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Sample records for microfabricated magnetic sifter

  1. Magnetic sifters and biochips for early diagnosis and therapy monitoring of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earhart, Chris

    2008-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles conjugated with biomolecules or recognition moieties are finding wide applications in medicine. In this context, we are developing a micromachined magnetic sifter and magnetic nanoparticles aimed for sample preparation applications in early diagnosis of cancer. The microfabricated sifter consisting of arrays of micron sized slits etched through a silicon wafer. A magnetic film is deposited on the wafer, producing high magnetic field gradients, comparable in magnitude to gradients in planar flow devices. As the solution flows through the die, magnetic particles are captured by the magnetic material surrounding the slits. The large number of slits allows for processing of large volumes of liquid, much greater than that of planar microfluidic devices. The sifters can be simply attached to a syringe or tube, resulting in a portable and user-friendly tool for molecular biology. Separation efficiencies of ˜ 50% for one pass through the sifter have been achieved. We have also designed and fabricated several types of magnetic biochips consisting of arrays of giant magnetoresistive (GMR) spin valve detectors with appropriate dimensions, surface chemistry, and microfluidics. An advanced electronic test station has been set up as a demonstration vehicle for the integrated evaluation of our magnetic biochips with commercial and custom magnetic nanoparticle labels for DNA or protein biomarkers. The magnetic biochip is capable of detecting down to 1-30 nanotags. Real-time detection of DNA signatures and protein targets in buffer and serum samples has been successfully performed in our laboratories, suggesting that magnetic biochips hold great promises for molecular diagnostics of cancer and other diseases. In collaboration with Chris M. Earhart, Wei Hu, Robert J. Wilson, Sebastian J. Osterfeld, Robert L. White, Nader Pourmand, and Shan X. Wang @ Stanford University. This work was supported by grants from NIH (1U54CA119367-01) and DARPA/Navy (N00014-02-1-0807).

  2. Isolation and mutational analysis of circulating tumor cells from lung cancer patients with magnetic sifters and biochips†

    PubMed Central

    Earhart, Christopher M.; Hughes, Casey E.; Gaster, Richard S.; Ooi, Chin Chun; Wilson, Robert J.; Zhou, Lisa Y.; Humke, Eric W.; Xu, Lingyun; Wong, Dawson J.; Willingham, Stephen B.; Schwartz, Erich J.; Weissman, Irving L.; Jeffrey, Stefanie S.; Neal, Joel W.; Rohatgi, Rajat; Wakelee, Heather A.; Wang, Shan X.

    2014-01-01

    Detection and characterization of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) may reveal insights into the diagnosis and treatment of malignant disease. Technologies for isolating CTCs developed thus far suffer from one or more limitations, such as low throughput, inability to release captured cells, and reliance on expensive instrumentation for enrichment or subsequent characterization. We report a continuing development of a magnetic separation device, the magnetic sifter, which is a miniature microfluidic chip with a dense array of magnetic pores. It offers high efficiency capture of tumor cells, labeled with magnetic nanoparticles, from whole blood with high throughput and efficient release of captured cells. For subsequent characterization of CTCs, an assay, using a protein chip with giant magnetoresistive nanosensors, has been implemented for mutational analysis of CTCs enriched with the magnetic sifter. The use of these magnetic technologies, which are separate devices, may lead the way to routine preparation and characterization of “liquid biopsies” from cancer patients. PMID:23969419

  3. Spin annihilations of and spin sifters for transverse electric and transverse magnetic waves in co- and counter-rotations

    PubMed Central

    Mok, Jinsik

    2014-01-01

    Summary This study is motivated in part to better understand multiplexing in wireless communications, which employs photons carrying varying angular momenta. In particular, we examine both transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) waves in either co-rotations or counter-rotations. To this goal, we analyze both Poynting-vector flows and orbital and spin parts of the energy flow density for the combined fields. Consequently, we find not only enhancements but also cancellations between the two modes. To our surprise, the photon spins in the azimuthal direction exhibit a complete annihilation for the counter-rotational case even if the intensities of the colliding waves are of different magnitudes. In contrast, the orbital flow density disappears only if the two intensities satisfy a certain ratio. In addition, the concepts of spin sifters and enantiomer sorting are illustrated. PMID:25383300

  4. Spin annihilations of and spin sifters for transverse electric and transverse magnetic waves in co- and counter-rotations.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyoung-In; Mok, Jinsik

    2014-01-01

    This study is motivated in part to better understand multiplexing in wireless communications, which employs photons carrying varying angular momenta. In particular, we examine both transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) waves in either co-rotations or counter-rotations. To this goal, we analyze both Poynting-vector flows and orbital and spin parts of the energy flow density for the combined fields. Consequently, we find not only enhancements but also cancellations between the two modes. To our surprise, the photon spins in the azimuthal direction exhibit a complete annihilation for the counter-rotational case even if the intensities of the colliding waves are of different magnitudes. In contrast, the orbital flow density disappears only if the two intensities satisfy a certain ratio. In addition, the concepts of spin sifters and enantiomer sorting are illustrated.

  5. Microfabricated Ion Beam Drivers for Magnetized Target Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persaud, Arun; Seidl, Peter; Ji, Qing; Ardanuc, Serhan; Miller, Joseph; Lal, Amit; Schenkel, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Efficient, low-cost drivers are important for Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF). Ion beams offer a high degree of control to deliver the required mega joules of driver energy for MTF and they can be matched to several types of magnetized fuel targets, including compact toroids and solid targets. We describe an ion beam driver approach based on the MEQALAC concept (Multiple Electrostatic Quadrupole Array Linear Accelerator) with many beamlets in an array of micro-fabricated channels. The channels consist of a lattice of electrostatic quadrupoles (ESQ) for focusing and of radio-frequency (RF) electrodes for ion acceleration. Simulations with particle-in-cell and beam envelope codes predict >10x higher current densities compared to state-of-the-art ion accelerators. This increase results from dividing the total ion beam current up into many beamlets to control space charge forces. Focusing elements can be biased taking advantage of high breakdown electric fields in sub-mm structures formed using MEMS techniques (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems). We will present results on ion beam transport and acceleration in MEMS based beamlets. Acknowledgments: This work is supported by the U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  6. Microfabricated magnetic structures for future medicine: from sensors to cell actuators

    PubMed Central

    Vitol, Elina A; Novosad, Valentyn; Rozhkova, Elena A

    2013-01-01

    In this review, we discuss the prospective medical application of magnetic carriers microfabricated by top-down techniques. Physical methods allow the fabrication of a variety of magnetic structures with tightly controlled magnetic properties and geometry, which makes them very attractive for a cost-efficient mass-production in the fast growing field of nanomedicine. Stand-alone fabricated particles along with integrated devices combining lithographically defined magnetic structures and synthesized magnetic tags will be considered. Applications of microfabricated multifunctional magnetic structures for future medicinal purposes range from ultrasensitive in vitro diagnostic bioassays, DNA sequencing and microfluidic cell sorting to magnetomechanical actuation, cargo delivery, contrast enhancement and heating therapy. PMID:23148542

  7. 7 CFR 58.224 - Sifters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT (CONTINUED) GRADING AND INSPECTION, GENERAL SPECIFICATIONS FOR APPROVED PLANTS AND STANDARDS FOR GRADES OF DAIRY PRODUCTS 1 General Specifications for Dairy... newly installed sifters used for dry milk and dry milk products shall comply with the 3-A...

  8. 7 CFR 58.224 - Sifters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Sifters. 58.224 Section 58.224 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE...

  9. Evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging issues for implantable microfabricated magnetic actuators.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyowon; Xu, Qing; Shellock, Frank G; Bergsneider, Marvin; Judy, Jack W

    2014-02-01

    The mechanical robustness of microfabricated torsional magnetic actuators in withstanding the strong static fields (7 T) and time-varying field gradients (17 T/m) produced by an MR system was studied in this investigation. The static and dynamic mechanical characteristics of 30 devices were quantitatively measured before and after exposure to both strong uniform and non-uniform magnetic fields. The results showed no statistically significant change in both the static and dynamic mechanical performance, which mitigate concerns about the mechanical stability of these devices in association with MR systems under the conditions used for this assessment. The MR-induced heating was also measured in a 3-T/128-MHz MR system. The results showed a minimal increase (1.6 °C) in temperature due to the presence of the magnetic microactuator array. Finally, the size of the MR-image artifacts created by the magnetic microdevices were quantified. The signal loss caused by the devices was approximately four times greater than the size of the device.

  10. Evaluation of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Issues for Implantable Microfabricated Magnetic Actuators

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyowon; Xu, Qing; Shellock, Frank G.; Bergsneider, Marvin; Judy, Jack W.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanical robustness of microfabricated torsional magnetic actuators in withstanding the strong static fields (7 T) and time-varying field gradients (17 T/m) produced by an MR system was studied in this investigation. The static and dynamic mechanical characteristics of 30 devices were quantitatively measured before and after exposure to both strong uniform and non-uniform magnetic fields. The results showed no statistically significant change in both the static and dynamic mechanical performance, which mitigate concerns about the mechanical stability of these devices in association with MR systems under the conditions used for this assessment. The MR-induced heating was also measured in a 3-T/128-MHz MR system. The results showed a minimal increase (1.6 °C) in temperature due to the presence of the magnetic microactuator array. Finally, the size of the MR-image artifacts created by the magnetic microdevices were quantified. The signal loss caused by the devices was approximately four times greater than the size of the device. PMID:24077662

  11. Development of Microfabricated Magnetic Actuators for Removing Cellular Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Selene A.; Lee, Hyowon; Pinney, James R; Khialeeva, Elvira; Bergsneider, Marvin; Judy, Jack W.

    2011-01-01

    Here we report on the development of torsional magnetic microactuators for displacing biological materials in implantable catheters. Static and dynamic behaviors of the devices were characterized in air and in fluid using optical experimental methods. The devices were capable of achieving large deflections (>60°) and had resonant frequencies that ranged from 70 Hz to 1.5 kHz in fluid. The effect of long-term actuation (>2.5 · 108 cycles) was quantified using resonant shift as the metric (Δf < 2%). Cell-clearing capabilities of the devices were evaluated by examining the effect of actuation on a layer of aggressively growing adherent cells. On average, actuated microdevices removed 37.4% of the adherent cell layer grown over the actuator surface. The effect of actuation time, deflection angle, and beam geometry were evaluated. The experimental results indicate that physical removal of adherent cells at the microscale is feasible using magnetic microactuation. PMID:21886945

  12. Microfabrication and characterization of magnetite-based magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Chando

    Magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) consisting of two magnetic layers separated by a thin insulating barrier have emerged as the major candidate for magnetic based information storage systems because of their relatively high tunneling magnetoresistance (MR). The magnitude of the MR is determined by the spin polarization of the magnetic layers. One of the most promising materials for MTJs is magnetite (Fe3O4), which has 100% spin polarization. In theory, the MR of Fe3O4-based MTJ should be large and inverse. However, to date most experimental results have shown a small, positive MR, especially when using an aluminum oxide barrier (AlOx). However, the origin of the sign and low magnitude of the MR for these tunnel junctions remains unclear. In this thesis, single phase Fe3O4 films and Fe 3O4-based MTJs (junction size: 2 x 2mum 2 ˜ 18 x 12mum) were fabricated with standard photolithography and characterized in terms of electrical, magnetic and microstructual properties. A reactive sputtering can produce high quality Fe3O4 films having smooth surface, which is confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and atomic force microscope (AFM). When a reactive sputtered Fe3O4 film was used as a top or bottom electrode for MTJs, the phase at the interface was not single phase Fe3O4. This is because the interface reaction, which can be written as: Fe3O4 + Al => Fe + AlOx (amorphous) , occurs. This causes the junctions to have poor transport. By using in situ oxidation of a thin Fe layer, it was possible to achieve a pure polycrystalline Fe3O4 interface with the AlOx barrier, resulting in an inverse MR. The results showed that the phases and quality of the interface adjacent to the AlOx barrier determine the sign and magnitude of the MR. To obtain inverse and large MR for an MTJ, pure and defect free Fe3O4 should exist at the interface adjacent to the AlOx barrier.

  13. SIFTER search: a web server for accurate phylogeny-based protein function prediction.

    PubMed

    Sahraeian, Sayed M; Luo, Kevin R; Brenner, Steven E

    2015-07-01

    We are awash in proteins discovered through high-throughput sequencing projects. As only a minuscule fraction of these have been experimentally characterized, computational methods are widely used for automated annotation. Here, we introduce a user-friendly web interface for accurate protein function prediction using the SIFTER algorithm. SIFTER is a state-of-the-art sequence-based gene molecular function prediction algorithm that uses a statistical model of function evolution to incorporate annotations throughout the phylogenetic tree. Due to the resources needed by the SIFTER algorithm, running SIFTER locally is not trivial for most users, especially for large-scale problems. The SIFTER web server thus provides access to precomputed predictions on 16 863 537 proteins from 232 403 species. Users can explore SIFTER predictions with queries for proteins, species, functions, and homologs of sequences not in the precomputed prediction set. The SIFTER web server is accessible at http://sifter.berkeley.edu/ and the source code can be downloaded.

  14. A microfabricated coil for implantable applications of magnetic spinal cord stimulation.

    PubMed

    Yu-Min Fu; Che-Yu Chen; Xin-Hong Qian; Yu-Ting Cheng; Chung-Yu Wu; Jui-Sheng Sun; Chien-Chun Huang; Chao-Kai Hu

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, a microfabricated inductive coil comprising of 125-turn coil windings and a MnZn-based magnetic core in a volume of 200 mm(3) is presented for the magnetic neural stimulation in a spinal cord. The coil winding with the parallel-linkage design instead of the typical serial-linkage one is proposed not only to provide better design flexibility to the current mode driving circuit but also to simplify the fabrication process of the 3-D inductive coil, which can further advance the coil miniaturization. Experimental results show the microcoil with a 1.5 A, 1 kHz square-wave current input can induce a voltages of ~220 μV on the conducting wire with an impedance of ~0.2 Ω @ 1 kHz, 1 mm separation. PMID:26737882

  15. A microfabricated magnetic force transducer-microaspiration system for studying membrane mechanics.

    PubMed

    Stark, D J; Killian, T C; Raphael, R M

    2011-10-01

    The application of forces to cell membranes is a powerful method for studying membrane mechanics. To apply controlled dynamic forces on the piconewton scale, we designed and characterized a microfabricated magnetic force transducer (MMFT) consisting of current-carrying gold wires patterned on a sapphire substrate. The experimentally measured forces applied to paramagnetic and ferromagnetic beads as a function of applied current agree well with theoretical models. We used this device to pull tethers from microaspirated giant unilamellar vesicles and measure the threshold force for tether formation. In addition, the interlayer drag coefficient of the membrane was determined from the tether-return velocity under magnetic force-free conditions. At high levels of current, vesicles expanded as a result of local temperature changes. A finite element thermal model of the MMFT provided absolute temperature calibration, allowing determination of the thermal expansivity coefficient of stearoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidycholine vesicles (1.7 ± 0.4 × 10(-3) K(-1)) and characterization of the Joule heating associated with current passing through the device. This effect can be used as a sensitive probe of temperature changes on the microscale. These studies establish the MMFT as an effective tool for applying precise forces to membranes at controlled rates and quantitatively studying membrane mechanical and thermo-mechanical properties. PMID:21896973

  16. SIFTER search: a web server for accurate phylogeny-based protein function prediction

    DOE PAGES

    Sahraeian, Sayed M.; Luo, Kevin R.; Brenner, Steven E.

    2015-05-15

    We are awash in proteins discovered through high-throughput sequencing projects. As only a minuscule fraction of these have been experimentally characterized, computational methods are widely used for automated annotation. Here, we introduce a user-friendly web interface for accurate protein function prediction using the SIFTER algorithm. SIFTER is a state-of-the-art sequence-based gene molecular function prediction algorithm that uses a statistical model of function evolution to incorporate annotations throughout the phylogenetic tree. Due to the resources needed by the SIFTER algorithm, running SIFTER locally is not trivial for most users, especially for large-scale problems. The SIFTER web server thus provides access tomore » precomputed predictions on 16 863 537 proteins from 232 403 species. Users can explore SIFTER predictions with queries for proteins, species, functions, and homologs of sequences not in the precomputed prediction set. Lastly, the SIFTER web server is accessible at http://sifter.berkeley.edu/ and the source code can be downloaded.« less

  17. SIFTER search: a web server for accurate phylogeny-based protein function prediction.

    PubMed

    Sahraeian, Sayed M; Luo, Kevin R; Brenner, Steven E

    2015-07-01

    We are awash in proteins discovered through high-throughput sequencing projects. As only a minuscule fraction of these have been experimentally characterized, computational methods are widely used for automated annotation. Here, we introduce a user-friendly web interface for accurate protein function prediction using the SIFTER algorithm. SIFTER is a state-of-the-art sequence-based gene molecular function prediction algorithm that uses a statistical model of function evolution to incorporate annotations throughout the phylogenetic tree. Due to the resources needed by the SIFTER algorithm, running SIFTER locally is not trivial for most users, especially for large-scale problems. The SIFTER web server thus provides access to precomputed predictions on 16 863 537 proteins from 232 403 species. Users can explore SIFTER predictions with queries for proteins, species, functions, and homologs of sequences not in the precomputed prediction set. The SIFTER web server is accessible at http://sifter.berkeley.edu/ and the source code can be downloaded. PMID:25979264

  18. SIFTER search: a web server for accurate phylogeny-based protein function prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Sahraeian, Sayed M.; Luo, Kevin R.; Brenner, Steven E.

    2015-05-15

    We are awash in proteins discovered through high-throughput sequencing projects. As only a minuscule fraction of these have been experimentally characterized, computational methods are widely used for automated annotation. Here, we introduce a user-friendly web interface for accurate protein function prediction using the SIFTER algorithm. SIFTER is a state-of-the-art sequence-based gene molecular function prediction algorithm that uses a statistical model of function evolution to incorporate annotations throughout the phylogenetic tree. Due to the resources needed by the SIFTER algorithm, running SIFTER locally is not trivial for most users, especially for large-scale problems. The SIFTER web server thus provides access to precomputed predictions on 16 863 537 proteins from 232 403 species. Users can explore SIFTER predictions with queries for proteins, species, functions, and homologs of sequences not in the precomputed prediction set. Lastly, the SIFTER web server is accessible at http://sifter.berkeley.edu/ and the source code can be downloaded.

  19. A microfabricated magnetic actuation device for mechanical conditioning of arrays of 3D microtissues.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fan; Zhao, Ruogang; Liu, Alan S; Metz, Tristin; Shi, Yu; Bose, Prasenjit; Reich, Daniel H

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes an approach to actuate magnetically arrays of microtissue constructs for long-term mechanical conditioning and subsequent biomechanical measurements. Each construct consists of cell/matrix material self-assembled around a pair of flexible poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) pillars. The deflection of the pillars reports the tissues' contractility. Magnetic stretching of individual microtissues via magnetic microspheres mounted on the cantilevers has been used to elucidate the tissues' elastic modulus and response to varying mechanical boundary conditions. This paper describes the fabrication of arrays of micromagnetic structures that can transduce an externally applied uniform magnetic field to actuate simultaneously multiple microtissues. These structures are fabricated on silicon-nitride coated Si wafers and contain electrodeposited Ni bars. Through-etched holes provide optical and culture media access when the devices are mounted on the PDMS microtissue scaffold devices. Both static and AC forces (up to 20 μN on each microtissue) at physiological frequencies are readily generated in external fields of 40 mT. Operation of the magnetic arrays was demonstrated via measurements of elastic modulus and dynamic stiffening in response to AC actuation of fibroblast populated collagen microtissues.

  20. Probing cellular traction forces with magnetic nanowires and microfabricated force sensor arrays.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Chia; Kramer, Corinne M; Chen, Christopher S; Reich, Daniel H

    2012-02-24

    In this paper, the use of magnetic nanowires for the study of cellular response to force is demonstrated. High-aspect ratio Ni rods with diameter 300 nm and lengths up to 20 μm were bound to or internalized by pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (SMCs) cultured on arrays of flexible micropost force sensors. Forces and torques were applied to the cells by driving the nanowires with AC magnetic fields in the frequency range 0.1-10 Hz, and the changes in cellular contractile forces were recorded with the microposts. These local stimulations yield global force reinforcement of the cells' traction forces, but this contractile reinforcement can be effectively suppressed upon addition of a calcium channel blocker, ruthenium red, suggesting the role of calcium channels in the mechanical response. The responsiveness of the SMCs to actuation depends on the frequency of the applied stimulation. These results show that the combination of magnetic nanoparticles and micropatterned, flexible substrates can provide new approaches to the study of cellular mechanotransduction.

  1. Probing cellular traction forces with magnetic nanowires and microfabricated force sensor arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi-Chia; Kramer, Corinne M.; Chen, Christopher S.; Reich, Daniel H.

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, the use of magnetic nanowires for the study of cellular response to force is demonstrated. High-aspect ratio Ni rods with diameter 300 nm and lengths up to 20 μm were bound to or internalized by pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (SMCs) cultured on arrays of flexible micropost force sensors. Forces and torques were applied to the cells by driving the nanowires with AC magnetic fields in the frequency range 0.1-10 Hz, and the changes in cellular contractile forces were recorded with the microposts. These local stimulations yield global force reinforcement of the cells’ traction forces, but this contractile reinforcement can be effectively suppressed upon addition of a calcium channel blocker, ruthenium red, suggesting the role of calcium channels in the mechanical response. The responsiveness of the SMCs to actuation depends on the frequency of the applied stimulation. These results show that the combination of magnetic nanoparticles and micropatterned, flexible substrates can provide new approaches to the study of cellular mechanotransduction.

  2. Microfabricated thermionic detector

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Patrick R; Manginell, Ronald P; Wheeler, David R; Trudell, Daniel E

    2012-10-30

    A microfabricated TID comprises a microhotplate and a thermionic source disposed on the microhotplate. The microfabricated TID can provide high sensitivity and selectivity to nitrogen- and phosphorous-containing compounds and other compounds containing electronegative function groups. The microfabricated TID can be microfabricated with semiconductor-based materials. The microfabricated TID can be combined with a microfabricated separation column and used in microanalytical system for the rapid on-site detection of pesticides, chemical warfare agents, explosives, pharmaceuticals, and other organic compounds that contain nitrogen or phosphorus.

  3. Micro-fabricated Helmholtz coil featuring disposable microfluidic sample inserts for applications in nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spengler, N.; Moazenzadeh, A.; Meier, R. Ch; Badilita, V.; Korvink, J. G.; Wallrabe, U.

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we report on a novel, multi-use, high-resolution NMR/MRI micro-detection probe for the screening of flat samples. It is based on a Helmholtz coil pair in the centre of the probe, built out of two 1.5 mm diameter wirebonded copper coils, resulting in a homogeneous distribution of the magnetic field. For liquids and suspensions, custom fabricated, disposable sample inserts are placed inside the pair and aligned automatically, preventing the sensor and the samples from contamination. The sensor was successfully tested in a 500 MHz (11.7 T) spectrometer where we achieved a linewidth of 1.79 Hz (3.58 ppb) of a water phantom. Nutation experiments revealed an overall B1-field uniformity of 92% (ratio in signal intensity at flip angles of 810°/90°), leading to a homogeneous excitation of concentration limited samples. To demonstrate the imaging capabilities of the detector, we acquired images of a solid and a liquid sample—of a piece of leaf, directly inserted into the probe and of a sample insert, filled with a suspension of 50 μm diameter polymer beads and deionized water, with in-plane resolutions of 20 × 20 μ m2 and 10 × 10 μ m2, respectively.

  4. Microfabricated Spin Polarized Atomic Magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez Martinez, Ricardo

    Spin polarized atomic magnetometers involve the preparation of atomic spins and their detection for monitoring magnetic fields. Due to the fact that magnetic fields are ubiquitous in our world, spin polarized atomic magnetometers are used in a wide range of applications from the detection of magnetic fields generated by the human heart and brain to the detection of nuclear magnetic resonance. In this thesis we developed microfabricated spin polarized atomic magnetometers. These sensors are based on optical pumping and spin-exchange collisions between alkali atoms and noble gases contained in microfabricated millimeter-scale vapor cells. In the first part of the thesis, we improved different features of current microfabricated optical magnetometers. Specifically, we improved the bandwidth of these devices, without degrading their magnetic field sensitivity, by broadening their magnetic resonance through spin-exchange collisions between alkali atoms. We also implemented all-optical excitation techniques to avoid problems, such as the magnetic perturbation of the environment, induced by the radio-frequency fields used in some of these sensors. In the second part of the thesis we demonstrated a microfluidic chip for the optical production and detection of hyperpolarized Xe gas through spin-exchange collisions with optically pumped Rb atoms. These devices are critical for the widespread use of spin polarized atomic magnetometers in applications requiring simple, compact, low-cost, and portable instrumentation.

  5. The CHAPS, SIFTER, and TAPS-R as Predictors of (C)AP Skills and (C)APD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Wayne J.; Jackson, Alison; Pender, Alice; Rose, Carla; Wilson, Jacqueline; Heine, Chyrisse; Khan, Asad

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors investigated the relationships between 3 tests used to screen for (central) auditory processing disorder ([C]APD)--the Children's Auditory Performance Scale (CHAPS; W. J. Smoski, M. A. Brunt, & J. C. Tannahill, 1998), the Screening Instrument for Targeting Educational Risk (SIFTER; K. Anderson, 1989), and the…

  6. Microfabricated teeter-totter resonator

    DOEpatents

    Adkins, Douglas Ray; Heller, Edwin J.; Shul, Randy J.

    2004-11-23

    A microfabricated teeter-totter resonator comprises a frame, a paddle pivotably anchored to the frame by pivot arms that define an axis of rotation, a current conductor line on a surface of the paddle, means for applying a static magnetic field substantially perpendicular to the rotational axis and in the plane of the paddle, and means for energizing the current conductor line with an alternating current. A Lorentz force is generated by the interaction of the magnetic field with the current flowing in the conductor line, causing the paddle to oscillate about the axis of rotation. The teeter-totter resonator can be fabricated with micromachining techniques with materials used in the integrated circuits manufacturing industry. The microfabricated teeter-totter resonator has many varied applications, both as an actuation device and as a sensor. When used as a chemical sensor, a chemically sensitive coating can be disposed on one or both surfaces of the paddle to enhance the absorption of chemical analytes from a fluid stream. The resulting mass change can be detected as a change in the resonant frequency or phase of the oscillatory motion of the paddle.

  7. Micro-Fabrication and Circuit Optimization for Magnetic Components of High-Efficiency DC-DC Converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Rui

    Magnetic components are essential parts of power converters. Inductors with magnetic cores are investigated. An eddy current loss model for pot-core inductors is developed with finite elemental analysis (FEA). The reliability of inductors using magnetic cores in a high-temperature environment is investigated. Working in up to 150°C circumstance for a short periods is not destructive for the inductors. Optimization of toroidal inductors in a DC-DC converter is investigated. Parasitic capacitance and the capacitive loss in toroidal inductors are modeled. Standard circuit optimization is performed to explore the energy conversion efficiency of the toroidal inductors. Thermal analysis, light-load efficiency and relative permeability of the toroidal inductor design are also investigated. The toroidal inductor can achieve about 85% efficiency for 3 A DC current and 1 W/mm2 power density. Inductor-only efficiency of toroidal inductors is investigated with revised model. At 100 MHz operating frequency, toroidal inductors can achieve more than 97% inductor efficiency with power density range of 0.7 W/mm2 to 6 W/mm2. The performance of our nanograngular magnetic core is dependent on the angle of the poling magnetic field compared to the field during operation. Experiments on a serious of samples show that the poling angle can deviate by up to 15 degrees from ideal with only a small penalty in performance. The field-angle experiment is intended to prove integrated toroidal inductor process possible. A magnetic fixture model is proposed for large-scale toroidal inductor processing.

  8. Microfabricated ion trap array

    DOEpatents

    Blain, Matthew G.; Fleming, James G.

    2006-12-26

    A microfabricated ion trap array, comprising a plurality of ion traps having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale ion traps to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microfabricated ion trap array with on-chip circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of the microfabricated ion trap array can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  9. Microfabricated AC impedance sensor

    DOEpatents

    Krulevitch, Peter; Ackler, Harold D.; Becker, Frederick; Boser, Bernhard E.; Eldredge, Adam B.; Fuller, Christopher K.; Gascoyne, Peter R. C.; Hamilton, Julie K.; Swierkowski, Stefan P.; Wang, Xiao-Bo

    2002-01-01

    A microfabricated instrument for detecting and identifying cells and other particles based on alternating current (AC) impedance measurements. The microfabricated AC impedance sensor includes two critical elements: 1) a microfluidic chip, preferably of glass substrates, having at least one microchannel therein and with electrodes patterned on both substrates, and 2) electrical circuits that connect to the electrodes on the microfluidic chip and detect signals associated with particles traveling down the microchannels. These circuits enable multiple AC impedance measurements of individual particles at high throughput rates with sufficient resolution to identify different particle and cell types as appropriate for environmental detection and clinical diagnostic applications.

  10. Microfabricated diffusion source

    DOEpatents

    Oborny, Michael C.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.; Manginell, Ronald P.

    2008-07-15

    A microfabricated diffusion source to provide for a controlled diffusion rate of a vapor comprises a porous reservoir formed in a substrate that can be filled with a liquid, a headspace cavity for evaporation of the vapor therein, a diffusion channel to provide a controlled diffusion of the vapor, and an outlet to release the vapor into a gas stream. The microfabricated diffusion source can provide a calibration standard for a microanalytical system. The microanalytical system with an integral diffusion source can be fabricated with microelectromechanical systems technologies.

  11. Microfabricated particle focusing device

    DOEpatents

    Ravula, Surendra K.; Arrington, Christian L.; Sigman, Jennifer K.; Branch, Darren W.; Brener, Igal; Clem, Paul G.; James, Conrad D.; Hill, Martyn; Boltryk, Rosemary June

    2013-04-23

    A microfabricated particle focusing device comprises an acoustic portion to preconcentrate particles over large spatial dimensions into particle streams and a dielectrophoretic portion for finer particle focusing into single-file columns. The device can be used for high throughput assays for which it is necessary to isolate and investigate small bundles of particles and single particles.

  12. Microfabricated bragg waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Hadley, G. Ronald

    2004-10-19

    A microfabricated Bragg waveguide of semiconductor-compatible material having a hollow core and a multilayer dielectric cladding can be fabricated by integrated circuit technologies. The microfabricated Bragg waveguide can comprise a hollow channel waveguide or a hollow fiber. The Bragg fiber can be fabricated by coating a sacrificial mandrel or mold with alternating layers of high- and low-refractive-index dielectric materials and then removing the mandrel or mold to leave a hollow tube with a multilayer dielectric cladding. The Bragg channel waveguide can be fabricated by forming a trench embedded in a substrate and coating the inner wall of the trench with a multilayer dielectric cladding. The thicknesses of the alternating layers can be selected to satisfy the condition for minimum radiation loss of the guided wave.

  13. Microfabricated integrated DNA analysis systems

    SciTech Connect

    Woolley, A.T.; Mathies, R.A.; Northrup, M.A.

    1996-12-31

    Microfabrication has the potential to revolutionize chemical analysis, from reactions to separations to molecular biotechnology. Microfabricated devices allow high speed separations, automated sample handling, and the study of reactions in the pl to {mu}l volume range. Our research has focused on microfabricated integrated DNA analysis systems (MIDAS). As a first step, we have demonstrated high-speed DNA restriction fragment sizing, and DNA sequencing on microfabricated capillary electrophoresis (CE) chips. We have recently coupled microfabricated PCR reactors and CE chips to make integrated DNA analysis devices. With these devices, rapid PCR can be performed and the reaction products immediately analyzed on the CE chip, eliminating the need for manual transfer of the amplified sample. PCR amplifications have been done in less than 16 minutes, followed by CE analysis in under 100 seconds. These PCR-CE chips represent an important step towards completely integrated sample manipulation on microfabricated devices.

  14. Microfabricated Formaldehyde Gas Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Flueckiger, Jonas; Ko, Frank K.; Cheung, Karen C.

    2009-01-01

    Formaldehyde is a volatile organic compound that is widely used in textiles, paper, wood composites, and household materials. Formaldehyde will continuously outgas from manufactured wood products such as furniture, with adverse health effects resulting from prolonged low-level exposure. New, microfabricated sensors for formaldehyde have been developed to meet the need for portable, low-power gas detection. This paper reviews recent work including silicon microhotplates for metal oxide-based detection, enzyme-based electrochemical sensors, and nanowire-based sensors. This paper also investigates the promise of polymer-based sensors for low-temperature, low-power operation. PMID:22291561

  15. Silicon microfabricated beam expander

    SciTech Connect

    Othman, A. Ibrahim, M. N.; Hamzah, I. H.; Sulaiman, A. A.; Ain, M. F.

    2015-03-30

    The feasibility design and development methods of silicon microfabricated beam expander are described. Silicon bulk micromachining fabrication technology is used in producing features of the structure. A high-precision complex 3-D shape of the expander can be formed by exploiting the predictable anisotropic wet etching characteristics of single-crystal silicon in aqueous Potassium-Hydroxide (KOH) solution. The beam-expander consist of two elements, a micromachined silicon reflector chamber and micro-Fresnel zone plate. The micro-Fresnel element is patterned using lithographic methods. The reflector chamber element has a depth of 40 µm, a diameter of 15 mm and gold-coated surfaces. The impact on the depth, diameter of the chamber and absorption for improved performance are discussed.

  16. Microfabricated triggered vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Roesler, Alexander W.; Schare, Joshua M.; Bunch, Kyle

    2010-05-11

    A microfabricated vacuum switch is disclosed which includes a substrate upon which an anode, cathode and trigger electrode are located. A cover is sealed over the substrate under vacuum to complete the vacuum switch. In some embodiments of the present invention, a metal cover can be used in place of the trigger electrode on the substrate. Materials used for the vacuum switch are compatible with high vacuum, relatively high temperature processing. These materials include molybdenum, niobium, copper, tungsten, aluminum and alloys thereof for the anode and cathode. Carbon in the form of graphitic carbon, a diamond-like material, or carbon nanotubes can be used in the trigger electrode. Channels can be optionally formed in the substrate to mitigate against surface breakdown.

  17. Microfabricated ion frequency standard

    DOEpatents

    Schwindt, Peter; Biedermann, Grant; Blain, Matthew G.; Stick, Daniel L.; Serkland, Darwin K.; Olsson, III, Roy H.

    2010-12-28

    A microfabricated ion frequency standard (i.e. an ion clock) is disclosed with a permanently-sealed vacuum package containing a source of ytterbium (Yb) ions and an octupole ion trap. The source of Yb ions is a micro-hotplate which generates Yb atoms which are then ionized by a ultraviolet light-emitting diode or a field-emission electron source. The octupole ion trap, which confines the Yb ions, is formed from suspended electrodes on a number of stacked-up substrates. A microwave source excites a ground-state transition frequency of the Yb ions, with a frequency-doubled vertical-external-cavity laser (VECSEL) then exciting the Yb ions up to an excited state to produce fluorescent light which is used to tune the microwave source to the ground-state transition frequency, with the microwave source providing a precise frequency output for the ion clock.

  18. Microfabricated therapeutic actuators

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Northrup, M. Allen; Ciarlo, Dino R.; Krulevitch, Peter A.; Benett, William J.

    1999-01-01

    Microfabricated therapeutic actuators are fabricated using a shape memory polymer (SMP), a polyurethane-based material that undergoes a phase transformation at a specified temperature (Tg). At a temperature above temperature Tg material is soft and can be easily reshaped into another configuration. As the temperature is lowered below temperature Tg the new shape is fixed and locked in as long as the material stays below temperature Tg. Upon reheating the material to a temperature above Tg, the material will return to its original shape. By the use of such SMP material, SMP microtubing can be used as a release actuator for the delivery of embolic coils through catheters into aneurysms, for example. The microtubing can be manufactured in various sizes and the phase change temperature Tg is determinate for an intended temperature target and intended use.

  19. Microfabricated therapeutic actuators

    DOEpatents

    Lee, A.P.; Northrup, M.A.; Ciarlo, D.R.; Krulevitch, P.A.; Benett, W.J.

    1999-06-15

    Microfabricated therapeutic actuators are fabricated using a shape memory polymer (SMP), a polyurethane-based material that undergoes a phase transformation at a specified temperature (Tg). At a temperature above temperature Tg material is soft and can be easily reshaped into another configuration. As the temperature is lowered below temperature Tg the new shape is fixed and locked in as long as the material stays below temperature Tg. Upon reheating the material to a temperature above Tg, the material will return to its original shape. By the use of such SMP material, SMP microtubing can be used as a release actuator for the delivery of embolic coils through catheters into aneurysms, for example. The microtubing can be manufactured in various sizes and the phase change temperature Tg is determinate for an intended temperature target and intended use. 8 figs.

  20. 3D microfabrication technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Esheng; FuTing, Yi; Tian, Yangchao; Liang, Jingqiu; Xian, Dingchang

    1998-08-01

    In the late of this century the great success of VSIC impacts into almost every fields of our social. Following this idea people starts to integrate microsensor microprocessor and microactuators into a small space to forming a Micro Electro and Mechanical System. Such small robot parts are applied to including satellites, computer communication, medical, chemical, biological and environment and so on research fields. The development of MEMS would strongly influence industrial revolution in the next century. LIGA technology including X-ray deep etching lithography; electroplating and plastic molding developed by Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center, Germany since the beginning of 1980. Its advantages are: it could make three-dimensional microstructures with lateral dimension in several micron range and thickness of several hundred microns with sub-micron precision. In principle all kinds of materials such as polymer, metal and ceramic could be used as microcomponents and could be mass- produced by plastic molding to a commercially available fabrication. LIGA process has become one of the most promising Microfabrication technologies for producing micromechanical, microfluid and micro-optical elements. It opens an additional field in the microstructure market.

  1. Implantation of microfabricated immunoisolating biocapsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Tejal A.; Chu, Wen Hwa; Ferrari, Mauro; Rasi, Guido; Sinibaldi-Vallebona, Paola; Borboni, Patrizia; Beattie, G.; Hayek, A.

    1998-03-01

    Silicon-based biocapsules have been microfabricated with uniform and well-controlled pore dimensions in the tens of nanometer range to provide effective immunoisolation of cell xenografts. Surface and bulk micromachining were integrated in the fabrication process, resulting in a diffusion membrane with mechanical and chemical stability, surrounded by an anisotropically-etched silicon wafer, which serves as the encapsulation cavity. The membrane allows the diffusion of essential nutrients while blocking the passage of immune molecules, which may destroy cellular transplants. Preliminary short term studies on both primary pancreatic islets and insulinoma cell lines encapsulated within microfabricated biocapsules were conducted to determine the toxicity and biocompatibility of biocapsules, the viability and functionality of encapsulated cells, as well as the overall immunoprotective capabilities of the biocapsule. Results seem to indicate that microfabricated biocapsules are non-toxic and do not elicit any adverse inflammatory reactions when implanted. Furthermore, encapsulated insulinoma cells remained viable and functional within microfabricated environments in vivo. These results show the feasibility and potential application of microfabricated biocapsules for several pathologies.

  2. Microfabricated Genomic Analysis System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve; Elms, Rene

    2005-01-01

    Genetic sequencing and many genetic tests and assays require electrophoretic separation of DNA. In this technique, DNA fragments are separated by size as they migrate through a sieving gel under the influence of an applied electric field. In order to conduct these analyses on-orbit, it is essential to acquire the capability to efficiently perform electrophoresis in a microgravity environment. Conventional bench top electrophoresis equipment is large and cumbersome and does not lead itself to on-orbit utilization. Much of the previous research regarding on-orbit electrophoresis involved altering conventional electrophoresis equipment for bioprocessing, purification, and/or separation technology applications. A new and more efficient approach to on-orbit electrophoresis is the use of a microfabricated electrophoresis platform. These platforms are much smaller, less expensive to produce and operate, use less power, require smaller sample sizes (nanoliters), and achieve separation in a much shorter distance (a few centimeters instead of 10 s or 100 s of centimeters.) In contrast to previous applications, this platform would be utilized as an analytical tool for life science/medical research, environmental monitoring, and medical diagnoses. Identification of infectious agents as well as radiation related damage are significant to NASA s efforts to maintain, study, and monitor crew health during and in support of near-Earth and interplanetary missions. The capability to perform genetic assays on-orbit is imperative to conduct relevant and insightful biological and medical research, as well as continuing NASA s search for life elsewhere. This technology would provide an essential analytical tool for research conducted in a microgravity environment (Shuttle, ISS, long duration/interplanetary missions.) In addition, this technology could serve as a critical and invaluable component of a biosentinel system to monitor space environment genotoxic insults to include radiation.

  3. Microfabrication using soft lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiao-Mei

    Soft Lithography is a group of non-photolithographic techniques currently being explored in our group. Four such techniques-microcontact printing (μCP), replica molding (REM), micromolding in capillaries (MIMIC), and microtransfer molding (μTM)-have been demonstrated for fabricating micro- and nanostructures of a variety of materials with dimension >=30 nm. Part I (Chapters 1-5) reviews several aspects of the three molding techniques REM, MIMIC, and μTM. Chapters 1-3 describe μTM and MIMIC, and the use of these techniques in the fabrication of functional devices. μTM is capable of generating μm-scale structures over large areas, on both planar and contoured surfaces, and is able to make 3-dimensional structures layer by layer. The capability of μTM and MIMIC has been demonstrated in the fabrication of single-mode waveguides, waveguide couplers and interferometers. The coupling between waveguides can be tailored by waveguide spacing or the differential in curing time between the waveguides and the cladding. Chapters 4-5 demonstrate the combination of REM and shrinkable polystyrene (PS) films to reduce the feature size of microstructures and to generate microstructures with high aspect ratios on both planar and curved surfaces. A shrinkable PS film is patterned with relief structures, and then heated and shrinks. Thermal shrinkage results in a 100-fold increase in the aspect ratio of the patterned microstructures in the PS film. The microstructures in the shrunken PS films can be transferred to many other materials by REM. Part II (Chapters 6-7) focuses on two issues in the microfabrication using self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) as ultrathin resists. Chapter 6 describes a selective etching solution for transferring patterns of SAMs of alkanethiolates into the underlying layers (e.g., gold, silver, and copper). This etching solution uses thiosulfate as the ligand that coordinates to the metal ions, and ferricyanide as the oxidant. It has been demonstrated to be

  4. Microfabricated Optically-Pumped Magnetometers for Biomagnetic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knappe, Svenja; Alem, Orang; Sheng, Dong; Kitching, John

    2016-06-01

    We report on the progress in developing microfabricated optically-pumped magnetometer arrays for imaging applications. We have improved our sensitivities by several orders of magnitude in the last ten years. Now, our zero-field magnetometers reach noise values below 15 fT/Hz1/2. Recently, we have also developed gradiometers to reject ambient magnetic field noise. We have built several imaging arrays and validated them for biomedical measurements of brain and heart activity.

  5. Infrared microthermography of microfabricated devices

    SciTech Connect

    Furstenberg, Robert; Kendziora, C. A.; Stepnowski, Stanley V.; McGill, R. Andrew

    2007-06-15

    We report a new experimental apparatus for infrared microthermography applicable to a wide class of samples including semitransparent ones and perforated devices. This setup is particularly well suited for the thermography of microfabricated devices. Traditionally, temperature calibration is performed using calibration hot plates, but this is not applicable to transmissive samples. In this work a custom designed miniature calibration oven in conjunction with spatial filtering is used to obtain accurate static and transient temperature maps of actively heated devices. The procedure does not require prior knowledge of the emissivity. Calibration and image processing algorithms are discussed and analyzed. We show that relatively inexpensive uncooled bolometer arrays can be a suitable detector choice in certain radiometric applications. As an example, we apply this method in the analysis of temperature profiles of an actively heated microfabricated preconcentrator device that incorporates a perforated membrane and is used in trace detection of illicit substances.

  6. Microfabricated injectable drug delivery system

    DOEpatents

    Krulevitch, Peter A.; Wang, Amy W.

    2002-01-01

    A microfabricated, fully integrated drug delivery system capable of secreting controlled dosages of multiple drugs over long periods of time (up to a year). The device includes a long and narrow shaped implant with a sharp leading edge for implantation under the skin of a human in a manner analogous to a sliver. The implant includes: 1) one or more micromachined, integrated, zero power, high and constant pressure generating osmotic engine; 2) low power addressable one-shot shape memory polymer (SMP) valves for switching on the osmotic engine, and for opening drug outlet ports; 3) microfabricated polymer pistons for isolating the pressure source from drug-filled microchannels; 4) multiple drug/multiple dosage capacity, and 5) anisotropically-etched, atomically-sharp silicon leading edge for penetrating the skin during implantation. The device includes an externally mounted controller for controlling on-board electronics which activates the SMP microvalves, etc. of the implant.

  7. Temperature programmable microfabricated gas chromatography column

    DOEpatents

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.

    2003-12-23

    A temperature programmable microfabricated gas chromatography column enables more efficient chemical separation of chemical analytes in a gas mixture by the integration of a resistive heating element and temperature sensing on the microfabricated column. Additionally, means are provided to thermally isolate the heated column from their surroundings. The small heat capacity and thermal isolation of the microfabricated column improves the thermal time response and power consumption, both important factors for portable microanalytical systems.

  8. Note: Detection of a single cobalt microparticle with a microfabricated atomic magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maser, D.; Pandey, S.; Ring, H.; Ledbetter, M. P.; Knappe, S.; Kitching, J.; Budker, D.

    2011-08-01

    We present magnetic detection of a single, 2 μ m diameter cobalt microparticle using an atomic magnetometer based on a microfabricated vapor cell. These results represent an improvement by a factor of 105 in terms of the detected magnetic moment over previous work using atomic magnetometers to detect magnetic microparticles. The improved sensitivity is due largely to the use of small vapor cells. In an optimized setup, we predict detection limits of 0.17 μ m^3.

  9. Microfabricated fuel heating value monitoring device

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, Alex L.; Manginell, Ronald P.; Moorman, Matthew W.

    2010-05-04

    A microfabricated fuel heating value monitoring device comprises a microfabricated gas chromatography column in combination with a catalytic microcalorimeter. The microcalorimeter can comprise a reference thermal conductivity sensor to provide diagnostics and surety. Using microfabrication techniques, the device can be manufactured in production quantities at a low per-unit cost. The microfabricated fuel heating value monitoring device enables continuous calorimetric determination of the heating value of natural gas with a 1 minute analysis time and 1.5 minute cycle time using air as a carrier gas. This device has applications in remote natural gas mining stations, pipeline switching and metering stations, turbine generators, and other industrial user sites. For gas pipelines, the device can improve gas quality during transfer and blending, and provide accurate financial accounting. For industrial end users, the device can provide continuous feedback of physical gas properties to improve combustion efficiency during use.

  10. Microfabricated electroactive carbon nanotube actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahluwalia, Arti; Baughman, Ray H.; De Rossi, Danilo; Mazzoldi, Alberto; Tesconi, Mario; Tognetti, Alessandro; Vozzi, Giovanni

    2001-07-01

    A variety of microfabrication techniques have been developed at the University of Pisa. They are based either on pressure or piston actuated microsyringes or modified ink-jet printers. This work present the results of a study aimed at fabricating carbon nanotube (NT) actuators using micro-syringes. In order to prevent the nanotubes from aggregating into clumps, they were enclosed in a partially cross-linked polyvinylalcohol - polyallylamine matrix. After sonication the solution remained homogenously dispersed for about 40 minutes, which was sufficient time for deposition. Small strips of NT, about 5 mm across and 15 mm long were deposited. Following deposition, the films were baked at 80 degree(s)C and their thickness, impedance and mechanical resistance measured. The results indicate that 50 minutes of baking time is sufficient to give a constant resistivity of 1.12 x 10-2 (Omega) m per layer similar to a typical semiconductor, and each layer has a thickness of about 6 micrometers .

  11. Advanced microfabrication technologies for microspacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghezzo, M.; Bagepalli, B.; Kodiyalam, S.; Korham, C.; Browall, K.; Alexander, Norman

    1993-06-01

    Advanced microfabrication technologies offer the prospect of reducing the weight and size of spacecraft through the use of lighter and stronger materials in conjunction with new mechanical/structural design concepts and design optimization methods. At the same time, electronic components have been scaled down while increasing functional utility. A two-fold benefit is derived for space applications through the use of less expensive components and the lower launch costs associated with lighter components. GE-CRD is actively pursuing research in these key technologies for a wide range of applications including satellites. These key technologies will be reviewed and an update on GE progress will be given. The need to reduce weight and lower cost, while maintaining product quality and reliability are primary drivers in the design of satellites, in general, and microsatellites in particular. For the structural subsystem, these requirements pose a complex design problem unless new mechanical design concepts and computer-aided design optimization methods are employed. Several new concepts, such as battery packs doubling as panel reinforcements and fuel tanks as integral structural members, need to utilized. In addition, new viscoelastic material damping concepts for spacecraft components provide for lighter weight/lower cost designs, while satisfying the structural dynamics requirements. High density interconnect (HDI) technology permits the use of bare IC's on a ceramic substrate with 90 percent active area utilization. A copper/polyimide multilayer structure is the backbone of the technology, which has demonstrated a size/weight reduction of greater than 10x compared to printed circuit board with performance up to the GHz level. HDI modules have exceptional mechanical robustness as evidenced by survival of 180 kg rapid acceleration tests. Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) are redefining sensors and actuators by miniaturization through micromachining techniques

  12. Microfabrication techniques for semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamanuki, Takemasa; Tadokoro, T.; Morito, Ken; Koyama, Fumio; Iga, Kenichi

    1991-03-01

    Several important techniques for fabricating micro-cavity semiconductor lasers including surface emitting lasers have been developed. Reactive ion beam etch (RIBE) for GaA1As and GaInAsP is employed and its condition for vertical fine etch under low damages and removal of residual damages are made clear. Passivation by sulfur is introduced to the fabrication process. Regrowth techniques for DII structures by LPE and MOCVD has been established. Some device applications are discussed. 1. MICRO-ETCHING PROCESS Micro-cavity lasers including a vertical cavity surface emitting laser1 are attracting the research interest for optical parallel processing and parallel light wave systems. In order to realize micron-order or sub-micron laserdevices the technology of micro-fabrication must be established. In this study the total fabrication technology has been almost completed. First fine and low damage etching condition by ultrahigh vacuum background RIBE using a Cl2 gas has been made clear. We have found an isotropic etching condition for the vertical side wall formation and good mask traceability i. e. the acceleration voltage is 500 V and substrate temperature is 150 C with a 5000A thickness Si02 mask. Residual damages induced on the surface and the side wall are characterized by photo-luminescence and making stripe lasers. Figure 1 is the histogram of the nominal threshold current density for (a) oxide-defined stripe lasers (b) RIBE etched and LPE regrown BH-lasers using an LPE grown DII wafer (LPE/LPE) and (c) RIBE etched

  13. Processing Nanostructured Sensors Using Microfabrication Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; VanderWal, Randall L.; Evans, Laura J.; Xu, Jennifer C.

    2010-01-01

    Standard microfabrication techniques can be implemented and scaled to help assemble nanoscale microsensors. Currently nanostructures are often deposited onto materials primarily by adding them to a solution, then applying the solution in a thin film. This results in random placement of the nanostructures with no controlled order, and no way to accurately reproduce the placement. This method changes the means by which microsensors with nanostructures are fabricated. The fundamental advantage to this approach is that it enables standard microfabrication techniques to be applied in the repeated manufacture of nanostructured sensors on a microplatform.

  14. Microfabricated pressure and shear stress sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Chang (Inventor); Chen, Jack (Inventor); Engel, Jonathan (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A microfabricated pressure sensor. The pressure sensor comprises a raised diaphragm disposed on a substrate. The diaphragm is configured to bend in response to an applied pressure difference. A strain gauge of a conductive material is coupled to a surface of the raised diaphragm and to at least one of the substrate and a piece rigidly connected to the substrate.

  15. Microfabrication Technologies for Oral Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Sant, Shilpa; Tao, Sarah L.; Fisher, Omar; Xu, Qiaobing; Peppas, Nicholas A.; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Micro-/nanoscale technologies such as lithographic techniques and microfluidics offer promising avenues to revolutionalize the fields of tissue engineering, drug discovery, diagnostics and personalized medicine. Microfabrication techniques are being explored for drug delivery applications due to their ability to combine several features such as precise shape and size into a single drug delivery vehicle. They also offer to create unique asymmetrical features incorporated into single or multiple reservoir systems maximizing contact area with the intestinal lining. Combined with intelligent materials, such microfabricated platforms can be designed to be bioadhesive and stimuli-responsive. Apart from drug delivery devices, microfabrication technologies offer exciting opportunities to create biomimetic gastrointestinal tract models incorporating physiological cell types, flow patterns and brush-border like structures. Here we review the recent developments in this field with a focus on the applications of microfabrication in the development of oral drug delivery devices and biomimetic gastrointestinal tract models that can be used to evaluate the drug delivery efficacy. PMID:22166590

  16. Processing of Nanostructured Devices Using Microfabrication Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W (Inventor); Xu, Jennifer C (Inventor); Evans, Laura J (Inventor); Kulis, Michael H (Inventor); Berger, Gordon M (Inventor); Vander Wal, Randall L (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Systems and methods that incorporate nanostructures into microdevices are discussed herein. These systems and methods can allow for standard microfabrication techniques to be extended to the field of nanotechnology. Sensors incorporating nanostructures can be fabricated as described herein, and can be used to reliably detect a range of gases with high response.

  17. Micro-fabrication Techniques for Target Components

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, R; Hamilton, J; Crawford, J; Ratti, S; Trevino, J; Graff, T; Stockton, C; Harvey, C

    2008-06-10

    Micro-fabrication techniques, derived from the semi-conductor industry, can be used to make a variety of useful mechanical components for targets. A selection of these components including supporting cooling arms for prototype cryogenic inertial confinement fusion targets, stepped and graded density targets for materials dynamics experiments are described. Micro-fabrication enables cost-effective, simultaneous fabrication of multiple high-precision components with complex geometries. Micro-fabrication techniques such as thin-film deposition, photo-lithographic patterning and etch processes normally used in the semi-conductor manufacture industry, can be exploited to make useful mechanical target components. Micro-fabrication processes have in recent years been used to create a number of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) components such as pressure sensors, accelerometers, ink jet printer heads, microfluidics platforms and the like. These techniques consist primarily of deposition of thin films of material, photo-lithographic patterning and etching processes performed sequentially to produce three dimensional structures using essentially planar processes. While the planar technology can be limiting in terms of the possible geometries of the final product, advantages of using these techniques include the ability to make multiple complex structures simultaneously and cost-effectively. Target components fabricated using these techniques include the supporting cooling arms for cryogenic prototype fusion ignition targets, stepped targets for equation-of-state experiments, and graded density reservoirs for material strength experiments.

  18. Microfabricated field calibration assembly for analytical instruments

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, Alex L.; Manginell, Ronald P.; Moorman, Matthew W.; Rodacy, Philip J.; Simonson, Robert J.

    2011-03-29

    A microfabricated field calibration assembly for use in calibrating analytical instruments and sensor systems. The assembly comprises a circuit board comprising one or more resistively heatable microbridge elements, an interface device that enables addressable heating of the microbridge elements, and, in some embodiments, a means for positioning the circuit board within an inlet structure of an analytical instrument or sensor system.

  19. Optical pumping in a microfabricated Rb vapor cell using a microfabricated Rb discharge light source

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatraman, V.; Kang, S.; Affolderbach, C.; Mileti, G.; Shea, H.

    2014-02-03

    Miniature (microfabricated alkali vapor resonance cell using (1) a microfabricated Rb discharge lamp light source, as well as (2) a conventional glass-blown Rb discharge lamp. The microfabricated Rb lamp cell is a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) light source, having the same inner cell volume of around 40 mm{sup 3} as that of the resonance cell, both filled with suitable buffer gases. A miniature (∼2 cm{sup 3} volume) test setup based on the M{sub z} magnetometer interrogation technique was used for observation of optical-radiofrequency double-resonance signals, proving the suitability of the microfabricated discharge lamp to introduce efficient optical pumping. The pumping ability of this light source was found to be comparable to or even better than that of a conventional glass-blown lamp. The reported results indicate that the micro-fabricated DBD discharge lamp has a high potential for the development of a new class of miniature atomic clocks, magnetometers, and quantum sensors.

  20. Microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device

    DOEpatents

    Olsson, Roy H.; El-Kady, Ihab F.; McCormick, Frederick; Fleming, James G.; Fleming, legal representative, Carol

    2010-11-23

    A microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device comprises a periodic two-dimensional array of scatterers embedded within the matrix material membrane, wherein the scatterer material has a density and/or elastic constant that is different than the matrix material and wherein the periodicity of the array causes destructive interference of the acoustic wave within an acoustic bandgap. The membrane can be suspended above a substrate by an air or vacuum gap to provide acoustic isolation from the substrate. The device can be fabricated using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies. Such microfabricated bulk wave phononic bandgap devices are useful for acoustic isolation in the ultrasonic, VHF, or UHF regime (i.e., frequencies of order 1 MHz to 10 GHz and higher, and lattice constants of order 100 .mu.m or less).

  1. Microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device

    DOEpatents

    Olsson, Roy H.; El-Kady, Ihab F.; McCormick, Frederick; Fleming, James G.; Fleming, Carol

    2010-06-08

    A microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device comprises a periodic two-dimensional array of scatterers embedded within the matrix material membrane, wherein the scatterer material has a density and/or elastic constant that is different than the matrix material and wherein the periodicity of the array causes destructive interference of the acoustic wave within an acoustic bandgap. The membrane can be suspended above a substrate by an air or vacuum gap to provide acoustic isolation from the substrate. The device can be fabricated using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies. Such microfabricated bulk wave phononic bandgap devices are useful for acoustic isolation in the ultrasonic, VHF, or UHF regime (i.e., frequencies of order 1 MHz to 10 GHz and higher, and lattice constants of order 100 .mu.m or less).

  2. Integration of micro-fabricated atomic magnetometers on military systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Gregory; Mhaskar, Rahul; Prouty, Mark; Miller, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    A new generation of ultra-high sensitivity magnetic sensors based on innovative micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) are being developed and incorporated into military systems. Specifically, we are currently working to fully integrate the latest generation of MicroFabricated Atomic Magnetometers (MFAMs) developed by Geometrics on defense mobility systems such as unmanned systems, military vehicles and handheld units. Recent reductions in size, weight, and power of these sensors has enabled new deployment opportunities for improved sensitivity to targets of interest, but has also introduced new challenges associated with noise mitigation, mission configuration planning, and data processing. Our work is focused on overcoming the practical aspects of integrating these sensors with various military platforms. Implications associated with utilizing these combined sensor systems in working environments are addressed in order to optimize signal-to-noise ratios, detection probabilities, and false alarm mitigation. Specifically, we present collaborative work that bridges the gap between commercial specialists and operation platform integration organizations including magnetic signature characterization and mitigation as well as the development of simulation tools that consider a wide array of sensor, environmental, platform, and mission-level parameters. We discuss unique deployment concepts for explosive hazard target geolocation, and data processing. Applications include configurations for undersea and underground threat detection - particularly those associated with stationary or mobile explosives and compact metallic targets such as munitions, subsea threats, and other hazardous objects. We show the potential of current and future features of miniaturized magnetic sensors including very high magnetic field sensitivities, bandwidth selectivity, and array processing.

  3. Overtaking method based on sand-sifter mechanism: Why do optimistic value functions find optimal solutions in multi-armed bandit problems?

    PubMed

    Ochi, Kento; Kamiura, Moto

    2015-09-01

    A multi-armed bandit problem is a search problem on which a learning agent must select the optimal arm among multiple slot machines generating random rewards. UCB algorithm is one of the most popular methods to solve multi-armed bandit problems. It achieves logarithmic regret performance by coordinating balance between exploration and exploitation. Since UCB algorithms, researchers have empirically known that optimistic value functions exhibit good performance in multi-armed bandit problems. The terms optimistic or optimism might suggest that the value function is sufficiently larger than the sample mean of rewards. The first definition of UCB algorithm is focused on the optimization of regret, and it is not directly based on the optimism of a value function. We need to think the reason why the optimism derives good performance in multi-armed bandit problems. In the present article, we propose a new method, which is called Overtaking method, to solve multi-armed bandit problems. The value function of the proposed method is defined as an upper bound of a confidence interval with respect to an estimator of expected value of reward: the value function asymptotically approaches to the expected value of reward from the upper bound. If the value function is larger than the expected value under the asymptote, then the learning agent is almost sure to be able to obtain the optimal arm. This structure is called sand-sifter mechanism, which has no regrowth of value function of suboptimal arms. It means that the learning agent can play only the current best arm in each time step. Consequently the proposed method achieves high accuracy rate and low regret and some value functions of it can outperform UCB algorithms. This study suggests the advantage of optimism of agents in uncertain environment by one of the simplest frameworks.

  4. Microfabricated linear Paul-Straubel ion trap

    DOEpatents

    Mangan, Michael A.; Blain, Matthew G.; Tigges, Chris P.; Linker, Kevin L.

    2011-04-19

    An array of microfabricated linear Paul-Straubel ion traps can be used for mass spectrometric applications. Each ion trap comprises two parallel inner RF electrodes and two parallel outer DC control electrodes symmetric about a central trap axis and suspended over an opening in a substrate. Neighboring ion traps in the array can share a common outer DC control electrode. The ions confined transversely by an RF quadrupole electric field potential well on the ion trap axis. The array can trap a wide array of ions.

  5. Microfabricated microengine with constant rotation rate

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, L.A.; Dickey, F.M.

    1999-09-21

    A microengine uses two synchronized linear actuators as a power source and converts oscillatory motion from the actuators into constant rotational motion via direct linkage connection to an output gear or wheel. The microengine provides output in the form of a continuously rotating output gear that is capable of delivering drive torque at a constant rotation to a micromechanism. The output gear can have gear teeth on its outer perimeter for directly contacting a micromechanism requiring mechanical power. The gear is retained by a retaining means which allows said gear to rotate freely. The microengine is microfabricated of polysilicon on one wafer using surface micromachining batch fabrication.

  6. Microfabrication of hybrid fluid membrane for microengines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chutani, R.; Formosa, F.; de Labachelerie, M.; Badel, A.; Lanzetta, F.

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes the microfabrication and dynamic characterization of thick membranes providing a technological solution for microengines. The studied membranes are called hybrid fluid-membrane (HFM) and consist of two thin membranes that encapsulate an incompressible fluid. This work details the microelectromechanical system (MEMS) scalable fabrication and characterization of HFMs. The membranes are composite structures based on Silicon spiral springs embedded in a polymer (RTV silicone). The anodic bonding of multiple stacks of Si/glass structures, the fluid filling and the sealing have been demonstrated. Various HFMs were successfully fabricated and their dynamic characterization demonstrates the agreement between experimental and theoretical results.

  7. Microfabricated Gas Phase Chemical Analysis Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Casalnuovo, Stephen A.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C; Heller, Edwin J.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Kottenstette, Richard J.; Lewis, Patrick R.; Manginell, Ronald P.; Matzke, Carolyn M.; Wong, C. Channy

    1999-08-02

    A portable, autonomous, hand-held chemical laboratory ({mu}ChemLab{trademark}) is being developed for trace detection (ppb) of chemical warfare (CW) agents and explosives in real-world environments containing high concentrations of interfering compounds. Microfabrication is utilized to provide miniature, low-power components that are characterized by rapid, sensitive and selective response. Sensitivity and selectivity are enhanced using two parallel analysis channels, each containing the sequential connection of a front-end sample collector/concentrator, a gas chromatographic (GC) separator, and a surface acoustic wave (SAW) detector. Component design and fabrication and system performance are described.

  8. Trends in Microfabrication Capabilities & Device Architectures.

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Todd; Jones, Adam; Lentine, Tony; Mudrick, John; Okandan, Murat; Rodrigues, Arun

    2015-06-01

    The last two decades have seen an explosion in worldwide R&D, enabling fundamentally new capabilities while at the same time changing the international technology landscape. The advent of technologies for continued miniaturization and electronics feature size reduction, and for architectural innovations, will have many technical, economic, and national security implications. It is important to anticipate possible microelectronics development directions and their implications on US national interests. This report forecasts and assesses trends and directions for several potentially disruptive microfabrication capabilities and device architectures that may emerge in the next 5-10 years.

  9. Microfabricated microengine with constant rotation rate

    DOEpatents

    Romero, Louis A.; Dickey, Fred M.

    1999-01-01

    A microengine uses two synchronized linear actuators as a power source and converts oscillatory motion from the actuators into constant rotational motion via direct linkage connection to an output gear or wheel. The microengine provides output in the form of a continuously rotating output gear that is capable of delivering drive torque at a constant rotation to a micromechanism. The output gear can have gear teeth on its outer perimeter for directly contacting a micromechanism requiring mechanical power. The gear is retained by a retaining means which allows said gear to rotate freely. The microengine is microfabricated of polysilicon on one wafer using surface micromachining batch fabrication.

  10. Integration of microfabricated low resistance and thousand-turn coils for vibration energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qian; Wang, Yufeng; Zhao, Lurui; Sok Kim, Eun

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents two microfabrication approaches for multi-layer coils for vibration-energy harvesters. A magnet array is arranged with alternating north- and south-orientation to provide a rapidly changing magnetic field for high electromagnetic energy conversion. Multi-turn spiral coils on silicon wafer are aligned to the magnet array for maximum magnetic flux change. One type of coil is made out of 300 μm-thick copper that is electroplated with silicon mold, and the other is built on 25 μm-thick copper electroplated with photoresist mold. The low resistive coils fabricated by the first approach are integrated in a microfabricated energy harvester of 17  ×  7  ×  1.7 mm3 (=0.2 cm3) weighing 0.8 g, which generates 14.3 μW power output (into 0.7 Ω load) from vibration amplitude of 6 μm at 250 Hz. The latter approach is used to make a 1080-turn coil for a microfabricated electromagnetic energy harvester with magnet array and plastic spring. Though the size and weight of the harvester are only 44  ×  20  ×  6 mm3 (=5.3 cm3) and 12 g, respectively, it generates 1.04 mW power output (into 190 Ω load) when it is vibrated at 75 Hz with vibration amplitude of 220 μm.

  11. Microfabricated wire arrays for Z-pinch.

    SciTech Connect

    Spahn, Olga Blum; Rowen, Adam M.; Cich, Michael Joseph; Peake, Gregory Merwin; Arrington, Christian L.; Nash, Thomas J.; Klem, John Frederick; Romero, Dustin Heinz

    2008-10-01

    Microfabrication methods have been applied to the fabrication of wire arrays suitable for use in Z. Self-curling GaAs/AlGaAs supports were fabricated as an initial route to make small wire arrays (4mm diameter). A strain relief structure that could be integrated with the wire was designed to allow displacements of the anode/cathode connections in Z. Electroplated gold wire arrays with integrated anode/cathode bus connections were found to be sufficiently robust to allow direct handling. Platinum and copper plating processes were also investigated. A process to fabricate wire arrays on any substrate with wire thickness up to 35 microns was developed. Methods to handle and mount these arrays were developed. Fabrication of wire arrays of 20mm diameter was demonstrated, and the path to 40mm array fabrication is clear. With some final investment to show array mounting into Z hardware, the entire process to produce a microfabricated wire array will have been demonstrated.

  12. Microfabricated structures for integrated DNA analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Burns, M A; Mastrangelo, C H; Sammarco, T S; Man, F P; Webster, J R; Johnsons, B N; Foerster, B; Jones, D; Fields, Y; Kaiser, A R; Burke, D T

    1996-01-01

    Photolithographic micromachining of silicon is a candidate technology for the construction of high-throughput DNA analysis devices. However, the development of complex silicon microfabricated systems has been hindered in part by the lack of a simple, versatile pumping method for integrating individual components. Here we describe a surface-tension-based pump able to move discrete nanoliter drops through enclosed channels using only local heating. This thermocapillary pump can accurately mix, measure, and divide drops by simple electronic control. In addition, we have constructed thermal-cycling chambers, gel electrophoresis channels, and radiolabeled DNA detectors that are compatible with the fabrication of thermocapillary pump channels. Since all of the components are made by conventional photolithographic techniques, they can be assembled into more complex integrated systems. The combination of pump and components into self-contained miniaturized devices may provide significant improvements in DNA analysis speed, portability, and cost. The potential of microfabricated systems lies in the low unit cost of silicon-based construction and in the efficient sample handling afforded by component integration. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8643614

  13. Microfabrication and Nanotechnology in Stent Design

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Adam W.; Chaikof, Elliot L.

    2012-01-01

    Intravascular stents were first introduced in the 1980s as an adjunct to primary angioplasty for management of early complications, including arterial dissection, or treatment of an inadequate technical outcome due to early elastic recoil of the atherosclerotic lesion. Despite the beneficial effects of stenting, persistent high rates of restenosis motivated the design of drug eluting stents for delivery of agents to limit the proliferative and other inflammatory responses within the vascular wall that contribute to the development of a restenotic lesion. These strategies have yielded a significant reduction in the incidence of restenosis, but challenges remain, including incomplete repair of the endothelium at the site of vascular wall injury that may be associated with a late risk of thrombosis. A failure of vessel wall healing has been attributed to primarily to the use of polymeric stent coatings, but the effects of the eluted drug and other material properties or design features of the stent cannot be excluded. Improvements in stent microfabrication, as well as the introduction of alternative materials may help to address those limitations that inhibit stent performance. This review describes the application of novel microfabrication processes and the evolution of new nanotechnologies that hold significant promise in eliminating existing shortcomings of current stent platforms. PMID:21462356

  14. Microfabricated Inserts for Magic Angle Coil Spinning (MACS) Wireless NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Badilita, Vlad; Fassbender, Birgit; Kratt, Kai; Wong, Alan; Bonhomme, Christian; Sakellariou, Dimitris; Korvink, Jan G.; Wallrabe, Ulrike

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the development and testing of the first automatically microfabricated probes to be used in conjunction with the magic angle coil spinning (MACS) NMR technique. NMR spectroscopy is a versatile technique for a large range of applications, but its intrinsically low sensitivity poses significant difficulties in analyzing mass- and volume-limited samples. The combination of microfabrication technology and MACS addresses several well-known NMR issues in a concerted manner for the first time: (i) reproducible wafer-scale fabrication of the first-in-kind on-chip LC microresonator for inductive coupling of the NMR signal and reliable exploitation of MACS capabilities; (ii) improving the sensitivity and the spectral resolution by simultaneous spinning the detection microcoil together with the sample at the “magic angle” of 54.74° with respect to the direction of the magnetic field (magic angle spinning – MAS), accompanied by the wireless signal transmission between the microcoil and the primary circuit of the NMR spectrometer; (iii) given the high spinning rates (tens of kHz) involved in the MAS methodology, the microfabricated inserts exhibit a clear kinematic advantage over their previously demonstrated counterparts due to the inherent capability to produce small radius cylindrical geometries, thus tremendously reducing the mechanical stress and tearing forces on the sample. In order to demonstrate the versatility of the microfabrication technology, we have designed MACS probes for various Larmor frequencies (194, 500 and 700 MHz) testing several samples such as water, Drosophila pupae, adamantane solid and LiCl at different magic angle spinning speeds. PMID:22936994

  15. Non-planar microfabricated gas chromatography column

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Patrick R.; Wheeler, David R.

    2007-09-25

    A non-planar microfabricated gas chromatography column comprises a planar substrate having a plurality of through holes, a top lid and a bottom lid bonded to opposite surfaces of the planar substrate, and inlet and outlet ports for injection of a sample gas and elution of separated analytes. A plurality of such planar substrates can be aligned and stacked to provide a longer column length having a small footprint. Furthermore, two or more separate channels can enable multi-channel or multi-dimensional gas chromatography. The through holes preferably have a circular cross section and can be coated with a stationary phase material or packed with a porous packing material. Importantly, uniform stationary phase coatings can be obtained and band broadening can be minimized with the circular channels. A heating or cooling element can be disposed on at least one of the lids to enable temperature programming of the column.

  16. Hybrid laser processing for microfabrication of glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugioka, K.; Obata, K.; Hong, M. H.; Wu, D. J.; Wong, L. L.; Lu, Y. F.; Chong, T. C.; Midorikawa, K.

    Hybrid laser processing for the precision microfabrication of glass materials, in which the interaction of a conventional pulsed laser beam and a medium on the material surface leads to effective ablation and modification, is reviewed. A major role of the medium is to produce strong absorption of the conventional laser beam by the material. Simultaneous irradiation by a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser beam that possesses an extremely small laser fluence and an ultraviolet (UV) laser greatly improves the ablation quality and modification efficiency for fused silica (VUV-UV multiwavelength excitation process). The metal plasma generated by the laser beam effectively assists high-quality ablation of transparent materials by the same laser beam, resulting in microstructuring, cutting, color marking, printing, and selective metallization of glass materials (laser-induced plasma-assisted ablation (LIPAA)). The detailed discussion presented here includes the ablation mechanism of hybrid laser processing.

  17. Microfabricated instrument for tissue biopsy and analysis

    DOEpatents

    Krulevitch, Peter A.; Lee, Abraham P.; Northrup, M. Allen; Benett, William J.

    2001-01-01

    A microfabricated biopsy/histology instrument which has several advantages over the conventional procedures, including minimal specimen handling, smooth cutting edges with atomic sharpness capable of slicing very thin specimens (approximately 2 .mu.m or greater), micro-liter volumes of chemicals for treating the specimens, low cost, disposable, fabrication process which renders sterile parts, and ease of use. The cutter is a "cheese-grater" style design comprising a block or substrate of silicon and which uses anisotropic etching of the silicon to form extremely sharp and precise cutting edges. As a specimen is cut, it passes through the silicon cutter and lies flat on a piece of glass which is bonded to the cutter. Microchannels are etched into the glass or silicon substrates for delivering small volumes of chemicals for treating the specimen. After treatment, the specimens can be examined through the glass substrate.

  18. Microfabricated high-throughput electronic particle detector.

    PubMed

    Wood, D K; Requa, M V; Cleland, A N

    2007-10-01

    We describe the design, fabrication, and use of a radio frequency reflectometer integrated with a microfluidic system, applied to the very high-throughput measurement of micron-scale particles, passing in a microfluidic channel through the sensor region. The device operates as a microfabricated Coulter counter [U.S. Patent No. 2656508 (1953)], similar to a design we have described previously, but here with significantly improved electrode geometry as well as including electronic tuning of the reflectometer; the two improvements yielding an improvement by more than a factor of 10 in the signal to noise and in the diametric discrimination of single particles. We demonstrate the high-throughput discrimination of polystyrene beads with diameters in the 4-10 microm range, achieving diametric resolutions comparable to the intrinsic spread of diameters in the bead distribution, at rates in excess of 15 x 10(6) beads/h.

  19. Microfabricated structures with electrical isolation and interconnections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, William A. (Inventor); Juneau, Thor N. (Inventor); Roessig, Allen W. (Inventor); Lemkin, Mark A. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The invention is directed to a microfabricated device. The device includes a substrate that is etched to define mechanical structures at least some of which are anchored laterally to the remainder of the substrate. Electrical isolation at points where mechanical structures are attached to the substrate is provided by filled isolation trenches. Filled trenches may also be used to electrically isolate structure elements from each other at points where mechanical attachment of structure elements is desired. The performance of microelectromechanical devices is improved by 1) having a high-aspect-ratio between vertical and lateral dimensions of the mechanical elements, 2) integrating electronics on the same substrate as the mechanical elements, 3) good electrical isolation among mechanical elements and circuits except where electrical interconnection is desired.

  20. Microfabricated devices for bio-applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xiaojun; Szaro, Ben G.; Gracias, Alison; Baselmans, Sofie; Tokranova, Natalya; Xu, Bai; Castracane, James

    2005-01-01

    This paper focuses on the development of two MEMS-based devices for lab-on-a-chip bio-applications. The first device is designed to facilitate cell secretion studies by enabling parallel electrochemical detection with millisecond resolution. Initial prototypes of micro-arrays have been fabricated with Cr/Au microelectrodes on various substrates such as polyimide, SU-8 and SiO2. An FT cell-line (bullfrog fibroblast, American Tissue Culture Collection) has been successfully established and cultured directly on these prototype micro-arrays. It is well known that the FT cells can uptake hormones or other macromolecules from the culture media through a non-specific uptake mechanism which is still under investigation. After culturing on micro-arrays, FT cells were loaded with norepinephrine of various concentrations by incubation in the culture media supplied with norepinephrines. Rapid elevation of intracellular Ca2+ levels triggers the exocytosis of norepinephrine which then can be detected by the Cr/Au electrodes. Microfabrication of these prototype micro-arrays as well as cell culture and electrochemical detection results will be presented in this paper. The second device is designed for 3-dimensional transportation of living cells on chips. Initial prototypes of micro-arrays were fabricated with SU-8 buried channels on a silicon substrate. Both single-layered and double-layered SU-8 buried channels have been realized to enable 2D and 3D cell transportation. Stained solutions were used to visualize fluid transport through the channel networks. Following this, living FT cells in solution were successfully transported through single-layered SU-8 channels. Testing of 3D transportation of living FT cells is underway. Microfabrication of these prototype micro-arrays and living cell transportation on chips will also be presented in this paper.

  1. 3D microscopy for microfabrication quality control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Matthew S.; De Jean, Paul D.

    2015-03-01

    A novel stereo microscope adapter, the SweptVue, has been developed to rapidly perform quantitative 3D microscopy for cost-effective microfabrication quality control. The SweptVue adapter uses the left and right stereo channels of an Olympus SZX7 stereo microscope for sample illumination and detection, respectively. By adjusting the temporal synchronization between the illumination lines projected from a Texas Instruments DLP LightCrafter and the rolling shutter on a Point Grey Flea3 CMOS camera, micrometer-scale depth features can be easily and rapidly measured at up to 5 μm resolution on a variety of microfabricated samples. In this study, the build performance of an industrial-grade Stratasys Object 300 Connex 3D printer was examined. Ten identical parts were 3D printed with a lateral and depth resolution of 42 μm and 30 μm, respectively, using both a rigid and flexible Stratasys PolyJet material. Surface elevation precision and accuracy was examined over multiple regions of interest on plateau and hemispherical surfaces. In general, the dimensions of the examined features were reproducible across the parts built using both materials. However, significant systemic lateral and height build errors were discovered, such as: decreased heights when approaching the edges of plateaus, inaccurate height steps, and poor tolerances on channel width. For 3D printed parts to be used in functional applications requiring micro-scale tolerances, they need to conform to specification. Despite appearing identical, our 3D printed parts were found to have a variety of defects that the SweptVue adapter quickly revealed.

  2. Magnetoencephalography of epilepsy with a microfabricated atomic magnetrode.

    PubMed

    Alem, Orang; Benison, Alex M; Barth, Daniel S; Kitching, John; Knappe, Svenja

    2014-10-22

    Magnetoencephalography has long held the promise of providing a noninvasive tool for localizing epileptic seizures in humans because of its high spatial resolution compared with the scalp EEG. Yet, this promise has been elusive, not because of a lack of sensitivity or spatial resolution but because the large size and immobility of present cryogenic (superconducting) technology prevent long-term telemetry required to capture these very infrequent epileptiform events. To circumvent this limitation, we used Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems technology to construct a noncryogenic (room temperature) microfabricated atomic magnetometer ("magnetrode") based on laser spectroscopy of rubidium vapor and similar in size and flexibility to scalp EEG electrodes. We tested the magnetrode by measuring the magnetic signature of epileptiform discharges in a rat model of epilepsy. We were able to measure neuronal currents of single epileptic discharges and more subtle spontaneous brain activity with a high signal-to-noise ratio approaching that of present superconducting sensors. These measurements are a promising step toward the goal of high-resolution noninvasive telemetry of epileptic events in humans with seizure disorders.

  3. Porosity and hydric behavior of typical calcite microfabrics in stalagmites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-García, M. B.; López-Arce, P.; Fernández-Valle, M. E.; Martín-Chivelet, J.; Fort, R.

    2012-07-01

    Petrophysical techniques commonly used for material characterization are applied for the first time to speleothem samples to investigate the porosity and hydric behavior of calcite stalagmites used in paleoclimatology. These techniques allow the determination of the stalagmites' potential to undergo diagenetic transformations when substantial changes in drip waters occur in the cave environment. The petrophysical techniques include water absorption under vacuum and by capillarity, nuclear magnetic resonance, environmental scanning electron microscopy, and mercury intrusion porosimetry. The studied samples comprise five common calcite microfabrics, which have markedly different porosities and hydric behaviors and, as a consequence, different sensibilities to diagenetic processes related to the influx of water. The experiments show that stalagmites can behave as complex, small-scale hydrological systems and that the circulation of water through them by complex nets of interconnected pores might be common. As the circulation of water favors diagenetic transformations that involve geochemical and isotopic changes, the characterization of flow patterns is key for outlining areas that are susceptible to such modifications, which is critical to paleoclimatic studies that are based on speleothems because geochemical and stable isotopic data are used as paleoenvironmental proxies and absolute ages are obtained by using radioactive isotope ratios. These potential modifications also have obvious implications for studies based on fluid inclusions in speleothems. The integrated methodology, which uses primarily non-destructive techniques, shows a high potential for characterization of any type of speleothem and other continental carbonates such as tufas or sinters.

  4. Zero-field remote detection of NMR with a microfabricated atomic magnetometer

    PubMed Central

    Ledbetter, M. P.; Savukov, I. M.; Budker, D.; Shah, V.; Knappe, S.; Kitching, J.; Michalak, D. J.; Xu, S.; Pines, A.

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate remote detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with a microchip sensor consisting of a microfluidic channel and a microfabricated vapor cell (the heart of an atomic magnetometer). Detection occurs at zero magnetic field, which allows operation of the magnetometer in the spin-exchange relaxation-free (SERF) regime and increases the proximity of sensor and sample by eliminating the need for a solenoid to create a leading field. We achieve pulsed NMR linewidths of 26 Hz, limited, we believe, by the residence time and flow dispersion in the encoding region. In a fully optimized system, we estimate that for 1 s of integration, 7 × 1013 protons in a volume of 1 mm3, prepolarized in a 10-kG field, can be detected with a signal-to-noise ratio of ≈3. This level of sensitivity is competitive with that demonstrated by microcoils in 100-kG magnetic fields, without requiring superconducting magnets. PMID:18287080

  5. Zero-field remote detection of NMR with a microfabricated atomic magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Ledbetter, M P; Savukov, I M; Budker, D; Shah, V; Knappe, S; Kitching, J; Michalak, D J; Xu, S; Pines, A

    2008-02-19

    We demonstrate remote detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with a microchip sensor consisting of a microfluidic channel and a microfabricated vapor cell (the heart of an atomic magnetometer). Detection occurs at zero magnetic field, which allows operation of the magnetometer in the spin-exchange relaxation-free (SERF) regime and increases the proximity of sensor and sample by eliminating the need for a solenoid to create a leading field. We achieve pulsed NMR linewidths of 26 Hz, limited, we believe, by the residence time and flow dispersion in the encoding region. In a fully optimized system, we estimate that for 1 s of integration, 7 x 10(13) protons in a volume of 1 mm(3), prepolarized in a 10-kG field, can be detected with a signal-to-noise ratio of approximately 3. This level of sensitivity is competitive with that demonstrated by microcoils in 100-kG magnetic fields, without requiring superconducting magnets.

  6. Microfabrics in Siliceous Hotsprings: Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guidry, S. A.; Chafetz, H. S.; Westall, F.

    2001-01-01

    Microfabrics shed light on the mechanisms governing siliceous sinter precipitation, the profound effects of microorganisms, as well as a conventional facies model for siliceous hotsprings. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  7. Microfabricated instrument for tissue biopsy and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Krulevitch, P.A.; Lee, A.P.; Northrup, M.A.; Benett, W.J.

    1999-11-16

    This invention relates to a microfabricated biopsy/histology instrument which has several advantages over the conventional procedures. The advantages include: minimal specimen handling; smooth cutting edges with atomic sharpness capable of slicing very thin specimens (approximately 2 {mu}m or greater); micro-liter volumes of chemicals for treating the specimens; low cost; disposable; fabrication process which renders sterile parts; and ease of use. The cutter is a cheese-grater style design comprising a block or substrate of silicon and which uses anisotropic etching of the silicon to form extremely sharp and precise cutting edges. As a specimen is cut, it passes through the silicon cutter and lies flat on a piece of glass which is bonded to the cutter. Microchannels are etched into the glass or silicon substrates for delivering small volumes of chemicals for treating the specimen. After treatment, the specimens can be examined through the glass substrate. For automation purposes, microvalves and micropumps may be incorporated. Also, specimens in parallel may be cut and treated with identical or varied chemicals. The instrument is disposable due to its low cost and thus could replace current expensive microtome and histology equipment.

  8. Microfabrication: LIGA-X and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupka, R. K.; Bouamrane, F.; Cremers, C.; Megtert, S.

    2000-09-01

    X-ray LIGA (Lithography, Electrogrowth, Moulding) is one of today's key technologies in microfabrication and upcoming modern (meso)-(nano) fabrication, already used and anticipated for micromechanics (micromotors, microsensors, spinnerets, etc.), micro-optics, micro-hydrodynamics (fluidic devices), microbiology, in medicine, in biology, and in chemistry for microchemical reactors. It compares to micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology, offering a larger, non-silicon choice of materials and better inherent precision. X-ray LIGA relies on synchrotron radiation to obtain necessary X-ray fluxes and uses X-ray proximity printing. Inherent advantages are its extreme precision, depth of field and very low intrinsic surface roughness. However, the quality of fabricated structures often depends on secondary effects during exposure and effects like resist adhesion. UV-LIGA, relying on thick UV resists is an alternative for projects requiring less precision. Modulating the spectral properties of synchrotron radiation, different regimes of X-ray lithography lead to (a) the mass-fabrication of classical nanostructures, (b) the fabrication of high aspect ratio nanostructures (HARNST), (c) the fabrication of high aspect ratio microstructures (HARMST), and (d) the fabrication of high aspect ratio centimeter structures (HARCST). Reviewing very recent activities around X-ray LIGA, we show the versatility of the method, obviously finding its region of application there, where it is best and other competing microtechnologies are less advantageous. An example of surface-based X-ray and particle lenses (orthogonal reflection optics (ORO)) made by X-ray LIGA is given.

  9. Microfabricated adhesive mimicking gecko foot-hair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geim, A. K.; Dubonos, S. V.; Grigorieva, I. V.; Novoselov, K. S.; Zhukov, A. A.; Shapoval, S. Yu.

    2003-07-01

    The amazing climbing ability of geckos has attracted the interest of philosophers and scientists alike for centuries. However, only in the past few years has progress been made in understanding the mechanism behind this ability, which relies on submicrometre keratin hairs covering the soles of geckos. Each hair produces a miniscule force ~10-7 N (due to van der Waals and/or capillary interactions) but millions of hairs acting together create a formidable adhesion of ~10 N cm-2: sufficient to keep geckos firmly on their feet, even when upside down on a glass ceiling. It is very tempting to create a new type of adhesive by mimicking the gecko mechanism. Here we report on a prototype of such 'gecko tape' made by microfabrication of dense arrays of flexible plastic pillars, the geometry of which is optimized to ensure their collective adhesion. Our approach shows a way to manufacture self-cleaning, re-attachable dry adhesives, although problems related to their durability and mass production are yet to be resolved.

  10. Microfabricated instrument for tissue biopsy and analysis

    DOEpatents

    Krulevitch, Peter A.; Lee, Abraham P.; Northrup, M. Allen; Benett, William J.

    1999-01-01

    A microfabricated biopsy/histology instrument which has several advantages over the conventional procedures, including minimal specimen handling, smooth cutting edges with atomic sharpness capable of slicing very thin specimens (approximately 2 .mu.m or greater), micro-liter volumes of chemicals for treating the specimens, low cost, disposable, fabrication process which renders sterile parts, and ease of use. The cutter is a "cheese-grater" style design comprising a block or substrate of silicon and which uses anisotropic etching of the silicon to form extremely sharp and precise cutting edges. As a specimen is cut, it passes through the silicon cutter and lies flat on a piece of glass which is bonded to the cutter. Microchannels are etched into the glass or silicon substrates for delivering small volumes of chemicals for treating the specimen. After treatment, the specimens can be examined through the glass substrate. For automation purposes, microvalves and micropumps may be incorporated. Also, specimens in parallel may be cut and treated with identical or varied chemicals. The instrument is disposable due to its low cost and thus could replace current expensive microtome and histology equipment.

  11. Microfabricated adhesive mimicking gecko foot-hair.

    PubMed

    Geim, A K; Dubonos, S V; Grigorieva, I V; Novoselov, K S; Zhukov, A A; Shapoval, S Yu

    2003-07-01

    The amazing climbing ability of geckos has attracted the interest of philosophers and scientists alike for centuries. However, only in the past few years has progress been made in understanding the mechanism behind this ability, which relies on submicrometre keratin hairs covering the soles of geckos. Each hair produces a miniscule force approximately 10(-7) N (due to van der Waals and/or capillary interactions) but millions of hairs acting together create a formidable adhesion of approximately 10 N x cm(-2): sufficient to keep geckos firmly on their feet, even when upside down on a glass ceiling. It is very tempting to create a new type of adhesive by mimicking the gecko mechanism. Here we report on a prototype of such 'gecko tape' made by microfabrication of dense arrays of flexible plastic pillars, the geometry of which is optimized to ensure their collective adhesion. Our approach shows a way to manufacture self-cleaning, re-attachable dry adhesives, although problems related to their durability and mass production are yet to be resolved.

  12. Research highlights: printing the future of microfabrication.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Peter; Murray, Coleman; Kim, Donghyuk; Di Carlo, Dino

    2014-05-01

    In this issue we highlight emerging microfabrication approaches suitable for microfluidic systems with a focus on "additive manufacturing" processes (i.e. printing). In parallel with the now-wider availability of low cost consumer-grade 3D printers (as evidenced by at least three brands of 3D printers for sale in a recent visit to an electronics store in Akihabara, Tokyo), commercial-grade 3D printers are ramping to higher and higher resolution with new capabilities, such as printing of multiple materials of different transparency, and with different mechanical and electrical properties. We highlight new work showing that 3D printing (stereolithography approaches in particular) has now risen as a viable technology to print whole microfluidic devices. Printing on 2D surfaces such as paper is an everyday experience, and has been used widely in analytical chemistry for printing conductive materials on paper strips for glucose and other electrochemical sensors. We highlight recent work using electrodes printed on paper for digital microfluidic droplet actuation. Finally, we highlight recent work in which printing of membrane-bound droplets that interconnect through bilayer membranes may open up an entirely new approach to microfluidic manufacturing of soft devices that mimic physiological systems.

  13. Microfabricated adhesive mimicking gecko foot-hair.

    PubMed

    Geim, A K; Dubonos, S V; Grigorieva, I V; Novoselov, K S; Zhukov, A A; Shapoval, S Yu

    2003-07-01

    The amazing climbing ability of geckos has attracted the interest of philosophers and scientists alike for centuries. However, only in the past few years has progress been made in understanding the mechanism behind this ability, which relies on submicrometre keratin hairs covering the soles of geckos. Each hair produces a miniscule force approximately 10(-7) N (due to van der Waals and/or capillary interactions) but millions of hairs acting together create a formidable adhesion of approximately 10 N x cm(-2): sufficient to keep geckos firmly on their feet, even when upside down on a glass ceiling. It is very tempting to create a new type of adhesive by mimicking the gecko mechanism. Here we report on a prototype of such 'gecko tape' made by microfabrication of dense arrays of flexible plastic pillars, the geometry of which is optimized to ensure their collective adhesion. Our approach shows a way to manufacture self-cleaning, re-attachable dry adhesives, although problems related to their durability and mass production are yet to be resolved. PMID:12776092

  14. Microfabricated polymer chip for capillary gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Hong, J W; Hosokawa, K; Fujii, T; Seki, M; Endo, I

    2001-01-01

    A polymer (PDMS: poly(dimethylsiloxane)) microchip for capillary gel electrophoresis that can separate different sizes of DNA molecules in a small experimental scale is presented. This microchip can be easily produced by a simple PDMS molding method against a microfabricated master without the use of elaborate bonding processes. This PDMS microchip could be used as a single use device unlike conventional microchips made of glass, quartz or silicon. The capillary channel on the chip was partially filled with agarose gel that can enhance separation resolution of different sizes of DNA molecules and can shorten the channel length required for the separation of the sample compared to capillary electrophoresis in free-flow or polymer solution format. We discuss the optimal conditions for the gel preparation that could be used in the microchannel. DNA molecules were successfully driven by an electric field and separated to form bands in the range of 100 bp to 1 kbp in a 2.0% agarose-filled microchannel with 8 mm of effective separation length.

  15. Microfabricated therapeutic actuators and release mechanisms therefor

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Fitch, Joseph P.; Schumann, Daniel L.; Da Silva, Luiz; Benett, William J.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    2000-01-01

    Microfabricated therapeutic actuators are fabricated using a shape memory polymer (SMP), a polyurethane-based material that undergoes a phase transformation at a specified temperature (Tg). At a temperature above temperature Tg material is soft and can be easily reshaped into another configuration. As the temperature is lowered below temperature Tg the new shape is fixed and locked in as long as the material stays below temperature Tg. Upon reheating the material to a temperature above Tg, the material will return to its original shape. By the use of such SMP material, SMP microtubing can be used as a retaining/release actuator for the delivery of material, such as embolic coils, for example, through catheters into aneurysms, for example. The microtubing can be manufactured in various sizes and the phase change temperature Tg is determinate for an intended temperature target and intended use. The SMP microtubing can be positioned around or within an end of a deposit material. Various heating arrangements can be utilized with the SMP release mechanism, and the SMP microtubing can include a metallic coating for enhanced light absorption.

  16. Fetal magnetocardiography measurements with an array of microfabricated optically pumped magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alem, Orang; Sander, Tilmann H.; Mhaskar, Rahul; LeBlanc, John; Eswaran, Hari; Steinhoff, Uwe; Okada, Yoshio; Kitching, John; Trahms, Lutz; Knappe, Svenja

    2015-06-01

    Following the rapid progress in the development of optically pumped magnetometer (OPM) technology for the measurement of magnetic fields in the femtotesla range, a successful assembly of individual sensors into an array of nearly identical sensors is within reach. Here, 25 microfabricated OPMs with footprints of 1 cm3 were assembled into a conformal array. The individual sensors were inserted into three flexible belt-shaped holders and connected to their respective light sources and electronics, which reside outside a magnetically shielded room, through long optical and electrical cables. With this setup the fetal magnetocardiogram of a pregnant woman was measured by placing two sensor belts over her abdomen and one belt over her chest. The fetal magnetocardiogram recorded over the abdomen is usually dominated by contributions from the maternal magnetocardiogram, since the maternal heart generates a much stronger signal than the fetal heart. Therefore, signal processing methods have to be applied to obtain the pure fetal magnetocardiogram: orthogonal projection and independent component analysis. The resulting spatial distributions of fetal cardiac activity are in good agreement with each other. In a further exemplary step, the fetal heart rate was extracted from the fetal magnetocardiogram. Its variability suggests fetal activity. We conclude that microfabricated optically pumped magnetometers operating at room temperature are capable of complementing or in the future even replacing superconducting sensors for fetal magnetocardiography measurements.

  17. Microfabricated Segmented-Involute-Foil Regenerator for Stirling Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, Mounir; Danila, Daniel; Simon, Terrence; Mantell, Susan; Sun, Liyong; Gedeon, David; Qiu, Songgang; Wood, Gary; Kelly, Kevin; McLean, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    An involute-foil regenerator was designed, microfabricated, and tested in an oscillating-flow test rig. The concept consists of stacked involute-foil nickel disks (see figure) microfabricated via a lithographic process. Test results yielded a performance of about twice that of the 90-percent random-fiber currently used in small Stirling converters. The segmented nature of the involute- foil in both the axial and radial directions increases the strength of the structure relative to wrapped foils. In addition, relative to random-fiber regenerators, the involute-foil has a reduced pressure drop, and is expected to be less susceptible to the release of metal fragments into the working space, thus increasing reliability. The prototype nickel involute-foil regenerator was adequate for testing in an engine with a 650 C hot-end temperature. This is lower than that required by larger engines, and high-temperature alloys are not suited for the lithographic microfabrication approach.

  18. Microfabrication of IPMC cilia for bio-inspired flow sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Hong; Li, Wen; Tan, Xiaobo

    2012-04-01

    As the primary flow sensing organ for fishes, the lateral line system plays a critical role in fish behavior. Analogous to its biological counterpart, an artificial lateral line system, consisting of arrays of micro flow sensors, is expected to be instrumental in the navigation and control of underwater robots. In this paper we investigate the microfabrication of ionic polymer-metal composite (IPMC) cilia for the purpose of flow sensing. While existing macro- and microfabrication methods for IPMCs have predominantly focused on planar structures, we propose a device where micro IPMC beams stand upright on a substrate to effectively interact with the flow. Challenges in the casting of 3D Nafion structure and selective formation of electrodes are discussed, and potential solutions for addressing these challenges are presented together with preliminary microfabrication results.

  19. Parylene C as a Sacrificial Material for Microfabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beamesderfer, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Parylene C has been investigated for use as a sacrificial material in microfabrication. Although Parylene C cannot be patterned lithographically like photoresists, it nevertheless extends the range of processing options by offering a set of properties that are suitable for microfabrication and are complementary to those of photoresists. The compatibility of Parylene C with several microfabrication processes was demonstrated in experiments in which a thin film of Parylene C was deposited on a silicon wafer, then several thin metal films were deposited and successfully patterned, utilizing the Parylene C pads as a sacrificial layer. The term "parylene" -- a contraction of "poly(para-xylene)" -- denotes a family of vapor-deposited polymers. In Parylene C (the most common form of parylene), a chlorine atom is substituted for one of the hydrogen atoms on the benzene ring of each para-xylene moiety. Heretofore, parylenes have been used as conformal coating materials in diverse applications.

  20. Development of neutral atom traps based on a microfabricated waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jau, Yuan-Yu; Lee, Jongmin; Biedermann, Grant; Siddiqui, Aleem; Eichenfield, Matt; Dougla, Erica

    2016-05-01

    Implementation of trapping neutral atoms in the evanescent fields generated by a nano-structure, such as a nanofiber or a microfabricated nano-waveguide, will naturally enable strong atom-photon interactions, which serve the key mechanisms for different type of quantum controls. At Sandia National Labs, we are aiming to develop a platform based on this concept to eventually trap cesium atoms with a microfabricated waveguide. Although, neutral atom traps using optical nanofiber has been demonstrated, there are several key issues that need to be resolved to realize trapping atoms with microfabricated structure. The subjects include the material for making the waveguide, optical power handling capability, surface adsorption of alkali-metal atoms, surface roughness of the nano-structure, cold-atom source for loading the atoms into the evanescent-field traps, etc. We will discuss our studies on these related subjects and report our latest progress.

  1. Microfabricated biocapsules for the immunoisolation of pancreatic islets of Langerhans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Tejal Ashwin

    1998-08-01

    A silicon-based microfabricated biocapsule was developed and evaluated for use in the immunoisolation of transplanted cells, specifically pancreatic islets of Langerhans for the treatment of Type I diabetes. The transplantation of cells with specific functions is a promising therapy for a wide variety of pathologies including diabetes, Parkinson's, and hemophilia. Such transplanted cells, however, are sensitive to both cellular and humoral immune rejection as well as damage by autoimmune activity, without chronic immunosuppression. The research presented in this dissertation investigated whether microfabricated silicon-based biocapsules, with uniform membrane pore sizes in the tens of nanometer range, could provide an immunoprotective environment for pancreatic islets and other insulin-secreting cell lines, while maintaining cell viability and functionality. By utilizing fabrication techniques commonly employed in the microelectronics industry (MEMS), membranes were fabricated with precisely controlled and uniform pore sizes, allowing the optimization of biocapsule membrane parameters for the encapsulation of specific hormone-secreting cell types. The biocapsule-forming process employed bulk micromachining to define cell-containing chambers within single crystalline silicon wafers. These chambers interface with the surrounding biological environment through polycrystalline silicon filter membranes, which were surface micromachined to present a high density of uniform pores to allow sufficient permeability to oxygen, glucose, and insulin. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments established the biocompatibility of the microfabricated biocapsule, and demonstrated that encapsulated cells could live and function normally in terms of insulin-secretion within microfabricated environments for extended periods of time. This novel research shows the potential of using microfabricated biocapsules for the encapsulation of several different cell xenografts. The semipermeability

  2. Pick-and-place nanomanipulation using microfabricated grippers.

    PubMed

    Mølhave, Kristian; Wich, Thomas; Kortschack, Axel; Bøggild, Peter

    2006-05-28

    Microfabricated grippers could be useful for the manipulation of nanoscopic and microscopic samples. A survey is presented of the force requirements for a microgripper to complete pick-and-place nanomanipulation tasks. We then demonstrate in situ pick-and-place operations of nanowires inside a scanning electron microscope using microfabricated electrostatically actuated grippers, and compare the theoretically estimated force requirements with the results of experimental tests of picking up nanowires to evaluate how grippers and strategies for nanomanipulation can be optimized.

  3. Microfabricated suspensions for electrical connections on the tunable elastomer membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Paul J.; Jeong, Kihun; Liu, Gang L.; Lee, Luke P.

    2004-12-01

    Electrical connections through microfabricated suspensions on a pneumatically pumped elastomer membrane were demonstrated. A method to fabricate the suspensions on the elastomer membrane was developed. The elastomer membrane was 1 mm in diameter and 120 μm in thickness. Resistances of the microfabricated suspensions measured across the elastomer membrane were within 1% difference when the membrane's center deflection ranged from 0 to 100 μm, which corresponded to a numerical aperture change from 0 to 0.2 as well as a 2.6% elongation of the elastomer.

  4. Femtotesla atomic magnetometry in a microfabricated vapor cell.

    PubMed

    Griffith, W Clark; Knappe, Svenja; Kitching, John

    2010-12-20

    We describe an optically pumped 87Rb magnetometer with 5 fT/Hz(1/2) sensitivity when operated in the spin-exchange relaxation free (SERF) regime. The magnetometer uses a microfabricated vapor cell consisting of a cavity etched in a 1 mm thick silicon wafer with anodically bonded Pyrex windows. The measurement volume of the magnetometer is 1 mm3, defined by the overlap region of a circularly polarized pump laser and a linearly polarized probe laser, both operated near 795 nm. Sensitivity limitations unique to the use of microfabricated cells are discussed.

  5. Microfabricated Chemical Sensors for Safety and Emission Control Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, G. W.; Neudeck, P. G.; Chen, L.-Y.; Knight, D.; Liu, C. C.; Wu, Q. H.

    1998-01-01

    Chemical sensor technology is being developed for leak detection, emission monitoring, and fire safety applications. The development of these sensors is based on progress in two types of technology: 1) Micromachining and microfabrication (MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS)-based) technology to fabricate miniaturized sensors. 2) The development of high temperature semiconductors, especially silicon carbide. Using these technologies, sensors to measure hydrogen, hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, oxygen, and carbon dioxide are being developed. A description is given of each sensor type and its present stage of development. It is concluded that microfabricated sensor technology has significant potential for use in a range of aerospace applications.

  6. Microfabrics in depleted mantle plaeotransform (New Caledonia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teyssier, Christian; Chatzaras, Vasileios; Von Der Handt, Anette

    2016-04-01

    The New Caledonia ophiolite contains several wrench zones that have been interpreted as paleotransforms. These transform-ridge systems developed at the transition between ridge development and intra-oceanic subduction that resulted in depleted mantle (about 18 % melt according to olivine Mg# - spinel Cr#). The most prominent is the Bogota Peninsula paleotransform, a 10 km wide shear zone in which strain localizes in the 2 km wide Ouassé mylonite zone. This strain gradient is associated with microstructure and microfabric evolution that informs the relationship between hydration and strain in mantle mylonite. Olivine recrystallized grain size varies from about 1 mm to about 0.2 mm toward the mylonite zone. The strain gradient is also demonstrated by increasing deformation of orthopyroxene (opx) grains that become elongate porphyroclasts in the mylonite zone. Orthopyroxene geothermometry reveals T ~ 1050-1000 C (Ca-opx) and 950-850 C (Cr-Al-opx) in the least deformed rocks. In the mylonite zone a wider range of T is recorded, with minima reaching 850 C (Ca-opx) and 750 C (Cr-Al-opx). Electron microprobe analysis also detects the presence of 20-200 micron interstitial, high-temperature amphibole (pargasite), with modal abundance increasing in the mylonite zone; this suggests that high-temperature pervasive fluid flow may have played a role in strain localization and mylonitization. Olivine crystallographic fabrics include A-type and E-type, the latter possibly reflecting hydration of shear zone tectonites. E-type fabrics are present in both mylonite and less deformed rocks, and appear to be more common in rocks with olivine grain size < 400 microns. A correlation between E-type fabrics and amphibole mode is being investigated. The shear zone protolith was depleted mantle in which the ridge-transform system was permeated by fluids. These fluids initially originated at the subduction interface, but during the transform evolution, ocean water likely permeated the shear

  7. Microfabricated Tactile Sensors for Biomedical Applications: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Saccomandi, Paola; Schena, Emiliano; Oddo, Calogero Maria; Zollo, Loredana; Silvestri, Sergio; Guglielmelli, Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    During the last decades, tactile sensors based on different sensing principles have been developed due to the growing interest in robotics and, mainly, in medical applications. Several technological solutions have been employed to design tactile sensors; in particular, solutions based on microfabrication present several attractive features. Microfabrication technologies allow for developing miniaturized sensors with good performance in terms of metrological properties (e.g., accuracy, sensitivity, low power consumption, and frequency response). Small size and good metrological properties heighten the potential role of tactile sensors in medicine, making them especially attractive to be integrated in smart interfaces and microsurgical tools. This paper provides an overview of microfabricated tactile sensors, focusing on the mean principles of sensing, i.e., piezoresistive, piezoelectric and capacitive sensors. These sensors are employed for measuring contact properties, in particular force and pressure, in three main medical fields, i.e., prosthetics and artificial skin, minimal access surgery and smart interfaces for biomechanical analysis. The working principles and the metrological properties of the most promising tactile, microfabricated sensors are analyzed, together with their application in medicine. Finally, the new emerging technologies in these fields are briefly described. PMID:25587432

  8. Microfabricated Silicon Microneedle Array for Transdermal Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Jing; Tay, Francis Eh; Miao, Jianmin; Iliescu, Ciprian

    2006-04-01

    This paper presents developed processes for silicon microneedle arrays microfabrication. Three types of microneedles structures were achieved by isotropic etching in inductively coupled plasma (ICP) using SF6/O2 gases, combination of isotropic etching with deep etching, and wet etching, respectively. A microneedle array with biodegradable porous tips was further developed based on the fabricated microneedles.

  9. Recent progress of laser precision microfabrication in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zhaogu; Xu, Guoliang; Zhao, Quanzhong; Liu, Cuiqing

    2002-02-01

    Review on recent progress of laser precision microfabrication in China is given in this paper. The universal fields of the LPM mostly using short pulse and short wavelength lasers in China are as follows: new materials, advanced manufacturing technology, information technology, biological technology, medical treatment and so on, which are given priority to the development in high-tech fields in China.

  10. Microfabricated sampling probes for in vivo monitoring of neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woong Hee; Slaney, Thomas R; Hower, Robert W; Kennedy, Robert T

    2013-04-16

    Microfabricated fluidic systems have emerged as a powerful approach for chemical analysis. Relatively unexplored is the use of microfabrication to create sampling probes. We have developed a sampling probe microfabricated in Si by bulk micromachining and lithography. The probe is 70 μm wide by 85 μm thick by 11 mm long and incorporates two buried channels that are 20 μm in diameter. The tip of the probe has two 20 μm holes where fluid is ejected or collected for sampling. Utility of the probe was demonstrated by sampling from the brain of live rats. For sampling, artificial cerebral spinal fluid was infused in through one channel at 50 nL/min while sample was withdrawn at the same flow rate from the other channel. Analysis of resulting fractions collected every 20 min from the striatum of rats by liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry demonstrated reliable detection of 17 neurotransmitters and metabolites. The small probe dimensions suggest it is less perturbing to tissue and can be used to sample smaller brain nuclei than larger sampling devices, such as microdialysis probes. This sampling probe may have other applications such as sampling from cells in culture. The use of microfabrication may also enable incorporation of electrodes for electrochemical or electrophysiological recording and other channels that enable more complex sample preparation on the device. PMID:23547793

  11. Nano- and microfabrication for overcoming drug delivery challenges

    PubMed Central

    Kam, Kimberly R.

    2013-01-01

    This highlight article describes current nano- and microfabrication techniques for creating drug delivery devices. We first review the main physiological barriers to delivering therapeutic agents. Then, we describe how novel fabrication methods can be utilized to combine many features into a single physiologically relevant device to overcome drug delivery challenges. PMID:23730504

  12. Experimental Characterization of Microfabricated VirtualImpactor Efficiency

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Air-Microfluidics Group is developing a microelectromechanical systems-based direct reading particulate matter (PM) mass sensor. The sensor consists of two main components: a microfabricated virtual impactor (VI) and a PM mass sensor. The VI leverages particle inertia to sepa...

  13. Microfabricated tactile sensors for biomedical applications: a review.

    PubMed

    Saccomandi, Paola; Schena, Emiliano; Oddo, Calogero Maria; Zollo, Loredana; Silvestri, Sergio; Guglielmelli, Eugenio

    2014-12-01

    During the last decades, tactile sensors based on different sensing principles have been developed due to the growing interest in robotics and, mainly, in medical applications. Several technological solutions have been employed to design tactile sensors; in particular, solutions based on microfabrication present several attractive features. Microfabrication technologies allow for developing miniaturized sensors with good performance in terms of metrological properties (e.g., accuracy, sensitivity, low power consumption, and frequency response). Small size and good metrological properties heighten the potential role of tactile sensors in medicine, making them especially attractive to be integrated in smart interfaces and microsurgical tools. This paper provides an overview of microfabricated tactile sensors, focusing on the mean principles of sensing, i.e., piezoresistive, piezoelectric and capacitive sensors. These sensors are employed for measuring contact properties, in particular force and pressure, in three main medical fields, i.e., prosthetics and artificial skin, minimal access surgery and smart interfaces for biomechanical analysis. The working principles and the metrological properties of the most promising tactile, microfabricated sensors are analyzed, together with their application in medicine. Finally, the new emerging technologies in these fields are briefly described.

  14. Sub-picotesla Scalar Atomic Magnetometer with a Microfabricated Vapor Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Mhaskar, Rahul

    2016-05-01

    We explore the sensitivity limits of scalar atomic magnetometry with a micro-fabricated Cs vapor cell. The millimeter-scale cell is fabricated using silicon Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) technology. The atomic spin procession is driven by an amplitude-modulated circularly polarized pump laser resonant with the D1 transition in Cs atoms. The precession is detected by an off-resonant linearly polarized probe laser using a balanced polarimeter setup. The probe light is spatially split into two beams to perform a gradiometer measurement. In a magnetic field of magnitude within the range of the earth magnetic field, we measure a sensitivity of less than 150 fT/ √Hz in the gradiometer mode, which shows that the magnetometer by itself can achieve sub-100 fT/ √Hz sensitivitiy. In addition to its high sensitivity, the magnetometer has a bandwidth of nearly 1 kHz due to the broad magnetic resonance inside the small cell. Our experiment suggests the feasibility of a portable, low-power and high-performance magnetometer, which can be operated in the earth's magnetic field. Such a device will greatly expand the range of applications for atomic magnetometers, such as the detection of nuclear magnetic resonance in an unshielded environment.

  15. Method For Chemical Sensing Using A Microfabricated Teeter-Totter Resonator

    DOEpatents

    Adkins, Douglas Ray; Heller, Edwin J.; Shul, Randy J.

    2004-11-30

    A method for sensing a chemical analyte in a fluid stream comprises providing a microfabricated teeter-totter resonator that relies upon a Lorentz force to cause oscillation in a paddle, applying a static magnetic field substantially aligned in-plane with the paddle, energizing a current conductor line on a surface of the paddle with an alternating electrical current to generate the Lorentz force, exposing the resonator to the analyte, and detecting the response of the oscillatory motion of the paddle to the chemical analyte. Preferably, a chemically sensitive coating is disposed on at least one surface of the paddle to enhance the sorption of the analyte by the paddle. The concentration of the analyte in a fluid stream can be determined by measuring the change in the resonant frequency or phase of the teeter-totter resonator as the chemical analyte is added to or removed from the paddle.

  16. Inkjet printing technology and conductive inks synthesis for microfabrication techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien Dang, Mau; Dung Dang, Thi My; Fribourg-Blanc, Eric

    2013-03-01

    Inkjet printing is an advanced technique which reliably reproduces text, images and photos on paper and some other substrates by desktop printers and is now used in the field of materials deposition. This interest in maskless materials deposition is coupled with the development of microfabrication techniques for the realization of circuits or patterns on flexible substrates for which printing techniques are of primary interest. This paper is a review of some results obtained in inkjet printing technology to develop microfabrication techniques at Laboratory for Nanotechnology (LNT). Ink development, in particular conductive ink, study of printed patterns, as well as application of these to the realization of radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags on flexible substrates, are presented. Invited talk at the 6th International Workshop on Advanced Materials Science and Nanotechnology, 30 October-2 November 2012, Ha Long, Vietnam.

  17. Microfabrication- and microfluidics-based patterning of cultured neuronal network.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Yuzo; Kotake, Naoki; Haga, Tatsuya; Suzuki, Takafumi; Mabuchi, Kunihiko

    2011-01-01

    The cultured neuronal monolayer has been a promising model system for studying the neuronal dynamics, from single cell to network-wide level. Randomness in the reconstituted network structure has, however, hindered regulated signal transmissions from one neuron to another or from one neuronal population to another. Applying microfabrication-based cell patterning techniques is a promising approach to handling these problems. In the present study, we attempt to regulate the direction of axon development and the pathway of signal transmissions in cultured neuronal networks using micro-fabrication and - fluidic techniques. We created a PDMS-based culture device, which consisted of arrays of U-shaped cell trapping microwells, and placed it onto a chemically micropatterned glass substrate. After 6 days in vitro, we confirmed that cortical neurons extended neurites along the medium flow direction and the micropatterned regions. PMID:22255121

  18. Multilayered Ge/SiGe Material in Microfabricated Thermoelectric Modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samarelli, A.; Llin, L. Ferre; Cecchi, S.; Chrastina, D.; Isella, G.; Etzelstorfer, T.; Stangl, J.; Gubler, E. Muller; Weaver, J. M. R.; Dobson, P.; Paul, D. J.

    2014-10-01

    Results for low dimensional p-type Ge/SiGe superlattices with Ge quantum wells of 3.43 nm are presented. A range of microfabricated test structures have been developed to characterise the cross-plane electrical and thermal properties of the Ge/SiGe heterostructures. These superlattices were directly grown on 100-mm-diameter silicon wafers by a chemical vapour deposition growth system with rates up to 6 nm/s. Quantum well and quantum mechanical tunnel barriers with dimensions down to nm have been designed, grown and tested; they demonstrate a ZT of 0.08 ± 0.011 and power factor of 1.34 ± 0.15 m W m-1 K-2 at 300 K. A complete microfabricated module using indium bump-bonding is reported together with preliminary results on unoptimised material and leg dimensions. Routes to optimise the material and modules are discussed.

  19. Microfabricated Thin-Film Inductors for High-Frequency DC-DC Power Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Di

    2011-12-01

    Microfabricated V-groove inductors targeted to operate above 10 MHz are investigated. Multilayer nano-granular Co-Zr-O/ZrO2 magnetic thin films are used as the core material of the inductors to improve the magnetic performance of the films deposited on the sidewalls of V-grooves and to control eddy-current loss in the core, which goes up very quickly as frequency increases. A loss model is developed to estimate eddy-current loss in multilayer magnetic thin films considering the effect of displacement current at high frequencies, and the model is applied in the design of V-groove inductors. V-groove inductors using multilayer magnetic thin films are co-optimized with power MOSFETs for 7-V to 3.3-V, 1-A DC-DC buck converters to maximize power handling capability per unit substrate area for given efficiencies. Prototype V-groove inductors are fabricated based on the optimization results, and measured and predicted performance of the inductors match well. The prototype inductors are a promising candidate for high-power-density high-efficiency DC-DC converters. The 7-V to 3.3-V, 1-A converters using prototype V-groove inductors are expected to exhibit power density of 2.5 W/mm2 and efficiency of 86% at 100 MHz, and power density of 0.36 W/mm2 and efficiency of 91% at 11 MHz.

  20. SEM microfabric analysis of glacial varves, Geneseo, N. Y

    SciTech Connect

    Pietraszek, S.R. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-03-01

    A detailed study of the microfabric of Pleistocene varved silty-clay from Geneseo Valley (Geneseo, N.Y.) indicates rapid deposition of sediment in a flocculated state into a glacial lake. Ten varve couplets of a 10 cm thick sample were studied using the Scanning Electron Microscope to determine their microfabric. Each varve ranges from 0.5 cm to 2.0 cm and represents an annual ( ) deposit. Varves consists of a lower light colored, coarse zone of silt and clay, and an upper darker colored, organic fine clayey zone. Graded bedding is observed in each couplet, and random clay particle orientation is dominant throughout a varve, with the exception of the top 0.5 mm of the fine layer. The upper and lower contacts are sharp. Fabric features are instrumental in reconstructing a depositional environment. Microfabric results of the glacial unit indicate that an initial heavy concentration of clay and silt was introduced into the basin in a single pulse during spring runoff. The majority of silt settled together with clay in a flocculated or aggregated state, forming the lower coarse zone of random orientation. As the silt concentration diminished, the clay continued to flocculate and settled as a fine clay aggregate. It is proposed that the settling took place during the spring and summer months. Finally, during the winter months, the sediment surface of the varve was disturbed by nemotode burrows, which reoriented the clay flakes into a zone of preferred fabric. Microfabric analysis of these glacial varves, thus suggests that sediment was rapidly deposited in a flocculated state.

  1. Micro-fabricated DC comparison calorimeter for RF power measurement.

    PubMed

    Neji, Bilel; Xu, Jing; Titus, Albert H; Meltzer, Joel

    2014-10-27

    Diode detection and bolometric detection have been widely used to measure radio frequency (RF) power. However, flow calorimeters, in particular micro-fabricated flow calorimeters, have been mostly unexplored as power meters. This paper presents the design, micro-fabrication and characterization of a flow calorimeter. This novel device is capable of measuring power from 100 μW to 200 mW. It has a 50-Ohm load that is heated by the RF source, and the heat is transferred to fluid in a microchannel. The temperature change in the fluid is measured by a thermistor that is connected in one leg of a Wheatstone bridge. The output voltage change of the bridge corresponds to the RF power applied to the load. The microfabricated device measures 25.4 mm × 50.8 mm, excluding the power supplies, microcontroller and fluid pump. Experiments demonstrate that the micro-fabricated sensor has a sensitivity up to 22 × 10⁻³ V/W. The typical resolution of this micro-calorimeter is on the order of 50 μW, and the best resolution is around 10 μW. The effective efficiency is 99.9% from 0−1 GHz and more than 97.5% at frequencies up to 4 GHz. The measured reflection coefficient of the 50-Ohm load and coplanar wave guide is less than −25 dB from 0−2 GHz and less than −16 dB at 2−4 GHz.

  2. Applied Geophysics in the world of tomorrow - Microfabrication arrives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, R. M.

    2012-12-01

    Instrument manufacturers have a unique perspective on the design and use of geophysical equipment. The field instrument must provide reliable and repeatable performance in every climate condition and environmental extreme. The gear must be easy to use and more importantly easy to understand for non-native English speakers. I have traveled the world installing, repairing, commissioning and demonstrating geophysical survey systems. Everywhere I have traveled there is one unassailable fact - our geophysicist compatriots in developed and developing countries are hungry for information and hungry for technology. They want more and better systems to help improve their understanding of the subsurface. And they want to serve their countries by helping to exploit natural resources. I hold up for your review the first highly successful portable magnetometer, the G-856. Designed in 1981 with over 5000 sold, it is still produced in record numbers today for use all over the world. How could it be that a rather simple device could be so long lived, and make such an impact in exploration programs for 32 years? The answer is in producing reliable and easy to use equipment that is affordable. One might compare it to the iPad or Android device of today. The innovative and no-frills interface has attracted users from all markets including mining, oil/gas, archaeology, environmental, UXO/military and forensics. Powerful ancillary software to process the data has always been included at no charge, offering geoscientists a solution rather than a black box. Many of our technologies are poised for dramatic breakthroughs in miniaturization and interconnectivity. I point specifically to the micro-fabrication of the cesium vapor magnetometer. Initiated 5 years ago in conjunction with NIST, Geometrics has embarked on a high stakes game of minimizing size, weight, power consumption and price while eliminating dead zones and maintaining or increasing sensitivity and sample speed. These new

  3. Microfabric analysis of the Appalachian basin Williamson and Willowvale shales

    SciTech Connect

    Burkins, D.L.; Woodard, M. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-03-01

    Shale samples from the Williamson and Willovale formations (Upper Llandoverian, Silurian) were studied to determine the relationship of microfabric (particle orientation) to sedimentary environment and processes. The shales were sampled along a traverse from Utica to Rochester, New York in the Appalachian foreland basin. Samples were taken from proximal and distal parts of the basin and analyzed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and using thin sections to determine the relationship between microfabric and basin position. Results show samples taken from the proximal part of the basin contain large amounts of silt grains, random orientation of clay flakes, and a high degree of bioturbation. Basinward, the samples become less silty, less bioturbated, and have more preferred orientation of clay flakes. The samples at the basin axis show the highest degree of preferred orientation and contain no silt grains. It can be concluded that the shale fabrics vary basinward and microfabric analysis is useful in determining the relative position of samples within a sedimentary basin.

  4. A microfabrication-based approach to quantitative isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Jia, Yuan; Lin, Qiao

    2016-04-15

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) directly measures heat evolved in a chemical reaction to determine equilibrium binding properties of biomolecular systems. Conventional ITC instruments are expensive, use complicated design and construction, and require long analysis times. Microfabricated calorimetric devices are promising, although they have yet to allow accurate, quantitative ITC measurements of biochemical reactions. This paper presents a microfabrication-based approach to integrated, quantitative ITC characterization of biomolecular interactions. The approach integrates microfabricated differential calorimetric sensors with microfluidic titration. Biomolecules and reagents are introduced at each of a series of molar ratios, mixed, and allowed to react. The reaction thermal power is differentially measured, and used to determine the thermodynamic profile of the biomolecular interactions. Implemented in a microdevice featuring thermally isolated, well-defined reaction volumes with minimized fluid evaporation as well as highly sensitive thermoelectric sensing, the approach enables accurate and quantitative ITC measurements of protein-ligand interactions under different isothermal conditions. Using the approach, we demonstrate ITC characterization of the binding of 18-Crown-6 with barium chloride, and the binding of ribonuclease A with cytidine 2'-monophosphate within reaction volumes of approximately 0.7 µL and at concentrations down to 2mM. For each binding system, the ITC measurements were completed with considerably reduced analysis times and material consumption, and yielded a complete thermodynamic profile of the molecular interaction in agreement with published data. This demonstrates the potential usefulness of our approach for biomolecular characterization in biomedical applications. PMID:26655185

  5. Laser-induced-plasma-assisted ablation for glass microfabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Minghui; Sugioka, Koji; Wu, Ding J.; Wong, L. L.; Lu, Yongfeng; Midorikawa, Katsumi; Chong, Tow Chong

    2001-10-01

    Glass is a hard transparent material with many applications in Photonics and advanced display industries. It is a high challenge to achieve crack-free glass microfabrication due to its special material characteristics. Laser-induced-plasma- assisted ablation is applied in this study to get the high quality glass microfabrication. In this processing, the laser beam goes through the glass substrate first and then irradiates on a solid target behind. For laser fluence above ablation threshold for the target, the generated plasma flies forward at a high speed. At a small target-to-substrate distance, there are strong interactions among laser light, target plasma and glass materials at the rear side of the substrate. Light absorption characteristic at the glass substrate is modified since the plasma may soften and dope into the glass in the interaction area. To have a better understanding of this processing, signal diagnostics are carried out to study the dynamic interaction. It is found that glass microfabrication is closely related to laser fluence, target-to-substrate distance, laser spot size and laser beam scanning speed. With proper control of the processing parameters, glass surface marking patterning and cutting can be achieved. With different materials as the targets, color marking of glass substrate can be obtained.

  6. A microfabrication-based approach to quantitative isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Jia, Yuan; Lin, Qiao

    2016-04-15

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) directly measures heat evolved in a chemical reaction to determine equilibrium binding properties of biomolecular systems. Conventional ITC instruments are expensive, use complicated design and construction, and require long analysis times. Microfabricated calorimetric devices are promising, although they have yet to allow accurate, quantitative ITC measurements of biochemical reactions. This paper presents a microfabrication-based approach to integrated, quantitative ITC characterization of biomolecular interactions. The approach integrates microfabricated differential calorimetric sensors with microfluidic titration. Biomolecules and reagents are introduced at each of a series of molar ratios, mixed, and allowed to react. The reaction thermal power is differentially measured, and used to determine the thermodynamic profile of the biomolecular interactions. Implemented in a microdevice featuring thermally isolated, well-defined reaction volumes with minimized fluid evaporation as well as highly sensitive thermoelectric sensing, the approach enables accurate and quantitative ITC measurements of protein-ligand interactions under different isothermal conditions. Using the approach, we demonstrate ITC characterization of the binding of 18-Crown-6 with barium chloride, and the binding of ribonuclease A with cytidine 2'-monophosphate within reaction volumes of approximately 0.7 µL and at concentrations down to 2mM. For each binding system, the ITC measurements were completed with considerably reduced analysis times and material consumption, and yielded a complete thermodynamic profile of the molecular interaction in agreement with published data. This demonstrates the potential usefulness of our approach for biomolecular characterization in biomedical applications.

  7. Microelectrode arrays fabricated using a novel hybrid microfabrication method

    PubMed Central

    Merlo, Mark W.; Snyder, Russell L.; Middlebrooks, John C.; Bachman, Mark

    2011-01-01

    We present novel hybrid microfabrication methods for microelectrode arrays that combine microwire assembly, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) manufacturing techniques and precision tool-based micromachining. This combination enables hybrid microfabrication to produce complex geometries and structures, increase material selection, and improve integration. A 32-channel shank microelectrode array was fabricated to highlight the hybrid microfabrication techniques. The electrode shank was 130 μm at its narrowest, had a 127 μm thickness and had iridium oxide electrode sites that were 25 μm in diameter with 150 μm spacing. Techniques used to fabricate this electrode include microassembly of insulated gold wires into a micromold, micromolding the microelectrode shank, post molding machining, sacrificial release of the microelectrode and electrodeposition of iridium oxide onto the microelectrode sites. Electrode site position accuracy was shown to have a standard deviation of less than 4 μm. Acute in vivo recordings with the 32-channel shank microelectrode array demonstrated comparable performance to that obtained with commercial microelectrode arrays . This new approach to microelectrode array fabrication will enable new microelectrodes, such as multi-sided arrays, drug eluding electrodes and biodegradable shanks. PMID:21979567

  8. Microfabricated sensors for the measurement of electromagnetic fields in biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monberg, James; Henning, Albert K.

    1995-09-01

    Public awareness of the risks of exposure to electromagnetic radiation has grown over the past ten yeras. The effects of power lines on human and animal health have drawn particular attention. Some longitudinal studies of cancer rates near power lines show a significant correlation, while others show a null result. The studies have suffered from inadequate sensors for the measurement of electromagnetic radiation in vivo. In this work, we describe the design, construction, and testing of electrically passive, microfabricated single-pole antennas and coils. These sensors will be used in vivo to study the effects of electromagnetic radiation on animals. Our testing to date has been limited to in vitro studies of the magnetic field probes. Magnetic field pickup coils were fabricated with up to 100 turns, over a length of up to 1000 micrometers . Measurements were carried out with the sensors in air, and in water of various saline concentrations. Magnetic fields were applied using a Helmholtz coil. Both dc and ac fields were applied. The results indicate that small-area measurements of electromagnetic fields in vitro can be made successfully, provided adequate shielding and amplification are used.

  9. Microfabricated Sieve for the Continuous Sorting of Macromolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, T. A. J.; Austin, R. H.

    1998-02-01

    In a two-dimensional periodic but asymmetric environment, a Brownian particle that is driven in one direction by a potential gradient will also drift in the orthogonal direction at a rate that depends on its diffusion coefficient. On this basis, we propose a new method for separating biological macromolecules according to size. A fine stream of molecules is electrophoresed through a microfabricated sieve, etched from a silicon chip by lithography. The sieve consists of a periodic array of oblong obstacles, which deflect the molecules so that each species follows a different trajectory, oblique to the flow. Advantages promised by the technique include improved efficiency, continuous sorting and ready automation.

  10. Cell lysis and DNA extraction in microfabricated devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prinz, Christelle; Tegenfeldt, Jonas; Austin, Robert

    2002-03-01

    We are developing a microfabricated device to lyse single cells and extract the DNA. The chip consists of two parts: a diffuse mixer combined with a dielectrophoretic trap. We are working with E. coli which have been made osmoticaly unstable before loading into the chip. The cells are lysed by osmotic shock in the mixer. The lysate is then passed to the dielectrophoretic trap. Attempts to separate the genomic DNA from the lysate fragments by selectively trapping the DNA using dielectrophoresis have been made. We have encountered cell sticking problems and are investingating surface modifications using Polyethylene glycol to solve this problem.

  11. Enhanced adhesion for LIGA microfabrication by using a buffer layer

    DOEpatents

    Bajikar, Sateesh S.; De Carlo, Francesco; Song, Joshua J.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is an improvement on the LIGA microfabrication process wherein a buffer layer is applied to the upper or working surface of a substrate prior to the placement of a resist onto the surface of the substrate. The buffer layer is made from an inert low-Z material (low atomic weight), a material that absorbs secondary X-rays emissions from the substrate that are generated from the substrate upon exposure to a primary X-rays source. Suitable materials for the buffer layer include polyamides and polyimide. The preferred polyimide is synthesized form pyromellitic anhydride and oxydianiline (PMDA-ODA).

  12. Enhanced adhesion for LIGA microfabrication by using a buffer layer

    DOEpatents

    Bajikar, Sateesh S.; De Carlo, Francesco; Song, Joshua J.

    2004-01-27

    The present invention is an improvement on the LIGA microfabrication process wherein a buffer layer is applied to the upper or working surface of a substrate prior to the placement of a resist onto the surface of the substrate. The buffer layer is made from an inert low-Z material (low atomic weight), a material that absorbs secondary X-rays emissions from the substrate that are generated from the substrate upon exposure to a primary X-rays source. Suitable materials for the buffer layer include polyamides and polyimide. The preferred polyimide is synthesized form pyromellitic anhydride and oxydianiline (PMDA-ODA).

  13. Microfabricated, flowthrough porous apparatus for discrete detection of binding reactions

    DOEpatents

    Beattie, Kenneth L.

    1998-01-01

    An improved microfabricated apparatus for conducting a multiplicity of individual and simultaneous binding reactions is described. The apparatus comprises a substrate on which are located discrete and isolated sites for binding reactions. The apparatus is characterized by discrete and isolated regions that extend through said substrate and terminate on a second surface thereof such that when a test sample is allowed to the substrate, it is capable of penetrating through each such region during the course of said binding reaction. The apparatus is especially useful for sequencing by hybridization of DNA molecules.

  14. Concentrating Genomic Length DNA in a Microfabricated Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Abrams, Ezra S.; Boles, T. Christian; Pedersen, Jonas N.; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Austin, Robert H.; Sturm, James C.

    2015-05-01

    We demonstrate that a microfabricated bump array can concentrate genomic-length DNA molecules efficiently at continuous, high flow velocities, up to 40 μ m /s , if the single-molecule DNA globule has a sufficiently large shear modulus. Increase in the shear modulus is accomplished by compacting the DNA molecules to minimal coil size using polyethylene glycol (PEG) derived depletion forces. We map out the sweet spot, where concentration occurs, as a function of PEG concentration and flow speed using a combination of theoretical analysis and experiment. Purification of DNA from enzymatic reactions for next-generation DNA-sequencing libraries will be an important application of this development.

  15. Microfabrication and Applications of Opto-Microfluidic Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Daiying; Men, Liqiu; Chen, Qiying

    2011-01-01

    A review of research activities on opto-microfluidic sensors carried out by the research groups in Canada is presented. After a brief introduction of this exciting research field, detailed discussion is focused on different techniques for the fabrication of opto-microfluidic sensors, and various applications of these devices for bioanalysis, chemical detection, and optical measurement. Our current research on femtosecond laser microfabrication of optofluidic devices is introduced and some experimental results are elaborated. The research on opto-microfluidics provides highly sensitive opto-microfluidic sensors for practical applications with significant advantages of portability, efficiency, sensitivity, versatility, and low cost. PMID:22163904

  16. Jet Penetration into a Scaled Microfabricated Stirling Cycle Regenerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Liyong; Simon, Terrence W.; Mantell, Susan; Ibrahim, Mournir; Gedeon, David; Tew, Roy

    2008-01-01

    The cooler and heater adjacent to the regenerator of a Stirling cycle engine have tubes or channels which form jets that pass into the regenerator while diffusing within the matrix. An inactive part of the matrix, beyond the cores of these jets, does not participate fully in the heat transfer between the flow of working fluid and the regenerator matrix material, weakening the regenerator s ability to exchange heat with the working fluid. The objective of the present program is to document this effect on the performance of the regenerator and to develop a model for generalizing the results. However, the small scales of actual Stirling regenerator matrices (on the order of tens of microns) make direct measurements of this effect very difficult. As a result, jet spreading within a regenerator matrix has not been characterized well and is poorly understood. Also, modeling is lacking experimental verification. To address this, a large-scale mockup of thirty times actual scale was constructed and operated under conditions that are dynamically similar to the engine operation. Jet penetration with round jets and slot jets into the microfabricated regenerator geometry are then measured by conventional means. The results are compared with those from a study of spreading of round jets within woven screen regenerator for further documentation of the comparative performance of the microfabricated regenerator geometry.

  17. Microfabrication of transparent materials using filamented femtosecond laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butkus, S.; Paipulas, D.; Gaižauskas, Eugenijus; KaškelytÄ--, D.; Sirutkaitis, V.

    2014-05-01

    Glass drilling realized with the help of femtosecond lasers attract industrial attention, however, desired tasks may require systems employing high numerical aperture (NA) focusing conditions, low repetition rate lasers and complex fast motion translation stages. Due to the sensitivity of such systems, slight instabilities in parameter values can lead to crack formations, severe fabrication rate decrement and poor quality overall results. A microfabrication system lacking the stated disadvantages was constructed and demonstrated in this report. An f-theta lens was used in combination with a galvanometric scanner, in addition, a water pumping system that enables formation of water films of variable thickness in real time on the samples. Water acts as a medium for filament formation, which in turn decreases the focal spot diameter and increases fluence and axial focal length. This article demonstrates the application of a femtosecond (280fs) laser towards rapid cutting of different transparent materials. Filament formation in water gives rise to strong ablation at the surface of the sample, moreover, the water, surrounding the ablated area, adds increased cooling and protection from cracking. The constructed microfabrication system is capable of drilling holes in thick soda-lime, hardened glasses and sapphire. The fabrication time varies depending on the diameter of the hole and spans from a few to several hundred seconds. Moreover, complex-shape fabrication was demonstrated.

  18. A microfabricated scaffold for retinal progenitor cell grafting.

    PubMed

    Neeley, William L; Redenti, Stephen; Klassen, Henry; Tao, Sarah; Desai, Tejal; Young, Michael J; Langer, Robert

    2008-02-01

    Diseases that cause photoreceptor cell degeneration afflict millions of people, yet no restorative treatment exists for these blinding disorders. Replacement of photoreceptors using retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) represents a promising therapy for the treatment of retinal degeneration. Previous studies have demonstrated the ability of polymer scaffolds to increase significantly both the survival and differentiation of RPCs. We report the microfabrication of a poly(glycerol-sebacate) scaffold with superior mechanical properties for the delivery of RPCs to the subretinal space. Using a replica molding technique, a porous poly(glycerol-sebacate) scaffold with a thickness of 45 microm was fabricated. Evaluation of the mechanical properties of this scaffold showed that the Young's modulus is about 5-fold lower and the maximum elongation at failure is about 10-fold higher than the previously reported RPC scaffolds. RPCs strongly adhered to the poly(glycerol-sebacate) scaffold, and endogenous fluorescence nearly doubled over a 2-day period before leveling off after 3 days. Immunohistochemistry revealed that cells grown on the scaffold for 7 days expressed a mixture of immature and mature markers, suggesting a tendency towards differentiation. We conclude that microfabricated poly(glycerol-sebacate) exhibits a number of novel properties for use as a scaffold for RPC delivery.

  19. Microfabricated capillary electrophoresis amino acid chirality analyzer for extraterrestrial exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutt, L. D.; Glavin, D. P.; Bada, J. L.; Mathies, R. A.

    1999-01-01

    Chiral separations of fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled amino acids have been performed on a microfabricated capillary electrophoresis chip to explore the feasibility of using such devices to analyze for extinct or extant life signs in extraterrestrial environments. The test system consists of a folded electrophoresis channel (19.0 cm long x 150 microns wide x 20 microns deep) that was photolithographically fabricated in a 10-cm-diameter glass wafer sandwich, coupled to a laser-excited confocal fluorescence detection apparatus providing subattomole sensitivity. Using a sodium dodecyl sulfate/gamma-cyclodextrin pH 10.0 carbonate electrophoresis buffer and a separation voltage of 550 V/cm at 10 degrees C, baseline resolution was observed for Val, Ala, Glu, and Asp enantiomers and Gly in only 4 min. Enantiomeric ratios were determined for amino acids extracted from the Murchison meteorite, and these values closely matched values determined by HPLC. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using microfabricated lab-on-a-chip systems to analyze extraterrestrial samples for amino acids.

  20. A Scalable Microfabricated Ion Trap for Quantum Information Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maunz, Peter; Haltli, Raymond; Hollowell, Andrew; Lobser, Daniel; Mizrahi, Jonathan; Rembetski, John; Resnick, Paul; Sterk, Jonathan D.; Stick, Daniel L.; Blain, Matthew G.

    2016-05-01

    Trapped Ion Quantum Information Processing (QIP) relies on complex microfabricated trap structures to enable scaling of the number of quantum bits. Building on previous demonstrations of surface-electrode ion traps, we have designed and characterized the Sandia high-optical-access (HOA-2) microfabricated ion trap. This trap features high optical access, high trap frequencies, low heating rates, and negligible charging of dielectric trap components. We have observed trap lifetimes of more than 100h, measured trap heating rates for ytterbium of less than 40quanta/s, and demonstrated shuttling of ions from a slotted to an above surface region and through a Y-junction. Furthermore, we summarize demonstrations of high-fidelity single and two-qubit gates realized in this trap. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. This work was supported by the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA).

  1. Microfabricated, amperometric, enzyme-based biosensors for in vivo applications.

    PubMed

    Weltin, Andreas; Kieninger, Jochen; Urban, Gerald A

    2016-07-01

    Miniaturized electrochemical in vivo biosensors allow the measurement of fast extracellular dynamics of neurotransmitter and energy metabolism directly in the tissue. Enzyme-based amperometric biosensing is characterized by high specificity and precision as well as high spatial and temporal resolution. Aside from glucose monitoring, many systems have been introduced mainly for application in the central nervous system in animal models. We compare the microsensor principle with other methods applied in biomedical research to show advantages and drawbacks. Electrochemical sensor systems are easily miniaturized and fabricated by microtechnology processes. We review different microfabrication approaches for in vivo sensor platforms, ranging from simple modified wires and fibres to fully microfabricated systems on silicon, ceramic or polymer substrates. The various immobilization methods for the enzyme such as chemical cross-linking and entrapment in polymer membranes are discussed. The resulting sensor performance is compared in detail. We also examine different concepts to reject interfering substances by additional membranes, aspects of instrumentation and biocompatibility. Practical considerations are elaborated, and conclusions for future developments are presented. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26935934

  2. Microcontact printing of self-assembled monolayers: applications in microfabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilbur, James L.; Kumar, Amit; Biebuyck, Hans A.; Kim, Enoch; Whitesides, George M.

    1996-12-01

    This paper describes applications in microfabrication using patterned self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) formed by microcontact printing. Microcontact printing 0957-4484/7/4/028/img1 is a flexible new technique that forms patterned SAMs with regions terminated by different chemical functionalities (and thus different physical and chemical properties), in patterns with 0957-4484/7/4/028/img2 dimensions. Patterns of SAM are formed using an alkanethiol as an `ink', and printing the alkanethiol on a metal support with elastomeric `stamp'. We fabricate the stamp by moulding a silicone elastomer using a master prepared by optical or x-ray microlithography or by other techniques. SAMs of long-chain alkanethiolates on gold and other metals can act as nanometer resists by protecting the supporting metal from corrosion by appropriately formulated etchants: the fabrication of microstructures of gold and silicon demonstrates the utility of patterned SAMs (formed by 0957-4484/7/4/028/img3) as nm resists. Patterned SAMs formed by 0957-4484/7/4/028/img3 can also control the wettability of a surface on the 0957-4484/7/4/028/img2 scale. The organization of liquids in patterned arrays with 0957-4484/7/4/028/img2 dimensions, and the patterned deposition of microcrystals and microcrystal arrays illustrate the use of controlled wettability for microfabrication.

  3. Microfabricated Chemical Sensors for Aerospace Fire Detection Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Fralick, Gustave; Thomas, Valarie; Makel, D.; Liu, C. C.; Ward, B.; Wu, Q. H.

    2001-01-01

    The detection of fires on-board commercial aircraft is extremely important for safety reasons. Although dependable fire detection equipment presently exists within the cabin, detection of fire within the cargo hold has been less reliable and susceptible to false alarms. A second, independent method of fire detection to complement the conventional smoke detection techniques, such as the measurement of chemical species indicative of a fire, will help reduce false alarms and improve aircraft safety. Although many chemical species are indicative of a fire, two species of particular interest are CO and CO2. This paper discusses microfabricated chemical sensor development tailored to meet the needs of fire safety applications. This development is based on progress in three types of technology: 1) Micromachining and microfabrication (Microsystem) technology to fabricate miniaturized sensors. 2) The use of nanocrystalline materials to develop sensors with improved stability combined with higher sensitivity. 3) The development of high temperature semiconductors, especially silicon carbide. The individual sensor being developed and their level of maturity will be presented.

  4. Microfabricated Chemical Gas Sensors and Sensor Arrays for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.

    2005-01-01

    Aerospace applications require the development of chemical sensors with capabilities beyond those of commercially available sensors. In particular, factors such as minimal sensor size, weight, and power consumption are particularly important. Development areas which have potential aerospace applications include launch vehicle leak detection, engine health monitoring, and fire detection. Sensor development for these applications is based on progress in three types of technology: 1) Micromachining and microfabrication (Microsystem) technology to fabricate miniaturized sensors; 2) The use of nanocrystalline materials to develop sensors with improved stability combined with higher sensitivity; 3) The development of high temperature semiconductors, especially silicon carbide. This presentation discusses the needs of space applications as well as the point-contact sensor technology and sensor arrays being developed to address these needs. Sensors to measure hydrogen, hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides (NO,), carbon monoxide, oxygen, and carbon dioxide are being developed as well as arrays for leak, fire, and emissions detection. Demonstrations of the technology will also be discussed. It is concluded that microfabricated sensor technology has significant potential for use in a range of aerospace applications.

  5. Ball-grid array architecture for microfabricated ion traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guise, Nicholas D.; Fallek, Spencer D.; Stevens, Kelly E.; Brown, K. R.; Volin, Curtis; Harter, Alexa W.; Amini, Jason M.; Higashi, Robert E.; Lu, Son Thai; Chanhvongsak, Helen M.; Nguyen, Thi A.; Marcus, Matthew S.; Ohnstein, Thomas R.; Youngner, Daniel W.

    2015-05-01

    State-of-the-art microfabricated ion traps for quantum information research are approaching nearly one hundred control electrodes. We report here on the development and testing of a new architecture for microfabricated ion traps, built around ball-grid array (BGA) connections, that is suitable for increasingly complex trap designs. In the BGA trap, through-substrate vias bring electrical signals from the back side of the trap die to the surface trap structure on the top side. Gold-ball bump bonds connect the back side of the trap die to an interposer for signal routing from the carrier. Trench capacitors fabricated into the trap die replace area-intensive surface or edge capacitors. Wirebonds in the BGA architecture are moved to the interposer. These last two features allow the trap die to be reduced to only the area required to produce trapping fields. The smaller trap dimensions allow tight focusing of an addressing laser beam for fast single-qubit rotations. Performance of the BGA trap as characterized with 40Ca+ ions is comparable to previous surface-electrode traps in terms of ion heating rate, mode frequency stability, and storage lifetime. We demonstrate two-qubit entanglement operations with 171Yb+ ions in a second BGA trap.

  6. Ball-grid array architecture for microfabricated ion traps

    SciTech Connect

    Guise, Nicholas D. Fallek, Spencer D.; Stevens, Kelly E.; Brown, K. R.; Volin, Curtis; Harter, Alexa W.; Amini, Jason M.; Higashi, Robert E.; Lu, Son Thai; Chanhvongsak, Helen M.; Nguyen, Thi A.; Marcus, Matthew S.; Ohnstein, Thomas R.; Youngner, Daniel W.

    2015-05-07

    State-of-the-art microfabricated ion traps for quantum information research are approaching nearly one hundred control electrodes. We report here on the development and testing of a new architecture for microfabricated ion traps, built around ball-grid array (BGA) connections, that is suitable for increasingly complex trap designs. In the BGA trap, through-substrate vias bring electrical signals from the back side of the trap die to the surface trap structure on the top side. Gold-ball bump bonds connect the back side of the trap die to an interposer for signal routing from the carrier. Trench capacitors fabricated into the trap die replace area-intensive surface or edge capacitors. Wirebonds in the BGA architecture are moved to the interposer. These last two features allow the trap die to be reduced to only the area required to produce trapping fields. The smaller trap dimensions allow tight focusing of an addressing laser beam for fast single-qubit rotations. Performance of the BGA trap as characterized with {sup 40}Ca{sup +} ions is comparable to previous surface-electrode traps in terms of ion heating rate, mode frequency stability, and storage lifetime. We demonstrate two-qubit entanglement operations with {sup 171}Yb{sup +} ions in a second BGA trap.

  7. Microfabricated Instrumentation for Chemical Sensing in Industrial Process Control

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, J. M.

    2000-06-01

    The monitoring of chemical constituents in manufacturing processes is of economic importance to most industries. The monitoring and control of chemical constituents may be of importance for product quality control or, in the case of process effluents, of environmental concern. The most common approach now employed for chemical process control is to collect samples which are returned to a conventional chemical analysis laboratory. This project attempts to demonstrate the use of microfabricated structures, referred to as 'lab-on-a-chip' devices, that accomplish chemical measurement tasks that emulate those performed in the conventional laboratory. The devices envisioned could be used as hand portable chemical analysis instruments where samples are analyzed in the field or as emplaced sensors for continuous 'real-time' monitoring. This project focuses on the development of filtration elements and solid phase extraction elements that can be monolithically integrated onto electrophoresis and chromatographic structures pioneered in the laboratory. Successful demonstration of these additional functional elements on integrated microfabricated devices allows lab-on-a-chip technologies to address real world samples that would be encountered in process control environments. The resultant technology has a broad application to industrial environmental monitoring problems. such as monitoring municipal water supplies, waste water effluent from industrial facilities, or monitoring of run-off from agricultural activities. The technology will also be adaptable to manufacturing process control scenarios. Microfabricated devices integrating sample filtration, solid phase extraction, and chromatographic separation with solvent programming were demonstrated. Filtering of the sample was accomplished at the same inlet with an array of seven channels each 1 {micro}m deep and 18 {micro}m wide. Sample concentration and separation were performed on channels 5 {micro}m deep and 25 {micro

  8. Sub-to super-ambient temperature programmable microfabricated gas chromatography column

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, Alex L.; Anderson, Lawrence F.

    2004-03-16

    A sub- to super-ambient temperature programmable microfabricated gas chromatography column enables more efficient chemical separation of chemical analytes in a gas mixture by combining a thermoelectric cooler and temperature sensing on the microfabricated column. Sub-ambient temperature programming enables the efficient separation of volatile organic compounds and super-ambient temperature programming enables the elution of less volatile analytes within a reasonable time. The small heat capacity and thermal isolation of the microfabricated column improves the thermal time response and power consumption, both important factors for portable microanalytical systems.

  9. A Microfabricated Involute-Foil Regenerator for Stirling Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tew, Roy; Ibrahim, Mounir; Danila, Daniel; Simon, Terrence; Mantell, Susan; Sun, Liyong; Gedeon, David; Kelly, Kevin; McLean, Jeffrey; Qiu, Songgang

    2007-01-01

    A segmented involute-foil regenerator has been designed, microfabricated and tested in an oscillating-flow rig with excellent results. During the Phase I effort, several approximations of parallel-plate regenerator geometry were chosen as potential candidates for a new microfabrication concept. Potential manufacturers and processes were surveyed. The selected concept consisted of stacked segmented-involute-foil disks (or annular portions of disks), originally to be microfabricated from stainless-steel via the LiGA (lithography, electroplating, and molding) process and EDM. During Phase II, re-planning of the effort led to test plans based on nickel disks, microfabricated via the LiGA process, only. A stack of nickel segmented-involute-foil disks was tested in an oscillating-flow test rig. These test results yielded a performance figure of merit (roughly the ratio of heat transfer to pressure drop) of about twice that of the 90 percent random fiber currently used in small approx.100 W Stirling space-power convertors-in the Reynolds Number range of interest (50 to 100). A Phase III effort is now underway to fabricate and test a segmented-involute-foil regenerator in a Stirling convertor. Though funding limitations prevent optimization of the Stirling engine geometry for use with this regenerator, the Sage computer code will be used to help evaluate the engine test results. Previous Sage Stirling model projections have indicated that a segmented-involute-foil regenerator is capable of improving the performance of an optimized involute-foil engine by 6 to 9 percent; it is also anticipated that such involute-foil geometries will be more reliable and easier to manufacture with tight-tolerance characteristics, than random-fiber or wire-screen regenerators. Beyond the near-term Phase III regenerator fabrication and engine testing, other goals are (1) fabrication from a material suitable for high temperature Stirling operation (up to 850 C for current engines; up to 1200 C

  10. A Microfabricated Involute-Foil Regenerator for Stirling Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tew, Roy; Ibrahim, Mounir; Danila, Daniel; Simon, Terry; Mantell, Susan; Sun, Liyong; Gedeon, David; Kelly, Kevin; McLean, Jeffrey; Wood, Gary; Qiu, Songgang

    2007-01-01

    A segmented involute-foil regenerator has been designed, microfabricated and tested in an oscillating-flow rig with excellent results. During the Phase I effort, several approximations of parallel-plate regenerator geometry were chosen as potential candidates for a new microfabrication concept. Potential manufacturers and processes were surveyed. The selected concept consisted of stacked segmented-involute-foil disks (or annular portions of disks), originally to be microfabricated from stainless-steel via the LiGA (lithography, electroplating, and molding) process and EDM (electric discharge machining). During Phase II, re-planning of the effort led to test plans based on nickel disks, microfabricated via the LiGA process, only. A stack of nickel segmented-involute-foil disks was tested in an oscillating-flow test rig. These test results yielded a performance figure of merit (roughly the ratio of heat transfer to pressure drop) of about twice that of the 90% random fiber currently used in small 100 W Stirling space-power convertors in the Reynolds Number range of interest (50-100). A Phase III effort is now underway to fabricate and test a segmented-involute-foil regenerator in a Stirling convertor. Though funding limitations prevent optimization of the Stirling engine geometry for use with this regenerator, the Sage computer code will be used to help evaluate the engine test results. Previous Sage Stirling model projections have indicated that a segmented-involute-foil regenerator is capable of improving the performance of an optimized involute-foil engine by 6-9%; it is also anticipated that such involute-foil geometries will be more reliable and easier to manufacture with tight-tolerance characteristics, than random-fiber or wire-screen regenerators. Beyond the near-term Phase III regenerator fabrication and engine testing, other goals are (1) fabrication from a material suitable for high temperature Stirling operation (up to 850 C for current engines; up to

  11. Rapid microfabrication of transparent materials using filamented femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butkus, S.; Gaižauskas, E.; Paipulas, D.; Viburys, Ž.; Kaškelyė, D.; Barkauskas, M.; Alesenkov, A.; Sirutkaitis, V.

    2014-01-01

    Microfabrication of transparent materials using femtosecond laser pulses has showed good potential towards industrial application. Maintaining pulse energies exceeding the critical self-focusing threshold by more than 100-fold produced filaments that were used for micromachining purposes. This article demonstrates two different micromachining techniques using femtosecond filaments generated in different transparent media (water and glass). The stated micromachining techniques are cutting and welding of transparent samples. In addition, cutting and drilling experiments were backed by theoretical modelling giving a deeper insight into the whole process. We demonstrate cut-out holes in soda-lime glass having thickness up to 1 mm and aspect ratios close to 20, moreover, the fabrication time is of the order of tens of seconds, in addition, grooves and holes were fabricated in hardened 1.1 mm thick glass (Corning Gorilla glass). Glass welding was made possible and welded samples were achieved after several seconds of laser fabrication.

  12. Progress Towards Quantum Simulation Using Micro-fabricated Ion Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, K.; Ji, G.; Rickerd, C.; Collins, K.; Monroe, C.

    2015-05-01

    We report on current experimental progress towards using a surface electrode trap for quantum simulation. We use a micro-fabricated trap developed collaboratively between the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) and Honeywell International known as the Ball Grid Array (BGA) trap. This trap features 96 electrodes for fine control of the DC potential as well as a small footprint allowing for tight focusing of interaction lasers. We discuss the experimental system which utilizes the BGA trap, loading of Yb171 ions in this trap, and deterministic loading of chains of five or more ions. We hope to take advantage of the features of this new trap architecture in order to perform a small scale Boson Sampling experiment. This work is performed in collaboration with the GTRI Ion Trap Group and supported by ARO with funding from the IARPA MQCO program, and the AFOSR STTR on Atom Trap Chips.

  13. Microfabricated Gas Sensors Demonstrated in Fire and Emission Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.

    2003-01-01

    A range of microfabricated chemical sensors are being developed to meet the needs of fire detection and emission monitoring in aerospace applications. These sensors have the advantages over traditional technology of minimal size, weight, and power consumption as well as the ability to be placed closer to where the measurements need to be made. Sensor arrays are being developed to address detection needs in environments where multiple species need to be measured. For example, the monitoring of chemical species such as carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), hydrocarbons, and other species is important in the detection of fires on airplanes and spacecraft. In contrast, different sensors are necessary for characterizing some aircraft engine designs where the monitoring of nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) and CO is of high interest. Demonstration of both fire and emission microsensor technology was achieved this year in a collaborative effort undertaken by the NASA Glenn Research Center, Case Western Reserve University, and Makel Engineering, Inc.

  14. Micro-fabricated fluorescence-activated cell sorter.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung Hwan; Chen, Chun H; Tsai, Frank S; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate a high sensitivity, high throughput microfabricated cell sorting device with the integrated piezoelectric actuator and optofluidic waveguide on a chip. For automated sorting, field-programmable-gate-array (FPGA) embedded real time control loop system is built. The sorting is performed under high flow rate ( approximately 10 cm/sec), and the sorting system can achieve a high throughput (> 1kHz) with high purity. Moreover, to enhance its sensitivity, Teflon AF coated liquid core waveguide (LCW) structure is demonstrated. Teflon AF has a lower refractive index (n=1.31) than water (n=1.33) and forms the cladding layer of the LCW. Incident light is confined and guided along the Teflon AF coated fluidic channel, and interact with samples flowing along the same channel. This enables flexible device design and gives high sensitivity to the fluorescence detection system. The preliminary results demonstrate sorting fluorescent beads at a sorting efficiency of approximately 70% with no false sorting.

  15. Microfabrication of Fresnel zone plates by laser induced solid ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Vanessa R. M.; Thomas, John; Santhosh, Chidangil; Ramachandran, Hema; Mathur, Deepak

    2016-07-01

    A novel and simple single-step method of inscribing optical elements on metal-coated transparent substrates is demonstrated. Laser induced solid ablation (LISA) demands very low laser energies (nJ), as can be amply provided by a femtosecond laser oscillator. Here, LISA is used to write Fresnel zone plates on indium and tungsten coated glass. With up to 100 zones, remarkable agreement is obtained between measured and expected values of the focal length. LISA has enabled attainment of focal spot sizes that are 38% smaller than what would be obtained using conventional lenses of the same numerical aperture. The simplicity with which a high degree of automation can readily be achieved using LISA makes this cost-effective method amenable to a wide variety of applications related to microfabrication of optical elements.

  16. How to Concentrate Genomic Length DNA in a Microfabricated Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Abrams, Ezra; Boles, Christian; Pedersen, Jonas; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Sturm, James; Austin, Robert

    We demonstrate that a microfabricated bump array can concentrate genomic-length DNA molecules efficiently at continuous, high flow velocities, up to 40 ?m/s, if the single-molecule DNA globule has a sufficiently large shear modulus.. Increase in the shear modulus is accomplished by compacting the DNA molecules to minimal coil-size using polyethylene glycol (PEG) derived depletion forces. We map out the sweet spot where concentration occurs as a function of PEG con- centration, flow speed, and bump array parameters using a combination of theoretical analysis and experiment. Purification of DNA from enzymatic reactions for next-generation DNA-sequencing libraries will be an important application of this development.

  17. Sisyphus at the Nanoscale: Bacterial Topotaxis in a Microfabricated Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Guillaume; Galajda, Peter; Liao, David; Austin, Robert H.

    2009-03-01

    The ballistic-like motion of self-propelled particles at low-Reynolds number can be exploited to influence their direction of motion. In particular, it has been demonstrated that by using the right topology (in this case a micro-fabricated array of funnel-like asymmetrical barriers), E.coli bacteria can be ``pumped'' between two adjacent regions (Galajda 2007, Wan 2008). We built upon this idea and developed a micro-habitat array in which chemotaxis and topotaxis --nutrient- and topology-driven motion, respectively-- are in opposition, leading to an inherently unstable environment in which a bacterium is constantly pushed away from the fitness landscape's summit in a Sisyphean fashion. Surprisingly, we find that the bacterial population as a whole is able to overcome the rectifying array. An in-depth microscopic analysis of the swimmer's motion is used to quantify the strategies adopted by the bacteria.

  18. Techniques For Microfabricating Coils For Microelectromechanical Systems Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, R. C.; Powell, A. L.

    2008-01-21

    The advanced technology necessary for building future space exploration vehicles includes microfabricated coils for making possible self-inductances integrated with other passive and active electronic components. Integrated inductances make possible significant improvements in reliability over the traditional arrangement of using external discrete inductances, as well as allowing significant size (volume) reductions (also important in space vehicles). Two possible fabrication techniques (one using proprietary branded 'Foturan' glass, the other using silicon wafer substrates) for microscopic coils are proposed, using electroplating into channels. The techniques have been evaluated for fabricating the planar electrical coils needed for typical microelectromechanical systems applications. There remain problems associated with processing using 'Foturan' glass, but coil fabrication on silicon wafers was successful. Fabrication methods such as these are expected to play an important part in the development of systems and subsystems for forthcoming space exploration missions.

  19. Microfabrication, characterization and in vivo MRI compatibility of diamond microelectrodes array for neural interfacing.

    PubMed

    Hébert, Clément; Warnking, Jan; Depaulis, Antoine; Garçon, Laurie Amandine; Mermoux, Michel; Eon, David; Mailley, Pascal; Omnès, Franck

    2015-01-01

    Neural interfacing still requires highly stable and biocompatible materials, in particular for in vivo applications. Indeed, most of the currently used materials are degraded and/or encapsulated by the proximal tissue leading to a loss of efficiency. Here, we considered boron doped diamond microelectrodes to address this issue and we evaluated the performances of a diamond microelectrode array. We described the microfabrication process of the device and discuss its functionalities. We characterized its electrochemical performances by cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy in saline buffer and observed the typical diamond electrode electrochemical properties, wide potential window and low background current, allowing efficient electrochemical detection. The charge storage capacitance and the modulus of the electrochemical impedance were found to remain in the same range as platinum electrodes used for standard commercial devices. Finally we observed a reduced Magnetic Resonance Imaging artifact when the device was implanted on a rat cortex, suggesting that boron doped-diamond is a very promising electrode material allowing functional imaging.

  20. A review of microfabrication techniques and dielectrophoretic microdevices for particle manipulation and separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M.; Li, W. H.; Zhang, J.; Alici, G.; Wen, W.

    2014-02-01

    The development of lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices over the past decade has attracted growing interest. LOC devices aim to achieve the miniaturization, integration, automation and parallelization of biological and chemical assays. One of the applications, the ability to effectively and accurately manipulate and separate micro- and nano-scale particles in an aqueous solution, is particularly appealing in biological, chemical and medical fields. Among the technologies that have been developed and implemented in microfluidic microsystems for particle manipulation and separation (such as mechanical, inertial, hydrodynamic, acoustic, optical, magnetic and electrical methodologies), dielectrophoresis (DEP) may prove to be the most popular because of its label-free nature, ability to manipulate neutral bioparticles, analyse with high selectivity and sensitivity, compatibility with LOC devices, and easy and direct interface with electronics. The required spatial electric non-uniformities for the DEP effect can be generated by patterning microelectrode arrays within microchannels, or placing insulating obstacles within a microchannel and curving the microchannels. A wide variety of electrode- and insulator-based DEP microdevices have been developed, fabricated, and successfully employed to manipulate and separate bioparticles (i.e. DNA, proteins, bacteria, viruses, mammalian and yeast cells). This review provides an overview of the state-of-the-art of microfabrication techniques and of the structures of dielectrophoretic microdevices aimed towards different applications. The techniques used for particle manipulation and separation based on microfluidics are provided in this paper. In addition, we also present the theoretical background of DEP.

  1. DETERMINATION OF HETEROGENEOUS ELECTRON TRANSFER RATE CONSTANTS AT MICROFABRICATED IRIDIUM ELECTRODES. (R825511C022)

    EPA Science Inventory

    There has been an increasing use of both solid metal and microfabricated iridium electrodes as substrates for various types of electroanalysis. However, investigations to determine heterogeneous electron transfer rate constants on iridium, especially at an electron beam evapor...

  2. Microfabrication of the UV transparent polymer CYTOP using a conventional pulsed green laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Tatsuya; Hanada, Yasutaka

    2016-03-01

    We report the surface microfabrication of CYTOP, an amorphous UV transparent fluoric polymer, using a conventional pulsed green laser. Fluorine-based polymers have unique characteristics, including high transparency from the deep-UV to the IR wavelengths, chemical stability and low refractive indices, and thus are expected to have a number of industrial applications. However, CYTOP and other fluoric polymers are generally very difficult to microfabricate. Therefore, we have developed a technique for the crack-free surface microfabrication of a CYTOP substrate based on ablation with a pulsed green laser followed by successive wet etching and annealing. In this work, the fundamental surface characteristics of the fabricated area were investigated. Following the surface microfabrication of CYTOP, a three-dimensional biochip was fabricated using a conventional bonding technique to demonstrate that a CYTOP biochip is superior to conventional transparent biochips with regard to the microscopic observation of cell motion.

  3. A Microfabricated Deuterium Ion Source for Compact Neutron Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Benjamin Bargsten

    Active neutron interrogation is generally accepted as a reliable means of detecting the illicit transportation of special nuclear materials, in particular highly enriched uranium. The development of portable active neutron interrogation systems for field detection applications could be facilitated by the use of a new deuterium ion source which has the potential to advance many of the performance limiting aspects of exiting compact, accelerator-driven neutron generators. The ion source being investigated is a gated array of sharp metal tips that uses high electric fields to generate deuterium ion currents through the physical processes of field ionization and field desorption. The deuterium ions produced by the source are extracted and used to drive a D-D (or D-T) fusion reaction to create neutrons. The basic microstructure for the ion source array is derived from modern semiconductor microfabrication technology for field emitter arrays, though many structural modifications have been made in an attempt to reach the required operating fields of the ion generation processes. Pulsed (field desorption) and d.c. (field ionization) tests conducted with each array design type developed thus far indicate a steady improvement in array tip operating fields. Field ionization studies were conducted with arrays at source temperatures of 77 K and 293 K. Newly developed arrays have demonstrated field ionization currents upwards of ˜50 nA, which is roughly 50% of the maximum ion production possible, as presently fabricated. Neutron production by field ionization was demonstrated for the first time from the microfabricated arrays. A maximum neutron yield of 95 n/s (6300 n/s/cm2 of array active area) was observed from a 1.5 mm2 array using a D-D fusion reaction at -90 kV. Field desorption studies at 77 K and 293 K were conducted in parallel with field ionization testing. To date, the arrays have consistently demonstrated the field desorption of deuterium ions from array tip surfaces

  4. Microfabrication and Test of a Three-Dimensional Polymer Hydro-focusing Unit for Flow Cytometry Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Ren; Feeback, Daniel L.; Wang, Wanjun

    2004-01-01

    This paper details a novel three-dimensional (3D) hydro-focusing micro cell sorter for micro flow cytometry applications. The unit was microfabricated by means of SU-8 3D lithography. The 3D microstructure for coaxial sheathing was designed, microfabricated, and tested. Three-dimensional hydro-focusing capability was demonstrated with an experiment to sort labeled tanned sheep erythrocytes (red blood cells). This polymer hydro-focusing microstructure is easily microfabricated and integrated with other polymer microfluidic structures.

  5. Microfabrication-derived DDS: From batch to individual production.

    PubMed

    Takada, K

    2008-06-01

    As a result of recent advances in microfabrication technology (MFT), microparticles including microcapsules and microspheres can be prepared individually and the disadvantages of the conventional microparticles produced by batch production, i.e. (i) low loading efficiency, (ii) large size variation, and (iii) initial burst release, have been remedied. In addition, all conventional microparticles have the same structure, a spherical shape, so they have only one function, sustained release. Threelayer microcapsules (TLMCs) have been designed to address these issues. TLMCs consist of a surface layer, a drug carrying layer, and a basement layer. TLMCs have sustained release as well as adhesiveness and targeting functions. TLMCs are prepared using ink-jet printer nozzle technology. The obtained TLMCs are used for the oral delivery of peptide/protein drugs and long-term sustained-release injection preparation. In addition, self-dissolving micropiles (SDMPs) can be individually produced by MFT as a percutaneous preparation. MFT allows biopharmaceutical drugs like insulin, erythropoietin, and growth hormone to be absorbed through the skin. Thus, advances in MFT have accelerated the development of pharmaceutical technology.

  6. Intracellular delivery of molecules using microfabricated nanoneedle arrays.

    PubMed

    Park, Seonhee; Choi, Seong-O; Paik, Seung-joon; Choi, Seungkeun; Allen, Mark; Prausnitz, Mark

    2016-02-01

    Many bioactive molecules have intracellular targets, but have difficulty crossing the cell membrane to reach those targets. To address this difficulty, we fabricated arrays of nanoneedles to gently and simultaneously puncture 10(5) cells and thereby provide transient pathways for transport of molecules into the cells. The nanoneedles were microfabricated by etching silicon to create arrays of nanoneedles measuring 12 μm in height, tapering to a sharp tip less than 30 nm wide to facilitate puncture into cells and spaced 10 μm apart in order to have at least one nanoneedle puncture each cell in a confluent monolayer. These nanoneedles were used for intracellular delivery in two ways: puncture loading, in which nanoneedle arrays were pressed into cell monolayers, and centrifuge loading, in which cells in suspension were spun down onto nanoneedle arrays. The effects on intracellular uptake and cell viability were determined as a function of nanoneedle length and sharpness, puncture force and duration, and molecular weight of the molecule delivered. Under optimal conditions, intracellular uptake was seen in approximately 50 % of cells while maintaining high cell viability. Overall, this study provides a comparative analysis of intracellular delivery using nanoneedle arrays by two different loading methods over a range of operating parameters. PMID:26797026

  7. Fractionation of Long DNA Molecules in Microfabricated Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakajin, Olgica; Duke, T. A. J.; Chou, C. F.; Tegenfeldt, J.; Chan, S. S.; Austin, R. H.; Cox, E. C.

    2000-03-01

    Novel microfabricated devices promise to accomplish fractionation of megabase DNA quickly, accurately, at low cost, and by using small sample amounts. At the entrance to the device the DNA is concentrated in a thin band either at a barrier via entropic forces, or on a platinum wire via dielectric forces. The DNA is then electrophoretically driven into an array of posts arranged in a hexagonal lattice. The dependence of mobility on the length of the DNA molecule is induced by a periodically changing electric field. Under the field whose direction changes by 120 degrees, the DNA molecules move in a regular fashion: the longer DNA molecules backtrack more and move forward at lower speeds than the shorter ones. This technique allows electric fields as large as 1000 V/cm and, thus reduces separation times of long molecules compared to the presently used technique of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. While in a gel it takes up to 48 hours of pulsing to resolve T4 (167 kbp) and lambda (48.5 kbp) molecules, in our device it takes less than 10 seconds. In 10 minutes we can separate these molecules by many millimeters. For video clips of DNA in hexagonal arrays go to http://suiling.princeton.edu

  8. High sensitivity, low power, microfabricated electrochemical sensor for CO

    SciTech Connect

    Neuzil, P.; Kayvani, D.; Maclay, G.J.

    1996-12-31

    CO is a toxic byproduct of incomplete combustion. Improperly vented fireplaces and faulty furnaces cause a estimated 400 deaths in the US each year. The presence of high CO levels may also indicate the presence of a fire. Hence, improved CO detection is of great interest and in the last several years commercial CO detectors have been released. The two most common methods of CO detection in commercial systems for residential use are (1) optical colorometric method, and (2) tin oxide sensor. The colorometric method has the advantage of low power, but the devices tend to give an alarm condition when exposed to low CO levels for a long time period, are difficult to reset, and have a lifetime of about 1 year. The tin oxide sensors have limited stability and high power requirement since the sensor must be heated. There is a need for a stable, sensitive, low power, low cost CO sensor. The authors have developed a planar amperometric sensor for CO detection using microfabrication technology.

  9. Microfabricated alkali vapor cell with anti-relaxation wall coating

    SciTech Connect

    Straessle, R.; Pétremand, Y.; Briand, D.; Rooij, N. F. de; Pellaton, M.; Affolderbach, C.; Mileti, G.

    2014-07-28

    We present a microfabricated alkali vapor cell equipped with an anti-relaxation wall coating. The anti-relaxation coating used is octadecyltrichlorosilane and the cell was sealed by thin-film indium-bonding at a low temperature of 140 °C. The cell body is made of silicon and Pyrex and features a double-chamber design. Depolarizing properties due to liquid Rb droplets are avoided by confining the Rb droplets to one chamber only. Optical and microwave spectroscopy performed on this wall-coated cell are used to evaluate the cell's relaxation properties and a potential gas contamination. Double-resonance signals obtained from the cell show an intrinsic linewidth that is significantly lower than the linewidth that would be expected in case the cell had no wall coating but only contained a buffer-gas contamination on the level measured by optical spectroscopy. Combined with further experimental evidence this proves the presence of a working anti-relaxation wall coating in the cell. Such cells are of interest for applications in miniature atomic clocks, magnetometers, and other quantum sensors.

  10. Microfabrication of microsystem-enabled photovoltaic (MEPV) cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielson, Gregory N.; Okandan, Murat; Cruz-Campa, Jose L.; Resnick, Paul J.; Wanlass, Mark W.; Clews, Peggy J.; Pluym, Tammy C.; Sanchez, Carlos A.; Gupta, Vipin P.

    2011-02-01

    Microsystem-Enabled Photovoltaic (MEPV) cells allow solar PV systems to take advantage of scaling benefits that occur as solar cells are reduced in size. We have developed MEPV cells that are 5 to 20 microns thick and down to 250 microns across. We have developed and demonstrated crystalline silicon (c-Si) cells with solar conversion efficiencies of 14.9%, and gallium arsenide (GaAs) cells with a conversion efficiency of 11.36%. In pursuing this work, we have identified over twenty scaling benefits that reduce PV system cost, improve performance, or allow new functionality. To create these cells, we have combined microfabrication techniques from various microsystem technologies. We have focused our development efforts on creating a process flow that uses standard equipment and standard wafer thicknesses, allows all high-temperature processing to be performed prior to release, and allows the remaining post-release wafer to be reprocessed and reused. The c-Si cell junctions are created using a backside point-contact PV cell process. The GaAs cells have an epitaxially grown junction. Despite the horizontal junction, these cells also are backside contacted. We provide recent developments and details for all steps of the process including junction creation, surface passivation, metallization, and release.

  11. Enhanced differentiation of retinal progenitor cells using microfabricated topographical cues

    PubMed Central

    Steedman, Mark R.; Tao, Sarah L.; Klassen, Henry

    2010-01-01

    Due to the retina’s inability to replace photoreceptors lost during retinal degeneration, significant interest has been placed in methods to implant replacement cells. Polymer scaffolds are increasingly being studied as vehicles for cellular delivery to degenerated retinas. Previously, we fabricated poly(methyl methacrylate) thin film scaffolds that increased survival and integration of implanted retinal progenitor cells (RPCs). Additionally, these scaffolds minimized the trauma and cellular response associated with implantation of foreign bodies into mouse eyes. Here, we demonstrate that biodegradable polycaprolactone (PCL) thin film scaffolds can be fabricated with integrated microtopography. Microfabricated topography in a PCL thin film enhanced the attachment and organization of RPCs compared to unstructured surfaces. Using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction we also observed that attachment to microtopography induced cellular differentiation. RPCs grown on PCL thin films exhibited an increase in gene expression for the photoreceptor markers recoverin and rhodopsin, an increase in the glial and Müller cell marker GFAP, and a decrease in SOX2 gene expression (a marker for undifferentiated progenitor cells) compared to cells grown on unmodified tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS). PMID:20077017

  12. Study of dendritic cell migration using micro-fabrication.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Pablo; Chabaud, Mélanie; Thiam, Hawa-Racine; Lankar, Danielle; Piel, Matthieu; Lennon-Dumenil, Ana-Maria

    2016-05-01

    Cell migration is a hallmark of dendritic cells (DCs) function. It is needed for DCs to scan their environment in search for antigens as well as to reach lymphatic organs in order to trigger T lymphocyte's activation. Such interaction leads to tolerance in the case of DCs migrating under homeostatic conditions or to immunity in the case of DCs migrating upon encounter with pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Cell migration is therefore essential for DCs to transfer information from peripheral tissues to lymphoid organs, thereby linking innate to adaptive immunity. This stresses the need to unravel the molecular mechanisms involved. However, the tremendous complexity of the tissue microenvironment as well as the limited spatio-temporal resolution of in vivo imaging techniques has made this task difficult. To bypass this problem, we have developed microfabrication-based experimental tools that are compatible with high-resolution imaging. Here, we will discuss how such devices can be used to study DC migration under controlled conditions that mimic their physiological environment in a robust quantitative manner.

  13. Kinetic studies of microfabricated biosensors using local adsorption strategy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Menglun; Huang, Jingze; Cui, Weiwei; Pang, Wei; Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Daihua; Duan, Xuexin

    2015-12-15

    Micro/nano scale biosensors integrated with the local adsorption mask have been demonstrated to have a better limit of detection (LOD) and less sample consumptions. However, the molecular diffusions and binding kinetics in such confined droplet have been less studied which limited further development and application of the local adsorption method and imposed restrictions on discovery of new signal amplification strategies. In this work, we studied the kinetic issues via experimental investigations and theoretical analysis on microfabricated biosensors. Mass sensitive film bulk acoustic resonator (FBAR) sensors with hydrophobic Teflon film covering the non-sensing area as the mask were introduced. The fabricated masking sensors were characterized with physical adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and specific binding of antibody and antigen. Over an order of magnitude improvement on LOD was experimentally monitored. An analytical model was introduced to discuss the target molecule diffusion and binding kinetics in droplet environment, especially the crucial effects of incubation time, which has been less covered in previous local adsorption related literatures. An incubation time accumulated signal amplification effect was theoretically predicted, experimentally monitored and carefully explained. In addition, device optimization was explored based on the analytical model to fully utilize the merits of local adsorption. The discussions on the kinetic issues are believed to have wide implications for other types of micro/nano fabricated biosensors with potentially improved LOD.

  14. Design and microfabrication of a lateral excited gallium arsenide biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bienaime, A.; Liu, L.; Elie-Caille, C.; Leblois, T.

    2012-02-01

    GaAs crystal presents some interesting perspectives for resonant biosensors due to its piezoelectric and good mechanical properties and the opportunity to bio-functionalize the surface. Moreover, GaAs can be micromachined by wet etching in several solutions, which constitutes a batch and low-cost process of fabrication. The lateral field excitation (LFE) is used to generate bulk acoustic waves. The main advantage of LFE is the possibility to measure in liquid media, moreover reduced aging and increased frequency stability are also ensured. In this study, an analytical modelization is used to determine the orientations of the vibrating membrane and the electric field that give satisfactory metrological performances. Electrical performances are discussed as a function of geometrical parameters. A simulation based on a Finite Element Modelization is performed in order to optimize the design of the resonant structure. The microfabrication process of the structure is presented. The choice of etchants is discussed in terms of etching rates and surface textures. Several steps of the fabrication of the sensing area structure are shown and characterized. Finally, the active area is fabricated according to the theoretical and experimental results of this study.

  15. Continuous-Flow Bioseparation Using Microfabricated Anisotropic Nanofluidic Sieving Structures

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jianping; Mao, Pan; Han, Jongyoon

    2010-01-01

    The anisotropic nanofluidic filter (nanofilter) array (ANA) is a unique molecular sieving structure for separating biomolecules. Here we describe fabrication of planar and vertical ANA chips and how to perform continuous-flow bioseparation using them. This protocol is most useful for bioengineers that are interested in developing automated multistep chip-based bioanalysis systems and assumes prior cleanroom microfabrication knowledge. The ANA consists of a two-dimensional periodic nanofilter array, and the designed structural anisotropy of the ANA causes different sized- or charged-biomolecules to follow distinct trajectories under applied electric fields, leading to efficient continuous-flow separation. Using microfluidic channels surrounding the ANA, the fractionated biomolecule streams are collected and routed to different fluid channels or reservoirs for convenient sample recovery and downstream bioanalysis. The ANA is physically robust and can be reused repeatedly. Compared to conventional gel-based separation techniques, the ANA offers the potential for faster separation, higher throughput, and more convenient sample recovery. PMID:19876028

  16. Nanofabrication and microfabrication of functional materials for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyoungshin; Cannizzaro, Christopher; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Langer, Robert; Vacanti, Charles A; Farokhzad, Omid C

    2007-08-01

    The burgeoning field of regenerative medicine promises significant progress in the treatment of cardiac ischemia, liver disease, and spinal cord injury. Key to its success will be the ability to engineer tissue safely and reliably. Tissue functionality must be recapitulated in the laboratory and then integrated into surrounding tissue upon transfer to the patient. Scaffolding materials must be chosen such that the microenvironment surrounding the cells is a close analog of the native environment. In the early days of tissue engineering, these materials were largely borrowed from other fields, with much of the focus on biocompatibility and biodegradation. However, attention has shifted recently to cell-cell and cell-surface interactions, largely because of enabling technologies at the nanoscale and microscale. Studies on cellular behavior in response to various stimuli are now easily realized by using microfabrication techniques and devices (e.g., biomedical microelectromechanical systems). These experiments are reproducible and moderate in cost, and often can be accomplished at high throughput, providing the fundamental knowledge required to design biomaterials that closely mimic the biological system. It is our opinion that these novel materials and technologies will bring engineered tissues one step closer to practical application in the clinic. This review discusses their application to cardiac, liver, and nerve tissue engineering.

  17. Mechanics of F-actin characterized with microfabricated cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiumei; Pollack, Gerald H

    2002-11-01

    In this report we characterized the longitudinal elasticity of single actin filaments manipulated by novel silicon-nitride microfabricated levers. Single actin filaments were stretched from zero tension to maximal physiological tension, P(0). The obtained length-tension relation was nonlinear in the low-tension range (0-50 pN) with a resultant strain of approximately 0.4-0.6% and then became linear at moderate to high tensions (approximately 50-230 pN). In this region, the stretching stiffness of a single rhodamine-phalloidin-labeled, 1-microm-long F-actin is 34.5 +/- 3.5 pN/nm. Such a length-tension relation could be characterized by an entropic-enthalpic worm-like chain model, which ascribes most of the energy consumed in the nonlinear portion to overcoming thermal undulations arising from the filament's interaction with surrounding solution and the linear portion to the intrinsic stretching elasticity. By fitting the experimental data with such a worm-like chain model, an estimation of persistence length of approximately 8.75 microm was derived. These results suggest that F-actin is more compliant than previously thought and that thin filament compliance may account for a substantial fraction of the sarcomere's elasticity.

  18. Acoustic coupling in capacitive microfabricated ultrasonic transducers: modeling and experiments.

    PubMed

    Caronti, Alessandro; Savoia, Alessandro; Caliano, Giosuè; Pappalardo, Massimo

    2005-12-01

    In the design of low-frequency transducer arrays for active sonar systems, the acoustic interactions that occur between the transducer elements have received much attention. Because of these interactions, the acoustic loading on each transducer depends on its position in the array, and the radiated acoustic power may vary considerably from one element to another. Capacitive microfabricated ultrasonic transducers (CMUT) are made of a two-dimensional array of metallized micromembranes, all electrically connected in parallel, and driven into flexural motion by the electrostatic force produced by an applied voltage. The mechanical impedance of these membranes is typically much lower than the acoustic impedance of water. In our investigations of acoustic coupling in CMUTs, interaction effects between the membranes in immersion were observed, similar to those reported in sonar arrays. Because CMUTs have many promising applications in the field of medical ultrasound imaging, understanding of cross-coupling mechanisms and acoustic interaction effects is especially important for reducing cross-talk between array elements, which can produce artifacts and degrade image quality. In this paper, we report a finite-element study of acoustic interactions in CMUTs and experimental results obtained by laser interferometry measurements. The good agreement found between finite element modeling (FEM) results and optical displacement measurements demonstrates that acoustic interactions through the liquid represent a major source of cross coupling in CMUTs.

  19. Microfabrication of High-Resolution Porous Membranes for Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Monica Y.; Li, David Jiang; Pham, Long K.; Wong, Brandon G.

    2014-01-01

    Microporous membranes are widely utilized in cell biology to study cell-cell signaling and cell migration. However, the thickness and low porosity of commercial track-etched membranes limit the quality of cell imaging and the degree of cell-cell contact that can be achieved on such devices. We employ photolithography-based microfabrication to achieve porous membranes with pore diameter as small as 0.9 μm, up to 40% porosity, and less than 5% variation in pore size. Through the use of a soap release layer, membranes as thin as 1 μm can be achieved. The thin membranes minimally disrupt contrast enhancement optics, thus allowing good quality imaging of unlabeled cells under white light, unlike commercial membranes. In addition, the polymer membrane materials display low autofluorescence even after patterning, facilitating high quality fluorescence microscopy. Finally, confocal imaging suggests that substantial cell-cell contact is possible through the pores of these thin membranes. This membrane technology can enhance existing uses of porous membranes in cell biology as well as enable new types of experiments. PMID:24567663

  20. Microfabricated Hydrogen Sensor Technology for Aerospace and Commercial Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Bickford, R. L.; Jansa, E. D.; Makel, D. B.; Liu, C. C.; Wu, Q. H.; Powers, W. T.

    1994-01-01

    Leaks on the Space Shuttle while on the Launch Pad have generated interest in hydrogen leak monitoring technology. An effective leak monitoring system requires reliable hydrogen sensors, hardware, and software to monitor the sensors. The system should process the sensor outputs and provide real-time leak monitoring information to the operator. This paper discusses the progress in developing such a complete leak monitoring system. Advanced microfabricated hydrogen sensors are being fabricated at Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) and tested at NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) and Gencorp Aerojet (Aerojet). Changes in the hydrogen concentrations are detected using a PdAg on silicon Schottky diode structure. Sensor temperature control is achieved with a temperature sensor and heater fabricated onto the sensor chip. Results of the characterization of these sensors are presented. These sensors can detect low concentrations of hydrogen in inert environments with high sensitivity and quick response time. Aerojet is developing the hardware and software for a multipoint leak monitoring system designed to provide leak source and magnitude information in real time. The monitoring system processes data from the hydrogen sensors and presents the operator with a visual indication of the leak location and magnitude. Work has commenced on integrating the NASA LeRC-CWRU hydrogen sensors with the Aerojet designed monitoring system. Although the leak monitoring system was designed for hydrogen propulsion systems, the possible applications of this monitoring system are wide ranged. Possible commercialization of the system will also be discussed.

  1. Microfabricated planar glass gas chromatography with photoionization detection.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Alastair C; Hamilton, Jacqueline F; Rhodes, Christopher N; Halliday, Jaydene; Bartle, Keith D; Homewood, Philip; Grenfell, Robin J P; Goody, Brian; Harling, Alice M; Brewer, Paul; Vargha, Gergely; Milton, Martin J T

    2010-01-29

    We report the development of a microfabricated gas chromatography system suitable for the separation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and compatible with use as a portable measurement device. Hydrofluoric acid etching of 95x95mm Schott B270 wafers has been used to give symmetrical hemi-spherical channels within a glass substrate. Two matching glass plates were subsequently cold bonded with the channels aligned; the flatness of the glass surfaces resulted in strong bonding through van der Waals forces. The device comprised gas fluidic interconnections, injection zone and 7.5 and 1.4m long, 320microm internal diameter capillaries. Optical microscopy confirmed the capillaries to have fully circular channel profiles. Direct column heating and cooling could be achieved using a combination of resistive heaters and Peltier devices. The low thermal conductivity of glass allowed for multiple uniform temperature zones to be achieved within a single glass chip. Temperature control over the range 10-200 degrees C was achieved with peak power demand of approximately 25W. The 7.5m capillary column was static coated with a 2microm film of non-polar dimethylpolysiloxane stationary phase. A standard FID and a modified lightweight 100mW photoionization detector (PID) were coupled to the column and performance tested with gas mixtures of monoaromatic and monoterpene species at the parts per million concentration level. The low power GC-PID device showed good performance for a small set of VOCs and sub ng detection sensitivity to monoaromatics. PMID:20022335

  2. Protocol for Identifying Fossil Biofilm Microfabrics in Archean and Martian Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bontognali, T. R. R.; McKenzie, J. A.; Vasconcelos, C.

    2014-12-01

    Microbial communities commonly live and grow in aggregates called biofilm. This slimy material is composed of exopolymeric substances (EPS) secreted from the microbial cell to the surrounding environment. Certain biofilms show internal microscopic fabrics, as for example, regularly shaped alveolar structures. These microfabrics are often considered as artifacts due to the dehydration steps required for scanning electron microscopy. However, recent studies have demonstrated that some microfabrics are not artifacts but actual structures, whose architecture is controlled by the microorganisms. These findings, mainly achieved for medical purposes, may have yet unconsidered implications for the search of early life on Earth and on Mars. Indeed, evidence exists that the microfabrics can be mineralized during early diagenesis, preserving fossil imprints of the original biofilm throughout the geological record. Here, we present the results of microscopic investigations of ancient sediments of various age, composition and metamorphic degree that contain microfabrics that we interpret as fossil biofilms. We compile a list of criteria that need to be evaluated before excluding that the putative fossil biofilms may be artifacts due to sample preparation or late stage contamination of the studied rocks. Additionally, we compare these microfabrics to those produced by pure cultures of microorganism grown in the laboratory, as well as microfabrics present in microbial mats that develop in modern evaporitic environments. Finally, we discuss the hypothesis - and the evidence that already exists in its support - that the micrometric size and the morphology of the EPS fabrics is specific to the organism and the genome concerned. By establishing a linkage between specific microbes and the architecture of the mineralized microfabrics, it may be possible to gain precise taxonomic information on early life, as well as to establish a new type of morphological biosignature to be searched

  3. Research of the new optical diffractive super-resolution element of the two-photon microfabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Peng; Zhu, Yu; Duan, Guanghong

    2006-11-01

    The new optical diffractive superresolution element (DSE) is being applied to improve the microfabrication radial superresolution in the two-photon three-dimension (3D) microfabrication system, which appeared only a few years ago and can provide the ability to confine photochemical and physical reactions to the order of laser wavelength in three dimensions. The design method of the DSE is that minimizing M if the lowest limit S l of the S and the highest limit G u of the G is set, where Liu [1] explained the definition of the S, M and G. Simulation test result proved that the microfabrication radial superresolution can be improved by the new optical DSE. The phenomenon can only be interpreted as the intensity of high-order and side of the zero-order diffraction peaks have been clapped under the twophoton absorption (TPA) polymerization threshold. In a word the polymerized volume can be chosen because the S l and the G u is correspondingly adjustable, even if the laser wavelength, objective lens and the photosensitive resin is fixed for a given two-photon microfabrication system. That means the radial superresolution of the two-photon microfabrication can be chosen.

  4. Development of Magnetic Microcalorimeters for Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, L. N.; Hummatov, R.; Hall, J. A.; Cantor, R. C.; Boyd, S. T. P.

    2016-07-01

    Integrating the SQUIDs and sensing coils of magnetic microcalorimeters onto the same die is a promising approach for maximizing flux coupling and signal/noise. However, new challenges in microfabrication must be overcome, because the underlying SQUID devices are sensitive to chemical attack and elevated processing temperatures. In this report, we describe development and details of a microfabrication process for integrated SQUID/sensor gamma-ray magnetic microcalorimeters with electroformed gold absorbers, starting from a modified version of the STAR Cryoelectronics "Delta 1000" Josephson Junction process.

  5. Microfabricated Arrays for Splitting and Assay of Clonal Colonies

    PubMed Central

    Gach, Philip C.; Xu, Wei; King, Samantha J.; Sims, Christopher E.; Bear, James; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2012-01-01

    A microfabricated platform was developed for highly parallel and efficient colony picking, splitting and clone identification. A pallet array provided patterned cell colonies which mated to a second printing array composed of bridging microstructures formed by a supporting base and attached post. The posts enabled mammalian cells from colonies initially cultured on the pallet array to migrate to corresponding sites on the printing array. Separation of the arrays simultaneously split the colonies creating a patterned replica. Optimization of array elements provided transfer efficiencies greater than 90% using bridging posts of 30 μm diameter and 100 μm length and total colony numbers of 3000. Studies using five mammalian cell lines demonstrated that a variety of adherent cell types could be cultured and effectively split with printing efficiencies of 78–92%. To demonstrate the technique’s utility, clonal cell lines with siRNA knockdown of Coronin 1B were generated using the arrays and compared to a traditional FACS/Western Blotting-based approach. Identification of target clones required a destructive assay to identify cells with an absence of Coronin 1B brought about by the successful infection of interfering shRNA construct. By virtue of miniaturization and its parallel format, the platform enabled the identification and generation of 12 target clones from a starting sample of only 3900 cells and required only 5-man hours over 11 days. In contrast, the traditional method required 500,000 cells and generated only 5 target clones with 34-man hours expended over 47 days. These data support the considerable reduction in time, manpower and reagents using the miniaturized platform for clonal selection by destructive assay versus conventional approaches. PMID:23153031

  6. Microfabricated arrays for splitting and assay of clonal colonies.

    PubMed

    Gach, Philip C; Xu, Wei; King, Samantha J; Sims, Christopher E; Bear, James; Allbritton, Nancy L

    2012-12-18

    A microfabricated platform was developed for highly parallel and efficient colony picking, splitting, and clone identification. A pallet array provided patterned cell colonies which mated to a second printing array composed of bridging microstructures formed by a supporting base and attached post. The posts enabled mammalian cells from colonies initially cultured on the pallet array to migrate to corresponding sites on the printing array. Separation of the arrays simultaneously split the colonies, creating a patterned replica. Optimization of array elements provided transfer efficiencies greater than 90% using bridging posts of 30 μm diameter and 100 μm length and total colony numbers of 3000. Studies using five mammalian cell lines demonstrated that a variety of adherent cell types could be cultured and effectively split with printing efficiencies of 78-92%. To demonstrate the technique's utility, clonal cell lines with siRNA knockdown of Coronin 1B were generated using the arrays and compared to a traditional FACS/Western Blotting-based approach. Identification of target clones required a destructive assay to identify cells with an absence of Coronin 1B brought about by the successful infection of interfering shRNA construct. By virtue of miniaturization and its parallel format, the platform enabled the identification and generation of 12 target clones from a starting sample of only 3900 cells and required only 5 man hours over 11 days. In contrast, the traditional method required 500,000 cells and generated only 5 target clones with 34 man hours expended over 47 days. These data support the considerable reduction in time, manpower, and reagents using the miniaturized platform for clonal selection by destructive assay versus conventional approaches. PMID:23153031

  7. Image analysis of neuronal pathfinding on microfabricated substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hockberger, Philip E.; Soekarno, Anita

    1994-08-01

    We have used digital imaging microscopy to evaluate possible guidance mechanisms of mouse neuroblastoma cells cultured on microfabricated glass substrates. Substrates were bound with either small charged amine or uncharged alkane molecules using silane-coupling chemistry or covered with proteins (laminin, collagen, fibronectin, albumin) by adsorption. Photolithographic procedures were used to pattern substrates with amine - alkane, amine - protein and alkane - protein combinations. Interference reflection microscopy (IRM) was used to visualize sites of cellular attachment on substrates (focal and close contacts), and image processing techniques were used to quantify the results in three different ways: total cellular area in contact with a substrate, area corresponding to focal and close contacts, and the percentage of focal and close contacts on each substrate. Cells attached to and extended neurites on each of the substrates were tested. IRM images of growth cones displayed similar gray levels on amine, alkane, fibronectin, and albumin substrates, whereas images on laminin and collagen were brighter. Brightness on laminin substrates was correlated with less area of focal contact and greater area with no contact. When cells were provided with choices on patterned substrates, they displayed the following preference of attachment: laminin, fibronectin, collagen>amine>alkane>albumin. This hierarchy reflected greater total surface area on preferred substrates. There was, however, no correlation between the hierarchy and the area corresponding to focal and close contacts or the percentage of contacts on different substrates. Our results support several recent observations which demonstrated that guidance was not correlated with differential adhesivity. These results are more in line with the theory that guidance is controlled by a signal transduction mechanism that couples locomotion with activation of membrane receptors.

  8. Microresonator Brillouin laser stabilization using a microfabricated rubidium cell.

    PubMed

    Loh, William; Hummon, Matthew T; Leopardi, Holly F; Fortier, Tara M; Quinlan, Frank; Kitching, John; Papp, Scott B; Diddams, Scott A

    2016-06-27

    We frequency stabilize the output of a miniature stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) laser to rubidium atoms in a microfabricated cell to realize a laser system with frequency stability at the 10-11 level over seven decades in averaging time. In addition, our system has the advantages of robustness, low cost and the potential for integration that would lead to still further miniaturization. The SBS laser operating at 1560 nm exhibits a spectral linewidth of 820 Hz, but its frequency drifts over a few MHz on the 1 hour timescale. By locking the second harmonic of the SBS laser to the Rb reference, we reduce this drift by a factor of 103 to the level of a few kHz over the course of an hour. For our combined SBS and Rb laser system, we measure a frequency noise of 4 × 104 Hz2/Hz at 10 Hz offset frequency which rapidly rolls off to a level of 0.2 Hz2/Hz at 100 kHz offset. The corresponding Allan deviation is ≤2 × 10-11 for averaging times spanning 10-4 to 103 s. By optically dividing the signal of the laser down to microwave frequencies, we generate an RF signal at 2 GHz with phase noise at the level of -76 dBc/Hz and -140 dBc/Hz at offset frequencies of 10 Hz and 10 kHz, respectively. PMID:27410604

  9. Microfabrication of hierarchical structures for engineered mechanical materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vera Canudas, Marc

    Materials found in nature present, in some cases, unique properties from their constituents that are of great interest in engineered materials for applications ranging from structural materials for the construction of bridges, canals and buildings to the fabrication of new lightweight composites for airplane and automotive bodies, to protective thin film coatings, amongst other fields. Research in the growing field of biomimetic materials indicates that the micro-architectures present in natural materials are critical to their macroscopic mechanical properties. A better understanding of the effect that structure and hierarchy across scales have on the material properties will enable engineered materials with enhanced properties. At the moment, very few theoretical models predict mechanical properties of simple materials based on their microstructures. Moreover these models are based on observations from complex biological systems. One way to overcome this challenge is through the use of microfabrication techniques to design and fabricate simple materials, more appropriate for the study of hierarchical organizations and microstructured materials. Arrays of structures with controlled geometry and dimension can be designed and fabricated at different length scales, ranging from a few hundred nanometers to centimeters, in order to mimic similar systems found in nature. In this thesis, materials have been fabricated in order to gain fundamental insight into the complex hierarchical materials found in nature and to engineer novel materials with enhanced mechanical properties. The materials fabricated here were mechanically characterized and compared to simple mechanics models to describe their behavior with the goal of applying the knowledge acquired to the design and synthesis of future engineered materials with novel properties.

  10. The maximum life expectancy for a micro-fabricated diaphragm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cǎlimǎnescu, Ioan; Stan, Liviu-Constantin; Popa, Viorica

    2015-02-01

    Micro-fabricated diaphragms can be used to provide pumping action in microvalve and microfluidic applications. The functionality of the microdiaphragm in a wirelessly actuated micropump plays a major role in low-powered device actuation. In developing micropumps and their components, it is becoming an increasing trend to predict the performance before the prototype is fabricated. Because performance prediction allows for an accurate estimation of yield and lifetime, in addition to developing better understanding of the device while taking into account the details of the device structure and second order effects. Hence avoid potential pitfalls in the device operation in a practical environment. The goal of this research is to determine via FEA the life expectancy for a corrugated circular diaphragm made out of an aluminum alloy. The geometry of the diaphragm is given below being generated within SolidWorks 2010, all the calculations were made using Ansys 13TM . The sound design of a micropump is heavily depending on the lifetime expectancy of the working part of the device which is the diaphragm. This will be subjected on cyclic loading and the fatigue will limit the life of this part. Once the diaphragm is breaking, the micropump is no more able to fulfill its scope. Any micropump manufacturer will then be very concerned on the life expectancy from the fatigue point of view of the diaphragms. The diaphragm circular and corrugated and made of Al alloy, showed a very good behavior from the fatigue point of view, the maximum life expectancy being 1.9 years of continuous functioning with 100 cycles per second. This work showed an simple and forward application of FEA analysis methods in order to estimate the fatigue behavior of corrugated circular microdiaphragms.

  11. Silicon-based microfabricated microbial fuel cell toxicity sensor.

    PubMed

    Dávila, D; Esquivel, J P; Sabaté, N; Mas, J

    2011-01-15

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have been used for several years as biosensors for measuring environmental parameters such as biochemical oxygen demand and water toxicity. The present study is focused on the detection of toxic matter using a novel silicon-based MFC. Like other existing toxicity sensors based on MFCs, this device is capable of detecting the variation on the current produced by the cell when toxic compounds are present in the medium. The MFC approach presented in this work aims to obtain a simple, compact and planar device for its further application as a biosensor in the design and fabrication of equipment for toxicity monitoring. It consists on a proton exchange membrane placed between two microfabricated silicon plates that act as current collectors. An array of square 80 μm × 80 μm vertical channels, 300 μm deep, have been defined trough the plates over an area of 6 mm × 6 mm. The final testing assembly incorporates two perspex pieces positioned onto the plates as reservoirs with a working volume of 144 μL per compartment. The operation of the microdevice as a direct electron transfer MFC has been validated by comparing its performance against a larger scale MFC, run under the same conditions. The device has been tested as a toxicity sensor by setting it at a fixed current while monitoring changes in the output power. A drop in the power production is observed when a toxic compound is added to the anode compartment. The compact design of the device makes it suitable for its incorporation into measurement equipment either as an individual device or as an array of sensors for high throughput processing.

  12. Microfabrication of Cell-Laden Hydrogels for Engineering Mineralized and Load Bearing Tissues.

    PubMed

    Li, Chia-Cheng; Kharaziha, Mahshid; Min, Christine; Maas, Richard; Nikkhah, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Microengineering technologies and advanced biomaterials have extensive applications in the field of regenerative medicine. In this chapter, we review the integration of microfabrication techniques and hydrogel-based biomaterials in the field of dental, bone, and cartilage tissue engineering. We primarily discuss the major features that make hydrogels attractive candidates to mimic extracellular matrix (ECM), and we consider the benefits of three-dimensional (3D) culture systems for tissue engineering applications. We then focus on the fundamental principles of microfabrication techniques including photolithography, soft lithography and bioprinting approaches. Lastly, we summarize recent research on microengineering cell-laden hydrogel constructs for dental, bone and cartilage regeneration, and discuss future applications of microfabrication techniques for load-bearing tissue engineering.

  13. An Integrated Microfabricated Device for Dual Microdialysis and On-line ESI Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry for the Analysis of Complex Biological Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Fan; Lin, Yuehe ); Wen, Jian Y.; Matson, Dean W. ); Smith, Richard D. )

    1999-05-01

    A microfabricated dual-microdialysis device in a single integrated microfabricated platform was constructed using laser micromachining techniques for the rapid fractionation and cleanup of complex biological samples. Results suggest the potential for integration of such microfabricated devices with other sample manipulations for the rapid ESI-MS analysis of complex biological samples.

  14. Medium to high throughput screening: microfabrication and chip-based technology.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yuan; Zhang, Xudong; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2012-01-01

    Medium to high throughput screening for toxicity testing can provide a wealth of information with significant time and cost savings. New technologies, such as microfabrication, microfluidics and chip-based technology, combined with advanced cell culture and detection techniques, open up new opportunities in toxicity testing. In this chapter, fundamentals of microfabrication and microfluidics are discussed with a focus on the broad and novel applications on toxicity studies enabled by these technologies. Emphasis is placed on microscale cell and tissue culture models for medium and high throughput systemic toxicity studies in vitro.

  15. MAGNETS

    DOEpatents

    Hofacker, H.B.

    1958-09-23

    This patent relates to nmgnets used in a calutron and more particularly to means fur clamping an assembly of magnet coils and coil spacers into tightly assembled relation in a fluid-tight vessel. The magnet comprises windings made up of an assembly of alternate pan-cake type coils and spacers disposed in a fluid-tight vessel. At one end of the tank a plurality of clamping strips are held firmly against the assembly by adjustable bolts extending through the adjacent wall. The foregoing arrangement permits taking up any looseness which may develop in the assembly of coils and spacers.

  16. Microfabricated capillary electrophoresis chip and method for simultaneously detecting multiple redox labels

    DOEpatents

    Mathies, Richard A.; Singhal, Pankaj; Xie, Jin; Glazer, Alexander N.

    2002-01-01

    This invention relates to a microfabricated capillary electrophoresis chip for detecting multiple redox-active labels simultaneously using a matrix coding scheme and to a method of selectively labeling analytes for simultaneous electrochemical detection of multiple label-analyte conjugates after electrophoretic or chromatographic separation.

  17. Development of a Web-Based System to Support Self-Directed Learning of Microfabrication Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jou, Min; Wu, Yu-Shiang

    2012-01-01

    Having engineers in microfabrication technologies educated has become much more difficult than having engineers educated in the traditional technologies, and this may be because of the high cost for acquirement of equipment, materials, and infrastructural means (i.e., cleaning rooms), all in addition to the hands-on practices that are often times…

  18. Laser Microfabricated Poly(glycerol Sebacate) Scaffolds for Heart Valve Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Masoumi, Nafiseh; Jean, Aurélie; Zugates, Jeffrey T.; Johnson, Katherine L.; Engelmayr, George C.

    2012-01-01

    Microfabricated poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) scaffolds may be applicable to tissue engineering heart valve leaflets by virtue of their controllable microstructure, stiffness, and elasticity. In the current study, PGS scaffolds were computationally designed and microfabricated by laser ablation to match the anisotropy and peak tangent moduli of native bovine aortic heart valve leaflets. Finite element simulations predicted PGS curing conditions, scaffold pore shape, and strut width capable of matching the scaffold effective stiffnesses to the leaflet peak tangent moduli. Based on simulation predicted effective stiffnesses of 1.041 MPa and 0.208 MPa for the scaffold preferred (PD) and orthogonal, cross-preferred (XD) material directions, scaffolds with diamond-shaped pores were microfabricated by laser ablation of PGS cured 12 hours at 160°C. Effective stiffnesses measured for the scaffold PD (0.83 ± 0.13 MPa) and XD (0.21 ± 0.03 MPa) were similar to both predicted values and peak tangent moduli measured for bovine aortic valve leaflets in the circumferential (1.00 ± 0.16 MPa) and radial (0.26 ± 0.03 MPa) directions. Scaffolds cultivated with fibroblasts for 3 weeks accumulated collagen (736 ± 193 μg/g wet weight) and DNA (17 ± 4 μg/g wet weight). This study provides a basis for the computational design of biomimetic microfabricated PGS scaffolds for tissue engineered heart valves. PMID:22826211

  19. MICROFABRICATED ELECTROCHEMICAL ANALYSIS SYSTEM FOR HEAVY METAL DETECTION. (R825511C047)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A low power, hand-held system has been developed for the measurement of heavy metal ions in aqueous solutions. The system consists of an electrode array sensor, a high performance single chip potentiostat and a microcontroller circuit. The sensor is a microfabricated array of ...

  20. Miniature Trace Gas Detector Based on Microfabricated Optical Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aveline, David C.; Yu, Nan; Thompson, Robert J.; Strekalov, Dmitry V.

    2013-01-01

    While a variety of techniques exist to monitor trace gases, methods relying on absorption of laser light are the most commonly used in terrestrial applications. Cavity-enhanced absorption techniques typically use high-reflectivity mirrors to form a resonant cavity, inside of which a sample gas can be analyzed. The effective absorption length is augmented by the cavity's high quality factor, or Q, because the light reflects many times between the mirrors. The sensitivity of such mirror-based sensors scales with size, generally making them somewhat bulky in volume. Also, specialized coatings for the high-reflectivity mirrors have limited bandwidth (typically just a few nanometers), and the delicate mirror surfaces can easily be degraded by dust or chemical films. As a highly sensitive and compact alternative, JPL is developing a novel trace gas sensor based on a monolithic optical resonator structure that has been modified such that a gas sample can be directly injected into the cavity. This device concept combines ultra-high Q optical whispering gallery mode resonators (WGMR) with microfabrication technology used in the semiconductor industry. For direct access to the optical mode inside a resonator, material can be precisely milled from its perimeter, creating an open gap within the WGMR. Within this open notch, the full optical mode of the resonator can be accessed. While this modification may limit the obtainable Q, calculations show that the reduction is not significant enough to outweigh its utility for trace gas detection. The notch can be milled from the high- Q crystalline WGMR with a focused ion beam (FIB) instrument with resolution much finer than an optical wavelength, thereby minimizing scattering losses and preserving the optical quality. Initial experimental demonstrations have shown that these opened cavities still support high-Q whispering gallery modes. This technology could provide ultrasensitive detection of a variety of molecular species in an

  1. Microfabrication and Test of a Three-Dimensional Polymer Hydro-focusing Unit for Flow Cytometry Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Ren; Feeback, Daniel L.; Wang, Wan-Jun

    2005-01-01

    This paper details a novel three-dimensional (3D) hydro-focusing micro cell sorter for micro flow cytometry applications. The unit was microfabricated by means of SU-8 3D lithography. The 3D microstructure for coaxial sheathing was designed, microfabricated, and tested. Three-dimensional hydrofocusing capability was demonstrated with an experiment to sort labeled tanned sheep erythrocytes (red blood cells). This polymer hydro-focusing microstructure is easily microfabricated and integrated with other polymer microfluidic structures. Keywords: SU-8, three-dimensional hydro-focusing, microfluidic, microchannel, cytometer

  2. Microfabrication and Test of a Three-Dimensional Polymer Hydro-Focusing Unit for Flow Cytometry Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Ren; Feedback, Daniel L.; Wang, Wanjun

    2004-01-01

    This paper details a novel three-dimensional (3D) hydro-focusing micro cell sorter for micro flow cytometry applications. The unit was micro-fabricated by means of SU-8 3D lithography. The 3D microstructure for coaxial sheathing was designed, micro-fabricated, and tested. Three-dimensional hydrofocusing capability was demonstrated with an experiment to sort labeled tanned sheep erythrocytes (red blood cells). This polymer hydro-focusing microstructure is easily micro-fabricated and integrated with other polymer microfluidic structures.

  3. High-yield microfabrication process for biomimetic artificial haircell sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junjun; Fan, Zhifang; Chen, Jack; Zou, Jun; Liu, Chang

    2002-07-01

    We have developed artificial haircell sensors based on an improved plastic deformation magnetic assembly (PDMA) method. The PDMA method is uniquely capable of realizing 3D microstructures in an efficient, IC-compatible manner. We have improved the design of the PDMA structure to significantly increase the yield by eliminating stress concentration. The robustness of the fabricated devices is enhanced using conformal Parylene deposition. The PDMA process uses magnetic force to bend surface micromachiend cantilever beams. If the bending is significant, the beams would enter plastic deformation regime and maintains permanently bent position even after the magnetic field is removed. Previously, the PDMA process is associated with appreciable yield loss during het magnetic assembly. The failure mechanisms is believed to be stress concentration at sharp corners defined by edges of sacrificial layers. In the new design, a structure enhancement feature is added to the surface micromachiend assembly and hence eliminating any sharp features. Haircells sensors are modular sensory units widely found in the biological world. Haircells are responsible for hearing, flow sensing, and for balancing/equilibrium. We are developing artificial haircell sensors using advanced micromachining technology. The artificial haircell sensors have similar physical scale compared with biological ones.

  4. Permanent magnet microstructures using dry-pressed magnetic powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oniku, Ololade D.; Bowers, Benjamin J.; Shetye, Sheetal B.; Wang, Naigang; Arnold, David P.

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents microfabrication methods and performance analysis of bonded powder permanent magnets targeting dimensions ranging from 10 µm to greater than 1 mm. For the structural definition and pattern transfer, a doctor blade technique is used to dry press magnetic powders into pre-etched cavities in a silicon substrate. The powders are secured in the cavities by one of the three methods: capping with a polyimide layer, thermal reflow of intermixed wax-binder particles, or conformal coating with a vapor-deposited parylene-C film. A systematic study of micromagnets fabricated using these methods is conducted using three different types of magnetic powders: 50 µm Nd-Fe-B, 5 µm Nd-Fe-B and 1 µm barium ferrite powder. The isotropic magnets are shown to exhibit intrinsic coercivities (Hci) as high as 720 kA m-1, remanences (Br) up to 0.5 T and maximum energy products (BHmax) up to 30 kJ m-3, depending on the magnetic powder used. Process compatibility experiments demonstrate the potential for the magnets to withstand typical microfabrication chemical exposure and thermal cycles, thereby facilitating their integration into more complex process flows. The remanences are also characterized at elevated temperatures to determine thermal sensitivities and maximum operating temperature ranges.

  5. Microfabricated arrays for fractionation of large DNA molecules via pulsed field electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakajin, Olgica; Duke, Thomas A. J.; Chou, Chia-Fu; Tegenfeldt, Jonas; Chan, Shirley S.; Austin, Robert H.; Cox, Edward C.

    1999-10-01

    Novel microfabricated devices promise to accomplish fractionation of chromosomal size DNA more quickly, more accurately, at lower cost, and by using smaller sample amounts. Chromosomes are released by lysing cells directly in the device. The chromosomal DNA is further concentrated on a platinum wire in a 10 μm wide band using the phenomenon of dielectric trapping in AC fields. The DNA is then electrophoretically driven into a microfabricated array of posts arranged in a hexagonal lattice. Under electric fields whose direction periodically changes by 120°, the longer DNA molecules move at lower speeds than the shorter ones, and separation according to size is achieved. This technique allows application of electric fields as large as 1000 V/cm and, thus, promises to reduce considerably separation times compared to the presently used technique of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

  6. Microfabricated chip-scale rubidium plasma light source for miniature atomic clocks.

    PubMed

    Venkatraman, Vinu; Pétremand, Yves; Affolderbach, Christoph; Mileti, Gaetano; de Rooij, Nico F; Shea, Herbert

    2012-03-01

    We present the microfabrication and characterization of a low-power, chip-scale Rb plasma light source, designed for optical pumping in miniature atomic clocks. A dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) configuration is used to ignite a Rb plasma in a micro-fabricated Rb vapor cell on which external indium electrodes were deposited. The device is electrically driven at frequencies between 1 and 36 MHz, and emits 140 μW of stable optical power while coupling less than 6 mW of electrical power to the discharge cell. Optical powers of up to 15 and 9 μW are emitted on the Rb D2 and D1 lines, respectively. Continuous operation of the light source for several weeks has been demonstrated, showing its capacity to maintain stable optical excitation of Rb atoms in chip-scale double-resonance atomic clocks.

  7. Microfabricated chip-scale rubidium plasma light source for miniature atomic clocks.

    PubMed

    Venkatraman, Vinu; Pétremand, Yves; Affolderbach, Christoph; Mileti, Gaetano; de Rooij, Nico F; Shea, Herbert

    2012-03-01

    We present the microfabrication and characterization of a low-power, chip-scale Rb plasma light source, designed for optical pumping in miniature atomic clocks. A dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) configuration is used to ignite a Rb plasma in a micro-fabricated Rb vapor cell on which external indium electrodes were deposited. The device is electrically driven at frequencies between 1 and 36 MHz, and emits 140 μW of stable optical power while coupling less than 6 mW of electrical power to the discharge cell. Optical powers of up to 15 and 9 μW are emitted on the Rb D2 and D1 lines, respectively. Continuous operation of the light source for several weeks has been demonstrated, showing its capacity to maintain stable optical excitation of Rb atoms in chip-scale double-resonance atomic clocks. PMID:22481778

  8. Assembling a ring-shaped crystal in a microfabricated surface ion trap

    DOE PAGES

    Stick, Daniel Lynn; Tabakov, Boyan; Benito, Francisco; Blain, Matthew; Clark, Craig R.; Clark, Susan; Haltli, Raymond A.; Maunz, Peter; Sterk, Jonathan D.; Tigges, Chris

    2015-09-01

    We report on experiments with a microfabricated surface trap designed for confining a chain of ions in a ring. Uniform ion separation over most of the ring is achieved with a rotationally symmetric design and by measuring and suppressing undesired electric fields. After reducing stray fields, the ions are confined primarily by a radio-frequency pseudopotential and their mutual Coulomb repulsion. As a result, approximately 400 40Ca+ ions with an average separation of 9 μm comprise the ion crystal.

  9. NIST on a Chip: Realizing SI units with microfabricated alkali vapour cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitching, J.; Donley, E. A.; Knappe, S.; Hummon, M.; Dellis, A. T.; Sherman, J.; Srinivasan, K.; Aksyuk, V. A.; Li, Q.; Westly, D.; Roxworthy, B.; Lal, A.

    2016-06-01

    We describe several ways in which microfabricated alkali atom vapour cells might potentially be used to accurately realize a variety of International System (SI) units, including the second, the meter, the kelvin, the ampere, and the volt, in a compact, low-cost “chip-scale” package. Such instruments may allow inexpensive in-situ calibrations at the user's location or widespread integration of accurate references into instrumentation and systems.

  10. Microfabricated glass devices for rapid single cell immobilization in mouse zygote microinjection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinyu; Sun, Yu

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents the design and microfabrication of a vacuum-based cell holding device for single-cell immobilization and the use of the device in mouse zygote microinjection. The device contains many through-holes, constructed via two-sided glass wet etching and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-glass bonding. Experimental results of mouse zygote immobilization and microinjection demonstrate that the device is effective for rapid cell immobilization and does not produce negative effect on embryonic development.

  11. Direct visualization of clay microfabric signatures driving organic matter preservation in fine-grained sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, Kenneth J.; Bennett, Richard H.; Mayer, Lawrence M.; Curry, Ann; Abril, Maritza; Biesiot, Patricia M.; Hulbert, Matthew H.

    2007-04-01

    We employed direct visualization of organic matter (OM) sequestered by microfabric signatures in organo-clay systems to study mechanisms of OM protection. We studied polysaccharides, an abundant class of OM in marine sediments, associated with the nano- and microfabric of clay sediment using a novel application of transmission electron microscopy, histochemical staining (periodic acid-thiosemicarbazide-silver proteinate), and enzymatic digestion techniques. We used two experimental organo-clay sediment environments. First, laboratory-consolidated sediment with 10% chitin (w/w) added was probed for chitin before and after digestion with chitinase. Second, fecal pellets from the polychaete Heteromastus filiformis were used as a natural environment rich in clay and polysaccharides. Sections of this material were probed with silver proteinate for polysaccharides before and after digestion with a mixture of enzymes (amylase, cellulase, chitinase, dextranase, and pectinase). In both environments, chitin or other polysaccharides were found within pores, bridging clay domains, and attached to clay surfaces in undigested samples. Digested samples showed chitin or polysaccharides more closely associated with clay surfaces and in small pores. Our results imply protective roles for both sorption to clay surfaces and encapsulation within clay microfabric signatures.

  12. Microfabrication of a platform to measure and manipulate the mechanics of engineered microtissues.

    PubMed

    Ramade, Alexandre; Legant, Wesley R; Picart, Catherine; Chen, Christopher S; Boudou, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Engineered tissues can be used to understand fundamental features of biology, develop organotypic in vitro model systems, and as engineered tissue constructs for replacing damaged tissue in vivo. However, a key limitation is an inability to test the wide range of parameters that might impact the engineered tissue in a high-throughput manner and in an environment that mimics the three-dimensional (3D) native architecture. We developed a microfabricated platform to generate arrays of microtissues embedded within 3D micropatterned matrices. Microcantilevers simultaneously constrain microtissue formation and report forces generated by the microtissues in real time, opening the possibility to use high-throughput, low-volume screening for studies on engineered tissues. Thanks to the micrometer scale of the microtissues, this platform is also suitable for high-throughput monitoring of drug-induced effect on architecture and contractility in engineered tissues. Moreover, independent variations of the mechanical stiffness of the cantilevers and collagen matrix allow the measurement and manipulation of the mechanics of the microtissues. Thus, our approach will likely provide valuable opportunities to elucidate how biomechanical, electrical, biochemical, and genetic/epigenetic cues modulate the formation and maturation of 3D engineered tissues. In this chapter, we describe the microfabrication, preparation, and experimental use of such microfabricated tissue gauges.

  13. In situ mechanical characterization of square microfabricated elastomeric membranes using an improved microindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kuo-Kang; Khoo, Hwa Seng; Tseng, Fan-Gang

    2004-02-01

    A testing method has been developed for in situ mechanical characterizations of square microfabricated elastomeric membranes, using a tailored microindentation instrument. Such a depth-sensing microindentation system, incorporated with a long-focal microscope for capturing the side view image, provides accurate load-displacement measurements and complete profiles of deformed membranes. The deformations of square silicon rubber membranes with various thicknesses were examined under different degrees of external central microindentation forces. These membranes were integrated and supported by SU-8 photoresist frames, with openings of 2 mm×2 mm. A theoretical model was applied to quantitatively correlate the membrane elasticity to the measured compliance under such indentation. Through comparing the simulated and experimental results, the average values of Young's modulus for these membranes were reasonably extracted and determined. Viscoelasticity of the membranes used was acknowledged; however, it showed no significant effect on the determination of the Young's modulus of the membranes in the current work. The good agreement between the experimental results and the theoretical analyses demonstrates the successful in situ mechanical characterizations of microfabricated elastomeric films, particularly for the square shape membrane, which is the most common structure or component for microfabricated devices.

  14. Microfabrication of a platform to measure and manipulate the mechanics of engineered microtissues.

    PubMed

    Ramade, Alexandre; Legant, Wesley R; Picart, Catherine; Chen, Christopher S; Boudou, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Engineered tissues can be used to understand fundamental features of biology, develop organotypic in vitro model systems, and as engineered tissue constructs for replacing damaged tissue in vivo. However, a key limitation is an inability to test the wide range of parameters that might impact the engineered tissue in a high-throughput manner and in an environment that mimics the three-dimensional (3D) native architecture. We developed a microfabricated platform to generate arrays of microtissues embedded within 3D micropatterned matrices. Microcantilevers simultaneously constrain microtissue formation and report forces generated by the microtissues in real time, opening the possibility to use high-throughput, low-volume screening for studies on engineered tissues. Thanks to the micrometer scale of the microtissues, this platform is also suitable for high-throughput monitoring of drug-induced effect on architecture and contractility in engineered tissues. Moreover, independent variations of the mechanical stiffness of the cantilevers and collagen matrix allow the measurement and manipulation of the mechanics of the microtissues. Thus, our approach will likely provide valuable opportunities to elucidate how biomechanical, electrical, biochemical, and genetic/epigenetic cues modulate the formation and maturation of 3D engineered tissues. In this chapter, we describe the microfabrication, preparation, and experimental use of such microfabricated tissue gauges. PMID:24560511

  15. Microfabrication of Super Absorbent Polymer Structure Using Nanoimprinting and Swelling Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaba, Tomomi; Kano, Tomonori; Miki, Norihisa

    2013-06-01

    Micro-fabrication technologies have been extensively studied to achieve smaller sizes and higher aspect ratios. When the features have sizes of a couple of micrometers or below, nano-imprinting can be an effective method for micro-fabrication at low cost. However, it is difficult to achieve aspect ratio greater than 1. In this research, we propose micro fabrication of super absorbent polymer (SAP) as a new material for micro devices. SAP swells by adding deionized water, which can be used as a post patterning process to enhance the aspect ratio of micro structures. Micropatterning of SAP must be conducted under thoroughly dry conditions and we used nano-imprinting processes. We successfully augmented an aspect ratio of the nano-imprinted micro holes of SAP from 0.65 to 1.2 by the swelling process. The proposed patterning and swelling process of SAP can be applicable to micro-fabricate high-aspect-ratio structures at low cost for high performance lab-on-a-chip.

  16. Microfabricated BTU monitoring device for system-wide natural gas monitoring.

    SciTech Connect

    Einfeld, Wayne; Manginell, Ronald Paul; Robinson, Alex Lockwood; Moorman, Matthew Wallace

    2005-11-01

    The natural gas industry seeks inexpensive sensors and instrumentation to rapidly measure gas heating value in widely distributed locations. For gas pipelines, this will improve gas quality during transfer and blending, and will expedite accurate financial accounting. Industrial endusers will benefit through continuous feedback of physical gas properties to improve combustion efficiency during use. To meet this need, Sandia has developed a natural gas heating value monitoring instrument using existing and modified microfabricated components. The instrument consists of a silicon micro-fabricated gas chromatography column in conjunction with a catalytic micro-calorimeter sensor. A reference thermal conductivity sensor provides diagnostics and surety. This combination allows for continuous calorimetric determination with a 1 minute analysis time and 1.5 minute cycle time using air as a carrier gas. This system will find application at remote natural gas mining stations, pipeline switching and metering stations, turbine generators, and other industrial user sites. Microfabrication techniques will allow the analytical components to be manufactured in production quantities at a low per-unit cost.

  17. Microfabricated Modular Scale-Down Device for Regenerative Medicine Process Development

    PubMed Central

    Reichen, Marcel; Macown, Rhys J.; Jaccard, Nicolas; Super, Alexandre; Ruban, Ludmila; Griffin, Lewis D.; Veraitch, Farlan S.; Szita, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    The capacity of milli and micro litre bioreactors to accelerate process development has been successfully demonstrated in traditional biotechnology. However, for regenerative medicine present smaller scale culture methods cannot cope with the wide range of processing variables that need to be evaluated. Existing microfabricated culture devices, which could test different culture variables with a minimum amount of resources (e.g. expensive culture medium), are typically not designed with process development in mind. We present a novel, autoclavable, and microfabricated scale-down device designed for regenerative medicine process development. The microfabricated device contains a re-sealable culture chamber that facilitates use of standard culture protocols, creating a link with traditional small-scale culture devices for validation and scale-up studies. Further, the modular design can easily accommodate investigation of different culture substrate/extra-cellular matrix combinations. Inactivated mouse embryonic fibroblasts (iMEF) and human embryonic stem cell (hESC) colonies were successfully seeded on gelatine-coated tissue culture polystyrene (TC-PS) using standard static seeding protocols. The microfluidic chip included in the device offers precise and accurate control over the culture medium flow rate and resulting shear stresses in the device. Cells were cultured for two days with media perfused at 300 µl.h−1 resulting in a modelled shear stress of 1.1×10−4 Pa. Following perfusion, hESC colonies stained positively for different pluripotency markers and retained an undifferentiated morphology. An image processing algorithm was developed which permits quantification of co-cultured colony-forming cells from phase contrast microscope images. hESC colony sizes were quantified against the background of the feeder cells (iMEF) in less than 45 seconds for high-resolution images, which will permit real-time monitoring of culture progress in future experiments. The

  18. Microfabricated electrospray emitter arrays with integrated extractor and accelerator electrodes for the propulsion of small spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandavino, S.; Ataman, C.; Ryan, C. N.; Chakraborty, S.; Courtney, D.; Stark, J. P. W.; Shea, H.

    2014-07-01

    Microfabricated electrospray thrusters could revolutionize the spacecraft industry by providing efficient propulsion capabilities to micro and nano satellites (1-100 kg). We present the modeling, design, fabrication and characterization of a new generation of devices, for the first time integrating in the fabrication process individual accelerator electrodes capable of focusing and accelerating the emitted sprays. Integrating these electrodes is a key milestone in the development of this technology; in addition to increasing the critical performance metrics of thrust, specific impulse and propulsive efficiency, the accelerators enable a number of new system features such as power tuning and thrust vectoring and balancing. Through microfabrication, we produced high density arrays (213 emitters cm-2) of capillary emitters, assembling them at wafer-level with an extractor/accelerator electrode pair separated by micro-sandblasted glass. Through IV measurements, we could confirm that acceleration could be decoupled from the extraction of the spray—an important element towards the flexibility of this technology. We present the largest reported internally fed microfabricated arrays operation, with 127 emitters spraying in parallel, for a total beam of 10-30 µA composed by 95% of ions. Effective beam focusing was also demonstrated, with plume half-angles being reduced from approximately 30° to 15° with 2000 V acceleration. Based on these results, we predict, with 3000 V acceleration, thrust per emitter of 38.4 nN, specific impulse of 1103 s and a propulsive efficiency of 22% with <1 mW/emitter power consumption.

  19. Using modeling and microfabrication for insights into factors controlling the location of crevice attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jason S.

    Microfabrication techniques and computational modeling were employed to examine the factors controlling the spatial distribution of crevice corrosion of 316L stainless steel in ferric chloride environments. Historically, in the interest of reducing calculation time, most computational models of crevice corrosion have used idealized crevice geometries. The idealization has been achieved by assuming that the crevice does not have any irregularities in its dimensions. However, this approach does not allow accurate comparison with results obtained from crevices found in practice or crevices formed using conventional multiple crevice assemblies (MCA) as these have surface roughness that, in conjunction with that of the metal, create irregular crevice gaps. Microfabrication techniques were used to bridge the gap between experimental and model results. Instead of using separate substrates and formers like those used in MCA studies, structural formers were fabricated directly onto 316L substrates. Crevice fabrication consisted of a structural material surrounding a sacrificial material, the latter of which was selectively etched to form a rigorously defined hollow structure over the 316L substrate. Microfabricated crevices with gaps as small as 28 nm were exposed to 6% ferric chloride solutions resulted in intermediate crevice corrosion. For crevice gaps below 3 microns, the site of greatest attack down the crevice length was independent of gap size. A novel multivariable boundary surface was used to accurately model the variations in the electrochemical boundary condition (current/potential relationship) as a function of chloride concentration. Modeling results qualitatively predicted the location of attack and that neither ohmic drop nor chemistry change models are suitable for austenitic stainless in acidic chloride environments. Instead, results showed that a chemistry dependent potential-current behavior is the factor that controls the spatial distribution of crevice

  20. Robust, microfabricated culture devices with improved control over the soluble microenvironment for the culture of embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Macown, Rhys J; Veraitch, Farlan S; Szita, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    The commercial use of stem cells continues to be constrained by the difficulty and high cost of developing efficient and reliable production protocols. The use of microfabricated systems combines good control over the cellular microenvironment with reduced use of resources in process optimization. Our previously reported microfabricated culture device was shown to be suitable for the culture of embryonic stem cells but required improvements to robustness, ease of use, and dissolved gas control. In this report, we describe a number of improvements to the design of the microfabricated system to significantly improve the control over shear stress and soluble factors, particularly dissolved oxygen. These control improvements are investigated by finite element modeling. Design improvements also make the system easier to use and improve the robustness. The culture device could be applied to the optimization of pluripotent stem cell growth and differentiation, as well as the development of monitoring and control strategies and improved culture systems at various scales. PMID:24677785

  1. Quantum information experiments with a micro-fabricated, cryogenic, surface-electrode ion trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, A. C.; Brown, K. R.; Ospelkaus, C.; Colombe, Y.; Leibfried, D.; Wineland, D. J.

    2011-05-01

    Although the basic components of a quantum information processor using trapped ions have been demonstrated, scaling to large numbers of qubits and operations so that algorithms and simulations of practical importance can be implemented remains a major challenge. This is technically challenging because it requires significant improvements in the precision with which quantum states of ions are prepared, manipulated and measured. Solutions are multi-disciplinary - involving micro-fabrication, cryogenics, integrated photonic devices, as wells as materials and surface science. Here we report progress from experiments that address a range of these issues. We use a micro-fabricated, cryogenic, surface-electrode ion trap, with two closely-spaced independently controlled potential wells. In the first experiment with this new apparatus, we implement a scheme for coupling two ions trapped in separate wells, and demonstrate tunable energy exchange at approximately the single quantum level. A second experiment investigates errors in single qubit gates (rotations) with the use of randomized bench-marking. Although the basic components of a quantum information processor using trapped ions have been demonstrated, scaling to large numbers of qubits and operations so that algorithms and simulations of practical importance can be implemented remains a major challenge. This is technically challenging because it requires significant improvements in the precision with which quantum states of ions are prepared, manipulated and measured. Solutions are multi-disciplinary - involving micro-fabrication, cryogenics, integrated photonic devices, as wells as materials and surface science. Here we report progress from experiments that address a range of these issues. We use a micro-fabricated, cryogenic, surface-electrode ion trap, with two closely-spaced independently controlled potential wells. In the first experiment with this new apparatus, we implement a scheme for coupling two ions trapped

  2. Assembling a ring-shaped crystal in a microfabricated surface ion trap

    SciTech Connect

    Stick, Daniel Lynn; Tabakov, Boyan; Benito, Francisco; Blain, Matthew; Clark, Craig R.; Clark, Susan; Haltli, Raymond A.; Maunz, Peter; Sterk, Jonathan D.; Tigges, Chris

    2015-09-01

    We report on experiments with a microfabricated surface trap designed for confining a chain of ions in a ring. Uniform ion separation over most of the ring is achieved with a rotationally symmetric design and by measuring and suppressing undesired electric fields. After reducing stray fields, the ions are confined primarily by a radio-frequency pseudopotential and their mutual Coulomb repulsion. As a result, approximately 400 40Ca+ ions with an average separation of 9 μm comprise the ion crystal.

  3. Microfabrication of an Implantable silicone Microelectrode array for an epiretinal prosthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Maghribi, M

    2003-06-10

    Millions of people suffering from diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa and macular degeneration are legally blind due to the loss of photoreceptor function. Fortunately a large percentage of the neural cells connected to the photoreceptors remain viable, and electrical stimulation of these cells has been shown to result in visual perception. These findings have generated worldwide efforts to develop a retinal prosthesis device, with the hope of restoring vision. Advances in microfabrication, integrated circuits, and wireless technologies provide the means to reach this challenging goal. This dissertation describes the development of innovative silicone-based microfabrication techniques for producing an implantable microelectrode array. The microelectrode array is a component of an epiretinal prosthesis being developed by a multi-laboratory consortium. This array will serve as the interface between an electronic imaging system and the human eye, directly stimulating retinal neurons via thin film conducting traces. Because the array is intended as a long-term implant, vital biological and physical design requirements must be met. A retinal implant poses difficult engineering challenges due to the size of the intraocular cavity and the delicate retina. Not only does it have to be biocompatible in terms of cytotoxicity and degradation, but it also has to be structurally biocompatible, with regard to smooth edges and high conformability; basically mimicking the biological tissue. This is vital to minimize stress and prevent physical damage to the retina. Also, the device must be robust to withstand the forces imposed on it during fabrication and implantation. In order to meet these biocompatibility needs, the use of non-conventional microfabrication materials such as silicone is required. This mandates the enhancement of currently available polymer-based fabrication techniques and the development of new microfabrication methods. Through an iterative process, devices

  4. Microfabricated chambers as force sensors for probing forces of fungal growth.

    PubMed

    Minc, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical properties of fungal cells influence their growth, division, morphogenesis, and invasiveness. These cells are characterized by high internal turgor pressure contained by a stiff but elastic cell wall. In here, we describe simple and versatile methods to measure forces of fungal growth, turgor pressure, and elastic moduli of fungi cell wall, using microfabricated polydimethylsiloxane wells of varying stiffness as single cell force sensors. We demonstrate the strength of this method with the rod-shape fission yeast Schizosaccaromyces pombe and highlight how it may be implemented for studying mechanical properties of other walled cells.

  5. Progressive evolution of microfabrics in high-temperature indentation creep experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wassmann, S.; Dorner, D.; Stoeckhert, B.

    2014-12-01

    Microfabrics of natural rocks as well as of those deformed in laboratory experiments are studied post-mortem, the history of fabric evolution being inferred from a finite state. This is a major drawback when being interested in modification of fabrics related to progressive deformation. Here we present a novel approach to analyze and compare fabrics in different stages of evolution, taking spatial position to mimic a time series. Using this approach, evolution in time can be investigated on one sample deformed in a single indentation creep test. Such experiments at high temperatures and atmospheric pressure provide information on mechanical properties of rock-forming minerals as well as on microfabrics developed during inhomogeneous deformation underneath the indenter. Using a conventional creep apparatus, a cylindrical alumina indenter, 2 mm in diameter, is driven by a dead load into the flat surface of a specimen. A penetration depth of 1 mm is typically reached after hours to days, depending on material, applied temperature, and load. Previous experiments on natural, polycrystalline anhydrite carried out at temperatures between 700°C and 920 °C yield a stress exponent of 3.9 indicating deformation in the dislocation creep regime, consistent with microstructural observations (Dorner et al., 2014; Solid Earth). Within a cone-shaped region in front of the indenter, the original microfabric appears entirely unaffected. The neutral cone is mantled by highly deformed shear zones. During progressive indentation this structure of undeformed cone and shear zones propagates into the specimen. Thus, for a homogeneous starting material, serial sections of the deformed specimen normal to the indenter axis provide insight into fabrics in distinct stages of evolution. Microfabrics developed at different distance in front of the approaching indenter can be taken to represent a time series. A disadvantage of the technique is that the history of shear zone deformation is

  6. Micro-beam and pulsed laser beam techniques for the micro-fabrication of diamond surface and bulk structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciortino, S.; Bellini, M.; Bosia, F.; Calusi, S.; Corsi, C.; Czelusniak, C.; Gelli, N.; Giuntini, L.; Gorelli, F.; Lagomarsino, S.; Mandò, P. A.; Massi, M.; Olivero, P.; Parrini, G.; Santoro, M.; Sordini, A.; Sytchkova, A.; Taccetti, F.; Vannoni, M.

    2015-04-01

    Micro-fabrication in diamond is applicable in a wide set of emerging technologies, exploiting the exceptional characteristics of diamond for application in bio-physics, photonics and radiation detection. Micro ion-beam irradiation and pulsed laser irradiation are complementary techniques, which permit the implementation of complex geometries, by modification and functionalization of surface and/or bulk material, modifying the optical, electrical and mechanical characteristics of the material. In this article we summarize the work done in Florence (Italy), concerning ion beam and pulsed laser beam micro-fabrication in diamond.

  7. Microfabricated Electrochemical Cell-Based Biosensors for Analysis of Living Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Wu, Chengxiong; Hu, Ning; Zhou, Jie; Du, Liping; Wang, Ping

    2012-01-01

    Cellular biochemical parameters can be used to reveal the physiological and functional information of various cells. Due to demonstrated high accuracy and non-invasiveness, electrochemical detection methods have been used for cell-based investigation. When combined with improved biosensor design and advanced measurement systems, the on-line biochemical analysis of living cells in vitro has been applied for biological mechanism study, drug screening and even environmental monitoring. In recent decades, new types of miniaturized electrochemical biosensor are emerging with the development of microfabrication technology. This review aims to give an overview of the microfabricated electrochemical cell-based biosensors, such as microelectrode arrays (MEA), the electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) technique, and the light addressable potentiometric sensor (LAPS). The details in their working principles, measurement systems, and applications in cell monitoring are covered. Driven by the need for high throughput and multi-parameter detection proposed by biomedicine, the development trends of electrochemical cell-based biosensors are also introduced, including newly developed integrated biosensors, and the application of nanotechnology and microfluidic technology. PMID:25585708

  8. Controlling trapping potentials and stray electric fields in a microfabricated ion trap through design and compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doret, S. Charles; Amini, Jason M.; Wright, Kenneth; Volin, Curtis; Killian, Tyler; Ozakin, Arkadas; Denison, Douglas; Hayden, Harley; Pai, C.-S.; Slusher, Richart E.; Harter, Alexa W.

    2012-07-01

    Recent advances in quantum information processing with trapped ions have demonstrated the need for new ion trap architectures capable of holding and manipulating chains of many (>10) ions. Here we present the design and detailed characterization of a new linear trap, microfabricated with scalable complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) techniques, that is well-suited to this challenge. Forty-four individually controlled dc electrodes provide the many degrees of freedom required to construct anharmonic potential wells, shuttle ions, merge and split ion chains, precisely tune secular mode frequencies, and adjust the orientation of trap axes. Microfabricated capacitors on dc electrodes suppress radio-frequency pickup and excess micromotion, while a top-level ground layer simplifies modeling of electric fields and protects trap structures underneath. A localized aperture in the substrate provides access to the trapping region from an oven below, permitting deterministic loading of particular isotopic/elemental sequences via species-selective photoionization. The shapes of the aperture and radio-frequency electrodes are optimized to minimize perturbation of the trapping pseudopotential. Laboratory experiments verify simulated potentials and characterize trapping lifetimes, stray electric fields, and ion heating rates, while measurement and cancellation of spatially-varying stray electric fields permits the formation of nearly-equally spaced ion chains.

  9. Tailorable 3D microfabrication for photonic applications: two-polymer microtransfer molding (proceedings paper)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jae-Hwang; kim, Chang-Hwan; Constant, Kristen; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2006-02-28

    For photonic devices, extending beyond the planar regime to the third dimension can allow a higher degree of integration and novel functionalities for applications such as photonic crystals and integrated optical circuits. Although conventional photolithography can achieve both high quality and structural control, it is still costly and slow for three-dimensional (3D) fabrication. Moreover, as diverse functional polymers emerge, there is potential to develop new techniques for quick and economical fabrication of 3D structures. We present a 3D microfabrication technique based on the soft lithographic technique, called two-polymer microtransfer molding (2P-{micro}TM) to accomplish low cost, high structural fidelity and tailorable 3D microfabrication for polymers. Using 2P-{micro}TM, highly layered polymeric microstructures are achievable by stacking planar structures layer by layer. For increased processing control, the surface chemistry of the polymers is characterized as a function of changing ultraviolet dosage to optimize yield in layer transfer. We discuss the application of the 2P-{micro}TM to build polymer templates for woodpile photonic crystals, and demonstrate methods for converting the polymer templates to dielectric and metallic photonic crystal structures. Finally, we will show that 2P-{micro}TM is promising for fabricating 3D polymeric optical waveguides.

  10. Micro-fabricated shunt to mimic arachnoid granulations for the treatment of communicating hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Kralick, Francis; Oh, Jonghyun; Medina, Tim; Noh, Hongseok Moses

    2012-01-01

    Hydrocephalus is the abnormal accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) within the confines of the skull that if left untreated results in significant morbidity and mortality. The treatment for hydrocephalus has remained essentially unchanged for over 50 years. It was a technological advance in materials that allowed John Holter, in conjunction with neurosurgeons Spitzer and Nulsen, to devise a valve and shunt system that diverted excess CSF from the ventricular space to the peritoneum. This ventriculo-peritoneal (VP) shunt is far from ideal, with problems associated with under/over shunting, mechanical mismatch, infection, high failure rates, disconnection and erosion. With the advances in the field of micro-fabrication and micro-machines we propose an innovative shunt system that would mimic the function of arachnoid granulations. This micro-fabricated shunting device, or micro-mechanical arachnoid granulation (MAG), consists of a multiplicity of micro-valves each 210 μm in diameter that each adhere to individual micro-needles. This work demonstrates the design and initial test results of the micro-valve with parameters for low cracking pressure, optimal flow rate, and reflux that would mimic the function of the native arachnoid granulations.

  11. Insights into foraminiferal influences on microfabrics of microbialites at Highborne Cay, Bahamas

    PubMed Central

    Bernhard, Joan M.; Edgcomb, Virginia P.; Visscher, Pieter T.; McIntyre-Wressnig, Anna; Summons, Roger E.; Bouxsein, Mary L.; Louis, Leeann; Jeglinski, Marleen

    2013-01-01

    Microbialites, which are organosedimentary structures formed by microbial communities through binding and trapping and/or in situ precipitation, have a wide array of distinctive morphologies and long geologic record. The origin of morphological variability is hotly debated; elucidating the cause or causes of microfabric differences could provide insights into ecosystem functioning and biogeochemistry during much of Earth’s history. Although rare today, morphologically distinct, co-occurring extant microbialites provide the opportunity to examine and compare microbial communities that may be responsible for establishing and modifying microbialite microfabrics. Highborne Cay, Bahamas, has extant laminated (i.e., stromatolites) and clotted (i.e., thrombolites) marine microbialites in close proximity, allowing focused questions about how community composition relates to physical attributes. Considerable knowledge exists about prokaryotic composition of microbialite mats (i.e., stromatolitic and thrombolitic mats), but little is known about their eukaryotic communities, especially regarding heterotrophic taxa. Thus, the heterotrophic eukaryotic communities of Highborne stromatolites and thrombolites were studied. Here, we show that diverse foraminiferal communities inhabit microbialite mat surfaces and subsurfaces; thecate foraminifera are relatively abundant in all microbialite types, especially thrombolitic mats; foraminifera stabilize grains in mats; and thecate reticulopod activities can impact stromatolitic mat lamination. Accordingly, and in light of foraminiferal impacts on modern microbialites, our results indicate that the microbialite fossil record may reflect the impact of the radiation of these protists. PMID:23716649

  12. Insights into foraminiferal influences on microfabrics of microbialites at Highborne Cay, Bahamas.

    PubMed

    Bernhard, Joan M; Edgcomb, Virginia P; Visscher, Pieter T; McIntyre-Wressnig, Anna; Summons, Roger E; Bouxsein, Mary L; Louis, Leeann; Jeglinski, Marleen

    2013-06-11

    Microbialites, which are organosedimentary structures formed by microbial communities through binding and trapping and/or in situ precipitation, have a wide array of distinctive morphologies and long geologic record. The origin of morphological variability is hotly debated; elucidating the cause or causes of microfabric differences could provide insights into ecosystem functioning and biogeochemistry during much of Earth's history. Although rare today, morphologically distinct, co-occurring extant microbialites provide the opportunity to examine and compare microbial communities that may be responsible for establishing and modifying microbialite microfabrics. Highborne Cay, Bahamas, has extant laminated (i.e., stromatolites) and clotted (i.e., thrombolites) marine microbialites in close proximity, allowing focused questions about how community composition relates to physical attributes. Considerable knowledge exists about prokaryotic composition of microbialite mats (i.e., stromatolitic and thrombolitic mats), but little is known about their eukaryotic communities, especially regarding heterotrophic taxa. Thus, the heterotrophic eukaryotic communities of Highborne stromatolites and thrombolites were studied. Here, we show that diverse foraminiferal communities inhabit microbialite mat surfaces and subsurfaces; thecate foraminifera are relatively abundant in all microbialite types, especially thrombolitic mats; foraminifera stabilize grains in mats; and thecate reticulopod activities can impact stromatolitic mat lamination. Accordingly, and in light of foraminiferal impacts on modern microbialites, our results indicate that the microbialite fossil record may reflect the impact of the radiation of these protists.

  13. Microfabricated Systems and Assays for Studying the Cytoskeletal Organization, Micromechanics, and Motility Patterns of Cancerous Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huda, Sabil; Pilans, Didzis; Makurath, Monika; Hermans, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Cell motions are driven by coordinated actions of the intracellular cytoskeleton – actin, microtubules (MTs) and substrate/focal adhesions (FAs). This coordination is altered in metastatic cancer cells resulting in deregulated and increased cellular motility. Microfabrication tools, including photolithography, micromolding, microcontact printing, wet stamping and microfluidic devices have emerged as a powerful set of experimental tools with which to probe and define the differences in cytoskeleton organization/dynamics and cell motility patterns in non-metastatic and metastatic cancer cells. In this review, we discuss four categories of microfabricated systems: (i) micropatterned substrates for studying of cell motility sub-processes (for example, MT targeting of FAs or cell polarization); (ii) systems for studying cell mechanical properties, (iii) systems for probing overall cell motility patterns within challenging geometric confines relevant to metastasis (for example, linear and ratchet geometries), and (iv) microfluidic devices that incorporate co-cultures of multiple cells types and chemical gradients to mimic in vivo intravasation/extravasation steps of metastasis. Together, these systems allow for creating controlled microenvironments that not only mimic complex soft tissues, but are also compatible with live cell high-resolution imaging and quantitative analysis of single cell behavior. PMID:26900544

  14. Microfabrication of a High-Throughput Nanochannel Delivery/Filtration System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrari, Mauro; Liu, Xuewu; Grattoni, Alessandro; Fine, Daniel; Hosali, Sharath; Goodall, Randi; Medema, Ryan; Hudson, Lee

    2011-01-01

    A microfabrication process is proposed to produce a nanopore membrane for continuous passive drug release to maintain constant drug concentrations in the patient s blood throughout the delivery period. Based on silicon microfabrication technology, the dimensions of the nanochannel area, as well as microchannel area, can be precisely controlled, thus providing a steady, constant drug release rate within an extended time period. The multilayered nanochannel structures extend the limit of release rate range of a single-layer nanochannel system, and allow a wide range of pre-defined porosity to achieve any arbitrary drug release rate using any preferred nanochannel size. This membrane system could also be applied to molecular filtration or isolation. In this case, the nanochannel length can be reduced to the nanofabrication limit, i.e., 10s of nm. The nanochannel delivery system membrane is composed of a sandwich of a thin top layer, the horizontal nanochannels, and a thicker bottom wafer. The thin top layer houses an array of microchannels that offers the inlet port for diffusing molecules. It also works as a lid for the nanochannels by providing the channels a top surface. The nanochannels are fabricated by a sacrificial layer technique that obtains smooth surfaces and precisely controlled dimensions. The structure of this nanopore membrane is optimized to yield high mechanical strength and high throughput.

  15. Insights into foraminiferal influences on microfabrics of microbialites at Highborne Cay, Bahamas.

    PubMed

    Bernhard, Joan M; Edgcomb, Virginia P; Visscher, Pieter T; McIntyre-Wressnig, Anna; Summons, Roger E; Bouxsein, Mary L; Louis, Leeann; Jeglinski, Marleen

    2013-06-11

    Microbialites, which are organosedimentary structures formed by microbial communities through binding and trapping and/or in situ precipitation, have a wide array of distinctive morphologies and long geologic record. The origin of morphological variability is hotly debated; elucidating the cause or causes of microfabric differences could provide insights into ecosystem functioning and biogeochemistry during much of Earth's history. Although rare today, morphologically distinct, co-occurring extant microbialites provide the opportunity to examine and compare microbial communities that may be responsible for establishing and modifying microbialite microfabrics. Highborne Cay, Bahamas, has extant laminated (i.e., stromatolites) and clotted (i.e., thrombolites) marine microbialites in close proximity, allowing focused questions about how community composition relates to physical attributes. Considerable knowledge exists about prokaryotic composition of microbialite mats (i.e., stromatolitic and thrombolitic mats), but little is known about their eukaryotic communities, especially regarding heterotrophic taxa. Thus, the heterotrophic eukaryotic communities of Highborne stromatolites and thrombolites were studied. Here, we show that diverse foraminiferal communities inhabit microbialite mat surfaces and subsurfaces; thecate foraminifera are relatively abundant in all microbialite types, especially thrombolitic mats; foraminifera stabilize grains in mats; and thecate reticulopod activities can impact stromatolitic mat lamination. Accordingly, and in light of foraminiferal impacts on modern microbialites, our results indicate that the microbialite fossil record may reflect the impact of the radiation of these protists. PMID:23716649

  16. Demonstration of a micro-fabricated hydrogen storage module for micro-power systems.

    PubMed

    Shan, Xi; Payer, Joe H; Wainright, Jesse S; Dudik, Laurie

    2011-01-15

    The objective of this work was to demonstrate a micro-fabricated hydrogen storage module for micro-power systems. Hydrogen storage materials were developed as thin-film inks to be compatible with an integrated manufacturing process. Performance and durability of storage modules were evaluated. Further, applications were demonstrated for a nickel-hydrogen battery and a micro-fabricated hydrogen-air PEM fuel cell. The ink making process, in which polymer binders and solvents were added to the palladium-treated alloys, slightly decreased the storage capacities, but had little effect on the activation properties of the treated alloys. After 5000 absorption/desorption cycles under hydrogen, the hydrogen storage capacities of the thin-film inks remained high. Absorption/desorption behavior of the ink was tested in the environment of a new type nickel-hydrogen battery, in which it would in contact with 26wt% KOH solution, and the ink showed no apparent degradation. Storage modules were used as the successfully as hydrogen source for PEM fuel cell.

  17. A microfabricated piezoelectric transducer platform for mechanical characterization of cellular events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Yu-Hsiang; Tang, William C.

    2009-09-01

    During the last decade, it was discovered that the mechanical properties and interactions of cells and their surrounding extra-cellular matrix play important roles in cellular activities. Substantial efforts have been made to develop various methodologies and tools to study cell mechanics. In this paper, we report an ongoing study on integrating the concept of a smart structure with a microfabricated thin film piezoelectric transducer for characterizing the various changes in mechanical properties associated with cellular events. A microbridge sensor integrated with a thin film piezoelectric transducer was created from silicon dioxide and zinc oxide sandwiched between two gold electrodes. The cells to be tested were cultured on the microbridge surface. The surface tractions exerted by the cells on the microbridge directly modulated the selected resonant behaviors, which were detected with the custom designed effective surface electrode. Our theory and simulation results showed, for the first time, that the application and changes in these surface tractions resulted in resonant and anti-resonant frequency shifts in the impedance response of the piezoelectric transducer. Both spatial and temporal information of dynamic cellular activities could be inferred from the changes in the impedance spectra. The design, theory, finite-element simulation, microfabrication techniques, and preliminary test results are discussed.

  18. Semi-disposable microvalves for use with microfabricated devices or microchips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuen, Po Ki; Kricka, Larry J.; Wilding, Peter

    2000-09-01

    The design, fabrication and performance characteristics of a semi-disposable CNC (computer numerical control) machined plexiglass microvalve system for use with microfabricated devices or microchips designed for human cell isolation and DNA amplification systems are described. Unlike other silicon chip-based microvalve systems, the CNC machined microvalve system is easy to fabricate, and it does not require a clean-room environment and complicated microfabrication procedures. The non-silicon-based microvalve comprises a disposable CNC machined plexiglass base and a flexible plastic membrane. The microvalve was formed from two discontinuous micro-channel components. The plexiglass used for fabrication does not inhibit biochemical reactions and extensive experimental flow studies were performed to optimize the design of the microvalve assembly so as to allow controlled flow. Different types of plastic membrane and eight different discontinuous micro-channel valve geometries were investigated and an optimum design was chosen based on the experimental results. The final design of the microvalve has minimal dead volume (less than 0.16 µl). We have demonstrated that the CNC machined plexiglass microvalve system can process microliter and sub-microliter sized samples of human whole blood without attendant problems, such as loss of sample on the microvalve system and loss by evaporation.

  19. Terahertz Response of a Microfabricated Rod Split-Ring-Resonator Electromagnetic Metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, H. O.; Casse, B. D.; Wilhelmi, O.; Saw, B. T.

    2005-02-01

    The first electromagnetic metamaterials (EM3) produced by microfabrication are reported. They are based on the rod split-ring-resonator design as proposed by Pendry et al. [

    IEEE Trans. Microwave Theory Tech. 47, 2075 (1999)IETMAB0018-948010.1109/22.798002
    ] and experimentally confirmed by Smith et al. [
    Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-9007 84, 4184 (2000)10.1103/PhysRevLett.84.4184
    ] in the GHz frequency range. Numerical simulation and experimental results from far infrared (FIR) transmission spectroscopy support the conclusion that the microfabricated composite material is EM3 in the range 1 2.7 THz. This extends the frequency range in which EM3 are available by about 3 orders of magnitude well into the FIR, thereby widely opening up opportunities to verify the unusual physical implications on electromagnetic theory as well as to build novel electromagnetic and optical devices.

  20. Development of Microfabricated Chemical Gas Sensors and Sensor Arrays for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, G. W.; Neudeck, P. G.; Fralick, G.; Thomas, V.; Liu, C. C.; Wu, W. H.; Ward, B.; Makel, D.

    2002-01-01

    Aerospace applications require the development of chemical sensors with capabilities beyond those of commercially available sensors. In particular, factors such as minimal sensor size, weight, and power consumption are particularly important. Development areas which have potential aerospace applications include launch vehicle leak detection, engine health monitoring, fire detection, and environmental monitoring. Sensor development for these applications is based on progress in three types of technology: 1) Micromachining and microfabrication (Microsystem) technology to fabricate miniaturized sensors. 2) The use of nanocrystalline materials to develop sensors with improved stability combined with higher sensitivity. 3) The development of high temperature semiconductors, especially silicon carbide. However, due to issues of selectivity and cross-sensitivity, individual sensors are limited in the amount of information that they can provide in environments that contain multiple chemical species. Thus, sensor arrays are being developed to address detection needs in such multi-species environments. This paper discusses the needs of space applications as well as the point-contact sensor technology and sensor arrays being developed to address these needs. Sensors to measure hydrogen, hydrocarbons, hydrazine, nitrogen oxides (NO,), carbon monoxide, oxygen, and carbon dioxide are being developed as well as arrays for leak, fire, and emissions detection. Demonstrations of the technology will also be discussed. It is concluded that microfabricated sensor technology has significant potential for use in a range of aerospace applications.

  1. Development and Application of Microfabricated Chemical Gas Sensors For Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, G. W.; Neudeck, P. G.; Fralick, G.; Thomas, V.; Liu, C. C.; Wu, Q. H.; Sawayda, M. S.; Jin, A.; Hammond, J.; Makel, D.; Hall, G.

    1990-01-01

    Aerospace applications require the development of chemical sensors with capabilities beyond those of commercially available sensors. In particular, factors such as minimal sensor size, weight, and power consumption are particularly important. Development areas which have potential aerospace applications include launch vehicle leak detection, engine health monitoring and control, and fire detection. Sensor development for these applications is based on progress in three types of technology: 1) Micromachining and microfabrication (Microsystem) technology to fabricate miniaturized sensors. 2) The use of nanocrystalline materials to develop sensors with improved stability combined with higher sensitivity. 3) The development of high temperature semiconductors, especially silicon carbide. Sensor development for each application involves its own challenges in the fields of materials science and fabrication technology. This paper discusses the needs of space applications and the point-contact sensor technology being developed to address these needs. Sensors to measure hydrogen, hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides (Nox, carbon monoxide, oxygen, and carbon dioxide are being developed. A description is given of each sensor type and its present stage of development. Demonstration and application these sensor technologies will be described. The demonstrations range from use of a microsystem based hydrogen sensor on the Shuttle to engine demonstration of a nanocrystalline based sensor for NO, detection. It is concluded that microfabricated sensor technology has significant potential for use in a range of aerospace applications.

  2. Current-modulating magnetic force microscope probe

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Frank Z.; Helian, Na; Clegg, Warwick W; Windmill, James F. C.; Jenkins, David

    2001-06-01

    A new current-modulating probe for the magnetic force microscope (MFM) is proposed in this article. The magnetic field, which will be used to interact with a magnetic specimen{close_quote}s stray field, is induced on the sharp tip of the conical magnetic core surrounded by a microfabricated single turn conductive coil. The reciprocity principle is used to obtain the force acting on the probe due to the specimen{close_quote}s stray field when scanned over a magnetic specimen. The magnetic field intensity is adjustable by control of the applied current. Images of specimens have been modeled using this probe. The suitability to different specimens is seen to be the biggest advantage of this scheme over the conventional probe designs. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  3. Two-photon polymerization microfabrication of hydrogels: an advanced 3D printing technology for tissue engineering and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Xing, Jin-Feng; Zheng, Mei-Ling; Duan, Xuan-Ming

    2015-08-01

    3D printing technology has attracted much attention due to its high potential in scientific and industrial applications. As an outstanding 3D printing technology, two-photon polymerization (TPP) microfabrication has been applied in the fields of micro/nanophotonics, micro-electromechanical systems, microfluidics, biomedical implants and microdevices. In particular, TPP microfabrication is very useful in tissue engineering and drug delivery due to its powerful fabrication capability for precise microstructures with high spatial resolution on both the microscopic and the nanometric scale. The design and fabrication of 3D hydrogels widely used in tissue engineering and drug delivery has been an important research area of TPP microfabrication. The resolution is a key parameter for 3D hydrogels to simulate the native 3D environment in which the cells reside and the drug is controlled to release with optimal temporal and spatial distribution in vitro and in vivo. The resolution of 3D hydrogels largely depends on the efficiency of TPP initiators. In this paper, we will review the widely used photoresists, the development of TPP photoinitiators, the strategies for improving the resolution and the microfabrication of 3D hydrogels.

  4. Microfabric Vessels for Embryoid Body Formation and Rapid Differentiation of Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hiroki; Idiris, Alimjan; Miwa, Tatsuaki; Kumagai, Hiromichi

    2016-01-01

    Various scalable three-dimensional culture systems for regenerative medicine using human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) have been developed to date. However, stable production of hiPSCs with homogeneous qualities still remains a challenge. Here, we describe a novel and simple embryoid body (EB) formation system using unique microfabricated culture vessels. Furthermore, this culture system is useful for high throughput EB formation and rapid generation of differentiated cells such as neural stem cells (NSCs) from hiPSCs. The period of NSC differentiation was significantly shortened under high EB density culture conditions. Simultaneous mass production of a pure population of NSCs was possible within 4 days. These results indicate that the novel culture system might not only become a unique tool to obtain new insights into developmental biology based on human stem cells, but also provide an important tractable platform for efficient and stable production of NSCs for clinical applications. PMID:27507707

  5. A Microfabricated Segmented-Involute-Foil Regenerator for Enhancing Reliability and Performance of Stirling Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, Mounir; Danila, Daniel; Simon, Terrence; Mantell, Susan; Sun, Liyong; Gadeon, David; Qiu, Songgang; Wood, Gary; Kelly, Kevin; McLean, Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    An actual-size microfabricated regenerator comprised of a stack of 42 disks, 19 mm diameter and 0.25 mm thick, with layers of microscopic, segmented, involute-shaped flow channels was fabricated and tested. The geometry resembles layers of uniformly-spaced segmented-parallel-plates, except the plates are curved. Each disk was made from electro-plated nickel using the LiGA process. This regenerator had feature sizes close to those required for an actual Stirling engine but the overall regenerator dimensions were sized for the NASA/Sunpower oscillating-flow regenerator test rig. Testing in the oscillating-flow test rig showed the regenerator performed extremely well, significantly better than currently used random-fiber material, producing the highest figures of merit ever recorded for any regenerator tested in that rig over its approximately 20 years of use.

  6. Temperature-depended mechanical properties of microfabricated vanadium oxide mechanical resonators for thermal sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inomata, Naoki; Pan, Libao; Toda, Masaya; Ono, Takahito

    2016-03-01

    This study describes our newly fabricated resonant thermal sensors based on vanadium oxide and investigates the temperature dependences of their resonant frequencies and Q factor. The suspended vanadium oxide resonators are microfabricated using Au or SiO2 as the sacrificial layer. The resonant frequency of the fabricated vanadium oxide resonators linearly varies with temperature, and the value of temperature coefficient of the resonant frequency is -1308 ppm/K in the range of 20-100 °C. The averaged Q factor in this range was 540. The temperature and thermal resolution of the vanadium oxide resonator are estimated as 1.7 mK/\\sqrt{\\text{Hz}} and 4.3 nW/\\sqrt{\\text{Hz}} , respectively, which are higher than those of a Si resonator having similar dimensions and under similar conditions. Therefore, the feasibility that vanadium oxide is a promising material for resonant thermal sensors is indicated.

  7. A system for trapping barium ions in a microfabricated surface trap

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, R. D. Sakrejda, T.; Wright, J.; Zhou, Z.; Blinov, B. B.; Chen, S.-P.

    2014-05-15

    We have developed a vacuum chamber and control system for rapid testing of microfabricated surface ion traps. Our system is modular in design and is based on an in-vacuum printed circuit board with integrated filters. We have used this system to successfully trap and cool barium ions and have achieved ion ‘dark' lifetimes of 31.6 s ± 3.4 s with controlled shuttling of ions. We provide a detailed description of the ion trap system including the in-vacuum materials used, control electronics and neutral atom source. We discuss the challenges presented in achieving a system which can work reliably over two years of operations in which the trap under test was changed at least 10 times.

  8. Brownian Motion Rectifier: Continuous Sorting of Macromolecules in a Microfabricated Sieve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, C. F.; Duke, T. A. J.; Chan, S. S.; Bakajin, O. B.; Austin, R. H.; Cox, E. C.

    1998-03-01

    A new method for separating biological macromolecules according to size has been proposed by Duke and Austin (T.A.J. Duke and R.H. Austin, preprint (1997).). A fine stream of molecules is transported through a microfabricated sieve, etched from a silicon chip by photolithography. The sieve consists of a periodic array of oblong obstacles, oriented at an angle to the direction of flow. The spatial asymmetry and the broken time-reversal symmetry (imposed by the flow) cause the Brownian motion of the molecules to be rectified. Since the effect depends on the thermal motion, molecules with different diffusion coefficients are deflected by different amounts, and consequently a mixture of molecules is sorted according to size. Our preliminary results in sorting a mixture of DNA in such a sieve will be presented.

  9. Simultaneous recording of rat auditory cortex and thalamus via a titanium-based, microfabricated, microelectrode device

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, PT; Rao, MP; Otto, KJ

    2011-01-01

    Direct recording from sequential processing stations within the brain has provided opportunity for enhancing understanding of important neural circuits, such as the corticothalamic loops underlying auditory, visual, and somatosensory processing. However, the common reliance upon microwire-based electrodes to perform such recordings often necessitates complex surgeries and increases trauma to neural tissues. This paper reports the development of titanium-based, microfabricated, microelectrode devices designed to address these limitations by allowing acute recording from the thalamic nuclei and associated cortical sites simultaneously in a minimally-invasive manner. In particular, devices were designed to simultaneously probe rat auditory cortex and auditory thalamus, with the intent of recording auditory response latencies and isolated action potentials within the separate anatomical sites. Details regarding the design, fabrication, and characterization of these devices are presented, as are preliminary results from acute in vivo recording. PMID:21628772

  10. Microfabricated DNA analysis system. Semi-annual report, August 1993--January 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Northrup, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    We are miniaturizing instrumentation for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) -- a bioanalytical technique that amplifies target sections of DNA through thermal cycling. This report focuses on delineating reaction chamber, design parameters through computer modeling and infrared imaging. We have also continued micro-chamber-based PCR experiments and have successfully amplified three different targets from two different biological sources. Specifically, we have amplified DNA from {beta}-globin (a subunit of hemoglobin), and two different-sized targets from the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). These experiments were performed in newly-designed chambers. Reaction chambers are also being designed with detection in mind, specifically for the detection of fluorescent DNA labels. Finally, some new developments in PCR technology are described as they represent potential biological diagnostics to be evaluated in microfabricated DNA analysis systems.

  11. Microfabricated rankine cycle steam turbine for power generation and methods of making the same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frechette, Luc (Inventor); Muller, Norbert (Inventor); Lee, Changgu (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    In accordance with the present invention, an integrated micro steam turbine power plant on-a-chip has been provided. The integrated micro steam turbine power plant on-a-chip of the present invention comprises a miniature electric power generation system fabricated using silicon microfabrication technology and lithographic patterning. The present invention converts heat to electricity by implementing a thermodynamic power cycle on a chip. The steam turbine power plant on-a-chip generally comprises a turbine, a pump, an electric generator, an evaporator, and a condenser. The turbine is formed by a rotatable, disk-shaped rotor having a plurality of rotor blades disposed thereon and a plurality of stator blades. The plurality of stator blades are interdigitated with the plurality of rotor blades to form the turbine. The generator is driven by the turbine and converts mechanical energy into electrical energy.

  12. Pre-Alpine and Alpine microfabrics in the Austroalpine crystalline basement (Matsch Unit, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberlei, T.; Habler, G.; Grasemann, B.; Thöni, M.

    2012-04-01

    The Matsch Unit is part of the Austroalpine crystalline basement of the Eastern Alps. Three distinct tectonometamorphic events have been recognized in this unit. These include Variscan amphibolite-facies metamorphism, a Permian low-pressure event related with pegmatite emplacement and a Cretaceous greenschist-facies metamorphic overprint (Haas, 1985; Habler et al., 2009). The Cretaceous "Vinschgau Shear Zone" representing the southern tectonic boundary of the Matsch unit is supposed to show an increase in shear zone width and metamorphic grade from W to E (Schmid & Haas, 1989; Froitzheim et al., 1997). Cretaceous deformation in the Matsch crystalline complex was typically restricted to distinct shear zones, especially at subunit boundaries as well as at the northern and southern margin of the Matsch unit. The current study is focused on comparing deformation and reaction microstructures in high- and low-strain domains of Cretaceous deformation affecting Permian pegmatites and their metapelitic host rocks from the eastern portion of the Matsch unit. A major challenge was the discrimination of Cretaceous and pre-Cretaceous microfabrics. Remarkable differences of heterochronous deformation stages are reflected by the deformation and recrystallization behaviour of quartz, feldspar, biotite and white mica as well as characteristic syn-tectonic phase assemblages that replaced Variscan and Permian parageneses in peraluminous metapelites. Pre-existing staurolite was decomposed to chloritoid and paragonite, whereas a second garnet generation grew at the expense of biotite. Furthermore, biotite fishes were marginally decomposed to aggregates of white mica and ilmenite. This reaction was also observed at kink bands within biotite clasts. Cretaceous quartz microfabrics imply dynamic recrystallization by subgrain rotation (SGR) and grain boundary migration (GBM) associated with the development of a strong lattice preferred orientation (LPO). Subsequently, bulging

  13. Microfabrication, surface modification, and laser guidance techniques to create a neuron biochip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirlo, Russell Kirk; Peng, Xiang; Yuan, Xiaocong; Gao, Bruce Zhi

    2008-09-01

    In this report we illustrate our application of soft lithography-based microfabrication, surface modification, and our unique laser cell-patterning system toward the creation of neuron biochips. We deposited individual forebrain neurons from Day 7 embryonic chicks into two rows of eight in a silicon microstructure aligned over a microelectrode array (MEA). The polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane with microstructures to confine cells and guide network connectivity was aligned to the electrodes of a MEA. Both the MEA and the PDMS membrane were treated with O2 plasma, Poly-L-Lysine, and Laminin to aid in cell attachment and survival. The primary advantage of our process is that it is quicker and simpler than previous cell-placement methods and may make highly defined neuronal network biochips more practical.

  14. Microfabric Vessels for Embryoid Body Formation and Rapid Differentiation of Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Hiroki; Idiris, Alimjan; Miwa, Tatsuaki; Kumagai, Hiromichi

    2016-01-01

    Various scalable three-dimensional culture systems for regenerative medicine using human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) have been developed to date. However, stable production of hiPSCs with homogeneous qualities still remains a challenge. Here, we describe a novel and simple embryoid body (EB) formation system using unique microfabricated culture vessels. Furthermore, this culture system is useful for high throughput EB formation and rapid generation of differentiated cells such as neural stem cells (NSCs) from hiPSCs. The period of NSC differentiation was significantly shortened under high EB density culture conditions. Simultaneous mass production of a pure population of NSCs was possible within 4 days. These results indicate that the novel culture system might not only become a unique tool to obtain new insights into developmental biology based on human stem cells, but also provide an important tractable platform for efficient and stable production of NSCs for clinical applications. PMID:27507707

  15. Characterization of spin pumping effect in Permalloy/Cu/Pt microfabricated lateral devices

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Tatsuya Seki, Takeshi; Takanashi, Koki; Ono, Shimpei

    2014-05-07

    We studied ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) for microfabricated lateral devices consisting of a Permalloy (Py) rectangular element and a Pt nano-element bridged by a Cu wire, which were located on a coplanar waveguide. A change in the resonance linewidth (Δf) was observed in the FMR spectra when the distance between Py and Pt (d) was varied. For devices with d < 400 nm, Δf definitely increased, suggesting the enhancement of the Gilbert damping constant (α). We discussed a possible reason for the this enhancement taking into account the increase in the efficiency of spin pumping into Cu due to the spin absorption of the attached Pt.

  16. A High-Average-Power Free Electron Laser for Microfabrication and Surface Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dylla, H. F.; Benson, S.; Bisognano, J.; Bohn, C. L.; Cardman, L.; Engwall, D.; Fugitt, J.; Jordan, K.; Kehne, D.; Li, Z.; Liu, H.; Merminga, L.; Neil, G. R.; Neuffer, D.; Shinn, M.; Sinclair, C.; Wiseman, M.; Brillson, L. J.; Henkel, D. P.; Helvajian, H.; Kelley, M. J.; Nair, Shanti

    1995-01-01

    CEBAF has developed a comprehensive conceptual design of an industrial user facility based on a kilowatt ultraviolet (UV) (160-1000 mm) and infrared (IR) (2-25 micron) free electron laser (FEL) driven by a recirculating, energy recovering 200 MeV superconducting radio frequency (SRF) accelerator. FEL users, CEBAF's partners in the Lase Processing Consortium, including AT&T, DuPont, IBM, Northrop Grumman, 3M, and Xerox, are developing applications such as metal, ceramic, and electronic material micro-fabrication and polymer and metal surface processing, with the overall effort leading to later scale-up to industrial systems at 50-100 kW. Representative applications are described. The proposed high-average-power FEL overcomes limitations of conventional laser sources in available power, cost-effectiveness, tunability, and pulse structure.

  17. Microfabricated devices for fluid mixing and their application for chemical synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kakuta, M; Bessoth, F G; Manz, A

    2001-01-01

    Over the last few decades, the processes of miniaturization, integration, and automation have revolutionized the world of science and industry. Within a chemical reaction process the unit operations, mixing, heating, and cooling, can be regarded as key steps. In microreactors, enhanced heat and mass transport, due to small characteristic dimensions together with large surface to volume ratios, are expected to open up a whole range of new possibilities. Increase in reaction yield, reduction of reaction time as well as byproduct formation, inherent process safety, and even completely new process routes are some of the advantages associated with microTAS (micro Total Analysis Systems) or microSYNTAS (micro SYNthesis Total Analysis Systems). This article aims to describe the development of microfabricated devices for fluid mixing, so-called micromixers, and their application for chemical synthesis.

  18. Metal-Organic Framework Thin Films as Stationary Phases in Microfabricated Gas-Chromatography Columns.

    SciTech Connect

    Read, Douglas; Sillerud, Colin Halliday

    2016-01-01

    The overarching goal of this project is to integrate Sandia's microfabricated gas-chromatography ( GC) columns with a stationary phase material that is capable of retaining high-volatility chemicals and permanent gases. The successful integration of such a material with GCs would dramatically expand the repertoire of detectable compounds for Sandia's various microanalysis systems. One such promising class of candidate materials is metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). In this report we detail our methods for controlled deposition of HKUST-1 MOF stationary phases within GC columns. We demonstrate: the chromatographic separation of natural gas; a method for determining MOF film thickness from chromatography alone; and the first-reported GC x GC separation of natural gas -- in general -- let alone for two disparate MOF stationary phases. In addition we determine the fundamental thermodynamic constant for mass sorption, the partition coefficient, for HKUST-1 and several light hydrocarbons and select toxic industrial chemicals.

  19. X-ray microfabrication and measurement of a terahertz mode converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, T. H.; Shew, B. Y.; Wu, C. Y.; Chen, N. C.

    2010-05-01

    Mode converters are critical for frequency-tunable terahertz gyrotrons. This study reports the development of a broadband TE02 mode converter centered at 0.2 THz. An octafeed sidewall coupling structure was employed and the mode purity was analyzed. The converter was built using the technique of x-ray microfabrication. The x rays irradiated on the SU-8 resist and generated a template of very high thickness of 1.295 mm. Pulse electroplating technique was used to deposit copper on the structure along the template. The parts then went through precise machining and the residual resist was removed via high-flux radical etching. A computer-aided diagnostic system was introduced to measure the performance of the converter. Results suggest that the frequency response of resistivity should be taken into consideration for the devices in terahertz region.

  20. Phase-space properties of magneto-optical traps utilising micro-fabricated gratings.

    PubMed

    McGilligan, J P; Griffin, P F; Riis, E; Arnold, A S

    2015-04-01

    We have used diffraction gratings to simplify the fabrication, and dramatically increase the atomic collection efficiency, of magneto-optical traps using micro-fabricated optics. The atom number enhancement was mainly due to the increased beam capture volume, afforded by the large area (4cm(2)) shallow etch (~ 200nm) binary grating chips. Here we provide a detailed theoretical and experimental investigation of the on-chip magneto-optical trap temperature and density in four different chip geometries using (87)Rb, whilst studying effects due to MOT radiation pressure imbalance. With optimal initial MOTs on two of the chips we obtain both large atom number (2×10(7)) and sub-Doppler temperatures (50 μK) after optical molasses.

  1. Microfabrication of pre-aligned fiber bundle couplers using ultraviolet lithography of SU-8.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ren; Soper, Steven A; Wang, Wanjun

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the design, microfabrication and testing of a pre-aligned array of fiber couplers using direct UV-lithography of SU-8. The fiber coupler array includes an out-of-plane refractive microlens array and two fiberport collimator arrays. With the optical axis of the pixels parallel to the substrate, each pixel of the microlens array can be pre-aligned with the corresponding pixels of the fiberport collimator array as defined by the lithography mask design. This out-of-plane polymer 3D microlens array is pre-aligned with the fiber collimator arrays with no additional adjustment and assembly required, therefore, it helps to dramatically reduce the running cost and improve the alignment quality and coupling efficiency. In addition, the experimental results for the fiber couplers are also presented and analyzed.

  2. A microfabricated fringing field capacitive pH sensor with an integrated readout circuit

    SciTech Connect

    Arefin, Md Shamsul Redoute, Jean-Michel; Rasit Yuce, Mehmet; Bulut Coskun, M.; Alan, Tuncay; Neild, Adrian

    2014-06-02

    This work presents a microfabricated fringe-field capacitive pH sensor using interdigitated electrodes and an integrated modulation-based readout circuit. The changes in capacitance of the sensor result from the permittivity changes due to pH variations and are converted to frequency shifts using a crossed-coupled voltage controlled oscillator readout circuit. The shift in resonant frequency of the readout circuit is 30.96 MHz for a change in pH of 1.0–5.0. The sensor can be used for the measurement of low pH levels, such as gastric acid, and can be integrated with electronic pills. The measurement results show high repeatability, low noise, and a stable output.

  3. Enhanced sensitivity of a microfabricated resonator using a graphene-polystyrene bilayer membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Minhyuk; Lee, Eunho; Cho, Kilwon; Jeon, Sangmin

    2014-08-18

    A graphene layer was synthesized using chemical vapor deposition methods and a polystyrene solution was spin-cast onto the graphene film. The graphene-polystyrene bilayer membrane was attached between the two tines of a microfabricated quartz tuning fork (QTF). The modulus of the graphene-polystyrene bilayer was measured to be twice that of a pristine polystyrene membrane. Exposure of the membrane-coated QTF to ethanol vapor decreased the resonance frequency of the microresonator. The bilayer membrane-coated QTF produced a frequency change that was three times the change obtained using a polystyrene membrane-coated QTF, with a lower degree of degradation in the Q factor. The limit of detection of the bilayer membrane-coated QTF to ethanol vapor was determined to be 20 ppm.

  4. In vitro liver model using microfabricated scaffolds in a modular bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Vinci, Bruna; Cavallone, Daniela; Vozzi, Giovanni; Mazzei, Daniele; Domenici, Claudio; Brunetto, Maurizia; Ahluwalia, Arti

    2010-02-01

    Hepatocyte function on 3-D microfabricated polymer scaffolds realised with the pressure-activated microsyringe was tested under static and dynamic conditions. The dynamic cell culture was obtained using the multicompartment modular bioreactor system. Hepatocyte cell density, glucose consumption, and albumin secretion rate were measured daily over a week. Cells seeded on scaffolds showed an increase in cell density compared with monolayer controls. Moreover, in dynamic culture, cell metabolic function increased three times in comparison with static monolayer cultures. These results suggest that cell density and cell-cell interactions are mediated by the architecture of the substrate, while the endogenous biochemical functions are regulated by a sustainable supply of nutrients and interstitial-like flow. Thus, a combination of 3-D scaffolds and dynamic flow conditions are both important for the development of a hepatic tissue model for applications in drug testing and regenerative medicine.

  5. Simultaneous recording of rat auditory cortex and thalamus via a titanium-based, microfabricated, microelectrode device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, P. T.; Rao, M. P.; Otto, K. J.

    2011-08-01

    Direct recording from sequential processing stations within the brain has provided opportunity for enhancing understanding of important neural circuits, such as the corticothalamic loops underlying auditory, visual, and somatosensory processing. However, the common reliance upon microwire-based electrodes to perform such recordings often necessitates complex surgeries and increases trauma to neural tissues. This paper reports the development of titanium-based, microfabricated, microelectrode devices designed to address these limitations by allowing acute recording from the thalamic nuclei and associated cortical sites simultaneously in a minimally invasive manner. In particular, devices were designed to simultaneously probe rat auditory cortex and auditory thalamus, with the intent of recording auditory response latencies and isolated action potentials within the separate anatomical sites. Details regarding the design, fabrication, and characterization of these devices are presented, as are preliminary results from acute in vivo recording.

  6. Note: Development of a microfabricated sensor to measure thermal conductivity of picoliter scale liquid samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Byoung Kyoo; Yi, Namwoo; Park, Jaesung; Kim, Dongsik

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents a thermal analysis device, which can measure thermal conductivity of picoliter scale liquid sample. We employ the three omega method with a microfabricated AC thermal sensor with nanometer width heater. The liquid sample is confined by a micro-well structure fabricated on the sensor surface. The performance of the instrument was verified by measuring the thermal conductivity of 27-picoliter samples of de-ionized (DI) water, ethanol, methanol, and DI water-ethanol mixtures with accuracies better than 3%. Furthermore, another analytical scheme allows real-time thermal conductivity measurement with 5% accuracy. To the best of our knowledge, this technique requires the smallest volume of sample to measure thermal property ever.

  7. Microfabrication of new microelectrode arrays equipped with a ground surface configuration for focal neural microstimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, L.; Joucla, S.; Lissorgues, G.; Yvert, B.

    2009-07-01

    Extracellular electrical stimulation of the central nervous system has been used empirically for decades, with both fundamental and clinical goals. Currently, microelectrode arrays (MEAs) offer new possibilities for CNS microstimulation, allowing in principle to activate only neurons located in the vicinity of the stimulation sites. To overcome the lack of focality of monopolar stimulations, multipolar approaches are commonly used, multiplying therefore the number of electrodes of the arrays and the complexity of the connection system behind. To overcome these limitations, we developed a ground surface configuration consisting in surrounding all the electrodes with a conductive surface laying over the MEA substrate, and using it for the stimulation current return. We first report the microfabrication of a prototype of MEA equipped with this configuration. We also perform experimental recordings of the potential field induced by microstimulations and confirm the expected increased focality with the ground surface configuration. This will open the way to focal 'pixel-like' microstimulation of neural networks using MEAs.

  8. Rapid microfabrication of transparent materials using a filamented beam of the IR femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butkus, S.; Paipulas, D.; Viburys, Ž.; Alesenkov, A.; Gaižauskas, E.; KaškelytÄ--, D.; Barkauskas, M.; Sirutkaitis, V.

    2014-03-01

    Glass drilling and welding applications realized with the help of femtosecond lasers attract industrial attention , however, desired tasks may require systems employing high numerical aperture (NA) focusing conditions, low repetition rate lasers and complex fast motion translation stages. Due to the sensitivity of such systems, slight instabilities in parameter values can lead to crack formations, severe fabrication rate decrement and poor quality overall results. A microfabrication system lacking the stated disadvantages was constructed and demonstrated in this report. An f-theta lens was used in combination with a galvanometric scanner, in addition, a water pumping system that enables formation of water films of variable thickness in real time on the samples. Water acts as a medium for filament formation, which in turn decreases the focal spot diameter and increases fluence and axial focal length . This article demonstrates the application of a femtosecond (280fs) laser towards two different micromachining techniques: rapid cutting and welding of transparent materials. Filament formation in water gives rise to strong ablation at the surface of the sample, moreover, the water, surrounding the ablated area, adds increased cooling and protection from cracking. The constructed microfabrication system is capable of drilling holes in thick soda-lime and hardened glasses. The fabrication time varies depending on the diameter of the hole and spans from a few to several hundred seconds. Moreover, complex-shape fabrication was demonstrated. Filament formation at the interface of two glass samples was also used for welding applications. By varying repetition rate, scanning speed and focal position optimal conditions for strong glass welding via filamentation were determined.

  9. Microfabrication of a two-stage BioMEMS microfluidic cell sorter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grafton, Meggie M.; Geheb, Benjamin; Jang, Jae Hyuk; Chuang, Han-Sheng; Rajdev, Pooja; Reece, Lisa M.; Irazoqui, Pedro P.; Wereley, Steven T.; Jung, Byunghoo; Leary, James F.

    2009-02-01

    Point-of-care devices represent the future for medical technologies. Current diagnostic tools are cumbersome, expensive, complicated, and often at risk for contamination. There is a need for cost effective, portable, closed-system, high-speed cell screening and cell isolating device. A microfabricated, exponentially-staging, BioMEMS microfluidic cytometer/cell sorting device offers these advantages over current technologies. A two-stage branched architecture allows the study of inter-particle spacing, flow relations, pressure measurements, and cell behavior in an environment where fluorescence detection is used to identify and analyze certain cellular characteristics. This device was microfabricated using the polymer PDMS to transmit light effectively, to be inexpensive and disposable, and to be easy to manipulate. For initial prototyping, an inverted fluorescent Nikon microscope provided the necessary excitation to view the particles and cells. For the portable device, avalanche photo diodes (APDs) and light emitting diodes (LEDs) are being incorporated into the device for the detection and excitation respectively. For low light level applications, sigma-delta modulation methods are being applied to reduce noise susceptibility and to detect the APD signal more efficiently. In addition, a data acquisition system (DAQ) has been designed that can effectively track signals from a cell sorter using a digital signal processing (DSP) board and a laptop computer. Currently elastomeric valves for diverting flow have been incorporated into the microfluidic chip. Measurements are being made of the effects of the microfluidics valve structures, or the simple opening and closing of selected channels to divert flow and cells down specific channels depending on their measured properties.

  10. Microfabrics in carbonate mylonites along a large-scale shear zone (Helvetic Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, Andreas; Herwegh, Marco; Evans, Brian; Pfiffner, Adrian; Austin, Nick; Vennemann, Torsten

    2007-11-01

    Carbonate mylonites with varying proportions of second-phase minerals were collected at positions of increasing metamorphic grade along the basal thrust of the Morcles nappe (Helvetic nappes, Switzerland). Variations of temperature, stress, and strain rate, changes in chemistry of solid and fluid phases, and differing degrees of strain localization and annealing were tracked by measuring the shapes, mean sizes, and size distributions of both matrix and second-phase grains, as well as crystal preferred orientation (CPO) of the matrix. Field structures suggest that strain rate was constant along the fault. The mean and distribution of the calcite grain sizes were affected most profoundly by temperature: Increased temperature, presumably accompanied by decreased stress, correlated with larger mean sizes and wider size distributions. At a given location, the matrix grains in mylonites with more second-phase particles are, on average, smaller, have narrower size distributions, and have more elongate shapes. For example, mylonites with 50 vol.% of second phases have matrix grain sizes half that of pure mylonites. Changes in calcite chemistry and the presence of synkinematic fluids seemed to influence microfabric only weakly. Temporal variations in conditions, such as exhumation-induced cooling, apparently provoke changes in temperature, stress, and strain rate along the nappe. These changes result in further strain localization during retrograde conditions and cause the grain size to be reduced by an additional 50%. The matrix CPO strengthens with increasing temperature or strain, but weakens and rotates with increasing second-phase content. These fabric changes suggest differing rates of grain growth, grain size reduction, and development of CPO owing to variations in the deformation conditions and, perhaps, mechanisms. To interpret natural mylonite structures or to extrapolate mechanical data to natural situations requires careful characterization of the microfabric

  11. Spatially monitoring oxygen level in 3D microfabricated cell culture systems using optical oxygen sensing beads.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Acosta, Miguel A; Leach, Jennie B; Carrier, Rebecca L

    2013-04-21

    Capability of measuring and monitoring local oxygen concentration at the single cell level (tens of microns scale) is often desirable but difficult to achieve in cell culture. In this study, biocompatible oxygen sensing beads were prepared and tested for their potential for real-time monitoring and mapping of local oxygen concentration in 3D micro-patterned cell culture systems. Each oxygen sensing bead is composed of a silica core loaded with both an oxygen sensitive Ru(Ph2phen3)Cl2 dye and oxygen insensitive Nile blue reference dye, and a poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) shell rendering biocompatibility. Human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells were cultivated on a series of PDMS and type I collagen based substrates patterned with micro-well arrays for 3 or 7 days, and then brought into contact with oxygen sensing beads. Using an image analysis algorithm to convert florescence intensity of beads to partial oxygen pressure in the culture system, tens of microns-size oxygen sensing beads enabled the spatial measurement of local oxygen concentration in the microfabricated system. Results generally indicated lower oxygen level inside wells than on top of wells, and local oxygen level dependence on structural features of cell culture surfaces. Interestingly, chemical composition of cell culture substrates also appeared to affect oxygen level, with type-I collagen based cell culture systems having lower oxygen concentration compared to PDMS based cell culture systems. In general, results suggest that oxygen sensing beads can be utilized to achieve real-time and local monitoring of micro-environment oxygen level in 3D microfabricated cell culture systems.

  12. A permalloy zigzag structure based magnetic bio-sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ger, Tzong-Rong; Xu, You-Ren; Huang, Hao-Ting; Wei, Zung-Hang

    2012-04-01

    A magnetic fluid consisting of Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles is embedded inside cells by intracellular uptake. A micro-fabricated magnetic zigzag-shaped surface structure is studied for use as a biosensor. We have developed a MOKE magnetometer based methodology to measure the different hysteresis loop signals between cells with and without being placed on zigzag sensors. Adding the magnetic cells on the structure decreases the coercivity from the magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE) signal of zigzag magnetic thin films because of the magnetic properties of superparamagnetic nanoparticles. The magnetoresistance measurement observed is that the switching fields of the zigzag structure with magnetic cells are significantly increased compared to the case without cells in the hard axis of the external field applied.

  13. Microfabrication of diamond-based slow-wave circuits for mm-wave and THz vacuum electronic sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lueck, M. R.; Malta, D. M.; Gilchrist, K. H.; Kory, C. L.; Mearini, G. T.; Dayton, J. A.

    2011-06-01

    Planar and helical slow-wave circuits for THz radiation sources have been made using novel microfabrication and assembly methods. A biplanar slow-wave circuit for a 650 GHz backward wave oscillator (BWO) was fabricated through the growth of diamond into high aspect ratio silicon molds and the selective metallization of the tops and sidewalls of 90 µm tall diamond features using lithographically created shadow masks. Helical slow-wave circuits for a 650 GHz BWO and a 95 GHz traveling wave tube were created through the patterning of trenches in thin film diamond, electroplating of gold half-helices, and high accuracy bonding of helix halves. The development of new techniques for the microfabrication of vacuum electronic components will help to facilitate compact and high-power sources for terahertz range radiation.

  14. Microfabrication of a Segmented-Involute-Foil Regenerator, Testing in a Sunpower Stirling Convertor and Supporting Modeling and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, Mounir B.; Tew, Roy C.; Gedeon, David; Wood, Gary; McLean, Jeff

    2008-01-01

    Under Phase II of a NASA Research Award contract, a prototype nickel segmented-involute-foil regenerator was microfabricated via LiGA and tested in the NASA/Sunpower oscillating-flow test rig. The resulting figure-of-merit was about twice that of the approx.90% porosity random-fiber material currently used in the small 50-100 W Stirling engines recently manufactured for NASA. That work was reported at the 2007 International Energy Conversion Engineering Conference in St. Louis, was also published as a NASA report, NASA/TM-2007-2149731, and has been more completely described in a recent NASA Contractor Report, NASA/CR-2007-2150062. Under a scaled-back version of the original Phase III plan, a new nickel segmentedinvolute- foil regenerator was microfabricated and has been tested in a Sunpower Frequency-Test-Bed (FTB) Stirling convertor. Testing in the FTB convertor produced about the same efficiency as testing with the original random-fiber regenerator. But the high thermal conductivity of the prototype nickel regenerator was responsible for a significant performance degradation. An efficiency improvement (by a 1.04 factor, according to computer predictions) could have been achieved if the regenerator been made from a low-conductivity material. Also the FTB convertor was not reoptimized to take full advantage of the microfabricated regenerator's low flow resistance; thus the efficiency would likely have been even higher had the FTB been completely reoptimized. This report discusses the regenerator microfabrication process, testing of the regenerator in the Stirling FTB convertor, and the supporting analysis. Results of the pre-test computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of the effects of the regenerator-test-configuration diffusers (located at each end of the regenerator) is included. The report also includes recommendations for accomplishing further development of involute-foil regenerators from a higher-temperature material than nickel.

  15. Micro-fabrication considerations for MEMS-based reconfigurable antenna apertures: with emphasis on DC bias network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadas, Hamid; Mousavi, Pedram; Daneshmand, Mojgan

    2016-11-01

    This note addresses the main challenges involved in monolithic micro-fabrication of large capacitive-MEMS-based reconfigurable electromagnetic apertures in antenna applications. The fabrication of a large DC bias line network, and also the metallic features in such apertures, requires special attention and optimization. It is shown that the choice of DC bias network material can impact DC and RF performance of the structure, and a trade-off between switching time and radiation pattern integrity should be considered.

  16. Quartz microfabrics in ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic rocks as indicators of low stress during uplift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stäb, C.; Kruhl, J. H.; Trepmann, C.; Wang, L.

    2012-12-01

    Ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) metamorphic rocks form in convergent tectonic settings at depths > 90 km. In general, UHP conditions are defined by the stability of coesite. Coesite inclusions in various host minerals are a common feature in UHP rocks. We present data of typical quartz microfabrics, which resulted from the transformation of coesite to quartz in inclusions and intergranular regions, and evidence of high temperature quartz microfabrics. Jadeite-quartzites and eclogites from the Dabie Shan - Sulu orogenic belt (central China) were investigated, both of which experienced peak UHP conditions of ~ 660°C / > 2.6 GPa (Liou et al., 1997) and 700-800°C / 3.1-4.1 GPa (Yoshida et al., 2004), respectively, at c. 220-230 Ma due to a N-subduction of the Yangtze craton beneath the Sino-Korean craton, followed by a nearly isothermal decompression to ~ 1 GPa. Both rocks contain coesite and/or quartz inclusions (up to 350 μm in diameter) in clinopyroxene and garnet and in their symplectitic rims with various microstructures: (i) rims of palisade quartz commonly in contact to coesite, (ii) quartz aggregates with sutured grain boundaries and central remnants of coesite, (iii) larger central quartz grains with subgrains, (iv) foam quartz (c. 50 μm sized), and (v) apparently strain-free single quartz crystals. The foam quartz shows a random c-axis distribution but preferred crystallographic orientations of grain boundaries. Intergranular foam quartz is found in quartz-eclogites from the Sulu region, most probably indicating quartz-coesite transformation and, therefore, former UHP conditions. The preservation of foam quartz in intergranular regions and inclusions (especially in symplectites) indicates low stress and nearly no deformation during uplift in the stability field of quartz. This points to strain localization in shear zones (Zhao et al., 2003). In veins in the jadeite-quartzites and quartz-eclogites quartz occurs in larger aggregates with sutured grain boundaries

  17. Influence of Protolith Composition and Sliding Velocity on the Microfabric of Fault Gouge: Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, C.; Underwood, M.; Schleicher, A.; Ikari, M.; Saffer, D. M.; Marone, C.

    2013-12-01

    The relation between fault gouge fabric and fault-slip behavior remains a central unknown in our knowledge of fault and earthquake mechanics. The linkage of cause to effect remains cryptic in part because natural gouges are highly variable (i.e., particle size distribution, mineralogy, microfabric), due to the heterogeneity of protoliths and differences in cumulative slip. To help isolate key variables, we conducted a series of direct shearing tests in a double direct shear configuration, on specimens of artificial powdered gouge. The experiments were conducted under room temperature and humidity conditions (RH = 14.4-32.8%), using ~3 mm-thick (prior to shearing) layers with nominal contact areas of 5x5 cm. Layers were sheared between grooved steel forcing blocks designed to minimize slip at the layer boundary. We tested four gouge compositions: illitic shale, chlorite schist, a 50:50 mixture of smectite and quartz, and Westerly granite. Three load point sliding velocities were applied (1.15, 11.5, and 115 microns/sec), and all experiments were conducted under a normal stress of ~50 MPa. As expected, the coefficients of friction vary as a function of both composition and sliding velocity. The smectite:quartz mixture is consistently weakest (0.38-0.39) and granite gouge is consistently strongest (0.60-0.61). Gouges of illitic shale and chlorite schist yielded larger differences as a function of sliding velocity, 0.40-0.53 and 0.48-0.58, respectively. To characterize the microfabric that developed within each sample during shearing, the twelve experimental wafers were analyzed by X-ray texture goniometry (XTG) and imaged (uncoated) using an FEI Quanta 600 scanning electron microscopy in low vacuum mode (80 Pa). SEM images were shot parallel and perpendicular to the shear plane at high voltage (30 kV) with spot size of 3.0 and working distance of 10 mm. After processing the digital images (1000X magnification), we ran statistical analyses of the apparent long

  18. Microfabrication of chip-sized scaffolds for three-dimensional cell cultivation.

    PubMed

    Giselbrecht, Stefan; Gottwald, Eric; Truckenmueller, Roman; Trautmann, Christina; Welle, Alexander; Guber, Andreas; Saile, Volker; Gietzelt, Thomas; Weibezahn, Karl-Friedrich

    2008-01-01

    Using microfabrication technologies is a prerequisite to create scaffolds of reproducible geometry and constant quality for three-dimensional cell cultivation. These technologies offer a wide spectrum of advantages not only for manufacturing but also for different applications. The size and shape of formed cell clusters can be influenced by the exact and reproducible architecture of the microfabricated scaffold and, therefore, the diffusion path length of nutrients and gases can be controlled.1 This is unquestionably a useful tool to prevent apoptosis and necrosis of cells due to an insufficient nutrient and gas supply or removal of cellular metabolites. Our polymer chip, called CellChip, has the outer dimensions of 2 x 2 cm with a central microstructured area. This area is subdivided into an array of up to 1156 microcontainers with a typical dimension of 300 m edge length for the cubic design (cp- or cf-chip) or of 300 m diameter and depth for the round design (r-chip).2 So far, hot embossing or micro injection moulding (in combination with subsequent laborious machining of the parts) was used for the fabrication of the microstructured chips. Basically, micro injection moulding is one of the only polymer based replication techniques that, up to now, is capable for mass production of polymer microstructures.3 However, both techniques have certain unwanted limitations due to the processing of a viscous polymer melt with the generation of very thin walls or integrated through holes. In case of the CellChip, thin bottom layers are necessary to perforate the polymer and provide small pores of defined size to supply cells with culture medium e.g. by microfluidic perfusion of the containers. In order to overcome these limitations and to reduce the manufacturing costs we have developed a new microtechnical approach on the basis of a down-scaled thermoforming process. For the manufacturing of highly porous and thin walled polymer chips, we use a combination of heavy ion

  19. Microfabrication of Chip-sized Scaffolds for Three-dimensional Cell cultivation

    PubMed Central

    Giselbrecht, Stefan; Gottwald, Eric; Truckenmueller, Roman; Trautmann, Christina; Welle, Alexander; Guber, Andreas; Saile, Volker; Gietzelt, Thomas; Weibezahn, Karl-Friedrich

    2008-01-01

    Using microfabrication technologies is a prerequisite to create scaffolds of reproducible geometry and constant quality for three-dimensional cell cultivation. These technologies offer a wide spectrum of advantages not only for manufacturing but also for different applications. The size and shape of formed cell clusters can be influenced by the exact and reproducible architecture of the microfabricated scaffold and, therefore, the diffusion path length of nutrients and gases can be controlled.1 This is unquestionably a useful tool to prevent apoptosis and necrosis of cells due to an insufficient nutrient and gas supply or removal of cellular metabolites. Our polymer chip, called CellChip, has the outer dimensions of 2 x 2 cm with a central microstructured area. This area is subdivided into an array of up to 1156 microcontainers with a typical dimension of 300 m edge length for the cubic design (cp- or cf-chip) or of 300 m diameter and depth for the round design (r-chip).2 So far, hot embossing or micro injection moulding (in combination with subsequent laborious machining of the parts) was used for the fabrication of the microstructured chips. Basically, micro injection moulding is one of the only polymer based replication techniques that, up to now, is capable for mass production of polymer microstructures.3 However, both techniques have certain unwanted limitations due to the processing of a viscous polymer melt with the generation of very thin walls or integrated through holes. In case of the CellChip, thin bottom layers are necessary to perforate the polymer and provide small pores of defined size to supply cells with culture medium e.g. by microfluidic perfusion of the containers. In order to overcome these limitations and to reduce the manufacturing costs we have developed a new microtechnical approach on the basis of a down-scaled thermoforming process. For the manufacturing of highly porous and thin walled polymer chips, we use a combination of heavy ion

  20. Microfabricated silicon leak for sampling planetary atmospheres with a mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Jamieson, B G; Lynch, B A; Harpold, D N; Niemann, H B; Shappirio, M D; Mahaffy, P R

    2007-06-01

    A microfabricated silicon mass spectrometer inlet leak has been designed, fabricated, and tested. This leak achieves a much lower conductance in a smaller volume than is possible with commonly available metal or glass capillary tubing. It will also be shown that it is possible to integrate significant additional functionality, such as inlet heaters and valves, into a silicon microleak with very little additional mass. The fabricated leak is compatible with high temperature (up to 500 degrees C) and high pressure (up to 100 bars) conditions, as would be encountered on a Venus atmospheric probe. These leaks behave in reasonable agreement with their theoretically calculated conductance, although this differs between devices and from the predicted value by as much as a factor of 2. This variation is believed to be the result of nonuniformity in the silicon etching process which is characterized in this work. Future versions of this device can compensate for characterized process variations in order to produce devices in closer agreement with designed conductance values. The integration of an inlet heater into the leak device has also been demonstrated in this work. PMID:17614640

  1. Development and application of a microfabricated multimodal neural catheter for neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunyan; Wu, Zhizhen; Limnuson, Kanokwan; Cheyuo, Cletus; Wang, Ping; Ahn, Chong H; Narayan, Raj K; Hartings, Jed A

    2016-02-01

    We present a microfabricated neural catheter for real-time continuous monitoring of multiple physiological, biochemical and electrophysiological variables that are critical to the diagnosis and treatment of evolving brain injury. The first generation neural catheter was realized by polyimide-based micromachining and a spiral rolling packaging method. The mechanical design and electrical operation of the microsensors were optimized and tailored for multimodal monitoring in rat brain such that the potential thermal, chemical and electrical crosstalk among the microsensors as well as errors from micro-environmental fluctuations are minimized. In vitro cytotoxicity analyses suggest that the developed neural catheters are minimally toxic to rat cortical neuronal cultures. In addition, in vivo histopathology results showed neither acute nor chronic inflammation for 7 days post implantation. The performance of the neural catheter was assessed in an in vivo needle prick model as a translational replica of a "mini" traumatic brain injury. It successfully monitored the expected transient brain oxygen, temperature, regional cerebral blood flow, and DC potential changes during the passage of spreading depolarization waves. We envisage that the developed multimodal neural catheter can be used to decipher the causes and consequences of secondary brain injury processes with high spatial and temporal resolution while reducing the potential for iatrogenic injury inherent to current use of multiple invasive probes. PMID:26780443

  2. Microfabrication of Arrays of Superconducting Transition Edge Sensors for CMB Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posada, Chrystian; Ding, Junjia; Bender, Amy; Khaire, Trupti; Lendinez, Sergi; Ciocys, Samuel; Wang, Gensheng; Yefremenko, Volodymyr; Padin, Steve; Carlstrom, John; Chang, Clarence; Novosad, Valentine; Spt3G Collaboration

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) provides a unique window for exploring fundamental physics. Increasing the sensitivity of CMB experiments requires fabricating focal planes with orders of magnitude more detectors than current instruments. This work presents the procedures used at Argonne National Laboratory for the fabrication of large arrays of dual-polarized multichroic detectors for CMB measurements. The detectors are composed of a broad-band sinuous antenna coupled to a Nb microstrip transmission line. In-line filters define the spectral response, allowing for individual measurement of three band-passes (95 GHz, 150GHz and 220 GHz). A Ti /Au termination resistor is used to couple the mm-wave signal to Ti/Au transition edge sensor (TES) bolometers. There are six bolometers per pixel, for a total of 16,140 detectors in the CMB receiver being fabricated. The monolithic microfabrication of the detector arrays will be presented and discussed in detail. The SPT3G collaboration is developing the thrid-generation camera for CMB measurements with the South Pole Telescope. Additional information can be found in the following link: https://pole.uchicago.edu/spt/.

  3. Dynamics of microtubule asters in microfabricated chambers: The role of catastrophes

    PubMed Central

    Faivre-Moskalenko, Cendrine; Dogterom, Marileen

    2002-01-01

    Recent in vivo as well as in vitro experiments have indicated that microtubule pushing alone is sufficient to position a microtubule-organizing center within a cell. Here, we investigate the effect of catastrophes on the dynamics of microtubule asters within microfabricated chambers that mimic the confining geometry of living cells. The use of a glass bead as the microtubule-organizing center allows us to manipulate the aster by using optical tweezers. In the case in which microtubules preexist, we show that because of microtubule buckling, repositioning almost never occurs after relocation with the optical tweezers, although initial microtubule growth always leads the aster to the geometrical center of the chamber. When a catastrophe promoter is added, we find instead that the aster is able to efficiently explore the chamber geometry even after being relocated with the optical tweezers. As predicted by theoretical calculations, the results of our in vitro experiments clearly demonstrate the need for catastrophes for proper positioning in a confining geometry. These findings correlate with recent observations of nuclear positioning in fission yeast cells. PMID:12486218

  4. Microfabrication of complex porous tissue engineering scaffolds using 3D projection stereolithography

    PubMed Central

    Gauvin, Robert; Chen, Ying-Chieh; Lee, Jin Woo; Soman, Pranav; Zorlutuna, Pinar; Nichol, Jason W.; Bae, Hojae; Chen, Shaochen; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    The success of tissue engineering will rely on the ability to generate complex, cell seeded three-dimensional (3D) structures. Therefore, methods that can be used to precisely engineer the architecture and topography of scaffolding materials will represent a critical aspect of functional tissue engineering. Previous approaches for 3D scaffold fabrication based on top-down and process driven methods are often not adequate to produce complex structures due to the lack of control on scaffold architecture, porosity, and cellular interactions. The proposed projection stereolithography (PSL) platform can be used to design intricate 3D tissue scaffolds that can be engineered to mimic the microarchitecture of tissues, based on computer aided design (CAD). The PSL system was developed, programmed and optimized to fabricate 3D scaffolds using gelatin methacrylate (GelMA). Variation of the structure and prepolymer concentration enabled tailoring the mechanical properties of the scaffolds. A dynamic cell seeding method was utilized to improve the coverage of the scaffold throughout its thickness. The results demonstrated that the interconnectivity of pores allowed for uniform human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) distribution and proliferation in the scaffolds, leading to high cell density and confluency at the end of the culture period. Moreover, immunohistochemistry results showed that cells seeded on the scaffold maintained their endothelial phenotype, demonstrating the biological functionality of the microfabricated GelMA scaffolds. PMID:22365811

  5. Microfabrication Technology for Large Lekid Arrays: From Nika2 to Future Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goupy, J.; Adane, A.; Benoit, A.; Bourrion, O.; Calvo, M.; Catalano, A.; Coiffard, G.; Hoarau, C.; Leclercq, S.; Le Sueur, H.; Macias-Perez, J.; Monfardini, A.; Peck, I.; Schuster, K.

    2016-08-01

    The lumped element kinetic inductance detectors (LEKID) demonstrated full maturity in the New IRAM KID Arrays (NIKA) instrument. These results allow directly comparing LEKID performance with other competing technologies (TES, doped silicon) in the mm and sub-mm range. A continuing effort is ongoing to improve the microfabrication technologies and concepts in order to satisfy the requirements of new instruments. More precisely, future satellites dedicated to cosmic microwave background (CMB) studies will require the same focal plane technology to cover, at least, the frequency range of 60-600 GHz. Aluminium LEKID developed for NIKA have so far demonstrated, under real telescope conditions, a performance approaching photon noise limitation in the band 120-300 GHz. By implementing superconducting bi-layers, we recently demonstrated LEKID arrays working in the range 80-120 GHz and with sensitivities approaching the goals for CMB missions. NIKA itself (350 pixels) is followed by a more ambitious project requiring several thousand (3000-5000) pixels. NIKA2 has been installed in October 2015 at the IRAM 30-m telescope. We will describe in detail the technological improvements that allowed a relatively harmless tenfold up-scaling in pixels count without degrading the initial sensitivity. In particular, we will briefly describe a solution to simplify the difficult fabrication step linked to the slot-line propagation mode in coplanar waveguide.

  6. Microfabrication of complex porous tissue engineering scaffolds using 3D projection stereolithography.

    PubMed

    Gauvin, Robert; Chen, Ying-Chieh; Lee, Jin Woo; Soman, Pranav; Zorlutuna, Pinar; Nichol, Jason W; Bae, Hojae; Chen, Shaochen; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2012-05-01

    The success of tissue engineering will rely on the ability to generate complex, cell seeded three-dimensional (3D) structures. Therefore, methods that can be used to precisely engineer the architecture and topography of scaffolding materials will represent a critical aspect of functional tissue engineering. Previous approaches for 3D scaffold fabrication based on top-down and process driven methods are often not adequate to produce complex structures due to the lack of control on scaffold architecture, porosity, and cellular interactions. The proposed projection stereolithography (PSL) platform can be used to design intricate 3D tissue scaffolds that can be engineered to mimic the microarchitecture of tissues, based on computer aided design (CAD). The PSL system was developed, programmed and optimized to fabricate 3D scaffolds using gelatin methacrylate (GelMA). Variation of the structure and prepolymer concentration enabled tailoring the mechanical properties of the scaffolds. A dynamic cell seeding method was utilized to improve the coverage of the scaffold throughout its thickness. The results demonstrated that the interconnectivity of pores allowed for uniform human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) distribution and proliferation in the scaffolds, leading to high cell density and confluency at the end of the culture period. Moreover, immunohistochemistry results showed that cells seeded on the scaffold maintained their endothelial phenotype, demonstrating the biological functionality of the microfabricated GelMA scaffolds.

  7. Microfabrication of color filter for liquid crystal display by inkjet-based method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chin-Tai

    2002-09-01

    This paper explored a new micro-fabrication design of color filter for liquid crystal display, which was based on the so-called ink-jet technology today. Technically, a new type of micro-fluidic method was presented to realize the most important manufacturing steps of color filter that specific red, green, and blue ink droplets generated from the drop-on-demand jet heads could be accurately deposited onto a transparent substrate. Physically, those droplets were automatically formed very thin color films because of natural liquid surface tension between the droplets and substrate. To obtain the desired thickness of color film, high walls were made on the surface of the substrate to allow the droplets freely flow in essential one dimension under constraint of two neighboring walls before the film forming and drying. As a result, a color filter with desired striped pattern we designed could be simply completed; for example, the droplets of 60-micrometer diameter might be expected to yield a 110-micrometer by 110-micrometer pixel of color filter with color thickness of one micrometer. By comparison with current pigment-dispersed method, we estimated that similar chromatic performance in the final product could be achieved with much low cost and short manufacturing process in the presented method herein.

  8. Heat transfer simulation and thermal measurements of microfabricated x-ray transparent heater stages

    SciTech Connect

    Baldasseroni, C.; Queen, D. R.; Cooke, David W.; Hellman, F.; Maize, K.; Shakouri, A.

    2011-09-15

    A microfabricated amorphous silicon nitride membrane-based nanocalorimeter is proposed to be suitable for an x-ray transparent sample platform with low power heating and built-in temperature sensing. In this work, thermal characterization in both air and vacuum are analyzed experimentally and via simulation. Infrared microscopy and thermoreflectance microscopy are used for thermal imaging of the sample area in air. While a reasonably large isothermal area is found on the sample area, the temperature homogeneity of the entire sample area is low, limiting use of the device as a heater stage in air or other gases. A simulation model that includes conduction, as well as radiation and convection heat loss, is presented with radiation and convection parameters determined experimentally. Simulated temperature distributions show that the homogeneity can be improved by using a thicker thermal conduction layer or reducing the pressure of the gas in the environment but neither are good solutions for the proposed use. A new simple design that has improved temperature homogeneity and a larger isothermal area while maintaining a thin thermal conduction layer is proposed and fabricated. This new design enables applications in transmission x-ray microscopes and spectroscopy setups at atmospheric pressure.

  9. Heat transfer simulation and thermal measurements of microfabricated x-ray transparent heater stages.

    PubMed

    Baldasseroni, C; Queen, D R; Cooke, David W; Maize, K; Shakouri, A; Hellman, F

    2011-09-01

    A microfabricated amorphous silicon nitride membrane-based nanocalorimeter is proposed to be suitable for an x-ray transparent sample platform with low power heating and built-in temperature sensing. In this work, thermal characterization in both air and vacuum are analyzed experimentally and via simulation. Infrared microscopy and thermoreflectance microscopy are used for thermal imaging of the sample area in air. While a reasonably large isothermal area is found on the sample area, the temperature homogeneity of the entire sample area is low, limiting use of the device as a heater stage in air or other gases. A simulation model that includes conduction, as well as radiation and convection heat loss, is presented with radiation and convection parameters determined experimentally. Simulated temperature distributions show that the homogeneity can be improved by using a thicker thermal conduction layer or reducing the pressure of the gas in the environment but neither are good solutions for the proposed use. A new simple design that has improved temperature homogeneity and a larger isothermal area while maintaining a thin thermal conduction layer is proposed and fabricated. This new design enables applications in transmission x-ray microscopes and spectroscopy setups at atmospheric pressure.

  10. Heat transfer simulation and thermal measurements of microfabricated x-ray transparent heater stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldasseroni, C.; Queen, D. R.; Cooke, David W.; Maize, K.; Shakouri, A.; Hellman, F.

    2011-09-01

    A microfabricated amorphous silicon nitride membrane-based nanocalorimeter is proposed to be suitable for an x-ray transparent sample platform with low power heating and built-in temperature sensing. In this work, thermal characterization in both air and vacuum are analyzed experimentally and via simulation. Infrared microscopy and thermoreflectance microscopy are used for thermal imaging of the sample area in air. While a reasonably large isothermal area is found on the sample area, the temperature homogeneity of the entire sample area is low, limiting use of the device as a heater stage in air or other gases. A simulation model that includes conduction, as well as radiation and convection heat loss, is presented with radiation and convection parameters determined experimentally. Simulated temperature distributions show that the homogeneity can be improved by using a thicker thermal conduction layer or reducing the pressure of the gas in the environment but neither are good solutions for the proposed use. A new simple design that has improved temperature homogeneity and a larger isothermal area while maintaining a thin thermal conduction layer is proposed and fabricated. This new design enables applications in transmission x-ray microscopes and spectroscopy setups at atmospheric pressure.

  11. Effect of microfabricated microgroove-surface devices on the morphology of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangkai; Aoyama, Tomoki; Yasuda, Takashi; Oike, Makoto; Ito, Akira; Tajino, Junichi; Nagai, Momoko; Fujioka, Rune; Iijima, Hirotaka; Yamaguchi, Shoki; Kakinuma, Norihiro; Kuroki, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    The surface of a material that is in contact with cells is known to affect cell morphology and function. To develop an appropriate surface for tendon engineering, we used zigzag microgroove surfaces, which are similar to the tenocyte microenvironment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of microgroove surfaces with different ridge angles (RAs), ridge lengths (RLs), ridge widths (RWs), and groove widths (GWs) on human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) shape. Dishes with microgroove surfaces were fabricated using cyclic olefin polymer by injection-compression molding. The other parameters were fixed, and effects of different RAs (180 - 30 °), RLs (5 - 500 μm), RWs (5 - 500 μm), and GWs (5 - 500 μm) were examined. Changes in the zigzag shape of the cell due to different RAs, RLs, RWs, and GWs were observed by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Cytoskeletal changes were investigated using Phalloidin immunofluorescence staining. As observed by optical microscopy, MSCs changed to a zigzag shape in response to microgroove surfaces with different ridge and groove properties. . As observed by scanning electron microscopy, the cell shape changed at turns in the microgroove surface. Phalloidin immunofluorescence staining indicated that F-actin, not only in cell filopodia but also inside the cell body, changed orientation to conform to the microgrooves. In conclusion, the use of zigzag microgroove surfaces microfabricated by injection-compression molding demonstrated the property of MSCs to alter their shapes to fit the surface.

  12. 3-D microarray and its microfabrication-free fluidic immunoassay device.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingshuai; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Lu, Zhisong; Li, Chang Ming

    2015-08-19

    Conventional 2-D microarray is known to have high-throughput detection capability; however, the sensing spots density is significantly hindered by the spot-to-spot distance (gap) requirement for eliminating cross-talks between adjacent spots. Herein a new conceptual 3-D microarray device is proposed to significantly improve the spots density. To demonstrate advantages of the 3-D array, a microfabrication-free fluidic immunoassay device is further made by simply coupling an antibodies-arrayed glass cuboid into a circular glass tube. Rapid, sensitive and high-throughput flow-through immunoassays were accomplished with the 3-D array-based device for detection limits of 10-100 pg mL(-1) and wide dynamic range over 4-5 orders of magnitude in human serum with cancer biomarkers α-fetoprotein (AFP) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as model targets, holding great promise for practical clinical applications. The 3-D microarray device not only significantly increases the density of sensing spots, but also greatly enhances the mass transport for rapid immunoassay when using in a flow-through device. PMID:26343442

  13. Microfabrication and Integration of a Sol-Gel PZT Folded Spring Energy Harvester

    PubMed Central

    Lueke, Jonathan; Badr, Ahmed; Lou, Edmond; Moussa, Walied A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the methodology and challenges experienced in the microfabrication, packaging, and integration of a fixed-fixed folded spring piezoelectric energy harvester. A variety of challenges were overcome in the fabrication of the energy harvesters, such as the diagnosis and rectification of sol-gel PZT film quality and adhesion issues. A packaging and integration methodology was developed to allow for the characterizing the harvesters under a base vibration. The conditioning circuitry developed allowed for a complete energy harvesting system, consisting a harvester, a voltage doubler, a voltage regulator and a NiMH battery. A feasibility study was undertaken with the designed conditioning circuitry to determine the effect of the input parameters on the overall performance of the circuit. It was found that the maximum efficiency does not correlate to the maximum charging current supplied to the battery. The efficiency and charging current must be balanced to achieve a high output and a reasonable output current. The development of the complete energy harvesting system allows for the direct integration of the energy harvesting technology into existing power management schemes for wireless sensing. PMID:26016911

  14. Differential mobility spectrometry of chlorocarbons with a micro-fabricated drift tube.

    PubMed

    Eiceman, G A; Krylov, E V; Tadjikov, B; Ewing, R G; Nazarov, E G; Miller, R A

    2004-04-01

    Chlorocarbons were ionized through gas phase chemistry at ambient pressure in air and resultant ions were characterized using a micro-fabricated drift tube with differential mobility spectrometry (DMS). Positive and negative product ions were characterized simultaneously in a single drift tube equipped with a 3 mCi (63)Ni ion source at 50 degrees C and drift gas of air with 1 ppm moisture. Scans of compensation voltage for most chlorocarbons produced differential mobility spectra with Cl(-) as the sole product ion and a few chlorocarbons produced adduct ions, M (.-) Cl(-). Detection limits were approximately 20-80 pg for gas chromatography-DMS measurements. Chlorocarbons also yielded positive ions through chemical ionization in air and differential mobility spectra showed peaks with characteristic compensation voltages for each substance. Field dependence of mobility was determined for positive and negative ions of each substance and confirmed characteristic behavior for each ion. A DMS analyzer with a membrane inlet was used to continuously monitor effluent from columns of bentonite or synthetic silica beads to determine breakthrough volumes of individual chlorocarbons. These findings suggest a potential of DMS for monitoring subsurface environments either on site or perhaps in situ.

  15. Multiplexed protein detection using antibody-conjugated microbead arrays in a microfabricated electrophoretic device

    PubMed Central

    Barbee, Kristopher D.; Hsiao, Alexander P.; Roller, Eric E.; Huang, Xiaohua

    2011-01-01

    We report the development of a microfabricated electrophoretic device for assembling high-density arrays of antibody-conjugated microbeads for chip-based protein detection. The device consists of a flow cell formed between a gold-coated silicon chip with an array of microwells etched in a silicon dioxide film and a glass coverslip with a series of thin gold counter electrode lines. We have demonstrated that 0.4 and 1 μm beads conjugated with antibodies can be rapidly assembled into the microwells by applying a pulsed electric field across the chamber. By assembling step-wise a mixture of fluorescently labeled antibody-conjugated microbeads, we incorporated both spatial and fluorescence encoding strategies to demonstrate significant multiplexing capabilities. We have shown that these antibody-conjugated microbead arrays can be used to perform on-chip sandwich immunoassays to detect test antigens at concentrations as low as 40 pM (6 ng/mL). A finite element model was also developed to examine the electric field distribution within the device for different counter electrode configurations over a range of line pitches and chamber heights. This device will be useful for assembling high-density, encoded antibody arrays for multiplexed detection of proteins and other types of protein-conjugated microbeads for applications such as the analysis of protein-protein interactions. PMID:20820631

  16. A microfabricated sun sensor using GaN-on-sapphire ultraviolet photodetector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Ruth A.; So, Hongyun; Chiamori, Heather C.; Suria, Ateeq J.; Chapin, Caitlin A.; Senesky, Debbie G.

    2016-09-01

    A miniature sensor for detecting the orientation of incident ultraviolet light was microfabricated using gallium nitride (GaN)-on-sapphire substrates and semi-transparent interdigitated gold electrodes for sun sensing applications. The individual metal-semiconductor-metal photodetector elements were shown to have a stable and repeatable response with a high sensitivity (photocurrent-to-dark current ratio (PDCR) = 2.4 at -1 V bias) and a high responsivity (3200 A/W at -1 V bias) under ultraviolet (365 nm) illumination. The 3 × 3 GaN-on-sapphire ultraviolet photodetector array was integrated with a gold aperture to realize a miniature sun sensor (1.35 mm × 1.35 mm) capable of determining incident light angles with a ±45° field of view. Using a simple comparative figure of merit algorithm, measurement of incident light angles of 0° and 45° was quantitatively and qualitatively (visually) demonstrated by the sun sensor, supporting the use of GaN-based sun sensors for orientation, navigation, and tracking of the sun within the harsh environment of space.

  17. Microfabricated devices for cell biology: all for one and one for all.

    PubMed

    Lautenschläger, Franziska; Piel, Matthieu

    2013-02-01

    Individual cells in their native physiological states face a dynamic multi-factorial environment. This is true of both single-celled and multi-cellular organisms. A key challenge in cell biology is the design of experimental methods and specific assays to disentangle the contribution of each of the parameters governing cell behavior. After decades of studying cells cultured in Petri dishes or on glass coverslips, researchers can now benefit from a range of recent technological developments that allow them to study cells in a variety of contexts, with different levels of complexity and control over a range of environmental parameters. These technologies include new types of microscopy for detailed imaging of large cell aggregates or even whole tissues, and the development of cell culture substrates, such as 3D matrices. Here we will review the contribution of a third type of tool, collectively known as microfabricated tools. Derived from techniques originally developed for microelectronics, these tools range in size from hundreds of microns to hundreds of nanometers.

  18. Microfabricated Nanotopological Surfaces for Study of Adhesion-dependent Cell mechanosensitivity**

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weiqiang; Sun, Yubing

    2014-01-01

    Cells display high sensitivity and exhibit diverse responses to the intrinsic nanotopography of the extracellular matrix through their nanoscale cellular sensing machinery. Here, we reported a simple microfabrication method for precise control and spatial patterning of the local nanoroughness on glass surfaces using photolithography and reactive ion etching (RIE). Using RIE-generated nanorough glass surfaces, we demonstrated that local nanoroughness could provide a potent biophysical signal to regulate a diverse array of NIH/3T3 fibroblast behaviors, including cell morphology, adhesion, proliferation and migration. We further showed that cellular responses to nanotopography might be regulated by cell adhesion signaling and actin cytoskeleton remodeling. To further investigate the role of cytoskeleton contractility in nanoroughness sensing, we applied the RIE method to generate nanoroughness on the tops of an array of elastomeric poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microposts. We utilized the PDMS microposts as force sensors and demonstrated that nanoroughness could indeed regulate the cytoskeleton contractility of NIH/3T3 fibroblasts. Our results suggested that a feedback regulation and mechano-chemical integration mechanism involving adhesion signaling, actin cytoskeleton, and intracellular mechanosensory components might play an important role in regulating mechanosensitive behaviors of NIH/3T3 fibroblasts. The capability to control and further predict cellular responses to nanoroughness might suggest novel methods for developing biomaterials mimicking nanotopographic structures in vivo and suitable local cellular microenvironments for functional tissue engineering. PMID:22887768

  19. Thermo-mechanical properties and microfabric of fly ash-stabilized gold tailings.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joon Kyu; Shang, Julie Q; Jeong, Sangseom

    2014-07-15

    This paper studies the changes in thermal conductivity, temperature, and unconfined compressive strength of gold tailings and fly ash mixtures during the curing period of 5 days. The microfabric of the cured mixtures was investigated with mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP). The mixture samples were prepared at their maximum dry unit weight and optimum moisture content. Effect of adding fly ash to gold tailings (i.e., 0, 20, and 40% of the dry weight of tailings) was examined, and a comparison was made on samples prepared at the same fly ash content by replacing gold tailings with humic acid (i.e., gold tailings and humic acid ratios of 100:0, 90:10, and 80:20 by weight) or by varying pore fluid chemistry (i.e., water and salt solutions of 1M NaCl and CaCl2). The results show that the initial thermal conductivity of the samples is sensitive to the mixture proportion and a declination in the thermal conductivity is observed due to hydration of fly ash and evaporation. Inclusion of fly ash and salts into gold tailings improves the unconfined compressive strength but the presence of humic acid in samples leads to the decrease of the strength. MIP results reveal the pore structure changes associated with the packing states of the samples that reflect the influential factors considered. PMID:24910909

  20. Scalable Microfabrication Procedures for Adhesive-Integrated Flexible and Stretchable Electronic Sensors.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dae Y; Kim, Yun-Soung; Ornelas, Gladys; Sinha, Mridu; Naidu, Keerthiga; Coleman, Todd P

    2015-09-16

    New classes of ultrathin flexible and stretchable devices have changed the way modern electronics are designed to interact with their target systems. Though more and more novel technologies surface and steer the way we think about future electronics, there exists an unmet need in regards to optimizing the fabrication procedures for these devices so that large-scale industrial translation is realistic. This article presents an unconventional approach for facile microfabrication and processing of adhesive-peeled (AP) flexible sensors. By assembling AP sensors on a weakly-adhering substrate in an inverted fashion, we demonstrate a procedure with 50% reduced end-to-end processing time that achieves greater levels of fabrication yield. The methodology is used to demonstrate the fabrication of electrical and mechanical flexible and stretchable AP sensors that are peeled-off their carrier substrates by consumer adhesives. In using this approach, we outline the manner by which adhesion is maintained and buckling is reduced for gold film processing on polydimethylsiloxane substrates. In addition, we demonstrate the compatibility of our methodology with large-scale post-processing using a roll-to-roll approach.

  1. Entrapment of bed bugs by leaf trichomes inspires microfabrication of biomimetic surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Szyndler, Megan W.; Haynes, Kenneth F.; Potter, Michael F.; Corn, Robert M.; Loudon, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Resurgence in bed bug infestations and widespread pesticide resistance have greatly renewed interest in the development of more sustainable, environmentally friendly methods to manage bed bugs. Historically, in Eastern Europe, bed bugs were entrapped by leaves from bean plants, which were then destroyed; this purely physical entrapment was related to microscopic hooked hairs (trichomes) on the leaf surfaces. Using scanning electron microscopy and videography, we documented the capture mechanism: the physical impaling of bed bug feet (tarsi) by these trichomes. This is distinct from a Velcro-like mechanism of non-piercing entanglement, which only momentarily holds the bug without sustained capture. Struggling, trapped bed bugs are impaled by trichomes on several legs and are unable to free themselves. Only specific, mechanically vulnerable locations on the bug tarsi are pierced by the trichomes, which are located at effective heights and orientations for bed bug entrapment despite a lack of any evolutionary association. Using bean leaves as templates, we microfabricated surfaces indistinguishable in geometry from the real leaves, including the trichomes, using polymers with material properties similar to plant cell walls. These synthetic surfaces snag the bed bugs temporarily but do not hinder their locomotion as effectively as real leaves. PMID:23576783

  2. Dielectrophoretic sorting on a microfabricated flow cytometer: label free separation of Babesia bovis infected erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Elisabete M; Nogueira, Nuno; Silva, Tiago; Braschler, Thomas; Demierre, Nicolas; Renaud, Philippe; Oliva, Abel G

    2008-08-01

    Dielectrophoresis is a method that has demonstrated great potential in cell discrimination and isolation. In this study, the dielectrophoretic sorting of normal and Babesia bovis infected erythrocytes was performed using a microfabricated flow cytometer. Separation was possible through exploitation of the dielectric differences between normal and infected erythrocytes, essentially due to the higher ionic membrane permeability of B. bovis infected cells. Sorting experiments were performed inside a microchip made from Pt microelectrodes and SU-8 channels patterned on a glass substrate. Optimum cell separation was achieved at 4 MHz using an in vitro culture of B. bovis suspended in 63 mS/m phosphate buffer and applying a sinusoidal voltage of 15 V peak-to-peak. Normal erythrocytes experienced stronger positive dielectrophoresis (pDEP) than B. bovis infected cells, moving them closer to the microelectrodes. Under these conditions it was possible to enrich the fraction of infected cells from 7 to 50% without the need of extensive sample preparation or labelling. Throughout the experiments very few microliters of sample were used, suggesting that this system may be considered suitable for integration in a low-cost automated device to be used in the in situ diagnostic of babesiosis. PMID:18511353

  3. Exploiting the Oxygen Inhibitory Effect on UV Curing in Microfabrication: A Modified Lithography Technique

    PubMed Central

    Alvankarian, Jafar; Majlis, Burhanuddin Yeop

    2015-01-01

    Rapid prototyping (RP) of microfluidic channels in liquid photopolymers using standard lithography (SL) involves multiple deposition steps and curing by ultraviolet (UV) light for the construction of a microstructure layer. In this work, the conflicting effect of oxygen diffusion and UV curing of liquid polyurethane methacrylate (PUMA) is investigated in microfabrication and utilized to reduce the deposition steps and to obtain a monolithic product. The conventional fabrication process is altered to control for the best use of the oxygen presence in polymerization. A novel and modified lithography technique is introduced in which a single step of PUMA coating and two steps of UV exposure are used to create a microchannel. The first exposure is maskless and incorporates oxygen diffusion into PUMA for inhibition of the polymerization of a thin layer from the top surface while the UV rays penetrate the photopolymer. The second exposure is for transferring the patterns of the microfluidic channels from the contact photomask onto the uncured material. The UV curing of PUMA as the main substrate in the presence of oxygen is characterized analytically and experimentally. A few typical elastomeric microstructures are manufactured. It is demonstrated that the obtained heights of the fabricated structures in PUMA are associated with the oxygen concentration and the UV dose. The proposed technique is promising for the RP of molds and microfluidic channels in terms of shorter processing time, fewer fabrication steps and creation of microstructure layers with higher integrity. PMID:25747514

  4. Preferred orientation of phyllosilicates: Effects of composition and stress on resedimented mudstone microfabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day-Stirrat, Ruarri J.; Schleicher, Anja M.; Schneider, Julia; Flemings, Peter B.; Germaine, John T.; van der Pluijm, Ben A.

    2011-09-01

    Development of a preferred orientation of clay minerals is investigated in response to changes in vertical effective stress and composition in resedimented material (Boston Blue Clay). Boston Blue Clay (BBC), an illitic glacio-marine clay composed of 57% clay-sized particles (<2 μm) was resedimented and step-loaded to a vertical effective stress of 0.1 MPa, 1 MPa, 6 MPa, and 10 MPa. These four samples show a small increase in preferred orientation of mica and chlorite with increasing vertical effective stress. Furthermore, pure BBC powder was admixed with silica (silt-sized quartz) in five different ratios of BBC:silica to form sediments with 57%, 52%, 48%, 44%, and 36% < 2 μm particles and were loaded to a maximum vertical effective stress of 2.4 MPa. Mica preferred orientation decreases significantly with decreasing clay content at one stress state. We used and compared three different techniques to characterize and quantify the preferred orientation of phyllosilicates: transmission-mode X-ray texture goniometry, reflection-mode X-ray texture goniometry, and grain and pore networks imaged using secondary and backscattered electron micrographs gathered on argon-ion-milled surfaces. Preferred orientation of the clay minerals shows good agreement between transmission-mode X-ray texture goniometry and reflection-mode X-ray texture goniometry. Mercury porosimetry further illuminates vertical effective stress and compositional controls on microfabric.

  5. Structural Reinforcement of Cell-Laden Hydrogels with Microfabricated Three Dimensional Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Chaenyung; Soman, Pranav; Zhu, Wei; Nikkhah, Mehdi; Camci-Unal, Gulden

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogels commonly used in tissue engineering are mechanically soft, thus often display structural weakness. Herein, we introduce a strategy for enhancing the structural integrity and fracture toughness of cell-laden hydrogels by incorporating a three-dimensional (3D) microfabricated scaffold as a structural element. A digital micromirror device projection printing (DMD-PP) system, a rapid prototyping technology which employs a layer-by-layer stereolithographic approach, was utilized to efficiently fabricate 3D scaffolds made from photocrosslinkable poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA). The scaffold was incorporated into a photocrosslinkable gelatin hydrogel by placing it in a pre-gel solution, and inducing in situ hydrogel formation. The resulting scaffold-reinforced hydrogels demonstrated significant increase in ultimate stress and provided structural support for weak hydrogels. In addition, the scaffold did not affect the rigidity of hydrogels, as it was not involved in the crosslinking reaction to form the hydrogel. Therefore, the presented approach could avoid inadvertent and undesired changes in the hydrogel rigidity which is a known regulator of cellular activities. Furthermore, the biocompatibility of scaffold-reinforced hydrogels was confirmed by evaluating the viability and proliferation of encapsulated fibroblasts. Overall, the strategy of incorporating 3D scaffolds into hydrogels as structural reinforcements presented in this study will be highly useful for enhancing the mechanical toughness of hydrogels for various tissue engineering applications. PMID:24778793

  6. Scalable Microfabrication Procedures for Adhesive-Integrated Flexible and Stretchable Electronic Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Dae Y.; Kim, Yun-Soung; Ornelas, Gladys; Sinha, Mridu; Naidu, Keerthiga; Coleman, Todd P.

    2015-01-01

    New classes of ultrathin flexible and stretchable devices have changed the way modern electronics are designed to interact with their target systems. Though more and more novel technologies surface and steer the way we think about future electronics, there exists an unmet need in regards to optimizing the fabrication procedures for these devices so that large-scale industrial translation is realistic. This article presents an unconventional approach for facile microfabrication and processing of adhesive-peeled (AP) flexible sensors. By assembling AP sensors on a weakly-adhering substrate in an inverted fashion, we demonstrate a procedure with 50% reduced end-to-end processing time that achieves greater levels of fabrication yield. The methodology is used to demonstrate the fabrication of electrical and mechanical flexible and stretchable AP sensors that are peeled-off their carrier substrates by consumer adhesives. In using this approach, we outline the manner by which adhesion is maintained and buckling is reduced for gold film processing on polydimethylsiloxane substrates. In addition, we demonstrate the compatibility of our methodology with large-scale post-processing using a roll-to-roll approach. PMID:26389915

  7. New Deep Reactive Ion Etching Process Developed for the Microfabrication of Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Laura J.; Beheim, Glenn M.

    2005-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is a promising material for harsh environment sensors and electronics because it can enable such devices to withstand high temperatures and corrosive environments. Microfabrication techniques have been studied extensively in an effort to obtain the same flexibility of machining SiC that is possible for the fabrication of silicon devices. Bulk micromachining using deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) is attractive because it allows the fabrication of microstructures with high aspect ratios (etch depth divided by lateral feature size) in single-crystal or polycrystalline wafers. Previously, the Sensors and Electronics Branch of the NASA Glenn Research Center developed a DRIE process for SiC using the etchant gases sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and argon (Ar). This process provides an adequate etch rate of 0.2 m/min and yields a smooth surface at the etch bottom. However, the etch sidewalls are rougher than desired, as shown in the preceding photomicrograph. Furthermore, the resulting structures have sides that slope inwards, rather than being precisely vertical. A new DRIE process for SiC was developed at Glenn that produces smooth, vertical sidewalls, while maintaining an adequately high etch rate.

  8. Combined experimental and mathematical approach for development of microfabrication-based cancer migration assay.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Saheli; Bustard, Bethany L; Welter, Jean F; Baskaran, Harihara

    2011-09-01

    Migration of cancer cells is a key determinant of metastasis, which is correlated with poor prognosis in patients. Evidence shows that cancer cell motility is regulated by stromal cell interactions. To quantify the role of homotypic and heterotypic cell-cell interaction in migration, a two-dimensional migration assay has been developed by microfabrication techniques. Two breast cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-453, were used to develop micropatterns of cancer cells (cell islands) that revealed distinct migration profiles in this assay. Although the individual migration rates of these cells showed only a sevenfold difference, MDA-MB-453 islands migrated significantly lower than MDA-MB-231 islands, indicating differential regulation of migration in isolated cells vs. islands. Island size had the greatest impact on migration, primarily for MDA-MB-231 cells. Migration of MDA-MB-231 islands was decreased by interaction with homotypic cells, and significantly more by heterotypic non-cancer-associated fibroblasts. In addition, a mathematical model of island migration in multi-cellular population has been developed using Stefan-Maxwell's equation. The model showed qualitative agreement with experimental results and predicted a biphasic relation between cell densities and island sizes. The combined experimental and mathematical model can be used to quantitatively study the impact of cell-cell interactions on migration. PMID:21701934

  9. Microfabricated engineered particle systems for respiratory drug delivery and other pharmaceutical applications.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Andres; Mack, Peter; Williams, Stuart; Fromen, Catherine; Shen, Tammy; Tully, Janet; Pillai, Jonathan; Kuehl, Philip; Napier, Mary; Desimone, Joseph M; Maynor, Benjamin W

    2012-01-01

    Particle Replication in Non-Wetting Templates (PRINT(®)) is a platform particle drug delivery technology that coopts the precision and nanoscale spatial resolution inherently afforded by lithographic techniques derived from the microelectronics industry to produce precisely engineered particles. We describe the utility of PRINT technology as a strategy for formulation and delivery of small molecule and biologic therapeutics, highlighting previous studies where particle size, shape, and chemistry have been used to enhance systemic particle distribution properties. In addition, we introduce the application of PRINT technology towards respiratory drug delivery, a particular interest due to the pharmaceutical need for increased control over dry powder characteristics to improve drug delivery and therapeutic indices. To this end, we have produced dry powder particles with micro- and nanoscale geometric features and composed of small molecule and protein therapeutics. Aerosols generated from these particles show attractive properties for efficient pulmonary delivery and differential respiratory deposition characteristics based on particle geometry. This work highlights the advantages of adopting proven microfabrication techniques in achieving unprecedented control over particle geometric design for drug delivery.

  10. Microfabrication and integration of a sol-gel PZT folded spring energy harvester.

    PubMed

    Lueke, Jonathan; Badr, Ahmed; Lou, Edmond; Moussa, Walied A

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the methodology and challenges experienced in the microfabrication, packaging, and integration of a fixed-fixed folded spring piezoelectric energy harvester. A variety of challenges were overcome in the fabrication of the energy harvesters, such as the diagnosis and rectification of sol-gel PZT film quality and adhesion issues. A packaging and integration methodology was developed to allow for the characterizing the harvesters under a base vibration. The conditioning circuitry developed allowed for a complete energy harvesting system, consisting a harvester, a voltage doubler, a voltage regulator and a NiMH battery. A feasibility study was undertaken with the designed conditioning circuitry to determine the effect of the input parameters on the overall performance of the circuit. It was found that the maximum efficiency does not correlate to the maximum charging current supplied to the battery. The efficiency and charging current must be balanced to achieve a high output and a reasonable output current. The development of the complete energy harvesting system allows for the direct integration of the energy harvesting technology into existing power management schemes for wireless sensing. PMID:26016911

  11. Combined experimental and mathematical approach for development of microfabrication-based cancer migration assay.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Saheli; Bustard, Bethany L; Welter, Jean F; Baskaran, Harihara

    2011-09-01

    Migration of cancer cells is a key determinant of metastasis, which is correlated with poor prognosis in patients. Evidence shows that cancer cell motility is regulated by stromal cell interactions. To quantify the role of homotypic and heterotypic cell-cell interaction in migration, a two-dimensional migration assay has been developed by microfabrication techniques. Two breast cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-453, were used to develop micropatterns of cancer cells (cell islands) that revealed distinct migration profiles in this assay. Although the individual migration rates of these cells showed only a sevenfold difference, MDA-MB-453 islands migrated significantly lower than MDA-MB-231 islands, indicating differential regulation of migration in isolated cells vs. islands. Island size had the greatest impact on migration, primarily for MDA-MB-231 cells. Migration of MDA-MB-231 islands was decreased by interaction with homotypic cells, and significantly more by heterotypic non-cancer-associated fibroblasts. In addition, a mathematical model of island migration in multi-cellular population has been developed using Stefan-Maxwell's equation. The model showed qualitative agreement with experimental results and predicted a biphasic relation between cell densities and island sizes. The combined experimental and mathematical model can be used to quantitatively study the impact of cell-cell interactions on migration.

  12. Effect of microfabricated microgroove-surface devices on the morphology of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangkai; Aoyama, Tomoki; Yasuda, Takashi; Oike, Makoto; Ito, Akira; Tajino, Junichi; Nagai, Momoko; Fujioka, Rune; Iijima, Hirotaka; Yamaguchi, Shoki; Kakinuma, Norihiro; Kuroki, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    The surface of a material that is in contact with cells is known to affect cell morphology and function. To develop an appropriate surface for tendon engineering, we used zigzag microgroove surfaces, which are similar to the tenocyte microenvironment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of microgroove surfaces with different ridge angles (RAs), ridge lengths (RLs), ridge widths (RWs), and groove widths (GWs) on human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) shape. Dishes with microgroove surfaces were fabricated using cyclic olefin polymer by injection-compression molding. The other parameters were fixed, and effects of different RAs (180 - 30 °), RLs (5 - 500 μm), RWs (5 - 500 μm), and GWs (5 - 500 μm) were examined. Changes in the zigzag shape of the cell due to different RAs, RLs, RWs, and GWs were observed by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Cytoskeletal changes were investigated using Phalloidin immunofluorescence staining. As observed by optical microscopy, MSCs changed to a zigzag shape in response to microgroove surfaces with different ridge and groove properties. . As observed by scanning electron microscopy, the cell shape changed at turns in the microgroove surface. Phalloidin immunofluorescence staining indicated that F-actin, not only in cell filopodia but also inside the cell body, changed orientation to conform to the microgrooves. In conclusion, the use of zigzag microgroove surfaces microfabricated by injection-compression molding demonstrated the property of MSCs to alter their shapes to fit the surface. PMID:26573821

  13. Shear Force at the Cell-Matrix Interface: Enhanced Analysis for Microfabricated Post Array Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Lemmon, Christopher A.; Sniadecki, Nathan J.; Ruiz, Sami Alom; Tan, John L.; Romer, Lewis H.; Chen, Christopher S.

    2006-01-01

    The interplay of mechanical forces between the extracellular environment and the cytoskeleton drives development, repair, and senescence in many tissues. Quantitative definition of these forces is a vital step in understanding cellular mechanosensing. Microfabricated post array detectors (mPADs) provide direct measurements of cell-generated forces during cell adhesion to extracellular matrix. A new approach to mPAD post labeling, volumetric imaging, and an analysis of post bending mechanics determined that cells apply shear forces and not point moments at the matrix interface. In addition, these forces could be accurately resolved from post deflections by using images of post tops and bases. Image analysis tools were then developed to increase the precision and throughput of post centroid location. These studies resulted in an improved method of force measurement with broad applicability and concise execution using a fully automated force analysis system. The new method measures cell-generated forces with less than 5%error and less than 90 seconds of computational time. Using this approach, we demonstrated direct and distinct relationships between cellular traction force and spread cell surface area for fibroblasts, endothelial cells, epithelial cells and smooth muscle cells. PMID:16708468

  14. Design, microfabrication, and analysis of micrometer-sized cylindrical ion trap arrays.

    PubMed

    Cruz, D; Chang, J P; Fico, M; Guymon, A J; Austin, D E; Blain, M G

    2007-01-01

    A description of the design and microfabrication of arrays of micrometer-scale cylindrical ion traps is offered. Electrical characterization and initial ion trapping experiments with a massively parallel array of 5 microm internal radius (r(0)) sized cylindrical ion traps (CITs) are also described. The ion trap, materials, and design are presented and shown to be critical in achieving minimal trapping potential while maintaining minimal power consumption. The ion traps, fabricated with metal electrodes, have inner radii of 1, 2, 5, and 10 microm and range from 5 to 24 microm in height. The electrical characteristics of packaged ion trap arrays were measured with a vector network analyzer. The testing focused on trapping toluene (C(7)H(8)), mass 91, 92, or 93 amu, in the 5 microm sized CITs. Ions were formed via electron impact ionization and were ejected by turning off the rf voltage applied to the ring electrode; a current signal was collected at this time. Optimum ionization and trapping conditions, such as a sufficient pseudopotential well and high ionization to ion loss rate ratio (as determined by simulation), proved to be difficult to establish due to the high device capacitance and the presence of exposed dielectric material in the trapping region. However, evidence was obtained suggesting the trapping of ions in 1%-15% of the traps in the array. These first tests on micrometer-scale CITs indicated the necessary materials and device design modifications for realizing ultrasmall and low power ion traps.

  15. Technology for On-Chip Qubit Control with Microfabricated Surface Ion Traps

    SciTech Connect

    Highstrete, Clark; Scott, Sean Michael; Maunz, Peter Lukas Wilhelm; Tigges, Christopher P.; Blain, Matthew Glenn; Heller, Edwin J.; Stevens, James E.

    2013-11-01

    Trapped atomic ions are a leading physical system for quantum information processing. However, scalability and operational fidelity remain limiting technical issues often associated with optical qubit control. One promising approach is to develop on-chip microwave electronic control of ion qubits based on the atomic hyperfine interaction. This project developed expertise and capabilities at Sandia toward on-chip electronic qubit control in a scalable architecture. The project developed a foundation of laboratory capabilities, including trapping the 171Yb+ hyperfine ion qubit and developing an experimental microwave coherent control capability. Additionally, the project investigated the integration of microwave device elements with surface ion traps utilizing Sandia’s state-of-the-art MEMS microfabrication processing. This effort culminated in a device design for a multi-purpose ion trap experimental platform for investigating on-chip microwave qubit control, laying the groundwork for further funded R&D to develop on-chip microwave qubit control in an architecture that is suitable to engineering development.

  16. Microfabricated silicon leak for sampling planetary atmospheres with a mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Jamieson, B. G.; Lynch, B. A.; Harpold, D. N.; Niemann, H. B.; Shappirio, M. D.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2007-06-15

    A microfabricated silicon mass spectrometer inlet leak has been designed, fabricated, and tested. This leak achieves a much lower conductance in a smaller volume than is possible with commonly available metal or glass capillary tubing. It will also be shown that it is possible to integrate significant additional functionality, such as inlet heaters and valves, into a silicon microleak with very little additional mass. The fabricated leak is compatible with high temperature (up to 500 deg. C) and high pressure (up to 100 bars) conditions, as would be encountered on a Venus atmospheric probe. These leaks behave in reasonable agreement with their theoretically calculated conductance, although this differs between devices and from the predicted value by as much as a factor of 2. This variation is believed to be the result of nonuniformity in the silicon etching process which is characterized in this work. Future versions of this device can compensate for characterized process variations in order to produce devices in closer agreement with designed conductance values. The integration of an inlet heater into the leak device has also been demonstrated in this work.

  17. Cell Sheet-Based Tissue Engineering for Organizing Anisotropic Tissue Constructs Produced Using Microfabricated Thermoresponsive Substrates.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hironobu; Okano, Teruo

    2015-11-18

    In some native tissues, appropriate microstructures, including orientation of the cell/extracellular matrix, provide specific mechanical and biological functions. For example, skeletal muscle is made of oriented myofibers that is responsible for the mechanical function. Native artery and myocardial tissues are organized three-dimensionally by stacking sheet-like tissues of aligned cells. Therefore, to construct any kind of complex tissue, the microstructures of cells such as myotubes, smooth muscle cells, and cardiomyocytes also need to be organized three-dimensionally just as in the native tissues of the body. Cell sheet-based tissue engineering allows the production of scaffold-free engineered tissues through a layer-by-layer construction technique. Recently, using microfabricated thermoresponsive substrates, aligned cells are being harvested as single continuous cell sheets. The cell sheets act as anisotropic tissue units to build three-dimensional tissue constructs with the appropriate anisotropy. This cell sheet-based technology is straightforward and has the potential to engineer a wide variety of complex tissues. In addition, due to the scaffold-free cell-dense environment, the physical and biological cell-cell interactions of these cell sheet constructs exhibit unique cell behaviors. These advantages will provide important clues to enable the production of well-organized tissues that closely mimic the structure and function of native tissues, required for the future of tissue engineering.

  18. DESIGN OF A MICROFABRICATED, TWO-ELECTRODE PHASE-CONTRAST ELEMENTSUITABLE FOR ELECTRON MICROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Cambie, Rossana; Downing, Kenneth H.; Typke, Dieter; Glaeser,Robert M.; Jin, Jian

    2006-09-20

    A miniature electrostatic element has been designed to selectively apply a ninety-degree phase shift to the unscattered beam in the back focal plane of the objective lens, in order to realize Zernike-type, in-focus phase contrast in an electron microscope. The design involves a cylindrically shaped, biased-voltage electrode, which is surrounded by a concentric grounded electrode. Electrostatic calculations have been used to determine that the fringing fields in the region of the scattered electron beams will cause a negligible phase shift as long as the ratio of electrode length to the transverse feature-size is greater than 5:1. Unlike the planar, three-electrode einzel lens originally proposed by Boersch for the same purpose, this new design does not require insulating layers to separate the biased and grounded electrodes, and it can thus be produced by a very simple microfabrication process. Scanning electron microscope images confirm that mechanically robust devices with feature sizes of {approx}1 {micro}m can be easily fabricated. Preliminary experimental images demonstrate that these devices do apply a 90-degree phase shift between the scattered and unscattered electrons, as expected.

  19. Micro-differential thermal analysis detection of adsorbed explosive molecules using microfabricated bridges.

    PubMed

    Senesac, Larry R; Yi, Dechang; Greve, Anders; Hales, Jan H; Davis, Zachary J; Nicholson, Don M; Boisen, Anja; Thundat, Thomas

    2009-03-01

    Although micromechanical sensors enable chemical vapor sensing with unprecedented sensitivity using variations in mass and stress, obtaining chemical selectivity using the micromechanical response still remains as a crucial challenge. Chemoselectivity in vapor detection using immobilized selective layers that rely on weak chemical interactions provides only partial selectivity. Here we show that the very low thermal mass of micromechanical sensors can be used to produce unique responses that can be used for achieving chemical selectivity without losing sensitivity or reversibility. We demonstrate that this method is capable of differentiating explosive vapors from nonexplosives and is additionally capable of differentiating individual explosive vapors such as trinitrotoluene, pentaerythritol tetranitrate, and cyclotrimethylenetrinitromine. This method, based on a microfabricated bridge with a programmable heating rate, produces unique and reproducible thermal response patterns within 50 ms that are characteristic to classes of adsorbed explosive molecules. We demonstrate that this micro-differential thermal analysis technique can selectively detect explosives, providing a method for fast direct detection with a limit of detection of 600x10(-12) g.

  20. Polyhalite microfabrics in an Alpine evaporite mélange: Hallstatt, Eastern Alps

    PubMed Central

    Schorn, Anja; Neubauer, Franz; Bernroider, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    In the Hallstatt salt mine (Austria), polyhalite rocks occur in 0.5–1 m thick and several metre long tectonic lenses within the protocataclasite to protomylonite matrix of the Alpine Haselgebirge Fm.. Thin section analysis of Hallstatt polyhalites reveals various fabric types similar to metamorphic rocks of crust-forming minerals, e.g. quartz and feldspar. Polyhalite microfabrics from Hallstatt include: (1) polyhalite mylonites, (2) metamorphic reaction fabrics, (3) vein-filling, fibrous polyhalite and (4) cavity-filling polyhalite. The polyhalite mylonites contain a wide range of shear fabrics commonly known in mylonitic quartzo–feldspathic shear zones within the ductile crust and developed from a more coarse-grained precursor rock. The mylonites are partly overprinted by recrystallised, statically grown polyhalite grains. Metamorphic reaction fabrics of polyhalite fibres between blödite (or astrakhanite) [Na2Mg(SO4)2.4H2O] and anhydrite have also been found. According to previous reports, blödite may occur primarily as nodules or intergrown with löweite. Reaction fabrics may have formed by exsolution, (re-)crystallisation, parallel growth or replacement. This fabric type was only found in one sample in relation with the decomposition of blödite at ca. 61 °C in the presence of halite or slightly above, testifying, therefore, a late stage prograde fabric significantly younger than the main polyhalite formation. PMID:26806997

  1. Micro differential thermal analysis detection of adsorbed explosive molecules using microfabricated bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Senesac, Larry R; Yi, Dechang; Greve, Anders; Hales, Jan; Davis, Zachary; Nicholson, Don M; Boisen, Anja; Thundat, Thomas George

    2009-01-01

    Although micromechanical sensors enable chemical vapor sensing with unprecedented sensitivity using variations in mass and stress, obtaining chemical selectivity using the micromechanical response still remains as a crucial challenge. Chemoselectivity in vapor detection using immobilized selective layers that rely on weak chemical interactions provides only partial selectivity. Here we show that the very low thermal mass of micromechanical sensors can be used to produce unique responses that can be used for achieving chemical selectivity without losing sensitivity or reversibility. We demonstrate that this method is capable of differentiating explosive vapors from nonexplosives and is additionally capable of differentiating individual explosive vapors such as trinitrotoluene, pentaerythritol tetranitrate, and cyclotrimethylenetrinitromine. This method, based on a microfabricated bridge with a programmable heating rate, produces unique and reproducible thermal response patterns within 50 ms that are characteristic to classes of adsorbed explosive molecules. We demonstrate that this micro-differential thermal analysis technique can selectively detect explosives, providing a method for fast direct detection with a limit of detection of 600 x 10{sup -12} g.

  2. Microfabricated Engineered Particle Systems for Respiratory Drug Delivery and Other Pharmaceutical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Andres; Mack, Peter; Williams, Stuart; Fromen, Catherine; Shen, Tammy; Tully, Janet; Pillai, Jonathan; Kuehl, Philip; Napier, Mary; DeSimone, Joseph M.; Maynor, Benjamin W.

    2012-01-01

    Particle Replication in Non-Wetting Templates (PRINT®) is a platform particle drug delivery technology that coopts the precision and nanoscale spatial resolution inherently afforded by lithographic techniques derived from the microelectronics industry to produce precisely engineered particles. We describe the utility of PRINT technology as a strategy for formulation and delivery of small molecule and biologic therapeutics, highlighting previous studies where particle size, shape, and chemistry have been used to enhance systemic particle distribution properties. In addition, we introduce the application of PRINT technology towards respiratory drug delivery, a particular interest due to the pharmaceutical need for increased control over dry powder characteristics to improve drug delivery and therapeutic indices. To this end, we have produced dry powder particles with micro- and nanoscale geometric features and composed of small molecule and protein therapeutics. Aerosols generated from these particles show attractive properties for efficient pulmonary delivery and differential respiratory deposition characteristics based on particle geometry. This work highlights the advantages of adopting proven microfabrication techniques in achieving unprecedented control over particle geometric design for drug delivery. PMID:22518316

  3. Microfabrication and integration of a sol-gel PZT folded spring energy harvester.

    PubMed

    Lueke, Jonathan; Badr, Ahmed; Lou, Edmond; Moussa, Walied A

    2015-05-26

    This paper presents the methodology and challenges experienced in the microfabrication, packaging, and integration of a fixed-fixed folded spring piezoelectric energy harvester. A variety of challenges were overcome in the fabrication of the energy harvesters, such as the diagnosis and rectification of sol-gel PZT film quality and adhesion issues. A packaging and integration methodology was developed to allow for the characterizing the harvesters under a base vibration. The conditioning circuitry developed allowed for a complete energy harvesting system, consisting a harvester, a voltage doubler, a voltage regulator and a NiMH battery. A feasibility study was undertaken with the designed conditioning circuitry to determine the effect of the input parameters on the overall performance of the circuit. It was found that the maximum efficiency does not correlate to the maximum charging current supplied to the battery. The efficiency and charging current must be balanced to achieve a high output and a reasonable output current. The development of the complete energy harvesting system allows for the direct integration of the energy harvesting technology into existing power management schemes for wireless sensing.

  4. Laser microfabrication of biomedical devices: time-resolved microscopy of the printing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, P.; Patrascioiu, A.; Fernández-Pradas, J. M.; Morenza, J. L.

    2013-04-01

    Laser printing constitutes an interesting alternative to more conventional printing techniques in the microfabrication of biomedical devices. The principle of operation of most laser printing techniques relies on the highly localized absorption of strongly focused laser pulses in the close proximity of the free surface of the liquid to be printed. This leads to the generation of a cavitation bubble which further expansion results in the ejection of a small fraction of the liquid, giving place to the deposition of a well-defined droplet onto a collector substrate. Laser printing has proved feasible for printing biological materials, from single-stranded DNA to proteins, and even living cells and microorganisms, with high degrees of resolution and reproducibility. In consequence, laser printing appears to be an excellent candidate for the fabrication of biological microdevices, such as DNA and protein microarrays, or miniaturized biosensors. The optimization of the performances of laser printing techniques requires a detailed knowledge of the dynamics of liquid transfer. Time-resolved microscopy techniques play a crucial role in this concern, since they allow tracking the evolution of the ejected material with excellent time and spatial resolution. Investigations carried out up to date have shown that liquid ejection proceeds through the formation of long, thin and stable liquid jets. In this work the different approaches used so far for monitoring liquid ejection during laser printing are considered, and it is shown how these techniques make possible to understand the complex dynamics involved in the process.

  5. A Microfabricated 8-40 GHz Dual-Polarized Reflector Feed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanhille, Kenneth; Durham, Tim; Stacy, William; Karasiewicz, David; Caba, Aaron; Trent, Christopher; Lambert, Kevin; Miranda, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Planar antennas based on tightly coupled dipole arrays (also known as a current sheet antenna or CSA) are amenable for use as electronically scanned phased arrays. They are capable of performance nearing a decade of bandwidth. These antennas have been demonstrated in many implementations at frequencies below 18 GHz. This paper describes the implementation using a relatively new multi-layer microfabrication process resulting in a small, 6x6 element, dual-linear polarized array with beamformer that operates from 8 to 40 GHz. The beamformer includes baluns that feed the dual-polarized differential antenna elements and reactive splitter networks that also cover the full frequency range of operation. This antenna array serves as a reflector feed for a multi-band instrument designed to measure snow water equivalent (SWE) from airborne platforms. The instrument has both radar and radiome try capability at multiple frequencies. Scattering-parameter and time-domain measurements have been used to characterize the array feed. Radiation patterns of the antenna have been measured and are compared to simulation. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this work represents the most integrated multi-octave millimeter-wave antenna feed fabricated to date.

  6. Probing the invasiveness of prostate cancer cells in a 3D microfabricated landscape

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liyu; Sun, Bo; Pedersen, Jonas N.; Aw Yong, Koh-Meng; Getzenberg, Robert H.; Stone, Howard A.; Austin, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    The metastatic invasion of cancer cells from primary tumors to distant ecological niches, rather than the primary tumors, is the cause of much cancer mortality [Zhang QB, et al. (2010) Int J Cancer 126:2534–2541; Chambers AF, Goss PE (2008) Breast Cancer Res 10:114]. Metastasis is a three-dimensional invasion process where cells spread from their site of origin and colonize distant microenvironmental niches. It is critical to be able to assess quantitatively the metastatic potential of cancer cells [Harma V, et al. (2010) PLoS ONE 5:e10431]. We have constructed a microfabricated chip with a three-dimensional topology consisting of lowlands and isolated square highlands (Tepuis), which stand hundreds of microns above the lowlands, in order to assess cancer cell metastatic potential as they invade the highlands. As a test case, the invasive ascents of the Tepui by highly metastatic PC-3 and noninvasive LNCaP prostate cancer cells were used. The vertical ascent by prostate cancer cells from the lowlands to the tops of the Tepui was imaged using confocal microscopy and used as a measure of the relative invasiveness. The less-metastatic cells (LNCaP) never populated all available tops, leaving about 15% of them unoccupied, whereas the more metastatic PC-3 cells occupied all available Tepuis. We argue that this distinct difference in invasiveness is due to contact inhibition. PMID:21474778

  7. Protein assembly onto patterned microfabricated devices through enzymatic activation of fusion pro-tag.

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, Angela T; Yi, Hyunmin; Luo, Xiaolong; Payne, Gregory F; Ghodssi, Reza; Rubloff, Gary W; Bentley, William E

    2008-02-15

    We report a versatile approach for covalent surface-assembly of proteins onto selected electrode patterns of pre-fabricated devices. Our approach is based on electro-assembly of the aminopolysaccharide chitosan scaffold as a stable thin film onto patterned conductive surfaces of the device, which is followed by covalent assembly of the target protein onto the scaffold surface upon enzymatic activation of the protein's "pro-tag." For our demonstration, the model target protein is green fluorescent protein (GFP) genetically fused with a pentatyrosine pro-tag at its C-terminus, which assembles onto both two-dimensional chips and within fully packaged microfluidic devices in situ and under flow. Our surface-assembly approach enables spatial selectivity and orientational control under mild experimental conditions. We believe that our integrated approach harnessing genetic manipulation, in situ enzymatic activation, and electro-assembly makes it advantageous for a wide variety of bioMEMS and biosensing applications that require facile "biofunctionalization" of microfabricated devices. PMID:17625789

  8. A microfabricated fixed path length silicon sample holder improves background subtraction for cryoSAXS

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, Jesse B.; Katz, Andrea M.; Meisburger, Steve P.; Warkentin, Matthew A.; Thorne, Robert E.; Pollack, Lois

    2015-01-01

    The application of small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) for high-throughput characterization of biological macromolecules in solution is limited by radiation damage. By cryocooling samples, radiation damage and required sample volumes can be reduced by orders of magnitude. However, the challenges of reproducibly creating the identically sized vitrified samples necessary for conventional background subtraction limit the widespread adoption of this method. Fixed path length silicon sample holders for cryoSAXS have been microfabricated to address these challenges. They have low background scattering and X-ray absorption, require only 640 nl of sample, and allow reproducible sample cooling. Data collected in the sample holders from a nominal illuminated sample volume of 2.5 nl are reproducible down to q ≃ 0.02 Å−1, agree with previous cryoSAXS work and are of sufficient quality for reconstructions that match measured crystal structures. These sample holders thus allow faster, more routine cryoSAXS data collection. Additional development is required to reduce sample fracturing and improve data quality at low q. PMID:26089749

  9. Novel microfabricated device to measure hormone/neurotransmitter release with millisecond temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillis, Kevin D.; Chen, Peng; Xu, Bai; Tokranova, Natalya; Feng, Xiaojun; Castracane, James

    2002-06-01

    We are developing a novel readout for secretion of hormones and neurotransmitter on micro/nanofabricated chips. Traditional biochemical assays of signaling molecules secreted from cells are slow, cumbersome and have at best, a temporal resolution of several seconds. On the other hand, electrochemical measurement of hormone or transmitter secretion can obtain millisecond temporal resolution if the diffusion distance between the release site on the cell and the working electrode is within 1 micron. Carbon fiber microelectrodes can have millisecond time resolution, but can only measure release form a small fraction of the cell surface. We have fabricated arrays of Au electrodes in wells micromachined on the surface of silicon microchips. Each well/microelectrode roughly conforms to the shape of a single cell in order to capture release forma large fraction of the surface area of each cell with minimal diffusional delays. This paper will present details of the microfabrication process flow as well a initial results demonstrating millisecond-resolution measurement of catecholamine secretion form adrenal chromaffin cells. Our goal for this project is to develop enabling technology for massively parallel systems on a chip such as cell-based biosensors to detect neurotoxins and high-throughput assays of drugs that affect neurotransmitter release.

  10. Biology on a Chip: Microfabrication for Studying the Behavior of Cultured Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nianzhen; Tourovskaia, Anna; Folch, Albert

    2013-01-01

    The ability to culture cells in vitro has revolutionized hypothesis testing in basic cell and molecular biology research and has become a standard methodology in drug screening and toxicology assays. However, the traditional cell culture methodology—consisting essentially of the immersion of a large population of cells in a homogeneous fluid medium—has become increasingly limiting, both from a fundamental point of view (cells in vivo are surrounded by complex spatiotemporal microenvironments) and from a practical perspective (scaling up the number of fluid handling steps and cell manipulations for high-throughput studies in vitro is prohibitively expensive). Micro fabrication technologies have enabled researchers to design, with micrometer control, the biochemical composition and topology of the substrate, the medium composition, as well as the type of neighboring cells surrounding the microenvironment of the cell. In addition, microtechnology is conceptually well suited for the development of fast, low-cost in vitro systems that allow for high-throughput culturing and analysis of cells under large numbers of conditions. Here we review a variety of applications of microfabrication in cell culture studies, with an emphasis on the biology of various cell types. PMID:15139302

  11. Magnetic Tools for Lab-on-a-chip Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Pekas, Nikola Slobodan

    2006-01-01

    This study establishes a set of magnetics-based tools that have been integrated with microfluidic systems. The overall impact of the work begins to enable the rapid and efficient manipulation and detection of magnetic entities such as particles, picoliter-sized droplets, or bacterial cells. Details of design, fabrication, and theoretical and experimental assessments are presented. The manipulation strategy has been demonstrated in the format of a particle diverter, whereby micron-sized particles are actively directed into desired flow channels at a split-flow junction by means of integrated microelectromagnets. Magnetic detection has been realized by deploying Giant Magnetoresistance (GMR) sensors--microfabricated structures originally developed for use as readout elements in computer hard-drives. We successfully transferred the GMR technology to the lab-on-a-chip arena, and demonstrated the versatility of the concept in several important areas: real-time, integrated monitoring of the properties of multiphase droplet flows; rapid quantitative determination of the concentration of magnetic nanoparticles in droplets of ferrofluids; and high-speed detection of individual magnetic microparticles and magnetotactic bacteria. The study also includes novel schemes for hydrodynamic flow focusing that work in conjunction with GMR-based detection to ensure precise navigation of the sample stream through the GMR detection volume, therefore effectively establishing a novel concept of a microfabricated magnetic flow cytometer.

  12. Self-assembled magnetic filter for highly efficient immunomagnetic separation.

    PubMed

    Issadore, David; Shao, Huilin; Chung, Jaehoon; Newton, Andita; Pittet, Mikael; Weissleder, Ralph; Lee, Hakho

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a compact and inexpensive microfluidic chip, the self-assembled magnetic filter, to efficiently remove magnetically tagged cells from suspension. The self-assembled magnetic filter consists of a microfluidic channel built directly above a self-assembled NdFeB magnet. Micrometre-sized grains of NdFeB assemble to form alternating magnetic dipoles, creating a magnetic field with a very strong magnitude B (from the material) and field gradient ▽B (from the configuration) in the microfluidic channel. The magnetic force imparted on magnetic beads is measured to be comparable to state-of-the-art microfabricated magnets, allowing for efficient separations to be performed in a compact, simple device. The efficiency of the magnetic filter is characterized by sorting non-magnetic (polystyrene) beads from magnetic beads (iron oxide). The filter enriches the population of non-magnetic beads to magnetic beads by a factor of >10(5) with a recovery rate of 90% at 1 mL h(-1). The utility of the magnetic filter is demonstrated with a microfluidic device that sorts tumor cells from leukocytes using negative immunomagnetic selection, and concentrates the tumor cells on an integrated membrane filter for optical detection. PMID:20949198

  13. Transparent magnetic photoresists for bioanalytical applications.

    PubMed

    Gach, Philip C; Sims, Christopher E; Allbritton, Nancy L

    2010-11-01

    Microfabricated devices possessing magnetic properties are of great utility in bioanalytical microdevices due to their controlled manipulation with external magnets. Current methods for creating magnetic microdevices yield a low-transparency material preventing light microscopy-based inspection of biological specimens on the structures. Uniformly transparent magnetic photoresists were developed for microdevices that require high transparency as well as consistent magnetism across the structure. Colloidal formation of 10 nm maghemite particles was minimized during addition to the negative photoresists SU-8 and 1002F through organic capping of the nanoparticles and utilization of solvent-based dispersion techniques. Photoresists with maghemite concentrations of 0.01-1% had a high transparency due to the even dispersal of maghemite nanoparticles within the polymer as observed with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). These magnetic photoresists were used to fabricate microstructures with aspect ratios up to 4:1 and a resolution of 3 μm. Various cell lines showed excellent adhesion and viability on the magnetic photoresists. An inspection of cells cultured on the magnetic photoresists with TEM showed cellular uptake of magnetic nanoparticles leeched from the photoresists. Cellular contamination by magnetic nanoparticles was eliminated by capping the magnetic photoresist surface with native 1002F photoresist or by removing the top layer of the magnetic photoresist through surface roughening. The utility of these magnetic photoresists was demonstrated by sorting single cells (HeLa, RBL and 3T3 cells) cultured on arrays of releasable magnetic micropallets. 100% of magnetic micropallets with attached cells were collected following release from the array. 85-92% of the collected cells expanded into colonies. The polymeric magnetic materials should find wide use in the fabrication of microstructures for bioanalytical technologies. PMID:20719380

  14. DNA templated magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinsella, Joseph M.

    Recent discoveries in nanoscience are predicted to potentially revolutionize future technologies in an extensive number of fields. These developments are contingent upon discovering new and often unconventional methods to synthesize and control nanoscale components. Nature provides several examples of working nanotechnology such as the use of programmed self assembly to build and deconstruct complex molecular systems. We have adopted a method to control the one dimensional assembly of magnetic nanoparticles using DNA as a scaffold molecule. With this method we have demonstrated the ability to organize 5 nm particles into chains that stretch up to ˜20 mum in length. One advantage of using DNA compared is the ability of the molecule to interact with other biomolecules. After assembling particles onto DNA we have been able to cleave the molecule into smaller fragments using restriction enzymes. Using ligase enzymes we have re-connected these fragments, coated with either gold or iron oxide, to form long one-dimensional arrangements of the two different types of nanoparticles on a single molecular guide. We have also created a sensitive magnetic field sensor by incorporating magnetic nanoparticle coated DNA strands with microfabricated electrodes. The IV characteristics of the aligned nanoparticles are dependant on the magnitude of an externally applied magnetic field. This transport phenomenon known as tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) shows room temperature resistance of our devices over 80% for cobalt ferrite coated DNA when a field of 20 kOe is applied. In comparison, studies using two dimensional nanoparticle films of irox oxides xii only exhibit a 35% MR effect. Confinement into one dimension using the DNA guide produces a TMR mechanism which produces significant increases in magnetoresistance. This property can be utilized for applications in magnetic field sensing, data storage, and logic elements.

  15. A fully microfabricated carbon nanotube three-electrode system on glass substrate for miniaturized electrochemical biosensors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joon Hyub; Lee, Jun-Yong; Jin, Joon-Hyung; Park, Chan Won; Lee, Cheol Jin; Min, Nam Ki

    2012-06-01

    We present an integration process to fabricate single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) three-electrode systems on glass substrate for electrochemical biosensors. Key issues involve optimization of the SWCNT working electrode to achieve high sensitivity, developing an optimal Ag/AgCl reference electrode with good stability, and process development to integrate these electrodes. Multiple spray coatings of the SWCNT film on glass substrate enabled easier integration of the SWCNT film into an electrochemical three-electrode system. O₂ plasma etching and subsequent activation of spray-coated SWCNT films were needed to pattern and functionalize the SWCNT working electrode films without serious damage to the SWCNTs, and to remove organic residues. The microfabricated three-electrode systems were characterized by microscopic and spectroscopic techniques, and the electrochemical properties were investigated using cyclic voltammetry and chrono-amperometry. The fully-integrated CNT three-electrode system showed an effective working electrode area about three times larger than its geometric surface area and an improved electrochemical activity for hydrogen peroxide decomposition. Finally, the effectiveness of miniaturized pf-SWCNT electrodes as biointerfaces was examined by applying them to immunosensors to detect Legionella(L) pneumophila, based on a direct sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) format with 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine dihydrochloride/hydrogen peroxide(TMB/H₂O₂) as the substrate/mediator system. The lower detection limit of the pf-SWCNT-based immunosensors to L. pneumophila is about 1500 times lower than that of the standard ELISA assay. PMID:22391878

  16. Investigations into the chemical structure based selectivity of the microfabricated nitrogen-phosphorus detector

    DOE PAGES

    Brocato, Terisse A.; Hess, Ryan F.; Moorman, Matthew; Simonson, Robert J.

    2015-10-28

    The nitrogen and phosphorus atoms are constituents of some of the most toxic chemical vapors. Nitrogen-phosphorus gas chromatograph detectors (NPDs) rely on selective ionization of such compounds using ionization temperatures typically greater than 600 °C. NPDs have previously been reported to be 7*104× and 105× more sensitive for nitrogen and phosphorus, respectively, than for carbon. Presented here is an investigation of the structure-based selectivity of a microfabricated nitrogen-phosphorus detector (μNPD). The μNPD presented here is smaller than a dime and can be placed in a system that is 1/100th the size of a commercial NPD. Comparison of responses of suchmore » devices to homologous anilines (p-methoxyaniline, p-fluoroaniline, and aniline) revealed that detection selectivity, determined by the ratio of μNPD to nonselective flame ionization detector (FID) peak areas, is correlated with acid disassociation pKa values for the respective analine. Selectivity was determined to be greatest for p-methoxyaniline, followed by p-fluoroaniline, with aniline having the smallest response. The limit of detection for a nitrogen containing chemical, p-methoxyaniline, using the μNPD was determined to be 0.29 ng compared to 59 ng for a carbon chemical containing no nitrogen or phosphorus, 1,3,5-trimethybenzene. The μNPD presented here has increased detection for nitrogen and phosphorus compared to the FID and with a slight increase in detection of carbon compounds compared to commercial NPD's sensitivity to nitrogen and carbon.« less

  17. Microfabrication of Nanoporous Gold Patterns for Cell-material Interaction Studies

    PubMed Central

    Daggumati, Pallavi; Kurtulus, Ozge; Chapman, Christopher Abbott Reece; Dimlioglu, Damla; Seker, Erkin

    2013-01-01

    Nanostructured materials with feature sizes in tens of nanometers have enhanced the performance of several technologies, including fuel cells, biosensors, biomedical device coatings, and drug delivery tools. Nanoporous gold (np-Au), produced by a nano-scale self-assembly process, is a relatively new material that exhibits large effective surface area, high electrical conductivity, and catalytic activity. These properties have made np-Au an attractive material to scientific community. Most studies on np-Au employ macro-scale specimens and focus on fundamental science of the material and its catalytic and sensor applications. The macro-scale specimens limit np-Au's potential in miniaturized systems, including biomedical devices. In order to address these issues, we initially describe two different methods to micropattern np-Au thin films on rigid substrates. The first method employs manually-produced stencil masks for creating millimeter-scale np-Au patterns, while the second method uses lift-off photolithography to pattern sub-millimeter-scale patterns. As the np-Au thin films are obtained by sputter-deposition process, they are compatible with conventional microfabrication techniques, thereby amenable to facile integration into microsystems. These systems include electrically-addressable biosensor platforms that benefit from high effective surface area, electrical conductivity, and gold-thiol-based surface bioconjugation. We describe cell culture, immunostaining, and image processing techniques to quantify np-Au's interaction with mammalian cells, which is an important performance parameter for some biosensors. We expect that the techniques illustrated here will assist the integration of np-Au in platforms at various length-scales and in numerous applications, including biosensors, energy storage systems, and catalysts. PMID:23893025

  18. Enhanced electroanalysis in lithium potassium eutectic (LKE) using microfabricated square microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Corrigan, Damion K; Blair, Ewen O; Terry, Jonathan G; Walton, Anthony J; Mount, Andrew R

    2014-11-18

    Molten salts (MSs) are an attractive medium for chemical and electrochemical processing and as a result there is demand for MS-compatible analysis technologies. However, MSs containing redox species present a challenging environment in which to perform analytical measurements because of their corrosive nature, significant thermal convection and the high temperatures involved. This paper outlines the fabrication and characterization of microfabricated square microelectrodes (MSMs) designed for electrochemical analysis in MS systems. Their design enables precise control over electrode dimension, the minimization of stress because of differential thermal expansion through design for high temperature operation, and the minimization of corrosive attack through effective insulation. The exemplar MS system used for characterization was lithium chloride/potassium chloride eutectic (LKE), which has potential applications in pyrochemical nuclear fuel reprocessing, metal refining, molten salt batteries and electric power cells. The observed responses for a range of redox ions between 400 and 500 °C (673 and 773 K) were quantitative and typical of microelectrodes. MSMs also showed the reduced iR drop, steady-state diffusion-limited response, and reduced sensitivity to convection seen for microelectrodes under ambient conditions and expected for these electrodes in comparison to macroelectrodes. Diffusion coefficients were obtained in close agreement with literature values, more readily and at greater precision and accuracy than both macroelectrode and previous microelectrode measurements. The feasibility of extracting individual physical parameters from mixtures of redox species (as required in reprocessing) and of the prolonged measurement required for online monitoring was also demonstrated. Together, this demonstrates that MSMs provide enhanced electrode devices widely applicable to the characterization of redox species in a range of MS systems.

  19. Microfabrication of nanoporous gold patterns for cell-material interaction studies.

    PubMed

    Daggumati, Pallavi; Kurtulus, Ozge; Chapman, Christopher Abbott Reece; Dimlioglu, Damla; Seker, Erkin

    2013-01-01

    Nanostructured materials with feature sizes in tens of nanometers have enhanced the performance of several technologies, including fuel cells, biosensors, biomedical device coatings, and drug delivery tools. Nanoporous gold (np-Au), produced by a nano-scale self-assembly process, is a relatively new material that exhibits large effective surface area, high electrical conductivity, and catalytic activity. These properties have made np-Au an attractive material to scientific community. Most studies on np-Au employ macro-scale specimens and focus on fundamental science of the material and its catalytic and sensor applications. The macro-scale specimens limit np-Au's potential in miniaturized systems, including biomedical devices. In order to address these issues, we initially describe two different methods to micropattern np-Au thin films on rigid substrates. The first method employs manually-produced stencil masks for creating millimeter-scale np-Au patterns, while the second method uses lift-off photolithography to pattern sub-millimeter-scale patterns. As the np-Au thin films are obtained by sputter-deposition process, they are compatible with conventional microfabrication techniques, thereby amenable to facile integration into microsystems. These systems include electrically-addressable biosensor platforms that benefit from high effective surface area, electrical conductivity, and gold-thiol-based surface bioconjugation. We describe cell culture, immunostaining, and image processing techniques to quantify np-Au's interaction with mammalian cells, which is an important performance parameter for some biosensors. We expect that the techniques illustrated here will assist the integration of np-Au in platforms at various length-scales and in numerous applications, including biosensors, energy storage systems, and catalysts. PMID:23893025

  20. Aging studies on micro-fabricated alkali buffer-gas cells for miniature atomic clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullah, S.; Affolderbach, C.; Gruet, F.; Mileti, G.

    2015-04-20

    We report an aging study on micro-fabricated alkali vapor cells using neon as a buffer gas. An experimental atomic clock setup is used to measure the cell's intrinsic frequency, by recording the clock frequency shift at different light intensities and extrapolating to zero intensity. We find a drift of the cell's intrinsic frequency of (−5.2 ± 0.6) × 10{sup −11}/day and quantify deterministic variations in sources of clock frequency shifts due to the major physical effects to identify the most probable cause of the drift. The measured drift is one order of magnitude stronger than the total frequency variations expected from clock parameter variations and corresponds to a slow reduction of buffer gas pressure inside the cell, which is compatible with the hypothesis of loss of Ne gas from the cell due to its permeation through the cell windows. A negative drift on the intrinsic cell frequency is reproducible for another cell of the same type. Based on the Ne permeation model and the measured cell frequency drift, we determine the permeation constant of Ne through borosilicate glass as (5.7 ± 0.7) × 10{sup −22} m{sup 2} s{sup −1 }Pa{sup −1} at 81 °C. We propose this method based on frequency metrology in an alkali vapor cell atomic clock setup based on coherent population trapping for measuring permeation constants of inert gases.

  1. Design, microfabrication, and analysis of micrometer-sized cylindrical ion trap arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, D.; Chang, J. P.; Fico, M.; Guymon, A. J.; Austin, D. E.; Blain, M. G.

    2007-01-01

    A description of the design and microfabrication of arrays of micrometer-scale cylindrical ion traps is offered. Electrical characterization and initial ion trapping experiments with a massively parallel array of 5μm internal radius (r0) sized cylindrical ion traps (CITs) are also described. The ion trap, materials, and design are presented and shown to be critical in achieving minimal trapping potential while maintaining minimal power consumption. The ion traps, fabricated with metal electrodes, have inner radii of 1, 2, 5, and 10μm and range from 5to24μm in height. The electrical characteristics of packaged ion trap arrays were measured with a vector network analyzer. The testing focused on trapping toluene (C7H8), mass 91, 92, or 93amu, in the 5μm sized CITs. Ions were formed via electron impact ionization and were ejected by turning off the rf voltage applied to the ring electrode; a current signal was collected at this time. Optimum ionization and trapping conditions, such as a sufficient pseudopotential well and high ionization to ion loss rate ratio (as determined by simulation), proved to be difficult to establish due to the high device capacitance and the presence of exposed dielectric material in the trapping region. However, evidence was obtained suggesting the trapping of ions in 1%-15% of the traps in the array. These first tests on micrometer-scale CITs indicated the necessary materials and device design modifications for realizing ultrasmall and low power ion traps.

  2. A microfabricated optofluidic ring resonator for sensitive, high-speed detection of volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Scholten, Kee; Fan, Xudong; Zellers, Edward T

    2014-10-01

    Advances in microanalytical systems for multi-vapor determinations to date have been impeded by limitations associated with the microsensor technologies employed. Here we introduce a microfabricated optofluidic ring resonator (μOFRR) sensor that addresses many of these limitations. The μOFRR combines vapor sensing and fluidic transport functions in a monolithic microstructure comprising a hollow, vertical SiOx cylinder (250 μm i.d., 1.2 μm wall thickness; 85 μm height) with a central quasi-toroidal mode-confinement section, grown and partially released from a Si substrate. The device also integrates on-chip fluidic-interconnection and fiber-optic probe alignment features. High-Q whispering gallery modes generated with a tunable 1550 nm laser exhibit rapid, reversible shifts in resonant wavelength arising from polymer swelling and refractive index changes as vapors partition into the ~300 nm PDMS film lining the cylinder. Steady-state sensor responses varied in proportion to concentration over a 50-fold range for the five organic vapors tested, providing calculated detection limits as low as 0.5 ppm (v/v) (for m-xylene and ethylbenzene). In dynamic exposure tests, responses to 5 μL injected m-xylene vapor pulses were 710 ms wide and were only 18% broader than those from a reference flame-ionization detector and also varied linearly with injected mass; 180 pg was measured and the calculated detection limit was 49 pg without use of preconcentration or split injection, at a flow rate compatible with efficient chromatographic separations. Coupling of this μOFRR with a micromachined gas chromatographic separation column is demonstrated. PMID:25131718

  3. Microfabrication of air core power inductors with metal-encapsulated polymer vias

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J; Herrault, F; Yu, XH; Kim, M; Shafer, RH; Allen, MG

    2013-01-25

    This paper reports three-dimensional (3-D) microfabricated toroidal inductors intended for power electronics applications. A key fabrication advance is the exploitation of thick metal encapsulation of polymer pillars to form a vertical via interconnections. The radial conductors of the toroidal inductor are formed by conventional plating-through-mold techniques, while the vertical windings (up to 650 mu m in height) are formed by polymer cores with metal plated on their external surfaces. This encapsulated polymer approach not only significantly reduces the required plating time but also exploits the relative ease of fabricating high-aspect-ratio SU-8 pillars. To form the top radial conductors, non-photopatternable SU-8 is introduced as a thick sacrificial layer. Two toroidal inductor geometries were fabricated and tested. The first inductor had an inner diameter of 2 mm, an outer diameter of 6 mm, 25 turns and a vertical via height of 650 mu m. The second inductor had an inner diameter of 4 mm, an outer diameter of 8 mm, 50 turns and a vertical via height of 650 mu m. Both inductor geometries were successfully fabricated and characterized in the frequency range of 0.1-100 MHz. Characterization results of the 25- and 50-turn inductors showed an average inductance of 76 and 200 nH, a low frequency (0.1 MHz) resistance of 0.2 and 1 Omega and a quality factor of 35 and 24 at 100 MHz, respectively. Finite-element simulations of the inductors were performed and agreed with the measured results to within 8%. The turn-to-turn breakdown voltage was measured to be in excess of 800 V and currents as high as 0.5 A could be successfully carried by the inductor windings.

  4. Investigations into the chemical structure based selectivity of the microfabricated nitrogen-phosphorus detector

    SciTech Connect

    Brocato, Terisse A.; Hess, Ryan F.; Moorman, Matthew; Simonson, Robert J.

    2015-10-28

    The nitrogen and phosphorus atoms are constituents of some of the most toxic chemical vapors. Nitrogen-phosphorus gas chromatograph detectors (NPDs) rely on selective ionization of such compounds using ionization temperatures typically greater than 600 °C. NPDs have previously been reported to be 7*104× and 105× more sensitive for nitrogen and phosphorus, respectively, than for carbon. Presented here is an investigation of the structure-based selectivity of a microfabricated nitrogen-phosphorus detector (μNPD). The μNPD presented here is smaller than a dime and can be placed in a system that is 1/100th the size of a commercial NPD. Comparison of responses of such devices to homologous anilines (p-methoxyaniline, p-fluoroaniline, and aniline) revealed that detection selectivity, determined by the ratio of μNPD to nonselective flame ionization detector (FID) peak areas, is correlated with acid disassociation pKa values for the respective analine. Selectivity was determined to be greatest for p-methoxyaniline, followed by p-fluoroaniline, with aniline having the smallest response. The limit of detection for a nitrogen containing chemical, p-methoxyaniline, using the μNPD was determined to be 0.29 ng compared to 59 ng for a carbon chemical containing no nitrogen or phosphorus, 1,3,5-trimethybenzene. The μNPD presented here has increased detection for nitrogen and phosphorus compared to the FID and with a slight increase in detection of carbon compounds compared to commercial NPD's sensitivity to nitrogen and carbon.

  5. UV-LIGA microfabrication process for sub-terahertz waveguides utilizing multiple layered SU-8 photoresist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malekabadi, Ali; Paoloni, Claudio

    2016-09-01

    A microfabrication process based on UV LIGA (German acronym of lithography, electroplating and molding) is proposed for the fabrication of relatively high aspect ratio sub-terahertz (100-1000 GHz) metal waveguides, to be used as a slow wave structure in sub-THz vacuum electron devices. The high accuracy and tight tolerances required to properly support frequencies in the sub-THz range can be only achieved by a stable process with full parameter control. The proposed process, based on SU-8 photoresist, has been developed to satisfy high planar surface requirements for metal sub-THz waveguides. It will be demonstrated that, for a given thickness, it is more effective to stack a number of layers of SU-8 with lower thickness rather than using a single thick layer obtained at lower spin rate. The multiple layer approach provides the planarity and the surface quality required for electroforming of ground planes or assembly surfaces and for assuring low ohmic losses of waveguides. A systematic procedure is provided to calculate soft and post-bake times to produce high homogeneity SU-8 multiple layer coating as a mold for very high quality metal waveguides. A double corrugated waveguide designed for 0.3 THz operating frequency, to be used in vacuum electronic devices, was fabricated as test structure. The proposed process based on UV LIGA will enable low cost production of high accuracy sub-THz 3D waveguides. This is fundamental for producing a new generation of affordable sub-THz vacuum electron devices, to fill the technological gap that still prevents a wide diffusion of numerous applications based on THz radiation.

  6. In Vitro Reconstruction of Neuronal Networks Derived from Human iPS Cells Using Microfabricated Devices

    PubMed Central

    Takayama, Yuzo; Kida, Yasuyuki S.

    2016-01-01

    Morphology and function of the nervous system is maintained via well-coordinated processes both in central and peripheral nervous tissues, which govern the homeostasis of organs/tissues. Impairments of the nervous system induce neuronal disorders such as peripheral neuropathy or cardiac arrhythmia. Although further investigation is warranted to reveal the molecular mechanisms of progression in such diseases, appropriate model systems mimicking the patient-specific communication between neurons and organs are not established yet. In this study, we reconstructed the neuronal network in vitro either between neurons of the human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell derived peripheral nervous system (PNS) and central nervous system (CNS), or between PNS neurons and cardiac cells in a morphologically and functionally compartmentalized manner. Networks were constructed in photolithographically microfabricated devices with two culture compartments connected by 20 microtunnels. We confirmed that PNS and CNS neurons connected via synapses and formed a network. Additionally, calcium-imaging experiments showed that the bundles originating from the PNS neurons were functionally active and responded reproducibly to external stimuli. Next, we confirmed that CNS neurons showed an increase in calcium activity during electrical stimulation of networked bundles from PNS neurons in order to demonstrate the formation of functional cell-cell interactions. We also confirmed the formation of synapses between PNS neurons and mature cardiac cells. These results indicate that compartmentalized culture devices are promising tools for reconstructing network-wide connections between PNS neurons and various organs, and might help to understand patient-specific molecular and functional mechanisms under normal and pathological conditions. PMID:26848955

  7. UV-LIGA microfabrication process for sub-terahertz waveguides utilizing multiple layered SU-8 photoresist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malekabadi, Ali; Paoloni, Claudio

    2016-09-01

    A microfabrication process based on UV LIGA (German acronym of lithography, electroplating and molding) is proposed for the fabrication of relatively high aspect ratio sub-terahertz (100–1000 GHz) metal waveguides, to be used as a slow wave structure in sub-THz vacuum electron devices. The high accuracy and tight tolerances required to properly support frequencies in the sub-THz range can be only achieved by a stable process with full parameter control. The proposed process, based on SU-8 photoresist, has been developed to satisfy high planar surface requirements for metal sub-THz waveguides. It will be demonstrated that, for a given thickness, it is more effective to stack a number of layers of SU-8 with lower thickness rather than using a single thick layer obtained at lower spin rate. The multiple layer approach provides the planarity and the surface quality required for electroforming of ground planes or assembly surfaces and for assuring low ohmic losses of waveguides. A systematic procedure is provided to calculate soft and post-bake times to produce high homogeneity SU-8 multiple layer coating as a mold for very high quality metal waveguides. A double corrugated waveguide designed for 0.3 THz operating frequency, to be used in vacuum electronic devices, was fabricated as test structure. The proposed process based on UV LIGA will enable low cost production of high accuracy sub-THz 3D waveguides. This is fundamental for producing a new generation of affordable sub-THz vacuum electron devices, to fill the technological gap that still prevents a wide diffusion of numerous applications based on THz radiation.

  8. Enhanced electroanalysis in lithium potassium eutectic (LKE) using microfabricated square microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Corrigan, Damion K; Blair, Ewen O; Terry, Jonathan G; Walton, Anthony J; Mount, Andrew R

    2014-11-18

    Molten salts (MSs) are an attractive medium for chemical and electrochemical processing and as a result there is demand for MS-compatible analysis technologies. However, MSs containing redox species present a challenging environment in which to perform analytical measurements because of their corrosive nature, significant thermal convection and the high temperatures involved. This paper outlines the fabrication and characterization of microfabricated square microelectrodes (MSMs) designed for electrochemical analysis in MS systems. Their design enables precise control over electrode dimension, the minimization of stress because of differential thermal expansion through design for high temperature operation, and the minimization of corrosive attack through effective insulation. The exemplar MS system used for characterization was lithium chloride/potassium chloride eutectic (LKE), which has potential applications in pyrochemical nuclear fuel reprocessing, metal refining, molten salt batteries and electric power cells. The observed responses for a range of redox ions between 400 and 500 °C (673 and 773 K) were quantitative and typical of microelectrodes. MSMs also showed the reduced iR drop, steady-state diffusion-limited response, and reduced sensitivity to convection seen for microelectrodes under ambient conditions and expected for these electrodes in comparison to macroelectrodes. Diffusion coefficients were obtained in close agreement with literature values, more readily and at greater precision and accuracy than both macroelectrode and previous microelectrode measurements. The feasibility of extracting individual physical parameters from mixtures of redox species (as required in reprocessing) and of the prolonged measurement required for online monitoring was also demonstrated. Together, this demonstrates that MSMs provide enhanced electrode devices widely applicable to the characterization of redox species in a range of MS systems. PMID:25284431

  9. Evaluation of a microfabricated thermal modulator for comprehensive two-dimensional microscale gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Jin; Serrano, Gustavo; Wise, Kensall D; Kurabayashi, Katsuo; Zellers, Edward T

    2011-07-15

    A microfabricated thermal modulator (μTM) designed for ultimate use in a comprehensive two-dimensional microscale gas chromatography (μGC × μGC) system is evaluated. The 2-stage device measures 13 mm (l) × 6 mm (w) × 0.5 mm (h) and consists of two interconnected serpentine etched-Si microchannels suspended from a thin Pyrex cap and wall-coated with PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane). The chip is mounted within a few tens of micrometers of a thermoelectric cooler that maintains both stages at a baseline temperature between -35 and -20 °C in order to focus analytes eluting from an upstream separation column. Each stage is heated to 210 °C sequentially at a rate as high as 2400 °C/s by independent thin-film resistors to inject the analytes in consecutive fractions to a downstream column, and then cooled at a rate as high as -168 °C/s. The average power dissipation is only ∼10 W for heating and 21 W for cooling without using consumable materials. In this study, the outlet of the μTM is connected directly to a flame ionization detector to assess its performance. Following a demonstration of basic operation, the modulated peak amplitude enhancement (PAE) and full-width-at-half-maximum (fwhm) are evaluated for members of a series of n-alkanes (C(6)-C(10)) as a function of the rim and stage temperatures; modulation period, phase, and offset; analyte concentration; and carrier-gas flow rate. A PAE as high as 50 and a fwhm as narrow as 90 ms are achieved for n-octane under optimized conditions.

  10. PUBLISHER'S NOTE: Microfabrication by localized electrochemical deposition: experimental investigation and theoretical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Said, R. A.

    2004-07-01

    During 2003, Dr R A Said published essentially duplicate versions of a paper in two archival journals: Nanotechnology and the Journal of The Electrochemical Society. The papers in question were: `Microfabrication by localized electrochemical deposition: experimental investigation and theoretical modelling' (2003 Nanotechnology 14 523) and `Shape formation of microstructures fabricated by localized electrochemical deposition' (2003 J. Electrochem. Soc. 150 C549). The two papers were submitted, revised, and published at essentially the same time. The papers used the same figures and neither paper referenced the other. Nanotechnology requires a signed copyright-transfer form assigning copyright in articles published to Institute of Physics Publishing, and the Journal of The Electrochemical Society requires the same for The Electrochemical Society. It is a tradition of long standing, stated in the information for contributors, that submission implies that the work has not been submitted, copyrighted, or accepted for publication elsewhere. Hence, duplicate publication not only raises legal questions and represents a serious breach of scientific ethics, but also leads to an unnecessary imposition on readers', referees', and editors' time. We regard this infraction as a serious matter. An apology from the author for this grave error is printed below. Author's apology I have mistakenly published similar results in two manuscripts in Nanotechnology and in the Journal of The Electrochemical Society, as stated above. I am responsible for this error. I agree with the Editors that such a practice should not have occurred, and I would like to sincerely apologize to Nanotechnology and the Journal of The Electrochemical Society, their publishers, and their readers for this matter. I will take actions in the future to prevent the occurrence of similar incidents. R A Said

  11. Design, microfabrication, and analysis of micrometer-sized cylindrical ion trap arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz, D.; Chang, J. P.; Fico, M.; Guymon, A. J.; Austin, D. E.; Blain, M. G.

    2007-01-15

    A description of the design and microfabrication of arrays of micrometer-scale cylindrical ion traps is offered. Electrical characterization and initial ion trapping experiments with a massively parallel array of 5 {mu}m internal radius (r{sub 0}) sized cylindrical ion traps (CITs) are also described. The ion trap, materials, and design are presented and shown to be critical in achieving minimal trapping potential while maintaining minimal power consumption. The ion traps, fabricated with metal electrodes, have inner radii of 1, 2, 5, and 10 {mu}m and range from 5 to 24 {mu}m in height. The electrical characteristics of packaged ion trap arrays were measured with a vector network analyzer. The testing focused on trapping toluene (C{sub 7}H{sub 8}), mass 91, 92, or 93 amu, in the 5 {mu}m sized CITs. Ions were formed via electron impact ionization and were ejected by turning off the rf voltage applied to the ring electrode; a current signal was collected at this time. Optimum ionization and trapping conditions, such as a sufficient pseudopotential well and high ionization to ion loss rate ratio (as determined by simulation), proved to be difficult to establish due to the high device capacitance and the presence of exposed dielectric material in the trapping region. However, evidence was obtained suggesting the trapping of ions in 1%-15% of the traps in the array. These first tests on micrometer-scale CITs indicated the necessary materials and device design modifications for realizing ultrasmall and low power ion traps.

  12. Microfabricated ion trap mass spectrometry for characterization of organics and potential biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Daniel

    Mass spectrometry is a powerful analytical technique with a strong history in planetary exploration, and is the method of choice for detection and identification of organic and biological molecules. MS instrumentation can also be combined with techniques such as gas chromatography, liquid chromatography, or chiral separation, which are particularly important for analysis of complex mixtures or possible homochirality. Ion traps have several inherent advantages, including speed of analysis (important for GC-MS), MS/MS capabilities (important to identification of unknown compounds), excellent sensitivity, and ease of coupling with ambient ionization techniques that are under development for biomolecule detection. We report on progress in using microfabrication techniques to produce radiofrequency quadrupole ion traps that are much smaller, lighter, and lower power than existing instruments. We produce ion traps using an assembly of two ceramic plates, the facing surfaces of which are lithographically patterned with electrodes. This approach allows great flexibility in the trap geometry, and we have demonstrated working mass spectrometers with quadrupole, linear, and toroidal trapping fields. The approach also allows correction of higher-order terms in the electric field. With this system, mass resolution of up to 1300 has been demonstrated, which is adequate for identification of a wide range of potential biomarkers. Capabilities such as tandem analysis have also been demonstrated. Of particular interest is an ion trap that contains both quadrupole and toroidal trapping regions simultaneously and coaxially. Ions can be trapped as a large reservoir in the toroidal region and introduced in small batches to the quadrupole region for mass analysis. This capability is particularly valuable where the sample of interest is very small, such as microfossil with trace organics, and where the organic inventory is both complex and unknown. Development and results of this device

  13. Microfabricated Collector-Generator Electrode Sensor for Measuring Absolute pH and Oxygen Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Dengler, Adam K; Wightman, R Mark; McCarty, Gregory S

    2015-10-20

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) has attracted attention for studying in vivo neurotransmission due to its subsecond temporal resolution, selectivity, and sensitivity. Traditional FSCV measurements use background subtraction to isolate changes in the local electrochemical environment, providing detailed information on fluctuations in the concentration of electroactive species. This background subtraction removes information about constant or slowly changing concentrations. However, determination of background concentrations is still important for understanding functioning brain tissue. For example, neural activity is known to consume oxygen and produce carbon dioxide which affects local levels of oxygen and pH. Here, we present a microfabricated microelectrode array which uses FSCV to detect the absolute levels of oxygen and pH in vitro. The sensor is a collector-generator electrode array with carbon microelectrodes spaced 5 μm apart. In this work, a periodic potential step is applied at the generator producing transient local changes in the electrochemical environment. The collector electrode continuously performs FSCV enabling these induced changes in concentration to be recorded with the sensitivity and selectivity of FSCV. A negative potential step applied at the generator produces a transient local pH shift at the collector. The generator-induced pH signal is detected using FSCV at the collector and correlated to absolute solution pH by postcalibration of the anodic peak position. In addition, in oxygenated solutions a negative potential step at the generator produces hydrogen peroxide by reducing oxygen. Hydrogen peroxide is detected with FSCV at the collector electrode, and the magnitude of the oxidative peak is proportional to absolute oxygen concentrations. Oxygen interference on the pH signal is minimal and can be accounted for with a postcalibration.

  14. The particle valve: On-demand particle trapping, filtering, and release from a microfabricated polydimethylsiloxane membrane using surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, David J.; Alan, Tuncay; Neild, Adrian

    2014-07-01

    We introduce a surface acoustic wave (SAW) based method for acoustically controlled concentration, capture, release, and sorting of particles in a microfluidic system. This method is power efficient by the nature of its design: the vertical direction of a traveling acoustic wave, in which the majority of the energy at the SAW-water interface is directed, is used to concentrate particles behind a microfabricated polydimethylsiloxane membrane extending partially into a channel. Sorting is also demonstrated with this concentration shown to be size-dependent. Low-power, miniature SAW devices, using methods such as the one demonstrated here, are well placed for future integration into point-of-care diagnostic systems.

  15. A Scalable Perfusion Culture System with Miniature Peristaltic Pumps for Live-Cell Imaging Assays with Provision for Microfabricated Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Sreenath; Suma, M.S.; Raju, Shilpa R.; Bhargav, Santosh D.B.; Arunima, S.; Das, Saumitra

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We present a perfusion culture system with miniature bioreactors and peristaltic pumps. The bioreactors are designed for perfusion, live-cell imaging studies, easy incorporation of microfabricated scaffolds, and convenience of operation in standard cell culture techniques. By combining with miniature peristaltic pumps—one for each bioreactor to avoid cross-contamination and to maintain desired flow rate in each—we have made a culture system that facilitates perfusion culture inside standard incubators. This scalable system can support multiple parallel perfusion experiments. The major components are fabricated by three-dimensional printing using VeroWhite, which we show to be amenable to ex vivo cell culture. Furthermore, the components of the system can be reused, thus making it economical. We validate the system and illustrate its versatility by culturing primary rat hepatocytes, live imaging the growth of mouse fibroblasts (NIH 3T3) on microfabricated ring-scaffolds inserted into the bioreactor, performing perfusion culture of breast cancer cells (MCF7), and high-magnification imaging of hepatocarcinoma cells (HuH7). PMID:26309810

  16. Structures, microfabrics and textures of the Cordilleran-type Rechnitz metamorphic core complex, Eastern Alps☆

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Shuyun; Neubauer, Franz; Bernroider, Manfred; Liu, Junlai; Genser, Johann

    2013-01-01

    Rechnitz window group represents a Cordilleran-style metamorphic core complex, which is almost entirely located within nearly contemporaneous Neogene sediments at the transition zone between the Eastern Alps and the Neogene Pannonian basin. Two tectonic units are distinguished within the Rechnitz metamorphic core complex (RMCC): (1) a lower unit mainly composed of Mesozoic metasediments, and (2) an upper unit mainly composed of ophiolite remnants. Both units are metamorphosed within greenschist facies conditions during earliest Miocene followed by exhumation and cooling. The internal structure of the RMCC is characterized by the following succession of structure-forming events: (1) blueschist relics of Paleocene/Eocene age formed as a result of subduction (D1), (2) ductile nappe stacking (D2) of an ophiolite nappe over a distant passive margin succession (ca. E–W to WNW–ESE oriented stretching lineation), (3) greenschist facies-grade metamorphism annealing dominant in the lower unit, and (4) ductile low-angle normal faulting (D3) (with mainly NE–SW oriented stretching lineation), and (5) ca. E to NE-vergent folding (D4). The microfabrics are related to mostly ductile nappe stacking to ductile low-angle normal faulting. Paleopiezometry in conjunction with P–T estimates yield high strain rates of 10− 11 to 10− 13 s− 1, depending on the temperature (400–350 °C) and choice of piezometer and flow law calibration. Progressive microstructures and texture analysis indicate an overprint of the high-temperature fabrics (D2) by the low-temperature deformation (D3). Phengitic mica from the Paleocene/Eocene high-pressure metamorphism remained stable during D2 ductile deformation as well as preserved within late stages of final sub-greenschist facies shearing. Chlorite geothermometry yields two temperature groups, 376–328 °C, and 306–132 °C. Chlorite is seemingly accessible to late-stage resetting. The RMCC underwent an earlier large-scale coaxial

  17. A microfabricated strain gauge array on polymer substrate for tactile neuroprostheses in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beygi, M.; Mutlu, S.; Güçlü, B.

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we present the design, microfabrication and characterization of a tactile sensor system which can be used for sensory neuroprostheses in rats. The sensor system consists of an array of 2  ×  7 cells, each of which has a series combination of four strain gauges. Each group of four strain gauges is placed around a square membrane with a size of 2.5  ×  2.5 mm2. Unlike most common tactile sensors based on silicon substrates, we used 3D-printed polylactic acid as a substrate, because it is not brittle, and under local extremes, it would prevent the catastrophic failure of all cells. The strain gauges were fabricated by depositing and patterning a 50 nm thick aluminum (Al) film on a polyimide sheet with a thickness of 0.125 mm. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer was bonded on the top surface of the PI membrane. The PDMS layer was prepared in two different thicknesses, 1.2 and 1.7 mm, to investigate its effect on the static response of the sensor. The sensitivity and the maximum allowable force, corresponding to the maximum deformation of 0.9 mm at the center of each cell, changed based on the thickness of the PDMS layer. Sensor cells operated linearly up to 3 N with an average sensitivity of 200 mΩ N-1 (0.7 Ω mm-1) for 1.2 mm thick PDMS. These values changed to 4 N and 70 mΩ N-1 (0.3 Ω mm-1), respectively, for 1.7 mm thick PDMS. The nonlinearity was less than 3%. The cells had low cross-talk (~5 mΩ N-1 and 0.02 Ω mm-1) relative to the average sensitivity. Additionally, the dynamic response of the sensor was characterized at several frequencies by using a vibrotactile stimulation system previously designed for psychophysics experiments. The sensor was also tested inside the rat conditioning chamber to demonstrate the relevant signals in a tactile neuroprosthesis.

  18. A microfabricated strain gauge array on polymer substrate for tactile neuroprostheses in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beygi, M.; Mutlu, S.; Güçlü, B.

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we present the design, microfabrication and characterization of a tactile sensor system which can be used for sensory neuroprostheses in rats. The sensor system consists of an array of 2  ×  7 cells, each of which has a series combination of four strain gauges. Each group of four strain gauges is placed around a square membrane with a size of 2.5  ×  2.5 mm2. Unlike most common tactile sensors based on silicon substrates, we used 3D-printed polylactic acid as a substrate, because it is not brittle, and under local extremes, it would prevent the catastrophic failure of all cells. The strain gauges were fabricated by depositing and patterning a 50 nm thick aluminum (Al) film on a polyimide sheet with a thickness of 0.125 mm. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer was bonded on the top surface of the PI membrane. The PDMS layer was prepared in two different thicknesses, 1.2 and 1.7 mm, to investigate its effect on the static response of the sensor. The sensitivity and the maximum allowable force, corresponding to the maximum deformation of 0.9 mm at the center of each cell, changed based on the thickness of the PDMS layer. Sensor cells operated linearly up to 3 N with an average sensitivity of 200 mΩ N‑1 (0.7 Ω mm‑1) for 1.2 mm thick PDMS. These values changed to 4 N and 70 mΩ N‑1 (0.3 Ω mm‑1), respectively, for 1.7 mm thick PDMS. The nonlinearity was less than 3%. The cells had low cross-talk (~5 mΩ N‑1 and 0.02 Ω mm‑1) relative to the average sensitivity. Additionally, the dynamic response of the sensor was characterized at several frequencies by using a vibrotactile stimulation system previously designed for psychophysics experiments. The sensor was also tested inside the rat conditioning chamber to demonstrate the relevant signals in a tactile neuroprosthesis.

  19. Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatographic separations with a temperature programmed microfabricated thermal modulator.

    PubMed

    Collin, William R; Nuñovero, Nicolas; Paul, Dibyadeep; Kurabayashi, Katsuo; Zellers, Edward T

    2016-04-29

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) with a temperature-programmed microfabricated thermal modulator (μTM) is demonstrated. The 0.78 cm(2), 2-stage μTM chip with integrated heaters and a PDMS coated microchannel was placed in thermal contact with a solid-state thermoelectric cooler and mounted on top of a bench scale GC. It was fluidically coupled through heated interconnects to an upstream first-dimension ((1)D) PDMS-coated capillary column and a downstream uncoated capillary or second-dimension ((2)D) PEG-coated capillary. A mixture of n-alkanes C6-C10 was separated isothermally and the full-width-at-half-maximum (fwhm) values of the modulated peaks were assessed as a function of the computer-controlled minimum and maximum stage temperatures of μTM, Tmin and Tmax, respectively. With Tmin and Tmax fixed at -25 and 100°C, respectively, modulated peaks of C6 and C7 had fwhm values<53 ms while the modulated peaks of C10 had a fwhm value of 1.3s, due to inefficient re-mobilization. With Tmin and Tmax fixed at 0 and 210°C, respectively, the fwhm value for the modulated C10 peaks decreased to 67 ms, but C6 and C7 exhibited massive breakthrough. By programming Tmin from -25 to 0°C and Tmax from 100 to 220°C, the C6 and C7 peaks had fwhm values≤50 ms, and the fwhm for C10 peaks remained<95 ms. Using the latter conditions for the GC×GC separation of a sample of unleaded gasoline yielded resolution similar to that reported with a commercial thermal modulator. Replacing the PDMS phase in the μTM with a trigonal-tricationic room temperature ionic liquid eliminated the bleed observed with the PDMS, but also reduced the capacity for several test compounds. Regardless, the demonstrated capability to independently temperature program this low resource μTM enhances its versatility and its promise for use in bench-scale GC×GC systems.

  20. Guided and magnetic self-assembly of tunable magnetoceptive gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasoglu, S.; Yu, C. H.; Gungordu, H. I.; Guven, S.; Vural, T.; Demirci, U.

    2014-09-01

    Self-assembly of components into complex functional patterns at microscale is common in nature, and used increasingly in numerous disciplines such as optoelectronics, microfabrication, sensors, tissue engineering and computation. Here, we describe the use of stable radicals to guide the self-assembly of magnetically tunable gels, which we call ‘magnetoceptive’ materials at the scale of hundreds of microns to a millimeter, each can be programmed by shape and composition, into heterogeneous complex structures. Using paramagnetism of free radicals as a driving mechanism, complex heterogeneous structures are built in the magnetic field generated by permanent magnets. The overall magnetic signature of final structure is erased via an antioxidant vitamin E, subsequent to guided self-assembly. We demonstrate unique capabilities of radicals and antioxidants in fabrication of soft systems with heterogeneity in material properties, such as porosity, elastic modulus and mass density; then in bottom-up tissue engineering and finally, levitational and selective assembly of microcomponents.

  1. Guided and magnetic self-assembly of tunable magnetoceptive gels

    PubMed Central

    Tasoglu, S.; Yu, C.H.; Gungordu, H.I.; Guven, S.; Vural, T.; Demirci, U.

    2014-01-01

    Self-assembly of components into complex functional patterns at microscale is common in nature, and used increasingly in numerous disciplines such as optoelectronics, microfabrication, sensors, tissue engineering and computation. Here, we describe the use of stable radicals to guide the self-assembly of magnetically tunable gels, which we call ‘magnetoceptive’ materials at the scale of hundreds of microns to a millimeter, each can be programmed by shape and composition, into heterogeneous complex structures. Using paramagnetism of free radicals as a driving mechanism, complex heterogeneous structures are built in the magnetic field generated by permanent magnets. The overall magnetic signature of final structure is erased via an antioxidant vitamin E, subsequent to guided self-assembly. We demonstrate unique capabilities of radicals and antioxidants in fabrication of soft systems with heterogeneity in material properties, such as porosity, elastic modulus and mass density; then in bottom-up tissue engineering and finally, levitational and selective assembly of microcomponents. PMID:25175148

  2. Microfabricated thermal conductivity sensor: a high resolution tool for quantitative thermal property measurement of biomaterials and solutions.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xin M; Ding, Weiping; Chen, Hsiu-hung; Shu, Zhiquan; Zhao, Gang; Zhang, Hai-feng; Gao, Dayong

    2011-10-01

    Obtaining accurate thermal properties of biomaterials plays an important role in the field of cryobiology. Currently, thermal needle, which is constructed by enclosing a manually winded thin metal wire with an insulation coating in a metallic sheath, is the only available device that is capable of measuring thermal conductivity of biomaterials. Major drawbacks, such as macroscale sensor size, lack of versatile format to accommodate samples with various shapes and sizes, neglected effects of heat transfer inside the probe and thermal contact resistance between the sensing element and the probe body, difficult to mass produce, poor data repeatability and reliability and labor-intense sensor calibration, have significantly reduced their potential to be an essential measurement tool to provide key thermal property information of biological specimens. In this study, we describe the development of an approach to measure thermal conductivity of liquids and soft bio-tissues using a proof-of-concept MEMS based thermal probe. By employing a microfabricated closely-packed gold wire to function as the heater and the thermistor, the presented thermal sensor can be used to measure thermal conductivities of fluids and natural soft biomaterials (particularly, the sensor may be directly inserted into soft tissues in living animal/plant bodies or into tissues isolated from the animal/plant bodies), where other more standard approaches cannot be used. Thermal standard materials have been used to calibrate two randomly selected thermal probes at room temperature. Variation between the obtained system calibration constants is less than 10%. By incorporating the previously obtained system calibration constant, three randomly selected thermal probes have been successfully utilized to measure the thermal conductivities of various solutions and tissue samples under different temperatures. Overall, the measurements are in agreement with the recommended values (percentage error less than 5

  3. Polyhalite microfabrics in an Alpine evaporite mélange: Hallstatt, Eastern Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schorn, A.; Neubauer, F.; Bernroider, M.

    2012-04-01

    Polyhalite [K2Ca2Mg(SO4)4 . 2H2O] commonly occurs in sedimentary evaporite successions and was described first from the salt mine Bad Ischl-Perneck in Austria (province Upper Austria) and has since been known from many salt deposits (Warren, 2006; Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg, 1035 p.). The study is undertaken for 40Ar/39Ar dating of tectonic processes of various polyhalite fabrics of Hallstatt, which have likely different formation ages, in order to supplement and extend further dating to further microfabric types as shown in Leitner (2011, Ph.D. thesis, University of Salzburg, 177 p.). In the Hallstatt salt mine, polyhalite rocks occur in 0.5 to 1 m thick tectonic lenses within the protocataclasite to protomylonite matrix of ductilely deformed halite of cataclastic clay-/mudstone. Thin section analysis of Hallstatt polyhalites reveal various fabric types including (1) polyhalite mylonites, (2) metamorphic reaction fabrics, (3) vein-filling, fibrous polyhalite and (4) cavity filling polyhalite. The polyhalite mylonites most likely formed along shear zones at high strain rates due to intracrystalline deformation and recrystallization. They may have developed from a more coarse-grained precursor metamorphic rock. Texture measurements by the electron back-scattered diffraction technique are in progress. The mylonites show a wide range of shear fabrics commonly known in mylonitic shear zones of the ductile crust. The mylonites are partly overprinted by recrystallized polyhalite grains, which are probably indicating a static growth. Metamorphic reaction fabrics of blödite (or astrakanite) [Na2Mg(SO4)2 . 4 H2O] between polyhalite seams and anhydrite has been found, too. According to Schauberger (1986, Archiv für Lagerstättenforschung der Geologischen Bundesanstalt, v. 7, p. 217-254), blödite of the Alpine Haselgebirge may occur primary as nodules or, more common, intergrown with the mineral löweite, which has a nearly identical chemical composition and is

  4. Magnetic microchip traps and single-atom detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Romain; Steinmetz, Tilo; Hommelhoff, Peter; Hansel, Wolfgang; Hansch, Theodor W.; Reichel, Jakob

    2003-07-01

    Microchip traps provide a promising approach to quantum information processing and communication (QIPC) with neutral atoms: strong and complex potentials can be produced for acting on the qubit atoms, and the potentials can be scaled to higher qubit numbers by virtue of the microfabrication process. We describe experimental results that are relevant to use in QIPC, such as the transport of Bose-Einstein-condensed atomic ensembles along the chip surface with the help of a magnetic conveyor belt. The second part of the paper is devoted to single-atom detection on the chip.

  5. Magnetic microchip traps and single-atom detection.

    PubMed

    Long, Romain; Steinmetz, Tilo; Hommelhoff, Peter; Hänsel, Wolfgang; Hänsch, Theodor W; Reichel, Jakob

    2003-07-15

    Microchip traps provide a promising approach to quantum information processing and communication (QIPC) with neutral atoms: strong and complex potentials can be produced for acting on the qubit atoms, and the potentials can be scaled to higher qubit numbers by virtue of the microfabrication process. We describe experimental results that are relevant to use in QIPC, such as the transport of Bose-Einstein-condensed atomic ensembles along the chip surface with the help of a magnetic conveyor belt. The second part of the paper is devoted to single-atom detection on the chip.

  6. Micro-fabrication by laser radiation forces: a direct route to reversible free-standing three-dimensional structures.

    PubMed

    Athanasekos, Loukas; Vasileiadis, Miltiadis; Mantzaridis, Christos; Karoutsos, Vagelis C; Koutselas, Ioannis; Pispas, Stergios; Vainos, Nikolaos A

    2012-10-22

    The origins and first demonstration of structurally stable solids formed by use of radiation forces are presented. By experimentally proving that radiation forces can indeed produce stable solid material forms, a novel method enabling two- and three-dimensional (2d and 3d) microfabrication is introduced: An optical, non-contact single-step physical operation, reversible with respect to materials nature, based on the sole use of radiation forces. The present innovation is elucidated by the formation of polyisoprene and polybutadiene micro-solids, as well as plasmonic and fluorescent hybrids, respectively comprising Au nanoparticles and CdS quantum dots, together with novel concepts of polymeric fiber-drawing by radiation forces. PMID:23187237

  7. Microfabricated polymer-based neural interface for electrical stimulation/recording, drug delivery, and chemical sensing--development.

    PubMed

    Tooker, Angela; Madsen, Teresa E; Yorita, Allison; Crowell, Andrea; Shah, Kedar G; Felix, Sarah; Mayberg, Helen S; Pannu, Satinderpall; Rainnie, Donald G; Tolosa, Vanessa

    2013-01-01

    We present here a microfabricated, multi-functional neural interface with the ability to selectively apply electrical and chemical stimuli, while simultaneously monitoring both electrical and chemical activity in the brain. Such a comprehensive approach is required to understand and treat neuropsychiatric disorders, such as major depressive disorder (MDD), and to understand the mechanisms underlying treatments, such as pharmaceutical therapies and deep brain stimulation (DBS). The polymer-based, multi-functional neural interface is capable of electrical stimulation and recording, targeted drug delivery, and electrochemical sensing. A variety of different electrode and fluidic channel arrangements are possible with this fabrication process. Preliminary testing has shown the suitability of these neural interfaces for in vivo electrical stimulation and recording, as well as in vitro chemical sensing. Testing of the in vitro drug delivery and combined in vivo functionalities this neural interface are currently underway.

  8. Microfabricated microengine for use as a mechanical drive and power source in the microdomain and fabrication process

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, E.J.; Sniegowski, J.J.

    1997-05-20

    A microengine uses two synchronized linear actuators as a power source and converts oscillatory motion from the actuators into rotational motion via direct linkage connection to an output gear or wheel. The microengine provides output in the form of a continuously rotating output gear that is capable of delivering drive torque to a micromechanism. The microengine can be operated at varying speeds and its motion can be reversed. Linear actuators are synchronized in order to provide linear oscillatory motion to the linkage means in the X and Y directions according to a desired position, rotational direction and speed of said mechanical output means. The output gear has gear teeth on its outer perimeter for directly contacting a micromechanism requiring mechanical power. The gear is retained by a retaining means which allows said gear to rotate freely. The microengine is microfabricated of polysilicon on one wafer using surface micromachining batch fabrication. 30 figs.

  9. Microfabricated microengine for use as a mechanical drive and power source in the microdomain and fabrication process

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Ernest J.; Sniegowski, Jeffry J.

    1997-01-01

    A microengine uses two synchronized linear actuators as a power source and converts oscillatory motion from the actuators into rotational motion via direct linkage connection to an output gear or wheel. The microengine provides output in the form of a continuously rotating output gear that is capable of delivering drive torque to a micromechanism. The microengine can be operated at varying speeds and its motion can be reversed. Linear actuators are synchronized in order to provide linear oscillatory motion to the linkage means in the X and Y directions according to a desired position, rotational direction and speed of said mechanical output means. The output gear has gear teeth on its outer perimeter for directly contacting a micromechanism requiring mechanical power. The gear is retained by a retaining means which allows said gear to rotate freely. The microengine is microfabricated of polysilicon on one wafer using surface micromachining batch fabrication.

  10. Sensitive Amino Acid Composition and Chirality Analysis in the Martian Regolith with a Microfabricated in situ Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skelley, A. M.; Grunthaner, F. J.; Bada, J. L.; Mathies, R. A.

    2003-12-01

    Recent advances in microfabricated "lab-on-a-chip" technologies have dramatically enhanced the capabilities of chemical and biochemical analyzers. The portability and sensitivity of these devices makes them ideal instruments for in situ chemical analysis on other planets. We have focused our initial studies on amino acid analysis because amino acids are more chemically resistant to decomposition than other biomolecules, and because amino acid chirality is a well-defined biomarker [1]. Previously, we developed a prototype electrophoresis chip, detection system and analysis method where the amino acids were labeled with fluorescein using FITC and then electrophoretically analyzed using g-cyclodextrin as the chiral resolution agent [2]. Extracts of the Murchison meteorite were analyzed, and the D/L ratios determined by microchip CE closely matched those from HPLC and GCMS and exhibited greater precision. Our microchip analyzer has now been further improved by establishing the capability of performing amino acid composition and chirality analyses using fluorescamine rather than FITC [3]. Fluorescamine is advantageous because it reacts more rapidly than FITC, and because excess reagent is hydrolyzed to a non-fluorescent product. Furthermore, the use of fluorescamine facilitates interfacing with the Mars Organic Detector (MOD) [4]. Fluorescamine-amino acids are separated using similar conditions as the FITC-aa, resulting in similar separation times and identical elution orders. Fluorescamine-aa are chirally resolved in the presence of hydroxy-propyl-b-cyclodextrin, and typical limits of detection are ˜ 50 nM. This work establishes the feasibility of combining fluorescamine labeling of amino acids with microfabricated CE devices to develop low-volume, high-sensitivity apparatus for extraterrestrial exploration. The stage is now set for the development of the Mars Organic Analyzer (MOA), a portable analysis system for amino acid extraction and chiral analysis that will

  11. A Micro-fabricated Hydrogen Storage Module with Sub-atmospheric Activation and Durability in Air Exposure.

    PubMed

    Shan, Xi; Payer, Joe H; Wainright, Jesse S; Dudik, Laurie

    2011-01-15

    The objective of this work was to develop a hydrogen storage module for onboard electrical power sources suitable for use in micro power systems and micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). Hydrogen storage materials were developed as thin-film inks to be compatible with an integrated manufacturing process. Important design aspects were (a) ready activation at sub-atmospheric hydrogen pressure and room temperature and (b) durability, i.e. capable of hundreds of absorption/desorption cycles and resistance to deactivation on exposure to air. Inks with palladium-treated intermetallic hydrogen storage alloys were developed and are shown here to be compatible with a thin-film micro-fabrication process. These hydrogen storage modules absorb hydrogen readily at atmospheric pressure, and the absorption/desorption rates remained fast even after the ink was exposed to air for 47 weeks.

  12. Microfabrication of controlled-geometry samples for the laser-heated diamond-anvil cell using focused ion beam technology

    SciTech Connect

    Pigott, Jeffrey S.; Reaman, Daniel M.; Panero, Wendy R.

    2012-02-06

    The pioneering of x-ray diffraction with in situ laser heating in the diamond-anvil cell has revolutionized the field of high-pressure mineral physics, expanding the ability to determine high-pressure, high-temperature phase boundaries and equations of state. Accurate determination of high-pressure, high-temperature phases and densities in the diamond-anvil cell rely upon collinearity of the x-ray beam with the center of the laser-heated spot. We present the development of microfabricated samples that, by nature of their design, will have the sample of interest in the hottest portion of the sample. We report initial successes with a simplified design using a Pt sample with dimensions smaller than the synchrotron-based x-ray spot such that it is the only part of the sample that absorbs the heating laser ensuring that the x-rayed volume is at the peak hotspot temperature. Microfabricated samples, synthesized using methods developed at The Ohio State University's Mineral Physics Laboratory and Campus Electron Optics Facility, were tested at high P-T conditions in the laser-heated diamond-anvil cell at beamline 16 ID-B of the Advanced Photon Source. Pt layer thicknesses of {le} 0.8 {micro}m absorb the laser and produce accurate measurements on the relative equations of state of Pt and PtC. These methods combined with high-purity nanofabrication techniques will allow for extension by the diamond-anvil cell community to multiple materials for high-precision high-pressure, high-temperature phase relations, equations of state, melting curves, and transport properties.

  13. Trapped-ion quantum logic gates based on oscillating magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Ospelkaus, C; Langer, C E; Amini, J M; Brown, K R; Leibfried, D; Wineland, D J

    2008-08-29

    Oscillating magnetic fields and field gradients can be used to implement single-qubit rotations and entangling multiqubit quantum gates for trapped-ion quantum information processing (QIP). With fields generated by currents in microfabricated surface-electrode traps, it should be possible to achieve gate speeds that are comparable to those of optically induced gates for realistic distances between the ion crystal and the electrode surface. Magnetic-field-mediated gates have the potential to significantly reduce the overhead in laser-beam control and motional-state initialization compared to current QIP experiments with trapped ions and will eliminate spontaneous scattering, a fundamental source of decoherence in laser-mediated gates.

  14. Rapid enrichment of leucocytes and genomic DNA from blood based on bifunctional core shell magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xin; Nie, Xiaorong; Yu, Bingbin; Zhang, Xu

    2007-04-01

    A series of protocols are proposed to extract genomic DNA from whole blood at different scales using carboxyl-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles as solid-phase absorbents. The enrichment of leucocytes and the adsorption of genomic DNA can be achieved with the same carboxyl-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles. The DNA bound to the bead surfaces can be used directly as PCR templates. By coupling cell separation and DNA purification, the whole operation can be accomplished in a few minutes. Our simplified protocols proved to be rapid, low cost, and biologically and chemically non-hazardous, and are therefore promising for microfabrication of a DNA-preparation chip and routine laboratory use.

  15. An integrated microfluidic platform for magnetic microbeads separation and confinement.

    PubMed

    Ramadan, Qasem; Samper, Victor; Poenar, Daniel P; Yu, Chen

    2006-03-15

    An innovative microfluidic platform for magnetic beads manipulation is introduced, consisting of novel microfabricated 3D magnetic devices positioned in a microfluidic chamber. Each magnetic device comprises of an embedded actuation micro-coil in various design versions, a ferromagnetic pillar, a magnetic backside plate and a sensing micro-coil. The various designs of the micro-coils enable efficient magnetic beads trapping and concentration in different patterns. The finite element analysis (FEA) results show a significant increase of the developed force on suspended magnetic beads when the magnetic pillar and backside plate were integrated into the device structure. These simulation results were confirmed experimentally by measuring the magnetic beads trapping ratios for the different designs and structures of the devices under continuous flow conditions. The trapping ratios and profiles were studied using beads counting, measuring the change of inductance with the sensing micro-coil and by image processing. The devices have efficiently demonstrated a controlled and localized magnetic beads trapping and concentration at small spatial locations for the first time. The new results shown in this study demonstrate the feasibility of efficiently using these original devices as key elements in complex bio-analysis systems.

  16. Remote detection of nuclear magnetic resonance with an anisotropic magnetoresistive sensor.

    PubMed

    Verpillat, F; Ledbetter, M P; Xu, S; Michalak, D J; Hilty, C; Bouchard, L-S; Antonijevic, S; Budker, D; Pines, A

    2008-02-19

    We report the detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) using an anisotropic magnetoresistive (AMR) sensor. A "remote-detection" arrangement was used in which protons in flowing water were prepolarized in the field of a superconducting NMR magnet, adiabatically inverted, and subsequently detected with an AMR sensor situated downstream from the magnet and the adiabatic inverter. AMR sensing is well suited for NMR detection in microfluidic "lab-on-a-chip" applications because the sensors are small, typically on the order of 10 mum. An estimate of the sensitivity for an optimized system indicates that approximately 6 x 10(13) protons in a volume of 1,000 mum(3), prepolarized in a 10-kG magnetic field, can be detected with a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 in a 1-Hz bandwidth. This level of sensitivity is competitive with that demonstrated by microcoils in superconducting magnets and with the projected sensitivity of microfabricated atomic magnetometers.

  17. A Microfabricated Segmented-Involute-Foil Regenerator for Enhancing Reliability and Performance of Stirling Engines. Phase III Final Report for the Radioisotope Power Conversion Technology NRA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, Mounir B.; Gedeon, David; Wood, Gary; McLean, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Under Phase III of NASA Research Announcement contract NAS3-03124, a prototype nickel segmented-involute-foil regenerator was microfabricated and tested in a Sunpower Frequency-Test-Bed (FTB) Stirling convertor. The team for this effort consisted of Cleveland State University, Gedeon Associates, Sunpower Inc. and International Mezzo Technologies. Testing in the FTB convertor produced about the same efficiency as testing with the original random-fiber regenerator. But the high thermal conductivity of the prototype nickel regenerator was responsible for a significant performance degradation. An efficiency improvement (by a 1.04 factor, according to computer predictions) could have been achieved if the regenerator was made from a low-conductivity material. Also, the FTB convertor was not reoptimized to take full advantage of the microfabricated regenerator s low flow resistance; thus, the efficiency would likely have been even higher had the FTB been completely reoptimized. This report discusses the regenerator microfabrication process, testing of the regenerator in the Stirling FTB convertor, and the supporting analysis. Results of the pre-test computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of the effects of the regenerator-test-configuration diffusers (located at each end of the regenerator) are included. The report also includes recommendations for further development of involute-foil regenerators from a higher-temperature material than nickel.

  18. Deformation and Brittle Failure of Folded Gneiss in Triaxial Compression: Failure Modes, Acoustic Signatures and Microfabric Controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agliardi, F.; Vinciguerra, S.; Dobbs, M. R.; Zanchetta, S.

    2014-12-01

    Fabric anisotropy is a key control of rock behavior in different geological settings and over different timescales. However, the effect of tectonically folded fabrics on the brittle strength and failure mode of metamorphic rocks is poorly understood. Recent data, obtained from uniaxial compression experiments on folded gneiss (Agliardi et al., 2014), demonstrated that their brittle failure modes depend upon the arrangement of two anisotropies (i.e. foliation and fold axial planes) and that rock strength correlates with failure mode. Since lithostatic pressure may significantly affect this rock behavior, we investigated its effect in triaxial compression experiments. We tested the Monte Canale Gneiss (Italian Alps), characterized by low phyllosilicate content and compositional layering folded at the cm-scale. We used a servo-controlled hydraulic loading system to test 19 air-dry cylindrical specimens (ø = 54 mm) that were characterized both in terms of fold geometry and orientation of foliation and fold axial planes to the axial load direction. The specimens were instrumented with direct contact axial and circumferential strain gauges. Acoustic emissions and P- and S-wave velocities were measured by piezoelectric transducers mounted in the compression platens. The tests were performed at confining pressures of 40 MPa and axial strain rates of 5*10-6 s-1. Post-failure study of fracture mechanisms and related microfabric controls was undertaken using X-ray CT, optical microscopy and SEM. Samples failed in three distinct brittle modes produced by different combinations of fractures parallel to foliation, fractures parallel to fold axial planes, or mm-scale shear bands. The failure modes, consistent with those described in uniaxial compression experiments, were found to be associated with distinct stress-strain and acoustic emission signatures. Failure modes involving quartz-dominated axial plane anisotropy correspond to higher peak strength and axial strain, less

  19. Polyphase serpentinization history of Mariana forearc mantle: observations on the microfabric of ultramafic clasts from ODP Leg 195, Site 1200

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahl, Wolf-Achim; Jöns, Niels; Bach, Wolfgang; Klein, Frieder

    2013-04-01

    In the forearc of the Mariana subduction zone system, a number of seamounts form from extrusion of blueschist and serpentine mud. Ocean Drilling Program Leg 195 drilled the South Chamorro seamount, where ultramafic clasts occur within the mud matrix. These clasts show a complex serpentinization history, which bears the potential for tracking the alteration history during uplift and cooling of mantle wedge rocks to the seafloor. Moreover, the microfabrics of the highly serpentinized harzburgite and dunite clasts exhibit evidence for multiple fracturing events in the forearc mantle. These, in turn, lead to fluid influx and varied styles of serpentinization of harzburgite and dunite. The serpentinized ultramafic clasts exhibit a variety of microfabrics that range from virtually undeformed to strongly deformed samples. Pervasively serpentinized harzburgites feature either an equigranular fabric of serpentinized olivine and orthopyroxene crystals, or different vein generations related to multiple stages of serpentinization. Several types of fluid pathways in harzburgites are present: (i) veins containing brucite and iron oxides, developed linearly without marked conformance with the rock fabric. In places, these veins developed mm-cm wide halos with finger-shaped serpentinization fronts. Veins of type (i) are either developed as syntaxial veins from a single crack-seal event with large magnetite crystals growing from one wall to the other (as confirmed with high-resolution X-ray microtomography), or formed by multiple fluid events. (ii) serpentine veins that encompass regions of marginally serpentinized, microgranular olivine and large orthopyroxene crystals. (iii) extensional serpentine veins (known as "Frankenstein" type). In the clasts studied, their occurrence is restricted to the halo region of type (i) veins. (iv) as a late-stage feature, extensional veins documenting multiple crack-seal events can be present in the serpentinites (either in undeformed regions with

  20. Micro-Fabricated Solid-State Radiation Detectors for Active Personal Dosimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Wrbanek, Susan Y.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Chen, Liang-Yu

    2007-01-01

    Active radiation dosimetry is important to human health and equipment functionality for space applications outside the protective environment of a space station or vehicle. This is especially true for long duration missions to the moon, where the lack of a magnetic field offers no protection from space radiation to those on extravehicular activities. In order to improve functionality, durability and reliability of radiation dosimeters for future NASA lunar missions, single crystal silicon carbide devices and scintillating fiber detectors are currently being investigated for applications in advanced extravehicular systems. For many years, NASA Glenn Research Center has led significant efforts in silicon carbide semiconductor technology research and instrumentation research for sensor applications under extreme conditions. This report summarizes the technical progress and accomplishments toward characterization of radiation-sensing components for the recommendation of their fitness for advanced dosimetry development.

  1. Demonstration of motionless Knudsen pump based micro-gas chromatography featuring micro-fabricated columns and on-column detectors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Gupta, Naveen K; Wise, Kensall D; Gianchandani, Yogesh B; Fan, Xudong

    2011-10-21

    This paper reports the investigation of a micro-gas chromatography (μGC) system that utilizes an array of miniaturized motionless Knudsen pumps (KPs) as well as microfabricated separation columns and optical detectors. A prototype system was built to achieve a flow rate of 1 mL min(-1) and 0.26 mL min(-1) for helium and dry air, respectively, when they were used as carrier gas. This system was then employed to evaluate GC performance compromises and demonstrate the ability to separate and detect gas mixtures containing analytes of different volatilities and polarities. Furthermore, the use of pressure programming of the KP array was demonstrated to significantly shorten the analysis time while maintaining a high detection resolution. Using this method, we obtained a high resolution detection of 5 alkanes of different volatilities within 5 min. Finally, we successfully detected gas mixtures of various polarities using a tandem-column μGC configuration by installing two on-column optical detectors to obtain complementary chromatograms.

  2. Microfabricated device and method for multiplexed electrokinetic focusing of fluid streams and a transport cytometry method using same

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Stephen C.; Ramsey, J. Michael

    2000-01-01

    A microfabricated device and method for electrokinetic transport of a liquid phase biological or chemical material is described. In accordance with one aspect of the present invention there is provided a microchip that is adapted for the simultaneous spatial confinement of electrokinetically driven fluidic material streams on a substrate. The apparatus includes a focusing chamber formed in a surface of the substrate and in fluid communication with two sample fluid channels and three focusing fluid channels. The device further includes electromotive means operatively connected to the sources of the sample fluid and the source of focusing fluid for electrokinetically driving the respective streams of the sample and focusing fluids through the respective channels into the focusing chamber such that the focusing fluid streams spatially confine the first and second sample fluid streams within the focusing chamber. In accordance with another aspect of this invention, there is provided a cytometry method for analyzing microscopic particles in a fluid medium on a microchip by utilizing the focusing function of the microchip. In the disclosed cytometry process the width of the fluid stream is narrowed in the focusing chamber. The microscopic particles in the focused sample fluid are then detected and/or measured using light scattering or other techniques.

  3. Design and implementation of injector/distributor structures for microfabricated non-porous pillar columns for capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Sukas, Sertan; Desmet, Gert; Gardeniers, Han J G E

    2013-05-10

    A previously proposed foil definition is applied in the design of injector/distributor structures for solid microfabricated column structures for capillary electrochromatography. In addition to a typical bifurcated distributor, an optimized design alternative with two different configurations is experimentally evaluated. Optimized designs yielded a flat profile for the injected sample with a maximum of 3% variation from the mean width, while it went up to 18% for the typical bifurcated distributor. The implemented electrokinetic injection approach enabled controlling the volume of the injected sample accurately without sacrificing the compactness of the device design. The width of the injected sample was directly proportional to the injection time, namely 165 and 218 μm base widths were obtained for 0.6 and 0.8s of feeding, respectively. Reducing the external porosity of the distributor by 85% compared to the typical design, optimized distributors caused a decrease in the mean flow velocity of up to 70%. However, having a flat initial plug shape enabled the separation of a mixture of Coumarin 440, 460, 480 and 540 at 1 mm downstream of the injection point in 80s, while it was even not possible to detect the C440 signal for a typical bifurcated design. PMID:23561733

  4. Flexible microfabricated film sensors for the in situ quantum dot-based voltammetric detection of DNA hybridization in microwells.

    PubMed

    Kokkinos, Christos; Economou, Anastasios; Speliotis, Thanasis; Petrou, Panagiota; Kakabakos, Sotirios

    2015-01-20

    A new flexible miniaturized integrated device was microfabricated for the in situ ultrasensitive voltammetric determination of DNA mutation in a microwell format, using quantum dots (QDs) labels. The integrated device consisted of thin Bi, Ag, and Pt films (serving as the working, reference, and counter electrode, respectively) deposited by sputtering on a flexible polyimide substrate. A DNA assay was employed in microwell format, where an immobilized complementary oligonucleotide probe hybridized with the biotinylated target oligonucleotide followed by reaction with streptavidin-conjugated PbS QDs. After the acidic dissolution of the QDs, the flexible sensor was rolled and inserted into the microwell and the Pb(II) released was determined in situ by anodic stripping voltammetry. Since the analysis took place directly in the microwell, the volume of the working solution was only 100 μL and the target DNA could be detected at a concentration down to 1.1 fmol L(-1). The proposed flexible microdevice addresses the restrictions of conventional rigid electrodes while it provides a low cost integrated transducer for the ultrasensitive detection of important biomolecules. PMID:25514352

  5. Lithographic Microfabrication of a 16-Electrode Array on a Probe Tip for High Spatial Resolution Electrochemical Localization of Exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Wigström, Joakim; Dunevall, Johan; Najafinobar, Neda; Lovrić, Jelena; Wang, Jun; Ewing, Andrew G; Cans, Ann-Sofie

    2016-02-16

    We report the lithographic microfabrication of a movable thin film microelectrode array (MEA) probe consisting of 16 platinum band electrodes placed on top of a supporting borosilicate glass substrate. These 1.2 μm wide electrodes were tightly packed and positioned parallel in two opposite rows within a 20 μm × 25 μm square area and with a distance less than 10 μm from the edge of the glass substrate. We demonstrate the ability to control and place the probe in close proximity to the surface of adherent bovine chromaffin cells and to amperometrically record single exocytosis release events with high spatiotemporal resolution. The two-dimensional position of single exocytotic events occurring in the center gap area separating the two rows of MEA band electrodes and that were codetected by electrodes in both rows was determined by analysis of the fractional detection of catecholamine released between electrodes and exploiting random walk simulations. Hence, two-dimensional electrochemical imaging recording of exocytosis release between the electrodes within this area was achieved. Similarly, by modeling the current spikes codetected by parallel adjacent band electrodes positioned in the same electrode row, a one-dimensional imaging of exocytosis with submicrometer resolution was accomplished within the area. The one- and two-dimensional electrochemical imaging using the MEA probe allowed for high spatial resolution of exocytosis activity and revealed heterogeneous release of catecholamine at the chromaffin cell surface.

  6. High accuracy thermal conductivity measurement of aqueous cryoprotective agents and semi-rigid biological tissues using a microfabricated thermal sensor.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xin M; Sekar, Praveen K; Zhao, Gang; Zhou, Xiaoming; Shu, Zhiquan; Huang, Zhongping; Ding, Weiping; Zhang, Qingchuan; Gao, Dayong

    2015-05-20

    An improved thermal-needle approach for accurate and fast measurement of thermal conductivity of aqueous and soft biomaterials was developed using microfabricated thermal conductivity sensors. This microscopic measuring device was comprehensively characterized at temperatures from 0 °C to 40 °C. Despite the previous belief, system calibration constant was observed to be highly temperature-dependent. Dynamic thermal conductivity response during cooling (40 °C to -40 °C) was observed using the miniaturized single tip sensor for various concentrations of CPAs, i.e., glycerol, ethylene glycol and dimethyl sulfoxide. Chicken breast, chicken skin, porcine limb, and bovine liver were assayed to investigate the effect of anatomical heterogeneity on thermal conductivity using the arrayed multi-tip sensor at 20 °C. Experimental results revealed distinctive differences in localized thermal conductivity, which suggests the use of approximated or constant property values is expected to bring about results with largely inflated uncertainties when investigating bio-heat transfer mechanisms and/or performing sophisticated thermal modeling with complex biological tissues. Overall, the presented micro thermal sensor with automated data analysis algorithm is a promising approach for direct thermal conductivity measurement of aqueous solutions and soft biomaterials and is of great value to cryopreservation of tissues, hyperthermia or cryogenic, and other thermal-based clinical diagnostics and treatments.

  7. High accuracy thermal conductivity measurement of aqueous cryoprotective agents and semi-rigid biological tissues using a microfabricated thermal sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xin M.; Sekar, Praveen K.; Zhao, Gang; Zhou, Xiaoming; Shu, Zhiquan; Huang, Zhongping; Ding, Weiping; Zhang, Qingchuan; Gao, Dayong

    2015-05-01

    An improved thermal-needle approach for accurate and fast measurement of thermal conductivity of aqueous and soft biomaterials was developed using microfabricated thermal conductivity sensors. This microscopic measuring device was comprehensively characterized at temperatures from 0 °C to 40 °C. Despite the previous belief, system calibration constant was observed to be highly temperature-dependent. Dynamic thermal conductivity response during cooling (40 °C to -40 °C) was observed using the miniaturized single tip sensor for various concentrations of CPAs, i.e., glycerol, ethylene glycol and dimethyl sulfoxide. Chicken breast, chicken skin, porcine limb, and bovine liver were assayed to investigate the effect of anatomical heterogeneity on thermal conductivity using the arrayed multi-tip sensor at 20 °C. Experimental results revealed distinctive differences in localized thermal conductivity, which suggests the use of approximated or constant property values is expected to bring about results with largely inflated uncertainties when investigating bio-heat transfer mechanisms and/or performing sophisticated thermal modeling with complex biological tissues. Overall, the presented micro thermal sensor with automated data analysis algorithm is a promising approach for direct thermal conductivity measurement of aqueous solutions and soft biomaterials and is of great value to cryopreservation of tissues, hyperthermia or cryogenic, and other thermal-based clinical diagnostics and treatments.

  8. Microfabrics and 3D grain shape of Gorleben rock salt: Constraints on deformation mechanisms and paleodifferential stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiemeyer, Nicolas; Zulauf, Gernold; Mertineit, Michael; Linckens, Jolien; Pusch, Maximilian; Hammer, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    The Permian Knäuel- and Streifensalz formations (z2HS1 and z2HS2) are main constituents of the Gorleben salt dome (Northern Germany) and show different amounts and distributions of anhydrite. The reconstruction of 3D halite grain shape ellipsoids reveals small grain size (3.4 ± 0.6 mm) and heterogeneous grain shapes in both formations, the latter attributed to the polyphase deformation of the rock salt during diapirism. The halite microfabrics of both formations indicate that strain-induced grain boundary migration was active during deformation. Crystal plastic deformation of halite is further documented by lattice bending, subgrain formation and minor subgrain rotation. Evidence for pressure solution of halite has not been found, but cannot be excluded because of the small grain size, the lack of LPO and the low differential stress (1.1-1.3 MPa) as deduced from subgrain-size piezometry. Anhydrite has been deformed in the brittle-ductile regime by solution precipitation creep, minor dislocation creep and brittle boudinage. No continuous anhydrite layers are preserved, and halite has acted as a sealing matrix embedding the disrupted anhydrite fragments prohibiting any potential migration pathways for fluids. Thus, anhydrite should not have a negative effect on the barrier properties of the Gorleben rock salts investigated in this study.

  9. Microfabrication procedure of PDMS microbeam array using photolithography for laminin printing and piconewton force transduction on axons.

    PubMed

    Sasoglu, F Mert; Bohl, Andrew J; Layton, Bradley E

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce our design for transducing forces on the order of tens of piconewtons by optically measuring deflection of a microfabricated beam tip as it pulls on an array of flexible structures such as axons in an array of laminin-printed neurons. To achieve this we have designed polymeric beams with spring constants on the order of 10 pN/microm. We have fabricated circular microbeams with Sylgard polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The elastic modulus of PDMS was determined experimentally using a microscale and a micrometer at different concentrations of curing agent and base agent and found to be on the order of 100 kPa. The designed geometry is a 100x100 tapered microcone array with each beam having a length of 100 microm, and a base diameter of 10 microm. A SU-8 negative photoresist is etched using photolithography and used as a mold for PDMS soft lithography. PDMS was injected into the mold and the array peeled from the mold.

  10. Nano- and micro-fabrication of perfluorinated polymers using quantum beam technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, Nozomi; Oshima, Akihiro; Urakawa, Tatsuya; Fukutake, Naoyuki; Nagai, Hiroyuki; Gowa, Tomoko; Takasawa, Yuya; Takahashi, Tomohiro; Numata, Yukari; Katoh, Takanori; Katoh, Etsuko; Tagawa, Seiichi; Washio, Masakazu

    2011-02-01

    Micro- and nano-fabrication researches of various perfluorinated polymers carried out recently both by synchrotron radiation (SR) direct photo-etching and by focused ion beam (FIB) direct mask less etching are reviewed. After the irradiation, the etching depth of the fabricated samples has been evaluated by optical microscope and scanning electron microscope. SR-induced surface modifications were studied by solid-state 19F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) analysis. It was found that the etching rate of FEP at 140 °C was highest and that of PTFE and PFA at 140 °C was lower in the SR etching. It was found that crosslinking reactions were induced by SR irradiation at the region within about 50 μm from the irradiated surface. FIB mask less etching showed very attractive features for nano-scale fabrications. The aspect ratio for crosslinked PTFE (RX-PTFE) reached 390. In addition, the nano-scale controlled structures with high aspect and quality of RX-PTFE were obtained without solid debris.

  11. Microfabricated torsion levers optimized for low force and high-frequency operation in fluids.

    PubMed

    Beyder, Arthur; Sachs, Frederick

    2006-01-01

    We developed a mass production fabrication process for making symmetrically supported torsion cantilevers/oscillators with highly compliant springs. These torsion probes offer advantages in atomic force microscopy (AFM) because they are small, have high optical gain, do not warp and can be made with two independent axes. Compared to traditional AFM cantilevers, these probes have higher frequency response, higher Q, lower noise, better optics (since the mirror does not bend) and two data channels. Soft small levers with sub-pN force resolution can resonate cleanly above 10 kHz in water. When fabricated with a ferromagnetic coating on the rigid reflecting pad, they can be driven magnetically or serve as high-resolution magnetometers. Asymmetric levers can be tapping mode probes or high-resolution accelerometers. The dual axis gimbaled probes with two orthogonal axes can operate on a standard AFM with single beam illumination. These probes can be used as self-referencing, drift free, cantilevers where one axis senses the substrate position and the other the sample position. These levers can be optimized for differential contrast or high-resolution friction imaging.

  12. Performance of Magnetic Penetration Thermometers for X-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagler, P. C.; Adams, J. S.; Balvin, M. A.; Bandler, S. R.; Denis, K. L.; Hsieh, W. T.; Kelly, D. P.; Porst, J. P.; Sadleir, J. E.; Seidel, G. M.; Smith, S. J.; Stevenson, T. R.

    2012-01-01

    The ideal X-ray camera for astrophysics would have more than a million pixels and provide an energy resolution of better than leV FWHM for energies up to 10 keY. We have microfabricated and characterized thin-film magnetic penetration thermometers (MPTs) that show great promise towards meeting these capabilities. MPTs operate in similar fashion to metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs), except that a superconducting sensor takes the place of a paramagnetic sensor and it is the temperature dependence of the superconductor's diamagnetic response that provides the temperature sensitivity. We present a description of the design and performance of our prototype thin-film MPTs with MoAu bilayer sensors, which have demonstrated an energy resolution of approx 2 eV FWHM at 1.5 keY and 4.3 eV FWHM at 5.9 keY.

  13. Note: On-chip multifunctional fluorescent-magnetic Janus helical microswimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, G.; Decanini, D.; Leroy, L.; Haghiri-Gosnet, A. M.

    2016-03-01

    Microswimmers integrated into microfluidic devices that are capable of self-illumination through fluorescence could revolutionize many aspects of technology, especially for biological applications. Few illumination and propulsion techniques of helical microswimmers inside microfluidic channels have been demonstrated. This paper presents the fabrication, detachment, and magnetic propulsions of multifunctional fluorescent-magnetic helical microswimmers integrated inside microfluidics. The fabrication process is based on two-photon laser lithography to pattern 3-D nanostructures from fluorescent photoresist coupled with conventional microfabrication techniques for magnetic thin film deposition by shadowing. After direct integration inside a microfluidic device, injected gas bubble allows gentle detachment of the integrated helical microswimmers whose magnetic propulsion can then be directly applied inside the microfluidic channel using external electromagnetic coil setup. With their small scale, fluorescence, excellent resistance to liquid/gas surface tension, and robust propulsion capability inside the microfluidic channel, the microswimmers can be used as high-resolution and large-range mobile micromanipulators inside microfluidic channels.

  14. Tissue-compliant neural implants from microfabricated carbon nanotube multilayer composite.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huanan; Patel, Paras R; Xie, Zhixing; Swanson, Scott D; Wang, Xueding; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2013-09-24

    Current neural prosthetic devices (NPDs) induce chronic inflammation due to complex mechanical and biological reactions related, in part, to staggering discrepancies of mechanical properties with neural tissue. Relatively large size of the implants and traumas to blood-brain barrier contribute to inflammation reactions, as well. Mitigation of these problems and the realization of long-term brain interface require a new generation of NPDs fabricated from flexible materials compliant with the brain tissue. However, such materials will need to display hard-to-combine mechanical and electrical properties which are not available in the toolbox of classical neurotechnology. Moreover, these new materials will concomitantly demand different methods of (a) device micromanufacturing and (b) surgical implantation in brains because currently used processes take advantage of high stiffness of the devices. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) serve as a promising foundation for such materials because of their record mechanical and electrical properties, but CNT-based tissue-compliant devices have not been realized yet. In this study, we formalize the mechanical requirements to tissue-compliant implants based on critical rupture strength of brain tissue and demonstrate that miniature CNT-based devices can satisfy these requirements. We fabricated them using MEMS-like technology and miniaturized them so that at least two dimensions of the electrodes would be comparable to brain tissue cells. The nanocomposite-based flexible neural electrodes were implanted into the rat motor cortex using a surgical procedure specifically designed for soft tissue-compliant implants. The post-surgery implant localization in the motor cortex was successfully visualized with magnetic resonance and photoacoustic imaging. In vivo functionality was demonstrated by successful registration of the low-frequency neural recording in the live brain of anesthetized rats. Investigation of inflammation processes around these

  15. Tissue-compliant neural implants from microfabricated carbon nanotube multilayer composite.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huanan; Patel, Paras R; Xie, Zhixing; Swanson, Scott D; Wang, Xueding; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2013-09-24

    Current neural prosthetic devices (NPDs) induce chronic inflammation due to complex mechanical and biological reactions related, in part, to staggering discrepancies of mechanical properties with neural tissue. Relatively large size of the implants and traumas to blood-brain barrier contribute to inflammation reactions, as well. Mitigation of these problems and the realization of long-term brain interface require a new generation of NPDs fabricated from flexible materials compliant with the brain tissue. However, such materials will need to display hard-to-combine mechanical and electrical properties which are not available in the toolbox of classical neurotechnology. Moreover, these new materials will concomitantly demand different methods of (a) device micromanufacturing and (b) surgical implantation in brains because currently used processes take advantage of high stiffness of the devices. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) serve as a promising foundation for such materials because of their record mechanical and electrical properties, but CNT-based tissue-compliant devices have not been realized yet. In this study, we formalize the mechanical requirements to tissue-compliant implants based on critical rupture strength of brain tissue and demonstrate that miniature CNT-based devices can satisfy these requirements. We fabricated them using MEMS-like technology and miniaturized them so that at least two dimensions of the electrodes would be comparable to brain tissue cells. The nanocomposite-based flexible neural electrodes were implanted into the rat motor cortex using a surgical procedure specifically designed for soft tissue-compliant implants. The post-surgery implant localization in the motor cortex was successfully visualized with magnetic resonance and photoacoustic imaging. In vivo functionality was demonstrated by successful registration of the low-frequency neural recording in the live brain of anesthetized rats. Investigation of inflammation processes around these

  16. Process optimization in high-average-power ultrashort pulse laser microfabrication: how laser process parameters influence efficiency, throughput and quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schille, Joerg; Schneider, Lutz; Loeschner, Udo

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, laser processing of technical grade stainless steel and copper using high-average-power ultrashort pulse lasers is studied in order to gain deeper insight into material removal for microfabrication. A high-pulse repetition frequency picosecond and femtosecond laser is used in conjunction with high-performance galvanometer scanners and an in-house developed two-axis polygon scanner system. By varying the processing parameters such as wavelength, pulse length, fluence and repetition rate, cavities of standardized geometry are fabricated and analyzed. From the depths of the cavities produced, the ablation rate and removal efficiency are estimated. In addition, the quality of the cavities is evaluated by means of scanning electron microscope micrographs or rather surface roughness measurements. From the results obtained, the influence of the machining parameters on material removal and machining quality is discussed. In addition, it is shown that both material removal rate and quality increase by using femtosecond compared to picosecond laser pulses. On stainless steel, a maximum throughput of 6.81 mm3/min is achieved with 32 W femtosecond laser powers; if using 187 W picosecond laser powers, the maximum is 15.04 mm3/min, respectively. On copper, the maximum throughputs are 6.1 mm3/min and 21.4 mm3/min, obtained with 32 W femtosecond and 187 W picosecond laser powers. The findings indicate that ultrashort pulses in the mid-fluence regime yield most efficient material removal. In conclusion, from the results of this analysis, a range of optimum processing parameters are derived feasible to enhance machining efficiency, throughput and quality in high-rate micromachining. The work carried out here clearly opens the way to significant industrial applications.

  17. Conventional and enantioselective gas chromatography with microfabricated planar columns for analysis of real-world samples of plant volatile fraction.

    PubMed

    Cagliero, C; Galli, S; Galli, M; Elmi, I; Belluce, M; Zampolli, S; Sgorbini, B; Rubiolo, P; Bicchi, C

    2016-01-15

    Within a project exploring the application of lab-on-chip GC to in-field analysis of the plant volatile fraction, this study evaluated the performance of a set of planar columns (also known as microchannels, MEMS columns, or microfabricated columns) of different dimensions installed in a conventional GC unit. Circular double-spiral-shaped-channel planar columns with different square/rectangular sections up to 2m long were applied to the analysis of both essential oils and headspace samples of a group of medicinal and aromatic plants (chamomile, peppermint, sage, rosemary, lavender and bergamot) and of standard mixtures of related compounds; the results were compared to those obtained with reference narrow-bore columns (l:5m, dc:0.1mm, df:0.1 μm). The above essential oils and headspaces were first analyzed quali-and quantitatively with planar columns statically coated with conventional stationary phases (5%-phenyl-polymethylsiloxane and auto-bondable nitroterephthalic-acid-modified polyethylene glycol), and then submitted to chiral recognition of their diagnostic markers, by enantioselective GC with a planar columns coated with a cyclodextrin derivative (30% 6(I-VII)-O-TBDMS-3(I-VII)-O-ethyl-2(I-VII)-O-ethyl-β-cyclodextrin in PS-086). Column characteristics and analysis conditions were first optimized to obtain suitable retention and efficiency for the samples investigated. The planar columns tested showed performances close to the reference conventional narrow-bore columns, with theoretical plate numbers per meter (N/m) ranging from 6100 to 7200 for those coated with the conventional stationary phases, and above 5600 for those with the chiral selector. PMID:26733393

  18. Isolation and detection of single molecules on paramagnetic beads using sequential fluid flows in microfabricated polymer array assemblies.

    PubMed

    Kan, Cheuk W; Rivnak, Andrew J; Campbell, Todd G; Piech, Tomasz; Rissin, David M; Mösl, Matthias; Peterça, Andrej; Niederberger, Hans-Peter; Minnehan, Kaitlin A; Patel, Purvish P; Ferrell, Evan P; Meyer, Raymond E; Chang, Lei; Wilson, David H; Fournier, David R; Duffy, David C

    2012-03-01

    We report a method for isolating individual paramagnetic beads in arrays of femtolitre-sized wells and detecting single enzyme-labeled proteins on these beads using sequential fluid flows in microfabricated polymer array assemblies. Arrays of femtolitre-sized wells were fabricated in cyclic olefin polymer (COP) using injection moulding based on DVD manufacturing. These arrays were bonded to a complementary fluidic structure that was also moulded in COP to create an enclosed device to allow delivery of liquids to the arrays. Enzyme-associated, paramagnetic beads suspended in aqueous solutions of enzyme substrate were delivered fluidically to the array such that one bead per well was loaded by gravity. A fluorocarbon oil was then flowed into the device to remove excess beads from the surface of the array, and to seal and isolate the femtolitre-sized wells containing beads and enzyme substrate. The device was then imaged using standard fluorescence imaging to determine which wells contained single enzyme molecules. The analytical performance of this device as the detector for digital ELISA compared favourably to the standard method, i.e., glass arrays mechanically sealed against a silicone gasket; prostate specific antigen (PSA) could be detected from 0.011 pg mL(-1) up to 100 pg mL(-1). The use of an enclosed fluidic device to isolate beads in single-molecule arrays offers a multitude of advantages for low-cost manufacturing, ease of automation, and instrument development to enable applications in biomarker validation and medical diagnosis. PMID:22179487

  19. Computer numerical control (CNC) lithography: light-motion synchronized UV-LED lithography for 3D microfabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungkwun; Yoon, Yong-Kyu; Allen, Mark G.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a computer-numerical-controlled ultraviolet light-emitting diode (CNC UV-LED) lithography scheme for three-dimensional (3D) microfabrication. The CNC lithography scheme utilizes sequential multi-angled UV light exposures along with a synchronized switchable UV light source to create arbitrary 3D light traces, which are transferred into the photosensitive resist. The system comprises a switchable, movable UV-LED array as a light source, a motorized tilt-rotational sample holder, and a computer-control unit. System operation is such that the tilt-rotational sample holder moves in a pre-programmed routine, and the UV-LED is illuminated only at desired positions of the sample holder during the desired time period, enabling the formation of complex 3D microstructures. This facilitates easy fabrication of complex 3D structures, which otherwise would have required multiple manual exposure steps as in the previous multidirectional 3D UV lithography approach. Since it is batch processed, processing time is far less than that of the 3D printing approach at the expense of some reduction in the degree of achievable 3D structure complexity. In order to produce uniform light intensity from the arrayed LED light source, the UV-LED array stage has been kept rotating during exposure. UV-LED 3D fabrication capability was demonstrated through a plurality of complex structures such as V-shaped micropillars, micropanels, a micro-‘hi’ structure, a micro-‘cat’s claw,’ a micro-‘horn,’ a micro-‘calla lily,’ a micro-‘cowboy’s hat,’ and a micro-‘table napkin’ array.

  20. Diffraction of a Bose-Einstein Condensate from a Magnetic Lattice on a Microchip

    SciTech Connect

    Guenther, A.; Kraft, S.; Kemmler, M.; Koelle, D.; Kleiner, R.; Zimmermann, C.; Fortagh, J.

    2005-10-21

    We experimentally study the diffraction of a Bose-Einstein condensate from a magnetic lattice, realized by a set of 372 parallel gold conductors which are microfabricated on a silicon substrate. The conductors generate a periodic potential for the atoms with a lattice constant of 4 {mu}m. After exposing the condensate to the lattice for several milliseconds we observe diffraction up to fifth order by standard time of flight imaging techniques. The experimental data can be quantitatively interpreted with a simple phase imprinting model. The demonstrated diffraction grating offers promising perspectives for the construction of an integrated atom interferometer.

  1. Tunnel magnetoresistance in full-epitaxial magnetic tunnel junctions with a top electrode consisting of a perpendicularly magnetized D022-Mn3Ge film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugihara, Atsushi; Suzuki, Kazuya; Miyazaki, Terunobu; Mizukami, Shigemi

    2015-07-01

    We grew a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) with a top electrode consisting of a Mn3Ge film using a thin Co-Fe alloy film as a seed layer. X-ray diffraction showed that the Mn3Ge had (001)-oriented D022 structure epitaxially grown on an MgO(001) substrate. Magnetic hysteresis loops suggested that the D022-Mn3Ge film possessed perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. A magnetoresistance (MR) ratio of 11.3% was observed in the microfabricated MTJ at room temperature. The resistance-field curve suggested that the top-Co-Fe and D022-Mn3Ge layer are weakly coupled antiferromagnetically. The optimization of top-Co-Fe composition would improve MR ratio.

  2. Investigation of magnetic microdiscs for bacterial pathogen detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo-Torres, Keisha Y.; Garraud, Nicolas; Arnold, David P.; McLamore, Eric S.

    2016-05-01

    Despite strict regulations to control the presence of human pathogens in our food supply, recent foodborne outbreaks have heightened public concern about food safety and created urgency to improve methods for pathogen detection. Herein we explore a potentially portable, low-cost system that uses magnetic microdiscs for the detection of bacterial pathogens in liquid samples. The system operates by optically measuring the rotational dynamics of suspended magnetic microdiscs functionalized with pathogen-binding aptamers. The soft ferromagnetic (Ni80Fe20) microdiscs exhibit a closed magnetic spin arrangement (i.e. spin vortex) with zero magnetic stray field, leading to no disc agglomeration when in free suspension. With very high surface area for functionalization and volumes 10,000x larger than commonly used superparamagnetic nanoparticles, these 1.5-μm-diameter microdiscs are well suited for tagging, trapping, actuating, or interrogating bacterial targets. This work reports a wafer-level microfabrication process for fabrication of 600 million magnetic microdiscs per substrate and measurement of their rotational dynamics response. Additionally, the biofunctionalization of the microdiscs with DNA aptamers, subsequent binding to E. coli bacteria, and their magnetic manipulation is reported.

  3. Magnetic Spinner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouseph, P. J.

    2006-12-01

    A science toy sometimes called the "magnetic spinner" is an interesting class demonstration to illustrate the principles of magnetic levitation. It can also be used to demonstrate Faraday's law and a horizontally suspended physical pendulum. The levitated part contains two circular magnets encased in a plastic housing. Each magnet stays above two triangular magnets fixed to the base. The magnetic repulsive force experienced by the circular magnets is independent of their orientation; therefore, the holder of these magnets can be rotated without affecting its stability. The holder with the circular magnets can be oscillated up and down as a horizontally suspended physical pendulum.

  4. Design, microfabrication, and characterization of a moulded PDMS/SU-8 inkjet dispenser for a Lab-on-a-Printer platform technology with disposable microfluidic chip.

    PubMed

    Bsoul, Anas; Pan, Sheng; Cretu, Edmond; Stoeber, Boris; Walus, Konrad

    2016-08-16

    In this paper, we present a disposable inkjet dispenser platform technology and demonstrate the Lab-on-a-Printer concept, an extension of the ubiquitous Lab-on-a-Chip concept, whereby microfluidic modules are directly integrated into the printhead. The concept is demonstrated here through the integration of an inkjet dispenser and a microfluidic mixer enabling control over droplet composition from a single nozzle in real-time during printing. The inkjet dispenser is based on a modular design platform that enables the low-cost microfluidic component and the more expensive actuation unit to be easily separated, allowing for the optional disposal of the former and reuse of the latter. To limit satellite droplet formation, a hydrophobic-coated and tapered micronozzle was microfabricated and integrated with the fluidics to realize the dispenser. The microfabricated devices generated droplets with diameters ranging from 150-220 μm, depending mainly on the orifice diameter, with printing rates up to 8000 droplets per second. The inkjet dispenser is capable of dispensing materials with a viscosity up to ∼19 mPa s. As a demonstration of the inkjet dispenser function and application, we have printed type I collagen seeded with human liver carcinoma cells (cell line HepG2), to form patterned biological structures.

  5. Design, microfabrication, and characterization of a moulded PDMS/SU-8 inkjet dispenser for a Lab-on-a-Printer platform technology with disposable microfluidic chip.

    PubMed

    Bsoul, Anas; Pan, Sheng; Cretu, Edmond; Stoeber, Boris; Walus, Konrad

    2016-08-16

    In this paper, we present a disposable inkjet dispenser platform technology and demonstrate the Lab-on-a-Printer concept, an extension of the ubiquitous Lab-on-a-Chip concept, whereby microfluidic modules are directly integrated into the printhead. The concept is demonstrated here through the integration of an inkjet dispenser and a microfluidic mixer enabling control over droplet composition from a single nozzle in real-time during printing. The inkjet dispenser is based on a modular design platform that enables the low-cost microfluidic component and the more expensive actuation unit to be easily separated, allowing for the optional disposal of the former and reuse of the latter. To limit satellite droplet formation, a hydrophobic-coated and tapered micronozzle was microfabricated and integrated with the fluidics to realize the dispenser. The microfabricated devices generated droplets with diameters ranging from 150-220 μm, depending mainly on the orifice diameter, with printing rates up to 8000 droplets per second. The inkjet dispenser is capable of dispensing materials with a viscosity up to ∼19 mPa s. As a demonstration of the inkjet dispenser function and application, we have printed type I collagen seeded with human liver carcinoma cells (cell line HepG2), to form patterned biological structures. PMID:27444216

  6. Neodymium Magnets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wida, Sam

    1992-01-01

    Uses extremely strong neodymium magnets to demonstrate several principles of physics including electromagnetic induction, Lenz's Law, domain theory, demagnetization, the Curie point, and magnetic flux lines. (MDH)

  7. Polydimethylsiloxane films doped with NdFeB powder: magnetic characterization and potential applications in biomedical engineering and microrobotics.

    PubMed

    Iacovacci, V; Lucarini, G; Innocenti, C; Comisso, N; Dario, P; Ricotti, L; Menciassi, A

    2015-12-01

    This work reports the fabrication, magnetic characterization and controlled navigation of film-shaped microrobots consisting of a polydimethylsiloxane-NdFeB powder composite material. The fabrication process relies on spin-coating deposition, powder orientation and permanent magnetization. Films with different powder concentrations (10 %, 30 %, 50 % and 70 % w/w) were fabricated and characterized in terms of magnetic properties and magnetic navigation performances (by exploiting an electromagnet-based platform). Standardized data are provided, thus enabling the exploitation of these composite materials in a wide range of applications, from MEMS/microrobot development to biomedical systems. Finally, the possibility to microfabricate free-standing polymeric structures and the biocompatibility of the proposed composite materials is demonstrated.

  8. Precision formed micro magnets: LDRD project summary report

    SciTech Connect

    CHRISTENSON,TODD R.; GARINO,TERRY J.; VENTURINI,EUGENE L.

    2000-02-01

    A microfabrication process is described that provides for the batch realization of miniature rare earth based permanent magnets. Prismatic geometry with features as small as 5 microns, thicknesses up through several hundred microns and with submicron tolerances may be accommodated. The processing is based on a molding technique using deep x-ray lithography as a means to generate high aspect-ratio precision molds from PMMA (poly methyl methacrylate) used as an x-ray photoresist. Subsequent molding of rare-earth permanent magnet (REPM) powder combined with a thermosetting plastic binder may take place directly in the PMMA mold. Further approaches generate an alumina form replicated from the PMMA mold that becomes an intermediate mold for pressing higher density REPM material and allows for higher process temperatures. Maximum energy products of 3--8 MGOe (Mega Gauss Oersted, 1 MGOe = 100/4{pi} kJ/m{sup 3}) are obtained for bonded isotropic forms of REPM with dimensions on the scale of 100 microns and up to 23 MGOe for more dense anisotropic REPM material using higher temperature processing. The utility of miniature precision REPMs is revealed by the demonstration of a miniature multipole brushless DC motor that possesses a pole-anisotropic rotor with dimensions that would otherwise prohibit multipole magnetization using a multipole magnetizing fixture at this scale. Subsequent multipole assembly also leads to miniaturized Halbach arrays, efficient magnetic microactuators, and mechanical spring-like elements which can offset miniaturized mechanical scaling behavior.

  9. Microfabricated Liquid Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, Alan H.; Joppin, C.; Kerrebrock, J. L.; Schneider, Steven J. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Under NASA Glenn Research Center sponsorship, MIT has developed the concept of micromachined, bipropellant, liquid rocket engines. This is potentially a breakthrough technology changing the cost-performance tradeoffs for small propulsion systems, enabling new applications, and redefining the meaning of the term low-cost-access-to-space. With this NASA support, a liquid-cooled, gaseous propellant version of the thrust chamber and nozzle was designed, built, and tested as a first step. DARPA is currently funding MIT to demonstrate turbopumps and controls. The work performed herein was the second year of a proposed three-year effort to develop the technology and demonstrate very high power density, regeneratively cooled, liquid bipropellant rocket engine thrust chamber and nozzles. When combined with the DARPA turbopumps and controls, this work would enable the design and demonstration of a complete rocket propulsion system. The original MIT-NASA concept used liquid oxygen-ethanol propellants. The military applications important to DARPA imply that storable liquid propellants are needed. Thus, MIT examined various storable propellant combinations including N2O4 and hydrazine, and H2O2 and various hydrocarbons. The latter are preferred since they do not have the toxicity of N2O4 and hydrazine. In reflection of the newfound interest in H2O2, it is once again in production and available commercially. A critical issue for the microrocket engine concept is cooling of the walls in a regenerative design. This is even more important at microscale than for large engines due to cube-square scaling considerations. Furthermore, the coolant behavior of rocket propellants has not been characterized at microscale. Therefore, MIT designed and constructed an apparatus expressly for this purpose. The report details measurements of two candidate microrocket fuels, JP-7 and JP-10.

  10. Microfabricated cylindrical ion trap

    DOEpatents

    Blain, Matthew G.

    2005-03-22

    A microscale cylindrical ion trap, having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale cylindrical ion trap to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The microscale CIT has a reduced ion mean free path, allowing operation at higher pressures with less expensive and less bulky vacuum pumping system, and with lower battery power than conventional- and miniature-sized ion traps. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microscale cylindrical ion trap with on-chip integrated circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of microscale cylindrical ion traps can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  11. Decal transfer microfabrication

    DOEpatents

    Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Childs, William Robert

    2004-10-19

    A method of making a microstructure includes forming a pattern in a surface of a silicon-containing elastomer, oxidizing the pattern, contacting the pattern with a substrate; and bonding the oxidized pattern and the substrate such that the pattern and the substrate are irreversibly attached. The silicon-containing elastomer may be removably attached to a transfer pad.

  12. Microfabricated therapeutic actuator mechanisms

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, M.A.; Ciarlo, D.R.; Lee, A.P.; Krulevitch, P.A.

    1997-07-08

    Electromechanical microstructures (microgrippers), either integrated circuit (IC) silicon-based or precision machined, to extend and improve the application of catheter-based interventional therapies for the repair of aneurysms in the brain or other interventional clinical therapies. These micromechanisms can be specifically applied to release platinum coils or other materials into bulging portions of the blood vessels also known as aneurysms. The ``micro`` size of the release mechanism is necessary since the brain vessels are the smallest in the body. Through a catheter more than one meter long, the micromechanism located at one end of the catheter can be manipulated from the other end thereof. The microgripper (micromechanism) of the invention will also find applications in non-medical areas where a remotely actuated microgripper or similar actuator would be useful or where micro-assembling is needed. 22 figs.

  13. Microfabricated therapeutic actuator mechanisms

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, Milton A.; Ciarlo, Dino R.; Lee, Abraham P.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    1997-01-01

    Electromechanical microstructures (microgrippers), either integrated circuit (IC) silicon-based or precision machined, to extend and improve the application of catheter-based interventional therapies for the repair of aneurysms in the brain or other interventional clinical therapies. These micromechanisms can be specifically applied to release platinum coils or other materials into bulging portions of the blood vessels also known as aneurysms. The "micro" size of the release mechanism is necessary since the brain vessels are the smallest in the body. Through a catheter more than one meter long, the micromechanism located at one end of the catheter can be manipulated from the other end thereof. The microgripper (micromechanism) of the invention will also find applications in non-medical areas where a remotely actuated microgripper or similar actuator would be useful or where micro-assembling is needed.

  14. Overview of LIGA Microfabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hruby, Jill

    2002-08-01

    This paper is an overview of the LIGA technique, an increasingly accepted approach for fabricating metal, ceramic or plastic microdevices. The LIGA technique was invented in Germany in the early 1980s and the acronym derives from the words LIthographie, Galvanoformung, Abformung meaning Lithography, Electroplating, and Molding in English. The paper is presented as an abbreviated set of annotated overheads used for the conference presentation and some summary remarks.

  15. Microfabrication services at INO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alain, Christine; Jerominek, Hubert; Topart, Patrice A.; Pope, Timothy D.; Picard, Francis; Cayer, Felix; Larouche, Carl; Leclair, Sebastien; Tremblay, Bruno

    2003-01-01

    MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical Systems) technology has expanded widely over the last decade in terms of its use in devices and instrumentation for diverse applications. However, access to versatile foundry services for MEMS fabrication is still limited. At INO, the presence of a multidisciplinary team and a complete tool set allow us to offer unique MEMS foundry-type services. These services include: design, prototyping, fabrication, packaging and testing of various MEMS and MOEMS devices. The design of a device starts with the evaluation of different structures adapted to a given application. Computer simulation tools, like IntelliSuite, ANSYS or custom software are used to evaluate the mechanical, optical, thermal and electromechanical performances. Standard IC manufacturing techniques such as metal, dielectric and semiconductor film deposition and etching as well as photolithographic pattern transfer are available. In addition, some unique techniques such as on-wafer lithography by laser writing, gray-scale mask lithography, thick photoresist lithography, selective electroplating, injection moulding and UV-assisted moulding are available to customers. The hermetic packaging and a novel patented wafer-level micropackaging are also applied. This multifaceted expertise has been utilized to manufacturing of several types of MEMS devices as well as complex instruments including micromirror-type devices, microfilters, IR microbolometric detector arrays, complete cameras and multipurpose sensors.

  16. Magnetic Spinner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ouseph, P. J.

    2006-01-01

    A science toy sometimes called the "magnetic spinner" is an interesting class demonstration to illustrate the principles of magnetic levitation. It can also be used to demonstrate Faraday's law and a horizontally suspended physical pendulum. The levitated part contains two circular magnets encased in a plastic housing. Each magnet stays…

  17. Magnetic Levitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossing, Thomas D.; Hull, John R.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the principles of magnetic levitation presented in the physics classroom and applied to transportation systems. Topics discussed include three classroom demonstrations to illustrate magnetic levitation, the concept of eddy currents, lift and drag forces on a moving magnet, magnetic levitation vehicles, levitation with permanent magnets…

  18. Stable, Microfabricated Thin Layer Chromatography Plates without Volume Distortion on Patterned, Carbon and Al2O3-Primed Carbon Nanotube Forests

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, David S.; Kanyal, Supriya S.; Gupta, Vipul; Vail, Michael A.; Dadson, Andrew; Engelhard, Mark H.; Vanfleet, Richard; Davis, Robert C.; Linford, Matthew R.

    2012-09-28

    In a recent report (Song, J.; et al., Advanced Functional Materials 2011, 21, 1132-1139) some of us described the fabrication of thin layer chromatography (TLC) plates from patterned carbon nanotube (CNT) forests, which were directly infiltrated/coated with silicon by low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) of silicon using SiH4. Following infiltration, the nanotubes were removed from the assemblies and the silicon simultaneously converted to SiO2 in a high temperature oxidation step. However, while straightforward, this process had some shortcomings, not the least of which was some distortion of the lithographically patterned features during the volume expansion that accompanied oxidation. Herein we overcome theis issue and also take substantial steps forward in the microfabrication of TLC plates by showing: (i) A new method for creating an adhesion promotion layer on CNT forests by depositing a few nanometers of carbon followed by atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Al2O3. This method for appears to be new, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirms the expected presence of oxygen after carbon deposition. ALD of Al2O3 alone and in combination with the carbon on patterned CNT forests was also explored as an adhesion promotion layer for CNT forest infiltration. (ii) Rapid, conformal deposition of an inorganic material that does not require subsequent oxidation: fast pseudo-ALD growth of SiO2 via alumina catalyzed deposition of tris(tert-butoxy)silanol onto the carbon/Al2O3-primed CNT forests. (iii) Faithful reproduction of the features in the masks used to microfabricate the TLC plates (M-TLC) this advance springs from the previous two points. (iv) A bonded (amino) phase on a CNT-templated microfabricated TLC plate. (v) Fast, highly efficient (125,000 - 225,000 N/m) separations of fluorescent dyes on M-TLC plates. (vi) Extensive characterization of our new materials by TEM, SEM, EDAX, DRIFT, and XPS. (vii) A substantially lower process temperature for the

  19. Utilisation de procedes de microfabrication pour la realisation de modules thermoelectriques a base d'alliages (Bi,Sb)2(Te,Se)3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashi, Siamak

    The production of thermoelectric devices uses nearly handmade techniques as an industry standard. These techniques are not suitable for the fabrication of smaller devices, where thermoelements are shorter than 1 millimetre. Researchers are focusing on how to decrease the height of thermoelements in a device, to the extent of depositing thermoelectric thin films. However, the best thermoelectric performances are obtained on modules fabricated from bulk material. Many tests were made to decrease the overall size of these devices, but until now, they would not permit to obtain the same range of performances as industrial devices. The aim of this project is to use microfabrication processes to obtain high power density thermoelectric devices. The precision obtained with the use of microfabrication techniques and automated methods has the potential to increase the performance and the industrial production of these devices. Fabrication steps were designed and tested in the facilities of the Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal to create hot extruded p-type and n-type (Bi,Sb)2(Te,Se)3 alloy based thermoelectric devices. These steps can be listed in three different categories, surface treatments, microfabrication methods and hot assembly. After cutting, p-type and n-type wafers were polished, underwent electropolishing and chemical etching before a diffusion barrier layer of nickel was deposited. Photolithography printed a pattern on the samples, where tin was then electroplated. A first assembly allowed soldering samples of each conduction type to alumina plates, before cutting the sample to free the thermoelements. A final assembly then created the finished devices by soldering of the two parts containing p-type and n-type thermoelements. The produced devices were functional, validating the designed steps. Electrical characterization of the best modules obtained indicate that the electromotive force is comparable to that of commercial modules under the same conditions

  20. Development of a micro nuclear magnetic resonance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goloshevsky, Artem

    Application of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) to on-line/in-line control of industrial processes is currently limited by equipment costs and requirements for installation. A superconducting magnet generating strong fields is the most expensive part of a typical NMR instrument. In industrial environments, fringe magnetic fields make accommodation of NMR instruments difficult. However, a portable, low-cost and low-field magnetic resonance system can be used in virtually any environment. Development of a number of hardware components for a portable, low-cost NMR instrument is reported in this dissertation. Chapter one provides a discussion on a miniaturized Helmholtz spiral radio-frequency (RF) coil (average diameter equal to 3.5 mm) and an NMR probe built around a capillary (outer diameter = 1.59 mm and inner diameter = 1.02 mm) for flow imaging. Experiments of NMR spectroscopy, static and dynamic (flow) imaging, conducted with the use of the miniaturized coil, are described. Chapter two presents a microfabricated package of two biaxial gradient coils and a Helmholtz RF coil. Planar configuration of discrete wires was used to create magnetic field gradients. Performance of the microfabricated gradient coils while imaging water flow compared well with a commercial gradient set of much larger size. Chapter three reports on flow imaging experiments with power law fluids (aqueous solutions of sodium salt of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC)) of different viscosities, carried out in the NMR probe with the miniaturized RF coil and capillary. Viscosities of the CMC solutions were determined based on the curve fits of the velocity profiles and simultaneous measurements of the flow rates. The curve fits were carried out according to the power law model equations. The NMR viscosity measurements compared well with measurements of the same CMC samples, performed on a conventional rotational rheometer. A portable, home-built transceiver, designed for NMR applications utilizing a

  1. Microfabricated tin-film electrodes for protein and DNA sensing based on stripping voltammetric detection of Cd(II) released from quantum dots labels.

    PubMed

    Kokkinos, Christos; Economou, Anastasios; Petrou, Panagiota S; Kakabakos, Sotirios E

    2013-11-19

    A novel disposable microfabricated tin-film electrochemical sensor was developed for the detection of proteins and DNA. The sensor was fabricated on a silicon wafer through photolithography to define the sensor geometry followed by tin sputtering. A sandwich-type immunoassay with biotinylated reporter antibody was employed for the determination of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in human serum samples. For the detection of C533G mutation of the RET gene, biotinylated oligonucleotide probes were used. The biotinylated biomolecular probes were labeled with streptavidin (STV)-conjugated CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs); quantification of the analytes was performed through acidic dissolution of the QDs and stripping voltammetric detection of the Cd(II) released. The proposed QD-based electrochemical sensor overcomes the limitations of existing voltammetric sensors and provides a mercury-free sensing platform with scope for mass-production and further potential for application in clinical diagnostics.

  2. Rapid magnetic microfluidic mixer utilizing AC electromagnetic field.

    PubMed

    Wen, Chih-Yung; Yeh, Cheng-Peng; Tsai, Chien-Hsiung; Fu, Lung-Ming

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents a novel simple micromixer based on stable water suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles (i.e. ferrofluids). The micromixer chip is built using standard microfabrication and simple soft lithography, and the design can be incorporated as a subsystem into any chemical microreactor or a miniaturized biological sensor. An electromagnet driven by an AC power source is used to induce transient interactive flows between a ferrofluid and Rhodamine B. The alternative magnetic field causes the ferrofluid to expand significantly and uniformly toward Rhodamine B, associated with a great number of extremely fine fingering structures on the interface in the upstream and downstream regions of the microchannel. These pronounced fingering patterns, which have not been observed by other active mixing methods utilizing only magnetic force, increase the mixing interfacial length dramatically. Along with the dominant diffusion effects occurring around the circumferential regions of the fine finger structures, the mixing efficiency increases significantly. The miscible fingering instabilities are observed and applied in the microfluidics for the first time. This work is carried with a view to developing functionalized ferrofluids that can be used as sensitive pathogen detectors and the present experimental results demonstrate that the proposed micromixer has excellent mixing capabilities. The mixing efficiency can be as high as 95% within 2.0 s and a distance of 3.0 mm from the inlet of the mixing channel, when the applied peak magnetic field is higher than 29.2 Oe and frequency ranges from 45 to 300 Hz. PMID:19921677

  3. Magnetic self-assembly of small parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shetye, Sheetal B.

    Modern society's propensity for miniaturized end-user products is compelling electronic manufacturers to assemble and package different micro-scale, multi-technology components in more efficient and cost-effective manners. As the size of the components gets smaller, issues such as part sticking and alignment precision create challenges that slow the throughput of conventional robotic pick-n-place systems. As an alternative, various self-assembly approaches have been proposed to manipulate micro to millimeter scale components in a parallel fashion without human or robotic intervention. In this dissertation, magnetic self-assembly (MSA) is demonstrated as a highly efficient, completely parallel process for assembly of millimeter scale components. MSA is achieved by integrating permanent micromagnets onto component bonding surfaces using wafer-level microfabrication processes. Embedded bonded powder methods are used for fabrication of the magnets. The magnets are then magnetized using pulse magnetization methods, and the wafers are then singulated to form individual components. When the components are randomly mixed together, self-assembly occurs when the intermagnetic forces overcome the mixing forces. Analytical and finite element methods (FEM) are used to study the force interactions between the micromagnets. The multifunctional aspects of MSA are presented through demonstration of part-to-part and part-to-substrate assembly of 1 mm x 1mm x 0.5 mm silicon components. Part-to-part assembly is demonstrated by batch assembly of free-floating parts in a liquid environment with the assembly yield of different magnetic patterns varying from 88% to 90% in 20 s. Part-to-substrate assembly is demonstrated by assembling an ordered array onto a fixed substrate in a dry environment with the assembly yield varying from 86% to 99%. In both cases, diverse magnetic shapes/patterns are used to control the alignment and angular orientation of the components. A mathematical model is

  4. Planetary magnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.

    1981-01-01

    A synoptic view of early and recent data on the planetary magnetism of Mercury, Venus, the moon, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn is presented. The data on Mercury from Mariner 10 are synthesized with various other sources, while data for Venus obtained from 120 orbits of Pioneer Venus give the upper limit of the magnetic dipole. Explorer 35 Lunar Orbiter data provided the first evidence of lunar magnetization, but it was the Apollo subsatellite data that measured accurately the magnetic dipole of the moon. A complete magnetic survey of Mars is still needed, and only some preliminary data are given on the magnetic dipole of the planet. Figures on the magnetic dipoles of Jupiter and Saturn are also suggested. It is concluded that if the magnetic field data are to be used to infer the interior properties of the planets, good measures of the multiple harmonics in the field are needed, which may be obtained only through low altitude polar orbits.

  5. Superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This report discusses the following topics on superconducting magnets: D19B and -C: The next steps for a record-setting magnet; D20: The push beyond 10 T: Beyond D20: Speculations on the 16-T regime; other advanced magnets for accelerators; spinoff applications; APC materials development; cable and cabling-machine development; and high-{Tc} superconductor at low temperature.

  6. Magnetizing of permanent magnets using HTS bulk magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Tetsuo; Muraya, Tomoki; Kawasaki, Nobutaka; Fukui, Satoshi; Ogawa, Jun; Sato, Takao; Terasawa, Toshihisa

    2012-01-01

    A demagnetized Nd-Fe-B permanent magnet was scanned just above the magnetic pole which contains the HTS bulk magnet generating a magnetic field of 3.27 T. The magnet sample was subsequently found to be fully magnetized in the open space of the static magnetic fields. We examined the magnetic field distributions when the magnetic poles were scanned twice to activate the magnet plate inversely with various overlap distances between the tracks of the bulk magnet. The magnetic field of the "rewritten" magnet reached the values of the magnetically saturated region of the material, showing steep gradients at the border of each magnetic pole. As a replacement for conventional pulse field magnetizing methods, this technique is proposed to expand the degree of freedom in the design of electromagnetic devices, and is proposed as a novel practical method for magnetizing rare-earth magnets, which have excellent magnetic performance and require intense fields of more than 3 T to be activated.

  7. Fabrication and integration of permanent magnet materials into MEMS transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Naigang

    Microscale permanent magnets (PM) are a key building block for magnetically based microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), such as sensors, actuators, and energy converters. However, the inability to concurrently achieve good magnetic properties and an integrated magnet fabrication process hinders the development of magnetic MEMS. To address this need, this dissertation develops methods for wafer-level microfabrication of thick (10--500+ microm), high-performance, permanent magnets using low-temperature (<180 °C) process steps. These methods and materials are then used to demonstrate fully batch-fabricated magnetic MEMS transducers. Two methods to fabricate micromagnets are developed: electroplating of Co-rich Co-Pt magnets into photoresist-defined molds and micro-packing of rare-earth magnetic powders to form wax-bonded magnets embedded in silicon. Patterned micromagnets with excellent magnetic properties and process-flow compatibility are demonstrated. Electroplated Co-Pt micromagnets with thickness up to 10 microm exhibit out-of-plane anisotropy with coercivities and energy products of 330 kA/m and 69 kJ/m3, respectively. Wax-bonded Nd-Fe-B micromagnets (500 x 500 x 320 microm3) exhibit a coercivity of 737 kA/m and a maximum energy product of 17 kJ/m3 with isotopic behavior. The wax-bonded powder magnets are then integrated into MEMS fabrication processes to batch-fabricate various electrodynamic transducer prototypes. A cantilever-type microtransducer achieves a 2.7 microm vertical deflection at a driving current of 5.5 mArms at 100 Hz. A piston-type transducer with elastomeric membrane obtains a 2.2 microm vertical displacement at a driving current of 670 mArms at 200 Hz. These devices demonstrate the integrability of wax-bonded Nd-Fe-B powder magnets into microscale electromechanical transducers. Electromechanical lumped element models are then developed for the piston-type electrodynamic actuators. The models enable prediction of the device performance as an

  8. Magnetic investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Bath, G.D.; Jahren, C.E.; Rosenbaum, J.G.; Baldwin, M.J.

    1983-12-31

    Air and ground magnetic anomalies in the Climax stock area of the NTS help define the gross configuration of the stock and detailed configuration of magnetized rocks at the Boundary and Tippinip faults that border the stock. Magnetizations of geologic units were evaluated by measurements of magnetic properties of drill core, minimum estimates of magnetizations from ground magnetic anomalies for near surface rocks, and comparisons of measured anomalies with anomalies computed by a three-dimensional forward program. Alluvial deposits and most sedimentary rocks are nonmagnetic, but drill core measurements reveal large and irregular changes in magnetization for some quartzites and marbles. The magnetizations of quartz monzonite and granodiorite near the stock surface are weak, about 0.15 A/m, and increase at a rate of 0.00196 A/m/m to 1.55 A/m, at depths greater than 700 m (2300 ft). The volcanic rocks of the area are weakly magnetized. Aeromagnetic anomalies 850 m (2800 ft) above the stock are explained by a model consisting of five vertical prisms. Prisms 1, 2, and 3 represent the near surface outline of the stock, prism 4 is one of the models developed by Whitehill (1973), and prism 5 is modified from the model developed by Allingham and Zietz (1962). Most of the anomaly comes from unsampled and strongly-magnetized deep sources that could be either granite or metamorphosed sedimentary rocks. 48 refs., 23 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Development of Metallic Magnetic Calorimeters with a Critical Temperature Switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. R.; Choi, J.; Jo, H. S.; Kang, C. S.; Kim, G. B.; Kim, H. L.; Kim, I. W.; Lee, H. J.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, M. K.; Oh, S. Y.; Sala, E.; So, J. H.; Yoon, W. S.; Kim, Y. H.

    2016-07-01

    We report on the progress in the development of meander-shaped metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs) with a critical temperature switch. A niobium meander-shaped coil in an MMC is arranged to form a superconducting loop. It is to measure the change in magnetization and to apply a persistent current that magnetizes the MMC sensor material. In this work, part of the superconducting loop is fabricated with another superconducting material with its transition temperature (T_C) lower than that of niobium. A persistent current can be injected in the loop while reducing the temperature from above to below the T_C of the switch. Aluminum (Al) wires and an alloy of molybdenum and germanium (MoGe) were tested as critical temperature switch. The test with the Al switch demonstrated the temperature switch concept for meander-shaped MMCs that require a large field current. Microfabricated MoGe switches showed a T_C near 4.3 K, but only 7 mA of persistent current could be charged due to MoGe film discontinuity. This issue requires further improvement in the fabrication procedure.

  10. Toward Epileptic Brain Region Detection Based on Magnetic Nanoparticle Patterning

    PubMed Central

    Pedram, Maysam Z.; Shamloo, Amir; Alasty, Aria; Ghafar-Zadeh, Ebrahim

    2015-01-01

    Resection of the epilepsy foci is the best treatment for more than 15% of epileptic patients or 50% of patients who are refractory to all forms of medical treatment. Accurate mapping of the locations of epileptic neuronal networks can result in the complete resection of epileptic foci. Even though currently electroencephalography is the best technique for mapping the epileptic focus, it cannot define the boundary of epilepsy that accurately. Herein we put forward a new accurate brain mapping technique using superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SPMNs). The main hypothesis in this new approach is the creation of super-paramagnetic aggregates in the epileptic foci due to high electrical and magnetic activities. These aggregates may improve tissue contrast of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that results in improving the resection of epileptic foci. In this paper, we present the mathematical models before discussing the simulation results. Furthermore, we mimic the aggregation of SPMNs in a weak magnetic field using a low-cost microfabricated device. Based on these results, the SPMNs may play a crucial role in diagnostic epilepsy and the subsequent treatment of this disease. PMID:26402686

  11. Planetary Magnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.

    2007-01-01

    The chapter on Planetary Magnetism by Connerney describes the magnetic fields of the planets, from Mercury to Neptune, including the large satellites (Moon, Ganymede) that have or once had active dynamos. The chapter describes the spacecraft missions and observations that, along with select remote observations, form the basis of our knowledge of planetary magnetic fields. Connerney describes the methods of analysis used to characterize planetary magnetic fields, and the models used to represent the main field (due to dynamo action in the planet's interior) and/or remnant magnetic fields locked in the planet's crust, where appropriate. These observations provide valuable insights into dynamo generation of magnetic fields, the structure and composition of planetary interiors, and the evolution of planets.

  12. Measurement of internal movements of the Escherichia coli ribosome using Forster resonance energy transfer and microsecond, continuous-flow turbulent mixing in micro-fabricated devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, Zigurts Krishna

    We have studied internal movements of the Eschericia coli ribosome with Forster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) using multiple donor-acceptor pairs labeled at specific ribosomal protein residues. We have developed a novel methodology that allows a more quantitative interpretation of distance data from FRET measurements, accounting for specific effects when using fluorescent probes, such as: non-stoichiometric labeling when biochemical separation is not possible, quantification of static and dynamic quenching, changes in extinction coefficients, effects of the orientation factor and the presence of random and systematic errors. From the obtained distance data, 13 donor-acceptor positions (from 18 independent FRET pairs) are used to model internal movements within the 30S subunit upon 70S association. These measurements are also applied to monitoring inter-subunit movements in functional states of the ribosome that are associated with the translocation cycle of the ribosome. This work reveals internal movements of the ribosome observed for the first time in solution, and presents in vitro evidence for large concerted inter-subunit motions associated with ribosome translocation. The second half of this thesis is independent of the above. We present the design, construction and implementation of micro-fabricated, continuous-flow, turbulent mixing devices that can mix two or three fluids to complete homogeneity on the molecular scale in the microsecond range. The prototypical designs are compact, portable, simple to fabricate and consume smaller sample volumes than current technology. We characterize the turbulent mixing process in microfluidic channels with fluorescence intensity and lifetime imaging and show that both the dependence of mixing times and pressure drop on the flow velocity and Reynolds number agree well with theoretical expectations for turbulent pipe flow. The novelties in this work are: the new methods of fabrication which enable production of three

  13. Planetary Magnetism

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, C.T.

    1980-02-01

    Planetary spacecraft have now probed the magnetic fields of all the terrestrial planets, the moon, Jupiter, and Saturn. These measurements reveal that dynamos are active in at least four of the planets, Mercury, the earth, Jupiter, and Saturn but that Venus and Mars appear to have at most only very weak planetary magnetic fields. The moon may have once possessed an internal dynamo, for the surface rocks are magnetized. The large satellites of the outer solar system are candidates for dynamo action in addition to the large planets themselves. Of these satellites the one most likely to generate its own internal magnetic field is Io.

  14. Magnetic shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, J.A.; Stone, R.R.; Fabyan, J.

    1987-10-06

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient magnetic field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines. 3 figs.

  15. Magnetic shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, John A.; Stone, Roger R.; Fabyan, Joseph

    1987-01-01

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient magnetic field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines.

  16. Planetary magnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.

    1980-01-01

    Planetary spacecraft have now probed the magnetic fields of all the terrestrial planets, the moon, Jupiter, and Saturn. These measurements reveal that dynamos are active in at least four of the planets, Mercury, the earth, Jupiter, and Saturn but that Venus and Mars appear to have at most only very weak planetary magnetic fields. The moon may have once possessed an internal dynamo, for the surface rocks are magnetized. The large satellites of the outer solar system are candidates for dynamo action in addition to the large planets themselves. Of these satellites the one most likely to generate its own internal magnetic field is Io.

  17. Combining Bottom-Up Self-Assembly with Top-Down Microfabrication to Create Hierarchical Inverse Opals with High Structural Order.

    PubMed

    Schaffner, Manuel; England, Grant; Kolle, Mathias; Aizenberg, Joanna; Vogel, Nicolas

    2015-09-01

    Colloidal particles can assemble into ordered crystals, creating periodically structured materials at the nanoscale without relying on expensive equipment. The combination of small size and high order leads to strong interaction with visible light, which induces macroscopic, iridescent structural coloration. To increase the complexity and functionality, it is important to control the organization of such materials in hierarchical structures with high degrees of order spanning multiple length scales. Here, a bottom-up assembly of polystyrene particles in the presence of a silica sol-gel precursor material (tetraethylorthosilicate, TEOS), which creates crack-free inverse opal films with high positional order and uniform crystal alignment along the (110) crystal plane, is combined with top-down microfabrication techniques. Micrometer scale hierarchical superstructures having a highly regular internal nanostructure with precisely controlled crystal orientation and wall profiles are produced. The ability to combine structural order at the nano- and microscale enables the fabrication of materials with complex optical properties resulting from light-matter interactions at different length scales. As an example, a hierarchical diffraction grating, which combines Bragg reflection arising from the nanoscale periodicity of the inverse opal crystal with grating diffraction resulting from a micrometer scale periodicity, is demonstrated. PMID:26042571

  18. Slow-Wave Characteristics of a Frame-Rod Structure Based on Micro-Fabricated Technology for THz Vacuum Electron Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Chengfang; Zhao, Bo; Yang, Yudong; Ju, Yongfeng; Yang, Dingli; Chang, Bo; He, Xiaofeng

    2016-11-01

    A simple equivalent circuit analysis of the frame-rod slow-wave structure (SWS) on dielectric substrates of a traveling-wave tube (TWT) is developed, using the quasi-TEM approximation approach for the dispersion and coupling impedance characteristics of the structure. Moreover, the obtained complex dispersion equation and coupling impedance are numerically calculated. The calculation results by our theory method agree well with the results obtained by the 3D EM simulation software HFSS. It is shown that the dispersion of the frame-rod circuit is decreased; the phase velocity is reduced and the bandwidth becomes greater, while the coupling impedance decreases after filling the dielectric materials in the frame-rod SWS. In addition, a comparison of slow-wave characteristics of this structure with a rectangular helix counterpart is made. As a planar slow-wave structure, this structure has potential applications in compact TWTs based on the micro-fabrication technology, which could be scaled to millimeter wave, even to THz frequency.

  19. USING LIGA BASED MICROFABRICATION TO IMPROVE OVERALL HEAT TRANSFER EFFICIENCY OF PRESSURIZED WATER REACTOR: I. Effects of Different Micro Pattern on Overall Heat Transfer.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, M.; Ibekwe, S.; Li, G.; Pang, S.S.; and Lian, K.

    2006-07-01

    The Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs in Figure 1) were originally developed for naval propulsion purposes, and then adapted to land-based applications. It has three parts: the reactor coolant system, the steam generator and the condenser. The Steam generator (a yellow area in Figure 1) is a shell and tube heat exchanger with high-pressure primary water passing through the tube side and lower pressure secondary feed water as well as steam passing through the shell side. Therefore, a key issue in increasing the efficiency of heat exchanger is to improve the design of steam generator, which is directly translated into economic benefits. The past research works show that the presence of a pin-fin array in a channel enhances the heat transfer significantly. Hence, using microfabrication techniques, such as LIGA, micro-molding or electroplating, some special microstructures can be fabricated around the tubes in the heat exchanger to increase the heat-exchanging efficiency and reduce the overall size of the heat-exchanger for the given heat transfer rates. In this paper, micro-pin fins of different densities made of SU-8 photoresist are fabricated and studied to evaluate overall heat transfer efficiency. The results show that there is an optimized micro pin-fin configuration that has the best overall heat transfer effects.

  20. High-separation efficiency micro-fabricated multi-capillary gas chromatographic columns for simulants of the nerve agents and blister agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yi; Du, Xiaosong; Wang, Yang; Tai, Huiling; Qiu, Dong; Lin, Qinghao; Jiang, Yadong

    2014-05-01

    To achieve both high speed and separation efficiency in the separation of a mixture of nerve and blister agent simulants, a high-aspect-ratio micro-fabricated multi-capillary column (MCC, a 50-cm-long, 450-μm-deep, and 60-μm-wide four-capillary column) was fabricated by the application of the microelectromechanical system (MEMS) techniques. Mixtures of chemical warfare agent (CWA) simulants - dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), triethyl phosphate (TEP), and methyl salicylate - were used as samples. The fabricated MCC allowed for the separation of all the components of the gaseous mixture within 24 s, even when the difference in boiling point was 4°C, as in the case of TEP and methyl salicylate. Furthermore, interfering agents - dichloromethane, ethanol, and toluene - were also included in the subsequent gaseous mixture samples. The boiling point of these six components ranged from 78°C to 219°C. All six components were clearly separated within 70 s. This study is the first to report the clear separation of gas mixtures of components with close boiling points. The column efficiency was experimentally determined to be 12,810 plates/m.

  1. Slow-Wave Characteristics of a Frame-Rod Structure Based on Micro-Fabricated Technology for THz Vacuum Electron Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Chengfang; Zhao, Bo; Yang, Yudong; Ju, Yongfeng; Yang, Dingli; Chang, Bo; He, Xiaofeng

    2016-09-01

    A simple equivalent circuit analysis of the frame-rod slow-wave structure (SWS) on dielectric substrates of a traveling-wave tube (TWT) is developed, using the quasi-TEM approximation approach for the dispersion and coupling impedance characteristics of the structure. Moreover, the obtained complex dispersion equation and coupling impedance are numerically calculated. The calculation results by our theory method agree well with the results obtained by the 3D EM simulation software HFSS. It is shown that the dispersion of the frame-rod circuit is decreased; the phase velocity is reduced and the bandwidth becomes greater, while the coupling impedance decreases after filling the dielectric materials in the frame-rod SWS. In addition, a comparison of slow-wave characteristics of this structure with a rectangular helix counterpart is made. As a planar slow-wave structure, this structure has potential applications in compact TWTs based on the micro-fabrication technology, which could be scaled to millimeter wave, even to THz frequency.

  2. High-separation efficiency micro-fabricated multi-capillary gas chromatographic columns for simulants of the nerve agents and blister agents.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Du, Xiaosong; Wang, Yang; Tai, Huiling; Qiu, Dong; Lin, Qinghao; Jiang, Yadong

    2014-01-01

    To achieve both high speed and separation efficiency in the separation of a mixture of nerve and blister agent simulants, a high-aspect-ratio micro-fabricated multi-capillary column (MCC, a 50-cm-long, 450-μm-deep, and 60-μm-wide four-capillary column) was fabricated by the application of the microelectromechanical system (MEMS) techniques. Mixtures of chemical warfare agent (CWA) simulants - dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), triethyl phosphate (TEP), and methyl salicylate - were used as samples. The fabricated MCC allowed for the separation of all the components of the gaseous mixture within 24 s, even when the difference in boiling point was 4°C, as in the case of TEP and methyl salicylate. Furthermore, interfering agents - dichloromethane, ethanol, and toluene - were also included in the subsequent gaseous mixture samples. The boiling point of these six components ranged from 78°C to 219°C. All six components were clearly separated within 70 s. This study is the first to report the clear separation of gas mixtures of components with close boiling points. The column efficiency was experimentally determined to be 12,810 plates/m. PMID:24899869

  3. Combining Bottom-Up Self-Assembly with Top-Down Microfabrication to Create Hierarchical Inverse Opals with High Structural Order.

    PubMed

    Schaffner, Manuel; England, Grant; Kolle, Mathias; Aizenberg, Joanna; Vogel, Nicolas

    2015-09-01

    Colloidal particles can assemble into ordered crystals, creating periodically structured materials at the nanoscale without relying on expensive equipment. The combination of small size and high order leads to strong interaction with visible light, which induces macroscopic, iridescent structural coloration. To increase the complexity and functionality, it is important to control the organization of such materials in hierarchical structures with high degrees of order spanning multiple length scales. Here, a bottom-up assembly of polystyrene particles in the presence of a silica sol-gel precursor material (tetraethylorthosilicate, TEOS), which creates crack-free inverse opal films with high positional order and uniform crystal alignment along the (110) crystal plane, is combined with top-down microfabrication techniques. Micrometer scale hierarchical superstructures having a highly regular internal nanostructure with precisely controlled crystal orientation and wall profiles are produced. The ability to combine structural order at the nano- and microscale enables the fabrication of materials with complex optical properties resulting from light-matter interactions at different length scales. As an example, a hierarchical diffraction grating, which combines Bragg reflection arising from the nanoscale periodicity of the inverse opal crystal with grating diffraction resulting from a micrometer scale periodicity, is demonstrated.

  4. Specific sorting of single bacterial cells with microfabricated fluorescence-activated cell sorting and tyramide signal amplification fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun H; Cho, Sung H; Chiang, Hsin-I; Tsai, Frank; Zhang, Kun; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2011-10-01

    When attempting to probe the genetic makeup of diverse bacterial communities that elude cell culturing, researchers face two primary challenges: isolation of rare bacteria from microbial samples and removal of contaminating cell-free DNA. We report a compact, low-cost, and high-performance microfabricated fluorescence-activated cell sorting (μFACS) technology in combination with a tyramide signal amplification fluorescence in situ hybridization (TSA-FISH) to address these two challenges. The TSA-FISH protocol that was adapted for flow cytometry yields a 10-30-fold enhancement in fluorescence intensity over standard FISH methods. The μFACS technology, capable of enhancing its sensitivity by ~18 dB through signal processing, was able to enrich TSA-FISH-labeled E. coli cells by 223-fold. The μFACS technology was also used to remove contaminating cell-free DNA. After two rounds of sorting on E. coli mixed with λ-phage DNA (10 ng/μL), we demonstrated over 100,000-fold reduction in λ-DNA concentration. The integrated μFACS and TSA-FISH technologies provide a highly effective and low-cost solution for research on the genomic complexity of bacteria as well as single-cell genomic analysis of other sample types. PMID:21809842

  5. Magnetic Recording.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowman, Charles E.

    A guide to the technology of magnetic recorders used in such fields as audio recording, broadcast and closed-circuit television, instrumentation recording, and computer data systems is presented. Included are discussions of applications, advantages, and limitations of magnetic recording, its basic principles and theory of operation, and its…

  6. Magnetic shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, J.A.; Stone, R.R.; Fabyan, J.

    1985-02-12

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines.

  7. Magnet Healing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finegold, Leonard

    2000-03-01

    Many people are convinced that static magnets—applied to their skin—will heal ills, and many businesses sell such magnets. The biophysics of such healing was reviewed [1] together with the general biophysics of static fields. Birds and insects do use the earth’s magnetic field for navigation. While insect and frog egg development can clearly be influenced by high fields (7 T and 17 T respectively), there is no experimental evidence that small magnetic fields (of less than 0.5 T) might heal, and much evidence that they cannot heal. A puzzle to the physics community is: How to show laypersons that simple magnets (very probably) do not heal, however attractive that idea might be. [1] L. Finegold, The Physics of "Alternative Medicine": Magnet Therapy, The Scientific Review of Alternative Medicine 3:26-33 (1999).

  8. Magnetic nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Matsui, Hiroshi; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2010-11-16

    A magnetic nanotube includes bacterial magnetic nanocrystals contacted onto a nanotube which absorbs the nanocrystals. The nanocrystals are contacted on at least one surface of the nanotube. A method of fabricating a magnetic nanotube includes synthesizing the bacterial magnetic nanocrystals, which have an outer layer of proteins. A nanotube provided is capable of absorbing the nanocrystals and contacting the nanotube with the nanocrystals. The nanotube is preferably a peptide bolaamphiphile. A nanotube solution and a nanocrystal solution including a buffer and a concentration of nanocrystals are mixed. The concentration of nanocrystals is optimized, resulting in a nanocrystal to nanotube ratio for which bacterial magnetic nanocrystals are immobilized on at least one surface of the nanotubes. The ratio controls whether the nanocrystals bind only to the interior or to the exterior surfaces of the nanotubes. Uses include cell manipulation and separation, biological assay, enzyme recovery, and biosensors.

  9. Bi-stable frequency up-conversion piezoelectric energy harvester driven by non-contact magnetic repulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Q. C.; Yang, Y. L.; Li, Xinxin

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents miniaturized energy harvesters, where the frequency up-conversion technique is used to improve the bandwidth of vibration energy harvesters. The proposed and developed miniature piezoelectric energy harvester utilizes magnetic repulsion forces to achieve non-contact frequency up-conversion, thereby avoiding mechanical collision and wear for long-term working durability. A pair of piezoelectric resonant cantilevers is micro-fabricated to generate electric power. A simplified model involving linear oscillators and magnetic interaction is deployed to demonstrate the feasibility of the device design. A bench-top harvester has been fabricated and characterized, resulting in average power generation of over 10 µW within a broad frequency range of 10-22 Hz under 1g acceleration.

  10. Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    AVCON, Inc. produces advanced magnetic bearing systems for industrial use, offering a unique technological approach based on contract work done at Marshall Space Flight Center and Lewis Research Center. Designed for the turbopump of the Space Shuttle main engine, they are now used in applications such as electric power generation, petroleum refining, machine tool operation and natural gas pipelines. Magnetic bearings support moving machinery without physical contact; AVCON's homopolar approach is a hybrid of permanent and electromagnets which are one-third the weight, smaller and more power- efficient than previous magnetic bearings.

  11. Lunar magnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, L. L.; Sonett, C. P.; Srnka, L. J.

    1984-01-01

    Aspects of lunar paleomagnetic and electromagnetic sounding results which appear inconsistent with the hypothesis that an ancient core dynamo was the dominant source of the observed crustal magnetism are discussed. Evidence is summarized involving a correlation between observed magnetic anomalies and ejecta blankets from impact events which indicates the possible importance of local mechanisms involving meteoroid impact processes in generating strong magnetic fields at the lunar surface. A reply is given to the latter argument which also presents recent evidence of a lunar iron core.

  12. Design and microfabrication of a high-aspect-ratio PDMS microbeam array for parallel nanonewton force measurement and protein printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasoglu, F. M.; Bohl, A. J.; Layton, B. E.

    2007-03-01

    Cell and protein mechanics has applications ranging from cellular development to tissue engineering. Techniques such as magnetic tweezers, optic tweezers and atomic force microscopy have been used to measure cell deformation forces of the order of piconewtons to nanonewtons. In this study, an array of polymeric polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microbeams with diameters of 10-40 µm and lengths of 118 µm was fabricated from Sylgard® with curing agent concentrations ranging from 5% to 20%. The resulting spring constants were 100-300 nN µm-1. The elastic modulus of PDMS was determined experimentally at different curing agent concentrations and found to be 346 kPa to 704 kPa in a millimeter-scale array and ~1 MPa in a microbeam array. Additionally, the microbeam array was used to print laminin for the purpose of cell adhesion. Linear and nonlinear finite element analyses are presented and compared to the closed-from solution. The highly compliant, transparent, biocompatible PDMS may offer a method for more rapid throughput in cell and protein mechanics force measurement experiments with sensitivities necessary for highly compliant structures such as axons.

  13. Magnetization directions and geometries of helical microswimmers for linear velocity-frequency response.

    PubMed

    Fu, Henry C; Jabbarzadeh, Mehdi; Meshkati, Farshad

    2015-04-01

    Recently, there has been much progress in creating microswimmers or microrobots capable of controlled propulsion in fluidic environments. These microswimmers have numerous possible applications in biomedicine, microfabrication, and sensing. One type of effective microrobot consists of rigid magnetic helical microswimmers that are propelled when rotated at a range of frequencies by an external rotating magnetic field. Here we focus on investigating which magnetic dipoles and helical geometries optimally lead to linear velocity-frequency response, which may be desirable for the precise control and positioning of microswimmers. We identify a class of optimal magnetic field moments. We connect our results to the wobbling behavior previously observed and studied in helical microswimmers. In contrast to previous studies, we find that when the full helical geometry is taken into account, wobble-free motion is not possible for magnetic fields rotating in a plane. Our results compare well quantitatively to previously reported experiments, validating the theoretical analysis method. Finally, in the context of our optimal moments, we identify helical geometries for minimization of wobbling and maximization of swimming velocities.

  14. Magnetic Nickel iron Electroformed Trap (MagNET): a master/replica fabrication strategy for ultra-high throughput (>100 mL h(-1)) immunomagnetic sorting.

    PubMed

    Ko, Jina; Yelleswarapu, Venkata; Singh, Anup; Shah, Nishal; Issadore, David

    2016-08-01

    Microfluidic devices can sort immunomagnetically labeled cells with sensitivity and specificity much greater than that of conventional methods, primarily because the size of microfluidic channels and micro-scale magnets can be matched to that of individual cells. However, these small feature sizes come at the expense of limited throughput (ϕ < 5 mL h(-1)) and susceptibility to clogging, which have hindered current microfluidic technology from processing relevant volumes of clinical samples, e.g. V > 10 mL whole blood. Here, we report a new approach to micromagnetic sorting that can achieve highly specific cell separation in unprocessed complex samples at a throughput (ϕ > 100 mL h(-1)) 100× greater than that of conventional microfluidics. To achieve this goal, we have devised a new approach to micromagnetic sorting, the magnetic nickel iron electroformed trap (MagNET), which enables high flow rates by having millions of micromagnetic traps operate in parallel. Our design rotates the conventional microfluidic approach by 90° to form magnetic traps at the edges of pores instead of in channels, enabling millions of the magnetic traps to be incorporated into a centimeter sized device. Unlike previous work, where magnetic structures were defined using conventional microfabrication, we take inspiration from soft lithography and create a master from which many replica electroformed magnetic micropore devices can be economically manufactured. These free-standing 12 μm thick permalloy (Ni80Fe20) films contain micropores of arbitrary shape and position, allowing the device to be tailored for maximal capture efficiency and throughput. We demonstrate MagNET's capabilities by fabricating devices with both circular and rectangular pores and use these devices to rapidly (ϕ = 180 mL h(-1)) and specifically sort rare tumor cells from white blood cells. PMID:27170379

  15. Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Video Gallery

    This science visualization shows a magnetospheric substorm, during which, magnetic reconnection causes energy to be rapidly released along the field lines in the magnetotail, that part of the magne...

  16. Magnetic Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Jane Bray; Nelson, Jim

    1992-01-01

    Describes the history of Richard Blakemore's discovery of magnetotaxic organisms. Discusses possible reasons why the magnetic response in bacteria developed. Proposes research experiments integrating biology and physics in which students investigate problems using cultures of magnetotaxic organisms. (MDH)

  17. Magnetic monopoles

    SciTech Connect

    Fryberger, D.

    1984-12-01

    In this talk on magnetic monopoles, first the author briefly reviews some historical background; then, the author describes what several different types of monopoles might look like; and finally the author discusses the experimental situation. 81 references.

  18. CRYOGENIC MAGNETS

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.; Taylor, C.E.

    1963-05-21

    A cryogenic magnet coil is described for generating magnetic fields of the order of 100,000 gauss with a minimum expenditure of energy lost in resistive heating of the coil inductors and energy lost irreversibly in running the coil refrigeration plant. The cryogenic coil comprises a coil conductor for generating a magnetic field upon energization with electrical current, and refrigeration means disposed in heat conductive relation to the coil conductor for cooling to a low temperature. A substantial reduction in the power requirements for generating these magnetic fields is attained by scaling the field generating coil to large size and particular dimensions for a particular conductor, and operating the coil at a particular optimum temperature commensurate with minimum overall power requirements. (AEC)

  19. Superconducting magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Extensive computer based engineering design effort resulted in optimization of a superconducting magnet design with an average bulk current density of approximately 12KA/cm(2). Twisted, stranded 0.0045 inch diameter NbTi superconductor in a copper matrix was selected. Winding the coil from this bundle facilitated uniform winding of the small diameter wire. Test coils were wound using a first lot of the wire. The actual packing density was measured from these. Interwinding voltage break down tests on the test coils indicated the need for adjustment of the wire insulation on the lot of wire subsequently ordered for construction of the delivered superconducting magnet. Using the actual packing densities from the test coils, a final magnet design, with the required enhancement and field profile, was generated. All mechanical and thermal design parameters were then also fixed. The superconducting magnet was then fabricated and tested. The first test was made with the magnet immersed in liquid helium at 4.2K. The second test was conducted at 2K in vacuum. In the latter test, the magnet was conduction cooled from the mounting flange end.

  20. Optical detection of NMR J-spectra at zero magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledbetter, M. P.; Crawford, C. W.; Pines, A.; Wemmer, D. E.; Knappe, S.; Kitching, J.; Budker, D.

    2009-07-01

    Scalar couplings of the form JI1 · I2 between nuclei impart valuable information about molecular structure to nuclear magnetic-resonance spectra. Here we demonstrate direct detection of J-spectra due to both heteronuclear and homonuclear J-coupling in a zero-field environment where the Zeeman interaction is completely absent. We show that characteristic functional groups exhibit distinct spectra with straightforward interpretation for chemical identification. Detection is performed with a microfabricated optical atomic magnetometer, providing high sensitivity to samples of microliter volumes. We obtain 0.1 Hz linewidths and measure scalar-coupling parameters with 4-mHz statistical uncertainty. We anticipate that the technique described here will provide a new modality for high-precision "J spectroscopy" using small samples on microchip devices for multiplexed screening, assaying, and sample identification in chemistry and biomedicine.

  1. An Electrostatic Microactuator for Positioning a Hard-Disk Drive Magnetic Head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshino, Tomonori; Toshiyoshi, Hiroshi; Mita, Makoto; Kobayashi, Dai; Fujita, Hiroyuki

    We have newly developed a prototype model of silicon microfabricated piggyback actuator for positioning a read/write head of magnetic hard-disk drive, which is usually referred to as a dual servo system because the piggyback actuator for fine control is used in collaboration with the voice-coil motor for coarse control. The actuator is made of a 50-micron-thick SOI (silicon on insulator) wafer processed by deep RIE (reactive ion etching) of high-aspect ratio. Actuation mechanism is based upon electrostatic force generated by multiple parallel plates. Maximum displacement of 0.2μ with a dc driving voltage of 20V has been achieved with a 1mm × 0.3mm actuator of its resonance at 25kHz. An analytical model for predicting electromechanical performance has also been developed.

  2. MAGNETIC IMAGING OF NANOCOMPOSITE MAGNETS

    SciTech Connect

    VOLKOV,V.V.ZHU,Y.

    2003-08-03

    Understanding the structure and magnetic behavior is crucial for optimization of nanocomposite magnets with high magnetic energy products. Many contributing factors such as phase composition, grain size distribution and specific domain configurations reflect a fine balance of magnetic energies at nanometer scale. For instance, magnetocrystalline anisotropy of grains and their orientations, degree of exchange coupling of magnetically soft and hard phases and specific energy of domain walls in a material. Modern microscopy, including Lorentz microscopy, is powerful tool for visualization and microstructure studies of nanocomposite magnets. However, direct interpretation of magnetically sensitive Fresnel/Foucault images for nanomagnets is usually problematic, if not impossible, because of the complex image contrast due to small grain size and sophisticated domain structure. Recently we developed an imaging technique based on Lorentz phase microscopy [l-4], which allows bypassing many of these problems and get quantitative information through magnetic flux mapping at nanometer scale resolution with a magnetically calibrated TEM [5]. This is our first report on application of this technique to nanocomposite magnets. In the present study we examine a nanocomposite magnet of nominal composition Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14+{delta}}B{sub 1.45} (14+{delta}=23.3, i.e. ''hard'' Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B-phase and 47.8 wt% of ''soft'' {alpha}-Fe phase ({delta}=9.3)), produced by Magnequench International, Inc. Conventional TEM/HREM study (Fig. 1-2) suggests that material has a bimodal grain-size distribution with maximum at d{sub max}=25 nm for Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phase and d{sub max} = 15 nm for {alpha}-Fe phase (Fig.1c, Fig.2) in agreement with synchrotron X-ray studies (d{sub max}=23.5 nm for Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B [6]). Lattice parameters for Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phase are a=8.80 and c=12.2 {angstrom}, as derived from SAED ring patterns (Fig.1a), again in good agreement with X-ray data

  3. Synthesis of novel fluorene-based two-photon absorbing molecules and their applications in optical data storage, microfabrication, and stimulated emission depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanez, Ciceron

    2009-12-01

    Two-photon absorption (2PA) has been used for a number of scientific and technological applications, exploiting the fact that the 2PA probability is directly proportional to the square of the incident light intensity (while one-photon absorption bears a linear relation to the incident light intensity). This intrinsic property of 2PA leads to 3D spatial localization, important in fields such as optical data storage, fluorescence microscopy, and 3D microfabrication. The spatial confinement that 2PA enables has been used to induce photochemical and photophysical events in increasingly smaller volumes and allowed nonlinear, 2PA-based, technologies to reach sub-diffraction limit resolutions. The primary focus of this dissertation is the development of novel, efficient 2PA, fluorene-based molecules to be used either as photoacid generators (PAGs) or fluorophores. A second aim is to develop more effective methods of synthesizing these compounds. As a third and final objective, the new molecules were used to develop a write-once-read many (WORM) optical data storage system, and stimulated emission depletion probes for bioimaging. In Chapter I, the microwave-assisted synthesis of triarylsulfonium salt photoacid generators (PAGs) from their diphenyliodonium counterparts is reported. The microwave-assisted synthesis of these novel sulfonium salts afforded reaction times 90 to 420 times faster than conventional thermal conditions, with photoacid quantum yields of new sulfonium PAGs ranging from 0.01 to 0.4. These PAGs were used to develop a fluorescence readout-based, nonlinear three-dimensional (3D) optical data storage system (Chapter II). In this system, writing was achieved by acid generation upon two-photon absorption (2PA) of a PAG (at 710 or 730 nm). Readout was then performed by interrogating two-photon absorbing dyes, after protonation, at 860 nm. Two-photon recording and readout of voxels was demonstrated in five and eight consecutive, crosstalk-free layers within a

  4. Electrochemical and microfabrication strategies for remotely operated smart chemical sensors: application of anodic stripping coulometry to calibration-free measurements of copper and mercury.

    PubMed

    Marei, Mohamed M; Roussel, Thomas J; Keynton, Robert S; Baldwin, Richard P

    2013-11-25

    Remote unattended sensor networks are increasingly sought after to monitor the drinking water distribution grid, industrial wastewater effluents, and even rivers and lakes. One of the biggest challenges for application of such sensors is the issue of in-field device calibration. With this challenge in mind, we report here the use of anodic stripping coulometry (ASC) as the basis of a calibration-free micro-fabricated electrochemical sensor (CF-MES) for heavy metal determinations. The sensor platform consisted of a photo-lithographically patterned gold working electrode on SiO2 substrate, which was housed within a custom stopped-flow thin-layer cell, with a total volume of 2-4 μL. The behavior of this platform was characterized by fluorescent particle microscopy and electrochemical studies utilizing Fe(CN)6(3-/4-) as a model analyte. The average charge obtained for oxidation of 500 μM ferrocyanide after 60s over a 10 month period was 176 μC, corresponding to a volume of 3.65 μL (RSD = 2.4%). The response of the platform to copper concentrations ranging from 50 to 7500 ppb was evaluated, and the ASC results showed a linear dependence of charge on copper concentrations with excellent reproducibility (RSD ≤ 2.5%) and accuracy for most concentrations (≤ 5-10% error). The platform was also used to determine copper and mercury mixtures, where the total metallic content was measurable with excellent reproducibility (RSD ≤ 4%) and accuracy (≤ 6% error).

  5. Electrochemical and microfabrication strategies for remotely operated smart chemical sensors: application of anodic stripping coulometry to calibration-free measurements of copper and mercury.

    PubMed

    Marei, Mohamed M; Roussel, Thomas J; Keynton, Robert S; Baldwin, Richard P

    2013-11-25

    Remote unattended sensor networks are increasingly sought after to monitor the drinking water distribution grid, industrial wastewater effluents, and even rivers and lakes. One of the biggest challenges for application of such sensors is the issue of in-field device calibration. With this challenge in mind, we report here the use of anodic stripping coulometry (ASC) as the basis of a calibration-free micro-fabricated electrochemical sensor (CF-MES) for heavy metal determinations. The sensor platform consisted of a photo-lithographically patterned gold working electrode on SiO2 substrate, which was housed within a custom stopped-flow thin-layer cell, with a total volume of 2-4 μL. The behavior of this platform was characterized by fluorescent particle microscopy and electrochemical studies utilizing Fe(CN)6(3-/4-) as a model analyte. The average charge obtained for oxidation of 500 μM ferrocyanide after 60s over a 10 month period was 176 μC, corresponding to a volume of 3.65 μL (RSD = 2.4%). The response of the platform to copper concentrations ranging from 50 to 7500 ppb was evaluated, and the ASC results showed a linear dependence of charge on copper concentrations with excellent reproducibility (RSD ≤ 2.5%) and accuracy for most concentrations (≤ 5-10% error). The platform was also used to determine copper and mercury mixtures, where the total metallic content was measurable with excellent reproducibility (RSD ≤ 4%) and accuracy (≤ 6% error). PMID:24216196

  6. Expression of albumin and cytochrome P450 enzymes in HepG2 cells cultured with a nanotechnology-based culture plate with microfabricated scaffold.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kazuaki; Kato, Natsuko; Aizawa, Kazuko; Mizutani, Reiko; Yamauchi, Junji; Tanoue, Akito

    2011-10-01

    The Nanoculture plate (NCP) is a recently developed plate which essentially consists of a textured surface with specific characteristics that induce spheroid formation: microfabrications with a micro-square pattern on the culture surface. The NCP can be used to generate uniform adhesive spheroids of cancer cell lines using conventional techniques without the need of any animal compounds. In this study, we assessed the performance of human hepatoma cell line HepG2 cells cultured with an NCP to evaluate the effects of the NCP on their hepatocyte-specific functions. The NCP facilitated the formation of three-dimensional (3D) HepG2 cell architecture. HepG2 cells cultured with an NCP exhibited enhanced mRNA expression levels of albumin and cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes compared to those cultured with a two-dimensional (2D) conventional plate. The expression levels of two specific liver-enriched transcription factors, hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (C/EBPα), were higher in HepG2 cells grown with the NCP than those in HepG2 cells grown with conventional plates before albumin and CYP enzymes expression levels were increased. The inducibility of CYP1A2 and CYP3A4 mRNA following exposure to inducers in HepG2 cells cultured with an NCP was comparable to that in HepG2 cells cultured with conventional plates, while the expression levels of CYP1A2 and CYP3A4 mRNA following exposure to inducers were higher when using an NCP than when using conventional plates. These results suggest that the use of an NCP enhances the hepatocyte-specific functions of HepG2 cells, such as drug-metabolizing enzyme expression, making the NCP/HepG2 system a useful tool for evaluating drug metabolism in vitro.

  7. Magnetism. Blowing magnetic skyrmion bubbles.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wanjun; Upadhyaya, Pramey; Zhang, Wei; Yu, Guoqiang; Jungfleisch, M Benjamin; Fradin, Frank Y; Pearson, John E; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav; Wang, Kang L; Heinonen, Olle; te Velthuis, Suzanne G E; Hoffmann, Axel

    2015-07-17

    The formation of soap bubbles from thin films is accompanied by topological transitions. Here we show how a magnetic topological structure, a skyrmion bubble, can be generated in a solid-state system in a similar manner. Using an inhomogeneous in-plane current in a system with broken inversion symmetry, we experimentally "blow" magnetic skyrmion bubbles from a geometrical constriction. The presence of a spatially divergent spin-orbit torque gives rise to instabilities of the magnetic domain structures that are reminiscent of Rayleigh-Plateau instabilities in fluid flows. We determine a phase diagram for skyrmion formation and reveal the efficient manipulation of these dynamically created skyrmions, including depinning and motion. The demonstrated current-driven transformation from stripe domains to magnetic skyrmion bubbles could lead to progress in skyrmion-based spintronics. PMID:26067256

  8. Magnetism. Blowing magnetic skyrmion bubbles.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wanjun; Upadhyaya, Pramey; Zhang, Wei; Yu, Guoqiang; Jungfleisch, M Benjamin; Fradin, Frank Y; Pearson, John E; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav; Wang, Kang L; Heinonen, Olle; te Velthuis, Suzanne G E; Hoffmann, Axel

    2015-07-17

    The formation of soap bubbles from thin films is accompanied by topological transitions. Here we show how a magnetic topological structure, a skyrmion bubble, can be generated in a solid-state system in a similar manner. Using an inhomogeneous in-plane current in a system with broken inversion symmetry, we experimentally "blow" magnetic skyrmion bubbles from a geometrical constriction. The presence of a spatially divergent spin-orbit torque gives rise to instabilities of the magnetic domain structures that are reminiscent of Rayleigh-Plateau instabilities in fluid flows. We determine a phase diagram for skyrmion formation and reveal the efficient manipulation of these dynamically created skyrmions, including depinning and motion. The demonstrated current-driven transformation from stripe domains to magnetic skyrmion bubbles could lead to progress in skyrmion-based spintronics.

  9. Magnetic neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Howard, M A; Grady, M S; Ritter, R C; Gillies, G T; Broaddus, W C; Dacey, R G

    1996-01-01

    Because of the complex shape of many brain structures, the ideal brain probe would be highly flexible and give the neurosurgeon the ability to independently and precisely control movement of the probe tip. A magnetic surgery system has been developed that implements this concept. Flexible brain probes with small permanent magnetic tips are placed on the brain surface through a small burr hole and then magnetically manipulated within the brain. Drive forces are produced by an array of six superconducting magnets suspended within a cryostatic helmet. They produce a maximum force of 3 times the threshold needed to move the probe through the parenchymal tissues at its normal speed of 1 mm/s. Computer-controlled magnetic impulses precisely direct the probe movement in any direction desired with movement accuracy of 0.47 mm in phantom gels. Probe position is monitored 3 times per second with orthogonally oriented microchannel plate X-ray systems, X-ray dose from a 3-hour simulated procedure is comparable to that of a chest X-ray. In vivo and in vitro feasibility studies have been carried out in dog and pig brains. Preclinical trials are planned for clinical applications including implantation of flexible brachytherapy threads.

  10. A polymer lab-on-a-chip for magnetic immunoassay with on-chip sampling and detection capabilities.

    PubMed

    Do, Jaephil; Ahn, Chong H

    2008-04-01

    This paper presents a new polymer lab-on-a-chip for magnetic bead-based immunoassay with fully on-chip sampling and detection capabilities, which provides a smart platform of magnetic immunoassay-based lab-on-a-chip for point-of-care testing (POCT) toward biochemical hazardous agent detection, food inspection or clinical diagnostics. In this new approach, the polymer lab-on-a-chip for magnetic bead-based immunoassay consists of a magnetic bead-based separator, an interdigitated array (IDA) micro electrode, and a microfluidic system, which are fully incorporated into a lab-on-a-chip on cyclic olefin copolymer (COC). Since the polymer lab-on-a-chip was realized using low cost, high throughput polymer microfabrication techniques such as micro injection molding and hot embossing method, a disposable polymer lab-on-a-chip for the magnetic bead-based immunoassay can be successfully realized in a disposable platform. With this newly developed polymer lab-on-a-chip, an enzyme-labelled electrochemical immunoassay (ECIA) was performed using magnetic beads as the mobile solid support, and the final enzyme product produced from the ECIA was measured using chronoamperometry. A sampling and detection of as low as 16.4 ng mL(-1) of mouse IgG has been successfully performed in 35 min for the entire procedure.

  11. Magnetic light

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Arseniy I.; Miroshnichenko, Andrey E.; Fu, Yuan Hsing; Zhang, JingBo; Luk’yanchuk, Boris

    2012-01-01

    Spherical silicon nanoparticles with sizes of a few hundreds of nanometers represent a unique optical system. According to theoretical predictions based on Mie theory they can exhibit strong magnetic resonances in the visible spectral range. The basic mechanism of excitation of such modes inside the nanoparticles is very similar to that of split-ring resonators, but with one important difference that silicon nanoparticles have much smaller losses and are able to shift the magnetic resonance wavelength down to visible frequencies. We experimentally demonstrate for the first time that these nanoparticles have strong magnetic dipole resonance, which can be continuously tuned throughout the whole visible spectrum varying particle size and visually observed by means of dark-field optical microscopy. These optical systems open up new perspectives for fabrication of low-loss optical metamaterials and nanophotonic devices. PMID:22768382

  12. MAGNETIC GRID

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.

    1960-08-01

    An electronic grid is designed employing magnetic forces for controlling the passage of charged particles. The grid is particularly applicable to use in gas-filled tubes such as ignitrons. thyratrons, etc., since the magnetic grid action is impartial to the polarity of the charged particles and, accordingly. the sheath effects encountered with electrostatic grids are not present. The grid comprises a conductor having sections spaced apart and extending in substantially opposite directions in the same plane, the ends of the conductor being adapted for connection to a current source.

  13. Magnetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Manchium (Inventor); Colvin, Michael S. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic polymer particles are formed by swelling porous, polymer particles and impregnating the particles with an aqueous solution of precursor magnetic metal salt such as an equimolar mixture of ferrous chloride and ferric chloride. On addition of a basic reagent such as dilute sodium hydroxide, the metal salts are converted to crystals of magnetite which are uniformly contained througout the pores of the polymer particle. The magnetite content can be increased and neutral buoyancy achieved by repetition of the impregnaton and neutralization steps to adjust the magnetite content to a desired level.

  14. Superconducting Magnets for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feenan, Peter

    2000-03-01

    MRI is now a well established diagnostic technique in medicine. The richness of information provided by magnetic resonance gives rise to a variety of techniques which in turn leads to a variety of magnet designs. Magnet designers must consider suitable superconduting materials for the magnet, but need also to consider the overall fomat of the magnet to maximise patient comfort, access for clinicians and convenience of use - in some examples magnets are destined for use within the operating theatre and special considerations are required for this. Magnet types include; (1) low-field general purpose imagers, (2) extremity imaging, (3) open magnets with exellent all-round access often employing iron or permanent magnetic materials, (4) high-field magnets, and (5) very high-field (7 Tesla and more) magnets for spectroscopy and functional imaging research. Examples of these magnet varieties will be shown and some of the design challenges discussed.

  15. Magnetic tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Harriss

    1992-01-01

    The move to visualization and image processing in data systems is increasing the demand for larger and faster mass storage systems. The technology of choice is magnetic tape. This paper briefly reviews the technology past, present, and projected. A case is made for standards and the value of the standards to users.

  16. Magnetic Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Ferrofluidics Corporation's recent innovation is a spindle for rotating computer discs that supports the disc's rotating shaft on a film of magnetic fluid instead of conventional ball bearings. According to its developers, the spindle offers greatly increased rotational stability, meaning substantially reduced vibration and mechanical noise, and non- repeatable runout. This allows disc drives to store two to 10 times more information.

  17. Magneto-transport and microstructure of Co{sub 2}Fe(Ga{sub 0.5}Ge{sub 0.5})/Cu lateral spin valves prepared by top-down microfabrication process

    SciTech Connect

    Ikhtiar,; Mitani, S.; Hono, K.; Kasai, S.; Takahashi, Y. K.; Itoh, A.; Ohkubo, T.

    2014-05-07

    Heusler alloy-based lateral spin valves with ohmic contacts are prepared for the Co{sub 2}Fe(Ga{sub 0.5}Ge{sub 0.5})/Cu system by means of the top-down microfabrication process. The magneto-transport and microstructure are characterized to investigate the influence of the microfabrication route on the spin dependent transport of lateral spin valves systematically. A large non-local spin signal (△R{sub S}) of 17.3 mΩ is observed at room temperature, which is attributed to the highly spin-polarized Co{sub 2}Fe(Ga{sub 0.5}Ge{sub 0.5}) ferromagnet and the clean Co{sub 2}Fe(Ga{sub 0.5}Ge{sub 0.5})/Cu interfaces confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. Based on the general expression of one-dimensional spin diffusion model, we discuss the importance of interfacial spin polarization in Heusler alloy-based lateral spin valves.

  18. Microfabrication with femtosecond laser processing : (A) laser ablation of ferrous alloys, (B) direct-write embedded optical waveguides and integrated optics in bulk glasses.

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Junpeng; McDaniel, Karen Lynn; Palmer, Jeremy Andrew; Yang, Pin; Griffith, Michelle Lynn; Vawter, Gregory Allen; Harris, Marc F.; Tallant, David Robert; Luk, Ting Shan; Burns, George Robert

    2004-11-01

    At Sandia National Laboratories, miniaturization dominates future hardware designs, and technologies that address the manufacture of micro-scale to nano-scale features are in demand. Currently, Sandia is developing technologies such as photolithography/etching (e.g. silicon MEMS), LIGA, micro-electro-discharge machining (micro-EDM), and focused ion beam (FIB) machining to fulfill some of the component design requirements. Some processes are more encompassing than others, but each process has its niche, where all performance characteristics cannot be met by one technology. For example, micro-EDM creates highly accurate micro-scale features but the choice of materials is limited to conductive materials. With silicon-based MEMS technology, highly accurate nano-scale integrated devices are fabricated but the mechanical performance may not meet the requirements. Femtosecond laser processing has the potential to fulfill a broad range of design demands, both in terms of feature resolution and material choices, thereby improving fabrication of micro-components. One of the unique features of femtosecond lasers is the ability to ablate nearly all materials with little heat transfer, and therefore melting or damage, to the surrounding material, resulting in highly accurate micro-scale features. Another unique aspect to femtosecond radiation is the ability to create localized structural changes thought nonlinear absorption processes. By scanning the focal point within transparent material, we can create three-dimensional waveguides for biological sensors and optical components. In this report, we utilized the special characteristics of femtosecond laser processing for microfabrication. Special emphasis was placed on the laser-material interactions to gain a science-based understanding of the process and to determine the process parameter space for laser processing of metals and glasses. Two areas were investigated, including laser ablation of ferrous alloys and direct

  19. Eclogite meso- and microfabrics: implications for the burial and exhumation history of eclogites in the Tauern Window (Eastern Alps) from P-T-d paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurz, Walter; Neubauer, Franz; Dachs, Edgar

    1998-02-01

    The Eclogite Zone of the central-southern Tauern Window comprises eclogites and associated high-pressure metasediments that are intercalated between Penninic basement units in the foot-wall and an imbricate stack in the hanging-wall. This nappe stack consists of continental basement units, cover sequences of a distal continental slope, and the main part of the ophiolitic Glockner Nappe. Textures and microfabrics of eclogites from the central-southern Tauern Window allow the establishment of the eclogitic and post-eclogitic deformation histories from burial by subduction to subsequent exhumation. The metamorphic evolution of the eclogites is documented by: (1) initial greenschist to blueschist facies; (2) eclogite facies at ca. 550-630°C and ±20 kbar; (3) a second blueschist facies overprint (ca. 450°C, 10-15 kbar); and (4) exhumation to pressures of ca. 6-7 kbar at 500-550°C (upper greenschist to lower amphibolite facies). An eclogitic penetrative foliation (S 1) and S-dipping stretching lineation (L 1) formed during the final stages of subduction of the eclogite-bearing unit. The P sbnd T evolution of the eclogites during D 1 documents the final increment of the prograde P sbnd T path. Later blueschist facies metamorphism is contemporaneous to top-to-the-N emplacement of the eclogite-bearing unit onto continental basement units within a subduction zone. We discuss two models of eclogite emplacement. Most probably, emplacement is achieved by a thrust along the base of the eclogite-bearing unit. Alternatively, the P sbnd T path of the eclogite facies rocks suggests an emplacement model similar to corner flow. Subsequent to eclogite and nappe emplacement, the nappe stack is entirely affected by a penetrative deformation (D 2) that resulted in the development of a mylonitic foliation (S 2) and an E-W-oriented stretching lineation (L 2) within lower amphibolite to upper greenschist facies. This deformation is related to a crustal-scale detachment zone, that formed

  20. Magnetic bearing. [for supplying magnetic fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, P. A. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A magnetic bearing is described which includes a pair of coaxial, toroidal, and permanent magnets having axially directed poles. Like poles of the permanent magnets are adjacent to each other, whereby the permanent magnets have a tendency to be urged apart along the common axis. An electromagnet is wound coaxially with the permanent magnets in such a manner that the poles are axially directed. Between the poles of each permanent magnet there is a low magnetic reluctance circuit including two series air gaps. Between the poles of the electromagnet a low reluctance path including only one air gap of each of the low magnetic reluctance circuits is provided. The low reluctance path for the electromagnet includes a ring axially translatable relative to the permanent magnets. The ring forms opposite faces of the air gaps in the magnetic circuits for each permanent magnet.

  1. Magnetic Reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Masaaki Yamada, Russell Kulsrud and Hantao Ji

    2009-09-17

    We review the fundamental physics of magnetic reconnection in laboratory and space plasmas, by discussing results from theory, numerical simulations, observations from space satellites, and the recent results from laboratory plasma experiments. After a brief review of the well-known early work, we discuss representative recent experimental and theoretical work and attempt to interpret the essence of significant modern findings. In the area of local reconnection physics, many significant findings have been made with regard to two- uid physics and are related to the cause of fast reconnection. Profiles of the neutral sheet, Hall currents, and the effects of guide field, collisions, and micro-turbulence are discussed to understand the fundamental processes in a local reconnection layer both in space and laboratory plasmas. While the understanding of the global reconnection dynamics is less developed, notable findings have been made on this issue through detailed documentation of magnetic self-organization phenomena in fusion plasmas. Application of magnetic reconnection physics to astrophysical plasmas is also brie y discussed.

  2. Microfabricated silicon biosensors for microphysiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bousse, L. J.; Libby, J. M.; Parce, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    Microphysiometers are biosensor devices that measure the metabolic rate of living cells by detecting the rate of extracellular acidification caused by a small number of cells. The cells are entrapped in a microvolume chamber, whose bottom surface is a silicon sensor chip. In a further miniaturization step, we have recently fabricated multichannel flow-through chips that will allow greater throughput and multiplicity. Microphysiometer technology can be applied to the detection of microorganisms. We describe the sensitive detection of bacteria and yeast. Further applications of microphysiometry to the characterization of microorganisms can be anticipated.

  3. Microfabricated optofluidic ring resonator structures

    PubMed Central

    Scholten, Kee; Fan, Xudong; Zellers, Edward. T.

    2011-01-01

    We describe the fabrication and preliminary optical characterization of rugged, Si-micromachined optofluidic ring resonator (μOFRR) structures consisting of thin-walled SiOx cylinders with expanded midsections designed to enhance the three-dimensional confinement of whispering gallery modes (WGMs). These μOFRR structures were grown thermally at wafer scale on the interior of Si molds defined by deep-reactive-ion etching and pre-treated to reduce surface roughness. Devices 85-μm tall with 2-μm thick walls and inner diameters ranging from 50 to 200 μm supported pure-mode WGMs with Q-factors >104 near 985 nm. Advantages for eventual vapor detection in gas chromatographic microsystems are highlighted. PMID:22053110

  4. FIB Microfabrication Software Design Considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, W.; Bowe, T.; Morlock, S.; Moskowitz, A.; Plourde, G.; Spaulding, G.; Scialdone, C.; Tsiang, E.

    1986-06-01

    Profit margins on high-volume ICs, such as the 256-K DRAM, are now inadequate. U.S. and foreign manufacturers cannot fully recover the ICs' engineering costs before a new round of product competition begins. Consequently, some semiconductor manufacturers are seeking less competitive designs with healthier, longer lasting profitability. These designs must be converted quickly from CAD to functional circuits in order for irofits to be realized. For ultrahigh performance devices, customized circuits, and rapid verification of design, FIB (focused ion beam) systems provide a viable alternative to the lengthy process of producing a large mask set. Early models of FI equipment did not require sophisticated software. However, as FIB technology approaches adolescence, it must be supported by software that gives the user a friendly system, the flexibility to design a wide variety of circuits, and good growth potential for tomorrow's ICs. Presented here is an overview of IBT's MicroFocus" 150 hardware, followed by descriptions of several MicroFocus software modules. Data preparation techniques from IBCAD formats to chip layout are compared to the more conventional lithographies. The MicroFocus 150 schemes for user interfacing, error logging, calibration, and subsystem control are given. The MicroFocus's pattern generator and bit slice software are explained. IBT's FIB patterning algorithms, which allow the fabrication of unique device types, are reviewed.

  5. Microfabricated Ice-Detection Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeAnna, Russell G.; Mehregany, Mehran; Roy, Shuvo; Zakar, Eugene

    1997-01-01

    Knowledge of ice conditions on important aircraft lift and control surfaces is critical for safe operation. These conditions can be determined with conventional ice-detection sensors, but these sensors are often expensive, require elaborate installation procedures, and interrupt the airflow. A micromachined, silicon-based, flush-mounted sensor which generates no internal heat has been designed, batch fabricated, packaged, and tested. The sensor is capable of distinguishing between an ice-covered and a clean surface. It employs a bulk micromachined wafer with a 7 micrometer-thick, boron-doped, silicon diaphragm which serves as one plate of a parallel-plate capacitor. This is bonded to a second silicon wafer which contains the fixed electrodes, one to drive the diaphragm by application of a voltage, the other to measure the deflection by a change in capacitance. The diaphragm sizes ranged from 1x1 mm to 3x3 mm, and the gap between parallel-plate capacitors is 2 micrometers. A 200 V d.c. was applied to the driving electrode which caused the capacitance to increase approximately 0.6pf, from a nominal capacitance of 0.6pf, when the surface was ice free. After the sensor was cooled below the freezing point of water, the same voltage range was applied to the drive electrode. The capacitance increased by the same amount. Then a drop of water was placed over the diaphragm and allowed to freeze. This created an approximately 2mm-thick ice layer. The applied 200V d.c. produced no change in capacitance, confirming that the diaphragm was locked to the ice layer. Since the sensor uses capacitive actuation, it uses very little power and is an ideal candidate for inclusion in a wireless sensing system.

  6. Isolation of cells for selective treatment and analysis using a magnetic microfluidic chip

    PubMed Central

    Yassine, O.; Gooneratne, C. P.; Abu Smara, D.; Li, F.; Mohammed, H.; Merzaban, J.; Kosel, J.

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the development and testing of a magnetic microfluidic chip (MMC) for trapping and isolating cells tagged with superparamagnetic beads (SPBs) in a microfluidic environment for selective treatment and analysis. The trapping and isolation are done in two separate steps; first, the trapping of the tagged cells in a main channel is achieved by soft ferromagnetic disks and second, the transportation of the cells into side chambers for isolation is executed by tapered conductive paths made of Gold (Au). Numerical simulations were performed to analyze the magnetic flux and force distributions of the disks and conducting paths, for trapping and transporting SPBs. The MMC was fabricated using standard microfabrication processes. Experiments were performed with E. coli (K12 strand) tagged with 2.8 μm SPBs. The results showed that E. coli can be separated from a sample solution by trapping them at the disk sites, and then isolated into chambers by transporting them along the tapered conducting paths. Once the E. coli was trapped inside the side chambers, two selective treatments were performed. In one chamber, a solution with minimal nutrition content was added and, in another chamber, a solution with essential nutrition was added. The results showed that the growth of bacteria cultured in the second chamber containing nutrient was significantly higher, demonstrating that the E. coli was not affected by the magnetically driven transportation and the feasibility of performing different treatments on selectively isolated cells on a single microfluidic platform. PMID:25379074

  7. Ferroelectricity in spiral magnets.

    PubMed

    Mostovoy, Maxim

    2006-02-17

    It was recently observed that the ferroelectrics showing the strongest sensitivity to an applied magnetic field are spiral magnets. We present a phenomenological theory of inhomogeneous ferroelectric magnets, which describes their thermodynamics and magnetic field behavior, e.g., dielectric susceptibility anomalies at magnetic transitions and sudden flops of electric polarization in an applied magnetic field. We show that electric polarization can also be induced at domain walls and that magnetic vortices carry electric charge. PMID:16606047

  8. Magnetic Nanoparticle Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Isaac; Josephson, Lee

    2009-01-01

    Many types of biosensors employ magnetic nanoparticles (diameter = 5–300 nm) or magnetic particles (diameter = 300–5,000 nm) which have been surface functionalized to recognize specific molecular targets. Here we cover three types of biosensors that employ different biosensing principles, magnetic materials, and instrumentation. The first type consists of magnetic relaxation switch assay-sensors, which are based on the effects magnetic particles exert on water proton relaxation rates. The second type consists of magnetic particle relaxation sensors, which determine the relaxation of the magnetic moment within the magnetic particle. The third type is magnetoresistive sensors, which detect the presence of magnetic particles on the surface of electronic devices that are sensitive to changes in magnetic fields on their surface. Recent improvements in the design of magnetic nanoparticles (and magnetic particles), together with improvements in instrumentation, suggest that magnetic material-based biosensors may become widely used in the future. PMID:22408498

  9. Biomimetic magnetic silk scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Samal, Sangram K; Dash, Mamoni; Shelyakova, Tatiana; Declercq, Heidi A; Uhlarz, Marc; Bañobre-López, Manuel; Dubruel, Peter; Cornelissen, Maria; Herrmannsdörfer, Thomas; Rivas, Jose; Padeletti, Giuseppina; De Smedt, Stefaan; Braeckmans, Kevin; Kaplan, David L; Dediu, V Alek

    2015-03-25

    Magnetic silk fibroin protein (SFP) scaffolds integrating magnetic materials and featuring magnetic gradients were prepared for potential utility in magnetic-field assisted tissue engineering. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were introduced into SFP scaffolds via dip-coating methods, resulting in magnetic SFP scaffolds with different strengths of magnetization. Magnetic SFP scaffolds showed excellent hyperthermia properties achieving temperature increases up to 8 °C in about 100 s. The scaffolds were not toxic to osteogenic cells and improved cell adhesion and proliferation. These findings suggest that tailored magnetized silk-based biomaterials can be engineered with interesting features for biomaterials and tissue-engineering applications.

  10. Electrically Tunable Magnetism in Magnetic Topological Insulators.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Lian, Biao; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    2015-07-17

    The external controllability of the magnetic properties in topological insulators would be important both for fundamental and practical interests. Here we predict the electric-field control of ferromagnetism in a thin film of insulating magnetic topological insulators. The decrease of band inversion by the application of electric fields results in a reduction of magnetic susceptibility, and hence in the modification of magnetism. Remarkably, the electric field could even induce the magnetic quantum phase transition from ferromagnetism to paramagnetism. We further propose a transistor device in which the dissipationless charge transport of chiral edge states is controlled by an electric field. In particular, the field-controlled ferromagnetism in a magnetic topological insulator can be used for voltage based writing of magnetic random access memories in magnetic tunnel junctions. The simultaneous electrical control of magnetic order and chiral edge transport in such devices may lead to electronic and spintronic applications for topological insulators.

  11. Magnetic Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Gonzalez, Walter D.

    1998-01-01

    One of the oldest mysteries in geomagnetism is the linkage between solar and geomagnetic activity. The 11-year cycles of both the numbers of sunspots and Earth geomagnetic storms were first noted by Sabine. A few years later, speculation on a causal relationship between flares and storms arose when Carrington reported that a large magnetic storm followed the great September 1859 solar flare. However, it was not until this century that a well-accepted statistical survey on large solar flares and geomagnetic storms was performed, and a significant correlation between flares and geomagnetic storms was noted. Although the two phenomena, one on the Sun and the other on the Earth, were statistically correlated, the exact physical linkage was still an unknown at this time. Various hypotheses were proposed, but it was not until interplanetary spacecraft measurements were available that a high-speed plasma stream rich in helium was associated with an intense solar flare. The velocity of the solar wind increased just prior to and during the helium passage, identifying the solar ejecta for the first time. Space plasma measurements and Skylab's coronagraph images of coronal mass elections (CMES) from the Sun firmly established the plasma link between the Sun and the Earth. One phenomenon associated with magnetic storms is brilliant "blood" red auroras, as shown.

  12. Superconducting magnet

    DOEpatents

    Satti, John A.

    1980-01-01

    A superconducting magnet designed to produce magnetic flux densities of the order of 4 to 5 Webers per square meter is constructed by first forming a cable of a plurality of matrixed superconductor wires with each wire of the plurality insulated from each other one. The cable is shaped into a rectangular cross-section and is wound with tape in an open spiral to create cooling channels. Coils are wound in a calculated pattern in saddle shapes to produce desired fields, such as dipoles, quadrupoles, and the like. Wedges are inserted between adjacent cables as needed to maintain substantially radial placement of the long dimensions of cross sections of the cables. After winding, individual strands in each of the cables are brought out to terminals and are interconnected to place all of the strands in series and to maximize the propagation of a quench by alternating conduction from an inner layer to an outer layer and from top half to bottom half as often as possible. Individual layers are separated from others by spiraled aluminum spacers to facilitate cooling. The wound coil is wrapped with an epoxy tape that is cured by heat and then machined to an interference fit with an outer aluminum pipe which is then affixed securely to the assembled coil by heating it to make a shrink fit. In an alternate embodiment, one wire of the cable is made of copper or the like to be heated externally to propagate a quench.

  13. Development of Magnetic Refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogiwara, Hiroyasu; Nakagome, Hideki; Kuriyama, Tohru

    A series of R & D of magnetic refrigerators has been done in order to realize an advanced type cryocooler for superconducting magnets of maglev trains and MRI medical system. As a result of efforts on both the magnetic refrigerator and superconducting magnets, a parasitic type magnetic refrigeration system was proposed.

  14. Permanent magnet assembly

    DOEpatents

    Chell, Jeremy; Zimm, Carl B.

    2006-12-12

    A permanent magnet assembly is disclosed that is adapted to provide a magnetic field across an arc-shaped gap. Such a permanent magnet assembly can be used, for example, to provide a time-varying magnetic field to an annular region for use in a magnetic refrigerator.

  15. The magnetization process: Hysteresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balsamel, Richard

    1990-01-01

    The magnetization process, hysteresis (the difference in the path of magnetization for an increasing and decreasing magnetic field), hysteresis loops, and hard magnetic materials are discussed. The fabrication of classroom projects for demonstrating hysteresis and the hysteresis of common magnetic materials is described in detail.

  16. Magnet innovations for linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Halbach, K.

    1986-06-01

    It is possible to produce large magnetic fields at the aperture of permanent magnet quadrupoles, even when the magnetic aperture is very small. That, combined with their compactness, makes permanent magnet quadrupoles very powerful components of small aperture linacs. Results will be presented about past and present work on both fixed and variable strength permanent magnets suitable for use in and around linacs.

  17. Magnetic field sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Nicolas

    2012-09-01

    Earlier papers1-3 in this journal have described experiments on measuring the magnetic fields of current-carrying wires and permanent magnets using magnetic field probes of various kinds. This paper explains how to use an iPad and the free app MagnetMeter-3D Vector Magnetometer and Accelerometer4 (compass HD) to measure the magnetic fields.

  18. Magnetization dynamics using ultrashort magnetic field pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tudosa, Ioan

    Very short and well shaped magnetic field pulses can be generated using ultra-relativistic electron bunches at Stanford Linear Accelerator. These fields of several Tesla with duration of several picoseconds are used to study the response of magnetic materials to a very short excitation. Precession of a magnetic moment by 90 degrees in a field of 1 Tesla takes about 10 picoseconds, so we explore the range of fast switching of the magnetization by precession. Our experiments are in a region of magnetic excitation that is not yet accessible by other methods. The current table top experiments can generate fields longer than 100 ps and with strength of 0.1 Tesla only. Two types of magnetic were used, magnetic recording media and model magnetic thin films. Information about the magnetization dynamics is extracted from the magnetic patterns generated by the magnetic field. The shape and size of these patterns are influenced by the dissipation of angular momentum involved in the switching process. The high-density recording media, both in-plane and perpendicular type, shows a pattern which indicates a high spin momentum dissipation. The perpendicular magnetic recording media was exposed to multiple magnetic field pulses. We observed an extended transition region between switched and non-switched areas indicating a stochastic switching behavior that cannot be explained by thermal fluctuations. The model films consist of very thin crystalline Fe films on GaAs. Even with these model films we see an enhanced dissipation compared to ferromagnetic resonance studies. The magnetic patterns show that damping increases with time and it is not a constant as usually assumed in the equation describing the magnetization dynamics. The simulation using the theory of spin-wave scattering explains only half of the observed damping. An important feature of this theory is that the spin dissipation is time dependent and depends on the large angle between the magnetization and the magnetic

  19. Magnetism of Carbonados

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kletetschka, G.; Taylor, P. T.; Wasilewski, P. J.

    2000-01-01

    Origin of Carbonado is not clear. Magnetism of Carbonado comes from the surface, indicating contemporary formation of both the surface and magnetic carriers. The interior of carbonado is relatively free of magnetic phases.

  20. Samarium/Cobalt Magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, D.; Kumar, K.; Frost, R.; Chang, C.

    1985-01-01

    Intrinsic magnetic coercivities of samarium cobalt magnets made to approach theoretical limit of 350 kA/m by carefully eliminating oxygen from finished magnet by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). HIP process viable alternative to currently used sintering process.