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Sample records for microfluidic chaotic bubble

  1. Intensely oscillating cavitation bubble in microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siew-Wan, Ohl; Tandiono; Klaseboer, Evert; Dave, Ow; Choo, Andre; Claus-Dieter, Ohl

    2015-12-01

    This study reports the technical breakthrough in generating intense ultrasonic cavitation in the confinement of a microfluidics channel [1], and applications that has been developed on this platform for the past few years [2,3,4,5]. Our system consists of circular disc transducers (10-20 mm in diameter), the microfluidics channels on PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane), and a driving circuitry. The cavitation bubbles are created at the gas- water interface due to strong capillary waves which are generated when the system is driven at its natural frequency (around 100 kHz) [1]. These bubbles oscillate and collapse within the channel. The bubbles are useful for sonochemistry and the generation of sonoluminescence [2]. When we add bacteria (Escherichia coli), and yeast cells (Pichia pastoris) into the microfluidics channels, the oscillating and collapsing bubbles stretch and lyse these cells [3]. Furthermore, the system is effective (DNA of the harvested intracellular content remains largely intact), and efficient (yield reaches saturation in less than 1 second). In another application, human red blood cells are added to a microchamber. Cell stretching and rapture are observed when a laser generated cavitation bubble expands and collapses next to the cell [4]. A numerical model of a liquid pocket surrounded by a membrane with surface tension which was placed next to an oscillating bubble was developed using the Boundary Element Method. The simulation results showed that the stretching of the liquid pocket occurs only when the surface tension is within a certain range.

  2. Bubble-induced damping in displacement-driven microfluidic flows.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jongho; Rahman, Faizur; Laoui, Tahar; Karnik, Rohit

    2012-08-01

    Bubble damping in displacement-driven microfluidic flows was theoretically and experimentally investigated for a Y-channel microfluidic network. The system was found to exhibit linear behavior for typical microfluidic flow conditions. The bubbles induced a low-pass filter behavior with a characteristic cutoff frequency that scaled proportionally with flow rate and inversely with bubble volume and exhibited a minimum with respect to the relative resistances of the connecting channels. A theoretical model based on the electrical circuit analogy was able to predict experimentally observed damping of fluctuations with excellent agreement. Finally, a flowmeter with high resolution (0.01 μL/min) was demonstrated as an application of the bubble-aided stabilization. This study may aid in the design of many other bubble-stabilized microfluidic systems.

  3. A multi-functional bubble-based microfluidic system

    PubMed Central

    Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Almansouri, Abdullah; Albloushi, Hamad; Yi, Pyshar; Soffe, Rebecca; Kalantar-zadeh, Kourosh

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the bubble-based systems have offered a new paradigm in microfluidics. Gas bubbles are highly flexible, controllable and barely mix with liquids, and thus can be used for the creation of reconfigurable microfluidic systems. In this work, a hydrodynamically actuated bubble-based microfluidic system is introduced. This system enables the precise movement of air bubbles via axillary feeder channels to alter the geometry of the main channel and consequently the flow characteristics of the system. Mixing of neighbouring streams is demonstrated by oscillating the bubble at desired displacements and frequencies. Flow control is achieved by pushing the bubble to partially or fully close the main channel. Patterning of suspended particles is also demonstrated by creating a large bubble along the sidewalls. Rigorous analytical and numerical calculations are presented to describe the operation of the system. The examples presented in this paper highlight the versatility of the developed bubble-based actuator for a variety of applications; thus providing a vision that can be expanded for future highly reconfigurable microfluidics. PMID:25906043

  4. Chaotic gas bubble oscillations in a viscoelastic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Fernández, Javier

    2008-05-01

    Regular and chaotic radial oscillations of an acoustically driven gas bubble in a viscoelastic fluid have been theoretically analyzed. For parameter values usually found in diagnostic ultrasound period-doubling routes to chaos have been identified. Thresholds values of the external pressure amplitude for a first bifurcation in terms of the elasticity and the shear viscosity of the host fluid have also been evaluated. To cite this article: J. Jiménez-Fernández, C. R. Mecanique 336 (2008).

  5. An active bubble trap and debubbler for microfluidic systems.

    PubMed

    Skelley, Alison M; Voldman, Joel

    2008-10-01

    We present a novel, fully integrated microfluidic bubble trap and debubbler. The 2-layer structure, based on a PDMS valve design, utilizes a featured membrane to stop bubble progression through the device. A pneumatic chamber directly above the trap is evacuated, and the bubble is pulled out through the gas-permeable PDMS membrane. Normal device operation, including continuous flow at atmospheric pressure, is maintained during the entire trapping and debubbling process. We present a range of trap sizes, from 2 to 10 mm diameter, and can trap and remove bubbles up to 25 microL in under 3 h.

  6. Slopes To Prevent Trapping of Bubbles in Microfluidic Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greer, Harold E.; Lee, Michael C.; Smith, J. Anthony; Willis, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    The idea of designing a microfluidic channel to slope upward along the direction of flow of the liquid in the channel has been conceived to help prevent trapping of gas bubbles in the channel. In the original application that gave rise to this idea, the microfluidic channels are parts of micro-capillary electrophoresis (microCE) devices undergoing development for use on Mars in detecting compounds indicative of life. It is necessary to prevent trapping of gas bubbles in these devices because uninterrupted liquid pathways are essential for sustaining the electrical conduction and flows that are essential for CE. The idea is also applicable to microfluidic devices that may be developed for similar terrestrial microCE biotechnological applications or other terrestrial applications in which trapping of bubbles in microfluidic channels cannot be tolerated. A typical microCE device in the original application includes, among other things, multiple layers of borosilicate float glass wafers. Microfluidic channels are formed in the wafers, typically by use of wet chemical etching. The figure presents a simplified cross section of part of such a device in which the CE channel is formed in the lowermost wafer (denoted the channel wafer) and, according to the present innovation, slopes upward into a via hole in another wafer (denoted the manifold wafer) lying immediately above the channel wafer. Another feature of the present innovation is that the via hole in the manifold wafer is made to taper to a wider opening at the top to further reduce the tendency to trap bubbles. At the time of reporting the information for this article, an effort to identify an optimum technique for forming the slope and the taper was in progress. Of the techniques considered thus far, the one considered to be most promising is precision milling by use of femtosecond laser pulses. Other similar techniques that may work equally well are precision milling using a focused ion beam, or a small diamond

  7. Rigorous buoyancy driven bubble mixing for centrifugal microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Burger, S; Schulz, M; von Stetten, F; Zengerle, R; Paust, N

    2016-01-21

    We present batch-mode mixing for centrifugal microfluidics operated at fixed rotational frequency. Gas is generated by the disk integrated decomposition of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to liquid water (H2O) and gaseous oxygen (O2) and inserted into a mixing chamber. There, bubbles are formed that ascent through the liquid in the artificial gravity field and lead to drag flow. Additionaly, strong buoyancy causes deformation and rupture of the gas bubbles and induces strong mixing flows in the liquids. Buoyancy driven bubble mixing is quantitatively compared to shake mode mixing, mixing by reciprocation and vortex mixing. To determine mixing efficiencies in a meaningful way, the different mixers are employed for mixing of a lysis reagent and human whole blood. Subsequently, DNA is extracted from the lysate and the amount of DNA recovered is taken as a measure for mixing efficiency. Relative to standard vortex mixing, DNA extraction based on buoyancy driven bubble mixing resulted in yields of 92 ± 8% (100 s mixing time) and 100 ± 8% (600 s) at 130g centrifugal acceleration. Shake mode mixing yields 96 ± 11% and is thus equal to buoyancy driven bubble mixing. An advantage of buoyancy driven bubble mixing is that it can be operated at fixed rotational frequency, however. The additional costs of implementing buoyancy driven bubble mixing are low since both the activation liquid and the catalyst are very low cost and no external means are required in the processing device. Furthermore, buoyancy driven bubble mixing can easily be integrated in a monolithic manner and is compatible to scalable manufacturing technologies such as injection moulding or thermoforming. We consider buoyancy driven bubble mixing an excellent alternative to shake mode mixing, in particular if the processing device is not capable of providing fast changes of rotational frequency or if the low average rotational frequency is challenging for the other integrated fluidic operations.

  8. Nonlinear dynamics of drops and bubbles and chaotic phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Eugene H.; Leal, L. G.; Feng, Z. C.; Holt, R. G.

    1994-01-01

    Nonlinear phenomena associated with the dynamics of free drops and bubbles are investigated analytically, numerically and experimentally. Although newly developed levitation and measurement techniques have been implemented, the full experimental validation of theoretical predictions has been hindered by interfering artifacts associated with levitation in the Earth gravitational field. The low gravity environment of orbital space flight has been shown to provide a more quiescent environment which can be utilized to better match the idealized theoretical conditions. The research effort described in this paper is a closely coupled collaboration between predictive and guiding theoretical activities and a unique experimental program involving the ultrasonic and electrostatic levitation of single droplets and bubbles. The goal is to develop and to validate methods based on nonlinear dynamics for the understanding of the large amplitude oscillatory response of single drops and bubbles to both isotropic and asymmetric pressure stimuli. The first specific area on interest has been the resonant coupling between volume and shape oscillatory modes isolated gas or vapor bubbles in a liquid host. The result of multiple time-scale asymptotic treatment, combined with domain perturbation and bifurcation methods, has been the prediction of resonant and near-resonant coupling between volume and shape modes leading to stable as well as chaotic oscillations. Experimental investigations of the large amplitude shape oscillation modes of centimeter-size single bubbles trapped in water at 1 G and under reduced hydrostatic pressure, have suggested the possibility of a low gravity experiment to study the direct coupling between these low frequency shape modes and the volume pulsation, sound-radiating mode. The second subject of interest has involved numerical modeling, using the boundary integral method, of the large amplitude shape oscillations of charged and uncharged drops in the presence

  9. Micropropulsion by an acoustic bubble for navigating microfluidic spaces.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jian; Yuan, Junqi; Cho, Sung Kwon

    2015-03-21

    This paper describes an underwater micropropulsion principle where a gaseous bubble trapped in a suspended microchannel and oscillated by external acoustic excitation generates a propelling force. The propelling swimmer is designed and microfabricated from parylene on the microscale (the equivalent diameter of the cylindrical bubble is around 60 μm) using microphotolithography. The propulsion mechanism is studied and verified by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations as well as experiments. The acoustically excited and thus periodically oscillating bubble generates alternating flows of intake and discharge through an opening of the microchannel. As the Reynolds number of oscillating flow increases, the difference between the intake and discharge flows becomes significant enough to generate a net flow (microstreaming flow) and a propulsion force against the channel. As the size of the device is reduced, however, the Reynolds number is also reduced. To maintain the Reynolds number in a certain range and thus generate a strong propulsion force in the fabricated device, the oscillation amplitude of the bubble is maximized (resonated) and the oscillation frequency is set high (over 10 kHz). Propelling motions by a single bubble as well as an array of bubbles are achieved on the microscale. In addition, the microswimmer demonstrates payload carrying. This propulsion mechanism may be applied to microswimmers that navigate microfluidic environments and possibly narrow passages in human bodies to perform biosensing, drug delivery, imaging, and microsurgery.

  10. Hydrophilic strips for preventing air bubble formation in a microfluidic chamber.

    PubMed

    Choi, Munseok; Na, Yang; Kim, Sung-Jin

    2015-12-01

    In a microfluidic chamber, unwanted formation of air bubbles is a critical problem. Here, we present a hydrophilic strip array that prevents air bubble formation in a microfluidic chamber. The array is located on the top surface of the chamber, which has a large variation in width, and consists of a repeated arrangement of super- and moderately hydrophilic strips. This repeated arrangement allows a flat meniscus (i.e. liquid front) to form when various solutions consisting of a single stream or two parallel streams with different hydrophilicities move through the chamber. The flat meniscus produced by the array completely prevents the formation of bubbles. Without the array in the chamber, the meniscus shape is highly convex, and bubbles frequently form in the chamber. This hydrophilic strip array will facilitate the use of a microfluidic chamber with a large variation in width for various microfluidic applications.

  11. Sonoporation of suspension cells with a single cavitation bubble in a microfluidic confinement.

    PubMed

    Gac, Séverine Le; Zwaan, Ed; van den Berg, Albert; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2007-12-01

    We report here the sonoporation of HL60 (human promyelocytic leukemia) suspension cells in a microfluidic confinement using a single laser-induced cavitation bubble. Cavitation bubbles can induce membrane poration of cells located in their close vicinity. Membrane integrity of suspension cells placed in a microfluidic chamber is probed through either the calcein release out of calcein-loaded cells or the uptake of trypan blue. Cells that are located farther away than four times Rmax (maximum bubble radius) from the cavitation bubble center remain fully unaffected, while cells closer than 0.75 Rmax become porated with a probability of >75%. These results enable us to define a distance of 0.75 Rmax as a critical interaction distance of the cavitation bubble with HL60 suspension cells. These experiments suggest that flow-induced poration of suspension cells is applicable in lab-on-a-chip systems, and this might be an interesting alternative to electroporation.

  12. Predictive model for the size of bubbles and droplets created in microfluidic T-junctions.

    PubMed

    van Steijn, Volkert; Kleijn, Chris R; Kreutzer, Michiel T

    2010-10-07

    We present a closed-form expression that allows the reader to predict the size of bubbles and droplets created in T-junctions without fitting. Despite the wide use of microfluidic devices to create bubbles and droplets, a physically sound expression for the size of bubbles and droplets, key in many applications, did not yet exist. The theoretical foundation of our expression comprises three main ingredients: continuity, geometrics and recently gained understanding of the mechanism which leads to pinch-off. Our simple theoretical model explains why the size of bubbles and droplets strongly depends on the shape of a T-junction, and teaches how the shape can be tuned to obtain the desired size. We successfully validated our model experimentally by analyzing the formation of gas bubbles, as well as liquid droplets, in T-junctions with a wide variety of shapes under conditions typical to multiphase microfluidics.

  13. Bubble-free and pulse-free fluid delivery into microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yang Jun; Yeom, Eunseop; Seo, Eunseok; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2014-01-01

    The bubble-free and pulse-free fluid delivery is critical to reliable operation of microfluidic devices. In this study, we propose a new method for stable bubble-free and pulse-free fluid delivery in a microfluidic device. Gas bubbles are separated from liquid by using the density difference between liquid and gas in a closed cavity. The pulsatile flow caused by a peristaltic pump is stabilized via gas compressibility. To demonstrate the proposed method, a fluidic chamber which is composed of two needles for inlet and outlet, one needle for a pinch valve and a closed cavity is carefully designed. By manipulating the opening or closing of the pinch valve, fluids fill up the fluidic chamber or are delivered into a microfluidic device through the fluidic chamber in a bubble-free and pulse-free manner. The performance of the proposed method in bubble-free and pulse-free fluid delivery is quantitatively evaluated. The proposed method is then applied to monitor the temporal variations of fluidic flows of rat blood circulating within a complex fluidic network including a rat, a pinch valve, a reservoir, a peristaltic pump, and the microfluidic device. In addition, the deformability of red blood cells and platelet aggregation are quantitatively evaluated from the information on the temporal variations of blood flows in the microfluidic device. These experimental demonstrations confirm that the proposed method is a promising tool for stable, bubble-free, and pulse-free supply of fluids, including whole blood, into a microfluidic device. Furthermore, the proposed method will be used to quantify the biophysical properties of blood circulating within an extracorporeal bypass loop of animal models.

  14. Early microfluidic dissolution regime of CO2 bubbles in viscous oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauzade, Martin; Cubaud, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the initial dynamical behavior of dissolving micro-bubbles composed of carbon dioxide gas in highly viscous silicone oils over a range of flow rates and pressure conditions. Microfluidic periodic trains of monodisperse CO2 bubbles are used to probe the interrelation between bubble dissolution and high-viscosity multiphase flows in microgeometries. The effective mass diffusion flux across the interface is measured by tracking individual bubbles and monitoring their shape as they experience a size reduction. The initial steady mass flux is characterized using a dissolution coefficient that depends on the fluids physicochemical properties. Our findings show the possibility to control and exploit the interplay between capillary and mass transfer phenomena with highly viscous fluids in small-scale systems. This work is supported by NSF (CBET- 1150389).

  15. Initial microfluidic dissolution regime of CO2 bubbles in viscous oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauzade, Martin; Cubaud, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    We examine the initial dynamical behavior of dissolving microbubbles composed of carbon dioxide gas in highly viscous silicone oils over a range of flow rates and pressure conditions. Microfluidic periodic trains of CO2 bubbles are used to probe the interrelation between bubble dissolution and high-viscosity multiphase flows in microgeometries. We investigate bubble morphology from low to large capillary numbers and calculate the effective mass diffusion flux across the interface by tracking and monitoring individual bubbles during shrinkage. The initial flux is characterized using a dissolution coefficient that reveals the influence of the oil molecular weight on the dissolution process. Our findings show the possibility to control and exploit the interplay between capillary and mass transfer phenomena with highly viscous fluids in small-scale systems.

  16. Post-Formation Shrinkage and Stabilization of Microfluidic Bubbles in Lipid Solution.

    PubMed

    Shih, Roger; Lee, Abraham P

    2016-03-01

    Medical ultrasound imaging often employs ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs), injectable microbubbles stabilized by shells or membranes. In tissue, the compressible gas cores can strongly scatter acoustic signals, resonate, and emit harmonics. However, bubbles generated by conventional methods have nonuniform sizes, reducing the fraction that resonates with a given transducer. Microfluidic flow-focusing is an alternative production method which generates highly monodisperse bubbles with uniform constituents, enabling more-efficient contrast enhancement than current UCAs. Production size is tunable by adjusting gas pressure and solution flow rate, but solution effects on downstream stable size and lifetime have not been closely examined. This study therefore investigated several solution parameters, including the DSPC/DSPE-PEG2000 lipid ratio, concentration, viscosity, and preparation temperature to determine their effects on stabilization. It was found that bubble lifetime roughly correlated with stable size, which in turn was strongly influenced by primary-lipid-to-emulsifier ratio, analogous to its effects on conventional bubble yield and Langmuir-trough compressibility in existing studies. Raising DSPE-PEG2000 fraction in solution reduced bubble surface area in proportion to its reduction of lipid packing density at low compression in literature. In addition, the surface area was found to increase proportionately with lipid concentration above 2.1 mM. However, viscosities above or below 2.3-3.3 mPa·s seemed to reduce bubble size. Finally, lipid preparation at room temperature led to smaller bubbles compared to preparation near or above the primary lipid's phase transition point. Understanding these effects will further improve on postformation control over microfluidic bubble production, and facilitate size-tuning for optimal contrast enhancement.

  17. Effect of surface waves on the secondary Bjerknes force experienced by bubbles in a microfluidic channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doinikov, Alexander A.; Combriat, Thomas; Thibault, Pierre; Marmottant, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    An analytical expression is derived for the secondary Bjerknes force experienced by two cylindrical bubbles in a microfluidic channel with planar elastic walls. The derived expression takes into account that the bubbles generate two types of scattered acoustic waves: bulk waves that propagate in the fluid gap with the speed of sound and Lamb-type surface waves that propagate at the fluid-wall interfaces with a much lower speed than that of the bulk waves. It is shown that the surface waves cause the bubbles to form a bound pair in which the equilibrium interbubble distance is determined by the wavelength of the surface waves, which is much smaller than the acoustic wavelength. Comparison of theoretical and experimental results demonstrates good agreement.

  18. Effects of coupling, bubble size, and spatial arrangement on chaotic dynamics of microbubble cluster in ultrasonic fields.

    PubMed

    Dzaharudin, Fatimah; Suslov, Sergey A; Manasseh, Richard; Ooi, Andrew

    2013-11-01

    Microbubble clustering may occur when bubbles become bound to targeted surfaces or are grouped by acoustic radiation forces in medical diagnostic applications. The ability to identify the formation of such clusters from the ultrasound echoes may be of practical use. Nonlinear numerical simulations were performed on clusters of microbubbles modeled by the modified Keller-Miksis equations. Encapsulated bubbles were considered to mimic practical applications but the aim of the study was to examine the effects of inter-bubble spacing and bubble size on the dynamical behavior of the cluster and to see if chaotic or bifurcation characteristics could be helpful in diagnostics. It was found that as microbubbles were clustered closer together, their oscillation amplitude for a given applied ultrasound power was reduced, and for inter-bubble spacing smaller than about ten bubble radii nonlinear subharmonics and ultraharmonics were eliminated. For clustered microbubbles, as for isolated microbubbles, an increase in the applied acoustic power caused bifurcations and transition to chaos. The bifurcations preceding chaotic behavior were identified by Floquet analysis and confirmed to be of the period-doubling type. It was found that as the number of microbubbles in a cluster increased, regularization occurred at lower ultrasound power and more windows of order appeared.

  19. A bubble- and clogging-free microfluidic particle separation platform with multi-filtration.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yinuo; Wang, Yue; Ma, Zengshuai; Wang, Wenhui; Ye, Xiongying

    2016-11-15

    Microfiltration is a compelling method to separate particles based on their distinct size and deformability. However, this approach is prone to clogging after processing a certain number of particles and forming bubbles in the separation procedure, which often leads to malfunctioning of devices. In this work, we report a bubble-free and clogging-free microfluidic particle separation platform with high throughput. The platform features an integrated bidirectional micropump, a hydrophilic microporous filtration membrane and a hydrophobic porous degassing membrane. The bidirectional micropump enables the fluid to flow back and forth repeatedly, which flushes the filtration membrane and clears the filtration micropores for further filtration, and to flow forward to implement multi-filtration. The hydrophobic porous membrane on top of the separation channel removes air bubbles forming in the separation channel, improving the separation efficiency and operational reliability. The microbead mixture and undiluted whole blood were separated using the microfluidic chip. After 5 cycles of reverse flushing and forward re-filtration, a 2857-fold enrichment ratio and an 89.8% recovery rate of 10 μm microbeads were achieved for microbead separation with 99.9% removal efficiency of 2 μm microbeads. After 8 cycles, white blood cells were effectively separated from whole blood with a 396-fold enrichment ratio and a 70.6% recovery rate at a throughput of 39.1 μl min(-1), demonstrating that the platform can potentially be used in biomedical applications.

  20. A microfluidic chaotic mixer platform for cancer stem cell immunocapture and release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaner, Sebastian Wesley

    Isolation of exceedingly rare and ambiguous cells, like cancer stem cells (CSCs), from a pool of other abundant cells is a daunting task primarily due to the inadequately defined properties of such cells. With phenotypes of different CSCs fairly well-defined, immunocapturing of CSCs is a desirable cell-specific capture technique. A microfluidic device is a proven candidate that offers the platform for user-constrained microenvironments that can be optimized for small-scale volumetric flow experimentation. In this study, we show how a well-known passive micromixer design (staggered herringbone mixer - SHM) can be optimized to induce maximum chaotic mixing within antibody-laced microchannels and, ultimately, promote CSC capture. The device's (Cancer Stem Cell Capture Chip - CSC3 (TM)) principle design configuration is called: Single-Walled Staggered Herringbone (SWaSH). The CSC3 (TM) was constructed of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) foundation and thinly coated with an alginate hydrogel derivatized with streptavidin. The results of our work showed that the non-stickiness of alginate and antigen-specific antibodies allowed for superb target-specific cell isolation and negligible non-specific cell binding. Future engineering design directions include developing new configurations (e.g. Staggered High-Low Herringbone (SHiLoH) and offset SHiLoH) to optimize microvortex generation within the microchannels. This study's qualitative and quantitative results can help stimulate progress into refinements in device design and prospective advancements in cancer stem cell isolation and more comprehensive single-cell and cluster analysis.

  1. Exploring bubble oscillation and mass transfer enhancement in acoustic-assisted liquid-liquid extraction with a microfluidic device

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yuliang; Chindam, Chandraprakash; Nama, Nitesh; Yang, Shikuan; Lu, Mengqian; Zhao, Yanhui; Mai, John D.; Costanzo, Francesco; Huang, Tony Jun

    2015-01-01

    We investigated bubble oscillation and its induced enhancement of mass transfer in a liquid-liquid extraction process with an acoustically-driven, bubble-based microfluidic device. The oscillation of individually trapped bubbles, of known sizes, in microchannels was studied at both a fixed frequency, and over a range of frequencies. Resonant frequencies were analytically identified and were found to be in agreement with the experimental observations. The acoustic streaming induced by the bubble oscillation was identified as the cause of this enhanced extraction. Experiments extracting Rhodanmine B from an aqueous phase (DI water) to an organic phase (1-octanol) were performed to determine the relationship between extraction efficiency and applied acoustic power. The enhanced efficiency in mass transport via these acoustic-energy-assisted processes was confirmed by comparisons against a pure diffusion-based process. PMID:26223474

  2. Exploring bubble oscillation and mass transfer enhancement in acoustic-assisted liquid-liquid extraction with a microfluidic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yuliang; Chindam, Chandraprakash; Nama, Nitesh; Yang, Shikuan; Lu, Mengqian; Zhao, Yanhui; Mai, John D.; Costanzo, Francesco; Huang, Tony Jun

    2015-07-01

    We investigated bubble oscillation and its induced enhancement of mass transfer in a liquid-liquid extraction process with an acoustically-driven, bubble-based microfluidic device. The oscillation of individually trapped bubbles, of known sizes, in microchannels was studied at both a fixed frequency, and over a range of frequencies. Resonant frequencies were analytically identified and were found to be in agreement with the experimental observations. The acoustic streaming induced by the bubble oscillation was identified as the cause of this enhanced extraction. Experiments extracting Rhodanmine B from an aqueous phase (DI water) to an organic phase (1-octanol) were performed to determine the relationship between extraction efficiency and applied acoustic power. The enhanced efficiency in mass transport via these acoustic-energy-assisted processes was confirmed by comparisons against a pure diffusion-based process.

  3. Chaotic advection in three-dimensional stationary vortex-breakdown bubbles: Šil'nikov's chaos and the devil's staircase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Ventikos, Yiannis; Lackey, Tahirih C.

    2001-10-01

    We study the motion of non-diffusive, passive particles within steady, three-dimensional vortex breakdown bubbles in a closed cylindrical container with a rotating bottom. The velocity fields are obtained by solving numerically the three-dimensional Navier Stokes equations. We clarify the relationship between the manifold structure of axisymmetric (ideal) vortex breakdown bubbles and those of the three-dimensional real-life (laboratory) flow fields, which exhibit chaotic particle paths. We show that the upstream and downstream fixed hyperbolic points in the former are transformed into spiral-out and spiral-in saddles, respectively, in the latter. Material elements passing repeatedly through the two saddle foci undergo intense stretching and folding, leading to the growth of infinitely many Smale horseshoes and sensitive dependence on initial conditions via the mechanism discovered by Šil'nikov (1965). Chaotic Šil'nikov orbits spiral upward (from the spiral-in to the spiral-out saddle) around the axis and then downward near the surface, wrapping around the toroidal region in the interior of the bubble. Poincaré maps reveal that the dynamics of this region is rich and consistent with what we would generically anticipate for a mildly perturbed, volume-preserving, three-dimensional dynamical system (MacKay 1994; Mezic & Wiggins 1994a). Nested KAM-tori, cantori, and periodic islands are found embedded within stochastic regions. We calculate residence times of upstream-originating non-diffusive particles and show that when mapped to initial release locations the resulting maps exhibit fractal properties. We argue that there exists a Cantor set of initial conditions that leads to arbitrarily long residence times within the breakdown region. We also show that the emptying of the bubble does not take place in a continuous manner but rather in a sequence of discrete bursting events during which clusters of particles exit the bubble at once. A remarkable finding in this

  4. Monodisperse, submicrometer droplets via condensation of microfluidic-generated gas bubbles.

    PubMed

    Seo, Minseok; Matsuura, Naomi

    2012-09-10

    Microfluidics (MFs) can produce monodisperse droplets with precise size control. However, the synthesis of monodisperse droplets much smaller than the minimum feature size of the microfluidic device (MFD) remains challenging, thus limiting the production of submicrometer droplets. To overcome the minimum micrometer-scale droplet sizes that can be generated using typical MFDs, the droplet material is heated above its boiling point (bp), and then MFs is used to produce monodisperse micrometer-scale bubbles (MBs) that are easily formed in the size regime where standard MFDs have excellent size control. After MBs are formed, they are cooled, condensing into dramatically smaller droplets that are beyond the size limit achievable using the original MFD, with a size decrease corresponding to the density difference between the gas and liquid phases of the droplet material. Herein, it is shown experimentally that monodisperse, submicrometer droplets of predictable sizes can be condensed from a monodisperse population of MBs as generated by MFs. Using perfluoropentane (PFP) as a representative solvent due to its low bp (29.2 °C), it is demonstrated that monodisperse PFP MBs can be produced at MFD temperatures >3.6 °C above the bp of PFP over a wide range of sizes (i.e., diameters from 2 to 200 μm). Independent of initial size, the generated MBs shrink rapidly in size from about 3 to 0 °C above the bp of PFP, corresponding to a phase change from gas to liquid, after which they shrink more slowly to form fully condensed droplets with diameters 5.0 ± 0.1 times smaller than the initial size of the MBs, even in the submicrometer size regime. This new method is versatile and flexible, and may be applied to any type of low-bp solvent for the manufacture of different submicrometer droplets for which precisely controlled dimensions are required.

  5. Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosperetti, Andrea

    2004-06-01

    Vanitas vanitatum et omnia vanitas: bubbles are emptiness, non-liquid, a tiny cloud shielding a mathematical singularity. Born from chance, a violent and brief life ending in the union with the (nearly) infinite. But a wealth of phenomena spring forth from this nothingness: underwater noise, sonoluminescence, boiling, and many others. Some recent results on a "blinking bubble" micropump and vapor bubbles in sound fields are outlined. The last section describes Leonardo da Vinci's observation of the non-rectlinear ascent of buoyant bubbles and justifies the name Leonardo's paradox recently attributed to this phenomenon.

  6. Chaotic oscillation of a bubble in a weakly viscous dielectric fluid under electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, J. M.; Kim, P. J.; Kang, I. S.

    2001-10-01

    The dynamics of a bubble in a weakly viscous dielectric fluid under electric fields is studied. The dynamical equations for the volume and shape mode oscillations are derived using the domain perturbation method with first-order accuracy in deformation. For the volume mode oscillation, we obtain the modified Rayleigh-Plesset equation which includes a forcing term due to the effect of electric field. For the shape mode oscillations, the Prosperetti-Seminara equation [Phys. Fluids 21, 1465 (1978)] is also extended. The dynamical equations are analyzed with two types of electric fields: the uniform field and the axisymmetric straining field. Equilibrium analysis is performed to find the equilibrium points in the phase planes and their stabilities in static electric fields. Then, the effects of time-periodic electric fields on the bubble dynamics are considered at two levels of viscosity effect [the inviscid limit and the case of Re=O(10)]. The nonlinear dynamics theory is used for analysis of the complicated volume and shape mode oscillations.

  7. Acoustic streaming produced by a cylindrical bubble undergoing volume and translational oscillations in a microfluidic channel.

    PubMed

    Doinikov, Alexander A; Combriat, Thomas; Thibault, Pierre; Marmottant, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    A theoretical model is developed for acoustic streaming generated by a cylindrical bubble confined in a fluid channel between two planar elastic walls. The bubble is assumed to undergo volume and translational oscillations. The volume oscillation is caused by an imposed acoustic pressure field and generates the bulk scattered wave in the fluid gap and Lamb-type surface waves propagating along the fluid-wall interfaces. The translational oscillation is induced by the velocity field of an external sound source such as another bubble or an oscillatory fluid flow. The acoustic streaming is assumed to result from the interaction of the volume and the translational modes of the bubble oscillations. The general solutions for the linear equations of fluid motion and the equations of acoustic streaming are calculated with no restrictions on the ratio between the viscous penetration depth and the bubble size. Approximate solutions for the limit of low viscosity are provided as well. Simulations of streamline patterns show that the geometry of the streaming resembles flows generated by a source dipole, while the vortex orientation is governed by the driving frequency, bubble size, and the distance of the bubble from the source of translational excitation. Experimental verification of the developed theory is performed using data for streaming generated by bubble pairs.

  8. Acoustic streaming produced by a cylindrical bubble undergoing volume and translational oscillations in a microfluidic channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doinikov, Alexander A.; Combriat, Thomas; Thibault, Pierre; Marmottant, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    A theoretical model is developed for acoustic streaming generated by a cylindrical bubble confined in a fluid channel between two planar elastic walls. The bubble is assumed to undergo volume and translational oscillations. The volume oscillation is caused by an imposed acoustic pressure field and generates the bulk scattered wave in the fluid gap and Lamb-type surface waves propagating along the fluid-wall interfaces. The translational oscillation is induced by the velocity field of an external sound source such as another bubble or an oscillatory fluid flow. The acoustic streaming is assumed to result from the interaction of the volume and the translational modes of the bubble oscillations. The general solutions for the linear equations of fluid motion and the equations of acoustic streaming are calculated with no restrictions on the ratio between the viscous penetration depth and the bubble size. Approximate solutions for the limit of low viscosity are provided as well. Simulations of streamline patterns show that the geometry of the streaming resembles flows generated by a source dipole, while the vortex orientation is governed by the driving frequency, bubble size, and the distance of the bubble from the source of translational excitation. Experimental verification of the developed theory is performed using data for streaming generated by bubble pairs.

  9. Computations of Chaotic Flows in Micromixers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-07

    microfluidic mixer and gas bubble filter driven by thermal bubble micropump . Sensor Actuat. A-Phys. 97-8, 665–671. Ukita, H. & Kanehira, M. 2002 A...Goto, H., Matsumoto, M. & Yada, T. 1998 Micro mixer incorporated with piezoelectri- cally driven valvless micropump microTAS 1998, 177–180. 17 A Bx

  10. Instability of two rising bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galper, Alexander; Miloh, Touvia

    1999-11-01

    We consider the stability of two rising ideal gas spherical bubbles subject of an intrinsic dynamics. The dynamics is prescribed or governed by the Rayleigh-Plesset equation adjusted for the pressure field induced by the other bubble in the center of each. Hence, each bubble exhibits linear (nonlinear) oscillations about a stable equilibrium. In order to treat the Liapunov stability problem of bubbles spatial motion we develop the corresponding Hamiltonian formalism. Thus, we find that the oscillations can stabilize the side-by-side and one-below-the-other bubbles translation. These types of translation are known to be asymptotically stable (unstable) for the motion of a pair of purely spherical rigid bubbles. The stabilization phenomenon depends on the frequency and phase difference in the bubbles fast oscillations. The ``rigid'' bubbles theory of the motion is known to have certain discrepancies with the relevant experiments. In order to remove them it is proposed to account for the vorticity wake behind each bubble. Nevertheless, we are able to explain the experiments remaining within the potential framework. Finally, we consider the case of chaotic pulsations. The motion of the two bubbles can also inherit a chaotic character. It results, in turn, in a certain strange attractor for the spatial motion of a pair.

  11. Microfluidic Biochip Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panzarella, Charles

    2004-01-01

    As humans prepare for the exploration of our solar system, there is a growing need for miniaturized medical and environmental diagnostic devices for use on spacecrafts, especially during long-duration space missions where size and power requirements are critical. In recent years, the biochip (or Lab-on-a- Chip) has emerged as a technology that might be able to satisfy this need. In generic terms, a biochip is a miniaturized microfluidic device analogous to the electronic microchip that ushered in the digital age. It consists of tiny microfluidic channels, pumps and valves that transport small amounts of sample fluids to biosensors that can perform a variety of tests on those fluids in near real time. It has the obvious advantages of being small, lightweight, requiring less sample fluids and reagents and being more sensitive and efficient than larger devices currently in use. Some of the desired space-based applications would be to provide smaller, more robust devices for analyzing blood, saliva and urine and for testing water and food supplies for the presence of harmful contaminants and microorganisms. Our group has undertaken the goal of adapting as well as improving upon current biochip technology for use in long-duration microgravity environments. In addition to developing computational models of the microfluidic channels, valves and pumps that form the basis of every biochip, we are also trying to identify potential problems that could arise in reduced gravity and develop solutions to these problems. One such problem is due to the prevalence of bubbly sample fluids in microgravity. A bubble trapped in a microfluidic channel could be detrimental to the operation of a biochip. Therefore, the process of bubble formation in microgravity needs to be studied, and a model of this process has been developed and used to understand how bubbles develop and move through biochip components. It is clear that some type of bubble filter would be necessary in Space, and

  12. Designing for chaos: applications of chaotic advection at the microscale.

    PubMed

    Stremler, Mark A; Haselton, F R; Aref, Hassan

    2004-05-15

    Chaotic advection can play an important role in efficient microfluidic mixers. We discuss a design paradigm that exploits chaotic advection and illustrate by two recent examples, namely enhancing gene expression profiling and constructing an in-line microfluidic mixing channel, how application of this paradigm has led to successful micromixers. We suggest that 'designing for chaos', that is, basing practical mixer design on chaotic advection analysis, is a promising approach to adopt in this developing field which otherwise has little to guide it and is constrained by issues of scale and manufacturability.

  13. Vapor Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosperetti, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    This article reviews the fundamental physics of vapor bubbles in liquids. Work on bubble growth and condensation for stationary and translating bubbles is summarized and the differences with bubbles containing a permanent gas stressed. In particular, it is shown that the natural frequency of a vapor bubble is proportional not to the inverse radius, as for a gas bubble, but to the inverse radius raised to the power 2/3. Permanent gas dissolved in the liquid diffuses into the bubble with strong effects on its dynamics. The effects of the diffusion of heat and mass on the propagation of pressure waves in a vaporous bubbly liquid are discussed. Other topics briefly touched on include thermocapillary flow, plasmonic nanobubbles, and vapor bubbles in an immiscible liquid.

  14. Tuning bubbly structures in microchannels

    PubMed Central

    Vuong, Sharon M.; Anna, Shelley L.

    2012-01-01

    Foams have many useful applications that arise from the structure and size distribution of the bubbles within them. Microfluidics allows for the rapid formation of uniform bubbles, where bubble size and volume fraction are functions of the input gas pressure, liquid flow rate, and device geometry. After formation, the microchannel confines the bubbles and determines the resulting foam structure. Bubbly structures can vary from a single row (“dripping”), to multiple rows (“alternating”), to densely packed bubbles (“bamboo” and dry foams). We show that each configuration arises in a distinct region of the operating space defined by bubble volume and volume fraction. We describe the boundaries between these regions using geometric arguments and show that the boundaries are functions of the channel aspect ratio. We compare these geometric arguments with foam structures observed in experiments using flow-focusing, T-junction, and co-flow designs to generate stable nitrogen bubbles in aqueous surfactant solution and stable droplets in oil containing dissolved surfactant. The outcome of this work is a set of design parameters that can be used to achieve desired foam structures as a function of device geometry and experimental control parameters. PMID:22655008

  15. Chaotic transport in dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggins, Stephen

    The subject of chaotic transport in dynamical systems is examined from the viewpoint of problems of phase space transport. The examples considered include uniform elliptical vortices in external linear time-dependent velocity fields; capture and passage through resonance in celestial mechanics; bubble dynamics in straining flows; and photodissociation of molecules. The discussion covers transport in two-dimensional maps; convective mixing and transport problems in fluid mechanics; transport in quasi-periodically forced systems; Markov models; and transport in k-degree-of-freedom Hamiltonian systems.

  16. Bubble and bubble cloud dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2000-07-01

    Cavitation bubbles are formed from small air bubbles, so-called nuclei, with the surrounding pressure reduction caused by the flow, and then, the bubbles shrink and collapse with the surrounding pressure rise. Such volumetric changes of bubbles are calculated in detail and it is found that they are significantly influenced by the internal phenomena, such as thermal diffusion, mist formation due to a homogeneous condensation, mass diffusion between vapor and noncondensable gas, heat and mass transfer through the bubble wall. The structure in cavitating flow interacts with the cavitation bubbles, and those bubbles form a cloud cavitation. It is well known that cloud cavitation is one of the most destructive forms. The behavior of bubble clouds is simulated numerically. An inward propagating shock wave is formed during the collapse of the bubble cloud, and the shock wave and its precursor are focused at the cloud center area. These phenomena associate high frequency pressure oscillations and violent bubble collapses. Those bubble collapses emit high pressure peaks, which are several hundreds times larger than that of a single bubble collapse.

  17. Manipulating bubbles with secondary Bjerknes forces

    SciTech Connect

    Lanoy, Maxime; Derec, Caroline; Leroy, Valentin; Tourin, Arnaud

    2015-11-23

    Gas bubbles in a sound field are submitted to a radiative force, known as the secondary Bjerknes force. We propose an original experimental setup that allows us to investigate in detail this force between two bubbles, as a function of the sonication frequency, as well as the bubbles radii and distance. We report the observation of both attractive and, more interestingly, repulsive Bjerknes force, when the two bubbles are driven in antiphase. Our experiments show the importance of taking multiple scatterings into account, which leads to a strong acoustic coupling of the bubbles when their radii are similar. Our setup demonstrates the accuracy of secondary Bjerknes forces for attracting or repealing a bubble, and could lead to new acoustic tools for noncontact manipulation in microfluidic devices.

  18. Suspended microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Casavant, Benjamin P; Berthier, Erwin; Theberge, Ashleigh B; Berthier, Jean; Montanez-Sauri, Sara I; Bischel, Lauren L; Brakke, Kenneth; Hedman, Curtis J; Bushman, Wade; Keller, Nancy P; Beebe, David J

    2013-06-18

    Although the field of microfluidics has made significant progress in bringing new tools to address biological questions, the accessibility and adoption of microfluidics within the life sciences are still limited. Open microfluidic systems have the potential to lower the barriers to adoption, but the absence of robust design rules has hindered their use. Here, we present an open microfluidic platform, suspended microfluidics, that uses surface tension to fill and maintain a fluid in microscale structures devoid of a ceiling and floor. We developed a simple and ubiquitous model predicting fluid flow in suspended microfluidic systems and show that it encompasses many known capillary phenomena. Suspended microfluidics was used to create arrays of collagen membranes, mico Dots (μDots), in a horizontal plane separating two fluidic chambers, demonstrating a transwell platform able to discern collective or individual cellular invasion. Further, we demonstrated that μDots can also be used as a simple multiplexed 3D cellular growth platform. Using the μDot array, we probed the combined effects of soluble factors and matrix components, finding that laminin mitigates the growth suppression properties of the matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor GM6001. Based on the same fluidic principles, we created a suspended microfluidic metabolite extraction platform using a multilayer biphasic system that leverages the accessibility of open microchannels to retrieve steroids and other metabolites readily from cell culture. Suspended microfluidics brings the high degree of fluidic control and unique functionality of closed microfluidics into the highly accessible and robust platform of open microfluidics.

  19. Microfluidic electronics.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shi; Wu, Zhigang

    2012-08-21

    Microfluidics, a field that has been well-established for several decades, has seen extensive applications in the areas of biology, chemistry, and medicine. However, it might be very hard to imagine how such soft microfluidic devices would be used in other areas, such as electronics, in which stiff, solid metals, insulators, and semiconductors have previously dominated. Very recently, things have radically changed. Taking advantage of native properties of microfluidics, advances in microfluidics-based electronics have shown great potential in numerous new appealing applications, e.g. bio-inspired devices, body-worn healthcare and medical sensing systems, and ergonomic units, in which conventional rigid, bulky electronics are facing insurmountable obstacles to fulfil the demand on comfortable user experience. Not only would the birth of microfluidic electronics contribute to both the microfluidics and electronics fields, but it may also shape the future of our daily life. Nevertheless, microfluidic electronics are still at a very early stage, and significant efforts in research and development are needed to advance this emerging field. The intention of this article is to review recent research outcomes in the field of microfluidic electronics, and address current technical challenges and issues. The outlook of future development in microfluidic electronic devices and systems, as well as new fabrication techniques, is also discussed. Moreover, the authors would like to inspire both the microfluidics and electronics communities to further exploit this newly-established field.

  20. Bubble Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrigan, Jackie

    2004-01-01

    A method of energy production that is capable of low pollutant emissions is fundamental to one of the four pillars of NASA s Aeronautics Blueprint: Revolutionary Vehicles. Bubble combustion, a new engine technology currently being developed at Glenn Research Center promises to provide low emissions combustion in support of NASA s vision under the Emissions Element because it generates power, while minimizing the production of carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxides (NOx), both known to be Greenhouse gases. and allows the use of alternative fuels such as corn oil, low-grade fuels, and even used motor oil. Bubble combustion is analogous to the inverse of spray combustion: the difference between bubble and spray combustion is that spray combustion is spraying a liquid in to a gas to form droplets, whereas bubble combustion involves injecting a gas into a liquid to form gaseous bubbles. In bubble combustion, the process for the ignition of the bubbles takes place on a time scale of less than a nanosecond and begins with acoustic waves perturbing each bubble. This perturbation causes the local pressure to drop below the vapor pressure of the liquid thus producing cavitation in which the bubble diameter grows, and upon reversal of the oscillating pressure field, the bubble then collapses rapidly with the aid of the high surface tension forces acting on the wall of the bubble. The rapid and violent collapse causes the temperatures inside the bubbles to soar as a result of adiabatic heating. As the temperatures rise, the gaseous contents of the bubble ignite with the bubble itself serving as its own combustion chamber. After ignition, this is the time in the bubble s life cycle where power is generated, and CO2, and NOx among other species, are produced. However, the pollutants CO2 and NOx are absorbed into the surrounding liquid. The importance of bubble combustion is that it generates power using a simple and compact device. We conducted a parametric study using CAVCHEM

  1. Bio-microfluidics: biomaterials and biomimetic designs.

    PubMed

    Domachuk, Peter; Tsioris, Konstantinos; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G; Kaplan, David L

    2010-01-12

    Bio-microfluidics applies biomaterials and biologically inspired structural designs (biomimetics) to microfluidic devices. Microfluidics, the techniques for constraining fluids on the micrometer and sub-micrometer scale, offer applications ranging from lab-on-a-chip to optofluidics. Despite this wealth of applications, the design of typical microfluidic devices imparts relatively simple, laminar behavior on fluids and is realized using materials and techniques from silicon planar fabrication. On the other hand, highly complex microfluidic behavior is commonplace in nature, where fluids with nonlinear rheology flow through chaotic vasculature composed from a range of biopolymers. In this Review, the current state of bio-microfluidic materials, designs and applications are examined. Biopolymers enable bio-microfluidic devices with versatile functionalization chemistries, flexibility in fabrication, and biocompatibility in vitro and in vivo. Polymeric materials such as alginate, collagen, chitosan, and silk are being explored as bulk and film materials for bio-microfluidics. Hydrogels offer options for mechanically functional devices for microfluidic systems such as self-regulating valves, microlens arrays and drug release systems, vital for integrated bio-microfluidic devices. These devices including growth factor gradients to study cell responses, blood analysis, biomimetic capillary designs, and blood vessel tissue culture systems, as some recent examples of inroads in the field that should lead the way in a new generation of microfluidic devices for bio-related needs and applications. Perhaps one of the most intriguing directions for the future will be fully implantable microfluidic devices that will also integrate with existing vasculature and slowly degrade to fully recapitulate native tissue structure and function, yet serve critical interim functions, such as tissue maintenance, drug release, mechanical support, and cell delivery.

  2. Slowing down bubbles with sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulain, Cedric; Dangla, Remie; Guinard, Marion

    2009-11-01

    We present experimental evidence that a bubble moving in a fluid in which a well-chosen acoustic noise is superimposed can be significantly slowed down even for moderate acoustic pressure. Through mean velocity measurements, we show that a condition for this effect to occur is for the acoustic noise spectrum to match or overlap the bubble's fundamental resonant mode. We render the bubble's oscillations and translational movements using high speed video. We show that radial oscillations (Rayleigh-Plesset type) have no effect on the mean velocity, while above a critical pressure, a parametric type instability (Faraday waves) is triggered and gives rise to nonlinear surface oscillations. We evidence that these surface waves are subharmonic and responsible for the bubble's drag increase. When the acoustic intensity is increased, Faraday modes interact and the strongly nonlinear oscillations behave randomly, leading to a random behavior of the bubble's trajectory and consequently to a higher slow down. Our observations may suggest new strategies for bubbly flow control, or two-phase microfluidic devices. It might also be applicable to other elastic objects, such as globules, cells or vesicles, for medical applications such as elasticity-based sorting.

  3. Sinking Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Jeremy; Ewoldt, Randy

    2016-11-01

    Intuition tells us that bubbles will rise and steel objects will sink in liquids, though here we describe the opposite. With experimental demonstration and theoretical rationale, we describe how the motion of containers of liquid with immersed solid objects and air bubbles can cause curious behaviors: sinking bubbles and rising high-density particles. Bubbles and solid spheres of diameter on the order of a few millimeters are introduced into fluids with different rheological constitutive behaviors. Imposed motion of the rigid container allows for control of the trajectories of the immersed particles - without the container imparting direct shearing motion on the fluid. Results demonstrate the necessary conditions to prevent or produce net motion of the bubbles and heavy particles, both with and against gravitational expectations.

  4. Bubble, Bubble, Toil and Trouble.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Bubbles are a fun way to introduce the concepts of surface tension, intermolecular forces, and the use of surfactants. Presents two activities in which students add chemicals to liquid dishwashing detergent with water in order to create longer lasting bubbles. (ASK)

  5. Bubble diagnostics

    DOEpatents

    Visuri, Steven R.; Mammini, Beth M.; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Celliers, Peter M.

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is intended as a means of diagnosing the presence of a gas bubble and incorporating the information into a feedback system for opto-acoustic thrombolysis. In opto-acoustic thrombolysis, pulsed laser radiation at ultrasonic frequencies is delivered intraluminally down an optical fiber and directed toward a thrombus or otherwise occluded vessel. Dissolution of the occlusion is therefore mediated through ultrasonic action of propagating pressure or shock waves. A vapor bubble in the fluid surrounding the occlusion may form as a result of laser irradiation. This vapor bubble may be used to directly disrupt the occlusion or as a means of producing a pressure wave. It is desirable to detect the formation and follow the lifetime of the vapor bubble. Knowledge of the bubble formation and lifetime yields critical information as to the maximum size of the bubble, density of the absorbed radiation, and properties of the absorbing material. This information can then be used in a feedback system to alter the irradiation conditions.

  6. Period-adding bifurcations and chaos in a bubble column.

    PubMed

    Piassi, Viviane S M; Tufaile, Alberto; Sartorelli, Jose Carlos

    2004-06-01

    We obtained period-adding bifurcations in a bubble formation experiment. Using the air flow rate as the control parameter in this experiment, the bubble emission from the nozzle in a viscous fluid undergoes from single bubbling to a sequence of periodic bifurcations of k to k+1 periods, occasionally interspersed with some chaotic regions. Our main assumption is that this period-adding bifurcation in bubble formation depends on flow rate variations in the chamber under the nozzle. This assumption was experimentally tested by placing a tube between the air reservoir and the chamber under the nozzle in the bubble column experiment. By increasing the tube length, more period-adding bifurcations were observed. We associated two main types of bubble growth to the flow rate fluctuations inside the chamber for different bubbling regimes. We also studied the properties of piecewise nonlinear maps obtained from the experimental reconstructed attractors, and we concluded that this experiment is a spatially extended system.

  7. Stretching cells and delivering drugs with bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohl, Claus-Dieter; Li, Fenfang; Chon U, Chan; Gao, Yu; Xu, Chenjie

    2015-11-01

    In this talk we'll review our work on impulsive cell stretching using cavitation bubbles and magnetic microbubbles for drug delivery. For sufficient short times cells can sustain a much larger areal strain than the yield strain obtained from quasi-static stretching. Experiments with red blood cells show that even then the rupture of the cell is slow process; it is caused by diffusive swelling rather than mechanical violation of the plasma membrane. In the second part we'll discuss bubbles coated with magnetic and drug loaded particles. These bubbles offer an interesting vector for on demand delivery of drugs using mild ultrasound and magnetic fields. We report on basic experiments in microfluidic channels revealing the release of the agent during bubble oscillations and first in vivo validation with a mouse tumor model. Singapore National Research Foundations Competitive Research Program funding (NRF-CRP9-2011-04).

  8. Primordial Bubbles within Primordial Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Occhionero, Franco; Amendola, Luca; Corasaniti, Pier Stefano

    The nucleation of primordial bubbles during an inflationary phase transition has been suggested to promote the formation of structure either above or below the horizon, depending on whether the nucleation occurs more or less than 60 e-folds before the end of inflation. Here we propose a mechanism which has both features and produces subhorizon cavities up to hundreds of h-1 Mpc -- where excess power is observed -- inside superhorizon bubbles, i.e. in open universes. For this purpose we build a new inflationary two-field model with two vacuum channels in the potential surface: by modulating the energy difference between these channels, episodes of back and forth transition occur in sequence during inflation. Thus, one physical process may i) reconcile inflation with openness and ii) seed a distribution of observable voids. Bubble spectra are given in terms of phenomenological parameters which in turn are functions of microscopic physical parameters. In principle large scale structure constrains fundamental physics: for example, to account for power at scales of hundreds of h-1 Mpc the singularity in the Euclidean action -- which separates the first from the second phase transition -- must be mild enough. The smoking gun of the process might be the imprint of non-Gaussian, ring-like signals on the microwave background at l > 1000 by the subhorizon bubbles. On the other end of the spectrum, the contribution to l =1,2 from the off-centerness of the observer in the open bubble, is being evaluated.

  9. Leverage bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wanfeng; Woodard, Ryan; Sornette, Didier

    2012-01-01

    Leverage is strongly related to liquidity in a market and lack of liquidity is considered a cause and/or consequence of the recent financial crisis. A repurchase agreement is a financial instrument where a security is sold simultaneously with an agreement to buy it back at a later date. Repurchase agreement (repo) market size is a very important element in calculating the overall leverage in a financial market. Therefore, studying the behavior of repo market size can help to understand a process that can contribute to the birth of a financial crisis. We hypothesize that herding behavior among large investors led to massive over-leveraging through the use of repos, resulting in a bubble (built up over the previous years) and subsequent crash in this market in early 2008. We use the Johansen-Ledoit-Sornette (JLS) model of rational expectation bubbles and behavioral finance to study the dynamics of the repo market that led to the crash. The JLS model qualifies a bubble by the presence of characteristic patterns in the price dynamics, called log-periodic power law (LPPL) behavior. We show that there was significant LPPL behavior in the market before that crash and that the predicted range of times predicted by the model for the end of the bubble is consistent with the observations.

  10. Tiny Bubbles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Hy

    1985-01-01

    A simple oxygen-collecting device (easily constructed from glass jars and a lid) can show bubbles released by water plants during photosynthesis. Suggestions are given for: (1) testing the collected gas; (2) using various carbon dioxide sources; and (3) measuring respiration. (DH)

  11. Optical microfluidics

    SciTech Connect

    Kotz, K.T.; Noble, K.A.; Faris, G.W.

    2004-09-27

    We present a method for the control of small droplets based on the thermal Marangoni effect using laser heating. With this approach, droplets covering five orders of magnitude in volume ({approx}1.7 {mu}L to 14 pL), immersed in decanol, were moved on an unmodified polystyrene surface, with speeds of up to 3 mm/s. When two droplets were brought into contact, they spontaneously fused and rapidly mixed in less than 33 ms. This optically addressed microfluidic approach has many advantages for microfluidic transport, including exceptional reconfigurability, low intersample contamination, large volume range, extremely simple substrates, no electrical connections, and ready scaling to large arrays.

  12. Bubble Drag Reduction Requires Large Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verschoof, Ruben A.; van der Veen, Roeland C. A.; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-09-01

    In the maritime industry, the injection of air bubbles into the turbulent boundary layer under the ship hull is seen as one of the most promising techniques to reduce the overall fuel consumption. However, the exact mechanism behind bubble drag reduction is unknown. Here we show that bubble drag reduction in turbulent flow dramatically depends on the bubble size. By adding minute concentrations (6 ppm) of the surfactant Triton X-100 into otherwise completely unchanged strongly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow containing bubbles, we dramatically reduce the drag reduction from more than 40% to about 4%, corresponding to the trivial effect of the bubbles on the density and viscosity of the liquid. The reason for this striking behavior is that the addition of surfactants prevents bubble coalescence, leading to much smaller bubbles. Our result demonstrates that bubble deformability is crucial for bubble drag reduction in turbulent flow and opens the door for an optimization of the process.

  13. Synchronization of chaotic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pecora, Louis M.; Carroll, Thomas L.

    2015-09-15

    We review some of the history and early work in the area of synchronization in chaotic systems. We start with our own discovery of the phenomenon, but go on to establish the historical timeline of this topic back to the earliest known paper. The topic of synchronization of chaotic systems has always been intriguing, since chaotic systems are known to resist synchronization because of their positive Lyapunov exponents. The convergence of the two systems to identical trajectories is a surprise. We show how people originally thought about this process and how the concept of synchronization changed over the years to a more geometric view using synchronization manifolds. We also show that building synchronizing systems leads naturally to engineering more complex systems whose constituents are chaotic, but which can be tuned to output various chaotic signals. We finally end up at a topic that is still in very active exploration today and that is synchronization of dynamical systems in networks of oscillators.

  14. Photothermal generation of microbubbles on plasmonic nanostructures inside microfluidic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingting; Li, Ming; Santos, Greggy M.; Zhao, Fusheng; Shih, Wei-Chuan

    2016-03-01

    Microbubbles have been utilized as micro-pumps, micro-mixers, micro-valves, micro-robots and surface cleaners. Various generation techniques can be found in the literature, including resistive heating, hydrodynamic methods, illuminating patterned metal films and noble metal nanoparticles of Au or Ag. We present photothermal microbubble generation by irradiating nanoporous gold disk covered microfluidic channels. The size of the microbubble can be controlled by adjusting the laser power. The dynamics of both bubble growth and shrinkage are studied. The advantages of this technique are flexible bubble generation locations, long bubble lifetimes, no need for light-adsorbing dyes, high controllability over bubble size, low power consumption, etc. This technique has the potential to provide new flow control functions in microfluidic devices.

  15. Mixing enhancement for high viscous fluids in a microfluidic chamber.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shasha; Huang, Xiaoyang; Yang, Chun

    2011-06-21

    Due to small channel dimensions and laminar flows, mixing in microfluidic systems is always a challenging task, especially for high viscous fluids. Here we report a method of enhancing microfluidic mixing for high viscous fluids using acoustically induced bubbles. The bubbles can be generated in an acoustically profiled microfluidic structure by using a piezoelectric disk activated at a working frequency range between 1.5 kHz and 2 kHz. The mixing enhancement is achieved through interactions between the oscillating bubbles and fluids. Both experimental studies and numerical simulations are conducted. In the experiments, DI water-glycerol mixture solutions with various viscosities were used. The results, based on the mixing efficiency calculated from experimentally acquired fluorescent images, showed that good mixing can occur in the DI water-glycerol solutions with their maximum viscosity up to 44.75 mPa s, which to our best knowledge is the highest viscosity of fluids in microfluidic mixing experiments. To explain the mechanisms of bubble generation, the numerical simulation results show that, corresponding to the actuations at the working frequency range used in the experiment, there exists a low pressure region where the pressure is lower than the water vapor pressure in the DI water-glycerol solutions, resulting in the generation of bubbles.

  16. Chaotic Synchronization between Coupled Pancreatic β-Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lading, B.; Mosekilde, E.; Yanchuk, S.; Maistrenko, Y.

    The paper first describes the main bifurcation structure for a typical model of an insulin producing pancreatic β-cell. Considering a system of two coupled identical and chaotically spiking β-cells, the paper continues to examine the bifurcations through which low periodic orbits embedded in the synchronized chaotic state lose their transverse stability and produce the characteristic picture of locally and globally riddled basins of attraction. We discuss the different types of riddled basins with the associated phenomena of attractor bubbling and on-off intermittency.

  17. Bubbling orientifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhi, Sunil; Smedbäck, Mikael

    2005-08-01

    We investigate a class of 1/2-BPS bubbling geometries associated to orientifolds of type-IIB string theory and thereby to excited states of the SO(N)/Sp(N) Script N = 4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory. The geometries are in correspondence with free fermions moving in a harmonic oscillator potential on the half-line. Branes wrapped on torsion cycles of these geometries are identified in the fermi fluid description. Besides being of intrinsic interest, these solutions may also occur as local geometries in flux compactifications where orientifold planes are present to ensure global charge cancellation. We comment on the extension of this procedure to M-theory orientifolds.

  18. Microfluidic Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Zheng, Siyang (Inventor); Lin, Jeffrey Chun-Hui (Inventor); Kasdan, Harvey L. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Described herein are particular embodiments relating to a microfluidic device that may be utilized for cell sensing, counting, and/or sorting. Particular aspects relate to a microfabricated device that is capable of differentiating single cell types from dense cell populations. One particular embodiment relates a device and methods of using the same for sensing, counting, and/or sorting leukocytes from whole, undiluted blood samples.

  19. Microfluidic Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Zheng, Siyang (Inventor); Lin, Jeffrey Chun-Hui (Inventor); Kasdan, Harvey (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Described herein are particular embodiments relating to a microfluidic device that may be utilized for cell sensing, counting, and/or sorting. Particular aspects relate to a microfabricated device that is capable of differentiating single cell types from dense cell populations. One particular embodiment relates a device and methods of using the same for sensing, counting, and/or sorting leukocytes from whole, undiluted blood samples.

  20. Microfluidic Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Zheng, Siyang (Inventor); Lin, Jeffrey Chun-Hui (Inventor); Kasdan, Harvey L. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Described herein are particular embodiments relating to a microfluidic device that may be utilized for cell sensing, counting, and/or sorting. Particular aspects relate to a microfabricated device that is capable of differentiating single cell types from dense cell populations. One particular embodiment relates a device and methods of using the same for sensing, counting, and/or sorting leukocytes from whole, undiluted blood samples.

  1. Expanding imaging capabilities for microfluidics: applicability of darkfield internal reflection illumination (DIRI) to observations in microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Yoshihiro; Otsuka, Chino; Sanzo, James; Higgins, Christopher; Nirei, Tatsuo; Schilling, Tobias; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidics is used increasingly for engineering and biomedical applications due to recent advances in microfabrication technologies. Visualization of bubbles, tracer particles, and cells in a microfluidic device is important for designing a device and analyzing results. However, with conventional methods, it is difficult to observe the channel geometry and such particles simultaneously. To overcome this limitation, we developed a Darkfield Internal Reflection Illumination (DIRI) system that improved the drawbacks of a conventional darkfield illuminator. This study was performed to investigate its utility in the field of microfluidics. The results showed that the developed system could clearly visualize both microbubbles and the channel wall by utilizing brightfield and DIRI illumination simultaneously. The methodology is useful not only for static phenomena, such as clogging, but also for dynamic phenomena, such as the detection of bubbles flowing in a channel. The system was also applied to simultaneous fluorescence and DIRI imaging. Fluorescent tracer beads and channel walls were observed clearly, which may be an advantage for future microparticle image velocimetry (μPIV) analysis, especially near a wall. Two types of cell stained with different colors, and the channel wall, can be recognized using the combined confocal and DIRI system. Whole-slide imaging was also conducted successfully using this system. The tiling function significantly expands the observing area of microfluidics. The developed system will be useful for a wide variety of engineering and biomedical applications for the growing field of microfluidics.

  2. Microfluidic waves

    PubMed Central

    Utz, Marcel; Begley, Matthew R.; Haj-Hariri, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    The propagation of pressure waves in fluidic channels with elastic covers is discussed in view of applications to flow control in microfluidic devices. A theory is presented which describes pressure waves in the fluid that are coupled to bending waves in the elastic cover. At low frequencies, the lateral bending of the cover dominates over longitudinal bending, leading to propagating, non-dispersive longitudinal pressure waves in the channel. The theory addresses effects due to both the finite viscosity and compressibility of the fluid. The coupled waves propagate without dispersion, as long as the wave length is larger than the channel width. It is shown that in channels of typical microfluidic dimensions, wave velocities in the range of a few 10 m s−1 result if the channels are covered by films of a compliant material such as PDMS. The application of this principle to design microfluidic band pass filters based on standing waves is discussed. Characteristic frequencies in the range of a few kHz are readily achieved with quality factors above 30. PMID:21966667

  3. Simple Autonomous Chaotic Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piper, Jessica; Sprott, J.

    2010-03-01

    Over the last several decades, numerous electronic circuits exhibiting chaos have been proposed. Non-autonomous circuits with as few as two components have been developed. However, the operation of such circuits relies on the non-ideal behavior of the devices used, and therefore the circuit equations can be quite complex. In this paper, we present two simple autonomous chaotic circuits using only opamps and linear passive components. The circuits each use one opamp as a comparator, to provide a signum nonlinearity. The chaotic behavior is robust, and independent of nonlinearities in the passive components. Moreover, the circuit equations are among the algebraically simplest chaotic systems yet constructed.

  4. Chaotic Boltzmann machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Hideyuki; Imura, Jun-Ichi; Horio, Yoshihiko; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2013-04-01

    The chaotic Boltzmann machine proposed in this paper is a chaotic pseudo-billiard system that works as a Boltzmann machine. Chaotic Boltzmann machines are shown numerically to have computing abilities comparable to conventional (stochastic) Boltzmann machines. Since no randomness is required, efficient hardware implementation is expected. Moreover, the ferromagnetic phase transition of the Ising model is shown to be characterised by the largest Lyapunov exponent of the proposed system. In general, a method to relate probabilistic models to nonlinear dynamics by derandomising Gibbs sampling is presented.

  5. Chaotic Boltzmann machines.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hideyuki; Imura, Jun-ichi; Horio, Yoshihiko; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    The chaotic Boltzmann machine proposed in this paper is a chaotic pseudo-billiard system that works as a Boltzmann machine. Chaotic Boltzmann machines are shown numerically to have computing abilities comparable to conventional (stochastic) Boltzmann machines. Since no randomness is required, efficient hardware implementation is expected. Moreover, the ferromagnetic phase transition of the Ising model is shown to be characterised by the largest Lyapunov exponent of the proposed system. In general, a method to relate probabilistic models to nonlinear dynamics by derandomising Gibbs sampling is presented.

  6. Improving electrokinetic microdevice stability by controlling electrolysis bubbles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwi Yong; Barber, Cedrick; Minerick, Adrienne R

    2014-07-01

    The voltage-operating window for many electrokinetic microdevices is limited by electrolysis gas bubbles that destabilize microfluidic system causing noise and irreproducible responses above ∼3 V DC and less than ∼1 kHz AC at 3 Vpp. Surfactant additives, SDS and Triton X-100, and an integrated semipermeable SnakeSkin® membrane were employed to control and assess electrolysis bubbles from platinum electrodes in a 180 by 70 μm, 10 mm long microchannel. Stabilized current responses at 100 V DC were observed with surfactant additives or SnakeSkin® barriers. Electrolysis bubble behaviors, visualized via video microscopy at the electrode surface and in the microchannels, were found to be influenced by surfactant function and SnakeSkin® barriers. Both SDS and Triton X-100 surfactants promoted smaller bubble diameters and faster bubble detachment from electrode surfaces via increasing gas solubility. In contrast, SnakeSkin® membranes enhanced natural convection and blocked bubbles from entering the microchannels and thus reduced current disturbances in the electric field. This data illustrated that electrode surface behaviors had substantially greater impacts on current stability than microbubbles within microchannels. Thus, physically blocking bubbles from microchannels is less effective than electrode functionalization approaches to stabilize electrokinetic microfluidic systems.

  7. Curvature-driven bubbles or droplets on the spiral surface

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shanpeng; Liu, Jianlin; Hou, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Directional motion of droplets or bubbles can often be observed in nature and our daily life, and this phenomenon holds great potential in many engineering areas. The study shows that droplets or bubbles can be driven to migrate perpetually on some special substrates, such as the Archimedean spiral, the logarithmic spiral and a cantilever sheet in large deflection. It is found that a bubble approaches or deviates from the position with highest curvature of the substrate, when it is on the concave or convex side. This fact is helpful to explain the repelling water capability of Nepenthes alata. Based on the force and energy analysis, the mechanism of the bubble migration is well addressed. These findings pave a new way to accurately manipulate droplet or bubble movement, which bring inspirations to the design of microfluidic and water harvesting devices, as well as oil displacement and ore filtration. PMID:27885261

  8. Curvature-driven bubbles or droplets on the spiral surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shanpeng; Liu, Jianlin; Hou, Jian

    2016-11-01

    Directional motion of droplets or bubbles can often be observed in nature and our daily life, and this phenomenon holds great potential in many engineering areas. The study shows that droplets or bubbles can be driven to migrate perpetually on some special substrates, such as the Archimedean spiral, the logarithmic spiral and a cantilever sheet in large deflection. It is found that a bubble approaches or deviates from the position with highest curvature of the substrate, when it is on the concave or convex side. This fact is helpful to explain the repelling water capability of Nepenthes alata. Based on the force and energy analysis, the mechanism of the bubble migration is well addressed. These findings pave a new way to accurately manipulate droplet or bubble movement, which bring inspirations to the design of microfluidic and water harvesting devices, as well as oil displacement and ore filtration.

  9. Single Bubble Sonoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farley, Jennifer; Hough, Shane

    2003-05-01

    Single Bubble Sonoluminescence is the emission of light from a single bubble suspended in a liquid caused by a continuum of repeated implosions due to pressure waves generated from a maintained ultrasonic sinusoidal wave source. H. Frenzel and H. Schultz first studied it in 1934 at the University of Cologne. It was not until 1988 with D.F. Gaitan that actual research began with single bubble sonoluminescence. Currently many theories exist attempting to explain the observed bubble phenomenon. Many of these theories require spherical behavior of the bubble. Observation of the bubble has shown that the bubble does not behave spherically in most cases. One explanation for this is known as jet theory. A spectrum of the bubble will give us the mean physical properties of the bubble such as temperature and pressure inside the bubble. Eventually, with the aide of fluorocene dye a full spectrum of the bubble will be obtained.

  10. Cascade Chaotic System With Applications.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yicong; Hua, Zhongyun; Pun, Chi-Man; Chen, C L Philip

    2015-09-01

    Chaotic maps are widely used in different applications. Motivated by the cascade structure in electronic circuits, this paper introduces a general chaotic framework called the cascade chaotic system (CCS). Using two 1-D chaotic maps as seed maps, CCS is able to generate a huge number of new chaotic maps. Examples and evaluations show the CCS's robustness. Compared with corresponding seed maps, newly generated chaotic maps are more unpredictable and have better chaotic performance, more parameters, and complex chaotic properties. To investigate applications of CCS, we introduce a pseudo-random number generator (PRNG) and a data encryption system using a chaotic map generated by CCS. Simulation and analysis demonstrate that the proposed PRNG has high quality of randomness and that the data encryption system is able to protect different types of data with a high-security level.

  11. Microfluidic interconnects

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    2001-01-01

    A miniature connector for introducing microliter quantities of solutions into microfabricated fluidic devices. The fluidic connector, for example, joins standard high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) tubing to 1 mm diameter holes in silicon or glass, enabling ml-sized volumes of sample solutions to be merged with .mu.l-sized devices. The connector has many features, including ease of connect and disconnect; a small footprint which enables numerous connectors to be located in a small area; low dead volume; helium leak-tight; and tubing does not twist during connection. Thus the connector enables easy and effective change of microfluidic devices and introduction of different solutions in the devices.

  12. Acoustic bubble removal method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Elleman, D. D.; Wang, T. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A method is described for removing bubbles from a liquid bath such as a bath of molten glass to be used for optical elements. Larger bubbles are first removed by applying acoustic energy resonant to a bath dimension to drive the larger bubbles toward a pressure well where the bubbles can coalesce and then be more easily removed. Thereafter, submillimeter bubbles are removed by applying acoustic energy of frequencies resonant to the small bubbles to oscillate them and thereby stir liquid immediately about the bubbles to facilitate their breakup and absorption into the liquid.

  13. Enhancing chaoticity of spatiotemporal chaos.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaowen; Zhang, Heqiao; Xue, Yu; Hu, Gang

    2005-01-01

    In some practical situations strong chaos is needed. This introduces the task of chaos control with enhancing chaoticity rather than suppressing chaoticity. In this paper a simple method of linear amplifications incorporating modulo operations is suggested to make spatiotemporal systems, which may be originally chaotic or nonchaotic, strongly chaotic. Specifically, this control can eliminate periodic windows, increase the values and the number of positive Lyapunov exponents, make the probability distributions of the output chaotic sequences more homogeneous, and reduce the correlations of chaotic outputs for different times and different space units. The applicability of the method to practical tasks, in particular to random number generators and secure communications, is briefly discussed.

  14. Bubble drag reduction requires large bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verschoof, Ruben; van der Veen, Roeland; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-11-01

    In the maritime industry, the injection of air bubbles into the turbulent boundary layer under the ship hull is seen as one of the most promising techniques to reduce the overall fuel consumption. A few volume percent (<= 4 %) of bubbles can reduce the overall drag up to 40% and beyond. However, the exact mechanism is unknown, thus hindering further progress and optimization. Here we show that bubble drag reduction in turbulent flow dramatically depends on the bubble size. By adding minute concentrations (6 ppm) of the surfactant Triton X-100 into otherwise completely unchanged strongly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow containing bubbles, we dramatically reduce the drag reduction from more than 40% to about 4%, corresponding to the trivial effect of the bubbles on the density and viscosity of the liquid . The reason for this striking behavior is that the addition of surfactants prevents bubble coalescence, leading to much smaller bubbles. Our result demonstrates that bubble deformability is crucial for bubble drag reduction in turbulent flow. We acknowledge support from STW and FOM.

  15. Active micromachines: Microfluidics powered by mesoscale turbulence

    PubMed Central

    Thampi, Sumesh P.; Doostmohammadi, Amin; Shendruk, Tyler N.; Golestanian, Ramin; Yeomans, Julia M.

    2016-01-01

    Dense active matter, from bacterial suspensions and microtubule bundles driven by motor proteins to cellular monolayers and synthetic Janus particles, is characterized by mesoscale turbulence, which is the emergence of chaotic flow structures. By immersing an ordered array of symmetric rotors in an active fluid, we introduce a microfluidic system that exploits spontaneous symmetry breaking in mesoscale turbulence to generate work. The lattice of rotors self-organizes into a spin state where neighboring discs continuously rotate in permanent alternating directions due to combined hydrodynamic and elastic effects. Our virtual prototype demonstrates a new research direction for the design of micromachines powered by the nematohydrodynamic properties of active turbulence. PMID:27419229

  16. Microfluidic electrochemical reactors

    DOEpatents

    Nuzzo, Ralph G [Champaign, IL; Mitrovski, Svetlana M [Urbana, IL

    2011-03-22

    A microfluidic electrochemical reactor includes an electrode and one or more microfluidic channels on the electrode, where the microfluidic channels are covered with a membrane containing a gas permeable polymer. The distance between the electrode and the membrane is less than 500 micrometers. The microfluidic electrochemical reactor can provide for increased reaction rates in electrochemical reactions using a gaseous reactant, as compared to conventional electrochemical cells. Microfluidic electrochemical reactors can be incorporated into devices for applications such as fuel cells, electrochemical analysis, microfluidic actuation, pH gradient formation.

  17. Chaotic LIDAR for Naval Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-29

    signal is used with a digital receiver to form a chaotic LIDAR (CLIDAR) ranging system. The design of the chaotic fiber ring laser and the fiber ...the first fiscal year we reported the development of wideband noise-like chaotic signals using low-power fiber ring lasers operating at infrared...ytterbium-doped fiber laser (YDFL), which outputs a >1 GHz noise-like chaotic intensity modulation. This signal is amplified by a 2-stage fiber

  18. Chaotic LIDAR for Naval Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    digital receiver to form a chaotic LIDAR (CLIDAR) ranging system. The design of the chaotic fiber ring laser and the fiber amplifiers are guided by...Progress In the first fiscal year we reported the development of wideband noise-like chaotic signals using low-power fiber ring lasers operating... fiber laser (YDFL), which outputs a >1 GHz noise-like chaotic intensity modulation. This signal is amplified by a 2-stage fiber amplifier chain to

  19. Microfluidic interconnects

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    2001-01-01

    A miniature connector for introducing microliter quantities of solutions into microfabricated fluidic devices, and which incorporates a molded ring or seal set into a ferrule cartridge, with or without a compression screw. The fluidic connector, for example, joins standard high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) tubing to 1 mm diameter holes in silicon or glass, enabling ml-sized volumes of sample solutions to be merged with .mu.l-sized devices. The connector has many features, including ease of connect and disconnect; a small footprint which enables numerous connectors to be located in a small area; low dead volume; helium leak-tight; and tubing does not twist during connection. Thus the connector enables easy and effective change of microfluidic devices and introduction of different solutions in the devices.

  20. Nonlocal chaotic phase synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Meng; Zheng, Zhi-Gang; Hu, Gang; Peng, Xi-Hong

    2000-09-01

    A novel synchronization behavior, nonlocal chaotic phase synchronization, is investigated. For two coupled Rossler oscillators with only one forced by an injected periodic signal, the phase of the unforced oscillator can be locked to the phase of the periodic signal while the forced one is well unlocked by the signal; in a chain of coupled chaotic oscillators with nearest coupling, the phase of an oscillator (or a cluster) can be locked to another nonneighbor one. Moreover, the mechanism underlying the transition to nonlocal synchronization is discussed in detail.

  1. New- vs. chaotic- inflations

    SciTech Connect

    Barenboim, Gabriela; Park, Wan-Il E-mail: Wanil.Park@uv.es

    2016-02-01

    We show that ''spiralized' models of new-inflation can be experimentally identified mostly by their positive spectral running in direct contrast with most chaotic-inflation models which have negative runnings typically in the range of O(10{sup −4}–10{sup −3})

  2. Microfluidic sieve valves

    DOEpatents

    Quake, Stephen R; Marcus, Joshua S; Hansen, Carl L

    2015-01-13

    Sieve valves for use in microfluidic device are provided. The valves are useful for impeding the flow of particles, such as chromatography beads or cells, in a microfluidic channel while allowing liquid solution to pass through the valve. The valves find particular use in making microfluidic chromatography modules.

  3. Tunable Microfluidic Microlasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    particularly convenient material for microfluidic experiments with LC. Figure 7: A droplet of E7 nematic liquid crystal on a PDMS...AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2011-0039 TUNABLE MICROFLUIDIC MICROLASERS Francesco Simoni Universita Politecnica delle Marche...DATES COVERED (From – To) 15 June 2010 – 15 June 2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE TUNABLE MICROFLUIDIC MICROLASERS 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8655

  4. Bubbly Cavitation Flows.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-31

    and 12. Comparison is also made with analytical predictions based on the Rayleigh - Plesset equations. In addition to the single bubble studies, the...bubble maximum size distributions and those predicted using the measured nuclei number distribution and the Rayleigh - Plesset model for the bubble dyna...tions 7, 9, 11, 12, 13 examined travelling bubble cavitation on two classic axisymmetric headforms (a Schiebe body and the ITTC headform) and, with the

  5. Chaotic mixing by microswimmers moving on quasiperiodic orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalali, Mir Abbas; Khoshnood, Atefeh; Alam, Mohammad-Reza

    2015-11-01

    Life on the Earth is strongly dependent upon mixing across a vast range of scales. For example, mixing distributes nutrients for microorganisms in aquatic environments, and balances the spatial energy distribution in the oceans and the atmosphere. From industrial point of view, mixing is essential in many microfluidic processes and lab-on-a-chip operations, polymer engineering, pharmaceutics, food engineering, petroleum engineering, and biotechnology. Efficient mixing, typically characterized by chaotic advection, is hard to achieve in low Reynolds number conditions because of the linear nature of the Stokes equation that governs the motion. We report the first demonstration of chaotic mixing induced by a microswimmer that strokes on quasiperiodic orbits with multi-loop turning paths. Our findings can be utilized to understand the interactions of microorganisms with their environments, and to design autonomous robotic mixers that can sweep and mix an entire volume of complex-geometry containers.

  6. Acoustic trapping in bubble-bounded micro-cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Mahoney, P.; McDougall, C.; Glynne-Jones, P.; MacDonald, M. P.

    2016-12-01

    We present a method for controllably producing longitudinal acoustic trapping sites inside microfluidic channels. Air bubbles are injected into a micro-capillary to create bubble-bounded `micro-cavities'. A cavity mode is formed that shows controlled longitudinal acoustic trapping between the two air/water interfaces along with the levitation to the centre of the channel that one would expect from a lower order lateral mode. 7 μm and 10 μm microspheres are trapped at the discrete acoustic trapping sites in these micro-cavities.We show this for several lengths of micro-cavity.

  7. Acoustic bubble traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisler, Reinhard; Kurz, Thomas; Lauterborn, Werner

    2000-07-01

    A small, oscillating bubble in a liquid can be trapped in the antinode of an acoustic standing wave field. Bubble stability is required for the study of single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL). The properties of the acoustic resonator are essential for the stable trapping of sonoluminescing bubbles. Resonators can be chosen according to the intended application: size and geometry can be varied in a wide range. In this work, the acoustic responses of different resonators were measured by means of holographic interferometry, hydrophones and a laser vibrometer. Also, high-speed photography was used to observe the bubble dynamics. Several single, stable sonoluminescent bubbles were trapped simultaneously within an acoustic resonator in the pressure antinodes of a higher harmonic mode (few bubble sonoluminescence, FBSL).

  8. Taming Chaotic Circuits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    lead to lock and capture range limits. •Desigl techni~41teq., that are equipped to exploit the real nonlinear and chaotic n tWe-of the deyicl, I can...linearization. This approximation hides the global dynamics that lead to lock and capture range limits. Design techniques that are equipped to exploit...7.23 Inverted pendulum stabilized via parametric resonance ......... 1:35 7.24 True dynamics for fl = 15 ...... ....................... 137 7.25

  9. Linear conversion of pressure into concentration, rapid switching of concentration, and generation of linear ramps of concentration in a microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Adler, Micha; Groisman, Alex

    2012-06-01

    Mixing of liquids to produce solutions with different concentrations is one of the basic functionalities of microfluidic devices. Generation of specific temporal patterns of concentration in microfluidic devices is an important technique to study responses of cells and model organisms to variations in the chemical composition of their environment. Here, we present a simple microfluidic network that linearly converts pressure at an inlet into concentration of a soluble reagent in an observation region and also enables independent concurrent linear control of concentrations of two reagents. The microfluidic device has an integrated mixer channel with chaotic three-dimensional flow that facilitates rapid switching of concentrations in a continuous range. A simple pneumatic setup generating linear ramps of pressure is used to produce smooth linear ramps and triangular waves of concentration with different slopes. The use of chaotic vs. laminar mixers is discussed in the context of microfluidic devices providing rapid switching and generating temporal waves of concentration.

  10. Probing Cell Deformability via Acoustically Actuated Bubbles

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yuliang; Nama, Nitesh; Li, Peng; Mao, Zhangming; Huang, Po-Hsun; Zhao, Chenglong; Costanzo, Francesco; Huang, Tony Jun

    2016-01-01

    An acoustically actuated, bubble-based technique is developed to investigate the deformability of cells suspended in microfluidic devices. A microsized bubble is generated by an optothermal effect near the targeted cells, which are suspended in a microfluidic chamber. Subsequently, acoustic actuation is employed to create localized acoustic streaming. In turn, the streaming flow results in hydrodynamic forces that deform the cells in situ. The deformability of the cells is indicative of their mechanical properties. The method in this study measures mechanical biomarkers from multiple cells in a single experiment, and it can be conveniently integrated with other bioanalysis and drug-screening platforms. Using this technique, the mean deformability of tens of HeLa, HEK, and HUVEC cells is measured to distinguish their mechanical properties. HeLa cells are deformed upon treatment with Cytochalasin. The technique also reveals the deformability of each subpopulation in a mixed, heterogeneous cell sample by the use of both fluorescent markers and mechanical biomarkers. The technique in this study, apart from being relevant to cell biology, will also enable biophysical cellular diagnosis. PMID:26715211

  11. The chaotic obliquity of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Touma, Jihad; Wisdom, Jack

    1993-01-01

    The discovery (by Laskar, 1989, 1990) that the evolution of the solar system is chaotic, made in a numerical integration of the averaged secular approximation of the equations of motions for the planets, was confirmed by Sussman and Wisdom (1992) by direct numerical integration of the whole solar system. This paper presents results of direct integrations of the rotation of Mars in the chaotically evolved planetary system, made using the same model as that used by Sussman and Wisdom. The numerical integration shows that the obliquity of Mars undergoes large chaotic variations, which occur as the system evolves in the chaotic zone associated with a secular spin-orbit resonance.

  12. Dynamics, Analysis and Implementation of a Multiscroll Memristor-Based Chaotic Circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alombah, N. Henry; Fotsin, Hilaire; Ngouonkadi, E. B. Megam; Nguazon, Tekou

    This article introduces a novel four-dimensional autonomous multiscroll chaotic circuit which is derived from the actual simplest memristor-based chaotic circuit. A fourth circuit element — another inductor — is introduced to generate the complex behavior observed. A systematic study of the chaotic behavior is performed with the help of some nonlinear tools such as Lyapunov exponents, phase portraits, and bifurcation diagrams. Multiple scroll attractors are observed in Matlab, Pspice environments and also experimentally. We also observe the phenomenon of antimonotonicity, periodic and chaotic bubbles, multiple periodic-doubling bifurcations, Hopf bifurcations, crises and the phenomenon of intermittency. The chaotic dynamics of this circuit is realized by laboratory experiments, Pspice simulations, numerical and analytical investigations. It is observed that the results from the three environments agree to a great extent. This topology is likely convenient to be used to intentionally generate chaos in memristor-based chaotic circuit applications, given the fact that multiscroll chaotic systems have found important applications as broadband signal generators, pseudorandom number generators for communication engineering and also in biometric authentication.

  13. Integrated Microfluidic Reactors.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Yu; Wang, Yanju; Wang, Shutao; Tseng, Hsian-Rong

    2009-12-01

    Microfluidic reactors exhibit intrinsic advantages of reduced chemical consumption, safety, high surface-area-to-volume ratios, and improved control over mass and heat transfer superior to the macroscopic reaction setting. In contract to a continuous-flow microfluidic system composed of only a microchannel network, an integrated microfluidic system represents a scalable integration of a microchannel network with functional microfluidic modules, thus enabling the execution and automation of complicated chemical reactions in a single device. In this review, we summarize recent progresses on the development of integrated microfluidics-based chemical reactors for (i) parallel screening of in situ click chemistry libraries, (ii) multistep synthesis of radiolabeled imaging probes for positron emission tomography (PET), (iii) sequential preparation of individually addressable conducting polymer nanowire (CPNW), and (iv) solid-phase synthesis of DNA oligonucleotides. These proof-of-principle demonstrations validate the feasibility and set a solid foundation for exploring a broad application of the integrated microfluidic system.

  14. Gas bubble detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mount, Bruce E. (Inventor); Burchfield, David E. (Inventor); Hagey, John M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A gas bubble detector having a modulated IR source focused through a bandpass filter onto a venturi, formed in a sample tube, to illuminate the venturi with modulated filtered IR to detect the presence of gas bubbles as small as 0.01 cm or about 0.004 in diameter in liquid flowing through the venturi. Means are provided to determine the size of any detected bubble and to provide an alarm in the absence of liquid in the sample tube.

  15. Tightrope walking bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Maleprade, Helene; Clanet, Christophe; Quere, David

    2016-11-01

    A fiber can hold a certain amount of liquid, which allows us to capture flying drops and control their motion. Immersed in water, a fiber can efficiently capture air bubbles only if it is hydrophobic. Using a superhydrophobic coating on an inclined wire, we experimentally control the rising velocity of air bubbles walking along the tightrope. We discuss the nature of the friction around the walker, and the resulting speed of bubbles.

  16. Chaotic rotation of Hyperion?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binzel, R. P.; Green, J. R.; Opal, C. B.

    1986-01-01

    Thomas et al. (1984) analyzed 14 Voyager 2 images of Saturn's satellite Hyperion and interpreted them to be consistent with a coherent (nonchaotic) rotation period of 13.1 days. This interpretation was criticized by Peale and Wisdom (1984), who argued that the low sampling frequency of Voyager data does not allow chaotic or nonchaotic rotation to be distinguished. New observations obtained with a higher sampling frequency are reported here which conclusively show that the 13.1 day period found by Thomas et al. was not due to coherent rotation.

  17. Nearly discontinuous chaotic mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, David Howland; Lim, Hyun K; Yu, Yan; Glimm, James G

    2009-01-01

    A new scientific approach is presented for a broad class of chaotic problems involving a high degree of mixing over rapid time scales. Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov unstable flows are typical of such problems. Microscopic mixing properties such as chemical reaction rates for turbulent mixtures can be obtained with feasible grid resolution. The essential dependence of (some) fluid mixing observables on transport phenomena is observed. This dependence includes numerical as well as physical transport and it includes laminar as well as turbulent transport. A new approach to the mathematical theory for the underlying equations is suggested.

  18. Microfluidics for manipulating cells.

    PubMed

    Mu, Xuan; Zheng, Wenfu; Sun, Jiashu; Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Xingyu

    2013-01-14

    Microfluidics, a toolbox comprising methods for precise manipulation of fluids at small length scales (micrometers to millimeters), has become useful for manipulating cells. Its uses range from dynamic management of cellular interactions to high-throughput screening of cells, and to precise analysis of chemical contents in single cells. Microfluidics demonstrates a completely new perspective and an excellent practical way to manipulate cells for solving various needs in biology and medicine. This review introduces and comments on recent achievements and challenges of using microfluidics to manipulate and analyze cells. It is believed that microfluidics will assume an even greater role in the mechanistic understanding of cell biology and, eventually, in clinical applications.

  19. Micro-fluidic interconnect

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat; Galambos, Paul C.; Benavides, Gilbert L.; Hetherington, Dale L.

    2006-02-28

    An apparatus for simultaneously aligning and interconnecting microfluidic ports is presented. Such interconnections are required to utilize microfluidic devices fabricated in Micro-Electromechanical-Systems (MEMS) technologies, that have multiple fluidic access ports (e.g. 100 micron diameter) within a small footprint, (e.g. 3 mm.times.6 mm). Fanout of the small ports of a microfluidic device to a larger diameter (e.g. 500 microns) facilitates packaging and interconnection of the microfluidic device to printed wiring boards, electronics packages, fluidic manifolds etc.

  20. A 3D Bubble Merger Model for RTI Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Baolian

    2015-11-01

    In this work we present a model for the merger processes of bubbles at the edge of an unstable acceleration driven mixing layer. Steady acceleration defines a self-similar mixing process, with a time-dependent inverse cascade of structures of increasing size. The time evolution is itself a renormalization group evolution. The model predicts the growth rate of a Rayleigh-Taylor chaotic fluid-mixing layer. The 3-D model differs from the 2-D merger model in several important ways. Beyond the extension of the model to three dimensions, the model contains one phenomenological parameter, the variance of the bubble radii at fixed time. The model also predicts several experimental numbers: the bubble mixing rate, the mean bubble radius, and the bubble height separation at the time of merger. From these we also obtain the bubble height to the radius aspect ratio, which is in good agreement with experiments. Applications to recent NIF and Omega experiments will be discussed. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36.

  1. Chaotic LIDAR for Naval Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    fiber ring lasers operating at infrared wavelengths (Task 1). Multiple infi-ared laser ...chaotic infrared fiber laser source, two fiber amplifier stages, and a firequency doubler to convert the wavelength from 1064 nm to 532 nm. Custom...transmitter’s wideband, high frequency chaotic signal is generated by the intensity modulation of a 1064 nm ytterbium-doped fiber laser (YDFL). This

  2. Chaotic systems in optical communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siuzdak, J.

    2016-09-01

    Communications application of chaotic oscillations of lasers with optoelectronic feedback was discussed. The possibility of eavesdropping of the transmission was analyzed. It was proved that if the rogue party precisely knows parameters of the chaotic system it may recreate the entire signals solely by observation of the optical signal power causing security breach.

  3. The chaotic rotation of Hyperion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisdom, J.; Peale, S. J.; Mignard, F.

    1984-01-01

    Under the assumption that the satellite is rotating about a principal axis that is normal to its orbit plane, a plot of spin rate-versus-orientation for Hyperion at the pericenter of its orbit has revealed a large, chaotic zone surrounding Hyperion's synchronous spin-orbit state. The chaotic zone is so large that it surrounds the 1/2 and 2 states, and libration in the 3/2 state is not possible. Rotation in the chaotic zone is also attitude-unstable. As tidal dissipation drives Hyperion's spin toward a nearly synchronous value, Hyperion necessarily enters the large chaotic zone, becoming attitude-unstable and tumbling. It is therefore predicted that Hyperion will be found to be tumbling chaotically.

  4. Active pneumatic control of centrifugal microfluidic flows for lab-on-a-chip applications.

    PubMed

    Clime, Liviu; Brassard, Daniel; Geissler, Matthias; Veres, Teodor

    2015-06-07

    This paper reports a novel method of controlling liquid motion on a centrifugal microfluidic platform based on the integration of a regulated pressure pump and a programmable electromechanical valving system. We demonstrate accurate control over the displacement of liquids within the system by pressurizing simultaneously multiple ports of the microfluidic device while the platform is rotating at high speed. Compared to classical centrifugal microfluidic platforms where liquids are solely driven by centrifugal and capillary forces, the method presented herein adds a new degree of freedom for fluidic manipulation, which represents a paradigm change in centrifugal microfluidics. We first demonstrate how various core microfluidic functions such as valving, switching, and reverse pumping (i.e., against the centrifugal field) can be easily achieved by programming the pressures applied at dedicated access ports of the microfluidic device. We then show, for the first time, that the combination of centrifugal force and active pneumatic pumping offers the possibility of mixing fluids rapidly (~0.1 s) and efficiently based on the creation of air bubbles at the bottom of a microfluidic reservoir. Finally, the suitability of the developed platform for performing complex bioanalytical assays in an automated fashion is demonstrated in a DNA harvesting experiment where recovery rates of about 70% were systematically achieved. The proposed concept offers the interesting prospect to decouple basic microfluidic functions from specific material properties, channel dimensions and fabrication tolerances, surface treatments, or on-chip active components, thus promoting integration of complex assays on simple and low-cost microfluidic cartridges.

  5. Prospects for bubble fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Nigmatulin, R.I.; Lahey, R.T. Jr.

    1995-09-01

    In this paper a new method for the realization of fusion energy is presented. This method is based on the superhigh compression of a gas bubble (deuterium or deuterium/thritium) in heavy water or another liquid. The superhigh compression of a gas bubble in a liquid is achieved through forced non-linear, non-periodic resonance oscillations using moderate amplitudes of forcing pressure. The key feature of this new method is a coordination of the forced liquid pressure change with the change of bubble volume. The corresponding regime of the bubble oscillation has been called {open_quotes}basketball dribbling (BD) regime{close_quotes}. The analytical solution describing this process for spherically symmetric bubble oscillations, neglecting dissipation and compressibility of the liquid, has been obtained. This solution shown no limitation on the supercompression of the bubble and the corresponding maximum temperature. The various dissipation mechanisms, including viscous, conductive and radiation heat losses have been considered. It is shown that in spite of these losses it is possible to achieve very high gas bubble temperatures. This because the time duration of the gas bubble supercompression becomes very short when increasing the intensity of compression, thus limiting the energy losses. Significantly, the calculated maximum gas temperatures have shown that nuclear fusion may be possible. First estimations of the affect of liquid compressibility have been made to determine possible limitations on gas bubble compression. The next step will be to investigate the role of interfacial instability and breaking down of the bubble, shock wave phenomena around and in the bubble and mutual diffusion of the gas and the liquid.

  6. Centrifugal microfluidic platforms: advanced unit operations and applications.

    PubMed

    Strohmeier, O; Keller, M; Schwemmer, F; Zehnle, S; Mark, D; von Stetten, F; Zengerle, R; Paust, N

    2015-10-07

    Centrifugal microfluidics has evolved into a mature technology. Several major diagnostic companies either have products on the market or are currently evaluating centrifugal microfluidics for product development. The fields of application are widespread and include clinical chemistry, immunodiagnostics and protein analysis, cell handling, molecular diagnostics, as well as food, water, and soil analysis. Nevertheless, new fluidic functions and applications that expand the possibilities of centrifugal microfluidics are being introduced at a high pace. In this review, we first present an up-to-date comprehensive overview of centrifugal microfluidic unit operations. Then, we introduce the term "process chain" to review how these unit operations can be combined for the automation of laboratory workflows. Such aggregation of basic functionalities enables efficient fluidic design at a higher level of integration. Furthermore, we analyze how novel, ground-breaking unit operations may foster the integration of more complex applications. Among these are the storage of pneumatic energy to realize complex switching sequences or to pump liquids radially inward, as well as the complete pre-storage and release of reagents. In this context, centrifugal microfluidics provides major advantages over other microfluidic actuation principles: the pulse-free inertial liquid propulsion provided by centrifugal microfluidics allows for closed fluidic systems that are free of any interfaces to external pumps. Processed volumes are easily scalable from nanoliters to milliliters. Volume forces can be adjusted by rotation and thus, even for very small volumes, surface forces may easily be overcome in the centrifugal gravity field which enables the efficient separation of nanoliter volumes from channels, chambers or sensor matrixes as well as the removal of any disturbing bubbles. In summary, centrifugal microfluidics takes advantage of a comprehensive set of fluidic unit operations such as

  7. Acoustical emission from bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longuet-Higgins, Michael S.

    1991-12-01

    The scientific objectives of this report are to investigate the dynamics of bubbles formed from a free surface (particularly the upper surface of the ocean) by breaking waves, and the resulting emission of underwater sound. The chief natural source of underwater sound in the ocean at frequencies from 0.5 to 50 kHz is known to be the acoustical emission from newly-formed bubbles and bubble clouds, particularly those created by breaking waves and rain. Attention has been drawn to the occurrence of high-speed jets directed into the bubble just after bubble closure. They have been observed both in rain-drop impacts and in the release of bubbles from an underwater nozzle. Qualitatively they are similar to the inward jets seen in the collapse of a cavitation bubble. There is also a similarity to the highly-accelerated upward jets in standing water waves (accelerations greater than 20g) or in bubbles bursting at a free surface. We have adopted a theoretical approach based on the dynamics of incompressible fluids with a free surface.

  8. Evaporation, Boiling and Bubbles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Evaporation and boiling are both terms applied to the change of a liquid to the vapour/gaseous state. This article argues that it is the formation of bubbles of vapour within the liquid that most clearly differentiates boiling from evaporation although only a minority of chemistry textbooks seems to mention bubble formation in this context. The…

  9. Let Them Blow Bubbles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korenic, Eileen

    1988-01-01

    Describes a series of activities and demonstrations involving the science of soap bubbles. Starts with a recipe for bubble solution and gives instructions for several activities on topics such as density, interference colors, optics, static electricity, and galaxy formation. Contains some background information to help explain some of the effects.…

  10. Simulating Surfzone Bubbles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    D (Ripple) and 3-D ( Truchas ) Navier- Stokes solvers. In the continuation of this work, our objectives are to: 1) Implement a physics-based...a bubble phase with multiple bubble size (or, more accurately, mass) bins. The existing 3-D model Truchas has been extended to include Carrica et al

  11. Bubble collision with gravitation

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Dong-il; Lee, Bum-Hoon; Lee, Wonwoo; Yeom, Dong-han E-mail: bhl@sogang.ac.kr E-mail: innocent.yeom@gmail.com

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we study vacuum bubble collisions with various potentials including gravitation, assuming spherical, planar, and hyperbolic symmetry. We use numerical calculations from double-null formalism. Spherical symmetry can mimic the formation of a black hole via multiple bubble collisions. Planar and especially hyperbolic symmetry describes two bubble collisions. We study both cases, when two true vacuum regions have the same field value or different field values, by varying tensions. For the latter case, we also test symmetric and asymmetric bubble collisions, and see details of causal structures. If the colliding energy is sufficient, then the vacuum can be destabilized, and it is also demonstrated. This double-null formalism can be a complementary approach in the context of bubble collisions.

  12. Interfacial Bubble Deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seymour, Brian; Shabane, Parvis; Cypull, Olivia; Cheng, Shengfeng; Feitosa, Klebert

    Soap bubbles floating at an air-water experience deformations as a result of surface tension and hydrostatic forces. In this experiment, we investigate the nature of such deformations by taking cross-sectional images of bubbles of different volumes. The results show that as their volume increases, bubbles transition from spherical to hemispherical shape. The deformation of the interface also changes with bubble volume with the capillary rise converging to the capillary length as volume increases. The profile of the top and bottom of the bubble and the capillary rise are completely determined by the volume and pressure differences. James Madison University Department of Physics and Astronomy, 4VA Consortium, Research Corporation for Advancement of Science.

  13. Microfluidics and Coagulation Biology

    PubMed Central

    Colace, Thomas V.; Tormoen, Garth W.

    2014-01-01

    The study of blood ex vivo can occur in closed or open systems, with or without flow. Microfluidic devices facilitate measurements of platelet function, coagulation biology, cellular biorheology, adhesion dynamics, pharmacology, and clinical diagnostics. An experimental session can accommodate 100s to 1000s of unique clotting events. Using microfluidics, thrombotic events can be studied on defined surfaces of biopolymers, matrix proteins, and tissue factor under constant flow rate or constant pressure drop conditions. Distinct shear rates can be created on a device with a single perfusion pump. Microfluidic devices facilitated the determination of intraluminal thrombus permeability and the discovery that platelet contractility can be activated by a sudden decrease in flow. Microfluidics are ideal for multicolor imaging of platelets, fibrin, and phosphatidylserine and provide a human blood analog to the mouse injury models. Overall, microfluidic advances offer many opportunities for research, drug testing under relevant hemodynamic conditions, and clinical diagnostics. PMID:23642241

  14. Unconventional microfluidics: expanding the discipline.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Ahmad Ahsan; Mao, Xiaole; Stratton, Zackary S; Huang, Tony Jun

    2013-04-21

    Since its inception, the discipline of microfluidics has been harnessed for innovations in the biomedicine/chemistry fields-and to great effect. This success has had the natural side-effect of stereotyping microfluidics as a platform for medical diagnostics and miniaturized lab processes. But microfluidics has more to offer. And very recently, some researchers have successfully applied microfluidics to fields outside its traditional domains. In this Focus article, we highlight notable examples of such "unconventional" microfluidics applications (e.g., robotics, electronics). It is our hope that these early successes in unconventional microfluidics prompt further creativity, and inspire readers to expand the microfluidics discipline.

  15. Unconventional microfluidics: expanding the discipline

    PubMed Central

    Nawaz, Ahmad Ahsan; Mao, Xiaole; Stratton, Zackary S.; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-01

    Since its inception, the discipline of microfluidics has been harnessed for innovations in the biomedicine/chemistry fields—and to great effect. This success has had the natural side-effect of stereotyping microfluidics as a platform for medical diagnostics and miniaturized lab processes. But microfluidics has more to offer. And very recently, some researchers have successfully applied microfluidics to fields outside its traditional domains. In this Focus article, we highlight notable examples of such “unconventional” microfluidics applications (e.g., robotics, electronics). It is our hope that these early successes in unconventional microfluidics prompt further creativity, and inspire readers to expand the microfluidics discipline. PMID:23478651

  16. Wavelet phase synchronization and chaoticity.

    PubMed

    Postnikov, E B

    2009-11-01

    It has been shown that the so-called "wavelet phase" (or "time-scale") synchronization of chaotic signals is actually synchronization of smoothed functions with reduced chaotic fluctuations. This fact is based on the representation of the wavelet transform with the Morlet wavelet as a solution of the Cauchy problem for a simple diffusion equation with initial condition in a form of harmonic function modulated by a given signal. The topological background of the resulting effect is discussed. It is argued that the wavelet phase synchronization provides information about the synchronization of an averaged motion described by bounding tori instead of the fine-level classical chaotic phase synchronization.

  17. Two-phase microfluidics: thermophysical fundamentals and engineering concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, V. V.

    2016-10-01

    Thermophysical fundamentals and engineering concepts of the two-phase microfluidic devises based on controlled liquid decay are discussed in this paper. The results of an experimental study of the explosive evaporation at a thin film heater of the MEMS devise in application to thermal inkjet printing are presented. The peculiarities of homogeneous nucleation and bubble growth in the liquid subjected to pulse heating are discussed. Using experimental data a simple equation suitable for predicting the growth rate of a vapor bubble in a non-uniformly superheated liquid was obtained and used to complete a mathematical model of the self-consistent nucleation and vapor bubbles growth in the induced pressure field. The results of numerical calculations according to the proposed model showed good agreement with the experimental data on a time of nucleation and duration of the initial stage of an explosive evaporation of water.

  18. Tribonucleation of bubbles

    PubMed Central

    Wildeman, Sander; Lhuissier, Henri; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    We report on the nucleation of bubbles on solids that are gently rubbed against each other in a liquid. The phenomenon is found to depend strongly on the material and roughness of the solid surfaces. For a given surface, temperature, and gas content, a trail of growing bubbles is observed if the rubbing force and velocity exceed a certain threshold. Direct observation through a transparent solid shows that each bubble in the trail results from the early coalescence of several microscopic bubbles, themselves detaching from microscopic gas pockets forming between the solids. From a detailed study of the wear tracks, with atomic force and scanning electron microscopy imaging, we conclude that these microscopic gas pockets originate from a local fracturing of the surface asperities, possibly enhanced by chemical reactions at the freshly created surfaces. Our findings will be useful either for preventing undesired bubble formation or, on the contrary, for “writing with bubbles,” i.e., creating controlled patterns of microscopic bubbles. PMID:24982169

  19. Bubble core field modification by residual electrons inside the bubble

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Haicheng; Xie Baisong; Zhao Xueyan; Zhang Shan; Hong Xueren; Liu Mingping

    2010-11-15

    Bubble core field modification due to the nondepleted electrons present inside the bubble is investigated theoretically. These residual electrons induce charge and current densities that can induce the bubble core field modification as well as the bubble shape change. It is found that the electrons entering into the bubble move backward at almost light speed and would weaken the transverse bubble fields. This reduces the ratio of longitudinal to transverse radius of the bubble. For the longitudinal bubble field, two effects compensate with each other because of their competition between the enhancement by the shortening of bubble shape and the reduction by the residual electrons. Therefore the longitudinal field is hardly changeable. As a comparison we perform particle-in-cell simulations and it is found that the results from theoretical consideration are consistent with simulation results. Implication of the modification of fields on bubble electron acceleration is also discussed briefly.

  20. Bubble dynamics in a micro-channel with a virtual check valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Rou; Zhu, Likun; Yu, Huidan (Whitney)

    2015-11-01

    Bubble dynamics plays a critical role in the design of a self-circulation and self-regulation gas generator with little or zero parasitic power consumption (Zhu et al, Microfluidics and Nanofluidics, 2011). We numerically study bubble dynamics in the micro-channel with a virtual check valve using lattice Boltzmann method. The lattice Boltzmann model has been validated through several static cases with a bubble sitting inside a liquid and on a solid surface with a triple contact among bubble, liquid, and solid. In this work, we simulate bubble transport driven via unbalanced capillary forces. Focus will be on the bubble merging phenomena between the moving bubble and a static bubble prior siting downstream in the channel with same and different sizes. By varying the size of the check valve, we study the effects of channel ratio between the check valve and channel on the dynamics of bubble-driven liquid circulation and seek for an optimal channel ratio to support experimental design. This research is supported by NSF Collaborative Research (1264739).

  1. Viscosity Destabilizes Sonoluminescing Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toegel, Ruediger; Luther, Stefan; Lohse, Detlef

    2006-03-01

    In single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) microbubbles are trapped in a standing sound wave, typically in water or water-glycerol mixtures. However, in viscous liquids such as glycol, methylformamide, or sulphuric acid it is not possible to trap the bubble in a stable position. This is very peculiar as larger viscosity normally stabilizes the dynamics. Suslick and co-workers call this new mysterious state of SBSL “moving-SBSL.” We identify the history force (a force nonlocal in time) as the origin of this destabilization and show that the instability is parametric. A force balance model quantitatively accounts for the observed quasiperiodic bubble trajectories.

  2. Viscosity destabilizes sonoluminescing bubbles.

    PubMed

    Toegel, Ruediger; Luther, Stefan; Lohse, Detlef

    2006-03-24

    In single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) microbubbles are trapped in a standing sound wave, typically in water or water-glycerol mixtures. However, in viscous liquids such as glycol, methylformamide, or sulphuric acid it is not possible to trap the bubble in a stable position. This is very peculiar as larger viscosity normally stabilizes the dynamics. Suslick and co-workers call this new mysterious state of SBSL "moving-SBSL." We identify the history force (a force nonlocal in time) as the origin of this destabilization and show that the instability is parametric. A force balance model quantitatively accounts for the observed quasiperiodic bubble trajectories.

  3. Rotating bubble membrane radiator

    DOEpatents

    Webb, Brent J.; Coomes, Edmund P.

    1988-12-06

    A heat radiator useful for expelling waste heat from a power generating system aboard a space vehicle is disclosed. Liquid to be cooled is passed to the interior of a rotating bubble membrane radiator, where it is sprayed into the interior of the bubble. Liquid impacting upon the interior surface of the bubble is cooled and the heat radiated from the outer surface of the membrane. Cooled liquid is collected by the action of centrifical force about the equator of the rotating membrane and returned to the power system. Details regarding a complete space power system employing the radiator are given.

  4. Cardiovascular bubble dynamics.

    PubMed

    Bull, Joseph L

    2005-01-01

    Gas bubbles can form in the cardiovascular system as a result of patho-physiological conditions or can be intentionally introduced for diagnostic or therapeutic reasons. The dynamic behavior of these bubbles is caused by a variety of mechanisms, such as inertia, pressure, interfacial tension, viscosity, and gravity. We review recent advances in the fundamental mechanics and applications of cardiovascular bubbles, including air embolism, ultrasound contrast agents, targeted microbubbles for drug delivery and molecular imaging, cavitation-induced tissue erosion for ultrasonic surgery, microbubble-induced angiogenesis and arteriogenesis, and gas embolotherapy.

  5. Microfluidics and microbial engineering.

    PubMed

    Kou, Songzi; Cheng, Danhui; Sun, Fei; Hsing, I-Ming

    2016-02-07

    The combination of microbial engineering and microfluidics is synergistic in nature. For example, microfluidics is benefiting from the outcome of microbial engineering and many reported point-of-care microfluidic devices employ engineered microbes as functional parts for the microsystems. In addition, microbial engineering is facilitated by various microfluidic techniques, due to their inherent strength in high-throughput screening and miniaturization. In this review article, we firstly examine the applications of engineered microbes for toxicity detection, biosensing, and motion generation in microfluidic platforms. Secondly, we look into how microfluidic technologies facilitate the upstream and downstream processes of microbial engineering, including DNA recombination, transformation, target microbe selection, mutant characterization, and microbial function analysis. Thirdly, we highlight an emerging concept in microbial engineering, namely, microbial consortium engineering, where the behavior of a multicultural microbial community rather than that of a single cell/species is delineated. Integrating the disciplines of microfluidics and microbial engineering opens up many new opportunities, for example in diagnostics, engineering of microbial motors, development of portable devices for genetics, high throughput characterization of genetic mutants, isolation and identification of rare/unculturable microbial species, single-cell analysis with high spatio-temporal resolution, and exploration of natural microbial communities.

  6. Applying microfluidics to electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Eddington, David T

    2007-01-01

    Microfluidics can be integrated with standard electrophysiology techniques to allow new experimental modalities. Specifically, the motivation for the microfluidic brain slice device is discussed including how the device docks to standard perfusion chambers and the technique of passive pumping which is used to deliver boluses of neuromodulators to the brain slice. By simplifying the device design, we are able to achieve a practical solution to the current unmet electrophysiology need of applying multiple neuromodulators across multiple regions of the brain slice. This is achieved by substituting the standard coverglass substrate of the perfusion chamber with a thin microfluidic device bonded to the coverglass substrate. This was then attached to the perfusion chamber and small holes connect the open-well of the perfusion chamber to the microfluidic channels buried within the microfluidic substrate. These microfluidic channels are interfaced with ports drilled into the edge of the perfusion chamber to access and deliver stimulants. This project represents how the field of microfluidics is transitioning away from proof-of concept device demonstrations and into practical solutions for unmet experimental and clinical needs.

  7. Cryptosystems based on chaotic dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    McNees, R.A.; Protopopescu, V.; Santoro, R.T.; Tolliver, J.S.

    1993-08-01

    An encryption scheme based on chaotic dynamics is presented. This scheme makes use of the efficient and reproducible generation of cryptographically secure pseudo random numbers from chaotic maps. The result is a system which encrypts quickly and possesses a large keyspace, even in small precision implementations. This system offers an excellent solution to several problems including the dissemination of key material, over the air rekeying, and other situations requiring the secure management of information.

  8. Chaotic LIDAR for Naval Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-15

    unambiguous ranging. The infrared ring resonator laser was inefficient largely because it included a circulator, which has high (>4 dB) loss at 1064 nm...best operating conditions for wideband transmitters. Detailed Description of Work Performed Chaotic Fiber Laser Upgrade The chaotic fiber lasers ...time. Thus the ring resonator laser was unable to drive the frequency-doubling circuit to produce green light, while the Fabry-Perot did not provide

  9. Chemistry in Soap Bubbles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Albert W. M.; Wong, A.; Lee, H. W.; Lee, H. Y.; Zhou, Ning-Huai

    2002-01-01

    Describes a laboratory experiment in which common chemical gases are trapped inside soap bubbles. Examines the physical and chemical properties of the gases such as relative density and combustion. (Author/MM)

  10. What's in a Bubble?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunderson, Megan

    2000-01-01

    Describes a unit on detergents and bubbles that establishes an interest in the properties of materials and focuses on active learning involving both hands- and minds-on learning rather than passive learning. (ASK)

  11. Blowing magnetic skyrmion bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wanjun; Upadhyaya, Pramey; Zhang, Wei; Yu, Guoqiang; Jungfleisch, M. Benjamin; Fradin, Frank Y.; Pearson, John E.; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav; Wang, Kang L.; Heinonen, Olle; te Velthuis, Suzanne G. E.; Hoffmann, Axel

    2015-07-01

    The formation of soap bubbles from thin films is accompanied by topological transitions. Here we show how a magnetic topological structure, a skyrmion bubble, can be generated in a solid-state system in a similar manner. Using an inhomogeneous in-plane current in a system with broken inversion symmetry, we experimentally “blow” magnetic skyrmion bubbles from a geometrical constriction. The presence of a spatially divergent spin-orbit torque gives rise to instabilities of the magnetic domain structures that are reminiscent of Rayleigh-Plateau instabilities in fluid flows. We determine a phase diagram for skyrmion formation and reveal the efficient manipulation of these dynamically created skyrmions, including depinning and motion. The demonstrated current-driven transformation from stripe domains to magnetic skyrmion bubbles could lead to progress in skyrmion-based spintronics.

  12. Controlled vesicle deformation and lysis by single oscillating bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmottant, Philippe; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha

    2003-05-01

    The ability of collapsing (cavitating) bubbles to focus and concentrate energy, forces and stresses is at the root of phenomena such as cavitation damage, sonochemistry or sonoluminescence. In a biomedical context, ultrasound-driven microbubbles have been used to enhance contrast in ultrasonic images. The observation of bubble-enhanced sonoporation-acoustically induced rupture of membranes-has also opened up intriguing possibilities for the therapeutic application of sonoporation as an alternative to cell-wall permeation techniques such as electroporation and particle guns. However, these pioneering experiments have not been able to pinpoint the mechanism by which the violently collapsing bubble opens pores or larger holes in membranes. Here we present an experiment in which gentle (linear) bubble oscillations are sufficient to achieve rupture of lipid membranes. In this regime, the bubble dynamics and the ensuing sonoporation can be accurately controlled. The use of microbubbles as focusing agents makes acoustics on the micrometre scale (microacoustics) a viable tool, with possible applications in cell manipulation and cell-wall permeation as well as in microfluidic devices.

  13. Numerical analysis of mixing by electrothermal induced flow in microfluidic systems

    PubMed Central

    Feng, J. J.; Krishnamoorthy, S.; Sundaram, S.

    2007-01-01

    An electrothermal flow induced chaotic mixing in microfluidic systems is studied analytically and numerically. The flow is induced due to the Coulombic and dielectric forces arising from the variation of the dielectric properties with respect to the temperature in the presence of an electric field. The numerical model is validated using an analytical solution derived for basic flow patterns in a simplified geometry. The computational model has been used to illustrate the mixing in microcavity and T-sensor constructs. The simulations predict the chaotic nature of the mixing process, where the material interface evolution shows exponential growth. PMID:19693379

  14. Blowing DNA bubbles.

    PubMed

    Severin, N; Zhuang, W; Ecker, C; Kalachev, A A; Sokolov, I M; Rabe, J P

    2006-11-01

    We report here experimental observations which indicate that topologically or covalently formed polymer loops embedded in an ultrathin liquid film on a solid substrate can be "blown" into circular "bubbles" during scanning force microscopy (SFM) imaging. In particular, supercoiled vector DNA has been unraveled, moved, stretched, and overstretched to two times its B-form length and then torn apart. We attribute the blowing of the DNA bubbles to the interaction of the tapping SFM tip with the ultrathin liquid film.

  15. 2012 Problem 8: Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Kejing; Xia, Qing; Wang, Sihui; Zhou, Huijun

    2015-10-01

    When a large number of bubbles exist in the water, an object may float on the surface or sink. The assumption of equivalent density is proposed in this article to explain the concrete example. According to the assumption, an object is floatable only if its density is less than the equivalent density of the water-bubble mixture. This conclusion is supported by the floating experiment and by measuring the pressure underwater to a satisfactory approximation.

  16. Bubble coalescence in magmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herd, Richard A.; Pinkerton, Harry

    1993-01-01

    The most important factors governing the nature of volcanic eruptions are the primary volatile contents, the ways in which volatiles exsolve, and how the resulting bubbles grow and interact. In this contribution we assess the importance of bubble coalescence. The degree of coalescence in alkali basalts has been measured using Image Analysis techniques and it is suggested to be a process of considerable importance. Binary coalescence events occur every few minutes in basaltic melts with vesicularities greater than around 35 percent.

  17. Clustering in Bubble Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenit, Roberto

    2000-11-01

    A monidisperse bubble suspension is studied experimentally for the limit in which the Weber number is small and the Reynolds number is large. For this regime the suspension can be modeled using potential flow theory to describe the dynamics of the interstitial fluid. Complete theoretical descriptions have been composed (Spelt and Sangani, 1998) to model the behavior of these suspensions. Bubble clustering is a natural instability that arises from the potential flow considerations, in which bubbles tend to align in horizontal rafts as they move upwards. The appearance of bubble clusters was recently corroborated experimentally by Zenit et al. (2000), who found that although clusters did appear, their strength was not as strong as the predictions. Experiments involving gravity driven shear flows are used to explain the nature of the clustering observed in these type of flows. Balances of the bubble phase pressure (in terms of a calculated diffusion coefficient) and the Maxwell pressure (from the potential flow description) are presented to predict the stability of the bubble suspension. The predictions are compared with experimental results.

  18. Adjustable, rapidly switching microfluidic gradient generation using focused travelling surface acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Destgeer, Ghulam; Im, Sunghyuk; Hang Ha, Byung; Ho Jung, Jin; Ahmad Ansari, Mubashshir; Jin Sung, Hyung

    2014-01-13

    We demonstrate a simple device to generate chemical concentration gradients in a microfluidic channel using focused travelling surface acoustic waves (F-TSAW). A pair of curved interdigitated metal electrodes deposited on the surface of a piezoelectric (LiNbO{sub 3}) substrate disseminate high frequency sound waves when actuated by an alternating current source. The F-TSAW produces chaotic acoustic streaming flow upon its interaction with the fluid inside a microfluidic channel, which mixes confluent streams of chemicals in a controlled fashion for an adjustable and rapidly switching gradient generation.

  19. Adjustable, rapidly switching microfluidic gradient generation using focused travelling surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Destgeer, Ghulam; Im, Sunghyuk; Hang Ha, Byung; Ho Jung, Jin; Ahmad Ansari, Mubashshir; Jin Sung, Hyung

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a simple device to generate chemical concentration gradients in a microfluidic channel using focused travelling surface acoustic waves (F-TSAW). A pair of curved interdigitated metal electrodes deposited on the surface of a piezoelectric (LiNbO3) substrate disseminate high frequency sound waves when actuated by an alternating current source. The F-TSAW produces chaotic acoustic streaming flow upon its interaction with the fluid inside a microfluidic channel, which mixes confluent streams of chemicals in a controlled fashion for an adjustable and rapidly switching gradient generation.

  20. Cell manipulation in microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Yun, Hoyoung; Kim, Kisoo; Lee, Won Gu

    2013-06-01

    Recent advances in the lab-on-a-chip field in association with nano/microfluidics have been made for new applications and functionalities to the fields of molecular biology, genetic analysis and proteomics, enabling the expansion of the cell biology field. Specifically, microfluidics has provided promising tools for enhancing cell biological research, since it has the ability to precisely control the cellular environment, to easily mimic heterogeneous cellular environment by multiplexing, and to analyze sub-cellular information by high-contents screening assays at the single-cell level. Various cell manipulation techniques in microfluidics have been developed in accordance with specific objectives and applications. In this review, we examine the latest achievements of cell manipulation techniques in microfluidics by categorizing externally applied forces for manipulation: (i) optical, (ii) magnetic, (iii) electrical, (iv) mechanical and (v) other manipulations. We furthermore focus on history where the manipulation techniques originate and also discuss future perspectives with key examples where available.

  1. Microfluidic multiplexing in bioanalyses.

    PubMed

    Araz, M Kursad; Tentori, Augusto M; Herr, Amy E

    2013-10-01

    The importance of biological assays spans from clinical diagnostics to environmental monitoring. Simultaneous detection of multiple analytes enhances the efficacy of bioassays by providing more data per assay under standardized conditions. Nevertheless, simultaneous handling and assaying of multiple samples, targets, and experimental conditions can be laborious, reagent consuming, and time intensive. Given these demands, microfluidic platforms have emerged over the past two decades as well-suited approaches for multiplexed assays. Microfluidic design supports integration of assay steps and reproducible sample manipulation across large sets of conditions--all relevant to multiplexed assays. Taken together, reduced reagent consumption, faster assay times, and potential for automation stemming from microfluidic assay design are attractive and needed multiplexed assay performance attributes. This review highlights recent advances in multiplexed bioanalyses benefitting from microfluidic integration.

  2. Microfluidic chemical reaction circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chung-cheng; Sui, Guodong; Elizarov, Arkadij; Kolb, Hartmuth C; Huang, Jiang; Heath, James R; Phelps, Michael E; Quake, Stephen R; Tseng, Hsian-rong; Wyatt, Paul; Daridon, Antoine

    2012-06-26

    New microfluidic devices, useful for carrying out chemical reactions, are provided. The devices are adapted for on-chip solvent exchange, chemical processes requiring multiple chemical reactions, and rapid concentration of reagents.

  3. Microfluidics in inorganic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Abou-Hassan, Ali; Sandre, Olivier; Cabuil, Valérie

    2010-08-23

    The application of microfluidics in chemistry has gained significant importance in the recent years. Miniaturized chemistry platforms provide controlled fluid transport, rapid chemical reactions, and cost-saving advantages over conventional reactors. The advantages of microfluidics have been clearly established in the field of analytical and bioanalytical sciences and in the field of organic synthesis. It is less true in the field of inorganic chemistry and materials science; however in inorganic chemistry it has mostly been used for the separation and selective extraction of metal ions. Microfluidics has been used in materials science mainly for the improvement of nanoparticle synthesis, namely metal, metal oxide, and semiconductor nanoparticles. Microfluidic devices can also be used for the formulation of more advanced and sophisticated inorganic materials or hybrids.

  4. There can be turbulence in microfluidics at low Reynolds number.

    PubMed

    Wang, G R; Yang, Fang; Zhao, Wei

    2014-04-21

    Turbulence is commonly viewed as a type of macroflow, where the Reynolds number (Re) has to be sufficiently high. In microfluidics, when Re is below or on the order of 1 and fast mixing is required, so far only chaotic flow has been reported to enhance mixing based on previous publications since turbulence is believed not to be possible to generate in such a low Re microflow. There is even a lack of velocimeter that can measure turbulence in microchannels. In this work, we report a direct observation of the existence of turbulence in microfluidics with Re on the order of 1 in a pressure driven flow under electrokinetic forcing using a novel velocimeter having ultrahigh spatiotemporal resolution. The work could provide a new method to control flow and transport phenomena in lab-on-a-chip and a new perspective on turbulence.

  5. Dimension of chaotic attractors

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J.D.; Ott, E.; Yorke, J.A.

    1982-09-01

    Dimension is perhaps the most basic property of an attractor. In this paper we discuss a variety of different definitions of dimension, compute their values for a typical example, and review previous work on the dimension of chaotic attractors. The relevant definitions of dimension are of two general types, those that depend only on metric properties, and those that depend on probabilistic properties (that is, they depend on the frequency with which a typical trajectory visits different regions of the attractor). Both our example and the previous work that we review support the conclusion that all of the probabilistic dimensions take on the same value, which we call the dimension of the natural measure, and all of the metric dimensions take on a common value, which we call the fractal dimension. Furthermore, the dimension of the natural measure is typically equal to the Lyapunov dimension, which is defined in terms of Lyapunov numbers, and thus is usually far easier to calculate than any other definition. Because it is computable and more physically relevant, we feel that the dimension of the natural measure is more important than the fractal dimension.

  6. Automatic sequential fluid handling with multilayer microfluidic sample isolated pumping

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jixiao; Fu, Hai; Yang, Tianhang; Li, Songjing

    2015-01-01

    To sequentially handle fluids is of great significance in quantitative biology, analytical chemistry, and bioassays. However, the technological options are limited when building such microfluidic sequential processing systems, and one of the encountered challenges is the need for reliable, efficient, and mass-production available microfluidic pumping methods. Herein, we present a bubble-free and pumping-control unified liquid handling method that is compatible with large-scale manufacture, termed multilayer microfluidic sample isolated pumping (mμSIP). The core part of the mμSIP is the selective permeable membrane that isolates the fluidic layer from the pneumatic layer. The air diffusion from the fluidic channel network into the degassing pneumatic channel network leads to fluidic channel pressure variation, which further results in consistent bubble-free liquid pumping into the channels and the dead-end chambers. We characterize the mμSIP by comparing the fluidic actuation processes with different parameters and a flow rate range of 0.013 μl/s to 0.097 μl/s is observed in the experiments. As the proof of concept, we demonstrate an automatic sequential fluid handling system aiming at digital assays and immunoassays, which further proves the unified pumping-control and suggests that the mμSIP is suitable for functional microfluidic assays with minimal operations. We believe that the mμSIP technology and demonstrated automatic sequential fluid handling system would enrich the microfluidic toolbox and benefit further inventions. PMID:26487904

  7. Electro-Microfluidic Packaging

    SciTech Connect

    BENAVIDES, GILBERT L.; GALAMBOS, PAUL C.

    2002-06-01

    Electro-microfluidics is experiencing explosive growth in new product developments. There are many commercial applications for electro-microfluidic devices such as chemical sensors, biological sensors, and drop ejectors for both printing and chemical analysis. The number of silicon surface micromachined electro-microfluidic products is likely to increase. Manufacturing efficiency and integration of microfluidics with electronics will become important. Surface micromachined microfluidic devices are manufactured with the same tools as IC's (integrated circuits) and their fabrication can be incorporated into the IC fabrication process. In order to realize applications for devices must be developed. An Electro-Microfluidic Dual In-line Package (EMDIP{trademark}) was developed surface micromachined electro-microfluidic devices, a practical method for getting fluid into these to be a standard solution that allows for both the electrical and the fluidic connections needed to operate a great variety of electro-microfluidic devices. The EMDIP{trademark} includes a fan-out manifold that, on one side, mates directly with the 200 micron diameter Bosch etched holes found on the device, and, on the other side, mates to lager 1 mm diameter holes. To minimize cost the EMDIP{trademark} can be injection molded in a great variety of thermoplastics which also serve to optimize fluid compatibility. The EMDIP{trademark} plugs directly into a fluidic printed wiring board using a standard dual in-line package pattern for the electrical connections and having a grid of multiple 1 mm diameter fluidic connections to mate to the underside of the EMDIP{trademark}.

  8. Flock-based microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Hitzbleck, Martina; Lovchik, Robert D; Delamarche, Emmanuel

    2013-05-21

    Flock-based microfluidics are created by depositing hydrophilic microfibers on an adhesive-coated substrate using an electric field. This enables the fabrication of self-powered microfluidics from one or more different kinds of fibers that form 2D and 3D flowpaths, which can wick 40 microliters of liquid per square centimeter. With this approach, large areas of functional wicking materials can be produced at extremely low cost.

  9. Surface acoustic wave microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiaoyun; Li, Peng; Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Stratton, Zackary S; Nama, Nitesh; Guo, Feng; Slotcavage, Daniel; Mao, Xiaole; Shi, Jinjie; Costanzo, Francesco; Huang, Tony Jun

    2013-09-21

    The recent introduction of surface acoustic wave (SAW) technology onto lab-on-a-chip platforms has opened a new frontier in microfluidics. The advantages provided by such SAW microfluidics are numerous: simple fabrication, high biocompatibility, fast fluid actuation, versatility, compact and inexpensive devices and accessories, contact-free particle manipulation, and compatibility with other microfluidic components. We believe that these advantages enable SAW microfluidics to play a significant role in a variety of applications in biology, chemistry, engineering and medicine. In this review article, we discuss the theory underpinning SAWs and their interactions with particles and the contacting fluids in which they are suspended. We then review the SAW-enabled microfluidic devices demonstrated to date, starting with devices that accomplish fluid mixing and transport through the use of travelling SAW; we follow that by reviewing the more recent innovations achieved with standing SAW that enable such actions as particle/cell focusing, sorting and patterning. Finally, we look forward and appraise where the discipline of SAW microfluidics could go next.

  10. Surface acoustic wave microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xiaoyun; Li, Peng; Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Stratton, Zackary S.; Nama, Nitesh; Guo, Feng; Slotcavage, Daniel; Mao, Xiaole; Shi, Jinjie; Costanzo, Francesco; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-01

    The recent introduction of surface acoustic wave (SAW) technology onto lab-on-a-chip platforms has opened a new frontier in microfluidics. The advantages provided by such SAW microfluidics are numerous: simple fabrication, high biocompatibility, fast fluid actuation, versatility, compact and inexpensive devices and accessories, contact-free particle manipulation, and compatibility with other microfluidic components. We believe that these advantages enable SAW microfluidics to play a significant role in a variety of applications in biology, chemistry, engineering, and medicine. In this review article, we discuss the theory underpinning SAWs and their interactions with particles and the contacting fluids in which they are suspended. We then review the SAW-enabled microfluidic devices demonstrated to date, starting with devices that accomplish fluid mixing and transport through the use of travelling SAW; we follow that by reviewing the more recent innovations achieved with standing SAW that enable such actions as particle/cell focusing, sorting, and patterning. Finally, we look forward and appraise where the discipline of SAW microfluidics could go next. PMID:23900527

  11. MEMS in microfluidic channels.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, Carol Iris Hill; Okandan, Murat; Michalske, Terry A.; Sounart, Thomas L.; Matzke, Carolyn M.

    2004-03-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) comprise a new class of devices that include various forms of sensors and actuators. Recent studies have shown that microscale cantilever structures are able to detect a wide range of chemicals, biomolecules or even single bacterial cells. In this approach, cantilever deflection replaces optical fluorescence detection thereby eliminating complex chemical tagging steps that are difficult to achieve with chip-based architectures. A key challenge to utilizing this new detection scheme is the incorporation of functionalized MEMS structures within complex microfluidic channel architectures. The ability to accomplish this integration is currently limited by the processing approaches used to seal lids on pre-etched microfluidic channels. This report describes Sandia's first construction of MEMS instrumented microfluidic chips, which were fabricated by combining our leading capabilities in MEMS processing with our low-temperature photolithographic method for fabricating microfluidic channels. We have explored in-situ cantilevers and other similar passive MEMS devices as a new approach to directly sense fluid transport, and have successfully monitored local flow rates and viscosities within microfluidic channels. Actuated MEMS structures have also been incorporated into microfluidic channels, and the electrical requirements for actuation in liquids have been quantified with an elegant theory. Electrostatic actuation in water has been accomplished, and a novel technique for monitoring local electrical conductivities has been invented.

  12. Microfluidic Mixing Technology for a Universal Health Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Eugene Y.; Bae, Candice

    2009-01-01

    A highly efficient means of microfluidic mixing has been created for use with the rHEALTH sensor an elliptical mixer and passive curvilinear mixing patterns. The rHEALTH sensor provides rapid, handheld, complete blood count, cell differential counts, electrolyte measurements, and other lab tests based on a reusable, flow-based microfluidic platform. These geometries allow for cleaning in a reusable manner, and also allow for complete mixing of fluid streams. The microfluidic mixing is performed by flowing two streams of fluid into an elliptical or curvilinear design that allows the combination of the flows into one channel. The mixing is accomplished by either chaotic advection around micro - fluidic loops. All components of the microfluidic chip are flow-through, meaning that cleaning solution can be introduced into the chip to flush out cells, plasma proteins, and dye. Tests were performed on multiple chip geometries to show that cleaning is efficient in any flowthrough design. The conclusion from these experiments is that the chip can indeed be flushed out with microliter volumes of solution and biological samples are cleaned readily from the chip with minimal effort. The technology can be applied in real-time health monitoring at patient s bedside or in a doctor s office, and real-time clinical intervention in acute situations. It also can be used for daily measurement of hematocrit for patients on anticoagulant drugs, or to detect acute myocardial damage outside a hospital.

  13. The dynamics of histotripsy bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreider, Wayne; Bailey, Michael R.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Khokhlova, Vera A.; Crum, Lawrence A.

    2011-09-01

    Histotripsy describes treatments in which high-amplitude acoustic pulses are used to excite bubbles and erode tissue. Though tissue erosion can be directly attributed to bubble activity, the genesis and dynamics of bubbles remain unclear. Histotripsy lesions that show no signs of thermal coagulative damage have been generated with two different acoustic protocols: relatively long acoustic pulses that produce local boiling within milliseconds and relatively short pulses that are higher in amplitude but likely do not produce boiling. While these two approaches are often distinguished as `boiling' versus `cavitation', such labels can obscure similarities. In both cases, a bubble undergoes large changes in radius and vapor is transported into and out of the bubble as it oscillates. Moreover, observations from both approaches suggest that bubbles grow to a size at which they cease to collapse violently. In order to better understand the dynamics of histotripsy bubbles, a single-bubble model has been developed that couples acoustically excited bubble motions to the thermodynamic state of the surrounding liquid. Using this model for bubbles exposed to histotripsy sound fields, simulations suggest that two mechanisms can act separately or in concert to lead to the typically observed bubble growth. First, nonlinear acoustic propagation leads to the evolution of shocks and an asymmetry in the positive and negative pressures that drive bubble motion. This asymmetry can have a rectifying effect on bubble oscillations whereby the bubble grows on average during each acoustic cycle. Second, vapor transport to/from the bubble tends to produce larger bubbles, especially at elevated temperatures. Vapor transport by itself can lead to rectified bubble growth when the ambient temperature exceeds 100 °C (`boiling') or local heating in the vicinity of the bubble leads to a superheated boundary layer.

  14. Statistical equilibrium of bubble oscillations in dilute bubbly flows

    PubMed Central

    Colonius, Tim; Hagmeijer, Rob; Ando, Keita; Brennen, Christopher E.

    2008-01-01

    The problem of predicting the moments of the distribution of bubble radius in bubbly flows is considered. The particular case where bubble oscillations occur due to a rapid (impulsive or step change) change in pressure is analyzed, and it is mathematically shown that in this case, inviscid bubble oscillations reach a stationary statistical equilibrium, whereby phase cancellations among bubbles with different sizes lead to time-invariant values of the statistics. It is also shown that at statistical equilibrium, moments of the bubble radius may be computed using the period-averaged bubble radius in place of the instantaneous one. For sufficiently broad distributions of bubble equilibrium (or initial) radius, it is demonstrated that bubble statistics reach equilibrium on a time scale that is fast compared to physical damping of bubble oscillations due to viscosity, heat transfer, and liquid compressibility. The period-averaged bubble radius may then be used to predict the slow changes in the moments caused by the damping. A benefit is that period averaging gives a much smoother integrand, and accurate statistics can be obtained by tracking as few as five bubbles from the broad distribution. The period-averaged formula may therefore prove useful in reducing computational effort in models of dilute bubbly flow wherein bubbles are forced by shock waves or other rapid pressure changes, for which, at present, the strong effects caused by a distribution in bubble size can only be accurately predicted by tracking thousands of bubbles. Some challenges associated with extending the results to more general (nonimpulsive) forcing and strong two-way coupled bubbly flows are briefly discussed. PMID:19547725

  15. Colliding with a crunching bubble

    SciTech Connect

    Freivogel, Ben; Freivogel, Ben; Horowitz, Gary T.; Shenker, Stephen

    2007-03-26

    In the context of eternal inflation we discuss the fate of Lambda = 0 bubbles when they collide with Lambda< 0 crunching bubbles. When the Lambda = 0 bubble is supersymmetric, it is not completely destroyed by collisions. If the domain wall separating the bubbles has higher tension than the BPS bound, it is expelled from the Lambda = 0 bubble and does not alter its long time behavior. If the domain wall saturates the BPS bound, then it stays inside the Lambda = 0 bubble and removes a finite fraction of future infinity. In this case, the crunch singularity is hidden behind the horizon of a stable hyperbolic black hole.

  16. Modelling single- and tandem-bubble dynamics between two parallel plates for biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, C.-T.; Choi, J.-K.; Singh, S.; Chahine, G. L.; Hay, T. A.; Ilinskii, Yu. A.; Zabolotskaya, E. A.; Hamilton, M. F.; Sankin, G.; Yuan, F.; Zhong, P.

    2013-01-01

    Carefully timed tandem microbubbles have been shown to produce directional and targeted membrane poration of individual cells in microfluidic systems, which could be of use in ultrasound-mediated drug and gene delivery. This study aims at contributing to the understanding of the mechanisms at play in such an interaction. The dynamics of single and tandem microbubbles between two parallel plates is studied numerically and analytically. Comparisons are then made between the numerical results and the available experimental results. Numerically, assuming a potential flow, a three-dimensional boundary element method (BEM) is used to describe complex bubble deformations, jet formation, and bubble splitting. Analytically, compressibility and viscous boundary layer effects along the channel walls, neglected in the BEM model, are considered while shape of the bubble is not considered. Comparisons show that energy losses modify the bubble dynamics when the two approaches use identical initial conditions. The initial conditions in the boundary element method can be adjusted to recover the bubble period and maximum bubble volume when in an infinite medium. Using the same conditions enables the method to recover the full dynamics of single and tandem bubbles, including large deformations and fast re-entering jet formation. This method can be used as a design tool for future tandem-bubble sonoporation experiments. PMID:24293683

  17. Our Chaotic Neighbor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Poster Version Large Magellanic Cloud

    This vibrant image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy to our own Milky Way galaxy.

    The infrared image, a mosaic of more than 100,000 individual tiles, offers astronomers a unique chance to study the lifecycle of stars and dust in a single galaxy. Nearly one million objects are revealed for the first time in this Spitzer view, which represents about a 1,000-fold improvement in sensitivity over previous space-based missions. Most of the new objects are dusty stars of various ages populating the Large Magellanic Cloud; the rest are thought to be background galaxies.

    The blue color in the picture, seen most prominently in the central bar, represents starlight from older stars. The chaotic, bright regions outside this bar are filled with hot, massive stars buried in thick blankets of dust. The red clouds contain cooler interstellar gas and molecular-sized dust grains illuminated by ambient starlight.

    The Large Magellanic Cloud, located 160,000 light-years from Earth, is one of a handful of dwarf galaxies that orbit our own Milky Way. It is approximately one-third as wide as the Milky Way, and, if it could be seen in its entirety, would cover the same amount of sky as a grid of about 480 full moons. About one-third of the whole galaxy can be seen in the Spitzer image.

    This picture is a composite of infrared light captured by Spitzer's infrared array camera. Light with wavelengths of 8 and 5.8 microns is red and orange: 4.5-micron light is green; and 3.6-micron light is blue.

  18. The Onset of Resonance-Controlled Instability in Spherical Bubble Oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, R. Glynn; Gaitan, D. Felipe

    1996-01-01

    Single bubble dynamics are investigated using acoustic techniques for isolation and manipulation. The goal of the investigations is to understand the dynamic origin of the various phenomena that bubbles exhibit: light emission, enhanced mass transport, chaotic and quasiperiodic oscillations, and translations. Once understood, acoustically manipulated bubbles can serve as platforms for materials effects on free surfaces, using surfactants to alter surface rheology and observing how that affects both dynamics and also mass transport. The effects of gravity on the problem will be shown to be significant. The first set of observations from 1g experimentation are presented. These observations are of the onset conditions for instability of the spherical shape of the bubble. For the size range 55-90 microns in diameter we observe instability governed by resonant mode coupling, which is significantly affected by the buoyant force and its effects.

  19. Sound synchronization of bubble trains in a viscous fluid: experiment and modeling.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Felipe Augusto Cardoso; Baptista, Murilo da Silva; Sartorelli, José Carlos

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the dynamics of formation of air bubbles expelled from a nozzle immersed in a viscous fluid under the influence of sound waves. We have obtained bifurcation diagrams by measuring the time between successive bubbles, having the air flow (Q) as a parameter control for many values of the sound wave amplitude (A), the height (H) of the solution above the top of the nozzle, and three values of the sound frequency (fs). Our parameter spaces (Q,A) revealed a scenario for the onset of synchronization dominated by Arnold tongues (frequency locking) which gives place to chaotic phase synchronization for sufficiently large A. The experimental results were accurately reproduced by numerical simulations of a model combining a simple bubble growth model for the bubble train and a coupling term with the sound wave added to the equilibrium pressure.

  20. Performance of sonication and microfluidization for liquid-liquid emulsification.

    PubMed

    Maa, Y F; Hsu, C C

    1999-05-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate and compare liquid-liquid emulsions (water-in-oil and oil-in-water) prepared using sonication and microfluidization. Liquid-liquid emulsions were characterized on the basis of emulsion droplet size determined using a laser-based particle size analyzer. An ultrasonic-driven benchtop sonicator and an air-driven microfluidizer were used for emulsification. Sonication generated emulsions through ultrasound-driven mechanical vibrations, which caused cavitation. The force associated with implosion of vapor bubbles caused emulsion size reduction and the flow of the bubbles resulted in mixing. An increase in viscosity of the dispersion phase improved the sonicator's emulsification capability, but an increase in the viscosity of the dispersed phase decreased the sonicator's emulsification capability. Although sonication might be comparable to homogenization in terms of emulsification efficiency, homogenization was relatively more effective in emulsifying more viscous solutions. Microfluidization, which used a high pressure to force the fluid into microchannels of a special configuration and initiated emulsification via a combined mechanism of cavitation, shear, and impact, exhibited excellent emulsification efficiency. Of the three methodologies, sonication generated more heat and might be less suitable for emulsion systems involving heat-sensitive materials. Homogenization is in general a more effective liquid-liquid emulsification method. The results derived from this study can serve as a basis for the evaluation of large-scale liquid-liquid emulsification in the microencapsulation process.

  1. Hybrid microfluidic systems: combining a polymer microfluidic toolbox with biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gärtner, Claudia; Kirsch, Stefanie; Anton, Birgit; Becker, Holger

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present polymer based microfluidic chips which contain functional elements (electrodes, biosensors) made out of a different material (metals, silicon, organic semiconductors). These hybrid microfluidic devices allow the integration of additional functionality other than the simple manipulation of liquids in the chip and have been developed as a reaction to the increasing requirement for functional integration in microfluidics.

  2. A Bubble Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    RCW 79 is seen in the southern Milky Way, 17,200 light-years from Earth in the constellation Centaurus. The bubble is 70-light years in diameter, and probably took about one million years to form from the radiation and winds of hot young stars.

    The balloon of gas and dust is an example of stimulated star formation. Such stars are born when the hot bubble expands into the interstellar gas and dust around it. RCW 79 has spawned at least two groups of new stars along the edge of the large bubble. Some are visible inside the small bubble in the lower left corner. Another group of baby stars appears near the opening at the top.

    NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope easily detects infrared light from the dust particles in RCW 79. The young stars within RCW 79 radiate ultraviolet light that excites molecules of dust within the bubble. This causes the dust grains to emit infrared light that is detected by Spitzer and seen here as the extended red features.

  3. The Dueling Bubble Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Anshuman; Borrell, Marcos; Felts, John; Leal, Gary; Hirsa, Amir

    2007-11-01

    When two drops or bubbles are brought into close proximity to each other, the thin film of the fluid between them drains as they are squeezed together. If the film becomes thin enough that intermolecular forces of attraction overwhelm capillary forces, the drops/bubbles coalesce and the time it takes for this to happen, starting from the point of apparent contact is referred to as the drainage time. One practical version of this scenario occurs during the formation of foams, when the thin film forms between gas bubbles that are growing in volume with time. We performed an experimental study that is intended to mimic this process in which the two drops (or bubbles) in the size range of 50-100 microns diameter are created by oozing a liquid/gas out of two capillaries of diameter less than 100 microns directly facing each other and immersed in a second fluid. We present measurements of drainage times for the cases of very low viscosity ratios PDMS drops in Castor oil (less than 0.05) and bubbles of air in PDMS, and highlight the differences that arise in part due to the different boundary conditions for thin film drainage for liquid-liquid versus gas-liquid systems, and in part due to the different Hamaker constants for the two systems.

  4. Bubbles of Metamorphosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Manu

    2011-11-01

    Metamorphosis presents a puzzling challenge where, triggered by a signal, an organism abruptly transforms its entire shape and form. Here I describe the role of physical fluid dynamic processes during pupal metamorphosis in flies. During early stages of pupation of third instar larvae into adult flies, a physical gas bubble nucleates at a precise temporal and spatial location, as part of the normal developmental program in Diptera. Although its existence has been known for the last 100 years, the origin and control of this ``cavitation'' event has remained completely mysterious. Where does the driving negative pressure for bubble nucleation come from? How is the location of the bubble nucleation site encoded in the pupae? How do molecular processes control such a physical event? What is the role of this bubble during development? Via developing in-vivo imaging techniques, direct bio-physical measurements in live insect pupal structures and physical modeling, here I elucidate the physical mechanism for appearance and disappearance of this bubble and predict the site of nucleation and its exact timing. This new physical insight into the process of metamorphosis also allows us to understand the inherent design of pupal shell architectures in various species of insects. Milton Award, Harvard Society of Fellows; Terman Fellowship, Stanford

  5. Punch card programmable microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Korir, George; Prakash, Manu

    2015-01-01

    Small volume fluid handling in single and multiphase microfluidics provides a promising strategy for efficient bio-chemical assays, low-cost point-of-care diagnostics and new approaches to scientific discoveries. However multiple barriers exist towards low-cost field deployment of programmable microfluidics. Incorporating multiple pumps, mixers and discrete valve based control of nanoliter fluids and droplets in an integrated, programmable manner without additional required external components has remained elusive. Combining the idea of punch card programming with arbitrary fluid control, here we describe a self-contained, hand-crank powered, multiplex and robust programmable microfluidic platform. A paper tape encodes information as a series of punched holes. A mechanical reader/actuator reads these paper tapes and correspondingly executes operations onto a microfluidic chip coupled to the platform in a plug-and-play fashion. Enabled by the complexity of codes that can be represented by a series of holes in punched paper tapes, we demonstrate independent control of 15 on-chip pumps with enhanced mixing, normally-closed valves and a novel on-demand impact-based droplet generator. We demonstrate robustness of operation by encoding a string of characters representing the word "PUNCHCARD MICROFLUIDICS" using the droplet generator. Multiplexing is demonstrated by implementing an example colorimetric water quality assays for pH, ammonia, nitrite and nitrate content in different water samples. With its portable and robust design, low cost and ease-of-use, we envision punch card programmable microfluidics will bring complex control of microfluidic chips into field-based applications in low-resource settings and in the hands of children around the world.

  6. Chaotic mixer using electro-osmosis at finite Péclet number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugioka, Hideyuki

    2010-03-01

    Two pressure-driven streams of two miscible liquids can only mix by diffusion in microfluidic channels because of the low Reynolds number. We present an idea to generate mixing by “chaotic advection” in microscale geometries. That is, we consider using induced-charge electro-osmosis to generate a second flow and then modulate between the pressure-driven and induced-charge flows. By using the combined method consisting of the boundary element method, the Lagrangian particle tracking method, and the random-walk method, we analyze mixing efficiency, mixing time, and mixing length, with the effects of modulation frequency and molecular diffusivity, and compare our proposed mixer with other mixers. By this analysis, we find that chaotic mixing can be produced efficiently in a microfluidic channel by switching between pressure-driven and induced-charge flows in a wide range of Péclet number under the specific condition of Strouhal number. By using our proposed mixer, we can expect to realize efficient chaotic mixing with minimum voltage in an ordinary flow channel with a simple structure without an oblique electric field even at large Péclet number.

  7. CHAOTIC ZONES AROUND GRAVITATING BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Shevchenko, Ivan I.

    2015-01-20

    The extent of the continuous zone of chaotic orbits of a small-mass tertiary around a system of two gravitationally bound primaries of comparable masses (a binary star, a binary black hole, a binary asteroid, etc.) is estimated analytically, as a function of the tertiary's orbital eccentricity. The separatrix map theory is used to demonstrate that the central continuous chaos zone emerges (above a threshold in the primaries' mass ratio) due to overlapping of the orbital resonances corresponding to the integer ratios p:1 between the tertiary and the central binary periods. In this zone, the unlimited chaotic orbital diffusion of the tertiary takes place, up to its ejection from the system. The primaries' mass ratio, above which such a chaotic zone is universally present at all initial eccentricities of the tertiary, is estimated. The diversity of the observed orbital configurations of biplanetary and circumbinary exosystems is shown to be in accord with the existence of the primaries' mass parameter threshold.

  8. Continuous Microfluidic Mixing Using Pulsatile Micropumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshmukh, Ajay; Liepmann, Dorian

    2000-11-01

    For many microfluidic and micro-TAS applications, the mixing of two fluids is required. At small length scales, however, traditional means of mixing, such as turbulence generation, are impossible yet diffusion is often too slow. For laminar mixing, 3 degrees of freedom are required. Since MEMS are normally 2-D, time-dependence is added for the third degree of freedom. This process involves the use of two positive displacement pumps to alternatively deliver two different fluids into a common channel and utilizing Taylor dispersion to mix them. This mixing process was modelled numerically and confirmed via experimental observation of fluorescent dye in a fabricated MEMS mixer. The pumps used in the device are a new design consisting of a bubble-piston and two check valves.

  9. Bubbles from nothing

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco-Pillado, Jose J.; Ramadhan, Handhika S.; Shlaer, Benjamin E-mail: handhika@cosmos.phy.tufts.edu

    2012-01-01

    Within the framework of flux compactifications, we construct an instanton describing the quantum creation of an open universe from nothing. The solution has many features in common with the smooth 6d bubble of nothing solutions discussed recently, where the spacetime is described by a 4d compactification of a 6d Einstein-Maxwell theory on S{sup 2} stabilized by flux. The four-dimensional description of this instanton reduces to that of Hawking and Turok. The choice of parameters uniquely determines all future evolution, which we additionally find to be stable against bubble of nothing instabilities.

  10. Multivariate bubbles and antibubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, John

    2014-08-01

    In this paper we develop models for multivariate financial bubbles and antibubbles based on statistical physics. In particular, we extend a rich set of univariate models to higher dimensions. Changes in market regime can be explicitly shown to represent a phase transition from random to deterministic behaviour in prices. Moreover, our multivariate models are able to capture some of the contagious effects that occur during such episodes. We are able to show that declining lending quality helped fuel a bubble in the US stock market prior to 2008. Further, our approach offers interesting insights into the spatial development of UK house prices.

  11. Bubble-free electrokinetic flow with propylene carbonate.

    PubMed

    Sritharan, Deepa; Chen, Abraham Simpson; Aluthgama, Prabhath; Naved, Bilal; Smela, Elisabeth

    2015-10-01

    For electroosmotic pumping, a large direct-current (DC) electric field (10+ V/cm) is applied across a liquid, typically an aqueous electrolyte. At these high voltages, water undergoes electrolysis to form hydrogen and oxygen, generating bubbles that can block the electrodes, cause pressure fluctuations, and lead to pump failure. The requirement to manage these gases constrains system designs. This article presents an alternative polar liquid for DC electrokinetic pumping, propylene carbonate (PC), which remains free of bubbles up to at least 10 kV/cm. This offers the opportunity to create electrokinetic devices in closed configurations, which we demonstrate with a fully sealed microfluidic hydraulic actuator. Furthermore, the electroosmotic velocity of PC is similar to that of water in PDMS microchannels. Thus, water could be substituted by PC in existing electroosmotic pumps.

  12. Liquid metal enabled microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Tang, Shi-Yang; Zhu, Jiu Yang; Schaefer, Samira; Mitchell, Arnan; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh; Dickey, Michael D

    2017-03-14

    Several gallium-based liquid metal alloys are liquid at room temperature. As 'liquid', such alloys have a low viscosity and a high surface tension while as 'metal', they have high thermal and electrical conductivities, similar to mercury. However, unlike mercury, these liquid metal alloys have low toxicity and a negligible vapor pressure, rendering them much safer. In comparison to mercury, the distinguishing feature of these alloys is the rapid formation of a self-limiting atomically thin layer of gallium oxide over their surface when exposed to oxygen. This oxide layer changes many physical and chemical properties of gallium alloys, including their interfacial and rheological properties, which can be employed and modulated for various applications in microfluidics. Injecting liquid metal into microfluidic structures has been extensively used to pattern and encapsulate highly deformable and reconfigurable electronic devices including electrodes, sensors, antennas, and interconnects. Likewise, the unique features of liquid metals have been employed for fabricating miniaturized microfluidic components including pumps, valves, heaters, and electrodes. In this review, we discuss liquid metal enabled microfluidic components, and highlight their desirable attributes including simple fabrication, facile integration, stretchability, reconfigurability, and low power consumption, with promising applications for highly integrated microfluidic systems.

  13. Fluid Dynamics of Bubbly Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, Y. H.; Koch, D. L.; Zenit, R.; Sangani, A.; Kushch, V. I.; Spelt, P. D. M.; Hoffman, M.; Nahra, H.; Fritz, C.; Dolesh, R.

    2002-01-01

    Experiments have been performed to study the average flow properties of inertially dominated bubbly liquids which may be described by a novel analysis. Bubbles with high Reynolds number and low Weber number may produce a fluid velocity disturbance that can be approximated by a potential flow. We studied the behavior of suspensions of bubbles of about 1.5 mm diameter in vertical and inclined channels. The suspension was produced using a bank of 900 glass capillaries with inner diameter of about 100 microns in a quasi-steady fashion. In addition, salt was added to the suspension to prevent bubble-bubble coalescence. As a result, a nearly monodisperse suspension of bubble was produced. By increasing the inclination angle, we were able to explore an increasing amount of shear to buoyancy motion. A pipe flow experiment with the liquid being recirculated is under construction. This will provide an even larger range of shear to buoyancy motion. We are planning a microgravity experiment in which a bubble suspension is subjected to shearing in a couette cell in the absence of a buoyancy-driven relative motion of the two phases. By employing a single-wire, hot film anemometer, we were able to obtain the liquid velocity fluctuations. The shear stress at the wall was measured using a hot film probe flush mounted on the wall. The gas volume fraction, bubble velocity, and bubble velocity fluctuations were measured using a homemade, dual impedance probe. In addition, we also employed a high-speed camera to obtain the bubble size distribution and bubble shape in a dilute suspension. A rapid decrease in bubble velocity for a dilute bubble suspension is attributed to the effects of bubble-wall collisions. The more gradual decrease of bubble velocity as gas volume fraction increases, due to subsequent hindering of bubble motion, is in qualitative agreement with the predictions of Spelt and Sangani for the effects of potential-flow bubble-bubble interactions on the mean velocity. The

  14. Macromolecular Crystal Growth by Means of Microfluidics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanderWoerd, Mark; Ferree, Darren; Spearing, Scott; Monaco, Lisa; Molho, Josh; Spaid, Michael; Brasseur, Mike; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have performed a feasibility study in which we show that chip-based, microfluidic (LabChip(TM)) technology is suitable for protein crystal growth. This technology allows for accurate and reliable dispensing and mixing of very small volumes while minimizing bubble formation in the crystallization mixture. The amount of (protein) solution remaining after completion of an experiment is minimal, which makes this technique efficient and attractive for use with proteins, which are difficult or expensive to obtain. The nature of LabChip(TM) technology renders it highly amenable to automation. Protein crystals obtained in our initial feasibility studies were of excellent quality as determined by X-ray diffraction. Subsequent to the feasibility study, we designed and produced the first LabChip(TM) device specifically for protein crystallization in batch mode. It can reliably dispense and mix from a range of solution constituents into two independent growth wells. We are currently testing this design to prove its efficacy for protein crystallization optimization experiments. In the near future we will expand our design to incorporate up to 10 growth wells per LabChip(TM) device. Upon completion, additional crystallization techniques such as vapor diffusion and liquid-liquid diffusion will be accommodated. Macromolecular crystallization using microfluidic technology is envisioned as a fully automated system, which will use the 'tele-science' concept of remote operation and will be developed into a research facility for the International Space Station as well as on the ground.

  15. Bubble injected hydrocyclone flotation cell

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, D.A.; Jordon, C.E.

    1990-11-20

    This patent describes an apparatus for selective separation of a mixture of hydrophobic and hydrophilic mineral particles. It comprises: a bubble-injected hydrocyclone flotation cell and a bubble slurry. The cell comprises an enclosed body section; a mineral pulp feed port; a bubble slurry feed port; and a vortex finder.

  16. The Early Years: Blowing Bubbles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2016-01-01

    Blowing bubbles is not only a favorite summer activity for young children. Studying bubbles that are grouped together, or "foam," is fun for children and fascinating to many real-world scientists. Foam is widely used--from the bedroom (mattresses) to outer space (insulating panels on spacecraft). Bubble foam can provide children a…

  17. Cohesion of Bubbles in Foam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Sydney

    1978-01-01

    The free-energy change, or binding energy, of an idealized bubble cluster is calculated on the basis of one mole of gas, and on the basis of a single bubble going from sphere to polyhedron. Some new relations of bubble geometry are developed in the course of the calculation. (BB)

  18. Microfluidic platforms for mechanobiology

    PubMed Central

    Polacheck, William J.; Li, Ran; Uzel, Sebastien G. M.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanotransduction has been a topic of considerable interest since early studies demonstrated a link between mechanical force and biological response. Until recently, studies of fundamental phenomena were based either on in vivo experiments with limited control or direct access, or on large-scale in vitro studies lacking many of the potentially important physiological factors. With the advent of microfluidics, many of the previous limitations of in vitro testing were eliminated or reduced through greater control or combined functionalities. At the same time, imaging capabilities were tremendously enhanced. In this review, we discuss how microfluidics has transformed the study of mechanotransduction. This is done in the context of the various cell types that exhibit force-induced responses and the new biological insights that have been elucidated. We also discuss new microfluidic studies that could produce even more realistic models of in vivo conditions by combining multiple stimuli or creating a more realistic microenvironment. PMID:23649165

  19. Microfluidic Mixing: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chia-Yen; Chang, Chin-Lung; Wang, Yao-Nan; Fu, Lung-Ming

    2011-01-01

    The aim of microfluidic mixing is to achieve a thorough and rapid mixing of multiple samples in microscale devices. In such devices, sample mixing is essentially achieved by enhancing the diffusion effect between the different species flows. Broadly speaking, microfluidic mixing schemes can be categorized as either “active”, where an external energy force is applied to perturb the sample species, or “passive”, where the contact area and contact time of the species samples are increased through specially-designed microchannel configurations. Many mixers have been proposed to facilitate this task over the past 10 years. Accordingly, this paper commences by providing a high level overview of the field of microfluidic mixing devices before describing some of the more significant proposals for active and passive mixers. PMID:21686184

  20. Optoacoustic tweezers: a programmable, localized cell concentrator based on opto-thermally generated, acoustically activated, surface bubbles

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yanhui; Li, Sixing; Rufo, Joseph; Yang, Shikuan; Guo, Feng; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-01

    We present a programmable, biocompatible technique for dynamically concentrating and patterning particles and cells in a microfluidic device. Since our technique utilizes opto-thermally generated, acoustically activated, surface bubbles, we name it “optoacoustic tweezers.” The optoacoustic tweezers are capable of concentrating particles/cells at any prescribed locations in a microfluidic chamber without the use of permanent structures, rendering it particularly useful for the formation of flexible, complex cell patterns. Additionally, this technique has demonstrated excellent biocompatibility and can be conveniently integrated with other microfluidic units. In our experiments, micro-bubbles were generated by focusing a 405 nm diode laser onto a gold-coated glass chamber. By properly tuning the laser, we demonstrate precise control over the position and size of the generated bubbles. Acoustic waves were then applied to activate the surface bubbles, causing them to oscillate at an optimized frequency. The resulting acoustic radiation force allowed us to locally trap particles/cells, including 15 μm polystyrene beads and HeLa cells, around each bubble. Cell-adhesion tests were also conducted after cell concentrating to confirm the biocompatibility of this technique. PMID:23511348

  1. Punch Card Programmable Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Korir, George; Prakash, Manu

    2015-01-01

    Small volume fluid handling in single and multiphase microfluidics provides a promising strategy for efficient bio-chemical assays, low-cost point-of-care diagnostics and new approaches to scientific discoveries. However multiple barriers exist towards low-cost field deployment of programmable microfluidics. Incorporating multiple pumps, mixers and discrete valve based control of nanoliter fluids and droplets in an integrated, programmable manner without additional required external components has remained elusive. Combining the idea of punch card programming with arbitrary fluid control, here we describe a self-contained, hand-crank powered, multiplex and robust programmable microfluidic platform. A paper tape encodes information as a series of punched holes. A mechanical reader/actuator reads these paper tapes and correspondingly executes operations onto a microfluidic chip coupled to the platform in a plug-and-play fashion. Enabled by the complexity of codes that can be represented by a series of holes in punched paper tapes, we demonstrate independent control of 15 on-chip pumps with enhanced mixing, normally-closed valves and a novel on-demand impact-based droplet generator. We demonstrate robustness of operation by encoding a string of characters representing the word “PUNCHCARD MICROFLUIDICS” using the droplet generator. Multiplexing is demonstrated by implementing an example colorimetric water quality assays for pH, ammonia, nitrite and nitrate content in different water samples. With its portable and robust design, low cost and ease-of-use, we envision punch card programmable microfluidics will bring complex control of microfluidic chips into field-based applications in low-resource settings and in the hands of children around the world. PMID:25738834

  2. Force Analysis of Qi Chaotic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Guoyuan; Liang, Xiyin

    2016-12-01

    The Qi chaotic system is transformed into Kolmogorov type of system. The vector field of the Qi chaotic system is decomposed into four types of torques: inertial torque, internal torque, dissipation and external torque. Angular momentum representing the physical analogue of the state variables of the chaotic system is identified. The Casimir energy law relating to the orbital behavior is identified and the bound of Qi chaotic attractor is given. Five cases of study have been conducted to discover the insights and functions of different types of torques of the chaotic attractor and also the key factors of producing different types of modes of dynamics.

  3. The Liberal Arts Bubble

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agresto, John

    2011-01-01

    The author expresses his doubt that the general higher education bubble will burst anytime soon. Although tuition, student housing, and book costs have all increased substantially, he believes it is still likely that the federal government will continue to pour billions into higher education, largely because Americans have been persuaded that it…

  4. Chaotic communication scheme with multiplication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobreshov, A. M.; Karavaev, A. A.

    2007-05-01

    A new scheme of data transmission with nonlinear admixing is described, in which the two mutually inverse operations (multiplication and division) ensure multiplicative mixing of the informative and chaotic signals that provides a potentially higher degree of security. A special feature of the proposed scheme is the absence of limitations (related to the division by zero) imposed on the types of informative signals.

  5. Chaotic dynamics, fluctuations, nonequilibrium ensembles.

    PubMed

    Gallavotti, Giovanni

    1998-06-01

    The ideas and the conceptual steps leading from the ergodic hypothesis for equilibrium statistical mechanics to the chaotic hypothesis for equilibrium and nonequilibrium statistical mechanics are illustrated. The fluctuation theorem linear law and universal slope prediction for reversible systems is briefly derived. Applications to fluids are briefly alluded to. (c) 1998 American Institute of Physics.

  6. Learning in a Chaotic Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Ellen; Plack, Margaret; Roche, Colleen; Smith, Jeffrey; Turley, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to understand how, when, and why emergency medicine residents learn while working in the chaotic environment of a hospital emergency room. Design/methodology/approach: This research used a qualitative interview methodology with thematic data analysis that was verified with the entire population of learners.…

  7. Sonication-microfluidics for fabrication of nanoparticle-stabilized microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haosheng; Li, Jiang; Zhou, Weizheng; Pelan, Eddie G; Stoyanov, Simeon D; Arnaudov, Luben N; Stone, Howard A

    2014-04-22

    An approach based upon sonication-microfluidics is presented to fabricate nanoparticle-coated microbubbles. The gas-in-liquid slug flow formed in a microchannel is subjected to ultrasound, leading to cavitation at the gas-liquid interface. Therefore, microbubbles are formed and then stabilized by the nanoparticles contained in the liquid. Compared to the conventional sonication method, this sonication-microfluidics continuous flow approach has unlimited gas nuclei for cavitation that yields continuous production of foam with shorter residence time. By controlling the flow rate ratios of the gas to the liquid, this method also achieves a higher production volume, smaller bubble size, and less waste of the nanoparticles needed to stabilize the microbubbles.

  8. Microfluidic Flame Barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mungas, Gregory S. (Inventor); Fisher, David J. (Inventor); Mungas, Christopher (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Propellants flow through specialized mechanical hardware that is designed for effective and safe ignition and sustained combustion of the propellants. By integrating a micro-fluidic porous media element between a propellant feed source and the combustion chamber, an effective and reliable propellant injector head may be implemented that is capable of withstanding transient combustion and detonation waves that commonly occur during an ignition event. The micro-fluidic porous media element is of specified porosity or porosity gradient selected to be appropriate for a given propellant. Additionally the propellant injector head design integrates a spark ignition mechanism that withstands extremely hot running conditions without noticeable spark mechanism degradation.

  9. Experimental Microfluidic System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culbertson, Christopher; Gonda, Steve; Ramsey, John Michael

    2005-01-01

    The ultimate goal of this project is to integrate microfluidic devices with NASA's space bioreactor systems. In such a system, the microfluidic device would provide realtime feedback control of the bioreactor by monitoring pH, glucose, and lactate levels in the cell media; and would provide an analytical capability to the bioreactor in exterrestrial environments for monitoring bioengineered cell products and health changes in cells due to environmental stressors. Such integrated systems could be used as biosentinels both in space and on planet surfaces. The objective is to demonstrate the ability of microfabricated devices to repeatedly and reproducibly perform bead cytometry experiments in micro, lunar, martian, and hypergravity (1.8g).

  10. Bubbly Little Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    In this processed Spitzer Space Telescope image, baby star HH 46/47 can be seen blowing two massive 'bubbles.' The star is 1,140 light-years away from Earth.

    The infant star can be seen as a white spot toward the center of the Spitzer image. The two bubbles are shown as hollow elliptical shells of bluish-green material extending from the star. Wisps of green in the image reveal warm molecular hydrogen gas, while the bluish tints are formed by starlight scattered by surrounding dust.

    These bubbles formed when powerful jets of gas, traveling at 200 to 300 kilometers per second, or about 120 to 190 miles per second, smashed into the cosmic cloud of gas and dust that surrounds HH 46/47. The red specks at the end of each bubble show the presence of hot sulfur and iron gas where the star's narrow jets are currently crashing head-on into the cosmic cloud's gas and dust material.

    Whenever astronomers observe a star, or snap a stellar portrait, through the lens of any telescope, they know that what they are seeing is slightly blurred. To clear up the blurring in Spitzer images, astronomers at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory developed an image processing technique for Spitzer called Hi-Res deconvolution.

    This process reduces blurring and makes the image sharper and cleaner, enabling astronomers to see the emissions around forming stars in greater detail. When scientists applied this image processing technique to the Spitzer image of HH 46/47, they were able to see winds from the star and jets of gas that are carving the celestial bubbles.

    This infrared image is a three-color composite, with data at 3.6 microns represented in blue, 4.5 and 5.8 microns shown in green, and 24 microns represented as red.

  11. Bubble dynamics and bubble-induced turbulence of a single-bubble chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Joohyoung; Park, Hyungmin

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, the bubble dynamics and liquid-phase turbulence induced by a chain of bubbles injected from a single nozzle have been experimentally investigated. Using a high-speed two-phase particle image velociemtry, measurements on the bubbles and liquid-phase velocity field are conducted in a transparent tank filled with water, while varying the bubble release frequency from 0.1 to 35 Hz. The tested bubble size ranges between 2.0-3.2 mm, and the corresponding bubble Reynolds number is 590-1100, indicating that it belongs to the regime of path instability. As the release frequency increases, it is found that the global shape of bubble dispersion can be classified into two regimes: from asymmetric (regular) to axisymmetric (irregular). In particular, at higher frequency, the wake vortices of leading bubbles cause an irregular behaviour of the following bubble. For the liquid phase, it is found that a specific trend on the bubble-induced turbulence appears in a strong relation to the above bubble dynamics. Considering this, we try to provide a theoretical model to estimate the liquid-phase turbulence induced by a chain of bubbles. Supported by a Grant funded by Samsung Electronics, Korea.

  12. Signature of anisotropic bubble collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Salem, Michael P.

    2010-09-15

    Our universe may have formed via bubble nucleation in an eternally inflating background. Furthermore, the background may have a compact dimension--the modulus of which tunnels out of a metastable minimum during bubble nucleation--which subsequently grows to become one of our three large spatial dimensions. When in this scenario our bubble universe collides with other ones like it, the collision geometry is constrained by the reduced symmetry of the tunneling instanton. While the regions affected by such bubble collisions still appear (to leading order) as disks in an observer's sky, the centers of these disks all lie on a single great circle, providing a distinct signature of anisotropic bubble nucleation.

  13. PDMS free-flow electrophoresis chips with integrated partitioning bars for bubble segregation.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Stefan; Weilbeer, Claudia; Howitz, Steffen; Becker, Holger; Beushausen, Volker; Belder, Detlev

    2011-01-21

    In this work, a microfluidic free-flow electrophoresis device with a novel approach for preventing gas bubbles from entering the separation area is presented. This is achieved by integrating partitioning bars to reduce the channel depth between electrode channels and separation chamber in order to obtain electrical contact and simultaneously prevent bubbles from entering the separation area. The three-layer sandwich chip features a reusable carrier plate with integrated ports for fluidic connection combined with a softlithographically cast microfluidic PDMS layer and a sealing glass slide. This design allows for a straightforward and rapid chip prototyping process. The performance of the device is demonstrated by free-flow zone electrophoretic separations of fluorescent dye mixtures as well as by the separation of labeled amines and amino acids with separation voltages up to 297 V.

  14. Ring Bubbles of Dolphins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariff, Karim; Marten, Ken; Psarakos, Suchi; White, Don J.; Merriam, Marshal (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The article discusses how dolphins create and play with three types of air-filled vortices. The underlying physics is discussed. Photographs and sketches illustrating the dolphin's actions and physics are presented. The dolphins engage in this behavior on their own initiative without food reward. These behaviors are done repeatedly and with singleminded effort. The first type is the ejection of bubbles which, after some practice on the part of the dolphin, turn into toroidal vortex ring bubbles by the mechanism of baroclinic torque. These bubbles grow in radius and become thinner as they rise vertically to the surface. One dolphin would blow two in succession and guide them to fuse into one. Physicists call this a vortex reconnection. In the second type, the dolphins first create an invisible vortex ring in the water by swimming on their side and waving their tail fin (also called flukes) vigorously. This vortex ring travels horizontally in the water. The dolphin then turns around, finds the vortex and injects a stream of air into it from its blowhole. The air "fills-out" the core of the vortex ring. Often, the dolphin would knock-off a smaller ring bubble from the larger ring (this also involves vortex reconnection) and steer the smaller ring around the tank. One other dolphin employed a few other techniques for planting air into the fluke vortex. One technique included standing vertically in the water with tail-up, head-down and tail piercing the free surface. As the fluke is waved to create the vortex ring, air is entrained from above the surface. Another technique was gulping air in the mouth, diving down, releasing air bubbles from the mouth and curling them into a ring when they rose to the level of the fluke. In the third type, demonstrated by only one dolphin, the longitudinal vortex created by the dorsal fin on the back is used to produce 10-15 foot long helical bubbles. In one technique she swims in a curved path. This creates a dorsal fin vortex since

  15. Chemistry in Microfluidic Channels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chia, Matthew C.; Sweeney, Christina M.; Odom, Teri W.

    2011-01-01

    General chemistry introduces principles such as acid-base chemistry, mixing, and precipitation that are usually demonstrated in bulk solutions. In this laboratory experiment, we describe how chemical reactions can be performed in a microfluidic channel to show advanced concepts such as laminar fluid flow and controlled precipitation. Three sets of…

  16. Oscillatory/Chaotic Thermocapillary Flow Induced by Radiant Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWitt, Kenneth J.

    1998-01-01

    There is a continuing need to understand the fluid physics occurring under low gravity conditions in processes such as crystal growth, materials processing, and the movement of bubbles or droplets. The fluid flow in such situations is often caused by a gradient in interfacial tension. If a temperature gradient is created due to a heat source, the resulting flow is called thermocapillary flow, a special case of Marangoni Convection. In this study, an experimental investigation was conducted using silicone oil in cylindrical containers with a laser heat source at the free surface. It was desired to determine the conditions under which steady, axisymmetrical thermocapillary flow becomes unstable and oscillatory three-dimensional flow states develop. The critical Marangoni number for each observed oscillatory state was measured as a function of the container aspect ratio and the dynamic Bond number, a measure of buoyant force versus ii thermocapillary force. Various oscillatory modes were observed during three- dimensional convection, and chaotic flow was reached in one test condition. The critical Marangoni numbers are compared with those measured in previous studies, and the power spectra and phase trajectories of the instantaneous surface temperature distributions are used to characterize the routes of transitions to the chaotic flow state. Results show that only superharmonic modes appear in the routes to chaos while infinite number of subharmonic modes occur in flow transitions for pure Rayleigh convection.

  17. Magnetic digital microfluidics - a review.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2017-03-14

    A digital microfluidic platform manipulates droplets on an open surface. Magnetic digital microfluidics utilizes magnetic forces for actuation and offers unique advantages compared to other digital microfluidic platforms. First, the magnetic particles used in magnetic digital microfluidics have multiple functions. In addition to serving as actuators, they also provide a functional solid substrate for molecule binding, which enables a wide range of applications in molecular diagnostics and immunodiagnostics. Second, magnetic digital microfluidics can be manually operated in a "power-free" manner, which allows for operation in low-resource environments for point-of-care diagnostics where even batteries are considered a luxury item. This review covers research areas related to magnetic digital microfluidics. This paper first summarizes the current development of magnetic digital microfluidics. Various methods of droplet manipulation using magnetic forces are discussed, ranging from conventional magnetic particle-based actuation to the recent development of ferrofluids and magnetic liquid marbles. This paper also discusses several new approaches that use magnetically controlled flexible substrates for droplet manipulation. In addition, we emphasize applications of magnetic digital microfluidics in biosensing and medical diagnostics, and identify the current limitations of magnetic digital microfluidics. We provide a perspective on possible solutions to close these gaps. Finally, the paper discusses the future improvement of magnetic digital microfluidics to explore potential new research directions.

  18. Oxygen control with microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Martin D; Rexius-Hall, Megan L; Elgass, Laura Jane; Eddington, David T

    2014-11-21

    Cellular function and behavior are affected by the partial pressure of O2, or oxygen tension, in the microenvironment. The level of oxygenation is important, as it is a balance of oxygen availability and oxygen consumption that is necessary to maintain normoxia. Changes in oxygen tension, from above physiological oxygen tension (hyperoxia) to below physiological levels (hypoxia) or even complete absence of oxygen (anoxia), trigger potent biological responses. For instance, hypoxia has been shown to support the maintenance and promote proliferation of regenerative stem and progenitor cells. Paradoxically, hypoxia also contributes to the development of pathological conditions including systemic inflammatory response, tumorigenesis, and cardiovascular disease, such as ischemic heart disease and pulmonary hypertension. Current methods to study cellular behavior in low levels of oxygen tension include hypoxia workstations and hypoxia chambers. These culture systems do not provide oxygen gradients that are found in vivo or precise control at the microscale. Microfluidic platforms have been developed to overcome the inherent limits of these current methods, including lack of spatial control, slow equilibration, and unachievable or difficult coupling to live-cell microscopy. The various applications made possible by microfluidic systems are the topic of this review. In order to understand how the microscale can be leveraged for oxygen control of cells and tissues within microfluidic systems, some background understanding of diffusion, solubility, and transport at the microscale will be presented in addition to a discussion on the methods for measuring the oxygen tension in microfluidic channels. Finally the various methods for oxygen control within microfluidic platforms will be discussed including devices that rely on diffusion from liquid or gas, utilizing on-or-off-chip mixers, leveraging cellular oxygen uptake to deplete the oxygen, relying on chemical reactions in

  19. Bubble dynamics in drinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broučková, Zuzana; Trávníček, Zdeněk; Šafařík, Pavel

    2014-03-01

    This study introduces two physical effects known from beverages: the effect of sinking bubbles and the hot chocolate sound effect. The paper presents two simple "kitchen" experiments. The first and second effects are indicated by means of a flow visualization and microphone measurement, respectively. To quantify the second (acoustic) effect, sound records are analyzed using time-frequency signal processing, and the obtained power spectra and spectrograms are discussed.

  20. Slurry bubble column hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rados, Novica

    Slurry bubble column reactors are presently used for a wide range of reactions in both chemical and biochemical industry. The successful design and scale up of slurry bubble column reactors require a complete understanding of multiphase fluid dynamics, i.e. phase mixing, heat and mass transport characteristics. The primary objective of this thesis is to improve presently limited understanding of the gas-liquid-solid slurry bubble column hydrodynamics. The effect of superficial gas velocity (8 to 45 cm/s), pressure (0.1 to 1.0 MPa) and solids loading (20 and 35 wt.%) on the time-averaged solids velocity and turbulent parameter profiles has been studied using Computer Automated Radioactive Particle Tracking (CARPT). To accomplish this, CARPT technique has been significantly improved for the measurements in highly attenuating systems, such as high pressure, high solids loading stainless steel slurry bubble column. At a similar set of operational conditions time-averaged gas and solids holdup profiles have been evaluated using the developed Computed Tomography (CT)/Overall gas holdup procedure. This procedure is based on the combination of the CT scans and the overall gas holdup measurements. The procedure assumes constant solids loading in the radial direction and axially invariant cross-sectionally averaged gas holdup. The obtained experimental holdup, velocity and turbulent parameters data are correlated and compared with the existing low superficial gas velocities and atmospheric pressure CARPT/CT gas-liquid and gas-liquid-solid slurry data. The obtained solids axial velocity radial profiles are compared with the predictions of the one dimensional (1-D) liquid/slurry recirculation phenomenological model. The obtained solids loading axial profiles are compared with the predictions of the Sedimentation and Dispersion Model (SDM). The overall gas holdup values, gas holdup radial profiles, solids loading axial profiles, solids axial velocity radial profiles and solids

  1. Sonoluminescence, sonochemistry and bubble dynamics of single bubble cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatanaka, Shin-ichi

    2012-09-01

    The amount of hydroxyl radicals produced from a single cavitation bubble was quantified by terephthalate dosimetry at various frequencies and pressure amplitudes, while the dynamics of the single bubble was observed by stroboscopic and light-scattering methods. Also, sonoluminescence (SL), sonochemiluminescence (SCL) of luminol, and sodium atom emission (Na*) in the cavitation field were observed. The amount of hydroxyl radicals per cycle as well as the intensity of SL was proportional to pressure amplitude at every frequency performed, and it decreased with increasing frequency. When the single bubble was dancing with a decrease in pressure amplitude, however, the amount of hydroxyl radicals was greater than that for the stable bubble at the higher pressure amplitude and did not significantly decrease with frequency. Furthermore, SCL and Na* were detected only under unstable bubble conditions. These results imply that the instability of bubbles significantly enhances sonochemical efficiency for non-volatile substances in liquid phase.

  2. Bubble colloidal AFM probes formed from ultrasonically generated bubbles.

    PubMed

    Vakarelski, Ivan U; Lee, Judy; Dagastine, Raymond R; Chan, Derek Y C; Stevens, Geoffrey W; Grieser, Franz

    2008-02-05

    Here we introduce a simple and effective experimental approach to measuring the interaction forces between two small bubbles (approximately 80-140 microm) in aqueous solution during controlled collisions on the scale of micrometers to nanometers. The colloidal probe technique using atomic force microscopy (AFM) was extended to measure interaction forces between a cantilever-attached bubble and surface-attached bubbles of various sizes. By using an ultrasonic source, we generated numerous small bubbles on a mildly hydrophobic surface of a glass slide. A single bubble picked up with a strongly hydrophobized V-shaped cantilever was used as the colloidal probe. Sample force measurements were used to evaluate the pure water bubble cleanliness and the general consistency of the measurements.

  3. Rectified growth of histotripsy bubbles

    PubMed Central

    Kreider, Wayne; Maxwell, Adam D.; Khokhlova, Tatiana; Simon, Julianna C.; Khokhlova, Vera A.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg; Bailey, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Histotripsy treatments use high-amplitude shock waves to fractionate tissue. Such treatments have been demonstrated using both cavitation bubbles excited with microsecond-long pulses and boiling bubbles excited for milliseconds. A common feature of both approaches is the need for bubble growth, where at 1 MHz cavitation bubbles reach maximum radii on the order of 100 microns and boiling bubbles grow to about 1 mm. To explore how histotripsy bubbles grow, a model of a single, spherical bubble that accounts for heat and mass transport was used to simulate the bubble dynamics. Results suggest that the asymmetry inherent in nonlinearly distorted waveforms can lead to rectified bubble growth, which is enhanced at elevated temperatures. Moreover, the rate of this growth is sensitive to the waveform shape, in particular the transition from the peak negative pressure to the shock front. Current efforts are focused on elucidating this behavior by obtaining an improved calibration of measured histotripsy waveforms with a fiber-optic hydrophone, using a nonlinear propagation model to assess the impact on the focal waveform of higher harmonics present at the source’s surface, and photographically observing bubble growth rates. PMID:26413193

  4. PREFACE: Nano- and microfluidics Nano- and microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Karin

    2011-05-01

    The field of nano- and microfluidics emerged at the end of the 1990s parallel to the demand for smaller and smaller containers and channels for chemical, biochemical and medical applications such as blood and DNS analysis [1], gene sequencing or proteomics [2, 3]. Since then, new journals and conferences have been launched and meanwhile, about two decades later, a variety of microfluidic applications are on the market. Briefly, 'the small flow becomes mainstream' [4]. Nevertheless, research in nano- and microfluidics is more than downsizing the spatial dimensions. For liquids on the nanoscale, surface and interface phenomena grow in importance and may even dominate the behavior in some systems. The studies collected in this special issue all concentrate on these type of systems and were part ot the priority programme SPP1164 'Nano- and Microfluidics' of the German Science Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, DFG). The priority programme was initiated in 2002 by Hendrik Kuhlmann and myself and was launched in 2004. Friction between a moving liquid and a solid wall may, for instance, play an important role so that the usual assumption of a no-slip boundary condition is no longer valid. Likewise, the dynamic deformations of soft objects like polymers, vesicles or capsules in flow arise from the subtle interplay between the (visco-)elasticity of the object and the viscous stresses in the surrounding fluid and, potentially, the presence of structures confining the flow like channels. Consequently, new theories were developed ( see articles in this issue by Münch and Wagner, Falk and Mecke, Bonthuis et al, Finken et al, Almenar and Rauscher, Straube) and experiments were set up to unambiguously demonstrate deviations from bulk, or 'macro', behavior (see articles in this issue by Wolff et al, Vinogradova and Belyaev, Hahn et al, Seemann et al, Grüner and Huber, Müller-Buschbaum et al, Gutsche et al, Braunmüller et al, Laube et al, Brücker, Nottebrock et al

  5. Illusion optics in chaotic light

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Suheng; Gan Shu; Xiong Jun; Zhang Xiangdong; Wang Kaige

    2010-08-15

    The time-reversal process provides the possibility to counteract the time evolution of a physical system. Recent research has shown that such a process can occur in the first-order field correlation of chaotic light and result in the spatial interference and phase-reversal diffraction in an unbalanced interferometer. Here we report experimental investigations on the invisibility cloak and illusion phenomena in chaotic light. In an unbalanced interferometer illuminated by thermal light, we have observed the cloak effect and the optical transformation of one object into another object. The experimental results can be understood by the phase-reversal diffraction, and they demonstrate the theoretical proposal of similar effects in complementary media.

  6. Illusion optics in chaotic light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Su-Heng; Gan, Shu; Xiong, Jun; Zhang, Xiangdong; Wang, Kaige

    2010-08-01

    The time-reversal process provides the possibility to counteract the time evolution of a physical system. Recent research has shown that such a process can occur in the first-order field correlation of chaotic light and result in the spatial interference and phase-reversal diffraction in an unbalanced interferometer. Here we report experimental investigations on the invisibility cloak and illusion phenomena in chaotic light. In an unbalanced interferometer illuminated by thermal light, we have observed the cloak effect and the optical transformation of one object into another object. The experimental results can be understood by the phase-reversal diffraction, and they demonstrate the theoretical proposal of similar effects in complementary media.

  7. Chaotic attractors with separated scrolls

    SciTech Connect

    Bouallegue, Kais

    2015-07-15

    This paper proposes a new behavior of chaotic attractors with separated scrolls while combining Julia's process with Chua's attractor and Lorenz's attractor. The main motivation of this work is the ability to generate a set of separated scrolls with different behaviors, which in turn allows us to choose one or many scrolls combined with modulation (amplitude and frequency) for secure communication or synchronization. This set seems a new class of hyperchaos because each element of this set looks like a simple chaotic attractor with one positive Lyapunov exponent, so the cardinal of this set is greater than one. This new approach could be used to generate more general higher-dimensional hyperchaotic attractor for more potential application. Numerical simulations are given to show the effectiveness of the proposed theoretical results.

  8. The Chaotic Dynamics of Jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egolf, David A.; Banigan, Edward J.; Illich, Matthew K.; Stace-Naughton, Derick J.

    2013-03-01

    Despite the appearance of simplicity, much of the behavior of granular materials remains mysterious. One intriguing puzzle is the dynamical mechanism underlying the ``jamming'' transition, in which disordered grains become rigid at high density. By applying nonlinear dynamical techniques to simulated 2D shear cells, we reveal the mechanisms of jamming and find they conflict with the prevailing picture of growing cooperative regions. Additionally, at the density corresponding to random close packing, we find a dynamical transition from chaotic to non-chaotic states accompanied by diverging dynamical length and time scales. Furthermore, we find that the dominant cooperative dynamical modes are strongly correlated with particle rearrangements and become increasingly unstable before stress jumps, providing a way to predict the times and locations of these earthquake-like stress-release events. This work was supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation (DMR-0094178) and Research Corporation.

  9. Chaotic desynchronization of multistrain diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Ira B.; Shaw, Leah B.; Cummings, Derek A. T.; Billings, Lora; McCrary, Marie; Burke, Donald S.

    2005-12-01

    Multistrain diseases are diseases that consist of several strains, or serotypes. The serotypes may interact by antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE), in which infection with a single serotype is asymptomatic, but infection with a second serotype leads to serious illness accompanied by greater infectivity. It has been observed from serotype data of dengue hemorrhagic fever that outbreaks of the four serotypes occur asynchronously. Both autonomous and seasonally driven outbreaks were studied in a model containing ADE. For sufficiently small ADE, the number of infectives of each serotype synchronizes, with outbreaks occurring in phase. When the ADE increases past a threshold, the system becomes chaotic, and infectives of each serotype desynchronize. However, certain groupings of the primary and secondary infectives remain synchronized even in the chaotic regime.

  10. Chaotic pulsations in stellar models

    SciTech Connect

    Buchler, J.R. )

    1990-12-01

    The irregular behavior of large-amplitude pulsating stars undergoing radial oscillations is examined theoretically, with a focus on hydrodynamic simulations of the W Virginis population II Cepheids (stars which show both regular and RV Tau characteristics). Sequences of models are constructed as one-parameter families (with luminosity, mass, and composition fixed and Teff as the control parameter) and analyzed to derive a systematic map of the bifurcation set; i.e., of the possible types of pulsations. The results are presented graphically, and it is shown that both cascades of period doubling (via destabilization of an overtone through a half-integer-type resonance) and tangent bifurcation are possible routes to chaos in these systems, depending on the stellar parameters. The general robustness of the chaotic behavior and the existence of a 'chaotic blue edge' in stellar-parameter space are demonstrated. 55 refs.

  11. The magnitude of lift forces acting on drops and bubbles in liquids flowing inside microchannels.

    PubMed

    Stan, Claudiu A; Ellerbee, Audrey K; Guglielmini, Laura; Stone, Howard A; Whitesides, George M

    2013-02-07

    Hydrodynamic lift forces offer a convenient way to manipulate particles in microfluidic applications, but there is little quantitative information on how non-inertial lift mechanisms act and compete with each other in the confined space of microfluidic channels. This paper reports measurements of lift forces on nearly spherical drops and bubbles, with diameters from one quarter to one half of the width of the channel, flowing in microfluidic channels, under flow conditions characterized by particle capillary numbers Ca(P) = 0.0003-0.3 and particle Reynolds numbers Re(P) = 0.0001-0.1. For Ca(P) < 0.01 and Re(P) < 0.01 the measured lift forces were much larger than predictions of deformation-induced and inertial lift forces found in the literature, probably due to physicochemical hydrodynamic effects at the interface of drops and bubbles, such as the presence of surfactants. The measured forces could be fit with good accuracy using an empirical formula given herein. The empirical formula describes the power-law dependence of the lift force on hydrodynamic parameters (velocity and viscosity of the carrier phase; sizes of channel and drop or bubble), and includes a numerical lift coefficient that depends on the fluids used. The empirical formula using an average lift coefficient of ~500 predicted, within one order of magnitude, all lift force measurements in channels with cross-sectional dimensions below 1 mm.

  12. Sneutrino chaotic inflation and landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murayama, Hitoshi; Nakayama, Kazunori; Takahashi, Fuminobu; Yanagida, Tsutomu T.

    2014-11-01

    The most naive interpretation of the BICEP2 data is the chaotic inflation by an inflaton with a quadratic potential. When combined with supersymmetry, we argue that the inflaton plays the role of right-handed scalar neutrino based on rather general considerations. The framework suggests that the right-handed sneutrino tunneled from a false vacuum in a landscape to our vacuum with a small negative curvature and suppressed scalar perturbations at large scales.

  13. Chaotic inflation and supersymmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Kallosh, Renata; Linde, Andrei; Rube, Tomas; Olive, Keith A.

    2011-10-15

    We investigate the recently proposed class of chaotic inflation models in supergravity with an arbitrary inflaton potential V({phi}). These models are extended to include matter fields in the visible sector and we employ a mechanism of supersymmetry breaking based on a particular phenomenological version of the KKLT mechanism (the KL model). We describe specific features of reheating in this class of models and show how one can solve the cosmological moduli and gravitino problems in this context.

  14. Droplet microfluidics based microseparation systems.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhiliang; Niu, Menglei; Zhang, Bo

    2012-06-01

    Lab on a chip (LOC) technology is a promising miniaturization approach. The feature that it significantly reduced sample consumption makes great sense in analytical and bioanalytical chemistry. Since the start of LOC technology, much attention has been focused on continuous flow microfluidic systems. At the turn of the century, droplet microfluidics, which was also termed segmented flow microfluidics, was introduced. Droplet microfluidics employs two immiscible phases to form discrete droplets, which are ideal vessels with confined volume, restricted dispersion, limited cross-contamination, and high surface area. Due to these unique features, droplet microfluidics proves to be a versatile tool in microscale sample handling. This article reviews the utility of droplet microfluidics in microanalytical systems with an emphasize on separation science, including sample encapsulation at ultra-small volume, compartmentalization of separation bands, isolation of droplet contents, and related detection techniques.

  15. Modelling chaotic vibrations using NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheerer, T. J.

    1993-01-01

    Due to the unavailability and, later, prohibitive cost of the computational power required, many phenomena in nonlinear dynamic systems have in the past been addressed in terms of linear systems. Linear systems respond to periodic inputs with periodic outputs, and may be characterized in the time domain or in the frequency domain as convenient. Reduction to the frequency domain is frequently desireable to reduce the amount of computation required for solution. Nonlinear systems are only soluble in the time domain, and may exhibit a time history which is extremely sensitive to initial conditions. Such systems are termed chaotic. Dynamic buckling, aeroelasticity, fatigue analysis, control systems and electromechanical actuators are among the areas where chaotic vibrations have been observed. Direct transient analysis over a long time period presents a ready means of simulating the behavior of self-excited or externally excited nonlinear systems for a range of experimental parameters, either to characterize chaotic behavior for development of load spectra, or to define its envelope and preclude its occurrence.

  16. Chaotic behavior of channeling particles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ling; Kaloyeros, Alain E.; Wang, Guang-Hou

    1994-03-01

    Channeling describes the collimated motion of energetic charged particles along the lattice plane or axis in a crystal. The energetic particles are steered through the channels formed by strings of atomic constituents in the lattice. In the case of planar channeling, the motion of a charged particle between the atomic planes can be periodic or quasiperiodic, such as a simple oscillatory motion in the transverse direction. In practice, however, the periodic motion of the channeling particles can be accompanied by an irregular, chaotic behavior. In this paper, the Moliere potential, which is considered as a good analytical approximation for the interaction of channeling particles with the rows of atoms in the lattice, is used to simulate the channeling behavior of positively charged particles in a tungsten (100) crystal plane. By appropriate selection of channeling parameters, such as the projectile energy E(0) and incident angle psi(0), the transition of channeling particles from regular to chaotic motion is demonstrated. It is argued that the fine structures that appear in the angular scan channeling experiments are due to the particles' chaotic motion.

  17. CHAOTIC CAPTURE OF NEPTUNE TROJANS

    SciTech Connect

    Nesvorny, David; Vokrouhlicky, David

    2009-06-15

    Neptune Trojans (NTs) are swarms of outer solar system objects that lead/trail planet Neptune during its revolutions around the Sun. Observations indicate that NTs form a thick cloud of objects with a population perhaps {approx}10 times more numerous than that of Jupiter Trojans and orbital inclinations reaching {approx}25 deg. The high inclinations of NTs are indicative of capture instead of in situ formation. Here we study a model in which NTs were captured by Neptune during planetary migration when secondary resonances associated with the mean-motion commensurabilities between Uranus and Neptune swept over Neptune's Lagrangian points. This process, known as chaotic capture, is similar to that previously proposed to explain the origin of Jupiter's Trojans. We show that chaotic capture of planetesimals from an {approx}35 Earth-mass planetesimal disk can produce a population of NTs that is at least comparable in number to that inferred from current observations. The large orbital inclinations of NTs are a natural outcome of chaotic capture. To obtain the {approx}4:1 ratio between high- and low-inclination populations suggested by observations, planetary migration into a dynamically excited planetesimal disk may be required. The required stirring could have been induced by Pluto-sized and larger objects that have formed in the disk.

  18. Characterizing chaotic melodies in automatic music composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coca, Andrés E.; Tost, Gerard O.; Zhao, Liang

    2010-09-01

    In this paper, we initially present an algorithm for automatic composition of melodies using chaotic dynamical systems. Afterward, we characterize chaotic music in a comprehensive way as comprising three perspectives: musical discrimination, dynamical influence on musical features, and musical perception. With respect to the first perspective, the coherence between generated chaotic melodies (continuous as well as discrete chaotic melodies) and a set of classical reference melodies is characterized by statistical descriptors and melodic measures. The significant differences among the three types of melodies are determined by discriminant analysis. Regarding the second perspective, the influence of dynamical features of chaotic attractors, e.g., Lyapunov exponent, Hurst coefficient, and correlation dimension, on melodic features is determined by canonical correlation analysis. The last perspective is related to perception of originality, complexity, and degree of melodiousness (Euler's gradus suavitatis) of chaotic and classical melodies by nonparametric statistical tests.

  19. Microfluidic device, and related methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Eric W. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method of making a microfluidic device is provided. The method features patterning a permeable wall on a substrate, and surrounding the permeable wall with a solid, non-permeable boundary structure to establish a microfluidic channel having a cross-sectional dimension less than 5,000 microns and a cross-sectional area at least partially filled with the permeable wall so that fluid flowing through the microfluidic channel at least partially passes through the permeable wall.

  20. In Search of the Big Bubble

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simoson, Andrew; Wentzky, Bethany

    2011-01-01

    Freely rising air bubbles in water sometimes assume the shape of a spherical cap, a shape also known as the "big bubble". Is it possible to find some objective function involving a combination of a bubble's attributes for which the big bubble is the optimal shape? Following the basic idea of the definite integral, we define a bubble's surface as…

  1. Chaotic evolution of the solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sussman, Gerald J.; Wisdom, Jack

    1992-01-01

    The evolution of the entire planetary system has been numerically integrated for a time span of nearly 100 million years. This calculation confirms that the evolution of the solar system as a whole is chaotic, with a time scale of exponential divergence of about 4 million years. Additional numerical experiments indicate that the Jovian planet subsystem is chaotic, although some small variations in the model can yield quasi-periodic motion. The motion of Pluto is independently and robustly chaotic.

  2. Intermittent chaotic chimeras for coupled rotators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmi, Simona; Martens, Erik A.; Thutupalli, Shashi; Torcini, Alessandro

    2015-09-01

    Two symmetrically coupled populations of N oscillators with inertia m display chaotic solutions with broken symmetry similar to experimental observations with mechanical pendulums. In particular, we report evidence of intermittent chaotic chimeras, where one population is synchronized and the other jumps erratically between laminar and turbulent phases. These states have finite lifetimes diverging as a power law with N and m . Lyapunov analyses reveal chaotic properties in quantitative agreement with theoretical predictions for globally coupled dissipative systems.

  3. Collapse of large vapor bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tegart, J.; Dominick, S.

    1982-01-01

    The refilling of propellant tanks while in a low-gravity environment requires that entrapped vapor bubbles be collapsed by increasing the system pressure. Tests were performed to verify the mechanism of collapse for these large vapor bubbles with the thermodynamic conditions, geometry, and boundary conditions being those applicable to propellant storage systems. For these conditions it was found that conduction heat transfer determined the collapse rate, with the specific bubble geometry having a significant influence.

  4. Microfluidic free-flow zone electrophoresis and isotachophoresis using carbon black nano-composite PDMS sidewall membranes.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaotong; Mavrogiannis, Nicholas; Ibo, Markela; Crivellari, Francesca; Gagnon, Zachary R

    2017-01-01

    We present a new type of free-flow electrophoresis (FFE) device for performing on-chip microfluidic isotachophoresis and zone electrophoresis. FFE is performed using metal gallium electrodes, which are isolated from a main microfluidic flow channel using thin micron-scale polydimethylsiloxane/carbon black (PDMS/CB) composite membranes integrated directly into the sidewalls of the microfluidic channel. The thin membrane allows for field penetration and effective electrophoresis, but serves to prevent bubble generation at the electrodes from electrolysis. We experimentally demonstrate the ability to use this platform to perform on-chip free-flow electrophoretic separation and isotachophoretic concentration. Due to the small size and simple fabrication procedure, this PDMS/CB platform could be used as a part of an on-chip upstream sample preparation toolkit for portable microfluidic diagnostic applications.

  5. Experimental observation of transition from chaotic bursting to chaotic spiking in a neural pacemaker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Huaguang

    2013-06-01

    The transition from chaotic bursting to chaotic spiking has been simulated and analyzed in theoretical neuronal models. In the present study, we report experimental observations in a neural pacemaker of a transition from chaotic bursting to chaotic spiking within a bifurcation scenario from period-1 bursting to period-1 spiking. This was induced by adjusting extracellular calcium or potassium concentrations. The bifurcation scenario began from period-doubling bifurcations or period-adding sequences of bursting pattern. This chaotic bursting is characterized by alternations between multiple continuous spikes and a long duration of quiescence, whereas chaotic spiking is comprised of fast, continuous spikes without periods of quiescence. Chaotic bursting changed to chaotic spiking as long interspike intervals (ISIs) of quiescence disappeared within bursting patterns, drastically decreasing both ISIs and the magnitude of the chaotic attractors. Deterministic structures of the chaotic bursting and spiking patterns are also identified by a short-term prediction. The experimental observations, which agree with published findings in theoretical neuronal models, demonstrate the existence and reveal the dynamics of a neuronal transition from chaotic bursting to chaotic spiking in the nervous system.

  6. Information encoder/decoder using chaotic systems

    DOEpatents

    Miller, S.L.; Miller, W.M.; McWhorter, P.J.

    1997-10-21

    The present invention discloses a chaotic system-based information encoder and decoder that operates according to a relationship defining a chaotic system. Encoder input signals modify the dynamics of the chaotic system comprising the encoder. The modifications result in chaotic, encoder output signals that contain the encoder input signals encoded within them. The encoder output signals are then capable of secure transmissions using conventional transmission techniques. A decoder receives the encoder output signals (i.e., decoder input signals) and inverts the dynamics of the encoding system to directly reconstruct the original encoder input signals. 32 figs.

  7. Information encoder/decoder using chaotic systems

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Samuel Lee; Miller, William Michael; McWhorter, Paul Jackson

    1997-01-01

    The present invention discloses a chaotic system-based information encoder and decoder that operates according to a relationship defining a chaotic system. Encoder input signals modify the dynamics of the chaotic system comprising the encoder. The modifications result in chaotic, encoder output signals that contain the encoder input signals encoded within them. The encoder output signals are then capable of secure transmissions using conventional transmission techniques. A decoder receives the encoder output signals (i.e., decoder input signals) and inverts the dynamics of the encoding system to directly reconstruct the original encoder input signals.

  8. Microfluidic redox battery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Wook; Goulet, Marc-Antoni; Kjeang, Erik

    2013-07-07

    A miniaturized microfluidic battery is proposed, which is the first membraneless redox battery demonstrated to date. This unique concept capitalizes on dual-pass flow-through porous electrodes combined with stratified, co-laminar flow to generate electrical power on-chip. The fluidic design is symmetric to allow for both charging and discharging operations in forward, reverse, and recirculation modes. The proof-of-concept device fabricated using low-cost materials integrated in a microfluidic chip is shown to produce competitive power levels when operated on a vanadium redox electrolyte. A complete charge/discharge cycle is performed to demonstrate its operation as a rechargeable battery, which is an important step towards providing sustainable power to lab-on-a-chip and microelectronic applications.

  9. Microfluidic colloid filtration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linkhorst, John; Beckmann, Torsten; Go, Dennis; Kuehne, Alexander J. C.; Wessling, Matthias

    2016-03-01

    Filtration of natural and colloidal matter is an essential process in today’s water treatment processes. The colloidal matter is retained with the help of micro- and nanoporous synthetic membranes. Colloids are retained in a “cake layer” – often coined fouling layer. Membrane fouling is the most substantial problem in membrane filtration: colloidal and natural matter build-up leads to an increasing resistance and thus decreasing water transport rate through the membrane. Theoretical models exist to describe macroscopically the hydrodynamic resistance of such transport and rejection phenomena; however, visualization of the various phenomena occurring during colloid retention is extremely demanding. Here we present a microfluidics based methodology to follow filter cake build up as well as transport phenomena occuring inside of the fouling layer. The microfluidic colloidal filtration methodology enables the study of complex colloidal jamming, crystallization and melting processes as well as translocation at the single particle level.

  10. The Microfluidic Jukebox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Say Hwa; Maes, Florine; Semin, Benoît; Vrignon, Jérémy; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2014-04-01

    Music is a form of art interweaving people of all walks of life. Through subtle changes in frequencies, a succession of musical notes forms a melody which is capable of mesmerizing the minds of people. With the advances in technology, we are now able to generate music electronically without relying solely on physical instruments. Here, we demonstrate a musical interpretation of droplet-based microfluidics as a form of novel electronic musical instruments. Using the interplay of electric field and hydrodynamics in microfluidic devices, well controlled frequency patterns corresponding to musical tracks are generated in real time. This high-speed modulation of droplet frequency (and therefore of droplet sizes) may also provide solutions that reconciles high-throughput droplet production and the control of individual droplet at production which is needed for many biochemical or material synthesis applications.

  11. Microfluidic channel fabrication method

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Don W.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Cardinale, Gregory F.

    2001-01-01

    A new channel structure for microfluidic systems and process for fabricating this structure. In contrast to the conventional practice of fabricating fluid channels as trenches or grooves in a substrate, fluid channels are fabricated as thin walled raised structures on a substrate. Microfluidic devices produced in accordance with the invention are a hybrid assembly generally consisting of three layers: 1) a substrate that can or cannot be an electrical insulator; 2) a middle layer, that is an electrically conducting material and preferably silicon, forms the channel walls whose height defines the channel height, joined to and extending from the substrate; and 3) a top layer, joined to the top of the channels, that forms a cover for the channels. The channels can be defined by photolithographic techniques and are produced by etching away the material around the channel walls.

  12. The Microfluidic Jukebox

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Say Hwa; Maes, Florine; Semin, Benoît; Vrignon, Jérémy; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Music is a form of art interweaving people of all walks of life. Through subtle changes in frequencies, a succession of musical notes forms a melody which is capable of mesmerizing the minds of people. With the advances in technology, we are now able to generate music electronically without relying solely on physical instruments. Here, we demonstrate a musical interpretation of droplet-based microfluidics as a form of novel electronic musical instruments. Using the interplay of electric field and hydrodynamics in microfluidic devices, well controlled frequency patterns corresponding to musical tracks are generated in real time. This high-speed modulation of droplet frequency (and therefore of droplet sizes) may also provide solutions that reconciles high-throughput droplet production and the control of individual droplet at production which is needed for many biochemical or material synthesis applications. PMID:24781785

  13. Microfluidic binary phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelescu, Dan; Menetrier, Laure; Wong, Joyce; Tabeling, Patrick; Salamitou, Philippe

    2004-03-01

    We present a novel binary phase flow regime where the two phases differ substantially in both their wetting and viscous properties. Optical tracking particles are used in order to investigate the details of such multiphase flow inside capillary channels. We also describe microfluidic filters we have developed, capable of separating the two phases based on capillary pressure. The performance of the filters in separating oil-water emulsions is discussed. Binary phase flow has been previously used in microchannels in applications such as emulsion generation, enhancement of mixing and assembly of custom colloidal paticles. Such microfluidic systems are increasingly used in a number of applications spanning a diverse range of industries, such as biotech, pharmaceuticals and more recently the oil industry.

  14. Neutron detection via bubble chambers.

    PubMed

    Jordan, D V; Ely, J H; Peurrung, A J; Bond, L J; Collar, J I; Flake, M; Knopf, M A; Pitts, W K; Shaver, M; Sonnenschein, A; Smart, J E; Todd, L C

    2005-01-01

    Research investigating the application of pressure-cycled bubble chambers to fast neutron detection is described. Experiments with a Halon-filled chamber showed clear sensitivity to an AmBe neutron source and insensitivity to a (137)Cs gamma source. Bubble formation was documented using high-speed photography, and a ceramic piezo-electric transducer element registered the acoustic signature of bubble formation. In a second set of experiments, the bubble nucleation response of a Freon-134a chamber to an AmBe neutron source was documented with high-speed photography.

  15. Helium bubble bursting in tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Sefta, Faiza; Juslin, Niklas; Wirth, Brian D.

    2013-12-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to systematically study the pressure evolution and bursting behavior of sub-surface helium bubbles and the resulting tungsten surface morphology. This study specifically investigates how bubble shape and size, temperature, tungsten surface orientation, and ligament thickness above the bubble influence bubble stability and surface evolution. The tungsten surface is roughened by a combination of adatom “islands,” craters, and pinholes. The present study provides insight into the mechanisms and conditions leading to various tungsten topology changes, which we believe are the initial stages of surface evolution leading to the formation of nanoscale fuzz.

  16. Droplets, Bubbles and Ultrasound Interactions.

    PubMed

    Shpak, Oleksandr; Verweij, Martin; de Jong, Nico; Versluis, Michel

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of droplets and bubbles with ultrasound has been studied extensively in the last 25 years. Microbubbles are broadly used in diagnostic and therapeutic medical applications, for instance, as ultrasound contrast agents. They have a similar size as red blood cells, and thus are able to circulate within blood vessels. Perfluorocarbon liquid droplets can be a potential new generation of microbubble agents as ultrasound can trigger their conversion into gas bubbles. Prior to activation, they are at least five times smaller in diameter than the resulting bubbles. Together with the violent nature of the phase-transition, the droplets can be used for local drug delivery, embolotherapy, HIFU enhancement and tumor imaging. Here we explain the basics of bubble dynamics, described by the Rayleigh-Plesset equation, bubble resonance frequency, damping and quality factor. We show the elegant calculation of the above characteristics for the case of small amplitude oscillations by linearizing the equations. The effect and importance of a bubble coating and effective surface tension are also discussed. We give the main characteristics of the power spectrum of bubble oscillations. Preceding bubble dynamics, ultrasound propagation is introduced. We explain the speed of sound, nonlinearity and attenuation terms. We examine bubble ultrasound scattering and how it depends on the wave-shape of the incident wave. Finally, we introduce droplet interaction with ultrasound. We elucidate the ultrasound-focusing concept within a droplets sphere, droplet shaking due to media compressibility and droplet phase-conversion dynamics.

  17. Bubble measuring instrument and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kline-Schoder, Robert (Inventor); Magari, Patrick J. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for a non-invasive bubble measuring instrument operable for detecting, distinguishing, and counting gaseous embolisms such as bubbles over a selectable range of bubble sizes of interest. A selected measurement volume in which bubbles may be detected is insonified by two distinct frequencies from a pump transducer and an image transducer, respectively. The image transducer frequency is much higher than the pump transducer frequency. The relatively low-frequency pump signal is used to excite bubbles to resonate at a frequency related to their diameter. The image transducer is operated in a pulse-echo mode at a controllable repetition rate that transmits bursts of high-frequency ultrasonic signal to the measurement volume in which bubbles may be detected and then receives the echo. From the echo or received signal, a beat signal related to the repetition rate may be extracted and used to indicate the presence or absence of a resonant bubble. In a preferred embodiment, software control maintains the beat signal at a preselected frequency while varying the pump transducer frequency to excite bubbles of different diameters to resonate depending on the range of bubble diameters selected for investigation.

  18. Bubble Measuring Instrument and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kline-Schoder, Robert (Inventor); Magari, Patrick J. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for a non-invasive bubble measuring instrument operable for detecting, distinguishing, and counting gaseous embolisms such as bubbles over a selectable range of bubble sizes of interest. A selected measurement volume in which bubbles may be detected is insonified by two distinct frequencies from a pump transducer and an image transducer. respectively. The image transducer frequency is much higher than the pump transducer frequency. The relatively low-frequency pump signal is used to excite bubbles to resonate at a frequency related to their diameter. The image transducer is operated in a pulse-echo mode at a controllable repetition rate that transmits bursts of high-frequency ultrasonic signal to the measurement volume in which bubbles may be detected and then receives the echo. From the echo or received signal, a beat signal related to the repetition rate may be extracted and used to indicate the presence or absence of a resonant bubble. In a preferred embodiment, software control maintains the beat signal at a preselected frequency while varying the pump transducer frequency to excite bubbles of different diameters to resonate depending on the range of bubble diameters selected for investigation.

  19. AC magnetohydrodynamic microfluidic switch

    SciTech Connect

    Lemoff, A V; Lee, A P

    2000-03-02

    A microfluidic switch has been demonstrated using an AC Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pumping mechanism in which the Lorentz force is used to pump an electrolytic solution. By integrating two AC MHD pumps into different arms of a Y-shaped fluidic circuit, flow can be switched between the two arms. This type of switch can be used to produce complex fluidic routing, which may have multiple applications in {micro}TAS.

  20. Three-dimensional numerical simulations of a bubble rising in an unbounded weakly viscous fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cano-Lozano, Jose Carlos; Martínez-Bazán, Carlos; Tchoufag, Joel; Magnaudet, Jacques

    2015-11-01

    Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of a freely rising bubble in an unbounded low-viscosity fluid are performed to analyze the bubble trajectory for values of Galileo and Bond numbers close to the transition between vertical and non-vertical paths. The simulations are performed with the Gerris Flow Solver, based on the Volume of Fluid technique to track the interface, allowing deformations of the bubble during its rising motion. We find the existence of novel regimes of the bubble rise which we describe by tracking the bubble shape, path geometry and wake vortical structures, as well as the temporal evolution of the instantaneous Reynolds number. Besides the traditional rectilinear, zigzag and spiral paths, we observe chaotic, reflectional-symmetry-breaking or reflectional-symmetry-preserving regimes previously reported for axisymmetric solid bodies. The DNS results also allow us to check the accuracy of the neutral curve defining the region of the parameter space within which the vertical path of a buoyancy-driven bubble with fore-and-aft asymmetric shape is linearly stable. Supported by the Spanish MINECO, Junta de Andalucía and EU Funds under projects DPI 2014-59292-C3-3-P and P11-TEP7495.

  1. Ultrafast microfluidics using surface acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Leslie Y.; Friend, James R.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate that surface acoustic waves (SAWs), nanometer amplitude Rayleigh waves driven at megahertz order frequencies propagating on the surface of a piezoelectric substrate, offer a powerful method for driving a host of extremely fast microfluidic actuation and micro∕bioparticle manipulation schemes. We show that sessile drops can be translated rapidly on planar substrates or fluid can be pumped through microchannels at 1–10 cm∕s velocities, which are typically one to two orders quicker than that afforded by current microfluidic technologies. Through symmetry-breaking, azimuthal recirculation can be induced within the drop to drive strong inertial microcentrifugation for micromixing and particle concentration or separation. Similar micromixing strategies can be induced in the same microchannel in which fluid is pumped with the SAW by merely changing the SAW frequency to rapidly switch the uniform through-flow into a chaotic oscillatory flow by exploiting superpositioning of the irradiated sound waves from the sidewalls of the microchannel. If the flow is sufficiently quiescent, the nodes of the transverse standing wave that arises across the microchannel also allow for particle aggregation, and hence, sorting on nodal lines. In addition, the SAW also facilitates other microfluidic capabilities. For example, capillary waves excited at the free surface of a sessile drop by the SAW underneath it can be exploited for micro∕nanoparticle collection and sorting at nodal points or lines at low powers. At higher powers, the large accelerations off the substrate surface as the SAW propagates across drives rapid destabilization of the drop free surface giving rise to inertial liquid jets that persist over 1–2 cm in length or atomization of the entire drop to produce 1–10 μm monodispersed aerosol droplets, which can be exploited for ink-jet printing, mass spectrometry interfacing, or pulmonary drug delivery. The atomization of polymer∕protein solutions

  2. Bubble dynamics under acoustic excitation with multiple frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. N.; Zhang, Y. N.; Li, S. C.

    2015-01-01

    Because of its magnificent mechanical and chemical effects, acoustic cavitation plays an important role in a broad range of biomedical, chemical and mechanical engineering problems. Particularly, irradiation of the multiple frequency acoustic wave could enhance the effects of cavitation. The advantages of employment of multi-frequency ultrasonic field include decreasing the cavitation thresholds, promoting cavitation nuclei generation, increasing the mass transfer and improving energy efficiency. Therefore, multi-frequency ultrasonic systems are employed in a variety of applications, e.g., to enhance the intensity of sonoluminenscence, to increase efficiency of sonochemical reaction, to improve the accuracy of ultrasound imaging and the efficiency of tissue ablation. Compared to single-frequency systems, a lot of new features of bubble dynamics exist in multi-frequency systems, such as special properties of oscillating bubbles, unique resonances in the bubble response curves, and unusual chaotic behaviours. In present paper, the underlying mechanisms of the cavitation effects under multi-frequency acoustical excitation are also briefly introduced.

  3. Microfluidic serial dilution circuit.

    PubMed

    Paegel, Brian M; Grover, William H; Skelley, Alison M; Mathies, Richard A; Joyce, Gerald F

    2006-11-01

    In vitro evolution of RNA molecules requires a method for executing many consecutive serial dilutions. To solve this problem, a microfluidic circuit has been fabricated in a three-layer glass-PDMS-glass device. The 400-nL serial dilution circuit contains five integrated membrane valves: three two-way valves arranged in a loop to drive cyclic mixing of the diluent and carryover, and two bus valves to control fluidic access to the circuit through input and output channels. By varying the valve placement in the circuit, carryover fractions from 0.04 to 0.2 were obtained. Each dilution process, which is composed of a diluent flush cycle followed by a mixing cycle, is carried out with no pipeting, and a sample volume of 400 nL is sufficient for conducting an arbitrary number of serial dilutions. Mixing is precisely controlled by changing the cyclic pumping rate, with a minimum mixing time of 22 s. This microfluidic circuit is generally applicable for integrating automated serial dilution and sample preparation in almost any microfluidic architecture.

  4. High-pressure microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjort, K.

    2015-03-01

    When using appropriate materials and microfabrication techniques, with the small dimensions the mechanical stability of microstructured devices allows for processes at high pressures without loss in safety. The largest area of applications has been demonstrated in green chemistry and bioprocesses, where extraction, synthesis and analyses often excel at high densities and high temperatures. This is accessible through high pressures. Capillary chemistry has been used since long but, just like in low-pressure applications, there are several potential advantages in using microfluidic platforms, e.g., planar isothermal set-ups, large local variations in geometries, dense form factors, small dead volumes and precisely positioned microstructures for control of reactions, catalysis, mixing and separation. Other potential applications are in, e.g., microhydraulics, exploration, gas driven vehicles, and high-pressure science. From a review of the state-of-art and frontiers of high pressure microfluidics, the focus will be on different solutions demonstrated for microfluidic handling at high pressures and challenges that remain.

  5. Droplet based microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Seemann, Ralf; Brinkmann, Martin; Pfohl, Thomas; Herminghaus, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Droplet based microfluidics is a rapidly growing interdisciplinary field of research combining soft matter physics, biochemistry and microsystems engineering. Its applications range from fast analytical systems or the synthesis of advanced materials to protein crystallization and biological assays for living cells. Precise control of droplet volumes and reliable manipulation of individual droplets such as coalescence, mixing of their contents, and sorting in combination with fast analysis tools allow us to perform chemical reactions inside the droplets under defined conditions. In this paper, we will review available drop generation and manipulation techniques. The main focus of this review is not to be comprehensive and explain all techniques in great detail but to identify and shed light on similarities and underlying physical principles. Since geometry and wetting properties of the microfluidic channels are crucial factors for droplet generation, we also briefly describe typical device fabrication methods in droplet based microfluidics. Examples of applications and reaction schemes which rely on the discussed manipulation techniques are also presented, such as the fabrication of special materials and biophysical experiments.

  6. Bubble Size Distribution in a Vibrating Bubble Column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohagheghian, Shahrouz; Wilson, Trevor; Valenzuela, Bret; Hinds, Tyler; Moseni, Kevin; Elbing, Brian

    2016-11-01

    While vibrating bubble columns have increased the mass transfer between phases, a universal scaling law remains elusive. Attempts to predict mass transfer rates in large industrial scale applications by extrapolating laboratory scale models have failed. In a stationary bubble column, mass transfer is a function of phase interfacial area (PIA), while PIA is determined based on the bubble size distribution (BSD). On the other hand, BSD is influenced by the injection characteristics and liquid phase dynamics and properties. Vibration modifies the BSD by impacting the gas and gas-liquid dynamics. This work uses a vibrating cylindrical bubble column to investigate the effect of gas injection and vibration characteristics on the BSD. The bubble column has a 10 cm diameter and was filled with water to a depth of 90 cm above the tip of the orifice tube injector. BSD was measured using high-speed imaging to determine the projected area of individual bubbles, which the nominal bubble diameter was then calculated assuming spherical bubbles. The BSD dependence on the distance from the injector, injector design (1.6 and 0.8 mm ID), air flow rates (0.5 to 5 lit/min), and vibration conditions (stationary and vibration conditions varying amplitude and frequency) will be presented. In addition to mean data, higher order statistics will also be provided.

  7. Visualization of airflow growing soap bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Rahbi, Hamood; Bock, Matthew; Ryu, Sangjin

    2016-11-01

    Visualizing airflow inside growing soap bubbles can answer questions regarding the fluid dynamics of soap bubble blowing, which is a model system for flows with a gas-liquid-gas interface. Also, understanding the soap bubble blowing process is practical because it can contribute to controlling industrial processes similar to soap bubble blowing. In this study, we visualized airflow which grows soap bubbles using the smoke wire technique to understand how airflow blows soap bubbles. The soap bubble blower setup was built to mimic the human blowing process of soap bubbles, which consists of a blower, a nozzle and a bubble ring. The smoke wire was placed between the nozzle and the bubble ring, and smoke-visualized airflow was captured using a high speed camera. Our visualization shows how air jet flows into the growing soap bubble on the ring and how the airflow interacts with the soap film of growing bubble.

  8. The study of effects of small perturbations on chaotic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Grebogi, C. . Lab. for Plasma Research); Yorke, J.A. . Inst. for Physical Science and Technology)

    1990-12-01

    This report discusses the following topics on small perturbations on chaotic systems: controlling chaos; shadowing and noise reduction; chaotic scattering; random maps; magnetic dynamo; and aids transmission. (LSP)

  9. Stable tridimensional bubble clusters in multi-bubble sonoluminescence (MBSL).

    PubMed

    Rosselló, J M; Dellavale, D; Bonetto, F J

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, stable clusters made of multiple sonoluminescent bubbles are experimentally and theoretically studied. Argon bubbles were acoustically generated and trapped using bi-frequency driving within a cylindrical chamber filled with a sulfuric acid aqueous solution (SA85w/w). The intensity of the acoustic pressure field was strong enough to sustain, during several minutes, a large number of positionally and spatially fixed (without pseudo-orbits) sonoluminescent bubbles over an ellipsoidally-shaped tridimensional array. The dimensions of the ellipsoids were studied as a function of the amplitude of the applied low-frequency acoustic pressure (PAc(LF)) and the static pressure in the fluid (P0). In order to explain the size and shape of the bubble clusters, we performed a series of numerical simulations of the hydrodynamic forces acting over the bubbles. In both cases the observed experimental behavior was in excellent agreement with the numerical results. The simulations revealed that the positionally stable region, mainly determined by the null primary Bjerknes force (F→Bj), is defined as the outer perimeter of an axisymmetric ellipsoidal cluster centered in the acoustic field antinode. The role of the high-frequency component of the pressure field and the influence of the secondary Bjerknes force are discussed. We also investigate the effect of a change in the concentration of dissolved gas on the positional and spatial instabilities through the cluster dimensions. The experimental and numerical results presented in this paper are potentially useful for further understanding and modeling numerous current research topics regarding multi-bubble phenomena, e.g. forces acting on the bubbles in multi-frequency acoustic fields, transient acoustic cavitation, bubble interactions, structure formation processes, atomic and molecular emissions of equal bubbles and nonlinear or unsteady acoustic pressure fields in bubbly media.

  10. Electronic Sensing for Microfluidic Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-08

    D. J. Insect cell culture in microfluidic channels. Biomedical Microdevices 4, 161-166 (2002). 8 20. Walker, G. M., Zeringue, H. C. & Beebe, D. J...engineering. Biomedical Microdevices 4, 167-175 (2002). 23. Moorthy, J. & Beebe, D. J. Organic and biomimetic designs for microfluidic systems

  11. Defect tolerance in microfluidic chambers for capacitive biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Glenn; Gray, Bonnie L.; Jain, Vijay K.

    2010-02-01

    Biomedical sensors combining microfluidic and electronics capabilities require defect avoidance in both the electronic processing circuits and microfluidic areas. Microfluidic sensors involve sealed channels through which sample fluids containing biomedical materials flow. Inserting microchannels between capacitive plates enable the detection of biomaterials by the changes in capacitance. However, faults occur when foreign particles, or fluid bubbles get lodged in the paths blocking a channel, thereby affecting the measured C. To achieve fault tolerance we investigate a Cathedral Chamber design, with pillars supporting the roof at regular intervals. This prevents single blockages from stopping fluid flow through the system in a channel, as there are many paths. We discuss the potential causes and effects of such blockages. Monte Carlo simulations show that the Cathedral Chamber design significantly increases lifetime of the system, an average of 6 times more particles are required before full blockage occurs compared to an array of parallel channels. Fluid flow modeling shows parallel channels show rapid rise of pressure with the number of blockages while the Cathedral chamber shows much slower rise, which reaches a plateau pressure until it is blocked. The impact of defects on the capacitive measurement is also discussed. Finally, an interesting application, one that uses patches of single chain Fragment variables (scFv's), the active part of antibodies, is also discussed.

  12. Wavelet filtering of chaotic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzesiak, M.

    Satisfactory method of removing noise from experimental chaotic data is still an open problem. Normally it is necessary to assume certain properties of the noise and dynamics, which one wants to extract, from time series. The wavelet based method of denoising of time series originating from low-dimensional dynamical systems and polluted by the Gaussian white noise is considered. Its efficiency is investigated by comparing the correlation dimension of clean and noisy data generated for some well-known dynamical systems. The wavelet method is contrasted with the singular value decomposition (SVD) and finite impulse response (FIR) filter methods.

  13. Chaotic behavior in dopamine neurodynamics.

    PubMed Central

    King, R; Barchas, J D; Huberman, B A

    1984-01-01

    We report the results of the dynamics of a model of the central dopaminergic neuronal system. In particular, for certain values of a parameter k, which monitors the efficacy of dopamine at the postsynaptic receptor, chaotic solutions of the dynamical equations appear--a prediction that correlates with the observed increased variability in behavior among schizophrenics, the rapid fluctuations in motor activity among Parkinsonian patients treated chronically with L-dopa, and the lability of mood in some patients with an affective disorder. Moreover our hypothesis offers specific results concerning the appearance or disappearance of erratic solutions as a function of k and the external input to the dopamine neuronal system. PMID:6583705

  14. Chaotic behavior in dopamine neurodynamics.

    PubMed

    King, R; Barchas, J D; Huberman, B A

    1984-02-01

    We report the results of the dynamics of a model of the central dopaminergic neuronal system. In particular, for certain values of a parameter k, which monitors the efficacy of dopamine at the postsynaptic receptor, chaotic solutions of the dynamical equations appear--a prediction that correlates with the observed increased variability in behavior among schizophrenics, the rapid fluctuations in motor activity among Parkinsonian patients treated chronically with L-dopa, and the lability of mood in some patients with an affective disorder. Moreover our hypothesis offers specific results concerning the appearance or disappearance of erratic solutions as a function of k and the external input to the dopamine neuronal system.

  15. Chaotic fluctuations in mathematical economics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki

    2011-03-01

    In this paper we examine a Cournot duopoly model, which expresses the strategic interaction between two firms. We formulate the dynamic adjustment process and investigate the dynamic properties of the stationary point. By introducing a memory mechanism characterized by distributed lag functions, we presuppose that each firm makes production decisions in a cautious manner. This implies that we have to deal with the system of integro-differential equations. By means of numerical simulations we show the occurrence of chaotic fluctuations in the case of fixed delays.

  16. Driving trajectories in chaotic scattering.

    PubMed

    Macau, Elbert E N; Caldas, Iberê L

    2002-02-01

    In this work we introduce a general approach for targeting in chaotic scattering that can be used to find a transfer trajectory between any two points located inside the scattering region. We show that this method can be used in association with a control of chaos strategy to drive around and keep a particle inside the scattering region. As an illustration of how powerful this approach is, we use it in a case of practical interest in celestial mechanics in which it is desired to control the evolution of two satellites that evolve around a large central body.

  17. Bubble formation in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antar, Basil N.

    1996-01-01

    An extensive experimental program was initiated for the purpose of understanding the mechanisms leading to bubble generation during fluid handling procedures in a microgravity environment. Several key fluid handling procedures typical for PCG experiments were identified for analysis in that program. Experiments were designed to specifically understand how such procedures can lead to bubble formation. The experiments were then conducted aboard the NASA KC-135 aircraft which is capable of simulating a low gravity environment by executing a parabolic flight attitude. However, such a flight attitude can only provide a low gravity environment of approximately 10-2go for a maximum period of 30 seconds. Thus all of the tests conducted for these experiments were designed to last no longer than 20 seconds. Several experiments were designed to simulate some of the more relevant fluid handling procedures during protein crystal growth experiments. These include submerged liquid jet cavitation, filling of a cubical vessel, submerged surface scratch, attached drop growth, liquid jet impingement, and geysering experiments. To date, four separate KC-135 flight campaigns were undertaken specifically for performing these experiments. However, different experiments were performed on different flights.

  18. Bubble formation in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antar, Basil N.

    1994-01-01

    Two KC-135 flight campaigns have been conducted to date which are specifically dedicated to study bubble formation in microgravity. The first flight was conducted during March 14-18, 1994, and the other during June 20-24, 1994. The results from the June 1994 flight have not been analyzed yet, while the results from the March flight have been partially analyzed. In the first flight three different experiments were performed, one with the specific aim at determining whether or not cavitation can take place during any of the fluid handling procedures adopted in the shuttle bioprocessing experiments. The other experiments were concerned with duplicating some of the procedures that resulted in bubble formation, namely the NCS filling procedure and the needle scratch of a solid surface. The results from this set of experiments suggest that cavitation did not take place during any of the fluid handling procedures. The results clearly indicate that almost all were generated as a result of the breakup of the gas/liquid interface. This was convincingly demonstrated in the scratch tests as well as in the liquid fill tests.

  19. Triangular bubble spline surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Kapl, Mario; Byrtus, Marek; Jüttler, Bert

    2011-01-01

    We present a new method for generating a Gn-surface from a triangular network of compatible surface strips. The compatible surface strips are given by a network of polynomial curves with an associated implicitly defined surface, which fulfill certain compatibility conditions. Our construction is based on a new concept, called bubble patches, to represent the single surface patches. The compatible surface strips provide a simple Gn-condition between two neighboring bubble patches, which are used to construct surface patches, connected with Gn-continuity. For n≤2, we describe the obtained Gn-condition in detail. It can be generalized to any n≥3. The construction of a single surface patch is based on Gordon–Coons interpolation for triangles. Our method is a simple local construction scheme, which works uniformly for vertices of arbitrary valency. The resulting surface is a piecewise rational surface, which interpolates the given network of polynomial curves. Several examples of G0, G1 and G2-surfaces are presented, which have been generated by using our method. The obtained surfaces are visualized with reflection lines to demonstrate the order of smoothness. PMID:22267872

  20. Bubble Transport through Micropillar Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kenneth; Savas, Omer

    2012-11-01

    In current energy research, artificial photosynthetic devices are being designed to split water and harvest hydrogen gas using energy from the sun. In one such design, hydrogen gas bubbles evolve on the catalytic surfaces of arrayed micropillars. If these bubbles are not promptly removed from the surface, they can adversely affect gas evolution rates, water flow rates, sunlight capture, and heat management of the system. Therefore, an efficient method of collecting the evolved gas bubbles is crucial. Preliminary flow visualization has been conducted of bubbles advecting through dense arrays of pillars. Bubbles moving through square and hexagonal arrays are tracked, and the results are qualitatively described. Initial attempts to correlate bubble motion with relevant lengthscales and forces are also presented. These observations suggest how bubble transport within such pillar arrays can be managed, as well as guide subsequent experiments that investigate bubble evolution and collection. This material is based upon work performed by the Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, a DOE Energy Innovation Hub, supported through the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under Award Number DE-SC0004993.

  1. Bubble detector investigations in China.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shi-Lun

    2006-01-01

    Investigation on bubble detectors started in China in 1989. Five types of bubble detectors have been developed, with LET thresholds ranging from 0.05 to 6.04 MeV mg(-1) cm(2) at 25 degrees C. The neutron response of bubble detectors made with freon-12 has been investigated with mono-energetic neutrons from 20 keV to 19 MeV. Its effective threshold energy for neutron detection is approximately 100 keV at 28 degrees C. The response above this threshold is approximately 1.5 x 10(-4) (bubble cm(-2))/(n cm(-2)). Bubble detectors are unique not only for neutron dosimetry but also for monitoring and identifying high-energy heavy ions such as cosmic radiation in the space. High-energy heavy ion tracks in large size bubble detectors have been investigated in cooperation with scientists in Japan. The key parameter behind the thresholds of bubble detectors for track registration is the critical rate of energy loss. Three approaches to identify high-energy heavy ions with bubble detectors are suggested.

  2. Chaotic control and synchronization for system identification.

    PubMed

    Carroll, T L

    2004-04-01

    Research into applications of synchronized chaotic systems assumes that it will be necessary to build many different drive-response pairs, but little is known in general about designing higher dimensional chaotic flows. In this paper, I do not add any design techniques, but I show that it is possible to create multiple drive-response pairs from one chaotic system by applying chaos control techniques to the drive and response systems. If one can design one chaotic system with the desired properties, then many drive-response pairs can be built from this system, so that it is not necessary to solve the design problem more than once. I show both numerical simulations and experimental work with chaotic circuits. I also test the response systems for ability to overcome noise or other interference.

  3. Simple driven chaotic oscillators with complex variables.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Delmar; Sprott, J C

    2009-03-01

    Despite a search, no chaotic driven complex-variable oscillators of the form z+f(z)=e(iOmegat) or z+f(z)=e(iOmegat) are found, where f is a polynomial with real coefficients. It is shown that, for analytic functions f(z), driven complex-variable oscillators of the form z+f(z)=e(iOmegat) cannot have chaotic solutions. Seven simple driven chaotic oscillators of the form z+f(z,z)=e(iOmegat) with polynomial f(z,z) are given. Their chaotic attractors are displayed, and Lyapunov spectra are calculated. Attractors for two of the cases have symmetry across the x=-y line. The systems' behavior with Omega as a control parameter in the range of Omega=0.1-2.0 is examined, revealing cases of period doubling, intermittency, chaotic transients, and period adding as routes to chaos. Numerous cases of coexisting attractors are also observed.

  4. Experimental investigation on noise of cavitation nozzle and its chaotic behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fenghua; Liu, Haifeng; Xu, Junchao; Tang, Chuanlin

    2013-07-01

    The researches of cavitation noise mainly focus on the incipiency and developing of cavitation to prevent the cavititation erosion in the hydraulic machinery, while there is few report about the collapse strength of cavitation bubbles produced by water jet through the cavitation nozzle to utilize efficiently the collapse energy of cavitation bubbles. The cavitation noise signals are collected with hydrophones for the cavitation nozzle and general nozzle at the target position and the nozzle exit separately in the conditions of different standoff distance. The features of signal's frequency spectrum and power spectrum are analyzed for various nozzles by way of classical methods. Meanwhile, based on chaotic theory, phase space reconstruction is processed and the maximum Lyapunov index is calculated separately for each cavitation signal's time series. The results of chaotic analysis are compared with the one of conventional analysis. The analyzed data show that there are the marked differences at the spectrum between the cavitation nozzle and general nozzle at the target position while the standoff distance is 35 mm, which mainly displays at the high frequency segment (60-120 kHz). The maximum Lyapunov index calculated appear at standoff distance 35 mm, which is an optimum standoff distance for the most bubbles to collapse at the target. At the nozzle exit, the noise signal of cavitation nozzle is different from the general nozzle, which also displays at the high frequency segment. The results demonstrate that the water jet modulated by the cavitation nozzle can produce effectually cavitation, and at the target position the amplitude and energy of noise spectrum in high frequency segment for cavitation nozzle are higher than conventional nozzle and the Lyapunov index of cavitation nozzle is larger than conventional nozzle as the standoff distance is less than 55 mm. The proposed research reveals that the cavitation noise produced by collapse of cavitation bubbles

  5. Optimizing homogenization by chaotic unmixing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weijs, Joost; Bartolo, Denis

    2016-11-01

    A number of industrial processes rely on the homogeneous dispersion of non-brownian particles in a viscous fluid. An ideal mixing would yield a so-called hyperuniform particle distribution. Such configurations are characterized by density fluctuations that grow slower than the standard √{ N}-fluctuations. Even though such distributions have been found in several natural structures, e.g. retina receptors in birds, they have remained out of experimental reach until very recently. Over the last 5 years independent experiments and numerical simulations have shown that periodically driven suspensions can self-assemble hyperuniformally. Simple as the recipe may be, it has one important disadvantage. The emergence of hyperuniform states co-occurs with a critical phase transition from reversible to non reversible particle dynamics. As a consequence the homogenization dynamics occurs over a time that diverges with the system size (critical slowing down). Here, we discuss how this process can be sped up by exploiting the stirring properties of chaotic advection. Among the questions that we answer are: What are the physical mechanisms in a chaotic flow that are relevant for hyperuniformity? How can we tune the flow parameters such to obtain optimal hyperuniformity in the fastest way? JW acknowledges funding by NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research) through a Rubicon Grant.

  6. Non-metric chaotic inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Enqvist, Kari; Koivisto, Tomi; Rigopoulos, Gerasimos E-mail: T.S.Koivisto@astro.uio.no

    2012-05-01

    We consider inflation within the context of what is arguably the simplest non-metric extension of Einstein gravity. There non-metricity is described by a single graviscalar field with a non-minimal kinetic coupling to the inflaton field Ψ, parameterized by a single parameter γ. There is a simple equivalent description in terms of a massless field and an inflaton with a modified potential. We discuss the implications of non-metricity for chaotic inflation and find that it significantly alters the inflaton dynamics for field values Ψ∼>M{sub P}/γ, dramatically changing the qualitative behaviour in this regime. In the equivalent single-field description this is described as a cuspy potential that forms of barrier beyond which the inflation becomes a ghost field. This imposes an upper bound on the possible number of e-folds. For the simplest chaotic inflation models, the spectral index and the tensor-to-scalar ratio receive small corrections dependent on the non-metricity parameter. We also argue that significant post-inflationary non-metricity may be generated.

  7. Inertial microfluidic physics.

    PubMed

    Amini, Hamed; Lee, Wonhee; Di Carlo, Dino

    2014-08-07

    Microfluidics has experienced massive growth in the past two decades, and especially with advances in rapid prototyping researchers have explored a multitude of channel structures, fluid and particle mixtures, and integration with electrical and optical systems towards solving problems in healthcare, biological and chemical analysis, materials synthesis, and other emerging areas that can benefit from the scale, automation, or the unique physics of these systems. Inertial microfluidics, which relies on the unconventional use of fluid inertia in microfluidic platforms, is one of the emerging fields that make use of unique physical phenomena that are accessible in microscale patterned channels. Channel shapes that focus, concentrate, order, separate, transfer, and mix particles and fluids have been demonstrated, however physical underpinnings guiding these channel designs have been limited and much of the development has been based on experimentally-derived intuition. Here we aim to provide a deeper understanding of mechanisms and underlying physics in these systems which can lead to more effective and reliable designs with less iteration. To place the inertial effects into context we also discuss related fluid-induced forces present in particulate flows including forces due to non-Newtonian fluids, particle asymmetry, and particle deformability. We then highlight the inverse situation and describe the effect of the suspended particles acting on the fluid in a channel flow. Finally, we discuss the importance of structured channels, i.e. channels with boundary conditions that vary in the streamwise direction, and their potential as a means to achieve unprecedented three-dimensional control over fluid and particles in microchannels. Ultimately, we hope that an improved fundamental and quantitative understanding of inertial fluid dynamic effects can lead to unprecedented capabilities to program fluid and particle flow towards automation of biomedicine, materials

  8. Motion in microfluidic ratchets.

    PubMed

    Caballero, D; Katuri, J; Samitier, J; Sánchez, S

    2016-11-15

    The ubiquitous random motion of mesoscopic active particles, such as cells, can be "rectified" or directed by embedding the particles in systems containing local and periodic asymmetric cues. Incorporated on lab-on-a-chip devices, these microratchet-like structures can be used to self-propel fluids, transport particles, and direct cell motion in the absence of external power sources. In this Focus article we discuss recent advances in the use of ratchet-like geometries in microfluidics which could open new avenues in biomedicine for applications in diagnosis, cancer biology, and bioengineering.

  9. Microfluidic Cell Culture Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takayama, Shuichi (Inventor); Cabrera, Lourdes Marcella (Inventor); Heo, Yun Seok (Inventor); Smith, Gary Daniel (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic devices for cell culturing and methods for using the same are disclosed. One device includes a substrate and membrane. The substrate includes a reservoir in fluid communication with a passage. A bio-compatible fluid may be added to the reservoir and passage. The reservoir is configured to receive and retain at least a portion of a cell mass. The membrane acts as a barrier to evaporation of the bio-compatible fluid from the passage. A cover fluid may be added to cover the bio-compatible fluid to prevent evaporation of the bio-compatible fluid.

  10. Thermocapillary actuation by optimized resistor pattern: bubbles and droplets displacing, switching and trapping.

    PubMed

    Selva, Bertrand; Miralles, Vincent; Cantat, Isabelle; Jullien, Marie-Caroline

    2010-07-21

    We report a novel method for bubble or droplet displacement, capture and switching within a bifurcation channel for applications in digital microfluidics based on the Marangoni effect, i.e. the appearance of thermocapillary tangential interface stresses stemming from local surface tension variations. The specificity of the reported actuation is that heating is provided by an optimized resistor pattern (B. Selva, J. Marchalot and M.-C. Jullien, An optimized resistor pattern for temperature gradient control in microfluidics, J. Micromech. Microeng., 2009, 19, 065002) leading to a constant temperature gradient along a microfluidic cavity. In this context, bubbles or droplets to be actuated entail a surface force originating from the thermal Marangoni effect. This actuator has been characterized (B. Selva, I. Cantat, and M.-C. Jullien, Migration of a bubble towards a higher surface tension under the effect of thermocapillary stress, preprint, 2009) and it was found that the bubble/droplet (called further element) is driven toward a high surface tension region, i.e. toward cold region, and the element velocity increases while decreasing the cavity thickness. Taking advantage of these properties three applications are presented: (1) element displacement, (2) element switching, detailed in a given range of working, in which elements are redirected towards a specific evacuation, (3) a system able to trap, and consequently stop on demand, the elements on an alveolus structure while the continuous phase is still flowing. The strength of this method lies in its simplicity: single layer system, in situ heating leading to a high level of integration, low power consumption (P < 0.4 W), low applied voltage (about 10 V), and finally this system is able to manipulate elements within a flow velocity up to 1 cm s(-1).

  11. Suitability of commercial software for direct numerical simulations of chaotic electrokinetic transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karatay, Elif; Mani, Ali

    2014-11-01

    Many microfluidic and electrochemical applications involve chaotic transport phenomena that arise due to instabilities stemming from coupling of hydrodynamics with ion transport and electrostatic forces. Recent investigations have revealed contribution of a wide range of spatio-temporal scales in such chaotic systems similar to those observed in turbulent flows. Given that these scales can span several orders of magnitude, significant numerical resolution is needed for accurate prediction of these phenomena. The objective of this work is to assess efficiency of commercial software for prediction of such phenomena. To this end we have considered Comsol Multiphysics as a general-purpose commercial CFD/transport solver, and have compared its performance against a custom-made DNS code tailored to the specific physics of chaotic electrokinetic phenomena. We present comparison for small systems, which can be simulated on a single core, and show detailed statistics including velocity and concentration spectra over a wide range of frequencies. Our results indicate that while accuracy can be guaranteed with proper mesh resolution, commercial solvers are generally at least an order of magnitude slower than custom-made DNS codes. Supported by NWO, Rubicon Grant.

  12. Microelectrokinetic turbulence in microfluidics at low Reynolds number.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guiren; Yang, Fang; Zhao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    There is commonly no turbulence in microfluidics, and the flows are believed to be either laminar or chaotic, since Reynolds number (Re) in microflows is usually on the order of unity or lower. However, we recently demonstrated that it is possible to achieve turbulence with low Re (based on the measured flow velocity and the width of the channel entrance) when a pressure-driven flow is electrokinetically forced in a quasi T-microchannel. To be able to measure high frequency velocity fluctuations in microchannels, a velocimeter with submicrometer spatial resolution and microsecond temporal resolution, called a laser-induced fluorescence photobleaching anemometer, is developed. Here we characterize the microelectrokinetic turbulence and observe some typical and important features of high Re flows, such as Kolmogorov -5/3 spectrum of velocity fluctuation, which usually can be realized only at very high Re in macroturbulent flows.

  13. Constrained Vapor Bubble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, J.; Karthikeyan, M.; Plawsky, J.; Wayner, P. C., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The nonisothermal Constrained Vapor Bubble, CVB, is being studied to enhance the understanding of passive systems controlled by interfacial phenomena. The study is multifaceted: 1) it is a basic scientific study in interfacial phenomena, fluid physics and thermodynamics; 2) it is a basic study in thermal transport; and 3) it is a study of a heat exchanger. The research is synergistic in that CVB research requires a microgravity environment and the space program needs thermal control systems like the CVB. Ground based studies are being done as a precursor to flight experiment. The results demonstrate that experimental techniques for the direct measurement of the fundamental operating parameters (temperature, pressure, and interfacial curvature fields) have been developed. Fluid flow and change-of-phase heat transfer are a function of the temperature field and the vapor bubble shape, which can be measured using an Image Analyzing Interferometer. The CVB for a microgravity environment, has various thin film regions that are of both basic and applied interest. Generically, a CVB is formed by underfilling an evacuated enclosure with a liquid. Classification depends on shape and Bond number. The specific CVB discussed herein was formed in a fused silica cell with inside dimensions of 3x3x40 mm and, therefore, can be viewed as a large version of a micro heat pipe. Since the dimensions are relatively large for a passive system, most of the liquid flow occurs under a small capillary pressure difference. Therefore, we can classify the discussed system as a low capillary pressure system. The studies discussed herein were done in a 1-g environment (Bond Number = 3.6) to obtain experience to design a microgravity experiment for a future NASA flight where low capillary pressure systems should prove more useful. The flight experiment is tentatively scheduled for the year 2000. The SCR was passed on September 16, 1997. The RDR is tentatively scheduled for October, 1998.

  14. Doughnut-shaped soap bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Préve, Deison; Saa, Alberto

    2015-10-01

    Soap bubbles are thin liquid films enclosing a fixed volume of air. Since the surface tension is typically assumed to be the only factor responsible for conforming the soap bubble shape, the realized bubble surfaces are always minimal area ones. Here, we consider the problem of finding the axisymmetric minimal area surface enclosing a fixed volume V and with a fixed equatorial perimeter L . It is well known that the sphere is the solution for V =L3/6 π2 , and this is indeed the case of a free soap bubble, for instance. Surprisingly, we show that for V <α L3/6 π2 , with α ≈0.21 , such a surface cannot be the usual lens-shaped surface formed by the juxtaposition of two spherical caps, but is rather a toroidal surface. Practically, a doughnut-shaped bubble is known to be ultimately unstable and, hence, it will eventually lose its axisymmetry by breaking apart in smaller bubbles. Indisputably, however, the topological transition from spherical to toroidal surfaces is mandatory here for obtaining the global solution for this axisymmetric isoperimetric problem. Our result suggests that deformed bubbles with V <α L3/6 π2 cannot be stable and should not exist in foams, for instance.

  15. Disorder growth in a monodisperse foam in microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taccoen, Nicolas; Dollet, Benjamin; Baroud, Charles

    2015-11-01

    Monodisperse foam destabilisation is a complex problem and concerns various applications. For instance, the geometric structure of a foamed gel or concrete must be preserved until the matrix sets. Here we study experimentally this problem by observing, in microfluidics , the evolution of a monolayer of ~30'000 spherical bubbles (radius 0.1mm). We are able to individually track their positions and radii during 20h. We observe a transition from a highly ordered crystalline state (polydispersity=3%) to a completely disorder amorphous state (polydispersity=30%). This final state follows the scaling laws predicted by the classical LSW theory. To describe the transition, we define a geometric criterion that classifies the bubbles in disordered or ordered population. We observe the nucleation and growth of disorder zones, while large ordered zones remain. We show that the destabilisation of the foam is not a homogeneous process, but is the combination of two effects: (i) the quick desabilisation inside disordered zones, (ii) the growth in size of these zones, at the expense of the monodisperse ordered zones. Finally, we measure the volume variation rate of each bubble and show that while most of the gas transfer occurs in disordered zones, activity exists in ordered zones.

  16. Multiple channel secure communication using chaotic system encoding

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.L.

    1996-12-31

    fA new method to encrypt signals using chaotic systems has been developed that offers benefits over conventional chaotic encryption methods. The method simultaneously encodes multiple plaintext streams using a chaotic system; a key is required to extract the plaintext from the chaotic cipertext. A working prototype demonstrates feasibility of the method by simultaneously encoding and decoding multiple audio signals using electrical circuits.

  17. Microfluidic Biochip Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panzarella, Charles

    2004-01-01

    As humans prepare for the exploration of our solar system, there is a growing need for miniaturized medical and environmental diagnostic devices for use on spacecrafts, especially during long-duration space missions where size and power requirements are critical. In recent years, the biochip (or Lab-on-a-Chip) has emerged as a technology that might be able to satisfy this need. In generic terms, a biochip is a miniaturized microfluidic device analogous to the electronic microchip that ushered in the digital age. It consists of tiny microfluidic channels, pumps and valves that transport small amounts of sample fluids to biosensors that can perform a variety of tests on those fluids in near real time. It has the obvious advantages of being small, lightweight, requiring less sample fluids and reagents and being more sensitive and efficient than larger devices currently in use. Some of the desired space-based applications would be to provide smaller, more robust devices for analyzing blood, saliva and urine and for testing water and food supplies for the presence of harmful contaminants and microorganisms. Our group has undertaken the goal of adapting as well as improving upon current biochip technology for use in long-duration microgravity environments.

  18. Jamming in Microfluidic Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Carlos; Daniels, Karen; Riehn, Robert

    2009-11-01

    We experimentally investigate the flow of a colloid through a microfluidic device. The glass microfluidic device consists of a wide channel with spatially periodic funnels manufactured with photolithographic methods. The device was etched to a depth of about 1 micron that restricts the solid phase of the colloid, fluorescent polystyrene spheres with sub-micron radii, to quasi-2D motion. The liquid phase of the colloid is an aqueous solution with trace amounts of a non-ionic surfactant and with a pH about 2 units above the pKa of the surface groups on the polystyrene spheres to maintain a stable colloid at concentrations high enough to produce jamming. The flow rate of the colloid is controlled by a computer interfaced syringe pump with two controllable modes of operation: a continuous, steady mode that provides a plug-like velocity profile and a discrete, jerky mode that sends compressional waves of specifiable sizes through the colloid. Using fluorescence microscopy, we observe the interactions between the colloid and the glass funnels and investigate how the interaction depends on the funnel geometry. In particular, we investigate the jamming transition from a liquid-like flowing state to a solid-like stationary state.

  19. Electro-Microfluidic Packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benavides, G. L.; Galambos, P. C.

    2002-06-01

    There are many examples of electro-microfluidic products that require cost effective packaging solutions. Industry has responded to a demand for products such as drop ejectors, chemical sensors, and biological sensors. Drop ejectors have consumer applications such as ink jet printing and scientific applications such as patterning self-assembled monolayers or ejecting picoliters of expensive analytes/reagents for chemical analysis. Drop ejectors can be used to perform chemical analysis, combinatorial chemistry, drug manufacture, drug discovery, drug delivery, and DNA sequencing. Chemical and biological micro-sensors can sniff the ambient environment for traces of dangerous materials such as explosives, toxins, or pathogens. Other biological sensors can be used to improve world health by providing timely diagnostics and applying corrective measures to the human body. Electro-microfluidic packaging can easily represent over fifty percent of the product cost and, as with Integrated Circuits (IC), the industry should evolve to standard packaging solutions. Standard packaging schemes will minimize cost and bring products to market sooner.

  20. Bubble Growth in Lunar Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.

    2009-05-01

    Although Moon is usually said to be volatile-"free", lunar basalts are often vesicular with mm-size bubbles. The vesicular nature of the lunar basalts suggests that they contained some initial gas concentration. A recent publication estimated volatile concentrations in lunar basalts (Saal et al. 2008). This report investigates bubble growth on Moon and compares with that on Earth. Under conditions relevant to lunar basalts, bubble growth in a finite melt shell (i.e., growth of multiple regularly-spaced bubbles) is calculated following Proussevitch and Sahagian (1998) and Liu and Zhang (2000). Initial H2O content of 700 ppm (Saal et al. 2008) or lower is used and the effect of other volatiles (such as carbon dioxide, halogens, and sulfur) is ignored. H2O solubility at low pressures (Liu et al. 2005), concentration-dependent diffusivity in basalt (Zhang and Stolper 1991), and lunar basalt viscosity (Murase and McBirney 1970) are used. Because lunar atmospheric pressure is essentially zero, the confining pressure on bubbles is completely supplied by the overlying magma. Due to low H2O content in lunar basaltic melt (700 ppm H2O corresponds to a saturation pressure of 75 kPa), H2O bubbles only grow in the upper 16 m of a basalt flow or lake. A depth of 20 mm corresponds to a confining pressure of 100 Pa. Hence, vesicular lunar rocks come from very shallow depth. Some findings from the modeling are as follows. (a) Due to low confining pressure as well as low viscosity, even though volatile concentration is very low, bubble growth rate is extremely high, much higher than typical bubble growth rates in terrestrial melts. Hence, mm-size bubbles in lunar basalts are not strange. (b) Because the pertinent pressures are so low, bubble pressure due to surface tension plays a main role in lunar bubble growth, contrary to terrestrial cases. (c) Time scale to reach equilibrium bubble size increases as the confining pressure increases. References: (1) Liu Y, Zhang YX (2000) Earth

  1. Partial coalescence of soap bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Daniel M.; Pucci, Giuseppe; Bush, John W. M.

    2015-11-01

    We present the results of an experimental investigation of the merger of a soap bubble with a planar soap film. When gently deposited onto a horizontal film, a bubble may interact with the underlying film in such a way as to decrease in size, leaving behind a smaller daughter bubble with approximately half the radius of its progenitor. The process repeats up to three times, with each partial coalescence event occurring over a time scale comparable to the inertial-capillary time. Our results are compared to the recent numerical simulations of Martin and Blanchette and to the coalescence cascade of droplets on a fluid bath.

  2. Threshold control of chaotic neural network.

    PubMed

    He, Guoguang; Shrimali, Manish Dev; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2008-01-01

    The chaotic neural network constructed with chaotic neurons exhibits rich dynamic behaviour with a nonperiodic associative memory. In the chaotic neural network, however, it is difficult to distinguish the stored patterns in the output patterns because of the chaotic state of the network. In order to apply the nonperiodic associative memory into information search, pattern recognition etc. it is necessary to control chaos in the chaotic neural network. We have studied the chaotic neural network with threshold activated coupling, which provides a controlled network with associative memory dynamics. The network converges to one of its stored patterns or/and reverse patterns which has the smallest Hamming distance from the initial state of the network. The range of the threshold applied to control the neurons in the network depends on the noise level in the initial pattern and decreases with the increase of noise. The chaos control in the chaotic neural network by threshold activated coupling at varying time interval provides controlled output patterns with different temporal periods which depend upon the control parameters.

  3. Terminating marine methane bubbles by superhydrophobic sponges.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao; Wu, Yuchen; Su, Bin; Wang, Jingming; Song, Yanlin; Jiang, Lei

    2012-11-14

    Marine methane bubbles are absorbed, steadily stored, and continuously transported based on the employment of superhydrophobic sponges. Antiwetting sponges are water-repellent in the atmosphere and absorb gas bubbles under water. Their capacity to store methane bubbles increases with enhanced submerged depth. Significantly, trapped methane bubbles can be continuously transported driven by differential pressure.

  4. The role of bubble ascent in magma mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesmaier, Sebastian; Morgavi, Daniele; Perugini, Diego; De Campos, Cristina; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Lavallée, Yan; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2013-04-01

    . Calculating the normalised variance provides an efficient statistical measure of the diffusion rate of cations at the interface of ambient rhyolite and basaltic plume tail. Bubble ascent provides an efficient mechanism for advection of contrasting melt compositions, independent from Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities [cf. 2], or convection induced by overpressure of rising magma. Interaction of volatile-bearing magmas may thus be enhanced at saturation of one or two end-members by buoyant forces exerted from free fluid phases. Future strategies involve to hone down tolerances in the experimental setup to minimise extraneous bubbles, achieve fluid dynamical constraints on the ascent of bubbles in basalt. [1] De Campos, C., D. Perugini, W. Ertel-Ingrisch, D. Dingwell, and G. Poli (2011), Enhancement of magma mixing efficiency by chaotic dynamics: an experimental study, Contrib. Mineral. Petrol. , 161(6), 863-881. [2] Thomas, N., S. Tait, and T. Koyaguchi (1993), Mixing of stratified liquids by the motion of gas bubbles: application to magma mixing, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. , 115(1-4), 161-175.

  5. Bubble Dynamics and Resulting Noise from Traveling Bubble Cavitation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-13

    has resulted in models which aqree well with bubble dynamics recorded by high speed film . Chahine, et. al. (23) incorporated asymmetric bubble...recording on the tape soundtrack . 3.8 Measurement of Gas Nuclei in Water The role of nuclei density and size in cavitation inception has been the subject...interference between the coherent background and the particle-diffracted radiation exooses photographic film in the far-field of the nuclei. This

  6. Urey Prize Lecture - Chaotic dynamics in the solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisdom, Jack

    1987-01-01

    Attention is given to solar system cases in which chaotic solutions of Newton's equations are important, as in chaotic rotation and orbital evolution. Hyperion is noted to be tumbling chaotically; chaotic orbital evolution is suggested to be of fundamental importance to an accounting for the Kirkwood gaps in asteroid distribution and for the phase space boundary of the chaotic zone at the 3/1 mean-motion commensurability with Jupiter. In addition, chaotic trajectories in the 2/1 chaotic zone reach very high eccentricities by a route that carries them to high inclinations temporarily.

  7. Regular transport dynamics produce chaotic travel times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villalobos, Jorge; Muñoz, Víctor; Rogan, José; Zarama, Roberto; Johnson, Neil F.; Toledo, Benjamín; Valdivia, Juan Alejandro

    2014-06-01

    In the hope of making passenger travel times shorter and more reliable, many cities are introducing dedicated bus lanes (e.g., Bogota, London, Miami). Here we show that chaotic travel times are actually a natural consequence of individual bus function, and hence of public transport systems more generally, i.e., chaotic dynamics emerge even when the route is empty and straight, stops and lights are equidistant and regular, and loading times are negligible. More generally, our findings provide a novel example of chaotic dynamics emerging from a single object following Newton's laws of motion in a regularized one-dimensional system.

  8. Chaotic background phase matching signal separation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Wu; Hui, Xia; Chen, Wang

    2016-07-01

    Aiming at the problem of separating the useful signal in the chaos background and using the phase matching method, the signal can be extracted effectively from the chaotic background. In this method, the chaotic background is not estimated with phase reconstruction and the geometric analysis of phase space is not required. Through the separation Simulation of the sinusoidal signal in the chaos background and the separation degree analysis, the low signal to noise ratio of the signal in the chaos background can be effectively separated. The effect of removing the chaotic background noise is obvious.

  9. Synchronisation control of composite chaotic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Jindao; Li, Chunbiao; Song, Bing; Hu, Wen

    2016-12-01

    Synchronisation conditions are studied for composite chaotic systems with complex compound structure and the signum function based on the theorem of zero-solution stability for a class of linear time-varying systems with countable discontinuous points. The synchronisation controller and its gain range are deduced according to the stability theorem, where the gain of the controller can speed synchronisation. Numerical simulation further proves the control theory and the validity of the synchronisation controller. The proposed controller can be widely applied in those chaotic systems with switch functions or other hybrid chaotic systems.

  10. Regular transport dynamics produce chaotic travel times.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Jorge; Muñoz, Víctor; Rogan, José; Zarama, Roberto; Johnson, Neil F; Toledo, Benjamín; Valdivia, Juan Alejandro

    2014-06-01

    In the hope of making passenger travel times shorter and more reliable, many cities are introducing dedicated bus lanes (e.g., Bogota, London, Miami). Here we show that chaotic travel times are actually a natural consequence of individual bus function, and hence of public transport systems more generally, i.e., chaotic dynamics emerge even when the route is empty and straight, stops and lights are equidistant and regular, and loading times are negligible. More generally, our findings provide a novel example of chaotic dynamics emerging from a single object following Newton's laws of motion in a regularized one-dimensional system.

  11. Chaotic neurodynamics for autonomous agents.

    PubMed

    Harter, Derek; Kozma, Robert

    2005-05-01

    Mesoscopic level neurodynamics study the collective dynamical behavior of neural populations. Such models are becoming increasingly important in understanding large-scale brain processes. Brains exhibit aperiodic oscillations with a much more rich dynamical behavior than fixed-point and limit-cycle approximation allow. Here we present a discretized model inspired by Freeman's K-set mesoscopic level population model. We show that this version is capable of replicating the important principles of aperiodic/chaotic neurodynamics while being fast enough for use in real-time autonomous agent applications. This simplification of the K model provides many advantages not only in terms of efficiency but in simplicity and its ability to be analyzed in terms of its dynamical properties. We study the discrete version using a multilayer, highly recurrent model of the neural architecture of perceptual brain areas. We use this architecture to develop example action selection mechanisms in an autonomous agent.

  12. Chaotic desynchronization of multistrain diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Leah; Billings, Lora; McCrary, Marie; Schwartz, Ira

    2005-03-01

    Dengue fever, a multi-strain disease, has four distinct co-existing serotypes (strains). The serotypes interact by antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE), in which infection with a single serotype is asymptomatic, but contact with a second serotype leads to serious illness accompanied by greater infectivity. It has been observed from serotype data that outbreaks of the four serotypes occur asynchronously (Nisalak et al., Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. 68: 192). We developed a compartmental model and did bifurcation analysis for multiple serotypes with ADE. Both autonomous and seasonally driven versions were studied. For sufficiently small ADE, we find that the number of infectives of each serotype synchronizes, with outbreaks occurring in phase. However, when the ADE increases past a threshold, the system becomes chaotic, and infectives of each serotype desynchronize.

  13. Aspherical bubble dynamics and oscillation times

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, A.; Noack, J.; Chapyak, E.J.; Godwin, R.P.

    1999-06-01

    The cavitation bubbles common in laser medicine are rarely perfectly spherical and are often located near tissue boundaries, in vessels, etc., which introduce aspherical dynamics. Here, novel features of aspherical bubble dynamics are explored by time-resolved photography and numerical simulations. The growth-collapse period of cylindrical bubbles of large aspect ratio (length:diameter {approximately}20) differs only slightly from twice the Rayleigh collapse time for a spherical bubble with an equivalent maximum volume. This fact justifies using the temporal interval between the acoustic signals emitted upon bubble creation and collapse to estimate the maximum bubble volume. As a result, hydrophone measurements can provide an estimate of the bubble size and energy even for aspherical bubbles. The change of the oscillation period of bubbles near solid walls and elastic (tissue-like) boundaries relative to that of isolated spherical bubbles is also investigated.

  14. Chaotic mixer improves microarray hybridization.

    PubMed

    McQuain, Mark K; Seale, Kevin; Peek, Joel; Fisher, Timothy S; Levy, Shawn; Stremler, Mark A; Haselton, Frederick R

    2004-02-15

    Hybridization is an important aspect of microarray experimental design which influences array signal levels and the repeatability of data within an array and across different arrays. Current methods typically require 24h and use target inefficiently. In these studies, we compare hybridization signals obtained in conventional static hybridization, which depends on diffusional target delivery, with signals obtained in a dynamic hybridization chamber, which employs a fluid mixer based on chaotic advection theory to deliver targets across a conventional glass slide array. Microarrays were printed with a pattern of 102 identical probe spots containing a 65-mer oligonucleotide capture probe. Hybridization of a 725-bp fluorescently labeled target was used to measure average target hybridization levels, local signal-to-noise ratios, and array hybridization uniformity. Dynamic hybridization for 1h with 1 or 10ng of target DNA increased hybridization signal intensities approximately threefold over a 24-h static hybridization. Similarly, a 10- or 60-min dynamic hybridization of 10ng of target DNA increased hybridization signal intensities fourfold over a 24h static hybridization. In time course studies, static hybridization reached a maximum within 8 to 12h using either 1 or 10ng of target. In time course studies using the dynamic hybridization chamber, hybridization using 1ng of target increased to a maximum at 4h and that using 10ng of target did not vary over the time points tested. In comparison to static hybridization, dynamic hybridization reduced the signal-to-noise ratios threefold and reduced spot-to-spot variation twofold. Therefore, we conclude that dynamic hybridization based on a chaotic mixer design improves both the speed of hybridization and the maximum level of hybridization while increasing signal-to-noise ratios and reducing spot-to-spot variation.

  15. Experimental investigation of quasiperiodic-chaotic-quasiperiodic-chaotic transition in a direct current magnetron sputtering plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sabavath, Gopi Kishan; Banerjee, I.; Mahapatra, S. K.; Shaw, Pankaj Kumar; Sekar Iyengar, A. N.

    2015-08-15

    Floating potential fluctuations from a direct current magnetron sputtering plasma have been analysed using time series analysis techniques like phase space plots, power spectra, frequency bifurcation plot, etc. The system exhibits quasiperiodic-chaotic-quasiperiodic-chaotic transitions as the discharge voltage was increased. The transitions of the fluctuations, quantified using the largest Lyapunov exponent, have been corroborated by Hurst exponent and the Shannon entropy. The Shannon entropy is high for quasiperiodic and low for chaotic oscillations.

  16. Transient bubbles, bublets and breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keen, Giles; Blake, John

    1999-11-01

    The non-spherical nature of the collapse of bubbles has important ramifications in many practical situations such as ultrasonic cleaning, tanning of leather, and underwater explosions. In particular the high speed liquid jet that can thread a collapsing bubble is central to the functional performance. An impressive photographic record of a liquid jet was obtained by Crum using a bubble situated in the vicinity of a platform oscillating vertically at a frequency of 60 Hz. A boundary integral method is used to model this situation and is found to closely mimic some of the observations. However, a slight variation of parameters or a change in the phase of the driving frequency can lead to dramatically different bubble behaviour, a feature also observed by Crum.

  17. Partial coalescence of soap bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucci, G.; Harris, D. M.; Bush, J. W. M.

    2015-06-01

    We present the results of an experimental investigation of the merger of a soap bubble with a planar soap film. When gently deposited onto a horizontal film, a bubble may interact with the underlying film in such a way as to decrease in size, leaving behind a smaller daughter bubble with approximately half the radius of its progenitor. The process repeats up to three times, with each partial coalescence event occurring over a time scale comparable to the inertial-capillary time. Our results are compared to the recent numerical simulations of Martin and Blanchette ["Simulations of surfactant effects on the dynamics of coalescing drops and bubbles," Phys. Fluids 27, 012103 (2015)] and to the coalescence cascade of droplets on a fluid bath.

  18. Driving bubbles out of glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattox, D. M.

    1981-01-01

    Surface tension gradient in melt forces gas bubbles to surface, increasing glass strength and transparency. Conventional chemical and buoyant fining are extremely slow in viscous glasses, but tension gradient method moves 250 um bubbles as rapidly as 30 um/s. Heat required for high temperature part of melt is furnished by stationary electrical or natural-gas heater; induction and laser heating are also possible. Method has many applications in industry processes.

  19. Microfluidic technology for molecular diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Tom; Dittrich, Petra S

    2013-01-01

    Molecular diagnostics have helped to improve the lives of millions of patients worldwide by allowing clinicians to diagnose patients earlier as well as providing better ongoing therapies. Point-of-care (POC) testing can bring these laboratory-based techniques to the patient in a home setting or to remote settings in the developing world. However, despite substantial progress in the field, there still remain many challenges. Progress in molecular diagnostics has benefitted greatly from microfluidic technology. This chapter aims to summarise the more recent advances in microfluidic-based molecular diagnostics. Sections include an introduction to microfluidic technology, the challenges of molecular diagnostics, how microfluidic advances are working to solve these issues, some alternative design approaches, and detection within these systems.

  20. Emergence of microfluidic wearable technologies.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Joo Chuan; Kenry; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2016-10-18

    There has been an intense interest in the development of wearable technologies, arising from increasing demands in the areas of fitness and healthcare. While still at an early stage, incorporating microfluidics in wearable technologies has enormous potential, especially in healthcare applications. For example, current microfluidic fabrication techniques can be innovatively modified to fabricate microstructures and incorporate electrically conductive elements on soft, flexible and stretchable materials. In fact, by leverarging on such microfabrication and liquid manipulation techniques, the developed flexible microfluidic wearable technologies have enabled several biosensing applications, including in situ sweat metabolites analysis, vital signs monitoring, and gait analysis. As such, we anticipate further significant breakthroughs and potential uses of wearable microfluidics in active drug delivery patches, soft robotics sensing and control, and even implantable artificial organs in the near future.

  1. Bioanalysis in structured microfluidic systems.

    PubMed

    Ros, Alexandra; Hellmich, Wibke; Regtmeier, Jan; Duong, Thanh Tu; Anselmetti, Dario

    2006-07-01

    Microfluidic and lab-on-a-chip devices have attracted widespread interest in separation sciences and bioanalysis. Recent designs in microfluidic devices extend common separation concepts by exploiting new phenomena for molecular dynamics on a length scale of 10 mum and below, giving rise to novel manipulation tools and nonintuitive phenomena for microseparations. Here, we focus on three very recent developments for bioseparations based on tailored microfluidic systems: Single cell navigation, trapping and steering with subsequent on-chip lysis, protein separation and LIF detection (Section 3.1), then we report dielectrophoretic trapping and separation of large DNA fragments in structured microfluidic devices (Section 3.2). Finally, a paradoxial migration phenomenon based on thermal fluctuations, periodically arranged microchannels and a biased alternating current electric field is presented in Section 3.3.

  2. Temperature measurements in cavitation bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutier-Delgosha, Olivier

    2016-11-01

    Cavitation is usually a nearly isothermal process in the liquid phase, but in some specific flow conditions like hot water or cryogenic fluids, significant temperature variations are detected. In addition, a large temperature increase happens inside the cavitation bubbles at the very end of their collapse, due to the fast compression of the gas at the bubble core, which is almost adiabatic. This process is of primary interest in various biomedical and pharmaceutical applications, where the mechanisms of bubble collapse plays a major role. To investigate the amplitude and the spatial distribution of these temperature variations inside and outside the cavitation bubbles, a system based on cold wires has been developed. They have been tested in a configuration of a single bubble obtained by submitting a small air bubble to a large amplitude pressure wave. Some promising results have been obtained after the initial validation tests. This work is funded by the Office of Naval Research Global under Grant N62909-16-1-2116, Dr. Salahuddin Ahmed & Ki-Han Kim program managers.

  3. Bubble baths: just splashing around?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Wesley; Speirs, Nathan; Sharker, Saberul Islam; Hurd, Randy; Williams, Bj; Truscott, Tadd

    2016-11-01

    Soap Bubbles on the water surface would seem to be an intuitive means for splash suppression, but their presence appears to be a double edged sword. We present on the water entry of hydrophilic spheres where the liquid surface is augmented by the presence of a bubble layer, similar to a bubble bath. While the presence of a bubble layer can diminish splashing upon impact at low Weber numbers, it also induces cavity formation at speeds below the critical velocity. The formation of a cavity generally results in larger Worthington jets and thus, larger amounts of ejected liquid. Bubble layers induce cavity formation by wetting the sphere prior to liquid impact, causing them to form cavities similar to those created by hydrophobic spheres. Droplets present on a pre-wetted sphere disrupt the flow of the advancing liquid during entry, pushing it away from the impacting body to form an entrained air cavity. This phenomena was noted by Worthington with pre-wetted stone marbles, and suggests that the application of a bubble layer is generally ineffective as a means of splash suppression.

  4. Towards printable open air microfluidics.

    SciTech Connect

    Collord, Andrew; Cook, Adam W.; Clem, Paul Gilbert; Fenton, Kyle Ross; Apblett, Christopher Alan; Branson, Eric D.

    2010-04-01

    We have demonstrated a novel microfluidic technique for aqueous media, which uses super-hydrophobic materials to create microfluidic channels that are open to the atmosphere. We have demonstrated the ability to perform traditional electrokinetic operations such as ionic separations and electrophoresis using these devices. The rate of evaporation was studied and found to increase with decreasing channel size, which places a limitation on the minimum size of channel that could be used for such a device.

  5. Passive microfluidic array card and reader

    DOEpatents

    Dugan, Lawrence Christopher; Coleman, Matthew A.

    2011-08-09

    A microfluidic array card and reader system for analyzing a sample. The microfluidic array card includes a sample loading section for loading the sample onto the microfluidic array card, a multiplicity of array windows, and a transport section or sections for transporting the sample from the sample loading section to the array windows. The microfluidic array card reader includes a housing, a receiving section for receiving the microfluidic array card, a viewing section, and a light source that directs light to the array window of the microfluidic array card and to the viewing section.

  6. Chaotic lasers: The world's fastest dice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Thomas E.; Roy, Rajarshi

    2008-12-01

    The dynamics of chaotic lasers can be harnessed to create a random-number generator that works at an astonishing rate. Such a generator could be implemented to make storage and transfer of data more secure at very high speeds.

  7. A practical test for noisy chaotic dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BenSaïda, Ahmed

    2015-12-01

    This code computes the largest Lyapunov exponent and tests for the presence of a chaotic dynamics, as opposed to stochastic dynamics, in a noisy scalar series. The program runs under MATLAB​® programming language.

  8. Chaotic dynamics of controlled electric power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, V. N.; Trosko, I. U.

    2016-12-01

    The conditions for appearance of chaotic dynamics of electromagnetic and electromechanical processes in energy systems described by the Park-Gorev bilinear differential equations with account for lags of coordinates and restrictions on control have been formulated. On the basis of classical equations, the parameters of synchronous generators and power lines, at which the chaotic dynamics of energy systems appears, have been found. The qualitative and quantitative characteristics of chaotic processes in energy associations of two types, based on the Hopf theorem, and methods of nonstationary linearization and decompositions are given. The properties of spectral characteristics of chaotic processes have been investigated, and the qualitative similarity of bilinear equations of power systems and Lorentz equations have been found. These results can be used for modernization of the systems of control of energy objects. The qualitative and quantitative characteristics for power energy systems as objects of control and for some laws of control with the feedback have been established.

  9. Multifolded torus chaotic attractors: Design and implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Simin; Lu, Jinhu; Chen, Guanrong

    2007-03-01

    This paper proposes a systematic methodology for creating multifolded torus chaotic attractors from a simple three-dimensional piecewise-linear system. Theoretical analysis shows that the multifolded torus chaotic attractors can be generated via alternative switchings between two basic linear systems. The theoretical design principle and the underlying dynamic mechanism are then further investigated by analyzing the emerging bifurcation and the stable and unstable subspaces of the two basic linear systems. A novel block circuit diagram is also designed for hardware implementation of 3-, 5-, 7-, 9-folded torus chaotic attractors via switching the corresponding switches. This is the first time a 9-folded torus chaotic attractor generated by an analog circuit has been verified experimentally. Furthermore, some recursive formulas of system parameters are rigorously derived, which is useful for improving hardware implementation.

  10. Bubble-free electrode actuation for micro-preparative scale electrophoresis of RNA.

    PubMed

    Vulto, Paul; Kuhn, Phillip; Urban, Gerald A

    2013-08-07

    A microfluidic chip is presented for lysis and one-step RNA purification from bacteria. Bacteria are lysed by joule-heating followed by a gel electrophoresis step for clean-up and subsequent elution of small RNA. Bubble formation during electrophoresis at constant current is suppressed through the use of a silver chloride cathode and a silver anode. To prevent silver chloride sediment in the bulk solution, the anode was immersed in a saturated chloride solution. Salt bridges in the form of polyacrylamide gels are used that could be precisely patterned with the help of phaseguides. Bubble-free actuation could be performed for more than 20 min under a constant current. For longer actuation times, cathodic silver-chloride became depleted and a silver-chloride sediment formed in the anodic microchamber at increasing distance from the anode with time. The chip functioning was verified by extraction of transfer-messenger RNA from Escherichia coli and subsequent amplification using reverse transcription real-time PCR. Incorporation of salt bridges enables effective bubble free actuation of Ag/AgCl electrodes in a microfluidic chip. This opens up new possibilities in a surge towards fully integrated diagnostic cartridges that are miniaturized and disposable.

  11. Microfluidic serial dilution ladder.

    PubMed

    Ahrar, Siavash; Hwang, Michelle; Duncan, Philip N; Hui, Elliot E

    2014-01-07

    Serial dilution is a fundamental procedure that is common to a large number of laboratory protocols. Automation of serial dilution is thus a valuable component for lab-on-a-chip systems. While a handful of different microfluidic strategies for serial dilution have been reported, approaches based on continuous flow mixing inherently consume larger amounts of sample volume and chip real estate. We employ valve-driven circulatory mixing to address these issues and also introduce a novel device structure to store each stage of the dilution process. The dilution strategy is based on sequentially mixing the rungs of a ladder structure. We demonstrate a 7-stage series of 1 : 1 dilutions with R(2) equal to 0.995 in an active device area of 1 cm(2).

  12. Enhanced Microfluidic Electromagnetic Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giovangrandi, Laurent (Inventor); Ricco, Antonio J. (Inventor); Kovacs, Gregory (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Techniques for enhanced microfluidic impedance spectroscopy include causing a core fluid to flow into a channel between two sheath flows of one or more sheath fluids different from the core fluid. Flow in the channel is laminar. A dielectric constant of a fluid constituting either sheath flow is much less than a dielectric constant of the core fluid. Electrical impedance is measured in the channel between at least a first pair of electrodes. In some embodiments, enhanced optical measurements include causing a core fluid to flow into a channel between two sheath flows of one or more sheath fluids different from the core fluid. An optical index of refraction of a fluid constituting either sheath flow is much less than an optical index of refraction of the core fluid. An optical property is measured in the channel.

  13. Inertial Focusing in Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Martel, Joseph M.; Toner, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    When Segré and Silberberg in 1961 witnessed particles in a laminar pipe flow congregating at an annulus in the pipe, scientists were perplexed and spent decades learning why such behavior occurred, finally understanding that it was caused by previously unknown forces on particles in an inertial flow. The advent of microfluidics opened a new realm of possibilities for inertial focusing in the processing of biological fluids and cellular suspensions and created a field that is now rapidly expanding. Over the past five years, inertial focusing has enabled high-throughput, simple, and precise manipulation of bodily fluids for a myriad of applications in point-of-care and clinical diagnostics. This review describes the theoretical developments that have made the field of inertial focusing what it is today and presents the key applications that will make inertial focusing a mainstream technology in the future. PMID:24905880

  14. Inertial focusing in microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Martel, Joseph M; Toner, Mehmet

    2014-07-11

    When Segré and Silberberg in 1961 witnessed particles in a laminar pipe flow congregating at an annulus in the pipe, scientists were perplexed and spent decades learning why such behavior occurred, finally understanding that it was caused by previously unknown forces on particles in an inertial flow. The advent of microfluidics opened a new realm of possibilities for inertial focusing in the processing of biological fluids and cellular suspensions and created a field that is now rapidly expanding. Over the past five years, inertial focusing has enabled high-throughput, simple, and precise manipulation of bodily fluids for a myriad of applications in point-of-care and clinical diagnostics. This review describes the theoretical developments that have made the field of inertial focusing what it is today and presents the key applications that will make inertial focusing a mainstream technology in the future.

  15. Bubble-Pen Lithography.

    PubMed

    Lin, Linhan; Peng, Xiaolei; Mao, Zhangming; Li, Wei; Yogeesh, Maruthi N; Rajeeva, Bharath Bangalore; Perillo, Evan P; Dunn, Andrew K; Akinwande, Deji; Zheng, Yuebing

    2016-01-13

    Current lithography techniques, which employ photon, electron, or ion beams to induce chemical or physical reactions for micro/nano-fabrication, have remained challenging in patterning chemically synthesized colloidal particles, which are emerging as building blocks for functional devices. Herein, we develop a new technique - bubble-pen lithography (BPL) - to pattern colloidal particles on substrates using optically controlled microbubbles. Briefly, a single laser beam generates a microbubble at the interface of colloidal suspension and a plasmonic substrate via plasmon-enhanced photothermal effects. The microbubble captures and immobilizes the colloidal particles on the substrate through coordinated actions of Marangoni convection, surface tension, gas pressure, and substrate adhesion. Through directing the laser beam to move the microbubble, we create arbitrary single-particle patterns and particle assemblies with different resolutions and architectures. Furthermore, we have applied BPL to pattern CdSe/ZnS quantum dots on plasmonic substrates and polystyrene (PS) microparticles on two-dimensional (2D) atomic-layer materials. With the low-power operation, arbitrary patterning and applicability to general colloidal particles, BPL will find a wide range of applications in microelectronics, nanophotonics, and nanomedicine.

  16. Parallel imaging microfluidic cytometer.

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, Daniel J; McKenna, Brian K; Evans, James G; Belkina, Anna C; Denis, Gerald V; Sherr, David H; Cheung, Man Ching

    2011-01-01

    By adding an additional degree of freedom from multichannel flow, the parallel microfluidic cytometer (PMC) combines some of the best features of fluorescence-activated flow cytometry (FCM) and microscope-based high-content screening (HCS). The PMC (i) lends itself to fast processing of large numbers of samples, (ii) adds a 1D imaging capability for intracellular localization assays (HCS), (iii) has a high rare-cell sensitivity, and (iv) has an unusual capability for time-synchronized sampling. An inability to practically handle large sample numbers has restricted applications of conventional flow cytometers and microscopes in combinatorial cell assays, network biology, and drug discovery. The PMC promises to relieve a bottleneck in these previously constrained applications. The PMC may also be a powerful tool for finding rare primary cells in the clinic. The multichannel architecture of current PMC prototypes allows 384 unique samples for a cell-based screen to be read out in ∼6-10 min, about 30 times the speed of most current FCM systems. In 1D intracellular imaging, the PMC can obtain protein localization using HCS marker strategies at many times for the sample throughput of charge-coupled device (CCD)-based microscopes or CCD-based single-channel flow cytometers. The PMC also permits the signal integration time to be varied over a larger range than is practical in conventional flow cytometers. The signal-to-noise advantages are useful, for example, in counting rare positive cells in the most difficult early stages of genome-wide screening. We review the status of parallel microfluidic cytometry and discuss some of the directions the new technology may take.

  17. Digital Microfluidics Sample Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, Michael G.; Srinivasan, Vijay; Eckhardt, Allen; Paik, Philip Y.; Sudarsan, Arjun; Shenderov, Alex; Hua, Zhishan; Pamula, Vamsee K.

    2010-01-01

    Three innovations address the needs of the medical world with regard to microfluidic manipulation and testing of physiological samples in ways that can benefit point-of-care needs for patients such as premature infants, for which drawing of blood for continuous tests can be life-threatening in their own right, and for expedited results. A chip with sample injection elements, reservoirs (and waste), droplet formation structures, fluidic pathways, mixing areas, and optical detection sites, was fabricated to test the various components of the microfluidic platform, both individually and in integrated fashion. The droplet control system permits a user to control droplet microactuator system functions, such as droplet operations and detector operations. Also, the programming system allows a user to develop software routines for controlling droplet microactuator system functions, such as droplet operations and detector operations. A chip is incorporated into the system with a controller, a detector, input and output devices, and software. A novel filler fluid formulation is used for the transport of droplets with high protein concentrations. Novel assemblies for detection of photons from an on-chip droplet are present, as well as novel systems for conducting various assays, such as immunoassays and PCR (polymerase chain reaction). The lab-on-a-chip (a.k.a., lab-on-a-printed-circuit board) processes physiological samples and comprises a system for automated, multi-analyte measurements using sub-microliter samples of human serum. The invention also relates to a diagnostic chip and system including the chip that performs many of the routine operations of a central labbased chemistry analyzer, integrating, for example, colorimetric assays (e.g., for proteins), chemiluminescence/fluorescence assays (e.g., for enzymes, electrolytes, and gases), and/or conductometric assays (e.g., for hematocrit on plasma and whole blood) on a single chip platform.

  18. On the timbre of chaotic algorithmic sounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiropoulos, Dimitrios A.; Sotiropoulos, Anastasios D.; Sotiropoulos, Vaggelis D.

    Chaotic sound waveforms generated algorithmically are considered to study their timbre characteristics of harmonic and inharmonic overtones, loudness and onset time. Algorithms employed in the present work come from different first order iterative maps with parameters that generate chaotic sound waveforms. The generated chaotic sounds are compared with each other in respect of their waveforms' energy over the same time interval. Interest is focused in the logistic, double logistic and elliptic iterative maps. For these maps, the energy of the algorithmically synthesized sounds is obtained numerically in the chaotic region. The results show that for a specific parameter value in the chaotic region for each one of the first two maps, the calculated sound energy is the same. The energy, though, produced by the elliptic iterative map is higher than that of the other two maps everywhere in the chaotic region. Under the criterion of equal energy, the discrete Fourier transform is employed to compute for the logistic and double logistic iterative maps, a) the generated chaotic sound's power spectral density over frequency revealing the location (frequency) and relative loudness of the overtones which can be associated with fundamental frequencies of musical notes, and b) the generated chaotic sound's frequency dependent phase, which together with the overtones' frequency, yields the overtones' onset time. It is found that the synthesized overtones' loudness, frequency and onset time are totally different for the two generating algorithms (iterative maps) even though the sound's total generated power is equal. It is also demonstrated that, within each one of the iterative maps considered, the overtone characteristics are strongly affected by the choice of initial loudness.

  19. IBFM for Ba isotopes and chaoticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucurescu, D.; Cáta-Danil, G.; Ivasçu, M.; Gizon, A.; Gizon, J.; Ur, C. A.

    1992-06-01

    Fluctuation properties have been analysed for the energy levels predicted by IBFM calculations in the Ba isotopes121Ba to131Ba. The results indicate, in general, a situation which is close to the chaotic limit. For the lighter isotopes studied (121 and 123), a phase transition is obtained in the low-spin, positive parity states, from a situation close to regularity at low excitation energies, towards chaoticity at higher excitations.

  20. IBFM for barium isotopes and chaoticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucurescu, D.; Cata-Danil, G.; Ivascu, M.; Gizon, A.; Gizon, J.; UR, C. A.

    Fluctuation properties have been analysed for the energy levels predicted by IBFM calculations in the Ba isotopes 121Ba to 131Ba. The results are indicating, in general, a situation which is close to the chaotic limit. For the lighter isotopes studied (121 and 131), a phase transition is obtained in the low-spin, positive states, from a situation close to regularity at low excitation energies, towards chaoticity at higher excitations.

  1. Post-Acceleration Chaotic Atrial Rhythm

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-01

    atrial flutter or two discrete P-wave morphologies with the rate less fibrillation. than 100 bpm). and sinus bradycardia. An occasional The time...mulhilocal paroxysmal atrial tach.- cardia with cclic Wcnckchach phenomenon under observation examinations. The chaotic atrial rhythm in this case ji r 13...CHAOTIC ATRIAL RHYTHM Final Report 1 July 81 - 30 July 81 6. PERFORMING OIG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(s) 8 CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBERS) r James E

  2. Acoustical Emission from Bubbles and Dynamics of Bubbles and Bubble Clouds.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-01-01

    distribution of bubble sizes from a breaking wave , that is immediately following on the entrainment and disintegration of a given volume of air? In the...experimental confirmation was found by later workers. A simple statistical model has been proposed for the initial bubble sizes from breaking waves ...which also has received experimental support. A direct method of calculating wave -generated ripples has been proposed, which accounts quantitatively

  3. FEASTING BLACK HOLE BLOWS BUBBLES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A monstrous black hole's rude table manners include blowing huge bubbles of hot gas into space. At least, that's the gustatory practice followed by the supermassive black hole residing in the hub of the nearby galaxy NGC 4438. Known as a peculiar galaxy because of its unusual shape, NGC 4438 is in the Virgo Cluster, 50 million light-years from Earth. These NASA Hubble Space Telescope images of the galaxy's central region clearly show one of the bubbles rising from a dark band of dust. The other bubble, emanating from below the dust band, is barely visible, appearing as dim red blobs in the close-up picture of the galaxy's hub (the colorful picture at right). The background image represents a wider view of the galaxy, with the central region defined by the white box. These extremely hot bubbles are caused by the black hole's voracious eating habits. The eating machine is engorging itself with a banquet of material swirling around it in an accretion disk (the white region below the bright bubble). Some of this material is spewed from the disk in opposite directions. Acting like high-powered garden hoses, these twin jets of matter sweep out material in their paths. The jets eventually slam into a wall of dense, slow-moving gas, which is traveling at less than 223,000 mph (360,000 kph). The collision produces the glowing material. The bubbles will continue to expand and will eventually dissipate. Compared with the life of the galaxy, this bubble-blowing phase is a short-lived event. The bubble is much brighter on one side of the galaxy's center because the jet smashed into a denser amount of gas. The brighter bubble is 800 light-years tall and 800 light-years across. The observations are being presented June 5 at the American Astronomical Society meeting in Rochester, N.Y. Both pictures were taken March 24, 1999 with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. False colors were used to enhance the details of the bubbles. The red regions in the picture denote the hot gas

  4. Chaotic magnetic fields: Particle motion and energization

    SciTech Connect

    Dasgupta, Brahmananda; Ram, Abhay K.; Li, Gang; Li, Xiaocan

    2014-02-11

    Magnetic field line equations correspond to a Hamiltonian dynamical system, so the features of a Hamiltonian systems can easily be adopted for discussing some essential features of magnetic field lines. The integrability of the magnetic field line equations are discussed by various authors and it can be shown that these equations are, in general, not integrable. We demonstrate several examples of realistic chaotic magnetic fields, produced by asymmetric current configurations. Particular examples of chaotic force-free field and non force-free fields are shown. We have studied, for the first time, the motion of a charged particle in chaotic magnetic fields. It is found that the motion of a charged particle in a chaotic magnetic field is not necessarily chaotic. We also showed that charged particles moving in a time-dependent chaotic magnetic field are energized. Such energization processes could play a dominant role in particle energization in several astrophysical environments including solar corona, solar flares and cosmic ray propagation in space.

  5. New developments in classical chaotic scattering.

    PubMed

    Seoane, Jesús M; Sanjuán, Miguel A F

    2013-01-01

    Classical chaotic scattering is a topic of fundamental interest in nonlinear physics due to the numerous existing applications in fields such as celestial mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics and fluid mechanics, among others. Many new advances in chaotic scattering have been achieved in the last few decades. This work provides a current overview of the field, where our attention has been mainly focused on the most important contributions related to the theoretical framework of chaotic scattering, the fractal dimension, the basins boundaries and new applications, among others. Numerical techniques and algorithms, as well as analytical tools used for its analysis, are also included. We also show some of the experimental setups that have been implemented to study diverse manifestations of chaotic scattering. Furthermore, new theoretical aspects such as the study of this phenomenon in time-dependent systems, different transitions and bifurcations to chaotic scattering and a classification of boundaries in different types according to symbolic dynamics are also shown. Finally, some recent progress on chaotic scattering in higher dimensions is also described.

  6. Single-bubble sonoluminescence from hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Kyuichi

    1999-09-01

    Single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) from a hydrogen bubble is studied theoretically based on a quasiadiabatic compression model of a bubble collapse. It is clarified that the maximum temperature in a hydrogen bubble in 20 °C water under conditions of SBSL is always about 6000 K due to the effect of chemical reactions inside the bubble. It is suggested that the light emission at such temperature is by the transition from the lowest stable triplet state of the H2 molecule to the repulsive state resulting from two normal atoms (H2*→2H+hν). It is shown that the number of hydrogen molecules inside the bubble remains almost constant in spite of the high temperature and pressure inside the bubble at the collapse. It is also shown that the addition of argon to a hydrogen bubble results in the higher maximum temperature inside the bubble.

  7. Electrodiffusion Method of Near-Wall Flow Diagnostics in Microfluidic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tihona, J.; Pěnkavová, V.; Stanovský, P.; Vejražka, J.

    2015-05-01

    The electrodiffusion technique has been mostly used for the near-wall flow diagnostics on large scales. A novel technique for fabrication of plastic microfluidic systems with integrated metal microelectrodes (called technique of sacrificed substrate) enables us to produce microfluidic devices with precisely shaped sensors for wall shear stress measurements. Several micrometer thick gold sensors, which are built-in a plastic substrate, exhibit good mechanical resistance and smoothness. Proper functioning of prepared chips with microsensors has been first tested in various calibration experiments (polarization curve, sensor response to polarization set-up, steady flow calibration, temperature dependence of diffusivity). Our first results obtained for separating/reattaching flow behind a backward-facing step and for gas-liquid Taylor flow in microchannels then demonstrate its applicability for the detection of near-wall flow reversal, the delimitation of flow - recirculation zones, and the determination of wall shear stress response to moving bubbles. Other applications of these sensors in microfluidics (e.g. characterization of liquid films, capillary waves, bubbles or drops) can be also envisaged.

  8. Chaotic Mixing of Granitic and Basaltic Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decampos, C.; Ingrisch, W. E.; Perugini, D.; Dingwell, D. B.; Poli, G.

    2008-12-01

    Chaotic mixing in magma chambers may play a central role in determining the timing and dynamics of volcanic eruptions. The dynamics of such chaotic mixing has been investigated solely in analog systems and in numerical simulations to date. Here we report the first experimental study of the dynamics of chaotic mixing in molten silicates of geological relevance. A newly developed device for the simulation of chaotic dynamics has been successfully employed for this purpose. Its development is based on the importance of chaotic dynamics for mixing processes; and previous studies evidencing that chaotic dynamics could equally control magma mixing processes in nature (Perugini et al., 2006. EPSL, 234: 669-680 and references therein). The special device for chaotic mixing silicate melts at high temperatures (up to 1700°C) has been built after the journal-bearing or eccentric-cylinder geometry for viscous fluids for the study of chaotic mixing in slow flows (Swanson and Ottino, 1990. J. Fluid Mech., 213:227-249). In order to generate chaos in a flow, the streamlines must be time dependent, resulting from alternating movements between the two cylinders. The mixing experiments were performed using end-members of: haplogranite [In wt.%: SiO2(71.6), Al2O3(12.4), Na2O(7.0), K2O(9.0)] and haplobasalt [SiO2(48.6), Al2O3(16.3), CaO(23.8), MgO (11.4)]. The haplogranite was doped with trace amounts of Rb, Sr, Ba, Zr and REE oxides. The experimental protocol started with a single run of alternating movements of spindle and crucible. It lasted for 110 minutes at a temperature of 1400°C. The experiment terminated by stopping all movement and letting the sample cool to room temperature. A cylinder of the resultant mixed glassy sample was recovered by drilling. Horizontal sections of this cylinder at varying heights were prepared for microprobe and ICP-MS- Laser Ablation analyses. Preliminary optical and microprobe studies reveal crystal-free filaments of intermediary compositions

  9. Bubble nucleation in an explosive micro-bubble actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Broek, D. M.; Elwenspoek, M.

    2008-06-01

    Explosive evaporation occurs when a thin layer of liquid reaches a temperature close to the critical temperature in a very short time. At these temperatures spontaneous nucleation takes place. The nucleated bubbles instantly coalesce forming a vapour film followed by rapid growth due to the pressure impulse. In this paper we take a closer look at the bubble nucleation. The moment of bubble nucleation was determined by both stroboscopic imaging and resistance thermometry. Two nucleation regimes could be distinguished. Several different heater designs were investigated under heat fluxes of hundreds of W mm-2. A close correspondence between current density in the heater and point of nucleation was found. This results in design rules for effective heaters.

  10. Bubble-based acoustic micropropulsors: active surfaces and mixers.

    PubMed

    Bertin, Nicolas; Spelman, Tamsin A; Combriat, Thomas; Hue, Hervé; Stéphan, Olivier; Lauga, Eric; Marmottant, Philippe

    2017-04-11

    Acoustic micropropulsors present great potential for microfluidic applications. The propulsion is based on encapsulated 20 μm bubbles excited by a contacless ultrasonic transducer. The vibrating bubbles then generate a powerful streaming flow, with speeds 1-100 mm s(-1) in water, through the action of viscous stresses. In this paper we introduce a full toolbox of micropropulsors using a versatile three-dimensional (3D) microfabrication setup. Doublets and triplets of propulsors are introduced, and the flows they generate are predicted by a theoretical hydrodynamic model. We then introduce whole surfaces covered with propulsors, which we term active surfaces. These surfaces are excited by a single ultrasonic wave, can generate collective flows and may be harnessed for mixing purposes. Several patterns of propulsors are tested, and the flows produced by the two most efficient mixers are predicted by a simple theoretical model based on flow singularities. In particular, the vortices generated by the most efficient pattern, an L-shaped mixer, are analysed in detail.

  11. Single-Bubble and Multibubble Sonoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Kyuichi

    1999-11-01

    Computer simulations of radiation processes in an air bubble and an argon bubble are performed under a condition of single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) based on a quasiadiabatic compression model of a bubble collapse. It is clarified that emissions from excited molecules are strongly quenched by high pressure and temperature inside a SBSL bubble and SBSL originates in the emissions from plasma. It is pointed out that sonoluminescence from cavitation fields (MBSL) originates in emissions from excited molecules, which is not quenched due to the much lower pressure and temperature inside the MBSL bubbles.

  12. Applied mathematics of chaotic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jen, E.; Alber, M.; Camassa, R.; Choi, W.; Crutchfield, J.; Holm, D.; Kovacic, G.; Marsden, J.

    1996-07-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objectives of the project were to develop new mathematical techniques for describing chaotic systems and for reexpressing them in forms that can be solved analytically and computationally. The authors focused on global bifurcation analysis of rigid body motion in an ideal incompressible fluid and on an analytical technique for the exact solution of nonlinear cellular automata. For rigid-body motion, they investigated a new completely integrable partial differential equation (PDE) representing model motion of fronts in nematic crystals and studied perturbations of the integrable PDE. For cellular automata with multiple domain structures, the work has included: (1) identification of the associated set of conserved quantities for each type of domain; (2) use of the conserved quantities to construct isomorphism between the nonlinear system and a linear template; and (3) use of exact solvability methods to characterize detailed structure of equilibrium states and to derive bounds for maximal transience times.

  13. Sky Dancer: a chaotic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cros, Anne; Castillo Flores, Fernando; Le Gal, Patrice

    2008-11-01

    We present the experimental study of a collapsible tube conveying an ascending air flow. An extreme of the membrane tube is mounted on the air blower exit, while the other extreme is free. The flow velocity can be varied. For low speeds -- and tubes short enough -- the cylinder stands up (stable state). As the velocity is increased, the system presents sporadic turbulent fluctuations, when the tube bends and rises again. As the air speed is increased again, the intermittent events become more and more frequent. Films realized in front of the system permit to observe waves that propagate in the tube. We measure that these waves have a sonic speed, confirming previous results. Moreover, films taken from the top of the system allow a quantitative characterization of the transition to chaos. By processing the images, we can reduce the evolution of the system to two states: stable (when it is raised) and chaotic (when the tube fluctuates). The histograms of unstable / stable states are coherent with an intermittent transition in the theory of chaos.

  14. Microfluidic control on nanoplasmonic thin films using Marangoni effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namura, Kyoko; Nakajima, Kaoru; Kimura, Kenji; Suzuki, Motofumi

    2016-07-01

    The rapid switching of flow direction in a thin microfluidic chamber filled with water is demonstrated using the thermoplasmonic Marangoni effect. A gold island film is used as a thermoplasmonic heater on which a continuous-wave laser is focused to generate a microbubble and develop Marangoni flows around it. The direction of the observed flow significantly changes depending on the laser power. When the laser power is square-wave modulated, the flow direction instantaneously switches in response to the power, creating a discrete pattern of polystyrene microspheres. Flow direction-switching is observed for laser power modulation frequencies of up to 40 Hz, which indicates that the time constant of the flow direction switching is on the order of at least several milliseconds. This rapid flow direction switching is attributed to the fast response of both the thermoplasmonic effect of the gold nanoparticles and the Marangoni effect on the bubble surface.

  15. Modular microfluidic system as a model of cystic fibrosis airways

    PubMed Central

    Skolimowski, M.; Weiss Nielsen, M.; Abeille, F.; Skafte-Pedersen, P.; Sabourin, D.; Fercher, A.; Papkovsky, D.; Molin, S.; Taboryski, R.; Sternberg, C.; Dufva, M.; Geschke, O.; Emnéus, J.

    2012-01-01

    A modular microfluidic airways model system that can simulate the changes in oxygen tension in different compartments of the cystic fibrosis (CF) airways was designed, developed, and tested. The fully reconfigurable system composed of modules with different functionalities: multichannel peristaltic pumps, bubble traps, gas exchange chip, and cell culture chambers. We have successfully applied this system for studying the antibiotic therapy of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the bacteria mainly responsible for morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis, in different oxygen environments. Furthermore, we have mimicked the bacterial reinoculation of the aerobic compartments (lower respiratory tract) from the anaerobic compartments (cystic fibrosis sinuses) following an antibiotic treatment. This effect is hypothesised as the one on the main reasons for recurrent lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients. PMID:23908680

  16. Recent Progress of Microfluidics in Translational Applications

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zongbin; Han, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidics, featuring microfabricated structures, is a technology for manipulating fluids at the micrometer scale. The small dimension and flexibility of microfluidic systems are ideal for mimicking molecular and cellular microenvironment, and show great potential in translational research and development. Here, the recent progress of microfluidics in biological and biomedical applications, including molecular analysis, cellular analysis, and chip-based material delivery and biomimetic design is presented. The potential future developments in the translational microfluidics field are also discussed. PMID:27091777

  17. Recent Progress of Microfluidics in Translational Applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zongbin; Han, Xin; Qin, Lidong

    2016-04-20

    Microfluidics, featuring microfabricated structures, is a technology for manipulating fluids at the micrometer scale. The small dimension and flexibility of microfluidic systems are ideal for mimicking molecular and cellular microenvironment, and show great potential in translational research and development. Here, the recent progress of microfluidics in biological and biomedical applications, including molecular analysis, cellular analysis, and chip-based material delivery and biomimetic design is presented. The potential future developments in the translational microfluidics field are also discussed.

  18. Phase diagrams for sonoluminescing bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilgenfeldt, Sascha; Lohse, Detlef; Brenner, Michael P.

    1996-11-01

    Sound driven gas bubbles in water can emit light pulses. This phenomenon is called sonoluminescence (SL). Two different phases of single bubble SL have been proposed: diffusively stable and diffusively unstable SL. We present phase diagrams in the gas concentration versus forcing pressure state space and also in the ambient radius versus gas concentration and versus forcing pressure state spaces. These phase diagrams are based on the thresholds for energy focusing in the bubble and two kinds of instabilities, namely (i) shape instabilities and (ii) diffusive instabilities. Stable SL only occurs in a tiny parameter window of large forcing pressure amplitude Pa˜1.2-1.5 atm and low gas concentration of less than 0.4% of the saturation. The upper concentration threshold becomes smaller with increased forcing. Our results quantitatively agree with experimental results of Putterman's UCLA group on argon, but not on air. However, air bubbles and other gas mixtures can also successfully be treated in this approach if in addition (iii) chemical instabilities are considered. All statements are based on the Rayleigh-Plesset ODE approximation of the bubble dynamics, extended in an adiabatic approximation to include mass diffusion effects. This approximation is the only way to explore considerable portions of parameter space, as solving the full PDEs is numerically too expensive. Therefore, we checked the adiabatic approximation by comparison with the full numerical solution of the advection diffusion PDE and find good agreement.

  19. Ethnic diversity deflates price bubbles

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Sheen S.; Apfelbaum, Evan P.; Bernard, Mark; Bartelt, Valerie L.; Zajac, Edward J.; Stark, David

    2014-01-01

    Markets are central to modern society, so their failures can be devastating. Here, we examine a prominent failure: price bubbles. Bubbles emerge when traders err collectively in pricing, causing misfit between market prices and the true values of assets. The causes of such collective errors remain elusive. We propose that bubbles are affected by ethnic homogeneity in the market and can be thwarted by diversity. In homogenous markets, traders place undue confidence in the decisions of others. Less likely to scrutinize others’ decisions, traders are more likely to accept prices that deviate from true values. To test this, we constructed experimental markets in Southeast Asia and North America, where participants traded stocks to earn money. We randomly assigned participants to ethnically homogeneous or diverse markets. We find a marked difference: Across markets and locations, market prices fit true values 58% better in diverse markets. The effect is similar across sites, despite sizeable differences in culture and ethnic composition. Specifically, in homogenous markets, overpricing is higher as traders are more likely to accept speculative prices. Their pricing errors are more correlated than in diverse markets. In addition, when bubbles burst, homogenous markets crash more severely. The findings suggest that price bubbles arise not only from individual errors or financial conditions, but also from the social context of decision making. The evidence may inform public discussion on ethnic diversity: it may be beneficial not only for providing variety in perspectives and skills, but also because diversity facilitates friction that enhances deliberation and upends conformity. PMID:25404313

  20. Gravity driven flows of bubble suspensions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenit, Roberto; Koch, Donald L.; Sangani, Ashok K.

    1999-11-01

    Experiments on vertical and inclined channels were performed to study the behavior of a mono-dispersed bubble suspension for which the dual limit of large Reynolds number and small Weber number is satisfied. A uniform stream of 1.5 mm diameter bubbles is produced by a bank of identical capillaries and coalescence is inhibited by addition of salt to the water. Measurements of the liquid velocity and bubble-probe collision rate are obtained with a hot wire anemometer. The gas volume fraction, bubble velocity, velocity variance and chord length are measured using a dual impedance probe. Image analysis is used to quantify the distributions of bubble size and aspect ratio. For vertical channels the bubble velocity is observed to decrease as the bubble concentration increases in accord with the predictions of Spelt and Sangani (1998). The bubble velocity variance arises largely due to bubble-wall and bubble-bubble collisions. For inclined channels, the strength of the shear flow is controlled by the extent of bubble segregation and the effective viscosity of the bubble phase. The measurements are compared with solutions of the averaged equations of motion for a range of gas volume fractions and channel inclination angles.

  1. Aspherical bubble dynamics and oscillation times

    SciTech Connect

    Godwin, R.P.; Chapyak, E.J.; Noack, J.; Vogel, A.

    1999-03-01

    The cavitation bubbles common in laser medicine are rarely perfectly spherical and are often located near tissue boundaries, in vessels, etc., which introduce aspherical dynamics. Here, novel features of aspherical bubble dynamics are explored. Time-resolved experimental photographs and simulations of large aspect ratio (length:diameter {approximately}20) cylindrical bubble dynamics are presented. The experiments and calculations exhibit similar dynamics. A small high-pressure cylindrical bubble initially expands radially with hardly any axial motion. Then, after reaching its maximum volume, a cylindrical bubble collapses along its long axis with relatively little radial motion. The growth-collapse period of these very aspherical bubbles differs only sightly from twice the Rayleigh collapse time for a spherical bubble with an equivalent maximum volume. This fact justifies using the temporal interval between the acoustic signals emitted upon bubble creation and collapse to estimate the maximum bubble volume. As a result, hydrophone measurements can provide an estimate of the bubble energy even for aspherical bubbles. The prolongation of the oscillation period of bubbles near solid boundaries relative to that of isolated spherical bubbles is also discussed.

  2. Machine vision for digital microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yong-Jun; Lee, Jeong-Bong

    2010-01-01

    Machine vision is widely used in an industrial environment today. It can perform various tasks, such as inspecting and controlling production processes, that may require humanlike intelligence. The importance of imaging technology for biological research or medical diagnosis is greater than ever. For example, fluorescent reporter imaging enables scientists to study the dynamics of gene networks with high spatial and temporal resolution. Such high-throughput imaging is increasingly demanding the use of machine vision for real-time analysis and control. Digital microfluidics is a relatively new technology with expectations of becoming a true lab-on-a-chip platform. Utilizing digital microfluidics, only small amounts of biological samples are required and the experimental procedures can be automatically controlled. There is a strong need for the development of a digital microfluidics system integrated with machine vision for innovative biological research today. In this paper, we show how machine vision can be applied to digital microfluidics by demonstrating two applications: machine vision-based measurement of the kinetics of biomolecular interactions and machine vision-based droplet motion control. It is expected that digital microfluidics-based machine vision system will add intelligence and automation to high-throughput biological imaging in the future.

  3. Bursting Bubbles and Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Wrenn, Steven P.; Dicker, Stephen M.; Small, Eleanor F.; Dan, Nily R.; Mleczko, Michał; Schmitz, Georg; Lewin, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses various interactions between ultrasound, phospholipid monolayer-coated gas bubbles, phospholipid bilayer vesicles, and cells. The paper begins with a review of microbubble physics models, developed to describe microbubble dynamic behavior in the presence of ultrasound, and follows this with a discussion of how such models can be used to predict inertial cavitation profiles. Predicted sensitivities of inertial cavitation to changes in the values of membrane properties, including surface tension, surface dilatational viscosity, and area expansion modulus, indicate that area expansion modulus exerts the greatest relative influence on inertial cavitation. Accordingly, the theoretical dependence of area expansion modulus on chemical composition - in particular, poly (ethylene glyclol) (PEG) - is reviewed, and predictions of inertial cavitation for different PEG molecular weights and compositions are compared with experiment. Noteworthy is the predicted dependence, or lack thereof, of inertial cavitation on PEG molecular weight and mole fraction. Specifically, inertial cavitation is predicted to be independent of PEG molecular weight and mole fraction in the so-called mushroom regime. In the “brush” regime, however, inertial cavitation is predicted to increase with PEG mole fraction but to decrease (to the inverse 3/5 power) with PEG molecular weight. While excellent agreement between experiment and theory can be achieved, it is shown that the calculated inertial cavitation profiles depend strongly on the criterion used to predict inertial cavitation. This is followed by a discussion of nesting microbubbles inside the aqueous core of microcapsules and how this significantly increases the inertial cavitation threshold. Nesting thus offers a means for avoiding unwanted inertial cavitation and cell death during imaging and other applications such as sonoporation. A review of putative sonoporation mechanisms is then presented, including those

  4. Bubbles Responding to Ultrasound Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Bubble and Drop Nonlinear Dynamics (BDND) experiment was designed to improve understanding of how the shape and behavior of bubbles respond to ultrasound pressure. By understanding this behavior, it may be possible to counteract complications bubbles cause during materials processing on the ground. This 12-second sequence came from video downlinked from STS-94, July 5 1997, MET:3/19:15 (approximate). The BDND guest investigator was Gary Leal of the University of California, Santa Barbara. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). Advanced fluid dynamics experiments will be a part of investigations plarned for the International Space Station. (435KB, 13-second MPEG, screen 160 x 120 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) A still JPG composite of this movie is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300162.html.

  5. How safe is Bubble Soccer?

    PubMed

    Halani, Sameer H; Riley, Jonathan P; Pradilla, Gustavo; Ahmad, Faiz U

    2016-12-01

    Traumatic neurologic injury in contact sports is a rare but serious consequence for its players. These injuries are most commonly associated with high-impact collisions, for example in football, but are found in a wide variety of sports. In an attempt to minimize these injuries, sports are trying to increase safety by adding protection for participants. Most recently is the seemingly 'safe' sport of Bubble Soccer, which attempts to protect its players with inflatable plastic bubbles. We report a case of a 16-year-old male sustaining a cervical spine burst fracture with incomplete spinal cord injury while playing Bubble Soccer. To our knowledge, this is the first serious neurological injury reported in the sport.

  6. From rational bubbles to crashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sornette, D.; Malevergne, Y.

    2001-10-01

    We study and generalize in various ways the model of rational expectation (RE) bubbles introduced by Blanchard and Watson in the economic literature. Bubbles are argued to be the equivalent of Goldstone modes of the fundamental rational pricing equation, associated with the symmetry-breaking introduced by non-vanishing dividends. Generalizing bubbles in terms of multiplicative stochastic maps, we summarize the result of Lux and Sornette that the no-arbitrage condition imposes that the tail of the return distribution is hyperbolic with an exponent μ<1. We then outline the main results of Malevergne and Sornette, who extend the RE bubble model to arbitrary dimensions d: a number d of market time series are made linearly interdependent via d× d stochastic coupling coefficients. We derive the no-arbitrage condition in this context and, with the renewal theory for products of random matrices applied to stochastic recurrence equations, we extend the theorem of Lux and Sornette to demonstrate that the tails of the unconditional distributions associated with such d-dimensional bubble processes follow power laws, with the same asymptotic tail exponent μ<1 for all assets. The distribution of price differences and of returns is dominated by the same power-law over an extended range of large returns. Although power-law tails are a pervasive feature of empirical data, the numerical value μ<1 is in disagreement with the usual empirical estimates μ≈3. We then discuss two extensions (the crash hazard rate model and the non-stationary growth rate model) of the RE bubble model that provide two ways of reconciliation with the stylized facts of financial data.

  7. Microfluidic photonic integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Sung Hwan; Godin, Jessica; Chen, Chun Hao; Tsai, Frank S.; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2008-11-01

    We report on the development of an inexpensive, portable lab-on-a-chip flow cytometer system in which microfluidics, photonics, and acoustics are integrated together to work synergistically. The system relies on fluid-filled twodimensional on-chip photonic components such as lenses, apertures, and slab waveguides to allow for illumination laser beam shaping, light scattering and fluorescence signal detection. Both scattered and fluorescent lights are detected by photodetectors after being collected and guided by the on-chip optics components (e.g. lenses and waveguides). The detected light signal is imported and amplified in real time and triggers the piezoelectric actuator so that the targeted samples are directed into desired reservoir for subsequent advanced analysis. The real-time, closed-loop control system is developed with field-programmable-gate-array (FPGA) implementation. The system enables high-throughput (1- 10kHz operation), high reliability and low-powered (<1mW) fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) on a chip. The microfabricated flow cytometer can potentially be used as a portable, inexpensive point-of-care device in resource poor environments.

  8. Vibration Induced Microfluidic Atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Leslie; Qi, Aisha; Friend, James

    2008-11-01

    We demonstrate rapid generation of micron aerosol droplets in a microfluidic device in which a fluid drop is exposed to surface vibration as it sits atop a piezoelectric substrate. Little, however, is understood about the processes by which these droplets form due to the complex hydrodynamic processes that occur across widely varying length and time scales. Through experiments, scaling theory and numerical modelling, we elucidate the interfacial destabilization mechanisms that lead to droplet formation. Droplets form due to the axisymmetric break-up of cylindrical liquid jets ejected as a consequence of interfacial destabilization. Their 10 μm size correlates with the jet radius and the instability wavelength, both determined from a viscous-capillary dominant force balance and confirmed through a numerical solution. With the exception of drops that spread into thin films with thicknesses on the order of the boundary layer dimension, the free surface is always observed to vibrate at the capillary-viscous resonance frequency despite the surface vibration frequency being several orders larger. This is contrary to common assumptions used in deriving subharmonic models resulting in a Mathieu equation, which has commonly led to spurious predictions in the droplet size.

  9. Microfluidic Compartmentalized Directed Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Paegel, Brian M.; Joyce, Gerald F.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Directed evolution studies often make use of water-in-oil compartments, which conventionally are prepared by bulk emulsification, a crude process that generates non-uniform droplets and can damage biochemical reagents. A microfluidic emulsification circuit was devised that generates uniform water-in-oil droplets (21.9 ± 0.8 μm radius) with high throughput (107–108 droplets per hour). The circuit contains a radial array of aqueous flow nozzles that intersect a surrounding oil flow channel. This device was used to evolve RNA enzymes with RNA ligase activity, selecting enzymes that could resist inhibition by neomycin. Each molecule in the population had the opportunity to undergo 108-fold selective amplification within its respective compartment. Then the progeny RNAs were harvested and used to seed new compartments. During five rounds of this procedure, the enzymes acquired mutations that conferred resistance to neomycin and caused some enzymes to become dependent on neomycin for optimal activity. PMID:20659684

  10. Microfluidic stretchable RF electronics.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shi; Wu, Zhigang

    2010-12-07

    Stretchable electronics is a revolutionary technology that will potentially create a world of radically different electronic devices and systems that open up an entirely new spectrum of possibilities. This article proposes a microfluidic based solution for stretchable radio frequency (RF) electronics, using hybrid integration of active circuits assembled on flex foils and liquid alloy passive structures embedded in elastic substrates, e.g. polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). This concept was employed to implement a 900 MHz stretchable RF radiation sensor, consisting of a large area elastic antenna and a cluster of conventional rigid components for RF power detection. The integrated radiation sensor except the power supply was fully embedded in a thin elastomeric substrate. Good electrical performance of the standalone stretchable antenna as well as the RF power detection sub-module was verified by experiments. The sensor successfully detected the RF radiation over 5 m distance in the system demonstration. Experiments on two-dimensional (2D) stretching up to 15%, folding and twisting of the demonstrated sensor were also carried out. Despite the integrated device was severely deformed, no failure in RF radiation sensing was observed in the tests. This technique illuminates a promising route of realizing stretchable and foldable large area integrated RF electronics that are of great interest to a variety of applications like wearable computing, health monitoring, medical diagnostics, and curvilinear electronics.

  11. Microfluidic reflow pumps.

    PubMed

    Haslam, Bryan; Tsai, Long-Fang; Anderson, Ryan R; Kim, Seunghyun; Hu, Weisheng; Nordin, Gregory P

    2015-07-01

    A new microfluidic pump, termed a reflow pump, is designed to operate with a sub-μl sample volume and transport it back and forth between two pneumatically actuated reservoirs through a flow channel typically containing one or more sensor surfaces. The ultimate motivation is to efficiently use the small sample volume in conjunction with convection to maximize analyte flux to the sensor surface(s) in order to minimize sensor response time. In this paper, we focus on the operational properties of the pumps themselves (rather than the sensor surfaces), and demonstrate both two-layer and three-layer polydimethylsiloxane reflow pumps. For the three-layer pump, we examine the effects of reservoir actuation pressure and actuation period, and demonstrate average volumetric flow rates as high as 500 μl/min. We also show that the two-layer design can pump up to 93% of the sample volume during each half period and demonstrate integration of a reflow pump with a single-chip microcantilever array to measure maximum flow rate.

  12. Removal of hydrogen bubbles from nuclear reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, R. V.

    1980-01-01

    Method proposed for removing large hydrogen bubbles from nuclear environment uses, in its simplest form, hollow spheres of palladium or platinum. Methods would result in hydrogen bubble being reduced in size without letting more radioactivity outside reactor.

  13. Electric field observations of equatorial bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggson, T. L.; Maynard, N. C.; Hanson, W. B.; Saba, Jack L.

    1992-03-01

    Results from the double floating probe experiment performed on the San Marco D satellite are presented, with emphasis on the observation of large incremental changes in the convective electric field vector at the boundary of equatorial plasma bubbles. Attention is given to isolated bubble structures in the upper ionospheric F regions; these observed bubble encounters are divided into two types - type I (live bubbles) and type II (dead bubbles). Type I bubbles show varying degrees of plasma depletion and large upward velocities range up to 1000 km/s. The geometry of these bubbles is such that the spacecraft orbit may cut them where they are tilting either eastward or (more often) westward. Type II bubbles exhibit plasma density depletion but no appreciable upward convection. Both types of events are usually surrounded by a halo of plasma turbulence, which can extend considerably beyond the region of plasma depletion.

  14. Unorthodox bubbles when boiling in cold water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Scott; Granick, Steve

    2014-01-01

    High-speed movies are taken when bubbles grow at gold surfaces heated spotwise with a near-infrared laser beam heating water below the boiling point (60-70 °C) with heating powers spanning the range from very low to so high that water fails to rewet the surface after bubbles detach. Roughly half the bubbles are conventional: They grow symmetrically through evaporation until buoyancy lifts them away. Others have unorthodox shapes and appear to contribute disproportionately to heat transfer efficiency: mushroom cloud shapes, violently explosive bubbles, and cavitation events, probably stimulated by a combination of superheating, convection, turbulence, and surface dewetting during the initial bubble growth. Moreover, bubbles often follow one another in complex sequences, often beginning with an unorthodox bubble that stirs the water, followed by several conventional bubbles. This large dataset is analyzed and discussed with emphasis on how explosive phenomena such as cavitation induce discrepancies from classical expectations about boiling.

  15. Soap Bubbles on a Cold Day.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waiveris, Charles

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the effects of blowing bubbles in extremely cold weather. Describes the freezing conditions of the bubbles and some physical properties. Suggests using the activity with all ages of students. (MVL)

  16. Electric field observations of equatorial bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggson, T. L.; Maynard, N. C.; Hanson, W. B.; Saba, Jack L.

    1992-01-01

    Results from the double floating probe experiment performed on the San Marco D satellite are presented, with emphasis on the observation of large incremental changes in the convective electric field vector at the boundary of equatorial plasma bubbles. Attention is given to isolated bubble structures in the upper ionospheric F regions; these observed bubble encounters are divided into two types - type I (live bubbles) and type II (dead bubbles). Type I bubbles show varying degrees of plasma depletion and large upward velocities range up to 1000 km/s. The geometry of these bubbles is such that the spacecraft orbit may cut them where they are tilting either eastward or (more often) westward. Type II bubbles exhibit plasma density depletion but no appreciable upward convection. Both types of events are usually surrounded by a halo of plasma turbulence, which can extend considerably beyond the region of plasma depletion.

  17. Unorthodox bubbles when boiling in cold water.

    PubMed

    Parker, Scott; Granick, Steve

    2014-01-01

    High-speed movies are taken when bubbles grow at gold surfaces heated spotwise with a near-infrared laser beam heating water below the boiling point (60-70 °C) with heating powers spanning the range from very low to so high that water fails to rewet the surface after bubbles detach. Roughly half the bubbles are conventional: They grow symmetrically through evaporation until buoyancy lifts them away. Others have unorthodox shapes and appear to contribute disproportionately to heat transfer efficiency: mushroom cloud shapes, violently explosive bubbles, and cavitation events, probably stimulated by a combination of superheating, convection, turbulence, and surface dewetting during the initial bubble growth. Moreover, bubbles often follow one another in complex sequences, often beginning with an unorthodox bubble that stirs the water, followed by several conventional bubbles. This large dataset is analyzed and discussed with emphasis on how explosive phenomena such as cavitation induce discrepancies from classical expectations about boiling.

  18. Behavior of Rapidly Sheared Bubble Suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sangani, A. S.; Kushch, V. I.; Hoffmann, M.; Nahra, H.; Koch, D. L.; Tsang, Y.

    2002-01-01

    An experiment to be carried out aboard the International Space Station is described. A suspension consisting of millimeter-sized bubbles in water containing some dissolved salt, which prevents bubbles from coalescing, will be sheared in a Couette cylindrical cell. Rotation of the outer cylinder will produce centrifugal force which will tend to accumulate the bubbles near the inner wall. The shearing will enhance collisions among bubbles creating thereby bubble phase pressure that will resist the tendency of the bubbles to accumulate near the inner wall. The bubble volume fraction and velocity profiles will be measured and compared with the theoretical predictions. Ground-based research on measurement of bubble phase properties and flow in vertical channel are described.

  19. Bubble memory module for spacecraft application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, P. J.; Looney, K. T.; Nichols, C. D.

    1985-01-01

    Bubble domain technology offers an all-solid-state alternative for data storage in onboard data systems. A versatile modular bubble memory concept was developed. The key module is the bubble memory module which contains all of the storage devices and circuitry for accessing these devices. This report documents the bubble memory module design and preliminary hardware designs aimed at memory module functional demonstration with available commercial bubble devices. The system architecture provides simultaneous operation of bubble devices to attain high data rates. Banks of bubble devices are accessed by a given bubble controller to minimize controller parts. A power strobing technique is discussed which could minimize the average system power dissipation. A fast initialization method using EEPROM (electrically erasable, programmable read-only memory) devices promotes fast access. Noise and crosstalk problems and implementations to minimize these are discussed. Flight memory systems which incorporate the concepts and techniques of this work could now be developed for applications.

  20. Micro vapor bubble jet flow for safe and high-rate fluorescence-activated cell sorting.

    PubMed

    de Wijs, Koen; Liu, Chengxun; Dusa, Alexandra; Vercruysse, Dries; Majeed, Bivragh; Tezcan, Deniz Sabuncuoglu; Blaszkiewicz, Kamil; Loo, Josine; Lagae, Liesbet

    2017-03-29

    Safe, high-rate and cost-effective cell sorting is important for clinical cell isolation. However, commercial fluorescence-activated cell sorters (FACS) are expensive and prone to aerosol-induced sample contamination. Here we report a microfluidic cell sorter allowing high rate and fully enclosed cell sorting. The sorter chip consists of an array of micro heating hotspots. Pulsed resistive heating in the hotspots produces numerous micro vapor bubbles with short duration, which gives rise to a rapid jet flow for cell sorting. With this method, we demonstrated high sorting rate comparable to commercial FACS and the significant enrichment of rare cancer cells. This vapor bubble based cell sorting method can be a powerful tool for contamination-free and affordable clinical cell sorting such as circulating tumor cell isolation and cancer cell therapy.

  1. Scaling regimes of thermocapillarity-driven dynamics of confined long bubbles: Effects of disjoining pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhury, Kaustav; Chakraborty, Suman

    2015-03-01

    During thermocapillary transport of a confined long bubble, we unveil the existence of a contrary-to-the-conventional disjoining-pressure-dominant scaling regime characterizing the dynamics of the thin liquid film engulfed between the bubble interface and the channel surface. Such a regime is realized for the limitingly small magnitude of the Marangoni stress (surface tension gradient) when the separating liquid region reaches an ultrathin dimension. Over this regime, we witness a severe breakdown of the seemingly intuitive scaling arguments based on the balance of viscous and capillary forces. Starting from competent balance criteria, we uncover the characteristic length scales involved, leading towards obtaining the new consistent scaling laws of the disjoining-pressure-dominant regime, in a simple closed form analytical fashion. Our scaling estimations are substantiated by full-scale numerical simulations of the pertinent thin-film equations. These new scaling laws appear to be convenient for implementing as a fundamental design basis for multiphase microfluidic systems.

  2. Enhancing defect tolerance in periodic post microfluidic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Glenn H.; Gray, Bonnie L.

    2016-03-01

    Biomedical sensors using microfluidic channels are prone to blockage due to particles and bubbles in the fluid. Wider channels may be used, but wide polymer channels may suffer from structural instability (e.g., sagging channel covers). A common design uses many parallel flow channels separated by structural support walls, but these can be rapidly blocked by particulates. We have been studying an alternative "Cathedral Chamber" design where the channel "roof" (cover) is support by periodic posts which creates many possible flow paths to bypass blockages. We use Monte Carlo modelling with iterative COMSOL fluid dynamics simulations to establish the stream lines, and particle velocities. Then a rules based methodology iteratively places trapped particles based on the fluid paths created by the existing blockages, until the system become fully blocked. Previous work has shown that the periodic post design increases lifetime by allowing 6 to 7 times more blockages than can a parallel channel design. In this paper, we simulate and analyze why expanding the number of channels increases almost linearly the number of particles required for blockages. Lifetime increase is still 4.5-5.5 times even for the limiting case of a 2 channel cathedral chamber. This shows the sideways flow created by the periodic posts creates many advantages for the microfluidic chambers.

  3. Single vegetal cell handling and fixing in a microfluidic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denoual, Matthieu J.; Koh, Aoki; Mita-Tixier, Agnes; Fujita, Hiroyuki

    2003-04-01

    The basic advantage of the microfluidic systems is that they enable reducing consumption of biological material and chemicals. But another major advantage of the microfluidic systems, not widely explored so far, is that with feature sizes reduced toward the size of cells, one can easily handle and fix a single cell. The interest of single cell handling and fixing appears when one wants to study biochemical exchanges between single cells or internal biochemical reactions inside an isolated cell. This work uses the shape of the microfluidc device to control the migration and placement of single vegetal cells. Three-dimensional micro-molding and poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) patterning techniques have been used to realize device prototypes. Double-height micro-molds are made of thick negative photoresist (SU8) Experiments have been undergone to optimize fluid rate flow and cell concentration regarding to right cell placement percentage. The PDMS prototypes systems confirm the good operation of the design to migrate cells, place and fix them. The placement rate, even if it is enough for statistical biochemical experiments, will be improved by the use of new material. New material will allow to get rid of air bubbles due to PDMS long-term hydrophobicity that render up to 25% settlement places unserviceable.

  4. Microfluidic manufacture of rt-PA-loaded echogenic liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Kandadai, Madhuvanthi A.; Mukherjee, Prithviraj; Shekhar, Himanshu; Shaw, George J.; Papautsky, Ian; Holland, Christy K.

    2016-01-01

    Echogenic liposomes (ELIP), loaded with recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA) and microbubbles that act as cavitation nuclei, are under development for ultrasound-mediated thrombolysis. Conventional manufacturing techniques produce a polydisperse rt-PA-loaded ELIP population with only a small percentage of particles containing microbubbles. Further, a polydisperse population of rt-PA-loaded ELIP has a broadband frequency response with complex bubble dynamics when exposed to pulsed ultrasound. In this work, a microfluidic flow-focusing device was used to generate monodisperse rt-PA-loaded ELIP (µtELIP) loaded with a perfluorocarbon gas. The rt-PA associated with the µtELIP was encapsulated within the lipid shell as well as intercalated within the lipid shell. The µtELIP had a mean diameter of 5 µm, a resonance frequency of 2.2 MHz, and were found to be stable for at least 30 min in 0.5%bovine serum albumin. Additionally, 35 % of µtELIP particles were estimated to contain microbubbles, an order of magnitude higher than that reported previously for batch-produced rt-PA-loaded ELIP. These findings emphasize the advantages offered by microfluidic techniques for improving the encapsulation efficiency of both rt-PA and perflurocarbon microbubbles within echogenic liposomes. PMID:27206512

  5. Imaging Liquids Using Microfluidic Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Xiao-Ying; Liu, Bingwen; Yang, Li

    2013-05-10

    Chemistry occurring in the liquid and liquid surface is important in many applications. Chemical imaging of liquids using vacuum based analytical techniques is challenging due to the difficulty in working with liquids with high volatility. Recent development in microfluidics enabled and increased our capabilities to study liquid in situ using surface sensitive techniques such as electron microscopy and spectroscopy. Due to its small size, low cost, and flexibility in design, liquid cells based on microfluidics have been increasingly used in studying and imaging complex phenomena involving liquids. This paper presents a review of microfluidic cells that were developed to adapt to electron microscopes and various spectrometers for in situ chemical analysis and imaging of liquids. The following topics will be covered including cell designs, fabrication techniques, unique technical features for vacuum compatible cells, and imaging with electron microscopy and spectroscopy. Challenges are summarized and recommendations for future development priority are proposed.

  6. Designing Colloidal Molecules with Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Bingqing; Ricouvier, Joshua; Malloggi, Florent

    2016-01-01

    The creation of new colloidal materials involves the design of functional building blocks. Here, a microfluidic method for designing building blocks one by one, at high throughput, with a broad range of shapes is introduced. The method exploits a coupling between hydrodynamic interactions and depletion forces that controls the configurational dynamics of droplet clusters traveling in microfluidic channels. Droplet clusters can be solidified in situ with UV. By varying the flow parameters, clusters are prescribed a given size, geometry, chemical and/or magnetic heterogeneities enabling local bonding. Compact structures (chains, triangles, diamonds, tetrahedrons,...) and noncompact structures, such as crosses and T, difficult to obtain with current techniques are produced. Size dispersions are small (2%) and throughputs are high (30 000 h−1). The work opens a new pathway, based on microfluidics, for designing colloidal building blocks with a potential to enable the creation of new materials. PMID:27840804

  7. Microfluidic tools toward industrial biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Aline F; Pessoa, Amanda C S N; Bastos, Reinaldo G; de la Torre, Lucimara G

    2016-11-01

    Microfluidics is a technology that operates with small amounts of fluids and makes possible the investigation of cells, enzymes, and biomolecules and encapsulation of biocatalysts in a greater variety of conditions than permitted using conventional methods. This review discusses technological possibilities that can be applied in the field of industrial biotechnology, presenting the principal definitions and fundamental aspects of microfluidic parameters to better understand advanced approaches. Specifically, concentration gradient generators, droplet-based microfluidics, and microbioreactors are explored as useful tools that can contribute to industrial biotechnology. These tools present potential applications, inclusive as commercial platforms to optimizing in bioprocesses development as screening cells, encapsulating biocatalysts, and determining critical kinetic parameters. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:1372-1389, 2016.

  8. Magma mixing enhanced by bubble segregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesmaier, S.; Daniele, M.; Renggli, C.; Perugini, D.; De Campos, C.; Hess, K. U.; Ertel-Ingrisch, W.; Lavallée, Y.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2014-12-01

    Rising bubbles may significantly affect magma mixing paths as has been demonstrated by analogue experiments in the past. Here, bubble-advection experiments are performed for the first time employing natural materials at magmatic temperatures. Cylinders of basaltic glass were placed below cylinders of rhyolite glass. Upon melting, interstitial air formed bubbles that rose into the rhyolite melt, thereby entraining tails of basaltic liquid. The formation of plume-like filaments of advected basalt within the rhyolite was characterized by microCT and subsequent high-resolution EMP analyses. Melt entrainment by bubble ascent appears as efficient mechanism to mingle contrasting melt compositions. MicroCT imaging shows bubbles trailing each other and trails of multiple bubbles having converged. Rheological modelling of the filaments yields viscosities of up to 2 orders of magnitude lower than for the surrounding rhyolitic liquid. Such a viscosity contrast implies that subsequent bubbles rising are likely to follow the same pathways that previously ascending bubbles have generated. Filaments formed by multiple bubbles would thus experience episodic replenishment with mafic material. Fundamental implications for the concept of bubble advection in magma mixing are thus a) an acceleration of mixing because of decreased viscous resistance for bubbles inside filaments and b) non-conventional diffusion systematics because of intermittent supply of mafic material (instead of a single pulse) inside a filament. Inside these filaments, the mafic material was variably hybridised to andesitic through rhyolitic composition. Compositional profiles alone are ambiguous, however, to determine whether single or multiple bubbles were involved during formation of a filament. Statistical analysis, employing concentration variance as measure of homogenisation, demonstrates that also filaments appearing as single-bubble filaments are likely to have experienced multiple bubbles passing through

  9. Building functional materials for health care and pharmacy from microfluidic principles and Flow Focusing.

    PubMed

    Gañán-Calvo, A M; Montanero, J M; Martín-Banderas, L; Flores-Mosquera, M

    2013-11-01

    In this review, we aim at establishing a relationship between the fundamentals of the microfluidics technologies used in the Pharmacy field, and the achievements accomplished by those technologies. We describe the main methods for manufacturing micrometer drops, bubbles, and capsules, as well as the corresponding underlying physical mechanisms. In this regard, the review is intended to show non-specialist readers the dynamical processes which determine the success of microfluidics techniques. Flow focusing (FF) is a droplet-based method widely used to produce different types of fluid entities on a continuous basis by applying an extensional co-flow. We take this technique as an example to illustrate how microfluidics technologies for drug delivery are progressing from a deep understanding of the physics of fluids involved. Specifically, we describe the limitations of FF, and review novel methods which enhance its stability and robustness. In the last part of this paper, we review some of the accomplishments of microfluidics when it comes to drug manufacturing and delivery. Special attention is paid to the production of the microencapsulated form because this fluidic structure gathers the main functionalities sought for in Pharmacy. We also show how FF has been adapted to satisfy an ample variety of pharmaceutical requirements to date.

  10. Rapid prototyping of glass microfluidic chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotz, Frederik; Plewa, Klaus; Bauer, Werner; Hanemann, Thomas; Waldbaur, Ansgar; Wilhelm, Elisabeth; Neumann, Christiane; Rapp, Bastian E.

    2015-03-01

    In academia the rapid and flexible creation of microfluidic chips is of great importance for microfluidic research. Besides polymers glass is a very important material especially when high chemical and temperature resistance are required. However, glass structuring is a very hazardous process which is not accessible to most members of the microfluidic community. We therefore sought a new method for the rapid and simple creation of transparent microfluidic glass chips by structuring and sintering amorphous silica suspensions. The whole process from a digital mask layout to a microstructured glass sheet can be done within two days. In this paper we show the applicability of this process to fabricate capillary driven microfluidic systems.

  11. The study of effects of small perturbations on chaotic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Grebogi, C.; Yorke, J.A.

    1991-12-01

    This report discusses the following topics: controlling chaotic dynamical systems; embedding of experimental data; effect of noise on critical exponents of crises; transition to chaotic scattering; and distribution of floaters on a fluid surface. (LSP)

  12. A microfluidic two-pump system inspired by liquid feeding in mosquitoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Andrew; Goad, Angela; Stremler, Mark; Socha, John; Jung, Sunghwan

    Mosquitoes feed on nectar and blood using a two-pump system in the head-a smaller cibarial pump in line with a larger a pharyngeal pump, with a valve in between. To suck, mosquitoes transport the liquid (which may be a multi-component viscous fluid, blood) through a long micro-channel, the proboscis. In the engineering realm, microfluidic devices in biomedical applications, such as lab-on-a-chip technology, necessitate implementing a robust pump design to handle clogging and increase flow control compared to a single-pump system. In this talk, we introduce a microfluidic pump design inspired by the mosquito's two-pump system. The pumping performance (flow rate) in presence of impurities (air bubbles, soft clogs) is quantified as a function of phase difference and volume expansion of the pumps, and the elasticity of the valve.

  13. Ex Situ Integration of Multifunctional Porous Polymer Monoliths into Thermoplastic Microfluidic Chips

    PubMed Central

    Kendall, Eric L.; Wienhold, Erik; Rahmanian, Omid D.; DeVoe, Don L.

    2014-01-01

    A unique method for incorporating functional porous polymer monolith elements into thermoplastic microfluidic chips is described. Monolith elements are formed in a microfabricated mold, rather than within the microchannels, and chemically functionalized off chip before insertion into solvent-softened thermoplastic microchannels during chip assembly. Because monoliths may be trimmed prior to final placement, control of their size, shape, and uniformity is greatly improved over in-situ photopolymerization methods. A characteristic trapezoidal profile facilitates rapid insertion and enables complete mechanical anchoring of the monolith periphery, eliminating the need for chemical attachment to the microchannel walls. Off-chip processing allows the parallel preparation of monoliths of differing compositions and surface chemistries in large batches. Multifunctional flow-through arrays of multiple monolith elements are demonstrated using this approach through the creation of a fluorescent immunosensor with integrated controls, and a microfluidic bubble separator comprising a combination of integrated hydrophobic and hydrophilic monolith elements. PMID:25018587

  14. Microfluidic partition with in situ biofabricated semipermeable biopolymer membranes for static gradient generation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaolong; Vo, Thanh; Jambi, Fahad; Pham, Phu; Choy, John S

    2016-09-21

    We report an in situ biofabrication strategy that conveniently partitions microfluidic networks into physically separated while chemically communicating microchannels with semipermeable biopolymer membranes, which enable the facile generation of static gradients for biomedical applications. The biofabrication of parallel biopolymer membranes was initiated with the dissipation of trapped air bubbles in parallel apertures in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic devices, followed by tunable membrane growth with precise temporal and spatial control to the desired thickness. Static gradients were generated within minutes and well maintained over time by pure diffusion of molecules through the biofabricated semipermeable membranes. As an example application, the static gradient of alpha factor was generated to study the development of the "shmoo" morphology of yeast over time. The in situ biofabrication provides a simple approach to generate static gradients and an ideal platform for biological applications where flow-free static gradients are indispensable.

  15. A “twisted” microfluidic mixer suitable for a wide range of flow rate applications

    PubMed Central

    Sivashankar, Shilpa; Agambayev, Sumeyra; Mashraei, Yousof; Li, Er Qiang; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.; Salama, Khaled Nabil

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a new “twisted” 3D microfluidic mixer fabricated by a laser writing/microfabrication technique. Effective and efficient mixing using the twisted micromixers can be obtained by combining two general chaotic mixing mechanisms: splitting/recombining and chaotic advection. The lamination of mixer units provides the splitting and recombination mechanism when the quadrant of circles is arranged in a two-layered serial arrangement of mixing units. The overall 3D path of the microchannel introduces the advection. An experimental investigation using chemical solutions revealed that these novel 3D passive microfluidic mixers were stable and could be operated at a wide range of flow rates. This micromixer finds application in the manipulation of tiny volumes of liquids that are crucial in diagnostics. The mixing performance was evaluated by dye visualization, and using a pH test that determined the chemical reaction of the solutions. A comparison of the tornado-mixer with this twisted micromixer was made to evaluate the efficiency of mixing. The efficiency of mixing was calculated within the channel by acquiring intensities using ImageJ software. Results suggested that efficient mixing can be obtained when more than 3 units were consecutively placed. The geometry of the device, which has a length of 30 mm, enables the device to be integrated with micro total analysis systems and other lab-on-chip devices. PMID:27453767

  16. Frictional drag reduction by bubble injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murai, Yuichi

    2014-07-01

    The injection of gas bubbles into a turbulent boundary layer of a liquid phase has multiple different impacts on the original flow structure. Frictional drag reduction is a phenomenon resulting from their combined effects. This explains why a number of different void-drag reduction relationships have been reported to date, while early works pursued a simple universal mechanism. In the last 15 years, a series of precisely designed experimentations has led to the conclusion that the frictional drag reduction by bubble injection has multiple manifestations dependent on bubble size and flow speed. The phenomena are classified into several regimes of two-phase interaction mechanisms. Each regime has inherent physics of bubbly liquid, highlighted by keywords such as bubbly mixture rheology, the spectral response of bubbles in turbulence, buoyancy-dominated bubble behavior, and gas cavity breakup. Among the regimes, bubbles in some selected situations lose the drag reduction effect owing to extra momentum transfer promoted by their active motions. This separates engineers into two communities: those studying small bubbles for high-speed flow applications and those studying large bubbles for low-speed flow applications. This article reviews the roles of bubbles in drag reduction, which have been revealed from fundamental studies of simplified flow geometries and from development of measurement techniques that resolve the inner layer structure of bubble-mixed turbulent boundary layers.

  17. Fluid control in microfluidic devices using a fluid conveyance extension and an absorbent microfluidic flow modulator.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Po Ki

    2013-05-07

    This article presents a simple method for controlling fluid in microfluidic devices without the need for valves or pumps. A fluid conveyance extension is fluidly coupled to the enclosed outlet chamber of a microfluidic device. After a fluid is introduced into the microfluidic device and saturates the fluid conveyance extension, a fluid flow in the microfluidic device is generated by contacting an absorbent microfluidic flow modulator with the fluid conveyance extension to absorb the fluid from the fluid conveyance extension through capillary action. Since the fluid in the microfluidic device is fluidly coupled with the fluid conveyance extension and the fluid conveyance extension is fluidly coupled with the absorbent microfluidic flow modulator, the absorption rate of the absorbent microfluidic flow modulator, which is the rate at which the absorbent microfluidic flow modulator absorbs fluid, matches the fluid flow rate in the microfluidic device. Thus, the fluid flow rate in the microfluidic device is set by the absorption rate of the absorbent microfluidic flow modulator. Sheath flow and fluid switching applications are demonstrated using this simple fluid control method without the need for valves or pumps. Also, the ability to control the fluid flow rate in the microfluidic device is demonstrated using absorbent microfluidic flow modulators with various absorbent characteristics and dimensions.

  18. Microfluidic device for drug delivery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beebe, David J. (Inventor); MacDonald, Michael J. (Inventor); Eddington, David T. (Inventor); Mensing, Glennys A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A microfluidic device is provided for delivering a drug to an individual. The microfluidic device includes a body that defines a reservoir for receiving the drug therein. A valve interconnects the reservoir to an output needle that is insertable into the skin of an individual. A pressure source urges the drug from the reservoir toward the needle. The valve is movable between a closed position preventing the flow of the drug from the reservoir to the output needle and an open position allowing for the flow of the drug from the reservoir to the output needle in response to a predetermined condition in the physiological fluids of the individual.

  19. Microfluidic devices for droplet injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubrecht, Donald; Akartuna, Ilke; Weitz, David

    2012-02-01

    As picoliter-scale reaction vessels, microfluidic water-in-oil emulsions have found application for high-throughput, large-sample number analyses. Often, the biological or chemical system under investigation needs to be encapsulated into droplets to prevent cross contamination prior to the introduction of reaction reagents. Previous techniques of picoinjection or droplet synchronization and merging enable the addition of reagents to individual droplets, but present limitations on what can be added to each droplet. We present microfluidic devices that couple the strengths of picoinjection and droplet merging, allowing us to selectively add precise volume to our droplet reactions.

  20. a Multiple-Plaintexts Chaotic Cryptosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xing-Yuan; Tan, Yisong

    2013-10-01

    In recent years, a lot of chaotic cryptosystems have been proposed. However, most of these cryptosystems can encrypt only one plaintext in one encryption process. We call these cryptosystems single-plaintext-oriented cryptosystems. In this paper, the authors propose a new chaotic cryptosystem which can encrypt multiple plaintexts in one encryption process. The proposed cryptosystem is dedicated to encrypting multiple plaintexts in the situation of transmitting multiple secret files over public data communication network in one secure transmission. Experiments and theoretic analysis show that the proposed cryptosystem possesses high security and fast performance speed. They also show that the proposed cryptosystem is more secure than single-plaintext-oriented chaotic cryptosystems in this special situation.

  1. Maximizing the security of chaotic optical communications.

    PubMed

    Hou, T T; Yi, L L; Yang, X L; Ke, J X; Hu, Y; Yang, Q; Zhou, P; Hu, W S

    2016-10-03

    The practical application of chaotic optical communications has been limited by two aspects: the difficulty in concealing the time delay - a critical security parameter in feedback chaotic systems, and the difficulty of significantly enlarging the key space without complicating the implementation. Here we propose an architecture to break the above limits. By introducing a frequency-dependent group delay module with frequency tuning resolution of 1 MHz into the chaotic feedback loop, we demonstrate excellent time delay concealment effect, and an additional huge key space of 1048 can be achieved at the same time. The effectiveness is proved by both numerical simulation and experiment. Besides, the proposed scheme is compatible with the existing commercial optical communication systems, thus pave the way for high-speed secure optical communications.

  2. Desktop chaotic systems: Intuition and visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bright, Michelle M.; Melcher, Kevin J.; Qammar, Helen K.; Hartley, Tom T.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a dynamic study of the Wildwood Pendulum, a commercially available desktop system which exhibits a strange attractor. The purpose of studying this chaotic pendulum is twofold: to gain insight in the paradigmatic approach of modeling, simulating, and determining chaos in nonlinear systems; and to provide a desktop model of chaos as a visual tool. For this study, the nonlinear behavior of this chaotic pendulum is modeled, a computer simulation is performed, and an experimental performance is measured. An assessment of the pendulum in the phase plane shows the strange attractor. Through the use of a box-assisted correlation dimension methodology, the attractor dimension is determined for both the model and the experimental pendulum systems. Correlation dimension results indicate that the pendulum and the model are chaotic and their fractal dimensions are similar.

  3. Secure key distribution applications of chaotic lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ning; Xue, Chenpeng; Lv, Yunxin; Qiu, Kun

    2016-11-01

    Chaotic semiconductor laser is a good candidate for secure communication and high-speed true random bit generator, for its characteristics of broad bandwidth and prominent unpredictability. Based on the synchronization property and true random bit generation characteristic of chaotic semiconductor lasers, physical secure key distribution is available. In this work, we majorly show three key distribution schemes stemming from synchronized chaotic semiconductor lasers or chaos-based key exchange protocol. The numerical results demonstrate that the security of the chaos-synchronization-based key distribution scheme can be physically enhanced by adopting dynamic synchronization scheme or encrypted key generation, and that of key distribution with chaos-based key exchange protocol is dependent on the security of the exchange protocol and finally determined by the difficulty of regeneration the chaos system accurately.

  4. Controlled transitions between cupolets of chaotic systems

    PubMed Central

    Morena, Matthew A.; Short, Kevin M.; Cooke, Erica E.

    2014-01-01

    We present an efficient control scheme that stabilizes the unstable periodic orbits of a chaotic system. The resulting orbits are known as cupolets and collectively provide an important skeleton for the dynamical system. Cupolets exhibit the interesting property that a given sequence of controls will uniquely identify a cupolet, regardless of the system's initial state. This makes it possible to transition between cupolets, and thus unstable periodic orbits, simply by switching control sequences. We demonstrate that although these transitions require minimal controls, they may also involve significant chaotic transients unless carefully controlled. As a result, we present an effective technique that relies on Dijkstra's shortest path algorithm from algebraic graph theory to minimize the transients and also to induce certainty into the control of nonlinear systems, effectively providing an efficient algorithm for the steering and targeting of chaotic systems. PMID:24697373

  5. An investigation of chaotic Kolmogorov flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platt, N.; Sirovich, L.; Fitzmaurice, N.

    1990-01-01

    A two dimensional flow governed by the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with a steady spatially periodic forcing (known as the Kolmogorov flow) is numerically simulated. The behavior of the flow and its transition states as the Reynolds number (Re) varies is investigated in detail, as well as a number of the flow features. A sequence of bifurcations is shown to take place in the flow as Re varied. Two main regimes of the flow were observed: small and large scale structure regimes corresponding to different ranges of Re. Each of the regimes includes a number of quasiperiodic, chaotic, and relaminarization windows. In addition, each range contains a chaotic window with non-ergodic chaotic attractors. Spatially disordered, but temporally steady states were discovered in large scale structure regime. Features of the diverse cases are displayed in terms of the temporal power spectrum, Poincare sections and, where possible, Lyapunov exponents and Kaplan-Yorke dimension.

  6. Controlled transitions between cupolets of chaotic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Morena, Matthew A. Short, Kevin M.; Cooke, Erica E.

    2014-03-15

    We present an efficient control scheme that stabilizes the unstable periodic orbits of a chaotic system. The resulting orbits are known as cupolets and collectively provide an important skeleton for the dynamical system. Cupolets exhibit the interesting property that a given sequence of controls will uniquely identify a cupolet, regardless of the system's initial state. This makes it possible to transition between cupolets, and thus unstable periodic orbits, simply by switching control sequences. We demonstrate that although these transitions require minimal controls, they may also involve significant chaotic transients unless carefully controlled. As a result, we present an effective technique that relies on Dijkstra's shortest path algorithm from algebraic graph theory to minimize the transients and also to induce certainty into the control of nonlinear systems, effectively providing an efficient algorithm for the steering and targeting of chaotic systems.

  7. Is it healthy to be chaotic?

    PubMed

    Otero-Siliceo, E; Arriada-Mendicoa, N

    2003-02-01

    The concept of Chaos has proven to be one of the greatest scientific advances that have led to radical philosophical implications. It deals with dynamic systems whose determining factors are completely unknown to us. Sometimes it seems that these dynamic systems exhibit a stochastic behavior while others portray simpler or better known behaviors where determinism is obvious. When the physician faces chaotic, dynamic systems, he or she wonders if it is healthy for these biologic systems to be chaotic. When analyzing the variation in brain and heart rates mathematically, the conclusion is that these rates are chaotic, complicated and unpredictable. Because each organ regulates its own performance, the mathematical variations seem to be the result of the organ's determinism rather than fluctuation. This healthy variability is neither a random nor an uncontrolled fluctuation. It is a certain, well-harmonized chaos, that 'provides the body with the flexibility to respond to different stimuli'.

  8. Experimental synchronization of single-transistor-based chaotic circuits.

    PubMed

    Fortuna, Luigi; Frasca, Mattia

    2007-12-01

    This work deals with nonautonomous chaotic circuits and, in particular, with the experimental characterization of the synchronization properties of two simple nonautonomous circuits. Two single-transistor chaotic circuits, which are among the simplest chaotic oscillators, are investigated. We studied synchronization of these circuits and found that the most appropriate technique to synchronize two single-transistor chaotic circuits is that based on the design of an inverse circuit.

  9. Multiple watermarking algorithm based on chaotic sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Zhen; Xiao, Weiwei; Zhang, Jihong

    2003-01-01

    Multiple digital watermarking technique can resolve the problems of multiple copyright claim and keep the traces of digital products in the different phase of publishing, selling and using. In this paper, a multiple digital watermarking algorithm based on chaotic sequences is proposed. The chaotic sequences have the advantages of massive, high security, and weakest correlation. The massive and independent digital watermark signals are generated through 1-D chaotic maps, which are determined by different initial conditions and parameters. The chaotic digital watermark signals effectively resolve the construction of massive watermarks with good performance. The capacity of the multiple watermarking is also analyzed in this paper. The length of the watermark can be selected adaptively according to the number of the watermarks. Multiple digital watermarking algorithm is more complex than the single watermarking algorithm in the embedding method. The principal problem is how to ensure that the late-coming watermark will not damage the embedded watermarks. Each watermark is added to the middle frequency coefficients of wavelet domain randomly by exploiting 2-D chaotic system, so the embedding and extracting of each watermark does not disturbed each other. Thinking of the parameters of 2-D chaotic system as the key to embedding procedure can prevent the watermarks to be removed malevolently, therefore the performance of security is better. The embedding algorithm based on noise analysis and wavelet transform is also exploited in this paper. To meet the transparence and robustness of the watermark, the watermark strength is adapted to the noise strength within the tolerance of wavelet coefficients. The experimental results demonstrate that this proposed algorithm is robust to many common attacks and the performance can satisfy the requirements in the application.

  10. LRL 25-inch Bubble Chamber

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Alvarez, L. W.; Gow, J. D.; Barrera, F.; Eckman, G.; Shand, J.; Watt, R.; Norgren, D.; Hernandez, H. P.

    1964-07-08

    The recently completed 25-inch hydrogen bubble chamber combines excellent picture quality with a fast operating cycle. The chamber has a unique optical system and is designed to take several pictures each Bevatron pulse, in conjunction with the Bevatron rapid beam ejection system.

  11. Ice bubbles confirm big chill

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, R.A.

    1996-06-14

    Clues buried in Greenland`s icesheet indicate that during the last ice age, the climate repeatedly warmed sharply, only to slide into a renewed chill lasting thousands of years. New indicators derived from trapped bubbles of ancient gases, nitrogen and methane, indicate that these were indeed catastrophic events. This article describes the research and adjunct issues.

  12. Bubble-driven inertial micropump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torniainen, Erik D.; Govyadinov, Alexander N.; Markel, David P.; Kornilovitch, Pavel E.

    2012-12-01

    The fundamental action of the bubble-driven inertial micropump is investigated. The pump has no moving parts and consists of a thermal resistor placed asymmetrically within a straight channel connecting two reservoirs. Using numerical simulations, the net flow is studied as a function of channel geometry, resistor location, vapor bubble strength, fluid viscosity, and surface tension. Two major regimes of behavior are identified: axial and non-axial. In the axial regime, the drive bubble either remains inside the channel, or continues to grow axially when it reaches the reservoir. In the non-axial regime, the bubble grows out of the channel and in all three dimensions while inside the reservoir. The net flow in the axial regime is parabolic with respect to the hydraulic diameter of the channel cross-section, but in the non-axial regime it is not. From numerical modeling, it is determined that the net flow is maximal when the axial regime crosses over to the non-axial regime. To elucidate the basic physical principles of the pump, a phenomenological one-dimensional model is developed and solved. A linear array of micropumps has been built using silicon-SU8 fabrication technology that is used to manufacture thermal inkjet printheads. Semi-continuous pumping across a 2 mm-wide channel has been demonstrated experimentally. Measured net flow with respect to viscosity variation is in excellent agreement with simulation results.

  13. Bursting the Taylor cone bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Zhao; Truscott, Tadd

    2014-11-01

    A soap bubble fixed on a surface and placed in an electric field will take on the shape of a cone rather than constant curvature (dome) when the electrical field is not present. The phenomenon was introduced by J. Zeleny (1917) and studied extensively by C.T. Wilson & G.I. Taylor (1925). We revisit the Taylor cone problem by studying the deformation and bursting of soap bubbles in a point charge electric field. A single bubble takes on the shape of a cone in the electric field and a high-speed camera equipped with a micro-lens is used to observe the unsteady dynamics at the tip. Rupture occurs as a very small piece of the tip is torn away from the bubble toward the point charge. Based on experiments, a theoretical model is developed that predicts when rupture should occur. This study may help in the design of foam-removal techniques in engineering and provide a better understanding of an electrified air-liquid interface.

  14. Models of cylindrical bubble pulsation

    PubMed Central

    Ilinskii, Yurii A.; Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A.; Hay, Todd A.; Hamilton, Mark F.

    2012-01-01

    Three models are considered for describing the dynamics of a pulsating cylindrical bubble. A linear solution is derived for a cylindrical bubble in an infinite compressible liquid. The solution accounts for losses due to viscosity, heat conduction, and acoustic radiation. It reveals that radiation is the dominant loss mechanism, and that it is 22 times greater than for a spherical bubble of the same radius. The predicted resonance frequency provides a basis of comparison for limiting forms of other models. The second model considered is a commonly used equation in Rayleigh-Plesset form that requires an incompressible liquid to be finite in extent in order for bubble pulsation to occur. The radial extent of the liquid becomes a fitting parameter, and it is found that considerably different values of the parameter are required for modeling inertial motion versus acoustical oscillations. The third model was developed by V. K. Kedrinskii [Hydrodynamics of Explosion (Springer, New York, 2005), pp. 23–26] in the form of the Gilmore equation for compressible liquids of infinite extent. While the correct resonance frequency and loss factor are not recovered from this model in the linear approximation, it provides reasonable agreement with observations of inertial motion. PMID:22978863

  15. Impurity bubbles in a BEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmermans, Eddy; Blinova, Alina; Boshier, Malcolm

    2013-05-01

    Polarons (particles that interact with the self-consistent deformation of the host medium that contains them) self-localize when strongly coupled. Dilute Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) doped with neutral distinguishable atoms (impurities) and armed with a Feshbach-tuned impurity-boson interaction provide a unique laboratory to study self-localized polarons. In nature, self-localized polarons come in two flavors that exhibit qualitatively different behavior: In lattice systems, the deformation is slight and the particle is accompanied by a cloud of collective excitations as in the case of the Landau-Pekar polarons of electrons in a dielectric lattice. In natural fluids and gases, the strongly coupled particle radically alters the medium, e.g. by expelling the host medium as in the case of the electron bubbles in superfluid helium. We show that BEC-impurities can self-localize in a bubble, as well as in a Landau-Pekar polaron state. The BEC-impurity system is fully characterized by only two dimensionless coupling constants. In the corresponding phase diagram the bubble and Landau-Pekar polaron limits correspond to large islands separated by a cross-over region. The same BEC-impurity species can be adiabatically Feshbach steered from the Landau-Pekar to the bubble regime. This work was funded by the Los Alamos LDRD program.

  16. Affirmative Discrimination and the Bubble

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clegg, Roger

    2011-01-01

    In this essay, the author discusses how affirmative action contributed to an unnatural rise in enrollments in college. In considering the higher education bubble, he makes the case that as the opposition to preferences continues to build, the momentum of this trend will only increase as funding shrinks. He offers some tentative answers to a series…

  17. "Financial Bubbles" and Monetary Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tikhonov, Yuriy A.; Pudovkina, Olga E.; Permjakova, Juliana V.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of this research is caused by the need of strengthening a role of monetary regulators to prevent financial bubbles in the financial markets. The aim of the article is the analysis of a problem of crisis phenomena in the markets of financial assets owing to an inadequate growth of their cost, owing to subjective reasons. The leading…

  18. Neutron Detection via Bubble Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, David V.; Ely, James H.; Peurrung, Anthony J.; Bond, Leonard J.; Collar, J. I.; Flake, Matthew; Knopf, Michael A.; Pitts, W. K.; Shaver, Mark W.; Sonnenschein, Andrew; Smart, John E.; Todd, Lindsay C.

    2005-10-06

    The results of a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) exploratory research project investigating the feasibility of fast neutron detection using a suitably prepared and operated, pressure-cycled bubble chamber are described. The research was conducted along two parallel paths. Experiments with a slow pressure-release Halon chamber at the Enrico Fermi Institute at the University of Chicago showed clear bubble nucleation sensitivity to an AmBe neutron source and insensitivity to the 662 keV gammas from a 137Cs source. Bubble formation was documented via high-speed (1000 frames/sec) photography, and the acoustic signature of bubble formation was detected using a piezo-electric transducer element mounted on the base of the chamber. The chamber’s neutron sensitivity as a function of working fluid temperature was mapped out. The second research path consisted of the design, fabrication, and testing of a fast pressure-release Freon-134a chamber at PNNL. The project concluded with successful demonstrations of the PNNL chamber’s AmBe neutron source sensitivity and 137Cs gamma insensitivity. The source response tests of the PNNL chamber were documented with high-speed photography.

  19. Integrated microfluidic probe station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrault, C. M.; Qasaimeh, M. A.; Brastaviceanu, T.; Anderson, K.; Kabakibo, Y.; Juncker, D.

    2010-11-01

    The microfluidic probe (MFP) consists of a flat, blunt tip with two apertures for the injection and reaspiration of a microjet into a solution—thus hydrodynamically confining the microjet—and is operated atop an inverted microscope that enables live imaging. By scanning across a surface, the microjet can be used for surface processing with the capability of both depositing and removing material; as it operates under immersed conditions, sensitive biological materials and living cells can be processed. During scanning, the MFP is kept immobile and centered over the objective of the inverted microscope, a few micrometers above a substrate that is displaced by moving the microscope stage and that is flushed continuously with the microjet. For consistent and reproducible surface processing, the gap between the MFP and the substrate, the MFP's alignment, the scanning speed, the injection and aspiration flow rates, and the image capture need all to be controlled and synchronized. Here, we present an automated MFP station that integrates all of these functionalities and automates the key operational parameters. A custom software program is used to control an independent motorized Z stage for adjusting the gap, a motorized microscope stage for scanning the substrate, up to 16 syringe pumps for injecting and aspirating fluids, and an inverted fluorescence microscope equipped with a charge-coupled device camera. The parallelism between the MFP and the substrate is adjusted using manual goniometer at the beginning of the experiment. The alignment of the injection and aspiration apertures along the scanning axis is performed using a newly designed MFP screw holder. We illustrate the integrated MFP station by the programmed, automated patterning of fluorescently labeled biotin on a streptavidin-coated surface.

  20. Integrated microfluidic probe station.

    PubMed

    Perrault, C M; Qasaimeh, M A; Brastaviceanu, T; Anderson, K; Kabakibo, Y; Juncker, D

    2010-11-01

    The microfluidic probe (MFP) consists of a flat, blunt tip with two apertures for the injection and reaspiration of a microjet into a solution--thus hydrodynamically confining the microjet--and is operated atop an inverted microscope that enables live imaging. By scanning across a surface, the microjet can be used for surface processing with the capability of both depositing and removing material; as it operates under immersed conditions, sensitive biological materials and living cells can be processed. During scanning, the MFP is kept immobile and centered over the objective of the inverted microscope, a few micrometers above a substrate that is displaced by moving the microscope stage and that is flushed continuously with the microjet. For consistent and reproducible surface processing, the gap between the MFP and the substrate, the MFP's alignment, the scanning speed, the injection and aspiration flow rates, and the image capture need all to be controlled and synchronized. Here, we present an automated MFP station that integrates all of these functionalities and automates the key operational parameters. A custom software program is used to control an independent motorized Z stage for adjusting the gap, a motorized microscope stage for scanning the substrate, up to 16 syringe pumps for injecting and aspirating fluids, and an inverted fluorescence microscope equipped with a charge-coupled device camera. The parallelism between the MFP and the substrate is adjusted using manual goniometer at the beginning of the experiment. The alignment of the injection and aspiration apertures along the scanning axis is performed using a newly designed MFP screw holder. We illustrate the integrated MFP station by the programmed, automated patterning of fluorescently labeled biotin on a streptavidin-coated surface.

  1. The effects of bubble-bubble interactions on pressures and temperatures produced by bubbles collapsing near a rigid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alahyari Beig, Shahaboddin; Johnsen, Eric

    2016-11-01

    Cavitation occurs in a wide range of hydraulic applications, and one of its most important consequences is structural damage to neighboring surfaces following repeated bubble collapse. A number of studies have been conducted to predict the pressures produced by the collapse of a single bubble. However, the collapse of multiple bubbles is known to lead to enhanced collapse pressures. In this study, we quantify the effects of bubble-bubble interactions on the bubble dynamics and pressures/temperatures produced by the collapse of a pair of bubbles near a rigid surface. For this purpose, we use an in-house, high-order accurate shock- and interface-capturing method to solve the 3D compressible Navier-Stokes equations for gas/liquid flows. The non-spherical bubble dynamics are investigated and the subsequent pressure and temperature fields are characterized based on the relevant parameters entering the problem: stand-off distance, geometrical configuation, collapse strength. We demonstrate that bubble-bubble interactions amplify/reduce pressures and temperatures produced at the collapse, and increase the non-sphericity of the bubbles and the collapse time, depending on the flow parameters.

  2. A class of chaotic bird calls?

    PubMed

    Fletcher, N H

    2000-08-01

    Evidence is presented that the basic vocalized sound produced by some cockatoos, specifically the Australian sulfur-crested cockatoo (Cacatua galerita) and the gang-gang cockatoo (Callocephalon fimbriatum), has a chaotic acoustic structure rather than the harmonic structure characteristic of most birdsongs. These findings support those of Fee et al. [Nature (London) 395(3), 67-71 (1999)] on nonlinear period-doubling transitions in the song of the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata). It is suggested that syllables with chaotic structure may be a feature of the songs of many birds.

  3. A New Chaotic Electro-Mechanical Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buscarino, Arturo; Famoso, Carlo; Fortuna, Luigi; Frasca, Mattia

    In this paper, a new electro-mechanical chaotic oscillator is presented. The system is based on the motion of the metal tip of a beam in a double-well potential generated by two magnets, and works thanks to the vibrations generated in the flexible mechanical structure by two rotating coils that produce noise-like signals. As the source of vibration is internal, the system may be considered an autonomous oscillator. Chaotic motion is experimentally observed and verified with a mathematical model of the phenomenon.

  4. Different Synchronization Schemes for Chaotic Rikitake Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, M. Ali

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents the chaos synchronization by designing a different type of controllers. Firstly, we propose the synchronization of bi-directional coupled chaotic Rikitake systems via hybrid feedback control. Secondly, we study the synchronization of unidirectionally coupled Rikitake systems using hybrid feedback control. Lastly, we investigate the synchronization of unidirectionally coupled Rikitake chaotic systems using tracking control. Comparing all the results, finally, we conclude that tracking control is more effective than feedback control. Simulation results are presented to show the efficiency of synchronization schemes.

  5. An adaptive strategy for controlling chaotic system.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yi-Jia; Hang, Hong-Xian

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents an adaptive strategy for controlling chaotic systems. By employing the phase space reconstruction technique in nonlinear dynamical systems theory, the proposed strategy transforms the nonlinear system into canonical form, and employs a nonlinear observer to estimate the uncertainties and disturbances of the nonlinear system, and then establishes a state-error-like feedback law. The developed control scheme allows chaos control in spite of modeling errors and parametric variations. The effectiveness of the proposed approach has been demonstrated through its applications to two well-known chaotic systems: Duffing oscillator and Rössler chaos.

  6. Will Quantum Cosmology Resurrect Chaotic Inflation Model?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang Pyo; Kim, Won

    2016-07-01

    The single field chaotic inflation model with a monomial power greater than one seems to be ruled out by the recent Planck and WMAP CMB data while Starobinsky model with a higher curvature term seems to be a viable model. Higher curvature terms being originated from quantum fluctuations, we revisit the quantum cosmology of the Wheeler-DeWitt equation for the chaotic inflation model. The semiclassical cosmology emerges from quantum cosmology with fluctuations of spacetimes and matter when the wave function is peaked around the semiclassical trajectory with quantum corrections a la the de Broglie-Bohm pilot theory.

  7. Higgs vacuum stability and modified chaotic inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Abhijit Kumar; Sil, Arunansu

    2017-02-01

    The issue of electroweak vacuum stability is studied in presence of a scalar field which participates in modifying the minimal chaotic inflation model. It is shown that the threshold effect on the Higgs quartic coupling originating from the Higgs-inflaton sector interaction can essentially make the electroweak vacuum stable up to the Planck scale. On the other hand we observe that the new physics parameters in this combined framework are enough to provide deviation from the minimal chaotic inflation predictions so as to keep it consistent with recent observation by Planck 2015.

  8. Bifurcation Structures in a Bimodal Piecewise Linear Map: Chaotic Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchuk, Anastasiia; Sushko, Iryna; Avrutin, Viktor

    In this work, we investigate the bifurcation structure of the parameter space of a generic 1D continuous piecewise linear bimodal map focusing on the regions associated with chaotic attractors (cyclic chaotic intervals). The boundaries of these regions corresponding to chaotic attractors with different number of intervals are identified. The results are obtained analytically using the skew tent map and the map replacement technique.

  9. Chaotic correlations in barrier billiards with arbitrary barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osbaldestin, A. H.; Adamson, L. N. C.

    2013-06-01

    We study autocorrelation functions in symmetric barrier billiards for golden mean trajectories with arbitrary barriers. Renormalization analysis reveals the presence of a chaotic invariant set and thus that, for a typical barrier, there are chaotic correlations. The chaotic renormalization set is the analogue of the so-called orchid that arises in a generalized Harper equation.

  10. Tiny Bubbles in my BEC

    SciTech Connect

    Blinova, Alina A.

    2012-08-01

    Ultracold atomic gases provide a unique way for exploring many-body quantum phenomena that are inaccessible to conventional low-temperature experiments. Nearly two decades ago the Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) - an ultracold gas of bosons in which almost all bosons occupy the same single-particle state - became experimentally feasible. Because a BEC exhibits superfluid properties, it can provide insights into the behavior of low-temperature helium liquids. We describe the case of a single distinguishable atom (an impurity) embedded in a BEC and strongly coupled to the BEC bosons. Depending on the strength of impurity-boson and boson-boson interactions, the impurity self-localizes into two fundamentally distinct regimes. The impurity atom can behave as a tightly localized 'polaron,' akin to an electron in a dielectric crystal, or as a 'bubble,' an analog to an electron bubble in superfluid helium. We obtain the ground state wavefunctions of the impurity and BEC by numerically solving the two coupled Gross-Pitaevskii equations that characterize the system. We employ the methods of imaginary time propagation and conjugate gradient descent. By appropriately varying the impurity-boson and boson-boson interaction strengths, we focus on the polaron to bubble crossover. Our results confirm analytical predictions for the polaron limit and uncover properties of the bubble regime. With these results we characterize the polaron to bubble crossover. We also summarize our findings in a phase diagram of the BEC-impurity system, which can be used as a guide in future experiments.

  11. Dissipation in deforming chaotic billiards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, Alexander Harvey

    Chaotic billiards (hard-walled cavities) in two or more dimensions are paradigm systems in the fields of classical and quantum chaos. We study the dissipation (irreversible heating) rate in such billiard systems due to general shape deformations which are periodic in time. We are motivated by older studies of one-body nuclear dissipation and by anticipated mesoscopic applications. We review the classical and quantum linear response theories of dissipation rate and demonstrate their correspondence in the semiclassical limit. In both pictures, heating is a result of stochastic energy spreading. The heating rate can be expressed as a frequency-dependent friction coefficient μ(ω), which depends on billiard shape and deformation choice. We show that there is a special class of deformations for which μ vanishes as like a power law in the small- ω limit. Namely, for deformations which cause translations and dilations μ ~ ω4 whereas for those which cause rotations μ ~ ω2. This contrasts the generic case for which μ ~ ω4 We show how a systematic treatment of this special class leads to an improved version of the `wall formula' estimate for μ(0). We show that the special nature of dilation (a new result) is semiclassically equivalent to a quasi- orthogonality relation between the (undeformed) billiard quantum eigenstates on the boundary. This quasi- orthogonality forms the heart of a `scaling method' for the numerical calculation of quantum eigenstates, invented recently by Vergini and Saraceno. The scaling method is orders of magnitude more efficient than any other known billiard quantization method, however an adequate explanation for its success has been lacking until now. We explain the scaling method, its errors, and applications. We also present improvements to Heller's plane wave method. Two smaller projects conclude the thesis. Firstly, we give a new formalism for quantum point contact (QPC) conductance in terms of scattering cross-section in the half

  12. Suppression of chaotic oscillations in a microchip laser by injection of a new orbit into the chaotic attractor.

    PubMed

    Uchida, A; Sato, T; Kannari, F

    1998-03-15

    Suppression of chaotic instability arising in a Nd:YVO(4) microchip laser subject to frequency-shifted optical feedback is accomplished by injection of one of the periodic orbits into the bifurcation region of another chaotic system driven by pump modulation. Various periodic patterns, which do not exist in the original chaotic attractor, can be extracted from the chaotic oscillation by use of this nonfeedback chaos-control technique.

  13. Antioscillons from bubble collisions at finite temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mersini-Houghton, Laura

    2014-04-01

    We study the role of the topology of bubbles at finite temperatures plays on collisions and the existence of new field configurations. We show that in the case of false vacuum decay at finite temperature, the cylindrical symmetry of bubbles admits a new exotic field with negative energies, the antiperiodic "twisted" field. New field configurations arise generically, not only at finite temperatures but whenever a cluster of bubbles resulting from collisions form nontrivial topologies. The interaction of both configurations induces instabilites on the bubble. Collisions of bubbles occupied by the new fields can lead to the emergence of new structures, named antioscillons.

  14. Asymmetric interface temperature during vapor bubble growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diana, A.; Castillo, M.; Steinberg, T.; Brutin, D.

    2013-07-01

    We investigate the nucleation, growth, and detachment of single vapor bubbles at the interface microscale. Shear flow is used to investigate pool and convective boiling situations using visible and infrared visualizations. We determine a threshold Reynolds number for the onset of asymmetric interfacial temperatures. Below this threshold, bubble growth is geometrically and thermally symmetric, while above, bubbles no longer grow thermally symmetrically. This is explained by the dominance of convective heat transfer removal over viscous effects at the bubble interface. We experimentally demonstrate asymmetric interfacial temperature profiles that should be taken into account for future bubble growth modeling.

  15. Bioinspired multicompartmental microfibers from microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yao; Zheng, Fuyin; Lu, Jie; Shang, Luoran; Xie, Zhuoying; Zhao, Yuanjin; Chen, Yongping; Gu, Zhongze

    2014-08-13

    Bioinspired multicompartmental microfibers are generated by novel capillary microfluidics. The resultant microfibers possess multicompartment body-and-shell compositions with specifically designed geometries. Potential use of these microfibers for tissue-engineering applications is demonstrated by creating multifunctional fibers with a spatially controlled encapsulation of cells.

  16. Microfluidic-integrated DNA nanobiosensors.

    PubMed

    Ansari, M I Haque; Hassan, Shabir; Qurashi, Ahsanulhaq; Khanday, Firdous Ahmad

    2016-11-15

    Over the last few decades, an increased demand has emerged for integrating biosensors with microfluidic- and nanofluidic-based lab-on-chip (LOC) devices for point-of-care (POC) diagnostics, in the medical industry and environmental monitoring of pathogenic threat agents. Such a merger of microfluidics with biosensing technologies allows for the precise control of volumes, as low as one nanolitre and the integration of various types of bioassays on a single miniaturized platform. This integration offers several favorable advantages, such as low reagent consumption, automation of sample preparation, reduction in processing time, low cost analysis, minimal handling of hazardous materials, high detection accuracy, portability and disposability. This review provides a synopsis of the most recent developments in the microfluidic-integrated biosensing field by delineating the fundamental theory of microfluidics, fabrication techniques and a detailed account of the various transduction methods that are employed. Lastly, the review discusses state-of-the-art DNA biosensors with a focus on optical DNA biosensors.

  17. Osteocyte culture in microfluidic devices

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Chao; Fan, Beiyuan; Chen, Deyong; Wei, Yuanchen; Huo, Bo; You, Lidan; Wang, Junbo; Chen, Jian

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a microfluidic device (poly-dimethylsiloxane micro channels bonded with glass slides) enabling culture of MLO-Y4 osteocyte like cells. In this study, on-chip collagen coating, cell seeding and culture, as well as staining were demonstrated in a tubing-free manner where gravity was used as the driving force for liquid transportation. MLO-Y4 cells were cultured in microfluidic channels with and without collagen coating where cellular images in a time sequence were taken and analyzed, confirming the positive effect of collagen coating on phenotype maintaining of MLO-Y4 cells. The proliferating cell nuclear antigen based proliferation assay was used to study cellular proliferation, revealing a higher proliferation rate of MLO-Y4 cells seeded in microfluidic channels without collagen coating compared to the substrates coated with collagen. Furthermore, the effects of channel dimensions (variations in width and height) on the viability of MLO-Y4 cells were explored based on the Calcein-AM and propidium iodide based live/dead assay and the Hoechst 33258 based apoptosis assay, locating the correlation between the decrease in channel width or height and the decrease in cell viability. As a platform technology, this microfluidic device may function as a new cell culture model enabling studies of osteocytes. PMID:25713691

  18. Fabrication of plastic microfluidic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Peter M.; Matson, Dean W.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Hammerstrom, D. J.

    1998-09-01

    Plastic components have many advantages, including ease of fabrication, low cost, chemical inertness, lightweight, and disposability. We report on the fabrication of three plastics-based microfluidic components: a motherboard, a dialysis unit, and a metal sensor. Microchannels, headers, and interconnects were produced in thin sheets (>=50 microns) of polyimide, PMMA, polyethylene, and polycarbonate using a direct-write excimer laser micromachining system. Machined sheets were laminated by thermal and adhesive bonding to form leak-tight microfluidic components. The microfluidic motherboard borrowed the `functionality on a chip' concept from the electronics industry and was the heart of a complex microfluidic analytical device. The motherboard platform was designed to be tightly integrated and self-contained (i.e., liquid flows are all confined within machined microchannels), reducing the need for tubing with fluid distribution and connectivity. This concept greatly facilitated system integration and miniaturization. As fabricated, the motherboard consisted of three fluid reservoirs connected to micropumps by microchannels. The fluids could either be pumped independently or mixed in microchannels prior to being directed to exterior analytical components via outlet ports. The microdialysis device was intended to separate electrolytic solutes from low volume samples prior to mass spectrometric analysis. The device consisted of a dialysis membrane laminated between opposed serpentine microchannels containing the sample fluid and a buffer solution. The laminated metal sensor consisted of fluid reservoirs, micro-flow channels, micropumps, mixing channels, reaction channels, and detector circuitry.

  19. Alternative model of single-bubble sonoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Kyuichi

    1997-12-01

    A model of single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) is constructed. In the model, the temperature is assumed to be spatially uniform inside the bubble except at the thermal boundary layer near the bubble wall even at the strong collapse based on the theoretical results of Kwak and Na [Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 4454 (1996)]. In the model, the effect of the kinetic energy of gases inside the bubble is taken into account, which heats up the whole bubble when gases stop their motions at the end of the strong collapse. In the model, a bubble in water containing air is assumed to consist mainly of argon based on the hypothesis of Lohse et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 1359 (1997)]. Numerical calculations under a SBSL condition reveal that the kinetic energy of gases heats up the whole bubble considerably. It is also clarified that vapor molecules (H2O) undergo chemical reactions in the heated interior of the bubble at the collapse and that chemical reactions decrease the temperature inside the bubble considerably. It is suggested that SBSL originates in thermal radiation from the whole bubble rather than a local point (the bubble center) heated by a converging spherical shock wave widely suggested in the previous theories of SBSL.

  20. Simulation of chaotic electrokinetic transport: performance of commercial software versus custom-built direct numerical simulation codes.

    PubMed

    Karatay, Elif; Druzgalski, Clara L; Mani, Ali

    2015-05-15

    Many microfluidic and electrochemical applications involve chaotic transport phenomena that arise due to instabilities stemming from coupling of hydrodynamics with ion transport and electrostatic forces. Recent investigations have revealed the contribution of a wide range of spatio-temporal scales in such electro-chaotic systems similar to those observed in turbulent flows. Given that these scales can span several orders of magnitude, significant numerical resolution is needed for accurate prediction of these phenomena. The objective of this work is to assess accuracy and efficiency of commercial software for prediction of such phenomena. We have considered the electroconvective flow induced by concentration polarization near an ion selective surface as a model problem representing chaotic elecrokinetic phenomena. We present detailed comparison of the performance of a general-purpose commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and transport solver against a custom-built direct numerical simulation code that has been tailored to the specific physics of unsteady electrokinetic flows. We present detailed statistics including velocity and ion concentration spectra over a wide range of frequencies as well as time-averaged statistics and computational time required for each simulation. Our results indicate that while accuracy can be guaranteed with proper mesh resolution and avoiding numerical dissipation, commercial solvers are generally at least an order of magnitude slower than custom-built direct numerical simulation codes.

  1. Mechanics of gas-vapor bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Yue; Zhang, Yuhang; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2017-03-01

    Most bubbles contain a mixture of vapor and incondensible gases. While the limit cases of pure vapor and pure gas bubbles are well studied, much less is known about the more realistic case of a mixture. The bubble contents continuously change due to the combined effects of evaporation and condensation and of gas diffusion in the liquid and in the bubble. This paper presents a model for this situation and illustrates by means of examples several physical processes that can occur: a bubble undergoing a temporary pressure reduction, which makes the liquid temporarily superheated; a bubble subjected to a burst of sound; and a bubble continuously growing by rectified diffusion of heat in the presence of an incondensible gas.

  2. Chaotic motif sampler: detecting motifs from biological sequences by using chaotic neurodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Takafumi; Ikeguchi, Tohru

    Identification of a region in biological sequences, motif extraction problem (MEP) is solved in bioinformatics. However, the MEP is an NP-hard problem. Therefore, it is almost impossible to obtain an optimal solution within a reasonable time frame. To find near optimal solutions for NP-hard combinatorial optimization problems such as traveling salesman problems, quadratic assignment problems, and vehicle routing problems, chaotic search, which is one of the deterministic approaches, has been proposed and exhibits better performance than stochastic approaches. In this paper, we propose a new alignment method that employs chaotic dynamics to solve the MEPs. It is called the Chaotic Motif Sampler. We show that the performance of the Chaotic Motif Sampler is considerably better than that of the conventional methods such as the Gibbs Site Sampler and the Neighborhood Optimization for Multiple Alignment Discovery.

  3. Generation of Bubbly Suspensions in Low Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry K.; Hoffmann, Monica I.; Hussey, Sam; Bell, Kimberly R.

    2000-01-01

    Generation of a uniform monodisperse bubbly suspension in low gravity is a rather difficult task because bubbles do not detach as easily as on Earth. Under microgravity, the buoyancy force is not present to detach the bubbles as they are formed from the nozzles. One way to detach the bubbles is to establish a detaching force that helps their detachment from the orifice. The drag force, established by flowing a liquid in a cross or co-flow configuration with respect to the nozzle direction, provides this additional force and helps detach the bubbles as they are being formed. This paper is concerned with studying the generation of a bubbly suspension in low gravity in support of a flight definition experiment titled "Behavior of Rapidly Sheared Bubbly Suspension." Generation of a bubbly suspension, composed of 2 and 3 mm diameter bubbles with a standard deviation <10% of the bubble diameter, was identified as one of the most important engineering/science issues associated with the flight definition experiment. This paper summarizes the low gravity experiments that were conducted to explore various ways of making the suspension. Two approaches were investigated. The first was to generate the suspension via a chemical reaction between the continuous and dispersed phases using effervescent material, whereas the second considered the direct injection of air into the continuous phase. The results showed that the reaction method did not produce the desired bubble size distribution compared to the direct injection of bubbles. However, direct injection of air into the continuous phase (aqueous salt solution) resulted in uniform bubble-diameter distribution with acceptable bubble-diameter standard deviation.

  4. Data analysis for the chaotic waterwheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutherford, George; Rogers, Benjamin; Martin, Richard

    2011-11-01

    The Malkus waterwheel is a simple mechanical system whose behavior is approximated by the Lorenz equations. The ISU waterwheel consists of a circular disk on which are mounted 36 cylindrical cells. The wheel is tilted, and water enters the cells symmetrically at the top of the wheel. Each cell has a hole in the bottom to allow water to escape, and friction is provided by inductive braking. The wheel can exhibit quasi-uniform rotation, periodic reversals, and chaotic reversals. The experimental data from our laboratory show good agreement with numerical simulations of the idealized model equations, although some significant differences remain. For example, at large values of the brake strength, the simulations show periodic motion, while the experimental data appear chaotic. This poster will describe the use of the 0-1 test for chaos to determine the nature (periodic or chaotic) for data over a range of brake strength values. This analysis contends that the experimental data at large damping values is indeed chaotic, in opposition to the numerical simulation prediction. We also report preliminary results of a novel method for determining the location of fixed points from the phase portraits of the experimental data.

  5. Phase synchronization of a new chaotic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahedi, Shahed; Md Noorani, Mohd Salmi

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we are going to apply phase and anti-phase synchronization on a recently studied chaotic system by the authors. The technique we employ to extract the phase at each time is EMD and we show that the corresponding intrinsic modes of the two systems are well phase locked after activating the control functions.

  6. Chaotic particle motion under linear surface waves.

    PubMed

    Bohr, Tomas; Hansen, Jonas Lundbek

    1996-12-01

    We investigate the motion of infinitesimal particles in the flow field inside the fluid under a traveling surface wave. It is shown that, even for two-dimensional waves, a superposition of two or more traveling harmonic waves is enough to generate chaotic particle motion, i.e., Lagrangian chaos. (c) 1996 American Institute of Physics.

  7. Periodic and chaotic behaviors in optical bistability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Li-xue; Li, Chun-fei; Hong, Jing

    1984-11-01

    The periodic and chaotic behaviors for both long and short delay time are demonstrated successfully using a hybrid OBD. The degree of stability S is introduced into the dynamic equations of optical bistability with a delayed feedback. The instability threshold is S = 2 for long delay time and S = 1 + π/2Q for short delay time.

  8. Heat and chaotic velocity in special relativity

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Perciante, A. L.

    2011-03-24

    The nature of the heat flux in special relativistic kinetic theory is discussed to some detail emphasizing the need to explicitly include the chaotic velocity in order to correctly define dissipative fluxes while retaining both their physical meaning and the Lorentz covariance of the theory.

  9. Integrated method for chaotic time series analysis

    DOEpatents

    Hively, L.M.; Ng, E.G.

    1998-09-29

    Methods and apparatus for automatically detecting differences between similar but different states in a nonlinear process monitor nonlinear data are disclosed. Steps include: acquiring the data; digitizing the data; obtaining nonlinear measures of the data via chaotic time series analysis; obtaining time serial trends in the nonlinear measures; and determining by comparison whether differences between similar but different states are indicated. 8 figs.

  10. Integrated method for chaotic time series analysis

    DOEpatents

    Hively, Lee M.; Ng, Esmond G.

    1998-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for automatically detecting differences between similar but different states in a nonlinear process monitor nonlinear data. Steps include: acquiring the data; digitizing the data; obtaining nonlinear measures of the data via chaotic time series analysis; obtaining time serial trends in the nonlinear measures; and determining by comparison whether differences between similar but different states are indicated.

  11. Suppression of cavitation inception by gas bubble injection: a numerical study focusing on bubble-bubble interaction.

    PubMed

    Ida, Masato; Naoe, Takashi; Futakawa, Masatoshi

    2007-10-01

    The dynamic behavior of cavitation and gas bubbles under negative pressure has been studied numerically to evaluate the effect of gas bubble injection into a liquid on the suppression of cavitation inception. In our previous studies, it was demonstrated by direct observation that cavitation occurs in liquid mercury when mechanical impacts are imposed, and this will cause cavitation damage in spallation neutron sources, in which liquid mercury is bombarded by a high-power proton beam. In the present paper, we describe numerical investigations of the dynamics of cavitation bubbles in liquid mercury using a multibubble model that takes into account the interaction of a cavitation bubble with preexisting gas bubbles through bubble-radiated pressure waves. The numerical results suggest that, if the mercury includes gas bubbles whose equilibrium radius is much larger than that of the cavitation bubble, the explosive expansion of the cavitation bubble (i.e., cavitation inception) is suppressed by the positive-pressure wave radiated by the injected bubbles, which decreases the magnitude of the negative pressure in the mercury.

  12. Microfluidic control on nano-plasmonic thin films using Marangoni effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namura, Kyoko; Nakajima, Kaoru; Kimura, Kenji; Suzuki, Motofumi

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the rapid switching of flow direction in a narrow parallel plate channel filled with water by using the thermoplasmonic Marangoni effect. A gold island film prepared in the channel is used as a thermoplasmonic heater, on which a continuous wave (CW) laser is focused to generate a micro bubble. By displacing the laser spot from the bubble center, Marangoni vortex flows are developed adjacent to the bubble. The direction of the observed flow significantly changes depending on the applied laser power. When the laser power is square-wave modulated at 5 Hz, the flow direction instantaneously switches in response to the power, and polystyrene microspheres dispersed in the water are arranged in a discrete pattern. The flow direction switching is observed for laser power modulation frequency of up to 40 Hz, which indicates that the time constant of the flow direction switching is at least of the order of several milliseconds. This rapid flow direction switching is attributed to the fast response of both the thermoplasmonic effect of the gold nanoparticles and the Marangoni effect on the bubble surface. Consequently, the thermoplasmonic Marangoni flows are useful for the dynamic and flexible flow control and microparticle manipulation in a microfluidic channel.

  13. Sheathless particle focusing in a microfluidic chamber by using the thermoplasmonic Marangoni effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namura, Kyoko; Nakajima, Kaoru; Kimura, Kenji; Suzuki, Motofumi

    2016-02-01

    We experimentally investigated the modes of the Marangoni flow around a microbubble in a 50-μm-thick water chamber and found a transition flow mode that enables sheathless particle focusing. A temperature gradient was thermoplasmonically induced around the laser spot on a gold nanoisland film, and Marangoni flows were generated around the microbubble to drive submicron particles dispersed in the water. When the laser spot was slightly displaced from the bubble center, the particles were continuously collected by the bubble underneath and leaked in one direction to form a focused particle stream. The generation of the particle-focusing Marangoni flow was attributed to the appropriate balance of the temperature gradient in the perpendicular and horizontal directions of the chamber, which was controlled by the laser spot position against the bubble center. Temporally controlling this flow mode with laser power caused the periodic emission of clustered particles from the bubble underneath. This particle handling method with a thermoplasmonic Marangoni flow can be useful for improving the efficiency of reaction or sensing processes that take place in a microfluidic chamber.

  14. Chaotic Map Construction from Common Nonlinearities and Microcontroller Implementations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ablay, Günyaz

    2016-06-01

    This work presents novel discrete-time chaotic systems with some known physical system nonlinearities. Dynamic behaviors of the models are examined with numerical methods and Arduino microcontroller-based experimental studies. Many new chaotic maps are generated in the form of x(k + 1) = rx(k) + f(x(k)) and high-dimensional chaotic systems are obtained by weak coupling or cross-coupling the same or different chaotic maps. An application of the chaotic maps is realized with Arduino for chaotic pulse width modulation to drive electrical machines. It is expected that the new chaotic maps and their microcontroller implementations will facilitate practical chaos-based applications in different fields.

  15. Applications of chaotic neurodynamics in pattern recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baird, Bill; Freeman, Walter J.; Eeckman, Frank H.; Yao, Yong

    1991-08-01

    Network algorithms and architectures for pattern recognition derived from neural models of the olfactory system are reviewed. These span a range from highly abstract to physiologically detailed, and employ the kind of dynamical complexity observed in olfactory cortex, ranging from oscillation to chaos. A simple architecture and algorithm for analytically guaranteed associative memory storage of analog patterns, continuous sequences, and chaotic attractors in the same network is described. A matrix inversion determines network weights, given prototype patterns to be stored. There are N units of capacity in an N node network with 3N2 weights. It costs one unit per static attractor, two per Fourier component of each sequence, and three to four per chaotic attractor. There are no spurious attractors, and for sequences there is a Liapunov function in a special coordinate system which governs the approach of transient states to stored trajectories. Unsupervised or supervised incremental learning algorithms for pattern classification, such as competitive learning or bootstrap Widrow-Hoff can easily be implemented. The architecture can be ''folded'' into a recurrent network with higher order weights that can be used as a model of cortex that stores oscillatory and chaotic attractors by a Hebb rule. Network performance is demonstrated by application to the problem of real-time handwritten digit recognition. An effective system with on-line learning has been written by Eeckman and Baird for the Macintosh. It utilizes static, oscillatory, and/or chaotic attractors of two kinds--Lorenze attractors, or attractors resulting from chaotically interacting oscillatory modes. The successful application to an industrial pattern recognition problem of a network architecture of considerable physiological and dynamical complexity, developed by Freeman and Yao, is described. The data sets of the problem come in three classes of difficulty, and performance of the biological network is

  16. Shadowing Lemma and chaotic orbit determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spoto, Federica; Milani, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    Orbit determination is possible for a chaotic orbit of a dynamical system, given a finite set of observations, provided the initial conditions are at the central time. The Shadowing Lemma (Anosov 1967; Bowen in J Differ Equ 18:333-356, 1975) can be seen as a way to connect the orbit obtained using the observations with a real trajectory. An orbit is a shadowing of the trajectory if it stays close to the real trajectory for some amount of time. In a simple discrete model, the standard map, we tackle the problem of chaotic orbit determination when observations extend beyond the predictability horizon. If the orbit is hyperbolic, a shadowing orbit is computed by the least squares orbit determination. We test both the convergence of the orbit determination iterative procedure and the behaviour of the uncertainties as a function of the maximum number of map iterations observed. When the initial conditions belong to a chaotic orbit, the orbit determination is made impossible by numerical instability beyond a computability horizon, which can be approximately predicted by a simple formula. Moreover, the uncertainty of the results is sharply increased if a dynamical parameter is added to the initial conditions as parameter to be estimated. The Shadowing Lemma does not dictate what the asymptotic behaviour of the uncertainties should be. These phenomena have significant implications, which remain to be studied, in practical problems of orbit determination involving chaos, such as the chaotic rotation state of a celestial body and a chaotic orbit of a planet-crossing asteroid undergoing many close approaches.

  17. Tunable power law in the desynchronization events of coupled chaotic electronic circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, Gilson F. de Lorenzo, Orlando di; Chevrollier, Martine; Passerat de Silans, Thierry; Oriá, Marcos; Souza Cavalcante, Hugo L. D. de

    2014-03-15

    We study the statistics of the amplitude of the synchronization error in chaotic electronic circuits coupled through linear feedback. Depending on the coupling strength, our system exhibits three qualitatively different regimes of synchronization: weak coupling yields independent oscillations; moderate to strong coupling produces a regime of intermittent synchronization known as attractor bubbling; and stronger coupling produces complete synchronization. In the regime of moderate coupling, the probability distribution for the sizes of desynchronization events follows a power law, with an exponent that can be adjusted by changing the coupling strength. Such power-law distributions are interesting, as they appear in many complex systems. However, most of the systems with such a behavior have a fixed value for the exponent of the power law, while here we present an example of a system where the exponent of the power law is easily tuned in real time.

  18. Study of different cross-shaped microchannels affecting thermal-bubble-actuated microparticle manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weichen; Tsou, Chingfu

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a thermal-bubble-actuated microfluidic chip with cross-shaped microchannels for evaluating the effect of different microchannel designs on microparticle manipulation. Four cross-shaped microchannel designs, with orthogonal, misaligned, skewed, and antiskewed types, were proposed in this study. The thermal bubble micropump, which is based on a resistive bulk microheater, was used to drive fluid transportation, and it can be realized using a simple microfabrication process with a silicon-on-isolator wafer. Using commercial COMSOL software, the flow profiles of microfluidics in various cross-shaped microchannels were simulated qualitatively under different pumping pressures. Microbeads, with a diameter of 20 μm, manipulated in four cross-shaped microchannels, were also implemented in this experiment. The results showed that a skewed microchannel design has a higher sorting rate compared with orthogonal, misaligned, and antiskewed microchannels because its flow velocity in the main microchannel is significantly reduced by pumping pressure. Typically, the successful sorting rate for this type of skewed microchannel can reach 30% at a pumping frequency of 100 Hz.

  19. Sonoporation from Jetting Cavitation Bubbles

    PubMed Central

    Ohl, Claus-Dieter; Arora, Manish; Ikink, Roy; de Jong, Nico; Versluis, Michel; Delius, Michael; Lohse, Detlef

    2006-01-01

    The fluid dynamic interaction of cavitation bubbles with adherent cells on a substrate is experimentally investigated. We find that the nonspherical collapse of bubbles near to the boundary is responsible for cell detachment. High-speed photography reveals that a wall bounded flow leads to the detachment of cells. Cells at the edge of the circular area of detachment are found to be permanently porated, whereas cells at some distance from the detachment area undergo viable cell membrane poration (sonoporation). The wall flow field leading to cell detachment is modeled with a self-similar solution for a wall jet, together with a kinetic ansatz of adhesive bond rupture. The self-similar solution for the δ-type wall jet compares very well with the full solution of the Navier-Stokes equation for a jet of finite thickness. Apart from annular sites of sonoporation we also find more homogenous patterns of molecule delivery with no cell detachment. PMID:16950843

  20. Etiology of gas bubble disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bouck, G.R.

    1980-11-01

    Gas bubble disease is a noninfectious, physically induced process caused by uncompensated hyperbaric pressure of total dissolved gases. When pressure compensation is inadequate, dissolved gases may form emboli (in blood) and emphysema (in tissues). The resulting abnormal physical presence of gases can block blood vessels (hemostasis) or tear tissues, and may result in death. Population mortality is generally skewed, in that the median time to death occurs well before the average time to death. Judged from mortality curves, three stages occur in gas bubble disease: (1) a period of gas pressure equilibrium, nonlethal cavitation, and increasing morbidity; (2) a period of rapid and heavy mortality; and (3) a period of protracted survival, despite lesions, and dysfunction that eventually terminates in total mortality. Safe limits for gas supersaturation depend on species tolerance and on factors that differ among hatcheries and rivers, between continuous and intermittent exposures, and across ranges of temperature and salinity.

  1. Bubble-induced cave collapse.

    PubMed

    Girihagama, Lakshika; Nof, Doron; Hancock, Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    Conventional wisdom among cave divers is that submerged caves in aquifers, such as in Florida or the Yucatan, are unstable due to their ever-growing size from limestone dissolution in water. Cave divers occasionally noted partial cave collapses occurring while they were in the cave, attributing this to their unintentional (and frowned upon) physical contact with the cave walls or the aforementioned "natural" instability of the cave. Here, we suggest that these cave collapses do not necessarily result from cave instability or contacts with walls, but rather from divers bubbles rising to the ceiling and reducing the buoyancy acting on isolated ceiling rocks. Using familiar theories for the strength of flat and arched (un-cracked) beams, we first show that the flat ceiling of a submerged limestone cave can have a horizontal expanse of 63 meters. This is much broader than that of most submerged Florida caves (~ 10 m). Similarly, we show that an arched cave roof can have a still larger expanse of 240 meters, again implying that Florida caves are structurally stable. Using familiar bubble dynamics, fluid dynamics of bubble-induced flows, and accustomed diving practices, we show that a group of 1-3 divers submerged below a loosely connected ceiling rock will quickly trigger it to fall causing a "collapse". We then present a set of qualitative laboratory experiments illustrating such a collapse in a circular laboratory cave (i.e., a cave with a circular cross section), with concave and convex ceilings. In these experiments, a metal ball represented the rock (attached to the cave ceiling with a magnet), and the bubbles were produced using a syringe located at the cave floor.

  2. Bubble-Induced Cave Collapse

    PubMed Central

    Girihagama, Lakshika; Nof, Doron; Hancock, Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    Conventional wisdom among cave divers is that submerged caves in aquifers, such as in Florida or the Yucatan, are unstable due to their ever-growing size from limestone dissolution in water. Cave divers occasionally noted partial cave collapses occurring while they were in the cave, attributing this to their unintentional (and frowned upon) physical contact with the cave walls or the aforementioned “natural” instability of the cave. Here, we suggest that these cave collapses do not necessarily result from cave instability or contacts with walls, but rather from divers bubbles rising to the ceiling and reducing the buoyancy acting on isolated ceiling rocks. Using familiar theories for the strength of flat and arched (un-cracked) beams, we first show that the flat ceiling of a submerged limestone cave can have a horizontal expanse of 63 meters. This is much broader than that of most submerged Florida caves (~ 10 m). Similarly, we show that an arched cave roof can have a still larger expanse of 240 meters, again implying that Florida caves are structurally stable. Using familiar bubble dynamics, fluid dynamics of bubble-induced flows, and accustomed diving practices, we show that a group of 1-3 divers submerged below a loosely connected ceiling rock will quickly trigger it to fall causing a “collapse”. We then present a set of qualitative laboratory experiments illustrating such a collapse in a circular laboratory cave (i.e., a cave with a circular cross section), with concave and convex ceilings. In these experiments, a metal ball represented the rock (attached to the cave ceiling with a magnet), and the bubbles were produced using a syringe located at the cave floor. PMID:25849088

  3. Development and interactions of two inert gas bubbles during decompression.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Y; Homer, L D; Thalmann, E D

    1996-09-01

    A mathematical model has been developed to simulate the evolution of two inert gas bubbles in tissue. This is useful for understanding the dynamics of bubbles that presumably arise during decompression. It is assumed that they are spherical and that the tissue volume surrounding them is infinite. The total pressure in each bubble is determined by the barometric and metabolic gas pressures as well as the pressure due to surface tension. Bipolar coordinates are employed to determine the inert gas pressure distribution. Two coupled governing equations for bubble radii are then derived and solved numerically. The results demonstrate how bubble evolution is affected by the distance between bubbles and the initial bubble radii. The existence time and bubble surface flux of two equal-sized bubbles are calculated and compared with those of a single gas bubble model. The results indicate that when two bubbles are very close, it takes 20% more time for two bubbles to dissolve than for a single one, and the total surface flux of two bubbles is nearly 20% less than twice of a single bubble. When the center-to-center distance is 10 times of bubble radius, the effect of bubble interaction on bubble existence time and surface flux are about 6 and 9% changes, respectively. We conclude that if bubbles are not too small, the interactions among bubbles should be included in inert gas bubble models predicting bubble evolution.

  4. Armoring confined bubbles in concentrated colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yingxian; Khodaparast, Sepideh; Stone, Howard

    2016-11-01

    Encapsulation of a bubble with microparticles is known to significantly improve the stability of the bubble. This phenomenon has recently gained increasing attention due to its application in a variety of technologies such as foam stabilization, drug encapsulation and colloidosomes. Nevertheless, the production of such colloidal armored bubble with controlled size and particle coverage ratio is still a great challenge industrially. We study the coating process of a long air bubble by microparticles in a circular tube filled with a concentrated microparticles colloidal suspension. As the bubble proceeds in the suspension of particles, a monolayer of micro-particles forms on the interface of the bubble, which eventually results in a fully armored bubble. We investigate the phenomenon that triggers and controls the evolution of the particle accumulation on the bubble interface. Moreover, we examine the effects of the mean flow velocity, the size of the colloids and concentration of the suspension on the dynamics of the armored bubble. The results of this study can potentially be applied to production of particle-encapsulated bubbles, surface-cleaning techniques, and gas-assisted injection molding.

  5. Soap bubbles in paintings: Art and science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behroozi, F.

    2008-12-01

    Soap bubbles became popular in 17th century paintings and prints primarily as a metaphor for the impermanence and fragility of life. The Dancing Couple (1663) by the Dutch painter Jan Steen is a good example which, among many other symbols, shows a young boy blowing soap bubbles. In the 18th century the French painter Jean-Simeon Chardin used soap bubbles not only as metaphor but also to express a sense of play and wonder. In his most famous painting, Soap Bubbles (1733/1734) a translucent and quavering soap bubble takes center stage. Chardin's contemporary Charles Van Loo painted his Soap Bubbles (1764) after seeing Chardin's work. In both paintings the soap bubbles have a hint of color and show two bright reflection spots. We discuss the physics involved and explain how keenly the painters have observed the interaction of light and soap bubbles. We show that the two reflection spots on the soap bubbles are images of the light source, one real and one virtual, formed by the curved surface of the bubble. The faint colors are due to thin film interference effects.

  6. Paths and wakes of deformable nearly spheroidal rising bubbles close to the transition to path instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cano-Lozano, José Carlos; Martínez-Bazán, Carlos; Magnaudet, Jacques; Tchoufag, Joël

    2016-09-01

    We report on a series of results provided by three-dimensional numerical simulations of nearly spheroidal bubbles freely rising and deforming in a still liquid in the regime close to the transition to path instability. These results improve upon those of recent computational studies [Cano-Lozano et al., Int. J. Multiphase Flow 51, 11 (2013), 10.1016/j.ijmultiphaseflow.2012.11.005; Phys. Fluids 28, 014102 (2016), 10.1063/1.4939703] in which the neutral curve associated with this transition was obtained by considering realistic but frozen bubble shapes. Depending on the dimensionless parameters that characterize the system, various paths geometries are observed by letting an initially spherical bubble starting from rest rise under the effect of buoyancy and adjust its shape to the surrounding flow. These include the well-documented rectilinear axisymmetric, planar zigzagging, and spiraling (or helical) regimes. A flattened spiraling regime that most often eventually turns into either a planar zigzagging or a helical regime is also frequently observed. Finally, a chaotic regime in which the bubble experiences small horizontal displacements (typically one order of magnitude smaller than in the other regimes) is found to take place in a region of the parameter space where no standing eddy exists at the back of the bubble. The discovery of this regime provides evidence that path instability does not always result from a wake instability as previously believed. In each regime, we examine the characteristics of the path, bubble shape, and vortical structure in the wake, as well as their couplings. In particular, we observe that, depending on the fluctuations of the rise velocity, two different vortex shedding modes exist in the zigzagging regime, confirming earlier findings with falling spheres. The simulations also reveal that significant bubble deformations may take place along zigzagging or spiraling paths and that, under certain circumstances, they dramatically alter

  7. Active, Universal Particle Micromanipulators: CPUs for Microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezic, Igor; Bottausci, Frederic

    2007-11-01

    Current designs for Lab-on-a-Chip applications consist of a variety of separate microfluidic chambers and channels for functions such as concentration, separation, reaction and mixing of bioparticles in liquids. Here we advance an alternative concept, named μfCPU, the Microfluidic Central Processing Unit, where the key microfluidic operations are performed within a single enclosure, using software-based inputs rather than physical hardware changes, thus emulating the role of the Central Processing Unit in computers and cells in living organisms. We present an experimental embodiment of such a device and describe a variety of microfluidic manipulation tasks achieved in it by the use of a suite of electromotive and fluidic forces in a time-dependent way to produce on-demand functionality. We also discuss a new microfluidic devices architecture that utilizes μfCPU as the basic processing unit and uses centralized pumping instead of integrated microfluidic pumps.

  8. Microfluidic Approaches for Protein Crystal Structure Analysis.

    PubMed

    Maeki, Masatoshi; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Tokeshi, Manabu; Miyazaki, Masaya

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes two microfluidic-based protein crystallization methods, protein crystallization behavior in the microfluidic devices, and their applications for X-ray crystal structure analysis. Microfluidic devices provide many advantages for protein crystallography; they require small sample volumes, provide high-throughput screening, and allow control of the protein crystallization. A droplet-based protein crystallization method is a useful technique for high-throughput screening and the formation of a single crystal without any complicated device fabrication process. Well-based microfluidic platforms also enable effective protein crystallization. This review also summarizes the protein crystal growth behavior in microfluidic devices as, is known from viewpoints of theoretical and experimental approaches. Finally, we introduce applications of microfluidic devices for on-chip crystal structure analysis.

  9. Unsteady thermocapillary migration of bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dill, Loren H.; Balasubramaniam, R.

    1988-01-01

    Upon the introduction of a gas bubble into a liquid possessing a uniform thermal gradient, an unsteady thermo-capillary flow begins. Ultimately, the bubble attains a constant velocity. This theoretical analysis focuses upon the transient period for a bubble in a microgravity environment and is restricted to situations wherein the flow is sufficiently slow such that inertial terms in the Navier-Stokes equation and convective terms in the energy equation may be safely neglected (i.e., both Reynolds and Marangoni numbers are small). The resulting linear equations were solved analytically in the Laplace domain with the Prandtl number of the liquid as a parameter; inversion was accomplished numerically using a standard IMSL routine. In the asymptotic long-time limit, the theory agrees with the steady-state theory of Young, Goldstein, and Block. The theory predicts that more than 90 percent of the terminal steady velocity is achieved when the smallest dimensionless time, i.e., the one based upon the largest time scale-viscous or thermal-equals unity.

  10. [Recent development of microfluidic diagnostic technologies].

    PubMed

    Li, Haifang; Zhang, Qianyun; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2011-04-01

    Microfluidic devices exhibit a great promising development in clinical diagnosis and disease screening due to their advantages of precise controlling of fluid flow, requirement of miniamount sample, rapid reaction speed and convenient integration. In this paper, the improvements of microfluidic diagnostic technologies in recent years are reviewed. The applications and developments of on-chip disease marker detection, microfluidic cell selection and cell drug metabolism, and diagnostic micro-devices are discussed.

  11. A microfluidic D-subminiature connector.

    PubMed

    Scott, Adina; Au, Anthony K; Vinckenbosch, Elise; Folch, Albert

    2013-06-07

    Standardized, affordable, user-friendly world-to-chip interfaces represent one of the major barriers to the adoption of microfluidics. We present a connector system for plug-and-play interfacing of microfluidic devices to multiple input and output lines. The male connectors are based on existing standardized housings from electronics that are inexpensive and widely available. The female connectors are fabricated using familiar replica molding techniques that can easily be adopted by microfluidic developers.

  12. Bubble-induced Color Doppler Feedback for Histotripsy Tissue Fractionation

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Ryan M.; Zhang, Xi; Maxwell, Adam; Cain, Charles; Xu, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Histotripsy therapy produces cavitating bubble clouds to increasingly fractionate and eventually liquefy tissue using high intensity ultrasound pulses. Following cavitation generated by each pulse, coherent motion of the cavitation residual nuclei can be detected using metrics formed from ultrasound color Doppler acquisitions. In this paper, three experiments were performed to investigate the characteristics of this motion as real-time feedback on histotripsy tissue fractionation. In the first experiment, bubble-induced color Doppler (BCD) and particle image velocimetry (PIV) analysis monitored the residual cavitation nuclei in the treatment region in an agarose tissue phantom treated with 2-cycle histotripsy pulses at > 30 MPa using a 500 kHz transducer. Both BCD and PIV results showed brief chaotic motion of the residual nuclei followed by coherent motion first moving away from the transducer and then rebounding back. Velocity measurements from both PIV and BCD agreed well, showing a monotonic increase in rebound time up to a saturation point for increased therapy dose. In a second experiment, a thin layer of red blood cells (RBC) was added to the phantom to allow quantification of the fractionation of the RBC layer to compare with BCD metrics. A strong linear correlation was observed between the fractionation level and the time to BCD peak rebound velocity over histotripsy treatment. Finally, the correlation between BCD feedback and histotripsy tissue fractionation was validated in ex vivo porcine liver evaluated histologically. BCD metrics showed strong linear correlation with fractionation progression, suggesting that BCD provides useful quantitative real-time feedback on histotripsy treatment progression. PMID:26863659

  13. Advances in microfluidics for environmental analysis.

    PubMed

    Jokerst, Jana C; Emory, Jason M; Henry, Charles S

    2012-01-07

    During the past few years, a growing number of groups have recognized the utility of microfluidic devices for environmental analysis. Microfluidic devices offer a number of advantages and in many respects are ideally suited to environmental analyses. Challenges faced in environmental monitoring, including the ability to handle complex and highly variable sample matrices, lead to continued growth and research. Additionally, the need to operate for days to months in the field requires further development of robust, integrated microfluidic systems. This review examines recently published literature on the applications of microfluidic systems for environmental analysis and provides insight in the future direction of the field.

  14. Chaotic dynamics of large-scale structures in a turbulent wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varon, Eliott; Eulalie, Yoann; Edwige, Stephie; Gilotte, Philippe; Aider, Jean-Luc

    2017-03-01

    The dynamics of a three-dimensional (3D) bimodal turbulent wake downstream of a square-back Ahmed body are experimentally studied in a wind tunnel through high-frequency wall-pressure probes mapping the rear of the model and a horizontal two-dimensional (2D) velocity field. The barycenters of the pressure distribution over the rear part of the model and the intensity recirculation are found highly correlated. Both described the most energetic large-scale structures dynamics, confirming the relation between the large-scale recirculation bubble and its wall-pressure footprint. Focusing on the pressure, its barycenter trajectory has a stochastic behavior but its low-frequency dynamics exhibit the same characteristics as a weak strange chaotic attractor system, with two well-defined attractors. The low-frequency dynamics associated to the large-scale structures are then analyzed. The largest Lyapunov exponent is first estimated, leading to a low positive value characteristic of strange attractors and weak chaotic systems. Afterwards, analyzing the autocorrelation function of the timeseries, we compute the correlation dimension, larger than two. The signal is finally transformed and analyzed as a telegraph signal, showing that its dynamics correspond to a quasirandom telegraph signal. This is the first demonstration that the low-frequency dynamics of a turbulent 3D wake are not a purely stochastic process but rather a weak chaotic process exhibiting strange attractors. From the flow control point of view, it also opens the path to more simple closed-loop flow-control strategies aiming at the stabilization of the wake and the control of the dynamics of the wake barycenter.

  15. The self-regulated AGN feedback loop: the role of chaotic cold accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspari, Massimo

    2015-08-01

    Accretion and feedback tied to supermassive black holes are known to play central role in the cosmic evolution of galaxies, groups, and clusters of galaxies. The self-regulation mechanism, that is how to link feedback and accretion, is matter of intense debate.Using high-resolution 3D hydrodynamic simulations, I discuss how the AGN feedback is tightly coupled with the formation of multiphase gas and the newly probed chaotic cold accretion. In a turbulent atmosphere heated by AGN feedback, cold clouds and filaments condense out of the hot plasma via nonlinear thermal instability, up to radii of 10s kpc, and rain toward the black hole. In the inner core, the recurrent chaotic collisions between the cold clouds, filaments, and central torus promote angular momentum cancellation, boosting the accretion rate up to 100 times the Bondi rate, which is comparable to the cooling rate.Such rapid variability triggers powerful AGN outflows, which quench the cooling flow and star formation without destroying the cool core. I highlight the major imprints of mechanical AGN feedback, such as buoyant bubbles, shocks, turbulence, and uplifted gas, with a critical eye toward concordance with X-ray observations. The tight self-regulation has key implications for the group/cluster scaling relations, such as Lx-Tx, in agreement with a recent X-ray stacking analysis of 250000 central galaxies.The AGN heating stifles the formation of multiphase gas, and thus accretion. Lacking the main fuel, AGN feedback subsides and the hot halo is allowed to cool again, restarting a new cycle. Ultimately, chaotic cold accretion creates a symbiotic link between the black hole and the whole host galaxy, leading to a tight self-regulated feedback loop which preserves the cores of groups and clusters in quasi thermal equilibrium throughout cosmic time.

  16. The self-regulated AGN feedback loop: the role of chaotic cold accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspari, Massimo

    2015-08-01

    Accretion and feedback tied to supermassive black holes are known to play central role in the cosmic evolution of galaxies, groups, and clusters of galaxies. The self-regulation mechanism, that is how to link feedback and accretion, is matter of intense debate.Using high-resolution 3D hydrodynamic simulations, I discuss how the AGN feedback is tightly coupled with the formation of multiphase gas and the newly probed chaotic cold accretion. In a turbulent atmosphere heated by AGN feedback, cold clouds and filaments condense out of the hot plasma via nonlinear thermal instability, up to radii of 10s kpc, and rain toward the black hole. In the inner core, the recurrent chaotic collisions between the cold clouds, filaments, and central torus promote angular momentum cancellation, boosting the accretion rate up to 100 times the Bondi rate, which is comparable to the cooling rate.Such rapid variability triggers powerful AGN outflows, which quench the cooling flow and star formation without destroying the cool core. I highlight the major imprints of mechanical AGN feedback, such as buoyant bubbles, shocks, turbulence, and uplifted gas, with a critical eye toward observational concordance. The tight self-regulation has key implications for the group/cluster scaling relations, such as Lx-Tx, in agreement with a recent X-ray stacking analysis of 250000 central galaxies.The AGN heating stifles the formation of multiphase gas, and thus accretion. Lacking the main fuel, AGN feedback subsides and the hot halo is allowed to cool again, restarting a new cycle. Ultimately, chaotic cold accretion creates a symbiotic link between the black hole and the whole host galaxy, leading to a tight self-regulated feedback loop which preserves the cores of groups and clusters in quasi thermal equilibrium throughout cosmic time.

  17. The self-regulated AGN feedback loop: the role of chaotic cold accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspari, Massimo

    2015-08-01

    Accretion and feedback tied to supermassive black holes are known to play central role in the cosmic evolution of galaxies, groups, and clusters of galaxies. The self-regulation mechanism, that is how to link feedback and accretion, is matter of intense debate.Using high-resolution 3D hydrodynamic simulations, I discuss how the AGN feedback is tightly coupled with the formation of multiphase gas and the newly probed chaotic cold accretion. In a turbulent atmosphere heated by AGN feedback, cold clouds and filaments condense out of the hot plasma via nonlinear thermal instability, up to radii of 10s kpc, and rain toward the black hole. In the inner core, the recurrent chaotic collisions between the cold clouds, filaments, and central torus promote angular momentum cancellation, boosting the accretion rate up to 100 times the Bondi rate, which is comparable to the cooling rate.Such rapid variability triggers powerful AGN outflows, which quench the cooling flow and star formation without destroying the cool core. I highlight the major imprints of mechanical AGN feedback, such as buoyant bubbles, shocks, turbulence, and uplifted gas, with a critical eye toward observational concordance. The tight self-regulation has key implications for the scaling relations, such as Lx-Tx, and the X-ray spectrum of hot halos.The AGN heating stifles the formation of multiphase gas, and thus accretion. Lacking the main fuel, AGN feedback subsides and the hot halo is allowed to cool again, restarting a new cycle. Ultimately, chaotic cold accretion creates a symbiotic link between the black hole and the whole host galaxy, leading to a tight self-regulated feedback loop which preserves the cores of groups and clusters in quasi thermal equilibrium throughout cosmic time.

  18. An air-bubble-actuated micropump for on-chip blood transportation.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Sheng-Hung; Liu, Cheng-Hsien

    2009-06-07

    A novel electrolysis-based micropump using air bubbles to achieve indirect actuation is proposed and demonstrated. Compared with other electrochemical micropumps, our micropump can drive microfluids without inducing the pH value variation in the main channel and the choking/sticking phenomena of electrolytic bubbles. It is promising for biomedical applications, especially for blood transportation. Our proposed on-chip electrolysis-bubble actuator with the features of room temperature operation, low driving voltage, low power consumption and large actuation force not only can minimize the possibility of cell-damage but also may enable portable and implantable lab-on-a-chip microsystems. Utilizing our proposed hydrophobic trapeziform pattern located at the junction of the T-shaped microchannel, the micropump makes the pumped fluid in the main channel be isolated from the electrolytic bubbles. It can be used for a variety of applications without the constraints on the pumped liquid. Experimental results show that the liquid displacement and the pumping rate could be easily and accurately controlled via the signal of a two-phase peristaltic sequence and the periodic generation of electrolytic bubbles. With an applied voltage of 2.5 V, the maximum pumping rate for DI water and whole blood were 121 nl min(-1) and 88 nl min(-1), respectively, with a channel cross section of 100 x 50 microm. Maximum back-pressure of 16 kPa and 11 kPa for DI water and whole blood, respectively, were achieved in our present prototype chips.

  19. Bernoulli Suction Effect on Soap Bubble Blowing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, John; Ryu, Sangjin

    2015-11-01

    As a model system for thin-film bubble with two gas-liquid interfaces, we experimentally investigated the pinch-off of soap bubble blowing. Using the lab-built bubble blower and high-speed videography, we have found that the scaling law exponent of soap bubble pinch-off is 2/3, which is similar to that of soap film bridge. Because air flowed through the decreasing neck of soap film tube, we studied possible Bernoulli suction effect on soap bubble pinch-off by evaluating the Reynolds number of airflow. Image processing was utilized to calculate approximate volume of growing soap film tube and the volume flow rate of the airflow, and the Reynolds number was estimated to be 800-3200. This result suggests that soap bubbling may involve the Bernoulli suction effect.

  20. Bubbles Rising Through a Soft Granular Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Mestre, Robin; MacMinn, Chris; Lee, Sungyon

    2016-11-01

    Bubble migration through a soft granular material involves a strong coupling between the bubble dynamics and the deformation of the material. This is relevant to a variety of natural processes such as gas venting from sediments and gas exsolution from magma. Here, we study this process experimentally by injecting air bubbles into a quasi-2D packing of soft hydrogel beads and measuring the size, speed, and morphology of the bubbles as they rise due to buoyancy. Whereas previous work has focused on deformation resisted by intergranular friction, we focus on the previously inaccessible regime of deformation resisted by elasticity. At low confining stress, the bubbles are irregular and rounded, migrating via local rearrangement. At high confining stress, the bubbles become unstable and branched, migrating via pathway opening. The authors thank The Royal Society for support (International Exchanges Ref IE150885).

  1. BUBBLE DYNAMICS AT GAS-EVOLVING ELECTRODES

    SciTech Connect

    Sides, Paul J.

    1980-12-01

    Nucleation of bubbles, their growth by diffusion of dissolved gas to the bubble surface and by coalescence, and their detachment from the electrode are all very fast phenomena; furthermore, electrolytically generated bubbles range in size from ten to a few hundred microns; therefore, magnification and high speed cinematography are required to observe bubbles and the phenomena of their growth on the electrode surface. Viewing the action from the front side (the surface on which the bubbles form) is complicated because the most important events occur close to the surface and are obscured by other bubbles passing between the camera and the electrode; therefore, oxygen was evolved on a transparent tin oxide "window" electrode and the events were viewed from the backside. The movies showed that coalescence of bubbles is very important for determining the size of bubbles and in the chain of transport processes; growth by diffusion and by coalescence proceeds in series and parallel; coalescing bubbles cause significant fluid motion close to the electrode; bubbles can leave and reattach; and bubbles evolve in a cycle of growth by diffusion and different modes of coalescence. An analytical solution for the primary potential and current distribution around a spherical bubble in contact with a plane electrode is presented. Zero at the contact point, the current density reaches only one percent of its undisturbed value at 30 percent of the radius from that point and goes through a shallow maximum two radii away. The solution obtained for spherical bubbles is shown to apply for the small bubbles of electrolytic processes. The incremental resistance in ohms caused by sparse arrays of bubbles is given by {Delta}R = 1.352 af/kS where f is the void fraction of gas in the bubble layer, a is the bubble layer thickness, k is the conductivity of gas free electrolyte, and S is the electrode area. A densely populated gas bubble layer on an electrode was modeled as a hexagonal array of

  2. Microfluidic studies of carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Abolhasani, Milad; Günther, Axel; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2014-07-28

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration, storage and recycling will greatly benefit from comprehensive studies of physical and chemical gas-liquid processes involving CO2. Over the past five years, microfluidics emerged as a valuable tool in CO2-related research, due to superior mass and heat transfer, reduced axial dispersion, well-defined gas-liquid interfacial areas and the ability to vary reagent concentrations in a high-throughput manner. This Minireview highlights recent progress in microfluidic studies of CO2-related processes, including dissolution of CO2 in physical solvents, CO2 reactions, the utilization of CO2 in materials science, and the use of supercritical CO2 as a "green" solvent.

  3. Self-assembly via microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Sánchez, Samuel

    2015-12-07

    The self-assembly of amphiphilic building blocks has attracted extensive interest in myriad fields in recent years, due to their great potential in the nanoscale design of functional hybrid materials. Microfluidic techniques provide an intriguing method to control kinetic aspects of the self-assembly of molecular amphiphiles by the facile adjustment of the hydrodynamics of the fluids. Up to now, there have been several reports about one-step direct self-assembly of different building blocks with versatile and multi-shape products without templates, which demonstrated the advantages of microfluidics. These assemblies with different morphologies have great applications in various areas such as cancer therapy, micromotor fabrication, and controlled drug delivery.

  4. Nanofluidic interfaces in microfluidic networks

    SciTech Connect

    Millet, Larry J.; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Retterer, Scott T.

    2015-09-24

    The integration of nano- and microfluidic technologies enables the construction of tunable interfaces to physical and biological systems across relevant length scales. The ability to perform chemical manipulations of miniscule sample volumes is greatly enhanced through these technologies and extends the ability to manipulate and sample the local fluidic environments at subcellular, cellular and community or tissue scales. Here we describe the development of a flexible surface micromachining process for the creation of nanofluidic channel arrays integrated within SU-8 microfluidic networks. The use of a semi-porous, silicon rich, silicon nitride structural layer allows rapid release of the sacrificial silicon dioxide during the nanochannel fabrication. Nanochannel openings that form the interface to biological samples are customized using focused ion beam milling. The compatibility of these interfaces with on-chip microbial culture is demonstrated.

  5. Superhydrophobicity for antifouling microfluidic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Shirtcliffe, N J; Roach, P

    2013-01-01

    Fouling of surfaces is often problematic in microfluidic devices, particularly when using protein or -enzymatic solutions. Various coating methods have been investigated to reduce the tendency for protein molecules to adsorb, mostly relying on hydrophobic surface chemistry or the antifouling ability of -polyethylene glycol. Here we present the potential use of superhydrophobic surfaces to not only reduce the amount of surface contamination but also to induce self-cleaning under flow conditions. The methodology is presented in order to prepare superhydrophobic surface coatings having micro- and nanoscale feature dimensions, as well as a step-by-step guide to quantify adsorbed protein down to nanogram levels. The fabrication of these surfaces as coatings via silica sol-gel and copper nano-hair growth is presented, which can be applied within microfluidic devices manufactured from various materials.

  6. Nanofluidic interfaces in microfluidic networks

    DOE PAGES

    Millet, Larry J.; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Retterer, Scott T.

    2015-09-24

    The integration of nano- and microfluidic technologies enables the construction of tunable interfaces to physical and biological systems across relevant length scales. The ability to perform chemical manipulations of miniscule sample volumes is greatly enhanced through these technologies and extends the ability to manipulate and sample the local fluidic environments at subcellular, cellular and community or tissue scales. Here we describe the development of a flexible surface micromachining process for the creation of nanofluidic channel arrays integrated within SU-8 microfluidic networks. The use of a semi-porous, silicon rich, silicon nitride structural layer allows rapid release of the sacrificial silicon dioxidemore » during the nanochannel fabrication. Nanochannel openings that form the interface to biological samples are customized using focused ion beam milling. The compatibility of these interfaces with on-chip microbial culture is demonstrated.« less

  7. Microfluidic hydrogels for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guo You; Zhou, Li Hong; Zhang, Qian Cheng; Chen, Yong Mei; Sun, Wei; Xu, Feng; Lu, Tian Jian

    2011-03-01

    With advanced properties similar to the native extracellular matrix, hydrogels have found widespread applications in tissue engineering. Hydrogel-based cellular constructs have been successfully developed to engineer different tissues such as skin, cartilage and bladder. Whilst significant advances have been made, it is still challenging to fabricate large and complex functional tissues due mainly to the limited diffusion capability of hydrogels. The integration of microfluidic networks and hydrogels can greatly enhance mass transport in hydrogels and spatiotemporally control the chemical microenvironment of cells, mimicking the function of native microvessels. In this review, we present and discuss recent advances in the fabrication of microfluidic hydrogels from the viewpoint of tissue engineering. Further development of new hydrogels and microengineering technologies will have a great impact on tissue engineering.

  8. Microfluidic preparation of polymer nanospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucuk, Israfil; Edirisinghe, Mohan

    2014-12-01

    In this work, solid polymer nanospheres with their surface tailored for drug adhesion were prepared using a V-shaped microfluidic junction. The biocompatible polymer solutions were infused using two channels of the microfluidic junction which was also simultaneously fed with a volatile liquid, perfluorohexane using the other channel. The mechanism by which the nanospheres are generated is explained using high speed camera imaging. The polymer concentration (5-50 wt%) and flow rates of the feeds (50-300 µl min-1) were important parameters in controlling the nanosphere diameter. The diameter of the polymer nanospheres was found to be in the range of 80-920 nm with a polydispersity index of 11-19 %. The interior structure and surfaces of the nanospheres prepared were studied using advanced microscopy and showed the presence of fine pores and cracks on surface which can be used as drug entrapment locations.

  9. Influence of bubble size on effervescent atomization. Part 1: bubble characterization and mean spray features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Taylor; Shepard, Thomas; Forliti, David

    2016-11-01

    In the effervescent atomization process a gas-liquid bubbly mixture is ejected from a nozzle with the goal of enhancing liquid break-up. In this work, high speed images are taken of the bubbly flow inside of an effervescent atomizer as well as downstream of the atomizer exit. The use of varying porous plate media grades and channel inserts at the air injection site of the atomizer permitted independent control of mean bubble size. Digital image analyses were used for bubble characterization and measuring mean spray features. The roles of air injection geometry on bubble population parameters inside of the effervescent atomizer are detailed. The effect of bubble size is examined at multiple gas to liquid flow rate ratios for which the bubbly flow regime was maintained. Results are presented demonstrating the influence of bubble size on the average jet width, jet dark core length, and liquid break-up.

  10. Integrating plasmonic diagnostics and microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Niu, Lifang; Zhang, Nan; Liu, Hong; Zhou, Xiaodong; Knoll, Wolfgang

    2015-09-01

    Plasmonics is generally divided into two categories: surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of electromagnetic modes propagating along a (noble) metal/dielectric interface and localized SPRs (LSPRs) on nanoscopic metallic structures (particles, rods, shells, holes, etc.). Both optical transducer concepts can be combined with and integrated in microfluidic devices for biomolecular analyte detections, with the benefits of small foot-print for point-of-care detection, low-cost for one-time disposal, and ease of being integrated into an array format. The key technologies in such integration include the plasmonic chip, microfluidic channel fabrication, surface bio-functionalization, and selection of the detection scheme, which are selected according to the specifics of the targeting analytes. This paper demonstrates a few examples of the many versions of how to combine plasmonics and integrated microfluidics, using different plasmonic generation mechanisms for different analyte detections. One example is a DNA sensor array using a gold film as substrate and surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy as the transduction method. This is then compared to grating-coupled SPR for poly(ethylene glycol) thiol interaction detected by angle interrogation, gold nanohole based LSPR chip for biotin-strepavidin detection by wavelength shift, and gold nanoholes/nanopillars for the detection of prostate specific antigen by quantum dot labels excited by the LSPR. Our experimental results exemplified that the plasmonic integrated microfluidics is a promising tool for understanding the biomolecular interactions and molecular recognition process as well as biosensing, especially for on-site or point-of-care diagnostics.

  11. Integrating plasmonic diagnostics and microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Lifang; Zhang, Nan; Liu, Hong; Zhou, Xiaodong; Knoll, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonics is generally divided into two categories: surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of electromagnetic modes propagating along a (noble) metal/dielectric interface and localized SPRs (LSPRs) on nanoscopic metallic structures (particles, rods, shells, holes, etc.). Both optical transducer concepts can be combined with and integrated in microfluidic devices for biomolecular analyte detections, with the benefits of small foot-print for point-of-care detection, low-cost for one-time disposal, and ease of being integrated into an array format. The key technologies in such integration include the plasmonic chip, microfluidic channel fabrication, surface bio-functionalization, and selection of the detection scheme, which are selected according to the specifics of the targeting analytes. This paper demonstrates a few examples of the many versions of how to combine plasmonics and integrated microfluidics, using different plasmonic generation mechanisms for different analyte detections. One example is a DNA sensor array using a gold film as substrate and surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy as the transduction method. This is then compared to grating-coupled SPR for poly(ethylene glycol) thiol interaction detected by angle interrogation, gold nanohole based LSPR chip for biotin-strepavidin detection by wavelength shift, and gold nanoholes/nanopillars for the detection of prostate specific antigen by quantum dot labels excited by the LSPR. Our experimental results exemplified that the plasmonic integrated microfluidics is a promising tool for understanding the biomolecular interactions and molecular recognition process as well as biosensing, especially for on-site or point-of-care diagnostics. PMID:26392832

  12. Acoustically-driven microfluidic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, A W; Benett, W J; Tarte, L R

    2000-06-23

    We have demonstrated a non-contact method of concentrating and mixing particles in a plastic microfluidic chamber employing acoustic radiation pressure. A flaw cell package has also been designed that integrates liquid sample interconnects, electrical contacts and a removable sample chamber. Experiments were performed on 1, 3, 6, and 10 {micro}m polystyrene beads. Increased antibody binding to a solid-phase substrate was observed in the presence of acoustic mixing due to improve mass transport.

  13. Multidimensional bioseparation with modular microfluidics

    DOEpatents

    Chirica, Gabriela S.; Renzi, Ronald F.

    2013-08-27

    A multidimensional chemical separation and analysis system is described including a prototyping platform and modular microfluidic components capable of rapid and convenient assembly, alteration and disassembly of numerous candidate separation systems. Partial or total computer control of the separation system is possible. Single or multiple alternative processing trains can be tested, optimized and/or run in parallel. Examples related to the separation and analysis of human bodily fluids are given.

  14. Bursting the bubble of melt inclusions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lowenstern, Jacob B.

    2015-01-01

    Most silicate melt inclusions (MI) contain bubbles, whose significance has been alternately calculated, pondered, and ignored, but rarely if ever directly explored. Moore et al. (2015) analyze the bubbles, as well as their host glasses, and conclude that they often hold the preponderance of CO2 in the MI. Their findings entreat future researchers to account for the presence of bubbles in MI when calculating volatile budgets, saturation pressures, and eruptive flux.

  15. Collapse of vacuum bubbles in a vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Kin-Wang; Wang, Shang-Yung

    2011-02-15

    We revisit the dynamics of a false vacuum bubble in a background de Sitter spacetime. We find that there exists a large parameter space that allows the bubble to collapse into a black hole or to form a wormhole. This may have interesting implications for the creation of a baby universe in the laboratory, the string landscape where the bubble nucleation takes place among a plenitude of metastable vacua, and the inflationary physics.

  16. Detailed Jet Dynamics in a Collapsing Bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supponen, Outi; Obreschkow, Danail; Kobel, Philippe; Farhat, Mohamed

    2015-12-01

    We present detailed visualizations of the micro-jet forming inside an aspherically collapsing cavitation bubble near a free surface. The high-quality visualizations of large and strongly deformed bubbles disclose so far unseen features of the dynamics inside the bubble, such as a mushroom-like flattened jet-tip, crown formation and micro-droplets. We also find that jetting near a free surface reduces the collapse time relative to the Rayleigh time.

  17. Buoyancy Driven Shear Flows of Bubble Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, R. J.; Zenit, R.; Chellppannair, T.; Koch, D. L.; Spelt, P. D. M.; Sangani, A.

    1998-11-01

    In this work the gas volume fraction and the root-mean-squared fluid velocity are measured in buoyancy driven shear flows of bubble suspensions in a tall, inclined, rectangular channel. The experiments are performed under conditions where We << 1 and Re >> 1 , so that the bubbles are relatively undeformed and the flow is inviscid and approximately irrotational. Nitrogen is introduced through an array of capillaries at the base of a .2x.02x2 m channel filled with an aqueous electrolyte solution (0.06 molL-1 MgSO_4). The rising bubbles generate a unidirectional shear flow, where the denser suspension at the lower surface of the channel falls, while the less dense suspension at the upper surface rises. Hot-film anemometry is used to measure the resulting gas volume fraction and fluid velocity profiles. The bubble collision rate with the sensor is related to the gas volume fraction and the mean and variance of the bubble velocity using an experimentally measured collision surface area for the sensor. Bubble collisions with the sensor are identified by the characteristic slope of the hot-film anemometer signal when bubbles collide with the sensor. It is observed that the steady shear flow develops a bubble phase pressure gradient across the channel gap as the bubbles interchange momentum through direct collisions. The discrete phase presssure gradient balances the buoyancy force driving bubbles toward the upper surface resulting in a steady void fraction profile across the gap width. The strength of the shear flow is controlled by the extent of bubble segregation and by the effective viscosity of the bubble phase. The measurements are compared with solutions of the averaged equations of motion (Kang et al. 1997; Spelt and Sangani, 1998), for a range of gas volume fractions and channel inclination angles.

  18. Bubble, Drop and Particle Unit (BDPU)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This section of the Life and Microgravity Spacelab (LMS) publication includes the following articles entitled: (1) Oscillatory Thermocapillary Instability; (2) Thermocapillary Convection in Multilayer Systems; (3) Bubble and Drop Interaction with Solidification Front; (4) A Liquid Electrohydrodynamics Experiment; (5) Boiling on Small Plate Heaters under Microgravity and a Comparison with Earth Gravity; (6) Thermocapillary Migration and Interactions of Bubbles and Drops; and (7) Nonlinear Surface Tension Driven Bubble Migration

  19. Whole-Teflon microfluidic chips.

    PubMed

    Ren, Kangning; Dai, Wen; Zhou, Jianhua; Su, Jing; Wu, Hongkai

    2011-05-17

    Although microfluidics has shown exciting potential, its broad applications are significantly limited by drawbacks of the materials used to make them. In this work, we present a convenient strategy for fabricating whole-Teflon microfluidic chips with integrated valves that show outstanding inertness to various chemicals and extreme resistance against all solvents. Compared with other microfluidic materials [e.g., poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)] the whole-Teflon chip has a few more advantages, such as no absorption of small molecules, little adsorption of biomolecules onto channel walls, and no leaching of residue molecules from the material bulk into the solution in the channel. Various biological cells have been cultured in the whole-Teflon channel. Adherent cells can attach to the channel bottom, spread, and proliferate well in the channels (with similar proliferation rate to the cells in PDMS channels with the same dimensions). The moderately good gas permeability of the Teflon materials makes it suitable to culture cells inside the microchannels for a long time.

  20. Continuous Flow Microfluidic Bioparticle Concentrator

    PubMed Central

    Martel, Joseph M.; Smith, Kyle C.; Dlamini, Mcolisi; Pletcher, Kendall; Yang, Jennifer; Karabacak, Murat; Haber, Daniel A.; Kapur, Ravi; Toner, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Innovative microfluidic technology has enabled massively parallelized and extremely efficient biological and clinical assays. Many biological applications developed and executed with traditional bulk processing techniques have been translated and streamlined through microfluidic processing with the notable exception of sample volume reduction or centrifugation, one of the most widely utilized processes in the biological sciences. We utilize the high-speed phenomenon known as inertial focusing combined with hydraulic resistance controlled multiplexed micro-siphoning allowing for the continuous concentration of suspended cells into pre-determined volumes up to more than 400 times smaller than the input with a yield routinely above 95% at a throughput of 240 ml/hour. Highlighted applications are presented for how the technology can be successfully used for live animal imaging studies, in a system to increase the efficient use of small clinical samples, and finally, as a means of macro-to-micro interfacing allowing large samples to be directly coupled to a variety of powerful microfluidic technologies. PMID:26061253

  1. Continuous Flow Microfluidic Bioparticle Concentrator.

    PubMed

    Martel, Joseph M; Smith, Kyle C; Dlamini, Mcolisi; Pletcher, Kendall; Yang, Jennifer; Karabacak, Murat; Haber, Daniel A; Kapur, Ravi; Toner, Mehmet

    2015-06-10

    Innovative microfluidic technology has enabled massively parallelized and extremely efficient biological and clinical assays. Many biological applications developed and executed with traditional bulk processing techniques have been translated and streamlined through microfluidic processing with the notable exception of sample volume reduction or centrifugation, one of the most widely utilized processes in the biological sciences. We utilize the high-speed phenomenon known as inertial focusing combined with hydraulic resistance controlled multiplexed micro-siphoning allowing for the continuous concentration of suspended cells into pre-determined volumes up to more than 400 times smaller than the input with a yield routinely above 95% at a throughput of 240 ml/hour. Highlighted applications are presented for how the technology can be successfully used for live animal imaging studies, in a system to increase the efficient use of small clinical samples, and finally, as a means of macro-to-micro interfacing allowing large samples to be directly coupled to a variety of powerful microfluidic technologies.

  2. Continuous Flow Microfluidic Bioparticle Concentrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, Joseph M.; Smith, Kyle C.; Dlamini, Mcolisi; Pletcher, Kendall; Yang, Jennifer; Karabacak, Murat; Haber, Daniel A.; Kapur, Ravi; Toner, Mehmet

    2015-06-01

    Innovative microfluidic technology has enabled massively parallelized and extremely efficient biological and clinical assays. Many biological applications developed and executed with traditional bulk processing techniques have been translated and streamlined through microfluidic processing with the notable exception of sample volume reduction or centrifugation, one of the most widely utilized processes in the biological sciences. We utilize the high-speed phenomenon known as inertial focusing combined with hydraulic resistance controlled multiplexed micro-siphoning allowing for the continuous concentration of suspended cells into pre-determined volumes up to more than 400 times smaller than the input with a yield routinely above 95% at a throughput of 240 ml/hour. Highlighted applications are presented for how the technology can be successfully used for live animal imaging studies, in a system to increase the efficient use of small clinical samples, and finally, as a means of macro-to-micro interfacing allowing large samples to be directly coupled to a variety of powerful microfluidic technologies.

  3. Some problems of the theory of bubble growth and condensation in bubble chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tkachev, L. G.

    1988-01-01

    This work is an attempt to explain the reasons for the discrepancies between the theoretical and experimental values of bubble growth rate in an overheated liquid, and to provide a brief formulation of the main premises of the theory on bubble growth in liquid before making a critical analysis. To simplify the problem, the floating upward of bubbles is not discussed; moreover, the study is based on the results of the theory of the behavior of fixed bubbles.

  4. Virtual Libraries: Interactive Support Software and an Application in Chaotic Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katsirikou, Anthi; Skiadas, Christos; Apostolou, Apostolos; Rompogiannakis, Giannis

    This paper begins with a discussion of the characteristics and the singularity of chaotic systems, including dynamic systems theory, chaotic orbit, fractals, chaotic attractors, and characteristics of chaotic systems. The second section addresses the digital libraries (DL) concept and the appropriateness of chaotic models, including definition and…

  5. Single-bubble sonoluminescence from noble gases.

    PubMed

    Yasui, K

    2001-03-01

    Single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) from noble gases in water is studied theoretically in order to clarify the reason of the distinguished feature that the luminescence is strong for all noble gases, while the other systems of cavitation luminescence are greatly enhanced by the presence of the heavy noble gas(xenon). It is clarified that in spite of the larger thermal conductivity of lighter noble gases the maximum temperature in a SBSL bubble of lighter noble gases is higher due both to the segregation of water vapor and noble gas inside a SBSL bubble and the stronger acoustic drive of a SBSL bubble of lighter noble gases.

  6. Single-bubble sonoluminescence from noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Kyuichi

    2001-03-01

    Single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) from noble gases in water is studied theoretically in order to clarify the reason of the distinguished feature that the luminescence is strong for all noble gases, while the other systems of cavitation luminescence are greatly enhanced by the presence of the heavy noble gas(xenon). It is clarified that in spite of the larger thermal conductivity of lighter noble gases the maximum temperature in a SBSL bubble of lighter noble gases is higher due both to the segregation of water vapor and noble gas inside a SBSL bubble and the stronger acoustic drive of a SBSL bubble of lighter noble gases.

  7. Spectroscopic characteristic of conical bubble luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qi-Dai; Fu, Li-Min; Ai, Xi-Cheng; Zhang, Jian-Ping; Wang, Long

    2005-04-01

    The conical bubble sonoluminescence (CBSL) from the collapse of the bubble was observed in an improved U-tube apparatus. The emitted light energy of a single CBSL flash was measured to be ~ 1.4mJ. The pulse width was about 100μs. The spectra of luminescence were continuum superimposed with the spectral bands from the excited-state C2, CN and CH. The CBSL provides a link between the light emission of the single-bubble and the multi-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL and MBSL).

  8. Multiple Spark-Generated Bubble Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoo, Boo Cheong; Adikhari, Deepak; Fong, Siew Wan; Klaseboer, Evert

    The complex interactions of two and three spark-generated bubbles are studied using high speed photography. The corresponding simulations are performed using a 3D Boundary Element Method (BEM) code. The bubbles generated are between 3 to 5 mm in radius, and they are either in-phase or out-of-phase with one another. The possible interaction phenomena between two identically sized bubbles are summarized. Depending on their relative distances and phase differences, they can coalesce, jet towards or away from one another, split into smaller bubbles, or 'catapult' away from one another. The 'catapult' effect can be utilized to generated high speed jet in the absence of a solid boundary or shockwave. Also three bubble interactions are highlighted. Complicated phenomena such as bubble forming an elliptical shape and bubble splitting are observed. The BEM simulations provide insight into the physics of the phenomena by providing details such as detailed bubble shape changes (experimental observations are limited by the temporal and spatial resolution), and jet velocity. It is noted that the well-tested BEM code [1,2] utilized here is computationally very efficient as compared to other full-domain methods since only the bubble surface is meshed.

  9. Analysis of a deflating soap bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, David P.; Sleyman, Sarah

    2010-10-01

    A soap bubble on the end of a cylindrical tube is seen to deflate as the higher pressure air inside the bubble escapes through a tube. We perform an experiment to measure the radius of the slowly deflating bubble and observe that the radius decreases to a minimum before quickly increasing. This behavior reflects the fact that the bubble ends up as a flat surface over the end of the tube. A theoretical analysis reproduces this behavior and compares favorably with the experimental data.

  10. Band gaps in bubble phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, V.; Bretagne, A.; Lanoy, M.; Tourin, A.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the interaction between Bragg and hybridization effects on the band gap properties of bubble phononic crystals. These latter consist of air cavities periodically arranged in an elastomer matrix and are fabricated using soft-lithography techniques. Their transmission properties are affected by Bragg effects due to the periodicity of the structure as well as hybridization between the propagating mode of the embedding medium and bubble resonance. The hybridization gap survives disorder while the Bragg gap requires a periodic distribution of bubbles. The distance between two bubble layers can be tuned to make the two gaps overlap or to create a transmission peak in the hybridization gap.

  11. Electrolytic Bubble Growth on Pillared Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kenneth; Savas, Omer

    2013-11-01

    In current energy research, artificial photosynthetic (AP) devices are being designed to split water and harvest hydrogen gas using sunlight. In one such design, hydrogen gas bubbles evolve on catalytic surfaces of arrayed micropillars. If these bubbles are not promptly removed from the surface, they can adversely affect gas evolution rates, water flow rates, sunlight capture, and heat management of the system - all of which deteriorate device performance. Therefore, understanding how to remove evolved gas bubbles from the pillar surfaces is crucial. Flow visualization of electrolytic bubble nucleation and detachment from the catalytic pillar surfaces has been conducted. The bubble departure diameter and lift-off frequency are extracted and compared with known correlations from boiling heat transfer. Bubble tracking indicates that bubble detachment is enhanced by local interactions with neighboring bubbles. These observations suggest how hydrogen gas bubbles can be effectively removed from pillared surfaces to prolong AP device longevity. Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Innovations Hub.

  12. Sound waves in multifractional liquids with bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubaidullin, D. A.; Gafiyatov, R. N.

    2017-01-01

    The propagation of sound waves in multifractional mixtures of liquid with vapor–gas and gas bubbles of different sizes and different compositions with phase transitions is studied. The dispersed phase consists of N+M fractions having various gases in bubbles and different in the bubbles radii. Phase transitions accounted for N fractions. The total bubble volume concentration is small (less than 1%). The dispersion relation is derived and dispersion curves is built. The evolution of the weak pulsed perturbations of the pressure in this mixture was calculated numerically.

  13. Bubble formation in additive manufacturing of glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Junjie; Gilbert, Luke J.; Peters, Daniel C.; Bristow, Douglas A.; Landers, Robert G.; Goldstein, Jonathan T.; Urbas, Augustine M.; Kinzel, Edward C.

    2016-05-01

    Bubble formation is a common problem in glass manufacturing. The spatial density of bubbles in a piece of glass is a key limiting factor to the optical quality of the glass. Bubble formation is also a common problem in additive manufacturing, leading to anisotropic material properties. In glass Additive Manufacturing (AM) two separate types of bubbles have been observed: a foam layer caused by the reboil of the glass melt and a periodic pattern of bubbles which appears to be unique to glass additive manufacturing. This paper presents a series of studies to relate the periodicity of bubble formation to part scan speed, laser power, and filament feed rate. These experiments suggest that bubbles are formed by the reboil phenomena why periodic bubbles result from air being trapped between the glass filament and the substrate. Reboil can be detected using spectroscopy and avoided by minimizing the laser power while periodic bubbles can be avoided by a two-step laser melting process to first establish good contact between the filament and substrate before reflowing the track with higher laser power.

  14. Delusions, superstitious conditioning and chaotic dopamine neurodynamics.

    PubMed

    Shaner, A

    1999-02-01

    Excessive mesolimbic dopaminergic neurotransmission is closely related to the psychotic symptoms of schizophrenia. A mathematical model of dopamine neuron firing rates, developed by King and others, suggests a mechanism by which excessive dopaminergic transmission could produce psychotic symptoms, especially delusions. In this model, firing rates varied chaotically when the efficacy of dopaminergic transmission was enhanced. Such non-contingent changes in firing rates in mesolimbic reward pathways could produce delusions by distorting thinking in the same way that non-contingent reinforcement produces superstitious conditioning. Though difficult to test in humans, the hypothesis is testable as an explanation for a common animal model of psychosis--amphetamine stereotypy in rats. The hypothesis predicts that: (1) amphetamine will cause chaotic firing rates in mesolimbic dopamine neurons; (2) non-contingent brain stimulation reward will produce stereotypy; (3) non-contingent microdialysis of dopamine into reward areas will produce stereotypy; and (4) dopamine antagonists will block all three effects.

  15. Chaotic coordinates for the Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, S. R.; Suzuki, Y.

    2014-10-15

    The theory of quadratic-flux-minimizing (QFM) surfaces is reviewed, and numerical techniques that allow high-order QFM surfaces to be efficiently constructed for experimentally relevant, non-integrable magnetic fields are described. As a practical example, the chaotic edge of the magnetic field in the Large Helical Device (LHD) is examined. A precise technique for finding the boundary surface is implemented, the hierarchy of partial barriers associated with the near-critical cantori is constructed, and a coordinate system, which we call chaotic coordinates, that is based on a selection of QFM surfaces is constructed that simplifies the description of the magnetic field, so that flux surfaces become “straight” and islands become “square.”.

  16. Fractal dynamics in chaotic quantum transport.

    PubMed

    Kotimäki, V; Räsänen, E; Hennig, H; Heller, E J

    2013-08-01

    Despite several experiments on chaotic quantum transport in two-dimensional systems such as semiconductor quantum dots, corresponding quantum simulations within a real-space model have been out of reach so far. Here we carry out quantum transport calculations in real space and real time for a two-dimensional stadium cavity that shows chaotic dynamics. By applying a large set of magnetic fields we obtain a complete picture of magnetoconductance that indicates fractal scaling. In the calculations of the fractality we use detrended fluctuation analysis-a widely used method in time-series analysis-and show its usefulness in the interpretation of the conductance curves. Comparison with a standard method to extract the fractal dimension leads to consistent results that in turn qualitatively agree with the previous experimental data.

  17. High frequency oscillators for chaotic radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beal, A. N.; Blakely, J. N.; Corron, N. J.; Dean, R. N.

    2016-05-01

    This work focuses on implementing a class of exactly solvable chaotic oscillators at speeds that allow real world radar applications. The implementation of a chaotic radar using a solvable system has many advantages due to the generation of aperiodic, random-like waveforms with an analytic representation. These advantages include high range resolution, no range ambiguity, and spread spectrum characteristics. These systems allow for optimal detection of a noise-like signal by the means of a linear matched filter using simple and inexpensive methods. This paper outlines the use of exactly solvable chaos in ranging systems, while addressing electronic design issues related to the frequency dependence of the system's stretching function introduced by the use of negative impedance converters (NICs).

  18. Active chaotic excitation for bolted joint monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasel, Timothy R.; Todd, Michael D.; Park, Gyuhae

    2006-03-01

    Recent research has shown that high frequency chaotic excitation and state space reconstruction may be used to identify incipient damage (loss of preload) in a bolted joint. In this study, a new experiment is undertaken with updated test equipment, including a piezostack actuator that allows for precise control of bolt preload. The excitation waveform is applied to a macro-fiber composite (MFC) patch that is bonded to the test structure and is sensed in an active manner using a second MFC patch. A novel prediction error algorithm, based on comparing filtered properties of the guided chaotic waves, is used to determine the damage state of a frame structure and is shown to be highly sensitive to small levels of bolt preload loss. The performance of the prediction error method is compared with standard structural health monitoring damage features that are based on time series analysis using auto-regressive (AR) models.

  19. Exact folded-band chaotic oscillator.

    PubMed

    Corron, Ned J; Blakely, Jonathan N

    2012-06-01

    An exactly solvable chaotic oscillator with folded-band dynamics is shown. The oscillator is a hybrid dynamical system containing a linear ordinary differential equation and a nonlinear switching condition. Bounded oscillations are provably chaotic, and successive waveform maxima yield a one-dimensional piecewise-linear return map with segments of both positive and negative slopes. Continuous-time dynamics exhibit a folded-band topology similar to Rössler's oscillator. An exact solution is written as a linear convolution of a fixed basis pulse and a discrete binary sequence, from which an equivalent symbolic dynamics is obtained. The folded-band topology is shown to be dependent on the symbol grammar.

  20. Chaotic map clustering algorithm for EEG analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellotti, R.; De Carlo, F.; Stramaglia, S.

    2004-03-01

    The non-parametric chaotic map clustering algorithm has been applied to the analysis of electroencephalographic signals, in order to recognize the Huntington's disease, one of the most dangerous pathologies of the central nervous system. The performance of the method has been compared with those obtained through parametric algorithms, as K-means and deterministic annealing, and supervised multi-layer perceptron. While supervised neural networks need a training phase, performed by means of data tagged by the genetic test, and the parametric methods require a prior choice of the number of classes to find, the chaotic map clustering gives a natural evidence of the pathological class, without any training or supervision, thus providing a new efficient methodology for the recognition of patterns affected by the Huntington's disease.