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Sample records for microfilaments

  1. Method and apparatus for testing microfilaments

    DOEpatents

    Schleitweiler, Patrick M.; Merten, Jr., Charles W.

    1995-08-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for testing tensile strength of microfilaments. Fibers as small as 0.001 inch in diameter and 0.04 inches in length have been tested, although the method and apparatus of the invention are capable of testing fibers of smaller diameter and length. The invention utilizes a method wherein one or both ends of a microfilament is gripped using resin which is softened sufficiently to accept an end of the microfilament and then allowed to harden. The invention also employs the use of a translation stage capable of controlled three-dimensional movement suited to facilitating gripping of the microfilament.

  2. Method and apparatus for testing microfilaments

    DOEpatents

    Schleitweiler, P.M.; Merten, C.W. Jr.

    1995-08-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for testing tensile strength of microfilaments. Fibers as small as 0.001 inch in diameter and 0.04 inches in length have been tested, although the method and apparatus of the invention are capable of testing fibers of smaller diameter and length. The invention utilizes a method wherein one or both ends of a microfilament is gripped using resin which is softened sufficiently to accept an end of the microfilament and then allowed to harden. The invention also employs the use of a translation stage capable of controlled three-dimensional movement suited to facilitating gripping of the microfilament. 2 figs.

  3. ATP and microfilaments in cellular oxidant injury.

    PubMed Central

    Hinshaw, D. B.; Armstrong, B. C.; Burger, J. M.; Beals, T. F.; Hyslop, P. A.

    1988-01-01

    Oxidant injury produces dramatic changes in cytoskeletal organization and cell shape. ATP synthetic pathways are major targets of oxidant injury resulting in rapid depletion of cellular ATP following oxidant exposure. The relation of ATP depletion to the changes in microfilament organization seen following H2O2 exposure were examined in the P388D1 cell line. Three hours of glucose depletion alone resulted in a decline in cellular ATP levels to less than 10% of controls, which was comparable to ATP levels in cells 30 to 60 minutes after exposure to 5 mM H2O2 in the presence of glucose. Adherent cells stained with rhodamine phalloidin, a probe specific for polymerized (F) actin, revealed a progressive shortening of microfilaments into globular aggregates within cells depleted of glucose over 3 hours, a pattern similar to earlier observations of H2O2-injured cells after 1 hour. The changes in cellular ATP associated with glucose depletion or H2O2 exposure were then correlated with G actin content measured by the DNAse 1 inhibition assay. No real differences in G actin content as a percentage of total actin were seen in P388D1 cells following 3 hours of glucose depletion or 30 to 60 minutes after exposure to 5 mM H2O2. But 2 to 3 hours after exposure to H2O2 there was a progressive decrease in G actin as a percentage of total actin within the cells. Transmission electron microscopy of cells depleted of glucose for 3 h or 1 hour after exposure to H2O2 revealed the presence of side-to-side aggregates or bundles of microfilaments within the cells. These observations suggest that declining levels of ATP either from metabolic inhibition or H2O2 injury are correlated with the fragmentation and shortening of microfilaments into aggregates. No net change in monomeric or polymeric actin was necessary for this to occur. However, at later time points after H2O2 exposure some actin assembly did occur. Images p[484]-a p481-a p482-a Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:3414780

  4. Microfilament distribution in protonemata of the moss Ceratodon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, L. M.; Sack, F. D.

    1995-01-01

    Microfilaments were visualized in dark-grown protonemata of the moss Ceratodon to assess their possible role in tip growth and gravitropism. The relative effectiveness of rhodamine phalloidin (with or without m-maleimidobenzoyl-N-hydroxysuccinimide ester (MBS)) and of immunofluorescence (using the C4 antibody) was evaluated for actin localization in the same cell type. Using immunofluorescence, microfilaments were primarily in an axial orientation within the apical cell. However, a more complex network of microfilaments was observed using rhodamine phalloidin after MBS pretreatment, especially when viewed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. This method revealed a rich three dimensional network of fine microfilaments throughout the apical cell, including the extreme apex. Although there were numerous internal microfilaments, peripheral microfilaments were more abundant. No major redistribution of microfilaments was detected after gravistimulation. The combination of MBS, rhodamine phalloidin, and confocal laser scanning microscopy preserves and reveals microfilaments remarkably well and documents perhaps the most extensive F-actin network visualized to date in any tip-growing cell.

  5. A Microfilament-eruption Mechanism for Solar Spicules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2016-09-01

    Recent investigations indicate that solar coronal jets result from eruptions of small-scale chromospheric filaments, called minifilaments; that is, the jets are produced by scaled-down versions of typical-sized filament eruptions. We consider whether solar spicules might in turn be scaled-down versions of coronal jets, being driven by eruptions of microfilaments. Assuming a microfilament's size is about a spicule's width (∼300 km), the estimated occurrence number plotted against the estimated size of erupting filaments, minifilaments, and microfilaments approximately follows a power-law distribution (based on counts of coronal mass ejections, coronal jets, and spicules), suggesting that many or most spicules could result from microfilament eruptions. Observed spicule-base Ca ii brightenings plausibly result from such microfilament eruptions. By analogy with coronal jets, microfilament eruptions might produce spicules with many of their observed characteristics, including smooth rise profiles, twisting motions, and EUV counterparts. The postulated microfilament eruptions are presumably eruptions of twisted-core micro-magnetic bipoles that are ∼1.″0 wide. These explosive bipoles might be built and destabilized by merging and cancelation of approximately a few to 100 G magnetic-flux elements of size ≲ 0\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 5{--}1\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 0. If, however, spicules are relatively more numerous than indicated by our extrapolated distribution, then only a fraction of spicules might result from this proposed mechanism.

  6. Incorporation of mammalian actin into microfilaments in plant cell nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Paves, Heiti; Truve, Erkki

    2004-01-01

    Background Actin is an ancient molecule that shows more than 90% amino acid homology between mammalian and plant actins. The regions of the actin molecule that are involved in F-actin assembly are largely conserved, and it is likely that mammalian actin is able to incorporate into microfilaments in plant cells but there is no experimental evidence until now. Results Visualization of microfilaments in onion bulb scale epidermis cells by different techniques revealed that rhodamine-phalloidin stained F-actin besides cytoplasm also in the nuclei whereas GFP-mouse talin hybrid protein did not enter the nuclei. Microinjection of fluorescently labeled actin was applied to study the presence of nuclear microfilaments in plant cells. Ratio imaging of injected fluorescent rabbit skeletal muscle actin and phalloidin staining of the microinjected cells showed that mammalian actin was able to incorporate into plant F-actin. The incorporation occurred preferentially in the nucleus and in the perinuclear region of plant cells whereas part of plant microfilaments, mostly in the periphery of cytoplasm, did not incorporate mammalian actin. Conclusions Microinjected mammalian actin is able to enter plant cell's nucleus, whereas incorporation of mammalian actin into plant F-actin occurs preferentially in the nucleus and perinuclear area. PMID:15102327

  7. Nuclear centering in Spirogyra: force integration by microfilaments along microtubules.

    PubMed

    Grolig, F

    1998-01-01

    The contribution of microtubules and microfilaments to the cytomechanics of transverse nuclear centering were investigated in the charophycean green alga Spirogyra crassa (Zygnematales). Cytoplasmic strands of enhanced rigidity and fasciate appearance radiate from the rim of the lenticular nucleus through the vacuole, frequently split once or twice and are attached to the helical chloroplast bands in the peripheral cytoplasm. The nucleus is encased in tubulin and a web of F-actin. Bundles of microtubules, emerging from the nuclear rim, are organized into dividing fascicles within the strands and reach to the inner surface of the chloroplast envelope. Organelles are translocated in both directions along similarly arranged fascicles of microfilament bundles which extend from the nucleus to the peripheral actin cytoskeleton. Application of microtubule- and/or microfilament-depolymerizing drugs affected the position of the nucleus only slowly, but in distinct ways. The differential effects suggest that nuclear centering depends on the tensional integrity of the perinuclear scaffold, with microfilaments conveying tension along stabilized microtubules and the actin cytoskeleton integrating the translocation forces generated within the scaffold.

  8. Motile apparatus in Vallisneria leaf cells. I. Organization of microfilaments.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Y; Nagai, R

    1981-04-01

    The organization of the microfilaments in epidermal cells of Vallisneria leaves was investigated with respect to the induction of cytoplasmic streaming (secondary streaming). In many of the epidermal cells, cytoplasm exhibited rotational streaming along the anticlinal wall of the cell after exposure around the anticlinal wall. The bundles were arrayed in parallel to the streaming direction. They were recognized usually as 10-40 closely packed dense dots in cross-section. The spacing between bundles was not even. Bundles tended to form groups of 4 to 5 in which the spacing between bundles was usually 0.3 to 0.5 micrometer. The microfilaments were identified as F-actin. Together with the fact that rotational streaming in Vallisneria cells by cytochalasin B, the motile mechanism of secondary streaming was concluded to be similar in its essential features to the cytoplasmic streaming seen in Characean cell (primary streaming). In epidermal cells that had been kept under low-intensity light the cytoplasm and the cytoplasmic streaming occurred in these cells. The bundles of microfilaments remained in the very thin layer of cytoplasm lining the anticlinal wall, although they were fewer and somewhat loosely packed. EGTA at appropriate concentration could induce cytoplasmic streaming in these cells. The mechanism of the induction is discussed on the basis of the effectiveness of EGTA and the requirement of a low concentration of free Ca2+ for cytoplasmic streaming in Characean cells. PMID:6792210

  9. Selective, pulsed CVD of platinum on microfilament gas sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Manginell, R.P.; Smith, J.H.; Ricco, A.J.; Moreno, D.J.; Hughes, R.C.; Huber, R.J.; Senturia, S.D.

    1996-05-01

    A post-processing, selective micro-chemical vapor deposition (``micro-CVD``) technology for the deposition of catalytic films on surface-micromachined, nitride-passivated polysilicon filaments has been investigated. Atmospheric pressure deposition of Pt on microfilaments was accomplished by thermal decomposition of Pt acetylacetonate; deposition occurs selectively only on those filaments which are electrically heated. Catalyst morphology, characterized by SEM, can be controlled by altering deposition time, filament temperature, and through the use of pulsed heating of the filament during deposition. Morphology plays an important role in determining the sensitivity of these devices when used as combustible gas sensors.

  10. Actin microfilaments in presumptive statocytes of root caps and coleoptiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, R. G.; Sack, F. D.

    1990-01-01

    Rhodamine-phalloidin was used to determine the distribution of actin microfilament bundles (mfb) in cells thought to be the site of gravity perception (statocytes) in coleoptiles and root caps of Zea mays and Hordeum vulgare. In coleoptile cells, amyloplasts were usually observed in close proximity to thick mfb, which often appeared to divide into finer mfb adjacent to individual amyloplasts. The nucleus in these cells was surrounded by an extensive network of mfb, which were connected to thicker transvacuolar mfb. Columella cells of the root cap contained an extensive reticulum of fine mfb throughout the protoplast, but lacked the much thicker mfb seen in coleoptile cells. The distribution and extent of mfb observed in fixed cells correlates with patterns of streaming and amyloplast movement seen in living cells. A possible role for actin mfb in the perception of gravity is discussed.

  11. The nitrate reductase inhibitor, tungsten, disrupts actin microfilaments in Zea mays L.

    PubMed

    Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S; Panteris, Emmanuel; Eleftheriou, Eleftherios P

    2014-05-01

    Tungsten is a widely used inhibitor of nitrate reductase, applied to diminish the nitric oxide levels in plants. It was recently shown that tungsten also has heavy metal attributes. Since information about the toxic effects of tungsten on actin is limited, and considering that actin microfilaments are involved in the entry of tungsten inside plant cells, the effects of tungsten on them were studied in Zea mays seedlings. Treatments with sodium tungstate for 3, 6, 12 or 24 h were performed on intact seedlings and seedlings with truncated roots. Afterwards, actin microfilaments in meristematic root and leaf tissues were stained with fluorescent phalloidin, and the specimens were examined by confocal laser scanning microscopy. While the actin microfilament network was well organized in untreated seedlings, in tungstate-treated ones it was disrupted in a time-dependent manner. In protodermal root cells, the effects of tungsten were stronger as cortical microfilaments were almost completely depolymerized and the intracellular ones appeared highly bundled. Fluorescence intensity measurements confirmed the above results. In the meristematic leaf tissue of intact seedlings, no depolymerization of actin microfilaments was noticed. However, when root tips were severed prior to tungstate application, both cortical and endoplasmic actin networks of leaf cells were disrupted and bundled after 24 h of treatment. The differential response of root and leaf tissues to tungsten toxicity may be due to differential penetration and absorption, while the effects on actin microfilaments could not be attributed to the nitric oxide depletion by tungsten.

  12. Plastins regulate ectoplasmic specialization via its actin bundling activity on microfilaments in the rat testis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan; Wong, Chris KC; Cheng, C Yan

    2016-01-01

    Plastins are a family of actin binding proteins (ABPs) known to cross-link actin microfilaments in mammalian cells, creating actin microfilament bundles necessary to confer cell polarity and cell shape. Plastins also support cell movement in response to changes in environment, involved in cell/tissue growth and development. They also confer plasticity to cells and tissues in response to infection or other pathological conditions (e.g., inflammation). In the testis, the cell-cell anchoring junction unique to the testis that is found at the Sertoli cell-cell interface at the blood-testis barrier (BTB) and at the Sertoli-spermatid (e.g., 8–19 spermatids in the rat testis) is the basal and the apical ectoplasmic specialization (ES), respectively. The ES is an F-actin-rich anchoring junction constituted most notably by actin microfilament bundles. A recent report using RNAi that specifically knocks down plastin 3 has yielded some insightful information regarding the mechanism by which plastin 3 regulates the status of actin microfilament bundles at the ES via its intrinsic actin filament bundling activity. Herein, we provide a brief review on the role of plastins in the testis in light of this report, which together with recent findings in the field, we propose a likely model by which plastins regulate ES function during the epithelial cycle of spermatogenesis via their intrinsic activity on actin microfilament organization in the rat testis. PMID:26608945

  13. Actin microfilament mediates osteoblast Cbfa1 responsiveness to BMP2 under simulated microgravity.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhongquan; Wu, Feng; Chen, Jian; Xu, Hongjie; Wang, Honghui; Guo, Feima; Tan, Yingjun; Ding, Bai; Wang, Jinfu; Wan, Yumin; Li, Yinghui

    2013-01-01

    Microgravity decreases osteoblastic activity, induces actin microfilament disruption and inhibits the responsiveness of osteoblast to cytokines, but the mechanisms remains enigmatic. The F-actin cytoskeleton has previously been implicated in manifold changes of cell shape, function and signaling observed under microgravity. Here we investigate the involvement of microfilament in mediating the effects of microgravity and BMP2 induction on Cbfa1 activity. For this purpose we constructed a fluorescent reporter cell line (OSE-MG63) of Cbfa1 activity by stably transfecting MG63 cells with a reporter consisting of six tandem copies of OSE2 and a minimal mOG2 promoter upstream of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). The fluorescence intensity of OSE-MG63 showed responsiveness to bone-related cytokines (IGF-I, vitamin D3 and BMP2) and presented an accordant tendency with alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. Using OSE-MG63 reporter fluorescence, we performed a semi-quantitative analysis of Cbfa1 activity after treatment with simulated microgravity, microfilament-disrupting agent (cytochalasin B, CB), microfilament-stabilizing agent (Jasplakinolide, JAS) or any combination thereof. In parallel, ALP activity, DNA binding activity of Cbfa1 to OSE2 (ChIP), F-actin structure (immunofluorescence) and EGFP mRNA expression (RT-qPCR) were analyzed. Simulated microgravity inhibited Cbfa1 activity, affected the responsiveness of Cbfa1 to cytokine BMP2, and caused a thinning and dispersed distribution of microfilament. Under normal gravity, CB significantly attenuated BMP2 induction to Cbfa1 activity as well as DNA binding activity of Cbfa1 to OSE2. The addition of JAS reversed the inhibitory effects of microgravity on the responsiveness of Cbfa1 to BMP2. Our study demonstrates that disrupting the microfilament organization by CB or simulated microgravity attenuates the responsiveness of Cbfa1 to BMP2. A stabilization of the microfilament organization by JAS reverses this

  14. Cytomagnetometric study of interactions between microfilaments and microtubules by measuring the energy imparted to magnetic particles within the cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemoto, Iku; Kawamura, Kazuhisa

    2005-05-01

    Cytomagnetometric measurements of the energy imparted to intracellular organelles were made to study the relationship between microtubules and microfilaments. Depolymerization of microtubules by colchicine resulted in an increase in the energy suggesting that microtubules in control condition suppress the activity of microfilaments.

  15. Roles of microfilaments and intermediate filaments in adrenal steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hall, P F; Almahbobi, G

    1997-03-15

    The problem for the steroidogenic cell if it is to accelerate steroid synthesis in response to trophic stimulation, consists in moving cholesterol from the sites of synthesis and storage to mitochondria at an accelerated rate. The most intensely studied situation is that in which the sterol is stored as ester in lipid droplets. Cholesterol ester must be de-esterified and transported to mitochondria where steroid synthesis begins. Since droplets and mitochondria are now known to be attached to intermediate filaments and since these structures are not contractile, it appears to be necessary to invoke the actions of other cytoskeletal elements. Actin microfilaments are involved in cholesterol transport so that it is tempting to propose that the contractile properties of actomyosin are used in this process. It is known that an energy-dependent contractile process involving actin is capable of disrupting intermediate filaments. Since the intermediate filaments appear to act by keeping lipid droplets and mitochondria apart, disruption of the filaments accompanied by a contractile process would be expected to allow these two structures to come together. This would open the way for the transfer of cholesterol to the steroidogenic pathway. This should be regarded as a first step. The events necessary for entry of cholesterol from droplets into the mitochondria remain to be clarified. In addition, the transport process for newly synthesized cholesterol that is not stored in droplets, is still not understood. At least four protein kinase enzymes have been identified in the cytoskeletons of adrenal cells, namely, Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase, protein kinase (Ca2+ and phospholipid-dependent), myosin light chain kinase, and protein kinase A (cyclic AMP-dependent). The Ca2+/calmodulin kinase promotes transport of cholesterol to mitochondria and does so under conditions in which phosphorylation of vimentin and myosin light chain occurs. Phosphorylation of vimentin results in

  16. Anticytoskeletal autoantibody to microfilament anchorage sites recognizes novel focal contact proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Senécal, J L; Fortin, S; Roussin, A; Joyal, F

    1987-01-01

    Actin microfilaments are anchored to the plasma membrane at focal contacts. Using an indirect immunofluorescence method, we detected an autoantibody reactive with focal contacts in PtK2, HEp-2, and BHK-21 cells in serum from two patients with early systemic sclerosis. With double immunofluorescence, using the actin-binding drug phalloidin, we localized the plaques decorated by these sera specifically at the termini of microfilament bundles. The reactive antigens were identified by immunoblotting as proteins of 80,000- and 75,300-mol wt in PtK2, and of 53,500-mol wt in HEp-2 and BHK-21 cells. The 53,500-mol wt protein was also identified in rat skeletal, myocardial, and smooth muscle tissues. The detergent solubility of these proteins suggested that they may be linked to the plasma membrane. The autoantigens were immunologically distinct from vinculin and alpha-actinin, two major proteins also known to be concentrated at the ends of microfilament bundles. Our observations suggest that this novel anticytoskeletal autoantibody may identify a novel family of vertebrate cell proteins involved in the linkage of microfilaments to the plasma membrane at focal contacts. Images PMID:2442196

  17. Villin: The major microfilament-associated protein of the intestinal microvillus

    PubMed Central

    Bretscher, Anthony; Weber, Klaus

    1979-01-01

    The major protein associated with actin in the microfilament core of intestinal microvilli has been purified. This protein, for which we propose the name villin, has a polypeptide molecular weight of approximately 95,000. Two arguments suggest that villin may be the microvillus crossfilament protein that links the microfilament core laterally down its length to the cytoplasmic side of the plasma membrane. First, electron microscopy shows that crossfilaments stay attached to isolated membrane-free microvillus cores. Calculation of the expected abundance of the crossfilament protein shows that only villin is present in sufficient quantity to account for these structures. Second, decoration of microvillus cores by antibodies to either actin or villin, followed by ferritin-labeled second antibody in a sandwich procedure, results in specific labeling of the cores in both cases. The antivillin decoration, however, gives rise to a greater increase in diameter, in agreement with a model in which villin projects from the F-actin microfilament core. Villin is distinct from α-actinin, a protein suggested to be involved in membrane anchorage of microfilaments in nonmuscle cells. The two proteins differ in molecular weight. Specific antibodies against villin and α-actinin show no immunological crossreactivity. Immunofluorescence microscopy reveals that villin is located in the microvilli of the brush border whereas α-actinin is absent from the microvilli but is found in the terminal web. In addition, villin is not found in microfilament bundles of tissue culture cells, which are rich in α-actinin. Thus, villin and α-actinin appear to be immunologically and functionally different proteins. Images PMID:287075

  18. Characterization of actin microfilaments at the apical pole of thyroid cells.

    PubMed

    Gabrion, J; Travers, F; Benyamin, Y; Sentein, P; Van Thoai, N

    1980-01-01

    In thyroid cells (rat or hog), actin has been detected by immunofluorescence with an antiactin antibody and, in electron microscopy by decoration "in situ" with heavy meromyosin. The antibody as the heavy meromyosin method have shown that actin microfilaments are especially localized at the apical pole of the cells, in a region where thin filaments are usually observed by conventional methods of electron microscopy. These microfilaments are attached to the apical membrane at the ends of the microvilli and form dense bundles at their cores. They are polarized towards the interior of the cell. Decorated filaments are also organized in a clear network, parallel to the apical membrane; they are associated with microvillar bundles, but also with small apical vesicles and lateral membranes, in tight or gap junctions.

  19. Cytoplasmic streaming emerges naturally from hydrodynamic self-organisation of a microfilament suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodhouse, Francis; Goldstein, Raymond

    2013-03-01

    Cytoplasmic streaming is the ubiquitous phenomenon of deliberate, active circulation of the entire liquid contents of a plant or animal cell by the walking of motor proteins on polymer filament tracks. Its manifestation in the plant kingdom is particularly striking, where many cells exhibit highly organised patterns of flow. How these regimented flow templates develop is biologically unclear, but there is growing experimental evidence to support hydrodynamically-mediated self-organisation of the underlying microfilament tracks. Using the spirally-streaming giant internodal cells of the characean algae Chara and Nitella as our prototype, we model the developing sub-cortical streaming cytoplasm as a continuum microfilament suspension subject to hydrodynamic and geometric forcing. We show that our model successfully reproduces emergent streaming behaviour by evolving from a totally disordered initial state into a steady characean ``conveyor belt'' configuration as a consequence of the cell geometry, and discuss applicability to other classes of steadily streaming plant cells.

  20. On spatial stabilization of dielectric barrier discharge microfilaments by residual heat build-up in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ráhel, Jozef; Szalay, Zsolt; Čech, Jan; Morávek, Tomás

    2016-04-01

    Microfilaments of dielectric barrier discharge are known for their multiple re-appearance at the same spot on dielectrics. This effect of localized re-appearance is driven by residual excited species and ions, surface charge deposited on the dielectric and the local temperature build-up resulting in the local increase of reduced electric field E/ΔN. To assess the magnitude of the latter, the breakdown voltage vs. temperature up to 180 °C was carefully measured at coplanar DBD and used as an input into the numerical simulation of heat build-up by the train of discharge pulses. An average reduction of breakdown voltage was found to be 20 V/K. The model predicted a quasi-stable microfilament temperature into which the thermal build-up rapidly converges. Its magnitude agreed well with the reported rotational temperature of similar electrode configuration. The impact of quasi-stable temperature on microfilament formation dynamics is further discussed. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Recent Breakthroughs in Microplasma Science and Technology", edited by Kurt Becker, Jose Lopez, David Staack, Klaus-Dieter Weltmann and Wei Dong Zhu.

  1. Effects of mechanical tension on protrusive activity and microfilament and intermediate filament organization in an epidermal epithelium moving in culture

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Mechanical tension influences tissue morphogenesis and the synthetic, mitotic, and motile behavior of cells. To determine the effects of tension on epithelial motility and cytoskeletal organization, small, motile clusters of epidermal cells were artificially extended with a micromanipulated needle. Protrusive activity perpendicular to the axis of tension was dramatically suppressed. To determine the ultrastructural basis for this phenomenon, cells whose exact locomotive behavior was recorded cinemicrographically were examined by transmission electron microscopy. In untensed, forward-moving lamellar protrusions, microfilaments appear disorganized and anisotropically oriented. But in cytoplasm held under tension by micromanipulation or by the locomotive activity of other cells within the epithelium, microfilaments are aligned parallel to the tension. In non-spreading regions of the epithelial margin, microfilaments lie in tight bundles parallel to apparent lines of tension. Thus, it appears that tension causes alignment of microfilaments. In contrast, intermediate filaments are excluded from motile protrusions, being confined to the thicker, more central part of the cell. They roughly follow the contours of the cell, but are not aligned relative to tension even when microfilaments in the same cell are. This suggests that the organization of intermediate filaments is relatively resistant to physical distortion and the intermediate filaments may act as passive structural support within the cell. The alignment of microfilaments under tension suggests a mechanism by which tension suppresses protrusive activity: microfilaments aligned by forces exerted through filament-surface or filament-filament interconnections cannot reorient against such force and so cannot easily extend protrusions in directions not parallel to tension. PMID:3958054

  2. The purified and recombinant Legionella pneumophila chaperonin alters mitochondrial trafficking and microfilament organization.

    PubMed

    Chong, Audrey; Lima, Celia A; Allan, David S; Nasrallah, Gheyath K; Garduño, Rafael A

    2009-11-01

    A portion of the total cellular pool of the Legionella pneumophila chaperonin, HtpB, is found on the bacterial cell surface, where it can mediate invasion of nonphagocytic cells. HtpB continues to be abundantly produced and released by internalized L. pneumophila and may thus have postinvasion functions. We used here two functional models (protein-coated beads and expression of recombinant proteins in CHO cells) to investigate the competence of HtpB in mimicking early intracellular trafficking events of L. pneumophila, including the recruitment of mitochondria, cytoskeletal alterations, the inhibition of phagosome-lysosome fusion, and association with the endoplasmic reticulum. Microscopy and flow cytometry studies indicated that HtpB-coated beads recruited mitochondria in CHO cells and U937-derived macrophages and induced transient changes in the organization of actin microfilaments in CHO cells. Ectopic expression of HtpB in the cytoplasm of transfected CHO cells also led to modifications in actin microfilaments similar to those produced by HtpB-coated beads but did not change the distribution of mitochondria. Association of phagosomes containing HtpB-coated beads with the endoplasmic reticulum was not consistently detected by either fluorescence or electron microscopy studies, and only a modest delay in the fusion of TrOv-labeled lysosomes with phagosomes containing HtpB-coated beads was observed. HtpB is the first Legionella protein and the first chaperonin shown to, by means of our functional models, induce mitochondrial recruitment and microfilament rearrangements, two postinternalization events that typify the early trafficking of virulent L. pneumophila. PMID:19687203

  3. [Study of a lysis medium stabilizing microfilaments and microtubules in vitro and in vivo].

    PubMed

    Foucault, G; Raymond, M N; Coffe, G; Pudles, J

    1984-01-01

    Determination of experimental conditions which allow the evaluation of the variations in the ratio of non polymerized and polymerized forms of actin and tubulin during the reorganization of the cytoskeletal cell system is of most valuable importance. In order to prepare cell homogenates which would reflect the in vivo situation, we tested in vitro a lysis medium which stabilized both microfilaments and microtubules, which were determined by DNase inhibition assays and colchicine binding assays respectively. This lysis medium containing 10 mM potassium phosphate, 1mM magnesium chloride, 5 mM EGTA, 1 M hexylene glycol, 1% Triton X-100, pH 6.4, used at 4 degrees C a) diffused rapidly into the cells; b) did not denature actin and tubulin; c) did not displace the equilibrium between non polymerized and polymerized forms of actin and tubulin, allowing biochemical assays on cell homogenates; d) blocked the evolution of the cytoskeletal system and permitted structural studies; e) and allowed the decoration of microfilaments by heavy meromyosin. PMID:6241485

  4. The complex dynamic network of microtubule and microfilament cytasters of the leech zygote.

    PubMed

    Cantillana, V; Urrutia, M; Ubilla, A; Fernández, J

    2000-12-01

    The organization of the cytoskeleton in the early first interphase zygote and its involvement in organelle redistribution were studied in the glossiphoniid leech Theromyzon trizonare by confocal and electron microscopy, immunofluorescence, and time-lapse video imaging after microinjection of labeled tubulin and/or actin and loading with a mitotracker. The cytoskeleton consists of an inner or endoplasmic and an outer or ectoplasmic domain. The inner domain consists of a monaster whose fibers retract from the zygote periphery by the end of the early first interphase. The outer domain is built upon a network of microtubules and microfilaments cytasters. Short pulses of microinjected labeled actin or tubulin and Taxol treatment demonstrate that cytasters are centers of microtubule and microfilament nucleation. Immunostaining with anti-centrophilin, anti-BX-63, and anti-AH-6 indicates that the network of cytasters includes centrosomal antigens. Cytasters move in an orderly fashion at speeds of 0.5-2 micrometer/min, in an energy-dependent process retarded and finally blocked by the ATP analogue AMP-PNP and high concentrations of Taxol. Colliding cytasters fuse and form larger cytoskeletal nucleation centers. The leech zygote is a highly compartmentalized cell whose cytasters function as articulated components of a very dynamic cytoskeletal system engaged in bulk transportation of organelles during ooplasmic segregation. PMID:11087633

  5. Intranuclear bundles of microfilaments and microtubules in chromaffin cells of the auricle of the heart of a lungfish, Protopterus aethiopicus.

    PubMed

    Scheuermann, D W; Adriaensen, D; De Groodt-Lasseel, M H

    1988-01-01

    Intranuclear microtubular-microfilamentous rod-like inclusions were investigated in chromaffin cells of the auricle of the heart of lungfishes. In conventional electron microscopy, these inclusions reveal a wide variety in appearance, depending on their orientation to the plane of sectioning. Whereas originally they were merely interpreted as a bundle of microfilaments, application of a goniometer stage showed the rod- or spindle-shaped intranuclear inclusions to have a basic substructure of parallel arranged microtubules among microfilaments, which are clearly connected to chromatin granules, occasionally penetrating dense areas of chromatin. The chemical nature and biological significance of these structures, which so far remain enigmatic, are discussed. PMID:3227775

  6. Redistribution of microfilament-associated proteins during the formation of focal contacts and adhesions in chick fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Couchman, J R; Badley, R A; Rees, D A

    1983-12-01

    The roles of the microfilament-associated proteins vinculin, alpha-actinin, myosin and filamin have been studied by immunofluorescence and double fluorescence in conjunction with interference reflection microscopy (IRM), during the development of focal contacts and focal adhesions in a chick fibroblast system which initially has no such adhesion specializations but then develops them sequentially over a 48 h period. Without exception, all focal contacts and focal adhesions contain both vinculin and alpha-actinin at every stage that we can detect by IRM or by double staining to reveal the associated microfilament bundles. Indeed the appearance of small bodies containing alpha-actinin and vinculin is shown to precede focal contact formation in our model system and such structures (not visible by IRM) are proposed to be the precursors of focal contacts and adhesions. Myosin and filamin are distributed generally with some reticular patterning in the early motile cells which lack the focal specializations, but as focal contacts and adhesions form these proteins become progressively recruited into the associated microfilament bundles. Only then do we see the marked depletion that has been reported earlier of diffusely distributed myosin and filamin in the leading lamella. Although this is not initially associated with any change in the motile status of the cells, the recruitment of these microfilament-associated proteins into stress fibres is proposed to occur in preparation for anchorage and bracing of cells to the substratum when they later become stationary. PMID:6421873

  7. Alteration in lung particle translocation, macrophage function, and microfilament arrangement in monocrotaline-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Madl, A K; Wilson, D W; Segall, H J; Pinkerton, K E

    1998-11-01

    Individuals with preexisting cardiopulmonary disease are thought to be more susceptible to acute episodes of particulate pollution resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. Our study was designed to evaluate particle fate and macrophage function in an animal model of monocrotaline (MCT)-induced pulmonary hypertension. Two weeks following a single MCT injection, Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed sequentially to two different colored fluorescent microspheres 1.0 micron in diameter by aerosolization. Morphometric evaluation of lung sections was performed 0 and 24 h following the final particle exposure to determine the intrapulmonary location of inhaled microspheres. A decrease in the number of particles phagocytized by alveolar macrophages and an increase of free particles overlying the epithelium were found in MCT-treated animals compared with control. Pulmonary macrophages recovered by bronchoalveolar lavage were evaluated for chemotactic and phagocytic ability. Macrophage chemotaxis was significantly impaired following MCT treatment compared with controls, whereas phagocytic activity of macrophages lavaged from MCT and control treatment groups was similar. Macrophages were stained for filamentous (F) and globular (G) actin using Texas-Red-labeled phalloidin and Oregon-green-labeled DNase I, respectively. The area of microfilament staining for F and G actin increased, but the ratio of F/G actin was significantly decreased in animals with MCT treatment compared with control. While the responses observed with MCT treatment, such as pulmonary edema, polymorphonuclear leukocytes influx, and unique macrophage morphology may contribute to impaired macrophage function, the change in microfilament arrangement suggests that MCT may inhibit macrophage chemotaxis and impair particle clearance from the lungs. PMID:9875297

  8. Role of coated vesicles, microfilaments, and calmodulin in receptor- mediated endocytosis by cultured B lymphoblastoid cells

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    Cell surface receptor IgM molecules of cultured human lymlphoblastoid cells (WiL2) patch and redistribute into a cap over the Golgi region of the cell after treatment with multivalent anti-IgM antibodies. During and after the redistribution, ligand-receptor clusters are endocytosed into coated pits and coated vesicles. Morphometric analysis of the distribution of ferritin-labeled ligand at EM resolution reveals the following sequence of events in the endocytosis of cell surface IgM: (a) binding of the multivalent ligand in a diffuse cell surface distribution, (b) clustering of the ligand-receptor complexes, (c) recruitment of clathrin coats to the cytoplasmic surface of the cell membrane opposite ligand-receptor clusters, (d) assembly and (e) internalization of coated vesicles, and (f) delivery of label into a large vesicular compartment, presumably partly lysosomal. Most of the labeled ligand enters this pathway. The recruitment of clathrin coats to the membrane opposite ligand-receptor clusters is sensitive to the calmodulin-directed drug Stelazine (trifluoperazine dihydrochloride). In addition, Stelazine inhibits an alternate pathway of endocytosis that does not involve coated vesicle formation. The actin-directed drug dihydrocytochalasin B has no effect on the recruitment of clathrin to the ligand-receptor clusters and the formation of coated pits and little effect on the alternate pathway, but this drug does interfere with subsequent coated vesicle formation and it inhibits capping. Cortical microfilaments that decorate with heavy meromyosin with constant polarity are observed in association with the coated regions of the plasma membrane and with coated vesicles. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of a coated vesicle preparation isolated from WiL2 cells demonstrates that the major polypeptides in the fraction are a 175-kdalton component that comigrates with calf brain clathrin, a 42- kdalton component that comigrates with rabbit muscle actin and a

  9. cAMP-mediated and metabolic amplification of insulin secretion are distinct pathways sharing independence of β-cell microfilaments.

    PubMed

    Mourad, Nizar I; Nenquin, Myriam; Henquin, Jean-Claude

    2012-10-01

    Insulin secretion is triggered by an increase in the cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](c)) in β-cells. Ca(2+)-induced exocytosis of insulin granules can be augmented by metabolic amplification (unknown signals generated through glucose metabolism) or neurohormonal amplification (in particular cAMP mediated). Functional actin microfilaments are not required for metabolic amplification, but their possible role in cAMP-mediated amplification is unknown. It is also uncertain whether cAMP (generated in response to glucose) is implicated in metabolic amplification. These questions were addressed using isolated mouse islets. cAMP levels were increased by phosphodiesterase inhibition (with isobutylmethylxanthine) and adenylate-cyclase stimulation (with forskolin or glucagon-like peptide-1, 7-36 amide). Raising cAMP levels had no steady-state impact on actin polymerization in control islets. Neither disruption (depolymerization by latrunculin) nor stabilization (polymerization by jasplakinolide) of actin microfilaments was counteracted by cAMP. Both changes increased both phases of glucose- or tolbutamide-induced insulin secretion but did not prevent further amplification by cAMP. These large changes in secretion were not caused by changes in [Ca(2+)](c), which was only slightly increased by cAMP. Both phases of insulin secretion were larger in response to glucose than tolbutamide, although [Ca(2+)](c) was lower. This difference in secretion, which reflects metabolic amplification, was independent of microfilaments, was not attributable to differences in cAMP, and persisted in presence of dibutyryl-cAMP or when cAMP levels were variably raised by isobutylmethylxanthine + forskolin or glucagon-like peptide-1, 7-36 amide. We conclude that metabolic and cAMP-mediated amplification of insulin secretion are distinct pathways that accelerate acquisition of release competence by insulin granules that can access exocytotic sites without intervention of microfilaments.

  10. The association of peroxisomes with the developing cell plate in dividing onion root cells depends on actin microfilaments and myosin.

    PubMed

    Collings, David A; Harper, John D I; Vaughn, Kevin C

    2003-12-01

    We have investigated changes in the distribution of peroxisomes through the cell cycle in onion ( Allium cepa L.) root meristem cells with immunofluorescence and electron microscopy, and in leek ( Allium porrum L.) epidermal cells with immunofluorescence and peroxisomal-targeted green fluorescent protein. During interphase and mitosis, peroxisomes distribute randomly throughout the cytoplasm, but beginning late in anaphase, they accumulate at the division plane. Initially, peroxisomes occur within the microtubule phragmoplast in two zones on either side of the developing cell plate. However, as the phragmoplast expands outwards to form an annulus, peroxisomes redistribute into a ring immediately inside the location of the microtubules. Peroxisome aggregation depends on actin microfilaments and myosin. Peroxisomes first accumulate in the division plane prior to the formation of the microtubule phragmoplast, and throughout cytokinesis, always co-localise with microfilaments. Microfilament-disrupting drugs (cytochalasin and latrunculin), and a putative inhibitor of myosin (2,3-butanedione monoxime), inhibit aggregation. We propose that aggregated peroxisomes function in the formation of the cell plate, either by regulating hydrogen peroxide production within the developing cell plate, or by their involvement in recycling of excess membranes from secretory vesicles via the beta-oxidation pathway. Differences in aggregation, a phenomenon which occurs in onion, some other monocots and to a lesser extent in tobacco BY-2 suspension cells, but which is not obvious in the roots of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh., may reflect differences within the primary cell walls of these plants.

  11. Complex relationship between TCTP, microtubules and actin microfilaments regulates cell shape in normal and cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Bazile, Franck; Pascal, Aude; Arnal, Isabelle; Le Clainche, Christophe; Chesnel, Franck; Kubiak, Jacek Z.

    2009-01-01

    Translationally Controlled Tumor-associated Protein (TCTP) is a ubiquitous and highly conserved protein implicated in cancers. Here we demonstrate that interactions of TCTP with microtubules (MTs) are functionally important but indirect, and we reveal novel interaction of TCTP with the actin cytoskeleton. Firstly, immunofluorescence in Xenopus XL2 cells revealed cytoplasmic fibers stained with TCTP but not with tubulin antibodies, as well as MT-free of TCTP. Furthermore, TCTP localized to a subset of actin-rich fibers in migrating cells. Secondly XlTCTP did not affect in vitro assembly/disassembly of MTs, and lacked MT binding affinity both in pull-down assays and in cell-free extracts. Although TCTP also failed to bind to purified F-actin, it associated with microfilaments in cell-free extracts. Thirdly, TCTP concentrated in mitotic spindle did not colocalize with MTs, and was easily dissociated from these structures except at the poles. Finally, RNAi knockdown of TCTP in XL2 and HeLa cells provoked drastic, MT-dependent, shape change. These data show that although TCTP interacts with MTs it does not behave as classic MT Associated Protein (MAP). Our evidence for an association of TCTP with F-actin structures, and for an involvement in cell shape regulation, implicates this protein in integrating cytoskeletal interations both in interphase and mitosis providing a new avenue to fully understand the role of TCTP. PMID:19168579

  12. Cytoplasmic streaming in plant cells emerges naturally by microfilament self-organization.

    PubMed

    Woodhouse, Francis G; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2013-08-27

    Many cells exhibit large-scale active circulation of their entire fluid contents, a process termed cytoplasmic streaming. This phenomenon is particularly prevalent in plant cells, often presenting strikingly regimented flow patterns. The driving mechanism in such cells is known: myosin-coated organelles entrain cytoplasm as they process along actin filament bundles fixed at the periphery. Still unknown, however, is the developmental process that constructs the well-ordered actin configurations required for coherent cell-scale flow. Previous experimental works on streaming regeneration in cells of Characean algae, whose longitudinal flow is perhaps the most regimented of all, hint at an autonomous process of microfilament self-organization driving the formation of streaming patterns during morphogenesis. Working from first principles, we propose a robust model of streaming emergence that combines motor dynamics with both microscopic and macroscopic hydrodynamics to explain how several independent processes, each ineffectual on its own, can reinforce to ultimately develop the patterns of streaming observed in the Characeae and other streaming species. PMID:23940314

  13. Cytoplasmic streaming in plant cells emerges naturally by microfilament self-organization

    PubMed Central

    Woodhouse, Francis G.; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2013-01-01

    Many cells exhibit large-scale active circulation of their entire fluid contents, a process termed cytoplasmic streaming. This phenomenon is particularly prevalent in plant cells, often presenting strikingly regimented flow patterns. The driving mechanism in such cells is known: myosin-coated organelles entrain cytoplasm as they process along actin filament bundles fixed at the periphery. Still unknown, however, is the developmental process that constructs the well-ordered actin configurations required for coherent cell-scale flow. Previous experimental works on streaming regeneration in cells of Characean algae, whose longitudinal flow is perhaps the most regimented of all, hint at an autonomous process of microfilament self-organization driving the formation of streaming patterns during morphogenesis. Working from first principles, we propose a robust model of streaming emergence that combines motor dynamics with both microscopic and macroscopic hydrodynamics to explain how several independent processes, each ineffectual on its own, can reinforce to ultimately develop the patterns of streaming observed in the Characeae and other streaming species. PMID:23940314

  14. Rearrangement of Actin Microfilaments in Plant Root Hairs Responding to Rhizobium etli Nodulation Signals1

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas, Luis; Vidali, Luis; Domínguez, Jimena; Pérez, Héctor; Sánchez, Federico; Hepler, Peter K.; Quinto, Carmen

    1998-01-01

    The response of the actin cytoskeleton to nodulation (Nod) factors secreted by Rhizobium etli has been studied in living root hairs of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) that were microinjected with fluorescein isothiocyanate-phalloidin. In untreated control cells or cells treated with the inactive chitin oligomer, the actin cytoskeleton was organized into long bundles that were oriented parallel to the long axis of the root hair and extended into the apical zone. Upon exposure to R. etli Nod factors, the filamentous actin became fragmented, as indicated by the appearance of prominent masses of diffuse fluorescence in the apical region of the root hair. These changes in the actin cytoskeleton were rapid, observed as soon as 5 to 10 min after application of the Nod factors. It was interesting that the filamentous actin partially recovered in the continued presence of the Nod factor: by 1 h, long bundles had reformed. However, these cells still contained a significant amount of diffuse fluorescence in the apical zone and in the nuclear area, presumably indicating the presence of short actin filaments. These results indicate that Nod factors alter the organization of actin microfilaments in root hair cells, and this could be a prelude for the formation of infection threads. PMID:9501120

  15. The Role of Microfilaments in Early Meiotic Maturation of Mouse Oocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calarco, Patricia G.

    2005-04-01

    Mouse oocyte microfilaments (MF) were perturbed by depolymerization (cytochalasin B) or stabilization (jasplakinolide) and correlated meiotic defects examined by confocal microscopy. MF, microtubules, and mitochondria were vitally stained; centrosomes ([gamma]-tubulin), after fixation. MF depolymerization by cytochalasin in culture medium did not affect central migration of centrosomes, mitochondria, or nuclear breakdown (GVBD); some MF signal was localized around the germinal vesicle (GV). In maturation-blocking medium (containing IBMX), central movement was curtailed and cortical MF aggregations made the plasma membrane wavy. Occasional long MF suggested that not all MF were depolymerized. MF stabilization by jasplakinolide led to MF aggregations throughout the cytoplasm. GVBD occurred (unless IBMX was present) but no spindle formed. Over time, most oocytes constricted creating a dumbbell shape with MF concentrated under one-half of the oocyte cortex and on either side of the constriction. In IBMX medium, the MF-containing half of the dumbbell over time sequestered the GV, MF, mitochondria, and one to two large cortical centrosomes; the non-MF half appeared empty. Cumulus processes contacted the oocyte surface (detected by microtubule content) and mirrored MF distribution. Results demonstrated that MF play an essential role in meiosis, primarily through cortically mediated events, including centrosome localization, spindle (or GV) movement to the periphery, activation of (polar body) constriction, and establishment of oocyte polarity. The presence of a cortical “organizing pole” is hypothesized.

  16. Cytoplasmic streaming in plant cells emerges naturally by microfilament self-organization.

    PubMed

    Woodhouse, Francis G; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2013-08-27

    Many cells exhibit large-scale active circulation of their entire fluid contents, a process termed cytoplasmic streaming. This phenomenon is particularly prevalent in plant cells, often presenting strikingly regimented flow patterns. The driving mechanism in such cells is known: myosin-coated organelles entrain cytoplasm as they process along actin filament bundles fixed at the periphery. Still unknown, however, is the developmental process that constructs the well-ordered actin configurations required for coherent cell-scale flow. Previous experimental works on streaming regeneration in cells of Characean algae, whose longitudinal flow is perhaps the most regimented of all, hint at an autonomous process of microfilament self-organization driving the formation of streaming patterns during morphogenesis. Working from first principles, we propose a robust model of streaming emergence that combines motor dynamics with both microscopic and macroscopic hydrodynamics to explain how several independent processes, each ineffectual on its own, can reinforce to ultimately develop the patterns of streaming observed in the Characeae and other streaming species.

  17. A marginal band-associated protein has properties of both microtubule- and microfilament-associated proteins

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    The marginal band of nucleated erythrocytes is a microtubule organelle under rigorous quantitative and spatial control, with properties quite different from those of the microtubule organelles of cultured cells. Previous results suggest that proteins other than tubulin may participate in organizing the marginal band, and may interact with elements of the erythrocyte cytoskeleton in addition to microtubules. To identify such species, we raised mAbs against the proteins that assemble from chicken brain homogenates with tubulin. One such antibody binds to a single protein in chicken erythrocytes, and produces an immunofluorescence pattern colocalizing with marginal band microtubules. Several properties of this protein are identical to those of ezrin, a protein isolated from brush border and localized to motile elements of cultured cells. A significant proportion of the antigen is not soluble in erythrocytes, as determined by extraction with nonionic detergent. This cytoskeleton-associated fraction is unaffected by treatments that solubilize the marginal band microtubules. The protein has properties of both microtubule- and microfilament-associated proteins. In the accompanying manuscript (Goslin, K., E. Birgbauer, G. Banker, and F. Solomon. 1989. J. Cell Biol. 109:1621-1631), we show that the same antibody recognizes a component of growth cones with a similar dual nature. In early embryonic red blood cells, the antigen is dispersed throughout the cell and does not colocalize with assembled tubulin. Its confinement to the marginal band during development follows rather than precedes that of microtubules. These results, along with previous work, suggest models for the formation of the marginal band. PMID:2677023

  18. Changes in membrane-microfilament interaction in intercellular adherens junctions upon removal of extracellular Ca2+ ions

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    EGTA-induced depletion of Ca2+ ions from the culture medium of Madin- Darby bovine kidney epithelial cells results in rapid splitting of adherens-type junctions and the detachment of the vinculin- and actin- containing filament bundle from the cytoplasmic faces of the plasma membrane of the zonula adhaerens. This process was monitored by phase- contrast microscopy, combined with electron microscopy and immunofluorescent localization of the two proteins. It is shown that shortly after extracellular free Ca2+ concentration is lowered to the micromolar range, the actin-containing, junction-associated belt of microfilaments, together with the vinculin-rich junctional plaque material, is irreversibly detached as one structural unit from the plasma membrane, contracts, and is displaced towards the perinuclear cytoplasm where it gradually disintegrates. Other actin- and vinculin- containing structures present in the same cells, notably the focal contacts at the substratum, are not similarly affected by the Ca2+ depletion and retain both the adhesion to the external surface and the association with the plaque and microfilament components. Electron microscopic examination has shown that the membrane domain of the zonulae adhaerentes, unlike that of desmosomes, is not endocytosed after Ca2+ removal and that the displaced actin- and vinculin- containing plaque and filament belt are not associated with a particular membrane. It is further shown that upon restoration of normal Ca2+ levels in the culture medium, new intercellular contacts are established gradually by accretion of both vinculin and actin into new belt-like plaque- and microfilament-containing structures. PMID:3084500

  19. Subaxolemmal cytoskeleton in squid giant axon. II. Morphological identification of microtubule- and microfilament-associated domains of axolemma

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    In the preceding paper (Kobayashi, T., S. Tsukita, S. Tsukita, Y. Yamamoto, and G. Matsumoto, 1986, J. Cell Biol., 102:1710-1725), we demonstrated biochemically that the subaxolemmal cytoskeleton of the squid giant axon was highly specialized and mainly composed of tubulin, actin, axolinin, and a 255-kD protein. In this paper, we analyzed morphologically the molecular organization of the subaxolemmal cytoskeleton in situ. For thin section electron microscopy, the subaxolemmal cytoskeleton was chemically fixed by the intraaxonal perfusion of the fixative containing tannic acid. With this fixation method, the ultrastructural integrity was well preserved. For freeze- etch replica electron microscopy, the intraaxonally perfused axon was opened and rapidly frozen by touching its inner surface against a cooled copper block (4 degrees K), thus permitting the direct stereoscopic observation of the cytoplasmic surface of the axolemma. Using these techniques, it became clear that the major constituents of the subaxolemmal cytoskeleton were microfilaments and microtubules. The microfilaments were observed to be associated with the axolemma through a specialized meshwork of thin strands, forming spot-like clusters just beneath the axolemma. These filaments were decorated with heavy meromyosin showing a characteristic arrowhead appearance. The microtubules were seen to run parallel to the axolemma and embedded in the fine three-dimensional meshwork of thin strands. In vitro observations of the aggregates of axolinin and immunoelectron microscopic analysis showed that this fine meshwork around microtubules mainly consisted of axolinin. Some microtubules grazed along the axolemma and associated laterally with it through slender strands. Therefore, we were led to conclude that the axolemma of the squid giant axon was specialized into two domains (microtubule- and microfilament- associated domains) by its underlying cytoskeletons. PMID:3700475

  20. Amplification of insulin secretion by acetylcholine or phorbol ester is independent of β-cell microfilaments and distinct from metabolic amplification.

    PubMed

    Mourad, Nizar I; Nenquin, Myriam; Henquin, Jean-Claude

    2013-03-10

    Insulin secretion (IS) triggered by β-cell [Ca(2+)](c) is amplified by metabolic and receptor-generated signals. Diacylglycerol largely mediates acetylcholine (ACh) effects through protein-kinase C and other effectors, which can be directly activated by phorbol-ester (PMA). Using mouse islets, we investigated the possible role of microfilaments in ACh/PMA-mediated amplification of IS. PMA had no steady-state impact on actin microfilaments. Although ACh slightly augmented and PMA diminished glucose- and tolbutamide-induced increases in β-cell [Ca(2+)](c), both amplified IS in control islets and after microfilament disruption (latrunculin) or stabilization (jasplakinolide). Both phases of IS were larger in response to glucose than tolbutamide, although [Ca(2+)](c) was lower. This difference in secretion, which reflects metabolic amplification, persisted in presence of ACh/PMA and was independent of microfilaments. Amplification of IS by ACh/PMA is thus distinct from metabolic amplification, but both pathways promote acquisition of release competence by insulin granules, which can access exocytotic sites without intervention of microfilaments.

  1. Enrichment of distinct microfilament-associated and GTP-binding-proteins in membrane/microvilli fractions from lymphoid cells

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Jian-Jiang; Wang, Guanghui; Pisitkun, Trairak; Patino-Lopez, Genaro; Nagashima, Kunio; Knepper, Mark A.; Shen, Rong-Fong; Shaw, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Summary Lymphocyte microvilli mediate initial adhesion to endothelium during lymphocyte transition from blood into tissue but their molecular organization is incompletely understood. We modified a shear-based procedure to prepare biochemical fractions enriched for membrane/microvilli (MMV) from both human peripheral blood T-lymphocytes (PBT) and a mouse pre-B lymphocyte line (300.19). Enrichment of proteins in MMV relative to post nuclear lysate was determined by LC/MS/MS analysis and label-free quantitation. Subsequent analysis emphasized the 291 proteins shared by PBT and 300.19 and estimated by MS peak area to be highest abundance. Validity of the label-free quantitation was confirmed by many internal consistencies and by comparison with Western blot analyses. The MMV fraction was enriched primarily for subsets of cytoskeletal proteins, transmembrane proteins and G-proteins, with similar patterns in both lymphoid cell types. The most enriched cytoskeletal proteins were microfilament-related proteins NHERF1, Ezrin/Radixin/Moesin (ERMs), ADF/cofilin and Myosin1G. Other microfilament proteins such as talin, gelsolin, myosin II and profilin were markedly reduced in MMV, as were intermediate filament- and microtubule-related proteins. Heterotrimeric G-proteins and some small G-proteins (especially Ras and Rap1) were enriched in the MMV preparation. Two notable general observations also emerged. There was less overlap between the two cells in their transmembrane proteins than in other classes of proteins, consistent with a special role of plasma membrane proteins in differentiation. Second, unstimulated primary T-lymphocytes have an unusually high concentration of actin and other microfilament related proteins, consistent with the singular role of actin-mediated motility in the immunological surveillance performed by these primary cells. Lymphocyte microvilli initiate adhesion to endothelium during movement from blood into tissue. Using LC/MS/MS and label

  2. Centrifugation causes adaptation of microfilaments: studies on the transport of statoliths in gravity sensing Chara rhizoids.

    PubMed

    Braun, M; Sievers, A

    1993-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is involved in the positioning of statoliths in tip growing Chara rhizoids. The balance between the acropetally acting gravity force and the basipetally acting net outcome of cytoskeletal force results in the dynamically stable position of the statoliths 10-30 micrometers above the cell tip. A change of the direction and/or the amount of one of these forces in a vertically growing rhizoid results in a dislocation of statoliths. Centrifugation was used as a tool to study the characteristics of the interaction between statoliths and microfilaments (MFs). Acropetal and basipetal accelerations up to 6.5 g were applied with the newly constructed slow-rotating-centrifuge-microscope (NIZEMI). Higher accelerations were applied by means of a conventional centrifuge, namely acropetally 10-200 g and basipetally 10-70 g. During acropetal accelerations (1.4-6g), statoliths were displaced to a new stable position nearer to the cell vertex (12-6.5 micrometers distance to the apical cell wall, respectively), but they did not sediment on the apical cell wall. The original position of the statoliths was reestablished within 30 s after centrifugation. Sedimentation of statoliths and reduction of the growth rates of the rhizoids were observed during acropetal accelerations higher than 50 g. When not only the amount but also the direction of the acceleration were changed in comparison to the natural condition, i.e., during basipetal accelerations (1.0-6.5 g), statoliths were displaced into the subapical zone (up to 90 micrometers distance to the apical cell wall); after 15-20 min the retransport of statoliths to the apex against the direction of acceleration started. Finally, the natural position in the tip was reestablished against the direction of continuous centrifugation. Retransport was observed during accelerations up to 70 g. Under the 1 g condition that followed the retransported statoliths showed an up to 5-fold increase in sedimentation time onto the

  3. A stochastic thermostat algorithm for coarse-grained thermomechanical modeling of large-scale soft matters: Theory and application to microfilaments

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tong; Gu, YuanTong

    2014-04-15

    As all-atom molecular dynamics method is limited by its enormous computational cost, various coarse-grained strategies have been developed to extend the length scale of soft matters in the modeling of mechanical behaviors. However, the classical thermostat algorithm in highly coarse-grained molecular dynamics method would underestimate the thermodynamic behaviors of soft matters (e.g. microfilaments in cells), which can weaken the ability of materials to overcome local energy traps in granular modeling. Based on all-atom molecular dynamics modeling of microfilament fragments (G-actin clusters), a new stochastic thermostat algorithm is developed to retain the representation of thermodynamic properties of microfilaments at extra coarse-grained level. The accuracy of this stochastic thermostat algorithm is validated by all-atom MD simulation. This new stochastic thermostat algorithm provides an efficient way to investigate the thermomechanical properties of large-scale soft matters.

  4. A stochastic thermostat algorithm for coarse-grained thermomechanical modeling of large-scale soft matters: Theory and application to microfilaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tong; Gu, YuanTong

    2014-04-01

    As all-atom molecular dynamics method is limited by its enormous computational cost, various coarse-grained strategies have been developed to extend the length scale of soft matters in the modeling of mechanical behaviors. However, the classical thermostat algorithm in highly coarse-grained molecular dynamics method would underestimate the thermodynamic behaviors of soft matters (e.g. microfilaments in cells), which can weaken the ability of materials to overcome local energy traps in granular modeling. Based on all-atom molecular dynamics modeling of microfilament fragments (G-actin clusters), a new stochastic thermostat algorithm is developed to retain the representation of thermodynamic properties of microfilaments at extra coarse-grained level. The accuracy of this stochastic thermostat algorithm is validated by all-atom MD simulation. This new stochastic thermostat algorithm provides an efficient way to investigate the thermomechanical properties of large-scale soft matters.

  5. The force induced by organelles' weight in the microfilament is in the range of 0.1-1 pN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chun; Wei, Dong; Zhuang, Feng Y.

    It has been well documented that a microgravity environment can bring about many changes in cell metabolism. Can mammalian cells feel the gravity directly? At present, arguments surrounding the problem are difficult to be answered through experiments. However, using finite element simulation to estimate the force exerted on the microfilament meshwork model, we demonstrated a possible way through which gravity acts on the cytoskeleton system. This system, which includes microfilaments, microtubules, and intermediate filaments, is responsible for the retention of cell shape and plays a role in many aspects related to cell proliferation and function. Many organelles, such as ribosomes and nucleus, are deposited, hinged, or attached on the cytoskeleton system. The weight of organelles can deform the cytoskeleton system and can induce force in it. Simulation results showed that the force induced by organelles' weight in the microfilament is in the range of 0.1-1 pN. The magnitude of the force is near the single Van der Waals bond force between the proteins, which is large enough to influence the hinge motion of proteins.

  6. Microtubule-associated Protein 2c Reorganizes Both Microtubules and Microfilaments into Distinct Cytological Structures in an Actin-binding Protein-280–deficient Melanoma Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, C. Casey; Leclerc, Nicole; Flanagan, Lisa A.; Lu, Mei; Janmey, Paul A.; Kosik, Kenneth S.

    1997-01-01

    The emergence of processes from cells often involves interactions between microtubules and microfilaments. Interactions between these two cytoskeletal systems are particularly apparent in neuronal growth cones. The juvenile isoform of the neuronal microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2c) is present in growth cones, where we hypothesize it mediates interactions between microfilaments and microtubules. To approach this problem in vivo, we used the human melanoma cell, M2, which lacks actin-binding protein-280 (ABP-280) and forms membrane blebs, which are not seen in wild-type or ABP-transfected cells. The microinjection of tau or mature MAP2 rescued the blebbing phenotype; MAP2c not only caused cessation of blebbing but also induced the formation of two distinct cellular structures. These were actin-rich lamellae, which often included membrane ruffles, and microtubule-bearing processes. The lamellae collapsed after treatment with cytochalasin D, and the processes retracted after treatment with colchicine. MAP2c was immunocytochemically visualized in zones of the cell that were devoid of tubulin, such as regions within the lamellae and in association with membrane ruffles. In vitro rheometry confirmed that MAP2c is an efficient actin gelation protein capable of organizing actin filaments into an isotropic array at very low concentrations; tau and mature MAP2 do not share this rheologic property. These results suggest that MAP2c engages in functionally specific interactions not only with microtubules but also with microfilaments. PMID:9049250

  7. Single microfilaments mediate the early steps of microtubule bundling during preprophase band formation in onion cotyledon epidermal cells.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Miyuki; Karahara, Ichirou; Kajimura, Naoko; Takaoka, Akio; Murata, Kazuyoshi; Misaki, Kazuyo; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Staehelin, L Andrew; Mineyuki, Yoshinobu

    2016-06-01

    The preprophase band (PPB) is a cytokinetic apparatus that determines the site of cell division in plants. It originates as a broad band of microtubules (MTs) in G2 and narrows to demarcate the future division site during late prophase. Studies with fluorescent probes have shown that PPBs contain F-actin during early stages of their development but become actin depleted in late prophase. Although this suggests that actins contribute to the early stages of PPB formation, how actins contribute to PPB-MT organization remains unsolved. To address this question, we used electron tomography to investigate the spatial relationship between microfilaments (MFs) and MTs at different stages of PPB assembly in onion cotyledon epidermal cells. We demonstrate that the PPB actins observed by fluorescence microscopy correspond to short, single MFs. A majority of the MFs are bound to MTs, with a subset forming MT-MF-MT bridging structures. During the later stages of PPB assembly, the MF-mediated links between MTs are displaced by MT-MT linkers as the PPB MT arrays mature into tightly packed MT bundles. On the basis of these observations, we propose that the primary function of actins during PPB formation is to mediate the initial bundling of the PPB MTs.

  8. VLN2 Regulates Plant Architecture by Affecting Microfilament Dynamics and Polar Auxin Transport in Rice[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shengyang; Xie, Yurong; Guo, Xiuping; Sheng, Peike; Wang, Juan; Wu, Chuanyin; Wang, Haiyang; Wan, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    As a fundamental and dynamic cytoskeleton network, microfilaments (MFs) are regulated by diverse actin binding proteins (ABPs). Villins are one type of ABPs belonging to the villin/gelsolin superfamily, and their function is poorly understood in monocotyledonous plants. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of a rice (Oryza sativa) mutant defective in VILLIN2 (VLN2), which exhibits malformed organs, including twisted roots and shoots at the seedling stage. Cellular examination revealed that the twisted phenotype of the vln2 mutant is mainly caused by asymmetrical expansion of cells on the opposite sides of an organ. VLN2 is preferentially expressed in growing tissues, consistent with a role in regulating cell expansion in developing organs. Biochemically, VLN2 exhibits conserved actin filament bundling, severing and capping activities in vitro, with bundling and stabilizing activity being confirmed in vivo. In line with these findings, the vln2 mutant plants exhibit a more dynamic actin cytoskeleton network than the wild type. We show that vln2 mutant plants exhibit a hypersensitive gravitropic response, faster recycling of PIN2 (an auxin efflux carrier), and altered auxin distribution. Together, our results demonstrate that VLN2 plays an important role in regulating plant architecture by modulating MF dynamics, recycling of PIN2, and polar auxin transport. PMID:26486445

  9. Single microfilaments mediate the early steps of microtubule bundling during preprophase band formation in onion cotyledon epidermal cells.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Miyuki; Karahara, Ichirou; Kajimura, Naoko; Takaoka, Akio; Murata, Kazuyoshi; Misaki, Kazuyo; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Staehelin, L Andrew; Mineyuki, Yoshinobu

    2016-06-01

    The preprophase band (PPB) is a cytokinetic apparatus that determines the site of cell division in plants. It originates as a broad band of microtubules (MTs) in G2 and narrows to demarcate the future division site during late prophase. Studies with fluorescent probes have shown that PPBs contain F-actin during early stages of their development but become actin depleted in late prophase. Although this suggests that actins contribute to the early stages of PPB formation, how actins contribute to PPB-MT organization remains unsolved. To address this question, we used electron tomography to investigate the spatial relationship between microfilaments (MFs) and MTs at different stages of PPB assembly in onion cotyledon epidermal cells. We demonstrate that the PPB actins observed by fluorescence microscopy correspond to short, single MFs. A majority of the MFs are bound to MTs, with a subset forming MT-MF-MT bridging structures. During the later stages of PPB assembly, the MF-mediated links between MTs are displaced by MT-MT linkers as the PPB MT arrays mature into tightly packed MT bundles. On the basis of these observations, we propose that the primary function of actins during PPB formation is to mediate the initial bundling of the PPB MTs. PMID:27053663

  10. Single microfilaments mediate the early steps of microtubule bundling during preprophase band formation in onion cotyledon epidermal cells

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Miyuki; Karahara, Ichirou; Kajimura, Naoko; Takaoka, Akio; Murata, Kazuyoshi; Misaki, Kazuyo; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Staehelin, L. Andrew; Mineyuki, Yoshinobu

    2016-01-01

    The preprophase band (PPB) is a cytokinetic apparatus that determines the site of cell division in plants. It originates as a broad band of microtubules (MTs) in G2 and narrows to demarcate the future division site during late prophase. Studies with fluorescent probes have shown that PPBs contain F-actin during early stages of their development but become actin depleted in late prophase. Although this suggests that actins contribute to the early stages of PPB formation, how actins contribute to PPB-MT organization remains unsolved. To address this question, we used electron tomography to investigate the spatial relationship between microfilaments (MFs) and MTs at different stages of PPB assembly in onion cotyledon epidermal cells. We demonstrate that the PPB actins observed by fluorescence microscopy correspond to short, single MFs. A majority of the MFs are bound to MTs, with a subset forming MT-MF-MT bridging structures. During the later stages of PPB assembly, the MF-mediated links between MTs are displaced by MT-MT linkers as the PPB MT arrays mature into tightly packed MT bundles. On the basis of these observations, we propose that the primary function of actins during PPB formation is to mediate the initial bundling of the PPB MTs. PMID:27053663

  11. The role of cytoskeleton in organizing growth cones: a microfilament- associated growth cone component depends upon microtubules for its localization

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    We are interested in the relationship between the cytoskeleton and the organization of polarized cell morphology. We show here that the growth cones of hippocampal neurons in culture are specifically stained by a monoclonal antibody called 13H9. In other systems, the antigen recognized by 13H9 is associated with marginal bands of chicken erythrocytes and shows properties of both microtubule-and microfilament- associated proteins (Birgbauer, E., and F. Solomon. 1989 J. Cell Biol. 109:1609-1620). This dual nature is manifest in hippocampal neurons as well. At early stages after plating, the antibody stains the circumferential lamellipodia that mediate initial cell spreading. As processes emerge, 13H9 staining is heavily concentrated in the distal regions of growth cones, particularly in lamellipodial fans. In these cells, the 13H9 staining is complementary to the localization of assembled microtubules. It colocalizes partially, but not entirely, with phalloidin staining of assembled actin. Incubation with nocodazole rapidly induces microtubule depolymerization, which proceeds in the distal-to-proximal direction in the processes. At the same time, a rapid and dramatic redistribution of the 13H9 staining occurs; it delocalizes along the axon shaft, becoming clearly distinct from the phalloidin staining and always remaining distal to the receding front of assembled microtubules. After longer times without assembled microtubules, no staining of 13H9 can be detected. Removal of the nocodazole allows the microtubules to reform, in an ordered proximal-to- distal fashion. The 13H9 immunoreactivity also reappears, but only in the growth cones, not in any intermediate positions along the axon, and only after the reformation of microtubules is complete. The results indicate that the antigen recognized by 13H9 is highly concentrated in growth cones, closely associated with polymerized actin, and that its proper localization depends upon intact microtubules. PMID:2677024

  12. Stationary organization of the actin cytoskeleton in Vallisneria: the role of stable microfilaments at the end walls.

    PubMed

    Ryu, J H; Takagi, S; Nagai, R

    1995-04-01

    In mesophyll cells of the aquatic angiosperm Vallisneria gigantea, bundles of microfilaments (MFs) serve as tracks for the rotational streaming of the cytoplasm, which occurs along the two longer side walls and the two shorter end walls. The stationary organization of these bundles has been shown to depend on the association of the bundles with the plasma membrane at the end walls. To identify the sites of such association, the effects of cytochalasin B (CB) on the configuration of the bundles of MFs were examined. In the case of the side walls, MFs were completely disrupted after treatment with CB at 100 micrograms/ml for 24 hours. By contrast, in the case of the end walls, a number of partially disrupted MFs remained even after 48 hours of treatment. After removal of CB, a completely normal arrangement of bundles of MFs was once again evident within 24 hours after a rather complicated process of reassembly. When reassembly had been completed, the direction of cytoplasmic streaming was reversed only in a small fraction of the treated cells, suggesting that bundles of MFs are anchored and stabilized at the end walls of each cell and that the polarity of reorganized bundles and, therefore, the direction of the cytoplasmic streaming is determined in a manner that depends on the original polarity of MFs that remained in spite of the disruptive action of CB. By contrast, the direction of reinitiated cytoplasmic streaming was reversed in 50% of cells in which the bundles of MFs had been completely disrupted by exogenously applied trypsin prior treatment with CB.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7615673

  13. Identification, purification, and characterization of a zyxin-related protein that binds the focal adhesion and microfilament protein VASP (vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein).

    PubMed

    Reinhard, M; Jouvenal, K; Tripier, D; Walter, U

    1995-08-15

    VASP (vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein), an established substrate of cAMP- and cGMP-dependent protein kinases in vitro and in living cells, is associated with focal adhesions, microfilaments, and membrane regions of high dynamic activity. Here, the identification of an 83-kDa protein (p83) that specifically binds VASP in blot overlays of different cell homogenates is reported. With VASP overlays as a detection tool, p83 was purified from porcine platelets and used to generate monospecific polyclonal antibodies. VASP binding to purified p83 in solid-phase binding assays and the closely matching subcellular localization in double-label immunofluorescence analyses demonstrated that both proteins also directly interact as native proteins in vitro and possibly in living cells. The subcellular distribution, the biochemical properties, as well as microsequencing data revealed that porcine platelet p83 is related to chicken gizzard zyxin and most likely represents the mammalian equivalent of the chicken protein. The VASP-p83 interaction may contribute to the targeting of VASP to focal adhesions, microfilaments, and dynamic membrane regions. Together with our recent identification of VASP as a natural ligand of the profilin poly-(L-proline) binding site, our present results suggest that, by linking profilin to zyxin/p83, VASP may participate in spatially confined profilin-regulated F-actin formation.

  14. Identification, purification, and characterization of a zyxin-related protein that binds the focal adhesion and microfilament protein VASP (vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein).

    PubMed Central

    Reinhard, M; Jouvenal, K; Tripier, D; Walter, U

    1995-01-01

    VASP (vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein), an established substrate of cAMP- and cGMP-dependent protein kinases in vitro and in living cells, is associated with focal adhesions, microfilaments, and membrane regions of high dynamic activity. Here, the identification of an 83-kDa protein (p83) that specifically binds VASP in blot overlays of different cell homogenates is reported. With VASP overlays as a detection tool, p83 was purified from porcine platelets and used to generate monospecific polyclonal antibodies. VASP binding to purified p83 in solid-phase binding assays and the closely matching subcellular localization in double-label immunofluorescence analyses demonstrated that both proteins also directly interact as native proteins in vitro and possibly in living cells. The subcellular distribution, the biochemical properties, as well as microsequencing data revealed that porcine platelet p83 is related to chicken gizzard zyxin and most likely represents the mammalian equivalent of the chicken protein. The VASP-p83 interaction may contribute to the targeting of VASP to focal adhesions, microfilaments, and dynamic membrane regions. Together with our recent identification of VASP as a natural ligand of the profilin poly-(L-proline) binding site, our present results suggest that, by linking profilin to zyxin/p83, VASP may participate in spatially confined profilin-regulated F-actin formation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 6 PMID:7644520

  15. Complementary roles of microtubules and microfilaments in the lung fibroblast-mediated contraction of collagen gels: Dynamics and the influence of cell density.

    PubMed

    Redden, Robert A; Doolin, Edward J

    2006-01-01

    Fibroblasts are important cellular components in wound healing, scar formation, and fibrotic disorders; and the fibroblast-populated collagen-gel (FPCG) model allows examination of fibroblast behavior in an in vitro three-dimensional environment similar to that in vivo. Contraction of free-floating FPCGs depends on an active and dynamic cytoskeleton, and the contraction dynamics are highly influenced by cell density. We investigated mechanistic differences between high- and low-cell density FPCG contraction by evaluating contraction dynamics in detail, using specific cytoskeletal disruptors. Collagen gels were seeded with human lung fibroblasts at either high (HD) or low (LD) density, and incubated with or without cytoskeletal disruptors colchicine (microtubules) or cytochalasin D (microfilaments). Gel area was measured daily. FPCG contraction curves were essentially sigmoidal, featuring an initial period of no contraction (lag phase), followed by a period of rapid contraction (log phase). Contraction curves of HD-FPCGs were distinct from those of LD-FPCGs. For example, HD-FPCGs had a negligible lag phase (compared with 3 d for LD-FPCGs) and exhibited a higher rate of log-phase contraction. Both colchicine and cytochalasin dose-dependently inhibited contraction but specifically affected different phases of contraction in HD- and LD-FPCGs; and colchicine inhibited LD-FPCGs much more than HD-FPCGs. The data indicate that LD- and HD-FPCGs contract through different primary mechanisms. Microtubules and microfilaments are both complementarily and dynamically involved in the contraction of FPCGs, and cell density influences primary cytoskeletal mechanisms. These results provide valuable information about fibroblast behavior in healing and fibrosis, and may suggest novel treatment options. PMID:16759151

  16. The Cauliflower Mosaic Virus Protein P6 Forms Motile Inclusions That Traffic along Actin Microfilaments and Stabilize Microtubules1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Harries, Phillip A.; Palanichelvam, Karuppaiah; Yu, Weichang; Schoelz, James E.; Nelson, Richard S.

    2009-01-01

    The gene VI product (P6) of Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) is a multifunctional protein known to be a major component of cytoplasmic inclusion bodies formed during CaMV infection. Although these inclusions are known to contain virions and are thought to be sites of translation from the CaMV 35S polycistronic RNA intermediate, the precise role of these bodies in the CaMV infection cycle remains unclear. Here, we examine the functionality and intracellular location of a fusion between P6 and GFP (P6-GFP). We initially show that the ability of P6-GFP to transactivate translation is comparable to unmodified P6. Consequently, our work has direct application for the large body of literature in which P6 has been expressed ectopically and its functions characterized. We subsequently found that P6-GFP forms highly motile cytoplasmic inclusion bodies and revealed through fluorescence colocalization studies that these P6-GFP bodies associate with the actin/endoplasmic reticulum network as well as microtubules. We demonstrate that while P6-GFP inclusions traffic along microfilaments, those associated with microtubules appear stationary. Additionally, inhibitor studies reveal that the intracellular movement of P6-GFP inclusions is sensitive to the actin inhibitor, latrunculin B, which also inhibits the formation of local lesions by CaMV in Nicotiana edwardsonii leaves. The motility of P6 along microfilaments represents an entirely new property for this protein, and these results imply a role for P6 in intracellular and cell-to-cell movement of CaMV. PMID:19028879

  17. A single-cell correlative nanoelectromechanosensing approach to detect cancerous transformation: monitoring the function of F-actin microfilaments in the modulation of the ion channel activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AbdolahadThe Authors With Same Contributions., Mohammad; Saeidi, Ali; Janmaleki, Mohsen; Mashinchian, Omid; Taghinejad, Mohammad; Taghinejad, Hossein; Azimi, Soheil; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Mohajerzadeh, Shams

    2015-01-01

    Cancerous transformation may be dependent on correlation between electrical disruptions in the cell membrane and mechanical disruptions of cytoskeleton structures. Silicon nanotube (SiNT)-based electrical probes, as ultra-accurate signal recorders with subcellular resolution, may create many opportunities for fundamental biological research and biomedical applications. Here, we used this technology to electrically monitor cellular mechanosensing. The SiNT probe was combined with an electrically activated glass micropipette aspiration system to achieve a new cancer diagnostic technique that is based on real-time correlation between mechanical and electrical behaviour of single cells. Our studies demonstrated marked changes in the electrical response following increases in the mechanical aspiration force in healthy cells. In contrast, such responses were extremely weak for malignant cells. Confocal microscopy results showed the impact of actin microfilament remodelling on the reduction of the electrical response for aspirated cancer cells due to the significant role of actin in modulating the ion channel activity in the cell membrane.Cancerous transformation may be dependent on correlation between electrical disruptions in the cell membrane and mechanical disruptions of cytoskeleton structures. Silicon nanotube (SiNT)-based electrical probes, as ultra-accurate signal recorders with subcellular resolution, may create many opportunities for fundamental biological research and biomedical applications. Here, we used this technology to electrically monitor cellular mechanosensing. The SiNT probe was combined with an electrically activated glass micropipette aspiration system to achieve a new cancer diagnostic technique that is based on real-time correlation between mechanical and electrical behaviour of single cells. Our studies demonstrated marked changes in the electrical response following increases in the mechanical aspiration force in healthy cells. In contrast, such

  18. Actin microfilaments participate in the regulation of the COL1A1 promoter activity in ROS17/2.8 cells under simulated microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Zhongquan; Li, Yinghui; Ding, Bai; Zhang, Xiaoyou; Tan, Yingjun; Wan, Yumin

    2006-01-01

    IntroductionMicrogravity is thought to decrease osteoblastic activity and induce osteoporosis during spaceflight, but the mechanisms, particularly the attendant changes in gene expression, are not well understood. It is suspected that the cytoskeletal system is involved in the manifold changes of cell shape, function, and signaling under microgravity conditions. MethodsWe constructed cell lines stably transfected with pJI36EGFP and pJI23EGFP, which contained a 3.6 and a 2.3 kb fragment, respectively, of the α1(I) collagen gene (COL1A1) promoter fused with the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) reporter gene. We then developed a semi-quantitative analysis of EGFP fluorescence intensity to evaluate the effects of clinorotation and/or cytochalasin B on the activity of the COL1A1 promoter. Simultaneously, we assessed the collagen type I protein content versus total protein content in clinorotated or control osteoblasts, using immunocytochemistry and the Bradford method, respectively. ResultsThe fluorescence intensity analysis revealed that the expression of COL1A1-EGFP increased in GFP-ROS cells clinorotated for 24 or 48 h, as compared with stationary control cultures. We observed a similar trend in collagen type I content, as assessed by immunocytochemistry. We found that the osteoblast microfilaments tended to disassemble and show a reduction in stress fibers under space flight and clinorotation. Treatment with cytochalasin B in normal gravity resulted in a dose-dependent increase of EGFP fluorescence intensity, indicating that disruption of the actin system was associated with increased activity of the COL1A1 promoter. ConclusionOur study demonstrates that disrupting the actin cytoskeleton by treatment with cytochalasin B and real or simulated microgravity conditions led to altered COL1A1 promoter activity. Together, these results suggest that actin may participate in the regulation of the COL1A1 promoter activity under microgravity conditions.

  19. Subcellular distribution of the calcium-storing inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-sensitive organelle in rat liver. Possible linkage to the plasma membrane through the actin microfilaments.

    PubMed Central

    Rossier, M F; Bird, G S; Putney, J W

    1991-01-01

    The role of Ins(1,4,5)P3 in the mobilization of Ca2+ from intracellular stores of non-muscle cells has been extensively demonstrated; however, the nature of the organelle releasing the Ca2+ is still poorly understood. The distributions of the Ins(1,4,5)P3-binding sites and of the Ins(1,4,5)P3-sensitive Ca2+ pool were investigated in subcellular fractions obtained from rat liver and compared with those of other markers. The Ins(1,4,5)P3-binding vesicles appeared to be completely distinct from the endoplasmic-reticulum-derived microsomes and were enriched in the same fractions which were enriched in alkaline phosphodiesterase I activity. This co-purification of the plasma-membrane marker with the Ins(1,4,5)P3-binding sites was dramatically altered after freezing or after treatment of the homogenate with the microfilament-disruptive drug cytochalasin B, suggesting that the Ins(1,4,5)P3-sensitive organelle may be linked to the plasma membrane through the actin microfilaments. No correlation was observed between the Ins(1,4,5)P3-binding capacity and the portion of the Ca2+ pool that was released by Ins(1,4,5)P3. This may result from the disruption of the native organelle during homogenization, leading to the formation of vesicles containing the Ins(1,4,5)P3 receptor, but lacking the Ca2+ pump. These results are consistent with the idea of a specialized Ins(1,4,5)P3-regulated organelle distinct from the endoplasmic reticulum, and we propose a model of the structural organization of this organelle, in which the anchorage to the cytoskeleton as well as the spatial separation of the Ca2+ pump from the Ins(1,4,5)P3 receptor have important functional significance. PMID:1849402

  20. The SPR3 gene encodes a sporulation-specific homologue of the yeast CDC3/10/11/12 family of bud neck microfilaments and is regulated by ABFI.

    PubMed

    Ozsarac, N; Bhattacharyya, M; Dawes, I W; Clancy, M J

    1995-10-16

    The SPR3 gene is selectively activated only during the sporulation phase of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc) life cycle. The predicted amino acid (aa) sequence has homology to microfilament proteins that are involved in cytokinesis and other proteins of unknown function. These include the products of Sc cell division cycle (CDC) genes involved in bud formation (Cdc3p, Cdc10p, Cdc11p and Cdc12p), Candida albicans proteins that accumulate in the hyphal phase (CaCdc3p and CaCdc10p), mouse brain-specific (H5p) and lymphocyte (Diff6p) proteins, Drosophila melanogaster (Dm) protein Pnutp (which is localized to the cleavage furrow of dividing cells), a Diff6p homologue (DmDiff6p), and the Sc septin protein (Sep1hp), a homologue of the 10-nm filament proteins of Sc. One strongly conserved region contains a potential ATP-GTP-binding domain. Primer extension analysis revealed six major transcription start points (tsp) beginning at -142 relative to the ATG start codon. The sequence immediately upstream from the tsp contains consensus binding sites for the HAP2/3/4 and ABFI transcription factors, a T-rich sequence and two putative novel elements for mid to late sporulation, termed SPR3 and PAL. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and footprint analyses demonstrated that the ABFI protein binds to a region containing the putative ABFI site in vitro, and site-directed mutagenesis showed that the ABFI motif is essential for expression of SPR3 at the appropriate stage in sporulating cells.

  1. Trapping and wiggling: elastohydrodynamics of driven microfilaments.

    PubMed Central

    Wiggins, C H; Riveline, D; Ott, A; Goldstein, R E

    1998-01-01

    We present an analysis of the planar motion of single semiflexible filaments subject to viscous drag or point forcing. These are the relevant forces in dynamic experiments designed to measure biopolymer bending moduli. By analogy with the "Stokes problems" in hydrodynamics (motion of a viscous fluid induced by that of a wall bounding the fluid), we consider the motion of a polymer, one end of which is moved in an impulsive or oscillatory way. Analytical solutions for the time-dependent shapes of such moving polymers are obtained within an analysis applicable to small-amplitude deformations. In the case of oscillatory driving, particular attention is paid to a characteristic length determined by the frequency of oscillation, the polymer persistence length, and the viscous drag coefficient. Experiments on actin filaments manipulated with optical traps confirm the scaling law predicted by the analysis and provide a new technique for measuring the elastic bending modulus. Exploiting this model, we also present a reanalysis of several published experiments on microtubules. PMID:9533717

  2. Microfilaments and microtubules: the news from yeast.

    PubMed

    Schott, Daniel; Huffaker, Tim; Bretscher, Anthony

    2002-12-01

    New evidence that cortical actin patches and the endocytic machinery share components supports the idea that actin patches are in fact transient membrane coats at the initial stage of endocytosis. Recent studies of actin cables have identified formins as the core of a novel actin-filament-assembling machine. Meanwhile, microtubule-binding proteins have been found in the kinetochore, and factors affecting microtubule dynamic instability have been identified. PMID:12457699

  3. Plant pathogenic bacteria target the actin microfilament network involved in the trafficking of disease defense components.

    PubMed

    Jelenska, Joanna; Kang, Yongsung; Greenberg, Jean T

    2014-01-01

    Cells of infected organisms transport disease defense-related molecules along actin filaments to deliver them to their sites of action to combat the pathogen. To accommodate higher demand for intracellular traffic, plant F-actin density increases transiently during infection or treatment of Arabidopsis with pathogen-associated molecules. Many animal and plant pathogens interfere with actin polymerization and depolymerization to avoid immune responses. Pseudomonas syringae, a plant extracellular pathogen, injects HopW1 effector into host cells to disrupt the actin cytoskeleton and reduce vesicle movement in order to elude defense responses. In some Arabidopsis accessions, however, HopW1 is recognized and causes resistance via an actin-independent mechanism. HopW1 targets isoform 7 of vegetative actin (ACT7) that is regulated by phytohormones and environmental factors. We hypothesize that dynamic changes of ACT7 filaments are involved in plant immunity. PMID:25551177

  4. Anti-tropomyosin antibodies co-localise with actin microfilaments and label plasmodesmata.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, Christine R; Blackman, Leila M; Collings, David A; Cordwell, Stuart J; Overall, Robyn L

    2009-06-01

    The actin cytoskeleton and associated actin-binding proteins form a complex network involved in a number of fundamental cellular processes including intracellular trafficking. In plants, both actin and myosin have been localised to plasmodesmata, and thus it is likely that other actin-binding proteins are also associated with plasmodesmata structure or function. A 75-kDa protein, enriched in plasmodesmata-rich cell wall extracts from the green alga Chara corallina, was sequenced and found to contain three peptides with similarity to the animal actin-binding protein tropomyosin. Western blot analysis with anti-tropomyosin antibodies confirmed the identity of this 75-kDa protein as a tropomyosin-like protein and further identified an additional 55-kDa protein, while immunofluorescence microscopy localised the antibodies to plasmodesmata and to the subcortical actin bundles and associated structures. The anti-tropomyosin antibodies detected a single protein at 42.5 kDa in Arabidopsis thaliana extracts and two proteins at 58.5 and 54 kDa in leek extracts, and these localised to plasmodesmata and the cell plate in A. thaliana and to plasmodesmata in leek tissue. Tropomyosin is an actin-binding protein thought to be involved in a range of functions associated with the actin cytoskeleton, including the regulation of myosin binding to actin filaments, but to date no tropomyosin-like proteins have been conclusively identified in plant genomes. Our data suggests that a tropomyosin-like protein is associated with plasmodesmata.

  5. Cell adhesion in zebrafish myogenesis: distribution of intermediate filaments, microfilaments, intracellular adhesion structures and extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Costa, Manoel L; Escaleira, Roberta C; Jazenko, Fernanda; Mermelstein, Claudia S

    2008-10-01

    To overcome the limitations of in vitro studies, we have been studying myogenesis in situ in zebrafish embryos, at a sub-cellular level. While in previous works we focused on myofibrillogenesis and some aspects of adhesion structures, here we describe in more detail cell adhesion structures and interactions among cytoskeletal components, membrane and extracellular matrix during zebrafish muscle development. We studied the intermediate filaments, and we describe the full range of desmin distribution in zebrafish development, from perinuclear to striated, until its deposition around the intersomite septa of older somites. This adhesion structure, positive for desmin and actin, has not been previously observed in myogenesis in vitro. We also show that actin is initially located in the intersomite septum region whereas it is confined to the myofibrils later on. While actin localization changes during development, the adhesion complex proteins vinculin, paxillin, talin, dystrophin, laminin and fibronectin always appear exclusively at the intersomite septa, and appear to be co-distributed, even though the extracellular proteins accumulates before the intracellular ones. Contrary to the adhesion proteins, that are continuously distributed, desmin and sarcomeric actin form triangular aggregates among the septa and the cytoskeleton. We studied the cytoskeletal linker plectin as well, and we show that it has a distribution similar to desmin and not to actin. We conclude that the in situ adhesion structures differ from their in vitro counterparts, and that the actual zebrafish embryo myogenesis is quite different than that which occurs in in vitro systems.

  6. Active movement in vitro of bundle of microfilaments isolated from Nitella cell

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    Subcortical fibrils composed of bundles of F-actin filaments and endoplasmic filaments are responsible for endoplasmic streaming. It is reported here that these fibrils and filaments move actively in an artificial medium containing Mg-ATP and sucrose at neutral pH, when the medium was added to the cytoplasm squeezed out of the cell. The movement was observed by phase-contrast microscopy or dark-field microscopy and recorded on 16-mm film. Chains of chloroplasts linked by subcortical fibrils showed translational movement in the medium. Even after all chloroplasts and the endoplasm were washed away by perfusion with fresh medium, free fibrils and/or filaments (henceforth, referred to as fibers) not attached to chloroplasts continued travelling in the direction of the fiber orientation. Sometimes the fibers formed rings and rotated. Chloroplast chains and free fibers or rings continued moving for 5-30 min at about half the rate of the endoplasmic streaming in vivo. Calcium ion concentrations < 10(-7) M permitted movement to take place. Electron microscopy revealed that both fibers and rings were bundles of F-actin filaments that showed the same polarity after decoration with heavy meromyosin. PMID:7193210

  7. Microfilaments and microtubules control the shape, motility, and subcellular distribution of cortical mitochondria in characean internodal cells.

    PubMed

    Foissner, I

    2004-12-01

    The shape, motility, and subcellular distribution of mitochondria in characean internodal cells were studied by visualizing fluorescent dyes with confocal laser scanning microscopy and conducting drug-inhibitor experiments. Shape, size, number, and distribution of mitochondria varied according to the growth status and the metabolic activity within the cell. Vermiform (sausage-shaped), disc-, or amoeba-like mitochondria were present in elongating internodes, whereas very young cells and older cells that had completed growth contained short, rodlike organelles only. Mitochondria were evenly distributed and passively transported in the streaming endoplasm. In the cortex, mitochondria were sandwiched between the plasma membrane and the stationary chloroplast files and distributed in relation to the pattern of pH banding. Highest mitochondrial densities were found at the acid, photosynthetically more active regions, whereas the alkaline sites contained fewer and smaller mitochondria. In the cortex of elongating cells, small mitochondria moved slowly along microtubules or actin filaments. The shape and motility of giant mitochondria depended on the simultaneous interaction with both cytoskeletal systems. There was no microtubule-dependent motility in the cortex of nonelongating mature cells and mitochondria only occasionally travelled along actin filaments. These observations suggest that mitochondria of characean internodes possess motor proteins for microtubules and actin filaments, both of which can be used either as tracks for migration or for immobilization. The cortical cytoskeleton probably controls the spatiotemporal distribution of mitochondria within the cell and promotes their association with chloroplasts, which is necessary for exchange of metabolites during photosynthesis and detoxification.

  8. Subaxolemmal cytoskeleton in squid giant axon. I. Biochemical analysis of microtubules, microfilaments, and their associated high-molecular- weight proteins

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Using the squid giant axon, we analyzed biochemically the molecular organization of the axonal cytoskeleton underlying the axolemma (subaxolemmal cytoskeleton). The preparation enriched in the subaxolemmal cytoskeleton was obtained by squeezing out the central part of the axoplasm using a roller. The electrophoretic banding pattern of the subaxolemmal cytoskeleton was characterized by large amounts of two high-molecular-weight (HMW) proteins (260 and 255 kD). The alpha, beta-tubulin, actin, and some other proteins were also its major constituents. The 260-kD protein is known to play an important role in maintaining the excitability of the axolemma (Matsumoto, G., M. Ichikawa, A. Tasaki, H. Murofushi, and H. Sakai, 1983, J. Membr. Biol., 77:77-91) and was recently designated "axolinin" (Sakai, H., G. Matsumoto, and H. Murofushi, 1985, Adv. Biophys., 19:43-89). We purified axolinin and the 255-kD protein in their native forms and further characterized their biochemical properties. The purified axolinin was soluble in 0.6 M NaCl solution but insoluble in 0.1 M NaCl solution. It co-sedimented with microtubules but not with actin filaments. In low-angle rotary-shadowing electron microscopy, the axolinin molecule in 0.6 M NaCl solution looked like a straight rod approximately 105 nm in length with a globular head at one end. On the other hand, the purified 255-kD protein was soluble in both 0.1 and 0.6 M NaCl solution and co-sedimented with actin filaments but not with microtubules. The 255-kD protein molecule appeared as a characteristic horseshoe-shaped structure approximately 35 nm in diameter. Furthermore, the 255-kD protein showed no cross-reactivity to the anti- axolinin antibody. Taken together, these characteristics lead us to conclude that the subaxolemmal cytoskeleton in the squid giant axon is highly specialized, and is mainly composed of microtubules and a microtubule-associated HMW protein (axolinin), and actin filaments and an actin filament-associated HMW protein (255-kD protein). PMID:3700474

  9. Actin microfilaments play a critical role in endocytosis at the apical but not the basolateral surface of polarized epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Treatment with cytochalasin D, a drug that acts by inducing the depolymerization of the actin cytoskeleton, selectively blocked endocytosis of membrane bound and fluid phase markers from the apical surface of polarized MDCK cells without affecting the uptake from the basolateral surface. Thus, in MDCK cell transformants that express the VSV G protein, cytochalasin blocked the internalization of an anti-G mAb bound to apical G molecules, but did not reduce the uptake of antibody bound to the basolateral surface. The selective effect of cytochalasin D on apical endocytosis was also demonstrated by the failure of the drug to reduce the uptake of 125I-labeled transferrin, which occurs by receptor-mediated endocytosis, via clathrin-coated pits, almost exclusively from the basolateral surface. The actin cytoskeleton appears to play a critical role in adsorptive as well as fluid phase apical endocytic events, since treatment with cytochalasin D prevented the apical uptake of cationized ferritin, that occurs after the marker binds to the cell surface, as well as uptake of Lucifer yellow, a fluorescent soluble dye. Moreover, the drug efficiently blocked infection of the cells with influenza virus, when the viral inoculum was applied to the apical surface. On the other hand, it did not inhibit the basolateral uptake of Lucifer yellow, nor did it prevent infection with VSV from the basolateral surface, or with influenza when this virus was applied to monolayers in which the formation of tight junctions had been prevented by depletion of calcium ions. EM demonstrated that cytochalasin D leads to an increase in the number of coated pits in the apical surface where it suppresses the pinching off of coated vesicles. In addition, in drug-treated cells cationized ferritin molecules that were bound to microvilli were not cleared from the microvillar surface, as is observed in untreated cells. These findings indicate that there is a fundamental difference in the process by which endocytic vesicles are formed at the two surfaces of polarized epithelial cells and that the integrity and/or the polymerization of actin filaments are required at the apical surface. Actin filaments in microvilli may be part of a mechanochemical motor that moves membrane components along the microvillar surface towards intermicrovillar spaces, or provides the force required for converting a membrane invagination or pit into an endocytic vesicle within the cytoplasm. PMID:8381123

  10. Linking microfilaments to intracellular membranes: the actin-binding and vesicle-associated protein comitin exhibits a mannose-specific lectin activity.

    PubMed Central

    Jung, E; Fucini, P; Stewart, M; Noegel, A A; Schleicher, M

    1996-01-01

    Comitin is a 24 kDa actin-binding protein from Dictyostelium discoideum that is located primarily on Golgi and vesicle membranes. We have probed the molecular basis of comitin's interaction with both actin and membranes using a series of truncation mutants obtained by expressing the appropriate cDNA in Escherichia coli. Comitin dimerizes in solution; its principle actin-binding activity is located between residues 90 and 135. The N-terminal 135 'core' residues of comitin contain a 3-fold sequence repeat that is homologous to several monocotyledon lectins and which retains key residues that determine these lectins' three-dimensional structure and mannose binding. These repeats of comitin appear to mediate its interaction with mannose residues in glycoproteins or glycolipids on the cytoplasmic surface of membrane vesicles from D.discoideum, and comitin can be released from membranes with mannose. Our data indicate that comitin binds to vesicle membranes via mannose residues and, by way of its interaction with actin, links these membranes to the cytoskeleton. Images PMID:8635456

  11. [Ultrastructure of the contractile apparatus of renal podocytes in vertebrate phylogenesis].

    PubMed

    Zaĭtsev, V B

    1984-06-01

    The evolution-determined ultrastructural characteristics were disclosed in the intracellular organization of the microfilaments of the contractile apparatus of renal podocytes in the lower (marine teleosts) and higher (dogs) vertebrates. In podocytes of the renal glomerules of the flounder and flying fish, the microfilaments 8-10 nm thick form dense bundles that make up an integral widely branched system, whereas in dogs, the microfilaments 4-7 nm thick are diffusely distributed in the cytoplasm, forming in essence its matrix.

  12. New Clue Found to Growth Factor Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Michelle

    1991-01-01

    Discussed is the discovery which may help to explain epidermal growth factor effects on the cell skeleton. The role of a protein called profilin in the regulation of the microfilament system is described. (CW)

  13. The cytoskeletons of isolated, neuronal growth cones.

    PubMed

    Gordon-Weeks, P R

    1987-06-01

    We have examined by electron microscopy the cytoskeletons of growth cones isolated from neonatal rat forebrain by the method of Gordon-Weeks and Lockerbie [Gordon-Weeks and Lockerbie (1984) Neuroscience 13, 119-136]. When fixed in suspension with conventional fixatives, isolated growth cones contain a central region filled with a branching system of smooth endoplasmic reticulum and a cortical region immediately beneath the plasma membrane that is relatively free of organelles and is composed of an amorphous granular cytoplasm. The filopodia of isolated growth cones are also devoid of organelles and contain a cytoplasm that is similar in appearance to that in the cortical region. No microtubules or neurofilaments have been found in these growth cones. When isolated growth cones were prepared for electron microscopy by a method which preserves actin filaments [Boyles, Anderson and Hutcherson (1985) J. Histochem. Cytochem. 33, 1116-1128], microfilaments were found throughout the cortical cytoplasm. In the filopodia, the microfilaments were bundled together and oriented longitudinally. Filopodial microfilament bundles often extended into the body of the growth cone and could traverse it completely. Inclusion of Triton X-100 (1% v/v) in the fixative solubilized the membranes and soluble cytoplasmic proteins of growth cones, allowing an unobscured view of the microfilament cytoskeleton including the core bundle of microfilaments in filopodia. Suspended within the cytoskeleton were the coats of coated vesicles. These were particularly numerous at the broad bases of filopodia. Microfilaments bound heavy meromyosin and were cytochalasin B (2.0 X 10(-7) M) sensitive. Individual microfilaments branched and within filopodia they were extensively cross-linked by thin (7 nm) filaments. Microtubules and neurofilaments were not seen in these cytoskeletons despite the fact that the fixative contained a Ca2+ chelator. When growth cones were preincubated in taxol (14 microM) their

  14. Cytochalasin D does not inhibit gravitropism in roots.

    PubMed

    Staves, M P; Wayne, R; Leopold, A C

    1997-11-01

    It is generally thought that sedimenting plastids are responsible for gravity sensing in higher plants. We directly tested the model generated by the current statolith hypothesis that the gravity sensing that leads to gravitropism results from an interaction between the plastids and actin microfilaments. We find that the primary roots of rice, corn, and cress undergo normal gravitropism and growth even when exposed to cytochalasin D, a disruptor of actin microfilaments. These results indicate that an interaction between amyloplasts and the actin cytoskeleton is not critical for gravity sensing in higher plants and weaken the current statolith hypothesis. PMID:11541060

  15. Induction of Plant Curvature by Magnetophoresis and Cytoskeletal Changes during Root Graviresponse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasenstein, Karl H.; Kuznetsov, Oleg A.; Blancaflor, Eilson B.

    1996-01-01

    High gradient magnetic fields (HGMF) induce curvature in roots and shoots. It is considered that this response is likely to be based on the intracellular displacement of bulk starch (amyloplasts) by the ponderomotive force generated by the HGMF. This process is called magnetophoresis. The differential elongation during the curvature along the concave and convex flanks of growing organs may be linked to the microtubular and/or microfilament cytoskeleton. The possible existence of an effect of the HGMF on the cytoskeleton was tested for, but none was found. The application of cytoskeletal stabilizers or depolymerizers showed that neither microtubules, nor microfilaments, are involved in the graviresponse.

  16. Actin cytoskeleton rearrangements in Arabidopsis roots under stress and during gravitropic response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozhvanov, Gregory; Medvedev, Sergei; Suslov, Dmitry; Demidchik, Vadim

    Among environmental factors, gravity vector is the only one which is constant in direction and accompanies the whole plant ontogenesis. That said, gravity vector can be considered as an essential factor for correct development of plants. Gravitropism is a plant growth response against changing its position relative to the gravity vector. It is well estableshed that gravitropism is directed by auxin redistribution across the gravistimulated organ. In addition to auxin, actin cytoskeleton was shown to be involved in gravitropism at different stages: gravity perception, signal transduction and gravitropic bending formation. However, the relationship between IAA and actin is still under discussion. In this work we studied rearrangements of actin cytoskeleton during root gravitropic response. Actin microfilaments were visualized in vivo in GFP-fABD2 transgenic Arabidopsis plants, and their angle distribution was acquired from MicroFilament Analyzer software. The curvature of actin microfilaments in root elongation zone was shown to be increased within 30-60 min of gravistimulation, the fraction of axially oriented microfilaments decreased with a concomitant increase in the fraction of oblique and transversally oriented microfilaments. In particular, the fraction of transversally oriented microfilaments (i.e. parallel to the gravity vector) increased 3-5 times. Under 10 min of sub-lethal salt stress impact, actin microfilament orientations widened from an initial axial orientation to a set of peaks at 15(°) , 45(°) and 90(°) . We conclude that the actin cytoskeleton rearrangements observed are associated with the regulation of basic mechanisms of cell extension growth by which the gravitropic bending is formed. Having common stress-related features, gravity-induced actin cytoskeleton rearrangement is slower but results in higher number of g-vector-parallel microfilaments when compared to salt stress-induced rearrangement. Also, differences in gravistimulated root

  17. Cytochalasin D does not inhibit gravitropism in roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staves, M. P.; Wayne, R.; Leopold, A. C.

    1997-01-01

    It is generally thought that sedimenting plastids are responsible for gravity sensing in higher plants. We directly tested the model generated by the current statolith hypothesis that the gravity sensing that leads to gravitropism results from an interaction between the plastids and actin microfilaments. We find that the primary roots of rice, corn, and cress undergo normal gravitropism and growth even when exposed to cytochalasin D, a disruptor of actin microfilaments. These results indicate that an interaction between amyloplasts and the actin cytoskeleton is not critical for gravity sensing in higher plants and weaken the current statolith hypothesis.

  18. The Molecules of the Cell Matrix.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Klaus; Osborn, Mary

    1985-01-01

    Cytoplasmic proteins form a highly structured yet changeable matrix that affects cell shape, division, motion, and transport of vesicles and organelles. Types of microfilaments, research techniques, actin and myosin, tumor cells, and other topics are addressed. Evidence indicates that the cell matrix might have a bearing on metabolism. (DH)

  19. Antibody mapping of functional domains in vinculin.

    PubMed Central

    Westmeyer, A; Ruhnau, K; Wegner, A; Jockusch, B M

    1990-01-01

    We have analyzed the functional domain structure of vinculin, a protein involved in linking microfilaments to the cytoplasmic face of cell membranes in animal cells. For this purpose, we used several monoclonal antibodies raised against chicken gizzard vinculin whose epitopes could be assigned to discrete regions in the vinculin sequence by immunoblotting of proteolytic fragments combined with N-terminal amino acid sequencing. Two of these antibodies induced the disruption of stress fibers and changed the number of morphology of focal contacts after microinjection in chicken embryo fibroblasts. Based on the location of its epitope in comparison with vinculin domains previously identified by other groups, we propose that one of these antibodies (15B7) interferes with the binding of vinculin to talin, the most peripheral of the microfilament proteins. The second antibody (14C10) binds within a region comprising three internal repeats and might therefore distort the inner architecture of vinculin. A third antibody (As3) inhibited the binding of F-actin to vinculin in an in vitro assay but had no effect on the microfilament system in cells. These data emphasize the role of vinculin as a key protein in microfilament-membrane linkage and support previous work on a direct interaction between vinculin and actin. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:1694125

  20. Motility and centrosomal organization during sea urchin and mouse fertilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, Heide; Schatten, Gerald

    1986-01-01

    It is noted that microfilaments are essential for incorporation of sperm in sea urchins and for pronuclear apposition in mice. The ability of sea urchin sperm to fertilize eggs is lowered by latrunculin, giving evidence that acrosomal microfilaments are of importance to the process of fertilization. Due to the uncertainty regarding the presence of microfilaments in various mammalian sperm, it is interesting that latrunculin does not noticeably affect the ability of mouse sperm to fertilize oocytes. The movements of the sperm and egg nuclei at the time of sea urchin fertilization are dependent on microtubules arranged into a radial monastral array (the sperm aster). In the mouse egg, microtubule activity is also required during pronuclear apposition, but they are arranged by a number of egg cytoplasmic sites. Results of the investigations show that both microtubules and microfilaments are necessary for the successful completion of fertilization in both mice and sea urchins, but at different stages. Also, it is demonstrated that centrosomes are contributed by the sperm in the process of sea urchin fertilization, but in mammals they may be inherited maternally.

  1. Inside the Cell: The New Frontier of Medical Science. Series: A New Medical Science for the 21st Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pines, Maya

    Provides information on cellular morphology and physiology, including general cell characteristics, the nucleus, ribosomes, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, lysosomes, mitochondria, microtubules, microfilaments, and membranes. Focuses on membranes which are postulated to play an important role in many aspects of health and disease.…

  2. Cellular basis for tentacle adherence in the Portuguese man-of-war (Physalia physalis).

    PubMed

    Cormier, S M; Hessinger, D A

    1980-01-01

    The fishing tentacles of Physalia physalis (Portuguese man-of-war) adhere to prey and human victims by the penetration of a barbed tubule connected to an intracellular nematocyst. The nematocyst is surrounded by a fibrillar system of microtubules and microfilaments that terminate in hemidesmosomal processes which anchor the nematocyst to the acellular mesoglea of the tentacle. PMID:6111136

  3. New dynamics in an old friend: dynamic tubular vacuoles radiate through the cortical cytoplasm of red onion epidermal cells.

    PubMed

    Wiltshire, Elizabeth J; Collings, David A

    2009-10-01

    The textbook image of the plant vacuole sitting passively in the centre of the cell is not always correct. We observed vacuole dynamics in the epidermal cells of red onion (Allium cepa) bulbs, using confocal microscopy to detect autofluorescence from the pigment anthocyanin. The central vacuole was penetrated by highly mobile transvacuolar strands of cytoplasm, which were also visible in concurrent transmitted light images. Tubular vacuoles also extended from the large central vacuole and radiated through the cortical cytoplasm. These tubules were thin, having a diameter of about 1.5 microm, and were connected to the central vacuole as shown by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments. The tubules were bounded by the tonoplast, as revealed by transient expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) targeted to the vacuolar membrane and through labeling with the dye MDY-64. Expression of endoplasmic reticulum-targeted GFP demonstrated that the vacuolar tubules were distinct from the cortical endoplasmic reticulum. Movement of the tubular vacuoles depended on actin microfilaments, as microfilament disruption blocked tubule movement and caused their collapse into minivacuoles. The close association of the tubules with GFP-tagged actin microfilaments suggests that the tubules are associated with myosin, and that tubules likely move along microfilaments. Tubular vacuoles do not require anthocyanin for their formation, as tubules were also present in white onion cells that lack anthocyanin. The function of these tubular vacuoles remains unknown, but as they greatly increase the surface area of the tonoplast, they might increase transport rates between the cytoplasm and vacuole.

  4. Impact of Marine Drugs on Cytoskeleton-Mediated Reproductive Events

    PubMed Central

    Silvestre, Francesco; Tosti, Elisabetta

    2010-01-01

    Marine organisms represent an important source of novel bioactive compounds, often showing unique modes of action. Such drugs may be useful tools to study complex processes such as reproduction; which is characterized by many crucial steps that start at gamete maturation and activation and virtually end at the first developmental stages. During these processes cytoskeletal elements such as microfilaments and microtubules play a key-role. In this review we describe: (i) the involvement of such structures in both cellular and in vitro processes; (ii) the toxins that target the cytoskeletal elements and dynamics; (iii) the main steps of reproduction and the marine drugs that interfere with these cytoskeleton-mediated processes. We show that marine drugs, acting on microfilaments and microtubules, exert a wide range of impacts on reproductive events including sperm maturation and motility, oocyte maturation, fertilization, and early embryo development. PMID:20479959

  5. Identification of enoxacin as an inhibitor of osteoclast formation and bone resorption by structure-based virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Ostrov, David A; Magis, Andrew T; Wronski, Thomas J; Chan, Edward K L; Toro, Edgardo J; Donatelli, Richard E; Sajek, Kristen; Haroun, Ireni N; Nagib, Michael I; Piedrahita, Ana; Harris, Ashley; Holliday, L Shannon

    2009-08-27

    An interaction between the B2 subunit of vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase) and microfilaments is required for osteoclast bone resorption. An atomic homology model of the actin binding site on B2 was generated and molecular docking simulations were performed. Enoxacin, a fluoroquinolone antibiotic, was identified and in vitro testing demonstrated that enoxacin blocked binding between purified B2 and microfilaments. Enoxacin dose dependently reduced the number of osteoclasts differentiating in mouse marrow cultures stimulated with 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3), as well as markers of osteoclast activity, and the number of resorption lacunae formed on bone slices. Enoxacin inhibited osteoclast formation at concentrations where osteoblast formation was not altered. In summary, enoxacin is a novel small molecule inhibitor of osteoclast bone resorption that acts by an unique mechanism and is therefore an attractive lead molecule for the development of a new class of antiosteoclastic agents.

  6. Special type of morphological reorganization induced by phorbol ester: reversible partition of cell into motile and stable domains

    SciTech Connect

    Dugina, V.B.; Svitkina, T.M.; Vasiliev, J.M.; Gelfand, I.M.

    1987-06-01

    The phorbol ester phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) induced reversible alteration of the shape of fibroblastic cells of certain transformed lines-namely, partition of the cells into two types of domains: motile body actively extending large lamellas and stable narrow cytoplasmic processes. Dynamic observations have shown that stable processes are formed from partially retracted lamellas and from contracted tail parts of cell bodies. Immunofluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy of platinum replicas of cytoskeleton have shown that PMA-induced narrow processes are rich in microtubules and intermediate filaments but relatively poor in actin microfilaments; in contrast, lamellas and cell bodies contained numerous microfilaments. Colcemid-induced depolymerization of microtubules led to contraction of PMA-induced processes; cytochalasin B prevented this contraction. It is suggested that PMA-induced separation of cell into motile and stable parts is due to directional movement of actin structures along the microtubular framework. Similar movements may play an important role in various normal morphogenetic processes.

  7. A method for visualizing cytoskeletal structures by the scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, I; Amakawa, Y

    1989-01-01

    The cytoskeleton of intestinal epithelial cells was observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Tissues were treated with Triton X-100, stained to enhance conductivity, and freeze-fractured in liquid nitrogen. With these procedures, not only the localization of core filaments (actin-containing microfilaments) and intermediate filaments but also the relations between fibrous structures and cell organellae were clearly revealed. This conventional method is of great value in interpreting the three-dimensional organization of intracellular fine structures. PMID:2809464

  8. Different calcium sensitivity in osteoclasts on glass and on bone and maintenance of cytoskeletal structures on bone in the presence of high extracellular calcium.

    PubMed

    Lakkakorpi, P T; Lehenkari, P P; Rautiala, T J; Väänänen, H K

    1996-09-01

    The sensitivity of rat osteoclasts to increased extracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca2+]e) was investigated by single cell measurements of free cytosolic calcium concentrations ([Ca2+]i), by changes in microfilament organization of resorbing osteoclasts, and by in vitro bone resorption assays. Osteoclasts cultured on glass and on bone showed clear differences in their responses, as in 44% and 52% of osteoclasts on glass but in only 21% and 25% of osteoclasts on bone [Ca2+]i increased when [Ca2+]e was increased from 2 mM to 6 or 10 mM via perfusion, respectively. Bone resorption was inhibited without changes in the osteoclast numbers only by 10 mM [Ca2+]e in 2 day cultures. Furthermore, there were no changes in the organization of microfilament structures in resorbing osteoclasts after increased [Ca2+]e (up to 20 mM [Ca2+]e, 30 min incubation). These results suggest that the sensitivity of osteoclasts to increased [Ca2+]e is dependent on their activation phase (resting/migrating vs. resorbing) and that resorbing osteoclasts are not sensitive to increased [Ca2+]e or that the sensing system cannot be reached in polarized resorbing osteoclasts. In contrast, increasing [Ca2+]i through the use of calcium ionophores dispersed specific microfilament structures at the sealing zone transiently in a few minutes. This shows that [Ca2+]i is used as a signaling mechanism to inactivate osteoclasts, with a similar end result on microfilament structures at the sealing zone as caused by increased concentration of cAMP and activation of protein kinase C.

  9. Association of actin with alpha crystallins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalakrishnan, S.; Boyle, D.; Takemoto, L.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The alpha crystallins are cytosolic proteins that co-localize and co-purify with actin-containing microfilaments. Affinity column chromatography employing both covalently-coupled actin or alpha crystallin was used to demonstrate specific and saturable binding of actin with alpha crystallin. This conclusion was confirmed by direct visualization of alpha aggregates bound to actin polymerized in vitro. The significance of this interaction in relation to the functional properties of these two polypeptides will be discussed.

  10. Specific disruption of vimentin filament organization in monkey kidney CV-1 cells by diphtheria toxin, exotoxin A, and cycloheximide.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, A H; Chen, L B; Murphy, J R; Fields, B N

    1980-12-01

    We have examined the effect of diphtheria toxin, Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A, and cycloheximide on the CV-1 cell cytoskeleton. Within a few hours after producing an inhibition of cellular protein synthesis, all these agents specifically disrupted the organization of the vimentin filament system with no discernable effect on microtubules or microfilaments during the period of observation. Furthermore, just as the inhibition of protein synthesis by cycloheximide is reversible, so was the disruption of vimentin filaments by cycloheximide.

  11. A-CAM: a 135-kD receptor of intercellular adherens junctions. II. Antibody-mediated modulation of junction formation

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Intercellular adherens junctions between cultured lens epithelial cells are highly Ca2+-dependent and are readily dissociated upon chelation of extracellular Ca2+ ions. Addition of Ca2+ to EGTA-treated cells results in the recovery of cell-cell junctions including the reorganization of adherens junction-specific cell adhesion molecule (A-CAM), vinculin, and actin (Volk, T., and B. Geiger, 1986, J. Cell Biol., 103:000-000). Incubation of cells during the recovery phase with Fab' fragments of anti-A-CAM specifically inhibited the re-formation of cell-cell adherens junctions. This inhibition was accompanied by remarkable changes in microfilament organization manifested by an apparent deterioration of stress fibers and the appearance of fragmented actin bundles throughout the cytoplasm. Incubation of EGTA-dissociated cells with intact divalent anti-A-CAM antibodies in normal medium had no apparent inhibitory effect on junction formation and did not affect the assembly of actin microfilament bundles. Moreover, adherens junctions formed in the presence of the divalent antibodies became essentially Ca2+-independent, suggesting that cell-cell adhesion between them was primarily mediated by the antibodies. These studies suggest that A-CAM participates in intercellular adhesion in adherens-type junctions and point to its involvement in microfilament bundle assembly. PMID:3095334

  12. The cytoskeleton of Drosophila-derived Schneider line-1 and Kc23 cells undergoes significant changes during long-term culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, H.; Hedrick, J.; Chakrabarti, A.

    1998-01-01

    Insect cell cultures derived from Drosophila melanogaster are increasingly being used as an alternative system to mammalian cell cultures, as they are amenable to genetic manipulation. Although Drosophila cells are an excellent tool for the study of genes and expression of proteins, culture conditions have to be considered in the interpretation of biochemical results. Our studies indicate that significant differences occur in cytoskeletal structure during the long-term culture of the Drosophila-derived cell lines Schneider Line-1 (S1) and Kc23. Scanning, transmission-electron, and immunofluorescence microscopy studies reveal that microfilaments, microtubules, and centrosomes become increasingly different during the culture of these cells from 24 h to 7-14 days. Significant cytoskeletal changes are observed at the cell surface where actin polymerizes into microfilaments, during the elongation of long microvilli. Additionally, long protrusions develop from the cell surface; these protrusions are microtubule-based and establish contact with neighboring cells. In contrast, the microtubule network in the interior of the cells becomes disrupted after four days of culture, resulting in altered transport of mitochondria. Microtubules and centrosomes are also affected in a small percent of cells during cell division, indicating an instability of centrosomes. Thus, the cytoskeletal network of microfilaments, microtubules, and centrosomes is affected in Drosophila cells during long-term culture. This implies that gene regulation and post-translational modifications are probably different under different culture conditions.

  13. Drak Is Required for Actomyosin Organization During Drosophila Cellularization

    PubMed Central

    Chougule, Ashish B.; Hastert, Mary C.; Thomas, Jeffrey H.

    2016-01-01

    The generation of force by actomyosin contraction is critical for a variety of cellular and developmental processes. Nonmuscle myosin II is the motor that drives actomyosin contraction, and its activity is largely regulated by phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain. During the formation of the Drosophila cellular blastoderm, actomyosin contraction drives constriction of microfilament rings, modified cytokinesis rings. Here, we find that Drak is necessary for most of the phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain during cellularization. We show that Drak is required for organization of myosin II within the microfilament rings. Proper actomyosin contraction of the microfilament rings during cellularization also requires Drak activity. Constitutive activation of myosin regulatory light chain bypasses the requirement for Drak, suggesting that actomyosin organization and contraction are mediated through Drak’s regulation of myosin activity. Drak is also involved in the maintenance of furrow canal structure and lateral plasma membrane integrity during cellularization. Together, our observations suggest that Drak is the primary regulator of actomyosin dynamics during cellularization. PMID:26818071

  14. Banding and polarity of actin filaments in interphase and cleaving cells

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    Heavy meromyosin (HMM) decoration of actin filaments was used to detect the polarity of microfilaments in interphase and cleaving rat kangaroo (PtK2) cells. Ethanol at -20 degrees C was used to make the cells permeable to HMM followed by tannic acid-glutaraldehyde fixation for electron microscopy. Uniform polarity of actin filaments was observed at cell junctions and central attachment plaques with the HMM arrowheads always pointing away from the junction or plaque. Stress fibers were banded in appearance with their component microfilaments exhibiting both parallel and antiparallel orientation with respect to one another. Identical banding of microfilament bundles was also seen in cleavage furrows with the same variation in filament polarity as found in stress fibers. Similarly banded fibers were not seen outside the cleavage furrow in mitotic cells. By the time that a mid-body was present, the actin filaments in the cleavage furrow were no longer in banded fibers. The alternating dark and light bands of both the stress fibers and cleavage furrow fibers are approximately equal in length, each measuring approximately 0.16 micrometer. Actin filaments were present in both bands, and individual decorated filaments could sometimes be traced through four band lengths. Undecorated filaments, 10 nm in diameter, could often be seen within the light bands. A model is proposed to explain the arrangement of filaments in stress fibers and cleavage furrows based on the striations observed with tannic acid and the polarity of the actin filaments. PMID:6995468

  15. Polarity protein Crumbs homolog-3 (CRB3) regulates ectoplasmic specialization dynamics through its action on F-actin organization in Sertoli cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ying; Lui, Wing-yee; Lee, Will M.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2016-01-01

    Crumbs homolog 3 (or Crumbs3, CRB3) is a polarity protein expressed by Sertoli and germ cells at the basal compartment in the seminiferous epithelium. CRB3 also expressed at the blood-testis barrier (BTB), co-localized with F-actin, TJ proteins occludin/ZO-1 and basal ES (ectoplasmic specialization) proteins N-cadherin/β-catenin at stages IV-VII only. The binding partners of CRB3 in the testis were the branched actin polymerization protein Arp3, and the barbed end-capping and bundling protein Eps8, illustrating its possible role in actin organization. CRB3 knockdown (KD) by RNAi in Sertoli cells with an established tight junction (TJ)-permeability barrier perturbed the TJ-barrier via changes in the distribution of TJ- and basal ES-proteins at the cell-cell interface. These changes were the result of CRB3 KD-induced re-organization of actin microfilaments, in which actin microfilaments were truncated, and extensively branched, thereby destabilizing F-actin-based adhesion protein complexes at the BTB. Using Polyplus in vivo-jetPEI as a transfection medium with high efficiency for CRB3 KD in the testis, the CRB3 KD testes displayed defects in spermatid and phagosome transport, and also spermatid polarity due to a disruption of F-actin organization. In summary, CRB3 is an actin microfilament regulator, playing a pivotal role in organizing actin filament bundles at the ES. PMID:27358069

  16. Observation of cytoskeleton dynamics in Arabidopsis-GFP-MAP4, -GFP-ABD2 plants under clinorotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, Galina

    With the aim to investigate the impact of simulated microgravity on the cytoskeleton arrangement and plant cell growth we observed Arabidopsis thaliana transfected with GFP- MAP4 and GFP-ABD2 under clinorotation (2 rpm). This allowed us to visualize the tubulin microtubules and actin microfilaments in live cells and helped to follow the dynamics of cytoskeleton rearrangements in simulated microgravity. Ability to investigate the changes in live plant cells opens the wide perspectives for onboard research. We applied the pharmacological approach and investigated the behavior of microtubules when the microfilaments were disrupted and vice versa. Measurements of cell parameters in the distal elongation zone of plant root showed the slight discoordination of growth in cells with damaged actin microfilament. It is suggested that mutual structural interrelations of the cytoskeleton elements is essential for growth coordination in plant root. Clinorotation experiments revealed that root cell growth is less dependent upon the mutual co-alignment between the cytoskeleton elements. In this connection, we assume the involvement of cytoskeleton in the mechanism of growth restriction which is hidden under constant g-vector and is unmasked in simulated microgravity.

  17. Effects of clinorotation and microgravity on sweet clover columella cells treated with cytochalasin D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilaire, E.; Paulsen, A. Q.; Brown, C. S.; Guikema, J. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    The cytoskeleton of columella cells is believed to be involved in maintaining the developmental polarity of cells observed as a reproducible positioning of cellular organelles. It is also implicated in the transduction of gravitropic signals. Roots of sweet clover (Melilotus alba L.) seedlings were treated with a microfilament disrupter, cytochalasin D, on a slowly rotating horizontal clinostat (2 rpm). Electron micrographs of treated columella cells revealed several ultrastructural effects including repositioning of the nucleus and the amyloplasts and the formation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) whorls. However, experiments performed during fast clinorotation (55 rpm) showed an accumulation (but no whorling) of a disorganized ER network at the proximal and distal pole and a random distribution of the amyloplasts. Therefore, formation of whorls depends upon the speed of clinorotation, and the overall impact of cytochalasin D suggests the necessity of microfilaments in organelle positioning. Interestingly, a similar drug treatment performed in microgravity aboard the US Space Shuttle Endeavour (STS-54, January 1993) caused a displacement of ER membranes and amyloplasts away from the distal plasma membrane. In the present study, we discuss the role of microfilaments in maintaining columella cell polarity and the utility of clinostats to simulate microgravity.

  18. Influence of local anesthetics upon human polymorphonuclear leukocyte function in vitro. Reduction of lysosomal enzyme release and superoxide anion production.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, I M; Lind, S; Hoffstein, S; Weissmann, G

    1977-08-01

    Cationic local anesthetics have been reported to influence cellular responses to surface stimuli by interfering with the function of microtubules and microfilaments. Since unimpaired microtubule and microfilament functions are required by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes in order to respond normally to surface stimulation, we have studied effects of the local anesthetic, tetracaine on the function and morphology of these cells in vitro. Tetracaine (0.25--1.0 mM) significantly reduced extracellular release of the lysosomal enzymes, beta-glucuronidase and lysozyme from polymorphonuclear leukocytes exposed to serum-treated zymosan (a particulate stimulus), zymosan-treated serum (a soluble stimulus), and to the surface-active lectin, concanavalin A. Tetracaine also significantly reduced superoixde anion production (superoxide dismutase-inhibitable cytochrome c reduction) by these cells. Tetrancaine was not cytotoxic and its effects could be reversed completely by washing cells once with buffer. Electron microscope examination of tetracaine-treated cells revealed marked alterations of surface membranes. Microtubules and microfilaments appeared normal in "resting" polymorphonuclear leukocytes, but the increase in microtubules normally observed in stimulated cells was not seen after tetracaine treatment. These results suggest that tetracaine interferes with those interactions between immune reactants and the polymorphonuclear leukocyte cell surface which provoke exocytosis and increased oxidative metabolism.

  19. Pivotal and distinct role for Plasmodium actin capping protein alpha during blood infection of the malaria parasite.

    PubMed

    Ganter, Markus; Rizopoulos, Zaira; Schüler, Herwig; Matuschewski, Kai

    2015-04-01

    Accurate regulation of microfilament dynamics is central to cell growth, motility and response to environmental stimuli. Stabilizing and depolymerizing proteins control the steady-state levels of filamentous (F-) actin. Capping protein (CP) binds to free barbed ends, thereby arresting microfilament growth and restraining elongation to remaining free barbed ends. In all CPs characterized to date, alpha and beta subunits form the active heterodimer. Here, we show in a eukaryotic parasitic cell that the two CP subunits can be functionally separated. Unlike the beta subunit, the CP alpha subunit of the apicomplexan parasite Plasmodium is refractory to targeted gene deletion during blood infection in the mammalian host. Combinatorial complementation of Plasmodium berghei CP genes with the orthologs from Plasmodium falciparum verified distinct activities of CP alpha and CP alpha/beta during parasite life cycle progression. Recombinant Plasmodium CP alpha could be produced in Escherichia coli in the absence of the beta subunit and the protein displayed F-actin capping activity. Thus, the functional separation of two CP subunits in a parasitic eukaryotic cell and the F-actin capping activity of CP alpha expand the repertoire of microfilament regulatory mechanisms assigned to CPs.

  20. Ethanol interferes with thrombin mediated changes in the morphology and cytoskeleton of human vascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, K.J.; Rubin, R.; Hoek, J.; Williams, S.K. )

    1991-03-15

    The effect of physiological concentrations of ethanol (EtOH) on the response of human vascular endothelial cells (EC) to thrombin was examined Treatment of EC with EtOH concentrations of 20-85mM for 2-10 min. produced no significant changes in the morphology of 3- and 4-day monolayers established on fibronectin coated polystyrene. When examined immunofluorescently no significantly changes in the microfilament or microtubule structures were seen. Exposure of EC monolayers to 0.5 and 1 U/ml of thrombin for 1-60 minutes causes a concentration and time dependent monolayer retraction, evidenced by a general decrease in cell size, increase in visible gaps in the monolayer and redistribution of the microtubule and microfilament networks. Pretreatment of EC monolayers with EtOH for 3-5 minutes prior to addition of thrombin prevents the changes seen with thrombin alone. Immunofluorescent examination of the microfilament and microtubule structures suggests than EtOH may act in part via the microtubule network, which appears to be disorganized/disrupted when the EC are exposed to EtOH and then thrombin. Colchicine studies show that EC which have been pretreated with EtOH respond to colchicine differently then cells which have not previously seen EtOH. These data suggest that EtOH may alter EC monolayer responsiveness either by indirect changes which are reflected in cytoskeletal disorganization or possibly by direct influence on the cytoskeleton.

  1. Cytoskeleton in Mast Cell Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Dráber, Pavel; Sulimenko, Vadym; Dráberová, Eduarda

    2012-01-01

    Mast cell activation mediated by the high affinity receptor for IgE (FcεRI) is a key event in allergic response and inflammation. Other receptors on mast cells, as c-Kit for stem cell factor and G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) synergistically enhance the FcεRI-mediated release of inflammatory mediators. Activation of various signaling pathways in mast cells results in changes in cell morphology, adhesion to substrate, exocytosis, and migration. Reorganization of cytoskeleton is pivotal in all these processes. Cytoskeletal proteins also play an important role in initial stages of FcεRI and other surface receptors induced triggering. Highly dynamic microtubules formed by αβ-tubulin dimers as well as microfilaments build up from polymerized actin are affected in activated cells by kinases/phosphatases, Rho GTPases and changes in concentration of cytosolic Ca2+. Also important are nucleation proteins; the γ-tubulin complexes in case of microtubules or Arp 2/3 complex with its nucleation promoting factors and formins in case of microfilaments. The dynamic nature of microtubules and microfilaments in activated cells depends on many associated/regulatory proteins. Changes in rigidity of activated mast cells reflect changes in intermediate filaments build up from vimentin. This review offers a critical appraisal of current knowledge on the role of cytoskeleton in mast cells signaling. PMID:22654883

  2. Alterations in the Cytoskeleton Accompany Aluminum-Induced Growth Inhibition and Morphological Changes in Primary Roots of Maize1

    PubMed Central

    Blancaflor, Elison B.; Jones, David L.; Gilroy, Simon

    1998-01-01

    Although Al is one of the major factors limiting crop production, the mechanisms of toxicity remain unknown. The growth inhibition and swelling of roots associated with Al exposure suggest that the cytoskeleton may be a target of Al toxicity. Using indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, microtubules and microfilaments in maize (Zea mays L.) roots were visualized and changes in their organization and stability correlated with the symptoms of Al toxicity. Growth studies showed that the site of Al toxicity was associated with the elongation zone. Within this region, Al resulted in a reorganization of microtubules in the inner cortex. However, the orientation of microtubules in the outer cortex and epidermis remained unchanged even after chronic symptoms of toxicity were manifest. Auxin-induced reorientation and cold-induced depolymerization of microtubules in the outer cortex were blocked by Al pretreatment. These results suggest that Al increased the stability of microtubules in these cells. The stabilizing effect of Al in the outer cortex coincided with growth inhibition. Reoriented microfilaments were also observed in Al-treated roots, and Al pretreatment minimized cytochalasin B-induced microfilament fragmentation. These data show that reorganization and stabilization of the cytoskeleton are closely associated with Al toxicity in maize roots. PMID:9733535

  3. Cytoskeletal filament assembly and the control of cell spreading and function by extracellular matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mooney, D. J.; Langer, R.; Ingber, D. E.

    1995-01-01

    This study was undertaken to analyze how cell binding to extracellular matrix produces changes in cell shape. We focused on the initial process of cell spreading that follows cell attachment to matrix and, thus, cell 'shape' changes are defined here in terms of alterations in projected cell areas, as determined by computerized image analysis. Cell spreading kinetics and changes in microtubule and actin microfilament mass were simultaneously quantitated in hepatocytes plated on different extracellular matrix substrata. The initial rate of cell spreading was highly dependent on the matrix coating density and decreased from 740 microns 2/h to 50 microns 2/h as the coating density was lowered from 1000 to 1 ng/cm2. At approximately 4 to 6 hours after plating, this initial rapid spreading rate slowed and became independent of the matrix density regardless of whether laminin, fibronectin, type I collagen or type IV collagen was used for cell attachment. Analysis of F-actin mass revealed that cell adhesion to extracellular matrix resulted in a 20-fold increase in polymerized actin within 30 minutes after plating, before any significant change in cell shape was observed. This was followed by a phase of actin microfilament disassembly which correlated with the most rapid phase of cell extension and ended at about 6 hours; F-actin mass remained relatively constant during the slow matrix-independent spreading phase. Microtubule mass increased more slowly in spreading cells, peaking at 4 hours, the time at which the transition between rapid and slow spreading rates was observed. However, inhibition of this early rise in microtubule mass using either nocodazole or cycloheximide did not prevent this transition. Use of cytochalasin D revealed that microfilament integrity was absolutely required for hepatocyte spreading whereas interference with microtubule assembly (using nocodazole or taxol) or protein synthesis (using cycloheximide) only partially suppressed cell extension. In

  4. Occluding junctions and cytoskeletal components in a cultured transporting epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Meza, I; Ibarra, G; Sabanero, M; Martinez-Palomo, A; Cereijido, M

    1980-01-01

    MDCK cells form uninterrupted monolayers and make occluding junctions similar to those of natural epithelia. This aricle explores the relationship between these junctions and the cytoskeleton by combining studies on the distribution of microfilaments and microtubules with the effect of drugs, such as colchicines and cytochalasin B, on the degree of tightness of the occluding junctions. To study the degree of tightness, monolayers were prepared by plating MDCK cells on mylon disks coated with collagen. Disks were mounted as flat sheets between two Lucite chambers, and the sealing capacity of the junctions was evaluated by measuring the electrical resistance across the monolayers. Equivalent monolayers on coverslips were used to study the distribution of microtubules and microfilaments by indirect immunofluorescence staining with antibodies against tubulin and actin. This was done both on complete cells and on cytoskeleton preparations in which the cell membranes had been solubilized before fixation. Staining with antiactin shows a reticular pattern of very fine filaments that spread radially toward the periphery where they form a continuous cortical ring underlying the plasma membrane. Staining with antitubulin depicts fibers that extend radially to form a network that occupies the cytoplasm up to the edges of the cell. Colchicine causes a profound disruption of microtubules but only a 27 percent decrease in the electrical resistance of the resting monolayers. Cytochalasin B, when present for prolonged periods, disrupts the cytoplasmic microfilaments and abolishes the electrical resistance. The cortical ring of filaments remains in place but appears fragmented with time. We find that removal of extracellular Ca(++), which causes the tight junctions to open, also causes the microfilaments and microtubules to retract toward the center of the cells. The process of junction opening and fiber retraction is reversed by the restoration of Ca(++). Colchicine has no effect

  5. Formin 1 Regulates Ectoplasmic Specialization in the Rat Testis Through Its Actin Nucleation and Bundling Activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Mruk, Dolores D; Wong, Chris K C; Han, Daishu; Lee, Will M; Cheng, C Yan

    2015-08-01

    During spermatogenesis, developing spermatids and preleptotene spermatocytes are transported across the adluminal compartment and the blood-testis barrier (BTB), respectively, so that spermatids line up near the luminal edge to prepare for spermiation, whereas preleptotene spermatocytes enter the adluminal compartment to differentiate into late spermatocytes to prepare for meiosis I/II. These cellular events involve actin microfilament reorganization at the testis-specific, actin-rich Sertoli-spermatid and Sertoli-Sertoli cell junction called apical and basal ectoplasmic specialization (ES). Formin 1, an actin nucleation protein known to promote actin microfilament elongation and bundling, was expressed at the apical ES but limited to stage VII of the epithelial cycle, whereas its expression at the basal ES/BTB stretched from stage III to stage VI, diminished in stage VII, and was undetectable in stage VIII tubules. Using an in vitro model of studying Sertoli cell BTB function by RNA interference and biochemical assays to monitor actin bundling and polymerization activity, a knockdown of formin 1 in Sertoli cells by approximately 70% impeded the tight junction-permeability function. This disruptive effect on the tight junction barrier was mediated by a loss of actin microfilament bundling and actin polymerization capability mediated by changes in the localization of branched actin-inducing protein Arp3 (actin-related protein 3), and actin bundling proteins Eps8 (epidermal growth factor receptor pathway substrate 8) and palladin, thereby disrupting cell adhesion. Formin 1 knockdown in vivo was found to impede spermatid adhesion, transport, and polarity, causing defects in spermiation in which elongated spermatids remained embedded into the epithelium in stage IX tubules, mediated by changes in the spatiotemporal expression of Arp3, Eps8, and palladin. In summary, formin 1 is a regulator of ES dynamics.

  6. Differential Regulation of Disheveled in a Novel Vegetal Cortical Domain in Sea Urchin Eggs and Embryos: Implications for the Localized Activation of Canonical Wnt Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Peng, ChiehFu Jeff; Wikramanayake, Athula H.

    2013-01-01

    Pattern formation along the animal-vegetal (AV) axis in sea urchin embryos is initiated when canonical Wnt (cWnt) signaling is activated in vegetal blastomeres. The mechanisms that restrict cWnt signaling to vegetal blastomeres are not well understood, but there is increasing evidence that the egg’s vegetal cortex plays a critical role in this process by mediating localized “activation” of Disheveled (Dsh). To investigate how Dsh activity is regulated along the AV axis, sea urchin-specific Dsh antibodies were used to examine expression, subcellular localization, and post-translational modification of Dsh during development. Dsh is broadly expressed during early sea urchin development, but immunolocalization studies revealed that this protein is enriched in a punctate pattern in a novel vegetal cortical domain (VCD) in the egg. Vegetal blastomeres inherit this VCD during embryogenesis, and at the 60-cell stage Dsh puncta are seen in all cells that display nuclear β-catenin. Analysis of Dsh post-translational modification using two-dimensional Western blot analysis revealed that compared to Dsh pools in the bulk cytoplasm, this protein is differentially modified in the VCD and in the 16-cell stage micromeres that partially inherit this domain. Dsh localization to the VCD is not directly affected by disruption of microfilaments and microtubules, but unexpectedly, microfilament disruption led to degradation of all the Dsh pools in unfertilized eggs over a period of incubation suggesting that microfilament integrity is required for maintaining Dsh stability. These results demonstrate that a pool of differentially modified Dsh in the VCD is selectively inherited by the vegetal blastomeres that activate cWnt signaling in early embryos, and suggests that this domain functions as a scaffold for localized Dsh activation. Localized cWnt activation regulates AV axis patterning in many metazoan embryos. Hence, it is possible that the VCD is an evolutionarily conserved

  7. Cellular target of weak magnetic fields: ionic conduction along actin filaments of microvilli.

    PubMed

    Gartzke, Joachim; Lange, Klaus

    2002-11-01

    The interaction of weak electromagnetic fields (EMF) with living cells is a most important but still unresolved biophysical problem. For this interaction, thermal and other types of noise appear to cause severe restrictions in the action of weak signals on relevant components of the cell. A recently presented general concept of regulation of ion and substrate pathways through microvilli provides a possible theoretical basis for the comprehension of physiological effects of even extremely low magnetic fields. The actin-based core of microfilaments in microvilli is proposed to represent a cellular interaction site for magnetic fields. Both the central role of F-actin in Ca2+ signaling and its polyelectrolyte nature eliciting specific ion conduction properties render the microvillar actin filament bundle an ideal interaction site for magnetic and electric fields. Ion channels at the tip of microvilli are connected with the cytoplasm by a bundle of microfilaments forming a diffusion barrier system. Because of its polyelectrolyte nature, the microfilament core of microvilli allows Ca2+ entry into the cytoplasm via nonlinear cable-like cation conduction through arrays of condensed ion clouds. The interaction of ion clouds with periodically applied EMFs and field-induced cation pumping through the cascade of potential barriers on the F-actin polyelectrolyte follows well-known physical principles of ion-magnetic field (MF) interaction and signal discrimination as described by the stochastic resonance and Brownian motor hypotheses. The proposed interaction mechanism is in accord with our present knowledge about Ca2+ signaling as the biological main target of MFs and the postulated extreme sensitivity for coherent excitation by very low field energies within specific amplitude and frequency windows. Microvillar F-actin bundles shielded by a lipid membrane appear to function like electronic integration devices for signal-to-noise enhancement; the influence of coherent signals

  8. Pigment granule translocation in red ovarian chromatophores from the palaemonid shrimp Macrobrachium olfersi (Weigmann, 1836): functional roles for the cytoskeleton and its molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Milograna, Sarah Ribeiro; Ribeiro, Márcia Regina; Baqui, Munira Muhammad Abdel; McNamara, John Campbell

    2014-12-01

    The binding of red pigment concentrating hormone (RPCH) to membrane receptors in crustacean chromatophores triggers Ca²⁺/cGMP signaling cascades that activate cytoskeletal motors, driving pigment granule translocation. We investigate the distributions of microfilaments and microtubules and their associated molecular motors, myosin and dynein, by confocal and transmission electron microscopy, evaluating a functional role for the cytoskeleton in pigment translocation using inhibitors of polymer turnover and motor activity in vitro. Microtubules occupy the chromatophore cell extensions whether the pigment granules are aggregated or dispersed. The inhibition of microtubule turnover by taxol induces pigment aggregation and inhibits re-dispersion. Phalloidin-FITC actin labeling, together with tannic acid fixation and ultrastructural analysis, reveals that microfilaments form networks associated with the pigment granules. Actin polymerization induced by jasplaquinolide strongly inhibits RPCH-induced aggregation, causes spontaneous pigment dispersion, and inhibits pigment re-dispersion. Inhibition of actin polymerization by latrunculin-A completely impedes pigment aggregation and re-dispersion. Confocal immunocytochemistry shows that non-muscle myosin II (NMMII) co-localizes mainly with pigment granules while blebbistatin inhibition of NMMII strongly reduces the RPCH response, also inducing spontaneous pigment dispersion. Myosin II and dynein also co-localize with the pigment granules. Inhibition of dynein ATPase by erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl) adenine induces aggregation, inhibits RPCH-triggered aggregation, and inhibits re-dispersion. Granule aggregation and dispersion depend mainly on microfilament integrity although microtubules may be involved. Both cytoskeletal polymers are functional only when subunit turnover is active. Myosin and dynein may be the molecular motors that drive pigment aggregation. These mechanisms of granule translocation in crustacean

  9. Enoxacin directly inhibits osteoclastogenesis without inducing apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Toro, Edgardo J; Zuo, Jian; Ostrov, David A; Catalfamo, Dana; Bradaschia-Correa, Vivian; Arana-Chavez, Victor; Caridad, Aliana R; Neubert, John K; Wronski, Thomas J; Wallet, Shannon M; Holliday, L Shannon

    2012-05-18

    Enoxacin has been identified as a small molecule inhibitor of binding between the B2-subunit of vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase) and microfilaments. It inhibits bone resorption by calcitriol-stimulated mouse marrow cultures. We hypothesized that enoxacin acts directly and specifically on osteoclasts by disrupting the interaction between plasma membrane-directed V-ATPases, which contain the osteoclast-selective a3-subunit of V-ATPase, and microfilaments. Consistent with this hypothesis, enoxacin dose-dependently reduced the number of multinuclear cells expressing tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activity produced by RANK-L-stimulated osteoclast precursors. Enoxacin (50 μM) did not induce apoptosis as measured by TUNEL and caspase-3 assays. V-ATPases containing the a3-subunit, but not the "housekeeping" a1-subunit, were isolated bound to actin. Treatment with enoxacin reduced the association of V-ATPase subunits with the detergent-insoluble cytoskeleton. Quantitative PCR revealed that enoxacin triggered significant reductions in several osteoclast-selective mRNAs, but levels of various osteoclast proteins were not reduced, as determined by quantitative immunoblots, even when their mRNA levels were reduced. Immunoblots demonstrated that proteolytic processing of TRAP5b and the cytoskeletal protein L-plastin was altered in cells treated with 50 μM enoxacin. Flow cytometry revealed that enoxacin treatment favored the expression of high levels of DC-STAMP on the surface of osteoclasts. Our data show that enoxacin directly inhibits osteoclast formation without affecting cell viability by a novel mechanism that involves changes in posttranslational processing and trafficking of several proteins with known roles in osteoclast function. We propose that these effects are downstream to blocking the binding interaction between a3-containing V-ATPases and microfilaments.

  10. Rational identification of enoxacin as a novel V-ATPase-directed osteoclast inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Toro, Edgardo J; Ostrov, David A; Wronski, Thomas J; Holliday, L Shannon

    2012-03-01

    Binding between vacuolar H+-ATPases (V-ATPases) and microfilaments is mediated by an actin binding domain in the B-subunit. Both isoforms of mammalian B-subunit bind microfilaments with high affinity. A similar actinbinding activity has been demonstrated in the B-subunit of yeast. A conserved "profilin-like" domain in the B-subunit mediates this actin-binding activity, named due to its sequence and structural similarity to an actin-binding surface of the canonical actin binding protein profilin. Subtle mutations in the "profilin-like" domain eliminate actin binding activity without disrupting the ability of the altered protein to associate with the other subunits of V-ATPase to form a functional proton pump. Analysis of these mutated B-subunits suggests that the actin-binding activity is not required for the "housekeeping" functions of V-ATPases, but is important for certain specialized roles. In osteoclasts, the actin-binding activity is required for transport of V-ATPases to the plasma membrane, a prerequisite for bone resorption. A virtual screen led to the identification of enoxacin as a small molecule that bound to the actin-binding surface of the B2-subunit and competitively inhibited B2-subunit and actin interaction. Enoxacin disrupted osteoclastic bone resorption in vitro, but did not affect osteoblast formation or mineralization. Recently, enoxacin was identified as an inhibitor of the virulence of Candida albicans and more importantly of cancer growth and metastasis. Efforts are underway to determine the mechanisms by which enoxacin and other small molecule inhibitors of B2 and microfilament binding interaction selectively block bone resorption, the virulence of Candida, cancer growth, and metastasis.

  11. Regulation of PGE(2) and PGI(2) release from human umbilical vein endothelial cells by actin cytoskeleton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, S. J.; Norvell, S. M.; Ponik, S. M.; Pavalko, F. M.

    2001-01-01

    Disruption of microfilaments in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) with cytochalasin D (cytD) or latrunculin A (latA) resulted in a 3.3- to 5.7-fold increase in total synthesis of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) and a 3.4- to 6.5-fold increase in prostacyclin (PGI(2)) compared with control cells. Disruption of the microtubule network with nocodazole or colchicine increased synthesis of PGE(2) 1.7- to 1.9-fold and PGI(2) 1.9- to 2.0-fold compared with control cells. Interestingly, however, increased release of PGE(2) and PGI(2) from HUVEC into the media occurred only when microfilaments were disrupted. CytD treatment resulted in 6.7-fold more PGE(2) and 3.8-fold more PGI(2) released from HUVEC compared with control cells; latA treatment resulted in 17.7-fold more PGE(2) and 11.2-fold more PGI(2) released compared with control cells. Both increased synthesis and release of prostaglandins in response to all drug treatments were completely inhibited by NS-398, a specific inhibitor of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Disruption of either microfilaments using cytD or latA or of microtubules using nocodazole or colchicine resulted in a significant increase in COX-2 protein levels, suggesting that the increased synthesis of prostaglandins in response to drug treatments may result from increased activity of COX-2. These results, together with studies demonstrating a vasoprotective role for prostaglandins, suggest that the cytoskeleton plays an important role in maintenance of endothelial barrier function by regulating prostaglandin synthesis and release from HUVEC.

  12. Exploring the human mesenchymal stem cell tubule communication network through electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Valente, Sabrina; Rossi, Roberta; Resta, Leonardo; Pasquinelli, Gianandrea

    2015-04-01

    Cells use several mechanisms to transfer information to other cells. In this study, we describe micro/nanotubular connections and exosome-like tubule fragments in multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from human arteries. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy allowed characterization of sinusoidal microtubular projections (700 nm average size, 200 µm average length, with bulging mitochondria and actin microfilaments); short, uniform, variously shaped nanotubular projections (100 nm, bidirectional communication); and tubule fragments (50 nm). This is the first study demonstrating that MSCs from human arteries constitutively interact through an articulate and dynamic tubule network allowing long-range cell to cell communication.

  13. Cytoskeleton and Cytoskeleton-Bound RNA Visualization in Frog and Insect Oocytes.

    PubMed

    Kloc, Malgorzata; Bilinski, Szczepan; Kubiak, Jacek Z

    2016-01-01

    The majority of oocyte functions involves and depends on the cytoskeletal elements, which include microtubules and actin and cytokeratin filaments. Various structures and molecules are temporarily or permanently bound to the cytoskeletal elements and their functions rely on cytoskeleton integrity and its timely assembly. Thus the accurate visualization of cytoskeleton is often crucial for studies and analyses of oocyte structure and functions. Here we describe several reliable methods for microtubule and/or microfilaments preservation and visualization in Xenopus oocyte extracts, and in situ in live and fixed insect and frog (Xenopus) oocytes. In addition, we describe visualization of cytoskeleton-bound RNAs using molecular beacons in live Xenopus oocytes. PMID:27557581

  14. Texture sensing of cytoskeletal dynamics in cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Satarupa; Lee, Rachel; Hourwitz, Matthew J.; Sun, Xiaoyu; Parent, Carole; Fourkas, John T.; Losert, Wolfgang

    Migrating cells can be directed towards a target by gradients in properties such as chemical concentration or mechanical properties of the surrounding microenvironment. In previous studies we have shown that micro/nanotopographical features on scales comparable to those of natural collagen fibers can guide fast migrating amoeboid cells by aligning actin polymerization waves to such nanostructures. We find that actin microfilaments and microtubules are aligned along the nanoridge topographies, modulating overall cell polarity and directional migration in epithelial cells. This work shows that topographic features on a biologically relevant length scale can modulate migration outcomes by affecting the texture sensing property of the cytoskeleton.

  15. Isolation and structure of the cytotoxin lyngbyabellin B and absolute configuration of lyngbyapeptin A from the marine cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula.

    PubMed

    Luesch, H; Yoshida, W Y; Moore, R E; Paul, V J

    2000-10-01

    An analogue of the potent microfilament-disrupter lyngbyabellin A (1) has been isolated as a minor metabolite from the marine cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula collected at Apra Harbor, Guam. It possesses slightly weaker cytotoxicity than 1 and has been named lyngbyabellin B (2). Primarily NMR spectroscopy was used to determine its structure. The absolute configuration of 2 has been ascertained by chiral HPLC analysis of degradation products and by comparison with lyngbyabellin A (1). The known modified tetrapeptide lyngbyapeptin A (3) has also been found in the same extract, and its absolute stereochemistry could be determined for the first time.

  16. Method for localized deposition of noble metal catalysts with control of morphology

    DOEpatents

    Ricco, Antonio J.; Manginell, Ronald P.; Huber, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    A combustible gas sensor that uses a resistively heated, noble metal-coated, micromachined polycrystalline Si filament to calorimetrically detect the presence and concentration of combustible gases. A thin catalytic Pt film was deposited by CVD from the precursor Pt(acac).sub.2 onto microfilaments resistively heated to approximately 500 .degree. C.; Pt deposits only on the hot filament. The filaments tested to date are 2 .mu.m thick .times.10 .mu.m wide .times.100, 250, 500, or 1000 .mu.m-long polycrystalline Si; some are overcoated with a 0.25 .mu.m-thick protective CVD Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 layer.

  17. The fine structure of granules in eosinophil leucocytes from aquatic and terrestrial birds.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, M H

    1978-01-01

    The ultrastructure of eosinophil granules from various aquatic and terrestrial birds has been described. Granules of three basic types were found. The first had a crystalline internum and was found only in the order Anseriformes, which included the black-necked screamer, ducks, geese and swans. The crystals occurred in three morphological forms. The second and least common granule examined contained a non-crystalline internum which was either homogeneous or composed of microfilaments or microtubules. The largest and most common group of birds had a homogenous granule with no internum shown. Homogeneous granules occurred less frequently than did those with interna. PMID:566969

  18. Studies on intracellular transport of secretory proteins in the rat exocrine pancreas. II. Inhibition of antimicrotubular agents.

    PubMed

    Seybold, J; Bieger, W; Kern, H F

    1975-11-28

    The possible role of microtubules and microfilaments in the secretory process of the rat exocrine pancreas was analysed in vitro using isolated pancreatic lobules. Colchicine and vinblastine as microtubule inhibitors, hexylene glycol as a microtubule stabilizer, and cytochalasin B as a disruptive agent for microfilaments were used in increasing concentrations to test their effects on protein synthesis, intracellular transport, zymogen discharge, and cellular respiration. Colchicine only at 10(-2) M concentrations inhibits protein synthesis, while vinblastine inhibits at 10(-6) and 10(-5) M by 20% and at 10(-4) M by 55%. A similar inhibition is observed with 1.5% concentrations of hexylene glycol while cytochalasine B at 1,5 and 10 mug/ml is without effect on protein synthesis. Colchicine and vinblastine have their major effects on intracellular transport both in secretion studies and cell fractionation experiments. Colchicine in concentrations between 10(-3) to 10(-5) M inhibits discharge of newly synthesized proteins by 50%, while vinblastine shows a dose-response relationship of 40% inhibition of 10(-6) M to 90% at 10(-4) M. Discharge of amylase is uniformly reduced by 30% by both colchicine and vinblastine in the whole dose range. The pronounced effect of colchicine and vinblastine is evident in cell fractionation studies: both drugs inhibit the disappearance of protein radioactivity from microsomes and its appearance in zymogen granules; similarly the peak radioactivity in smooth microsomes (Golgi) appears delayed. No differential effect on the secretory process was observed with 1.5% concentrations of hexylene glycol or cytochalasin B at 1.5 and 10 mug/ml concentrations. A fines tructural analysis of microtubules and microfilaments in the exocrine pancreatic cell reveals their distribution in all parts of the cytoplasm and in relation to all cell organelles. Both systems (microtubules, microfilaments) seem to be connected, at least in certain areas of the

  19. Changes in F-actin organization induced by hard metal particle exposure in rat pulmonary epithelial cells using laser scanning confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Antonini, J M; Starks, K; Roberts, J R; Millecchia, L; Yang, H M; Rao, K M

    2000-01-01

    Chronic inhalation of hard metal (WC-Co) particles causes alveolitis and the eventual development of pulmonary fibrosis. The initial inflammatory response includes a change in the alveolar epithelial cell-capillary barrier, which has been shown to be regulated by the state of assembly and organization of the actin cytoskeletal network. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect WC-Co particles have on F-actin organization of lung epithelial cells in an in vitro culture system. Rat lung epithelial (L2) cells were exposed to 5, 25, and 100 microg/mL of WC-Co particles, as well as the individual components (Co and WC) of the hard metal mixture particles for 24 h. The effect on F-actin organization was visualized by laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) following Bodipy-Phallacidin staining. Minimal changes in the F-actin microfilaments of L2 cells were observed by LSCM after exposure to WC and WC-Co at 5 and 25 microg/mL, while at 100 microg/mL, there was a noticeable disruption in the uniform distribution of L2 cell F-actin microfilaments. After exposure to Co, a dose-dependent change in the F-actin organization of the L2 cells was observed. Little change in F-actin assembly was observed after treatment with 5 microg/mL of Co (the concentration equivalent to the 5% amount of Co commonly present in 100 microg/mL of the WC-Co sample mixture). However, at 100 microg/mL of Co, the microfilaments aggregated into homogeneous masses within the cells, and a significant loss in the organization of L2 F-actin was observed. These dramatic alterations in F-actin organization seen after exposure to the higher doses of Co were attributed to an increase in L2 cell injury as measured by lactate dehydrogenase and trypan blue exclusion. We conclude the pulmonary response evoked in the lung by inhalation of high levels of WC-Co particles is unlikely due to alterations in the F-actin microfilaments of lung-epithelial cells. PMID:10900403

  20. Contraction of cross-linked actomyosin bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshinaga, Natsuhiko; Marcq, Philippe

    2012-08-01

    Cross-linked actomyosin bundles retract when severed in vivo by laser ablation, or when isolated from the cell and micromanipulated in vitro in the presence of ATP. We identify the timescale for contraction as a viscoelastic time τ, where the viscosity is due to (internal) protein friction. We obtain an estimate of the order of magnitude of the contraction time τ ≈ 10-100 s, consistent with available experimental data for circumferential microfilament bundles and stress fibers. Our results are supported by an exactly solvable, hydrodynamic model of a retracting bundle as a cylinder of isotropic, active matter, from which the order of magnitude of the active stress is estimated.

  1. Forced expression of chimeric human fibroblast tropomyosin mutants affects cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Human fibroblasts generate at least eight tropomyosin (TM) isoforms (hTM1, hTM2, hTM3, hTM4, hTM5, hTM5a, hTM5b, and hTMsm alpha) from four distinct genes, and we have previously demonstrated that bacterially produced chimera hTM5/3 exhibits an unusually high affinity for actin filaments and a loss of the salt dependence typical for TM-actin binding (Novy, R.E., J. R. Sellers, L.-F. Liu, and J.J.-C. Lin, 1993. Cell Motil. & Cytoskeleton. 26: 248-261). To examine the functional consequences of expressing this mutant TM isoform in vivo, we have transfected CHO cells with the full-length cDNA for hTM5/3 and compared them to cells transfected with hTM3 and hTM5. Immunofluorescence microscopy reveals that stably transfected CHO cells incorporate force- expressed hTM3 and hTM5 into stress fibers with no significant effect on general cell morphology, microfilament organization or cytokinesis. In stable lines expressing hTM5/3, however, cell division is slow and sometimes incomplete. The doubling time and the incidence of multinucleate cells in the stable hTM5/3 lines roughly parallel expression levels. A closely related chimeric isoform hTM5/2, which differs only in the internal, alternatively spliced exon also produces defects in cytokinesis, suggesting that normal TM function may involve coordination between the amino and carboxy terminal regions. This coordination may be prevented in the chimeric mutants. As bacterially produced hTM5/3 and hTM5/2 can displace hTM3 and hTM5 from actin filaments in vitro, it is likely that CHO-expressed hTM5/3 and hTM5/2 can displace endogenous TMs to act dominantly in vivo. These results support a role for nonmuscle TM isoforms in the fine tuning of microfilament organization during cytokinesis. Additionally, we find that overexpression of TM does not stabilize endogenous microfilaments, rather, the hTM-expressing cells are actually more sensitive to cytochalasin B. This suggests that regulation of microfilament integrity in vivo

  2. Effects of inhibitors on 1-methyladenine induced maturation of starfish oocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Harold H.; Xu, Quanhan

    1986-12-01

    1-methladenine (1-MA) induces starfish oocytes maturation via surface reaction followed by the appearance of a cytoplasmic maturation factor which in turn induces germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) to resume meiosis. Cellular mechanisms involved in GVBD were investigated by microinjection of metabolic inhibitors. Colchicine (Co) inhibited maturation, cytochalasin-B (CB) delayed GVBD and actinomycin-D-(Act-D) and puromycin (Pu) had no effect. It appears that the microtubule and the microfilament systems are associated with the nuclear membrane dissolution during the process of oocyte maturation of starfish.

  3. Cytoskeleton and Cytoskeleton-Bound RNA Visualization in Frog and Insect Oocytes.

    PubMed

    Kloc, Malgorzata; Bilinski, Szczepan; Kubiak, Jacek Z

    2016-01-01

    The majority of oocyte functions involves and depends on the cytoskeletal elements, which include microtubules and actin and cytokeratin filaments. Various structures and molecules are temporarily or permanently bound to the cytoskeletal elements and their functions rely on cytoskeleton integrity and its timely assembly. Thus the accurate visualization of cytoskeleton is often crucial for studies and analyses of oocyte structure and functions. Here we describe several reliable methods for microtubule and/or microfilaments preservation and visualization in Xenopus oocyte extracts, and in situ in live and fixed insect and frog (Xenopus) oocytes. In addition, we describe visualization of cytoskeleton-bound RNAs using molecular beacons in live Xenopus oocytes.

  4. Analysis of murine cellular receptors for tumor-killing factor

    SciTech Connect

    Ohsawa, F.; Natori, S.

    1987-01-01

    Receptors for tumor-killing factor (TKF) on the surface of murine cells were analyzed using radioiodinated TKF. Not only sensitive cells but also insensitive cells were found to have specific receptors. Among the sensitive cells, no clear relation was observed between the number of receptors on the cell surface and sensitivity to TKF. Compounds affecting microfilaments (cytochalasin B and D) and microtubules (colchicine and Colcemid) significantly inhibited cytolysis of sensitive cells induced by receptor-bound TKF. It is concluded that internalization of receptor-bound TKF is a prerequisite for triggering cytolysis.

  5. Effects of X irradiation on the cytoskeleton of rat alveolar macrophages in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ladyman, S.J.; Townsend, K.M.S.; Edwards, C.

    1984-07-01

    The three-dimensional visualization of Triton X-100 resistant cytoskeletons has been used to demonstrate that an absorbed dose of 120 Gy from X rays causes a distinctive and reproducible alteration of the cytoskeleton of intact rat alveolar macrophages in vitro. The alteration has also been shown to be rapidly and completely ''repaired'' and to be apparently similar to alterations caused by colchicine but dissimilar to those caused by cytochalasin B. From these observations and those of other workers who have studied the irradiation of extracted microtubular proteins in vitro, the authors think it likely that microtubules rather than microfilaments are the radiosensitive component of the macrophage cytoskeleton.

  6. Synthetic peptides that cause F-actin bundling and block actin depolymerization

    DOEpatents

    Sederoff, Heike; Huber, Steven C; Larabell, Carolyn A

    2011-10-18

    Synthetic peptides derived from sucrose synthase, and having homology to actin and actin-related proteins, sharing a common motif, useful for causing acting bundling and preventing actin depolymerization. Peptides exhibiting the common motif are described, as well as specific synthetic peptides which caused bundled actin and inhibit actin depolymerization. These peptides can be useful for treating a subject suffering from a disease characterized by cells having neoplastic growth, for anti-cancer therapeutics, delivered to subjects solely, or concomitantly or sequentially with other known cancer therapeutics. These peptides can also be used for stabilizing microfilaments in living cells and inhibiting growth of cells.

  7. Para-hydrogen narrow filament evaporation at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizarova, T. G.; Gogolin, A. A.; Montero, S.

    2012-11-01

    Undercooling of liquid para-hydrogen (pH2) below its freezing point at equilibrium (13.8 K) has been shown recently in flowing micro-filaments evaporating in low density background gas [M. Kühnel et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 245301 (2011)]. An hydrodynamical model accounting for this process is reported here. Analytical expressions for the local temperature T of a filament, averaged over its cross section, are obtained as a function of distance z to the nozzle. Comparison with the experiment is shown. It is shown also that the thermocapillary forces induce a parabolic profile of velocity across the jet.

  8. Characterization and immunocytochemical localization of actin and fibronectin in haemocytes of the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    PubMed

    Panara, F; Di Rosa, I; Fagotti, A; Simoncelli, F; Mangiabene, C; Pipe, R K; Pascolini, R

    1996-02-01

    Cell-extracellular matrix interactions are recognized to be important for human leucocyte functions, including chemotaxis and phagocytosis. These activities depend on a reorganization of the microfilament actin (F-actin) promoted by fibronectin, one of the major components of extracellular matrices. Although invertebrate haemocytes are, in many aspects, similar to the human granulocyte-monocyte-macrophage cell lineage, actin and fibronectin have not been well studied in these cells. Consequently, the characterization and structural organization of actin and fibronectin in mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis) haemocytes was investigated using Western blotting analysis, indirect immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy. Actin was immunocharacterized by an anti-total actin monoclonal antibody. Fibronectin was immunocharacterized by an autologous polyclonal antiserum directed against the protein of mussel haemolymph. Actin was mainly localized along the peripheral cytoplasm of the haemocyte. The distribution of the F-actin microfilaments was assayed with Rhodamine-labelled phalloidin. F-actin was associated mainly with stress-fibres of spreading haemocytes and with microspikes at the adhesion sites. The labelling by the anti-fibronectin antiserum of the haemocyte rough endoplasmic reticulum vesicles, revealed by immunoelectron microscopy, suggests that these cells are involved in fibronectin biosynthesis. Gold particles were also present along the outer surfaces of the cell plasma membrane and its protrusions. Mussel fibronectin was localized immunohistochemically at the adhesion sites and in the extracellular matrix fibrils. The relationships between fibronectin and the actin cytoskeleton in Mytilus galloprovincialis haemocytes are discussed.

  9. Reactivation of organelle movements along the cytoskeletal framework of a giant freshwater ameba

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    The peripheral feeding network of the giant freshwater ameba Reticulomyxa can be easily and rapidly lysed to produce an extensive, stable, and completely exposed cytoskeletal framework of colinear microtubules and microfilaments. Most of the organelles that remain attached to this framework resume rapid saltatory movements at rates of up to 20 micron/s if ATP is added. This lysed model system is also capable of other forms of motility, namely an active splaying of microtubule bundles and bulk streaming. Reactivation does not occur with other nucleoside triphosphates, requires Mg ions, is insensitive to even high concentrations of erythro-9-(3-[2-hydroxynonyl]) adenine, is sensitive to vanadate only at concentrations of approximately 100 microM, and is inhibited by N-ethylmaleimide at concentrations greater than 100 microM. The physiology of this reactivation suggests an organelle transport motor distinct from cytoplasmic dynein and possibly the recently described kinesin. This system can serve as a model for elucidating the mechanisms of intracellular transport and, in addition, provides a unique opportunity to examine associations between microtubules and microfilaments. PMID:3733883

  10. Rescue of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS)-mediated Sertoli cell injury by overexpression of gap junction protein connexin 43

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan; Mruk, Dolores D.; Chen, Haiqi; Wong, Chris K. C.; Lee, Will M.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2016-01-01

    Perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) is an environmental toxicant used in developing countries, including China, as a stain repellent for clothing, carpets and draperies, but it has been banned in the U.S. and Canada since the late 2000s. PFOS perturbed the Sertoli cell tight junction (TJ)-permeability barrier, causing disruption of actin microfilaments in cell cytosol, perturbing the localization of cell junction proteins (e.g., occluden-ZO-1, N-cadherin-ß-catenin). These changes destabilized Sertoli cell blood-testis barrier (BTB) integrity. These findings suggest that human exposure to PFOS might induce BTB dysfunction and infertility. Interestingly, PFOS-induced Sertoli cell injury associated with a down-regulation of the gap junction (GJ) protein connexin43 (Cx43). We next investigated if overexpression of Cx43 in Sertoli cells could rescue the PFOS-induced cell injury. Indeed, overexpression of Cx43 in Sertoli cells with an established TJ-barrier blocked the disruption in PFOS-induced GJ-intercellular communication, resulting in the re-organization of actin microfilaments, which rendered them similar to those in control cells. Furthermore, cell adhesion proteins that utilized F-actin for attachment became properly distributed at the cell-cell interface, resealing the disrupted TJ-barrier. In summary, Cx43 is a good target that might be used to manage PFOS-induced reproductive dysfunction. PMID:27436542

  11. Plasmolysis: Loss of Turgor and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Lang, Ingeborg; Sassmann, Stefan; Schmidt, Brigitte; Komis, George

    2014-11-26

    Plasmolysis is a typical response of plant cells exposed to hyperosmotic stress. The loss of turgor causes the violent detachment of the living protoplast from the cell wall. The plasmolytic process is mainly driven by the vacuole. Plasmolysis is reversible (deplasmolysis) and characteristic to living plant cells. Obviously, dramatic structural changes are required to fulfill a plasmolytic cycle. In the present paper, the fate of cortical microtubules and actin microfilaments is documented throughout a plasmolytic cycle in living cells of green fluorescent protein (GFP) tagged Arabidopsis lines. While the microtubules became wavy and highly bundled during plasmolysis, cortical filamentous actin remained in close vicinity to the plasma membrane lining the sites of concave plasmolysis and adjusting readily to the diminished size of the protoplast. During deplasmolysis, cortical microtubule re-organization progressed slowly and required up to 24 h to complete the restoration of the original pre-plasmolytic pattern. Actin microfilaments, again, recovered faster and organelle movement remained intact throughout the whole process. In summary, the hydrostatic skeleton resulting from the osmotic state of the plant vacuole "overrules" the stabilization by cortical cytoskeletal elements.

  12. Nematic Liquid Crystal Alignment Behaviors between Crossed Stretched Miropolymer Filaments with Anchoring Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikake, Hideo; Murashige, Takeshi; Sato, Hiroto; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Kurita, Taiichiro; Sato, Fumio

    2006-04-01

    We observed the molecular alignment of a liquid crystal (LC) induced by crossing two stretched micropolymer filaments between glass substrates and confirmed its light modulation property. The two microfilaments, which were extracted from a cellulose cloth by stretching it in advance, had surface molecular alignment and stabilized nematic LC alignment between the microfilaments crossed with a small angle. In the fabricated LC cell, a spatially-uniform LC planar alignment is achieved in the area of a filament interval of less than 60 μm. By polarizing microscopy observation of the isotropic-to-nematic wetting transition of the LC material between the polymer filaments, it was confirmed that the stable LC alignment area is formed by the surface anchoring of the filaments. When external voltages were applied to the obtained uniformed alignment LC area, a characteristic periodic electrooptic property was confirmed on the basis of electrically-controlled birefringence under the alignment control of the in-plane anchoring of the filaments.

  13. Regulation of vacuolar H{sup +}-ATPase in microglia by RANKL

    SciTech Connect

    Serrano, Eric M.; Ricofort, Ryan D.; Zuo, Jian; Ochotny, Noelle; Manolson, Morris F.; Holliday, L. Shannon

    2009-11-06

    Vacuolar H{sup +}-ATPases (V-ATPases) are large electrogenic proton pumps composed of numerous subunits that play vital housekeeping roles in the acidification of compartments of the endocytic pathway. Additionally, V-ATPases play specialized roles in certain cell types, a capacity that is linked to cell type selective expression of isoforms of some of the subunits. We detected low levels of the a3 isoform of the a-subunit in mouse brain extracts. Examination of various brain-derived cell types by immunoblotting showed a3 was expressed in the N9 microglia cell line and in primary microglia, but not in other cell types. The expression of a3 in osteoclasts requires stimulation by Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor {kappa}B-ligand (RANKL). We found that Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor {kappa}B (RANK) was expressed by microglia. Stimulation of microglia with RANKL triggered increased expression of a3. V-ATPases in microglia were shown to bind microfilaments, and stimulation with RANKL increased the proportion of V-ATPase associated with the detergent-insoluble cytoskeletal fraction and with actin. In summary, microglia express the a3-subunit of V-ATPase. The expression of a3 and the interaction between V-ATPases and microfilaments was modulated by RANKL. These data suggest a novel molecular pathway for regulating microglia.

  14. Cytochalasin B treatment of mouse oocytes during intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) increases embryo survival without impairment of development.

    PubMed

    Hu, Li-li; Shen, Xing-hui; Zheng, Zhong; Wang, Zhen-dong; Liu, Zhong-hua; Jin, Lian-hong; Lei, Lei

    2012-11-01

    Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) is a technique commonly used in clinical and research settings. In mouse oocytes, conventional ICSI has a poor survival rate caused by a high level of lysis. Cytochalasin B (CB) is a toxic microfilament-inhibiting agent that is known to relax the cytoskeleton and enhance the flexibility of oocytes. CB has been used widely in nuclear transfer experiments to improve the success rate of the micromanipulation, however information describing the use of CB in ICSI is limited. Here, we demonstrated that the addition of 5 μg/ml CB to the manipulation medium of ICSI procedure significantly improved the survival rate of the ICSI embryos (80.74% vs. 89.50%, p < 0.05), and that there was no harm for the in vitro or in vivo development. The birth rates and birth weights were not significantly different between the CB-treated and -untreated groups. Interestingly, the microfilaments of the ICSI embryos were almost undetectable immediately after CB treatment; however, they gradually re-appeared and had fully recovered to the normal level 2 h later. Moreover, CB did not disturb spindle rotation, second polar body formation or pronuclei migration, and had no effect on the microtubules. We thus conclude that ICSI manipulation in CB-containing medium results in significantly improved survival rate of mouse ICSI embryos, and that short-term treatment with CB during ICSI manipulation does not have adverse effects on the development of ICSI embryos.

  15. Plasmolysis: Loss of Turgor and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Lang, Ingeborg; Sassmann, Stefan; Schmidt, Brigitte; Komis, George

    2014-01-01

    Plasmolysis is a typical response of plant cells exposed to hyperosmotic stress. The loss of turgor causes the violent detachment of the living protoplast from the cell wall. The plasmolytic process is mainly driven by the vacuole. Plasmolysis is reversible (deplasmolysis) and characteristic to living plant cells. Obviously, dramatic structural changes are required to fulfill a plasmolytic cycle. In the present paper, the fate of cortical microtubules and actin microfilaments is documented throughout a plasmolytic cycle in living cells of green fluorescent protein (GFP) tagged Arabidopsis lines. While the microtubules became wavy and highly bundled during plasmolysis, cortical filamentous actin remained in close vicinity to the plasma membrane lining the sites of concave plasmolysis and adjusting readily to the diminished size of the protoplast. During deplasmolysis, cortical microtubule re-organization progressed slowly and required up to 24 h to complete the restoration of the original pre-plasmolytic pattern. Actin microfilaments, again, recovered faster and organelle movement remained intact throughout the whole process. In summary, the hydrostatic skeleton resulting from the osmotic state of the plant vacuole "overrules" the stabilization by cortical cytoskeletal elements. PMID:27135521

  16. Rescue of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS)-mediated Sertoli cell injury by overexpression of gap junction protein connexin 43

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Nan; Mruk, Dolores D.; Chen, Haiqi; Wong, Chris K. C.; Lee, Will M.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2016-07-01

    Perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) is an environmental toxicant used in developing countries, including China, as a stain repellent for clothing, carpets and draperies, but it has been banned in the U.S. and Canada since the late 2000s. PFOS perturbed the Sertoli cell tight junction (TJ)-permeability barrier, causing disruption of actin microfilaments in cell cytosol, perturbing the localization of cell junction proteins (e.g., occluden-ZO-1, N-cadherin-ß-catenin). These changes destabilized Sertoli cell blood-testis barrier (BTB) integrity. These findings suggest that human exposure to PFOS might induce BTB dysfunction and infertility. Interestingly, PFOS-induced Sertoli cell injury associated with a down-regulation of the gap junction (GJ) protein connexin43 (Cx43). We next investigated if overexpression of Cx43 in Sertoli cells could rescue the PFOS-induced cell injury. Indeed, overexpression of Cx43 in Sertoli cells with an established TJ-barrier blocked the disruption in PFOS-induced GJ-intercellular communication, resulting in the re-organization of actin microfilaments, which rendered them similar to those in control cells. Furthermore, cell adhesion proteins that utilized F-actin for attachment became properly distributed at the cell-cell interface, resealing the disrupted TJ-barrier. In summary, Cx43 is a good target that might be used to manage PFOS-induced reproductive dysfunction.

  17. Arabidopsis FH1 Formin Affects Cotyledon Pavement Cell Shape by Modulating Cytoskeleton Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Rosero, Amparo; Oulehlová, Denisa; Stillerová, Lenka; Schiebertová, Petra; Grunt, Michal; Žárský, Viktor; Cvrčková, Fatima

    2016-03-01

    Plant cell morphogenesis involves concerted rearrangements of microtubules and actin microfilaments. We previously reported that FH1, the main Arabidopsis thaliana housekeeping Class I membrane-anchored formin, contributes to actin dynamics and microtubule stability in rhizodermis cells. Here we examine the effects of mutations affecting FH1 (At3g25500) on cell morphogenesis and above-ground organ development in seedlings, as well as on cytoskeletal organization and dynamics, using a combination of confocal and variable angle epifluorescence microscopy with a pharmacological approach. Homozygous fh1 mutants exhibited cotyledon epinasty and had larger cotyledon pavement cells with more pronounced lobes than the wild type. The pavement cell shape alterations were enhanced by expression of the fluorescent microtubule marker GFP-microtubule-associated protein 4 (MAP4). Mutant cotyledon pavement cells exhibited reduced density and increased stability of microfilament bundles, as well as enhanced dynamics of microtubules. Analogous results were also obtained upon treatments with the formin inhibitor SMIFH2 (small molecule inhibitor of formin homology 2 domains). Pavement cell shape in wild-type (wt) and fh1 plants in some situations exhibited a differential response towards anti-cytoskeletal drugs, especially the microtubule disruptor oryzalin. Our observations indicate that FH1 participates in the control of microtubule dynamics, possibly via its effects on actin, subsequently influencing cell morphogenesis and macroscopic organ development. PMID:26738547

  18. Small heat shock proteins in cellular adhesion and migration: evidence from Plasmodium genetics.

    PubMed

    Montagna, Georgina N; Matuschewski, Kai; Buscaglia, Carlos A

    2012-01-01

    Cellular locomotion and adhesion critically depend on regulated turnover of filamentous actin. Biochemical data from diverse model systems support a role for the family of small heat shock proteins (HSPBs) in microfilament regulation. The small chaperones could either act directly, through competition with the motor myosin, or indirectly, through modulation of actin depolymerizing factor/cofilin activity. However, a direct link between HSPBs and actin-based cellular motility remained to be established. In a recent experimental genetics study, we provided evidence for regulation of Plasmodium motility by HSPB6/Hsp20. The infectious forms of malaria parasites, termed sporozoites, display fast and continuous substrate-dependent motility, which is largely driven by turnover of actin microfilaments. Sporozoite gliding locomotion is essential to avoid destruction by host defense mechanisms and to ultimately reach a hepatocyte, the target cell, where to transform and replicate. Genetic ablation of Plasmodium HSP20 dramatically changed sporozoite speed and substrate adhesion, resulting in impaired natural malaria transmission. In this article, we discuss the function of Hsp20 in this fast-moving unicellular protozoan and implications for the roles of HSPBs in adhesion and migration of eukaryotic cells.

  19. RICE MORPHOLOGY DETERMINANT Encodes the Type II Formin FH5 and Regulates Rice Morphogenesis[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zheng; Zhang, Yi; Tan, Hexin; Wang, Ying; Li, Gang; Liang, Wanqi; Yuan, Zheng; Hu, Jianping; Ren, Haiyun; Zhang, Dabing

    2011-01-01

    Multicellular organisms contain a large number of formins; however, their physiological roles in plants remain poorly understood. Here, we reveal that formin homology 5 (FH5), a type II formin mutated in rice morphology determinant (rmd), plays a crucial role in determining rice (Oryza sativa) morphology. FH5/RMD encodes a formin-like protein consisting of an N-terminal phosphatase tensin (PTEN)-like domain, an FH1 domain, and an FH2 domain. The rmd mutants display a bending growth pattern in seedlings, are stunted as adult plants, and have aberrant inflorescence (panicle) and seed shape. Cytological analysis showed that rmd mutants have severe cell elongation defects and abnormal microtubule and microfilament arrays. FH5/RMD is ubiquitously expressed in rice tissues, and its protein localization to the chloroplast surface is mediated by the PTEN domain. Biochemical assays demonstrated that recombinant FH5 protein can nucleate actin polymerization from monomeric G-actin or actin/profilin complexes, cap the barbed end of actin filaments, and bundle actin filaments in vitro. Moreover, FH5 can directly bind to and bundle microtubules through its FH2 domain in vitro. Our findings suggest that the rice formin protein FH5 plays a critical role in determining plant morphology by regulating actin dynamics and proper spatial organization of microtubules and microfilaments. PMID:21307283

  20. F-actin distribution and function during sexual development in Eimeria maxima.

    PubMed

    Frölich, Sonja; Wallach, Michael

    2015-06-01

    To determine the involvement of the actin cytoskeleton in macrogametocyte growth and oocyst wall formation, freshly purified macrogametocytes and oocysts were stained with Oregon Green 514 conjugated phalloidin to visualize F-actin microfilaments, while Evans blue staining was used to detect type 1 wall forming bodies (WFB1s) and the outer oocyst wall. The double-labelled parasites were then analysed at various stages of sexual development using three-dimensional confocal microscopy. The results showed F-actin filaments were distributed throughout the entire cytoplasm of mature Eimeria maxima macrogametocytes forming a web-like meshwork of actin filaments linking the type 1 WFBs together into structures resembling 'beads on a string'. At the early stages of oocyst wall formation, F-actin localization changed in alignment with the egg-shaped morphology of the forming oocysts with F-actin microfilaments making direct contact with the WFB1s. In tissue oocysts, the labelled actin cytoskeleton was situated underneath the forming outer layer of the oocyst wall. Treatment of macrogametocytes in vitro with the actin depolymerizing agents, Cytochalasin D and Latrunculin, led to a reduction in the numbers of mature WFB1s in the cytoplasm of the developing macrogametocytes, indicating that the actin plays an important role in WFB1 transport and oocyst wall formation in E. maxima.

  1. Single-molecule imaging of beta-actin mRNAs in the cytoplasm of a living cell.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Mai; Ishihama, Yo; Shirasaki, Yoshitaka; Kurama, Hideki; Funatsu, Takashi

    2009-04-15

    Beta-actin mRNA labeled with an MS2-EGFP fusion protein was expressed in chicken embryo fibroblasts and its localization and movement were analyzed by single-molecule imaging. Most beta-Actin mRNAs localized to the leading edge, while some others were observed in the perinuclear region. Singe-molecule tracking of individual mRNAs revealed that the majority of mRNAs were in unrestricted Brownian motion at the leading edge and in restricted Brownian motion in the perinuclear region. The macroscopic diffusion coefficient of mRNA (D(MACRO)) at the leading edge was 0.3 microm(2)/s. On the other hand, D(MACRO) in the perinuclear region was 0.02 microm(2)/s. The destruction of microfilaments with cytochalasin D, which is known to delocalize beta-actin mRNAs, led to an increase in D(MACRO) to 0.2 microm(2)/s in the perinuclear region. These results suggest that the microstructure, composed of microfilaments, serves as a barrier for the movement of beta-actin mRNA.

  2. Cytoskeleton Modifications and Autophagy Induction in TCam-2 Seminoma Cells Exposed to Simulated Microgravity

    PubMed Central

    Ferranti, Francesca; Caruso, Maria; Cammarota, Marcella; Fabrizi, Cinzia; Fumagalli, Lorenzo; Schiraldi, Chiara; Catizone, Angela

    2014-01-01

    The study of how mechanical forces may influence cell behavior via cytoskeleton remodeling is a relevant challenge of nowadays that may allow us to define the relationship between mechanics and biochemistry and to address the larger problem of biological complexity. An increasing amount of literature data reported that microgravity condition alters cell architecture as a consequence of cytoskeleton structure modifications. Herein, we are reporting the morphological, cytoskeletal, and behavioral modifications due to the exposition of a seminoma cell line (TCam-2) to simulated microgravity. Even if no differences in cell proliferation and apoptosis were observed after 24 hours of exposure to simulated microgravity, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis revealed that the change of gravity vector significantly affects TCam-2 cell surface morphological appearance. Consistent with this observation, we found that microtubule orientation is altered by microgravity. Moreover, the confocal analysis of actin microfilaments revealed an increase in the cell width induced by the low gravitational force. Microtubules and microfilaments have been related to autophagy modulation and, interestingly, we found a significant autophagic induction in TCam-2 cells exposed to simulated microgravity. This observation is of relevant interest because it shows, for the first time, TCam-2 cell autophagy as a biological response induced by a mechanical stimulus instead of a biochemical one. PMID:25140323

  3. Inhibition of anchorage-dependent cell spreading triggers apoptosis in cultured human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    When cultivated on substrates that prevent cell adhesion (the polymer polyhydroxyethylmethacrylate, bovine serum albumin, and Teflon), human endothelial cells (EC) rapidly lost viability with a half-life of approximately 10 h. Dying EC showed the morphological and biochemical characteristics of apoptosis. The apoptotic process of suspended EC was delayed by the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. To obtain information as to the mechanism involved in the apoptosis of suspended EC, we investigated whether adhesion to matrix proteins or integrin occupancy in EC retaining a round shape may affect EC suicide. EC bound to low coating concentration of either fibronectin or vitronectin, retaining a round shape and failing to organize actin microfilaments, underwent to rapid cell death; by contrast, cells on high substrate concentrations became flattened, showed actin microfilament organization, and retained viability. Addition of saturating amounts of soluble vitronectin to suspended round-shaped EC did not reduce the process of apoptosis. Finally, when suspended EC bound Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp- Ser-coated microbeads (approximately 10 microbeads/cell), yet retaining a round shape, the apoptotic process was not affected. Oncogene- transformed EC in suspension were less susceptible to cell death and apoptosis than normal EC. Overall, these data indicate that cell attachment to matrix or integrin binding per se is not sufficient for maintaining cell viability, and that cells need to undergo some minimal degree of shape change to survive. Modulation of interaction with the extracellular matrix can, therefore, be an important target for the control of angiogenesis. PMID:7523422

  4. Immunocytochemical localization of alpha-actinin in intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Geiger, B; Tokuyasu, K T; Singer, S J

    1979-01-01

    alpha-Actinin was localized in chicken intestinal epithelial cells by immunofluorescence and immunoferritin labeling of thin frozen sections. Most of the label of the brush border was confined to the terminal web area. The label there was concentrated mainly along the "roots" of the microvilli core microfilaments and in the vicinity of the zonula adherens. In the latter structure, the narrow electron-dense zones adjacent to the cell membranes, however, were not significantly labeled. This suggests that alpha-actinin does not mediate directly the association of the transverse terminal web microfilaments to the membrane at the zonula adherens. Sparse ferritin labeling was found near the tight junction, whereas the staining associated with the spot desmosome was negligible. The microvilli were not significantly labeled by either immunofluorescence or immunoferritin staining unless the sections were previously treated with detergent. Moreover, alpha-actinin (or a structurally related protein) was not detected in preparations of purified microvillar vesicles, suggesting the possibility that the alpha-actinin staining in the microvilli may be an artificial due to its translocation by the detergent from the terminal web onto the microvilli. The possible roles of alpha-actinin in the organization and function of the brush border are discussed. Images PMID:379865

  5. Regulation of vacuolar H(+)-ATPase in microglia by RANKL.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Eric M; Ricofort, Ryan D; Zuo, Jian; Ochotny, Noelle; Manolson, Morris F; Holliday, L Shannon

    2009-11-01

    Vacuolar H(+)-ATPases (V-ATPases) are large electrogenic proton pumps composed of numerous subunits that play vital housekeeping roles in the acidification of compartments of the endocytic pathway. Additionally, V-ATPases play specialized roles in certain cell types, a capacity that is linked to cell type selective expression of isoforms of some of the subunits. We detected low levels of the a3 isoform of the a-subunit in mouse brain extracts. Examination of various brain-derived cell types by immunoblotting showed a3 was expressed in the N9 microglia cell line and in primary microglia, but not in other cell types. The expression of a3 in osteoclasts requires stimulation by Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor kappaB-ligand (RANKL). We found that Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor kappaB (RANK) was expressed by microglia. Stimulation of microglia with RANKL triggered increased expression of a3. V-ATPases in microglia were shown to bind microfilaments, and stimulation with RANKL increased the proportion of V-ATPase associated with the detergent-insoluble cytoskeletal fraction and with actin. In summary, microglia express the a3-subunit of V-ATPase. The expression of a3 and the interaction between V-ATPases and microfilaments was modulated by RANKL. These data suggest a novel molecular pathway for regulating microglia.

  6. Regulation of Vacuolar H+-ATPase in Microglia by RANKL

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Eric M.; Ricofort, Ryan D.; Zuo, Jian; Ochotny, Noelle; Manolson, Morris F.; Holliday, L. Shannon

    2009-01-01

    Vacuolar H+-ATPases (V-ATPases) are large electrogenic proton pumps composed of numerous subunits that play vital housekeeping roles in the acidification of compartments of the endocytic pathway. Additionally, V-ATPase play specialized roles in certain cell types, a capacity that is linked to cell type selective expression of isoforms of some of the subunits. We detected low levels of the a3 isoform of the a-subunit in mouse brain extracts. Examination of various brain-derived cell types by immunoblotting showed a3 was expressed in the N9 microglia cell line and in primary microglia, but not in other cell types. The expression of a3 in osteoclasts requires stimulation by Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor κ B -ligand (RANKL). We found that Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor κ B (RANK) was expressed by microglia. Stimulation of microglia with RANKL triggered increased expression of a3. V-ATPases in microglia were shown to bind microfilaments, and stimulation with RANKL increased the proportion of V-ATPase associated with the detergent-insoluble cytoskeletal fraction and with actin. In summary, microglia express the a3-subunit of V-ATPase. The expression of a3 and the interaction between V-ATPases and microfilaments was modulated by RANKL. These data suggest a novel molecular pathway for regulating microglia. PMID:19715671

  7. Triggering signaling pathways using F-actin self-organization

    PubMed Central

    Colin, A.; Bonnemay, L.; Gayrard, C.; Gautier, J.; Gueroui, Z.

    2016-01-01

    The spatiotemporal organization of proteins within cells is essential for cell fate behavior. Although it is known that the cytoskeleton is vital for numerous cellular functions, it remains unclear how cytoskeletal activity can shape and control signaling pathways in space and time throughout the cell cytoplasm. Here we show that F-actin self-organization can trigger signaling pathways by engineering two novel properties of the microfilament self-organization: (1) the confinement of signaling proteins and (2) their scaffolding along actin polymers. Using in vitro reconstitutions of cellular functions, we found that both the confinement of nanoparticle-based signaling platforms powered by F-actin contractility and the scaffolding of engineered signaling proteins along actin microfilaments can drive a signaling switch. Using Ran-dependent microtubule nucleation, we found that F-actin dynamics promotes the robust assembly of microtubules. Our in vitro assay is a first step towards the development of novel bottom-up strategies to decipher the interplay between cytoskeleton spatial organization and signaling pathway activity. PMID:27698406

  8. A kinesin with calponin-homology domain is involved in premitotic nuclear migration

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Nicole; Klotz, Jan; Nick, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Interaction and cross-talk between microtubules and actin microfilaments are important for numerous processes during plant growth and development, including the control of cell elongation and tissue expansion, but little is known about the molecular components of this interaction. Plant kinesins with the calponin-homology domain (KCH) were recently identified and associated with a putative role in microtubule-microfilament cross-linking. The putative biological role of the rice KCH member OsKCH1 is addressed here using a combined approach with Tos17 kch1 knock-out mutants on the one hand, and a KCH1 overexpression line generated in tobacco BY-2 cells. It is shown that OsKCH1 is expressed in a development and tissue-specific manner in rice and antagonistic cell elongation and division phenotypes as a result of knock-down and overexpression are reported. Further, the dynamic repartitioning of OsKCH1 during the cell cycle is described and it is demonstrated that KCH overexpression delays nuclear positioning and mitosis in BY-2 cells. These findings are discussed with respect to a putative role of KCHs as linkers between actin filaments and microtubules during nuclear positioning. PMID:20566563

  9. Regulation of cytoskeletal dynamics by redox signaling and oxidative stress: implications for neuronal development and trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Carlos; González-Billault, Christian

    2015-01-01

    A proper balance between chemical reduction and oxidation (known as redox balance) is essential for normal cellular physiology. Deregulation in the production of oxidative species leads to DNA damage, lipid peroxidation and aberrant post-translational modification of proteins, which in most cases induces injury, cell death and disease. However, physiological concentrations of oxidative species are necessary to support important cell functions, such as chemotaxis, hormone synthesis, immune response, cytoskeletal remodeling, Ca2+ homeostasis and others. Recent evidence suggests that redox balance regulates actin and microtubule dynamics in both physiological and pathological contexts. Microtubules and actin microfilaments contain certain amino acid residues that are susceptible to oxidation, which reduces the ability of microtubules to polymerize and causes severing of actin microfilaments in neuronal and non-neuronal cells. In contrast, inhibited production of reactive oxygen species (ROS; e.g., due to NOXs) leads to aberrant actin polymerization, decreases neurite outgrowth and affects the normal development and polarization of neurons. In this review, we summarize emerging evidence suggesting that both general and specific enzymatic sources of redox species exert diverse effects on cytoskeletal dynamics. Considering the intimate relationship between cytoskeletal dynamics and trafficking, we also discuss the potential effects of redox balance on intracellular transport via regulation of the components of the microtubule and actin cytoskeleton as well as cytoskeleton-associated proteins, which may directly impact localization of proteins and vesicles across the soma, dendrites and axon of neurons. PMID:26483635

  10. Protein Kinases Possibly Mediate Hypergravity-Induced Changes in F-Actin Expression by Endothelial Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, Felisha D.; Melhado, Caroline D.; Bosah, Francis N.; Harris-Hooker, Sandra A.; Sanford, Gary L.

    1998-01-01

    Basic cellular functions such as electrolyte concentration, cell growth rate, glucose utilization, bone formation, response to growth stimulation, and exocytosis are modified in microgravity. These studies indicate that microgravity affects a number of physiological systems and included in this are cell signaling mechanisms. Rijken and coworkers performed growth factor studies that showed PKC signaling and actin microfilament organization appears to be sensitive to microgravity, suggesting that the inhibition of signal transduction by microgravity may be related to alterations in actin microfilament organization. However, similar studies have not been done for vascular cells. Vascular endothelial cells play critical roles in providing nutrients to organ and tissues and in wound repair. The major deterrent to ground-based microgravity studies is that it is impossible to achieved true microgravity for longer than a few minutes on earth. Hence, it has not been possible to conduct prolonged microgravity studies except for two models that simulate certain aspects of microgravity. However, hypergravity is quite easily achieved. Several researchers have shown that hypergravity will increase the proliferation of several different cell lines while decreasing cell motility and slowing liver regeneration following partial hepatectomy, These studies indicate the hypergravity also alters the behavior of most cells. Several investigators have shown that hypergravity affects the activation of several protein kinases (PKs) in cells. In this study, we investigated whether hypergravity alters the expression of f-actin by bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs) and the role of PK's (calmodulin 11 dependent, PKA and PKC) as mediators of these effects.

  11. Micro-to-nano biomechanical modeling for assisted biological cell injection.

    PubMed

    Ladjal, Hamid; Hanus, Jean-Luc; Ferreira, Antoine

    2013-09-01

    To facilitate training of biological cell injection operations, we are developing an interactive virtual environment to simulate needle insertion into biological cells. This paper presents methodologies for dynamic modeling, visual/haptic display, and model validation of cell injection. We first investigate the challenging issues in the modeling of the biomechanical properties of living cells. We propose two dynamic models to simulate cell deformation and puncture. The first approach is based on the assumptions that the mechanical response of living cells is mainly determined by the cytoskeleton and that the cytoskeleton is organized as a tensegrity structure including microfilaments, microtubules, and intermediate filaments. Equivalent microtubules struts are represented with a linear mass-tensor finite-element model and equivalent microfilaments and intermediate filaments with viscoelastic Kelvin-Voigt elements. The second modeling method assumes the overall cell as an homogeneous hyperelastic model (St, Venant-Kirchhoff). Both graphic and haptic rendering are provided in real time to the operator through a 3-D virtual environment. Simulated responses are compared to experimental data to show the effectiveness of the proposed physically based model. PMID:23613019

  12. Non linear behaviour of cell tensegrity models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alippi, A.; Bettucci, A.; Biagioni, A.; Conclusio, D.; D'Orazio, A.; Germano, M.; Passeri, D.

    2012-05-01

    Tensegrity models for the cytoskeleton structure of living cells is largely used nowadays for interpreting the biochemical response of living tissues to mechanical stresses. Microtubules, microfilaments and filaments are the microscopic cell counterparts of struts (microtubules) and cables (microfilaments and filaments) in the macroscopic world: the formers oppose to compression, the latters to tension, thus yielding an overall structure, light and highly deformable. Specific cell surface receptors, such as integrins, act as the coupling elements that transmit the outside mechanical stress state into the cell body. Reversible finite deformations of tensegrity structures have been widely demonstrated experimentally and in a number of living cell simulations. In the present paper, the bistability behaviour of two general models, the linear bar oscillator and the icosahedron, is studied, as they are both obtained from mathematical simulation, the former, and from larger scale experiments, the latter. The discontinuity in the frequency response of the oscillation amplitude and the lateral bending of the resonance curves are put in evidence, as it grows larger as the driving amplitude increases, respectively.

  13. The organelle of differentiation in embryos: the cell state splitter.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Natalie K; Gordon, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The cell state splitter is a membraneless organelle at the apical end of each epithelial cell in a developing embryo. It consists of a microfilament ring and an intermediate filament ring subtending a microtubule mat. The microtubules and microfilament ring are in mechanical opposition as in a tensegrity structure. The cell state splitter is bistable, perturbations causing it to contract or expand radially. The intermediate filament ring provides metastability against small perturbations. Once this snap-through organelle is triggered, it initiates signal transduction to the nucleus, which changes gene expression in one of two readied manners, causing its cell to undergo a step of determination and subsequent differentiation. The cell state splitter also triggers the cell state splitters of adjacent cells to respond, resulting in a differentiation wave. Embryogenesis may be represented then as a bifurcating differentiation tree, each edge representing one cell type. In combination with the differentiation waves they propagate, cell state splitters explain the spatiotemporal course of differentiation in the developing embryo. This review is excerpted from and elaborates on "Embryogenesis Explained" (World Scientific Publishing, Singapore, 2016). PMID:26965444

  14. Transport of Motor Proteins along Microtubules: A Study by Optical Trapping Method and Analysis of Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarlane, Angelique

    The cellular transportation is fundamental for cell function. Under this transportation, organelles bind to motor proteins. These proteins, then move along cellular microfilaments such as microtubules. The optical trapping technique is a method that allows us to monitor the movement of molecular motors along their tracks. In this method, motor proteins are absorbed by micro-sized beads. The beads are captured by the laser and placed close to the microfilaments. Consequently, the motor proteins bind to the track and move along them. This motion can be recorded and analyzed. In this work, we have analyzed many produced trajectories resulted from the motion of a single kinesin along microtubules. We present the design of the experiment, the method of recording and extracting data, as well as the factors that need to be considered to obtain accurate results. Finally, we calculated some of the physical properties resulted from kinesin movement in our experiment. Our outcomes are compatible with previously reported results. I acknowledge the support of NJSGC 2016 during this project. This work was conducted under the supervision of Dr. Mitra Feizabadi.

  15. Single-molecule imaging of {beta}-actin mRNAs in the cytoplasm of a living cell

    SciTech Connect

    Yamagishi, Mai; Ishihama, Yo; Shirasaki, Yoshitaka; Kurama, Hideki; Funatsu, Takashi

    2009-04-15

    {beta}-Actin mRNA labeled with an MS2-EGFP fusion protein was expressed in chicken embryo fibroblasts and its localization and movement were analyzed by single-molecule imaging. Most {beta}-Actin mRNAs localized to the leading edge, while some others were observed in the perinuclear region. Singe-molecule tracking of individual mRNAs revealed that the majority of mRNAs were in unrestricted Brownian motion at the leading edge and in restricted Brownian motion in the perinuclear region. The macroscopic diffusion coefficient of mRNA (D{sub MACRO}) at the leading edge was 0.3 {mu}m{sup 2}/s. On the other hand, D{sub MACRO} in the perinuclear region was 0.02 {mu}m{sup 2}/s. The destruction of microfilaments with cytochalasin D, which is known to delocalize {beta}-actin mRNAs, led to an increase in D{sub MACRO} to 0.2 {mu}m{sup 2}/s in the perinuclear region. These results suggest that the microstructure, composed of microfilaments, serves as a barrier for the movement of {beta}-actin mRNA.

  16. Phenotypes of Aging Postovulatory Oocytes After Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer in Mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ah Reum; Shimoike, Takashi; Wakayama, Teruhiko; Kishigami, Satoshi

    2016-06-01

    Oocytes rapidly lose their developmental potential after ovulation, termed postovulatory oocyte aging, and often exhibit characteristic phenotypes, such as cytofragmentation, abnormal spindle shapes, and chromosome misalignments. Here, we reconstructed mouse oocytes using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) to reveal the effect of somatic cell-derived nuclei on oocyte physiology during aging. Normal oocytes started undergoing cytofragmentation 24 hours after oocyte collection; however, this occurred earlier in SCNT oocytes and was more severe at 48 hours, suggesting that the transferred somatic cell nuclei affected oocyte physiology. We found no difference in the status of acetylated α-tubulin (Ac-Tub) and α-tubulin (Tub) between normal and SCNT aging oocytes, but unlike normal oocytes, aging SCNT oocytes did not have astral microtubules. Interestingly, aging SCNT oocytes displayed more severely scattered chromosomes or irregularly shaped spindles. Observations of the microfilaments showed that, in normal oocytes, there was a clear actin ring beneath the plasma membrane and condensed microfilaments around the spindle (the actin cap) at 0 hours, and the actin filaments started degenerating at 1 hour, becoming completely disrupted and distributed to the cytoplasm at 24 hours. By contrast, in SCNT oocytes, an actin cap formed around the transplanted nuclei within 1 hour of SCNT, which was still present at 24 hours. Thus, SCNT oocytes age in a similar but distinct way, suggesting that they not only contain nuclei with abnormal epigenetics but are also physiologically different. PMID:27253626

  17. Altered Membrane Dynamics of Quantum Dot-Conjugated Integrins during Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Bone Marrow Derived Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hongfeng; Titushkin, Igor; Stroscio, Michael; Cho, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Functionalized quantum dots offer several advantages for tracking the motion of individual molecules on the cell surface, including selective binding, precise optical identification of cell surface molecules, and detailed examination of the molecular motion without photobleaching. We have used quantum dots conjugated with integrin antibodies and performed studies to quantitatively demonstrate changes in the integrin dynamics during osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow derived progenitor cells (BMPCs). Consistent with the unusually strong BMPC adhesion previously observed, integrins on the surface of undifferentiated BMPC were found in clusters and the lateral diffusion was slow (e.g., ∼10−11 cm2/s). At times as early as those after a 3-day incubation in the osteogenic differentiation media, the integrin diffusion coefficients increased by an order of magnitude, and the integrin dynamics became indistinguishable from that measured on the surface of terminally differentiated human osteoblasts. Furthermore, microfilaments in BMPCs consisted of atypically thick bundles of stress fibers that were responsible for restricting the integrin lateral mobility. Studies using laser optical tweezers showed that, unlike fully differentiated osteoblasts, the BMPC cytoskeleton is weakly associated with its cell membrane. Based on these findings, it appears likely that the altered integrin dynamics is correlated with BMPC differentiation and that the integrin lateral mobility is restricted by direct links to microfilaments. PMID:17114225

  18. Altered membrane dynamics of quantum dot-conjugated integrins during osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow derived progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongfeng; Titushkin, Igor; Stroscio, Michael; Cho, Michael

    2007-02-15

    Functionalized quantum dots offer several advantages for tracking the motion of individual molecules on the cell surface, including selective binding, precise optical identification of cell surface molecules, and detailed examination of the molecular motion without photobleaching. We have used quantum dots conjugated with integrin antibodies and performed studies to quantitatively demonstrate changes in the integrin dynamics during osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow derived progenitor cells (BMPCs). Consistent with the unusually strong BMPC adhesion previously observed, integrins on the surface of undifferentiated BMPC were found in clusters and the lateral diffusion was slow (e.g., approximately 10(-11) cm2/s). At times as early as those after a 3-day incubation in the osteogenic differentiation media, the integrin diffusion coefficients increased by an order of magnitude, and the integrin dynamics became indistinguishable from that measured on the surface of terminally differentiated human osteoblasts. Furthermore, microfilaments in BMPCs consisted of atypically thick bundles of stress fibers that were responsible for restricting the integrin lateral mobility. Studies using laser optical tweezers showed that, unlike fully differentiated osteoblasts, the BMPC cytoskeleton is weakly associated with its cell membrane. Based on these findings, it appears likely that the altered integrin dynamics is correlated with BMPC differentiation and that the integrin lateral mobility is restricted by direct links to microfilaments.

  19. Contact-dependent cytopathogenic mechanisms of Trichomonas vaginalis

    SciTech Connect

    Krieger, J.N.; Ravdin, J.I.; Rein, M.F.

    1985-12-01

    The cytopathogenic mechanisms of Trichomonas vaginalis have been debated since the 1940s. We examined the following three proposed pathogenic mechanisms: contact-dependent extracellular killing, cytophagocytosis, and extracellular cytotoxins. Serial observations of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell monolayers exposed to trichomonads revealed that (i) trichomonads form clumps, (ii) the clumps adhere to cells in culture, and (iii) monolayer destruction occurs only in areas of contact with T. vaginalis. Kinetic analysis of target cell killing by trichomonads revealed that the probability of CHO cell death was related to the probability of contact with T. vaginalis, supporting the observation by microscopy that trichomonads kill cells only by direct contact. Simultaneous studies of /sup 111/indium oxine label release from CHO cells and trypan blue dye exclusion demonstrated that T. vaginalis kills target cells without phagocytosis. Filtrates of trichomonad cultures or from media in which trichomonads were killing CHO cells had no effect on CHO cell monolayers, indicating that trichomonads do not kill cells by a cell-free or secreted cytotoxin. The microfilament inhibitor cytochalasin D (10 micrograms/ml) inhibited trichomonad killing of CHO cell monolayers by 80% (P less than 0.0001). In contrast, the microtubule inhibitor vinblastine (10(-6) M) caused only 17% inhibition of trichomonad destruction of CHO cell monolayers (P less than 0.020), whereas colchicine (10(-6) M) had no effect. T. vaginalis kills target cells by direct contact without phagocytosis. This event requires intact trichomonad microfilament function; microtubule function appears not to be essential.

  20. Arabidopsis FH1 Formin Affects Cotyledon Pavement Cell Shape by Modulating Cytoskeleton Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Rosero, Amparo; Oulehlová, Denisa; Stillerová, Lenka; Schiebertová, Petra; Grunt, Michal; Žárský, Viktor; Cvrčková, Fatima

    2016-03-01

    Plant cell morphogenesis involves concerted rearrangements of microtubules and actin microfilaments. We previously reported that FH1, the main Arabidopsis thaliana housekeeping Class I membrane-anchored formin, contributes to actin dynamics and microtubule stability in rhizodermis cells. Here we examine the effects of mutations affecting FH1 (At3g25500) on cell morphogenesis and above-ground organ development in seedlings, as well as on cytoskeletal organization and dynamics, using a combination of confocal and variable angle epifluorescence microscopy with a pharmacological approach. Homozygous fh1 mutants exhibited cotyledon epinasty and had larger cotyledon pavement cells with more pronounced lobes than the wild type. The pavement cell shape alterations were enhanced by expression of the fluorescent microtubule marker GFP-microtubule-associated protein 4 (MAP4). Mutant cotyledon pavement cells exhibited reduced density and increased stability of microfilament bundles, as well as enhanced dynamics of microtubules. Analogous results were also obtained upon treatments with the formin inhibitor SMIFH2 (small molecule inhibitor of formin homology 2 domains). Pavement cell shape in wild-type (wt) and fh1 plants in some situations exhibited a differential response towards anti-cytoskeletal drugs, especially the microtubule disruptor oryzalin. Our observations indicate that FH1 participates in the control of microtubule dynamics, possibly via its effects on actin, subsequently influencing cell morphogenesis and macroscopic organ development.

  1. Progressive hair straightening using an automated flat iron: function of silicones.

    PubMed

    Dussaud, Anne; Rana, Bhavna; Lam, Hui Tung

    2013-01-01

    An automated hair iron was built with which the hair temperature, contact force of the iron against the hair tress, and gliding speed were controlled. The changes in keratin were characterized by several techniques including differential scanning calorimetry, birefringence measurements, and wet tensile tests. Undamaged curly hair was ironed for several iron cycles at temperatures ranging from 120°C to 175°C and washed between each iron cycle. Irreversible straightening of curly hair was observed and depended on the temperature and the number of cycles. The birefringence data suggested that the straightening was related to a gradual decrease of the microfilament organization. Silicone treatment did not significantly affect the course of microfilament denaturation, but it improved the quality of straightening. It enhanced the fiber alignment under the gliding action of the iron. Progressive thermal straightening may be a promising method to achieve permanent smoothing of curly hair without chemical treatment. Ironing at the onset temperature (∼154°C), before substantial disulfide bond scission occurred, seemed to be a good compromise between process speed, straightening performance, and hair integrity (i.e., reduced loss of cross-linking). PMID:23578835

  2. Altering Intracellular pH Disrupts Development and Cellular Organization in Preimplantation Hamster Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Squirrell, Jayne M.; Lane, Michelle; Bavister, Barry D.

    2016-01-01

    In early cleavage stage hamster embryos, the inability to regulate intracellular pH (pHi) properly is associated with reduced developmental competence in vitro. The disruption of mitochondrial organization is also correlated with reduced development in vitro. To determine the relationship between pHi and the disruption of cytoplasmic organization, we examined the effects of altering pHi on hamster embryo development, mitochondrial distribution, and cytoskeletal organization. The weak base trimethylamine was used to increase pHi and was found to reduce embryo development and disrupt the perinuclear organization of mitochondria. The weak acid 5,5-dimethyl-2,4-oxazolinedione was used to decrease pHi and was also found to reduce development and disrupt the perinuclear organization of mitochondria. With either treatment, the microfilament organization was perturbed, but the microtubule cytoskeleton was not. However, the temporal progression of the disruption of mitochondrial distribution was more rapid in alkalinized embryos than acidified embryos, as revealed by two-photon imaging of living embryos. Additionally, the disruption of the microfilament network by the two treatments was not identical. The cytoplasmic disruptions observed were not due to acute toxicity of the compounds because embryos recovered developmentally when the treatment compounds were removed. These observations link ionic homeostasis, structural integrity and developmental competence in preimplantation hamster embryos. PMID:11369617

  3. ELECTRON MICROSCOPE AND EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATIONS OF THE NEUROFILAMENTOUS NETWORK IN DEITERS' NEURONS

    PubMed Central

    Metuzals, J.; Mushynski, W. E.

    1974-01-01

    The assembly of filamentous elements and their relations to the plasma membrane and to the nuclear pores have been studied in Deiters' neurons of rabbit brain. Electron microscopy of thin sections and of ectoplasm spread preparations have been integrated with physicochemical experiments and differential interference microscopy of freshly isolated cells. A neurofilamentous network extends as a continuous, three-dimensional, semilattice structure throughout the ectoplasm, the "plasma roads," and the perinuclear zone of the perikaryon. This space network consists of ∼90-Å wide neurofilaments arranged in fascicles which are interconnected by an exchange of neurofilaments. The neurofilaments consist of intercoiled ∼20-Å wide unit-filaments and are associated through cross-associating filaments with other neurofilaments of the fascicle and with microfilaments. The ∼20–50-Å wide microfilaments display intimate associations with the plasma membrane and with the nuclear pores. Electron microscopy of thin sections from glycerinated and heavy meromyosin-treated Deiters' neurons shows that actin-like filaments are present in the pre- and postsynaptic regions of synapses terminating on these neurons. It is proposed that the neurofilamentous space network serves a transducing function by linking plasma membrane activities with the genetic machinery of the neuron. PMID:4599504

  4. Organized F-actin is essential for normal trichome morphogenesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Szymanski, D B; Marks, M D; Wick, S M

    1999-01-01

    Actin microfilaments form a three-dimensional cytoskeletal network throughout the cell and constitute an essential throughway for organelle and vesicle transport. Development of Arabidopsis trichomes, unicellular structures derived from the epidermis, is being used as a genetic system in which to study actin-dependent growth in plant cells. The present study indicates that filamentous actin (F-actin) plays an important role during Arabidopsis trichome morphogenesis. For example, immunolocalization of actin filaments during trichome morphogenesis identified rearrangements of the cytoskeletal structure during the development of the mature cell. Moreover, pharmacological experiments indicate that there are distinct requirements for actin- and microtubule-dependent function during trichome morphogenesis. The F-actin-disrupting drug cytochalasin D does not affect the establishment of polarity during trichome development; however, maintenance and coordination of the normal pattern of cell growth are very sensitive to this drug. In contrast, oryzalin, an agent that depolymerizes microtubules, severely inhibits cell polarization. Furthermore, cytochalasin D treatment phenocopies a known class of mutations that cause distorted trichome morphology. Results of an analysis of cell shape and microfilament structure in wild-type, mutant, and drug-treated trichomes are consistent with a role for actin in the maintenance and coordination of an established growth pattern. PMID:10590162

  5. Rescue of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS)-mediated Sertoli cell injury by overexpression of gap junction protein connexin 43.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Mruk, Dolores D; Chen, Haiqi; Wong, Chris K C; Lee, Will M; Cheng, C Yan

    2016-01-01

    Perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) is an environmental toxicant used in developing countries, including China, as a stain repellent for clothing, carpets and draperies, but it has been banned in the U.S. and Canada since the late 2000s. PFOS perturbed the Sertoli cell tight junction (TJ)-permeability barrier, causing disruption of actin microfilaments in cell cytosol, perturbing the localization of cell junction proteins (e.g., occluden-ZO-1, N-cadherin-ß-catenin). These changes destabilized Sertoli cell blood-testis barrier (BTB) integrity. These findings suggest that human exposure to PFOS might induce BTB dysfunction and infertility. Interestingly, PFOS-induced Sertoli cell injury associated with a down-regulation of the gap junction (GJ) protein connexin43 (Cx43). We next investigated if overexpression of Cx43 in Sertoli cells could rescue the PFOS-induced cell injury. Indeed, overexpression of Cx43 in Sertoli cells with an established TJ-barrier blocked the disruption in PFOS-induced GJ-intercellular communication, resulting in the re-organization of actin microfilaments, which rendered them similar to those in control cells. Furthermore, cell adhesion proteins that utilized F-actin for attachment became properly distributed at the cell-cell interface, resealing the disrupted TJ-barrier. In summary, Cx43 is a good target that might be used to manage PFOS-induced reproductive dysfunction. PMID:27436542

  6. Dynamic study of cell mechanical and structural responses to rapid changes of calcium level.

    PubMed

    Richelme, F; Benoliel, A M; Bongrand, P

    2000-02-01

    Cell shape control is complex since it may involve multiple cytoskeletal components and metabolic pathways. Here we present a kinetic study of the mechanical and structural responses of cells from the monocytic THP-1 line to a rapid increase of cytosolic calcium level. Cells were exposed to ionomycin in a medium of varying calcium concentration and they were probed at regular intervals for (1) cortical rigidity as determined with micropipette aspiration, and (2) content and distribution of polymerized actin, myosin or ABP-280, as determined with flow cytometry and/or confocal microscopy. An increase of free intracellular calcium level induced: (1) a biphasic deformability change with marked stiffening within a second, and significant softening a minute later; (2) a biphasic change of actin polymerization with initial decrease (within less than a second) and rapid recovery (within a few seconds); (3) a topographical redistribution of microfilaments with an oscillatory behavior of the cortical fraction, while no substantial redistribution of myosin or ABP-280 was detected. It is suggested that a regulation of cell rigidity might be achieved without any structural change by suitable modulation of the lifetime of bridges formed between microfilaments by actin binding proteins.

  7. Identification of icsA, a plasmid locus of Shigella flexneri that governs bacterial intra- and intercellular spread through interaction with F-actin.

    PubMed Central

    Bernardini, M L; Mounier, J; d'Hauteville, H; Coquis-Rondon, M; Sansonetti, P J

    1989-01-01

    The capacity of Shigella to spread within the cytosol of infected epithelial cells and to infect adjacent cells is critical for the development of infection foci, which lead to mucosal abscesses. Shigella is a nonmotile microorganism that appears to utilize host cell microfilaments to generate intra- as well as intercellular movements, since this movement was inhibited by cytochalasin D and involvement of F-actin was demonstrated by direct labeling of infected cells with the specific dye N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)phallacidin. Such movements led to the formation of extracellular protrusions, which may explain cell to cell spread. icsA, a locus necessary for intra- and intercellular spread, was identified on the Shigella flexneri virulence plasmid pWR100. This locus was cloned and shown to express a 120-kDa outer membrane protein, which plays an important role in the interactions established between host cell microfilaments and the bacterial surface, thus leading to intracellular movement. Images PMID:2542950

  8. Mechanisms involved in the blood-testis barrier increased permeability induced by EMP.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Wu; Ding, Gui-Rong; Shi, Chang-Hong; Zeng, Li-Hua; Liu, Jun-Ye; Li, Jing; Zhao, Tao; Chen, Yong-Bin; Guo, Guo-Zhen

    2010-09-30

    The blood-testis barrier (BTB) plays an important role in male reproductive system. Lots of environmental stimulations can increase the permeability of BTB and then result in antisperm antibody (AsAb) generation, which is a key step in male immune infertility. Here we reported the results of male mice exposed to electromagnetic pulse (EMP) by measuring the expression of tight-junction-associated proteins (ZO-1 and Occludin), vimentin microfilaments, and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta3) as well as AsAb level in serum. Male BALB/c mice were sham exposed or exposed to EMP at two different intensities (200kV/m and 400kV/m) for 200 pulses. The testes were collected at different time points after EMP exposure. Immunofluorescence histocytochemistry, western blotting, laser confocal microscopy and RT-PCR were used in this study. Compared with sham group, the expression of ZO-1 and TGF-beta3 significantly decreased accompanied with unevenly stained vimentin microfilaments and increased serum AsAb levels in EMP-exposed mice. These results suggest a potential BTB injury and immune infertility in male mice exposed to a certain intensity of EMP.

  9. Heavy metal effects on cellular shape changes, cleavage, and larval development of the marine gastropod mollusk, (Ilyanassa obsoleta Say)

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad, G.W.

    1988-07-01

    The spawning areas for many marine invertebrates are in intertidal zones which can be exposed to surface water run-off containing heavy metals. The cellular shape changes and cleavage patterns of Ilyanassa embryos greatly resemble those of bivalve mollusks, such as Mytilus edulis, that occur in the same intertidal areas. Determining the concentrations of heavy metals tolerated by the molluscan embryos inhabiting such clam and mussel beds therefore is of some economic significance. Moreover, such research may providedata on the heavy metal effects on the cytoskeleton. There is increasing evidence that components of the cytoskeleton, directly or indirectly, are targets for toxic agents. Polar lobe formation is a cellular shape change that resembles cytokinesis. It is seen in the fertilized eggs of many marine mollusks. Recent data with inorganic and organic Ca/sup 2 +/ antagonists suggest that both polar lobe formation and cytokinesis utilize Ca/sup 2 +/ released from sequestered, intracellular sites. Both of these cellular constrictions are associated with microfilaments and are preceded by activation steps requiring microtubules. The data presented below suggest that several heavy metals affect the microfilament-dependent steps.

  10. Cytoskeleton modifications and autophagy induction in TCam-2 seminoma cells exposed to simulated microgravity.

    PubMed

    Ferranti, Francesca; Caruso, Maria; Cammarota, Marcella; Masiello, Maria Grazia; Corano Scheri, Katia; Fabrizi, Cinzia; Fumagalli, Lorenzo; Schiraldi, Chiara; Cucina, Alessandra; Catizone, Angela; Ricci, Giulia

    2014-01-01

    The study of how mechanical forces may influence cell behavior via cytoskeleton remodeling is a relevant challenge of nowadays that may allow us to define the relationship between mechanics and biochemistry and to address the larger problem of biological complexity. An increasing amount of literature data reported that microgravity condition alters cell architecture as a consequence of cytoskeleton structure modifications. Herein, we are reporting the morphological, cytoskeletal, and behavioral modifications due to the exposition of a seminoma cell line (TCam-2) to simulated microgravity. Even if no differences in cell proliferation and apoptosis were observed after 24 hours of exposure to simulated microgravity, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis revealed that the change of gravity vector significantly affects TCam-2 cell surface morphological appearance. Consistent with this observation, we found that microtubule orientation is altered by microgravity. Moreover, the confocal analysis of actin microfilaments revealed an increase in the cell width induced by the low gravitational force. Microtubules and microfilaments have been related to autophagy modulation and, interestingly, we found a significant autophagic induction in TCam-2 cells exposed to simulated microgravity. This observation is of relevant interest because it shows, for the first time, TCam-2 cell autophagy as a biological response induced by a mechanical stimulus instead of a biochemical one.

  11. beta-Dystroglycan modulates the interplay between actin and microtubules in human-adhered platelets.

    PubMed

    Cerecedo, Doris; Cisneros, Bulmaro; Suárez-Sánchez, Rocío; Hernández-González, Enrique; Galván, Iván

    2008-05-01

    To maintain the continuity of an injured blood vessel, platelets change shape, secrete granule contents, adhere, aggregate, and retract in a haemostatic plug. Ordered arrays of microtubules, microfilaments, and associated proteins are responsible for these platelet responses. In full-spread platelets, microfilament bundles in association with other cytoskeleton proteins are anchored in focal contacts. Recent studies in migrating cells suggest that co-ordination and direct physical interaction of microtubules and actin network modulate adhesion development. In platelets, we have proposed a feasible association between these two cytoskeletal systems, as well as the participation of the dystrophin-associated protein complex, as part of the focal adhesion complex. The present study analysed the participation of microtubules and actin during the platelet adhesion process. Confocal microscopy, fluorescence resonance transfer energy and immunoprecipitation assays were used to provide evidence of a cross-talk between these two cytoskeletal systems. Interestingly, beta-dystroglycan was found to act as an interplay protein between actin and microtubules and an additional communication between these two cytoskeleton networks was maintained through proteins of focal adhesion complex. Altogether our data are indicative of a dynamic co-participation of actin filaments and microtubules in modulating focal contacts to achieve platelet function.

  12. Hyperthermia effects on the cytoskeleton and on cell morphology.

    PubMed

    Coakley, W T

    1987-01-01

    Human erythrocyte ghost membranes undergo five thermal transitions at temperatures between 50 and 75 degrees C. Spontaneous fragmentation of whole cells occurs at 50 degrees C, a transition temperature which has been associated with denaturation of the cytoskeletal protein spectrin. Haemolysis occurs at 65 degrees C and microvesiculation of the resulting ghost membrane is seen at temperatures in excess of 70 degrees C. The cell fragmentation develops through spatially periodic growth of surface waves on the erythrocyte membrane. The interfacial instability associated with the surface wave growth arises from thermal impairment of the stabilizing function of spectrin. Interfacial instability is also associated with the beading pattern which arises when long processes drawn mechanically from erythrocytes are heated. Similar beading of cell processes is a feature of many cytoskeleton-weakening agents acting on nonerythroid cells. The complexities of the cytoskeletons of eucaryotic cells including structure, composition and interaction of cytoskeletal microfilaments, microtubules and intermediate filaments, both with each other and with the cell membrane, are outlined. Attention is drawn to the importance of the function of proteins which interact with the cytoskeletal elements and to the influence of calcium concentration on those proteins. Actin monomers are denatured (and are no longer polymerizable) at temperatures a few degrees above the growth temperature of the cell source of the actins. Actin in the filament form requires much higher denaturation temperatures. This greater thermal lability of actin monomers would be expected to result (because of treadmilling in microfilaments) in a gradual depolymerization of the filaments. Depolymerization of microtubules occurs at temperatures close to the cell growth temperature and may be dependent on a thermal effect on microtubule-associated proteins. The response of spread interphase mammalian cells to temperatures

  13. Metabolic and cytoskeletal modulation of transferrin receptor mobility in mitogen-activated human lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Galbraith, G M; Galbraith, R M

    1980-01-01

    The transferrin receptors which appear on mitogen-activated human peripheral blood lymphocytes were found by the use of immunofluorescence techniques to display temperature-dependent patching and capping reactions upon binding of transferrin. Lateral mobility of ligand-occupied membrane sites was accompanied by both shedding and endocytosis of receptor-transferrin complexes. In the presence of sodium azide or the microfilament inhibitor cytochalasin B, cap formation and shedding were markedly inhibited. In contrast, endocytosis of patched receptor-ligand complexes was inhibited by azide and microtubule inhibitors, including colchicine, vinblastine and vincristine. Co-capping experiments performed to elucidate further the alterations in membrane configuration involved in these reactions failed to reveal any topographical relationship between transferrin receptors and lectin-binding sites in these cells. These studied indicate that temperature-dependent mobility of transferrin receptors upon mitogen-activated peripheral blood lymphocytes is dependent upon the integrity of the cytoskeletal system and metabolic function of the cell. PMID:6258830

  14. Polygonal networks, "geodomes", of adult rat hepatocytes in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Y; Furukawa, K; Mitaka, T; Yokoi, T; Kodama, T

    1988-01-01

    Polygonal networks, "geodomes", in cultured hepatocytes of adult rats were examined by both light and electron microscopy. On light microscopical examinations of specimens stained with Coomassie blue after the treatment with Triton X-100, the networks were detected 5 days after culture, which consisted of triangles arranged mainly in hexagonal patterns. They surrounded main cell body, looking like a headband, or were occasionally situated over nuclei, looking like a geodesic dome. Scanning electron microscopical observations after Triton treatment revealed that these structures were located underneath surface membrane. Transmission electron microscopical investigations revealed that the connecting fibers of networks consisted of microfilaments which radiated in a compact bundle from electron-dense vertices. PMID:3396075

  15. In vitro phagocytosis and intracellular survival of Campylobacter jejuni with phagocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kiehlbauch, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    In vitro phagocytosis and intracellular survival of Campylobacter jejuni was studied using three types of mononuclear phagocytes: a J774G8 peritoneal macrophage line, resident BABL/c peritoneal macrophages and human peripheral blood monocytes. In phagocytosis assays using CFU determinations, phagocytosis increased steadily over an 8 hr time period. Results obtained using a /sup 51/Cr assay indicated no consistent significant difference between phagocytosis of C. jejuni between the three mononuclear phagocytes or PMN's and that maximum infection occurred prior to 0.5 hr and maintained throughout the 4 hr assay. Further investigation of the mechanism of attachment and entry of C. jejuni revealed this process required the expenditure of energy by the phagocyte, but was not inhibited by inhibitors of microfilament functions. In addition, phagocytosis was enhanced by the presence of 20% FCS,

  16. The cytoskeleton of digitonin-treated rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Fiskum, G; Craig, S W; Decker, G L; Lehninger, A L

    1980-06-01

    Treatment of isolated rat hepatocptes with low concentrations of digitonin increases the permeability of the plsma membrane to cytosolic proteins without causing release of organelles such as mitochondria into the surrounding medium. Electron microscopy showed that treatment of the cells with increasing concentations of digitonin results in a progressive loss in the continuity of the plasma membrane, while most other aspects of cellular morphology remain normal. Depletion of background staining material from the cytosol by digitonin treatment of the cells greatly enhances the visualization of the cytoskeleton. The use of this technique, together with immunofluorescent light microscopy, has verified the presence of an actin-containing filamentous network at the hepatocyte cortex as well as intermediate filaments distributed throughout the cell. Digitonin is thus useful both for selectively permeabilizing the plasma membrane and for intensifying the appearance of intracellular structures such as microfilaments that are normally difficult to observe in cells such as hepatocytes.

  17. Millijoule femtosecond micro-Bessel beams for ultra-high aspect ratio machining.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Sambit; Chanal, Margaux; Clady, Raphaël; Mouskeftaras, Alexandros; Grojo, David

    2015-08-20

    We report on a functional experimental design for Bessel beam generation capable of handling high-energy ultrashort pulses (up to 1.2 mJ per pulse of 50 fs duration). This allows us to deliver intensities exceeding the breakdown threshold for air or any dielectric along controlled micro-filaments with lengths exceeding 4 mm. It represents an unprecedented upscaling in comparison to recent femtosecond Bessel beam micromachining experiments. We produce void microchannels through glass substrates to demonstrate that aspect ratios exceeding 1200∶1 can be achieved by using single high-intensity pulses. This demonstration must lead to new methodologies for deep-drilling and high-speed cutting applications.

  18. Nanocapillarity-mediated magnetic assembly of nanoparticles into ultraflexible filaments and reconfigurable networks.

    PubMed

    Bharti, Bhuvnesh; Fameau, Anne-Laure; Rubinstein, Michael; Velev, Orlin D

    2015-11-01

    The fabrication of multifunctional materials with tunable structure and properties requires programmed binding of their building blocks. For example, particles organized in long-ranged structures by external fields can be bound permanently into stiff chains through electrostatic or van der Waals attraction, or into flexible chains through soft molecular linkers such as surface-grafted DNA or polymers. Here, we show that capillarity-mediated binding between magnetic nanoparticles coated with a liquid lipid shell can be used for the assembly of ultraflexible microfilaments and network structures. These filaments can be magnetically regenerated on mechanical damage, owing to the fluidity of the capillary bridges between nanoparticles and their reversible binding on contact. Nanocapillary forces offer opportunities for assembling dynamically reconfigurable multifunctional materials that could find applications as micromanipulators, microbots with ultrasoft joints, or magnetically self-repairing gels.

  19. F-actin crosslinker: A key player for the mechanical stability of filopodial protrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tong; Oloyede, Adekunle; Gu, Y. T.

    2013-12-01

    Filopodial protrusion initiates cell migration, which decides the fate of cells in biological environments. In order to understand the structural stability of ultra-slender filopodial protrusion, we have developed an explicit modeling strategy that can study both static and dynamic characteristics of microfilament bundles. Our study reveals that the stability of filopodial protrusions is dependent on the density of F-actin crosslinkers. This cross-linkage strategy is a requirement for the optimization of cell structures, resulting in the provision and maintenance of adequate bending stiffness and buckling resistance while mediating the vibration. This cross-linkage strategy explains the mechanical stability of filopodial protrusion and helps understand the mechanisms of mechanically induced cellular activities.

  20. Bcl-wav and the mitochondrial calcium uniporter drive gastrula morphogenesis in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Prudent, Julien; Popgeorgiev, Nikolay; Bonneau, Benjamin; Thibaut, Julien; Gadet, Rudy; Lopez, Jonathan; Gonzalo, Philippe; Rimokh, Ruth; Manon, Stephen; Houart, Corinne; Herbomel, Philippe; Aouacheria, Abdel; Gillet, Germain

    2013-01-01

    Bcl-2 proteins are acknowledged as key regulators of programmed cell death. However, increasing data suggest additional roles, including regulation of the cell cycle, metabolism and cytoskeletal dynamics. Here we report the discovery and characterization of a new Bcl-2-related multidomain apoptosis accelerator, Bcl-wav, found in fish and frogs. Genetic and molecular studies in zebrafish indicate that Bcl-wav and the recently identified mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) contribute to the formation of the notochord axis by controlling blastomere convergence and extension movements during gastrulation. Furthermore, we found that Bcl-wav controls intracellular Ca(2+) trafficking by acting on the mitochondrial voltage-dependent anion channel, and possibly on MCU, with direct consequences on actin microfilament dynamics and blastomere migration guidance. Thus, from an evolutionary point of view, the original function of Bcl-2 proteins might have been to contribute in controlling the global positioning system of blastomeres during gastrulation, a critical step in metazoan development.

  1. Mechanotransduction Across the Cell Surface and Through the Cytoskeleton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ning; Butler, James P.; Ingber, Donald E.

    1993-05-01

    Mechanical stresses were applied directly to cell surface receptors with a magnetic twisting device. The extracellular matrix receptor, integrin β_1, induced focal adhesion formation and supported a force-dependent stiffening response, whereas nonadhesion receptors did not. The cytoskeletal stiffness (ratio of stress to strain) increased in direct proportion to the applied stress and required intact microtubules and intermediate filaments as well as microfilaments. Tensegrity models that incorporate mechanically interdependent struts and strings that reorient globally in response to a localized stress mimicked this response. These results suggest that integrins act as mechanoreceptors and transmit mechanical signals to the cytoskeleton. Mechanotransduction, in turn, may be mediated simultaneously at multiple locations inside the cell through force-induced rearrangements within a tensionally integrated cytoskeleton.

  2. Perversions with a twist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Pedro E. S.; Trigueiros, Joao L.; Trindade, Ana C.; Simoes, Ricardo; Dias, Ricardo G.; Godinho, Maria Helena; de Abreu, Fernao Vistulo

    2016-03-01

    Perversions connecting two helices with symmetric handedness are a common occurrence in nature, for example in tendrils. These defects can be found in our day life decorating ribbon gifts or when plants use tendrils to attach to a support. Perversions arise when clamped elastic filaments coil into a helical shape but have to conserve zero overall twist. We investigate whether other types of perversions exist and if they display different properties. Here we show mathematically and experimentally that a continuous range of different perversions can exist and present different geometries. Experimentally, different perversions were generated using micro electrospun fibres. Our experimental results also confirm that these perversions behave differently upon release and adopt different final configurations. These results also demonstrate that it is possible to control on demand the formation and shape of microfilaments, in particular, of electrospun fibres by using ultraviolet light.

  3. JVG9, a benzimidazole derivative, alters the surface and cytoskeleton of Trypanosoma cruzi bloodstream trypomastigotes

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Chiguer, Dylan L; Hernández-Luis, Francisco; Nogueda-Torres, Benjamín; Castillo, Rafael; Reynoso-Ducoing, Olivia; Hernández-Campos, Alicia; Ambrosio, Javier R

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi has a particular cytoskeleton that consists of a subpellicular network of microtubules and actin microfilaments. Therefore, it is an excellent target for the development of new anti-parasitic drugs. Benzimidazole 2-carbamates, a class of well-known broad-spectrum anthelmintics, have been shown to inhibit the in vitro growth of many protozoa. Therefore, to find efficient anti-trypanosomal (trypanocidal) drugs, our group has designed and synthesised several benzimidazole derivatives. One, named JVG9 (5-chloro-1H-benzimidazole-2-thiol), has been found to be effective against T. cruzi bloodstream trypomastigotes under both in vitro and in vivo conditions. Here, we present the in vitro effects observed by laser scanning confocal and scanning electron microscopy on T. cruzi trypomastigotes. Changes in the surface and the distribution of the cytoskeletal proteins are consistent with the hypothesis that the trypanocidal activity of JVG9 involves the cytoskeleton as a target. PMID:25317703

  4. Parvovirus particles and movement in the cellular cytoplasm and effects of the cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Lyi, Sangbom Michael; Tan, Min Jie Alvin; Parrish, Colin R

    2014-05-01

    Cell infection by parvoviruses requires that capsids be delivered from outside the cell to the cytoplasm, followed by genome trafficking to the nucleus. Here we microinject capsids into cells that lack receptors and followed their movements within the cell over time. In general the capsids remained close to the positions where they were injected, and most particles did not move to the vicinity of or enter the nucleus. When 70 kDa-dextran was injected along with the capsids that did not enter the nucleus in significant amounts. Capsids conjugated to peptides containing the SV40 large T-antigen nuclear localization signal remained in the cytoplasm, although bovine serum albumen conjugated to the same peptide entered the nucleus rapidly. No effects of disruption of microfilaments, intermediate filaments, or microtubules on the distribution of the capsids were observed. These results suggest that movement of intact capsids within cells is primarily associated with passive processes.

  5. Characterization of Glass Fiber Separator Material for Lithium Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subbarao, S.; Frank, H.

    1984-01-01

    Characterization studies were carried out on a glass fiber paper that is currently employed as a separator material for some LiSOCl2 primary cells. The material is of the non-woven type made from microfilaments of E-type glass and contains an ethyl acrylate binder. Results from extraction studies and tensile testing revealed that the binder content and tensile strength of the paper were significantly less than values specified by the manufacturer. Scanning electron micrographs revealed the presence of clusters of impurities many of which were high in iron content. Results of emission spectroscopy revealed high overall levels of iron and leaching, followed by atomic absorption measurements, revealed that essentially all of this iron is soluble in SOCl2.

  6. Perversions with a twist.

    PubMed

    Silva, Pedro E S; Trigueiros, Joao L; Trindade, Ana C; Simoes, Ricardo; Dias, Ricardo G; Godinho, Maria Helena; de Abreu, Fernao Vistulo

    2016-01-01

    Perversions connecting two helices with symmetric handedness are a common occurrence in nature, for example in tendrils. These defects can be found in our day life decorating ribbon gifts or when plants use tendrils to attach to a support. Perversions arise when clamped elastic filaments coil into a helical shape but have to conserve zero overall twist. We investigate whether other types of perversions exist and if they display different properties. Here we show mathematically and experimentally that a continuous range of different perversions can exist and present different geometries. Experimentally, different perversions were generated using micro electrospun fibres. Our experimental results also confirm that these perversions behave differently upon release and adopt different final configurations. These results also demonstrate that it is possible to control on demand the formation and shape of microfilaments, in particular, of electrospun fibres by using ultraviolet light. PMID:27025549

  7. Perversions with a twist

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Pedro E. S.; Trigueiros, Joao L.; Trindade, Ana C.; Simoes, Ricardo; Dias, Ricardo G.; Godinho, Maria Helena; de Abreu, Fernao Vistulo

    2016-01-01

    Perversions connecting two helices with symmetric handedness are a common occurrence in nature, for example in tendrils. These defects can be found in our day life decorating ribbon gifts or when plants use tendrils to attach to a support. Perversions arise when clamped elastic filaments coil into a helical shape but have to conserve zero overall twist. We investigate whether other types of perversions exist and if they display different properties. Here we show mathematically and experimentally that a continuous range of different perversions can exist and present different geometries. Experimentally, different perversions were generated using micro electrospun fibres. Our experimental results also confirm that these perversions behave differently upon release and adopt different final configurations. These results also demonstrate that it is possible to control on demand the formation and shape of microfilaments, in particular, of electrospun fibres by using ultraviolet light. PMID:27025549

  8. Two Molecules of Lobophorolide Cooperate to Stabilize an Actin Dimer Using Both Their 'Ring' and 'Tail' Region

    SciTech Connect

    Blain, J.; Mok, Y; Kubanek, J; Allingham, J

    2010-01-01

    Actin filament-disrupting marine macrolides are promising templates from which to design therapeutics against cancer and other diseases that co-opt the actin cytoskeleton. Typically, these macrolides form either a 1:1 or 2:1 actin-macrolide complex where their aliphatic side chain, or 'tail', has been reported to convey the major determinant of cytotoxicity. We now report the structure of the marine macrolide lobophorolide bound to actin with a unique 2:2 stoichiometry in which two lobophorolide molecules cooperate to form a dimerization interface that is composed entirely of the macrolide 'ring' region, and each molecule of lobophorolide interacts with both actin subunits via their ring and tail regions to tether the subunits together. This binding mode imposes multiple barriers against microfilament stability and holds important implications for development of actin-targeting drugs and the evolution of macrolide biosynthetic enzymes.

  9. Mechanotransduction across the cell surface and through the cytoskeleton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, N.; Butler, J. P.; Ingber, D. E.

    1993-01-01

    Mechanical stresses were applied directly to cell surface receptors with a magnetic twisting device. The extracellular matrix receptor, integrin beta 1, induced focal adhesion formation and supported a force-dependent stiffening response, whereas nonadhesion receptors did not. The cytoskeletal stiffness (ratio of stress to strain) increased in direct proportion to the applied stress and required intact microtubules and intermediate filaments as well as microfilaments. Tensegrity models that incorporate mechanically interdependent struts and strings that reorient globally in response to a localized stress mimicked this response. These results suggest that integrins act as mechanoreceptors and transmit mechanical signals to the cytoskeleton. Mechanotransduction, in turn, may be mediated simultaneously at multiple locations inside the cell through force-induced rearrangements within a tensionally integrated cytoskeleton.

  10. Impaired mechanical stability, migration and contractile capacity in vimentin-deficient fibroblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckes, B.; Dogic, D.; Colucci-Guyon, E.; Wang, N.; Maniotis, A.; Ingber, D.; Merckling, A.; Langa, F.; Aumailley, M.; Delouvee, A.; Koteliansky, V.; Babinet, C.; Krieg, T.

    1998-01-01

    Loss of a vimentin network due to gene disruption created viable mice that did not differ overtly from wild-type littermates. Here, primary fibroblasts derived from vimentin-deficient (-/-) and wild-type (+/+) mouse embryos were cultured, and biological functions were studied in in vitro systems resembling stress situations. Stiffness of -/- fibroblasts was reduced by 40% in comparison to wild-type cells. Vimentin-deficient cells also displayed reduced mechanical stability, motility and directional migration towards different chemo-attractive stimuli. Reorganization of collagen fibrils and contraction of collagen lattices were severely impaired. The spatial organization of focal contact proteins, as well as actin microfilament organization was disturbed. Thus, absence of a vimentin filament network does not impair basic cellular functions needed for growth in culture, but cells are mechanically less stable, and we propose that therefore they are impaired in all functions depending upon mechanical stability.

  11. Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen-Targeted Photodynamic Therapy Induces Rapid Cytoskeletal Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tiancheng; Wu, Lisa Y.; Berkman, Clifford E.

    2010-01-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), an established enzyme-biomarker for prostate cancer, has attracted considerable attention as a target for imaging and therapeutic applications. We aimed to determine the effects of PSMA-targeted photodynamic therapy (PDT) on cytoskeletal networks in prostate cancer cells. PSMA-targeted PDT resulted in rapid disruption of microtubules (α-/β-tubulin), microfilaments (actin), and intermediate filaments (cytokeratin 8/18) in the cytoplasm of LNCaP cells. The collapse of cytoplasmic microtubules and the later nuclear translocation of α-/β-tubulin were the most dramatic alternation. It is likely that these early changes of cytoskeletal networks are partly involved in the initiation of cell death. PMID:20452720

  12. The effect of length and diameter on the resistivity of bromine intercalated graphite fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.

    1989-01-01

    The resistivity of bromine intercalated graphite fibers has been shown to vary with both the diameter and the length of the fibers. This is due to bromine depletion from the fiber surface. Model calculations assuming a 1.0 micron bromine depletion zone for P-100, and 3.0 microns for vapor-grown graphite fibers fit the respective diameter dependence of their resistivities quite well. Length dependence data imply a bromine depletion zone along the length of P-100 fibers which is also a few microns, but that of vapor grown fibers appears to be as large as 300 microns. Despite these values, microfilaments, which are much smaller than the expected depletion zones, do form residual bromine intercalation compounds with resistivities about one-half of their pristine value.

  13. Relationship between Microtubule Network Structure and Intracellular Transport in Cultured Endothelial Cells Affected by Shear Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, Susumu; Ikezawa, Kenji; Ikeda, Mariko; Tanishita, Kazuo

    Endothelial cells (ECs) that line the inner surface of blood vessels are barriers to the transport of various substances into or from vessel walls, and are continuously exposed to shear stress induced by blood flow in vivo. Shear stress affects the cytoskeleton (e.g., microtubules, microfilaments, intermediate filaments), and affects the transport of macromolecules. Here, the relationship between the microtubule network structure and this transport process for albumin uptake within cultured aortic endothelial cells affected by shear stress was studied. Based on fluorescent images of albumin uptake obtained by using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), both the microtubule network and albumin uptake in ECs were disrupted by colchicine and were affected by shear stress loading.

  14. Gravity and the cell: Intracellular structures and Stokes sedimentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, P.

    1977-01-01

    Plant and certain animal embryos appear to be responsive to the gravity vector during early stages of development. The convection of particle sedimentation as the basis for the sensing of gravity is investigated using the cells of wheat seedlings, amphibian embryos, and mammals. Exploration of the mammalian cell for sedimenting particles reveals that their existence is unlikely, especially in the presence of a network of microtubules and microfilaments considered to be responsible for intracellular organization. Destruction of these structures renders the cell susceptible to accelerations several times g. Large dense particles, such as chromosomes, nucleoli, and cytoplasmic organelles are acted upon by forces much larger than that due to gravity, and their positions in the cell appear to be insensitive to gravity.

  15. Mena–GRASP65 interaction couples actin polymerization to Golgi ribbon linking

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Danming; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Huang, Shijiao; Yuan, Hebao; Li, Jie; Wang, Yanzhuang

    2016-01-01

    In mammalian cells, the Golgi reassembly stacking protein 65 (GRASP65) has been implicated in both Golgi stacking and ribbon linking by forming trans-oligomers through the N-terminal GRASP domain. Because the GRASP domain is globular and relatively small, but the gaps between stacks are large and heterogeneous, it remains puzzling how GRASP65 physically links Golgi stacks into a ribbon. To explore the possibility that other proteins may help GRASP65 in ribbon linking, we used biochemical methods and identified the actin elongation factor Mena as a novel GRASP65-binding protein. Mena is recruited onto the Golgi membranes through interaction with GRASP65. Depleting Mena or disrupting actin polymerization resulted in Golgi fragmentation. In cells, Mena and actin were required for Golgi ribbon formation after nocodazole washout; in vitro, Mena and microfilaments enhanced GRASP65 oligomerization and Golgi membrane fusion. Thus Mena interacts with GRASP65 to promote local actin polymerization, which facilitates Golgi ribbon linking. PMID:26538023

  16. Nanocapillarity-mediated magnetic assembly of nanoparticles into ultraflexible filaments and reconfigurable networks

    PubMed Central

    Bharti, Bhuvnesh; Fameau, Anne-Laure; Rubinstein, Michael; Velev, Orlin D.

    2016-01-01

    The fabrication of multifunctional materials with tunable structure and properties requires programmed binding of their building blocks1,2. For example, particles organized in long-ranged structures by external fields3,4 can be bound permanently into stiff chains through electrostatic or van der Waals attraction4,5, or into flexible chains through soft molecular linkers such as surface-grafted DNA or polymers6–11. Here, we show that capillarity-mediated binding between magnetic nanoparticles coated with a liquid lipid shell can be used for the assembly of ultraflexible microfilaments and network structures. These filaments can be magnetically regenerated on mechanical damage, owing to the fluidity of the capillary bridges between nanoparticles and their reversible binding on contact. Nanocapillary forces offer opportunities for assembling dynamically reconfigurable multifunctional materials that could find applications as micromanipulators, microbots with ultrasoft joints, or magnetically self-repairing gels. PMID:26237128

  17. Neuronal migration in the murine rostral migratory stream requires serum response factor

    PubMed Central

    Alberti, Siegfried; Krause, Sven M.; Kretz, Oliver; Philippar, Ulrike; Lemberger, Thomas; Casanova, Emilio; Wiebel, Franziska F.; Schwarz, Heinz; Frotscher, Michael; Schütz, Günther; Nordheim, Alfred

    2005-01-01

    The central nervous system is fundamentally dependent on guided cell migration, both during development and in adulthood. We report an absolute requirement of the transcription factor serum response factor (SRF) for neuronal migration in the mouse forebrain. Conditional, late-prenatal deletion of Srf causes neurons to accumulate ectopically at the subventricular zone (SVZ), a prime neurogenic region in the brain. SRF-deficient cells of the SVZ exhibit impaired tangential chain migration along the rostral migratory stream into the olfactory bulb. SVZ explants display retarded chain migration in vitro. Regarding target genes, SRF deficiency impairs expression of the β-actin and gelsolin genes, accompanied by reduced cytoskeletal actin fiber density. At the posttranslational level, cofilin, a key regulator of actin dynamics, displays dramatically elevated inhibitory phosphorylation at Ser-3. Our studies indicate that SRF-controlled gene expression directs both the structure and dynamics of the actin microfilament, thereby determining cell-autonomous neuronal migration. PMID:15837932

  18. Cytoskeletal components of Beta vulgaris root hairs in altered gravity fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, G. V.

    Root hairs of Beta vulgaris are protrusions from rhizodermal cells and are characterised by plagiotropic growth. The roles of the cytoskeleton and of gravity in this growth process are being studied with the help of a clinostat. Through the use of immunocytochemical and fluorescent staining methods which reveal microtubules (MTs) and microfilaments (MFs), it was found that these cytoskeletal components of the root hairs of 4-day-old seedlings of B. vulgaris were affected by clinorotation at 2 r.p.m. In control conditions, MTs were found to be distributed evenly throughout the root hair, and an intense fluorescence due to MFs was observed at the tip of the hairs. With clinorotation, however, MTs became distributed at random, though no redistribution of MFs was observed. The latter finding conforms to the idea that MFs are responsible for tip growth. That MTs are more sensitive to altered gravity conditions is presently being tested.

  19. Fine structure and RNA synthesis of Tetrahymena during cytochalasin B inhibition of phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, J R

    1977-01-01

    Cytochalasin B inhibits the formation of normal-sized food vacuoles in Tetrahymena but the cells do not starve. Treated cells differ from starved cells in that they retain a high rate of incorporation of tritiated uridine. Large numbers of smaller vacuoles, about 1 micrometer in diameter, are formed, presumably by pinocytic activity of the cytopharyngeal membrane. This effect may perhaps be due to interference with the mechanism by which food vacuoles are sealed off at the cytostome, in which microfilaments may participate. Inhibited organisms may form tubes continuous with the cytopharynx instead of separate food vacuoles. It is not clear, however, why the formation of the small vacuoles is resistant to the drug.

  20. Cytomegalovirus Restructures Lipid Rafts via a US28/CDC42-Mediated Pathway, Enhancing Cholesterol Efflux from Host Cells.

    PubMed

    Low, Hann; Mukhamedova, Nigora; Cui, Huanhuan L; McSharry, Brian P; Avdic, Selmir; Hoang, Anh; Ditiatkovski, Michael; Liu, Yingying; Fu, Ying; Meikle, Peter J; Blomberg, Martin; Polyzos, Konstantinos A; Miller, William E; Religa, Piotr; Bukrinsky, Michael; Soderberg-Naucler, Cecilia; Slobedman, Barry; Sviridov, Dmitri

    2016-06-28

    Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) contains cholesterol, but how HCMV interacts with host cholesterol metabolism is unknown. We found that, in human fibroblasts, HCMV infection increased the efflux of cellular cholesterol, despite reducing the abundance of ABCA1. Mechanistically, viral protein US28 was acting through CDC42, rearranging actin microfilaments, causing association of actin with lipid rafts, and leading to a dramatic change in the abundance and/or structure of lipid rafts. These changes displaced ABCA1 from the cell surface but created new binding sites for apolipoprotein A-I, resulting in enhanced cholesterol efflux. The changes also reduced the inflammatory response in macrophages. HCMV infection modified the host lipidome profile and expression of several genes and microRNAs involved in cholesterol metabolism. In mice, murine CMV infection elevated plasma triglycerides but did not affect the level and functionality of high-density lipoprotein. Thus, HCMV, through its protein US28, reorganizes lipid rafts and disturbs cell cholesterol metabolism.

  1. Parvovirus particles and movement in the cellular cytoplasm and effects of the cytoskeleton

    SciTech Connect

    Lyi, Sangbom Michael; Tan, Min Jie Alvin Parrish, Colin R.

    2014-05-15

    Cell infection by parvoviruses requires that capsids be delivered from outside the cell to the cytoplasm, followed by genome trafficking to the nucleus. Here we microinject capsids into cells that lack receptors and followed their movements within the cell over time. In general the capsids remained close to the positions where they were injected, and most particles did not move to the vicinity of or enter the nucleus. When 70 kDa-dextran was injected along with the capsids that did not enter the nucleus in significant amounts. Capsids conjugated to peptides containing the SV40 large T-antigen nuclear localization signal remained in the cytoplasm, although bovine serum albumen conjugated to the same peptide entered the nucleus rapidly. No effects of disruption of microfilaments, intermediate filaments, or microtubules on the distribution of the capsids were observed. These results suggest that movement of intact capsids within cells is primarily associated with passive processes.

  2. JVG9, a benzimidazole derivative, alters the surface and cytoskeleton of Trypanosoma cruzi bloodstream trypomastigotes.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Chiguer, Dylan L; Hernández-Luis, Francisco; Nogueda-Torres, Benjamín; Castillo, Rafael; Reynoso-Ducoing, Olivia; Hernández-Campos, Alicia; Ambrosio, Javier R

    2014-09-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi has a particular cytoskeleton that consists of a subpellicular network of microtubules and actin microfilaments. Therefore, it is an excellent target for the development of new anti-parasitic drugs. Benzimidazole 2-carbamates, a class of well-known broad-spectrum anthelmintics, have been shown to inhibit the in vitro growth of many protozoa. Therefore, to find efficient anti-trypanosomal (trypanocidal) drugs, our group has designed and synthesised several benzimidazole derivatives. One, named JVG9 (5-chloro-1H-benzimidazole-2-thiol), has been found to be effective against T. cruzi bloodstream trypomastigotes under both in vitro and in vivo conditions. Here, we present the in vitro effects observed by laser scanning confocal and scanning electron microscopy on T. cruzi trypomastigotes. Changes in the surface and the distribution of the cytoskeletal proteins are consistent with the hypothesis that the trypanocidal activity of JVG9 involves the cytoskeleton as a target.

  3. JVG9, a benzimidazole derivative, alters the surface and cytoskeleton of Trypanosoma cruzi bloodstream trypomastigotes.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Chiguer, Dylan L; Hernández-Luis, Francisco; Nogueda-Torres, Benjamín; Castillo, Rafael; Reynoso-Ducoing, Olivia; Hernández-Campos, Alicia; Ambrosio, Javier R

    2014-09-09

    Trypanosoma cruzi has a particular cytoskeleton that consists of a subpellicular network of microtubules and actin microfilaments. Therefore, it is an excellent target for the development of new anti-parasitic drugs. Benzimidazole 2-carbamates, a class of well-known broad-spectrum anthelmintics, have been shown to inhibit the in vitro growth of many protozoa. Therefore, to find efficient anti-trypanosomal (trypanocidal) drugs, our group has designed and synthesised several benzimidazole derivatives. One, named JVG9 (5-chloro-1H-benzimidazole-2-thiol), has been found to be effective against T. cruzi bloodstream trypomastigotes under both in vitro and in vivo conditions. Here, we present the in vitro effects observed by laser scanning confocal and scanning electron microscopy on T. cruzi trypomastigotes. Changes in the surface and the distribution of the cytoskeletal proteins are consistent with the hypothesis that the trypanocidal activity of JVG9 involves the cytoskeleton as a target.

  4. Role of Intermediate Filaments in Vesicular Traffic.

    PubMed

    Margiotta, Azzurra; Bucci, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Intermediate filaments are an important component of the cellular cytoskeleton. The first established role attributed to intermediate filaments was the mechanical support to cells. However, it is now clear that intermediate filaments have many different roles affecting a variety of other biological functions, such as the organization of microtubules and microfilaments, the regulation of nuclear structure and activity, the control of cell cycle and the regulation of signal transduction pathways. Furthermore, a number of intermediate filament proteins have been involved in the acquisition of tumorigenic properties. Over the last years, a strong involvement of intermediate filament proteins in the regulation of several aspects of intracellular trafficking has strongly emerged. Here, we review the functions of intermediate filaments proteins focusing mainly on the recent knowledge gained from the discovery that intermediate filaments associate with key proteins of the vesicular membrane transport machinery. In particular, we analyze the current understanding of the contribution of intermediate filaments to the endocytic pathway. PMID:27120621

  5. The cell biology of Tobacco mosaic virus replication and movement.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chengke; Nelson, Richard S

    2013-01-01

    Successful systemic infection of a plant by Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) requires three processes that repeat over time: initial establishment and accumulation in invaded cells, intercellular movement, and systemic transport. Accumulation and intercellular movement of TMV necessarily involves intracellular transport by complexes containing virus and host proteins and virus RNA during a dynamic process that can be visualized. Multiple membranes appear to assist TMV accumulation, while membranes, microfilaments and microtubules appear to assist TMV movement. Here we review cell biological studies that describe TMV-membrane, -cytoskeleton, and -other host protein interactions which influence virus accumulation and movement in leaves and callus tissue. The importance of understanding the developmental phase of the infection in relationship to the observed virus-membrane or -host protein interaction is emphasized. Utilizing the latest observations of TMV-membrane and -host protein interactions within our evolving understanding of the infection ontogeny, a model for TMV accumulation and intracellular spread in a cell biological context is provided.

  6. Geometric control of vimentin intermediate filaments.

    PubMed

    Shabbir, Shagufta H; Cleland, Megan M; Goldman, Robert D; Mrksich, Milan

    2014-02-01

    Significant efforts have addressed the role of vimentin intermediate filaments (VIF) in cell motility, shape, adhesion and their connections to microfilaments (MF) and microtubules (MT). The present work uses micropatterned substrates to control the shapes of mouse fibroblasts and demonstrates that the cytoskeletal elements are dependent on each other and that unlike MF, VIF are globally controlled. For example, both square and circle shaped cells have a similar VIF distribution while MF distributions in these two shapes are quite different and depend on the curvature of the shape. Furthermore, in asymmetric and polarized shaped cells VIF avoid the sharp edges where MF are highly localized. Experiments with vimentin null mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) adherent to polarized (teardrop) and un-polarized (dumbbell) patterns show that the absence of VIF alters microtubule organization and perturbs cell polarity. The results of this study also demonstrate the utility of patterned substrates for quantitative studies of cytoskeleton organization in adherent cells.

  7. Physical properties of cytoplasmic intermediate filaments.

    PubMed

    Block, Johanna; Schroeder, Viktor; Pawelzyk, Paul; Willenbacher, Norbert; Köster, Sarah

    2015-11-01

    Intermediate filaments (IFs) constitute a sophisticated filament system in the cytoplasm of eukaryotes. They form bundles and networks with adapted viscoelastic properties and are strongly interconnected with the other filament types, microfilaments and microtubules. IFs are cell type specific and apart from biochemical functions, they act as mechanical entities to provide stability and resilience to cells and tissues. We review the physical properties of these abundant structural proteins including both in vitro studies and cell experiments. IFs are hierarchical structures and their physical properties seem to a large part be encoded in the very specific architecture of the biopolymers. Thus, we begin our review by presenting the assembly mechanism, followed by the mechanical properties of individual filaments, network and structure formation due to electrostatic interactions, and eventually the mechanics of in vitro and cellular networks. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mechanobiology.

  8. Intermediate filaments in cell migration and invasion: the unusual suspects.

    PubMed

    Leduc, Cécile; Etienne-Manneville, Sandrine

    2015-02-01

    Cell migration is a multistep process which relies on the coordination of cytoskeletal structures in space and time. While the roles of actin and microtubules have been investigated in great details, the lack of inhibitors and visualizing tools and the large number of proteins forming intermediate filaments (IFs) have delayed the characterization of IF functions during migration. However, a large body of evidence has progressively pointed to changes in IF composition as an important parameter in the regulation of cell migratory properties both during development and tumor invasion. More recent in-depth analyses show that IFs are dynamically reorganized to participate, together with microfilaments and microtubules, to the key steps leading to cell migration.

  9. Actin filaments and microtubules of Arabidopsis suspension cells show different responses to changing turgor pressure.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lanchun; Wang, Bochu; Gong, Wei; Zhang, Yungang; Zhu, Liqing; Yang, Xingyan

    2011-02-25

    Past decades have brought great advances in understanding the relationship between turgor pressure and plant cell growth. New studies have provided evidence that turgor pressure acts as a stimulus for cell growth, and is also a developmental cue for post-embryonic organogenesis. However, the subcellular mechanisms underlying plant cell turgor pressure sensing remain unclear. Here, using the relatively simple undifferentiated cells from suspension cultures, we report real-time in vivo observations of the reorganization of microtubules and actin microfilaments induced by turgor pressure changes. We found that these two cytoskeletal elements differed in their reorganization patterns. Our results will be useful in the understanding of the relationship between the cytoskeleton, turgor pressure, and stress in plant cell morphogenesis.

  10. Role of Intermediate Filaments in Vesicular Traffic

    PubMed Central

    Margiotta, Azzurra; Bucci, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Intermediate filaments are an important component of the cellular cytoskeleton. The first established role attributed to intermediate filaments was the mechanical support to cells. However, it is now clear that intermediate filaments have many different roles affecting a variety of other biological functions, such as the organization of microtubules and microfilaments, the regulation of nuclear structure and activity, the control of cell cycle and the regulation of signal transduction pathways. Furthermore, a number of intermediate filament proteins have been involved in the acquisition of tumorigenic properties. Over the last years, a strong involvement of intermediate filament proteins in the regulation of several aspects of intracellular trafficking has strongly emerged. Here, we review the functions of intermediate filaments proteins focusing mainly on the recent knowledge gained from the discovery that intermediate filaments associate with key proteins of the vesicular membrane transport machinery. In particular, we analyze the current understanding of the contribution of intermediate filaments to the endocytic pathway. PMID:27120621

  11. Bcl-wav and the mitochondrial calcium uniporter drive gastrula morphogenesis in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Prudent, Julien; Popgeorgiev, Nikolay; Bonneau, Benjamin; Thibaut, Julien; Gadet, Rudy; Lopez, Jonathan; Gonzalo, Philippe; Rimokh, Ruth; Manon, Stephen; Houart, Corinne; Herbomel, Philippe; Aouacheria, Abdel; Gillet, Germain

    2013-01-01

    Bcl-2 proteins are acknowledged as key regulators of programmed cell death. However, increasing data suggest additional roles, including regulation of the cell cycle, metabolism and cytoskeletal dynamics. Here we report the discovery and characterization of a new Bcl-2-related multidomain apoptosis accelerator, Bcl-wav, found in fish and frogs. Genetic and molecular studies in zebrafish indicate that Bcl-wav and the recently identified mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) contribute to the formation of the notochord axis by controlling blastomere convergence and extension movements during gastrulation. Furthermore, we found that Bcl-wav controls intracellular Ca(2+) trafficking by acting on the mitochondrial voltage-dependent anion channel, and possibly on MCU, with direct consequences on actin microfilament dynamics and blastomere migration guidance. Thus, from an evolutionary point of view, the original function of Bcl-2 proteins might have been to contribute in controlling the global positioning system of blastomeres during gastrulation, a critical step in metazoan development. PMID:23942336

  12. Initial stem cell adhesion on porous silicon surface: molecular architecture of actin cytoskeleton and filopodial growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collart-Dutilleul, Pierre-Yves; Panayotov, Ivan; Secret, Emilie; Cunin, Frédérique; Gergely, Csilla; Cuisinier, Frédéric; Martin, Marta

    2014-10-01

    The way cells explore their surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM) during development and migration is mediated by lamellipodia at their leading edge, acting as an actual motor pulling the cell forward. Lamellipodia are the primary area within the cell of actin microfilaments (filopodia) formation. In this work, we report on the use of porous silicon (pSi) scaffolds to mimic the ECM of mesenchymal stem cells from the dental pulp (DPSC) and breast cancer (MCF-7) cells. Our atomic force microscopy (AFM), fluorescence microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results show that pSi promoted the appearance of lateral filopodia protruding from the DPSC cell body and not only in the lamellipodia area. The formation of elongated lateral actin filaments suggests that pores provided the necessary anchorage points for protrusion growth. Although MCF-7 cells displayed a lower presence of organized actin network on both pSi and nonporous silicon, pSi stimulated the formation of extended cell protrusions.

  13. MDI: integrity index of cytoskeletal fibers observed by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manghi, Massimo; Bruni, Luca; Croci, Simonetta

    2016-06-01

    The Modified Directional Index (MDI) is a form factor of the angular spectrum computed from the 2D Fourier transform of an image marking the prevalence of rectilinear features throughout the picture. We study some properties of the index and we apply it to AFM images of cell cytoskeleton regions featuring patterns of rectilinear nearly parallel actin filaments as in the case of microfilaments grouped in bundles. The analysis of AFM images through MDI calculation quantifies the fiber directionality changes which could be related to fiber damages. This parameter is applied to the images of Hs 578Bst cell line, non-tumoral and not immortalized human epithelial cell line, irradiated with X-rays at doses equivalent to typical radiotherapy treatment fractions. In the reported samples, we could conclude that the damages are mainly born to the membrane and not to the cytoskeleton. It could be interesting to test the parameter also using other kinds of chemical or physical agents.

  14. The interest of actin immunocytochemistry in diagnostic histopathology.

    PubMed

    Bussolati, G; Papotti, M; Foschini, M P; Eusebi, V

    1987-01-01

    The immunohistochemical detection of different isoforms of actin provides useful data in the histopathological diagnosis of human tumours. The marked resistance of this protein to fixation and embedding procedures makes it a practical alternative to the ultrastructural search of microfilaments in routine tissue sections. Staining with monoclonal antibodies against alpha smooth muscle actin is helpful in the diagnosis of benign and malignant smooth muscle tumours and allows the differentiation of various types of spindle cell sarcomas. These antibodies are also useful in tracing the myoepithelial cells in normal and various pathological conditions of the breast and salivary glands. Skeletal muscle actin is a reliable marker in the diagnosis of rhabdomyosarcomas. Its use should be combined and complemented with other markers (i.e. desmin; foetal, slow and fast myosins; myoglobin) to monitor the degree of rhabdomyoblastic differentiation of the neoplastic cells in single cases, a parameter of potential prognostic value.

  15. Traffic of Secondary Metabolites to Cell Surface in the Red Alga Laurencia dendroidea Depends on a Two-Step Transport by the Cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Vanessa M.; Oliveira, Louisi S.; Passos, Raoni M. F.; Viana, Nathan B.; Mermelstein, Cláudia; Sant'Anna, Celso; Pereira, Renato C.; Paradas, Wladimir C.; Thompson, Fabiano L.; Amado-Filho, Gilberto M.; Salgado, Leonardo T.

    2013-01-01

    In Laurencia dendroidea, halogenated secondary metabolites are primarily located in the vacuole named the corps en cerise (CC). For chemical defence at the surface level, these metabolites are intracellularly mobilised through vesicle transport from the CC to the cell periphery for posterior exocytosis of these chemicals. The cell structures involved in this specific vesicle traffic as well as the cellular structures related to the positioning and anchoring of the CC within the cell are not well known. Here, we aimed to investigate the role of cytoskeletal elements in both processes. Cellular and molecular assays were conducted to i) determine the ultrastructural apparatus involved in the vesicle traffic, ii) localise cytoskeletal filaments, iii) evaluate the role of different cytoskeletal filaments in the vesicle transport, iv) identify the cytoskeletal filaments responsible for the positioning and anchoring of the CC, and v) identify the transcripts related to cytoskeletal activity and vesicle transport. Our results show that microfilaments are found within the connections linking the CC to the cell periphery, playing an essential role in the vesicle traffic at these connections, which means a first step of the secondary metabolites transport to the cell surface. After that, the microtubules work in the positioning of the vesicles along the cell periphery towards specific regions where exocytosis takes place, which corresponds to the second step of the secondary metabolites transport to the cell surface. In addition, microtubules are involved in anchoring and positioning the CC to the cell periphery. Transcriptomic analysis revealed the expression of genes coding for actin filaments, microtubules, motor proteins and cytoskeletal accessory proteins. Genes related to vesicle traffic, exocytosis and membrane recycling were also identified. Our findings show, for the first time, that actin microfilaments and microtubules play an underlying cellular role in the

  16. Traffic of secondary metabolites to cell surface in the red alga Laurencia dendroidea depends on a two-step transport by the cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Reis, Vanessa M; Oliveira, Louisi S; Passos, Raoni M F; Viana, Nathan B; Mermelstein, Cláudia; Sant'anna, Celso; Pereira, Renato C; Paradas, Wladimir C; Thompson, Fabiano L; Amado-Filho, Gilberto M; Salgado, Leonardo T

    2013-01-01

    In Laurencia dendroidea, halogenated secondary metabolites are primarily located in the vacuole named the corps en cerise (CC). For chemical defence at the surface level, these metabolites are intracellularly mobilised through vesicle transport from the CC to the cell periphery for posterior exocytosis of these chemicals. The cell structures involved in this specific vesicle traffic as well as the cellular structures related to the positioning and anchoring of the CC within the cell are not well known. Here, we aimed to investigate the role of cytoskeletal elements in both processes. Cellular and molecular assays were conducted to i) determine the ultrastructural apparatus involved in the vesicle traffic, ii) localise cytoskeletal filaments, iii) evaluate the role of different cytoskeletal filaments in the vesicle transport, iv) identify the cytoskeletal filaments responsible for the positioning and anchoring of the CC, and v) identify the transcripts related to cytoskeletal activity and vesicle transport. Our results show that microfilaments are found within the connections linking the CC to the cell periphery, playing an essential role in the vesicle traffic at these connections, which means a first step of the secondary metabolites transport to the cell surface. After that, the microtubules work in the positioning of the vesicles along the cell periphery towards specific regions where exocytosis takes place, which corresponds to the second step of the secondary metabolites transport to the cell surface. In addition, microtubules are involved in anchoring and positioning the CC to the cell periphery. Transcriptomic analysis revealed the expression of genes coding for actin filaments, microtubules, motor proteins and cytoskeletal accessory proteins. Genes related to vesicle traffic, exocytosis and membrane recycling were also identified. Our findings show, for the first time, that actin microfilaments and microtubules play an underlying cellular role in the

  17. Antibodies to T- and L-isoforms of the cytoskeletal protein, fimbrin, in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    De Mendonca Neto, E C; Kumar, A; Shadick, N A; Michon, A M; Matsudaira, P; Eaton, R B; Kumar, P; Schur, P H

    1992-01-01

    The cytoskeleton is a complex network of proteins that maintain cell shape, mobility, and organelle function. Its components can be divided into three distinct classes: microfilaments, microtubules, and intermediate filaments. Fimbrins are microfilament proteins, a family of cytoplasmic phosphoproteins. Expression of the L-fimbrin isoform is restricted to replicating blood cells and expression of the T-fimbrin isoform to replicating cells of solid tissues. Sera from normals and from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), juvenile arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren's syndrome, osteoarthritis, vasculitis, scleroderma, and mixed connective tissue disease were tested for the presence of antibodies to T- and L-fimbrin by ELISA, using purified recombinant fimbrin. The mean OD of sera from SLE patients was significantly higher than in normals (T-fimbrin, P less than 0.0001; L-fimbrin, P less than 0.001). 48 of 98 SLE sera had antibodies to T-fimbrin; 32 had antibodies to L-fimbrin; 20 had antibodies to both; 28 had only anti-T, and 12 had only anti-L-fimbrin. The mean OD for sera of the other rheumatic diseases was not significantly different from normals. The presence of either L- or T-fimbrin antibody was associated with pleuropericarditis (P = 0.015), photosensitivity (P = 0.011), and anti-Sm antibody (P = 0.010). Central nervous system SLE was associated with the presence of the L-fimbrin antibody alone (P = 0.016). There was a strong association between DR7 (but not other MHC alleles) and anti-L-fimbrin antibodies in SLE patients (chi square = 18; P less than 0.00002). No MHC association was observed with anti-T-fimbrin antibodies. Images PMID:1522211

  18. Effects of hypergravity on adipose-derived stem cell morphology, mechanical property and proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Tavakolinejad, Alireza; Rabbani, Mohsen; Janmaleki, Mohsen

    2015-08-21

    Alteration in specific inertial conditions can lead to changes in morphology, proliferation, mechanical properties and cytoskeleton of cells. In this report, the effects of hypergravity on morphology of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells (ADSCs) are indicated. ADSCs were repeatedly exposed to discontinuous hypergravity conditions of 10 g, 20 g, 40 g and 60 g by utilizing centrifuge (three times of 20 min exposure, with an interval of 40 min at 1 g). Cell morphology in terms of length, width and cell elongation index and cytoskeleton of actin filaments and microtubules were analyzed by image processing. Consistent changes observed in cell elongation index as morphological change. Moreover, cell proliferation was assessed and mechanical properties of cells in case of elastic modulus of cells were evaluated by Atomic Force Microscopy. Increase in proliferation and decrease in elastic modulus of cells are further results of this study. Staining ADSC was done to show changes in cytoskeleton of the cells associated to hypergravity condition specifically in microfilament and microtubule components. After exposing to hypergravity, significant changes were observed in microfilaments and microtubule density as components of cytoskeleton. It was concluded that there could be a relationship between changes in morphology and MFs as the main component of the cells. - Highlights: • Hypergravity (10 g, 20 g, 40 g and 60 g) affects on adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs). • ADSCs after exposure to the hypergravity are more slender. • The height of ADSCs increases in all test groups comparing their control group. • Hypergravity decreases ADSCs modulus of elasticity and cell actin fiber content. • Hypergravity enhances proliferation rate of ADSCs.

  19. Rab11 and Actin Cytoskeleton Participate in Giardia lamblia Encystation, Guiding the Specific Vesicles to the Cyst Wall

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Romero, Araceli; Leon-Avila, Gloria; Wang, Ching C.; Perez Rangel, Armando; Camacho Nuez, Minerva; Garcia Tovar, Carlos; Ayala-Sumuano, Jorge Tonatiuh; Luna-Arias, Juan Pedro; Hernandez, Jose Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Background Giardia passes through two stages during its life cycle, the trophozoite and the cyst. Cyst formation involves the synthesis of cyst wall proteins (CWPs) and the transport of CWPs into encystation-specific vesicles (ESVs). Active vesicular trafficking is essential for encystation, but the molecular machinery driving vesicular trafficking remains unknown. The Rab proteins are involved in the targeting of vesicles to several intracellular compartments through their association with cytoskeletal motor proteins. Methodology and Principal Findings In this study, we found a relationship between Rab11 and the actin cytoskeleton in CWP1 transport. Confocal microscopy showed Rab11 was distributed throughout the entire trophozoite, while in cysts it was translocated to the periphery of the cell, where it colocalized with ESVs and microfilaments. Encystation was also accompanied by changes in rab11 mRNA expression. To evaluate the role of microfilaments in encystation, the cells were treated with latrunculin A. Scanning electron microscopy showed this treatment resulted in morphological damages to encysted parasites. The intensity of fluorescence-labeled Rab11 and CWP1 in ESVs and cyst walls was reduced, and rab11 and cwp1 mRNA levels were down-regulated. Furthermore, knocking down Rab11 with a hammerhead ribozyme resulted in an up to 80% down-regulation of rab11 mRNA. Although this knockdown did not appear lethal for trophozoites and did not affect cwp1 expression during the encystation, confocal images showed CWP1 was redistributed throughout the cytosol. Conclusions and Significance Our results indicate that Rab11 participates in the early and late encystation stages by regulating CWP1 localization and the actin-mediated transport of ESVs towards the periphery. In addition, alterations in the dynamics of actin affected rab11 and cwp1 expression. Our results provide new information about the molecules involved in Giardia encystation and suggest that Rab11 and

  20. Altering the cellular mechanical force balance results in integrated changes in cell, cytoskeletal and nuclear shape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, J. R.; Karp, S.; Ingber, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    Studies were carried out with capillary endothelial cells cultured on fibronectin (FN)-coated dishes in order to analyze the mechanism of cell and nuclear shape control by extracellular matrix (ECM). To examine the role of the cytoskeleton in shape determination independent of changes in transmembrane osmotic pressure, membranes of adherent cells were permeabilized with saponin (25 micrograms/ml) using a buffer that maintains the functional integrity of contractile microfilaments. Real-time videomicroscopic studies revealed that addition of 250 microM ATP resulted in time-dependent retraction and rounding of permeabilized cells and nuclei in a manner similar to that observed in intact living cells following detachment using trypsin-EDTA. Computerized image analysis confirmed that permeabilized cells remained essentially rigid in the absence of ATP and that retraction was stimulated in a dose-dependent manner as the concentration of ATP was raised from 10 to 250 microM. Maximal rounding occurred by 30 min with projected cell and nuclear areas being reduced by 69 and 41%, respectively. ATP-induced rounding was also accompanied by a redistribution of microfilaments resulting in formation of a dense net of F-actin surrounding retracted nuclei. Importantly, ATP-stimulated changes in cell, cytoskeletal, and nuclear form were prevented in permeabilized cells using a synthetic myosin peptide (IRICRKG) that has been previously shown to inhibit actomyosin filament sliding in muscle. In contrast, both the rate and extent of cell and nuclear rounding were increased in permeabilized cells exposed to ATP when the soluble FN peptide, GRGDSP, was used to dislodge immobilized FN from cell surface integrin receptors.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  1. Cell cytoskeletal changes effected by static compressive stress lead to changes in the contractile properties of tissue regenerative collagen membranes.

    PubMed

    Gellynck, K; Shah, R; Deng, D; Parkar, M; Liu, W; Knowles, J C; Buxton, P

    2013-01-01

    Static compressive stress can influence the matrix, which subsequently affects cell behaviour and the cell's ability to further transform the matrix. This study aimed to assess response to static compressive stress at different stages of osteoblast differentiation and assess the cell cytoskeleton's role as a conduit of matrix-derived stimuli. Mouse bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) (D1 ORL UVA), osteoblastic cells (MC3T3-E1) and post-osteoblast/pre-osteocyte-like cells (MLO-A5) were seeded in hydrated and compressed collagen gels. Contraction was quantified macroscopically, and cell morphology, survival, differentiation and mineralisation assessed using confocal microscopy, alamarBlue® assay, real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and histological stains, respectively. Confocal microscopy demonstrated cell shape changes and favourable microfilament organisation with static compressive stress of the collagen matrix; furthermore, cell survival was greater compared to the hydrated gels. The stage of osteoblast differentiation determined the degree of matrix contraction, with MSCs demonstrating the greatest amount. Introduction of microfilament disrupting inhibitors confirmed that pre-stress and tensegrity forces were under the influence of gel density, and there was increased survival and differentiation of the cells within the compressed collagen compared to the hydrated collagen. There was also relative stiffening and differentiation with time of the compressed cell-seeded collagen, allowing for greater manipulation. In conclusion, the combined collagen chemistry and increased density of the microenvironment can promote upregulation of osteogenic genes and mineralisation; MSCs can facilitate matrix contraction to form an engineered membrane with the potential to serve as a 'pseudo-periosteum' in the regeneration of bone defects. PMID:23813054

  2. Nuclear Function of Subclass I Actin-Depolymerizing Factor Contributes to Susceptibility in Arabidopsis to an Adapted Powdery Mildew Fungus1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Inada, Noriko; Higaki, Takumi; Hasezawa, Seiichiro

    2016-01-01

    Actin-depolymerizing factors (ADFs) are conserved proteins that function in regulating the structure and dynamics of actin microfilaments in eukaryotes. In this study, we present evidence that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) subclass I ADFs, particularly ADF4, functions as a susceptibility factor for an adapted powdery mildew fungus. The null mutant of ADF4 significantly increased resistance against the adapted powdery mildew fungus Golovinomyces orontii. The degree of resistance was further enhanced in transgenic plants in which the expression of all subclass I ADFs (i.e. ADF1–ADF4) was suppressed. Microscopic observations revealed that the enhanced resistance of adf4 and ADF1-4 knockdown plants (ADF1-4Ri) was associated with the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide and cell death specific to G. orontii-infected cells. The increased resistance and accumulation of hydrogen peroxide in ADF1-4Ri were suppressed by the introduction of mutations in the salicylic acid- and jasmonic acid-signaling pathways but not by a mutation in the ethylene-signaling pathway. Quantification by microscopic images detected an increase in the level of actin microfilament bundling in ADF1-4Ri but not in adf4 at early G. orontii infection time points. Interestingly, complementation analysis revealed that nuclear localization of ADF4 was crucial for susceptibility to G. orontii. Based on its G. orontii-infected-cell-specific phenotype, we suggest that subclass I ADFs are susceptibility factors that function in a direct interaction between the host plant and the powdery mildew fungus. PMID:26747284

  3. A novel multifunctional biomedical material based on polyacrylonitrile: Preparation and characterization.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huan-ling; Bremner, David H; Li, He-yu; Shi, Qi-quan; Wu, Jun-zi; Xiao, Rui-qiu; Zhu, Li-min

    2016-05-01

    Wet spun microfibers have great potential in the design of multifunctional controlled release materials. Curcumin (Cur) and vitamin E acetate (Vit. E Ac) were used as a model drug system to evaluate the potential application of the drug-loaded microfiber system for enhanced delivery. The drugs and polyacrylonitrile (PAN) were blended together and spun to produce the target drug-loaded microfiber using an improved wet-spinning method and then the microfibers were successfully woven into fabrics. Morphological, mechanical properties, thermal behavior, drug release performance characteristics, and cytocompatibility were determined. The drug-loaded microfiber had a lobed "kidney" shape with a height of 50-100 μm and width of 100-200 μm. The addition of Cur and Vit. E Ac had a great influence on the surface and cross section structure of the microfiber, leading to a rough surface having microvoids. X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicated that the drugs were successfully encapsulated and dispersed evenly in the microfilament fiber. After drug loading, the mechanical performance of the microfilament changed, with the breaking strength improved slightly, but the tensile elongation increased significantly. Thermogravimetric results showed that the drug load had no apparent adverse effect on the thermal properties of the microfibers. However, drug release from the fiber, as determined through in-vitro experiments, is relatively low and this property is maintained over time. Furthermore, in-vitro cytocompatibility testing showed that no cytotoxicity on the L929 cells was found up to 5% and 10% respectively of the theoretical drug loading content (TDLC) of curcumin and vitamin E acetate. This study provides reference data to aid the development of multifunctional textiles and to explore their use in the biomedical material field. PMID:26952475

  4. [IL-1beta stimulates alpha-smooth muscle actin expression through JNK/p38 signal pathway in cultured rat mesangial cells].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Li, Xiao-Mei; Wang, Hai-Yan

    2002-06-25

    To investigate the role of intracellular mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPKs, ERK, JNK and p38) signal pathways in IL-1beta -stimulated alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) expression in rat mesangial cells (rMC), alpha-SMA-promoter gene was transfected into rMC by electro-perforation method and the promoter activity was assayed after IL-1beta (10 ng/ml) stimulation. Protein expression of alpha-SMA was assayed by Western blot. The results were compared between the groups stimulated by IL-1beta with or without PD98059 and SB203580, which are thought to block ERK and p38 pathway, respectively. Dominant-negative-JNKK plasmid was co-transfected in rMC to block JNK pathway. The spatial distribution of alpha-SMA and microfilament-like structure was observed by a confocal laser scanning microscope or an electric microscope. After 6 or 24 h of incubation with IL-1beta, rMC underwent a phenotypic change, which was represented by up-regulation of alpha-SMA promoter activity and protein expression. An increase in alpha-SMA and microfilament-like structure was found around the cell nucleus. Block of JNK and/or p38 pathway greatly inhibited IL-1beta -induced alpha-SMA expression, and the block of p38 pathway also suppressed the basal level of alpha-SMA expression. In contrast, ERK pathway had no influence on the process. It is, therefore, concluded that IL-1beta -stimulated expression of alpha-SMA is due to its protein synthesis and cytoskeleton re-organization in activated rMC. Intracellular signal regulation of alpha-SMA expression seems to be mediated mainly by JNK/p38 pathways, but ERK appears to have no effect on the process.

  5. Spatial Localisation of Actin Filaments across Developmental Stages of the Malaria Parasite

    PubMed Central

    Angrisano, Fiona; Delves, Michael J.; Zuccala, Elizabeth S.; Turnbull, Lynne; Dekiwadia, Chaitali; Olshina, Maya A.; Marapana, Danushka S.; Wong, Wilson; Mollard, Vanessa; Bradin, Clare H.; Tonkin, Christopher J.; Gunning, Peter W.; Ralph, Stuart A.; Whitchurch, Cynthia B.; Sinden, Robert E.; Cowman, Alan F.; McFadden, Geoffrey I.; Baum, Jake

    2012-01-01

    Actin dynamics have been implicated in a variety of developmental processes during the malaria parasite lifecycle. Parasite motility, in particular, is thought to critically depend on an actomyosin motor located in the outer pellicle of the parasite cell. Efforts to understand the diverse roles actin plays have, however, been hampered by an inability to detect microfilaments under native conditions. To visualise the spatial dynamics of actin we generated a parasite-specific actin antibody that shows preferential recognition of filamentous actin and applied this tool to different lifecycle stages (merozoites, sporozoites and ookinetes) of the human and mouse malaria parasite species Plasmodium falciparum and P. berghei along with tachyzoites from the related apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii. Actin filament distribution was found associated with three core compartments: the nuclear periphery, pellicular membranes of motile or invasive parasite forms and in a ring-like distribution at the tight junction during merozoite invasion of erythrocytes in both human and mouse malaria parasites. Localisation at the nuclear periphery is consistent with an emerging role of actin in facilitating parasite gene regulation. During invasion, we show that the actin ring at the parasite-host cell tight junction is dependent on dynamic filament turnover. Super-resolution imaging places this ring posterior to, and not concentric with, the junction marker rhoptry neck protein 4. This implies motor force relies on the engagement of dynamic microfilaments at zones of traction, though not necessarily directly through receptor-ligand interactions at sites of adhesion during invasion. Combined, these observations extend current understanding of the diverse roles actin plays in malaria parasite development and apicomplexan cell motility, in particular refining understanding on the linkage of the internal parasite gliding motor with the extra-cellular milieu. PMID:22389687

  6. In Vitro Interaction of Pseudomonas aeruginosa with Human Middle Ear Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Rahul; Grati, M’hamed; Gerring, Robert; Blackwelder, Patricia; Yan, Denise; Li, Jian-Dong; Liu, Xue Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Background Otitis media (OM) is an inflammation of the middle ear which can be acute or chronic. Acute OM is caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis whereas Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a leading cause of chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM). CSOM is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the middle ear characterized by infection and discharge. The survivors often suffer from hearing loss and neurological sequelae. However, no information is available regarding the interaction of P. aeruginosa with human middle ear epithelial cells (HMEECs). Methodology and Findings In the present investigation, we demonstrate that P. aeruginosa is able to enter and survive inside HMEECs via an uptake mechanism that is dependent on microtubule and actin microfilaments. The actin microfilament disrupting agent as well as microtubule inhibitors exhibited significant decrease in invasion of HMEECs by P. aeruginosa. Confocal microscopy demonstrated F-actin condensation associated with bacterial entry. This recruitment of F-actin was transient and returned to normal distribution after bacterial internalization. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated the presence of bacteria on the surface of HMEECs, and transmission electron microscopy confirmed the internalization of P. aeruginosa located in the plasma membrane-bound vacuoles. We observed a significant decrease in cell invasion of OprF mutant compared to the wild-type strain. P. aeruginosa induced cytotoxicity, as demonstrated by the determination of lactate dehydrogenase levels in culture supernatants of infected HMEECs and by a fluorescent dye-based assay. Interestingly, OprF mutant showed little cell damage compared to wild-type P. aeruginosa. Conclusions and Significance This study deciphered the key events in the interaction of P. aeruginosa with HMEECs in vitro and highlighted the role of bacterial outer membrane protein, OprF, in this process. Understanding the molecular mechanisms in

  7. Growth inhibition and changes in morphology and actin distribution in Acetabularia acetabulum by phalloidin and phalloidin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Sawitzky, H; Hanfstingl, U; Faulstich, H

    2003-03-01

    Effects on morphology and microfilament structure caused by phalloidin, phallacidin, and some semisynthetic phalloidin derivatives were studied in vegetative cells of the green alga Acetabularia acetabulum (L.) Silva. All phalloidin derivatives (except for phalloidin itself) caused growth stop of the alga after 1 day and (except for the fluorescein-labeled phalloidin) death of the cells after 4-7 days. Hair whorl tip growth and morphology as screened by light microscopy, as well as microfilament structure in tips, suggested that growth stop is correlated with a disorganization of actin filaments similar to that recently described for jasplakinolide (H. Sawitzky, S. Liebe, J. Willingale-Theune, D. Menzel, European Journal of Cell Biology 78: 424-433, 1999). Using rabbit muscle actin as a model target protein, we found that the toxic effects in vivo did not correlate with actin affinity values, suggesting that permeation through membranes must play a role. Indeed, the most lipophilic phalloidin derivatives benzoylphalloidin and dithiolanophalloidin were the most active in causing growth stop at ca. 100 microM. In comparison to the concentration of jasplakinolide required to cause similar effects (<3 microM), the two most active phalloidin derivatives exhibited an activity ca. 30 times lower. Nonetheless, lipophilic phalloidin derivatives can be used in algae, and probably also other cells, to modulate actin dynamics in vivo. In addition, we found that the fluorescent fluorescein isothiocyanate-phalloidin is able to enter living algal cells and stains actin structures brightly. Since it does not suppress actin dynamics, we suggest fluorescein isothiocyanate-phalloidin as a tool for studying rearrangements of actin structures in live cells, e.g., by confocal laser scanning microscopy.

  8. Fertilization Induces a Transient Exposure of Phosphatidylserine in Mouse Eggs

    PubMed Central

    Curia, Claudio A.; Ernesto, Juan I.; Stein, Paula; Busso, Dolores; Schultz, Richard M.; Cuasnicu, Patricia S.; Cohen, Débora J.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) is normally localized to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane and the requirement of PS translocation to the outer leaflet in cellular processes other than apoptosis has been demonstrated recently. In this work we investigated the occurrence of PS mobilization in mouse eggs, which express flippase Atp8a1 and scramblases Plscr1 and 3, as determined by RT-PCR; these enzyme are responsible for PS distribution in cell membranes. We find a dramatic increase in binding of flouresceinated-Annexin-V, which specifically binds to PS, following fertilization or parthenogenetic activation induced by SrCl2 treatment. This increase was not observed when eggs were first treated with BAPTA-AM, indicating that an increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration was required for PS exposure. Fluorescence was observed over the entire egg surface with the exception of the regions overlying the meiotic spindle and sperm entry site. PS exposure was also observed in activated eggs obtained from CaMKIIγ null females, which are unable to exit metaphase II arrest despite displaying Ca2+ spikes. In contrast, PS exposure was not observed in TPEN-activated eggs, which exit metaphase II arrest in the absence of Ca2+ release. PS exposure was also observed when eggs were activated with ethanol but not with a Ca2+ ionophore, suggesting that the Ca2+ source and concentration are relevant for PS exposure. Last, treatment with cytochalasin D, which disrupts microfilaments, or jasplakinolide, which stabilizes microfilaments, prior to egg activation showed that PS externalization is an actin-dependent process. Thus, the Ca2+ rise during egg activation results in a transient exposure of PS in fertilized eggs that is not associated with apoptosis. PMID:23951277

  9. The protein and lipid composition of the membrane of milk fat globules depends on their size.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Argov-Argaman, Nurit; Anggrek, Jeni; Boeren, Sjef; van Hooijdonk, Toon; Vervoort, Jacques; Hettinga, Kasper Arthur

    2016-06-01

    In bovine milk, fat globules (MFG) have a heterogeneous size distribution with diameters ranging from 0.1 to 15 µm. Although efforts have been made to explain differences in lipid composition, little is known about the protein composition of MFG membranes (MFGM) in different sizes of MFG. In this study, protein and lipid analyses were combined to study MFG formation and secretion. Two different sized MFG fractions (7.6±0.9 µm and 3.3±1.2 µm) were obtained by centrifugation. The protein composition of MFGM in the large and small MFG fractions was compared using mass-spectrometry-based proteomics techniques. The lipid composition and fatty acid composition of MFG was determined using HPLC-evaporative light-scattering detector and gas chromatography, respectively. Two frequently studied proteins in lipid droplet biogenesis, perilipin-2 and TIP47, were increased in the large and small MFG fractions, respectively. In the large MFG fraction, besides perilipin-2, cytoplasmic vesicle proteins (heat shock proteins, 14-3-3 proteins, and Rabs), microfilaments and intermediate filament-related proteins (actin and vimentin), host defense proteins (cathelicidins), and phosphatidylinositol were higher in concentration. On the other hand, cholesterol synthesis enzymes [lanosterol synthase and sterol-4-α-carboxylate 3-dehydrogenase (decarboxylating)], cholesterol, unsaturated fatty acids, and phosphatidylethanolamine were, besides TIP47, higher in concentration in the small MFG fraction. These results suggest that vesicle proteins, microfilaments and intermediate filaments, cholesterol, and specific phospholipids play an important role in lipid droplet growth, secretion, or both. The observations from this study clearly demonstrated the difference in protein and lipid composition between small and large MFG fractions. Studying the role of these components in more detail in future experiments may lead to a better understanding of fat globule formation and secretion.

  10. Effects of glycine on phagocytosis and secretion by Kupffer cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hui-Wen; Yun, Ke-Ming; Han, De-Wu; Xu, Rui-Ling; Zhao, Yuan-Chang

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects and mechanisms of action of glycine on phagocytosis and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α secretion by Kupffer cells in vitro. METHODS: Kupffer cells were isolated from normal rats by collagenase digestion and Percoll density gradient differential centrifugation. After culture for 24 h, Kupffer cells were incubated in fresh Dulbecco's Modification of Eagle’s Medium containing glycine (G1: 1 mmol/L, G2: 10 mmol/L, G3: 100 mmol/L and G4: 300 mmol/L) for 3 h, then used to measure phagocytosis by a bead test, TNF-α secretion after lipopolysaccharide stimulation by radioactive immunoassay, and microfilament and microtubule expression by staining with phalloidin-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) or a monoclonal anti-α tubulin-FITC antibody, respectively, and evaluated under a ultraviolet fluorescence microscope. RESULTS: Glycine decreased the phagocytosis of Kupffer cells at both 30 min and 60 min (P < 0.01, P < 0.05). The numbers of beads phagocytosed by Kupffer cells in 30 min were 16.9 ± 4.0 (control), 9.6 ± 4.1 (G1), 12.1 ± 5.7 (G2), 8.1 ± 3.2 (G3) and 7.5 ± 2.0 (G4), and were 22.5 ± 7.9 (control), 20.1 ± 5.8 (G1), 19.3 ± 4.8 (G2), 13.5 ± 4.7 (G3) and 9.2 ± 3.1 (G4) after 60 min. TNF-α secretion by Kupffer cells in G1 (0.19 ± 0.03), G2 (0.16 ± 0.04), G3 (0.14 ± 0.03) and G4 (0.13 ± 0.05) was significantly less than that in controls (0.26 ± 0.03, P < 0.01), and the decrease in secretion was dose-dependent (P < 0.05). Microfilaments of Kupffer cells in G2, G3 and G4 groups were arranged in a disorderly manner. The fluorescence densities of microtubules in G1 (53.4 ± 10.5), G2 (54.1 ± 14.6), G3 (64.9 ± 12.1) and G4 (52.1 ± 14.2) were all lower than those in the controls (102.2 ± 23.7, P < 0.01), but the decrease in microtubule fluorescence density was not dose-dependant. CONCLUSION: Glycine can decrease the phagocytosis and secretion by Kupffer cells in vitro, which may be related to the changes in the expression of

  11. Cellular basis of gravity resistance in plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoson, Takayuki; Matsumoto, Shouhei; Inui, Kenichi; Zhang, Yan; Soga, Kouichi; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Hashimoto, Takashi

    Mechanical resistance to the gravitational force is a principal gravity response in plants distinct from gravitropism. In the final step of gravity resistance, plants increase the rigidity of their cell walls via modifications to the cell wall metabolism and apoplastic environment. We studied cellular events that are related to the cell wall changes under hypergravity conditions produced by centrifugation. Hypergravity induced reorientation of cortical microtubules from transverse to longitudinal directions in epidermal cells of stem organs. In Arabidopsis tubulin mutants, the percentage of cells with longitudinal microtubules was high even at 1 g, and it was further increased by hypergravity. Hypocotyls of tubulin mutants also showed either left-handed or right-handed helical growth at 1 g, and the degree of twisting phenotype was intensified under hypergravity conditions. The left-handed helical growth mutants had right-handed microtubule arrays, whereas the right-handed mutant had left-handed arrays. There was a close correlation between the alignment angle of epidermal cell files and the alignment of cortical microtubules. Gadolinium ions suppressed both the twisting phenotype and reorientation of microtubules in tubulin mutants. These results support the hypothesis that cortical microtubules play an es-sential role in maintenance of normal growth phenotype against the gravitational force, and suggest that mechanoreceptors are involved in modifications to morphology and orientation of microtubule arrays by hypergravity. Actin microfilaments, in addition to microtubules, may be involved in gravity resistance. The nucleus of epidermal cells of azuki bean epicotyls, which is present almost in the center of the cell at 1 g, was displaced to the cell bottom by increasing the magnitude of gravity. Cytochalasin D stimulated the sedimentation by hypergravity of the nu-cleus, suggesting that the positioning of the nucleus is regulated by actin microfilaments, which is

  12. Effects of altered gravity on the cell cycle, actin cytoskeleton and proteome in Physarum polycephalum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jie; Zhang, Xiaoxian; Gao, Yong; Li, Shuijie; Sun, Yeqing

    Some researchers suggest that the changes of cell cycle under the effect of microgravity may be associated with many serious adverse physiological changes. In the search for underlying mechanisms and possible new countermeasures, we used the slime mold Physarum polycephalum in which all the nuclei traverse the cell cycle in natural synchrony to study the effects of altered gravity on the cell cycle, actin cytoskeleton and proteome. In parallel, the cell cycle was analyzed in Physarum incubated (1) in altered gravity for 20 h, (2) in altered gravity for 40 h, (3) in altered gravity for 80 h, and (4) in ground controls. The cell cycle, the actin cytoskeleton, and proteome in the altered gravity and ground controls were examined. The results indicated that the duration of the G2 phase was lengthened 20 min in high aspect ratio vessel (HARV) for 20 h, and prolonged 2 h in altered gravity either for 40 h or for 80 h, whereas the duration of other phases in the cell cycle was unchanged with respect to the control. The microfilaments in G2 phase had a reduced number of fibers and a unique abnormal morphology in altered gravity for 40 h, whereas the microfilaments in other phases of cell cycle were unchanged when compared to controls. Employing classical two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE), we examined the effect of the altered gravity on P. polycephalum proteins. The increase in the duration of G2 phase in altered gravity for 40 h was accompanied by changes in the 2-DE protein profiles, over controls. Out of a total of 200 protein spots investigated in G2 phase, which were reproducible in repeated experiments, 72 protein spots were visually identified as specially expressed, and 11 proteins were up-regulated by 2-fold and 28 proteins were down-regulated by 2-fold over controls. Out of a total of three low-expressed proteins in G2 phase in altered gravity for 40 h, two proteins were unknown proteins, and one protein was spherulin 3b by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (MS

  13. Incorporation and turnover of biotin-labeled actin microinjected into fibroblastic cells: an immunoelectron microscopic study

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    We investigated the mechanism of turnover of an actin microfilament system in fibroblastic cells on an electron microscopic level. A new derivative of actin was prepared by labeling muscle actin with biotin. Cultured fibroblastic cells were microinjected with biotinylated actin, and incorporated biotin-actin molecules were detected by immunoelectron microscopy using an anti-biotin antibody and a colloidal gold-labeled secondary antibody. We also analyzed the localization of injected biotin-actin molecules on a molecular level by freeze-drying techniques. Incorporation of biotin-actin was rapid in motile peripheral regions, such as lamellipodia and microspikes. At approximately 1 min after injection, biotin-actin molecules were mainly incorporated into the distal part of actin bundles in the microspikes. Heavily labeled actin filaments were also observed at the distal fringe of the densely packed actin networks in the lamellipodium. By 5 min after injection, most actin polymers in microspikes and lamellipodia were labeled uniformly. These findings suggest that actin subunits are added preferentially at the membrane-associated ends of preexisting actin filaments. At earlier times after injection, we often observed that the labeled segments were continuous with unlabeled segments, suggesting the incorporation of new subunits at the ends of preexisting filaments. Actin incorporation into stress fibers was a slower process. At 2-3 min after injection, microfilaments at the surface of stress fibers incorporated biotin-actin, but filaments in the core region of stress fibers did not. At 5-10 min after injection, increasing density of labeling along stress fibers toward their distal ends was observed. Stress fiber termini are generally associated with focal contacts. There was no rapid nucleation of actin filaments off the membrane of focal contacts and the pattern of actin incorporation at focal contacts was essentially identical to that into distal parts of stress fibers

  14. Identification of two distinct functional domains on vinculin involved in its association with focal contacts

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    We report here on the identification of two distinct functional domains on chicken vinculin molecule, which can, independently, mediate its interaction with focal contacts in living cells. These findings were obtained by immunofluorescent labeling of COS cells transfected with a series of chicken vinculin-specific cDNA constructs derived from clones cVin1 and cVin5 (Bendori, R., D. Salomon, and B. Geiger. 1987. EMBO [Eur. Mol. Biol. Organ.] J. 6:2897-2905). These included a chimeric construct consisting of 5' sequences of cVin1 attached to the complementary 3' region of cVin5, as well as several constructs of either cVin1 or cVin5 from which 3' or 5' sequences were deleted. We show here that the products of both cVin1 and cVin5, and of the cVin1/cVin5 chimera, readily associated with focal contacts in transfected COS cells. Furthermore, 78 and 45 kD NH2-terminal fragments encoded by a deleted cVin1 and the 78-kD COOH-terminal portion of vinculin encoded by cVin5 were capable of binding specifically to focal contact areas. In contrast 3'-deletion mutants prepared from clone cVin5 and a 5'-deletion mutant of cVin1, lacking both NH2- and COOH- terminal sequences, failed to associate with focal contacts in transfected cells. The loss of binding was accompanied by an overall disarray of the microfilament system. These results, together with previous in vitro binding studies, suggest that vinculin contains at least two independent sites for binding to focal contacts; the NH2- terminal domain may contain the talin binding site while the COOH- terminal domain may mediate vinculin-vinculin interaction. Moreover, the disruptive effect of the double-deleted molecule (lacking the two focal-contact binding sites) on the organization of actin suggests that a distinct region involved in the binding of vinculin to the microfilament system is present in the NH2-terminal 45-kD region of the molecule. PMID:2500446

  15. Structure of the F–actin–tropomyosin complex

    PubMed Central

    von der Ecken, Julian; Müller, Mirco; Lehman, William; Manstein, Dietmar J.; Penczek, Pawel A.; Raunser, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Filamentous actin (F-actin) is the major protein of muscle thin filaments, and actin microfilaments are the main component of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. Mutations in different actin isoforms lead to early-onset autosomal dominant non-syndromic hearing loss1, familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections2, and multiple variations of myopathies3. In striated muscle fibres, the binding of myosin motors to actin filaments is mainly regulated by tropomyosin and troponin4,5. Tropomyosin also binds to F-actin in smooth muscle and in non-muscle cells and stabilizes and regulates the filaments there in the absence of troponin6. Although crystal structures for monomeric actin (G-actin) are available7, a high-resolution structure of F-actin is still missing, hampering our understanding of how disease-causing mutations affect the function of thin muscle filaments and microfilaments. Here we report the three-dimensional structure of F-actin at a resolution of 3.7 ångstroms in complex with tropomyosin at a resolution of 6.5ångstroms, determined by electron cryomicroscopy. The structure reveals that the D-loop is ordered and acts as a central region for hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions that stabilize the F-actin filament. We clearly identify the density corresponding to ADP and Mg2+ and explain the possible effect of prominent disease-causing mutants. A comparison of F-actin with G-actin reveals the conformational changes during filament formation and identifies the D-loop as their key mediator. We also confirm that negatively charged tropomyosin interacts with a positively charged groove on F-actin. Comparison of the position of tropomyosin in F-actin–tropomyosin with its position in our previously determined actin–tropomyosin–myosin structure8 reveals a myosin-induced transition of tropomyosin. Our results allow us to understand the role of individual mutations in the genesis of actin- and tropomyosin-related diseases and will serve as a strong

  16. Dual effects of guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate on secretion by electroporated human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Smolen, J E; Stoehr, S J; Kuczynski, B; Koh, E K; Omann, G M

    1991-01-01

    It is generally believed that G-proteins play stimulatory roles on cell activation. In contrast, we found that guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate (GTP[S]) was a potent inhibitor of Ca(2+)-induced secretion from specific granules (as monitored by vitamin B-12-binding protein). GTP[S] inhibition of specific-granule release occurred in the presence or absence of adenine nucleotides, required Mg2+ (1-3 mM), and was half-maximal at 30 microM-GTP[S]. The dual stimulatory and inhibitory effects of GTP[S] could be readily observed and differentiated when degranulation was monitored over a range of Ca2+ concentrations. Inhibition of specific-granule release by GTP[S] was observed at low Ca2+ concentrations and resulted from shifting the Ca2+ dose-response curves to the right. In contrast, GTP[S] promoted azurophil-granule secretion at relatively high concentrations of Ca2+ and appeared to be due to a general enhancement at all Ca2+ concentrations. A series of hydrolysable and non-hydrolysable nucleotides did not mimic GTP[S] or block its action. Inhibition by GTP[S] occurred in cells which were sensitized with a protein kinase C agonist, suggesting that inhibition of secretion took place distal to this enzyme. However, the inhibitory effects of GTP[S] on specific-granule secretion were reversed by cytochalasin D, which prevents new microfilament formation; this compound also enhanced the stimulation of azurophil-granule release by GTP[S]. We also found that GTP[S] greatly increased the F-actin content of permeabilized neutrophils, whereas Ca2+ (to a lesser extent) decreased F-actin. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that at least two G-proteins are involved in regulating secretion: one which has been previously described as stimulating Ca(2+)-induced secretion (particularly from azurophil granules) and a second, possibly involved in promoting microfilament assembly, which inhibits the discharge of specific granules. PMID:1953659

  17. Free and polymerized tubulin in cultured bone cells and Chinese hamster ovary cells: the influence of cold and hormones

    PubMed Central

    Beertsen, W; Heersche, JNM; Aubin, JE

    1982-01-01

    with disorganization of the microfilament system, since microfilaments, detected using affinity-purified actin antibodies, did alter drastically their appearance and distribution after hormone addition. PMID:6292234

  18. Cell shape, cytoskeletal mechanics, and cell cycle control in angiogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingber, D. E.; Prusty, D.; Sun, Z.; Betensky, H.; Wang, N.

    1995-01-01

    Capillary endothelial cells can be switched between growth and differentiation by altering cell-extracellular matrix interactions and thereby, modulating cell shape. Studies were carried out to determine when cell shape exerts its growth-regulatory influence during cell cycle progression and to explore the role of cytoskeletal structure and mechanics in this control mechanism. When G0-synchronized cells were cultured in basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-containing defined medium on dishes coated with increasing densities of fibronectin or a synthetic integrin ligand (RGD-containing peptide), cell spreading, nuclear extension, and DNA synthesis all increased in parallel. To determine the minimum time cells must be adherent and spread on extracellular matrix (ECM) to gain entry into S phase, cells were removed with trypsin or induced to retract using cytochalasin D at different times after plating. Both approaches revealed that cells must remain extended for approximately 12-15 h and hence, most of G1, in order to enter S phase. After this restriction point was passed, normally 'anchorage-dependent' endothelial cells turned on DNA synthesis even when round and in suspension. The importance of actin-containing microfilaments in shape-dependent growth control was confirmed by culturing cells in the presence of cytochalasin D (25-1000 ng ml-1): dose-dependent inhibition of cell spreading, nuclear extension, and DNA synthesis resulted. In contrast, induction of microtubule disassembly using nocodazole had little effect on cell or nuclear spreading and only partially inhibited DNA synthesis. Interestingly, combination of nocodazole with a suboptimal dose of cytochalasin D (100 ng ml-1) resulted in potent inhibition of both spreading and growth, suggesting that microtubules are redundant structural elements which can provide critical load-bearing functions when microfilaments are partially compromised. Similar synergism between nocodazole and cytochalasin D was observed

  19. Polycystin-2 interacts with troponin I, an angiogenesis inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Shen, Patrick Y; Wu, Guanqing; Chen, Xing-Zhen

    2003-01-21

    Polycystin-2 (PC2), encoded by the PKD2 gene, is mutated in 10-15% of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) patients. PC2 is a Ca(2+)-permeable nonselective cation channel and is present in kidney and many other organs. Likewise, PKD2-mutated patients and mice exhibit extrarenal abnormalities. In comparison with cysts in the kidney, liver, and pancreas, abnormalities in the heart, brain, and vascular vessels are less understood. In particular, roles of PC2 in muscle and endothelia remain largely unknown. In the present study, using a yeast two-hybrid screening, we discovered that the PC2 carboxyl terminal domain (D682-V968) interacts with the cardiac troponin I, an important regulatory component of the actin microfilament in cardiac muscle cells. This interaction was demonstrated by GST pull-down and microtiter binding assays. Dose-dependent binding between PC2 and troponin I followed a Michaelis-Menten relationship, indicating a 1:1 binding stoichiometry. The interacting domains were located to the R872-H927 segment of PC2 and the M1-V107 and K106-L158 segments of troponin I. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that the cardiac and two skeletal isoforms of troponin I were all associated with PC2, when coexpressed in mouse fibroblast NIH 3T3 cells and Xenopus oocytes. Furthermore, reciprocal co-immunoprecipitation verified the interaction between the native polycystin-2 and troponin I in human adult heart tissues. This study thus provides new evidence for a direct attachment of PC2 to the actin microfilament network, in addition to the recently identified association between PC2 and trypomyosin-1. Troponin I functions as an inhibitory subunit of the troponin complex for calcium-dependent regulation of muscle contraction and as an inhibitor of angiogenesis seen in ADPKD. It is possible that altered interaction due to pathogenic polycystin-1 or -2 mutations can account for angiogenesis in ADPKD and may be corrected to some extent by

  20. Hypotonic stimulation of the Na+ active transport in frog skeletal muscle: role of the cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Venosa, R A

    2003-01-01

    Hypotonicity produces a marked activation of the Na+ pump in frog sartorius muscle. The increase in net Na+ efflux under hypotonic conditions occurs despite the reductions in [Na+]i that are due to fibre swelling and Na+ loss. The pump density (ouabain binding) increases not only upon reduction of the medium osmotic pressure (π) from its normal value (π= 1) to one-half (π= 0.5), but also in muscles that are returned to π= 1 after equilibration in π= 2 medium. The equilibration in π= 2 medium does not affect pump density. Ouabain-binding increments cannot be ascribed to a rise in the Na+–K+ exchange rate of a fixed number of pumps: they also occurred in the continued presence of a saturating concentration of ouabain (50 μm). Under those conditions, the π= 1 →π= 0.5 transfer produced a 43 % increase in pump sites, while the π= 2 →π= 1 transfer induced a rise of 46 %. Actinomycin D did not alter the stimulation of Na+ extrusion elicited by hypotonicity, suggesting that de novo synthesis of pumps was not involved in the increase of the apparent number of pump sites. Disruption of microtubules by colchicine (100 μm) and intermediate filaments by acrylamide (4 mm) did not alter the hypotonic effect. Likewise, genistein (100 μm), a specific inhibitor of tyrosine kinase, did not affect significantly the hypotonic response. Microfilament-disrupting agents like cytochalasin B (5 μm) and latrunculin B (10 μm) reduced the increase in Na+ efflux induced by π= 1 →π= 0.5 transfer by about 35 % and 72 %, respectively. Latrunculin B reduced the increases in pump density generated by π= 1 →π= 0.5 and π= 2 →π= 1 transfers by about 79 % and 91 %, respectively. The results suggest that the membrane stretch due to hypotonic fibre volume increase would promote a microfilament-mediated insertion of submembranous spare Na+ pumps in the sarcolemma and, consequently, the rise in active Na+ transport. PMID:12598593

  1. Interaction of rat Sertoli cells with a collagen lattice in vitro.

    PubMed

    Borland, K; Ehrlich, H P; Muffly, K; Dills, W L; Hall, P F

    1986-11-01

    Sertoli cells from rats aged 15, 20, and 25 d were subcultured onto collagen-coated, plastic dishes. If the collagen was released from the plastic surface by rimming, the floating rafts of collagen showed uniform shrinkage. If the collagen was allowed to remain attached to the plastic, holes appeared in the collagen with cells from rats aged 25 d but not with those of 15 d. Cells from rats aged 20 d caused fewer and smaller holes to appear. The holes were associated with the formation of clumps of spherical cells from which elongated Sertoli cells extended into the surrounding collagen to end near holes. Rhodamine-phalloidin revealed diffusely distributed actin in the spherical cells in contrast to well-developed microfilaments in the peripheral elongated cells. Addition of cytochalasin B (5 micrograms/ml) to the medium prevented contraction of the floating rafts and the development of holes in the attached collagen. In addition, cytochalasin B caused the peripheral cells to become spherical and to separate from the clumps. Moreover, rhodamine-phalloidin revealed that actin in the peripheral cells occurred as clumps without microfilaments when cytochalasin B was present. When Sertoli cells were subcultured onto silicone rubber films, the cells produced wrinkling of the rubber surface within 4 h of plating. These observations were interpreted to mean that Sertoli cells exert local tractional forces on various substrata. These forces require actin, presumably acting by a contractile mechanism. When the collagen is attached to plastic and the cells are organized into clumps with radiating elongated cells (cells from rats aged 25 d), the tractional forces in the elongated cells reorganize the collagen fibers to produce holes. When cells are uniformly distributed (cells from rats aged 15 d), holes are not formed. When the collagen is released from the plastic surface, tractional forces cause the floating rafts to shrink. These interactions of the cells with collagen are

  2. Proteolytic activity of the 26S proteasome is required for the meiotic resumption, germinal vesicle breakdown, and cumulus expansion of porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes matured in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yi, Young-Joo; Nagyova, Eva; Manandhar, Gaurishankar; Procházka, Radek; Sutovsky, Miriam; Park, Chang-Sik; Sutovsky, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The resumption of oocyte meiosis in mammals encompasses the landmark event of oocyte germinal vesicle (GV) breakdown (GVBD), accompanied by the modification of cell-to-cell communication and adhesion between the oocyte and surrounding cumulus cells. The concomitant cumulus expansion relies on microfilament-cytoskeletal remodeling and extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition. We hypothesized that this multifaceted remodeling event requires substrate-specific proteolysis by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP). We evaluated meiotic progression, cytoskeletal dynamics, and the production of cumulus ECM in porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) cultured with or without 10-200 microM MG132, a specific proteasomal inhibitor, for the first 22 h of in vitro maturation, followed by 22 h of culture with or without MG132. Treatment with 10 microM MG132 arrested 28.4% of oocytes in GV stage (vs. 1.3% in control), 43.1% in prometaphase I, and 16.2% in metaphase I, whereas 83.7% of control ova reached metaphase II (0% of MG132 reached metaphase II). The proportion of GV-stage ova increased progressively to >90% with increased concentration of MG132 (20-200 microM). Furthermore, MG132 blocked the extrusion of the first polar body and degradation of F-actin-rich transzonal projections (TZP) interconnecting cumulus cells with the oocyte. The microfilament disruptor cytochalasin E (CE) prevented cumulus expansion but accelerated the breakdown of TZPs. Ova treated with a combination of 10 microM MG132 and 10 microM CE underwent GVBD, despite the inhibition of proteasomal activity. However, 90.0% of cumulus-free ova treated with 10 microM MG132 remained in GV stage, compared with 16.7% GV ova in control. Cumulus expansion, retention of hyaluronic acid, and the deposition of cumulus ECM relying on the covalent transfer of heavy chains of inter-alpha trypsin inhibitor (IalphaI) were also inhibited by MG132. Cumulus expansion in control COCs was accompanied by the degradation of ubiquitin

  3. Association of mitogen-activated protein kinases with microtubules in mouse macrophages

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Taxol, a microtubule-binding diterpene, mimics many effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on mouse macrophages. The LPS-mimetic effects of taxol appear to be under the same genetic control as responses to LPS itself. Thus we have postulated a role for microtubule-associated proteins (MAP) in the response of macrophages to LPS. Stimulation of macrophages by LPS quickly induces the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK). MAPK are generally considered cytosolic enzymes. Herein we report that much of the LPS-activatable pool of MAPK in primary mouse peritoneal macrophages is microtubule associated. By immunofluorescence, MAPK were localized to colchicine- and nocodazole- disruptible filaments. From both mouse brain and RAW 264.7 macrophages, MAPK could be coisolated with polymerized tubulin. Fractionation of primary macrophages into cytosol-, microfilament-, microtubule-, and intermediated filament-rich extracts revealed that approximately 10% of MAPK but none of MAPK kinase (MEK1A and MEK2) was microtubule bound. Exposure of macrophages to LPS did not change the proportion of MAPK bound to microtubules, but preferentially activated the microtubule- associated pool. These findings confirm the prediction that LPS activates a kinase bound to microtubules. Together with LPS-mimetic actions of taxol and the shared genetic control of responses to LPS and taxol, these results support the hypothesis that a major LPS-signaling pathway in mouse macrophages may involve activation of one or more microtubule-associated kinases. PMID:8666946

  4. Calorimetric gas sensor

    DOEpatents

    Ricco, Antonio J.; Hughes, Robert C.; Smith, James H.; Moreno, Daniel J.; Manginell, Ronald P.; Senturia, Stephen D.; Huber, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    A combustible gas sensor that uses a resistively heated, noble metal-coated, micromachined polycrystalline Si filament to calorimetrically detect the presence and concentration of combustible gases. The filaments tested to date are 2 .mu.m thick.times.10 .mu.m wide.times.100, 250, 500, or 1000 .mu.m-long polycrystalline Si; some are overcoated with a 0.25 .mu.m-thick protective CVD Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 layer. A thin catalytic Pt film was deposited by CVD from the precursor Pt(acac).sub.2 onto microfilaments resistively heated to approximately 500.degree. C.; Pt deposits only on the hot filament. Using a constant-resistance-mode feedback circuit, Pt-coated filaments operating at ca. 300.degree. C. (35 mW input power) respond linearly, in terms of the change in supply current required to maintain constant resistance (temperature), to H.sub.2 concentrations between 100 ppm and 1% in an 80/20 N.sub.2 /O.sub.2 mixture. Other catalytic materials can also be used.

  5. Calorimetric gas sensor

    DOEpatents

    Ricco, A.J.; Hughes, R.C.; Smith, J.H.; Moreno, D.J.; Manginell, R.P.; Senturia, S.D.; Huber, R.J.

    1998-11-10

    A combustible gas sensor is described that uses a resistively heated, noble metal-coated, micromachined polycrystalline Si filament to calorimetrically detect the presence and concentration of combustible gases. The filaments tested to date are 2 {micro}m thick {times} 10{micro}m wide {times} 100, 250, 500, or 1000 {micro}m-long polycrystalline Si; some are overcoated with a 0.25 {micro}m-thick protective CVD Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} layer. A thin catalytic Pt film was deposited by CVD from the precursor Pt(acac){sub 2} onto microfilaments resistively heated to approximately 500 C; Pt deposits only on the hot filament. Using a constant-resistance-mode feedback circuit, Pt-coated filaments operating at ca. 300 C (35 mW input power) respond linearly, in terms of the change in supply current required to maintain constant resistance (temperature), to H{sub 2} concentrations between 100 ppm and 1% in an 80/20 N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} mixture. Other catalytic materials can also be used. 11 figs.

  6. Reciprocal Interactions between Cell Adhesion Molecules of the Immunoglobulin Superfamily and the Cytoskeleton in Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Leshchyns'ka, Iryna; Sytnyk, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules of the immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) including the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and members of the L1 family of neuronal cell adhesion molecules play important functions in the developing nervous system by regulating formation, growth and branching of neurites, and establishment of the synaptic contacts between neurons. In the mature brain, members of IgSF regulate synapse composition, function, and plasticity required for learning and memory. The intracellular domains of IgSF cell adhesion molecules interact with the components of the cytoskeleton including the submembrane actin-spectrin meshwork, actin microfilaments, and microtubules. In this review, we summarize current data indicating that interactions between IgSF cell adhesion molecules and the cytoskeleton are reciprocal, and that while IgSF cell adhesion molecules regulate the assembly of the cytoskeleton, the cytoskeleton plays an important role in regulation of the functions of IgSF cell adhesion molecules. Reciprocal interactions between NCAM and L1 family members and the cytoskeleton and their role in neuronal differentiation and synapse formation are discussed in detail. PMID:26909348

  7. Natural Product Libraries to Accelerate the High Throughput Discovery of Therapeutic Leads±

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Tyler A.; Sohn, Johann; Inman, Wayne D.; Estee, Samarkand A.; Loveridge, Steven T.; Vervoort, Helene C.; Tenney, Karen; Liu, Junke; Ang, Kenny Kean-Hooi; Ratnam, Joseline; Bray, Walter M.; Gassner, Nadine C.; Shen, Young Y.; Lokey, R. Scott; McKerrow, James H.; Boundy-Mills, Kyria; Nukanto, Arif; Kanti, Atit; Julistiono, Heddy; Kardono, Leonardus B. S.; Bjeldanes, Leonard F.; Crews, Phillip

    2011-01-01

    A high throughput (HT) paradigm generating LC-MS-UV-ELSD based natural product libraries to discover compounds with new bioactivities and or molecular structures is presented. To validate this methodology an extract of the Indo Pacific marine sponge Cacospongia mycofijiensis was evaluated using assays involving cytoskeletal profiling, tumor cell lines, and parasites. Twelve known compounds were identified including the latrunculins (1–4, 10), fijianolides (5, 8–9), mycothiazole (11), the aignopsanes (6–7) and sacrotride A (13). Compounds 1–4, 5, 8–11 exhibited bioactivity not previously reported against the parasite T. brucei, while 11 showed selectivity for lymphoma (U937) tumor cell lines. Four new compounds were also discovered including: aignopsanoic acid B (13), apo latrunculin T (14), 20-methoxy-fijianolide A (15) and aignopsane ketal (16). Compounds 13 and 16 represent important derivatives of the aignopsane class, 14 exhibited inhibition of T. brucei without disrupting microfilament assembly and 15 demonstrated modest microtubule stabilizing effects. The use of removable well plate libraries to avoid false positives from extracts enriched with only 1–2 major metabolites is also discussed. Overall, these results highlight the advantages of applying modern methods in natural products-based research to accelerate the HT discovery of therapeutic leads and or new molecular structures using LC-MS-UV-ELSD based libraries. PMID:22129061

  8. Comparative proteomic analysis of human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells under simulated microgravity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongqian; Wang, Hongbin; Lai, Chengjun; Wang, Lu; Deng, Yulin

    2013-02-01

    Microgravity is one of the most important features in spaceflight. Previous evidence has shown that neurophysiological impairment signs occurred under microgravity. The present study was undertaken to explore the change in protein abundance in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells that were grown in a microgravity environment. The comparative proteomic method based on the (18)O labeling technique was applied to investigate the up-regulated proteins and down-regulated proteins in SH-SY5Y under simulated microgravity. Twenty-two differentially abundant proteins were quantified in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. The cell microfilament network was disrupted under simulated microgravity, which was determined by the immunocytochemistry. The concentration of reactive oxygen species, malondialdehyde, and free Ca2+ ion significantly increased, and the level of ATP significantly decreased under simulated microgravity. However, there was no obvious cell apoptosis observed under simulated microgravity. These results provide new molecular evidence for the change in protein abundance in SH-SY5Y cells under simulated microgravity, which might unfold biological mechanisms and the development of effective countermeasures to deal with microgravity-related neurological problems. We believe that the state-of-the-art proteomic assay may be a means by which aerospace scientists will begin to understand the underlying mechanisms of space life activities at the protein level.

  9. Cytological and molecular characterization of non-host resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana against wheat stripe rust.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yulin; Zhang, Hongchang; Yao, Juanni; Han, Qingmei; Wang, Xiaojie; Huang, Lili; Kang, Zhensheng

    2013-01-01

    Wheat stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), is one of the most destructive diseases of wheat worldwide. We report the use of the non-host plant Arabidopsis thaliana to identify the basis of resistance to Pst at the cytological and molecular levels. No visible symptoms were observed on Arabidopsis leaves inoculated with Pst. Microscopic observations showed that significantly reduced numbers of Pst urediospores had successfully achieved penetration in Arabidopsis compared with those in wheat. There were significant differences in the frequency of stomatal penetration but not in fungal growth among different Pst races in Arabidopsis. The fungus failed to successfully form haustoria in Arabidopsis and attempted infection induced an active response including accumulation of phenolic compounds and callose deposition in plant cells. A set of defence-related genes were also up regulated during the Pst infection. Compared with wild type plants, increased fungal growth was observed in an npr1-1 mutant and in NahG transformed plants, which both are insensitive to salicylic acid. However, treatment of Arabidopsis plants with cytochalasin B, an inhibitor of actin microfilament polymerization, did not increase susceptibility to Pst. Our results demonstrate that Arabidopsis can be used to study mechanisms of non-host resistance to wheat stripe rust, and highlight the significance of participation of salicylic acid in non-host resistance to rust fungi.

  10. Microtubule Polymerization Functions in Hypersensitive Response and Accumulation of H2O2 in Wheat Induced by the Stripe Rust.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Wang, Yang; Liu, Xinjie; Xu, Yuanliu; Ma, Qing

    2016-01-01

    The plant cytoskeleton, including microtubules and microfilaments, is one of the important factors in determining the polarity of cell division and growth, as well as the interaction of plants with invading pathogens. In defense responses of wheat against the stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici) infection, hypersensitive response is the most crucial event to prevent the spread of pathogens. In order to reveal the effect of microtubules on the hypersensitive cell death and H2O2 accumulation in the interaction of wheat (Triticum aestivum) cv. Suwon 11 with an incompatible race, CYR23, wheat leaves were treated with microtubule inhibitor, oryzalin, before inoculation. The results showed that the frequency of infection sites with hypersensitive response occurrence was significantly reduced, and hypersensitive cell death in wheat leaves was suppressed compared to the control. In addition, the frequency and the incidence of infected cells with H2O2 accumulation were also reduced after the treatment with oryzalin. Those results indicated that microtubules are related to hypersensitive response and H2O2 accumulation in wheat induced by the stripe rust, and depolymerization of microtubules reduces the resistance of plants to pathogen infection in incompatible interaction, suggesting that microtubules play a potential role in the expression of resistance of wheat against the stripe rust fungus.

  11. Forming a tough shell via an intracellular matrix and cellular junctions in the tail epidermis of Oikopleura dioica (Chordata: Tunicata: Appendicularia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, Keisuke; Nishino, Atsuo; Hirose, Euichi

    2011-08-01

    A postanal tail is a major synapomorphy of the phylum Chordata, which is composed of three subphyla: Vertebrata, Cephalochordata, and Tunicata (Urochordata). Among tunicates, appendicularians are the only group that retains the tail in the adult, and the adult tail functions in locomotion and feeding in combination with a cellulose-based house structure. Given the phylogenetic position of tunicates, the appendicularian adult tail may possess ancestral features of the chordate tail. We assess the ultrastructural development of the tail epidermis of the appendicularian Oikopleura dioica. The epidermis of the larval tail is enclosed by the larval envelope, which is a thin sheet similar to the outer tunic layer of ascidian larvae. The epidermis of the adult tail seems to bear no tunic-like cellulosic integuments, and the tail fin is a simple folding of the epidermis. Every epidermal cell, except for the triangular cells at the edge of the tail fin, has a conspicuous matrix layer of fibrous content in the apical cytoplasm without enclosing membranes. The epidermis of the larval tail does not have a fibrous matrix layer, suggesting the production of the layer during larval development and metamorphosis. Zonulae adhaerentes firmly bind the epidermal cells of the adult tail to one another, and the dense microfilaments lining the cell borders constitute a mechanical support for the cell membranes. The intracellular matrix, cell junctions, and cytoskeletons probably make the tail epidermis a tough, flexible shell supporting the active beating of the oikopleuran adult tail.

  12. Forming a tough shell via an intracellular matrix and cellular junctions in the tail epidermis of Oikopleura dioica (Chordata: Tunicata: Appendicularia).

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Keisuke; Nishino, Atsuo; Hirose, Euichi

    2011-08-01

    A postanal tail is a major synapomorphy of the phylum Chordata, which is composed of three subphyla: Vertebrata, Cephalochordata, and Tunicata (Urochordata). Among tunicates, appendicularians are the only group that retains the tail in the adult, and the adult tail functions in locomotion and feeding in combination with a cellulose-based house structure. Given the phylogenetic position of tunicates, the appendicularian adult tail may possess ancestral features of the chordate tail. We assess the ultrastructural development of the tail epidermis of the appendicularian Oikopleura dioica. The epidermis of the larval tail is enclosed by the larval envelope, which is a thin sheet similar to the outer tunic layer of ascidian larvae. The epidermis of the adult tail seems to bear no tunic-like cellulosic integuments, and the tail fin is a simple folding of the epidermis. Every epidermal cell, except for the triangular cells at the edge of the tail fin, has a conspicuous matrix layer of fibrous content in the apical cytoplasm without enclosing membranes. The epidermis of the larval tail does not have a fibrous matrix layer, suggesting the production of the layer during larval development and metamorphosis. Zonulae adhaerentes firmly bind the epidermal cells of the adult tail to one another, and the dense microfilaments lining the cell borders constitute a mechanical support for the cell membranes. The intracellular matrix, cell junctions, and cytoskeletons probably make the tail epidermis a tough, flexible shell supporting the active beating of the oikopleuran adult tail.

  13. Disruption of the microtubule network alters cellulose deposition and causes major changes in pectin distribution in the cell wall of the green alga, Penium margaritaceum.

    PubMed

    Domozych, David S; Sørensen, Iben; Sacks, Carly; Brechka, Hannah; Andreas, Amanda; Fangel, Jonatan U; Rose, Jocelyn K C; Willats, William G T; Popper, Zoë A

    2014-02-01

    Application of the dintroaniline compound, oryzalin, which inhibits microtubule formation, to the unicellular green alga Penium margaritaceum caused major perturbations to its cell morphology, such as swelling at the wall expansion zone in the central isthmus region. Cell wall structure was also notably altered, including a thinning of the inner cellulosic wall layer and a major disruption of the homogalacturonan (HG)-rich outer wall layer lattice. Polysaccharide microarray analysis indicated that the oryzalin treatment resulted in an increase in HG abundance in treated cells but a decrease in other cell wall components, specifically the pectin rhamnogalacturonan I (RG-I) and arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs). The ring of microtubules that characterizes the cortical area of the cell isthmus zone was significantly disrupted by oryzalin, as was the extensive peripheral network of actin microfilaments. It is proposed that the disruption of the microtubule network altered cellulose production, the main load-bearing component of the cell wall, which in turn affected the incorporation of HG in the two outer wall layers, suggesting coordinated mechanisms of wall polymer deposition.

  14. Automorphosis of higher plants on a 3-D clinostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoson, T.; Kamisaka, S.; Yamashita, M.; Masuda, Y.

    On a three-dimensional (3-D) clinostat, various plant organs developed statocytes capable of responding to the gravity vector. The graviresponse of primary roots of garden cress and maize grown on the clinostat was the same as the control roots, whereas that of maize coleoptiles was reduced. When maize seedlings were grown in the presence of 10^-4 M gibberellic acid and kinetin, the graviresponse of both roots and shoots was suppressed. The corresponding suppression of amyloplast development was observed in the clinostatted and the hormone-treated seedlings. Maize roots and shoots showed spontaneous curvatures in different portions on the 3-D clinostat. The hormone treatment did not significantly influence such an automorphic curvature. When the root cap was removed, maize roots did not curve gravitropically. However, the removal suppressed the automorphic curvatures only slightly. On the other hand, the removal of coleoptile tip did not influence its graviresponse, whereas the spontaneous curvature of decapitated coleoptiles on the clinostat was strongly suppressed. Also, cytochalasin B differently affected the gravitropic and the automorphic curvatures of maize roots and shoots. From these results it is concluded that the graviperception and the early processes of signal transmission are unnecessary for automorphoses under simulated microgravity conditions. Moreover, the results support the view that the amyloplasts act as statoliths probably via an interaction with microfilaments.

  15. Mechanical signaling and the cellular response to extracellular matrix in angiogenesis and cardiovascular physiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingber, Donald E.

    2002-01-01

    Great advances have been made in the identification of the soluble angiogenic factors, insoluble extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules, and receptor signaling pathways that mediate control of angiogenesis--the growth of blood capillaries. This review focuses on work that explores how endothelial cells integrate these chemical signals with mechanical cues from their local tissue microenvironment so as to produce functional capillary networks that exhibit specialized form as well as function. These studies have revealed that ECM governs whether an endothelial cell will switch between growth, differentiation, motility, or apoptosis programs in response to a soluble stimulus based on its ability to mechanically resist cell tractional forces and thereby produce cell and cytoskeletal distortion. Transmembrane integrin receptors play a key role in this mechanochemical transduction process because they both organize a cytoskeletal signaling complex within the focal adhesion and preferentially focus mechanical forces on this site. Molecular filaments within the internal cytoskeleton--microfilaments, microtubules, and intermediate filaments--also contribute to the cell's structural and functional response to mechanical stress through their role as discrete support elements within a tensegrity-stabilized cytoskeletal array. Importantly, a similar form of mechanical control also has been shown to be involved in the regulation of contractility in vascular smooth muscle cells and cardiac myocytes. Thus, the mechanism by which cells perform mechanochemical transduction and the implications of these findings for morphogenetic control are discussed in the wider context of vascular development and cardiovascular physiology.

  16. Mechanical behavior in living cells consistent with the tensegrity model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, N.; Naruse, K.; Stamenovic, D.; Fredberg, J. J.; Mijailovich, S. M.; Tolic-Norrelykke, I. M.; Polte, T.; Mannix, R.; Ingber, D. E.

    2001-01-01

    Alternative models of cell mechanics depict the living cell as a simple mechanical continuum, porous filament gel, tensed cortical membrane, or tensegrity network that maintains a stabilizing prestress through incorporation of discrete structural elements that bear compression. Real-time microscopic analysis of cells containing GFP-labeled microtubules and associated mitochondria revealed that living cells behave like discrete structures composed of an interconnected network of actin microfilaments and microtubules when mechanical stresses are applied to cell surface integrin receptors. Quantitation of cell tractional forces and cellular prestress by using traction force microscopy confirmed that microtubules bear compression and are responsible for a significant portion of the cytoskeletal prestress that determines cell shape stability under conditions in which myosin light chain phosphorylation and intracellular calcium remained unchanged. Quantitative measurements of both static and dynamic mechanical behaviors in cells also were consistent with specific a priori predictions of the tensegrity model. These findings suggest that tensegrity represents a unified model of cell mechanics that may help to explain how mechanical behaviors emerge through collective interactions among different cytoskeletal filaments and extracellular adhesions in living cells.

  17. Myofibroblast secretome and its auto-/paracrine signaling.

    PubMed

    Bomb, Ritin; Heckle, Mark R; Sun, Yao; Mancarella, Salvatore; Guntaka, Ramareddy V; Gerling, Ivan C; Weber, Karl T

    2016-01-01

    Myofibroblasts (myoFb) are phenotypically transformed, contractile fibroblast-like cells expressing α-smooth muscle actin microfilaments. They are integral to collagen fibrillogenesis with scar tissue formation at sites of repair irrespective of the etiologic origins of injury or tissue involved. MyoFb can persist long after healing is complete, where their ongoing turnover of collagen accounts for a progressive structural remodeling of an organ (a.k.a. fibrosis, sclerosis or cirrhosis). Such persistent metabolic activity is derived from a secretome consisting of requisite components in the de novo generation of angiotensin (Ang) II. Autocrine and paracrine signaling induced by tissue AngII is expressed via AT1 receptor ligand binding to respectively promote: i) regulation of myoFb collagen synthesis via the fibrogenic cytokine TGF-β1-Smad pathway; and ii) dedifferentiation and protein degradation of atrophic myocytes immobilized and ensnared by fibrillar collagen at sites of scarring. Several cardioprotective strategies in the prevention of fibrosis and involving myofibroblasts are considered. They include: inducing myoFb apoptosis through inactivation of antiapoptotic proteins; AT1 receptor antagonist to interfere with auto-/paracrine myoFb signaling or to induce counterregulatory expression of ACE2; and attacking the AngII-AT1R-TGF-β1-Smad pathway by antibody or the use of triplex-forming oligonucleotides.

  18. Sense and antisense modification of glial alpha B-crystallin production results in alterations of stress fiber formation and thermoresistance.

    PubMed

    Iwaki, T; Iwaki, A; Tateishi, J; Goldman, J E

    1994-06-01

    The phenotypic effects of selectively altering the levels of alpha B-crystallin in cultured glial cells were analyzed using sense and antisense approaches. Rat C6 glioma cells and human U-373MG glioma cells were transfected with a rat alpha B-crystallin sense cDNA or an antisense cDNA regulated by a Rous sarcoma virus promoter to alter cellular levels of alpha B-crystallin. The antisense strategy resulted in decreased alpha B-crystallin levels, as revealed by Western blot and immunocytochemical analyses. The reduced alpha B-crystallin expression was accompanied by alterations in cellular phenotype: (a) a reduction of cell size and/or a slender cell morphology; (b) a disorganized microfilament network; and (c) a reduction of cell adhesiveness. Like HSP27, the presence of additional alpha B-crystallin protein confers a thermoresistant phenotype to stable transfectants. Thus, alpha B-crystallin in glioma cells plays a role in their thermal resistance and may contribute to the stability of cytoskeletal organization. PMID:8207065

  19. The behaviour of the plasma membrane during plasmolysis: a study by UV microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lang-Pauluzzi, I

    2000-06-01

    A high resolution ultraviolet (UV) bright-field microscope was used to analyse the formation of Hechtian strands and the Hechtian reticulation that remain attached to the cell wall after plasmolysis and deplasmolysis of onion inner epidermal cells. In real time video images, UV microscopy allowed a detailed investigation of the dynamic behaviour of the plasma membrane during the processes of osmotic water loss and uptake. Furthermore, the role of cytoskeletal elements as possible linkers of the plasma membrane to the cell wall was probed by application of cytoskeletal drugs during plasmolysis. Microtubules were depolymerized in oryzalin, and latrunculin B was used to destabilize actin microfilaments. The results showed no visible changes in the formation of the Hechtian reticulation or strands. Plasmolysis forms appeared to be normal, indicating stong membrane-to-wall attachments independent of cytoskeletal elements. During re-expansion of the protoplast in deplasmolysis, the plasma membrane incorporated Hechtian strands and subprotoplasts, fused with the Hechtian reticulation and finally realigned at the cell wall.

  20. The IQGAP-related protein DGAP1 interacts with Rac and is involved in the modulation of the F-actin cytoskeleton and control of cell motility.

    PubMed

    Faix, J; Clougherty, C; Konzok, A; Mintert, U; Murphy, J; Albrecht, R; Mühlbauer, B; Kuhlmann, J

    1998-10-01

    DGAP1 of Dictyostelium discoideum is a cell cortex associated 95 kDa protein that shows homology to both RasGTPase-activating proteins (RasGAPs) and RasGAP-related proteins. When tested for RasGAP activity, recombinant DGAP1 protein did not promote the GTPase activity of human H-Ras or of Dictyostelium RasG in vitro. Instead, DGAP1 bound to Dictyostelium Rac1A and human Rac1, but not to human Cdc42. DGAP1 preferentially interacted with the activated GTP-bound forms of Rac1 and Rac1A, but did not affect the GTPase activities. Since Rho-type GTPases are implicated in the formation of specific F-actin structures and in the control of cell morphology, the microfilament system of mutants that either lack or overexpress DGAP1 has been analysed. DGAP1-null mutants showed elevated levels of F-actin that was organised in large leading edges, membrane ruffles or numerous large filopods. Expression of actin fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) was used to monitor the actin dynamics in these cells, and revealed that the F-actin cytoskeleton of DGAP1-null cells was rapidly re-arranged to form ruffles and filopods. Conversely, in DGAP1-overexpressing cells, the formation of cellular projections containing F-actin was largely suppressed. Measurement of cell migration demonstrated that DGAP1 expression is inversely correlated with the speed of cell motility. PMID:9739079

  1. Intraclonal heterogeneity and distinct molecular mechanisms characterize the development of t(4;14) and t(11;14) myeloma.

    PubMed

    Walker, Brian A; Wardell, Christopher P; Melchor, Lorenzo; Hulkki, Sanna; Potter, Nicola E; Johnson, David C; Fenwick, Kerry; Kozarewa, Iwanka; Gonzalez, David; Lord, Christopher J; Ashworth, Alan; Davies, Faith E; Morgan, Gareth J

    2012-08-01

    We have used whole exome sequencing to compare a group of presentation t(4;14) with t(11;14) cases of myeloma to define the mutational landscape. Each case was characterized by a median of 24.5 exonic nonsynonymous single-nucleotide variations, and there was a consistently higher number of mutations in the t(4;14) group, but this number did not reach statistical significance. We show that the transition and transversion rates in the 2 subgroups are similar, suggesting that there was no specific mechanism leading to mutation differentiating the 2 groups. Only 3% of mutations were seen in both groups, and recurrently mutated genes include NRAS, KRAS, BRAF, and DIS3 as well as DNAH5, a member of the axonemal dynein family. The pattern of mutation in each group was distinct, with the t(4;14) group being characterized by deregulation of chromatin organization, actin filament, and microfilament movement. Recurrent RAS pathway mutations identified subclonal heterogeneity at a mutational level in both groups, with mutations being present as either dominant or minor subclones. The presence of subclonal diversity was confirmed at a single-cell level using other tumor-acquired mutations. These results are consistent with a distinct molecular pathogenesis underlying each subgroup and have important impacts on targeted treatment strategies. The Medical Research Council Myeloma IX trial is registered under ISRCTN68454111. PMID:22573403

  2. Ultrastructural localization of plasma membrane-associated urokinase- type plasminogen activator at focal contacts

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    We have recently shown that urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 are both found extracellularly beneath cultured human skin fibroblasts and HT-1080 sarcoma cells, but in distinct localizations. Here, the ultrastructural distribution of u-PA was studied using immunoferritin electron microscopy. In HT-1080 cells, u-PA on the extracellular aspect of the plasma membrane was detected at sites of direct contact of the cell with the growth substratum beneath all parts of the ventral cell surface. The ferritin-labeled adhesion plaques, which were enriched in submembraneous microfilaments, were frequently seen at the leading lamellae of the cells as well as in lamellipodia and microspikes. Besides the cell-substratum adhesion plaques, ferritin label was detected at cell-cell contact sites. Double-label immunofluorescence showed a striking colocalization of u-PA and vinculin in both HT-1080 cells and WI-38 lung fibroblasts, which is consistent with u-PA being a focal contact component. The u-PA-containing focal contacts of WI-38 cells had no direct codistribution with fibronectin fibrils. In WI-38 cells made stationary by cultivation in a medium containing 0.5% FCS, vinculin plaques became highly elongated and more centrally located, whereas u-PA immunolabel disappeared from such focal adhesions. These findings show that plasma membrane-associated u-PA is an intrinsic component of focal contacts, where, we propose, it enables directional proteolysis for cell migration and invasion. PMID:3123496

  3. Epithelial contact guidance on well-defined micro- and nanostructured substrates

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Ana I.; Abrams, George A.; Bertics, Paul J.; Murphy, Christopher J.; Nealey, Paul F.

    2006-01-01

    Summary The human corneal basement membrane has a rich felt-like surface topography with feature dimensions between 20 nm and 200 nm. On the basis of these findings, we designed lithographically defined substrates to investigate whether nanotopography is a relevant stimulus for humancorneal epithelial cells. We found that cells elongated and aligned along patterns of grooves and ridges with feature dimensions as small as 70 nm, whereas on smooth substrates, cells were mostly round. The percentage of aligned cells was constant on substrate tomographies with lateral dimensions ranging from the nano- to the micronscale, and increased with groove depth. The presence of serum in the culture medium resulted in a larger percentage of cells aligning along the topographic patterns than when no serum was added to the basal medium. When present, actin microfilaments and focal adhesions were aligned along the substrate topographies. The width of the focal adhesions was determined by the width of the ridges in the underlying substrate. This work documents that biologic length-scale topographic features that model features encountered in the native basement membrane can profoundly affect epithelial cell behavior. PMID:12692189

  4. Pharmacological targeting of actin-dependent dynamin oligomerization ameliorates chronic kidney disease in diverse animal models

    PubMed Central

    Schiffer, Mario; Teng, Beina; Gu, Changkyu; Shchedrina, Valentina A.; Kasaikina, Marina; Pham, Vincent A.; Hanke, Nils; Rong, Song; Gueler, Faikah; Schroder, Patricia; Tossidou, Irini; Park, Joon-Keun; Staggs, Lynne; Haller, Hermann; Erschow, Sergej; Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Wei, Changli; Chen, Chuang; Tardi, Nicholas; Hakroush, Samy; Selig, Martin K.; Vasilyev, Aleksandr; Merscher, Sandra; Reiser, Jochen; Sever, Sanja

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of the actin cytoskeleton in podocytes represents a common pathway in the pathogenesis of proteinuria across a spectrum of chronic kidney diseases (CKD). The GTPase dynamin has been implicated in the maintenance of cellular architecture in podocytes through its direct interaction with actin. Furthermore, the propensity of dynamin to oligomerize into higher-order structures in an actin-dependent manner and to crosslink actin microfilaments into higher order structures have been correlated with increased actin polymerization and global organization of the actin cytoskeleton in the cell. We found that use of the small molecule Bis-T-23, which promotes actin-dependent dynamin oligomerization and thus increased actin polymerization in injured podocytes, was sufficient to improve renal health in diverse models of both transient kidney disease and of CKD. In particular, administration of Bis-T-23 in these renal disease models restored the normal ultrastructure of podocyte foot processes, lowered proteinuria, lowered collagen IV deposits in the mesangial matrix, diminished mesangial matrix expansion and extended lifespan. These results further establish that alterations in the actin cytoskeleton of kidney podocytes is a common hallmark of CKD, while also underscoring the significant regenerative potential of injured glomeruli and that targeting the oligomerization cycle of dynamin represents an attractive potential therapeutic target to treat CKD. PMID:25962121

  5. A Method for Quantifying Mechanical Properties of Tissue following Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Vy; Bigley, Tarin; Terhune, Scott S.; Wakatsuki, Tetsuro

    2012-01-01

    Viral infection and replication involves the reorganization of the actin network within the host cell. Actin plays a central role in the mechanical properties of cells. We have demonstrated a method to quantify changes in mechanical properties of fabricated model three-dimensional (3D) connective tissue following viral infection. Using this method, we have characterized the impact of infection by the human herpesvirus, cytomegalovirus (HCMV). HCMV is a member of the herpesvirus family and infects a variety of cell types including fibroblasts. In the body, fibroblasts are necessary for maintaining connective tissue and function by creating mechanical force. Using this 3D connective tissue model, we observed that infection disrupted the cell’s ability to generate force and reduced the cumulative contractile force of the tissue. The addition of HCMV viral particles in the absence of both viral gene expression and DNA replication was sufficient to disrupt tissue function. We observed that alterations of the mechanical properties are, in part, due to a disruption of the underlying complex actin microfilament network established by the embedded fibroblasts. Finally, we were able to prevent HCMV-mediated disruption of tissue function by the addition of human immune globulin against HCMV. This study demonstrates a method to quantify the impact of viral infection on mechanical properties which are not evident using conventional cell culture systems. PMID:22870300

  6. The Presynaptic Microtubule Cytoskeleton in Physiological and Pathological Conditions: Lessons from Drosophila Fragile X Syndrome and Hereditary Spastic Paraplegias.

    PubMed

    Bodaleo, Felipe J; Gonzalez-Billault, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The capacity of the nervous system to generate neuronal networks relies on the establishment and maintenance of synaptic contacts. Synapses are composed of functionally different presynaptic and postsynaptic compartments. An appropriate synaptic architecture is required to provide the structural basis that supports synaptic transmission, a process involving changes in cytoskeletal dynamics. Actin microfilaments are the main cytoskeletal components present at both presynaptic and postsynaptic terminals in glutamatergic synapses. However, in the last few years it has been demonstrated that microtubules (MTs) transiently invade dendritic spines, promoting their maturation. Nevertheless, the presence and functions of MTs at the presynaptic site are still a matter of debate. Early electron microscopy (EM) studies revealed that MTs are present in the presynaptic terminals of the central nervous system (CNS) where they interact with synaptic vesicles (SVs) and reach the active zone. These observations have been reproduced by several EM protocols; however, there is empirical heterogeneity in detecting presynaptic MTs, since they appear to be both labile and unstable. Moreover, increasing evidence derived from studies in the fruit fly neuromuscular junction proposes different roles for MTs in regulating presynaptic function in physiological and pathological conditions. In this review, we summarize the main findings that support the presence and roles of MTs at presynaptic terminals, integrating descriptive and biochemical analyses, and studies performed in invertebrate genetic models. PMID:27504085

  7. Structural Differences Explain Diverse Functions of Plasmodium Actins

    PubMed Central

    Vahokoski, Juha; Martinez, Silvia Muñico; Ignatev, Alexander; Lepper, Simone; Frischknecht, Friedrich; Sidén-Kiamos, Inga; Sachse, Carsten; Kursula, Inari

    2014-01-01

    Actins are highly conserved proteins and key players in central processes in all eukaryotic cells. The two actins of the malaria parasite are among the most divergent eukaryotic actins and also differ from each other more than isoforms in any other species. Microfilaments have not been directly observed in Plasmodium and are presumed to be short and highly dynamic. We show that actin I cannot complement actin II in male gametogenesis, suggesting critical structural differences. Cryo-EM reveals that Plasmodium actin I has a unique filament structure, whereas actin II filaments resemble canonical F-actin. Both Plasmodium actins hydrolyze ATP more efficiently than α-actin, and unlike any other actin, both parasite actins rapidly form short oligomers induced by ADP. Crystal structures of both isoforms pinpoint several structural changes in the monomers causing the unique polymerization properties. Inserting the canonical D-loop to Plasmodium actin I leads to the formation of long filaments in vitro. In vivo, this chimera restores gametogenesis in parasites lacking actin II, suggesting that stable filaments are required for exflagellation. Together, these data underline the divergence of eukaryotic actins and demonstrate how structural differences in the monomers translate into filaments with different properties, implying that even eukaryotic actins have faced different evolutionary pressures and followed different paths for developing their polymerization properties. PMID:24743229

  8. Microfluidic Investigation Reveals Distinct Roles for Actin Cytoskeleton and Myosin II Activity in Capillary Leukocyte Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Gabriele, Sylvain; Benoliel, Anne-Marie; Bongrand, Pierre; Théodoly, Olivier

    2009-01-01

    Circulating leukocyte sequestration in pulmonary capillaries is arguably the initiating event of lung injury in acute respiratory distress syndrome. We present a microfluidic investigation of the roles of actin organization and myosin II activity during the different stages of leukocyte trafficking through narrow capillaries (entry, transit and shape relaxation) using specific drugs (latrunculin A, jasplakinolide, and blebbistatin). The deformation rate during entry reveals that cell stiffness depends strongly on F-actin organization and hardly on myosin II activity, supporting a microfilament role in leukocyte sequestration. In the transit stage, cell friction is influenced by stiffness, demonstrating that the actin network is not completely broken after a forced entry into a capillary. Conversely, membrane unfolding was independent of leukocyte stiffness. The surface area of sequestered leukocytes increased by up to 160% in the absence of myosin II activity, showing the major role of molecular motors in microvilli wrinkling and zipping. Finally, cell shape relaxation was largely independent of both actin organization and myosin II activity, whereas a deformed state was required for normal trafficking through capillary segments. PMID:19450501

  9. Cytochalasin B induces apoptosis through the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in HeLa human cervical carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jiyoung; Yi, Myeongjin; Zhang, Xin; Xu, Yi; Jung, Jee H; Kim, Dong-Kyoo

    2013-10-01

    Cytochalasin B (CB) is a cell-permeable mycotoxin. It inhibits cytoplasmic division by blocking the formation of contractile microfilaments, it inhibits cell movement and induces nuclear extrusion. In the present study, we investigated the anticancer activity of CB in HeLa human cervical carcinoma cells. CB showed significant cytotoxicity, with an IC50 of 7.9 µM, in a WST-8 assay and significantly inhibited cell proliferation. Furthermore, results from Annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide double-staining indicated that CB induced early apoptosis of HeLa cells in a time-dependent manner. The cells exhibited apoptotic morphology, including cell shrinkage and nuclear condensation. CB induced cell cycle arrest at the S phase. We also observed inhibition of DNA replication in a [3H]-thymidine incorporation assay. Furthermore, CB induced a time-dependent increase in reactive oxygen species and a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential. Western blot analysis showed an increase in levels of mitochondrial factors Bax and Bcl-2, which was followed by activation of caspase-9 and -3. These results suggested that CB induced apoptosis via a mitochondrial-dependent pathway in HeLa cells. PMID:23863920

  10. Atomic force microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy on the cytoskeleton of permeabilised and embedded cells.

    PubMed

    Meller, Karl; Theiss, Carsten

    2006-03-01

    We describe a technical method of cell permeabilisation and embedding to study the organisation and distribution of intracellular proteins with aid of atomic force microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy in identical areas. While confocal laser scanning microscopy is useful for the identification of certain proteins subsequent labelling with markers or antibodies, atomic force microscopy allows the observation of macromolecular structures in fixed and living cells. To demonstrate the field of application of this preparatory technique, cells were permeabilised, fixed, and the actin cytoskeleton was stained with phalloidin-rhodamine. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to show the organisation of these microfilaments, e.g. geodesic dome structures. Thereafter, cells were embedded in Durcupan water-soluble resin, followed by UV-polymerisation of resin at 4 degrees C. This procedure allowed intracellular visualisation of the cell nucleus or cytoskeletal elements by atomic force microscopy, for instance to analyse the globular organisation of actin filaments. Therefore, this method offers a great potential to combine both microscopy techniques in order to understand and interpret intracellular protein relations, for example, the biochemical and morphological interaction of the cytoskeleton. PMID:16360280

  11. Invasion of HeLa 229 cells by virulent Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed Central

    Ewanowich, C A; Melton, A R; Weiss, A A; Sherburne, R K; Peppler, M S

    1989-01-01

    Phase-dependent invasive behavior of Bordetella pertussis was demonstrated by recovery of viable organisms from gentamicin-treated HeLa cell monolayers and by transmission electron microscopy. Several mutants of B. pertussis with Tn5 or Tn5 lac inserted into various vir-regulated genes were evaluated for differences in their invasive abilities. Mutants lacking filamentous hemagglutinin, pertussis toxin, and two as yet uncharacterized vir-regulated products had levels of invasion significantly lower than that of the parent strain BP338. In contrast, invasion by mutants lacking adenylate cyclase toxin was significantly increased compared with that of wild-type B. pertussis. This increase in invasion was eliminated when concentrations of intracellular cyclic 3'-5' AMP were stimulated by treating HeLa cells with cholera toxin or forskolin. Entry of B. pertussis occurred through a microfilament-dependent phagocytic process, as evidenced by the marked reduction in uptake following treatment of HeLa cells with cytochalasin D. Invasion was inhibited with polyclonal anti-B. pertussis and anti-filamentous hemagglutinin antisera. In addition, a monoclonal antibody against lipooligosaccharide A reduced uptake by 65.5%. The preservation of HeLa cell integrity and the limited replication of intracellular bacteria suggest that invasion may represent a means by which B. pertussis evades an active host immune response. Images PMID:2547718

  12. The Drosophila formin Fhos is a primary mediator of sarcomeric thin-filament array assembly

    PubMed Central

    Shwartz, Arkadi; Dhanyasi, Nagaraju; Schejter, Eyal D; Shilo, Ben-Zion

    2016-01-01

    Actin-based thin filament arrays constitute a fundamental core component of muscle sarcomeres. We have used formation of the Drosophila indirect flight musculature for studying the assembly and maturation of thin-filament arrays in a skeletal muscle model system. Employing GFP-tagged actin monomer incorporation, we identify several distinct phases in the dynamic construction of thin-filament arrays. This sequence includes assembly of nascent arrays after an initial period of intensive microfilament synthesis, followed by array elongation, primarily from filament pointed-ends, radial growth of the arrays via recruitment of peripheral filaments and continuous barbed-end turnover. Using genetic approaches we have identified Fhos, the single Drosophila homolog of the FHOD sub-family of formins, as a primary and versatile mediator of IFM thin-filament organization. Localization of Fhos to the barbed-ends of the arrays, achieved via a novel N-terminal domain, appears to be a critical aspect of its sarcomeric roles. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16540.001 PMID:27731794

  13. Cytoskeletal and mitochondrial properties of bovine oocytes obtained by Ovum Pick-Up: the effects of follicle stimulation and in vitro maturation.

    PubMed

    Somfai, Tamás; Matoba, Satoko; Inaba, Yasushi; Nakai, Michiko; Imai, Kei; Nagai, Takashi; Geshi, Masaya

    2015-12-01

    Follicle stimulation by follicular stimulating hormone (FSH) is known to improve developmental competence of bovine oocytes obtained by Ovum Pick-Up (OPU); however, the exact factors in oocytes affected by this treatment have remained unclear. We compared in vitro matured (IVM) oocytes obtained at the immature stage from cows by OPU either without or with stimulation with FSH (non-stimulated and stimulated OPU, respectively) to those obtained by superstimulation and in vivo maturation in terms of cytoskeleton morphology, mitochondrial distribution, intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content and H2 O2 levels at the metaphase-II stage and intracellular Ca(2+) levels after in vitro fertilization (IVF). Confocal microscopy after immunostaining revealed reduced size of the meiotic spindle, associated with increased tendencies of microfilament degradation and insufficient mitochondrial re-distribution in non-stimulated OPU-derived IVM oocytes compared with those collected by stimulated OPU, which in turn resembled in vivo matured oocytes. However, there was no difference in mitochondrial functions between oocytes obtained by stimulated or non-stimulated OPU in terms of ATP content, cytoplasmic H2 O2 levels, base Ca(2+) levels and the frequencies and amplitudes of Ca(2+) oscillations after IVF. Larger size of metaphase spindles in oocytes obtained by stimulated OPU may reflect and potentially contribute to their high developmental competence.

  14. Cytotoxic Effects of Tropodithietic Acid on Mammalian Clonal Cell Lines of Neuronal and Glial Origin.

    PubMed

    Wichmann, Heidi; Vocke, Farina; Brinkhoff, Thorsten; Simon, Meinhard; Richter-Landsberg, Christiane

    2015-12-01

    The marine metabolite tropodithietic acid (TDA), produced by several Roseobacter clade bacteria, is known for its broad antimicrobial activity. TDA is of interest not only as a probiotic in aquaculture, but also because it might be of use as an antibacterial agent in non-marine or non-aquatic environments, and thus the potentially cytotoxic influences on eukaryotic cells need to be evaluated. The present study was undertaken to investigate its effects on cells of the mammalian nervous system, i.e., neuronal N2a cells and OLN-93 cells as model systems for nerve cells and glia. The data show that in both cell lines TDA exerted morphological changes and cytotoxic effects at a concentration of 0.3-0.5 µg/mL (1.4-2.4 µM). Furthermore, TDA caused a breakdown of the mitochondrial membrane potential, the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases ERK1/2, and the induction of the small heat shock protein HSP32/HO-1, which is considered as a sensor of oxidative stress. The cytotoxic effects were accompanied by an increase in intracellular Ca(2+)-levels, the disturbance of the microtubule network, and the reorganization of the microfilament system. Hence, mammalian cells are a sensitive target for the action of TDA and react by the activation of a stress response resulting in cell death. PMID:26633426

  15. Cytotoxic Effects of Tropodithietic Acid on Mammalian Clonal Cell Lines of Neuronal and Glial Origin

    PubMed Central

    Wichmann, Heidi; Vocke, Farina; Brinkhoff, Thorsten; Simon, Meinhard; Richter-Landsberg, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    The marine metabolite tropodithietic acid (TDA), produced by several Roseobacter clade bacteria, is known for its broad antimicrobial activity. TDA is of interest not only as a probiotic in aquaculture, but also because it might be of use as an antibacterial agent in non-marine or non-aquatic environments, and thus the potentially cytotoxic influences on eukaryotic cells need to be evaluated. The present study was undertaken to investigate its effects on cells of the mammalian nervous system, i.e., neuronal N2a cells and OLN-93 cells as model systems for nerve cells and glia. The data show that in both cell lines TDA exerted morphological changes and cytotoxic effects at a concentration of 0.3–0.5 µg/mL (1.4–2.4 µM). Furthermore, TDA caused a breakdown of the mitochondrial membrane potential, the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases ERK1/2, and the induction of the small heat shock protein HSP32/HO-1, which is considered as a sensor of oxidative stress. The cytotoxic effects were accompanied by an increase in intracellular Ca2+-levels, the disturbance of the microtubule network, and the reorganization of the microfilament system. Hence, mammalian cells are a sensitive target for the action of TDA and react by the activation of a stress response resulting in cell death. PMID:26633426

  16. Myosin II regulation during C. elegans embryonic elongation: LET-502/ROCK, MRCK-1 and PAK-1, three kinases with different roles.

    PubMed

    Gally, Christelle; Wissler, Frédéric; Zahreddine, Hala; Quintin, Sophie; Landmann, Frédéric; Labouesse, Michel

    2009-09-01

    Myosin II plays a central role in epithelial morphogenesis; however, its role has mainly been examined in processes involving a single cell type. Here we analyze the structure, spatial requirement and regulation of myosin II during C. elegans embryonic elongation, a process that involves distinct epidermal cells and muscles. We developed novel GFP probes to visualize the dynamics of actomyosin remodeling, and found that the assembly of myosin II filaments, but not actin microfilaments, depends on the myosin regulatory light chain (MLC-4) and essential light chain (MLC-5, which we identified herein). To determine how myosin II regulates embryonic elongation, we rescued mlc-4 mutants with various constructs and found that MLC-4 is essential in a subset of epidermal cells. We show that phosphorylation of two evolutionary conserved MLC-4 serine and threonine residues is important for myosin II activity and organization. Finally, in an RNAi screen for potential myosin regulatory light chain kinases, we found that the ROCK, PAK and MRCK homologs act redundantly. The combined loss of ROCK and PAK, or ROCK and MRCK, completely prevented embryonic elongation, but a constitutively active form of MLC-4 could only rescue a lack of MRCK. This result, together with systematic genetic epistasis tests with a myosin phosphatase mutation, suggests that ROCK and MRCK regulate MLC-4 and the myosin phosphatase. Moreover, we suggest that ROCK and PAK regulate at least one other target essential for elongation, in addition to MLC-4. PMID:19675126

  17. Enhancement of human polymorphonuclear leukocyte adherence to plastic and endothelium by phorbol myristate acetate. Comparison with human C5a.

    PubMed Central

    Webster, R. O.; Wysolmerski, R. B.; Lagunoff, D.

    1986-01-01

    The adherence of circulating neutrophils to vascular endothelium represents a necessary step in the chemotactic emigration of neutrophils to extravascular inflammatory sites. Studies of neutrophil adherence induced by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) were undertaken to determine the ability of a nonchemotactic neutrophil stimulus to provoke increased adherence. The authors found that the adherence of human neutrophils to plastic surfaces or confluent monolayers of endothelial cells is enhanced in a concentration-dependent fashion by exposure of neutrophils to PMA. The effect of PMA concentration (0.1-5.0 ng/ml) on increased neutrophil adherence parallels that observed for superoxide anion generation and release of lysosomal enzymes from specific granules. Whereas complement C5a-treated neutrophils exhibited a fourfold to fivefold increase in adherence to endothelial cells, PMA-treated neutrophils showed a 10-fold to 20-fold increase. The ability of PMA to cause increased neutrophil adherence to endothelium appeared to be directed primarily at the neutrophil. Pretreatment of neutrophils with PMA was as effective as coincubation in causing increased adherence to plastic surfaces or confluent cultured endothelial cells, but pretreatment of endothelial cells with PMA failed to promote neutrophil adherence. Alteration of neutrophil cytoskeletal structures by cytochalasin B treatment did not prevent subsequent PMA-stimulated neutrophil adherence. These results demonstrate that increased neutrophil adherence to surfaces can be induced by a nonchemotactic stimulus and that neutrophil adherence is independent of organized microfilaments. Images Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:3789092

  18. Extracellular ultrathin fibers sensitive to intracellular reactive oxygen species: Formation of intercellular membrane bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Se-Hui; Park, Jin-Young; Joo, Jung-Hoon; Kim, Young-Myeong; Ha, Kwon-Soo

    2011-07-15

    Membrane bridges are key cellular structures involved in intercellular communication; however, dynamics for their formation are not well understood. We demonstrated the formation and regulation of novel extracellular ultrathin fibers in NIH3T3 cells using confocal and atomic force microscopy. At adjacent regions of neighboring cells, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and glucose oxidase induced ultrathin fiber formation, which was prevented by Trolox, a reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger. The height of ROS-sensitive ultrathin fibers ranged from 2 to 4 nm. PMA-induced formation of ultrathin fibers was inhibited by cytochalasin D, but not by Taxol or colchicine, indicating that ultrathin fibers mainly comprise microfilaments. PMA-induced ultrathin fibers underwent dynamic structural changes, resulting in formation of intercellular membrane bridges. Thus, these fibers are formed by a mechanism(s) involving ROS and involved in formation of intercellular membrane bridges. Furthermore, ultrastructural imaging of ultrathin fibers may contribute to understanding the diverse mechanisms of cell-to-cell communication and the intercellular transfer of biomolecules, including proteins and cell organelles.

  19. Imaging tumour heterogeneity of the consequences of a PKCα-substrate interaction in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Weitsman, Gregory; Lawler, Katherine; Kelleher, Muireann T; Barrett, James E; Barber, Paul R; Shamil, Eamon; Festy, Frederic; Patel, Gargi; Fruhwirth, Gilbert O; Huang, Lufei; Tullis, Iain D C; Woodman, Natalie; Ofo, Enyinnaya; Ameer-Beg, Simon M; Irshad, Sheeba; Condeelis, John; Gillett, Cheryl E; Ellis, Paul A; Vojnovic, Borivoj; Coolen, Anthony C C; Ng, Tony

    2014-12-01

    Breast cancer heterogeneity demands that prognostic models must be biologically driven and recent clinical evidence indicates that future prognostic signatures need evaluation in the context of early compared with late metastatic risk prediction. In pre-clinical studies, we and others have shown that various protein-protein interactions, pertaining to the actin microfilament-associated proteins, ezrin and cofilin, mediate breast cancer cell migration, a prerequisite for cancer metastasis. Moreover, as a direct substrate for protein kinase Cα, ezrin has been shown to be a determinant of cancer metastasis for a variety of tumour types, besides breast cancer; and has been described as a pivotal regulator of metastasis by linking the plasma membrane to the actin cytoskeleton. In the present article, we demonstrate that our tissue imaging-derived parameters that pertain to or are a consequence of the PKC-ezrin interaction can be used for breast cancer prognostication, with inter-cohort reproducibility. The application of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded patient samples to probe protein proximity within the typically <10 nm range to address the oncological challenge of tumour heterogeneity, is discussed.

  20. Human macrophage hemoglobin-iron metabolism in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Custer, G.; Balcerzak, S.; Rinehart, J.

    1982-01-01

    An entirely in vitro technique was employed to characterize hemoglobin-iron metabolism by human macrophages obtained by culture of blood monocytes and pulmonary alveolar macrophages. Macrophages phagocytized about three times as many erythrocytes as monocytes and six times as many erythrocytes as pulmonary alveolar macrophages. The rate of subsequent release of /sup 59/Fe to the extracellular transferrin pool was two- to fourfold greater for macrophages as compared to the other two cell types. The kinetics of /sup 59/Fe-transferrin release were characterized by a relatively rapid early phase (hours 1-4) followed by a slow phase (hours 4-72) for all three cell types. Intracellular movement of iron was characterized by a rapid shift from hemoglobin to ferritin that was complete with the onset of the slow phase of extracellular release. A transient increase in /sup 59/Fe associated with an intracellular protein eluting with transferrin was also observed within 1 hour after phagocytosis. The process of hemoglobin-iron release to extracellular transferrin was inhibited at 4 degrees C but was unaffected by inhibitory of protein synthesis, glycolysis, microtubule function, and microfilament function. These data emphasize the rapidity of macrophage hemoglobin iron metabolism, provide a model for characterization of this process in vitro, and in general confirm data obtained utilizing in vivo animal models.

  1. The syndecan family of proteoglycans. Novel receptors mediating internalization of atherogenic lipoproteins in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Fuki, I V; Kuhn, K M; Lomazov, I R; Rothman, V L; Tuszynski, G P; Iozzo, R V; Swenson, T L; Fisher, E A; Williams, K J

    1997-01-01

    Cell-surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans have been shown to participate in lipoprotein catabolism, but the roles of specific proteoglycan classes have not been examined previously. Here, we studied the involvement of the syndecan proteoglycan family. First, transfection of CHO cells with expression vectors for several syndecan core proteins produced parallel increases in the cell association and degradation of lipoproteins enriched in lipoprotein lipase, a heparan-binding protein. Second, a chimeric construct, FcR-Synd1, that consists of the ectodomain of the IgG Fc receptor Ia linked to the highly conserved transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of syndecan-1 directly mediated efficient internalization, in a process triggered by ligand clustering. Third, internalization of lipase-enriched lipoproteins via syndecan-1 and of clustered IgGs via the chimera showed identical kinetics (t1/2 = 1 h) and identical dose-response sensitivities to cytochalasin B, which disrupts microfilaments, and to genistein, which inhibits tyrosine kinases. In contrast, internalization of the receptor-associated protein, which proceeds via coated pits, showed a t1/2 < 15 min, limited sensitivity to cytochalasin B, and complete insensitivity to genistein. Thus, syndecan proteoglycans can directly mediate ligand catabolism through a pathway with characteristics distinct from coated pits, and might act as receptors for atherogenic lipoproteins and other ligands in vivo. PMID:9294130

  2. Mitochondrial dynamics and their intracellular traffic in porcine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Yamochi, T; Hashimoto, S; Amo, A; Goto, H; Yamanaka, M; Inoue, M; Nakaoka, Y; Morimoto, Y

    2016-08-01

    Meiotic maturation of oocytes requires a variety of ATP-dependent reactions, such as germinal vesicle breakdown, spindle formation, and rearrangement of plasma membrane structure, which is required for fertilization. Mitochondria are accordingly expected be localized to subcellular sites of energy utilization. Although microtubule-dependent cellular traffic for mitochondria has been studied extensively in cultured neuronal (and some other somatic) cells, the molecular mechanism of their dynamics in mammalian oocytes at different stages of maturation remains obscure. The present work describes dynamic aspects of mitochondria in porcine oocytes at the germinal vesicle stage. After incubation of oocytes with MitoTracker Orange followed by centrifugation, mitochondria-enriched ooplasm was obtained using a glass needle and transferred into a recipient oocyte. The intracellular distribution of the fluorescent mitochondria was then observed over time using a laser scanning confocal microscopy equipped with an incubator. Kinetic analysis revealed that fluorescent mitochondria moved from central to subcortical areas of oocytes and were dispersed along plasma membranes. Such movement of mitochondria was inhibited by either cytochalasin B or cytochalasin D but not by colcemid, suggesting the involvement of microfilaments. This method of visualizing mitochondrial dynamics in live cells permits study of the pathophysiology of cytoskeleton-dependent intracellular traffic of mitochondria and associated energy metabolism during meiotic maturation of oocytes.

  3. Mechanical response of a living human epidermal keratinocyte sheet as measured in a composite diaphragm inflation experiment.

    PubMed

    Selby, John C; Shannon, Mark A

    2007-01-01

    Sheets of normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs) were reconstituted in vitro on tensed but highly compliant, freestanding polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membranes, 5.0 mm in diameter and 10 mum thick. NHEK-PDMS composite diaphragm (CD) specimens were then subjected to cyclical axisymmetric inflation tests to investigate epithelial sheet rheology under conditions of physiologically severe deformations (~50% nominal polar biaxial strains). Because the compliance of the specially formulated PDMS membrane was greater than that of the attached cell layer, the finite load-deformation behavior (mechanical response) of the living NHEK sheet was inferred from differences between the mechanical behavior of the CD specimen and the response of the underlying PDMS membrane measured prior to cell culture. In these composite diaphragm inflation (CDI) experiments, interconnected NHEKs exhibited rheological behaviors that were suggestive of a viscoelastic-plastic stress response. Remarkably, specimens returned to quiescent culture following a sequence of inflation tests recovered at least 80% of their original ability to store elastic strain energy, evidence of biological adaptation and recovery or restitutio ad integrum. Unlike methodologies that assay the morphological or biochemical response of cultured cells to an applied mechanostimulus, CDI experiments can be used to probe the load-bearing functions of desmosomes and adherens junctions within a living epithelial sheet, as well as to assess the rheological behaviors of the intermediate filament and microfilament networks that these cell-cell junctions serve to interconnect. PMID:18401074

  4. Regulation of blood-testis barrier by actin binding proteins and protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan; Tang, Elizabeth I.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2016-01-01

    The blood-testis barrier (BTB) is an important ultrastructure in the testis since the onset of spermatogenesis coincides with the establishment of a functional barrier in rodents and humans. It is also noted that a delay in the assembly of a functional BTB following treatment of neonatal rats with drugs such as diethylstilbestrol or adjudin also delays the first wave of spermiation. While the BTB is one of the tightest blood-tissue barriers, it undergoes extensive remodeling, in particular at stage VIII of the epithelial cycle to facilitate the transport of preleptotene spermatocytes connected in clones across the immunological barrier. Without this timely transport of preleptotene spermatocytes derived from type B spermatogonia, meiosis will be arrested, causing aspermatogenesis. Yet the biology and regulation of the BTB remains largely unexplored since the morphological studies in the 1970s. Recent studies, however, have shed new light on the biology of the BTB. Herein, we critically evaluate some of these findings, illustrating that the Sertoli cell BTB is regulated by actin binding proteins (ABPs), likely supported by non-receptor protein kinases, to modulate the organization of actin microfilament bundles at the site. Furthermore, microtubule (MT)-based cytoskeleton is also working in concert with the actin-based cytoskeleton to confer BTB dynamics. This timely review provides an update on the unique biology and regulation of the BTB based on the latest findings in the field, focusing on the role of ABPs and non-receptor protein kinases. PMID:26628556

  5. Extracellular components implicated in the stationary organization of the actin cytoskeleton in mesophyll cells of Vallisneria.

    PubMed

    Ryu, J H; Mizuno, K; Takagi, S; Nagai, R

    1997-04-01

    In mesophyll cells of Vallisneria gigantea Graebner, an aquatic angiosperm, the association of the plasma membrane with the cell wall at the end wall has been reported to be indispensable for the mechanism that maintains the stationary organization of the bundles of microfilaments (MFs) [Masuda et al. (1991) Protoplasma 162: 151]. To identify putative extracellular components that might play a crucial role in this mechanism, we examined the effects of two exogenously applied synthetic hexapeptides, GRGDSP and ARYDEI, which include an RGD and an RYD motif, respectively. The RGD motif is known as a recognition site in molecules required for adhesion to the substratum at sites of focal contacts. Within 24 h, both peptides (at concentrations of 1-15 mM) induced extremely abnormal patterns of cytoplasmic streaming, as well as the striking disruption of the arrangement of bundles of MFs. GRGESP and ARYEEI peptides, used as controls, had no detectable effects. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that polyclonal antibodies against the ARYDEI peptide bound to the cell walls of mesophyll cells while a preimmune serum did not. Western blotting analysis demonstrated that the antibodies recognized polypeptides of 54 kDa and 27 kDa in an extract of total proteins from the leaves of Vallisneria. The results suggest that some extracellular proteins(s), with a conserved RGD or RYD motif in its amino acid sequence, might be involved in the maintenance of the stationary organization of the bundles of MFs. PMID:9177028

  6. Attenuation of LDHA expression in cancer cells leads to redox-dependent alterations in cytoskeletal structure and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Arseneault, Robert; Chien, Andrew; Newington, Jordan T; Rappon, Tim; Harris, Richard; Cumming, Robert C

    2013-09-28

    Aerobic glycolysis, the preferential use of glycolysis even in the presence of oxygen to meet cellular metabolic demands, is a near universal feature of cancer. This unique type of metabolism is thought to protect cancer cells from damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in the mitochondria. Using the cancer cell line MDA-MB-435 it is shown that shRNA mediated knockdown of lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA), a key mediator of aerobic glycolysis, results in elevated mitochondrial ROS production and a concomitant decrease in cell proliferation and motility. Redox-sensitive proteins affected by oxidative stress associated with LDHA knockdown were identified by Redox 2D-PAGE and mass spectrometry. In particular, tropomyosin (Tm) isoforms Tm4, Tm5NM1 and Tm5NM5, proteins involved in cell migration and cytoskeletal dynamics, exhibited changes in disulfide bonding and co-localized with peri-nuclear actin aggregates in LDHA knockdown cells. In contrast, treatment with the thiol-based antioxidant N-acetylcysteine promoted the relocalization of Tms to cortical actin microfilaments and partially rescued the migration defects associated with attenuated LDHA expression. These results suggest that aerobic glycolysis and reduced mitochondrial ROS production create an environment conducive to cytoskeletal remodeling; key events linked to the high cell motility associated with cancer.

  7. Citrobacter freundii invades and replicates in human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Badger, J L; Stins, M F; Kim, K S

    1999-08-01

    Neonatal bacterial meningitis remains a disease with unacceptable rates of morbidity and mortality despite the availability of effective antimicrobial therapy. Citrobacter spp. cause neonatal meningitis but are unique in their frequent association with brain abscess formation. The pathogenesis of Citrobacter spp. causing meningitis and brain abscess is not well characterized; however, as with other meningitis-causing bacteria (e.g., Escherichia coli K1 and group B streptococci), penetration of the blood-brain barrier must occur. In an effort to understand the pathogenesis of Citrobacter spp. causing meningitis, we have used the in vitro blood-brain barrier model of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) to study the interaction between C. freundii and HBMEC. In this study, we show that C. freundii is capable of invading and trancytosing HBMEC in vitro. Invasion of HBMEC by C. freundii was determined to be dependent on microfilaments, microtubules, endosome acidification, and de novo protein synthesis. Immunofluorescence microscopy studies revealed that microtubules aggregated after HBMEC came in contact with C. freundii; furthermore, the microtubule aggregation was time dependent and seen with C. freundii but not with noninvasive E. coli HB101 and meningitic E. coli K1. Also in contrast to other meningitis-causing bacteria, C. freundii is able to replicate within HBMEC. This is the first demonstration of a meningitis-causing bacterium capable of intracellular replication within BMEC. The important determinants of the pathogenesis of C. freundii causing meningitis and brain abscess may relate to invasion of and intracellular replication in HBMEC.

  8. Sensor potency of the moonlighting enzyme-decorated cytoskeleton: the cytoskeleton as a metabolic sensor

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is extensive evidence for the interaction of metabolic enzymes with the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. The significance of these interactions is far from clear. Presentation of the hypothesis In the cytoskeletal integrative sensor hypothesis presented here, the cytoskeleton senses and integrates the general metabolic activity of the cell. This activity depends on the binding to the cytoskeleton of enzymes and, depending on the nature of the enzyme, this binding may occur if the enzyme is either active or inactive but not both. This enzyme-binding is further proposed to stabilize microtubules and microfilaments and to alter rates of GTP and ATP hydrolysis and their levels. Testing the hypothesis Evidence consistent with the cytoskeletal integrative sensor hypothesis is presented in the case of glycolysis. Several testable predictions are made. There should be a relationship between post-translational modifications of tubulin and of actin and their interaction with metabolic enzymes. Different conditions of cytoskeletal dynamics and enzyme-cytoskeleton binding should reveal significant differences in local and perhaps global levels and ratios of ATP and GTP. The different functions of moonlighting enzymes should depend on cytoskeletal binding. Implications of the hypothesis The physical and chemical effects arising from metabolic sensing by the cytoskeleton would have major consequences on cell shape, dynamics and cell cycle progression. The hypothesis provides a framework that helps the significance of the enzyme-decorated cytoskeleton be determined. PMID:23398642

  9. Microtubules restrict plastid sedimentation in protonemata of the moss Ceratodon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwuchow, J.; Sack, F. D.

    1994-01-01

    Apical cells of protonemata of the moss Ceratodon purpureus are unusual among plant cells with sedimentation in that only some amyloplasts sediment and these do not fall completely to the bottom of vertical cells. To determine whether the cytoskeleton restricts plastid sedimentation, the effects of amiprophos-methyl (APM) and cytochalasin D (CD) on plastid position were quantified. APM treatments of 30-60 min increased the plastid sedimentation that is normally seen along the length of untreated or control cells. Longer APM treatments often resulted in more dramatic plastid sedimentation, and in some cases almost all plastids sedimented to the lowermost point in the cell. In contrast, the microfilament inhibitor CD did not affect longitudinal plastid sedimentation compared to untreated cells, although it did disturb or eliminate plastid zonation in the tip. These data suggest that microtubules restrict the sedimentation of plastids along the length of the cell and that microtubules are load-bearing for all the plastids in the apical cell. This demonstrates the importance of the cytoskeleton in maintaining organelle position and cell organization against the force of gravity.

  10. The Enrichment of Histomonas meleagridis and Its Pathogen-Specific Protein Analysis: A First Step to Shed Light on Its Virulence.

    PubMed

    Pham, Anh Dao Nguyen; Mast, Jan; Magez, Stefan; Goddeeris, Bruno Maria; Carpentier, Sebastien C

    2016-09-01

    Since the discovery of Histomonas meleagridis in 1893, the necessity of isolating pure H. meleagridis has been highlighted over the years in the battle against histomonosis. Insights into the molecular characteristics of this protozoon open possibilities to proper treatment. Axenization of H. meleagridis in vitro cultures cocultured with bacteria has been unsuccessful. Numerous unsuccessful attempts at culturing H. meleagridis axenically have reinforced the assumption that the protozoa had an obligate relationship with certain bacteria originating from the host ceca. Within these perspectives, we enriched H. meleagridis cells from a mono-eukaryotic culture copropagated with host cecal bacteria by flow cytometry. The enrichment of histomonads was confirmed through transmission electron microscopy and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. For the first time several protein spots were successfully identified. The majority of spots were annotated as cytoskeletal proteins. Actin microfilaments are known to be a key player in cell spreading, cell adhesion, phagocytosis, signal transduction, and several other processes. Together with the identification of superoxide dismutase, the information generated from protein analysis of H. meleagridis may serve as a very first step toward understanding its pathogenesis and virulence. PMID:27610722

  11. Flagellar root contraction and nuclear movement during flagellar regeneration in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    When Chlamydomonas cells are deflagellated by pH shock or mechanical shear the nucleus rapidly moves toward the flagellar basal apparatus at the anterior end of the cell. During flagellar regeneration the nucleus returns to a more central position within the cell. The nucleus is connected to the flagellar apparatus by a system of fibers, the flagellar roots (rhizoplasts), which undergo a dramatic contraction that coincides with anterior nuclear movement. A corresponding extension of the root system, back to its preshock configuration is observed as the nucleus retracts to a central position. Anterior displacement of the nucleus and flagellar root contraction require free calcium in the medium. Nuclear movement and flagellar root contraction and extension are not sensitive to inhibitors of protein synthesis (cycloheximide), or drugs that influence either microtubules (colchicine) or actin-based microfilaments (cytochalasin D). Detergent- extracted cell models contract and extend their flagellar roots and move their nuclei in response to alterations of free calcium levels in the medium. Cycles of nuclear movement in detergent-extracted models require ATP to potentiate the contractile mechanism for subsequent calcium-induced contraction. Flagellar root contraction and nuclear movement in Chlamydomonas may be causally related to signaling of induction of flagellar precursor genes or to the transport of flagellar precursors or their messages to sites of synthesis or assembly near the basal apparatus of the cell. PMID:3667698

  12. Activation of 5-HT7 receptor stimulates neurite elongation through mTOR, Cdc42 and actin filaments dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Speranza, Luisa; Giuliano, Teresa; Volpicelli, Floriana; De Stefano, M. Egle; Lombardi, Loredana; Chambery, Angela; Lacivita, Enza; Leopoldo, Marcello; Bellenchi, Gian C.; di Porzio, Umberto; Crispino, Marianna; Perrone-Capano, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that the serotonin receptor subtype 7 (5-HT7R) plays a crucial role in shaping neuronal morphology during embryonic and early postnatal life. Here we show that pharmacological stimulation of 5-HT7R using a highly selective agonist, LP-211, enhances neurite outgrowth in neuronal primary cultures from the cortex, hippocampus and striatal complex of embryonic mouse brain, through multiple signal transduction pathways. All these signaling systems, involving mTOR, the Rho GTPase Cdc42, Cdk5, and ERK, are known to converge on the reorganization of cytoskeletal proteins that subserve neurite outgrowth. Indeed, our data indicate that neurite elongation stimulated by 5-HT7R is modulated by drugs affecting actin polymerization. In addition, we show, by 2D Western blot analyses, that treatment of neuronal cultures with LP-211 alters the expression profile of cofilin, an actin binding protein involved in microfilaments dynamics. Furthermore, by using microfluidic chambers that physically separate axons from the soma and dendrites, we demonstrate that agonist-dependent activation of 5-HT7R stimulates axonal elongation. Our results identify for the first time several signal transduction pathways, activated by stimulation of 5-HT7R, that converge to promote cytoskeleton reorganization and consequent modulation of axonal elongation. Therefore, the activation of 5-HT7R might represent one of the key elements regulating CNS connectivity and plasticity during development. PMID:25814944

  13. Intermediate Filaments: A Historical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Oshima, Robert G.

    2007-01-01

    Intracellular protein filaments intermediate in size between actin microfilaments and microtubules are composed of a surprising variety of tissue specific proteins commonly interconnected with other filamentous systems for mechanical stability and decorated by a variety of proteins that provide specialized functions. The sequence conservation of the coiled-coil, alpha-helical structure responsible for polymerization into individual 10 nm filaments defines the classification of intermediate filament proteins into a large gene family. Individual filaments further assemble into bundles and branched cytoskeletons visible in the light microscope. However, it is the diversity of the variable terminal domains that likely contributes most to different functions. The search for the functions of intermediate filament proteins has led to discoveries of roles in diseases of the skin, heart, muscle, liver, brain, adipose tissues and even premature aging. The diversity of uses of intermediate filaments as structural elements and scaffolds for organizing the distribution of decorating molecules contrasts with other cytoskeletal elements. This review is an attempt to provide some recollection of how such a diverse field emerged and changed over about 30 years. PMID:17493611

  14. Photonic force microscopy of local tension at cell surface focal adhesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordeleau, François; Bessard, Judicaël; Marceau, Normand; Sheng, Yunlong

    2006-09-01

    The ability of cells to sustain mechanical stress is essential. It is however not very well understood how tension is expressed from the inside of the cell to the exterior. Here we show that these forces can be measured by photonic force microscopy (PFM), which is able to apply a force to cells and to probe their response to the physical stress. Our setup consists of an inverted microscope coupled with an optical trap from a 5W ND:YVO 4 fiber laser. Forces are applied to the cell by the trap through a 5μm polystyrene bead coated with fibronectin, pre-incubated with cells to allow bead attachment and creation of focal adhesions. The reaction of the cell is monitored by sensing the position of the bead relative to the trap center by a quadrant photodiode, when the bead is in an equilibrium state between the photonics forces and the membrane elasticity and cell stiffness. The detection system is calibrated using a piezo nano-positioner and thermal noise analysis. We observed increased deformation of H4 cells treated with cytocholasin D, which disrupts the actin microfilaments. This observation is correlated to an overall decrease in the force by the photonics force microscope. Our results suggest that cell stiffness can be assessed by the PFM, which allows quantification of a tension within cells with sufficient precision.

  15. Regulation of Intracellular Structural Tension by Talin in the Axon Growth and Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Dingyu, Wang; Fanjie, Meng; Zhengzheng, Ding; Baosheng, Huang; Chao, Yang; Yi, Pan; Huiwen, Wu; Jun, Guo; Gang, Hu

    2016-09-01

    Intracellular tension is the most important characteristic of neuron polarization as well as the growth and regeneration of axons, which can be generated by motor proteins and conducted along the cytoskeleton. To better understand this process, we created Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based tension probes that can be incorporated into microfilaments to provide a real-time measurement of forces in neuron cytoskeletons. We found that our probe could be used to assess the structural tension of neuron polarity. Nerve growth factor (NGF) upregulated structural forces, whereas the glial-scar inhibitors chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) and aggrecan weakened such forces. Notably, the tension across axons was distributed uniformly and remarkably stronger than that in the cell body in NGF-stimulated neurons. The mechanosensors talin/vinculin could antagonize the effect of glial-scar inhibitors via structural forces. However, E-cadherin was closely associated with glial-scar inhibitor-induced downregulation of structural forces. Talin/vinculin was involved in the negative regulation of E-cadherin transcription through the nuclear factor-kappa B pathway. Collectively, this study clarified the mechanism underlying intracellular tension in the growth and regeneration of axons which, conversely, can be regulated by talin and E-cadherin.

  16. Analysis of compaction, allocation, and outgrowth in the early mouse embryo

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, A.E.

    1988-01-01

    Examination of the process of compaction by cinemicrography, and by the use of cytoskeleton-disrupting agents showed it to be a variable, progressive event, dependent on microfilaments both for cell flattering and for polarization of surface microvilli. Examination of the subsequent cleavage division by cinemicrography revealed that there are three major planes of division, and made possible the determination of their relative frequencies during fourth cleavage. Attachment and trophoblast outgrowth on substrates of extracellular matrix molecules was found to involve a group of 140 kD glycoproteins. Addition to the culture medium of a synthetic peptide containing the Arg-Gly-Asp tripeptide cell recognition sequence of fibronectin inhibited trophoblasts outgrowth, but not attachment, on both laminin and fibronectin. Immunoprecipitation of /sup 125/I surface-labeled embryos revealed that the 140 kD glycoproteins are exposed on the surfaces of embryos during outgrowth formation, but are not detectable immediately after hatching. Immunofluorescence experiments showed that the 140 kD glycoproteins and the cytoskeletal proteins vinculin and talin are enriched on the cell processes and ventral surfaces of trophoblasts cells in embryo outgrowths, in patterns similar to those seen in fibroblasts, and consistent with their role in adhesion of the trophoblasts cells to the substratum.

  17. Microgravity effects during fertilization, cell division, development, and calcium metabolism in sea urchins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, Heide

    1996-01-01

    The overall objectives of this project are to explore the role of microgravity during fertilization, early development, cytoskeletal organization, and skeletal calcium deposition in a model development system: the sea urchin eggs and embryos. While pursuing these objectives, we have also helped to develop, test, and fly the Aquatic Research Facility (ARF) system. Cells were fixed at preselected time points to preserve the structures and organelles of interest with regards to cell biology events during development. The protocols used for the analysis of the results had been developed during the earlier part of this research and were applied for post-flight analysis using light and (immuno)fluorescence microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The structures of interest are: microtubules during fertilization, cell division, and cilia movement; microfilaments during cell surface restructuring and cell division; centrosomes and centrioles during cell division, cell differentiation, and cilia formation and movement; membranes, Golgi, endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, and chromosomes at all stages of development; and calcium deposits during spicule formation in late-stage embryos. In addition to further explore aspects important or living in space, several aspects of this research are also aimed at understanding diseases that affect humans on Earth which may be accelerated in space.

  18. Effects of spaceflight conditions on fertilization and embryogenesis in the sea urchin Lytechinus pictus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, H.; Chakrabarti, A.; Taylor, M.; Sommer, L.; Levine, H.; Anderson, K.; Runco, M.; Kemp, R.

    1999-01-01

    Calcium loss and muscle atrophy are two of the main metabolic changes experienced by astronauts and crew members during exposure to microgravity in space. Calcium and cytoskeletal events were investigated within sea urchin embryos which were cultured in space under both microgravity and 1 g conditions. Embryos were fixed at time-points ranging from 3 h to 8 days after fertilization. Investigative emphasis was placed upon: (1) sperm-induced calcium-dependent exocytosis and cortical granule secretion, (2) membrane fusion of cortical granule and plasma membranes; (3) microfilament polymerization and microvilli elongation; and (5) embryonic development into morula, blastula, gastrula, and pluteus stages. For embryos cultured under microgravity conditions, the processes of cortical granule discharge, fusion of cortical granule membranes with the plasma membrane, elongation of microvilli and elevation of the fertilization coat were reduced in comparison with embryos cultured at 1 g in space and under normal conditions on Earth. Also, 4% of all cells undergoing division in microgravity showed abnormalities in the centrosome-centriole complex. These abnormalities were not observed within the 1 g flight and ground control specimens, indicating that significant alterations in sea urchin development processes occur under microgravity conditions. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  19. Use of fluorescent nanoparticles to investigate nutrient acquisition by developing Eimeria maxima macrogametocytes

    PubMed Central

    Frölich, Sonja; Wallach, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The enteric disease coccidiosis, caused by the unicellular parasite Eimeria, is a major and reoccurring problem for the poultry industry. While the molecular machinery driving host cell invasion and oocyst wall formation has been well documented in Eimeria, relatively little is known about the host cell modifications which lead to acquisition of nutrients and parasite growth. In order to understand the mechanism(s) by which nutrients are acquired by developing intracellular gametocytes and oocysts, we have performed uptake experiments using polystyrene nanoparticles (NPs) of 40 nm and 100 nm in size, as model NPs typical of organic macromolecules. Cytochalasin D and nocodazole were used to inhibit, respectively, the polymerization of the actin and microtubules. The results indicated that NPs entered the parasite at all stages of macrogametocyte development and early oocyst maturation via an active energy dependent process. Interestingly, the smaller NPs were found throughout the parasite cytoplasm, while the larger NPs were mainly localised to the lumen of large type 1 wall forming body organelles. NP uptake was reduced after microfilament disruption and treatment with nocodazole. These observations suggest that E. maxima parasites utilize at least 2 or more uptake pathways to internalize exogenous material during the sexual stages of development. PMID:27352801

  20. Fibroblast adhesion to RGDS shows novel features compared with fibronectin

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    As previously shown by others, the fibroblast attachment and spreading activity of fibronectin is mimicked by a short peptide (RGDS or longer) from the cell binding domain. Normal rat kidney fibroblasts showed similar attachment kinetics on either peptide GRGDSC or bovine plasma fibronectin and binding to either substratum was inhibited by peptide alone. We now demonstrate, however, considerable differences in biological activity between peptide and fibronectin. In particular, cells developed novel adhesion structures on peptide-coated substrata. Interference reflection microscopy showed a predominance of small round dark grey/black patches of adherent membrane ("spots") with relatively few focal adhesions, which occurred only at the outermost cell margins in contrast to their distribution in cells spread on fibronectin. The spots were resistant to detergent extraction and stained less strongly or not at all for vinculin. Electron microscopy in vertical thin section showed that the ventral surface of the cell was characterized by "point-contacts", corresponding in size to the spot structures seen by interference reflection microscopy, and which were only occasionally associated with microfilaments. Cells also required a higher substratum loading of peptide than fibronectin to promote spreading and proceeded to spread less rapidly and to a lesser extent, developing very few and extremely fine actin cables. PMID:3611194

  1. DNA vaccine encoding Haemonchus contortus actin induces partial protection in goats.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ruofeng; Wang, Jingjing; Xu, Lixin; Song, Xiaokai; Li, Xiangrui

    2014-10-01

    Actin is a globular multi-functional protein that forms microfilaments, and participates in many important cellular processes. Previous study found that Haemonchus contortus actin could be recognized by the serum of goats infected with the homology parasite. This indicated that H. contortus actin could be a potential candidate for vaccine. In this study, DNA vaccine encoding H. contortus actin was tested for protection against experimental H. contortus infections in goats. Fifteen goats were allocated into three trial groups. The animals of Actin group were vaccinated with the DNA vaccine on day 0 and 14, and challenged with 5000 infective H. contortus third stage larval (L3) on day 28. An unvaccinated positive control group was challenged with L3 at the same time. An unvaccinated negative control group was not challenged with L3. The results showed that DNA vaccine were transcribed at local injection sites and expressed in vivo post immunizations respectively. For goats in Actin vaccinated group, higher levels of serum IgG, serum IgA and mucosal IgA were produced, the percentages of CD4(+) T lymphocytes, CD8(+) T lymphocytes and B lymphocytes and the concentrations of TGF-β were increased significantly (P<0.05). Following L3 challenge, the mean eggs per gram feces (EPG) and worm burdens of Actin group were reduced by 34.4% and 33.1%, respectively. This study suggest that recombinant H. contortus Actin DNA vaccine induced partial immune response and has protective potential against goat haemonchosis.

  2. Disruption of the microtubule network alters cellulose deposition and causes major changes in pectin distribution in the cell wall of the green alga, Penium margaritaceum

    PubMed Central

    Domozych, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Application of the dintroaniline compound, oryzalin, which inhibits microtubule formation, to the unicellular green alga Penium margaritaceum caused major perturbations to its cell morphology, such as swelling at the wall expansion zone in the central isthmus region. Cell wall structure was also notably altered, including a thinning of the inner cellulosic wall layer and a major disruption of the homogalacturonan (HG)-rich outer wall layer lattice. Polysaccharide microarray analysis indicated that the oryzalin treatment resulted in an increase in HG abundance in treated cells but a decrease in other cell wall components, specifically the pectin rhamnogalacturonan I (RG-I) and arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs). The ring of microtubules that characterizes the cortical area of the cell isthmus zone was significantly disrupted by oryzalin, as was the extensive peripheral network of actin microfilaments. It is proposed that the disruption of the microtubule network altered cellulose production, the main load-bearing component of the cell wall, which in turn affected the incorporation of HG in the two outer wall layers, suggesting coordinated mechanisms of wall polymer deposition. PMID:24285826

  3. The organization of the actin cytoskeleton in vertical and graviresponding primary roots of maize.

    PubMed

    Blancaflor, E B; Hasenstein, K H

    1997-04-01

    To determine whether actin microfilament (MF) organization is correlated with differential elongation, primary roots of Zea mays cv Merit maintained vertically or reoriented horizontally for 15 to 120 min were stained with rhodamine phalloidin and examined with a confocal microscope. Root curvature was measured with a computer-controlled video digitizer. In vertical roots bundles of MFs in the elongation and maturation zone were oriented parallel to the longitudinal axis of cells. MFs in the vascular parenchyma cells were more abundant than in the cortex and epidermis. Epidermal and proendodermal cells in the meristematic region contained transverse cortical MFs. The organization of MFs of graviresponding roots was similar to that of vertical roots. Application of cytochalasin B or cytochalasin D resulted in extensive disruption of MFs in the cortex and epidermis, but only partially affected MFs in the stele. Despite the cytochalasin B-induced depolymerization of MFs, gravicurvature exceeded that of controls. In contrast, the auxin transport inhibitor N-1 naphthylphthalamic acid suppressed root curvature but had no observable effect on the integrity of the MFs. The data indicate that MFs may not be involved in the graviresponse of maize roots. PMID:11536803

  4. Automorphosis of higher plants on a 3-D clinostat.

    PubMed

    Hoson, T; Kamisaka, S; Yamashita, M; Masuda, Y

    1998-01-01

    On a three-dimensional (3-D) clinostat, various plant organs developed statocytes capable of responding to the gravity vector. The graviresponse of primary roots of garden cress and maize grown on the clinostat was the same as the control roots, whereas that of maize coleoptiles was reduced. When maize seedlings were grown in the presence of 10(-4) M gibberellic acid and kinetin, the graviresponse of both roots and shoots was suppressed. The corresponding suppression of amyloplast development was observed in the clinostatted and the hormone-treated seedlings. Maize roots and shoots showed spontaneous curvatures in different portions on the 3-D clinostat. The hormone treatment did not significantly influence such an automorphic curvature. When the root cap was removed, maize roots did not curve gravitropically. However, the removal suppressed the automorphic curvatures only slightly. On the other hand, the removal of coleoptile tip did not influence its graviresponse, whereas the spontaneous curvature of decapitated coleoptiles on the clinostat was strongly suppressed. Also, cytochalasin B differently affected the gravitropic and the automorphic curvatures of maize roots and shoots. From these results it is concluded that the graviperception and the early processes of signal transmission are unnecessary for automorphoses under simulated microgravity conditions. Moreover, the results support the view that the amyloplasts act as statoliths probably via an interaction with microfilaments. PMID:11541377

  5. Columella cells revisited: novel structures, novel properties, and a novel gravisensing model.

    PubMed

    Staehelin, L A; Zheng, H Q; Yoder, T L; Smith, J D; Todd, P

    2000-06-01

    A hundred years of research has not produced a clear understanding of the mechanism that transduces the energy associated with the sedimentation of starch-filled amyloplast statoliths in root cap columella cells into a growth response. Most models postulate that the statoliths interact with microfilaments (MF) to transmit signals to the plasma membrane (or ER), or that sedimentation onto these organelles produces the signals. However, no direct evidence for statolith-MF links has been reported, and no asymmetric structures of columella cells have been identified that might explain how a root turned by 90 degrees knows which side is up. To address these and other questions, we have (1) quantitatively examined the effects of microgravity on the size, number, and spatial distribution of statoliths; (2) re-evaluated the ultrastructure of columella cells in high-pressure frozen/freeze-substituted roots; and (3) followed the sedimentation dynamics of statolith movements in reoriented root tips. The findings have led to the formulation of a new model for the gravity-sensing apparatus of roots, which envisages the cytoplasm pervaded by an actin-based cytoskeletal network. This network is denser in the ER-devoid central region of the cell than in the ER-rich cell cortex and is coupled to receptors in the plasma membrane. Statolith sedimentation is postulated to disrupt the network and its links to receptors in some regions of the cell cortex, while allowing them to reform in other regions and thereby produce a directional signal. PMID:11543286

  6. Long-distance communication by specialized cellular projections during pigment pattern development and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Eom, Dae Seok; Bain, Emily J; Patterson, Larissa B; Grout, Megan E; Parichy, David M

    2015-01-01

    Changes in gene activity are essential for evolutionary diversification. Yet, elucidating the cellular behaviors that underlie modifications to adult form remains a profound challenge. We use neural crest-derived adult pigmentation of zebrafish and pearl danio to uncover cellular bases for alternative pattern states. We show that stripes in zebrafish require a novel class of thin, fast cellular projection to promote Delta-Notch signaling over long distances from cells of the xanthophore lineage to melanophores. Projections depended on microfilaments and microtubules, exhibited meandering trajectories, and stabilized on target cells to which they delivered membraneous vesicles. By contrast, the uniformly patterned pearl danio lacked such projections, concomitant with Colony stimulating factor 1-dependent changes in xanthophore differentiation that likely curtail signaling available to melanophores. Our study reveals a novel mechanism of cellular communication, roles for differentiation state heterogeneity in pigment cell interactions, and an unanticipated morphogenetic behavior contributing to a striking difference in adult form. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12401.001 PMID:26701906

  7. Microtubule Polymerization Functions in Hypersensitive Response and Accumulation of H2O2 in Wheat Induced by the Stripe Rust.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Wang, Yang; Liu, Xinjie; Xu, Yuanliu; Ma, Qing

    2016-01-01

    The plant cytoskeleton, including microtubules and microfilaments, is one of the important factors in determining the polarity of cell division and growth, as well as the interaction of plants with invading pathogens. In defense responses of wheat against the stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici) infection, hypersensitive response is the most crucial event to prevent the spread of pathogens. In order to reveal the effect of microtubules on the hypersensitive cell death and H2O2 accumulation in the interaction of wheat (Triticum aestivum) cv. Suwon 11 with an incompatible race, CYR23, wheat leaves were treated with microtubule inhibitor, oryzalin, before inoculation. The results showed that the frequency of infection sites with hypersensitive response occurrence was significantly reduced, and hypersensitive cell death in wheat leaves was suppressed compared to the control. In addition, the frequency and the incidence of infected cells with H2O2 accumulation were also reduced after the treatment with oryzalin. Those results indicated that microtubules are related to hypersensitive response and H2O2 accumulation in wheat induced by the stripe rust, and depolymerization of microtubules reduces the resistance of plants to pathogen infection in incompatible interaction, suggesting that microtubules play a potential role in the expression of resistance of wheat against the stripe rust fungus. PMID:27610380

  8. Impact of Phenylpropanoid Compounds on Heat Stress Tolerance in Carrot Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Commisso, Mauro; Toffali, Ketti; Strazzer, Pamela; Stocchero, Matteo; Ceoldo, Stefania; Baldan, Barbara; Levi, Marisa; Guzzo, Flavia

    2016-01-01

    The phenylpropanoid and flavonoid families include thousands of specialized metabolites that influence a wide range of processes in plants, including seed dispersal, auxin transport, photoprotection, mechanical support and protection against insect herbivory. Such metabolites play a key role in the protection of plants against abiotic stress, in many cases through their well-known ability to inhibit the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, the precise role of specific phenylpropanoid and flavonoid molecules is unclear. We therefore investigated the role of specific anthocyanins (ACs) and other phenylpropanoids that accumulate in carrot cells cultivated in vitro, focusing on their supposed ability to protect cells from heat stress. First we characterized the effects of heat stress to identify quantifiable morphological traits as markers of heat stress susceptibility. We then fed the cultures with precursors to induce the targeted accumulation of specific compounds, and compared the impact of heat stress in these cultures and unfed controls. Data modeling based on projection to latent structures (PLS) regression revealed that metabolites containing coumaric or caffeic acid, including ACs, correlate with less heat damage. Further experiments suggested that one of the cellular targets damaged by heat stress and protected by these metabolites is the actin microfilament cytoskeleton. PMID:27713760

  9. Weightlessness influences the cytoskeleton and ROS level in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Wang; Lina, Qu; Yingxian, Li; Qi, Li; Lei, Bi; Yinghui, Li

    During Spaceflight the nerve system of astronauts was obviously influenced To investigate how gravity effects nerve system the SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells were taken as research object By utilizing clinostat and parabolic flight for the model of gravity changing the level of reactive oxygen species was assayed in different time under simulated microgravity the cytomorphology and cytoskeleton of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells were also observed after parabolic flight and clinostat by the conventional and the confocal laser scanning microscope The data showed that ROS level was enhanced and the cytoskeleton was damaged which microfilaments and microtubules were highly disorganized the cell shape was deteriorated under simulated microgravity indicating the relativity between the ROS level fluctuating and cytoskeleton changing It illuminates signal transduction disturbed by oxidative stress also regulates the cytoskeleton changing in SH-SY5Y cells The results suggest the cytoskeleton which is the receptor for sensing gravity was also regulated by cellular redox state which clues on the complexity of cell for self-adjusting to gravity changing

  10. Bacterial Vegetative Insecticidal Proteins (Vip) from Entomopathogenic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Chakroun, Maissa; Banyuls, Núria; Bel, Yolanda; Escriche, Baltasar; Ferré, Juan

    2016-06-01

    Entomopathogenic bacteria produce insecticidal proteins that accumulate in inclusion bodies or parasporal crystals (such as the Cry and Cyt proteins) as well as insecticidal proteins that are secreted into the culture medium. Among the latter are the Vip proteins, which are divided into four families according to their amino acid identity. The Vip1 and Vip2 proteins act as binary toxins and are toxic to some members of the Coleoptera and Hemiptera. The Vip1 component is thought to bind to receptors in the membrane of the insect midgut, and the Vip2 component enters the cell, where it displays its ADP-ribosyltransferase activity against actin, preventing microfilament formation. Vip3 has no sequence similarity to Vip1 or Vip2 and is toxic to a wide variety of members of the Lepidoptera. Its mode of action has been shown to resemble that of the Cry proteins in terms of proteolytic activation, binding to the midgut epithelial membrane, and pore formation, although Vip3A proteins do not share binding sites with Cry proteins. The latter property makes them good candidates to be combined with Cry proteins in transgenic plants (Bacillus thuringiensis-treated crops [Bt crops]) to prevent or delay insect resistance and to broaden the insecticidal spectrum. There are commercially grown varieties of Bt cotton and Bt maize that express the Vip3Aa protein in combination with Cry proteins. For the most recently reported Vip4 family, no target insects have been found yet. PMID:26935135

  11. Nanofiber Alignment Regulates NIH3T3 Cell Orientation and Cytoskeletal Gene Expression on Electrospun PCL+Gelatin Nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Fee, Timothy; Surianarayanan, Swetha; Downs, Crawford; Zhou, Yong; Berry, Joel

    2016-01-01

    To examine the influence of substrate topology on the behavior of fibroblasts, tissue engineering scaffolds were electrospun from polycaprolactone (PCL) and a blend of PCL and gelatin (PCL+Gel) to produce matrices with both random and aligned nanofibrous orientations. The addition of gelatin to the scaffold was shown to increase the hydrophilicity of the PCL matrix and to increase the proliferation of NIH3T3 cells compared to scaffolds of PCL alone. The orientation of nanofibers within the matrix did not have an effect on the proliferation of adherent cells, but cells on aligned substrates were shown to elongate and align parallel to the direction of substrate fiber alignment. A microarray of cyotoskeleton regulators was probed to examine differences in gene expression between cells grown on an aligned and randomly oriented substrates. It was found that transcriptional expression of eight genes was statistically different between the two conditions, with all of them being upregulated in the aligned condition. The proteins encoded by these genes are linked to production and polymerization of actin microfilaments, as well as focal adhesion assembly. Taken together, the data indicates NIH3T3 fibroblasts on aligned substrates align themselves parallel with their substrate and increase production of actin and focal adhesion related genes. PMID:27196306

  12. A focal adhesion factor directly linking intracellularly motile Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria ivanovii to the actin-based cytoskeleton of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, T; Ebel, F; Domann, E; Niebuhr, K; Gerstel, B; Pistor, S; Temm-Grove, C J; Jockusch, B M; Reinhard, M; Walter, U

    1995-04-01

    The surface-bound ActA polypeptide of the intracellular bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is the sole listerial factor needed for recruitment of host actin filaments by intracellularly motile bacteria. Here we report that following Listeria infection the host vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP), a microfilament- and focal adhesion-associated substrate of both the cAMP- and cGMP-dependent protein kinases, accumulates on the surface of intracytoplasmic bacteria prior to the detection of F-actin 'clouds'. VASP remains associated with the surface of highly motile bacteria, where it is polarly located, juxtaposed between one extremity of the bacterial surface and the front of the actin comet tail. Since actin filament polymerization occurs only at the very front of the tail, VASP exhibits properties of a host protein required to promote actin polymerization. Purified VASP binds directly to the ActA polypeptide in vitro. A ligand-overlay blot using purified radiolabelled VASP enabled us to identify the ActA homologue of the related intracellular motile pathogen, Listeria ivanovii, as a protein with a molecular mass of approximately 150 kDa. VASP also associates with actin filaments recruited by another intracellularly motile bacterial pathogen, Shigella flexneri. Hence, by the simple expedient of expressing surface-bound attractor molecules, bacterial pathogens effectively harness cytoskeletal components to achieve intracellular movement.

  13. Loss of actin cytoskeletal function and EDS1 activity, in combination, severely compromises non-host resistance in Arabidopsis against wheat powdery mildew.

    PubMed

    Yun, Byung-Wook; Atkinson, Helen A; Gaborit, Charlotte; Greenland, Andy; Read, Nick D; Pallas, Jacqueline A; Loake, Gary J

    2003-06-01

    Plant immunity against the majority of the microbial pathogens is conveyed by a phenomenon known as non-host resistance (NHR). This defence mechanism affords durable protection to plant species against given species of phytopathogens. We investigated the genetic basis of NHR in Arabidopsis against the wheat powdery mildew fungus Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici (Bgt). Both primary and appressorial germ tubes were produced from individual Bgt conidia on the surface of the Arabidopsis leaves. Attempted infection occasionally resulted in successful penetration, which led to the development of an abnormal unilateral haustorium. Inoculation of a series of Arabidopsis defence-related mutants with Bgt resulted in the attenuation of reactive oxygen intermediate (ROI) production and salicylic acid (SA)-dependent defence gene expression in eds1, pad4 and nahG plants, which are known to be defective in some aspects of host resistance. Furthermore, Bgt often developed bilateral haustoria in the mutant Arabidopsis lines that closely resembled those formed in wheat. A similar decrease in NHR was observed following treatment of the wild-type Arabidopsis plants with cytochalasin E, an inhibitor of actin microfilament polymerisation. In eds1 mutants, inhibition of actin polymerisation severely compromised NHR in Arabidopsis against Bgt. This permitted completion of the Bgt infection cycle on these plants. Therefore, actin cytoskeletal function and EDS1 activity, in combination, are major contributors to NHR in Arabidopsis against wheat powdery mildew.

  14. Computational and theoretical modeling of intermediate filament networks: Structure, mechanics and disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zhao; Buehler, Markus J.

    2012-08-01

    Intermediate filaments, in addition to microtubules and actin microfilaments, are one of the three major components of the cytoskeleton in eukaryotic cells. It was discovered during the recent decades that in most cells, intermediate filament proteins play key roles to reinforce cells subjected to large-deformation, and that they participate in signal transduction, and it was proposed that their nanomechanical properties are critical to perform those functions. However, it is still poorly understood how the nanoscopic structure, as well as the combination of chemical composition, molecular structure and interfacial properties of these protein molecules contribute to the biomechanical properties of filaments and filament networks. Here we review recent progress in computational and theoretical studies of the intermediate filaments network at various levels in the protein's structure. A multiple scale method is discussed, used to couple molecular modeling with atomistic detail to larger-scale material properties of the networked material. It is shown that a finer-trains-coarser methodology as discussed here provides a useful tool in understanding the biomechanical property and disease mechanism of intermediate filaments, coupling experiment and simulation. It further allows us to improve the understanding of associated disease mechanisms and lays the foundation for engineering the mechanical properties of biomaterials.

  15. Morphology, ultrastructure, and development of the parasitic larva and its surrounding trophamnion of Polypodium hydriforme Ussov (Coelenterata).

    PubMed

    Raikova, E V

    1980-01-01

    The larval stage of Polypodium hydriforme is planuliform and parasitic inside the growing oocytes of acipenserid fishes. The larva has inverted germ layers and a special envelope, the trophamnion, surrounding it within the host oocyte. The trophamnion is a giant unicellular provisory structure derived from the second polar body and performing both protective and digestive functions, clearly a result of adaptation to parasitism. The trophamnion displays microvilli on its inner surface, and irregular protrusions anchoring it to the yolk on its outer surface. Its cytoplasm contains long nuclear fragments, ribosomes, mitochondria, microtubules, microfilaments, prominent Golgi bodies, primary lysosomes, and secondary lysosomes with partially digested inclusions. The cells of the larva proper are poorly differentiated. No muscular, glandular, neural, interstitial, or nematocyst-forming cells have been found. The entodermal (outer layer) cells bear flagella and contain rough endoplasmic reticulum; the ectodermal (inner layer) cells lack cilia and contain an apical layer of acid mucopolysaccharid granules. The cells of both layers contain mitochondria, microtubules, and Golgi bodies; their nuclei display large nucleoli with nucleolonema-like structure, decondensed chromatin, and some perichromatin granules. At their apical rims, the ectodermal cells from septate junctions; laterally, the cells of both layers form simple contacts and occasional interdigitations. The lateral surfaces of entodermal cells are strengthened by microtubules. PMID:6104540

  16. Fibroblast response is enhanced by poly(L-lactic acid) nanotopography edge density and proximity

    PubMed Central

    Milner, Keith R; Siedlecki, Christopher A

    2007-01-01

    The development of scaffolds for use in tissue engineering applications requires careful choice of macroscale properties, such as mechanical characteristics, porosity and biodegradation. The micro- and nano-scale properties of the scaffold surface are also an important design criterion as these influence cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. The cellular response is known to be affected by surface topography but the mechanisms governing this remain unclear. Homogenous poly(L-lactic acid) was textured with surface nanotopographies by two-stage replication molding of heterogeneous demixed polymer films. Initial cell adhesion was improved on nanotextured surfaces compared with smooth controls, but subsequent cell density was significantly reduced on the roughest surfaces. Improvements in cell response were found to correlate with focal contact and actin microfilament development. Cell response was found to trend both with the surface density of topography edges and with inter-topography spacing, indicating possible roles for edges stimulating cell adhesion/proliferation or for spacing to modulate the ability of integrin-ligand bonds to cluster and form focal adhesions. This study furthers understanding of the geometric properties of surface nanotopographies that affect cellular response. It is hoped that identification of the mechanisms governing cell-topography interactions will allow rule-based design of biomaterial surface to engineer specific cellular responses. PMID:17722548

  17. Perspectives on low voltage transmission electron microscopy as applied to cell biology.

    PubMed

    Bendayan, Moise; Paransky, Eugene

    2014-12-01

    Low voltage transmission electron microscopy (LVTEM) with accelerating voltages as low as 5 kV was applied to cell biology. To take advantage of the increased contrast given by LVTEM, tissue preparation was modified omitting all heavy metals such as osmium, uranium, and lead from the fixation, on block staining and counterstaining. Nonstained ultra-thin tissue sections (40 nm thick) generated highly contrasted images. While the aspect of the cells remains similar to that obtained by conventional TEM, some new substructures were revealed. The pancreatic acinar cells granules present a heterogeneous matrix with partitions corresponding to segregation of their different secretory proteins. Microvilli display their core of microfilaments anchored to the dense top membrane. Mitochondria revealed the presence of distinct particles along their cristea membranes that may correspond to the ATP synthase complexes or oxysomes. The dense nuclear chromatin displays a honey-comb appearance while distinct beads aligned along thin threads were seen in the dispersed chromatin. These new features revealed by LVTEM correlate with structures described or predicted through other approaches. Masking effects due to thickness of the tissue sections and to the presence of heavy metals must have prevented their observation by conventional TEM. Furthermore, the immunogold was adapted to LVTEM revealing nuclear lamin-A at the edge of the dense chromatin ribbons. Combining cytochemistry with LVTEM brings additional advantages to this new approach in cell biology.

  18. Endocytic mechanisms utilized by chlamydiae and their influence on induction of productive infection.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, D J; Pearce, J H

    1991-09-01

    The microfilament-disrupting drug cytochalasin D and, initially, inoculation at 20 degrees C were used to differentiate between phagocytosis (sensitive to both treatments) and pinocytosis (resistant to both treatments) to assess whether chlamydial uptake into McCoy cells occurred by one or both mechanisms and whether each could contribute to productive infection. Both treatments suppressed the infectivity of Chlamydia trachomatis L2/434/Bu and C. psittaci GPIC (the guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis strain) following static inoculation by only 50%, indicating that there was simultaneous operation of both phagocytosis and pinocytosis during uptake that led to productive infection. Measurement of the entry of organisms by two separate assays established that both strains predominantly used a cytochalasin D-resistant (pinocytic) mechanism, implying that phagocytic uptake was coupled to a higher frequency of productive infection. Integration of the data on infectivity and entry allowed the potential for an organism to infect a host cell to be quantified. This synthesis revealed that for both strains the infectivity potential following phagocytic entry was ca. 10-fold greater than that following pinocytic entry. However, both entry mechanisms were exploited more efficiently by strain L2/434/Bu than by strain GPIC (unless the latter was inoculated with centrifugation), indicating that intrinsic strain properties are more important for infectivity potential than the endocytic mechanism utilized.

  19. Kinesin-mediated organelle translocation revealed by specific cellular manipulations

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The distribution of membrane-bound organelles was studied in cultured hippocampal neurons after antisense oligonucleotide suppression of the kinesin-heavy chain (KHC). We observed reduced 3,3'- dihexyloxacarbocyanine iodide (DiOC6(3)) fluorescent staining in neurites and growth cones. In astrocytes, KHC suppression results in the disappearance of the DiOC6(3)-positive reticular network from the cell periphery, and a parallel accumulation of label within the cell center. On the other hand, mitochondria microtubules and microfilaments display a distribution that closely resembles that observed in control cells. KHC suppression of neurons and astrocytes completely inhibited the Brefeldin A-induced spreading and tubulation of the Golgi- associated structure enriched in mannose-6-phosphate receptors. In addition, KHC suppression prevents the low pH-induced anterograde redistribution of late endocytic structures. Taken collectively, these observations suggest that in living neurons, kinesin mediates the anterograde transport of tubulovesicular structures originated in the central vacuolar system (e.g., the endoplasmic reticulum) and that the regulation of kinesin-membrane interactions may be of key importance for determining the intracellular distribution of selected organelles. PMID:7962067

  20. RAB-10 Promotes EHBP-1 Bridging of Filamentous Actin and Tubular Recycling Endosomes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peixiang; Liu, Hang; Wang, Yu; Liu, Ou; Zhang, Jing; Gleason, Adenrele; Yang, Zhenrong; Wang, Hui; Shi, Anbing; Grant, Barth D

    2016-06-01

    EHBP-1 (Ehbp1) is a conserved regulator of endocytic recycling, acting as an effector of small GTPases including RAB-10 (Rab10). Here we present evidence that EHBP-1 associates with tubular endosomal phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] enriched membranes through an N-terminal C2-like (NT-C2) domain, and define residues within the NT-C2 domain that mediate membrane interaction. Furthermore, our results indicate that the EHBP-1 central calponin homology (CH) domain binds to actin microfilaments in a reaction that is stimulated by RAB-10(GTP). Loss of any aspect of this RAB-10/EHBP-1 system in the C. elegans intestinal epithelium leads to retention of basolateral recycling cargo in endosomes that have lost their normal tubular endosomal network (TEN) organization. We propose a mechanism whereby RAB-10 promotes the ability of endosome-bound EHBP-1 to also bind to the actin cytoskeleton, thereby promoting endosomal tubulation. PMID:27272733

  1. Aromatic hydrocarbons upregulate glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and induce changes in actin cytoskeleton. Role of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR).

    PubMed

    Reyes-Hernández, O D; Mejía-García, A; Sánchez-Ocampo, E M; Castro-Muñozledo, F; Hernández-Muñoz, R; Elizondo, G

    2009-12-21

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a multifunctional enzyme involved in several cellular functions including glycolysis, membrane transport, microtubule assembly, DNA replication and repair, nuclear RNA export, apoptosis, and the detection of nitric oxide stress. Therefore, modifications in the regulatory ability and function of GAPDH may alter cellular homeostasis. We report here that 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and beta-naphthoflavone, which are well-known ligands for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), increase GAPDH mRNA levels in vivo and in vitro, respectively. These compounds fail to induce GAPDH transcription in an AhR-null mouse model, suggesting that the increase in GAPDH level is dependent upon AhR activation. To analyse the consequences of AhR ligands on GAPDH function, mice were treated with TCDD and the level of liver activity of GAPDH was determined. The results showed that TCDD treatment increased GAPDH activity. On the other hand, treatment of Hepa-1 cells with beta-naphthoflavone leads to an increase in microfilament density when compared to untreated cultures. Collectively, these results suggest that AhR ligands, such as polycyclic hydrocarbons, can modify GAPDH expression and, therefore, have the potential to alter the multiple functions of this enzyme.

  2. The RhoGAP RGA-2 and LET-502/ROCK achieve a balance of actomyosin-dependent forces in C. elegans epidermis to control morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Diogon, Marie; Wissler, Frédéric; Quintin, Sophie; Nagamatsu, Yasuko; Sookhareea, Satis; Landmann, Frédéric; Hutter, Harald; Vitale, Nicolas; Labouesse, Michel

    2007-07-01

    Embryonic morphogenesis involves the coordinate behaviour of multiple cells and requires the accurate balance of forces acting within different cells through the application of appropriate brakes and throttles. In C. elegans, embryonic elongation is driven by Rho-binding kinase (ROCK) and actomyosin contraction in the epidermis. We identify an evolutionary conserved, actin microfilament-associated RhoGAP (RGA-2) that behaves as a negative regulator of LET-502/ROCK. The small GTPase RHO-1 is the preferred target of RGA-2 in vitro, and acts between RGA-2 and LET-502 in vivo. Two observations show that RGA-2 acts in dorsal and ventral epidermal cells to moderate actomyosin tension during the first half of elongation. First, time-lapse microscopy shows that loss of RGA-2 induces localised circumferentially oriented pulling on junctional complexes in dorsal and ventral epidermal cells. Second, specific expression of RGA-2 in dorsal/ventral, but not lateral, cells rescues the embryonic lethality of rga-2 mutants. We propose that actomyosin-generated tension must be moderated in two out of the three sets of epidermal cells surrounding the C. elegans embryo to achieve morphogenesis.

  3. Silencing the Nucleocytoplasmic O-GlcNAc Transferase Reduces Proliferation, Adhesion, and Migration of Cancer and Fetal Human Colon Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Steenackers, Agata; Olivier-Van Stichelen, Stéphanie; Baldini, Steffi F; Dehennaut, Vanessa; Toillon, Robert-Alain; Le Bourhis, Xuefen; El Yazidi-Belkoura, Ikram; Lefebvre, Tony

    2016-01-01

    The post-translational modification of proteins by O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) is regulated by a unique couple of enzymes. O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) transfers the GlcNAc residue from UDP-GlcNAc, the final product of the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP), whereas O-GlcNAcase (OGA) removes it. This study and others show that OGT and O-GlcNAcylation levels are increased in cancer cell lines. In that context, we studied the effect of OGT silencing in the colon cancer cell lines HT29 and HCT116 and the primary colon cell line CCD841CoN. Herein, we report that OGT silencing diminished proliferation, in vitro cell survival and adhesion of primary and cancer cell lines. SiOGT dramatically decreased HT29 and CCD841CoN migration, CCD841CoN harboring high capabilities of migration in Boyden chamber system when compared to HT29 and HCT116. The expression levels of actin and tubulin were unaffected by OGT knockdown but siOGT seemed to disorganize microfilament, microtubule, and vinculin networks in CCD841CoN. While cancer cell lines harbor higher levels of OGT and O-GlcNAcylation to fulfill their proliferative and migratory properties, in agreement with their higher consumption of HBP main substrates glucose and glutamine, our data demonstrate that OGT expression is not only necessary for the biological properties of cancer cell lines but also for normal cells.

  4. Magnetophoretic Induction of Root Curvature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasenstein, Karl H.

    1997-01-01

    The last year of the grant period concerned the consolidation of previous experiments to ascertain that the theoretical premise apply not just to root but also to shoots. In addition, we verified that high gradient magnetic fields do not interfere with regular cellular activities. Previous results have established that: (1) intracellular magnetophoresis is possible; and (2) HGMF lead to root curvature. In order to investigate whether HGMF affect the assembly and/or organization of structural proteins, we examined the arrangement of microtubules in roots exposed to HGMF. The cytoskeletal investigations were performed with fomaldehyde-fixed, nonembedded tissue segments that were cut with a vibratome. Microtubules (MTs) were stained with rat anti-yeast tubulin (YOL 1/34) and DTAF-labeled antibody against rat IgG. Microfilaments (MFs) were visualized by incubation in rhodamine-labeled phalloidin. The distribution and arrangement of both components of the cytoskeleton were examined with a confocal microscope. Measurements of growth rates and graviresponse were done using a video-digitizer. Since HGMF repel diamagnetic substances including starch-filled amyloplasts and most The second aspect of the work includes studies of the effect of cytoskeletal inhibitors on MTs and MFs. The analysis of the effect of micotubular inhibitors on the auxin transport in roots showed that there is very little effect of MT-depolymerizing or stabilizing drugs on auxin transport. This is in line with observations that application of such drugs is not immediately affecting the graviresponsiveness of roots.

  5. A novel culture morphology resulting from applied mechanical strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grymes, R. A.; Sawyer, C.

    1997-01-01

    To demonstrate that cells both perceive and respond to external force, a strain/relaxation regimen was applied to normal human fetal and aged dermal fibroblasts cultured as monolayers on flexible membranes. The precisely controlled protocol of stretch (20% elongation of the culture membrane) at 6.67 cycles/min caused a progressive change in the monolayers, such that the original randomly distributed pattern of cells became a symmetric, radial distribution as the cell bodies aligned parallel to the applied force. High cell density interfered with the success of re-alignment in the fetal cell cultures observed, which may reflect a preference in this cell strain for cell-cell over cell-matrix contacts. The chronologically aged cells observed did not demonstrate this feature, aligning efficiently at all seeding densities examined. The role of microfilaments in force perception and transmission was investigated through the addition of cytochalasin D in graded doses. Both intercellular interactions and cytoskeletal integrity mediate the morphological response to mechanical strain.

  6. Sub-lethal concentrations of CdCl2 disrupt cell migration and cytoskeletal proteins in cultured mouse TM4 Sertoli cells.

    PubMed

    Egbowon, Biola F; Harris, Wayne; Arnott, Gordon; Mills, Chris Lloyd; Hargreaves, Alan J

    2016-04-01

    The aims of this study were to examine the effects of CdCl2 on the viability, migration and cytoskeleton of cultured mouse TM4 Sertoli cells. Time- and concentration-dependent changes were exhibited by the cells but 1 μM CdCl2 was sub-cytotoxic at all time-points. Exposure to 1 and 12 μM CdCl2 for 4 h resulted in disruption of the leading edge, as determined by chemical staining. Cell migration was inhibited by both 1 and 12 μM CdCl2 in a scratch assay monitored by live cell imaging, although exposure to the higher concentration was associated with cell death. Western blotting and immunofluorescence staining indicated that CdCl2 caused a concentration dependent reduction in actin and tubulin levels. Exposure to Cd(2+) also resulted in significant changes in the levels and/or phosphorylation status of the microtubule and microfilament destabilising proteins cofilin and stathmin, suggesting disruption of cytoskeletal dynamics. Given that 1-12 μM Cd(2+) is attainable in vivo, our findings are consistent with the possibility that Cd(2+) induced impairment of testicular development and reproductive health may involve a combination of reduced Sertoli cell migration and impaired Sertoli cell viability depending on the timing, level and duration of exposure. PMID:26724415

  7. Microminiature coaxial cable and methods manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Bongianni, Wayne L.

    1986-01-01

    A coaxial cable is provided having a ribbon inner conductor surrounded by a dielectric and a circumferential conductor. The coaxial cable may be microminiature comprising a very thin ribbon strip conductor from between 5 to 15 .mu.m thick and from 150 to 200 .mu.m wide, having a surrounding foamed dielectric or parylene applied thereon by a vapor plasma process and an outer conductor of an adhering high conductivity metal vacuum deposited on the dielectric. Alternately the foam dielectric embodiment may have a contiguous parylene coating applied adjacent the inner conductor or the outer conductor or both. Also, the cable may be fabricated by forming a thin ribbon of strip conductive material into an inner conductor, applying thereabout a dielectric by spraying on a solution of polystyrene and polyethylene and then vacuum depositing and adhering high conductivity metal about the dielectric. The cable strength may be increased by adding glass microfilament fibers or glass microballoons to the solution of polystyrene and polyethylene. Further, the outer conductive layer may be applied by electroless deposition in an aqueous solution rather than by vacuum deposition. A thin coating of parylene is preferably applied to the outer conductor to prevent its oxidation and inhibit mechanical abrasion.

  8. Microminiature coaxial cable and method of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Bongianni, W.L.

    1989-03-28

    A coaxial cable is provided having a ribbon inner conductor surrounded by a dielectric and a circumferential conductor. The coaxial cable may be microminiature comprising a very thin ribbon strip conductor from between 5 to 15 [mu]m thick and from 150 to 200 [mu]m wide, having a surrounding foamed dielectric or parylene applied thereon by a vapor plasma process and an outer conductor of an adhering high conductivity metal vacuum deposited on the dielectric. Alternately, the foam dielectric embodiment may have a contiguous parylene coating applied adjacent the inner conductor or the outer conductor or both. Also, the cable may be fabricated by forming a thin ribbon of strip conductive material into an inner conductor, applying thereabout a dielectric by spraying on a solution of polystyrene and polyethylene and then vacuum depositing and adhering high conductivity metal about the dielectric. The cable strength may be increased by adding glass microfilament fibers or glass microspheres to the solution of polystyrene and polyethylene. Further, the outer conductive layer may be applied by electroless deposition in an aqueous solution rather than by vacuum deposition. A thin coating of parylene is preferably applied to the outer conductor to prevent its oxidation and inhibit mechanical abrasion. 2 figs.

  9. Microminiature coaxial cable and methods of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Bongianni, W.L.

    1983-12-29

    A coaxial cable is provided having a ribbon inner conductor surrounded by a dielectric and a circumferential conductor. The coaxial cable may be microminiature comprising a very thin ribbon strip conductor from between 5 to 15 ..mu..m thick and from 150 to 200 ..mu..m wide, having a surrounding foamed dielectric or parylene applied thereon by a vapor plasma process and an outer conductor of an adhering high conductivity metal vacuum deposited on the dieleectric. Alternately the foam dielectric embodiment may have a contiguous parylene coating applied adjacent the inner conductor or the outer conductor or both. Also, the cable may be fabricated by forming a thin ribbon of strip conductive material into an inner conductor, applying thereabout a dielectric by spraying on a solution of polystyrene and polyethylene and then vacuum depositing and adhering high conductivity metal about the dielectric. The cable strength may be increased by adding glass microfilament fibers or glass microballoons to the solution of polystyrene and polyethylene. Further, the outer conductive layer may be applied by electroless deposition in an aqueous solution rather than by vacuum deposition. A thin coating of parylene is preferably applied to the outer conductor to prevent its oxidation and inhibit mechanical abrasion.

  10. Microminiature coaxial cable and methods manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Bongianni, W.L.

    1986-04-08

    A coaxial cable is provided having a ribbon inner conductor surrounded by a dielectric and a circumferential conductor. The coaxial cable may be microminiature comprising a very thin ribbon strip conductor from between 5 to 15 [mu]m thick and from 150 to 200 [mu]m wide, having a surrounding foamed dielectric or parylene applied thereon by a vapor plasma process and an outer conductor of an adhering high conductivity metal vacuum deposited on the dielectric. Alternately the foam dielectric embodiment may have a contiguous parylene coating applied adjacent the inner conductor or the outer conductor or both. Also, the cable may be fabricated by forming a thin ribbon of strip conductive material into an inner conductor, applying thereabout a dielectric by spraying on a solution of polystyrene and polyethylene and then vacuum depositing and adhering high conductivity metal about the dielectric. The cable strength may be increased by adding glass microfilament fibers or glass microballoons to the solution of polystyrene and polyethylene. Further, the outer conductive layer may be applied by electroless deposition in an aqueous solution rather than by vacuum deposition. A thin coating of parylene is preferably applied to the outer conductor to prevent its oxidation and inhibit mechanical abrasion. 2 figs.

  11. Microminiature coaxial cable and method of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Bongianni, Wayne L.

    1989-01-01

    A coaxial cable is provided having a ribbon inner conductor surrounded by a dielectric and a circumferential conductor. The coaxial cable may be microminiature comprising a very thin ribbon strip conductor from between 5 to 15 .mu.m thick and from 150 to 200 .mu.m wide, having a surrounding foamed dielectric or parylene applied thereon by a vapor plasma process and an outer conductor of an adhering high conductivity metal vacuum deposited on the dielectric. Alternately, the foam dielectric embodiment may have a contiguous parylene coating applied adjacent the inner conductor or the outer conductor or both. Also, the cable may be fabricated by forming a thin ribbon of strip conductive material into an inner conductor, applying thereabout a dielectric by spraying on a solution of polystyrene and polyethylene and then vacuum depositing and adhering high conductivity metal about the dielectric. The cable strength may be increased by adding glass microfilament fibers or glass microspheres to the solution of polystyrene and polyethylene. Further, the outer conductive layer may be applied by electroless deposition in an aqueous solution rather than by vacuum deposition. A thin coating of parylene is preferably applied to the outer conductor to prevent its oxidation and inhibit mechanical abrasion.

  12. Disruption of the three cytoskeletal networks in mammalian cells does not affect transcription, translation, or protein translocation changes induced by heat shock.

    PubMed Central

    Welch, W J; Feramisco, J R

    1985-01-01

    Mammalian cells show a complex series of transcriptional and translational switching events in response to heat shock treatment which ultimately lead to the production and accumulation of a small number of proteins, the so-called heat shock (or stress) proteins. We investigated the heat shock response in both qualitative and quantitative ways in cells that were pretreated with drugs that specifically disrupt one or more of the three major cytoskeletal networks. (These drugs alone, cytochalasin E and colcemid, do not result in induction of the heat shock response.) Our results indicated that disruption of the actin microfilaments, the vimentin-containing intermediate filaments, or the microtubules in living cells does not hinder the ability of the cell to undergo an apparently normal heat shock response. Even when all three networks were simultaneously disrupted (resulting in a loose, baglike appearance of the cells), the cells still underwent a complete heat shock response as assayed by the appearance of the heat shock proteins. In addition, the major induced 72-kilodalton heat shock protein was efficiently translocated from the cytoplasm into its proper location in the nucleus and nucleolus irrespective of the condition of the three cytoskeletal elements. Images PMID:4040602

  13. Actin cytoskeleton demonstration in Trichomonas vaginalis and in other trichomonads.

    PubMed

    Brugerolle, G; Bricheux, G; Coffe, G

    1996-01-01

    The flagellate form of Trichomonas vaginalis (T v) transforms to amoeboid cells upon adherence to converslips. They grow and their nuclei divide without undergoing cytokinesis, yielding giant cells and a monolayer of T v F-actin was demonstrated in Trichomonas vaginalis by fluorescence microscopy using phalloidin and an anti-actin mAb which labelled the cytoplasm of both the flagellate and amoeboid forms. Comparative electrophoresis and immunoblotting established that the actin band has the same 42 kDa as muscle actin, but 2-D electrophoresis resolved the actin band into four spots; the two major spots observed were superimposable with major muscle actin isoforms. Electron microscopy demonstrated an ectoplasmic microfibrillar layer along the adhesion zone of amoeboid T v adhering to coverslips. Immunogold staining, using anti-actin monoclonal antibodies demonstrated that this layer was mainly composed of actin microfilaments. A comparative immunoblotting study comprising seven trichomonad species showed that all trichomonads studied expressed actin. The mAb Sigma A-4700 specific for an epitope on the actin C-terminal sequence labelled only actin of Trichomonas vaginalis, Tetratrichomonas gallinarum. Trichomitus batrachorum and Hypotrichomonas acosta, but not the actin of Tritrichomonas foetus, Tritrichomonas augusta and Monocercomonas sp. This discrimination between a 'trichomonas branch' and a 'tritrichomonas branch' is congruent with inferred sequence phylogeny from SSu rRNA and with classical phylogeny of trichomonads. PMID:9175265

  14. Extensive and Intimate Association of the Cytoskeleton with Forming Silica in Diatoms: Control over Patterning on the Meso- and Micro-Scale

    PubMed Central

    Tesson, Benoit; Hildebrand, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Background The diatom cell wall, called the frustule, is predominantly made out of silica, in many cases with highly ordered nano- and micro-scale features. Frustules are built intracellularly inside a special compartment, the silica deposition vesicle, or SDV. Molecules such as proteins (silaffins and silacidins) and long chain polyamines have been isolated from the silica and shown to be involved in the control of the silica polymerization. However, we are still unable to explain or reproduce in vitro the complexity of structures formed by diatoms. Methods/Principal Finding In this study, using fluorescence microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy, we were able to compare and correlate microtubules and microfilaments with silica structure formed in diversely structured diatom species. The high degree of correlation between silica structure and actin indicates that actin is a major element in the control of the silica morphogenesis at the meso and microscale. Microtubules appear to be involved in the spatial positioning on the mesoscale and strengthening of the SDV. Conclusions/Significance These results reveal the importance of top down control over positioning of and within the SDV during diatom wall formation and open a new perspective for the study of the mechanism of frustule patterning as well as for the understanding of the control of membrane dynamics by the cytoskeleton. PMID:21200414

  15. Disruption of blastomeric F-actin: a potential early biomarker of developmental toxicity in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Kanungo, Jyotshnabala; Paule, Merle G

    2011-07-01

    The expression of at least some biomarkers of toxicity is generally thought to precede the appearance of frank pathology. In the context of developmental toxicity, certain early indicators may be predictive of later drastic outcome. The search for predictive biomarkers of toxicity in the cells (blastomeres) of an early embryo can benefit from the fact that for normal development to proceed, the maintenance of blastomere cellular integrity during the process of transition from an embryo to a fully functional organism is paramount. Actin microfilaments are integral parts of blastomeres in the developing zebrafish embryo and contribute toward the proper progression of early development (cleavage and epiboly). In early embryos, the filamentous actin (F-actin) is present and helps to define the boundary of each blastomere as they remain adhered to each other. In our studies, we observed that when blastomeric F-actin is depolymerized by agents like gelsolin, the blastomeres lose cellular integrity, which results in abnormal larvae later in development. There are a variety of toxicants that depolymerize F-actin in early mammalian embryos, the later consequences of which are, at present, not known. We propose that very early zebrafish embryos (~5-h old) exposed to such toxicants will also respond in a like manner. In this review, we discuss the potential use of F-actin disruption as a predictive biomarker of developmental toxicity in zebrafish. PMID:21461911

  16. Actin binding proteins, spermatid transport and spermiation.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xiaojing; Mruk, Dolores D; Cheng, Yan-Ho; Tang, Elizabeth I; Han, Daishu; Lee, Will M; Wong, Elissa W P; Cheng, C Yan

    2014-06-01

    The transport of germ cells across the seminiferous epithelium is composed of a series of cellular events during the epithelial cycle essential to the completion of spermatogenesis. Without the timely transport of spermatids during spermiogenesis, spermatozoa that are transformed from step 19 spermatids in the rat testis fail to reach the luminal edge of the apical compartment and enter the tubule lumen at spermiation, thereby arriving the epididymis for further maturation. Step 19 spermatids and/or sperms that remain in the epithelium beyond stage VIII of the epithelial cycle will be removed by the Sertoli cell via phagocytosis to form phagosomes and be degraded by lysosomes, leading to subfertility and/or infertility. However, the biology of spermatid transport, in particular the final events that lead to spermiation remain elusive. Based on recent data in the field, we critically evaluate the biology of spermiation herein by focusing on the actin binding proteins (ABPs) that regulate the organization of actin microfilaments at the Sertoli-spermatid interface, which is crucial for spermatid transport during this event. The hypothesis we put forth herein also highlights some specific areas of research that can be pursued by investigators in the years to come.

  17. Live Cell Imaging During Germination Reveals Dynamic Tubular Structures Derived from Protein Storage Vacuoles of Barley Aleurone Cells.

    PubMed

    Ibl, Verena; Stoger, Eva

    2014-01-01

    The germination of cereal seeds is a rapid developmental process in which the endomembrane system undergoes a series of dynamic morphological changes to mobilize storage compounds. The changing ultrastructure of protein storage vacuoles (PSVs) in the cells of the aleurone layer has been investigated in the past, but generally this involved inferences drawn from static pictures representing different developmental stages. We used live cell imaging in transgenic barley plants expressing a TIP3-GFP fusion protein as a fluorescent PSV marker to follow in real time the spatially and temporally regulated remodeling and reshaping of PSVs during germination. During late-stage germination, we observed thin, tubular structures extending from PSVs in an actin-dependent manner. No extensions were detected following the disruption of actin microfilaments, while microtubules did not appear to be involved in the process. The previously-undetected tubular PSV structures were characterized by complex movements, fusion events and a dynamic morphology. Their function during germination remains unknown, but might be related to the transport of solutes and metabolites.

  18. Simultaneous Visualization of Peroxisomes and Cytoskeletal Elements Reveals Actin and Not Microtubule-Based Peroxisome Motility in Plants1[w

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Jaideep; Mathur, Neeta; Hülskamp, Martin

    2002-01-01

    Peroxisomes were visualized in living plant cells using a yellow fluorescent protein tagged with a peroxisomal targeting signal consisting of the SKL motif. Simultaneous visualization of peroxisomes and microfilaments/microtubules was accomplished in onion (Allium cepa) epidermal cells transiently expressing the yellow fluorescent protein-peroxi construct, a green fluorescent protein-mTalin construct that labels filamentous-actin filaments, and a green fluorescent protein-microtubule-binding domain construct that labels microtubules. The covisualization of peroxisomes and cytoskeletal elements revealed that, contrary to the reports from animal cells, peroxisomes in plants appear to associate with actin filaments and not microtubules. That peroxisome movement is actin based was shown by pharmacological studies. For this analysis we used onion epidermal cells and various cell types of Arabidopsis including trichomes, root hairs, and root cortex cells exhibiting different modes of growth. In transient onion epidermis assay and in transgenic Arabidopsis plants, an interference with the actin cytoskeleton resulted in progressive loss of saltatory movement followed by the aggregation and a complete cessation of peroxisome motility within 30 min of drug application. Microtubule depolymerization or stabilization had no effect. PMID:11891258

  19. The sertolian epithelium in the testis of men affected by 'Sertoli-cell-only syndrome'.

    PubMed

    Tedde, G; Montella, A; Fiocca, D; Delrio, A N

    1993-01-01

    Because of the architectural complexity of the seminiferous epithelium, the Sertoli cell is extremely difficult to study. The individual cellular constituents of the tubular wall are intimately associated with one another; especially Sertoli cells and germinal cells are tightly connected. As implied by the name, Sertoli-cell-only syndrome (SCOS) is characterized by the presence of only Sertoli cells in the seminiferous tubule. The absence of germinal cells makes this condition ideal for the morphological study of Sertoli cell. Testicular biopsy specimens of subjects affected by SCOS were studied under light and electron microscopy. The Sertoli cells appeared to be morphologically normal, except for their shape, that appears to be columnar as result of the complete absence of the germinal cells. The cellular outlines were irregular, particularly at the base, but the cytoplasm contained normal organelles and inclusions. The presence of both pale and dark elements was evident. These differences in staining reflect the variability in concentration of glycogen particles and intermediate microfilaments in the cytoplasm. In spite of these differences between Sertoli cells in SCOS and those in normal subjects, SCOS represents a satisfactory model for the morphological and functional analysis of the Sertoli cells. PMID:7694556

  20. [Cytoskeletal control of cell length regulation].

    PubMed

    Kharitonova, M A; Levina, C M; Rovenskii, I A

    2002-01-01

    It was shown that mouse embryo fibroblasts and human foreskin diploid fibroblasts of AGO 1523 line cultivated on specially prepared substrates with narrow (15 +/- 3 microns) linear adhesive strips were elongated and oriented along the strips, but the mean lengths of the fibroblasts of each type on the strips differed from those on the standard culture substrates. In contrast to the normal fibroblasts, the length of mouse embryonic fibroblasts with inactivated gene-suppresser Rb responsible for negative control of cell proliferation (MEF Rb-/-), ras-transformed mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF Rb-/-ras), or normal rat epitheliocytes of IAR2 line significantly exceeded those of the same cells on the standard culture substrates. The results of experiments with the drugs specifically affecting the cytoskeleton (colcemid and cytochalasin D) suggest that the constant mean length of normal fibroblasts is controlled by a dynamic equilibrium between two forces: centripetal tension of contractile actin-myosin microfilaments and centrifugal force generated by growing microtubules. This cytoskeletal mechanism is disturbed in MEF Rb-/- or MEF Rb-/-ras, probably, because of an impaired actin cytoskeleton and also in IAR2 epitheliocytes due to the different organization of the actin-myosin system in these cells, as compared to that in the fibroblasts. PMID:11862697

  1. [Peculiarities of ultrastructure of excretory system in Bothrioplana semperi (Platyhelminthes, Turbellaria)].

    PubMed

    Kornakova, E E

    2010-01-01

    Ultrastructural study of morphology of cirtocytes and excretory channels was performed in the free living turbellaria Bothrioplana semperi (Turbellaria, Seriata). It has been shown that cirtocytes of this species are formed by two cells--the terminal and the proximal cells of the channel. The fan is composed of two rod rows. The external row goes out from the terminal cell, the internal one is a derivate of the channel proximal cell. Inside each rod of the external row there runs a bundle of microfilaments; it originates in the cytoplasm of the channel proximal cell distal to bases of the external rods. On the internal rod membranes there are noted small electrondense granules disposed separately or fused in the solid layer continuing into a dense "membrane" connecting rods of the external and internal rows. Rare internal leptotrichiae go out from the cirtocyte cavity bottom. External leptotrichiae are absent. The septate desmosome at the level of the terminal cell is absent, but is present in the channel proximal cell at the level of terminal of cilia. The apical surface of the channel cell carries rare short microvilli. The basement membrane of cells of excretory channels forms deep invaginations almost reaching the apical membrane. Epithelium of excretory channels is deprived of cilia. Ultrastructure of cirtocytes and excretory channels of B. semperi is similar to those in representatives of the suborder Proseriata (Seriata). The significance of ultrastructure of the Proseriata cirtocytes, especially of the order of formation of versh, for construction of phylogeny of Platyhelminthes is discussed.

  2. Actin Filaments Are Involved in the Coupling of V0-V1 Domains of Vacuolar H+-ATPase at the Golgi Complex.

    PubMed

    Serra-Peinado, Carla; Sicart, Adrià; Llopis, Juan; Egea, Gustavo

    2016-04-01

    We previously reported that actin-depolymerizing agents promote the alkalization of the Golgi stack and thetrans-Golgi network. The main determinant of acidic pH at the Golgi is the vacuolar-type H(+)-translocating ATPase (V-ATPase), whose V1domain subunitsBandCbind actin. We have generated a GFP-tagged subunitB2construct (GFP-B2) that is incorporated into the V1domain, which in turn is coupled to the V0sector. GFP-B2 subunit is enriched at distal Golgi compartments in HeLa cells. Subcellular fractionation, immunoprecipitation, and inversal FRAP experiments show that the actin depolymerization promotes the dissociation of V1-V0domains, which entails subunitB2translocation from Golgi membranes to the cytosol. Moreover, molecular interaction between subunitsB2andC1and actin were detected. In addition, Golgi membrane lipid order disruption byd-ceramide-C6 causes Golgi pH alkalization. We conclude that actin regulates the Golgi pH homeostasis maintaining the coupling of V1-V0domains of V-ATPase through the binding of microfilaments to subunitsBandCand preserving the integrity of detergent-resistant membrane organization. These results establish the Golgi-associated V-ATPase activity as the molecular link between actin and the Golgi pH. PMID:26872971

  3. Troponin I binds polycystin-L and inhibits its calcium-induced channel activation.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Liu, Yan; Shen, Patrick Y; Dai, Xiao-Qing; Wang, Shaohua; Smillie, Lawrence B; Sandford, Richard; Chen, Xing-Zhen

    2003-06-24

    Polycystin-L (PCL) is an isoform of polycystin-2, the product of the second gene associated with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, and functions as a Ca(2+)-regulated nonselective cation channel. We recently demonstrated that polycystin-2 interacts with troponin I, an important regulatory component of the actin microfilament complex in striated muscle cells and an angiogenesis inhibitor. In this study, using the two-microelectrode voltage-clamp technique and Xenopus oocyte expression system, we showed that the calcium-induced PCL channel activation is substantially inhibited by the skeletal and cardiac troponin I (60% and 31% reduction, respectively). Reciprocal co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that PCL physically associates with the skeletal and cardiac troponin I isoforms in overexpressed Xenopus oocytes and mouse fibroblast NIH 3T3 cells. Furthermore, both native PCL and cardiac troponin I were present in human heart tissues where they indeed associate with each other. GST pull-down and microtiter binding assays showed that the C-terminus of PCL interacts with the troponin I proteins. The yeast two-hybrid assay further verified this interaction and defined the corresponding interacting domains of the PCL C-terminus and troponin I. Taken together, this study suggests that troponin I acts as a regulatory subunit of the PCL channel complex and provides the first direct evidence that PCL is associated with the actin cytoskeleton through troponin I. PMID:12809519

  4. Ultrastructural studies of the epiphyseal plate of chicks fed a vitamin D-deficient and low-calcium diet.

    PubMed

    Takechi, M; Itakura, C

    1995-08-01

    The epiphyseal plates of rachitic chicks fed a vitamin D-deficient and low-calcium diet were examined ultrastructurally at 4, 7, 14, 18 and 21 days old. On and after 14 days, changes were observed. Chondrocytes in resting, proliferating and maturing zones commonly showed a reduction in cell organelles, suggestive of a decrease in synthetic activity of matrix components. In addition, the resting zone cells had numerous intracytoplasmic microfilaments. Mitotic figures were present but not increased in number in the proliferating zone. Autolysosome-like dense bodies in the chondrocytes and clusters of degenerative and necrotic chondrocytes were observed in the proliferating and maturing zones. In the calcifying zone of the rachitic epiphyseal plate, initial calcification was observed characterized by the deposition of apatite crystals in matrix vesicles and the formation of spherical crystal clusters. The crystal clusters were separated from each other by collagen fibrils on which only small amounts of apatite crystals had been deposited. In this zone, hypertrophic chondrocytes responsible for the initial calcification were seen, but not the stellate chondrocytes responsible for the progression of matrix calcification after its initiation. These findings suggest that accumulation of the proliferating and maturing zone cells as a characteristic lesion of the epiphyseal plate in rachitic chicks is caused by a disturbance of cell maturation. Such disturbance in the calcifying zone may explain the progression of the defect in matrix calcification.

  5. Dynamic and ultrastructural study of sphincter of Oddi in early-stage cholelithiasis in rabbits with hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jing-Guo; Wang, Yao-Cheng; Du, Fan; Yu, Hou-Jun

    2000-02-01

    AIM:To study the relationship between pre-formation of gallstone and the kinetics and ultra-structure of sphincter of Oddi.METHODS:Adult female rabbits were used and divided into 3 groups,and fed with either normal or high cholesterol diet for four or eight weeks.Each group contained eight rabbits. The manometry of sphincter of Oddi, biliary cineradiography, gallbladder volume measurement and ultrastructure observation under electron microscope were performed.RESULTS:In groups I and II,the basal pressure in low-pressure ampulla or high pressure zone of sphincter of Oddi was elevated,the amplitude of phasic contraction was decreased and the volume of gallbladder were increased, with a significant difference (P < 0.01) from those of control. Gallstones were found in group II rabbits (7/8). Under cineradiography, low-pressure ampulla showed a spasmodic status without apparent peristaltic contraction. Under electron microscope, inside the muscular cells of sphincter of Oddi, loosening of micro filament and swelling of plasmosomes which congregated at the top were observed. The amount showed no obvious change under nitric oxide synthase (NOS) stain.CONCLUSION:Twisting of the microfilament and disarrangement of kink macula densa inside the muscular cells suggested that the sphincter of Oddi was under spasmodic status. The impaired diastolic function caused and aggravated the stasis of cystic bile. The swelling plasmosome could be one of the important factors in elevating the tonic pressure of sphincter of Oddi.

  6. Disruption of the actin cytoskeleton results in the promotion of gravitropism in inflorescence stems and hypocotyls of Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuyoshi; Kiss, John Z.

    2002-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is hypothesized to play a major role in gravity perception and transduction mechanisms in roots of plants. To determine whether actin microfilaments (MFs) are involved in these processes in stem-like organs, we studied gravitropism in Arabidopsis inflorescence stems and hypocotyls. Localization studies using Alexa Fluor-phalloidin in conjugation with confocal microscopy demonstrated a longitudinally and transversely oriented actin MF network in endodermal cells of stems and hypocotyls. Latrunculin B (Lat-B) treatment of hypocotyls caused depolymerization of actin MFs in endodermal cells and a significant reduction of hypocotyl growth rates. Actin MFs in Lat-B-treated inflorescence stems also were disrupted, but growth rates were not affected. Despite disruption of the actin cytoskeleton in these two organs, Lat-B-treated stems and hypocotyls exhibited a promotion of gravitropic curvature in response to reorientation. In contrast, Lat-B reduced gravitropic curvature in roots but also reduced the growth rate. Thus, in contrast to prevailing hypotheses, our results suggest that actin MFs are not a necessary component of gravitropism in inflorescence stems and hypocotyls. Furthermore, this is the first study to demonstrate a prominent actin MF network in endodermal cells in the putative gravity-perceiving cells in stems.

  7. Use of fluorescent nanoparticles to investigate nutrient acquisition by developing Eimeria maxima macrogametocytes.

    PubMed

    Frölich, Sonja; Wallach, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The enteric disease coccidiosis, caused by the unicellular parasite Eimeria, is a major and reoccurring problem for the poultry industry. While the molecular machinery driving host cell invasion and oocyst wall formation has been well documented in Eimeria, relatively little is known about the host cell modifications which lead to acquisition of nutrients and parasite growth. In order to understand the mechanism(s) by which nutrients are acquired by developing intracellular gametocytes and oocysts, we have performed uptake experiments using polystyrene nanoparticles (NPs) of 40 nm and 100 nm in size, as model NPs typical of organic macromolecules. Cytochalasin D and nocodazole were used to inhibit, respectively, the polymerization of the actin and microtubules. The results indicated that NPs entered the parasite at all stages of macrogametocyte development and early oocyst maturation via an active energy dependent process. Interestingly, the smaller NPs were found throughout the parasite cytoplasm, while the larger NPs were mainly localised to the lumen of large type 1 wall forming body organelles. NP uptake was reduced after microfilament disruption and treatment with nocodazole. These observations suggest that E. maxima parasites utilize at least 2 or more uptake pathways to internalize exogenous material during the sexual stages of development. PMID:27352801

  8. Actin marker lines in grapevine reveal a gatekeeper function of guard cells.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xin; Buchholz, Günther; Nick, Peter

    2014-08-15

    Resistance to abiotic and biotic stress is a central topic for sustainable agriculture, especially in grapevine, one of the field crops with the highest economic output per acreage. As early cellular factors for plant defense, actin microfilaments (AF) are of high relevance. We therefore generated a transgenic actin marker line for grapevine by expressing a fusion protein between green fluorescent protein and the second actin-binding domain of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) fimbrin, AtFIM1. Based on this first cytoskeletal-marker line in grapevine, the response of AFs to phytopathogenic microorganisms could be followed in vivo. Upon inoculation with fluorescently labeled strains of phytopathogenic bacteria, actin responses were confined to the guard cells. In contrast, upon contact with zoospores of Plasmopara viticola, not only the guard cells, but also epidermal pavement cells, where no zoospores had attached responded with the formation of a perinuclear actin basket. Our data support the hypothesis that guard cells act as pacemakers of defense, dominating the responses of the remaining epidermal cells. PMID:24973589

  9. Actin Filaments Are Involved in the Coupling of V0-V1 Domains of Vacuolar H+-ATPase at the Golgi Complex.

    PubMed

    Serra-Peinado, Carla; Sicart, Adrià; Llopis, Juan; Egea, Gustavo

    2016-04-01

    We previously reported that actin-depolymerizing agents promote the alkalization of the Golgi stack and thetrans-Golgi network. The main determinant of acidic pH at the Golgi is the vacuolar-type H(+)-translocating ATPase (V-ATPase), whose V1domain subunitsBandCbind actin. We have generated a GFP-tagged subunitB2construct (GFP-B2) that is incorporated into the V1domain, which in turn is coupled to the V0sector. GFP-B2 subunit is enriched at distal Golgi compartments in HeLa cells. Subcellular fractionation, immunoprecipitation, and inversal FRAP experiments show that the actin depolymerization promotes the dissociation of V1-V0domains, which entails subunitB2translocation from Golgi membranes to the cytosol. Moreover, molecular interaction between subunitsB2andC1and actin were detected. In addition, Golgi membrane lipid order disruption byd-ceramide-C6 causes Golgi pH alkalization. We conclude that actin regulates the Golgi pH homeostasis maintaining the coupling of V1-V0domains of V-ATPase through the binding of microfilaments to subunitsBandCand preserving the integrity of detergent-resistant membrane organization. These results establish the Golgi-associated V-ATPase activity as the molecular link between actin and the Golgi pH.

  10. Effect of Tropomyosin on Formin-Bound Actin Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Ujfalusi, Zoltán; Vig, Andrea; Hild, Gábor; Nyitrai, Miklós

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Formins are conservative proteins with important roles in the regulation of the microfilament system in eukaryotic cells. Previous studies showed that the binding of formins to actin made the structure of actin filaments more flexible. Here, the effects of tropomyosin on formin-induced changes in actin filaments were investigated using fluorescence spectroscopic methods. The temperature dependence of the Förster-type resonance energy transfer showed that the formin-induced increase of flexibility of actin filaments was diminished by the binding of tropomyosin to actin. Fluorescence anisotropy decay measurements also revealed that the structure of flexible formin-bound actin filaments was stabilized by the binding of tropomyosin. The stabilizing effect reached its maximum when all binding sites on actin were occupied by tropomyosin. The effect of tropomyosin on actin filaments was independent of ionic strength, but became stronger as the magnesium concentration increased. Based on these observations, we propose that in cells there is a molecular mechanism in which tropomyosin binding to actin plays an important role in forming mechanically stable actin filaments, even in the case of formin-induced rapid filament assembly. PMID:18931257

  11. Thermally Driven and Cytoskeletal-Assisted Dynamics of the Mitochondrial Reticulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowles, Michelle K.; Marcus, Andrew H.

    2003-05-01

    We report Fourier imaging correlation spectroscopy (FICS) and digital video fluorescence microscopy (DVFM) measurements of the dynamics of the mitochondrial reticulum in living osteosarcoma cells. Mitochondrial dynamics are strongly influenced by interactions with cytoskeletal filaments and their associated motor proteins, which lead to complex multi-exponential relaxations that occur over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. The cytoskeleton consists of an interconnected polymer network whose primary components are microfilaments (actin) and microtubules (tubulin). These filaments work with motor proteins to translate organelles through the cell. We studied the dynamics of osteosarcoma cells labeled with red fluorescent protein in the mitochondrial matrix space using DVFM and FICS. Cells were then treated with cytoskeletal destabilizing drugs. Analysis of microscopy data allows for us to determine whether dynamic processes are diffusive or driven (by the cytoskeleton or collective dynamics). In FICS experiments, the control cells exhibit a unique pattern of dynamics that are then simplified when the cytoskeleton is depolymerized. Upon depolymerization, the dynamics of the organelle appear primarily diffusive.

  12. The involvement of the rho gene product, a small molecular weight GTP-binding protein, in polyploidization of a human megakaryocytic cell line, CMK.

    PubMed

    Takada, M; Morii, N; Kumagai, S; Ryo, R

    1996-03-01

    The role of rho proteins, which are ras p21-related small GTP-binding proteins, in megakaryocyte endomitosis was examined using a botulinum C3 exoenzyme (C3), a rho inactivating enzyme. The megakaryocytic leukemia cell line CMK expressed high levels of rhoA and rhoC mRNAs, whereas rhoB mRNA was expressed at a very low level. The addition of C3 to the culture medium caused ADP-ribosylation of the rho proteins in CMK cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. This procedure also induced a higher frequency of polyploid cells with increased glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa antigens on the cells. This effect of C3 on both ploidy and the antigen expression was abolished by prior incubation of C3 with an anti-C3 monoclonal antibody. Cytochalasin B, an actin polymerization inhibitor, also induced polyploid cells; however, it did not stimulate the expression of GP IIb/IIIa antigens in CMK cells. This finding suggests that C3-induced increase in the expression of GP IIb/IIIa antigens was not through the actin microfilament disassembly. The present study suggests that the rho p21 is a partly regulatory component in polyploidization and GP IIb/IIIa antigen expression of a human megakaryocytic cell line, CMK.

  13. Manufacturing of Three-dimensionally Microstructured Nanocomposites through Microfluidic Infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Dermanaki-Farahani, Rouhollah; Lebel, Louis Laberge; Therriault, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Microstructured composite beams reinforced with complex three-dimensionally (3D) patterned nanocomposite microfilaments are fabricated via nanocomposite infiltration of 3D interconnected microfluidic networks. The manufacturing of the reinforced beams begins with the fabrication of microfluidic networks, which involves layer-by-layer deposition of fugitive ink filaments using a dispensing robot, filling the empty space between filaments using a low viscosity resin, curing the resin and finally removing the ink. Self-supported 3D structures with other geometries and many layers (e.g. a few hundreds layers) could be built using this method. The resulting tubular microfluidic networks are then infiltrated with thermosetting nanocomposite suspensions containing nanofillers (e.g. single-walled carbon nanotubes), and subsequently cured. The infiltration is done by applying a pressure gradient between two ends of the empty network (either by applying a vacuum or vacuum-assisted microinjection). Prior to the infiltration, the nanocomposite suspensions are prepared by dispersing nanofillers into polymer matrices using ultrasonication and three-roll mixing methods. The nanocomposites (i.e. materials infiltrated) are then solidified under UV exposure/heat cure, resulting in a 3D-reinforced composite structure. The technique presented here enables the design of functional nanocomposite macroscopic products for microengineering applications such as actuators and sensors. PMID:24686754

  14. Rapid Mass Movement of Chloroplasts during Segment Formation of the Calcifying Siphonalean Green Alga, Halimeda macroloba

    PubMed Central

    Larkum, Anthony W. D.; Salih, Anya; Kühl, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Background The calcifying siphonalean green alga, Halimeda macroloba is abundant on coral reefs and is important in the production of calcium carbonate sediments. The process by which new green segments are formed over-night is revealed here for the first time. Methodology/Principal Findings Growth of new segments was visualised by epifluorescence and confocal microscopy and by pulse amplitude modulation (PAM) fluorimetry. Apical colourless proto-segments were initiated on day 1, and formed a loose network of non-calcified, non-septate filaments, containing no chloroplasts. Rapid greening was initiated at dusk by i) the mass movement of chloroplasts into these filaments from the parent segment and ii) the growth of new filaments containing chloroplasts. Greening was usually complete in 3–5 h and certainly before dawn on day 2 when the first signs of calcification were apparent. Mass chloroplast movement took place at a rate of ∼0.65 µm/s. Photosynthetic yield and rate remained low for a period of 1 to several hours, indicating that the chloroplasts were made de novo. Use of the inhibitors colchicine and cytochalasin d indicated that the movement process is dependent on both microtubules and microfilaments. Significance This unusual process involves the mass movement of chloroplasts at a high rate into new segments during the night and rapid calcification on the following day and may be an adaptation to minimise the impact of herbivorous activity. PMID:21750703

  15. In vitro culture of hFOB1.19 osteoblast cells on TGF-β1-SF-CS three-dimensional scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    TONG, SHUANG; XUE, LEI; XU, DA-PENG; LIU, ZI-MEI; DU, YANG; WANG, XU-KAI

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the biocompatibility of transforming growth factor-β1-silk fibroin-chitosan (TGF-β1-SF-CS) scaffolds. In order to provide an ideal scaffold for use in bone tissue engineering, TGF-β1 was introduced into the SF-CS scaffold in order to reconstruct a three dimensional scaffold, following which hFOB1.19 osteoblast cells were seeded onto TGF-β1-SF-CS and SF-CS scaffolds. On the TGF-β1-SF-CS and SF-CS scaffolds, the cell adhesion rate increased in a time-dependent manner. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the cells grew actively and exhibited normal morphological features with multiple fissions, and granular and filamentous substrates were observed surrounding the cells. In addition, the cell microfilaments were closely connected with the scaffolds. The cells exhibited attached growth on the surfaces of the scaffolds, however, the growth also extended into the scaffolds. Cell Counting Kit-8 and ALP analyses revealed that TGF-β1 significantly promoted the growth and proliferation of the hFOB1.19 osteoblast cells in the SF-CS scaffolds, and the enhancement of osteoblast cell proliferation and activity by TGF-β1 occurred in a time-dependent manner. The TGF-β1-SF-CS composite material may offer potential as an ideal scaffold material for bone tissue engineering. PMID:26530112

  16. Polycaprolactone Scaffolds Fabricated via Bioextrusion for Tissue Engineering Applications

    PubMed Central

    Domingos, Marco; Dinucci, Dinuccio; Cometa, Stefania; Alderighi, Michele; Bártolo, Paulo Jorge; Chiellini, Federica

    2009-01-01

    The most promising approach in Tissue Engineering involves the seeding of porous, biocompatible/biodegradable scaffolds, with donor cells to promote tissue regeneration. Additive biomanufacturing processes are increasingly recognized as ideal techniques to produce 3D structures with optimal pore size and spatial distribution, providing an adequate mechanical support for tissue regeneration while shaping in-growing tissues. This paper presents a novel extrusion-based system to produce 3D scaffolds with controlled internal/external geometry for TE applications.The BioExtruder is a low-cost system that uses a proper fabrication code based on the ISO programming language enabling the fabrication of multimaterial scaffolds. Poly(ε-caprolactone) was the material chosen to produce porous scaffolds, made by layers of directionally aligned microfilaments. Chemical, morphological, and in vitro biological evaluation performed on the polymeric constructs revealed a high potential of the BioExtruder to produce 3D scaffolds with regular and reproducible macropore architecture, without inducing relevant chemical and biocompatibility alterations of the material. PMID:20126577

  17. Staufen Recruitment into Stress Granules Does Not Affect Early mRNA Transport in Oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, María G.; Tosar, Leandro J. Martinez; Loschi, Mariela; Pasquini, Juana M.; Correale, Jorge; Kindler, Stefan; Boccaccio, Graciela L.

    2005-01-01

    Staufen is a conserved double-stranded RNA-binding protein required for mRNA localization in Drosophila oocytes and embryos. The mammalian homologues Staufen 1 and Staufen 2 have been implicated in dendritic RNA targeting in neurons. Here we show that in rodent oligodendrocytes, these two proteins are present in two independent sets of RNA granules located at the distal myelinating processes. A third kind of RNA granules lacks Staufen and contains major myelin mRNAs. Myelin Staufen granules associate with microfilaments and microtubules, and their subcellular distribution is affected by polysome-disrupting drugs. Under oxidative stress, both Staufen 1 and Staufen 2 are recruited into stress granules (SGs), which are stress-induced organelles containing transiently silenced messengers. Staufen SGs contain the poly(A)-binding protein (PABP), the RNA-binding proteins HuR and TIAR, and small but not large ribosomal subunits. Staufen recruitment into perinuclear SGs is paralleled by a similar change in the overall localization of polyadenylated RNA. Under the same conditions, the distribution of recently transcribed and exported mRNAs is not affected. Our results indicate that Staufen 1 and Staufen 2 are novel and ubiquitous SG components and suggest that Staufen RNPs are involved in repositioning of most polysomal mRNAs, but not of recently synthesized transcripts, during the stress response. PMID:15525674

  18. Nanosurface design of dental implants for improved cell growth and function.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hsu-An; Hung, Yao-Ching; Chiou, Jin-Chern; Tai, Shih-Ming; Chen, Hsin-Hung; Huang, G Steven

    2012-08-24

    A strategy was proposed for the topological design of dental implants based on an in vitro survey of optimized nanodot structures. An in vitro survey was performed using nanodot arrays with dot diameters ranging from 10 to 200 nm. MG63 osteoblasts were seeded on nanodot arrays and cultured for 3 days. Cell number, percentage undergoing apoptotic-like cell death, cell adhesion and cytoskeletal organization were evaluated. Nanodots with a diameter of approximately 50 nm enhanced cell number by 44%, minimized apoptotic-like cell death to 2.7%, promoted a 30% increase in microfilament bundles and maximized cell adhesion with a 73% increase in focal adhesions. An enhancement of about 50% in mineralization was observed, determined by von Kossa staining and by Alizarin Red S staining. Therefore, we provide a complete range of nanosurfaces for growing osteoblasts to discriminate their nanoscale environment. Nanodot arrays present an opportunity to positively and negatively modulate cell behavior and maturation. Our results suggest a topological approach which is beneficial for the design of dental implants.

  19. Columella cells revisited: novel structures, novel properties, and a novel gravisensing model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staehelin, L. A.; Zheng, H. Q.; Yoder, T. L.; Smith, J. D.; Todd, P.

    2000-01-01

    A hundred years of research has not produced a clear understanding of the mechanism that transduces the energy associated with the sedimentation of starch-filled amyloplast statoliths in root cap columella cells into a growth response. Most models postulate that the statoliths interact with microfilaments (MF) to transmit signals to the plasma membrane (or ER), or that sedimentation onto these organelles produces the signals. However, no direct evidence for statolith-MF links has been reported, and no asymmetric structures of columella cells have been identified that might explain how a root turned by 90 degrees knows which side is up. To address these and other questions, we have (1) quantitatively examined the effects of microgravity on the size, number, and spatial distribution of statoliths; (2) re-evaluated the ultrastructure of columella cells in high-pressure frozen/freeze-substituted roots; and (3) followed the sedimentation dynamics of statolith movements in reoriented root tips. The findings have led to the formulation of a new model for the gravity-sensing apparatus of roots, which envisages the cytoplasm pervaded by an actin-based cytoskeletal network. This network is denser in the ER-devoid central region of the cell than in the ER-rich cell cortex and is coupled to receptors in the plasma membrane. Statolith sedimentation is postulated to disrupt the network and its links to receptors in some regions of the cell cortex, while allowing them to reform in other regions and thereby produce a directional signal.

  20. Nanosurface design of dental implants for improved cell growth and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Hsu-An; Hung, Yao-Ching; Chiou, Jin-Chern; Tai, Shih-Ming; Chen, Hsin-Hung; Huang, G. Steven

    2012-08-01

    A strategy was proposed for the topological design of dental implants based on an in vitro survey of optimized nanodot structures. An in vitro survey was performed using nanodot arrays with dot diameters ranging from 10 to 200 nm. MG63 osteoblasts were seeded on nanodot arrays and cultured for 3 days. Cell number, percentage undergoing apoptotic-like cell death, cell adhesion and cytoskeletal organization were evaluated. Nanodots with a diameter of approximately 50 nm enhanced cell number by 44%, minimized apoptotic-like cell death to 2.7%, promoted a 30% increase in microfilament bundles and maximized cell adhesion with a 73% increase in focal adhesions. An enhancement of about 50% in mineralization was observed, determined by von Kossa staining and by Alizarin Red S staining. Therefore, we provide a complete range of nanosurfaces for growing osteoblasts to discriminate their nanoscale environment. Nanodot arrays present an opportunity to positively and negatively modulate cell behavior and maturation. Our results suggest a topological approach which is beneficial for the design of dental implants.

  1. Structural Analysis of Alterations in Zebrafish Muscle Differentiation Induced by Simvastatin and Their Recovery with Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Laise M.; Rios, Eduardo A.; Midlej, Victor; Atella, Georgia C.; Herculano-Houzel, Suzana; Benchimol, Marlene; Mermelstein, Claudia; Costa, Manoel Luís

    2015-01-01

    In vitro studies show that cholesterol is essential to myogenesis. We have been using zebrafish to overcome the limitations of the in vitro approach and to study the sub-cellular structures and processes involved during myogenesis. We use simvastatin—a drug widely used to prevent high levels of cholesterol and cardiovascular disease—during zebrafish skeletal muscle formation. Simvastatin is an efficient inhibitor of cholesterol synthesis that has various myotoxic consequences. Here, we employed simvastatin concentrations that cause either mild or severe morphological disturbances to observe changes in the cytoskeleton (intermediate filaments and microfilaments), extracellular matrix and adhesion markers by confocal microscopy. With low-dose simvastatin treatment, laminin was almost normal, and alpha-actinin was reduced in the myofibrils. With high simvastatin doses, laminin and vinculin were reduced and appeared discontinuous along the septa, with almost no myofibrils, and small amounts of desmin accumulating close to the septa. We also analyzed sub-cellular alterations in the embryos by electron microscopy, and demonstrate changes in embryo and somite size, septa shape, and in myofibril structure. These effects could be reversed by the addition of exogenous cholesterol. These results contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms of action of simvastatin in muscle cells in particular, and in the study of myogenesis in general. PMID:25786435

  2. Structural analysis of alterations in zebrafish muscle differentiation induced by simvastatin and their recovery with cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Campos, Laise M; Rios, Eduardo A; Midlej, Victor; Atella, Georgia C; Herculano-Houzel, Suzana; Benchimol, Marlene; Mermelstein, Claudia; Costa, Manoel Luís

    2015-06-01

    In vitro studies show that cholesterol is essential to myogenesis. We have been using zebrafish to overcome the limitations of the in vitro approach and to study the sub-cellular structures and processes involved during myogenesis. We use simvastatin--a drug widely used to prevent high levels of cholesterol and cardiovascular disease--during zebrafish skeletal muscle formation. Simvastatin is an efficient inhibitor of cholesterol synthesis that has various myotoxic consequences. Here, we employed simvastatin concentrations that cause either mild or severe morphological disturbances to observe changes in the cytoskeleton (intermediate filaments and microfilaments), extracellular matrix and adhesion markers by confocal microscopy. With low-dose simvastatin treatment, laminin was almost normal, and alpha-actinin was reduced in the myofibrils. With high simvastatin doses, laminin and vinculin were reduced and appeared discontinuous along the septa, with almost no myofibrils, and small amounts of desmin accumulating close to the septa. We also analyzed sub-cellular alterations in the embryos by electron microscopy, and demonstrate changes in embryo and somite size, septa shape, and in myofibril structure. These effects could be reversed by the addition of exogenous cholesterol. These results contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms of action of simvastatin in muscle cells in particular, and in the study of myogenesis in general.

  3. Nanochips of Tantalum Oxide Nanodots as artificial-microenvironments for monitoring Ovarian cancer progressiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhawan, Udesh; Wang, Ssu-Meng; Chu, Ying Hao; Huang, Guewha S.; Lin, Yan Ren; Hung, Yao Ching; Chen, Wen Liang

    2016-08-01

    Nanotopography modulates cell characteristics and cell behavior. Nanotopological cues can be exploited to investigate the in-vivo modulation of cell characteristics by the cellular microenvironment. However, the studies explaining the modulation of tumor cell characteristics and identifying the transition step in cancer progressiveness are scarce. Here, we engineered nanochips comprising of Tantalum oxide nanodot arrays of 10, 50, 100 and 200 nm as artificial microenvironments to study the modulation of cancer cell behavior. Clinical samples of different types of Ovarian cancer at different stages were obtained, primary cultures were established and then seeded on different nanochips. Immunofluorescence (IF) was performed to compare the morphologies and cell characteristics. Indices corresponding to cell characteristics were defined. A statistical comparison of the cell characteristics in response to the nanochips was performed. The cells displayed differential growth parameters. Morphology, Viability, focal adhesions, microfilament bundles and cell area were modulated by the nanochips which can be used as a measure to study the cancer progressiveness. The ease of fabrication of nanochips ensures mass-production. The ability of the nanochips to act as artificial microenvironments and modulate cell behavior may lead to further prospects in the markerless monitoring of the progressiveness and ultimately, improving the prognosis of Ovarian cancer.

  4. Tight junction targeting and intracellular trafficking of occludin in polarized epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Veedamali S; Marchant, Jonathan S; Ye, Dongmei; Ma, Thomas Y; Said, Hamid M

    2007-11-01

    Occludin, a transmembrane (TM)-spanning protein, is an integral component of the tight junctional (TJ) complexes that regulate epithelial integrity and paracellular barrier function. However, the molecular determinants that dictate occludin targeting and delivery to the TJs remain unclear. Here, using live cell imaging of yellow fluorescent protein-labeled occludin fragments, we resolved the intracellular trafficking of occludin-fusion proteins in polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney and Caco-2 cells to delineate the regions within the occludin polypeptide that are important for occludin targeting to the TJs. Live cell confocal imaging showed that complete or partial truncation of the COOH-terminal tail of the occludin polypeptide did not prevent occludin targeting to the TJs in epithelial cell lines. Progressive truncations into the COOH-terminal tail decreased the efficiency of occludin expression; after the removal of the regions proximal to the fourth transmembrane domain (TM4), the efficiency of expression increased. However, further deletions into the TM4 abolished TJ targeting, which resulted in constructs that were retained intracellularly within the endoplasmic reticulum. The full-length occludin polypeptide trafficked to the cell surface within a heterogenous population of intracellular vesicles that delivered occludin to the plasma membrane in a microtubule- and temperature-dependent manner. In contrast, the steady-state localization of occludin at the cell surface was dependent on intact microfilaments but not microtubules.

  5. Role of cytoskeleton in differentiation of gravisensitive root sites in simulated microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, G.; Kordyum, E.

    Cytoskeleton is known to be one of the elements participating in signaling reactions caused by altered gravity in plant cells. Up to date actin microfilaments (MFs) are considered mainly in respect of their involvement in statolith movement and tubulin microtubules (MTs) are investigated in respect of their participation in gravitropic plant growth response (root bending). But there are numerous data evidencing that the role of cytoskeleton in plant gravisensing is far more complex. To contribute to the issue the novel approach is proposed. In particular, since gravity is persistent factor through plant evolution it is suggested to compare the arrangement of cytoskeletal elements at the consequent developmental stages of graviperceiving (root cap) and gravireacting (cell in elongation zone) root sites both in stationary control and simulated microgravity. Special emphasis is given to MF dynamics in the process of statocyte differentiation and establishing statocyte polarity while developing from cells of root cap meristem. MTs are going to be elucidated in epidermal and cortex root cell lines originating from meristem of proper root. Root of Beta vulgaris seedling is used as an object. Methods of cytoskeleton immunohistochemistry, cytoskeleton inhibitors, plant mutant on cytoskeleton genes as well as blockers of auxin transport are intended to be applied. It is anticipated that data will be collected on the influence caused by simulated microgravity on cytoskeleton involvement in the development of plant gravisensing organs. Such an approach will not only widen our knowledge about cytoskeleton role in plant development but also in plant gravireaction.

  6. Reciprocal Interactions between Cell Adhesion Molecules of the Immunoglobulin Superfamily and the Cytoskeleton in Neurons.

    PubMed

    Leshchyns'ka, Iryna; Sytnyk, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules of the immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) including the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and members of the L1 family of neuronal cell adhesion molecules play important functions in the developing nervous system by regulating formation, growth and branching of neurites, and establishment of the synaptic contacts between neurons. In the mature brain, members of IgSF regulate synapse composition, function, and plasticity required for learning and memory. The intracellular domains of IgSF cell adhesion molecules interact with the components of the cytoskeleton including the submembrane actin-spectrin meshwork, actin microfilaments, and microtubules. In this review, we summarize current data indicating that interactions between IgSF cell adhesion molecules and the cytoskeleton are reciprocal, and that while IgSF cell adhesion molecules regulate the assembly of the cytoskeleton, the cytoskeleton plays an important role in regulation of the functions of IgSF cell adhesion molecules. Reciprocal interactions between NCAM and L1 family members and the cytoskeleton and their role in neuronal differentiation and synapse formation are discussed in detail. PMID:26909348

  7. Characterization of natural low-methoxyl pectin from sunflower head extracted by sodium citrate and purified by ultrafiltration.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jiaqi; Hua, Xiao; Yang, Ruijin; Chen, Ying; Yang, Hui

    2015-08-01

    Sunflower head pectin was extracted by 0.6% (w/v) sodium citrate under 85°C, 3.5h with a solid to liquid ratio of 1:40, giving the maximum uronic acid yield of 16.90% (w/w). The extract was purified by an ultrafiltration membrane with the molecular weight cut-off of 8000 Da and dried by spray-drying to obtain SFHP(A) powders with particle diameters of 2-5 μm. In comparison to the SFHP(B) extracted by ammonium oxalate and isolated by alcohol, SFHP(A) had a close DM (22.56%) but a considerably lower DAm (3.42%). HPSEC-MALLS analysis suggested that SFHP(A) has undergo a deeper degradation resulting in smaller Mw and Mn. HPAEC-PAD showed that SFHP(A) contains more neutral sugars since the degraded RG fragments have been retained during ultrafiltration. Finally, pectin aggregation in aqueous was investigated by FEG-SEM, which reveals that pectin network structure is constructed by microfilaments via coiling, intertwining and crosslinking.

  8. Impact of keratin intermediate filaments on insulin-mediated glucose metabolism regulation in the liver and disease association.

    PubMed

    Roux, Alexandra; Gilbert, Stéphane; Loranger, Anne; Marceau, Normand

    2016-02-01

    In all cells, a tight regulation exists between glucose uptake and utilization to prevent diseases related to its perturbed metabolism. In insulin-targeted cells, such as hepatocytes, proper glucose utilization requires an elaborate interplay between the insulin receptor, the glucose transporter, and mitochondria that involves the participation of actin microfilaments and microtubules. In addition, there is increasing evidence of an involvement of the third cytoskeletal network provided by intermediate filaments (IFs). Keratins belong to the multigene family of IF proteins, coordinately expressed as distinct pairs within the context of epithelial cell differentiation. Hepatocyte IFs are made up of the [keratin (K)8/K18] pair only, whereas pancreatic β-cell IFs additionally include small amounts of K7. There are accumulating examples of K8/K18 involvement in the glucose-insulin cross-talk, including the modulation of plasma glucose levels, insulin release from pancreatic β-cells, and insulin-mediated glucose uptake and glycogen production in hepatocytes after a K8/K18 loss. This review integrates the mechanistic features that support such an impact of K8/K18 IFs on insulin-dependent glucose metabolism regulation in liver and its implication in glucose- or insulin-associated diseases.

  9. PHBV/PAM Scaffolds with Local Oriented Structure through UV Polymerization for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yingjun

    2014-01-01

    Locally oriented tissue engineering scaffolds can provoke cellular orientation and direct cell spread and migration, offering an exciting potential way for the regeneration of the complex tissue. Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) scaffolds with locally oriented hydrophilic polyacrylamide (PAM) inside the macropores of the scaffolds were achieved through UV graft polymerization. The interpenetrating PAM chains enabled good interconnectivity of PHBV/PAM scaffolds that presented a lower porosity and minor diameter of pores than PHBV scaffolds. The pores with diameter below 100 μm increased to 82.15% of PHBV/PAM scaffolds compared with 31.5% of PHBV scaffolds. PHBV/PAM scaffold showed a much higher compressive elastic modulus than PHBV scaffold due to PAM stuffing. At 5 days of culturing, sheep chondrocytes spread along the similar direction in the macropores of PHBV/PAM scaffolds. The locally oriented PAM chains might guide the attachment and spreading of chondrocytes and direct the formation of microfilaments via contact guidance. PMID:24579074

  10. GRP78 clustering at the cell surface of neurons transduces the action of exogenous alpha-synuclein

    PubMed Central

    Bellani, S; Mescola, A; Ronzitti, G; Tsushima, H; Tilve, S; Canale, C; Valtorta, F; Chieregatti, E

    2014-01-01

    Mutation or multiplication of the alpha-synuclein (Syn)-encoding gene is frequent cause of early onset Parkinson's disease (PD). Recent evidences point to the pathogenic role of excess Syn also in sporadic PD. Syn is a cytosolic protein, which has been shown to be released from neurons. Here we provide evidence that extracellular Syn induces an increase in surface-exposed glucose-related protein of 78 kDa (GRP78), which becomes clustered in microdomains of the neuronal plasma membrane. Upon interacting with Syn, GRP78 activates a signaling cascade leading to cofilin 1 inactivation and stabilization of microfilaments, thus affecting morphology and dynamics of actin cytoskeleton in cultured neurons. Downregulation of GRP78 abolishes the activity of exogenous Syn, indicating that it is the primary target of Syn. Inactivation of cofilin 1 and stabilization of actin cytoskeleton are present also in fibroblasts derived from genetic PD patients, which show a dramatic increase in stress fibers. Similar changes are displayed by control cells incubated with the medium of PD fibroblasts, only when Syn is present. The accumulation of Syn in the extracellular milieu, its interaction with the plasma membrane and Syn-driven clustering of GRP78 appear, therefore, responsible for the dysregulation of actin turnover, leading to early deficits in synaptic function that precede neurodegeneration. PMID:25124556

  11. Computational model for the cell-mechanical response of the osteocyte cytoskeleton based on self-stabilizing tensegrity structures.

    PubMed

    Kardas, Dieter; Nackenhorst, Udo; Balzani, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism by which mechanical stimulation on osteocytes results in biochemical signals that initiate the remodeling process inside living bone tissue is largely unknown. Even the type of stimulation acting on these cells is not yet clearly identified. However, the cytoskeleton of osteocytes is suggested to play a major role in the mechanosensory process due to the direct connection to the nucleus. In this paper, a computational approach to model and simulate the cell structure of osteocytes based on self-stabilizing tensegrity structures is suggested. The computational model of the cell consists of the major components with respect to mechanical aspects: the integrins that connect the cell with the extracellular bone matrix, and different types of protein fibers (microtubules and intermediate filaments) that form the cytoskeleton, the membrane-cytoskeleton (microfilaments), the nucleus and the centrosome. The proposed geometrical cell models represent the cell in its physiological environment which is necessary in order to give a statement on the cell behavior in vivo. Studies on the mechanical response of osteocytes after physiological loading and in particular the mechanical response of the nucleus show that the load acting on the nucleus is rising with increasing deformation applied to the integrins. PMID:22527364

  12. Small GTPase RhoA regulates cytoskeleton dynamics during porcine oocyte maturation and early embryo development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Duan, Xing; Cao, Rui; Liu, Hong-Lin; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Rui, Rong; Sun, Shao-Chen

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian oocyte maturation is distinguished by asymmetric division that is regulated primarily by cytoskeleton, including microtubules and microfilaments. Small Rho GTPase RhoA is a key regulator of cytoskeletal organization which regulates cell polarity, migration, and division. In this study, we investigated the roles of RhoA in mammalian oocyte meiosis and early embryo cleavage. (1) Disrupting RhoA activity or knock down the expression of RhoA caused the failure of polar body emission. This may have been due to decreased actin assembly and subsequent spindle migration defects. The involvement of RhoA in this process may have been though its regulation of actin nucleators ROCK, p-Cofilin, and ARP2 expression. (2) In addition, spindle morphology was also disrupted and p-MAPK expression decreased in RhoA inhibited or RhoA KD oocytes, which indicated that RhoA also regulated MAPK phosphorylation for spindle formation. (3) Porcine embryo development was also suppressed by inhibiting RhoA activity. Two nuclei were observed in one blastomere, and actin expression was reduced, which indicated that RhoA regulated actin-based cytokinesis of porcine embryo. Thus, our results demonstrated indispensable roles for RhoA in regulating porcine oocyte meiosis and cleavage during early embryo development.

  13. Proteomic profiling of cellular proteins interacting with the hepatitis C virus core protein.

    PubMed

    Kang, Su-Min; Shin, Min-Jung; Kim, Jung-Hee; Oh, Jong-Won

    2005-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a causative agent of chronic hepatitis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The core protein of HCV packages the viral RNA genome to form a nucleocapsid. In addition to its function as a structural protein, core protein is involved in regulation of cellular transcription, virus-induced transformation, and pathogenesis. To gain insights into cellular functions of the core protein by identification of cellular proteins interacting with the core protein, we employed a proteomic approach. Hepatocytes soluble cytoplasmic proteins were applied to the core proteins immobilized on Ni-nitrilotriacetic resin and total bound cellular proteins were resolved by 2-DE. Analyses of interacting proteins by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry allowed identification of 14 cellular proteins binding to the core protein. These proteins include DEAD-box polypeptide 5, similar in function to a known protein identified previously by yeast two-hybrid screening and 13 newly identified cellular proteins. Interestingly, nine protein spots were identified as intermediate microfilament proteins, including cytokeratins (five spots for cytokeratin 8, two for cytokeratin 19, and one for cytokeratin 18) and vimentin. Cytokeratin 8 and vimentin, which were previously shown to be involved in the infection processes of other viruses, were further analyzed to confirm their in vivo interactions with the core protein by immunoblotting and immunofluorescence microscopy. We discuss the functional implications of the interactions of the core protein with newly identified cellular proteins in HCV infection and pathogenesis.

  14. Galectin-3-induced cell spreading and motility relies on distinct signaling mechanisms compared to fibronectin.

    PubMed

    More, Shyam K; Chiplunkar, Shubhada V; Kalraiya, Rajiv D

    2016-05-01

    Secreted galectin-3 often gets incorporated into extracellular matrix and is utilized by cancer cells for spreading, movement, and metastatic dissemination. Here we investigate molecular mechanisms by which galectin-3 brings about these effects and compare it with fibronectin. Imaging of cells spread on fibronectin showed stress fibers throughout cell body, however, galectin-3-induced formation of parallel actin bundles in the lamellipodial region resulting in unique morphological features. FRAP analysis showed that the actin turnover in the lamellipodial region was much higher in cells spread on galectin-3 as compared to that on fibronectin. Rac1 activation is correlated with lamellipodial organization on both the substrates. Activation of Akt and Rac1, the regulators of actin dynamics, show inverse correlation with each other on both galectin-3 and fibronectin. Activation of Erk however, remained similar. Further, inhibition of activation of Akt and Erk inhibited spreading and motility of cells on galectin-3 but not on fibronectin. The results very comprehensively demonstrate distinct signaling pathways that regulate microfilament organization, lamellipodial structures, spreading, and movement of cells plated on galectin-3 as opposed to fibronectin.

  15. Effects of the in vitro administered ethanol and lipopolysaccharide toxin on membrane properties, intracellular free calcium and phagocytic function of isolated rat kupffer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Victorov, A.; Smith, T.; Abril, E.; Hamlin, E.; Earnest, D. )

    1991-03-11

    Low concentrations of ethanol slightly stimulated phagocytosis of cultured Kupffer cells (KC), producing practically no effect on membrane microviscosity and cytosolic free (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i}. On the contrary, high concentrations of ethanol significantly suppressed phagocytic function, increased fluidity of membrane lipids and caused a sustained rise in (Ca{sup 2}){sub i}; above the resting level of 41-85 nM. Treatment of KC with colchicine and cytochalasin B dramatically destructurized the plasma membrane lipids. Short term preincubation of KC with high doses of alcohol stimulated the disordering effects of both drugs, suggesting direct interaction of ethanol with microtubule and microfilament structures. The authors hypothesize that ethanol impairs phagocytosis of KC by concerted actions on membrane lipid fluidity, cytosolic free Ca{sup 2+} and functioning of cytoskeleton. On the other hand, incubation of KC with low concentrations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) produced no changes in (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i}; or plasma membrane fluidity but reduced by several fold the fluidizing effect of subsequently added ethanol. They suggested that low doses of LPS, by activating second messengers other than Ca{sup 2+}, alter the functioning of the cytoskeleton and cause reorganization of the plasma membrane thus making KC membranes more resistent to the fluidizing action of ethanol and partially restoring the phagocytic function.

  16. Modulation of C-nociceptive Activities by Inputs from Myelinated Fibers.

    PubMed

    Wan-Ru, Duan; Yi-Kuan, Xie

    2016-01-01

    To understand the mechanisms of neuropathic pain caused by demyelination, a rapid-onset, completed but reversible demyelination of peripheral A-fibers and neuropathic pain behaviors in adult rats by single injection of cobra venom into the sciatic nerve, was created. Microfilament recording revealed that cobra venom selectively blocked A-fibers, but not C-fibers. Selective blockade of A-fibers may result from A-fiber demyelination at the site of venom injection as demonstrated by microscope examination. Neuropathic pain behaviors including inflammatory response appeared almost immediately after venom injection and lasted about 3 weeks. Electrophysiological studies indicated that venom injection induced loss of conduction in A-fibers, increased sensitivity of C-polymodal nociceptors to innocuous stimuli, and triggered spontaneous activity from peripheral and central terminals of C-fiber nociceptors. Neurogenic inflammatory responses were also observed in the affected skin via Evans blue extravasation experiments. Both antidromic C-fiber spontaneous activity and neurogenic inflammation were substantially decreased by continuous A-fiber threshold electric stimuli applied proximally to the venom injection site. The data suggest that normal activity of peripheral A-fibers may produce inhibitory modulation of C-polymodal nociceptors. Removal of inhibition to C-fiber polymodal nociceptors following demyelination of A-fibers may result in pain and neurogenic inflammation in the affected receptive field. PMID:26900061

  17. The Presynaptic Microtubule Cytoskeleton in Physiological and Pathological Conditions: Lessons from Drosophila Fragile X Syndrome and Hereditary Spastic Paraplegias

    PubMed Central

    Bodaleo, Felipe J.; Gonzalez-Billault, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The capacity of the nervous system to generate neuronal networks relies on the establishment and maintenance of synaptic contacts. Synapses are composed of functionally different presynaptic and postsynaptic compartments. An appropriate synaptic architecture is required to provide the structural basis that supports synaptic transmission, a process involving changes in cytoskeletal dynamics. Actin microfilaments are the main cytoskeletal components present at both presynaptic and postsynaptic terminals in glutamatergic synapses. However, in the last few years it has been demonstrated that microtubules (MTs) transiently invade dendritic spines, promoting their maturation. Nevertheless, the presence and functions of MTs at the presynaptic site are still a matter of debate. Early electron microscopy (EM) studies revealed that MTs are present in the presynaptic terminals of the central nervous system (CNS) where they interact with synaptic vesicles (SVs) and reach the active zone. These observations have been reproduced by several EM protocols; however, there is empirical heterogeneity in detecting presynaptic MTs, since they appear to be both labile and unstable. Moreover, increasing evidence derived from studies in the fruit fly neuromuscular junction proposes different roles for MTs in regulating presynaptic function in physiological and pathological conditions. In this review, we summarize the main findings that support the presence and roles of MTs at presynaptic terminals, integrating descriptive and biochemical analyses, and studies performed in invertebrate genetic models. PMID:27504085

  18. Sucrose esters increase drug penetration, but do not inhibit p-glycoprotein in caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Lóránd; Hellinger, Éva; Pilbat, Ana-Maria; Kittel, Ágnes; Török, Zsolt; Füredi, András; Szakács, Gergely; Veszelka, Szilvia; Sipos, Péter; Ózsvári, Béla; Puskás, László G; Vastag, Monika; Szabó-Révész, Piroska; Deli, Mária A

    2014-10-01

    Sucrose fatty acid esters are increasingly used as excipients in pharmaceutical products, but few data are available on their toxicity profile, mode of action, and efficacy on intestinal epithelial models. Three water-soluble sucrose esters, palmitate (P-1695), myristate (M-1695), laurate (D-1216), and two reference absorption enhancers, Tween 80 and Cremophor RH40, were tested on Caco-2 cells. Caco-2 monolayers formed a good barrier as reflected by high transepithelial resistance and positive immunostaining for junctional proteins claudin-1, ZO-1, and β-catenin. Sucrose esters in nontoxic concentrations significantly reduced resistance and impedance, and increased permeability for atenolol, fluorescein, vinblastine, and rhodamine 123 in Caco-2 monolayers. No visible opening of the tight junctions was induced by sucrose esters assessed by immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy, but some alterations were seen in the structure of filamentous actin microfilaments. Sucrose esters fluidized the plasma membrane and enhanced the accumulation of efflux transporter ligands rhodamine 123 and calcein AM in epithelial cells, but did not inhibit the P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-mediated calcein AM accumulation in MES-SA/Dx5 cell line. These data indicate that in addition to their dissolution-increasing properties sucrose esters can enhance drug permeability through both the transcellular and paracellular routes without inhibiting P-gp.

  19. Characterization of natural low-methoxyl pectin from sunflower head extracted by sodium citrate and purified by ultrafiltration.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jiaqi; Hua, Xiao; Yang, Ruijin; Chen, Ying; Yang, Hui

    2015-08-01

    Sunflower head pectin was extracted by 0.6% (w/v) sodium citrate under 85°C, 3.5h with a solid to liquid ratio of 1:40, giving the maximum uronic acid yield of 16.90% (w/w). The extract was purified by an ultrafiltration membrane with the molecular weight cut-off of 8000 Da and dried by spray-drying to obtain SFHP(A) powders with particle diameters of 2-5 μm. In comparison to the SFHP(B) extracted by ammonium oxalate and isolated by alcohol, SFHP(A) had a close DM (22.56%) but a considerably lower DAm (3.42%). HPSEC-MALLS analysis suggested that SFHP(A) has undergo a deeper degradation resulting in smaller Mw and Mn. HPAEC-PAD showed that SFHP(A) contains more neutral sugars since the degraded RG fragments have been retained during ultrafiltration. Finally, pectin aggregation in aqueous was investigated by FEG-SEM, which reveals that pectin network structure is constructed by microfilaments via coiling, intertwining and crosslinking. PMID:25766806

  20. An internal motor kinesin is associated with the Golgi apparatus and plays a role in trichome morphogenesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ling; Lee, Yuh-Ru Julie; Pan, Ruiqin; Maloof, Julin N; Liu, Bo

    2005-02-01

    Members of the kinesin superfamily are microtubule-based motor proteins that transport molecules/organelles along microtubules. We have identified similar internal motor kinesins, Kinesin-13A, from the cotton Gossypium hirsutum and Arabidopsis thaliana. Their motor domains share high degree of similarity with those of internal motor kinesins of animals and protists in the MCAK/Kinesin13 subfamily. However, no significant sequence similarities were detected in sequences outside the motor domain. In Arabidopsis plants carrying the T-DNA knockout kinesin-13a-1 and kinesin-13a-2 mutations at the Kinesin-13A locus, >70% leaf trichomes had four branches, whereas wild-type trichomes had three. Immunofluorescent results showed that AtKinesin-13A and GhKinesin-13A localized to entire Golgi stacks. In both wild-type and kinesin-13a mutant cells, the Golgi stacks were frequently associated with microtubules and with actin microfilaments. Aggregation/clustering of Golgi stacks was often observed in the kinesin-13a mutant trichomes and other epidermal cells. This suggested that the distribution of the Golgi apparatus in cell cortex might require microtubules and Kinesin-13A, and the organization of Golgi stacks could play a regulatory role in trichome morphogenesis. Our results also indicate that plant kinesins in the MCAK/Kinesin-13 subfamily have evolved to take on different tasks than their animal counterparts.

  1. Holoblastic early cleavage of Tetrodontophora bielanensis (Collembola) eggs, with special reference to its irregularity.

    PubMed

    Klag, J; Jura, C; Krzysztofowicz, A; Kisiel, E

    1999-01-01

    The fertilized eggs of Tetrodontophora bielanensis start to cleave 6 to 8 days after oviposition and initially only karyokineses occur. The cytokinesis begins after two karyokineses, when four nuclei are observed in the ooplasm. Two cleavage furrows, perpendicular to each other, appear simultaneously at the egg poles where polar bodies are located and gradually the furrows encompass the whole egg diameter. The furrow formation is initiated by the bundle of microfilaments that contract and pull superficial fragments of the oolemma into the yolk and subsequently new membranes, separating the daughter cells, start to form. However, they do not grow towards the egg centre but bifurcate, leaving the central part of the ooplasm outside of the newly formed blastomeres. Starting from the fourth or fifth cleavage division, the bifurcations permanently occur and multiple cleavage furrows are formed on the embryo surface. Moreover, fragments of the ooplasm, enclosed within the cell membrane but devoid of cell nucleus are observed. During further development such cell fragments become reincorporated into the embryo. This mode of cleavage leads eventually to the formation of cellular blastoderm on the embryo surface. The results presented in the paper suggest that the control of cleavage in T. bielanensis acts not at the level of cytoplasmic determinants but rather at the level of positional information of blastomeres. PMID:10482251

  2. Modulatory Effects of Connexin-43 Expression on Gap Junction Intercellular Communications with Mast Cells and Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Pistorio, Ashey L.; Ehrlich, H. Paul

    2011-01-01

    The influence of mast cells upon aberrant wound repair and excessive fibrosis has supportive evidence, but the mechanism for these mast cell activities is unclear. It is proposed that heterocellular gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) between fibroblasts and mast cells directs some fibroblast activities. An in vitro model was used employing a rodent derived peritoneal mast cell line (RMC-1) and human dermal derived fibroblasts. The influence of the expression of the gap junction channel structural protein, connexin 43 (Cx-43) on heterocellular GJIC, the expression of microtubule β-tubulin and microfilament α smooth muscle actin (SMA) were investigated. The knockdown of Cx-43 by siRNA in RMC-1 cells completely blocked GJIC between RMC-1 cells. SiRNA knockdown of Cx-43 within fibroblasts only dampened GJIC between fibroblasts. It appears Cx-43 is the only expressed connexin in RMC-1 cells. Fibroblasts express other connexins that participate in GJIC between fibroblasts in the absence of Cx-43 expression. Heterocellular GJIC between RMC-1 cells and fibroblasts transformed fibroblasts into myofibroblasts, expressing α SMA within cytoplasmic stress fibers. The knockdown of Cx-43 in RMC-1 cells increased β-tubulin expression, but its knockdown in fibroblasts reduced β-tubulin expression. Knocking down the expression of Cx-43 in fibroblasts limited α SMA expression. Cx-43 participation is critical for heterocellular GJIC between mast cells and fibroblasts, which may herald a novel direction for controlling fibrosis. PMID:21328609

  3. Myosin VIIa, harmonin and cadherin 23, three Usher I gene products that cooperate to shape the sensory hair cell bundle

    PubMed Central

    Boëda, Batiste; El-Amraoui, Aziz; Bahloul, Amel; Goodyear, Richard; Daviet, Laurent; Blanchard, Stéphane; Perfettini, Isabelle; Fath, Karl R.; Shorte, Spencer; Reiners, Jan; Houdusse, Anne; Legrain, Pierre; Wolfrum, Uwe; Richardson, Guy; Petit, Christine

    2002-01-01

    Deaf-blindness in three distinct genetic forms of Usher type I syndrome (USH1) is caused by defects in myosin VIIa, harmonin and cadherin 23. Despite being critical for hearing, the functions of these proteins in the inner ear remain elusive. Here we show that harmonin, a PDZ domain-containing protein, and cadherin 23 are both present in the growing stereocilia and that they bind to each other. Moreover, we demonstrate that harmonin b is an F-actin-bundling protein, which is thus likely to anchor cadherin 23 to the stereocilia microfilaments, thereby identifying a novel anchorage mode of the cadherins to the actin cytoskeleton. Moreover, harmonin b interacts directly with myosin VIIa, and is absent from the disorganized hair bundles of myosin VIIa mutant mice, suggesting that myosin VIIa conveys harmonin b along the actin core of the developing stereocilia. We propose that the shaping of the hair bundle relies on a functional unit composed of myosin VIIa, harmonin b and cadherin 23 that is essential to ensure the cohesion of the stereocilia. PMID:12485990

  4. Myosin VIIa, harmonin and cadherin 23, three Usher I gene products that cooperate to shape the sensory hair cell bundle.

    PubMed

    Boëda, Batiste; El-Amraoui, Aziz; Bahloul, Amel; Goodyear, Richard; Daviet, Laurent; Blanchard, Stéphane; Perfettini, Isabelle; Fath, Karl R; Shorte, Spencer; Reiners, Jan; Houdusse, Anne; Legrain, Pierre; Wolfrum, Uwe; Richardson, Guy; Petit, Christine

    2002-12-16

    Deaf-blindness in three distinct genetic forms of Usher type I syndrome (USH1) is caused by defects in myosin VIIa, harmonin and cadherin 23. Despite being critical for hearing, the functions of these proteins in the inner ear remain elusive. Here we show that harmonin, a PDZ domain-containing protein, and cadherin 23 are both present in the growing stereocilia and that they bind to each other. Moreover, we demonstrate that harmonin b is an F-actin-bundling protein, which is thus likely to anchor cadherin 23 to the stereocilia microfilaments, thereby identifying a novel anchorage mode of the cadherins to the actin cytoskeleton. Moreover, harmonin b interacts directly with myosin VIIa, and is absent from the disorganized hair bundles of myosin VIIa mutant mice, suggesting that myosin VIIa conveys harmonin b along the actin core of the developing stereocilia. We propose that the shaping of the hair bundle relies on a functional unit composed of myosin VIIa, harmonin b and cadherin 23 that is essential to ensure the cohesion of the stereocilia.

  5. Function of osteocytes in bone.

    PubMed

    Aarden, E M; Burger, E H; Nijweide, P J

    1994-07-01

    Although the structural design of cellular bone (i.e., bone containing osteocytes that are regularly spaced throughout the bone matrix) dates back to the first occurrence of bone as a tissue in evolution, and although osteocytes represent the most abundant cell type of bone, we know as yet little about the role of the osteocyte in bone metabolism. Osteocytes descend from osteoblasts. They are formed by the incorporation of osteoblasts into the bone matrix. Osteocytes remain in contact with each other and with cells on the bone surface via gap junction-coupled cell processes passing through the matrix via small channels, the canaliculi, that connect the cell body-containing lacunae with each other and with the outside world. During differentiation from osteoblasts to mature osteocyte the cells lose a large part of their cell organelles. Their cell processes are packed with microfilaments. In this review we discuss the various theories on osteocyte function that have taken in consideration these special features of osteocytes. These are 1) osteocytes are actively involved in bone turnover; 2) the osteocyte network is through its large cell-matrix contact surface involved in ion exchange; and 3) osteocytes are the mechanosensory cells of bone and play a pivotal role in functional adaptation of bone. In our opinion, especially the last theory offers an exciting concept for which some biomechanical, biochemical, and cell biological evidence is already available and which fully warrants further investigations.

  6. Human Lung Cancer Cell Line A-549 ATCC Is Differentially Affected by Supranutritional Organic and Inorganic Selenium

    PubMed Central

    Flores Villavicencio, Lérida Liss; Cruz-Jiménez, Gustavo; Barbosa-Sabanero, Gloria; Kornhauser-Araujo, Carlos; Mendoza-Garrido, M. Eugenia; de la Rosa, Guadalupe; Sabanero-López, Myrna

    2014-01-01

    The effects of organic and inorganic forms of selenium (Se) on human cells have been extensively studied for nutritional concentrations; however, to date, little is known about the potential toxicity at supranutritional levels. In the present study we determined the effects of sodium selenite (SSe) and selenomethionine (SeMet) on cell growth and intracellular structures in lung cancer cells exposed at Se concentrations between 0 and 3 mM. Our results showed that SSe affected cell growth more rapidly than SeMet (24 h and 48 h, resp.). After 24 h of cells exposure to 0.5, 1.5, and 3 mM SSe, cell growth was reduced by 10, 50, and 60%, as compared to controls. After 48 h, nuclear fragmentation was evident in cells exposed to SSe, suggesting an induction to cell death. In contrast, SeMet did not affect cell proliferation, and the cells were phenotypically similar to controls. Microtubules and microfilaments structures were also affected by both Se compounds, again SSe being more toxic than SeMet. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the differential effects of organic and inorganic Se in supranutritional levels in lung cancer cells. PMID:25477771

  7. Effect of Cytochalasin B, Lantrunculin B, Colchicine, Cycloheximid, Dimethyl Sulfoxide and Ion Channel Inhibitors on Biospeckle Activity in Apple Tissue.

    PubMed

    Kurenda, Andrzej; Pieczywek, Piotr M; Adamiak, Anna; Zdunek, Artur

    2013-01-01

    The biospeckle phenomenon is used for non-destructive monitoring the quality of fresh fruits and vegetables, but in the case of plant tissues there is a lack of experimentally confirmed information about the biological origin of the biospeckle activity (BA). As a main sources of BA, processes associated with the movement inside the cell, such as cytoplasmic streaming, organelle movement and intra- and extracellular transport mechanisms, are considered. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of metabolism inhibitors, connected with intracellular movement such as cytochalasin B, lantrunculin B, colchicine, cycloheximid, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and mixture of ion channel inhibitors, injected into apples, on BA. Two methods of BA analysis based on cross-correlation coefficient and Laser Speckle Contrast Analysis (LASCA) were used. DMSO, lantrunculin B and mixture of ion channel inhibitors have a significant effect on BA, and approximately 74 % of BA of apple tissue is potentially caused by biological processes. Results indicate that the functioning of actin microfilaments and ion channels significantly affect BA.

  8. Endocytosis of heat-denatured albumin by cultured rat Kupffer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Brouwer, A.; Knook, D.L.

    1982-10-01

    Purified Kupffer cells were obtained by centrifugal elutriation of sinusoidal cells isolated by pronase treatment of the rat liver. The endocytosis of radioactively labeled heat-aggregated colloidal albumin (CA /sup 125/I) was investigated in maintenance cultures of the purified Kupffer cells. The endocytic capacity of the cells was studied during 4 days of culture. Maximum uptake was observed after 24 hr of culture, with a gradual decline during the following days. When the uptake was measured after incubation with increasing concentrations of CA /sup 125/I, a saturation effect was observed. This finding and the observed high rate of uptake are strong indications that receptor sites on the cell membrane are involved in the mechanism of endocytosis. The uptake of CA /sup 125/I by Kupffer cells was inhibited by the metabolic inhibitors fluoride and antimycin A, indicating that endocytosis of CA /sup 125/I is dependent on energy derived from both glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration. The mechanism of internalization may also require the action of microfilaments as well as intact microtubules, since both cytochalasin B and colchicine inhibited the uptake of CA /sup 125/I. The intracellular degradation of CA /sup 125/I by Kupffer cells was strongly inhibited by chloroquine but not by colchicine. The degradation of ingested CA /sup 125/I occurred within the Kupffer cell lysosomes.

  9. Comparative proteomic analysis of human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells under simulated microgravity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongqian; Wang, Hongbin; Lai, Chengjun; Wang, Lu; Deng, Yulin

    2013-02-01

    Microgravity is one of the most important features in spaceflight. Previous evidence has shown that neurophysiological impairment signs occurred under microgravity. The present study was undertaken to explore the change in protein abundance in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells that were grown in a microgravity environment. The comparative proteomic method based on the (18)O labeling technique was applied to investigate the up-regulated proteins and down-regulated proteins in SH-SY5Y under simulated microgravity. Twenty-two differentially abundant proteins were quantified in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. The cell microfilament network was disrupted under simulated microgravity, which was determined by the immunocytochemistry. The concentration of reactive oxygen species, malondialdehyde, and free Ca2+ ion significantly increased, and the level of ATP significantly decreased under simulated microgravity. However, there was no obvious cell apoptosis observed under simulated microgravity. These results provide new molecular evidence for the change in protein abundance in SH-SY5Y cells under simulated microgravity, which might unfold biological mechanisms and the development of effective countermeasures to deal with microgravity-related neurological problems. We believe that the state-of-the-art proteomic assay may be a means by which aerospace scientists will begin to understand the underlying mechanisms of space life activities at the protein level. PMID:23421552

  10. Divergent Label-free Cell Phenotypic Pharmacology of Ligands at the Overexpressed β2-Adrenergic Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ferrie, Ann M.; Sun, Haiyan; Zaytseva, Natalya; Fang, Ye

    2014-01-01

    We present subclone sensitive cell phenotypic pharmacology of ligands at the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2-AR) stably expressed in HEK-293 cells. The parental cell line was transfected with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged β2-AR. Four stable subclones were established and used to profile a library of sixty-nine AR ligands. Dynamic mass redistribution (DMR) profiling resulted in a pharmacological activity map suggesting that HEK293 endogenously expresses functional Gi-coupled α2-AR and Gs-coupled β2-AR, and the label-free cell phenotypic activity of AR ligands are subclone dependent. Pathway deconvolution revealed that the DMR of epinephrine is originated mostly from the remodeling of actin microfilaments and adhesion complexes, to less extent from the microtubule networks and receptor trafficking, and certain agonists displayed different efficacy towards the cAMP-Epac pathway. We demonstrate that receptor signaling and ligand pharmacology is sensitive to the receptor expression level, and the organization of the receptor and its signaling circuitry. PMID:24451999

  11. The UL24 protein of herpes simplex virus 1 affects the sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins involved in fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Ben Abdeljelil, Nawel; Rochette, Pierre-Alexandre; Pearson, Angela

    2013-09-15

    Mutations in UL24 of herpes simplex virus type 1 can lead to a syncytial phenotype. We hypothesized that UL24 affects the sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins involved in fusion. In non-immortalized human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs) we detected viral glycoproteins B (gB), gD, gH and gL present in extended blotches throughout the cytoplasm with limited nuclear membrane staining; however, in HFFs infected with a UL24-deficient virus (UL24X), staining for the viral glycoproteins appeared as long, thin streaks running across the cell. Interestingly, there was a decrease in co-localized staining of gB and gD with F-actin at late times in UL24X-infected HFFs. Treatment with chemical agents that perturbed the actin cytoskeleton hindered the formation of UL24X-induced syncytia in these cells. These data support a model whereby the UL24 syncytial phenotype results from a mislocalization of viral glycoproteins late in infection. - Highlights: • UL24 affects the sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins required for fusion. • Sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins varies in cell-type dependent manner. • Drugs targeting actin microfilaments affect formation of UL24-related syncytia in HFFs.

  12. Graviresponses in fungi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, D.

    Although the orientation of mycelial hyphal growth is usually independent of the gravity vector, individual specialised hyphae can show response to gravity. This is exemplified by the sporangiophore of Phycomyces, but the most striking gravitropic reactions occur in mushroom fruit bodies. During the course of development of a mushroom different tropisms predominate at different times; the young fruit body primordium is positively phototropic, but negative gravitropism later predominates. The switch between tropisms has been associated with meiosis. The spore-bearing tissue is positively gravitropic and responds independently of the stem. Bracket polypores do not show tropisms but exhibit gravimorphogenetic responses: disturbance leads to renewal of growth producing an entirely new fruiting structure. Indications from both clinostat and space flown experiments are that the basic form of the mushroom (overall tissue arrangement of stem, cap, gills, hymenium, veil) is established independently of the gravity vector although maturation, and especially commitment to the meiosis-sporulation pathway, requires the normal gravity vector. The gravity perception mechanism is difficult to identify. The latest results suggest that disturbance of cytoskeletal microfilaments is involved in perception (with nuclei possibly being used as statoliths), and Ca^2+-mediated signal transduction may be involved in directing growth differentials.

  13. Actin marker lines in grapevine reveal a gatekeeper function of guard cells.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xin; Buchholz, Günther; Nick, Peter

    2014-08-15

    Resistance to abiotic and biotic stress is a central topic for sustainable agriculture, especially in grapevine, one of the field crops with the highest economic output per acreage. As early cellular factors for plant defense, actin microfilaments (AF) are of high relevance. We therefore generated a transgenic actin marker line for grapevine by expressing a fusion protein between green fluorescent protein and the second actin-binding domain of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) fimbrin, AtFIM1. Based on this first cytoskeletal-marker line in grapevine, the response of AFs to phytopathogenic microorganisms could be followed in vivo. Upon inoculation with fluorescently labeled strains of phytopathogenic bacteria, actin responses were confined to the guard cells. In contrast, upon contact with zoospores of Plasmopara viticola, not only the guard cells, but also epidermal pavement cells, where no zoospores had attached responded with the formation of a perinuclear actin basket. Our data support the hypothesis that guard cells act as pacemakers of defense, dominating the responses of the remaining epidermal cells.

  14. Activation of 5-HT7 receptor stimulates neurite elongation through mTOR, Cdc42 and actin filaments dynamics.

    PubMed

    Speranza, Luisa; Giuliano, Teresa; Volpicelli, Floriana; De Stefano, M Egle; Lombardi, Loredana; Chambery, Angela; Lacivita, Enza; Leopoldo, Marcello; Bellenchi, Gian C; di Porzio, Umberto; Crispino, Marianna; Perrone-Capano, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that the serotonin receptor subtype 7 (5-HT7R) plays a crucial role in shaping neuronal morphology during embryonic and early postnatal life. Here we show that pharmacological stimulation of 5-HT7R using a highly selective agonist, LP-211, enhances neurite outgrowth in neuronal primary cultures from the cortex, hippocampus and striatal complex of embryonic mouse brain, through multiple signal transduction pathways. All these signaling systems, involving mTOR, the Rho GTPase Cdc42, Cdk5, and ERK, are known to converge on the reorganization of cytoskeletal proteins that subserve neurite outgrowth. Indeed, our data indicate that neurite elongation stimulated by 5-HT7R is modulated by drugs affecting actin polymerization. In addition, we show, by 2D Western blot analyses, that treatment of neuronal cultures with LP-211 alters the expression profile of cofilin, an actin binding protein involved in microfilaments dynamics. Furthermore, by using microfluidic chambers that physically separate axons from the soma and dendrites, we demonstrate that agonist-dependent activation of 5-HT7R stimulates axonal elongation. Our results identify for the first time several signal transduction pathways, activated by stimulation of 5-HT7R, that converge to promote cytoskeleton reorganization and consequent modulation of axonal elongation. Therefore, the activation of 5-HT7R might represent one of the key elements regulating CNS connectivity and plasticity during development.

  15. H2O2-induced filamin redistribution in endothelial cells is modulated by the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Hastie, L E; Patton, W F; Hechtman, H B; Shepro, D

    1997-09-01

    Hypoxia/reoxygenation injury in vitro causes endothelial cell cytoskeletal rearrangement that is related to increased monolayer permeability. Nonmuscle filamin (ABP-280) promotes orthogonal branching of F-actin and links microfilaments to membrane glycoproteins. Human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers are exposed to H2O2 (100 microM) for 1-60 min, with or without modulators of cAMP-dependent second-messenger pathways, and evaluated for changes in filamin distribution, cAMP levels, and the formation of gaps at interendothelial junctions. Filamin translocates from the membrane-cytoskeletal interface to the cytosol within 1 min of exposure to H2O2. This is associated with a decrease in endothelial cell cAMP levels from 83 pmoles/mg protein to 15 pmoles/mg protein. Intercellular gaps form 15 min after H2O2 treatment and progressively increase in number and diameter through 60 min. Both filamin redistribution and actin redistribution are associated with decreased phosphorylation of filamin and are prevented by activation of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase pathway. A synthetic peptide corresponding to filamin's C-terminal, cAMP-dependent, protein kinase phosphorylation site effectively induces filamin translocation and intercellular gap formation, which suggests that decreased phosphorylation of filamin at this site causes filamin redistribution and destabilization of junctions. These data indicate that H2O2-induced filamin redistribution and interendothelial cell gap formation result from inhibition of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase pathway.

  16. Plasticity of the brush border - the yin and yang of intestinal homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Delacour, Delphine; Salomon, Julie; Robine, Sylvie; Louvard, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    The brush border on the apical surface of enterocytes is a highly specialized structure well-adapted for efficient digestion and nutrient transport, whilst at the same time providing a protective barrier for the intestinal mucosa. The brush border is constituted of a densely ordered array of microvilli, protrusions of the plasma membrane, which are supported by actin-based microfilaments and interacting proteins and anchored in an apical network of actomyosin and intermediate filaments, the so-called terminal web. The highly dynamic, specialized apical domain is both an essential partner for the gut microbiota and an efficient signalling platform that enables adaptation to physiological stimuli from the external and internal milieu. Nevertheless, genetic alterations or various pathological stresses, such as infection, inflammation, and mechanical or nutritional alterations, can jeopardize this equilibrium and compromise intestinal functions. Long-time neglected, the intestinal brush-border shall be enlightening again as the central actor of the complex but essential intestinal homeostasis. Here, we review the processes and components involved in brush border organization and discuss pathological mechanisms that can induce brush border defects and their physiological consequences.

  17. A polarized cell model for Chikungunya virus infection: entry and egress of virus occurs at the apical domain of polarized cells.

    PubMed

    Lim, Pei Jin; Chu, Justin Jang Hann

    2014-02-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) has resulted in several outbreaks in the past six decades. The clinical symptoms of Chikungunya infection include fever, skin rash, arthralgia, and an increasing incidence of encephalitis. The re-emergence of CHIKV with more severe pathogenesis highlights its potential threat on our human health. In this study, polarized HBMEC, polarized Vero C1008 and non-polarized Vero cells grown on cell culture inserts were infected with CHIKV apically or basolaterally. Plaque assays, viral binding assays and immunofluorescence assays demonstrated apical entry and release of CHIKV in polarized HBMEC and Vero C1008. Drug treatment studies were performed to elucidate both host cell and viral factors involved in the sorting and release of CHIKV at the apical domain of polarized cells. Disruption of host cell myosin II, microtubule and microfilament networks did not disrupt the polarized release of CHIKV. However, treatment with tunicamycin resulted in a bi-directional release of CHIKV, suggesting that N-glycans of CHIKV envelope glycoproteins could serve as apical sorting signals. PMID:24587455

  18. Twisting integrin receptors increases endothelin-1 gene expression in endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J.; Fabry, B.; Schiffrin, E. L.; Wang, N.; Ingber, D. E. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    A magnetic twisting stimulator was developed based on the previously published technique of magnetic twisting cytometry. Using ligand-coated ferromagnetic microbeads, this device can apply mechanical stresses with varying amplitudes, duration, frequencies, and waveforms to specific cell surface receptors. Biochemical and biological responses of the cells to the mechanical stimulation can be assayed. Twisting integrin receptors with RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp)-containing peptide-coated beads increased endothelin-1 (ET-1) gene expression by >100%. In contrast, twisting scavenger receptors with acetylated low-density lipoprotein-coated beads or twisting HLA antigen with anti-HLA antibody-coated beads did not lead to alterations in ET-1 gene expression. In situ hybridization showed that the increase in ET-1 mRNA was localized in the cells that were stressed with the RGD-coated beads. Blocking stretch-activated ion channels with gadolinium, chelating Ca2+ with EGTA, or inhibiting tyrosine phosphorylation with genistein abolished twist-induced ET-1 mRNA elevation. Abolishing cytoskeletal tension with an inhibitor of the myosin ATPase, with an inhibitor of myosin light chain kinase, or with an actin microfilament disrupter blocked twisted-induced increases in ET-1 expression. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that the molecular structural linkage of integrin-cytoskeleton is an important pathway for stress-induced ET-1 gene expression.

  19. Neurofilament dynamics and involvement in neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Gentil, Benoit J; Tibshirani, Michael; Durham, Heather D

    2015-06-01

    Neurons are extremely polarised cells in which the cytoskeleton, composed of microtubules, microfilaments and neurofilaments, plays a crucial role in maintaining structure and function. Neurofilaments, the 10-nm intermediate filaments of neurons, provide structure and mechanoresistance but also provide a scaffolding for the organization of the nucleus and organelles such as mitochondria and ER. Disruption of neurofilament organization and expression or metabolism of neurofilament proteins is characteristic of certain neurological syndromes including Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Charcot-Marie-Tooth sensorimotor neuropathies and Giant Axonal Neuropathy. Microfluorometric live imaging techniques have been instrumental in revealing the dynamics of neurofilament assembly and transport and their functions in organizing intracellular organelle networks. The insolubility of neurofilament proteins has limited identifying interactors by conventional biochemical techniques but yeast two-hybrid experiments have revealed new roles for oligomeric, nonfilamentous structures including vesicular trafficking. Although having long half-lives, new evidence points to degradation of subunits by the ubiquitin-proteasome system as a mechanism of normal turnover. Although certain E3-ligases ubiquitinating neurofilament proteins have been identified, the overall process of neurofilament degradation is not well understood. We review these mechanisms of neurofilament homeostasis and abnormalities in motor neuron and peripheral nerve disorders. Much remains to discover about the disruption of processes that leads to their pathological aggregation and accumulation and the relevance to pathogenesis. Understanding these mechanisms is crucial for identifying novel therapeutic strategies.

  20. Cytokeratin 18-mediated disorganization of intermediate filaments is induced by degradation of plectin in human liver cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi-Hsiang; Ho, Chin-Chin; Cheng, Chiung-Chi; Chao, Wei-Ting; Pei, Ren-Jeng; Hsu, Yung-Hsiang; Lai, Yih-Shyong

    2011-04-15

    Plectin is a cross-linking protein that organizes the cytoskeleton into a stable meshwork that helps maintain the uniform size and shape of cells. As cells of hepatocellular carcinoma are morphologically different from healthy human hepatocytes, we hypothesized that plectin deficiency and cytoskeletal disorganization underlies this pleomorphic transformation. To test this hypothesis we induced apoptosis as the most accessible pathway for creating plectin deficiency status in vivo. We analyzed expression levels and organization of plectin and other cytoskeletal elements, including intermediate filaments, microfilaments, and microtubules, after staurosporine-induced apoptosis in human Chang liver cells. The results revealed the expression of plectin and cytokeratin 18 were downregulated in hepatocellular carcinoma tissues in vivo. The expression of actin and tubulin, however, were not altered. In vitro analysis indicated that plectin and cytokeratin 18 were cleaved following staurosporine-treatment of human Chang liver cells. Time course experiments revealed that plectin was cleaved 2h earlier than cytokeratin 18. The organization of plectin and cytokeratin 18 networks collapsed after staurosporine-treatment. Conclusively, degradation of plectin induced by staurosporine-treatment in liver cells resulted in cytoskeleton disruption and induced morphological changes in these cells by affecting the expression and organization of cytokeratin 18.

  1. Differential effects of caldesmon on the intermediate conformational states of polymerizing actin.

    PubMed

    Huang, Renjian; Grabarek, Zenon; Wang, Chih-Lueh Albert

    2010-01-01

    The actin-binding protein caldesmon (CaD) reversibly inhibits smooth muscle contraction. In non-muscle cells, a shorter CaD isoform co-exists with microfilaments in the stress fibers at the quiescent state, but the phosphorylated CaD is found at the leading edge of migrating cells where dynamic actin filament remodeling occurs. We have studied the effect of a C-terminal fragment of CaD (H32K) on the kinetics of the in vitro actin polymerization by monitoring the fluorescence of pyrene-labeled actin. Addition of H32K or its phosphorylated form either attenuated or accelerated the pyrene emission enhancement, depending on whether it was added at the early or the late phase of actin polymerization. However, the CaD fragment had no effect on the yield of sedimentable actin, nor did it affect the actin ATPase activity. Our findings can be explained by a model in which nascent actin filaments undergo a maturation process that involves at least two intermediate conformational states. If present at early stages of actin polymerization, CaD stabilizes one of the intermediate states and blocks the subsequent filament maturation. Addition of CaD at a later phase accelerates F-actin formation. The fact that CaD is capable of inhibiting actin filament maturation provides a novel function for CaD and suggests an active role in the dynamic reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton.

  2. Determination of apical membrane polarity in mammary epithelial cell cultures: The role of cell-cell, cell-substratum, and membrane-cytoskeleton interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Parry, G.; Beck, J.C.; Moss, L.; Bartley, J. ); Ojakian, G.K. )

    1990-06-01

    The membrane glycoprotein, PAS-O, is a major differentiation antigen on mammary epithelial cells and is located exclusively in the apical domain of the plasma membrane. The authors have used 734B cultured human mammary carcinoma cells as a model system to study the role of tight junctions, cell-substratum contacts, and submembranous cytoskeletal elements in restricting PAS-O to the apical membrane. Immunofluorescence and immunoelectronmicroscopy experiments demonstrated that while tight junctions demarcate PAS-O distribution in confluent cultures, apical polarity could be established at low culture densities when cells could not form tight junctions with neighboring cells. They suggest, then, that interactions between vitronectin and its receptor, are responsible for establishment of membrane domains in the absence of tight junctions. The role of cytoskeletal elements in restricting PAS-O distribution was examined by treating cultures with cytochalasin D, colchicine, or acrylamide. Cytochalasin D led to a redistribution of PAS0O while colchicine and acrylamide did not. They hypothesize that PAS-O is restricted to the apical membrane by interactions with a microfilament network and that the cytoskeletal organization is dependent upon cell-cell and cell-substratum interactions.

  3. Augmented stress fiber arrays after cytopharmacologic disassembly of microtubules

    SciTech Connect

    Godman, G.C.; Tannenbaum, J.; Brett, J.B.

    1986-03-01

    Disruption of microtubules (mt) of bovine aortic endothelial (BAE) cells, and normal and transformed fibroblasts, by exposure to 2.5 ..mu..M colchicine; 12 ..mu..M vinblastine; or 1 ..mu..M nocodazole, for 5 or 20 hrs results in aggregation of vimentin-intermediate filament (IF) and the development of markedly augmented stress fiber (SF) arrays. After disassembly of mt, confluent BAE, with circumferential marginal microfilament bands and few central SF, develop dense ribbon-like SF arrays, and spontaneously transformed fibroblasts (tHmf-e), which before treatment are apolar or epithelioid and have few or no SF, acquire extensive organized SF arrays. The axially oriented SF span the entire cell length and terminate in vinculin-containing adhesion plaques, polarizing these cells. The visible increase in SF associated actin is not accompanied by an increase either in actin synthesis (determined from electropherograms after pulse labeling with (/sup 35/S)methionine), or content (DNAse I assay for total cell actin). The reorganization of actin into SF and the development of vinculin adhesion plaques is independent of protein synthesis and occurs in the presence of cycloheximide (10 ..mu..g/ml). These results suggest a role for mt and IF in the regulation of the organizational state of the actin-based cytoskeleton.

  4. Phagocytosis of Histoplasma capsulatum yeasts and microconidia by human cultured macrophages and alveolar macrophages. Cellular cytoskeleton requirement for attachment and ingestion.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, S L; Bucher, C; Rhodes, J; Bullock, W E

    1990-01-01

    Phagocytosis of Histoplasma capsulatum (Hc) yeasts and microconidia by human macrophages (M phi) was quantified by a fluorescence quenching technique. Phagocytosis of unopsonized Hc yeasts by monocyte-derived M phi and human alveolar M phi (AM) was rapid. After 60 min, 79% of cultured M phi and 59% of AM had ingested an average of 9.8 and 11 yeasts/M phi, respectively. In contrast, only 26% of monocytes ingested 4.5 yeasts/cell after 60 min. Phagocytosis of unopsonized microconidia by cultured M phi and by AM was equivalent. Monoclonal antibodies specific for the alpha-chains and beta-chain of the CD18 family of adhesion receptors inhibited the binding of Hc yeasts and microconidia to cultured M phi and AM. Thus, the M phi CD18 complex mediates recognition of both phases of this dimorphic fungus. Disruption of actin microfilaments with cytochalasin D inhibited both attachment and ingestion of yeasts by M phi. In contrast, nocodazole, which prevents polymerization of microtubules, did not inhibit binding or ingestion. Both drugs inhibited ingestion, but neither drug inhibited binding of C3b- and C3bi-coated sheep erythrocytes to complement receptors type one (CR1) or type three (CR3), respectively. Therefore, different signal transducing mechanisms for phagocytosis appear to be triggered by the binding of Hc yeasts to CD18, and by the binding of EC3bi to CD11b/CD18, respectively. Images PMID:2104879

  5. Coalescence of Golgi fragments in microtubule-deprived living cells.

    PubMed

    Polishchuk, R S; Polishchuk, E V; Mironov, A A

    1999-03-01

    The process of stack coalescence, an important mechanism of Golgi recovery from mitosis, was examined using novel experimental paradigms. In living cells with disrupted (by nocodazole) microtubules, galactosyl transferase-GFP-labelled Golgi fragments constantly appeared, grew, sometimes moved with a speed of 1-2 microns/min, coalesced or gradually diminished and disappeared. The rate of Golgi fragment turnover and coalescence was highly balanced to maintain a constant number of Golgi units per cell. Moreover some Golgi islands appear and some received new GalTase-GFP after photobleaching of cell cytoplasm. Short tubules extending from the rims of scattered Golgi fragments frequently formed bridges between ministacks, inducing their coalescence. The frequency of coalescence could also be inhibited by disruption of actin microfilaments. After the Golgi redistribution into endoplasmic reticulum induced by brefeldin A, either the growth of small Golgi fragments or their coalescence leads to compartmentalized stack formation without the participation of microtubules. These results demonstrate that this coalescence between isolated Golgi stacks is microtubule-independent and could thus be mediated by membranous tubules.

  6. The organization of the actin cytoskeleton in vertical and graviresponding primary roots of maize

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blancaflor, E. B.; Hasenstein, K. H.

    1997-01-01

    To determine whether actin microfilament (MF) organization is correlated with differential elongation, primary roots of Zea mays cv Merit maintained vertically or reoriented horizontally for 15 to 120 min were stained with rhodamine phalloidin and examined with a confocal microscope. Root curvature was measured with a computer-controlled video digitizer. In vertical roots bundles of MFs in the elongation and maturation zone were oriented parallel to the longitudinal axis of cells. MFs in the vascular parenchyma cells were more abundant than in the cortex and epidermis. Epidermal and proendodermal cells in the meristematic region contained transverse cortical MFs. The organization of MFs of graviresponding roots was similar to that of vertical roots. Application of cytochalasin B or cytochalasin D resulted in extensive disruption of MFs in the cortex and epidermis, but only partially affected MFs in the stele. Despite the cytochalasin B-induced depolymerization of MFs, gravicurvature exceeded that of controls. In contrast, the auxin transport inhibitor N-1 naphthylphthalamic acid suppressed root curvature but had no observable effect on the integrity of the MFs. The data indicate that MFs may not be involved in the graviresponse of maize roots.

  7. LIM Kinase Inhibitor Pyr1 Reduces the Growth and Metastatic Load of Breast Cancers.

    PubMed

    Prunier, Chloé; Josserand, Véronique; Vollaire, Julien; Beerling, Evelyne; Petropoulos, Christos; Destaing, Olivier; Montemagno, Christopher; Hurbin, Amandine; Prudent, Renaud; de Koning, Leanne; Kapur, Reuben; Cohen, Pascale A; Albiges-Rizo, Corinne; Coll, Jean-Luc; van Rheenen, Jacco; Billaud, Marc; Lafanechère, Laurence

    2016-06-15

    LIM kinases (LIMK) are emerging targets for cancer therapy, and they function as network hubs to coordinate actin and microtubule dynamics. When LIMKs are inhibited, actin microfilaments are disorganized and microtubules are stabilized. Owing to their stabilizing effect on microtubules, LIMK inhibitors may provide a therapeutic strategy to treat taxane-resistant cancers. In this study, we investigated the effect of LIMK inhibition on breast tumor development and on paclitaxel-resistant tumors, using a novel selective LIMK inhibitor termed Pyr1. Treatment of breast cancer cells, including paclitaxel-resistant cells, blocked their invasion and proliferation in vitro and their growth in vivo in tumor xenograft assays. The tumor-invasive properties of Pyr1 were investigated in vivo by intravital microscopy of tumor xenografts. A striking change of cell morphology was observed with a rounded phenotype arising in a subpopulation of cells, while other cells remained elongated. Notably, although Pyr1 decreased the motility of elongated cells, it increased the motility of rounded cells in the tumor. Pyr1 administration prevented the growth of metastasis but not their spread. Overall, our results provided a preclinical proof of concept concerning how a small-molecule inhibitor of LIMK may offer a strategy to treat taxane-resistant breast tumors and metastases. Cancer Res; 76(12); 3541-52. ©2016 AACR.

  8. Divergent Label-free Cell Phenotypic Pharmacology of Ligands at the Overexpressed β2-Adrenergic Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrie, Ann M.; Sun, Haiyan; Zaytseva, Natalya; Fang, Ye

    2014-01-01

    We present subclone sensitive cell phenotypic pharmacology of ligands at the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2-AR) stably expressed in HEK-293 cells. The parental cell line was transfected with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged β2-AR. Four stable subclones were established and used to profile a library of sixty-nine AR ligands. Dynamic mass redistribution (DMR) profiling resulted in a pharmacological activity map suggesting that HEK293 endogenously expresses functional Gi-coupled α2-AR and Gs-coupled β2-AR, and the label-free cell phenotypic activity of AR ligands are subclone dependent. Pathway deconvolution revealed that the DMR of epinephrine is originated mostly from the remodeling of actin microfilaments and adhesion complexes, to less extent from the microtubule networks and receptor trafficking, and certain agonists displayed different efficacy towards the cAMP-Epac pathway. We demonstrate that receptor signaling and ligand pharmacology is sensitive to the receptor expression level, and the organization of the receptor and its signaling circuitry.

  9. Stress-dependent morphogenesis: continuum mechanics and truss systems.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, José J; Conte, Vito; Miodownik, Mark

    2010-08-01

    A set of equilibrium equations is derived for the stress-controlled shape change of cells due to the remodelling and growth of their internal architecture. The approach involves the decomposition of the deformation gradient into an active and a passive component; the former is allowed to include a growth process, while the latter is assumed to be hyperelastic and mass-preserving. The two components are coupled with a control function that provides the required feedback mechanism. The balance equations for general continua are derived and, using a variational approach, we deduce the equilibrium equations and study the effects of the control function on these equations. The results are applied to a truss system whose function is to simulate the cytoskeletal network constituted by myosin microfilaments and microtubules, which are found experimentally to control shape change in cells. Special attention is paid to the conditions that a thermodynamically consistent formulation should satisfy. The model is used to simulate the multicellular shape changes observed during ventral furrow invagination of the Drosophila melanogaster embryo. The results confirm that ventral furrow invagination can be achieved through stress control alone, without the need for other regulatory or signalling mechanisms. The model also reveals that the yolk plays a distinct role in the process, which is different to its role during invagination with externally imposed strains. In stress control, the incompressibility constraint of the yolk leads, via feedback, to the generation of a pressure in the ventral zone of the epithelium that eventually eases its rise and internalisation.

  10. Nanochips of Tantalum Oxide Nanodots as artificial-microenvironments for monitoring Ovarian cancer progressiveness.

    PubMed

    Dhawan, Udesh; Wang, Ssu-Meng; Chu, Ying Hao; Huang, Guewha S; Lin, Yan Ren; Hung, Yao Ching; Chen, Wen Liang

    2016-01-01

    Nanotopography modulates cell characteristics and cell behavior. Nanotopological cues can be exploited to investigate the in-vivo modulation of cell characteristics by the cellular microenvironment. However, the studies explaining the modulation of tumor cell characteristics and identifying the transition step in cancer progressiveness are scarce. Here, we engineered nanochips comprising of Tantalum oxide nanodot arrays of 10, 50, 100 and 200 nm as artificial microenvironments to study the modulation of cancer cell behavior. Clinical samples of different types of Ovarian cancer at different stages were obtained, primary cultures were established and then seeded on different nanochips. Immunofluorescence (IF) was performed to compare the morphologies and cell characteristics. Indices corresponding to cell characteristics were defined. A statistical comparison of the cell characteristics in response to the nanochips was performed. The cells displayed differential growth parameters. Morphology, Viability, focal adhesions, microfilament bundles and cell area were modulated by the nanochips which can be used as a measure to study the cancer progressiveness. The ease of fabrication of nanochips ensures mass-production. The ability of the nanochips to act as artificial microenvironments and modulate cell behavior may lead to further prospects in the markerless monitoring of the progressiveness and ultimately, improving the prognosis of Ovarian cancer. PMID:27534915

  11. Statistics of active transport in Xenopus melanophores cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Snezhko, A.; Barlan, K.; Aranson, I. S.; Gelfand, V. I.; Materials Science Division; Northwestern Univ.

    2010-11-01

    The transport of cell cargo, such as organelles and protein complexes in the cytoplasm, is determined by cooperative action of molecular motors stepping along polar cytoskeletal elements. Analysis of transport of individual organelles generated useful information about the properties of the motor proteins and underlying cytoskeletal elements. In this work, for the first time (to our knowledge), we study collective movement of multiple organelles using Xenopus melanophores, pigment cells that translocate several thousand of pigment granules (melanosomes), spherical organelles of a diameter of {approx} 1 {micro}m. These cells disperse melanosomes in the cytoplasm in response to high cytoplasmic cAMP, while at low cAMP melanosomes cluster at the cell center. Obtained results suggest spatial and temporal organization, characterized by strong correlations between movement of neighboring organelles, with correlation length of {approx} 4 {micro}m and pair lifetime {approx} 5 s. Furthermore, velocity statistics revealed strongly non-Gaussian velocity distribution with high velocity tails demonstrating exponential behavior suggestive of strong velocity correlations. Depolymerization of vimentin intermediate filaments using a dominant-negative vimentin mutant or actin with cytochalasin B reduced correlation of behavior of individual particles. Based on our analysis, we concluded that steric repulsion is dominant, but both intermediate filaments and actin microfilaments are involved in dynamic cross-linking organelles in the cytoplasm.

  12. Cytoskeletal-assisted dynamics of the mitochondrial reticulum in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, Michelle K.; Guenza, Marina G.; Capaldi, Roderick A.; Marcus, Andrew H.

    2002-01-01

    Subcellular organelle dynamics are strongly influenced by interactions with cytoskeletal filaments and their associated motor proteins, and lead to complex multiexponential relaxations that occur over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Here we report spatio-temporal measurements of the fluctuations of the mitochondrial reticulum in osteosarcoma cells by using Fourier imaging correlation spectroscopy, over time and distance scales of 10−2 to 103 s and 0.5–2.5 μm. We show that the method allows a more complete description of mitochondrial dynamics, through the time- and length-scale-dependent collective diffusion coefficient D(k,τ), than available by other means. Addition of either nocodazole to disrupt microtubules or cytochalasin D to disassemble microfilaments simplifies the intermediate scattering function. When both drugs are used, the reticulum morphology of mitochondria is retained even though the cytoskeletal elements have been de-polymerized. The dynamics of the organelle are then primarily diffusive and can be modeled as a collection of friction points interconnected by elastic springs. This study quantitatively characterizes organelle dynamics in terms of collective cytoskeletal interactions in living cells. PMID:12417764

  13. Microtubule Polymerization Functions in Hypersensitive Response and Accumulation of H2O2 in Wheat Induced by the Stripe Rust

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinjie; Xu, Yuanliu

    2016-01-01

    The plant cytoskeleton, including microtubules and microfilaments, is one of the important factors in determining the polarity of cell division and growth, as well as the interaction of plants with invading pathogens. In defense responses of wheat against the stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici) infection, hypersensitive response is the most crucial event to prevent the spread of pathogens. In order to reveal the effect of microtubules on the hypersensitive cell death and H2O2 accumulation in the interaction of wheat (Triticum aestivum) cv. Suwon 11 with an incompatible race, CYR23, wheat leaves were treated with microtubule inhibitor, oryzalin, before inoculation. The results showed that the frequency of infection sites with hypersensitive response occurrence was significantly reduced, and hypersensitive cell death in wheat leaves was suppressed compared to the control. In addition, the frequency and the incidence of infected cells with H2O2 accumulation were also reduced after the treatment with oryzalin. Those results indicated that microtubules are related to hypersensitive response and H2O2 accumulation in wheat induced by the stripe rust, and depolymerization of microtubules reduces the resistance of plants to pathogen infection in incompatible interaction, suggesting that microtubules play a potential role in the expression of resistance of wheat against the stripe rust fungus.

  14. Microtubule Polymerization Functions in Hypersensitive Response and Accumulation of H2O2 in Wheat Induced by the Stripe Rust

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinjie; Xu, Yuanliu

    2016-01-01

    The plant cytoskeleton, including microtubules and microfilaments, is one of the important factors in determining the polarity of cell division and growth, as well as the interaction of plants with invading pathogens. In defense responses of wheat against the stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici) infection, hypersensitive response is the most crucial event to prevent the spread of pathogens. In order to reveal the effect of microtubules on the hypersensitive cell death and H2O2 accumulation in the interaction of wheat (Triticum aestivum) cv. Suwon 11 with an incompatible race, CYR23, wheat leaves were treated with microtubule inhibitor, oryzalin, before inoculation. The results showed that the frequency of infection sites with hypersensitive response occurrence was significantly reduced, and hypersensitive cell death in wheat leaves was suppressed compared to the control. In addition, the frequency and the incidence of infected cells with H2O2 accumulation were also reduced after the treatment with oryzalin. Those results indicated that microtubules are related to hypersensitive response and H2O2 accumulation in wheat induced by the stripe rust, and depolymerization of microtubules reduces the resistance of plants to pathogen infection in incompatible interaction, suggesting that microtubules play a potential role in the expression of resistance of wheat against the stripe rust fungus. PMID:27610380

  15. Dynein Light Chain 1 Regulates Dynamin-mediated F-Actin Assembly during Sperm Individualization in DrosophilaD⃞

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh-Roy, Anindya; Desai, Bela S.; Ray, Krishanu

    2005-01-01

    Toward the end of spermiogenesis, spermatid nuclei are compacted and the clonally related spermatids individualize to become mature and active sperm. Studies in Drosophila showed that caudal end-directed movement of a microfilament-rich structure, called investment cone, expels the cytoplasmic contents of individual spermatids. F-actin dynamics plays an important role in this process. Here we report that the dynein light chain 1 (DLC1) of Drosophila is involved in two separate cellular processes during sperm individualization. It is enriched around spermatid nuclei during postelongation stages and plays an important role in the dynein-dynactin–dependent rostral retention of the nuclei during this period. In addition, DDLC1 colocalizes with dynamin along investment cones and regulates F-actin assembly at this organelle by retaining dynamin along the cones. Interestingly, we found that this process does not require the other subunits of cytoplasmic dynein-dynactin complex. Altogether, these observations suggest that DLC1 could independently regulate multiple cellular functions and established a novel role of this protein in F-actin assembly in Drosophila. PMID:15829565

  16. Demonstration of mechanical connections between integrins, cytoskeletal filaments, and nucleoplasm that stabilize nuclear structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maniotis, A. J.; Chen, C. S.; Ingber, D. E.

    1997-01-01

    We report here that living cells and nuclei are hard-wired such that a mechanical tug on cell surface receptors can immediately change the organization of molecular assemblies in the cytoplasm and nucleus. When integrins were pulled by micromanipulating bound microbeads or micropipettes, cytoskeletal filaments reoriented, nuclei distorted, and nucleoli redistributed along the axis of the applied tension field. These effects were specific for integrins, independent of cortical membrane distortion, and were mediated by direct linkages between the cytoskeleton and nucleus. Actin microfilaments mediated force transfer to the nucleus at low strain; however, tearing of the actin gel resulted with greater distortion. In contrast, intermediate filaments effectively mediated force transfer to the nucleus under both conditions. These filament systems also acted as molecular guy wires to mechanically stiffen the nucleus and anchor it in place, whereas microtubules acted to hold open the intermediate filament lattice and to stabilize the nucleus against lateral compression. Molecular connections between integrins, cytoskeletal filaments, and nuclear scaffolds may therefore provide a discrete path for mechanical signal transfer through cells as well as a mechanism for producing integrated changes in cell and nuclear structure in response to changes in extracellular matrix adhesivity or mechanics.

  17. Phagocytic activity and hyperpolarizing responses in L-strain mouse fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Y; Tsuchiya, W; Yada, T; Yano, J; Yawo, H

    1981-01-01

    1. Fibroblastic L cells not only respond with a slow hyperpolarizing potential change to a mechanical or electrical stimulus but also show spontaneous, repetitive hyperpolarizations (i.e. membrane potential oscillation). 2. Almost all the cells can actively take up latex beads whose surfaces were treated by U.V. irradiation. 3. Non-phagocytic L cells hardly showed hyperpolarizing responses, while hyperpolarizing responses were obtained in all the phagocytic L cells. The exposure of the cell surface to beads, however, did not trigger the generation of hyperpolarizing responses. 4. Metabolic inhibitors, low temperature and cytochalasin B inhibited both the uptake of beads and the hyperpolarizing responses. 5. Increasing the external concentration of Ca2+ induced a remarkable stimulation of the phagocytosis of beads. Mg2+ and Ba2+, which inhibited hyperpolarizing responses due to competition for Ca2+ sites on the outer surface of the membrane, significantly suppressed the uptake of beads. 6. Verapamil, a Ca2+ channel blocker, inhibited not only hyperpolarizing membrane responses but also ingestion of beads. 7. It is concluded that the Ca2+ inflow on the hyperpolarizing membrane responses is closely associated with the phagocytic activity in L cells, probably through activation of the microfilament assembly. Images Plate 1 PMID:7024506

  18. An ultrastructural study of the Sertoli cell in the water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Kurohmaru, M; Yamashiro, S; Azmi, T I; Basrur, P K

    1992-03-01

    The ultrastructure of Sertoli cell in the water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) was observed in a transmission electron microscope. The nucleus had homogeneous nucleoplasm, scarce heterochromatin and multivesicular nuclear body (MNB). The MNB was composed of numerous vesicles and ribosome-like dense structures. The vesicles varied in size and number and contained a sparse and flocculent substance. In the indentation of the nucleus, aggregates of ribosomes were frequently observed. In the apical and middle region of the cell, long mitochondria and microtubules were distributed parallel to the long axis of the cell. Non-laminated smooth ER and some ribosomes were also recognizable throughout this region. In the basal region, widely-distributed laminated smooth ER was characteristic. Microfilament bundles at ectoplasmic specialization were irregularly arranged. Frequently-emerged nodular processes occasionally separated from basal lamina and formed round structures within Sertoli cytoplasm. Although these characteristics of buffalo Sertoli cell were very similar to those of the bovine studied, the aggregate of ribosomes was more developed in the buffalo.

  19. Sarcocystis dubeyi n. sp. (Protozoa: Sarcocystidae) in the water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Huong, L T; Uggla, A

    1999-02-01

    Sarcocystis dubeyi n. sp. is proposed for a species forming thick-walled, microscopic sarcocysts in striated muscular tissues of the water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis). Sarcocysts of S. dubeyi were found in histological sections of skeletal muscles and esophagus, but not in heart and tongue, of 8 (13%) of 60 water buffaloes examined in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Sarcocysts of S. dubeyi were up to 600 microns long and up to 200 microns wide. The cyst wall was 4.5-9 microns thick and was composed of tightly packed, cylindrical villar protrusions (Vp) that had a uniform width of up to 3 microns, a length of up to 8 microns, and a blunt, often flattened tip. The Vp contained microfilaments but no prominent electron-dense granules. The definitive host of S. dubeyi was not determined, but it could possibly be humans or other primates. By the present description, 4 Sarcocystis species are recognized in the water buffalo: the macrocyst-forming Sarcocystis fusiformis and S. buffalonis and the microcyst-forming S. levinei and S. dubeyi.

  20. Sarcocystis levinei infection in Philippine water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Claveria, F G; Cruz, M J

    2000-01-01

    Ultrastructural studies of sarcocysts obtained from Philippine water buffaloes revealed the presence of the commonly reported macroscopic species, Sarcocystis fusiformis, and the microscopic species Sarcocystis levinei (Dissanaike A, Kan S. Studies on Sarcocystis in Malaysia. I: Sarcocystis levinei n.sp. from the water buffalo Bubalus bubalis. Z Parasitenkd 1978;55:127-38), (Huong L, Dubey J, Uggla A. Redescription of Sarcocystis levinei Dissanaike and Kan, 1978 (Protozoa: Sarcocystidae) of the water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis). J Parasitol 1997;83:1148-52). The globular to oval microscopic cysts commonly observed in the muscles of the diaphragm and neck exhibit compartmentalized arrangement of zoites with septal partitions and measure 13-48 microns in diameter. The parasitophorous vacuolar membrane of sarcocyst bears minute and hair-like villar protrusions measuring 2.3-2.75 microns long emanating at certain distances from the primary cyst wall and lack microfilaments. Villar protrusions have expanded to dome-shaped base measuring 0.33-1.6 microns long by 0.22-1.0 micron wide, and intermediate and tapering distal segments bent approximately 90 degrees and run parallel to the cyst surface. The distal segments at some areas join to form conical tufts. The primary cyst wall bears numerous prominent undulations that are arranged in small clusters. The ground substance is 0.42-0.57 micron thick. This paper documents the first report of S. levinei in Philippine water buffaloes possessing the type 7 cyst wall.

  1. Sarcocystis buffalonis n.sp. (Protozoa: Sarcocystidae) from the water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Huong, L T; Dubey, J P; Nikkilä, T; Uggla, A

    1997-06-01

    Sarcocystis buffalonis n. sp. is proposed for a species forming thick-walled, macroscopic sarcocysts in skeletal muscles and the esophagus of the water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis). Sarcocysts of S. buffalonis were found in 68 (10.5%) of 647 buffalo carcasses examined grossly at slaughter in Ho Chi Minh City in southern Vietnam. Sarcocystis buffalonis sarcocysts were 1-8 mm long and 0.1-0.5 mm wide. The cyst wall was 3-7.7 microns thick and had palisadelike villar protrusions that were constricted at the base, expanded laterally in the mid-region, and tapered distally. The villar protrusions contained microfilaments and electron-dense granules. Sarcocysts of Sarcocystis fusiformis, the other well-known macroscopic species occurring in water buffalo, were also found in 60 of the 68 animals infected with S. buffalonis. Sarcocysts of S. fusiformis were thin walled and had characteristic cauliflowerlike villar protrusions. Two of 7 cats fed isolated S. buffalonis sarcocysts were found to have 12 x 8 microns sporocysts in their intestine or feces 10 days after inoculation.

  2. Sarcocystis spp infection in Philippine water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Claveria, F G; Cruz, M J; Lim, R S

    2000-01-01

    In a survey of sarcocysts in muscle tissues obtained from 142 water buffaloes, 65% of the carcasses had sarcocysts. Macroscopic and two forms of microscopic sarcocysts, the spindle-shaped or fusiform sarcocysts commonly occurring in the muscles of the esophagus, throat and limbs, and the globular to oval-shaped sarcocysts which were the dominant form in the diaphragm and cervical muscle tissues were noted. Ultrastructural analysis of macroscopic and microscopic sarcocysts and their cyst wall revealed two distinct species of Sarcocystis: the macroscopic species, Sarcocystis fusiformis which has been previously reported in Philippine carabaos possessing highly dendritic cauliflower-like projections emanating from the primary cyst wall, with annulated microfilaments and numerous electron dense granules: and the Sarcocystis levinei (Dissanaike and Kan, 1978) Huong, Dubey and Uggla. 1997 exhibiting a cyst wall with undulating and hair-like villar protrusions with expanded or dome-shaped base, intermediate finger-like, and distal tapering segments which at some points join to form conical tufts. Our findings represent the first report of S. levinei in the country supported with ultrastructural analysis of the sarcocysts and cyst wall, and likewise refute earlier published reports that all microscopic sarcocysts in Philippine carabaos are developing forms of the macroscopic species, S. fusiformis. Histopathological changes such as displacement and necrosis of the surrounding host muscle tissue were observed with macroscopic sarcocysts and histologically processed tissue samples containing microscopic fusiform sarcocysts. Necrotic myofibrils and mitochondria were evident in ultrathin sections.

  3. Desmosomal molecules in and out of adhering junctions: normal and diseased States of epidermal, cardiac and mesenchymally derived cells.

    PubMed

    Pieperhoff, Sebastian; Barth, Mareike; Rickelt, Steffen; Franke, Werner W

    2010-01-01

    Current cell biology textbooks mention only two kinds of cell-to-cell adhering junctions coated with the cytoplasmic plaques: the desmosomes (maculae adhaerentes), anchoring intermediate-sized filaments (IFs), and the actin microfilament-anchoring adherens junctions (AJs), including both punctate (puncta adhaerentia) and elongate (fasciae adhaerentes) structures. In addition, however, a series of other junction types has been identified and characterized which contain desmosomal molecules but do not fit the definition of desmosomes. Of these special cell-cell junctions containing desmosomal glycoproteins or proteins we review the composite junctions (areae compositae) connecting the cardiomyocytes of mature mammalian hearts and their importance in relation to human arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathies. We also emphasize the various plakophilin-2-positive plaques in AJs (coniunctiones adhaerentes) connecting proliferatively active mesenchymally-derived cells, including interstitial cells of the heart and several soft tissue tumor cell types. Moreover, desmoplakin has also been recognized as a constituent of the plaques of the complexus adhaerentes connecting certain lymphatic endothelial cells. Finally, we emphasize the occurrence of the desmosomal transmembrane glycoprotein, desmoglein Dsg2, out of the context of any junction as dispersed cell surface molecules in certain types of melanoma cells and melanocytes. This broadening of our knowledge on the diversity of AJ structures indicates that it may still be too premature to close the textbook chapters on cell-cell junctions. PMID:20671973

  4. Phosphoinositide binding inhibits alpha-actinin bundling activity.

    PubMed

    Fraley, Tamara S; Tran, Thuan C; Corgan, Anne Marie; Nash, Coral A; Hao, Jie; Critchley, David R; Greenwood, Jeffrey A

    2003-06-27

    alpha-Actinin is an abundant actin-bundling and adhesion protein that directly links actin filaments to integrin receptors. Previously, in platelet-derived growth factor-treated fibroblasts, we demonstrated that phosphoinositides bind to alpha-actinin, regulating its localization (Greenwood, J. A., Theibert, A. B., Prestwich, G. D., and Murphy-Ullrich, J. E. (2000) J. Cell Biol. 150, 627- 642). In this study, phosphoinositide binding and regulation of alpha-actinin function is further characterized. Phosphoinositide binding specificity, determined using a protein-lipid overlay procedure, suggests that alpha-actinin interacts with phosphates on the 4th and 5th position of the inositol head group. Binding assays and mutational analyses demonstrate that phosphoinositides bind to the calponin homology domain 2 of alpha-actinin. Phosphoinositide binding inhibited the bundling activity of alpha-actinin by blocking the interaction of the actin-binding domain with actin filaments. Consistent with these results, excessive bundling of actin filaments was observed in fibroblasts expressing an alpha-actinin mutant with decreased phosphoinositide affinity. We conclude that the interaction of alpha-actinin with phosphoinositides regulates actin stress fibers in the cell by controlling the extent to which microfilaments are bundled.

  5. Phosphoinositides differentially regulate alpha-actinin flexibility and function.

    PubMed

    Corgan, Anne Marie; Singleton, CoreyAyne; Santoso, Cynthia B; Greenwood, Jeffrey A

    2004-03-15

    Alpha-actinin is a cell-adhesion and cytoskeletal protein that bundles actin microfilaments and links these filaments directly to integrin-adhesion receptors. Phosphoinositides bind to and regulate the interaction of a-actinin with actin filaments and integrin receptors. In the present study, we demonstrate that PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 inhibits and disrupts a-actinin-bundling activity, whereas PtdIns(4,5)P2 can only inhibit activity. In addition, a protease-sensitivity assay was developed to examine the flexibility of the linker region between the actin-binding domain and the spectrin repeats of a-actinin. Both phosphoinositides influenced the extent of proteolysis and the cleavage sites. PtdIns(4,5)P2 binding decreased the proteolysis of a-actinin, suggesting a role in stabilizing the structure of the protein. In contrast, PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 binding enhanced a-actinin proteolysis, indicating an increase in the flexibility of the protein. Furthermore, phosphoinositide binding influenced the proteolysis of the N- and C-terminal domains of a-actinin, indicating regulation of structure within both domains. These results support the hypothesis that PtdIns(4,5)P2 and PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 differentially regulate a-actinin function by modulating the structure and flexibility of the protein.

  6. Phosphoinositides differentially regulate alpha-actinin flexibility and function.

    PubMed Central

    Corgan, Anne Marie; Singleton, CoreyAyne; Santoso, Cynthia B; Greenwood, Jeffrey A

    2004-01-01

    Alpha-actinin is a cell-adhesion and cytoskeletal protein that bundles actin microfilaments and links these filaments directly to integrin-adhesion receptors. Phosphoinositides bind to and regulate the interaction of a-actinin with actin filaments and integrin receptors. In the present study, we demonstrate that PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 inhibits and disrupts a-actinin-bundling activity, whereas PtdIns(4,5)P2 can only inhibit activity. In addition, a protease-sensitivity assay was developed to examine the flexibility of the linker region between the actin-binding domain and the spectrin repeats of a-actinin. Both phosphoinositides influenced the extent of proteolysis and the cleavage sites. PtdIns(4,5)P2 binding decreased the proteolysis of a-actinin, suggesting a role in stabilizing the structure of the protein. In contrast, PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 binding enhanced a-actinin proteolysis, indicating an increase in the flexibility of the protein. Furthermore, phosphoinositide binding influenced the proteolysis of the N- and C-terminal domains of a-actinin, indicating regulation of structure within both domains. These results support the hypothesis that PtdIns(4,5)P2 and PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 differentially regulate a-actinin function by modulating the structure and flexibility of the protein. PMID:14670080

  7. Nanochips of Tantalum Oxide Nanodots as artificial-microenvironments for monitoring Ovarian cancer progressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Dhawan, Udesh; Wang, Ssu-Meng; Chu, Ying Hao; Huang, Guewha S.; Lin, Yan Ren; Hung, Yao Ching; Chen, Wen Liang

    2016-01-01

    Nanotopography modulates cell characteristics and cell behavior. Nanotopological cues can be exploited to investigate the in-vivo modulation of cell characteristics by the cellular microenvironment. However, the studies explaining the modulation of tumor cell characteristics and identifying the transition step in cancer progressiveness are scarce. Here, we engineered nanochips comprising of Tantalum oxide nanodot arrays of 10, 50, 100 and 200 nm as artificial microenvironments to study the modulation of cancer cell behavior. Clinical samples of different types of Ovarian cancer at different stages were obtained, primary cultures were established and then seeded on different nanochips. Immunofluorescence (IF) was performed to compare the morphologies and cell characteristics. Indices corresponding to cell characteristics were defined. A statistical comparison of the cell characteristics in response to the nanochips was performed. The cells displayed differential growth parameters. Morphology, Viability, focal adhesions, microfilament bundles and cell area were modulated by the nanochips which can be used as a measure to study the cancer progressiveness. The ease of fabrication of nanochips ensures mass-production. The ability of the nanochips to act as artificial microenvironments and modulate cell behavior may lead to further prospects in the markerless monitoring of the progressiveness and ultimately, improving the prognosis of Ovarian cancer. PMID:27534915

  8. RAB-10 Promotes EHBP-1 Bridging of Filamentous Actin and Tubular Recycling Endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Liu, Ou; Zhang, Jing; Gleason, Adenrele; Yang, Zhenrong; Wang, Hui; Shi, Anbing; Grant, Barth D.

    2016-01-01

    EHBP-1 (Ehbp1) is a conserved regulator of endocytic recycling, acting as an effector of small GTPases including RAB-10 (Rab10). Here we present evidence that EHBP-1 associates with tubular endosomal phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] enriched membranes through an N-terminal C2-like (NT-C2) domain, and define residues within the NT-C2 domain that mediate membrane interaction. Furthermore, our results indicate that the EHBP-1 central calponin homology (CH) domain binds to actin microfilaments in a reaction that is stimulated by RAB-10(GTP). Loss of any aspect of this RAB-10/EHBP-1 system in the C. elegans intestinal epithelium leads to retention of basolateral recycling cargo in endosomes that have lost their normal tubular endosomal network (TEN) organization. We propose a mechanism whereby RAB-10 promotes the ability of endosome-bound EHBP-1 to also bind to the actin cytoskeleton, thereby promoting endosomal tubulation. PMID:27272733

  9. Effect of weightlessness on cytoskeleton architecture and proliferation of human breast cancer cell line MCF-7.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassy, J.; Portet, S.; Beil, M.; Millot, G.; Fauvel-Lafeve, F.; Gasset, G.; Schoevaert, D.

    Because cells are sensitive to mechanical forces, weightlessness might act on stress- dependent cell changes. We hypothesized that the integration of environmental factors might induce specific cytoskeletal architecture patterns, characterized by quantitative image analysis. Human breast cancer cells MCF-7, flown in space in a Photon capsule, were fixed after 1.5, 22 and 48 h in orbit. Cells subjected to weightlessness were compared to 1g in-flight and ground controls. Post-flight, fluorescent labelings were performed to visualize cell proliferation (Ki-67), three cytoskeleton components (microtubules, microfilaments and intermediate filaments) and chromatin structure. Confocal microscopy and image analysis were used to quantify cycling cells and mitosis, modifications of the cytokeratin network and chromatin structure. Two main phenomenons were observed in weightlessness: - The perinuclear cytokeratin network and chromatin structure were looser. Theseresults are in agreement with basic predictions of cellular tensegrity. - More cells were cycling and mitosis was prolonged. Finally, cell proliferation wasreduced as a consequence of a cell-cycle blockade. Microtubules were altered inmany cells.The prolongation of mitosis can be explained by an alteration of microtubule self-organization in weightlessness, involving reaction-diffusion processes. This couldbe considered as an example function of microtubules in gravisensing.

  10. Weightlessness acts on human breast cancer cell line MCF-7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassy, J.; Portet, S.; Beil, M.; Millot, G.; Fauvel-Lafève, F.; Gasset, G.; Schoevaert, D.

    2003-10-01

    Because cells are sensitive to mechanical forces, weightlessness might act on stress-dependent cell changes. Human breast cancer cells MCF-7, flown in space in a Photon capsule, were fixed after 1.5, 22 and 48 h in orbit. Cells subjected to weightlessness were compared to 1g in-flight and ground controls. Post-flight, fluorescent labeling was performed to visualize cell proliferation (Ki-67), three cytoskeleton components and chromatin structure. Confocal microscopy and image analysis were used to quantify cycling cells and mitosis, modifications of the cytokeratin network and chromatin structure. Several main phenomena were observed in weightlessness: The perinuclear cytokeratin network and chromatin structure were looser. More cells were cycling and mitosis was prolonged. Finally, cell proliferation was reduced as a consequence of a cell-cycle blockade. Microtubules were altered in many cells. The results reported in the first point are in agreement with basic predictions of cellular tensegrity. The prolongation of mitosis can be explained by an alteration of microtubules. We discuss here the different mechanisms involved in weightlessness alteration of microtubules: i) alteration of their self-organization by reaction-diffusion processes, and a mathematical model is proposed, ii) activation or desactivation of microtubules stabilizing proteins, acting on both microtubule and microfilament networks in cell cortex.

  11. Effects of glucocorticoids on the interaction of lymphoblastoid cells with human endothelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Maca, R D; Fry, G L; Hakes, A D

    1978-08-01

    The adhesive characteristics of cultured acute lymphocytic leukemia cells (CCRF-CEM), lymphoma cells (Raji), and freshly isolated acute lymphocytic leukemia cells to human cultured endothelial cells were studied. An assay system was used whereby these neoplastic cells were allowed to interact with endothelial cells while being continuously agitated on a rocking platform. All cell lines adhered significantly to the endothelium monolayers. This process appeared not to be dependent upon intact microtubular or microfilament function. Likewise, removing surface sialic acid from either cell type did not alter this process. In contrast incubating the endothelial cells for 24 or 48 hr with dexamethasone decreased adhesiveness of either CCRF-CEM or Raji cells to the endothelial cells by approximately 40%. Incubating these cells with hydrocortisone instead of dexamethasone for 48 hr was equally as effective in altering the endothelial cell adhesiveness. The decreased adhesiveness could be blocked by cycloheximide, indicating that this altered adhesiveness of the endothelial cells involves protein synthesis, presumably of a surface protein. We suggest that this assay system may provide a means to evaluate other agents that can alter the surface characteristics of endothelial cells, which may have important implications in various disease states such as inflammation, thrombogenesis, and metastatic disease. PMID:276420

  12. Singapore grouper iridovirus-encoded semaphorin homologue (SGIV-sema) contributes to viral replication, cytoskeleton reorganization and inhibition of cellular immune responses.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yang; Cui, Huachun; Guo, Chuanyu; Wei, Jingguang; Huang, Youhua; Li, Lili; Qin, Qiwei

    2014-05-01

    Semaphorins are a large, phylogenetically conserved family of proteins that are involved in a wide range of biological processes including axonal steering, organogenesis, neoplastic transformation, as well as immune responses. In this study, a novel semaphorin homologue gene belonging to the Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV), ORF155R (termed SGIV-sema), was cloned and characterized. The coding region of SGIV-sema is 1728 bp in length, encoding a predicted protein with 575 aa. SGIV-sema contains a ~370 aa N-terminal Sema domain, a conserved plexin-semaphorin-integrin (PSI) domain, and an immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domain near the C terminus. SGIV-sema is an early gene product during viral infection and predominantly distributed in the cytoplasm with a speckled and clubbed pattern of appearance. Functionally, SGIV-sema could promote viral replication during SGIV infection in vitro, with no effect on the proliferation of host cells. Intriguingly, ectopically expressed SGIV-sema could alter the cytoskeletal structure of fish cells, characterized by a circumferential ring of microtubules near the nucleus and a disrupted microfilament organization. Furthermore, SGIV-sema was able to attenuate the cellular immune response, as demonstrated by decreased expression of inflammation/immune-related genes such as IL-8, IL-15, TNF-α and mediator of IRF3 activation (MITA), in SGIV-sema-expressing cells before and after SGIV infection. Ultimately, our study identified a novel, functional SGIV gene that could regulate cytoskeletal structure, immune responses and facilitate viral replication.

  13. Rapid flow-induced responses in endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stamatas, G. N.; McIntire, L. V.

    2001-01-01

    Endothelial cells alter their morphology, growth rate, and metabolism in response to fluid shear stress. To study rapid flow-induced responses in the 3D endothelial cell morphology and calcium distribution, coupled fluorescence microscopy with optical sectioning, digital imaging, and numerical deconvolution techniques have been utilized. Results demonstrate that within the first minutes of flow application nuclear calcium is increasing. In the same time frame whole cell height and nuclear height are reduced by about 1 microm. Whole cell height changes may facilitate reduction of shear stress gradients on the luminal surface, whereas nuclear structural changes may be important for modulating endothelial growth rate and metabolism. To study the role of the cytoskeleton in these responses, endothelial cells have been treated with specific disrupters (acrylamide, cytochalasin D, and colchicine) of each of the cytoskeleton elements (intermediate filaments, microfilaments, and microtubules, respectively). None of these compounds had any effect on the shear-induced calcium response. Cytochalasin D and acrylamide did not affect the shear-induced nuclear morphology changes. Colchicine, however, completely abrogated the response, indicating that microtubules may be implicated in force transmission from the plasma membrane to the nucleus. A pedagogical model based on tensegrity theory principles is presented that is consistent with the results on the 3D endothelial morphology.

  14. N-WASP Is Required for Stabilization of Podocyte Foot Processes

    PubMed Central

    Schell, Christoph; Baumhakl, Lisa; Salou, Sarah; Conzelmann, Ann-Christin; Meyer, Charlotte; Helmstädter, Martin; Wrede, Christoph; Grahammer, Florian; Eimer, Stefan; Kerjaschki, Dontscho; Walz, Gerd; Snapper, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Alteration of cortical actin structures is the common final pathway leading to podocyte foot process effacement and proteinuria. The molecular mechanisms that safeguard podocyte foot process architecture and maintain the three-dimensional actin network remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate that neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP), which promotes actin nucleation, is required to stabilize podocyte foot processes. Mice lacking N-WASP specifically in podocytes were born with normal kidney function but developed significant proteinuria 3 weeks after birth, suggesting an important role for N-WASP in maintaining foot processes. In addition, inducing deletion of N-WASP in adult mice resulted in severe proteinuria and kidney failure. Electron microscopy showed an accumulation of electron-dense patches of actin and strikingly altered morphology of podocyte foot processes. Although basic actin-based processes such as cell migration were not affected, primary cultures of N-WASP–deficient podocytes revealed significant impairment of dynamic actin reorganization events, including the formation of circular dorsal ruffles. Taken together, our findings suggest that N-WASP–mediated actin nucleation of branched microfilament networks is specifically required for the maintenance of foot processes, presumably sustaining the mechanical resistance of the filtration barrier. PMID:23471198

  15. Microvillar ion channels: cytoskeletal modulation of ion fluxes.

    PubMed

    Lange, K

    2000-10-21

    The recently presented theory of microvillar Ca(2+)signaling [Lange, K. (1999) J. Cell. Physiol.180, 19-35], combined with Manning's theory of "condensed counterions" in linear polyelectrolytes [Manning, G. S. (1969). J. Chem. Phys.51, 924-931] and the finding of cable-like ion conductance in actin filaments [Lin, E. C. & Cantiello, H. F. (1993). Biophys. J.65, 1371-1378], allows a systematic interpretation of the role of the actin cytoskeleton in ion channel regulation. Ion conduction through actin filament bundles of microvilli exhibits unique nonlinear transmission properties some of which closely resemble that of electronic semiconductors: (1) bundles of microfilaments display significant resistance to cation conduction and (2) this resistance is decreased by supply of additional energy either as thermal, mechanical or electromagnetic field energy. Other transmission properties, however, are unique for ionic conduction in polyelectrolytes. (1) Current pulses injected into the filaments were transformed into oscillating currents or even into several discrete charge pulses closely resembling that of single-channel recordings. Discontinuous transmission is due to the existence of counterion clouds along the fixed anionic charge centers of the polymer, each acting as an "ionic capacitor". (2) The conductivity of linear polyelectrolytes strongly decreases with the charge number of the counterions; thus, Ca(2+)and Mg(2+)are effective modulator of charge transfer through linear polyelectrolytes. Field-dependent formation of divalent cation plugs on either side of the microvillar conduction line may generate the characteristic gating behavior of cation channels. (3) Mechanical movement of actin filament bundles, e.g. bending of hair cell microvilli, generates charge translocations along the filament structure (mechano-electrical coupling). (4) Energy of external fields, by inducing molecular dipoles within the polyelectrolyte matrix, can be transformed into mechanical

  16. Inhibition of respiratory burst activity in alveolar macrophages by bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids: characterization of drug-cell interaction.

    PubMed

    Ma, J Y; Barger, M W; Ma, J K; Castranova, V

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of various bisbenzylisoquinoline (BBIQ) alkaloids on respiratory burst activity of alveolar macrophages and to characterize the interaction of these drugs with alveolar phagocytes. BBIQ alkaloids were chosen for study because they exhibit a wide range of antifibrotic potencies in a rat model, with tetrandrine being very effective and tubocurarine being ineffective. These drugs inhibited zymosan-stimulated oxygen consumption with a potency sequence of tetrandrine (TT) approximately fangchinoline (FA) > berbamine (BE) approximately cepharanthine (CE) approximately cycleanine (CY) > tubocurarine (TU). This inhibition of respiratory burst activity could not be attributed to a drug-induced decline in the ATP content of these pneumocytes. Drug binding to alveolar macrophages was directly dependent on temperature and drug concentration. The sequence for binding capacity was FA > TT approximately BE approximately CY > CE > TU. Therefore, there was no simple relationship between binding capacity and inhibitory potency. Binding capacity was not related to lipophilicity of these alkaloids. In addition, tetrandrine failed to bind to metabolically dead cells or sonicated macrophage preparations. These data suggest that the interaction of BBIQ alkaloids with phagocytes is not simply nonspecific binding to membrane lipids. Alteration of the cytoskeletal system with vinblastine, taxol, or cytochalasin B decreased tetrandrine binding by approximately 33% when added separately and by 93% when added jointly. Pre-exposure of alveolar macrophages to stimulants increased the ability of BBIQ alkaloids to inhibit both oxygen consumption and superoxide release. These data suggest that the mechanism by which BBIQ alkaloids inhibit activation of phagocytes involves microtubules and bules and microfilaments. Pre-exposure of macrophages to stimulants would change the conformation of cytoskeletal components and may make these structures

  17. Integrin receptor involvement in actin cable formation in an in vitro model of events associated with wound contraction.

    PubMed

    Stephens, P; Genever, P G; Wood, E J; Raxworthy, M J

    1997-01-01

    Actin cables have been reported to act in vivo as contractile 'purse strings' capable of closing embryonic wounds through generation of circumferential tension. Furthermore, their involvement in wounds within in vitro model systems suggests that actin cable contraction may be an important mechanism involved in the process of wound closure. The aim of this study therefore, was to investigate the appearance of actin cables in a contracting fibroblast populated collagen lattice, an in vitro model of events associated with wound contraction. Utilising this in vitro model, the time-course of actin cable production was investigated and the involvement of integrin receptors analysed using immunofluorescent labelling techniques. Over a period of hours distinct cellular cable-like structures developed at the edges of collagen lattices coinciding with the onset of contraction. Cellular organisation within the cable was evident as was polymerisation of actin microfilaments into elongated stress fibres forming a continuous cell-cell 'actin cable' around the circumference of the lattice. Immunolocalisation demonstrated that integrin receptor subunits beta 1 and alpha 2 but not alpha 5 were involved in apparent intimate cell-cell contact between juxtaposed fibroblasts within this actin cable. This study demonstrates the involvement of integrin receptors in actin cable formation within collagen lattice systems undergoing reorganisation. Such integrin involvement may enable participating cells to respond to the tensional status of their surrounding environment and via cell-cell communication, to permit a co-ordinated contraction of the cable. It is concluded that integrin receptor involvement in active actin cable contraction may be involved in the process of wound contraction.

  18. Flavone-resistant Leishmania donovani overexpresses LdMRP2 transporter in the parasite and activates host MRP2 on macrophages to circumvent the flavone-mediated cell death.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Sayan; Mukhopadhyay, Rupkatha; Saha, Sourav; Mishra, Amartya; Sengupta, Souvik; Roy, Syamal; Majumder, Hemanta K

    2014-06-01

    In parasites, ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters represent an important family of proteins related to drug resistance and other biological activities. Resistance of leishmanial parasites to therapeutic drugs continues to escalate in developing countries, and in many instances, it is due to overexpressed ABC efflux pumps. Progressively adapted baicalein (BLN)-resistant parasites (pB(25)R) show overexpression of a novel ABC transporter, which was classified as ABCC2 or Leishmania donovani multidrug resistance protein 2 (LdMRP2). The protein is primarily localized in the flagellar pocket region and in internal vesicles. Overexpressed LdABCC2 confers substantial BLN resistance to the parasites by rapid drug efflux. The BLN-resistant promastigotes when transformed into amastigotes in macrophage cells cannot be cured by treatment of macrophages with BLN. Amastigote resistance is concomitant with the overexpression of macrophage MRP2 transporter. Reporter analysis and site-directed mutagenesis assays demonstrated that antioxidant response element 1 is activated upon infection. The expression of this phase II detoxifying gene is regulated by NFE2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-mediated antioxidant response element activation. In view of the fact that the signaling pathway of phosphoinositol 3-kinase controls microfilament rearrangement and translocation of actin-associated proteins, the current study correlates with the intricate pathway of phosphoinositol 3-kinase-mediated nuclear translocation of Nrf2, which activates MRP2 expression in macrophages upon infection by the parasites. In contrast, phalloidin, an agent that prevents depolymerization of actin filaments, inhibits Nrf2 translocation and Mrp2 gene activation by pB(25)R infection. Taken together, these results provide insight into the mechanisms by which resistant clinical isolates of L. donovani induce intracellular events relevant to drug resistance.

  19. Ultrastructural and tissue-culture studies on the role of fibronectin, collagen and glycosaminoglycans in the migration of neural crest cells in the fowl embryo.

    PubMed

    Newgreen, D F; Gibbins, I L; Sauter, J; Wallenfels, B; Wütz, R

    1982-01-01

    The initial migration of neural crest (NC) cells into cell-free space was studied by transmission electron microscopy at trunk levels of fowl embryos, some of which were fixed in the presence of ruthenium red. Migrating NC cells occurred in zones which contained fewer ruthenium-red stained 15-40nm diameter granules than other regions. The ruthenium-red stained granules were linked by similarly stained thin (greater than 3nm diameter) microfibrils. The granules resemble proteoglycan and the microfibrils may be hyaluronate. NC cells contacted thicker (greater than 10 nm diameter) fibrils and interstitial bodies, which did not require ruthenium red for visualization. Cytoplasmic microfilaments were sometimes aligned at the point of contact with the extracellular fibrils, which may be fibronectin and collagen. Phase-contrast time-lapse videotaping and scanning electron microscopy showed that NC cells of the fowl embryo in vitro migrated earlier and more extensively on glass coated with fibronectin-rich fibrous material and adsorbed fibronectin molecules than on glass coated with collagen type I (fibres and adsorbed molecules). NC cells became completely enmeshed in fibronectin-rich fibres, but generally remained on the surface of collagen-fibre gels. When given a choice, NC cells strongly preferred fibronectin coatings to plain glass, and plain glass to dried collagen gels. NC cells showed a slight preference for plain glass over glass to which collagen was adsorbed. Addition to the culture medium of hyaluronate (initial conc. 20 mg/ml), chondroitin (5 mg/ml) and fully sulphated chondroitin sulphate and dermatan sulphate (up to 10 mg/ml) did not drastically alter NC cell migration on fibronectin-rich fibrous substrates. PMID:7034954

  20. Type V Collagen in Health, Disease, and Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mak, Ki M; Png, Chien Yi M; Lee, Danielle J

    2016-05-01

    Type V collagen (COLV) is a regulatory fibril-forming collagen. It has at least three different molecular isoforms-α1(V)2 α2(V), α1(V)3, and α1(V)α2(V)α3(V)-formed by combinations of three different polypeptide α chains-α1(V), α2(V), and α3(V). COL V is a relatively minor collagen of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Morphologically, COLV occurs as heterotypic fibrils with type I collagen (COLI), microfilaments, or 12-nm-thick fibrils. COLV is synthesized in various mesenchymal cells and its gene expression is modulated by TGF-β and growth factors. While resistant to digestion by interstitial collagenases, native and denatured COLV are degraded by metalloproteinases and gelatinases, thereby promoting ECM remodeling. COLV interacts with matrix collagens and structural proteins, conferring structural integrity to tissue scaffolds. It binds matrix macromolecules, modulating cellular behavior, and functions. COLV co-assembles with COLI into heterotypic fibrils in the cornea and skin dermis, acting as a dominant regulator of collagen fibrillogenesis. COLV deficiency is associated with loss of corneal transparency and classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, while COLV overexpression is found in cancer, granulation tissue, inflammation, atherosclerosis, and fibrosis of lungs, skin, kidneys, adipose tissue, and liver. COLV isoform containing the α3(V) chain is involved in mediating pancreatic islet cell functions. In the liver, COLV is a minor but regular component of the ECM. Increases in COLV are associated with both early and advanced hepatic fibrosis. The neoepitopes of COLV have been shown to be a useful noninvasive serum biomarker for assessing fibrotic progression and resolution in experimental hepatic fibrosis. COLV is multifunctional in health, disease, and fibrosis.

  1. RNA-dependent association with myosin IIA promotes F-actin-guided trafficking of the ELAV-like protein HuR to polysomes

    PubMed Central

    Doller, Anke; Schulz, Sebastian; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Eberhardt, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    The role of the mRNA-binding protein human antigen R (HuR) in stabilization and translation of AU-rich elements (ARE) containing mRNAs is well established. However, the trafficking of HuR and bound mRNA cargo, which comprises a fundamental requirement for the aforementioned HuR functions is only poorly understood. By administering different cytoskeletal inhibitors, we found that the protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ)-triggered accumulation of cytoplasmic HuR by Angiotensin II (AngII) is an actin-myosin driven process functionally relevant for stabilization of ARE-bearing mRNAs. Furthermore, we show that the AngII-induced recruitment of HuR and its bound mRNA from ribonucleoprotein particles to free and cytoskeleton bound polysomes strongly depended on an intact actomyosin cytoskeleton. In addition, HuR allocation to free and cytoskeletal bound polysomes is highly sensitive toward RNase and PPtase and structurally depends on serine 318 (S318) located within the C-terminal RNA recognition motif (RRM3). Conversely, the trafficking of the phosphomimetic HuRS318D, mimicking HuR phosphorylation at S318 by the PKCδ remained PPtase resistant. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments with truncated HuR proteins revealed that the stimulus-induced association of HuR with myosin IIA is strictly RNA dependent and mediated via the RRM3. Our data implicate a microfilament dependent transport of HuR, which is relevant for stimulus-induced targeting of ARE-bearing mRNAs from translational inactive ribonucleoprotein particles to polysomes. PMID:23921630

  2. Relationship between expression of serendipity alpha and cellularisation of the Drosophila embryo as revealed by interspecific transformation.

    PubMed

    Ibnsouda, S; Schweisguth, F; de Billy, G; Vincent, A

    1993-10-01

    A dramatic reorganization of the cytoskeleton underlies the cellularisation of the syncytial Drosophila embryo. Formation of a regular network of acto-myosin filaments, providing a structural framework, and possibly a contractile force as well, appears essential for the synchronous invagination of the plasma membrane between adjacent nuclei. The serendipity alpha (sry alpha) gene is required for this complete reorganization of the microfilaments at the onset of membrane invagination. We compare here the structure and expression of sry alpha between D. pseudoobscura, D. subobscura and D. melanogaster. Interspersion of evolutionarily highly conserved and divergent regions is observed in the protein. One such highly conserved region shows sequence similarities to a motif found in proteins of the ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) family. Four 7-13 bp motifs are conserved in the 5' promoter region; two of these are also found, and at the same position relative to the TATA box, in nullo, another zygotic gene recently shown to be involved in cellularisation. The compared patterns of expression of D. melanogaster sry alpha and nullo, and D. pseudoobscura sry alpha reveal a complex regulation of the spatiotemporal accumulation of their transcripts. The D. pseudoobscura sry alpha gene is able to rescue the cellularisation defects associated with a complete loss of sry alpha function in D. melanogaster embryos, even though species-specific aspects of its expression are maintained. Despite their functional homologies, the D. melanogaster and D. pseudoobscura sry alpha RNAs have different subcellular localisations, suggesting that this specific localization has no conserved role in targeting the sry alpha protein to the apical membranes. PMID:8287797

  3. Outgrowth of neurites is a dual process.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, Rosalba; Racchetti, Gabriella; Meldolesi, Jacopo

    2010-11-01

    In neurons and neurosecretory (nerve) cells, neurite outgrowth requires the enlargement of the plasma membrane sustained by the exocytosis of specific vesicles. The well known, slow canonical form of outgrowth induced in pheochromocytoma PC12 cells by NGF, as well as the outgrowth taking place in neurons, involve vesicles positive for the vSNARE Ti-VAMP. Working in defective PC12 clones expressing high levels of the transcriptional repressor REST, we have identified now a new, rapid form of outgrowth, triggered by activation of a small GTPase, Rac1. This form is sustained by the exocytosis of another type of vesicles, taking place locally at the tip of neurite growth cones, the enlargeosomes (vSNARE: VAMP4). This new form, which is positively controlled by REST, requires the dynamics of microtubules, but not of microfilaments. Its signaling remains undefined because established second messengers, (Ca(2+), DAG, cAMP) seem not involved. Using a high REST/enlargeosome-rich PC12 clone transfected with TrkA we have found that the NGF-induced outgrowth is not always slow, but can be fast in cells expressing high levels of the receptor involved, TrkA; that PC12 can express together the two distinct forms of outgrowth, canonical and new, activated independently from each other. Their comparative characterization in terms of changes in the cytoskeleton has now been initiated. The two forms are present also in neurons where the new one seems to predominate in the initial phases of development, the canonical one later on. Our results identify a new aspect of the REST impact in nerve cell specificity/function. The existence of two distinct forms of neurite outgrowth may cope better than a single form with the variable needs of nerve cells in the subsequent stages of their development. PMID:21331244

  4. Microarray analysis of natural socially regulated plasticity in circadian rhythms of honey bees.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L; Southey, Bruce R; Shemesh, Yair; Rubin, Elad B; Cohen, Mira; Robinson, Gene E; Bloch, Guy

    2012-02-01

    Honey bee workers care for ("nurse") the brood around the clock without circadian rhythmicity, but then they forage outside with strong circadian rhythms and a consolidated nightly rest. This chronobiological plasticity is associated with variation in the expression of the canonical "clock genes" that regulate the circadian clock: nurse bees show no brain rhythms of expression, while foragers do. These results suggest that the circadian system is organized differently in nurses and foragers. Nurses switch to activity with circadian rhythms shortly after being removed from the hive, suggesting that at least some clock cells in their brain continue to measure time while in the hive. We performed a microarray genome-wide survey to determine general patterns of brain gene expression in nurses and foragers sampled around the clock. We found 160 and 541 transcripts that exhibited significant sinusoidal oscillations in nurses and foragers, respectively, with peaks of expression distributed throughout the day in both task groups. Consistent with earlier studies, transcripts of genes involved in circadian rhythms, including Clockwork Orange that has not been studied before in bees, oscillated in foragers but not in nurses. The oscillating transcripts also were enriched for genes involved in the visual system, "development" and "response to stimuli" (foragers), "muscle contraction" and "microfilament motor gene expression" (nurses), and "generation of precursor metabolites" and "energy" (both). Transcripts of genes encoding P450 enzymes oscillated in both nurses and foragers but with a different phase. This study identified new putative clock-controlled genes in the honey bee and suggests that some brain functions show circadian rhythmicity even in nurse bees that are active around the clock.

  5. Plant acoustics: in the search of a sound mechanism for sound signaling in plants.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Ratnesh Chandra; Ghosh, Ritesh; Bae, Hanhong

    2016-08-01

    Being sessile, plants continuously deal with their dynamic and complex surroundings, identifying important cues and reacting with appropriate responses. Consequently, the sensitivity of plants has evolved to perceive a myriad of external stimuli, which ultimately ensures their successful survival. Research over past centuries has established that plants respond to environmental factors such as light, temperature, moisture, and mechanical perturbations (e.g. wind, rain, touch, etc.) by suitably modulating their growth and development. However, sound vibrations (SVs) as a stimulus have only started receiving attention relatively recently. SVs have been shown to increase the yields of several crops and strengthen plant immunity against pathogens. These vibrations can also prime the plants so as to make them more tolerant to impending drought. Plants can recognize the chewing sounds of insect larvae and the buzz of a pollinating bee, and respond accordingly. It is thus plausible that SVs may serve as a long-range stimulus that evokes ecologically relevant signaling mechanisms in plants. Studies have suggested that SVs increase the transcription of certain genes, soluble protein content, and support enhanced growth and development in plants. At the cellular level, SVs can change the secondary structure of plasma membrane proteins, affect microfilament rearrangements, produce Ca(2+) signatures, cause increases in protein kinases, protective enzymes, peroxidases, antioxidant enzymes, amylase, H(+)-ATPase / K(+) channel activities, and enhance levels of polyamines, soluble sugars and auxin. In this paper, we propose a signaling model to account for the molecular episodes that SVs induce within the cell, and in so doing we uncover a number of interesting questions that need to be addressed by future research in plant acoustics.

  6. A role for complexes of survival of motor neurons (SMN) protein with gemins and profilin in neurite-like cytoplasmic extensions of cultured nerve cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Aarti; Lambrechts, Anja; Le thi Hao; Le, Thanh T.; Sewry, Caroline A.; Ampe, Christophe; Burghes, Arthur H.M.; Morris, Glenn E. . E-mail: glenn.morris@rjah.nhs.uk

    2005-09-10

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is caused by reduced levels of SMN (survival of motor neurons protein) and consequent loss of motor neurons. SMN is involved in snRNP transport and nuclear RNA splicing, but axonal transport of SMN has also been shown to occur in motor neurons. SMN also binds to the small actin-binding protein, profilin. We now show that SMN and profilin II co-localise in the cytoplasm of differentiating rat PC12 cells and in neurite-like extensions, especially at their growth cones. Many components of known SMN complexes were also found in these extensions, including gemin2 (SIP-1), gemin6, gemin7 and unrip (unr-interacting protein). Coilin p80 and Sm core protein immunoreactivity, however, were seen only in the nucleus. SMN is known to associate with {beta}-actin mRNA and specific hnRNPs in axons and in neurite extensions of cultured nerve cells, and SMN also stimulates neurite outgrowth in cultures. Our results are therefore consistent with SMN complexes, rather than SMN alone, being involved in the transport of actin mRNPs along the axon as in the transport of snRNPs into the nucleus by similar SMN complexes. Antisense knockdown of profilin I and II isoforms inhibited neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells and caused accumulation of SMN and its associated proteins in cytoplasmic aggregates. BIAcore studies demonstrated a high affinity interaction of SMN with profilin IIa, the isoform present in developing neurons. Pathogenic missense mutations in SMN, or deletion of exons 5 and 7, prevented this interaction. The interaction is functional in that SMN can modulate actin polymerisation in vitro by reducing the inhibitory effect of profilin IIa. This suggests that reduced SMN in SMA might cause axonal pathfinding defects by disturbing the normal regulation of microfilament growth by profilins.

  7. Dynamics of Hippocampal Protein Expression During Long-term Spatial Memory Formation.

    PubMed

    Borovok, Natalia; Nesher, Elimelech; Levin, Yishai; Reichenstein, Michal; Pinhasov, Albert; Michaelevski, Izhak

    2016-02-01

    Spatial memory depends on the hippocampus, which is particularly vulnerable to aging. This vulnerability has implications for the impairment of navigation capacities in older people, who may show a marked drop in performance of spatial tasks with advancing age. Contemporary understanding of long-term memory formation relies on molecular mechanisms underlying long-term synaptic plasticity. With memory acquisition, activity-dependent changes occurring in synapses initiate multiple signal transduction pathways enhancing protein turnover. This enhancement facilitates de novo synthesis of plasticity related proteins, crucial factors for establishing persistent long-term synaptic plasticity and forming memory engrams. Extensive studies have been performed to elucidate molecular mechanisms of memory traces formation; however, the identity of plasticity related proteins is still evasive. In this study, we investigated protein turnover in mouse hippocampus during long-term spatial memory formation using the reference memory version of radial arm maze (RAM) paradigm. We identified 1592 proteins, which exhibited a complex picture of expression changes during spatial memory formation. Variable linear decomposition reduced significantly data dimensionality and enriched three principal factors responsible for variance of memory-related protein levels at (1) the initial phase of memory acquisition (165 proteins), (2) during the steep learning improvement (148 proteins), and (3) the final phase of the learning curve (123 proteins). Gene ontology and signaling pathways analysis revealed a clear correlation between memory improvement and learning phase-curbed expression profiles of proteins belonging to specific functional categories. We found differential enrichment of (1) neurotrophic factors signaling pathways, proteins regulating synaptic transmission, and actin microfilament during the first day of the learning curve; (2) transcription and translation machinery, protein

  8. Ultrastructural and tissue-culture studies on the role of fibronectin, collagen and glycosaminoglycans in the migration of neural crest cells in the fowl embryo.

    PubMed

    Newgreen, D F; Gibbins, I L; Sauter, J; Wallenfels, B; Wütz, R

    1982-01-01

    The initial migration of neural crest (NC) cells into cell-free space was studied by transmission electron microscopy at trunk levels of fowl embryos, some of which were fixed in the presence of ruthenium red. Migrating NC cells occurred in zones which contained fewer ruthenium-red stained 15-40nm diameter granules than other regions. The ruthenium-red stained granules were linked by similarly stained thin (greater than 3nm diameter) microfibrils. The granules resemble proteoglycan and the microfibrils may be hyaluronate. NC cells contacted thicker (greater than 10 nm diameter) fibrils and interstitial bodies, which did not require ruthenium red for visualization. Cytoplasmic microfilaments were sometimes aligned at the point of contact with the extracellular fibrils, which may be fibronectin and collagen. Phase-contrast time-lapse videotaping and scanning electron microscopy showed that NC cells of the fowl embryo in vitro migrated earlier and more extensively on glass coated with fibronectin-rich fibrous material and adsorbed fibronectin molecules than on glass coated with collagen type I (fibres and adsorbed molecules). NC cells became completely enmeshed in fibronectin-rich fibres, but generally remained on the surface of collagen-fibre gels. When given a choice, NC cells strongly preferred fibronectin coatings to plain glass, and plain glass to dried collagen gels. NC cells showed a slight preference for plain glass over glass to which collagen was adsorbed. Addition to the culture medium of hyaluronate (initial conc. 20 mg/ml), chondroitin (5 mg/ml) and fully sulphated chondroitin sulphate and dermatan sulphate (up to 10 mg/ml) did not drastically alter NC cell migration on fibronectin-rich fibrous substrates.

  9. Mechanotransduction in colonic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Young, S H; Ennes, H S; Mayer, E A

    1997-11-15

    We evaluated mechanisms which mediate alterations in intracellular biochemical events in response to transient mechanical stimulation of colonic smooth muscle cells. Cultured myocytes from the circular muscle layer of the rabbit distal colon responded to brief focal mechanical deformation of the plasma membrane with a transient increase in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) with peak of 422.7 +/- 43.8 nm above an average resting [Ca2+]i of 104.8 +/- 10.9 nM (n = 57) followed by both rapid and prolonged recovery phases. The peak [Ca2+]i increase was reduced by 50% in the absence of extracellular Ca2+, while the prolonged [Ca2+]i recovery was either abolished or reduced to less than or = 15% of control values. In contrast, no significant effect of gadolinium chloride (100 microM) or lanthanum chloride (25 microM) on either peak transient or prolonged [Ca2+]i recovery was observed. Pretreatment of cells with thapsigargin (1 microM) resulted in a 25% reduction of the mechanically induced peak [Ca2+]i response, while the phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122 had no effect on the [Ca2+]i transient peak. [Ca2+]i transients were abolished when cells previously treated with thapsigargin were mechanically stimulated in Ca2+-free solution, or when Ca2+ stores were depleted by thapsigargin in Ca2+-free solution. Pretreatment with the microfilament disrupting drug cytochalasin D (10 microM) or microinjection of myocytes with an intracellular saline resulted in complete inhibition of the transient. The effect of cytochalasin D was reversible and did not prevent the [Ca2+]i increases in response to thapsigargin. These results suggest a communication, which may be mediated by direct mechanical link via actin filaments, between the plasma membrane and an internal Ca2+ store.

  10. Biotechnological aspects of cytoskeletal regulation in plants.

    PubMed

    Komis, George; Luptovciak, Ivan; Doskocilova, Anna; Samaj, Jozef

    2015-11-01

    The cytoskeleton is a protein-based intracellular superstructure that evolved early after the appearance of bacterial prokaryotes. Eventually cytoskeletal proteins and their macromolecular assemblies were established in eukaryotes and assumed critical roles in cell movements, intracellular organization, cell division and cell differentiation. In biomedicine the small-molecules targeting cytoskeletal elements are in the frontline of anticancer research with plant-derived cytoskeletal drugs such as Vinca alkaloids and toxoids, being routinely used in the clinical practice. Moreover, plants are also major material, food and energy resources for human activities ranging from agriculture, textile industry, carpentry, energy production and new material development to name some few. Most of these inheritable traits are associated with cell wall synthesis and chemical modification during primary and secondary plant growth and inevitably are associated with the dynamics, organization and interactions of the plant cytoskeleton. Taking into account the vast intracellular spread of microtubules and actin microfilaments the cytoskeleton collectively assumed central roles in plant growth and development, in determining the physical stance of plants against the forces of nature and becoming a battleground between pathogenic invaders and the defense mechanisms of plant cells. This review aims to address the role of the plant cytoskeleton in manageable features of plants including cellulose biosynthesis with implications in wood and fiber properties, in biofuel production and the contribution of plant cytoskeletal elements in plant defense responses against pathogens or detrimental environmental conditions. Ultimately the present work surveys the potential of cytoskeletal proteins as platforms of plant genetic engineering, nominating certain cytoskeletal proteins as vectors of favorable traits in crops and other economically important plants.

  11. Tip-localized actin polymerization and remodeling, reflected by the localization of ADF, profilin and villin, are fundamental for gravity-sensing and polar growth in characean rhizoids.

    PubMed

    Braun, Markus; Hauslage, Jens; Czogalla, Aleksander; Limbach, Christoph

    2004-07-01

    Polar organization and gravity-oriented, polarized growth of characean rhizoids are dependent on the actin cytoskeleton. In this report, we demonstrate that the prominent center of the Spitzenkörper serves as the apical actin polymerization site in the extending tip. After cytochalasin D-induced disruption of the actin cytoskeleton, the regeneration of actin microfilaments (MFs) starts with the reappearance of a flat, brightly fluorescing actin array in the outermost tip. The actin array rounds up, produces actin MFs that radiate in all directions and is then relocated into its original central position in the center of the Spitzenkörper. The emerging actin MFs rearrange and cross-link to form the delicate, subapical meshwork, which then controls the statolith positioning, re-establishes the tip-high calcium gradient and mediates the reorganization of the Spitzenkörper with its central ER aggregate and the accumulation of secretory vesicles. Tip growth and gravitropic sensing, which includes control of statolith positioning and gravity-induced sedimentation, are not resumed until the original polar actin organization is completely restored. Immunolocalization of the actin-binding proteins, actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF) and profilin, which both accumulate in the center of the Spitzenkörper, indicates high actin turnover and gives additional support for the actin-polymerizing function of this central, apical area. Association of villin immunofluorescence with two populations of thick undulating actin cables with uniform polarity underlying rotational cytoplasmic streaming in the basal region suggests that villin is the major actin-bundling protein in rhizoids. Our results provide evidence that the precise coordination of apical actin polymerization and dynamic remodeling of actin MFs by actin-binding proteins play a fundamental role in cell polarization, gravity sensing and gravity-oriented polarized growth of characean rhizoids.

  12. Endocytosis and intracellular processing of platelet microparticles by brain endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Faille, Dorothée; El-Assaad, Fatima; Mitchell, Andrew J; Alessi, Marie-Christine; Chimini, Giovanna; Fusai, Thierry; Grau, Georges E; Combes, Valéry

    2012-08-01

    Platelet-derived microparticles (PMP) bind and modify the phenotype of many cell types including endothelial cells. Recently, we showed that PMP were internalized by human brain endothelial cells (HBEC). Here we intend to better characterize the internalization mechanisms of PMP and their intracellular fate. Confocal microscopy analysis of PKH67-labelled PMP distribution in HBEC showed PMP in early endosome antigen 1 positive endosomes and in LysoTracker-labelled lysosomes, confirming a role for endocytosis in PMP internalization. No fusion of calcein-loaded PMP with HBEC membranes was observed. Quantification of PMP endocytosis using flow cytometry revealed that it was partially inhibited by trypsin digestion of PMP surface proteins and by extracellular Ca(2+) chelation by EDTA, suggesting a partial role for receptor-mediated endocytosis in PMP uptake. This endocytosis was independent of endothelial receptors such as intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and was not increased by tumour necrosis factor stimulation of HBEC. Platelet-derived microparticle internalization was dramatically increased in the presence of decomplemented serum, suggesting a role for PMP opsonin-dependent phagocytosis. Platelet-derived microparticle uptake was greatly diminished by treatment of HBEC with cytochalasin D, an inhibitor of microfilament formation required for both phagocytosis and macropinocytosis, with methyl-β-cyclodextrin that depletes membrane cholesterol needed for macropinocytosis and with amiloride that inhibits the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger involved in macropinocytosis. In conclusion, PMP are taken up by active endocytosis in HBEC, involving mechanisms consistent with both phagocytosis and macropinocytosis. These findings identify new processes by which PMP could modify endothelial cell phenotype and functions.

  13. Motility-dependence of the heterogenous staining of culture cells by a monoclonal anti-tropomyosin antibody

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody (CG1) which recognizes tropomyosin isoforms 1 and 3 of chicken embryo fibroblasts was used to detect what is a motility- dependent change in the availability of the antigenic determinant in tropomyosin molecules along microfilaments. Immunofluorescence microscopy with this antibody revealed a heterogenous staining pattern among chicken embryo fibroblasts cells such that a population (17%) of cells showed only background staining. Stress fibers in about half the population of the cells stained weakly with this antibody, while the stress fibers in another population of cells (35%) showed very strong staining. After glycerination or cytochalasin B treatment, all of the cells became positive in reaction to CG1 antibody, suggesting that the antigenic determinant was present in every cell. On the other hand, all of the cells after brief nonionic detergent treatment became negative to CG1 antibody. The CG1 staining pattern was not significantly changed in cells at different stages after release from colcemid blockage, nor was a brief treatment of cells with buffer containing 2 M urea, mild trypsin, chymotrypsin, or V.8 protease effective in changing the reactivity. However, most of the cells with a morphology typical of movement, and all of the contracted, glycerinated cells were strongly positive to CG1 antibody. These results suggest that the unmasking of the CG1 determinant may be motility-dependent. Immunoblot analysis showed that forced modification on the cysteine residue of tropomyosin molecules, caused either by performic acid oxidation or by disulfide cross-linking with the chemical 5,5'-dithiobis (2-nitrobenzoate), results in drastic changes in the reactivity of the different isoforms to CG1 antibody. These results indicate that the cysteine residue is involved in the CG1 determinant. The motility-dependent unmasking of this determinant may suggest an important role for nonmuscle tropomyosin in regulating cell motility. PMID:2448313

  14. Internalization and cellular pools of never growth factor in pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells

    SciTech Connect

    Neet, K.E.; Kasaian, M.

    1987-05-01

    Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) binds to a cell surface receptor on responsive neuronal cells to initiate cell maintenance and/or differentiation regimes. The purpose of these studies was to define quantitatively the fate of NGF in PC12 cells with respect to various cellular compartments in a single series of biochemical experiments. Different binding methodologies were evaluated in suspension and on plates. 50 pM SVI-NGF was bound to rat PC12 cells in suspension for 30 min at 37, followed by various methods and combinations of methods to remove subsets of bound ligand. Distinction could be made between NGF bound to fast vs. slow cell surface receptors, NGF bound to slow receptors at the cell surface vs. cell interior, and detergent-soluble vs. cytoskeletally-attached NGF. These treatments defined the relative size of five pools, including the fast receptor (65%), two intracellular compartments (12% and 3%) susceptible to nonionic detergent, and a detergent-stable intracellular pool of ligand (16%). At 37 the cold chase stable and the acid stable pools were about the same size because of rapid internalization, but the slow receptor was measurable at 4. Inhibitors were used to define the route of NGF through the cell from the plasma membrane to degradation. Chloroquine caused accumulation of NGF only in pools that were not associated with the cytoskeleton, implicating this compartment in supplying ligand to the lysosome. Results with cytochalasin B and colchicine and suggested both microfilament and microtubule pathways in NGF degradation. A model for the movement of NGF through the cell was developed based on these observations.

  15. Internalization of Escherichia Coli O157:H7 by Bovine Rectal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Haiqing; Wang, Jing; Lim, Ji Youn; Davitt, Christine; Minnich, Scott A.; Hovde, Carolyn J.

    2011-01-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 (O157) causes human diarrheal disease and healthy cattle are its primary reservoir. O157 colonize the bovine epithelial mucosa at the recto-anal junction (RAJ). Previous studies show that O157 at this site are not eliminated by aggressive interventions including applications of O157-specific lytic bacteriophages and other bactericidal agents. We hypothesize that some O157 at the RAJ mucosa are protected from these killing agents by host cell internalization. To test this hypothesis, rectal biopsies from O157 culture positive and negative cattle were analyzed by fluorescent microscopy and subjected to gentamicin protection assays. GFP-labeled bacteria were found located deep within the tissue crypts and a small number of O157 were recovered from rectal biopsies after gentamicin treatment. Primary bovine rectal epithelial (PBRE) cell cultures were incubated with O157 and subjected to gentamicin protection assays. Strains ATCC 43895, 43894, Sakai, and WSU180 entered the PBRE cells with different levels of efficiency ranging from 0.18 to 19.38% of the inocula. Intracellular bacteria were confirmed to be within membrane-bounded vacuoles by electron microscopy. Cytochalasin D curtailed internalization of O157 indicating internalization was dependent on eukaryotic microfilament assembly. Strain ATCC 43895 exhibited the highest efficiency of internalization and survived for at least 24 h within PBRE cells. Deletion mutation of intimin or its receptor in ATCC 43895 did not reduce bacterial internalization. This strain produced more biofilm than the others tested. Retrospective analysis of cattle challenged with two O157 strains, showed ATCC 43895, the most efficient at host cell internalization, was most persistent. PMID:21687423

  16. Effects of cyclic AMP on growth and differentiation of rat retinoblastoma-like tumor cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nishida, T; Mukai, N; Solish, S P; Pomeroy, M

    1982-02-01

    We examined the effects of cyclic AMP (cAMP) on the growth and differentiation of RAO 188 cells, a cultured cell line derived from a retinoblastoma-like tumor induced in an inbred rat by intravitreous inoculation with human adenovirus serotype 12. After adding cAMP analogs (dibutyryl cAMP and 8-bromo cAMP) and phosphodiesterase inhibitors (theophylline, amino-phylline, and 1-methyl-3-isobutyl xanthine) to the RAO 188 cell culture medium, we measured changes in cell incorporation of the DNA and RNA precursors 14C-thymidine and 3H-uridine, and we observed the morphologic alterations of RAO 188 by phase-contrast and transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Incorporation of the labeled precursors decreased with increased concentrations of cAMP analogs and phosphodiesterase inhibitors. Incorporation of the labeled precursors was inhibited shortly after the addition of dibutyryl cAMP to the culture medium. The effect was maximal at 8 hr and was sustained for up to 48 hr. Reversibility of cAMP effects on incorporation gradually decreased for 10 days; at 10 days these effects were essentially irreversible. Neuritelike processes developed shortly after cAMP analog treatment and formed a network after 24 hr. Transmission electron microscopy disclosed changes in the cell membrane and cytoplasm of cells treated with 8-bromo cAMP and theophylline: perturbation of the cell membrane and the appearance of intercellular junctional devices and microfilaments. The activity of glutamate decarboxylase, which is involved in the biosynthesis of gamma-aminobutyric acid, was increased in treated cells. These results show that cAMP decreases DNA and RNA synthesis and cell proliferation and facilitates morphologic and biochemical differentiation of RAO 188 cells.

  17. In Vivo, Villin Is Required for Ca2+-Dependent F-Actin Disruption in Intestinal Brush Borders

    PubMed Central

    Ferrary, Evelyne; Cohen-Tannoudji, Michel; Pehau-Arnaudet, Gérard; Lapillonne, Alexandre; Athman, Rafika; Ruiz, Tereza; Boulouha, Lilia; El Marjou, Fatima; Doye, Anne; Fontaine, Jean-Jacques; Antony, Claude; Babinet, Charles; Louvard, Daniel; Jaisser, Frédéric; Robine, Sylvie

    1999-01-01

    Villin is an actin-binding protein localized in intestinal and kidney brush borders. In vitro, villin has been demonstrated to bundle and sever F-actin in a Ca2+-dependent manner. We generated knockout mice to study the role of villin in vivo. In villin-null mice, no noticeable changes were observed in the ultrastructure of the microvilli or in the localization and expression of the actin-binding and membrane proteins of the intestine. Interestingly, the response to elevated intracellular Ca2+ differed significantly between mutant and normal mice. In wild-type animals, isolated brush borders were disrupted by the addition of Ca2+, whereas Ca2+ had no effect in villin-null isolates. Moreover, increase in intracellular Ca2+ by serosal carbachol or mucosal Ca2+ ionophore A23187 application abolished the F-actin labeling only in the brush border of wild-type animals. This F-actin disruption was also observed in physiological fasting/refeeding experiments. Oral administration of dextran sulfate sodium, an agent that causes colonic epithelial injury, induced large mucosal lesions resulting in a higher death probability in mice lacking villin, 36 ± 9.6%, compared with wild-type mice, 70 ± 8.8%, at day 13. These results suggest that in vivo, villin is not necessary for the bundling of F-actin microfilaments, whereas it is necessary for the reorganization elicited by various signals. We postulate that this property might be involved in cellular plasticity related to cell injury. PMID:10459016

  18. F-actin dampens NLRP3 inflammasome activity via Flightless-I and LRRFIP2

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Danielle; Fickentscher, Céline; de Moerloose, Philippe; Brandt, Karim J.

    2016-01-01

    NLRP3 and ASC are able to form a large multimeric complex called inflammasome in response to a number danger signals. The NLRP3 inflammasome is required for the activation of caspase-1 and subsequent maturation of pro-IL-1β into active IL-1β. Although the mechanisms regulating the formation and activity of NLRP3 inflammasome are yet not fully elucidated, data suggest that the assembly of NLRP3 inflammasome requires microtubules to induce the proximity of ASC and NLRP3. In this study we show that microfilaments (F-actin) inhibit NLRP3 inflammasome activity and interact with NLRP3 and ASC. We demonstrate that the inhibition depends on the actin polymerization state but not on the active polymerization process. In ATP- or nigericin-activated macrophages, our data further indicate that Flightless-I (FliI) and leucine-rich repeat FliI-interaction protein 2 (LRRFIP2) are required for the co-localization of NLRP3, ASC and F-actin. We also established that the ability of Ca2+ to accentuate the activity of NLRP3 inflammasome is abrogated in FliI- and LRRFIP2-knockdown macrophages, suggesting that Ca2+ signaling requires the presence of FliI and LRRFIP2. Accordingly, we observed that Ca2+/FliI-dependent severing of F-actin suppresses F-actin/FliI/LRRFIP2-dependent NLRP3 inflammasome inhibition leading to increase IL-1β production. Altogether, our results unveil a new function of F-actin in the regulation of NLRP3 inflammasome activity strengthening the importance of cytoskeleton in the regulation of inflammation. PMID:27431477

  19. Cytoskeletal changes in podocytes associated with foot process effacement in Masugi nephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Shirato, I.; Sakai, T.; Kimura, K.; Tomino, Y.; Kriz, W.

    1996-01-01

    Foot process effacement represents the most characteristic change in podocyte phenotype under a great variety of experimental as well as human glomerulopathies. It consists in simplification up to a total disappearance of an interdigitating foot process pattern. Finally, podocytes affix to the glomerular basement membrane by outspread epithelial sheets. Structural and immunocytochemical techniques were applied to analyze the cytoskeletal changes associated with foot process effacement in Masugi nephritis. Three days after injection of the anti-glomerular-basement-membrane serum an interdigitating foot process pattern was almost fully lost; more than 90 percent of the outer glomerular capillary surface were covered by expanded sheets of podocyte epithelium that contain a highly organized cytoskeleton adhering to the basal cell membrane. Structurally, this cytoskeleton consists of an interwoven network of microfilaments with regularly distributed dense bodies, which obviously serve as cross-linkers within this network. Immunocytochemically, the expression of actin, alpha-actinin, and pp44 (a specific podocyte protein normally associated with the cytoskeleton of foot processes) were increased in this structure; alpha-actinin was especially prominent in the dense bodies. The results are consistent with the view that foot process effacement represents an adaptive change in cell shape including hypertrophy of the contractile apparatus, reinforcing the supportive role of podocytes. Several factors associated with increased distending forces to podocytes may underlie this phenotype change including loss of mesangial support, elevated glomerular pressures, and impairment of GBM substructure as well as of podocyte-GBM-contacts. Twenty-eight days after serum injection a remodeling of the foot process pattern was seen. It appears that this restitution depends on a preceding repair of mesangial support function to glomerular capillaries. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure

  20. Ultrastructure, ZIO-staining and chromaffinity of gerbil pinealocytes.

    PubMed

    Chau, Y P; Liao, K K; Kao, M H; Huang, B N; Kao, Y S; Lu, K S

    1994-11-01

    The ultrastructure and cytochemistry of the gerbil pineal gland were studied by the conventional electron microscopy, zinc iodide-osmium tetroxide (ZIO) staining and chromaffin reaction. Conventional electron microscopy revealed that the ultrastructure of gerbil pinealocytes are similar to other rodents, i.e., irregular cell contour with numerous cytoplasmic processes, round or oval nucleus and prominent nucleoli, elongated mitochondria with flattened and tubular cristae and dense matrix, well-developed Golgi apparatus and its associated structures, abundant elements of endoplasmic reticulum--both smooth and rough varieties, and bundles of microfilament and microtubule in the cytoplasm. Some pinealocyte processes contain numerous small clear and "slightly coated" vesicles. Numerous profiles of varicosities containing small dense-cored and clear vesicles were frequently encountered. After ZIO treatment, ZIO staining was preferentially localized in the cytoplasm of some, but not all, of the gerbil pinealocytes. Numerous small clear vesicles (30-50 nm in diameter) in the process of the pinealocytes or in the varicosities of the nerve fibers showed strong ZIO-philia. After chromaffin reaction treatment, the number and electron density of small clear and dense-cored vesicles in the profiles of nerve varicosities increased and this indicates that some of the small clear and dense-cored vesicles in the varicosities are reactive. It is thus concluded that (1) the vesicles in the pinealocytes may be rich in cystine and/or cysteine and possibly the organelle is involved in the sequestering calcium ion during the calcification of the pineal concretions, and (2) the small dense-cored and clear vesicles in the nerve fibers in the gerbil pineal parenchyma may contain both serotonin and primary biogenic amines. PMID:7530780

  1. Lateral diffusion and retrograde movements of individual cell surface components on single motile cells observed with Nanovid microscopy

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    A recently introduced extension of video-enhanced light microscopy, called Nanovid microscopy, documents the dynamic reorganization of individual cell surface components on living cells. 40-microns colloidal gold probes coupled to different types of poly-L-lysine label negative cell surface components of PTK2 cells. Evidence is provided that they bind to negative sialic acid residues of glycoproteins, probably through nonspecific electrostatic interactions. The gold probes, coupled to short poly-L-lysine molecules (4 kD) displayed Brownian motion, with a diffusion coefficient in the range 0.1-0.2 micron2/s. A diffusion coefficient in the 0.1 micron2/s range was also observed with 40-nm gold probes coupled to an antibody against the lipid-linked Thy-1 antigen on 3T3 fibroblasts. Diffusion of these probes is largely confined to apparent microdomains of 1-2 microns in size. On the other hand, the gold probes, coupled to long poly-L-lysine molecules (240 kD) molecules and bound to the leading lamella, were driven rearward, toward the boundary between lamelloplasm and perinuclear cytoplasm at a velocity of 0.5-1 micron/min by a directed ATP-dependent mechanism. This uniform motion was inhibited by cytochalasin, suggesting actin microfilament involvement. A similar behavior on MO cells was observed when the antibody-labeled gold served as a marker for the PGP-1 (GP-80) antigen. These results show that Nanovid microscopy, offering the possibility to observe the motion of individual specific cell surface components, provides a new and powerful tool to study the dynamic reorganization of the cell membrane during locomotion and in other biological contexts as well. PMID:1670778

  2. A new assay for invasion of HeLa 229 cells by Bordetella pertussis: effects of inhibitors, phenotypic modulation, and genetic alterations.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, C K; Roberts, A L; Finn, T M; Knapp, S; Mekalanos, J J

    1990-01-01

    Invasion and intracellular survival of Bordetella pertussis in HeLa 229 cells was studied by a new assay that utilizes polymyxin B instead of gentamicin to rapidly kill extracellular organisms. Invasion measured by this assay was time and temperature dependent and was inhibited by the microfilament drug cytochalasin D. The invasion process was also dependent on a functional vir locus (also known as bvg), the positive regulator of virulence gene expression in B. pertussis. Four spontaneous Vir- phase variants of B. pertussis and a mutant with a transposon insertion mutation in the vir locus did not invade. Cells that were environmentally modulated and thus did not express virulence determinants also did not invade. Two Vir- mutants, a vir-directed plasmid insertion mutant and a UV-light-induced mutant, were capable of invasion, although they did not produce other known virulence factors such as pertussis toxin and hemolysin but did produce small amounts of filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA) and the 69-kilodalton outer membrane protein. None of 70 Tn5 IS50L::phoA (TnphoA) insertion mutants of strain Bp18323 (including three mutants defective in FHA) tested showed any reproducible defect in invasion. A mutant carrying a site-directed deletion mutation in FHA was also capable of invasion in our assay. These data suggest that there is redundancy in the invasion functions of B. pertussis and that one or more of these are coordinately regulated with FHA and the 69-kilodalton outer membrane protein more tightly than with other vir-activated gene products. Images PMID:2370104

  3. Isolation and partial characterisation of neuronal growth cones from neonatal rat forebrain.

    PubMed

    Gordon-Weeks, P R; Lockerbie, R O

    1984-09-01

    We have devised a method for the isolation of viable neuronal growth cones from neonatal rat forebrain. The method involves differential and density gradient centrifugation and exploits the relatively low buoyant density (approximately 1.018 g/cm3) of growth cones. There are no known biochemical markers for growth cones and it was necessary therefore to monitor for their presence during the isolation using transmission electron microscopy. Several criteria were used to identify isolated growth cones including the presence of filopodia, an extensive system of branching, tubular smooth endoplasmic reticulum and a region rich in microfilaments subjacent to the plasma membrane. These morphological features are similar to those of growth cones identified unequivocally in intact developing brain and in tissue culture. Electron microscopical analysis showed that greater than 90% of membrane-bound, identifiable objects in one fraction were growth cones by these criteria. The major contaminant consisted of membrane sacs and vesicles of unidentified origin. There were only small amounts of isolated rough endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. Isolated growth cones were roughly spherical in shape with a diameter of 1.9 +/- 0.5 micron (mean +/- 1 SD). They usually contained mitochondria, large granular vesicles and small vesicles, and occasionally contained coated vesicles, lysosomes, lamellar bodies and multivesicular bodies, and only very rarely, intermediate filaments. Occasionally, growth cones had rudimentary synapses on them. The viability of isolated growth cones was investigated by observing their behaviour in short-term culture. After a few hours in culture on poly-D-lysine-coated coverslips, growth cones flattened down and extended filopodia-like processes. This behaviour was inhibited by cytochalasin B and reversibly by cold (4 degrees C). We conclude that physiologically active growth cones can be isolated rapidly and in large numbers by the method described here.

  4. New insights into FAK function and regulation during spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gungor-Ordueri, N. Ece; Mruk, Dolores D.; Wan, Hin-ting; Wong, Elissa W.P.; Celik-Ozenci, Ciler; Lie, Pearl P.Y.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2014-01-01

    Summary Germ cell transport across the seminiferous epithelium during the epithelial cycle is crucial to spermatogenesis, although molecular mechanism(s) that regulate these events remain unknown. Studies have shown that spatiotemporal expression of crucial regulatory proteins during the epithelial cycle represents an efficient and physiologically important mechanism to regulate spermatogenesis without involving de novo synthesis of proteins and/or expression of genes. Herein, we critically review the role of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in coordinating the transport of spermatids and preleptotene spermatocytes across the epithelium and the blood-testis barrier (BTB), respectively, along the apical ectoplasmic specialization (ES) – blood-testis barrier – basement membrane (BM) functional axis during spermatogenesis. In the testis, p-FAK-Tyr397 and p-FAKTyr407 are spatiotemporally expressed during the epithelial cycle at the actin-rich anchoring junction known as ES, regulating cell adhesion at the Sertolispermatid (apical ES) and Sertoli cell-cell (basal ES) interface. Phosphorylated forms of FAK exert their effects by regulating the homeostasis of F-actin at the ES, mediated via their effects on actin polymerization so that microfilaments are efficiently re-organized, such as from their “bundled” to “de-bundled/branched” configuration and vice versa during the epithelial cycle to facilitate the transport of: (i) spermatids across the epithelium, and (ii) preleptotene spermatocytes across the BTB. In summary, p-FAK-Tyr407 and p-FAK-Tyr397 are important regulators of spermatogenesis which serve as molecular switches that turn “on” and “off” adhesion function at the apical ES and the basal ES/BTB, mediated via their spatiotemporal expression during the epithelial cycle. A hypothetical model depicting the role of these two molecular switches is also proposed. PMID:24578181

  5. Simulated Microgravity Alters Actin Cytoskeleton and Integrin-Mediated Focal Adhesions of Cultured Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershovich, P. M.; Gershovic, J. G.; Buravkova, L. B.

    2008-06-01

    Cytoskeletal alterations occur in several cell types including lymphocytes, glial cells, and osteoblasts, during spaceflight and under simulated microgravity (SMG) (3, 4). One potential mechanism for cytoskeletal gravisensitivity is disruption of extracellular matrix (ECM) and integrin interactions. Focal adhesions are specialized sites of cell-matrix interaction composed of integrins and the diversity of focal adhesion-associated cytoplasmic proteins including vinculin, talin, α-actinin, and actin filaments (4, 5). Integrins produce signals essential for proper cellular function, survival and differentiation. Therefore, we investigated the effects of SMG on F-actin cytoskeleton structure, vinculin focal adhesions, expression of some integrin subtypes and cellular adhesion molecules (CAMs) in mesenchymal stem cells derived from human bone marrow (hMSCs). Simulated microgravity was produced by 3D-clinostat (Dutch Space, Netherlands). Staining of actin fibers with TRITC-phalloidin showed reorganization even after 30 minutes of simulated microgravity. The increasing of cells number with abnormal F-actin was observed after subsequent terms of 3D-clinorotation (6, 24, 48, 120 hours). Randomization of gravity vector altered dimensional structure of stress fibers and resulted in remodeling of actin fibers inside the cells. In addition, we observed vinculin redistribution inside the cells after 6 hours and prolonged terms of clinorotation. Tubulin fibers in a contrast with F-actin and vinculin didn't show any reorganization even after long 3Dclinorotation (120 hours). The expression of integrin α2 increased 1,5-6-fold in clinorotated hMSCs. Also we observed decrease in number of VCAM-1-positive cells and changes in expression of ICAM-1. Taken together, our findings indicate that SMG leads to microfilament and adhesion alterations of hMSCs most probably associated with involvement of some integrin subtypes.

  6. Modulation of the extracellular matrix patterning of thrombospondins by actin dynamics and thrombospondin oligomer state

    PubMed Central

    Hellewell, Andrew L.; Gong, Xianyun; Schärich, Karsten; Christofidou, Elena D.; Adams, Josephine C.

    2015-01-01

    Thrombospondins (TSPs) are evolutionarily-conserved, secreted glycoproteins that interact with cell surfaces and extracellular matrix (ECM) and have complex roles in cell interactions. Unlike the structural components of the ECM that form networks or fibrils, TSPs are deposited into ECM as arrays of nanoscale puncta. The cellular and molecular mechanisms for the patterning of TSPs in ECM are poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated whether the mechanisms of TSP patterning in cell-derived ECM involves actin cytoskeletal pathways or TSP oligomer state. From tests of a suite of pharmacological inhibitors of small GTPases, actomyosin-based contractility, or actin microfilament integrity and dynamics, cytochalasin D and jasplakinolide treatment of cells were identified to result in altered ECM patterning of a model TSP1 trimer. The strong effect of cytochalasin D indicated that mechanisms controlling puncta patterning depend on global F-actin dynamics. Similar spatial changes were obtained with endogenous TSPs after cytochalasin D treatment, implicating physiological relevance. Under matched experimental conditions with ectopically-expressed TSPs, the magnitude of the effect was markedly lower for pentameric TSP5 and Drosophila TSP, than for trimeric TSP1 or dimeric Ciona TSPA. To distinguish between the variables of protein sequence or oligomer state, we generated novel, chimeric pentamers of TSP1. These proteins accumulated within ECM at higher levels than TSP1 trimers, yet the effect of cytochalasin D on the spatial distribution of puncta was reduced. These findings introduce a novel concept that F-actin dynamics modulate the patterning of TSPs in ECM and that TSP oligomer state is a key determinant of this process. PMID:26182380

  7. Quantitative Evaluation of Stomatal Cytoskeletal Patterns during the Activation of Immune Signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Shimono, Masaki; Higaki, Takumi; Kaku, Hanae; Shibuya, Naoto; Hasezawa, Seiichiro

    2016-01-01

    Historically viewed as primarily functioning in the regulation of gas and water vapor exchange, it is now evident that stomata serve an important role in plant immunity. Indeed, in addition to classically defined functions related to cell architecture and movement, the actin cytoskeleton has emerged as a central component of the plant immune system, underpinning not only processes related to cell shape and movement, but also receptor activation and signaling. Using high resolution quantitative imaging techniques, the temporal and spatial changes in the actin microfilament array during diurnal cycling of stomatal guard cells has revealed a highly orchestrated transition from random arrays to ordered bundled filaments. While recent studies have demonstrated that plant stomata close in response to pathogen infection, an evaluation of stimulus-induced changes in actin cytoskeletal dynamics during immune activation in the guard cell, as well as the relationship of these changes to the function of the actin cytoskeleton and stomatal aperture, remains undefined. In the current study, we employed quantitative cell imaging and hierarchical clustering analyses to define the response of the guard cell actin cytoskeleton to pathogen infection and the elicitation of immune signaling. Using this approach, we demonstrate that stomatal-localized actin filaments respond rapidly, and specifically, to both bacterial phytopathogens and purified pathogen elicitors. Notably, we demonstrate that higher order temporal and spatial changes in the filament array show distinct patterns of organization during immune activation, and that changes in the naïve diurnal oscillations of guard cell actin filaments are perturbed by pathogens, and that these changes parallel pathogen-induced stomatal gating. The data presented herein demonstrate the application of a highly tractable and quantifiable method to assign transitions in actin filament organization to the activation of immune signaling in

  8. Characterization of Amoeboaphelidium protococcarum, an algal parasite new to the cryptomycota isolated from an outdoor algal pond used for the production of biofuel.

    PubMed

    Letcher, Peter M; Lopez, Salvador; Schmieder, Robert; Lee, Philip A; Behnke, Craig; Powell, Martha J; McBride, Robert C

    2013-01-01

    Mass culture of algae for the production of biofuels is a developing technology designed to offset the depletion of fossil fuel reserves. However, large scale culture of algae in open ponds can be challenging because of incidences of infestation with algal parasites. Without knowledge of the identity of the specific parasite and how to control these pests, algal-based biofuel production will be limited. We have characterized a eukaryotic parasite of Scenedesmus dimorphus growing in outdoor ponds used for biofuel production. We demonstrated that as the genomic DNA of parasite FD01 increases, the concentration of S. dimorphus cells decreases; consequently, this is a highly destructive pathogen. Techniques for culture of the parasite and host were developed, and the endoparasite was identified as the Aphelidea, Amoeboaphelidium protococcarum. Phylogenetic analysis of ribosomal sequences revealed that parasite FD01 placed within the recently described Cryptomycota, a poorly known phylum based on two species of Rozella and environmental samples. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that aplanospores of the parasite produced filose pseudopodia, which contained fine fibers the diameter of actin microfilaments. Multiple lipid globules clustered and were associated with microbodies, mitochondria and a membrane cisternae, an arrangement characteristic of the microbody-lipid globule complex of chytrid zoospores. After encystment and attachment to the host cells, the parasite injected its protoplast into the host between the host cell wall and plasma membrane. At maturity the unwalled parasite occupied the entire host cell. After cleavage of the protoplast into aplanospores, a vacuole and lipids remained in the host cell. Amoeboaphelidium protococcarum isolate FD01 is characteristic of the original description of this species and is different from strain X-5 recently characterized. Our results help put a face on the Cryptomycota, revealing that the phylum is more

  9. Micromechanical properties of keratin intermediate filament networks

    PubMed Central

    Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj; DeGiulio, James V.; Lorand, Laszlo; Goldman, Robert D.; Ridge, Karen M.

    2008-01-01

    Keratin intermediate filaments (KIFs) form cytoskeletal KIF networks that are essential for the structural integrity of epithelial cells. However, the mechanical properties of the in situ network have not been defined. Particle-tracking microrheology (PTM) was used to obtain the micromechanical properties of the KIF network in alveolar epithelial cells (AECs), independent of other cytoskeletal components, such as microtubules and microfilaments. The storage modulus (G′) at 1 Hz of the KIF network decreases from the perinuclear region (335 dyn/cm2) to the cell periphery (95 dyn/cm2), yielding a mean value of 210 dyn/cm2. These changes in G′ are inversely proportional to the mesh size of the network, which increases ≈10-fold from the perinuclear region (0.02 μm2) to the cell periphery (0.3 μm2). Shear stress (15 dyn/cm2 for 4 h) applied across the surface of AECs induces a more uniform distribution of KIF, with the mesh size of the network ranging from 0.02 μm2 near the nucleus to only 0.04 μm2 at the cell periphery. This amounts to a 40% increase in the mean G′. The storage modulus of the KIF network in the perinuclear region accurately predicts the shear-induced deflection of the cell nucleus to be 0.87 ± 0.03 μm. The high storage modulus of the KIF network, coupled with its solid-like rheological behavior, supports the role of KIF as an intracellular structural scaffold that helps epithelial cells to withstand external mechanical forces. PMID:18199836

  10. Ultrastructural changes in granulosa cells and plasma steroid levels after administration of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone in the Western painted turtle, Chrysemys picta.

    PubMed

    Al-Kindi, A Y; Mahmoud, Y; Woller, M J

    2001-08-01

    In this study we investigated the effects of treatment by luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) on the morphology and steroid release of ovarian tissues in the Western painted turtle, (Chrysemys picta). In Experiment I, four adult female turtles were injected with synthetic mammalian LHRH (i.p., 500 pg/g bodyweight) and four with saline 2-3 weeks prior to ovulation. Granulosa cells from LHRH-treated turtles vs controls contained both preovulatory follicles (16-20 mm in diameter) and small follicles (0.5-1.00mm in diameter) with increased RER, free ribosomes and mitochondria with swollen cristae. An increase in the amount of cytoskeletal material (microfilaments) was observed in granulosa cells of the experimental turtles compared to the controls. Cytoplasmic extensions of the oocyte and granulosa cells were longer in the small follicles of treated animals, accounting for the observed increase in the thickness of the zona pellucida (ZP) over the controls. In Experiment II, administration of LHRH (i.p.) to 10 turtles during the same period triggered a substantial increase in plasma progesterone and estradiol-17beta levels over the 10 saline-injected controls. This supports the idea that in this species, as in mammals, steroidogenic activity in the ovarian follicles are under the control of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. The ultrastructure and hormonal levels of the experimental animals were typical of untreated turtles just prior to ovulation. In this species the development of follicles and steroidogenesis can be stimulated prematurely by a releasing hormone from a nonreptilian origin.

  11. Dynamics of axonal mRNA transport and implications for peripheral nerve regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Soonmoon; van Niekerk, Erna A.; Merianda, Tanuja T.; Twiss, Jeffery L.

    2009-01-01

    Locally generating new proteins in subcellular regions provides means to spatially and temporally modify protein content in polarized cells. Recent years have seen resurgence of the concept that axonal processes of neurons can locally synthesize proteins. Experiments from a number of groups have now shown that axonal protein synthesis helps to initiate growth, provides a means to respond to guidance cues, and generates retrograde signaling complexes. Additionally, there is increasing evidence that locally synthesized proteins provide functions beyond injury responses and growth in the mature peripheral nervous system. A key regulatory event in this translational regulation is moving the mRNA templates into the axonal compartment. Transport of mRNAs into axons is a highly regulated and specific process that requires interaction of RNA binding proteins with specific cis-elements or structures within the mRNAs. mRNAs are transported in ribonucleoprotein particles that interact with microtubule motor proteins for long-range axonal transport and likely use microfilaments for short-range movement in the axons. The mature axon is able to recruit mRNAs into translation with injury and possibly other stimuli suggesting that mRNAs can be stored in a dormant state in the distal axon until needed. Axotomy triggers a shift in the populations of mRNAs localized to axons indicating a dynamic regulation of the specificity of the axonal transport machinery. In this review, we discuss how axonal mRNA transport and localization are regulated to achieve specific changes in axonal RNA content in response to axonal stimuli. PMID:19699200

  12. Fc epsilon RI-mediated association of 6-micron beads with RBL-2H3 mast cells results in exclusion of signaling proteins from the forming phagosome and abrogation of normal downstream signaling

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Cells of the mucosal mast cell line, RBL-2H3, are normally stimulated to degranulate after aggregation of high affinity receptors for IgE (Fc epsilon RI) by soluble cross-linking ligands. This cellular degranulation process requires sustained elevation of cytoplasmic Ca2+. In this study, we investigated the response of RBL-2H3 cells to 6- micron beads coated with IgE-specific ligands. These ligand-coated beads cause only small, transient Ca2+ responses, even though the same ligands added in soluble form cause larger, more sustained Ca2+ responses. The ligand-coated 6-micron beads also fail to stimulate significant degranulation of RBL-2H3 cells, whereas much larger ligand- coated Sepharose beads stimulate ample degranulation. Confocal fluorescence microscopy shows that the 6-micron beads (but not the Sepharose beads) are phagocytosed by RBL-2H3 cells and that, beginning with the initial stages of bead engulfment, there is exclusion of many plasma membrane components from the 6-micron bead/cell interface, including p53/56lyn and several other markers for detergent-resistant membrane domains, as well as an integrin and unliganded IgE-Fc epsilon RI. The fluorescent lipid probe DiIC16 is a marker for the membrane domains that is excluded from the cell/bead interface, whereas a structural analogue, fast DiI, which differs from DiIC16 by the presence of unsaturated acyl chains, is not substantially excluded from the interface. None of these components are excluded from the interface of RBL-2H3 cells and the large Sepharose beads. Additional confocal microscopy analysis indicates that microfilaments are involved in the exclusion of plasma membrane components from the cell/bead interface. These results suggest that initiation of phagocytosis diverts normal signaling pathways in a cytoskeleton-driven membrane clearance process that alters the physiological response of the cells. PMID:8830772

  13. Plant acoustics: in the search of a sound mechanism for sound signaling in plants.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Ratnesh Chandra; Ghosh, Ritesh; Bae, Hanhong

    2016-08-01

    Being sessile, plants continuously deal with their dynamic and complex surroundings, identifying important cues and reacting with appropriate responses. Consequently, the sensitivity of plants has evolved to perceive a myriad of external stimuli, which ultimately ensures their successful survival. Research over past centuries has established that plants respond to environmental factors such as light, temperature, moisture, and mechanical perturbations (e.g. wind, rain, touch, etc.) by suitably modulating their growth and development. However, sound vibrations (SVs) as a stimulus have only started receiving attention relatively recently. SVs have been shown to increase the yields of several crops and strengthen plant immunity against pathogens. These vibrations can also prime the plants so as to make them more tolerant to impending drought. Plants can recognize the chewing sounds of insect larvae and the buzz of a pollinating bee, and respond accordingly. It is thus plausible that SVs may serve as a long-range stimulus that evokes ecologically relevant signaling mechanisms in plants. Studies have suggested that SVs increase the transcription of certain genes, soluble protein content, and support enhanced growth and development in plants. At the cellular level, SVs can change the secondary structure of plasma membrane proteins, affect microfilament rearrangements, produce Ca(2+) signatures, cause increases in protein kinases, protective enzymes, peroxidases, antioxidant enzymes, amylase, H(+)-ATPase / K(+) channel activities, and enhance levels of polyamines, soluble sugars and auxin. In this paper, we propose a signaling model to account for the molecular episodes that SVs induce within the cell, and in so doing we uncover a number of interesting questions that need to be addressed by future research in plant acoustics. PMID:27342223

  14. Cytotoxicity of Thirdhand Smoke and Identification of Acrolein as a Volatile Thirdhand Smoke Chemical That Inhibits Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Bahl, Vasundhra; Weng, Nikki J-H; Schick, Suzaynn F; Sleiman, Mohamad; Whitehead, Jacklyn; Ibarra, Allison; Talbot, Prue

    2016-03-01

    Thirdhand smoke (THS) is a mixture of chemicals that remain on indoor surfaces after smoking has ceased. These chemicals can be inhaled, ingested, or absorbed dermally, and thus could impact human health. We evaluated the cytotoxicity and mode of action of fresh and aged THS, the toxicity of volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) in THS, and the molecular targets of acrolein, a VOC in THS. Experiments were done using mouse neural stem cells (mNSC), human pulmonary fibroblasts (hPF), and lung A549 epithelial cells. THS-exposed cotton cloth was extracted in Dulbecco's Eagle Medium and caused cytotoxicity in the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. THS extracts induced blebbing, immotility, vacuolization, cell fragmentation, severing of microfilaments and depolymerization of microtubules in mNSC. Cytotoxicity was inversely related to headspace volume in the extraction container and was lost upon aging, suggesting that VOCs in THS were cytotoxic. Phenol, 2',5'-dimethyl furan and acrolein were identified as the most cytotoxic VOCs in THS, and in combination, their cytotoxicity increased. Acrolein inhibited proliferation of mNSC and hPF and altered expression of cell cycle regulatory genes. Twenty-four hours of treatment with acrolein decreased expression of transcription factor Dp-1, a factor needed for the G1 to S transition in the cell cycle. At 48 h, WEE1 expression increased, while ANACP1 expression decreased consistent with blocking entry into and completion of the M phase of the cell cycle. This study identified acrolein as a highly cytotoxic VOC in THS which killed cells at high doses and inhibited cell proliferation at low doses. PMID:26719373

  15. Calcium and actin in the saga of awakening oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Santella, Luigia Limatola, Nunzia; Chun, Jong T.

    2015-04-24

    The interaction of the spermatozoon with the egg at fertilization remains one of the most fascinating mysteries of life. Much of our scientific knowledge on fertilization comes from studies on sea urchin and starfish, which provide plenty of gametes. Large and transparent, these eggs have served as excellent model systems for studying egg activation and embryo development in seawater, a plain natural medium. Starfish oocytes allow the study of the cortical, cytoplasmic and nuclear changes during the meiotic maturation process, which can also be triggered in vitro by hormonal stimulation. These morphological and biochemical changes ensure successful fertilization of the eggs at the first metaphase. On the other hand, sea urchin eggs are fertilized after the completion of meiosis, and are particularly suitable for the study of sperm–egg interaction, early events of egg activation, and embryonic development, as a large number of mature eggs can be fertilized synchronously. Starfish and sea urchin eggs undergo abrupt changes in the cytoskeleton and ion fluxes in response to the fertilizing spermatozoon. The plasma membrane and cortex of an egg thus represent “excitable media” that quickly respond to the stimulus with the Ca{sup 2+} swings and structural changes. In this article, we review some of the key findings on the rapid dynamic rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton in the oocyte/egg cortex upon hormonal or sperm stimulation and their roles in the modulation of the Ca{sup 2+} signals and in the control of monospermic fertilization. - Highlights: • Besides microtubules, microfilaments may anchor the nucleus to oocyte surface. • The cortical Ca{sup 2+} flash and wave at fertilization mirror electrical membrane change. • Artificial egg activation lacks microvilli extension in the perivitelline space. • Calcium is necessary but not sufficient for cortical granules exocytosis. • Actin cytoskeleton modulates Ca{sup 2+} release at oocyte maturation

  16. Modification of Experimental Protocols for a Space Shuttle Flight and Applications for the Analysis of Cytoskeletal Structures During Fertilization, Cell Division , and Development in Sea Urchin Embryos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarti, Amitabha; Stoecker, Andrew; Schatten, Heide

    1995-01-01

    To explore the role of microgravity on cytoskeletal organization and skeletal calcium deposition during fertilization, cell division, and early development, the sea urchin was chosen as a model developmental system. Methods were developed to employ light, immunofluorescence, and electron microscopy on cultures being prepared for flight on the Space Shuttle. For analysis of microfilaments, microtubules, centrosomes, and calcium-requiring events, our standard laboratory protocols had to be modified substantially for experimentation on the Space Shuttle. All manipulations were carried out in a closed culture chamber containing 35 ml artificial sea water as a culture fluid. Unfertilized eggs stored for 24 hours in these chambers were fertilized with sperm diluted in sea water and fixed with concentrated fixatives for final fixation in formaldehyde, taxol, EGTA, and MgCl2(exp -6)H2O for 1 cell to 16 cell stages to preserve cytoskeletal structures for simultaneous analysis with light, immunofluorescence, and electron microscopy, and 1.5 percent glutaraldehyde and 0.4 percent formaldehyde for blastula and plueus stages. The fixed samples wre maintained in chambers without degradation for up to two weeks after which the specimens were processed and analyzed with routine methods. Since complex manipulations are not possible in the closed chambers, the fertilization coat was removed from fixation using 0.5 percent freshly prepared sodium thioglycolate solution at pH 10.0 which provided reliable immunofluorescence staining for microtubules. Sperm/egg fusion, mitosis, cytokinesis, and calcium deposition during spicule formatin in early embryogenesis were found to be without artificial alterations when compared to cells fixed fresh and processed with conventional methods.

  17. Microtubule-associated proteins 1 (MAP1) promote human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) intracytoplasmic routing to the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Juliette; Portilho, Débora M; Danckaert, Anne; Munier, Sandie; Becker, Andreas; Roux, Pascal; Zambo, Anaba; Shorte, Spencer; Jacob, Yves; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Charneau, Pierre; Clavel, François; Arhel, Nathalie J

    2015-02-20

    After cell entry, HIV undergoes rapid transport toward the nucleus using microtubules and microfilaments. Neither the cellular cytoplasmic components nor the viral proteins that interact to mediate transport have yet been identified. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, we identified four cytoskeletal components as putative interaction partners for HIV-1 p24 capsid protein: MAP1A, MAP1S, CKAP1, and WIRE. Depletion of MAP1A/MAP1S in indicator cell lines and primary human macrophages led to a profound reduction in HIV-1 infectivity as a result of impaired retrograde trafficking, demonstrated by a characteristic accumulation of capsids away from the nuclear membrane, and an overall defect in nuclear import. MAP1A/MAP1S did not impact microtubule network integrity or cell morphology but contributed to microtubule stabilization, which was shown previously to facilitate infection. In addition, we found that MAP1 proteins interact with HIV-1 cores both in vitro and in infected cells and that interaction involves MAP1 light chain LC2. Depletion of MAP1 proteins reduced the association of HIV-1 capsids with both dynamic and stable microtubules, suggesting that MAP1 proteins help tether incoming viral capsids to the microtubular network, thus promoting cytoplasmic trafficking. This work shows for the first time that following entry into target cells, HIV-1 interacts with the cytoskeleton via its p24 capsid protein. Moreover, our results support a role for MAP1 proteins in promoting efficient retrograde trafficking of HIV-1 by stimulating the formation of stable microtubules and mediating the association of HIV-1 cores with microtubules.

  18. Statin-induced impairment of monocyte migration is gender-related.

    PubMed

    Ruggieri, Anna; Gambardella, Lucrezia; Maselli, Angela; Vona, Rosa; Anticoli, Simona; Panusa, Alessia; Malorni, Walter; Matarrese, Paola

    2014-12-01

    Statins, widely used for treatment of hypercholesterolemia, have been demonstrated to exert pleiotropic beneficial effects independently of their cholesterol-lowering action, such as anti-inflammatory activity. A gender disparity has been observed in their cholesterol lowering activity as well as in response to these "off label" effects. Monocytes play a central role in atherosclerotic disease and, more in general, in inflammatory responses, through their chemotactic function and cytokine production. On these bases, in the present work, we examined the effect of statins on homeostasis and migration properties of freshly isolated monocytes from male and female healthy donors. Two prototypic natural and synthetic statins with different polarity, that is, type 1 and type 2 statins, have been considered: simvastatin and atorvastatin. Freshly isolated monocytes from peripheral blood of male and female healthy donors were treated with these drugs in the absence or presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation. Results obtained indicated that the polar statin efficiently inhibited chemotaxis of monocytes more than the apolar statin and that this effect was more significantly induced in cells from females than in cells from males. Dissecting the mechanisms involved, we found that these results could mainly be due to differential effects on: (i) the release of key cytokines, for example, MCP-1 and TNF-α; (ii) the maintenance of the redox homeostasis; (iii) a target activity on microfilament network integrity and function. All in all these results could suggest a reappraisal of "off-label" effects of statins taking into account either their chemical structure, that is, molecular polarity, or the gender issue. PMID:24777636

  19. Narrow-band UVB radiation promotes dendrite formation by activating Rac1 in B16 melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wu-Qing; Wu, Jin-Feng; Xiao, Xiao-Qing; Xiao, Qin; Wang, Jing; Zuo, Fu-Guo

    2013-09-01

    Melanocytes are found scattered throughout the basal layer of the epidermis. Following hormone or ultraviolet (UV) light stimulation, the melanin pigments contained in melanocytes are transferred through the dendrites to the surrounding keratinocytes to protect against UV light damage or carcinogenesis. This has been considered as a morphological indicator of melanocytes and melanoma cells. Small GTPases of the Rho family have been implicated in the regulation of actin reorganization underlying dendrite formation in melanocytes and melanoma cells. It has been proven that ultraviolet light plays a pivotal role in melanocyte dendrite formation; however, the molecular mechanism underlying this process has not been fully elucidated. The effect of small GTPases, such as Rac1 and RhoA, on the morphology of B16 melanoma cells treated with narrow-band UVB radiation was investigated. The morphological changes were observed under a phase contrast microscope and the F-actin microfilament of the cytoskeleton was observed under a laser scanning confocal microscope. The pull-down assay was performed to detect the activity of the small GTPases Rac1 and RhoA. The morphological changes were evident, with globular cell bodies and increased numbers of tree branch-like dendrites. The cytoskeletal F-actin appeared disassembled following narrow-band UVB irradiation of B16 melanoma cells. Treatment of B16 melanoma cells with narrow-band UVB radiation resulted in the activation of Rac1 in a time-dependent manner. In conclusion, the present study may provide a novel method through which narrow-band UVB radiation may be used to promote dendrite formation by activating the Rac1 signaling pathway, resulting in F-actin rearrangement in B16 melanoma cells. PMID:24649261

  20. Human MCF10A Mammary Epithelial Cells Undergo Apoptosis following Actin Depolymerization That Is Independent of Attachment and Rescued by Bcl-2

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Stuart S.; Leder, Philip

    2001-01-01

    Many tumor cells are impaired in adhesion-regulated apoptosis, which contributes to their metastatic potential. However, suppression of this apoptotic pathway in untransformed cells is not mediated only by adhesion to the extracellular matrix but also through the resulting ability to spread and adopt a distinct morphology. Since cell spreading is dependent on the integrity of the actin microfilament cytoskeleton, we sought to determine if actin depolymerization was sufficient to induce apoptosis, even in the presence of continuous attachment. For this study, we used a human mammary epithelial cell line (MCF10A), which is immortalized but remains adhesion dependent for survival. Treatment of MCF10A cells with latrunculin-A (LA), an inhibitor of actin polymerization, rapidly led to disruption of the actin cytoskeleton and caused cell rounding but preserved attachment. Initiation of apoptosis in LA-treated MCF10A cells was detected by mitochondrial localization of the Bax apoptotic protein, which was prevented by overexpression of Bcl-2. DNA fragmentation and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage in LA-treated MCF10A cells indicated progression to the execution phase of apoptosis. The MDA-MB-453 cell line, which was derived from a metastatic human mammary tumor, was resistant to PARP cleavage and loss of viability in response to actin depolymerization. Stable overexpression of Bcl-2 in the untransformed MCF10A cells was able to recapitulate the resistance to apoptosis found in the tumor cell line. We demonstrate that inhibition of actin polymerization is sufficient to stimulate apoptosis in attached MCF10A cells, and we present a novel role for Bcl-2 in cell death induced by direct disruption of the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:11533241

  1. Structure and function of small heat shock/alpha-crystallin proteins: established concepts and emerging ideas.

    PubMed

    MacRae, T H

    2000-06-01

    Small heat shock/alpha-crystallin proteins are defined by conserved sequence of approximately 90 amino acid residues, termed the alpha-crystallin domain, which is bounded by variable amino- and carboxy-terminal extensions. These proteins form oligomers, most of uncertain quaternary structure, and oligomerization is prerequisite to their function as molecular chaperones. Sequence modelling and physical analyses show that the secondary structure of small heat shock/alpha-crystallin proteins is predominately beta-pleated sheet. Crystallography, site-directed spin-labelling and yeast two-hybrid selection demonstrate regions of secondary structure within the alpha-crystallin domain that interact during oligomer assembly, a process also dependent on the amino terminus. Oligomers are dynamic, exhibiting subunit exchange and organizational plasticity, perhaps leading to functional diversity. Exposure of hydrophobic residues by structural modification facilitates chaperoning where denaturing proteins in the molten globule state associate with oligomers. The flexible carboxy-terminal extension contributes to chaperone activity by enhancing the solubility of small heat shock/alpha-crystallin proteins. Site-directed mutagenesis has yielded proteins where the effect of the change on structure and function depends upon the residue modified, the organism under study and the analytical techniques used. Most revealing, substitution of a conserved arginine residue within the alpha-crystallin domain has a major impact on quaternary structure and chaperone action probably through realignment of beta-sheets. These mutations are linked to inherited diseases. Oligomer size is regulated by a stress-responsive cascade including MAPKAP kinase 2/3 and p38. Phosphorylation of small heat shock/alpha-crystallin proteins has important consequences within stressed cells, especially for microfilaments.

  2. Investigating cytoskeletal function in chloroplast protrusion formation in the arctic-alpine plant Oxyria digyna.

    PubMed

    Holzinger, A; Wasteneys, G O; Lütz, C

    2007-05-01

    Arctic and alpine plants like Oxyria digyna have to face enhanced environmental stress. This study compared leaves from Oxyria digyna collected in the Arctic at Svalbard (78 degrees N) and in the Austrian Alps (47 degrees N) at cellular, subcellular, and ultrastructural levels. Oxyria digyna plants collected in Svalbard had significantly thicker leaves than the samples collected in the Austrian Alps. This difference was generated by increased thickness of the palisade and spongy mesophyll layers in the arctic plants, while epidermal cells had no significant size differences between the two habitats. A characteristic feature of arctic, alpine, and cultivated samples was the occurrence of broad stroma-filled chloroplast protrusions, 2 - 5 microm broad and up to 5 microm long. Chloroplast protrusions were in close spatial contact with other organelles including mitochondria and microbodies. Mitochondria were also present in invaginations of the chloroplasts. A dense network of cortical microtubules found in the mesophyll cells suggested a potential role for microtubules in the formation and function of chloroplast protrusions. No direct interactions between microtubules and chloroplasts, however, were observed and disruption of the microtubule arrays with the anti-microtubule agent oryzalin at 5 - 10 microM did not alter the appearance or dynamics of chloroplast protrusions. These observations suggest that, in contrast to studies on stromule formation in Nicotiana, microtubules are not involved in the formation and morphology of chloroplast protrusions in Oxyria digyna. The actin microfilament-disrupting drug latrunculin B (5 - 10 microM for 2 h) arrested cytoplasmic streaming and altered the cytoplasmic integrity of mesophyll cells. However, at the ultrastructural level, stroma-containing, thylakoid-free areas were still visible, mostly at the concave sides of the chloroplasts. As chloroplast protrusions were frequently found to be mitochondria-associated in Oxyria

  3. Comparison of Myofibroblasts Between Solid/Multicystic Ameloblastoma and Unicystic Ameloblastoma: An Immunohistochemical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Sadhana; Narayan, Thondikulam Venakataraman; Jayaram, Ranjita

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Microenvironment is crucial for the maintenance of cellular functions and tissue integrity suggesting that cancer-induced changes in the stroma may contribute to cancer invasion and its biological behaviour. One of the major constituent of the tumour stroma is myofibroblasts. Myofibroblasts are differentiated host fibroblasts that express α-Sma as cytoplasmic microfilaments. They are considered as one of the modified stromal component which in recent years have been thought to have a role in the invasion and aggressive behaviour of odontogenic tumours too. Aim To detect immunohistochemically the presence of myofibroblasts in solid/multicystic ameloblastoma and in unicystic ameloblastoma and to see if a relationship exists between the frequency and pattern of distribution of myofibroblasts and the behaviour of ameloblastomas. Materials and Methods Ten cases each of solid/multicystic ameloblastoma and unicystic ameloblastoma were stained immunohistochemically for vimentin, α-SMA and desmin. The frequency and pattern of distribution of myofibroblasts in the two study groups were analysed and then compared with clinical and radiographic features of pain and cortical perforation respectively. Results Immunohistochemical reaction for α-SMA (alpha Smooth Muscle Actin) showed positive cells in the stroma of both solid/multicystic and unicystic ameloblastomas. The mean number of myofibroblasts was more in unicystic ameloblastoma (UA) compared to Solid/Multicystic Ameloblastoma (SMA). Myofibroblasts expression was dense and arranged in the form of fascicles with indistinct cell borders in one case of follicular ameloblastoma, two cases of plexiform ameloblastoma and in a focal area of one case of type 1UA. In all other cases where the expression was noted, the myofibroblasts were spindle in shape with distinct cell boundaries. Conclusion The results of the study indicate that myofibroblasts alone may not play a role in the behaviour of ameloblastomas. This

  4. Mitochondria as Sub-cellular Targets of Space Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hei, Tom; Zhang, Bo; Davidson, Mercy

    High linear energy transfer (LET) radiation including alpha particles and heavy ions is the major type of radiation find in space and is considered a potential health risk for astronauts. Even though the chance that these high LET particles traversing through the cytoplasm of cells is higher than that through the nuclei, the contribution of targeted cytoplasmic irradiation, to the induction of genomic instability and other chromosomal damages induced by high LET radiation is not known. Mitochondria are the sole energy center of a cell and normal mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles that move along microtubules or microfilaments and continuously fuse and divide in healthy cells. A balance between mitochondrial fusion and fission is essential to maintain normal mitochondrial function. Targeted cytoplasmic irradiation by high LET alpha particles induced DNA oxidative damage and double strand breaks in wild type rho+ human small airway epithelial (SAE) cells. Furthermore, there was a significant increase in autophagy and micronuclei, which is an indication of genomic instability, together with the activation of nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-kappaB) and mitochondrial inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) signaling pathways in rho+ SAE cells. In contrast, SAE cells with depleted mitochondrial DNA (rho0) and, therefore, no oxidative metabolic functions, exhibited a significantly lower response to these same endpoints examined after cytoplasmic irradiation with high LET alpha particles. The results indicate that normal mitochondrial function is essential in mediating radiation induced genotoxic damages in mammalian cells. Furthermore, the findings may shed some light in the design of countermeasures for space radiation protection.

  5. Interaction of Prevotella intermedia strain 17 leucine-rich repeat domain protein AdpF with eukaryotic cells promotes bacterial internalization.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Dipanwita; Kang, Dae-Joong; Anaya-Bergman, Cecilia; Wyant, Tiana; Ghosh, Arnab K; Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Lewis, Janina P

    2014-06-01

    Prevotella intermedia is an oral bacterium implicated in a variety of oral diseases. Although internalization of this bacterium by nonphagocytic host cells is well established, the molecular players mediating the process are not well known. Here, the properties of a leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain protein, designated AdpF, are described. This protein contains a leucine-rich region composed of 663 amino acid residues, and molecular modeling shows that it folds into a classical curved solenoid structure. The cell surface localization of recombinant AdpF (rAdpF) was confirmed by electron and confocal microscopy analyses. The recombinant form of this protein bound fibronectin in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the protein was internalized by host cells, with the majority of the process accomplished within 30 min. The internalization of rAdpF was inhibited by nystatin, cytochalasin, latrunculin, nocodazole, and wortmannin, indicating that microtubules, microfilaments, and signal transduction are required for the invasion. It is noteworthy that preincubation of eukaryotic cells with AdpF increased P. intermedia 17 internalization by 5- and 10-fold for HeLa and NIH 3T3 fibroblast cell lines, respectively. The addition of the rAdpF protein was also very effective in inducing bacterial internalization into the oral epithelial cell line HN4, as well as into primary cells, including human oral keratinocytes (HOKs) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Finally, cells exposed to P. intermedia 17 internalized the bacteria more readily upon reinfection. Taken together, our data demonstrate that rAdpF plays a role in the internalization of P. intermedia 17 by a variety of host cells.

  6. Exploring the Stability Limits of Actin and Its Suprastructures

    PubMed Central

    Rosin, Christopher; Erlkamp, Mirko; Ecken, Julian von der; Raunser, Stefan; Winter, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Actin is the main component of the microfilament system in eukaryotic cells and can be found in distinct morphological states. Global (G)-actin is able to assemble into highly organized, supramolecular cellular structures known as filamentous (F)-actin and bundled (B)-actin. To evaluate the structure and stability of G-, F-, and B-actin over a wide range of temperatures and pressures, we used Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in combination with differential scanning and pressure perturbation calorimetry, small-angle x-ray scattering, laser confocal scanning microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Our analysis was designed to provide new (to our knowledge) insights into the stabilizing forces of actin self-assembly and to reveal the stability of the actin polymorphs, including in conditions encountered in extreme environments. In addition, we sought to explain the limited pressure stability of actin self-assembly observed in vivo. G-actin is not only the least temperature-stable but also the least pressure-stable actin species. Under abyssal conditions, where temperatures as low as 1–4°C and pressures up to 1 kbar are reached, G-actin is hardly stable. However, the supramolecular assemblies of actin are stable enough to withstand the extreme conditions usually encountered on Earth. Be