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Sample records for microfluidic protein patterning

  1. Channel surface patterning of alternating biomimetic protein combinations for enhanced microfluidic tumor cell isolation.

    PubMed

    Launiere, Cari; Gaskill, Marissa; Czaplewski, Gregory; Myung, Ja Hye; Hong, Seungpyo; Eddington, David T

    2012-05-01

    Here, we report a new method for multicomponent protein patterning in a microchannel and also a technique for improving immunoaffinity-based circulating tumor cell (CTC) capture by patterning regions of alternating adhesive proteins using the new method. The first of two proteins, antiepithelial cell adhesion molecule (anti-EpCAM), provides the specificity for CTC capture. The second, E-selectin, increases CTC capture under shear. Patterning regions with and without E-selectin allows captured leukocytes, which also bind E-selectin and are unwanted impurities in CTC isolation, to roll a short distance and detach from the capture surface. This reduces leukocyte capture by up to 82%. The patterning is combined with a leukocyte elution step in which a calcium chelating buffer effectively deactivates E-selectin so that leukocytes may be rinsed away 60% more efficiently than with a buffer containing calcium. The alternating patterning of this biomimetic protein combination, used in conjunction with the elution step, reduces capture of leukocytes while maintaining a high tumor cell capture efficiency that is up to 1.9 times higher than the tumor cell capture efficiency of a surface with only anti-EpCAM. The new patterning technique described here does not require mask alignment and can be used to spatially control the immobilization of any two proteins or protein mixtures inside a sealed microfluidic channel.

  2. Stable sol-gel microstructured and microfluidic networks for protein patterning.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y D; Park, C B; Clark, D S

    2001-06-05

    We demonstrate the formation of micropatterned sol-gel structures containing active proteins by patterning with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannels. To transport sol solution efficiently into the hydrophobic PDMS microchannels, a hydrophilic-hydrophobic block copolymer was used to impart hydrophilicity to the PDMS microchannels. Poor adhesion of the micropatterned gel structure onto glass slides was improved by treating the glass surface with a polymeric substrate. To minimize cracks in the gel microstructure, hybrid matrices of interpenetrating organic and inorganic networks were prepared containing the reactive organic moieties polyvinylalcohol or polyvinylpyrrolidone. Retention of biochemical activity within the micropatterned gel was demonstrated by performing immunobinding assays with immobilized immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody. The potential application of microfluidics technology to immobilized-enzyme biocatalysis was demonstrated using PDMS-patterned microchannels filled with trypsin-containing sol-gels. This work provides a foundation for the microfabrication of functional protein chips using sol-gel processes. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  3. Rapid photochemical surface patterning of proteins in thiol-ene based microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Lafleur, Josiane P; Kwapiszewski, Radoslaw; Jensen, Thomas G; Kutter, Jörg P

    2013-02-21

    The suitable optical properties of thiol-ene polymers combined with the ease of modifying their surface for the attachment of recognition molecules make them ideal candidates in many biochip applications. This paper reports the rapid one-step photochemical surface patterning of biomolecules in microfluidic thiol-ene chips. This work focuses on thiol-ene substrates featuring an excess of thiol groups at their surface. The thiol-ene stoichiometric composition can be varied to precisely control the number of surface thiol groups available for surface modification up to an average surface density of 136 ± 17 SH nm(-2). Biotin alkyne was patterned directly inside thiol-ene microchannels prior to conjugation with fluorescently labelled streptavidin. The surface bound conjugates were detected by evanescent wave-induced fluorescence (EWIF), demonstrating the success of the grafting procedure and its potential for biochip applications.

  4. [Effects of Radix Astragali and Fructus Corni on urinary protein pattern in nephropathy mice by microfluidic chip].

    PubMed

    Huang, Li-ming; Shi, Xiao-qiang; Liang, Heng

    2007-07-01

    To study the urinary protein patterns of nephropathy mice induced by dextran and the effects of aquesous extract of Fructus Corni (AEFC) and Radix Astragali (AERA). Nephropathy model was established by administrated with dextran to mice. Some of the dextran treated mice were given AERA (20 g x kg(-1) x d(-1)) as AERA group, other mice were given AEFC (10 g x kg(-1) x d(-1)) as AEFC group. Some of the dextran treated mice were given water as model group, some normal mice as normal control group. After a 12 weeks' treatment, 24 hour urine of four groups was collected, respectively. Each urinary sample was divided into two parts, one was non-concentrated urine sample, another was used as concentrated urine sample. Two kinds of urinary sample of four groups were analyzed with microfluidic chips on Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer instrument. Each group's urinary protein patterns were obtained, more than 20 proteins were were detected. Compared with normal group, about five kinds of protein were found in urinary sample of model group, among which M > 43 x 10(3) proteins were increased. Compared with model group, significant treated-related protein's kind and quantitative changes in AERA treated group and AEFC group were found. Urinary protein kinds were reduced, especially certain the proteins (M > 50 x 10(3)) were significantly decreased approach to normal patterns. Non-concentrated urine samples' protein pattern mainly included were proteins (M=29, 32, 43, 52, 68, 76 x 10(3) and concentrated urine samples mainly included the proteins (M=22, 24, 32, 46 x 10(3)). AERA and AEFC could reduce the urinary protein and made protein pattern different, which showed that radix astragali and fructus corni could play an important role in protecting renal function of nephropathy mice and finding the target protein markers related to AERA and AEFC effects on nephropathy mice.

  5. Strategy for allosteric analysis based on protein-patterned stationary phase in microfluidic chip.

    PubMed

    Bi, Hongyan; Weng, Xuexiang; Qu, Haiyun; Kong, Jilie; Yang, Pengyuan; Liu, Baohong

    2005-01-01

    An effective method is presented for the on-chip analysis of chiral interactions with a successful depression of nonspecific adsorption. The alumina gel-derived protein network on poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) microchannel was explored to form a protein-stationary phase and then used to carry out electrophoresis for fast enantioseparation coupled with electrochemical detection. On the basis of the chemical modification of a synthesized copolymer containing silane-functionalized scaffold, alumina sol-gel could react readily with the silane groups and form steady microstructure on the chip surface achieving the encapsulation of functional biomolecules. Compared with the native PMMA microchannels, the modified surfaces exhibited much better wettability, more stable and enhanced electroosmotic mobility, and less nonspecific adsorption. The water contact angle and EOF of alumina-gel-derived PMMA substrate were 22 degrees and 4.3 x 10(-4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), compared to those of 73 degrees and 1.9 x 10(-4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) from the untreated one, respectively. Bovine serum albumin, acting as a target protein, could be stably and homogeneously immobilized in the modified PMMA microchannel to fabricate a protein-stationary phase. Under a mild condition, D- and L-tryptophan were efficiently separated with a resolution of 1.57. The as-prepared microchip can perform chiral separations within short time, indicating that the general protocol has the potential to provide a platform for high throughput screening of enantiomer candidates such as those biochemical drugs with protein targets and the research of receptor interactions.

  6. Microfluidic Approaches for Protein Crystal Structure Analysis.

    PubMed

    Maeki, Masatoshi; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Tokeshi, Manabu; Miyazaki, Masaya

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes two microfluidic-based protein crystallization methods, protein crystallization behavior in the microfluidic devices, and their applications for X-ray crystal structure analysis. Microfluidic devices provide many advantages for protein crystallography; they require small sample volumes, provide high-throughput screening, and allow control of the protein crystallization. A droplet-based protein crystallization method is a useful technique for high-throughput screening and the formation of a single crystal without any complicated device fabrication process. Well-based microfluidic platforms also enable effective protein crystallization. This review also summarizes the protein crystal growth behavior in microfluidic devices as, is known from viewpoints of theoretical and experimental approaches. Finally, we introduce applications of microfluidic devices for on-chip crystal structure analysis.

  7. Microfluidic Tools for Protein Crystallography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, Bahige G.

    X-ray crystallography is the most widely used method to determine the structure of proteins, providing an understanding of their functions in all aspects of life to advance applications in fields such as drug development and renewable energy. New techniques, namely serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX), have unlocked the ability to unravel the structures of complex proteins with vital biological functions. A key step and major bottleneck of structure determination is protein crystallization, which is very arduous due to the complexity of proteins and their natural environments. Furthermore, crystal characteristics govern data quality, thus need to be optimized to attain the most accurate reconstruction of the protein structure. Crystal size is one such characteristic in which narrowed distributions with a small modal size can significantly reduce the amount of protein needed for SFX. A novel microfluidic sorting platform was developed to isolate viable ~200 nm -- ~600 nm photosystem I (PSI) membrane protein crystals from ~200 nm -- ~20 ?m crystal samples using dielectrophoresis, as confirmed by fluorescence microscopy, second-order nonlinear imaging of chiral crystals (SONICC), and dynamic light scattering. The platform was scaled-up to rapidly provide 100s of microliters of sorted crystals necessary for SFX, in which similar crystal size distributions were attained. Transmission electron microscopy was used to view the PSI crystal lattice, which remained well-ordered postsorting, and SFX diffraction data was obtained, confirming a high-quality, viable crystal sample. Simulations indicated sorted samples provided accurate, complete SFX datasets with 3500-fold less protein than unsorted samples. Microfluidic devices were also developed for versatile, rapid protein crystallization screening using nanovolumes of sample. Concentration gradients of protein and precipitant were generated to crystallize PSI, phycocyanin, and lysozyme using modified counterdiffusion

  8. Rapid Protein Separations in Microfluidic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, Z. H.; Das, Champak; Xia, Zheng; Stoyanov, Alexander V.; Fredrickson, Carl K.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes fabrication of glass and plastic microfluidic devices for protein separations. Although the long-term goal is to develop a microfluidic device for two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, this paper focuses on the first dimension-isoelectric focusing (IEF). A laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) imaging system has been built for imaging an entire channel in an IEF device. The whole-channel imaging eliminates the need to migrate focused protein bands, which is required if a single-point detector is used. Using the devices and the imaging system, we are able to perform IEF separations of proteins within minutes rather than hours in traditional bench-top instruments.

  9. Rapid Protein Separations in Microfluidic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, Z. H.; Das, Champak; Xia, Zheng; Stoyanov, Alexander V.; Fredrickson, Carl K.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes fabrication of glass and plastic microfluidic devices for protein separations. Although the long-term goal is to develop a microfluidic device for two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, this paper focuses on the first dimension-isoelectric focusing (IEF). A laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) imaging system has been built for imaging an entire channel in an IEF device. The whole-channel imaging eliminates the need to migrate focused protein bands, which is required if a single-point detector is used. Using the devices and the imaging system, we are able to perform IEF separations of proteins within minutes rather than hours in traditional bench-top instruments.

  10. Surface patterning of bonded microfluidic channels

    PubMed Central

    Priest, Craig

    2010-01-01

    Microfluidic channels in which multiple chemical and biological processes can be integrated into a single chip have provided a suitable platform for high throughput screening, chemical synthesis, detection, and alike. These microchips generally exhibit a homogeneous surface chemistry, which limits their functionality. Localized surface modification of microchannels can be challenging due to the nonplanar geometries involved. However, chip bonding remains the main hurdle, with many methods involving thermal or plasma treatment that, in most cases, neutralizes the desired chemical functionality. Postbonding modification of microchannels is subject to many limitations, some of which have been recently overcome. Novel techniques include solution-based modification using laminar or capillary flow, while conventional techniques such as photolithography remain popular. Nonetheless, new methods, including localized microplasma treatment, are emerging as effective postbonding alternatives. This Review focuses on postbonding methods for surface patterning of microchannels. PMID:21045927

  11. Patterning of PMMA microfluidic parts using screen printing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahari Kaleibar, Aminreza; Rahbar, Mona; Haiducu, Marius; Parameswaran, Ash M.

    2010-02-01

    An inexpensive and rapid micro-fabrication process for producing PMMA microfluidic components has been presented. Our proposed technique takes advantages of commercially available economical technologies such as the silk screen printing and UV patterning of PMMA substrates to produce the microfluidic components. As a demonstration of our proposed technique, we had utilized a homemade deep-UV source, λ=254nm, a silk screen mask made using a local screen-printing shop and Isopropyl alcohol - water mixture (IPA-water) as developer to quickly define the microfluidic patterns. The prototyped devices were successfully bonded, sealed, and the device functionality tested and demonstrated. The screen printing based technique can produce microfluidic channels as small as 50 micrometers quite easily, making this technique the most cost-effective, fairly high precision and at the same time an ultra economical plastic microfluidic components fabrication process reported to date.

  12. Integrated Microfluidics for Protein Modification Discovery*

    PubMed Central

    Noach-Hirsh, Meirav; Nevenzal, Hadas; Glick, Yair; Chorni, Evelin; Avrahami, Dorit; Barbiro-Michaely, Efrat; Gerber, Doron; Tzur, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Protein post-translational modifications mediate dynamic cellular processes with broad implications in human disease pathogenesis. There is a large demand for high-throughput technologies supporting post-translational modifications research, and both mass spectrometry and protein arrays have been successfully utilized for this purpose. Protein arrays override the major limitation of target protein abundance inherently associated with MS analysis. This technology, however, is typically restricted to pre-purified proteins spotted in a fixed composition on chips with limited life-time and functionality. In addition, the chips are expensive and designed for a single use, making complex experiments cost-prohibitive. Combining microfluidics with in situ protein expression from a cDNA microarray addressed these limitations. Based on this approach, we introduce a modular integrated microfluidic platform for multiple post-translational modifications analysis of freshly synthesized protein arrays (IMPA). The system's potency, specificity and flexibility are demonstrated for tyrosine phosphorylation and ubiquitination in quasicellular environments. Unlimited by design and protein composition, and relying on minute amounts of biological material and cost-effective technology, this unique approach is applicable for a broad range of basic, biomedical and biomarker research. PMID:26276765

  13. Integrated Microfluidics for Protein Modification Discovery.

    PubMed

    Noach-Hirsh, Meirav; Nevenzal, Hadas; Glick, Yair; Chorni, Evelin; Avrahami, Dorit; Barbiro-Michaely, Efrat; Gerber, Doron; Tzur, Amit

    2015-10-01

    Protein post-translational modifications mediate dynamic cellular processes with broad implications in human disease pathogenesis. There is a large demand for high-throughput technologies supporting post-translational modifications research, and both mass spectrometry and protein arrays have been successfully utilized for this purpose. Protein arrays override the major limitation of target protein abundance inherently associated with MS analysis. This technology, however, is typically restricted to pre-purified proteins spotted in a fixed composition on chips with limited life-time and functionality. In addition, the chips are expensive and designed for a single use, making complex experiments cost-prohibitive. Combining microfluidics with in situ protein expression from a cDNA microarray addressed these limitations. Based on this approach, we introduce a modular integrated microfluidic platform for multiple post-translational modifications analysis of freshly synthesized protein arrays (IMPA). The system's potency, specificity and flexibility are demonstrated for tyrosine phosphorylation and ubiquitination in quasicellular environments. Unlimited by design and protein composition, and relying on minute amounts of biological material and cost-effective technology, this unique approach is applicable for a broad range of basic, biomedical and biomarker research. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Microfluidic DNA extraction using a patterned aluminum oxide membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungkyu; Gale, Bruce K.

    2006-01-01

    A DNA extraction system was designed and fabricated using an AOM (aluminum oxide membrane) with 200 nm pores and PDMS microfluidic channels. The membrane was patterned using soft lithography techniques and SU-8 photolithography on the membrane. After making the pattern with SU-8, the AOM was observed using an SEM (scanning electro microscope) to verify the AOM structure was not damaged. From the SEM images, the AOM structure was not different after modification with SU-8. To complete the system, a PDMS mold for the microfluidic channels was made by soft lithography. Using the SU-8 mold, PDMS microchannels were cast using PDMS with a low polymer to curing agent ratio to provide adhesion between the patterned membrane and microfluidic channel. Then, the patterned membrane was sandwiched between PDMS microfluidic channels in a parallel format. The completed system was tested with 10ug of Lambda DNA mixed with the fluorescent dye SYBR Green I. Following DNA extraction, the surface of each well was examined with fluorescence microscopy while embedded in the microfluidic system. Extracted and immobilized DNA on the AOM was observed in almost every separation well. This microsystem, referred to as a membrane-on-a-chip, has potential applications in high-throughput DNA extraction and analysis, with the possibility of being integrated into polymer-based microfluidic systems.

  15. Protein immobilization techniques for microfluidic assays

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dohyun; Herr, Amy E.

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidic systems have shown unequivocal performance improvements over conventional bench-top assays across a range of performance metrics. For example, specific advances have been made in reagent consumption, throughput, integration of multiple assay steps, assay automation, and multiplexing capability. For heterogeneous systems, controlled immobilization of reactants is essential for reliable, sensitive detection of analytes. In most cases, protein immobilization densities are maximized, while native activity and conformation are maintained. Immobilization methods and chemistries vary significantly depending on immobilization surface, protein properties, and specific assay goals. In this review, we present trade-offs considerations for common immobilization surface materials. We overview immobilization methods and chemistries, and discuss studies exemplar of key approaches—here with a specific emphasis on immunoassays and enzymatic reactors. Recent “smart immobilization” methods including the use of light, electrochemical, thermal, and chemical stimuli to attach and detach proteins on demand with precise spatial control are highlighted. Spatially encoded protein immobilization using DNA hybridization for multiplexed assays and reversible protein immobilization surfaces for repeatable assay are introduced as immobilization methods. We also describe multifunctional surface coatings that can perform tasks that were, until recently, relegated to multiple functional coatings. We consider the microfluidics literature from 1997 to present and close with a perspective on future approaches to protein immobilization. PMID:24003344

  16. Microfluidic chips for protein differential expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Armenta, Jenny M; Dawoud, Abdulilah A; Lazar, Iulia M

    2009-04-01

    Biomarker discovery and screening using novel proteomic technologies is an area that is attracting increased attention in the biomedical community. Early detection of abnormal physiological conditions will be highly beneficial for diagnosing various diseases and increasing survivability rates. Clearly, progress in this area will depend on the development of fast, reliable, and highly sensitive and specific sample bioanalysis methods. Microfluidics has emerged as a technology that could become essential in proteomics research as it enables the integration of all sample preparation, separation, and detection steps, with the added benefit of enhanced sample throughput. The combination of these advantages with the sensitivity and capability of MS detection to deliver precise structural information makes microfluidics-MS a very competitive technology for biomarker discovery. The integration of LC microchip devices with MS detection, and specifically their applicability to biomarker screening applications in MCF-7 breast cancer cellular extracts is reported in this manuscript. Loading approximately 0.1-1 microg of crude protein extract tryptic digest on the chip has typically resulted in the reliable identification of approximately 40-100 proteins. The potential of an LC-ESI-MS chip for comparative proteomic analysis of isotopically labeled MCF-7 breast cancer cell extracts is explored for the first time.

  17. Characterization of soy protein nanoparticles prepared by high shear microfluidization

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soy protein nanoparticles were produced with a microfluidizer and characterized in terms of particle size, size distribution, morphology, rheological properties, and aggregate structure. Three stages of structure breakdown were observed when the soy protein dispersion was passed through the microflu...

  18. Structural characterization of soy protein nanoparticles from high shear microfluidization

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soy protein nanoparticles were produced with a microfluidizer and characterized in terms of particle size, size distribution, morphology, rheological properties, and aggregate structure. Three stages of structure breakdown were observed when the soy protein dispersion was passed through the microflu...

  19. Chemoselective ligand patterning of electroactive surfaces using microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Westcott, Nathan P; Yousaf, Muhammad N

    2009-10-01

    To generate model substrates for cell adhesion, we have developed two different biocompatible strategies based on self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of alkanethiolates on gold terminated with latent ketones and aldehydes. Under spatial control, the hydroquinone and alcohol-terminated SAMs can be oxidized to allow for oxyamine ligand patterning on the surface with microfluidic cassettes. These immobilization strategies were characterized by electrochemistry, fluorescence, and utilizing a cell adhesive peptide, cell patterns were generated.

  20. Microfluidic Mixers for Studying Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Waldauer, Steven A.; Wu, Ling; Yao, Shuhuai; Bakajin, Olgica; Lapidus, Lisa J.

    2012-01-01

    The process by which a protein folds into its native conformation is highly relevant to biology and human health yet still poorly understood. One reason for this is that folding takes place over a wide range of timescales, from nanoseconds to seconds or longer, depending on the protein1. Conventional stopped-flow mixers have allowed measurement of folding kinetics starting at about 1 ms. We have recently developed a microfluidic mixer that dilutes denaturant ~100-fold in ~8 μs2. Unlike a stopped-flow mixer, this mixer operates in the laminar flow regime in which turbulence does not occur. The absence of turbulence allows precise numeric simulation of all flows within the mixer with excellent agreement to experiment3-4. Laminar flow is achieved for Reynolds numbers Re ≤100. For aqueous solutions, this requires micron scale geometries. We use a hard substrate, such as silicon or fused silica, to make channels 5-10 μm wide and 10 μm deep (See Figure 1). The smallest dimensions, at the entrance to the mixing region, are on the order of 1 μm in size. The chip is sealed with a thin glass or fused silica coverslip for optical access. Typical total linear flow rates are ~1 m/s, yielding Re~10, but the protein consumption is only ~0.5 nL/s or 1.8 μL/hr. Protein concentration depends on the detection method: For tryptophan fluorescence the typical concentration is 100 μM (for 1 Trp/protein) and for FRET the typical concentration is ~100 nM. The folding process is initiated by rapid dilution of denaturant from 6 M to 0.06 M guanidine hydrochloride. The protein in high denaturant flows down a central channel and is met on either side at the mixing region by buffer without denaturant moving ~100 times faster (see Figure 2). This geometry causes rapid constriction of the protein flow into a narrow jet ~100 nm wide. Diffusion of the light denaturant molecules is very rapid, while diffusion of the heavy protein molecules is much slower, diffusing less than 1 μm in 1 ms

  1. Microfluidic flow-flash: method for investigating protein dynamics.

    PubMed

    Toepke, Michael W; Brewer, Scott H; Vu, Dung M; Rector, Kirk D; Morgan, Joel E; Gennis, Robert B; Kenis, Paul J A; Dyer, R Brian

    2007-01-01

    We report a new method, microfluidic flow-flash, for measuring protein reaction kinetics. The method couples a microscope imaging detection system with a microfluidic flow cell to reduce data acquisition times and sample consumption. This combination allows for the simultaneous collection of spectral and temporal information. The microfluidic flow cell design utilizes three-dimensional sheath flow to reduce sample dispersion and minimize sample consumption. The ability to alter the flow rates in the microfluidic flow cells allows a variety of time scales to be studied with submillisecond time resolution. The imaging detection system can be coupled with several spectroscopic probes including fluorescence and UV/visible absorbance spectroscopy. Here, we utilize the microfluidic flow-flash method to probe the kinetics of CO recombination or O2 binding to myoglobin after the laser-induced photolysis of CO from myoglobin by UV/visible absorbance spectral imaging.

  2. Multiplexed microfluidic quantification of proteins in serum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, Nitin; Rajauria, Sukumar; Cleland, Andrew

    2015-03-01

    Rapid and low cost immunoassays targeting proteins in blood or other bodily fluids are highly sought after for point-of-care devices and early screening of patients. Immunoturbidimetric assays utilize latex particles functionalized with antibodies, with particle aggregation in the presence of the analyte detected by a change in absorbance. Using a high throughput micro-fluidic particle analyzer based solely on electrical signals (resistive pulse sensing), we are able to accurately quantify the degree of aggregation by analyzing the changes in the particle size distribution. Thus we study the aggregation of streptavidin (SAv) coated beads in the presence of biotinylated bovine serum albumin as a proof-of-principle assay and extract the binding capacity of the SAv beads from the dose-response curve. We also use our aggregation measurement platform to characterize a commercial C-reactive protein (CRP) immunoturbidimetric assay (hsCRP, Diazyme Inc.). We obtain a linear calibration curve as well as a better limit of detection of CRP than that obtained by absorbance measurements. By using different bead sizes functionalized with different antibodies, multiplexed analyte detection is also possible. We demonstrate this by combining the commercial anti-CRP functionalized beads (0.4 microns) with biotin coated beads (1.0 microns), and carry out the simultaneous detection of SAv and CRP in a single sample.

  3. Protein Microarrays with Novel Microfluidic Methods: Current Advances.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Chandra K; Aguirre, Gerson R

    2014-07-01

    Microfluidic-based micromosaic technology has allowed the pattering of recognition elements in restricted micrometer scale areas with high precision. This controlled patterning enabled the development of highly multiplexed arrays multiple analyte detection. This arraying technology was first introduced in the beginning of 2001 and holds tremendous potential to revolutionize microarray development and analyte detection. Later, several microfluidic methods were developed for microarray application. In this review we discuss these novel methods and approaches which leverage the property of microfluidic technologies to significantly improve various physical aspects of microarray technology, such as enhanced imprinting homogeneity, stability of the immobilized biomolecules, decreasing assay times, and reduction of the costs and of the bulky instrumentation.

  4. Patterned Immobilization of Antibodies within Roll-to-Roll Hot Embossed Polymeric Microfluidic Channels

    PubMed Central

    Feyssa, Belachew; Liedert, Christina; Kivimaki, Liisa; Johansson, Leena-Sisko; Jantunen, Heli; Hakalahti, Leena

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a method for the patterned immobilization of capture antibodies into a microfluidic platform fabricated by roll-to-roll (R2R) hot embossing on poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). Covalent attachment of antibodies was achieved by two sequential inkjet printing steps. First, a polyethyleneimine (PEI) layer was deposited onto oxygen plasma activated PMMA foil and further cross-linked with glutaraldehyde (GA) to provide an amine-reactive aldehyde surface (PEI-GA). This step was followed by a second deposition of antibody by overprinting on the PEI-GA patterned PMMA foil. The PEI polymer ink was first formulated to ensure stable drop formation in inkjet printing and the printed films were characterized using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Anti-CRP antibody was patterned on PMMA foil by the developed method and bonded permanently with R2R hot embossed PMMA microchannels by solvent bonding lamination. The functionality of the immobilized antibody inside the microfluidic channel was evaluated by fluorescence-based sandwich immunoassay for detection of C-reactive protein (CRP). The antibody-antigen assay exhibited a good level of linearity over the range of 10 ng/ml to 500 ng/ml (R2 = 0.991) with a calculated detection limit of 5.2 ng/ml. The developed patterning method is straightforward, rapid and provides a versatile approach for creating multiple protein patterns in a single microfluidic channel for multiplexed immunoassays. PMID:23874811

  5. Using Adhesive Patterning to Construct 3D Paper Microfluidic Devices.

    PubMed

    Kalish, Brent; Tsutsui, Hideaki

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate the use of patterned aerosol adhesives to construct both planar and nonplanar 3D paper microfluidic devices. By spraying an aerosol adhesive through a metal stencil, the overall amount of adhesive used in assembling paper microfluidic devices can be significantly reduced. We show on a simple 4-layer planar paper microfluidic device that the optimal adhesive application technique and device construction style depends heavily on desired performance characteristics. By moderately increasing the overall area of a device, it is possible to dramatically decrease the wicking time and increase device success rates while also reducing the amount of adhesive required to keep the device together. Such adhesive application also causes the adhesive to form semi-permanent bonds instead of permanent bonds between paper layers, enabling single-use devices to be non-destructively disassembled after use. Nonplanar 3D origami devices also benefit from the semi-permanent bonds during folding, as it reduces the likelihood that unrelated faces may accidently stick together. Like planar devices, nonplanar structures see reduced wicking times with patterned adhesive application vs uniformly applied adhesive.

  6. Hydrogel microfluidics for the patterning of pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Cosson, S.; Lutolf, M. P.

    2014-01-01

    Biomolecular signaling is of utmost importance in governing many biological processes such as the patterning of the developing embryo where biomolecules regulate key cell-fate decisions. In vivo, these factors are presented in a spatiotemporally tightly controlled fashion. Although state-of-the-art microfluidic technologies allow precise biomolecule delivery in time and space, long-term (stem) cell culture at the micro-scale is often far from ideal due to medium evaporation, limited space for cell growth or shear stress. To overcome these challenges, we here introduce a concept based on hydrogel microfluidics for decoupling conventional, macro-scale cell culture from precise biomolecule delivery through a gel layer. We demonstrate the spatiotemporally controlled neuronal commitment of mouse embryonic stem cells via delivery of retinoic acid gradients. This technique should be useful for testing the effect of dose and timing of biomolecules, singly or in combination, on stem cell fate. PMID:24662945

  7. Hydrogel microfluidics for the patterning of pluripotent stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosson, S.; Lutolf, M. P.

    2014-03-01

    Biomolecular signaling is of utmost importance in governing many biological processes such as the patterning of the developing embryo where biomolecules regulate key cell-fate decisions. In vivo, these factors are presented in a spatiotemporally tightly controlled fashion. Although state-of-the-art microfluidic technologies allow precise biomolecule delivery in time and space, long-term (stem) cell culture at the micro-scale is often far from ideal due to medium evaporation, limited space for cell growth or shear stress. To overcome these challenges, we here introduce a concept based on hydrogel microfluidics for decoupling conventional, macro-scale cell culture from precise biomolecule delivery through a gel layer. We demonstrate the spatiotemporally controlled neuronal commitment of mouse embryonic stem cells via delivery of retinoic acid gradients. This technique should be useful for testing the effect of dose and timing of biomolecules, singly or in combination, on stem cell fate.

  8. High throughput and multiplex localization of proteins and cells for in situ micropatterning using pneumatic microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Chun; Liu, Wenming; Tu, Qin; Ma, Chao; Zhao, Lei; Wang, Yaolei; Ouyang, Jia; Pang, Long; Wang, Jinyi

    2015-02-07

    Micropatterning technologies are emerging as an enabling tool for various microfluidic-based applications in life sciences. However, the high throughput and multiplex localization of multiple bio-components in a microfluidic device has not yet been well established. In this paper, we describe a simple and in situ micropatterning method using an integrated microfluidic device with pneumatic microstructures (PμSs) for highly controllable immobilization of both proteins and cells in a high throughput, geometry-dynamic, and multi-patterning way. The precise Pluronic F127 passivation of a microchamber surface except the PμS-blocked regions was performed and characterized, and the spatial dynamics and consistency of both the PμSs and protein/cell micropatterning were optically evaluated and quantitatively demonstrated too. Furthermore, a systematic investigation of PμS-assisted micropatterning in microfluidics was carried out. The feature of high throughput and spatial control of micropatterning can be simply realized by using the well-designed PμS arrays. Meanwhile, the co-micropatterning of different proteins (bovine serum albumin and chicken egg albumin) and cells (human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human hepatocellular carcinoma cells) in a microfluidic device was successfully accomplished with the orderly serial manipulation of PμS groups. We demonstrate that PμS-assisted micropatterning can be applied as a convenient microfluidic component for large-scale and diversified protein/cell patterning and manipulation, which could be useful for cell-based tissue organization, high-throughput imaging, protein-related interactions and immunoassays.

  9. Strategic enzyme patterning for microfluidic biofuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjeang, E.; Sinton, D.; Harrington, D. A.

    The specific character of biological enzyme catalysts enables combined fuel and oxidant channels and simplified non-compartmentalized fuel cell assemblies. In this work, a microstructured enzymatic biofuel cell architecture is proposed, and species transport phenomena combined with consecutive chemical reactions are studied computationally in order to provide guidelines for optimization. This is the first computational study of this technology, and a 2D CFD model for species transport coupled with laminar fluid flow and Michaelis-Menten enzyme kinetics is established. It is shown that the system is reaction rate limited, indicating that enzyme specific turnover numbers are key parameters for biofuel cell performance. Separated and mixed enzyme patterns in different proportions are analyzed for various Peclet numbers. High fuel utilization is achieved in the diffusion dominated and mixed species transport regimes with separated enzymes arranged in relation to individual turnover rates. However, the Peclet number has to be above a certain threshold value to obtain satisfying current densities. The mixed transport regime is particularly attractive while current densities are maintained close to maximum levels. Optimum performance is achieved by mixed enzyme patterning tailored with respect to individual turnover rates, enabling high current densities combined with nearly complete fuel utilization.

  10. RNA-protein binding kinetics in an automated microfluidic reactor.

    PubMed

    Ridgeway, William K; Seitaridou, Effrosyni; Phillips, Rob; Williamson, James R

    2009-11-01

    Microfluidic chips can automate biochemical assays on the nanoliter scale, which is of considerable utility for RNA-protein binding reactions that would otherwise require large quantities of proteins. Unfortunately, complex reactions involving multiple reactants cannot be prepared in current microfluidic mixer designs, nor is investigation of long-time scale reactions possible. Here, a microfluidic 'Riboreactor' has been designed and constructed to facilitate the study of kinetics of RNA-protein complex formation over long time scales. With computer automation, the reactor can prepare binding reactions from any combination of eight reagents, and is optimized to monitor long reaction times. By integrating a two-photon microscope into the microfluidic platform, 5-nl reactions can be observed for longer than 1000 s with single-molecule sensitivity and negligible photobleaching. Using the Riboreactor, RNA-protein binding reactions with a fragment of the bacterial 30S ribosome were prepared in a fully automated fashion and binding rates were consistent with rates obtained from conventional assays. The microfluidic chip successfully combines automation, low sample consumption, ultra-sensitive fluorescence detection and a high degree of reproducibility. The chip should be able to probe complex reaction networks describing the assembly of large multicomponent RNPs such as the ribosome.

  11. RNA–protein binding kinetics in an automated microfluidic reactor

    PubMed Central

    Ridgeway, William K.; Seitaridou, Effrosyni; Phillips, Rob; Williamson, James R.

    2009-01-01

    Microfluidic chips can automate biochemical assays on the nanoliter scale, which is of considerable utility for RNA–protein binding reactions that would otherwise require large quantities of proteins. Unfortunately, complex reactions involving multiple reactants cannot be prepared in current microfluidic mixer designs, nor is investigation of long-time scale reactions possible. Here, a microfluidic ‘Riboreactor’ has been designed and constructed to facilitate the study of kinetics of RNA–protein complex formation over long time scales. With computer automation, the reactor can prepare binding reactions from any combination of eight reagents, and is optimized to monitor long reaction times. By integrating a two-photon microscope into the microfluidic platform, 5-nl reactions can be observed for longer than 1000 s with single-molecule sensitivity and negligible photobleaching. Using the Riboreactor, RNA–protein binding reactions with a fragment of the bacterial 30S ribosome were prepared in a fully automated fashion and binding rates were consistent with rates obtained from conventional assays. The microfluidic chip successfully combines automation, low sample consumption, ultra-sensitive fluorescence detection and a high degree of reproducibility. The chip should be able to probe complex reaction networks describing the assembly of large multicomponent RNPs such as the ribosome. PMID:19759214

  12. Refolding of a membrane protein in a microfluidics reactor.

    PubMed

    Zaccai, Nathan R; Yunus, Kamran; Matthews, S M; Fisher, Adrian C; Falconer, Robert J

    2007-07-01

    Membrane protein production for structural studies is often hindered by the formation of non-specific aggregates from which the protein has to be denatured and then refolded to a functional state. We developed a new approach, which uses microfluidics channels, to refold protein correctly in quantities sufficient for structural studies. Green fluorescent protein (GFP), a soluble protein, and bacteriorhodopsin (BR), a transmembrane protein, were used to demonstrate the efficiency of the process. Urea-denatured GFP refolded as the urea diffused away from the protein, forming in the channel a uniform fluorescent band when observed by confocal microscopy. Sodium dodecyl sulphate-denatured BR refolded within the channel on mixing with detergent-lipid mixed micelles. The refolding, monitored by absorbance spectroscopy, was found to be flow rate dependent. This potential of microfluidic reactors for screening protein-folding conditions and producing protein would be particularly amenable for high-throughput applications required in structural genomics.

  13. Screening for Host Factors Directly Interacting with RSV Protein: Microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Kipper, Sarit; Avrahami, Dorit; Bajorek, Monika; Gerber, Doron

    2016-01-01

    We present a high-throughput microfluidics platform to identify novel host cell binding partners of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) matrix (M) protein. The device consists of thousands of reaction chambers controlled by micro-mechanical valves. The microfluidic device is mated to a microarray-printed custom-made gene library. These genes are then transcribed and translated on-chip, resulting in a protein array ready for binding to RSV M protein.Even small viral proteome, such as that of RSV, presents a challenge due to the fact that viral proteins are usually multifunctional and thus their interaction with the host is complex. Protein microarrays technology allows the interrogation of protein-protein interactions, which could possibly overcome obstacles by using conventional high throughput methods. Using microfluidics platform we have identified new host interactors of M involved in various cellular pathways. A number of microfluidics based assays have already provided novel insights into the virus-host interactome, and the results have important implications for future antiviral strategies aimed at targets of viral protein interactions with the host.

  14. Protein Microarrays with Novel Microfluidic Methods: Current Advances

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Chandra K.; Aguirre, Gerson R.

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic-based micromosaic technology has allowed the pattering of recognition elements in restricted micrometer scale areas with high precision. This controlled patterning enabled the development of highly multiplexed arrays multiple analyte detection. This arraying technology was first introduced in the beginning of 2001 and holds tremendous potential to revolutionize microarray development and analyte detection. Later, several microfluidic methods were developed for microarray application. In this review we discuss these novel methods and approaches which leverage the property of microfluidic technologies to significantly improve various physical aspects of microarray technology, such as enhanced imprinting homogeneity, stability of the immobilized biomolecules, decreasing assay times, and reduction of the costs and of the bulky instrumentation. PMID:27600343

  15. Droplet-driven transports on superhydrophobic-patterned surface microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Xing, Siyuan; Harake, Ryan S; Pan, Tingrui

    2011-11-07

    Droplet-based transport phenomena driven by surface tension have been explored as an automated pumping source for a number of chemical and biological applications. In this paper, we present a comprehensive theoretical and experimental investigation of unconventional droplet-based motions on a superhydrophobic-patterned surface microfluidic (S(2)M) platform. The S(2)M surfaces are monolithically fabricated using a facile two-step laser micromachining technique on regular polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) chemistry. Unlike the traditional droplet-driven pumps built on an enclosed microfluidic network, the S(2)M network pins the liquid-solid interface of droplets to the lithographically defined wetting boundary and establishes a direct linkage between the volumetric and hydraulic measures. Moreover, diverse modes of droplet motions are theoretically determined and experimentally characterized in a bi-droplet configuration, among which several unconventional droplet-driven transport phenomena are first demonstrated. These include big-to-small droplet merging, droplet balancing, as well as bidirectional transporting, in addition to the classic small-to-big droplet transition. Furthermore, multi-stage programmable bidirectional pumping has been implemented on the S(2)M platform, according to the newly established droplet manipulation principle, to illustrate its potential use for automated biomicrofluidic and point-of-care diagnostic applications.

  16. Protein Crystal Growth With the Aid of Microfluidics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanderWoerd, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Protein crystallography is one of three well-known methods to obtain the structure of proteins. A major rate limiting step in protein crystallography is protein crystal nucleation and growth, which is still largely a process conducted by trial-and-error methods. Many attempts have been made to improve protein crystal growth by performing growth in microgravity. Although the use of microgravity appears to improve crystal quality in some attempts, this method has been inefficient because several reasons: we lack a fundamental understanding of macromolecular crystal growth in general and of the influence of microgravity in particular, we have to start with crystal growth conditions in microgravity based on conditions on the ground and finally the hardware does not allow for experimental iteration without reloading samples on the ground. To partially accommodate the disadvantages of the current hardware, we have used microfluidic technology (Lab-on-a-Chip devices) to design the concept of a more efficient crystallization device, suitable for use on the International Space Station and in high-throughput applications on the ground. The concept and properties of microfluidics, the application design process, and the advances in protein crystal growth hardware will be discussed in this presentation. Some examples of proteins crystallized in the new hardware will be discussed, including the differences between conventional crystallization versus crystallization in microfluidics.

  17. Protein Crystal Growth With the Aid of Microfluidics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanderWoerd, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Protein crystallography is one of three well-known methods to obtain the structure of proteins. A major rate limiting step in protein crystallography is protein crystal nucleation and growth, which is still largely a process conducted by trial-and-error methods. Many attempts have been made to improve protein crystal growth by performing growth in microgravity. Although the use of microgravity appears to improve crystal quality in some attempts, this method has been inefficient because several reasons: we lack a fundamental understanding of macromolecular crystal growth in general and of the influence of microgravity in particular, we have to start with crystal growth conditions in microgravity based on conditions on the ground and finally the hardware does not allow for experimental iteration without reloading samples on the ground. To partially accommodate the disadvantages of the current hardware, we have used microfluidic technology (Lab-on-a-Chip devices) to design the concept of a more efficient crystallization device, suitable for use on the International Space Station and in high-throughput applications on the ground. The concept and properties of microfluidics, the application design process, and the advances in protein crystal growth hardware will be discussed in this presentation. Some examples of proteins crystallized in the new hardware will be discussed, including the differences between conventional crystallization versus crystallization in microfluidics.

  18. Applying microfluidic techniques in quantitative studies of protein aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herling, Therese

    2012-02-01

    Protein aggregation and fibrillation is involved in a number of devastating diseases, of which we have a limited understanding at present. Microfluidic techniques can be used in developing quantitative assays to study individual aspects of protein aggregation. Under certain conditions bovine insulin aggregates to give spherulites; spherical structures with fibrils growing and branching out from a central core. Drawing a parallel to actin polymerisation of the cell's cytoskeleton, fibril growth generates force. The force generated by polymerisation at fibril ends during spherulite growth can be measured in a microfluidic environment (TPJ Knowles et al, PNAS, 2009). By measuring the bending of four polydimethylsiloxane walls by a growing spherulite positioned in the centre, the force generated by polymerisation at fibril termini can be calculated. By growing the spherulites with a constant flow of monomer, the maximum force able to be generated by fibril growth, the stall force, can be calculated. This gives insight into the energy landscape of protein aggregation.

  19. Microfluidic Generation of Lipidic Mesophases for Membrane Protein Crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, S.; Roberts, G; Tice, J; Gennis, R; Kenis, P

    2009-01-01

    We report on a microfluidic method for the formation of aqueous/lipid mesophases to enable screening of suitable crystallization conditions of membrane proteins from a membrane-like phase in sub-20 nL volumes. This integrated microfluidic chip and the employed mixing strategy address the specific challenges associated with the mixing of fluids of highly different viscosities (here a factor of 30) as well as the non-Newtonian character of the resulting mesophases. The chip requires less than 20 nL of material per condition screened, whereas typically on the order of 10 {micro}L or more is needed for a batch preparation in the present screening methods. We validated our approach with the successful crystallization of the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin.

  20. Microfluidic IEF technique for sequential phosphorylation analysis of protein kinases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Nakchul; Song, Simon; Choi, Hoseok; Lim, Bu-Taek; Kim, Young-Pil

    2015-11-01

    Sequential phosphorylation of protein kinases play the important role in signal transduction, protein regulation, and metabolism in living cells. The analysis of these phosphorylation cascades will provide new insights into their physiological functions in many biological functions. Unfortunately, the existing methods are limited to analyze the cascade activity. Therefore, we suggest a microfluidic isoelectric focusing technique (μIEF) for the analysis of the cascade activity. Using the technique, we show that the sequential phosphorylation of a peptide by two different kinases can be successfully detected on a microfluidic chip. In addition, the inhibition assay for kinase activity and the analysis on a real sample have also been conducted. The results indicate that μIEF is an excellent means for studies on phosphorylation cascade activity.

  1. Modular microfluidics for point-of-care protein purifications

    SciTech Connect

    Millet, L. J.; Lucheon, J. D.; Standaert, R. F.; Retterer, S. T.; Doktycz, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Biochemical separations are the heart of diagnostic assays and purification methods for biologics. On-chip miniaturization and modularization of separation procedures will enable the development of customized, portable devices for personalized health-care diagnostics and point-of-use production of treatments. In this report, we describe the design and fabrication of miniature ion exchange, size exclusion and affinity chromatography modules for on-chip clean-up of recombinantly-produced proteins. Our results demonstrate that these common separations techniques can be implemented in microfluidic modules with performance comparable to conventional approaches. We introduce embedded 3-D microfluidic interconnects for integrating micro-scale separation modules that can be arranged and reconfigured to suit a variety of fluidic operations or biochemical processes. In conclusion, we demonstrate the utility of the modular approach with a platform for the enrichment of enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) from Escherichia coli lysate through integrated affinity and size-exclusion chromatography modules.

  2. Microfluidic-based patterning of embryonic stem cells for in vitro development studies.

    PubMed

    Suri, Shalu; Singh, Ankur; Nguyen, Anh H; Bratt-Leal, Andres M; McDevitt, Todd C; Lu, Hang

    2013-12-07

    In vitro recapitulation of mammalian embryogenesis and examination of the emerging behaviours of embryonic structures require both the means to engineer complexity and accurately assess phenotypes of multicellular aggregates. Current approaches to study multicellular populations in 3D configurations are limited by the inability to create complex (i.e. spatially heterogeneous) environments in a reproducible manner with high fidelity thus impeding the ability to engineer microenvironments and combinations of cells with similar complexity to that found during morphogenic processes such as development, remodelling and wound healing. Here, we develop a multicellular embryoid body (EB) fusion technique as a higher-throughput in vitro tool, compared to a manual assembly, to generate developmentally relevant embryonic patterns. We describe the physical principles of the EB fusion microfluidic device design; we demonstrate that >60 conjoined EBs can be generated overnight and emulate a development process analogous to mouse gastrulation during early embryogenesis. Using temporal delivery of bone morphogenic protein 4 (BMP4) to embryoid bodies, we recapitulate embryonic day 6.5 (E6.5) during mouse embryo development with induced mesoderm differentiation in murine embryonic stem cells leading to expression of Brachyury-T-green fluorescent protein (T-GFP), an indicator of primitive streak development and mesoderm differentiation during gastrulation. The proposed microfluidic approach could be used to manipulate hundreds or more of individual embryonic cell aggregates in a rapid fashion, thereby allowing controlled differentiation patterns in fused multicellular assemblies to generate complex yet spatially controlled microenvironments.

  3. Microfluidic-based patterning of embryonic stem cells for in vitro development studies

    PubMed Central

    Suri, Shalu; Singh, Ankur; Nguyen, Anh H.; Bratt-Leal, Andres M.; McDevitt, Todd C.

    2013-01-01

    In vitro recapitulation of mammalian embryogenesis and examination of the emerging behaviours of embryonic structures require both the means to engineer complexity and accurately assess phenotypes of multicellular aggregates. Current approaches to study multicellular populations in 3D configurations are limited by the inability to create complex (i.e. spatially heterogeneous) environments in a reproducible manner with high fidelity thus impeding the ability to engineer microenvironments and combinations of cells with similar complexity to that found during morphogenic processes such as development, remodelling and wound healing. Here, we develop a multicellular embryoid body (EB) fusion technique as a higher-throughput in vitro tool, compared to a manual assembly, to generate developmentally relevant embryonic patterns. We describe the physical principles of the EB fusion microfluidic device design; we demonstrate that >60 conjoined EBs can be generated overnight and emulate a development process analogous to mouse gastrulation during early embryogenesis. Using temporal delivery of bone morphogenic protein 4 (BMP4) to embryoid bodies, we recapitulate embryonic day 6.5 (E6.5) during mouse embryo development with induced mesoderm differentiation in murine embryonic stem cells leading to expression of Brachyury-T-green fluorescent protein (T-GFP), an indicator of primitive streak development and mesoderm differentiation during gastrulation. The proposed microfluidic approach could be used to manipulate hundreds or more of individual embryonic cell aggregates in a rapid fashion, thereby allowing controlled differentiation patterns in fused multicellular assemblies to generate complex yet spatially controlled microenvironments. PMID:24113509

  4. Patterning proteins and cells using soft lithography.

    PubMed

    Kane, R S; Takayama, S; Ostuni, E; Ingber, D E; Whitesides, G M

    1999-12-01

    This review describes the pattering of proteins and cells using a non-photolithographic microfabrication technology, which we call 'soft lithography' because it consists of a set of related techniques, each of which uses stamps or channels fabricated in an elastomeric ('soft') material for pattern transfer. The review covers three soft lithographic techniques: microcontact printing, patterning using microfluidic channels, and laminar flow patterning. These soft lithographic techniques are inexpensive, are procedurally simple, and can be used to pattern a variety of planar and non-planar substrates. Their successful application does not require stringent regulation of the laboratory environment, and they can be used to pattern surfaces with delicate ligands. They provide control over both the surface chemistry and the cellular environment. We discuss both the procedures for patterning based on these soft lithographic techniques, and their applications in biosensor technology, in tissue engineering, and for fundamental studies in cell biology.

  5. Using Microfluidics to Decouple Nucleation and Growth of Protein Crystals.

    PubMed

    Shim, Jung-Uk; Cristobal, Galder; Link, Darren R; Thorsen, Todd; Fraden, Seth

    2007-01-01

    A high throughput, low volume microfluidic device has been designed to decouple the physical processes of protein crystal nucleation and growth. This device, called the Phase Chip, is constructed out of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) elastomer. One of the Phase Chip's innovations is to exploit surface tension forces to guide each drop to a storage chamber. We demonstrate that nanoliter water-in-oil drops of protein solutions can be rapidly stored in individual wells thereby allowing the screening of 1000 conditions while consuming a total of only 10 mug protein on a 20 cm(2) chip. Another significant advance over current microfluidic devices is that each well is in contact with a reservoir via a dialysis membrane through which only water and other low molecular weight organic solvents can pass, but not salt, polymer, or protein. This enables the concentration of all solutes in a solution to be reversibly, rapidly, and precisely varied in contrast to current methods, such as the free interface diffusion or sitting drop methods, which are irreversible. The Phase Chip operates by first optimizing conditions for nucleation by using dialysis to supersaturate the protein solution, which leads to nucleation of many small crystals. Next, conditions are optimized for crystal growth by using dialysis to reduce the protein and precipitant concentrations, which leads small crystals to dissolve while simultaneously causing only the largest ones to grow, ultimately resulting in the transformation of many small, unusable crystals into a few large ones.

  6. Wettability control on multiphase flow in patterned microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juanes, R.; Zhao, B.; MacMinn, C. W.

    2016-12-01

    Multiphase flow in porous media is important in many natural and industrial processes, including geologic CO2 sequestration, enhanced oil recovery, and water infiltration into soil. Although it is well known that the wetting properties of porous media can vary drastically depending on the type of media and pore fluids, the effect of wettability on multiphase flow continues to challenge our microscopic and macroscopic descriptions. Here, we study the impact of wettability on viscously unfavorable fluid-fluid displacement in disordered media by means of high-resolution imaging in microfluidic flow cells patterned with vertical posts. By systematically varying the wettability of the flow cell over a wide range of contact angles, we find that increasing the substrate's affinity to the injected fluid results in more efficient displacement of the defending fluid up to a critical wetting transition, beyond which the trend is reversed. We identify the pore-scale mechanisms—cooperative pore filling (increasing displacement efficiency) and corner flow (decreasing displacement efficiency)—responsible for this macroscale behavior, and show that they rely on the inherent 3D nature of interfacial flows, even in quasi-2D media. Our results demonstrate the powerful control of wettability on multiphase flow in porous media, and show that the markedly different invasion protocols that emerge—from pore-filling to post-bridging—are determined by physical mechanisms that are missing from current pore-scale and continuum-scale descriptions.

  7. Wettability control on multiphase flow in patterned microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Benzhong; Juanes, Ruben

    2016-01-01

    Multiphase flow in porous media is important in many natural and industrial processes, including geologic CO2 sequestration, enhanced oil recovery, and water infiltration into soil. Although it is well known that the wetting properties of porous media can vary drastically depending on the type of media and pore fluids, the effect of wettability on multiphase flow continues to challenge our microscopic and macroscopic descriptions. Here, we study the impact of wettability on viscously unfavorable fluid–fluid displacement in disordered media by means of high-resolution imaging in microfluidic flow cells patterned with vertical posts. By systematically varying the wettability of the flow cell over a wide range of contact angles, we find that increasing the substrate’s affinity to the invading fluid results in more efficient displacement of the defending fluid up to a critical wetting transition, beyond which the trend is reversed. We identify the pore-scale mechanisms—cooperative pore filling (increasing displacement efficiency) and corner flow (decreasing displacement efficiency)—responsible for this macroscale behavior, and show that they rely on the inherent 3D nature of interfacial flows, even in quasi-2D media. Our results demonstrate the powerful control of wettability on multiphase flow in porous media, and show that the markedly different invasion protocols that emerge—from pore filling to postbridging—are determined by physical mechanisms that are missing from current pore-scale and continuum-scale descriptions. PMID:27559089

  8. Wettability control on multiphase flow in patterned microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juanes, Ruben; Zhao, Benzhong; MacMinn, Christopher

    2016-11-01

    Multiphase flow in porous media is important in many natural and industrial processes, including geologic CO2 sequestration, enhanced oil recovery, and water infiltration into soil. Although it is well known that the wetting properties of porous media can vary drastically depending on the type of media and pore fluids, the effect of wettability on multiphase flow continues to challenge our microscopic and macroscopic descriptions. Here, we study the impact of wettability on viscously unfavorable fluid-fluid displacement in disordered media by means of high-resolution imaging in microfluidic flow cells patterned with vertical posts. By systematically varying the wettability of the flow cell over a wide range of contact angles, we find that increasing the substrate's affinity to the injected fluid results in more efficient displacement of the defending fluid up to a critical wetting transition, beyond which the trend is reversed. We identify the pore-scale mechanisms-cooperative pore filling (increasing displacement efficiency) and corner flow (decreasing displacement efficiency)-responsible for this macroscale behavior, and show that they rely on the inherent 3D nature of interfacial flows, even in quasi-2D media. Our results demonstrate the powerful control of wettability on multiphase flow in porous media, and show that the markedly different invasion protocols that emerge-from pore-filling to post-bridging-are determined by physical mechanisms that are missing from current pore-scale and continuum-scale descriptions.

  9. Pathogen receptor discovery with a microfluidic human membrane protein array.

    PubMed

    Glick, Yair; Ben-Ari, Ya'ara; Drayman, Nir; Pellach, Michal; Neveu, Gregory; Boonyaratanakornkit, Jim; Avrahami, Dorit; Einav, Shirit; Oppenheim, Ariella; Gerber, Doron

    2016-04-19

    The discovery of how a pathogen invades a cell requires one to determine which host cell receptors are exploited. This determination is a challenging problem because the receptor is invariably a membrane protein, which represents an Achilles heel in proteomics. We have developed a universal platform for high-throughput expression and interaction studies of membrane proteins by creating a microfluidic-based comprehensive human membrane protein array (MPA). The MPA is, to our knowledge, the first of its kind and offers a powerful alternative to conventional proteomics by enabling the simultaneous study of 2,100 membrane proteins. We characterized direct interactions of a whole nonenveloped virus (simian virus 40), as well as those of the hepatitis delta enveloped virus large form antigen, with candidate host receptors expressed on the MPA. Selected newly discovered membrane protein-pathogen interactions were validated by conventional methods, demonstrating that the MPA is an important tool for cellular receptor discovery and for understanding pathogen tropism.

  10. One step antibody-mediated isolation and patterning of multiple cell types in microfluidic devices

    PubMed Central

    Bavli, Danny; Ezra, Elishai; Kitsberg, Daniel; Murthy, Shashi K.; Nahmias, Yaakov

    2016-01-01

    Cell-cell interactions play a key role in regeneration, differentiation, and basic tissue function taking place under physiological shear forces. However, current solutions to mimic such interactions by micro-patterning cells within microfluidic devices have low resolution, high fabrication complexity, and are limited to one or two cell types. Here, we present a microfluidic platform capable of laminar patterning of any biotin-labeled peptide using streptavidin-based surface chemistry. The design permits the generation of arbitrary cell patterns from heterogeneous mixtures in microfluidic devices. We demonstrate the robust co-patterning of α-CD24, α-ASGPR-1, and α-Tie2 antibodies for rapid isolation and co-patterning of mixtures of hepatocytes and endothelial cells. In addition to one-step isolation and patterning, our design permits step-wise patterning of multiple cell types and empty spaces to create complex cellular geometries in vitro. In conclusion, we developed a microfluidic device that permits the generation of perfusable tissue-like patterns in microfluidic devices by directly injecting complex cell mixtures such as differentiated stem cells or tissue digests with minimal sample preparation. PMID:27051469

  11. Microfluidic Devices with Photodefinable Pseudo-valves for Protein Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Z. Hugh

    Plastic microfluidic devices are fabricated with an array of pseudo-valves for two-dimensional (2D) protein separation. The devices are made by compression molding; the mold is created by electroplating on a glass master fabricated by photolithography. Each device consists of one channel for isoelectric focusing (IEF) and multiple parallel channels for polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). The IEF channel (first dimension) is orthogonal to the PAGE channels (second dimension). Microfluidic pseudo-valves are created at the intersections of orthogonal channels by photodefinable, in situ gel polymerization. These valves enable the introduction of two types of separation media into orthogonal channels for performing 2D protein separation in the device. The presence of the pseudo-valves prevents one separation medium from being contaminated by the other medium, although proteins are allowed to transfer from the first to the second dimension under an electric field. Two-dimensional protein separation is achieved in less than 10 min, an improvement of two orders of magnitude compared with the conventional 2D gel electrophoresis using an IEF strip and a PAGE slab.

  12. Model-controlled hydrodynamic focusing to generate multiple overlapping gradients of surface-immobilized proteins in microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Georgescu, Walter; Jourquin, Jerome; Estrada, Lourdes; Anderson, Alexander R A; Quaranta, Vito; Wikswo, John P

    2008-02-01

    Historically, it has been difficult to generate accurate and reproducible protein gradients for studies of interactions between cells and extracellular matrix. Here we demonstrate a method for rapid patterning of protein gradients using computer-driven hydrodynamic focusing in a simple microfluidic device. In contrast to published work, we are moving the complexity of gradient creation from the microfluidic hardware to dynamic computer control. Using our method, switching from one gradient profile to another requires only a few hours to devise a new control file, not days or weeks to design and build a new microfluidic device. Fitting existing protein deposition models to our data, we can extract key parameters needed for controlling protein deposition. Several protein deposition models were evaluated under microfluidic flow conditions. A mathematical model for our deposition method allows us to determine the parameters for a protein adsorption model and then predict the final shape of the surface density gradient. Simple and non-monotonic single and multi-protein gradient profiles were designed and deposited using the same device.

  13. Microsecond Microfluidic Mixing for Investigation of Protein Folding Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Hertzog, D E; Santiago, J G; Bakajin, O

    2005-02-10

    We have developed and characterized a mixer to study the reaction kinetics of protein folding on a microsecond timescale. The mixer uses hydrodynamic focusing of pressure-driven flow in a microfluidic channel to reduce diffusion times as first demonstrated by Knight et al.[1]. Features of the mixer include 1 {micro}s mixing times, sample consumptions of order 1 nl/s, loading sample volumes on the order of microliters, and the ability to manufacture in fused silica for compatibility with most spectroscopic methods.

  14. Microsecond Microfluidic Mixing for Investigation of Protein Folding Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Hertzog, D E; Santiago, J G; Bakajin, O

    2003-06-25

    We have developed and characterized a mixer to study the reaction kinetics of protein folding on a microsecond timescale. The mixer uses hydrodynamic focusing of pressure-driven flow in a microfluidic channel to reduce diffusion times as first demonstrated by Knight et al.[1]. Features of the mixer include 1 {micro}s mixing times, sample consumptions of order 1 nl/s, loading sample volumes on the order of microliters, and the ability to manufacture in fused silica for compatibility with most spectroscopic methods.

  15. Laminated microfluidic system for small sample protein analysis

    PubMed Central

    Saedinia, Sara; Nastiuk, Kent L.; Krolewski, John J.; Li, G. P.; Bachman, Mark

    2014-01-01

    We describe a technology based on lamination that allows for the production of highly integrated 3D devices suitable for performing a wide variety of microfluidic assays. This approach uses a suite of microfluidic coupons (“microfloupons”) that are intended to be stacked as needed to produce an assay of interest. Microfloupons may be manufactured in paper, plastic, gels, or other materials, in advance, by different manufacturers, then assembled by the assay designer as needed. To demonstrate this approach, we designed, assembled, and characterized a microfloupon device that performs sodium-dodecyl-sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis on a small sample of protein. This device allowed for the manipulation and transport of small amounts of protein sample, tight injection into a thin polyacrylamide gel, electrophoretic separation of the proteins into bands, and subsequent removal of the gel from the device for imaging and further analysis. The microfloupons are rugged enough to handle and can be easily aligned and laminated, allowing for a variety of different assays to be designed and configured by selecting appropriate microfloupons. This approach provides a convenient way to perform assays that have multiple steps, relieving the need to design highly sophisticated devices that incorporate all functions in a single unit, while still achieving the benefits of small sample size, automation, and high speed operation. PMID:24753728

  16. Effect of microfluidized and stearic acid modified soy protein in natural rubber

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Microfluidized and stearic acid modified soy protein aggregates were used to reinforced natural rubber. The size of soy protein particles was reduced with a microfluidizing and ball milling process. Filler size reduction with longer ball milling time tends to increase tensile strength of the rubber ...

  17. Modular microfluidics for point-of-care protein purifications

    DOE PAGES

    Millet, L. J.; Lucheon, J. D.; Standaert, R. F.; ...

    2015-01-01

    Biochemical separations are the heart of diagnostic assays and purification methods for biologics. On-chip miniaturization and modularization of separation procedures will enable the development of customized, portable devices for personalized health-care diagnostics and point-of-use production of treatments. In this report, we describe the design and fabrication of miniature ion exchange, size exclusion and affinity chromatography modules for on-chip clean-up of recombinantly-produced proteins. Our results demonstrate that these common separations techniques can be implemented in microfluidic modules with performance comparable to conventional approaches. We introduce embedded 3-D microfluidic interconnects for integrating micro-scale separation modules that can be arranged and reconfigured tomore » suit a variety of fluidic operations or biochemical processes. In conclusion, we demonstrate the utility of the modular approach with a platform for the enrichment of enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) from Escherichia coli lysate through integrated affinity and size-exclusion chromatography modules.« less

  18. Wettability control on fluid-fluid displacements in patterned microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, B.; MacMinn, C. W.; Juanes, R.

    2015-12-01

    Two-phase flow in porous media is important in many natural and industrial processes like geologic CO2 sequestration, enhanced oil recovery, and water infiltration in soil. While it is well known that the wetting properties of porous media can vary drastically depending on the type of media and the pore fluids, the effect of wettability on fluid displacement continues to challenge our microscopic and macroscopic descriptions. Here we conduct two-phase flow experiments via radial displacement of viscous silicone oil by water, in planar microfluidic devices patterned with vertical posts. These devices allow for visualization of flow through a complex but well-defined microstructure. In addition, the surface energy of the devices can be tuned over a wide range of contact angles, allowing us to access different wettability conditions. We use a fluorescent dye to measure the in-plane water saturation. We perform constant-rate injection experiments with highly unfavorable mobility contrast (viscosity of injected water is 350 times less than the displaced silicone oil) at injection rates over four orders of magnitude. We focus on three particular wetting conditions: drainage (θ=120°), weak imbibition (θ=60°), and strong imbibition (θ=7°). In drainage, we observe a transition from viscous fingering at high capillary numbers to a morphology that, in contrast with conventional knowledge, is different from capillary fingering. In weak imbibition, we observe an apparent stabilization of flow instabilities, as a result of cooperative invasion at the pore scale. In strong imbibition, we find that the flow behavior is heavily influenced by a precursor front that emanates from the main imbibition front. The nature of the precursor front depends on the capillary number. At intermediate capillary numbers, the precursor front consists primarily of corner flow that connects the surface of neighboring posts, forming ramified fingers. The progress of corner flow is overtaken by

  19. Three-dimensional paper-based microfluidic device for assays of protein and glucose in urine.

    PubMed

    Sechi, Deidre; Greer, Brady; Johnson, Jesse; Hashemi, Nastaran

    2013-11-19

    The first step in curing a disease is being able to detect the disease effectively. Paper-based microfluidic devices are biodegradable and can make diagnosing diseases cost-effective and easy in almost all environments. We created a three-dimesnional (3D) paper device using wax printing fabrication technique and basic principles of origami. This design allows for a versatile fabrication technique over previously reported patterning of SU-8 photoresist on chromatography paper by employing a readily available wax printer. The design also utilizes multiple colorimetric assays that can accommodate one or more analytes including urine, blood, and saliva. In this case to demonstrate the functionality of the 3D paper-based microfluidic system, a urinalysis of protein and glucose assays is conducted. The amounts of glucose and protein introduced to the device are found to be proportional to the color change of each assay. This color change was quantified by use of Adobe Photoshop. Urine samples from participants with no pre-existing health conditions and one person with diabetes were collected and compared against synthetic urine samples with predetermined glucose and protein levels. Utilizing this method, we were able to confirm that both protein and glucose levels were in fact within healthy ranges for healthy participants. For the participant with diabetes, glucose was found to be above the healthy range while the protein level was in the healthy range.

  20. Development of Microfluidic Systems Enabling High-Throughput Single-Cell Protein Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Beiyuan; Li, Xiufeng; Chen, Deyong; Peng, Hongshang; Wang, Junbo; Chen, Jian

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews recent developments in microfluidic systems enabling high-throughput characterization of single-cell proteins. Four key perspectives of microfluidic platforms are included in this review: (1) microfluidic fluorescent flow cytometry; (2) droplet based microfluidic flow cytometry; (3) large-array micro wells (microengraving); and (4) large-array micro chambers (barcode microchips). We examine the advantages and limitations of each technique and discuss future research opportunities by focusing on three key performance parameters (absolute quantification, sensitivity, and throughput). PMID:26891303

  1. An integrated microfluidic biochemical detection system for protein analysis with magnetic bead-based sampling capabilities.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jin-Woo; Oh, Kwang W; Thomas, Jennifer H; Heineman, William R; Halsall, H Brian; Nevin, Joseph H; Helmicki, Arthur J; Henderson, H Thurman; Ahn, Chong H

    2002-02-01

    This paper presents the development and characterization of an integrated microfluidic biochemical detection system for fast and low-volume immunoassays using magnetic beads, which are used as both immobilization surfaces and bio-molecule carriers. Microfluidic components have been developed and integrated to construct a microfluidic biochemical detection system. Magnetic bead-based immunoassay, as a typical example of biochemical detection and analysis, has been successfully performed on the integrated microfluidic biochemical analysis system that includes a surface-mounted biofilter and electrochemical sensor on a glass microfluidic motherboard. Total time required for an immunoassay was less than 20 min including sample incubation time, and sample volume wasted was less than 50 microl during five repeated assays. Fast and low-volume biochemical analysis has been successfully achieved with the developed biofilter and immunosensor, which is integrated to the microfluidic system. Such a magnetic bead-based biochemical detection system, described in this paper, can be applied to protein analysis systems.

  2. Light-sheet based lithography technique for patterning an array of microfluidic channels.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Kavya; Mondal, Partha Pratim

    2017-02-08

    We propose a Light-sheet laser interference lithography technique for fabricating periodic microfluidic channels. This technique uses multiple light-sheet illumination pattern that is generated using a spatial filter at the back-aperture of the cylindrical lens. Specially designed spatial filter is used that give rise to a periodic pattern at the focal plane which is essentially a 1D Fourier transform of the spatial filter transfer function. One-dimensional focusing property of the cylindrical lens result in the generation of line shaped channel geometry. To design microfluidic channels, the illumination pattern is exposed to the glass substrate coated with a photopolymer sensitized to 532 nm and subsequently developed using standard chemical protocols. Experimentally, the 1D periodic channel structure has an approximate width and periodicity of approximately 11.25 microns. Light-sheets based lithography technique offer a fast and single-shot process to generate microfluidic channels. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. X-ray transparent Microfluidics for Protein Crystallization and Biomineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opathalage, Achini

    Protein crystallization demands the fundamental understanding of nucleation and applying techniques to find the optimal conditions to achieve the kinetic pathway for a large and defect free crystal. Classical nucleation theory predicts that the nucleation occurs at high supersaturation conditions. In this dissertation we sought out to develop techniques to attain optimal supersaturation profile to a large defect free crystal and subject it to in-situ X-ray diffraction using microfluidics. We have developed an emulsion-based serial crystallographic technology in nanolitre-sized droplets of protein solution encapsulated in to nucleate one crystal per drop. Diffraction data are measured, one crystal at a time, from a series of room temperature crystals stored on an X-ray semi-transparent microfluidic chip, and a 93% complete data set is obtained by merging single diffraction frames taken from different un-oriented crystals. As proof of concept, the structure of Glucose Isomerase was solved to 2.1 A. We have developed a suite of X-ray semi-transparent micrfluidic devices which enables; controlled evaporation as a method of increasing supersaturation and manipulating the phase space of proteins and small molecules. We exploited the inherently high water permeability of the thin X-ray semi-transparent devices as a mean of increasing the supersaturation by controlling the evaporation. We fabricated the X-ray semi-transparent version of the PhaseChip with a thin PDMS membrane by which the storage and the reservoir layers are separated, and studies the phase transition of amorphous CaCO3.

  4. 3D-printed microfluidic chips with patterned, cell-laden hydrogel constructs.

    PubMed

    Knowlton, Stephanie; Yu, Chu Hsiang; Ersoy, Fulya; Emadi, Sharareh; Khademhosseini, Ali; Tasoglu, Savas

    2016-06-20

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing offers potential to fabricate high-throughput and low-cost fabrication of microfluidic devices as a promising alternative to traditional techniques which enables efficient design iterations in the development stage. In this study, we demonstrate a single-step fabrication of a 3D transparent microfluidic chip using two alternative techniques: a stereolithography-based desktop 3D printer and a two-step fabrication using an industrial 3D printer based on polyjet technology. This method, compared to conventional fabrication using relatively expensive materials and labor-intensive processes, presents a low-cost, rapid prototyping technique to print functional 3D microfluidic chips. We enhance the capabilities of 3D-printed microfluidic devices by coupling 3D cell encapsulation and spatial patterning within photocrosslinkable gelatin methacryloyl (GelMA). The platform presented here serves as a 3D culture environment for long-term cell culture and growth. Furthermore, we have demonstrated the ability to print complex 3D microfluidic channels to create predictable and controllable fluid flow regimes. Here, we demonstrate the novel use of 3D-printed microfluidic chips as controllable 3D cell culture environments, advancing the applicability of 3D printing to engineering physiological systems for future applications in bioengineering.

  5. Development of a multiplexed microfluidic proteomic reactor and its application for studying protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ruijun; Hoa, Xuyen Dai; Lambert, Jean-Philippe; Pezacki, John Paul; Veres, Teodor; Figeys, Daniel

    2011-06-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics techniques have been very successful for the identification and study of protein-protein interactions. Typically, immunopurification of protein complexes is conducted, followed by protein separation by gel electrophoresis and in-gel protein digestion, and finally, mass spectrometry is performed to identify the interacting partners. However, the manual processing of the samples is time-consuming and error-prone. Here, we developed a polymer-based microfluidic proteomic reactor aimed at the parallel analysis of minute amounts of protein samples obtained from immunoprecipitation. The design of the proteomic reactor allows for the simultaneous processing of multiple samples on the same devices. Each proteomic reactor on the device consists of SCX beads packed and restricted into a 1 cm microchannel by two integrated pillar frits. The device is fabricated using a combination of low-cost hard cyclic olefin copolymer thermoplastic and elastomeric thermoplastic materials (styrene/(ethylene/butylenes)/styrene) using rapid hot-embossing replication techniques with a polymer-based stamp. Three immunopurified protein samples are simultaneously captured, reduced, alkylated, and digested on the device within 2-3 h instead of the days required for the conventional protein-protein interaction studies. The limit of detection of the microfluidic proteomic reactor was shown to be lower than 2 ng of protein. Furthermore, the application of the microfluidic proteomic reactor was demonstrated for the simultaneous processing of the interactome of the histone variant Htz1 in wild-type yeast and in a swr1Δ yeast strain compared to an untagged control using a novel three-channel microfluidic proteomic reactor.

  6. Flexible microfluidic cloth-based analytical devices using a low-cost wax patterning technique.

    PubMed

    Nilghaz, Azadeh; Wicaksono, Dedy H B; Gustiono, Dwi; Abdul Majid, Fadzilah Adibah; Supriyanto, Eko; Abdul Kadir, Mohammed Rafiq

    2012-01-07

    This paper describes the fabrication of microfluidic cloth-based analytical devices (μCADs) using a simple wax patterning method on cotton cloth for performing colorimetric bioassays. Commercial cotton cloth fabric is proposed as a new inexpensive, lightweight, and flexible platform for fabricating two- (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) microfluidic systems. We demonstrated that the wicking property of the cotton microfluidic channel can be improved by scouring in soda ash (Na(2)CO(3)) solution which will remove the natural surface wax and expose the underlying texture of the cellulose fiber. After this treatment, we fabricated narrow hydrophilic channels with hydrophobic barriers made from patterned wax to define the 2D microfluidic devices. The designed pattern is carved on wax-impregnated paper, and subsequently transferred to attached cotton cloth by heat treatment. To further obtain 3D microfluidic devices having multiple layers of pattern, a single layer of wax patterned cloth can be folded along a predefined folding line and subsequently pressed using mechanical force. All the fabrication steps are simple and low cost since no special equipment is required. Diagnostic application of cloth-based devices is shown by the development of simple devices that wick and distribute microvolumes of simulated body fluids along the hydrophilic channels into reaction zones to react with analytical reagents. Colorimetric detection of bovine serum albumin (BSA) in artificial urine is carried out by direct visual observation of bromophenol blue (BPB) colour change in the reaction zones. Finally, we show the flexibility of the novel microfluidic platform by conducting a similar reaction in a bent pinned μCAD.

  7. Low-cost, high-throughput fabrication of cloth-based microfluidic devices using a photolithographical patterning technique.

    PubMed

    Wu, Peijing; Zhang, Chunsun

    2015-03-21

    In this work, we first report a facile, low-cost and high-throughput method for photolithographical fabrication of microfluidic cloth-based analytical devices (μCADs) by simply using a cotton cloth as a substrate material and employing an inexpensive hydrophobic photoresist laboratory-formulated from commercially available reagents, which allows patterning of reproducible hydrophilic-hydrophobic features in the cloth with well-defined and uniform boundaries. Firstly, we evaluated the wicking properties of cotton cloths by testing the wicking rate in the cloth channel, in combination with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) analyses. It is demonstrated that the wicking properties of the cloth microfluidic channel can be improved by soaking the cloth substrate in 20 wt% NaOH solution and by washing the cloth-based microfluidic patterns with 3 wt% SDS solution. Next, we studied the minimum dimensions achievable for the width of the hydrophobic barriers and hydrophilic channels. The results indicate that the smallest width for a desired hydrophobic barrier is designed to be 100 μm and that for a desired hydrophilic channel is designed to be 500 μm. Finally, the high-throughput μCADs prepared using the developed fabrication technique were demonstrated for colorimetric assays of glucose and protein in artificial urine samples. It has been shown that the photolithographically patterned μCADs have potential for a simple, quantitative colorimetric urine test. The combination of cheap cloth and inexpensive high-throughput photolithography enables the development of new types of low-cost cloth-based microfluidic devices, such as "microzone plates" and "gate arrays", which provide new methods to perform biochemical assays or control fluid flow.

  8. Accessing Protein Methyltransferase and Demethylase Enzymology Using Microfluidic Capillary Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Wigle, Tim J.; Provencher, Laurel M.; Norris, Jacqueline L.; Jin, Jian; Brown, Peter J.; Frye, Stephen V.; Janzen, William P.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The discovery of small molecules targeting the > 80 enzymes that add (methyltransferases) or remove (demethylases) methyl marks from lysine and arginine residues, most notably present in histone tails, may yield unprecedented chemotherapeutic agents and facilitate regenerative medicine. To better enable chemical exploration of these proteins, we have developed a novel and highly quantitative microfluidic capillary electrophoresis assay to enable full mechanistic studies of these enzymes and the kinetics of their inhibition. This technology separates small biomolecules, i.e., peptides, based on their charge-to-mass ratio. Methylation, however, does not alter the charge of peptide substrates. To overcome this limitation, we have employed a methylation-sensitive endoproteinase strategy to separate methylated from unmethylated peptides. The assay was validated on a lysine methyltransferase (G9a) and a lysine demethylase (LSD1) and was employed to investigate the inhibition of G9a by small molecules. PMID:20659682

  9. Microfluidic Western Blotting of Low-Molecular-Mass Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We describe a microfluidic Western blot assay (μWestern) using a Tris tricine discontinuous buffer system suitable for analyses of a wide molecular mass range (6.5–116 kDa). The Tris tricine μWestern is completed in an enclosed, straight glass microfluidic channel housing a photopatterned polyacrylamide gel that incorporates a photoactive benzophenone methacrylamide monomer. Upon brief ultraviolet (UV) light exposure, the hydrogel toggles from molecular sieving for size-based separation to a covalent immobilization scaffold for in situ antibody probing. Electrophoresis controls all assay stages, affording purely electronic operation with no pumps or valves needed for fluid control. Electrophoretic introduction of antibody into and along the molecular sieving gel requires that the probe must traverse through (i) a discontinuous gel interface central to the transient isotachophoresis used to achieve high-performance separations and (ii) the full axial length of the separation gel. In-channel antibody probing of small molecular mass species is especially challenging, since the gel must effectively sieve small proteins while permitting effective probing with large-molecular-mass antibodies. To create a well-controlled gel interface, we introduce a fabrication method that relies on a hydrostatic pressure mismatch between the buffer and polymer precursor solution to eliminate the interfacial pore-size control issues that arise when a polymerizing polymer abuts a nonpolymerizing polymer solution. Combined with a new swept antibody probe plug delivery scheme, the Tris tricine μWestern blot enables 40% higher separation resolution as compared to a Tris glycine system, destacking of proteins down to 6.5 kDa, and a 100-fold better signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for small pore gels, expanding the range of applicable biological targets. PMID:25268977

  10. Direct optical patterning of poly(dimethylsiloxane) microstructures for microfluidic chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shaorui; Tung, Wing-Tai; Wong, Dexter S.; Bian, Liming; Zhang, A. Ping

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we present an optical maskless exposure approach for direct patterning of large-area high resolution microfluidic chips using photosensitive poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) materials. Both positive- and negative-tone photosensitive PDMS (photoPDMS) were successfully patterned into various microfluidic devices with complex geometries by using an optical maskless lithography process. The positive-tone PDMS is used for patterning of largearea chips, while the negative-tone PDMS is demonstrated to fabricate high-resolution microstructures and on-chip devices. With the seamless pattern-stitching technique, a large-area microfluidic chip with size of 5.5 × 2.8 cm2 with complex three-dimensional (3D) staggered herringbone mixers (SHMs) for micro-flow gradient generation has been directly fabricated within 125 minutes by using the positive-tone PDMS. A small microfluidic chip with feature size as small as 5 μm is demonstrated by using the negative-tone PDMS. The experimental results reveal that the optical maskless lithography technology enables to rapidly pattern high-resolution microstructures and is very promising for development of lab-on-a-chip devices.

  11. Pathogen receptor discovery with a microfluidic human membrane protein array

    PubMed Central

    Glick, Yair; Ben-Ari, Ya’ara; Drayman, Nir; Pellach, Michal; Neveu, Gregory; Boonyaratanakornkit, Jim; Avrahami, Dorit; Einav, Shirit; Oppenheim, Ariella

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of how a pathogen invades a cell requires one to determine which host cell receptors are exploited. This determination is a challenging problem because the receptor is invariably a membrane protein, which represents an Achilles heel in proteomics. We have developed a universal platform for high-throughput expression and interaction studies of membrane proteins by creating a microfluidic-based comprehensive human membrane protein array (MPA). The MPA is, to our knowledge, the first of its kind and offers a powerful alternative to conventional proteomics by enabling the simultaneous study of 2,100 membrane proteins. We characterized direct interactions of a whole nonenveloped virus (simian virus 40), as well as those of the hepatitis delta enveloped virus large form antigen, with candidate host receptors expressed on the MPA. Selected newly discovered membrane protein–pathogen interactions were validated by conventional methods, demonstrating that the MPA is an important tool for cellular receptor discovery and for understanding pathogen tropism. PMID:27044079

  12. Regioselective patterning of multiple SAMs and applications in surface-guided smart microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chuanzhao; Xu, Pengcheng; Li, Xinxin

    2014-12-24

    A top-down nanofabrication technology is developed to integrate multiple SAMs (self-assembled monolayers) into regioselective patterns. With ultraviolet light exposure through regioselectively hollowed hard mask, an existing SAM at designated microregions can be removed and a dissimilar kind of SAM can be regrown there. By repeating the photolithography-like process cycle, diverse kinds of SAM building blocks can be laid out as a desired pattern in one microfluidic channel. In order to ensure high quality of the surface modifications, the SAMs are vapor-phase deposited before the channel is closed by a bonding process. For the first time the technique makes it possible to integrate three or more kinds of SAMs in one microchannel. The technique is very useful for multiplex surface functionalization of microfluidic chips where different segments of a microfluidic channel need to be individually modified with different SAMs or into arrayed pattern for surface-guided fluidic properties like hydrophobicity/philicity and/or oleophobicity/philicity, etc. The technique has been well validated by experimental demonstration of various surface-directed flow-guiding functions. By modifying a microchannel surface into an arrayed pattern of multi-SAM "two-tone" stripe array, surface-guiding-induced 3D swirling flow is generated in a microfluidic channel that experimentally exhibits quick oil/water mixing and high-efficiency oil-to-water chemical extraction.

  13. Microfluidic Patterning of Metal Structures for Flexible Conductors by In Situ Polymer-Assisted Electroless Deposition.

    PubMed

    Liang, Suqing; Li, Yaoyao; Zhou, Tingjiao; Yang, Jinbin; Zhou, Xiaohu; Zhu, Taipeng; Huang, Junqiao; Zhu, Julie; Zhu, Deyong; Liu, Yizhen; He, Chuanxin; Zhang, Junmin; Zhou, Xuechang

    2017-02-01

    A low-cost, solution-processed, versatile, microfluidic approach is developed for patterning structures of highly conductive metals (e.g., copper, silver, and nickel) on chemically modified flexible polyethylene terephthalate thin films by in situ polymer-assisted electroless metal deposition. This method has significantly lowered the consumption of catalyst as well as the metal plating solution.

  14. "Print-n-Shrink" technology for the rapid production of microfluidic chips and protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Sollier, Kevin; Mandon, Céline A; Heyries, Kevin A; Blum, Loïc J; Marquette, Christophe A

    2009-12-21

    An innovative method for the production of microfluidic chips integrating protein spots is described. The technology, called "Print-n-Shrink", is based on the screen-printing of a microfluidic design (using a dielectric ink) onto Polyshrink polystyrene sheets. The initial print which has a minimum size of 15 microm (height) x 230 microm (width) is thermally treated (30 seconds, 163 degrees C) to shrink and generate features of 85 microm (height) x 100 microm (width). Concomitantly, proteins such as monoclonal antibodies or cellular adhesion proteins are spotted onto the Polyshrink sheets and shrunk together with the microfluidic design, creating a complete biochip integrating both complex microfluidic designs and protein spots for bioanalytical applications.

  15. Identification of microfluidic two-phase flow patterns in lab-on-chip devices.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhaochu; Dong, Tao; Halvorsen, Einar

    2014-01-01

    This work describes a capacitive sensor for identification of microfluidic two-phase flow in lab-on-chip devices. With interdigital electrodes and thin insulation layer utilized, this sensor is capable of being integrated with the microsystems easily. Transducing principle and design considerations are presented with respect to the microfluidic gas/liquid flow patterns. Numerical simulation results verify the operational principle. And the factors affecting the performance of the sensor are discussed. Besides, a feasible process flow for the fabrication is also proposed.

  16. An optimized resistor pattern for temperature gradient control in microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selva, Bertrand; Marchalot, Julien; Jullien, Marie-Caroline

    2009-06-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the possibility of generating high-temperature gradients with a linear temperature profile when heating is provided in situ. Thanks to improved optimization algorithms, the shape of resistors, which constitute the heating source, is optimized by applying the genetic algorithm NSGA-II (acronym for the non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm) (Deb et al 2002 IEEE Trans. Evol. Comput. 6 2). Experimental validation of the linear temperature profile within the cavity is carried out using a thermally sensitive fluorophore, called Rhodamine B (Ross et al 2001 Anal. Chem. 73 4117-23, Erickson et al 2003 Lab Chip 3 141-9). The high level of agreement obtained between experimental and numerical results serves to validate the accuracy of this method for generating highly controlled temperature profiles. In the field of actuation, such a device is of potential interest since it allows for controlling bubbles or droplets moving by means of thermocapillary effects (Baroud et al 2007 Phys. Rev. E 75 046302). Digital microfluidics is a critical area in the field of microfluidics (Dreyfus et al 2003 Phys. Rev. Lett. 90 14) as well as in the so-called lab-on-a-chip technology. Through an example, the large application potential of such a technique is demonstrated, which entails handling a single bubble driven along a cavity using simple and tunable embedded resistors.

  17. Fabrication of microfluidic devices containing patterned microwell arrays.

    PubMed

    Henley, W Hampton; Dennis, Patty J; Ramsey, J Michael

    2012-02-07

    A rapid fabrication and prototyping technique to incorporate microwell arrays with sub-10 μm features within a single layer of microfluidic circuitry is presented. Typically, the construction of devices that incorporate very small architecture within larger components has required the assembly of multiple elements to form a working device. Rapid, facile production of a working device using only a single layer of molded polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and a glass support substrate is achieved with the reported fabrication technique. A combination of conventional wet-chemical etching for larger (≥20 μm) microchannel features and focused ion beam (FIB) milling for smaller (≤10 μm) microwell features was used to fabricate a monolithic glass master mold. PDMS/glass hybrid chips were then produced using simple molding and oxygen plasma bonding methods. Microwell structures were loaded with 3 μm antibody-functionalized dye-encoded polystyrene spheres, and a sandwich immunoassay for common cytokines was performed to demonstrate proof-of-principle. Potential applications for this device include highly parallel multiplexed sandwich immunoassays, DNA/RNA hybridization analyses, and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The fabrication technique described can be used for rapid prototyping of devices wherever submicrometer- to micrometer-sized features are incorporated into a microfluidic device.

  18. A novel microfluidics-based method for probing weak protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Tan, Darren Cherng-wen; Wijaya, I Putu Mahendra; Andreasson-Ochsner, Mirjam; Vasina, Elena Nikolaevna; Nallani, Madhavan; Hunziker, Walter; Sinner, Eva-Kathrin

    2012-08-07

    We report the use of a novel microfluidics-based method to detect weak protein-protein interactions between membrane proteins. The tight junction protein, claudin-2, synthesised in vitro using a cell-free expression system in the presence of polymer vesicles as membrane scaffolds, was used as a model membrane protein. Individual claudin-2 molecules interact weakly, although the cumulative effect of these interactions is significant. This effect results in a transient decrease of average vesicle dispersivity and reduction in transport speed of claudin-2-functionalised vesicles. Polymer vesicles functionalised with claudin-2 were perfused through a microfluidic channel and the time taken to traverse a defined distance within the channel was measured. Functionalised vesicles took 1.19 to 1.69 times longer to traverse this distance than unfunctionalised ones. Coating the channel walls with protein A and incubating the vesicles with anti-claudin-2 antibodies prior to perfusion resulted in the functionalised vesicles taking 1.75 to 2.5 times longer to traverse this distance compared to the controls. The data show that our system is able to detect weak as well as strong protein-protein interactions. This system offers researchers a portable, easily operated and customizable platform for the study of weak protein-protein interactions, particularly between membrane proteins.

  19. A Microfluidic, High Throughput Protein Crystal Growth Method for Microgravity

    PubMed Central

    Carruthers Jr, Carl W.; Gerdts, Cory; Johnson, Michael D.; Webb, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The attenuation of sedimentation and convection in microgravity can sometimes decrease irregularities formed during macromolecular crystal growth. Current terrestrial protein crystal growth (PCG) capabilities are very different than those used during the Shuttle era and that are currently on the International Space Station (ISS). The focus of this experiment was to demonstrate the use of a commercial off-the-shelf, high throughput, PCG method in microgravity. Using Protein BioSolutions’ microfluidic Plug Maker™/CrystalCard™ system, we tested the ability to grow crystals of the regulator of glucose metabolism and adipogenesis: peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (apo-hPPAR-γ LBD), as well as several PCG standards. Overall, we sent 25 CrystalCards™ to the ISS, containing ~10,000 individual microgravity PCG experiments in a 3U NanoRacks NanoLab (1U = 103 cm.). After 70 days on the ISS, our samples were returned with 16 of 25 (64%) microgravity cards having crystals, compared to 12 of 25 (48%) of the ground controls. Encouragingly, there were more apo-hPPAR-γ LBD crystals in the microgravity PCG cards than the 1g controls. These positive results hope to introduce the use of the PCG standard of low sample volume and large experimental density to the microgravity environment and provide new opportunities for macromolecular samples that may crystallize poorly in standard laboratories. PMID:24278480

  20. Multiplexed microfluidic blotting of proteins and nucleic acids by parallel, serpentine microchannels.

    PubMed

    He, Sha; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Pei; Xu, Xingzhi; Zhu, Kui; Pan, Wenying; Liu, Wenwen; Cai, Kaiyong; Sun, Jiashu; Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Xingyu

    2015-01-07

    This work develops a high-throughput, high-efficiency and straightforward microfluidic blotting method for analyzing proteins and nucleic acids. Sample solutions containing antibodies (for protein detection) or hybridization probes (for nucleic acid detection) are introduced into the parallel, serpentine microchannels to specifically recognize the immobilized targets on the substrate, achieving the identification of multiple targets in multiple samples simultaneously. The loading control, molecular weight markers, and antigen/antibody titration are designed and integrated into the microfluidic chip, thus allowing for the quantification of proteins and nucleic acids. Importantly, we could easily distinguish the adjacent blotting bands inside parallel microchannels, which may be difficult to achieve in conventional blotting. The small dimensions of microfluidic channels also help to reduce the amount of probing molecules and to accelerate the biochemical reaction. Our microfluidic blotting could bypass the steps of blocking and washing, further reducing the operation time and complexity.

  1. A robust and scalable microfluidic metering method that allows protein crystal growth by free interface diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Carl L.; Skordalakes, Emmanuel; Berger, James M.; Quake, Stephen R.

    2002-12-01

    Producing robust and scalable fluid metering in a microfluidic device is a challenging problem. We developed a scheme for metering fluids on the picoliter scale that is scalable to highly integrated parallel architectures and is independent of the properties of the working fluid. We demonstrated the power of this method by fabricating and testing a microfluidic chip for rapid screening of protein crystallization conditions, a major hurdle in structural biology efforts. The chip has 480 active valves and performs 144 parallel reactions, each of which uses only 10 nl of protein sample. The properties of microfluidic mixing allow an efficient kinetic trajectory for crystallization, and the microfluidic device outperforms conventional techniques by detecting more crystallization conditions while using 2 orders of magnitude less protein sample. We demonstrate that diffraction-quality crystals may be grown and harvested from such nanoliter-volume reactions.

  2. A robotics platform for automated batch fabrication of high density, microfluidics-based DNA microarrays, with applications to single cell, multiplex assays of secreted proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Habib; Sutherland, Alex; Shin, Young Shik; Hwang, Kiwook; Qin, Lidong; Krom, Russell-John; Heath, James R.

    2011-01-01

    Microfluidics flow-patterning has been utilized for the construction of chip-scale miniaturized DNA and protein barcode arrays. Such arrays have been used for specific clinical and fundamental investigations in which many proteins are assayed from single cells or other small sample sizes. However, flow-patterned arrays are hand-prepared, and so are impractical for broad applications. We describe an integrated robotics/microfluidics platform for the automated preparation of such arrays, and we apply it to the batch fabrication of up to eighteen chips of flow-patterned DNA barcodes. The resulting substrates are comparable in quality with hand-made arrays and exhibit excellent substrate-to-substrate consistency. We demonstrate the utility and reproducibility of robotics-patterned barcodes by utilizing two flow-patterned chips for highly parallel assays of a panel of secreted proteins from single macrophage cells. PMID:21974603

  3. A robotics platform for automated batch fabrication of high density, microfluidics-based DNA microarrays, with applications to single cell, multiplex assays of secreted proteins.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Habib; Sutherland, Alex; Shin, Young Shik; Hwang, Kiwook; Qin, Lidong; Krom, Russell-John; Heath, James R

    2011-09-01

    Microfluidics flow-patterning has been utilized for the construction of chip-scale miniaturized DNA and protein barcode arrays. Such arrays have been used for specific clinical and fundamental investigations in which many proteins are assayed from single cells or other small sample sizes. However, flow-patterned arrays are hand-prepared, and so are impractical for broad applications. We describe an integrated robotics/microfluidics platform for the automated preparation of such arrays, and we apply it to the batch fabrication of up to eighteen chips of flow-patterned DNA barcodes. The resulting substrates are comparable in quality with hand-made arrays and exhibit excellent substrate-to-substrate consistency. We demonstrate the utility and reproducibility of robotics-patterned barcodes by utilizing two flow-patterned chips for highly parallel assays of a panel of secreted proteins from single macrophage cells. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  4. A robotics platform for automated batch fabrication of high density, microfluidics-based DNA microarrays, with applications to single cell, multiplex assays of secreted proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Habib; Sutherland, Alex; Shin, Young Shik; Hwang, Kiwook; Qin, Lidong; Krom, Russell-John; Heath, James R.

    2011-09-01

    Microfluidics flow-patterning has been utilized for the construction of chip-scale miniaturized DNA and protein barcode arrays. Such arrays have been used for specific clinical and fundamental investigations in which many proteins are assayed from single cells or other small sample sizes. However, flow-patterned arrays are hand-prepared, and so are impractical for broad applications. We describe an integrated robotics/microfluidics platform for the automated preparation of such arrays, and we apply it to the batch fabrication of up to eighteen chips of flow-patterned DNA barcodes. The resulting substrates are comparable in quality with hand-made arrays and exhibit excellent substrate-to-substrate consistency. We demonstrate the utility and reproducibility of robotics-patterned barcodes by utilizing two flow-patterned chips for highly parallel assays of a panel of secreted proteins from single macrophage cells.

  5. Integration of protein processing steps on a droplet microfluidics platform for MALDI-MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Debalina; Ytterberg, A Jimmy; Son, Sang Uk; Loo, Joseph A; Garrell, Robin L

    2010-03-01

    A droplet-based (digital) microfluidics platform has been developed to prepare and purify protein samples for measurement by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). Liquid droplets are moved in air by sequentially applying an electric potential to an array of electrodes patterned beneath a hydrophobic dielectric layer. We show that a complete integrated sequence of protein processing steps can be performed on this platform, including disulfide reduction, alkylation, and enzymatic digestion, followed by cocrystallization with a MALDI matrix and analysis of the sample in situ by MALDI-MS. Proteins carbonic anhydrase, cytochrome c, and ubiquitin were used to demonstrate the digestion and postdigestion steps; insulin, serum albumin, and lysozyme were used to illustrate the complete sequence of protein processing steps available with the platform. Several functional improvements in the platform are reported, notably, the incorporation of acetonitrile in the protein droplets to facilitate movement, and patterning the device surfaces to optimize sample crystallization. The method is fast, simple, repeatable, and results in lower reagent consumption and sample loss than conventional techniques for proteomics sample preparation.

  6. Thermoplastic microfluidic devices and their applications in protein and DNA analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ke; Fan, Z. Hugh

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidics is a platform technology that has been used for genomics, proteomics, chemical synthesis, environment monitoring, cellular studies, and other applications. The fabrication materials of microfluidic devices have traditionally included silicon and glass, but plastics have gained increasing attention in the past few years. We focus this review on thermoplastic microfluidic devices and their applications in protein and DNA analysis. We outline the device design and fabrication methods, followed by discussion on the strategies of surface treatment. We then concentrate on several significant advancements in applying thermoplastic microfluidic devices to protein separation, immunoassays, and DNA analysis. Comparison among numerous efforts, as well as the discussion on the challenges and innovation associated with detection, is presented. PMID:21274478

  7. Soft and rigid two-level microfluidic networks for patterning surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juncker, David; Schmid, Heinz; Bernard, André; Caelen, Isabelle; Michel, Bruno; de Rooij, Nico; Delamarche, Emmanuel

    2001-09-01

    We describe the microfabrication and use of elastomeric and rigid two-level microfluidic networks (µFNs), made of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) or Si, for patterning surfaces. The first level corresponds to microchannels and the second to via holes through the µFNs serving as filling and venting ports. µFNs in PDMS are manufactured using a `sandwich' replication from a microfabricated four inch mold structured with SU-8 photoresist, which is planarized by mechanical polishing. µFNs in Si are microfabricated using deep reactive ion etching. Both types of µFNs can be positioned onto a substrate, creating sealed microchannels, filled with different liquids, flushed, removed and reused. These two-level µFNs allow us to access the ports from the rear, minimize interchannel crosstalk, and are economic of solutions. The channels are made wettable so that the liquids can flow spontaneously into the conduits, but stop at the venting ports. The sealing of the conduits usually requires that either the µFN or the substrate be soft. A strategy for using hard two-level µFNs, in Si, for patterning hard substrates is presented: despite voids in-between the µFN and the substrate, a water-based solution can be guided by hydrophilic microchannels over a hydrophobic surface. Adjusting the wetting properties of the various surfaces is key to preventing undesired spreading of solutions. We illustrate our concepts by micromolding colored photocurable polymers on glass and patterning proteins as lines on a polystyrene surface.}

  8. A novel approach to determine the efficacy of patterned surfaces for biofouling control in relation to its microfluidic environment.

    PubMed

    Halder, Partha; Nasabi, Mahyar; Lopez, Francisco Javier Tovar; Jayasuriya, Niranjali; Bhattacharya, Satinath; Deighton, Margaret; Mitchell, Arnan; Bhuiyan, Muhammed Ali

    2013-01-01

    Biofouling, the unwanted growth of sessile microorganisms on submerged surfaces, presents a serious problem for underwater structures. While biofouling can be controlled to various degrees with different microstructure-based patterned surfaces, understanding of the underlying mechanism is still imprecise. Researchers have long speculated that microtopographies might influence near-surface microfluidic conditions, thus microhydrodynamically preventing the settlement of microorganisms. It is therefore very important to identify the microfluidic environment developed on patterned surfaces and its relation with the antifouling behaviour of those surfaces. This study considered the wall shear stress distribution pattern as a significant aspect of this microfluidic environment. In this study, patterned surfaces with microwell arrays were assessed experimentally with a real-time biofilm development monitoring system using a novel microchannel-based flow cell reactor. Finally, computational fluid dynamics simulations were carried out to show how the microfluidic conditions were affecting the initial settlement of microorganisms.

  9. Tape Transfer Atomization Patterning of Liquid Alloys for Microfluidic Stretchable Wireless Power Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Seung Hee; Hjort, Klas; Wu, Zhigang

    2015-01-01

    Stretchable electronics offers unsurpassed mechanical compliance on complex or soft surfaces like the human skin and organs. To fully exploit this great advantage, an autonomous system with a self-powered energy source has been sought for. Here, we present a new technology to pattern liquid alloys on soft substrates, targeting at fabrication of a hybrid-integrated power source in microfluidic stretchable electronics. By atomized spraying of a liquid alloy onto a soft surface with a tape transferred adhesive mask, a universal fabrication process is provided for high quality patterns of liquid conductors in a meter scale. With the developed multilayer fabrication technique, a microfluidic stretchable wireless power transfer device with an integrated LED was demonstrated, which could survive cycling between 0% and 25% strain over 1,000 times. PMID:25673261

  10. Tape transfer atomization patterning of liquid alloys for microfluidic stretchable wireless power transfer.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seung Hee; Hjort, Klas; Wu, Zhigang

    2015-02-12

    Stretchable electronics offers unsurpassed mechanical compliance on complex or soft surfaces like the human skin and organs. To fully exploit this great advantage, an autonomous system with a self-powered energy source has been sought for. Here, we present a new technology to pattern liquid alloys on soft substrates, targeting at fabrication of a hybrid-integrated power source in microfluidic stretchable electronics. By atomized spraying of a liquid alloy onto a soft surface with a tape transferred adhesive mask, a universal fabrication process is provided for high quality patterns of liquid conductors in a meter scale. With the developed multilayer fabrication technique, a microfluidic stretchable wireless power transfer device with an integrated LED was demonstrated, which could survive cycling between 0% and 25% strain over 1,000 times.

  11. Expedient generation of patterned surface aldehydes by microfluidic oxidation for chemoselective immobilization of ligands and cells.

    PubMed

    Westcott, Nathan P; Pulsipher, Abigail; Lamb, Brian M; Yousaf, Muhammad N

    2008-09-02

    An expedient and inexpensive method to generate patterned aldehydes on self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of alkanethiolates on gold with control of density for subsequent chemoselective immobilization from commercially available starting materials has been developed. Utilizing microfluidic cassettes, primary alcohol oxidation of tetra(ethylene glycol) undecane thiol and 11-mercapto-1-undecanol SAMs was performed directly on the surface generating patterned aldehyde groups with pyridinium chlorochromate. The precise density of surface aldehydes generated can be controlled and characterized by electrochemistry. For biological applications, fibroblast cells were seeded on patterned surfaces presenting biospecifc cell adhesive (Arg-Glyc-Asp) RGD peptides.

  12. Protein crystallization using microfluidic technologies based on valves, droplets, and SlipChip.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2010-01-01

    To obtain protein crystals, researchers must search for conditions in multidimensional chemical space. Empirically, thousands of crystallization experiments are carried out to screen various precipitants at multiple concentrations. Microfluidics can manipulate fluids on a nanoliter scale, and it affects crystallization twofold. First, it miniaturizes the experiments that can currently be done on a larger scale and enables crystallization of proteins that are available only in small amounts. Second, it offers unique experimental approaches that are difficult or impossible to implement on a larger scale. Ongoing development of microfluidic techniques and their integration with protein production, characterization, and in situ diffraction promises to accelerate the progress of structural biology.

  13. Topographically-patterned porous membranes in a microfluidic device as an in vitro model of renal reabsorptive barriers

    PubMed Central

    Frohlich, Else M.; Alonso, José Luis; Borenstein, Jeffrey T.; Zhang, Xin; Arnaout, M. Amin

    2015-01-01

    Models of reabsorptive barriers require both a means to provide realistic physiologic cues to and quantify transport across a layer of cells forming the barrier. Here we have topographically-patterned porous membranes with several user-defined pattern types. To demonstrate the utility of the patterned membranes, we selected one type of pattern and applied it to a membrane to serve as a cell culture support in a microfluidic model of a renal reabsorptive barrier. The topographic cues in the model resemble physiological cues found in vivo while the porous structure allows quantification of transport across the cell layer. Sub-micron surface topography generated via hot-embossing onto a track-etched polycarbonate membrane, fully replicated topographical features and preserved porous architecture. Pore size and shape were analyzed with SEM and image analysis to determine the effect of hot embossing on pore morphology. The membrane was assembled into a bilayer microfluidic device and a human kidney proximal tubule epithelial cell line (HK-2) and primary renal proximal tubule epithelial cells (RPTEC) were cultured to confluency on the membrane. Immunofluorescent staining of both cell types revealed protein expression indicative of the formation of a reabsorptive barrier responsive to mechanical stimulation: ZO-1 (tight junction), paxillin (focal adhesions) and acetylated α-tubulin (primary cilia). HK-2 and RPTEC aligned in the direction of ridge/groove topography of the membrane in the device, evidence that the device has mechanical control over cell response. This topographically-patterned porous membrane provides an in vitro platform on which to model reabsorptive barriers with meaningful applications for understanding biological transport phenomenon, underlying disease mechanisms, and drug toxicity. PMID:23636129

  14. Topographically-patterned porous membranes in a microfluidic device as an in vitro model of renal reabsorptive barriers.

    PubMed

    Frohlich, Else M; Alonso, José Luis; Borenstein, Jeffrey T; Zhang, Xin; Arnaout, M Amin; Charest, Joseph L

    2013-06-21

    Models of reabsorptive barriers require both a means to provide realistic physiologic cues to and quantify transport across a layer of cells forming the barrier. Here we have topographically-patterned porous membranes with several user-defined pattern types. To demonstrate the utility of the patterned membranes, we selected one type of pattern and applied it to a membrane to serve as a cell culture support in a microfluidic model of a renal reabsorptive barrier. The topographic cues in the model resemble physiological cues found in vivo while the porous structure allows quantification of transport across the cell layer. Sub-micron surface topography generated via hot-embossing onto a track-etched polycarbonate membrane, fully replicated topographical features and preserved porous architecture. Pore size and shape were analyzed with SEM and image analysis to determine the effect of hot embossing on pore morphology. The membrane was assembled into a bilayer microfluidic device and a human kidney proximal tubule epithelial cell line (HK-2) and primary renal proximal tubule epithelial cells (RPTEC) were cultured to confluency on the membrane. Immunofluorescent staining of both cell types revealed protein expression indicative of the formation of a reabsorptive barrier responsive to mechanical stimulation: ZO-1 (tight junction), paxillin (focal adhesions) and acetylated α-tubulin (primary cilia). HK-2 and RPTEC aligned in the direction of ridge/groove topography of the membrane in the device, evidence that the device has mechanical control over cell response. This topographically-patterned porous membrane provides an in vitro platform on which to model reabsorptive barriers with meaningful applications for understanding biological transport phenomenon, underlying disease mechanisms, and drug toxicity.

  15. Capture and X-ray diffraction studies of protein microcrystals in a microfluidic trap array

    SciTech Connect

    Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Murray, Thomas D.; Koehl, Antoine; Araci, Ismail Emre; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Zeldin, Oliver B.; Cohen, Aina E.; Soltis, S. Michael; Baxter, Elizabeth L.; Brewster, Aaron S.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Brunger, Axel T.; Berger, James M.

    2015-04-01

    A microfluidic platform has been developed for the capture and X-ray analysis of protein microcrystals, affording a means to improve the efficiency of XFEL and synchrotron experiments. X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) promise to enable the collection of interpretable diffraction data from samples that are refractory to data collection at synchrotron sources. At present, however, more efficient sample-delivery methods that minimize the consumption of microcrystalline material are needed to allow the application of XFEL sources to a wide range of challenging structural targets of biological importance. Here, a microfluidic chip is presented in which microcrystals can be captured at fixed, addressable points in a trap array from a small volume (<10 µl) of a pre-existing slurry grown off-chip. The device can be mounted on a standard goniostat for conducting diffraction experiments at room temperature without the need for flash-cooling. Proof-of-principle tests with a model system (hen egg-white lysozyme) demonstrated the high efficiency of the microfluidic approach for crystal harvesting, permitting the collection of sufficient data from only 265 single-crystal still images to permit determination and refinement of the structure of the protein. This work shows that microfluidic capture devices can be readily used to facilitate data collection from protein microcrystals grown in traditional laboratory formats, enabling analysis when cryopreservation is problematic or when only small numbers of crystals are available. Such microfluidic capture devices may also be useful for data collection at synchrotron sources.

  16. Characterization of microfluidic mixing and reaction in microchannels via analysis of cross-sectional patterns

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Wei-Feng; Hsu, Miao-Hsing; Chen, Yu-Tzu; Yang, Jing-Tang

    2011-01-01

    For the diagnosis of biochemical reactions, the investigation of microflow behavior, and the confirmation of simulation results in microfluidics, experimentally quantitative measurements are indispensable. To characterize the mixing and reaction of fluids in microchannel devices, we propose a mixing quality index (Mqi) to quantify the cross-sectional patterns (also called mixing patterns) of fluids, captured with a confocal-fluorescence microscope (CFM). The operating parameters of the CFM for quantification were carefully tested. We analyzed mixing patterns, flow advection, and mass exchange of fluids in the devices with overlapping channels of two kinds. The mixing length of the two devices derived from the analysis of Mqi is demonstrated to be more precise than that estimated with a commonly applied method of blending dye liquors. By means of fluorescence resonance-energy transfer (FRET), we monitored the hybridization of two complementary oligonucleotides (a FRET pair) in the devices. The captured patterns reveal that hybridization is a progressive process along the downstream channel. The FRET reaction and the hybridization period were characterized through quantification of the reaction patterns. This analytical approach is a promising diagnostic tool that is applicable to the real-time analysis of biochemical and chemical reactions such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR), catalytic, or synthetic processes in microfluidic devices. PMID:21503162

  17. Refolding of difficult-to-fold proteins by a gradual decrease of denaturant using microfluidic chips.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Miyazaki, Masaya; Briones-Nagata, Maria Portia; Maeda, Hideaki

    2010-06-01

    Protein refolding is an important process to obtain active recombinant proteins from inclusion bodies (protein aggregates). However, the conventional refolding method of dialysis or dilution is a time consuming procedure and often, recovering yields of active proteins are low. In this study, we used controllable diffusion through laminar flow in microchannels to control the denaturant concentration. The performance of the designed microfluidic chips was evaluated by the refolding of difficult-to-fold proteins (citrate synthase and the zeta-associated protein 70-kDa protein kinase domain). We demonstrated this by varying the flow rates of the diluting buffer stream(s) and multi-junctions which could control the different flow rate ratios of the buffer stream(s) and the denatured protein stream. By this strategy, we were able to improve the efficiency of protein refolding. Our method achieved refolding within a short period of time at room temperature without the need of any small molecules or chaperone proteins. Moreover, the efficiency of protein refolding by microfluidic chip was found higher than that prepared by dialysis or dilution. These results suggest that microfluidic chips employing this strategy may provide miniaturized tools for rapid and efficient recovery of active proteins from inclusion bodies.

  18. Fabrication of thermo-responsive microfluidic membrane using photopolymerization patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyejeong; Lee, Sang Joon

    2015-11-01

    The programmed manipulation of responsive functional hydrogels is receiving large attention because of its unique functions and wide range of engineering applications. In this study, we developed an innovative stomata-inspired membrane (SIM) by fabricating a temperature-responsive hydrogel with a simple, cost effective, and high-throughput photopolymerization patterning process. Polymerization-induced diffusion on the macro-scale surface gives rise to form a multi-parted polymer membrane with fine pores by simple UV irradiation. After heating the SIM, the less deformable thick frame supports the whole structure, and the highly deformable thin base regulates the size of pores. The morphological configuration of the SIM can be easily changed by varying the solution composition or selecting a suitable photomask with different pattern. The developed SIM has the special sensing-to-actuation functions of stimuli-responsive hydrogels. This membrane with temperature-responsive pores would be potentially utilized in numerous practical applications, such as filter membranes with self-adjustable pores, membrane-based sensors, membrane-based actuators, and multi-functional membranes etc. This study was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) and funded by the Korean government (MSIP) (Grant No. 2008-0061991).

  19. Understanding wax screen-printing: a novel patterning process for microfluidic cloth-based analytical devices.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min; Zhang, Chunsun; Liu, Feifei

    2015-09-03

    In this work, we first introduce the fabrication of microfluidic cloth-based analytical devices (μCADs) using a wax screen-printing approach that is suitable for simple, inexpensive, rapid, low-energy-consumption and high-throughput preparation of cloth-based analytical devices. We have carried out a detailed study on the wax screen-printing of μCADs and have obtained some interesting results. Firstly, an analytical model is established for the spreading of molten wax in cloth. Secondly, a new wax screen-printing process has been proposed for fabricating μCADs, where the melting of wax into the cloth is much faster (∼5 s) and the heating temperature is much lower (75 °C). Thirdly, the experimental results show that the patterning effects of the proposed wax screen-printing method depend to a certain extent on types of screens, wax melting temperatures and melting time. Under optimized conditions, the minimum printing width of hydrophobic wax barrier and hydrophilic channel is 100 μm and 1.9 mm, respectively. Importantly, the developed analytical model is also well validated by these experiments. Fourthly, the μCADs fabricated by the presented wax screen-printing method are used to perform a proof-of-concept assay of glucose or protein in artificial urine with rapid high-throughput detection taking place on a 48-chamber cloth-based device and being performed by a visual readout. Overall, the developed cloth-based wax screen-printing and arrayed μCADs should provide a new research direction in the development of advanced sensor arrays for detection of a series of analytes relevant to many diverse applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Fluorescence enhancement and multiple protein detection in ZnO nanostructure microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Sang, Chen-Hsiang; Chou, Shu-Jen; Pan, F M; Sheu, Jeng-Tzong

    2016-01-15

    In this study, different morphological ZnO nanostructures, those of sharp nanowires (NWs), rod NWs, and hexahedral-puncheon nanostructures, were grown in microfluidic channels on the same glass substrate. Characterizations of correspondent biomolecule binding properties were simulated and demonstrated. The surface was modified using 3-ammineopropyl-triethoxysilane (3-APTES) and biotin-N-hydroxysuccinimide ester (NHS-biotin). Different concentrations (4.17pM to 41.7nM) of dye-conjugated streptavidin were simultaneously infused through the second microfluidic channels, which lie 90° from the first microfluidic channels. The florescent intensity at the crossover areas showed good agreement with simulations, with sharp ZnO NWs exhibiting the largest dynamic range and the highest fluorescent intensity. We further characterize correspondent protein detection using sharp ZnO NWs. The surfaces of these ZnO NWs were modified with mouse immunoglobulin G (IgG), infused through the second microfluidic channels with dye-conjugated (Alexa 546) anti-mouse IgG in different concentrations. Concentrations ranging from 417fM to 41.7nM can be resolved using sharp ZnO NWs. Finally, multiple protein detection was demonstrated using a five-by-eight microfluidic channel array. Fluorescence images present clear multiple detections at the crossover areas when using the sharp ZnO NWs for simultaneous dye-conjugated anti-mouse IgG and dye-conjugated anti-rabbit IgG (Alexa 647) detection.

  1. TiO2 coated microfluidic devices for recoverable hydrophilic and hydrophobic patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jin-Hyung; Kim, Sang Kyung; Park, Hyung-Ho; Kim, Tae Song

    2015-03-01

    We report a simple method for modifying the surfaces of plastic microfluidic devices through dynamic coating process with a nano-colloidal TiO2 sol. The surface of the thermoplastic, cyclic olefin copolymer (COC) was coated with the TiO2 film, that displayed an effective photocatalytic property. The hydrophilic surface is obtained in the TiO2-coated zone of a microfluidic channel, and TiO2 coated surface degradation can be reversed easily by UV irradiation. The present work shows a photocatalytic activity concerning the effect of TiO2 coating density, which is controlled by the number of coating cycles. The hydrophilized surface was characterized by the contact angle of water and the TiO2 coated COC surface reduced the water contact angle from 85° to less than 10° upon UV irradiation. The photocatalytic effect of the layer that was coated five times with TiO2 was excellent, and the super-hydrophilicity of the TiO2 surface could be promptly recovered after 10 months of storage at atmospheric conditions. The COC microfluidic devices, in which TiO2 has been freshly deposited and aged for 10 months, were capable of generating water-in oil-in water (W/O/W) double emulsions easily and uniformly by simple control of the flow rates for demonstration of excellent hydrophilic patterning and recovery of the TiO2 coated in the microchannels.

  2. Paramagnetic Structures within a Microfluidic Channel for Enhanced Immunomagnetic Isolation and Surface Patterning of Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Chen; Hassanisaber, Hamid; Yu, Richard; Ma, Sai; Verbridge, Scott S.; Lu, Chang

    2016-01-01

    In this report, we demonstrate a unique method for embedding magnetic structures inside a microfluidic channel for cell isolation. We used a molding process to fabricate these structures out of a ferrofluid of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles. We show that the embedded magnetic structures significantly increased the magnetic field in the channel, resulting in up to 4-fold enhancement in immunomagnetic capture as compared with a channel without these embedded magnetic structures. We also studied the spatial distribution of trapped cells both experimentally and computationally. We determined that the surface pattern of these trapped cells was determined by both location of the magnet and layout of the in-channel magnetic structures. Our magnetic structure embedded microfluidic device achieved over 90% capture efficiency at a flow velocity of 4 mm/s, a speed that was roughly two orders of magnitude faster than previous microfluidic systems used for a similar purpose. We envision that our technology will provide a powerful tool for detection and enrichment of rare cells from biological samples. PMID:27388549

  3. Acoustic Tweezing and Patterning of Concentration Fields in Microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsen, Jonas T.; Bruus, Henrik

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrate theoretically that acoustic forces acting on inhomogeneous fluids can be used to pattern and manipulate solute concentration fields into spatiotemporally controllable configurations stabilized against gravity. A theoretical framework describing the dynamics of concentration fields that weakly perturb the fluid density and speed of sound is presented and applied to study manipulation of concentration fields in rectangular-channel acoustic eigenmodes and in Bessel-function acoustic vortices. In the first example, methods to obtain horizontal and vertical multilayer stratification of the concentration field at the end of a flow-through channel are presented. In the second example, we demonstrate acoustic tweezing and spatiotemporal manipulation of a local high-concentration region in a lower-concentration medium, thereby extending the realm of acoustic tweezing to include concentration fields.

  4. Microfluidics for the analysis of membrane proteins: how do we get there?

    PubMed

    Battle, Katrina N; Uba, Franklin I; Soper, Steven A

    2014-08-01

    The development of fully automated and high-throughput systems for proteomics is now in demand because of the need to generate new protein-based disease biomarkers. Unfortunately, it is difficult to identify protein biomarkers that are low abundant when in the presence of highly abundant proteins, especially in complex biological samples such as serum, cell lysates, and other biological fluids. Membrane proteins, which are in many cases of low abundance compared to the cytosolic proteins, have various functions and can provide insight into the state of a disease and serve as targets for new drugs making them attractive biomarker candidates. Traditionally, proteins are identified through the use of gel electrophoretic techniques, which are not always suitable for particular protein samples such as membrane proteins. Microfluidics offers the potential as a fully automated platform for the efficient and high-throughput analysis of complex samples, such as membrane proteins, and do so with performance metrics that exceed their bench-top counterparts. In recent years, there have been various improvements to microfluidics and their use for proteomic analysis as reported in the literature. Consequently, this review presents an overview of the traditional proteomic-processing pipelines for membrane proteins and insights into new technological developments with a focus on the applicability of microfluidics for the analysis of membrane proteins. Sample preparation techniques will be discussed in detail and novel interfacing strategies as it relates to MS will be highlighted. Lastly, some general conclusions and future perspectives are presented.

  5. Tandem surface microfluidic lithography and activation to generate patch pattern biospecific ligand and cell arrays.

    PubMed

    Pulsipher, Abigail; Yousaf, Muhammad N

    2010-03-16

    We report a rapid, inexpensive, and flexible methodology that combines microfluidic lithography and oxidative activation to pattern and chemically alter selective regions of SAMs on gold for subsequent chemoselective ligand immobilization. We demonstrate that PCC, a mild oxidant, can be used to convert hydroxyl-terminated SAMs to aldehydes and decorated with a variety of oxyamine-containing molecules. This strategy is compatible with cell culture and was employed to create a biospecific ligand platform for peptide-mediated, cell adhesion arrays. By using a number of different ligands and characterization tools, we showed that the generation of both cell patterning and ligand microarray patterning can be achieved. SAM formation, activation, ligand immobilization, and biospecific cell patterning are characterized by contact angle, cyclic voltammetry (CV), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) (Supporting Information), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and fluorescence microscopy.

  6. MICROFLUIDIC MIXERS FOR THE INVESTIGATION OF PROTEIN FOLDING USING SYNCHROTRON RADIATION CIRCULAR DICHROISM SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, A; Hertzog, D; Baumgartel, P; Lengefeld, J; Horsley, D; Schuler, B; Bakajin, O

    2006-03-20

    The purpose of this study is to design, fabricate and optimize microfluidic mixers to investigate the kinetics of protein secondary structure formation with Synchrotron Radiation Circular Dichroism (SRCD) spectroscopy. The mixers are designed to rapidly initiate protein folding reaction through the dilution of denaturant. The devices are fabricated out of fused silica, so that they are transparent in the UV. We present characterization of mixing in the fabricated devices, as well as the initial SRCD data on proteins inside the mixers.

  7. Application of microfluidic chip with integrated optics for electrophoretic separations of proteins.

    PubMed

    Vieillard, Julien; Mazurczyk, Radoslaw; Morin, Christophe; Hannes, Benjamin; Chevolot, Yann; Desbène, Paul-Louis; Krawczyk, Stanislas

    2007-01-15

    This paper describes the fabrication, the characterization and the applications of a capillary electrophoresis microchip. This hybrid device (glass/PDMS) features channels and optical waveguides integrated in one common substrate. It can be used for electrophoretic separation and fluorimetric detection of molecules. The microfluidic performance of the device is demonstrated by capillary zone and gel electrophoresis of proteins.

  8. A Novel Impedimetric Microfluidic Analysis System for Transgenic Protein Cry1Ab Detection

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Shunru; Ye, Zunzhong; Wang, Yixian; Ying, Yibin

    2017-01-01

    Impedimetric analysis method is an important tool for food safety detection. In this work, a novel impedimetric microfluidic analysis system consisted of a printed gold electrode chip and a microfluidic flow cell was developed for sensitive and selective detection of transgenic protein Cry1Ab. Anti-Cry1Ab aptamer coated magnetic beads were used to recognize transgenic protein Cry1Ab and form Cry1Ab-aptamer modified magnetic beads. After separation, the obtained Cry1Ab-aptamer modified magnetic beads were dissolved in 0.01 M mannitol and followed by injection into the microfluidic flow cell for impedimetric measurement. At the frequency of 358.3 Hz, the impedance signal shows a good linearity with the concentrations of Cry1Ab protein at a range from 0 to 0.2 nM, and the detection limit is 0.015 nM. The results demonstrate that the impedimetric microfluidic analysis system provides an alternative way to enable sensitive, rapid and specific detection of transgenic protein Cry1Ab. PMID:28251986

  9. A Microfluidic Device for Immunoassay-Based Protein Analysis of Single E. coli Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Stratz, Simone; Dittrich, Petra S

    2015-01-01

    We present a method suitable for quantitative analysis of intracellular proteins, metabolites and secondary messengers of single bacterial cells. The method integrates the concept of immunoassays on a microfluidic device that facilitates single cell trapping and isolating in a small volume of a few tens of picoliters. Combination of the benefits of microfluidic systems for single cell analysis with the high analytical selectivity and sensitivity of immunoassays enables the detection of even low abundant intracellular analytes which occur only at a few hundred copies per bacterium.

  10. Patterned solvent delivery and etching for the fabrication of plastic microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Brister, Paul C; Weston, Kenneth D

    2005-11-15

    A very simple method for micropatterning flat plastic substrates that can be used to build microfluidic devices is demonstrated. Patterned poly(dimethylsiloxane) elastomer is used as a template to control the flow path of an etching solvent through a channel design to be reproduced on the plastic substrate. The etching solvent was a acetone/ethanol mixture for poly(methyl methacrylate) substrates or a dimethylformamide/acetone mixture for polystyrene. The method is extremely fast in that duplicate plastic substrates can be patterned in just a few minutes each. We identified conditions that lead to smooth channel surfaces and characterized the rate of etching under these conditions. We determined that, for sufficiently short etching times (shallow channel depths), the etch rate is independent of the linear flow rate. This is very important since it means that the etch depth is approximately constant even in complex channel geometries where there will be a wide range of etchant flow rates at different positions in the pattern to be reproduced. We also demonstrate that the method can be used to produce channels with different depths on the same substrate as well as channels that intersect to form a continuous fluid junction. The method provides a nice alternative to existing methods to rapidly fabricate microfluidic devices in rigid plastics without the need for specialized equipment.

  11. Optically Induced Thermal Gradients for Protein Characterization in Nanolitre-scale Samples in Microfluidic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Sagar, D. M.; Aoudjane, Samir; Gaudet, Matthieu; Aeppli, Gabriel; Dalby, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Proteins are the most vital biological functional units in every living cell. Measurement of protein stability is central to understanding their structure, function and role in diseases. While proteins are also sought as therapeutic agents, they can cause diseases by misfolding and aggregation in vivo. Here we demonstrate a novel method to measure protein stability and denaturation kinetics, on unprecedented timescales, through optically-induced heating of nanolitre samples in microfluidic capillaries. We obtain protein denaturation kinetics as a function of temperature, and accurate thermodynamic stability data, from a snapshot experiment on a single sample. We also report the first experimental characterization of optical heating in controlled microcapillary flow, verified by computational fluid dynamics modelling. Our results demonstrate that we now have the engineering science in hand to design integrated all-optical microfluidic chips for a diverse range of applications including in-vitro DNA amplification, healthcare diagnostics, and flow chemistry. PMID:23823279

  12. Flexible method for fabricating protein patterns on superhydrophobic platforms controlled by magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Li, Hao; Zou, Haoyang; Wang, Chenmiao; Zhang, Hao; Mano, João F; Song, Wenlong

    2017-02-28

    Inspired by the rolling of water droplets on lotus leaves, we developed a novel, magnetic field-controlled patterning method for water-soluble proteins and other functional materials on superhydrophobic platforms. This simple method can be used to fabricate biochips and open micro-fluidic devices in a simple way.

  13. Cyclic olefin homopolymer-based microfluidics for protein crystallization and in situ X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Emamzadah, Soheila; Petty, Tom J; De Almeida, Victor; Nishimura, Taisuke; Joly, Jacques; Ferrer, Jean Luc; Halazonetis, Thanos D

    2009-09-01

    Microfluidics is a promising technology for the rapid identification of protein crystallization conditions. However, most of the existing systems utilize silicone elastomers as the chip material which, despite its many benefits, is highly permeable to water vapour. This limits the time available for protein crystallization to less than a week. Here, the use of a cyclic olefin homopolymer-based microfluidics system for protein crystallization and in situ X-ray diffraction is described. Liquid handling in this system is performed in 2 mm thin transparent cards which contain 500 chambers, each with a volume of 320 nl. Microbatch, vapour-diffusion and free-interface diffusion protocols for protein crystallization were implemented and crystals were obtained of a number of proteins, including chicken lysozyme, bovine trypsin, a human p53 protein containing both the DNA-binding and oligomerization domains bound to DNA and a functionally important domain of Arabidopsis Morpheus' molecule 1 (MOM1). The latter two polypeptides have not been crystallized previously. For X-ray diffraction analysis, either the cards were opened to allow mounting of the crystals on loops or the crystals were exposed to X-rays in situ. For lysozyme, an entire X-ray diffraction data set at 1.5 A resolution was collected without removing the crystal from the card. Thus, cyclic olefin homopolymer-based microfluidics systems have the potential to further automate protein crystallization and structural genomics efforts.

  14. Fabrication of anti-protein-fouling poly(ethylene glycol) microfluidic chip electrophoresis by sandwich photolithography

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Hailin; Xu, Xiaodan; Yu, Bing; Liu, Huwei

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidic chip electrophoresis (MCE) is a powerful separation tool for biomacromolecule analysis. However, adsorption of biomacromolecules, particularly proteins onto microfluidic channels severely degrades the separation performance of MCE. In this paper, an anti-protein-fouling MCE was fabricated using a novel sandwich photolithography of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) prepolymers. Photopatterned microchannel with a minimum resolution of 10 μm was achieved. After equipped with a conventional online electrochemical detector, the device enabled baseline separation of bovine serum albumin, lysozyme (Lys), and cytochrome c (Cyt-c) in 53 s under a voltage of 200 V. Compared with a traditional polydimethylsiloxane MCE made by soft lithography, the PEG MCE made by the sandwich photolithography not only eliminated the need of a master mold and the additional modification process of the microchannel but also showed excellent anti-protein-fouling properties for protein separation. PMID:27493702

  15. Fabrication of anti-protein-fouling poly(ethylene glycol) microfluidic chip electrophoresis by sandwich photolithography.

    PubMed

    Cong, Hailin; Xu, Xiaodan; Yu, Bing; Liu, Huwei; Yuan, Hua

    2016-07-01

    Microfluidic chip electrophoresis (MCE) is a powerful separation tool for biomacromolecule analysis. However, adsorption of biomacromolecules, particularly proteins onto microfluidic channels severely degrades the separation performance of MCE. In this paper, an anti-protein-fouling MCE was fabricated using a novel sandwich photolithography of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) prepolymers. Photopatterned microchannel with a minimum resolution of 10 μm was achieved. After equipped with a conventional online electrochemical detector, the device enabled baseline separation of bovine serum albumin, lysozyme (Lys), and cytochrome c (Cyt-c) in 53 s under a voltage of 200 V. Compared with a traditional polydimethylsiloxane MCE made by soft lithography, the PEG MCE made by the sandwich photolithography not only eliminated the need of a master mold and the additional modification process of the microchannel but also showed excellent anti-protein-fouling properties for protein separation.

  16. Protein-protein interaction analysis in single microfluidic droplets using FRET and fluorescence lifetime detection.

    PubMed

    Benz, Christian; Retzbach, Heiko; Nagl, Stefan; Belder, Detlev

    2013-07-21

    Herein, we demonstrate the feasibility of a protein-protein interaction analysis and reaction progress monitoring in microfluidic droplets using FRET and microscopic fluorescence lifetime measurements. The fabrication of microdroplet chips using soft- and photolithographic techniques is demonstrated and the resulting chips reliably generate microdroplets of 630 pL and 6.71 nL at frequencies of 7.9 and 0.75 Hz, respectively. They were used for detection of protein-protein interactions in microdroplets using a model system of Alexa Fluor 488 labelled biotinylated BSA, Alexa Fluor 594 labelled streptavidin and unlabelled chicken egg white avidin. These microchips could be used for quantitative detection of avidin and streptavidin in microdroplets in direct and competitive assay formats with nanomolar detection limits, corresponding to attomole protein amounts. Four droplets were found to be sufficient for analytical determination. Fluorescence intensity ratio and fluorescence lifetime measurements were performed and compared for microdroplet FRET determination. A competitive on-chip binding assay for determination of unlabelled avidin using fluorescence lifetime detection could be performed within 135 s only.

  17. Dynamics of Drosophila embryonic patterning network perturbed in space and time using microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Lucchetta, Elena M; Lee, Ji Hwan; Fu, Lydia A; Patel, Nipam H; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2005-04-28

    Biochemical networks are perturbed both by fluctuations in environmental conditions and genetic variation. These perturbations must be compensated for, especially when they occur during embryonic pattern formation. Complex chemical reaction networks displaying spatiotemporal dynamics have been controlled and understood by perturbing their environment in space and time. Here, we apply this approach using microfluidics to investigate the robust network in Drosophila melanogaster that compensates for variation in the Bicoid morphogen gradient. We show that the compensation system can counteract the effects of extremely unnatural environmental conditions--a temperature step--in which the anterior and posterior halves of the embryo are developing at different temperatures and thus at different rates. Embryonic patterning was normal under this condition, suggesting that a simple reciprocal gradient system is not the mechanism of compensation. Time-specific reversals of the temperature step narrowed down the critical period for compensation to between 65 and 100 min after onset of embryonic development. The microfluidic technology used here may prove useful to future studies, as it allows spatial and temporal regulation of embryonic development.

  18. Cyclic olefin homopolymer-based microfluidics for protein crystallization and in situ X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Emamzadah, Soheila; Petty, Tom J.; De Almeida, Victor; Nishimura, Taisuke; Joly, Jacques; Ferrer, Jean-Luc; Halazonetis, Thanos D.

    2009-09-01

    A cyclic olefin homopolymer-based microfluidics system has been established for protein crystallization and in situ X-ray diffraction. Microfluidics is a promising technology for the rapid identification of protein crystallization conditions. However, most of the existing systems utilize silicone elastomers as the chip material which, despite its many benefits, is highly permeable to water vapour. This limits the time available for protein crystallization to less than a week. Here, the use of a cyclic olefin homopolymer-based microfluidics system for protein crystallization and in situ X-ray diffraction is described. Liquid handling in this system is performed in 2 mm thin transparent cards which contain 500 chambers, each with a volume of 320 nl. Microbatch, vapour-diffusion and free-interface diffusion protocols for protein crystallization were implemented and crystals were obtained of a number of proteins, including chicken lysozyme, bovine trypsin, a human p53 protein containing both the DNA-binding and oligomerization domains bound to DNA and a functionally important domain of Arabidopsis Morpheus’ molecule 1 (MOM1). The latter two polypeptides have not been crystallized previously. For X-ray diffraction analysis, either the cards were opened to allow mounting of the crystals on loops or the crystals were exposed to X-rays in situ. For lysozyme, an entire X-ray diffraction data set at 1.5 Å resolution was collected without removing the crystal from the card. Thus, cyclic olefin homopolymer-based microfluidics systems have the potential to further automate protein crystallization and structural genomics efforts.

  19. A perfusion-capable microfluidic bioreactor for assessing microbial heterologous protein production

    PubMed Central

    Mozdzierz, Nicholas J.; Love, Kerry R.; Lee, Kevin S.; Lee, Harry L. T.; Shah, Kartik A.; Ram, Rajeev J.

    2015-01-01

    We present an integrated microfluidic bioreactor for fully continuous perfusion cultivation of suspended microbial cell cultures. This system allowed continuous and stable heterologous protein expression by sustaining the cultivation of Pichia pastoris over 11 days. This technical capability also allowed testing the impact of perfusion conditions on protein expression. This advance should enable small-scale models for process optimization in continuous biomanufacturing. PMID:26055071

  20. Compact Structure Patterns in Proteins.

    PubMed

    Chitturi, Bhadrachalam; Shi, Shuoyong; Kinch, Lisa N; Grishin, Nick V

    2016-10-23

    Globular proteins typically fold into tightly packed arrays of regular secondary structures. We developed a model to approximate the compact parallel and antiparallel arrangement of α-helices and β-strands, enumerated all possible topologies formed by up to five secondary structural elements (SSEs), searched for their occurrence in spatial structures of proteins, and documented their frequencies of occurrence in the PDB. The enumeration model grows larger super-secondary structure patterns (SSPs) by combining pairs of smaller patterns, a process that approximates a potential path of protein fold evolution. The most prevalent SSPs are typically present in superfolds such as the Rossmann-like fold, the ferredoxin-like fold, and the Greek key motif, whereas the less frequent SSPs often possess uncommon structure features such as split β-sheets, left-handed connections, and crossing loops. This complete SSP enumeration model, for the first time, allows us to investigate which theoretically possible SSPs are not observed in available protein structures. All SSPs with up to four SSEs occurred in proteins. However, among the SSPs with five SSEs, approximately 20% (218) are absent from existing folds. Of these unobserved SSPs, 80% contain two or more uncommon structure features. To facilitate future efforts in protein structure classification, engineering, and design, we provide the resulting patterns and their frequency of occurrence in proteins at: http://prodata.swmed.edu/ssps/. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Fabrication of microfluidic chips using lithographic patterning and adhesive bonding of the thick negative photoresist AZ 125 nXT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoll, Thorsten; Bergmann, Andreas; Nußbaum, Dominic

    2015-05-01

    In this work, for the first time the negative photoresist AZ 125 nXT was used for the fabrication of a microfluidic chip. Usually, fabrication of microfluidic devices on the basis of silicon or glass substrates is done by using the epoxy-based negative photoresist SU-8 or other thick film polymer materials. The suitability of SU-8 for various microfluidic applications has been shown in the fields of bioanalytic devices, lab-on-chip systems or microreaction technology. However, processing is always a very challenging task with regard to the adaptation of process parameters to the individual design and required functionality. Now, the AZ 125 nXT allows for the fabrication of structures in a wide thickness range with only one type of viscosity. In contrast to SU-8, the AZ 125 nXT is fully cross-linked during UV exposure and does not require a time-consuming post-exposure bake. 90 μm deep microfluidic channels were defined by lithographic patterning of AZ 125 nXT. Sealing of the open microfluidic channels was performed by a manual adhesive bonding process at a temperature of 100 °C. The fluidic function was successfully tested with flow rates up to 20 ml/min by means of a microfluidic edge connector. Long term stability and chemical resistance of the fabricated microfluidic channels will be investigated in the near future. The presented work shows the potential of AZ 125 nXT as a possible alternative to SU-8 for the fabrication of microfluidic chips.

  2. Capture and X-ray diffraction studies of protein microcrystals in a microfluidic trap array

    DOE PAGES

    Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Murray, Thomas D.; Koehl, Antoine; ...

    2015-03-27

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) promise to enable the collection of interpretable diffraction data from samples that are refractory to data collection at synchrotron sources. At present, however, more efficient sample-delivery methods that minimize the consumption of microcrystalline material are needed to allow the application of XFEL sources to a wide range of challenging structural targets of biological importance. Here, a microfluidic chip is presented in which microcrystals can be captured at fixed, addressable points in a trap array from a small volume (<10 µl) of a pre-existing slurry grown off-chip. The device can be mounted on a standard goniostat formore » conducting diffraction experiments at room temperature without the need for flash-cooling. Proof-of-principle tests with a model system (hen egg-white lysozyme) demonstrated the high efficiency of the microfluidic approach for crystal harvesting, permitting the collection of sufficient data from only 265 single-crystal still images to permit determination and refinement of the structure of the protein. This work shows that microfluidic capture devices can be readily used to facilitate data collection from protein microcrystals grown in traditional laboratory formats, enabling analysis when cryopreservation is problematic or when only small numbers of crystals are available. Such microfluidic capture devices may also be useful for data collection at synchrotron sources.« less

  3. Capture and X-ray diffraction studies of protein microcrystals in a microfluidic trap array

    SciTech Connect

    Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Murray, Thomas D.; Koehl, Antoine; Araci, Ismail Emre; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Zeldin, Oliver B.; Cohen, Aina E.; Soltis, S. Michael; Baxter, Elizabeth L.; Brewster, Aaron S.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Brunger, Axel T.; Berger, James M.

    2015-03-27

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) promise to enable the collection of interpretable diffraction data from samples that are refractory to data collection at synchrotron sources. At present, however, more efficient sample-delivery methods that minimize the consumption of microcrystalline material are needed to allow the application of XFEL sources to a wide range of challenging structural targets of biological importance. Here, a microfluidic chip is presented in which microcrystals can be captured at fixed, addressable points in a trap array from a small volume (<10 µl) of a pre-existing slurry grown off-chip. The device can be mounted on a standard goniostat for conducting diffraction experiments at room temperature without the need for flash-cooling. Proof-of-principle tests with a model system (hen egg-white lysozyme) demonstrated the high efficiency of the microfluidic approach for crystal harvesting, permitting the collection of sufficient data from only 265 single-crystal still images to permit determination and refinement of the structure of the protein. This work shows that microfluidic capture devices can be readily used to facilitate data collection from protein microcrystals grown in traditional laboratory formats, enabling analysis when cryopreservation is problematic or when only small numbers of crystals are available. Such microfluidic capture devices may also be useful for data collection at synchrotron sources.

  4. Capture and X-ray diffraction studies of protein microcrystals in a microfluidic trap array.

    PubMed

    Lyubimov, Artem Y; Murray, Thomas D; Koehl, Antoine; Araci, Ismail Emre; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Zeldin, Oliver B; Cohen, Aina E; Soltis, S Michael; Baxter, Elizabeth L; Brewster, Aaron S; Sauter, Nicholas K; Brunger, Axel T; Berger, James M

    2015-04-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) promise to enable the collection of interpretable diffraction data from samples that are refractory to data collection at synchrotron sources. At present, however, more efficient sample-delivery methods that minimize the consumption of microcrystalline material are needed to allow the application of XFEL sources to a wide range of challenging structural targets of biological importance. Here, a microfluidic chip is presented in which microcrystals can be captured at fixed, addressable points in a trap array from a small volume (<10 µl) of a pre-existing slurry grown off-chip. The device can be mounted on a standard goniostat for conducting diffraction experiments at room temperature without the need for flash-cooling. Proof-of-principle tests with a model system (hen egg-white lysozyme) demonstrated the high efficiency of the microfluidic approach for crystal harvesting, permitting the collection of sufficient data from only 265 single-crystal still images to permit determination and refinement of the structure of the protein. This work shows that microfluidic capture devices can be readily used to facilitate data collection from protein microcrystals grown in traditional laboratory formats, enabling analysis when cryopreservation is problematic or when only small numbers of crystals are available. Such microfluidic capture devices may also be useful for data collection at synchrotron sources.

  5. A single microfluidic chip with dual surface properties for protein drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Bokharaei, Mehrdad; Saatchi, Katayoun; Häfeli, Urs O

    2017-04-15

    Principles of double emulsion generation were incorporated in a glass microfluidic chip fabricated with two different surface properties in order to produce protein loaded polymer microspheres. The microspheres were produced by integrating two microfluidic flow focusing systems and a multi-step droplet splitting and mixing system into one chip. The chip consists of a hydrophobic and a hydrophilic section with two different heights, 12μm and 45μm, respectively. As a result, the protein is homogenously distributed throughout the polymer microsphere matrix, not just in its center (which has been studied before). In our work, the inner phase was bovine serum albumin (BSA) in phosphate buffered saline, the disperse phase was poly (lactic acid) in chloroform and the continuous phase was an aqueous solution of poly(vinyl alcohol). After solvent removal, BSA loaded microspheres with an encapsulation efficiency of up to 96% were obtained. Our results show the feasibility of producing microspheres loaded with a hydrophilic drug in a microfluidic system that integrates different microfluidic units into one chip. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A microfluidic device for multiplexed protein detection in nano-liter volumes.

    PubMed

    Diercks, Alan H; Ozinsky, Adrian; Hansen, Carl L; Spotts, James M; Rodriguez, David J; Aderem, Alan

    2009-03-01

    We describe a microfluidic immunoassay device that permits sensitive and quantitative multiplexed protein measurements on nano-liter-scale samples. The device exploits the combined power of integrated microfluidics and optically encoded microspheres to create an array of approximately 100-microm(2) sensors functionalized with capture antibodies directed against distinct targets. This strategy overcomes the need for performing biochemical coupling of affinity reagents to the device substrate, permits multiple proteins to be detected in a nano-liter-scale sample, is scalable to large numbers of samples, and has the required sensitivity to measure the abundance of proteins derived from single mammalian cells. The sensitivity of the device is sufficient to detect 1000 copies of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in a volume of 4.7nl.

  7. Specific transport of target molecules by motor proteins in microfluidic channels.

    PubMed

    Tarhan, Mehmet C; Yokokawa, Ryuji; Morin, Fabrice O; Fujita, Hiroyuki

    2013-06-03

    Direct transport powered by motor proteins can alleviate the challenges presented by miniaturization of microfluidic systems. There have been several recent attempts to build motor-protein-driven transport systems based on simple capturing or transport mechanisms. However, to achieve a multifunctional device for practical applications, a more complex sorting/transport system should be realized. Herein, the proof of concept of a sorting device employing selective capture of distinct target molecules and transport of the sorted molecules to different predefined directions is presented. By combining the bottom-up functionality of biological systems with the top-down handling capabilities of micro-electromechanical systems technology, highly selective molecular recognition and motor-protein-based transport is integrated in a microfluidic channel network.

  8. Microfluidic mixers for the investigation of rapid protein folding kinetics using synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kane, Avinash S; Hoffmann, Armin; Baumgärtel, Peter; Seckler, Robert; Reichardt, Gerd; Horsley, David A; Schuler, Benjamin; Bakajin, Olgica

    2008-12-15

    We have developed a microfluidic mixer optimized for rapid measurements of protein folding kinetics using synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) spectroscopy. The combination of fabrication in fused silica and synchrotron radiation allows measurements at wavelengths below 220 nm, the typical limit of commercial instrumentation. At these wavelengths, the discrimination between the different types of protein secondary structure increases sharply. The device was optimized for rapid mixing at moderate sample consumption by employing a serpentine channel design, resulting in a dead time of less than 200 micros. Here, we discuss the design and fabrication of the mixer and quantify the mixing efficiency using wide-field and confocal epi-fluorescence microscopy. We demonstrate the performance of the device in SRCD measurements of the folding kinetics of cytochrome c, a small, fast-folding protein. Our results show that the combination of SRCD with microfluidic mixing opens new possibilities for investigating rapid conformational changes in biological macromolecules that have previously been inaccessible.

  9. Proteolysis in microfluidic droplets: an approach to interface protein separation and peptide mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ji, Ji; Nie, Lei; Qiao, Liang; Li, Yixin; Guo, Liping; Liu, Baohong; Yang, Pengyuan; Girault, Hubert H

    2012-08-07

    A versatile microreactor protocol based on microfluidic droplets has been developed for on-line protein digestion. Proteins separated by liquid chromatography are fractionated in water-in-oil droplets and digested in sequence. The microfluidic reactor acts also as an electrospray ionization emitter for mass spectrometry analysis of the peptides produced in the individual droplets. Each droplet is an enzymatic micro-reaction unit with efficient proteolysis due to rapid mixing, enhanced mass transfer and automated handling. This droplet approach eliminates sample loss, cross-contamination, non-specific absorption and memory effect. A protein mixture was successfully identified using the droplet-based micro-reactor as interface between reverse phase liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry.

  10. Rapid cell-patterning and microfluidic chip fabrication by crack-free CO2 laser ablation on glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Meng-Hua; Cheng, Ji-Yen; Wei, Cheng-Wey; Chuang, Yung-Chuan; Young, Tai-Horng

    2006-07-01

    This paper uses a widely available CO2 laser scriber (λ = 10.6 µm) to perform the direct-writing ablation of quartz, borofloat and pyrex substrates for the development of microfluidic chips and cell chips. The surface quality of the ablated microchannels and the presence of debris and distortion are examined by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and surface profile measurement techniques. The developed laser ablation system provides a versatile and economic approach for the fabrication of glass microfluidic chips with crack-free structures. In the laser writing process, the desired microfluidic patterns are designed using commercial computer software and are then transferred to the laser scriber to ablate the trenches. This process eliminates the requirement for corrosive chemicals and photomasks, and hence the overall microchip development time is limited to less than 24 h. Additionally, since the laser writing process is not limited by the dimensions of a photomask, the microchannels can be written over a large substrate area. The machining capability and versatility of the laser writing system are demonstrated through its application to the fabrication of a borofloat microfluidic chip and the writing of a series of asymmetric trenches in a microwell array. It is shown that the minimum attainable trench width is 95 µm and that the maximum trench depth is 225 µm. The system provides an economic and powerful means of rapid glass microfluidic chip development. A rapid cell-patterning method based on this method is also demonstrated.

  11. High speed digital protein interaction analysis using microfluidic single molecule detection system.

    PubMed

    Chou, Chao-Kai; Jing, Nan; Yamaguchi, Hirohito; Tsou, Pei-Hsiang; Lee, Heng-Huan; Chen, Chun-Te; Wang, Ying-Nai; Hong, Sungmin; Su, Chin; Kameoka, Jun; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2010-07-21

    The understanding of protein interaction dynamics is important for signal transduction research but current available techniques prove difficult in addressing this issue. Thus, using the microfluidic approach, we developed a digital protein analytical platform and methodology named MAPS (Microfluidic system Analyzing Protein in Single complex) that can measure the amount of target proteins and protein complexes at the digitally single molecule resolution. By counting protein events individually, this system can provide rough protein interaction ratios which will be critical for understanding signal transduction dynamics. In addition, this system only requires less than an hour to characterize the target protein sample, which is much quicker than conventional approaches. As a proof of concept, we have determined the interaction ratios of oncogenic signaling protein complexes EGFR/Src and EGFR/STAT3 before and after EGF ligand stimulation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that the interaction ratio between EGFR and its downstream proteins has been characterized. The information from MAPS will be critical for the study of protein signal transduction quantitation and dynamics.

  12. Recombinant Protein-Stabilized Monodisperse Microbubbles with Tunable Size Using a Valve-Based Microfluidic Device

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Microbubbles are used as contrast enhancing agents in ultrasound sonography and more recently have shown great potential as theranostic agents that enable both diagnostics and therapy. Conventional production methods lead to highly polydisperse microbubbles, which compromise the effectiveness of ultrasound imaging and therapy. Stabilizing microbubbles with surfactant molecules that can impart functionality and properties that are desirable for specific applications would enhance the utility of microbubbles. Here we generate monodisperse microbubbles with a large potential for functionalization by combining a microfluidic method and recombinant protein technology. Our microfluidic device uses an air-actuated membrane valve that enables production of monodisperse microbubbles with narrow size distribution. The size of microbubbles can be precisely tuned by dynamically changing the dimension of the channel using the valve. The microbubbles are stabilized by an amphiphilic protein, oleosin, which provides versatility in controlling the functionalization of microbubbles through recombinant biotechnology. We show that it is critical to control the composition of the stabilizing agents to enable formation of highly stable and monodisperse microbubbles that are echogenic under ultrasound insonation. Our protein-shelled microbubbles based on the combination of microfluidic generation and recombinant protein technology provide a promising platform for ultrasound-related applications. PMID:25265041

  13. Microfluidic-integrated patterned ITO immunosensor for rapid detection of prostate-specific membrane antigen biomarker in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Seenivasan, Rajesh; Singh, Chandra K; Warrick, Jay W; Ahmad, Nihal; Gunasekaran, Sundaram

    2017-09-15

    An optically transparent patterned indium tin oxide (ITO) three-electrode sensor integrated with a microfluidic channel was designed for label-free immunosensing of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), a prostate cancer (PCa) biomarker, expressed on prostate tissue and circulating tumor cells but also found in serum. The sensor relies on cysteamine capped gold nanoparticles (N-AuNPs) covalently linked with anti-PSMA antibody (Ab) for target specificity. A polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic channel is used to efficiently and reproducibly introduce sample containing soluble proteins/cells to the sensor. The PSMA is detected and quantified by measuring the change in differential pulse voltammetry signal of a redox probe ([Fe(CN)6](3-)/[Fe(CN)6](4-)) that is altered upon binding of PSMA with PSMA-Ab immobilized on N-AuNPs/ITO. Detection of PSMA expressing cells and soluble PSMA was tested. The limit of detection (LOD) of the sensor for PSMA-based PCa cells is 6/40µL (i.e., 150 cells/mL) (n=3) with a linear range of 15-400 cells/40µL (i.e., 375-10,000 cells/mL), and for the soluble PSMA is 0.499ng/40µL (i.e., 12.5ng/mL) (n=3) with the linear range of 0.75-250ng/40µL (i.e., 19-6250ng/mL), both with an incubation time of 10min. The results indicate that the sensor has a suitable sensitivity and dynamic range for routine detection of PCa circulating tumor cells and can be adapted to detect other biomarkers/cancer cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Microfluidic chips with multi-junctions: an advanced tool in recovering proteins from inclusion bodies

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Miyazaki, Masaya

    2015-01-01

    Active recombinant proteins are used for studying the biological functions of genes and for the development of therapeutic drugs. Overexpression of recombinant proteins in bacteria often results in the formation of inclusion bodies, which are protein aggregates with non-native conformations. Protein refolding is an important process for obtaining active recombinant proteins from inclusion bodies. However, the conventional refolding method of dialysis or dilution is time-consuming and recovered active protein yields are often low, and a cumbersome trial-and-error process is required to achieve success. To circumvent these difficulties, we used controllable diffusion through laminar flow in microchannels to regulate the denaturant concentration. This method largely aims at reducing protein aggregation during the refolding procedure. This Commentary introduces the principles of the protein refolding method using microfluidic chips and the advantage of our results as a tool for rapid and efficient recovery of active recombinant proteins from inclusion bodies. PMID:25531187

  15. Microfluidic chips with multi-junctions: an advanced tool in recovering proteins from inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Miyazaki, Masaya

    2015-01-01

    Active recombinant proteins are used for studying the biological functions of genes and for the development of therapeutic drugs. Overexpression of recombinant proteins in bacteria often results in the formation of inclusion bodies, which are protein aggregates with non-native conformations. Protein refolding is an important process for obtaining active recombinant proteins from inclusion bodies. However, the conventional refolding method of dialysis or dilution is time-consuming and recovered active protein yields are often low, and a cumbersome trial-and-error process is required to achieve success. To circumvent these difficulties, we used controllable diffusion through laminar flow in microchannels to regulate the denaturant concentration. This method largely aims at reducing protein aggregation during the refolding procedure. This Commentary introduces the principles of the protein refolding method using microfluidic chips and the advantage of our results as a tool for rapid and efficient recovery of active recombinant proteins from inclusion bodies.

  16. Microfluidics-assisted engineering of polymeric microcapsules with high encapsulation efficiency for protein drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Pessi, Jenni; Santos, Hélder A; Miroshnyk, Inna; JoukoYliruusi; Weitz, David A; Mirza, Sabiruddin

    2014-09-10

    In this study, microfluidic technology was employed to develop protein formulations. The microcapsules were produced with a biphasic flow to create water-oil-water (W/O/W) double emulsion droplets with ultrathin shells. Optimized microcapsule formulations containing 1% (w/w) bovine serum albumin (BSA) in the inner phase were prepared with poly(vinyl alcohol), polycaprolactone and polyethylene glycol. All the particles were found to be intact and with a particle size of 23-47 μm. Furthermore, the particles were monodisperse, non-porous and stable up to 4 weeks. The encapsulation efficiency of BSA in the microcapsules was 84%. The microcapsules released 30% of their content within 168 h. This study demonstrates that microfluidics is a powerful technique for engineering formulations for therapeutic proteins.

  17. A microfluidic device for the batch adsorption of a protein on adsorbent particles.

    PubMed

    Rho, Hoon Suk; Hanke, Alexander Thomas; Ottens, Marcel; Gardeniers, Han

    2017-10-07

    A microfluidic platform or "microfluidic batch adsorption device" is presented, which performs two sets of 9 parallel protein incubations with/without adsorbent particles to achieve an adsorption isotherm of a protein in a single experiment. The stepwise concentration gradient of a target protein was created by the integration of microvalves into the device. The nanoliter-scale reactor (41 nl) allows about 5000 times reduction of sample consumption and fast analysis compared with a conventional 96 well plate. The integration of two sets of parallel reactors as reference reactors and adsorption reactors, respectively, in a single microfluidic format has many advantages, such as the exclusion of the influence of undesired experimental fluctuations, and the possibility of real-time tracing of adsorption processes. We performed batch adsorption of albumin-fluorescein isothiocyanate conjugate (FITC-BSA) on polymeric particles (Source 15Q) to obtain an adsorption isotherm. The obtained on-chip parameters maximum adsorption amount (Qmax) and adsorption constant (Keq) were 0.33 ± 0.03 ng per particle and 0.97 ± 0.22 L g(-1), respectively, which are in good agreement with off-chip values (Qmax = 0.34 ± 0.01 ng per particle and Keq = 0.81 ± 0.10 L g(-1)). On-chip adsorption isotherms of FITC-BSA at various concentrations of sodium chloride (NaCl) were measured to evaluate the effect of this salt on the adsorption capability of Source 15Q. The microfluidic device serves as a new analytical tool, useful in biotechnological and industrial applications, where the adsorption behavior of (bio)molecules on commercial adsorbent particles plays critical roles, such as protein separation and purification, detection of analytes and biomarkers, and solid-phase immunoassays.

  18. A microfluidic approach for protein structure determination at room temperature via on-chip anomalous diffraction.

    PubMed

    Perry, Sarah L; Guha, Sudipto; Pawate, Ashtamurthy S; Bhaskarla, Amrit; Agarwal, Vinayak; Nair, Satish K; Kenis, Paul J A

    2013-08-21

    We report a microfluidic approach for de novo protein structure determination via crystallization screening and optimization, as well as on-chip X-ray diffraction data collection. The structure of phosphonoacetate hydrolase (PhnA) has been solved to 2.11 Åvia on-chip collection of anomalous data that has an order of magnitude lower mosaicity than what is typical for traditional structure determination methods.

  19. Microfluidic cell sorter for use in developing red fluorescent proteins with improved photostability.

    PubMed

    Davis, Lloyd M; Lubbeck, Jennifer L; Dean, Kevin M; Palmer, Amy E; Jimenez, Ralph

    2013-06-21

    This paper presents a novel microfluidic cytometer for mammalian cells that rapidly measures the irreversible photobleaching of red fluorescent proteins expressed within each cell and achieves high purity (>99%) selection of individual cells based on these measurements. The selection is achieved by using sub-millisecond timed control of a piezo-tilt mirror to steer a focused 1064-nm laser spot for optical gradient force switching following analysis of the fluorescence signals from passage of the cell through a series of 532-nm laser beams. In transit through each beam, the fluorescent proteins within the cell undergo conversion to dark states, but the microfluidic chip enables the cell to pass sufficiently slowly that recovery from reversible dark states occurs between beams, thereby enabling irreversible photobleaching to be quantified separately from the reversible dark-state conversion. The microfluidic platform achieves sorting of samples down to sub-millilitre volumes with minimal loss, wherein collected cells remain alive and can subsequently proliferate. The instrument provides a unique first tool for rapid selection of individual mammalian cells on the merits of photostability and is likely to form the basis of subsequent lab-on-a-chip platforms that combine photobleaching with other spectroscopic measurements for on-going research to develop advanced red fluorescent proteins by screening of genetic libraries.

  20. Electrostatic protein immobilization using charged polyacrylamide gels and cationic detergent microfluidic Western blotting.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dohyun; Karns, Kelly; Tia, Samuel Q; He, Mei; Herr, Amy E

    2012-03-06

    We report a novel protein immobilization matrix for fully integrated microfluidic Western blotting (WB). The electrostatic immobilization gel (EIG) enables immobilization of all proteins sized using cetyl trimethylammonium bromide polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (CTAB-PAGE), for subsequent electrophoretic probing with detection affinity reagents (e.g., labeled antibodies). The "pan-analyte" capture strategy introduced here uses polyacrylamide gel grafted with concentrated point charges (zwitterionic macromolecules), in contrast to existing microfluidic WB strategies that rely on a sandwich immunoassay format for analyte immobilization and detection. Sandwich approaches limit analyte immobilization to capture of only a priori known targets. A charge interaction mechanism study supports the hypothesis that electrostatic interaction plays a major role in analyte immobilization on the EIG. We note that protein capture efficiency depends on both the concentration of copolymerized charges and ionic strength of the gel buffer. We demonstrate pan-analyte immobilization of sized CTAB-laden model proteins (protein G, ovalbumin, bovine serum albumin, β-galactosidase, lactoferrin) on the EIG with initial capture efficiencies ranging from 21 to 100%. Target proteins fixed on the EIG (protein G, lactoferrin) are detected using antibody probes with signal-to-noise ratios of 34 to 275. The approach advances protein immunoblotting performance through 200× reduction on sample consumption, 12× reduction in assay duration, and automated assay operation, compared to slab-gel WB. Using the microfluidic WB assay, assessment of lactoferrin in human tear fluid is demonstrated with a goal of advancing toward nonbiopsy-based diagnosis of Sjögren's Syndrome, an autoimmune disease.

  1. Crystallization of the Large Membrane Protein Complex Photosystem I in a Microfluidic Channel

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Bahige G.; Kupitz, Christopher; Fromme, Petra; Ros, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Traditional macroscale protein crystallization is accomplished non-trivially by exploring a range of protein concentrations and buffers in solution until a suitable combination is attained. This methodology is time consuming and resource intensive, hindering protein structure determination. Even more difficulties arise when crystallizing large membrane protein complexes such as photosystem I (PSI) due to their large unit cells dominated by solvent and complex characteristics that call for even stricter buffer requirements. Structure determination techniques tailored for these ‘difficult to crystallize’ proteins such as femtosecond nanocrystallography are being developed, yet still need specific crystal characteristics. Here, we demonstrate a simple and robust method to screen protein crystallization conditions at low ionic strength in a microfluidic device. This is realized in one microfluidic experiment using low sample amounts, unlike traditional methods where each solution condition is set up separately. Second harmonic generation microscopy via Second Order Nonlinear Imaging of Chiral Crystals (SONICC) was applied for the detection of nanometer and micrometer sized PSI crystals within microchannels. To develop a crystallization phase diagram, crystals imaged with SONICC at specific channel locations were correlated to protein and salt concentrations determined by numerical simulations of the time-dependent diffusion process along the channel. Our method demonstrated that a portion of the PSI crystallization phase diagram could be reconstructed in excellent agreement with crystallization conditions determined by traditional methods. We postulate that this approach could be utilized to efficiently study and optimize crystallization conditions for a wide range of proteins that are poorly understood to date. PMID:24191698

  2. Nanoliter-scale protein crystallization and screening with a microfluidic droplet robot.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying; Zhu, Li-Na; Guo, Rui; Cui, Heng-Jun; Ye, Sheng; Fang, Qun

    2014-05-23

    Large-scale screening of hundreds or even thousands of crystallization conditions while with low sample consumption is in urgent need, in current structural biology research. Here we describe a fully-automated droplet robot for nanoliter-scale crystallization screening that combines the advantages of both automated robotics technique for protein crystallization screening and the droplet-based microfluidic technique. A semi-contact dispensing method was developed to achieve flexible, programmable and reliable liquid-handling operations for nanoliter-scale protein crystallization experiments. We applied the droplet robot in large-scale screening of crystallization conditions of five soluble proteins and one membrane protein with 35-96 different crystallization conditions, study of volume effects on protein crystallization, and determination of phase diagrams of two proteins. The volume for each droplet reactor is only ca. 4-8 nL. The protein consumption significantly reduces 50-500 fold compared with current crystallization stations.

  3. Abseq: Ultrahigh-throughput single cell protein profiling with droplet microfluidic barcoding

    PubMed Central

    Shahi, Payam; Kim, Samuel C.; Haliburton, John R.; Gartner, Zev J.; Abate, Adam R.

    2017-01-01

    Proteins are the primary effectors of cellular function, including cellular metabolism, structural dynamics, and information processing. However, quantitative characterization of proteins at the single-cell level is challenging due to the tiny amount of protein available. Here, we present Abseq, a method to detect and quantitate proteins in single cells at ultrahigh throughput. Like flow and mass cytometry, Abseq uses specific antibodies to detect epitopes of interest; however, unlike these methods, antibodies are labeled with sequence tags that can be read out with microfluidic barcoding and DNA sequencing. We demonstrate this novel approach by characterizing surface proteins of different cell types at the single-cell level and distinguishing between the cells by their protein expression profiles. DNA-tagged antibodies provide multiple advantages for profiling proteins in single cells, including the ability to amplify low-abundance tags to make them detectable with sequencing, to use molecular indices for quantitative results, and essentially limitless multiplexing. PMID:28290550

  4. Abseq: Ultrahigh-throughput single cell protein profiling with droplet microfluidic barcoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahi, Payam; Kim, Samuel C.; Haliburton, John R.; Gartner, Zev J.; Abate, Adam R.

    2017-03-01

    Proteins are the primary effectors of cellular function, including cellular metabolism, structural dynamics, and information processing. However, quantitative characterization of proteins at the single-cell level is challenging due to the tiny amount of protein available. Here, we present Abseq, a method to detect and quantitate proteins in single cells at ultrahigh throughput. Like flow and mass cytometry, Abseq uses specific antibodies to detect epitopes of interest; however, unlike these methods, antibodies are labeled with sequence tags that can be read out with microfluidic barcoding and DNA sequencing. We demonstrate this novel approach by characterizing surface proteins of different cell types at the single-cell level and distinguishing between the cells by their protein expression profiles. DNA-tagged antibodies provide multiple advantages for profiling proteins in single cells, including the ability to amplify low-abundance tags to make them detectable with sequencing, to use molecular indices for quantitative results, and essentially limitless multiplexing.

  5. Nanoliter-Scale Protein Crystallization and Screening with a Microfluidic Droplet Robot

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ying; Zhu, Li-Na; Guo, Rui; Cui, Heng-Jun; Ye, Sheng; Fang, Qun

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale screening of hundreds or even thousands of crystallization conditions while with low sample consumption is in urgent need, in current structural biology research. Here we describe a fully-automated droplet robot for nanoliter-scale crystallization screening that combines the advantages of both automated robotics technique for protein crystallization screening and the droplet-based microfluidic technique. A semi-contact dispensing method was developed to achieve flexible, programmable and reliable liquid-handling operations for nanoliter-scale protein crystallization experiments. We applied the droplet robot in large-scale screening of crystallization conditions of five soluble proteins and one membrane protein with 35–96 different crystallization conditions, study of volume effects on protein crystallization, and determination of phase diagrams of two proteins. The volume for each droplet reactor is only ca. 4–8 nL. The protein consumption significantly reduces 50–500 fold compared with current crystallization stations. PMID:24854085

  6. Abseq: Ultrahigh-throughput single cell protein profiling with droplet microfluidic barcoding.

    PubMed

    Shahi, Payam; Kim, Samuel C; Haliburton, John R; Gartner, Zev J; Abate, Adam R

    2017-03-14

    Proteins are the primary effectors of cellular function, including cellular metabolism, structural dynamics, and information processing. However, quantitative characterization of proteins at the single-cell level is challenging due to the tiny amount of protein available. Here, we present Abseq, a method to detect and quantitate proteins in single cells at ultrahigh throughput. Like flow and mass cytometry, Abseq uses specific antibodies to detect epitopes of interest; however, unlike these methods, antibodies are labeled with sequence tags that can be read out with microfluidic barcoding and DNA sequencing. We demonstrate this novel approach by characterizing surface proteins of different cell types at the single-cell level and distinguishing between the cells by their protein expression profiles. DNA-tagged antibodies provide multiple advantages for profiling proteins in single cells, including the ability to amplify low-abundance tags to make them detectable with sequencing, to use molecular indices for quantitative results, and essentially limitless multiplexing.

  7. On-line protein capture on magnetic beads for ultrasensitive microfluidic immunoassays of cancer biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Otieno, Brunah A; Krause, Colleen E; Latus, Alina; Chikkaveeraiah, Bhaskara V; Faria, Ronaldo C; Rusling, James F

    2014-03-15

    Accurate, sensitive, multiplexed detection of biomarker proteins holds significant promise for personalized cancer diagnostics. Here we describe the incorporation of a novel on-line chamber to capture cancer biomarker proteins on magnetic beads derivatized with 300,000 enzyme labels and 40,000 antibodies into a modular microfluidic immunoarray. Capture and detection chambers are produced from PDMS on machined molds and do not require lithography. Protein analytes are captured from serum or other biological samples in the stirred capture chamber on the beads held in place magnetically. The beads are subsequently washed free of sample components, and wash solutions sent to waste. Removal of the magnet and valve switching sends the magnetic bead-protein bioconjugates into a detection chamber where they are captured on 8 antibody-decorated gold nanoparticle-film sensors and detected amperometrically. Most steps in the immunoassay including protein capture, washing and measurement are incorporated into the device. In simultaneous assays, the microfluidic system gave ultralow detection limits of 5 fg mL(-1) for interleukin-6 (IL-6) and 7 fg mL(-1) for IL-8 in serum. Accuracy was demonstrated by measuring IL-6 and IL-8 in conditioned media from oral cancer cell lines and showing good correlations with standard ELISAs. The on-line capture chamber facilitates rapid, sensitive, repetitive protein separation and measurement in 30 min in a semi-automated system adaptable to multiplexed protein detection. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A Versatile Method of Patterning Proteins and Cells.

    PubMed

    Shrirao, Anil B; Kung, Frank H; Yip, Derek; Firestein, Bonnie L; Cho, Cheul H; Townes-Anderson, Ellen

    2017-02-26

    Substrate and cell patterning techniques are widely used in cell biology to study cell-to-cell and cell-to-substrate interactions. Conventional patterning techniques work well only with simple shapes, small areas and selected bio-materials. This article describes a method to distribute cell suspensions as well as substrate solutions into complex, long, closed (dead-end) polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannels using negative pressure. This method enables researchers to pattern multiple substrates including fibronectin, collagen, antibodies (Sal-1), poly-D-lysine (PDL), and laminin. Patterning of substrates allows one to indirectly pattern a variety of cells. We have tested C2C12 myoblasts, the PC12 neuronal cell line, embryonic rat cortical neurons, and amphibian retinal neurons. In addition, we demonstrate that this technique can directly pattern fibroblasts in microfluidic channels via brief application of a low vacuum on cell suspensions. The low vacuum does not significantly decrease cell viability as shown by cell viability assays. Modifications are discussed for application of the method to different cell and substrate types. This technique allows researchers to pattern cells and proteins in specific patterns without the need for exotic materials or equipment and can be done in any laboratory with a vacuum.

  9. An integrated microfluidics-tandem mass spectrometry system for automated protein analysis.

    PubMed

    Figeys, D; Gygi, S P; McKinnon, G; Aebersold, R

    1998-09-15

    We describe an integrated analytical system consisting of a microfluidics device micromachined using photolithography/etching technology, a panel of computer-controlled high-voltage relays, and an electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometer. Movement of solvents and samples on the device and off the device to the mass spectrometer was achieved by directed electroosmotic pumping induced by the activation of a suitable constellation of high-voltage relays. The system was used for the sequential automated analysis of protein digests. We demonstrate low femtomole per microliter sensitivity of detection and compatibility of the system with the automated analysis of proteins separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis.

  10. Emulsification properties of pea protein isolate using homogenization, microfluidization and ultrasonication.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Noel A; Kennedy, Deirdre; Hogan, Sean A; Kelly, Philip M; Thapa, Krishtina; Murphy, Kevin M; Fenelon, Mark A

    2016-11-01

    Pea protein isolate (PPI) is used in many food formulations, due to its low cost, commercial availability and excellent amino acid profile. The objective of this study was to determine the emulsification properties of PPI. Particle size of PPI powders showed neither temperature (25-65°C) nor time (up to 24h) increased solubilisation of powder particles during mixing. Heating PPI dispersions (10%, w/w, protein) from 45 to 90°C led to an increase in storage modulus (G'; Pa) at 71°C, indicating the onset of protein aggregation. Gel formation occurred at 79°C (G'>1Pa). Pea protein-stabilised emulsions made using homogenization (15MPa; 1 pass) or microfluidization (50MPa; 1 pass) resulted in the formation of cold-set gels, with gel strength increasing with increasing oil concentration and fluidic pressure. Droplet size and viscosity of pea protein-stabilised emulsions decreased and increased, respectively, with increasing ultrasonication time. Overall, ultrasonication (<50°C) can create a uniform droplet size emulsion, while, homogenization and microfluidization can produce cold-set gels for use in a wide-range of food applications. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Microfluidic polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with in situ immunoblotting for native protein analysis.

    PubMed

    He, Mei; Herr, Amy E

    2009-10-01

    We introduce an automated immunoblotting method that reports protein electrophoretic mobility and identity in a single streamlined microfluidic assay. Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) was integrated with subsequent in situ immunoblotting. Integration of three PA gel elements into a glass microfluidic chip achieved multiple functions, including (1) rapid protein separation via on-chip PAGE, (2) directed electrophoretic transfer of resolved protein peaks to an in-line blotting membrane, and (3) high-efficiency identification of the transferred proteins using antibody-functionalized blotting membranes. In-chip blotting membranes were photopatterned with biotinylated antibody using streptavidin polyacrylamide (PA) thus yielding postseparation sample analysis. No pressure driven flow or fluid valving was required, as the assay was operated by electrokinetically programmed control. A model sample of fluorescently labeled BSA (negative control), alpha-actinin, and prostate specific antigen (PSA) was selected to develop and characterize the assay. A 5 min assay time was required without operator intervention. Optimization of the blotting membrane (geometry, operation, and composition) yielded a detection limit of approximately 0.05 pg (alpha-actinin peak). An important additional blotting fabrication strategy was developed and characterized to allow vanishingly small antibody consumption (approximately 1 microg), as well as end-user customization of the blotting membrane after device fabrication and storage. This first report of rapid on-chip protein PAGE integrated with in situ immunoblotting forms the basis for a sensitive, automated approach applicable to numerous forms of immunoblotting.

  12. Microfluidic screening and whole-genome sequencing identifies mutations associated with improved protein secretion by yeast.

    PubMed

    Huang, Mingtao; Bai, Yunpeng; Sjostrom, Staffan L; Hallström, Björn M; Liu, Zihe; Petranovic, Dina; Uhlén, Mathias; Joensson, Haakan N; Andersson-Svahn, Helene; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-08-25

    There is an increasing demand for biotech-based production of recombinant proteins for use as pharmaceuticals in the food and feed industry and in industrial applications. Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is among preferred cell factories for recombinant protein production, and there is increasing interest in improving its protein secretion capacity. Due to the complexity of the secretory machinery in eukaryotic cells, it is difficult to apply rational engineering for construction of improved strains. Here we used high-throughput microfluidics for the screening of yeast libraries, generated by UV mutagenesis. Several screening and sorting rounds resulted in the selection of eight yeast clones with significantly improved secretion of recombinant α-amylase. Efficient secretion was genetically stable in the selected clones. We performed whole-genome sequencing of the eight clones and identified 330 mutations in total. Gene ontology analysis of mutated genes revealed many biological processes, including some that have not been identified before in the context of protein secretion. Mutated genes identified in this study can be potentially used for reverse metabolic engineering, with the objective to construct efficient cell factories for protein secretion. The combined use of microfluidics screening and whole-genome sequencing to map the mutations associated with the improved phenotype can easily be adapted for other products and cell types to identify novel engineering targets, and this approach could broadly facilitate design of novel cell factories.

  13. Multiplexed Affinity-Based Separation of Proteins and Cells Using Inertial Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Aniruddh; Hou, Han Wei; Mahan, Alison. E.; Han, Jongyoon; Alter, Galit

    2016-01-01

    Isolation of low abundance proteins or rare cells from complex mixtures, such as blood, is required for many diagnostic, therapeutic and research applications. Current affinity-based protein or cell separation methods use binary ‘bind-elute’ separations and are inefficient when applied to the isolation of multiple low-abundance proteins or cell types. We present a method for rapid and multiplexed, yet inexpensive, affinity-based isolation of both proteins and cells, using a size-coded mixture of multiple affinity-capture microbeads and an inertial microfluidic particle sorter device. In a single binding step, different targets–cells or proteins–bind to beads of different sizes, which are then sorted by flowing them through a spiral microfluidic channel. This technique performs continuous-flow, high throughput affinity-separation of milligram-scale protein samples or millions of cells in minutes after binding. We demonstrate the simultaneous isolation of multiple antibodies from serum and multiple cell types from peripheral blood mononuclear cells or whole blood. We use the technique to isolate low abundance antibodies specific to different HIV antigens and rare HIV-specific cells from blood obtained from HIV+ patients. PMID:27026280

  14. Microfluidic devices for label-free separation of cells through transient interaction with asymmetric receptor patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, S.; Singh, R.; Hollatz, M. H.; Lee, C.-H.; Karp, J.; Karnik, R.

    2012-02-01

    Cell sorting serves an important role in clinical diagnosis and biological research. Most of the existing microscale sorting techniques are either non-specific to antigen type or rely on capturing cells making sample recovery difficult. We demonstrate a simple; yet effective technique for isolating cells in an antigen specific manner by using transient interactions of the cell surface antigens with asymmetric receptor patterned surface. Using microfluidic devices incorporating P-selectin patterns we demonstrate separation of HL60 cells from K562 cells. We achieved a sorting purity above 90% and efficiency greater than 85% with this system. We also present a mathematical model incorporating flow mediated and adhesion mediated transport of cells in the microchannel that can be used to predict the performance of these devices. Lastly, we demonstrate the clinical significance of the method by demonstrating single step separation of neutrophils from whole blood. When whole blood is introduced in the device, the granulocyte population gets separated exclusively yielding neutrophils of high purity (<10% RBC contamination). To our knowledge, this is the first ever demonstration of continuous label free sorting of neutrophils from whole blood. We believe this technology will be useful in developing point-of-care diagnostic devices and also for a host of cell sorting applications.

  15. A Microfluidic Platform for Characterization of Protein—Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Javanmard, Mehdi; Talasaz, Amirali H.; Nemat-Gorgani, Mohsen; Huber, David E.; Pease, Fabian; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Davis, Ronald W.

    2010-01-01

    Traditionally, expensive and time consuming techniques such as mass spectrometry and Western Blotting have been used for characterization of protein–protein interactions. In this paper, we describe the design, fabrication, and testing of a rapid and inexpensive sensor, involving the use of microelectrodes in a microchannel, which can be used for real-time electrical detection of specific interactions between proteins. We have successfully demonstrated detection of target glycoprotein–glycoprotein interactions, antigen-antibody interactions, and glycoprotein-antigen interactions. We have also demonstrated the ability of this technique to distinguish between strong and weak interactions. Using this approach, it may be possible to multiplex an array of these sensors onto a chip and probe a complex mixture for various types of interactions involving protein molecules. PMID:20467571

  16. Using nanoliter plugs in microfluidics to facilitate and understand protein crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Bo; Gerdts, Cory J; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2006-01-01

    Protein crystallization is important for determining protein structures by X-ray diffraction. Nanoliter-sized plugs —aqueous droplets surrounded by a fluorinated carrier fluid —have been applied to the screening of protein crystallization conditions. Preformed arrays of plugs in capillary cartridges enable sparse matrix screening. Crystals grown in plugs inside a microcapillary may be analyzed by in situ X-ray diffraction. Screening using plugs, which are easily formed in PDMS microfluidic channels, is simple and economical, and minimizes consumption of the protein. This approach also has the potential to improve our understanding of the fundamentals of protein crystallization, such as the effect of mixing on the nucleation of crystals. PMID:16154351

  17. Paper-based microfluidic approach for surface-enhanced raman spectroscopy and highly reproducible detection of proteins beyond picomolar concentration.

    PubMed

    Saha, Arindam; Jana, Nikhil R

    2015-01-14

    Although microfluidic approach is widely used in various point of care diagnostics, its implementation in surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS)-based detection is challenging. This is because SERS signal depends on plasmonic nanoparticle aggregation induced generation of stable electromagnetic hot spots and in currently available microfluidic platform this condition is difficult to adapt. Here we show that SERS can be adapted using simple paper based microfluidic system where both the plasmonic nanomaterials and analyte are used in mobile phase. This approach allows analyte induced controlled particle aggregation and electromagnetic hot spot generation inside the microfluidic channel with the resultant SERS signal, which is highly reproducible and sensitive. This approach has been used for reproducible detection of protein in the pico to femtomolar concentration. Presented approach is simple, rapid, and cost-effective, and requires low sample volume. Method can be extended for SERS-based detection of other biomolecules.

  18. A compact disk-like centrifugal microfluidic system for high-throughput nanoliter-scale protein crystallization screening.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Chen, Qiang; Li, Junjun; Hu, Xiaojian; Zhao, Jianlong

    2010-06-01

    A centrifuge-based microfluidic system has been developed that enables automated high-throughput and low-volume protein crystallizations. In this system, protein solution was automatically and accurately metered and dispensed into nanoliter-sized multiple reaction chambers, and it was mixed with various types of precipitants using a combination of capillary effect and centrifugal force. It has the advantages of simple fabrication, easy operation, and extremely low waste. To demonstrate the feasibility of this system, we constructed a chip containing 24 units and used it to perform lysozyme and cyan fluorescent protein (CyPet) crystallization trials. The results demonstrate that high-quality crystals can be grown and harvested from such a nanoliter-volume microfluidic system. Compared to other microfluidic technologies for protein crystallization, this microfluidic system allows zero waste, simple structure and convenient operation, which suggests that our microfluidic disk can be applied not only to protein crystallization, but also to the miniaturization of various biochemical reactions requiring precise nanoscale control.

  19. Electrochemical Protein Cleavage in a Microfluidic Cell with Integrated Boron Doped Diamond Electrodes.

    PubMed

    van den Brink, Floris T G; Zhang, Tao; Ma, Liwei; Bomer, Johan; Odijk, Mathieu; Olthuis, Wouter; Permentier, Hjalmar P; Bischoff, Rainer; van den Berg, Albert

    2016-09-20

    Specific electrochemical cleavage of peptide bonds at the C-terminal side of tyrosine and tryptophan generates peptides amenable to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis for protein identification. To this end we developed a microfluidic electrochemical cell of 160 nL volume that combines a cell geometry optimized for a high electrochemical conversion efficiency (>95%) with an integrated boron doped diamond (BDD) working electrode offering a wide potential window in aqueous solution and reduced adsorption of peptides and proteins. Efficient cleavage of the proteins bovine insulin and chicken egg white lysozyme was observed at 4 out of 4 and 7 out of 9 of the predicted cleavage sites, respectively. Chicken egg white lysozyme was identified based on 5 electrochemically generated peptides using a proteomics database searching algorithm. These results show that electrochemical peptide bond cleavage in a microfluidic cell is a novel, fully instrumental approach toward protein analysis and eventually proteomics studies in conjunction with mass spectrometry.

  20. Profiling protein expression in circulating tumour cells using microfluidic western blotting

    PubMed Central

    Sinkala, Elly; Sollier-Christen, Elodie; Renier, Corinne; Rosàs-Canyelles, Elisabet; Che, James; Heirich, Kyra; Duncombe, Todd A.; Vlassakis, Julea; Yamauchi, Kevin A.; Huang, Haiyan; Jeffrey, Stefanie S.; Herr, Amy E.

    2017-01-01

    Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) are rare tumour cells found in the circulatory system of certain cancer patients. The clinical and functional significance of CTCs is still under investigation. Protein profiling of CTCs would complement the recent advances in enumeration, transcriptomic and genomic characterization of these rare cells and help define their characteristics. Here we describe a microfluidic western blot for an eight-plex protein panel for individual CTCs derived from estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer patients. The precision handling and analysis reveals a capacity to assay sparingly available patient-derived CTCs, a biophysical CTC phenotype more lysis-resistant than breast cancer cell lines, a capacity to report protein expression on a per CTC basis and two statistically distinct GAPDH subpopulations within the patient-derived CTCs. Targeted single-CTC proteomics with the capacity for archivable, multiplexed protein analysis offers a unique, complementary taxonomy for understanding CTC biology and ascertaining clinical impact. PMID:28332571

  1. Wettability patterning for high-rate, pumpless fluid transport on open, non-planar microfluidic platforms.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Aritra; Ganguly, Ranjan; Schutzius, Thomas M; Megaridis, Constantine M

    2014-05-07

    Surface tension driven transport of liquids on open substrates offers an enabling tool for open micro total analysis systems that are becoming increasingly popular for low-cost biomedical diagnostic devices. The present study uses a facile wettability patterning method to produce open microfluidic tracks that - due to their shape, surface texture and chemistry - are capable of transporting a wide range of liquid volumes (~1-500 μL) on-chip, overcoming viscous and other opposing forces (e.g., gravity) at the pertinent length scales. Small volumes are handled as individual droplets, while larger volumes require repeated droplet transport. The concept is developed and demonstrated with coatings based on TiO2 filler particles, which, when present in adequate (~80 wt.%) quantities within a hydrophobic fluoroacrylic polymer matrix, form composites that are intrinsically superhydrophobic. Such composite coatings become superhydrophilic upon exposure to UV light (390 nm). A commercial laser printer-based photo-masking approach is used on the coating for spatially selective wettability conversion from superhydrophobic to superhydrophilic. Carefully designed wedge-patterned surface tension confined tracks on the open-air devices move liquid on them without power input, even when acting against gravity. Simple designs of wettability patterning are used on versatile substrates (e.g., metals, polymers, paper) to demonstrate complex droplet handling tasks, e.g., merging, splitting and metered dispensing, some of which occur in 3-D geometries. Fluid transport rates of up to 350 μL s(-1) are attained. Applicability of the design on metal substrates allows these devices to be used also for other microscale engineering applications, e.g., water management in fuel cells.

  2. Re-use of commercial microfluidics chips for DNA, RNA, and protein electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thi; Kwak, Sukyoung; Karpowicz, Steven J

    2014-11-01

    Microfluidics chip technology is a powerful and convenient alternative to agarose gels and PAGE, but costs can be high due to certain chips being non-reusable. Here we describe a method to regenerate, re-use, and store Agilent DNA, RNA, and protein electrophoresis chips designed for use in the Bioanalyzer 2100. By washing the sample wells and displacing the old gel matrix with new gel-dye mix, we have run samples on the same chip up to ten times with negligible loss of signal quality. Chips whose wells were loaded with buffer or water were stored successfully for one week before re-use.

  3. Science Issues Associated with the Use of a Microfluidic Chip Designed Specifically for Protein Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Anna M.; Monaco, Lisa; Barnes, Cindy; Spearing, Scott; Jenkins, Andy; Johnson, Todd; Mayer, Derek; Cole, Helen

    2003-01-01

    The Iterative Biological Crystallization team in partnership with Caliper Technologies has produced a prototype microfluidic chip for batch crystallization that has been designed and tested. The chip is designed for the mixing and dispensing of up to five solutions with possible variation of the recipe being delivered to two growth wells. Developments that have led to the successful on-chip crystallization of a few model proteins have required investigative insight into many different areas, including fluid mixing dynamics, surface treatments, quantification and fidelity of reagent delivery. This presentation will encompass the ongoing studies and data accumulated toward these efforts.

  4. Patterned electrode-based amperometric gas sensor for direct nitric oxide detection within microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Cha, Wansik; Tung, Yi-Chung; Meyerhoff, Mark E; Takayama, Shuichi

    2010-04-15

    This article describes a thin amperometric nitric oxide (NO) sensor that can be microchannel embedded to enable direct real-time detection of NO produced by cells cultured within the microdevice. A key for achieving the thin ( approximately 1 mm) planar sensor configuration required for sensor-channel integration is the use of gold/indium-tin oxide patterned electrode directly on a porous polymer membrane (pAu/ITO) as the base working electrode. The electrochemically deposited Au-hexacyanoferrate layer on pAu/ITO is used to catalyze NO oxidation to nitrite at lower applied potentials (0.65-0.75 V vs Ag/AgCl) and stabilize current output. Furthermore, use of a gas-permeable membrane to separate internal sensor compartments from the sample phase imparts excellent NO selectivity over common interfering agents (e.g., nitrite, ascorbate, ammonia, etc.) present in culture media and biological fluids. The optimized sensor design reversibly detects NO down to the approximately 1 nM level in stirred buffer and <10 nM in flowing buffer when integrated within a polymeric microfluidic device. We demonstrate utility of the channel-embedded sensor by monitoring NO generation from macrophages cultured within non-gas-permeable microchannels, as they are stimulated with endotoxin.

  5. Development-on-chip: in vitro neural tube patterning with a microfluidic device

    PubMed Central

    Soundararajan, Prabakaran; Chennampally, Phaneendra; Cox, Gregory A.

    2016-01-01

    Embryogenesis is a highly regulated process in which the precise spatial and temporal release of soluble cues directs differentiation of multipotent stem cells into discrete populations of specialized adult cell types. In the spinal cord, neural progenitor cells are directed to differentiate into adult neurons through the action of mediators released from nearby organizing centers, such as the floor plate and paraxial mesoderm. These signals combine to create spatiotemporal diffusional landscapes that precisely regulate the development of the central nervous system (CNS). Currently, in vivo and ex vivo studies of these signaling factors present some inherent ambiguity. In vitro methods are preferred for their enhanced experimental clarity but often lack the technical sophistication required for biological realism. In this article, we present a versatile microfluidic platform capable of mimicking the spatial and temporal chemical environments found in vivo during neural tube development. Simultaneous opposing and/or orthogonal gradients of developmental morphogens can be maintained, resulting in neural tube patterning analogous to that observed in vivo. PMID:27246712

  6. A double-emulsion microfluidic platform for in vitro green fluorescent protein expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, N.; Oakeshott, J. G.; Easton, C. J.; Peat, T. S.; Surjadi, R.; Zhu, Y.

    2011-05-01

    Microfluidic droplet technology has gained popularity due to the advantages over conventional emulsion techniques and capabilities for a wide range of applications. In this paper, the development of a simple microfluidic-based double-emulsion system is reported. Such a system could be potentially used for in vitro protein synthesis. The system involves a two-step process to make water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) emulsions. A PMMA microchip is used for the formation of water-in-oil (W/O) single-emulsion droplets. Then, the single-emulsion droplets are transported to a PDMS/glass microchip to make the W/O/W double-emulsion droplets. The system was first characterized by detecting fluorescein sodium salt as a model dye in the internal aqueous droplets using laser-induced fluorescence. The effect of the flow rates of the internal aqueous phase and outer continuous aqueous phase on the formation of the double-emulsion droplets is investigated to provide information for system optimization. On-chip storage of double-emulsion droplets is also investigated to allow for protein synthesis from a PCR-generated DNA template using either commercial in vitro transcription and translation kits or crude Escherichia coli S30 extracts. In vitro expression of the green fluorescent protein is successfully demonstrated in this system.

  7. Microfluidic experiments reveal that antifreeze proteins bound to ice crystals suffice to prevent their growth

    PubMed Central

    Celik, Yeliz; Drori, Ran; Pertaya-Braun, Natalya; Altan, Aysun; Barton, Tyler; Bar-Dolev, Maya; Groisman, Alex; Davies, Peter L.; Braslavsky, Ido

    2013-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are a subset of ice-binding proteins that control ice crystal growth. They have potential for the cryopreservation of cells, tissues, and organs, as well as for production and storage of food and protection of crops from frost. However, the detailed mechanism of action of AFPs is still unclear. Specifically, there is controversy regarding reversibility of binding of AFPs to crystal surfaces. The experimentally observed dependence of activity of AFPs on their concentration in solution appears to indicate that the binding is reversible. Here, by a series of experiments in temperature-controlled microfluidic devices, where the medium surrounding ice crystals can be exchanged, we show that the binding of hyperactive Tenebrio molitor AFP to ice crystals is practically irreversible and that surface-bound AFPs are sufficient to inhibit ice crystal growth even in solutions depleted of AFPs. These findings rule out theories of AFP activity relying on the presence of unbound protein molecules. PMID:23300286

  8. Relationship between functional properties and aggregation changes of whey protein induced by high pressure microfluidization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cheng-Mei; Zhong, Jun-Zhen; Liu, Wei; Tu, Zong-Cai; Wan, Jie; Cai, Xiao-Fei; Song, Xin-Yun

    2011-05-01

    Aggregation changes of whey protein induced by high-pressure microfluidization (HPM) treatment have been investigated in relation with their functional properties. Whey protein was treated with HPM under pressure from 40 to 160 MPa. Functional properties (solubility, foaming, and emulsifying properties) of whey protein concentrate (WPC) ultrafiltered from fluid whey were evaluated. The results showed significant modifications in the solubility (30% to 59%) and foaming properties (20% to 65%) of WPC with increasing pressure. However, emulsifying property of WPC treated at different pressures was significantly worse than untreated sample. To better understand the mechanism of the modification by HPM, the HPM-induced aggregation changes were examined using particle size distribution, scanning electron microscopy, and hydrophobicity. It was indicated that HPM induced 2 kinds of aggregation changes on WPC: deaggregation and reaggregation of WPC, which resulted in the changes of functional properties of WPC modified by HPM. © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists®

  9. Laser-induced fluorescence imaging system for protein separations in microfluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Champak; Stoyanov, Alexander; Fredrickson, Carl; Tran-Son-Tay, Roger; Fan, Zhonghui H.

    2004-12-01

    This paper describes a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection system for imaging proteins separated in a microfluidic device. The diameter of a laser beam is first increased through a beam expander, and subsequently focused into a line using a cylindrical lens. The resultant laser line is used to image an entire capillary or channel in which protein separation took place. The fluorescence emission is collected with a cooled, scientific grade charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. The detection limit was determined using a series of concentrations of fluorescein solutions. The temporal and spatial effects of photobleaching from laser irradiation were analyzed and the parameters to reduce the effect of photobleaching are discussed. We used the imaging system to demonstrate rapid analysis of proteins using isoelectric focusing.

  10. Microfluidic Cold-Finger Device for the Investigation of Ice-Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Haleva, Lotem; Celik, Yeliz; Bar-Dolev, Maya; Pertaya-Braun, Natalya; Kaner, Avigail; Davies, Peter L; Braslavsky, Ido

    2016-09-20

    Ice-binding proteins (IBPs) bind to ice crystals and control their structure, enlargement, and melting, thereby helping their host organisms to avoid injuries associated with ice growth. IBPs are useful in applications where ice growth control is necessary, such as cryopreservation, food storage, and anti-icing. The study of an IBP's mechanism of action is limited by the technological difficulties of in situ observations of molecules at the dynamic interface between ice and water. We describe herein a new, to our knowledge, apparatus designed to generate a controlled temperature gradient in a microfluidic chip, called a microfluidic cold finger (MCF). This device allows growth of a stable ice crystal that can be easily manipulated with or without IBPs in solution. Using the MCF, we show that the fluorescence signal of IBPs conjugated to green fluorescent protein is reduced upon freezing and recovers at melting. This finding strengthens the evidence for irreversible binding of IBPs to their ligand, ice. We also used the MCF to demonstrate the basal-plane affinity of several IBPs, including a recently described IBP from Rhagium inquisitor. Use of the MCF device, along with a temperature-controlled setup, provides a relatively simple and robust technique that can be widely used for further analysis of materials at the ice/water interface. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Micropatterning stretched and aligned DNA using microfluidics and surface patterning for applications in hybridization-mediated templated assembly of nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbeck, Jeffrey; Petit, Cecilia

    2004-03-01

    Current efforts in nanotechnology use one of two basic approaches: top-down fabrication and bottom-up assembly. Top-down strategies use lithography and contact printing to create patterned surfaces and microfluidic channels that, in turn, can corral and organize nanoscale structures. Bottom-up approaches use templates to direct the assembly of atoms, molecules, and nanoparticles through molecular recognition. The goal of this work is to integrate these strategies by first patterning and orienting DNA molecules through top-down tools so that single DNA chains can then serve as templates for the bottom-up construction of hetero-structures composed of proteins and nanoparticles, both metallic and semi-conducting. The first part of this talk focuses on the top-down strategies used to create microscopic patterns of stretched and aligned molecules of DNA. Specifically, it presents a new method in which molecular combing -- a process by which molecules are deposited and stretched onto a surface by the passage of an air-water interface -- is performed in microchannels. This approach demonstrates that the shape and motion of this interface serve as an effective local field directing the chains dynamically as they are stretched onto the surface. The geometry of the microchannel directs the placement of the DNA molecules, while the geometry of the air-water interface directs the local orientation and curvature of the molecules. This ability to control both the placement and orientation of chains has implication for the use of this technique in genetic analysis and in the bottom up approach to nanofabrication.The second half of this talk presents our bottom-up strategy, which allows placement of nanoparticles along individual DNA chains with a theoretical resolution of less than 1 nm. Specifically, we demonstrate the sequence-specific patterning of nanoparticles via the hybridization of functionalized complementary probes to surface-bound chains of double-stranded DNA. Using

  12. The application of a microfluidic reactor including spontaneously adsorbed trypsin for rapid protein digestion of human tear samples.

    PubMed

    Kecskemeti, Adam; Nagy, Cynthia; Csosz, Eva; Kallo, Gergo; Gaspar, Attila

    2017-07-08

    The application of a newly developed microfluidic immobilized enzymatic reactor (IMER) designed to accelerate protein digestion in clinical samples is presented. The IMER contains trypsin adsorbed on the porous surface of a PDMS microfluidic chip. Human tear with its relatively low volume and high protein content is collected and used for testing the digestion efficiency of the IMER. With the use of CZE peptide mapping, the efficiency and reproducibility of the reactor are investigated. No significant difference is observed in the CZE peptide profiles of the same tear sample digested in-solution or via microfluidic IMER. LC-MS measurements show that the microfluidic IMER digestion enables the identification of more proteins compared to standard in-solution digestion and those proteins that are identified with both digestion methods have higher sequence coverage when digested with the IMER. The proposed reactor is well-suited for rapid and efficient protein digestion and even eight digestions can be carried out simultaneously. The PDMS chip is inexpensive and easy to fabricate, thus its application can be an attractive alternative for proteomic related research. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Protein patterning by a DNA origami framework.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Hüsnü; Krissanaprasit, Abhichart; Besenbacher, Flemming; Gothelf, Kurt V; Dong, Mingdong

    2016-08-18

    A spatial arrangement of proteins provides structural and functional advantages in vast technological applications as well as fundamental research. Most protein patterning procedures employ complicated, time consuming and very costly nanofabrication techniques. As an alternative route, we developed a fully biomolecular self-assembly method using DNA Origami Frames (DOF) as a template for both small and large scale protein patterning. We employed a triangular DOF (tDOF) to arrange the Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) protein. Our in situ protein patterning strategy provides a novel, fully organic platform using a fast and low-cost surface approach with possible utilization in fundamental science and technological applications.

  14. A method to integrate patterned electrospun fibers with microfluidic systems to generate complex microenvironments for cell culture applications

    PubMed Central

    Wallin, Patric; Zandén, Carl; Carlberg, Björn; Hellström Erkenstam, Nina; Liu, Johan; Gold, Julie

    2012-01-01

    The properties of a cell’s microenvironment are one of the main driving forces in cellular fate processes and phenotype expression invivo. The ability to create controlled cell microenvironments invitro becomes increasingly important for studying or controlling phenotype expression in tissue engineering and drug discovery applications. This includes the capability to modify material surface properties within well-defined liquid environments in cell culture systems. One successful approach to mimic extra cellular matrix is with porous electrospun polymer fiber scaffolds, while microfluidic networks have been shown to efficiently generate spatially and temporally defined liquid microenvironments. Here, a method to integrate electrospun fibers with microfluidic networks was developed in order to form complex cell microenvironments with the capability to vary relevant parameters. Spatially defined regions of electrospun fibers of both aligned and random orientation were patterned on glass substrates that were irreversibly bonded to microfluidic networks produced in poly-dimethyl-siloxane. Concentration gradients obtained in the fiber containing channels were characterized experimentally and compared with values obtained by computational fluid dynamic simulations. Velocity and shear stress profiles, as well as vortex formation, were calculated to evaluate the influence of fiber pads on fluidic properties. The suitability of the system to support cell attachment and growth was demonstrated with a fibroblast cell line. The potential of the platform was further verified by a functional investigation of neural stem cell alignment in response to orientation of electrospun fibers versus a microfluidic generated chemoattractant gradient of stromal cell-derived factor 1 alpha. The described method is a competitive strategy to create complex microenvironments invitro that allow detailed studies on the interplay of topography, substrate surface properties, and soluble

  15. Microfluidic devices fabricated using fast wafer-scale LED-lithography patterning.

    PubMed

    Challa, Pavan K; Kartanas, Tadas; Charmet, Jérôme; Knowles, Tuomas P J

    2017-01-01

    Current lithography approaches underpinning the fabrication of microfluidic devices rely on UV exposure of photoresists to define microstructures in these materials. Conventionally, this objective is achieved with gas discharge mercury lamps, which are capable of producing high intensity UV radiation. However, these sources are costly, have a comparatively short lifetime, necessitate regular calibration, and require significant time to warm up prior to exposure taking place. To address these limitations we exploit advances in solid state sources in the UV range and describe a fast and robust wafer-scale laboratory exposure system relying entirely on UV-Light emitting diode (UV-LED) illumination. As an illustration of the potential of this system for fast and low-cost microfluidic device production, we demonstrate the microfabrication of a 3D spray-drying microfluidic device and a 3D double junction microdroplet maker device.

  16. Protein immobilization on the surface of polydimethylsiloxane and polymethyl methacrylate microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Khnouf, Ruba; Karasneh, Dina; Albiss, Borhan Aldeen

    2016-02-01

    PDMS and PMMA are two of the most used polymers in the fabrication of lab-on-chip or microfluidic devices. In order to use these polymers in biological applications, it is sometimes essential to be able to bind biomolecules such as proteins and DNA to the surface of these materials. In this work, we have evaluated a number of processes that have been developed to bind protein to PDMS surfaces which include passive adsorption, passive adsorption with glutaraldehyde cross-linking, (3-aminopropyl) triethoxysilane functionalization followed by glutaraldehyde or 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride cross-linkers. It has been shown that the latter technique--using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride--results in more than twice the bonding of protein to the surface of PDMS microchannels than proteins binding passively. We have also evaluated a few techniques that have been tested for the functionalization of PMMA microchannels where we have found that the use of polyethyleneimine (PEI) has led to the strongest protein-PMMA microchannel bond. We finally demonstrated the effect of PDMS curing methodology on protein adsorption to its surface, and showed that increased curing time is the factor that reduces passive adsorption the most.

  17. Nanoliter microfluidic hybrid method for simultaneous screening and optimization validated with crystallization of membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liang; Mustafi, Debarshi; Fu, Qiang; Tereshko, Valentina; Chen, Delai L.; Tice, Joshua D.; Ismagilov, Rustem F.

    2006-01-01

    High-throughput screening and optimization experiments are critical to a number of fields, including chemistry and structural and molecular biology. The separation of these two steps may introduce false negatives and a time delay between initial screening and subsequent optimization. Although a hybrid method combining both steps may address these problems, miniaturization is required to minimize sample consumption. This article reports a “hybrid” droplet-based microfluidic approach that combines the steps of screening and optimization into one simple experiment and uses nanoliter-sized plugs to minimize sample consumption. Many distinct reagents were sequentially introduced as ≈140-nl plugs into a microfluidic device and combined with a substrate and a diluting buffer. Tests were conducted in ≈10-nl plugs containing different concentrations of a reagent. Methods were developed to form plugs of controlled concentrations, index concentrations, and incubate thousands of plugs inexpensively and without evaporation. To validate the hybrid method and demonstrate its applicability to challenging problems, crystallization of model membrane proteins and handling of solutions of detergents and viscous precipitants were demonstrated. By using 10 μl of protein solution, ≈1,300 crystallization trials were set up within 20 min by one researcher. This method was compatible with growth, manipulation, and extraction of high-quality crystals of membrane proteins, demonstrated by obtaining high-resolution diffraction images and solving a crystal structure. This robust method requires inexpensive equipment and supplies, should be especially suitable for use in individual laboratories, and could find applications in a number of areas that require chemical, biochemical, and biological screening and optimization. PMID:17159147

  18. Towards microfluidic reactors for cell-free protein synthesis at the point-of-care

    SciTech Connect

    Timm, Andrea C.; Shankles, Peter G.; Foster, Carmen M.; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Retterer, Scott T.

    2015-12-22

    Cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) is a powerful technology that allows for optimization of protein production without maintenance of a living system. Integrated within micro- and nano-fluidic architectures, CFPS can be optimized for point-of care use. Here, we describe the development of a microfluidic bioreactor designed to facilitate the production of a single-dose of a therapeutic protein, in a small footprint device at the point-of-care. This new design builds on the use of a long, serpentine channel bioreactor and is enhanced by integrating a nanofabricated membrane to allow exchange of materials between parallel reactor and feeder channels. This engineered membrane facilitates the exchange of metabolites, energy, and inhibitory species, prolonging the CFPS reaction and increasing protein yield. Membrane permeability can be altered by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition and atomic layer deposition to tune the exchange rate of small molecules. This allows for extended reaction times and improved yields. Further, the reaction product and higher molecular weight components of the transcription/translation machinery in the reactor channel can be retained. As a result, we show that the microscale bioreactor design produces higher protein yields than conventional tube-based batch formats, and that product yields can be dramatically improved by facilitating small molecule exchange within the dual-channel bioreactor.

  19. Fabrication of X-ray compatible microfluidic platforms for protein crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Guha, Sudipto; Perry, Sarah L.; Pawate, Ashtamurthy S.; Kenis, Paul J.A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports a method for fabricating multilayer microfluidic protein crystallization platforms using different materials to achieve X-ray transparency and compatibility with crystallization reagents. To validate this approach, three soluble proteins, lysozyme, thaumatin, and ribonuclease A were crystallized on-chip, followed by on-chip diffraction data collection. We also report a chip with an array of wells for screening different conditions that consume a minimal amount of protein solution as compared to traditional screening methods. A large number of high quality isomorphous protein crystals can be grown in the wells, after which slices of X-ray data can be collected from many crystals still residing within the wells. Complete protein structures can be obtained by merging these slices of data followed by further processing with crystallography software. This approach of using an x-ray transparent chip for screening, crystal growth, and X-ray data collection enables room temperature data collection from many crystals mounted in parallel, which thus eliminates crystal handling and minimizes radiation damage to the crystals. PMID:23105172

  20. Towards microfluidic reactors for cell-free protein synthesis at the point-of-care

    DOE PAGES

    Timm, Andrea C.; Shankles, Peter G.; Foster, Carmen M.; ...

    2015-12-22

    Cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) is a powerful technology that allows for optimization of protein production without maintenance of a living system. Integrated within micro- and nano-fluidic architectures, CFPS can be optimized for point-of care use. Here, we describe the development of a microfluidic bioreactor designed to facilitate the production of a single-dose of a therapeutic protein, in a small footprint device at the point-of-care. This new design builds on the use of a long, serpentine channel bioreactor and is enhanced by integrating a nanofabricated membrane to allow exchange of materials between parallel reactor and feeder channels. This engineered membrane facilitatesmore » the exchange of metabolites, energy, and inhibitory species, prolonging the CFPS reaction and increasing protein yield. Membrane permeability can be altered by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition and atomic layer deposition to tune the exchange rate of small molecules. This allows for extended reaction times and improved yields. Further, the reaction product and higher molecular weight components of the transcription/translation machinery in the reactor channel can be retained. As a result, we show that the microscale bioreactor design produces higher protein yields than conventional tube-based batch formats, and that product yields can be dramatically improved by facilitating small molecule exchange within the dual-channel bioreactor.« less

  1. Microfluidic three-dimensional hydrodynamic flow focusing for the rapid protein concentration analysis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sungmin; Tsou, Pei-Hsiang; Chou, Chao-Kai; Yamaguchi, Hirohito; Su, Chin B; Hung, Mien-Chie; Kameoka, Jun

    2012-06-01

    A simple microfluidic 3D hydrodynamic flow focusing device has been developed and demonstrated quantitative determinations of quantum dot 525 with antibody (QD525-antibody) and hemagglutinin epitope tagged MAX (HA-MAX) protein concentrations. This device had a step depth cross junction structure at a hydrodynamic flow focusing point at which the analyte stream was flowed into a main detection channel and pinched not only horizontally but also vertically by two sheath streams. As a result, a triangular cross-sectional flow profile of the analyte stream was formed and the laser was focused on the top of the triangular shaped analyte stream. Since the detection volume was smaller than the radius of laser spot, a photon burst histogram showed Gaussian distribution, which was necessary for the quantitative analysis of protein concentration. By using this approach, a linear concentration curve of QD525-antibody down to 10 pM was demonstrated. In addition, the concentration of HA-MAX protein in HEK293 cell lysate was determined as 0.283 ± 0.015 nM. This approach requires for only 1 min determining protein concentration. As the best of our knowledge, this is the first time to determinate protein concentration by using single molecule detection techniques.

  2. Clonal analysis of individual human embryonic stem cell differentiation patterns in microfluidic cultures.

    PubMed

    Sikorski, Darek J; Caron, Nicolas J; VanInsberghe, Michael; Zahn, Hans; Eaves, Connie J; Piret, James M; Hansen, Carl L

    2015-10-01

    Heterogeneity in the clonal outputs of individual human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) confounds analysis of their properties in studies of bulk populations and how to manipulate them for clinical applications. To circumvent this problem we developed a microfluidic device that supports the robust generation of colonies derived from single ESCs. This microfluidic system contains 160 individually addressable chambers equipped for perfusion culture of individual hESCs that could be shown to match the growth rates, marker expression and colony morphologies obtained in conventional cultures. Use of this microfluidic device to analyze the clonal growth kinetics of multiple individual hESCs induced to differentiation revealed variable shifts in the growth rate, area per cell and expression of OCT4 in the progeny of individual hESCs. Interestingly, low OCT4 expression, a slower growth rate and low nuclear to cytoplasmic ratios were found to be correlated responses. This study demonstrates how microfluidic systems can be used to enable large scale live-cell imaging of isolated hESCs exposed to changing culture conditions, to examine how different aspects of their variable responses are correlated. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Toward Microfluidic Reactors for Cell-Free Protein Synthesis at the Point-of-Care.

    PubMed

    Timm, Andrea C; Shankles, Peter G; Foster, Carmen M; Doktycz, Mitchel J; Retterer, Scott T

    2016-02-10

    Cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) is a powerful technology that allows for optimization of protein production without maintenance of a living system. Integrated within micro and nanofluidic architectures, CFPS can be optimized for point-of-care use. Here, the development of a microfluidic bioreactor designed to facilitate the production of a single-dose of a therapeutic protein, in a small footprint device at the point-of-care, is described. This new design builds on the use of a long, serpentine channel bioreactor and is enhanced by integrating a nanofabricated membrane to allow exchange of materials between parallel "reactor" and "feeder" channels. This engineered membrane facilitates the exchange of metabolites, energy, and inhibitory species, and can be altered by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition and atomic layer deposition to tune the exchange rate of small molecules. This allows for extended reaction times and improved yields. Further, the reaction product and higher molecular weight components of the transcription/translation machinery in the reactor channel can be retained. It has been shown that the microscale bioreactor design produces higher protein yields than conventional tube-based batch formats, and that product yields can be dramatically improved by facilitating small molecule exchange within the dual-channel bioreactor. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Sensitive Protein Detection and Quantification in Paper-Based Microfluidics for the Point of Care.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Caitlin E; Shah, Kamal G; Yager, Paul

    2017-01-01

    The design of appropriate diagnostic assays for the point of care requires development of suitable biosensors, detection methods, and diagnostic platforms for sensitive, quantitative detection of biological analytes. Protein targets in particular are especially challenging to detect quantitatively and sensitively due to the lack of amplification strategies akin to nucleic acid amplification. However, recent advances in transducer and biosensor design, new detection labels, and paper-based microfluidics may realize the goal of sensitive, fast, portable, and low-cost protein detection. In this review, we discuss the biochemistry, optics, and engineering advances that may be leveraged to design such a sensitive protein diagnostic assay. The binding kinetics, mechanisms of binding in porous networks, and potential transducers are explained in detail. We discuss the relative merits of various optical detection strategies, potential detection labels, optical readout approaches, and image-processing techniques that are amenable to point-of-care use. To conclude, we present a systematic analysis of potential approaches to enhance the sensitivity of paper-based assays. The assay development framework presented here provides bioassay developers a strategy to methodically enhance the sensitivity and point-of-care suitability of protein diagnostics.

  5. X-ray Transparent Microfluidic Chip for Mesophase-Based Crystallization of Membrane Proteins and On-Chip Structure Determination

    SciTech Connect

    Khvostichenko, Daria S.; Schieferstein, Jeremy M.; Pawate, Ashtamurthy S.; Laible, Philip D.; Kenis, Paul J. A.

    2014-10-01

    ABSTRACT: Crystallization from lipidic mesophase matrices is a promising route to diffraction-quality crystals and structures of membrane proteins. The microfluidic approach reported here eliminates two bottlenecks of the standard mesophase-based crystallization protocols: (i) manual preparation of viscous mesophases and (ii) manual harvesting of often small and fragile protein crystals. In the approach reported here, protein-loaded mesophases are formulated in an X-ray transparent microfluidic chip using only 60 nL of the protein solution per crystallization trial. The X-ray transparency of the chip enables diffraction data collection from multiple crystals residing in microfluidic wells, eliminating the normally required manual harvesting and mounting of individual crystals. We validated our approach by on-chip crystallization of photosynthetic reaction center, a membrane protein from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, followed by solving its structure to a resolution of 2.5 Å using X-ray diffraction data collected on-chip under ambient conditions. A moderate conformational change in hydrophilic chains of the protein was observed when comparing the on-chip, room temperature structure with known structures for which data were acquired under cryogenic conditions.

  6. X-ray transparent microfluidic chip for mesophase-based crystallization of membrane proteins and on-chip structure determination

    DOE PAGES

    Khvostichenko, Daria S.; Schieferstein, Jeremy M.; Pawate, Ashtamurthy S.; ...

    2014-08-21

    Crystallization from lipidic mesophase matrices is a promising route to diffraction-quality crystals and structures of membrane proteins. The microfluidic approach reported here eliminates two bottlenecks of the standard mesophase-based crystallization protocols: (i) manual preparation of viscous mesophases and (ii) manual harvesting of often small and fragile protein crystals. In the approach reported here, protein-loaded mesophases are formulated in an X-ray transparent microfluidic chip using only 60 nL of the protein solution per crystallization trial. The X-ray transparency of the chip enables diffraction data collection from multiple crystals residing in microfluidic wells, eliminating the normally required manual harvesting and mounting ofmore » individual crystals. In addition, we validated our approach by on-chip crystallization of photosynthetic reaction center, a membrane protein from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, followed by solving its structure to a resolution of 2.5 Å using X-ray diffraction data collected on-chip under ambient conditions. A moderate conformational change in hydrophilic chains of the protein was observed when comparing the on-chip, room temperature structure with known structures for which data were acquired under cryogenic conditions.« less

  7. Use of PLL-g-PEG in micro-fluidic devices for localizing selective and specific protein binding.

    PubMed

    Marie, Rodolphe; Beech, Jason P; Vörös, Janos; Tegenfeldt, Jonas O; Höök, Fredrik

    2006-11-21

    By utilizing flow-controlled PLL-g-PEG and PLL-g-PEGbiotin modification of predefined regions of a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) micro-fluidic device, with an intentionally chosen large (approximately 1 cm2) internal surface area, we report rapid (10 min), highly localized (6 x 10(-6) cm2), and specific surface-based protein capture from a sample volume (100 microL) containing a low amount of protein (160 attomol in pure buffer and 400 attomol in serum). The design criteria for this surface modification were achieved using QCM-D (quartz crystal microbalance with energy dissipation monitoring) of serum protein adsorption onto PLL-g-PEG-modified oxidized PDMS. Equally good, or almost as good, results were obtained for oxidized SU-8, Topas, and poly(methyl metacrylate) (PMMA), demonstrating the generic potential of PLL-g-PEG for surface modification in various micro-fluidic applications.

  8. [An enzyme reactor based on aptamer modified microfluidic chip for protein analysis].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Peng; Li, Dalei; Man, Yan; Geng, Lina; Lü, Xuefei; Deng, Yulin

    2012-11-01

    As a kind of recognition molecule, aptamer has been studied and applied widely in numerous science fields in recent years. Immobilized enzymatic reactor has drawn much attention because of its striking advantages, such as high digestion efficiency and ease in coupling with the separation and detection systems. In this study, a novel microfluidic enzymatic chip, which immobilized trypsin based on aptamer, was prepared and proposed. An online analysis platform, which consisted of an aptamer-based chip and high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, was established by using a 6-port valve and applied to protein analysis. The enzymatic capacity and stability performance of chip reactor were characterized by using mixed protein sample, which consisted of bovine serum albumin (BSA), myoglobin (Mb) and cytochrome c (Cyt. c). The sample digestion time of the chip reactor was about 5.76 s while 1 microL/min of flow rate was adopted; and moreover, 5 ng of Mb was identified successfully with the sequence coverage of 37%. Furthermore, the sequence coverages and the relative standard deviations were 44.3% and 6.5% for BSA, 65.0% and 2.7% for Mb, 62.0% and 5.6% for Cyt. c respectively when 500 ng digest of mixed proteins were analyzed in three runs. According to experimental results, the online analysis platform possesses the ability of high sensitivity and good stability, which can provide a promising tool for rapid and high-throughput proteomics study in the near future.

  9. Rapid Real-time Electrical Detection of Proteins Using Single Conducting Polymer Nanowire-Based Microfluidic Aptasensor

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jiyong; Luo, Xiliang; Lee, Innam; Hu, Yushi; Cui, Xinyan Tracy; Yun, Minhee

    2011-01-01

    Single polypyrrole (PPy) nanowire-based microfluidic aptasensors were fabricated using a one-step electrochemical deposition method. The successful incorporation of the aptamers into the PPy nanowire was confirmed by fluorescence microscopy image. The microfluidic aptasensor showed responses to IgE protein solutions in the range from 0.01 nM to 100 nM, and demonstrated excellent specificity and sensitivity with faster response and rapid stabilization times (~20 s). At the lowest examined IgE concentration of 0.01nM, the microfluidic aptasensor still exhibited ~0.32% change in the conductance. The functionality of this aptasensor was able to be regenerated using an acid treatment with no major change in sensitivity. In addition, the detection of cancer biomarker MUC1 was performed using another microfluidic aptasensor, which showed a very low detection limit of 2.66 nM MUC1 compared to commercially available MUC1 diagnosis assay (800 nM). PMID:21937215

  10. An off-the-shelf integrated microfluidic device comprising self-assembled monolayers for protein array experiments

    PubMed Central

    Hen, Mirit; Ronen, Maria; Deitch, Alex; Barbiro-Michaely, Efrat; Oren, Ziv; Sukenik, Chaim N.; Gerber, Doron

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidic-based protein arrays are promising tools for life sciences, with increased sensitivity and specificity. One of the drawbacks of this technology is the need to create fresh surface chemistry for protein immobilization at the beginning of each experiment. In this work, we attempted to include the process of surface functionalization as part of the fabrication of the device, which would substitute the time consuming step of surface functionalization at the beginning of each protein array experiment. To this end, we employed a novel surface modification using self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) to immobilize biomolecules within the channels of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) integrated microfluidic device. As a model, we present a general method for depositing siloxane-anchored SAMs, with 1-undecyl-thioacetate-trichlorosilane (C11TA) on the silica surfaces. The process involved developing PDMS-compatible conditions for both SAM deposition and functional group activation. We successfully demonstrated the ability to produce, within an integrated microfluidic channel, a C11TA monolayer with a covalently conjugated antibody. The antibody could then bind its antigen with a high signal to background ratio. We further demonstrated that the antibody was still active after storage of the device for a week. Integration of the surface chemistry into the device as part of its fabrication process has potential to significantly simplify and shorten many experimental procedures involving microfluidic–based protein arrays. In turn, this will allow for broader dissemination of this important technology. PMID:26421087

  11. Fabrication of a polystyrene microfluidic chip coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for protein analysis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xianqiao; Dong, Yuanyuan; He, Qiaohong; Chen, Hengwu; Zhu, Zhiwei

    2015-05-15

    A highly integrated polystyrene (PS) microfluidic chip coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for on-chip protein digestion and online analysis was developed. The immobilized enzymatic microreactor for on-chip protein digestion was integrated onto microchip via the novel method of region-selective UV-modification combined with glutaraldehyde-based immobilization. The micro film electric contact for applying high voltage was prepared on chips by using UV-directed electroless plating technique. A micro-tip was machined at the end of main channel, serving as the interface between microchip and mass spectrometric detector. On-chip digestion and online detection of protein was carried out by coupling the microchip with mass spectrometry (MS). The influences of methanol flow rate in side channel on the stability of spray and intensity of signals were investigated systematically. Also the influence of sample flow rate on the performance of immobilized enzymatic reactor were investigated. Stable spray was obtained at the spray voltage of 2.8-3.0kV and the methanol flow rate of 500-700nLmin(-1) with the relative standard deviation (RSD) of total ion current (TIC) less than 10%. The influence of sample flow rate on the performance of immobilized enzymatic reactor was also studied. The sequence coverage of protein identification decreased with the increase of flow rate of the sample solution. A sequence coverage of 96% was obtained with immobilized enzymatic reactor at the sample flow rate of 100nLmin(-1) with the reaction time of 8.4min. It could detect cytochrome c as low as 10μgmL(-1) with the developed system. No obvious decrease in protein digestion efficiency was observed after the chip continuously performed for 4h and stored for 15d. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Geometry-induced protein pattern formation

    PubMed Central

    Thalmeier, Dominik; Halatek, Jacob; Frey, Erwin

    2016-01-01

    Protein patterns are known to adapt to cell shape and serve as spatial templates that choreograph downstream processes like cell polarity or cell division. However, how can pattern-forming proteins sense and respond to the geometry of a cell, and what mechanistic principles underlie pattern formation? Current models invoke mechanisms based on dynamic instabilities arising from nonlinear interactions between proteins but neglect the influence of the spatial geometry itself. Here, we show that patterns can emerge as a direct result of adaptation to cell geometry, in the absence of dynamical instability. We present a generic reaction module that allows protein densities robustly to adapt to the symmetry of the spatial geometry. The key component is an NTPase protein that cycles between nucleotide-dependent membrane-bound and cytosolic states. For elongated cells, we find that the protein dynamics generically leads to a bipolar pattern, which vanishes as the geometry becomes spherically symmetrical. We show that such a reaction module facilitates universal adaptation to cell geometry by sensing the local ratio of membrane area to cytosolic volume. This sensing mechanism is controlled by the membrane affinities of the different states. We apply the theory to explain AtMinD bipolar patterns in Δ EcMinDE Escherichia coli. Due to its generic nature, the mechanism could also serve as a hitherto-unrecognized spatial template in many other bacterial systems. Moreover, the robustness of the mechanism enables self-organized optimization of protein patterns by evolutionary processes. Finally, the proposed module can be used to establish geometry-sensitive protein gradients in synthetic biological systems. PMID:26739566

  13. Geometry-induced protein pattern formation.

    PubMed

    Thalmeier, Dominik; Halatek, Jacob; Frey, Erwin

    2016-01-19

    Protein patterns are known to adapt to cell shape and serve as spatial templates that choreograph downstream processes like cell polarity or cell division. However, how can pattern-forming proteins sense and respond to the geometry of a cell, and what mechanistic principles underlie pattern formation? Current models invoke mechanisms based on dynamic instabilities arising from nonlinear interactions between proteins but neglect the influence of the spatial geometry itself. Here, we show that patterns can emerge as a direct result of adaptation to cell geometry, in the absence of dynamical instability. We present a generic reaction module that allows protein densities robustly to adapt to the symmetry of the spatial geometry. The key component is an NTPase protein that cycles between nucleotide-dependent membrane-bound and cytosolic states. For elongated cells, we find that the protein dynamics generically leads to a bipolar pattern, which vanishes as the geometry becomes spherically symmetrical. We show that such a reaction module facilitates universal adaptation to cell geometry by sensing the local ratio of membrane area to cytosolic volume. This sensing mechanism is controlled by the membrane affinities of the different states. We apply the theory to explain AtMinD bipolar patterns in [Formula: see text] EcMinDE Escherichia coli. Due to its generic nature, the mechanism could also serve as a hitherto-unrecognized spatial template in many other bacterial systems. Moreover, the robustness of the mechanism enables self-organized optimization of protein patterns by evolutionary processes. Finally, the proposed module can be used to establish geometry-sensitive protein gradients in synthetic biological systems.

  14. Microfluidic sorting of protein nanocrystals by size for X-ray free-electron laser diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Bahige G.; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi; Coe, Jesse; Conrad, Chelsie E.; Dörner, Katerina; Sierra, Raymond G.; Stevenson, Hilary P.; Camacho-Alanis, Fernanda; Grant, Thomas D.; Nelson, Garrett; James, Daniel; Calero, Guillermo; Wachter, Rebekka M.; Spence, John C. H.; Weierstall, Uwe; Fromme, Petra; Ros, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    The advent and application of the X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) has uncovered the structures of proteins that could not previously be solved using traditional crystallography. While this new technology is powerful, optimization of the process is still needed to improve data quality and analysis efficiency. One area is sample heterogeneity, where variations in crystal size (among other factors) lead to the requirement of large data sets (and thus 10–100 mg of protein) for determining accurate structure factors. To decrease sample dispersity, we developed a high-throughput microfluidic sorter operating on the principle of dielectrophoresis, whereby polydisperse particles can be transported into various fluid streams for size fractionation. Using this microsorter, we isolated several milliliters of photosystem I nanocrystal fractions ranging from 200 to 600 nm in size as characterized by dynamic light scattering, nanoparticle tracking, and electron microscopy. Sorted nanocrystals were delivered in a liquid jet via the gas dynamic virtual nozzle into the path of the XFEL at the Linac Coherent Light Source. We obtained diffraction to ∼4 Å resolution, indicating that the small crystals were not damaged by the sorting process. We also observed the shape transforms of photosystem I nanocrystals, demonstrating that our device can optimize data collection for the shape transform-based phasing method. Using simulations, we show that narrow crystal size distributions can significantly improve merged data quality in serial crystallography. From this proof-of-concept work, we expect that the automated size-sorting of protein crystals will become an important step for sample production by reducing the amount of protein needed for a high quality final structure and the development of novel phasing methods that exploit inter-Bragg reflection intensities or use variations in beam intensity for radiation damage-induced phasing. This method will also permit an analysis

  15. Microfluidic sorting of protein nanocrystals by size for X-ray free-electron laser diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Abdallah, Bahige G.; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi; Coe, Jesse; Conrad, Chelsie E.; Dörner, Katerina; Sierra, Raymond G.; Stevenson, Hilary P.; Camacho-Alanis, Fernanda; Grant, Thomas D.; Nelson, Garrett; James, Daniel; Calero, Guillermo; Wachter, Rebekka M.; Spence, John C. H.; Weierstall, Uwe; Fromme, Petra; Ros, Alexandra

    2015-08-19

    We report that the advent and application of the X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) has uncovered the structures of proteins that could not previously be solved using traditional crystallography. While this new technology is powerful, optimization of the process is still needed to improve data quality and analysis efficiency. One area is sample heterogeneity, where variations in crystal size (among other factors) lead to the requirement of large data sets (and thus 10–100 mg of protein) for determining accurate structure factors. To decrease sample dispersity, we developed a high-throughput microfluidic sorter operating on the principle of dielectrophoresis, whereby polydisperse particles can be transported into various fluid streams for size fractionation. Using this microsorter, we isolated several milliliters of photosystem I nanocrystal fractions ranging from 200 to 600 nm in size as characterized by dynamic light scattering, nanoparticle tracking, and electron microscopy. Sorted nanocrystals were delivered in a liquid jet via the gas dynamic virtual nozzle into the path of the XFEL at the Linac Coherent Light Source. We obtained diffraction to ~4 Å resolution, indicating that the small crystals were not damaged by the sorting process. We also observed the shape transforms of photosystem I nanocrystals, demonstrating that our device can optimize data collection for the shape transform-based phasing method. Using simulations, we show that narrow crystal size distributions can significantly improve merged data quality in serial crystallography. From this proof-of-concept work, we expect that the automated size-sorting of protein crystals will become an important step for sample production by reducing the amount of protein needed for a high quality final structure and the development of novel phasing methods that exploit inter-Bragg reflection intensities or use variations in beam intensity for radiation damage-induced phasing. Ultimately, this method will also

  16. Microfluidic sorting of protein nanocrystals by size for X-ray free-electron laser diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Abdallah, Bahige G.; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi; ...

    2015-08-19

    We report that the advent and application of the X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) has uncovered the structures of proteins that could not previously be solved using traditional crystallography. While this new technology is powerful, optimization of the process is still needed to improve data quality and analysis efficiency. One area is sample heterogeneity, where variations in crystal size (among other factors) lead to the requirement of large data sets (and thus 10–100 mg of protein) for determining accurate structure factors. To decrease sample dispersity, we developed a high-throughput microfluidic sorter operating on the principle of dielectrophoresis, whereby polydisperse particles canmore » be transported into various fluid streams for size fractionation. Using this microsorter, we isolated several milliliters of photosystem I nanocrystal fractions ranging from 200 to 600 nm in size as characterized by dynamic light scattering, nanoparticle tracking, and electron microscopy. Sorted nanocrystals were delivered in a liquid jet via the gas dynamic virtual nozzle into the path of the XFEL at the Linac Coherent Light Source. We obtained diffraction to ~4 Å resolution, indicating that the small crystals were not damaged by the sorting process. We also observed the shape transforms of photosystem I nanocrystals, demonstrating that our device can optimize data collection for the shape transform-based phasing method. Using simulations, we show that narrow crystal size distributions can significantly improve merged data quality in serial crystallography. From this proof-of-concept work, we expect that the automated size-sorting of protein crystals will become an important step for sample production by reducing the amount of protein needed for a high quality final structure and the development of novel phasing methods that exploit inter-Bragg reflection intensities or use variations in beam intensity for radiation damage-induced phasing. Ultimately, this method

  17. Pattern Recognition of Adsorbing HP Lattice Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Matthew S.; Shi, Guangjie; Wüst, Thomas; Landau, David P.; Schmid, Friederike

    2015-03-01

    Protein adsorption is relevant in fields ranging from medicine to industry, and the qualitative behavior exhibited by course-grained models could shed insight for further research in such fields. Our study on the selective adsorption of lattice proteins utilizes the Wang-Landau algorithm to simulate the Hydrophobic-Polar (H-P) model with an efficient set of Monte Carlo moves. Each substrate is modeled as a square pattern of 9 lattice sites which attract either H or P monomers, and are located on an otherwise neutral surface. The fully enumerated set of 102 unique surfaces is simulated with each protein sequence. A collection of 27-monomer sequences is used- each of which is non-degenerate and protein-like. Thermodynamic quantities such as the specific heat and free energy are calculated from the density of states, and are used to investigate the adsorption of lattice proteins on patterned substrates. Research supported by NSF.

  18. Protein structure protection commits gene expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianping; Liang, Han; Fernández, Ariel

    2008-01-01

    Gene co-expressions often determine module-defining spatial and temporal concurrences of proteins. Yet, little effort has been devoted to tracing coordinating signals for expression correlations to the three-dimensional structures of gene products. We performed a global structure-based analysis of the yeast and human proteomes and contrasted this information against their respective transcriptome organizations obtained from comprehensive microarray data. We show that protein vulnerability quantifies dosage sensitivity for metabolic adaptation phases and tissue-specific patterns of mRNA expression, determining the extent of co-expression similarity of binding partners. The role of protein intrinsic disorder in transcriptome organization is also delineated by interrelating vulnerability, disorder propensity and co-expression patterns. Extremely vulnerable human proteins are shown to be subject to severe post-transcriptional regulation of their expression through significant micro-RNA targeting, making mRNA levels poor surrogates for protein-expression levels. By contrast, in yeast the expression of extremely under-wrapped proteins is likely regulated through protein aggregation. Thus, the 85 most vulnerable proteins in yeast include the five confirmed prions, while in human, the genes encoding extremely vulnerable proteins are predicted to be targeted by microRNAs. Hence, in both vastly different organisms protein vulnerability emerges as a structure-encoded signal for post-transcriptional regulation. Vulnerability of protein structure and the concurrent need to maintain structural integrity are shown to quantify dosage sensitivity, compelling gene expression patterns across tissue types and temporal adaptation phases in a quantifiable manner. Extremely vulnerable proteins impose additional constraints on gene expression: They are subject to high levels of regulation at the post-transcriptional level.

  19. Different Migration Patterns of Sea Urchin and Mouse Sperm Revealed by a Microfluidic Chemotaxis Device

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoon Soo; Suarez, Susan S.; Wu, Mingming

    2013-01-01

    Chemotaxis refers to a process whereby cells move up or down a chemical gradient. Sperm chemotaxis is known to be a strategy exploited by marine invertebrates such as sea urchins to reach eggs efficiently in moving water. Less is understood about how or whether chemotaxis is used by mammalian sperm to reach eggs, where fertilization takes place within the confinement of a reproductive tract. In this report, we quantitatively assessed sea urchin and mouse sperm chemotaxis using a recently developed microfluidic model and high-speed imaging. Results demonstrated that sea urchin Arbacia punctulata sperm were chemotactic toward the peptide resact with high chemotactic sensitivity, with an average velocity Vx up the chemical gradient as high as 20% of its average speed (238 μm/s), while mouse sperm displayed no statistically significant chemotactic behavior in progesterone gradients, which had been proposed to guide mammalian sperm toward eggs. This work demonstrates the validity of a microfluidic model for quantitative sperm chemotaxis studies, and reveals a biological insight that chemotaxis up a progesterone gradient may not be a universal strategy for mammalian sperm to reach eggs. PMID:23613731

  20. Different migration patterns of sea urchin and mouse sperm revealed by a microfluidic chemotaxis device.

    PubMed

    Chang, Haixin; Kim, Beum Jun; Kim, Yoon Soo; Suarez, Susan S; Wu, Mingming

    2013-01-01

    Chemotaxis refers to a process whereby cells move up or down a chemical gradient. Sperm chemotaxis is known to be a strategy exploited by marine invertebrates such as sea urchins to reach eggs efficiently in moving water. Less is understood about how or whether chemotaxis is used by mammalian sperm to reach eggs, where fertilization takes place within the confinement of a reproductive tract. In this report, we quantitatively assessed sea urchin and mouse sperm chemotaxis using a recently developed microfluidic model and high-speed imaging. Results demonstrated that sea urchin Arbacia punctulata sperm were chemotactic toward the peptide resact with high chemotactic sensitivity, with an average velocity Vx up the chemical gradient as high as 20% of its average speed (238 μm/s), while mouse sperm displayed no statistically significant chemotactic behavior in progesterone gradients, which had been proposed to guide mammalian sperm toward eggs. This work demonstrates the validity of a microfluidic model for quantitative sperm chemotaxis studies, and reveals a biological insight that chemotaxis up a progesterone gradient may not be a universal strategy for mammalian sperm to reach eggs.

  1. Disulfide bonding patterns and protein topologies.

    PubMed Central

    Benham, C. J.; Jafri, M. S.

    1993-01-01

    This paper examines the topological properties of protein disulfide bonding patterns. First, a description of these patterns in terms of partially directed graphs is developed. The topologically distinct disulfide bonding patterns available to a polypeptide chain containing n disulfide bonds are enumerated, and their symmetry and reducibility properties are examined. The theoretical probabilities are calculated that a randomly chosen pattern of n bonds will have any combination of symmetry and reducibility properties, given that all patterns have equal probability of being chosen. Next, the National Biomedical Research Foundation protein sequence and Brookhaven National Laboratories protein structure (PDB) databases are examined, and the occurrences of disulfide bonding patterns in them are determined. The frequencies of symmetric and/or reducible patterns are found to exceed theoretical predictions based on equiprobable pattern selection. Kauzmann's model, in which disulfide bonds form during random encounters as the chain assumes random coil conformations, finds that bonds are more likely to form with near neighbor cysteines than with remote cysteines. The observed frequencies of occurrence of disulfide patterns are found here to be virtually uncorrelated with the predictions of this alternative random bonding model. These results strongly suggest that disulfide bond pattern formation is not the result of random factors, but instead is a directed process. Finally, the PDB structure database is examined to determine the extrinsic topologies of polypeptides containing disulfide bonds. A complete survey of all structures in the database found no instances in which two loops formed by disulfide bonds within the same polypeptide chain are topologically linked. Similarly, no instances are found in which two loops present on different polypeptide chains in a structure are catenated. Further, no examples of topologically knotted loops occur. In contrast, pseudolinking

  2. Hybrid Magnetic-DNA Directed Immobilisation Approach for Efficient Protein Capture and Detection on Microfluidic Platforms.

    PubMed

    Esmaeili, Elaheh; Ghiass, Mohammad Adel; Vossoughi, Manouchehr; Soleimani, Masoud

    2017-03-15

    In this study, a hybrid magnetic-DNA directed immobilisation approach is presented to enhance protein capture and detection on a microfluidic platform. DNA-modified magnetic nanoparticles are added in a solution to capture fluorescently labelled immunocomplexes to be detected optically. A magnetic set-up composed of cubic permanent magnets and a microchannel was designed and implemented based on finite element analysis results to efficiently concentrate the nanoparticles only over a defined area of the microchannel as the sensing zone. This in turn, led to the fluorescence emission localisation and the searching area reduction. Also, compared to processes in which the immunocomplex is formed directly on the surface, the proposed approach provides a lower steric hindrance, higher mass transfer, lower equilibrium time, and more surface concentration of the captured targets leading to a faster and more sensitive detection. As a proof-of-concept, the set-up is capable of detecting prostate-specific membrane antigen with concentrations down to 0.7 nM. Our findings suggest that the approach holds a great promise for applications in clinical assays and disease diagnosis.

  3. High-performance fluorescence-encoded magnetic microbeads as microfluidic protein chip supports for AFP detection.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiaoqun; Yan, Huan; Yang, Jiumin; Wu, Yudong; Zhang, Jian; Yao, Yingyi; Liu, Ping; Wang, Huiquan; Hu, Zhidong; Chang, Jin

    2016-10-05

    Fluorescence-encoded magnetic microbeads (FEMMs), with the fluorescence encoding ability of quantum dots (QDs) and magnetic enrichment and separation functions of Fe3O4 nanoparticles, have been widely used for multiple biomolecular detection as microfluidic protein chip supports. However, the preparation of FEMMs with long-term fluorescent encoding and immunodetection stability is still a challenge. In this work, we designed a novel high-temperature chemical swelling strategy. The QDs and Fe3O4 nanoparticles were effectively packaged into microbeads via the thermal motion of the polymer chains and the hydrophobic interaction between the nanoparticles and microbeads. The FEMMs obtained a highly uniform fluorescent property and long-term encoding and immunodetection stability and could be quickly magnetically separated and enriched. Then, the QD-encoded magnetic microbeads were applied to alpha fetoprotein (AFP) detection via sandwich immunoreaction. The properties of the encoded microspheres were characterized using a self-designed detecting apparatus, and the target molecular concentration in the sample was also quantified. The results suggested that the high-performance FEMMs have great potential in the field of biomolecular detection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Enhanced detection of quantum dots labeled protein by simultaneous bismuth electrodeposition into microfluidic channel.

    PubMed

    Medina-Sánchez, Mariana; Miserere, Sandrine; Cadevall, Miquell; Merkoçi, Arben

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we propose an electrochemical immunoassay into a disposable microfluidic platform, using quantum dots (QDs) as labels and their enhanced detection using bismuth as an alternative to mercury electrodes. CdSe@ZnS QDs were used to tag human IgG as a model protein and detected through highly sensitive stripping voltammetry of the dissolved metallic component (cadmium in our case). The modification of the screen printed carbon electrodes (SPCEs) was done by a simple electrodeposition of bismuth that was previously mixed with the sample containing QDs. A magneto-immunosandwich assay was performed using a micromixer. A magnet placed at its outlet in order to capture the magnetic beads used as solid support for the immunoassay. SPCEs were integrated at the end of the channel as detector. Different parameters such as bismuth concentration, flow rate, and incubation times, were optimized. The LOD for HIgG in presence of bismuth was 3.5 ng/mL with a RSD of 13.2%. This LOD was about 3.3-fold lower than the one obtained without bismuth. Furthermore, the sensitivity of the system was increased 100-fold respect to experiments carried out with classical screen-printed electrodes, both in presence of bismuth.

  5. Using Three-Phase Flow of Immiscible Liquids to Prevent Coalescence of Droplets in Microfluidic Channels: Criteria to Identify theThird Liquid and Validation with Protein Crystallizations

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.; Li, L; Reyes, S; Adamson, D; Ismagilov, R

    2007-01-01

    This manuscript describes the effect of interfacial tensions on three-phase liquid-liquid-liquid flow in microfluidic channels and the use of this flow to prevent microfluidic plugs from coalescing. One problem in using microfluidic plugs as microreactors is the coalescence of adjacent plugs caused by the relative motion of plugs during flow. Here, coalescence of reagent plugs was eliminated by using plugs of a third immiscible liquid as spacers to separate adjacent reagent plugs. This work tested the requirements of interfacial tensions for plugs of a third liquid to be effective spacers. Two candidates satisfying the requirements were identified, and one of these liquids was used in the crystallization of protein human Tdp1 to demonstrate its compatibility with protein crystallization in plugs. This method for identifying immiscible liquids for use as a spacer will also be useful for applications involving manipulation of large arrays of droplets in microfluidic channels.

  6. A simple microfluidic platform to study age-dependent protein abundance and localization changes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Margarita; Novarina, Daniele; Rempel, Irina L.; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M.; Chang, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae divides asymmetrically, with a smaller daughter cell emerging from its larger mother cell. While the daughter lineage is immortal, mother cells age with each cell division and have a finite lifespan. The replicative ageing of the yeast mother cell has been used as a model to study the ageing of mitotically active human cells. Several microfluidic platforms, which use fluid flow to selectively remove daughter cells, have recently been developed that can monitor cell physiology as mother cells age. However, these platforms are not trivial to set up and users often require many hours of training. In this study, we have developed a simple system, which combines a commercially available microfluidic platform (the CellASIC ONIX Microfluidic Platform) and a genetic tool to prevent the proliferation of daughter cells (the Mother Enrichment Program), to monitor protein abundance and localization changes during approximately the first half of the yeast replicative lifespan. We validated our system by observing known age-dependent changes, such as decreased Sir2 abundance, and have identified a protein with a previously unknown age-dependent change in localization. PMID:28685142

  7. Functionalized poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate microgels by microfluidics: In situ peptide encapsulation for in serum selective protein detection.

    PubMed

    Celetti, Giorgia; Natale, Concetta Di; Causa, Filippo; Battista, Edmondo; Netti, Paolo A

    2016-09-01

    Polymeric microparticles represent a robustly platform for the detection of clinically relevant analytes in biological samples; they can be functionalized encapsulating a multiple types of biologics entities, enhancing their applications as a new class of colloid materials. Microfluidic offers a versatile platform for the synthesis of monodisperse and engineered microparticles. In this work, we report microfluidic synthesis of novel polymeric microparticles endowed with specific peptide due to its superior specificity for target binding in complex media. A peptide sequence was efficiently encapsulated into the polymeric network and protein binding occurred with high affinity (KD 0.1-0.4μM). Fluidic dynamics simulation was performed to optimize the production conditions for monodisperse and stable functionalized microgels. The results demonstrate the easy and fast realization, in a single step, of functionalized monodisperse microgels using droplet-microfluidic technique, and how the inclusion of the peptide within polymeric network improve both the affinity and the specificity of protein capture. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. QR-on-a-chip: a computer-recognizable micro-pattern engraved microfluidic device for high-throughput image acquisition.

    PubMed

    Yun, Kyungwon; Lee, Hyunjae; Bang, Hyunwoo; Jeon, Noo Li

    2016-02-21

    This study proposes a novel way to achieve high-throughput image acquisition based on a computer-recognizable micro-pattern implemented on a microfluidic device. We integrated the QR code, a two-dimensional barcode system, onto the microfluidic device to simplify imaging of multiple ROIs (regions of interest). A standard QR code pattern was modified to arrays of cylindrical structures of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Utilizing the recognition of the micro-pattern, the proposed system enables: (1) device identification, which allows referencing additional information of the device, such as device imaging sequences or the ROIs and (2) composing a coordinate system for an arbitrarily located microfluidic device with respect to the stage. Based on these functionalities, the proposed method performs one-step high-throughput imaging for data acquisition in microfluidic devices without further manual exploration and locating of the desired ROIs. In our experience, the proposed method significantly reduced the time for the preparation of an acquisition. We expect that the method will innovatively improve the prototype device data acquisition and analysis.

  9. Ultrasensitive detection of low-abundance surface-marker protein using isothermal rolling circle amplification in a microfluidic nanoliter platform.

    PubMed

    Konry, Tania; Smolina, Irina; Yarmush, Joel M; Irimia, Daniel; Yarmush, Martin L

    2011-02-07

    With advances in immunology and cancer biology, there is an unmet need for increasingly sensitive systems to monitor the expression of specific cell markers for the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic tools. To address this challenge, a highly sensitive labeling method that translates antigen-antibody recognition processes into DNA detection events that can be greatly amplified via isothermal rolling circle amplification (RCA) is applied. By merging the single-molecule detection power of RCA reactions with microfluidic technology, it is demonstrated that the identification of specific protein markers can be achieved on tumor-cell surfaces in miniaturized nanoliter reaction droplets. Furthermore, this combined approach of signal amplification in a microfluidic format could extend the utility of existing methods by reducing sample and reagent consumption and enhancing the sensitivities and specificities for various applications, including early diagnosis of cancer.

  10. Protein patterns as endpoints in environmental remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, B.; Brown, D.

    1995-12-31

    Biological endpoints can complement chemical analyses in monitoring environmental remediation. In some cases the levels of chemical detection are so low that the costs of clean-up to no detection would be prohibitive. And chemical tests do not indicate the availability of the contaminants to the biota. On the other hand many if not most biological tests lack specificity. The authors have investigated a protein expression assay to establish an endpoint for clean-up of sulfur mustard and breakdown products. Earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris) were exposed to sulfur mustard (SM), a breakdown product thiodiethanol (TDE), and ethylene glycol, the solvent for the two chemicals. Tissue from the lining of the coelomic cavity was taken from each of 6 worms in each treatment class. Soluble proteins were extracted and separated on one and two-dimensional (1D and 2D) gels. The 1 D gels showed no difference by eye but the patterns from control and solvent control worms on 2D gels differed from those of worms exposed to TDE and SM. The 1D gel data were digitized and analyzed by pattern recognition using artificial neural networks. The protein patterns under the two treatments and the two controls were learned in one set of data and successfully recognized in a second. This indicated that what was learned was useful in recognizing patterns induced by SM and TDE. Thus a possible endpoint for remediation would be the protein pattern at no effect levels of chemicals of interest.

  11. The proteomic reactor: a microfluidic device for processing minute amounts of protein prior to mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Ethier, Martin; Hou, Weimin; Duewel, Henry S; Figeys, Daniel

    2006-10-01

    Gel-free proteomics has emerged as a complement to conventional gel-based proteomics. Gel-free approaches focus on peptide or protein fractionation, but they do not address the efficiency of protein processing. We report the development of a microfluidic proteomic reactor that greatly simplifies the processing of complex proteomic samples by combining multiple proteomic steps. Rapid extraction and enrichment of proteins from complex proteomic samples or directly from cells are readily performed on the reactor. Furthermore, chemical and enzymatic treatments of proteins are performed in 50 nL effective volume, which results in an increased number of generated peptides. The products are compatible with mass spectrometry. We demonstrated that the proteomic reactor is at least 10 times more sensitive than current gel-free methodologies with one protein identified per 440 pg of protein lysate injected on the reactor. Furthermore, as little as 300 cells can be directly introduced on the proteomic reactor and analyzed by mass spectrometry.

  12. Micro- and nanometer-scale patterned surface in a microchannel for cell culture in microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Goto, Makiko; Tsukahara, Takehiko; Sato, Kiichi; Kitamori, Takehiko

    2008-02-01

    A novel microdevice which had a micro- and nanometer-scale patterned surface for cell adhesion in a microchip was developed. The surface had a metal pattern fabricated by electron-beam lithography and metal sputtering and a chemical pattern consisting of a self-assembled monolayer of alkanethiol. The metal patterned surface had a gold stripe pattern which was as small as 300 nm wide and 150 nm high and both topography and chemical properties could be controlled. Mouse fibroblast NIH/3T3 cells were cultured on the patterned surface and elongated along the gold stripes. These cells recognized the size of the pattern and the chemical properties on the pattern though it was much smaller than they were. There was satisfactory cell growth under fresh medium flow in the microchip. The combination of the patterned surface and the microchip provides cells with a novel environment for their growth and will facilitate many cellular experiments.

  13. Coupling of a microfluidic mixer to a Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer for protein-conformation studies.

    PubMed

    Prim, Denis; Crelier, Simon; Segura, Jean-Manuel

    2011-01-01

    The biological properties of a protein critically depend on its conformation, which can vary as a result of changes in conditions such as pH or following the addition of various substances. Being able to reliably assess the quality of protein structures under various conditions is therefore of crucial importance. Infrared (IR) spectroscopy of the Amide I band of proteins is a powerful method for the determination of protein conformations and further allows the analysis of continuously flowing solutions of the target molecule. Here, a commercial Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer was coupled to a microfluidic mixer to allow the on-line monitoring of protein conformation under varying conditions. The validity of the concept was demonstrated by continuously recording the variations of the IR spectrum of poly-L-lysine resulting from repetitive, pH-induced conformational changes.

  14. Microfluidics and Coagulation Biology

    PubMed Central

    Colace, Thomas V.; Tormoen, Garth W.

    2014-01-01

    The study of blood ex vivo can occur in closed or open systems, with or without flow. Microfluidic devices facilitate measurements of platelet function, coagulation biology, cellular biorheology, adhesion dynamics, pharmacology, and clinical diagnostics. An experimental session can accommodate 100s to 1000s of unique clotting events. Using microfluidics, thrombotic events can be studied on defined surfaces of biopolymers, matrix proteins, and tissue factor under constant flow rate or constant pressure drop conditions. Distinct shear rates can be created on a device with a single perfusion pump. Microfluidic devices facilitated the determination of intraluminal thrombus permeability and the discovery that platelet contractility can be activated by a sudden decrease in flow. Microfluidics are ideal for multicolor imaging of platelets, fibrin, and phosphatidylserine and provide a human blood analog to the mouse injury models. Overall, microfluidic advances offer many opportunities for research, drug testing under relevant hemodynamic conditions, and clinical diagnostics. PMID:23642241

  15. Development of a Fast Microfluidic Mixer for Studies of Protein Folding KineticsFinal Report Cover Page

    SciTech Connect

    Bakajin, O

    2005-02-10

    We designed and fabricated mixing devices that will help us elucidate the mechanisms of protein folding through measurements of folding reaction rates. These devices can be used in studying of other biological systems and are compatible with various spectroscopic observation methods. The project involved development of fabrication processes and setup of a laboratory for assembly and characterization of microfluidic devices, as well as measurements of protein folding kinetics. We produced three variants of the mixer: (1) The ultra fast mixer for Foerster Resonance Energy Transfer measurements (described by Anal. Chem. Article UCRL-JRNL-206676) and MicroTAS Conference Proceedings article (UCRL-JC-153057 ) included in the report; (2) The ultra fast mixer for UV measurements (described by the poster presented at MicroTAS conference (UCRL-POST-207476) included in the report); and (3) The mixer for single molecule measurements (described by the Science article UCRL-JC-153057) included in the report. In these mixers, the channels are narrow, ranging from a few to hundreds of {micro}m, so that the flow is laminar and all of the mixing is achieved through diffusion. Our goal is to develop robust microfluidic mixer with at least 100 times lower consumption rate, shorter dead time and time resolution than commercially available mixers that would be compatible with most commonly used spectroscopic methods. We are also developing mixers that can be used in combination with single molecule spectroscopy. The mixers are used to study kinetics of fast protein folding reactions using bulk fluorescence and single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer techniques. Capabilities for microfluidic have been developed at BSNL that will be useful for studies of interactions of DNA with proteins and other projects such as the single molecule detector for detection of low concentration of toxins.

  16. Integrating gene synthesis and microfluidic protein analysis for rapid protein engineering

    PubMed Central

    Blackburn, Matthew C.; Petrova, Ekaterina; Correia, Bruno E.; Maerkl, Sebastian J.

    2016-01-01

    The capability to rapidly design proteins with novel functions will have a significant impact on medicine, biotechnology and synthetic biology. Synthetic genes are becoming a commodity, but integrated approaches have yet to be developed that take full advantage of gene synthesis. We developed a solid-phase gene synthesis method based on asymmetric primer extension (APE) and coupled this process directly to high-throughput, on-chip protein expression, purification and characterization (via mechanically induced trapping of molecular interactions, MITOMI). By completely circumventing molecular cloning and cell-based steps, APE-MITOMI reduces the time between protein design and quantitative characterization to 3–4 days. With APE-MITOMI we synthesized and characterized over 400 zinc-finger (ZF) transcription factors (TF), showing that although ZF TFs can be readily engineered to recognize a particular DNA sequence, engineering the precise binding energy landscape remains challenging. We also found that it is possible to engineer ZF–DNA affinity precisely and independently of sequence specificity and that in silico modeling can explain some of the observed affinity differences. APE-MITOMI is a generic approach that should facilitate fundamental studies in protein biophysics, and protein design/engineering. PMID:26704969

  17. Integrating gene synthesis and microfluidic protein analysis for rapid protein engineering.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Matthew C; Petrova, Ekaterina; Correia, Bruno E; Maerkl, Sebastian J

    2016-04-20

    The capability to rapidly design proteins with novel functions will have a significant impact on medicine, biotechnology and synthetic biology. Synthetic genes are becoming a commodity, but integrated approaches have yet to be developed that take full advantage of gene synthesis. We developed a solid-phase gene synthesis method based on asymmetric primer extension (APE) and coupled this process directly to high-throughput, on-chip protein expression, purification and characterization (via mechanically induced trapping of molecular interactions, MITOMI). By completely circumventing molecular cloning and cell-based steps, APE-MITOMI reduces the time between protein design and quantitative characterization to 3-4 days. With APE-MITOMI we synthesized and characterized over 400 zinc-finger (ZF) transcription factors (TF), showing that although ZF TFs can be readily engineered to recognize a particular DNA sequence, engineering the precise binding energy landscape remains challenging. We also found that it is possible to engineer ZF-DNA affinity precisely and independently of sequence specificity and that in silico modeling can explain some of the observed affinity differences. APE-MITOMI is a generic approach that should facilitate fundamental studies in protein biophysics, and protein design/engineering.

  18. A novel microfluidic assay reveals a key role for protein kinase C δ in regulating human neutrophil-endothelium interaction.

    PubMed

    Soroush, Fariborz; Zhang, Ting; King, Devon J; Tang, Yuan; Deosarkar, Sudhir; Prabhakarpandian, Balabhaskar; Kilpatrick, Laurie E; Kiani, Mohammad F

    2016-11-01

    A key step in neutrophil-mediated tissue damage is the migration of activated neutrophils across the vascular endothelium. Previously, we identified protein kinase C δ as a critical regulator of neutrophil migration in sepsis but did not identify specific steps in migration. In this study, we used our novel biomimetic microfluidic assay to delineate systematically the mechanism by which protein kinase C δ regulates individual steps in human neutrophil-endothelial interaction during inflammation. The biomimetic microfluidic assay includes a network of vascular channels, produced from in vivo images connected to a tissue compartment through a porous barrier. HUVECs cultured in vascular channels formed a complete lumen under physiologic shear flow. HUVECs were pretreated with TNF-α ± a protein kinase C δ inhibitor, and the tissue compartment was filled with a chemoattractant (fMLP or IL-8). Under physiologic shear flow, the role of protein kinase C δ on spatial and temporal neutrophil adherence/migration was quantified. Protein kinase C δ inhibition significantly reduced neutrophil adhesion in response to fMLP and IL-8 only under low shear rate and near bifurcations. Protein kinase C δ inhibition also decreased adherence to nonactivated HUVECs in response to fMLP or IL-8. Protein kinase C δ inhibition reduced neutrophil migration into the tissue compartment in response to fMLP and to a lesser degree, to IL-8. Antibody-coated microparticles demonstrated that protein kinase C δ inhibition down-regulated E-selectin and ICAM-1 but not VCAM-1 expression. With the use of a physiologically relevant in vitro model system, we demonstrate that protein kinase C δ plays an important role in the regulation of neutrophil adherence/migration during inflammation and identifies key steps regulated by protein kinase C δ in neutrophil-endothelial interactions.

  19. Coupling High Throughput Microfluidics and Small-Angle X-ray Scattering to Study Protein Crystallization from Solution.

    PubMed

    Pham, Nhat; Radajewski, Dimitri; Round, Adam; Brennich, Martha; Pernot, Petra; Biscans, Béatrice; Bonneté, Françoise; Teychené, Sébastien

    2017-02-21

    In this work, we propose the combination of small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and high throughput, droplet based microfluidics as a powerful tool to investigate macromolecular interactions, directly related to protein solubility. For this purpose, a robust and low cost microfluidic platform was fabricated for achieving the mixing of proteins, crystallization reagents, and buffer in nanoliter volumes and the subsequent generation of nanodroplets by means of a two phase flow. The protein samples are compartmentalized inside droplets, each one acting as an isolated microreactor. Hence their physicochemical conditions (concentration, pH, etc.) can be finely tuned without cross-contamination, allowing the screening of a huge number of saturation conditions with a small amount of biological material. The droplet flow is synchronized with synchrotron radiation SAXS measurements to probe protein interactions while minimizing radiation damage. To this end, the experimental setup was tested with rasburicase (known to be very sensitive to denaturation), proving the structural stability of the protein in the droplets and the absence of radiation damage. Subsequently weak interaction variations as a function of protein saturation was studied for the model protein lysozime. The second virial coefficients (A2) were determined from the X-ray structure factors extrapolated to the origin. A2 obtained values were found to be in good agreement with data previously reported in literature but using only a few milligrams of protein. The experimental results presented here highlight the interest and convenience of using this methodology as a promising and potential candidate for studying protein interactions for the construction of phase diagrams.

  20. Technical Advance: Changes in neutrophil migration patterns upon contact with platelets in a microfluidic assay.

    PubMed

    Frydman, Galit H; Le, Anna; Ellett, Felix; Jorgensen, Julianne; Fox, James G; Tompkins, Ronald G; Irimia, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    Neutrophils are traditionally regarded as the "first responders" of the immune system. However, recent observations revealed that platelets often respond earlier to recruit and activate neutrophils within sites of injury and inflammation. Currently, platelet-neutrophil interactions are studied by intravital microscopy. Although such studies provide exceptional, physiologic in vivo data, they are also laborious and have low throughput. To accelerate platelet-neutrophil interaction studies, we have developed and optimized an ex vivo microfluidic platform with which the interactions between platelets and moving neutrophils are measured at single-cell level in precise conditions and with high throughput. With the use of this new assay, we have evaluated changes in neutrophil motility upon direct contact with platelets. Motility changes include longer distances traveled, frequent changes in direction, and faster neutrophil velocities compared with a standard motility response to chemoattractant fMLP. We also found that the neutrophil-platelet direct interactions are transient and mediated by CD62P-CD162 interactions, localized predominantly at the uropod of moving neutrophils. This "crawling," oscillatory neutrophil behavior upon platelet contact is consistent with previous in vivo studies and validates the use of this new test for the exploration of this interactive relationship.

  1. An in-line spectrophotometer on a centrifugal microfluidic platform for real-time protein determination and calibration.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhaoxiong; Zhang, Dongying; Wang, Guanghui; Tang, Minghui; Dong, Yumin; Zhang, Yixin; Ho, Ho-Pui; Zhang, Xuping

    2016-09-21

    In this paper, an in-line, low-cost, miniature and portable spectrophotometric detection system is presented and used for fast protein determination and calibration in centrifugal microfluidics. Our portable detection system is configured with paired emitter and detector diodes (PEDD), where the light beam between both LEDs is collimated with enhanced system tolerance. It is the first time that a physical model of PEDD is clearly presented, which could be modelled as a photosensitive RC oscillator. A portable centrifugal microfluidic system that contains a wireless port in real-time communication with a smartphone has been built to show that PEDD is an effective strategy for conducting rapid protein bioassays with detection performance comparable to that of a UV-vis spectrophotometer. The choice of centrifugal microfluidics offers the unique benefits of highly parallel fluidic actuation at high accuracy while there is no need for a pump, as inertial forces are present within the entire spinning disc and accurately controlled by varying the spinning speed. As a demonstration experiment, we have conducted the Bradford assay for bovine serum albumin (BSA) concentration calibration from 0 to 2 mg mL(-1). Moreover, a novel centrifugal disc with a spiral microchannel is proposed for automatic distribution and metering of the sample to all the parallel reactions at one time. The reported lab-on-a-disc scheme with PEDD detection may offer a solution for high-throughput assays, such as protein density calibration, drug screening and drug solubility measurement that require the handling of a large number of reactions in parallel.

  2. Finding protein-protein interaction patterns by contact map matching.

    PubMed

    Melo, R C; Ribeiro, C; Murray, C S; Veloso, C J M; da Silveira, C H; Neshich, G; Meira, W; Carceroni, R L; Santoro, M M

    2007-10-05

    We propose a novel method for defining patterns of contacts present in protein-protein complexes. A new use of the traditional contact maps (more frequently used for representation of the intra-chain contacts) is presented for analysis of inter-chain contacts. Using an algorithm based on image processing techniques, we can compare protein-protein interaction maps and also obtain a dissimilarity score between them. The same algorithm used to compare the maps can align the contacts of all the complexes and be helpful in the determination of a pattern of conserved interactions at the interfaces. We present an example for the application of this method by analyzing the pattern of interaction of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitors and trypsins, chymotrypsins, a thrombin, a matriptase, and a kallikrein - all classified as serine proteases. We found 20 contacts conserved in trypsins and chymotrypsins and 3 specific ones are present in all the serine protease complexes studied. The method was able to identify important contacts for the protein family studied and the results are in agreement with the literature.

  3. Versatile multiple protein nanopatterning within a microfluidic channel for cell recruitment studies.

    PubMed

    Andersen, A S; Zheng, W F; Sutherland, D S; Jiang, X Y

    2015-12-21

    A novel approach combining self-assembly-based colloidal lithography and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) micromolding to generate complex protein nanopatterns for studying the mechanisms of leukocyte extravasation within microchannels is presented. Nanostructured surfaces sealed onto PDMS-molded microchannels are chemically functionalized in situ in an all-aqueous process to generate bi-functional chemical nanopatterns. Subsequent co-immobilization with proteins makes use of common non-covalent coupling (e.g. HIS-tags, FC-tags and biotin-tags), giving nanopatterns of arbitrary combinations of oriented, functional proteins. Up to three different proteins were simultaneously co-immobilized into the microchannel with nanoscale precision, demonstrating the complex patterns. As a proof-of-principle, a mimic of an inflamed endothelium was constructed using a macro- and nanoscale pattern of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1) and P-selectin, and the response of leukocytes through live cell imaging was measured. A clear result on the rolling behavior of the cells was observed with rolling limited to areas where ICAM1 and P-selectin are present. This micro/nano-interface will open new doors to investigations of how spatial distributions of proteins control cellular activity.

  4. Microfluidic device, and related methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Eric W. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method of making a microfluidic device is provided. The method features patterning a permeable wall on a substrate, and surrounding the permeable wall with a solid, non-permeable boundary structure to establish a microfluidic channel having a cross-sectional dimension less than 5,000 microns and a cross-sectional area at least partially filled with the permeable wall so that fluid flowing through the microfluidic channel at least partially passes through the permeable wall.

  5. Magnetolithographic patterning of inner walls of a tube: a new dimension in microfluidics and sequential microreactors.

    PubMed

    Bardea, Amos; Baram, Aviad; Tatikonda, Anand Kumar; Naaman, Ron

    2009-12-30

    By applying magnetolithography it is possible to chemically pattern the inside of tubes. This new capability allows one to perform sequential processes within the tubes. Several enzymatic reactions are demonstrated.

  6. A PMMA microfluidic droplet platform for in vitro protein expression using crude E. coli S30 extract.

    PubMed

    Wu, N; Zhu, Y; Brown, S; Oakeshott, J; Peat, T S; Surjadi, R; Easton, C; Leech, P W; Sexton, B A

    2009-12-07

    Droplet based microfluidics are promising new tools for biological and chemical assays. In this paper, a high throughput and high sensitivity microfluidic droplet platform is described for in vitro protein expression using crude Escherichia coli S30 extract. A flow-focusing polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) microchip was designed and integrated with different functions involving droplet generation, storage, separation and detection. The material used for the chip is superior to the previously tested polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) due to its mechanical and chemical properties. Droplet formation characteristics such as size and generation rate are investigated systematically. The effect of surfactants Abil EM90 and Span80 in the oil phase on droplet formation and optical detection is also studied. The performance of the system is demonstrated by the high throughput and stable droplet generation and ultralow detection limit. The robustness of the system is also demonstrated by the successful synthesis of a green fluorescent protein (GFP) using E. coli S30 extract as a source of RNA translation reagents.

  7. Determination of cell metabolite VEGF₁₆₅ and dynamic analysis of protein-DNA interactions by combination of microfluidic technique and luminescent switch-on probe.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xuexia; Leung, Ka-Ho; Lin, Ling; Lin, Luyao; Lin, Sheng; Leung, Chung-Hang; Ma, Dik-Lung; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2016-05-15

    In this paper, we rationally design a novel G-quadruplex-selective luminescent iridium (III) complex for rapid detection of oligonucleotide and VEGF165 in microfluidics. This new probe is applied as a convenient biosensor for label-free quantitative analysis of VEGF165 protein from cell metabolism, as well as for studying the kinetics of the aptamer-protein interaction combination with a microfluidic platform. As a result, we have successfully established a quantitative analysis of VEGF165 from cell metabolism. Furthermore, based on the principles of hydrodynamic focusing and diffusive mixing, different transient states during kinetics process were monitored and recorded. Thus, the combination of microfluidic technique and G-quadruplex luminescent probe will be potentially applied in the studies of intramolecular interactions and molecule recognition in the future.

  8. Monitoring the Differentiation and Migration Patterns of Neural Cells Derived from Human Embryonic Stem Cells Using a Microfluidic Culture System

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nayeon; Park, Jae Woo; Kim, Hyung Joon; Yeon, Ju Hun; Kwon, Jihye; Ko, Jung Jae; Oh, Seung-Hun; Kim, Hyun Sook; Kim, Aeri; Han, Baek Soo; Lee, Sang Chul; Jeon, Noo Li; Song, Jihwan

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidics can provide unique experimental tools to visualize the development of neural structures within a microscale device, which is followed by guidance of neurite growth in the axonal isolation compartment. We utilized microfluidics technology to monitor the differentiation and migration of neural cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). We co-cultured hESCs with PA6 stromal cells, and isolated neural rosette-like structures, which subsequently formed neurospheres in suspension culture. Tuj1-positive neural cells, but not nestin-positive neural precursor cells (NPCs), were able to enter the microfluidics grooves (microchannels), suggesting that neural cell-migratory capacity was dependent upon neuronal differentiation stage. We also showed that bundles of axons formed and extended into the microchannels. Taken together, these results demonstrated that microfluidics technology can provide useful tools to study neurite outgrowth and axon guidance of neural cells, which are derived from human embryonic stem cells. PMID:24938227

  9. Monitoring the differentiation and migration patterns of neural cells derived from human embryonic stem cells using a microfluidic culture system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nayeon; Park, Jae Woo; Kim, Hyung Joon; Yeon, Ju Hun; Kwon, Jihye; Ko, Jung Jae; Oh, Seung-Hun; Kim, Hyun Sook; Kim, Aeri; Han, Baek Soo; Lee, Sang Chul; Jeon, Noo Li; Song, Jihwan

    2014-06-01

    Microfluidics can provide unique experimental tools to visualize the development of neural structures within a microscale device, which is followed by guidance of neurite growth in the axonal isolation compartment. We utilized microfluidics technology to monitor the differentiation and migration of neural cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). We co-cultured hESCs with PA6 stromal cells, and isolated neural rosette-like structures, which subsequently formed neurospheres in suspension culture. Tuj1-positive neural cells, but not nestin-positive neural precursor cells (NPCs), were able to enter the microfluidics grooves (microchannels), suggesting that neural cell-migratory capacity was dependent upon neuronal differentiation stage. We also showed that bundles of axons formed and extended into the microchannels. Taken together, these results demonstrated that microfluidics technology can provide useful tools to study neurite outgrowth and axon guidance of neural cells, which are derived from human embryonic stem cells.

  10. Sedimentation Patterns of Rapidly Reversible Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Schuck, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The transport behavior of macromolecular mixtures with rapidly reversible complex formation is of great interest in the study of protein interactions by many different methods. Complicated transport patterns arise even for simple bimolecular reactions, when all species exhibit different migration velocities. Although partial differential equations are available to describe the spatial and temporal evolution of the interacting system given particular initial conditions, a general overview of the phase behavior of the systems in parameter space has not yet been reported. In the case of sedimentation of two-component mixtures, this study presents simple analytical solutions that solve the underlying equations in the diffusion-free limit previously subject to Gilbert-Jenkins theory. The new expressions describe, with high precision, the average sedimentation coefficients and composition of each boundary, which allow the examination of features of the whole parameter space at once, and may be used for experimental design and robust analysis of experimental boundary patterns to derive the stoichiometry and affinity of the complex. This study finds previously unrecognized features, including a phase transition between boundary patterns. The model reveals that the time-average velocities of all components in the reaction mixture must match—a condition that suggests an intuitive physical picture of an effective particle of the coupled cosedimentation of an interacting system. Adding to the existing numerical solutions of the relevant partial differential equations, the effective particle model provides physical insights into the relationships of the parameters that govern sedimentation patterns. PMID:20441765

  11. Microfluidic networks embedded in a printed circuit board

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Liangwei; Hu, Yueli

    2017-07-01

    In order to improve the robustness of microfluidic networks in printed circuit board (PCB)-based microfluidic platforms, a new method was presented. A pattern in a PCB was formed using hollowed-out technology. Polydimethylsiloxane was partly filled in the hollowed-out fields after mounting an adhesive tape on the bottom of the PCB, and solidified in an oven. Then, microfluidic networks were built using soft lithography technology. Microfluidic transportation and dilution operations were demonstrated using the fabricated microfluidic platform. Results show that this method can embed microfluidic networks into a PCB, and microfluidic operations can be implemented in the microfluidic networks embedded into the PCB.

  12. DETECTION OF TOPOLOGICAL PATTERNS IN PROTEIN NETWORKS.

    SciTech Connect

    MASLOV,S.SNEPPEN,K.

    2003-11-17

    property of many biological networks that was recently brought to attention of the scientific community [3, 4, 5] is an extremely broad distribution of node connectivities defined as the number of immediate neighbors of a given node in the network. While the majority of nodes have just a few edges connecting them to other nodes in the network, there exist some nodes, that we will refer to as ''hubs'', with an unusually large number of neighbors. The connectivity of the most connected hub in such a network is typically several orders of magnitude larger than the average connectivity in the network. Often the distribution of connectivities of individual nodes can be approximated by a scale-free power law form [3] in which case the network is referred to as scale-free. Among biological networks distributions of node connectivities in metabolic [4], protein interaction [5], and brain functional [6] networks can be reasonably approximated by a power law extending for several orders of magnitude. The set of connectivities of individual nodes is an example of a low-level (single-node) topological property of a network. While it answers the question about how many neighbors a given node has, it gives no information about the identity of those neighbors. It is clear that most functional properties of networks are defined at a higher topological level in the exact pattern of connections of nodes to each other. However, such multi-node connectivity patterns are rather difficult to quantify and compare between networks. In this work we concentrate on multi-node topological properties of protein networks. These networks (as any other biological networks) lack the top-down design. Instead, selective forces of biological evolution shape them from raw material provided by random events such as mutations within individual genes, and gene duplications. As a result their connections are characterized by a large degree of randomness. One may wonder which connectivity patterns are indeed

  13. Suspended microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Casavant, Benjamin P; Berthier, Erwin; Theberge, Ashleigh B; Berthier, Jean; Montanez-Sauri, Sara I; Bischel, Lauren L; Brakke, Kenneth; Hedman, Curtis J; Bushman, Wade; Keller, Nancy P; Beebe, David J

    2013-06-18

    Although the field of microfluidics has made significant progress in bringing new tools to address biological questions, the accessibility and adoption of microfluidics within the life sciences are still limited. Open microfluidic systems have the potential to lower the barriers to adoption, but the absence of robust design rules has hindered their use. Here, we present an open microfluidic platform, suspended microfluidics, that uses surface tension to fill and maintain a fluid in microscale structures devoid of a ceiling and floor. We developed a simple and ubiquitous model predicting fluid flow in suspended microfluidic systems and show that it encompasses many known capillary phenomena. Suspended microfluidics was used to create arrays of collagen membranes, mico Dots (μDots), in a horizontal plane separating two fluidic chambers, demonstrating a transwell platform able to discern collective or individual cellular invasion. Further, we demonstrated that μDots can also be used as a simple multiplexed 3D cellular growth platform. Using the μDot array, we probed the combined effects of soluble factors and matrix components, finding that laminin mitigates the growth suppression properties of the matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor GM6001. Based on the same fluidic principles, we created a suspended microfluidic metabolite extraction platform using a multilayer biphasic system that leverages the accessibility of open microchannels to retrieve steroids and other metabolites readily from cell culture. Suspended microfluidics brings the high degree of fluidic control and unique functionality of closed microfluidics into the highly accessible and robust platform of open microfluidics.

  14. Suspended microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Casavant, Benjamin P.; Berthier, Erwin; Theberge, Ashleigh B.; Berthier, Jean; Montanez-Sauri, Sara I.; Bischel, Lauren L.; Brakke, Kenneth; Hedman, Curtis J.; Bushman, Wade; Keller, Nancy P.; Beebe, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Although the field of microfluidics has made significant progress in bringing new tools to address biological questions, the accessibility and adoption of microfluidics within the life sciences are still limited. Open microfluidic systems have the potential to lower the barriers to adoption, but the absence of robust design rules has hindered their use. Here, we present an open microfluidic platform, suspended microfluidics, that uses surface tension to fill and maintain a fluid in microscale structures devoid of a ceiling and floor. We developed a simple and ubiquitous model predicting fluid flow in suspended microfluidic systems and show that it encompasses many known capillary phenomena. Suspended microfluidics was used to create arrays of collagen membranes, mico Dots (μDots), in a horizontal plane separating two fluidic chambers, demonstrating a transwell platform able to discern collective or individual cellular invasion. Further, we demonstrated that μDots can also be used as a simple multiplexed 3D cellular growth platform. Using the μDot array, we probed the combined effects of soluble factors and matrix components, finding that laminin mitigates the growth suppression properties of the matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor GM6001. Based on the same fluidic principles, we created a suspended microfluidic metabolite extraction platform using a multilayer biphasic system that leverages the accessibility of open microchannels to retrieve steroids and other metabolites readily from cell culture. Suspended microfluidics brings the high degree of fluidic control and unique functionality of closed microfluidics into the highly accessible and robust platform of open microfluidics. PMID:23729815

  15. A critical insight into the development pipeline of microfluidic immunoassay devices for the sensitive quantitation of protein biomarkers at the point of care.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Ana I; Reis, Nuno M

    2017-03-13

    The latest clinical procedures for the timely and cost-effective diagnosis of chronic and acute clinical conditions, such as cardiovascular diseases, cancer, chronic respiratory diseases, diabetes or sepsis (i.e. the biggest causes of death worldwide), involve the quantitation of specific protein biomarkers released into the blood stream or other physiological fluids (e.g. urine or saliva). The clinical thresholds are usually in the femtomolar to picolomar range, and consequently the measurement of these protein biomarkers heavily relies on highly sophisticated, bulky and automated equipment in centralised pathology laboratories. The first microfluidic devices capable of measuring protein biomarkers in miniaturised immunoassays were presented nearly two decades ago and promised to revolutionise point-of-care (POC) testing by offering unmatched sensitivity and automation in a compact POC format; however, the development and adoption of microfluidic protein biomarker tests has fallen behind expectations. This review presents a detailed critical overview into the pipeline of microfluidic devices developed in the period 2005-2016 capable of measuring protein biomarkers from the pM to fM range in formats compatible with POC testing, with a particular focus on the use of affordable microfluidic materials and compact low-cost signal interrogation. The integration of these two important features (essential unique selling points for the successful microfluidic diagnostic products) has been missed in previous review articles and explain the poor adoption of microfluidic technologies in this field. Most current miniaturised devices compromise either on the affordability, compactness and/or performance of the test, making current tests unsuitable for the POC measurement of protein biomarkers. Seven core technical areas, including (i) the selected strategy for antibody immobilisation, (ii) the surface area and surface-area-to-volume ratio, (iii) surface passivation, (iv) the

  16. New developments in protein structure-function analysis by MS and use of hydrogen-deuterium exchange microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Landreh, Michael; Astorga-Wells, Juan; Johansson, Jan; Bergman, Tomas; Jörnvall, Hans

    2011-10-01

    The study of protein structure and function has evolved to become a leading discipline in the biophysical sciences. Although it is not yet possible to determine 3D protein structures from MS data alone, multiple MS-based techniques can be combined to obtain structural and functional data that are complementary to classical protein structure information obtained from NMR or X-ray crystallography. Monitoring gas-phase interactions of noncovalent complexes yields information on binding constants, complex stability, and the nature of interactions. Ion mobility MS and chemical crosslinking strategies can be applied to probe the architecture of macromolecular assemblies and protein-ligand complexes. MS analysis of hydrogen-deuterium exchange can be used to determine the localization of secondary structure elements, binding sites and conformational dynamics of proteins in solution. This minireview focuses first on new strategies that combine these techniques to gain insights into protein structure and function. Using one such strategy, we then demonstrate how a novel hydrogen-deuterium exchange microfluidics tool can be used online with an ESI mass spectrometer to monitor regional accessibility in a peptide, as exemplified with amyloid-β peptide 1-40.

  17. Microfluidic electronics.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shi; Wu, Zhigang

    2012-08-21

    Microfluidics, a field that has been well-established for several decades, has seen extensive applications in the areas of biology, chemistry, and medicine. However, it might be very hard to imagine how such soft microfluidic devices would be used in other areas, such as electronics, in which stiff, solid metals, insulators, and semiconductors have previously dominated. Very recently, things have radically changed. Taking advantage of native properties of microfluidics, advances in microfluidics-based electronics have shown great potential in numerous new appealing applications, e.g. bio-inspired devices, body-worn healthcare and medical sensing systems, and ergonomic units, in which conventional rigid, bulky electronics are facing insurmountable obstacles to fulfil the demand on comfortable user experience. Not only would the birth of microfluidic electronics contribute to both the microfluidics and electronics fields, but it may also shape the future of our daily life. Nevertheless, microfluidic electronics are still at a very early stage, and significant efforts in research and development are needed to advance this emerging field. The intention of this article is to review recent research outcomes in the field of microfluidic electronics, and address current technical challenges and issues. The outlook of future development in microfluidic electronic devices and systems, as well as new fabrication techniques, is also discussed. Moreover, the authors would like to inspire both the microfluidics and electronics communities to further exploit this newly-established field.

  18. A cyclic-olefin-copolymer microfluidic immobilized-enzyme reactor for rapid digestion of proteins from dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Wouters, Bert; Dapic, Irena; Valkenburg, Thalassa S E; Wouters, Sam; Niezen, Leon; Eeltink, Sebastiaan; Corthals, Garry L; Schoenmakers, Peter J

    2017-03-31

    A critical step in the bottom-up characterization of proteomes is the conversion of proteins to peptides, by means of endoprotease digestion. Nowadays this method typically uses overnight digestion and as such represents a considerable bottleneck for high-throughput analysis. This report describes protein digestion using an immobilized-enzyme reactor (IMER), which enables accelerated digestion times that are completed within seconds to minutes. For rapid digestion to occur, a cyclic-olefin-copolymer microfluidic reactor was constructed containing trypsin immobilized on a polymer monolithic material through a 2-vinyl-4,4-dimethylazlactone linker. The IMER was applied for the rapid offline digestion of both singular protein standards and a complex protein mixture prior to liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) analysis. The effects of protein concentration and residence time in the IMER were assessed for protein standards of varying molecular weight between 11 and 240kDa. Compared to traditional in-solution digestion, IMER-facilitated protein digestion at room temperature for 5min yielded similar results in terms of sequence coverage and number of identified peptides. Good repeatability was demonstrated with a relative standard deviation of 6% for protein-sequence coverage. The potential of the IMER was also demonstrated for a complex protein mixture in the analysis of dried blood spots. Compared to a traditional workflow a similar number of proteins could be identified, while reducing the total analysis time from 22.5h to 4h and importantly omitting the sample-pre-treatment steps (denaturation, reduction, and alkylation). The identified proteins from two workflows showed similar distributions in terms of molecular weight and hydrophobic character. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Simple Host—Guest Chemistry To Modulate the Process of Concentration and Crystallization of Membrane Proteins by Detergent Capture in a Microfluidic Device

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liang; Nachtergaele, Sigrid; Seddon, Annela M.; Tereshko, Valentina; Ponomarenko, Nina; Ismagilov, Rustem F.

    2008-01-01

    This paper utilizes cyclodextrin-based host—guest chemistry in a microfluidic device to modulate the crystallization of membrane proteins and the process of concentration of membrane protein samples. Methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MBCD) can efficiently capture a wide variety of detergents commonly used for the stabilization of membrane proteins by sequestering detergent monomers. Reaction Center (RC) from Blastochloris viridis was used here as a model system. In the process of concentrating membrane protein samples, MBCD was shown to break up free detergent micelles and prevent them from being concentrated. The addition of an optimal amount of MBCD to the RC sample captured loosely bound detergent from the protein-detergent complex and improved sample homogeneity, as characterized by dynamic light scattering. Using plug-based microfluidics, RC crystals were grown in the presence of MBCD, giving a different morphology and space group than crystals grown without MBCD. The crystal structure of RC crystallized in the presence of MBCD was consistent with the changes in packing and crystal contacts hypothesized for removal of loosely bound detergent. The incorporation of MBCD into a plug-based microfluidic crystallization method allows efficient use of limited membrane protein sample by reducing the amount of protein required and combining sparse matrix screening and optimization in one experiment. The use of MBCD for detergent capture can be expanded to develop cyclodextrin-derived molecules for fine-tuned detergent capture and thus modulate membrane protein crystallization in an even more controllable way. PMID:18831551

  20. Simple Host−Guest Chemistry To Modulate the Process of Concentration and Crystallization of Membrane Proteins by Detergent Capture in a Microfluidic Device

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Liang; Nachtergaele, Sigrid; Seddon, Annela M.; Tereshko, Valentina; Ponomarenko, Nina; Ismagilov, Rustem F.

    2009-01-15

    This paper utilizes cyclodextrin-based host-guest chemistry in a microfluidic device to modulate the crystallization of membrane proteins and the process of concentration of membrane protein samples. Methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin (MBCD) can efficiently capture a wide variety of detergents commonly used for the stabilization of membrane proteins by sequestering detergent monomers. Reaction Center (RC) from Blastochloris viridis was used here as a model system. In the process of concentrating membrane protein samples, MBCD was shown to break up free detergent micelles and prevent them from being concentrated. The addition of an optimal amount of MBCD to the RC sample captured loosely bound detergent from the protein-detergent complex and improved sample homogeneity, as characterized by dynamic light scattering. Using plug-based microfluidics, RC crystals were grown in the presence of MBCD, giving a different morphology and space group than crystals grown without MBCD. The crystal structure of RC crystallized in the presence of MBCD was consistent with the changes in packing and crystal contacts hypothesized for removal of loosely bound detergent. The incorporation of MBCD into a plug-based microfluidic crystallization method allows efficient use of limited membrane protein sample by reducing the amount of protein required and combining sparse matrix screening and optimization in one experiment. The use of MBCD for detergent capture can be expanded to develop cyclodextrin-derived molecules for fine-tuned detergent capture and thus modulate membrane protein crystallization in an even more controllable way.

  1. Surface acoustic wave microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xiaoyun; Li, Peng; Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Stratton, Zackary S.; Nama, Nitesh; Guo, Feng; Slotcavage, Daniel; Mao, Xiaole; Shi, Jinjie; Costanzo, Francesco; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-01

    The recent introduction of surface acoustic wave (SAW) technology onto lab-on-a-chip platforms has opened a new frontier in microfluidics. The advantages provided by such SAW microfluidics are numerous: simple fabrication, high biocompatibility, fast fluid actuation, versatility, compact and inexpensive devices and accessories, contact-free particle manipulation, and compatibility with other microfluidic components. We believe that these advantages enable SAW microfluidics to play a significant role in a variety of applications in biology, chemistry, engineering, and medicine. In this review article, we discuss the theory underpinning SAWs and their interactions with particles and the contacting fluids in which they are suspended. We then review the SAW-enabled microfluidic devices demonstrated to date, starting with devices that accomplish fluid mixing and transport through the use of travelling SAW; we follow that by reviewing the more recent innovations achieved with standing SAW that enable such actions as particle/cell focusing, sorting, and patterning. Finally, we look forward and appraise where the discipline of SAW microfluidics could go next. PMID:23900527

  2. Surface acoustic wave microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiaoyun; Li, Peng; Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Stratton, Zackary S; Nama, Nitesh; Guo, Feng; Slotcavage, Daniel; Mao, Xiaole; Shi, Jinjie; Costanzo, Francesco; Huang, Tony Jun

    2013-09-21

    The recent introduction of surface acoustic wave (SAW) technology onto lab-on-a-chip platforms has opened a new frontier in microfluidics. The advantages provided by such SAW microfluidics are numerous: simple fabrication, high biocompatibility, fast fluid actuation, versatility, compact and inexpensive devices and accessories, contact-free particle manipulation, and compatibility with other microfluidic components. We believe that these advantages enable SAW microfluidics to play a significant role in a variety of applications in biology, chemistry, engineering and medicine. In this review article, we discuss the theory underpinning SAWs and their interactions with particles and the contacting fluids in which they are suspended. We then review the SAW-enabled microfluidic devices demonstrated to date, starting with devices that accomplish fluid mixing and transport through the use of travelling SAW; we follow that by reviewing the more recent innovations achieved with standing SAW that enable such actions as particle/cell focusing, sorting and patterning. Finally, we look forward and appraise where the discipline of SAW microfluidics could go next.

  3. Electro-Microfluidic Packaging

    SciTech Connect

    BENAVIDES, GILBERT L.; GALAMBOS, PAUL C.

    2002-06-01

    Electro-microfluidics is experiencing explosive growth in new product developments. There are many commercial applications for electro-microfluidic devices such as chemical sensors, biological sensors, and drop ejectors for both printing and chemical analysis. The number of silicon surface micromachined electro-microfluidic products is likely to increase. Manufacturing efficiency and integration of microfluidics with electronics will become important. Surface micromachined microfluidic devices are manufactured with the same tools as IC's (integrated circuits) and their fabrication can be incorporated into the IC fabrication process. In order to realize applications for devices must be developed. An Electro-Microfluidic Dual In-line Package (EMDIP{trademark}) was developed surface micromachined electro-microfluidic devices, a practical method for getting fluid into these to be a standard solution that allows for both the electrical and the fluidic connections needed to operate a great variety of electro-microfluidic devices. The EMDIP{trademark} includes a fan-out manifold that, on one side, mates directly with the 200 micron diameter Bosch etched holes found on the device, and, on the other side, mates to lager 1 mm diameter holes. To minimize cost the EMDIP{trademark} can be injection molded in a great variety of thermoplastics which also serve to optimize fluid compatibility. The EMDIP{trademark} plugs directly into a fluidic printed wiring board using a standard dual in-line package pattern for the electrical connections and having a grid of multiple 1 mm diameter fluidic connections to mate to the underside of the EMDIP{trademark}.

  4. Automatic disease screening method using image processing for dried blood microfluidic drop stain pattern recognition.

    PubMed

    Sikarwar, Basant S; Roy, Mukesh; Ranjan, Priya; Goyal, Ayush

    2016-07-01

    This paper examines programmed automatic recognition of infection from samples of dried stains of micro-scale drops of patient blood. This technique has the upside of being low-cost and less-intrusive and not requiring puncturing the patient with a needle for drawing blood, which is especially critical for infants and the matured. It also does not require expensive pathological blood test laboratory equipment. The method is shown in this work to be successful for ailment identification in patients suffering from tuberculosis and anaemia. Illness affects the physical properties of blood, which thus influence the samples of dried micro-scale blood drop stains. For instance, if a patient has a severe drop in platelet count, which is often the case of dengue or malaria patients, the blood's physical property of viscosity drops substantially, i.e. the blood is thinner. Thus, the blood micro-scale drop stain samples can be utilised for diagnosing maladies. This paper presents programmed automatic examination of the dried micro-scale drop blood stain designs utilising an algorithm based on pattern recognition. The samples of micro-scale blood drop stains of ordinary non-infected people are clearly recognisable as well as the samples of micro-scale blood drop stains of sick people, due to key distinguishing features. As a contextual analysis, the micro-scale blood drop stains of patients infected with tuberculosis have been contrasted with the micro-scale blood drop stains of typical normal healthy people. The paper dives into the fundamental flow mechanics behind how the samples of the dried micro-scale blood drop stain is shaped. What has been found is a thick ring like feature in the dried micro-scale blood drop stains of non-ailing people and thin shape like lines in the dried micro-scale blood drop stains of patients with anaemia or tuberculosis disease. The ring like feature at the periphery is caused by an outward stream conveying suspended particles to the edge

  5. Control of crystal polymorph in microfluidics using molluscan 28 kDa Ca²(+)-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Ji, Bozhi; Cusack, Maggie; Freer, Andy; Dobson, Phil S; Gadegaard, Nikolaj; Yin, Huabing

    2010-10-01

    Biominerals produced by biological systems in physiologically relevant environments possess extraordinary properties that are often difficult to replicate under laboratory conditions. Understanding the mechanism that underlies the process of biomineralisation can lead to novel strategies in the development of advanced materials. Using microfluidics, we have demonstrated for the first time, that an extrapallial (EP) 28 kDa protein, located in the extrapallial compartment between mantle and shell of Mytilus edulis, can influence, at both micro- and nanoscopic levels, the morphology, structure and polymorph that is laid down in the shell ultrastructure. Crucially, this influence is predominantly dependent on the existence of an EP protein concentration gradient and its consecutive interaction with Ca²(+) ions. Novel lemon-shaped hollow vaterite structures with a clearly defined nanogranular assembly occur only where particular EP protein and Ca²(+) gradients co-exist. Computational fluid dynamics enabled the progress of the reaction to be mapped and the influence of concentration gradients across the device to be calculated. Importantly, these findings could not have been observed using conventional bulk mixing methods. Our findings not only provide direct experimental evidence of the potential influence of EP proteins in crystal formation, but also offer a new biomimetic strategy to develop functional biomaterials for applications such as encapsulation and drug delivery.

  6. Wax-bonding 3D microfluidic chips.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiuqing; Yi, Xin; Xiao, Kang; Li, Shunbo; Kodzius, Rimantas; Qin, Jianhua; Wen, Weijia

    2010-10-07

    We report a simple, low-cost and detachable microfluidic chip incorporating easily accessible paper, glass slides or other polymer films as the chip materials along with adhesive wax as the recycling bonding material. We use a laser to cut through the paper or film to form patterns and then sandwich the paper and film between glass sheets or polymer membranes. The hot-melt adhesive wax can realize bridge bonding between various materials, for example, paper, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) film, glass sheets, or metal plate. The bonding process is reversible and the wax is reusable through a melting and cooling process. With this process, a three-dimensional (3D) microfluidic chip is achievable by vacuating and venting the chip in a hot-water bath. To study the biocompatibility and applicability of the wax-based microfluidic chip, we tested the PCR compatibility with the chip materials first. Then we applied the wax-paper based microfluidic chip to HeLa cell electroporation (EP). Subsequently, a prototype of a 5-layer 3D chip was fabricated by multilayer wax bonding. To check the sealing ability and the durability of the chip, green fluorescence protein (GFP) recombinant Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria were cultured, with which the chemotaxis of E. coli was studied in order to determine the influence of antibiotic ciprofloxacin concentration on the E. coli migration.

  7. Microfluidic Diffusion Analysis of the Sizes and Interactions of Proteins under Native Solution Conditions.

    PubMed

    Arosio, Paolo; Müller, Thomas; Rajah, Luke; Yates, Emma V; Aprile, Francesco A; Zhang, Yingbo; Cohen, Samuel I A; White, Duncan A; Herling, Therese W; De Genst, Erwin J; Linse, Sara; Vendruscolo, Michele; Dobson, Christopher M; Knowles, Tuomas P J

    2016-01-26

    Characterizing the sizes and interactions of macromolecules under native conditions is a challenging problem in many areas of molecular sciences, which fundamentally arises from the polydisperse nature of biomolecular mixtures. Here, we describe a microfluidic platform for diffusional sizing based on monitoring micron-scale mass transport simultaneously in space and time. We show that the global analysis of such combined space-time data enables the hydrodynamic radii of individual species within mixtures to be determined directly by deconvoluting average signals into the contributions from the individual species. We demonstrate that the ability to perform rapid noninvasive sizing allows this method to be used to characterize interactions between biomolecules under native conditions. We illustrate the potential of the technique by implementing a single-step quantitative immunoassay that operates on a time scale of seconds and detects specific interactions between biomolecules within complex mixtures.

  8. PDMS bonding to a bio-friendly photoresist via self-polymerized poly(dopamine) adhesive for complex protein micropatterning inside microfluidic channels.

    PubMed

    Kim, Miju; Song, Kwang Hoon; Doh, Junsang

    2013-12-01

    Protein micropatterned surfaces integrated with microfluidics are useful in numerous bioanalytical and biological applications. In this study, we demonstrated the fabrication of complex protein micropatterned surfaces within poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microfluidic channels by attaching the PDMS channels to bio-friendly photoresist films and subsequently performing microscope projection photolithography (MPP). A muscle-inspired poly(dopamine) (PDA) coating was employed to mediate the bonding between the PDMS and the bio-friendly photoresist poly(2,2-dimethoxy nitrobenzyl methacrylate-r-methyl methacrylate-r-poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate) (PDMP). By adjusting the dip-coating time for the PDA coating, we could successfully introduce sufficient amounts of functional groups on the PDMP surfaces to mediate strong bonding between the PDMS channels and the PDA-coated PDMP thin films with minimal alteration of the surface properties of the PDMP thin films that are critical for protein micropatterning. Using this novel bonding strategy, we successfully fabricated multiple protein micropatterns and gradient micropatterns of proteins within microfluidic channels. The technique developed in this study will be useful for the fabrication of complex biochips for multiplex bioassays and fundamental cell biological studies.

  9. Spectroscopic Analysis of Red Fluorescent Proteins and Development of a Microfluidic Cell Sorter for the Generation of Improved Variants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubbeck, Jennifer L.

    The discovery of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) launched the development of a wide variety of fluorescent protein (FP) mutants whose spectral and photophysical diversity revolutionized in vivo imaging. The excitation and emission spectra of red fluorescent proteins (RFPs), in particular, have been ideally tuned to a window optically favorable for in vivo work. However, their quantum yields, photostabilities and fluorescence intermittency properties require improvement if they are to be broadly employed for low-copy or single-molecule measurements. Attempts to engineer improved RFPs often result in optimization of one photophysical property at the expense of others. We developed a microfluidic-based cytometer for screening HeLa cell-based genetic RFP-libraries simultaneously on the basis of fluorescence lifetime (a proxy for quantum yield), photostability, and brightness. Ten 532 nm excitation beams interrogate each cell in flow. The first is electro-optically modulated (30 MHz) to enable lifetime measurement with phase fluorimetry. The remaining beams act as a pulse sequence for isolating the irreversible photobleaching time constant. Optical-force switching is employed to sort cells based on any combination of the photophysical parameters. Screening with this instrument enables identification of regions of the structure that synergistically affect quantum yield and photostability and the sorting capability provides a new tool for accelerating the development of next generation RFPs.

  10. Liquid metal enabled microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Tang, Shi-Yang; Zhu, Jiu Yang; Schaefer, Samira; Mitchell, Arnan; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh; Dickey, Michael D

    2017-03-14

    Several gallium-based liquid metal alloys are liquid at room temperature. As 'liquid', such alloys have a low viscosity and a high surface tension while as 'metal', they have high thermal and electrical conductivities, similar to mercury. However, unlike mercury, these liquid metal alloys have low toxicity and a negligible vapor pressure, rendering them much safer. In comparison to mercury, the distinguishing feature of these alloys is the rapid formation of a self-limiting atomically thin layer of gallium oxide over their surface when exposed to oxygen. This oxide layer changes many physical and chemical properties of gallium alloys, including their interfacial and rheological properties, which can be employed and modulated for various applications in microfluidics. Injecting liquid metal into microfluidic structures has been extensively used to pattern and encapsulate highly deformable and reconfigurable electronic devices including electrodes, sensors, antennas, and interconnects. Likewise, the unique features of liquid metals have been employed for fabricating miniaturized microfluidic components including pumps, valves, heaters, and electrodes. In this review, we discuss liquid metal enabled microfluidic components, and highlight their desirable attributes including simple fabrication, facile integration, stretchability, reconfigurability, and low power consumption, with promising applications for highly integrated microfluidic systems.

  11. Measuring dynamics in weakly structured regions of proteins using microfluidics-enabled subsecond H/D exchange mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rob, Tamanna; Liuni, Peter; Gill, Preet Kamal; Zhu, Shaolong; Balachandran, Naresh; Berti, Paul J; Wilson, Derek J

    2012-04-17

    This work introduces an integrated microfluidic device for measuring rapid H/D exchange (HDX) in proteins. By monitoring backbone amide HDX on the millisecond to low second time scale, we are able to characterize conformational dynamics in weakly structured regions, such as loops and molten globule-like domains that are inaccessible in conventional HDX experiments. The device accommodates the entire MS-based HDX workflow on a single chip with residence times sufficiently small (ca. 8 s) that back-exchange is negligible (≤5%), even without cooling. Components include an adjustable position capillary mixer providing a variable-time labeling pulse, a static mixer for HDX quenching, a proteolytic microreactor for rapid protein digestion, and on-chip electrospray ionization (ESI). In the present work, we characterize device performance using three model systems, each illustrating a different application of 'time-resolved' HDX. Ubiquitin is used to illustrate a crude, high throughput structural analysis based on a single subsecond HDX time-point. In experiments using cytochrome c, we distinguish dynamic behavior in loops, establishing a link between flexibility and interactions with the heme prosthetic group. Finally, we localize an unusually high 'burst-phase' of HDX in the large tetrameric enzyme DAHP synthase to a 'molten globule-like' region surrounding the active site.

  12. A novel microfluidic mixer based on dual-hydrodynamic focusing for interrogating the kinetics of DNA-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Xu, Fei; Liu, Chao; Xu, Youzhi; Feng, Xiaojun; Liu, Bi-Feng

    2013-08-21

    Kinetic measurement of biomacromolecular interaction plays a significant role in revealing the underlying mechanisms of cellular activities. Due to the small diffusion coefficient of biomacromolecules, it is difficult to resolve the rapid kinetic process with traditional analytical methods such as stopped-flow or laminar mixers. Here, we demonstrated a unique continuous-flow laminar mixer based on microfluidic dual-hydrodynamic focusing to characterize the kinetics of DNA-protein interactions. The time window of this mixer for kinetics observation could cover from sub-milliseconds to seconds, which made it possible to capture the folding process with a wide dynamic range. Moreover, the sample consumption was remarkably reduced to <0.55 μL min⁻¹, over 1000-fold saving in comparison to those reported previously. We further interrogated the interaction kinetics of G-quadruplex and the single-stranded DNA binding protein, indicating that this novel micromixer would be a useful approach for analyzing the interaction kinetics of biomacromolecules.

  13. Microfluidics experiments of dissolution in a fracture. Influence of Damköhler and Péclet numbers, and of the geometry on the dissolution pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osselin, Florian; Budek, Agnieszka; Cybulski, Olgierd; Szymczak, Piotr

    2015-04-01

    Dissolution of natural rocks is an ever present phenomenon in nature. The shaping of natural landscapes by the dissolution of limestone gives for example birth to exceptional features like karsts. Currently dissolution is also at the heart of key research topics as Carbon Capture and Storage or Enhanced Oil Recovery. The basics principles of dissolution are well-known, however, the sheer amount of different patterns arising from these mechanisms and the strong dependency on parameters such as pore network, chemical composition and flow rate, make it particularly difficult to study theoretically and experimentally. In this study we present a microfluidic experiment simulating the behavior of a dissolving fluid in a fracture. The experiments consist of a chip of gyspum inserted between two polycarbonate plates and subjected to a constant flow rate of pure water. The point in using microfluidics is that it allows a complete control on the experimental parameters such as geometry and chemical composition of the porous medium, flow rate, fracture aperture, roughness of the fracture walls, and an in situ observation of the geometry evolution which is impossible with 3D natural rocks. Thanks to our experiments we have been able to cover the whole range of dissolution patterns, from wormholing or DLA fingering to homogeneous dissolution, by changing Péclet and Damköhler numbers. Moreover, we have been able to tweak the geometry of our artificial fracture, inserting finger seeds or non-dissolvable obstacles. The comparison of the experimental patterns with the numerical dissolution code dissol (Szymczak and Ladd 2011) has then shown a very good correlation of the patterns, giving confidence in both experiments and modeling.

  14. Conservation of complex knotting and slipknotting patterns in proteins.

    PubMed

    Sułkowska, Joanna I; Rawdon, Eric J; Millett, Kenneth C; Onuchic, Jose N; Stasiak, Andrzej

    2012-06-26

    While analyzing all available protein structures for the presence of knots and slipknots, we detected a strict conservation of complex knotting patterns within and between several protein families despite their large sequence divergence. Because protein folding pathways leading to knotted native protein structures are slower and less efficient than those leading to unknotted proteins with similar size and sequence, the strict conservation of the knotting patterns indicates an important physiological role of knots and slipknots in these proteins. Although little is known about the functional role of knots, recent studies have demonstrated a protein-stabilizing ability of knots and slipknots. Some of the conserved knotting patterns occur in proteins forming transmembrane channels where the slipknot loop seems to strap together the transmembrane helices forming the channel.

  15. PHOTOLITHOGRAPHY-FREE LASER-PATTERNED HF ACID-RESISTANT CHROMIUM-POLYIMIDE MASK FOR RAPID FABRICATION OF MICROFLUIDIC SYSTEMS IN GLASS.

    PubMed

    Zamuruyev, Konstantin O; Zrodnikov, Yuriy; Davis, Cristina E

    2017-01-01

    Excellent chemical and physical properties of glass, over a range of operating conditions, make it a preferred material for chemical detection systems in analytical chemistry, biology, and the environmental sciences. However, it is often compromised with SU8, PDMS, or Parylene materials due to the sophisticated mask preparation requirements for wet etching of glass. Here, we report our efforts toward developing a photolithography-free laser-patterned hydrofluoric acid-resistant chromium-polyimide tape mask for rapid prototyping of microfluidic systems in glass. The patterns are defined in masking layer with a diode-pumped solid-state laser. Minimum feature size is limited to the diameter of the laser beam, 30 μm; minimum spacing between features is limited by the thermal shrinkage and adhesive contact of the polyimide tape to 40 μm. The patterned glass substrates are etched in 49% hydrofluoric acid at ambient temperature with soft agitation (in time increments, up to 60 min duration). In spite of the simplicity, our method demonstrates comparable results to the other current more sophisticated masking methods in terms of the etched depth (up to 300 μm in borosilicate glass), feature under etch ratio in isotropic etch (~1.36), and low mask hole density. The method demonstrates high yield and reliability. To our knowledge, this method is the first proposed technique for rapid prototyping of microfluidic systems in glass with such high performance parameters. The proposed method of fabrication can potentially be implemented in research institutions without access to a standard clean-room facility.

  16. Photolithography-free laser-patterned HF acid-resistant chromium-polyimide mask for rapid fabrication of microfluidic systems in glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamuruyev, Konstantin O.; Zrodnikov, Yuriy; Davis, Cristina E.

    2017-01-01

    Excellent chemical and physical properties of glass, over a range of operating conditions, make it a preferred material for chemical detection systems in analytical chemistry, biology, and the environmental sciences. However, it is often compromised with SU8, PDMS, or Parylene materials due to the sophisticated mask preparation requirements for wet etching of glass. Here, we report our efforts toward developing a photolithography-free laser-patterned hydrofluoric acid-resistant chromium-polyimide tape mask for rapid prototyping of microfluidic systems in glass. The patterns are defined in masking layer with a diode-pumped solid-state laser. Minimum feature size is limited to the diameter of the laser beam, 30 µm minimum spacing between features is limited by the thermal shrinkage and adhesive contact of the polyimide tape to 40 µm. The patterned glass substrates are etched in 49% hydrofluoric acid at ambient temperature with soft agitation (in time increments, up to 60 min duration). In spite of the simplicity, our method demonstrates comparable results to the other current more sophisticated masking methods in terms of the etched depth (up to 300 µm in borosilicate glass), feature under etch ratio in isotropic etch (~1.36), and low mask hole density. The method demonstrates high yield and reliability. To our knowledge, this method is the first proposed technique for rapid prototyping of microfluidic systems in glass with such high performance parameters. The proposed method of fabrication can potentially be implemented in research institutions without access to a standard clean-room facility.

  17. High-throughput gene expression analysis at the level of single proteins using a microfluidic turbidostat and automated cell tracking

    PubMed Central

    Ullman, G.; Wallden, M.; Marklund, E. G.; Mahmutovic, A.; Razinkov, Ivan; Elf, J.

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a method combining microfluidics, time-lapsed single-molecule microscopy and automated image analysis allowing for the observation of an excess of 3000 complete cell cycles of exponentially growing Escherichia coli cells per experiment. The method makes it possible to analyse the rate of gene expression at the level of single proteins over the bacterial cell cycle. We also demonstrate that it is possible to count the number of non-specifically DNA binding LacI–Venus molecules using short excitation light pulses. The transcription factors are localized on the nucleoids in the cell and appear to be uniformly distributed on chromosomal DNA. An increase in the expression of LacI is observed at the beginning of the cell cycle, possibly because some gene copies are de-repressed as a result of partitioning inequalities at cell division. Finally, a size–growth rate uncertainty relation is observed where cells living in rich media vary more in the length at birth than in generation time, and the opposite is true for cells living in poorer media. PMID:23267179

  18. Study of local intracellular signals regulating axonal morphogenesis using a microfluidic device

    PubMed Central

    Uryu, Daiki; Tamaru, Tomohiro; Suzuki, Azusa; Sakai, Rie; Konishi, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The establishment and maintenance of axonal patterning is crucial for neuronal function. To identify the molecular systems that operate locally to control axonal structure, it is important to manipulate molecular functions in restricted subcellular areas for a long period of time. Microfluidic devices can be powerful tools for such purposes. In this study, we demonstrate the application of a microfluidic device to clarify the function of local Ca2+ signals in axons. Membrane depolarization significantly induced axonal branch-extension in cultured cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs). Local application of nifedipine using a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based microfluidic device demonstrated that Ca2+ entry from the axonal region via L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels (L-VDCC) is required for branch extension. Furthermore, we developed a method for locally controlling protein levels by combining genetic techniques and use of a microfluidic culture system. A vector for enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) fused to a destabilizing domain derived from E. coli dihydrofolate reductase (ecDHFR) is introduced in neurons by electroporation. By local application of the DHFR ligand, trimethoprim (TMP) using a microfluidic device, we were able to manipulate differentially the level of fusion protein between axons and somatodendrites. The present study revealed the effectiveness of microfluidic devices to address fundamental biological issues at subcellular levels, and the possibility of their development in combination with molecular techniques. PMID:27877916

  19. Direct-writing colloidal photonic crystal microfluidic chips by inkjet printing for label-free protein detection.

    PubMed

    Shen, Weizhi; Li, Mingzhu; Ye, Changqing; Jiang, Lei; Song, Yanlin

    2012-09-07

    Integrating photonic crystals (PC) into microfluidic systems has attracted immense interest for its novel functions. However, it is still a great challenge to fabricate PC microfluidic chips rapidly with complex functions. In this work, a direct-writing colloidal PC microchannel was firstly achieved by inkjet printing and was used for the surface-tension-confined microfluidic immune assay. PC channels with different structure colors have been successfully integrated on one chip. The fabricated chip has the advantages of rapid fabrication, quick fluidic transport and can monitor the fluidic fluxion using the naked eye. Utilizing this PC microfluidic chip, a colorimetric label-free immune assay was realized without nonspecific adsorption interference of the target.

  20. Ice matrix in reconfigurable microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossi, A. M.; Vareijka, M.; Piletska, E. V.; Turner, A. P. F.; Meglinski, I.; Piletsky, S. A.

    2013-07-01

    Microfluidic devices find many applications in biotechnologies. Here, we introduce a flexible and biocompatible microfluidic ice-based platform with tunable parameters and configuration of microfluidic patterns that can be changed multiple times during experiments. Freezing and melting of cavities, channels and complex relief structures created and maintained in the bulk of ice by continuous scanning of an infrared laser beam are used as a valve action in microfluidic systems. We demonstrate that pre-concentration of samples and transport of ions and dyes through the open channels created can be achieved in ice microfluidic patterns by IR laser-assisted zone melting. The proposed approach can be useful for performing separation and sensing processes in flexible reconfigurable microfluidic devices.

  1. A rapid standardized quantitative microfluidic system approach for evaluating human tear proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bavelloni, Alberto; Blalock, William; Fresina, Michela; Campos, Emilio C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To explore the potential of a chip-based miniaturized capillary gel electrophoresis device in a quantitative evaluation of the human tear protein profile and to validate the method. Methods A total of 5 μl of tears were collected from 25 patients diagnosed as having mild to moderate dry eye according to Dry Eye Workshop guidelines and from 20 matched normal volunteers. Protein analysis was performed with the 2100 Bioanalyzer; different protein kit assays were evaluated (Protein 80 kit, Protein 230 kit, High Sensitivity Protein 250 kit) for sizing and quantifying protein samples from 5 to 80 kDa, 14 to 230 kDa, and 5 to 250 kDa, respectively. A standard protein ladder was loaded on each chip to allow an estimation of the appropriate molecular weight of the separated proteins; a sample buffer containing a lower and an upper marker was used to check the correct alignment of each lane. Virtual bands generated by the Bioanalyzer were identified and validated as follows: tear samples were run in parallel and proteins separated by one-dimensional and two-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate–PAGE and characterized by immunoblotting, enzymatic digestion, and analysis with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry followed by a search of the SProt human protein database. Results Analyses were successfully performed by using as small as a 2 μl tear sample. The Protein 230 kit was selected as the best chip kit, able to differentiate all the proteins of interest. The measurement noise parameters were low, and reproducibility and repeatability exhibited high accuracy (0.998 and 0.995, respectively) and precision (0.974 and 0.977, respectively). The coefficient of variability was slightly higher than that declared by the manufacturer (6.2% versus 5.0%). Total protein content and the following proteins were recognized in all samples: lipophilin A lysozyme C, tear lipocalin-1, zinc-alpha-2-glycoprotein, serotransferrin, lactotransferrin, and exudated serum albumin

  2. A rapid standardized quantitative microfluidic system approach for evaluating human tear proteins.

    PubMed

    Versura, Piera; Bavelloni, Alberto; Blalock, William; Fresina, Michela; Campos, Emilio C

    2012-01-01

    To explore the potential of a chip-based miniaturized capillary gel electrophoresis device in a quantitative evaluation of the human tear protein profile and to validate the method. A total of 5 μl of tears were collected from 25 patients diagnosed as having mild to moderate dry eye according to Dry Eye Workshop guidelines and from 20 matched normal volunteers. Protein analysis was performed with the 2100 Bioanalyzer; different protein kit assays were evaluated (Protein 80 kit, Protein 230 kit, High Sensitivity Protein 250 kit) for sizing and quantifying protein samples from 5 to 80 kDa, 14 to 230 kDa, and 5 to 250 kDa, respectively. A standard protein ladder was loaded on each chip to allow an estimation of the appropriate molecular weight of the separated proteins; a sample buffer containing a lower and an upper marker was used to check the correct alignment of each lane. Virtual bands generated by the Bioanalyzer were identified and validated as follows: tear samples were run in parallel and proteins separated by one-dimensional and two-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE and characterized by immunoblotting, enzymatic digestion, and analysis with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry followed by a search of the SProt human protein database. Analyses were successfully performed by using as small as a 2 μl tear sample. The Protein 230 kit was selected as the best chip kit, able to differentiate all the proteins of interest. The measurement noise parameters were low, and reproducibility and repeatability exhibited high accuracy (0.998 and 0.995, respectively) and precision (0.974 and 0.977, respectively). The coefficient of variability was slightly higher than that declared by the manufacturer (6.2% versus 5.0%). Total protein content and the following proteins were recognized in all samples: lipophilin A lysozyme C, tear lipocalin-1, zinc-alpha-2-glycoprotein, serotransferrin, lactotransferrin, and exudated serum albumin. Our data demonstrate that this

  3. Adsorption of HP Lattice Proteins on Patterned Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Matthew; Shi, Guangjie; Landau, David P.; Li, Ying Wai; Wuest, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    The HP lattice model[2] is a course-grained, yet useful tool for modeling protein sequences where amino acids are treated as either hydrophobic (H) or polar (P) monomers. With the use of Wang-Landau sampling and an efficient set of Monte-Carlo moves[3], HP lattice proteins adsorbed on patterned surfaces are studied. Each substrate is modeled as a periodically bounded pattern of lattice sites that interact with either H or P monomers in the lattice protein, where the energy contributions of the surface are determined by assigned coupling strengths. By analyzing energy degeneracies, along with the thermodynamic and structural quantities of the protein, both the protein folding and surface adsorption can be observed. The adsorption behavior of the lattice proteins on patterned surfaces will be compared to those interacting with uniform surfaces. Research supported by NSF.

  4. Selective filling for patterning in microfluidic channels and integration of chromatography in "lab-on-a-chip" devices using sol-gel technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jindal, Rohit

    The last decade has seen tremendous advancement in the development of miniaturized chemical analysis system also known as "lab-on-a-chip". It is believed that the true potential of these devices will be achieved by integrating various functions such as separation, reaction, sensing, mixing, pumping, injection and detection onto a single chip. The ability to pattern different functionalities is indispensable for the development of highly integrated devices. In this work, a simple method based on the concept of selective filling is described for patterning in the microfluidic channels. It is based on the difference in the free energy of filling between an open and a covered part of the channel. This method was used for the integration of chromatography in the microfluidic devices. A chromatographic column was realized by utilizing sol-gel as an immobilization matrix for entrapping reversed phase chromatographic particles. Localization of the stationary phase was achieved using the selective filling technique. Channels were fabricated in quartz using photolithography and wet etching. Electroosmotic flow was used for manipulating fluid movement in the channels. Cross channel design was used for making a pulse injection of the solutes in the separation channel. An optical fiber setup was developed for carrying out on-chip UV absorbance detection. Stationary phase was created under different sol-gel synthesis conditions. It was established that the sol-gel synthesis carried out under acidic conditions provides the optimum synthesis conditions for creating separation column. Chromatographic performance of the stationary phase material was demonstrated by separating peptides present in a mixture. The sol-gel immobilization method was extended for the integration of micropump in the chip. The micropump enables pumping of the fluid in field free channels. Preliminary results, demonstrating the potential of carbon nanotubes as a support material in the microfluidic channels

  5. Encoding protein-ligand interaction patterns in fingerprints and graphs.

    PubMed

    Desaphy, Jérémy; Raimbaud, Eric; Ducrot, Pierre; Rognan, Didier

    2013-03-25

    We herewith present a novel and universal method to convert protein-ligand coordinates into a simple fingerprint of 210 integers registering the corresponding molecular interaction pattern. Each interaction (hydrophobic, aromatic, hydrogen bond, ionic bond, metal complexation) is detected on the fly and physically described by a pseudoatom centered either on the interacting ligand atom, the interacting protein atom, or the geometric center of both interacting atoms. Counting all possible triplets of interaction pseudoatoms within six distance ranges, and pruning the full integer vector to keep the most frequent triplets enables the definition of a simple (210 integers) and coordinate frame-invariant interaction pattern descriptor (TIFP) that can be applied to compare any pair of protein-ligand complexes. TIFP fingerprints have been calculated for ca. 10,000 druggable protein-ligand complexes therefore enabling a wide comparison of relationships between interaction pattern similarity and ligand or binding site pairwise similarity. We notably show that interaction pattern similarity strongly depends on binding site similarity. In addition to the TIFP fingerprint which registers intermolecular interactions between a ligand and its target protein, we developed two tools (Ishape, Grim) to align protein-ligand complexes from their interaction patterns. Ishape is based on the overlap of interaction pseudoatoms using a smooth Gaussian function, whereas Grim utilizes a standard clique detection algorithm to match interaction pattern graphs. Both tools are complementary and enable protein-ligand complex alignments capitalizing on both global and local pattern similarities. The new fingerprint and companion alignment tools have been successfully used in three scenarios: (i) interaction-biased alignment of protein-ligand complexes, (ii) postprocessing docking poses according to known interaction patterns for a particular target, and (iii) virtual screening for bioisosteric

  6. Directed self-assembly of proteins into discrete radial patterns

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Garima; Prashanthi, Kovur; Thundat, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Unlike physical patterning of materials at nanometer scale, manipulating soft matter such as biomolecules into patterns is still in its infancy. Self-assembled monolayer (SAM) with surface density gradient has the capability to drive biomolecules in specific directions to create hierarchical and discrete structures. Here, we report on a two-step process of self-assembly of the human serum albumin (HSA) protein into discrete ring structures based on density gradient of SAM. The methodology involves first creating a 2-dimensional (2D) polyethylene glycol (PEG) islands with responsive carboxyl functionalities. Incubation of proteins on such pre-patterned surfaces results in direct self-assembly of protein molecules around PEG islands. Immobilization and adsorption of protein on such structures over time evolve into the self-assembled patterns. PMID:23719678

  7. Stereomask lithography for multi-protein patterning.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Siwei; Chen, Arnold; Revzin, Alexander; Pan, Tingrui

    2014-01-01

    The advances of biologically-friendly micropatterning technologies have benefited many areas of biological and medical research, including quantitative biochemical assay, point-of-care devices, biosensing and regenerative medicine. Conventional micropatterning techniques, for example, photolithography and soft lithography, have seen encouraging adaptation to creating biological micropatterns in the last decades. However, they still have not completely addressed the major needs of constructing multi-object biological microarrays with single-cell resolution without requiring cleanroom access. In this chapter, we present a novel versatile biological lithography technique to achieve integrated multi-object patterning with high feature resolution and high adaptability to various biomaterials, referred to as stereomask lithography (SML). A novel three-dimensional stereomask has been developed for successive patterning of multiple objects. The stereomask consists of both patterned through holes, which layout new micropatterns and non-through recesses, which protect pre-existing features on the substrate. Furthermore, high-precision reversible alignment among multiple bio-objects is achieved by adopting a peg-in-hole design between the substrate and stereomasks. As demonstration, we have successfully used the SML technique to construct complex biological microenvironment with various bio-functional components at single-cell resolution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Control and automation of multilayered integrated microfluidic device fabrication.

    PubMed

    Kipper, Sarit; Frolov, Ludmila; Guy, Ortal; Pellach, Michal; Glick, Yair; Malichi, Asaf; Knisbacher, Binyamin A; Barbiro-Michaely, Efrat; Avrahami, Dorit; Yavets-Chen, Yehuda; Levanon, Erez Y; Gerber, Doron

    2017-01-31

    Integrated microfluidics is a sophisticated three-dimensional (multi layer) solution for high complexity serial or parallel processes. Fabrication of integrated microfluidic devices requires soft lithography and the stacking of thin-patterned PDMS layers. Precise layer alignment and bonding is crucial. There are no previously reported standards for alignment of the layers, which is mostly performed using uncontrolled processes with very low alignment success. As a result, integrated microfluidics is mostly used in academia rather than in the many potential industrial applications. We have designed and manufactured a semiautomatic Microfluidic Device Assembly System (μDAS) for full device production. μDAS comprises an electrooptic mechanical system consisting of four main parts: optical system, smart media holder (for PDMS), a micropositioning xyzθ system and a macropositioning XY mechanism. The use of the μDAS yielded valuable information regarding PDMS as the material for device fabrication, revealed previously unidentified errors, and enabled optimization of a robust fabrication process. In addition, we have demonstrated the utilization of the μDAS technology for fabrication of a complex 3 layered device with over 12 000 micromechanical valves and an array of 64 × 64 DNA spots on a glass substrate with high yield and high accuracy. We increased fabrication yield from 25% to about 85% with an average layer alignment error of just ∼4 μm. It also increased our protein expression yields from 80% to over 90%, allowing us to investigate more proteins per experiment. The μDAS has great potential to become a valuable tool for both advancing integrated microfluidics in academia and producing and applying microfluidic devices in the industry.

  9. A Microfluidic Bioreactor with in Situ SERS Imaging for the Study of Controlled Flow Patterns of Biofilm Precursor Materials

    PubMed Central

    Paquet-Mercier, François; Aznaveh, Nahid Babaei; Safdar, Muhammad; Greener, Jesse

    2013-01-01

    A microfluidic bioreactor with an easy to fabricate nano-plasmonic surface is demonstrated for studies of biofilms and their precursor materials via Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS). The system uses a novel design to induce sheath flow confinement of a sodium citrate biofilm precursor stream against the SERS imaging surface to measure spatial variations in the concentration profile. The unoptimised SERS enhancement was approximately 2.5 × 104, thereby improving data acquisition time, reducing laser power requirements and enabling a citrate detection limit of 0.1 mM, which was well below the concentrations used in biofilm nutrient solutions. The flow confinement was observed by both optical microscopy and SERS imaging with good complementarity. We demonstrate the new bioreactor by growing flow-templated biofilms on the microchannel wall. This work opens the way for in situ spectral imaging of biofilms and their biochemical environment under dynamic flow conditions. PMID:24172286

  10. A microfluidic bioreactor with in situ SERS imaging for the study of controlled flow patterns of biofilm precursor materials.

    PubMed

    Paquet-Mercier, François; Aznaveh, Nahid Babaei; Safdar, Muhammad; Greener, Jesse

    2013-10-29

    A microfluidic bioreactor with an easy to fabricate nano-plasmonic surface is demonstrated for studies of biofilms and their precursor materials via Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS). The system uses a novel design to induce sheath flow confinement of a sodium citrate biofilm precursor stream against the SERS imaging surface to measure spatial variations in the concentration profile. The unoptimised SERS enhancement was approximately 2.5 × 10(4), thereby improving data acquisition time, reducing laser power requirements and enabling a citrate detection limit of 0.1 mM, which was well below the concentrations used in biofilm nutrient solutions. The flow confinement was observed by both optical microscopy and SERS imaging with good complementarity. We demonstrate the new bioreactor by growing flow-templated biofilms on the microchannel wall. This work opens the way for in situ spectral imaging of biofilms and their biochemical environment under dynamic flow conditions.

  11. Abnormal erythrocyte membrane protein pattern in severe megaloblastic anemia.

    PubMed Central

    Ballas, S K

    1978-01-01

    The erythrocyte membrane protein pattern of patients with megaloblastic anemia was determined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate. In severe megaloblastic anemia, secondary either to folic acid or vitamin B12 deficiency, the erythrocyte membrane protein pattern was grossly abnormal, lacking bands 1, 2 (spectrin), and 3 and having several diffuse, faster migrating bands. After adequate vitamin replacement therapy, the erythrocyte membrane protein pattern returned to normal. In mild megaloblastic anemia, secondary either to folic acid of vitamin B12 deficiency, and in severe iron deficiency anemia, the erythrocyte membrane protein pattern was normal. Erythrocyte membrane protein pattern of normal membranes did not change after mixing with abnormal membranes before polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate. Protease activity extracted from membranes of megalocytes was not different from normal. These findings indicate that the erythrocyte membrane protein pattern is abnormal in severe megaloblastic anemia and that this abnormality is not secondary to increased activity of the endogenous erythrocyte membrane proteinase. Images PMID:659579

  12. Optical microfluidics

    SciTech Connect

    Kotz, K.T.; Noble, K.A.; Faris, G.W.

    2004-09-27

    We present a method for the control of small droplets based on the thermal Marangoni effect using laser heating. With this approach, droplets covering five orders of magnitude in volume ({approx}1.7 {mu}L to 14 pL), immersed in decanol, were moved on an unmodified polystyrene surface, with speeds of up to 3 mm/s. When two droplets were brought into contact, they spontaneously fused and rapidly mixed in less than 33 ms. This optically addressed microfluidic approach has many advantages for microfluidic transport, including exceptional reconfigurability, low intersample contamination, large volume range, extremely simple substrates, no electrical connections, and ready scaling to large arrays.

  13. Amino acid scoring patterns for protein quality assessment.

    PubMed

    Millward, D Joe

    2012-08-01

    The 1985 FAO/WHO/UNU protein report defined reference amino acid patterns for infants based on breast milk and for preschool children, schoolchildren and adults from age specific estimates of dietary indispensible amino acid requirements divided by the safe protein requirement for each age group. This report argued that the protein quality of a diet should be estimated from its digestibility adjusted by its amino acid score calculated from its limiting amino acid in comparison with the reference amino acid pattern. Subsequently a joint FAO/WHO expert consultation on protein quality evaluation (1991) endorsed this protein digestibility-corrected score approach. However it rejected the adult scoring pattern identified in the 1985 report arguing that the amino acid values for this pattern were too low. As an interim measure it suggested that the scoring pattern for preschool children should be used for all age groups apart from infants. The recent WHO/FAO/UNU (2007) report endorsed the 1985 report in recommending the amino acid content of breast milk as the best estimate of infant amino acid requirements. However it was only able to identify reliable requirement values for adults and adopted a factorial approach to derivation of age-related scoring patterns. This utilized the adult pattern for maintenance, and the pattern of human tissue protein for growth. Thus scoring patterns were derived for children aged 0·5, 1-2, 3-10, 11-14, 15-18 years and for adults. The total dietary amino acid requirements calculated for these age groups were divided by the mean protein requirement to give the scoring pattern which should be used to adjust digestible intakes to identify the available protein in specific diets. However because the adult values were determined in subjects at protein intakes much higher than the mean minimum protein requirement, i.e. at 1 g/kg/d rather than 0·66 g/kg/d, the pattern is likely to include higher values than the minimum requirement and should

  14. Mining the characteristic interaction patterns on protein-protein binding interfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Liu, Zhihai; Han, Li; Li, Chengke; Wang, Renxiao

    2013-09-23

    Protein-protein interactions are observed in various biological processes. They are important for understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms and can be potential targets for developing small-molecule regulators of such processes. Previous studies suggest that certain residues on protein-protein binding interfaces are "hot spots". As an extension to this concept, we have developed a residue-based method to identify the characteristic interaction patterns (CIPs) on protein-protein binding interfaces, in which each pattern is a cluster of four contacting residues. Systematic analysis was conducted on a nonredundant set of 1,222 protein-protein binding interfaces selected out of the entire Protein Data Bank. Favored interaction patterns across different protein-protein binding interfaces were retrieved by considering both geometrical and chemical conservations. As demonstrated on two test tests, our method was able to predict hot spot residues on protein-protein binding interfaces with good recall scores and acceptable precision scores. By analyzing the function annotations and the evolutionary tree of the protein-protein complexes in our data set, we also observed that protein-protein interfaces sharing common characteristic interaction patterns are normally associated with identical or similar biological functions.

  15. Quantitative analysis of four protein biomarkers: An automated microfluidic cartridge-based method and its comparison to colorimetric ELISA.

    PubMed

    Dysinger, Mark; Marusov, Greg; Fraser, Stephanie

    2017-09-13

    Biomarker quantitation with ligand binding assays has matured greatly in recent years. This maturation has been partly in response to demands for more data points from fewer samples or less available sample volume. Multiplexing offers opportunities to acquire data for multiple analytes from single sample assay iterations, but has its own unique challenges and limitations. ProteinSimple has developed Simple Plex™, an automated immunoassay platform consisting of microfluidic cartridge-based assays run on the Ella instrument. Ella subverts traditional multiplexing challenges by rapidly performing triplicate measurements of up to four different analytes simultaneously, each in their own respective assay vessels and all from a single sample. Here we describe a comparison of the Simple Plex platform versus colorimetric ELISA and their respective abilities to quantitate four common biomarkers (MCP-1/CCL2, VEGF-A, TNF-α, and IL-6) from twenty-eight healthy individual donor plasma samples. Each biomarker was tested on the two platforms on each of two days. Ella analysis required significantly reduced sample volume, manual steps, and total time. Overall, Ella was able to quantify results for all twenty-eight samples for each of the four biomarkers. In contrast, ELISA was able to measure quantifiable results within respective calibration curve ranges for MCP-1/CCL2 (96% of samples) and VEGFA (7% of samples). For TNF-α and IL-6, ELISA was not sensitive enough to quantify any samples in the assay ranges. This stark difference in quantitative results underscores Ella's ability to multiplex without compromising sensitivity, and has far reaching potential for biomarker panel measurement in support of diagnosis, prognosis, and monitoring of disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Datamining protein structure databanks for crystallization patterns of proteins.

    PubMed

    Valafar, Homayoun; Prestegard, James H; Valafar, Faramarz

    2002-12-01

    A study of 345 protein structures selected among 1,500 structures determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods, revealed useful correlations between crystallization properties and several parameters for the studied proteins. NMR methods of structure determination do not require the growth of protein crystals, and hence allow comparison of properties of proteins that have or have not been the subject of crystallographic approaches. One- and two-dimensional statistical analyses of the data confirmed a hypothesized relation between the size of the molecule and its crystallization potential. Furthermore, two-dimensional Bayesian analysis revealed a significant relationship between relative ratio of different secondary structures and the likelihood of success for crystallization trials. The most immediate result is an apparent correlation of crystallization potential with protein size. Further analysis of the data revealed a relationship between the unstructured fraction of proteins and the success of its crystallization. Utilization of Bayesian analysis on the latter correlation resulted in a prediction performance of about 64%, whereas a two-dimensional Bayesian analysis succeeded with a performance of about 75%.

  17. Elastohydrodynamics and Kinetics of Protein Patterning in the Immunological Synapse.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Andreas; Mahadevan, L

    2015-12-01

    We propose a minimal mathematical model for the physical basis of membrane protein patterning in the immunological synapse (IS), which encompass membrane mechanics, protein binding kinetics and motion, and fluid flow in the synaptic cleft. Our theory leads to simple predictions for the spatial and temporal scales of protein cluster formation, growth and arrest as a function of membrane stiffness, rigidity and kinetics of the adhesive proteins, and the fluid flow in the synaptic cleft. Numerical simulations complement these scaling laws by quantifying the nucleation, growth and stabilization of proteins domains on the size of the cell. Direct comparison with experiment shows that passive elastohydrodynamics and kinetics of protein binding in the synaptic cleft can describe the short-time formation and organization of protein clusters, without evoking any active processes in the cytoskeleton. Despite the apparent complexity of the process, our analysis shows that just two dimensionless parameters characterize the spatial and temporal evolution of the protein pattern: a ratio of membrane elasticity to protein stiffness, and the ratio of a hydrodynamic time scale for fluid flow relative to the protein binding rate. A simple phase diagram encompasses the variety of patterns that can arise.

  18. Elastohydrodynamics and Kinetics of Protein Patterning in the Immunological Synapse

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Andreas; Mahadevan, L.

    2015-01-01

    We propose a minimal mathematical model for the physical basis of membrane protein patterning in the immunological synapse (IS), which encompass membrane mechanics, protein binding kinetics and motion, and fluid flow in the synaptic cleft. Our theory leads to simple predictions for the spatial and temporal scales of protein cluster formation, growth and arrest as a function of membrane stiffness, rigidity and kinetics of the adhesive proteins, and the fluid flow in the synaptic cleft. Numerical simulations complement these scaling laws by quantifying the nucleation, growth and stabilization of proteins domains on the size of the cell. Direct comparison with experiment shows that passive elastohydrodynamics and kinetics of protein binding in the synaptic cleft can describe the short-time formation and organization of protein clusters, without evoking any active processes in the cytoskeleton. Despite the apparent complexity of the process, our analysis shows that just two dimensionless parameters characterize the spatial and temporal evolution of the protein pattern: a ratio of membrane elasticity to protein stiffness, and the ratio of a hydrodynamic time scale for fluid flow relative to the protein binding rate. A simple phase diagram encompasses the variety of patterns that can arise. PMID:26699430

  19. Label-free study of the function of ion channel protein on a microfluidic optical sensor integrated with artificial cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Tang, Yanyan; Zhang, Ling; Wu, Jianmin

    2014-01-21

    A label-free optical sensor was constructed by integrating pH sensing material and supported phospholipid bilayers (SPBs) in a microfluidic chip. The pH sensing material was composed of a double layer structure consisting of chitosan hydrogel and electrochemically etched porous silicon. The pH change in the microchip could induce a reversible swelling of the chitosan hydrogel layer and consequently caused a shift in effective optical thickness (EOT) of the double layer, which could be observed by Fourier transformed reflectometric interference spectroscopy (FT-RIS). After phospholipid bilayers (PLBs) were self-assembled on the sensing layer, the EOT almost remained constant during the cycling of pH from 7.4 to 6.2, indicating the blockage of H(+) translocation by the PLBs. For studying the behavior of ion channel protein, gramicidin A, a typical ion channel protein, was inserted in the SPBs for mimicking the ion transportation function of cell membrane. Due to the H(+) transportation capability of gramicidin A, the optical response to pH change could partially recover. In the presence of Ca(2+), the pore of the ion channel protein was blocked, causing a significant decrease in the EOT response upon pH change. The bio-functionalized microfluidic sensor fabricated in this work will provide a reliable platform for studying the function of ion channel protein, which is an important class of drug targets.

  20. Patterns in protein primary sequences: classification, display and analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Saurugger, P. N.; Metfessel, B. A.

    1991-01-01

    The protein folding code, which is contained in the amino acid chain of a protein, has so far eluded elucidation. However, patterns of hydrophobic residues have previously been identified which show a specificity towards certain secondary structural elements. We are developing an analysis toolkit to find, visualize, and analyze patterns in primary sequences. Preliminary results show that there exist patterns in primary sequences which are useful for predicting the structural class of amino acid chains, performing especially well for the all-alpha helix and all-beta sheet classes. PMID:1807631

  1. Bioanalysis in structured microfluidic systems.

    PubMed

    Ros, Alexandra; Hellmich, Wibke; Regtmeier, Jan; Duong, Thanh Tu; Anselmetti, Dario

    2006-07-01

    Microfluidic and lab-on-a-chip devices have attracted widespread interest in separation sciences and bioanalysis. Recent designs in microfluidic devices extend common separation concepts by exploiting new phenomena for molecular dynamics on a length scale of 10 mum and below, giving rise to novel manipulation tools and nonintuitive phenomena for microseparations. Here, we focus on three very recent developments for bioseparations based on tailored microfluidic systems: Single cell navigation, trapping and steering with subsequent on-chip lysis, protein separation and LIF detection (Section 3.1), then we report dielectrophoretic trapping and separation of large DNA fragments in structured microfluidic devices (Section 3.2). Finally, a paradoxial migration phenomenon based on thermal fluctuations, periodically arranged microchannels and a biased alternating current electric field is presented in Section 3.3.

  2. An efficient, versatile and scalable pattern growth approach to mine frequent patterns in unaligned protein sequences.

    PubMed

    Ye, Kai; Kosters, Walter A; Ijzerman, Adriaan P

    2007-03-15

    Pattern discovery in protein sequences is often based on multiple sequence alignments (MSA). The procedure can be computationally intensive and often requires manual adjustment, which may be particularly difficult for a set of deviating sequences. In contrast, two algorithms, PRATT2 (http//www.ebi.ac.uk/pratt/) and TEIRESIAS (http://cbcsrv.watson.ibm.com/) are used to directly identify frequent patterns from unaligned biological sequences without an attempt to align them. Here we propose a new algorithm with more efficiency and more functionality than both PRATT2 and TEIRESIAS, and discuss some of its applications to G protein-coupled receptors, a protein family of important drug targets. In this study, we designed and implemented six algorithms to mine three different pattern types from either one or two datasets using a pattern growth approach. We compared our approach to PRATT2 and TEIRESIAS in efficiency, completeness and the diversity of pattern types. Compared to PRATT2, our approach is faster, capable of processing large datasets and able to identify the so-called type III patterns. Our approach is comparable to TEIRESIAS in the discovery of the so-called type I patterns but has additional functionality such as mining the so-called type II and type III patterns and finding discriminating patterns between two datasets. The source code for pattern growth algorithms and their pseudo-code are available at http://www.liacs.nl/home/kosters/pg/.

  3. Predicting protein function by frequent functional association pattern mining in protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Cho, Young-Rae; Zhang, Aidong

    2010-01-01

    Predicting protein function from protein interaction networks has been challenging because of the complexity of functional relationships among proteins. Most previous function prediction methods depend on the neighborhood of or the connected paths to known proteins. However, their accuracy has been limited due to the functional inconsistency of interacting proteins. In this paper, we propose a novel approach for function prediction by identifying frequent patterns of functional associations in a protein interaction network. A set of functions that a protein performs is assigned into the corresponding node as a label. A functional association pattern is then represented as a labeled subgraph. Our frequent labeled subgraph mining algorithm efficiently searches the functional association patterns that occur frequently in the network. It iteratively increases the size of frequent patterns by one node at a time by selective joining, and simplifies the network by a priori pruning. Using the yeast protein interaction network, our algorithm found more than 1400 frequent functional association patterns. The function prediction is performed by matching the subgraph, including the unknown protein, with the frequent patterns analogous to it. By leave-one-out cross validation, we show that our approach has better performance than previous link-based methods in terms of prediction accuracy. The frequent functional association patterns generated in this study might become the foundations of advanced analysis for functional behaviors of proteins in a system level.

  4. Integrated microfluidic platforms for investigating neuronal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyung Joon

    This dissertation describes the development and application of integrated microfluidics-based assay platforms to study neuronal activities in the nervous system in-vitro. The assay platforms were fabricated using soft lithography and micro/nano fabrication including microfluidics, surface patterning, and nanomaterial synthesis. The use of integrated microfluidics-based assay platform allows culturing and manipulating many types of neuronal tissues in precisely controlled microenvironment. Furthermore, they provide organized multi-cellular in-vitro model, long-term monitoring with live cell imaging, and compatibility with molecular biology techniques and electrophysiology experiment. In this dissertation, the integrated microfluidics-based assay platforms are developed for investigation of neuronal activities such as local protein synthesis, impairment of axonal transport by chemical/physical variants, growth cone path finding under chemical/physical cues, and synaptic transmission in neuronal circuit. Chapter 1 describes the motivation, objectives, and scope for developing in-vitro platform to study various neuronal activities. Chapter 2 introduces microfluidic culture platform for biochemical assay with large-scale neuronal tissues that are utilized as model system in neuroscience research. Chapter 3 focuses on the investigation of impaired axonal transport by beta-Amyloid and oxidative stress. The platform allows to control neuronal processes and to quantify mitochondrial movement in various regions of axons away from applied drugs. Chapter 4 demonstrates the development of microfluidics-based growth cone turning assay to elucidate the mechanism underlying axon guidance under soluble factors and shear flow. Using this platform, the behaviors of growth cone of mammalian neurons are verified under the gradient of inhibitory molecules and also shear flow in well-controlled manner. In Chapter 5, I combine in-vitro multicellular model with microfabricated MEA

  5. Excimer laser ablation for spatially controlled protein patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thissen, Helmut; Hayes, Jason P.; Kingshott, Peter; Johnson, Graham; Harvey, Erol C.; Griesser, Hans J.

    2001-11-01

    Two-dimensional control over the location of proteins on surfaces is desired for a number of applications including diagnostic tests and tissue engineered medical devices. Many of these applications require patterns of specific proteins that allow subsequent two-dimensionally controlled cell attachment. The ideal technique would allow the deposition of specific protein patterns in areas where cell attachment is required, with complete prevention of unspecific protein adsorption in areas where cells are not supposed to attach. In our study, collagen I was used as an example for an extracellular matrix protein known to support the attachment of bovine corneal epithelial cells. An allylamine plasma polymer was deposited on a silicon wafer substrate, followed by grafting of poly(ethylene oxide). Two-dimensional control over the surface chemistry was achieved using a 248 nm excimer laser. Results obtained by XPS and AFM show that the combination of extremely low-fouling surfaces with excimer laser ablation can be used effectively for the production of spatially controlled protein patterns with a resolution of less than 1 micrometers . Furthermore, it was shown that bovine corneal epithelial cell attachment followed exactly the created protein patterns. The presented method is an effective tool for a number of in vitro and in vivo applications.

  6. Microtubule patterning in the presence of moving motor proteins.

    PubMed

    White, D; de Vries, G; Martin, J; Dawes, A

    2015-10-07

    Cytoskeletal polymers such as microtubules (MTs) interact with motor proteins to form higher-order structures. In vitro experiments have shown that MT patterns such as asters, bundles, and vortices can form under the influence of a single type of dynamic motor protein. MTs also can form anti-parallel bundles, similar to bundles that form the mitotic spindle during cell division, under the influence of two types of moving motors with opposite directionality. Despite the importance of MT structures, their mechanism of formation is not yet understood. We develop an integro-partial differential equation model to describe the dynamic interactions between MTs and moving motor proteins. Our model takes into account motor protein speed, processivity, density, and directionality, as well as MT treadmilling and reorganization due to interactions with motors. Simulation results show that plus-end directed motor proteins can form vortex patterns at low motor density, while minus-end directed motor proteins form aster patterns at similar densities. Also, motor proteins with opposite directionality are able to organize MTs into anti-parallel bundles. Our model is able to provide a quantitative and qualitative description of MT patterning, providing insights into possible mechanisms of spindle formation.

  7. Biomimetic Replication of Microscopic Metal-Organic Framework Patterns Using Printed Protein Patterns.

    PubMed

    Liang, Kang; Carbonell, Carlos; Styles, Mark J; Ricco, Raffaele; Cui, Jiwei; Richardson, Joseph J; Maspoch, Daniel; Caruso, Frank; Falcaro, Paolo

    2015-12-02

    It is demonstrated that metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) can be replicated in a biomimetic fashion from protein patterns. Bendable, fluorescent MOF patterns are formed with micrometer resolution under ambient conditions. Furthermore, this technique is used to grow MOF patterns from fingerprint residue in 30 s with high fidelity. This technique is not only relevant for crime-scene investigation, but also for biomedical applications.

  8. Rapid, highly efficient extraction and purification of membrane proteins using a microfluidic continuous-flow based aqueous two-phase system.

    PubMed

    Hu, Rui; Feng, Xiaojun; Chen, Pu; Fu, Meng; Chen, Hong; Guo, Lin; Liu, Bi-Feng

    2011-01-07

    Membrane proteins play essential roles in regulating various fundamental cellular functions. To investigate membrane proteins, extraction and purification are usually prerequisite steps. Here, we demonstrated a microfluidic aqueous PEG/detergent two-phase system for the purification of membrane proteins from crude cell extract, which replaced the conventional discontinuous agitation method with continuous extraction in laminar flows, resulting in significantly increased extraction speed and efficiency. To evaluate this system, different separation and detection methods were used to identify the purified proteins, such as capillary electrophoresis, SDS-PAGE and nano-HPLC-MS/MS. Swiss-Prot database with Mascot search engine was used to search for membrane proteins from random selected bands of SDS-PAGE. Results indicated that efficient purification of membrane proteins can be achieved within 5-7s and approximately 90% of the purified proteins were membrane proteins (the highest extraction efficiency reported up to date), including membrane-associated proteins and integral membrane proteins with multiple transmembrane domains. Compared to conventional approaches, this new method had advantages of greater specific surface area, minimal emulsification, reduced sample consumption and analysis time. We expect the developed method to be potentially useful in membrane protein purifications, facilitating the investigation of membrane proteomics.

  9. Development of Plate Reader and On-Line Microfluidic Screening to Identify Ligands of the 5-Hydroxytryptamine Binding Protein in Venoms

    PubMed Central

    Otvos, Reka A.; Krishnamoorthy Iyer, Janaki; van Elk, René; Ulens, Chris; Niessen, Wilfried M. A.; Somsen, Govert W.; Kini, R. Manjunatha; Smit, August B.; Kool, Jeroen

    2015-01-01

    The 5-HT3 receptor is a ligand-gated ion channel, which is expressed in the nervous system. Its antagonists are used clinically for treatment of postoperative- and radiotherapy-induced emesis and irritable bowel syndrome. In order to better understand the structure and function of the 5-HT3 receptor, and to allow for compound screening at this receptor, recently a serotonin binding protein (5HTBP) was engineered with the Acetylcholine Binding Protein as template. In this study, a fluorescence enhancement assay for 5HTBP ligands was developed in plate-reader format and subsequently used in an on-line microfluidic format. Both assay types were validated using an existing radioligand binding assay. The on-line microfluidic assay was coupled to HPLC via a post-column split which allowed parallel coupling to a mass spectrometer to collect MS data. This high-resolution screening (HRS) system is well suitable for compound mixture analysis. As a proof of principle, the venoms of Dendroapsis polylepis, Pseudonaja affinis and Pseudonaja inframacula snakes were screened and the accurate masses of the found bioactives were established. To demonstrate the subsequent workflow towards structural identification of bioactive proteins and peptides, the partial amino acid sequence of one of the bioactives from the Pseudonaja affinis venom was determined using a bottom-up proteomics approach. PMID:26114334

  10. Development of Plate Reader and On-Line Microfluidic Screening to Identify Ligands of the 5-Hydroxytryptamine Binding Protein in Venoms.

    PubMed

    Otvos, Reka A; Iyer, Janaki Krishnamoorthy; van Elk, René; Ulens, Chris; Niessen, Wilfried M A; Somsen, Govert W; Kini, R Manjunatha; Smit, August B; Kool, Jeroen

    2015-06-24

    The 5-HT3 receptor is a ligand-gated ion channel, which is expressed in the nervous system. Its antagonists are used clinically for treatment of postoperative- and radiotherapy-induced emesis and irritable bowel syndrome. In order to better understand the structure and function of the 5-HT3 receptor, and to allow for compound screening at this receptor, recently a serotonin binding protein (5HTBP) was engineered with the Acetylcholine Binding Protein as template. In this study, a fluorescence enhancement assay for 5HTBP ligands was developed in plate-reader format and subsequently used in an on-line microfluidic format. Both assay types were validated using an existing radioligand binding assay. The on-line microfluidic assay was coupled to HPLC via a post-column split which allowed parallel coupling to a mass spectrometer to collect MS data. This high-resolution screening (HRS) system is well suitable for compound mixture analysis. As a proof of principle, the venoms of Dendroapsis polylepis, Pseudonaja affinis and Pseudonaja inframacula snakes were screened and the accurate masses of the found bioactives were established. To demonstrate the subsequent workflow towards structural identification of bioactive proteins and peptides, the partial amino acid sequence of one of the bioactives from the Pseudonaja affinis venom was determined using a bottom-up proteomics approach.

  11. Highly efficient dynamic modification of plastic microfluidic devices using proteins in microchip capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Naruishi, Nahoko; Tanaka, Yoshihide; Higashi, Tetsuji; Wakida, Shin-ichi

    2006-10-20

    New dynamic coating agents were investigated for the manipulation of electroosmotic flow (EOF) in poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) microchips. Blocking proteins designed for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) applications (e.g. Block Ace and UltraBlock), and egg-white lysozyme were proposed in this study. The EOF could be enhanced, suppressed or its direction could be reversed, depending on the buffer pH and the charge on the proteins. The coating procedure is simple, requiring only filling of the microchannels with a coating solution, followed by a rinse with a running buffer solution prior to analysis. One major advantage of this method is that it is not necessary to add the coating agent to the running buffer solution. Block Ace and UltraBlock coatings were stable for at least five runs in a given microchannel without the need to condition the coating between runs other than replenishing the buffer solution after each run, i.e. the RSD values of EOF (n=5) were less than 4.3%, and there was no significant change in the EOF after 5 runs. The reproducibility of the coating procedures was found from the channel-to-channel RSD values of the EOF, and were less than 5.0% when using HEPES-Na buffer (pH 7.4) as the running buffer. Several examples of electrophoretic separations of amino acids and biogenic amines derivatized with 4-fluoro-7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole (NBD-F) are demonstrated in this paper. The dynamic coating method has the potential for a broad range of applications in microchip capillary electrophoresis (microchip CE) separations.

  12. Patterns of fluorescent protein expression in Scleractinian corals.

    PubMed

    Gruber, David F; Kao, Hung-Teh; Janoschka, Stephen; Tsai, Julia; Pieribone, Vincent A

    2008-10-01

    Biofluorescence exists in only a few classes of organisms, with Anthozoa possessing the majority of species known to express fluorescent proteins. Most species within the Anthozoan subgroup Scleractinia (reef-building corals) not only express green fluorescent proteins, they also localize the proteins in distinct anatomical patterns.We examined the distribution of biofluorescence in 33 coral species, representing 8 families, from study sites on Australia's Great Barrier Reef. For 28 of these species, we report the presence of biofluorescence for the first time. The dominant fluorescent emissions observed were green (480-520 nm) and red (580-600 nm). Fluorescent proteins were expressed in three distinct patterns (highlighted, uniform, and complementary) among specific anatomical structures of corals across a variety of families. We report no significant overlap between the distribution of fluorescent proteins and the distribution of zooxanthellae. Analysis of the patterns of fluorescent protein distribution provides evidence that the scheme in which fluorescent proteins are distributed among the anatomical structures of corals is nonrandom. This targeted expression of fluorescent proteins in corals produces contrast and may function as a signaling mechanism to organisms with sensitivity to specific wavelengths of light.

  13. The Microfluidic Jukebox

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Say Hwa; Maes, Florine; Semin, Benoît; Vrignon, Jérémy; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Music is a form of art interweaving people of all walks of life. Through subtle changes in frequencies, a succession of musical notes forms a melody which is capable of mesmerizing the minds of people. With the advances in technology, we are now able to generate music electronically without relying solely on physical instruments. Here, we demonstrate a musical interpretation of droplet-based microfluidics as a form of novel electronic musical instruments. Using the interplay of electric field and hydrodynamics in microfluidic devices, well controlled frequency patterns corresponding to musical tracks are generated in real time. This high-speed modulation of droplet frequency (and therefore of droplet sizes) may also provide solutions that reconciles high-throughput droplet production and the control of individual droplet at production which is needed for many biochemical or material synthesis applications. PMID:24781785

  14. The Microfluidic Jukebox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Say Hwa; Maes, Florine; Semin, Benoît; Vrignon, Jérémy; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2014-04-01

    Music is a form of art interweaving people of all walks of life. Through subtle changes in frequencies, a succession of musical notes forms a melody which is capable of mesmerizing the minds of people. With the advances in technology, we are now able to generate music electronically without relying solely on physical instruments. Here, we demonstrate a musical interpretation of droplet-based microfluidics as a form of novel electronic musical instruments. Using the interplay of electric field and hydrodynamics in microfluidic devices, well controlled frequency patterns corresponding to musical tracks are generated in real time. This high-speed modulation of droplet frequency (and therefore of droplet sizes) may also provide solutions that reconciles high-throughput droplet production and the control of individual droplet at production which is needed for many biochemical or material synthesis applications.

  15. Integration of dialysis membranes into a poly(dimethylsiloxane) microfluidic chip for isoelectric focusing of proteins using whole-channel imaging detection.

    PubMed

    Ou, Junjie; Glawdel, Tomasz; Samy, Razim; Wang, Shuwen; Liu, Zhen; Ren, Carolyn L; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2008-10-01

    A poly(dimethylsiloxane) microfluidic chip-based cartridge is developed and reported here for protein analysis using isoelectic focusing (IEF)-whole-channel imaging detection (WCID) technology. In this design, commercial dialysis membranes are integrated to separate electrolytes and samples and to reduce undesired pressure-driven flow. Fused-silica capillaries are also incorporated in this design for sample injection and channel surface preconditioning. This structure is equivalent to that of a commercial fused-silica capillary-based cartridge for adapting to an IEF analyzer (iCE280 analyzer) to perform IEF-WCID. The successful integration of dialysis membranes into a microfluidic chip significantly improves IEF repeatability by eliminating undesired pressure-driven hydrodynamics and also makes sample injection much easier than that using the first-generation chip as reported recently. In this study, two microfluidic chips with a 100-microm-high, 100-microm-wide and a 200-microm-high, 50-microm-wide microchannel, respectively, were applied for qualitative and quantitative analysis of proteins. The mixture containing six pI markers with a pH range of 3-10 was successfully separated using IEF-WCID. The pH gradient exhibited a good linearity by plotting the pI value versus peak position, and the correlation coefficient reached 0.9994 and 0.9995 separately for the two chips. The separation of more complicated human hemoglobin control sample containing HbA, HbF, HbS, and HbC was also achieved. Additionally, for the quantitative analysis, a good linearity of IEF peak value versus myoglobin concentration in the range of 20-100 microg/mL was obtained.

  16. Geometry sensing by self-organized protein patterns

    PubMed Central

    Schweizer, Jakob; Loose, Martin; Bonny, Mike; Kruse, Karsten; Mönch, Ingolf; Schwille, Petra

    2012-01-01

    In the living cell, proteins are able to organize space much larger than their dimensions. In return, changes of intracellular space can influence biochemical reactions, allowing cells to sense their size and shape. Despite the possibility to reconstitute protein self-organization with only a few purified components, we still lack knowledge of how geometrical boundaries affect spatiotemporal protein patterns. Following a minimal systems approach, we used purified proteins and photolithographically patterned membranes to study the influence of spatial confinement on the self-organization of the Min system, a spatial regulator of bacterial cytokinesis, in vitro. We found that the emerging protein pattern responds even to the lateral, two-dimensional geometry of the membrane such that, as in the three-dimensional cell, Min protein waves travel along the longest axis of the membrane patch. This shows that for spatial sensing the Min system does not need to be enclosed in a three-dimensional compartment. Using a computational model we quantitatively analyzed our experimental findings and identified persistent binding of MinE to the membrane as requirement for the Min system to sense geometry. Our results give insight into the interplay between geometrical confinement and biochemical patterns emerging from a nonlinear reaction–diffusion system. PMID:22949703

  17. Multistability and dynamic transitions of intracellular Min protein patterns.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fabai; Halatek, Jacob; Reiter, Matthias; Kingma, Enzo; Frey, Erwin; Dekker, Cees

    2016-06-08

    Cells owe their internal organization to self-organized protein patterns, which originate and adapt to growth and external stimuli via a process that is as complex as it is little understood. Here, we study the emergence, stability, and state transitions of multistable Min protein oscillation patterns in live Escherichia coli bacteria during growth up to defined large dimensions. De novo formation of patterns from homogenous starting conditions is observed and studied both experimentally and in simulations. A new theoretical approach is developed for probing pattern stability under perturbations. Quantitative experiments and simulations show that, once established, Min oscillations tolerate a large degree of intracellular heterogeneity, allowing distinctly different patterns to persist in different cells with the same geometry. Min patterns maintain their axes for hours in experiments, despite imperfections, expansion, and changes in cell shape during continuous cell growth. Transitions between multistable Min patterns are found to be rare events induced by strong intracellular perturbations. The instances of multistability studied here are the combined outcome of boundary growth and strongly nonlinear kinetics, which are characteristic of the reaction-diffusion patterns that pervade biology at many scales. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  18. Turn prediction in proteins using a pattern-matching approach.

    PubMed

    Cohen, F E; Abarbanel, R M; Kuntz, I D; Fletterick, R J

    1986-01-14

    We extend the use of amino acid sequence patterns [Cohen, F.E., Abarbanel, R. M., Kuntz, I. D., & Fletterick, R. J. (1983) Biochemistry 22, 4894-4904] to the identification of turns in globular proteins. The approach uses a conservative strategy, combined with a hierarchical search (strongest patterns first) and length-dependent masking, to achieve high accuracy (95%) on a test set of proteins of known structure. Applying the same procedure to homologous families gives a 90% success rate. Straightforward changes are suggested to improve the predictive power. The computer program, written in Lisp, provides a general pattern-recognition language well suited for a number of investigations of protein and nucleic acid sequences.

  19. Systematic and fully automated identification of protein sequence patterns.

    PubMed

    Hart, R K; Royyuru, A K; Stolovitzky, G; Califano, A

    2000-01-01

    We present an efficient algorithm to systematically and automatically identify patterns in protein sequence families. The procedure is based on the Splash deterministic pattern discovery algorithm and on a framework to assess the statistical significance of patterns. We demonstrate its application to the fully automated discovery of patterns in 974 PROSITE families (the complete subset of PROSITE families which are defined by patterns and contain DR records). Splash generates patterns with better specificity and undiminished sensitivity, or vice versa, in 28% of the families; identical statistics were obtained in 48% of the families, worse statistics in 15%, and mixed behavior in the remaining 9%. In about 75% of the cases, Splash patterns identify sequence sites that overlap more than 50% with the corresponding PROSITE pattern. The procedure is sufficiently rapid to enable its use for daily curation of existing motif and profile databases. Third, our results show that the statistical significance of discovered patterns correlates well with their biological significance. The trypsin subfamily of serine proteases is used to illustrate this method's ability to exhaustively discover all motifs in a family that are statistically and biologically significant. Finally, we discuss applications of sequence patterns to multiple sequence alignment and the training of more sensitive score-based motif models, akin to the procedure used by PSI-BLAST. All results are available at httpl//www.research.ibm.com/spat/.

  20. Microfluidic Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Zheng, Siyang (Inventor); Lin, Jeffrey Chun-Hui (Inventor); Kasdan, Harvey L. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Described herein are particular embodiments relating to a microfluidic device that may be utilized for cell sensing, counting, and/or sorting. Particular aspects relate to a microfabricated device that is capable of differentiating single cell types from dense cell populations. One particular embodiment relates a device and methods of using the same for sensing, counting, and/or sorting leukocytes from whole, undiluted blood samples.

  1. Microfluidic Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Zheng, Siyang (Inventor); Lin, Jeffrey Chun-Hui (Inventor); Kasdan, Harvey (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Described herein are particular embodiments relating to a microfluidic device that may be utilized for cell sensing, counting, and/or sorting. Particular aspects relate to a microfabricated device that is capable of differentiating single cell types from dense cell populations. One particular embodiment relates a device and methods of using the same for sensing, counting, and/or sorting leukocytes from whole, undiluted blood samples.

  2. Microfluidic Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Zheng, Siyang (Inventor); Lin, Jeffrey Chun-Hui (Inventor); Kasdan, Harvey L. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Described herein are particular embodiments relating to a microfluidic device that may be utilized for cell sensing, counting, and/or sorting. Particular aspects relate to a microfabricated device that is capable of differentiating single cell types from dense cell populations. One particular embodiment relates a device and methods of using the same for sensing, counting, and/or sorting leukocytes from whole, undiluted blood samples.

  3. Microfluidic Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Zheng, Siyang (Inventor); Lin, Jeffrey Chun-Hui (Inventor); Kasdan, Harvey L. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Described herein are particular embodiments relating to a microfluidic device that may be utilized for cell sensing, counting, and/or sorting. Particular aspects relate to a microfabricated device that is capable of differentiating single cell types from dense cell populations. One particular embodiment relates a device and methods of using the same for sensing, counting, and/or sorting leukocytes from whole, undiluted blood samples.

  4. Towards quantitative prediction of proteasomal digestion patterns of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldobin, Denis S.; Zaikin, Alexey

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the problem of proteasomal degradation of proteins. Though proteasomes are important for all aspects of cellular metabolism, some details of the physical mechanism of the process remain unknown. We introduce a stochastic model of the proteasomal degradation of proteins, which accounts for the protein translocation and the topology of the positioning of cleavage centers of a proteasome from first principles. For this model we develop a mathematical description based on a master equation and techniques for reconstruction of the cleavage specificity inherent to proteins and the proteasomal translocation rates, which are a property of the proteasome species, from mass spectroscopy data on digestion patterns. With these properties determined, one can quantitatively predict digestion patterns for new experimental set-ups. Additionally we design an experimental set-up for a synthetic polypeptide with a periodic sequence of amino acids, which enables especially reliable determination of translocation rates.

  5. Microfluidic waves

    PubMed Central

    Utz, Marcel; Begley, Matthew R.; Haj-Hariri, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    The propagation of pressure waves in fluidic channels with elastic covers is discussed in view of applications to flow control in microfluidic devices. A theory is presented which describes pressure waves in the fluid that are coupled to bending waves in the elastic cover. At low frequencies, the lateral bending of the cover dominates over longitudinal bending, leading to propagating, non-dispersive longitudinal pressure waves in the channel. The theory addresses effects due to both the finite viscosity and compressibility of the fluid. The coupled waves propagate without dispersion, as long as the wave length is larger than the channel width. It is shown that in channels of typical microfluidic dimensions, wave velocities in the range of a few 10 m s−1 result if the channels are covered by films of a compliant material such as PDMS. The application of this principle to design microfluidic band pass filters based on standing waves is discussed. Characteristic frequencies in the range of a few kHz are readily achieved with quality factors above 30. PMID:21966667

  6. Fourier Analysis of Conservation Patterns in Protein Secondary Structure.

    PubMed

    Palaniappan, Ashok; Jakobsson, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Residue conservation is a common observation in alignments of protein families, underscoring positions important in protein structure and function. Though many methods measure the level of conservation of particular residue positions, currently we do not have a way to study spatial oscillations occurring in protein conservation patterns. It is known that hydrophobicity shows spatial oscillations in proteins, which is characterized by computing the hydrophobic moment of the protein domains. Here, we advance the study of moments of conservation of protein families to know whether there might exist spatial asymmetry in the conservation patterns of regular secondary structures. Analogous to the hydrophobic moment, the conservation moment is defined as the modulus of the Fourier transform of the conservation function of an alignment of related protein, where the conservation function is the vector of conservation values at each column of the alignment. The profile of the conservation moment is useful in ascertaining any periodicity of conservation, which might correlate with the period of the secondary structure. To demonstrate the concept, conservation in the family of potassium ion channel proteins was analyzed using moments. It was shown that the pore helix of the potassium channel showed oscillations in the moment of conservation matching the period of the α-helix. This implied that one side of the pore helix was evolutionarily conserved in contrast to its opposite side. In addition, the method of conservation moments correctly identified the disposition of the voltage sensor of voltage-gated potassium channels to form a 310 helix in the membrane.

  7. Modeling associated protein-DNA pattern discovery with unified scores.

    PubMed

    Chan, Tak-Ming; Lo, Leung-Yau; Sze-To, Ho-Yin; Leung, Kwong-Sak; Xiao, Xinshu; Wong, Man-Hon

    2013-01-01

    Understanding protein-DNA interactions, specifically transcription factor (TF) and transcription factor binding site (TFBS) bindings, is crucial in deciphering gene regulation. The recent associated TF-TFBS pattern discovery combines one-sided motif discovery on both the TF and the TFBS sides. Using sequences only, it identifies the short protein-DNA binding cores available only in high-resolution 3D structures. The discovered patterns lead to promising subtype and disease analysis applications. While the related studies use either association rule mining or existing TFBS annotations, none has proposed any formal unified (both-sided) model to prioritize the top verifiable associated patterns. We propose the unified scores and develop an effective pipeline for associated TF-TFBS pattern discovery. Our stringent instance-level evaluations show that the patterns with the top unified scores match with the binding cores in 3D structures considerably better than the previous works, where up to 90 percent of the top 20 scored patterns are verified. We also introduce extended verification from literature surveys, where the high unified scores correspond to even higher verification percentage. The top scored patterns are confirmed to match the known WRKY binding cores with no available 3D structures and agree well with the top binding affinities of in vivo experiments.

  8. Microfluidic Mixing Technology for a Universal Health Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Eugene Y.; Bae, Candice

    2009-01-01

    A highly efficient means of microfluidic mixing has been created for use with the rHEALTH sensor an elliptical mixer and passive curvilinear mixing patterns. The rHEALTH sensor provides rapid, handheld, complete blood count, cell differential counts, electrolyte measurements, and other lab tests based on a reusable, flow-based microfluidic platform. These geometries allow for cleaning in a reusable manner, and also allow for complete mixing of fluid streams. The microfluidic mixing is performed by flowing two streams of fluid into an elliptical or curvilinear design that allows the combination of the flows into one channel. The mixing is accomplished by either chaotic advection around micro - fluidic loops. All components of the microfluidic chip are flow-through, meaning that cleaning solution can be introduced into the chip to flush out cells, plasma proteins, and dye. Tests were performed on multiple chip geometries to show that cleaning is efficient in any flowthrough design. The conclusion from these experiments is that the chip can indeed be flushed out with microliter volumes of solution and biological samples are cleaned readily from the chip with minimal effort. The technology can be applied in real-time health monitoring at patient s bedside or in a doctor s office, and real-time clinical intervention in acute situations. It also can be used for daily measurement of hematocrit for patients on anticoagulant drugs, or to detect acute myocardial damage outside a hospital.

  9. Solid-phase extraction and purification of membrane proteins using a UV-modified PMMA microfluidic bioaffinity μSPE device.

    PubMed

    Battle, Katrina N; Jackson, Joshua M; Witek, Małgorzata A; Hupert, Mateusz L; Hunsucker, Sally A; Armistead, Paul M; Soper, Steven A

    2014-03-21

    We present a novel microfluidic solid-phase extraction (μSPE) device for the affinity enrichment of biotinylated membrane proteins from whole cell lysates. The device offers features that address challenges currently associated with the extraction and purification of membrane proteins from whole cell lysates, including the ability to release the enriched membrane protein fraction from the extraction surface so that they are available for downstream processing. The extraction bed was fabricated in PMMA using hot embossing and was comprised of 3600 micropillars. Activation of the PMMA micropillars by UV/O3 treatment permitted generation of surface-confined carboxylic acid groups and the covalent attachment of NeutrAvidin onto the μSPE device surfaces, which was used to affinity select biotinylated MCF-7 membrane proteins directly from whole cell lysates. The inclusion of a disulfide linker within the biotin moiety permitted release of the isolated membrane proteins via DTT incubation. Very low levels (∼20 fmol) of membrane proteins could be isolated and recovered with ∼89% efficiency with a bed capacity of 1.7 pmol. Western blotting indicated no traces of cytosolic proteins in the membrane protein fraction as compared to significant contamination using a commercial detergent-based method. We highlight future avenues for enhanced extraction efficiency and increased dynamic range of the μSPE device using computational simulations of different micropillar geometries to guide future device designs.

  10. A method of packaging molecule/cell-patterns in an open space into a glass microfluidic channel by combining pressure-based low/room temperature bonding and fluorosilane patterning.

    PubMed

    Funano, Shun-Ichi; Ota, Nobutoshi; Sato, Asako; Tanaka, Yo

    2017-10-10

    We report a fabrication method of a "post-molecule/cell patterned" glass microchip using pressure-based low/room temperature bonding in dry conditions combined with fluorosilane patterning. Multiple proteins/cells were patterned in a single channel using this method. This simple method will provide benefits for using microchips for high throughput analysis in many biological experiments.

  11. A Microfluidic System with Surface Patterning for Investigating Cavitation Bubble(s)-Cell Interaction and the Resultant Bioeffects at the Single-Cell Level

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fenfang; Yuan, Fang; Sankin, Georgy; Yang, Chen; Zhong, Pei

    2017-01-01

    In this manuscript, we first describe the fabrication protocol of a microfluidic chip, with gold dots and fibronectin-coated regions on the same glass substrate that precisely controls the generation of tandem bubbles and individual cells patterned nearby with well-defined locations and shapes. We then demonstrate the generation of tandem bubbles by using two pulsed lasers illuminating a pair of gold dots with a few-microsecond time delay. We visualize the bubble-bubble interaction and jet formation by high-speed imaging and characterize the resultant flow field using particle image velocimetry (PIV). Finally, we present some applications of this technique for single cell analysis, including cell membrane poration with macromolecule uptake, localized membrane deformation determined by the displacements of attached integrin-binding beads, and intracellular calcium response from ratiometric imaging. Our results show that a fast and directional jetting flow is produced by the tandem bubble interaction, which can impose a highly-localized shear stress on the surface of a cell grown in close proximity. Furthermore, different bioeffects can be induced by altering the strength of the jetting flow by adjusting the standoff distance from the cell to the tandem bubbles. PMID:28117807

  12. A Microfluidic System with Surface Patterning for Investigating Cavitation Bubble(s)-Cell Interaction and the Resultant Bioeffects at the Single-cell Level.

    PubMed

    Li, Fenfang; Yuan, Fang; Sankin, Georgy; Yang, Chen; Zhong, Pei

    2017-01-10

    In this manuscript, we first describe the fabrication protocol of a microfluidic chip, with gold dots and fibronectin-coated regions on the same glass substrate, that precisely controls the generation of tandem bubbles and individual cells patterned nearby with well-defined locations and shapes. We then demonstrate the generation of tandem bubbles by using two pulsed lasers illuminating a pair of gold dots with a few-microsecond time delay. We visualize the bubble-bubble interaction and jet formation by high-speed imaging and characterize the resultant flow field using particle image velocimetry (PIV). Finally, we present some applications of this technique for single cell analysis, including cell membrane poration with macromolecule uptake, localized membrane deformation determined by the displacements of attached integrin-binding beads, and intracellular calcium response from ratiometric imaging. Our results show that a fast and directional jetting flow is produced by the tandem bubble interaction, which can impose a highly localized shear stress on the surface of a cell grown in close proximity. Furthermore, different bioeffects can be induced by altering the strength of the jetting flow by adjusting the standoff distance from the cell to the tandem bubbles.

  13. Chemicals and heat generate different protein patterns in Acinetobacter calcoaceticus.

    PubMed

    Benndorf, D; Loffhagen, N; Babel, W

    1997-01-01

    The effect of exposing Acinetobacter calcoaceticus 69-V to DNP-stress and heat shock was examined by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of proteins, which were detected either by autoradiography or by silver staining. Both DNP stress and heat shock led to altered patterns of protein synthesis or concentration. About 10% of the proteins which were synthesized newly or at an increased rate and about 25% of those which were found newly or with an increased concentration after DNP treatment were identified after heat shock, too.

  14. Photo-patterned free-standing hydrogel microarrays for massively parallel protein analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncombe, Todd A.; Herr, Amy E.

    2015-03-01

    Microfluidic technologies have largely been realized within enclosed microchannels. While powerful, a principle limitation of closed-channel microfluidics is the difficulty for sample extraction and downstream processing. To address this limitation and expand the utility of microfluidic analytical separation tools, we developed an openchannel hydrogel architecture for rapid protein analysis. Designed for compatibility with slab-gel polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) reagents and instruments, we detail the development of free-standing polyacrylamide gel (fsPAG) microstructures supporting electrophoretic performance rivalling that of microfluidic platforms. Owing to its open architecture - the platform can be easily interfaced with automated robotic controllers and downstream processing (e.g., sample spotters, immunological probing, mass spectroscopy). The fsPAG devices are directly photopatterened atop of and covalently attached to planar polymer or glass surfaces. Due to the fast < 1 hr design-prototype-test cycle - significantly faster than mold based fabrication techniques - rapid prototyping devices with fsPAG microstructures provides researchers a powerful tool for developing custom analytical assays. Leveraging the rapid prototyping benefits - we up-scale from a unit separation to an array of 96 concurrent fsPAGE assays in 10 min run time driven by one electrode pair. The fsPAGE platform is uniquely well-suited for massively parallelized proteomics, a major unrealized goal from bioanalytical technology.

  15. Isozyme patterns and protein profiles in neuromuscular disorders.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Y H; Tipler, T D; Morgan-Hughes, J A; Neerunjun, J S; Hopkinson, D A

    1982-06-01

    The isozyme patterns of six different enzymes and the polypeptide profiles of soluble proteins have been examined in muscle biopsy specimens from 74 patients with a wide variety of neuromuscular disorders. About half of the samples showed unusual features in at least one, and often several, of the enzymes and proteins tested. The extent of the biochemical abnormalities was roughly proportional to the severity of the disorders. In all cases the unusual isozymes and polypeptide profiles seemed to reflect a reversion to the fetal pattern of gene expression. However, this change appeared to occur in extant muscle and was not dependent on the appearance of new muscle fibres. Among the enzymes, phosphoglycerate mutase followed by creatine kinase appeared to be the most sensitive index of muscle disorder. The extent of the change in the muscle creatine kinase isozyme pattern was not correlated with the levels of serum creatine kinase activity.

  16. Isozyme patterns and protein profiles in neuromuscular disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Y H; Tipler, T D; Morgan-Hughes, J A; Neerunjun, J S; Hopkinson, D A

    1982-01-01

    The isozyme patterns of six different enzymes and the polypeptide profiles of soluble proteins have been examined in muscle biopsy specimens from 74 patients with a wide variety of neuromuscular disorders. About half of the samples showed unusual features in at least one, and often several, of the enzymes and proteins tested. The extent of the biochemical abnormalities was roughly proportional to the severity of the disorders. In all cases the unusual isozymes and polypeptide profiles seemed to reflect a reversion to the fetal pattern of gene expression. However, this change appeared to occur in extant muscle and was not dependent on the appearance of new muscle fibres. Among the enzymes, phosphoglycerate mutase followed by creatine kinase appeared to be the most sensitive index of muscle disorder. The extent of the change in the muscle creatine kinase isozyme pattern was not correlated with the levels of serum creatine kinase activity. Images PMID:6286971

  17. Improved method for predicting protein fold patterns with ensemble classifiers.

    PubMed

    Chen, W; Liu, X; Huang, Y; Jiang, Y; Zou, Q; Lin, C

    2012-01-27

    Protein folding is recognized as a critical problem in the field of biophysics in the 21st century. Predicting protein-folding patterns is challenging due to the complex structure of proteins. In an attempt to solve this problem, we employed ensemble classifiers to improve prediction accuracy. In our experiments, 188-dimensional features were extracted based on the composition and physical-chemical property of proteins and 20-dimensional features were selected using a coupled position-specific scoring matrix. Compared with traditional prediction methods, these methods were superior in terms of prediction accuracy. The 188-dimensional feature-based method achieved 71.2% accuracy in five cross-validations. The accuracy rose to 77% when we used a 20-dimensional feature vector. These methods were used on recent data, with 54.2% accuracy. Source codes and dataset, together with web server and software tools for prediction, are available at: http://datamining.xmu.edu.cn/main/~cwc/ProteinPredict.html.

  18. Droplet based microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Seemann, Ralf; Brinkmann, Martin; Pfohl, Thomas; Herminghaus, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Droplet based microfluidics is a rapidly growing interdisciplinary field of research combining soft matter physics, biochemistry and microsystems engineering. Its applications range from fast analytical systems or the synthesis of advanced materials to protein crystallization and biological assays for living cells. Precise control of droplet volumes and reliable manipulation of individual droplets such as coalescence, mixing of their contents, and sorting in combination with fast analysis tools allow us to perform chemical reactions inside the droplets under defined conditions. In this paper, we will review available drop generation and manipulation techniques. The main focus of this review is not to be comprehensive and explain all techniques in great detail but to identify and shed light on similarities and underlying physical principles. Since geometry and wetting properties of the microfluidic channels are crucial factors for droplet generation, we also briefly describe typical device fabrication methods in droplet based microfluidics. Examples of applications and reaction schemes which rely on the discussed manipulation techniques are also presented, such as the fabrication of special materials and biophysical experiments.

  19. Discovering patterns to extract protein-protein interactions from full texts.

    PubMed

    Huang, Minlie; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Hao, Yu; Payan, Donald G; Qu, Kunbin; Li, Ming

    2004-12-12

    Although there are several databases storing protein-protein interactions, most such data still exist only in the scientific literature. They are scattered in scientific literature written in natural languages, defying data mining efforts. Much time and labor have to be spent on extracting protein pathways from literature. Our aim is to develop a robust and powerful methodology to mine protein-protein interactions from biomedical texts. We present a novel and robust approach for extracting protein-protein interactions from literature. Our method uses a dynamic programming algorithm to compute distinguishing patterns by aligning relevant sentences and key verbs that describe protein interactions. A matching algorithm is designed to extract the interactions between proteins. Equipped only with a dictionary of protein names, our system achieves a recall rate of 80.0% and precision rate of 80.5%. The program is available on request from the authors.

  20. Preparation and characterization of a packed bead immobilized trypsin reactor integrated into a PDMS microfluidic chip for rapid protein digestion.

    PubMed

    Kecskemeti, Adam; Gaspar, Attila

    2017-05-01

    This paper demonstrates the design, efficiency and applicability of a simple, inexpensive and high sample throughput microchip immobilized enzymatic reactor (IMER) for rapid protein digestion. The IMER contains conventional silica particles with covalently immobilized trypsin packed inside of a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microchip channel (10mm×1mm×35µm). The microchip consists of 9 different channels, enabling 9 simultaneous protein digestions. Trypsin was covalently immobilized using carbodiimide activation, the ideal trypsin/silica particle ratio (i.e. measured mass ratio before the immobilization reaction) was determined. The amount of immobilized trypsin was 10-15μg trypsin for 1mg silica particle. Migration times of CZE peptide maps showed good repeatability and reproducibility (RSD%=0.02-0.31%). The IMER maintained its activity for 2 months, in this period it was used effectively for rapid proteolysis. Four proteins (myoglobin, lysozyme, hemoglobin and albumin) in a wide size range (15-70kDa) were digested to demonstrate the applicability of the reactor. Their CZE peptide maps were compared to peptide maps obtained from standard in-solution digestion of the four proteins. The number of peptide peaks correlated well with the theoretically expected peptide number in both cases, the peak patterns of the electropherograms were similar, however, digestion with the microchip IMER requires only <10s, while in-solution digestion takes 16h. LC-MS/MS peptide mapping was also carried out, the four proteins were identified with satisfying sequence coverages (29-50%), trypsin autolysis peptides were not detected. The protein content of human serum was digested with the IMER and with in-solution digestion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Microfluidic interconnects

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    2001-01-01

    A miniature connector for introducing microliter quantities of solutions into microfabricated fluidic devices. The fluidic connector, for example, joins standard high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) tubing to 1 mm diameter holes in silicon or glass, enabling ml-sized volumes of sample solutions to be merged with .mu.l-sized devices. The connector has many features, including ease of connect and disconnect; a small footprint which enables numerous connectors to be located in a small area; low dead volume; helium leak-tight; and tubing does not twist during connection. Thus the connector enables easy and effective change of microfluidic devices and introduction of different solutions in the devices.

  2. New Host Factors Important for Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Replication Revealed by a Novel Microfluidics Screen for Interactors of Matrix (M) Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Kipper, Sarit; Hamad, Samar; Caly, Leon; Avrahami, Dorit; Bacharach, Eran; Jans, David A.; Gerber, Doron; Bajorek, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Although human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia in infants and elderly worldwide, there is no licensed RSV vaccine or effective drug treatment available. The RSV Matrix protein plays key roles in virus life cycle, being found in the nucleus early in infection in a transcriptional inhibitory role, and later localizing in viral inclusion bodies before coordinating viral assembly and budding at the plasma membrane. In this study, we used a novel, high throughput microfluidics platform and custom human open reading frame library to identify novel host cell binding partners of RSV matrix. Novel interactors identified included proteins involved in host transcription regulation, the innate immunity response, cytoskeletal regulation, membrane remodeling, and cellular trafficking. A number of these interactions were confirmed by immunoprecipitation and cellular colocalization approaches. Importantly, the physiological significance of matrix interaction with the actin-binding protein cofilin 1, caveolae protein Caveolin 2, and the zinc finger protein ZNF502 was confirmed. siRNA knockdown of the host protein levels resulted in reduced RSV virus production in infected cells. These results have important implications for future antiviral strategies aimed at targets of RSV matrix in the host cell. PMID:25556234

  3. New host factors important for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) replication revealed by a novel microfluidics screen for interactors of matrix (M) protein.

    PubMed

    Kipper, Sarit; Hamad, Samar; Caly, Leon; Avrahami, Dorit; Bacharach, Eran; Jans, David A; Gerber, Doron; Bajorek, Monika

    2015-03-01

    Although human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia in infants and elderly worldwide, there is no licensed RSV vaccine or effective drug treatment available. The RSV Matrix protein plays key roles in virus life cycle, being found in the nucleus early in infection in a transcriptional inhibitory role, and later localizing in viral inclusion bodies before coordinating viral assembly and budding at the plasma membrane. In this study, we used a novel, high throughput microfluidics platform and custom human open reading frame library to identify novel host cell binding partners of RSV matrix. Novel interactors identified included proteins involved in host transcription regulation, the innate immunity response, cytoskeletal regulation, membrane remodeling, and cellular trafficking. A number of these interactions were confirmed by immunoprecipitation and cellular colocalization approaches. Importantly, the physiological significance of matrix interaction with the actin-binding protein cofilin 1, caveolae protein Caveolin 2, and the zinc finger protein ZNF502 was confirmed. siRNA knockdown of the host protein levels resulted in reduced RSV virus production in infected cells. These results have important implications for future antiviral strategies aimed at targets of RSV matrix in the host cell.

  4. Electrochemical and chemical microfluidic gold etching to generate patterned and gradient substrates for cell adhesion and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Westcott, Nathan P; Lamb, Brian M; Yousaf, Muhammad N

    2009-05-01

    To generate patterned substrates of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) for cell adhesion and migration studies, a variety of gold/glass hybrid substrates were fabricated from gold evaporated on glass. A variety of surfaces were generated including gradients of gold height, completely etched gold/glass hybrids, and partially etched gold surfaces for pattern visualization. Etch rates were controlled by the alkanethiol present on the surface. Gradients of gold height were created using an electrochemical etch with control over the position and slope of the gold height gradient. Cells were seeded to these surfaces, and their adhesion to the gold was controlled by the surface chemistry present in the channel regions. In the future, the etched gold surfaces will be used to simulate the varying nanotopology experienced by the migrating cell in vivo.

  5. Laser Ablation of Polymer Microfluidic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Killeen, Kevin

    2004-03-01

    Microfluidic technology is ideal for processing precious samples of limited volumes. Some of the most important classes of biological samples are both high in sample complexity and low in concentration. Combining the elements of sample pre-concentration, chemical separation and high sensitivity detection with chemical identification is essential for realizing a functional microfluidic based analysis system. Direct write UV laser ablation has been used to rapidly fabricate microfluidic devices capable of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-MS. These chip-LC/MS devices use bio-compatible, solvent resistant and flexible polymer materials such as polyimide. A novel microfluidic to rotary valve interface enables, leak free, high pressure fluid switching between multiple ports of the microfluidic chip-LC/MS device. Electrospray tips with outer dimension of 50 um and inner of 15 um are formed by ablating the polymer material concentrically around a multilayer laminated channel structure. Biological samples of digested proteins were used to evaluate the performance of these microfluidic devices. Liquid chromatography separation and similar sample pretreatments have been performed using polymeric microfluidic devices with on-chip separation channels. Mass spectrometry was performed using an Agilent Technologies 1100 series ion trap mass spectrometer. Low fmol amounts of protein samples were positively and routinely identified by searching the MS/MS spectral data against protein databases. The sensitivity and separation performance of the chip-LC devices has been found to be comparable to state of the art nano-electrospray systems.

  6. Tacky COC: a solvent bonding technique for fabrication of microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Nico; Nargang, Tobias M.; Helmer, Dorothea; Rapp, Bastian E.

    2016-03-01

    The academic community knows cyclic olefin copolymer (COC) as a well suited material for microfluidic applications because COC has numerous interesting properties such as high transmittance, good chemical resistance and good biocompatibility. Here we present a fast and cost-effective method for bonding of two COC substrates: exposure to appropriate solvents gives a tacky COC surface which when brought in contact with untreated COC forms a strong and optical clear bond. The bonding process is carried out at room temperature and takes less than three minutes which makes it significantly faster than currently described methods: This method does not require special lab equipment such as hot plates or hydraulic presses. The mild conditions of the bond process also allow for such "tacky COC" lids to be used for sealing of microfluidic chips containing immobilized protein patterns which is of high interest for immunodiagnostic testing inside microfluidic chips.

  7. Microfluidic device having an immobilized pH gradient and PAGE gels for protein separation and analysis

    DOEpatents

    Sommer, Gregory J.; Hatch, Anson V.; Singh, Anup K.; Wang, Ying-Chih

    2012-12-11

    Disclosed is a novel microfluidic device enabling on-chip implementation of a two-dimensional separation methodology. Previously disclosed microscale immobilized pH gradients (IPG) are combined with perpendicular polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) microchannels to achieve orthogonal separations of biological samples. Device modifications enable inclusion of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in the second dimension. The device can be fabricated to use either continuous IPG gels, or the microscale isoelectric fractionation membranes we have also previously disclosed, for the first dimension. The invention represents the first all-gel two-dimensional separation microdevice, with significantly higher resolution power over existing devices.

  8. Microfluidic device having an immobilized pH gradient and page gels for protein separation and analysis

    DOEpatents

    Sommer, Gregory J; Hatch, Anson V; Singh, Anup K; Wang, Ying-Chih

    2014-05-20

    Disclosed is a novel microfluidic device enabling on-chip implementation of a two-dimensional separation methodology. Previously disclosed microscale immobilized pH gradients (IPG) are combined with perpendicular polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) microchannels to achieve orthogonal separations of biological samples. Device modifications enable inclusion of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in the second dimension. The device can be fabricated to use either continuous IPG gels, or the microscale isoelectric fractionation membranes we have also previously disclosed, for the first dimension. The invention represents the first all-gel two-dimensional separation microdevice, with significantly higher resolution power over existing devices.

  9. Protein pattern of Xenopus laevis embryos grown in simulated microgravity.

    PubMed

    Tedeschi, Gabriella; Pagliato, Lara; Negroni, Manuela; Montorfano, Gigliola; Corsetto, Paola; Nonnis, Simona; Negri, Armando; Rizzo, Angela Maria

    2011-03-01

    Numerous studies indicate that microgravity affects cell growth and differentiation in many living organisms, and various processes are modified when cells are placed under conditions of weightlessness. However, until now, there is no coherent explanation for these observations, and little information is available concerning the biomolecules involved. Our aim has been to investigate the protein pattern of Xenopus laevis embryos exposed to simulated microgravity during the first 6 days of development. A proteomic approach was applied to compare the protein profiles of Xenopus embryos developed in simulated microgravity and in normal conditions. Attention was focused on embryos that do not present visible malformations in order to investigate if weightlessness has effects at protein level in the absence of macroscopic alterations. The data presented strongly suggest that some of the major components of the cytoskeleton vary in such conditions. Three major findings are described for the first time: (i) the expression of important factors involved in the organization and stabilization of the cytoskeleton, such as Arp (actin-related protein) 3 and stathmin, is heavily affected by microgravity; (ii) the amount of the two major cytoskeletal proteins, actin and tubulin, do not change in such conditions; however, (iii) an increase in the tyrosine nitration of these two proteins can be detected. The data suggest that, in the absence of morphological alterations, simulated microgravity affects the intracellular movement system of cells by altering cytoskeletal proteins heavily involved in the regulation of cytoskeleton remodelling.

  10. Nanoscale protein patterning using self-assembled diblock copolymers.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nitin; Hahm, Jong-in

    2005-07-19

    Novel methods for immobilizing proteins on surfaces have the potential to impact basic biological research as well as various biochip applications. Here, we demonstrate a unique method to pattern proteins with a nanometer periodicity on silicon oxide substrates using microphase-separated diblock copolymer thin films. We developed a straightforward and effective protein immobilization technique using the microphase-separated domains of polystyrene-block-poly(methyl methacrylate) to localize various model protein molecules such as bovine immunoglobulin G, fluorescein isothiocyanate conjugated anti-bovine immunoglobulin G, and protein G. The self-organizing nature of the diblock copolymer was exploited to produce periodically alternating, nanometer-spaced polymeric domains exposing the two chemical compositions of the diblock to surface. We demonstrate that the model proteins selectively self-organize themselves on the microdomain regions of specific polymer components due to their preferential interactions with one of the two polymer segments. This diblock copolymer-based, self-assembly approach represents a step forward for facile, nanometer-spaced protein immobilization with high areal density and could provide a pathway to high-throughput proteomic arrays and biosensors.

  11. Room-temperature serial crystallography using a kinetically optimized microfluidic device for protein crystallization and on-chip X-ray diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Heymann, Michael; Opthalage, Achini; Wierman, Jennifer L.; Akella, Sathish; Szebenyi, Doletha M. E.; Gruner, Sol M.; Fraden, Seth

    2014-01-01

    An emulsion-based serial crystallographic technology has been developed, in which nanolitre-sized droplets of protein solution are encapsulated in oil and stabilized by surfactant. Once the first crystal in a drop is nucleated, the small volume generates a negative feedback mechanism that lowers the supersaturation. This mechanism is exploited to produce one crystal per drop. Diffraction data are measured, one crystal at a time, from a series of room-temperature crystals stored on an X-ray semi-transparent microfluidic chip, and a 93% complete data set is obtained by merging single diffraction frames taken from different unoriented crystals. As proof of concept, the structure of glucose isomerase was solved to 2.1 Å, demonstrating the feasibility of high-throughput serial X-ray crystallography using synchrotron radiation. PMID:25295176

  12. Preparation of stripe-patterned heterogeneous hydrogel sheets using microfluidic devices for high-density coculture of hepatocytes and fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Aoi; Yamakoshi, Kenta; Yajima, Yuya; Utoh, Rie; Yamada, Masumi; Seki, Minoru

    2013-12-01

    Here we demonstrate the production of stripe-patterned heterogeneous hydrogel sheets for the high-density 3D coculture of multiple cell types, by using microchannel-combined micronozzle devices. The prepared hydrogel sheet, composed of multiple regions with varying physical stiffness, regulates the direction of proliferation of encapsulated cells and enables the formation of arrays of rod-like heterotypic organoids inside the hydrogel matrix. We successfully prepared stripe-patterned hydrogel sheets with a uniform thickness of ~100 μm and a width of several millimeters. Hepatoma cells (HepG2) and fibroblasts (Swiss 3T3) were embedded inside the hydrogel matrix and cocultured, to form heterotypic micro-organoids mimicking in vivo hepatic cord structures. The upregulation of hepatic functions by the 3D coculture was confirmed by analyzing liver-specific functions. The presented heterogeneous hydrogel sheet could be useful, as it provides relatively large, but precisely-controlled, 3-dimensional microenvironments for the high-density coculture of multiple types of cells.

  13. Using macromolecular-crystallography beamline and microfluidic platform for small-angle diffraction studies of lipidic matrices for membrane-protein crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondrashkina, E.; Khvostichenko, D. S.; Perry, S. L.; Von Osinski, J.; Kenis, P. J. A.; Brister, K.

    2013-03-01

    Macromolecular-crystallography (MX) beamlines routinely provide a possibility to change X-ray beam energy, focus the beam to a size of tens of microns, align a sample on a microdiffractometer using on-axis video microscope, and collect data with an area-detector positioned in three dimensions. These capabilities allow for running complementary measurements of small-angle X-ray scattering and diffraction (SAXS) at the same beamline with such additions to the standard MX setup as a vacuum path between the sample and the detector, a modified beam stop, and a custom sample cell. On the 21-ID-D MX beamline at the Advanced Photon Source we attach a vacuum flight tube to the area detector support and use the support motion for aligning a beam stop built into the rear end of the flight tube. At 8 KeV energy and 1 m sample-to-detector distance we can achieve a small-angle resolution of 0.01A-1 in the reciprocal space. Measuring SAXS with this setup, we have studied phase diagrams of lipidic mesophases used as matrices for membrane-protein crystallization. The outcome of crystallization trials is significantly affected by the structure of the lipidic mesophases, which is determined by the composition of the crystallization mixture. We use a microfluidic chip for the mesophase formulation and in situ SAXS data collection. Using the MX beamline and the microfluidic platform we have demonstrated the viability of the high-throughput SAXS studies facilitating screening of lipidic matrices for membrane-protein crystallization.

  14. Microfluidic electrochemical reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Nuzzo, Ralph G; Mitrovski, Svetlana M

    2011-03-22

    A microfluidic electrochemical reactor includes an electrode and one or more microfluidic channels on the electrode, where the microfluidic channels are covered with a membrane containing a gas permeable polymer. The distance between the electrode and the membrane is less than 500 micrometers. The microfluidic electrochemical reactor can provide for increased reaction rates in electrochemical reactions using a gaseous reactant, as compared to conventional electrochemical cells. Microfluidic electrochemical reactors can be incorporated into devices for applications such as fuel cells, electrochemical analysis, microfluidic actuation, pH gradient formation.

  15. Assembly of designed protein scaffolds into monolayers for nanoparticle patterning.

    PubMed

    Mejias, Sara H; Couleaud, Pierre; Casado, Santiago; Granados, Daniel; Garcia, Miguel Angel; Abad, Jose M; Cortajarena, Aitziber L

    2016-05-01

    The controlled assembly of building blocks to achieve new nanostructured materials with defined properties at different length scales through rational design is the basis and future of bottom-up nanofabrication. This work describes the assembly of the idealized protein building block, the consensus tetratricopeptide repeat (CTPR), into monolayers by oriented immobilization of the blocks. The selectivity of thiol-gold interaction for an oriented immobilization has been verified by comparing a non-thiolated protein building block. The physical properties of the CTPR protein thin biomolecular films including topography, thickness, and viscoelasticity, are characterized. Finally, the ability of these scaffolds to act as templates for inorganic nanostructures has been demonstrated by the formation of well-packed gold nanoparticles (GNPs) monolayer patterned by the CTPR monolayer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Thermoosmotic microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingcheng; Ripoll, Marisol

    2016-10-19

    Microchannels with asymmetrically ratcheted walls are here shown to behave as effective and versatile microfluidic pumps if locally heated. When the boundary walls have different temperatures, the confined liquid experiences a temperature gradient along the sawtooth edges, which can induce a thermoosmotic flow. A mesoscale molecular simulation approach is here employed to investigate the flows which are contrasted using an analytical approach. Microchannels can be composed by one or two ratcheted walls which can be straight or cylindrical. Varying the channel geometry can not only change the overall fluid flux, but also vary the flow patters from shear to capillary type, or even to extensional type flows. This scheme does not require multiphase fluids or any movable channel parts, although they are possible to be implemented. The proposed principle is then very versatile to locally manipulate complex fluids, and a promising tool to recover waste heat, to facilitate cooling of microchips, and to manufacture portable lab-on-a-chip devices.

  17. Microfluidic interconnects

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    2001-01-01

    A miniature connector for introducing microliter quantities of solutions into microfabricated fluidic devices, and which incorporates a molded ring or seal set into a ferrule cartridge, with or without a compression screw. The fluidic connector, for example, joins standard high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) tubing to 1 mm diameter holes in silicon or glass, enabling ml-sized volumes of sample solutions to be merged with .mu.l-sized devices. The connector has many features, including ease of connect and disconnect; a small footprint which enables numerous connectors to be located in a small area; low dead volume; helium leak-tight; and tubing does not twist during connection. Thus the connector enables easy and effective change of microfluidic devices and introduction of different solutions in the devices.

  18. Microfluidic molecular assay platform for the detection of miRNAs, mRNAs, proteins, and post-translational modifications at single-cell resolution

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Meiye; Singh, Anup K.

    2014-07-15

    In this study, cell signaling is a dynamic and complex process. A typical signaling pathway may begin with activation of cell surface receptors, leading to activation kinase cascade that culminates in induction of mRNA and non-coding miRNA production in the nucleus, followed by modulation of mRNA expression by miRNAs in the cytosol, and end with production of proteins in response to the signaling pathway. Signaling pathways involve proteins, miRNA, and mRNAs, along with various forms of transient post-translational modifications, and detecting each type of signaling molecule requires categorically different sample preparation methods such as Western blotting for proteins, PCR formore » nucleic acids, and flow cytometry for post-translational modifications. Since we know that cells in populations behave heterogeneously1, especially in the cases of stem cells, cancer, and hematopoiesis, there is need for a new technology that provides capability to detect and quantify multiple categories of signaling molecules in intact single cells to provide a comprehensive view of the cell’s physiological state. In this technical brief, we describe our microfluidic platform with a portfolio of customized molecular assays that can detect nucleic acids, proteins, and post-translational modifications in single intact cells with >95% reduction in reagent requirement in under 8 hours.« less

  19. Microfluidic molecular assay platform for the detection of miRNAs, mRNAs, proteins, and post-translational modifications at single-cell resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Meiye; Singh, Anup K.

    2014-07-15

    In this study, cell signaling is a dynamic and complex process. A typical signaling pathway may begin with activation of cell surface receptors, leading to activation kinase cascade that culminates in induction of mRNA and non-coding miRNA production in the nucleus, followed by modulation of mRNA expression by miRNAs in the cytosol, and end with production of proteins in response to the signaling pathway. Signaling pathways involve proteins, miRNA, and mRNAs, along with various forms of transient post-translational modifications, and detecting each type of signaling molecule requires categorically different sample preparation methods such as Western blotting for proteins, PCR for nucleic acids, and flow cytometry for post-translational modifications. Since we know that cells in populations behave heterogeneously1, especially in the cases of stem cells, cancer, and hematopoiesis, there is need for a new technology that provides capability to detect and quantify multiple categories of signaling molecules in intact single cells to provide a comprehensive view of the cell’s physiological state. In this technical brief, we describe our microfluidic platform with a portfolio of customized molecular assays that can detect nucleic acids, proteins, and post-translational modifications in single intact cells with >95% reduction in reagent requirement in under 8 hours.

  20. Pbx homeodomain proteins pattern both the zebrafish retina and tectum.

    PubMed

    French, Curtis R; Erickson, Timothy; Callander, Davon; Berry, Karyn M; Koss, Ron; Hagey, Daniel W; Stout, Jennifer; Wuennenberg-Stapleton, Katrin; Ngai, John; Moens, Cecilia B; Waskiewicz, Andrew J

    2007-07-16

    Pbx genes encode TALE class homeodomain transcription factors that pattern the developing neural tube, pancreas, and blood. Within the hindbrain, Pbx cooperates with Hox proteins to regulate rhombomere segment identity. Pbx cooperates with Eng to regulate midbrain-hindbrain boundary maintenance, and with MyoD to control fast muscle cell differentiation. Although previous results have demonstrated that Pbx is required for proper eye size, functions in regulating retinal cell identity and patterning have not yet been examined. Analysis of retinal ganglion cell axon pathfinding and outgrowth in pbx2/4 null embryos demonstrated a key role for pbx genes in regulating neural cell behavior. To identify Pbx-dependent genes involved in regulating retino-tectal pathfinding, we conducted a microarray screen for Pbx-dependent transcripts in zebrafish, and detected genes that are specifically expressed in the eye and tectum. A subset of Pbx-dependent retinal transcripts delineate specific domains in the dorso-temporal lobe of the developing retina. Furthermore, we determined that some Pbx-dependent transcripts also require Meis1 and Gdf6a function. Since gdf6a expression is also dependent on Pbx, we propose a model in which Pbx proteins regulate expression of the growth factor gdf6a, which in turn regulates patterning of the dorso-temporal lobe of the retina. This, in concert with aberrant tectal patterning in pbx2/4 null embryos, may lead to the observed defects in RGC outgrowth. These data define a novel role for Pbx in patterning the vertebrate retina and tectum in a manner required for proper retinal ganglion cell axon outgrowth.

  1. Pbx homeodomain proteins pattern both the zebrafish retina and tectum

    PubMed Central

    French, Curtis R; Erickson, Timothy; Callander, Davon; Berry, Karyn M; Koss, Ron; Hagey, Daniel W; Stout, Jennifer; Wuennenberg-Stapleton, Katrin; Ngai, John; Moens, Cecilia B; Waskiewicz, Andrew J

    2007-01-01

    Background Pbx genes encode TALE class homeodomain transcription factors that pattern the developing neural tube, pancreas, and blood. Within the hindbrain, Pbx cooperates with Hox proteins to regulate rhombomere segment identity. Pbx cooperates with Eng to regulate midbrain-hindbrain boundary maintenance, and with MyoD to control fast muscle cell differentiation. Although previous results have demonstrated that Pbx is required for proper eye size, functions in regulating retinal cell identity and patterning have not yet been examined. Results Analysis of retinal ganglion cell axon pathfinding and outgrowth in pbx2/4 null embryos demonstrated a key role for pbx genes in regulating neural cell behavior. To identify Pbx-dependent genes involved in regulating retino-tectal pathfinding, we conducted a microarray screen for Pbx-dependent transcripts in zebrafish, and detected genes that are specifically expressed in the eye and tectum. A subset of Pbx-dependent retinal transcripts delineate specific domains in the dorso-temporal lobe of the developing retina. Furthermore, we determined that some Pbx-dependent transcripts also require Meis1 and Gdf6a function. Since gdf6a expression is also dependent on Pbx, we propose a model in which Pbx proteins regulate expression of the growth factor gdf6a, which in turn regulates patterning of the dorso-temporal lobe of the retina. This, in concert with aberrant tectal patterning in pbx2/4 null embryos, may lead to the observed defects in RGC outgrowth. Conclusion These data define a novel role for Pbx in patterning the vertebrate retina and tectum in a manner required for proper retinal ganglion cell axon outgrowth. PMID:17634100

  2. Mapping out Min protein patterns in fully confined fluidic chambers

    PubMed Central

    Caspi, Yaron; Dekker, Cees

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial Min protein system provides a major model system for studying reaction-diffusion processes in biology. Here we present the first in vitro study of the Min system in fully confined three-dimensional chambers that are lithography-defined, lipid-bilayer coated and isolated through pressure valves. We identify three typical dynamical behaviors that occur dependent on the geometrical chamber parameters: pole-to-pole oscillations, spiral rotations, and traveling waves. We establish the geometrical selection rules and show that, surprisingly, Min-protein spiral rotations govern the larger part of the geometrical phase diagram. Confinement as well as an elevated temperature reduce the characteristic wavelength of the Min patterns, although even for confined chambers with a bacterial-level viscosity, the patterns retain a ~5 times larger wavelength than in vivo. Our results provide an essential experimental base for modeling of intracellular Min gradients in bacterial cell division as well as, more generally, for understanding pattern formation in reaction-diffusion systems. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19271.001 PMID:27885986

  3. Mapping out Min protein patterns in fully confined fluidic chambers.

    PubMed

    Caspi, Yaron; Dekker, Cees

    2016-11-25

    The bacterial Min protein system provides a major model system for studying reaction-diffusion processes in biology. Here we present the first in vitro study of the Min system in fully confined three-dimensional chambers that are lithography-defined, lipid-bilayer coated and isolated through pressure valves. We identify three typical dynamical behaviors that occur dependent on the geometrical chamber parameters: pole-to-pole oscillations, spiral rotations, and traveling waves. We establish the geometrical selection rules and show that, surprisingly, Min-protein spiral rotations govern the larger part of the geometrical phase diagram. Confinement as well as an elevated temperature reduce the characteristic wavelength of the Min patterns, although even for confined chambers with a bacterial-level viscosity, the patterns retain a ~5 times larger wavelength than in vivo. Our results provide an essential experimental base for modeling of intracellular Min gradients in bacterial cell division as well as, more generally, for understanding pattern formation in reaction-diffusion systems.

  4. Inertial microfluidic physics.

    PubMed

    Amini, Hamed; Lee, Wonhee; Di Carlo, Dino

    2014-08-07

    Microfluidics has experienced massive growth in the past two decades, and especially with advances in rapid prototyping researchers have explored a multitude of channel structures, fluid and particle mixtures, and integration with electrical and optical systems towards solving problems in healthcare, biological and chemical analysis, materials synthesis, and other emerging areas that can benefit from the scale, automation, or the unique physics of these systems. Inertial microfluidics, which relies on the unconventional use of fluid inertia in microfluidic platforms, is one of the emerging fields that make use of unique physical phenomena that are accessible in microscale patterned channels. Channel shapes that focus, concentrate, order, separate, transfer, and mix particles and fluids have been demonstrated, however physical underpinnings guiding these channel designs have been limited and much of the development has been based on experimentally-derived intuition. Here we aim to provide a deeper understanding of mechanisms and underlying physics in these systems which can lead to more effective and reliable designs with less iteration. To place the inertial effects into context we also discuss related fluid-induced forces present in particulate flows including forces due to non-Newtonian fluids, particle asymmetry, and particle deformability. We then highlight the inverse situation and describe the effect of the suspended particles acting on the fluid in a channel flow. Finally, we discuss the importance of structured channels, i.e. channels with boundary conditions that vary in the streamwise direction, and their potential as a means to achieve unprecedented three-dimensional control over fluid and particles in microchannels. Ultimately, we hope that an improved fundamental and quantitative understanding of inertial fluid dynamic effects can lead to unprecedented capabilities to program fluid and particle flow towards automation of biomedicine, materials

  5. Semiconductor sensor embedded microfluidic chip for protein biomarker detection using a bead-based immunoassay combined with deoxyribonucleic acid strand labeling.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yen-Heng; Peng, Po-Yu

    2015-04-15

    Two major issues need to be addressed in applying semiconductor biosensors to detecting proteins in immunoassays. First, the length of the antibody on the sensor surface surpasses the Debye lengths (approximately 1 nm, in normal ionic strength solution), preventing certain specifically bound proteins from being tightly attached to the sensor surface. Therefore, these proteins do not contribute to the sensor's surface potential change. Second, these proteins carry a small charge and can be easily affected by the pH of the surrounding solution. This study proposes a magnetic bead-based immunoassay using a secondary antibody to label negatively charged DNA fragments for signal amplification. An externally imposed magnetic force attaches the analyte tightly to the sensor surface, thereby effectively solving the problem of the analyte protein's distance to the sensor surface surpassing the Debye lengths. In addition, a normal ion intensity buffer can be used without dilution for the proposed method. Experiments revealed that the sensitivity can be improved by using a longer DNA fragment for labeling and smaller magnetic beads as solid support for the antibody. By using a 90 base pair DNA label, the signal was 15 times greater than that without labeling. In addition, by using a 120 nm magnetic bead, a minimum detection limit of 12.5 ng mL(-1) apolipoprotein A1 can be measured. Furthermore, this study integrates a semiconductor sensor with a microfluidic chip. With the help of microvalves and micromixers in the chip, the length of the mixing step for each immunoassay has been reduced from 1h to 20 min, and the sample volume has been reduced from 80 μL to 10 μL. In practice, a protein biomarker in a urinary bladder cancer patient's urine was successfully measured using this technique. This study provides a convenient and effective method to measure protein using a semiconductor sensor.

  6. Fabrication of universal serial bus flash disk type microfluidic chip electrophoresis and application for protein analysis under ultra low voltage

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Hailin; Xu, Xiaodan; Yu, Bing; Liu, Huwei

    2016-01-01

    A simple and effective universal serial bus (USB) flash disk type microfluidic chip electrophoresis (MCE) was developed by using poly(dimethylsiloxane) based soft lithography and dry film based printed circuit board etching techniques in this paper. The MCE had a microchannel diameter of 375 μm and an effective length of 25 mm. Equipped with a conventional online electrochemical detector, the device enabled effectively separation of bovine serum albumin, lysozyme, and cytochrome c in 80 s under the ultra low voltage from a computer USB interface. Compared with traditional capillary electrophoresis, the USB flash disk type MCE is not only portable and inexpensive but also fast with high separation efficiency. PMID:27042249

  7. Fabrication of universal serial bus flash disk type microfluidic chip electrophoresis and application for protein analysis under ultra low voltage.

    PubMed

    Cong, Hailin; Xu, Xiaodan; Yu, Bing; Liu, Huwei; Yuan, Hua

    2016-03-01

    A simple and effective universal serial bus (USB) flash disk type microfluidic chip electrophoresis (MCE) was developed by using poly(dimethylsiloxane) based soft lithography and dry film based printed circuit board etching techniques in this paper. The MCE had a microchannel diameter of 375 μm and an effective length of 25 mm. Equipped with a conventional online electrochemical detector, the device enabled effectively separation of bovine serum albumin, lysozyme, and cytochrome c in 80 s under the ultra low voltage from a computer USB interface. Compared with traditional capillary electrophoresis, the USB flash disk type MCE is not only portable and inexpensive but also fast with high separation efficiency.

  8. Pbx Homeodomain Proteins: TALEnted regulators of Limb Patterning and Outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Capellini, Terence D.; Zappavigna, Vincenzo; Selleri, Licia

    2011-01-01

    Limb development has long provided an excellent model for understanding the genetic principles driving embryogenesis. Studies utilizing chick and mouse have led to new insights into limb patterning and morphogenesis. Recent research has centered on the regulatory networks underlying limb development. Here, we discuss the hierarchical, overlapping, and iterative roles of Pbx family members in appendicular development that have emerged from genetic analyses in the mouse. Pbx genes are essential in determining limb bud positioning, early bud formation, limb axes establishment and coordination, and patterning and morphogenesis of most elements of the limb and girdle. Pbx proteins directly regulate critical effectors of limb and girdle development, including morphogen-encoding genes like Shh in limb posterior mesoderm, and transcription factor-encoding genes like Alx1 in pre-scapular domains. Interestingly, at least in limb buds, Pbx appear to act not only as Hox cofactors, but also in the upstream control of 5' HoxA/D gene expression. PMID:21416555

  9. Laterally Mobile, Functionalized Self-Assembled Monolayers at the Fluorous−Aqueous Interface in a Plug-Based Microfluidic System: Characterization and Testing with Membrane Protein Crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Kreutz, Jason E.; Li, Liang; Roach, L. Spencer; Hatakeyama, Takuji; Ismagilov, Rustem F.

    2009-11-04

    This paper describes a method to generate functionalizable, mobile self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) in plug-based microfluidics. Control of interfaces is advancing studies of biological interfaces, heterogeneous reactions, and nanotechnology. SAMs have been useful for such studies, but they are not laterally mobile. Lipid-based methods, though mobile, are not easily amenable to setting up the hundreds of experiments necessary for crystallization screening. Here we demonstrate a method, complementary to current SAM and lipid methods, for rapidly generating mobile, functionalized SAMs. This method relies on plugs, droplets surrounded by a fluorous carrier fluid, to rapidly explore chemical space. Specifically, we implemented his-tag binding chemistry to design a new fluorinated amphiphile, RfNTA, using an improved one-step synthesis of RfOEG under Mitsunobu conditions. RfNTA introduces specific binding of protein at the fluorous-aqueous interface, which concentrates and orients proteins at the interface, even in the presence of other surfactants. We then applied this approach to the crystallization of a his-tagged membrane protein, Reaction Center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, performed 2400 crystallization trials, and showed that this approach can increase the range of crystal-producing conditions, the success rate at a given condition, the rate of nucleation, and the quality of the crystal formed.

  10. G-protein coupled receptor expression patterns delineate medulloblastoma subgroups

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor in children. Genetic profiling has identified four principle tumor subgroups; each subgroup is characterized by different initiating mutations, genetic and clinical profiles, and prognoses. The two most well-defined subgroups are caused by overactive signaling in the WNT and SHH mitogenic pathways; less is understood about Groups 3 and 4 medulloblastoma. Identification of tumor subgroup using molecular classification is set to become an important component of medulloblastoma diagnosis and staging, and will likely guide therapeutic options. However, thus far, few druggable targets have emerged. G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) possess characteristics that make them ideal targets for molecular imaging and therapeutics; drugs targeting GPCRs account for 30-40% of all current pharmaceuticals. While expression patterns of many proteins in human medulloblastoma subgroups have been discerned, the expression pattern of GPCRs in medulloblastoma has not been investigated. We hypothesized that analysis of GPCR expression would identify clear subsets of medulloblastoma and suggest distinct GPCRs that might serve as molecular targets for both imaging and therapy. Results Our study found that medulloblastoma tumors fall into distinct clusters based solely on GPCR expression patterns. Normal cerebellum clustered separately from the tumor samples. Further, two of the tumor clusters correspond with high fidelity to the WNT and SHH subgroups of medulloblastoma. Distinct over-expressed GPCRs emerge; for example, LGR5 and GPR64 are significantly and uniquely over-expressed in the WNT subgroup of tumors, while PTGER4 is over-expressed in the SHH subgroup. Uniquely under-expressed GPCRs were also observed. Our key findings were independently validated using a large international dataset. Conclusions Our results identify GPCRs with potential to act as imaging and therapeutic targets. Elucidating tumorigenic pathways

  11. PREFACE: Nano- and microfluidics Nano- and microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Karin

    2011-05-01

    The field of nano- and microfluidics emerged at the end of the 1990s parallel to the demand for smaller and smaller containers and channels for chemical, biochemical and medical applications such as blood and DNS analysis [1], gene sequencing or proteomics [2, 3]. Since then, new journals and conferences have been launched and meanwhile, about two decades later, a variety of microfluidic applications are on the market. Briefly, 'the small flow becomes mainstream' [4]. Nevertheless, research in nano- and microfluidics is more than downsizing the spatial dimensions. For liquids on the nanoscale, surface and interface phenomena grow in importance and may even dominate the behavior in some systems. The studies collected in this special issue all concentrate on these type of systems and were part ot the priority programme SPP1164 'Nano- and Microfluidics' of the German Science Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, DFG). The priority programme was initiated in 2002 by Hendrik Kuhlmann and myself and was launched in 2004. Friction between a moving liquid and a solid wall may, for instance, play an important role so that the usual assumption of a no-slip boundary condition is no longer valid. Likewise, the dynamic deformations of soft objects like polymers, vesicles or capsules in flow arise from the subtle interplay between the (visco-)elasticity of the object and the viscous stresses in the surrounding fluid and, potentially, the presence of structures confining the flow like channels. Consequently, new theories were developed ( see articles in this issue by Münch and Wagner, Falk and Mecke, Bonthuis et al, Finken et al, Almenar and Rauscher, Straube) and experiments were set up to unambiguously demonstrate deviations from bulk, or 'macro', behavior (see articles in this issue by Wolff et al, Vinogradova and Belyaev, Hahn et al, Seemann et al, Grüner and Huber, Müller-Buschbaum et al, Gutsche et al, Braunmüller et al, Laube et al, Brücker, Nottebrock et al

  12. Superhydrophobicity for antifouling microfluidic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Shirtcliffe, N J; Roach, P

    2013-01-01

    Fouling of surfaces is often problematic in microfluidic devices, particularly when using protein or -enzymatic solutions. Various coating methods have been investigated to reduce the tendency for protein molecules to adsorb, mostly relying on hydrophobic surface chemistry or the antifouling ability of -polyethylene glycol. Here we present the potential use of superhydrophobic surfaces to not only reduce the amount of surface contamination but also to induce self-cleaning under flow conditions. The methodology is presented in order to prepare superhydrophobic surface coatings having micro- and nanoscale feature dimensions, as well as a step-by-step guide to quantify adsorbed protein down to nanogram levels. The fabrication of these surfaces as coatings via silica sol-gel and copper nano-hair growth is presented, which can be applied within microfluidic devices manufactured from various materials.

  13. Microfluidic sieve valves

    DOEpatents

    Quake, Stephen R; Marcus, Joshua S; Hansen, Carl L

    2015-01-13

    Sieve valves for use in microfluidic device are provided. The valves are useful for impeding the flow of particles, such as chromatography beads or cells, in a microfluidic channel while allowing liquid solution to pass through the valve. The valves find particular use in making microfluidic chromatography modules.

  14. Tunable Microfluidic Microlasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    particularly convenient material for microfluidic experiments with LC. Figure 7: A droplet of E7 nematic liquid crystal on a PDMS...AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2011-0039 TUNABLE MICROFLUIDIC MICROLASERS Francesco Simoni Universita Politecnica delle Marche...DATES COVERED (From – To) 15 June 2010 – 15 June 2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE TUNABLE MICROFLUIDIC MICROLASERS 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8655

  15. Morphology and protein patterns of honey bee drone accessory glands.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Landim, Carminda da; Dallacqua, Rodrigo Pires

    2005-09-30

    We used light and transmission electron microscopy to examine the morphology of the accessory glands of immature and mature adult males of Apis mellifera L. We also made an electrophoretic analysis of the protein content of the mature gland. The glands of the immature male actively secrete a mucous substance that can be seen in the lumen of the gland of the mature male. This secretion stains with mercury bromophenol blue and with periodic acid-Schiff reaction, which stain glyconjugates. The protein content was higher in the lumen secretion than in the gland wall extracts. The electrophoresis patterns of the wall extracts were different from those of the secretion found in the gland lumen.

  16. Electro-Microfluidic Packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benavides, G. L.; Galambos, P. C.

    2002-06-01

    There are many examples of electro-microfluidic products that require cost effective packaging solutions. Industry has responded to a demand for products such as drop ejectors, chemical sensors, and biological sensors. Drop ejectors have consumer applications such as ink jet printing and scientific applications such as patterning self-assembled monolayers or ejecting picoliters of expensive analytes/reagents for chemical analysis. Drop ejectors can be used to perform chemical analysis, combinatorial chemistry, drug manufacture, drug discovery, drug delivery, and DNA sequencing. Chemical and biological micro-sensors can sniff the ambient environment for traces of dangerous materials such as explosives, toxins, or pathogens. Other biological sensors can be used to improve world health by providing timely diagnostics and applying corrective measures to the human body. Electro-microfluidic packaging can easily represent over fifty percent of the product cost and, as with Integrated Circuits (IC), the industry should evolve to standard packaging solutions. Standard packaging schemes will minimize cost and bring products to market sooner.

  17. The E4 protein; structure, function and patterns of expression

    SciTech Connect

    Doorbar, John

    2013-10-15

    }E4, these kinases regulate one of the E1{sup ∧}E4 proteins main functions, the association with the cellular keratin network, and eventually also its cleavage by the protease calpain which allows assembly into amyloid-like fibres and reorganisation of the keratin network. Although the E4 proteins of different HPV types appear divergent at the level of their primary amino acid sequence, they share a recognisable modular organisation and pattern of expression, which may underlie conserved functions and regulation. Assembly into higher-order multimers and suppression of cell proliferation are common to all E4 proteins examined. Although not yet formally demonstrated, a role in virus release and transmission remains a likely function for E4. - Highlights: • E4 gene products have a modular structure, and are expressed from the E1{sup ∧}E4 spliced mRNA. • E4 proteins are modified during epithelial differentiation by phosphorylation and proteolysis. • The E4 proteins contribute to genome amplification-efficiency and virus synthesis. • E4 proteins are abundantly expressed and may facilitate efficient virus release and transmission. • High-risk E4 proteins are deposited as amyloid fibres and can be used as infection biomarkers.

  18. Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) interacting proteins exhibit different expression patterns during development.

    PubMed

    Bonaccorso, C M; Spatuzza, M; Di Marco, B; Gloria, A; Barrancotto, G; Cupo, A; Musumeci, S A; D'Antoni, S; Bardoni, B; Catania, M V

    2015-05-01

    Fragile X syndrome is caused by the lack of expression of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), an RNA-binding protein involved in mRNA transport and translation. FMRP is a component of mRNA ribonucleoprotein complexes and it can interact with a range of proteins either directly or indirectly, as demonstrated by two-hybrid selection and co-immunoprecipitation, respectively. Most of FMRP-interacting proteins are RNA-binding proteins such as FXR1P, FXR2P and 82-FIP. Interestingly, FMRP can also interact directly with the cytoplasmic proteins CYFIP1 and CYFIP2, which do not bind RNA and link FMRP to the RhoGTPase pathway. The interaction with these different proteins may modulate the functions of FMRP by influencing its affinity to RNA and by affecting the FMRP ability of cytoskeleton remodeling through Rho/Rac GTPases. To better define the relationship of FMRP with its interacting proteins during brain development, we have analyzed the expression pattern of FMRP and its interacting proteins in the cortex, striatum, hippocampus and cerebellum at different ages in wild type (WT) mice. FMRP and FXR2P were strongly expressed during the first week and gradually decreased thereafter, more rapidly in the cerebellum than in the cortex. FXR1P was also expressed early and showed a reduction at later stages of development with a similar developmental pattern in these two regions. CYFIP1 was expressed at all ages and peaked in the third post-natal week. In contrast, CYFIP2 and 82-FIP (only in forebrain regions) were moderately expressed at P3 and gradually increased after P7. In general, the expression pattern of each protein was similar in the regions examined, except for 82-FIP, which exhibited a strong expression at P3 and low levels at later developmental stages in the cerebellum. Our data indicate that FMRP and its interacting proteins have distinct developmental patterns of expression and suggest that FMRP may be preferentially associated to certain proteins in

  19. Concentration Dependent Ion-Protein Interaction Patterns Underlying Protein Oligomerization Behaviours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batoulis, Helena; Schmidt, Thomas H.; Weber, Pascal; Schloetel, Jan-Gero; Kandt, Christian; Lang, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    Salts and proteins comprise two of the basic molecular components of biological materials. Kosmotropic/chaotropic co-solvation and matching ion water affinities explain basic ionic effects on protein aggregation observed in simple solutions. However, it is unclear how these theories apply to proteins in complex biological environments and what the underlying ionic binding patterns are. Using the positive ion Ca2+ and the negatively charged membrane protein SNAP25, we studied ion effects on protein oligomerization in solution, in native membranes and in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We find that concentration-dependent ion-induced protein oligomerization is a fundamental chemico-physical principle applying not only to soluble but also to membrane-anchored proteins in their native environment. Oligomerization is driven by the interaction of Ca2+ ions with the carboxylate groups of aspartate and glutamate. From low up to middle concentrations, salt bridges between Ca2+ ions and two or more protein residues lead to increasingly larger oligomers, while at high concentrations oligomers disperse due to overcharging effects. The insights provide a conceptual framework at the interface of physics, chemistry and biology to explain binding of ions to charged protein surfaces on an atomistic scale, as occurring during protein solubilisation, aggregation and oligomerization both in simple solutions and membrane systems.

  20. Microfluidic System for Solution Array Based Bioassays

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, G M; Tok, J B; Pannu, S S; Rose, K A

    2006-02-10

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate new enabling technology for multiplex biodetection systems that are flexible, miniaturizable, highly automated, low cost, and high performance. It builds on prior successes at LLNL with particle-based solution arrays, such as those used in the Autonomous Pathogen Detection System (APDS) successfully field deployed to multiple locations nationwide. We report the development of a multiplex solution array immunoassay based upon engineered metallic nanorod particles. Nanobarcodes{reg_sign} particles are fabricated by sequential electrodeposition of dissimilar metals within porous alumina templates, yielding optically encoded striping patterns that can be read using standard laboratory microscope optics and PC-based image processing software. The addition of self-assembled monolayer (SAM) coatings and target-specific antibodies allows each encoded class of nanorod particles to be directed against a different antigen target. A prototype assay panel directed against bacterial, viral, and soluble protein targets demonstrates simultaneous detection at sensitivities comparable to state of the art immunoassays, with minimal cross-reactivity. Studies have been performed to characterize the colloidal properties (zeta potential) of the suspended nanorod particles as a function of pH, the ionic strength of the suspending solution, and surface functionalization state. Additional studies have produced means for the non-contact manipulation of the particles, including the insertion of magnetic nickel stripes within the encoding pattern, and control via externally applied electromagnetic fields. Using the results of these studies, the novel Nanobarcodes{reg_sign} based assay was implemented in a prototype automated system with the sample processing functions and optical readout performed on a microfluidic card. The unique physical properties of the nanorod particles enable the development of integrated microfluidic systems for

  1. Digital Microfluidics for Immunoprecipitation.

    PubMed

    Seale, Brendon; Lam, Charis; Rackus, Darius G; Chamberlain, M Dean; Liu, Chang; Wheeler, Aaron R

    2016-10-04

    Immunoprecipitation (IP) is a common method for isolating a targeted protein from a complex sample such as blood, serum, or cell lysate. In particular, IP is often used as the primary means of target purification for the analysis by mass spectrometry of novel biologically derived pharmaceuticals, with particular utility for the identification of molecules bound to a protein target. Unfortunately, IP is a labor-intensive technique, is difficult to perform in parallel, and has limited options for automation. Furthermore, the technique is typically limited to large sample volumes, making the application of IP cleanup to precious samples nearly impossible. In recognition of these challenges, we introduce a method for performing microscale IP using magnetic particles and digital microfluidics (DMF-IP). The new method allows for 80% recovery of model proteins from approximately microliter volumes of serum in a sample-to-answer run time of approximately 25 min. Uniquely, analytes are eluted from these small samples in a format compatible with direct analysis by mass spectrometry. To extend the technique to be useful for large samples, we also developed a macro-to-microscale interface called preconcentration using liquid intake by paper (P-CLIP). This technique allows for efficient analysis of samples >100× larger than are typically processed on microfluidic devices. As described herein, DMF-IP and P-CLIP-DMF-IP are rapid, automated, and multiplexed methods that have the potential to reduce the time and effort required for IP sample preparations with applications in the fields of pharmacy, biomarker discovery, and protein biology.

  2. Robust regulation of oscillatory Min-protein patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halatek, Jacob; Frey, Erwin

    2012-02-01

    Robust spatial patterning was crucial just from the beginning of cellular evolution, and is key to the development of multicellular organisms. In E. Coli, the oscillatory pole-to-pole dynamics of MinCDE proteins functionality prevent improper cell divisions apart from midcell. Min-oscillations are characterized by the remarkable robustness with which spatial patterns dynamically adapt to variations of cell geometry. Moreover, adaption, and therefore proper cell division, is independent of temperature. These observations raise fundamental questions about the underlying core mechanisms, and about the role of spatial cues. With a conceptually novel and universal approach to cellular geometries, we introduce a robust model based on experimental data, consistently explaining the mechanisms underlying pole-to-pole, striped and circular patterns, as well as the observed temperature-dependence. Contrary to prior conjectures, the model predicts that MinD and cardiolipin domains are not colocalized. The key mechanisms are transient sequestration of MinE, and highly canalized transfer of MinD between polar zones. MinD channeling enhances midcell localization and facilitates stripe formation, revealing the potential optimization process from which robust Min-oscillations originally arose.

  3. Protein profile changes during porcine oocyte aging and effects of caffeine on protein expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guang-Jian; Wang, Ke; Miao, De-Qiang; Guo, Lei; Hou, Yi; Schatten, Heide; Sun, Qing-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    It has been shown that oocyte aging critically affects reproduction and development. By using proteomic tools, in the present study, changes in protein profiles during porcine oocyte aging and effects of caffeine on oocyte aging were investigated. By comparing control MII oocytes with aging MII oocytes, we identified 23 proteins that were up-regulated and 3 proteins that were down-regulated during the aging process. In caffeine-treated oocytes, 6 proteins were identified as up-regulated and 12 proteins were identified as down-regulated. A total of 38 differentially expressed proteins grouped into 5 regulation patterns were determined to relate to the aging and anti-aging process. By using the Gene Ontology system, we found that numerous functional gene products involved in metabolism, stress response, reactive oxygen species and cell cycle regulation were differentially expressed during the oocyte aging process, and most of these proteins are for the first time reported in our study, including 2 novel proteins. In addition, several proteins were found to be modified during oocyte aging. These data contribute new information that may be useful for future research on cellular aging and for improvement of oocyte quality.

  4. The E4 protein; structure, function and patterns of expression.

    PubMed

    Doorbar, John

    2013-10-01

    the E1^E4 proteins main functions, the association with the cellular keratin network, and eventually also its cleavage by the protease calpain which allows assembly into amyloid-like fibres and reorganisation of the keratin network. Although the E4 proteins of different HPV types appear divergent at the level of their primary amino acid sequence, they share a recognisable modular organisation and pattern of expression, which may underlie conserved functions and regulation. Assembly into higher-order multimers and suppression of cell proliferation are common to all E4 proteins examined. Although not yet formally demonstrated, a role in virus release and transmission remains a likely function for E4.

  5. Design of hydrodynamically confined microfluidics: controlling flow envelope and pressure.

    PubMed

    Christ, Kevin V; Turner, Kevin T

    2011-04-21

    Closed-channel microfluidic devices are widely used in a number of chemical and biological applications; however, it is often difficult to interact with samples, such as cells, that are enclosed inside them. Hydrodynamically confined microflows (HCMs) allow microfluidic-type flows to be generated in open liquid environments, such as Petri dishes, thus greatly increasing the flexibility of microfluidic approaches. HCMs have previously been used for protein patterning and selective cell treatment applications, but the underlying fluid mechanics is not fully understood. Here, we examine the effect of device geometry and flow parameters on the properties of the flow envelope and pressure drop of several two-port HCM devices using a combination of experiments and modeling. A three-port device, which allows for different flow envelope shapes to be generated, is also analyzed. The experimental results agree well with the 3-D computational fluid dynamics simulations, with the majority of the measurements within 10% of the simulations. The results presented provide a framework for understanding the fluid mechanics of HCMs and will aid in the design of HCM devices for a broad range of applications.

  6. ceRNA crosstalk stabilizes protein expression and affects the correlation pattern of interacting proteins

    PubMed Central

    Martirosyan, Araks; De Martino, Andrea; Pagnani, Andrea; Marinari, Enzo

    2017-01-01

    Gene expression is a noisy process and several mechanisms, both transcriptional and post-transcriptional, can stabilize protein levels in cells. Much work has focused on the role of miRNAs, showing in particular that miRNA-mediated regulation can buffer expression noise for lowly expressed genes. Here, using in silico simulations and mathematical modeling, we demonstrate that miRNAs can exert a much broader influence on protein levels by orchestrating competition-induced crosstalk between mRNAs. Most notably, we find that miRNA-mediated cross-talk (i) can stabilize protein levels across the full range of gene expression rates, and (ii) modifies the correlation pattern of co-regulated interacting proteins, changing the sign of correlations from negative to positive. The latter feature may constitute a potentially robust signature of the existence of RNA crosstalk induced by endogenous competition for miRNAs in standard cellular conditions. PMID:28266541

  7. ceRNA crosstalk stabilizes protein expression and affects the correlation pattern of interacting proteins.

    PubMed

    Martirosyan, Araks; De Martino, Andrea; Pagnani, Andrea; Marinari, Enzo

    2017-03-07

    Gene expression is a noisy process and several mechanisms, both transcriptional and post-transcriptional, can stabilize protein levels in cells. Much work has focused on the role of miRNAs, showing in particular that miRNA-mediated regulation can buffer expression noise for lowly expressed genes. Here, using in silico simulations and mathematical modeling, we demonstrate that miRNAs can exert a much broader influence on protein levels by orchestrating competition-induced crosstalk between mRNAs. Most notably, we find that miRNA-mediated cross-talk (i) can stabilize protein levels across the full range of gene expression rates, and (ii) modifies the correlation pattern of co-regulated interacting proteins, changing the sign of correlations from negative to positive. The latter feature may constitute a potentially robust signature of the existence of RNA crosstalk induced by endogenous competition for miRNAs in standard cellular conditions.

  8. Hierarchical protein patterning by meso to molecular scale self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Andreas S.; Sutherland, Duncan S.; Ogaki, Ryosuke

    2015-10-01

    Numerous protein patterning methodologies are used extensively for biomedical research and development. We have developed a novel bottom-up protein patterning method using a combination of self-assembly processes in the meso to molecular scale range to allow hierarchical protein patterns to be straightforwardly fabricated with low cost over large areas. As a proof of principle, we patterned vitronectin in various dimensional hierarchies using meso to nanoscale colloids and self-assembled monolayers.

  9. Ultrafast microfluidics using surface acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Leslie Y.; Friend, James R.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate that surface acoustic waves (SAWs), nanometer amplitude Rayleigh waves driven at megahertz order frequencies propagating on the surface of a piezoelectric substrate, offer a powerful method for driving a host of extremely fast microfluidic actuation and micro∕bioparticle manipulation schemes. We show that sessile drops can be translated rapidly on planar substrates or fluid can be pumped through microchannels at 1–10 cm∕s velocities, which are typically one to two orders quicker than that afforded by current microfluidic technologies. Through symmetry-breaking, azimuthal recirculation can be induced within the drop to drive strong inertial microcentrifugation for micromixing and particle concentration or separation. Similar micromixing strategies can be induced in the same microchannel in which fluid is pumped with the SAW by merely changing the SAW frequency to rapidly switch the uniform through-flow into a chaotic oscillatory flow by exploiting superpositioning of the irradiated sound waves from the sidewalls of the microchannel. If the flow is sufficiently quiescent, the nodes of the transverse standing wave that arises across the microchannel also allow for particle aggregation, and hence, sorting on nodal lines. In addition, the SAW also facilitates other microfluidic capabilities. For example, capillary waves excited at the free surface of a sessile drop by the SAW underneath it can be exploited for micro∕nanoparticle collection and sorting at nodal points or lines at low powers. At higher powers, the large accelerations off the substrate surface as the SAW propagates across drives rapid destabilization of the drop free surface giving rise to inertial liquid jets that persist over 1–2 cm in length or atomization of the entire drop to produce 1–10 μm monodispersed aerosol droplets, which can be exploited for ink-jet printing, mass spectrometry interfacing, or pulmonary drug delivery. The atomization of polymer∕protein solutions

  10. Microfluidic White Organic Light-Emitting Diode Based on Integrated Patterns of Greenish-Blue and Yellow Solvent-Free Liquid Emitters

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Naofumi; Kasahara, Takashi; Edura, Tomohiko; Oshima, Juro; Ishimatsu, Ryoichi; Tsuwaki, Miho; Imato, Toshihiko; Shoji, Shuichi; Mizuno, Jun

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrated a novel microfluidic white organic light-emitting diode (microfluidic WOLED) based on integrated sub-100-μm-wide microchannels. Single-μm-thick SU-8-based microchannels, which were sandwiched between indium tin oxide (ITO) anode and cathode pairs, were fabricated by photolithography and heterogeneous bonding technologies. 1-Pyrenebutyric acid 2-ethylhexyl ester (PLQ) was used as a solvent-free greenish-blue liquid emitter, while 2,8-di-tert-butyl-5,11-bis(4-tert-butylphenyl)-6,12-diphenyltetracene (TBRb)-doped PLQ was applied as a yellow liquid emitter. In order to form the liquid white light-emitting layer, the greenish-blue and yellow liquid emitters were alternately injected into the integrated microchannels. The fabricated electro-microfluidic device successfully exhibited white electroluminescence (EL) emission via simultaneous greenish-blue and yellow emissions under an applied voltage of 100 V. A white emission with Commission Internationale de l’Declairage (CIE) color coordinates of (0.40, 0.42) was also obtained; the emission corresponds to warm-white light. The proposed device has potential applications in subpixels of liquid-based microdisplays and for lighting. PMID:26439164

  11. Microfluidic White Organic Light-Emitting Diode Based on Integrated Patterns of Greenish-Blue and Yellow Solvent-Free Liquid Emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Naofumi; Kasahara, Takashi; Edura, Tomohiko; Oshima, Juro; Ishimatsu, Ryoichi; Tsuwaki, Miho; Imato, Toshihiko; Shoji, Shuichi; Mizuno, Jun

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrated a novel microfluidic white organic light-emitting diode (microfluidic WOLED) based on integrated sub-100-μm-wide microchannels. Single-μm-thick SU-8-based microchannels, which were sandwiched between indium tin oxide (ITO) anode and cathode pairs, were fabricated by photolithography and heterogeneous bonding technologies. 1-Pyrenebutyric acid 2-ethylhexyl ester (PLQ) was used as a solvent-free greenish-blue liquid emitter, while 2,8-di-tert-butyl-5,11-bis(4-tert-butylphenyl)-6,12-diphenyltetracene (TBRb)-doped PLQ was applied as a yellow liquid emitter. In order to form the liquid white light-emitting layer, the greenish-blue and yellow liquid emitters were alternately injected into the integrated microchannels. The fabricated electro-microfluidic device successfully exhibited white electroluminescence (EL) emission via simultaneous greenish-blue and yellow emissions under an applied voltage of 100 V. A white emission with Commission Internationale de l’Declairage (CIE) color coordinates of (0.40, 0.42) was also obtained; the emission corresponds to warm-white light. The proposed device has potential applications in subpixels of liquid-based microdisplays and for lighting.

  12. Autophagy and lysosomal related protein expression patterns in human glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Giatromanolaki, Alexandra; Sivridis, Efthimios; Mitrakas, Achileas; Kalamida, Dimitra; Zois, Christos E; Haider, Syed; Piperidou, Charitomeni; Pappa, Aglaia; Gatter, Kevin C; Harris, Adrian L; Koukourakis, Michael I

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma cells are resistant to apoptotic stimuli with autophagic death prevailing under cytotoxic stress. Autophagy interfering agents may represent a new strategy to test in combination with chemo-radiation. We investigated the patterns of expression of autophagy related proteins (LC3A, LC3B, p62, Beclin 1, ULK1 and ULK2) in a series of patients treated with post-operative radiotherapy. Experiments with glioblastoma cell lines (T98 and U87) were also performed to assess autophagic response under conditions simulating the adverse intratumoral environment. Glioblastomas showed cytoplasmic overexpression of autophagic proteins in a varying extent, so that cases could be grouped into low and high expression groups. 10/23, 5/23, 13/23, 5/23, 8/23 and 9/23 cases examined showed extensive expression of LC3A, LC3B, Beclin 1, Ulk 1, Ulk 2 and p62, respectively. Lysosomal markers Cathepsin D and LAMP2a, as well as the lyososomal biogenesis transcription factor TFEB were frequently overexpressed in glioblastomas (10/23, 11/23, and 10/23 cases, respectively). TFEB was directly linked with PTEN, Cathepsin D, HIF1α, LC3B, Beclin 1 and p62 expression. PTEN was also significantly related with LC3B but not LC3A expression, in both immunohistochemistry and gene expression analysis. Confocal microscopy in T98 and U87 cell lines showed distinct identity of LC3A and LC3B autophagosomes. The previously reported stone-like structure (SLS) pattern of LC3 expression was related with prognosis. SLS were inducible in glioblastoma cell lines under exposure to acidic conditions and 2DG mediated glucose antagonism. The present study provides the basis for autophagic characterization of human glioblastoma for further translational studies and targeted therapy trials.

  13. Manufacturing methods and applications of membranes in microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xueye; Shen, Jienan; Hu, Zengliang; Huo, Xuyao

    2016-12-01

    Applications of membranes in microfluidics solved many thorny problems for analytical chemistry and bioscience, so that the use of membranes in microfluidics has been a topic of growing interest. Many different examples have been reported, demonstrating the versatile use of membranes. This work reviews a lot of applications of membranes in microfluidics. Membranes in microfluidics for applications including chemical reagents detection, gas detection, drug screening, cell, protein, microreactor, electrokinetical fluid, pump and valve and fluid transport control and so on, have been analyzed and discussed. In addition, the definition and basic concepts of membranes are summed up. And the methods of manufacturing membranes in microfluidics are discussed. This paper will provide a helpful reference to researchers who want to study applications of membranes in microfluidics.

  14. Pbx homeodomain proteins: TALEnted regulators of limb patterning and outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Capellini, Terence D; Zappavigna, Vincenzo; Selleri, Licia

    2011-05-01

    Limb development has long provided an excellent model for understanding the genetic principles driving embryogenesis. Studies utilizing chick and mouse have led to new insights into limb patterning and morphogenesis. Recent research has centered on the regulatory networks underlying limb development. Here, we discuss the hierarchical, overlapping, and iterative roles of Pbx family members in appendicular development that have emerged from genetic analyses in the mouse. Pbx genes are essential in determining limb bud positioning, early bud formation, limb axes establishment and coordination, and patterning and morphogenesis of most elements of the limb and girdle. Pbx proteins directly regulate critical effectors of limb and girdle development, including morphogen-encoding genes like Shh in limb posterior mesoderm, and transcription factor-encoding genes like Alx1 in pre-scapular domains. Interestingly, at least in limb buds, Pbx appear to act not only as Hox cofactors, but also in the upstream control of 5' HoxA/D gene expression. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Digital Microfluidics Sample Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, Michael G.; Srinivasan, Vijay; Eckhardt, Allen; Paik, Philip Y.; Sudarsan, Arjun; Shenderov, Alex; Hua, Zhishan; Pamula, Vamsee K.

    2010-01-01

    Three innovations address the needs of the medical world with regard to microfluidic manipulation and testing of physiological samples in ways that can benefit point-of-care needs for patients such as premature infants, for which drawing of blood for continuous tests can be life-threatening in their own right, and for expedited results. A chip with sample injection elements, reservoirs (and waste), droplet formation structures, fluidic pathways, mixing areas, and optical detection sites, was fabricated to test the various components of the microfluidic platform, both individually and in integrated fashion. The droplet control system permits a user to control droplet microactuator system functions, such as droplet operations and detector operations. Also, the programming system allows a user to develop software routines for controlling droplet microactuator system functions, such as droplet operations and detector operations. A chip is incorporated into the system with a controller, a detector, input and output devices, and software. A novel filler fluid formulation is used for the transport of droplets with high protein concentrations. Novel assemblies for detection of photons from an on-chip droplet are present, as well as novel systems for conducting various assays, such as immunoassays and PCR (polymerase chain reaction). The lab-on-a-chip (a.k.a., lab-on-a-printed-circuit board) processes physiological samples and comprises a system for automated, multi-analyte measurements using sub-microliter samples of human serum. The invention also relates to a diagnostic chip and system including the chip that performs many of the routine operations of a central labbased chemistry analyzer, integrating, for example, colorimetric assays (e.g., for proteins), chemiluminescence/fluorescence assays (e.g., for enzymes, electrolytes, and gases), and/or conductometric assays (e.g., for hematocrit on plasma and whole blood) on a single chip platform.

  16. Patterns of soybean proline-rich protein gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, R E; Nagao, R T; Key, J L

    1992-01-01

    The expression patterns of three members of a gene family that encodes proline-rich proteins in soybean (SbPRPs) were examined using in situ hybridization experiments. In most instances, the expression of SbPRP genes was intense in a limited number of cell types of a particular organ. SbPRP1 RNA was localized in several cell types of soybean hypocotyls, including cells within the phloem and xylem. SbPRP1 expression increased within epidermal cells in the elongating and mature regions of the hypocotyl; expression was detected also in lignified cells surrounding the hilum of mature seeds. SbPRP2 RNA was present in cortical cells and in the vascular tissue of the hypocotyl, especially cells of the phloem. This gene was expressed also in the inner integuments of the mature seed coat. SbPRP3 RNA was localized specifically to the endodermoid layer of cells surrounding the stele in the elongating region of the hypocotyl, as well as in the epidermal cells of leaves and cotyledons. These data show that members of this gene family exhibit cell-specific expression. The members of the SbPRP gene family are expressed in different types of cells and in some cell types that also express the glycine-rich protein or hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein classes of genes. PMID:1525563

  17. Exploring protein-DNA interactions in 3D using in situ construction, manipulation, and visualization of individual DNA-dumbbells with optical traps, microfluidics, and fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Forget, Anthony L.; Dombrowski, Christopher C.; Amitani, Ichiro; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    In this Protocol, we describe a procedure to generate ‘DNA-dumbbells’ — single molecules of DNA with a microscopic bead attached at each end — and techniques for manipulating individual DNA-dumbbells. We also detail the design and fabrication of a microfluidic device (flow cell) used in conjunction with dual optical trapping to manipulate DNA-dumbbells and to visualize individual protein–DNA complexes by single-molecule epifluorescence microscopy. Our design of the flow cell enables the rapid movement of trapped molecules between laminar flow channels and a flow-free ‘reservoir’. The reservoir provides the means to examine formation of DNA–protein complexes in solution in the absence of external flow forces, while still maintaining a predetermined end-to-end extension of the DNA. These features facilitate examination of the role of three-dimensional DNA conformation and dynamics in protein–DNA interactions. Preparation of flow cells and reagents requires two days each; in situ DNA-dumbbell assembly and imaging of single protein–DNA complexes requires another day. PMID:23411634

  18. The design and fabrication of autonomous polymer-based surface tension-confined microfluidic platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swickrath, Michael J.

    The field of microfluidics, lab-on-a-chip technologies in particular, promises the capacity to automate sophisticated laboratory analyses into a platform that can be implemented by a user with minimal analytical experience. However, the fabrication methods traditionally employed to manufacture microfluidic devices are cost ineffective and time intensive. Consequently, current production techniques render exploiting this technology for clinical application problematic. This work describes an alternative fabrication technique to mitigate the aforementioned problems through surface tension-driven flow. Hydrophilic conduits are patterned on a variety of commodity polymeric substrates. The opposing two-dimensionally patterned devices are brought within close proximity for the fabrication of a parallel plate configured microfluidic device. The microfluidic platforms demonstrate the ability to facilitate spontaneous capillary pumping with a high degree of precision and minimal expenditure of fluid reagent. In particular, several cost-effective fabrication procedures are illustrated as well as the capacity to manipulate fluids within the platforms utilizing volumes less than 20 total microliters. Furthermore, applications are demonstrated within the devices such as enzymatic-catalysis, on-chip urinalysis (i.e. glucose and protein detection), and micromixing; demonstrating the efficacy of the platform to automate fluid transport concomitantly with reaction processes. In addition, preliminary designs and protocols are suggested in the last chapter of this work for surface tension-confined devices capable of performing enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Moreover, theoretical aspects of microfluidic flow are explored within this document including the physics of wetting and wetting energetics, factors influencing surface tension (and thereby the system driving force), the conservative level set method coupling two

  19. A microfluidic platform with a flow-balanced fluidic network for osteoarthritis diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kangil; Park, Yoo Min; Yoon, Hyun C.; Yang, Sang Sik

    2013-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common human diseases, and the occurrence of OA is likely to increase with the increase of population ages. The diagnosis of OA is based on patientrelevant measures, structural measures, and measurement of biomarkers that are released through joint metabolism. Traditionally, radiography or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used to diagnose OA and predict its course. However, diagnostic imaging in OA provides only indirect information on pathology and treatment response. A sensing of OA based on the detection of biomarkers insignificantly improves the accuracy and sensitivity of diagnosis and reduces the cost compared with that of radiography or MRI. In our former study, we proposed microfluidic platform to detect biomarker of OA. But the platform can detect only one biomarker because it has one microfluidic channel. In this report, we proposes microfluidic platform that can detect several biomarkers. The proposed platform has three layers. The bottom layer has gold patterns on a Si substrate for optical sensing. The middle layer and top layer were fabricated by polydimethysiloxane (PDMS) using soft-lithography. The middle layer has four channels connecting top layer to bottom layer. The top layer consists of one sample injection inlet, and four antibody injection inlets. To this end, we designed a flow-balanced microfluidic network using analogy between electric and hydraulic systems. Also, the designed microfluidic network was confirmed by finite element model (FEM) analysis using COMSOL FEMLAB. To verify the efficiency of fabricated platform, the optical sensing test was performed to detect biomarker of OA using fluorescence microscope. We used cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) as biomarker because it reflects specific changes in joint tissues. The platform successfully detected various concentration of COMP (0, 100, 500, 1000 ng/ml) at each chamber. The effectiveness of the microfluidic platform was verified

  20. Rapid wasted-free microfluidic fabrication based on ink-jet approach for microfluidic sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarujareet, Ungkarn; Amarit, Rattasart; Sumriddetchkajorn, Sarun

    2016-11-01

    Realizing that current microfluidic chip fabrication techniques are time consuming and labor intensive as well as always have material leftover after chip fabrication, this research work proposes an innovative approach for rapid microfluidic chip production. The key idea relies on a combination of a widely-used inkjet printing method and a heat-based polymer curing technique with an electronic-mechanical control, thus eliminating the need of masking and molds compared to typical microfluidic fabrication processes. In addition, as the appropriate amount of polymer is utilized during printing, there is much less amount of material wasted. Our inkjet-based microfluidic printer can print out the desired microfluidic chip pattern directly onto a heated glass surface, where the printed polymer is suddenly cured. Our proof-of-concept demonstration for widely-used single-flow channel, Y-junction, and T-junction microfluidic chips shows that the whole microfluidic chip fabrication process requires only 3 steps with a fabrication time of 6 minutes.

  1. Integrated Microfluidic Reactors.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Yu; Wang, Yanju; Wang, Shutao; Tseng, Hsian-Rong

    2009-12-01

    Microfluidic reactors exhibit intrinsic advantages of reduced chemical consumption, safety, high surface-area-to-volume ratios, and improved control over mass and heat transfer superior to the macroscopic reaction setting. In contract to a continuous-flow microfluidic system composed of only a microchannel network, an integrated microfluidic system represents a scalable integration of a microchannel network with functional microfluidic modules, thus enabling the execution and automation of complicated chemical reactions in a single device. In this review, we summarize recent progresses on the development of integrated microfluidics-based chemical reactors for (i) parallel screening of in situ click chemistry libraries, (ii) multistep synthesis of radiolabeled imaging probes for positron emission tomography (PET), (iii) sequential preparation of individually addressable conducting polymer nanowire (CPNW), and (iv) solid-phase synthesis of DNA oligonucleotides. These proof-of-principle demonstrations validate the feasibility and set a solid foundation for exploring a broad application of the integrated microfluidic system.

  2. Fabrication of nanometer-sized protein patterns using atomic force microscopy and selective immobilization.

    PubMed Central

    Wadu-Mesthrige, K; Amro, N A; Garno, J C; Xu, S; Liu , G

    2001-01-01

    A new methodology is introduced to produce nanometer-sized protein patterns. The approach includes two main steps, nanopatterning of self-assembled monolayers using atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanolithography and subsequent selective immobilization of proteins on the patterned monolayers. The resulting templates and protein patterns are characterized in situ using AFM. Compared with conventional protein fabrication methods, this approach is able to produce smaller patterns with higher spatial precision. In addition, fabrication and characterization are completed in near physiological conditions. The adsorption configuration and bioreactivity of the proteins within the nanopatterns are also studied in situ. PMID:11259301

  3. Commercialization of microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Volpatti, Lisa R; Yetisen, Ali K

    2014-07-01

    Microfluidic devices offer automation and high-throughput screening, and operate at low volumes of consumables. Although microfluidics has the potential to reduce turnaround times and costs for analytical devices, particularly in medical, veterinary, and environmental sciences, this enabling technology has had limited diffusion into consumer products. This article analyzes the microfluidics market, identifies issues, and highlights successful commercialization strategies. Addressing niche markets and establishing compatibility with existing workflows will accelerate market penetration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Two-dimensional isoelectric focusing OFFGEL and microfluidic lab-on-chip electrophoresis for assessing dissolved proteins in seawater.

    PubMed

    García-Otero, Natalia; Peña-Vázquez, Elena; Barciela-Alonso, María Carmen; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar; Moreda-Piñeiro, Antonio

    2013-06-18

    Dissolved proteins were assessed in surface and deep seawater by two-dimensional isoelectric focusing (IEF) OFFGEL-lab-on-chip (LOC) electrophoresis after tangential flow ultrafiltration followed by centrifugal ultrafiltration (preconcentration factor of 3000). Dissolved protein isolation was performed by treating the ultrafiltrated retentate with cold acetone and also with chloroform as precipitating reagents. The best electrophoretic behavior of the isolated proteins was obtained after protein precipitation with chloroform before different rinsing stages for removing methanol and water interferences. Metals bound to proteins in the different OFFGEL fractions were assessed by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry, under optimized operating conditions. Experiments regarding stability of the metal-binding proteins [superoxide dismutase (SOD) and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) as protein models] showed the integrity of the Zn-binding SOD/ADH under the OFFGEL electrophoretic conditions. However, stability of Cu bound to SOD is not guaranteed. The first electrophoretic dimension (IEF OFFGEL) showed that dissolved proteins in surface seawater exhibit alkaline isoelectric points (pIs of 8.10 and 8.37) and also acid Ips (4.82, 5.13, 5.43, and 5.73), while LOC showed that the isolated proteins exhibit a spread molecular weight range (within 15 - 63 kDa); although, high molecular weights were the most commonly found. Regarding deep seawater, isolated proteins were of acid Ips (from 3.30 to 4.22) and low molecular weight (within the 21-24 kDa range). Elements such as Cd, Cu, Mn, and Ni were mainly associated with dissolved proteins of alkaline pIs in surface seawater, while Zn was mainly associated to proteins of acid pIs. However, only Cu and Mn were found to be bound to dissolved proteins of higher Ips in deep seawater, and the amount of Mn (from 68 to 84 μg L(-1)) was higher than that found in dissolved

  5. Instability mechanisms in microfluidics and nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thamida, Sunil Kumar

    -organization dynamics of the pores. In microfluidic devices, electrokinetic flow produces spiral vortices and corner aggregation of particles and proteins at an inner corner of a channel turn that is unexplained by the short ranged DLVO forces. Field leakage effect due to the non perfectly insulating wall reveals a nonlinear singular and ejecting slip velocity condition at an acute angled sharp corner. The complete flow streamlines, vortices and the corner entrainment are revealed by conformal mapping, harmonic analysis and numerical simulation using Lattice-Boltzmann-Method (LBM). The method of hodograph transform developed for the earlier projects to solve the Laplace equation is also applied to find optimum shapes of dispersion free turns for electro-osmotic microfluidic channels.

  6. Predicting Droplet Formation on Centrifugal Microfluidic Platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moebius, Jacob Alfred

    Centrifugal microfluidics is a widely known research tool for biological sample and water quality analysis. Currently, the standard equipment used for such diagnostic applications include slow, bulky machines controlled by multiple operators. These machines can be condensed into a smaller, faster benchtop sample-to-answer system. Sample processing is an important step taken to extract, isolate, and convert biological factors, such as nucleic acids or proteins, from a raw sample to an analyzable solution. Volume definition is one such step. The focus of this thesis is the development of a model predicting monodispersed droplet formation and the application of droplets as a technique for volume definition. First, a background of droplet microfluidic platforms is presented, along with current biological analysis technologies and the advantages of integrating such technologies onto microfluidic platforms. Second, background and theories of centrifugal microfluidics is given, followed by theories relevant to droplet emulsions. Third, fabrication techniques for centrifugal microfluidic designs are discussed. Finally, the development of a model for predicting droplet formation on the centrifugal microfluidic platform are presented for the rest of the thesis. Predicting droplet formation analytically based on the volumetric flow rates of the continuous and dispersed phases, the ratios of these two flow rates, and the interfacial tension between the continuous and dispersed phases presented many challenges, which will be discussed in this work. Experimental validation was completed using continuous phase solutions of different interfacial tensions. To conclude, prospective applications are discussed with expected challenges.

  7. Microfluidics for manipulating cells.

    PubMed

    Mu, Xuan; Zheng, Wenfu; Sun, Jiashu; Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Xingyu

    2013-01-14

    Microfluidics, a toolbox comprising methods for precise manipulation of fluids at small length scales (micrometers to millimeters), has become useful for manipulating cells. Its uses range from dynamic management of cellular interactions to high-throughput screening of cells, and to precise analysis of chemical contents in single cells. Microfluidics demonstrates a completely new perspective and an excellent practical way to manipulate cells for solving various needs in biology and medicine. This review introduces and comments on recent achievements and challenges of using microfluidics to manipulate and analyze cells. It is believed that microfluidics will assume an even greater role in the mechanistic understanding of cell biology and, eventually, in clinical applications.

  8. Micro-fluidic interconnect

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat; Galambos, Paul C.; Benavides, Gilbert L.; Hetherington, Dale L.

    2006-02-28

    An apparatus for simultaneously aligning and interconnecting microfluidic ports is presented. Such interconnections are required to utilize microfluidic devices fabricated in Micro-Electromechanical-Systems (MEMS) technologies, that have multiple fluidic access ports (e.g. 100 micron diameter) within a small footprint, (e.g. 3 mm.times.6 mm). Fanout of the small ports of a microfluidic device to a larger diameter (e.g. 500 microns) facilitates packaging and interconnection of the microfluidic device to printed wiring boards, electronics packages, fluidic manifolds etc.

  9. 3D thermoplastic elastomer microfluidic devices for biological probe immobilization.

    PubMed

    Brassard, Daniel; Clime, Liviu; Li, Kebin; Geissler, Matthias; Miville-Godin, Caroline; Roy, Emmanuel; Veres, Teodor

    2011-12-07

    Microfluidics has emerged as a valuable tool for the high-resolution patterning of biological probes on solid supports. Yet, its widespread adoption as a universal biological immobilization tool is still limited by several technical challenges, particularly for the patterning of isolated spots using three-dimensional (3D) channel networks. A key limitation arises from the difficulties to adapt the techniques and materials typically used in prototyping to low-cost mass-production. In this paper, we present the fabrication of thin thermoplastic elastomer membranes with microscopic through-holes using a hot-embossing process that is compatible with high-throughput manufacturing. The membranes provide the basis for the fabrication of highly integrated 3D microfluidic devices with a footprint of only 1 × 1 cm(2). When placed on a solid support, the device allows for the immobilization of up to 96 different probes in the form of a 10 × 10 array comprising isolated spots of 50 × 50 μm(2). The design of the channel network is optimized using 3D simulations based on the Lattice-Boltzmann method to promote capillary action as the sole force distributing the liquid in the device. Finally, we demonstrate the patterning of DNA and protein arrays on hard thermoplastic substrates yielding spots of excellent definition that prove to be highly specific in subsequent hybridization experiments.

  10. Protein patterning on silicon-based surface using background hydrophobic thin film.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Soo; Lee, Sang-Ho; Park, Sung-Soo; Kim, Yong-Kweon; Kim, Byung-Gee

    2003-04-01

    A new and convenient protein patterning method on silicon-based surface was developed for protein array by spin coating of hydrophobic thin film (CYTOP). Photolithographic lift-off process was used to display two-dimensional patterns of spatially hydrophilic region. The background hydrophobic thin film was used to suppress nonspecific protein binding, and the hydrophilic target protein binding region was chemically modified to introduce aldehyde group after removal of the photoresist layer. The difference in surface energy between the hydrophilic pattern and background hydrophobic film would induce easier covalent binding of proteins onto defined hydrophilic areas having physical and chemical constraints. Below 1 microg/ml of total protein concentration, the CYTOP hydrophobic film effectively suppressed nonspecific binding of the protein. During the process of protein patterning, inherent property of the hydrophobic thin film was not changed judging from static and dynamic contact angle survey. Quantitative analysis of the protein binding was demonstrated by streptavidin-biotin system.

  11. Infrared light induced patterning of proteins on ppNIPAM thermoresponsive thin films: a "protein laser printer".

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xuanhong; Yegan Erdem, E; Takeuchi, Shoji; Fujita, Hiroyuki; Ratner, Buddy D; Böhringer, Karl F

    2010-04-21

    Protein micropatterns have applications in fundamental life sciences and clinical medicine. In this work, we present a new technique to create 2-D protein micropatterns by local activation of a thin film of thermoresponsive plasma-deposited poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (ppNIPAM) using a computer-controlled infrared laser beam. While the whole substrate is exposed to the protein solution, protein deposition happens only at laser-activated locations. A few seconds of laser exposure is all that is required to form a pattern with resolution in the single micrometre range. Successful ligand binding after protein deposition indicates that protein function remains intact after laser-induced adsorption onto ppNIPAM. This rapid, simple technique advances currently available strategies for protein patterning by its potential to pattern proteins in an enclosed environment or onto a 3-D scaffold.

  12. Matrix Gla Protein expression pattern in the early avian embryo.

    PubMed

    Correia, Elizabeth; Conceição, Natércia; Cancela, M Leonor; Belo, José A

    2016-01-01

    MGP (Matrix Gla Protein) is an extracellular matrix vitamin K dependent protein previously identified as a physiological inhibitor of calcification and shown to be well conserved among vertebrates during evolution. MGP is involved in other mechanisms such as TGF-β and BMP activity, and a proposed modulator of cell-matrix interactions. MGP is expressed early in vertebrate development although its role has not been clarified. Previous work in the chicken embryo found MGP localization predominantly in the aorta and aortic valve base, but no data is available earlier in development. Here we examined MGP expression pattern using whole-mount in situ hybridization and histological sectioning during the initial stages of chick development. MGP was first detected at HH10 in the head and in the forming dorsal aorta. At the moment of the onset of blood circulation, MGP was expressed additionally in the venous plexus which will remodel into the vitelline arteries. By E2.25, it is clear that the vitelline arteries are MGP positive. MGP expression progresses centrifugally throughout the area vasculosa of the yolk sac. Between stages HH17 and HH19 MGP is seen in the dorsal aorta, heart, notochord, nephric duct, roof plate, vitelline arteries and in the yolk sac, beneath main arterial branches and in the vicinity of several vessels and venules. MGP expression persists in these areas at least until E4.5. These data suggest that MGP expression could be associated with cell migration and differentiation and to the onset of angiogenesis in the developing chick embryo. This data has biomedical relevance by pointing to the potential use of chick embryo explants to study molecules involved in artery calcification.

  13. Hierarchical polymer brush nanoarrays: a versatile way to prepare multiscale patterns of proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunfeng; Zhang, Junhu; Liu, Wendong; Li, Daowei; Fang, Liping; Sun, Hongchen; Yang, Bai

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents a versatile way to prepare multiscale and gradient patterns of proteins. The protein patterns are fabricated by conjugating proteins covalently on patterns of polymer brush that are prepared by techniques combining colloidal lithography with photolithography, and two-step colloidal lithography. Taking advantages of this technique, the parameters of protein patterns, such as height, diameters, periods, and distances between two dots, can be arbitrarily tuned. In addition, the protein patterns with varies of architectures, such as microdiscs, microstripes, microrings, microtriangles, microgrids, etc., consisting of protein nanodots, are prepared and the sample size is up to 4 cm(2). The as-prepared patterns of fibronectin can promote the cell adhesion and cell location.

  14. Parallel imaging microfluidic cytometer.

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, Daniel J; McKenna, Brian K; Evans, James G; Belkina, Anna C; Denis, Gerald V; Sherr, David H; Cheung, Man Ching

    2011-01-01

    By adding an additional degree of freedom from multichannel flow, the parallel microfluidic cytometer (PMC) combines some of the best features of fluorescence-activated flow cytometry (FCM) and microscope-based high-content screening (HCS). The PMC (i) lends itself to fast processing of large numbers of samples, (ii) adds a 1D imaging capability for intracellular localization assays (HCS), (iii) has a high rare-cell sensitivity, and (iv) has an unusual capability for time-synchronized sampling. An inability to practically handle large sample numbers has restricted applications of conventional flow cytometers and microscopes in combinatorial cell assays, network biology, and drug discovery. The PMC promises to relieve a bottleneck in these previously constrained applications. The PMC may also be a powerful tool for finding rare primary cells in the clinic. The multichannel architecture of current PMC prototypes allows 384 unique samples for a cell-based screen to be read out in ∼6-10 min, about 30 times the speed of most current FCM systems. In 1D intracellular imaging, the PMC can obtain protein localization using HCS marker strategies at many times for the sample throughput of charge-coupled device (CCD)-based microscopes or CCD-based single-channel flow cytometers. The PMC also permits the signal integration time to be varied over a larger range than is practical in conventional flow cytometers. The signal-to-noise advantages are useful, for example, in counting rare positive cells in the most difficult early stages of genome-wide screening. We review the status of parallel microfluidic cytometry and discuss some of the directions the new technology may take.

  15. Microfluidic devices for cell cultivation and proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Tehranirokh, Masoomeh; Kouzani, Abbas Z.; Francis, Paul S.; Kanwar, Jagat R.

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidic technology provides precise, controlled-environment, cost-effective, compact, integrated, and high-throughput microsystems that are promising substitutes for conventional biological laboratory methods. In recent years, microfluidic cell culture devices have been used for applications such as tissue engineering, diagnostics, drug screening, immunology, cancer studies, stem cell proliferation and differentiation, and neurite guidance. Microfluidic technology allows dynamic cell culture in microperfusion systems to deliver continuous nutrient supplies for long term cell culture. It offers many opportunities to mimic the cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions of tissues by creating gradient concentrations of biochemical signals such as growth factors, chemokines, and hormones. Other applications of cell cultivation in microfluidic systems include high resolution cell patterning on a modified substrate with adhesive patterns and the reconstruction of complicated tissue architectures. In this review, recent advances in microfluidic platforms for cell culturing and proliferation, for both simple monolayer (2D) cell seeding processes and 3D configurations as accurate models of in vivo conditions, are examined. PMID:24273628

  16. Polyion complex libraries possessing naturally occurring differentiation for pattern-based protein discrimination.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Shunsuke; Yoshimoto, Keitaro

    2013-11-14

    Polyion complexes with naturally occurring differentiation of enzymes serve to create receptor libraries with high differentiability and lower synthetic demands for pattern-based protein discrimination.

  17. Hydrogel discs for digital microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Fiddes, Lindsey K.; Luk, Vivienne N.; Au, Sam H.; Ng, Alphonsus H. C.; Luk, Victoria; Kumacheva, Eugenia; Wheeler, Aaron R.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogels are networks of hydrophilic polymer chains that are swollen with water, and they are useful for a wide range of applications because they provide stable niches for immobilizing proteins and cells. We report here the marriage of hydrogels with digital microfluidic devices. Until recently, digital microfluidics, a fluid handling technique in which discrete droplets are manipulated electromechanically on the surface of an array of electrodes, has been used only for homogeneous systems involving liquid reagents. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that the cylindrical hydrogel discs can be incorporated into digital microfluidic systems and that these discs can be systematically addressed by droplets of reagents. Droplet movement is observed to be unimpeded by interaction with the gel discs, and gel discs remain stationary when droplets pass through them. Analyte transport into gel discs is observed to be identical to diffusion in cases in which droplets are incubated with gels passively, but transport is enhanced when droplets are continually actuated through the gels. The system is useful for generating integrated enzymatic microreactors and for three-dimensional cell culture. This paper demonstrates a new combination of techniques for lab-on-a-chip systems which we propose will be useful for a wide range of applications. PMID:22662096

  18. Fabrication and characterization of mesoscale protein patterns using atomic force microscopy (AFM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Pei

    2011-07-01

    A versatile AFM local oxidation lithography was developed for fabricating clean protein patterns ranging from nanometer to sub-millimeter scale on octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) layer of Si (100) wafer. This protein patterning method can generate bio-active protein pattern with a clean background without the need of the anti-fouling the surface or repetitive rinsing. As a model system, lysozyme protein patterns were investigated through their binding reactions with antibodies and aptamers by AFM. Polyclonal anti-lysozyme antibodies and anti-lysozyme aptamer are found to preferentially bind to the lysozyme molecules on the edge of a protein pattern before their binding to the interior ones. It was also demonstrated that the topography of the immobilized protein pattern affects the antibody binding direction. We found that the anti-lysozyme antibodies binding to the edge lysozyme molecules on the half-buried pattern started from the top but the binding on the extruded pattern started from the side because of their different spatial accessibility. In addition, after incubating lysozyme pattern with anti-lysozyme aptamer in buffer solution for enough long time, some fractal-shaped aptamer fibers with 1-6nm high and up to tens of micrometers long were formed by the self-assembling of aptamer molecules on the surface. The aptamer fibers anchor specifically on the edge of protein patterns, which originates from the biospecific recognition between the aptamer and its target protein. Once these edge-bound fibers have formed, they can serve as scaffolds for further assembly processes. We used these aptamer fibers as templates to fabricate palladium and streptavidin nanowires, which anchored on the pattern edges and never cross over or collapse over each other. The aptamer fiber scaffold potentially can lead to an effective means to fabricate and interface nanowires to existing surface patterns. KEYWORDS: Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Protein Patterns, Lysozyme, Aptamer

  19. Unconventional microfluidics: expanding the discipline.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Ahmad Ahsan; Mao, Xiaole; Stratton, Zackary S; Huang, Tony Jun

    2013-04-21

    Since its inception, the discipline of microfluidics has been harnessed for innovations in the biomedicine/chemistry fields-and to great effect. This success has had the natural side-effect of stereotyping microfluidics as a platform for medical diagnostics and miniaturized lab processes. But microfluidics has more to offer. And very recently, some researchers have successfully applied microfluidics to fields outside its traditional domains. In this Focus article, we highlight notable examples of such "unconventional" microfluidics applications (e.g., robotics, electronics). It is our hope that these early successes in unconventional microfluidics prompt further creativity, and inspire readers to expand the microfluidics discipline.

  20. Unconventional microfluidics: expanding the discipline

    PubMed Central

    Nawaz, Ahmad Ahsan; Mao, Xiaole; Stratton, Zackary S.; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-01

    Since its inception, the discipline of microfluidics has been harnessed for innovations in the biomedicine/chemistry fields—and to great effect. This success has had the natural side-effect of stereotyping microfluidics as a platform for medical diagnostics and miniaturized lab processes. But microfluidics has more to offer. And very recently, some researchers have successfully applied microfluidics to fields outside its traditional domains. In this Focus article, we highlight notable examples of such “unconventional” microfluidics applications (e.g., robotics, electronics). It is our hope that these early successes in unconventional microfluidics prompt further creativity, and inspire readers to expand the microfluidics discipline. PMID:23478651

  1. Protein kinase C modulates ventilatory patterning in the developing rat.

    PubMed

    Bandla, H P; Simakajornboon, N; Graff, G R; Gozal, D

    1999-03-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) mediates important components of signal transduction pathways underlying neuronal excitability and modulates respiratory timing mechanisms in adult rats. To determine ventilatory effects of systemic PKC inhibition during development, whole-body plethysmographic recordings were conducted in 2-3-d (n = 11), 5-6-d (n = 19), 10-12-d (n = 14), and 20-21-d-old (n = 14) rat pups after treatment with vehicle and Ro 32-0432 (100 mg/kg, intraperitoneally). Ro 32-0432 decreased minute ventilation (V E) by 51.0 +/- 5.5% (mean +/- SEM) in youngest pups (p < 0.01) but only 19.1 +/- 6.8% in 20-21-d-old pups (p < 0.01). V E decreases were always due to frequency reductions with tidal volume (VT) remaining unaffected. Respiratory rate decreases primarily resulted from marked expiratory time (TE) prolongations being more pronounced in 2-3-d-old (115.5 +/- 28.9%) compared with 20-21-d old (36.6 +/- 10.9%; p < 0.002 analysis of variance [ANOVA] ). Expression of the PKC isoforms alpha, beta, gamma, delta, iota, and mu was further examined in brainstem and cortex by immunoblotting and revealed different patterns with postnatal age and location. We conclude that endogenous PKC inhibition elicits age-dependent ventilatory reductions which primarily affect timing mechanisms rather than changes in volume drive. This effect on ventilation abates with increasing postnatal age suggesting that the neural substrate mediating overall respiratory output may be more critically dependent on PKC activity in the immature animal.

  2. Patterned polymer nanowire arrays as an effective protein immobilizer for biosensing and HIV detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yue; Liu, Yingyi; Zhu, Guang; Fang, Hao; Huang, Yunhui; Jiang, Xingyu; Wang, Zhong L.

    2012-12-01

    We report an array of polymeric nanowires for effectively immobilizing biomolecules on biochips owing to the large surface area. The nanowires were fabricated in predesigned patterns using an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching process. Microfluidic biochips integrated using the substrates with arrays of nanowires and polydimethylsiloxane channels have been demonstrated to be effective for detecting antigens, and a detection limit of antigens at 0.2 μg mL-1 has been achieved, which is improved by a factor of 50 compared to that based on flat substrates without the nanowires. In addition, the high sensitivity for clinical detection of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody has also been demonstrated, showing a 20 times enhancement in fluorescent signal intensity between the samples with positive and negative HIV.

  3. Trehalose Glycopolymer Resists Allow Direct Writing of Protein Patterns by Electron-Beam Lithography

    PubMed Central

    Bat, Erhan; Lee, Juneyoung; Lau, Uland Y.; Maynard, Heather D.

    2015-01-01

    Direct-write patterning of multiple proteins on surfaces is of tremendous interest for a myriad of applications. Precise arrangement of different proteins at increasingly smaller dimensions is a fundamental challenge to apply the materials in tissue engineering, diagnostics, proteomics and biosensors. Herein we present a new resist that protects proteins during electron beam exposure and its application in direct-write patterning of multiple proteins. Polymers with pendant trehalose units are shown to effectively cross-link to surfaces as negative resists, while at the same time providing stabilization to proteins during the vacuum and electron beam irradiation steps. In this manner, arbitrary patterns of several different classes of proteins such as enzymes, growth factors and immunoglobulins are realized. Utilizing the high precision alignment capability of electron-beam lithography, surfaces with complex patterns of multiple proteins are successfully generated at the micrometer and nanometer scale without requiring cleanroom conditions. PMID:25791943

  4. Trehalose glycopolymer resists allow direct writing of protein patterns by electron-beam lithography.

    PubMed

    Bat, Erhan; Lee, Juneyoung; Lau, Uland Y; Maynard, Heather D

    2015-03-20

    Direct-write patterning of multiple proteins on surfaces is of tremendous interest for a myriad of applications. Precise arrangement of different proteins at increasingly smaller dimensions is a fundamental challenge to apply the materials in tissue engineering, diagnostics, proteomics and biosensors. Herein, we present a new resist that protects proteins during electron-beam exposure and its application in direct-write patterning of multiple proteins. Polymers with pendant trehalose units are shown to effectively crosslink to surfaces as negative resists, while at the same time providing stabilization to proteins during the vacuum and electron-beam irradiation steps. In this manner, arbitrary patterns of several different classes of proteins such as enzymes, growth factors and immunoglobulins are realized. Utilizing the high-precision alignment capability of electron-beam lithography, surfaces with complex patterns of multiple proteins are successfully generated at the micrometre and nanometre scale without requiring cleanroom conditions.

  5. Reagent-loaded plastic microfluidic chips for detecting homocysteine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suk, Ji Won; Jang, Jae-Young; Cho, Jun-Hyeong

    2008-05-01

    This report describes the preliminary study on plastic microfluidic chips with pre-loaded reagents for detecting homocysteine (Hcy). All reagents needed in an Hcy immunoassay were included in a microfluidic chip to remove tedious assay steps. A simple and cost-effective bonding method was developed to realize reagent-loaded microfluidic chips. This technique uses an intermediate layer between two plastic substrates by selectively patterning polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) on the embossed surface of microchannels and fixing the substrates under pressure. Using this bonding method, the competitive immunoassay for SAH, a converted form of Hcy, was performed without any damage to reagents in chips, and the results showed that the fluorescent signal from antibody antigen binding decreased as the SAH concentration increased. Based on the SAH immunoassay, whole immunoassay steps for Hcy detection were carried out in plastic microfluidic chips with all necessary reagents. These experiments demonstrated the feasibility of the Hcy immunoassay in microfluidic devices.

  6. Accelerated Biofluid Filling in Complex Microfluidic Networks by Vacuum-Pressure Accelerated Movement (V-PAM).

    PubMed

    Yu, Zeta Tak For; Cheung, Mei Ki; Liu, Shirley Xiaosu; Fu, Jianping

    2016-09-01

    Rapid fluid transport and exchange are critical operations involved in many microfluidic applications. However, conventional mechanisms used for driving fluid transport in microfluidics, such as micropumping and high pressure, can be inaccurate and difficult for implementation for integrated microfluidics containing control components and closed compartments. Here, a technology has been developed termed Vacuum-Pressure Accelerated Movement (V-PAM) capable of significantly enhancing biofluid transport in complex microfluidic environments containing dead-end channels and closed chambers. Operation of the V-PAM entails a pressurized fluid loading into microfluidic channels where gas confined inside can rapidly be dissipated through permeation through a thin, gas-permeable membrane sandwiched between microfluidic channels and a network of vacuum channels. Effects of different structural and operational parameters of the V-PAM for promoting fluid filling in microfluidic environments have been studied systematically. This work further demonstrates the applicability of V-PAM for rapid filling of temperature-sensitive hydrogels and unprocessed whole blood into complex irregular microfluidic networks such as microfluidic leaf venation patterns and blood circulatory systems. Together, the V-PAM technology provides a promising generic microfluidic tool for advanced fluid control and transport in integrated microfluidics for different microfluidic diagnosis, organs-on-chips, and biomimetic studies.

  7. Microfluidic PDMS on paper (POP) devices.

    PubMed

    Shangguan, Jin-Wen; Liu, Yu; Pan, Jian-Bin; Xu, Bi-Yi; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2016-12-20

    In this paper, we propose a generalized concept of microfluidic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) on paper (POP) devices, which combines well the merits of paper chips and PDMS chips. First, we optimized the conditions for accurate PDMS spatial patterning on paper, based on screen printing and a high temperature enabled superfast curing technique, which enables PDMS patterning to an accuracy of tens of microns in less than ten seconds. This, in turn, makes it available for seamless, reversible and reliable integration of the resulting paper layer with other PDMS channel structures. The integrated POP devices allow for both porous paper and smooth channels to be spatially defined on the devices, greatly extending the flexibility for designers to be able to construct powerful functional structures. To demonstrate the versatility of this design, a prototype POP device for the colorimetric analysis of liver function markers, serum protein, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST), was constructed. On this POP device, quantitative sample loading, mixing and multiplex analysis have all been realized.

  8. Easy fabrication of thin membranes with through holes. Application to protein patterning.

    PubMed

    Masters, Thomas; Engl, Wilfried; Weng, Zhe L; Arasi, Bakya; Gauthier, Nils; Viasnoff, Virgile

    2012-01-01

    Since protein patterning on 2D surfaces has emerged as an important tool in cell biology, the development of easy patterning methods has gained importance in biology labs. In this paper we present a simple, rapid and reliable technique to fabricate thin layers of UV curable polymer with through holes. These membranes are as easy to fabricate as microcontact printing stamps and can be readily used for stencil patterning. We show how this microfabrication scheme allows highly reproducible and highly homogeneous protein patterning with micron sized resolution on surfaces as large as 10 cm(2). Using these stencils, fragile proteins were patterned without loss of function in a fully hydrated state. We further demonstrate how intricate patterns of multiple proteins can be achieved by stacking the stencil membranes. We termed this approach microserigraphy.

  9. Applying microfluidics to electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Eddington, David T

    2007-01-01

    Microfluidics can be integrated with standard electrophysiology techniques to allow new experimental modalities. Specifically, the motivation for the microfluidic brain slice device is discussed including how the device docks to standard perfusion chambers and the technique of passive pumping which is used to deliver boluses of neuromodulators to the brain slice. By simplifying the device design, we are able to achieve a practical solution to the current unmet electrophysiology need of applying multiple neuromodulators across multiple regions of the brain slice. This is achieved by substituting the standard coverglass substrate of the perfusion chamber with a thin microfluidic device bonded to the coverglass substrate. This was then attached to the perfusion chamber and small holes connect the open-well of the perfusion chamber to the microfluidic channels buried within the microfluidic substrate. These microfluidic channels are interfaced with ports drilled into the edge of the perfusion chamber to access and deliver stimulants. This project represents how the field of microfluidics is transitioning away from proof-of concept device demonstrations and into practical solutions for unmet experimental and clinical needs.

  10. Applying Microfluidics to Electrophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Eddington, David T.

    2007-01-01

    Microfluidics can be integrated with standard electrophysiology techniques to allow new experimental modalities. Specifically, the motivation for the microfluidic brain slice device is discussed including how the device docks to standard perfusion chambers and the technique of passive pumping which is used to deliver boluses of neuromodulators to the brain slice. By simplifying the device design, we are able to achieve a practical solution to the current unmet electrophysiology need of applying multiple neuromodulators across multiple regions of the brain slice. This is achieved by substituting the standard coverglass substrate of the perfusion chamber with a thin microfluidic device bonded to the coverglass substrate. This was then attached to the perfusion chamber and small holes connect the open-well of the perfusion chamber to the microfluidic channels buried within the microfluidic substrate. These microfluidic channels are interfaced with ports drilled into the edge of the perfusion chamber to access and deliver stimulants. This project represents how the field of microfluidics is transitioning away from proof-of concept device demonstrations and into practical solutions for unmet experimental and clinical needs. PMID:18989410

  11. Microfluidics and microbial engineering.

    PubMed

    Kou, Songzi; Cheng, Danhui; Sun, Fei; Hsing, I-Ming

    2016-02-07

    The combination of microbial engineering and microfluidics is synergistic in nature. For example, microfluidics is benefiting from the outcome of microbial engineering and many reported point-of-care microfluidic devices employ engineered microbes as functional parts for the microsystems. In addition, microbial engineering is facilitated by various microfluidic techniques, due to their inherent strength in high-throughput screening and miniaturization. In this review article, we firstly examine the applications of engineered microbes for toxicity detection, biosensing, and motion generation in microfluidic platforms. Secondly, we look into how microfluidic technologies facilitate the upstream and downstream processes of microbial engineering, including DNA recombination, transformation, target microbe selection, mutant characterization, and microbial function analysis. Thirdly, we highlight an emerging concept in microbial engineering, namely, microbial consortium engineering, where the behavior of a multicultural microbial community rather than that of a single cell/species is delineated. Integrating the disciplines of microfluidics and microbial engineering opens up many new opportunities, for example in diagnostics, engineering of microbial motors, development of portable devices for genetics, high throughput characterization of genetic mutants, isolation and identification of rare/unculturable microbial species, single-cell analysis with high spatio-temporal resolution, and exploration of natural microbial communities.

  12. Microfluidic Diffusion Viscometer for Rapid Analysis of Complex Solutions.

    PubMed

    Arosio, Paolo; Hu, Kevin; Aprile, Francesco A; Müller, Thomas; Knowles, Tuomas P J

    2016-04-05

    The viscosity of complex solutions is a physical property of central relevance for a large number of applications in material, biological, and biotechnological sciences. Here we demonstrate a microfluidic technology to measure the viscosity of solutions by following the advection and diffusion of tracer particles under steady-state flow. We validate our method with standard water-glycerol mixtures, and then we apply this microfluidic diffusion viscometer to measure the viscosity of protein solutions at high concentrations as well as of a crude cell lysate. Our approach exhibits a series of attractive features, including analysis time on the order of seconds and the consumption of a few μL of sample, as well as the possibility to readily integrate the microfluidic viscometer in other instrument platforms or modular microfluidic devices. These characteristics make microfluidic diffusion viscometry an attractive approach in automated processes in biotechnology and health-care sciences where fast measurements with limited amount of sample consumption are required.

  13. Microfluidic integration for automated targeted proteomic assays.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Alex J; Lin, Robert K C; Peehl, Donna M; Herr, Amy E

    2012-04-17

    A dearth of protein isoform-based clinical diagnostics currently hinders advances in personalized medicine. A well-organized protein biomarker validation process that includes facile measurement of protein isoforms would accelerate development of effective protein-based diagnostics. Toward scalable protein isoform analysis, we introduce a microfluidic "single-channel, multistage" immunoblotting strategy. The multistep assay performs all immunoblotting steps: separation, immobilization of resolved proteins, antibody probing of immobilized proteins, and all interim wash steps. Programmable, low-dispersion electrophoretic transport obviates the need for pumps and valves. A three-dimensional bulk photoreactive hydrogel eliminates manual blotting. In addition to simplified operation and interfacing, directed electrophoretic transport through our 3D nanoporous reactive hydrogel yields superior performance over the state-of-the-art in enhanced capture efficiency (on par with membrane electroblotting) and sparing consumption of reagents (ca. 1 ng antibody), as supported by empirical and by scaling analyses. We apply our fully integrated microfluidic assay to protein measurements of endogenous prostate specific antigen isoforms in (i) minimally processed human prostate cancer cell lysate (1.1 pg limit of detection) and (ii) crude sera from metastatic prostate cancer patients. The single-instrument functionality establishes a scalable microfluidic framework for high-throughput targeted proteomics, as is relevant to personalized medicine through robust protein biomarker verification, systematic characterization of new antibody probes for functional proteomics, and, more broadly, to characterization of human biospecimen repositories.

  14. BindML/BindML+: Detecting Protein-Protein Interaction Interface Propensity from Amino Acid Substitution Patterns.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qing; La, David; Kihara, Daisuke

    2017-01-01

    Prediction of protein-protein interaction sites in a protein structure provides important information for elucidating the mechanism of protein function and can also be useful in guiding a modeling or design procedures of protein complex structures. Since prediction methods essentially assess the propensity of amino acids that are likely to be part of a protein docking interface, they can help in designing protein-protein interactions. Here, we introduce BindML and BindML+ protein-protein interaction sites prediction methods. BindML predicts protein-protein interaction sites by identifying mutation patterns found in known protein-protein complexes using phylogenetic substitution models. BindML+ is an extension of BindML for distinguishing permanent and transient types of protein-protein interaction sites. We developed an interactive web-server that provides a convenient interface to assist in structural visualization of protein-protein interactions site predictions. The input data for the web-server are a tertiary structure of interest. BindML and BindML+ are available at http://kiharalab.org/bindml/ and http://kiharalab.org/bindml/plus/ .

  15. Integrated multifunctional microfluidics for automated proteome analyses.

    PubMed

    Osiri, John K; Shadpour, Hamed; Witek, Małgorzata A; Soper, Steven A

    2011-01-01

    Proteomics is a challenging field for realizing totally integrated microfluidic systems for complete proteome processing due to several considerations, including the sheer number of different protein types that exist within most proteomes, the large dynamic range associated with these various protein types, and the diverse chemical nature of the proteins comprising a typical proteome. For example, the human proteome is estimated to have >10(6) different components with a dynamic range of >10(10). The typical processing pipeline for proteomics involves the following steps: (1) selection and/or extraction of the particular proteins to be analyzed; (2) multidimensional separation; (3) proteolytic digestion of the protein sample; and (4) mass spectral identification of either intact proteins (top-down proteomics) or peptide fragments generated from proteolytic digestions (bottom-up proteomics). Although a number of intriguing microfluidic devices have been designed, fabricated and evaluated for carrying out the individual processing steps listed above, work toward building fully integrated microfluidic systems for protein analysis has yet to be realized. In this chapter, information will be provided on the nature of proteomic analysis in terms of the challenges associated with the sample type and the microfluidic devices that have been tested to carry out individual processing steps. These include devices such as those for multidimensional electrophoretic separations, solid-phase enzymatic digestions, and solid-phase extractions, all of which have used microfluidics as the functional platform for their implementation. This will be followed by an in-depth review of microfluidic systems, which are defined as units possessing two or more devices assembled into autonomous systems for proteome processing. In addition, information will be provided on the challenges involved in integrating processing steps into a functional system and the approaches adopted for device

  16. Nanomaterials meet microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Pumera, Martin

    2011-05-28

    Nanomaterials and lab-on-a-chip platforms have undergone enormous development during the past decade. Here, we present an overview of how microfluidics benefited from the use of nanomaterials for the enhanced separation and detection of analytes. We also discuss how nanomaterials benefit from microfluidics in terms of synthesis and in terms of the simulation of environments for nanomotors and nanorobots. In our opinion, the "marriage" of nanomaterials and microfluidics is highly beneficial and is expected to solve vital challenges in related fields. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  17. Electroporation of cells in microfluidic droplets.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yihong; Wang, Jun; Bao, Ning; Lu, Chang

    2009-03-01

    Droplet-based microfluidics has raised a lot of interest recently due to its wide applications to screening biological/chemical assays with high throughput. Despite the advances on droplet-based assays involving cells, gene delivery methods that are compatible with the droplet platform have been lacking. In this report, we demonstrate a simple microfluidic device that encapsulates cells into aqueous droplets and then electroporates the encapsulated cells. The electroporation occurs when the cell-containing droplets (in oil) flow through a pair of microelectrodes with a constant voltage established in between. We investigate the parameters and characteristics of the electroporation. We demonstrate delivering enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) plasmid into Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. We envision the application of this technique to high-throughput functional genomics studies based on droplet microfluidics.

  18. THE USE OF EVOLUTIONARY PATTERNS IN PROTEIN ANNOTATION

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Angela; Bachman, Ben; Erdin, Serkan; Lichtarge, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Summary With genomic data skyrocketing, their biological interpretation remains a serious challenge. Diverse computational methods address this problem by pointing to the existence of recurrent patterns among sequence, structure, and function. These patterns emerge naturally from evolutionary variation, natural selection, and divergence—the defining features of biological systems—and they identify molecular events and shapes that underlie specificity of function and allosteric communication. Here we review these methods, and the patterns they identify in case studies and in proteome-wide applications, to infer and rationally redesign function. PMID:22633559

  19. Protein expression pattern of human MIER1 alpha, a novel estrogen receptor binding protein

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Patti L.; Paterno, Gary D.; Gillespie, Laura L.

    2014-01-01

    MIER1 is a transcriptional regulator that exists as several isoforms. Of particular interest is the MIER1α isoform, which contains in its unique C-terminus an LXXLL motif for interaction with nuclear hormone receptors. Indeed, MIER1α has been shown to interact with ERα and inhibit estrogen-stimulated growth of breast carcinoma cells. Moreover, the subcellular localization of MIER1α changes dramatically, from nuclear to cytoplasmic, during progression to invasive breast carcinoma. While human MIER1 RNA and protein expression pattern data have been posted on several websites, none of these studies use probes or antibodies that distinguish between the α and β isoforms. We report here the first immunohistochemical study of the MIER1α protein expression pattern in human tissues. Our analysis revealed intense staining of specific cell types within virtually every endocrine and reproductive tissue except for the thyroid gland. In particular, we detected intense staining of ovarian follicles and germinal epithelium, ductal epithelial cells of the breast, pancreatic islet cells, all areas of the anterior pituitary and all zones of the adrenal cortex; moderate staining of germ cells and Leydig cells within the testis, patches of chromaffin cells in the adrenal medulla and weak staining of the fibromuscular stroma within the prostate. Immunoreactivity was limited to the cytoplasm in all positive cells except for oocytes and germinal epithelial cells in which the nucleus was also stained and in ductal epithelial cells of the breast in which staining was exclusively nuclear. In general, non-endocrine tissues were negative, however a few exceptions were noted. These included hepatocytes, myocardial fibers and neurons in all regions of the brain examined, with the exception of the thalamus. Neuronal staining was restricted to the cell bodies and dendrites, as most axons were negative. These data suggest that human MIER1α functions specifically in endocrine tissues and in

  20. Cell manipulation in microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Yun, Hoyoung; Kim, Kisoo; Lee, Won Gu

    2013-06-01

    Recent advances in the lab-on-a-chip field in association with nano/microfluidics have been made for new applications and functionalities to the fields of molecular biology, genetic analysis and proteomics, enabling the expansion of the cell biology field. Specifically, microfluidics has provided promising tools for enhancing cell biological research, since it has the ability to precisely control the cellular environment, to easily mimic heterogeneous cellular environment by multiplexing, and to analyze sub-cellular information by high-contents screening assays at the single-cell level. Various cell manipulation techniques in microfluidics have been developed in accordance with specific objectives and applications. In this review, we examine the latest achievements of cell manipulation techniques in microfluidics by categorizing externally applied forces for manipulation: (i) optical, (ii) magnetic, (iii) electrical, (iv) mechanical and (v) other manipulations. We furthermore focus on history where the manipulation techniques originate and also discuss future perspectives with key examples where available.

  1. Microfluidic chemical reaction circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chung-cheng; Sui, Guodong; Elizarov, Arkadij; Kolb, Hartmuth C; Huang, Jiang; Heath, James R; Phelps, Michael E; Quake, Stephen R; Tseng, Hsian-rong; Wyatt, Paul; Daridon, Antoine

    2012-06-26

    New microfluidic devices, useful for carrying out chemical reactions, are provided. The devices are adapted for on-chip solvent exchange, chemical processes requiring multiple chemical reactions, and rapid concentration of reagents.

  2. Microfluidic multiplexing in bioanalyses.

    PubMed

    Araz, M Kursad; Tentori, Augusto M; Herr, Amy E

    2013-10-01

    The importance of biological assays spans from clinical diagnostics to environmental monitoring. Simultaneous detection of multiple analytes enhances the efficacy of bioassays by providing more data per assay under standardized conditions. Nevertheless, simultaneous handling and assaying of multiple samples, targets, and experimental conditions can be laborious, reagent consuming, and time intensive. Given these demands, microfluidic platforms have emerged over the past two decades as well-suited approaches for multiplexed assays. Microfluidic design supports integration of assay steps and reproducible sample manipulation across large sets of conditions--all relevant to multiplexed assays. Taken together, reduced reagent consumption, faster assay times, and potential for automation stemming from microfluidic assay design are attractive and needed multiplexed assay performance attributes. This review highlights recent advances in multiplexed bioanalyses benefitting from microfluidic integration.

  3. Microfluidics: reframing biological enquiry.

    PubMed

    Duncombe, Todd A; Tentori, Augusto M; Herr, Amy E

    2015-09-01

    The underlying physical properties of microfluidic tools have led to new biological insights through the development of microsystems that can manipulate, mimic and measure biology at a resolution that has not been possible with macroscale tools. Microsystems readily handle sub-microlitre volumes, precisely route predictable laminar fluid flows and match both perturbations and measurements to the length scales and timescales of biological systems. The advent of fabrication techniques that do not require highly specialized engineering facilities is fuelling the broad dissemination of microfluidic systems and their adaptation to specific biological questions. We describe how our understanding of molecular and cell biology is being and will continue to be advanced by precision microfluidic approaches and posit that microfluidic tools - in conjunction with advanced imaging, bioinformatics and molecular biology approaches - will transform biology into a precision science.

  4. Microfluidics in inorganic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Abou-Hassan, Ali; Sandre, Olivier; Cabuil, Valérie

    2010-08-23

    The application of microfluidics in chemistry has gained significant importance in the recent years. Miniaturized chemistry platforms provide controlled fluid transport, rapid chemical reactions, and cost-saving advantages over conventional reactors. The advantages of microfluidics have been clearly established in the field of analytical and bioanalytical sciences and in the field of organic synthesis. It is less true in the field of inorganic chemistry and materials science; however in inorganic chemistry it has mostly been used for the separation and selective extraction of metal ions. Microfluidics has been used in materials science mainly for the improvement of nanoparticle synthesis, namely metal, metal oxide, and semiconductor nanoparticles. Microfluidic devices can also be used for the formulation of more advanced and sophisticated inorganic materials or hybrids.

  5. Flock-based microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Hitzbleck, Martina; Lovchik, Robert D; Delamarche, Emmanuel

    2013-05-21

    Flock-based microfluidics are created by depositing hydrophilic microfibers on an adhesive-coated substrate using an electric field. This enables the fabrication of self-powered microfluidics from one or more different kinds of fibers that form 2D and 3D flowpaths, which can wick 40 microliters of liquid per square centimeter. With this approach, large areas of functional wicking materials can be produced at extremely low cost.

  6. Outer Membrane Proteins form Specific Patterns in Antibiotic-Resistant Edwardsiella tarda

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Bo; Wang, Chao; Li, Hui; Su, Yu-bin; Ye, Jin-zhou; Yang, Man-jun; Jiang, Ming; Peng, Xuan-xian

    2017-01-01

    Outer membrane proteins of Gram-negative bacteria play key roles in antibiotic resistance. However, it is unknown whether outer membrane proteins that respond to antibiotics behave in a specific manner. The present study specifically investigated the differentially expressed outer membrane proteins of an antibiotic-resistant bacterium, Edwardsiella tarda, a Gram-negative pathogen that can lead to unnecessary mass medication of antimicrobials and consequently resistance development in aquaculture and a spectrum of intestinal and extraintestinal diseases in humans. The comparison of a clinically isolated strain to the laboratory derived kanamycin-, tetracycline-, or chloramphenicol-resistant strains identified their respective outer membrane proteins expression patterns, which are distinct to each other. Similarly, the same approach was utilized to profile the patterns in double antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Surprisingly, one pattern is always dominant over the other as to these three antibiotics; the pattern of chloramphenicol is over tetracycline, which is over kanamycin. This type of pattern was also confirmed in clinically relevant multidrug-resistant bacteria. In addition, the presence of plasmid encoding antibiotic-resistant genes also alters the outer membrane protein profile in a similar manner. Our results demonstrate that bacteria adapt the antibiotic stress through the regulation of outer membrane proteins expression. And more importantly, different outer membrane protein profiles were required to cope with different antibiotics. This type of specific pattern provides the rationale for the development of novel strategy to design outer membrane protein arrays to identify diverse multidrug resistance profiles as biomarkers for clinical medication. PMID:28210241

  7. Microfluidic parallel circuit for measurement of hydraulic resistance.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sungyoung; Lee, Myung Gwon; Park, Je-Kyun

    2010-08-31

    We present a microfluidic parallel circuit that directly compares the test channel of an unknown hydraulic resistance with the reference channel with a known resistance, thereby measuring the unknown resistance without any measurement setup, such as standard pressure gauges. Many of microfluidic applications require the precise transport of fluid along a channel network with complex patterns. Therefore, it is important to accurately characterize and measure the hydraulic resistance of each channel segment, and determines whether the device principle works well. However, there is no fluidic device that includes features, such as the ability to diagnose microfluidic problems by measuring the hydraulic resistance of a microfluidic component in microscales. To address the above need, we demonstrate a simple strategy to measure an unknown hydraulic resistance, by characterizing the hydraulic resistance of microchannels with different widths and defining an equivalent linear channel of a microchannel with repeated patterns of a sudden contraction and expansion.

  8. MEMS in microfluidic channels.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, Carol Iris Hill; Okandan, Murat; Michalske, Terry A.; Sounart, Thomas L.; Matzke, Carolyn M.

    2004-03-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) comprise a new class of devices that include various forms of sensors and actuators. Recent studies have shown that microscale cantilever structures are able to detect a wide range of chemicals, biomolecules or even single bacterial cells. In this approach, cantilever deflection replaces optical fluorescence detection thereby eliminating complex chemical tagging steps that are difficult to achieve with chip-based architectures. A key challenge to utilizing this new detection scheme is the incorporation of functionalized MEMS structures within complex microfluidic channel architectures. The ability to accomplish this integration is currently limited by the processing approaches used to seal lids on pre-etched microfluidic channels. This report describes Sandia's first construction of MEMS instrumented microfluidic chips, which were fabricated by combining our leading capabilities in MEMS processing with our low-temperature photolithographic method for fabricating microfluidic channels. We have explored in-situ cantilevers and other similar passive MEMS devices as a new approach to directly sense fluid transport, and have successfully monitored local flow rates and viscosities within microfluidic channels. Actuated MEMS structures have also been incorporated into microfluidic channels, and the electrical requirements for actuation in liquids have been quantified with an elegant theory. Electrostatic actuation in water has been accomplished, and a novel technique for monitoring local electrical conductivities has been invented.

  9. Complex chromatin condensation patterns and nuclear protein transitions during spermiogenesis: examples from mollusks.

    PubMed

    Chiva, M; Saperas, N; Ribes, E

    2011-12-01

    In this paper we review and analyze the chromatin condensation pattern during spermiogenesis in several species of mollusks. Previously, we had described the nuclear protein transitions during spermiogenesis in these species. The results of our study show two types of condensation pattern: simple patterns and complex patterns, with the following general characteristics: (a) When histones (always present in the early spermatid nucleus) are directly replaced by SNBP (sperm nuclear basic proteins) of the protamine type, the spermiogenic chromatin condensation pattern is simple. However, if the replacement is not direct but through intermediate proteins, the condensation pattern is complex. (b) The intermediate proteins found in mollusks are precursor molecules that are processed during spermiogenesis to the final protamine molecules. Some of these final protamines represent proteins with the highest basic amino acid content known to date, which results in the establishment of a very strong electrostatic interaction with DNA. (c) In some instances, the presence of complex patterns of chromatin condensation clearly correlates with the acquisition of specialized forms of the mature sperm nuclei. In contrast, simple condensation patterns always lead to rounded, oval or slightly cylindrical nuclei. (d) All known cases of complex spermiogenic chromatin condensation patterns are restricted to species with specialized sperm cells (introsperm). At the time of writing, we do not know of any report on complex condensation pattern in species with external fertilization and, therefore, with sperm cells of the primitive type (ect-aquasperm). (e) Some of the mollusk an spermiogenic chromatin condensation patterns of the complex type are very similar (almost identical) to those present in other groups of animals. Interestingly, the intermediate proteins involved in these cases can be very different.In this study, we discuss the biological significance of all these features and

  10. PatternQuery: web application for fast detection of biomacromolecular structural patterns in the entire Protein Data Bank.

    PubMed

    Sehnal, David; Pravda, Lukáš; Svobodová Vařeková, Radka; Ionescu, Crina-Maria; Koča, Jaroslav

    2015-07-01

    Well defined biomacromolecular patterns such as binding sites, catalytic sites, specific protein or nucleic acid sequences, etc. precisely modulate many important biological phenomena. We introduce PatternQuery, a web-based application designed for detection and fast extraction of such patterns. The application uses a unique query language with Python-like syntax to define the patterns that will be extracted from datasets provided by the user, or from the entire Protein Data Bank (PDB). Moreover, the database-wide search can be restricted using a variety of criteria, such as PDB ID, resolution, and organism of origin, to provide only relevant data. The extraction generally takes a few seconds for several hundreds of entries, up to approximately one hour for the whole PDB. The detected patterns are made available for download to enable further processing, as well as presented in a clear tabular and graphical form directly in the browser. The unique design of the language and the provided service could pave the way towards novel PDB-wide analyses, which were either difficult or unfeasible in the past. The application is available free of charge at http://ncbr.muni.cz/PatternQuery. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. Modulation of cell adhesion complexes by surface protein patterns.

    PubMed

    Pesen, Devrim; Haviland, David B

    2009-03-01

    Cell adhesion is an important process in several biological phenomena. To investigate the formation and organization of focal adhesions, we developed a patterning approach based on electron beam lithography. Nanodots (radius <1230 nm) and nanorings (inner radius <320 nm) of fibronectin (FN) were patterned on a K-Casein background. Intracellular vinculin immunofluorescence mirrored the FN nanopatterns. Atomic force microscopy showed that FN nanodots and nanorings organize the immediate cytoskeleton into straight fibrils and diverging fibril bundles, respectively. Our results suggest that a minimum of approximately 40 FN molecules is required for a cell to form a focal adhesion.

  12. Regular Nanoscale Protein Patterns via Directed Adsorption through Self-Assembled DNA Origami Masks.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Saminathan; Subramaniam, Sivaraman; Stewart, A Francis; Grundmeier, Guido; Keller, Adrian

    2016-11-16

    DNA origami has become a widely used method for synthesizing well-defined nanostructures with promising applications in various areas of nanotechnology, biophysics, and medicine. Recently, the possibility to transfer the shape of single DNA origami nanostructures into different materials via molecular lithography approaches has received growing interest due to the great structural control provided by the DNA origami technique. Here, we use ordered monolayers of DNA origami nanostructures with internal cavities on mica surfaces as molecular lithography masks for the fabrication of regular protein patterns over large surface areas. Exposure of the masked sample surface to negatively charged proteins results in the directed adsorption of the proteins onto the exposed surface areas in the holes of the mask. By controlling the buffer and adsorption conditions, the protein coverage of the exposed areas can be varied from single proteins to densely packed monolayers. To demonstrate the versatility of this approach, regular nanopatterns of four different proteins are fabricated: the single-strand annealing proteins Redβ and Sak, the iron-storage protein ferritin, and the blood protein bovine serum albumin (BSA). We furthermore demonstrate the desorption of the DNA origami mask after directed protein adsorption, which may enable the fabrication of hierarchical patterns composed of different protein species. Because selectivity in adsorption is achieved by electrostatic interactions between the proteins and the exposed surface areas, this approach may enable also the large-scale patterning of other charged molecular species or even nanoparticles.

  13. Invariant patterns in crystal lattices: Implications for protein folding algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    HART,WILLIAM E.; ISTRAIL,SORIN

    2000-06-01

    Crystal lattices are infinite periodic graphs that occur naturally in a variety of geometries and which are of fundamental importance in polymer science. Discrete models of protein folding use crystal lattices to define the space of protein conformations. Because various crystal lattices provide discretizations of the same physical phenomenon, it is reasonable to expect that there will exist invariants across lattices related to fundamental properties of the protein folding process. This paper considers whether performance-guaranteed approximability is such an invariant for HP lattice models. The authors define a master approximation algorithm that has provable performance guarantees provided that a specific sublattice exists within a given lattice. They describe a broad class of crystal lattices that are approximable, which further suggests that approximability is a general property of HP lattice models.

  14. Hybrid microfluidic systems: combining a polymer microfluidic toolbox with biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gärtner, Claudia; Kirsch, Stefanie; Anton, Birgit; Becker, Holger

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present polymer based microfluidic chips which contain functional elements (electrodes, biosensors) made out of a different material (metals, silicon, organic semiconductors). These hybrid microfluidic devices allow the integration of additional functionality other than the simple manipulation of liquids in the chip and have been developed as a reaction to the increasing requirement for functional integration in microfluidics.

  15. Image reversal for direct electron beam patterning of protein coated surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pesen, Devrim; Erlandsson, Anna; Ulfendahl, Mats; Haviland, David B

    2007-11-01

    Electron beam lithography (EBL) is used to create surfaces with protein patterns, which are characterized by immunofluorescence and atomic force microscopies. Both negative and positive image processes are realized by electron beam irradiation of proteins absorbed on a silicon surface, where image reversal is achieved by selectively binding a second species of protein to the electron beam exposed areas on the first protein layer. Biofunctionality at the cellular level was established by culturing cortical cells on patterned lines of fibronectin adsorbed on a bovine serum albumin background for 7 days in culture.

  16. Patterns and plasticity in RNA-protein interactions enable recruitment of multiple proteins through a single site

    SciTech Connect

    Valley, Cary T.; Porter, Douglas F.; Qiu, Chen; Campbell, Zachary T.; Tanaka Hall, Traci M.; Wickens, Marvin

    2012-06-28

    mRNA control hinges on the specificity and affinity of proteins for their RNA binding sites. Regulatory proteins must bind their own sites and reject even closely related noncognate sites. In the PUF [Pumilio and fem-3 binding factor (FBF)] family of RNA binding proteins, individual proteins discriminate differences in the length and sequence of binding sites, allowing each PUF to bind a distinct battery of mRNAs. Here, we show that despite these differences, the pattern of RNA interactions is conserved among PUF proteins: the two ends of the PUF protein make critical contacts with the two ends of the RNA sites. Despite this conserved 'two-handed' pattern of recognition, the RNA sequence is flexible. Among the binding sites of yeast Puf4p, RNA sequence dictates the pattern in which RNA bases are flipped away from the binding surface of the protein. Small differences in RNA sequence allow new modes of control, recruiting Puf5p in addition to Puf4p to a single site. This embedded information adds a new layer of biological meaning to the connections between RNA targets and PUF proteins.

  17. Microfluidic probe: a new tool for integrating microfluidic environments and electronic wafer-probing.

    PubMed

    Routenberg, David A; Reed, Mark A

    2010-01-07

    We demonstrate a new tool for integrating microfluidic channels with commonly used electronic probing techniques. The "microfluidic probe" allows rapid and repeatable fluidic and electronic addressing of small die sites on a variety of substrate types without the need for permanent modification or dicing of the device wafers. We also use the probe to demonstrate locally patterned chemical modification of a substrate. The probes are easily fabricated using standard soft-lithography and basic machining making this a widely accessible technique for electronics and fluidics researchers.

  18. Highly efficient and selective isolation of rare tumor cells using a microfluidic chip with wavy-herringbone micro-patterned surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shunqiang; Thomas, Antony; Lee, Elaine; Yang, Shu; Cheng, Xuanhong; Liu, Yaling

    2016-04-07

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in peripheral blood have been recognized as a general biomarker for diagnosing cancer and providing guidance for personalized treatments. Yet due to their rarity, the challenge for their clinical utility lies in the efficient isolation while avoiding the capture of other non-targeted white blood cells (WBCs). In this paper, a wavy-herringbone (HB) microfluidic chip coated with antibody directly against epithelial cell adhesion molecule (anti-EpCAM) was developed for highly efficient and selective isolation of tumor cells from tumor cell-spiked whole blood samples. By extending the concept of the hallmark HB-Chip in the literature, the wavy-HB chip not only achieves high capture efficiency (up to 85.0%) by micro-vortexes induced by HB structures, but also achieves high purity (up to 39.4%) due to the smooth wavy microstructures. These smooth wavy-HB structures eliminate the ultra-low shear rate regions in the traditional grooved-HB structures that lead to non-specific trapping of cells. Compared with the grooved-HB chip with sharp corners, the wavy-HB chip shows significantly higher purity while maintaining similarly high capture efficiency. Furthermore, the wavy-HB chip has up to 11% higher captured cell viability over the grooved-HB chip. The distributions of tumor cells and WBCs along the grooves and waves are investigated to help understand the mechanisms behind the better performance of the wavy-HB chip. The wavy-HB chip may serve as a promising platform for CTC capture and cancer diagnosis.

  19. Neuronal Cell Patterning on Covalently Bound Protein Patterns by Micro-Contact Printing Techniques and the Functioning of Proteins Bound on Silane Monolayers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    Buttler, J.E., Ni, L ., Brown, W.R., Joshi, K.S., Cha g , J., n Rosenberg, B., and Voss, Jr. E.W., 1993: The Immunochemistry of Sandwich Elisas—VI...CONTRACT NUMBER g 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING...biotin, lectins, protein A and protein G , and a fragment of specific antibodies. We believe that the patterns of neuronal cells on the protein

  20. Punch card programmable microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Korir, George; Prakash, Manu

    2015-01-01

    Small volume fluid handling in single and multiphase microfluidics provides a promising strategy for efficient bio-chemical assays, low-cost point-of-care diagnostics and new approaches to scientific discoveries. However multiple barriers exist towards low-cost field deployment of programmable microfluidics. Incorporating multiple pumps, mixers and discrete valve based control of nanoliter fluids and droplets in an integrated, programmable manner without additional required external components has remained elusive. Combining the idea of punch card programming with arbitrary fluid control, here we describe a self-contained, hand-crank powered, multiplex and robust programmable microfluidic platform. A paper tape encodes information as a series of punched holes. A mechanical reader/actuator reads these paper tapes and correspondingly executes operations onto a microfluidic chip coupled to the platform in a plug-and-play fashion. Enabled by the complexity of codes that can be represented by a series of holes in punched paper tapes, we demonstrate independent control of 15 on-chip pumps with enhanced mixing, normally-closed valves and a novel on-demand impact-based droplet generator. We demonstrate robustness of operation by encoding a string of characters representing the word "PUNCHCARD MICROFLUIDICS" using the droplet generator. Multiplexing is demonstrated by implementing an example colorimetric water quality assays for pH, ammonia, nitrite and nitrate content in different water samples. With its portable and robust design, low cost and ease-of-use, we envision punch card programmable microfluidics will bring complex control of microfluidic chips into field-based applications in low-resource settings and in the hands of children around the world.

  1. Different evolutionary patterns of classical swine fever virus envelope proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Yang, Zexiao; Zhang, Mingwang

    2016-03-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is the causative agent of classical swine fever, which is a highly contagious disease of the domestic pig as well as wild boar. The proteins E(rns), E1, and E2 are components of the viral envelope membrane. They are also implicated in virus attachment and entry, replication, and (or) anti-immune response. Here, we studied the genetic variations of these envelope proteins in the evolution of CSFV. The results reveal that the envelope proteins underwent different evolutionary fates. In E(rns) and E1, but not E2, a number of amino acid sites experienced functional divergence. Furthermore, the diversification in E(rns) and E1 was generally episodic because the divergence-related changes of E1 only occurred with the separation of 2 major groups of CSFV and that of E(rns) took place with the division of 1 major group. The major divergence-related sites of E(rns) are located on one of the substrate-binding regions of the RNase domain and C-terminal extension. These functional domains have been reported to block activation of the innate immune system and attachment and entry into host cells, respectively. Our results may shed some light on the divergent roles of the envelope proteins.

  2. Protein patterns of black fungi under simulated Mars-like conditions.

    PubMed

    Zakharova, Kristina; Marzban, Gorji; de Vera, Jean-Pierre; Lorek, Andreas; Sterflinger, Katja

    2014-05-29

    Two species of microcolonial fungi - Cryomyces antarcticus and Knufia perforans - and a species of black yeasts-Exophiala jeanselmei - were exposed to thermo-physical Mars-like conditions in the simulation chamber of the German Aerospace Center. In this study the alterations at the protein expression level from various fungi species under Mars-like conditions were analyzed for the first time using 2D gel electrophoresis. Despite of the expectations, the fungi did not express any additional proteins under Mars simulation that could be interpreted as stress induced HSPs. However, up-regulation of some proteins and significant decreasing of protein number were detected within the first 24 hours of the treatment. After 4 and 7 days of the experiment protein spot number was increased again and the protein patterns resemble the protein patterns of biomass from normal conditions. It indicates the recovery of the metabolic activity under Martian environmental conditions after one week of exposure.

  3. Protein patterns of black fungi under simulated Mars-like conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharova, Kristina; Marzban, Gorji; de Vera, Jean-Pierre; Lorek, Andreas; Sterflinger, Katja

    2014-05-01

    Two species of microcolonial fungi - Cryomyces antarcticus and Knufia perforans - and a species of black yeasts-Exophiala jeanselmei - were exposed to thermo-physical Mars-like conditions in the simulation chamber of the German Aerospace Center. In this study the alterations at the protein expression level from various fungi species under Mars-like conditions were analyzed for the first time using 2D gel electrophoresis. Despite of the expectations, the fungi did not express any additional proteins under Mars simulation that could be interpreted as stress induced HSPs. However, up-regulation of some proteins and significant decreasing of protein number were detected within the first 24 hours of the treatment. After 4 and 7 days of the experiment protein spot number was increased again and the protein patterns resemble the protein patterns of biomass from normal conditions. It indicates the recovery of the metabolic activity under Martian environmental conditions after one week of exposure.

  4. Protein patterns of black fungi under simulated Mars-like conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zakharova, Kristina; Marzban, Gorji; de Vera, Jean-Pierre; Lorek, Andreas; Sterflinger, Katja

    2014-01-01

    Two species of microcolonial fungi – Cryomyces antarcticus and Knufia perforans - and a species of black yeasts–Exophiala jeanselmei - were exposed to thermo-physical Mars-like conditions in the simulation chamber of the German Aerospace Center. In this study the alterations at the protein expression level from various fungi species under Mars-like conditions were analyzed for the first time using 2D gel electrophoresis. Despite of the expectations, the fungi did not express any additional proteins under Mars simulation that could be interpreted as stress induced HSPs. However, up-regulation of some proteins and significant decreasing of protein number were detected within the first 24 hours of the treatment. After 4 and 7 days of the experiment protein spot number was increased again and the protein patterns resemble the protein patterns of biomass from normal conditions. It indicates the recovery of the metabolic activity under Martian environmental conditions after one week of exposure. PMID:24870977

  5. Hybrid IC / Microfluidic Chips for the Manipulation of Biological Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hakho

    2005-03-01

    A hybrid IC / Microfluidic chip that can manipulate individual biological cells in a fluid with microscopic resolution has been demonstrated. The chip starts with a custom-designed silicon integrated circuit (IC) produced in a foundry using standard processing techniques. A microfluidic chamber is then fabricated on top of the IC to provide a biocompatible environment. The motion of biological cells in the chamber is controlled using a two-dimensional array of micro-scale electromagnets in the IC that generate spatially patterned magnetic fields. A local peak in the magnetic field amplitude will trap a magnetic bead and an attached cell; by moving the peak's location, the bead-bound cell can be moved to any position on the chip surface above the array. By generating multiple peaks, many cells can be moved independently along separate paths, allowing many different manipulations of individual cells. The hybrid IC / Microfluidic chip can be used, for example, to sort cells or to assemble tissue on micrometer length scales. To prove the concept, an IC / Microfluidic chip was fabricated, based on a custom-designed IC that contained a two-dimensional microcoil array with integrated current sources and control circuits. The chip was tested by trapping and moving biological cells tagged with magnetic beads inside the microfluidic chamber over the array. By combining the power of silicon technology with the biocompatibility of microfluidics, IC / Microfluidic chips will make new types of investigations possible in biological and biomedical studies.

  6. Integrated microfluidic probe station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrault, C. M.; Qasaimeh, M. A.; Brastaviceanu, T.; Anderson, K.; Kabakibo, Y.; Juncker, D.

    2010-11-01

    The microfluidic probe (MFP) consists of a flat, blunt tip with two apertures for the injection and reaspiration of a microjet into a solution—thus hydrodynamically confining the microjet—and is operated atop an inverted microscope that enables live imaging. By scanning across a surface, the microjet can be used for surface processing with the capability of both depositing and removing material; as it operates under immersed conditions, sensitive biological materials and living cells can be processed. During scanning, the MFP is kept immobile and centered over the objective of the inverted microscope, a few micrometers above a substrate that is displaced by moving the microscope stage and that is flushed continuously with the microjet. For consistent and reproducible surface processing, the gap between the MFP and the substrate, the MFP's alignment, the scanning speed, the injection and aspiration flow rates, and the image capture need all to be controlled and synchronized. Here, we present an automated MFP station that integrates all of these functionalities and automates the key operational parameters. A custom software program is used to control an independent motorized Z stage for adjusting the gap, a motorized microscope stage for scanning the substrate, up to 16 syringe pumps for injecting and aspirating fluids, and an inverted fluorescence microscope equipped with a charge-coupled device camera. The parallelism between the MFP and the substrate is adjusted using manual goniometer at the beginning of the experiment. The alignment of the injection and aspiration apertures along the scanning axis is performed using a newly designed MFP screw holder. We illustrate the integrated MFP station by the programmed, automated patterning of fluorescently labeled biotin on a streptavidin-coated surface.

  7. Integrated microfluidic probe station.

    PubMed

    Perrault, C M; Qasaimeh, M A; Brastaviceanu, T; Anderson, K; Kabakibo, Y; Juncker, D

    2010-11-01

    The microfluidic probe (MFP) consists of a flat, blunt tip with two apertures for the injection and reaspiration of a microjet into a solution--thus hydrodynamically confining the microjet--and is operated atop an inverted microscope that enables live imaging. By scanning across a surface, the microjet can be used for surface processing with the capability of both depositing and removing material; as it operates under immersed conditions, sensitive biological materials and living cells can be processed. During scanning, the MFP is kept immobile and centered over the objective of the inverted microscope, a few micrometers above a substrate that is displaced by moving the microscope stage and that is flushed continuously with the microjet. For consistent and reproducible surface processing, the gap between the MFP and the substrate, the MFP's alignment, the scanning speed, the injection and aspiration flow rates, and the image capture need all to be controlled and synchronized. Here, we present an automated MFP station that integrates all of these functionalities and automates the key operational parameters. A custom software program is used to control an independent motorized Z stage for adjusting the gap, a motorized microscope stage for scanning the substrate, up to 16 syringe pumps for injecting and aspirating fluids, and an inverted fluorescence microscope equipped with a charge-coupled device camera. The parallelism between the MFP and the substrate is adjusted using manual goniometer at the beginning of the experiment. The alignment of the injection and aspiration apertures along the scanning axis is performed using a newly designed MFP screw holder. We illustrate the integrated MFP station by the programmed, automated patterning of fluorescently labeled biotin on a streptavidin-coated surface.

  8. A photoreversible protein-patterning approach for guiding stem cell fate in three-dimensional gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deforest, Cole A.; Tirrell, David A.

    2015-05-01

    Although biochemically patterned hydrogels are capable of recapitulating many critical aspects of the heterogeneous cellular niche, exercising spatial and temporal control of the presentation and removal of biomolecular signalling cues in such systems has proved difficult. Here, we demonstrate a synthetic strategy that exploits two bioorthogonal photochemistries to achieve reversible immobilization of bioactive full-length proteins with good spatial and temporal control within synthetic, cell-laden biomimetic scaffolds. A photodeprotection-oxime-ligation sequence permits user-defined quantities of proteins to be anchored within distinct subvolumes of a three-dimensional matrix, and an ortho-nitrobenzyl ester photoscission reaction facilitates subsequent protein removal. By using this approach to pattern the presentation of the extracellular matrix protein vitronectin, we accomplished reversible differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells to osteoblasts in a spatially defined manner. Our protein-patterning approach should provide further avenues to probe and direct changes in cell physiology in response to dynamic biochemical signalling.

  9. Research highlights: microfluidics meets big data.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Peter; Weaver, Westbrook M; Masaeli, Mahdokht; Owsley, Keegan; Di Carlo, Dino

    2014-03-07

    In this issue we highlight a collection of recent work in which microfluidic parallelization and automation have been employed to address the increasing need for large amounts of quantitative data concerning cellular function--from correlating microRNA levels to protein expression, increasing the throughput and reducing the noise when studying protein dynamics in single-cells, and understanding how signal dynamics encodes information. The painstaking dissection of cellular pathways one protein at a time appears to be coming to an end, leading to more rapid discoveries which will inevitably translate to better cellular control--in producing useful gene products and treating disease at the individual cell level. From these studies it is also clear that development of large scale mutant or fusion libraries, automation of microscopy, image analysis, and data extraction will be key components as microfluidics contributes its strengths to aid systems biology moving forward.

  10. In planta localisation patterns of MADS domain proteins during floral development in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Urbanus, Susan L; de Folter, Stefan; Shchennikova, Anna V; Kaufmann, Kerstin; Immink, Richard GH; Angenent, Gerco C

    2009-01-01

    Background MADS domain transcription factors play important roles in various developmental processes in flowering plants. Members of this family play a prominent role in the transition to flowering and the specification of floral organ identity. Several studies reported mRNA expression patterns of the genes encoding these MADS domain proteins, however, these studies do not provide the necessary information on the temporal and spatial localisation of the proteins. We have made GREEN FLUORESCENT PROTEIN (GFP) translational fusions with the four MADS domain proteins SEPALLATA3, AGAMOUS, FRUITFULL and APETALA1 from the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and analysed the protein localisation patterns in living plant tissues by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Results We unravelled the protein localisation patterns of the four MADS domain proteins at a cellular and subcellular level in inflorescence and floral meristems, during development of the early flower bud stages, and during further differentiation of the floral organs. The protein localisation patterns revealed a few deviations from known mRNA expression patterns, suggesting a non-cell autonomous action of these factors or alternative control mechanisms. In addition, we observed a change in the subcellular localisation of SEPALLATA3 from a predominantly nuclear localisation to a more cytoplasmic localisation, occurring specifically during petal and stamen development. Furthermore, we show that the down-regulation of the homeodomain transcription factor WUSCHEL in ovular tissues is preceded by the occurrence of both AGAMOUS and SEPALLATA3 proteins, supporting the hypothesis that both proteins together suppress WUSCHEL expression in the ovule. Conclusion This approach provides a highly detailed in situ map of MADS domain protein presence during early and later stages of floral development. The subcellular localisation of the transcription factors in the cytoplasm, as observed at certain stages during

  11. Biopolymers Confined in Surface-Modified Silicon Microfluidic Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Pfohl, T.; Yasa, M.; Safinya, C. R.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, M. W.; Wen, Z.

    2001-03-01

    We have developed surface modification techniques for control of wettability and surface charge in lithographically fabricated Si microfluidic channels. Surface microstructures (patterns) with contrasting wetting properties were created using a combination of microcontact printing and polyelectrolyte adsorption. The selective control of the surface property enabled us to devise various techniques for loading and processing biomaterials in the channels. Using fluorescence and laser scanning confocal microscopy, we studied the structure of biopolymers including DNA, F-Actin and microtubules confined in the surface-modified microchannels. The polymers were observed to align linearly along the channels, which suggests that the channel arrays can be used as effective substrates for aligning filamentous proteins for structural characterization by x-ray diffraction. (Work supported by NSF-DMR-9972246, NSF-DMR-0076357, ONR-N00014-00-1-0214, UC-Biotech 99-14, and CULAR 99-216)

  12. Quantity of dietary protein intake, but not pattern of intake, affects net protein balance primarily through differences in protein synthesis in older adults.

    PubMed

    Kim, Il-Young; Schutzler, Scott; Schrader, Amy; Spencer, Horace; Kortebein, Patrick; Deutz, Nicolaas E P; Wolfe, Robert R; Ferrando, Arny A

    2015-01-01

    To examine whole body protein turnover and muscle protein fractional synthesis rate (MPS) following ingestions of protein in mixed meals at two doses of protein and two intake patterns, 20 healthy older adult subjects (52-75 yr) participated in one of four groups in a randomized clinical trial: a level of protein intake of 0.8 g (1RDA) or 1.5 g·kg(-1)·day(-1) (∼2RDA) with uneven (U: 15/20/65%) or even distribution (E: 33/33/33%) patterns of intake for breakfast, lunch, and dinner over the day (1RDA-U, 1RDA-E, 2RDA-U, or 2RDA-E). Subjects were studied with primed continuous infusions of L-[(2)H5]phenylalanine and L-[(2)H2]tyrosine on day 4 following 3 days of diet habituation. Whole body protein kinetics [protein synthesis (PS), breakdown, and net balance (NB)] were expressed as changes from the fasted to the fed states. Positive NB was achieved at both protein levels, but NB was greater in 2RDA vs. 1RDA (94.8 ± 6.0 vs. 58.9 ± 4.9 g protein/750 min; P = 0.0001), without effects of distribution on NB. The greater NB was due to the higher PS with 2RDA vs. 1RDA (15.4 ± 4.8 vs. -18.0 ± 8.4 g protein/750 min; P = 0.0018). Consistent with PS, MPS was greater with 2RDA vs. 1RDA, regardless of distribution patterns. In conclusion, whole body net protein balance was greater with protein intake above recommended dietary allowance (0.8 g protein·kg(-1)·day(-1)) in the context of mixed meals, without demonstrated effects of protein intake pattern, primarily through higher rates of protein synthesis at whole body and muscle levels.

  13. Glycosylation patterns of membrane proteins of the jellyfish Cyanea capillata.

    PubMed

    Schetz, J A; Anderson, P A

    1995-02-01

    Integral and membrane-associated proteins extracted from neuron-enriched perirhopalial tissue of the jellyfish Cyanea capillata were probed with a panel of lectins that recognize sugar epitopes of varying complexity. Of the 13 lectins tested, only concanavalin A, jacalin lectin and tomato lectin stained distinct bands on Western blots, indicating the presence of repeating alpha-1,6-mannoses, terminal Gal-alpha-1,6-GalNAc and repeating beta-1,4-linked GlcNAc, respectively. In whole-mounted perirhopalial tissue, jacalin lectin stained several cell types, including neurons, muscle, cilia and mucus strands. Tomato lectin stained secretory cells intensely, and neurons in a punctate fashion. Concanavalin A stained cytoplasmic epitopes in both ecto- and endodermal cells, and ectodermal secretory cells and the mucus strands emanating from them. With the exception of tomato lectin's sugar epitope, the other sugar epitopes identified in this study are "non-complex". This study suggests that while glycosylation of integral and membrane-associated proteins occurs in Cyanea, the sugars post-translationally linked to these proteins tend to be simple.

  14. An ultra-sensitive microfluidic immunoassay using living radical polymerization and porous polymer monoliths.

    SciTech Connect

    Abhyankar, Vinay V.; Singh, Anup K.; Hatch, Anson V.

    2010-07-01

    We present a platform that combines patterned photopolymerized polymer monoliths with living radical polymerization (LRP) to develop a low cost microfluidic based immunoassay capable of sensitive (low to sub pM) and rapid (<30 minute) detection of protein in 100 {micro}L sample. The introduction of LRP functionality to the porous monolith allows one step grafting of functionalized affinity probes from the monolith surface while the composition of the hydrophilic graft chain reduces non-specific interactions and helps to significantly improve the limit of detection.

  15. Automatic generation of primary sequence patterns from sets of related protein sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, R F; Smith, T F

    1990-01-01

    We have developed a computer algorithm that can extract the pattern of conserved primary sequence elements common to all members of a homologous protein family. The method involves clustering the pairwise similarity scores among a set of related sequences to generate a binary dendrogram (tree). The tree is then reduced in a stepwise manner by progressively replacing the node connecting the two most similar termini by one common pattern until only a single common "root" pattern remains. A pattern is generated at a node by (i) performing a local optimal alignment on the sequence/pattern pair connected by the node with the use of an extended dynamic programming algorithm and then (ii) constructing a single common pattern from this alignment with a nested hierarchy of amino acid classes to identify the minimal inclusive amino acid class covering each paired set of elements in the alignment. Gaps within an alignment are created and/or extended using a "pay once" gap penalty rule, and gapped positions are converted into gap characters that function as 0 or 1 amino acid of any type during subsequent alignment. This method has been used to generate a library of covering patterns for homologous families in the National Biomedical Research Foundation/Protein Identification Resource protein sequence data base. We show that a covering pattern can be more diagnostic for sequence family membership than any of the individual sequences used to construct the pattern. Images PMID:2296575

  16. Stromal Protein Ecm1 Regulates Ureteric Bud Patterning and Branching

    PubMed Central

    Paroly, Suneeta S.; Wang, Fengwei; Spraggon, Lee; Merregaert, Joseph; Batourina, Ekatherina; Tycko, Benjamin; Schmidt-Ott, Kai M.; Grimmond, Sean; Little, Melissa; Mendelsohn, Cathy

    2013-01-01

    The interactions between the nephrogenic mesenchyme and the ureteric bud during kidney development are well documented. While recent studies have shed some light on the importance of the stroma during renal development, many of the signals generated in the stroma, the genetic pathways and interaction networks involving the stroma are yet to be identified. Our previous studies demonstrate that retinoids are crucial for branching of the ureteric bud and for patterning of the cortical stroma. In the present study we demonstrate that autocrine retinoic acid (RA) signaling in stromal cells is critical for their survival and patterning, and show that Extracellular matrix 1, Ecm1, a gene that in humans causes irritable bowel syndrome and lipoid proteinosis, is a novel RA-regulated target in the developing kidney, which is secreted from the cortical stromal cells surrounding the cap mesenchyme and ureteric bud. Our studies suggest that Ecm1 is required in the ureteric bud for regulating the distribution of Ret which is normally restricted to the tips, as inhibition of Ecm1 results in an expanded domain of Ret expression and reduced numbers of branches. We propose a model in which retinoid signaling in the stroma activates expression of Ecm1, which in turn down-regulates Ret expression in the ureteric bud cleft, where bifurcation normally occurs and normal branching progresses. PMID:24391906

  17. Tuning Fluidic Resistance via Liquid Crystal Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Anupam

    2013-01-01

    Flow of molecularly ordered fluids, like liquid crystals, is inherently coupled with the average local orientation of the molecules, or the director. The anisotropic coupling—typically absent in isotropic fluids—bestows unique functionalities to the flowing matrix. In this work, we harness this anisotropy to pattern different pathways to tunable fluidic resistance within microfluidic devices. We use a nematic liquid crystalline material flowing in microchannels to demonstrate passive and active modulation of the flow resistance. While appropriate surface anchoring conditions—which imprint distinct fluidic resistances within microchannels under similar hydrodynamic parameters—act as passive cues, an external field, e.g., temperature, is used to actively modulate the flow resistance in the microfluidic device. We apply this simple concept to fabricate basic fluidic circuits, which can be hierarchically extended to create complex resistance networks, without any additional design or morphological patterning of the microchannels. PMID:24256819

  18. Living anionic polymerization using a microfluidic reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Iida, Kazunori; Chastek, Thomas Q.; Beers, Kathryn L.; Cavicchi, Kevin A.; Chun, Jaehun; Fasolka, Michael J.

    2009-02-01

    Living anionic polymerizations were conducted within aluminum-polyimide microfluidic devices. Polymerizations of styrene in cyclohexane were carried out at various conditions, including elevated temperature (60 °C) and high monomer concentration (42%, by volume). The reactions were safely maintained at a controlled temperature at all points in the reactor. Conducting these reactions in a batch reactor results in uncontrolled heat generation with potentially dangerous rises in pressure. Moreover, the microfluidic nature of these devices allows for flexible 2D designing of the flow channel. Four flow designs were examined (straight, periodically pinched, obtuse zigzag, and acute zigzag channels). The ability to use the channel pattern to increase the level of mixing throughout the reactor was evaluated. When moderately high molecular mass polymers with increased viscosity were made, the patterned channels produced polymers with narrower PDI, indicating that passive mixing arising from the channel design is improving the reaction conditions.

  19. Living anionic polymerization using a microfluidic reactor.

    PubMed

    Iida, Kazunori; Chastek, Thomas Q; Beers, Kathryn L; Cavicchi, Kevin A; Chun, Jaehun; Fasolka, Michael J

    2009-01-21

    Living anionic polymerizations were conducted within aluminum-polyimide microfluidic devices. Polymerizations of styrene in cyclohexane were carried out at various conditions, including elevated temperature (60 degrees C) and high monomer concentration (42%, by volume). The reactions were safely maintained at a controlled temperature at all points in the reactor. Conducting these reactions in a batch reactor results in uncontrolled heat generation with potentially dangerous rises in pressure. Moreover, the microfluidic nature of these devices allows for flexible 2D designing of the flow channel. Four flow designs were examined (straight, periodically pinched, obtuse zigzag, and acute zigzag channels). The ability to use the channel pattern to increase the level of mixing throughout the reactor was evaluated. When moderately high molecular mass polymers with increased viscosity were made, the patterned channels produced polymers with narrower PDI, indicating that passive mixing arising from the channel design is improving the reaction conditions.

  20. Guided protein/cell patterning on superhydrophilic polymer brushes functionalized with mussel-inspired polydopamine coatings.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jianwen; Liu, Tao; Chen, Runhai; Liu, Jingchuan; Chen, Jiayue; Zhao, Chunyu; Yin, Ligang; Li, Chunming; Xu, Xiaodong; Shi, Qiang; Yin, Jinghua

    2017-06-20

    A simple approach for preparing bicomponent polymer patterns was developed by coating polydopamine (PDA) on superhydrophilic poly(2-acryl-amido-2-methylpropane sulfonic acid) (PAMPS) brushes. Well-defined and versatile arrays of proteins and cells were achieved without harm to proteins and cells.

  1. Urinary protein patterns in patients with Balkan endemic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Djukanović, Ljubica; Djordjević, Vidosava; Ležaić, Višnja; Cukuranović, Rade; Marić, Ivko; Bukvić, Danica; Marinković, Jelena; Cukuranović, Jovana; Rajić, Milena; Stefanović, Vladisav

    2013-12-01

    Urinary excretion of beta2-microglobulin (beta2-MG), albumin, immunoglobulin G (IgG) and protein was examined in patients with Balkan endemic nephropathy (BEN), glomerulonephritis (GN) and healthy controls. The proteins were measured in morning urine samples from 74 patients with BEN, 50 healthy persons and 22 patients with GN. In BEN patients, median values for albumin, beta2-MG and protein were above upper normal limits, but median IgG was inside normal range. All patients with GN had microalbuminuria (MAU) and half of them had increased urinary beta2-MG, which was also found in eleven patients with increased urinary IgG. In BEN patients, there were significant negative correlations between eGFR and all measured urinary proteins, the composition of which changed during the course of BEN. In patients with eGFR > 60 ml/min/1.73 m(2) isolated beta2-MG was the most frequent finding (10/12 patients), but MAU was present in 4/12 patients. In BEN patients with eGFR between 30 and 59 ml/min/1.73 m(2), beta2-MG appeared as often as the combination of beta2-MG and albumin and isolated MAU. Out of 49 BEN patients with eGFR > 30 ml/min/1.73 m(2) 15 had increased urinary IgG either alone (1) or together with beta2-MG (3) or albumin (3) or beta2-MG and albumin (8). In BEN patients with GFR < 30 ml/min/1.73 m(2) only 1/25 had isolated beta2-MG but increased urinary IgG with increased beta2-MG, and albumin was the most frequent. Although low-molecular weight proteinuria was the most frequent urinary finding in BEN patients, MAU was frequently detected in advanced stages of BEN but also in some patients with eGFR > 60 ml/min/1.73 m(2). IgG was increasingly found as eGFR decreased.

  2. Comparative SDS-page protein patterns of four ascaridid nematodes.

    PubMed

    Ashour, A A; Taha, H A; Mohammad A el-H

    1995-12-01

    In order to investigate the degree of homogeneity and heterogeneity of the ascaridid nematodes. Toxascaris leonina, Parascaris equorum, Toxocara canis and T. vitulorum, protein extracts from adult worms of the four nematodes were resolved into a number of bands. Comparative analysis of dominant bands showed that 13 bands were common among the four species, but certain unique bands were also found in each species including 4 in T. vitulorum, one in T. leonina, two in T. canis, while P. equorum shares both T. canis and T. leonina in most of their bands. Among the four ascaridid studied, T. vitulorum appears to be the most divergent species.

  3. High-quality combinatorial protein libraries using the binary patterning approach.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Luke H

    2014-01-01

    Protein combinatorial libraries have become a platform technology for exploring protein sequence space for novel molecules for use in research, synthetic biology, biotechnology, and medicine. To expedite the isolation of proteins with novel/desired functions using screens and selections, high-quality approaches that generate protein libraries rich in folded and soluble structures are desirable for this goal. The binary patterning approach is a protein library design method that incorporates elements of both rational design and combinatorial diversity to specify the arrangement of polar and nonpolar amino acid residues in the context of a desired, folded tertiary structure template. An overview of the considerations necessary to design and construct binary patterned libraries of de novo and natural proteins is presented.

  4. Microfluidic Mixing: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chia-Yen; Chang, Chin-Lung; Wang, Yao-Nan; Fu, Lung-Ming

    2011-01-01

    The aim of microfluidic mixing is to achieve a thorough and rapid mixing of multiple samples in microscale devices. In such devices, sample mixing is essentially achieved by enhancing the diffusion effect between the different species flows. Broadly speaking, microfluidic mixing schemes can be categorized as either “active”, where an external energy force is applied to perturb the sample species, or “passive”, where the contact area and contact time of the species samples are increased through specially-designed microchannel configurations. Many mixers have been proposed to facilitate this task over the past 10 years. Accordingly, this paper commences by providing a high level overview of the field of microfluidic mixing devices before describing some of the more significant proposals for active and passive mixers. PMID:21686184

  5. Microfluidic platforms for mechanobiology

    PubMed Central

    Polacheck, William J.; Li, Ran; Uzel, Sebastien G. M.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanotransduction has been a topic of considerable interest since early studies demonstrated a link between mechanical force and biological response. Until recently, studies of fundamental phenomena were based either on in vivo experiments with limited control or direct access, or on large-scale in vitro studies lacking many of the potentially important physiological factors. With the advent of microfluidics, many of the previous limitations of in vitro testing were eliminated or reduced through greater control or combined functionalities. At the same time, imaging capabilities were tremendously enhanced. In this review, we discuss how microfluidics has transformed the study of mechanotransduction. This is done in the context of the various cell types that exhibit force-induced responses and the new biological insights that have been elucidated. We also discuss new microfluidic studies that could produce even more realistic models of in vivo conditions by combining multiple stimuli or creating a more realistic microenvironment. PMID:23649165

  6. Fluorescent Biotin Analogues for Microstructure Patterning and Selective Protein Immobilization.

    PubMed

    Krishna, K Vijaya; Ghosh, Subhadip; Sharma, Bikramjit; Singh, Leeju; Mukherjee, Saptarshi; Verma, Sandeep

    2015-11-24

    Benzyl substitution on ureido nitrogens of biotin led to manifestation of aggregation-induced emission, which was studied by steady-state fluorescence, microscopy, and TD-DFT, providing a rationale into the observed photophysical behavior. Besides exhibiting solvatochromism, the biotin derivatives revealed emission peaks centered at ∼430 and 545 nm, which has been attributed to the π-π stacking interactions. Our TD-DFT results also correlate the spectroscopic data and quantify the nature of transitions involved. The isothermal titration calorimetry data substantiates that the binding of the biotin derivatives with avidin are pretty strong. These derivatives on lithographic patterning present a platform for site specific strept(avidin) immobilization, thus opening avenues for potential applications exploiting these interactions. The fluorescent biotin derivatives can thus find applications in cellular biology and imaging.

  7. Differential extraction and protein sequencing reveals major differences in patterns of primary cell wall proteins from plants.

    PubMed

    Robertson, D; Mitchell, G P; Gilroy, J S; Gerrish, C; Bolwell, G P; Slabas, A R

    1997-06-20

    The proteins of the primary cell walls of suspension cultured cells of five plant species, Arabidopsis, carrot, French bean, tomato, and tobacco, have been compared. The approach that has been adopted is differential extraction followed by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), rather than two-dimensional gel analysis, to facilitate protein sequencing. Whole cells were washed sequentially with the following aqueous solutions, CaCl2, CDTA (cyclohexane diaminotetraacetic acid, DTT (dithiothreitol), NaCl, and borate. SDS-PAGE analysis showed consistent differences between species. From the 233 proteins that were selected for sequencing, 63% gave N-terminal data. This analysis shows that (i) patterns of proteins revealed by SDS-PAGE are strikingly different for all five species, (ii) a large number of these proteins cannot be identified by data base searches indicating that a significant proportion of wall proteins have not been previously described, (iii) the major proteins that can be identified belong to very different classes of proteins, (iv) the majority of proteins found in the extracellular growth media are absent from their respective cell wall extracts, and (v) the results of the extraction process are indicative of higher order structure. It appears that aspects of speciation reside in the complement of extracellular wall proteins. The data represent a protein resource for cell wall studies complementary to EST (expressed sequence tag) and DNA sequencing strategies.

  8. Punch Card Programmable Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Korir, George; Prakash, Manu

    2015-01-01

    Small volume fluid handling in single and multiphase microfluidics provides a promising strategy for efficient bio-chemical assays, low-cost point-of-care diagnostics and new approaches to scientific discoveries. However multiple barriers exist towards low-cost field deployment of programmable microfluidics. Incorporating multiple pumps, mixers and discrete valve based control of nanoliter fluids and droplets in an integrated, programmable manner without additional required external components has remained elusive. Combining the idea of punch card programming with arbitrary fluid control, here we describe a self-contained, hand-crank powered, multiplex and robust programmable microfluidic platform. A paper tape encodes information as a series of punched holes. A mechanical reader/actuator reads these paper tapes and correspondingly executes operations onto a microfluidic chip coupled to the platform in a plug-and-play fashion. Enabled by the complexity of codes that can be represented by a series of holes in punched paper tapes, we demonstrate independent control of 15 on-chip pumps with enhanced mixing, normally-closed valves and a novel on-demand impact-based droplet generator. We demonstrate robustness of operation by encoding a string of characters representing the word “PUNCHCARD MICROFLUIDICS” using the droplet generator. Multiplexing is demonstrated by implementing an example colorimetric water quality assays for pH, ammonia, nitrite and nitrate content in different water samples. With its portable and robust design, low cost and ease-of-use, we envision punch card programmable microfluidics will bring complex control of microfluidic chips into field-based applications in low-resource settings and in the hands of children around the world. PMID:25738834

  9. [Analysis of gingival crevicular fluid. Relation of isoelectric focusing protein patterns to clinical evaluation].

    PubMed

    Aoki, Y; Yoshinaga, E; Tamazawa, O

    1988-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the protein patterns in gingival crevicular fluid relation to the isoelectric focusing protein patterns of GCF and to clinical evaluations. GCF was collected with filter paper from 105 subjects. The probing depth, the gingival index (Löe & Silness) and the plaque index (Silness & Löe) as clinical evaluations The results follow: 1. The main isoelectric focusing protein patterns of GCF were between pH 5.5 and 7.5. In comparison, the GCF and the serum from the same patients showed patterns to similar serum albumin. 2. Between of GCF pH 5.5 and 7.5 the protein patterns that ranged over 60% was pI 5.65, 6.45, 6.55, 6.75 and 7.00. The frequencies of the ranges of protein patterns and clinical evaluation were compared by the X2 test. pI 5.65, 6.45, 6.55 and 6.75 and PD were significant different, as were pI 6.45, 6.55 and 6.75 and GI. But each pI and PIl. were not significantly different.

  10. Rapid prototyping of multiphase microfluidics with robotic cutters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zidong; Zhao, Zhengtuo; Lo, Joe Fu-jiou

    2014-03-01

    Microfluidic devices offer novel techniques to address biological and biomedical issues. Standard microfluidic fabrication uses photolithography to pattern channels on silicon wafers with high resolution. Even the relatively straightforward SU8 and soft lithography in microfluidics require investing and training in photolithography, which is also time consuming due to complicated thick resist procedures, including sensitive substrate pretreatment, coating, soft bake, expose, post-exposure bake, and developing steps. However, for applications where low resolution (>200 μm) and high turn-around (> 4 designs/day) prototyping are met with little or no lithography infrastructure, robotic cutters [1] offer flexible options for making glass and PDMS microfluidics. We describe the use of robotics cutters for designing microfluidic geometries, and compliment it with safe glass etching, with depths down to 60 μm. Soft lithography patterning of 200 μm thick PDMS membrane was also explored. Without high equipment investment and lengthy student training, both glass and PDMS microfluidics can be achieved in small facilities using this technique.

  11. Extracellular matrix protein patterns guide human chondrocytes adhesion and alignment characterized by vimentin and matrilin-3.

    PubMed

    Pan, Chang-Jiang; Ding, Hong-Yan; Dong, Yun-Xiao

    2013-02-01

    The main purpose of the present study is to investigate the influences of collagen VI (col-VI) patterns on human chondrocytes behaviors. To this end, col-VI stripes with varying width and interstripe spacing are created on polystyrene (PS) surfaces by microcontact printing (μCP). Human chondrocytes are then seeded on these protein patterns and the cell adhesion and alignment are investigated by staining the vimentin and matrilin-3 secreted by seeded chondrocytes. The results indicate that the cells preferentially attach onto the protein areas, rendering cell patterns and the elongated cell shapes. The pattern dimensions can significantly influence cell adhesion, spreading and orientation. The stripe protein patterns can guide cell adhesion and alignment. The cell morphologies can be controlled by carefully designing the pattern shapes and sizes. Our results suggest that the protein patterns can be used to modify biomaterials' surfaces for selective cell-binding and cell alignment. It could provide some cues for the development of novel implantable biomaterials, such as tissue-engineered scaffolds for cartilage replacement, where specific cell alignment is needed.

  12. Microcontact printing of substrate-bound protein patterns for cell and tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Martin; Bastmeyer, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Patterned distributions of signalling molecules play fundamental roles during embryonic development. Several attempts have been made to reproduce these patterns in vitro. In order to study substrate-bound or membrane proteins, microcontact printing (μCP) is a suitable method for tethering molecules on various surfaces. Here, we describe three μCP variants to produce patterns down to feature sizes of about 300 nm, which are highly variable with respect to shape, protein spacing, and density. Briefly, the desired pattern is etched into a silicon master, which is then used as a master for the printing process. Each variant offers certain advantages and the method of choice depends on the desired protein and the biological question.

  13. Protein patterning utilizing region-specific control of wettability by surface modification under atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Donghee; Kwon, Min-Sung; Hyun, Ji-Chul; Jun, Chang-Duk; Chung, Euiheon; Yang, Sung

    2013-09-01

    Wettability control can be crucial in improving the uniformity of selective protein immobilization in high-density microarrays. In this study, we propose an atmospheric-pressure plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (AP-PECVD)-based method in conjunction with photolithography to implement region-specific control of wettability on Si substrate. The proposed PECVD method under atmospheric pressure condition would be a useful alternative of conventional reactive plasma-based treatments methods requiring vacuum condition for uniform protein patterning. Layers with dissimilar wettability and roughness prepared by AP-PECVD process using tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) or TEOS-O2 as precursors could realize uniform protein patterning in a micrometer-scale.

  14. Microfluidic Flame Barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mungas, Gregory S. (Inventor); Fisher, David J. (Inventor); Mungas, Christopher (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Propellants flow through specialized mechanical hardware that is designed for effective and safe ignition and sustained combustion of the propellants. By integrating a micro-fluidic porous media element between a propellant feed source and the combustion chamber, an effective and reliable propellant injector head may be implemented that is capable of withstanding transient combustion and detonation waves that commonly occur during an ignition event. The micro-fluidic porous media element is of specified porosity or porosity gradient selected to be appropriate for a given propellant. Additionally the propellant injector head design integrates a spark ignition mechanism that withstands extremely hot running conditions without noticeable spark mechanism degradation.

  15. Microfluidic CARS cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Han-Wei; Bao, Ning; Le, Thuc T.; Lu, Chang; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2009-01-01

    Coherent anti-stokes Raman scattering (CARS) flow cytometry was demonstrated by combining a laser-scanning CARS microscope with a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) based microfluidic device. Line-scanning across the hydrodynamically focused core stream was performed for detection of flowing objects. Parameters were optimized by utilizing polystyrene beads as flowing particles. Population measurements of adipocytes isolated from mouse fat tissues demonstrated the viability of microfluidic CARS cytometry for quantitation of adipocyte size distribution. CARS cytometry could be a new modality for quantitative analysis with vibrational selectivity. PMID:18542688

  16. Experimental Microfluidic System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culbertson, Christopher; Gonda, Steve; Ramsey, John Michael

    2005-01-01

    The ultimate goal of this project is to integrate microfluidic devices with NASA's space bioreactor systems. In such a system, the microfluidic device would provide realtime feedback control of the bioreactor by monitoring pH, glucose, and lactate levels in the cell media; and would provide an analytical capability to the bioreactor in exterrestrial environments for monitoring bioengineered cell products and health changes in cells due to environmental stressors. Such integrated systems could be used as biosentinels both in space and on planet surfaces. The objective is to demonstrate the ability of microfabricated devices to repeatedly and reproducibly perform bead cytometry experiments in micro, lunar, martian, and hypergravity (1.8g).

  17. Development & Characterization of Multifunctional Microfluidic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ucar, Ahmet Burak

    developing 'smart' windows and heat management. To better design new color changing elastomers, we investigated the role of the network geometry on liquid replacement efficiency with the aid of a multiphysics modeling and simulation software package, COMSOL. We simulated the liquid flow in various network geometries. Serpentine, parallel channel and lattice networks, as well as their tapered versions were compared. The comparison criteria were based on rapid and uniform liquid replacement with the least amount of dye/liquid required, for which we set multiple constraints such as constant inlet pressure or total channel area. We demonstrated that the tapered lattice type network provided the most rapid and uniform replacement with minimal liquid waste. Next, we designed a simple and inexpensive liquid dispensing microfluidic material which does not require complex micromachining techniques or automated actuators. It consisted of only a PDMS matrix with embedded chambers and channels. 'Pores/slits' were made on the surface and the liquid was released by contact on the dispensing surface of the material. We varied the network design, geometry, dimension, slit shape and length, and tested the material's liquid release performance. Promising preliminary results were obtained but for an end product with repeatable and reproducible performance, both material fabrication and characterization need to be improved further. Finally, we describe an alternative material/method for the fabrication of microfluidic materials. We aimed to replace the conventional fabrication material PDMS with Polyethylene (PE) sheets. The sheets were as transparent and flexible as PDMS, and also thinner. Channel patterns were drawn with a polymer solution of PolyVinylAlcohol (PVA), which is immiscible with PE, and captured in between the two PE sheets. After fusing the PE sheets on a hot press, PVA was washed off with water, so that the 'microfluidic channels' were successfully created. The produced channel

  18. Detection of protein three-dimensional side-chain patterns: new examples of convergent evolution.

    PubMed

    Russell, R B

    1998-06-26

    Detection of recurring three-dimensional side-chain patterns is a potential means of inferring protein function. This paper presents a new method for detecting such patterns and discusses various implications. The method allows detection of side-chain patterns without any prior knowledge of function, requiring only protein structure data and associated multiple sequence alignments. A recursive, depth-first search algorithm finds all possible groups of identical amino acids common to two protein structures independent of sequence order. The search is highly constrained by distance constraints, and by ignoring amino acids unlikely to be involved in protein function. A weighted root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) between equivalenced groups of amino acids is used as a measure of similarity. The statistical significance of any RMSD is assigned by reference to a distribution fitted to simulated data. Searches with the Ser/His/Asp catalytic triad, a His/His porphyrin binding pattern, and the zinc-finger Cys/Cys/His/His pattern are performed to test the method on known examples. An all-against-all comparison of representatives from the structural classification of proteins (SCOP) is performed, revealing several new examples of evolutionary convergence to common patterns of side-chains within different tertiary folds and in different orders along the sequence. These include a di-zinc binding Asp/Asp/His/His/Ser pattern common to alkaline phosphatase/bacterial aminopeptidase, and an Asp/Glu/His/His/Asn/Asn pattern common to the active sites of DNase I and endocellulase E1. Implications for protein evolution, function prediction and the rational design of functional regulators are discussed. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  19. A "place n play" modular pump for portable microfluidic applications.