Science.gov

Sample records for microfabricated magnetic sifter

  1. Magnetic sifters and biochips for early diagnosis and therapy monitoring of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earhart, Chris

    2008-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles conjugated with biomolecules or recognition moieties are finding wide applications in medicine. In this context, we are developing a micromachined magnetic sifter and magnetic nanoparticles aimed for sample preparation applications in early diagnosis of cancer. The microfabricated sifter consisting of arrays of micron sized slits etched through a silicon wafer. A magnetic film is deposited on the wafer, producing high magnetic field gradients, comparable in magnitude to gradients in planar flow devices. As the solution flows through the die, magnetic particles are captured by the magnetic material surrounding the slits. The large number of slits allows for processing of large volumes of liquid, much greater than that of planar microfluidic devices. The sifters can be simply attached to a syringe or tube, resulting in a portable and user-friendly tool for molecular biology. Separation efficiencies of ˜ 50% for one pass through the sifter have been achieved. We have also designed and fabricated several types of magnetic biochips consisting of arrays of giant magnetoresistive (GMR) spin valve detectors with appropriate dimensions, surface chemistry, and microfluidics. An advanced electronic test station has been set up as a demonstration vehicle for the integrated evaluation of our magnetic biochips with commercial and custom magnetic nanoparticle labels for DNA or protein biomarkers. The magnetic biochip is capable of detecting down to 1-30 nanotags. Real-time detection of DNA signatures and protein targets in buffer and serum samples has been successfully performed in our laboratories, suggesting that magnetic biochips hold great promises for molecular diagnostics of cancer and other diseases. In collaboration with Chris M. Earhart, Wei Hu, Robert J. Wilson, Sebastian J. Osterfeld, Robert L. White, Nader Pourmand, and Shan X. Wang @ Stanford University. This work was supported by grants from NIH (1U54CA119367-01) and DARPA/Navy (N00014-02-1-0807).

  2. Isolation and mutational analysis of circulating tumor cells from lung cancer patients with magnetic sifters and biochips†

    PubMed Central

    Earhart, Christopher M.; Hughes, Casey E.; Gaster, Richard S.; Ooi, Chin Chun; Wilson, Robert J.; Zhou, Lisa Y.; Humke, Eric W.; Xu, Lingyun; Wong, Dawson J.; Willingham, Stephen B.; Schwartz, Erich J.; Weissman, Irving L.; Jeffrey, Stefanie S.; Neal, Joel W.; Rohatgi, Rajat; Wakelee, Heather A.; Wang, Shan X.

    2014-01-01

    Detection and characterization of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) may reveal insights into the diagnosis and treatment of malignant disease. Technologies for isolating CTCs developed thus far suffer from one or more limitations, such as low throughput, inability to release captured cells, and reliance on expensive instrumentation for enrichment or subsequent characterization. We report a continuing development of a magnetic separation device, the magnetic sifter, which is a miniature microfluidic chip with a dense array of magnetic pores. It offers high efficiency capture of tumor cells, labeled with magnetic nanoparticles, from whole blood with high throughput and efficient release of captured cells. For subsequent characterization of CTCs, an assay, using a protein chip with giant magnetoresistive nanosensors, has been implemented for mutational analysis of CTCs enriched with the magnetic sifter. The use of these magnetic technologies, which are separate devices, may lead the way to routine preparation and characterization of “liquid biopsies” from cancer patients. PMID:23969419

  3. Spin annihilations of and spin sifters for transverse electric and transverse magnetic waves in co- and counter-rotations

    PubMed Central

    Mok, Jinsik

    2014-01-01

    Summary This study is motivated in part to better understand multiplexing in wireless communications, which employs photons carrying varying angular momenta. In particular, we examine both transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) waves in either co-rotations or counter-rotations. To this goal, we analyze both Poynting-vector flows and orbital and spin parts of the energy flow density for the combined fields. Consequently, we find not only enhancements but also cancellations between the two modes. To our surprise, the photon spins in the azimuthal direction exhibit a complete annihilation for the counter-rotational case even if the intensities of the colliding waves are of different magnitudes. In contrast, the orbital flow density disappears only if the two intensities satisfy a certain ratio. In addition, the concepts of spin sifters and enantiomer sorting are illustrated. PMID:25383300

  4. A microfabricated optically-pumped magnetic gradiometer.

    PubMed

    Sheng, D; Perry, A R; Krzyzewski, S P; Geller, S; Kitching, J; Knappe, S

    2017-01-16

    We report on the development of a microfabricated atomic magnetic gradiometer based on optical spectroscopy of alkali atoms in the vapor phase. The gradiometer, which operates in the spin-exchange relaxation free regime, has a length of 60 mm and cross sectional diameter of 12 mm, and consists of two chip-scale atomic magnetometers which are interrogated by a common laser light. The sensor can measure differences in magnetic fields, over a 20 mm baseline, of 10 fT/[Formula: see text] at frequencies above 20 Hz. The maximum rejection of magnetic field noise is 1000 at 10 Hz. By use of a set of compensation coils wrapped around the sensor, we also measure the sensor sensitivity at several external bias field strengths up to 150 mG. This device is useful for applications that require both sensitive gradient field information and high common-mode noise cancellation.

  5. A microfabricated optically-pumped magnetic gradiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, D.; Perry, A. R.; Krzyzewski, S. P.; Geller, S.; Kitching, J.; Knappe, S.

    2017-01-01

    We report on the development of a microfabricated atomic magnetic gradiometer based on optical spectroscopy of alkali atoms in the vapor phase. The gradiometer, which operates in the spin-exchange relaxation free regime, has a length of 60 mm and cross sectional diameter of 12 mm, and consists of two chip-scale atomic magnetometers which are interrogated by a common laser light. The sensor can measure differences in magnetic fields, over a 20 mm baseline, of 10 fT/ Hz1 /2 at frequencies above 20 Hz. The maximum rejection of magnetic field noise is 1000 at 10 Hz. By use of a set of compensation coils wrapped around the sensor, we also measure the sensor sensitivity at several external bias field strengths up to 150 mG. This device is useful for applications that require both sensitive gradient field information and high common-mode noise cancellation.

  6. Microfabricated Ion Beam Drivers for Magnetized Target Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persaud, Arun; Seidl, Peter; Ji, Qing; Ardanuc, Serhan; Miller, Joseph; Lal, Amit; Schenkel, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Efficient, low-cost drivers are important for Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF). Ion beams offer a high degree of control to deliver the required mega joules of driver energy for MTF and they can be matched to several types of magnetized fuel targets, including compact toroids and solid targets. We describe an ion beam driver approach based on the MEQALAC concept (Multiple Electrostatic Quadrupole Array Linear Accelerator) with many beamlets in an array of micro-fabricated channels. The channels consist of a lattice of electrostatic quadrupoles (ESQ) for focusing and of radio-frequency (RF) electrodes for ion acceleration. Simulations with particle-in-cell and beam envelope codes predict >10x higher current densities compared to state-of-the-art ion accelerators. This increase results from dividing the total ion beam current up into many beamlets to control space charge forces. Focusing elements can be biased taking advantage of high breakdown electric fields in sub-mm structures formed using MEMS techniques (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems). We will present results on ion beam transport and acceleration in MEMS based beamlets. Acknowledgments: This work is supported by the U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  7. Microfabricated magnetic structures for future medicine: from sensors to cell actuators.

    PubMed

    Vitol, Elina A; Novosad, Valentyn; Rozhkova, Elena A

    2012-10-01

    In this review, we discuss the prospective medical application of magnetic carriers microfabricated by top-down techniques. Physical methods allow the fabrication of a variety of magnetic structures with tightly controlled magnetic properties and geometry, which makes them very attractive for a cost-efficient mass-production in the fast growing field of nanomedicine. Stand-alone fabricated particles along with integrated devices combining lithographically defined magnetic structures and synthesized magnetic tags will be considered. Applications of microfabricated multifunctional magnetic structures for future medicinal purposes range from ultrasensitive in vitro diagnostic bioassays, DNA sequencing and microfluidic cell sorting to magnetomechanical actuation, cargo delivery, contrast enhancement and heating therapy.

  8. 7 CFR 58.224 - Sifters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... stainless steel or other equally noncorrosive material and shall be of sanitary construction and accessible for cleaning and inspection. The mesh size of sifter screen used for various dry dairy products...

  9. 7 CFR 58.224 - Sifters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... for cleaning and inspection. The mesh size of sifter screen used for various dry dairy products shall... MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT (CONTINUED) GRADING AND INSPECTION, GENERAL SPECIFICATIONS FOR APPROVED PLANTS AND STANDARDS FOR GRADES OF DAIRY PRODUCTS 1 General Specifications for...

  10. Micro-fabricated integrated coil and magnetic circuit and method of manufacturing thereof

    DOEpatents

    Mihailovich, Robert E.; Papavasiliou, Alex P.; Mehrotra, Vivek; Stupar, Philip A.; Borwick, III, Robert L.; Ganguli, Rahul; DeNatale, Jeffrey F.

    2017-03-28

    A micro-fabricated electromagnetic device is provided for on-circuit integration. The electromagnetic device includes a core. The core has a plurality of electrically insulating layers positioned alternatingly between a plurality of magnetic layers to collectively form a continuous laminate having alternating magnetic and electrically insulating layers. The electromagnetic device includes a coil embedded in openings of the semiconductor substrate. An insulating material is positioned in the cavity and between the coil and an inner surface of the core. A method of manufacturing the electromagnetic device includes providing a semiconductor substrate having openings formed therein. Windings of a coil are electroplated and embedded in the openings. The insulating material is coated on or around an exposed surface of the coil. Alternating magnetic layers and electrically insulating layers may be micro-fabricated and electroplated as a single and substantially continuous segment on or around the insulating material.

  11. Evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging issues for implantable microfabricated magnetic actuators.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyowon; Xu, Qing; Shellock, Frank G; Bergsneider, Marvin; Judy, Jack W

    2014-02-01

    The mechanical robustness of microfabricated torsional magnetic actuators in withstanding the strong static fields (7 T) and time-varying field gradients (17 T/m) produced by an MR system was studied in this investigation. The static and dynamic mechanical characteristics of 30 devices were quantitatively measured before and after exposure to both strong uniform and non-uniform magnetic fields. The results showed no statistically significant change in both the static and dynamic mechanical performance, which mitigate concerns about the mechanical stability of these devices in association with MR systems under the conditions used for this assessment. The MR-induced heating was also measured in a 3-T/128-MHz MR system. The results showed a minimal increase (1.6 °C) in temperature due to the presence of the magnetic microactuator array. Finally, the size of the MR-image artifacts created by the magnetic microdevices were quantified. The signal loss caused by the devices was approximately four times greater than the size of the device.

  12. Development and testing of a synchronous micropump based on electroplated coils and microfabricated polymer magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halhouli, A. T. Al; Kilani, M. I.; Waldschik, A.; Phataralaoha, A.; Büttgenbach, S.

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, the concept, fabrication, activation and testing of a novel synchronous micropump based on microfabricated copper coils and polymer magnets are presented. The pump works by the synchronized rotation of two polymer magnets in an annular SU-8 microfluidic channel. Magnet rotation is achieved by sequentially activating a set of planar coils to repel or attract the first magnet (traveling magnet) through the channel, while the second one is anchored between the inlet and the outlet ports. At the end of each pumping cycle, the magnets exchange their anchored and traveling functions. The synchronization of magnet rotation has been achieved through programming two activation schemes that proved the high dependence of the pump operation and performance on employed activation scheme parameters. The magnetic forces exerted from electroplated coils on the polymer magnet were tested experimentally using a three-dimensional force sensor. Different coil dimensions have been investigated. A maximum force of 658 µN at an applied current of 138 mA was achieved. The micropump has successfully pumped water with rotational speeds up to 83.33 rpm. Water flow rates in the range of 17.3 µL min-1 at 31.25 rpm to 158.7 µL min-1 at 83.33 rpm were achieved.

  13. A microfabricated magnetic force transducer-microaspiration system for studying membrane mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, D. J.; Killian, T. C.; Raphael, R. M.

    2011-10-01

    The application of forces to cell membranes is a powerful method for studying membrane mechanics. To apply controlled dynamic forces on the piconewton scale, we designed and characterized a microfabricated magnetic force transducer (MMFT) consisting of current-carrying gold wires patterned on a sapphire substrate. The experimentally measured forces applied to paramagnetic and ferromagnetic beads as a function of applied current agree well with theoretical models. We used this device to pull tethers from microaspirated giant unilamellar vesicles and measure the threshold force for tether formation. In addition, the interlayer drag coefficient of the membrane was determined from the tether-return velocity under magnetic force-free conditions. At high levels of current, vesicles expanded as a result of local temperature changes. A finite element thermal model of the MMFT provided absolute temperature calibration, allowing determination of the thermal expansivity coefficient of stearoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidycholine vesicles (1.7 ± 0.4 × 10-3 K-1) and characterization of the Joule heating associated with current passing through the device. This effect can be used as a sensitive probe of temperature changes on the microscale. These studies establish the MMFT as an effective tool for applying precise forces to membranes at controlled rates and quantitatively studying membrane mechanical and thermo-mechanical properties.

  14. Permanent magnet desktop magnetic resonance imaging system with microfabricated multiturn gradient coils for microflow imaging in capillary tubes.

    PubMed

    Sahebjavaher, Ramin S; Walus, Konrad; Stoeber, Boris

    2010-02-01

    A prototype for a desktop high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) velocimetry instrument to characterize flow fields in a capillary tube is demonstrated. This inexpensive compact system is achieved with a 0.6 T permanent magnetic configuration (Larmor frequency of 25 MHz) and temperature compensation using off-the-shelf NdFeB permanent magnets. A triaxial gradient module with microfabricated copper coils using a lithographic fabrication process has been developed. This gradient module is capable of generating fast-switching gradients (<100 micros) with amplitudes up to 1.7 T/m using custom made current amplifiers, and was optimized for microflow imaging. The radio frequency probe is integrated with the gradient module and is driven by custom electronics. A two-dimensional (2D) cross-sectional static image of the inside of a capillary tube with an inner diameter of 1.67 mm is acquired at an in-plane spatial resolution of better than 40 microm. Time-of-flight flow measurements were also obtained using this MRI system to measure the velocity profile of water flowing at average velocities of above 50 mm/s. The flow profile for slower flow velocities was obtained using phase-encoded techniques, which provides quantitative velocity information in 2D.

  15. 7 CFR 58.246 - Cleaning of dryers, collectors, conveyors, ducts, sifters and storage bins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cleaning of dryers, collectors, conveyors, ducts, sifters and storage bins. 58.246 Section 58.246 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture..., conveyors, ducts, sifters and storage bins. This equipment shall be cleaned as often as is necessary...

  16. SIFTER search: a web server for accurate phylogeny-based protein function prediction

    PubMed Central

    Sahraeian, Sayed M.; Luo, Kevin R.; Brenner, Steven E.

    2015-01-01

    We are awash in proteins discovered through high-throughput sequencing projects. As only a minuscule fraction of these have been experimentally characterized, computational methods are widely used for automated annotation. Here, we introduce a user-friendly web interface for accurate protein function prediction using the SIFTER algorithm. SIFTER is a state-of-the-art sequence-based gene molecular function prediction algorithm that uses a statistical model of function evolution to incorporate annotations throughout the phylogenetic tree. Due to the resources needed by the SIFTER algorithm, running SIFTER locally is not trivial for most users, especially for large-scale problems. The SIFTER web server thus provides access to precomputed predictions on 16 863 537 proteins from 232 403 species. Users can explore SIFTER predictions with queries for proteins, species, functions, and homologs of sequences not in the precomputed prediction set. The SIFTER web server is accessible at http://sifter.berkeley.edu/ and the source code can be downloaded. PMID:25979264

  17. SIFTER search: a web server for accurate phylogeny-based protein function prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Sahraeian, Sayed M.; Luo, Kevin R.; Brenner, Steven E.

    2015-05-15

    We are awash in proteins discovered through high-throughput sequencing projects. As only a minuscule fraction of these have been experimentally characterized, computational methods are widely used for automated annotation. Here, we introduce a user-friendly web interface for accurate protein function prediction using the SIFTER algorithm. SIFTER is a state-of-the-art sequence-based gene molecular function prediction algorithm that uses a statistical model of function evolution to incorporate annotations throughout the phylogenetic tree. Due to the resources needed by the SIFTER algorithm, running SIFTER locally is not trivial for most users, especially for large-scale problems. The SIFTER web server thus provides access to precomputed predictions on 16 863 537 proteins from 232 403 species. Users can explore SIFTER predictions with queries for proteins, species, functions, and homologs of sequences not in the precomputed prediction set. Lastly, the SIFTER web server is accessible at http://sifter.berkeley.edu/ and the source code can be downloaded.

  18. SIFTER search: a web server for accurate phylogeny-based protein function prediction

    DOE PAGES

    Sahraeian, Sayed M.; Luo, Kevin R.; Brenner, Steven E.

    2015-05-15

    We are awash in proteins discovered through high-throughput sequencing projects. As only a minuscule fraction of these have been experimentally characterized, computational methods are widely used for automated annotation. Here, we introduce a user-friendly web interface for accurate protein function prediction using the SIFTER algorithm. SIFTER is a state-of-the-art sequence-based gene molecular function prediction algorithm that uses a statistical model of function evolution to incorporate annotations throughout the phylogenetic tree. Due to the resources needed by the SIFTER algorithm, running SIFTER locally is not trivial for most users, especially for large-scale problems. The SIFTER web server thus provides access tomore » precomputed predictions on 16 863 537 proteins from 232 403 species. Users can explore SIFTER predictions with queries for proteins, species, functions, and homologs of sequences not in the precomputed prediction set. Lastly, the SIFTER web server is accessible at http://sifter.berkeley.edu/ and the source code can be downloaded.« less

  19. 7 CFR 58.246 - Cleaning of dryers, collectors, conveyors, ducts, sifters and storage bins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Cleaning of dryers, collectors, conveyors, ducts, sifters and storage bins. 58.246 Section 58.246 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture..., conveyors, ducts, sifters and storage bins. This equipment shall be cleaned as often as is necessary...

  20. Micro-fabricated racetrack inductors with thin-film magnetic cores for on-chip power conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harburg, Daniel Vincent

    The accelerating trend to miniaturize electronic systems and devices is placing large demands on the components responsible for delivering electrical power to these systems. Most power conversion circuits require magnetic components (inductors and transformers) in order to operate at high efficiencies; these components, however, have not yet been widely miniaturized and integrated with electronic components that are fabricated in a CMOS process and are most often realized as discrete off-chip components. Improved on-chip inductors are therefore required to realize a monolithic Power Supply On-Chip (PwrSoC) for electronic systems where size and efficiency are of critical importance. This thesis presents design, modeling, optimization, and micro-fabrication techniques for building chip-scale racetrack power inductors with thin-film magnetic cores. Our in- ductors are designed for high-power-density and high-efficiency dc-dc converters which transfer 25 W of power at frequencies between 5 and 30 MHz. The dc-dc converter is designed to serve as a high-input-voltage solid-state lighting driver. Magnetic components on silicon substrates with sputtered Co-Zr-O magnetic cores are optimized using a series of models that characterize each inductor loss mechanism. The optimized designs were fabricated and tested at small-signal levels and in the high-frequency power converter. The converter achieves an 89% conversion efficiency at 5 MHz with an inductor power density of 1 W/mm2 of substrate area. Small-signal measurements of the inductors are compared with modeled predictions to validate the design optimization approach. Fabricated compo- nents achieve inductance values of 1.2 iH and peak quality factors of 15.1 at 8.3 MHz.

  1. Micro-fabricated magnetic microcalorimeter development for x-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandler, Simon R.; Adams, Joseph S.; Beyer, Joern; Hseih, Wen-Ting; Rotzinger, Hannes; Seidel, George M.; Stevenson, Thomas

    2008-07-01

    X-ray microcalorimeters using magnetic sensors show great promise for use in astronomical x-ray spectroscopy. We have begun to develop technology for fabricating arrays of magnetic calorimeters for X-ray astronomy. The magnetization change in each pixel of the paramagnetic sensor material due to the heat input of an absorbed x-ray is sensed by a meander shaped coil. With this geometry it is possible to obtain excellent energy sensitivity, low magnetic cross-talk and large format arrays fabricated on wafers that are separate from the SQUID read-out. We report on the results from our prototype arrays, which are coupled to low noise 2-stage SQUIDs developed at the PTB Berlin. The first testing results are presented and the sensitivity compared with calculations.

  2. A Program of Research on Microfabrication Techniques for VLSI Magnetic Devices.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-01

    these films is less than Hk - 4wMs. Accordingly we have chosen to investigate samarium additions to cobalt chrome. Samarium cobalt is well known as a...permanent magnet material offering coercive forces up to about 30,000 gauss. We therefore believe that high coercive force samarium cobalt chromium...magnetic moment to a suitable value. Three rare earths are substituted for yttrium; samarium , thulium, and gadolinium. The amounts of each substituting

  3. Laser micro-bending for precise micro-fabrication of magnetic disk drive components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, Naohisa

    2003-11-01

    Laser Micro-Bending technology attracts attention as one of the laser processing technology promising from now on. It has the feature that does not contact and does not have the spring back that fabrication in high accuracy can be performed. In our company, Laser Micro-Bending technology development is tackled about ten years before, and the laser bending fabrication technology of a sheet metal and ceramic material has so far been established. It has utilized as rapid prototyping of the sheet metal. But, by re-examination of laser oscillation control etc., it finds out that it is the excellent processing method for manufacture of the high precision mechanism parts for magnetic disk drives. This report explains the technology and machines of the roll and pitch adjustment of a magnetic head suspension, and flatting or crowning of the air bearing surface of a magnetic head slider by using Laser Micro-Bending technology.

  4. A Program of Research on Microfabrication Techniques for VLSI Magnetic Devices.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-01

    resonance measurements were done using a wideband microwave spectrometer, to determine the magnetic...for YIG. After Hansen [53] 32 Fig. 2-11: Temperature Dependence of Stress Averaging Factor F 34 Fig. 2-12. Frequency Response of the Microwave Signal...Strain uniformity (1M.- . Ol a O-ring radius f Microwave frequency = /2w

  5. A Program of Research on Microfabrication Techniques for VLSI Magnetic Devices.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-01

    in this range was about -0.2%/ 0 C, providing a good match to barium- ferrite permanent magnets. The 1pm bubble materials were in fact tested in ion...of03 0.772 parameters. as well as the crystalline anisotropy field are 203 0.2274 0.174 given for different film compositions. Effects of samarium Zd2...linearly with samarium 0 addition at a rote of 240 Do per samarium ion. Frequency dependence of AM was typically 20 OeIGhz. Gyromagnetic ratio on all 0.5

  6. Laser processes for precise microfabrication of magnetic disk-drive components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Andrew C.

    2000-11-01

    The technique of laser micro-processing has recently found several important and widespread applications in the manufacturing of disk-drive components. Examples provided here include the cleaning of surface contaminants, the formation of nano-bumps on disk surfaces for controlled surface texturing or for making glide height standards, and the micro-bending of magnetic head sliders for flight-height controls. Short-pulsed laser irradiation at suitable wavelength, fluence, and incidence direction can be used to clean off particulate and organic-film contaminants from surfaces of critical components, for example, the slider and the disk. Controlled disk texturing is needed to alleviate the problem of stiction which occurs when the disk stop spinning and the super smooth slider comes into stationary contact with the super smooth disk. A compact laser operating at high pulse repetition rate can be used to produce a low-stiction racetrack composed of typically a million nano-bumps. This can be done both for NiP/aluminum disks, or for glass disks. Single isolated bump with a specified height for providing height-standard can also be tailor-made. Very recently, we have developed a 'laser curvature adjust technique' and implemented it into production of magnetic head sliders. Here, microscopic adjustments of the curvature of air bearing surface of sliders can be produced by suitable laser scribing at the back side of the ceramic slider.

  7. Microfabricated thermionic detector

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Patrick R; Manginell, Ronald P; Wheeler, David R; Trudell, Daniel E

    2012-10-30

    A microfabricated TID comprises a microhotplate and a thermionic source disposed on the microhotplate. The microfabricated TID can provide high sensitivity and selectivity to nitrogen- and phosphorous-containing compounds and other compounds containing electronegative function groups. The microfabricated TID can be microfabricated with semiconductor-based materials. The microfabricated TID can be combined with a microfabricated separation column and used in microanalytical system for the rapid on-site detection of pesticides, chemical warfare agents, explosives, pharmaceuticals, and other organic compounds that contain nitrogen or phosphorus.

  8. Micro-fabricated Helmholtz coil featuring disposable microfluidic sample inserts for applications in nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spengler, N.; Moazenzadeh, A.; Meier, R. Ch; Badilita, V.; Korvink, J. G.; Wallrabe, U.

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we report on a novel, multi-use, high-resolution NMR/MRI micro-detection probe for the screening of flat samples. It is based on a Helmholtz coil pair in the centre of the probe, built out of two 1.5 mm diameter wirebonded copper coils, resulting in a homogeneous distribution of the magnetic field. For liquids and suspensions, custom fabricated, disposable sample inserts are placed inside the pair and aligned automatically, preventing the sensor and the samples from contamination. The sensor was successfully tested in a 500 MHz (11.7 T) spectrometer where we achieved a linewidth of 1.79 Hz (3.58 ppb) of a water phantom. Nutation experiments revealed an overall B1-field uniformity of 92% (ratio in signal intensity at flip angles of 810°/90°), leading to a homogeneous excitation of concentration limited samples. To demonstrate the imaging capabilities of the detector, we acquired images of a solid and a liquid sample—of a piece of leaf, directly inserted into the probe and of a sample insert, filled with a suspension of 50 μm diameter polymer beads and deionized water, with in-plane resolutions of 20 × 20 μ m2 and 10 × 10 μ m2, respectively.

  9. Microfabricated teeter-totter resonator

    DOEpatents

    Adkins, Douglas Ray; Heller, Edwin J.; Shul, Randy J.

    2004-11-23

    A microfabricated teeter-totter resonator comprises a frame, a paddle pivotably anchored to the frame by pivot arms that define an axis of rotation, a current conductor line on a surface of the paddle, means for applying a static magnetic field substantially perpendicular to the rotational axis and in the plane of the paddle, and means for energizing the current conductor line with an alternating current. A Lorentz force is generated by the interaction of the magnetic field with the current flowing in the conductor line, causing the paddle to oscillate about the axis of rotation. The teeter-totter resonator can be fabricated with micromachining techniques with materials used in the integrated circuits manufacturing industry. The microfabricated teeter-totter resonator has many varied applications, both as an actuation device and as a sensor. When used as a chemical sensor, a chemically sensitive coating can be disposed on one or both surfaces of the paddle to enhance the absorption of chemical analytes from a fluid stream. The resulting mass change can be detected as a change in the resonant frequency or phase of the oscillatory motion of the paddle.

  10. Effect of lithographically-induced strain relaxation on the magnetic domain configuration in microfabricated epitaxially grown Fe81Ga19.

    PubMed

    Beardsley, R P; Parkes, D E; Zemen, J; Bowe, S; Edmonds, K W; Reardon, C; Maccherozzi, F; Isakov, I; Warburton, P A; Campion, R P; Gallagher, B L; Cavill, S A; Rushforth, A W

    2017-02-10

    We investigate the role of lithographically-induced strain relaxation in a micron-scaled device fabricated from epitaxial thin films of the magnetostrictive alloy Fe81Ga19. The strain relaxation due to lithographic patterning induces a magnetic anisotropy that competes with the magnetocrystalline and shape induced anisotropies to play a crucial role in stabilising a flux-closing domain pattern. We use magnetic imaging, micromagnetic calculations and linear elastic modelling to investigate a region close to the edges of an etched structure. This highly-strained edge region has a significant influence on the magnetic domain configuration due to an induced magnetic anisotropy resulting from the inverse magnetostriction effect. We investigate the competition between the strain-induced and shape-induced anisotropy energies, and the resultant stable domain configurations, as the width of the bar is reduced to the nanoscale range. Understanding this behaviour will be important when designing hybrid magneto-electric spintronic devices based on highly magnetostrictive materials.

  11. Effect of lithographically-induced strain relaxation on the magnetic domain configuration in microfabricated epitaxially grown Fe81Ga19

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beardsley, R. P.; Parkes, D. E.; Zemen, J.; Bowe, S.; Edmonds, K. W.; Reardon, C.; Maccherozzi, F.; Isakov, I.; Warburton, P. A.; Campion, R. P.; Gallagher, B. L.; Cavill, S. A.; Rushforth, A. W.

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the role of lithographically-induced strain relaxation in a micron-scaled device fabricated from epitaxial thin films of the magnetostrictive alloy Fe81Ga19. The strain relaxation due to lithographic patterning induces a magnetic anisotropy that competes with the magnetocrystalline and shape induced anisotropies to play a crucial role in stabilising a flux-closing domain pattern. We use magnetic imaging, micromagnetic calculations and linear elastic modelling to investigate a region close to the edges of an etched structure. This highly-strained edge region has a significant influence on the magnetic domain configuration due to an induced magnetic anisotropy resulting from the inverse magnetostriction effect. We investigate the competition between the strain-induced and shape-induced anisotropy energies, and the resultant stable domain configurations, as the width of the bar is reduced to the nanoscale range. Understanding this behaviour will be important when designing hybrid magneto-electric spintronic devices based on highly magnetostrictive materials.

  12. The CHAPS, SIFTER, and TAPS-R as Predictors of (C)AP Skills and (C)APD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Wayne J.; Jackson, Alison; Pender, Alice; Rose, Carla; Wilson, Jacqueline; Heine, Chyrisse; Khan, Asad

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors investigated the relationships between 3 tests used to screen for (central) auditory processing disorder ([C]APD)--the Children's Auditory Performance Scale (CHAPS; W. J. Smoski, M. A. Brunt, & J. C. Tannahill, 1998), the Screening Instrument for Targeting Educational Risk (SIFTER; K. Anderson, 1989), and…

  13. Microfabricated ion trap array

    DOEpatents

    Blain, Matthew G.; Fleming, James G.

    2006-12-26

    A microfabricated ion trap array, comprising a plurality of ion traps having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale ion traps to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microfabricated ion trap array with on-chip circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of the microfabricated ion trap array can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  14. Effect of lithographically-induced strain relaxation on the magnetic domain configuration in microfabricated epitaxially grown Fe81Ga19

    PubMed Central

    Beardsley, R. P.; Parkes, D. E.; Zemen, J.; Bowe, S.; Edmonds, K. W.; Reardon, C.; Maccherozzi, F.; Isakov, I.; Warburton, P. A.; Campion, R. P.; Gallagher, B. L.; Cavill, S. A.; Rushforth, A. W.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the role of lithographically-induced strain relaxation in a micron-scaled device fabricated from epitaxial thin films of the magnetostrictive alloy Fe81Ga19. The strain relaxation due to lithographic patterning induces a magnetic anisotropy that competes with the magnetocrystalline and shape induced anisotropies to play a crucial role in stabilising a flux-closing domain pattern. We use magnetic imaging, micromagnetic calculations and linear elastic modelling to investigate a region close to the edges of an etched structure. This highly-strained edge region has a significant influence on the magnetic domain configuration due to an induced magnetic anisotropy resulting from the inverse magnetostriction effect. We investigate the competition between the strain-induced and shape-induced anisotropy energies, and the resultant stable domain configurations, as the width of the bar is reduced to the nanoscale range. Understanding this behaviour will be important when designing hybrid magneto-electric spintronic devices based on highly magnetostrictive materials. PMID:28186114

  15. EPR-correlated dipolar spectroscopy by Q-band chirp SIFTER.

    PubMed

    Doll, Andrin; Jeschke, Gunnar

    2016-08-17

    While two-dimensional correlation spectra contain more information as compared to one-dimensional spectra, typical spectral widths encountered in electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy largely restrict the applicability of correlation techniques. In essence, the monochromatic excitation pulses established in pulsed EPR often cannot uniformly excite the entire spectrum. Here, this restriction is alleviated for nitroxide spin labels at Q-band microwave frequencies around 35 GHz. This is achieved by substitution of monochromatic pulses by frequency-swept chirp pulses tailored for uniform excitation. Unwanted interference effects brought by this substitution are analyzed for a pair of electron spins with secular dipolar coupling. Experimentally, the dipole-dipole interaction can be separated from other interactions by a constant-time Zeeman-compensated solid echo sequence called SIFTER. Such SIFTER experiments usually yield a one-dimensional dipolar spectrum. EPR-correlated dipolar spectra can be obtained when the four pulses are replaced by chirp pulses. These two-dimensional spectra encode additional information on the geometrical arrangement of the two spin labels. With the excitation parameters achieved by a home-built Q-band spectrometer capable of frequency-swept excitation, unwanted interference effects can be largely neglected for the examined model compound with a spin-spin distance of 4 nm. The experimentally obtained correlation pattern conforms to the expectation based on the inter-spin geometry of the investigated rigid model compound.

  16. Microfabricated AC impedance sensor

    DOEpatents

    Krulevitch, Peter; Ackler, Harold D.; Becker, Frederick; Boser, Bernhard E.; Eldredge, Adam B.; Fuller, Christopher K.; Gascoyne, Peter R. C.; Hamilton, Julie K.; Swierkowski, Stefan P.; Wang, Xiao-Bo

    2002-01-01

    A microfabricated instrument for detecting and identifying cells and other particles based on alternating current (AC) impedance measurements. The microfabricated AC impedance sensor includes two critical elements: 1) a microfluidic chip, preferably of glass substrates, having at least one microchannel therein and with electrodes patterned on both substrates, and 2) electrical circuits that connect to the electrodes on the microfluidic chip and detect signals associated with particles traveling down the microchannels. These circuits enable multiple AC impedance measurements of individual particles at high throughput rates with sufficient resolution to identify different particle and cell types as appropriate for environmental detection and clinical diagnostic applications.

  17. Microfabricated diffusion source

    DOEpatents

    Oborny, Michael C.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.; Manginell, Ronald P.

    2008-07-15

    A microfabricated diffusion source to provide for a controlled diffusion rate of a vapor comprises a porous reservoir formed in a substrate that can be filled with a liquid, a headspace cavity for evaporation of the vapor therein, a diffusion channel to provide a controlled diffusion of the vapor, and an outlet to release the vapor into a gas stream. The microfabricated diffusion source can provide a calibration standard for a microanalytical system. The microanalytical system with an integral diffusion source can be fabricated with microelectromechanical systems technologies.

  18. Microfabricated particle focusing device

    DOEpatents

    Ravula, Surendra K.; Arrington, Christian L.; Sigman, Jennifer K.; Branch, Darren W.; Brener, Igal; Clem, Paul G.; James, Conrad D.; Hill, Martyn; Boltryk, Rosemary June

    2013-04-23

    A microfabricated particle focusing device comprises an acoustic portion to preconcentrate particles over large spatial dimensions into particle streams and a dielectrophoretic portion for finer particle focusing into single-file columns. The device can be used for high throughput assays for which it is necessary to isolate and investigate small bundles of particles and single particles.

  19. Microfabricated bragg waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Hadley, G. Ronald

    2004-10-19

    A microfabricated Bragg waveguide of semiconductor-compatible material having a hollow core and a multilayer dielectric cladding can be fabricated by integrated circuit technologies. The microfabricated Bragg waveguide can comprise a hollow channel waveguide or a hollow fiber. The Bragg fiber can be fabricated by coating a sacrificial mandrel or mold with alternating layers of high- and low-refractive-index dielectric materials and then removing the mandrel or mold to leave a hollow tube with a multilayer dielectric cladding. The Bragg channel waveguide can be fabricated by forming a trench embedded in a substrate and coating the inner wall of the trench with a multilayer dielectric cladding. The thicknesses of the alternating layers can be selected to satisfy the condition for minimum radiation loss of the guided wave.

  20. Microfabrication Technology for Photonics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    and W. Wiegmann, Appl. Phys. Lett. 42, 925 (1983). (17) S. Ovadia, H.M. Gibbs, J.L. Jewell, D . Sarid , N. Perghambarian, Optical Eng’g. 24, 565 (1985...DATE 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES C3VERED June 1990 Final Jun 88 - Jun 89 4. lYRE AND SUSTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS C - F306O2-88- D -0027 MICROFABRICATION...Rd, Syracuse NY 13244-5300. 12Za. D ISUTIONIAVAILAIITfY STATEME NT 12b. DISTRIBIJTION CODE Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. 7

  1. Microfabricated Formaldehyde Gas Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Flueckiger, Jonas; Ko, Frank K.; Cheung, Karen C.

    2009-01-01

    Formaldehyde is a volatile organic compound that is widely used in textiles, paper, wood composites, and household materials. Formaldehyde will continuously outgas from manufactured wood products such as furniture, with adverse health effects resulting from prolonged low-level exposure. New, microfabricated sensors for formaldehyde have been developed to meet the need for portable, low-power gas detection. This paper reviews recent work including silicon microhotplates for metal oxide-based detection, enzyme-based electrochemical sensors, and nanowire-based sensors. This paper also investigates the promise of polymer-based sensors for low-temperature, low-power operation. PMID:22291561

  2. Silicon microfabricated beam expander

    SciTech Connect

    Othman, A. Ibrahim, M. N.; Hamzah, I. H.; Sulaiman, A. A.; Ain, M. F.

    2015-03-30

    The feasibility design and development methods of silicon microfabricated beam expander are described. Silicon bulk micromachining fabrication technology is used in producing features of the structure. A high-precision complex 3-D shape of the expander can be formed by exploiting the predictable anisotropic wet etching characteristics of single-crystal silicon in aqueous Potassium-Hydroxide (KOH) solution. The beam-expander consist of two elements, a micromachined silicon reflector chamber and micro-Fresnel zone plate. The micro-Fresnel element is patterned using lithographic methods. The reflector chamber element has a depth of 40 µm, a diameter of 15 mm and gold-coated surfaces. The impact on the depth, diameter of the chamber and absorption for improved performance are discussed.

  3. Microfabricated ion frequency standard

    DOEpatents

    Schwindt, Peter; Biedermann, Grant; Blain, Matthew G.; Stick, Daniel L.; Serkland, Darwin K.; Olsson, III, Roy H.

    2010-12-28

    A microfabricated ion frequency standard (i.e. an ion clock) is disclosed with a permanently-sealed vacuum package containing a source of ytterbium (Yb) ions and an octupole ion trap. The source of Yb ions is a micro-hotplate which generates Yb atoms which are then ionized by a ultraviolet light-emitting diode or a field-emission electron source. The octupole ion trap, which confines the Yb ions, is formed from suspended electrodes on a number of stacked-up substrates. A microwave source excites a ground-state transition frequency of the Yb ions, with a frequency-doubled vertical-external-cavity laser (VECSEL) then exciting the Yb ions up to an excited state to produce fluorescent light which is used to tune the microwave source to the ground-state transition frequency, with the microwave source providing a precise frequency output for the ion clock.

  4. Microfabricated triggered vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Roesler, Alexander W.; Schare, Joshua M.; Bunch, Kyle

    2010-05-11

    A microfabricated vacuum switch is disclosed which includes a substrate upon which an anode, cathode and trigger electrode are located. A cover is sealed over the substrate under vacuum to complete the vacuum switch. In some embodiments of the present invention, a metal cover can be used in place of the trigger electrode on the substrate. Materials used for the vacuum switch are compatible with high vacuum, relatively high temperature processing. These materials include molybdenum, niobium, copper, tungsten, aluminum and alloys thereof for the anode and cathode. Carbon in the form of graphitic carbon, a diamond-like material, or carbon nanotubes can be used in the trigger electrode. Channels can be optionally formed in the substrate to mitigate against surface breakdown.

  5. Microfabricated therapeutic actuators

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Northrup, M. Allen; Ciarlo, Dino R.; Krulevitch, Peter A.; Benett, William J.

    1999-01-01

    Microfabricated therapeutic actuators are fabricated using a shape memory polymer (SMP), a polyurethane-based material that undergoes a phase transformation at a specified temperature (Tg). At a temperature above temperature Tg material is soft and can be easily reshaped into another configuration. As the temperature is lowered below temperature Tg the new shape is fixed and locked in as long as the material stays below temperature Tg. Upon reheating the material to a temperature above Tg, the material will return to its original shape. By the use of such SMP material, SMP microtubing can be used as a release actuator for the delivery of embolic coils through catheters into aneurysms, for example. The microtubing can be manufactured in various sizes and the phase change temperature Tg is determinate for an intended temperature target and intended use.

  6. Microfabricated therapeutic actuators

    DOEpatents

    Lee, A.P.; Northrup, M.A.; Ciarlo, D.R.; Krulevitch, P.A.; Benett, W.J.

    1999-06-15

    Microfabricated therapeutic actuators are fabricated using a shape memory polymer (SMP), a polyurethane-based material that undergoes a phase transformation at a specified temperature (Tg). At a temperature above temperature Tg material is soft and can be easily reshaped into another configuration. As the temperature is lowered below temperature Tg the new shape is fixed and locked in as long as the material stays below temperature Tg. Upon reheating the material to a temperature above Tg, the material will return to its original shape. By the use of such SMP material, SMP microtubing can be used as a release actuator for the delivery of embolic coils through catheters into aneurysms, for example. The microtubing can be manufactured in various sizes and the phase change temperature Tg is determinate for an intended temperature target and intended use. 8 figs.

  7. SIFTER: Scintillating Fiber Telescopes for Energetic Radiation, Gamma-Ray Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciesas, William S.

    2002-01-01

    The research project "SIFTER: Scintillating Fiber Telescopes for Energetic Radiation, Gamma-Ray Applications" approved under the NASA High Energy Astrophysics Research Program. The principal investigator of the proposal was Prof. Geoffrey N. Pendleton, who is currently on extended leave from UAH. Prof. William S. Paciesas administered the grant during Dr. Pendleton's absence. The project was originally funded for one year from 6/8/2000 to 6/7/2001. Due to conflicts with other commitments by the PI, the period of performance was extended at no additional cost until 6/30/2002. The goal of this project was to study scintillating fiber pair-tracking gamma-ray telescope configurations specifically designed to perform imaging and spectroscopy in the 5 - 250 MeV energy range. The main efforts were concentrated in two areas: 1) development of tracking techniques and event reconstruction algorithms, with particular emphasis on angular resolution; and 2) investigation of coded apertures as a means to improve the instrument angular resolution at low energies.

  8. Microfabricated Genomic Analysis System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve; Elms, Rene

    2005-01-01

    Genetic sequencing and many genetic tests and assays require electrophoretic separation of DNA. In this technique, DNA fragments are separated by size as they migrate through a sieving gel under the influence of an applied electric field. In order to conduct these analyses on-orbit, it is essential to acquire the capability to efficiently perform electrophoresis in a microgravity environment. Conventional bench top electrophoresis equipment is large and cumbersome and does not lead itself to on-orbit utilization. Much of the previous research regarding on-orbit electrophoresis involved altering conventional electrophoresis equipment for bioprocessing, purification, and/or separation technology applications. A new and more efficient approach to on-orbit electrophoresis is the use of a microfabricated electrophoresis platform. These platforms are much smaller, less expensive to produce and operate, use less power, require smaller sample sizes (nanoliters), and achieve separation in a much shorter distance (a few centimeters instead of 10 s or 100 s of centimeters.) In contrast to previous applications, this platform would be utilized as an analytical tool for life science/medical research, environmental monitoring, and medical diagnoses. Identification of infectious agents as well as radiation related damage are significant to NASA s efforts to maintain, study, and monitor crew health during and in support of near-Earth and interplanetary missions. The capability to perform genetic assays on-orbit is imperative to conduct relevant and insightful biological and medical research, as well as continuing NASA s search for life elsewhere. This technology would provide an essential analytical tool for research conducted in a microgravity environment (Shuttle, ISS, long duration/interplanetary missions.) In addition, this technology could serve as a critical and invaluable component of a biosentinel system to monitor space environment genotoxic insults to include radiation.

  9. Microfabrication using soft lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiao-Mei

    Soft Lithography is a group of non-photolithographic techniques currently being explored in our group. Four such techniques-microcontact printing (μCP), replica molding (REM), micromolding in capillaries (MIMIC), and microtransfer molding (μTM)-have been demonstrated for fabricating micro- and nanostructures of a variety of materials with dimension >=30 nm. Part I (Chapters 1-5) reviews several aspects of the three molding techniques REM, MIMIC, and μTM. Chapters 1-3 describe μTM and MIMIC, and the use of these techniques in the fabrication of functional devices. μTM is capable of generating μm-scale structures over large areas, on both planar and contoured surfaces, and is able to make 3-dimensional structures layer by layer. The capability of μTM and MIMIC has been demonstrated in the fabrication of single-mode waveguides, waveguide couplers and interferometers. The coupling between waveguides can be tailored by waveguide spacing or the differential in curing time between the waveguides and the cladding. Chapters 4-5 demonstrate the combination of REM and shrinkable polystyrene (PS) films to reduce the feature size of microstructures and to generate microstructures with high aspect ratios on both planar and curved surfaces. A shrinkable PS film is patterned with relief structures, and then heated and shrinks. Thermal shrinkage results in a 100-fold increase in the aspect ratio of the patterned microstructures in the PS film. The microstructures in the shrunken PS films can be transferred to many other materials by REM. Part II (Chapters 6-7) focuses on two issues in the microfabrication using self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) as ultrathin resists. Chapter 6 describes a selective etching solution for transferring patterns of SAMs of alkanethiolates into the underlying layers (e.g., gold, silver, and copper). This etching solution uses thiosulfate as the ligand that coordinates to the metal ions, and ferricyanide as the oxidant. It has been demonstrated to be

  10. Microfabricated Optically-Pumped Magnetometers for Biomagnetic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knappe, Svenja; Alem, Orang; Sheng, Dong; Kitching, John

    2016-06-01

    We report on the progress in developing microfabricated optically-pumped magnetometer arrays for imaging applications. We have improved our sensitivities by several orders of magnitude in the last ten years. Now, our zero-field magnetometers reach noise values below 15 fT/Hz1/2. Recently, we have also developed gradiometers to reject ambient magnetic field noise. We have built several imaging arrays and validated them for biomedical measurements of brain and heart activity.

  11. Microfabricated injectable drug delivery system

    DOEpatents

    Krulevitch, Peter A.; Wang, Amy W.

    2002-01-01

    A microfabricated, fully integrated drug delivery system capable of secreting controlled dosages of multiple drugs over long periods of time (up to a year). The device includes a long and narrow shaped implant with a sharp leading edge for implantation under the skin of a human in a manner analogous to a sliver. The implant includes: 1) one or more micromachined, integrated, zero power, high and constant pressure generating osmotic engine; 2) low power addressable one-shot shape memory polymer (SMP) valves for switching on the osmotic engine, and for opening drug outlet ports; 3) microfabricated polymer pistons for isolating the pressure source from drug-filled microchannels; 4) multiple drug/multiple dosage capacity, and 5) anisotropically-etched, atomically-sharp silicon leading edge for penetrating the skin during implantation. The device includes an externally mounted controller for controlling on-board electronics which activates the SMP microvalves, etc. of the implant.

  12. Infrared microthermography of microfabricated devices

    SciTech Connect

    Furstenberg, Robert; Kendziora, C. A.; Stepnowski, Stanley V.; McGill, R. Andrew

    2007-06-15

    We report a new experimental apparatus for infrared microthermography applicable to a wide class of samples including semitransparent ones and perforated devices. This setup is particularly well suited for the thermography of microfabricated devices. Traditionally, temperature calibration is performed using calibration hot plates, but this is not applicable to transmissive samples. In this work a custom designed miniature calibration oven in conjunction with spatial filtering is used to obtain accurate static and transient temperature maps of actively heated devices. The procedure does not require prior knowledge of the emissivity. Calibration and image processing algorithms are discussed and analyzed. We show that relatively inexpensive uncooled bolometer arrays can be a suitable detector choice in certain radiometric applications. As an example, we apply this method in the analysis of temperature profiles of an actively heated microfabricated preconcentrator device that incorporates a perforated membrane and is used in trace detection of illicit substances.

  13. Infrared microthermography of microfabricated devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furstenberg, Robert; Kendziora, C. A.; Stepnowski, Stanley V.; McGill, R. Andrew

    2007-06-01

    We report a new experimental apparatus for infrared microthermography applicable to a wide class of samples including semitransparent ones and perforated devices. This setup is particularly well suited for the thermography of microfabricated devices. Traditionally, temperature calibration is performed using calibration hot plates, but this is not applicable to transmissive samples. In this work a custom designed miniature calibration oven in conjunction with spatial filtering is used to obtain accurate static and transient temperature maps of actively heated devices. The procedure does not require prior knowledge of the emissivity. Calibration and image processing algorithms are discussed and analyzed. We show that relatively inexpensive uncooled bolometer arrays can be a suitable detector choice in certain radiometric applications. As an example, we apply this method in the analysis of temperature profiles of an actively heated microfabricated preconcentrator device that incorporates a perforated membrane and is used in trace detection of illicit substances.

  14. Temperature programmable microfabricated gas chromatography column

    DOEpatents

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.

    2003-12-23

    A temperature programmable microfabricated gas chromatography column enables more efficient chemical separation of chemical analytes in a gas mixture by the integration of a resistive heating element and temperature sensing on the microfabricated column. Additionally, means are provided to thermally isolate the heated column from their surroundings. The small heat capacity and thermal isolation of the microfabricated column improves the thermal time response and power consumption, both important factors for portable microanalytical systems.

  15. Microfabrication materials for biomedical microdevices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansford, Derek James

    Major hurdles to the implementation of microfabricated devices for therapeutic applications include materials processing and biocompatibility issues. This dissertation reports research on improving the materials selection and fabrication for biomedical microdevices, using a microfabricated immunoisolation biocapsule as an example. Two material classes in the microfabrication protocol were examined based on the requirements determined for biomedical microdevices: the adhesive layer for bonding devices to encapsulate delicate biological substances and the thin film structural materials for surface structures, such as the biocapsule membrane. The major requirements for the adhesive layer material included non-cytotoxicity during bonding, adhesive strength, and durability under physiological conditions. Low glassy-phase transition temperature (Tg) methacrylates were found to be suitable candidates for adhesives of biomedical microdevices. A comparison study of poly propy1methacrylate (PPMA), poly (butyl, ethyl) methacrylate (PBEMA), and the higher Tg PMMA showed that all of the methacrylates had similar biocompatibility, adhesive strength, and durability. The adhesive strengths were found to be suitable for the adhesion of biomedical microdevices, as shown by measurement using a pressurized plate test and the current use of PMMA as bone cement. None of the methacrylates showed evidence of cytotoxicity, as measured by both optical and cytometric cell culture cytotoxicity tests. A protocol for the selective placement of smooth, thin films of PPMA using a Gel-PakTM transfer substrate was developed and demonstrated. The major requirements determined for the thin film structural materials were based on processing, mechanical, and biological parameters. Several candidates were identified as for structural materials based on these requirements: polycrystalline silicon. silicon nitride, fluoropolymers, PMMA, and silicone. A new fabrication protocol was developed to allow the

  16. Microfabricated fuel heating value monitoring device

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, Alex L.; Manginell, Ronald P.; Moorman, Matthew W.

    2010-05-04

    A microfabricated fuel heating value monitoring device comprises a microfabricated gas chromatography column in combination with a catalytic microcalorimeter. The microcalorimeter can comprise a reference thermal conductivity sensor to provide diagnostics and surety. Using microfabrication techniques, the device can be manufactured in production quantities at a low per-unit cost. The microfabricated fuel heating value monitoring device enables continuous calorimetric determination of the heating value of natural gas with a 1 minute analysis time and 1.5 minute cycle time using air as a carrier gas. This device has applications in remote natural gas mining stations, pipeline switching and metering stations, turbine generators, and other industrial user sites. For gas pipelines, the device can improve gas quality during transfer and blending, and provide accurate financial accounting. For industrial end users, the device can provide continuous feedback of physical gas properties to improve combustion efficiency during use.

  17. Microfabricated tools for quantitative plant biology.

    PubMed

    Elitaş, Meltem; Yüce, Meral; Budak, Hikmet

    2017-03-13

    The development of microfabricated devices that will provide high-throughput quantitative data and high resolution in a fast, repeatable and reproducible manner is essential for plant biology research. Plants have been intensely explored since the beginning of humanity, especially for medical needs. However, plant biology research is still laborious, lacking the latest technological advancements in the laboratory practices. Microfabricated tools can provide a significant contribution to plant biology research since they require small volumes of samples and reagents with minimal cost and labor. Besides, they minimize the wet lab requirements while providing a parallel measurement platform for high-throughput data. Here, we have reviewed the cutting-edge microfabricated technologies developed for plant biology research. The description of the microfabricated device components, their integration with plant science and their substitution with the conventional techniques are presented. Our discussion on the challenges and future opportunities for scientists working at the fascinating intersection between plant science and engineering concludes this study.

  18. Processing Nanostructured Sensors Using Microfabrication Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; VanderWal, Randall L.; Evans, Laura J.; Xu, Jennifer C.

    2010-01-01

    Standard microfabrication techniques can be implemented and scaled to help assemble nanoscale microsensors. Currently nanostructures are often deposited onto materials primarily by adding them to a solution, then applying the solution in a thin film. This results in random placement of the nanostructures with no controlled order, and no way to accurately reproduce the placement. This method changes the means by which microsensors with nanostructures are fabricated. The fundamental advantage to this approach is that it enables standard microfabrication techniques to be applied in the repeated manufacture of nanostructured sensors on a microplatform.

  19. Micro-fabrication Techniques for Target Components

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, R; Hamilton, J; Crawford, J; Ratti, S; Trevino, J; Graff, T; Stockton, C; Harvey, C

    2008-06-10

    Micro-fabrication techniques, derived from the semi-conductor industry, can be used to make a variety of useful mechanical components for targets. A selection of these components including supporting cooling arms for prototype cryogenic inertial confinement fusion targets, stepped and graded density targets for materials dynamics experiments are described. Micro-fabrication enables cost-effective, simultaneous fabrication of multiple high-precision components with complex geometries. Micro-fabrication techniques such as thin-film deposition, photo-lithographic patterning and etch processes normally used in the semi-conductor manufacture industry, can be exploited to make useful mechanical target components. Micro-fabrication processes have in recent years been used to create a number of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) components such as pressure sensors, accelerometers, ink jet printer heads, microfluidics platforms and the like. These techniques consist primarily of deposition of thin films of material, photo-lithographic patterning and etching processes performed sequentially to produce three dimensional structures using essentially planar processes. While the planar technology can be limiting in terms of the possible geometries of the final product, advantages of using these techniques include the ability to make multiple complex structures simultaneously and cost-effectively. Target components fabricated using these techniques include the supporting cooling arms for cryogenic prototype fusion ignition targets, stepped targets for equation-of-state experiments, and graded density reservoirs for material strength experiments.

  20. Microfabricated pressure and shear stress sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Chang (Inventor); Chen, Jack (Inventor); Engel, Jonathan (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A microfabricated pressure sensor. The pressure sensor comprises a raised diaphragm disposed on a substrate. The diaphragm is configured to bend in response to an applied pressure difference. A strain gauge of a conductive material is coupled to a surface of the raised diaphragm and to at least one of the substrate and a piece rigidly connected to the substrate.

  1. Processing of Nanostructured Devices Using Microfabrication Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W (Inventor); Xu, Jennifer C (Inventor); Evans, Laura J (Inventor); Kulis, Michael H (Inventor); Berger, Gordon M (Inventor); Vander Wal, Randall L (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Systems and methods that incorporate nanostructures into microdevices are discussed herein. These systems and methods can allow for standard microfabrication techniques to be extended to the field of nanotechnology. Sensors incorporating nanostructures can be fabricated as described herein, and can be used to reliably detect a range of gases with high response.

  2. Microfabrication Technologies for Oral Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Sant, Shilpa; Tao, Sarah L.; Fisher, Omar; Xu, Qiaobing; Peppas, Nicholas A.; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Micro-/nanoscale technologies such as lithographic techniques and microfluidics offer promising avenues to revolutionalize the fields of tissue engineering, drug discovery, diagnostics and personalized medicine. Microfabrication techniques are being explored for drug delivery applications due to their ability to combine several features such as precise shape and size into a single drug delivery vehicle. They also offer to create unique asymmetrical features incorporated into single or multiple reservoir systems maximizing contact area with the intestinal lining. Combined with intelligent materials, such microfabricated platforms can be designed to be bioadhesive and stimuli-responsive. Apart from drug delivery devices, microfabrication technologies offer exciting opportunities to create biomimetic gastrointestinal tract models incorporating physiological cell types, flow patterns and brush-border like structures. Here we review the recent developments in this field with a focus on the applications of microfabrication in the development of oral drug delivery devices and biomimetic gastrointestinal tract models that can be used to evaluate the drug delivery efficacy. PMID:22166590

  3. Optical pumping in a microfabricated Rb vapor cell using a microfabricated Rb discharge light source

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatraman, V.; Kang, S.; Affolderbach, C.; Mileti, G.; Shea, H.

    2014-02-03

    Miniature (microfabricated alkali vapor resonance cell using (1) a microfabricated Rb discharge lamp light source, as well as (2) a conventional glass-blown Rb discharge lamp. The microfabricated Rb lamp cell is a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) light source, having the same inner cell volume of around 40 mm{sup 3} as that of the resonance cell, both filled with suitable buffer gases. A miniature (∼2 cm{sup 3} volume) test setup based on the M{sub z} magnetometer interrogation technique was used for observation of optical-radiofrequency double-resonance signals, proving the suitability of the microfabricated discharge lamp to introduce efficient optical pumping. The pumping ability of this light source was found to be comparable to or even better than that of a conventional glass-blown lamp. The reported results indicate that the micro-fabricated DBD discharge lamp has a high potential for the development of a new class of miniature atomic clocks, magnetometers, and quantum sensors.

  4. Microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device

    DOEpatents

    Olsson, Roy H.; El-Kady, Ihab F.; McCormick, Frederick; Fleming, James G.; Fleming, Carol

    2010-06-08

    A microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device comprises a periodic two-dimensional array of scatterers embedded within the matrix material membrane, wherein the scatterer material has a density and/or elastic constant that is different than the matrix material and wherein the periodicity of the array causes destructive interference of the acoustic wave within an acoustic bandgap. The membrane can be suspended above a substrate by an air or vacuum gap to provide acoustic isolation from the substrate. The device can be fabricated using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies. Such microfabricated bulk wave phononic bandgap devices are useful for acoustic isolation in the ultrasonic, VHF, or UHF regime (i.e., frequencies of order 1 MHz to 10 GHz and higher, and lattice constants of order 100 .mu.m or less).

  5. Trapping of branched DNA in microfabricated structures.

    PubMed Central

    Volkmuth, W D; Duke, T; Austin, R H; Cox, E C

    1995-01-01

    We have observed electrostatic trapping of tribranched DNA molecules undergoing electrophoresis in a microfabricated pseudo-two-dimensional array of posts. Trapping occurs in a unique transport regimen in which the electrophoretic mobility is extremely sensitive to polymer topology. The arrest of branched polymers is explained by considering their center-of-mass motion; in certain conformations, owing to the constraints imposed by the obstacles a molecule cannot advance without the center of mass first moving a short distance backwards. The depth of the resulting local potential well can be much greater than the thermal energy so that escape of an immobilized molecule can be extremely slow. We summarize the expected behavior of the mobility as a function of field strength and topology and point out that the microfabricated arrays are highly suitable for detecting an extremely small number of branched molecules in a very large population of linear molecules. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7624337

  6. Microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device

    DOEpatents

    Olsson, Roy H.; El-Kady, Ihab F.; McCormick, Frederick; Fleming, James G.; Fleming, legal representative, Carol

    2010-11-23

    A microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device comprises a periodic two-dimensional array of scatterers embedded within the matrix material membrane, wherein the scatterer material has a density and/or elastic constant that is different than the matrix material and wherein the periodicity of the array causes destructive interference of the acoustic wave within an acoustic bandgap. The membrane can be suspended above a substrate by an air or vacuum gap to provide acoustic isolation from the substrate. The device can be fabricated using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies. Such microfabricated bulk wave phononic bandgap devices are useful for acoustic isolation in the ultrasonic, VHF, or UHF regime (i.e., frequencies of order 1 MHz to 10 GHz and higher, and lattice constants of order 100 .mu.m or less).

  7. Integration of micro-fabricated atomic magnetometers on military systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Gregory; Mhaskar, Rahul; Prouty, Mark; Miller, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    A new generation of ultra-high sensitivity magnetic sensors based on innovative micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) are being developed and incorporated into military systems. Specifically, we are currently working to fully integrate the latest generation of MicroFabricated Atomic Magnetometers (MFAMs) developed by Geometrics on defense mobility systems such as unmanned systems, military vehicles and handheld units. Recent reductions in size, weight, and power of these sensors has enabled new deployment opportunities for improved sensitivity to targets of interest, but has also introduced new challenges associated with noise mitigation, mission configuration planning, and data processing. Our work is focused on overcoming the practical aspects of integrating these sensors with various military platforms. Implications associated with utilizing these combined sensor systems in working environments are addressed in order to optimize signal-to-noise ratios, detection probabilities, and false alarm mitigation. Specifically, we present collaborative work that bridges the gap between commercial specialists and operation platform integration organizations including magnetic signature characterization and mitigation as well as the development of simulation tools that consider a wide array of sensor, environmental, platform, and mission-level parameters. We discuss unique deployment concepts for explosive hazard target geolocation, and data processing. Applications include configurations for undersea and underground threat detection - particularly those associated with stationary or mobile explosives and compact metallic targets such as munitions, subsea threats, and other hazardous objects. We show the potential of current and future features of miniaturized magnetic sensors including very high magnetic field sensitivities, bandwidth selectivity, and array processing.

  8. Microfabricating 3D Structures by Laser Origami

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-09

    technique generates 3D microstructures by controlled out-of- plane folding of 2D patterns through a variety of laser-based digital fabrication...processes. Digital microfabrication techniques such as laser direct-write (LDW) offer a viable alternative for generating 3D self-folding designs. These...folding at the microscale where manual or mechanized actuation of the smaller struc- tures is not practical. LDW techniques allow micromachining and

  9. Evaluation of microfabricated deformable mirror systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, William D.; Lee, Max K.; Bright, Victor M.; Welsh, Byron M.

    1998-09-01

    This paper presents recent result for aberration correction and beam steering experiments using polysilicon surface micromachined piston micromirror arrays. Microfabricated deformable mirrors offer a substantial cost reduction for adaptive optic systems. In addition to the reduced mirror cost, microfabricated mirrors typically require low control voltages, thus eliminating high voltage amplifiers. The greatly reduced cost per channel of adaptive optic systems employing microfabricated deformable mirrors promise high order aberration correction at low cost. Arrays of piston micromirrors with 128 active elements were tested. Mirror elements are on a 203 micrometers 12 by 12 square grid. The overall array size is 2.4 mm square. The arrays were fabricated in the commercially available DARPA supported MUMPs surface micromachining foundry process. The cost per mirror array in this prototyping process is less than 200 dollars. Experimental results are presented for a hybrid correcting element comprised of a lenslet array and piston micromirror array, and for a piston micromirror array only. Also presented is a novel digital deflection micromirror which requires no digital to analog converters, further reducing the cost of adaptive optics system.

  10. Trends in Microfabrication Capabilities & Device Architectures.

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Todd; Jones, Adam; Lentine, Tony; Mudrick, John; Okandan, Murat; Rodrigues, Arun

    2015-06-01

    The last two decades have seen an explosion in worldwide R&D, enabling fundamentally new capabilities while at the same time changing the international technology landscape. The advent of technologies for continued miniaturization and electronics feature size reduction, and for architectural innovations, will have many technical, economic, and national security implications. It is important to anticipate possible microelectronics development directions and their implications on US national interests. This report forecasts and assesses trends and directions for several potentially disruptive microfabrication capabilities and device architectures that may emerge in the next 5-10 years.

  11. Microfabricated linear Paul-Straubel ion trap

    DOEpatents

    Mangan, Michael A [Albuquerque, NM; Blain, Matthew G [Albuquerque, NM; Tigges, Chris P [Albuquerque, NM; Linker, Kevin L [Albuquerque, NM

    2011-04-19

    An array of microfabricated linear Paul-Straubel ion traps can be used for mass spectrometric applications. Each ion trap comprises two parallel inner RF electrodes and two parallel outer DC control electrodes symmetric about a central trap axis and suspended over an opening in a substrate. Neighboring ion traps in the array can share a common outer DC control electrode. The ions confined transversely by an RF quadrupole electric field potential well on the ion trap axis. The array can trap a wide array of ions.

  12. Microfabricated microengine with constant rotation rate

    DOEpatents

    Romero, Louis A.; Dickey, Fred M.

    1999-01-01

    A microengine uses two synchronized linear actuators as a power source and converts oscillatory motion from the actuators into constant rotational motion via direct linkage connection to an output gear or wheel. The microengine provides output in the form of a continuously rotating output gear that is capable of delivering drive torque at a constant rotation to a micromechanism. The output gear can have gear teeth on its outer perimeter for directly contacting a micromechanism requiring mechanical power. The gear is retained by a retaining means which allows said gear to rotate freely. The microengine is microfabricated of polysilicon on one wafer using surface micromachining batch fabrication.

  13. Microfabricated microengine with constant rotation rate

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, L.A.; Dickey, F.M.

    1999-09-21

    A microengine uses two synchronized linear actuators as a power source and converts oscillatory motion from the actuators into constant rotational motion via direct linkage connection to an output gear or wheel. The microengine provides output in the form of a continuously rotating output gear that is capable of delivering drive torque at a constant rotation to a micromechanism. The output gear can have gear teeth on its outer perimeter for directly contacting a micromechanism requiring mechanical power. The gear is retained by a retaining means which allows said gear to rotate freely. The microengine is microfabricated of polysilicon on one wafer using surface micromachining batch fabrication.

  14. Observation and suppression of quantized spin waves in microfabricated permalloy elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Tatsuya; Seki, Takeshi; Ono, Shimpei; Takanashi, Koki

    2014-01-01

    We report the observation and suppression of quantized spin wave modes in a microfabricated rectangular permalloy (Py) element. The Py element was located on a coplanar waveguide and was connected to a Cu wire. The quantized Damon-Eshbach spin wave and the perpendicular standing spin wave modes appeared in the resonance spectra for the Py elements. Those non-uniform magnetization dynamics were suppressed when the non-uniformity of the radio frequency magnetic field for the excitation was reduced by changing the design of the device structure.

  15. Subpicotesla atomic magnetometry with a microfabricated vapour cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Vishal; Knappe, Svenja; Schwindt, Peter D. D.; Kitching, John

    2007-11-01

    Highly sensitive magnetometers capable of measuring magnetic fields below 1 pT have an impact on areas as diverse as geophysical surveying, the detection of unexploded ordinance, space science, nuclear magnetic resonance, health care and perimeter and remote monitoring. Recently, it has been shown that laboratory optical magnetometers, based on the precession of the spins of alkali atoms in the vapour phase, could achieve sensitivities in the femtotesla range, comparable to, or even exceeding, those of superconducting quantum interference devices. We demonstrate here an atomic magnetometer based on a millimetre-scale microfabricated alkali vapour cell with sensitivity below 70 fT Hz-1/2. Additionally, we use a simplified optical configuration that requires only a single low-power laser. This result suggests that millimetre-scale, low-power femtotesla magnetometers are feasible, and we support this proposition with a simple sensitivity scaling analysis. Such an instrument would greatly expand the range of applications in which atomic magnetometers could be used.

  16. Integration of microfabricated low resistance and thousand-turn coils for vibration energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qian; Wang, Yufeng; Zhao, Lurui; Sok Kim, Eun

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents two microfabrication approaches for multi-layer coils for vibration-energy harvesters. A magnet array is arranged with alternating north- and south-orientation to provide a rapidly changing magnetic field for high electromagnetic energy conversion. Multi-turn spiral coils on silicon wafer are aligned to the magnet array for maximum magnetic flux change. One type of coil is made out of 300 μm-thick copper that is electroplated with silicon mold, and the other is built on 25 μm-thick copper electroplated with photoresist mold. The low resistive coils fabricated by the first approach are integrated in a microfabricated energy harvester of 17  ×  7  ×  1.7 mm3 (=0.2 cm3) weighing 0.8 g, which generates 14.3 μW power output (into 0.7 Ω load) from vibration amplitude of 6 μm at 250 Hz. The latter approach is used to make a 1080-turn coil for a microfabricated electromagnetic energy harvester with magnet array and plastic spring. Though the size and weight of the harvester are only 44  ×  20  ×  6 mm3 (=5.3 cm3) and 12 g, respectively, it generates 1.04 mW power output (into 190 Ω load) when it is vibrated at 75 Hz with vibration amplitude of 220 μm.

  17. Microfabricated structures for integrated DNA analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Burns, M A; Mastrangelo, C H; Sammarco, T S; Man, F P; Webster, J R; Johnsons, B N; Foerster, B; Jones, D; Fields, Y; Kaiser, A R; Burke, D T

    1996-01-01

    Photolithographic micromachining of silicon is a candidate technology for the construction of high-throughput DNA analysis devices. However, the development of complex silicon microfabricated systems has been hindered in part by the lack of a simple, versatile pumping method for integrating individual components. Here we describe a surface-tension-based pump able to move discrete nanoliter drops through enclosed channels using only local heating. This thermocapillary pump can accurately mix, measure, and divide drops by simple electronic control. In addition, we have constructed thermal-cycling chambers, gel electrophoresis channels, and radiolabeled DNA detectors that are compatible with the fabrication of thermocapillary pump channels. Since all of the components are made by conventional photolithographic techniques, they can be assembled into more complex integrated systems. The combination of pump and components into self-contained miniaturized devices may provide significant improvements in DNA analysis speed, portability, and cost. The potential of microfabricated systems lies in the low unit cost of silicon-based construction and in the efficient sample handling afforded by component integration. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8643614

  18. Microfabricated wire arrays for Z-pinch.

    SciTech Connect

    Spahn, Olga Blum; Rowen, Adam M.; Cich, Michael Joseph; Peake, Gregory Merwin; Arrington, Christian L.; Nash, Thomas J.; Klem, John Frederick; Romero, Dustin Heinz

    2008-10-01

    Microfabrication methods have been applied to the fabrication of wire arrays suitable for use in Z. Self-curling GaAs/AlGaAs supports were fabricated as an initial route to make small wire arrays (4mm diameter). A strain relief structure that could be integrated with the wire was designed to allow displacements of the anode/cathode connections in Z. Electroplated gold wire arrays with integrated anode/cathode bus connections were found to be sufficiently robust to allow direct handling. Platinum and copper plating processes were also investigated. A process to fabricate wire arrays on any substrate with wire thickness up to 35 microns was developed. Methods to handle and mount these arrays were developed. Fabrication of wire arrays of 20mm diameter was demonstrated, and the path to 40mm array fabrication is clear. With some final investment to show array mounting into Z hardware, the entire process to produce a microfabricated wire array will have been demonstrated.

  19. Microfabrication and nanotechnology in stent design.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Adam W; Chaikof, Elliot L

    2011-01-01

    Intravascular stents were first introduced in the 1980s as an adjunct to primary angioplasty for management of early complications, including arterial dissection, or treatment of an inadequate technical outcome due to early elastic recoil of the atherosclerotic lesion. Despite the beneficial effects of stenting, persistent high rates of restenosis motivated the design of drug-eluting stents for delivery of agents to limit the proliferative and other inflammatory responses within the vascular wall that contribute to the development of a restenotic lesion. These strategies have yielded a significant reduction in the incidence of restenosis, but challenges remain, including incomplete repair of the endothelium at the site of vascular wall injury that may be associated with a late risk of thrombosis. A failure of vessel wall healing has been attributed primarily to the use of polymeric stent coatings, but the effects of the eluted drug and other material properties or design features of the stent cannot be excluded. Improvements in stent microfabrication, as well as the introduction of alternative materials may help to address those limitations that inhibit stent performance. This review describes the application of novel microfabrication processes and the evolution of new nanotechnologies that hold significant promise in eliminating existing shortcomings of current stent platforms.

  20. Microfabrication and Nanotechnology in Stent Design

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Adam W.; Chaikof, Elliot L.

    2012-01-01

    Intravascular stents were first introduced in the 1980s as an adjunct to primary angioplasty for management of early complications, including arterial dissection, or treatment of an inadequate technical outcome due to early elastic recoil of the atherosclerotic lesion. Despite the beneficial effects of stenting, persistent high rates of restenosis motivated the design of drug eluting stents for delivery of agents to limit the proliferative and other inflammatory responses within the vascular wall that contribute to the development of a restenotic lesion. These strategies have yielded a significant reduction in the incidence of restenosis, but challenges remain, including incomplete repair of the endothelium at the site of vascular wall injury that may be associated with a late risk of thrombosis. A failure of vessel wall healing has been attributed to primarily to the use of polymeric stent coatings, but the effects of the eluted drug and other material properties or design features of the stent cannot be excluded. Improvements in stent microfabrication, as well as the introduction of alternative materials may help to address those limitations that inhibit stent performance. This review describes the application of novel microfabrication processes and the evolution of new nanotechnologies that hold significant promise in eliminating existing shortcomings of current stent platforms. PMID:21462356

  1. Microfabricated phononic crystal devices and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson, R. H., III; El-Kady, I.

    2009-01-01

    Phononic crystals are the acoustic wave analogue of photonic crystals. Here a periodic array of scattering inclusions located in a homogeneous host material forbids certain ranges of acoustic frequencies from existence within the crystal, thus creating what are known as acoustic bandgaps. The majority of previously reported phononic crystal devices have been constructed by hand, assembling scattering inclusions in a viscoelastic medium, predominantly air, water or epoxy, resulting in large structures limited to frequencies below 1 MHz. Recently, phononic crystals and devices have been scaled to VHF (30-300 MHz) frequencies and beyond by utilizing microfabrication and micromachining technologies. This paper reviews recent developments in the area of micro-phononic crystals including design techniques, material considerations, microfabrication processes, characterization methods and reported device structures. Micro-phononic crystal devices realized in low-loss solid materials are emphasized along with their potential application in radio frequency communications and acoustic imaging for medical ultrasound and nondestructive testing. The reported advances in batch micro-phononic crystal fabrication and simplified testing promise not only the deployment of phononic crystals in a number of commercial applications but also greater experimentation on a wide variety of phononic crystal structures.

  2. Microfabricated inserts for magic angle coil spinning (MACS) wireless NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Badilita, Vlad; Fassbender, Birgit; Kratt, Kai; Wong, Alan; Bonhomme, Christian; Sakellariou, Dimitris; Korvink, Jan G; Wallrabe, Ulrike

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the development and testing of the first automatically microfabricated probes to be used in conjunction with the magic angle coil spinning (MACS) NMR technique. NMR spectroscopy is a versatile technique for a large range of applications, but its intrinsically low sensitivity poses significant difficulties in analyzing mass- and volume-limited samples. The combination of microfabrication technology and MACS addresses several well-known NMR issues in a concerted manner for the first time: (i) reproducible wafer-scale fabrication of the first-in-kind on-chip LC microresonator for inductive coupling of the NMR signal and reliable exploitation of MACS capabilities; (ii) improving the sensitivity and the spectral resolution by simultaneous spinning the detection microcoil together with the sample at the "magic angle" of 54.74° with respect to the direction of the magnetic field (magic angle spinning - MAS), accompanied by the wireless signal transmission between the microcoil and the primary circuit of the NMR spectrometer; (iii) given the high spinning rates (tens of kHz) involved in the MAS methodology, the microfabricated inserts exhibit a clear kinematic advantage over their previously demonstrated counterparts due to the inherent capability to produce small radius cylindrical geometries, thus tremendously reducing the mechanical stress and tearing forces on the sample. In order to demonstrate the versatility of the microfabrication technology, we have designed MACS probes for various Larmor frequencies (194, 500 and 700 MHz) testing several samples such as water, Drosophila pupae, adamantane solid and LiCl at different magic angle spinning speeds.

  3. Microfabricated structures with electrical isolation and interconnections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, William A. (Inventor); Juneau, Thor N. (Inventor); Roessig, Allen W. (Inventor); Lemkin, Mark A. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The invention is directed to a microfabricated device. The device includes a substrate that is etched to define mechanical structures at least some of which are anchored laterally to the remainder of the substrate. Electrical isolation at points where mechanical structures are attached to the substrate is provided by filled isolation trenches. Filled trenches may also be used to electrically isolate structure elements from each other at points where mechanical attachment of structure elements is desired. The performance of microelectromechanical devices is improved by 1) having a high-aspect-ratio between vertical and lateral dimensions of the mechanical elements, 2) integrating electronics on the same substrate as the mechanical elements, 3) good electrical isolation among mechanical elements and circuits except where electrical interconnection is desired.

  4. Microfabrication of hydrogels for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Tianyue; Chiellini, Federica; Schmaljohan, Dirk; Solaro, Roberto; Ober, Christopher K.

    2002-07-01

    Hydrogels have gained general acceptance as biocompatible materials and are the basis of many promising applications in tissue engineering, drug release formulations and biosensors. Polymer processing techniques that can generate miniature hydrogel microstructures are not only critical as scaffolds for tissue re-growth but also very effective for increasing the efficiency of drug delivery and biosensors. Our approach is to use both optical and soft lithographic methods to microfabricate hydrogels. In this paper, we describe a photolithographic process to pattern hydrogel materials and analyze factors influencing sensitivity and lateral resolution. The model system we are investigating is based on 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), which is well known for its non-toxicity and its widespread use in the contact lens industry.

  5. Microfabricated high-throughput electronic particle detector.

    PubMed

    Wood, D K; Requa, M V; Cleland, A N

    2007-10-01

    We describe the design, fabrication, and use of a radio frequency reflectometer integrated with a microfluidic system, applied to the very high-throughput measurement of micron-scale particles, passing in a microfluidic channel through the sensor region. The device operates as a microfabricated Coulter counter [U.S. Patent No. 2656508 (1953)], similar to a design we have described previously, but here with significantly improved electrode geometry as well as including electronic tuning of the reflectometer; the two improvements yielding an improvement by more than a factor of 10 in the signal to noise and in the diametric discrimination of single particles. We demonstrate the high-throughput discrimination of polystyrene beads with diameters in the 4-10 microm range, achieving diametric resolutions comparable to the intrinsic spread of diameters in the bead distribution, at rates in excess of 15 x 10(6) beads/h.

  6. Non-planar microfabricated gas chromatography column

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Patrick R.; Wheeler, David R.

    2007-09-25

    A non-planar microfabricated gas chromatography column comprises a planar substrate having a plurality of through holes, a top lid and a bottom lid bonded to opposite surfaces of the planar substrate, and inlet and outlet ports for injection of a sample gas and elution of separated analytes. A plurality of such planar substrates can be aligned and stacked to provide a longer column length having a small footprint. Furthermore, two or more separate channels can enable multi-channel or multi-dimensional gas chromatography. The through holes preferably have a circular cross section and can be coated with a stationary phase material or packed with a porous packing material. Importantly, uniform stationary phase coatings can be obtained and band broadening can be minimized with the circular channels. A heating or cooling element can be disposed on at least one of the lids to enable temperature programming of the column.

  7. Microfabricated instrument for tissue biopsy and analysis

    DOEpatents

    Krulevitch, Peter A.; Lee, Abraham P.; Northrup, M. Allen; Benett, William J.

    2001-01-01

    A microfabricated biopsy/histology instrument which has several advantages over the conventional procedures, including minimal specimen handling, smooth cutting edges with atomic sharpness capable of slicing very thin specimens (approximately 2 .mu.m or greater), micro-liter volumes of chemicals for treating the specimens, low cost, disposable, fabrication process which renders sterile parts, and ease of use. The cutter is a "cheese-grater" style design comprising a block or substrate of silicon and which uses anisotropic etching of the silicon to form extremely sharp and precise cutting edges. As a specimen is cut, it passes through the silicon cutter and lies flat on a piece of glass which is bonded to the cutter. Microchannels are etched into the glass or silicon substrates for delivering small volumes of chemicals for treating the specimen. After treatment, the specimens can be examined through the glass substrate.

  8. Microfabricated devices in microbial bioenergy sciences.

    PubMed

    Han, Arum; Hou, Huijie; Li, Lei; Kim, Hyun Soo; de Figueiredo, Paul

    2013-04-01

    Microbes provide a platform for the synthesis of clean energy from renewable resources. Significant investments in discovering new microbial systems and capabilities, discerning the molecular mechanisms that mediate microbial bioenergy production, and optimizing existing microbial bioenergy systems have been made. However, further development is needed to achieve the economically feasible large-scale production of value-added energy products. Microfabricated lab-on-a-chip systems provide cost- and time-efficient opportunities for analyzing microbe-mediated bioenergy synthesis. Here, we review developments in the application of lab-on-a-chip systems to the bioenergy sciences. We focus on systems that support the analysis of microbial generation of bioelectricity, biogas, and liquid transportation fuels. We conclude by suggesting possible future directions.

  9. Advanced laser microfabrication of photonic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Peter R.; Chen, Kevin P.; Corkum, Paul B.; Naumov, Andrei; Ng, Sandy; Zhang, Jie

    2000-11-01

    The powerful transition from electronic to photonic systems in today's Internet-driven communication industry is driving the development of processes to miniaturize and integrate optical components. New processing and packaging technologies are now required that can precisely shape and assemble transparent optical components to sub-wavelength accuracy. Laser microfabrication technology is beginning to play a role here. Our groups are exploring two extremes in laser technology- ultrafast lasers and very short wavelength F2 lasers- to microstructure optical surfaces and to profile refractive-index structures inside transparent glasses. In this paper, we compare photosensitivity responses, spatial resolution, and processing windows for the deep-ultraviolet and ultrafast laser approaches, and discuss prospects for laser printing and trimming of optical waveguide components and circuits.

  10. Microfabricated devices for bio-applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xiaojun; Szaro, Ben G.; Gracias, Alison; Baselmans, Sofie; Tokranova, Natalya; Xu, Bai; Castracane, James

    2005-01-01

    This paper focuses on the development of two MEMS-based devices for lab-on-a-chip bio-applications. The first device is designed to facilitate cell secretion studies by enabling parallel electrochemical detection with millisecond resolution. Initial prototypes of micro-arrays have been fabricated with Cr/Au microelectrodes on various substrates such as polyimide, SU-8 and SiO2. An FT cell-line (bullfrog fibroblast, American Tissue Culture Collection) has been successfully established and cultured directly on these prototype micro-arrays. It is well known that the FT cells can uptake hormones or other macromolecules from the culture media through a non-specific uptake mechanism which is still under investigation. After culturing on micro-arrays, FT cells were loaded with norepinephrine of various concentrations by incubation in the culture media supplied with norepinephrines. Rapid elevation of intracellular Ca2+ levels triggers the exocytosis of norepinephrine which then can be detected by the Cr/Au electrodes. Microfabrication of these prototype micro-arrays as well as cell culture and electrochemical detection results will be presented in this paper. The second device is designed for 3-dimensional transportation of living cells on chips. Initial prototypes of micro-arrays were fabricated with SU-8 buried channels on a silicon substrate. Both single-layered and double-layered SU-8 buried channels have been realized to enable 2D and 3D cell transportation. Stained solutions were used to visualize fluid transport through the channel networks. Following this, living FT cells in solution were successfully transported through single-layered SU-8 channels. Testing of 3D transportation of living FT cells is underway. Microfabrication of these prototype micro-arrays and living cell transportation on chips will also be presented in this paper.

  11. Magnetoencephalography of epilepsy with a microfabricated atomic magnetrode.

    PubMed

    Alem, Orang; Benison, Alex M; Barth, Daniel S; Kitching, John; Knappe, Svenja

    2014-10-22

    Magnetoencephalography has long held the promise of providing a noninvasive tool for localizing epileptic seizures in humans because of its high spatial resolution compared with the scalp EEG. Yet, this promise has been elusive, not because of a lack of sensitivity or spatial resolution but because the large size and immobility of present cryogenic (superconducting) technology prevent long-term telemetry required to capture these very infrequent epileptiform events. To circumvent this limitation, we used Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems technology to construct a noncryogenic (room temperature) microfabricated atomic magnetometer ("magnetrode") based on laser spectroscopy of rubidium vapor and similar in size and flexibility to scalp EEG electrodes. We tested the magnetrode by measuring the magnetic signature of epileptiform discharges in a rat model of epilepsy. We were able to measure neuronal currents of single epileptic discharges and more subtle spontaneous brain activity with a high signal-to-noise ratio approaching that of present superconducting sensors. These measurements are a promising step toward the goal of high-resolution noninvasive telemetry of epileptic events in humans with seizure disorders.

  12. Zero-field remote detection of NMR with a microfabricated atomic magnetometer

    PubMed Central

    Ledbetter, M. P.; Savukov, I. M.; Budker, D.; Shah, V.; Knappe, S.; Kitching, J.; Michalak, D. J.; Xu, S.; Pines, A.

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate remote detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with a microchip sensor consisting of a microfluidic channel and a microfabricated vapor cell (the heart of an atomic magnetometer). Detection occurs at zero magnetic field, which allows operation of the magnetometer in the spin-exchange relaxation-free (SERF) regime and increases the proximity of sensor and sample by eliminating the need for a solenoid to create a leading field. We achieve pulsed NMR linewidths of 26 Hz, limited, we believe, by the residence time and flow dispersion in the encoding region. In a fully optimized system, we estimate that for 1 s of integration, 7 × 1013 protons in a volume of 1 mm3, prepolarized in a 10-kG field, can be detected with a signal-to-noise ratio of ≈3. This level of sensitivity is competitive with that demonstrated by microcoils in 100-kG magnetic fields, without requiring superconducting magnets. PMID:18287080

  13. Overtaking method based on sand-sifter mechanism: Why do optimistic value functions find optimal solutions in multi-armed bandit problems?

    PubMed

    Ochi, Kento; Kamiura, Moto

    2015-09-01

    A multi-armed bandit problem is a search problem on which a learning agent must select the optimal arm among multiple slot machines generating random rewards. UCB algorithm is one of the most popular methods to solve multi-armed bandit problems. It achieves logarithmic regret performance by coordinating balance between exploration and exploitation. Since UCB algorithms, researchers have empirically known that optimistic value functions exhibit good performance in multi-armed bandit problems. The terms optimistic or optimism might suggest that the value function is sufficiently larger than the sample mean of rewards. The first definition of UCB algorithm is focused on the optimization of regret, and it is not directly based on the optimism of a value function. We need to think the reason why the optimism derives good performance in multi-armed bandit problems. In the present article, we propose a new method, which is called Overtaking method, to solve multi-armed bandit problems. The value function of the proposed method is defined as an upper bound of a confidence interval with respect to an estimator of expected value of reward: the value function asymptotically approaches to the expected value of reward from the upper bound. If the value function is larger than the expected value under the asymptote, then the learning agent is almost sure to be able to obtain the optimal arm. This structure is called sand-sifter mechanism, which has no regrowth of value function of suboptimal arms. It means that the learning agent can play only the current best arm in each time step. Consequently the proposed method achieves high accuracy rate and low regret and some value functions of it can outperform UCB algorithms. This study suggests the advantage of optimism of agents in uncertain environment by one of the simplest frameworks.

  14. Microfabrication of encoded microparticle array for multiplexed DNA hybridization detection.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Zheng-Liang; Morita, Yasutaka; Yamamura, Shouhei; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2005-05-21

    A strategy for the high-sensitivity, high-selectivity, and multiplexed detection of oligonucleotide hybridizations has been developed with an encoded Ni microparticle random array that was manufactured by a "top-down" approach using micromachining and microfabrication techniques.

  15. Microfabrics in Siliceous Hotsprings: Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guidry, S. A.; Chafetz, H. S.; Westall, F.

    2001-01-01

    Microfabrics shed light on the mechanisms governing siliceous sinter precipitation, the profound effects of microorganisms, as well as a conventional facies model for siliceous hotsprings. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  16. Microfabrication of microchannels for fuel cell plates.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ho Su; Park, Dong Sam

    2010-01-01

    Portable electronic devices such as notebook computers, PDAs, cellular phones, etc., are being widely used, and they increasingly need cheap, efficient, and lightweight power sources. Fuel cells have been proposed as possible power sources to address issues that involve energy production and the environment. In particular, a small type of fuel-cell system is known to be suitable for portable electronic devices. The development of micro fuel cell systems can be achieved by the application of microchannel technology. In this study, the conventional method of chemical etching and the mechanical machining method of micro end milling were used for the microfabrication of microchannel for fuel cell separators. The two methods were compared in terms of their performance in the fabrication with regards to dimensional errors, flatness, straightness, and surface roughness. Following microchannel fabrication, the powder blasting technique is introduced to improve the coating performance of the catalyst on the surface of the microchannel. Experimental results show that end milling can remarkably increase the fabrication performance and that surface treatment by powder blasting can improve the performance of catalyst coating.

  17. Microfabrication: LIGA-X and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupka, R. K.; Bouamrane, F.; Cremers, C.; Megtert, S.

    2000-09-01

    X-ray LIGA (Lithography, Electrogrowth, Moulding) is one of today's key technologies in microfabrication and upcoming modern (meso)-(nano) fabrication, already used and anticipated for micromechanics (micromotors, microsensors, spinnerets, etc.), micro-optics, micro-hydrodynamics (fluidic devices), microbiology, in medicine, in biology, and in chemistry for microchemical reactors. It compares to micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology, offering a larger, non-silicon choice of materials and better inherent precision. X-ray LIGA relies on synchrotron radiation to obtain necessary X-ray fluxes and uses X-ray proximity printing. Inherent advantages are its extreme precision, depth of field and very low intrinsic surface roughness. However, the quality of fabricated structures often depends on secondary effects during exposure and effects like resist adhesion. UV-LIGA, relying on thick UV resists is an alternative for projects requiring less precision. Modulating the spectral properties of synchrotron radiation, different regimes of X-ray lithography lead to (a) the mass-fabrication of classical nanostructures, (b) the fabrication of high aspect ratio nanostructures (HARNST), (c) the fabrication of high aspect ratio microstructures (HARMST), and (d) the fabrication of high aspect ratio centimeter structures (HARCST). Reviewing very recent activities around X-ray LIGA, we show the versatility of the method, obviously finding its region of application there, where it is best and other competing microtechnologies are less advantageous. An example of surface-based X-ray and particle lenses (orthogonal reflection optics (ORO)) made by X-ray LIGA is given.

  18. Microfabricated Optical Cavities and Photonic Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lončar, Marko; Scherer, Axel

    Microfabricated periodic structures with a high refractive index contrast have recently become very interesting geometries for the manipulation of light. The existence of a photonic bandgap, a frequency range within which propagation of light is prevented in all directions, is very useful where spatial localization of light is required. Ideally, by constructing three-dimensional confinement geometries, light propagation can be controlled in all three dimensions. However, since the fabrication of 3D photonic crystals is difficult, a more manufacturable approach is based on the use of one- or two-dimensional geometries. Here we describe the evolution of microcavities from 1D Bragg reflectors to 2D photonic crystals. The 1D microcavity laser (VCSEL) has already found widespread commercial use in data communications, and the equivalent 2D geometry has recently attracted a lot of research attention. 2D photonic crystal lasers, fabricated within a thin dielectric membrane and perforated with a two-dimensional lattice of holes, are very appealing for dense integration of photonic devices in telecommunications and optical sensing systems. In this chapter, we describe theory and experiments of planar photonic crystals as well as their applications towards lasers and super-dispersive elements. Low-threshold 2D photonic crystal lasers were recently demonstrated both in air and in different chemical solutions and can now be used to perform spectroscopic tests on ultra-small volumes of analyte.

  19. Microfabricated therapeutic actuators and release mechanisms therefor

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Fitch, Joseph P.; Schumann, Daniel L.; Da Silva, Luiz; Benett, William J.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    2000-01-01

    Microfabricated therapeutic actuators are fabricated using a shape memory polymer (SMP), a polyurethane-based material that undergoes a phase transformation at a specified temperature (Tg). At a temperature above temperature Tg material is soft and can be easily reshaped into another configuration. As the temperature is lowered below temperature Tg the new shape is fixed and locked in as long as the material stays below temperature Tg. Upon reheating the material to a temperature above Tg, the material will return to its original shape. By the use of such SMP material, SMP microtubing can be used as a retaining/release actuator for the delivery of material, such as embolic coils, for example, through catheters into aneurysms, for example. The microtubing can be manufactured in various sizes and the phase change temperature Tg is determinate for an intended temperature target and intended use. The SMP microtubing can be positioned around or within an end of a deposit material. Various heating arrangements can be utilized with the SMP release mechanism, and the SMP microtubing can include a metallic coating for enhanced light absorption.

  20. Research highlights: printing the future of microfabrication.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Peter; Murray, Coleman; Kim, Donghyuk; Di Carlo, Dino

    2014-05-07

    In this issue we highlight emerging microfabrication approaches suitable for microfluidic systems with a focus on "additive manufacturing" processes (i.e. printing). In parallel with the now-wider availability of low cost consumer-grade 3D printers (as evidenced by at least three brands of 3D printers for sale in a recent visit to an electronics store in Akihabara, Tokyo), commercial-grade 3D printers are ramping to higher and higher resolution with new capabilities, such as printing of multiple materials of different transparency, and with different mechanical and electrical properties. We highlight new work showing that 3D printing (stereolithography approaches in particular) has now risen as a viable technology to print whole microfluidic devices. Printing on 2D surfaces such as paper is an everyday experience, and has been used widely in analytical chemistry for printing conductive materials on paper strips for glucose and other electrochemical sensors. We highlight recent work using electrodes printed on paper for digital microfluidic droplet actuation. Finally, we highlight recent work in which printing of membrane-bound droplets that interconnect through bilayer membranes may open up an entirely new approach to microfluidic manufacturing of soft devices that mimic physiological systems.

  1. Microfabrication of integrated atomic vapor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conkey, Donald B.; Brenning, Rebecca L.; Hawkins, Aaron R.; Yang, Wenge; Wu, Bin; Schmidt, Holger

    2007-02-01

    The integration of hollow anti-resonant reflecting optical waveguides (ARROWs) with vapor cells on silicon chips provides a compact platform for a number of optical applications, including the study of quantum coherence effects such as electromagnetically induced transparency and single-photon nonlinearities, as well as frequency stabilization standards. The use of hollow waveguides allows for light propagation in low index (vapor) media with compact mode areas. ARROWs make particularly attractive waveguides for this purpose because they can be interfaced with solid core waveguides, microfabricated on a planar substrate, and are effectively single mode. ARROW fabrication utilizes an acidremoved sacrificial core surrounded by alternating plasma deposited dielectric layers, which act as Fabry-Perot reflectors. A demonstration platform consisting of solid and hollow core waveguides integrated with rubidium vapor cells has been constructed. Rubidium was used because it is of particular interest for studying quantum coherence effects. Liquefied rubidium was transferred from a bulk supply into an on-chip vapor cell in an anaerobic atmosphere glovebox. Optical absorption measurements confirmed the presence of rubidium vapor within the hollow waveguide platform. Coherence dephasing in the small dimensions of the ARROW (quantum coherence effect) can be addressed by adding a buffer gas and passivation coatings to the ARROW walls.

  2. Microfabricated instrument for tissue biopsy and analysis

    DOEpatents

    Krulevitch, Peter A.; Lee, Abraham P.; Northrup, M. Allen; Benett, William J.

    1999-01-01

    A microfabricated biopsy/histology instrument which has several advantages over the conventional procedures, including minimal specimen handling, smooth cutting edges with atomic sharpness capable of slicing very thin specimens (approximately 2 .mu.m or greater), micro-liter volumes of chemicals for treating the specimens, low cost, disposable, fabrication process which renders sterile parts, and ease of use. The cutter is a "cheese-grater" style design comprising a block or substrate of silicon and which uses anisotropic etching of the silicon to form extremely sharp and precise cutting edges. As a specimen is cut, it passes through the silicon cutter and lies flat on a piece of glass which is bonded to the cutter. Microchannels are etched into the glass or silicon substrates for delivering small volumes of chemicals for treating the specimen. After treatment, the specimens can be examined through the glass substrate. For automation purposes, microvalves and micropumps may be incorporated. Also, specimens in parallel may be cut and treated with identical or varied chemicals. The instrument is disposable due to its low cost and thus could replace current expensive microtome and histology equipment.

  3. Study of cell migration in microfabricated channels.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Pablo; Terriac, Emmanuel; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria; Piel, Matthieu

    2014-02-21

    The method described here allows the study of cell migration under confinement in one dimension. It is based on the use of microfabricated channels, which impose a polarized phenotype to cells by physical constraints. Once inside channels, cells have only two possibilities: move forward or backward. This simplified migration in which directionality is restricted facilitates the automatic tracking of cells and the extraction of quantitative parameters to describe cell movement. These parameters include cell velocity, changes in direction, and pauses during motion. Microchannels are also compatible with the use of fluorescent markers and are therefore suitable to study localization of intracellular organelles and structures during cell migration at high resolution. Finally, the surface of the channels can be functionalized with different substrates, allowing the control of the adhesive properties of the channels or the study of haptotaxis. In summary, the system here described is intended to analyze the migration of large cell numbers in conditions in which both the geometry and the biochemical nature of the environment are controlled, facilitating the normalization and reproducibility of independent experiments.

  4. Silicon microfabricated column with microfabricated differential mobility spectrometer for GC analysis of volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Lambertus, Gordon R; Fix, Cory S; Reidy, Shaelah M; Miller, Ranaan A; Wheeler, David; Nazarov, Erkinjon; Sacks, Richard

    2005-12-01

    A 3.0-m-long, 150-microm-wide, 240-microm-deep channel etched in a 3.2-cm-square silicon chip, covered with a Pyrex wafer, and coated with a dimethyl polysiloxane stationary phase is used for the GC separation of volatile organic compounds. The column, which generates approximately 5500 theoretical plates, is temperature-programmed in a conventional convection oven. The column is connected through a heated transfer line to a microfabricated differential mobility spectrometer. The spectrometer incorporates a 63Ni source for atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization of the analytes. Nitrogen or air transport gas (flow 300 cm(3)/min) drives the analyte ions through the cell. The spectrometer operates with an asymmetric radio frequency (RF) electric field between a pair of electrodes in the detector cell. During each radio frequency cycle, the ion mobility alternates between a high-field and a low-field value (differential mobility). Ions oscillate between the electrodes, and only ions with an appropriate differential mobility reach a pair of biased collectors at the downstream end of the cell. A compensation voltage applied to one of the RF electrodes is scanned to allow ions with different differential mobilities to pass through the cell without being annihilated at the RF electrodes. A unique feature of the device is that both positive and negative ions are detected from a single experiment. The combined microfabricated column and detector is evaluated for the analysis of volatile organic compounds with a variety of functionalities.

  5. Fetal magnetocardiography measurements with an array of microfabricated optically pumped magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alem, Orang; Sander, Tilmann H.; Mhaskar, Rahul; LeBlanc, John; Eswaran, Hari; Steinhoff, Uwe; Okada, Yoshio; Kitching, John; Trahms, Lutz; Knappe, Svenja

    2015-06-01

    Following the rapid progress in the development of optically pumped magnetometer (OPM) technology for the measurement of magnetic fields in the femtotesla range, a successful assembly of individual sensors into an array of nearly identical sensors is within reach. Here, 25 microfabricated OPMs with footprints of 1 cm3 were assembled into a conformal array. The individual sensors were inserted into three flexible belt-shaped holders and connected to their respective light sources and electronics, which reside outside a magnetically shielded room, through long optical and electrical cables. With this setup the fetal magnetocardiogram of a pregnant woman was measured by placing two sensor belts over her abdomen and one belt over her chest. The fetal magnetocardiogram recorded over the abdomen is usually dominated by contributions from the maternal magnetocardiogram, since the maternal heart generates a much stronger signal than the fetal heart. Therefore, signal processing methods have to be applied to obtain the pure fetal magnetocardiogram: orthogonal projection and independent component analysis. The resulting spatial distributions of fetal cardiac activity are in good agreement with each other. In a further exemplary step, the fetal heart rate was extracted from the fetal magnetocardiogram. Its variability suggests fetal activity. We conclude that microfabricated optically pumped magnetometers operating at room temperature are capable of complementing or in the future even replacing superconducting sensors for fetal magnetocardiography measurements.

  6. Fetal magnetocardiography measurements with an array of microfabricated optically pumped magnetometers.

    PubMed

    Alem, Orang; Sander, Tilmann H; Mhaskar, Rahul; LeBlanc, John; Eswaran, Hari; Steinhoff, Uwe; Okada, Yoshio; Kitching, John; Trahms, Lutz; Knappe, Svenja

    2015-06-21

    Following the rapid progress in the development of optically pumped magnetometer (OPM) technology for the measurement of magnetic fields in the femtotesla range, a successful assembly of individual sensors into an array of nearly identical sensors is within reach. Here, 25 microfabricated OPMs with footprints of 1 cm(3) were assembled into a conformal array. The individual sensors were inserted into three flexible belt-shaped holders and connected to their respective light sources and electronics, which reside outside a magnetically shielded room, through long optical and electrical cables. With this setup the fetal magnetocardiogram of a pregnant woman was measured by placing two sensor belts over her abdomen and one belt over her chest. The fetal magnetocardiogram recorded over the abdomen is usually dominated by contributions from the maternal magnetocardiogram, since the maternal heart generates a much stronger signal than the fetal heart. Therefore, signal processing methods have to be applied to obtain the pure fetal magnetocardiogram: orthogonal projection and independent component analysis. The resulting spatial distributions of fetal cardiac activity are in good agreement with each other. In a further exemplary step, the fetal heart rate was extracted from the fetal magnetocardiogram. Its variability suggests fetal activity. We conclude that microfabricated optically pumped magnetometers operating at room temperature are capable of complementing or in the future even replacing superconducting sensors for fetal magnetocardiography measurements.

  7. An optimized microfabricated platform for the optical generation and detection of hyperpolarized 129Xe

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Daniel J.; Seltzer, Scott J.; Jiménez-Martínez, Ricardo; Ring, Hattie L.; Malecek, Nicolas S.; Knappe, Svenja; Donley, Elizabeth A.; Kitching, John; Bajaj, Vikram S.; Pines, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Low thermal-equilibrium nuclear spin polarizations and the need for sophisticated instrumentation render conventional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) incompatible with small-scale microfluidic devices. Hyperpolarized 129Xe gas has found use in the study of many materials but has required very large and expensive instrumentation. Recently a microfabricated device with modest instrumentation demonstrated all-optical hyperpolarization and detection of 129Xe gas. This device was limited by 129Xe polarizations less than 1%, 129Xe NMR signals smaller than 20 nT, and transport of hyperpolarized 129Xe over millimeter lengths. Higher polarizations, versatile detection schemes, and flow of 129Xe over larger distances are desirable for wider applications. Here we demonstrate an ultra-sensitive microfabricated platform that achieves 129Xe polarizations reaching 7%, NMR signals exceeding 1 μT, lifetimes up to 6 s, and simultaneous two-mode detection, consisting of a high-sensitivity in situ channel with signal-to-noise of 105 and a lower-sensitivity ex situ detection channel which may be useful in a wider variety of conditions. 129Xe is hyperpolarized and detected in locations more than 1 cm apart. Our versatile device is an optimal platform for microfluidic magnetic resonance in particular, but equally attractive for wider nuclear spin applications benefitting from ultra-sensitive detection, long coherences, and simple instrumentation. PMID:28266629

  8. An optimized microfabricated platform for the optical generation and detection of hyperpolarized 129Xe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Daniel J.; Seltzer, Scott J.; Jiménez-Martínez, Ricardo; Ring, Hattie L.; Malecek, Nicolas S.; Knappe, Svenja; Donley, Elizabeth A.; Kitching, John; Bajaj, Vikram S.; Pines, Alexander

    2017-03-01

    Low thermal-equilibrium nuclear spin polarizations and the need for sophisticated instrumentation render conventional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) incompatible with small-scale microfluidic devices. Hyperpolarized 129Xe gas has found use in the study of many materials but has required very large and expensive instrumentation. Recently a microfabricated device with modest instrumentation demonstrated all-optical hyperpolarization and detection of 129Xe gas. This device was limited by 129Xe polarizations less than 1%, 129Xe NMR signals smaller than 20 nT, and transport of hyperpolarized 129Xe over millimeter lengths. Higher polarizations, versatile detection schemes, and flow of 129Xe over larger distances are desirable for wider applications. Here we demonstrate an ultra-sensitive microfabricated platform that achieves 129Xe polarizations reaching 7%, NMR signals exceeding 1 μT, lifetimes up to 6 s, and simultaneous two-mode detection, consisting of a high-sensitivity in situ channel with signal-to-noise of 105 and a lower-sensitivity ex situ detection channel which may be useful in a wider variety of conditions. 129Xe is hyperpolarized and detected in locations more than 1 cm apart. Our versatile device is an optimal platform for microfluidic magnetic resonance in particular, but equally attractive for wider nuclear spin applications benefitting from ultra-sensitive detection, long coherences, and simple instrumentation.

  9. Parylene C as a Sacrificial Material for Microfabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beamesderfer, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Parylene C has been investigated for use as a sacrificial material in microfabrication. Although Parylene C cannot be patterned lithographically like photoresists, it nevertheless extends the range of processing options by offering a set of properties that are suitable for microfabrication and are complementary to those of photoresists. The compatibility of Parylene C with several microfabrication processes was demonstrated in experiments in which a thin film of Parylene C was deposited on a silicon wafer, then several thin metal films were deposited and successfully patterned, utilizing the Parylene C pads as a sacrificial layer. The term "parylene" -- a contraction of "poly(para-xylene)" -- denotes a family of vapor-deposited polymers. In Parylene C (the most common form of parylene), a chlorine atom is substituted for one of the hydrogen atoms on the benzene ring of each para-xylene moiety. Heretofore, parylenes have been used as conformal coating materials in diverse applications.

  10. Integration of suspended carbon nanotubes into micro-fabricated devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karp, Gabriel A.; Ya'akobovitz, Assaf; David-Pur, Moshe; Ioffe, Zvi; Cheshnovsky, Ori; Krylov, Slava; Hanein, Yael

    2009-08-01

    The integration of suspended carbon nanotubes into micron-scale silicon-based devices offers many exciting advantages in the realm of nano-scale sensing and micro- and nano-electromechanical systems (MEMS and NEMS). To realize such devices, simple fabrication schemes are needed. Here we present a new method to integrate carbon nanotubes into silicon-based devices by applying conventional micro-fabrication methods combined with a guided chemical vapor deposition growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes. The described procedure yields clean, long, taut and well-positioned tubes in electrical contact to conducting electrodes. The positioning, alignment and tautness of the tubes are all controlled by the structural and chemical features of the micro-fabricated substrate. As the approach described consists of common micro-fabrication and chemical vapor deposition growth procedures, it offers a viable route toward MEMS-NEMS integration and commercial utilization of carbon nanotubes as nano-electromechanical transducers.

  11. Microfabricated Segmented-Involute-Foil Regenerator for Stirling Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, Mounir; Danila, Daniel; Simon, Terrence; Mantell, Susan; Sun, Liyong; Gedeon, David; Qiu, Songgang; Wood, Gary; Kelly, Kevin; McLean, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    An involute-foil regenerator was designed, microfabricated, and tested in an oscillating-flow test rig. The concept consists of stacked involute-foil nickel disks (see figure) microfabricated via a lithographic process. Test results yielded a performance of about twice that of the 90-percent random-fiber currently used in small Stirling converters. The segmented nature of the involute- foil in both the axial and radial directions increases the strength of the structure relative to wrapped foils. In addition, relative to random-fiber regenerators, the involute-foil has a reduced pressure drop, and is expected to be less susceptible to the release of metal fragments into the working space, thus increasing reliability. The prototype nickel involute-foil regenerator was adequate for testing in an engine with a 650 C hot-end temperature. This is lower than that required by larger engines, and high-temperature alloys are not suited for the lithographic microfabrication approach.

  12. Microfabrication of IPMC cilia for bio-inspired flow sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Hong; Li, Wen; Tan, Xiaobo

    2012-04-01

    As the primary flow sensing organ for fishes, the lateral line system plays a critical role in fish behavior. Analogous to its biological counterpart, an artificial lateral line system, consisting of arrays of micro flow sensors, is expected to be instrumental in the navigation and control of underwater robots. In this paper we investigate the microfabrication of ionic polymer-metal composite (IPMC) cilia for the purpose of flow sensing. While existing macro- and microfabrication methods for IPMCs have predominantly focused on planar structures, we propose a device where micro IPMC beams stand upright on a substrate to effectively interact with the flow. Challenges in the casting of 3D Nafion structure and selective formation of electrodes are discussed, and potential solutions for addressing these challenges are presented together with preliminary microfabrication results.

  13. Development of neutral atom traps based on a microfabricated waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jau, Yuan-Yu; Lee, Jongmin; Biedermann, Grant; Siddiqui, Aleem; Eichenfield, Matt; Dougla, Erica

    2016-05-01

    Implementation of trapping neutral atoms in the evanescent fields generated by a nano-structure, such as a nanofiber or a microfabricated nano-waveguide, will naturally enable strong atom-photon interactions, which serve the key mechanisms for different type of quantum controls. At Sandia National Labs, we are aiming to develop a platform based on this concept to eventually trap cesium atoms with a microfabricated waveguide. Although, neutral atom traps using optical nanofiber has been demonstrated, there are several key issues that need to be resolved to realize trapping atoms with microfabricated structure. The subjects include the material for making the waveguide, optical power handling capability, surface adsorption of alkali-metal atoms, surface roughness of the nano-structure, cold-atom source for loading the atoms into the evanescent-field traps, etc. We will discuss our studies on these related subjects and report our latest progress.

  14. Microfabricated biocapsules for the immunoisolation of pancreatic islets of Langerhans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Tejal Ashwin

    1998-08-01

    A silicon-based microfabricated biocapsule was developed and evaluated for use in the immunoisolation of transplanted cells, specifically pancreatic islets of Langerhans for the treatment of Type I diabetes. The transplantation of cells with specific functions is a promising therapy for a wide variety of pathologies including diabetes, Parkinson's, and hemophilia. Such transplanted cells, however, are sensitive to both cellular and humoral immune rejection as well as damage by autoimmune activity, without chronic immunosuppression. The research presented in this dissertation investigated whether microfabricated silicon-based biocapsules, with uniform membrane pore sizes in the tens of nanometer range, could provide an immunoprotective environment for pancreatic islets and other insulin-secreting cell lines, while maintaining cell viability and functionality. By utilizing fabrication techniques commonly employed in the microelectronics industry (MEMS), membranes were fabricated with precisely controlled and uniform pore sizes, allowing the optimization of biocapsule membrane parameters for the encapsulation of specific hormone-secreting cell types. The biocapsule-forming process employed bulk micromachining to define cell-containing chambers within single crystalline silicon wafers. These chambers interface with the surrounding biological environment through polycrystalline silicon filter membranes, which were surface micromachined to present a high density of uniform pores to allow sufficient permeability to oxygen, glucose, and insulin. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments established the biocompatibility of the microfabricated biocapsule, and demonstrated that encapsulated cells could live and function normally in terms of insulin-secretion within microfabricated environments for extended periods of time. This novel research shows the potential of using microfabricated biocapsules for the encapsulation of several different cell xenografts. The semipermeability

  15. Microfabricated Chemical Sensors for Safety and Emission Control Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, G. W.; Neudeck, P. G.; Chen, L.-Y.; Knight, D.; Liu, C. C.; Wu, Q. H.

    1998-01-01

    Chemical sensor technology is being developed for leak detection, emission monitoring, and fire safety applications. The development of these sensors is based on progress in two types of technology: 1) Micromachining and microfabrication (MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS)-based) technology to fabricate miniaturized sensors. 2) The development of high temperature semiconductors, especially silicon carbide. Using these technologies, sensors to measure hydrogen, hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, oxygen, and carbon dioxide are being developed. A description is given of each sensor type and its present stage of development. It is concluded that microfabricated sensor technology has significant potential for use in a range of aerospace applications.

  16. Recent progress of laser precision microfabrication in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zhaogu; Xu, Guoliang; Zhao, Quanzhong; Liu, Cuiqing

    2002-02-01

    Review on recent progress of laser precision microfabrication in China is given in this paper. The universal fields of the LPM mostly using short pulse and short wavelength lasers in China are as follows: new materials, advanced manufacturing technology, information technology, biological technology, medical treatment and so on, which are given priority to the development in high-tech fields in China.

  17. Experimental Characterization of Microfabricated VirtualImpactor Efficiency

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Air-Microfluidics Group is developing a microelectromechanical systems-based direct reading particulate matter (PM) mass sensor. The sensor consists of two main components: a microfabricated virtual impactor (VI) and a PM mass sensor. The VI leverages particle inertia to sepa...

  18. Microfabricated Silicon Microneedle Array for Transdermal Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Jing; Tay, Francis Eh; Miao, Jianmin; Iliescu, Ciprian

    2006-04-01

    This paper presents developed processes for silicon microneedle arrays microfabrication. Three types of microneedles structures were achieved by isotropic etching in inductively coupled plasma (ICP) using SF6/O2 gases, combination of isotropic etching with deep etching, and wet etching, respectively. A microneedle array with biodegradable porous tips was further developed based on the fabricated microneedles.

  19. Microfabricated Tactile Sensors for Biomedical Applications: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Saccomandi, Paola; Schena, Emiliano; Oddo, Calogero Maria; Zollo, Loredana; Silvestri, Sergio; Guglielmelli, Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    During the last decades, tactile sensors based on different sensing principles have been developed due to the growing interest in robotics and, mainly, in medical applications. Several technological solutions have been employed to design tactile sensors; in particular, solutions based on microfabrication present several attractive features. Microfabrication technologies allow for developing miniaturized sensors with good performance in terms of metrological properties (e.g., accuracy, sensitivity, low power consumption, and frequency response). Small size and good metrological properties heighten the potential role of tactile sensors in medicine, making them especially attractive to be integrated in smart interfaces and microsurgical tools. This paper provides an overview of microfabricated tactile sensors, focusing on the mean principles of sensing, i.e., piezoresistive, piezoelectric and capacitive sensors. These sensors are employed for measuring contact properties, in particular force and pressure, in three main medical fields, i.e., prosthetics and artificial skin, minimal access surgery and smart interfaces for biomechanical analysis. The working principles and the metrological properties of the most promising tactile, microfabricated sensors are analyzed, together with their application in medicine. Finally, the new emerging technologies in these fields are briefly described. PMID:25587432

  20. Application of femtosecond laser pulses for microfabrication of transparent media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juodkazis, S.; Matsuo, S.; Misawa, H.; Mizeikis, V.; Marcinkevicius, A.; Sun, H.-B.; Tokuda, Y.; Takahashi, M.; Yoko, T.; Nishii, J.

    2002-09-01

    Femtosecond laser microfabrication of 3D optical memories and photonic crystal (PhC) structures in solid glasses and liquid resins are demonstrated. The optical memories can be read out from both transmission and emission images. The PhC structures reveal clear signatures of photonic bandgap (PBG) and microcavity formation.

  1. Microfabrication of nanowires-based GMR biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellamkonda, R.; John, T.; Mathew, B.; DeCoster, M.; Hegab, H.; Palmer, J.; Davis, D.

    2009-05-01

    This study focuses on the development of current-perpendicular-to plane (CPP) Giant Magnetoresistance (GMR) of CoNiCu/Cu multilayered nanowire based microfluidic sensors for the detection of magnetic nanoparticles and fluids. The visible measurable variations in electrical voltage due to changes in external magnetic field are later to be monitored in microfluidic biosensor for the detection of toxicants in cells. An early prototype device was fabricated and tested using both an aqueous nonmagnetic medium (water) and a commercially available ferrofluid solution. A magnetic field of 0.01T caused a resistance change of 1.37% for ferrofluid, while a 1.1% GMR was recorded for the water baseline.

  2. Sub-picotesla Scalar Atomic Magnetometer with a Microfabricated Vapor Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Mhaskar, Rahul

    2016-05-01

    We explore the sensitivity limits of scalar atomic magnetometry with a micro-fabricated Cs vapor cell. The millimeter-scale cell is fabricated using silicon Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) technology. The atomic spin procession is driven by an amplitude-modulated circularly polarized pump laser resonant with the D1 transition in Cs atoms. The precession is detected by an off-resonant linearly polarized probe laser using a balanced polarimeter setup. The probe light is spatially split into two beams to perform a gradiometer measurement. In a magnetic field of magnitude within the range of the earth magnetic field, we measure a sensitivity of less than 150 fT/ √Hz in the gradiometer mode, which shows that the magnetometer by itself can achieve sub-100 fT/ √Hz sensitivitiy. In addition to its high sensitivity, the magnetometer has a bandwidth of nearly 1 kHz due to the broad magnetic resonance inside the small cell. Our experiment suggests the feasibility of a portable, low-power and high-performance magnetometer, which can be operated in the earth's magnetic field. Such a device will greatly expand the range of applications for atomic magnetometers, such as the detection of nuclear magnetic resonance in an unshielded environment.

  3. Method For Chemical Sensing Using A Microfabricated Teeter-Totter Resonator

    DOEpatents

    Adkins, Douglas Ray; Heller, Edwin J.; Shul, Randy J.

    2004-11-30

    A method for sensing a chemical analyte in a fluid stream comprises providing a microfabricated teeter-totter resonator that relies upon a Lorentz force to cause oscillation in a paddle, applying a static magnetic field substantially aligned in-plane with the paddle, energizing a current conductor line on a surface of the paddle with an alternating electrical current to generate the Lorentz force, exposing the resonator to the analyte, and detecting the response of the oscillatory motion of the paddle to the chemical analyte. Preferably, a chemically sensitive coating is disposed on at least one surface of the paddle to enhance the sorption of the analyte by the paddle. The concentration of the analyte in a fluid stream can be determined by measuring the change in the resonant frequency or phase of the teeter-totter resonator as the chemical analyte is added to or removed from the paddle.

  4. Solid state synthesis of chitosan and its unsaturated derivatives for laser microfabrication of 3D scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akopova, T. A.; Demina, T. S.; Bagratashvili, V. N.; Bardakova, K. N.; Novikov, M. M.; Selezneva, I. I.; Istomin, A. V.; Svidchenko, E. A.; Cherkaev, G. V.; Surin, N. M.; Timashev, P. S.

    2015-07-01

    Chitosans with various degrees of deacetylation and molecular weights and their allyl substituted derivatives were obtained through a solvent-free reaction under shear deformation in an extruder. Structure and physical-chemical analysis of the samples were carried out using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), ultraviolet (UV) and infrared radiation (IR) spectroscopy. Photosensitive materials based on the synthesized polymers were successfully used for microfabrication of 3D well-defined architectonic structures by laser stereolithography. Study on the metabolic activity of NCTC L929 cultured in the presence of the cured chitosan extracts indicates that the engineered biomaterials could support adhesion, spreading and growth of adherent-dependent cells, and thus could be considered as biocompatible scaffolds.

  5. Microfabricated bioprocessor for integrated nanoliter-scale Sanger DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Blazej, Robert G; Kumaresan, Palani; Mathies, Richard A

    2006-05-09

    An efficient, nanoliter-scale microfabricated bioprocessor integrating all three Sanger sequencing steps, thermal cycling, sample purification, and capillary electrophoresis, has been developed and evaluated. Hybrid glass-polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) wafer-scale construction is used to combine 250-nl reactors, affinity-capture purification chambers, high-performance capillary electrophoresis channels, and pneumatic valves and pumps onto a single microfabricated device. Lab-on-a-chip-level integration enables complete Sanger sequencing from only 1 fmol of DNA template. Up to 556 continuous bases were sequenced with 99% accuracy, demonstrating read lengths required for de novo sequencing of human and other complex genomes. The performance of this miniaturized DNA sequencer provides a benchmark for predicting the ultimate cost and efficiency limits of Sanger sequencing.

  6. A phase diagram for microfabrication of geometrically controlled hydrogel scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Tirella, A; Orsini, A; Vozzi, G; Ahluwalia, A

    2009-12-01

    Hydrogels are considered as excellent candidates for tissue substitutes by virtue of their high water content and biphasic nature. However, the fact that they are soft, wet and floppy renders them difficult to process and use as custom-designed scaffolds. To address this problem alginate hydrogels were modeled and characterized by measuring stress-strain and creep behavior as well as viscosity as a function of sodium alginate concentration, cross-linking time and calcium ion concentration. The gels were then microfabricated into scaffolds using the pressure-assisted microsyringe. The mechanical and viscous characteristics were used to generate a processing window in the form of a phase diagram which describes the fidelity of the scaffolds as a function of the material and machine parameters. The approach can be applied to a variety of microfabrication methods and biomaterials in order to design well-controlled custom scaffolds.

  7. Inkjet printing technology and conductive inks synthesis for microfabrication techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien Dang, Mau; Dung Dang, Thi My; Fribourg-Blanc, Eric

    2013-03-01

    Inkjet printing is an advanced technique which reliably reproduces text, images and photos on paper and some other substrates by desktop printers and is now used in the field of materials deposition. This interest in maskless materials deposition is coupled with the development of microfabrication techniques for the realization of circuits or patterns on flexible substrates for which printing techniques are of primary interest. This paper is a review of some results obtained in inkjet printing technology to develop microfabrication techniques at Laboratory for Nanotechnology (LNT). Ink development, in particular conductive ink, study of printed patterns, as well as application of these to the realization of radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags on flexible substrates, are presented. Invited talk at the 6th International Workshop on Advanced Materials Science and Nanotechnology, 30 October-2 November 2012, Ha Long, Vietnam.

  8. Precision microfabrication with Q-switched CO2 lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunsky, Corey M.; Matsumoto, Hisashi

    2003-02-01

    This paper presents a new CO2 laser technology for precision microfabrication applications. The laser produces short (microsecond) pulses at very high pulse repetition frequencies (PRFs). In contrast, most commercial CO2-laser micromachining applications employ one of two type of CO2 lasers: RF-excited with external pulse modulation, and TEA lasers. The laser technology presented here produces pulses sharing some of the characteristics of the TEA CO2 laser, but is capable of delivering them at much higher PRFs (20-100 kHz). Microfabrication applications to date are primarily microdrilling in common electronic circuit board and IC packaging materials, including unreinforced, glass-fiber reinforced, and particle-filled epoxies. These materials are processed using pulse energies lower than those generally used by conventional CO2 laser designs, and at speeds typically 1.5 to three times as fast as achieved by conventional CO2 laser drills.

  9. Microfabricated devices for performing chemical and biochemical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, J.M.; Jacobson, S.C.; Foote, R.S.

    1997-05-01

    There is growing interest in microfabricated devices that perform chemical and biochemical analysis. The general goal is to use microfabrication tools to construct miniature devices that can perform a complete analysis starting with an unprocessed sample. Such devices have been referred to as lab-on-a-chip devices. Initial efforts on microfluidic laboratory-on-a-chip devices focused on chemical separations. There are many potential applications of these fluidic microchip devices. Some applications such as chemical process control or environmental monitoring would require that a chip be used over an extended period of time or for many analyses. Other applications such as forensics, clinical diagnostics, and genetic diagnostics would employ the chip devices as single use disposable devices.

  10. Micro-Fabricated DC Comparison Calorimeter for RF Power Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Neji, Bilel; Xu, Jing; Titus, Albert H.; Meltzer, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Diode detection and bolometric detection have been widely used to measure radio frequency (RF) power. However, flow calorimeters, in particular micro-fabricated flow calorimeters, have been mostly unexplored as power meters. This paper presents the design, micro-fabrication and characterization of a flow calorimeter. This novel device is capable of measuring power from 100 μW to 200 mW. It has a 50-Ohm load that is heated by the RF source, and the heat is transferred to fluid in a microchannel. The temperature change in the fluid is measured by a thermistor that is connected in one leg of a Wheatstone bridge. The output voltage change of the bridge corresponds to the RF power applied to the load. The microfabricated device measures 25.4 mm × 50.8 mm, excluding the power supplies, microcontroller and fluid pump. Experiments demonstrate that the micro-fabricated sensor has a sensitivity up to 22 × 10−3 V/W. The typical resolution of this micro-calorimeter is on the order of 50 μW, and the best resolution is around 10 μW. The effective efficiency is 99.9% from 0–1 GHz and more than 97.5% at frequencies up to 4 GHz. The measured reflection coefficient of the 50-Ohm load and coplanar wave guide is less than −25 dB from 0–2 GHz and less than −16 dB at 2–4 GHz. PMID:25350509

  11. SEM microfabric analysis of glacial varves, Geneseo, N. Y

    SciTech Connect

    Pietraszek, S.R. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-03-01

    A detailed study of the microfabric of Pleistocene varved silty-clay from Geneseo Valley (Geneseo, N.Y.) indicates rapid deposition of sediment in a flocculated state into a glacial lake. Ten varve couplets of a 10 cm thick sample were studied using the Scanning Electron Microscope to determine their microfabric. Each varve ranges from 0.5 cm to 2.0 cm and represents an annual ( ) deposit. Varves consists of a lower light colored, coarse zone of silt and clay, and an upper darker colored, organic fine clayey zone. Graded bedding is observed in each couplet, and random clay particle orientation is dominant throughout a varve, with the exception of the top 0.5 mm of the fine layer. The upper and lower contacts are sharp. Fabric features are instrumental in reconstructing a depositional environment. Microfabric results of the glacial unit indicate that an initial heavy concentration of clay and silt was introduced into the basin in a single pulse during spring runoff. The majority of silt settled together with clay in a flocculated or aggregated state, forming the lower coarse zone of random orientation. As the silt concentration diminished, the clay continued to flocculate and settled as a fine clay aggregate. It is proposed that the settling took place during the spring and summer months. Finally, during the winter months, the sediment surface of the varve was disturbed by nemotode burrows, which reoriented the clay flakes into a zone of preferred fabric. Microfabric analysis of these glacial varves, thus suggests that sediment was rapidly deposited in a flocculated state.

  12. Practical, Microfabrication-Free Device for Single-Cell Isolation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Liang-I; Chao, Shih-hui; Meldrum, Deirdre R.

    2009-01-01

    Microfabricated devices have great potential in cell-level studies, but are not easily accessible for the broad biology community. This paper introduces the Microscale Oil-Covered Cell Array (MOCCA) as a low-cost device for high throughput single-cell analysis that can be easily produced by researchers without microengineering knowledge. Instead of using microfabricated structures to capture cells, MOCCA isolates cells in discrete aqueous droplets that are separated by oil on patterned hydrophilic areas across a relatively more hydrophobic substrate. The number of randomly seeded Escherichia coli bacteria in each discrete droplet approaches single-cell levels. The cell distribution on MOCCA is well-fit with Poisson distribution. In this pioneer study, we created an array of 900-picoliter droplets. The total time needed to seed cells in ∼3000 droplets was less than 10 minutes. Compared to traditional microfabrication techniques, MOCCA dramatically lowers the cost of microscale cell arrays, yet enhances the fabrication and operational efficiency for single-cell analysis. PMID:19696926

  13. Microfabric analysis of the Appalachian basin Williamson and Willowvale shales

    SciTech Connect

    Burkins, D.L.; Woodard, M. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-03-01

    Shale samples from the Williamson and Willovale formations (Upper Llandoverian, Silurian) were studied to determine the relationship of microfabric (particle orientation) to sedimentary environment and processes. The shales were sampled along a traverse from Utica to Rochester, New York in the Appalachian foreland basin. Samples were taken from proximal and distal parts of the basin and analyzed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and using thin sections to determine the relationship between microfabric and basin position. Results show samples taken from the proximal part of the basin contain large amounts of silt grains, random orientation of clay flakes, and a high degree of bioturbation. Basinward, the samples become less silty, less bioturbated, and have more preferred orientation of clay flakes. The samples at the basin axis show the highest degree of preferred orientation and contain no silt grains. It can be concluded that the shale fabrics vary basinward and microfabric analysis is useful in determining the relative position of samples within a sedimentary basin.

  14. A microfabrication-based approach to quantitative isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Jia, Yuan; Lin, Qiao

    2016-04-15

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) directly measures heat evolved in a chemical reaction to determine equilibrium binding properties of biomolecular systems. Conventional ITC instruments are expensive, use complicated design and construction, and require long analysis times. Microfabricated calorimetric devices are promising, although they have yet to allow accurate, quantitative ITC measurements of biochemical reactions. This paper presents a microfabrication-based approach to integrated, quantitative ITC characterization of biomolecular interactions. The approach integrates microfabricated differential calorimetric sensors with microfluidic titration. Biomolecules and reagents are introduced at each of a series of molar ratios, mixed, and allowed to react. The reaction thermal power is differentially measured, and used to determine the thermodynamic profile of the biomolecular interactions. Implemented in a microdevice featuring thermally isolated, well-defined reaction volumes with minimized fluid evaporation as well as highly sensitive thermoelectric sensing, the approach enables accurate and quantitative ITC measurements of protein-ligand interactions under different isothermal conditions. Using the approach, we demonstrate ITC characterization of the binding of 18-Crown-6 with barium chloride, and the binding of ribonuclease A with cytidine 2'-monophosphate within reaction volumes of approximately 0.7 µL and at concentrations down to 2mM. For each binding system, the ITC measurements were completed with considerably reduced analysis times and material consumption, and yielded a complete thermodynamic profile of the molecular interaction in agreement with published data. This demonstrates the potential usefulness of our approach for biomolecular characterization in biomedical applications.

  15. Applied Geophysics in the world of tomorrow - Microfabrication arrives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, R. M.

    2012-12-01

    Instrument manufacturers have a unique perspective on the design and use of geophysical equipment. The field instrument must provide reliable and repeatable performance in every climate condition and environmental extreme. The gear must be easy to use and more importantly easy to understand for non-native English speakers. I have traveled the world installing, repairing, commissioning and demonstrating geophysical survey systems. Everywhere I have traveled there is one unassailable fact - our geophysicist compatriots in developed and developing countries are hungry for information and hungry for technology. They want more and better systems to help improve their understanding of the subsurface. And they want to serve their countries by helping to exploit natural resources. I hold up for your review the first highly successful portable magnetometer, the G-856. Designed in 1981 with over 5000 sold, it is still produced in record numbers today for use all over the world. How could it be that a rather simple device could be so long lived, and make such an impact in exploration programs for 32 years? The answer is in producing reliable and easy to use equipment that is affordable. One might compare it to the iPad or Android device of today. The innovative and no-frills interface has attracted users from all markets including mining, oil/gas, archaeology, environmental, UXO/military and forensics. Powerful ancillary software to process the data has always been included at no charge, offering geoscientists a solution rather than a black box. Many of our technologies are poised for dramatic breakthroughs in miniaturization and interconnectivity. I point specifically to the micro-fabrication of the cesium vapor magnetometer. Initiated 5 years ago in conjunction with NIST, Geometrics has embarked on a high stakes game of minimizing size, weight, power consumption and price while eliminating dead zones and maintaining or increasing sensitivity and sample speed. These new

  16. Microfabricated sensors for the measurement of electromagnetic fields in biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monberg, James; Henning, Albert K.

    1995-09-01

    Public awareness of the risks of exposure to electromagnetic radiation has grown over the past ten yeras. The effects of power lines on human and animal health have drawn particular attention. Some longitudinal studies of cancer rates near power lines show a significant correlation, while others show a null result. The studies have suffered from inadequate sensors for the measurement of electromagnetic radiation in vivo. In this work, we describe the design, construction, and testing of electrically passive, microfabricated single-pole antennas and coils. These sensors will be used in vivo to study the effects of electromagnetic radiation on animals. Our testing to date has been limited to in vitro studies of the magnetic field probes. Magnetic field pickup coils were fabricated with up to 100 turns, over a length of up to 1000 micrometers . Measurements were carried out with the sensors in air, and in water of various saline concentrations. Magnetic fields were applied using a Helmholtz coil. Both dc and ac fields were applied. The results indicate that small-area measurements of electromagnetic fields in vitro can be made successfully, provided adequate shielding and amplification are used.

  17. Concentrating Genomic Length DNA in a Microfabricated Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Abrams, Ezra S.; Boles, T. Christian; Pedersen, Jonas N.; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Austin, Robert H.; Sturm, James C.

    2015-05-01

    We demonstrate that a microfabricated bump array can concentrate genomic-length DNA molecules efficiently at continuous, high flow velocities, up to 40 μ m /s , if the single-molecule DNA globule has a sufficiently large shear modulus. Increase in the shear modulus is accomplished by compacting the DNA molecules to minimal coil size using polyethylene glycol (PEG) derived depletion forces. We map out the sweet spot, where concentration occurs, as a function of PEG concentration and flow speed using a combination of theoretical analysis and experiment. Purification of DNA from enzymatic reactions for next-generation DNA-sequencing libraries will be an important application of this development.

  18. Microfabricated, flowthrough porous apparatus for discrete detection of binding reactions

    DOEpatents

    Beattie, Kenneth L.

    1998-01-01

    An improved microfabricated apparatus for conducting a multiplicity of individual and simultaneous binding reactions is described. The apparatus comprises a substrate on which are located discrete and isolated sites for binding reactions. The apparatus is characterized by discrete and isolated regions that extend through said substrate and terminate on a second surface thereof such that when a test sample is allowed to the substrate, it is capable of penetrating through each such region during the course of said binding reaction. The apparatus is especially useful for sequencing by hybridization of DNA molecules.

  19. Enhanced adhesion for LIGA microfabrication by using a buffer layer

    DOEpatents

    Bajikar, Sateesh S.; De Carlo, Francesco; Song, Joshua J.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is an improvement on the LIGA microfabrication process wherein a buffer layer is applied to the upper or working surface of a substrate prior to the placement of a resist onto the surface of the substrate. The buffer layer is made from an inert low-Z material (low atomic weight), a material that absorbs secondary X-rays emissions from the substrate that are generated from the substrate upon exposure to a primary X-rays source. Suitable materials for the buffer layer include polyamides and polyimide. The preferred polyimide is synthesized form pyromellitic anhydride and oxydianiline (PMDA-ODA).

  20. Enhanced adhesion for LIGA microfabrication by using a buffer layer

    DOEpatents

    Bajikar, Sateesh S.; De Carlo, Francesco; Song, Joshua J.

    2004-01-27

    The present invention is an improvement on the LIGA microfabrication process wherein a buffer layer is applied to the upper or working surface of a substrate prior to the placement of a resist onto the surface of the substrate. The buffer layer is made from an inert low-Z material (low atomic weight), a material that absorbs secondary X-rays emissions from the substrate that are generated from the substrate upon exposure to a primary X-rays source. Suitable materials for the buffer layer include polyamides and polyimide. The preferred polyimide is synthesized form pyromellitic anhydride and oxydianiline (PMDA-ODA).

  1. Laser-based microfabrication for cell adhesion and migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Jordan S.

    Mammalian cell adhesion and migration impact a multitude of cellular behaviors and tissue remodeling processes. Over the past several decades, investigators have methodically improved in vitro systems as mimics of the extracellular microenvironment to study these biologic phenomena. Experiments have progressed from early studies on bifunctional inorganic surfaces to those with purified adhesive proteins against an organic, non-adhesive background. Recently, subcellular geometric patterns of adhesive proteins have proven useful to restrict and direct focal contact formation, cell survival, lamellopodia extension, and the maturation of "supermature" focal contacts. The vast majority of recent studies have involved the construction of hydrophobic patches with adsorbed fibronectin as the adhesive constraint of choice. However, the extracellular matrix (ECM) in which cells operate is a complex and diverse environment where numerous signals interact with a cell simultaneously; signals that the cell must integrate and that directly impact these processes. Microfabrication methods to approximate the extracellular milieu have significant limitations in their potential to be extended to pattern multiple bioactive ligands with high precision. Current techniques require multi-step processes which lose feature fidelity at every pattern transfer step, while simultaneously increasing logistical complexity and the chance of technical missteps. We have developed a family of complementary techniques using the raster-scanning laser of a confocal microscope to address a number of current challenges in improving microfabrication. For our work with thin films of self-assembled organic monolayers, we systematically removed the multi-step processing requirements of conventional photolithographic microfabrication and characterized and verified the technical advantages of our new patterning techniques. For 3D work, we developed and demonstrated micron-scale biochemical and mechanical

  2. A planar microfabricated electrolyzer for hydrogen and oxygen generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, L.; Myer, B.; Tellefsen, K.; Pau, S.

    We present the design, fabrication and testing of a microfabricated planar reactor for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) using thin film Pt electrodes and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) fluidic chamber. The reactor is designed to separate gases by flow dynamics and reactor flow is analyzed by three-dimensional finite element analysis. The planar geometry is scalable, compact and stackable. Using KOH 28 wt% electrolyte, we have achieved a hydrogen generation density of 0.23 kg h -1 m -3 and an efficiency of 48% with a flow rate of 10 ml min -1 and cell voltage of 3 V.

  3. Millimeter-wave Bragg diffraction of microfabricated crystal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, C. P.; Lin, S. Y.; Chang, T. H.; Shew, B. Y.

    2011-06-01

    A compact diffraction apparatus is developed with millimeter-wave propagation between two parallel plates. Two types of microfabricated model crystals are individually mounted on a rotatable structure. In contrast to previous work, the experimental results agree well with Bragg's predictions because multiple scattering is minimized in this configuration. Factors that affect the resolution and signal strength, such as the number of scatterers, cylinder radius, and the distance between the detector and the model crystal, are analyzed. The apparatus offers a visually accessible way to teach students about crystal structure as well as scattering and diffraction.

  4. Microfabricated Chemical Sensors for Aerospace Fire Detection Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Fralick, Gustave; Thomas, Valarie; Makel, D.; Liu, C. C.; Ward, B.; Wu, Q. H.

    2001-01-01

    The detection of fires on-board commercial aircraft is extremely important for safety reasons. Although dependable fire detection equipment presently exists within the cabin, detection of fire within the cargo hold has been less reliable and susceptible to false alarms. A second, independent method of fire detection to complement the conventional smoke detection techniques, such as the measurement of chemical species indicative of a fire, will help reduce false alarms and improve aircraft safety. Although many chemical species are indicative of a fire, two species of particular interest are CO and CO2. This paper discusses microfabricated chemical sensor development tailored to meet the needs of fire safety applications. This development is based on progress in three types of technology: 1) Micromachining and microfabrication (Microsystem) technology to fabricate miniaturized sensors. 2) The use of nanocrystalline materials to develop sensors with improved stability combined with higher sensitivity. 3) The development of high temperature semiconductors, especially silicon carbide. The individual sensor being developed and their level of maturity will be presented.

  5. The Intersection of Flow Cytometry with Microfluidics and Microfabrication

    PubMed Central

    Piyasena, Menake E.; Graves, Steven W.

    2014-01-01

    A modern flow cytometer can analyze and sort particles on a one by one basis at rates of 50,000 particles per second. Flow cytometers can also measure as many as 17 channels of fluorescence, several angles of scattered light, and other non-optical parameters such as particle impedance. More specialized flow cytometers can provide even greater analysis power, such as single molecule detection, imaging, and full spectral collection, at reduced rates. These capabilities have made flow cytometers an invaluable tool for numerous applications including cellular immunophenotyping, CD4+ T-cell counting, multiplex microsphere analysis, high-throughput screening, and rare cell analysis and sorting. Many bio-analytical techniques have been influenced by the advent of microfluidics as a component in analytical tools and flow cytometry is no exception. Here we detail the functions and uses of a modern flow cytometer, review the recent and historical contributions of microfluidics and microfabricated devices to field of flow cytometry, examine current application areas, and suggest opportunities for the synergistic application of microfabrication approaches to modern flow cytometry. PMID:24488050

  6. Ball-grid array architecture for microfabricated ion traps

    SciTech Connect

    Guise, Nicholas D. Fallek, Spencer D.; Stevens, Kelly E.; Brown, K. R.; Volin, Curtis; Harter, Alexa W.; Amini, Jason M.; Higashi, Robert E.; Lu, Son Thai; Chanhvongsak, Helen M.; Nguyen, Thi A.; Marcus, Matthew S.; Ohnstein, Thomas R.; Youngner, Daniel W.

    2015-05-07

    State-of-the-art microfabricated ion traps for quantum information research are approaching nearly one hundred control electrodes. We report here on the development and testing of a new architecture for microfabricated ion traps, built around ball-grid array (BGA) connections, that is suitable for increasingly complex trap designs. In the BGA trap, through-substrate vias bring electrical signals from the back side of the trap die to the surface trap structure on the top side. Gold-ball bump bonds connect the back side of the trap die to an interposer for signal routing from the carrier. Trench capacitors fabricated into the trap die replace area-intensive surface or edge capacitors. Wirebonds in the BGA architecture are moved to the interposer. These last two features allow the trap die to be reduced to only the area required to produce trapping fields. The smaller trap dimensions allow tight focusing of an addressing laser beam for fast single-qubit rotations. Performance of the BGA trap as characterized with {sup 40}Ca{sup +} ions is comparable to previous surface-electrode traps in terms of ion heating rate, mode frequency stability, and storage lifetime. We demonstrate two-qubit entanglement operations with {sup 171}Yb{sup +} ions in a second BGA trap.

  7. Microfabrication of transparent materials using filamented femtosecond laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butkus, S.; Paipulas, D.; Gaižauskas, Eugenijus; KaškelytÄ--, D.; Sirutkaitis, V.

    2014-05-01

    Glass drilling realized with the help of femtosecond lasers attract industrial attention, however, desired tasks may require systems employing high numerical aperture (NA) focusing conditions, low repetition rate lasers and complex fast motion translation stages. Due to the sensitivity of such systems, slight instabilities in parameter values can lead to crack formations, severe fabrication rate decrement and poor quality overall results. A microfabrication system lacking the stated disadvantages was constructed and demonstrated in this report. An f-theta lens was used in combination with a galvanometric scanner, in addition, a water pumping system that enables formation of water films of variable thickness in real time on the samples. Water acts as a medium for filament formation, which in turn decreases the focal spot diameter and increases fluence and axial focal length. This article demonstrates the application of a femtosecond (280fs) laser towards rapid cutting of different transparent materials. Filament formation in water gives rise to strong ablation at the surface of the sample, moreover, the water, surrounding the ablated area, adds increased cooling and protection from cracking. The constructed microfabrication system is capable of drilling holes in thick soda-lime, hardened glasses and sapphire. The fabrication time varies depending on the diameter of the hole and spans from a few to several hundred seconds. Moreover, complex-shape fabrication was demonstrated.

  8. Ball-grid array architecture for microfabricated ion traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guise, Nicholas D.; Fallek, Spencer D.; Stevens, Kelly E.; Brown, K. R.; Volin, Curtis; Harter, Alexa W.; Amini, Jason M.; Higashi, Robert E.; Lu, Son Thai; Chanhvongsak, Helen M.; Nguyen, Thi A.; Marcus, Matthew S.; Ohnstein, Thomas R.; Youngner, Daniel W.

    2015-05-01

    State-of-the-art microfabricated ion traps for quantum information research are approaching nearly one hundred control electrodes. We report here on the development and testing of a new architecture for microfabricated ion traps, built around ball-grid array (BGA) connections, that is suitable for increasingly complex trap designs. In the BGA trap, through-substrate vias bring electrical signals from the back side of the trap die to the surface trap structure on the top side. Gold-ball bump bonds connect the back side of the trap die to an interposer for signal routing from the carrier. Trench capacitors fabricated into the trap die replace area-intensive surface or edge capacitors. Wirebonds in the BGA architecture are moved to the interposer. These last two features allow the trap die to be reduced to only the area required to produce trapping fields. The smaller trap dimensions allow tight focusing of an addressing laser beam for fast single-qubit rotations. Performance of the BGA trap as characterized with 40Ca+ ions is comparable to previous surface-electrode traps in terms of ion heating rate, mode frequency stability, and storage lifetime. We demonstrate two-qubit entanglement operations with 171Yb+ ions in a second BGA trap.

  9. Microfabricated capillary electrophoresis amino acid chirality analyzer for extraterrestrial exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutt, L. D.; Glavin, D. P.; Bada, J. L.; Mathies, R. A.

    1999-01-01

    Chiral separations of fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled amino acids have been performed on a microfabricated capillary electrophoresis chip to explore the feasibility of using such devices to analyze for extinct or extant life signs in extraterrestrial environments. The test system consists of a folded electrophoresis channel (19.0 cm long x 150 microns wide x 20 microns deep) that was photolithographically fabricated in a 10-cm-diameter glass wafer sandwich, coupled to a laser-excited confocal fluorescence detection apparatus providing subattomole sensitivity. Using a sodium dodecyl sulfate/gamma-cyclodextrin pH 10.0 carbonate electrophoresis buffer and a separation voltage of 550 V/cm at 10 degrees C, baseline resolution was observed for Val, Ala, Glu, and Asp enantiomers and Gly in only 4 min. Enantiomeric ratios were determined for amino acids extracted from the Murchison meteorite, and these values closely matched values determined by HPLC. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using microfabricated lab-on-a-chip systems to analyze extraterrestrial samples for amino acids.

  10. Three-dimensional microfabrication through a multimode optical fiber.

    PubMed

    Morales-Delgado, Edgar E; Urio, Loic; Conkey, Donald B; Stasio, Nicolino; Psaltis, Demetri; Moser, Christophe

    2017-03-20

    3D printing based on additive manufacturing is an advanced manufacturing technique that allows the fabrication of arbitrary macroscopic and microscopic objects. Many 3D printing systems require large optical elements or nozzles in proximity to the built structure. This prevents their use in applications in which there is no direct access to the area where the objects have to be printed. Here, we demonstrate three-dimensional microfabrication based on two-photon polymerization (TPP) through an ultra-thin printing nozzle of 560 µm in diameter. Using wavefront shaping, femtosecond infrared pulses are focused and scanned through a multimode optical fiber (MMF) inside a photoresist that polymerizes via two-photon absorption. We show the construction of arbitrary 3D structures built with voxels of diameters down to 400 nm on the other side of the fiber. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of microfabrication through a multimode optical fiber. The proposed printing nozzle can reach and manufacture micro-structures in otherwise inaccessible areas through small apertures. Our work represents a new area which we refer to as endofabrication.

  11. Microfabricated, amperometric, enzyme-based biosensors for in vivo applications.

    PubMed

    Weltin, Andreas; Kieninger, Jochen; Urban, Gerald A

    2016-07-01

    Miniaturized electrochemical in vivo biosensors allow the measurement of fast extracellular dynamics of neurotransmitter and energy metabolism directly in the tissue. Enzyme-based amperometric biosensing is characterized by high specificity and precision as well as high spatial and temporal resolution. Aside from glucose monitoring, many systems have been introduced mainly for application in the central nervous system in animal models. We compare the microsensor principle with other methods applied in biomedical research to show advantages and drawbacks. Electrochemical sensor systems are easily miniaturized and fabricated by microtechnology processes. We review different microfabrication approaches for in vivo sensor platforms, ranging from simple modified wires and fibres to fully microfabricated systems on silicon, ceramic or polymer substrates. The various immobilization methods for the enzyme such as chemical cross-linking and entrapment in polymer membranes are discussed. The resulting sensor performance is compared in detail. We also examine different concepts to reject interfering substances by additional membranes, aspects of instrumentation and biocompatibility. Practical considerations are elaborated, and conclusions for future developments are presented. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  12. A Scalable Microfabricated Ion Trap for Quantum Information Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maunz, Peter; Haltli, Raymond; Hollowell, Andrew; Lobser, Daniel; Mizrahi, Jonathan; Rembetski, John; Resnick, Paul; Sterk, Jonathan D.; Stick, Daniel L.; Blain, Matthew G.

    2016-05-01

    Trapped Ion Quantum Information Processing (QIP) relies on complex microfabricated trap structures to enable scaling of the number of quantum bits. Building on previous demonstrations of surface-electrode ion traps, we have designed and characterized the Sandia high-optical-access (HOA-2) microfabricated ion trap. This trap features high optical access, high trap frequencies, low heating rates, and negligible charging of dielectric trap components. We have observed trap lifetimes of more than 100h, measured trap heating rates for ytterbium of less than 40quanta/s, and demonstrated shuttling of ions from a slotted to an above surface region and through a Y-junction. Furthermore, we summarize demonstrations of high-fidelity single and two-qubit gates realized in this trap. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. This work was supported by the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA).

  13. Jet Penetration into a Scaled Microfabricated Stirling Cycle Regenerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Liyong; Simon, Terrence W.; Mantell, Susan; Ibrahim, Mournir; Gedeon, David; Tew, Roy

    2008-01-01

    The cooler and heater adjacent to the regenerator of a Stirling cycle engine have tubes or channels which form jets that pass into the regenerator while diffusing within the matrix. An inactive part of the matrix, beyond the cores of these jets, does not participate fully in the heat transfer between the flow of working fluid and the regenerator matrix material, weakening the regenerator s ability to exchange heat with the working fluid. The objective of the present program is to document this effect on the performance of the regenerator and to develop a model for generalizing the results. However, the small scales of actual Stirling regenerator matrices (on the order of tens of microns) make direct measurements of this effect very difficult. As a result, jet spreading within a regenerator matrix has not been characterized well and is poorly understood. Also, modeling is lacking experimental verification. To address this, a large-scale mockup of thirty times actual scale was constructed and operated under conditions that are dynamically similar to the engine operation. Jet penetration with round jets and slot jets into the microfabricated regenerator geometry are then measured by conventional means. The results are compared with those from a study of spreading of round jets within woven screen regenerator for further documentation of the comparative performance of the microfabricated regenerator geometry.

  14. Microfabricated Chemical Gas Sensors and Sensor Arrays for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.

    2005-01-01

    Aerospace applications require the development of chemical sensors with capabilities beyond those of commercially available sensors. In particular, factors such as minimal sensor size, weight, and power consumption are particularly important. Development areas which have potential aerospace applications include launch vehicle leak detection, engine health monitoring, and fire detection. Sensor development for these applications is based on progress in three types of technology: 1) Micromachining and microfabrication (Microsystem) technology to fabricate miniaturized sensors; 2) The use of nanocrystalline materials to develop sensors with improved stability combined with higher sensitivity; 3) The development of high temperature semiconductors, especially silicon carbide. This presentation discusses the needs of space applications as well as the point-contact sensor technology and sensor arrays being developed to address these needs. Sensors to measure hydrogen, hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides (NO,), carbon monoxide, oxygen, and carbon dioxide are being developed as well as arrays for leak, fire, and emissions detection. Demonstrations of the technology will also be discussed. It is concluded that microfabricated sensor technology has significant potential for use in a range of aerospace applications.

  15. Microfabricated Instrumentation for Chemical Sensing in Industrial Process Control

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, J. M.

    2000-06-01

    The monitoring of chemical constituents in manufacturing processes is of economic importance to most industries. The monitoring and control of chemical constituents may be of importance for product quality control or, in the case of process effluents, of environmental concern. The most common approach now employed for chemical process control is to collect samples which are returned to a conventional chemical analysis laboratory. This project attempts to demonstrate the use of microfabricated structures, referred to as 'lab-on-a-chip' devices, that accomplish chemical measurement tasks that emulate those performed in the conventional laboratory. The devices envisioned could be used as hand portable chemical analysis instruments where samples are analyzed in the field or as emplaced sensors for continuous 'real-time' monitoring. This project focuses on the development of filtration elements and solid phase extraction elements that can be monolithically integrated onto electrophoresis and chromatographic structures pioneered in the laboratory. Successful demonstration of these additional functional elements on integrated microfabricated devices allows lab-on-a-chip technologies to address real world samples that would be encountered in process control environments. The resultant technology has a broad application to industrial environmental monitoring problems. such as monitoring municipal water supplies, waste water effluent from industrial facilities, or monitoring of run-off from agricultural activities. The technology will also be adaptable to manufacturing process control scenarios. Microfabricated devices integrating sample filtration, solid phase extraction, and chromatographic separation with solvent programming were demonstrated. Filtering of the sample was accomplished at the same inlet with an array of seven channels each 1 {micro}m deep and 18 {micro}m wide. Sample concentration and separation were performed on channels 5 {micro}m deep and 25 {micro

  16. Sub-to super-ambient temperature programmable microfabricated gas chromatography column

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, Alex L.; Anderson, Lawrence F.

    2004-03-16

    A sub- to super-ambient temperature programmable microfabricated gas chromatography column enables more efficient chemical separation of chemical analytes in a gas mixture by combining a thermoelectric cooler and temperature sensing on the microfabricated column. Sub-ambient temperature programming enables the efficient separation of volatile organic compounds and super-ambient temperature programming enables the elution of less volatile analytes within a reasonable time. The small heat capacity and thermal isolation of the microfabricated column improves the thermal time response and power consumption, both important factors for portable microanalytical systems.

  17. Microfabrication of Fresnel zone plates by laser induced solid ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Vanessa R. M.; Thomas, John; Santhosh, Chidangil; Ramachandran, Hema; Mathur, Deepak

    2016-07-01

    A novel and simple single-step method of inscribing optical elements on metal-coated transparent substrates is demonstrated. Laser induced solid ablation (LISA) demands very low laser energies (nJ), as can be amply provided by a femtosecond laser oscillator. Here, LISA is used to write Fresnel zone plates on indium and tungsten coated glass. With up to 100 zones, remarkable agreement is obtained between measured and expected values of the focal length. LISA has enabled attainment of focal spot sizes that are 38% smaller than what would be obtained using conventional lenses of the same numerical aperture. The simplicity with which a high degree of automation can readily be achieved using LISA makes this cost-effective method amenable to a wide variety of applications related to microfabrication of optical elements.

  18. How to Concentrate Genomic Length DNA in a Microfabricated Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Abrams, Ezra; Boles, Christian; Pedersen, Jonas; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Sturm, James; Austin, Robert

    We demonstrate that a microfabricated bump array can concentrate genomic-length DNA molecules efficiently at continuous, high flow velocities, up to 40 ?m/s, if the single-molecule DNA globule has a sufficiently large shear modulus.. Increase in the shear modulus is accomplished by compacting the DNA molecules to minimal coil-size using polyethylene glycol (PEG) derived depletion forces. We map out the sweet spot where concentration occurs as a function of PEG con- centration, flow speed, and bump array parameters using a combination of theoretical analysis and experiment. Purification of DNA from enzymatic reactions for next-generation DNA-sequencing libraries will be an important application of this development.

  19. A Microfabricated Involute-Foil Regenerator for Stirling Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tew, Roy; Ibrahim, Mounir; Danila, Daniel; Simon, Terry; Mantell, Susan; Sun, Liyong; Gedeon, David; Kelly, Kevin; McLean, Jeffrey; Wood, Gary; Qiu, Songgang

    2007-01-01

    A segmented involute-foil regenerator has been designed, microfabricated and tested in an oscillating-flow rig with excellent results. During the Phase I effort, several approximations of parallel-plate regenerator geometry were chosen as potential candidates for a new microfabrication concept. Potential manufacturers and processes were surveyed. The selected concept consisted of stacked segmented-involute-foil disks (or annular portions of disks), originally to be microfabricated from stainless-steel via the LiGA (lithography, electroplating, and molding) process and EDM (electric discharge machining). During Phase II, re-planning of the effort led to test plans based on nickel disks, microfabricated via the LiGA process, only. A stack of nickel segmented-involute-foil disks was tested in an oscillating-flow test rig. These test results yielded a performance figure of merit (roughly the ratio of heat transfer to pressure drop) of about twice that of the 90% random fiber currently used in small 100 W Stirling space-power convertors in the Reynolds Number range of interest (50-100). A Phase III effort is now underway to fabricate and test a segmented-involute-foil regenerator in a Stirling convertor. Though funding limitations prevent optimization of the Stirling engine geometry for use with this regenerator, the Sage computer code will be used to help evaluate the engine test results. Previous Sage Stirling model projections have indicated that a segmented-involute-foil regenerator is capable of improving the performance of an optimized involute-foil engine by 6-9%; it is also anticipated that such involute-foil geometries will be more reliable and easier to manufacture with tight-tolerance characteristics, than random-fiber or wire-screen regenerators. Beyond the near-term Phase III regenerator fabrication and engine testing, other goals are (1) fabrication from a material suitable for high temperature Stirling operation (up to 850 C for current engines; up to

  20. Rapid microfabrication of transparent materials using filamented femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butkus, S.; Gaižauskas, E.; Paipulas, D.; Viburys, Ž.; Kaškelyė, D.; Barkauskas, M.; Alesenkov, A.; Sirutkaitis, V.

    2014-01-01

    Microfabrication of transparent materials using femtosecond laser pulses has showed good potential towards industrial application. Maintaining pulse energies exceeding the critical self-focusing threshold by more than 100-fold produced filaments that were used for micromachining purposes. This article demonstrates two different micromachining techniques using femtosecond filaments generated in different transparent media (water and glass). The stated micromachining techniques are cutting and welding of transparent samples. In addition, cutting and drilling experiments were backed by theoretical modelling giving a deeper insight into the whole process. We demonstrate cut-out holes in soda-lime glass having thickness up to 1 mm and aspect ratios close to 20, moreover, the fabrication time is of the order of tens of seconds, in addition, grooves and holes were fabricated in hardened 1.1 mm thick glass (Corning Gorilla glass). Glass welding was made possible and welded samples were achieved after several seconds of laser fabrication.

  1. Microfabricated multi-frequency particle impedance characterization system

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, C K; Hamilton, J; Ackler, H; Krulevitch, P; Boser, B; Eldredge, A; Becker, F; Yang, J; Gascoyne, P

    2000-03-01

    We have developed a microfabricated flow-through impedance characterization system capable of performing AC, multi-frequency measurements on cells and other particles. The sensor measures both the resistive and reactive impedance of passing particles, at rates of up to 100 particles per second. Its operational bandwidth approaches 10 MHz with a signal-to-noise ratio of approximately 40 dB. Particle impedance is measured at three or more frequencies simultaneously, enabling the derivation of multiple particle parameters. This constitutes an improvement to the well-established technique of DC particle sizing via the Coulter Principle. Human peripheral blood granulocyte radius, membrane capacitance, and cytoplasmic conductivity were measured (r = 4.1 {micro}m, C{sub mem} = 0.9 {micro}F/cm{sup 2}, {sigma}{sub int} = 0.66 S/m) and were found to be consistent with published values.

  2. Development of a hydrogen gas sensor using microfabrication technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Chung-Chiun; Wu, Qinghai; Stuczynski, Matthew; Madzsar, George C.

    1992-01-01

    Microfabrication and micromachining technologies are used to produce a hydrogen gas sensor based on a palladium-silver film. The sensor uses a heater that is fabricated by diffusing p-type borones into the substrate, forming a resistance heater. A diode for temperature measurement is produced using p-type boron and n-type phosphor diffused into the substrate. A thickness of the palladium-silver film is approximately 300 arcsec. The hydrogen gas sensor employs the proven palladium-silver diode structure and is surrounded by a phosphor doped resistance heater which can be heated up to a temperature of 250 C. Experimental results show that the sensor is capable of operating over a wide range of hydrogen concentration levels between 0-95 percent without any hysteresis effects.

  3. Highly uniform parallel microfabrication using a large numerical aperture system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zi-Yu; Zhang, Chen-Chu; Hu, Yan-Lei; Wang, Chao-Wei; Li, Jia-Wen; Su, Ya-Hui; Chu, Jia-Ru; Wu, Dong

    2016-07-01

    In this letter, we report an improved algorithm to produce accurate phase patterns for generating highly uniform diffraction-limited multifocal arrays in a large numerical aperture objective system. It is shown that based on the original diffraction integral, the uniformity of the diffraction-limited focal arrays can be improved from ˜75% to >97%, owing to the critical consideration of the aperture function and apodization effect associated with a large numerical aperture objective. The experimental results, e.g., 3 × 3 arrays of square and triangle, seven microlens arrays with high uniformity, further verify the advantage of the improved algorithm. This algorithm enables the laser parallel processing technology to realize uniform microstructures and functional devices in the microfabrication system with a large numerical aperture objective.

  4. Microfabricated Gas Sensors Demonstrated in Fire and Emission Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.

    2003-01-01

    A range of microfabricated chemical sensors are being developed to meet the needs of fire detection and emission monitoring in aerospace applications. These sensors have the advantages over traditional technology of minimal size, weight, and power consumption as well as the ability to be placed closer to where the measurements need to be made. Sensor arrays are being developed to address detection needs in environments where multiple species need to be measured. For example, the monitoring of chemical species such as carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), hydrocarbons, and other species is important in the detection of fires on airplanes and spacecraft. In contrast, different sensors are necessary for characterizing some aircraft engine designs where the monitoring of nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) and CO is of high interest. Demonstration of both fire and emission microsensor technology was achieved this year in a collaborative effort undertaken by the NASA Glenn Research Center, Case Western Reserve University, and Makel Engineering, Inc.

  5. Techniques For Microfabricating Coils For Microelectromechanical Systems Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, R. C.; Powell, A. L.

    2008-01-21

    The advanced technology necessary for building future space exploration vehicles includes microfabricated coils for making possible self-inductances integrated with other passive and active electronic components. Integrated inductances make possible significant improvements in reliability over the traditional arrangement of using external discrete inductances, as well as allowing significant size (volume) reductions (also important in space vehicles). Two possible fabrication techniques (one using proprietary branded 'Foturan' glass, the other using silicon wafer substrates) for microscopic coils are proposed, using electroplating into channels. The techniques have been evaluated for fabricating the planar electrical coils needed for typical microelectromechanical systems applications. There remain problems associated with processing using 'Foturan' glass, but coil fabrication on silicon wafers was successful. Fabrication methods such as these are expected to play an important part in the development of systems and subsystems for forthcoming space exploration missions.

  6. Techniques For Microfabricating Coils For Microelectromechanical Systems Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, R. C.; Powell, A. L.

    2008-01-01

    The advanced technology necessary for building future space exploration vehicles includes microfabricated coils for making possible self-inductances integrated with other passive and active electronic components. Integrated inductances make possible significant improvements in reliability over the traditional arrangement of using external discrete inductances, as well as allowing significant size (volume) reductions (also important in space vehicles). Two possible fabrication techniques (one using proprietary branded "Foturan" glass, the other using silicon wafer substrates) for microscopic coils are proposed, using electroplating into channels. The techniques have been evaluated for fabricating the planar electrical coils needed for typical microelectromechanical systems applications. There remain problems associated with processing using "Foturan" glass, but coil fabrication on silicon wafers was successful. Fabrication methods such as these are expected to play an important part in the development of systems and subsystems for forthcoming space exploration missions.

  7. A Microfabricated Involute-Foil Regenerator for Stirling Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tew, Roy; Ibrahim, Mounir; Danila, Daniel; Simon, Terrence; Mantell, Susan; Sun, Liyong; Gedeon, David; Kelly, Kevin; McLean, Jeffrey; Qiu, Songgang

    2007-01-01

    A segmented involute-foil regenerator has been designed, microfabricated and tested in an oscillating-flow rig with excellent results. During the Phase I effort, several approximations of parallel-plate regenerator geometry were chosen as potential candidates for a new microfabrication concept. Potential manufacturers and processes were surveyed. The selected concept consisted of stacked segmented-involute-foil disks (or annular portions of disks), originally to be microfabricated from stainless-steel via the LiGA (lithography, electroplating, and molding) process and EDM. During Phase II, re-planning of the effort led to test plans based on nickel disks, microfabricated via the LiGA process, only. A stack of nickel segmented-involute-foil disks was tested in an oscillating-flow test rig. These test results yielded a performance figure of merit (roughly the ratio of heat transfer to pressure drop) of about twice that of the 90 percent random fiber currently used in small approx.100 W Stirling space-power convertors-in the Reynolds Number range of interest (50 to 100). A Phase III effort is now underway to fabricate and test a segmented-involute-foil regenerator in a Stirling convertor. Though funding limitations prevent optimization of the Stirling engine geometry for use with this regenerator, the Sage computer code will be used to help evaluate the engine test results. Previous Sage Stirling model projections have indicated that a segmented-involute-foil regenerator is capable of improving the performance of an optimized involute-foil engine by 6 to 9 percent; it is also anticipated that such involute-foil geometries will be more reliable and easier to manufacture with tight-tolerance characteristics, than random-fiber or wire-screen regenerators. Beyond the near-term Phase III regenerator fabrication and engine testing, other goals are (1) fabrication from a material suitable for high temperature Stirling operation (up to 850 C for current engines; up to 1200 C

  8. Near-field microscopy with a microfabricated solid immersion lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Daniel Alden

    2001-07-01

    Diffraction of focused light prevents optical microscopes from resolving features in air smaller than half the wavelength, λ Spatial resolution can be improved by passing light through a sub-wavelength metal aperture scanned close to a sample, but aperture-based probes suffer from low optical throughput, typically below 10-4. An alternate and more efficient technique is solid immersion microscopy in which light is focused through a high refractive index Solid Immersion Lens (SIL). This work describes the fabrication, modeling, and use of a microfabricated SIL to obtain spatial resolution better than the diffraction limit in air with high optical throughput for infrared applications. SILs on the order of 10 μm in diameter are fabricated from single-crystal silicon and integrated onto silicon cantilevers with tips for scanning. We measure a focused spot size of λ/5 with optical throughput better than 10-1 at a wavelength of λ = 9.3 μm. Spatial resolution is improved to λ/10 with metal apertures fabricated directly on the tip of the silicon SIL. Microlenses have reduced spherical aberration and better transparency than large lenses but cannot be made arbitrarily small and still focus. We model the advantages and limitations of focusing in lenses close to the wavelength in diameter using an extension of Mie theory. We also investigate a new contrast mechanism unique to microlenses resulting from the decrease in field-of-view with lens diameter. This technique is shown to achieve λ/4 spatial resolution. We explore applications of the microfabricated silicon SIL for high spatial resolution thermal microscopy and biological spectroscopy. Thermal radiation is collected through the SIL from a heated surface with spatial resolution four times better than that of a diffraction- limited infrared microscope. Using a Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer, we observe absorption peaks in bacteria cells positioned at the focus of the silicon SIL.

  9. Microfabrication, characterization and in vivo MRI compatibility of diamond microelectrodes array for neural interfacing.

    PubMed

    Hébert, Clément; Warnking, Jan; Depaulis, Antoine; Garçon, Laurie Amandine; Mermoux, Michel; Eon, David; Mailley, Pascal; Omnès, Franck

    2015-01-01

    Neural interfacing still requires highly stable and biocompatible materials, in particular for in vivo applications. Indeed, most of the currently used materials are degraded and/or encapsulated by the proximal tissue leading to a loss of efficiency. Here, we considered boron doped diamond microelectrodes to address this issue and we evaluated the performances of a diamond microelectrode array. We described the microfabrication process of the device and discuss its functionalities. We characterized its electrochemical performances by cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy in saline buffer and observed the typical diamond electrode electrochemical properties, wide potential window and low background current, allowing efficient electrochemical detection. The charge storage capacitance and the modulus of the electrochemical impedance were found to remain in the same range as platinum electrodes used for standard commercial devices. Finally we observed a reduced Magnetic Resonance Imaging artifact when the device was implanted on a rat cortex, suggesting that boron doped-diamond is a very promising electrode material allowing functional imaging.

  10. A review of silicon microfabricated ion traps for quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Dong-Il "Dan"; Hong, Seokjun; Lee, Minjae; Kim, Taehyun

    2015-12-01

    Quantum information processing (QIP) has become a hot research topic as evidenced by S. Haroche and D. J. Wineland receiving the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2012. Various MEMS-based microfabrication methods will be a key enabling technology in implementing novel and scalable ion traps for QIP. This paper provides a brief introduction of ion trap devices, and reviews ion traps made using conventional precision machining as well as MEMS-based microfabrication. Then, microfabrication methods for ion traps are explained in detail. Finally, current research issues in microfabricated ion traps are presented. The QIP renders significant new challenges for MEMS, as various QIP technologies are being developed for secure encrypted communication and complex computing applications.

  11. DETERMINATION OF HETEROGENEOUS ELECTRON TRANSFER RATE CONSTANTS AT MICROFABRICATED IRIDIUM ELECTRODES. (R825511C022)

    EPA Science Inventory

    There has been an increasing use of both solid metal and microfabricated iridium electrodes as substrates for various types of electroanalysis. However, investigations to determine heterogeneous electron transfer rate constants on iridium, especially at an electron beam evapor...

  12. Microfabricated structures and devices featuring nanostructured titania thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monkowski, Adam J.

    2007-05-01

    When titanium reacts with hydrogen peroxide at 80°C--100°C, a nanostructured titania (NST) thin film is formed on the titanium surface. This nanostructured film is particularly suited for integration with thin film and bulk microfabrication techniques. The ability to manufacture devices in a batch format is a principal advantage of microfabrication-based production. To reliably produce arrays of micro-patterned NST thin films on the wafer scale, a patterning guideline must be considered. The formation of NST relies on a re-deposition process; adequate ti-peroxo species must be generated and remain at the solid-solution interface. Numerical analysis of the characteristic transient diffusion behavior for various micro-patterns has been compared with experimental data to generate a criterion to guide the design of NST micro-patterns. Wafer scale arrays of NST micro gas-sensors have been fabricated using standard thin film techniques. Sensing elements are 20 mum on a side. High sensitivity to hydrogen is achieved by modification of the sensors with platinum nanoparticles. When exposed to a 10 mT partial pressure of hydrogen at 250°C, the functionalized devices exhibit more than one order of magnitude resistance decrease with a response time of approximately 7 sec. Titanium microstructures formed using the titanium ICP deep etch (TIDE) process have been integrated with NST films to produce an ordered nanostructure-microstructure composite (3D-NST). The process developed allows for the incorporation of a planar top surface, advantageous for bonding and sealing applications, in which the nanostructured thin film is formed only on feature sidewalls and floors. When titanium microstructures are spaced less than 1 mum apart, titania nanostructures bridge adjacent features. NST and 3D-NST structures have been assembled and tested in a dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) device. The NST film is approximately 900nm thick; this yielded a DSSC with an efficiency of 1.8%, similar

  13. Three-dimensional microfabrication using two-photon polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumpston, Brian H.; Ehrlich, Jeffrey E.; Kuebler, Stephen M.; Lipson, Matthew; Marder, Seth R.; McCord-Maughon, D.; Perry, Joseph W.; Roeckel, Harold; Rumi, Maria Cristina

    1998-09-01

    Photopolymerization initiated by the simultaneous absorption of two photons is unique in its ability to produce complex three-dimensional (3D) structures from a single, thick photopolymer film. Strong 3D confinement of the polymerization process is not possible in other polymer microfabrication techniques such as LIGA, rapid prototyping, and conventional photoresist technology. Two-photon polymerization also permits the fabrication of 3D structures and the definition of lithographic features on non-planar surfaces. We have developed a wide array of chromophores which hold great promise for 3D microfabrication, as well as other applications, such as two-photon fluorescence imaging and 3D optical data storage. These materials are based on a donor- (pi) -donor, donor-acceptor-donor, or acceptor-donor-acceptor structural motif. The magnitude of the two-photon absorption cross-section, (delta) , and the position of the two-photon absorption maximum, (lambda) (2)max, can be controlled by varying the length of the conjugated bridge and by varying the strength of the donor/acceptor groups. In this way, chromophores have been developed which exhibit strong two- photon absorption in the range of 500 - 975 nm, in some cases as high as 4400 X 10-50 cm4 s/photon-molecule. In the case of donor-(pi) -donor structures, quantum-chemical calculations show that the large absorption cross-sections arise from the symmetric re-distribution of charge from the donor end-groups to the conjugated bridge, resulting in an electronic excited-state which is more delocalized than the ground state. For many of these molecules, two-photon excitation populates a state which is sufficiently reducing that a charge transfer reaction can occur with acrylate monomers. The efficiency of these processes can be described using Marcus theory. Under suitable conditions, such reactions can induce radical polymerization of acrylate resins. Polymerization rates have been measured, and we show that these two

  14. Microfabrication and Test of a Three-Dimensional Polymer Hydro-focusing Unit for Flow Cytometry Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Ren; Feeback, Daniel L.; Wang, Wanjun

    2004-01-01

    This paper details a novel three-dimensional (3D) hydro-focusing micro cell sorter for micro flow cytometry applications. The unit was microfabricated by means of SU-8 3D lithography. The 3D microstructure for coaxial sheathing was designed, microfabricated, and tested. Three-dimensional hydro-focusing capability was demonstrated with an experiment to sort labeled tanned sheep erythrocytes (red blood cells). This polymer hydro-focusing microstructure is easily microfabricated and integrated with other polymer microfluidic structures.

  15. Microfabrication of High-Resolution Porous Membranes for Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Monica Y.; Li, David Jiang; Pham, Long K.; Wong, Brandon G.

    2014-01-01

    Microporous membranes are widely utilized in cell biology to study cell-cell signaling and cell migration. However, the thickness and low porosity of commercial track-etched membranes limit the quality of cell imaging and the degree of cell-cell contact that can be achieved on such devices. We employ photolithography-based microfabrication to achieve porous membranes with pore diameter as small as 0.9 μm, up to 40% porosity, and less than 5% variation in pore size. Through the use of a soap release layer, membranes as thin as 1 μm can be achieved. The thin membranes minimally disrupt contrast enhancement optics, thus allowing good quality imaging of unlabeled cells under white light, unlike commercial membranes. In addition, the polymer membrane materials display low autofluorescence even after patterning, facilitating high quality fluorescence microscopy. Finally, confocal imaging suggests that substantial cell-cell contact is possible through the pores of these thin membranes. This membrane technology can enhance existing uses of porous membranes in cell biology as well as enable new types of experiments. PMID:24567663

  16. Casimir force between a microfabricated elliptic cylinder and a plate

    SciTech Connect

    Decca, R. S.; Fischbach, E.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Krause, D. E.; Lopez, D.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2011-10-15

    We investigate the Casimir force between a microfabricated elliptic cylinder (cylindrical lens) and a plate made of real materials. After a brief discussion of the fabrication procedure, which typically results in elliptic rather than circular cylinders, the Lifshitz-type formulas for the Casimir force and for its gradient are derived. In the specific case of equal semiaxes, the resulting formulas coincide with those derived previously for circular cylinders. The nanofabrication procedure may also result in asymmetric cylindrical lenses obtained from parts of two different cylinders, or rotated through some angle about the axis of the cylinder. In these cases, the Lifshitz-type formulas for the Casimir force between a lens and a plate and for its gradient are also derived, and the influence of lens asymmetry is determined. Additionally, we obtain an expression for the shift of the natural frequency of a micromachined oscillator with an attached elliptic cylindrical lens interacting with a plate via the Casimir force in a nonlinear regime.

  17. Microfabricated hydrogen sensor technology for aerospace and commercial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Bickford, R. L.; Jansa, E. D.; Makel, D. B.; Liu, C. C.; Wu, Q. H.; Powers, W. T.

    1994-08-01

    Leaks on the Space Shuttle while on the Launch Pad have generated interest in hydrogen leak monitoring technology. An effective leak monitoring system requires reliable hydrogen sensors, hardware, and software to monitor the sensors. The system should process the sensor outputs and provide real-time leak monitoring information to the operator. This paper discusses the progress in developing such a complete leak monitoring system. Advanced microfabricated hydrogen sensors are being fabricated at Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) and tested at NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) and Gencorp Aerojet (Aerojet). Changes in the hydrogen concentrations are detected using a PdAg on silicon Schottky diode structure. Sensor temperature control is achieved with a temperature sensor and heater fabricated onto the sensor chip. Results of the characterization of these sensors are presented. These sensors can detect low concentrations of hydrogen in inert environments with high sensitivity and quick response time. Aerojet is developing the hardware and software for a multipoint leak monitoring system designed to provide leak source and magnitude information in real time. The monitoring system processes data from the hydrogen sensors and presents the operator with a visual indication of the leak location and magnitude. Work has commenced on integrating the NASA LeRC-CWRU hydrogen sensors with the Aerojet designed monitoring system. Although the leak monitoring system was designed for hydrogen propulsion systems, the possible applications of this monitoring system are wide ranged. Possible commercialization of the system will also be discussed.

  18. Microfabricated hydrogen sensor technology for aerospace and commercial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Bickford, Randall L.; Jansa, E. D.; Makel, Darby B.; Liu, Chung-Chiun; Wu, Q. H.; Powers, William T.

    1994-10-01

    Leaks on the Space Shuttle while on the Launch Pad have generated interest in hydrogen leak monitoring technology. An effective leak monitoring system requires reliable hydrogen sensors, hardware, and software to monitor the sensors. The system should process the sensor outputs and provide real-time leak monitoring information to the operator. This paper discusses the progress in developing such a complete leak monitoring system. Advanced microfabricated hydrogen sensors are being fabricated at Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) and tested at NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) and Gencorp Aerojet (Aerojet). Changes in the hydrogen concentrations are detected using a PdAg on silicon Schottky diode structure. Sensor temperature control is achieved with a temperature sensor and heater fabricated onto the sensor chip. Results of the characterization of these sensors are presented. These sensors can detect low concentrations of hydrogen in inert environments with high sensitivity and quick response time. Aerojet is developing the hardware and software for a multipoint leak monitoring system designed to provide leak source and magnitude information in real time. The monitoring system processes data from the hydrogen sensors and presents the operator with a visual indication of the leak location and magnitude. Work has commenced on integrating the NASA LeRC-CWRU hydrogen sensors with the Aerojet designed monitoring system. Although the leak monitoring system was designed for hydrogen propulsion systems, the possible applications of this monitoring system are wide ranged. Possible commercialization of the system will also be discussed.

  19. Kinetic studies of microfabricated biosensors using local adsorption strategy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Menglun; Huang, Jingze; Cui, Weiwei; Pang, Wei; Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Daihua; Duan, Xuexin

    2015-12-15

    Micro/nano scale biosensors integrated with the local adsorption mask have been demonstrated to have a better limit of detection (LOD) and less sample consumptions. However, the molecular diffusions and binding kinetics in such confined droplet have been less studied which limited further development and application of the local adsorption method and imposed restrictions on discovery of new signal amplification strategies. In this work, we studied the kinetic issues via experimental investigations and theoretical analysis on microfabricated biosensors. Mass sensitive film bulk acoustic resonator (FBAR) sensors with hydrophobic Teflon film covering the non-sensing area as the mask were introduced. The fabricated masking sensors were characterized with physical adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and specific binding of antibody and antigen. Over an order of magnitude improvement on LOD was experimentally monitored. An analytical model was introduced to discuss the target molecule diffusion and binding kinetics in droplet environment, especially the crucial effects of incubation time, which has been less covered in previous local adsorption related literatures. An incubation time accumulated signal amplification effect was theoretically predicted, experimentally monitored and carefully explained. In addition, device optimization was explored based on the analytical model to fully utilize the merits of local adsorption. The discussions on the kinetic issues are believed to have wide implications for other types of micro/nano fabricated biosensors with potentially improved LOD.

  20. Study of dendritic cell migration using micro-fabrication.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Pablo; Chabaud, Mélanie; Thiam, Hawa-Racine; Lankar, Danielle; Piel, Matthieu; Lennon-Dumenil, Ana-Maria

    2016-05-01

    Cell migration is a hallmark of dendritic cells (DCs) function. It is needed for DCs to scan their environment in search for antigens as well as to reach lymphatic organs in order to trigger T lymphocyte's activation. Such interaction leads to tolerance in the case of DCs migrating under homeostatic conditions or to immunity in the case of DCs migrating upon encounter with pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Cell migration is therefore essential for DCs to transfer information from peripheral tissues to lymphoid organs, thereby linking innate to adaptive immunity. This stresses the need to unravel the molecular mechanisms involved. However, the tremendous complexity of the tissue microenvironment as well as the limited spatio-temporal resolution of in vivo imaging techniques has made this task difficult. To bypass this problem, we have developed microfabrication-based experimental tools that are compatible with high-resolution imaging. Here, we will discuss how such devices can be used to study DC migration under controlled conditions that mimic their physiological environment in a robust quantitative manner.

  1. Laser-induced charging of microfabricated ion traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shannon X.; Hao Low, Guang; Lachenmyer, Nathan S.; Ge, Yufei; Herskind, Peter F.; Chuang, Isaac L.

    2011-11-01

    Electrical charging of metal surfaces due to photoelectric generation of carriers is of concern in trapped ion quantum computation systems, due to the high sensitivity of the ions' motional quantum states to deformation of the trapping potential. The charging induced by typical laser frequencies involved in Doppler cooling and quantum control is studied here, with microfabricated surface-electrode traps made of aluminum, copper, and gold, operated at 6 K with a single Sr+ ion trapped 100 μm above the trap surface. The lasers used are at 370, 405, 460, and 674 nm, and the typical photon flux at the trap is 1014 photons/cm2/sec. Charging is detected by monitoring the ion's micromotion signal, which is related to the number of charges created on the trap. A wavelength and material dependence of the charging behavior is observed: Lasers at lower wavelengths cause more charging, and aluminum exhibits more charging than copper or gold. We describe the charging dynamic based on a rate-equation approach.

  2. Ultra Smooth Microfabricated Mirrors for Atom Chip Based Cavity QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loyd, Thomas; Benito, Francisco; Biedermann, Grant; Fortier, Kevin; Stick, Daniel; Schwindt, Peter; Blain, Matthew

    2010-03-01

    Microfabricated optical cavities are an attractive system for atomic physics research. When paired with an atom the small mode volume can lead to strong atom-cavity coupling with only a modest finesse. Such systems are of significant interest for applications in quantum information [1]. While experiments using a single cavity or a small number of cavities tend to be tractable, scaling the number of cavities required for a useful quantum network remains challenging [2]. In this work, we have developed an ultra high reflectivity micro-mirror for scalable quantum information systems taking the work of Trupke et al. [3] as a starting point. We have demonstrated that our micro-mirror fabrication technique produces ultra smooth mirror surfaces of 2.2 Angstroms rms. Optical cavities formed with these mirrors exhibit a high finesse of over 60,000 leading to a calculated single atom cooperativity of more than 200. These cavities are attractive candidates for integrated cavity QED experiments and quantum information processing on an atom chip platform. [1]. P K. Vahala, ed., Optical Microcavities, (World Scientific, Singapore, 2004). [2]. H. J. Kimble, Nature, 453, 1023 (2008). [3]. M. Trupke, E. A. Hinds, S. Eriksson, E. A. Curtis, Z. Moktadir, E. Kukharenka, and M. Kraft, Appl. Phys. Lett., 87, 211106 (2005).

  3. DNA Typing in Thirty Seconds with a Microfabricated Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmalzing, Dieter; Koutny, Lance; Adourian, Aram; Belgrader, Phillip; Matsudaira, Paul; Ehrlich, Daniel

    1997-09-01

    We report the development of a practical ultrafast allelic profiling assay for the analysis of short tandem repeats (STRs) by using a highly optimized microfluidic electrophoresis device. We have achieved baseline-resolved electrophoretic separations of single-locus STR samples in 30 sec. Analyses of PCR samples containing the four loci CSF1PO, TPOX, THO1, and vWA (abbreviated as CTTv) were performed in less than 2 min. This constitutes a 10- to 100-fold improvement in speed relative to capillary or slab gel systems. The separation device consists of a microfabricated channel 45 μ m × 100 μ m in cross section and 26 mm in length, filled with a replaceable polyacrylamide matrix operated under denaturing conditions at 50 degrees C. A fluorescently labeled STR ladder was used as an internal standard for allele identification. Samples were prepared by standard procedures and only 4 μ l was required for each analysis. The device is capable of repetitive operation and is suitable for automated high-speed and high-throughput applications.

  4. Microfabricated alkali vapor cell with anti-relaxation wall coating

    SciTech Connect

    Straessle, R.; Pétremand, Y.; Briand, D.; Rooij, N. F. de; Pellaton, M.; Affolderbach, C.; Mileti, G.

    2014-07-28

    We present a microfabricated alkali vapor cell equipped with an anti-relaxation wall coating. The anti-relaxation coating used is octadecyltrichlorosilane and the cell was sealed by thin-film indium-bonding at a low temperature of 140 °C. The cell body is made of silicon and Pyrex and features a double-chamber design. Depolarizing properties due to liquid Rb droplets are avoided by confining the Rb droplets to one chamber only. Optical and microwave spectroscopy performed on this wall-coated cell are used to evaluate the cell's relaxation properties and a potential gas contamination. Double-resonance signals obtained from the cell show an intrinsic linewidth that is significantly lower than the linewidth that would be expected in case the cell had no wall coating but only contained a buffer-gas contamination on the level measured by optical spectroscopy. Combined with further experimental evidence this proves the presence of a working anti-relaxation wall coating in the cell. Such cells are of interest for applications in miniature atomic clocks, magnetometers, and other quantum sensors.

  5. Microfabricated planar glass gas chromatography with photoionization detection.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Alastair C; Hamilton, Jacqueline F; Rhodes, Christopher N; Halliday, Jaydene; Bartle, Keith D; Homewood, Philip; Grenfell, Robin J P; Goody, Brian; Harling, Alice M; Brewer, Paul; Vargha, Gergely; Milton, Martin J T

    2010-01-29

    We report the development of a microfabricated gas chromatography system suitable for the separation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and compatible with use as a portable measurement device. Hydrofluoric acid etching of 95x95mm Schott B270 wafers has been used to give symmetrical hemi-spherical channels within a glass substrate. Two matching glass plates were subsequently cold bonded with the channels aligned; the flatness of the glass surfaces resulted in strong bonding through van der Waals forces. The device comprised gas fluidic interconnections, injection zone and 7.5 and 1.4m long, 320microm internal diameter capillaries. Optical microscopy confirmed the capillaries to have fully circular channel profiles. Direct column heating and cooling could be achieved using a combination of resistive heaters and Peltier devices. The low thermal conductivity of glass allowed for multiple uniform temperature zones to be achieved within a single glass chip. Temperature control over the range 10-200 degrees C was achieved with peak power demand of approximately 25W. The 7.5m capillary column was static coated with a 2microm film of non-polar dimethylpolysiloxane stationary phase. A standard FID and a modified lightweight 100mW photoionization detector (PID) were coupled to the column and performance tested with gas mixtures of monoaromatic and monoterpene species at the parts per million concentration level. The low power GC-PID device showed good performance for a small set of VOCs and sub ng detection sensitivity to monoaromatics.

  6. Instrumentation for Microfabrication with Deep X-ray Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantenburg, F. J.

    2007-01-01

    Deep X-ray lithography for microfabrication is performed at least at ten synchrotron radiation centers worldwide. The characteristic energies of these sources range from 1.4 keV up to 8 keV, covering mask making capabilities, deep X-ray lithography up to ultra deep x-ray lithography of several millimeters resist thickness. Limitations in deep X-ray lithography arise from hard X-rays in the SR-spectrum leading to adhesion losses of resist lines after the developing process, as well as heat load due to very high fluxes leading to thermal expansion of mask and resist during exposure and therefore to microstructure distortion. Considering the installations at ANKA as an example, the advantages of mirrors and central beam stops for DXRL are presented. Future research work will concentrate on feature sizes much below 1 μm, while the commercialization of DXRL goes in the direction of massive automation, including parallel exposures of several samples in a very wide SR-fan, developing and inspection.

  7. Optimization of dielectrophoretic DNA stretching in microfabricated devices

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Kyung Eun; Burns, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    We have found that the surface and bulk solution properties in a microfabricated device affect the degree and probability of electrostretching of DNA molecules. Using lambda phage DNA, we found that significantly hydrophilic surfaces between the electrodes decreases the efficiency of stretching. Surfaces treated with higher silane (trimethyl chlorosilane) concentrations performed better presumably due to the decreased non-specific adsorption of DNA on these surfaces compared to their more hydrophilic counterparts. The shape and dimensions of the electrodes also affected the efficiency of stretching. Both lift-off and metal etching methods produced electrodes with random microscopic peaks along the electrode’s edge and were poorly suited for stretching. Annealing the electrodes (450°C for 10 min) removed most of these peaks and allowed for more controlled stretching to be obtained. We also found that thin electrodes (65nm) gave close to a 90% success rate of DNA stretching but stretching with thick electrodes (350nm) produced only a 20% success rate. PMID:16642979

  8. Microfabrication and characterization of porous channels for DNA purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xing; Cui, Da-Fu; Liu, Chang-Chun; Li, Hui

    2007-01-01

    The present work demonstrates the availability of using porous channels of microfluidic chips as a solid phase matrix for extracting DNA from whole blood. Two kinds of porous channels were microfabricated by MEMS technology and anodization technology. The anodization process of porous channels was investigated and optimized. Porous channels were characterized, and a porous rectangle channel showed a more uniform and stable feature related to a porous V-type channel. The optimal porous rectangle channel was further used for purifying DNA, which showed a higher DNA recovery than the non-porous one. Optimization of the DNA elution condition established a higher DNA extracted efficiency at 55 °C than at 25 °C or at 70 °C. The time consumed in the incubation process for eluting DNA could be reduced by increasing the flow rate of the washing step. Compared to commercial kits, the porous rectangle channel under optimal conditions could extract two-fold amounts of PCR-amplifiable DNA from whole blood in 15 min. This highly efficient, effortless and flexible technology can be used as a lab-on-a-chip component for initial biologic sample preparation.

  9. Mechanics of F-actin characterized with microfabricated cantilevers.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiumei; Pollack, Gerald H

    2002-01-01

    In this report we characterized the longitudinal elasticity of single actin filaments manipulated by novel silicon-nitride microfabricated levers. Single actin filaments were stretched from zero tension to maximal physiological tension, P(0). The obtained length-tension relation was nonlinear in the low-tension range (0-50 pN) with a resultant strain of approximately 0.4-0.6% and then became linear at moderate to high tensions (approximately 50-230 pN). In this region, the stretching stiffness of a single rhodamine-phalloidin-labeled, 1-microm-long F-actin is 34.5 +/- 3.5 pN/nm. Such a length-tension relation could be characterized by an entropic-enthalpic worm-like chain model, which ascribes most of the energy consumed in the nonlinear portion to overcoming thermal undulations arising from the filament's interaction with surrounding solution and the linear portion to the intrinsic stretching elasticity. By fitting the experimental data with such a worm-like chain model, an estimation of persistence length of approximately 8.75 microm was derived. These results suggest that F-actin is more compliant than previously thought and that thin filament compliance may account for a substantial fraction of the sarcomere's elasticity. PMID:12414703

  10. Continuous-Flow Bioseparation Using Microfabricated Anisotropic Nanofluidic Sieving Structures

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jianping; Mao, Pan; Han, Jongyoon

    2010-01-01

    The anisotropic nanofluidic filter (nanofilter) array (ANA) is a unique molecular sieving structure for separating biomolecules. Here we describe fabrication of planar and vertical ANA chips and how to perform continuous-flow bioseparation using them. This protocol is most useful for bioengineers that are interested in developing automated multistep chip-based bioanalysis systems and assumes prior cleanroom microfabrication knowledge. The ANA consists of a two-dimensional periodic nanofilter array, and the designed structural anisotropy of the ANA causes different sized- or charged-biomolecules to follow distinct trajectories under applied electric fields, leading to efficient continuous-flow separation. Using microfluidic channels surrounding the ANA, the fractionated biomolecule streams are collected and routed to different fluid channels or reservoirs for convenient sample recovery and downstream bioanalysis. The ANA is physically robust and can be reused repeatedly. Compared to conventional gel-based separation techniques, the ANA offers the potential for faster separation, higher throughput, and more convenient sample recovery. PMID:19876028

  11. Protocol for Identifying Fossil Biofilm Microfabrics in Archean and Martian Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bontognali, T. R. R.; McKenzie, J. A.; Vasconcelos, C.

    2014-12-01

    Microbial communities commonly live and grow in aggregates called biofilm. This slimy material is composed of exopolymeric substances (EPS) secreted from the microbial cell to the surrounding environment. Certain biofilms show internal microscopic fabrics, as for example, regularly shaped alveolar structures. These microfabrics are often considered as artifacts due to the dehydration steps required for scanning electron microscopy. However, recent studies have demonstrated that some microfabrics are not artifacts but actual structures, whose architecture is controlled by the microorganisms. These findings, mainly achieved for medical purposes, may have yet unconsidered implications for the search of early life on Earth and on Mars. Indeed, evidence exists that the microfabrics can be mineralized during early diagenesis, preserving fossil imprints of the original biofilm throughout the geological record. Here, we present the results of microscopic investigations of ancient sediments of various age, composition and metamorphic degree that contain microfabrics that we interpret as fossil biofilms. We compile a list of criteria that need to be evaluated before excluding that the putative fossil biofilms may be artifacts due to sample preparation or late stage contamination of the studied rocks. Additionally, we compare these microfabrics to those produced by pure cultures of microorganism grown in the laboratory, as well as microfabrics present in microbial mats that develop in modern evaporitic environments. Finally, we discuss the hypothesis - and the evidence that already exists in its support - that the micrometric size and the morphology of the EPS fabrics is specific to the organism and the genome concerned. By establishing a linkage between specific microbes and the architecture of the mineralized microfabrics, it may be possible to gain precise taxonomic information on early life, as well as to establish a new type of morphological biosignature to be searched

  12. Research of the new optical diffractive super-resolution element of the two-photon microfabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Peng; Zhu, Yu; Duan, Guanghong

    2006-11-01

    The new optical diffractive superresolution element (DSE) is being applied to improve the microfabrication radial superresolution in the two-photon three-dimension (3D) microfabrication system, which appeared only a few years ago and can provide the ability to confine photochemical and physical reactions to the order of laser wavelength in three dimensions. The design method of the DSE is that minimizing M if the lowest limit S l of the S and the highest limit G u of the G is set, where Liu [1] explained the definition of the S, M and G. Simulation test result proved that the microfabrication radial superresolution can be improved by the new optical DSE. The phenomenon can only be interpreted as the intensity of high-order and side of the zero-order diffraction peaks have been clapped under the twophoton absorption (TPA) polymerization threshold. In a word the polymerized volume can be chosen because the S l and the G u is correspondingly adjustable, even if the laser wavelength, objective lens and the photosensitive resin is fixed for a given two-photon microfabrication system. That means the radial superresolution of the two-photon microfabrication can be chosen.

  13. Silicon-based microfabricated microbial fuel cell toxicity sensor.

    PubMed

    Dávila, D; Esquivel, J P; Sabaté, N; Mas, J

    2011-01-15

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have been used for several years as biosensors for measuring environmental parameters such as biochemical oxygen demand and water toxicity. The present study is focused on the detection of toxic matter using a novel silicon-based MFC. Like other existing toxicity sensors based on MFCs, this device is capable of detecting the variation on the current produced by the cell when toxic compounds are present in the medium. The MFC approach presented in this work aims to obtain a simple, compact and planar device for its further application as a biosensor in the design and fabrication of equipment for toxicity monitoring. It consists on a proton exchange membrane placed between two microfabricated silicon plates that act as current collectors. An array of square 80 μm × 80 μm vertical channels, 300 μm deep, have been defined trough the plates over an area of 6 mm × 6 mm. The final testing assembly incorporates two perspex pieces positioned onto the plates as reservoirs with a working volume of 144 μL per compartment. The operation of the microdevice as a direct electron transfer MFC has been validated by comparing its performance against a larger scale MFC, run under the same conditions. The device has been tested as a toxicity sensor by setting it at a fixed current while monitoring changes in the output power. A drop in the power production is observed when a toxic compound is added to the anode compartment. The compact design of the device makes it suitable for its incorporation into measurement equipment either as an individual device or as an array of sensors for high throughput processing.

  14. The maximum life expectancy for a micro-fabricated diaphragm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cǎlimǎnescu, Ioan; Stan, Liviu-Constantin; Popa, Viorica

    2015-02-01

    Micro-fabricated diaphragms can be used to provide pumping action in microvalve and microfluidic applications. The functionality of the microdiaphragm in a wirelessly actuated micropump plays a major role in low-powered device actuation. In developing micropumps and their components, it is becoming an increasing trend to predict the performance before the prototype is fabricated. Because performance prediction allows for an accurate estimation of yield and lifetime, in addition to developing better understanding of the device while taking into account the details of the device structure and second order effects. Hence avoid potential pitfalls in the device operation in a practical environment. The goal of this research is to determine via FEA the life expectancy for a corrugated circular diaphragm made out of an aluminum alloy. The geometry of the diaphragm is given below being generated within SolidWorks 2010, all the calculations were made using Ansys 13TM . The sound design of a micropump is heavily depending on the lifetime expectancy of the working part of the device which is the diaphragm. This will be subjected on cyclic loading and the fatigue will limit the life of this part. Once the diaphragm is breaking, the micropump is no more able to fulfill its scope. Any micropump manufacturer will then be very concerned on the life expectancy from the fatigue point of view of the diaphragms. The diaphragm circular and corrugated and made of Al alloy, showed a very good behavior from the fatigue point of view, the maximum life expectancy being 1.9 years of continuous functioning with 100 cycles per second. This work showed an simple and forward application of FEA analysis methods in order to estimate the fatigue behavior of corrugated circular microdiaphragms.

  15. Microfabrication of Cell-Laden Hydrogels for Engineering Mineralized and Load Bearing Tissues.

    PubMed

    Li, Chia-Cheng; Kharaziha, Mahshid; Min, Christine; Maas, Richard; Nikkhah, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Microengineering technologies and advanced biomaterials have extensive applications in the field of regenerative medicine. In this chapter, we review the integration of microfabrication techniques and hydrogel-based biomaterials in the field of dental, bone, and cartilage tissue engineering. We primarily discuss the major features that make hydrogels attractive candidates to mimic extracellular matrix (ECM), and we consider the benefits of three-dimensional (3D) culture systems for tissue engineering applications. We then focus on the fundamental principles of microfabrication techniques including photolithography, soft lithography and bioprinting approaches. Lastly, we summarize recent research on microengineering cell-laden hydrogel constructs for dental, bone and cartilage regeneration, and discuss future applications of microfabrication techniques for load-bearing tissue engineering.

  16. Microfabric development in dunite during high stress deformation and subsequent recrystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trepmann, Claudia; Druiventak, Anthony; Matysiak, Agnes; Renner, Jörg

    2010-05-01

    The microfabric development in dunite is analyzed in non-steady state deformation and annealing experiments, which are designed to simulate earthquake-driven episodic creep in the upper mantle of the oceanic lithosphere at the base of the seismogenic zone. The samples are deformed in a servohydraulically-controlled solid medium deformation apparatus at a temperature of 600°C, a constant strain rate of 10-4s-1 (kick) and a confining pressure of 1.0 GPa. In some experiments deformation is followed by annealing for 15 h to 70 h at zero nominal differential stress, temperatures of 800°C to 1000°C (kick & cook) and 2.0 GPa confining pressure. We use coarse-grained dunite from the Almklovdalen peridotite complex (Western Norway) as starting material. The dunite comprises ca. 90% olivine, <10% orthopyroxene and small amounts of spinel and chlorite. The kick experiments yield maximum differential stress of ca. 1 GPa and < 20% of permanent strain. The resulting microfabrics are analysed by optical and electron microscopic techniques. Intragranular microcracks and micro-shear zones in olivine, which can be crystallographically controlled, developed during deformation. After annealing at 1000°C, the microfabric is characterized by very fine-grained recrystallized olivine grains with an average diameter of ca. 5 µm. The recrystallized grains are arranged along micro-shear zones and occur in aggregates surrounding olivine porphyroclasts. The area fraction of recrystallized grains is varying but generally smaller than 20%. The microfabrics from our experiments compare well with microfabrics observed from naturally deformed peridotites of the Baldissero, Balmuccia and Finero complexes in the Western Alps. Similar olivine recrystallization aggregates in naturally deformed peridotites are frequently interpreted as indicative of deformation by dislocation or diffusion creep. The microfabrics of our kick & cook experiments indicate a development through an initial stage of high

  17. Enrichment of cancer cells from whole blood using a microfabricated porous filter.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Hye; Lee, Jong Kil; Kim, Byung Chul; Rhim, Sung Han; Kim, Jhin Wook; Kim, Kyung Hee; Jung, Sung Mok; Park, Pyeong Soo; Park, Hee Chul; Lee, Jason; Jeon, Byung Hee

    2013-09-01

    Enrichment of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from whole blood is very challenging due to its rarity. We have developed a new CTC enrichment method using a microfabricated filter. The filter was designed to fractionate tumor cells by cell size and optimized to have high porosity and proper pore distribution. When cancer cells were spiked in whole blood, the average recovery rate was 82.0 to 86.7% and the limit of detection by filtration process was approximately 2 cancer cells in a testing volume of blood. The results indicate that the microfabricated filter-based enrichment would be useful to retrieve and analyze CTCs in practice.

  18. Fabrication of Micro Probe-Type Electrodes for Microelectro-Chemical Machining Using Microfabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, W. B.; Choi, J. H.; Park, C. W.; Kim, G. M.; Shin, H. S.; Chu, C. N.; Kim, B. H.

    In this study, the mass fabrication of microelectrode tools for microelectrochemical machining (MECM) was studied using microfabrication processes. The cantilever type geometry of microelectrodes was defined by photolithography processes, and metal patterns were made for electrical contacts. Various fabrication processes were studied for the fabrication of microelectrode tools, such as wet etching, lift-off, and electroforming for metal layer patterning. MECM test results showed feasibility of the fabricated electrode tools. The microfabricated electrodes can be used as micromachining tools for various electrical micromachining of steel mold and parts of microdevices.

  19. Simulations and design of microfabricated interdigitated electrodes for use in a gold nanoparticle enhanced biosensor.

    PubMed

    Hermansen, Peter; MacKay, Scott; Wishart, David; Jie Chen

    2016-08-01

    Microfabricated interdigitated electrode chips have been designed for use in a unique gold-nanoparticle based biosensor system. The use of these electrodes will allow for simple, accurate, inexpensive, and portable biosensing, with potential applications in diagnostics, medical research, and environmental testing. To determine the optimal design for these electrodes, finite element analysis simulations were carried out using COMSOL Multiphysics software. The results of these simulations determined some of the optimal design parameters for microfabricating interdigitated electrodes as well as predicting the effects of different electrode materials. Finally, based on the results of these simulations two different kinds of interdigitated electrode chips were made using photolithography.

  20. Development of a Micro-Fabricated Total-Field Magnetometer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    size and complexity of such platforms. Another advantage of the MFTFM is that they could be used to develop small hand-held magnetic gradiometers ...because the total field sensors are far too bulky and heavy. A new generation of wand-based magnetic gradiometers would greatly facilitate the

  1. Development of a Web-Based System to Support Self-Directed Learning of Microfabrication Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jou, Min; Wu, Yu-Shiang

    2012-01-01

    Having engineers in microfabrication technologies educated has become much more difficult than having engineers educated in the traditional technologies, and this may be because of the high cost for acquirement of equipment, materials, and infrastructural means (i.e., cleaning rooms), all in addition to the hands-on practices that are often times…

  2. Laser microfabricated poly(glycerol sebacate) scaffolds for heart valve tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Masoumi, Nafiseh; Jean, Aurélie; Zugates, Jeffrey T; Johnson, Katherine L; Engelmayr, George C

    2013-01-01

    Microfabricated poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) scaffolds may be applicable to tissue engineering heart valve leaflets by virtue of their controllable microstructure, stiffness, and elasticity. In this study, PGS scaffolds were computationally designed and microfabricated by laser ablation to match the anisotropy and peak tangent moduli of native bovine aortic heart valve leaflets. Finite element simulations predicted PGS curing conditions, scaffold pore shape, and strut width capable of matching the scaffold effective stiffnesses to the leaflet peak tangent moduli. On the basis of simulation predicted effective stiffnesses of 1.041 and 0.208 MPa for the scaffold preferred (PD) and orthogonal, cross-preferred (XD) material directions, scaffolds with diamond-shaped pores were microfabricated by laser ablation of PGS cured 12 h at 160°C. Effective stiffnesses measured for the scaffold PD (0.83 ± 0.13 MPa) and XD (0.21 ± 0.03 MPa) were similar to both predicted values and peak tangent moduli measured for bovine aortic valve leaflets in the circumferential (1.00 ± 0.16 MPa) and radial (0.26 ± 0.03 MPa) directions. Scaffolds cultivated with fibroblasts for 3 weeks accumulated collagen (736 ± 193 μg/g wet weight) and DNA (17 ± 4 μg/g wet weight). This study provides a basis for the computational design of biomimetic microfabricated PGS scaffolds for tissue-engineered heart valves.

  3. MICROFABRICATED ELECTROCHEMICAL ANALYSIS SYSTEM FOR HEAVY METAL DETECTION. (R825511C047)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A low power, hand-held system has been developed for the measurement of heavy metal ions in aqueous solutions. The system consists of an electrode array sensor, a high performance single chip potentiostat and a microcontroller circuit. The sensor is a microfabricated array of ...

  4. Microfabricated capillary electrophoresis chip and method for simultaneously detecting multiple redox labels

    DOEpatents

    Mathies, Richard A.; Singhal, Pankaj; Xie, Jin; Glazer, Alexander N.

    2002-01-01

    This invention relates to a microfabricated capillary electrophoresis chip for detecting multiple redox-active labels simultaneously using a matrix coding scheme and to a method of selectively labeling analytes for simultaneous electrochemical detection of multiple label-analyte conjugates after electrophoretic or chromatographic separation.

  5. Miniature Trace Gas Detector Based on Microfabricated Optical Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aveline, David C.; Yu, Nan; Thompson, Robert J.; Strekalov, Dmitry V.

    2013-01-01

    While a variety of techniques exist to monitor trace gases, methods relying on absorption of laser light are the most commonly used in terrestrial applications. Cavity-enhanced absorption techniques typically use high-reflectivity mirrors to form a resonant cavity, inside of which a sample gas can be analyzed. The effective absorption length is augmented by the cavity's high quality factor, or Q, because the light reflects many times between the mirrors. The sensitivity of such mirror-based sensors scales with size, generally making them somewhat bulky in volume. Also, specialized coatings for the high-reflectivity mirrors have limited bandwidth (typically just a few nanometers), and the delicate mirror surfaces can easily be degraded by dust or chemical films. As a highly sensitive and compact alternative, JPL is developing a novel trace gas sensor based on a monolithic optical resonator structure that has been modified such that a gas sample can be directly injected into the cavity. This device concept combines ultra-high Q optical whispering gallery mode resonators (WGMR) with microfabrication technology used in the semiconductor industry. For direct access to the optical mode inside a resonator, material can be precisely milled from its perimeter, creating an open gap within the WGMR. Within this open notch, the full optical mode of the resonator can be accessed. While this modification may limit the obtainable Q, calculations show that the reduction is not significant enough to outweigh its utility for trace gas detection. The notch can be milled from the high- Q crystalline WGMR with a focused ion beam (FIB) instrument with resolution much finer than an optical wavelength, thereby minimizing scattering losses and preserving the optical quality. Initial experimental demonstrations have shown that these opened cavities still support high-Q whispering gallery modes. This technology could provide ultrasensitive detection of a variety of molecular species in an

  6. Microfabrication and Test of a Three-Dimensional Polymer Hydro-focusing Unit for Flow Cytometry Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Ren; Feeback, Daniel L.; Wang, Wan-Jun

    2005-01-01

    This paper details a novel three-dimensional (3D) hydro-focusing micro cell sorter for micro flow cytometry applications. The unit was microfabricated by means of SU-8 3D lithography. The 3D microstructure for coaxial sheathing was designed, microfabricated, and tested. Three-dimensional hydrofocusing capability was demonstrated with an experiment to sort labeled tanned sheep erythrocytes (red blood cells). This polymer hydro-focusing microstructure is easily microfabricated and integrated with other polymer microfluidic structures. Keywords: SU-8, three-dimensional hydro-focusing, microfluidic, microchannel, cytometer

  7. Microfabrication and Test of a Three-Dimensional Polymer Hydro-Focusing Unit for Flow Cytometry Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Ren; Feedback, Daniel L.; Wang, Wanjun

    2004-01-01

    This paper details a novel three-dimensional (3D) hydro-focusing micro cell sorter for micro flow cytometry applications. The unit was micro-fabricated by means of SU-8 3D lithography. The 3D microstructure for coaxial sheathing was designed, micro-fabricated, and tested. Three-dimensional hydrofocusing capability was demonstrated with an experiment to sort labeled tanned sheep erythrocytes (red blood cells). This polymer hydro-focusing microstructure is easily micro-fabricated and integrated with other polymer microfluidic structures.

  8. MAGNETS

    DOEpatents

    Hofacker, H.B.

    1958-09-23

    This patent relates to nmgnets used in a calutron and more particularly to means fur clamping an assembly of magnet coils and coil spacers into tightly assembled relation in a fluid-tight vessel. The magnet comprises windings made up of an assembly of alternate pan-cake type coils and spacers disposed in a fluid-tight vessel. At one end of the tank a plurality of clamping strips are held firmly against the assembly by adjustable bolts extending through the adjacent wall. The foregoing arrangement permits taking up any looseness which may develop in the assembly of coils and spacers.

  9. Simple shear experiments on calcite rocks: rheology and microfabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, S. M.; Panozzo, R.; Bauer, S.

    Ideal simple shearing of Carrara marble and Solnhofen limestone was achieved by inserting calcite rock slices into sandstone cylinders precut at 35°. The experiments covered a wide range in temperatures (25-900°C) at confining pressures of 200 and 250 MPa and at strain rates between 10 -3 and 10 -5 s -1. Shear strains of up γ = 2.7 were achieved. The stress-strain data for simple shear favourably compare with predictions on the basis of existing flow laws established in coaxial testing. This comparison demonstrates that the simple shear experiments covered most of the previously established flow regimes for calcite rocks. At the highest temperatures Carrara marble exhibited substantial work softening after high shear strains. A complete texture analysis was carried out with the U-stage and a texture goniometer. The following four distinct microfabric regimes were found. (1) Twinning regime: an oblique c-axis maximum deflected from the pole to the flattening plane towards σ1 and against the imposed sense of shear results directly from e-twinning. Extensive twinning (some grains are completely twinned) rapidly rotates the c-axes into near parallelism with σ1. This regime was observed for Carrara marble deformed at temperatures below 700°C and for Solnhofen limestone at room temperature. (2) Intracrystalline slip regime: three c-axis maxima were observed in both rock types at more elevated temperatures and in the absence of twinning. These c-axis orientations result from an alignment of slip planes and slip directions into parallelism with the shear-zone boundary and the shear direction, respectively. This finding supports the idea of an 'orientation for easy slip' resulting from simple shearing. In addition to r- and f-glide, basal glide is inferred to have been operative. (3) Grain-boundary sliding regime: a great circle distribution of c-axes approximately perpendicular to the direction of finite shortening is observed. This texture is weaker compared to the

  10. Microfabricated electrolysis pump system for isolating rare cells in blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furdui, Vasile I.; Kariuki, James K.; Jed Harrison, D.

    2003-07-01

    An integrated system for immunomagnetic separation of rare cells from blood is presented. A micromachined device was fabricated by bonding silicon die with etched structures to a glass cover plate on which electrodes are defined. Electrolytic generation of gas from 0.50 M KNO3 (aqueous) provided pumping actuation for a device that performed the capture and purification of rare cells spiked into a 7.5 µl reconstituted blood sample. The system consisted of two pumps, a sample and a wash buffer meander reservoir, and a main channel for magnetic field trapping of rare cells captured by antibody-coated magnetic beads. A maximum pumping rate of 1.4 +/- 0.1 µl min-1 was obtained at a current of 180 µA, and the maximum blood sample volume delivered to the capture bed was 6.5-7 µl. The trapped cells could be washed with the buffer from the second pump and then delivered to the exit port of the chip after removing the magnetic field.

  11. Microfabricated chip-scale rubidium plasma light source for miniature atomic clocks.

    PubMed

    Venkatraman, Vinu; Pétremand, Yves; Affolderbach, Christoph; Mileti, Gaetano; de Rooij, Nico F; Shea, Herbert

    2012-03-01

    We present the microfabrication and characterization of a low-power, chip-scale Rb plasma light source, designed for optical pumping in miniature atomic clocks. A dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) configuration is used to ignite a Rb plasma in a micro-fabricated Rb vapor cell on which external indium electrodes were deposited. The device is electrically driven at frequencies between 1 and 36 MHz, and emits 140 μW of stable optical power while coupling less than 6 mW of electrical power to the discharge cell. Optical powers of up to 15 and 9 μW are emitted on the Rb D2 and D1 lines, respectively. Continuous operation of the light source for several weeks has been demonstrated, showing its capacity to maintain stable optical excitation of Rb atoms in chip-scale double-resonance atomic clocks.

  12. Microfabrication of biofactory-on-a-chip devices using laser ablation technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talary, Mark S.; Burt, Julian P.; Rizvi, Nadeem H.; Rumsby, Phil T.; Pethig, Ron

    1999-03-01

    In recent years, microfabrication techniques derived from existing expertise in the microelectronics industry have been applied to the fields of biotechnology and clinical diagnostics. In this work, 'Biofactory-on-a-chip' devices are being developed to demonstrate how these microfabrication techniques can be combined with electrokinetic phenomena to manipulate, separate and characterize biological material using non-uniform electric fields. Excimer laser ablation methods have been used to fabricate these devices. Key to the successful fabrication and functioning of 'Biofactory' devices is the ability to: machine microelectrodes with micrometer feature sizes over a large area; create via-holes in insulating layers to form electrical interconnects in multilayer structures; fabricate shaped microfluidic channels; and control alignment in the device production with micron accuracy.

  13. Assembling a ring-shaped crystal in a microfabricated surface ion trap

    DOE PAGES

    Stick, Daniel Lynn; Tabakov, Boyan; Benito, Francisco; ...

    2015-09-01

    We report on experiments with a microfabricated surface trap designed for confining a chain of ions in a ring. Uniform ion separation over most of the ring is achieved with a rotationally symmetric design and by measuring and suppressing undesired electric fields. After reducing stray fields, the ions are confined primarily by a radio-frequency pseudopotential and their mutual Coulomb repulsion. As a result, approximately 400 40Ca+ ions with an average separation of 9 μm comprise the ion crystal.

  14. NIST on a Chip: Realizing SI units with microfabricated alkali vapour cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitching, J.; Donley, E. A.; Knappe, S.; Hummon, M.; Dellis, A. T.; Sherman, J.; Srinivasan, K.; Aksyuk, V. A.; Li, Q.; Westly, D.; Roxworthy, B.; Lal, A.

    2016-06-01

    We describe several ways in which microfabricated alkali atom vapour cells might potentially be used to accurately realize a variety of International System (SI) units, including the second, the meter, the kelvin, the ampere, and the volt, in a compact, low-cost “chip-scale” package. Such instruments may allow inexpensive in-situ calibrations at the user's location or widespread integration of accurate references into instrumentation and systems.

  15. Tweezing of Magnetic and Non-Magnetic Objects with Magnetic Fields.

    PubMed

    Timonen, Jaakko V I; Grzybowski, Bartosz A

    2017-02-15

    Although strong magnetic fields cannot be conveniently "focused" like light, modern microfabrication techniques enable preparation of microstructures with which the field gradients - and resulting magnetic forces - can be localized to very small dimensions. This ability provides the foundation for magnetic tweezers which in their classical variant can address magnetic targets. More recently, the so-called negative magnetophoretic tweezers have also been developed which enable trapping and manipulations of completely nonmagnetic particles provided that they are suspended in a high-magnetic-susceptibility liquid. These two modes of magnetic tweezing are complimentary techniques tailorable for different types of applications. This Progress Report provides the theoretical basis for both modalities and illustrates their specific uses ranging from the manipulation of colloids in 2D and 3D, to trapping of living cells, control of cell function, experiments with single molecules, and more.

  16. Microfabrication of Super Absorbent Polymer Structure Using Nanoimprinting and Swelling Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaba, Tomomi; Kano, Tomonori; Miki, Norihisa

    2013-06-01

    Micro-fabrication technologies have been extensively studied to achieve smaller sizes and higher aspect ratios. When the features have sizes of a couple of micrometers or below, nano-imprinting can be an effective method for micro-fabrication at low cost. However, it is difficult to achieve aspect ratio greater than 1. In this research, we propose micro fabrication of super absorbent polymer (SAP) as a new material for micro devices. SAP swells by adding deionized water, which can be used as a post patterning process to enhance the aspect ratio of micro structures. Micropatterning of SAP must be conducted under thoroughly dry conditions and we used nano-imprinting processes. We successfully augmented an aspect ratio of the nano-imprinted micro holes of SAP from 0.65 to 1.2 by the swelling process. The proposed patterning and swelling process of SAP can be applicable to micro-fabricate high-aspect-ratio structures at low cost for high performance lab-on-a-chip.

  17. Microfabricated BTU monitoring device for system-wide natural gas monitoring.

    SciTech Connect

    Einfeld, Wayne; Manginell, Ronald Paul; Robinson, Alex Lockwood; Moorman, Matthew Wallace

    2005-11-01

    The natural gas industry seeks inexpensive sensors and instrumentation to rapidly measure gas heating value in widely distributed locations. For gas pipelines, this will improve gas quality during transfer and blending, and will expedite accurate financial accounting. Industrial endusers will benefit through continuous feedback of physical gas properties to improve combustion efficiency during use. To meet this need, Sandia has developed a natural gas heating value monitoring instrument using existing and modified microfabricated components. The instrument consists of a silicon micro-fabricated gas chromatography column in conjunction with a catalytic micro-calorimeter sensor. A reference thermal conductivity sensor provides diagnostics and surety. This combination allows for continuous calorimetric determination with a 1 minute analysis time and 1.5 minute cycle time using air as a carrier gas. This system will find application at remote natural gas mining stations, pipeline switching and metering stations, turbine generators, and other industrial user sites. Microfabrication techniques will allow the analytical components to be manufactured in production quantities at a low per-unit cost.

  18. Microwelding method using a tungsten probe for microfabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konno, Takeshi; Egashira, Mitsuru; Kobayashi, Mikihiko; Shinya, Norio

    2000-06-01

    Probe manipulation of fine particles has been investigated in our laboratory. The feature of our system is that wide range of voltage, 0-10kV, can be applied between the probe and the substrate. In this method, we can pick up a fine particle at the tip of the probe, carry, place and weld the particle at a predetermined point on the substrate by controlling the applied voltage to the probe. When the particle is picked up, 10-50V is applied. And 2-10kV is applied for the welding. Breaking shear stress of welded particles is measured as follows. A sheet spring, where the strain gauges are stuck, is prepared. One end of the sheet spring is held, and moved to push off the welded particle by the free end. The shear stress is calculated from the output of the strain gauges. The breaking shear stress is 44-71MPa for gold particles welded on a gold substrate. Self- sustaining characters, 'NRIM', are formed from gold particles of 40micrometers as an example of microstructure. Preliminary experiments for the application to the ball grid array are carried out. We also fabricated a slant tower of magnetostrictive particles. It will be used as a micro- actuator in the alternative magnetic field.

  19. Robust, microfabricated culture devices with improved control over the soluble microenvironment for the culture of embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Macown, Rhys J; Veraitch, Farlan S; Szita, Nicolas

    2014-06-01

    The commercial use of stem cells continues to be constrained by the difficulty and high cost of developing efficient and reliable production protocols. The use of microfabricated systems combines good control over the cellular microenvironment with reduced use of resources in process optimization. Our previously reported microfabricated culture device was shown to be suitable for the culture of embryonic stem cells but required improvements to robustness, ease of use, and dissolved gas control. In this report, we describe a number of improvements to the design of the microfabricated system to significantly improve the control over shear stress and soluble factors, particularly dissolved oxygen. These control improvements are investigated by finite element modeling. Design improvements also make the system easier to use and improve the robustness. The culture device could be applied to the optimization of pluripotent stem cell growth and differentiation, as well as the development of monitoring and control strategies and improved culture systems at various scales.

  20. Robust, microfabricated culture devices with improved control over the soluble microenvironment for the culture of embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Macown, Rhys J; Veraitch, Farlan S; Szita, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    The commercial use of stem cells continues to be constrained by the difficulty and high cost of developing efficient and reliable production protocols. The use of microfabricated systems combines good control over the cellular microenvironment with reduced use of resources in process optimization. Our previously reported microfabricated culture device was shown to be suitable for the culture of embryonic stem cells but required improvements to robustness, ease of use, and dissolved gas control. In this report, we describe a number of improvements to the design of the microfabricated system to significantly improve the control over shear stress and soluble factors, particularly dissolved oxygen. These control improvements are investigated by finite element modeling. Design improvements also make the system easier to use and improve the robustness. The culture device could be applied to the optimization of pluripotent stem cell growth and differentiation, as well as the development of monitoring and control strategies and improved culture systems at various scales. PMID:24677785

  1. A high-flux isopore micro-fabricated membrane for effective concentration and recovering of waterborne pathogens.

    PubMed

    Warkiani, Majid Ebrahimi; Lou, Chao-Ping; Liu, Hao-Bing; Gong, Hai-Qing

    2012-08-01

    A high-flux metallic micro/nano-filtration membrane has been fabricated and validated for isolation of waterborne pathogens from drinking water. Obtained membrane with smooth surface and perfectly ordered pores was achieved by a high yield and cost effective multilevel lithography and electroplating technique. The micro-fabricated membrane was also strengthened with an integrated back-support, which can withstand a high pressure during filtration. The results of microfiltration tests with model particles revealed the superior performance of the micro-fabricated filter than current commercial filters in sample throughput, recovery ratio, and reusability. This study highlighted the potential application of micro-fabricated filer in rapid filtration and recovery of C. parvum oocysts for downstream analysis.

  2. Microfabrication of an Implantable silicone Microelectrode array for an epiretinal prosthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Maghribi, Mariam Nader

    2003-06-10

    Millions of people suffering from diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa and macular degeneration are legally blind due to the loss of photoreceptor function. Fortunately a large percentage of the neural cells connected to the photoreceptors remain viable, and electrical stimulation of these cells has been shown to result in visual perception. These findings have generated worldwide efforts to develop a retinal prosthesis device, with the hope of restoring vision. Advances in microfabrication, integrated circuits, and wireless technologies provide the means to reach this challenging goal. This dissertation describes the development of innovative silicone-based microfabrication techniques for producing an implantable microelectrode array. The microelectrode array is a component of an epiretinal prosthesis being developed by a multi-laboratory consortium. This array will serve as the interface between an electronic imaging system and the human eye, directly stimulating retinal neurons via thin film conducting traces. Because the array is intended as a long-term implant, vital biological and physical design requirements must be met. A retinal implant poses difficult engineering challenges due to the size of the intraocular cavity and the delicate retina. Not only does it have to be biocompatible in terms of cytotoxicity and degradation, but it also has to be structurally biocompatible, with regard to smooth edges and high conformability; basically mimicking the biological tissue. This is vital to minimize stress and prevent physical damage to the retina. Also, the device must be robust to withstand the forces imposed on it during fabrication and implantation. In order to meet these biocompatibility needs, the use of non-conventional microfabrication materials such as silicone is required. This mandates the enhancement of currently available polymer-based fabrication techniques and the development of new microfabrication methods. Through an iterative process, devices

  3. A novel low-volume two-chamber microfabricated platform for evaluating drug metabolism and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Bale, Shyam Sundhar; Sridharan, Gautham Vivek; Golberg, Inna; Prodanov, Ljupcho; McCarty, William J; Usta, Osman Berk; Jindal, Rohit; Yarmush, Martin L

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate drug and metabolite efficacy on a target organ, it is essential to include metabolic function of hepatocytes, and to evaluate metabolite influence on both hepatocytes and the target of interest. Herein, we have developed a two-chamber microfabricated device separated by a membrane enabling communication between hepatocytes and cancer cells. The microscale environment created enables cell co-culture in a low media-to-cell ratio leading to higher metabolite formation and rapid accumulation, which is lost in traditional plate cultures or other interconnected models due to higher culture volumes. We demonstrate the efficacy of this system by metabolism of tegafur by hepatocytes resulting in cancer cell toxicity.

  4. Precise control of epitaxy of graphene by microfabricating SiC substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukidome, H.; Kawai, Y.; Fromm, F.; Kotsugi, M.; Handa, H.; Ide, T.; Ohkouchi, T.; Miyashita, H.; Enta, Y.; Kinoshita, T.; Seyller, Th.; Suemitsu, M.

    2012-07-01

    Epitaxial graphene (EG) on SiC is promising owing to a capability to produce high-quality film on a wafer scale. One of the remaining issues is microscopic thickness variation of EG near surface steps, which induces variations in its electronic properties and device characteristics. We demonstrate here that the variations of layer thickness and electronic properties are minimized by using microfabricated SiC substrates which spatially confines the epitaxy. This technique will contribute to the realization of highly reliable graphene devices.

  5. Characterization of spin pumping effect in Permalloy/Cu/Pt microfabricated lateral devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Tatsuya; Seki, Takeshi; Ono, Shimpei; Takanashi, Koki

    2014-05-01

    We studied ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) for microfabricated lateral devices consisting of a Permalloy (Py) rectangular element and a Pt nano-element bridged by a Cu wire, which were located on a coplanar waveguide. A change in the resonance linewidth (Δf) was observed in the FMR spectra when the distance between Py and Pt (d) was varied. For devices with d < 400 nm, Δf definitely increased, suggesting the enhancement of the Gilbert damping constant (α). We discussed a possible reason for the this enhancement taking into account the increase in the efficiency of spin pumping into Cu due to the spin absorption of the attached Pt.

  6. Assembling a ring-shaped crystal in a microfabricated surface ion trap

    SciTech Connect

    Stick, Daniel Lynn; Tabakov, Boyan; Benito, Francisco; Blain, Matthew; Clark, Craig R.; Clark, Susan; Haltli, Raymond A.; Maunz, Peter; Sterk, Jonathan D.; Tigges, Chris

    2015-09-01

    We report on experiments with a microfabricated surface trap designed for confining a chain of ions in a ring. Uniform ion separation over most of the ring is achieved with a rotationally symmetric design and by measuring and suppressing undesired electric fields. After reducing stray fields, the ions are confined primarily by a radio-frequency pseudopotential and their mutual Coulomb repulsion. As a result, approximately 400 40Ca+ ions with an average separation of 9 μm comprise the ion crystal.

  7. Characterizing and reducing microfabrication-induced loss in superconducting devices, Part II: Xmon qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megrant, Anthony; Dunsworth, A.; Quintana, C.; Kelly, J.; Barends, R.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Z.; Chiaro, B.; Fowler, A.; Jeffrey, E.; Mutus, J.; Neill, C.; O'Malley, P. J. J.; Roushan, P.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T.; Martinis, J. M.

    Microfabrication-induced loss has previously been shown to limit the coherence times of both planar and 3-D superconducting qubits. Energy loss in these qubits arises from interactions with two-level state defects which are located in thin lossy surface dielectrics. More recently, we have identified a major source of this loss and then substantially improved this decoherence channel using a novel resonator structure for characterization and improvement. I will report on recent measurements of Xmon qubits with substantially improved coherence times due to our new fabrication process.

  8. Characterizing and reducing microfabrication-induced loss in superconducting devices, Part I: Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunsworth, Andrew; Megrant, A.; Chen, Z.; Quintana, C.; Burkett, B.; Kelly, J.; Barends, R.; Fowler, A.; Jeffrey, E.; White, T.; Sank, D.; Mutus, J.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Y.; Chiaro, B.; Neill, C.; O'Malley, P. J. J.; Roushan, P.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; Martinis, J. M.

    Planar and 3D superconducting qubits have previously been shown to be limited by microfabrication induced loss. Using finite element simulations, we have identified a major source of this decoherence in superconducting qubits. Furthermore, we experimentally verified this dominant loss channel using a novel resonator based approach, which we call 'Hydra' resonators. We fully characterized and then substantially reduced this loss channel using these Hydra resonators. I will report on these measurements and their implications on improving the coherence of superconducting qubits. This work is supported by Google inc.

  9. Breakthrough UV LIGA Microfabrication of Sub-mm and THz Circuits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    showcased in a demonstration 220 GHz serpentine waveguide amplifier tube [5] in a companion paper [6]. II. THE TOLERANCE CHALLENGE Fig. 1 compares two...and (d) 1.5 THz. REFERENCES [1] A. M. Cook, et al., “Wideband W-band Serpentine Waveguide TWT,” these proceedings. [2] J. H. Booske, et al...filed March 15, 2012; inventor: C. D. Joye. [5] C. D. Joye, et al, “3D UV-LIGA Microfabricated Circuits for a Wideband 50W G-band Serpentine

  10. Insights into foraminiferal influences on microfabrics of microbialites at Highborne Cay, Bahamas

    PubMed Central

    Bernhard, Joan M.; Edgcomb, Virginia P.; Visscher, Pieter T.; McIntyre-Wressnig, Anna; Summons, Roger E.; Bouxsein, Mary L.; Louis, Leeann; Jeglinski, Marleen

    2013-01-01

    Microbialites, which are organosedimentary structures formed by microbial communities through binding and trapping and/or in situ precipitation, have a wide array of distinctive morphologies and long geologic record. The origin of morphological variability is hotly debated; elucidating the cause or causes of microfabric differences could provide insights into ecosystem functioning and biogeochemistry during much of Earth’s history. Although rare today, morphologically distinct, co-occurring extant microbialites provide the opportunity to examine and compare microbial communities that may be responsible for establishing and modifying microbialite microfabrics. Highborne Cay, Bahamas, has extant laminated (i.e., stromatolites) and clotted (i.e., thrombolites) marine microbialites in close proximity, allowing focused questions about how community composition relates to physical attributes. Considerable knowledge exists about prokaryotic composition of microbialite mats (i.e., stromatolitic and thrombolitic mats), but little is known about their eukaryotic communities, especially regarding heterotrophic taxa. Thus, the heterotrophic eukaryotic communities of Highborne stromatolites and thrombolites were studied. Here, we show that diverse foraminiferal communities inhabit microbialite mat surfaces and subsurfaces; thecate foraminifera are relatively abundant in all microbialite types, especially thrombolitic mats; foraminifera stabilize grains in mats; and thecate reticulopod activities can impact stromatolitic mat lamination. Accordingly, and in light of foraminiferal impacts on modern microbialites, our results indicate that the microbialite fossil record may reflect the impact of the radiation of these protists. PMID:23716649

  11. Microfabrication of a High-Throughput Nanochannel Delivery/Filtration System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrari, Mauro; Liu, Xuewu; Grattoni, Alessandro; Fine, Daniel; Hosali, Sharath; Goodall, Randi; Medema, Ryan; Hudson, Lee

    2011-01-01

    A microfabrication process is proposed to produce a nanopore membrane for continuous passive drug release to maintain constant drug concentrations in the patient s blood throughout the delivery period. Based on silicon microfabrication technology, the dimensions of the nanochannel area, as well as microchannel area, can be precisely controlled, thus providing a steady, constant drug release rate within an extended time period. The multilayered nanochannel structures extend the limit of release rate range of a single-layer nanochannel system, and allow a wide range of pre-defined porosity to achieve any arbitrary drug release rate using any preferred nanochannel size. This membrane system could also be applied to molecular filtration or isolation. In this case, the nanochannel length can be reduced to the nanofabrication limit, i.e., 10s of nm. The nanochannel delivery system membrane is composed of a sandwich of a thin top layer, the horizontal nanochannels, and a thicker bottom wafer. The thin top layer houses an array of microchannels that offers the inlet port for diffusing molecules. It also works as a lid for the nanochannels by providing the channels a top surface. The nanochannels are fabricated by a sacrificial layer technique that obtains smooth surfaces and precisely controlled dimensions. The structure of this nanopore membrane is optimized to yield high mechanical strength and high throughput.

  12. Development of a microfabricated optical bend loss sensor for distributive pressure measurement.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Chih; Ledoux, William R; Huang, Chu-Yu; Huang, Cheng-Sheng; Klute, Glenn K; Reinhall, Per G

    2008-02-01

    A flexible high-resolution sensor capable of measuring the distribution of pressure beneath the foot via a microfabricated optical waveguide system is presented. The uniqueness of the system is in its batch fabrication process, which involves a microfabrication molding technique with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) as the optical medium. The sensor manufacturing technique is described in detail, the optical performance of the waveguides is quantified and the effect of using a matching fluid to improve fiber-coupling efficiency is demonstrated. Mechanical loading tests were performed on a 4 x 4 array with a 2-mm spacing between sensing elements. Loading displacement curves were obtained using a 0 to 0.4 mm triangle loading profile. A force of 0.28 N applied to one of the sensing elements produced a displacement of a 0.325 mm and 39% change in the output light intensity. Multiple loadings were conducted to demonstrate the repeatability of the sensor. A force image algorithm with a two-layer neural network system was used to identify four load magnitudes and four different shaped applicators. All four shapes were successfully identified with the neural network.

  13. Terahertz Response of a Microfabricated Rod Split-Ring-Resonator Electromagnetic Metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, H. O.; Casse, B. D.; Wilhelmi, O.; Saw, B. T.

    2005-02-01

    The first electromagnetic metamaterials (EM3) produced by microfabrication are reported. They are based on the rod split-ring-resonator design as proposed by Pendry et al. [

    IEEE Trans. Microwave Theory Tech. 47, 2075 (1999)IETMAB0018-948010.1109/22.798002
    ] and experimentally confirmed by Smith et al. [
    Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-9007 84, 4184 (2000)10.1103/PhysRevLett.84.4184
    ] in the GHz frequency range. Numerical simulation and experimental results from far infrared (FIR) transmission spectroscopy support the conclusion that the microfabricated composite material is EM3 in the range 1 2.7 THz. This extends the frequency range in which EM3 are available by about 3 orders of magnitude well into the FIR, thereby widely opening up opportunities to verify the unusual physical implications on electromagnetic theory as well as to build novel electromagnetic and optical devices.

  14. A multi-probe micro-fabrication apparatus based on the friction-induced fabrication method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhijiang; Song, Chenfei; Guo, Jian; Yu, Bingjun; Qian, Linmao

    2013-12-01

    A novel multi-probe micro-fabrication apparatus was developed based on the friction-induced fabrication method. The main parts of the apparatus include actuating device, loading system, and control system. With a motorized XY linear stage, the maximum fabrication area of 50 mm × 50 mm can be achieved, and the maximum sliding speed of probes can be as high as 10 mm/s. Through locating steel micro balls into indents array, the preparation of multi-probe array can be realized by a simple and low-cost way. The cantilever was designed as a structure of deformable parallelogram with two beams, by which the fabrication force can be precisely controlled. Combining the friction-induced scanning with selective etching in KOH solution, various micro-patterns were fabricated on Si(100) surface without any masks or exposure. As a low-cost and high efficiency fabrication device, the multi-probe micro-fabrication apparatus may encourage the development of friction-induced fabrication method and shed new light on the texture engineering.

  15. Microfabricated systems and assays for studying the cytoskeletal organization, micromechanics, and motility patterns of cancerous cells

    DOE PAGES

    Huda, Sabil; Pilans, Didzis; Makurath, Monika; ...

    2014-08-28

    Cell motions are driven by coordinated actions of the intracellular cytoskeleton – actin, microtubules (MTs) and substrate/focal adhesions (FAs). This coordination is altered in metastatic cancer cells resulting in deregulated and increased cellular motility. Microfabrication tools, including photolithography, micromolding, microcontact printing, wet stamping and microfluidic devices have emerged as a powerful set of experimental tools with which to probe and define the differences in cytoskeleton organization/dynamics and cell motility patterns in non-metastatic and metastatic cancer cells. In this paper, we discuss four categories of microfabricated systems: (i) micropatterned substrates for studying of cell motility sub-processes (for example, MT targeting ofmore » FAs or cell polarization); (ii) systems for studying cell mechanical properties, (iii) systems for probing overall cell motility patterns within challenging geometric confines relevant to metastasis (for example, linear and ratchet geometries), and (iv) microfluidic devices that incorporate co-cultures of multiple cell types and chemical gradients to mimic in vivo intravasation/extravasation steps of metastasis. Finally, together, these systems allow for creating controlled microenvironments that not only mimic complex soft tissues, but are also compatible with live cell high-resolution imaging and quantitative analysis of single cell behavior.« less

  16. Microfabricated systems and assays for studying the cytoskeletal organization, micromechanics, and motility patterns of cancerous cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huda, Sabil; Pilans, Didzis; Makurath, Monika; Hermans, Thomas M.; Kandere-Grzybowska, Kristiana; Grzybowski, Bartosz A.

    2014-08-28

    Cell motions are driven by coordinated actions of the intracellular cytoskeleton – actin, microtubules (MTs) and substrate/focal adhesions (FAs). This coordination is altered in metastatic cancer cells resulting in deregulated and increased cellular motility. Microfabrication tools, including photolithography, micromolding, microcontact printing, wet stamping and microfluidic devices have emerged as a powerful set of experimental tools with which to probe and define the differences in cytoskeleton organization/dynamics and cell motility patterns in non-metastatic and metastatic cancer cells. In this paper, we discuss four categories of microfabricated systems: (i) micropatterned substrates for studying of cell motility sub-processes (for example, MT targeting of FAs or cell polarization); (ii) systems for studying cell mechanical properties, (iii) systems for probing overall cell motility patterns within challenging geometric confines relevant to metastasis (for example, linear and ratchet geometries), and (iv) microfluidic devices that incorporate co-cultures of multiple cell types and chemical gradients to mimic in vivo intravasation/extravasation steps of metastasis. Finally, together, these systems allow for creating controlled microenvironments that not only mimic complex soft tissues, but are also compatible with live cell high-resolution imaging and quantitative analysis of single cell behavior.

  17. Focusing and waveguiding of Lamb waves in micro-fabricated piezoelectric phononic plates.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Meng-Jhen; Lin, Yu-Ching; Ono, Takahito; Esashi, Masayoshi; Yeh, Sih-Ling; Wu, Tsung-Tsong

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents results on the numerical and experimental studies of focusing and waveguiding of the lowest anti-symmetric Lamb wave in micro-fabricated piezoelectric phononic plates. The phononic structure was based on an AT-cut quartz plate and consisted of a gradient-index phononic crystal (GRIN PC) lens and a linear phononic plate waveguide. The band structures of the square-latticed AT-cut quartz phononic crystal plates with different filling ratios were analyzed using the finite element method. The design of a GRIN PC plate lens which is attached with a linear phononic plate waveguide is proposed. In designing the waveguide, propagation modes in square-latticed PC plates with different waveguide widths were studied and the results were served for the experimental design. In the micro-fabrication, deep reactive ion etching (Deep-RIE) process with a laboratory-made etcher was utilized to fabricate both the GRIN PC plate lens and the linear phononic waveguide on an 80 μm thick AT-cut quartz plate. Interdigital transducers were fabricated directly on the quartz plate to generate the lowest anti-symmetric Lamb waves. A vibro-meter was used to detect the wave fields and the measured results on the focusing and waveguiding of the piezoelectric GRIN PC lens and waveguide are in good accordance with the numerical predictions. The results of this study may serve as a basis for developing an active micro plate lens and related devices.

  18. Microfabricated solenoids and Helmholtz coils for NMR spectroscopy of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Ehrmann, Klaus; Saillen, Nicolas; Vincent, Franck; Stettler, Matthieu; Jordan, Martin; Wurm, Florian Maria; Besse, Pierre-André; Popovic, Radivoje

    2007-03-01

    NMR-microprobes based on solenoids and Helmholtz coils have been microfabricated and NMR-spectra of mammalian cells have successfully been taken. The microfabrication technology developed for these probes consists of three electroplated copper levels for low resistance coils and three SU-8 layers for the integration of microchannels. This technology allows fabricating solenoids, Helmholtz and planar coils on the same wafer. The coils have inner diameters in the range of 160 to 400 microm and detection volumes of 5 to 22 nL. The solenoid and Helmholtz coils show improved RF-field characteristics compared to a planar coil fabricated with the same process. The fabricated solenoid has a particularly low resistance of only 0.46 Omega at 300 MHz. Moreover, it is very sensitive and has a very uniform RF-field, but shows large line width. The Helmholtz coils are slightly less sensitive, but display a far narrower line width, and are therefore a good compromise. With a Helmholtz coil, a SNR of 620 has been measured after one scan on 9 nL pure water. An NMR-microprobe based on a Helmholtz coil has also been used to take spectra of CHO cells that have been concentrated in the sensitive region of the coil with a mechanical filter integrated into the channel.

  19. Automated and online characterization of adherent cell culture growth in a microfabricated bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Jaccard, Nicolas; Macown, Rhys J; Super, Alexandre; Griffin, Lewis D; Veraitch, Farlan S; Szita, Nicolas

    2014-10-01

    Adherent cell lines are widely used across all fields of biology, including drug discovery, toxicity studies, and regenerative medicine. However, adherent cell processes are often limited by a lack of advances in cell culture systems. While suspension culture processes benefit from decades of development of instrumented bioreactors, adherent cultures are typically performed in static, noninstrumented flasks and well-plates. We previously described a microfabricated bioreactor that enables a high degree of control on the microenvironment of the cells while remaining compatible with standard cell culture protocols. In this report, we describe its integration with automated image-processing capabilities, allowing the continuous monitoring of key cell culture characteristics. A machine learning-based algorithm enabled the specific detection of one cell type within a co-culture setting, such as human embryonic stem cells against the background of fibroblast cells. In addition, the algorithm did not confuse image artifacts resulting from microfabrication, such as scratches on surfaces, or dust particles, with cellular features. We demonstrate how the automation of flow control, environmental control, and image acquisition can be employed to image the whole culture area and obtain time-course data of mouse embryonic stem cell cultures, for example, for confluency.

  20. Insights into foraminiferal influences on microfabrics of microbialites at Highborne Cay, Bahamas.

    PubMed

    Bernhard, Joan M; Edgcomb, Virginia P; Visscher, Pieter T; McIntyre-Wressnig, Anna; Summons, Roger E; Bouxsein, Mary L; Louis, Leeann; Jeglinski, Marleen

    2013-06-11

    Microbialites, which are organosedimentary structures formed by microbial communities through binding and trapping and/or in situ precipitation, have a wide array of distinctive morphologies and long geologic record. The origin of morphological variability is hotly debated; elucidating the cause or causes of microfabric differences could provide insights into ecosystem functioning and biogeochemistry during much of Earth's history. Although rare today, morphologically distinct, co-occurring extant microbialites provide the opportunity to examine and compare microbial communities that may be responsible for establishing and modifying microbialite microfabrics. Highborne Cay, Bahamas, has extant laminated (i.e., stromatolites) and clotted (i.e., thrombolites) marine microbialites in close proximity, allowing focused questions about how community composition relates to physical attributes. Considerable knowledge exists about prokaryotic composition of microbialite mats (i.e., stromatolitic and thrombolitic mats), but little is known about their eukaryotic communities, especially regarding heterotrophic taxa. Thus, the heterotrophic eukaryotic communities of Highborne stromatolites and thrombolites were studied. Here, we show that diverse foraminiferal communities inhabit microbialite mat surfaces and subsurfaces; thecate foraminifera are relatively abundant in all microbialite types, especially thrombolitic mats; foraminifera stabilize grains in mats; and thecate reticulopod activities can impact stromatolitic mat lamination. Accordingly, and in light of foraminiferal impacts on modern microbialites, our results indicate that the microbialite fossil record may reflect the impact of the radiation of these protists.

  1. Microfabricated Electrochemical Cell-Based Biosensors for Analysis of Living Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Wu, Chengxiong; Hu, Ning; Zhou, Jie; Du, Liping; Wang, Ping

    2012-01-01

    Cellular biochemical parameters can be used to reveal the physiological and functional information of various cells. Due to demonstrated high accuracy and non-invasiveness, electrochemical detection methods have been used for cell-based investigation. When combined with improved biosensor design and advanced measurement systems, the on-line biochemical analysis of living cells in vitro has been applied for biological mechanism study, drug screening and even environmental monitoring. In recent decades, new types of miniaturized electrochemical biosensor are emerging with the development of microfabrication technology. This review aims to give an overview of the microfabricated electrochemical cell-based biosensors, such as microelectrode arrays (MEA), the electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) technique, and the light addressable potentiometric sensor (LAPS). The details in their working principles, measurement systems, and applications in cell monitoring are covered. Driven by the need for high throughput and multi-parameter detection proposed by biomedicine, the development trends of electrochemical cell-based biosensors are also introduced, including newly developed integrated biosensors, and the application of nanotechnology and microfluidic technology. PMID:25585708

  2. Controlling trapping potentials and stray electric fields in a microfabricated ion trap through design and compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doret, S. Charles; Amini, Jason M.; Wright, Kenneth; Volin, Curtis; Killian, Tyler; Ozakin, Arkadas; Denison, Douglas; Hayden, Harley; Pai, C.-S.; Slusher, Richart E.; Harter, Alexa W.

    2012-07-01

    Recent advances in quantum information processing with trapped ions have demonstrated the need for new ion trap architectures capable of holding and manipulating chains of many (>10) ions. Here we present the design and detailed characterization of a new linear trap, microfabricated with scalable complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) techniques, that is well-suited to this challenge. Forty-four individually controlled dc electrodes provide the many degrees of freedom required to construct anharmonic potential wells, shuttle ions, merge and split ion chains, precisely tune secular mode frequencies, and adjust the orientation of trap axes. Microfabricated capacitors on dc electrodes suppress radio-frequency pickup and excess micromotion, while a top-level ground layer simplifies modeling of electric fields and protects trap structures underneath. A localized aperture in the substrate provides access to the trapping region from an oven below, permitting deterministic loading of particular isotopic/elemental sequences via species-selective photoionization. The shapes of the aperture and radio-frequency electrodes are optimized to minimize perturbation of the trapping pseudopotential. Laboratory experiments verify simulated potentials and characterize trapping lifetimes, stray electric fields, and ion heating rates, while measurement and cancellation of spatially-varying stray electric fields permits the formation of nearly-equally spaced ion chains.

  3. A microfabricated bio-sensor for erythrocytes deformability and volume distributions analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bransky, Avishay; Korin, Natanel; Nemirovski, Yael; Dinnar, Uri

    2007-12-01

    The deformability of erythrocytes is of great importance for oxygen delivery in the microcirculation. Reduced RBC deformability is associated with several types of hemolytic anaemias, malaria, sepsis and diabetes. Aging of erythrocytes is also associated with loss of deformability as well as reduction in cell volume. An automated rheoscope has been developed, utilizing a microfabricated glass flow cell, high speed camera and advanced image-processing software. RBCs suspended in a high viscosity medium were filmed flowing through a microchannel. The system produces valuable data such as velocity profiles of RBCs, spatial distribution within the microchannel, cell volume and deformation index (DI) curves. The variation of DI across the channel height, due to change in shear stress, was measured for the first time. Such DI curves were obtained for normal and Thalassemia RBCs and their diagnostic potential was demonstrated. The spatial distribution and velocity of RBCs and rigid microspheres were measured. Both RBC and rigid spheres showed enhanced inward lateral migration, however the RBCs form a depletion region at the center of flow. The volume and surface area of the flowing cells have been estimated based on a fluid mechanics model and experimental results and fell within the normal range. Hence, the system developed, provides means for examining the behavior of individual RBCs in microchannels, and may serve as a microfabricated diagnostic device for deformability and volume measurements.

  4. Development and Application of Microfabricated Chemical Gas Sensors For Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, G. W.; Neudeck, P. G.; Fralick, G.; Thomas, V.; Liu, C. C.; Wu, Q. H.; Sawayda, M. S.; Jin, A.; Hammond, J.; Makel, D.; Hall, G.

    1990-01-01

    Aerospace applications require the development of chemical sensors with capabilities beyond those of commercially available sensors. In particular, factors such as minimal sensor size, weight, and power consumption are particularly important. Development areas which have potential aerospace applications include launch vehicle leak detection, engine health monitoring and control, and fire detection. Sensor development for these applications is based on progress in three types of technology: 1) Micromachining and microfabrication (Microsystem) technology to fabricate miniaturized sensors. 2) The use of nanocrystalline materials to develop sensors with improved stability combined with higher sensitivity. 3) The development of high temperature semiconductors, especially silicon carbide. Sensor development for each application involves its own challenges in the fields of materials science and fabrication technology. This paper discusses the needs of space applications and the point-contact sensor technology being developed to address these needs. Sensors to measure hydrogen, hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides (Nox, carbon monoxide, oxygen, and carbon dioxide are being developed. A description is given of each sensor type and its present stage of development. Demonstration and application these sensor technologies will be described. The demonstrations range from use of a microsystem based hydrogen sensor on the Shuttle to engine demonstration of a nanocrystalline based sensor for NO, detection. It is concluded that microfabricated sensor technology has significant potential for use in a range of aerospace applications.

  5. Development of Microfabricated Chemical Gas Sensors and Sensor Arrays for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, G. W.; Neudeck, P. G.; Fralick, G.; Thomas, V.; Liu, C. C.; Wu, W. H.; Ward, B.; Makel, D.

    2002-01-01

    Aerospace applications require the development of chemical sensors with capabilities beyond those of commercially available sensors. In particular, factors such as minimal sensor size, weight, and power consumption are particularly important. Development areas which have potential aerospace applications include launch vehicle leak detection, engine health monitoring, fire detection, and environmental monitoring. Sensor development for these applications is based on progress in three types of technology: 1) Micromachining and microfabrication (Microsystem) technology to fabricate miniaturized sensors. 2) The use of nanocrystalline materials to develop sensors with improved stability combined with higher sensitivity. 3) The development of high temperature semiconductors, especially silicon carbide. However, due to issues of selectivity and cross-sensitivity, individual sensors are limited in the amount of information that they can provide in environments that contain multiple chemical species. Thus, sensor arrays are being developed to address detection needs in such multi-species environments. This paper discusses the needs of space applications as well as the point-contact sensor technology and sensor arrays being developed to address these needs. Sensors to measure hydrogen, hydrocarbons, hydrazine, nitrogen oxides (NO,), carbon monoxide, oxygen, and carbon dioxide are being developed as well as arrays for leak, fire, and emissions detection. Demonstrations of the technology will also be discussed. It is concluded that microfabricated sensor technology has significant potential for use in a range of aerospace applications.

  6. Two-photon polymerization microfabrication of hydrogels: an advanced 3D printing technology for tissue engineering and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Xing, Jin-Feng; Zheng, Mei-Ling; Duan, Xuan-Ming

    2015-08-07

    3D printing technology has attracted much attention due to its high potential in scientific and industrial applications. As an outstanding 3D printing technology, two-photon polymerization (TPP) microfabrication has been applied in the fields of micro/nanophotonics, micro-electromechanical systems, microfluidics, biomedical implants and microdevices. In particular, TPP microfabrication is very useful in tissue engineering and drug delivery due to its powerful fabrication capability for precise microstructures with high spatial resolution on both the microscopic and the nanometric scale. The design and fabrication of 3D hydrogels widely used in tissue engineering and drug delivery has been an important research area of TPP microfabrication. The resolution is a key parameter for 3D hydrogels to simulate the native 3D environment in which the cells reside and the drug is controlled to release with optimal temporal and spatial distribution in vitro and in vivo. The resolution of 3D hydrogels largely depends on the efficiency of TPP initiators. In this paper, we will review the widely used photoresists, the development of TPP photoinitiators, the strategies for improving the resolution and the microfabrication of 3D hydrogels.

  7. A microfabricated fringing field capacitive pH sensor with an integrated readout circuit

    SciTech Connect

    Arefin, Md Shamsul Redoute, Jean-Michel; Rasit Yuce, Mehmet; Bulut Coskun, M.; Alan, Tuncay; Neild, Adrian

    2014-06-02

    This work presents a microfabricated fringe-field capacitive pH sensor using interdigitated electrodes and an integrated modulation-based readout circuit. The changes in capacitance of the sensor result from the permittivity changes due to pH variations and are converted to frequency shifts using a crossed-coupled voltage controlled oscillator readout circuit. The shift in resonant frequency of the readout circuit is 30.96 MHz for a change in pH of 1.0–5.0. The sensor can be used for the measurement of low pH levels, such as gastric acid, and can be integrated with electronic pills. The measurement results show high repeatability, low noise, and a stable output.

  8. Note: Development of a microfabricated sensor to measure thermal conductivity of picoliter scale liquid samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Byoung Kyoo; Yi, Namwoo; Park, Jaesung; Kim, Dongsik

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents a thermal analysis device, which can measure thermal conductivity of picoliter scale liquid sample. We employ the three omega method with a microfabricated AC thermal sensor with nanometer width heater. The liquid sample is confined by a micro-well structure fabricated on the sensor surface. The performance of the instrument was verified by measuring the thermal conductivity of 27-picoliter samples of de-ionized (DI) water, ethanol, methanol, and DI water-ethanol mixtures with accuracies better than 3%. Furthermore, another analytical scheme allows real-time thermal conductivity measurement with 5% accuracy. To the best of our knowledge, this technique requires the smallest volume of sample to measure thermal property ever.

  9. A High-Average-Power Free Electron Laser for Microfabrication and Surface Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dylla, H. F.; Benson, S.; Bisognano, J.; Bohn, C. L.; Cardman, L.; Engwall, D.; Fugitt, J.; Jordan, K.; Kehne, D.; Li, Z.; Liu, H.; Merminga, L.; Neil, G. R.; Neuffer, D.; Shinn, M.; Sinclair, C.; Wiseman, M.; Brillson, L. J.; Henkel, D. P.; Helvajian, H.; Kelley, M. J.; Nair, Shanti

    1995-01-01

    CEBAF has developed a comprehensive conceptual design of an industrial user facility based on a kilowatt ultraviolet (UV) (160-1000 mm) and infrared (IR) (2-25 micron) free electron laser (FEL) driven by a recirculating, energy recovering 200 MeV superconducting radio frequency (SRF) accelerator. FEL users, CEBAF's partners in the Lase Processing Consortium, including AT&T, DuPont, IBM, Northrop Grumman, 3M, and Xerox, are developing applications such as metal, ceramic, and electronic material micro-fabrication and polymer and metal surface processing, with the overall effort leading to later scale-up to industrial systems at 50-100 kW. Representative applications are described. The proposed high-average-power FEL overcomes limitations of conventional laser sources in available power, cost-effectiveness, tunability, and pulse structure.

  10. New perspectives for direct PDMS microfabrication using a CD-DVD laser.

    PubMed

    Hautefeuille, M; Cabriales, L; Pimentel-Domínguez, R; Velázquez, V; Hernández-Cordero, J; Oropeza-Ramos, L; Rivera, M; Carreón-Castro, M P; Grether, M; López-Moreno, E

    2013-12-21

    A simple and inexpensive alternative to high-power lasers for the direct fabrication of microchannels and rapid prototyping of poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is presented. By focusing the infrared laser beam of a commercial, low-power CD-DVD unit on absorbing carbon micro-cluster additives, highly localized PDMS combustion can be used to etch the polymer, which is otherwise transparent at such wavelengths. Thanks to a precise and automated control of laser conditions, laser-induced incandescence is originated at the material surface and produces high-resolution micropatterns that present properties normally induced with lasers of much greater energies in PDMS: formation of in situ nanodomains, local fluorescence and waveguide patterns. An extensive study of the phenomenon and its performance for PDMS microfabrication are presented.

  11. A novel low-volume two-chamber microfabricated platform for evaluating drug metabolism and toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Bale, Shyam Sundhar; Sridharan, Gautham Vivek; Golberg, Inna; Prodanov, Ljupcho; McCarty, William J.; Usta, Osman Berk; Jindal, Rohit; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate drug and metabolite efficacy on a target organ, it is essential to include metabolic function of hepatocytes, and to evaluate metabolite influence on both hepatocytes and the target of interest. Herein, we have developed a two-chamber microfabricated device separated by a membrane enabling communication between hepatocytes and cancer cells. The microscale environment created enables cell co-culture in a low media-to-cell ratio leading to higher metabolite formation and rapid accumulation, which is lost in traditional plate cultures or other interconnected models due to higher culture volumes. We demonstrate the efficacy of this system by metabolism of tegafur by hepatocytes resulting in cancer cell toxicity. PMID:26925437

  12. A system for trapping barium ions in a microfabricated surface trap

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, R. D. Sakrejda, T.; Wright, J.; Zhou, Z.; Blinov, B. B.; Chen, S.-P.

    2014-05-15

    We have developed a vacuum chamber and control system for rapid testing of microfabricated surface ion traps. Our system is modular in design and is based on an in-vacuum printed circuit board with integrated filters. We have used this system to successfully trap and cool barium ions and have achieved ion ‘dark' lifetimes of 31.6 s ± 3.4 s with controlled shuttling of ions. We provide a detailed description of the ion trap system including the in-vacuum materials used, control electronics and neutral atom source. We discuss the challenges presented in achieving a system which can work reliably over two years of operations in which the trap under test was changed at least 10 times.

  13. Microfabricated rankine cycle steam turbine for power generation and methods of making the same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frechette, Luc (Inventor); Muller, Norbert (Inventor); Lee, Changgu (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    In accordance with the present invention, an integrated micro steam turbine power plant on-a-chip has been provided. The integrated micro steam turbine power plant on-a-chip of the present invention comprises a miniature electric power generation system fabricated using silicon microfabrication technology and lithographic patterning. The present invention converts heat to electricity by implementing a thermodynamic power cycle on a chip. The steam turbine power plant on-a-chip generally comprises a turbine, a pump, an electric generator, an evaporator, and a condenser. The turbine is formed by a rotatable, disk-shaped rotor having a plurality of rotor blades disposed thereon and a plurality of stator blades. The plurality of stator blades are interdigitated with the plurality of rotor blades to form the turbine. The generator is driven by the turbine and converts mechanical energy into electrical energy.

  14. A Microfabricated Segmented-Involute-Foil Regenerator for Enhancing Reliability and Performance of Stirling Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, Mounir; Danila, Daniel; Simon, Terrence; Mantell, Susan; Sun, Liyong; Gadeon, David; Qiu, Songgang; Wood, Gary; Kelly, Kevin; McLean, Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    An actual-size microfabricated regenerator comprised of a stack of 42 disks, 19 mm diameter and 0.25 mm thick, with layers of microscopic, segmented, involute-shaped flow channels was fabricated and tested. The geometry resembles layers of uniformly-spaced segmented-parallel-plates, except the plates are curved. Each disk was made from electro-plated nickel using the LiGA process. This regenerator had feature sizes close to those required for an actual Stirling engine but the overall regenerator dimensions were sized for the NASA/Sunpower oscillating-flow regenerator test rig. Testing in the oscillating-flow test rig showed the regenerator performed extremely well, significantly better than currently used random-fiber material, producing the highest figures of merit ever recorded for any regenerator tested in that rig over its approximately 20 years of use.

  15. Low material budget microfabricated cooling devices for particle detectors and front-end electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mapelli, A.; Catinaccio, A.; Daguin, J.; van Lintel, H.; Nuessle, G.; Petagna, P.; Renaud, P.

    2011-06-01

    Novel cooling systems with very low material budget are being fabricated and studied. They consist of silicon wafers in which microchannels are etched and closed by bonding another wafer. This cooling option is being considered for future HEP detectors of the sLHC and linear colliders. It is currently under investigation as an option for the cooling of the NA62 Gigatracker silicon pixel detector and its front-end electronics where the microfabricated cooling plate would stand directly in the beam. In this particular case, microchannel cooling meets both the very aggressive X 0 (0.15%) specifications and the anticipated 2 W/cm 2 power dissipation by the active electronics.

  16. Optical and mechanical characterization of microfabricated optical bend loss sensor for distributive pressure measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei-Chih; Huang, Chu-Yu; Chiang, Te-Kuang; Reinhall, Per G.

    2007-04-01

    The paper describes the development of a mesh waveguide sensor capable of measuring pressure force at the plantar interface. The uniqueness of the system is in its batch fabrication process, which involves a microfabrication molding technique with poly(dimethylsiloxane)(PDMS) as the optical medium. The pressure sensor consists of an array of optical waveguides lying in perpendicular rows and columns separated by elastomeric pads. A map of normal stress was constructed based on observed macro bending which causes intensity attenuation from the physical deformation of two adjacent perpendicular waveguides. In this paper, optical and mechanical analysis of the bend loss will be presented. We will also present the results using a two-layer neural network system for force and image construction of fourteen different shape patterns and its corresponding four different applied forces.

  17. Microfabricated DNA analysis system. Semi-annual report, August 1993--January 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Northrup, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    We are miniaturizing instrumentation for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) -- a bioanalytical technique that amplifies target sections of DNA through thermal cycling. This report focuses on delineating reaction chamber, design parameters through computer modeling and infrared imaging. We have also continued micro-chamber-based PCR experiments and have successfully amplified three different targets from two different biological sources. Specifically, we have amplified DNA from {beta}-globin (a subunit of hemoglobin), and two different-sized targets from the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). These experiments were performed in newly-designed chambers. Reaction chambers are also being designed with detection in mind, specifically for the detection of fluorescent DNA labels. Finally, some new developments in PCR technology are described as they represent potential biological diagnostics to be evaluated in microfabricated DNA analysis systems.

  18. Simultaneous recording of rat auditory cortex and thalamus via a titanium-based, microfabricated, microelectrode device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, P. T.; Rao, M. P.; Otto, K. J.

    2011-08-01

    Direct recording from sequential processing stations within the brain has provided opportunity for enhancing understanding of important neural circuits, such as the corticothalamic loops underlying auditory, visual, and somatosensory processing. However, the common reliance upon microwire-based electrodes to perform such recordings often necessitates complex surgeries and increases trauma to neural tissues. This paper reports the development of titanium-based, microfabricated, microelectrode devices designed to address these limitations by allowing acute recording from the thalamic nuclei and associated cortical sites simultaneously in a minimally invasive manner. In particular, devices were designed to simultaneously probe rat auditory cortex and auditory thalamus, with the intent of recording auditory response latencies and isolated action potentials within the separate anatomical sites. Details regarding the design, fabrication, and characterization of these devices are presented, as are preliminary results from acute in vivo recording.

  19. A forensic laboratory tests the Berkeley microfabricated capillary array electrophoresis device.

    PubMed

    Greenspoon, Susan A; Yeung, Stephanie H I; Johnson, Kelly R; Chu, Wai K; Rhee, Han N; McGuckian, Amy B; Crouse, Cecelia A; Chiesl, Thomas N; Barron, Annelise E; Scherer, James R; Ban, Jeffrey D; Mathies, Richard A

    2008-07-01

    Miniaturization of capillary electrophoresis onto a microchip for forensic short tandem repeat analysis is the initial step in the process of producing a fully integrated and automated analysis system. A prototype of the Berkeley microfabricated capillary array electrophoresis device was installed at the Virginia Department of Forensic Science for testing. Instrument performance was verified by PowerPlex 16 System profiling of single source, sensitivity series, mixture, and casework samples. Mock sexual assault samples were successfully analyzed using the PowerPlex Y System. Resolution was assessed using the TH01, CSF1PO, TPOX, and Amelogenin loci and demonstrated to be comparable with commercial systems along with the instrument precision. Successful replacement of the Hjerten capillary coating method with a dynamic coating polymer was performed. The accurate and rapid typing of forensic samples demonstrates the successful technology transfer of this device into a practitioner laboratory and its potential for advancing high-throughput forensic typing.

  20. Enhanced sensitivity of a microfabricated resonator using a graphene-polystyrene bilayer membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Minhyuk; Lee, Eunho; Cho, Kilwon; Jeon, Sangmin

    2014-08-18

    A graphene layer was synthesized using chemical vapor deposition methods and a polystyrene solution was spin-cast onto the graphene film. The graphene-polystyrene bilayer membrane was attached between the two tines of a microfabricated quartz tuning fork (QTF). The modulus of the graphene-polystyrene bilayer was measured to be twice that of a pristine polystyrene membrane. Exposure of the membrane-coated QTF to ethanol vapor decreased the resonance frequency of the microresonator. The bilayer membrane-coated QTF produced a frequency change that was three times the change obtained using a polystyrene membrane-coated QTF, with a lower degree of degradation in the Q factor. The limit of detection of the bilayer membrane-coated QTF to ethanol vapor was determined to be 20 ppm.

  1. Metal-Organic Framework Thin Films as Stationary Phases in Microfabricated Gas-Chromatography Columns.

    SciTech Connect

    Read, Douglas; Sillerud, Colin Halliday

    2016-01-01

    The overarching goal of this project is to integrate Sandia's microfabricated gas-chromatography ( GC) columns with a stationary phase material that is capable of retaining high-volatility chemicals and permanent gases. The successful integration of such a material with GCs would dramatically expand the repertoire of detectable compounds for Sandia's various microanalysis systems. One such promising class of candidate materials is metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). In this report we detail our methods for controlled deposition of HKUST-1 MOF stationary phases within GC columns. We demonstrate: the chromatographic separation of natural gas; a method for determining MOF film thickness from chromatography alone; and the first-reported GC x GC separation of natural gas -- in general -- let alone for two disparate MOF stationary phases. In addition we determine the fundamental thermodynamic constant for mass sorption, the partition coefficient, for HKUST-1 and several light hydrocarbons and select toxic industrial chemicals.

  2. Heating rate and electrode charging measurements in a scalable, microfabricated, surface-electrode ion trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allcock, D. T. C.; Harty, T. P.; Janacek, H. A.; Linke, N. M.; Ballance, C. J.; Steane, A. M.; Lucas, D. M.; Jarecki, R. L.; Habermehl, S. D.; Blain, M. G.; Stick, D.; Moehring, D. L.

    2012-06-01

    We characterise the performance of a surface-electrode ion "chip" trap fabricated using established semiconductor integrated circuit and micro-electro-mechanical-system (MEMS) microfabrication processes, which are in principle scalable to much larger ion trap arrays, as proposed for implementing ion trap quantum information processing. We measure rf ion micromotion parallel and perpendicular to the plane of the trap electrodes, and find that on-package capacitors reduce this to ≲10 nm in amplitude. We also measure ion trapping lifetime, charging effects due to laser light incident on the trap electrodes, and the heating rate for a single trapped ion. The performance of this trap is found to be comparable with others of the same size scale.

  3. Comparison of microfabricated hexagonal and lamellar post arrays for DNA electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhen; Dorfman, Kevin D.

    2014-01-01

    We used Brownian dynamics simulations to compare DNA separations in microfabricated post arrays containing either hexagonal or lamellar lattices. Contrary to intuition, dense hexagonal arrays with frequent DNA-post collisions do not yield the optimal separation. Rather, hexagonal arrays with pore sizes commensurate with the radius of gyration of the DNA lead to increased separation resolution due to a molecular-weight dependent collision probability that increases with molecular weight. However, when the hexagonal array is too sparse, this advantage is lost due to the low number of collisions. Lamellar lattices, such as the DNA nanofence, appear to be superior to a hexagonal array at the same post density, since the lamellar lattice combines regions for DNA relaxation with locally dense post regions for collisions. The relative advantages of different post array designs are explained in terms of the statistics for the number of collisions and the holdup time, providing guidelines for designing post arrays for separating long DNA. PMID:24132597

  4. Note: Development of a microfabricated sensor to measure thermal conductivity of picoliter scale liquid samples.

    PubMed

    Park, Byoung Kyoo; Yi, Namwoo; Park, Jaesung; Kim, Dongsik

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents a thermal analysis device, which can measure thermal conductivity of picoliter scale liquid sample. We employ the three omega method with a microfabricated AC thermal sensor with nanometer width heater. The liquid sample is confined by a micro-well structure fabricated on the sensor surface. The performance of the instrument was verified by measuring the thermal conductivity of 27-picoliter samples of de-ionized (DI) water, ethanol, methanol, and DI water-ethanol mixtures with accuracies better than 3%. Furthermore, another analytical scheme allows real-time thermal conductivity measurement with 5% accuracy. To the best of our knowledge, this technique requires the smallest volume of sample to measure thermal property ever.

  5. A microfabricated fringing field capacitive pH sensor with an integrated readout circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arefin, Md Shamsul; Bulut Coskun, M.; Alan, Tuncay; Redoute, Jean-Michel; Neild, Adrian; Rasit Yuce, Mehmet

    2014-06-01

    This work presents a microfabricated fringe-field capacitive pH sensor using interdigitated electrodes and an integrated modulation-based readout circuit. The changes in capacitance of the sensor result from the permittivity changes due to pH variations and are converted to frequency shifts using a crossed-coupled voltage controlled oscillator readout circuit. The shift in resonant frequency of the readout circuit is 30.96 MHz for a change in pH of 1.0-5.0. The sensor can be used for the measurement of low pH levels, such as gastric acid, and can be integrated with electronic pills. The measurement results show high repeatability, low noise, and a stable output.

  6. Spatially monitoring oxygen level in 3D microfabricated cell culture systems using optical oxygen sensing beads.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Acosta, Miguel A; Leach, Jennie B; Carrier, Rebecca L

    2013-04-21

    Capability of measuring and monitoring local oxygen concentration at the single cell level (tens of microns scale) is often desirable but difficult to achieve in cell culture. In this study, biocompatible oxygen sensing beads were prepared and tested for their potential for real-time monitoring and mapping of local oxygen concentration in 3D micro-patterned cell culture systems. Each oxygen sensing bead is composed of a silica core loaded with both an oxygen sensitive Ru(Ph2phen3)Cl2 dye and oxygen insensitive Nile blue reference dye, and a poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) shell rendering biocompatibility. Human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells were cultivated on a series of PDMS and type I collagen based substrates patterned with micro-well arrays for 3 or 7 days, and then brought into contact with oxygen sensing beads. Using an image analysis algorithm to convert florescence intensity of beads to partial oxygen pressure in the culture system, tens of microns-size oxygen sensing beads enabled the spatial measurement of local oxygen concentration in the microfabricated system. Results generally indicated lower oxygen level inside wells than on top of wells, and local oxygen level dependence on structural features of cell culture surfaces. Interestingly, chemical composition of cell culture substrates also appeared to affect oxygen level, with type-I collagen based cell culture systems having lower oxygen concentration compared to PDMS based cell culture systems. In general, results suggest that oxygen sensing beads can be utilized to achieve real-time and local monitoring of micro-environment oxygen level in 3D microfabricated cell culture systems.

  7. Rapid microfabrication of transparent materials using a filamented beam of the IR femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butkus, S.; Paipulas, D.; Viburys, Ž.; Alesenkov, A.; Gaižauskas, E.; KaškelytÄ--, D.; Barkauskas, M.; Sirutkaitis, V.

    2014-03-01

    Glass drilling and welding applications realized with the help of femtosecond lasers attract industrial attention , however, desired tasks may require systems employing high numerical aperture (NA) focusing conditions, low repetition rate lasers and complex fast motion translation stages. Due to the sensitivity of such systems, slight instabilities in parameter values can lead to crack formations, severe fabrication rate decrement and poor quality overall results. A microfabrication system lacking the stated disadvantages was constructed and demonstrated in this report. An f-theta lens was used in combination with a galvanometric scanner, in addition, a water pumping system that enables formation of water films of variable thickness in real time on the samples. Water acts as a medium for filament formation, which in turn decreases the focal spot diameter and increases fluence and axial focal length . This article demonstrates the application of a femtosecond (280fs) laser towards two different micromachining techniques: rapid cutting and welding of transparent materials. Filament formation in water gives rise to strong ablation at the surface of the sample, moreover, the water, surrounding the ablated area, adds increased cooling and protection from cracking. The constructed microfabrication system is capable of drilling holes in thick soda-lime and hardened glasses. The fabrication time varies depending on the diameter of the hole and spans from a few to several hundred seconds. Moreover, complex-shape fabrication was demonstrated. Filament formation at the interface of two glass samples was also used for welding applications. By varying repetition rate, scanning speed and focal position optimal conditions for strong glass welding via filamentation were determined.

  8. Toward a microfabricated preconcentrator-focuser for a wearable micro-scale gas chromatograph.

    PubMed

    Bryant-Genevier, Jonathan; Zellers, Edward T

    2015-11-27

    This article describes work leading to a microfabricated preconcentrator-focuser (μPCF) designed for integration into a wearable microfabricated gas chromatograph (μGC) for monitoring workplace exposures to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) ranging in vapor pressure from ∼0.03 to 13kPa at concentrations near their respective Threshold Limit Values. Testing was performed on both single- and dual-cavity, etched-Si μPCF devices with Pyrex caps and integrated resistive heaters, packed with the graphitized carbons Carbopack X (C-X) and/or Carbopack B (C-B). Performance was assessed by measuring the 10% breakthrough volumes and injection bandwidths of a series of VOCs, individually and in mixtures, as a function of the VOC air concentrations, mixture complexity, sampling and desorption flow rates, adsorbent masses, temperature, and the injection split ratio. A dual-cavity device containing 1.4mg of C-X and 2.0mg of C-B was capable of selectively and quantitatively capturing a mixture of 14 VOCs at low-ppm concentrations in a few minutes from sample volumes sufficiently large to permit detection at relevant concentrations for workplace applications with the μGC detector that we ultimately plan to use. Thermal desorption at 225°C for 40s yielded ≥99% desorption of all analytes, and injected bandwidths as narrow as 0.6s facilitated efficient separation on a downstream 6-m GC column in <3min. A preconcentration factor of 620 was achieved for benzene from a sample of just 31mL. Increasing the mass of C-X to 2.3mg would be required for exhaustive capture of the more volatile target VOCs at high-ppm concentrations.

  9. Tunable magnetic resonance in double layered metallic structures.

    PubMed

    Zhou, L; Zhu, Y Y

    2011-12-01

    Double layered metallic gratings have been investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The authors have reported that tunable magnetic resonance (MR) can be achieved by modulating the vertical chirped width dh which could be controlled conveniently in the common electron and/or ion beam microfabrications. The linear relationship between MR wavelength and dh has been reported. By introducing the difference of electric and magnetic penetration depth, an analytic formula deduced from a modified LC model has shown good agreement with the simulation results, and an effective width for trapezoidal sandwiched microstructures has been presented. Our results may provide an alternative choice for tunable MR and broad bandwidth of magnetic metamaterials.

  10. Development of a W-band Serpentine Waveguide Amplifier based on a UV-LIGA Microfabricated Copper Circuit

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    circuits to withstand the extreme temperatures of continuous high- power operation, which is a limitation in the mmW regime for the helix -type circuit...through a series of smooth 180-degree bends while exchanging energy with an electron beam, is an alternative to the helix that is amenable to planar...microfabrication. The SWG is a good balance between the wide bandwidth of a helix and the high output power of a coupled-cavity type circuit [4

  11. Microfabrication of a Segmented-Involute-Foil Regenerator, Testing in a Sunpower Stirling Convertor and Supporting Modeling and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, Mounir B.; Tew, Roy C.; Gedeon, David; Wood, Gary; McLean, Jeff

    2008-01-01

    Under Phase II of a NASA Research Award contract, a prototype nickel segmented-involute-foil regenerator was microfabricated via LiGA and tested in the NASA/Sunpower oscillating-flow test rig. The resulting figure-of-merit was about twice that of the approx.90% porosity random-fiber material currently used in the small 50-100 W Stirling engines recently manufactured for NASA. That work was reported at the 2007 International Energy Conversion Engineering Conference in St. Louis, was also published as a NASA report, NASA/TM-2007-2149731, and has been more completely described in a recent NASA Contractor Report, NASA/CR-2007-2150062. Under a scaled-back version of the original Phase III plan, a new nickel segmentedinvolute- foil regenerator was microfabricated and has been tested in a Sunpower Frequency-Test-Bed (FTB) Stirling convertor. Testing in the FTB convertor produced about the same efficiency as testing with the original random-fiber regenerator. But the high thermal conductivity of the prototype nickel regenerator was responsible for a significant performance degradation. An efficiency improvement (by a 1.04 factor, according to computer predictions) could have been achieved if the regenerator been made from a low-conductivity material. Also the FTB convertor was not reoptimized to take full advantage of the microfabricated regenerator's low flow resistance; thus the efficiency would likely have been even higher had the FTB been completely reoptimized. This report discusses the regenerator microfabrication process, testing of the regenerator in the Stirling FTB convertor, and the supporting analysis. Results of the pre-test computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of the effects of the regenerator-test-configuration diffusers (located at each end of the regenerator) is included. The report also includes recommendations for accomplishing further development of involute-foil regenerators from a higher-temperature material than nickel.

  12. Micro-fabrication considerations for MEMS-based reconfigurable antenna apertures: with emphasis on DC bias network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadas, Hamid; Mousavi, Pedram; Daneshmand, Mojgan

    2016-11-01

    This note addresses the main challenges involved in monolithic micro-fabrication of large capacitive-MEMS-based reconfigurable electromagnetic apertures in antenna applications. The fabrication of a large DC bias line network, and also the metallic features in such apertures, requires special attention and optimization. It is shown that the choice of DC bias network material can impact DC and RF performance of the structure, and a trade-off between switching time and radiation pattern integrity should be considered.

  13. Advanced Microfabricated Devices for Sensitive Biomarker Detection and Analysis on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skelley, A. M.; Scherer, J. R.; Aubrey, A. D.; Grover, W. H.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Grunthaner, F. J.; Bada, J. L.; Willis, P.; Mathies, R. A.

    2006-12-01

    Detection of life on Mars requires definition of a suitable biomarker and development of sensitive instrumentation capable of performing in situ chemical analyses [1]. Our studies have focused on amino acid analysis because amino acids are more resistant to decomposition than other biomolecules, and because amino acid chirality is a well-defined biomarker. We have developed the Mars Organic Analyzer (MOA), a portable amino acid analysis system that consists of a compact instrument and a novel multi-layer CE microchip, and we have performed extensive laboratory and field validation of this instrument [2]. The heart of the MOA is the 100-mm diameter, 4-mm thick microchip that contains the CE separation channels as well as microfabricated valves and pumps for automated integrated sample preparation and handling. The microfabricated device is operated by a portable instrument that performs CE separation and LIF detection. The limits of detection of fluorescamine-labeled amino acids are in the nM to pM range corresponding to part- per-trillion sensitivities. The MOA has been field tested on soil samples rich in jarosite from the Panoche Valley, CA. These results demonstrate that amines and amino acids can be extracted from sulfate-rich acidic soils such as jarosite and analyzed using the MOA. The MOA was also recently field tested in the Yungay region of the Atacama Desert in Chile. The instrument was successfully operated in this challenging environment and performed over 300 amino acid analyses in a two week period. The MOA has also been used to label and analyze two of the four nucleobases, and methods are being developed to detect PAH's [3]. This presentation will discuss the unique challenges of developing microdevices for sensitive analysis of biomarker compounds. We will also describe current efforts to develop multichannel analysis systems and microfluidic automated analysis systems that will be used to enable flight versions of this instrument. For more details

  14. Microfabrication of chip-sized scaffolds for three-dimensional cell cultivation.

    PubMed

    Giselbrecht, Stefan; Gottwald, Eric; Truckenmueller, Roman; Trautmann, Christina; Welle, Alexander; Guber, Andreas; Saile, Volker; Gietzelt, Thomas; Weibezahn, Karl-Friedrich

    2008-05-12

    Using microfabrication technologies is a prerequisite to create scaffolds of reproducible geometry and constant quality for three-dimensional cell cultivation. These technologies offer a wide spectrum of advantages not only for manufacturing but also for different applications. The size and shape of formed cell clusters can be influenced by the exact and reproducible architecture of the microfabricated scaffold and, therefore, the diffusion path length of nutrients and gases can be controlled.1 This is unquestionably a useful tool to prevent apoptosis and necrosis of cells due to an insufficient nutrient and gas supply or removal of cellular metabolites. Our polymer chip, called CellChip, has the outer dimensions of 2 x 2 cm with a central microstructured area. This area is subdivided into an array of up to 1156 microcontainers with a typical dimension of 300 m edge length for the cubic design (cp- or cf-chip) or of 300 m diameter and depth for the round design (r-chip).2 So far, hot embossing or micro injection moulding (in combination with subsequent laborious machining of the parts) was used for the fabrication of the microstructured chips. Basically, micro injection moulding is one of the only polymer based replication techniques that, up to now, is capable for mass production of polymer microstructures.3 However, both techniques have certain unwanted limitations due to the processing of a viscous polymer melt with the generation of very thin walls or integrated through holes. In case of the CellChip, thin bottom layers are necessary to perforate the polymer and provide small pores of defined size to supply cells with culture medium e.g. by microfluidic perfusion of the containers. In order to overcome these limitations and to reduce the manufacturing costs we have developed a new microtechnical approach on the basis of a down-scaled thermoforming process. For the manufacturing of highly porous and thin walled polymer chips, we use a combination of heavy ion

  15. Microfabrics and deformation mechanisms in a jadeite-blueschist from the Franciscan melange, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wassmann, S.; Krohe, A.; Stoeckhert, B.; Trepmann, C.

    2010-12-01

    The Franciscan melange is a chaotic mixture of metasedimentary, metabasic and hydrated mantle material forming a typical block in matrix structure with extreme strain gradients on length scales between centimeter and kilometer. Mineral assemblages indicate high-pressure low-temperature metamorphism, with assemblages comprising jadeite + quartz, glaucophane, and aragonite. In combination, the structural relations and metamorphic conditions suggest that the Franciscan melange records processes in the deep level of an accretionary complex or in a subduction channel reaching to great depth. Exhumed materials provide insight into typical deformation mechanisms, stress states, and stress history at depth, which cannot be gained by other approaches. Here we analyze the microfabrics of a highly deformed and compositionally heterogenous jadeite-blueschist. Brittle failure is evident on various length scales. Several generations of fractures are widened and sealed to become veins. The shape of the veins, poor fitting of the walls, and the overall low aspect ratio indicate host rock deformation during sealing. The vein minerals indicate sealing at high-pressure metamorphic conditions, with aragonite being predominant in the latest generation. Individual jadeite porphyroblasts are fragmented. The fractures are sealed by quartz and new jadeite epitactically grown on the broken host. Microstructures suggest that the distributed deformation concomitant with vein formation is predominantly by dissolution precipitation creep. Jadeite porphyroblasts show strain caps and strain shadows, indicating progressive deformation after their crystallization. Unequivocal evidence for dislocation creep is restricted to quartz in some of the veins, where the fine-grained microstructure indicates strain induced grain boundary migration and subgrain rotation. In contrast, in other veins quartz shows a foam structure controlled by interfacial free energy. The microfabrics of the jadeite

  16. Microfabrication of Chip-sized Scaffolds for Three-dimensional Cell cultivation

    PubMed Central

    Giselbrecht, Stefan; Gottwald, Eric; Truckenmueller, Roman; Trautmann, Christina; Welle, Alexander; Guber, Andreas; Saile, Volker; Gietzelt, Thomas; Weibezahn, Karl-Friedrich

    2008-01-01

    Using microfabrication technologies is a prerequisite to create scaffolds of reproducible geometry and constant quality for three-dimensional cell cultivation. These technologies offer a wide spectrum of advantages not only for manufacturing but also for different applications. The size and shape of formed cell clusters can be influenced by the exact and reproducible architecture of the microfabricated scaffold and, therefore, the diffusion path length of nutrients and gases can be controlled.1 This is unquestionably a useful tool to prevent apoptosis and necrosis of cells due to an insufficient nutrient and gas supply or removal of cellular metabolites. Our polymer chip, called CellChip, has the outer dimensions of 2 x 2 cm with a central microstructured area. This area is subdivided into an array of up to 1156 microcontainers with a typical dimension of 300 m edge length for the cubic design (cp- or cf-chip) or of 300 m diameter and depth for the round design (r-chip).2 So far, hot embossing or micro injection moulding (in combination with subsequent laborious machining of the parts) was used for the fabrication of the microstructured chips. Basically, micro injection moulding is one of the only polymer based replication techniques that, up to now, is capable for mass production of polymer microstructures.3 However, both techniques have certain unwanted limitations due to the processing of a viscous polymer melt with the generation of very thin walls or integrated through holes. In case of the CellChip, thin bottom layers are necessary to perforate the polymer and provide small pores of defined size to supply cells with culture medium e.g. by microfluidic perfusion of the containers. In order to overcome these limitations and to reduce the manufacturing costs we have developed a new microtechnical approach on the basis of a down-scaled thermoforming process. For the manufacturing of highly porous and thin walled polymer chips, we use a combination of heavy ion

  17. Complement activation by candidate biomaterials of an implantable microfabricated medical device.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, Andrey; Hellerud, Bernt C; Pharo, Anne; Johannessen, Erik A; Mollnes, Tom E

    2011-08-01

    Implantable devices realized by microfabrication have introduced a new class of potential biomaterials whose properties would need to be assessed. Such devices include sensors for measuring biological substances like glucose. Thus, 14 different candidate materials intended for design of such a device were investigated with respect to their complement activation potential in human serum. The fluid-phase activation was measured by the products C4d, Bb, C3bc, and the terminal complement complex (TCC), whereas solid-phase activation was measured by deposition of TCC on the material surfaces. No fluid-phase activation was found for materials related to the capsule, carrier, or sealing. Fluid-phase activation was, however, triggered to a various extent in three of the four nanoporous membranes (cellulose, polyamide, and aluminium oxide), whereas polycarbonate was rendered inactive. Solid-phase activation discriminated more sensitively between all the materials, revealing that the capsule candidate polydimethylsiloxane and sealing candidate silicone 3140 were highly compatible, showing significantly lower TCC deposition than the negative control (p < 0.01). Three of the candidate materials were indifferent, whereas the remaining nine showed significantly higher deposition of TCC than the negative control (p < 0.01). In conclusion, complement activation, in particular when examined on the solid phase, discriminated well between the different candidate materials tested and could be used as a guide for the selection of the best-suited materials for further investigation and development of the device.

  18. Polyhalite microfabrics in an Alpine evaporite mélange: Hallstatt, Eastern Alps

    PubMed Central

    Schorn, Anja; Neubauer, Franz; Bernroider, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    In the Hallstatt salt mine (Austria), polyhalite rocks occur in 0.5–1 m thick and several metre long tectonic lenses within the protocataclasite to protomylonite matrix of the Alpine Haselgebirge Fm.. Thin section analysis of Hallstatt polyhalites reveals various fabric types similar to metamorphic rocks of crust-forming minerals, e.g. quartz and feldspar. Polyhalite microfabrics from Hallstatt include: (1) polyhalite mylonites, (2) metamorphic reaction fabrics, (3) vein-filling, fibrous polyhalite and (4) cavity-filling polyhalite. The polyhalite mylonites contain a wide range of shear fabrics commonly known in mylonitic quartzo–feldspathic shear zones within the ductile crust and developed from a more coarse-grained precursor rock. The mylonites are partly overprinted by recrystallised, statically grown polyhalite grains. Metamorphic reaction fabrics of polyhalite fibres between blödite (or astrakhanite) [Na2Mg(SO4)2.4H2O] and anhydrite have also been found. According to previous reports, blödite may occur primarily as nodules or intergrown with löweite. Reaction fabrics may have formed by exsolution, (re-)crystallisation, parallel growth or replacement. This fabric type was only found in one sample in relation with the decomposition of blödite at ca. 61 °C in the presence of halite or slightly above, testifying, therefore, a late stage prograde fabric significantly younger than the main polyhalite formation. PMID:26806997

  19. Microfabricated Engineered Particle Systems for Respiratory Drug Delivery and Other Pharmaceutical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Andres; Mack, Peter; Williams, Stuart; Fromen, Catherine; Shen, Tammy; Tully, Janet; Pillai, Jonathan; Kuehl, Philip; Napier, Mary; DeSimone, Joseph M.; Maynor, Benjamin W.

    2012-01-01

    Particle Replication in Non-Wetting Templates (PRINT®) is a platform particle drug delivery technology that coopts the precision and nanoscale spatial resolution inherently afforded by lithographic techniques derived from the microelectronics industry to produce precisely engineered particles. We describe the utility of PRINT technology as a strategy for formulation and delivery of small molecule and biologic therapeutics, highlighting previous studies where particle size, shape, and chemistry have been used to enhance systemic particle distribution properties. In addition, we introduce the application of PRINT technology towards respiratory drug delivery, a particular interest due to the pharmaceutical need for increased control over dry powder characteristics to improve drug delivery and therapeutic indices. To this end, we have produced dry powder particles with micro- and nanoscale geometric features and composed of small molecule and protein therapeutics. Aerosols generated from these particles show attractive properties for efficient pulmonary delivery and differential respiratory deposition characteristics based on particle geometry. This work highlights the advantages of adopting proven microfabrication techniques in achieving unprecedented control over particle geometric design for drug delivery. PMID:22518316

  20. Microfabricated self-resonant structure as a passive wireless chemical sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Sheng; Pasupathy, Praveenkumar; Neikirk, Dean P.

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes ongoing work to develop a low cost, passive wireless chemical sensor using a microfabricated inductor with interdigitated capacitors (IDC). A self-resonant-structure (SRS) is designed by incorporating IDC electrodes in the inter-winding space of the inductor. The distributed IDC capacitance is affected by dielectric constant and conductivity of its environment or material under test (MUT). This serves as a capacitive transducer changing the resonant frequency of the SRS. The SRS is interrogated using a non-contact inductively coupled reader coil. The shift in resonance frequency of the SRS is used to detect material properties of the environment/MUT. The dielectric constant (ɛ) and conductivity (σ) can be used to provide information about the surrounding environment. The ɛ and the σ are determined by fitting and extraction from circuit models of the IDC. Relationship between sensor layout and coupling factor between sensor and reader is investigated. Optimizations of the coupling factor based on this relationship are discussed. IDC design trade-offs between the sensor's sensitivity and coupling factor are investigated. The sensor's response to variety of liquid MUTs with a wide range of dielectric constant and conductivity is presented.

  1. Microfabricated silicon leak for sampling planetary atmospheres with a mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Jamieson, B. G.; Lynch, B. A.; Harpold, D. N.; Niemann, H. B.; Shappirio, M. D.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2007-06-15

    A microfabricated silicon mass spectrometer inlet leak has been designed, fabricated, and tested. This leak achieves a much lower conductance in a smaller volume than is possible with commonly available metal or glass capillary tubing. It will also be shown that it is possible to integrate significant additional functionality, such as inlet heaters and valves, into a silicon microleak with very little additional mass. The fabricated leak is compatible with high temperature (up to 500 deg. C) and high pressure (up to 100 bars) conditions, as would be encountered on a Venus atmospheric probe. These leaks behave in reasonable agreement with their theoretically calculated conductance, although this differs between devices and from the predicted value by as much as a factor of 2. This variation is believed to be the result of nonuniformity in the silicon etching process which is characterized in this work. Future versions of this device can compensate for characterized process variations in order to produce devices in closer agreement with designed conductance values. The integration of an inlet heater into the leak device has also been demonstrated in this work.

  2. A fully microfabricated carbon nanotube three-electrode system on glass substrate for miniaturized electrochemical biosensors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joon Hyub; Lee, Jun-Yong; Jin, Joon-Hyung; Park, Chan Won; Lee, Cheol Jin; Min, Nam Ki

    2012-06-01

    We present an integration process to fabricate single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) three-electrode systems on glass substrate for electrochemical biosensors. Key issues involve optimization of the SWCNT working electrode to achieve high sensitivity, developing an optimal Ag/AgCl reference electrode with good stability, and process development to integrate these electrodes. Multiple spray coatings of the SWCNT film on glass substrate enabled easier integration of the SWCNT film into an electrochemical three-electrode system. O₂ plasma etching and subsequent activation of spray-coated SWCNT films were needed to pattern and functionalize the SWCNT working electrode films without serious damage to the SWCNTs, and to remove organic residues. The microfabricated three-electrode systems were characterized by microscopic and spectroscopic techniques, and the electrochemical properties were investigated using cyclic voltammetry and chrono-amperometry. The fully-integrated CNT three-electrode system showed an effective working electrode area about three times larger than its geometric surface area and an improved electrochemical activity for hydrogen peroxide decomposition. Finally, the effectiveness of miniaturized pf-SWCNT electrodes as biointerfaces was examined by applying them to immunosensors to detect Legionella(L) pneumophila, based on a direct sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) format with 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine dihydrochloride/hydrogen peroxide(TMB/H₂O₂) as the substrate/mediator system. The lower detection limit of the pf-SWCNT-based immunosensors to L. pneumophila is about 1500 times lower than that of the standard ELISA assay.

  3. Exploiting the oxygen inhibitory effect on UV curing in microfabrication: a modified lithography technique.

    PubMed

    Alvankarian, Jafar; Majlis, Burhanuddin Yeop

    2015-01-01

    Rapid prototyping (RP) of microfluidic channels in liquid photopolymers using standard lithography (SL) involves multiple deposition steps and curing by ultraviolet (UV) light for the construction of a microstructure layer. In this work, the conflicting effect of oxygen diffusion and UV curing of liquid polyurethane methacrylate (PUMA) is investigated in microfabrication and utilized to reduce the deposition steps and to obtain a monolithic product. The conventional fabrication process is altered to control for the best use of the oxygen presence in polymerization. A novel and modified lithography technique is introduced in which a single step of PUMA coating and two steps of UV exposure are used to create a microchannel. The first exposure is maskless and incorporates oxygen diffusion into PUMA for inhibition of the polymerization of a thin layer from the top surface while the UV rays penetrate the photopolymer. The second exposure is for transferring the patterns of the microfluidic channels from the contact photomask onto the uncured material. The UV curing of PUMA as the main substrate in the presence of oxygen is characterized analytically and experimentally. A few typical elastomeric microstructures are manufactured. It is demonstrated that the obtained heights of the fabricated structures in PUMA are associated with the oxygen concentration and the UV dose. The proposed technique is promising for the RP of molds and microfluidic channels in terms of shorter processing time, fewer fabrication steps and creation of microstructure layers with higher integrity.

  4. COMBINED EXPERIMENTAL AND MATHEMATICAL APPROACH FOR DEVELOPMENT OF MICROFABRICATION-BASED CANCER MIGRATION ASSAY

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Saheli; Bustard, Bethany L.; Welter, Jean F.; Baskaran, Harihara

    2011-01-01

    Migration of cancer cells is a key determinant of metastasis, which is correlated with poor prognosis in patients. Evidence shows that cancer cell motility is regulated by stromal cell interactions. To quantify the role of homotypic and heterotypic cell-cell interaction on migration, a two-dimensional migration assay has been developed by microfabrication techniques. Two breast cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-453, were used to develop micropatterns of cancer cells (cell islands) that revealed distinct migration profiles in this assay. Although the individual migration rates of these cells showed only a seven-fold difference, MDA-MB-453 islands migrated significantly lower than MDA-MB-231 islands, indicating differential regulation of migration in isolated cells vs. islands. Island size had the greatest impact on migration, primarily for MDA-MB-231 cells. Migration of MDA-MB-231 islands was decreased by interaction with homotypic cells, and significantly more by heterotypic non-cancer associated fibroblasts. In addition, a mathematical model of island migration in multi-cellular population has been developed using Stefan-Maxwell's equation. The model showed qualitative agreement with experimental results and predicted a biphasic relation between cell densities and island sizes. The combined experimental and mathematical model can be used to quantitatively study the impact of cell-cell interactions on migration. PMID:21701934

  5. Microfabrication of Arrays of Superconducting Transition Edge Sensors for CMB Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posada, Chrystian; Ding, Junjia; Bender, Amy; Khaire, Trupti; Lendinez, Sergi; Ciocys, Samuel; Wang, Gensheng; Yefremenko, Volodymyr; Padin, Steve; Carlstrom, John; Chang, Clarence; Novosad, Valentine; Spt3G Collaboration

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) provides a unique window for exploring fundamental physics. Increasing the sensitivity of CMB experiments requires fabricating focal planes with orders of magnitude more detectors than current instruments. This work presents the procedures used at Argonne National Laboratory for the fabrication of large arrays of dual-polarized multichroic detectors for CMB measurements. The detectors are composed of a broad-band sinuous antenna coupled to a Nb microstrip transmission line. In-line filters define the spectral response, allowing for individual measurement of three band-passes (95 GHz, 150GHz and 220 GHz). A Ti /Au termination resistor is used to couple the mm-wave signal to Ti/Au transition edge sensor (TES) bolometers. There are six bolometers per pixel, for a total of 16,140 detectors in the CMB receiver being fabricated. The monolithic microfabrication of the detector arrays will be presented and discussed in detail. The SPT3G collaboration is developing the thrid-generation camera for CMB measurements with the South Pole Telescope. Additional information can be found in the following link: https://pole.uchicago.edu/spt/.

  6. Biology on a Chip: Microfabrication for Studying the Behavior of Cultured Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nianzhen; Tourovskaia, Anna; Folch, Albert

    2013-01-01

    The ability to culture cells in vitro has revolutionized hypothesis testing in basic cell and molecular biology research and has become a standard methodology in drug screening and toxicology assays. However, the traditional cell culture methodology—consisting essentially of the immersion of a large population of cells in a homogeneous fluid medium—has become increasingly limiting, both from a fundamental point of view (cells in vivo are surrounded by complex spatiotemporal microenvironments) and from a practical perspective (scaling up the number of fluid handling steps and cell manipulations for high-throughput studies in vitro is prohibitively expensive). Micro fabrication technologies have enabled researchers to design, with micrometer control, the biochemical composition and topology of the substrate, the medium composition, as well as the type of neighboring cells surrounding the microenvironment of the cell. In addition, microtechnology is conceptually well suited for the development of fast, low-cost in vitro systems that allow for high-throughput culturing and analysis of cells under large numbers of conditions. Here we review a variety of applications of microfabrication in cell culture studies, with an emphasis on the biology of various cell types. PMID:15139302

  7. A microfabricated sun sensor using GaN-on-sapphire ultraviolet photodetector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Ruth A.; So, Hongyun; Chiamori, Heather C.; Suria, Ateeq J.; Chapin, Caitlin A.; Senesky, Debbie G.

    2016-09-01

    A miniature sensor for detecting the orientation of incident ultraviolet light was microfabricated using gallium nitride (GaN)-on-sapphire substrates and semi-transparent interdigitated gold electrodes for sun sensing applications. The individual metal-semiconductor-metal photodetector elements were shown to have a stable and repeatable response with a high sensitivity (photocurrent-to-dark current ratio (PDCR) = 2.4 at -1 V bias) and a high responsivity (3200 A/W at -1 V bias) under ultraviolet (365 nm) illumination. The 3 × 3 GaN-on-sapphire ultraviolet photodetector array was integrated with a gold aperture to realize a miniature sun sensor (1.35 mm × 1.35 mm) capable of determining incident light angles with a ±45° field of view. Using a simple comparative figure of merit algorithm, measurement of incident light angles of 0° and 45° was quantitatively and qualitatively (visually) demonstrated by the sun sensor, supporting the use of GaN-based sun sensors for orientation, navigation, and tracking of the sun within the harsh environment of space.

  8. Microfabrication and Integration of a Sol-Gel PZT Folded Spring Energy Harvester

    PubMed Central

    Lueke, Jonathan; Badr, Ahmed; Lou, Edmond; Moussa, Walied A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the methodology and challenges experienced in the microfabrication, packaging, and integration of a fixed-fixed folded spring piezoelectric energy harvester. A variety of challenges were overcome in the fabrication of the energy harvesters, such as the diagnosis and rectification of sol-gel PZT film quality and adhesion issues. A packaging and integration methodology was developed to allow for the characterizing the harvesters under a base vibration. The conditioning circuitry developed allowed for a complete energy harvesting system, consisting a harvester, a voltage doubler, a voltage regulator and a NiMH battery. A feasibility study was undertaken with the designed conditioning circuitry to determine the effect of the input parameters on the overall performance of the circuit. It was found that the maximum efficiency does not correlate to the maximum charging current supplied to the battery. The efficiency and charging current must be balanced to achieve a high output and a reasonable output current. The development of the complete energy harvesting system allows for the direct integration of the energy harvesting technology into existing power management schemes for wireless sensing. PMID:26016911

  9. Exploiting the Oxygen Inhibitory Effect on UV Curing in Microfabrication: A Modified Lithography Technique

    PubMed Central

    Alvankarian, Jafar; Majlis, Burhanuddin Yeop

    2015-01-01

    Rapid prototyping (RP) of microfluidic channels in liquid photopolymers using standard lithography (SL) involves multiple deposition steps and curing by ultraviolet (UV) light for the construction of a microstructure layer. In this work, the conflicting effect of oxygen diffusion and UV curing of liquid polyurethane methacrylate (PUMA) is investigated in microfabrication and utilized to reduce the deposition steps and to obtain a monolithic product. The conventional fabrication process is altered to control for the best use of the oxygen presence in polymerization. A novel and modified lithography technique is introduced in which a single step of PUMA coating and two steps of UV exposure are used to create a microchannel. The first exposure is maskless and incorporates oxygen diffusion into PUMA for inhibition of the polymerization of a thin layer from the top surface while the UV rays penetrate the photopolymer. The second exposure is for transferring the patterns of the microfluidic channels from the contact photomask onto the uncured material. The UV curing of PUMA as the main substrate in the presence of oxygen is characterized analytically and experimentally. A few typical elastomeric microstructures are manufactured. It is demonstrated that the obtained heights of the fabricated structures in PUMA are associated with the oxygen concentration and the UV dose. The proposed technique is promising for the RP of molds and microfluidic channels in terms of shorter processing time, fewer fabrication steps and creation of microstructure layers with higher integrity. PMID:25747514

  10. Heat transfer simulation and thermal measurements of microfabricated x-ray transparent heater stages

    SciTech Connect

    Baldasseroni, C.; Queen, D. R.; Cooke, David W.; Hellman, F.; Maize, K.; Shakouri, A.

    2011-09-15

    A microfabricated amorphous silicon nitride membrane-based nanocalorimeter is proposed to be suitable for an x-ray transparent sample platform with low power heating and built-in temperature sensing. In this work, thermal characterization in both air and vacuum are analyzed experimentally and via simulation. Infrared microscopy and thermoreflectance microscopy are used for thermal imaging of the sample area in air. While a reasonably large isothermal area is found on the sample area, the temperature homogeneity of the entire sample area is low, limiting use of the device as a heater stage in air or other gases. A simulation model that includes conduction, as well as radiation and convection heat loss, is presented with radiation and convection parameters determined experimentally. Simulated temperature distributions show that the homogeneity can be improved by using a thicker thermal conduction layer or reducing the pressure of the gas in the environment but neither are good solutions for the proposed use. A new simple design that has improved temperature homogeneity and a larger isothermal area while maintaining a thin thermal conduction layer is proposed and fabricated. This new design enables applications in transmission x-ray microscopes and spectroscopy setups at atmospheric pressure.

  11. Microfabrication of complex porous tissue engineering scaffolds using 3D projection stereolithography

    PubMed Central

    Gauvin, Robert; Chen, Ying-Chieh; Lee, Jin Woo; Soman, Pranav; Zorlutuna, Pinar; Nichol, Jason W.; Bae, Hojae; Chen, Shaochen; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    The success of tissue engineering will rely on the ability to generate complex, cell seeded three-dimensional (3D) structures. Therefore, methods that can be used to precisely engineer the architecture and topography of scaffolding materials will represent a critical aspect of functional tissue engineering. Previous approaches for 3D scaffold fabrication based on top-down and process driven methods are often not adequate to produce complex structures due to the lack of control on scaffold architecture, porosity, and cellular interactions. The proposed projection stereolithography (PSL) platform can be used to design intricate 3D tissue scaffolds that can be engineered to mimic the microarchitecture of tissues, based on computer aided design (CAD). The PSL system was developed, programmed and optimized to fabricate 3D scaffolds using gelatin methacrylate (GelMA). Variation of the structure and prepolymer concentration enabled tailoring the mechanical properties of the scaffolds. A dynamic cell seeding method was utilized to improve the coverage of the scaffold throughout its thickness. The results demonstrated that the interconnectivity of pores allowed for uniform human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) distribution and proliferation in the scaffolds, leading to high cell density and confluency at the end of the culture period. Moreover, immunohistochemistry results showed that cells seeded on the scaffold maintained their endothelial phenotype, demonstrating the biological functionality of the microfabricated GelMA scaffolds. PMID:22365811

  12. Scalable Microfabrication Procedures for Adhesive-Integrated Flexible and Stretchable Electronic Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Dae Y.; Kim, Yun-Soung; Ornelas, Gladys; Sinha, Mridu; Naidu, Keerthiga; Coleman, Todd P.

    2015-01-01

    New classes of ultrathin flexible and stretchable devices have changed the way modern electronics are designed to interact with their target systems. Though more and more novel technologies surface and steer the way we think about future electronics, there exists an unmet need in regards to optimizing the fabrication procedures for these devices so that large-scale industrial translation is realistic. This article presents an unconventional approach for facile microfabrication and processing of adhesive-peeled (AP) flexible sensors. By assembling AP sensors on a weakly-adhering substrate in an inverted fashion, we demonstrate a procedure with 50% reduced end-to-end processing time that achieves greater levels of fabrication yield. The methodology is used to demonstrate the fabrication of electrical and mechanical flexible and stretchable AP sensors that are peeled-off their carrier substrates by consumer adhesives. In using this approach, we outline the manner by which adhesion is maintained and buckling is reduced for gold film processing on polydimethylsiloxane substrates. In addition, we demonstrate the compatibility of our methodology with large-scale post-processing using a roll-to-roll approach. PMID:26389915

  13. Chiral analysis of neurotransmitters using cyclodextrin-modified capillary electrophoresis equipped with microfabricated interdigitated electrodes.

    PubMed

    Male, Keith B; Luong, John H T

    2003-06-27

    We present cyclodextrin-modified capillary electrophoresis equipped with a microfabricated chip consisting of an array of eight interdigitated microband platinum electrodes (IDs) for simultaneous analysis of three chiral models: epinephrine, norepinephrine and isoproterenol. The IDE chip, positioned very close to the capillary outlet, served as an amplification/detection system. Emerging neurotransmitters at the IDE surface were oxidized at +1.1 V by seven electrodes of the array and then detected by the remaining electrode, poised at +0.0 V. There was an amplification effect on the detecting electrode owing to the recycle between the reduced and oxidized forms of the optical isomers at the electrode surface. The detecting "amplification" current response was governed by the applied potential, the detecting electrode position, the number of adjacent electrodes used for recycling and the distance between the oxidative and reductive electrodes. The six chiral forms of the three neurotransmitters were resolved using 25 mM heptakis(2,6,di-o-methyl)-beta-cyclodextrin with a detection limit of approximately 5 microM. The scheme detected a reduced compound at a reducing potential instead of conventional oxidation detection to alleviate electrode fouling and electroactive interferences. The concurrent oxidation/reduction detection of compounds also facilitated and ascertained peak identification as interfering compounds were unlikely to have the same oxidative/reductive characteristics and mobilities as the analytes of interrogation.

  14. New Deep Reactive Ion Etching Process Developed for the Microfabrication of Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Laura J.; Beheim, Glenn M.

    2005-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is a promising material for harsh environment sensors and electronics because it can enable such devices to withstand high temperatures and corrosive environments. Microfabrication techniques have been studied extensively in an effort to obtain the same flexibility of machining SiC that is possible for the fabrication of silicon devices. Bulk micromachining using deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) is attractive because it allows the fabrication of microstructures with high aspect ratios (etch depth divided by lateral feature size) in single-crystal or polycrystalline wafers. Previously, the Sensors and Electronics Branch of the NASA Glenn Research Center developed a DRIE process for SiC using the etchant gases sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and argon (Ar). This process provides an adequate etch rate of 0.2 m/min and yields a smooth surface at the etch bottom. However, the etch sidewalls are rougher than desired, as shown in the preceding photomicrograph. Furthermore, the resulting structures have sides that slope inwards, rather than being precisely vertical. A new DRIE process for SiC was developed at Glenn that produces smooth, vertical sidewalls, while maintaining an adequately high etch rate.

  15. Micro-differential thermal analysis detection of adsorbed explosive molecules using microfabricated bridges.

    PubMed

    Senesac, Larry R; Yi, Dechang; Greve, Anders; Hales, Jan H; Davis, Zachary J; Nicholson, Don M; Boisen, Anja; Thundat, Thomas

    2009-03-01

    Although micromechanical sensors enable chemical vapor sensing with unprecedented sensitivity using variations in mass and stress, obtaining chemical selectivity using the micromechanical response still remains as a crucial challenge. Chemoselectivity in vapor detection using immobilized selective layers that rely on weak chemical interactions provides only partial selectivity. Here we show that the very low thermal mass of micromechanical sensors can be used to produce unique responses that can be used for achieving chemical selectivity without losing sensitivity or reversibility. We demonstrate that this method is capable of differentiating explosive vapors from nonexplosives and is additionally capable of differentiating individual explosive vapors such as trinitrotoluene, pentaerythritol tetranitrate, and cyclotrimethylenetrinitromine. This method, based on a microfabricated bridge with a programmable heating rate, produces unique and reproducible thermal response patterns within 50 ms that are characteristic to classes of adsorbed explosive molecules. We demonstrate that this micro-differential thermal analysis technique can selectively detect explosives, providing a method for fast direct detection with a limit of detection of 600x10(-12) g.

  16. Micro differential thermal analysis detection of adsorbed explosive molecules using microfabricated bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Senesac, Larry R; Yi, Dechang; Greve, Anders; Hales, Jan; Davis, Zachary; Nicholson, Don M; Boisen, Anja; Thundat, Thomas George

    2009-01-01

    Although micromechanical sensors enable chemical vapor sensing with unprecedented sensitivity using variations in mass and stress, obtaining chemical selectivity using the micromechanical response still remains as a crucial challenge. Chemoselectivity in vapor detection using immobilized selective layers that rely on weak chemical interactions provides only partial selectivity. Here we show that the very low thermal mass of micromechanical sensors can be used to produce unique responses that can be used for achieving chemical selectivity without losing sensitivity or reversibility. We demonstrate that this method is capable of differentiating explosive vapors from nonexplosives and is additionally capable of differentiating individual explosive vapors such as trinitrotoluene, pentaerythritol tetranitrate, and cyclotrimethylenetrinitromine. This method, based on a microfabricated bridge with a programmable heating rate, produces unique and reproducible thermal response patterns within 50 ms that are characteristic to classes of adsorbed explosive molecules. We demonstrate that this micro-differential thermal analysis technique can selectively detect explosives, providing a method for fast direct detection with a limit of detection of 600 x 10{sup -12} g.

  17. Probing the invasiveness of prostate cancer cells in a 3D microfabricated landscape

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liyu; Sun, Bo; Pedersen, Jonas N.; Aw Yong, Koh-Meng; Getzenberg, Robert H.; Stone, Howard A.; Austin, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    The metastatic invasion of cancer cells from primary tumors to distant ecological niches, rather than the primary tumors, is the cause of much cancer mortality [Zhang QB, et al. (2010) Int J Cancer 126:2534–2541; Chambers AF, Goss PE (2008) Breast Cancer Res 10:114]. Metastasis is a three-dimensional invasion process where cells spread from their site of origin and colonize distant microenvironmental niches. It is critical to be able to assess quantitatively the metastatic potential of cancer cells [Harma V, et al. (2010) PLoS ONE 5:e10431]. We have constructed a microfabricated chip with a three-dimensional topology consisting of lowlands and isolated square highlands (Tepuis), which stand hundreds of microns above the lowlands, in order to assess cancer cell metastatic potential as they invade the highlands. As a test case, the invasive ascents of the Tepui by highly metastatic PC-3 and noninvasive LNCaP prostate cancer cells were used. The vertical ascent by prostate cancer cells from the lowlands to the tops of the Tepui was imaged using confocal microscopy and used as a measure of the relative invasiveness. The less-metastatic cells (LNCaP) never populated all available tops, leaving about 15% of them unoccupied, whereas the more metastatic PC-3 cells occupied all available Tepuis. We argue that this distinct difference in invasiveness is due to contact inhibition. PMID:21474778

  18. Aging studies on micro-fabricated alkali buffer-gas cells for miniature atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, S.; Affolderbach, C.; Gruet, F.; Mileti, G.

    2015-04-01

    We report an aging study on micro-fabricated alkali vapor cells using neon as a buffer gas. An experimental atomic clock setup is used to measure the cell's intrinsic frequency, by recording the clock frequency shift at different light intensities and extrapolating to zero intensity. We find a drift of the cell's intrinsic frequency of (-5.2 ± 0.6) × 10-11/day and quantify deterministic variations in sources of clock frequency shifts due to the major physical effects to identify the most probable cause of the drift. The measured drift is one order of magnitude stronger than the total frequency variations expected from clock parameter variations and corresponds to a slow reduction of buffer gas pressure inside the cell, which is compatible with the hypothesis of loss of Ne gas from the cell due to its permeation through the cell windows. A negative drift on the intrinsic cell frequency is reproducible for another cell of the same type. Based on the Ne permeation model and the measured cell frequency drift, we determine the permeation constant of Ne through borosilicate glass as (5.7 ± 0.7) × 10-22 m2 s-1 Pa-1 at 81 °C. We propose this method based on frequency metrology in an alkali vapor cell atomic clock setup based on coherent population trapping for measuring permeation constants of inert gases.

  19. Photolithography-Based Substrate Microfabrication for Patterning Semaphorin 3A to Study Neuronal Development

    PubMed Central

    Shelly, Maya; Lee, Seong-Il; Suarato, Giulia; Meng, Yizhi; Pautot, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Summary Protein micropatterning techniques, including microfluidic devices and protein micro-contact printing, enable the generation of highly controllable substrates for spatial manipulation of intracellular and extracellular signaling determinants to examine the development of cultured dissociated neurons in vitro. In particular, culture substrates coated with proteins of interest in defined stripes, including cell adhesion molecules and secreted proteins, have been successfully used to study neuronal polarization, a process in which the neuron establishes axon and dendrite identities, a critical architecture for the input/output functions of the neuron. We have recently used this methodology to pattern the extracellular protein Semaphorin 3A (Sema3A), a secreted factor known to control neuronal development in the mammalian embryonic cortex. We showed that stripe patterned Sema3A regulates axon and dendrite formation during the early phase of neuronal polarization in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Here, we describe microfabrication and substrate stripe micropatterning of Sema3A. We note that same methodologies can be applied to pattern other extracellular proteins that regulate neuronal development in the embryonic brain, as Nerve growth factor (NGF), Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and Netrin-1. We describe modifications of these methodologies for stripe micropatterning of membrane-permeable analogs of the second messengers cyclic AMP (cAMP) and cyclic GMP (cGMP), intracellular regulators of neuronal polarization that might act downstream of Sema3A. PMID:27787862

  20. Multiplexed protein detection using antibody-conjugated microbead arrays in a microfabricated electrophoretic device

    PubMed Central

    Barbee, Kristopher D.; Hsiao, Alexander P.; Roller, Eric E.; Huang, Xiaohua

    2011-01-01

    We report the development of a microfabricated electrophoretic device for assembling high-density arrays of antibody-conjugated microbeads for chip-based protein detection. The device consists of a flow cell formed between a gold-coated silicon chip with an array of microwells etched in a silicon dioxide film and a glass coverslip with a series of thin gold counter electrode lines. We have demonstrated that 0.4 and 1 μm beads conjugated with antibodies can be rapidly assembled into the microwells by applying a pulsed electric field across the chamber. By assembling step-wise a mixture of fluorescently labeled antibody-conjugated microbeads, we incorporated both spatial and fluorescence encoding strategies to demonstrate significant multiplexing capabilities. We have shown that these antibody-conjugated microbead arrays can be used to perform on-chip sandwich immunoassays to detect test antigens at concentrations as low as 40 pM (6 ng/mL). A finite element model was also developed to examine the electric field distribution within the device for different counter electrode configurations over a range of line pitches and chamber heights. This device will be useful for assembling high-density, encoded antibody arrays for multiplexed detection of proteins and other types of protein-conjugated microbeads for applications such as the analysis of protein-protein interactions. PMID:20820631

  1. Microfabrication Technology for Large Lekid Arrays: From Nika2 to Future Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goupy, J.; Adane, A.; Benoit, A.; Bourrion, O.; Calvo, M.; Catalano, A.; Coiffard, G.; Hoarau, C.; Leclercq, S.; Le Sueur, H.; Macias-Perez, J.; Monfardini, A.; Peck, I.; Schuster, K.

    2016-08-01

    The lumped element kinetic inductance detectors (LEKID) demonstrated full maturity in the New IRAM KID Arrays (NIKA) instrument. These results allow directly comparing LEKID performance with other competing technologies (TES, doped silicon) in the mm and sub-mm range. A continuing effort is ongoing to improve the microfabrication technologies and concepts in order to satisfy the requirements of new instruments. More precisely, future satellites dedicated to cosmic microwave background (CMB) studies will require the same focal plane technology to cover, at least, the frequency range of 60-600 GHz. Aluminium LEKID developed for NIKA have so far demonstrated, under real telescope conditions, a performance approaching photon noise limitation in the band 120-300 GHz. By implementing superconducting bi-layers, we recently demonstrated LEKID arrays working in the range 80-120 GHz and with sensitivities approaching the goals for CMB missions. NIKA itself (350 pixels) is followed by a more ambitious project requiring several thousand (3000-5000) pixels. NIKA2 has been installed in October 2015 at the IRAM 30-m telescope. We will describe in detail the technological improvements that allowed a relatively harmless tenfold up-scaling in pixels count without degrading the initial sensitivity. In particular, we will briefly describe a solution to simplify the difficult fabrication step linked to the slot-line propagation mode in coplanar waveguide.

  2. A Microfabricated 96-Well 3D Assay Enabling High-Throughput Quantification of Cellular Invasion Capabilities

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Rui; Wei, Yuanchen; Li, Chaobo; Chen, Feng; Chen, Deyong; Zhao, Xiaoting; Luan, Shaoliang; Fan, Beiyuan; Guo, Wei; Wang, Junbo; Chen, Jian

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a 96-well microfabricated assay to study three-dimensional (3D) invasion of tumor cells. A 3D cluster of tumor cells was first generated within each well by seeding cells onto a micro-patterned surface consisting of a central fibronectin-coated area that promotes cellular attachment, surrounded by a poly ethylene glycol (PEG) coated area that is resistant to cellular attachment. Following the formation of the 3D cell clusters, a 3D collagen extracellular matrix was formed in each well by thermal-triggered gelation. Invasion of the tumor cells into the extracellular matrix was subsequently initiated and monitored. Two modes of cellular infiltration were observed: A549 cells invaded into the extracellular matrix following the surfaces previously coated with PEG molecules in a pseudo-2D manner, while H1299 cells invaded into the extracellular matrix in a truly 3D manner including multiple directions. Based on the processing of 2D microscopic images, a key parameter, namely, equivalent invasion distance (the area of invaded cells divided by the circumference of the initial cell cluster) was obtained to quantify migration capabilities of these two cell types. These results validate the feasibility of the proposed platform, which may function as a high-throughput 3D cellular invasion assay. PMID:28240272

  3. Scalable Microfabrication Procedures for Adhesive-Integrated Flexible and Stretchable Electronic Sensors.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dae Y; Kim, Yun-Soung; Ornelas, Gladys; Sinha, Mridu; Naidu, Keerthiga; Coleman, Todd P

    2015-09-16

    New classes of ultrathin flexible and stretchable devices have changed the way modern electronics are designed to interact with their target systems. Though more and more novel technologies surface and steer the way we think about future electronics, there exists an unmet need in regards to optimizing the fabrication procedures for these devices so that large-scale industrial translation is realistic. This article presents an unconventional approach for facile microfabrication and processing of adhesive-peeled (AP) flexible sensors. By assembling AP sensors on a weakly-adhering substrate in an inverted fashion, we demonstrate a procedure with 50% reduced end-to-end processing time that achieves greater levels of fabrication yield. The methodology is used to demonstrate the fabrication of electrical and mechanical flexible and stretchable AP sensors that are peeled-off their carrier substrates by consumer adhesives. In using this approach, we outline the manner by which adhesion is maintained and buckling is reduced for gold film processing on polydimethylsiloxane substrates. In addition, we demonstrate the compatibility of our methodology with large-scale post-processing using a roll-to-roll approach.

  4. Entrapment of bed bugs by leaf trichomes inspires microfabrication of biomimetic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Szyndler, Megan W; Haynes, Kenneth F; Potter, Michael F; Corn, Robert M; Loudon, Catherine

    2013-06-06

    Resurgence in bed bug infestations and widespread pesticide resistance have greatly renewed interest in the development of more sustainable, environmentally friendly methods to manage bed bugs. Historically, in Eastern Europe, bed bugs were entrapped by leaves from bean plants, which were then destroyed; this purely physical entrapment was related to microscopic hooked hairs (trichomes) on the leaf surfaces. Using scanning electron microscopy and videography, we documented the capture mechanism: the physical impaling of bed bug feet (tarsi) by these trichomes. This is distinct from a Velcro-like mechanism of non-piercing entanglement, which only momentarily holds the bug without sustained capture. Struggling, trapped bed bugs are impaled by trichomes on several legs and are unable to free themselves. Only specific, mechanically vulnerable locations on the bug tarsi are pierced by the trichomes, which are located at effective heights and orientations for bed bug entrapment despite a lack of any evolutionary association. Using bean leaves as templates, we microfabricated surfaces indistinguishable in geometry from the real leaves, including the trichomes, using polymers with material properties similar to plant cell walls. These synthetic surfaces snag the bed bugs temporarily but do not hinder their locomotion as effectively as real leaves.

  5. Zinc Detection in Serum by Anodic Stripping Voltammetry on Microfabricated Bismuth Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Jothimuthu, Preetha; Wilson, Robert A; Herren, Josi; Pei, Xing; Kang, Wenjing; Daniels, Rodney; Wong, Hector; Beyette, Fred; Heineman, William R; Papautsky, Ian

    2013-02-01

    Zinc (Zn) homeostasis is required for a functional immune system. Critically ill patients often exhibit decreased Zn serum concentrations and could potentially benefit from Zn supplementation as a therapeutic strategy. However, the conventional approaches to monitoring Zn are time consuming and costly. This work reports on detection of Zn by anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) on bismuth electrodes in a microfabricated electrochemical cell. The working potential window of the electrodeposited bismuth film electrode was investigated by cyclic voltammetry, while square wave ASV was used for measuring Zn in acetate buffer and blood serum. Conditions critical to sensing, such as preconcentration potential, preconcentration time, and buffer pH, were optimized for Zn detection. The sensor was successfully calibrated with pH 6 acetate buffer in the physiologically-relevant range of 5 μM to 50μM Zn and exhibited well-defined and highly repeatable peaks. The sensor was used to demonstrate measurement of Zn in blood serum digested in HCl. The results of this work show that Zn detection in serum is possible with smaller sample volumes (μL vs. μL) and faster turnaround time (hours vs. days) as compared with the conventional spectroscopic methods.

  6. Hybrid microfabrication of nanofiber-based sheets and rods for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Park, Suk-Hee; Kim, Min Sung; Lee, Dasom; Choi, Yong Whan; Kim, Deok-Ho; Suh, Kahp-Yang

    2013-12-01

    Electrospun nanofibers have been developed into a variety of forms for tissue engineering scaffolds to regulate the cellular functions guided by nanotopographical cues. Here, we have successfully fabricated nanofiber-based scaffold complexes of rod and sheet type by combining the three microfabrication techniques of electrospinning, spin coating, and polymer melt deposition. It was demonstrated that this hybrid fabrication could produce uniaxially aligned nanofiber scaffolds supported by a thin film, allowing for a mechanically enforced substrate for cell culture as well as facile scaffold manipulation. The results of cell analysis indicated that nanofibers on spin-coated films could provide contact guidance effects on cells and retain them even after manipulation. As an application of the cell-laden nanofiber film, we built a rod-type structure by rolling up the film around a mechanically supporting core microfiber, which was incorporated by polymer melt deposition. A biocompatible and biodegradable polymer, polycaprolactone, was used throughout the processes and thus could be used as a directly implantable substitute in tissue regeneration.

  7. Polyhalite microfabrics in an Alpine evaporite mélange: Hallstatt, Eastern Alps.

    PubMed

    Schorn, Anja; Neubauer, Franz; Bernroider, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    In the Hallstatt salt mine (Austria), polyhalite rocks occur in 0.5-1 m thick and several metre long tectonic lenses within the protocataclasite to protomylonite matrix of the Alpine Haselgebirge Fm.. Thin section analysis of Hallstatt polyhalites reveals various fabric types similar to metamorphic rocks of crust-forming minerals, e.g. quartz and feldspar. Polyhalite microfabrics from Hallstatt include: (1) polyhalite mylonites, (2) metamorphic reaction fabrics, (3) vein-filling, fibrous polyhalite and (4) cavity-filling polyhalite. The polyhalite mylonites contain a wide range of shear fabrics commonly known in mylonitic quartzo-feldspathic shear zones within the ductile crust and developed from a more coarse-grained precursor rock. The mylonites are partly overprinted by recrystallised, statically grown polyhalite grains. Metamorphic reaction fabrics of polyhalite fibres between blödite (or astrakhanite) [Na2Mg(SO4)2.4H2O] and anhydrite have also been found. According to previous reports, blödite may occur primarily as nodules or intergrown with löweite. Reaction fabrics may have formed by exsolution, (re-)crystallisation, parallel growth or replacement. This fabric type was only found in one sample in relation with the decomposition of blödite at ca. 61 °C in the presence of halite or slightly above, testifying, therefore, a late stage prograde fabric significantly younger than the main polyhalite formation.

  8. Microfabricated devices for cell biology: all for one and one for all.

    PubMed

    Lautenschläger, Franziska; Piel, Matthieu

    2013-02-01

    Individual cells in their native physiological states face a dynamic multi-factorial environment. This is true of both single-celled and multi-cellular organisms. A key challenge in cell biology is the design of experimental methods and specific assays to disentangle the contribution of each of the parameters governing cell behavior. After decades of studying cells cultured in Petri dishes or on glass coverslips, researchers can now benefit from a range of recent technological developments that allow them to study cells in a variety of contexts, with different levels of complexity and control over a range of environmental parameters. These technologies include new types of microscopy for detailed imaging of large cell aggregates or even whole tissues, and the development of cell culture substrates, such as 3D matrices. Here we will review the contribution of a third type of tool, collectively known as microfabricated tools. Derived from techniques originally developed for microelectronics, these tools range in size from hundreds of microns to hundreds of nanometers.

  9. A Microfabricated 96-Well 3D Assay Enabling High-Throughput Quantification of Cellular Invasion Capabilities.

    PubMed

    Hao, Rui; Wei, Yuanchen; Li, Chaobo; Chen, Feng; Chen, Deyong; Zhao, Xiaoting; Luan, Shaoliang; Fan, Beiyuan; Guo, Wei; Wang, Junbo; Chen, Jian

    2017-02-27

    This paper presents a 96-well microfabricated assay to study three-dimensional (3D) invasion of tumor cells. A 3D cluster of tumor cells was first generated within each well by seeding cells onto a micro-patterned surface consisting of a central fibronectin-coated area that promotes cellular attachment, surrounded by a poly ethylene glycol (PEG) coated area that is resistant to cellular attachment. Following the formation of the 3D cell clusters, a 3D collagen extracellular matrix was formed in each well by thermal-triggered gelation. Invasion of the tumor cells into the extracellular matrix was subsequently initiated and monitored. Two modes of cellular infiltration were observed: A549 cells invaded into the extracellular matrix following the surfaces previously coated with PEG molecules in a pseudo-2D manner, while H1299 cells invaded into the extracellular matrix in a truly 3D manner including multiple directions. Based on the processing of 2D microscopic images, a key parameter, namely, equivalent invasion distance (the area of invaded cells divided by the circumference of the initial cell cluster) was obtained to quantify migration capabilities of these two cell types. These results validate the feasibility of the proposed platform, which may function as a high-throughput 3D cellular invasion assay.

  10. Cell Sheet-Based Tissue Engineering for Organizing Anisotropic Tissue Constructs Produced Using Microfabricated Thermoresponsive Substrates.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hironobu; Okano, Teruo

    2015-11-18

    In some native tissues, appropriate microstructures, including orientation of the cell/extracellular matrix, provide specific mechanical and biological functions. For example, skeletal muscle is made of oriented myofibers that is responsible for the mechanical function. Native artery and myocardial tissues are organized three-dimensionally by stacking sheet-like tissues of aligned cells. Therefore, to construct any kind of complex tissue, the microstructures of cells such as myotubes, smooth muscle cells, and cardiomyocytes also need to be organized three-dimensionally just as in the native tissues of the body. Cell sheet-based tissue engineering allows the production of scaffold-free engineered tissues through a layer-by-layer construction technique. Recently, using microfabricated thermoresponsive substrates, aligned cells are being harvested as single continuous cell sheets. The cell sheets act as anisotropic tissue units to build three-dimensional tissue constructs with the appropriate anisotropy. This cell sheet-based technology is straightforward and has the potential to engineer a wide variety of complex tissues. In addition, due to the scaffold-free cell-dense environment, the physical and biological cell-cell interactions of these cell sheet constructs exhibit unique cell behaviors. These advantages will provide important clues to enable the production of well-organized tissues that closely mimic the structure and function of native tissues, required for the future of tissue engineering.

  11. Technology for On-Chip Qubit Control with Microfabricated Surface Ion Traps

    SciTech Connect

    Highstrete, Clark; Scott, Sean Michael; Maunz, Peter Lukas Wilhelm; Tigges, Christopher P.; Blain, Matthew Glenn; Heller, Edwin J.; Stevens, James E.

    2013-11-01

    Trapped atomic ions are a leading physical system for quantum information processing. However, scalability and operational fidelity remain limiting technical issues often associated with optical qubit control. One promising approach is to develop on-chip microwave electronic control of ion qubits based on the atomic hyperfine interaction. This project developed expertise and capabilities at Sandia toward on-chip electronic qubit control in a scalable architecture. The project developed a foundation of laboratory capabilities, including trapping the 171Yb+ hyperfine ion qubit and developing an experimental microwave coherent control capability. Additionally, the project investigated the integration of microwave device elements with surface ion traps utilizing Sandia’s state-of-the-art MEMS microfabrication processing. This effort culminated in a device design for a multi-purpose ion trap experimental platform for investigating on-chip microwave qubit control, laying the groundwork for further funded R&D to develop on-chip microwave qubit control in an architecture that is suitable to engineering development.

  12. A microfabricated fixed path length silicon sample holder improves background subtraction for cryoSAXS

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, Jesse B.; Katz, Andrea M.; Meisburger, Steve P.; Warkentin, Matthew A.; Thorne, Robert E.; Pollack, Lois

    2015-01-01

    The application of small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) for high-throughput characterization of biological macromolecules in solution is limited by radiation damage. By cryocooling samples, radiation damage and required sample volumes can be reduced by orders of magnitude. However, the challenges of reproducibly creating the identically sized vitrified samples necessary for conventional background subtraction limit the widespread adoption of this method. Fixed path length silicon sample holders for cryoSAXS have been microfabricated to address these challenges. They have low background scattering and X-ray absorption, require only 640 nl of sample, and allow reproducible sample cooling. Data collected in the sample holders from a nominal illuminated sample volume of 2.5 nl are reproducible down to q ≃ 0.02 Å−1, agree with previous cryoSAXS work and are of sufficient quality for reconstructions that match measured crystal structures. These sample holders thus allow faster, more routine cryoSAXS data collection. Additional development is required to reduce sample fracturing and improve data quality at low q. PMID:26089749

  13. A Microfabricated 8-40 GHz Dual-Polarized Reflector Feed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanhille, Kenneth; Durham, Tim; Stacy, William; Karasiewicz, David; Caba, Aaron; Trent, Christopher; Lambert, Kevin; Miranda, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Planar antennas based on tightly coupled dipole arrays (also known as a current sheet antenna or CSA) are amenable for use as electronically scanned phased arrays. They are capable of performance nearing a decade of bandwidth. These antennas have been demonstrated in many implementations at frequencies below 18 GHz. This paper describes the implementation using a relatively new multi-layer microfabrication process resulting in a small, 6x6 element, dual-linear polarized array with beamformer that operates from 8 to 40 GHz. The beamformer includes baluns that feed the dual-polarized differential antenna elements and reactive splitter networks that also cover the full frequency range of operation. This antenna array serves as a reflector feed for a multi-band instrument designed to measure snow water equivalent (SWE) from airborne platforms. The instrument has both radar and radiome try capability at multiple frequencies. Scattering-parameter and time-domain measurements have been used to characterize the array feed. Radiation patterns of the antenna have been measured and are compared to simulation. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this work represents the most integrated multi-octave millimeter-wave antenna feed fabricated to date.

  14. ELECTRICALLY ACTUATED, PRESSURE-DRIVEN LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY SEPARATIONS IN MICROFABRICATED DEVICES

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Hernan V.; Woolley, Adam T.

    2012-01-01

    Electrolysis-based micropumps integrated with microfluidic channels in micromachined glass substrates are presented. Photolithography combined with wet chemical etching and thermal bonding enabled the fabrication of multi-layer devices containing electrically actuated micropumps interfaced with sample and mobile phase reservoirs. A stationary phase was deposited on the microchannel walls by coating with 10% (w/w) chlorodimethyloctadecylsilane in toluene. Pressure-balanced injection was implemented by controlling the electrolysis time and voltage applied in the two independent micropumps. Current fluctuations in the micropumps due to the stochastic formation of bubbles on the electrode surfaces were determined to be the main cause of variation between separations. On-chip electrochemical pumping enabled the loading of pL samples with no dead volume between injection and separation. A mobile phase composed of 70% acetonitrile and 30% 50 mM acetate buffer (pH 5.45) was used for the chromatographic separation of three fluorescently labeled amino acids in <40 s with an efficiency of >3000 theoretical plates in a 2.5-cm-long channel. Our results demonstrate the potential of electrochemical micropumps integrated with microchannels to perform rapid chromatographic separations in a microfabricated platform. Importantly, these devices represent a significant step toward the development of miniaturized and fully integrated liquid chromatography systems. PMID:17960281

  15. Combined experimental and mathematical approach for development of microfabrication-based cancer migration assay.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Saheli; Bustard, Bethany L; Welter, Jean F; Baskaran, Harihara

    2011-09-01

    Migration of cancer cells is a key determinant of metastasis, which is correlated with poor prognosis in patients. Evidence shows that cancer cell motility is regulated by stromal cell interactions. To quantify the role of homotypic and heterotypic cell-cell interaction in migration, a two-dimensional migration assay has been developed by microfabrication techniques. Two breast cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-453, were used to develop micropatterns of cancer cells (cell islands) that revealed distinct migration profiles in this assay. Although the individual migration rates of these cells showed only a sevenfold difference, MDA-MB-453 islands migrated significantly lower than MDA-MB-231 islands, indicating differential regulation of migration in isolated cells vs. islands. Island size had the greatest impact on migration, primarily for MDA-MB-231 cells. Migration of MDA-MB-231 islands was decreased by interaction with homotypic cells, and significantly more by heterotypic non-cancer-associated fibroblasts. In addition, a mathematical model of island migration in multi-cellular population has been developed using Stefan-Maxwell's equation. The model showed qualitative agreement with experimental results and predicted a biphasic relation between cell densities and island sizes. The combined experimental and mathematical model can be used to quantitatively study the impact of cell-cell interactions on migration.

  16. Concurrent recordings of bladder afferents from multiple nerves using a microfabricated PDMS microchannel electrode array.

    PubMed

    Delivopoulos, Evangelos; Chew, Daniel J; Minev, Ivan R; Fawcett, James W; Lacour, Stéphanie P

    2012-07-21

    In this paper we present a compliant neural interface designed to record bladder afferent activity. We developed the implant's microfabrication process using multiple layers of silicone rubber and thin metal so that a gold microelectrode array is embedded within four parallel polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannels (5 mm long, 100 μm wide, 100 μm deep). Electrode impedance at 1 kHz was optimized using a reactive ion etching (RIE) step, which increased the porosity of the electrode surface. The electrodes did not deteriorate after a 3 month immersion in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) at 37 °C. Due to the unique microscopic topography of the metal film on PDMS, the electrodes are extremely compliant and can withstand handling during implantation (twisting and bending) without electrical failure. The device was transplanted acutely to anaesthetized rats, and strands of the dorsal branch of roots L6 and S1 were surgically teased and inserted in three microchannels under saline immersion to allow for simultaneous in vivo recordings in an acute setting. We utilized a tripole electrode configuration to maintain background noise low and improve the signal to noise ratio. The device could distinguish two types of afferent nerve activity related to increasing bladder filling and contraction. To our knowledge, this is the first report of multichannel recordings of bladder afferent activity.

  17. Magnetic Tools for Lab-on-a-chip Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Pekas, Nikola Slobodan

    2006-01-01

    This study establishes a set of magnetics-based tools that have been integrated with microfluidic systems. The overall impact of the work begins to enable the rapid and efficient manipulation and detection of magnetic entities such as particles, picoliter-sized droplets, or bacterial cells. Details of design, fabrication, and theoretical and experimental assessments are presented. The manipulation strategy has been demonstrated in the format of a particle diverter, whereby micron-sized particles are actively directed into desired flow channels at a split-flow junction by means of integrated microelectromagnets. Magnetic detection has been realized by deploying Giant Magnetoresistance (GMR) sensors--microfabricated structures originally developed for use as readout elements in computer hard-drives. We successfully transferred the GMR technology to the lab-on-a-chip arena, and demonstrated the versatility of the concept in several important areas: real-time, integrated monitoring of the properties of multiphase droplet flows; rapid quantitative determination of the concentration of magnetic nanoparticles in droplets of ferrofluids; and high-speed detection of individual magnetic microparticles and magnetotactic bacteria. The study also includes novel schemes for hydrodynamic flow focusing that work in conjunction with GMR-based detection to ensure precise navigation of the sample stream through the GMR detection volume, therefore effectively establishing a novel concept of a microfabricated magnetic flow cytometer.

  18. Magnetic micromechanical structures based on CoNi electrodeposited alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cojocaru, P.; Magagnin, L.; Gomez, E.; Vallés, E.; Liu, F.; Carraro, C.; Maboudian, R.

    2010-12-01

    Electrodeposited CoNi magnetic microstructures compatible with silicon microfabrication technology have been developed using a sulfamate acidic bath, as an alternative to a less environmentally friendly chloride bath. The galvanostatic electrodeposition in the formulated electrolyte allows the deposition of cobalt-rich CoNi films and microstructures defined by photoresist at high deposition rates. Microstructures are adherent to the substrate, with a good lateral definition and resistance to the wet etching for the release of the sacrificial layer. The released structures respond to applied magnetic fields and no breakage occurred during large deformation.

  19. Aging studies on micro-fabricated alkali buffer-gas cells for miniature atomic clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullah, S.; Affolderbach, C.; Gruet, F.; Mileti, G.

    2015-04-20

    We report an aging study on micro-fabricated alkali vapor cells using neon as a buffer gas. An experimental atomic clock setup is used to measure the cell's intrinsic frequency, by recording the clock frequency shift at different light intensities and extrapolating to zero intensity. We find a drift of the cell's intrinsic frequency of (−5.2 ± 0.6) × 10{sup −11}/day and quantify deterministic variations in sources of clock frequency shifts due to the major physical effects to identify the most probable cause of the drift. The measured drift is one order of magnitude stronger than the total frequency variations expected from clock parameter variations and corresponds to a slow reduction of buffer gas pressure inside the cell, which is compatible with the hypothesis of loss of Ne gas from the cell due to its permeation through the cell windows. A negative drift on the intrinsic cell frequency is reproducible for another cell of the same type. Based on the Ne permeation model and the measured cell frequency drift, we determine the permeation constant of Ne through borosilicate glass as (5.7 ± 0.7) × 10{sup −22} m{sup 2} s{sup −1 }Pa{sup −1} at 81 °C. We propose this method based on frequency metrology in an alkali vapor cell atomic clock setup based on coherent population trapping for measuring permeation constants of inert gases.

  20. High-performance, static-coated silicon microfabricated columns for gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Reidy, Shaelah; Lambertus, Gordon; Reece, Jennifer; Sacks, Richard

    2006-04-15

    A procedure is described for the preparation of high-performance etched silicon columns for gas chromatography. Rectangular channels, 150 mum wide by 240 mum deep are fabricated in silicon substrates by gas-phase reactive ion etching. A 0.1-0.2-mum-thick film of dimethyl polysiloxane stationary phase is deposited on the channel walls by filling the channel with a dilute solution in 1:1 n-pentane and dichloromethane and pumping away the solvent. A thermally activated cross-linking agent is used for in situ cross-linking. A 3-m-long microfabricated column generated approximately 12 500 theoretical plates at optimal operating conditions using air as carrier gas. A kinetic model for the efficiency of rectangular cross-section columns is used to evaluate column performance. Results indicate an additional source of gas-phase dispersion beyond longitudinal diffusion and nonequilibrium effects, probably resulting from numerous turns in the gas flow path through the channel. The columns are thermally stable to at least 180 degrees C using air carrier gas. Temperature programming is demonstrated for the boiling point range from n-C5 to n-C12. A 3.0-m-long column heated at 10 degrees C/min obtains a peak capacity of over 100 peaks with a resolution of 1.18 and a separation time of approximately 500 s. With a 0.25-m-long column heated at 30 degrees C/min, a peak capacity of 28 peaks is obtained with a separation time of 150 s. Applications are shown for the analysis of air-phase petroleum hydrocarbons and the high-speed analysis of chemical warfare agent and explosive markers.

  1. Generation of static and dynamic patterned co-cultures using microfabricated parylene-C stencils.

    PubMed

    Wright, Dylan; Rajalingam, Bimalraj; Selvarasah, Selvapraba; Dokmeci, Mehmet R; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2007-10-01

    Many biological processes, such as stem cell differentiation, wound healing and development, involve dynamic interactions between cells and their microenvironment. The ability to control these dynamic processes in vitro would be potentially useful to fabricate tissue engineering constructs, study biological processes, and direct stem cell differentiation. In this paper, we used a parylene-C microstencil to develop two methods of creating patterned co-cultures using either static or dynamic conditions. In the static case, embryonic stem (ES) cells were co-cultured with fibroblasts or hepatocytes by using the reversible sealing of the stencil on the substrate. In the dynamic case, ES cells were co-cultured with NIH-3T3 fibroblasts and AML12 hepatocytes sequentially by engineering the surface properties of the stencil. In this approach, the top surface of the parylene-C stencil was initially treated with hyaluronic acid (HA) to reduce non-specific cell adhesion. The stencil was then sealed on a substrate and seeded with ES cells which adhered to the underlying substrate through the holes in the membrane. To switch the surface properties of the parylene-C stencils to cell adhesive, collagen was deposited on the parylene-C surfaces. Subsequently, a second cell type was seeded on the parylene-C stencils to form a patterned co-culture. This group of cells was removed by peeling off the parylene-C stencils, which enabled the patterning of a third cell type. Although the static patterned co-culture approach has been demonstrated previously with a variety of methods, layer-by-layer modification of microfabricated parylene-C stencils enables dynamic patterning of multiple cell types in sequence. Thus, this method is a promising approach to engineering the complexity of cell-cell interactions in tissue culture in a spatially and temporally regulated manner.

  2. Precise control over the oxygen conditions within the Boyden chamber using a microfabricated insert.

    PubMed

    Oppegard, Shawn C; Blake, Alexander J; Williams, Justin C; Eddington, David T

    2010-09-21

    Cell migration is a hallmark of cancer cell metastasis and is highly correlated with hypoxia in tumors. The Boyden chamber is a porous membrane-based migration platform that has seen a great deal of use for both in vitro migration and invasion assays due to its adaptability to common culture vessels and relative ease of use. The hypoxic chamber is a current tool that can be implemented to investigate the cellular response to oxygen paradigms. Unfortunately, this method lacks the spatial and temporal precision to accurately model a number of physiological phenomena. In this article, we present a newly developed microfabricated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) device that easily adapts to the Boyden chamber, and provides more control over the oxygenation conditions exposed to cells. The device equilibrates to 1% oxygen in about 20 min, thus demonstrating the capabilities of a system for researchers to establish both short-term continuous and intermittent hypoxia regimes. A Parylene-C thin-film coating was used to prevent ambient air penetration through the bulk PDMS and was found to yield improved equilibration times and end-point concentrations. MDA-MD-231 cells, an invasive breast cancer line, were used as a model cell type to demonstrate the effect of oxygen concentration on cell migration through the Boyden chamber porous membrane. Continuous hypoxia downregulated migration of cells relative to the normoxic control, as did an intermittent hypoxia regime (IH) cycling between 0% and 21% oxygen (0-21% IH). However, cells exposed to 5-21% IH exhibited increased migration compared to the other conditions, as well as relative to the normoxic control. The results presented here show the device can be utilized for experiments implementing the Boyden chamber for in vitro hypoxic studies, allowing experiments to be conducted faster and with more precision than currently possible.

  3. PUBLISHER'S NOTE: Microfabrication by localized electrochemical deposition: experimental investigation and theoretical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Said, R. A.

    2004-07-01

    During 2003, Dr R A Said published essentially duplicate versions of a paper in two archival journals: Nanotechnology and the Journal of The Electrochemical Society. The papers in question were: `Microfabrication by localized electrochemical deposition: experimental investigation and theoretical modelling' (2003 Nanotechnology 14 523) and `Shape formation of microstructures fabricated by localized electrochemical deposition' (2003 J. Electrochem. Soc. 150 C549). The two papers were submitted, revised, and published at essentially the same time. The papers used the same figures and neither paper referenced the other. Nanotechnology requires a signed copyright-transfer form assigning copyright in articles published to Institute of Physics Publishing, and the Journal of The Electrochemical Society requires the same for The Electrochemical Society. It is a tradition of long standing, stated in the information for contributors, that submission implies that the work has not been submitted, copyrighted, or accepted for publication elsewhere. Hence, duplicate publication not only raises legal questions and represents a serious breach of scientific ethics, but also leads to an unnecessary imposition on readers', referees', and editors' time. We regard this infraction as a serious matter. An apology from the author for this grave error is printed below. Author's apology I have mistakenly published similar results in two manuscripts in Nanotechnology and in the Journal of The Electrochemical Society, as stated above. I am responsible for this error. I agree with the Editors that such a practice should not have occurred, and I would like to sincerely apologize to Nanotechnology and the Journal of The Electrochemical Society, their publishers, and their readers for this matter. I will take actions in the future to prevent the occurrence of similar incidents. R A Said

  4. Investigations into the chemical structure based selectivity of the microfabricated nitrogen-phosphorus detector

    SciTech Connect

    Brocato, Terisse A.; Hess, Ryan F.; Moorman, Matthew; Simonson, Robert J.

    2015-10-28

    The nitrogen and phosphorus atoms are constituents of some of the most toxic chemical vapors. Nitrogen-phosphorus gas chromatograph detectors (NPDs) rely on selective ionization of such compounds using ionization temperatures typically greater than 600 °C. NPDs have previously been reported to be 7*104× and 105× more sensitive for nitrogen and phosphorus, respectively, than for carbon. Presented here is an investigation of the structure-based selectivity of a microfabricated nitrogen-phosphorus detector (μNPD). The μNPD presented here is smaller than a dime and can be placed in a system that is 1/100th the size of a commercial NPD. Comparison of responses of such devices to homologous anilines (p-methoxyaniline, p-fluoroaniline, and aniline) revealed that detection selectivity, determined by the ratio of μNPD to nonselective flame ionization detector (FID) peak areas, is correlated with acid disassociation pKa values for the respective analine. Selectivity was determined to be greatest for p-methoxyaniline, followed by p-fluoroaniline, with aniline having the smallest response. The limit of detection for a nitrogen containing chemical, p-methoxyaniline, using the μNPD was determined to be 0.29 ng compared to 59 ng for a carbon chemical containing no nitrogen or phosphorus, 1,3,5-trimethybenzene. The μNPD presented here has increased detection for nitrogen and phosphorus compared to the FID and with a slight increase in detection of carbon compounds compared to commercial NPD's sensitivity to nitrogen and carbon.

  5. Investigations into the chemical structure based selectivity of the microfabricated nitrogen-phosphorus detector

    DOE PAGES

    Brocato, Terisse A.; Hess, Ryan F.; Moorman, Matthew; ...

    2015-10-28

    The nitrogen and phosphorus atoms are constituents of some of the most toxic chemical vapors. Nitrogen-phosphorus gas chromatograph detectors (NPDs) rely on selective ionization of such compounds using ionization temperatures typically greater than 600 °C. NPDs have previously been reported to be 7*104× and 105× more sensitive for nitrogen and phosphorus, respectively, than for carbon. Presented here is an investigation of the structure-based selectivity of a microfabricated nitrogen-phosphorus detector (μNPD). The μNPD presented here is smaller than a dime and can be placed in a system that is 1/100th the size of a commercial NPD. Comparison of responses of suchmore » devices to homologous anilines (p-methoxyaniline, p-fluoroaniline, and aniline) revealed that detection selectivity, determined by the ratio of μNPD to nonselective flame ionization detector (FID) peak areas, is correlated with acid disassociation pKa values for the respective analine. Selectivity was determined to be greatest for p-methoxyaniline, followed by p-fluoroaniline, with aniline having the smallest response. The limit of detection for a nitrogen containing chemical, p-methoxyaniline, using the μNPD was determined to be 0.29 ng compared to 59 ng for a carbon chemical containing no nitrogen or phosphorus, 1,3,5-trimethybenzene. The μNPD presented here has increased detection for nitrogen and phosphorus compared to the FID and with a slight increase in detection of carbon compounds compared to commercial NPD's sensitivity to nitrogen and carbon.« less

  6. Microfabricated ion trap mass spectrometry for characterization of organics and potential biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Daniel

    Mass spectrometry is a powerful analytical technique with a strong history in planetary exploration, and is the method of choice for detection and identification of organic and biological molecules. MS instrumentation can also be combined with techniques such as gas chromatography, liquid chromatography, or chiral separation, which are particularly important for analysis of complex mixtures or possible homochirality. Ion traps have several inherent advantages, including speed of analysis (important for GC-MS), MS/MS capabilities (important to identification of unknown compounds), excellent sensitivity, and ease of coupling with ambient ionization techniques that are under development for biomolecule detection. We report on progress in using microfabrication techniques to produce radiofrequency quadrupole ion traps that are much smaller, lighter, and lower power than existing instruments. We produce ion traps using an assembly of two ceramic plates, the facing surfaces of which are lithographically patterned with electrodes. This approach allows great flexibility in the trap geometry, and we have demonstrated working mass spectrometers with quadrupole, linear, and toroidal trapping fields. The approach also allows correction of higher-order terms in the electric field. With this system, mass resolution of up to 1300 has been demonstrated, which is adequate for identification of a wide range of potential biomarkers. Capabilities such as tandem analysis have also been demonstrated. Of particular interest is an ion trap that contains both quadrupole and toroidal trapping regions simultaneously and coaxially. Ions can be trapped as a large reservoir in the toroidal region and introduced in small batches to the quadrupole region for mass analysis. This capability is particularly valuable where the sample of interest is very small, such as microfossil with trace organics, and where the organic inventory is both complex and unknown. Development and results of this device

  7. UV-LIGA microfabrication process for sub-terahertz waveguides utilizing multiple layered SU-8 photoresist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malekabadi, Ali; Paoloni, Claudio

    2016-09-01

    A microfabrication process based on UV LIGA (German acronym of lithography, electroplating and molding) is proposed for the fabrication of relatively high aspect ratio sub-terahertz (100-1000 GHz) metal waveguides, to be used as a slow wave structure in sub-THz vacuum electron devices. The high accuracy and tight tolerances required to properly support frequencies in the sub-THz range can be only achieved by a stable process with full parameter control. The proposed process, based on SU-8 photoresist, has been developed to satisfy high planar surface requirements for metal sub-THz waveguides. It will be demonstrated that, for a given thickness, it is more effective to stack a number of layers of SU-8 with lower thickness rather than using a single thick layer obtained at lower spin rate. The multiple layer approach provides the planarity and the surface quality required for electroforming of ground planes or assembly surfaces and for assuring low ohmic losses of waveguides. A systematic procedure is provided to calculate soft and post-bake times to produce high homogeneity SU-8 multiple layer coating as a mold for very high quality metal waveguides. A double corrugated waveguide designed for 0.3 THz operating frequency, to be used in vacuum electronic devices, was fabricated as test structure. The proposed process based on UV LIGA will enable low cost production of high accuracy sub-THz 3D waveguides. This is fundamental for producing a new generation of affordable sub-THz vacuum electron devices, to fill the technological gap that still prevents a wide diffusion of numerous applications based on THz radiation.

  8. Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatographic separations with a microfabricated thermal modulator.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Gustavo; Paul, Dibyadeep; Kim, Sung-Jin; Kurabayashi, Katsuo; Zellers, Edward T

    2012-08-21

    Rapid, comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatographic (GC × GC) separations by use of a microfabricated midpoint thermal modulator (μTM) are demonstrated, and the effects of various μTM design and operating parameters on performance are characterized. The two-stage μTM chip consists of two interconnected spiral etched-Si microchannels (4.2 and 2.8 cm long) with a cross section of 250 × 140 μm(2), an anodically bonded Pyrex cap, and a cross-linked wall coating of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). Integrated heaters provide rapid, sequential heating of each μTM stage, while a proximate, underlying thermoelectric cooler provides continual cooling. The first-dimension column used for GC × GC separations was a 6 m long, 250 μm i.d. capillary with a PDMS stationary phase, and the second-dimension column was a 0.5 m long, 100 μm i.d. capillary with a poly(ethylene glycol) phase. Using sets of five to seven volatile test compounds (boiling point ≤174 °C), the effects of the minimum (T(min)) and maximum (T(max)) modulation temperature, stage heating lag/offset (O(s)), modulation period (P(M)), and volumetric flow rate (F) on the quality of the separations were evaluated with respect to several performance metrics. Best results were obtained with a T(min) = -20 °C, T(max) = 210 °C, O(s) = 600 ms, P(M) = 6 s, and F = 0.9 mL/min. Replicate modulated peak areas and retention times were reproducible to <5%. A structured nine-component GC × GC chromatogram was produced, and a 21 component separation was achieved in <3 min. The potential for creating portable μGC × μGC systems is discussed.

  9. Microfabricated plastic chips by hot embossing methods and their applications for DNA separation and detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gwo-Bin; Chen, Shu-Hui; Huang, Guan-Ruey; Lin, Yen-Heng; Sung, Wang-Chou

    2000-08-01

    Design and fabrication of microfluidic devices on polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) substrates using novel microfabrication methods are described. The image of microfluidic devices is transferred from quartz master templates possessing inverse image of the devices to plastic plates by using hot embossing method. The micro channels on master templates are formed by the combination of metal etch mask and wet chemical etching. The micromachined quartz templates can be used repeatedly to fabricate cheap and disposable plastic devices. The reproducibility of the hot embossing method is evaluated after using 10 channels on different plastics. The relative standard deviation of the plastic channel profile from ones on quartz templates is less than 1%. In this study, the PMMA chips have been demonstrated as a micro capillary electrophoresis ((mu) -CE) device for DNA separation and detection. The capability of the fabricated chip for electrophoretic injection and separation is characterized via the analysis of DNA fragments (phi) X174. Results indicate that all of the 11 DNA fragments of the size marker could be identified in less than 3 minutes with relative standard deviations less than 0.4% and 8% for migration time and peak area, respectively. Moreover, with the use of near IR dye, fluorescence signals of the higher molecular weight fragments ($GTR 603 bp in length) could be detected at total DNA concentrations as low as 0.1 (mu) g/mL. In addition to DNA fragments (phi) X174, DNA sizing of hepatitis C viral (HCV) amplicon is also achieved using microchip electrophoresis fabricated on PMMA substrate.

  10. In Vitro Reconstruction of Neuronal Networks Derived from Human iPS Cells Using Microfabricated Devices.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Yuzo; Kida, Yasuyuki S

    2016-01-01

    Morphology and function of the nervous system is maintained via well-coordinated processes both in central and peripheral nervous tissues, which govern the homeostasis of organs/tissues. Impairments of the nervous system induce neuronal disorders such as peripheral neuropathy or cardiac arrhythmia. Although further investigation is warranted to reveal the molecular mechanisms of progression in such diseases, appropriate model systems mimicking the patient-specific communication between neurons and organs are not established yet. In this study, we reconstructed the neuronal network in vitro either between neurons of the human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell derived peripheral nervous system (PNS) and central nervous system (CNS), or between PNS neurons and cardiac cells in a morphologically and functionally compartmentalized manner. Networks were constructed in photolithographically microfabricated devices with two culture compartments connected by 20 microtunnels. We confirmed that PNS and CNS neurons connected via synapses and formed a network. Additionally, calcium-imaging experiments showed that the bundles originating from the PNS neurons were functionally active and responded reproducibly to external stimuli. Next, we confirmed that CNS neurons showed an increase in calcium activity during electrical stimulation of networked bundles from PNS neurons in order to demonstrate the formation of functional cell-cell interactions. We also confirmed the formation of synapses between PNS neurons and mature cardiac cells. These results indicate that compartmentalized culture devices are promising tools for reconstructing network-wide connections between PNS neurons and various organs, and might help to understand patient-specific molecular and functional mechanisms under normal and pathological conditions.

  11. Microfabricated Collector-Generator Electrode Sensor for Measuring Absolute pH and Oxygen Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Dengler, Adam K; Wightman, R Mark; McCarty, Gregory S

    2015-10-20

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) has attracted attention for studying in vivo neurotransmission due to its subsecond temporal resolution, selectivity, and sensitivity. Traditional FSCV measurements use background subtraction to isolate changes in the local electrochemical environment, providing detailed information on fluctuations in the concentration of electroactive species. This background subtraction removes information about constant or slowly changing concentrations. However, determination of background concentrations is still important for understanding functioning brain tissue. For example, neural activity is known to consume oxygen and produce carbon dioxide which affects local levels of oxygen and pH. Here, we present a microfabricated microelectrode array which uses FSCV to detect the absolute levels of oxygen and pH in vitro. The sensor is a collector-generator electrode array with carbon microelectrodes spaced 5 μm apart. In this work, a periodic potential step is applied at the generator producing transient local changes in the electrochemical environment. The collector electrode continuously performs FSCV enabling these induced changes in concentration to be recorded with the sensitivity and selectivity of FSCV. A negative potential step applied at the generator produces a transient local pH shift at the collector. The generator-induced pH signal is detected using FSCV at the collector and correlated to absolute solution pH by postcalibration of the anodic peak position. In addition, in oxygenated solutions a negative potential step at the generator produces hydrogen peroxide by reducing oxygen. Hydrogen peroxide is detected with FSCV at the collector electrode, and the magnitude of the oxidative peak is proportional to absolute oxygen concentrations. Oxygen interference on the pH signal is minimal and can be accounted for with a postcalibration.

  12. Grain trapping by filamentous cyanobacterial and algal mats: implications for stromatolite microfabrics through time.

    PubMed

    Frantz, C M; Petryshyn, V A; Corsetti, F A

    2015-09-01

    Archean and Proterozoic stromatolites are sparry or fine-grained and finely laminated; coarse-grained stromatolites, such as many found in modern marine systems, do not appear until quite late in the fossil record. The cause of this textural change and its relevance to understanding the evolutionary history of stromatolites is unclear. Cyanobacteria are typically considered the dominant stromatolite builders through time, but studies demonstrating the trapping and binding abilities of cyanobacterial mats are limited. With this in mind, we conducted experiments to test the grain trapping and binding capabilities of filamentous cyanobacterial mats and trapping in larger filamentous algal mats in order to better understand grain size trends in stromatolites. Mats were cut into squares, inclined in saltwater tanks at angles from 0 to 75° (approximating the angle of lamina in typical stromatolites), and grains of various sizes (fine sand, coarse sand, and fine pebbles) were delivered to their surface. Trapping of grains by the cyanobacterial mats depended strongly on (i) how far filaments protruded from the sediment surface, (ii) grain size, and (iii) the mat's incline angle. The cyanobacterial mats were much more effective at trapping fine grains beyond the abiotic slide angle than larger grains. In addition, the cyanobacterial mats actively bound grains of all sizes over time. In contrast, the much larger algal mats trapped medium and coarse grains at all angles. Our experiments suggest that (i) the presence of detrital grains beyond the abiotic slide angle can be considered a biosignature in ancient stromatolites where biogenicity is in question, and, (ii) where coarse grains are present within stromatolite laminae at angles beyond the abiotic angle of slide (e.g., most modern marine stromatolites), typical cyanobacterial-type mats are probably not solely responsible for the construction, giving insight into the evolution of stromatolite microfabrics through time.

  13. Carbonate fabrics in the modern microbialites of Pavilion Lake: two suites of microfabrics that reflect variation in microbial community morphology, growth habit, and lithification.

    PubMed

    Theisen, C Harwood; Sumner, D Y; Mackey, T J; Lim, D S S; Brady, A L; Slater, G F

    2015-07-01

    Modern microbialites in Pavilion Lake, BC, provide an analog for ancient non-stromatolitic microbialites that formed from in situ mineralization. Because Pavilion microbialites are mineralizing under the influence of microbial communities, they provide insights into how biological processes influence microbialite microfabrics and mesostructures. Hemispherical nodules and micrite-microbial crusts are two mesostructures within Pavilion microbialites that are directly associated with photosynthetic communities. Both filamentous cyanobacteria in hemispherical nodules and branching filamentous green algae in micrite-microbial crusts were associated with calcite precipitation at microbialite surfaces and with characteristic microfabrics in the lithified microbialite. Hemispherical nodules formed at microbialite surfaces when calcite precipitated around filamentous cyanobacteria with a radial growth habit. The radial filament pattern was preserved within the microbialite to varying degrees. Some subsurface nodules contained well-defined filaments, whereas others contained only dispersed organic inclusions. Variation in filament preservation is interpreted to reflect differences in timing and amount of carbonate precipitation relative to heterotrophic decay, with more defined filaments reflecting greater lithification prior to degradation than more diffuse filaments. Micrite-microbial crusts produce the second suite of microfabrics and form in association with filamentous green algae oriented perpendicular to the microbialite surface. Some crusts include calcified filaments, whereas others contained voids that reflect the filamentous community in shape, size, and distribution. Pavilion microbialites demonstrate that microfabric variation can reflect differences in lithification processes and microbial metabolisms as well as microbial community morphology and organization. Even when the morphology of individual filaments or cells is not well preserved, the microbial growth

  14. Inside the Creative Sifter: Recognizing Metacognition in Creativity Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puryear, Jeb S.

    2016-01-01

    The parallels between cognitive development and creativity are neglected in the literature. Piaget's information transformations are personalized, meaning individual constructions can involve creativity. Vygotsky's work considers the implications and interactions of social influences, conventions, and personal implications for creative…

  15. Strain rate dependent calcite microfabric evolution - an experiment carried out by nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogowitz, Anna; Grasemann, Bernhard; Rice, A. Hugh N.; Huet, Benjamin; Habler, Gerlinde

    2013-04-01

    The deformation behaviour of calcite has been studied experimentally in detail. Different strain rates and pressure and temperature conditions have been used to investigate a wide range of deformation regimes/mechanisms. However, a direct comparison with natural fault rocks remains difficult because of the extreme differences between experimental and natural strain rates. An a-type flanking structure developed in calcite-marbles of the Pyrgos unit, on Syros, provides a natural laboratory for directly studying the effects of strain rate variations at constant P-T conditions. The rocks of the Pyrgos unit underwent Eocene blueschist-facies metamorphism, resulting in coarse grained recrystallized marbles. During the subsequent greenschist-facies overprinting, the flanking structure started to form adjacent to a several meters long cross-cutting element (CE), which rotated into the shear direction, developing an antithetic offset. Comparing the microfabrics in the 1-2 cm thick CE mylonites and in the surrounding host rocks, which formed under the same metamorphic conditions but with different strain rates, is the central focus of this study. Numerical models have shown that a-type flanking folds form with a background shear strain of only about 1-2. However, the displacement along the CE varies between 60 and 120 cm, resulting in shear strains between 30 and 120. Assuming that all the deformation took place during the same event, significant strain rate variations (1 to 2 orders of magnitude) must have occurred between the CE and the host rock. Due to the extreme variations in strain and strain rate, different deformation mechanisms and types of dynamic recrystallization were active, leading to the development of different microstructures and textures. With increasing strain, the dominant deformation mechanism changed from twinning to dislocation glide and -climb and finally to diffusion creep. Additionally, a change from subgrain rotation to bulging recrystallization

  16. A microfabricated strain gauge array on polymer substrate for tactile neuroprostheses in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beygi, M.; Mutlu, S.; Güçlü, B.

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we present the design, microfabrication and characterization of a tactile sensor system which can be used for sensory neuroprostheses in rats. The sensor system consists of an array of 2  ×  7 cells, each of which has a series combination of four strain gauges. Each group of four strain gauges is placed around a square membrane with a size of 2.5  ×  2.5 mm2. Unlike most common tactile sensors based on silicon substrates, we used 3D-printed polylactic acid as a substrate, because it is not brittle, and under local extremes, it would prevent the catastrophic failure of all cells. The strain gauges were fabricated by depositing and patterning a 50 nm thick aluminum (Al) film on a polyimide sheet with a thickness of 0.125 mm. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer was bonded on the top surface of the PI membrane. The PDMS layer was prepared in two different thicknesses, 1.2 and 1.7 mm, to investigate its effect on the static response of the sensor. The sensitivity and the maximum allowable force, corresponding to the maximum deformation of 0.9 mm at the center of each cell, changed based on the thickness of the PDMS layer. Sensor cells operated linearly up to 3 N with an average sensitivity of 200 mΩ N-1 (0.7 Ω mm-1) for 1.2 mm thick PDMS. These values changed to 4 N and 70 mΩ N-1 (0.3 Ω mm-1), respectively, for 1.7 mm thick PDMS. The nonlinearity was less than 3%. The cells had low cross-talk (~5 mΩ N-1 and 0.02 Ω mm-1) relative to the average sensitivity. Additionally, the dynamic response of the sensor was characterized at several frequencies by using a vibrotactile stimulation system previously designed for psychophysics experiments. The sensor was also tested inside the rat conditioning chamber to demonstrate the relevant signals in a tactile neuroprosthesis.

  17. Structures, microfabrics and textures of the Cordilleran-type Rechnitz metamorphic core complex, Eastern Alps.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shuyun; Neubauer, Franz; Bernroider, Manfred; Liu, Junlai; Genser, Johann

    2013-11-26

    Rechnitz window group represents a Cordilleran-style metamorphic core complex, which is almost entirely located within nearly contemporaneous Neogene sediments at the transition zone between the Eastern Alps and the Neogene Pannonian basin. Two tectonic units are distinguished within the Rechnitz metamorphic core complex (RMCC): (1) a lower unit mainly composed of Mesozoic metasediments, and (2) an upper unit mainly composed of ophiolite remnants. Both units are metamorphosed within greenschist facies conditions during earliest Miocene followed by exhumation and cooling. The internal structure of the RMCC is characterized by the following succession of structure-forming events: (1) blueschist relics of Paleocene/Eocene age formed as a result of subduction (D1), (2) ductile nappe stacking (D2) of an ophiolite nappe over a distant passive margin succession (ca. E-W to WNW-ESE oriented stretching lineation), (3) greenschist facies-grade metamorphism annealing dominant in the lower unit, and (4) ductile low-angle normal faulting (D3) (with mainly NE-SW oriented stretching lineation), and (5) ca. E to NE-vergent folding (D4). The microfabrics are related to mostly ductile nappe stacking to ductile low-angle normal faulting. Paleopiezometry in conjunction with P-T estimates yield high strain rates of 10(- 11) to 10(- 13) s(- 1), depending on the temperature (400-350 °C) and choice of piezometer and flow law calibration. Progressive microstructures and texture analysis indicate an overprint of the high-temperature fabrics (D2) by the low-temperature deformation (D3). Phengitic mica from the Paleocene/Eocene high-pressure metamorphism remained stable during D2 ductile deformation as well as preserved within late stages of final sub-greenschist facies shearing. Chlorite geothermometry yields two temperature groups, 376-328 °C, and 306-132 °C. Chlorite is seemingly accessible to late-stage resetting. The RMCC underwent an earlier large-scale coaxial deformation

  18. Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatographic separations with a temperature programmed microfabricated thermal modulator.

    PubMed

    Collin, William R; Nuñovero, Nicolas; Paul, Dibyadeep; Kurabayashi, Katsuo; Zellers, Edward T

    2016-04-29

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) with a temperature-programmed microfabricated thermal modulator (μTM) is demonstrated. The 0.78 cm(2), 2-stage μTM chip with integrated heaters and a PDMS coated microchannel was placed in thermal contact with a solid-state thermoelectric cooler and mounted on top of a bench scale GC. It was fluidically coupled through heated interconnects to an upstream first-dimension ((1)D) PDMS-coated capillary column and a downstream uncoated capillary or second-dimension ((2)D) PEG-coated capillary. A mixture of n-alkanes C6-C10 was separated isothermally and the full-width-at-half-maximum (fwhm) values of the modulated peaks were assessed as a function of the computer-controlled minimum and maximum stage temperatures of μTM, Tmin and Tmax, respectively. With Tmin and Tmax fixed at -25 and 100°C, respectively, modulated peaks of C6 and C7 had fwhm values<53 ms while the modulated peaks of C10 had a fwhm value of 1.3s, due to inefficient re-mobilization. With Tmin and Tmax fixed at 0 and 210°C, respectively, the fwhm value for the modulated C10 peaks decreased to 67 ms, but C6 and C7 exhibited massive breakthrough. By programming Tmin from -25 to 0°C and Tmax from 100 to 220°C, the C6 and C7 peaks had fwhm values≤50 ms, and the fwhm for C10 peaks remained<95 ms. Using the latter conditions for the GC×GC separation of a sample of unleaded gasoline yielded resolution similar to that reported with a commercial thermal modulator. Replacing the PDMS phase in the μTM with a trigonal-tricationic room temperature ionic liquid eliminated the bleed observed with the PDMS, but also reduced the capacity for several test compounds. Regardless, the demonstrated capability to independently temperature program this low resource μTM enhances its versatility and its promise for use in bench-scale GC×GC systems.

  19. Structures, microfabrics and textures of the Cordilleran-type Rechnitz metamorphic core complex, Eastern Alps☆

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Shuyun; Neubauer, Franz; Bernroider, Manfred; Liu, Junlai; Genser, Johann

    2013-01-01

    Rechnitz window group represents a Cordilleran-style metamorphic core complex, which is almost entirely located within nearly contemporaneous Neogene sediments at the transition zone between the Eastern Alps and the Neogene Pannonian basin. Two tectonic units are distinguished within the Rechnitz metamorphic core complex (RMCC): (1) a lower unit mainly composed of Mesozoic metasediments, and (2) an upper unit mainly composed of ophiolite remnants. Both units are metamorphosed within greenschist facies conditions during earliest Miocene followed by exhumation and cooling. The internal structure of the RMCC is characterized by the following succession of structure-forming events: (1) blueschist relics of Paleocene/Eocene age formed as a result of subduction (D1), (2) ductile nappe stacking (D2) of an ophiolite nappe over a distant passive margin succession (ca. E–W to WNW–ESE oriented stretching lineation), (3) greenschist facies-grade metamorphism annealing dominant in the lower unit, and (4) ductile low-angle normal faulting (D3) (with mainly NE–SW oriented stretching lineation), and (5) ca. E to NE-vergent folding (D4). The microfabrics are related to mostly ductile nappe stacking to ductile low-angle normal faulting. Paleopiezometry in conjunction with P–T estimates yield high strain rates of 10− 11 to 10− 13 s− 1, depending on the temperature (400–350 °C) and choice of piezometer and flow law calibration. Progressive microstructures and texture analysis indicate an overprint of the high-temperature fabrics (D2) by the low-temperature deformation (D3). Phengitic mica from the Paleocene/Eocene high-pressure metamorphism remained stable during D2 ductile deformation as well as preserved within late stages of final sub-greenschist facies shearing. Chlorite geothermometry yields two temperature groups, 376–328 °C, and 306–132 °C. Chlorite is seemingly accessible to late-stage resetting. The RMCC underwent an earlier large-scale coaxial

  20. Microfabricated, silicon devices with nanowells and nanogap electrodes: a platform for dielectric spectroscopy with silane-tunable response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifi Fini, Hassan; Suganuma, Yoshinori; Dhirani, Al-Amin

    2015-05-01

    Combining the advantages of nanogap devices and impedance spectroscopy can potentially provide a platform for dielectric spectroscopy with widely ranging applications—from fundamental studies at the nanoscale and surfaces to label free and selective sensors. The present study characterizes the impedance response of a microfabricated, silicon-based device with a large array of nanowells surrounded by annular, nanogap detection regions. Device impedance is measured versus frequency over 5 orders in a variety of organic solvents with dielectric constants ranging over 2 orders. The study finds two key results. First, an equivalent R/C circuit model is found to compare favorably with device impedance response over these wide ranges of parameters. Importantly, the model correlates with structure of the nanogap device, which suggests that such a structure-impedance response approach can help guide modeling of other devices geometries. Second, the model points to—and data confirm—correlation between nanogap device response and dielectric constant of materials in the nanogaps, particularly at low frequencies. In addition, the correlation is significantly modified by robust, silane functionalization of the devices due to a large surface-to-volume ratio of the nanogaps. These results demonstrate that nanogap impedance spectroscopy using microfabricated/silanized silicon devices is a robust and versatile platform for dielectric spectroscopy of materials on the nanoscale and on surfaces.

  1. Development of multistage magnetic deposition microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nath, Pulak; Strelnik, Joseph; Vasanji, Amit; Moore, Lee R; Williams, P Stephen; Zborowski, Maciej; Roy, Shuvo; Fleischman, Aaron J

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic deposition microscropy (MDM) combines magnetic deposition and optical analysis of magnetically tagged cells into a single platform. Our multistage MDM uses enclosed microfabricated channels and a magnet assembly comprising four zones in series. The enclosed channels alleviate the problem plaguing previous versions of MDM: scouring of the cell deposition layer by the air-liquid interface as the channel is drained. The four-zone magnet assembly was designed to maximize capture efficiency, and experiments yielded total capture efficiencies of >99% of fluorescent- and magnetically-labeled Jurkat cells at reasonable throughputs (10(3) cells/min). A digital image processing protocol was developed to measure the average pixel intensities of the deposited cells in different zones, indicative of the marker expression. Preliminary findings indicate that the multistage MDM may be suitable for depositing cells and particles in successive zones according to their magnetic properties (e.g., magnetic susceptibilities or magnetophoretic mobilities). The overall goal is to allow the screening of multiple disease conditions in a single platform.

  2. Moment Selective Digital Detection of Single Magnetic Beads for Multiplexed Bioassays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llandro, J.; Hayward, T. J.; Bland, J. A. C.; Morecroft, D.; Castaño, F. J.; Colin, I. A.; Ross, C. A.

    2008-06-01

    Research into lab-on-a-chip multiplexed bioassays has focused on libraries of biochemical probes, indexed by optically encoded micron-sized labels. However, few current methods have reconciled large multiplexing capability with a rapid detection system amenable to miniaturization. Magnetic identification of labels provides a strong candidate solution to this problem, yet no proposed single-label magnetic detection system can both read and encode magnetic labels. We present a magnetic multiplexed assay in lab-on-a-chip format which identifies target biomolecules from the hybridization results by reading encoded magnetic beads. We show that a microfabricated magnetoresistive ring-shaped sensor can read the magnetic moments of individual commercially available paramagnetic beads using an active digital technique. This work provides proof of principle for a new approach to magnetic labeling of biomolecules for high-throughput bioassays.

  3. Microfabricated thermal conductivity sensor: a high resolution tool for quantitative thermal property measurement of biomaterials and solutions.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xin M; Ding, Weiping; Chen, Hsiu-hung; Shu, Zhiquan; Zhao, Gang; Zhang, Hai-feng; Gao, Dayong

    2011-10-01

    Obtaining accurate thermal properties of biomaterials plays an important role in the field of cryobiology. Currently, thermal needle, which is constructed by enclosing a manually winded thin metal wire with an insulation coating in a metallic sheath, is the only available device that is capable of measuring thermal conductivity of biomaterials. Major drawbacks, such as macroscale sensor size, lack of versatile format to accommodate samples with various shapes and sizes, neglected effects of heat transfer inside the probe and thermal contact resistance between the sensing element and the probe body, difficult to mass produce, poor data repeatability and reliability and labor-intense sensor calibration, have significantly reduced their potential to be an essential measurement tool to provide key thermal property information of biological specimens. In this study, we describe the development of an approach to measure thermal conductivity of liquids and soft bio-tissues using a proof-of-concept MEMS based thermal probe. By employing a microfabricated closely-packed gold wire to function as the heater and the thermistor, the presented thermal sensor can be used to measure thermal conductivities of fluids and natural soft biomaterials (particularly, the sensor may be directly inserted into soft tissues in living animal/plant bodies or into tissues isolated from the animal/plant bodies), where other more standard approaches cannot be used. Thermal standard materials have been used to calibrate two randomly selected thermal probes at room temperature. Variation between the obtained system calibration constants is less than 10%. By incorporating the previously obtained system calibration constant, three randomly selected thermal probes have been successfully utilized to measure the thermal conductivities of various solutions and tissue samples under different temperatures. Overall, the measurements are in agreement with the recommended values (percentage error less than 5

  4. Guided and magnetic self-assembly of tunable magnetoceptive gels

    PubMed Central

    Tasoglu, S.; Yu, C.H.; Gungordu, H.I.; Guven, S.; Vural, T.; Demirci, U.

    2014-01-01

    Self-assembly of components into complex functional patterns at microscale is common in nature, and used increasingly in numerous disciplines such as optoelectronics, microfabrication, sensors, tissue engineering and computation. Here, we describe the use of stable radicals to guide the self-assembly of magnetically tunable gels, which we call ‘magnetoceptive’ materials at the scale of hundreds of microns to a millimeter, each can be programmed by shape and composition, into heterogeneous complex structures. Using paramagnetism of free radicals as a driving mechanism, complex heterogeneous structures are built in the magnetic field generated by permanent magnets. The overall magnetic signature of final structure is erased via an antioxidant vitamin E, subsequent to guided self-assembly. We demonstrate unique capabilities of radicals and antioxidants in fabrication of soft systems with heterogeneity in material properties, such as porosity, elastic modulus and mass density; then in bottom-up tissue engineering and finally, levitational and selective assembly of microcomponents. PMID:25175148

  5. Guided and magnetic self-assembly of tunable magnetoceptive gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasoglu, S.; Yu, C. H.; Gungordu, H. I.; Guven, S.; Vural, T.; Demirci, U.

    2014-09-01

    Self-assembly of components into complex functional patterns at microscale is common in nature, and used increasingly in numerous disciplines such as optoelectronics, microfabrication, sensors, tissue engineering and computation. Here, we describe the use of stable radicals to guide the self-assembly of magnetically tunable gels, which we call ‘magnetoceptive’ materials at the scale of hundreds of microns to a millimeter, each can be programmed by shape and composition, into heterogeneous complex structures. Using paramagnetism of free radicals as a driving mechanism, complex heterogeneous structures are built in the magnetic field generated by permanent magnets. The overall magnetic signature of final structure is erased via an antioxidant vitamin E, subsequent to guided self-assembly. We demonstrate unique capabilities of radicals and antioxidants in fabrication of soft systems with heterogeneity in material properties, such as porosity, elastic modulus and mass density; then in bottom-up tissue engineering and finally, levitational and selective assembly of microcomponents.

  6. Guided and magnetic self-assembly of tunable magnetoceptive gels.

    PubMed

    Tasoglu, S; Yu, C H; Gungordu, H I; Guven, S; Vural, T; Demirci, U

    2014-09-01

    Self-assembly of components into complex functional patterns at microscale is common in nature, and used increasingly in numerous disciplines such as optoelectronics, microfabrication, sensors, tissue engineering and computation. Here, we describe the use of stable radicals to guide the self-assembly of magnetically tunable gels, which we call 'magnetoceptive' materials at the scale of hundreds of microns to a millimeter, each can be programmed by shape and composition, into heterogeneous complex structures. Using paramagnetism of free radicals as a driving mechanism, complex heterogeneous structures are built in the magnetic field generated by permanent magnets. The overall magnetic signature of final structure is erased via an antioxidant vitamin E, subsequent to guided self-assembly. We demonstrate unique capabilities of radicals and antioxidants in fabrication of soft systems with heterogeneity in material properties, such as porosity, elastic modulus and mass density; then in bottom-up tissue engineering and finally, levitational and selective assembly of microcomponents.

  7. Polyhalite microfabrics in an Alpine evaporite mélange: Hallstatt, Eastern Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schorn, A.; Neubauer, F.; Bernroider, M.

    2012-04-01

    Polyhalite [K2Ca2Mg(SO4)4 . 2H2O] commonly occurs in sedimentary evaporite successions and was described first from the salt mine Bad Ischl-Perneck in Austria (province Upper Austria) and has since been known from many salt deposits (Warren, 2006; Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg, 1035 p.). The study is undertaken for 40Ar/39Ar dating of tectonic processes of various polyhalite fabrics of Hallstatt, which have likely different formation ages, in order to supplement and extend further dating to further microfabric types as shown in Leitner (2011, Ph.D. thesis, University of Salzburg, 177 p.). In the Hallstatt salt mine, polyhalite rocks occur in 0.5 to 1 m thick tectonic lenses within the protocataclasite to protomylonite matrix of ductilely deformed halite of cataclastic clay-/mudstone. Thin section analysis of Hallstatt polyhalites reveal various fabric types including (1) polyhalite mylonites, (2) metamorphic reaction fabrics, (3) vein-filling, fibrous polyhalite and (4) cavity filling polyhalite. The polyhalite mylonites most likely formed along shear zones at high strain rates due to intracrystalline deformation and recrystallization. They may have developed from a more coarse-grained precursor metamorphic rock. Texture measurements by the electron back-scattered diffraction technique are in progress. The mylonites show a wide range of shear fabrics commonly known in mylonitic shear zones of the ductile crust. The mylonites are partly overprinted by recrystallized polyhalite grains, which are probably indicating a static growth. Metamorphic reaction fabrics of blödite (or astrakanite) [Na2Mg(SO4)2 . 4 H2O] between polyhalite seams and anhydrite has been found, too. According to Schauberger (1986, Archiv für Lagerstättenforschung der Geologischen Bundesanstalt, v. 7, p. 217-254), blödite of the Alpine Haselgebirge may occur primary as nodules or, more common, intergrown with the mineral löweite, which has a nearly identical chemical composition and is

  8. Microfabricated microengine for use as a mechanical drive and power source in the microdomain and fabrication process

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, E.J.; Sniegowski, J.J.

    1994-12-31

    A microengine uses two synchronized linear actuators as a power source and converts oscillatory motion from the actuators into rotational motion via direct linkage connection to an output gear or wheel. The microengine provides output in the form of a continuously rotating output gear that is capable of delivering drive torque to a micromechanism. The microengine can be operated at varying speeds and its motion can be reversed. Linear actuators are synchronized in order to provide linear oscillatory motion to the linkage means in the X and Y directions according to a desired position, rotational direction and speed of said mechanical output means. The output gear has gear teeth on its outer perimeter for directly contacting a micromechanism requiring mechanical power. The gear is retained by a retaining means which allows said gear to rotate freely. The microengine is microfabricated of polysilicon on one wafer using surface micromachining batch fabrication.

  9. Sensitive Amino Acid Composition and Chirality Analysis in the Martian Regolith with a Microfabricated in situ Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skelley, A. M.; Grunthaner, F. J.; Bada, J. L.; Mathies, R. A.

    2003-12-01

    Recent advances in microfabricated "lab-on-a-chip" technologies have dramatically enhanced the capabilities of chemical and biochemical analyzers. The portability and sensitivity of these devices makes them ideal instruments for in situ chemical analysis on other planets. We have focused our initial studies on amino acid analysis because amino acids are more chemically resistant to decomposition than other biomolecules, and because amino acid chirality is a well-defined biomarker [1]. Previously, we developed a prototype electrophoresis chip, detection system and analysis method where the amino acids were labeled with fluorescein using FITC and then electrophoretically analyzed using g-cyclodextrin as the chiral resolution agent [2]. Extracts of the Murchison meteorite were analyzed, and the D/L ratios determined by microchip CE closely matched those from HPLC and GCMS and exhibited greater precision. Our microchip analyzer has now been further improved by establishing the capability of performing amino acid composition and chirality analyses using fluorescamine rather than FITC [3]. Fluorescamine is advantageous because it reacts more rapidly than FITC, and because excess reagent is hydrolyzed to a non-fluorescent product. Furthermore, the use of fluorescamine facilitates interfacing with the Mars Organic Detector (MOD) [4]. Fluorescamine-amino acids are separated using similar conditions as the FITC-aa, resulting in similar separation times and identical elution orders. Fluorescamine-aa are chirally resolved in the presence of hydroxy-propyl-b-cyclodextrin, and typical limits of detection are ˜ 50 nM. This work establishes the feasibility of combining fluorescamine labeling of amino acids with microfabricated CE devices to develop low-volume, high-sensitivity apparatus for extraterrestrial exploration. The stage is now set for the development of the Mars Organic Analyzer (MOA), a portable analysis system for amino acid extraction and chiral analysis that will

  10. Microfabricated microengine for use as a mechanical drive and power source in the microdomain and fabrication process

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, E.J.; Sniegowski, J.J.

    1997-05-20

    A microengine uses two synchronized linear actuators as a power source and converts oscillatory motion from the actuators into rotational motion via direct linkage connection to an output gear or wheel. The microengine provides output in the form of a continuously rotating output gear that is capable of delivering drive torque to a micromechanism. The microengine can be operated at varying speeds and its motion can be reversed. Linear actuators are synchronized in order to provide linear oscillatory motion to the linkage means in the X and Y directions according to a desired position, rotational direction and speed of said mechanical output means. The output gear has gear teeth on its outer perimeter for directly contacting a micromechanism requiring mechanical power. The gear is retained by a retaining means which allows said gear to rotate freely. The microengine is microfabricated of polysilicon on one wafer using surface micromachining batch fabrication. 30 figs.

  11. Microfabricated microengine for use as a mechanical drive and power source in the microdomain and fabrication process

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Ernest J.; Sniegowski, Jeffry J.

    1997-01-01

    A microengine uses two synchronized linear actuators as a power source and converts oscillatory motion from the actuators into rotational motion via direct linkage connection to an output gear or wheel. The microengine provides output in the form of a continuously rotating output gear that is capable of delivering drive torque to a micromechanism. The microengine can be operated at varying speeds and its motion can be reversed. Linear actuators are synchronized in order to provide linear oscillatory motion to the linkage means in the X and Y directions according to a desired position, rotational direction and speed of said mechanical output means. The output gear has gear teeth on its outer perimeter for directly contacting a micromechanism requiring mechanical power. The gear is retained by a retaining means which allows said gear to rotate freely. The microengine is microfabricated of polysilicon on one wafer using surface micromachining batch fabrication.

  12. Microfabrication of controlled-geometry samples for the laser-heated diamond-anvil cell using focused ion beam technology.

    PubMed

    Pigott, Jeffrey S; Reaman, Daniel M; Panero, Wendy R

    2011-11-01

    The pioneering of x-ray diffraction with in situ laser heating in the diamond-anvil cell has revolutionized the field of high-pressure mineral physics, expanding the ability to determine high-pressure, high-temperature phase boundaries and equations of state. Accurate determination of high-pressure, high-temperature phases and densities in the diamond-anvil cell rely upon collinearity of the x-ray beam with the center of the laser-heated spot. We present the development of microfabricated samples that, by nature of their design, will have the sample of interest in the hottest portion of the sample. We report initial successes with a simplified design using a Pt sample with dimensions smaller than the synchrotron-based x-ray spot such that it is the only part of the sample that absorbs the heating laser ensuring that the x-rayed volume is at the peak hotspot temperature. Microfabricated samples, synthesized using methods developed at The Ohio State University's Mineral Physics Laboratory and Campus Electron Optics Facility, were tested at high P-T conditions in the laser-heated diamond-anvil cell at beamline 16 ID-B of the Advanced Photon Source. Pt layer thicknesses of ≤0.8 μm absorb the laser and produce accurate measurements on the relative equations of state of Pt and PtC. These methods combined with high-purity nanofabrication techniques will allow for extension by the diamond-anvil cell community to multiple materials for high-precision high-pressure, high-temperature phase relations, equations of state, melting curves, and transport properties.

  13. Annealing free magnetic tunnel junction sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudde, S.; Leitao, D. C.; Cardoso, S.; Freitas, P. P.

    2017-04-01

    Annealing is a major step in the fabrication of magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs). It sets the exchange bias between the pinned and antiferromagnetic layers, and helps to increase the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in both amorphous and crystalline junctions. Recent research on MTJs has focused on MgO-based structures due to their high TMR. However, the strict process control and mandatory annealing step can limit the scope of the application of these structures as sensors. In this paper, we present AlOx-based MTJs that are produced by ion beam sputtering and remote plasma oxidation and show optimum transport properties with no annealing. The microfabricated devices show TMR values of up to 35% and using NiFe/CoFeB free layers provides tunable linear ranges, leading to coercivity-free linear responses with sensitivities of up to 5.5%/mT. The top-pinned synthetic antiferromagnetic reference shows a stability of about 30 mT in the microfabricated devices. Sensors with linear ranges of up to 60 mT are demonstrated. This paves the way for the integration of MTJ sensors in heat-sensitive applications such as flexible substrates, or for the design of low-footprint on-chip multiaxial sensing devices.

  14. Development of FeNiMoB thin film materials for microfabricated magnetoelastic sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Cai; Gooneratne, Chinthaka; Cha, Dongkyu; Chen Long; Kosel, Jurgen; Gianchandani, Yogesh

    2012-12-01

    Metglas{sup TM} 2826MB foils of 25-30 {mu}m thickness with the composition of Fe{sub 40}Ni{sub 38}Mo{sub 4}B{sub 18} have been used for magnetoelastic sensors in various applications over many years. This work is directed at the investigation of {approx}3 {mu}m thick iron-nickel-molybdenum-boron (FeNiMoB) thin films that are intended for integrated microsystems. The films are deposited on Si substrate by co-sputtering of iron-nickel (FeNi), molybdenum (Mo), and boron (B) targets. The results show that dopants of Mo and B can significantly change the microstructure and magnetic properties of FeNi materials. When FeNi is doped with only Mo its crystal structure changes from polycrystalline to amorphous with the increase of dopant concentration; the transition point is found at about 10 at. % of Mo content. A significant change in anisotropic magnetic properties of FeNi is also observed as the Mo dopant level increases. The coercivity of FeNi films doped with Mo decreases to a value less than one third of the value without dopant. Doping the FeNi with B together with Mo considerably decreases the value of coercivity and the out-of-plane magnetic anisotropy properties, and it also greatly changes the microstructure of the material. In addition, doping B to FeNiMo remarkably reduces the remanence of the material. The film material that is fabricated using an optimized process is magnetically as soft as amorphous Metglas{sup TM} 2826MB with a coercivity of less than 40 Am{sup -1}. The findings of this study provide us a better understanding of the effects of the compositions and microstructure of FeNiMoB thin film materials on their magnetic properties.

  15. Development of FeNiMoB thin film materials for microfabricated magnetoelastic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Cai; Gooneratne, Chinthaka; Cha, Dongkyu; Chen, Long; Gianchandani, Yogesh; Kosel, Jurgen

    2012-12-01

    MetglasTM 2826MB foils of 25-30 μm thickness with the composition of Fe40Ni38Mo4B18 have been used for magnetoelastic sensors in various applications over many years. This work is directed at the investigation of ˜3 μm thick iron-nickel-molybdenum-boron (FeNiMoB) thin films that are intended for integrated microsystems. The films are deposited on Si substrate by co-sputtering of iron-nickel (FeNi), molybdenum (Mo), and boron (B) targets. The results show that dopants of Mo and B can significantly change the microstructure and magnetic properties of FeNi materials. When FeNi is doped with only Mo its crystal structure changes from polycrystalline to amorphous with the increase of dopant concentration; the transition point is found at about 10 at. % of Mo content. A significant change in anisotropic magnetic properties of FeNi is also observed as the Mo dopant level increases. The coercivity of FeNi films doped with Mo decreases to a value less than one third of the value without dopant. Doping the FeNi with B together with Mo considerably decreases the value of coercivity and the out-of-plane magnetic anisotropy properties, and it also greatly changes the microstructure of the material. In addition, doping B to FeNiMo remarkably reduces the remanence of the material. The film material that is fabricated using an optimized process is magnetically as soft as amorphous MetglasTM 2826MB with a coercivity of less than 40 Am-1. The findings of this study provide us a better understanding of the effects of the compositions and microstructure of FeNiMoB thin film materials on their magnetic properties.

  16. Rapid enrichment of leucocytes and genomic DNA from blood based on bifunctional core shell magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xin; Nie, Xiaorong; Yu, Bingbin; Zhang, Xu

    2007-04-01

    A series of protocols are proposed to extract genomic DNA from whole blood at different scales using carboxyl-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles as solid-phase absorbents. The enrichment of leucocytes and the adsorption of genomic DNA can be achieved with the same carboxyl-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles. The DNA bound to the bead surfaces can be used directly as PCR templates. By coupling cell separation and DNA purification, the whole operation can be accomplished in a few minutes. Our simplified protocols proved to be rapid, low cost, and biologically and chemically non-hazardous, and are therefore promising for microfabrication of a DNA-preparation chip and routine laboratory use.

  17. A Microfabricated Segmented-Involute-Foil Regenerator for Enhancing Reliability and Performance of Stirling Engines. Phase III Final Report for the Radioisotope Power Conversion Technology NRA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, Mounir B.; Gedeon, David; Wood, Gary; McLean, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Under Phase III of NASA Research Announcement contract NAS3-03124, a prototype nickel segmented-involute-foil regenerator was microfabricated and tested in a Sunpower Frequency-Test-Bed (FTB) Stirling convertor. The team for this effort consisted of Cleveland State University, Gedeon Associates, Sunpower Inc. and International Mezzo Technologies. Testing in the FTB convertor produced about the same efficiency as testing with the original random-fiber regenerator. But the high thermal conductivity of the prototype nickel regenerator was responsible for a significant performance degradation. An efficiency improvement (by a 1.04 factor, according to computer predictions) could have been achieved if the regenerator was made from a low-conductivity material. Also, the FTB convertor was not reoptimized to take full advantage of the microfabricated regenerator s low flow resistance; thus, the efficiency would likely have been even higher had the FTB been completely reoptimized. This report discusses the regenerator microfabrication process, testing of the regenerator in the Stirling FTB convertor, and the supporting analysis. Results of the pre-test computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of the effects of the regenerator-test-configuration diffusers (located at each end of the regenerator) are included. The report also includes recommendations for further development of involute-foil regenerators from a higher-temperature material than nickel.

  18. Microfabricated refractive index gradient based detector for reversed-phase liquid chromatography with mobile phase gradient elution.

    PubMed

    McBrady, Adam D; Synovec, Robert E

    2006-02-10

    Typical refractive index (RI) detectors for liquid chromatography (LC) are not well suited to application with mobile phase gradient elution, due to the difficulty in correcting for the detected baseline shift during the gradient. We report a sensitive, highly reproducible, microfabricated refractive index gradient (micro-RIG) detector that performs well with mobile phase gradient elution LC. Since the micro-RIG signal remains on-scale throughout the mobile phase gradient, one can apply a baseline correction procedure. We demonstrate that by collecting two mobile phase gradient blanks and subtracting one of them from the other, a reproducible, flat baseline is achieved. Therefore, subtracting a blank from a separation provides a baseline corrected chromatogram with reasonably high signal-to-noise ratio for eluting analytes. The micro-RIG detector uses a collimated diode laser beam to optically probe a RIG formed perpendicular to the laminar flow direction within a microfabricated borosilicate glass chip. The chip-based design of the detector is suitable for either traditional bench-top or LC-on-a-chip technologies. We report reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) separations of proteins and polymers, over mobile phase gradient conditions of 67% A:33% B to 3% A:97% B by volume, where A is 96% methanol:3.9% water:0.1% trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), and B is 3.9% methanol:96% water:0.1% TFA. The separations were performed on a Jupiter 5 mu C4 300 A 150 mm x 1.0 mm Phenomenex column at a flow rate of 20 microl/min. Viscosity changes during the mobile phase gradient separation are found to shift the on-chip merge position of the detected concentration gradient (i.e., RIG), in a reproducible fashion. However, this viscosity effect makes detection sensitivity vary throughout the mobile phase gradient, due to moving the optimized position of the probe beam in relation to the analyte concentration gradient being probed. None-the-less, consistent limits

  19. Remote detection of nuclear magnetic resonance with an anisotropic magnetoresistive sensor.

    PubMed

    Verpillat, F; Ledbetter, M P; Xu, S; Michalak, D J; Hilty, C; Bouchard, L-S; Antonijevic, S; Budker, D; Pines, A

    2008-02-19

    We report the detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) using an anisotropic magnetoresistive (AMR) sensor. A "remote-detection" arrangement was used in which protons in flowing water were prepolarized in the field of a superconducting NMR magnet, adiabatically inverted, and subsequently detected with an AMR sensor situated downstream from the magnet and the adiabatic inverter. AMR sensing is well suited for NMR detection in microfluidic "lab-on-a-chip" applications because the sensors are small, typically on the order of 10 mum. An estimate of the sensitivity for an optimized system indicates that approximately 6 x 10(13) protons in a volume of 1,000 mum(3), prepolarized in a 10-kG magnetic field, can be detected with a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 in a 1-Hz bandwidth. This level of sensitivity is competitive with that demonstrated by microcoils in superconducting magnets and with the projected sensitivity of microfabricated atomic magnetometers.

  20. A post-fabrication selective magnetic annealing technique in standard MEMS processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, A.; Karmakar, N. C.; Yuce, M. R.

    2016-11-01

    A selective electrothermal magnetic annealing technique is introduced that provides programming capabilities for mechanical micro-resonators. In the proposed approach, the magnetic properties of resonators can be locally tuned in a post-fabrication batch-compatible process step. A prototype is implemented in a standard microfabrication process, where resonating ferromagnetic elements are suspended on top of a polysilicon resistive heater. The ferromagnetic elements consist of electroplated Nickel (Ni) with minor Iron (Fe) impurities. The electro-thermo-mechanical heating phenomenon is simulated for design purposes. The magnetization of micro-resonators with and without magnetic annealing is measured. The resulting magnetic property enhancement is illustrated by hysteresis (M-H) loop variations.

  1. Micro-Fabricated Solid-State Radiation Detectors for Active Personal Dosimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Wrbanek, Susan Y.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Chen, Liang-Yu

    2007-01-01

    Active radiation dosimetry is important to human health and equipment functionality for space applications outside the protective environment of a space station or vehicle. This is especially true for long duration missions to the moon, where the lack of a magnetic field offers no protection from space radiation to those on extravehicular activities. In order to improve functionality, durability and reliability of radiation dosimeters for future NASA lunar missions, single crystal silicon carbide devices and scintillating fiber detectors are currently being investigated for applications in advanced extravehicular systems. For many years, NASA Glenn Research Center has led significant efforts in silicon carbide semiconductor technology research and instrumentation research for sensor applications under extreme conditions. This report summarizes the technical progress and accomplishments toward characterization of radiation-sensing components for the recommendation of their fitness for advanced dosimetry development.

  2. Microfabricated device and method for multiplexed electrokinetic focusing of fluid streams and a transport cytometry method using same

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Stephen C.; Ramsey, J. Michael

    2000-01-01

    A microfabricated device and method for electrokinetic transport of a liquid phase biological or chemical material is described. In accordance with one aspect of the present invention there is provided a microchip that is adapted for the simultaneous spatial confinement of electrokinetically driven fluidic material streams on a substrate. The apparatus includes a focusing chamber formed in a surface of the substrate and in fluid communication with two sample fluid channels and three focusing fluid channels. The device further includes electromotive means operatively connected to the sources of the sample fluid and the source of focusing fluid for electrokinetically driving the respective streams of the sample and focusing fluids through the respective channels into the focusing chamber such that the focusing fluid streams spatially confine the first and second sample fluid streams within the focusing chamber. In accordance with another aspect of this invention, there is provided a cytometry method for analyzing microscopic particles in a fluid medium on a microchip by utilizing the focusing function of the microchip. In the disclosed cytometry process the width of the fluid stream is narrowed in the focusing chamber. The microscopic particles in the focused sample fluid are then detected and/or measured using light scattering or other techniques.

  3. A microfabricated water-immersible scanning mirror with a small form factor for handheld ultrasound and photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Song; Huang, Chih-Hsien; Zou, Jun

    2016-03-01

    Micro scanning mirrors that can operate reliably under water is useful in both ultrasound and photoacoustic microscopic imaging, where fast scanning of focused high-frequency ultrasound beams is desired for pixel-by-pixel data acquisition. This paper reports the development of a new micro-fabricated water-immersible scanning mirror with a small form factor. It consists of an optically and acoustically reflective mirror plate, which is supported onto two flexible polymer hinges and driven by an integrated electromagnetic micro-actuator. It can achieve one-axis scanning of +/-12.1° at a resonant frequency of 250Hz in air and 210Hz in water, respectively. By optimizing the design and enhancing the fabrication with high-precision optical 3D printing, the overall size of the scanning mirror module is less than 7 mm × 5 mm × 7 mm. The small form factor, large scanning angle, and high resonant frequency of the new water-immersible scanning mirror make it suitable for building compact handheld imaging probes for in-vivo high-speed and wide-field ultrasound and photoacoustic microscopy.

  4. Microfabrication and Device Parameter Testing of the Focal Plane Arrays for the Spider and BICEP2/Keck CMB Polarimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonetti, J. A.; Turner, A. D.; Kenyon, M.; Orlando, A.; Brevik, J. A.; Trangsrud, A.; Sudiwala, R.; Leduc, H. G.; Nguyen, H. T.; Day, P. K.; Bock, J. J.; Golwala, S. R.; Sayers, J.; Kovac, J. M.; Lange, A. E.; Jones, W. C.; Kuo, C. L.

    2009-12-01

    Spider and BICEP2/Keck are projects to study the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). The focal planes for both require large format arrays of superconducting transition edge sensors (TES's). A major challenge for these projects is fabricating arrays with high uniformity in device parameters. A microfabrication process is described that meets this challenge. The results from device testing are discussed. Each focal plane is composed of 4 square wafers (tiles), and each wafer contains 128 membrane-isolated, polarization-sensitive, antenna-coupled TES's. After processing, selected wafers are pre-screened in a quick-turn-around, cryogen-free, 3He fridge. The pre-screening is performed with a commercial resistance bridge and measures transition temperatures (Tc) and normal state resistances (Rn). After pre-screening, 4 tiles at a time are fully characterized in a testbed employing a SQUID readout and SQUID mulitplexing. The tests demonstrate the values of Tc, Rn, thermal conductance, g, and the standard deviations of each, across a wafer and from wafer to wafer, are within design specifications.

  5. Human mammalian cell sorting using a highly integrated micro-fabricated fluorescence-activated cell sorter (microFACS).

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung Hwan; Chen, Chun H; Tsai, Frank S; Godin, Jessica M; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2010-06-21

    We demonstrate a high performance microfabricated FACS system with highly integrated microfluidics, optics, acoustics, and electronics. Single cell manipulation at a high speed is made possible by the fast response time (approximately 0.1 ms) of the integrated PZT actuator and the nozzle structure at the sorting junction. A Teflon AF-coated optofluidic waveguide along the microfluidic channel guides the illumination light, enabling multi-spot detection, while a novel space-time coding technology enhances the detection sensitivity of the microFACS system. The real-time control loop system is implemented using a field-programmable-gate-array (FPGA) for automated and accurate sorting. The microFACS achieves a high purification enrichment factor: up to approximately 230 fold for both polystyrene microbeads and suspended human mammalian cells (K562) at a high throughput (>1000 cells s(-1)). The sorting mechanism is independent of cell properties such as size, density, and shape, thus the presented system can be applied to sort out any pure sub-populations. This new lab-on-a-chip FACS system, therefore, holds promise to revolutionize microfluidic cytometers to meet cost, size, and performance goals.

  6. High accuracy thermal conductivity measurement of aqueous cryoprotective agents and semi-rigid biological tissues using a microfabricated thermal sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xin M.; Sekar, Praveen K.; Zhao, Gang; Zhou, Xiaoming; Shu, Zhiquan; Huang, Zhongping; Ding, Weiping; Zhang, Qingchuan; Gao, Dayong

    2015-05-01

    An improved thermal-needle approach for accurate and fast measurement of thermal conductivity of aqueous and soft biomaterials was developed using microfabricated thermal conductivity sensors. This microscopic measuring device was comprehensively characterized at temperatures from 0 °C to 40 °C. Despite the previous belief, system calibration constant was observed to be highly temperature-dependent. Dynamic thermal conductivity response during cooling (40 °C to -40 °C) was observed using the miniaturized single tip sensor for various concentrations of CPAs, i.e., glycerol, ethylene glycol and dimethyl sulfoxide. Chicken breast, chicken skin, porcine limb, and bovine liver were assayed to investigate the effect of anatomical heterogeneity on thermal conductivity using the arrayed multi-tip sensor at 20 °C. Experimental results revealed distinctive differences in localized thermal conductivity, which suggests the use of approximated or constant property values is expected to bring about results with largely inflated uncertainties when investigating bio-heat transfer mechanisms and/or performing sophisticated thermal modeling with complex biological tissues. Overall, the presented micro thermal sensor with automated data analysis algorithm is a promising approach for direct thermal conductivity measurement of aqueous solutions and soft biomaterials and is of great value to cryopreservation of tissues, hyperthermia or cryogenic, and other thermal-based clinical diagnostics and treatments.

  7. Microfabrics and 3D grain shape of Gorleben rock salt: Constraints on deformation mechanisms and paleodifferential stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiemeyer, Nicolas; Zulauf, Gernold; Mertineit, Michael; Linckens, Jolien; Pusch, Maximilian; Hammer, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    The Permian Knäuel- and Streifensalz formations (z2HS1 and z2HS2) are main constituents of the Gorleben salt dome (Northern Germany) and show different amounts and distributions of anhydrite. The reconstruction of 3D halite grain shape ellipsoids reveals small grain size (3.4 ± 0.6 mm) and heterogeneous grain shapes in both formations, the latter attributed to the polyphase deformation of the rock salt during diapirism. The halite microfabrics of both formations indicate that strain-induced grain boundary migration was active during deformation. Crystal plastic deformation of halite is further documented by lattice bending, subgrain formation and minor subgrain rotation. Evidence for pressure solution of halite has not been found, but cannot be excluded because of the small grain size, the lack of LPO and the low differential stress (1.1-1.3 MPa) as deduced from subgrain-size piezometry. Anhydrite has been deformed in the brittle-ductile regime by solution precipitation creep, minor dislocation creep and brittle boudinage. No continuous anhydrite layers are preserved, and halite has acted as a sealing matrix embedding the disrupted anhydrite fragments prohibiting any potential migration pathways for fluids. Thus, anhydrite should not have a negative effect on the barrier properties of the Gorleben rock salts investigated in this study.

  8. High accuracy thermal conductivity measurement of aqueous cryoprotective agents and semi-rigid biological tissues using a microfabricated thermal sensor

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xin M.; Sekar, Praveen K.; Zhao, Gang; Zhou, Xiaoming; Shu, Zhiquan; Huang, Zhongping; Ding, Weiping; Zhang, Qingchuan; Gao, Dayong

    2015-01-01

    An improved thermal-needle approach for accurate and fast measurement of thermal conductivity of aqueous and soft biomaterials was developed using microfabricated thermal conductivity sensors. This microscopic measuring device was comprehensively characterized at temperatures from 0 °C to 40 °C. Despite the previous belief, system calibration constant was observed to be highly temperature-dependent. Dynamic thermal conductivity response during cooling (40 °C to –40 °C) was observed using the miniaturized single tip sensor for various concentrations of CPAs, i.e., glycerol, ethylene glycol and dimethyl sulfoxide. Chicken breast, chicken skin, porcine limb, and bovine liver were assayed to investigate the effect of anatomical heterogeneity on thermal conductivity using the arrayed multi-tip sensor at 20 °C. Experimental results revealed distinctive differences in localized thermal conductivity, which suggests the use of approximated or constant property values is expected to bring about results with largely inflated uncertainties when investigating bio-heat transfer mechanisms and/or performing sophisticated thermal modeling with complex biological tissues. Overall, the presented micro thermal sensor with automated data analysis algorithm is a promising approach for direct thermal conductivity measurement of aqueous solutions and soft biomaterials and is of great value to cryopreservation of tissues, hyperthermia or cryogenic, and other thermal-based clinical diagnostics and treatments. PMID:25993037

  9. Photothermal Microneedle Etching: Improved Three-Dimensional Microfabrication Method for Agarose Gel for Topographical Control of Cultured Cell Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriguchi, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Kenji

    2006-08-01

    We have developed a new three-dimensional (3D) microfabrication method for agarose gel, photothermal microneedle etching (PTMNE), by means of an improved photothermal spot heating using a focused 1064 nm laser beam for melting a portion of the agarose layer at the tip of the microneedle, where a photoabsorbent chromium layer is coated to be heated. The advantage of this method is that it allows the 3D control of the melting topography within the thick agarose layer with a 2 μm resolution, whereas conventional photothermal etching can enable only two-dimensional (2D) control on the surface of the chip. By this method, we can form the spheroid clusters of particular cells from isolated single cells without any physical contact with other cells in other chambers, which is important for measuring the community effect of the cell group from isolated single cells. When we set single cancer cells in microchambers of 100 μm in diameter, formed in a 50-μm-thick agarose layer, we observed that they grew, divided, and formed spheroid clusters of cells in each microchamber. The result indicates the potential of this method to be a fundamental technique in the research of multicellular spherical clusters of cells for checking the community effect of cells in 3D structures, such as the permeabilities of chemicals and substrates into the cluster, which is complementary to conventional 2D dish cultivation and can contribute to the cell-based screening of drugs.

  10. High accuracy thermal conductivity measurement of aqueous cryoprotective agents and semi-rigid biological tissues using a microfabricated thermal sensor.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xin M; Sekar, Praveen K; Zhao, Gang; Zhou, Xiaoming; Shu, Zhiquan; Huang, Zhongping; Ding, Weiping; Zhang, Qingchuan; Gao, Dayong

    2015-05-20

    An improved thermal-needle approach for accurate and fast measurement of thermal conductivity of aqueous and soft biomaterials was developed using microfabricated thermal conductivity sensors. This microscopic measuring device was comprehensively characterized at temperatures from 0 °C to 40 °C. Despite the previous belief, system calibration constant was observed to be highly temperature-dependent. Dynamic thermal conductivity response during cooling (40 °C to -40 °C) was observed using the miniaturized single tip sensor for various concentrations of CPAs, i.e., glycerol, ethylene glycol and dimethyl sulfoxide. Chicken breast, chicken skin, porcine limb, and bovine liver were assayed to investigate the effect of anatomical heterogeneity on thermal conductivity using the arrayed multi-tip sensor at 20 °C. Experimental results revealed distinctive differences in localized thermal conductivity, which suggests the use of approximated or constant property values is expected to bring about results with largely inflated uncertainties when investigating bio-heat transfer mechanisms and/or performing sophisticated thermal modeling with complex biological tissues. Overall, the presented micro thermal sensor with automated data analysis algorithm is a promising approach for direct thermal conductivity measurement of aqueous solutions and soft biomaterials and is of great value to cryopreservation of tissues, hyperthermia or cryogenic, and other thermal-based clinical diagnostics and treatments.

  11. Material considerations in the microfabrication of grating microstructures for use in a laser-powered linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, J.B.

    1986-12-01

    Collaborative work between Brookhaven and Los Alamos National Laboratories is developing a new type of linear accelerator that uses a high-power, picosecond pulse CO/sub 2/ laser to irradiate a specialized form of grating with a pitch of 10.6 microns. The electromagnetic field that results can be used to accelerate electrons at field gradients of several GeV/m with potential efficiencies much better than current accelerators. The grating must be conductive to minimize resistive losses, be able to withstand high fields without damage, and requires dimensional tolerances in the sub-micron range. These requirements focus attention on grating material selection, microfabrication methods, and metrological methods used for quality control. At present, several types of gratings have been manufactured by reactive ion etching of fused silica in CHF/sub 3//Ar or etching silicon with KOH/H/sub 2/O or ethylenediamine-pyrocatechol solutions. Metrological analysis of the gratings has begun with a Tracor Northern 5700 digital image analyzer.

  12. Microscopically-Tuned Band Structure of Epitaxial Graphene through Interface and Stacking Variations Using Si Substrate Microfabrication

    PubMed Central

    Fukidome, Hirokazu; Ide, Takayuki; Kawai, Yusuke; Shinohara, Toshihiro; Nagamura, Naoka; Horiba, Koji; Kotsugi, Masato; Ohkochi, Takuo; Kinoshita, Toyohiko; Kumighashira, Hiroshi; Oshima, Masaharu; Suemitsu, Maki

    2014-01-01

    Graphene exhibits unusual electronic properties, caused by a linear band structure near the Dirac point. This band structure is determined by the stacking sequence in graphene multilayers. Here we present a novel method of microscopically controlling the band structure. This is achieved by epitaxy of graphene on 3C-SiC(111) and 3C-SiC(100) thin films grown on a 3D microfabricated Si(100) substrate (3D-GOS (graphene on silicon)) by anisotropic etching, which produces Si(111) microfacets as well as major Si(100) microterraces. We show that tuning of the interface between the graphene and the 3C-SiC microfacets enables microscopic control of stacking and ultimately of the band structure of 3D-GOS, which is typified by the selective emergence of semiconducting and metallic behaviours on the (111) and (100) portions, respectively. The use of 3D-GOS is thus effective in microscopically unlocking various potentials of graphene depending on the application target, such as electronic or photonic devices. PMID:24903119

  13. Micro-fabricated wireless biosensors for the detection of S. typhimurium in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Suiqiong; Johnson, Michael L.; Li, Yugui; Chen, Huiqin; Banerjee, Ishita; Chen, I.-Hsuan; Barbaree, James M.; Cheng, Z.-Y.; Chin, Bryan A.

    2010-04-01

    Food borne illnesses from the ingestion of S. typhimurium have been of primary concern due to their common occurrence in food products of daily consumption. In this paper, micron size, magnetoelastic (ME) biosensors for the detection of S. typhimurium were fabricated and tested in liquid solutions containing known concentrations of S. typhimurium cells. The biosensors are comprised of a ME sensor platform and immobilized bio-molecular recognition element (E2 phage) that has been engineered to bind the S. typhimurium multi-valently. The micron size ME sensor platforms were manufactured using microelectronics fabrication techniques. Phage was engineered at Auburn University and immobilized onto all surfaces of the sensor. The ME biosensor oscillates with a characteristic resonance frequency when subjected to a time varying magnetic field. Binding between the phage and bacteria, adds mass to the sensor that causes a shift in the sensor's resonance frequency. Sensors with the dimension of 500x100x4 μm were exposed to S. typhimurium with increasing known concentrations ranging from 5 x101 to 5 x 107 cfu/ml. The ME biosensor exhibited high sensitivity and a detection limit better than 50 cfu/ml.

  14. Microfabrication of membrane-based devices by HARSE and combined HARSE/wet etching

    SciTech Connect

    Manginell, R.P.; Frye-Mason, G.C.; Schubert, W.K.; Shul, R.J.; Willison, C.G.

    1998-08-01

    Deep-reactive ion etching (DRIE) of silicon, also known as high-aspect-ratio silicon etching (HARSE), is distinguished by fast etch rates ({approximately}3 {micro}m/min), crystal orientation independence, anisotropy, vertical sidewall profiles and CMOS compatibility. By using through-wafer HARSE and stopping on a dielectric film placed on the opposite side of the wafer, freestanding dielectric membranes were produced. Dielectric membrane-based sensors and actuators fabricated in this way include microhotplates, flow sensors, valves and magnetically-actuated flexural plate wave (FPW) devices. Unfortunately, low-stress silicon nitride, a common membrane material, has an appreciable DRI etch rate. To overcome this problem HARSE can be followed by a brief wet chemical etch. This approach has been demonstrated using KOH or HF/Nitric/Acetic etchants, both of which have significantly smaller etch rates on silicon nitride than does DRIE. Composite membranes consisting of silicon dioxide and silicon nitride layers are also under evaluation due to the higher DRIE selectivity to silicon dioxide.

  15. Tissue-compliant neural implants from microfabricated carbon nanotube multilayer composite.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huanan; Patel, Paras R; Xie, Zhixing; Swanson, Scott D; Wang, Xueding; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2013-09-24

    Current neural prosthetic devices (NPDs) induce chronic inflammation due to complex mechanical and biological reactions related, in part, to staggering discrepancies of mechanical properties with neural tissue. Relatively large size of the implants and traumas to blood-brain barrier contribute to inflammation reactions, as well. Mitigation of these problems and the realization of long-term brain interface require a new generation of NPDs fabricated from flexible materials compliant with the brain tissue. However, such materials will need to display hard-to-combine mechanical and electrical properties which are not available in the toolbox of classical neurotechnology. Moreover, these new materials will concomitantly demand different methods of (a) device micromanufacturing and (b) surgical implantation in brains because currently used processes take advantage of high stiffness of the devices. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) serve as a promising foundation for such materials because of their record mechanical and electrical properties, but CNT-based tissue-compliant devices have not been realized yet. In this study, we formalize the mechanical requirements to tissue-compliant implants based on critical rupture strength of brain tissue and demonstrate that miniature CNT-based devices can satisfy these requirements. We fabricated them using MEMS-like technology and miniaturized them so that at least two dimensions of the electrodes would be comparable to brain tissue cells. The nanocomposite-based flexible neural electrodes were implanted into the rat motor cortex using a surgical procedure specifically designed for soft tissue-compliant implants. The post-surgery implant localization in the motor cortex was successfully visualized with magnetic resonance and photoacoustic imaging. In vivo functionality was demonstrated by successful registration of the low-frequency neural recording in the live brain of anesthetized rats. Investigation of inflammation processes around these

  16. Performance of Magnetic Penetration Thermometers for X-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagler, P. C.; Adams, J. S.; Balvin, M. A.; Bandler, S. R.; Denis, K. L.; Hsieh, W. T.; Kelly, D. P.; Porst, J. P.; Sadleir, J. E.; Seidel, G. M.; Smith, S. J.; Stevenson, T. R.

    2012-01-01

    The ideal X-ray camera for astrophysics would have more than a million pixels and provide an energy resolution of better than leV FWHM for energies up to 10 keY. We have microfabricated and characterized thin-film magnetic penetration thermometers (MPTs) that show great promise towards meeting these capabilities. MPTs operate in similar fashion to metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs), except that a superconducting sensor takes the place of a paramagnetic sensor and it is the temperature dependence of the superconductor's diamagnetic response that provides the temperature sensitivity. We present a description of the design and performance of our prototype thin-film MPTs with MoAu bilayer sensors, which have demonstrated an energy resolution of approx 2 eV FWHM at 1.5 keY and 4.3 eV FWHM at 5.9 keY.

  17. Square spiral photonic crystals: robust architecture for microfabrication of materials with large three-dimensional photonic band gaps.

    PubMed

    Toader, Ovidiu; John, Sajeev

    2002-07-01

    We provide a blueprint for microfabricating photonic crystals with very large and robust three-dimensional photonic band gaps (PBG's). These crystals are based on interleaving polygonal spiral posts and can be efficiently manufactured on a large scale in a one-step process using the recently introduced technique of glancing angle deposition. We classify various families of spiral photonic crystals based on (i) the parent three-dimensional (3D) point lattice to which they are most closely related, (ii) the crystallographic axis of the parent lattice around which the spiral posts wind, and (iii) the set of points of the parent lattice which the spiral arms connect or nearly connect. We obtain optimal geometries for the spiral photonic crystals by detailed mapping of the size and location of the PBG within a multidimensional parameter space which characterizes the shape of each spiral post. For the optimum PBG, the spiral arms and elbows may deviate significantly from the points of the original point lattice. The largest 3D PBG's are obtained for square spiral posts that wind around the [001] axis of diamond (or face centered cubic) lattice and in which the spiral arm segments approximately connect either the fifth or first nearest-neighbor points of the parent lattice. In the case of silicon posts (with a dielectric constant of 11.9) in an air background, whose arm segments nearly connect fifth nearest-neighbor point of the diamond lattice, the full PBG can be as large as 16% of the gap center frequency. For the corresponding air posts in a silicon background, the maximum PBG is 24% of the gap center frequency. We compute both the total electromagnetic density of states and the electromagnetic field distributions near the PBG. It is suggested the PBG in an optimized structure is highly tolerant to various forms of disorder that may arise during the manufacturing process.

  18. Microfabricated gas chromatograph for on-site determination of trichloroethylene in indoor air arising from vapor intrusion. 1. Field evaluation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Kyu; Burris, David R; Chang, Hungwei; Bryant-Genevier, Jonathan; Zellers, Edward T

    2012-06-05

    Results are presented of inaugural field tests of two identical prototype microfabricated gas chromatographs (μGC) adapted for the in situ determination of trichloroethylene (TCE) in indoor air in support of vapor intrusion (VI) investigations. Each μGC prototype has a pretrap and partially selective high-volume sampler of conventional design, a micromachined-Si focuser for injection, dual micromachined-Si columns for separation, and an integrated array of four microscale chemiresistors with functionalized gold nanoparticle interface films for multichannel detection. Scrubbed ambient air is used as the carrier gas. Field-generated calibration curves were linear for injected TCE masses of 26-414 ng (4.8-77 ppb·L; r(2) > 0.98) and the projected single-sensor detection limit was 0.052 ppb for an 8-L air sample collected and analyzed in 20 min. Consistent performance between the prototypes and good medium-term stability were shown. Above the mitigation action level (MAL) of 2.3 ppb for the field-test site, μGC TCE determinations fell within ±25% of those from the reference method for 21 of 26 measurements, in the presence of up to 37 documented background VOCs. Below the MAL, positive biases were consistently observed, which are attributable to background VOCs that were unresolvable chromatographically or by analysis of the sensor-array response patterns. Results demonstrate that this type of μGC instrument could serve the need for routine TCE determinations in VI-related assessment and mitigation efforts.

  19. Process optimization in high-average-power ultrashort pulse laser microfabrication: how laser process parameters influence efficiency, throughput and quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schille, Joerg; Schneider, Lutz; Loeschner, Udo

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, laser processing of technical grade stainless steel and copper using high-average-power ultrashort pulse lasers is studied in order to gain deeper insight into material removal for microfabrication. A high-pulse repetition frequency picosecond and femtosecond laser is used in conjunction with high-performance galvanometer scanners and an in-house developed two-axis polygon scanner system. By varying the processing parameters such as wavelength, pulse length, fluence and repetition rate, cavities of standardized geometry are fabricated and analyzed. From the depths of the cavities produced, the ablation rate and removal efficiency are estimated. In addition, the quality of the cavities is evaluated by means of scanning electron microscope micrographs or rather surface roughness measurements. From the results obtained, the influence of the machining parameters on material removal and machining quality is discussed. In addition, it is shown that both material removal rate and quality increase by using femtosecond compared to picosecond laser pulses. On stainless steel, a maximum throughput of 6.81 mm3/min is achieved with 32 W femtosecond laser powers; if using 187 W picosecond laser powers, the maximum is 15.04 mm3/min, respectively. On copper, the maximum throughputs are 6.1 mm3/min and 21.4 mm3/min, obtained with 32 W femtosecond and 187 W picosecond laser powers. The findings indicate that ultrashort pulses in the mid-fluence regime yield most efficient material removal. In conclusion, from the results of this analysis, a range of optimum processing parameters are derived feasible to enhance machining efficiency, throughput and quality in high-rate micromachining. The work carried out here clearly opens the way to significant industrial applications.

  20. Conventional and enantioselective gas chromatography with microfabricated planar columns for analysis of real-world samples of plant volatile fraction.

    PubMed

    Cagliero, C; Galli, S; Galli, M; Elmi, I; Belluce, M; Zampolli, S; Sgorbini, B; Rubiolo, P; Bicchi, C

    2016-01-15

    Within a project exploring the application of lab-on-chip GC to in-field analysis of the plant volatile fraction, this study evaluated the performance of a set of planar columns (also known as microchannels, MEMS columns, or microfabricated columns) of different dimensions installed in a conventional GC unit. Circular double-spiral-shaped-channel planar columns with different square/rectangular sections up to 2m long were applied to the analysis of both essential oils and headspace samples of a group of medicinal and aromatic plants (chamomile, peppermint, sage, rosemary, lavender and bergamot) and of standard mixtures of related compounds; the results were compared to those obtained with reference narrow-bore columns (l:5m, dc:0.1mm, df:0.1 μm). The above essential oils and headspaces were first analyzed quali-and quantitatively with planar columns statically coated with conventional stationary phases (5%-phenyl-polymethylsiloxane and auto-bondable nitroterephthalic-acid-modified polyethylene glycol), and then submitted to chiral recognition of their diagnostic markers, by enantioselective GC with a planar columns coated with a cyclodextrin derivative (30% 6(I-VII)-O-TBDMS-3(I-VII)-O-ethyl-2(I-VII)-O-ethyl-β-cyclodextrin in PS-086). Column characteristics and analysis conditions were first optimized to obtain suitable retention and efficiency for the samples investigated. The planar columns tested showed performances close to the reference conventional narrow-bore columns, with theoretical plate numbers per meter (N/m) ranging from 6100 to 7200 for those coated with the conventional stationary phases, and above 5600 for those with the chiral selector.

  1. Computer numerical control (CNC) lithography: light-motion synchronized UV-LED lithography for 3D microfabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungkwun; Yoon, Yong-Kyu; Allen, Mark G.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a computer-numerical-controlled ultraviolet light-emitting diode (CNC UV-LED) lithography scheme for three-dimensional (3D) microfabrication. The CNC lithography scheme utilizes sequential multi-angled UV light exposures along with a synchronized switchable UV light source to create arbitrary 3D light traces, which are transferred into the photosensitive resist. The system comprises a switchable, movable UV-LED array as a light source, a motorized tilt-rotational sample holder, and a computer-control unit. System operation is such that the tilt-rotational sample holder moves in a pre-programmed routine, and the UV-LED is illuminated only at desired positions of the sample holder during the desired time period, enabling the formation of complex 3D microstructures. This facilitates easy fabrication of complex 3D structures, which otherwise would have required multiple manual exposure steps as in the previous multidirectional 3D UV lithography approach. Since it is batch processed, processing time is far less than that of the 3D printing approach at the expense of some reduction in the degree of achievable 3D structure complexity. In order to produce uniform light intensity from the arrayed LED light source, the UV-LED array stage has been kept rotating during exposure. UV-LED 3D fabrication capability was demonstrated through a plurality of complex structures such as V-shaped micropillars, micropanels, a micro-‘hi’ structure, a micro-‘cat’s claw,’ a micro-‘horn,’ a micro-‘calla lily,’ a micro-‘cowboy’s hat,’ and a micro-‘table napkin’ array.

  2. Note: On-chip multifunctional fluorescent-magnetic Janus helical microswimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, G.; Decanini, D.; Leroy, L.; Haghiri-Gosnet, A. M.

    2016-03-01

    Microswimmers integrated into microfluidic devices that are capable of self-illumination through fluorescence could revolutionize many aspects of technology, especially for biological applications. Few illumination and propulsion techniques of helical microswimmers inside microfluidic channels have been demonstrated. This paper presents the fabrication, detachment, and magnetic propulsions of multifunctional fluorescent-magnetic helical microswimmers integrated inside microfluidics. The fabrication process is based on two-photon laser lithography to pattern 3-D nanostructures from fluorescent photoresist coupled with conventional microfabrication techniques for magnetic thin film deposition by shadowing. After direct integration inside a microfluidic device, injected gas bubble allows gentle detachment of the integrated helical microswimmers whose magnetic propulsion can then be directly applied inside the microfluidic channel using external electromagnetic coil setup. With their small scale, fluorescence, excellent resistance to liquid/gas surface tension, and robust propulsion capability inside the microfluidic channel, the microswimmers can be used as high-resolution and large-range mobile micromanipulators inside microfluidic channels.

  3. Microfabrics of calcite ultramylonites as records of coaxial and non-coaxial deformation kinematics: Examples from the Rocher de l'Yret shear zone (Western Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trullenque, Ghislain; Kunze, Karsten; Heilbronner, Renee; Stünitz, Holger; Schmid, Stefan M.

    2006-09-01

    Microfabrics were analysed in calcite mylonites from the rim of the Pelvoux massif (Western Alps, France). WNW-directed emplacement of the internal Penninic units onto the Dauphinois domain produced intense deformation of an Eocene-age nummulitic limestone under lower anchizone metamorphic conditions (slightly below 300 °C). Two types of microfabrics developed primarily by dislocation creep accompanied by dynamic recrystallisation in the absence of twinning. Coaxial kinematics are inferred for samples exhibiting grain shape fabrics and textures with orthorhombic symmetry. Their texture (crystallographic preferred orientation, CPO) is characterised by two c-axis maxima, symmetrically oriented at 15° from the normal to the macroscopic foliation. Non-coaxial deformation is evident in samples with monoclinic shape fabrics and textures characterised by a single oblique c-axis maximum tilted with the sense of shear by about 15°. From the analysis of suitably oriented slip systems for the main texture components under given kinematics it is inferred that the orthorhombic textures, which developed in coaxial kinematics, favour activity of <10-11> and <02-21> slip along the f and r planes, respectively, with minor contributions of basal-< a> slip. In contrast, the monoclinic textures, which developed during simple shear, are most suited for duplex < a> slip along the basal plane. The transition between the dominating slip systems for the orthorhombic and monoclinic microfabrics is interpreted to be due to the effects of dynamic recrystallisation upon texture development. Since oblique c-axis maxima documented in the literature are most often rotated not with but against the shear sense, calcite textures alone should not be used as unequivocal shear sense indicators, but need to be complemented by microstructural criteria such as shape preferred orientations, grain size estimates and amount of twinning.

  4. Tunnel magnetoresistance in full-epitaxial magnetic tunnel junctions with a top electrode consisting of a perpendicularly magnetized D022-Mn3Ge film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugihara, Atsushi; Suzuki, Kazuya; Miyazaki, Terunobu; Mizukami, Shigemi

    2015-07-01

    We grew a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) with a top electrode consisting of a Mn3Ge film using a thin Co-Fe alloy film as a seed layer. X-ray diffraction showed that the Mn3Ge had (001)-oriented D022 structure epitaxially grown on an MgO(001) substrate. Magnetic hysteresis loops suggested that the D022-Mn3Ge film possessed perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. A magnetoresistance (MR) ratio of 11.3% was observed in the microfabricated MTJ at room temperature. The resistance-field curve suggested that the top-Co-Fe and D022-Mn3Ge layer are weakly coupled antiferromagnetically. The optimization of top-Co-Fe composition would improve MR ratio.

  5. Emplacement of an Archean gneiss dome, northern Ontario, Canada: Inflation inferred from magnetic fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borradaile, G. J.; Gauthier, D.

    2003-04-01

    Previous field structural studies of the Ash Bay gneiss dome revealed an upward convex foliation with an integral east-west lineation defined by a quartzo-felspathic matrix. Unfortunately, the amphibolite facies gneisses lack traditional indicators of microfabric evolution, such as kinematic indicators, so that it is difficult to relate the foliation's orientation distribution to an emplacement mechanism for the dome. Fortunately, anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility isolates a distinct microfabric because of the preferred orientation of high-susceptibility, accessory magnetite. The magnetite subfabric developed late in the metamorphic crystallization history, and its magnetic foliation and magnetic lineation are similarly oriented to the S-L fabric of the quartz-feldspar matrix. However, the magnetite foliation dips less steeply and forms a less convex domal surface than the field schistosity. The metamorphic schistosity and the magnetite foliation thus isolate the domal deflection at different stages, confirming the inflation and upward motion of the Ash Bay diapir during the closing stages of amphibolite facies metamorphism.

  6. Investigation of magnetic microdiscs for bacterial pathogen detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo-Torres, Keisha Y.; Garraud, Nicolas; Arnold, David P.; McLamore, Eric S.

    2016-05-01

    Despite strict regulations to control the presence of human pathogens in our food supply, recent foodborne outbreaks have heightened public concern about food safety and created urgency to improve methods for pathogen detection. Herein we explore a potentially portable, low-cost system that uses magnetic microdiscs for the detection of bacterial pathogens in liquid samples. The system operates by optically measuring the rotational dynamics of suspended magnetic microdiscs functionalized with pathogen-binding aptamers. The soft ferromagnetic (Ni80Fe20) microdiscs exhibit a closed magnetic spin arrangement (i.e. spin vortex) with zero magnetic stray field, leading to no disc agglomeration when in free suspension. With very high surface area for functionalization and volumes 10,000x larger than commonly used superparamagnetic nanoparticles, these 1.5-μm-diameter microdiscs are well suited for tagging, trapping, actuating, or interrogating bacterial targets. This work reports a wafer-level microfabrication process for fabrication of 600 million magnetic microdiscs per substrate and measurement of their rotational dynamics response. Additionally, the biofunctionalization of the microdiscs with DNA aptamers, subsequent binding to E. coli bacteria, and their magnetic manipulation is reported.

  7. Design, microfabrication, and characterization of a moulded PDMS/SU-8 inkjet dispenser for a Lab-on-a-Printer platform technology with disposable microfluidic chip.

    PubMed

    Bsoul, Anas; Pan, Sheng; Cretu, Edmond; Stoeber, Boris; Walus, Konrad

    2016-08-16

    In this paper, we present a disposable inkjet dispenser platform technology and demonstrate the Lab-on-a-Printer concept, an extension of the ubiquitous Lab-on-a-Chip concept, whereby microfluidic modules are directly integrated into the printhead. The concept is demonstrated here through the integration of an inkjet dispenser and a microfluidic mixer enabling control over droplet composition from a single nozzle in real-time during printing. The inkjet dispenser is based on a modular design platform that enables the low-cost microfluidic component and the more expensive actuation unit to be easily separated, allowing for the optional disposal of the former and reuse of the latter. To limit satellite droplet formation, a hydrophobic-coated and tapered micronozzle was microfabricated and integrated with the fluidics to realize the dispenser. The microfabricated devices generated droplets with diameters ranging from 150-220 μm, depending mainly on the orifice diameter, with printing rates up to 8000 droplets per second. The inkjet dispenser is capable of dispensing materials with a viscosity up to ∼19 mPa s. As a demonstration of the inkjet dispenser function and application, we have printed type I collagen seeded with human liver carcinoma cells (cell line HepG2), to form patterned biological structures.

  8. Microfabricated discontinuous-edge surface topographies influence osteoblast adhesion, migration, cytoskeletal organization, and proliferation and enhance matrix and mineral deposition in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, D W; Wong, K S; Brunette, D M

    2006-05-01

    The fabrication of surfaces that stimulate increased adhesion, migration, and differentiated function of osteoblasts has been viewed as being desirable for many orthopedic applications. Previous studies have shown that microfabricated pits and grooves alter adhesion, spreading, matrix secretion, and production of mineral by rat calvarial osteoblasts (RCOs). The mechanisms underlying these effects are unknown, although microenvironment and cell alignment are considered to play a role. The aim of this work was to investigate the behavior of RCOs on microfabricated discontinuous-edge surfaces (DESs), which could provide an alternative means to control both the microenvironment and cellular alignment. Two types of discontinuous-type structures were employed, gap-cornered boxes and micron scale pillars. DES gap-cornered boxes and the pillars influenced the arrangement of F-actin, microtubules, and vinculin. Osteoblasts were guided in their direction of migration on both types of substrata. Both box DESs and pillars altered the staining intensity and localization pattern of phosphotyrosine and src-activated FAK localization. Cell multilayering, matrix deposition, and mineralization were enhanced on both discontinuous topographies when compared with smooth controls. This study shows that DESs alter adhesion, migration, and proliferative responses from osteoblasts at early time points (<1 week) and promote multilayering, matrix deposition, and mineral deposition at later times (2-6 weeks). Such topographical patterns could potentially be employed as effective surface features on bone-contacting implants or in membrane-based periodontal applications.

  9. Specialty magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Halbach, K.

    1986-07-01

    A number of basic conceptual designs are explained for magnet systems that use permanent magnet materials. Included are iron free multipoles and hybrid magnets. Also appended is a discussion of the manufacturing process and magnetic properties of some permanent magnet materials. (LEW)

  10. Magnetic testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasley, R. L.; Barton, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Magnetic techniques are described for the nondestructive evaluation of defects in materials. The physical principles, and the magnetic-particle method are discussed along with magnetic-hysteresis measurements and electric current perturbations.

  11. Neodymium Magnets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wida, Sam

    1992-01-01

    Uses extremely strong neodymium magnets to demonstrate several principles of physics including electromagnetic induction, Lenz's Law, domain theory, demagnetization, the Curie point, and magnetic flux lines. (MDH)

  12. Polydimethylsiloxane films doped with NdFeB powder: magnetic characterization and potential applications in biomedical engineering and microrobotics.

    PubMed

    Iacovacci, V; Lucarini, G; Innocenti, C; Comisso, N; Dario, P; Ricotti, L; Menciassi, A

    2015-12-01

    This work reports the fabrication, magnetic characterization and controlled navigation of film-shaped microrobots consisting of a polydimethylsiloxane-NdFeB powder composite material. The fabrication process relies on spin-coating deposition, powder orientation and permanent magnetization. Films with different powder concentrations (10 %, 30 %, 50 % and 70 % w/w) were fabricated and characterized in terms of magnetic properties and magnetic navigation performances (by exploiting an electromagnet-based platform). Standardized data are provided, thus enabling the exploitation of these composite materials in a wide range of applications, from MEMS/microrobot development to biomedical systems. Finally, the possibility to microfabricate free-standing polymeric structures and the biocompatibility of the proposed composite materials is demonstrated.

  13. Ultrasmall Microfabricated Laser Cavities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-23

    as 105-106 K/W, where material gain saturates and nonradiative processes overwhelm before the device can go into stimulated emission [17, 90, 96...K. Hwang, D.-S. Song, I.-Y. Han, and Y.-H. Lee, \\Effect of nonradiative recombination on light emitting properties of two dimensional photonic

  14. Microfabricated therapeutic actuator mechanisms

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, M.A.; Ciarlo, D.R.; Lee, A.P.; Krulevitch, P.A.

    1997-07-08

    Electromechanical microstructures (microgrippers), either integrated circuit (IC) silicon-based or precision machined, to extend and improve the application of catheter-based interventional therapies for the repair of aneurysms in the brain or other interventional clinical therapies. These micromechanisms can be specifically applied to release platinum coils or other materials into bulging portions of the blood vessels also known as aneurysms. The ``micro`` size of the release mechanism is necessary since the brain vessels are the smallest in the body. Through a catheter more than one meter long, the micromechanism located at one end of the catheter can be manipulated from the other end thereof. The microgripper (micromechanism) of the invention will also find applications in non-medical areas where a remotely actuated microgripper or similar actuator would be useful or where micro-assembling is needed. 22 figs.

  15. Microfabricated therapeutic actuator mechanisms

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, Milton A.; Ciarlo, Dino R.; Lee, Abraham P.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    1997-01-01

    Electromechanical microstructures (microgrippers), either integrated circuit (IC) silicon-based or precision machined, to extend and improve the application of catheter-based interventional therapies for the repair of aneurysms in the brain or other interventional clinical therapies. These micromechanisms can be specifically applied to release platinum coils or other materials into bulging portions of the blood vessels also known as aneurysms. The "micro" size of the release mechanism is necessary since the brain vessels are the smallest in the body. Through a catheter more than one meter long, the micromechanism located at one end of the catheter can be manipulated from the other end thereof. The microgripper (micromechanism) of the invention will also find applications in non-medical areas where a remotely actuated microgripper or similar actuator would be useful or where micro-assembling is needed.

  16. Decal transfer microfabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Childs, William Robert

    2004-10-19

    A method of making a microstructure includes forming a pattern in a surface of a silicon-containing elastomer, oxidizing the pattern, contacting the pattern with a substrate; and bonding the oxidized pattern and the substrate such that the pattern and the substrate are irreversibly attached. The silicon-containing elastomer may be removably attached to a transfer pad.

  17. Microfabricated Liquid Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, Alan H.; Joppin, C.; Kerrebrock, J. L.; Schneider, Steven J. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Under NASA Glenn Research Center sponsorship, MIT has developed the concept of micromachined, bipropellant, liquid rocket engines. This is potentially a breakthrough technology changing the cost-performance tradeoffs for small propulsion systems, enabling new applications, and redefining the meaning of the term low-cost-access-to-space. With this NASA support, a liquid-cooled, gaseous propellant version of the thrust chamber and nozzle was designed, built, and tested as a first step. DARPA is currently funding MIT to demonstrate turbopumps and controls. The work performed herein was the second year of a proposed three-year effort to develop the technology and demonstrate very high power density, regeneratively cooled, liquid bipropellant rocket engine thrust chamber and nozzles. When combined with the DARPA turbopumps and controls, this work would enable the design and demonstration of a complete rocket propulsion system. The original MIT-NASA concept used liquid oxygen-ethanol propellants. The military applications important to DARPA imply that storable liquid propellants are needed. Thus, MIT examined various storable propellant combinations including N2O4 and hydrazine, and H2O2 and various hydrocarbons. The latter are preferred since they do not have the toxicity of N2O4 and hydrazine. In reflection of the newfound interest in H2O2, it is once again in production and available commercially. A critical issue for the microrocket engine concept is cooling of the walls in a regenerative design. This is even more important at microscale than for large engines due to cube-square scaling considerations. Furthermore, the coolant behavior of rocket propellants has not been characterized at microscale. Therefore, MIT designed and constructed an apparatus expressly for this purpose. The report details measurements of two candidate microrocket fuels, JP-7 and JP-10.

  18. Microfabricated cylindrical ion trap

    DOEpatents

    Blain, Matthew G.

    2005-03-22

    A microscale cylindrical ion trap, having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale cylindrical ion trap to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The microscale CIT has a reduced ion mean free path, allowing operation at higher pressures with less expensive and less bulky vacuum pumping system, and with lower battery power than conventional- and miniature-sized ion traps. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microscale cylindrical ion trap with on-chip integrated circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of microscale cylindrical ion traps can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  19. Precision formed micro magnets: LDRD project summary report

    SciTech Connect

    CHRISTENSON,TODD R.; GARINO,TERRY J.; VENTURINI,EUGENE L.

    2000-02-01

    A microfabrication process is described that provides for the batch realization of miniature rare earth based permanent magnets. Prismatic geometry with features as small as 5 microns, thicknesses up through several hundred microns and with submicron tolerances may be accommodated. The processing is based on a molding technique using deep x-ray lithography as a means to generate high aspect-ratio precision molds from PMMA (poly methyl methacrylate) used as an x-ray photoresist. Subsequent molding of rare-earth permanent magnet (REPM) powder combined with a thermosetting plastic binder may take place directly in the PMMA mold. Further approaches generate an alumina form replicated from the PMMA mold that becomes an intermediate mold for pressing higher density REPM material and allows for higher process temperatures. Maximum energy products of 3--8 MGOe (Mega Gauss Oersted, 1 MGOe = 100/4{pi} kJ/m{sup 3}) are obtained for bonded isotropic forms of REPM with dimensions on the scale of 100 microns and up to 23 MGOe for more dense anisotropic REPM material using higher temperature processing. The utility of miniature precision REPMs is revealed by the demonstration of a miniature multipole brushless DC motor that possesses a pole-anisotropic rotor with dimensions that would otherwise prohibit multipole magnetization using a multipole magnetizing fixture at this scale. Subsequent multipole assembly also leads to miniaturized Halbach arrays, efficient magnetic microactuators, and mechanical spring-like elements which can offset miniaturized mechanical scaling behavior.

  20. Stable, Microfabricated Thin Layer Chromatography Plates without Volume Distortion on Patterned, Carbon and Al2O3-Primed Carbon Nanotube Forests

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, David S.; Kanyal, Supriya S.; Gupta, Vipul; Vail, Michael A.; Dadson, Andrew; Engelhard, Mark H.; Vanfleet, Richard; Davis, Robert C.; Linford, Matthew R.

    2012-09-28

    In a recent report (Song, J.; et al., Advanced Functional Materials 2011, 21, 1132-1139) some of us described the fabrication of thin layer chromatography (TLC) plates from patterned carbon nanotube (CNT) forests, which were directly infiltrated/coated with silicon by low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) of silicon using SiH4. Following infiltration, the nanotubes were removed from the assemblies and the silicon simultaneously converted to SiO2 in a high temperature oxidation step. However, while straightforward, this process had some shortcomings, not the least of which was some distortion of the lithographically patterned features during the volume expansion that accompanied oxidation. Herein we overcome theis issue and also take substantial steps forward in the microfabrication of TLC plates by showing: (i) A new method for creating an adhesion promotion layer on CNT forests by depositing a few nanometers of carbon followed by atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Al2O3. This method for appears to be new, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirms the expected presence of oxygen after carbon deposition. ALD of Al2O3 alone and in combination with the carbon on patterned CNT forests was also explored as an adhesion promotion layer for CNT forest infiltration. (ii) Rapid, conformal deposition of an inorganic material that does not require subsequent oxidation: fast pseudo-ALD growth of SiO2 via alumina catalyzed deposition of tris(tert-butoxy)silanol onto the carbon/Al2O3-primed CNT forests. (iii) Faithful reproduction of the features in the masks used to microfabricate the TLC plates (M-TLC) this advance springs from the previous two points. (iv) A bonded (amino) phase on a CNT-templated microfabricated TLC plate. (v) Fast, highly efficient (125,000 - 225,000 N/m) separations of fluorescent dyes on M-TLC plates. (vi) Extensive characterization of our new materials by TEM, SEM, EDAX, DRIFT, and XPS. (vii) A substantially lower process temperature for the

  1. Magnetic Levitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossing, Thomas D.; Hull, John R.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the principles of magnetic levitation presented in the physics classroom and applied to transportation systems. Topics discussed include three classroom demonstrations to illustrate magnetic levitation, the concept of eddy currents, lift and drag forces on a moving magnet, magnetic levitation vehicles, levitation with permanent magnets…

  2. Magnetic Spinner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ouseph, P. J.

    2006-01-01

    A science toy sometimes called the "magnetic spinner" is an interesting class demonstration to illustrate the principles of magnetic levitation. It can also be used to demonstrate Faraday's law and a horizontally suspended physical pendulum. The levitated part contains two circular magnets encased in a plastic housing. Each magnet stays…

  3. Characterization and comparison of three microfabrication methods to generate out-of-plane microvortices for single cell rotation and 3D imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shetty, Rishabh M.; Myers, Jakrey R.; Sreenivasulu, Manoj; Teller, Wacey; Vela, Juan; Houkal, Jeff; Chao, Shih-Hui; Johnson, Roger H.; Kelbauskas, Laimonas; Wang, Hong; Meldrum, Deirdre R.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents three different microfabrication technologies for manufacturing out-of-plane, flat-bottomed, undercut trapezoidal structures for generating a fluidic microscale vortex (microvortex). The first method is based on anisotropic silicon etching and a ‘sandwich’ UV polymer casting assembly; the second method uses a backside diffuser photolithography technique; and the third method features a tilted backside photolithography technique. We discuss the advantages, limitations, and utility of each technique. We further demonstrate that the microvortex generated in the resultant undercut trapezoidal structures can be used to rotate biological microparticles, e.g. single, live cells for multiperspective, high resolution 3D imaging using computed tomography, and angularly resolved confocal imaging.

  4. Single-mask, three-dimensional microfabrication of high-aspect-ratio structures in bulk silicon using reactive ion etching lag and sacrificial oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, M. P.; Aimi, M. F.; MacDonald, N. C.

    2004-12-01

    This letter describes a simple method for three-dimensional microfabrication of complex, high-aspect-ratio structures with arbitrary surface height profiles in bulk silicon. The method relies on the exploitation of reactive ion etching lag to simultaneously define all features using a single lithographic masking step. Modulation of the mask pattern openings used to define the features results in etch depth variation across the pattern, which is then translated into surface height variation through removal of the superstructure above the etched floors. Utilization of a nonisotropic superstructure removal method based on sacrificial oxidation enables definition of high-aspect-ratio structures with vertical sidewalls and fine features. The utility of the approach is demonstrated in the fabrication of a sloping electrode structure for application in a hybrid micromirror device.

  5. Microfabricated tin-film electrodes for protein and DNA sensing based on stripping voltammetric detection of Cd(II) released from quantum dots labels.

    PubMed

    Kokkinos, Christos; Economou, Anastasios; Petrou, Panagiota S; Kakabakos, Sotirios E

    2013-11-19

    A novel disposable microfabricated tin-film electrochemical sensor was developed for the detection of proteins and DNA. The sensor was fabricated on a silicon wafer through photolithography to define the sensor geometry followed by tin sputtering. A sandwich-type immunoassay with biotinylated reporter antibody was employed for the determination of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in human serum samples. For the detection of C533G mutation of the RET gene, biotinylated oligonucleotide probes were used. The biotinylated biomolecular probes were labeled with streptavidin (STV)-conjugated CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs); quantification of the analytes was performed through acidic dissolution of the QDs and stripping voltammetric detection of the Cd(II) released. The proposed QD-based electrochemical sensor overcomes the limitations of existing voltammetric sensors and provides a mercury-free sensing platform with scope for mass-production and further potential for application in clinical diagnostics.

  6. Development of a micro nuclear magnetic resonance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goloshevsky, Artem

    Application of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) to on-line/in-line control of industrial processes is currently limited by equipment costs and requirements for installation. A superconducting magnet generating strong fields is the most expensive part of a typical NMR instrument. In industrial environments, fringe magnetic fields make accommodation of NMR instruments difficult. However, a portable, low-cost and low-field magnetic resonance system can be used in virtually any environment. Development of a number of hardware components for a portable, low-cost NMR instrument is reported in this dissertation. Chapter one provides a discussion on a miniaturized Helmholtz spiral radio-frequency (RF) coil (average diameter equal to 3.5 mm) and an NMR probe built around a capillary (outer diameter = 1.59 mm and inner diameter = 1.02 mm) for flow imaging. Experiments of NMR spectroscopy, static and dynamic (flow) imaging, conducted with the use of the miniaturized coil, are described. Chapter two presents a microfabricated package of two biaxial gradient coils and a Helmholtz RF coil. Planar configuration of discrete wires was used to create magnetic field gradients. Performance of the microfabricated gradient coils while imaging water flow compared well with a commercial gradient set of much larger size. Chapter three reports on flow imaging experiments with power law fluids (aqueous solutions of sodium salt of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC)) of different viscosities, carried out in the NMR probe with the miniaturized RF coil and capillary. Viscosities of the CMC solutions were determined based on the curve fits of the velocity profiles and simultaneous measurements of the flow rates. The curve fits were carried out according to the power law model equations. The NMR viscosity measurements compared well with measurements of the same CMC samples, performed on a conventional rotational rheometer. A portable, home-built transceiver, designed for NMR applications utilizing a

  7. Magnetic approaches to study collective three-dimensional cell mechanics in long-term cultures (invited)

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ruogang; Boudou, Thomas; Wang, Wei-Gang; Chen, Christopher S.; Reich, Daniel H.

    2014-01-01

    Contractile forces generated by cells and the stiffness of the surrounding extracellular matrix are two central mechanical factors that regulate cell function. To characterize the dynamic evolution of these two mechanical parameters during tissue morphogenesis, we developed a magnetically actuated micro-mechanical testing system in which fibroblast-populated collagen microtissues formed spontaneously in arrays of microwells that each contains a pair of elastomeric microcantilevers. We characterized the magnetic actuation performance of this system and evaluated its capacity to support long-term cell culture. We showed that cells in the microtissues remained viable during prolonged culture periods of up to 15 days, and that the mechanical properties of the microtissues reached and maintained at a stable state after a fast initial increase stage. Together, these findings demonstrate the utility of this microfabricated bio-magneto-mechanical system in extended mechanobiological studies in a physiologically relevant 3D environment. PMID:24803684

  8. Planetary magnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.

    1981-01-01

    A synoptic view of early and recent data on the planetary magnetism of Mercury, Venus, the moon, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn is presented. The data on Mercury from Mariner 10 are synthesized with various other sources, while data for Venus obtained from 120 orbits of Pioneer Venus give the upper limit of the magnetic dipole. Explorer 35 Lunar Orbiter data provided the first evidence of lunar magnetization, but it was the Apollo subsatellite data that measured accurately the magnetic dipole of the moon. A complete magnetic survey of Mars is still needed, and only some preliminary data are given on the magnetic dipole of the planet. Figures on the magnetic dipoles of Jupiter and Saturn are also suggested. It is concluded that if the magnetic field data are to be used to infer the interior properties of the planets, good measures of the multiple harmonics in the field are needed, which may be obtained only through low altitude polar orbits.

  9. Digital magnetic tagging for multiplexed suspension-based biochemical assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrelias, T.; Trypiniotis, T.; Palfreyman, J. J.; Hong, B.; Vyas, K.; Hayward, T. J.; Llandro, J.; Kopper, K. P.; Bland, J. A. C.; Robertson, P. A.; Barnes, C. H. W.

    2009-04-01

    Microarrays and suspension (or bead)-based technologies have attracted significant interest for their broad applications in high throughput molecular biology. However, the throughput of microarrays will always be limited by the array density and the slow diffusion of molecules to their binding sites. Suspension-based technologies, in which all the reactions take place directly on the surface of microcarriers functionalized with molecular probes, could offer true multiplexing due to the possibility of extending their detection capability by a straightforward expansion of the size of the chemical library of probes. To fully exploit their potential, the microcarriers must be tagged, but the number of distinct codes available from spectrometric/graphical/physical encoding methods is currently fairly limited. A digital magnetic tagging method based on magnetic microtags, which have been anisotropy engineered to provide stable magnetization directions which correspond to digital codes, is reported. The tags can be suspended in solution and functionalized with a variety of biological molecular probes. Magnetic tagging offers several benefits compared to the traditional optical encoding techniques currently employed. It offers minimal background signals, potential for a large number of distinct codes, miniaturization of devices, and the ability to write a code in situ. Experimental data showing the reading of individual magnetic microbars from samples comprising 50×20 μm2 Ni elements, as well as micromagnetic simulations that show the feasibility of stray field detection, are presented. The stray fields of the magnetic microbars spanning a range of 60 mOe were detected by a microfabricated fluxgate sensor scanned in a raster fashion over the sample that was placed about 70 μm away. Free floating tags have also been fabricated for use in microfluidic systems. A magnetic lab-on-a-chip device could be used for tagging biomolecular probes for applications in genome

  10. Magnetizing of permanent magnets using HTS bulk magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Tetsuo; Muraya, Tomoki; Kawasaki, Nobutaka; Fukui, Satoshi; Ogawa, Jun; Sato, Takao; Terasawa, Toshihisa

    2012-01-01

    A demagnetized Nd-Fe-B permanent magnet was scanned just above the magnetic pole which contains the HTS bulk magnet generating a magnetic field of 3.27 T. The magnet sample was subsequently found to be fully magnetized in the open space of the static magnetic fields. We examined the magnetic field distributions when the magnetic poles were scanned twice to activate the magnet plate inversely with various overlap distances between the tracks of the bulk magnet. The magnetic field of the "rewritten" magnet reached the values of the magnetically saturated region of the material, showing steep gradients at the border of each magnetic pole. As a replacement for conventional pulse field magnetizing methods, this technique is proposed to expand the degree of freedom in the design of electromagnetic devices, and is proposed as a novel practical method for magnetizing rare-earth magnets, which have excellent magnetic performance and require intense fields of more than 3 T to be activated.

  11. Impact of the limitations of state-of-the-art micro-fabrication processes on the performance of pillar array columns for liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Op de Beeck, Jeff; De Malsche, Wim; Tezcan, Deniz S; De Moor, Piet; Desmet, Gert

    2012-05-25

    We report on the practical limitations of the current state-of-the-art in micro-fabrication technology to produce the small pillar sizes that are needed to obtain high efficiency pillar array columns. For this purpose, nine channels with a different pillar diameter, ranging from 5 to 0.5 μm were fabricated using state-of the-art deep-UV lithography and deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) etching technology. The obtained results strongly deviated from the theoretically expected trend, wherein the minimal plate height (H(min)) would reduce linearly with the pillar diameter. The minimal plate height decreases from 1.7 to 1.2 μm when going from 4.80 to 3.81 μm diameter pillars, but as the dimensions are further reduced, the minimal plate heights rise again to values around 2 μm. The smallest pillar diameter even produced the worst minimal plate height (4 μm). An in-depth scanning electron microscopy (SEM) inspection of the different channels clearly reveals that these findings can be attributed to the micro-fabrication limitations that are inevitably encountered when exploring the limits of deep-UV lithography and DRIE etching processes. When the target dimensions of the design approach the etching resolution limits, the band broadening increases in a strongly non-linear way with the decreased pillar dimensions. This highly non-linear relationship can be understood from first principles: when the machining error is of the order of 100-200 nm and when the target design size for the inter-pillar distance is of the order of 250 nm, this inevitably leads to pores that will range in size between 50 and 450 nm that we want to highlight with our paper highly non-linear relationship. This highly non-linear relationship can be understood from first principles: when the machining error is of the order of 100-200 nm and when the target design size for the inter-pillar distance is of the order of 250 nm, this inevitably leads to pores that will range in size between 50 and 450

  12. Measurement of internal movements of the Escherichia coli ribosome using Forster resonance energy transfer and microsecond, continuous-flow turbulent mixing in micro-fabricated devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, Zigurts Krishna

    We have studied internal movements of the Eschericia coli ribosome with Forster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) using multiple donor-acceptor pairs labeled at specific ribosomal protein residues. We have developed a novel methodology that allows a more quantitative interpretation of distance data from FRET measurements, accounting for specific effects when using fluorescent probes, such as: non-stoichiometric labeling when biochemical separation is not possible, quantification of static and dynamic quenching, changes in extinction coefficients, effects of the orientation factor and the presence of random and systematic errors. From the obtained distance data, 13 donor-acceptor positions (from 18 independent FRET pairs) are used to model internal movements within the 30S subunit upon 70S association. These measurements are also applied to monitoring inter-subunit movements in functional states of the ribosome that are associated with the translocation cycle of the ribosome. This work reveals internal movements of the ribosome observed for the first time in solution, and presents in vitro evidence for large concerted inter-subunit motions associated with ribosome translocation. The second half of this thesis is independent of the above. We present the design, construction and implementation of micro-fabricated, continuous-flow, turbulent mixing devices that can mix two or three fluids to complete homogeneity on the molecular scale in the microsecond range. The prototypical designs are compact, portable, simple to fabricate and consume smaller sample volumes than current technology. We characterize the turbulent mixing process in microfluidic channels with fluorescence intensity and lifetime imaging and show that both the dependence of mixing times and pressure drop on the flow velocity and Reynolds number agree well with theoretical expectations for turbulent pipe flow. The novelties in this work are: the new methods of fabrication which enable production of three

  13. Magnetic investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Bath, G.D.; Jahren, C.E.; Rosenbaum, J.G.; Baldwin, M.J.

    1983-12-31

    Air and ground magnetic anomalies in the Climax stock area of the NTS help define the gross configuration of the stock and detailed configuration of magnetized rocks at the Boundary and Tippinip faults that border the stock. Magnetizations of geologic units were evaluated by measurements of magnetic properties of drill core, minimum estimates of magnetizations from ground magnetic anomalies for near surface rocks, and comparisons of measured anomalies with anomalies computed by a three-dimensional forward program. Alluvial deposits and most sedimentary rocks are nonmagnetic, but drill core measurements reveal large and irregular changes in magnetization for some quartzites and marbles. The magnetizations of quartz monzonite and granodiorite near the stock surface are weak, about 0.15 A/m, and increase at a rate of 0.00196 A/m/m to 1.55 A/m, at depths greater than 700 m (2300 ft). The volcanic rocks of the area are weakly magnetized. Aeromagnetic anomalies 850 m (2800 ft) above the stock are explained by a model consisting of five vertical prisms. Prisms 1, 2, and 3 represent the near surface outline of the stock, prism 4 is one of the models developed by Whitehill (1973), and prism 5 is modified from the model developed by Allingham and Zietz (1962). Most of the anomaly comes from unsampled and strongly-magnetized deep sources that could be either granite or metamorphosed sedimentary rocks. 48 refs., 23 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Development of Metallic Magnetic Calorimeters with a Critical Temperature Switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. R.; Choi, J.; Jo, H. S.; Kang, C. S.; Kim, G. B.; Kim, H. L.; Kim, I. W.; Lee, H. J.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, M. K.; Oh, S. Y.; Sala, E.; So, J. H.; Yoon, W. S.; Kim, Y. H.

    2016-07-01

    We report on the progress in the development of meander-shaped metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs) with a critical temperature switch. A niobium meander-shaped coil in an MMC is arranged to form a superconducting loop. It is to measure the change in magnetization and to apply a persistent current that magnetizes the MMC sensor material. In this work, part of the superconducting loop is fabricated with another superconducting material with its transition temperature (T_C) lower than that of niobium. A persistent current can be injected in the loop while reducing the temperature from above to below the T_C of the switch. Aluminum (Al) wires and an alloy of molybdenum and germanium (MoGe) were tested as critical temperature switch. The test with the Al switch demonstrated the temperature switch concept for meander-shaped MMCs that require a large field current. Microfabricated MoGe switches showed a T_C near 4.3 K, but only 7 mA of persistent current could be charged due to MoGe film discontinuity. This issue requires further improvement in the fabrication procedure.

  15. Toward Epileptic Brain Region Detection Based on Magnetic Nanoparticle Patterning

    PubMed Central

    Pedram, Maysam Z.; Shamloo, Amir; Alasty, Aria; Ghafar-Zadeh, Ebrahim

    2015-01-01

    Resection of the epilepsy foci is the best treatment for more than 15% of epileptic patients or 50% of patients who are refractory to all forms of medical treatment. Accurate mapping of the locations of epileptic neuronal networks can result in the complete resection of epileptic foci. Even though currently electroencephalography is the best technique for mapping the epileptic focus, it cannot define the boundary of epilepsy that accurately. Herein we put forward a new accurate brain mapping technique using superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SPMNs). The main hypothesis in this new approach is the creation of super-paramagnetic aggregates in the epileptic foci due to high electrical and magnetic activities. These aggregates may improve tissue contrast of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that results in improving the resection of epileptic foci. In this paper, we present the mathematical models before discussing the simulation results. Furthermore, we mimic the aggregation of SPMNs in a weak magnetic field using a low-cost microfabricated device. Based on these results, the SPMNs may play a crucial role in diagnostic epilepsy and the subsequent treatment of this disease. PMID:26402686

  16. Multifunctional graphene sensors for magnetic and hydrogen detection.

    PubMed

    Huang, Le; Zhang, Zhiyong; Li, Zishen; Chen, Bingyan; Ma, Xiaomeng; Dong, Lijun; Peng, Lian-Mao

    2015-05-13

    Multifunctional graphene magnetic/hydrogen sensors are constructed for the first time through a simple microfabrication process. The as-fabricated graphene sensor may act as excellent Hall magnetic detector, demonstrating small linearity error within 2% and high magnetic resolution up to 7 mG/Hz(0.5). Meanwhile the same graphene sensor is also demonstrated as high-performance hydrogen sensor with high gas response, excellent linearity, and great repeatability and selectivity. In particular, the graphene sensor exhibits high hydrogen response up to 32.5% when exposed to 1000 ppm hydrogen, outperforming most graphene-based hydrogen sensors. In addition the hydrogen-sensing mechanism of Pd-decorated graphene is systematically explored through investigating its transfer characteristics during gas detection. Our work demonstrates that graphene is a terrific material for multifunctional sensing, which may in principle reduce the complexity of manufacturing process, lower the number of sensors required in the sensing systems, and potentially derive new and more powerful functions.

  17. Planetary Magnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.

    2007-01-01

    The chapter on Planetary Magnetism by Connerney describes the magnetic fields of the planets, from Mercury to Neptune, including the large satellites (Moon, Ganymede) that have or once had active dynamos. The chapter describes the spacecraft missions and observations that, along with select remote observations, form the basis of our knowledge of planetary magnetic fields. Connerney describes the methods of analysis used to characterize planetary magnetic fields, and the models used to represent the main field (due to dynamo action in the planet's interior) and/or remnant magnetic fields locked in the planet's crust, where appropriate. These observations provide valuable insights into dynamo generation of magnetic fields, the structure and composition of planetary interiors, and the evolution of planets.

  18. Dielectrophoretic investigation of Bi₂Te₃ nanowires-a microfabricated thermoelectric characterization platform for measuring the thermoelectric and structural properties of single nanowires.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi; Kojda, Danny; Peranio, Nicola; Kroener, Michael; Mitdank, Rüdiger; Toellner, William; Nielsch, Kornelius; Fischer, Saskia F; Gutsch, Sebastian; Zacharias, Margit; Eibl, Oliver; Woias, Peter

    2015-03-27

    In this article a microfabricated thermoelectric nanowire characterization platform to investigate the thermoelectric and structural properties of single nanowires is presented. By means of dielectrophoresis (DEP), a method to manipulate and orient nanowires in a controlled way to assemble them onto our measurement platform is introduced. The thermoelectric platform fabricated with optimally designed DEP electrodes results in a yield of nanowire assembly of approximately 90% under an applied peak-to-peak ac signal Vpp = 10 V and frequency f = 20 MHz within a series of 200 experiments. Ohmic contacts between the aligned single nanowire and the electrodes on the platform are established by electron beam-induced deposition. The Seebeck coefficient and electrical conductivity of electrochemically synthesized Bi2Te3 nanowires are measured to be -51 μV K(-1) and (943 ± 160)/(Ω(-1) cm(-1)), respectively. Chemical composition and crystallographic structure are obtained using transmission electron microscopy. The selected nanowire is observed to be single crystalline over its entire length and no grain boundaries are detected. At the surface of the nanowire, 66.1 ± 1.1 at.% Te and 34.9 ± 1.1 at.% Bi are observed. In contrast, chemical composition of 64.2 at.% Te and 35.8 at.% Bi is detected in the thick center of the nanowire.

  19. Atomic force microscopy imaging and electrical recording of lipid bilayers supported over microfabricated silicon chip nanopores: lab-on-a-chip system for lipid membranes and ion channels.

    PubMed

    Quist, Arjan P; Chand, Ami; Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Daraio, Chiara; Jin, Sungho; Lal, Ratnesh

    2007-01-30

    We describe a silicon chip-based supported bilayer system to detect the presence of ion channels and their electrical conductance in lipid bilayers. Nanopores were produced in microfabricated silicon membranes by electron beam lithography as well as by using a finely focused ion beam. Thermal oxide was used to shrink pore sizes, if necessary, and to create an insulating surface. The chips with well-defined pores were easily mounted on a double-chamber plastic cell recording system, allowing for controlling the buffer conditions both above and below the window. The double-chamber system allowed using an atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip as one electrode and inserting a platinum wire as the second electrode under the membrane window, to measure electrical current across lipid bilayers that are suspended over the pores. Atomic force imaging, stiffness measurement, and electrical capacitance measurement show the feasibility of supporting lipid bilayers over defined nanopores: a key requirement to use any such technique for structure-function study of ion channels. Online addition of gramicidin, an ion-channel-forming peptide, resulted in electrical current flow across the bilayer, and the I-V curve that was measured using the conducting AFM tip indicates the presence of many conducting gramicidin ion channels.

  20. Combining Bottom-Up Self-Assembly with Top-Down Microfabrication to Create Hierarchical Inverse Opals with High Structural Order.

    PubMed

    Schaffner, Manuel; England, Grant; Kolle, Mathias; Aizenberg, Joanna; Vogel, Nicolas

    2015-09-09

    Colloidal particles can assemble into ordered crystals, creating periodically structured materials at the nanoscale without relying on expensive equipment. The combination of small size and high order leads to strong interaction with visible light, which induces macroscopic, iridescent structural coloration. To increase the complexity and functionality, it is important to control the organization of such materials in hierarchical structures with high degrees of order spanning multiple length scales. Here, a bottom-up assembly of polystyrene particles in the presence of a silica sol-gel precursor material (tetraethylorthosilicate, TEOS), which creates crack-free inverse opal films with high positional order and uniform crystal alignment along the (110) crystal plane, is combined with top-down microfabrication techniques. Micrometer scale hierarchical superstructures having a highly regular internal nanostructure with precisely controlled crystal orientation and wall profiles are produced. The ability to combine structural order at the nano- and microscale enables the fabrication of materials with complex optical properties resulting from light-matter interactions at different length scales. As an example, a hierarchical diffraction grating, which combines Bragg reflection arising from the nanoscale periodicity of the inverse opal crystal with grating diffraction resulting from a micrometer scale periodicity, is demonstrated.

  1. High-separation efficiency micro-fabricated multi-capillary gas chromatographic columns for simulants of the nerve agents and blister agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yi; Du, Xiaosong; Wang, Yang; Tai, Huiling; Qiu, Dong; Lin, Qinghao; Jiang, Yadong

    2014-05-01

    To achieve both high speed and separation efficiency in the separation of a mixture of nerve and blister agent simulants, a high-aspect-ratio micro-fabricated multi-capillary column (MCC, a 50-cm-long, 450-μm-deep, and 60-μm-wide four-capillary column) was fabricated by the application of the microelectromechanical system (MEMS) techniques. Mixtures of chemical warfare agent (CWA) simulants - dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), triethyl phosphate (TEP), and methyl salicylate - were used as samples. The fabricated MCC allowed for the separation of all the components of the gaseous mixture within 24 s, even when the difference in boiling point was 4°C, as in the case of TEP and methyl salicylate. Furthermore, interfering agents - dichloromethane, ethanol, and toluene - were also included in the subsequent gaseous mixture samples. The boiling point of these six components ranged from 78°C to 219°C. All six components were clearly separated within 70 s. This study is the first to report the clear separation of gas mixtures of components with close boiling points. The column efficiency was experimentally determined to be 12,810 plates/m.

  2. High-separation efficiency micro-fabricated multi-capillary gas chromatographic columns for simulants of the nerve agents and blister agents

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    To achieve both high speed and separation efficiency in the separation of a mixture of nerve and blister agent simulants, a high-aspect-ratio micro-fabricated multi-capillary column (MCC, a 50-cm-long, 450-μm-deep, and 60-μm-wide four-capillary column) was fabricated by the application of the microelectromechanical system (MEMS) techniques. Mixtures of chemical warfare agent (CWA) simulants - dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), triethyl phosphate (TEP), and methyl salicylate - were used as samples. The fabricated MCC allowed for the separation of all the components of the gaseous mixture within 24 s, even when the difference in boiling point was 4°C, as in the case of TEP and methyl salicylate. Furthermore, interfering agents - dichloromethane, ethanol, and toluene - were also included in the subsequent gaseous mixture samples. The boiling point of these six components ranged from 78°C to 219°C. All six components were clearly separated within 70 s. This study is the first to report the clear separation of gas mixtures of components with close boiling points. The column efficiency was experimentally determined to be 12,810 plates/m. PMID:24899869

  3. Determination of the size and structure of an X-pinch x-ray source from the diffraction pattern produced by microfabricated slits.

    PubMed

    Song, Byung Moo; Pikuz, Sergei A; Shelkovenko, Tatiania A; Hammer, David A

    2005-04-20

    X-pinch plasma emits subnanosecond bursts of x rays in the 3-10-keV energy range from a small source. As such, it has been used for high-resolution point-projection imaging of small, dense, rapidly changing plasmas as well as for submillimeter-thick biological samples. In addition to the effect of source size on geometric resolution, a small source size can also provide high spatial coherence of x rays, enabling the rays to be used for imaging weakly absorbing objects with excellent spatial resolution by a method called phase-contrast imaging. To determine the source size, we microfabricated gold slits and imaged them in a point-projection radiography configuration. The shape of the shadow image pattern depends on the source size and energy band of the x rays, the shape and material used for the slits, and the geometry of the experiment. Experimental results have been compared with wave-optics calculations of the expected image pattern as a function of all the parameters listed above. For example, assuming a Gaussiansource distribution, an effective source size in 2.5-4.1 A radiation (1 A = 0.1 nm) of 1.2 +/- 0.5 microm (full width at half-maximum) was determined for a 20-microm Mo wire X pinch. Characterization of the size and structure of the x-ray bursts from X pinches by the use of different wire materials and different slit structures is made.

  4. Planetary magnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.

    1980-01-01

    Planetary spacecraft have now probed the magnetic fields of all the terrestrial planets, the moon, Jupiter, and Saturn. These measurements reveal that dynamos are active in at least four of the planets, Mercury, the earth, Jupiter, and Saturn but that Venus and Mars appear to have at most only very weak planetary magnetic fields. The moon may have once possessed an internal dynamo, for the surface rocks are magnetized. The large satellites of the outer solar system are candidates for dynamo action in addition to the large planets themselves. Of these satellites the one most likely to generate its own internal magnetic field is Io.

  5. Magnetic shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, J.A.; Stone, R.R.; Fabyan, J.

    1987-10-06

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient magnetic field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines. 3 figs.

  6. Magnetic shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, John A.; Stone, Roger R.; Fabyan, Joseph

    1987-01-01

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient magnetic field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines.

  7. Magnetic Recording.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowman, Charles E.

    A guide to the technology of magnetic recorders used in such fields as audio recording, broadcast and closed-circuit television, instrumentation recording, and computer data systems is presented. Included are discussions of applications, advantages, and limitations of magnetic recording, its basic principles and theory of operation, and its…

  8. Magnetic shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, J.A.; Stone, R.R.; Fabyan, J.

    1985-02-12

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines.

  9. Magnetic nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Matsui, Hiroshi; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2010-11-16

    A magnetic nanotube includes bacterial magnetic nanocrystals contacted onto a nanotube which absorbs the nanocrystals. The nanocrystals are contacted on at least one surface of the nanotube. A method of fabricating a magnetic nanotube includes synthesizing the bacterial magnetic nanocrystals, which have an outer layer of proteins. A nanotube provided is capable of absorbing the nanocrystals and contacting the nanotube with the nanocrystals. The nanotube is preferably a peptide bolaamphiphile. A nanotube solution and a nanocrystal solution including a buffer and a concentration of nanocrystals are mixed. The concentration of nanocrystals is optimized, resulting in a nanocrystal to nanotube ratio for which bacterial magnetic nanocrystals are immobilized on at least one surface of the nanotubes. The ratio controls whether the nanocrystals bind only to the interior or to the exterior surfaces of the nanotubes. Uses include cell manipulation and separation, biological assay, enzyme recovery, and biosensors.

  10. Selective actuation of arrays of carbon nanotubes using magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Volodin, Alexander; Santini, Claudia A; De Gendt, Stefan; Vereecken, Philippe M; Van Haesendonck, Chris

    2013-07-23

    We introduce the use of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) to actuate mechanical resonances in as grown arrays of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) loaded with Ni particles (Ni-CNTs). This contactless method is closely related to the magnetic resonance force microscopy technique and provides spatial selectivity of actuation along the array. The Ni-CNT arrays are grown by chemical vapor deposition and are composed of homogeneous CNTs with uniform length (~600 nm) and almost equal diameter (~20 nm), which are loaded with Ni catalyst particles at their tips due to the tip growth mode. The vibrations of the Ni-CNTs are actuated by relying on the driving force that appears due to the FMR excited at about 2 GHz in the Ni particles (diameter ~100 nm). The Ni-CNT oscillations (frequency ~40 MHz) are detected mechanically by atomic force microscopy. The acquired oscillation images of the Ni-CNT uniform array reveal clear maxima in the spatial distribution of the oscillation amplitudes. We attribute these maxima to the "sensitive slices", i.e., the spatial regions of the Ni-CNT array where the FMR condition is met. Similar to magnetic resonance imaging, the sensitive slice is determined by the magnetic field gradient and moves along the Ni-CNT array as the applied magnetic field is ramped. Our excitation method does not require the presence of any additional microfabricated electrodes or coils near the CNTs and is particularly advantageous in cases where the traditional electrical actuation methods are not effective or cannot be implemented. The remote actuation can be effectively implemented also for arrays of other magnetic nanomechanical resonators.

  11. Enhancement of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in FeB free layers using a thin MgO cap layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, Hitoshi; Ishibashi, Shota; Saruya, Takeshi; Nozaki, Takayuki; Fukushima, Akio; Yakushiji, Kay; Ando, Koji; Suzuki, Yoshishige; Yuasa, Shinji

    2012-04-01

    We prepared magnetic tunnel junction films with PtMn/CoFe/Ru/CoFeB/MgO tunnel barrier/FeB free layer/MgO cap layer/Ta multilayers using sputtering and measured magnetic and magnetoresistive properties of the films at room temperature. The magnetization curves of the FeB plane film measured under perpendicular-to-plane magnetic fields showed much smaller saturation fields (Hs) than those expected from the demagnetizing field. Hs decreased from 4 to 0.4 kOe with increasing MgO cap layer thickness. The small Hs is due to the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) induced at both MgO barrier-FeB and FeB-MgO cap interfaces. After microfabrication, the small free layer cells having a 1.6 nm thick MgO cap layer showed a magnetization easy axis in the perpendicular-to-plane direction. By inducing PMA from both upper and lower interfaces, we can stabilize the magnetization of the relatively thick (2 nm) FeB free layer in the perpendicular-to-plane direction.

  12. Micro Penning Trap for Continuous Magnetic Field Monitoring in High Radiation Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latorre, Javiera; Bollen, Georg; Gulyuz, Kerim; Ringle, Ryan; Bado, Philippe; Dugan, Mark; Lebit Team; Translume Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    As new facilities for rare isotope beams, like FRIB at MSU, are constructed, there is a need for new instrumentation to monitor magnetic fields in beam magnets that can withstand the higher radiation level. Currently NMR probes, the instruments used extensively to monitor magnetic fields, do not have a long lifespans in radiation-high environments. Therefore, a radiation-hard replacement is needed. We propose to use Penning trap mass spectrometry techniques to make high precision magnetic field measurements. Our Penning microtrap will be radiation resistant as all of the vital electronics will be at a safe distance from the radiation. The trap itself is made from materials not subject to radiation damage. Penning trap mass spectrometers can determine the magnetic field by measuring the cyclotron frequency of an ion with a known mass and charge. This principle is used on the Low Energy Beam Ion Trap (LEBIT) minitrap at NSCL which is the foundation for the microtrap. We have partnered with Translume, who specialize in glass micro-fabrication, to develop a microtrap in fused-silica glass. A microtrap is finished and ready for testing at NSCL with all of the electronic and hardware components setup. DOE Phase II SBIR Award No. DE-SC0011313, NSF Award Number 1062410 REU in Physics, NSF under Grant No. PHY-1102511.

  13. Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    AVCON, Inc. produces advanced magnetic bearing systems for industrial use, offering a unique technological approach based on contract work done at Marshall Space Flight Center and Lewis Research Center. Designed for the turbopump of the Space Shuttle main engine, they are now used in applications such as electric power generation, petroleum refining, machine tool operation and natural gas pipelines. Magnetic bearings support moving machinery without physical contact; AVCON's homopolar approach is a hybrid of permanent and electromagnets which are one-third the weight, smaller and more power- efficient than previous magnetic bearings.

  14. Magnetic disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallinson, John C.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic disk recording was invented in 1953 and has undergone intensive development ever since. As a result of this 38 years of development, the cost per byte and the areal density have halved and doubled respectively every 2-2 1/2 years. Today, the cost per byte is lower than 10(exp -6) dollars per byte and area densities exceed 100 10(exp 6) bits per square inch. In this talk, the recent achievements in magnetic disk recording are first surveyed briefly. Then, the principal areas of current technical development are outlined. Finally, some comments are made about the future of magnetic disk recording.

  15. Lunar magnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, L. L.; Sonett, C. P.; Srnka, L. J.

    1984-01-01

    Aspects of lunar paleomagnetic and electromagnetic sounding results which appear inconsistent with the hypothesis that an ancient core dynamo was the dominant source of the observed crustal magnetism are discussed. Evidence is summarized involving a correlation between observed magnetic anomalies and ejecta blankets from impact events which indicates the possible importance of local mechanisms involving meteoroid impact processes in generating strong magnetic fields at the lunar surface. A reply is given to the latter argument which also presents recent evidence of a lunar iron core.

  16. Synthesis of novel fluorene-based two-photon absorbing molecules and their applications in optical data storage, microfabrication, and stimulated emission depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanez, Ciceron

    2009-12-01

    Two-photon absorption (2PA) has been used for a number of scientific and technological applications, exploiting the fact that the 2PA probability is directly proportional to the square of the incident light intensity (while one-photon absorption bears a linear relation to the incident light intensity). This intrinsic property of 2PA leads to 3D spatial localization, important in fields such as optical data storage, fluorescence microscopy, and 3D microfabrication. The spatial confinement that 2PA enables has been used to induce photochemical and photophysical events in increasingly smaller volumes and allowed nonlinear, 2PA-based, technologies to reach sub-diffraction limit resolutions. The primary focus of this dissertation is the development of novel, efficient 2PA, fluorene-based molecules to be used either as photoacid generators (PAGs) or fluorophores. A second aim is to develop more effective methods of synthesizing these compounds. As a third and final objective, the new molecules were used to develop a write-once-read many (WORM) optical data storage system, and stimulated emission depletion probes for bioimaging. In Chapter I, the microwave-assisted synthesis of triarylsulfonium salt photoacid generators (PAGs) from their diphenyliodonium counterparts is reported. The microwave-assisted synthesis of these novel sulfonium salts afforded reaction times 90 to 420 times faster than conventional thermal conditions, with photoacid quantum yields of new sulfonium PAGs ranging from 0.01 to 0.4. These PAGs were used to develop a fluorescence readout-based, nonlinear three-dimensional (3D) optical data storage system (Chapter II). In this system, writing was achieved by acid generation upon two-photon absorption (2PA) of a PAG (at 710 or 730 nm). Readout was then performed by interrogating two-photon absorbing dyes, after protonation, at 860 nm. Two-photon recording and readout of voxels was demonstrated in five and eight consecutive, crosstalk-free layers within a

  17. Microfabricated gas chromatograph for on-site determinations of TCE in indoor air arising from vapor intrusion. 2. Spatial/temporal monitoring.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Kyu; Burris, David R; Bryant-Genevier, Jonathan; Gorder, Kyle A; Dettenmaier, Erik M; Zellers, Edward T

    2012-06-05

    We demonstrate the use of two prototype Si-microfabricated gas chromatographs (μGC) for continuous, short-term measurements of indoor trichloroethylene (TCE) vapor concentrations related to the investigation of TCE vapor intrusion (VI) in two houses. In the first house, with documented TCE VI, temporal variations in TCE air concentrations were monitored continuously for up to 48 h near the primary VI entry location under different levels of induced differential pressure (relative to the subslab). Concentrations ranged from 0.23 to 27 ppb by volume (1.2-150 μg/m(3)), and concentration trends agreed closely with those determined from concurrent reference samples. The sensitivity and temporal resolution of the measurements were sufficiently high to detect transient fluctuations in concentration resulting from short-term changes in variables affecting the extent of VI. Spatial monitoring showed a decreasing TCE concentration gradient with increasing distance from the primary VI entry location. In the second house, with no TCE VI, spatial profiles derived from the μGC prototype data revealed an intentionally hidden source of TCE within a closet, demonstrating the capability for locating non-VI sources. Concentrations measured in this house ranged from 0.51 to 56 ppb (2.7-300 μg/m(3)), in good agreement with reference method values. This first field demonstration of μGC technology for automated, near-real-time, selective VOC monitoring at low- or subppb levels augurs well for its use in short- and long-term on-site analysis of indoor air in support of VI assessments.

  18. Electrochemical and microfabrication strategies for remotely operated smart chemical sensors: application of anodic stripping coulometry to calibration-free measurements of copper and mercury.

    PubMed

    Marei, Mohamed M; Roussel, Thomas J; Keynton, Robert S; Baldwin, Richard P

    2013-11-25

    Remote unattended sensor networks are increasingly sought after to monitor the drinking water distribution grid, industrial wastewater effluents, and even rivers and lakes. One of the biggest challenges for application of such sensors is the issue of in-field device calibration. With this challenge in mind, we report here the use of anodic stripping coulometry (ASC) as the basis of a calibration-free micro-fabricated electrochemical sensor (CF-MES) for heavy metal determinations. The sensor platform consisted of a photo-lithographically patterned gold working electrode on SiO2 substrate, which was housed within a custom stopped-flow thin-layer cell, with a total volume of 2-4 μL. The behavior of this platform was characterized by fluorescent particle microscopy and electrochemical studies utilizing Fe(CN)6(3-/4-) as a model analyte. The average charge obtained for oxidation of 500 μM ferrocyanide after 60s over a 10 month period was 176 μC, corresponding to a volume of 3.65 μL (RSD = 2.4%). The response of the platform to copper concentrations ranging from 50 to 7500 ppb was evaluated, and the ASC results showed a linear dependence of charge on copper concentrations with excellent reproducibility (RSD ≤ 2.5%) and accuracy for most concentrations (≤ 5-10% error). The platform was also used to determine copper and mercury mixtures, where the total metallic content was measurable with excellent reproducibility (RSD ≤ 4%) and accuracy (≤ 6% error).

  19. 7 CFR 58.246 - Cleaning of dryers, collectors, conveyors, ducts, sifters and storage bins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cleaning of dryers, collectors, conveyors, ducts... PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT (CONTINUED) GRADING AND INSPECTION, GENERAL SPECIFICATIONS FOR APPROVED PLANTS AND STANDARDS FOR GRADES OF DAIRY PRODUCTS 1 General Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for...

  20. 7 CFR 58.246 - Cleaning of dryers, collectors, conveyors, ducts, sifters and storage bins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cleaning of dryers, collectors, conveyors, ducts... PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT (CONTINUED) GRADING AND INSPECTION, GENERAL SPECIFICATIONS FOR APPROVED PLANTS AND STANDARDS FOR GRADES OF DAIRY PRODUCTS 1 General Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for...

  1. 7 CFR 58.246 - Cleaning of dryers, collectors, conveyors, ducts, sifters and storage bins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Cleaning of dryers, collectors, conveyors, ducts... PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT (CONTINUED) GRADING AND INSPECTION, GENERAL SPECIFICATIONS FOR APPROVED PLANTS AND STANDARDS FOR GRADES OF DAIRY PRODUCTS 1 General Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for...

  2. An Electrostatic Microactuator for Positioning a Hard-Disk Drive Magnetic Head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshino, Tomonori; Toshiyoshi, Hiroshi; Mita, Makoto; Kobayashi, Dai; Fujita, Hiroyuki

    We have newly developed a prototype model of silicon microfabricated piggyback actuator for positioning a read/write head of magnetic hard-disk drive, which is usually referred to as a dual servo system because the piggyback actuator for fine control is used in collaboration with the voice-coil motor for coarse control. The actuator is made of a 50-micron-thick SOI (silicon on insulator) wafer processed by deep RIE (reactive ion etching) of high-aspect ratio. Actuation mechanism is based upon electrostatic force generated by multiple parallel plates. Maximum displacement of 0.2μ with a dc driving voltage of 20V has been achieved with a 1mm × 0.3mm actuator of its resonance at 25kHz. An analytical model for predicting electromechanical performance has also been developed.

  3. Miniaturized Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Platform for Detection and Profiling of Circulating Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Cesar M.; Ghazani, Arezou A.; Chung, Jaehoon; Shao, Huilin; Issadore, David; Yoon, Tae-Jong; Weissleder, Ralph; Lee, Hakho

    2013-01-01

    Accurate detection and profiling of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is a highly sought after technology to improve cancer management. Such “liquid biopsies” could offer a non-invasive, repeatable window into each patient’s tumor, facilitating early cancer diagnosis and treatment monitoring. The rarity of CTCs, approximated at 1 CTC for every billion peripheral blood cells, however, poses significant challenges to sensitive and reliable detection. We have recently developed a new biosensor platform, namely a micro-nuclear magnetic resonance (µNMR). Through the synergistic integration of microfabrication, nanosensors, and novel chemistries, the µNMR platform offers high detection sensitivity and point-of-care operation, overcoming technical barriers in CTC research. We herein review the µNMR technology with emphasis on its application on CTC detection. Recent advances in the sensing technology will be summarized, followed by the description on the dynamic interplay between preclinical and clinical CTC studies. PMID:23835814

  4. Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Video Gallery

    This science visualization shows a magnetospheric substorm, during which, magnetic reconnection causes energy to be rapidly released along the field lines in the magnetotail, that part of the magne...

  5. Magnetic monopoles

    SciTech Connect

    Fryberger, D.

    1984-12-01

    In this talk on magnetic monopoles, first the author briefly reviews some historical background; then, the author describes what several different types of monopoles might look like; and finally the author discusses the experimental situation. 81 references.

  6. CRYOGENIC MAGNETS

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.; Taylor, C.E.

    1963-05-21

    A cryogenic magnet coil is described for generating magnetic fields of the order of 100,000 gauss with a minimum expenditure of energy lost in resistive heating of the coil inductors and energy lost irreversibly in running the coil refrigeration plant. The cryogenic coil comprises a coil conductor for generating a magnetic field upon energization with electrical current, and refrigeration means disposed in heat conductive relation to the coil conductor for cooling to a low temperature. A substantial reduction in the power requirements for generating these magnetic fields is attained by scaling the field generating coil to large size and particular dimensions for a particular conductor, and operating the coil at a particular optimum temperature commensurate with minimum overall power requirements. (AEC)

  7. Superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Willen, E.; Dahl, P.; Herrera, J.

    1985-01-01

    This report provides a self-consistent description of a magnetic field in the aperture of a superconducting magnet and details how this field can be calculated in a magnet with cos theta current distribution in the coils. A description of an apparatus that can be used to measure the field uniformity in the aperture has been given. Finally, a detailed description of the magnet being developed for use in the Superconducting Super Collider is given. When this machine is built, it will be by far the largest application of superconductivity to date and promises to make possible the experimental discoveries needed to understand the basic laws of nature governing the world in which we live.

  8. Magnetic Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Jane Bray; Nelson, Jim

    1992-01-01

    Describes the history of Richard Blakemore's discovery of magnetotaxic organisms. Discusses possible reasons why the magnetic response in bacteria developed. Proposes research experiments integrating biology and physics in which students investigate problems using cultures of magnetotaxic organisms. (MDH)

  9. Superconducting magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Extensive computer based engineering design effort resulted in optimization of a superconducting magnet design with an average bulk current density of approximately 12KA/cm(2). Twisted, stranded 0.0045 inch diameter NbTi superconductor in a copper matrix was selected. Winding the coil from this bundle facilitated uniform winding of the small diameter wire. Test coils were wound using a first lot of the wire. The actual packing density was measured from these. Interwinding voltage break down tests on the test coils indicated the need for adjustment of the wire insulation on the lot of wire subsequently ordered for construction of the delivered superconducting magnet. Using the actual packing densities from the test coils, a final magnet design, with the required enhancement and field profile, was generated. All mechanical and thermal design parameters were then also fixed. The superconducting magnet was then fabricated and tested. The first test was made with the magnet immersed in liquid helium at 4.2K. The second test was conducted at 2K in vacuum. In the latter test, the magnet was conduction cooled from the mounting flange end.

  10. MAGNETIC IMAGING OF NANOCOMPOSITE MAGNETS

    SciTech Connect

    VOLKOV,V.V.ZHU,Y.

    2003-08-03

    Understanding the structure and magnetic behavior is crucial for optimization of nanocomposite magnets with high magnetic energy products. Many contributing factors such as phase composition, grain size distribution and specific domain configurations reflect a fine balance of magnetic energies at nanometer scale. For instance, magnetocrystalline anisotropy of grains and their orientations, degree of exchange coupling of magnetically soft and hard phases and specific energy of domain walls in a material. Modern microscopy, including Lorentz microscopy, is powerful tool for visualization and microstructure studies of nanocomposite magnets. However, direct interpretation of magnetically sensitive Fresnel/Foucault images for nanomagnets is usually problematic, if not impossible, because of the complex image contrast due to small grain size and sophisticated domain structure. Recently we developed an imaging technique based on Lorentz phase microscopy [l-4], which allows bypassing many of these problems and get quantitative information through magnetic flux mapping at nanometer scale resolution with a magnetically calibrated TEM [5]. This is our first report on application of this technique to nanocomposite magnets. In the present study we examine a nanocomposite magnet of nominal composition Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14+{delta}}B{sub 1.45} (14+{delta}=23.3, i.e. ''hard'' Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B-phase and 47.8 wt% of ''soft'' {alpha}-Fe phase ({delta}=9.3)), produced by Magnequench International, Inc. Conventional TEM/HREM study (Fig. 1-2) suggests that material has a bimodal grain-size distribution with maximum at d{sub max}=25 nm for Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phase and d{sub max} = 15 nm for {alpha}-Fe phase (Fig.1c, Fig.2) in agreement with synchrotron X-ray studies (d{sub max}=23.5 nm for Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B [6]). Lattice parameters for Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phase are a=8.80 and c=12.2 {angstrom}, as derived from SAED ring patterns (Fig.1a), again in good agreement with X-ray data

  11. Covalent magnetism and magnetic impurities.

    PubMed

    Gruber, C; Bedolla, P O; Mohn, P

    2013-05-08

    We use the model of covalent magnetism and its application to magnetic insulators applied to the case of insulating carbon doped BaTiO3. Since the usual Stoner mechanism is not applicable we study the possibility of the formation of magnetic order based on a mechanism favoring singly occupied orbitals. On the basis of our model parameters we formulate a criterion similar to the Stoner criterion but also valid for insulators. We describe the model of covalent magnetism using a molecular orbital picture and determine the occupation numbers for spin-up and spin-down states. Our model allows a simulation of the results of our ab initio calculations for E(ℳ) which are found to be in very good agreement.

  12. A polymer lab-on-a-chip for magnetic immunoassay with on-chip sampling and detection capabilities.

    PubMed

    Do, Jaephil; Ahn, Chong H

    2008-04-01

    This paper presents a new polymer lab-on-a-chip for magnetic bead-based immunoassay with fully on-chip sampling and detection capabilities, which provides a smart platform of magnetic immunoassay-based lab-on-a-chip for point-of-care testing (POCT) toward biochemical hazardous agent detection, food inspection or clinical diagnostics. In this new approach, the polymer lab-on-a-chip for magnetic bead-based immunoassay consists of a magnetic bead-based separator, an interdigitated array (IDA) micro electrode, and a microfluidic system, which are fully incorporated into a lab-on-a-chip on cyclic olefin copolymer (COC). Since the polymer lab-on-a-chip was realized using low cost, high throughput polymer microfabrication techniques such as micro injection molding and hot embossing method, a disposable polymer lab-on-a-chip for the magnetic bead-based immunoassay can be successfully realized in a disposable platform. With this newly developed polymer lab-on-a-chip, an enzyme-labelled electrochemical immunoassay (ECIA) was performed using magnetic beads as the mobile solid support, and the final enzyme product produced from the ECIA was measured using chronoamperometry. A sampling and detection of as low as 16.4 ng mL(-1) of mouse IgG has been successfully performed in 35 min for the entire procedure.

  13. Magnetic Heads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoshima, Tokihiko

    Figure 6.1 shows how rapidly the areal density of hard disk drives (HDD) has been increasing over the past 20 years [1]. Several critical innovations were necessary to bring about such rapid progress in the field of magnetic recording [2]. One of the most significant innovations from the viewpoint of material improvement was the electrodeposition of permalloy (Ni80Fe20), which was introduced by IBM in 1979 as the core material of a thin-film inductive head to increase the magnetic recording density [3]. After the introduction of the magneto-resistive (MR) element as the read head and the electrodeposited permalloy as the write head by IBM in 1991 [4], the rate of increase in the recording density of HDDs jumped from 30% per year to 60% per year. Recently, a giant magneto-resistive (GMR) element has been used for the read element instead of the MR element. The rate of increase in the recording density jumped to over 100% per year in 1999, which is an incredible rate of increase. Since 2002, however, the rate of increase has decreased to 30%; thus, new innovations are required to maintain the rate of increase. In 2004, the practical use of perpendicular magnetic recording instead of longitudinal magnetic recording was announced [5]. This system is a critical innovation for developing high-performance HDD systems with high-recording density. The design of the magnetic recording head was changed because of the change of the recording system.

  14. Magnetic light

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Arseniy I.; Miroshnichenko, Andrey E.; Fu, Yuan Hsing; Zhang, JingBo; Luk’yanchuk, Boris

    2012-01-01

    Spherical silicon nanoparticles with sizes of a few hundreds of nanometers represent a unique optical system. According to theoretical predictions based on Mie theory they can exhibit strong magnetic resonances in the visible spectral range. The basic mechanism of excitation of such modes inside the nanoparticles is very similar to that of split-ring resonators, but with one important difference that silicon nanoparticles have much smaller losses and are able to shift the magnetic resonance wavelength down to visible frequencies. We experimentally demonstrate for the first time that these nanoparticles have strong magnetic dipole resonance, which can be continuously tuned throughout the whole visible spectrum varying particle size and visually observed by means of dark-field optical microscopy. These optical systems open up new perspectives for fabrication of low-loss optical metamaterials and nanophotonic devices. PMID:22768382

  15. Magnetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Manchium (Inventor); Colvin, Michael S. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic polymer particles are formed by swelling porous, polymer particles and impregnating the particles with an aqueous solution of precursor magnetic metal salt such as an equimolar mixture of ferrous chloride and ferric chloride. On addition of a basic reagent such as dilute sodium hydroxide, the metal salts are converted to crystals of magnetite which are uniformly contained througout the pores of the polymer particle. The magnetite content can be increased and neutral buoyancy achieved by repetition of the impregnaton and neutralization steps to adjust the magnetite content to a desired level.

  16. MAGNETIC GRID

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.

    1960-08-01

    An electronic grid is designed employing magnetic forces for controlling the passage of charged particles. The grid is particularly applicable to use in gas-filled tubes such as ignitrons. thyratrons, etc., since the magnetic grid action is impartial to the polarity of the charged particles and, accordingly. the sheath effects encountered with electrostatic grids are not present. The grid comprises a conductor having sections spaced apart and extending in substantially opposite directions in the same plane, the ends of the conductor being adapted for connection to a current source.

  17. Microfabrication with femtosecond laser processing : (A) laser ablation of ferrous alloys, (B) direct-write embedded optical waveguides and integrated optics in bulk glasses.

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Junpeng; McDaniel, Karen Lynn; Palmer, Jeremy Andrew; Yang, Pin; Griffith, Michelle Lynn; Vawter, Gregory Allen; Harris, Marc F.; Tallant, David Robert; Luk, Ting Shan; Burns, George Robert

    2004-11-01

    At Sandia National Laboratories, miniaturization dominates future hardware designs, and technologies that address the manufacture of micro-scale to nano-scale features are in demand. Currently, Sandia is developing technologies such as photolithography/etching (e.g. silicon MEMS), LIGA, micro-electro-discharge machining (micro-EDM), and focused ion beam (FIB) machining to fulfill some of the component design requirements. Some processes are more encompassing than others, but each process has its niche, where all performance characteristics cannot be met by one technology. For example, micro-EDM creates highly accurate micro-scale features but the choice of materials is limited to conductive materials. With silicon-based MEMS technology, highly accurate nano-scale integrated devices are fabricated but the mechanical performance may not meet the requirements. Femtosecond laser processing has the potential to fulfill a broad range of design demands, both in terms of feature resolution and material choices, thereby improving fabrication of micro-components. One of the unique features of femtosecond lasers is the ability to ablate nearly all materials with little heat transfer, and therefore melting or damage, to the surrounding material, resulting in highly accurate micro-scale features. Another unique aspect to femtosecond radiation is the ability to create localized structural changes thought nonlinear absorption processes. By scanning the focal point within transparent material, we can create three-dimensional waveguides for biological sensors and optical components. In this report, we utilized the special characteristics of femtosecond laser processing for microfabrication. Special emphasis was placed on the laser-material interactions to gain a science-based understanding of the process and to determine the process parameter space for laser processing of metals and glasses. Two areas were investigated, including laser ablation of ferrous alloys and direct

  18. Separation and identification of peptides from gel-isolated membrane proteins using a microfabricated device for combined capillary electrophoresis/nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Kelly, J F; Chernushevich, I; Harrison, D J; Thibault, P

    2000-02-01

    The coupling of microfabricated devices to nanoelectrospray mass spectrometers using both a triple quadrupole and a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer (QqTOF MS) is presented for the analysis of trace-level membrane proteins. Short disposable nanoelectrospray emitters were directly coupled to the chip device via a low dead volume connection. The analytical performance of this integrated device in terms of sensitivity and reproducibility was evaluated for standard peptide mixtures. A concentration detection limit ranging from 3.2 to 43.5 nM for different peptides was achieved in selected ion monitoring, thus representing a 10-fold improvement in sensitivity compared to that of microelectrospray using the same chip/mass spectrometer. Replicate injections indicated that reproducibility of migration time was typically less than 3.1% RSD whereas RSD values of 6-13% were observed on peak areas. Although complete resolution of individual components is not typically achieved for complex digests, the present chip capillary electrophoresis (chip-CE) device enabled proper sample cleanup and partial separation of multicomponent samples prior to mass spectral identification. Analyses of protein digests were typically achieved in less than 1.5 min with peak widths of 1.8-2.5 s (half-height definition) as indicated from individual reconstructed ion electropherograms. The application of this chip-CE/QqTOF MS system is further demonstrated for the identification of membrane proteins which form a subset of the Haemophilus influenzae proteome. Bands first separated by 1D-gel electrophoresis were excised and digested, and extracted tryptic peptides were loaded on the chip without any further sample cleanup or on-line adsorption preconcentration. Accurate molecular mass determination (< 5 ppm) in peptide-mapping experiments was obtained by introducing an internal standard via a postseparation channel. The analytical potential of this integrated device for the identification of

  19. Magneto-transport and microstructure of Co{sub 2}Fe(Ga{sub 0.5}Ge{sub 0.5})/Cu lateral spin valves prepared by top-down microfabrication process

    SciTech Connect

    Ikhtiar,; Mitani, S.; Hono, K.; Kasai, S.; Takahashi, Y. K.; Itoh, A.; Ohkubo, T.

    2014-05-07

    Heusler alloy-based lateral spin valves with ohmic contacts are prepared for the Co{sub 2}Fe(Ga{sub 0.5}Ge{sub 0.5})/Cu system by means of the top-down microfabrication process. The magneto-transport and microstructure are characterized to investigate the influence of the microfabrication route on the spin dependent transport of lateral spin valves systematically. A large non-local spin signal (△R{sub S}) of 17.3 mΩ is observed at room temperature, which is attributed to the highly spin-polarized Co{sub 2}Fe(Ga{sub 0.5}Ge{sub 0.5}) ferromagnet and the clean Co{sub 2}Fe(Ga{sub 0.5}Ge{sub 0.5})/Cu interfaces confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. Based on the general expression of one-dimensional spin diffusion model, we discuss the importance of interfacial spin polarization in Heusler alloy-based lateral spin valves.

  20. Magnetic Monopoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    't Hooft, Gerardus

    Before 1974, speculations concerning the existence of pure magnetic charges had been diverse. Many experimental searches had been carried out, and up to today, no single magnetic charge has ever been isolated, apart from some indirect evidence [1] that slowly evaporated when it appeared to be impossible to reproduce it. The theoretical situation was also somewhat confused. Dirac [2] had written a brilliant paper on the subject, showing the Dirac quantization rule. But then Julian Schwinger came with an argument that a factor 2 should be added to this quantization rule — this would be falsified by our later results; presently, we know that if the Dirac quantum is odd, there will be a violation of the spin-statistics addition theorem: fermions can be made out of bosons. Many researchers tried to devise a perturbative scheme to handle monopoles in field theory — in vain, because, if the electric charge unit e is small enough for perturbation theory to make sense, then the magnetic charge unit g = 2πn/e will be far too big. In particular, the use of a separate `dual vector potential' for magnetic charges is doomed to lead to inconsistencies if also electric charges occur. Either g or e is small, but never both…

  1. Magnetic tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Harriss

    1992-01-01

    The move to visualization and image processing in data systems is increasing the demand for larger and faster mass storage systems. The technology of choice is magnetic tape. This paper briefly reviews the technology past, present, and projected. A case is made for standards and the value of the standards to users.

  2. Magnetic Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Ferrofluidics Corporation's recent innovation is a spindle for rotating computer discs that supports the disc's rotating shaft on a film of magnetic fluid instead of conventional ball bearings. According to its developers, the spindle offers greatly increased rotational stability, meaning substantially reduced vibration and mechanical noise, and non- repeatable runout. This allows disc drives to store two to 10 times more information.

  3. Magnetic microtraps for cavity QED, Bose-Einstein condensates, and atom optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lev, Benjamin L.

    The system comprised of an atom strongly coupled to photons, known as cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED), provides a rich experimental setting for quantum information processing, both in the implementation of quantum logic gates and in the development of quantum networks. Moreover, studies of cavity QED will help elucidate the dynamics of continuously observed open quantum systems with quantum-limited feedback. To achieve these goals in cavity QED, a neutral atom must be tightly confined inside a high-finesse cavity with small mode volume for long periods of time. Microfabricated wires on a substrate---known as an atom chip---can create a sufficiently high-curvature magnetic potential to trap atoms in the Lamb-Dicke regime. We have recently integrated an optical fiber Fabry-Perot cavity with such a device. The microwires allow the on-chip collection and laser cooling of neutral atoms, and allow the magnetic waveguiding of these atoms to an Ioffe trap inside the cavity mode. Magnetically trapped intracavity atoms have been detected with this cavity QED system. A similar experiment employing microdisks and photonic bandgap cavities is nearing completion. With these more exotic cavities, a robust and scalable atom-cavity chip system will deeply probe the strong coupling regime of cavity QED with magnetically trapped atoms. Atom chips have found great success in producing and manipulating Bose-Einstein condensates and in creating novel atom optical elements. An on-chip BEC has been attained in a miniaturized system incorporating an atom chip designed for atom interferometry and for studies of Josephson effects of a BEC in a double-well potential. Using similar microfabrication techniques, we created and demonstrated a specular magnetic atom mirror formed from a standard computer hard drive. This device, in conjunction with micron-sized charged circular pads, can produce a 1-D ring trap which may prove useful for studying Tonks gases in a ring geometry and for

  4. Giant magenetoresistive sensors. 2. Detection of biorecognition events at self-referencing and magnetically tagged arrays.

    PubMed

    Millen, Rachel L; Nordling, John; Bullen, Heather A; Porter, Marc D; Tondra, Mark; Granger, Michael C

    2008-11-01

    Microfabricated devices formed from alternating layers of magnetic and nonmagnetic materials at combined thicknesses of a few hundred nanometers exhibit a phenomenon known as the giant magnetoresistance effect. Devices based on this effect are known as giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensors. The resistance of a GMR is dependent on the strength of an external magnetic field, which has resulted in the widespread usage of such platforms in high-speed, high-data density storage drives. The same attributes (i.e., sensitivity, small size, and speed) are also important embodiments of many types of bioanalytical sensors, pointing to an intriguing opportunity via an integration of GMR technology, magnetic labeling strategies, and biorecognition elements (e.g., antibodies). This paper describes the utilization of GMRs for the detection of streptavidin-coated magnetic particles that are selectively captured by biotinylated gold addresses on a 2 x 0.3 cm sample stick. A GMR sensor network reads the addresses on a sample stick in a manner that begins to emulate that of a "card-swipe" system. This study also takes advantage of on-sample magnetic addresses that function as references for internal calibration of the GMR response and as a facile means to account for small variations in the gap between the sample stick and sensor. The magnetic particle surface coverage at the limit of detection was determined to be approximately 2%, which corresponds to approximately 800 binding events over the 200 x 200 microm capture address. These findings, along with the potential use of streptavidin-coated magnetic particles as a universal label for antigen detection in, for example, heterogeneous assays, are discussed.

  5. Shear-mode magnetic force microscopy using a quartz tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Yongho; Kim, Kyungho; Jhe, Wonho

    2003-03-01

    In conventional magnetic force microscopy (MFM), the cantilever is employed as a force sensor and optical deflection detection is used to measure its vibration. Micro-fabricated cantilever has such a small spring constant order of 10 N/m. The cantilever has some weak points; unexpected crash occurs because of its low stiffness, high resolution MFM is difficult because the dithering amplitude is large ( ˜ 10 nm), and laser light should be exposed, which is undesirable for low temperature or dark environment. We demonstrate shear-mode magnetic force microscopy using a quartz tuning fork with a spring constant of 1300 N/m. A sharpened cobalt tip is attached to the prong of the tuning fork so that it can be controlled in shear mode. We have obtained high resolution images of recorded magnetization patterns of hard disks with a spatial resolution of 50 nm. The minimum detectable force gradient is an order of 10-4 N/m. There are important advantages in tuning fork based MFM; (i) Because the tuning fork sensor is stiff, the tip will not be pulled by the attractive van der Waals force. So, unexpected crash can be avoided. (ii) Its minimum detectable dithering amplitude is much smaller than that of cantilever, (The spectral noise density of the tuning fork is ˜ 100 fm/ Hz) which supports the high resolution imaging. (iii) As the tuning fork is self-dithering and self-sensing device, one can avoid optical deflection detection and the scanning head is simple and small. (iv) Tuning fork based MFM can be operated in dark and low temperature condition, because no optical source is necessary and dissipated power can be reduced ˜ 1 pW.

  6. Optical Forces Near Microfabricated Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    with refractive index n2 = 1.38 arising from a single Gaussian beam propagating in a medium with refractive index n1 = 1.335 (initial beam waist w0...the object. In each of the following cases, wavelength is set at 808 nm and the initial beam waist is w0 = 2.4 µm and the 54 65 Figure 5.4: Comparison...1.335. The choice of beam waist and wavelength agree with our experimental set up . In case of refractive index and eccentricity variation the trap

  7. Microfabricated silicon biosensors for microphysiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bousse, L. J.; Libby, J. M.; Parce, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    Microphysiometers are biosensor devices that measure the metabolic rate of living cells by detecting the rate of extracellular acidification caused by a small number of cells. The cells are entrapped in a microvolume chamber, whose bottom surface is a silicon sensor chip. In a further miniaturization step, we have recently fabricated multichannel flow-through chips that will allow greater throughput and multiplicity. Microphysiometer technology can be applied to the detection of microorganisms. We describe the sensitive detection of bacteria and yeast. Further applications of microphysiometry to the characterization of microorganisms can be anticipated.

  8. FIB Microfabrication Software Design Considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, W.; Bowe, T.; Morlock, S.; Moskowitz, A.; Plourde, G.; Spaulding, G.; Scialdone, C.; Tsiang, E.

    1986-06-01

    Profit margins on high-volume ICs, such as the 256-K DRAM, are now inadequate. U.S. and foreign manufacturers cannot fully recover the ICs' engineering costs before a new round of product competition begins. Consequently, some semiconductor manufacturers are seeking less competitive designs with healthier, longer lasting profitability. These designs must be converted quickly from CAD to functional circuits in order for irofits to be realized. For ultrahigh performance devices, customized circuits, and rapid verification of design, FIB (focused ion beam) systems provide a viable alternative to the lengthy process of producing a large mask set. Early models of FI equipment did not require sophisticated software. However, as FIB technology approaches adolescence, it must be supported by software that gives the user a friendly system, the flexibility to design a wide variety of circuits, and good growth potential for tomorrow's ICs. Presented here is an overview of IBT's MicroFocus" 150 hardware, followed by descriptions of several MicroFocus software modules. Data preparation techniques from IBCAD formats to chip layout are compared to the more conventional lithographies. The MicroFocus 150 schemes for user interfacing, error logging, calibration, and subsystem control are given. The MicroFocus's pattern generator and bit slice software are explained. IBT's FIB patterning algorithms, which allow the fabrication of unique device types, are reviewed.

  9. Magnetic switching

    SciTech Connect

    Birx, D.; Cook, E.; Hawkins, S.; Poor, S.; Reginato, L.; Schmidt, J.; Smith, M.

    1983-06-01

    The paper discusses the development program in magnetic switching which was aimed at solving the rep-rate and reliability limitations of the ATA spark gaps. The end result has been a prototype physically very similar to the present Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) pulse power unit but vastly superior in performance. This prototype, which is easily adaptable to the existing systems, has achieved a burst rep-rate of 20 kHz and an output voltage of 500 kV. A one-on-one substitution of the existing pulse power module would result in a 100 MeV accelerator. Furthermore, the high efficiency of the magnetic pulse compression stages has allowed CW operation of the prototype at one kilohertz opening up other applications for the pulse power. Performance and design details will be described.

  10. Magnetic Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-01

    Defense supported the development of microwave ferrites , and today 85 percent of that market is still military. Magnetostrictive sensors for sonar...or hard ferrite , Although both cobalt and samarium are expensive and the production process is difficult v4,*-°’. because of the strong tendency of...plentiful materials supply and low magnet cost. This calls for automated mass-production methods for ferrites and, perhaps, Nd-Fe-based REPMs. But for

  11. Optical Magnetism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-15

    anisotropic and exhibit chirality , and investigated the dispersion relations of plane wave propagation in chiral (bi-isotropic) and the more general...tensor components of ǫr, µr, and in addition the chirality parameter tensor κ. II. MAGNETISM FROM CARBON NANOTUBE COIL ARRAYS Our preliminary studies...nanocoils, it is important to pay attention to the subtle issue of chirality . Most meta- materials exhibit only simple constitutive relations of the form D

  12. Magnetic Reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Masaaki Yamada, Russell Kulsrud and Hantao Ji

    2009-09-17

    We review the fundamental physics of magnetic reconnection in laboratory and space plasmas, by discussing results from theory, numerical simulations, observations from space satellites, and the recent results from laboratory plasma experiments. After a brief review of the well-known early work, we discuss representative recent experimental and theoretical work and attempt to interpret the essence of significant modern findings. In the area of local reconnection physics, many significant findings have been made with regard to two- uid physics and are related to the cause of fast reconnection. Profiles of the neutral sheet, Hall currents, and the effects of guide field, collisions, and micro-turbulence are discussed to understand the fundamental processes in a local reconnection layer both in space and laboratory plasmas. While the understanding of the global reconnection dynamics is less developed, notable findings have been made on this issue through detailed documentation of magnetic self-organization phenomena in fusion plasmas. Application of magnetic reconnection physics to astrophysical plasmas is also brie y discussed.

  13. Significance of fine-grained microfabrics from a Cretaceous stromatolite bed (Muñecas Fm, late Turonian, Northern Iberian Ranges, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Martínez, Marta; Reitner, Joachim; Gil, Javier; García-Hidalgo, José; Segura, Manolo

    2010-05-01

    A fine-grained stromatolite bed of great lateral continuity (km scale) and small synoptic relief (from 15 cm up to 40 cm) is registered in the Muñecas Formation (Floquet et al., 1982), of the Northern Iberian Ranges. Muñecas Fm is mainly composed of thin-bedded limestones and marls deposited during the late Turonian. At this time, the Iberian microplate was located in subtropical palaeolatitudes (20°N-30°N according Dercourt et al., 2000) and shallow-water carbonate platform facies were deposited in a wide and shallow seaway, along a NW-SE trending, intracratonic basin (Upper Cretaceous Iberian basin), between the emergent areas of the Hesperian massif to the W and the Ebro massif to the NE (Segura et al 2002). The stromatolite bed (facies 2.1) overlies heterolithic facies (facies 1.1) composed of marls and thin-bedded, massive mudstones with micritic intraclasts, ostracods and reworked sponges, and bearing quartz-silt and bioclastic-rich wavy bands. The coeval facies, laterally equivalent to the stromatolite bed, consist of an oolite-rich, sheet-like deposit (facies 2.2). Packstone and grainstone of radial-fibrous oolites overlie burrowed bioclastic mudstone-wackestones (facies 1.2) with bivalve fragments, gastropods, foraminifers, and sponges. The stromatolite bed is capped by ostracod-rich limestones (facies 3) and marls. The stromatolite posses a stratiform to LLH macrostructure, and in some places domed bioherms up to 1 m width occur. Internally, mesostructure is composed by planar, wavy to hemispherical stromatoids. They display a broad spectrum of microestructures: dense micrite, peloids (microbial as well as bahamite peloids), clotted microfabrics, irregular micritic-wall tubes and dendroid-arborescent microframeworks (filamentous cyanobacteria?). The microfacial study of the vertical arrangement of the stromatolite laminae reveals different growth stages probably related with environmental changes. In fact, the whole fine-grained stromatolite accretion

  14. 1/f noise in linearized low resistance MgO magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, J. M.; Ferreira, R.; Freitas, P. P.; Langer, J.; Ocker, B.; Maass, W.

    2006-04-01

    Low RA MgO magnetic tunnel junctions prepared at Singulus (Ta 3/CuN 30/Ta 5/PtMn 20/CoFe 2.5/Ru 0.7/CoFeB 3/MgO 1.2/CoFeB 3/Ta 5 (thickness in nanometers) were microfabricated at INESC-MN. The junctions were patterned into micron-sized sensors (5-20 μm2) with controlled shape anisotropy (aspect ratio ranging from 2 to 20). A small external longitudinal bias field (15-30 Oe) was further used to improve sensor linearity. The MgO junctions have a resistance-area product of 150 Ω μm2 and a maximum tunnel magnetoresistance of 130%. Noise measurements were done in linearized sensors, from dc to 500 kHz. The magnetic and nonmagnetic contributions to the 1/f noise were determined. From the data fitting, Hooge parameters of ~2.20×10-9 μm2 were obtained for the nonmagnetic 1/f noise. Analysis of direct experimental data revealed the possibility to detect variations of magnetic fields in the order of 10-10 T/Hz0.5 with these MgO junctions, demonstrating their potential for ultralow-field detection.

  15. Biomimetic cilia arrays - fabrication, magnetic actuation, and driven fluid transport phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, Adam

    The cilium is one of biology's most basic functional nanostructures, present on nearly every cell and increasingly realized as vital to many aspects of human health. A fundamental reason for the ubiquity of cilia is their ability to effectively interact with fluids at the microscale, where the Reynolds number is low and thus inertia is irrelevant. This ability makes cilia an attractive and popular candidate for an engineered biomimic with potential applications in microfluidics and sensing. In addition, biological ciliated systems are difficult to study for many reasons, and so I demonstrate how a functional biomimetic system can also serve as a model platform for highly controlled studies of biologically relevant, cilia-driven hydrodynamics. Using the template-based microfabrication of a magnetic nanoparticle/polymer composite, I fabricate arrays of magnetically actuated biomimetic cilia at the scale of their biological analogues. I will discuss this fabrication technique and the magnetic actuation of these arrays to mimic the beat of biological cilia. I also report on the nature of the fluid flows driven by the cilia beat, and demonstrate how these cilia arrays can simultaneously generate long-range fluid transport and mixing in distinct fluid flow regimes. Finally, I present these results within the context of canonical hydrodynamics problems and discuss the implications for biological systems, such as the motile cilia recently discovered in the embryonic node.

  16. Noncentrosymmetric Magnets Hosting Magnetic Skyrmions.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Naoya; Seki, Shinichiro; Tokura, Yoshinori

    2017-03-17

    The concept of a skyrmion, which was first introduced by Tony Skyrme in the field of particle physics, has become widespread in condensed matter physics to describe various topological orders. Skyrmions in magnetic materials have recently received particular attention; they represent vortex-like spin structures with the character of nanometric particles and produce fascinating physical properties rooted in their topological nature. Here, a series of noncentrosymmetric ferromagnets hosting skyrmions is reviewed: B20 metals, Cu2 OSeO3 , Co-Zn-Mn alloys, and GaV4 S8 , where Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction plays a key role in the stabilization of skyrmion spin texture. Their topological spin arrangements and consequent emergent electromagnetic fields give rise to striking features in transport and magnetoelectric properties in metals and insulators, such as the topological Hall effect, efficient electric-drive of skyrmions, and multiferroic behavior. Such electric controllability and nanometric particle natures highlight magnetic skyrmions as a potential information carrier for high-density magnetic storage devices with excellent energy efficiency.

  17. Magnetic Nanoparticle Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Isaac; Josephson, Lee

    2009-01-01

    Many types of biosensors employ magnetic nanoparticles (diameter = 5–300 nm) or magnetic particles (diameter = 300–5,000 nm) which have been surface functionalized to recognize specific molecular targets. Here we cover three types of biosensors that employ different biosensing principles, magnetic materials, and instrumentation. The first type consists of magnetic relaxation switch assay-sensors, which are based on the effects magnetic particles exert on water proton relaxation rates. The second type consists of magnetic particle relaxation sensors, which determine the relaxation of the magnetic moment within the magnetic particle. The third type is magnetoresistive sensors, which detect the presence of magnetic particles on the surface of electronic devices that are sensitive to changes in magnetic fields on their surface. Recent improvements in the design of magnetic nanoparticles (and magnetic particles), together with improvements in instrumentation, suggest that magnetic material-based biosensors may become widely used in the future. PMID:22408498

  18. Biomimetic magnetic silk scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Samal, Sangram K; Dash, Mamoni; Shelyakova, Tatiana; Declercq, Heidi A; Uhlarz, Marc; Bañobre-López, Manuel; Dubruel, Peter; Cornelissen, Maria; Herrmannsdörfer, Thomas; Rivas, Jose; Padeletti, Giuseppina; De Smedt, Stefaan; Braeckmans, Kevin; Kaplan, David L; Dediu, V Alek

    2015-03-25

    Magnetic silk fibroin protein (SFP) scaffolds integrating magnetic materials and featuring magnetic gradients were prepared for potential utility in magnetic-field assisted tissue engineering. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were introduced into SFP scaffolds via dip-coating methods, resulting in magnetic SFP scaffolds with different strengths of magnetization. Magnetic SFP scaffolds showed excellent hyperthermia properties achieving temperature increases up to 8 °C in about 100 s. The scaffolds were not toxic to osteogenic cells and improved cell adhesion and proliferation. These findings suggest that tailored magnetized silk-based biomaterials can be engineered with interesting features for biomaterials and tissue-engineering applications.

  19. Thin Magnetically Soft Wires for Magnetic Microsensors

    PubMed Central

    Zhukova, Valentina; Ipatov, Mihail; Zhukov, Arcady

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in technology involving magnetic materials require development of novel advanced magnetic materials with improved magnetic and magneto-transport properties and with reduced dimensionality. Therefore magnetic materials with outstanding magnetic characteristics and reduced dimensionality have recently gained much attention. Among these magnetic materials a family of thin wires with reduced geometrical dimensions (of order of 1–30 μm in diameter) have gained importance within the last few years. These thin wires combine excellent soft magnetic properties (with coercivities up to 4 A/m) with attractive magneto-transport properties (Giant Magneto-impedance effect, GMI, Giant Magneto-resistance effect, GMR) and an unusual re-magnetization process in positive magnetostriction compositions exhibiting quite fast domain wall propagation. In this paper we overview the magnetic and magneto-transport properties of these microwires that make them suitable for microsensor applications. PMID:22291562

  20. Superconducting magnet

    DOEpatents

    Satti, John A.

    1980-01-01

    A superconducting magnet designed to produce magnetic flux densities of the order of 4 to 5 Webers per square meter is constructed by first forming a cable of a plurality of matrixed superconductor wires with each wire of the plurality insulated from each other one. The cable is shaped into a rectangular cross-section and is wound with tape in an open spiral to create cooling channels. Coils are wound in a calculated pattern in saddle shapes to produce desired fields, such as dipoles, quadrupoles, and the like. Wedges are inserted between adjacent cables as needed to maintain substantially radial placement of the long dimensions of cross sections of the cables. After winding, individual strands in each of the cables are brought out to terminals and are interconnected to place all of the strands in series and to maximize the propagation of a quench by alternating conduction from an inner layer to an outer layer and from top half to bottom half as often as possible. Individual layers are separated from others by spiraled aluminum spacers to facilitate cooling. The wound coil is wrapped with an epoxy tape that is cured by heat and then machined to an interference fit with an outer aluminum pipe which is then affixed securely to the assembled coil by heating it to make a shrink fit. In an alternate embodiment, one wire of the cable is made of copper or the like to be heated externally to propagate a quench.

  1. Magnetic Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Gonzalez, Walter D.

    1998-01-01

    One of the oldest mysteries in geomagnetism is the linkage between solar and geomagnetic activity. The 11-year cycles of both the numbers of sunspots and Earth geomagnetic storms were first noted by Sabine. A few years later, speculation on a causal relationship between flares and storms arose when Carrington reported that a large magnetic storm followed the great September 1859 solar flare. However, it was not until this century that a well-accepted statistical survey on large solar flares and geomagnetic storms was performed, and a significant correlation between flares and geomagnetic storms was noted. Although the two phenomena, one on the Sun and the other on the Earth, were statistically correlated, the exact physical linkage was still an unknown at this time. Various hypotheses were proposed, but it was not until interplanetary spacecraft measurements were available that a high-speed plasma stream rich in helium was associated with an intense solar flare. The velocity of the solar wind increased just prior to and during the helium passage, identifying the solar ejecta for the first time. Space plasma measurements and Skylab's coronagraph images of coronal mass elections (CMES) from the Sun firmly established the plasma link between the Sun and the Earth. One phenomenon associated with magnetic storms is brilliant "blood" red auroras, as shown.

  2. The magnetization process: Hysteresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balsamel, Richard

    1990-01-01

    The magnetization process, hysteresis (the difference in the path of magnetization for an increasing and decreasing magnetic field), hysteresis loops, and hard magnetic materials are discussed. The fabrication of classroom projects for demonstrating hysteresis and the hysteresis of common magnetic materials is described in detail.

  3. Magnet innovations for linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Halbach, K.

    1986-06-01

    It is possible to produce large magnetic fields at the aperture of permanent magnet quadrupoles, even when the magnetic aperture is very small. That, combined with their compactness, makes permanent magnet quadrupoles very powerful components of small aperture linacs. Results will be presented about past and present work on both fixed and variable strength permanent magnets suitable for use in and around linacs.

  4. Permanent magnet assembly

    DOEpatents

    Chell, Jeremy; Zimm, Carl B.

    2006-12-12

    A permanent magnet assembly is disclosed that is adapted to provide a magnetic field across an arc-shaped gap. Such a permanent magnet assembly can be used, for example, to provide a time-varying magnetic field to an annular region for use in a magnetic refrigerator.

  5. Samarium/Cobalt Magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, D.; Kumar, K.; Frost, R.; Chang, C.

    1985-01-01

    Intrinsic magnetic coercivities of samarium cobalt magnets made to approach theoretical limit of 350 kA/m by carefully eliminating oxygen from finished magnet by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). HIP process viable alternative to currently used sintering process.

  6. Intraocular magnet of Parel.

    PubMed Central

    Crock, G. W.; Janakiraman, P.; Reddy, P.

    1986-01-01

    The intraocular magnet (IOM) is a new device based on permanent magnetism providing controlled energy for removal of magnetic intraocular foreign bodies. Its use is reported in 11 cases. Images PMID:3801364

  7. Magnetism of Carbonados

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kletetschka, G.; Taylor, P. T.; Wasilewski, P. J.

    2000-01-01

    Origin of Carbonado is not clear. Magnetism of Carbonado comes from the surface, indicating contemporary formation of both the surface and magnetic carriers. The interior of carbonado is relatively free of magnetic phases.

  8. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... usually given through an IV in the arm. MRI Research Programs at FDA Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ...

  9. Smashing magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrier-Barbut, Igor

    2016-11-01

    Understanding or designing phases of matter relies in the first place on the knowledge at the microscopic level of the interactions taking place between the constituents. In quantum gases, a renewed interest is rising about the interaction between two dipoles, owing to its anisotropic and long-range character. In a new paper, Burdick et al (2016 New J. Phys. 18 113004) demonstrate experimentally the angular-dependence of collisions between two dysprosium atoms, an atomic species that carries a magnetic dipole moment among the largest in the periodic table. This is realized by colliding two 164Dy Bose-Einstein condensates, and the experiments are backed by a theoretical analysis to connect these results with the two-body scattering cross-section. This represents a further step on the way to the full control of dipole-interacting many-body systems.

  10. Magnetized accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyvaerts, J.

    This lecture reviews in simple terms the general subject of large scale magnetic field coupling to plasma flows in the vicinity of accreting compact stars. The relevant astrophysical phenomenology is summarized. Disk interaction with the magnetosphere of accreting stars is first discussed, in particular the structure of the magnetopause, its stability and plasma ejection in so-called propeller systems. The physics of accretion/ejection is then considered. Acceleration and focusing mechanisms of jets from accretion disks around compact stars or black holes and the question of the self-consistency of accretion and ejection are described. By contrast, small scale MHD turbulence in disks is not discussed, neither are accretion columns near the polar caps of neutron stars or white dwarfs. The reader is only assumed to have some basic knowledge of astrophysics and of fluid mechanics and electromagnetism.

  11. Magnetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Manchium (Inventor); Colvin, Michael S. (Inventor); Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Richards, Gil F. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Metal oxide containing polymers and particularly styrene, acrylic or protein polymers containing fine, magnetic iron oxide particles are formed by combining a NO.sub.2 -substituted polymer with an acid such as hydrochloric acid in the presence of metal, particularly iron particles. The iron is oxidized to fine, black Fe.sub.3 O.sub.4 particles which deposit selectively on the polymer particles. Nitrated polymers are formed by reacting functionally substituted, nitrated organic compounds such as trinitrobenzene sulfonate or dinitrofluoro benzene with a functionally coreactive polymer such as an amine modified acrylic polymer or a protein. Other transition metals such as cobalt can also be incorporated into polymers using this method.

  12. Magnetization of ferromagnetic clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Naoki; Bertsch, G.; Yabana, Kazuhiro

    1995-02-01

    The magnetization and deflection profiles of magnetic clusters in a Stern-Gerlach magnet are calculated for conditions under which the magnetic moment is fixed in the intrinsic frame of the cluster, and the clusters enter the magnetic field adiabatically. The predicted magnetization is monotonic in the Langevin parameter, the ratio of magnetic energy {mu}{sub 0}B to thermal energy k{sub B}T. In low field the average magnetization is 2/3 of the Langevin function. The high-field moment approaches saturation asymptotically as B{sup {minus}1/2} instead of the B{sup {minus}1} dependence in the Langevin function.

  13. The Third Flight Magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGhee, R. Wayne

    1998-01-01

    A self-shielded superconducting magnet was designed for the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator Program. This is the third magnet built from this design. The magnets utilize Cryomagnetics' patented ultra-low current technology. The magnetic system is capable of reaching a central field of two tesla at slightly under two amperes and has a total inductance of 1068 henries. This final report details the requirements of the magnet, the specifications of the resulting magnet, the test procedures and test result data for the third magnet (Serial # C-654-M), and recommended precautions for use of the magnet.

  14. A smart fully integrated micromachined separator with soft magnetic micro-pillar arrays for cell isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Tao; Su, Qianhua; Yang, Zhaochu; Zhang, Yulong; Egeland, Eirik B.; Gu, Dan D.; Calabrese, Paolo; Kapiris, Matteo J.; Karlsen, Frank; Minh, Nhut T.; Wang, K.; Jakobsen, Henrik

    2010-11-01

    A smart fully integrated micromachined separator with soft magnetic micro-pillar arrays has been developed and demonstrated, which can merely employ one independent lab-on-chip to realize cell isolation. The simulation, design, microfabrication and test for the new electromagnetic micro separator were executed. The simulation results of the electromagnetic field in the separator show that special soft magnetic micro-pillar arrays can amplify and redistribute the electromagnetic field generated by the micro-coils. The separator can be equipped with a strong magnetic field to isolate the target cells with a considerably low input current. The micro separator was fabricated by micro-processing technology. An electroplating bath was hired to deposit NiCo/NiFe to fabricate the micro-pillar arrays. An experimental system was set up to verify the function of the micro separator by isolating the lymphocytes, in which the human whole blood mixed with Dynabeads® FlowComp Flexi and monoclonal antibody MHCD2704 was used as the sample. The results show that the electromagnetic micro separator with an extremely low input current can recognize and capture the target lymphocytes with a high efficiency, the separation ratio reaching more than 90% at a lower flow rate. For the electromagnetic micro separator, there is no external magnetizing field required, and there is no extra cooling system because there is less Joule heat generated due to the lower current. The magnetic separator is totally reusable, and it can be used to separate cells or proteins with common antigens.

  15. Magnetic hyperthermia in solid magnetic colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubarev, A. Yu.; Iskakova, L. Yu.; Abu-Bakr, A. F.

    2017-02-01

    We present results of theoretical study of magnetic hyperthermia in systems of single-domain ferromagnetic particles homogeneously distributed in a solid matrix. The heat effect is induced by linearly polarized alternating magnetic field. The effect of magnetic interaction between the particles as well as influence of orientation of the particles magnetic axes are in a focus of our consideration. Analysis shows that the interparticle interaction increases intensity of the heat production. The thermal effect in the systems with parallel orientation of the particles axes of easy magnetization is significantly higher than that in the case of random orientation of these axes.

  16. Hoosier Magnetics

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2015-09-30

    Hoosier Magnetics proposes to replace the indirect clinker water cooling system with a cooling system that recycles heat from the hot ferrite to preheat the combustion air. This innovative process would significantly reduce the amount of natural gas required to heat the combustion air while eliminating Hoosier’s largest source of downtime. According to the Department of Energy’s Industrial Technologies Program for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, process temperature is customarily used as a rough indication of where preheating air will be cost effective. Previous studies have concluded that processes operating above 1,600° F are ideal candidates for the utilization of pre-heated combustion air. Hoosier Magnetics’ operating temperatures run between 1800-2200° F making Hoosier the perfect candidate. Using preheated air at 1200° F will result in 35% fuel savings, or $298,935 annually. Additionally, the new system would have improved process reliability and result in both production efficiency increases and cost savings. This technology is NOT practiced or utilized on a wide-spread basis but could have a significant energy reduction impact in many different high heat utilizing industries in the country. While the energy savings is apparent with this theory the application and design of such a process has not been studied.

  17. MAGNETIC DENSITOMETER

    DOEpatents

    McCann, J.A.; Jones, R.H.

    1961-08-15

    A magnetic densitometer for locating defects and metallic inclusions in materials is described. The apparatus consists of two primary coils connected in series opposition and adapted te be placed in inductive relation to the material under test, a source of constant frequency alternating current coupled across the primary coil combination, a pick-up coil disposed in symmetrical inductive relationship with said primary coils, a phase-shifter coupled to the output of the energizing source. The output of the phase-shifter is coupled in series with the pick-up coil. An amplifier is provided selective to the third harmonic of the energizing source frequency. The series combination of the pick-up coil and the phase-shifter output are connected across the input of the amplifier, and an amplitude comparitor is coupled to the output of the amplifier and the energizing source for comparing the instantaneous amplitude of the amplifier output and the instantaneous output of the energizing source and producing an output proportional to the difference in amplitude. A recorder is coupled to the output of the amplitude comparison means to give an indication of the amplitude difference, thereby providing a permanent presentation of the character of the changes in characteristics exhibited by the material under test. (AEC)

  18. Structural and transport properties of epitaxial Fe/ZnSe/FeCo magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustavsson, F.; George, J.-M.; Etgens, V. H.; Eddrief, M.

    2001-11-01

    The use of a semiconductor barrier in heteroepitaxy with ferromagnetic metal electrodes describes a novel type of magnetic tunnel junctions. In this work, epitaxial Fe/ZnSe/FeCo magnetic tunnel junctions have been grown on ZnSe(001) buffered GaAs(001) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. Alloying a small amount of Co with Fe in the base electrode provides a better seed epilayer for the growth of the ZnSe barrier compared to pure Fe as seen by transmission electron microscopy. Detailed characterization of the FeCo surface was performed by in situ scanning tunneling microscopy and revealed pyramid-shaped defects of up to 60 Å in height distributed on the FeCo surface. Transport measurements on microfabricated tunnel junctions yielded up to 16% magnetoresistance at 10 K and the effect is attributed to spin polarized tunneling across the semiconductor barrier in the energy range of the gap. The observed anomalous character of the magnetoresistance was attributed to conduction through the pyramidal defects in the base FeCo layer.

  19. Fabrication of fluorinated polyimide microgrids using magnetically controlled reactive ion etching (MC-RIE) and their applications to an ion drag integrated micropump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuya, Akinori; Shimokawa, Fusao; Matsuura, Tohru; Sawada, Renshi

    1996-09-01

    Magnetically controlled reactive ion etching (MC-RIE) of a fluorinated polyimide substrate achieved etching selectivity of up to 2600, resulting in a smoothly etched surface and structures hundreds of micrometers high having good perpendicularity. This technique is useful for three-dimensional microfabrication. As an example of a typical application, we fabricated an ion drag integrated micropump with microgrid sets consisting of 0960-1317/6/3/003/img1 high pole-shaped counter-electrode elements arranged like a pair of interleaved combs by using a fluorinated polyimide as the structural material, metallization, and lift-off using a ZnO sacrificial layer. This micropump moved ethanol with a flow rate of about 0960-1317/6/3/003/img2 when 200 V was applied to the counter electrodes.

  20. Contactless Magnetic Slip Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumagai, Hiroyuki (Inventor); Deardon, Joe D. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A contactless magnetic slip ring is disclosed having a primary coil and a secondary coil. The primary and secondary coils are preferably magnetically coupled together, in a highly reliable efficient manner, by a magnetic layered core. One of the secondary and primary coils is rotatable and the contactless magnetic slip ring provides a substantially constant output.