency voltages in the two caviiies is continuously controlled to effect particle acceleration.

  19. JPL Contamination Control Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakkolb, Brian

    2013-01-01

    JPL has extensive expertise fielding contamination sensitive missions-in house and with our NASA/industry/academic partners.t Development and implementation of performance-driven cleanliness requirements for a wide range missions and payloads - UV-Vis-IR: GALEX, Dawn, Juno, WFPC-II, AIRS, TES, et al - Propulsion, thermal control, robotic sample acquisition systems. Contamination control engineering across the mission life cycle: - System and payload requirements derivation, analysis, and contamination control implementation plans - Hardware Design, Risk trades, Requirements V-V - Assembly, Integration & Test planning and implementation - Launch site operations and launch vehicle/payload integration - Flight ops center dot Personnel on staff have expertise with space materials development and flight experiments. JPL has capabilities and expertise to successfully address contamination issues presented by space and habitable environments. JPL has extensive experience fielding and managing contamination sensitive missions. Excellent working relationship with the aerospace contamination control engineering community/.

  20. NEWS: Feeling in control?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-05-01

    Windmill Graphics simulation software has been developed to help explain control technology to students. The software allows an engineering process such as might be found in the oil or gas industry to be controlled from a PC through simulations of closing drain valves, filling tanks, starting heating operations etc. Other tasks include using level control systems with digital sensors, temperature control with digital and analogue sensors and monitoring systems plus datalogging. The kit was funded by the Scottish Higher Still Development Unit and it has been distributed to all secondary schools, further education colleges and teacher training institutes in Scotland. It will also in turn be distributed to all schools in England, but in the meantime free copies can be downloaded from: www.windmill.co.uk/wmldemo.html

  1. Controlled Cardiac Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chenglin; Liu, Ying; Wang, Ge

    2006-01-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CT) has been a hot topic for years because of the clinical importance of cardiac diseases and the rapid evolution of CT systems. In this paper, we propose a novel strategy for controlled cardiac CT that may effectively reduce image artifacts due to cardiac and respiratory motions. Our approach is radically different from existing ones and is based on controlling the X-ray source rotation velocity and powering status in reference to the cardiac motion. We theoretically show that by such a control-based intervention the data acquisition process can be optimized for cardiac CT in the cases of periodic and quasiperiodic cardiac motions. Specifically, we formulate the corresponding coordination/control schemes for either exact or approximate matches between the ideal and actual source positions, and report representative simulation results that support our analytic findings. PMID:23165017

  2. Active control of convection

    SciTech Connect

    Bau, H.H.

    1995-12-31

    Using stability theory, numerical simulations, and in some instances experiments, it is demonstrated that the critical Rayleigh number for the bifurcation (1) from the no-motion (conduction) state to the motion state and (2) from time-independent convection to time-dependent, oscillatory convection in the thermal convection loop and Rayleigh-Benard problems can be significantly increased or decreased. This is accomplished through the use of a feedback controller effectuating small perturbations in the boundary data. The controller consists of sensors which detect deviations in the fluid`s temperature from the motionless, conductive values and then direct actuators to respond to these deviations in such a way as to suppress the naturally occurring flow instabilities. Actuators which modify the boundary`s temperature/heat flux are considered. The feedback controller can also be used to control flow patterns and generate complex dynamic behavior at relatively low Rayleigh numbers.

  3. Vapor Control Layer Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    2009-09-08

    This information sheet describes the level of vapor control required on the interior side of framed walls with typical fibrous cavity insulation (fibreglass, rockwool, or cellulose, based on DOE climate zone of construction.

  4. Computer controlled antenna system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raumann, N. A.

    1972-01-01

    Digital techniques are discussed for application to the servo and control systems of large antennas. The tracking loop for an antenna at a STADAN tracking site is illustrated. The augmentation mode is also considered.

  5. Advances in infection control

    PubMed Central

    Marra, Alexandre Rodrigues

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Several initiatives took place in recent years in relation to nosocomial infection control in order to increase patient safety. Some of these initiatives will be commented in this brief review. PMID:27074240

  6. Cryogenic Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Goloborod'ko, S.; /Fermilab

    1989-02-27

    The control system (CS) for the cryogenic arrangement of the DO Liquid Argon Calorimeter consists of a Texas instruments 560/565 Programmable Logical Controller (PLC), two remote bases with Remote Base Controllers and a corresponding set of input/output (I/O) modules, and a PC AST Premium 286 (IBM AT Compatible). The PLC scans a set of inputs and provides a set of outputs based on a ladder logic program and PID control loops. The inputs are logic or analog (current, voltage) signals from equipment status switches or transducers. The outputs are logic or analog (current or voltage) signals for switching solenoids and positioning pneumatic actuators. Programming of the PLC is preformed by using the TISOFT2/560/565 package, which is installed in the PC. The PC communicates to the PLC through a serial RS232 port and provides operator interface to the cryogenic process using Xpresslink software.

  7. Birth control pills - combination

    MedlinePlus

    The pill - combination; Oral contraceptives - combination; OCP - combination; Contraception - combination; BCP - combination ... Birth control pills help keep you from getting pregnant. When taken daily, they are one of the most ...

  8. Linear Hereditary Control Systems,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Relationships between external and internal models for systems with time lags are discussed. The use of various canonical forms for the models in solving optimal control problems is considered. (Author)

  9. Surface Enhanced Quantum Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangan, Chitra

    2013-05-01

    Miniaturization of quantum technologies have led to physics that require the marriage of atomic physics and nanomaterials science. Some of the resulting areas of research are hybrid quantum devices, single-molecule spectroscopies, table-top intense field generators, etc. I will present an area of research that I dub ``Surface-enhanced quantum control'' that is an exciting way of controlling light and nanomatter. By combining the electromagnetic enhancement properties of plasmonic nanomaterials with the modification of the atomic properties, we can achieve an unprecedented level of control over quantum dynamics. I will present examples of surface-enhanced state purification, in which quantum states near metal nanostructures can be rapidly purified by the application of a weak near-resonant control field. We gratefully acknowledge support from the NSERC Discovery Grant Program and the NSERC Strategic Network for Bioplasmonic Systems.

  10. Ferroelectric Light Control Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); Choi, Sang H. (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Kim, Jae-Woo (Inventor); Elliott, Jr., James R. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A light control device is formed by ferroelectric material and N electrodes positioned adjacent thereto to define an N-sided regular polygonal region or circular region there between where N is a multiple of four.

  11. Cairo: repackaging population control.

    PubMed

    Simons, H

    1995-01-01

    Aid agencies, charities, and other nongovernmental organizations once denounced population control programs as racist interference in the third world. Yet, at the United Nations Conference on Population and Development in Cairo last September, these same organizations endorsed very similar ideas. The U.N. can now claim that even its fiercest critics not only have muted their criticism of population control programs but now positively endorse them. Over the last 30 years, population control has been consciously repackaged by the U.S. establishment. The image of population control has changed from being overtly anti-third world to being about giving the people of the third world--especially women--basic rights in family planning. Wrapped up in the language of women's empowerment and environmentalism, the establishment's old arguments about there being too many nonwhite babies in the world, have, unfortunately, won the day.

  12. Telerobot control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backes, Paul G. (Inventor); Tso, Kam S. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    This invention relates to an operator interface for controlling a telerobot to perform tasks in a poorly modeled environment and/or within unplanned scenarios. The telerobot control system includes a remote robot manipulator linked to an operator interface. The operator interface includes a setup terminal, simulation terminal, and execution terminal for the control of the graphics simulator and local robot actuator as well as the remote robot actuator. These terminals may be combined in a single terminal. Complex tasks are developed from sequential combinations of parameterized task primitives and recorded teleoperations, and are tested by execution on a graphics simulator and/or local robot actuator, together with adjustable time delays. The novel features of this invention include the shared and supervisory control of the remote robot manipulator via operator interface by pretested complex tasks sequences based on sequences of parameterized task primitives combined with further teleoperation and run-time binding of parameters based on task context.

  13. Insecticides and Biological Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furness, G. O.

    1972-01-01

    Use of insecticides has been questioned due to their harmful effects on edible items. Biological control of insects along with other effective practices for checking spread of parasites on crops are discussed. (PS)

  14. Technologies for Legionella Control

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation includes a review of new Office of Water document entitled "Technologies for Legionella Control in Premise Plumbing Systems", and discussion on ORD research projects involving Legionella and disinfection.

  15. Tight Diabetes Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... Size: A A A Listen En Español Tight Diabetes Control Keeping your blood glucose levels as close ... and syringes, than before. What About Type 2 Diabetes? The DCCT studied only people with type 1 ...

  16. Thermal control canister

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ollendorf, S. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    An apparatus for maintaining a heat dissipating load at a substantially constant temperature, and more particularly, to such an apparatus where in variable conductance heat pipes control the radiating area of a radiator is described.

  17. Birth control after 1984.

    PubMed

    Djerassi, C

    1970-09-04

    1) Eric Blair (alias George Orwell) can rest easy in his grave, because birth control by governmentally imposed methods, such as incorporation of a contraceptive agent into drinking water, is totally unfeasible by 1984. 2) Fundamentally new birth control procedures in the female (for example, a once-a-month luteolytic or abortifacient agent) and a male contraceptive pill probably will not be developed until the 1980's at the earliest, and then only if major steps of the type outlined in this article are instituted in the early 1970's. Development during the next decade of practical new methods of birth control without important incentives for continued active participation by the pharmaceutical industry is highly unlikely. If none are developed, birth control in 1984 will not differ significantly from that of today.

  18. Soviet Mission Control Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This photo is an overall view of the Mission Control Center in Korolev, Russia during the Expedition Seven mission. The Expedition Seven crew launched aboard a Soyez spacecraft on April 26, 2003. Photo credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls

  19. Control system testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittler, W. H.; Collart, R. E.

    1984-08-01

    A three stage process of ground testing of the Space Telescope Pointing Control System is used for verification prior to on-orbit operation. First, development tests are conducted in a laboratory environment using flight/engineering model control sensor and actuators configured with an engineering model of the flight computer and data management system breadboards. These development tests validate the results of computer simulations predicting control system performance. Integration tests bring together flight system elements and software interfaced to a software simulation of vehicle dynamics to confirm closed loop performance. The final ground test phase, flight systems testing, is conducted on the fully assembled Space Telescope, verifies interfaces with the Fine Guidance Sensors and includes a thermal vacuum testing period. During the final test phase, the Point Control System is exercised with the dynamics simulator running in real time.

  20. Solid state power controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbs, R. S.

    1973-01-01

    The rationale, analysis, design, breadboarding and testing of the incremental functional requirements are reported that led to the development of prototype 1 and 5 Amp dc and 1 Amp ac solid state power controllers (SSPC's). The SSPC's are to be considered for use as a replacement of electro-mechanical relays and circuit breakers in future spacecraft and aircraft. They satisfy the combined function of both the relay and circuit breaker and can be remotely controlled by small signals, typically 10 mA, 5 to 28 Vdc. They have the advantage over conventional relay/circuit breaker systems in that they can be located near utilization equipment and the primary ac or dc bus. The low level control, trip indication and status signals can be circuited by small guage wire for control, computer interface, logic, electrical multiplexing, unboard testing, and power management and distribution purposes. This results in increased system versatility at appreciable weight saving and increased reliability.

  1. Model-free control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fliess, Michel; Join, Cédric

    2013-12-01

    'Model-free control'and the corresponding 'intelligent' PID controllers (iPIDs), which already had many successful concrete applications, are presented here for the first time in an unified manner, where the new advances are taken into account. The basics of model-free control is now employing some old functional analysis and some elementary differential algebra. The estimation techniques become quite straightforward via a recent online parameter identification approach. The importance of iPIs and especially of iPs is deduced from the presence of friction. The strange industrial ubiquity of classic PIDs and the great difficulty for tuning them in complex situations is deduced, via an elementary sampling, from their connections with iPIDs. Several numerical simulations are presented which include some infinite-dimensional systems. They demonstrate not only the power of our intelligent controllers but also the great simplicity for tuning them.

  2. Advances in Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, David L.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Advances in electronics and computer science have enabled industries (pulp/paper, iron/steel, petroleum/chemical) to attain better control of their processes with resulting increases in quality, productivity, profitability, and compliance with government regulations. (JN)

  3. Mission Control Roses

    NASA Video Gallery

    The 110th bouquet of roses arrived in Mission Control on Saturday, July 9, 2011. They were sent as quietly as they have been for more than 23 years by a family near Dallas, Texas. For 110 shuttle m...

  4. Robust Adaptive Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narendra, K. S.; Annaswamy, A. M.

    1985-01-01

    Several concepts and results in robust adaptive control are are discussed and is organized in three parts. The first part surveys existing algorithms. Different formulations of the problem and theoretical solutions that have been suggested are reviewed here. The second part contains new results related to the role of persistent excitation in robust adaptive systems and the use of hybrid control to improve robustness. In the third part promising new areas for future research are suggested which combine different approaches currently known.

  5. Neural Architectures for Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, James K.

    1991-01-01

    The cerebellar model articulated controller (CMAC) neural architectures are shown to be viable for the purposes of real-time learning and control. Software tools for the exploration of CMAC performance are developed for three hardware platforms, the MacIntosh, the IBM PC, and the SUN workstation. All algorithm development was done using the C programming language. These software tools were then used to implement an adaptive critic neuro-control design that learns in real-time how to back up a trailer truck. The truck backer-upper experiment is a standard performance measure in the neural network literature, but previously the training of the controllers was done off-line. With the CMAC neural architectures, it was possible to train the neuro-controllers on-line in real-time on a MS-DOS PC 386. CMAC neural architectures are also used in conjunction with a hierarchical planning approach to find collision-free paths over 2-D analog valued obstacle fields. The method constructs a coarse resolution version of the original problem and then finds the corresponding coarse optimal path using multipass dynamic programming. CMAC artificial neural architectures are used to estimate the analog transition costs that dynamic programming requires. The CMAC architectures are trained in real-time for each obstacle field presented. The coarse optimal path is then used as a baseline for the construction of a fine scale optimal path through the original obstacle array. These results are a very good indication of the potential power of the neural architectures in control design. In order to reach as wide an audience as possible, we have run a seminar on neuro-control that has met once per week since 20 May 1991. This seminar has thoroughly discussed the CMAC architecture, relevant portions of classical control, back propagation through time, and adaptive critic designs.

  6. Supercavitating Vehicle Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-10

    herein as winglets , are supported by a strut attached to the vehicle. The angle of attack of each winglet is controlled by a winglet actuator. The... winglet assembly may be extended into or retracted from the water by means of a spring-loaded actuated mount, which pivots the strut supporting the... winglet . When fully retracted, the winglet assembly is contained completely within the cavity. [0014] The segmented ring wing is controlled by one or more

  7. Understanding Command and Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    and Control are fractal concepts. They can be applied to all subsets of an enterprise; to the functions performed; to the levels of the organizations...to the focus of the activity, whether strategic or tactical. Membership in these fractals may overlap with individual entities and groups...belonging to multiple fractals dynamically. • Different Command and Control Approaches will be appropriate for different sets of purposes or circumstances

  8. JPRS Report, Arms Control.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    automated control systems, computerized complexes, high-speed computers capable of millions of operations a second and having a formidable memory; we have...be, since we do not yet know the number of tranports : how many lorries and what type. [Reporter] Will the Polish side have any control whatso... technology to Iraq when the Gulf crisis erupted. After stating that Brazil has no chemical weapons, Rezek justified the agreement. Rezek said: It is

  9. Test Control Center exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Have you ever wondered how the engineers at John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., test fire a Space Shuttle Main Engine? The Test Control Center exhibit at StenniSphere can answer your questions by simulating the test firing of a Space Shuttle Main Engine. A recreation of one of NASA's test control centers, the exhibit explains and portrays the 'shake, rattle and roar' that happens during a real test firing.

  10. Drone Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Drones, subscale vehicles like the Firebees, and full scale retired military aircraft are used to test air defense missile systems. The DFCS (Drone Formation Control System) computer, developed by IBM (International Business Machines) Federal Systems Division, can track ten drones at once. A program called ORACLS is used to generate software to track and control Drones. It was originally developed by Langley and supplied by COSMIC (Computer Software Management and Information Center). The program saved the company both time and money.

  11. GPS Control Segment Improvements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-29

    Systems Center GPS Control Segment Improvements Mr. Tim McIntyre GPS Product Support Manager GPS Ops Support and Sustainment Division Peterson...hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and...DATE 29 APR 2015 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE GPS Control Segment Improvements 5a. CONTRACT

  12. TACS Central Control Facility.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-12

    Central Control Facility 6 3. System Management Data Flow 7 B. Hardware Operating Environment 9 1. Computer 9 2. TACS Interfaces 9 3. Other Central...TERMINATION TIMING 131 Appendix C SYSTEM MANAGEMENT DATA FORMATS 135 Appendix D FIVE- AND NINE-SLOT SYSTEM IMPLEMENTATION DIFFERENCES 147 Appendix E...control burst management ) 26 2-7 Call Progress Messages 29 2-8 Flowchart of Assignment/Blockage Decision Process for All-Member Net Requests 30 2-9

  13. GPS Control Segment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-29

    AND MISSILE SYSTEMS CENTER • Provides GPS Ill SV command and control • NAV capability equivalent to GPS IIF (legacy and modern signals) - No L 1 ...Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions...information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number 1 . REPORT DATE 29 APR 2015 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00

  14. Digital flight control research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, J. E.; Stern, R. G.; Smith, T. B.; Sinha, P.

    1974-01-01

    The results of studies which were undertaken to contribute to the design of digital flight control systems, particularly for transport aircraft are presented. In addition to the overall design considerations for a digital flight control system, the following topics are discussed in detail: (1) aircraft attitude reference system design, (2) the digital computer configuration, (3) the design of a typical digital autopilot for transport aircraft, and (4) a hybrid flight simulator.

  15. Adaptive and Nonlinear Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-29

    in [22], we also applied the concept of zero dynamics to the problem of exact linearization of a nonlinear control system by dynamic feedback. Exact ...nonlinear systems, although it was well-known that the conditions for exact linearization are very stringent and consequently do not apply to a broad...29th IEEE Conference n Decision and Control, Invited Paper delivered by Dr. Gilliam. Exact Linearization of Zero Dynamics, 29th IEEE Conference on

  16. Flight Trajectory Control Investigation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    control algorithms for four-dimensional guidance of a transport air- craft were investigated for feasibility. Cost function constraints on the ptimal...21 3.1.6 Solution Constraints .... ............. ... 25 3.1.7 Trajectory Generator Review .. ......... .. 25 3.2 OPTIMAl CONTROLLER ALGORITHM...value formulation to a six-degree-of-freedom point mass aircraft with all the structural, maneuver, and mission constraints accounted for by using pelalty

  17. Thoracic damage control surgery.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Roberto; Saad, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The damage control surgery came up with the philosophy of applying essential maneuvers to control bleeding and abdominal contamination in trauma patients who are within the limits of their physiological reserves. This concept was extended to thoracic injuries, where relatively simple maneuvers can shorten operative time of in extremis patients. This article aims to revise the various damage control techniques in thoracic organs that must be known to the surgeon engaged in emergency care. RESUMO A cirurgia de controle de danos surgiu com a filosofia de se aplicar manobras essenciais para controle de sangramento e contaminação abdominal, em doentes traumatizados, nos limites de suas reservas fisiológicas. Este conceito se estendeu para as lesões torácicas, onde manobras relativamente simples, podem abreviar o tempo operatório de doentes in extremis. Este artigo tem como objetivo, revisar as diversas técnicas de controle de dano em órgãos torácicos, que devem ser de conhecimento do cirurgião que atua na emergência.

  18. Failure of chaos control

    PubMed

    van De Water W; de Weger J

    2000-11-01

    We study the control of chaos in an experiment on a parametrically excited pendulum whose excitation mechanism is not perfect. This imperfection leads to a weakly excited degree of freedom with an associated small eigenvalue. Although the state of the pendulum could be characterized well and although the perturbation is weak, we fail to control chaos. From a numerical model we learn that the small eigenvalue cannot be ignored when attempting control. However, the estimate of this eigenvalue from an (experimental) time series is elusive. The reason is that points in an experimental time series are distributed according to the natural measure. It is this extremely uneven distribution of points that thwarts attempts to measure eigenvalues that are very different. Another consequence of the phase-space distribution of points for control is the occurrence of logarithmic-oscillations in the waiting time before control can be attempted. We come to the conclusion that chaos needs to be destroyed before the information needed for its control can be obtained.

  19. Pit disassembly motion control

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, L.; Pittman, P. C.

    2001-01-01

    A Department of Energy (DOE) Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) is being designed for the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. The facility will recover plutonium from excess nuclear weapon pits defined in START II and START III treaties. The plutonium will be stored and used to produce mixed oxide reactor fuel at another new DOE facility. Because of radiation dose issues, much of the pit disassembly work and material transfer will be automated. Automated material handling systems will interface with disassembly lathes, conversion reactors that produce oxide for storage, robotic container welding stations, vault retrieval systems, and nondestructive assay (NDA) instrumentation. The goal is to use common motion control hardware for material transfer and possibly common motion controllers for the unique PDCF systems. The latter is complicated by the different directions manufactures are considering for distributed control, such as Firewire, SERCOS, etc., and by the unique control requirements of machines such as lathes compared to controls for an integrated NDA system. The current design approach is to standardize where possible, use network cables to replace wire bundles where possible, but to first select hardware and motion controllers that meet specific machine or process requirements.

  20. Integrated airframe propulsion control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fennell, R. E.; Black, S. B.

    1982-01-01

    Perturbation equations which describe flight dynamics and engine operation about a given operating point are combined to form an integrated aircraft/propulsion system model. Included in the model are the dependence of aerodynamic coefficients upon atmospheric variables along with the dependence of engine variables upon flight condition and inlet performance. An off-design engine performance model is used to identify interaction parameters in the model. Inclusion of subsystem interaction effects introduces coupling between flight and propulsion variables. To analyze interaction effects on control, consideration is first given to control requirements for separate flight and engine models. For the separate airframe model, feedback control provides substantial improvement in short period damping. For the integrated system, feedback control compensates for the coupling present in the model and provides good overall system stability. However, this feedback control law involves many non-zero gains. Analysis of suboptimal control strategies indicates that performance of the closed loop integrated system can be maintained with a feedback matrix in which the number of non-zero gains is small relative to the number of components in the feedback matrix.