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Sample records for microglial-mediated motoneuron injury

  1. Progesterone neuroprotection in traumatic CNS injury and motoneuron degeneration.

    PubMed

    De Nicola, Alejandro F; Labombarda, Florencia; Gonzalez Deniselle, Maria Claudia; Gonzalez, Susana L; Garay, Laura; Meyer, Maria; Gargiulo, Gisella; Guennoun, Rachida; Schumacher, Michael

    2009-07-01

    Studies on the neuroprotective and promyelinating effects of progesterone in the nervous system are of great interest due to their potential clinical connotations. In peripheral neuropathies, progesterone and reduced derivatives promote remyelination, axonal regeneration and the recovery of function. In traumatic brain injury (TBI), progesterone has the ability to reduce edema and inflammatory cytokines, prevent neuronal loss and improve functional outcomes. Clinical trials have shown that short-and long-term progesterone treatment induces a significant improvement in the level of disability among patients with brain injury. In experimental spinal cord injury (SCI), molecular markers of functional motoneurons become impaired, including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA, Na,K-ATPase mRNA, microtubule-associated protein 2 and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT). SCI also produces motoneuron chromatolysis. Progesterone treatment restores the expression of these molecules while chromatolysis subsided. SCI also causes oligodendrocyte loss and demyelination. In this case, a short progesterone treatment enhances proliferation and differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitors into mature myelin-producing cells, whereas prolonged treatment increases a transcription factor (Olig1) needed to repair injury-induced demyelination. Progesterone neuroprotection has also been shown in motoneuron neurodegeneration. In Wobbler mice spinal cord, progesterone reverses the impaired expression of BDNF, ChAT and Na,K-ATPase, prevents vacuolar motoneuron degeneration and the development of mitochondrial abnormalities, while functionally increases muscle strength and the survival of Wobbler mice. Multiple mechanisms contribute to these progesterone effects, and the role played by classical nuclear receptors, extra nuclear receptors, membrane receptors, and the reduced metabolites of progesterone in neuroprotection and myelin formation remain an exciting field worth of exploration

  2. Motoneuron injury and repair: New perspectives on gonadal steroids as neurotherapeutics.

    PubMed

    Tetzlaff, Julie E; Huppenbauer, Christopher B; Tanzer, Lisa; Alexander, Thomas D; Jones, Kathryn J

    2006-01-01

    In this review, we will summarize recent work from our laboratory on the role of gonadal steroids as neuroprotective agents in motoneuron viability following cell stress. Three motoneuron models will be discussed: developing axotomized hamster facial motoneurons (FMNs); adult axotomized mouse FMNs; and immortalized, cultured mouse spinal motoneurons subjected to heat shock. New work on two relevant motoneuron proteins, the survival of motor neuron protein, and neuritin or candidate plasticity-related gene 15, indicates differential steroid regulation of these two proteins after axotomy. The concept of gonadal steroids as cellular stress correction factors and the implications of this for acute neurological injury situations will be presented as well. PMID:16632875

  3. Functional recovery after cervical spinal cord injury: Role of neurotrophin and glutamatergic signaling in phrenic motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Gill, Luther C; Gransee, Heather M; Sieck, Gary C; Mantilla, Carlos B

    2016-06-01

    Cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) interrupts descending neural drive to phrenic motoneurons causing diaphragm muscle (DIAm) paralysis. Recent studies using a well-established model of SCI, unilateral spinal hemisection of the C2 segment of the cervical spinal cord (SH), provide novel information regarding the molecular and cellular mechanisms of functional recovery after SCI. Over time post-SH, gradual recovery of rhythmic ipsilateral DIAm activity occurs. Recovery of ipsilateral DIAm electromyogram (EMG) activity following SH is enhanced by increasing brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the region of the phrenic motoneuron pool. Delivery of exogenous BDNF either via intrathecal infusion or via mesenchymal stem cells engineered to release BDNF similarly enhance recovery. Conversely, recovery after SH is blunted by quenching endogenous BDNF with the fusion-protein TrkB-Fc in the region of the phrenic motoneuron pool or by selective inhibition of TrkB kinase activity using a chemical-genetic approach in TrkB(F616A) mice. Furthermore, the importance of BDNF signaling via TrkB receptors at phrenic motoneurons is highlighted by the blunting of recovery by siRNA-mediated downregulation of TrkB receptor expression in phrenic motoneurons and by the enhancement of recovery evident following virally-induced increases in TrkB expression specifically in phrenic motoneurons. BDNF/TrkB signaling regulates synaptic plasticity in various neuronal systems, including glutamatergic pathways. Glutamatergic neurotransmission constitutes the main inspiratory-related, excitatory drive to motoneurons, and following SH, spontaneous neuroplasticity is associated with increased expression of ionotropic N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in phrenic motoneurons. Evidence for the role of BDNF/TrkB and glutamatergic signaling in recovery of DIAm activity following cervical SCI is reviewed.

  4. Reorganization of laryngeal motoneurons after crush injury in the recurrent laryngeal nerve of the rat

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Morato, Ignacio; Valderrama-Canales, Francisco J; Berdugo, Gabriel; Arias, Gonzalo; McHanwell, Stephen; Sañudo, José; Vázquez, Teresa; Pascual-Font, Arán

    2013-01-01

    Motoneurons innervating laryngeal muscles are located in the nucleus ambiguus (Amb), but there is no general agreement on the somatotopic representation and even less is known on how an injury in the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) affects this pattern. This study analyzes the normal somatotopy of those motoneurons and describes its changes over time after a crush injury to the RLN. In the control group (control group 1, n = 9 rats), the posterior cricoarytenoid (PCA) and thyroarytenoid (TA) muscles were injected with cholera toxin-B. In the experimental groups the left RLN of each animal was crushed with a fine tip forceps and, after several survival periods (1, 2, 4, 8, 12 weeks; minimum six rats per time), the PCA and TA muscles were injected as described above. After each surgery, the motility of the vocal folds was evaluated. Additional control experiments were performed; the second control experiment (control group 2, n = 6 rats) was performed labeling the TA and PCA immediately prior to the section of the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN), in order to eliminate the possibility of accidental labeling of the cricothyroid (CT) muscle by spread from the injection site. The third control group (control group 3, n = 5 rats) was included to determine if there is some sprouting from the SLN into the territories of the RLN after a crush of this last nerve. One week after the crush injury of the RLN, the PCA and TA muscles were injected immediately before the section of the SLN. The results show that a single population of neurons represents each muscle with the PCA in the most rostral position followed caudalwards by the TA. One week post-RLN injury, both the somatotopy and the number of labeled motoneurons changed, where the labeled neurons were distributed randomly; in addition, an area of topographical overlap of the two populations was observed and vocal fold mobility was lost. In the rest of the survival periods, the overlapping area is larger, but the movement of

  5. Reorganization of laryngeal motoneurons after crush injury in the recurrent laryngeal nerve of the rat.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Morato, Ignacio; Valderrama-Canales, Francisco J; Berdugo, Gabriel; Arias, Gonzalo; McHanwell, Stephen; Sañudo, José; Vázquez, Teresa; Pascual-Font, Arán

    2013-04-01

    Motoneurons innervating laryngeal muscles are located in the nucleus ambiguus (Amb), but there is no general agreement on the somatotopic representation and even less is known on how an injury in the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) affects this pattern. This study analyzes the normal somatotopy of those motoneurons and describes its changes over time after a crush injury to the RLN. In the control group (control group 1, n = 9 rats), the posterior cricoarytenoid (PCA) and thyroarytenoid (TA) muscles were injected with cholera toxin-B. In the experimental groups the left RLN of each animal was crushed with a fine tip forceps and, after several survival periods (1, 2, 4, 8, 12 weeks; minimum six rats per time), the PCA and TA muscles were injected as described above. After each surgery, the motility of the vocal folds was evaluated. Additional control experiments were performed; the second control experiment (control group 2, n = 6 rats) was performed labeling the TA and PCA immediately prior to the section of the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN), in order to eliminate the possibility of accidental labeling of the cricothyroid (CT) muscle by spread from the injection site. The third control group (control group 3, n = 5 rats) was included to determine if there is some sprouting from the SLN into the territories of the RLN after a crush of this last nerve. One week after the crush injury of the RLN, the PCA and TA muscles were injected immediately before the section of the SLN. The results show that a single population of neurons represents each muscle with the PCA in the most rostral position followed caudalwards by the TA. One week post-RLN injury, both the somatotopy and the number of labeled motoneurons changed, where the labeled neurons were distributed randomly; in addition, an area of topographical overlap of the two populations was observed and vocal fold mobility was lost. In the rest of the survival periods, the overlapping area is larger, but

  6. Motoneuron model of self-sustained firing after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Kurian, Mini; Jung, Ranu

    2016-01-01

    Under many conditions spinal motoneurons produce plateau potentials, resulting in self-sustained firing and providing a mechanism for translating short-lasting synaptic inputs into long-lasting motor output. During the acute-stage of spinal cord injury (SCI), the endogenous ability to generate plateaus is lost; however, during the chronic-stage of SCI, plateau potentials reappear with prolonged self-sustained firing that has been implicated in the development of spasticity. In this work, we extend previous modeling studies to systematically investigate the mechanisms underlying the generation of plateau potentials in motoneurons, including the influences of specific ionic currents, the morphological characteristics of the soma and dendrite, and the interactions between persistent inward currents and synaptic input. In particular, the goal of these computational studies is to explore the possible interactions between morphological and electrophysiological changes that occur after incomplete SCI. Model results predict that some of the morphological changes generally associated with the chronic-stage for some types of spinal cord injuries can cause a decrease in self-sustained firing. This and other computational results presented here suggest that the observed increases in self-sustained firing following some types of SCI may occur mainly due to changes in membrane conductances and changes in synaptic activity, particularly changes in the strength and timing of inhibition. PMID:21526348

  7. Treadmill training induced lumbar motoneuron dendritic plasticity and behavior recovery in adult rats after a thoracic contusive spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongxing; Liu, Nai-Kui; Zhang, Yi Ping; Deng, Lingxiao; Lu, Qing-Bo; Shields, Christopher B; Walker, Melissa J; Li, Jianan; Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2015-09-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is devastating, causing sensorimotor impairments and paralysis. Persisting functional limitations on physical activity negatively affect overall health in individuals with SCI. Physical training may improve motor function by affecting cellular and molecular responses of motor pathways in the central nervous system (CNS) after SCI. Although motoneurons form the final common path for motor output from the CNS, little is known concerning the effect of exercise training on spared motoneurons below the level of injury. Here we examined the effect of treadmill training on morphological, trophic, and synaptic changes in the lumbar motoneuron pool and on behavior recovery after a moderate contusive SCI inflicted at the 9th thoracic vertebral level (T9) using an Infinite Horizon (IH, 200 kDyne) impactor. We found that treadmill training significantly improved locomotor function, assessed by Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor rating scale, and reduced foot drops, assessed by grid walking performance, as compared with non-training. Additionally, treadmill training significantly increased the total neurite length per lumbar motoneuron innervating the soleus and tibialis anterior muscles of the hindlimbs as compared to non-training. Moreover, treadmill training significantly increased the expression of a neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the lumbar motoneurons as compared to non-training. Finally, treadmill training significantly increased synaptic density, identified by synaptophysin immunoreactivity, in the lumbar motoneuron pool as compared to non-training. However, the density of serotonergic terminals in the same regions did not show a significant difference between treadmill training and non-training. Thus, our study provides a biological basis for exercise training as an effective medical practice to improve recovery after SCI. Such an effect may be mediated by synaptic plasticity, and neurotrophic modification in the

  8. Treadmill training induced lumbar motoneuron dendritic plasticity and behavior recovery in adult rats after a thoracic contusive spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongxing; Liu, Nai-Kui; Zhang, Yi Ping; Deng, Lingxiao; Lu, Qing-Bo; Shields, Christopher B; Walker, Melissa J; Li, Jianan; Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2015-09-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is devastating, causing sensorimotor impairments and paralysis. Persisting functional limitations on physical activity negatively affect overall health in individuals with SCI. Physical training may improve motor function by affecting cellular and molecular responses of motor pathways in the central nervous system (CNS) after SCI. Although motoneurons form the final common path for motor output from the CNS, little is known concerning the effect of exercise training on spared motoneurons below the level of injury. Here we examined the effect of treadmill training on morphological, trophic, and synaptic changes in the lumbar motoneuron pool and on behavior recovery after a moderate contusive SCI inflicted at the 9th thoracic vertebral level (T9) using an Infinite Horizon (IH, 200 kDyne) impactor. We found that treadmill training significantly improved locomotor function, assessed by Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor rating scale, and reduced foot drops, assessed by grid walking performance, as compared with non-training. Additionally, treadmill training significantly increased the total neurite length per lumbar motoneuron innervating the soleus and tibialis anterior muscles of the hindlimbs as compared to non-training. Moreover, treadmill training significantly increased the expression of a neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the lumbar motoneurons as compared to non-training. Finally, treadmill training significantly increased synaptic density, identified by synaptophysin immunoreactivity, in the lumbar motoneuron pool as compared to non-training. However, the density of serotonergic terminals in the same regions did not show a significant difference between treadmill training and non-training. Thus, our study provides a biological basis for exercise training as an effective medical practice to improve recovery after SCI. Such an effect may be mediated by synaptic plasticity, and neurotrophic modification in the

  9. Modulation of inhibitory strength and kinetics facilitates regulation of persistent inward currents and motoneuron excitability following spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Venugopal, Sharmila; Hamm, Thomas M.; Crook, Sharon M.

    2011-01-01

    Spasticity is commonly observed after chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) and many other central nervous system disorders (e.g., multiple sclerosis, stroke). SCI-induced spasticity has been associated with motoneuron hyperexcitability partly due to enhanced activation of intrinsic persistent inward currents (PICs). Disrupted spinal inhibitory mechanisms also have been implicated. Altered inhibition can result from complex changes in the strength, kinetics, and reversal potential (ECl−) of γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA) and glycine receptor currents. Development of optimal therapeutic strategies requires an understanding of the impact of these interacting factors on motoneuron excitability. We employed computational methods to study the effects of conductance, kinetics, and ECl− of a dendritic inhibition on PIC activation and motoneuron discharge. A two-compartment motoneuron with enhanced PICs characteristic of SCI and receiving recurrent inhibition from Renshaw cells was utilized in these simulations. This dendritic inhibition regulated PIC onset and offset and exerted its strongest effects at motoneuron recruitment and in the secondary range of the current-frequency relationship during PIC activation. Increasing inhibitory conductance compensated for moderate depolarizing shifts in ECl− by limiting PIC activation and self-sustained firing. Furthermore, GABAA currents exerted greater control on PIC activation than glycinergic currents, an effect attributable to their slower kinetics. These results suggest that modulation of the strength and kinetics of GABAA currents could provide treatment strategies for uncontrollable spasms. PMID:21775715

  10. Regenerating motor bridge axons refine connections and synapse on lumbar motoneurons to bypass chronic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Campos, Lucas W; Chakrabarty, Samit; Haque, Raqeeb; Martin, John H

    2008-02-10

    To restore motor control after spinal cord injury requires reconnecting the brain with spinal motor circuits below the lesion. A bridge around the injury is an important alternative to promoting axon regeneration through the injury. Previously, we reported a novel motor bridge in rats. The thirteenth thoracic nerve was detached from the muscle it innervates and the cut end implanted caudally into the lumbar gray matter where motor bridge axons regenerate. In this study, we first determined that regenerating bridge axons project to spinal motor circuits. Stable projections were present in ventral motor laminae of the cord, including putative synapses directly on motoneurons, 2 months after insertion in the intact cord. At this time, earlier-forming dorsal horn projections were mostly eliminated. Regenerating axons were effective in evoking leg motor activity as early as 2 weeks. We next determined that bridge axons could regenerate caudal to a chronic injury. We hemisected the spinal cord at L2 and inserted the bridge nerve 1 month later at L5 and found ventral laminae projections similar to those in intact animals, including onto motoneurons directly. Finally, we determined that the bridge circuit could be activated by neural pathways rostral to its origin. For spinally hemisected animals, we electrically stimulated the rostral spinal cord and recorded evoked potentials from the bridge and, in turn, motor responses in the sciatic nerve. Our findings suggests that bridge motoneurons could be used by descending motor pathways as premotor interneurons to transmit neural signals to bypass a chronic spinal injury.

  11. Delaying the onset of treadmill exercise following peripheral nerve injury has different effects on axon regeneration and motoneuron synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Jaclyn; Evans, Jonathan T; Mildenhall, Taylor; Mulligan, Amanda; Konieczny, Aimee; Rose, Samuel J; English, Arthur W

    2015-04-01

    Transection of a peripheral nerve results in withdrawal of synapses from motoneurons. Some of the withdrawn synapses are restored spontaneously, but those containing the vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGLUT1), and arising mainly from primary afferent neurons, are withdrawn permanently. If animals are exercised immediately after nerve injury, regeneration of the damaged axons is enhanced and no withdrawal of synapses from injured motoneurons can be detected. We investigated whether delaying the onset of exercise until after synapse withdrawal had occurred would yield similar results. In Lewis rats, the right sciatic nerve was cut and repaired. Reinnervation of the soleus muscle was monitored until a direct muscle (M) response was observed to stimulation of the tibial nerve. At that time, rats began 2 wk of daily treadmill exercise using an interval training protocol. Both M responses and electrically-evoked H reflexes were monitored weekly for an additional seven wk. Contacts made by structures containing VGLUT1 or glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD67) with motoneurons were studied from confocal images of retrogradely labeled cells. Timing of full muscle reinnervation was similar in both delayed and immediately exercised rats. H reflex amplitude in delayed exercised rats was only half that found in immediately exercised animals. Unlike immediately exercised animals, motoneuron contacts containing VGLUT1 in delayed exercised rats were reduced significantly, relative to intact rats. The therapeutic window for application of exercise as a treatment to promote restoration of synaptic inputs onto motoneurons following peripheral nerve injury is different from that for promoting axon regeneration in the periphery. PMID:25632080

  12. Differential effects on KCC2 expression and spasticity of ALS and traumatic injuries to motoneurons

    PubMed Central

    Mòdol, Laura; Mancuso, Renzo; Alé, Albert; Francos-Quijorna, Isaac; Navarro, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease manifested by progressive muscle atrophy and paralysis due to the loss of upper and lower motoneurons (MN). Spasticity appears in ALS patients leading to further disabling consequences. Loss of the inhibitory tone induced by downregulation of the potassium chloride cotransporter 2 (KCC2) in MN has been proposed to importantly contribute to the spastic behavior after spinal cord injury (SCI). The aim of the present study was to test whether the alterations in the expression of KCC2 are linked to the appearance of spasticity in the SODG93A ALS murine model. We compared SODG93A mice to wild type mice subjected to SCI to mimic the spinal MN disconnection from motor descending pathways, and to sciatic nerve lesion to mimic the loss of MN connectivity to muscle. Electrophysiological results show that loss of motor function is observed at presymptomatic stage (8 weeks) in SODG93A mice but hyperreflexia and spasticity do not appear until a late stage (16 weeks). However, KCC2 was not downregulated despite MN suffered disconnection both from muscles and upper MNs. Further experiments revealed decreased gephyrin expression, as a general marker of inhibitory systems, accompanied by a reduction in the number of Renshaw interneurons. Moreover, 5-HT fibers were increased in the ventral horn of the lumbar spinal cord at late stage of disease progression in SOD1G93A mice. Taken together, the present results indicate that spasticity appears late in the ALS model, and may be mediated by a decrease in inhibitory interneurons and an increase of 5-HT transmission, while the absence of down-regulation of KCC2 could rather indicate an inability of MNs to respond to insults. PMID:24478630

  13. Gastric vagal motoneuron function is maintained following experimental spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, Emily M.; Holmes, Gregory M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Clinical reports indicate that spinal cord injury (SCI) initiates profound gastric dysfunction. Gastric reflexes involve stimulation of sensory vagal fibers, which engage brainstem circuits that modulate efferent output back to the stomach, thereby completing the vago-vagal reflex. Our recent studies in a rodent model of experimental high thoracic (T3-) SCI suggest that reduced vagal afferent sensitivity to gastrointestinal (GI) stimuli may be responsible for diminished gastric function. Nevertheless, derangements in efferent signals from the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV) to the stomach may also account for reduced motility. Methods: We assessed the anatomical, neurophysiological and functional integrity of gastric-projecting DMV neurons in T3-SCI rats using: 1) retrograde labeling of gastric-projecting DMV neurons; 2) whole cell recordings from gastric-projecting neurons of the DMV; and, 3) in vivo measurements of gastric contractions following unilateral microinjection of thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) into the DMV. Key Results: Immunohistochemical analysis of gastric-projecting DMV neurons demonstrated no difference between control and T3-SCI rats. Whole cell in vitro recordings showed no alteration in DMV membrane properties and the neuronal morphology of these same, neurobiotin-labeled, DMV neurons were unchanged after T3-SCI with regard to cell size and dendritic arborization. Central microinjection of TRH induced a significant facilitation of gastric contractions in both control and T3-SCI rats and there were no significant dose-dependent differences between groups. Conclusions: Our data suggest that the acute, 3 day to 1 week post-SCI, dysfunction of vagally-mediated gastric reflexes do not include derangements in the efferent DMV motoneurons. PMID:25316513

  14. Plasticity of recurrent inhibitory reflexes in cat spinal motoneurons following peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Havton, L; Kellerth, J O

    1990-01-01

    Chronic axotomy of a peripheral motor nerve in cat causes a gradual reduction in the number of intramedullary axon collaterals originating from the axotomized motoneurons (Havton and Kellerth 1984, 1989). This axon collateral elimination would be expected to reduce the amount of recurrent inhibitory reflex actions mediated by these cells. The aim of the present study was to investigate the recurrent inhibition originating from axotomized motoneurons and, also, to see whether the elimination of axon collaterals from the axotomized neurons might induce secondary compensatory changes in the recurrent inhibitory pathways originating from synergistic non-lesioned motoneurons. The results, which were obtained by means of intracellular recordings and monosynaptic reflex testing, indicate that postoperative enhancement of reflex actions may take place in the recurrent inhibitory pathways persisting in the axotomized motoneurons as well as in those originating from synergistic nonlesioned motoneurons. It is suggested that the site of compensatory enhancement is at the synaptic reflex contacts between the motoraxon collaterals and the inhibitory Renshaw interneurons. PMID:2311705

  15. Neuroprotective actions of androgens on motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Fargo, Keith N; Foecking, Eileen M; Jones, Kathryn J; Sengelaub, Dale R

    2009-07-01

    Androgens have a variety of protective and therapeutic effects in both the central and peripheral nervous systems. Here we review these effects as they related specifically to spinal and cranial motoneurons. Early in development, androgens are critical for the formation of important neuromuscular sex differences, decreasing the magnitude of normally occurring cell death in select motoneuron populations. Throughout the lifespan, androgens also protect against motoneuron death caused by axonal injury. Surviving motoneurons also display regressive changes to their neurites as a result of both direct axonal injury and loss of neighboring motoneurons. Androgen treatment enhances the ability of motoneurons to recover from these regressive changes and regenerate both axons and dendrites, restoring normal neuromuscular function. Androgens exert these protective effects by acting through a variety of molecular pathways. Recent work has begun to examine how androgen treatment can interact with other treatment strategies in promoting recovery from motoneuron injury.

  16. Tenascin-R restricts posttraumatic remodeling of motoneuron innervation and functional recovery after spinal cord injury in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Apostolova, Ivayla; Irintchev, Andrey; Schachner, Melitta

    2006-07-26

    Tenascin-R (TNR) is an extracellular glycoprotein in the CNS implicated in neural development and plasticity. Its repellent properties for growing axons in a choice situation with a conducive substrate in vitro have indicated that TNR may impede regeneration in the adult mammalian CNS. Here we tested whether constitutive lack of TNR has beneficial impacts on recovery from spinal cord injury in adult mice. Using the Basso, Beattie, Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor rating scale, we found that open-field locomotion in TNR-deficient (TNR-/-) mice recovered better that in wild-type (TNR+/+) littermates after compression of the thoracic spinal cord. We also designed, validated, and applied a motion analysis approach allowing numerical assessment of motor functions. We found, in agreement with the BBB score, that functions requiring low levels of supraspinal control such as plantar stepping improved more in TNR-/- mice. This was not the case for motor tasks demanding precision such as ladder climbing. Morphological analyses revealed no evidence that improved recovery of some functions in the mutant mice were attributable to enhanced tissue sparing or axonal regrowth. Estimates of perisomatic puncta revealed reduced innervation by cholinergic and GABAergic terminals around motoneurons in intact TNR-/- compared with TNR+/+ mice. Relative to nonlesioned animals, spinal cord repair was associated with increase in GABAergic and decrease of glutamatergic puncta in TNR-/- but not in TNR+/+ mice. Our results suggest that TNR restricts functional recovery by limiting posttraumatic remodeling of synapses around motoneuronal cell bodies where TNR is normally expressed in perineuronal nets.

  17. Nerve injury reduces responses of hypoglossal motoneurones to baseline and chemoreceptor-modulated inspiratory drive in the adult rat

    PubMed Central

    González-Forero, David; Portillo, Federico; Sunico, Carmen R; Moreno-López, Bernardo

    2004-01-01

    The effects of peripheral nerve lesions on the membrane and synaptic properties of motoneurones have been extensively studied. However, minimal information exists about how these alterations finally influence discharge activity and motor output under physiological afferent drive. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of hypoglossal (XIIth) nerve crushing on hypoglossal motoneurone (HMN) discharge in response to the basal inspiratory afferent drive and its chemosensory modulation by CO2. The evolution of the lesion was assessed by recording the compound muscle action potential evoked by XIIth nerve stimulation, which was lost on crushing and then recovered gradually to control values from the second to fourth weeks post-lesion. Basal inspiratory activities recorded 7 days post-injury in the nerve proximal to the lesion site, and in the nucleus, were reduced by 51.6% and 35.8%, respectively. Single unit antidromic latencies were lengthened by lesion, and unusually high stimulation intensities were frequently required to elicit antidromic spikes. Likewise, inspiratory modulation of unitary discharge under conditions in which chemoreceptor drive was varied by altering end-tidal CO2 was reduced by more than 60%. Although the general recruitment scheme was preserved after XIIth nerve lesion, we noticed an increased proportion of low-threshold units and a reduced recruitment gain across the physiological range. Immunohistochemical staining of synaptophysin in the hypoglossal nuclei revealed significant reductions of this synaptic marker after nerve injury. Morphological and functional alterations recovered with muscle re-innervation. Thus, we report here that nerve lesion induced changes in the basal activity and discharge modulation of HMNs, concurrent with the loss of afferent inputs. Nevertheless, we suggest that an increase in membrane excitability, reported by others, and in the proportion of low-threshold units, could serve to preserve minimal electrical

  18. Phase relation changes between the firings of alpha and gamma-motoneurons and muscle spindle afferents in the sacral micturition centre during continence functions in brain-dead human and patients with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Schalow, G

    2010-01-01

    1. Single-nerve fibre action potentials (APs) were recorded with 2 pairs of wire electrodes from lower sacral nerve roots during surgery in patients with spinal cord injury and in a brain-dead human. Conduction velocity distribution histograms were constructed for afferent and efferent fibres, nerve fibre groups were identified and simultaneous impulse patterns of alpha and gamma-motoneurons and secondary muscle spindle afferents (SP2) were constructed. Temporal relations between afferent and efferent APs were analyzed by interspike interval (II) and phase relation changes to explore the coordinated self-organization of somatic and parasympathetic neuronal networks in the sacral micturition centre during continence functions under physiologic (brain-dead) and pathophysiologic conditions (spinal cord injury). 2. In a paraplegic with hyperreflexia of the bladder, urinary bladder stretch (S1) and tension receptor afferents (ST) fired already when the bladder was empty, and showed a several times higher bladder afferent activity increase upon retrograde bladder filling than observed in the brain-dead individual. Two alpha2-motoneurons (FR) innervating the external bladder sphincter were already oscillatory firing to generate high activity levels when the bladder was empty. They showed activity levels with no bladder filling, comparable to those measured at a bladder filling of 600 ml in the brain-dead individual. A bladder storage volume of 600 ml was thus lost in the paraplegic, due to a too high bladder afferent input to the sacral micturition center, secondary to inflammation and hypertrophy of the detrusor. 3. In a brain-dead human, 2 phase relations existed per oscillation period of 160 ms between the APs of a sphincteric oscillatory firing alpha2-motoneuron, a dynamic fusimotor and a secondary muscle spindle afferent fibre. Following stimulation of mainly somatic afferent fibres, the phase relations changed only little. 4. In a paraplegic with dyssynergia of the

  19. Synaptic Control of Motoneuronal Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Rekling, Jens C.; Funk, Gregory D.; Bayliss, Douglas A.; Dong, Xiao-Wei; Feldman, Jack L.

    2016-01-01

    Movement, the fundamental component of behavior and the principal extrinsic action of the brain, is produced when skeletal muscles contract and relax in response to patterns of action potentials generated by motoneurons. The processes that determine the firing behavior of motoneurons are therefore important in understanding the transformation of neural activity to motor behavior. Here, we review recent studies on the control of motoneuronal excitability, focusing on synaptic and cellular properties. We first present a background description of motoneurons: their development, anatomical organization, and membrane properties, both passive and active. We then describe the general anatomical organization of synaptic input to motoneurons, followed by a description of the major transmitter systems that affect motoneuronal excitability, including ligands, receptor distribution, pre- and postsynaptic actions, signal transduction, and functional role. Glutamate is the main excitatory, and GABA and glycine are the main inhibitory transmitters acting through ionotropic receptors. These amino acids signal the principal motor commands from peripheral, spinal, and supraspinal structures. Amines, such as serotonin and norepinephrine, and neuropeptides, as well as the glutamate and GABA acting at metabotropic receptors, modulate motoneuronal excitability through pre- and postsynaptic actions. Acting principally via second messenger systems, their actions converge on common effectors, e.g., leak K+ current, cationic inward current, hyperpolarization-activated inward current, Ca2+ channels, or presynaptic release processes. Together, these numerous inputs mediate and modify incoming motor commands, ultimately generating the coordinated firing patterns that underlie muscle contractions during motor behavior. PMID:10747207

  20. Accumulation of SOD1 mutants in postnatal motoneurons does not cause motoneuron pathology or motoneuron disease.

    PubMed

    Lino, Maria Maddalena; Schneider, Corinna; Caroni, Pico

    2002-06-15

    Transgenic mice expressing high levels of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS)-associated mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) under the control of a human SOD1 minigene (hMg) accumulate mutant protein ubiquitously and develop motoneuron disease. However, restricted expression of SOD1 mutants in neurons apparently does not cause motor impairments in mice. Here, we investigated the possible pathogenic roles of mutant SOD1 accumulation in motoneurons. First, we used a Thy1 expression cassette to drive high constitutive expression of transgene in postnatal mouse neurons, including upper and lower motoneurons. Second, we expressed human (h) SOD1(G93A) and hSOD1(G85R) as transgenes (i.e., two SOD1 mutants with aggressive pathogenic properties in inducing FALS). Third, in addition to clinical signs of disease, we monitored early signs of disease onset and pathogenesis, including muscle innervation, astrogliosis in the spinal cord, and accumulation of ubiquitinated deposits in motoneurons and astrocytes. We report that high-level expression and accumulation of the mutant proteins in neurons failed to produce any detectable sign of pathology or disease in these transgenic mice. Crossing hMg-SOD1(G93A) mice (Gurney et al., 1994) with Thy1-SOD1(G93A) mice produced double-transgenic mice with spinal cord SOD1(G93A) levels that were approximately twofold higher than in the hMg-SOD1(G93A) single transgenics but did not affect the onset or progression of pathology or motoneuron disease. The accumulation of mutant SOD1 in postnatal motoneurons is thus not sufficient and probably also not critical to induce or accelerate motoneuron disease in FALS mice. The pathogenic process in FALS may involve non-neuronal cells, and selective vulnerability of motoneurons to this process may lead to motoneuron pathology and disease.

  1. Neuronal BDNF Signaling Is Necessary for the Effects of Treadmill Exercise on Synaptic Stripping of Axotomized Motoneurons

    PubMed Central

    Krakowiak, Joey; Liu, Caiyue; Papudesu, Chandana; Ward, P. Jillian; Wilhelm, Jennifer C.; English, Arthur W.

    2015-01-01

    The withdrawal of synaptic inputs from the somata and proximal dendrites of spinal motoneurons following peripheral nerve injury could contribute to poor functional recovery. Decreased availability of neurotrophins to afferent terminals on axotomized motoneurons has been implicated as one cause of the withdrawal. No reduction in contacts made by synaptic inputs immunoreactive to the vesicular glutamate transporter 1 and glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 is noted on axotomized motoneurons if modest treadmill exercise, which stimulates the production of neurotrophins by spinal motoneurons, is applied after nerve injury. In conditional, neuron-specific brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) knockout mice, a reduction in synaptic contacts onto motoneurons was noted in intact animals which was similar in magnitude to that observed after nerve transection in wild-type controls. No further reduction in coverage was found if nerves were cut in knockout mice. Two weeks of moderate daily treadmill exercise following nerve injury in these BDNF knockout mice did not affect synaptic inputs onto motoneurons. Treadmill exercise has a profound effect on synaptic inputs to motoneurons after peripheral nerve injury which requires BDNF production by those postsynaptic cells. PMID:25918648

  2. Different discharge properties of facial nucleus motoneurons following neurotmesis in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Shi, Suming; Xu, Lei; Li, Jianfeng; Han, Yuechen; Wang, Haibo

    2016-08-26

    Facial nucleus motoneurons innervating the facial expressive muscles are involved in a wide range of motor activities, however, the types of movement related neurons and their electrophysiological transformation after peripheral facial nerve injury haven't been revealed. This study was designed to elucidate the types of facial nucleus motoneurons and their alterations of discharge parameters following peripheral facial nerve injury in vivo. Here we set up a rat model by implanting electrode arrays into the brainstem and recorded the electrophysiological signals of facial nucleus neurons in the intact rats for 5 days, then transected the trunk of facial nerve (TF), and continued the record for 4 weeks. At the 4th week post-surgery, the morphological changes of TFs were analyzed. In this paper, we described two types of putative facial nucleus motoneurons based on their electrophysiological properties and their firing frequency adaptation. Type I motoneurons (n=57.6%) were characterized by a sustained spike adaptation, Type II motoneurons (n=26.2%) were identified by a phasic fast spike firing. Facial palsy and synkinesia, caused by neurotmesis of TF, were accompanied by firing rates reduction and firing pattern alteration of motoneurons. Our findings suggest the presence of two types of facial nucleus motorneurons, and their response patterns after neurotmesis support the notion that the discharge pattern of motorneurons may play an important role in the facial nerve function.

  3. Valproic acid protection against the brachial plexus root avulsion-induced death of motoneurons in rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dianxiu; Li, Qiang; Zhu, Xiaojuan; Wu, Guangzhi; Cui, Shusen

    2013-10-01

    In this study, the role of valproic acid (VPA) in protecting motoneuron after brachial plexus root avulsion was investigated in adult rats. Sixty rats were used in this study, and underwent the brachial plexus root avulsion injury, which was created by using a micro-hemostat forceps to pull out brachial plexus root from the intervertebral foramen. The animals were divided into two groups, VPA group administered with VPA dissolved in drinking water (300 mg/kg) daily, and control group had drinking water every day. The spinal cords (C5-T1) were harvested at day 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, and 28 for immunohistochemistry analysis, TUNEL staining, Nissl staining, and electron microscopy, respectively. The results showed that with VPA administration, the survival of motoneurons was promoted and the cell apoptosis was inhibited. The number of c-Jun and Bcl-2 positive motoneurons was increased immediately after avulsion both in control and VPA group, however, the percent of c-Jun positive motoneurons was decreased and the percent of Bcl-2 positive motoneurons was increased by VPA treatment significantly. Our results indicated that motoneurons were protected by VPA against cell death induced by brachial plexus root avulsion through c-Jun inhibition and Bcl-2 induction. PMID:23843283

  4. Adaptability of the oxidative capacity of motoneurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chalmers, G. R.; Roy, R. R.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1992-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that a chronic change in neuronal activation can produce a change in soma oxidative capacity, suggesting that: (i) these 2 variables are directly related in neurons and (ii) ion pumping is an important energy requiring activity of a neuron. Most of these studies, however, have focused on reduced activation levels of sensory systems. In the present study the effect of a chronic increase or decrease in motoneuronal activity on motoneuron oxidative capacity and soma size was studied. In addition, the effect of chronic axotomy was studied as an indicator of whether cytoplasmic volume may also be related to the oxidative capacity of motoneurons. A quantitative histochemical assay for succinate dehydrogenase activity was used as a measure of motoneuron oxidative capacity in experimental models in which chronic electromyography has been used to verify neuronal activity levels. Spinal transection reduced, and spinal isolation virtually eliminated lumbar motoneuron electrical activity. Functional overload of the plantaris by removal of its major synergists was used to chronically increase neural activity of the plantaris motor pool. No change in oxidative capacity or soma size resulted from either a chronic increase or decrease in neuronal activity level. These data indicate that the chronic modulation of ionic transport and neurotransmitter turnover associated with action potentials do not induce compensatory metabolic responses in the metabolic capacity of the soma of lumbar motoneurons. Soma oxidative capacity was reduced in the axotomized motoneurons, suggesting that a combination of axoplasmic transport, intracellular biosynthesis and perhaps neurotransmitter turnover represent the major energy demands on a motoneuron. While soma oxidative capacity may be closely related to neural activity in some neural systems, e.g. visual and auditory, lumbar motoneurons appear to be much less sensitive to modulations in chronic activity levels.

  5. Neonatal motoneurons overexpressing the bcl-2 protooncogene in transgenic mice are protected from axotomy-induced cell death.

    PubMed Central

    Dubois-Dauphin, M; Frankowski, H; Tsujimoto, Y; Huarte, J; Martinou, J C

    1994-01-01

    In vitro, the overexpression of the bcl-2 protooncogene in cultured neurons has been shown to prevent apoptosis induced by neurotrophic factor deprivation. We have generated transgenic mice overexpressing the Bcl-2 protein in neurons, including motoneurons of the facial nucleus. We have tested whether Bcl-2 could protect these motoneurons from experimentally induced cell death in new born mice. To address this question, we performed unilateral lesion of the facial nerve of wild-type and transgenic 2-day-old mice. In wild-type mice, the lesioned nerve and the corresponding motoneuron cell bodies in the facial nucleus underwent rapid degeneration. In contrast, in transgenic mice, facial motoneurons survived axotomy. Not only their cell bodies but also their axons were protected up to the lesion site. These results demonstrate that in vivo Bcl-2 protects neonatal motoneurons from degeneration after axonal injury. A better understanding of the mechanisms by which Bcl-2 prevents neuronal cell death in vivo could lead to the development of strategies for the treatment of motoneuron degenerative diseases. Images PMID:8159744

  6. Delayed riluzole treatment is able to rescue injured rat spinal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Nógrádi, A; Szabó, A; Pintér, S; Vrbová, G

    2007-01-19

    The effect of delayed 2-amino-6-trifluoromethoxy-benzothiazole (riluzole) treatment on injured motoneurons was studied. The L4 ventral root of adult rats was avulsed and reimplanted into the spinal cord. Immediately after the operation or with a delay of 5, 10, 14 or 16 days animals were treated with riluzole (n=5 in each group) while another four animals remained untreated. Three months after the operation the fluorescent dye Fast Blue was applied to the proximal end of the cut ventral ramus of the L4 spinal nerve to retrogradely label reinnervating neurons. Three days later the spinal cords were processed for counting the retrogradely labeled cells and choline acetyltransferase immunohistochemistry was performed to reveal the cholinergic cells in the spinal cords. In untreated animals there were 20.4+/-1.6 (+/-S.E.M.) retrogradely labeled neurons while in animals treated with riluzole immediately or 5 and 10 days after ventral root avulsion the number of labeled motoneurons ranged between 763+/-36 and 815+/-50 (S.E.M.). Riluzole treatment starting at 14 and 16 days after injury resulted in significantly lower number of reinnervating motoneurons (67+/-4 and 52+/-3 S.E.M., respectively). Thus, riluzole dramatically enhanced the survival and reinnervating capacity of injured motoneurons not only when treatment started immediately after injury but also in cases when riluzole treatment was delayed for up to 10 days. These results suggest that motoneurons destined to die after ventral root avulsion are programmed to survive for some time after injury and riluzole is able to rescue them during this period of time. PMID:17084537

  7. Hypocretinergic control of spinal cord motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Yamuy, Jack; Fung, Simon J; Xi, Mingchu; Chase, Michael H

    2004-06-01

    Hypocretinergic (orexinergic) neurons in the lateral hypothalamus project to motor columns in the lumbar spinal cord. Consequently, we sought to determine whether the hypocretinergic system modulates the electrical activity of motoneurons. Using in vivo intracellular recording techniques, we examined the response of spinal motoneurons in the cat to electrical stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus. In addition, we examined the membrane potential response to orthodromic stimulation and intracellular current injection before and after both hypothalamic stimulation and the juxtacellular application of hypocretin-1. It was found that (1) hypothalamic stimulation produced a complex sequence of depolarizing- hyperpolarizing potentials in spinal motoneurons; (2) the depolarizing potentials decreased in amplitude after the application of SB-334867, a hypocretin type 1 receptor antagonist; (3) the EPSP induced by dorsal root stimulation was not affected by the application of SB-334867; (4) subthreshold stimulation of dorsal roots and intracellular depolarizing current steps produced spike potentials when applied in concert to stimulation of the hypothalamus or after the local application of hypocretin-1; (5) the juxtacellular application of hypocretin-1 induced motoneuron depolarization and, frequently, high-frequency discharge; (6) hypocretin-1 produced a significant decrease in rheobase (36%), membrane time constant (16.4%), and the equalizing time constant (23.3%); (7) in a small number of motoneurons, hypocretin-1 produced an increase in the synaptic noise; and (8) the input resistance was not affected after hypocretin-1. The juxtacellular application of vehicle (saline) and denatured hypocretin-1 did not produce changes in the preceding electrophysiological properties. We conclude that hypothalamic hypocretinergic neurons are capable of modulating the activity of lumbar motoneurons through presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms. The lack of hypocretin

  8. Identification of common excitatory motoneurons in Drosophila melanogaster larvae.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, Eiji; Komatsu, Akira; Tsujimura, Hidenobu

    2007-05-01

    In insects, four types of motoneurons have long been known, including fast motoneurons, slow motoneurons, common inhibitory motoneurons, and DUM neurons. They innervate the same muscle and control its contraction together. Recent studies in Drosophila have suggested the existence of another type of motoneuron, the common excitatory motoneuron. Here, we found that shakB-GAL4 produced by labels this type of motoneuron in Drosophila larvae. We found that Drosophila larvae have two common excitatory motoneurons in each abdominal segment, RP2 for dorsal muscles and MNSNb/d-Is for ventral muscles. They innervate most of the internal longitudinal or oblique muscles on the dorsal or ventral body wall with type-Is terminals and use glutamate as a transmitter. Electrophysiological recording indicated that stimulation of the RP2 axon evoked excitatory junctional potential in a dorsal muscle. PMID:17867850

  9. Factors influencing the spinal motoneurons in development

    PubMed Central

    Wiese, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The development of the spinal cord needs a concerted interaction of transcription factors activating diverse genes and signals from outside acting on the specification of the different cells. Signals have to act on the segments of the embryo as well as on the cranial-caudal axis and the dorso-ventral axis. Additionally the axons of the motoneurons have to cross the central nervous system barrier to connect to the periphery. Intensive anatomical studies have been followed by molecular characterization of the different subsets of transcription factors that are expressed by cells of the developing spinal cord. Here, intensive studies for the most important appearing cells, the motoneurons, have resulted in a good knowledge on the expression patterns of these proteins. Nonetheless motoneurons are by far not the only important cells and the concert activity of all cells besides them is necessary for the correct function and integrity of motoneurons within the spinal cord. This article will briefly summarize the different aspects on spinal cord development and focuses on the differentiation as well as the functionalization of motoneurons. PMID:26807112

  10. Relations among passive electrical properties of lumbar alpha-motoneurones of the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Gustafsson, B; Pinter, M J

    1984-01-01

    The relations among passive membrane properties have been examined in cat motoneurones utilizing exclusively electrophysiological techniques. A significant relation was found to exist between the input resistance and the membrane time constant. The estimated electrotonic length showed no evident tendency to vary with input resistance but did show a tendency to decrease with increasing time constant. Detailed analysis of this trend suggests, however, that a variation in dendritic geometry is likely to exist among cat motoneurones, such that the dendritic trees of motoneurones projecting to fast-twitch muscle units are relatively more expansive than those of motoneurones projecting to slow-twitch units. Utilizing an expression derived from the Rall neurone model, the total capacitance of the equivalent cylinder corresponding to a motoneurone has been estimated. With the assumption of a constant and uniform specific capacitance of 1 mu F/cm2, the resulting values have been used as estimates of cell surface area. These estimates agree well with morphologically obtained measurements from cat motoneurones reported by others. Both membrane time constant (and thus likely specific membrane resistivity) and electrotonic length showed little tendency to vary with surface area. However, after-hyperpolarization (a.h.p.) duration showed some tendency to vary such that cells with brief a.h.p. duration were, on average, larger than those with longer a.h.p. durations. Apart from motoneurones with the lowest values, axonal conduction velocity was only weakly related to variations in estimated surface area. Input resistance and membrane time constant were found to vary systematically with the a.h.p. duration. Analysis suggested that the major part of the increase in input resistance with a.h.p. duration was related to an increase in membrane resistivity and a variation in dendritic geometry rather than to differences in surface area among the motoneurones. The possible effects of

  11. NO orchestrates the loss of synaptic boutons from adult "sick" motoneurons: modeling a molecular mechanism.

    PubMed

    Moreno-López, Bernardo; Sunico, Carmen R; González-Forero, David

    2011-02-01

    Synapse elimination is the main factor responsible for the cognitive decline accompanying many of the neuropathological conditions affecting humans. Synaptic stripping of motoneurons is also a common hallmark of several motor pathologies. Therefore, knowledge of the molecular basis underlying this plastic process is of central interest for the development of new therapeutic tools. Recent advances from our group highlight the role of nitric oxide (NO) as a key molecule triggering synapse loss in two models of motor pathologies. De novo expression of the neuronal isoform of NO synthase (nNOS) in motoneurons commonly occurs in response to the physical injury of a motor nerve and in the course of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In both conditions, this event precedes synaptic withdrawal from motoneurons. Strikingly, nNOS-synthesized NO is "necessary" and "sufficient" to induce synaptic detachment from motoneurons. The mechanism involves a paracrine/retrograde action of NO on pre-synaptic structures, initiating a downstream signaling cascade that includes sequential activation of (1) soluble guanylyl cyclase, (2) cyclic guanosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase, and (3) RhoA/Rho kinase (ROCK) signaling. Finally, ROCK activation promotes phosphorylation of regulatory myosin light chain, which leads to myosin activation and actomyosin contraction. This latter event presumably contributes to the contractile force to produce ending axon retraction. Several findings support that this mechanism may operate in the most prevalent neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. The output from human inspiratory motoneurone pools

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Jane E; Gandevia, Simon C

    2008-01-01

    Survival requires adequate pulmonary ventilation which, in turn, depends on adequate contraction of muscles acting on the chest wall in the presence of a patent upper airway. Bulbospinal outputs projecting directly and indirectly to ‘obligatory’ respiratory motoneurone pools generate the required muscle contractions. Recent studies of the phasic inspiratory output of populations of single motor units to five muscles acting on the chest wall (including the diaphragm) reveal that the time of onset, the progressive recruitment, and the amount of motoneuronal drive (expressed as firing frequency) differ among the muscles. Tonic firing with an inspiratory modulation of firing rate is common in low intercostal spaces of the parasternal and external intercostal muscles but rare in the diaphragm. A new time and frequency plot has been developed to depict the behaviour of the motoneurone populations. The magnitude of inspiratory firing of motor unit populations is linearly correlated to the mechanical advantage of the intercostal muscle region at which the motor unit activity is recorded. This represents a ‘neuromechanical’ principle by which the CNS controls motoneuronal output according to mechanical advantage, presumably in addition to the Henneman's size principle of motoneurone recruitment. Studies of the genioglossus, an obligatory upper airway muscle that helps maintain airway patency, reveal that it receives simultaneous inspiratory, expiratory and tonic drives even during quiet breathing. There is much to be learned about the neural drive to pools of human inspiratory and expiratory muscles, not only during respiratory tasks but also in automatic and volitional tasks, and in diseases that alter the required drive. PMID:17974589

  13. Androgenic, But Not Estrogenic, Protection of Motoneurons from Somal and Dendritic Atrophy Induced by the Death of Neighboring Motoneurons

    PubMed Central

    Fargo, Keith N.; Sengelaub, Dale R.

    2009-01-01

    Motoneuron loss is a significant medical problem, capable of causing severe movement disorders or even death. We have been investigating the effects of motoneuron loss on surviving motoneurons in a lumbar motor nucleus, the spinal nucleus of the bulbocavernosus (SNB). SNB motoneurons undergo marked dendritic and somal atrophy following the experimentally induced death of other nearby SNB motoneurons. However, treatment with testosterone at the time of lesioning attenuates this atrophy. Because testosterone can be metabolized into the estrogen estradiol (as well as other physiologically active steroid hormones), it was unknown whether the protective effect of testosterone was an androgen effect, an estrogen effect, or both. In the present experiment, we used a retrogradely transported neurotoxin to kill the majority of SNB motoneurons on one side of the spinal cord only in adult male rats. Some animals were also treated with either testosterone, the androgen dihydrotestosterone (which cannot be converted into estradiol), or the estrogen estradiol. As seen previously, partial motoneuron loss led to reductions in soma area and in dendritic length and extent in surviving motoneurons. Testosterone and dihydrotestosterone attenuated these reductions, but estradiol had no protective effect. These results indicate that the neuroprotective effect of testosterone on the morphology of SNB motoneurons following partial motoneuron depletion is an androgen effect rather than an estrogen effect. PMID:17565709

  14. Selective vulnerability and pruning of phasic motoneuron axons in motoneuron disease alleviated by CNTF.

    PubMed

    Pun, San; Santos, Alexandre Ferrão; Saxena, Smita; Xu, Lan; Caroni, Pico

    2006-03-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases can have long preclinical phases and insidious progression patterns, but the mechanisms of disease progression are poorly understood. Because quantitative accounts of neuronal circuitry affected by disease have been lacking, it has remained unclear whether disease progression reflects processes of stochastic loss or temporally defined selective vulnerabilities of distinct synapses or axons. Here we derive a quantitative topographic map of muscle innervation in the hindlimb. We show that in two mouse models of motoneuron disease (G93A SOD1 and G85R SOD1), axons of fast-fatiguable motoneurons are affected synchronously, long before symptoms appear. Fast-fatigue-resistant motoneuron axons are affected at symptom-onset, whereas axons of slow motoneurons are resistant. Axonal vulnerability leads to synaptic vesicle stalling and accumulation of BC12a1-a, an anti-apoptotic protein. It is alleviated by ciliary neurotrophic factor and triggers proteasome-dependent pruning of peripheral axon branches. Thus, motoneuron disease involves predictable, selective vulnerability patterns by physiological subtypes of axons, episodes of abrupt pruning in the target region and compensation by resistant axons.

  15. Motoneurons are essential for vascular pathfinding

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Amy H.; Suli, Arminda; Yaniv, Karina; Weinstein, Brant; Li, Dean Y.; Chien, Chi-Bin

    2011-01-01

    The neural and vascular systems share common guidance cues that have direct and independent signaling effects on nerves and endothelial cells. Here, we show that zebrafish Netrin 1a directs Dcc-mediated axon guidance of motoneurons and that this neural guidance function is essential for lymphangiogenesis. Specifically, Netrin 1a secreted by the muscle pioneers at the horizontal myoseptum (HMS) is required for the sprouting of dcc-expressing rostral primary motoneuron (RoP) axons and neighboring axons along the HMS, adjacent to the future trajectory of the parachordal chain (PAC). These axons are required for the formation of the PAC and, subsequently, the thoracic duct. The failure to form the PAC in netrin 1a or dcc morphants is phenocopied by laser ablation of motoneurons and is rescued both by cellular transplants and overexpression of dcc mRNA. These results provide a definitive example of the requirement of axons in endothelial guidance leading to the parallel patterning of nerves and vessels in vivo. PMID:21828101

  16. Electrical Stimulation of Low-Threshold Proprioceptive Fibers in the Adult Rat Increases Density of Glutamatergic and Cholinergic Terminals on Ankle Extensor α-Motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Gajewska-Woźniak, Olga; Grycz, Kamil; Czarkowska-Bauch, Julita; Skup, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    The effects of stimulation of low-threshold proprioceptive afferents in the tibial nerve on two types of excitatory inputs to α-motoneurons were tested. The first input is formed by glutamatergic Ia sensory afferents contacting monosynaptically α-motoneurons. The second one is the cholinergic input originating from V0c-interneurons, located in lamina X of the spinal cord, modulating activity of α-motoneurons via C-terminals. Our aim was to clarify whether enhancement of signaling to ankle extensor α-motoneurons, via direct electrical stimulation addressed predominantly to low-threshold proprioceptive fibers in the tibial nerve of awake rats, will affect Ia glutamatergic and cholinergic innervation of α-motoneurons of lateral gastrocnemius (LG). LG motoneurons were identified with True Blue tracer injected intramuscularly. Tibial nerve was stimulated for 7 days with continuous bursts of three pulses applied in four 20 min sessions daily. The Hoffmann reflex and motor responses recorded from the soleus muscle, LG synergist, allowed controlling stimulation. Ia terminals and C-terminals abutting on LG-labeled α-motoneurons were detected by immunofluorescence (IF) using input-specific anti- VGLUT1 and anti-VAChT antibodies, respectively. Quantitative analysis of confocal images revealed that the number of VGLUT1 IF and VAChT IF terminals contacting the soma of LG α-motoneurons increased after stimulation by 35% and by 26%, respectively, comparing to the sham-stimulated side. The aggregate volume of VGLUT1 IF and VAChT IF terminals increased by 35% and by 30%, respectively. Labeling intensity of boutons was also increased, suggesting an increase of signaling to LG α-motoneurons after stimulation. To conclude, one week of continuous burst stimulation of proprioceptive input to LG α-motoneurons is effective in enrichment of their direct glutamatergic but also indirect cholinergic inputs. The effectiveness of such and longer stimulation in models of injury is a

  17. Electrical Stimulation of Low-Threshold Proprioceptive Fibers in the Adult Rat Increases Density of Glutamatergic and Cholinergic Terminals on Ankle Extensor α-Motoneurons

    PubMed Central

    Gajewska-Woźniak, Olga; Grycz, Kamil; Czarkowska-Bauch, Julita; Skup, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    The effects of stimulation of low-threshold proprioceptive afferents in the tibial nerve on two types of excitatory inputs to α-motoneurons were tested. The first input is formed by glutamatergic Ia sensory afferents contacting monosynaptically α-motoneurons. The second one is the cholinergic input originating from V0c—interneurons, located in lamina X of the spinal cord, modulating activity of α-motoneurons via C-terminals. Our aim was to clarify whether enhancement of signaling to ankle extensor α-motoneurons, via direct electrical stimulation addressed predominantly to low-threshold proprioceptive fibers in the tibial nerve of awake rats, will affect Ia glutamatergic and cholinergic innervation of α-motoneurons of lateral gastrocnemius (LG). LG motoneurons were identified with True Blue tracer injected intramuscularly. Tibial nerve was stimulated for 7 days with continuous bursts of three pulses applied in four 20 min sessions daily. The Hoffmann reflex and motor responses recorded from the soleus muscle, LG synergist, allowed controlling stimulation. Ia terminals and C-terminals abutting on LG-labeled α-motoneurons were detected by immunofluorescence (IF) using input-specific anti- VGLUT1 and anti-VAChT antibodies, respectively. Quantitative analysis of confocal images revealed that the number of VGLUT1 IF and VAChT IF terminals contacting the soma of LG α-motoneurons increased after stimulation by 35% and by 26%, respectively, comparing to the sham-stimulated side. The aggregate volume of VGLUT1 IF and VAChT IF terminals increased by 35% and by 30%, respectively. Labeling intensity of boutons was also increased, suggesting an increase of signaling to LG α-motoneurons after stimulation. To conclude, one week of continuous burst stimulation of proprioceptive input to LG α-motoneurons is effective in enrichment of their direct glutamatergic but also indirect cholinergic inputs. The effectiveness of such and longer stimulation in models of injury is a

  18. Electrical Stimulation of Low-Threshold Proprioceptive Fibers in the Adult Rat Increases Density of Glutamatergic and Cholinergic Terminals on Ankle Extensor α-Motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Gajewska-Woźniak, Olga; Grycz, Kamil; Czarkowska-Bauch, Julita; Skup, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    The effects of stimulation of low-threshold proprioceptive afferents in the tibial nerve on two types of excitatory inputs to α-motoneurons were tested. The first input is formed by glutamatergic Ia sensory afferents contacting monosynaptically α-motoneurons. The second one is the cholinergic input originating from V0c-interneurons, located in lamina X of the spinal cord, modulating activity of α-motoneurons via C-terminals. Our aim was to clarify whether enhancement of signaling to ankle extensor α-motoneurons, via direct electrical stimulation addressed predominantly to low-threshold proprioceptive fibers in the tibial nerve of awake rats, will affect Ia glutamatergic and cholinergic innervation of α-motoneurons of lateral gastrocnemius (LG). LG motoneurons were identified with True Blue tracer injected intramuscularly. Tibial nerve was stimulated for 7 days with continuous bursts of three pulses applied in four 20 min sessions daily. The Hoffmann reflex and motor responses recorded from the soleus muscle, LG synergist, allowed controlling stimulation. Ia terminals and C-terminals abutting on LG-labeled α-motoneurons were detected by immunofluorescence (IF) using input-specific anti- VGLUT1 and anti-VAChT antibodies, respectively. Quantitative analysis of confocal images revealed that the number of VGLUT1 IF and VAChT IF terminals contacting the soma of LG α-motoneurons increased after stimulation by 35% and by 26%, respectively, comparing to the sham-stimulated side. The aggregate volume of VGLUT1 IF and VAChT IF terminals increased by 35% and by 30%, respectively. Labeling intensity of boutons was also increased, suggesting an increase of signaling to LG α-motoneurons after stimulation. To conclude, one week of continuous burst stimulation of proprioceptive input to LG α-motoneurons is effective in enrichment of their direct glutamatergic but also indirect cholinergic inputs. The effectiveness of such and longer stimulation in models of injury is a

  19. Tissue-type plasminogen activator is not required for kainate-induced motoneuron death in vitro.

    PubMed

    Vandenberghe, W; Van Den Bosch, L; Robberecht, W

    1998-08-24

    Spinal motoneurons are highly vulnerable to kainate both in vivo and in vitro. Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) and plasmin have recently been shown to mediate kainate-induced neuronal death in the mouse hippocampus in vivo. The aim of the present study was to determine whether tPA also mediates the kainate-induced death of motoneurons in vitro. A motoneuron-enriched neuronal population was isolated from the ventral spinal cord of wild-type (WT) and tPA-deficient (tPA-/-) mouse embryos. WT and tPA-/- neurons were cultured on WT and tPA-/- spinal glial feeder layers, respectively. WT and tPA-/- co-cultures were morphologically indistinguishable. Expression of tPA in WT co-cultures was demonstrated using RT-PCR. WT and tPA-/- co-cultures were exposed to kainate for 24 h. The neurotoxic effect of kainate did not differ significantly between WT and tPA-/- cultures. The plasmin inhibitor alpha2-antiplasmin did not protect WT neurons against kainate-induced injury. These results indicate that the plasmin system is not a universal mediator of kainate-induced excitotoxicity.

  20. Development of Connectivity in a Motoneuronal Network in Drosophila Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Couton, Louise; Mauss, Alex S.; Yunusov, Temur; Diegelmann, Soeren; Evers, Jan Felix; Landgraf, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Much of our understanding of how neural networks develop is based on studies of sensory systems, revealing often highly stereotyped patterns of connections, particularly as these diverge from the presynaptic terminals of sensory neurons. We know considerably less about the wiring strategies of motor networks, where connections converge onto the dendrites of motoneurons. Here, we investigated patterns of synaptic connections between identified motoneurons with sensory neurons and interneurons in the motor network of the Drosophila larva and how these change as it develops. Results We find that as animals grow, motoneurons increase the number of synapses with existing presynaptic partners. Different motoneurons form characteristic cell-type-specific patterns of connections. At the same time, there is considerable variability in the number of synapses formed on motoneuron dendrites, which contrasts with the stereotypy reported for presynaptic terminals of sensory neurons. Where two motoneurons of the same cell type contact a common interneuron partner, each postsynaptic cell can arrive at a different connectivity outcome. Experimentally changing the positioning of motoneuron dendrites shows that the geography of dendritic arbors in relation to presynaptic partner terminals is an important determinant in shaping patterns of connectivity. Conclusions In the Drosophila larval motor network, the sets of connections that form between identified neurons manifest an unexpected level of variability. Synapse number and the likelihood of forming connections appear to be regulated on a cell-by-cell basis, determined primarily by the postsynaptic dendrites of motoneuron terminals. PMID:25702582

  1. Transgenic neuronal nitric oxide synthase expression induces axotomy-like changes in adult motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Montero, Fernando; Sunico, Carmen R; Liu, Behui; Paton, Julian F R; Kasparov, Sergey; Moreno-López, Bernardo

    2010-09-15

    Dysregulation of protein expression, function and/or aggregation is a hallmark of a number of neuropathological conditions. Among them, upregulation and/or de novo expression of the neuronal isoform of nitric oxide (NO) synthase (nNOS) commonly occurs in diverse neurodegenerative diseases and in axotomized motoneurons. We used adenoviral (AVV) and lentiviral (LVV) vectors to study the effects of de novo nNOS expression on the functional properties and synaptic array of motoneurons. AVV-nNOS injection into the genioglossus muscle retrogradely transduced neonatal hypoglossal motoneurons (HMNs). Ratiometric real-time NO imaging confirmed that transduced HMNs generated NO gradients in brain parenchyma (space constant: 12.3 μm) in response to a glutamatergic stimulus. Unilateral AVV-nNOS microinjection in the hypoglossal nucleus of adult rats induced axotomy-like changes in HMNs. Specifically, we found alterations in axonal conduction properties and the recruitment order of motor units and reductions in responsiveness to synaptic drive and in the linear density of synaptophysin-positive puncta opposed to HMN somata. Functional alterations were fully prevented by chronic treatment with nNOS or soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitors. Synaptic and functional changes were also completely avoided by prior intranuclear injection of a neuron-specific LVV system for miRNA-mediated nNOS knock-down (LVV-miR-shRNA/nNOS). Furthermore, synaptic and several functional changes evoked by XIIth nerve injury were to a large extent prevented by intranuclear administration of LVV-miR-shRNA/nNOS. We suggest that nNOS up-regulation creates a repulsive NO gradient for synaptic boutons underlying most of the functional impairment undergone by injured motoneurons. This further strengthens the case for nNOS targeting as a plausible strategy for treatment of peripheral neuropathies and neurodegenerative disorders.

  2. Transgenic neuronal nitric oxide synthase expression induces axotomy-like changes in adult motoneurons

    PubMed Central

    Montero, Fernando; Sunico, Carmen R; Liu, Behui; Paton, Julian F R; Kasparov, Sergey; Moreno-López, Bernardo

    2010-01-01

    Dysregulation of protein expression, function and/or aggregation is a hallmark of a number of neuropathological conditions. Among them, upregulation and/or de novo expression of the neuronal isoform of nitric oxide (NO) synthase (nNOS) commonly occurs in diverse neurodegenerative diseases and in axotomized motoneurons. We used adenoviral (AVV) and lentiviral (LVV) vectors to study the effects of de novo nNOS expression on the functional properties and synaptic array of motoneurons. AVV-nNOS injection into the genioglossus muscle retrogradely transduced neonatal hypoglossal motoneurons (HMNs). Ratiometric real-time NO imaging confirmed that transduced HMNs generated NO gradients in brain parenchyma (space constant: ∼12.3 μm) in response to a glutamatergic stimulus. Unilateral AVV-nNOS microinjection in the hypoglossal nucleus of adult rats induced axotomy-like changes in HMNs. Specifically, we found alterations in axonal conduction properties and the recruitment order of motor units and reductions in responsiveness to synaptic drive and in the linear density of synaptophysin-positive puncta opposed to HMN somata. Functional alterations were fully prevented by chronic treatment with nNOS or soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitors. Synaptic and functional changes were also completely avoided by prior intranuclear injection of a neuron-specific LVV system for miRNA-mediated nNOS knock-down (LVV-miR-shRNA/nNOS). Furthermore, synaptic and several functional changes evoked by XIIth nerve injury were to a large extent prevented by intranuclear administration of LVV-miR-shRNA/nNOS. We suggest that nNOS up-regulation creates a repulsive NO gradient for synaptic boutons underlying most of the functional impairment undergone by injured motoneurons. This further strengthens the case for nNOS targeting as a plausible strategy for treatment of peripheral neuropaties and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:20660560

  3. Voltage-dependent amplification of synaptic inputs in respiratory motoneurones.

    PubMed

    Enríquez Denton, M; Wienecke, J; Zhang, M; Hultborn, H; Kirkwood, P A

    2012-07-01

    The role of persistent inward currents (PICs) in cat respiratory motoneurones (phrenic inspiratory and thoracic expiratory) was investigated by studying the voltage-dependent amplification of central respiratory drive potentials (CRDPs), recorded intracellularly, with action potentials blocked with the local anaesthetic derivative, QX-314. Decerebrate unanaesthetized or barbiturate-anaesthetized preparations were used. In expiratory motoneurones, plateau potentials were observed in the decerebrates, but not under anaesthesia. For phrenic motoneurones, no plateau potentials were observed in either state (except in one motoneurone after the abolition of the respiratory drive by means of a medullary lesion), but all motoneurones showed voltage-dependent amplification of the CRDPs, over a wide range of membrane potentials, too wide to result mainly from PIC activation. The measurements of the amplification were restricted to the phase of excitation, thus excluding the inhibitory phase. Amplification was found to be greatest for the smallest CRDPs in the lowest resistance motoneurones and was reduced or abolished following intracellular injection of the NMDA channel blocker, MK-801. Plateau potentials were readily evoked in non-phrenic cervical motoneurones in the same (decerebrate) preparations. We conclude that the voltage-dependent amplification of synaptic excitation in phrenic motoneurones is mainly the result of NMDA channel modulation rather than the activation of Ca2+ channel mediated PICs, despite phrenic motoneurones being strongly immunohistochemically labelled for CaV1.3 channels. The differential PIC activation in different motoneurones, all of which are CaV1.3 positive, leads us to postulate that the descending modulation of PICs is more selective than has hitherto been believed. PMID:22495582

  4. Electrotonic characteristics of alpha motoneurones of varying size

    PubMed Central

    Burke, R. E.; ten Bruggencate, G.

    1971-01-01

    1. The neuronal membrane responses to long constant current pulses (essentially current steps) have been studied in cat triceps surae motoneurones identified as to the type of muscle fibres, fast twitch (type F) or slow twitch (type S), innervated by the cell being studied. For each motoneurone the membrane time constant, τM, and input resistance, RN, were determined from the response to a current step. In addition, shorter time constants (`equalizing time constants') resulting from current spread into the dendrites were estimated by graphical analysis. 2. The electrotonic length of the combined motoneurone soma and dendritic tree was estimated from the current step data using the neuronal equivalent cylinder model formulated by Rall (Rall, 1969). The mean electrotonic length of the motoneurone equivalent cylinder was approximately 1·5 in both type F and type S motoneurones. The mean membrane time constant of type F cells was 5·6 msec and that of type S motoneurones was 6·7 msec. This difference in mean τM values was of border line statistical significance. 3. The results indicate that the electrotonic length of the combined dendritic trees of both large type F and small type S motoneurones is essentially the same. The implication of this conclusion for interpretation of previous analyses of the monosynaptic EPSP is discussed. PMID:5545177

  5. Aging of motoneurons and synaptic processes in the cat.

    PubMed

    Chase, M H; Morales, F R; Boxer, P A; Fung, S J

    1985-11-01

    The aging of spinal cord alpha motoneurons was explored in old cats with intracellular recording techniques to determine the basic membrane properties of these neurons and their monosynaptic response following activation of group Ia afferent fibers. The conduction velocity of the motoneurons' axons decreased in old animals (14 to 15 years of age) compared with adult controls (1 to 3 years of age). The input resistance of the motoneurons increased in the old cats; no change occurred in the resting membrane potential or spike amplitude. There was a reduction in the delay between the initial segment and the somadendritic components of the antidromic spike. The half-width duration of the monosynaptic EPSP in the old cats increased, but its amplitude did not change. These data indicate that a host of different membrane properties of spinal cord motoneurons and their Ia-monosynaptic input are affected by the aging process. Analysis of the results suggests that the degradation of neuronal processes occurs in all motoneurons rather than preferentially affecting a specific population of motoneurons. PMID:2996926

  6. Lectin-based Isolation and Culture of Mouse Embryonic Motoneurons

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Rebecca; Jablonka, Sibylle; Sczepan, Teresa; Sendtner, Michael; Wiese, Stefan; Klausmeyer, Alice

    2011-01-01

    Spinal motoneurons develop towards postmitotic stages through early embryonic nervous system development and subsequently grow out dendrites and axons. Neuroepithelial cells of the neural tube that express Nkx6.1 are the unique precursor cells for spinal motoneurons1. Though postmitotic motoneurons move towards their final position and organize themselves into columns along the spinal tract2,3. More than 90% of all these differentiated and positioned motoneurons express the transcription factors Islet 1/2. They innervate the muscles of the limbs as well as those of the body and the inner organs. Among others, motoneurons typically express the high affinity receptors for brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and Neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), the tropomyosin-related kinase B and C (TrkB, TrkC). They do not express the tropomyosin-related kinase A (TrkA)4. Beside the two high affinity receptors, motoneurons do express the low affinity neurotrophin receptor p75NTR. The p75NTR can bind all neurotrophins with similar but lower affinity to all neurotrophins than the high affinity receptors would bind the mature neurotrophins. Within the embryonic spinal cord, the p75NTR is exclusively expressed by the spinal motoneurons5. This has been used to develop motoneuron isolation techniques to purify the cells from the vast majority of surrounding cells6. Isolating motoneurons with the help of specific antibodies (panning) against the extracellular domains of p75NTR has turned out to be an expensive method as the amount of antibody used for a single experiment is high due to the size of the plate used for panning. A much more economical alternative is the use of lectin. Lectin has been shown to specifically bind to p75NTR as well7. The following method describes an alternative technique using wheat germ agglutinin for a preplating procedure instead of the p75NTR antibody. The lectin is an extremely inexpensive alternative to the p75NTR antibody and the purification grades using

  7. Behaviour of the motoneurone pool in a fatiguing submaximal contraction.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Chris J; Giesebrecht, Sabine; Gandevia, Simon C; Taylor, Janet L

    2011-07-15

    During fatigue caused by a sustained maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), motoneurones become markedly less responsive when tested during the silent period following transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). To determine whether this reduction depends on the repetitive activation of the motoneurones, responses to TMS (motor evoked potentials, MEPs) and to cervicomedullary stimulation (cervicomedullary motor evoked potentials, CMEPs) were tested during a sustained submaximal contraction at a constant level of electromyographic activity (EMG). In such a contraction, some motoneurones are repetitively activated whereas others are not active. On four visits, eight subjects performed a 10 min maintained-EMG elbow flexor contraction of 25% maximum. Test stimuli were delivered with and without conditioning by TMS given 100 ms prior. Test responses were MEPs or CMEPs (two visits each, small responses evoked by weak stimuli on one visit and large responses on the other). During the sustained contraction, unconditioned CMEPs decreased ∼20% whereas conditioned CMEPs decreased ∼75 and 30% with weak and strong stimuli, respectively. Conditioned MEPs were reduced to the same extent as CMEPs of the same size. The data reveal a novel decrease in motoneurone excitability during a submaximal contraction if EMG is maintained. Further, the much greater reduction of conditioned than unconditioned CMEPs shows the critical influence of voluntary drive on motoneurone responsiveness. Strong test stimuli attenuate the reduction of conditioned CMEPs which indicates that low-threshold motoneurones active in the contraction are most affected. The equivalent reduction of conditioned MEPs and CMEPs suggests that, similar to findings with a sustained MVC, impaired motoneurone responsiveness rather than intracortical inhibition is responsible for the fatigue-related impairment of the MEP during a sustained submaximal contraction. PMID:21606110

  8. A medullary inhibitory region for trigeminal motoneurons in the cat.

    PubMed

    Castillo, P; Pedroarena, C; Chase, M H; Morales, F R

    1991-05-24

    The present report describes the effects on trigeminal motoneurons of stimulation of a circumscribed site within the parvocellular region of the medullary reticular formation. This medullary site was selected because anatomical studies have shown that premotor interneurons project from this site to the trigeminal motorpool. Electrical stimulation of this site induced IPSPs (PcRF-IPSPs) in jaw-closer motoneurons. A population of these IPSPs, recorded contralateral to the site of stimulation, exhibited latencies shorter than 1.5 ms (mean 1.16 +/- 0.08 SD). Their mean amplitude was 1.72 mV +/- 1.13 SD and their mean duration was 3.52 ms +/- 2.15 SD. We believe that these PcRF-IPSPs arose as the result of activation of a monosynaptic pathway. A comparable inhibitory input from this site to ipsilateral jaw-closer motoneurons and to both contra and ipsilateral digastric motoneurons was also observed. We therefore conclude that this medullary PcRF site contains premotor interneurons that are capable of postsynaptically inhibiting motoneurons that innervate antagonistic jaw muscles. PMID:1884229

  9. Survival of newly postmitotic motoneurons is transiently independent of exogenous trophic support.

    PubMed

    Mettling, C; Gouin, A; Robinson, M; el M'Hamdi, H; Camu, W; Bloch-Gallego, E; Buisson, B; Tanaka, H; Davies, A M; Henderson, C E

    1995-04-01

    We compared the survival requirements of early- and late-born motoneurons from E5 chicken spinal cord. Density gradient centrifugation followed by immunopanning using SC1 antibody allowed us to purify two size classes of motoneuron. Large motoneurons retained by 6.8% metrizamide were shown by BrdU labeling in ovo to be born on average 1.5 d earlier than the small motoneurons recovered from the metrizamide pellet. Large motoneurons were both biochemically and functionally more mature: they expressed higher levels of choline acetyltransferase and low-affinity neurotrophin receptor, and had an acute requirement for trophic support from muscle-derived factors. After 24 hr in culture in basal medium, all early-born motoneurons died, whereas 60% of late-born motoneurons survived. Small motoneurons can develop into large motoneurons in ovo, suggesting that they represent a general transitional stage in motoneuron development. Our results suggest that a defined period elapses between birth of a motoneuron and its acquisition of trophic dependence, possibly corresponding to the time required for target innervation. This property may have important consequences for the timing and regulation of developmental motoneuron death.

  10. Requirement of enhanced Survival Motoneuron protein imposed during neuromuscular junction maturation

    PubMed Central

    Kariya, Shingo; Obis, Teresa; Garone, Caterina; Akay, Turgay; Sera, Fusako; Iwata, Shinichi; Homma, Shunichi; Monani, Umrao R.

    2014-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy is a common motor neuron disease caused by low survival motoneuron (SMN), a key protein in the proper splicing of genes. Restoring the protein is therefore a promising therapeutic strategy. Implementation of this strategy, however, depends on defining the temporal requirements for SMN. Here, we used controlled knockdown of SMN in transgenic mice to determine the precise postnatal stage requirements for this protein. Reducing SMN in neonatal mice resulted in a classic SMA-like phenotype. Unexpectedly, depletion of SMN in adults had relatively little effect. Insensitivity to low SMN emerged abruptly at postnatal day 17, which coincided with establishment of the fully mature neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Mature animals depleted of SMN eventually exhibited evidence of selective neuromuscular pathology that was made worse by traumatic injury. The ability to regenerate the mature NMJ in aged or injured SMN-depleted mice was grossly impaired, a likely consequence of the inability to meet the surge in demand for motoneuronal SMN that was seen in controls. Our results demonstrate that relative maturity of the NMJ determines the temporal requirement for the SMN protein. These observations suggest that the use of potent but potentially deleterious SMN-enhancing agents could be tapered in human patients once the neuromuscular system matures and reintroduced as needed to enhance SMN for remodeling aged or injured NMJs. PMID:24463453

  11. Modulation of human motoneuron activity by a mental arithmetic task.

    PubMed

    Bensoussan, Laurent; Duclos, Yann; Rossi-Durand, Christiane

    2012-10-01

    This study aimed to determine whether the performance of a mental task affects motoneuron activity. To this end, the tonic discharge pattern of wrist extensor motor units was analyzed in healthy subjects while they were required to maintain a steady wrist extension force and to concurrently perform a mental arithmetic (MA) task. A shortening of the mean inter-spike interval (ISI) and a decrease in ISI variability occurred when MA task was superimposed to the motor task. Aloud and silent MA affected equally the rate and variability of motoneuron discharge. Increases in surface EMG activity and force level were consistent with the modulation of the motor unit discharge rate. Trial-by-trial analysis of the characteristics of motor unit firing revealed that performing MA increases activation of wrist extensor SMU. It is suggested that increase in muscle spindle afferent activity, resulting from fusimotor drive activation by MA, may have contributed to the increase in synaptic inputs to motoneurons during the mental task performance, likely together with enhancement in the descending drive. The finding that a mental task affects motoneuron activity could have consequences in assessment of motor disabilities and in rehabilitation in motor pathologies.

  12. Divisive gain modulation of motoneurons by inhibition optimizes muscular control.

    PubMed

    Vestergaard, Mikkel; Berg, Rune W

    2015-02-25

    When using muscles, the precision with which force is delivered is as important as the delivery of force itself. Force is regulated by both the number of recruited motoneurons and their spike frequency. While it is known that the recruitment is ordered to reduce variability in force, it remains unclear whether the motoneuron gain, i.e., the slope of the transformation between synaptic input and spiking output, is also modulated to reduce variability in force. To address this issue, we use turtle hindlimb scratching as a model for fine motor control, since this behavior involves precise limb movement to rub the location of somatic nuisance touch. We recorded intracellularly from motoneurons in a reduced preparation where the limbs were removed to increase mechanical stability and the motor nerve activity served as a surrogate for muscle force. We found that not only is the gain of motoneurons regulated on a subsecond timescale, it is also adjusted to minimize variability. The modulation is likely achieved via an expansive nonlinearity between spike rate and membrane potential with inhibition having a divisive influence. These findings reveal a versatile mechanism of modulating neuronal sensitivity and suggest that such modulation is fundamentally linked to optimization.

  13. Succinate dehydrogenase activity and soma size of motoneurons innervating different portions of the rat tibialis anterior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishihara, A.; Roy, R. R.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1995-01-01

    The spatial distribution, soma size and oxidative enzyme activity of gamma and alpha motoneurons innervating muscle fibres in the deep (away from the surface of the muscle) and superficial (close to the surface of the muscle) portions of the tibialis anterior in normal rats were determined. The deep portion had a higher percentage of high oxidative fibres than the superficial portion of the muscle. Motoneurons were labelled by retrograde neuronal transport of fluorescent tracers: Fast Blue and Nuclear Yellow were injected into the deep portion and Nuclear Yellow into the superficial portion of the muscle. Therefore, motoneurons innervating the deep portion were identified by both a blue fluorescent cytoplasm and a golden-yellow fluorescent nucleus, while motoneurons innervating the superficial portion were identified by only a golden-yellow fluorescent nucleus. After staining for succinate dehydrogenase activity on the same section used for the identification of the motoneurons, soma size and succinate dehydrogenase activity of the motoneurons were measured. The gamma and alpha motoneurons innervating both the deep and superficial portions were located primarily at L4 and were intermingled within the same region of the dorsolateral portion of the ventral horn in the spinal cord. Mean soma size was similar for either gamma or alpha motoneurons in the two portions of the muscle. The alpha motoneurons innervating the superficial portion had a lower mean succinate dehydrogenase activity than those innervating the deep portion of the muscle. An inverse relationship between soma size and succinate dehydrogenase activity of alpha, but not gamma, motoneurons innervating both the deep and superficial portions was observed. Based on three-dimensional reconstructions within the spinal cord, there were no apparent differences in the spatial distribution of the motoneurons, either gamma or alpha, associated with the deep and superficial compartments of the muscle. The data

  14. Membrane properties of external urethral and external anal sphincter motoneurones in the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, M

    1991-01-01

    1. Intracellular recordings were made from external urethral sphincter (EUS) and external anal sphincter (EAS) motoneurones in the cat spinal cord under pentobarbitone anaesthesia. EUS and EAS motoneurones were located in segments S1 and S2 in the lateral part of the ventral horn corresponding to column Y of Romanes in the cat or group X of Onuf in man. 2. The axonal conduction velocity of sphincter motoneurones, calculated from the latency of the antidromic action potential and the conduction distance, ranged from 16 to 80 ms-1, much slower than that of hindlimb motoneurones. The duration of the spike after-hyperpolarization (AHP) was in a similar range to that of hindlimb motoneurones. The antidromic latency, the duration of the action potential and the duration of the AHP were positively correlated with one another. 3. The input resistance ranged from 2.6 to 9.0 M omega and was positively correlated with the latency of the antidromic spike. The plots of input resistance versus conduction velocity in sphincter motoneurones were distributed around the extrapolated regression line determined for hindlimb motoneurones, indicating that there is a common correlation amongst conduction velocity, input resistance, and size of motoneurones regardless of the muscle type innervated by a motoneurone. 4. The regression line relating AHP duration and input resistance in sphincter motoneurones was quite different from that in hindlimb motoneurones in its slope, indicating that the AHP duration does not depend solely on the size of the motoneurone. 5. The voltage responses to injection of steps of hyperpolarizing current developed a time-dependent depolarizing 'sag' at higher current levels. The delay in onset and the time constant of decay of this depolarizing sag depended upon the peak amplitude of the hyperpolarizing response. The slope resistance in the I-V curve decreased in the hyperpolarizing direction in all neurones examined, indicating the existence of anomalous

  15. Motoneuron number in the lumbar lateral motor column of larval and adult bullfrogs.

    PubMed

    Farel, P B

    1987-07-01

    Motoneuron number in the lumbar lateral motor column of the bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana, was investigated through the course of premetamorphic development and in postmetamorphic frogs. Motoneurons were distinguished on the basis of histological characteristics into two classes, type L (less differentiated) and type M (more differentiated). The number of type L motoneurons on each side showed a precipitous decline between stages V and VI (6,300 to 2,500) and a slower rate of loss until stage XI (to 550). Type M motoneurons increased in number between stages V and VII (560 to 2,775) and declined precipitously between stages VII and VIII to a value similar to that of juvenile frogs (1,100). These changes in motoneuron number do not correspond to the formation of myotubes or to the appearance of contractile properties in hindlimb muscles. The development of myotubes in the hindlimb occurs only after total motoneuron number has declined by 35%. Similarly, hindlimb muscle contraction develops after the early decline in type L motoneuron number and is restricted to proximal thigh at the peak of type M motoneuron number. In postmetamorphic frogs, a weak (r = 0.44) but statistically significant correlation was found between type M motoneuron number and body length. In the largest frogs (greater than 15 cm body length), 1262 +/- 157 (mean +/- s.d.) motoneurons were present, whereas the smallest frogs (less than 5 cm body length) had 1099 +/- 98 motoneurons. These results are not consistent with previous findings that the variance of motoneuron number among small frogs is greater than that among larger frogs. The present results are thus inconsistent with explanations of size-related differences in motoneuron number that are based on selection of small frogs with greater number of motoneurons for survival. The increase in motoneuron number may be due to a slow addition of newly born motoneurons to the LMC or to the differentiation of existing motoneurons. The latter

  16. Motonuclear changes after cranial nerve injury and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, E; Pallini, R; Lauretti, L; La Marca, F; Scogna, A; Rossi, G F

    1997-09-01

    Little is known about the mechanisms at play in nerve regeneration after nerve injury. Personal studies are reported regarding motonuclear changes after regeneration of injured cranial nerves, in particular of the facial and oculomotor nerves, as well as the influence that the natural molecule acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) has on post-axotomy cranial nerve motoneuron degeneration after facial and vagus nerve lesions. Adult and newborn animal models were used. Massive motoneuron response after nerve section and reconstruction was observed in the motonuclei of all nerves studied. ALC showed to have significant neuroprotective effects on the degeneration of axotomized motoneurons. Complex quantitative, morphological and somatotopic nuclear changes occurred that sustain new hypotheses regarding the capacities of motoneurons to regenerate and the possibilities of new neuron proliferation. The particularities of such observations are described and discussed.

  17. Loss of motoneuron-specific microRNA-218 causes systemic neuromuscular failure.

    PubMed

    Amin, Neal D; Bai, Ge; Klug, Jason R; Bonanomi, Dario; Pankratz, Matthew T; Gifford, Wesley D; Hinckley, Christopher A; Sternfeld, Matthew J; Driscoll, Shawn P; Dominguez, Bertha; Lee, Kuo-Fen; Jin, Xin; Pfaff, Samuel L

    2015-12-18

    Dysfunction of microRNA (miRNA) metabolism is thought to underlie diseases affecting motoneurons. One miRNA, miR-218, is abundantly and selectively expressed by developing and mature motoneurons. Here we show that mutant mice lacking miR-218 die neonatally and exhibit neuromuscular junction defects, motoneuron hyperexcitability, and progressive motoneuron cell loss, all of which are hallmarks of motoneuron diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal muscular atrophy. Gene profiling reveals that miR-218 modestly represses a cohort of hundreds of genes that are neuronally enriched but are not specific to a single neuron subpopulation. Thus, the set of messenger RNAs targeted by miR-218, designated TARGET(218), defines a neuronal gene network that is selectively tuned down in motoneurons to prevent neuromuscular failure and neurodegeneration.

  18. Inhibition of Sirt1 promotes neural progenitors toward motoneuron differentiation from human embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yun; Wang, Jing; Chen, Guian; Fan, Dongsheng; Deng, Min

    2011-01-14

    Research highlights: {yields} Nicotinamide inhibit Sirt1. {yields} MASH1 and Ngn2 activation. {yields} Increase the expression of HB9. {yields} Motoneurons formation increases significantly. -- Abstract: Several protocols direct human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) toward differentiation into functional motoneurons, but the efficiency of motoneuron generation varies based on the human ESC line used. We aimed to develop a novel protocol to increase the formation of motoneurons from human ESCs. In this study, we tested a nuclear histone deacetylase protein, Sirt1, to promote neural precursor cell (NPC) development during differentiation of human ESCs into motoneurons. A specific inhibitor of Sirt1, nicotinamide, dramatically increased motoneuron formation. We found that about 60% of the cells from the total NPCs expressed HB9 and {beta}III-tubulin, commonly used motoneuronal markers found in neurons derived from ESCs following nicotinamide treatment. Motoneurons derived from ESC expressed choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), a positive marker of mature motoneuron. Moreover, we also examined the transcript levels of Mash1, Ngn2, and HB9 mRNA in the differentiated NPCs treated with the Sirt1 activator resveratrol (50 {mu}M) or inhibitor nicotinamide (100 {mu}M). The levels of Mash1, Ngn2, and HB9 mRNA were significantly increased after nicotinamide treatment compared with control groups, which used the traditional protocol. These results suggested that increasing Mash1 and Ngn2 levels by inhibiting Sirt1 could elevate HB9 expression, which promotes motoneuron differentiation. This study provides an alternative method for the production of transplantable motoneurons, a key requirement in the development of hESC-based cell therapy in motoneuron disease.

  19. Transmitter inputs to different motoneuron subgroups in the oculomotor and trochlear nucleus in monkey

    PubMed Central

    Zeeh, Christina; Mustari, Michael J.; Hess, Bernhard J. M.; Horn, Anja K. E.

    2015-01-01

    In all vertebrates the eyes are moved by six pairs of extraocular muscles enabling horizontal, vertical and rotatory movements. Recent work showed that each extraocular muscle is controlled by two motoneuronal groups: (1) Motoneurons of singly-innervated muscle fibers (SIF) that lie within the boundaries of motonuclei mediating a fast muscle contraction; and (2) motoneurons of multiply-innervated muscle fibers (MIF) in the periphery of motonuclei mediating a tonic muscle contraction. Currently only limited data about the transmitter inputs to the SIF and MIF motoneurons are available. Here we performed a quantitative study on the transmitter inputs to SIF and MIF motoneurons of individual muscles in the oculomotor and trochlear nucleus in monkey. Pre-labeled motoneurons were immunostained for GABA, glutamate decarboxylase, GABA-A receptor, glycine transporter 2, glycine receptor 1, and vesicular glutamate transporters 1 and 2. The main findings were: (1) the inhibitory control of SIF motoneurons for horizontal and vertical eye movements differs. Unlike in previous primate studies a considerable GABAergic input was found to all SIF motoneuronal groups, whereas a glycinergic input was confined to motoneurons of the medial rectus (MR) muscle mediating horizontal eye movements and to those of the levator palpebrae (LP) muscle elevating the upper eyelid. Whereas SIF and MIF motoneurons of individual eye muscles do not differ numerically in their GABAergic, glycinergic and vGlut2 input, vGlut1 containing terminals densely covered the supraoculomotor area (SOA) targeting MR MIF motoneurons. It is reasonable to assume that the vGlut1 input affects the near response system in the SOA, which houses the preganglionic neurons mediating pupillary constriction and accommodation and the MR MIF motoneurones involved in vergence. PMID:26257611

  20. State-dependent phenomena in cat masseter motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Kohlmeier, K A; López-Rodríguez, F; Liu, R H; Morales, F R; Chase, M H

    1996-05-25

    In the present study we explored the mechanisms of carbachol-induced muscle atonia in the alpha-chloralose-anesthetized animal. We compared our findings to those that have been previously obtained in unanesthetized cats during muscle atonia occurring during natural active sleep. Accordingly, in cats anesthetized with alpha-chloralose, intracellular records were obtained from masseter motoneurons before and after carbachol-induced motor atonia. Following the induction of atonia, the membrane potential activity was dominated by high-frequency, discrete, hyperpolarizing potentials. These hyperpolarizing potentials were reversed in polarity by the intracellular injection of chloride ions and abolished by the application of strychnine. These findings indicate that they were inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) mediated by glycine. These IPSPs appeared exclusively during muscle atonia. In addition, masseter motoneurons were significantly hyperpolarized and their rheobase increased. There was a decrease in input resistance and membrane time constant. In the alpha-chloralose-anesthetized preparation, stimulation of the nucleus pontis oralis (NPO) induced IPSPs in masseter motoneurons following, but never prior to, the pontine injection of carbachol. Thus, this is the first demonstration that "reticular response-reversal' may be elicited in an anesthetized preparation. Another state-dependent phenomenon of active sleep, the occurrence of IPSPs in motoneurons that are temporally correlated with ponto-geniculo-occipital (PGO) waves, was also observed in this preparation only after carbachol administration. Based on the data in this report, we conclude that the inhibitory system that mediates atonia during the state of active sleep can be activated in an animal that is anesthetized with alpha-chloralose. Specifically, the neuronal groups that generate spontaneous IPSPs, those that mediate the phenomenon of reticular response-reversal, and those involved in the generation

  1. Medullary activation of intercostal fusimotor and alpha motoneurones

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, P.; Sears, T. A.

    1970-01-01

    1. Studies have been made of the anatomical localization in the brain stem of the sites at which tetanic stimulation evoke inspiratory and expiratory apneusis. 2. The inspiratory responses arise from a relatively circumscribed region within the medulla corresponding to the nucleus reticularis giganto-cellularis and ventralis which give rise to the medullary contingent of the long reticulo-spinal tracts. Expiratory responses were obtained dorsal and lateral to this area, but not localized to any cyto-architectonically distinct region of the reticular formation. 3. During the apneustic responses there was co-activation of the intercostal alpha and fusimotor neurones with reciprocal inhibition of the antagonistic motoneurones. The threshold for activation of the fusimotor neurones was usually lower than for the alpha motoneurones. 4. Results with brief tetanic stimulation suggest that the long reticulospinal tracts are responsible for the apneustic responses and that the effects are mediated at segmental level over an interneuronal pathway. 5. The response of the intercostal motoneurones during the apneustic responses is shown to be dependent on the integrity of the dorsal spinal roots. PMID:5499806

  2. Medullary activation of intercostal fusimotor and alpha motoneurones.

    PubMed

    Andersen, P; Sears, T A

    1970-08-01

    1. Studies have been made of the anatomical localization in the brain stem of the sites at which tetanic stimulation evoke inspiratory and expiratory apneusis.2. The inspiratory responses arise from a relatively circumscribed region within the medulla corresponding to the nucleus reticularis giganto-cellularis and ventralis which give rise to the medullary contingent of the long reticulo-spinal tracts. Expiratory responses were obtained dorsal and lateral to this area, but not localized to any cyto-architectonically distinct region of the reticular formation.3. During the apneustic responses there was co-activation of the intercostal alpha and fusimotor neurones with reciprocal inhibition of the antagonistic motoneurones. The threshold for activation of the fusimotor neurones was usually lower than for the alpha motoneurones.4. Results with brief tetanic stimulation suggest that the long reticulospinal tracts are responsible for the apneustic responses and that the effects are mediated at segmental level over an interneuronal pathway.5. The response of the intercostal motoneurones during the apneustic responses is shown to be dependent on the integrity of the dorsal spinal roots.

  3. Sexual dimorphism of perineal muscles and motoneurons in spotted hyenas.

    PubMed

    Forger, N G; Frank, L G; Breedlove, S M; Glickman, S E

    1996-11-11

    Female spotted hyenas are known for their male-like genitalia, high levels of aggression, and dominance over males, characteristics which are attributed to exposure to elevated levels of testosterone in utero. Although the nervous system of spotted hyenas has not previously been examined, one might predict that neural systems which are sexually dimorphic in other mammals would be monomorphic in this species. Spinal motoneurons which innervate muscles associated with the phallus are located in Onuf's nucleus and are more numerous in males than in females in a wide array of mammals. Onuf's nucleus was examined in adult and neonatal spotted hyenas and, contrary to expectation, was found to be sexually dimorphic in the typical mammalian pattern: Males have significantly more motoneurons in Onuf's nucleus than do females. This dimorphism was correlated with a previously undescribed dimorphism in the relevant target musculature. Specifically, the morphology of the bulbocavernosus muscle is distinctly different in male and female spotted hyenas. Pregnant hyenas were treated with anti-androgen in an attempt to interfere with the actions of androgen during fetal development. Motoneuron number in Onuf's nucleus and the morphology of the bulbocavernosus muscle were feminized in males exposed to anti-androgen in utero.

  4. Alpha, beta and gamma motoneurons: functional diversity in the motor system's final pathway.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Marin; Zytnicki, Daniel

    2011-09-01

    Since their discovery in the late 19th century our conception of motoneurons has steadily evolved. Motoneurons share the same general function: they drive the contraction of muscle fibers and are the final common pathway, i.e., the seat of convergence of all the central and peripheral pathways involved in motricity. However, motoneurons innervate different types of muscular targets. Ordinary muscle fibers are subdivided into three main subtypes according to their structural and mechanical properties. Intrafusal muscle fibers located within spindles can elicit either a dynamic, or a static, action on the spindle sensory endings. No less than seven categories of motoneurons have thereby been identified on the basis of their innervation pattern. This functional diversity has hinted at a similar diversity in the inputs each motoneuron receives, as well as in the electrical, or cellular, properties of the motoneurons that match the properties of their muscle targets. The notion of the diverse properties of motoneurons has been well established by the work of many prominent neuroscientists. But in today's scientific literature, it tends to fade and motoneurons are often thought of as a homogenous group, which develop from a given population of precursor cells, and which express a common set of molecules. We first present here the historical milestones that led to the recognition of the functional diversity of motoneurons. We then review how the intrinsic electrical properties of motoneurons are precisely tuned in each category of motoneurons in order to produce an output that is adapted to the contractile properties of their specific targets.

  5. Changes in the electrophysiological properties of cat spinal motoneurons following the intramuscular injection of adriamycin compared with changes in the properties of motoneurons in aged cats.

    PubMed

    Liu, R H; Yamuy, J; Xi, M C; Morales, F R; Chase, M H

    1995-11-01

    1. This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of adriamycin (ADM, Doxorubicin) on the basic electrophysiological properties of spinal cord motoneurons in the adult cat. ADM was injected into the biceps, gastrocnemius, semitendinosus, and semimembranosus muscles of the left hindlimb (1.2 mg per muscle). Intracellular recordings from motoneurons innervating these muscles were carried out 12, 20, or 40 days after ADM administration and from corresponding motoneurons in untreated control cats. 2. Twelve days after ADM injection, motoneurons innervating ADM-treated muscles (ADM MNs) exhibited statistically significant increases in input resistance, membrane time constant, and amplitude of the action potential's afterhyperpolarization (AHP). In addition, there was a statistically significant decrease in rheobase and in the delay between the action potential of the initial segment (IS) and that of the somadendritic (SD) portion of the motoneuron (IS-SD delay). There were no significant changes in the resting membrane potential, threshold depolarization, action potential amplitude, or axonal conduction velocity. 3. The changes in electrical properties of motoneurons at 20 and 40 days after ADM injection were qualitatively similar to those observed at 12 days. However, at 40 days after ADM injection there was a statistically significant decrease in the axonal conduction velocity of the ADM MNs. 4. The normal correlations that are present between the AHP duration and electrical properties of the control motoneurons were observed in the ADM MNs, e.g., AHP duration was positively correlated with the input resistance and time constant and negatively correlated with the axonal conduction velocity. The correlation coefficients, however, were reduced in comparison with the control data. 5. This study demonstrates that ADM exerts significant effects on the electrical properties of motoneurons when injected into their target muscles. The majority of the changes in

  6. Motoneuron development influences dorsal root ganglia survival and Schwann cell development in a vertebrate model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Hao, Le Thi; Duy, Phan Q; Jontes, James D; Beattie, Christine E

    2015-01-15

    Low levels of the survival motor neuron protein (SMN) cause the disease spinal muscular atrophy. A primary characteristic of this disease is motoneuron dysfunction and paralysis. Understanding why motoneurons are affected by low levels of SMN will lend insight into this disease and to motoneuron biology in general. Motoneurons in zebrafish smn mutants develop abnormally; however, it is unclear where Smn is needed for motoneuron development since it is a ubiquitously expressed protein. We have addressed this issue by expressing human SMN in motoneurons in zebrafish maternal-zygotic (mz) smn mutants. First, we demonstrate that SMN is present in axons, but only during the period of robust motor axon outgrowth. We also conclusively demonstrate that SMN acts cell autonomously in motoneurons for proper motoneuron development. This includes the formation of both axonal and dendritic branches. Analysis of the peripheral nervous system revealed that Schwann cells and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons developed abnormally in mz-smn mutants. Schwann cells did not wrap axons tightly and had expanded nodes of Ranvier. The majority of DRG neurons had abnormally short peripheral axons and later many of them failed to divide and died. Expressing SMN just in motoneurons rescued both of these cell types showing that their failure to develop was secondary to the developmental defects in motoneurons. Driving SMN just in motoneurons did not increase survival of the animal, suggesting that SMN is needed for motoneuron development and motor circuitry, but that SMN in other cells types factors into survival.

  7. Transcriptional enhancement of Smn levels in motoneurons is crucial for proper axon morphology in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Spiró, Zoltán; Koh, Angela; Tay, Shermaine; See, Kelvin; Winkler, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    An unresolved mystery in the field of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is why a reduction of the ubiquitously expressed Smn protein causes defects mostly in motoneurons. We addressed the possibility that this restricted vulnerability stems from elevated Smn expression in motoneurons. To explore this, we established an ex vivo zebrafish culture system of GFP-marked motoneurons to quantitatively measure Smn protein and smn mRNA levels as well as promoter activity in motoneurons versus other cell types. Importantly, we uncovered that Smn levels are elevated in motoneurons by means of transcriptional activation. In addition, we identified the ETS family transcription factor Etv5b to be responsible for increased smn transcription in motoneurons. Moreover, we established that the additional supply of Smn protein in motoneurons is necessary for proper axonogenesis in a cell-autonomous manner. These findings demonstrate the reliance of motoneurons on more Smn, thereby adding a novel piece of evidence for their increased vulnerability under SMA conditions. PMID:27273160

  8. State-dependent control of lumbar motoneurons by the hypocretinergic system.

    PubMed

    Yamuy, Jack; Fung, Simon J; Xi, Mingchu; Chase, Michael H

    2010-02-01

    Neurons in the lateral hypothalamus (LH) that synthesize hypocretins (Hcrt-1 and Hcrt-2) are active during wakefulness and excite lumbar motoneurons. Because hypocretinergic cells also discharge during phasic periods of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, we sought to examine their action on the activity of motoneurons during this state. Accordingly, cat lumbar motoneurons were intracellularly recorded, under alpha-chloralose anesthesia, prior to (control) and during the carbachol-induced REM sleep-like atonia (REMc). During control conditions, LH stimulation induced excitatory postsynaptic potentials (composite EPSP) in motoneurons. In contrast, during REMc, identical LH stimulation induced inhibitory PSPs in motoneurons. We then tested the effects of LH stimulation on motoneuron responses following the stimulation of the nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis (NRGc) which is part of a brainstem-spinal cord system that controls motoneuron excitability in a state-dependent manner. LH stimulation facilitated NRGc stimulation-induced composite EPSP during control conditions whereas it enhanced NRGc stimulation-induced IPSPs during REMc. These intriguing data indicate that the LH exerts a state-dependent control of motor activity. As a first step to understand these results, we examined whether hypocretinergic synaptic mechanisms in the spinal cord were state dependent. We found that the juxtacellular application of Hcrt-1 induced motoneuron excitation during control conditions whereas motoneuron inhibition was enhanced during REMc. These data indicate that the hypocretinergic system acts on motoneurons in a state-dependent manner via spinal synaptic mechanisms. Thus, deficits in Hcrt-1 may cause the coexistence of incongruous motor signs in cataplectic patients, such as motor suppression during wakefulness and movement disorders during REM sleep. PMID:19962375

  9. Effects of background noise on the response of rat and cat motoneurones to excitatory current transients.

    PubMed Central

    Poliakov, A V; Powers, R K; Sawczuk, A; Binder, M D

    1996-01-01

    1. We studied the responses of rat hypoglossal motoneurones to excitatory current transients (ECTs) using a brainstem slice preparation. Steady, repetitive discharge at rates of 12-25 impulses s-1 was elicited from the motoneurones by injecting long (40 s) steps of constant current. Poisson trains of the ECTs were superimposed on these steps. The effects of additional synaptic noise was simulated by adding a zero-mean random process to the stimuli. 2. We measured the effects of the ECTs on motoneurone discharge probability by compiling peristimulus time histograms (PSTHs) between the times of occurrence of the ECTs and the motoneurone spikes. The ECTs produced modulation of motoneurone discharge similar to that produced by excitatory postsynaptic currents. 3. The addition of noise altered the pattern of the motoneurone response to the current transients: both the amplitude and the area of the PSTH peaks decreased as the power of the superimposed noise was increased. Noise tended to reduce the efficacy of the ECTs, particularly when the motoneurones were firing at lower frequencies. Although noise also increased the firing frequency of the motoneurones slightly, the effects of noise on ECT efficacy did not simply result from noise-induced changes in mean firing rate. 4. A modified version of the experimental protocol was performed in lumbar motoneurones of intact, pentobarbitone-anaesthetized cats. These recordings yielded results similar to those obtained in rat hypoglossal motoneurones in vitro. 5. Our results suggest that the presence of concurrent synaptic inputs reduces the efficacy of any one input. The implications of this change in efficacy and the possible underlying mechanisms are discussed. PMID:8866358

  10. Implantable optical-electrode device for stimulation of spinal motoneurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matveev, M. V.; Erofeev, A. I.; Zakharova, O. A.; Pyatyshev, E. N.; Kazakin, A. N.; Vlasova, O. L.

    2016-08-01

    Recent years, optogenetic method of scientific research has proved its effectiveness in the nerve cell stimulation tasks. In our article we demonstrate an implanted device for the spinal optogenetic motoneurons activation. This work is carried out in the Laboratory of Molecular Neurodegeneration of the Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University, together with Nano and Microsystem Technology Laboratory. The work of the developed device is based on the principle of combining fiber optic light stimulation of genetically modified cells with the microelectrode multichannel recording of neurons biopotentials. The paper presents a part of the electrode implant manufacturing technique, combined with the optical waveguide of ThorLabs (USA).

  11. Procion yellow staining of motoneurones in the frog.

    PubMed

    Czéh, G; Gueritaud, J P

    1975-01-01

    Intracellular recording and subsequent staining of spinal motoneurones in the frog was made by procion-filled micropipettes. Spike discharges in response to dorsal root (DR) and ventral root (VR) volleys as well as to direct current injections were studied. Reconstruction of the dendritic tree of the cell stained after recording was made from photomicrographs taken from frozen serial sections of the spinal cord. Migration of the dye into a neighbouring unimpaled cell was observed. The advantages of the procion injection technique in studying the frog's spinal cord physiology are discussed.

  12. Extensor motoneurone properties are altered immediately before and during fictive locomotion in the adult decerebrate rat

    PubMed Central

    MacDonell, C W; Power, K E; Chopek, J W; Gardiner, K R; Gardiner, P F

    2015-01-01

    Key points This is the first report, in adult decerebrate rats, to examine intracellular hindlimb motoneurone properties during quiescence, fictive locomotion and a tonic period immediately before fictive locomotion that is characterized by increased peripheral nerve activity. It is shown for the first time during fictive locomotion that motoneurones become more responsive in the tonic period, suggesting that the motoneurone pool becomes primed before patterned motor output commences. Spike frequency adaptation exists in quiescence and during fictive locomotion during constant excitation with injected current but not during centrally driven fictive locomotion. Motoneurones within the extensor motor pool show changes in excitability even when they are not directly involved in locomotion. The data show increased responsiveness of motoneurones during locomotion via a lowered threshold for spike initiation and decreased rheobase. Abstract This study examined motoneurone properties during fictive locomotion in the adult rat for the first time. Fictive locomotion was induced via electrical stimulation of the mesencephalic locomotor region in decerebrate adult rats under neuromuscular blockade to compare basic and rhythmic motoneurone properties in antidromically identified extensor motoneurones during: (1) quiescence, before and after fictive locomotion; (2) the ‘tonic’ period immediately preceding locomotor-like activity, whereby the amplitude of peripheral flexor (peroneal) and extensor (tibial) nerves are increased but alternation has not yet occurred; and (3) locomotor-like episodes. Locomotion was identified by alternating flexor–extensor nerve activity, where the motoneurone either produced membrane oscillations consistent with a locomotor drive potential (LDP) or did not display membrane oscillation during alternating nerve activity. Cells producing LDPs were referred to as such, while those that did not were referred to as ‘idle’ motoneurones. LDP and

  13. Accumulation of glycogen in axotomized adult rat facial motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Takezawa, Yosuke; Baba, Otto; Kohsaka, Shinichi; Nakajima, Kazuyuki

    2015-06-01

    This study biochemically determined glycogen content in the axotomized facial nucleus of adult rats up to 35 days postinsult. The amounts of glycogen in the transected facial nucleus were significantly increased at 5 days postinsult, peaked at 7 days postinsult, and declined to the control levels at 21-35 days postinsult. Immunohistochemical analysis with antiglycogen antibody revealed that the quantity of glycogen granules in the axotomized facial nucleus was greater than that in the control nucleus at 7 days postinjury. Dual staining methods with antiglycogen antibody and a motoneuron marker clarified that the glycogen was localized mainly in motoneurons. Immunoblotting and quantification analysis revealed that the ratio of inactive glycogen synthase (GS) to total GS was significantly decreased in the injured nucleus at about 1-3 days postinsult and significantly increased from 7 to 14 days postinsult, suggesting that glycogen is actively synthesized in the early period postinjury but suppressed after 7 days postinsult. The enhanced glycogen at about 5-7 days postinsult is suggested to be responsible for the decrease in inactive GS levels, and the decrease of glycogen after 7 days postinsult is considered to be caused by increased inactive GS levels and possibly the increase in active glycogen phosphorylase.

  14. Organization of lumbosacral motoneuronal cell groups innervating hindlimb, pelvic floor, and axial muscles in the cat.

    PubMed

    Vanderhorst, V G; Holstege, G

    1997-05-26

    In a study on descending pathways from the nucleus retroambiguus (NRA) to hindlimb motoneurons (see accompanying paper), it appeared impossible, using data from the literature, to precisely determine which muscles were innervated by the motoneurons receiving the NRA fibers. This lack of data made it necessary to produce a detailed map of the lumbosacral motoneuronal cell groups in the cat. Therefore, 50 different muscles or muscle compartments of hindlimb, pelvic floor and lower back were injected with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in 135 cases. The respective muscles were divided into ten groups: I, sartorius and iliopsoas; II, quadriceps; III, adductors; IV, hamstrings; V, gluteal and other proximal muscles of the hip; VI, posterior compartment of the distal hindlimb; VII, anterior compartment of the distal hindlimb; VIII, long flexors and intrinsic muscles of the foot; IX, pelvic floor muscles; and X, extensors of the lower back and tail. The L4-S2 segments were cut and incubated, and labeled motoneurons were counted and plotted. A new method was developed that made it possible, despite variations in size and segmental organization between the different cases, to compare the results of different cases. The results show that the spatial interrelationship between the hindlimb and pelvic floor lumbosacral motoneuronal cell groups remains constant. This finding enabled the authors to compose an accurate overall map of the location of lumbosacral motoneuronal cell groups. The general distribution of the motoneuronal cell groups is also discussed in respect to their dorsoventral, mediolateral, and rostrocaudal position within the lumbosacral ventral horn. PMID:9136811

  15. Noradrenergic Modulation of Intrinsic and Synaptic Properties of Lumbar Motoneurons in the Neonatal Rat Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Tartas, Maylis; Morin, France; Barrière, Grégory; Goillandeau, Michel; Lacaille, Jean-Claude; Cazalets, Jean-René; Bertrand, Sandrine S.

    2009-01-01

    Although it is known that noradrenaline (NA) powerfully controls spinal motor networks, few data are available regarding the noradrenergic (NAergic) modulation of intrinsic and synaptic properties of neurons in motor networks. Our work explores the cellular basis of NAergic modulation in the rat motor spinal cord. We first show that lumbar motoneurons express the three classes of adrenergic receptors at birth. Using patch-clamp recordings in the newborn rat spinal cord preparation, we characterized the effects of NA and of specific agonists of the three classes of adrenoreceptors on motoneuron membrane properties. NA increases the motoneuron excitability partly via the inhibition of a KIR like current. Methoxamine (α1), clonidine (α2) and isoproterenol (β) differentially modulate the motoneuron membrane potential but also increase motoneuron excitability, these effects being respectively inhibited by the antagonists prazosin (α1), yohimbine (α2) and propranolol (β). We show that the glutamatergic synaptic drive arising from the T13-L2 network is enhanced in motoneurons by NA, methoxamine and isoproterenol. On the other hand, NA, isoproterenol and clonidine inhibit both the frequency and amplitude of miniature glutamatergic EPSCs while methoxamine increases their frequency. The T13-L2 synaptic drive is thereby differentially modulated from the other glutamatergic synapses converging onto motoneurons and enhanced by presynaptic α1 and β receptor activation. Our data thus show that the NAergic system exerts a powerful and complex neuromodulation of lumbar motor networks in the neonatal rat spinal cord. PMID:20300468

  16. Axotomized neonatal motoneurons overexpressing the bcl2 proto-oncogene retain functional electrophysiological properties.

    PubMed Central

    Alberi, S; Raggenbass, M; de Bilbao, F; Dubois-Dauphin, M

    1996-01-01

    Bcl2 overexpression prevents axotomy-induced neuronal death of neonatal facial motoneurons, as defined by morphological criteria. However, the functional properties of these surviving lesioned transgenic neurons are unknown. Using transgenic mice overexpressing the protein Bcl2, we have investigated the bioelectrical properties of transgenic facial motoneurons from 7 to 20 days after neonatal unilateral axotomy using brain-stem slices and whole cell patch-clamp recording. Nonaxotomized facial motoneurons from wild-type and transgenic mice had similar properties; they had an input resistance of 38 +/- 6 M omega and fired repetitively after injection of positive current pulses. When cells were voltage-clamped at or near their resting membrane potential, alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA), N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA), or vasopressin generated sustained inward currents. In transgenic axotomized mice, facial motoneurons could be found located ipsilaterally to the lesion; they had an input resistance of 150 +/- 30 M omega, indicating that they were smaller in size, fired repetitively, and were also responsive to AMPA, NMDA, and vasopressin. Morphological measurements achieved 1 week after the lesion have shown that application of brain-derived neurotrophic factor prevented the reduction in size of axotomized transgenic motoneurons. These data indicate that Bcl2 not only prevents morphological apoptotic death of axotomized neonatal transgenic motoneurons but also permits motoneurons to conserve functional electrophysiological properties. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8633001

  17. A role for motoneuron subtype-selective ER stress in disease manifestations of FALS mice.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Smita; Cabuy, Erik; Caroni, Pico

    2009-05-01

    The mechanisms underlying disease manifestations in neurodegeneration remain unclear, but their understanding is critical to devising effective therapies. We carry out a longitudinal analysis in vivo of identified motoneurons selectively vulnerable (VUL) or resistant (RES) to motoneuron disease (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, ALS) and show that subtype-selective endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress responses influence disease manifestations. VUL motoneurons were selectively prone to ER stress and showed gradually upregulated ER stress markers from birth on in three mouse models of familial ALS (FALS). 25-30 days before the earliest denervations, ubiquitin signals increased in both VUL and RES motoneurons, but an unfolded protein response coupled with microglial activation was initiated selectively in VUL motoneurons. This transition was followed by selective axonal degeneration and spreading stress. The ER stress-protective agent salubrinal attenuated disease manifestations and delayed progression, whereas chronic enhancement of ER stress promoted disease. Thus, whereas all motoneurons are preferentially affected in ALS, ER stress responses in specific motoneuron subtypes influence the progressive manifestations of weakening and paralysis.

  18. Synaptic origin of the respiratory-modulated activity of laryngeal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Ono, K; Shiba, K; Nakazawa, K; Shimoyama, I

    2006-07-01

    To determine the synaptic source of the respiratory-related activity of laryngeal motoneurons, spike-triggered averaging of the membrane potentials of laryngeal motoneurons was conducted using spikes of respiratory neurons located between the Bötzinger complex and the rostral ventral respiratory group as triggers in decerebrate, paralyzed cats. We identified one excitatory and two inhibitory sources for inspiratory laryngeal motoneurons, and two inhibitory sources for expiratory laryngeal motoneurons. In inspiratory laryngeal motoneurons, monosynaptic excitatory postsynaptic potentials were evoked by spikes of inspiratory neurons with augmenting firing patterns, and monosynaptic inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) were evoked by spikes of expiratory neurons with decrementing firing patterns and by spikes of inspiratory neurons with decrementing firing patterns. In expiratory laryngeal motoneurons, monosynaptic IPSPs were evoked by spikes of inspiratory neurons with decrementing firing patterns and by spikes of expiratory neurons with augmenting firing patterns. We conclude that various synaptic inputs from respiratory neurons contribute to shaping the respiratory-related trajectory of membrane potential of laryngeal motoneurons.

  19. Postnatal development of alpha- and gamma-peroneal motoneurons in kittens: an ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Simon, M; Destombes, J; Horcholle-Bossavit, G; Thiesson, D

    1996-05-01

    Motoneurons innervating the peroneus brevis muscle of 1 week- and 3 week-old kittens were retrogradely labelled by HRP and examined by electron microscopy. At 1 week the distribution of mean cell body diameters was unimodal. Consequently alpha- and gamma-motoneurons could not be identified by their size. The aim of this study was to see whether the alpha- and gamma-motoneurons of kittens could be identified using the combination of ultrastructural criteria previously defined in the adult cat. Using these three criteria it was not possible to distinguish all the motoneurons as either alpha- or gamma in the kitten and a fourth criterion (frequency of F bouton profiles) was added to aid identification. However, with these four criteria, at 1 week six of 21 motoneurons and at 3 weeks two of 18 could still not be clearly identified as alpha or gamma (four were tentatively considered to be gamma, and four could not be identified). The maturation of alpha-motoneurons between 1 week and the adult was accompanied by an increase in somatic membrane area and a significant decrease in the somatic packing density of F boutons. On gamma-motoneurons there was a decrease in the somatic packing density of F boutons between 1 and 3 weeks. However, the numbers of F and S boutons remained stable for both motoneuron types. Age-related changes in apposition and active zone lengths of F and S boutons characterize the synaptic rearrangements which are occurring during the postnatal development of motoneurons. PMID:8808802

  20. Resistance of extraocular motoneuron terminals to effects of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis sera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mosier, D. R.; Siklos, L.; Appel, S. H.

    2000-01-01

    In sporadic ALS (s-ALS), axon terminals contain increased intracellular calcium. Passively transferred sera from patients with s-ALS increase intracellular calcium in spinal motoneuron terminals in vivo and enhance spontaneous transmitter release, a calcium-dependent process. In this study, passive transfer of s-ALS sera increased spontaneous release from spinal but not extraocular motoneuron terminals, suggesting that the resistance to physiologic abnormalities induced by s-ALS sera in mice parallels the resistance of extraocular motoneurons to dysfunction and degeneration in ALS.

  1. The minimal inhibitory synaptic currents evoked in neonatal rat motoneurones.

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, T

    1992-01-01

    1. Tight-seal whole-cell recordings were made from lumbar motoneurones visually identified in thin slices of neonatal rat spinal cord. The inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) were evoked by extracellular stimulation of a neighbouring internuncial neurone in the presence of glutamate receptor antagonists. 2. Glycinergic IPSCs were recorded in the presence of bicuculline. The IPSCs appeared in an all-or-none manner as the graded stimulus intensity exceeded a certain threshold. Their latencies showed a unimodal distribution with a mean of 0.81 ms at 37 degrees C. Thus, the observed IPSCs are suggested to be monosynaptically evoked unitary IPSCs. The mean conductance of unitary IPSCs was 2.9 +/- 1.2 nS (+/- S.D.). 3. When the external Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]o) was reduced, the number of failures in response to stimulation increased, thereby reducing the mean amplitude of IPSCs. The mean amplitude of IPSCs was linearly related to the [Ca2+]o (0.35-1.4 mM) with a mean slope of 3.1 +/- 0.67 on double logarithmic co-ordinates. 4. The amplitude of individual IPSCs decreased with decrease in [Ca2+]o. However, below 0.7 mM [Ca2+]o, the mean amplitude of IPSCs (excluding failures) reached a steady minimum level. The mean conductance of these IPSCs measured in 0.5 mM [Ca2+]o was 657 +/- 281 pS. 5. The minimal IPSCs had a coefficient of variation of 0.50 +/- 0.13. No clear correlation was observed between the rise time and the amplitude of minimal IPSCs evoked in individual motoneurones, indicating that the amplitude variability is not due to the different synaptic locations. 6. Spontaneous miniature IPSCs were recorded from motoneurones in the presence of tetrodotoxin. The miniature IPSCs had a mean conductance of 739 +/- 278 pS, being comparable to the minimal evoked IPSCs. 7. Under various internal and external Cl- concentration, the reversal potential of the IPSCs (EIPSC) approximately coincided with the Cl- equilibrium potential. A 730-fold change in the potassium

  2. Tracing of motoneurones and primary afferent projections after intracellular staining with Lucifer Yellow: dye-coupling.

    PubMed

    Adanina, V O; Shapovalov, A I; Shiriaev, B I; Tamarova, Z A

    1983-06-01

    Intracellular injection of the fluorescent dye Lucifer Yellow CH into single motoneurones of the isolated perfused frog spinal cord resulted in backfilling of presynaptic fibres originating from dorsal roots and ventrolateral funiculi. The dye transfer from primary sensory fibres into motoneurones was observed following application of Lucifer Yellow to the central end of the cut dorsal root. The dye-coupling coincides with electrical coupling at sensory-motor synapses presumably through gap junctions. The fluorescent primary afferent fibres were traced from the dorsal roots to the motor nucleus where they terminate the chains of swellings. Most swellings are located in dorsal horn and in the intermediate zone approximately 100-100 micrometers from the somata of motoneurones. A few varicosities are located ion the cell bodies of the motoneurones.

  3. RNA content in spinal cord motoneurons during hypokinesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorbunova, A. V.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of a diminished motor activity of rats upon the ribonucleic and (RNA) content in a single isolated motoneuron of frontal of their spinal cord was studied. Within a 1 to 30 day exposure of rats to the hypokinetic conditions, RNA content was found to decrease on the 1st, 3rd, and 5th day and to return to the initial level by the 7th day. No changes in RNA content were observed during the subsequent stages of the xperiments. The volume of the nerve cells declined on the 3rd and 5th day, whereas RNA concentration reduced on the 1st, 3rd, 5th, and 30th day.

  4. Identification of motoneurons supplying multiply- or singly-innervated extraocular muscle fibers in the rat.

    PubMed

    Eberhorn, A C; Büttner-Ennever, J A; Horn, A K E

    2006-02-01

    In mammals, the extraocular muscle fibers can be categorized in singly-innervated and multiply-innervated muscle fibers. In the monkey oculomotor, trochlear and abducens nucleus the motoneurons of multiply-innervated muscle fibers lie separated from those innervating singly-innervated muscle fibers and show different histochemical properties. In order to discover, if this organization is a general feature of the oculomotor system, we investigated the location of singly-innervated muscle fiber and multiply-innervated muscle fiber motoneurons in the rat using combined tract-tracing and immunohistochemical techniques. The singly-innervated muscle fiber and multiply-innervated muscle fiber motoneurons of the medial and lateral rectus muscle were identified by retrograde tracer injections into the muscle belly or the distal myotendinous junction. The belly injections labeled the medial rectus muscle subgroup of the oculomotor nucleus or the greatest part of abducens nucleus, including some cells outside the medial border of abducens nucleus. In contrast, the distal injections labeled only a subset of the medial rectus muscle motoneurons and exclusively cells outside the medial border of abducens nucleus. The tracer detection was combined with immunolabeling using antibodies for perineuronal nets (chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan) and non-phosphorylated neurofilaments. In monkeys both antibodies permit a distinction between singly-innervated muscle fiber and multiply-innervated muscle fiber motoneurons. The experiments revealed that neurons labeled from a distal injection lack both markers and are assumed to represent multiply-innervated muscle fiber motoneurons, whereas those labeled from a belly injection are chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan- and non-phosphorylated neurofilament-immunopositive and assumed to represent singly-innervated muscle fiber motoneurons. The overall identification of multiply-innervated muscle fiber and singly-innervated muscle fiber motoneurons

  5. Nitrergic innervation of trigeminal and hypoglossal motoneurons in the cat.

    PubMed

    Pose, Ines; Fung, Simon; Sampogna, Sharon; Chase, Michael H; Morales, Francisco R

    2005-04-11

    The present study was undertaken to determine the location of trigeminal and hypoglossal premotor neurons that express neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in the cat. Cholera toxin subunit b (CTb) was injected into the trigeminal (mV) or the hypoglossal (mXII) motor nuclei in order to label the corresponding premotor neurons. CTb immunocytochemistry was combined with NADPH-d histochemistry or nNOS immunocytochemistry to identify premotor nitrergic (NADPH-d(+)/CTb(+) or nNOS(+)/ CTb(+) double-labeled) neurons. Premotor trigeminal as well as premotor hypoglossal neurons were located in the ventro-medial medullary reticular formation in a region corresponding to the nucleus magnocellularis (Mc) and the ventral aspect of the nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis (NRGc). Following the injection of CTb into the mV, this region was found to contain a total of 60 +/- 15 double-labeled neurons on the ipsilateral side and 33 +/- 14 on the contralateral side. CTb injections into the mXII resulted in 40 +/- 17 double-labeled neurons in this region on the ipsilateral side and 16 +/- 5 on the contralateral side. Thus, we conclude that premotor trigeminal and premotor hypoglossal nitrergic cells coexist in the same medullary region. They are colocalized with a larger population of nitrergic cells (7200 +/- 23). Premotor neurons in other locations did not express nNOS. The present data demonstrate that a population of neurons within the Mc and the NRGc are the source of the nitrergic innervation of trigeminal and hypoglossal motoneurons. Based on the characteristics of nitric oxide actions and its diffusibility, we postulate that these neurons may serve to synchronize the activity of mV and mXII motoneurons. PMID:15804497

  6. Extensor motoneurone properties are altered immediately before and during fictive locomotion in the adult decerebrate rat.

    PubMed

    MacDonell, C W; Power, K E; Chopek, J W; Gardiner, K R; Gardiner, P F

    2015-05-15

    This study examined motoneurone properties during fictive locomotion in the adult rat for the first time. Fictive locomotion was induced via electrical stimulation of the mesencephalic locomotor region in decerebrate adult rats under neuromuscular blockade to compare basic and rhythmic motoneurone properties in antidromically identified extensor motoneurones during: (1) quiescence, before and after fictive locomotion; (2) the 'tonic' period immediately preceding locomotor-like activity, whereby the amplitude of peripheral flexor (peroneal) and extensor (tibial) nerves are increased but alternation has not yet occurred; and (3) locomotor-like episodes. Locomotion was identified by alternating flexor-extensor nerve activity, where the motoneurone either produced membrane oscillations consistent with a locomotor drive potential (LDP) or did not display membrane oscillation during alternating nerve activity. Cells producing LDPs were referred to as such, while those that did not were referred to as 'idle' motoneurones. LDP and idle motoneurones during locomotion had hyperpolarized spike threshold (Vth ; LDP: 3.8 mV; idle: 5.8 mV), decreased rheobase and an increased discharge rate (LDP: 64%; idle: 41%) during triangular ramp current injection even though the frequency-current slope was reduced by 70% and 55%, respectively. Modulation began in the tonic period immediately preceding locomotion, with a hyperpolarized Vth and reduced rheobase. Spike frequency adaptation did not occur in spiking LDPs or firing generated from sinusoidal current injection, but occurred during a sustained current pulse during locomotion. Input conductance showed no change. Results suggest motoneurone modulation occurs across the pool and is not restricted to motoneurones engaged in locomotion. PMID:25809835

  7. Motoneuron axon pathfinding errors in zebrafish: Differential effects related to concentration and timing of nicotine exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Menelaou, Evdokia; Paul, Latoya T.; Perera, Surangi N.; Svoboda, Kurt R.

    2015-04-01

    Nicotine exposure during embryonic stages of development can affect many neurodevelopmental processes. In the developing zebrafish, exposure to nicotine was reported to cause axonal pathfinding errors in the later born secondary motoneurons (SMNs). These alterations in SMN axon morphology coincided with muscle degeneration at high nicotine concentrations (15–30 μM). Previous work showed that the paralytic mutant zebrafish known as sofa potato exhibited nicotine-induced effects onto SMN axons at these high concentrations but in the absence of any muscle deficits, indicating that pathfinding errors could occur independent of muscle effects. In this study, we used varying concentrations of nicotine at different developmental windows of exposure to specifically isolate its effects onto subpopulations of motoneuron axons. We found that nicotine exposure can affect SMN axon morphology in a dose-dependent manner. At low concentrations of nicotine, SMN axons exhibited pathfinding errors, in the absence of any nicotine-induced muscle abnormalities. Moreover, the nicotine exposure paradigms used affected the 3 subpopulations of SMN axons differently, but the dorsal projecting SMN axons were primarily affected. We then identified morphologically distinct pathfinding errors that best described the nicotine-induced effects on dorsal projecting SMN axons. To test whether SMN pathfinding was potentially influenced by alterations in the early born primary motoneuron (PMN), we performed dual labeling studies, where both PMN and SMN axons were simultaneously labeled with antibodies. We show that only a subset of the SMN axon pathfinding errors coincided with abnormal PMN axonal targeting in nicotine-exposed zebrafish. We conclude that nicotine exposure can exert differential effects depending on the levels of nicotine and developmental exposure window. - Highlights: • Embryonic nicotine exposure can specifically affect secondary motoneuron axons in a dose-dependent manner.

  8. [Modern knowledge about the mechanism of the transsynaptic interactions of motoneurons and skeletal muscles].

    PubMed

    Mikhaĭlov, V V

    2002-01-01

    Are cited data about identification regulators of materials non-mediators of the nature executing direct and return (ortho- and retrograde) interplay of motoneurons and myocytes of a skeletal musculation. Neuro- and myotrophogenes are submitted by polypeptide materials dispossessed by specific specificity. The definite functional properties and endocellular processes in muscle cages and motoneurons are adjusted by miscellaneous kinds conforming neuro- and myotrophogenes. PMID:12449810

  9. Marked and variable inhibition by chemical fixation of cytochrome oxidase and succinate dehydrogenase in single motoneurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chalmers, G. R.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of tissue fixation on succinate dehydrogenase and cytochrome oxidase activity in single motoneurons of the rat was demonstrated using a computer image processing system. Inhibition of enzyme activity by chemical fixation was variable, with some motoneurons being affected more than others. It was concluded that quantification of enzymatic activity in chemically fixed tissue provides an imprecise estimate of enzyme activities found in fresh-frozen tissues.

  10. Effects of acute dorsal spinal hemisection on motoneuron discharge in the medial gastrocnemius of the decerebrate cat.

    PubMed

    Powers, R K; Rymer, W Z

    1988-05-01

    1. The discharge of single alpha-motoneuron axons was recorded from small cut filaments of the medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscle nerve in the decerebrated cat preparation before and after a dorsal hemisection of the thoracic spinal cord. The remainder of the MG muscle nerve was left intact, and muscle force and multiunit electromyographic (EMG) activity were recorded along with alpha-motoneuron discharge, while motor output was varied by manual stimulation of the contralateral hindlimb. 2. We recorded activity in 32 motoneurons before and after the spinal lesion, and pre- and postlesion recruitment forces and minimum firing rates were determined for 30 of these. Postlesion decreases in minimum firing rates were observed in 25/30 motoneurons, and decreases in recruitment force were seen in 21/30 motoneurons. The remaining motoneurons, which generally had low presection recruitment forces and minimum rates, exhibited postlesion increases in both parameters (see below). 3. The effects of the spinal lesion on the recruitment force and minimum firing rate of a motoneuron were related to the prelesion values of these parameters; the largest postlesion decreases were seen in motoneurons with the highest prelesion rates and recruitment forces. Spinal lesions thus acted to shift and compress the range of recruitment forces and minimum firing rates, so that after the lesion all motoneurons tended to exhibit discharge behavior typical of that seen only in the lowest threshold motoneurons before the lesion. In addition, motoneurons with low prelesion recruitment forces (less than 1.0 N of active force) generally showed an increase in recruitment force after the lesion, indicating that the lesion may have led to changes in the prelesion recruitment order. Direct evidence of recruitment reversals was obtained in 4/14 experiments where two or more motoneurons were followed pre- and postlesion. 4. The lesion-induced changes in motoneuron discharge characteristics were associated

  11. Serotonin differentially modulates the intrinsic properties of spinal motoneurons from the adult turtle

    PubMed Central

    Perrier, Jean-François; Cotel, Florence

    2008-01-01

    This report considers serotonergic (5-HT) effects on spinal motoneurons, reviewing previous data and presenting a new study showing distinct effects of two 5-HT receptor subtypes. We previously investigated the effects of 5-HT on motoneurons in a slice preparation from the spinal cord of the adult turtle. In agreement with previous studies, we had found that 5-HT applied to the extracellular medium promoted a voltage sensitive plateau potential. However, we also reported that this effect was only observed in half of the motoneurons; 5-HT inhibited the firing of the other half of the motoneurons recorded from. To investigate the reasons for this, we applied 5-HT focally by means of the microiontophoresis technique. Facilitation of plateau potentials was observed when 5-HT was released at sites throughout the somatodendritic region. However, motoneurons were inhibited by 5-HT when selectively applied in the perisomatic region. These two effects could be induced in the same motoneuron. With pharmacological tools, we demonstrate here that the facilitation of plateau potentials is mediated by 5-HT2 receptors and the inhibitory effect is due to the activation of 5-HT1A/7 receptors. PMID:18096602

  12. Pattern of innervation and recruitment of different classes of motoneurons in adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Ampatzis, Konstantinos; Song, Jianren; Ausborn, Jessica; El Manira, Abdeljabbar

    2013-06-26

    In vertebrates, spinal circuits drive rhythmic firing in motoneurons in the appropriate sequence to produce locomotor movements. These circuits become active early during development and mature gradually to acquire the flexibility necessary to accommodate the increased behavioral repertoire of adult animals. The focus here is to elucidate how different pools of motoneurons are organized and recruited and how membrane properties contribute to their mode of operation. For this purpose, we have used the in vitro preparation of adult zebrafish. We show that different motoneuron pools are organized in a somatotopic fashion in the motor column related to the type of muscle fibers (slow, intermediate, fast) they innervate. During swimming, the different motoneuron pools are recruited in a stepwise manner from slow, to intermediate, to fast to cover the full range of locomotor frequencies seen in intact animals. The spike threshold, filtering properties, and firing patterns of the different motoneuron pools are graded in a manner that relates to their order of recruitment. Our results thus show that motoneurons in adult zebrafish are organized into distinct modules, each with defined locations, properties, and recruitment patterns tuned to precisely match the muscle properties and hence produce swimming of different speeds and modalities. PMID:23804107

  13. Tonic inhibition and ponto-geniculo-occipital-related activities shape abducens motoneuron discharge during REM sleep.

    PubMed

    Escudero, Miguel; Márquez-Ruiz, Javier

    2008-07-15

    Eye movements, ponto-geniculo-occipital (PGO) waves, muscular atonia and desynchronized cortical activity are the main characteristics of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Although eye movements designate this phase, little is known about the activity of the oculomotor system during REM sleep. In this work, we recorded binocular eye movements by the scleral search-coil technique and the activity of identified abducens (ABD) motoneurons along the sleep-wake cycle in behaving cats. The activity of ABD motoneurons during REM sleep was characterized by a tonic decrease of their mean firing rate throughout this period, and short bursts and pauses coinciding with the occurrence of PGO waves. We demonstrate that the decrease in the mean firing discharge was due to an active inhibition of ABD motoneurons, and that the occurrence of primary and secondary PGO waves induced a pattern of simultaneous but opposed phasic activation and inhibition on each ABD nucleus. With regard to eye movements, during REM sleep ABD motoneurons failed to codify eye position as during alertness, but continued to codify eye velocity. The pattern of tonic inhibition and the phasic activations and inhibitions shown by ABD motoneurons coincide with those reported in other non-oculomotor motoneurons, indicating that the oculomotor system - contrary to what has been accepted until now - is not different from other motor systems during REM sleep, and that all motor systems are receiving similar command signals during this period.

  14. Mutant SOD1-expressing astrocytes release toxic factors that trigger motoneuron death by inducing hyperexcitability.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Elsa; Izaurieta, Pamela; Weiss, Alexandra; Mir, Franco R; Rojas, Patricio; Gonzalez, David; Rojas, Fabiola; Brown, Robert H; Madrid, Rodolfo; van Zundert, Brigitte

    2013-06-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating paralytic disorder caused by dysfunction and degeneration of motoneurons starting in adulthood. Recent studies using cell or animal models document that astrocytes expressing disease-causing mutations of human superoxide dismutase 1 (hSOD1) contribute to the pathogenesis of ALS by releasing a neurotoxic factor(s). Neither the mechanism by which this neurotoxic factor induces motoneuron death nor its cellular site of action has been elucidated. Here we show that acute exposure of primary wild-type spinal cord cultures to conditioned medium derived from astrocytes expressing mutant SOD1 (ACM-hSOD1(G93A)) increases persistent sodium inward currents (PC(Na)), repetitive firing, and intracellular calcium transients, leading to specific motoneuron death days later. In contrast to TTX, which paradoxically increased twofold the amplitude of calcium transients and killed motoneurons, reduction of hyperexcitability by other specific (mexiletine) and nonspecific (spermidine and riluzole) blockers of voltage-sensitive sodium (Na(v)) channels restored basal calcium transients and prevented motoneuron death induced by ACM-hSOD1(G93A). These findings suggest that riluzole, the only FDA-approved drug with known benefits for ALS patients, acts by inhibiting hyperexcitability. Together, our data document that a critical element mediating the non-cell-autonomous toxicity of ACM-hSOD1(G93A) on motoneurons is increased excitability, an observation with direct implications for therapy of ALS. PMID:23486205

  15. Reversal of the late phase of spike frequency adaptation in cat spinal motoneurons during fictive locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Brownstone, Robert M.; Krawitz, Sherry; Jordan, Larry M.

    2016-01-01

    In spinal motoneurons, late spike frequency adaptation (SFA) is defined as the slowing of the firing rate over tens of seconds and can be seen during sustained or intermittent current injection. Although the function of late SFA is not known, it may result in a decrease in force production over time, or muscle fatigue. Because locomotion can persist for long periods of time without fatigue, late SFA was studied using intracellular recordings from adult cat motoneurons during fictive locomotion. Of eight lumbar motoneurons studied, all showed late adaptation during control conditions, but none demonstrated late adaptation during locomotor activity. The most consistent properties that correlated with the presence or absence of late SFA were those related to availability of fast, inactivating sodium channels, particularly action potential rate of rise. Evidence of the reversal of late SFA during locomotion was present for several minutes following locomotor trials, consistent with the suggestion that SFA is modulated through slow metabotropic pathways. The abolition of late adaptation in spinal motoneurons during fictive locomotion is an example of a state-dependent change in the “intrinsic” properties of mammalian motoneurons. This change contributes to increased excitability of motoneurons during locomotion and results in robust firing during sustained locomotion. PMID:21177992

  16. Manual cervical traction reduces alpha-motoneuron excitability in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Bradnam, L; Rochester, L; Vujnovich, A

    2000-01-01

    The excitability of the Flexor Carpi Radialis alpha-motoneuron pool following manual cervical traction was assessed in twenty asymptomatic subjects, and compared to a hands only intervention. The excitability of the alpha-motoneuron pool was measured indirectly using the Hoffmann (H) reflex. H-reflex recruitment curves were taken to assess the number of alpha-motoneurons (alpha-motoneurons) firing in response to a given incremental increase in stimulation intensity. The rate of rise of the slope of the H-reflex recruitment curve (Hslp) was assessed using linear regression. Following manual cervical traction Hslp was significantly lower than pre-intervention trials. Manual cervical traction, therefore, reduced the excitability of the Flexor Carpi Radialis alpha-motoneuron pool. This effect was mediated by the central nervous system. There was no significant decrease in alpha-motoneuron excitability following the hands only intervention. Hslp was shown to be a more sensitive measure of changes in the H-reflex than the more traditional parameter of Hmax/Mmax ratio and should be used in future studies of this nature.

  17. Reversal of the late phase of spike frequency adaptation in cat spinal motoneurons during fictive locomotion.

    PubMed

    Brownstone, Robert M; Krawitz, Sherry; Jordan, Larry M

    2011-03-01

    In spinal motoneurons, late spike frequency adaptation (SFA) is defined as the slowing of the firing rate over tens of seconds and can be seen during sustained or intermittent current injection. Although the function of late SFA is not known, it may result in a decrease in force production over time, or muscle fatigue. Because locomotion can persist for long periods of time without fatigue, late SFA was studied using intracellular recordings from adult cat motoneurons during fictive locomotion. Of eight lumbar motoneurons studied, all showed late adaptation during control conditions, but none demonstrated late adaptation during locomotor activity. The most consistent properties that correlated with the presence or absence of late SFA were those related to availability of fast, inactivating sodium channels, particularly action potential rate of rise. Evidence of the reversal of late SFA during locomotion was present for several minutes following locomotor trials, consistent with the suggestion that SFA is modulated through slow metabotropic pathways. The abolition of late adaptation in spinal motoneurons during fictive locomotion is an example of a state-dependent change in the "intrinsic" properties of mammalian motoneurons. This change contributes to increased excitability of motoneurons during locomotion and results in robust firing during sustained locomotion. PMID:21177992

  18. Drive latencies in hypoglossal motoneurons indicate developmental change in the brainstem respiratory network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fietkiewicz, Christopher; Loparo, Kenneth A.; Wilson, Christopher G.

    2011-10-01

    The respiratory rhythm originates and diverges from the brainstem to drive thousands of motoneurons that are responsible for control of the diaphragm, intercostals and upper airway. These motoneurons are known to have a wide range of phase relationships, even within a single motoneuron pool. The proposed source of this rhythm, the preBötzinger complex (preBötC), responds to an array of developmental changes in the first days post-birth, specifically at postnatal day 3 (P3). We hypothesize that such developmental changes in the preBötC have a direct effect on motoneuron phase relationships and should be detectable around age P3. To test our hypothesis, we obtained single- and dual-voltage-clamp recordings of hypoglossal motoneurons in an in vitro slice preparation. We introduce a novel approach to analyzing the phase relationships between motoneurons by using cross-correlation analysis to determine the drive latencies. This analysis reveals that the distribution of drive latencies undergoes a significant change at or before age P3. We use a computational model of the in vitro slice to demonstrate the observed phase differences and hypothesize that network heterogeneity alone may not be sufficient to explain them. Through simulations, we show the effects on the preBötC of different network characteristics such as clustering and common inputs.

  19. Synaptic Connectivity between Renshaw Cells and Motoneurons in the Recurrent Inhibitory Circuit of the Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Niall J.; Bhumbra, Gardave S.; Foster, Joshua D.

    2015-01-01

    Renshaw cells represent a fundamental component of one of the first discovered neuronal circuits, but their function in motor control has not been established. They are the only central neurons that receive collateral projections from motor outputs, yet the efficacy of the excitatory synapses from single and converging motoneurons remains unknown. Here we present the results of dual whole-cell recordings from identified, synaptically connected Renshaw cell-motoneuron pairs in the mouse lumbar spinal cord. The responses from single Renshaw cells demonstrate that motoneuron synapses elicit large excitatory conductances with few or no failures. We show that the strong excitatory input from motoneurons results from a high probability of neurotransmitter release onto multiple postsynaptic contacts. Dual current-clamp recordings confirm that single motoneuron inputs were sufficient to depolarize the Renshaw cell beyond threshold for firing. Reciprocal connectivity was observed in approximately one-third of the paired recordings tested. Ventral root stimulation was used to evoke currents from Renshaw cells or motoneurons to characterize responses of single neurons to the activation of their corresponding presynaptic cell populations. Excitatory or inhibitory synaptic inputs in the recurrent inhibitory loop induced substantial effects on the excitability of respective postsynaptic cells. Quantal analysis estimates showed a large number of converging inputs from presynaptic motoneuron and Renshaw cell populations. The combination of considerable synaptic efficacy and extensive connectivity within the recurrent circuitry indicates a role of Renshaw cells in modulating motor outputs that may be considerably more important than has been previously supposed. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We have recently shown that Renshaw cells mediate powerful shunt inhibition on motoneuron excitability. Here we complete a quantitative description of the recurrent circuit using recordings of

  20. Morphology of spinal motoneurones mediating a cutaneous spinal reflex in the cat.

    PubMed

    Egger, M D; Freeman, N C; Proshansky, E

    1980-09-01

    1. Intracellular injections of horseradish peroxidase were made in a functionally identified population of motoneurones in spinal cords of cats. These motoneurones were activated by tactile stimulation of the hind-limb central foot pad. 2. Cell bodies of twenty-two such motoneurones were located in the dorsolateral portion of the ventral horn in the first sacral segment. The mean diameter of the major axis of transverse sections through twelve of these cell bodies was 68 . 2 micrometer, the mean diameter of the minor axis was 48 . 7 micrometer. The major axis tended to be oriented dorsomedially-ventrolaterally. 3. In the transverse plane, the dendrites had a characteristic configuration, with a prominent group of dendrites travelling from the cell body dorsomedially into the dorsal horn, entering Rexed's lamina VI. For seventeen motoneurones with well stained dendrites, the mean medial spread of the dendrites was 960 micrometer. Though the mean lateral spread was only 508 micrometer, all of these motoneurones sent dendritic projections into the lateral white matter. The mean dorsal spread of the dendrites was 693 micrometer, the mean ventral spread, 748 micrometer. In the rostrocaudal direction, the mean spread rostrally was 911 micrometer, the mean spread caudally was 998 micrometer. The maximum dendritic spread for a single motoneurone was 2,940 micrometer, in the rostro caudal direction. The sum of dendritic lengths over an entire dendritic tree for the best-stained motoneurones exceeded 13,000 micrometer. 4. The mean diameter of the initial segment of axons of nineteen motoneurones was 4 . 3 micrometer. These axons were notable for the lack or paucity of axon collaterals. Only five of twenty-one axons possessed collaterals; of these, only one possessed more than a single collateral system. This sparseness of the collateral system was reflected in a low level of recurrent inhibition. 5. A possible relationship is discussed between the prominent dorsomedially

  1. Changes in electrophysiological properties of cat hypoglossal motoneurons during carbachol-induced motor inhibition.

    PubMed

    Fung, S J; Yamuy, J; Xi, M C; Engelhardt, J K; Morales, F R; Chase, M H

    2000-12-01

    The control of hypoglossal motoneurons during sleep is important from a basic science perspective as well as to understand the bases for pharyngeal occlusion which results in the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. In the present work, we used intracellular recording techniques to determine changes in membrane properties in adult cats in which atonia was produced by the injection of carbachol into the pontine tegmentum (AS-carbachol). During AS-carbachol, 86% of the recorded hypoglossal motoneurons were found to be postsynaptically inhibited on the basis of analyses of their electrical properties; the electrical properties of the remaining 14% were similar to motoneurons recorded during control conditions. Those cells that exhibited changes in their electrical properties during AS-carbachol also displayed large-amplitude inhibitory synaptic potentials. Following sciatic nerve stimulation, hypoglossal motoneurons which responded with a depolarizing potential during control conditions exhibited a hyperpolarizing potential during AS-carbachol. Both spontaneous and evoked inhibitory potentials recorded during AS-carbachol were comparable to those that have been previously observed in trigeminal and spinal cord motoneurons under similar experimental conditions as well as during naturally occurring active sleep. Calculations based on modeling the changes that we found in input resistance and membrane time constant with a three-compartment neuron model suggest that shunts are present in all three compartments of the hypoglossal motoneuron model. Taken together, these data indicate that postsynaptic inhibitory drives are widely distributed on the soma-dendritic tree of hypoglossal motoneurons during AS-carbachol. These postsynaptic inhibitory actions are likely to be involved in the pathophysiology of obstructive sleep apnea. PMID:11102580

  2. Dynamics of free intracellular Ca2+ during synaptic and spike activity of cricket tibial motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Baden, Tom; Hedwig, Berthold

    2009-04-01

    For all nervous systems, motoneurons are the main output pathway. They are involved in generating episodic motor activity as well as enduring motor rhythms. To determine whether changes in cytosolic Ca(2+) correlate with motor performance, we studied the spatiotemporal dynamics, mode of entry and role of free intracellular Ca(2+) in cricket (Gryllus bimaculatus) front leg tibial extensor and flexor motoneurons. Synaptic activation or intracellular depolarising current injection uniformly increased Ca(2+) with the same dynamics throughout the primary and secondary branches of the dendritic tree of all motoneurons. Ca(2+) rise times (mean tau(rise), 233-295 ms) were lower than decay times (mean tau(decay), 1927-1965 ms), and resulted in a Ca(2+) plateau during repetitive activation, such as during walking. The neurons therefore operate with a different Ca(2+) level during walking than during episodic leg movements. Ca(2+) enters the dendritic processes of motoneurons via a voltage-activated mechanism. Entry is driven by subthreshold excitation, and is largely independent of the neurons' spiking activity. To what extent ligand-activated mechanisms of Ca(2+) entry operate remains uncertain. We found no evidence for any prominent Ca(2+)-activated secondary currents in these motoneurons. Excitatory postsynaptic potentials evoked by extracellular stimulation of descending neurons were unaffected by the level of free intracellular Ca(2+). The activity of tibial motoneurons therefore appears to be only weakly dependent on the level of free intracellular Ca(2+) in dendrites. This is different to what has been found for many other neurons studied, and may represent an essential prerequisite for insect motoneurons to support a wide range of both episodic and rhythmic motor sequences underlying behaviour.

  3. Basic electrophysiological properties of spinal cord motoneurons during old age in the cat.

    PubMed

    Morales, F R; Boxer, P A; Fung, S J; Chase, M H

    1987-07-01

    1. The electrophysiological properties of alpha-motoneurons in old cats (14-15 yr) were compared with those of adult cats (1-3 yr). These properties were measured utilizing intracellular recording and stimulating techniques. 2. Unaltered in the old cat motoneurons were the membrane potential, action potential amplitude, and slopes of the initial segment (IS) and soma dendritic (SD) spikes, as well as the duration and amplitude of the action potential's afterhyperpolarization. 3. In contrast, the following changes in the electrophysiological properties of lumbar motoneurons were found in the old cats: a decrease in axonal conduction velocity, a shortening of the IS-SD delay, an increase in input resistance, and a decrease in rheobase. 4. In spite of these considerable changes in motoneuron properties in the old cat, normal correlations between different electrophysiological properties were maintained. The following key relationships, among others, were the same in adult and old cat motoneurons: membrane potential polarization versus action potential amplitude, duration of the afterhyperpolarization versus motor axon conduction velocity, and rheobase versus input conductance. 5. A review of the existing literature reveals that neither chronic spinal cord section nor deafferentation (13, 21) in adult animals produce the changes observed in old cats. Thus we consider it unlikely that a loss of synaptic contacts was responsible for the modifications in electrophysiological properties observed in old cat motoneurons. 6. We conclude that during old age there are significant changes in the soma-dendritic portion of cat motoneurons, as indicated by the modifications found in input resistance, rheobase, and IS-SD delay, as well as significant changes in their axons, as indicated by a decrease in conduction velocity. PMID:3612223

  4. Spinal commissural connections to motoneurons controlling the primate hand and wrist.

    PubMed

    Soteropoulos, Demetris S; Edgley, Steve A; Baker, Stuart N

    2013-06-01

    Left-right coordination is essential for locomotor movements and is partly mediated by spinal commissural systems. Such coordination is also essential for reaching and manipulation in primates, but the role of spinal commissural systems here has not been studied. We investigated commissural connectivity to motoneurons innervating forelimb muscles using intracellular recordings in acutely anesthetized macaque monkeys. In 57 of 81 motoneurons, synaptic responses (52 of 57 excitatory) were evoked after contralateral intraspinal microstimulation in the gray matter (cISMS; 300 μA maximum current intensity). Some responses (15 of 57) occurred at latencies compatible with a monosynaptic linkage, including in motoneurons projecting to intrinsic hand muscles (9 cells). Three pieces of evidence suggest that these effects reflected the action of commissural interneurons. In two cells, preceding cISMS with stimulation of the contralateral medial brainstem descending pathways facilitated the motoneuron responses, suggesting that cISMS acted on cell bodies whose excitability was increased by descending inputs. Pairing cISMS with stimulation of the contralateral corticospinal tract yielded no evidence of response occlusion in 16 cells tested, suggesting that the effects were not merely axon reflexes generated by stimulation of corticospinal axon branches, which cross the midline. Finally, stimulation of contralateral peripheral nerves evoked responses in 28 of 52 motoneurons (7 of 9 projecting to the hand). Our results demonstrate the existence of commissural neurons with access to spinal motoneurons in primate cervical spinal cord that receive inputs from the periphery as well as descending pathways. Most importantly, commissural neurons also innervate motoneurons of intrinsic hand muscles.

  5. Transplanted Oligodendrocytes and Motoneuron Progenitors Generated from Human Embryonic Stem Cells Promote Locomotor Recovery After Spinal Cord Transection

    PubMed Central

    Erceg, Slaven; Ronaghi, Mohammad; Oria, Marc; García Roselló, Mireia; Aragó, Maria Amparo Pérez; Lopez, Maria Gomez; Radojevic, Ivana; Moreno-Manzano, Victoria; Rodríguez-Jiménez, Francisco-Javier; Shanker Bhattacharya, Shom; Cordoba, Juan; Stojkovic, Miodrag

    2010-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) hold great promise for the treatment of patients with many neurodegenerative diseases particularly those arising from cell loss or neural dysfunction including spinal cord injury. This study evaluates the therapeutic effects of transplanted hESC-derived oligodendrocyte progenitors (OPC) and/or motoneuron progenitors (MP) on axonal remyelination and functional recovery of adult rats after complete spinal cord transection. OPC and/or MP were grafted into the site of injury in the acute phase. Based on Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan scores recovery of locomotor function was significantly enhanced in rats treated with OPC and/or MP when compared with control animals. When transplanted into the spinal cord immediately after complete transection, OPC and MP survived, migrated, and differentiated into mature oligodendrocytes and neurons showing in vivo electrophysiological activity. Taken together, these results indicate that OPC and MP derived from hESC could be a useful therapeutic strategy to repair injured spinal cord. Stem Cells 2010; 28:1541–1549. PMID:20665739

  6. Toll-like receptor 2-mediated alternative activation of microglia is protective after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Stirling, David P; Cummins, Karen; Mishra, Manoj; Teo, Wulin; Yong, V Wee; Stys, Peter

    2014-03-01

    Improving neurological outcome after spinal cord injury is a major clinical challenge because axons, once severed, do not regenerate but 'dieback' from the lesion site. Although microglia, the immunocompetent cells of the brain and spinal cord respond rapidly to spinal cord injury, their role in subsequent injury or repair remains unclear. To assess the role of microglia in spinal cord white matter injury we used time-lapse two-photon and spectral confocal imaging of green fluorescent protein-labelled microglia, yellow fluorescent protein-labelled axons, and Nile Red-labelled myelin of living murine spinal cord and revealed dynamic changes in white matter elements after laser-induced spinal cord injury in real time. Importantly, our model of acute axonal injury closely mimics the axonopathy described in well-characterized clinically relevant models of spinal cord injury including contusive-, compressive- and transection-based models. Time-lapse recordings revealed that microglia were associated with some acute pathophysiological changes in axons and myelin acutely after laser-induced spinal cord injury. These pathophysiological changes included myelin and axonal spheroid formation, spectral shifts in Nile Red emission spectra in axonal endbulbs detected with spectral microscopy, and 'bystander' degeneration of axons that survived the initial injury, but then succumbed to secondary degeneration. Surprisingly, modulation of microglial-mediated release of neurotoxic molecules failed to protect axons and myelin. In contrast, sterile stimulation of microglia with the specific toll-like receptor 2 agonist Pam2CSK4 robustly increased the microglial response to ablation, reduced secondary degeneration of central myelinated fibres, and induced an alternative (mixed M1:M2) microglial activation profile. Conversely, Tlr2 knock out: Thy1 yellow fluorescent protein double transgenic mice experienced greater axonal dieback than littermate controls. Thus, promoting an alternative

  7. Dependence of phrenic motoneurone output on the oscillatory component of arterial blood gas composition.

    PubMed Central

    Cross, B A; Grant, B J; Guz, A; Jones, P W; Semple, S J; Stidwill, R P

    1979-01-01

    1. The hypothesis that respiratory oscillations of arterial blood gas composition influence ventilation has been examined. 2. Phrenic motoneurone output recorded in the C5 root of the left phrenic nerve and the respiratory oscillations of arterial pH in the right common carotid artery were measured in vagotomized anaesthetized dogs which had been paralysed and artificially ventilated. 3. The effect of a change in tidal volume for one or two breaths on phrenic motoneurone output was measured with the inspiratory pump set at a constant frequency similar to, and in phase with, the animal's own respiratory frequency. A reduction of tidal volume to zero or an increase by 30% led to a corresponding change of mean carotid artery pH level. The changes of carotid artery pH resulted in a change of phrenic motoneurone output, predominantly of expiratory time (Te) but to a lesser extent of inspiratory time (T1) and also peak amplitude of 'integrated' phrenic motoneurone output (Phr). Denervation of the carotid bifurcation blocked this response. 4. The onset of movement of the inspiratory pump was triggered by the onset of phrenic motoneurone output. When a time delay was interposed between them, the phase relationship between respiratory oscillations of arterial pH and phrenic motoneurone output altered. The dominant effect was to alter Te; smaller and less consistent changes of Phr and T1 were observed. 5. When the inspiratory pump was maintained at a constant frequency but independent of and slightly different from the animal's own respiratory frequency (as judged by phrenic motoneurone output), the phase relationship between phrenic motoneurone output and the respiratory oscillations of pH changed breath by breath over a sequence of 100-200 breaths, without change of the mean level of arterial blood gas composition. Te varied by up to 30% about its mean value depending on the phase relationship. Ti and Phr were also dependent on the phase relationship but varied to a lesser

  8. Activation patterns of embryonic chick lumbosacral motoneurones following large spinal cord reversals.

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, M W

    1987-01-01

    1. Embryonic chick motoneurones were caused to innervate inappropriate hindlimb muscles by rotating the presumptive lumbosacral region of the neural tube in stage 15-16 embryos which is prior to the outgrowth of motoneurone axons. 2. The activation patterns of motoneurones in control and spinal cord reversal embryos were analysed from electromyographic (e.m.g.) recordings of stage 36 limb muscles during evoked movement sequences in an isolated spinal cord-limb preparation. Histograms representing the frequency of activation were constructed for each muscle. The muscle's pattern of activation was classified as flexor-like or extensor-like and compared to the activation patterns of control muscles. 3. A series of control operations was performed in which the prospective lumbosacral region of the neural tube was removed and replaced in its original orientation. Muscles in these embryos were innervated by their normal motoneurone pools and they were activated normally, indicating that the neural tube operation per se does not alter the activation pattern of motoneurones. Furthermore, some muscles (twelve out of sixty-one) in spinal cord reversal embryos had normal activation patterns and appeared to be innervated by their original motoneurones. Based on these results and the result of a previous study (Landmesser & O'Donovan, 1984 b), it is concluded that motoneurones in reversed spinal cords are activated in a manner appropriate for their original identity. 4. The majority of muscles (thirty-three out of sixty-one) in large spinal cord reversal embryos were activated during an appropriate phase of the kicking cycle. Of the remaining muscles, 16% were activated inappropriately (i.e. extensor muscles were activated as flexors, and vice versa), and 30% had a novel 'mixed' flexor- and extensor-like activation pattern. However, the activation pattern of most muscles differed markedly from that of any other control muscles regardless of whether the muscle was activated

  9. Developmental nicotine exposure disrupts dendritic arborization patterns of hypoglossal motoneurons in the neonatal rat.

    PubMed

    Powell, Gregory L; Gaddy, Joshua; Xu, Fei; Fregosi, Ralph F; Levine, Richard B

    2016-10-01

    Maternal smoking or use of other products containing nicotine during pregnancy can have significant adverse consequences for respiratory function in neonates. We have shown, in previous studies, that developmental nicotine exposure (DNE) in a model system compromises the normal function of respiratory circuits within the brainstem. The effects of DNE include alterations in the excitability and synaptic interactions of the hypoglossal motoneurons, which innervate muscles of the tongue. This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that these functional consequences of DNE are accompanied by changes in the dendritic morphology of hypoglossal motoneurons. Hypoglossal motoneurons in brain stem slices were filled with neurobiotin during whole-cell patch clamp recordings and subjected to histological processing to reveal dendrites. Morphometric analysis, including the Sholl method, revealed significant effects of DNE on dendritic branching patterns. In particular, whereas within the first five postnatal days there was significant growth of the higher-order dendritic branches of motoneurons from control animals, the growth was compromised in motoneurons from neonates that were subjected to DNE. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 1125-1137, 2016. PMID:26818139

  10. The use of dendrograms to describe the electrical activity of motoneurons underlying behaviors in leeches

    PubMed Central

    Juárez-Hernández, León J.; Bisson, Giacomo; Torre, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    The present manuscript aims at identifying patterns of electrical activity recorded from neurons of the leech nervous system, characterizing specific behaviors. When leeches are at rest, the electrical activity of neurons and motoneurons is poorly correlated. When leeches move their head and/or tail, in contrast, action potential (AP) firing becomes highly correlated. When the head or tail suckers detach, specific patterns of electrical activity are detected. During elongation and contraction the electrical activity of motoneurons in the Medial Anterior and Dorsal Posterior nerves increase, respectively, and several motoneurons are activated both during elongation and contraction. During crawling, swimming, and pseudo-swimming patterns of electrical activity are better described by the dendrograms of cross-correlations of motoneurons pairs. Dendrograms obtained from different animals exhibiting the same behavior are similar and by averaging these dendrograms we obtained a template underlying a given behavior. By using this template, the corresponding behavior is reliably identified from the recorded electrical activity. The analysis of dendrograms during different leech behavior reveals the fine orchestration of motoneurons firing specific to each stereotyped behavior. Therefore, dendrograms capture the subtle changes in the correlation pattern of neuronal networks when they become involved in different tasks or functions. PMID:24098274

  11. Uncoupling nicotine mediated motoneuron axonal pathfinding errors and muscle degeneration in zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, Lillian; Tanguay, Robert L.; Svoboda, Kurt R.

    2009-05-15

    Zebrafish embryos offer a unique opportunity to investigate the mechanisms by which nicotine exposure impacts early vertebrate development. Embryos exposed to nicotine become functionally paralyzed by 42 hpf suggesting that the neuromuscular system is compromised in exposed embryos. We previously demonstrated that secondary spinal motoneurons in nicotine-exposed embryos were delayed in development and that their axons made pathfinding errors (Svoboda, K.R., Vijayaraghaven, S., Tanguay, R.L., 2002. Nicotinic receptors mediate changes in spinal motoneuron development and axonal pathfinding in embryonic zebrafish exposed to nicotine. J. Neurosci. 22, 10731-10741). In that study, we did not consider the potential role that altered skeletal muscle development caused by nicotine exposure could play in contributing to the errors in spinal motoneuron axon pathfinding. In this study, we show that an alteration in skeletal muscle development occurs in tandem with alterations in spinal motoneuron development upon exposure to nicotine. The alteration in the muscle involves the binding of nicotine to the muscle-specific AChRs. The nicotine-induced alteration in muscle development does not occur in the zebrafish mutant (sofa potato, [sop]), which lacks muscle-specific AChRs. Even though muscle development is unaffected by nicotine exposure in sop mutants, motoneuron axonal pathfinding errors still occur in these mutants, indicating a direct effect of nicotine exposure on nervous system development.

  12. The tight relationship between asymmetric signaling and locational excitability in motoneuron dendrites.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hojeong; Heckman, C J

    2015-01-01

    Spinal motoneurons possess large, highly branching dendritic structures that contain thousands of synaptic contacts and various voltage-gated ion channels (VGICs). Research has indicated that dendritic arborization and cable properties provide the basis for foundational dendritic processing, which is characterized by direction-dependent signal propagation and location-dependent channel activation in dendritic arbors. Due to these arbors' complex structure, signals attenuate differentially depending on whether propagation occurs from the soma to the dendrite or in the opposite direction. In addition, current thresholds for the activation of dendritic ion channels differ depending on the location of these channels within dendrites. However, whether and how these foundational properties for dendritic signaling and excitability are related in motoneurons remains unclear. Based on our analyses of anatomically reconstructed motoneurons and novel reduced models, we propose that 1) directional signal propagation is similar across spinal motoneurons, regardless of cell type-specific structures; 2) reduced models that retain dendritic signaling asymmetry can accurately replicate anatomical dendritic excitability in both passive and active modes; and 3) asymmetric signal propagation and locational dendritic excitability are closely related, irrespective of motoneurons' arbor structures. PMID:27066175

  13. Distinct Roles of Muscle and Motoneuron LRP4 in Neuromuscular Junction Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haitao; Lu, Yisheng; Shen, Chengyong; Patel, Neil; Gan, Lin; Xiong, Wen C.; Mei, Lin

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Neuromuscular junction (NMJ) formation requires precise interaction between motoneurons and muscle fibers. LRP4 is a receptor of agrin that is thought to act incis to stimulate MuSK in muscle fibers for postsynaptic differentiation. Here we dissected the roles of LRP4 in muscle fibers and motoneurons in NMJ formation by cell-specific mutation. Studies of muscle-specific mutants suggest that LRP4 is involved in deciding where to form AChR clusters in muscle fibers, postsynaptic differentiation, and axon terminal development. LRP4 in HEK293 cells increased synapsin or SV2 puncta in contacting axons of co-cultured neurons, suggesting a synaptogenic function. Analysis of LRP4 muscle and motoneuron double mutants and mechanistic studies suggest that NMJ formation may also be regulated by LRP4 in motoneurons, which could serve as agrin’s receptor in trans to induce AChR clusters. These observations uncovered distinct roles of LRP4 in motoneurons and muscles in NMJ development. PMID:22794264

  14. Distinct roles of muscle and motoneuron LRP4 in neuromuscular junction formation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haitao; Lu, Yisheng; Shen, Chengyong; Patel, Neil; Gan, Lin; Xiong, Wen C; Mei, Lin

    2012-07-12

    Neuromuscular junction (NMJ) formation requires precise interaction between motoneurons and muscle fibers. LRP4 is a receptor of agrin that is thought to act in cis to stimulate MuSK in muscle fibers for postsynaptic differentiation. Here we dissected the roles of LRP4 in muscle fibers and motoneurons in NMJ formation by cell-specific mutation. Studies of muscle-specific mutants suggest that LRP4 is involved in deciding where to form AChR clusters in muscle fibers, postsynaptic differentiation, and axon terminal development. LRP4 in HEK293 cells increased synapsin or SV2 puncta in contacting axons of cocultured neurons, suggesting a synaptogenic function. Analysis of LRP4 muscle and motoneuron double mutants and mechanistic studies suggest that NMJ formation may also be regulated by LRP4 in motoneurons, which could serve as agrin's receptor in trans to induce AChR clusters. These observations uncovered distinct roles of LRP4 in motoneurons and muscles in NMJ development. PMID:22794264

  15. Front leg movements and tibial motoneurons underlying auditory steering in the cricket (Gryllus bimaculatus deGeer).

    PubMed

    Baden, T; Hedwig, B

    2008-07-01

    Front leg movements in the cricket (Gryllus bimaculatus) were measured during phonotactic steering on a trackball together with electromyogram recordings of the tibial extensor and flexor muscles. Up-down leg movements clearly indicated the step cycle and were independent of auditory stimulation. By contrast, left-right movements of the front leg were dependent on sound direction, with crickets performing rapid steering leg movements towards the active speaker. Steering movements were dependent on the phase of sound relative to the step cycle, and were greatest for sounds occurring during the swing phase. During phonotaxis the slow extensor tibiae motoneuron responded to ipsilateral sounds with a latency of 35-40 ms, whereas the fast flexor tibiae motoneurons were excited by contralateral sound. We made intracellular recordings of two tibial extensor and at least eight flexor motoneurons. The fast extensor tibiae, the slow extensor tibiae and one fast flexor tibiae motoneurons were individually identifiable, but a group of at least four fast flexor tibiae as well as at least three slow flexor tibiae motoneurons of highly similar morphology could not be distinguished. Motoneurons received descending inputs from cephalic ganglia and from local prothoracic networks. There was no overlap between the dendritic fields of the tibial motoneurons and the auditory neuropile. They did not respond to auditory stimulation at rest. Neither extracellular stimulation of descending pathways nor pharmacological activation of prothoracic motor networks changed the auditory responsiveness. Therefore, any auditory input to tibial motoneurons is likely to be indirect, possibly via the brain.

  16. Mild Hyperbaric Oxygen Improves Decreased Oxidative Capacity of Spinal Motoneurons Innervating the Soleus Muscle of Rats with Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Takemura, Ai; Ishihara, Akihiko

    2016-09-01

    Rats with type 2 diabetes exhibit decreased oxidative capacity, such as reduced oxidative enzyme activity, low-intensity staining for oxidative enzymes in fibers, and no high-oxidative type IIA fibers, in the skeletal muscle, especially in the soleus muscle. In contrast, there are no data available concerning the oxidative capacity of spinal motoneurons innervating skeletal muscle of rats with type 2 diabetes. This study examined the oxidative capacity of motoneurons innervating the soleus muscle of non-obese rats with type 2 diabetes. In addition, this study examined the effects of mild hyperbaric oxygen at 1.25 atmospheres absolute with 36 % oxygen for 10 weeks on the oxidative capacity of motoneurons innervating the soleus muscle because mild hyperbaric oxygen improves the decreased oxidative capacity of the soleus muscle in non-obese rats with type 2 diabetes. Spinal motoneurons innervating the soleus muscle were identified using nuclear yellow, a retrograde fluorescent neuronal tracer. Thereafter, the cell body sizes and succinate dehydrogenase activity of identified motoneurons were analyzed. Decreased succinate dehydrogenase activity of small-sized alpha motoneurons innervating the soleus muscle was observed in rats with type 2 diabetes. The decreased succinate dehydrogenase activity of these motoneurons was improved by mild hyperbaric oxygen. Therefore, we concluded that rats with type 2 diabetes have decreased oxidative capacity in motoneurons innervating the soleus muscle and this decreased oxidative capacity is improved by mild hyperbaric oxygen.

  17. Motoneurons, DUM cells, and sensory neurons in an insect thoracic ganglion: a tracing study in the stick insect Carausius morosus.

    PubMed

    Goldammer, Jens; Büschges, Ansgar; Schmidt, Joachim

    2012-02-01

    Anatomical features of leg motoneurons, dorsal unpaired median (DUM) cells, and sensory neurons in stick insect mesothoracic ganglia were examined using fluorescent dye backfills of lateral nerves. Structures were analyzed in whole-mounts of ganglia and transverse sections. Numbers of motoneurons and details of their structure by far exceed previously published data. The general neuroanatomical layout of motoneurons matches the general orthopteran pattern. Cell bodies of excitatory motoneurons form clusters in the lateral cortex, dendrites branch mainly in the dorsal neuropil. We identified nine DUM cells, six of which have axons in nerve nl5. Most sensory fibers terminate in the ventral association center (VAC). Twenty-three small cell bodies located close to the soma of the fast extensor tibiae motoneuron likely belong to strand receptors. Labeled structures are compared with previously published data from stick insects and other orthopterous insects. PMID:21618233

  18. Neuroplasticity and Repair in Rodent Neurotoxic Models of Spinal Motoneuron Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gulino, Rosario

    2016-01-01

    Retrogradely transported toxins are widely used to set up protocols for selective lesioning of the nervous system. These methods could be collectively named “molecular neurosurgery” because they are able to destroy specific types of neurons by using targeted neurotoxins. Lectins such as ricin, volkensin, or modeccin and neuropeptide- or antibody-conjugated saporin represent the most effective toxins used for neuronal lesioning. Some of these specific neurotoxins could be used to induce selective depletion of spinal motoneurons. In this review, we extensively describe two rodent models of motoneuron degeneration induced by volkensin or cholera toxin-B saporin. In particular, we focus on the possible experimental use of these models to mimic neurodegenerative diseases, to dissect the molecular mechanisms of neuroplastic changes underlying the spontaneous functional recovery after motoneuron death, and finally to test different strategies of neural repair. The potential clinical applications of these approaches are also discussed. PMID:26862439

  19. Non-Cell-Autonomous Regulation of Retrograde Motoneuronal Axonal Transport in an SBMA Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Halievski, Katherine; Kemp, Michael Q; Breedlove, S Marc; Miller, Kyle E; Jordan, Cynthia L

    2016-01-01

    Defects in axonal transport are seen in motoneuronal diseases, but how that impairment comes about is not well understood. In spinal bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), a disorder linked to a CAG/polyglutamine repeat expansion in the androgen receptor (AR) gene, the disease-causing AR disrupts axonal transport by acting in both a cell-autonomous fashion in the motoneurons themselves, and in a non-cell-autonomous fashion in muscle. The non-cell-autonomous mechanism is suggested by data from a unique "myogenic" transgenic (TG) mouse model in which an AR transgene expressed exclusively in skeletal muscle fibers triggers an androgen-dependent SBMA phenotype, including defects in retrograde transport. However, motoneurons in this TG model retain the endogenous AR gene, leaving open the possibility that impairments in transport in this model also depend on ARs in the motoneurons themselves. To test whether non-cell-autonomous mechanisms alone can perturb retrograde transport, we generated male TG mice in which the endogenous AR allele has the testicular feminization mutation (Tfm) and, consequently, is nonfunctional. Males carrying the Tfm allele alone show no deficits in motor function or axonal transport, with or without testosterone treatment. However, when Tfm males carrying the myogenic transgene (Tfm/TG) are treated with testosterone, they develop impaired motor function and defects in retrograde transport, having fewer retrogradely labeled motoneurons and deficits in endosomal flux based on time-lapse video microscopy of living axons. These findings demonstrate that non-cell-autonomous disease mechanisms originating in muscle are sufficient to induce defects in retrograde transport in motoneurons. PMID:27517091

  20. Non-Cell-Autonomous Regulation of Retrograde Motoneuronal Axonal Transport in an SBMA Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Halievski, Katherine; Kemp, Michael Q.; Breedlove, S. Marc; Miller, Kyle E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Defects in axonal transport are seen in motoneuronal diseases, but how that impairment comes about is not well understood. In spinal bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), a disorder linked to a CAG/polyglutamine repeat expansion in the androgen receptor (AR) gene, the disease-causing AR disrupts axonal transport by acting in both a cell-autonomous fashion in the motoneurons themselves, and in a non-cell-autonomous fashion in muscle. The non-cell-autonomous mechanism is suggested by data from a unique “myogenic” transgenic (TG) mouse model in which an AR transgene expressed exclusively in skeletal muscle fibers triggers an androgen-dependent SBMA phenotype, including defects in retrograde transport. However, motoneurons in this TG model retain the endogenous AR gene, leaving open the possibility that impairments in transport in this model also depend on ARs in the motoneurons themselves. To test whether non-cell-autonomous mechanisms alone can perturb retrograde transport, we generated male TG mice in which the endogenous AR allele has the testicular feminization mutation (Tfm) and, consequently, is nonfunctional. Males carrying the Tfm allele alone show no deficits in motor function or axonal transport, with or without testosterone treatment. However, when Tfm males carrying the myogenic transgene (Tfm/TG) are treated with testosterone, they develop impaired motor function and defects in retrograde transport, having fewer retrogradely labeled motoneurons and deficits in endosomal flux based on time-lapse video microscopy of living axons. These findings demonstrate that non-cell-autonomous disease mechanisms originating in muscle are sufficient to induce defects in retrograde transport in motoneurons. PMID:27517091

  1. Nerve growth factor regulates the firing patterns and synaptic composition of motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Davis-López de Carrizosa, María A; Morado-Díaz, Camilo J; Morcuende, Sara; de la Cruz, Rosa R; Pastor, Angel M

    2010-06-16

    Target-derived neurotrophins exert powerful synaptotrophic actions in the adult brain and are involved in the regulation of different forms of synaptic plasticity. Target disconnection produces a profound synaptic stripping due to the lack of trophic support. Consequently, target reinnervation leads to synaptic remodeling and restoration of cellular functions. Extraocular motoneurons are unique in that they normally express the TrkA neurotrophin receptor in the adult, a feature not seen in other cranial or spinal motoneurons, except after lesions such as axotomy or in neurodegenerative diseases like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. We investigated the effects of nerve growth factor (NGF) by retrogradely delivering this neurotrophin to abducens motoneurons of adult cats. Axotomy reduced the density of somatic boutons and the overall tonic and phasic firing modulation. Treatment with NGF restored synaptic inputs and firing modulation in axotomized motoneurons. When K252a, a selective inhibitor of tyrosine kinase activity, was applied to specifically test TrkA effects, the NGF-mediated restoration of synapses and firing-related parameters was abolished. Discharge variability and recruitment threshold were, however, increased by NGF compared with control or axotomized motoneurons. Interestingly, these parameters returned to normal following application of REX, an antibody raised against neurotrophin receptor p75 (p75(NTR)). In conclusion, NGF, acting retrogradely through TrkA receptors, supports afferent boutons and regulates the burst and tonic signals correlated with eye movements. On the other hand, p75(NTR) activation regulates recruitment threshold, which impacts on firing regularity. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing powerful synaptotrophic effects of NGF on motoneurons in vivo.

  2. Mechanisms of spinal motoneurons survival in rats under simulated hypogravity on earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islamov, R. R.; Mishagina, E. A.; Tyapkina, O. V.; Shajmardanova, G. F.; Eremeev, A. A.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.; Nikolskij, E. E.; Grigorjev, A. I.

    2011-05-01

    It was previously shown that different cell types in vivo and in vitro may die via apoptosis under weightlessness conditions in space as well as in simulated hypogravity on the Earth. We assessed survivability of spinal motoneurons of rats after 35-day antiorthostatic hind limb suspension. Following weight bearing, unloading the total protein content in lumbar spinal cord is dropped by 21%. The electrophysiological studies of m. gastrocnemius revealed an elevated motoneurons' reflex excitability and conduction disturbances in the sciatic nerve axons. The number of myelinated fibers in the ventral root of experimental animals was insignificantly increased by 35-day of antiorthostatic hind limb suspension, although the retrograde axonal transport was significantly decreased during the first week of simulated hypogravity. The results of the immunohistochemical assay with antibodies against proapoptotic protein caspase 9 and cytotoxicity marker neuron specific nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and the TUNEL staining did not reveal any signs of apoptosis in motoneurons of suspended and control animals. To examine the possible adaptation mechanisms activated in motoneurons in response to simulated hypogravity we investigated immunoexpression of Hsp25 and Hsp70 in lumbar spinal cord of the rats after 35-day antiorthostatic hind limb suspension. Comparative analysis of the immunohistochemical reaction with anti-Hsp25 antibodies revealed differential staining of motoneurons in intact and experimental animals. The density of immunoprecipitate with anti-Hsp25 antibodies was substantially higher in motoneurons of the 35-day suspended than control rats and the more intensive precipitate in this reaction was observed in motoneuron neuritis. Quantitative analysis of Hsp25 expression demonstrated an increase in the Hsp25 level by 95% in experimental rats compared to the control. The immunoexpression of Hsp70 found no qualitative and quantitative differences in control and experimental

  3. Serotonin-induced bistability of turtle motoneurones caused by a nifedipine-sensitive calcium plateau potential.

    PubMed Central

    Hounsgaard, J; Kiehn, O

    1989-01-01

    1. The effect of serotonin on the firing properties of motoneurones was studied in transverse sections of the adult turtle spinal cord in vitro with intracellular recording techniques. 2. In normal medium, turtle motoneurones adapt from an initial high frequency to a low steady firing during a depolarizing current pulse. In the presence of serotonin (4-100 microM) motoneurones responded with accelerated firing and a frequency jump during a depolarizing current pulse followed by an after-depolarization outlasting the stimulus. From a depolarized holding potential motoneuronal activity was shifted between two stable states by brief depolarizing and hyperpolarizing current pulses. As an expression of this bistable firing behaviour, the frequency-current relation in response to a triangular current injection was counter-clockwise in serotonin while clockwise in normal medium. 3. The delay to onset of the frequency jump was shortened as the amplitude of the activation pulse was increased. From a positive holding potential the after-depolarization exceeded spike threshold and its duration increased with an increase in steady bias current. The effect of serotonin on turtle motoneurones could be blocked by methysergide (10 microM). 4. When action potentials were depressed by tetrodotoxin, a voltage-dependent, non-inactivating plateau potential, intrinsic to the motoneurone, was revealed. Activation of this voltage plateau provides the motoneurones with two stable states of firing. The apparent input resistance was 2-4-fold lower during the plateau than at rest. 5. The serotonin-induced plateau potential was Ca2+-dependent and was blocked when Ca2+ was replaced by either Co2+ (3 mM) or Mn2+ (3 mM). 6. The Ca2+ plateau was blocked by nifedipine (1-15 microM). 7. Serotonin reduced the slow after-hyperpolarization following action potentials. The change in balance between inward and outward currents seems to be sufficient to reveal the plateau response. 8. Although a small

  4. Control of hypoglossal motoneurones during naturally occurring sleep and wakefulness in the intact, unanaesthetized cat: a field potential study.

    PubMed

    Fung, Simon J; Chase, Michael H

    2014-08-01

    The present electrophysiological study was designed to determine the discharge threshold of hypoglossal motoneurones during naturally occurring states of sleep and wakefulness in the intact, unanaesthetized cat. The antidromic field potential, which reflects the net level of membrane excitability of motoneurones and therefore their discharge threshold, was recorded in the hypoglossal nucleus following stimulation of the hypoglossal nerve. The amplitude of the antidromic field potential was larger during wakefulness and non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep compared with REM sleep. There was no significant difference in the amplitude of the field potential when wakefulness was compared with NREM sleep (P = 0.103, df = 3, t = 2.324). However, there was a 46% reduction in amplitude during REM sleep compared with NREM sleep (P < 0.001, df = 10, t = 6.421) or wakefulness (P < 0.01, df = 4, t = -4.598). These findings indicate that whereas the excitability of motoneurones that comprise the hypoglossal motor pool is relatively constant during wakefulness and NREM sleep, their excitability is significantly reduced during REM sleep. This state-dependent pattern of control of hypoglossal motoneurones during REM sleep is similar to that reported for motoneurones in other motor nuclei at all levels of the neuraxis. The decrease in the evoked response of hypoglossal motoneurones, which reflects a significant increase in the discharge threshold of individual motoneurones, results in atonia of the lingual and related muscles during REM sleep. PMID:24605864

  5. TrkB gene therapy by adeno-associated virus enhances recovery after cervical spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Gálvez, Gabriel; Zambrano, Juan M; Diaz Soto, Juan C; Zhan, Wen-Zhi; Gransee, Heather M; Sieck, Gary C; Mantilla, Carlos B

    2016-02-01

    Unilateral cervical spinal cord hemisection at C2 (C2SH) interrupts descending bulbospinal inputs to phrenic motoneurons, paralyzing the diaphragm muscle. Recovery after C2SH is enhanced by brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling via the tropomyosin-related kinase subtype B (TrkB) receptor in phrenic motoneurons. The role for gene therapy using adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated delivery of TrkB to phrenic motoneurons is not known. The present study determined the therapeutic efficacy of intrapleural delivery of AAV7 encoding for full-length TrkB (AAV-TrkB) to phrenic motoneurons 3 days post-C2SH. Diaphragm EMG was recorded chronically in male rats (n=26) up to 21 days post-C2SH. Absent ipsilateral diaphragm EMG activity was verified 3 days post-C2SH. A greater proportion of animals displayed recovery of ipsilateral diaphragm EMG activity during eupnea by 14 and 21 days post-SH after AAV-TrkB (10/15) compared to AAV-GFP treatment (2/11; p=0.031). Diaphragm EMG amplitude increased over time post-C2SH (p<0.001), and by 14 days post-C2SH, AAV-TrkB treated animals displaying recovery achieved 48% of the pre-injury values compared to 27% in AAV-GFP treated animals. Phrenic motoneuron mRNA expression of glutamatergic AMPA and NMDA receptors revealed a significant, positive correlation (r(2)=0.82), with increased motoneuron NMDA expression evident in animals treated with AAV-TrkB and that displayed recovery after C2SH. Overall, gene therapy using intrapleural delivery of AAV-TrkB to phrenic motoneurons is sufficient to promote recovery of diaphragm activity, adding a novel potential intervention that can be administered after upper cervical spinal cord injury to improve impaired respiratory function. PMID:26607912

  6. Muscle biopsies show that FES of denervated muscles reverses human muscle degeneration from permanent spinal motoneuron lesion.

    PubMed

    Kern, Helmut; Rossini, Katia; Carraro, Ugo; Mayr, Winfried; Vogelauer, Michael; Hoellwarth, Ursula; Hofer, Christian

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents biopsy analyses in support of the clinical evidence of muscle recovery induced by a new system of life-long functional-electrical-stimulation (FES) training in permanent spinal-motoneuron-denervated human muscle. Not earlier than 1 year after subjects experienced complete conus cauda lesion, their thigh muscles were electrically stimulated at home for several years with large skin surface electrodes and an expressly designed stimulator that delivered much longer impulses than those presently available for clinical use. The poor excitability of long-term denervated muscles was first improved by several months of twitch-contraction training. Then, the muscles were tetanically stimulated against progressively increased loads. Needle biopsies of vastus lateralis from long-term denervated subjects showed severe myofiber atrophy or lipodystrophy beginning 2 years after spinal cord injury (SCI). Muscle biopsies from a group of 3.6- to 13.5-year denervated subjects, who underwent 2.4 to 9.3 years of FES, show that this progressive training almost reverted long-term muscle atrophy/degeneration.

  7. Emerging Roles of Filopodia and Dendritic Spines in Motoneuron Plasticity during Development and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kanjhan, Refik; Noakes, Peter G.; Bellingham, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    Motoneurons develop extensive dendritic trees for receiving excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs to perform a variety of complex motor tasks. At birth, the somatodendritic domains of mouse hypoglossal and lumbar motoneurons have dense filopodia and spines. Consistent with Vaughn's synaptotropic hypothesis, we propose a developmental unified-hybrid model implicating filopodia in motoneuron spinogenesis/synaptogenesis and dendritic growth and branching critical for circuit formation and synaptic plasticity at embryonic/prenatal/neonatal period. Filopodia density decreases and spine density initially increases until postnatal day 15 (P15) and then decreases by P30. Spine distribution shifts towards the distal dendrites, and spines become shorter (stubby), coinciding with decreases in frequency and increases in amplitude of excitatory postsynaptic currents with maturation. In transgenic mice, either overexpressing the mutated human Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (hSOD1G93A) gene or deficient in GABAergic/glycinergic synaptic transmission (gephyrin, GAD-67, or VGAT gene knockout), hypoglossal motoneurons develop excitatory glutamatergic synaptic hyperactivity. Functional synaptic hyperactivity is associated with increased dendritic growth, branching, and increased spine and filopodia density, involving actin-based cytoskeletal and structural remodelling. Energy-dependent ionic pumps that maintain intracellular sodium/calcium homeostasis are chronically challenged by activity and selectively overwhelmed by hyperactivity which eventually causes sustained membrane depolarization leading to excitotoxicity, activating microglia to phagocytose degenerating neurons under neuropathological conditions. PMID:26843990

  8. Extrasynaptic α6 Subunit-Containing GABAA Receptors Modulate Excitability in Turtle Spinal Motoneurons

    PubMed Central

    Andres, Carmen; Aguilar, Justo; González-Ramírez, Ricardo; Elias-Viñas, David; Felix, Ricardo; Delgado-Lezama, Rodolfo

    2014-01-01

    Motoneurons are furnished with a vast repertoire of ionotropic and metabotropic receptors as well as ion channels responsible for maintaining the resting membrane potential and involved in the regulation of the mechanisms underlying its membrane excitability and firing properties. Among them, the GABAA receptors, which respond to GABA binding by allowing the flow of Cl− ions across the membrane, mediate two distinct forms of inhibition in the mature nervous system, phasic and tonic, upon activation of synaptic or extrasynaptic receptors, respectively. In a previous work we showed that furosemide facilitates the monosynaptic reflex without affecting the dorsal root potential. Our data also revealed a tonic inhibition mediated by GABAA receptors activated in motoneurons by ambient GABA. These data suggested that the high affinity GABAA extrasynaptic receptors may have an important role in motor control, though the molecular nature of these receptors was not determined. By combining electrophysiological, immunofluorescence and molecular biology techniques with pharmacological tools here we show that GABAA receptors containing the α6 subunit are expressed in adult turtle spinal motoneurons and can function as extrasynaptic receptors responsible for tonic inhibition. These results expand our understanding of the role of GABAA receptors in motoneuron tonic inhibition. PMID:25531288

  9. Influence of proprioceptive feedback on the firing rate and recruitment of motoneurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Luca, C. J.; Kline, J. C.

    2012-02-01

    We investigated the relationships of the firing rate and maximal recruitment threshold of motoneurons recorded during isometric contraction with the number of spindles in individual muscles. At force levels above 10% of maximal voluntary contraction, the firing rate was inversely related to the number of spindles in a muscle, with the slope of the relationship increasing with force. The maximal recruitment threshold of motor units increased linearly with the number of spindles in the muscle. Thus, muscles with a greater number of spindles had lower firing rates and a greater maximal recruitment threshold. These findings may be explained by a mechanical interaction between muscle fibres and adjacent spindles. During low-level (0% to 10%) voluntary contractions, muscle fibres of recruited motor units produce force twitches that activate nearby spindles to respond with an immediate excitatory feedback that reaches maximal level. As the force increases further, the twitches overlap and tend towards tetanization, the muscle fibres shorten, the spindles slacken, their excitatory firings decrease, and the net excitation to the homonymous motoneurons decreases. Motoneurons of muscles with greater number of spindles receive a greater decrease in excitation which reduces their firing rates, increases their maximal recruitment threshold, and changes the motoneuron recruitment distribution.

  10. Functional Expression of T-Type Ca2+ Channels in Spinal Motoneurons of the Adult Turtle

    PubMed Central

    Canto-Bustos, Martha; Loeza-Alcocer, Emanuel; González-Ramírez, Ricardo; Gandini, María A.; Delgado-Lezama, Rodolfo; Felix, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated Ca2+ (CaV) channels are transmembrane proteins comprising three subfamilies named CaV1, CaV2 and CaV3. The CaV3 channel subfamily groups the low-voltage activated Ca2+ channels (LVA or T-type) a significant role in regulating neuronal excitability. CaV3 channel activity may lead to the generation of complex patterns of action potential firing such as the postinhibitory rebound (PIR). In the adult spinal cord, these channels have been found in dorsal horn interneurons where they control physiological events near the resting potential and participate in determining excitability. In motoneurons, CaV3 channels have been found during development, but their functional expression has not yet been reported in adult animals. Here, we show evidence for the presence of CaV3 channel-mediated PIR in motoneurons of the adult turtle spinal cord. Our results indicate that Ni2+ and NNC55-0396, two antagonists of CaV3 channel activity, inhibited PIR in the adult turtle spinal cord. Molecular biology and biochemical assays revealed the expression of the CaV3.1 channel isotype and its localization in motoneurons. Together, these results provide evidence for the expression of CaV3.1 channels in the spinal cord of adult animals and show also that these channels may contribute to determine the excitability of motoneurons. PMID:25255145

  11. Nkx2.2+ Progenitors Generate Somatic Motoneurons in the Chick Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Gotoh, Hitoshi; Ono, Katsuhiko; Nomura, Tadashi; Takebayashi, Hirohide; Harada, Hidekiyo; Nakamura, Harukazu; Ikenaka, Kazuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Heterogeneous classes of neurons are present in the spinal cord and are essential for its function. Expression patterns of transcription factors in neural progenitor cells determine neuron subtypes during development. Nkx2.2 is expressed in the progenitor cell pool located just ventrally to the Olig2-positive pool and is indispensable for V3 interneuron generation in the spinal cord and also for visceral motoneuron generation in the hindbrain. However, whether Nkx2.2-positive progenitor cells generate diverse classes of neuron is not fully understood. Using a chick lineage tracing method in a genetically-defined manner, we found that Nkx2.2-expressing progenitor cells differentiate into general visceral motoneurons as well as sim1-positive V3 interneurons. Surprisingly, we further observed that Nkx2.2-expressing progenitors differentiate into somatic motoneuron. Our findings suggest that the different classes of motoneurons are derived from more complex sources than were previously expected in the chick spinal cord. PMID:23284718

  12. Efficacy of seven retrograde tracers, compared in multiple-labelling studies of feline motoneurones.

    PubMed

    Richmond, F J; Gladdy, R; Creasy, J L; Kitamura, S; Smits, E; Thomson, D B

    1994-07-01

    The labelling efficacies of 7 retrograde tracers were evaluated following cut nerve exposure or intramuscular injection into the serially compartmentalized neck muscle, biventer cervicis. Tested tracers included Fast Blue (FB), Fluorogold (FG), dextran conjugated to fluorescein (FD), dextran conjugated to rhodamine (Fluororuby (FR), 3000 and 10,000 MW), fluorescent latex microspheres, horseradish peroxidase coupled to colloidal gold, and 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethyl indocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI). In 2 animals, horseradish peroxidase was also employed and spinal cords were processed for peroxidase activity to evaluate its effect on the appearance of cells labelled with fluorescent tracers. Four tracers, FB, FG, FD and FR, could be observed in motoneurones under the conditions of our study. FB and FG labelled comparable numbers of motoneurones following cut nerve exposure, but dissimilar numbers following intramuscular injection. FG diffused extensively following injection and was found in motoneurones not only in the appropriate ipsilateral segment but also adjacent ipsilateral and contralateral segments. Intramuscular injections of FB usually labelled fewer cells than cut nerve exposure, but evidence for spurious labelling following intramuscular injection could also be found. FD or FR labelled motoneurones following cut nerve exposure but not following intramuscular injection. The conjugated dextrans labelled more variable numbers of cells than FB or FG, but the labelled cells had similar patterns of distribution. The remaining tracers were ineffective as retrograde markers in our study, and the possible reasons for these failures are discussed.

  13. Localization of pectoral fin motoneurons (sonic and hovering) in the croaking gourami Trichopsis vittatus.

    PubMed

    Ladich, F; Fine, M L

    1992-01-01

    The pectoral fin of the croaking gourami, Trichopsis vittatus, has become modified as a sound-producing organ and retains its original function in locomotion and hovering. We used retrograde transport of horseradish peroxidase to localize sonic motoneurons in Trichopsis. Betta splendens, a related nonsonic gourami with unspecialized pectoral fins, served as a control. A single injection into Trichopsis epaxial muscle labeled a dorsal motor column of large cells (mean of 16.3 microns) ventrolateral to the central canal. Pectoral motoneurons formed a ventrolateral spinal motor column of smaller neurons (means from 7.7 to 11.9 microns, depending upon fish size), of about 2 mm in rostrocaudal extent, starting in the caudal medulla. Our data suggest that motoneurons for different pectoral muscles are segregated into rostrocaudal pools within the column. Distribution, morphology and size of motoneurons were similar between Trichopsis and Betta, and there was no evidence of a distinct population of neurons which might be specialized exclusively for sound production. These data suggest that a fish can evolve a specialized end organ without major reorganization of the central nervous system. PMID:1537046

  14. Cannabinoid agonists rearrange synaptic vesicles at excitatory synapses and depress motoneuron activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    García-Morales, Victoria; Montero, Fernando; Moreno-López, Bernardo

    2015-05-01

    Impairment of motor skills is one of the most common acute adverse effects of cannabis. Related studies have focused mainly on psychomotor alterations, and little is known about the direct impact of cannabinoids (CBs) on motoneuron physiology. As key modulators of synaptic function, CBs regulate multiple neuronal functions and behaviors. Presynaptic CB1 mediates synaptic strength depression by inhibiting neurotransmitter release, via a poorly understood mechanism. The present study examined the effect of CB agonists on excitatory synaptic inputs incoming to hypoglossal motoneurons (HMNs) in vitro and in vivo. The endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA) and the synthetic CB agonist WIN 55,212-2 rapidly and reversibly induced short-term depression (STD) of glutamatergic synapses on motoneurons by a presynaptic mechanism. Presynaptic effects were fully reversed by the CB1-selective antagonist AM281. Electrophysiological and electron microscopy analysis showed that WIN 55,212-2 reduced the number of synaptic vesicles (SVs) docked to active zones in excitatory boutons. Given that AM281 fully abolished depolarization-induced depression of excitation, motoneurons can be feasible sources of CBs, which in turn act as retrograde messengers regulating synaptic function. Finally, microiontophoretic application of the CB agonist O-2545 reversibly depressed, presumably via CB1, glutamatergic inspiratory-related activity of HMNs in vivo. Therefore, evidence support that CBs, via presynaptic CB1, induce excitatory STD by reducing the readily releasable pool of SVs at excitatory synapses, then attenuating motoneuron activity. These outcomes contribute a possible mechanistic basis for cannabis-associated motor performance disturbances such as ataxia, dysarthria and dyscoordination.

  15. Clearance of the mutant androgen receptor in motoneuronal models of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy☆

    PubMed Central

    Rusmini, Paola; Crippa, Valeria; Giorgetti, Elisa; Boncoraglio, Alessandra; Cristofani, Riccardo; Carra, Serena; Poletti, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an X-linked motoneuron disease caused by an abnormal expansion of a tandem CAG repeat in exon 1 of the androgen receptor (AR) gene that results in an abnormally long polyglutamine tract (polyQ) in the AR protein. As a result, the mutant AR (ARpolyQ) misfolds, forming cytoplasmic and nuclear aggregates in the affected neurons. Neurotoxicity only appears to be associated with the formation of nuclear aggregates. Thus, improved ARpolyQ cytoplasmic clearance, which indirectly decreases ARpolyQ nuclear accumulation, has beneficial effects on affected motoneurons. In addition, increased ARpolyQ clearance contributes to maintenance of motoneuron proteostasis and viability, preventing the blockage of the proteasome and autophagy pathways that might play a role in the neuropathy in SBMA. The expression of heat shock protein B8 (HspB8), a member of the small heat shock protein family, is highly induced in surviving motoneurons of patients affected by motoneuron diseases, where it seems to participate in the stress response aimed at cell protection. We report here that HspB8 facilitates the autophagic removal of misfolded aggregating species of ARpolyQ. In addition, though HspB8 does not influence p62 and LC3 (two key autophagic molecules) expression, it does prevent p62 bodies formation, and restores the normal autophagic flux in these cells. Interestingly, trehalose, a well-known autophagy stimulator, induces HspB8 expression, suggesting that HspB8 might act as one of the molecular mediators of the proautophagic activity of trehalose. Collectively, these data support the hypothesis that treatments aimed at restoring a normal autophagic flux that result in the more efficient clearance of mutant ARpolyQ might produce beneficial effects in SBMA patients. PMID:23810450

  16. Cannabinoid agonists rearrange synaptic vesicles at excitatory synapses and depress motoneuron activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    García-Morales, Victoria; Montero, Fernando; Moreno-López, Bernardo

    2015-05-01

    Impairment of motor skills is one of the most common acute adverse effects of cannabis. Related studies have focused mainly on psychomotor alterations, and little is known about the direct impact of cannabinoids (CBs) on motoneuron physiology. As key modulators of synaptic function, CBs regulate multiple neuronal functions and behaviors. Presynaptic CB1 mediates synaptic strength depression by inhibiting neurotransmitter release, via a poorly understood mechanism. The present study examined the effect of CB agonists on excitatory synaptic inputs incoming to hypoglossal motoneurons (HMNs) in vitro and in vivo. The endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA) and the synthetic CB agonist WIN 55,212-2 rapidly and reversibly induced short-term depression (STD) of glutamatergic synapses on motoneurons by a presynaptic mechanism. Presynaptic effects were fully reversed by the CB1-selective antagonist AM281. Electrophysiological and electron microscopy analysis showed that WIN 55,212-2 reduced the number of synaptic vesicles (SVs) docked to active zones in excitatory boutons. Given that AM281 fully abolished depolarization-induced depression of excitation, motoneurons can be feasible sources of CBs, which in turn act as retrograde messengers regulating synaptic function. Finally, microiontophoretic application of the CB agonist O-2545 reversibly depressed, presumably via CB1, glutamatergic inspiratory-related activity of HMNs in vivo. Therefore, evidence support that CBs, via presynaptic CB1, induce excitatory STD by reducing the readily releasable pool of SVs at excitatory synapses, then attenuating motoneuron activity. These outcomes contribute a possible mechanistic basis for cannabis-associated motor performance disturbances such as ataxia, dysarthria and dyscoordination. PMID:25595101

  17. Mechanism and Function of Mixed-Mode Oscillations in Vibrissa Motoneurons

    PubMed Central

    Golomb, David

    2014-01-01

    Vibrissa motoneurons in the facial nucleus innervate the intrinsic and extrinsic muscles that move the whiskers. Their intrinsic properties affect the way they process fast synaptic input from the vIRT and Bötzinger nuclei together with serotonergic neuromodulation. In response to constant current (Iapp) injection, vibrissa motoneurons may respond with mixed mode oscillations (MMOs), in which sub-threshold oscillations (STOs) are intermittently mixed with spikes. This study investigates the mechanisms involved in generating MMOs in vibrissa motoneurons and their function in motor control. It presents a conductance-based model that includes the M-type K+ conductance, gM, the persistent Na+ conductance, gNaP, and the cationic h conductance, gh. For gh = 0 and moderate values of gM and gNaP, the model neuron generates STOs, but not MMOs, in response to Iapp injection. STOs transform abruptly to tonic spiking as the current increases. In addition to STOs, MMOs are generated for gh>0 for larger values of Iapp; the Iapp range in which MMOs appear increases linearly with gh. In the MMOs regime, the firing rate increases with Iapp like a Devil's staircase. Stochastic noise disrupts the temporal structure of the MMOs, but for a moderate noise level, the coefficient of variation (CV) is much less than one and varies non-monotonically with Iapp. Furthermore, the estimated time period between voltage peaks, based on Bernoulli process statistics, is much higher in the MMOs regime than in the tonic regime. These two phenomena do not appear when moderate noise generates MMOs without an intrinsic MMO mechanism. Therefore, and since STOs do not appear in spinal motoneurons, the analysis can be used to differentiate different MMOs mechanisms. MMO firing activity in vibrissa motoneurons suggests a scenario in which moderate periodic inputs from the vIRT and Bötzinger nuclei control whisking frequency, whereas serotonergic neuromodulation controls whisking amplitude. PMID

  18. Increased serotonergic innervation of lumbosacral motoneurons of rolling mouse Nagoya in correlation with abnormal hindlimb extension.

    PubMed

    Koyanagi, Y; Sawada, K; Sakata-Haga, H; Jeong, Y-G; Fukui, Y

    2006-12-01

    Rolling Mouse Nagoya (RMN) carries a mutation in a gene encoding for alpha(1A) subunit of P/Q-type Ca(2+) channel (Ca(v)2.1). In addition to ataxia, this mutant mouse exhibits abnormal hindlimb extension, which is characterized by a sustained excessive tone of hindlimb extensor muscles. This study aimed to clarify whether serotonergic (5-HTergic) innervation of the spinal motoneurons was altered in RMN in relation to the abnormal hindlimb extension. The density of 5-HT immunoreactive fibres in the ventral horn of lumbar and sacral regions of spinal cord was significantly greater in RMN than in controls. Retrograde wheat germ agglutinin-conjugated horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) labelling combined with 5-HT immunostaining revealed that the number of 5-HT immunoreactive terminals adjoining femoris quadriceps motoneurons was about 2.5-fold greater in RMN than in controls. Furthermore, 5-HT immunostaining in the lumbar cord ventral horn was examined in three other Ca(v)2.1 mutant mice (tottering, leaner and pogo) as to whether or not they showed the abnormal hindlimb extension. Among these mutants, the increased density of 5-HT immunoreactive fibres was observed in correlation with the presence of the abnormal hindlimb extension. The results suggest an increased 5-HTergic innervation of the lumbosacral motoneurons in correlation with the abnormal hindlimb extension in RMN and other Ca(v)2.1 mutant mice. As 5-HT is known to induce the sustained membrane depolarizations without continuous excitatory synaptic inputs (plateau potentials) in spinal motoneurons, the increased 5-HTergic innervation may cause the sustained excitation of hindlimb extensor motoneurons, resulting in the abnormal hindlimb extension.

  19. Clearance of the mutant androgen receptor in motoneuronal models of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Rusmini, Paola; Crippa, Valeria; Giorgetti, Elisa; Boncoraglio, Alessandra; Cristofani, Riccardo; Carra, Serena; Poletti, Angelo

    2013-11-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an X-linked motoneuron disease caused by an abnormal expansion of a tandem CAG repeat in exon 1 of the androgen receptor (AR) gene that results in an abnormally long polyglutamine tract (polyQ) in the AR protein. As a result, the mutant AR (ARpolyQ) misfolds, forming cytoplasmic and nuclear aggregates in the affected neurons. Neurotoxicity only appears to be associated with the formation of nuclear aggregates. Thus, improved ARpolyQ cytoplasmic clearance, which indirectly decreases ARpolyQ nuclear accumulation, has beneficial effects on affected motoneurons. In addition, increased ARpolyQ clearance contributes to maintenance of motoneuron proteostasis and viability, preventing the blockage of the proteasome and autophagy pathways that might play a role in the neuropathy in SBMA. The expression of heat shock protein B8 (HspB8), a member of the small heat shock protein family, is highly induced in surviving motoneurons of patients affected by motoneuron diseases, where it seems to participate in the stress response aimed at cell protection. We report here that HspB8 facilitates the autophagic removal of misfolded aggregating species of ARpolyQ. In addition, though HspB8 does not influence p62 and LC3 (two key autophagic molecules) expression, it does prevent p62 bodies formation, and restores the normal autophagic flux in these cells. Interestingly, trehalose, a well-known autophagy stimulator, induces HspB8 expression, suggesting that HspB8 might act as one of the molecular mediators of the proautophagic activity of trehalose. Collectively, these data support the hypothesis that treatments aimed at restoring a normal autophagic flux that result in the more efficient clearance of mutant ARpolyQ might produce beneficial effects in SBMA patients.

  20. Functional identification of the input-output transforms of mammalian motoneurones.

    PubMed

    Binder, M D; Poliakov, A V; Powers, R K

    1999-01-01

    We studied the responses of rat hypoglossal and cat lumbar motoneurones to a variety of excitatory and inhibitory injected current transients during repetitive discharge. The amplitudes and time courses of the transients were comparable to those of the synaptic currents underlying postsynaptic potentials (PSPs) recorded in these cells. Poisson trains of these current transients were combined with an additional independent, high frequency random waveform to approximate band-limited white noise. The composite, white noise waveform was then superimposed on long duration suprathreshold current steps. We used the responses of the motoneurones to the white noise stimulus to derive zero-, first- and second-order Wiener kernels, which provide a quantitative description of the relation between injected current and discharge probability. The convolution integral computed for an injected current waveform and the first-order Wiener kernel provides the best linear prediction of the associated peristimulus time histogram (PSTH). This linear model provided good matches to most of the PSTHs compiled between the times of occurrence of individual current transients and motoneurone discharges. However, for the largest amplitude current transients, a significant improvement in the PSTH match was often achieved by expanding the model to include the convolution of the second-order Wiener kernel with the input. The overall transformation of current inputs into firing rate could be approximated by a second-order Wiener Model, i.e., a cascade of a dynamic, linear filter followed by a static non-linearity. At a given mean firing rate, the non-linear component of the motoneurone's response could be described by the square of the linear component multiplied by a constant coefficient. The amplitude of the response of the linear component increased with the average firing rate, whereas the value of the multiplicative coefficient in the nonlinear component decreased. As a result, the overall

  1. Hypocretin (orexin) input to trigeminal and hypoglossal motoneurons in the cat: a double-labeling immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Fung, S J; Yamuy, J; Sampogna, S; Morales, F R; Chase, M H

    2001-06-01

    In trigeminal and hypoglossal motor nuclei of adult cats, hypocretin immunoreactive fiber varicosities were observed in apposition to retrogradely labeled motoneuron somata and dendrites. Among those lateral hypothalamus neurons that project to the hypoglossal nucleus some were determined to be hypocretin immunoreactive and were located amongst the single-labeled hypocretinergic neurons. These data suggest that hypocretin may play a role in the synaptic control of these motoneurons. PMID:11382413

  2. Intraspinally mediated state-dependent enhancement of motoneurone excitability during fictive scratch in the adult decerebrate cat.

    PubMed

    Power, Kevin E; McCrea, David A; Fedirchuk, Brent

    2010-08-01

    This is the first study to report on the increase in motoneurone excitability during fictive scratch in adult decerebrate cats. Intracellular recordings from antidromically identified motoneurones revealed a decrease in the voltage threshold for spike initiation (V(th)), a suppression of motoneurone afterhyperpolarization and activation of voltage-dependent excitation at the onset of scratch. These state-dependent changes recovered within 10-20 s after scratch and could be evoked after acute transection of the spinal cord at C1. Thus, there is a powerful intraspinal system that can quickly and reversibly re-configure neuronal excitability during spinal network activation. Fictive scratch was evoked in spinal intact and transected decerebrate preparations by stroking the pinnae following topical curare application to the dorsal cervical spinal cord and neuromuscular block. Hyperpolarization of V(th) occurred (mean 5.8 mV) in about 80% of ipsilateral flexor, extensor or bifunctional motoneurones during fictive scratch. The decrease in V(th) began before any scratch-evoked motoneurone activity as well as during the initial phase in which extensors are tonically hyperpolarized. The V(th) of contralateral extensors depolarized by a mean of +3.7 mV during the tonic contralateral extensor activity accompanying ipsilateral scratch. There was a consistent and substantial reduction of afterhyperpolarization amplitude without large increases in motoneurone conductance in both spinal intact and transected preparations. Depolarizing current injection increased, and hyperpolarization decreased the amplitude of rhythmic scratch drive potentials in acute spinal preparations indicating that the spinal scratch-generating network can activate voltage-dependent conductances in motoneurones. The enhanced excitability in spinal preparations associated with fictive scratch indicates the existence of previously unrecognized, intraspinal mechanisms increasing motoneurone excitability.

  3. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, 7-nitroindazole, delays motor dysfunction and spinal motoneuron degeneration in the wobbler mouse.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, K; Iwasaki, Y; Kinoshita, M

    1998-09-18

    Gene mutations of superoxide dismutase (SOD) have been discovered in familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS), endothelial NOS and 3-nitrotyrosine immunoreactivities are selectively increased in the spinal motoneurons of sporadic ALS. Other study suggests that 3-nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity is enhanced in the spinal motoneurons of sporadic and familial ALS patients. The hypothesis is postulated that increased production of radical species, such as superoxide and peroxynitrite, may cause motoneuron degeneration in ALS. There are increased amounts of nitric oxide and SOD hypoactivities in the brain and spinal cord of wobbler mice. NOS is also induced in the vacuolated spinal motoneurons or axons in this animal. Free radicals might contribute to the pathogenesis of wobbler mouse motoneuron disease. Lecithinized SOD treatment has retarded the progression of this disease. This evidence allowed us to determine whether NOS inhibitors delay progression of wobbler mouse motoneuron disease. After clinical diagnosis at age 3-4 weeks, wobbler mice were injected with intraperitoneal non-selective NOS inhibitor, N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 50 mg/kg), two doses of neuronal NOS inhibitor, 7-nitroindazole (5 or 50 mg/kg) or a vehicle solution, daily for 4 weeks in a blind fashion. In comparison with vehicle, 7-nitroindazole-treated mice potentiated grip strength and attenuated deformities in the forelimbs. 7-Nitroindazole treatment increased the biceps muscle weight, reduced denervation muscle atrophy, and suppressed degeneration of spinal motoneurons. To a lesser degree, L-NAME-treated mice displayed slowed progression of disease. The present studies indicate that neuronal NOS inhibitor may be a candidate for promising therapy in lower motoneuron disease or motor neuropathy. PMID:9804111

  4. Repeated Baclofen treatment ameliorates motor dysfunction, suppresses reflex activity and decreases the expression of signaling proteins in reticular nuclei and lumbar motoneurons after spinal trauma in rats.

    PubMed

    Kucharíková, Andrea; Schreiberová, Andrea; Závodská, Monika; Gedrová, Štefánia; Hricová, Ľudmila; Pavel, Jaroslav; Gálik, Ján; Maršala, Martin; Lukáčová, Nadežda

    2014-03-01

    The interruption of supraspinal input to the spinal cord leads to motor dysfunction and the development of spasticity. Clinical studies have shown that Baclofen (a GABAB agonist), while effective in modulating spasticity is associated with side-effects and the development of tolerance. The aim of the present study was to assess if discontinued Baclofen treatment and its repeated application leads antispasticity effects, and whether such changes affect neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in the brainstem, nNOS and parvalbumin (PV) in lumbar α-motoneurons and glial fibrillary acidic protein in the ventral horn of the spinal cord. Adult male Wistar rats were exposed to Th9 spinal cord transection. Baclofen (30mg/b.w.) diluted in drinking water, was administered for 6 days, starting at week 1 after injury and then repeated till week 4 after injury. The behavior of the animals was tested (tail-flick test, BBB locomotor score) from 1 to 8 weeks. Our results clearly indicate the role of nitric oxide, produced by nNOS in the initiation and the maintenance of spasticity states 1, 6 and 8 weeks after spinal trauma. A considerable decrease of nNOS staining after Baclofen treatment correlates with improvement of motor dysfunction. The findings also show that parvalbumin and astrocytes participate in the regulation of ion concentrations in the sub-acute phase after the injury.

  5. Probing the corticospinal link between the motor cortex and motoneurones: some neglected aspects of human motor cortical function.

    PubMed

    Petersen, N C; Butler, J E; Taylor, J L; Gandevia, S C

    2010-04-01

    This review considers the operation of the corticospinal system in primates. There is a relatively widespread cortical area containing corticospinal outputs to a single muscle and thus a motoneurone pool receives corticospinal input from a wide region of the cortex. In addition, corticospinal cells themselves have divergent intraspinal branches which innervate more than one motoneuronal pool but the synergistic couplings involving the many hand muscles are likely to be more diverse than can be accommodated simply by fixed patterns of corticospinal divergence. Many studies using transcranial magnetic stimulation of the human motor cortex have highlighted the capacity of the cortex to modify its apparent excitability in response to altered afferent inputs, training and various pathologies. Studies using cortical stimulation at 'very low' intensities which elicit only short-latency suppression of the discharge of motor units have revealed that the rapidly conducting corticospinal axons (stimulated at higher intensities) drive motoneurones in normal voluntary contractions. There are also major non-linearities generated at a spinal level in the relation between corticospinal output and the output from the motoneurone pool. For example, recent studies have revealed that the efficacy of the human corticospinal connection with motoneurones undergoes activity-dependent changes which influence the size of voluntary contractions. Hence, corticospinal drives must be sculpted continuously to compensate for the changing functional efficacy of the descending systems which activate the motoneurones. This highlights the need for proprioceptive monitoring of movements to ensure their accurate execution. PMID:20003100

  6. Decreased succinate dehydrogenase activity of gamma and alpha motoneurons in mouse spinal cords following 13 weeks of exposure to microgravity.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Akihiko; Nagatomo, Fumiko; Fujino, Hidemi; Kondo, Hiroyo; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    2013-10-01

    Cell body size and succinate dehydrogenase activity of motoneurons in the dorsolateral region of the ventral horn in the lumbar and cervical segments of the mouse spinal cord were assessed after long-term exposure to microgravity and compared with those of ground-based controls. Mice were housed in a mouse drawer system on the International Space Station for 13 weeks. The mice were transported to the International Space Station by the Space Shuttle Discovery and returned to Earth by the Space Shuttle Atlantis. No changes in the cell body size of motoneurons were observed in either segment after exposure to microgravity, but succinate dehydrogenase activity of small-sized (<300 μm(2)) gamma and medium-sized (300-700 μm(2)) alpha motoneurons, which have higher succinate dehydrogenase activity than large-sized (>700 μm(2)) alpha motoneurons, in both segments was lower than that of ground-based controls. We concluded that exposure to microgravity for longer than 3 months induced decreased succinate dehydrogenase activity of both gamma and slow-type alpha motoneurons. In particular, the decreased succinate dehydrogenase activity of gamma motoneurons was observed only after long-term exposure to microgravity. PMID:23943522

  7. Decreased succinate dehydrogenase activity of gamma and alpha motoneurons in mouse spinal cords following 13 weeks of exposure to microgravity.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Akihiko; Nagatomo, Fumiko; Fujino, Hidemi; Kondo, Hiroyo; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    2013-10-01

    Cell body size and succinate dehydrogenase activity of motoneurons in the dorsolateral region of the ventral horn in the lumbar and cervical segments of the mouse spinal cord were assessed after long-term exposure to microgravity and compared with those of ground-based controls. Mice were housed in a mouse drawer system on the International Space Station for 13 weeks. The mice were transported to the International Space Station by the Space Shuttle Discovery and returned to Earth by the Space Shuttle Atlantis. No changes in the cell body size of motoneurons were observed in either segment after exposure to microgravity, but succinate dehydrogenase activity of small-sized (<300 μm(2)) gamma and medium-sized (300-700 μm(2)) alpha motoneurons, which have higher succinate dehydrogenase activity than large-sized (>700 μm(2)) alpha motoneurons, in both segments was lower than that of ground-based controls. We concluded that exposure to microgravity for longer than 3 months induced decreased succinate dehydrogenase activity of both gamma and slow-type alpha motoneurons. In particular, the decreased succinate dehydrogenase activity of gamma motoneurons was observed only after long-term exposure to microgravity.

  8. Descending pathways to the cutaneus trunci muscle motoneuronal cell group in the cat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holstege, Gert; Blok, Bertil F.

    1989-01-01

    The descending pathways to the motoneuronal cell group of the cutaneous trunci muscle (CTM) of the cat were investigated by injecting H-3-labeled lucine into the brain stem, the diencephalon, or the C1, C2, C6, and C8 segments of the spinal cord, and examining fixed autoradiographic sections of the spinal cord and brain regions. Results demonstrate presence of specific supraspinal projectons to the CTM motor nucleus originating in the contralateral nucleus retroambiguous and the ipsilateral dorsolateral pontine tegmentum. Results also suggest that propriospinal pathways to the CTM motor nucleus originating in the cervical cord do not exist, although these propriospinal projections to all other motoneuronal cell groups surrounding the CTM nucleus are very strong.

  9. Neuropathology in respiratory-related motoneurons in young Pompe (Gaa(-/-)) mice.

    PubMed

    Turner, Sara M F; Hoyt, Aaron K; ElMallah, Mai K; Falk, Darin J; Byrne, Barry J; Fuller, David D

    2016-06-15

    Respiratory and/or lingual dysfunction are among the first motor symptoms in Pompe disease, a disorder resulting from absence or dysfunction of the lysosomal enzyme acid α-glucosidase (GAA). Here, we histologically evaluated the medulla, cervical and thoracic spinal cords in 6 weeks old asymptomatic Pompe (Gaa(-/-)) mice to determine if neuropathology in respiratory motor regions has an early onset. Periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining indicated glycogen accumulation was exclusively occurring in Gaa(-/-) hypoglossal, mid-cervical and upper thoracic motoneurons. Markers of DNA damage (Tunel) and ongoing apoptosis (Cleaved Caspase 3) did not co-localize with PAS staining, but were prominent in a medullary region which included the nucleus tractus solitarius, and also in the thoracic spinal dorsal horn. We conclude that respiratory-related motoneurons are particularly susceptible to GAA deficiency and that neuronal glycogen accumulation and neurodegeneration may occur independently in early stage disease. The data support early therapeutic intervention in Pompe disease. PMID:26921786

  10. Neuromodulation impact on nonlinear firing behavior of a reduced model motoneuron with the active dendrite

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hojeong; Heckman, C. J.

    2014-01-01

    Neuromodulatory inputs from brainstem systems modulate the normal function of spinal motoneurons by altering the activation properties of persistent inward currents (PICs) in their dendrites. However, the effect of the PIC on firing outputs also depends on its location in the dendritic tree. To investigate the interaction between PIC neuromodulation and PIC location dependence, we used a two-compartment model that was biologically realistic in that it retains directional and frequency-dependent electrical coupling between the soma and the dendrites, as seen in multi-compartment models based on full anatomical reconstructions of motoneurons. Our two-compartment approach allowed us to systematically vary the coupling parameters between the soma and the dendrite to accurately reproduce the effect of location of the dendritic PIC on the generation of nonlinear (hysteretic) motoneuron firing patterns. Our results show that as a single parameter value for PIC activation was either increased or decreased by 20% from its default value, the solution space of the coupling parameter values for nonlinear firing outputs was drastically reduced by approximately 80%. As a result, the model tended to fire only in a linear mode at the majority of dendritic PIC sites. The same results were obtained when all parameters for the PIC activation simultaneously changed only by approximately ±10%. Our results suggest the democratization effect of neuromodulation: the neuromodulation by the brainstem systems may play a role in switching the motoneurons with PICs at different dendritic locations to a similar mode of firing by reducing the effect of the dendritic location of PICs on the firing behavior. PMID:25309410

  11. Estrogenic support of motoneuron dendritic growth via the neuromuscular periphery in a sexually dimorphic motor system.

    PubMed

    Nowacek, Ari S; Sengelaub, Dale R

    2006-08-01

    The lumbar spinal cord of rats contains the sexually dimorphic, steroid-sensitive spinal nucleus of the bulbocavernosus (SNB). In males, the growth of SNB dendrites is steroid-dependent: dendrites fail to grow after castration, but grow in castrates treated with androgens or estrogens. Blocking estradiol synthesis or estrogen receptors in gonadally intact males attenuates SNB dendritic growth, suggesting that estrogens are required and must be able to act at their receptors to support normal masculine dendritic growth. However, SNB motoneurons do not accumulate estrogens, suggesting that estrogens act indirectly to support SNB dendritic growth. In this experiment, we examined whether local estrogen action in the neuromuscular periphery was involved in the postnatal development of SNB motoneurons. Motoneuron morphology was assessed in gonadally intact and castrated males. Gonadally intact males were left untreated or given either blank or tamoxifen implants sutured to the target musculature, or tamoxifen interscapular implants. Castrated males were left untreated or were given estradiol by muscle or interscapular implants or systemic injection during the period of SNB dendritic growth. At postnatal day 28, when SNB dendritic length is normally maximal, SNB motoneurons were retrogradely labeled with cholera toxin-HRP and reconstructed in three dimensions. While interscapular tamoxifen implants were ineffective, blocking estrogen receptors at the target musculature resulted in attenuation of SNB dendritic growth. In contrast, while interscapular implants of estradiol were ineffective, local treatment with estradiol at the target musculature in castrated males resulted in masculinization of dendritic growth. Thus, estrogens may act by an indirect action in the neuromuscular periphery to support SNB dendritic growth.

  12. Corticospinal Inputs to Primate Motoneurons Innervating the Forelimb from Two Divisions of Primary Motor Cortex and Area 3a

    PubMed Central

    Witham, Claire L.; Fisher, Karen M.; Edgley, Steve A.

    2016-01-01

    Previous anatomical work in primates has suggested that only corticospinal axons originating in caudal primary motor cortex (“new M1”) and area 3a make monosynaptic cortico-motoneuronal connections with limb motoneurons. By contrast, the more rostral “old M1” is proposed to control motoneurons disynaptically via spinal interneurons. In six macaque monkeys, we examined the effects from focal stimulation within old and new M1 and area 3a on 135 antidromically identified motoneurons projecting to the upper limb. EPSPs with segmental latency shorter than 1.2 ms were classified as definitively monosynaptic; these were seen only after stimulation within new M1 or at the new M1/3a border (incidence 6.6% and 1.3%, respectively; total n = 27). However, most responses had longer latencies. Using measures of the response facilitation after a second stimulus compared with the first, and the reduction in response latency after a third stimulus compared with the first, we classified these late responses as likely mediated by either long-latency monosynaptic (n = 108) or non-monosynaptic linkages (n = 108). Both old and new M1 generated putative long-latency monosynaptic and non-monosynaptic effects; the majority of responses from area 3a were non-monosynaptic. Both types of responses from new M1 had significantly greater amplitude than those from old M1. We suggest that slowly conducting corticospinal fibers from old M1 generate weak late monosynaptic effects in motoneurons. These may represent a stage in control of primate motoneurons by the cortex intermediate between disynaptic output via an interposed interneuron seen in nonprimates and the fast direct monosynaptic connections present in new M1. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The corticospinal tract in Old World primates makes monosynaptic connections to motoneurons; previous anatomical work suggests that these connections come only from corticospinal tract (CST) neurons in the subdivision of primary motor cortex within the

  13. The influence of increased membrane conductance on response properties of spinal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Grigonis, Ramunas; Guzulaitis, Robertas; Buisas, Rokas; Alaburda, Aidas

    2016-10-01

    During functional spinal neural network activity motoneurons receive massive synaptic excitation and inhibition, and their membrane conductance increases considerably - they are switched to a high-conductance state. High-conductance states can substantially alter response properties of motoneurons. In the present study we investigated how an increase in membrane conductance affects spike frequency adaptation, the gain (i.e., the slope of the frequency-current relationship) and the threshold for action potential generation. We used intracellular recordings from adult turtle motoneurons in spinal cord slices. Membrane conductance was increased pharmacologically by extracellular application of the GABAA receptor agonist muscimol. Our findings suggest that an increase in membrane conductance of about 40-50% increases the magnitude of spike frequency adaptation, but does not change the threshold for action potential generation. Increased conductance causes a subtractive rather than a divisive effect on the initial and the early frequency-current relationships and may have not only a subtractive but also a divisive effect on the steady-state frequency-current relationship. PMID:27450930

  14. Subthreshold excitatory activity and motoneuron discharge during REM periods of active sleep.

    PubMed

    Chase, M H; Morales, F R

    1983-09-16

    A striking paradox of the rapid eye movement periods of active sleep, which are typically characterized by the exacerbation of somatomotor atonia, is the occurrence of muscle twitches and jerks. The purpose of this study was to examine the specific motoneuron membrane potential processes responsible for these myoclonic patterns of activity. In lumbar motoneurons, examined intracellularly in the cat prepared for long-term study, these processes consisted of recurrent depolarizing membrane potential shifts and spontaneous action potentials that were either full-sized or of partial amplitude. In addition, the invasion of antidromically induced spikes into the soma was often blocked. Hyperpolarizing potentials were evident in the intervals between spontaneous spikes. Hyperpolarization was also observed immediately before depolarization and spike activity, in contrast to the gradual depolarization of the motoneuron membrane potential that always occurred during wakefulness. Thus, during rapid eye movement periods, in conjunction with muscle twitches and jerks, a strong excitatory input is superimposed on a background of inhibitory input. The unique patterns of membrane potential change that arise thus seem to result from the simultaneous coactivation of excitatory and inhibitory processes. PMID:6310749

  15. Glutamatergic motoneurons in the stomatogastric ganglion of the mantis shrimp Squilla oratoria.

    PubMed

    Chiba, C; Tazaki, K

    1992-07-01

    1. Transmitters of motoneurons in the stomatogastric ganglion (STG) of Squilla were identified by analyzing the excitatory neuromuscular properties of muscles in the posterior cardiac plate (pcp) and pyloric regions. 2. Bath and iontophoretic applications of glutamate produce depolarizations in these muscles. The pharmacological experiments and desensitization of the junctional receptors elucidate the glutamatergic nature of the excitatory junctional potentials (EJPs) evoked in the constrictor and dilator muscles. The reversal potentials for the excitatory junctional current (EJC) and for the glutamate-induced current are almost the same. 3. Some types of dilator muscle show sensitivity to both glutamate and acetylcholine (ACh) exogenously applied. The pharmacological evidence and desensitization of the junctional receptors indicate the glutamatergic nature of neuromuscular junctions in these dually sensitive muscles. The reversal potentials for the EJC and for the ACh-induced current are not identical. 4. Glutamate is a candidate as an excitatory neuro-transmitter at the neuromuscular junctions which the STG motoneurons named PCP, PY, PD, LA and VC make with the identified muscles. Kainic and quisqualic acids which act on glutamate receptors are potent excitants of these muscles. Extrajunctional receptors to ACh are present in two types of the muscle innervated by LA and VC. 5. Neurotransmitters used by the STG motoneurons of stomatopods are compared to those of decapods. PMID:1359128

  16. Cardiotrophin-1, a muscle-derived cytokine, is required for the survival of subpopulations of developing motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Oppenheim, R W; Wiese, S; Prevette, D; Armanini, M; Wang, S; Houenou, L J; Holtmann, B; Gotz, R; Pennica, D; Sendtner, M

    2001-02-15

    Developing motoneurons require trophic support from their target, the skeletal muscle. Despite a large number of neurotrophic molecules with survival-promoting activity for isolated embryonic motoneurons, those factors that are required for motoneuron survival during development are still not known. Cytokines of the ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF)-leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) family have been shown to play a role in motoneuron (MN) survival. Importantly, in mice lacking the LIFRbeta or the CNTFRalpha there is a significant loss of MNs during embryonic development. Because genetic deletion of either (or both) CNTF or LIF fails, by contrast, to perturb MN survival before birth, it was concluded that another ligand exists that is functionally inactivated in the receptor deleted mice, resulting in MN loss during development. One possible candidate for this ligand is the CNTF-LIF family member cardiotrophin-1 (CT-1). CT-1 is highly expressed in embryonic skeletal muscle, secreted by myotubes, and promotes the survival of cultured embryonic mouse and rat MNs. Here we show that ct-1 deficiency causes increased motoneuron cell death in spinal cord and brainstem nuclei of mice during a period between embryonic day 14 and the first postnatal week. Interestingly, no further loss was detectable during the subsequent postnatal period, and nerve lesion in young adult ct-1-deficient mice did not result in significant additional loss of motoneurons, as had been previously observed in mice lacking both CNTF and LIF. CT-1 is the first bona fide muscle-derived neurotrophic factor to be identified that is required for the survival of subgroups of developing motoneurons. PMID:11160399

  17. Static γ-motoneurones couple group Ia and II afferents of single muscle spindles in anaesthetised and decerebrate cats

    PubMed Central

    Gladden, M H; Matsuzaki, H

    2002-01-01

    Ideas about the functions of static γ-motoneurones are based on the responses of primary and secondary endings to electrical stimulation of single static γ-axons, usually at high frequencies. We compared these effects with the actions of spontaneously active γ-motoneurones. In anaesthetised cats, afferents and efferents were recorded in intramuscular nerve branches to single muscle spindles. The occurrence of γ-spikes, identified by a spike shape recognition system, was linked to video-taped contractions of type-identified intrafusal fibres in the dissected muscle spindles. When some static γ-motoneurones were active at low frequency (< 15 Hz) they coupled the firing of group Ia and II afferents. Activity of other static γ-motoneurones which tensed the intrafusal fibres appeared to enhance this effect. Under these conditions the secondary ending responded at shorter latency than the primary ending. In another series of experiments on decerebrate cats, responses of primary and secondary endings of single muscle spindles to activation of γ-motoneurones by natural stimuli were compared with their responses to electrical stimulation of single γ-axons supplying the same spindle. Electrical stimulation mimicked the natural actions of γ-motoneurones on either the primary or the secondary ending, but not on both together. However, γ-activity evoked by natural stimuli coupled the firing of afferents with the muscle at constant length, and also when it was stretched. Analysis showed that the timing and tightness of this coupling determined the degree of summation of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) evoked by each afferent in α-motoneurones and interneurones contacted by terminals of both endings, and thus the degree of facilitation of reflex actions of group II afferents. PMID:12181298

  18. Chloride-sensitive MEQ fluorescence in chick embryo motoneurons following manipulations of chloride and during spontaneous network activity.

    PubMed

    Chub, Nikolai; Mentis, George Z; O'donovan, Michael J

    2006-01-01

    Intracellular Cl(-) ([Cl(-)](in)) homeostasis is thought to be an important regulator of spontaneous activity in the spinal cord of the chick embryo. We investigated this idea by visualizing the variations of [Cl(-)](in) in motoneurons retrogradely labeled with the Cl-sensitive dye 6-methoxy-N-ethylquinolinium iodide (MEQ) applied to cut muscle nerves in the isolated E10-E12 spinal cord. This labeling procedure obviated the need for synthesizing the reduced, cell-permeable dihydro-MEQ (DiH-MEQ). The specificity of motoneuron labeling was confirmed using retrograde co-labeling with Texas Red Dextran and immunocytochemistry for choline acetyltransferase (ChAT). In MEQ-labeled motoneurons, the GABA(A) receptor agonist isoguvacine (100 muM) increased somatic and dendritic fluorescence by 7.4 and 16.7%, respectively. The time course of this fluorescence change mirrored that of the depolarization recorded from the axons of the labeled motoneurons. Blockade of the inward Na(+)/K(-)/2Cl(-) co-transporter (NKCC1) with bumetanide (20 microM) or with a low-Na(+) bath solution (12 mM), increased MEQ fluorescence by 5.3 and 11.4%, respectively, consistent with a decrease of [Cl(-)](in). After spontaneous episodes of activity, MEQ fluorescence increased and then declined to the pre-episode level during the interepisode interval. The largest fluorescence changes occurred over motoneuron dendrites (19.7%) with significantly smaller changes (5.2%) over somata. Collectively, these results show that retrogradely loaded MEQ can be used to detect [Cl(-)](in) in motoneurons, that the bumetanide-sensitive NKCC1 co-transporter is at least partially responsible for the elevated [Cl(-)](in) of developing motoneurons, and that dendritic [Cl(-)](in) decreases during spontaneous episodes and recovers during the inter-episode interval, presumably due to the action of NKCC1. PMID:16192339

  19. The pattern of excitation of human lower limb motoneurones by probable group II muscle afferents.

    PubMed

    Simonetta-Moreau, M; Marque, P; Marchand-Pauvert, V; Pierrot-Deseilligny, E

    1999-05-15

    1. Heteronymous group II effects were investigated in the human lower limb. Changes in firing probability of single motor units in quadriceps (Q), biceps (Bi), semitendinosus (ST), gastrocnemius medialis (GM) and tibialis anterior (TA) were studied after electrical stimuli between 1 and 3 times motor threshold (MT) applied to common peroneal (CP), superficial (SP) and deep (DP) peroneal, Bi and GM nerves in those nerve-muscle combinations without recurrent inhibition. 2. Stimulation of the CP and Bi nerves evoked in almost all of the explored Q motor units a biphasic excitation with a low-threshold early peak, attributable to non-monosynaptic group I excitation, and a higher threshold late peak. When the CP nerve was cooled (or the stimulation applied to a distal branch, DP), the increase in latency was greater for the late than for the early peak, indicating that the late excitation is due to stimulation of afferents with a slower conduction velocity than group I fibres, presumably in the group II range. In ST motor units the group II excitation elicited by stimulation of the GM and SP nerves was particularly large and frequent, and the non-monosynaptic group I excitation was often replaced by an inhibition. 3. A late group II-induced excitation from CP to Q motoneurones and from GM and SP to ST motoneurones was also observed when using the H reflex as a test. 4. The electrical threshold and conduction velocity of the largest diameter fibres evoking the group II excitation were estimated to be 2.1 and 0.65 times those of the fastest Ia afferents, respectively. In the combinations tested in the present investigation the group II input seemed to be primarily of muscle origin. 5. The potent heteronymous group II excitation of motoneurones of both flexors and extensors of the knee contrasted with the absence of a group II effect from DP to GM and from GM to TA. In none of the combinations explored was there any evidence for group II inhibition of motoneurones. The

  20. Improved lentiviral transduction of ALS motoneurons in vivo via dual targeting.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Valerie B; Ovsepian, Saak V; Bodeker, Macdara; Dolly, J Oliver

    2013-11-01

    Treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a progressive neurodegenerative disease, is hampered by its complex etiology and lack of efficient means for targeted transfer of therapeutics into motoneurons. The objective of this research was engineering of a versatile motoneuron targeting adapter--a full-length atoxic tetanus toxin fused to core-streptavidin (CS-TeTIM)--for retro-axonal transduction of viral vectors; validation of the targeting efficiency of CS-TeTIM in vivo, by expression of green fluorescence protein (GFP) reporter in motoneurons of presymptomatic and symptomatic ALS-like SOD1(G93A) mice, and comparison with age-matched controls; and appraisal of lentiviral transduction with CS-TeTIM relative to (1) a HC binding fragment of tetanus toxin CS-TeTx(HC), (2) rabies glycoprotein (RG), and (3) a CS-TeTIM-RG dual targeting approach. CS-TeTIM and CS-TeTx(HC) were engineered using recombinant technology and site-directed mutagenesis. Biotinylated vectors, pseudotyped with vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G) or RG, were linked to these adaptors and injected intraperitoneally (ip) into presymptomatic (12 weeks old), symptomatic SOD1(G93A) (22 weeks old) or wild type control mice, followed by monitoring of GFP expression in the spinal cord and supraspinal motor structures with quantitative PCR and immuno-histochemistry. Transcripts were detected in the spinal cord and supraspinal motor structures of all mice 2 weeks after receiving a single ip injection, although in symptomatic SOD1(G93A) animals reporter RNA levels were lower compared to presymptomatic and wild-type controls irrespective of the targeting approach. GFP transduction with CS-TeTIM proved more efficient than CS-TeTx(HC) across all groups while CS-TeTIM-RG dual-targeted vectors yielded the highest transcript numbers. Importantly, in both wild-type and presymptomatic SOD1(G93A) mice strong colabeling of choline-acetyltransferase (ChAT) and GFP was visualized in neurons of the

  1. Improved lentiviral transduction of ALS motoneurons in vivo via dual targeting.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Valerie B; Ovsepian, Saak V; Bodeker, Macdara; Dolly, J Oliver

    2013-11-01

    Treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a progressive neurodegenerative disease, is hampered by its complex etiology and lack of efficient means for targeted transfer of therapeutics into motoneurons. The objective of this research was engineering of a versatile motoneuron targeting adapter--a full-length atoxic tetanus toxin fused to core-streptavidin (CS-TeTIM)--for retro-axonal transduction of viral vectors; validation of the targeting efficiency of CS-TeTIM in vivo, by expression of green fluorescence protein (GFP) reporter in motoneurons of presymptomatic and symptomatic ALS-like SOD1(G93A) mice, and comparison with age-matched controls; and appraisal of lentiviral transduction with CS-TeTIM relative to (1) a HC binding fragment of tetanus toxin CS-TeTx(HC), (2) rabies glycoprotein (RG), and (3) a CS-TeTIM-RG dual targeting approach. CS-TeTIM and CS-TeTx(HC) were engineered using recombinant technology and site-directed mutagenesis. Biotinylated vectors, pseudotyped with vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G) or RG, were linked to these adaptors and injected intraperitoneally (ip) into presymptomatic (12 weeks old), symptomatic SOD1(G93A) (22 weeks old) or wild type control mice, followed by monitoring of GFP expression in the spinal cord and supraspinal motor structures with quantitative PCR and immuno-histochemistry. Transcripts were detected in the spinal cord and supraspinal motor structures of all mice 2 weeks after receiving a single ip injection, although in symptomatic SOD1(G93A) animals reporter RNA levels were lower compared to presymptomatic and wild-type controls irrespective of the targeting approach. GFP transduction with CS-TeTIM proved more efficient than CS-TeTx(HC) across all groups while CS-TeTIM-RG dual-targeted vectors yielded the highest transcript numbers. Importantly, in both wild-type and presymptomatic SOD1(G93A) mice strong colabeling of choline-acetyltransferase (ChAT) and GFP was visualized in neurons of the

  2. Functional identification of the input-output transforms of motoneurones in the rat and cat.

    PubMed

    Poliakov, A V; Powers, R K; Binder, M D

    1997-10-15

    1. We studied the responses of rat hypoglossal and cat lumbar motoneurones to a variety of excitatory and inhibitory injected current transients during repetitive discharge. The amplitudes and time courses of the transients were comparable to those of the synaptic currents underlying unitary and small compound postsynaptic potentials (PSPs) recorded in these cells. Poisson trains of ten of these excitatory and ten inhibitory current transients were combined with an additional independent, high-frequency random waveform to approximate band limited white noise. The white noise waveform was then superimposed on long duration (39 s) suprathreshold current steps. 2. We measured the effects of each of the current transients on motoneurone discharge by compiling peristimulus time histograms (PSTHs) between the times of occurrence of individual current transients and motoneurone discharges. We estimated the changes in membrane potential associated with each current transient by approximating the passive response of the motoneurone with a simple resistance-capacitance circuit. The relations between the features of these simulated PSPs and those of the PSTHs were similar to those reported previously for real PSPs: the short-latency PSTH peak (or trough) was generally longer than the initial phase of the PSP derivative, but shorter than the time course of the PSP itself. Linear models of the PSP to PSTH transform based on the PSP time course, the time derivative of the PSP, or a linear combination of the two parameters could not reproduce the full range of PSTH profiles observed. 3. We also used the responses of the motoneurones to the white noise stimulus to derive zero-, first- and second-order Wiener kernels, which provide a quantitative description of the relation between injected current and discharge probability. The convolution integral computed for an injected current waveform and the first-order Wiener kernel should provide the best linear prediction of the

  3. Electrophysiological properties of lumbar motoneurons in the alpha-chloralose-anesthetized cat during carbachol-induced motor inhibition.

    PubMed

    Xi, M C; Liu, R H; Yamuy, J; Morales, F R; Chase, M H

    1997-07-01

    The present study was undertaken 1) to examine the neuronal mechanisms responsible for the inhibition of spinal cord motoneurons that occurs in alpha-chloralose-anesthetized cats following the microinjection of carbachol into the nucleus pontis oralis (NPO), and 2) to determine whether the inhibitory mechanisms are the same as those that are responsible for the postsynaptic inhibition of motoneurons that is present during naturally occurring active sleep. Accordingly, the basic electrophysiological properties of lumbar motoneurons were examined, with the use of intracellular recording techniques, in cats anesthetized with alpha-chloralose and compared with those present during naturally occurring active sleep. The intrapontine administration of carbachol resulted in a sustained reduction in the amplitude of the spinal cord Ia monosynaptic reflex. Discrete large-amplitude inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs), which are only present during the state of active sleep in the chronic cat, were also observed in high-gain recordings from lumbar motoneurons after the injection of carbachol. During carbachol-induced motor inhibition, lumbar motoneurons exhibited a statistically significant decrease in input resistance, membrane time constant and a reduction in the amplitude of the action potential's afterhyperpolarization. In addition, there was a statistically significant increase in rheobase and in the delay between the initial-segment (IS) and somadendritic (SD) portions of the action potential (IS-SD delay). There was a significant increase in the mean motoneuron resting membrane potential (i.e., hyperpolarization). The preceding changes in the electrophysiological properties of motoneurons, as well as the development of discrete IPSPs, indicate that lumbar motoneurons are postsynaptically inhibited after the intrapontine administration of carbachol in cats that are anesthetized with alpha-chloralose. These changes in the electrophysiological properties of lumbar

  4. Effects of extensor and flexor group I afferent volleys on the excitability of individual soleus motoneurones in man

    PubMed Central

    Ashby, Peter; Labelle, Keith

    1977-01-01

    The contour of the postsynaptic potential (PSP) produced in a neurone by an afferent volley can be derived from the contour of the post-stimulus time histogram (PSTH) of that neurone when it is discharging rhythmically. In the present study the PSTH of the firing of individual soleus motor units after stimulation of the popliteal or peroneal nerve was used to explore the effects of extensor and flexor group I afferent volleys on the excitability of single soleus motoneurones in man. Extensor group I volleys resulted in an early peak of increased impulse density in the PSTH of 75% of soleus motoneurones. The latency suggests an analogy with the Ia EPSP. The mean duration of the peak of increased impulse density, equivalent to the rise time of the EPSP, was 3.6 ms. Flexor group I volleys result in a period of reduced impulse density in the PSTH of five out of nine soleus motoneurones. The latency suggests an analogy with the Ia IPSP. We conclude that this method could be used to explore the afferent connections to single motoneurones in man and to derive some of the characteristics of the postsynaptic potentials from a variety of afferent nerve fibres in single human motoneurones. PMID:599368

  5. Cell culture models to investigate the selective vulnerability of motoneuronal mitochondria to familial ALS-linked G93ASOD1.

    PubMed

    Raimondi, Andrea; Mangolini, Alessandra; Rizzardini, Milena; Tartari, Silvia; Massari, Silvia; Bendotti, Caterina; Francolini, Maura; Borgese, Nica; Cantoni, Lavinia; Pietrini, Grazia

    2006-07-01

    Mitochondrial damage induced by superoxide dismutase (SOD1) mutants has been proposed to have a causative role in the selective degeneration of motoneurons in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In order to investigate the basis of the tissue specificity of mutant SOD1 we compared the effect of the continuous expression of wild-type or mutant (G93A) human SOD1 on mitochondrial morphology in the NSC-34 motoneuronal-like, the N18TG2 neuroblastoma and the non-neuronal Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cell lines. Morphological alterations of mitochondria were observed in NSC-34 expressing the G93A mutant (NSC-G93A) but not the wild-type SOD1, whereas a ten-fold greater level of total expression of the mutant had no effect on mitochondria of non-motoneuronal cell lines. Fragmented network, swelling and cristae remodelling but not vacuolization of mitochondria or other intracellular organelles were observed only in NSC-G93A cells. The mitochondrial alterations were not explained by a preferential localization of the mutant within NSC-G93A mitochondria, as a higher amount of the mutant SOD1 was found in mitochondria of MDCK-G93A cells. Our results suggest that mitochondrial vulnerability of motoneurons to G93ASOD1 is recapitulated in NSC-34 cells, and that peculiar features in network dynamics may account for the selective alterations of motoneuronal mitochondria. PMID:16903849

  6. Proper migration and axon outgrowth of zebrafish cranial motoneuron subpopulations require the cell adhesion molecule MDGA2A

    PubMed Central

    Ingold, Esther; vom Berg-Maurer, Colette M.; Burckhardt, Christoph J.; Lehnherr, André; Rieder, Philip; Keller, Philip J.; Stelzer, Ernst H.; Greber, Urs F.; Neuhauss, Stephan C. F.; Gesemann, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The formation of functional neuronal circuits relies on accurate migration and proper axonal outgrowth of neuronal precursors. On the route to their targets migrating cells and growing axons depend on both, directional information from neurotropic cues and adhesive interactions mediated via extracellular matrix molecules or neighbouring cells. The inactivation of guidance cues or the interference with cell adhesion can cause severe defects in neuronal migration and axon guidance. In this study we have analyzed the function of the MAM domain containing glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor 2A (MDGA2A) protein in zebrafish cranial motoneuron development. MDGA2A is prominently expressed in distinct clusters of cranial motoneurons, especially in the ones of the trigeminal and facial nerves. Analyses of MDGA2A knockdown embryos by light sheet and confocal microscopy revealed impaired migration and aberrant axonal outgrowth of these neurons; suggesting that adhesive interactions mediated by MDGA2A are required for the proper arrangement and outgrowth of cranial motoneuron subtypes. PMID:25572423

  7. Revisiting Antagonist Effects in Hypoglossal Nucleus: Brainstem Circuit for the State-Dependent Control of Hypoglossal Motoneurons: A Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Fenik, Victor B.

    2015-01-01

    We reassessed and provided new insights into the findings that were obtained in our previous experiments that employed the injections of combined adrenergic, serotonergic, GABAergic, and glycinergic antagonists into the hypoglossal nucleus in order to pharmacologically abolish the depression of hypoglossal nerve activity that occurred during carbachol-induced rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep-like state in anesthetized rats. We concluded that noradrenergic disfacilitation is the major mechanism that is responsible for approximately 90% of the depression of hypoglossal motoneurons, whereas the remaining 10% can be explained by serotonergic mechanisms that have net inhibitory effect on hypoglossal nerve activity during REM sleep-like state. We hypothesized that both noradrenergic and serotonergic state-dependent mechanisms indirectly control hypoglossal motoneuron excitability during REM sleep; their activities are integrated and mediated to hypoglossal motoneurons by reticular formation neurons. In addition, we proposed a brainstem neural circuit that can explain the new findings. PMID:26648908

  8. Comparison of dendritic calcium transients in juvenile wild type and SOD1(G93A) mouse lumbar motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Quinlan, Katharina A; Lamano, Jonathan B; Samuels, Julienne; Heckman, C J

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies of spinal motoneurons in the SOD1 mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis have shown alterations long before disease onset, including increased dendritic branching, increased persistent Na(+) and Ca(2+) currents, and impaired axonal transport. In this study dendritic Ca(2+) entry was investigated using two photon excitation fluorescence microscopy and whole-cell patch-clamp of juvenile (P4-11) motoneurons. Neurons were filled with both Ca(2+) Green-1 and Texas Red dextrans, and line scans performed throughout. Steps were taken to account for different sources of variability, including (1) dye filling and laser penetration, (2) dendritic anatomy, and (3) the time elapsed from the start of recording. First, Ca(2+) Green-1 fluorescence was normalized by Texas Red; next, neurons were reconstructed so anatomy could be evaluated; finally, time was recorded. Customized software detected the largest Ca(2+) transients (area under the curve) from each line scan and matched it with parameters above. Overall, larger dendritic diameter and shorter path distance from the soma were significant predictors of larger transients, while time was not significant up to 2 h (data thereafter was dropped). However, Ca(2+) transients showed additional variability. Controlling for previous factors, significant variation was found between Ca(2+) signals from different processes of the same neuron in 3/7 neurons. This could reflect differential expression of Ca(2+) channels, local neuromodulation or other variations. Finally, Ca(2+) transients in SOD1(G93A) motoneurons were significantly smaller than in non-transgenic motoneurons. In conclusion, motoneuron processes show highly variable Ca(2+) transients, but these transients are smaller overall in SOD1(G93A) motoneurons. PMID:25914627

  9. Motoneuron properties during motor inhibition produced by microinjection of carbachol into the pontine reticular formation of the decerebrate cat.

    PubMed

    Morales, F R; Engelhardt, J K; Soja, P J; Pereda, A E; Chase, M H

    1987-04-01

    It is well established that cholinergic agonists, when injected into the pontine reticular formation in cats, produce a generalized suppression of motor activity (1, 3, 6, 14, 18, 27, 33, 50). The responsible neuronal mechanisms were explored by measuring ventral root activity, the amplitude of the Ia-monosynaptic reflex, and the basic electrophysiological properties of hindlimb motoneurons before and after carbachol was microinjected into the pontine reticular formation of decerebrate cats. Intrapontine microinjections of carbachol (0.25-1.0 microliter, 16 mg/ml) resulted in the tonic suppression of ventral root activity and a decrease in the amplitude of the Ia-monosynaptic reflex. An analysis of intracellular records from lumbar motoneurons during the suppression of motor activity induced by carbachol revealed a considerable decrease in input resistance and membrane time constant as well as a reduction in motoneuron excitability, as evidenced by a nearly twofold increase in rheobase. Discrete inhibitory postsynaptic potentials were also observed following carbachol administration. The changes in motoneuron properties (rheobase, input resistance, and membrane time constant), as well as the development of discrete inhibitory postsynaptic potentials, indicate that spinal cord motoneurons were postsynaptically inhibited following the pontine administration of carbachol. In addition, the inhibitory processes that arose after carbachol administration in the decerebrate cat were remarkably similar to those that are present during active sleep in the chronic cat. These findings suggest that the microinjection of carbachol into the pontine reticular formation activates the same brain stem-spinal cord system that is responsible for the postsynaptic inhibition of alpha-motoneurons that occurs during active sleep. PMID:3585456

  10. Distinct inhibitory neurons exert temporally specific control over activity of a motoneuron receiving concurrent excitation and inhibition.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Kosei; Brezina, Vladimir; Weiss, Klaudiusz R; Jing, Jian

    2009-09-23

    Recent work suggests that concurrent excitation and inhibition originating in central pattern generators (CPGs) may be used to control rhythmic motoneuronal activity. The specific roles that the inhibition plays in such cases are not well understood, however, in part because of the lack of identification of presynaptic inhibitory neurons. Here we demonstrate that, in the Aplysia feeding CPG, inhibitory inputs may be critical for flexible control of the activity of motoneurons in different forms of behavior. The feeding CPG generates ingestive and egestive motor programs, differing in the high and low activity, respectively, of the motoneuron B8 during the retraction phase of the programs. We show that, during retraction, B8 receives concurrent excitation and inhibition that produces a high-conductance state. The inhibition originates in two types of CPG neurons, B4/5 and B70, that are more active in egestion than ingestion and play a role in suppressing B8 activity during egestion. In turn, the activities of both B4/5 and B70 are suppressed by the ingestion-promoting descending interneuron CBI-3 (for cerebral-buccal interneuron 3). Thus, concurrent excitation and inhibition may be an effective means of controlling motoneuronal activity in a behavior-dependent manner. More detailed analyses reveal, furthermore, that B4/5 and B70 exert complementary actions by acting preferentially in the early and late part of retraction, respectively. Thus, the use of multiple neurons to generate inhibitory inputs to motoneurons that receive concurrent excitation and inhibition brings an additional level of flexibility that allows a temporally specific control of motoneuronal activity within a single phase of motor programs.

  11. Motoneuronal and muscle synergies involved in cat hindlimb control during fictive and real locomotion: a comparison study.

    PubMed

    Markin, Sergey N; Lemay, Michel A; Prilutsky, Boris I; Rybak, Ilya A

    2012-04-01

    We compared the activity profiles and synergies of spinal motoneurons recorded during fictive locomotion evoked in immobilized decerebrate cat preparations by midbrain stimulation to the activity profiles and synergies of the corresponding hindlimb muscles obtained during forward level walking in cats. The fictive locomotion data were collected in the Spinal Cord Research Centre, University of Manitoba, and provided by Dr. David McCrea; the real locomotion data were obtained in the laboratories of M. A. Lemay and B. I. Prilutsky. Scatterplot representation and minimum spanning tree clustering algorithm were used to identify the possible motoneuronal and muscle synergies operating during both fictive and real locomotion. We found a close similarity between the activity profiles and synergies of motoneurons innervating one-joint muscles during fictive locomotion and the profiles and synergies of the corresponding muscles during real locomotion. However, the activity patterns of proximal nerves controlling two-joint muscles, such as posterior biceps and semitendinosus (PBSt) and rectus femoris (RF), were not uniform in fictive locomotion preparations and differed from the activity profiles of the corresponding two-joint muscles recorded during forward level walking. Moreover, the activity profiles of these nerves and the corresponding muscles were unique and could not be included in the synergies identified in fictive and real locomotion. We suggest that afferent feedback is involved in the regulation of locomotion via motoneuronal synergies controlled by the spinal central pattern generator (CPG) but may also directly affect the activity of motoneuronal pools serving two-joint muscles (e.g., PBSt and RF). These findings provide important insights into the organization of the spinal CPG in mammals, the motoneuronal and muscle synergies engaged during locomotion, and their afferent control.

  12. Activation properties of trigeminal motoneurons in participants with and without bruxism

    PubMed Central

    D'Amico, Jessica M.; Yavuz, Ş. Utku; Saraçoğlu, Ahmet; Atiş, Elif Sibel; Türker, Kemal S.

    2013-01-01

    In animals, sodium- and calcium-mediated persistent inward currents (PICs), which produce long-lasting periods of depolarization under conditions of low synaptic drive, can be activated in trigeminal motoneurons following the application of the monoamine serotonin. Here we examined if PICs are activated in human trigeminal motoneurons during voluntary contractions and under physiological levels of monoaminergic drive (e.g., serotonin and norepinephrine) using a paired motor unit analysis technique. We also examined if PICs activated during voluntary contractions are larger in participants who demonstrate involuntary chewing during sleep (bruxism), which is accompanied by periods of high monoaminergic drive. In control participants, during a slowly increasing and then decreasing isometric contraction, the firing rate of an earlier-recruited masseter motor unit, which served as a measure of synaptic input to a later-recruited test unit, was consistently lower during derecruitment of the test unit compared with at recruitment (ΔF = 4.6 ± 1.5 imp/s). The ΔF, therefore, is a measure of the reduction in synaptic input needed to counteract the depolarization from the PIC to provide an indirect estimate of PIC amplitude. The range of ΔF values measured in the bruxer participants during similar voluntary contractions was the same as in controls, suggesting that abnormally high levels of monoaminergic drive are not continually present in the absence of involuntary motor activity. We also observed a consistent “onion skin effect” during the moderately sized contractions (<20% of maximal), whereby the firing rate of higher threshold motor units discharged at slower rates (by 4–7 imp/s) compared with motor units with relatively lower thresholds. The presence of lower firing rates in the more fatigue-prone, higher threshold trigeminal motoneurons, in addition to the activation of PICs, likely facilitates the activation of the masseter muscle during motor activities

  13. Persistent GABAA/C responses to gabazine, taurine and beta-alanine in rat hypoglossal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Chesnoy-Marchais, D

    2016-08-25

    In hypoglossal motoneurons, a sustained anionic current, sensitive to a blocker of ρ-containing GABA receptors, (1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridin-4-yl)methylphosphinic acid (TPMPA) and insensitive to bicuculline, was previously shown to be activated by gabazine. In order to better characterize the receptors involved, the sensitivity of this atypical response to pentobarbital (30μM), allopregnanolone (0.3μM) and midazolam (0.5μM) was first investigated. Pentobarbital potentiated the response, whereas the steroid and the benzodiazepine were ineffective. The results indicate the involvement of hybrid heteromeric receptors, including at least a GABA receptor ρ subunit and a γ subunit, accounting for the pentobarbital-sensitivity. The effects of the endogenous β amino acids, taurine and β-alanine, which are released under various pathological conditions and show neuroprotective properties, were then studied. In the presence of the glycine receptor blocker strychnine (1μM), both taurine (0.3-1mM) and β-alanine (0.3mM) activated sustained anionic currents, which were partly blocked by TPMPA (100μM). Thus, both β amino acids activated ρ-containing GABA receptors in hypoglossal motoneurons. Bicuculline (20μM) reduced responses to taurine and β-alanine, but small sustained responses persisted in the presence of both strychnine and bicuculline. Responses to β-alanine were slightly increased by allopregnanolone, indicating a contribution of the bicuculline- and neurosteroid-sensitive GABAA receptors underlying tonic inhibition in these motoneurons. Since sustained activation of anionic channels inhibits most mature principal neurons, the ρ-containing GABA receptors permanently activated by taurine and β-alanine might contribute to some of their neuroprotective properties under damaging overexcitatory situations. PMID:27246441

  14. Motoneuronal TASK channels contribute to immobilizing effects of inhalational general anesthetics

    PubMed Central

    Lazarenko, Roman M.; Willcox, Sarah C.; Shu, Shaofang; Berg, Allison P.; Jevtovic-Todorovic, Vesna; Talley, Edmund M.; Chen, Xiangdong; Bayliss, Douglas A.

    2010-01-01

    General anesthetics cause sedation, hypnosis and immobilization via central nervous system mechanisms that remain incompletely understood; contributions of particular anesthetic targets in specific neural pathways remain largely unexplored. Among potential molecular targets for mediating anesthetic actions, the TASK subgroup (TASK-1, K2P3.1& TASK-3, K2P9.1) of background K+ channels are appealing candidates since they are expressed in CNS sites relevant to anesthetic actions and activated by clinically relevant concentrations of inhaled anesthetics. Here, we used global and conditional TASK channel single and double subunit knockout mice to demonstrate definitively that TASK channels account for motoneuronal anesthetic-activated K+ currents and to test their contributions to sedative, hypnotic and immobilizing anesthetic actions. In motoneurons from all knockout mice lines, TASK-like currents were reduced and cells were less sensitive to hyperpolarizing effects of halothane and isoflurane. In an immobilization assay, higher concentrations of both halothane and isoflurane were required to render TASK knockout animals unresponsive to a tail pinch; in assays of sedation (loss of movement) and hypnosis (loss-of-righting reflex), TASK knockout mice showed a modest decrease in sensitivity, and only for halothane. In conditional knockout mice, with TASK channel deletion restricted to cholinergic neurons, immobilizing actions of the inhaled anesthetics and sedative effects of halothane were reduced to the same extent as in global knockout lines. These data indicate that TASK channels in cholinergic neurons are a molecular substrate for select actions of inhaled anesthetics; for immobilization, which is spinally mediated, these data implicate motoneurons as the likely neuronal substrate. PMID:20519544

  15. Restorative effects of reinnervation on the size and dendritic arborization patterns of axotomized cat spinal alpha-motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Brännström, T; Havton, L; Kellerth, J O

    1992-04-22

    In a preceding paper [Brännström, et al. (1992) J. Comp. Neurol. 318:439-451] a marked reduction in dendritic size was observed in cat spinal motoneurons following permanent axotomy. The aim of the present study was to analyse the possible restorative effects of peripheral reinnervation on the size and dendritic branching patterns of cat spinal motoneurons which had been deprived of neuromuscular contact for an extended period of time. In adult cats the medial gastrocnemius (MG) nerve was transected and ligated. After 6 weeks the nerve was allowed to reinnervate its muscle through a nerve graft. With approximately 6 weeks needed for muscle reinnervation [Foehring, et al. (1986) J. Neurophysiol. 55:947-965], the MG motoneurons were devoid of neuromuscular contact for altogether about 12 weeks. Two years later reinnervated MG alpha-motoneurons were intracellularly labelled with horseradish peroxidase to allow quantitative analyses of the cell bodies and dendritic trees. Comparisons were made with previous data from normal and permanently axotomized MG motoneurons. The reinnervated motoneurons exhibited positive correlations between dendritic stem diameter, on one hand, and combined length, volume, membrane area, and number of end branches of the whole dendrite, on the other. By using the regression equations for these correlations, the total dendritic size of whole reinnervated motoneurons could be estimated. Such calculations showed that in comparison with the reduction in dendritic size found at 12 weeks after permanent axotomy (Brännström et al., see above), peripheral reinnervation caused the dendritic volume and membrane area to return to normal values. However, the values for combined dendritic length and number of dendritic end branches were still reduced by more than 25% as compared to the normal situation. The results indicate that following reinnervation of the target muscle, the axotomized motoneurons did not recover their original number of dendritic

  16. Neuroprotective and Neurorestorative Processes after Spinal Cord Injury: The Case of the Bulbospinal Respiratory Neurons.

    PubMed

    Kastner, Anne; Matarazzo, Valéry

    2016-01-01

    High cervical spinal cord injuries interrupt the bulbospinal respiratory pathways projecting to the cervical phrenic motoneurons resulting in important respiratory defects. In the case of a lateralized injury that maintains the respiratory drive on the opposite side, a partial recovery of the ipsilateral respiratory function occurs spontaneously over time, as observed in animal models. The rodent respiratory system is therefore a relevant model to investigate the neuroplastic and neuroprotective mechanisms that will trigger such phrenic motoneurons reactivation by supraspinal pathways. Since part of this recovery is dependent on the damaged side of the spinal cord, the present review highlights our current understanding of the anatomical neuroplasticity processes that are developed by the surviving damaged bulbospinal neurons, notably axonal sprouting and rerouting. Such anatomical neuroplasticity relies also on coordinated molecular mechanisms at the level of the axotomized bulbospinal neurons that will promote both neuroprotection and axon growth. PMID:27563469

  17. Neuroprotective and Neurorestorative Processes after Spinal Cord Injury: The Case of the Bulbospinal Respiratory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    High cervical spinal cord injuries interrupt the bulbospinal respiratory pathways projecting to the cervical phrenic motoneurons resulting in important respiratory defects. In the case of a lateralized injury that maintains the respiratory drive on the opposite side, a partial recovery of the ipsilateral respiratory function occurs spontaneously over time, as observed in animal models. The rodent respiratory system is therefore a relevant model to investigate the neuroplastic and neuroprotective mechanisms that will trigger such phrenic motoneurons reactivation by supraspinal pathways. Since part of this recovery is dependent on the damaged side of the spinal cord, the present review highlights our current understanding of the anatomical neuroplasticity processes that are developed by the surviving damaged bulbospinal neurons, notably axonal sprouting and rerouting. Such anatomical neuroplasticity relies also on coordinated molecular mechanisms at the level of the axotomized bulbospinal neurons that will promote both neuroprotection and axon growth. PMID:27563469

  18. Dendrites are dispensable for basic motoneuron function but essential for fine tuning of behavior

    PubMed Central

    Ryglewski, Stefanie; Kadas, Dimitrios; Hutchinson, Katie; Schuetzler, Natalie; Vonhoff, Fernando; Duch, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Dendrites are highly complex 3D structures that define neuronal morphology and connectivity and are the predominant sites for synaptic input. Defects in dendritic structure are highly consistent correlates of brain diseases. However, the precise consequences of dendritic structure defects for neuronal function and behavioral performance remain unknown. Here we probe dendritic function by using genetic tools to selectively abolish dendrites in identified Drosophila wing motoneurons without affecting other neuronal properties. We find that these motoneuron dendrites are unexpectedly dispensable for synaptic targeting, qualitatively normal neuronal activity patterns during behavior, and basic behavioral performance. However, significant performance deficits in sophisticated motor behaviors, such as flight altitude control and switching between discrete courtship song elements, scale with the degree of dendritic defect. To our knowledge, our observations provide the first direct evidence that complex dendrite architecture is critically required for fine-tuning and adaptability within robust, evolutionarily constrained behavioral programs that are vital for mating success and survival. We speculate that the observed scaling of performance deficits with the degree of structural defect is consistent with gradual increases in intellectual disability during continuously advancing structural deficiencies in progressive neurological disorders. PMID:25453076

  19. Formation and characterisation of neuromuscular junctions between hiPSC derived motoneurons and myotubes.

    PubMed

    Demestre, M; Orth, M; Föhr, K J; Achberger, K; Ludolph, A C; Liebau, S; Boeckers, T M

    2015-09-01

    Striated skeletal muscle cells from humans represent a valuable source for in vitro studies of the motoric system as well as for pathophysiological investigations in the clinical settings. Myoblasts can readily be grown from human muscle tissue. However, if muscle tissue is unavailable, myogenic cells can be generated from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) preferably without genetic engineering. Our study aimed to optimize the generation of hiPSCs derived myogenic cells by employing selection of CD34 positive cells and followed by distinct, stepwise culture conditions. Following the expansion of CD34 positive single cells under myogenic cell culture conditions, serum deprived myoblast-like cells finally fused and formed multinucleated striated myotubes that expressed a set of key markers for muscle differentiation. In addition, these myotubes contracted upon electrical stimulation, responded to acetylcholine (Ach) and were able to generate action potentials. Finally, we co-cultured motoneurons and myotubes generated from identical hiPSCs cell lines. We could observe the early aggregation of acetylcholine receptors in muscle cells of immature co-cultures. At later stages, we identified and characterised mature neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). In summary, we describe here the successful generation of an iPS cell derived functional cellular system consisting of two distinct communicating cells types. This in vitro co-culture system could therefore contribute to research on diseases in which the motoneurons and the NMJ are predominantly affected, such as in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or spinal muscular atrophy. PMID:26255853

  20. Neuropathology in respiratory-related motoneurons in young Pompe (Gaa−/−) mice

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Sara M.F.; Hoyt, Aaron K.; ElMallah, Mai K.; Falk, Darin J.; Byrne, Barry J.; Fuller, David D.

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory and/or lingual dysfunction are among the first motor symptoms in Pompe disease, a disorder resulting from absence or dysfunction of the lysosomal enzyme acid α-glucosidase (GAA). Here, we histologically evaluated the medulla, cervical and thoracic spinal cords in 6 weeks old asymptomatic Pompe (Gaa−/−) mice to determine if neuropathology in respiratory motor regions has an early onset. Periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining indicated glycogen accumulation was exclusively occurring in Gaa−/− hypoglossal, mid-cervical and upper thoracic motoneurons. Markers of DNA damage (Tunel) and ongoing apoptosis (Cleaved Caspase 3) did not co-localize with PAS staining, but were prominent in a medullary region which included the nucleus tractus solitarius, and also in the thoracic spinal dorsal horn. We conclude that respiratory-related motoneurons are particularly susceptible to GAA deficiency and that neuronal glycogen accumulation and neurodegeneration may occur independently in early stage disease. The data support early therapeutic intervention in Pompe disease. PMID:26921786

  1. Regulation of acetylcholine release by intracellular acidification of developing motoneurons in Xenopus cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Hwa; Wu, Mei-Lin; Fu, Wen-Mei

    1998-01-01

    The effects of intracellular pH changes on the acetylcholine (ACh) release and cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration at developing neuromuscular synapses were studied in Xenopus nerve-muscle co-cultures. Spontaneous and evoked ACh release of motoneurons was monitored by using whole-cell voltage-clamped myocytes. Intracellular alkalinization with 15 mm NH4Cl slightly reduced the frequency of spontaneous synaptic currents (SSCs). However, cytosolic acidification following withdrawal of extracellular NH4Cl caused a marked and transient increase in spontaneous ACh release. Another method of cytosolic acidification was used in which NaCl in Ringer solution was replaced with weak organic acids. The increase in spontaneous ACh release paralleled the level of intracellular acidification resulting from addition of these organic acids. Acetate and propionate but not isethionate, methylsulphate and glucuronate, caused an increase in intracellular pH and a marked increase in spontaneous ACh release. Impulse-evoked ACh release was slightly augmented by intracellular alkalinization and inhibited by cytosolic acidification. Cytosolic acidification was accompanied by an elevation in the cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i), resulting from both external Ca2+ influx and intracellular Ca2+ mobilization. In contrast, the increase in [Ca2+]i induced by high K+ was inhibited by cytosolic acidification. We conclude that cytosolic acidification regulates spontaneous and evoked ACh release differentially in Xenopus motoneurons, increasing spontaneous ACh release but inhibiting evoked ACh release. PMID:9490814

  2. Behavioral state-specific inhibitory postsynaptic potentials impinge on cat lumbar motoneurons during active sleep.

    PubMed

    Morales, F R; Boxer, P; Chase, M H

    1987-11-01

    High-gain intracellular records were obtained from lumbar motoneurons in intact, undrugged cats during naturally occurring states of wakefulness, quiet sleep, and active sleep. Spontaneous, discrete, inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) were found to impinge on lumbar motoneurons during all states of sleep and wakefulness. IPSPs which occurred during wakefulness and quiet sleep were of relatively low amplitude and had a low frequency of occurrence. During the state of active sleep there occurred a great increase in inhibitory input. This was the result of the appearance of large-amplitude IPSPs and of an increase in the frequency of low-amplitude IPSPs which were indistinguishable from those recorded during wakefulness and quiet sleep. In addition to a difference in amplitude, the time course of the large IPSPs recorded during active sleep further differentiated them from the smaller IPSPs recorded during wakefulness, quiet sleep, and active sleep; i.e., their rise-time and half-width were of longer duration and their rate-of-rise was significantly faster. We suggest that the large, active sleep-specific IPSPs reflect the activity of a group of inhibitory interneurons which are inactive during wakefulness and quiet sleep and which discharge during active sleep. These as yet unidentified interneurons would then serve as the last link in the brain stem-spinal cord inhibitory system which is responsible for producing muscle atonia during the state of active sleep. PMID:3666087

  3. Three types of inhibitory miniature potentials in frog spinal cord motoneurons: possible GABA and glycine cotransmission.

    PubMed

    Polina, Yu A; Amakhin, D V; Kozhanov, V M; Kurchavyi, G G; Veselkin, N P

    2007-03-01

    Miniature inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (mIPSP) of motoneurons in isolated frog spinal cord were recorded in conditions of blockade of the conduction of nerve spikes and ionotropic glutamate receptors (TTX, 1 microM, CNQX, 25 microM, D-AP5, 50 microM). Three types of mIPSP were identified: those with fast and slow time characteristics and mIPSP with two-component decays. Two-component mIPSP accounted for 8.7% of all selected responses, fast mIPSP for 64.5%, and slow mIPSP for 26.8%. Blockade of GABA(A) receptors with bicuculline (20 microM) led to decreases in the numbers of slow and two-component mIPSP and an increase in the number of mIPSP with fast kinetics. Strychnine (1 microM), a blocker of glycine receptors, led to a reduction in the number of fast receptors and an increase in the number of slow potentials. These data suggest that frog spinal cord motoneurons have three types of inhibitory mIPSP, mediated by GABA, glycine, and simultaneous release of these two transmitters from the same presynaptic terminals. PMID:17294103

  4. Neuron volume in the ventral horn in Wobbler mouse motoneuron disease: a light microscope stereological study

    PubMed Central

    DOCKERY, P.; TANG, Y.; MORAIS, M.; VACCA-GALLOWAY, L. L.

    1997-01-01

    Previous pathological reports have indicated that swollen and vacuolated motoneuron cell bodies are the most predominant feature characterising Wobbler mouse motoneuron disease, but there has been little supportive evidence using area measurements. The present study focuses on the possible role of changes in neuronal nuclear and perikaryal volumes in the cervical spinal cord ventral horn, using new and traditional stereological probes which provide unbiased estimates of volume. Semithin sections from the ventral horn of Wobbler mice and age and sex-matched phenotypically normal littermates were examined at 2 ages (young and old). The young Wobbler group had significantly larger volume weighted mean perikaryal volumes compared with age-matched controls, reflecting the presence of large swollen cells characteristic of this group; this situation was reversed in the control group. Number-weighted perikaryal volume estimates in the old Wobbler group were smaller than in age-matched controls. The variation in perikaryal volume was greatest in the young Wobbler group in which the coefficient of variation was 127%. The mean number weighted and volume weighted mean nuclear volumes were significantly smaller in the old Wobbler group compared with age-matched controls and young Wobbler groups. The application of new stereological probes has enabled us to document more precisely these changes in neuronal structure in the Wobbler mutant mouse. PMID:9279662

  5. Muscle fiber regeneration in human permanent lower motoneuron denervation: relevance to safety and effectiveness of FES-training, which induces muscle recovery in SCI subjects.

    PubMed

    Carraro, Ugo; Rossini, Katia; Mayr, Winfried; Kern, Helmut

    2005-03-01

    Morphologic characteristics of the long-term denervated muscle in animals suggest that some original fibers are lost and some of those seen are the result of repeated cycles of fiber regeneration. Muscle biopsies from lower motoneuron denervated patients enrolled in the EU Project RISE show the characteristics of long-term denervation. They present a few atrophic or severely atrophic myofibers dispersed among adipocytes and connective tissue (denervated degenerated muscle, DDM). Monoclonal antibody for embryonic myosin shows that regenerative events are present from 1- to 37-years postspinal cord injury (SCI). After 2- to 10-years FES-training the muscle cryosections present mainly large round myofibers. In the FES-trained muscles the regenerative events are present, but at a lower rate than long-term denervated muscles (myofiber per mm2 of cryosection area: 0.8 +/- 1.3 in FES vs. 2.3 +/- 2.3 in DDM, mean +/- SD, P = 0.011). In our opinion this is a sound additional evidence of effectiveness of the Kern's electrical stimulation protocol for FES of DDM. In any case, the overall results demonstrate that the FES-training is safe: at least it does not induce more myofiber damage/regeneration than denervation per se.

  6. Naloxone reduces the amplitude of IPSPs evoked in lumbar motoneurons by reticular stimulation during carbachol-induced motor inhibition.

    PubMed

    Xi, M C; Liu, R H; Yamuy, J; Morales, F R; Chase, M H

    1999-02-20

    During active sleep or carbachol-induced motor inhibition, electrical stimulation of the medullary nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis (NRGc) evoked large amplitude, glycinergic inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) in cat motoneurons. The present study was directed to determine whether these IPSPs, that are specific to the state of active sleep, are modulated by opioid peptides. Accordingly, intracellular recordings were obtained from lumbar motoneurons of acute decerebrate cats during carbachol-induced motor inhibition while an opiate receptor antagonist, naloxone, was microiontophoretically released next to the recorded cells. Naloxone reversibly reduced by 26% the mean amplitude of NRGc-evoked IPSPs (1.9+/-0.2 mV (S.E.M.) vs. 1.4+/-0.2 mV; n=11, control and naloxone, respectively, p<0.05), but had no effect on the other waveform parameters of these IPSPs (e.g., latency-to-onset, latency-to-peak, duration, etc.). The mean resting membrane potential, input resistance and membrane time constant of motoneurons following naloxone ejection were not statistically different from those of the control. These data indicate that opioid peptides have a modulatory effect on NRGc-evoked IPSPs during carbachol-induced motor inhibition. We therefore suggest that endogenous opioid peptides may act as neuromodulators to regulate inhibitory glycinergic synaptic transmission at motoneurons during active sleep. PMID:10082872

  7. Localisation of motoneurons supplying the extra-ocular muscles of the rat using horseradish peroxidase and fluorescent double labelling.

    PubMed Central

    Labandeira Garcia, J L; Gomez Segade, L A; Suarez Nuñez, J M

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes a qualitative and quantitative investigation into the location of the motoneurons innervating the extra-ocular muscles of the rat. Injections of horseradish peroxidase, bisbenzimide, propidium iodide and DAPI-primuline were made either in one or simultaneously in two muscles. Unlike those of the cat, rabbit and monkey, the motoneurons which make up the oculomotor nucleus of the rat are not arranged in spatially separate subgroups belonging each to its corresponding extra-ocular muscle, but instead allow a high degree of superposition among the motor pools which they compose. The motoneurons innervating the lateral rectus and inferior oblique muscles are all homolateral; those of the medial and inferior rectus muscles are mainly homolateral with a few contralateral exceptions; and those of the superior rectus, levator palpebrae and superior oblique muscles are mainly contralateral with a small minority of homolateral exceptions. As well as from the main motor pools with which they are associated, the medial rectus, inferior rectus, superior rectus, levator palpebrae, superior oblique and lateral rectus muscles all receive innervation from motoneurons lying among the fibres of the fasciculus longitudinalis medialis. All these observations are supported by quantitative data. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:6195140

  8. Selective Requirement for Maintenance of Synaptic Contacts onto Motoneurons by Target-Derived trkB Receptors

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic contacts onto motoneurons were studied in mice in which the gene for the trkB neurotrophin receptor was knocked out selectively in a subset of spinal motoneurons. The extent of contacts by structures immunoreactive for either of two different vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1 and VGLUT2), the vesicular GABA transporter, or glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67) with the somata of motoneurons, was studied in wild type and trkB knockout cells in tamoxifen treated male and female SLICK-trkB−/− mice. Selective knockout of the trkB gene resulted in a marked reduction in contacts made by VGLUT2- and GAD67-immunoreactive structures in both sexes and a significant reduction in contacts containing only glycine in male mice. No reduction was found for glycinergic contacts in female mice or for VGLUT1 immunoreactive contacts in either sex. Signaling through postsynaptic trkB receptors is considered to be an essential part of a cellular mechanism for maintaining the contacts of some, but not all, synaptic contacts onto motoneurons. PMID:27433358

  9. A simulation study to examine the effect of common motoneuron inputs on correlated patterns of motor unit discharge.

    PubMed

    Lowery, Madeleine M; Erim, Zeynep

    2005-10-01

    The influence of common oscillatory inputs to the motoneuron pool on correlated patterns of motor unit discharge was examined using model simulations. Motor unit synchronization, in-phase fluctuations in mean firing rates known as 'common drive', and the coefficient of variation of the muscle force were examined as the frequency and amplitude of common oscillatory inputs to the motoneuron pool were varied. The amount of synchronization, the peak correlation between mean firing rates and the coefficient of variation of the force varied with both the frequency and amplitude of the common input signal. Values for 'common drive' and the force coefficient of variation were highest for oscillatory inputs at frequencies less than 5 Hz, while synchronization reached a maximum when the frequency of the common input was close to the average motor unit firing rate. The frequency of the common input signal for which the highest levels of synchronization were observed increased as motoneuron firing rates increased in response to higher target force levels. The simulation results suggest that common low-frequency oscillations in motor unit firing rates and short-term synchronization result from oscillatory activity in different bands of the frequency spectrum of shared motoneuron inputs. The results also indicate that the amount of synchronization between motor unit discharges depends not only on the amplitude of the shared input signal, but also on its frequency in relation to the present firing rates of the individual motor units.

  10. Neural encoding of input transients investigated by intracellular injection of ramp currents in cat α-motoneurones

    PubMed Central

    Baldissera, F.; Campadelli, Paola; Piccinelli, L.

    1982-01-01

    1. Input—output relations were analysed in spinal α-motoneurones during current transients reaching a steady level after a linear growth of different slopes. The motoneurone output considered in the analysis was the instantaneous frequency of the cell discharge. 2. In all motoneurones firing frequency during the ramp exceeded that of the final steady level and it was related to the velocity of rise of the current. In the majority of motoneurones the instantaneous frequency grew during the ramp stimulus, as if it were dependent on current intensity as well as on its rate of rise. Only in a few cells was firing frequency constant over the first two interspike intervals during the ramp, as would be expected if this response depended solely on the rate of rise. 3. Frequency—velocity (f/v) plots for different rates of rise of the injected current showed a linear relation for each interspike interval. Presence or absence of an intensity component was revealed in these plots by divergence or, respectively, overlapping of the f/v relations for the first and second intervals. Divergence was eliminated by subtraction of the estimated intensity component. The slope of the f/v relation for the first interval did not change significantly after subtraction of the intensity component and was taken as an index of the dynamic sensitivity of the motoneurones. The slope of the f/v relation varied greatly (from 47 to 330 impulses s-1. (nA ms-1)-1) in the population examined and was higher in motoneurones with a long-lasting afterhyperpolarization (a.h.p.) than in those where it was short-lasting. 4. It is proposed that the ability of the motoneurones to encode both the steady level and the rate of change of input signals depends on the conductance changes responsible for the a.h.p. and their accumulation. A positive correlation was found between the size of the a.h.p. potassium current, estimated as a.h.p. peak voltage/cell input resistance, and the slope of the f/v relation for

  11. Immunohistochemical study of motoneurons in lumbar spinal cord of c57black/6 mice after 30-days space flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyapkina, Oksana; Islamov, Rustem; Nurullin, Leniz; Petrov, Konstantin.; Rezvyakov, Pavel; Nikolsky, Evgeny

    To investigate mechanisms of hypogravity motor syndrome development the immunoexpression of heat shock proteins (Hsp27 and Hsp70), proteins of synaptic transmission (Synaptophysin and PSD95) and neuroprotective proteins (VEGF and Flt-1) in motoneurons of lumbar spinal cord in c57black/6 control mice (n=2) and after 30-days space flight (n=2) was studied. For a quantitative assessment of target proteins level in motoneurons frozen cross sections of lumbar spinal cord were underwent to immunohistochemical staining. Primary antibodies against VEGF, Flt-1, Hsp27 and Hsp70 (SantaCruz Biotechnology, inc. USA), against Synaptophysin and PSD95 (Abcam plc, UK) were visualized by streptavidin-biotin method. Images of spinal cords were received using OlympusBX51WI microscope with AxioCamMRm camera (CarlZeiss, Germany) and the AxioVisionRel. 4.6.3 software (CarlZeiss, Germany). The digitized data were analyzed using ImageJ 1.43 software (NIH, the USA). Quantitively, protein level in motoneurons was estimated by the density of immunoprecipitation. Results of research have not revealed any reliable changes in the immunnoexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its Flt-1 receptor in motoneurons of lumbar spinal cord in control and in mice after 30-day space flight. Studying of heat shock proteins, such as Hsp27 and Hsp70, revealed the decrease in level of these proteins immunoexpression in motoneurons of mice from flight group by 15% and 10%, respectively. Some decrease in level of immunnoexpression of presynaptic membrane proteins (synaptophysin, by 21%) and proteins of postsynaptic area (PSD95, by 55%) was observed after space flight. The data obtained testify to possible changes in a functional state (synaptic activity and stress resistance) of motoneurons of lumbar spinal cord in mice after space flight. Thus, we obtained new data on involvement of motoneurons innervating skeletal muscles in development of hypogravity motor syndrome. Research was supported

  12. Contribution of intrinsic motoneuron properties to discharge hysteresis and its estimation based on paired motor unit recordings: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Powers, Randall K; Heckman, C J

    2015-07-01

    Motoneuron activity is strongly influenced by the activation of persistent inward currents (PICs) mediated by voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels. However, the amount of PIC contribution to the activation of human motoneurons can only be estimated indirectly. Simultaneous recordings of pairs of motor units have been used to provide an estimate of the PIC contribution by using the firing rate of the lower threshold unit to provide an estimate of the common synaptic drive to both units, and the difference in firing rate (ΔF) of this lower threshold unit at recruitment and de-recruitment of the higher threshold unit to estimate the PIC contribution to activation of the higher threshold unit. It has recently been suggested that a number of factors other than PIC can contribute to ΔF values, including mechanisms underlying spike frequency adaptation and spike threshold accommodation. In the present study, we used a set of compartmental models representing a sample of 20 motoneurons with a range of thresholds to investigate how several different intrinsic motoneuron properties can potentially contribute to variations in ΔF values. We drove the models with linearly increasing and decreasing noisy conductance commands of different rate of rise and duration and determined the influence of different intrinsic mechanisms on discharge hysteresis (the difference in excitatory drive at recruitment and de-recruitment) and ΔF. Our results indicate that, although other factors can contribute, variations in discharge hysteresis and ΔF values primarily reflect the contribution of dendritic PICs to motoneuron activation.

  13. Properties of inward and outward potassium currents in cultured mouse motoneurons.

    PubMed

    McLarnon, J G; Kim, S U; Michikawa, M; Xu, R

    1995-01-01

    Inward rectifier potassium currents and calcium-dependent potassium currents have been studied in cultured embryonic mouse motoneurons. Sustained unitary inward rectifier potassium currents were recorded from cell-attached patches and the channel conductance was dependent on external K+ concentration with a value of 25 pS when external K+ was 140 mM. The channel open probability exhibited a sigmoidal dependence on potential with the largest values (near 0.7) at depolarizing patch potentials. Inactivating inward rectifier potassium currents were also recorded in some cell-attached patches following voltage steps to hyperpolarizing potentials with the rate of inactivation faster with larger hyperpolarizing steps. Whole-cell inward rectifier potassium currents increased from an initial level to a steady-state level with hyperpolarizing steps to -120 mV from a holding potential of -60 mV; with larger hyperpolarizing commands the peak currents decayed to the steady-state. The steady-state current-voltage relation exhibited a region of negative slope resistance. External Cs+ (0.5-1 mM) reduced the amplitudes of macroscopic currents and diminished the open times of unitary currents consistent with block of open rectifying channels with an estimated KD for channel block of 1 mM. A large conductance calcium-dependent potassium channel was isolated in inside-out patches with a conductance of 240 pS with symmetrical 140 mM K+ across the patches and a conductance of 110 pS when the external K+ was reduced to 5 mM. With symmetrical K+ the channel open probability exhibited a sigmoid dependence on potential with the largest values, in excess of 0.8, associated with patch depolarization. The dependence of open probability on potential was dependent on the concentrations of internal Ca2+ and external K+. Properties of inward rectifier and calcium-dependent K+ channels, such as the voltage dependence of open probability, are involved in the establishment of cellular excitability in

  14. Excitatory drive to the alpha-motoneuron pool during a fatiguing submaximal contraction in man.

    PubMed Central

    Löscher, W N; Cresswell, A G; Thorstensson, A

    1996-01-01

    1. This study was undertaken to examine changes of excitatory drive to the triceps surae alpha-motoneuron pool during fatiguing submaximal isometric contractions in man. Eight healthy subjects maintained isometric plantar flexions at 30 percent of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) until the limit of endurance (range, 6-9 min). 2. Excitability of the alpha-motoneuron pool to Ia afferent stimulation (H reflex), electromyograms (EMG) and maximum compound motor unit action potentials (Mmax) from the lateral (LG) and medial heads (MG) of the gastrocnemius as well as from the soleus muscle (Sol) were recorded throughout the contraction. Superimposed maximum twitch torques (twitch occlusion) and isometric torque fluctuations (tremor) were also recorded as indirect measures of excitatory drive. 3. H reflexes were studied at different levels of underlying voluntary contraction to assess the relationship between H reflex amplitude and excitatory drive. With increasing levels of underlying contraction up to MVC, superimposed H reflex amplitude increased for LG in six subjects, for MG in all eight and for Sol in five. In the remaining cases, H reflex amplitude first increased and then plateaued between 30-50% of MVC. 4. H/Mmax ratios increased during fatigue in those muscles that showed an H reflex amplitude increase with high levels of underlying contraction. In these cases, LG and MG H/Mmax increased significantly after about 50 and 20% of endurance time onward, respectively, whereas Sol H/Mmax demonstrated a significant increase up to 40% of endurance time. 5. EMG root mean square (r.m.s.) increased linearly throughout the contraction for all three muscles, while tremor r.m.s. increased in a non-linear way, with a steeper increase from 60% of endurance time onward. Superimposed twitch amplitude decreased significantly from 25% of endurance time onward. 6. It is concluded that during fatiguing isometric contractions at 30% of MVC, the excitatory drive to the triceps surae

  15. Descending pathways to the cutaneus trunci muscle motoneuronal cell group in the cat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holstege, Gert; Blok, Bertil F.

    1989-01-01

    Pathways involved in the cutaneous trunci muscle (CTM) reflex in the cat were investigated. Experimental animals were injected with tritium-labeled L-leucine into their spinal cord, brain stem, or diencephalon and, after six weeks, perfused with 10-percent formalin. The brains and spinal cords were postfixed in formalin and were cut into transverse 25-micron-thick frozen sections for autoradiography. Results based on injections in the C1, C2, C6, and C8 segments suggest that propriospinal pathways to the CTM motor nucleus originating in the cervical cord do no exist, although these propriospinal projections are very strong to all other motoneuronal cell groups surrounding the CTM motor nucleus. The results also demonstrate presence of specific supraspinal projections to the CTM motor nucleus, originating in the contralateral nucleus retroambiguous and the ipsilateral dorsolateral pontine tegmentum.

  16. A Caged Ret Kinase Inhibitor and its Effect on Motoneuron Development in Zebrafish Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Bliman, David; Nilsson, Jesper R.; Kettunen, Petronella; Andréasson, Joakim; Grøtli, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase receptor RET is implicated in the development and maintenance of neurons of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Attaching activity-compromising photocleavable groups (caging) to inhibitors could allow for external spatiotemporally controlled inhibition using light, potentially providing novel information on how these kinase receptors are involved in cellular processes. Here, caged RET inhibitors were obtained from 3-substituted pyrazolopyrimidine-based compounds by attaching photolabile groups to the exocyclic amino function. The most promising compound displayed excellent inhibitory effect in cell-free, as well as live-cell assays upon decaging. Furthermore, inhibition could be efficiently activated with light in vivo in zebrafish embryos and was shown to effect motoneuron development. PMID:26300345

  17. Forskolin activation of an identified peptide-sensitive motoneurone in Aplysia.

    PubMed Central

    Ram, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    Activation of a physiological response by the adenylate cyclase activator, forskolin, has been suggested as a new criterion for testing the role of cyclic AMP. In Aplysia, motoneurone B16, which innervates muscle 15, is activated by the peptide egg-laying hormone (ELH). In high magnesium-low calcium medium, used to block synaptic activity, forskolin produced a similar response to ELH. Forskolin, at a concentration of 100 microM, consistently activated the ELH-sensitive neurone; vehicle produced no response while 30 microM forskolin usually produced lower levels of activity than 100 microM. The data are consistent with cyclic AMP mediation of the ELH response. PMID:6317117

  18. Cell size and geometry of spinal cord motoneurons in the adult cat following the intramuscular injection of adriamycin: comparison with data from aged cats.

    PubMed

    Liu, R H; Yamuy, J; Engelhardt, J K; Xi, M C; Morales, F R; Chase, M H

    1996-10-28

    Adriamycin (ADM), an antineoplastic antibiotic, when injected intramuscularly, is taken up by motoneuron axonal terminals and retrogradely transported to the motoneuron soma where it exerts its neurotoxic effect. In the present study, ADM was injected into the hindlimb muscles of five adult cats. Measurements of the electrophysiological properties of the lumbar motoneurons innervating these muscles were obtained using intracellular techniques. Based upon these data the equivalent cylinder model of motoneurons was employed to evaluate ADM-induced changes in cell size and cell geometry. The size of cell somas in the ventral horn was also measured using light microscopy and computer imaging software. There were significant increases in the membrane time constant (25%) and input resistance (50%) in motoneurons whose muscles were treated with ADM (ADM-MNs) compared with data from control motoneurons (control-MNs). The increase in membrane time constant is attributed to an increase in membrane resistance; the increase in input resistance appears to depend upon both an increase in membrane resistance and a decrease in total cell surface area. Cell capacitance, which is proportional to the total cell surface area, was significantly reduced (15%) in ADM-MNs. Calculations based on cable theory indicate that while there was no significant change in the length of the equivalent cylinder for ADM-MNs, there was a significant decrease (17%) in the diameter of the equivalent cylinder. These data indicate that there is a decrease in total cell surface area which can be attributed to the shrinkage of branches throughout the dendritic tree. There was also a small (7%) but statistically significant decrease in the electrotonic length of ADM-MNs. Morphological analysis also revealed that the mean cross-sectional area of the somas of those ventral horn neurons which are likely to correspond to the motoneuron population was significantly reduced on the ADM-treated side compared to that

  19. Putative Excitatory and Putative Inhibitory Inputs Localize to Different Dendritic Domains in a Drosophila Flight Motoneuron

    PubMed Central

    Kuehn, Claudia; Duch, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    Input-output computations of individual neurons may be affected by the three-dimensional structure of their dendrites and by the targeting of input synapses to specific parts of their dendrites. However, only few examples exist where dendritic architecture can be related to behaviorally relevant computations of a neuron. By combining genetic, immunohistochemical, and confocal laser scanning methods this study estimates the location of the spike initiating zone and the dendritic distribution patterns of putative synaptic inputs on an individually identified Drosophila flight motorneuron, MN5. MN5 is a monopolar neuron with more than 4000 dendritic branches. The site of spike initiation was estimated by mapping sodium channel immunolabel onto geometric reconstructions of MN5. Maps of putative excitatory cholinergic and of putative inhibitory GABAergic inputs on MN5 dendrites were created by charting tagged Dα7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and Rdl GABAA receptors onto MN5 dendritic surface reconstructions. Although these methods provided only an estimate of putative input synapse distributions, the data indicated that inhibitory and excitatory synapses were targeted preferentially to different dendritic domains of MN5, and thus, computed mostly separately. Most putative inhibitory inputs were close to spike initiation, which was consistent with sharp inhibition, as predicted previously based on recordings of motoneuron firing patterns during flight. By contrast, highest densities of putative excitatory inputs at more distant dendritic regions were consistent with the prediction that in response to different power demands during flight, tonic excitatory drive to flight motoneuron dendrites must be smoothly translated into different tonic firing frequencies. PMID:23279094

  20. Changes in the amounts of cytoskeletal proteins within the perikarya and axons of regenerating frog motoneurons

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Changes in the amounts of tubulin, actin, and neurofilament polypeptides were found in regenerating motoneurons of grass frogs during the period of axonal elongation. Ventral roots 9 and 10 were transected unilaterally about 7 mm from the spinal cord. 35 d later, [3H]colchicine binding had decreased in the proximal stumps to approximately one-half of contralateral control values, well before the regenerating motor axons had reinnervated skeletal muscles of the hind limb. [3H]colchicine binding did not change significantly in the operated halves of the 9th and 10th spinal cord segments over a 75-d period. The relative amounts of actin, tubulin, and neurofilament polypeptides in the operated ventral roots were measured by quantitative densitometry of stained two-dimensional electrophoretic gels. Alpha-tubulin, beta-tubulin, and the 68,000 molecular weight subunit of neurofilaments (NF68) decreased within the transected ventral roots to 78%, 57%, and less than 15% of control values, respectively. The amount of actin increased to 132% of control values within the operated ventral roots, although this change was not statistically significant. Opposite changes were found within motoneuronal cell bodies isolated from the spinal cord. The relative amounts of alpha-tubulin, beta-tubulin and NF68 within axotomized perikarya increased, respectively, to 191%, 146%, and 144% of that in control perikarya isolated from the contralateral side of the spinal cord. Thus, the changes in NF68 and tubulin did not occur uniformly throughout the injured cells. The possible structural and functional consequences of these changes are discussed. PMID:6402517

  1. The nature of corticospinal paths driving human motoneurones during voluntary contractions.

    PubMed

    Butler, Jane E; Larsen, Thomas S; Gandevia, Simon C; Petersen, Nicolas T

    2007-10-15

    The properties of the human motor cortex can be studied non-invasively using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Stimulation at high intensity excites corticospinal cells with fast conducting axons that make direct connections to motoneurones of human upper limb muscles, while low-intensity stimulation can suppress ongoing EMG. To assess whether these cells are used in normal voluntary contractions, we used TMS at very low intensities to suppress the firing of single motor units in biceps brachii (n = 14) and first dorsal interosseous (FDI, n = 6). Their discharge was recorded with intramuscular electrodes and cortical stimulation was delivered at multiple intensities at appropriate times during sustained voluntary firing at approximately 10 Hz. For biceps, high-intensity stimulation produced facilitation at 17.1 +/- 2.1 ms (lasting 2.4 +/- 0.9 ms), while low-intensity stimulation (below motor threshold) produced suppression (without facilitation) at 20.2 +/- 2.1 ms (lasting 7.6 +/- 2.2 ms). For FDI, high-intensity stimulation produced facilitation at 23.3 +/- 1.2 ms (lasting 1.8 +/- 0.4 ms), with suppression produced by low-intensity stimulation at 25.2 +/- 2.6 ms (lasting 7.5 +/- 2.6 ms). The difference between the onsets of facilitation and suppression was short: 3.1 +/- 1.2 ms for biceps and 2.0 +/- 1.5 ms for FDI. This latency difference is much less than that previously reported using surface EMG recordings ( approximately 10 ms). These data suggest that low-intensity cortical stimulation inhibits ongoing activity in fast-conducting corticospinal axons through an oligosynaptic (possibly disynaptic) path, and that this activity is normally contributing to drive the motoneurones during voluntary contractions.

  2. [The effect of metabotropic glutamate receptors on longitude of posttetanic reaction in spinal motoneurons of frog].

    PubMed

    Mel'ian, Z E; Kozhanov, V M; Clamann, H P

    2001-01-01

    Effects of metabotropic glutamate receptors of the duration of posttetanic changes in monosynaptic excitatory postsynaptic potentials (mEPSP), evoked by afferent and reticulospinal input stimulation, were investigated in lumbar motoneurons of the frog isolated spinal cord. It was found that application of MAP4 (25 microM), a selective antagonist of group III of these receptors, prolonged posttetanic potentiation and depression of synaptic transmission, whereas activation of this group of metabotropic glutamate receptors by L-AP4 (1 mM), a selective agonist of these receptors, suppressed the amplitude of synaptic responses, but did not affect the dynamics of development of posttetanic changes. The NMDA receptor antagonist AP5 (50 microM), added to the perfusing solution, blocked completely the effects produced by MAP4. Neither selective antagonist MCCG (400 microM), nor agonist tACPD (50 microM) of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors affected the terms of mEPSP posttetanic potentiation and depression, although the latter, in contrast to the antagonist, in most cases increased the synaptic potential amplitude. The data obtained permit to suggest that group III metabotropic receptors may control the duration of posttetanic changes of synaptic transmission in the frog spinal motoneurons. The long-term changes in the investigated synapses seem to be mediated by activation of postsynaptic metabotropic glutamate receptors (most likely, of group I receptors), which is normally masked with activation of group III presynaptic autoreceptors. The mechanism of such an induction essentially depends on activation of NMDA type of inotropic glutamate receptors.

  3. Differences in Dysfunction of Thenar and Hypothenar Motoneurons in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jia; Cui, Liying; Liu, Mingsheng; Guan, Yuzhou; Li, Xiaoguang; Li, Dawei; Cui, Bo; Shen, Dongchao; Ding, Qingyun

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine differences in spinal motoneuron dysfunction between the abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and the abductor digiti minimi (ADM) in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients based on studying F-waves. Forty ALS patients and 20 normal controls (NCs) underwent motor nerve conduction studies on both median and ulnar nerves, including F-waves elicited by 100 electrical stimuli. The F-wave persistence (P < 0.05), index repeating neuron (RN; P < 0.001), and index repeater F-waves (Freps; P < 0.001) significantly differed between the APB and the ADM in the NC participants. For the hands of the ALS patients that lacked detectable wasting or weakness and exhibited either no or mild impairment of discrete finger movements, significantly reduced F-wave persistence (P < 0.001), increased index RN (P < 0.001), and increased index Freps (P < 0.001) were observed in APB in comparison with the normal participants, with relatively normal ADM F-wave parameters. For the hands of ALS patients that exhibited wasting and weakness, the mean F-wave amplitude (P < 0.05), the F/M amplitude ratio (P < 0.05), F-wave persistence (P < 0.001), index RN (P < 0.05), and index Freps (P < 0.05) significantly differed between APB and ADM. The differences in the dysfunction of motoneurons innervating APB and ADM are unique manifestations in ALS patients. The F-wave persistence (P = 0.002), index RN (P < 0.001), and index Freps (P < 0.001) in the APB seemed to differentiate ALS from the NCs more robustly than the ADM/APB Compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitude ratio. Thus, F-waves may reveal subclinical alterations in anterior horn cells, and may potentially help to distinguish ALS from mimic disorders. PMID:27014030

  4. Pharmacological profile of a tachykinin antagonist, spantide, as examined on rat spinal motoneurones.

    PubMed Central

    Yanagisawa, M.; Otsuka, M.

    1990-01-01

    1. The pharmacological profile of a tachykinin antagonist, [D-Arg1, D-Trp7,9, Leu11] substance P (spantide), was studied on motoneurones of the isolated spinal cord of the newborn rat. For this purpose, potentials were recorded from a lumbar ventral root extracellularly and drugs were bath-applied in the presence of tetrodotoxin (TTX). 2. Neurokinin A (NKA), a NK2-receptor selective agonist, induced concentration-dependent depolarizations, which were antagonized by spantide. Analyses of concentration-response curves suggested a competitive type antagonism with a pA2 of 6.5. 3. Depolarizations induced by acetyl-Arg6-septide, a NK1-receptor selective agonist, were also antagonized by spantide with a pA2 of 6.5. 4. Spantide (0.5-16 microM) had no depolarizing action on the ventral root in the presence of TTX. 5. Spantide antagonized the depolarizing action of substance P (SP) when SP was applied at low concentrations (0.1-0.3 microM) or by short duration pulses in artificial cerebrospinal fluid containing TTX, but much higher concentrations of spantide (4-10 microM) were needed to exert an antagonistic action against SP than against acetyl-Arg6-septide or NKA. 6. Thyrotrophin-releasing hormone, L-glutamate, GABA, and noradrenaline, also induced depolarizations of the ventral root in the presence of TTX but the responses to these agonists were not depressed by spantide (16 microM). 7. These results suggest that there is a subtype of tachykinin receptors on neonatal rat spinal motoneurones to which NKA, acetyl-Arg6-septide and spantide bind competitively with high affinity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1698496

  5. SUCCESSFUL TRANSPLANTATION OF MOTONEURONS INTO THE PERIPHERAL NERVE DEPENDS ON THE NUMBER OF TRANSPLANTED CELLS

    PubMed Central

    KATO, SHUICHI; KURIMOTO, SHIGERU; NAKANO, TOMONORI; YONEDA, HIDEMASA; ISHII, HISAO; MITA-SUGIURA, SATOKA; HIRATA, HITOSHI

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Transplantation of motoneurons (MN) into the peripheral nerve to provide a source of neurons for muscle reinnervation, termed motoneuron integrated striated muscle (MISM), may provide the potential to restore functional muscle activity, when combined with computer-programmed functional electrical stimulation (FES). The number of MNs required to restore innervation to denervated muscles in adult Fischer 344 rats was investigated by comparing two groups, one transplanted with 2 × 105 cells (group A) and the other with 1 × 106 cells (group B). Twelve weeks after transplantation, electrophysiological analysis, muscle function analysis, and tissue analysis were performed. The mean motor nerve conduction velocity was faster (12.4 ± 1.0 m/s vs. 8.5 ± 0.7 m/s, P = 0.011) and the mean amplitude of compound muscle action potential was larger (1.6 ± 0.4 mV vs. 0.7 ± 0.2 mV, P = 0.034) in group B. The dorsiflexed ankle angle was larger in group B (27 ± 5° vs. 75 ± 8°, P = 0.02). The mean myelinated axon number in the peroneal nerve and the proportion of reinnervated motor end plates were also greater in group B (317 ± 33 vs. 104 ± 17, 87.5 ± 3.4% vs. 40.6 ± 7.7%; P < 0.01, respectively). When sufficient MNs are transplanted into the peripheral nerve, MISM forms functional motor units. MISM, in conjunction with FES, provides a new treatment strategy for paralyzed muscles. PMID:25797991

  6. Genetic ablation of NMDA receptor subunit NR3B in mouse reveals motoneuronal and nonmotoneuronal phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Niemann, Stephan; Kanki, Hiroaki; Fukui, Yasuyuki; Takao, Keizo; Fukaya, Masahiro; Hynynen, Meri N; Churchill, Michael J; Shefner, Jeremy M; Bronson, Roderick T; Brown, Robert H; Watanabe, Masahiko; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Itohara, Shigeyoshi; Hayashi, Yasunori

    2007-09-01

    NR3B is a modulatory subunit of the NMDA receptor, abundantly expressed in both cranial and spinal somatic motoneurons and at lower levels in other regions of the brain as well. Recently, we found the human NR3B gene (GRIN3B) to be highly genetically heterogeneous, and that approximately 10% of the normal European-American population lacks NR3B due to homozygous occurrence of a null allele in the gene. Therefore, it is especially important to understand the phenotypic consequences of the genetic loss of NR3B in both humans and animal models. We here provide results of behavioral analysis of mice genetically lacking NR3B, which is an ideal animal model due to homogeneity in genetic and environmental background. The NR3B(-/-) mice are viable and fertile. Consistent with the expression of NR3B in somatic motoneurons, the NR3B(-/-) mice showed a moderate but significant impairment in motor learning or coordination, and decreased activity in their home cages. Remarkably, the NR3B(-/-) mice showed a highly increased social interaction with their familiar cage mates in their home cage but moderately increased anxiety-like behaviour and decreased social interaction in a novel environment, consistent with the inhibitory role of NR3B on the functions of NMDA receptors. This work is the first reporting of the functional significance of NR3B in vivo and may give insight into the contribution of genetic variability of NR3B in the phenotypic heterogeneity among human population.

  7. F Wave Study in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: Assessment of Segmental Motoneuronal Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jia; Cui, Li-Ying; Liu, Ming-Sheng; Guan, Yu-Zhou; Li, Xiao-Guang; Cui, Bo; Ding, Qing-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dysfunctional spinal circuit may play a role in the pathophysiology of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The purpose of this study was to use F waves for assessment of segmental motoneuronal excitability following upper motor neuron (UMN) dysfunctions in ALS. Methods: We studied the F waves of 152 ulnar nerves recorded from abductor digiti minimi in 82 patients with ALS. Two groups of hands were defined based on the presence or absence of pyramidal signs in the same upper limb. The group with pyramidal signs in the upper limbs was designated as the P group, and the group without pyramidal signs in the upper limbs was designated as the NP group. Results: The mean (P < 0.001), median (P < 0.001) and maximum (P = 0.035) F wave amplitudes, mean (P < 0.001), median (P < 0.001) and maximum (P = 0.003) F/M amplitude ratio, index repeating neuron (P < 0.001) and index repeater F waves (P < 0.001) of the P group were significantly increased compared with the NP group. No significant differences were identified for F wave chronodispersion (P = 0.628), mean F wave latency (P = 0.151), minimum F wave latency (P = 0.211), maximum F wave latency (P = 0.199), F wave persistence (P = 0.738), F wave duration (P = 0.152), F wave conduction velocity (P = 0.813) and number of giant F waves (P = 0.072) between the two groups. Conclusions: In this study, increased F wave amplitude, F/M amplitude ratio and number of repeater F waves reflected enhanced segmental motoneuronal excitability following UMN dysfunctions in ALS. PMID:26112713

  8. Differences in Dysfunction of Thenar and Hypothenar Motoneurons in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jia; Cui, Liying; Liu, Mingsheng; Guan, Yuzhou; Li, Xiaoguang; Li, Dawei; Cui, Bo; Shen, Dongchao; Ding, Qingyun

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine differences in spinal motoneuron dysfunction between the abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and the abductor digiti minimi (ADM) in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients based on studying F-waves. Forty ALS patients and 20 normal controls (NCs) underwent motor nerve conduction studies on both median and ulnar nerves, including F-waves elicited by 100 electrical stimuli. The F-wave persistence (P < 0.05), index repeating neuron (RN; P < 0.001), and index repeater F-waves (Freps; P < 0.001) significantly differed between the APB and the ADM in the NC participants. For the hands of the ALS patients that lacked detectable wasting or weakness and exhibited either no or mild impairment of discrete finger movements, significantly reduced F-wave persistence (P < 0.001), increased index RN (P < 0.001), and increased index Freps (P < 0.001) were observed in APB in comparison with the normal participants, with relatively normal ADM F-wave parameters. For the hands of ALS patients that exhibited wasting and weakness, the mean F-wave amplitude (P < 0.05), the F/M amplitude ratio (P < 0.05), F-wave persistence (P < 0.001), index RN (P < 0.05), and index Freps (P < 0.05) significantly differed between APB and ADM. The differences in the dysfunction of motoneurons innervating APB and ADM are unique manifestations in ALS patients. The F-wave persistence (P = 0.002), index RN (P < 0.001), and index Freps (P < 0.001) in the APB seemed to differentiate ALS from the NCs more robustly than the ADM/APB Compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitude ratio. Thus, F-waves may reveal subclinical alterations in anterior horn cells, and may potentially help to distinguish ALS from mimic disorders.

  9. Differences in Dysfunction of Thenar and Hypothenar Motoneurons in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jia; Cui, Liying; Liu, Mingsheng; Guan, Yuzhou; Li, Xiaoguang; Li, Dawei; Cui, Bo; Shen, Dongchao; Ding, Qingyun

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine differences in spinal motoneuron dysfunction between the abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and the abductor digiti minimi (ADM) in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients based on studying F-waves. Forty ALS patients and 20 normal controls (NCs) underwent motor nerve conduction studies on both median and ulnar nerves, including F-waves elicited by 100 electrical stimuli. The F-wave persistence (P < 0.05), index repeating neuron (RN; P < 0.001), and index repeater F-waves (Freps; P < 0.001) significantly differed between the APB and the ADM in the NC participants. For the hands of the ALS patients that lacked detectable wasting or weakness and exhibited either no or mild impairment of discrete finger movements, significantly reduced F-wave persistence (P < 0.001), increased index RN (P < 0.001), and increased index Freps (P < 0.001) were observed in APB in comparison with the normal participants, with relatively normal ADM F-wave parameters. For the hands of ALS patients that exhibited wasting and weakness, the mean F-wave amplitude (P < 0.05), the F/M amplitude ratio (P < 0.05), F-wave persistence (P < 0.001), index RN (P < 0.05), and index Freps (P < 0.05) significantly differed between APB and ADM. The differences in the dysfunction of motoneurons innervating APB and ADM are unique manifestations in ALS patients. The F-wave persistence (P = 0.002), index RN (P < 0.001), and index Freps (P < 0.001) in the APB seemed to differentiate ALS from the NCs more robustly than the ADM/APB Compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitude ratio. Thus, F-waves may reveal subclinical alterations in anterior horn cells, and may potentially help to distinguish ALS from mimic disorders. PMID:27014030

  10. Signaling mechanism underlying the histamine-modulated action of hypoglossal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zi-Long; Wu, Xu; Luo, Yan-Jia; Wang, Lu; Qu, Wei-Min; Li, Shan-Qun; Huang, Zhi-Li

    2016-04-01

    Histamine, an important modulator of the arousal states of the central nervous system, has been reported to contribute an excitatory drive at the hypoglossal motor nucleus to the genioglossus (GG) muscle, which is involved in the pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnea. However, the effect of histamine on hypoglossal motoneurons (HMNs) and the underlying signaling mechanisms have remained elusive. Here, whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were conducted using neonatal rat brain sections, which showed that histamine excited HMNs with an inward current under voltage-clamp and a depolarization membrane potential under current-clamp via histamine H1 receptors (H1Rs). The phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122 blocked H1Rs-mediated excitatory effects, but protein kinase A inhibitor and protein kinase C inhibitor did not, indicating that the signal transduction cascades underlying the excitatory action of histamine on HMNs were H1R/Gq/11 /phospholipase C/inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3). The effects of histamine were also dependent on extracellular Na(+) and intracellular Ca(2+), which took place via activation of Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchangers. These results identify the signaling molecules associated with the regulatory effect of histamine on HMNs. The findings of this study may provide new insights into therapeutic approaches in obstructive sleep apnea. We proposed the post-synaptic mechanisms underlying the modulation effect of histamine on hypoglossal motoneuron. Histamine activates the H1Rs via PLC and IP3, increases Ca(2+) releases from intracellular stores, promotes Na(+) influx and Ca(2+) efflux via the NCXs, and then produces an inward current and depolarizes the neurons. Histamine modulates the excitability of HMNs with other neuromodulators, such as noradrenaline, serotonin and orexin. We think that these findings should provide an important new direction for drug development for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea.

  11. Astrocytes expressing mutant SOD1 and TDP43 trigger motoneuron death that is mediated via sodium channels and nitroxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Fabiola; Cortes, Nicole; Abarzua, Sebastian; Dyrda, Agnieszka; van Zundert, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal paralytic disorder caused by dysfunction and degeneration of motor neurons. Multiple disease-causing mutations, including in the genes for SOD1 and TDP-43, have been identified in ALS. Astrocytes expressing mutant SOD1 are strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of ALS: we have shown that media conditioned by astrocytes carrying mutant SOD1(G93A) contains toxic factor(s) that kill motoneurons by activating voltage-sensitive sodium (Na v ) channels. In contrast, a recent study suggests that astrocytes expressing mutated TDP43 contribute to ALS pathology, but do so via cell-autonomous processes and lack non-cell-autonomous toxicity. Here we investigate whether astrocytes that express diverse ALS-causing mutations release toxic factor(s) that induce motoneuron death, and if so, whether they do so via a common pathogenic pathway. We exposed primary cultures of wild-type spinal cord cells to conditioned medium derived from astrocytes (ACM) that express SOD1 (ACM-SOD1(G93A) and ACM-SOD1(G86R)) or TDP43 (ACM-TDP43(A315T)) mutants; we show that such exposure rapidly (within 30-60 min) increases dichlorofluorescein (DCF) fluorescence (indicative of nitroxidative stress) and leads to extensive motoneuron-specific death within a few days. Co-application of the diverse ACMs with anti-oxidants Trolox or esculetin (but not with resveratrol) strongly improves motoneuron survival. We also find that co-incubation of the cultures in the ACMs with Na v channel blockers (including mexiletine, spermidine, or riluzole) prevents both intracellular nitroxidative stress and motoneuron death. Together, our data document that two completely unrelated ALS models lead to the death of motoneuron via non-cell-autonomous processes, and show that astrocytes expressing mutations in SOD1 and TDP43 trigger such cell death through a common pathogenic pathway that involves nitroxidative stress, induced at least in part by Na v channel activity. PMID

  12. The modulation by 5-HT of glutamatergic inputs from the raphe pallidus to rat hypoglossal motoneurones, in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Bouryi, Vitali A; Lewis, David I

    2003-01-01

    Decreases in the activity of 5-HT-containing caudal raphe neurones during sleep are thought to be partially responsible for the resultant disfacilitation of hypoglossal motoneurones. Whilst 5-HT has a direct excitatory action on hypoglossal motoneurones as a result of activation of 5-HT2 receptors, microinjection of 5-HT2 antagonists into the hypoglossal nucleus reduces motor activity to a much lesser extent compared to the suppression observed during sleep suggesting other transmitters co-localised in caudal raphe neurones may also be involved. The aim of the present study was therefore to characterise raphe pallidus inputs to hypoglossal motoneurones. Whole cell recordings were made from hypoglossal motoneurones in vitro. 5-HT evoked a direct membrane depolarisation (8.45 ± 3.8 mV, P < 0.001) and increase in cell input resistance (53 ± 40 %, P < 0.001) which was blocked by the 5-HT2 antagonist, ritanserin (2.40 ± 2.7 vs. 7.04 ± 4.6 mV). Stimulation within the raphe pallidus evoked a monosynaptic EPSC that was significantly reduced by the AMPA/kainateantagonist, NBQX (22.8 ± 16 % of control, P < 0.001). In contrast, the 5-HT2 antagonist, ritanserin, had no effect on the amplitude of these EPSCs (106 ± 31 % of control, P = n.s.). 5-HT reduced these EPSCs to 50.0 ± 13 % of control (P < 0.001), as did the 5-HT1A agonist, 8-OH-DPAT (52.5 ± 17 %, P < 0.001) and the 5-HT1B agonist, CP 93129 (40.6 ± 29 %, P < 0.01). 8-OH-DPAT and CP 93129 increased the paired pulse ratio (1.38 ± 0.27 to 1.91 ± 0.54, P < 0.05 & 1.27 ± 0.08 to 1.44 ± 0.13, P < 0.01 respectively) but had no effect on the postsynaptic glutamate response (99 ± 4.4 % and 100 ± 2.5 %, P = n.s.). They also increased the frequency (P < 0.001), but not the amplitude, of miniature glutamatergic EPSCs in hypoglossal motoneurones. These data demonstrate that raphe pallidus inputs to hypoglossal motoneurones are predominantly glutamatergic in nature, with 5-HT decreasing the release of glutamate from

  13. Soma size and Cav1.3 channel expression in vulnerable and resistant motoneuron populations of the SOD1G93A mouse model of ALS

    PubMed Central

    Shoenfeld, Liza; Westenbroek, Ruth E.; Fisher, Erika; Quinlan, Katharina A.; Tysseling, Vicki M.; Powers, Randall K.; Heckman, Charles J.; Binder, Marc D.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Although the loss of motoneurons is an undisputed feature of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in man and in its animal models (SOD1 mutant mice), how the disease affects the size and excitability of motoneurons prior to their degeneration is not well understood. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that motoneurons in mutant SOD1G93A mice exhibit an enlargement of soma size (i.e., cross‐sectional area) and an increase in Cav1.3 channel expression at postnatal day 30, well before the manifestation of physiological symptoms that typically occur at p90 (Chiu et al. 1995). We made measurements of spinal and hypoglossal motoneurons vulnerable to degeneration, as well as motoneurons in the oculomotor nucleus that are resistant to degeneration. Overall, we found that the somata of motoneurons in male SOD1G93A mutants were larger than those in wild‐type transgenic males. When females were included in the two groups, significance was lost. Expression levels of the Cav1.3 channels were not differentiated by genotype, sex, or any interaction of the two. These results raise the intriguing possibility of an interaction between male sex steroid hormones and the SOD1 mutation in the etiopathogenesis of ALS. PMID:25107988

  14. Simultaneous intracellular recording of a lumbar motoneuron and the force produced by its motor unit in the adult mouse in vivo.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Marin; Marin, Manuel; Heckman, C J

    2012-12-05

    The spinal motoneuron has long been a good model system for studying neural function because it is a neuron of the central nervous system with the unique properties of (1) having readily identifiable targets (the muscle fibers) and therefore having a very well-known function (to control muscle contraction); (2) being the convergent target of many spinal and descending networks, hence the name of "final common pathway"; and (3) having a large soma which makes it possible to penetrate them with sharp intracellular electrodes. Furthermore, when studied in vivo, it is possible to record simultaneously the electrical activity of the motoneurons and the force developed by their muscle targets. Performing intracellular recordings of motoneurons in vivo therefore put the experimentalist in the unique position of being able to study, at the same time, all the compartments of the "motor unit" (the name given to the motoneuron, its axon, and the muscle fibers it innervates(1)): the inputs impinging on the motoneuron, the electrophysiological properties of the motoneuron, and the impact of these properties on the physiological function of the motoneurons, i.e. the force produced by its motor unit. However, this approach is very challenging because the preparation cannot be paralyzed and thus the mechanical stability for the intracellular recording is reduced. Thus, this kind of experiments has only been achieved in cats and in rats. However, the study of spinal motor systems could make a formidable leap if it was possible to perform similar experiments in normal and genetically modified mice. For technical reasons, the study of the spinal networks in mice has mostly been limited to neonatal in vitro preparations, where the motoneurons and the spinal networks are immature, the motoneurons are separated from their targets, and when studied in slices, the motoneurons are separated from most of their inputs. Until recently, only a few groups had managed to perform intracellular

  15. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... before. Often, the injury is minor because your skull is hard and it protects your brain. But ... injuries can be more severe, such as a skull fracture, concussion, or traumatic brain injury. Head injuries ...

  16. Back Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... extending from your neck to your pelvis. Back injuries can result from sports injuries, work around the house or in the garden, ... back is the most common site of back injuries and back pain. Common back injuries include Sprains ...

  17. Increased activity of pre-motor network does not change the excitability of motoneurons during protracted scratch initiation.

    PubMed

    Guzulaitis, Robertas; Alaburda, Aidas; Hounsgaard, Jorn

    2013-04-01

    Intrinsic response properties of neurons change during network activity. These changes may reinforce the initiation of particular forms of network activity. If so, the involvement of neurons in particular behaviours in multifunctional networks could be determined by up- or down-regulation of their intrinsic excitability. Here we employed an experimental paradigm of protracted scratch initiation in the integrated carapace-spinal cord preparation of adult turtles (Chrysemys scripta elegans). The protracted initiation of scratch network activity allows us to investigate the excitability of motoneurons and pre-motor network activity in the time interval from the start of sensory stimulation until the onset of scratch activity. Our results suggest that increased activity in the pre-motor network facilitates the onset of scratch episodes but does not change the excitability of motoneurons at the onset of scratching.

  18. Strychnine blockade of the non-reciprocal inhibition of trigeminal motoneurons induced by stimulation of the parvocellular reticular formation.

    PubMed

    Castillo, P; Pedroarena, C; Chase, M H; Morales, F R

    1991-12-20

    Stimulation of a region within the parvocellular medullary reticular formation (PcRF) that contains somas of premotor interneurons produces short latency inhibitory synaptic potentials (IPSPs) in cat trigeminal motoneurons. The present study was undertaken to determine whether glycinergic synapses are responsible for these IPSPs. The intravenous administration of strychnine, an established glycine antagonist, abolished these PcRF-IPSPs. This effect appears to be specific for glycinergic inhibitory synapses because the short lasting component of the IPSP produced by inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) stimulation was also abolished, whereas, in contrast, the long lasting non-glycinergic component of this IPSP was not suppressed. These results indicate that a glycinergic system in the reticular formation is responsible for the non-reciprocal postsynaptic inhibition of trigeminal motoneurons. PMID:1817740

  19. Serotonin spillover onto the axon initial segment of motoneurons induces central fatigue by inhibiting action potential initiation

    PubMed Central

    Cotel, Florence; Exley, Richard; Cragg, Stephanie J.; Perrier, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    Motor fatigue induced by physical activity is an everyday experience characterized by a decreased capacity to generate motor force. Factors in both muscles and the central nervous system are involved. The central component of fatigue modulates the ability of motoneurons to activate muscle adequately independently of the muscle physiology. Indirect evidence indicates that central fatigue is caused by serotonin (5-HT), but the cellular mechanisms are unknown. In a slice preparation from the spinal cord of the adult turtle, we found that prolonged stimulation of the raphe-spinal pathway—as during motor exercise—activated 5-HT1A receptors that decreased motoneuronal excitability. Electrophysiological tests combined with pharmacology showed that focal activation of 5-HT1A receptors at the axon initial segment (AIS), but not on other motoneuronal compartments, inhibited the action potential initiation by modulating a Na+ current. Immunohistochemical staining against 5-HT revealed a high-density innervation of 5-HT terminals on the somatodendritic membrane and a complete absence on the AIS. This observation raised the hypothesis that a 5-HT spillover activates receptors at this latter compartment. We tested it by measuring the level of extracellular 5-HT with cyclic voltammetry and found that prolonged stimulations of the raphe-spinal pathway increased the level of 5-HT to a concentration sufficient to activate 5-HT1A receptors. Together our results demonstrate that prolonged release of 5-HT during motor activity spills over from its release sites to the AIS of motoneurons. Here, activated 5-HT1A receptors inhibit firing and, thereby, muscle contraction. Hence, this is a cellular mechanism for central fatigue. PMID:23487756

  20. The emergence of the "motoneuron concept": from the early 19th C to the beginning of the 20th C.

    PubMed

    Clarac, François; Barbara, Jean-Gaël

    2011-08-29

    This article addresses the emergence of the "motoneuron concept," i.e., the idea that this cell had properties of particular advantage for its control of muscle activation. The motor function of the ventral roots was established early in the 19th C and the term "motor cell," (or "motor nerve cell") was introduced shortly thereafter by Albrecht von Kölliker and some other histologists. They knew that motor cells were among the neurons with the largest soma in vertebrates and for this reason they were, and remained for many decades, the best and most studied neuronal model. The work of clinicians like Guillaume Duchenne de Boulogne and Jean-Martin Charcot on motor degenerative syndromes began before a clear description of motor cells was available, because it was initially more difficult to establish whether the deficits of paralysis and muscle weakness were due to neuronal or muscular lesions. Next, the pioneering physiologist, Charles Sherrington, who was influenced greatly by the anatomical contributions and speculations of Santiago Ramón y Cajal, used the term, "motor neuron," rather than motor cell for the neuron that he considered was functionally "the final common path" for providing command signals to the musculature. In the early 20th C he proposed that activation of a motor neuron resulted from the sum of its various excitatory and inhibitory CNS inputs. The contraction of motor neuron to "motoneuron(e)" was put into common usage by John Fulton (among possibly others) in 1926. The motoneuron concept is still evolving with new discoveries on the horizon.

  1. Effect of stimulation of the nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis on the membrane potential of cat lumbar motoneurons during sleep and wakefulness.

    PubMed

    Chase, M H; Morales, F R; Boxer, P A; Fung, S J; Soja, P J

    1986-10-29

    The present study was performed in order to determine the effect of electrical stimulation of the medullary nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis (NRGc) on the membrane potential of spinal cord motoneurons during sleep and wakefulness. Accordingly, intracellular recordings were obtained from lumbar motoneurons in unanesthetized normally respiring cats during naturally occurring states of wakefulness, quiet sleep and active sleep. Electrical stimuli applied to the NRGc evoked synaptic potentials which occurred at short latency (less than 10 ms) and did not exhibit consistent changes in their waveforms during any states of sleep or wakefulness. During wakefulness and quiet sleep, longer latency (greater than 20 ms) low-amplitude hyperpolarizing potentials occasionally followed NRGc stimulation. However, during active sleep, NRGc stimulation produced, in all motoneurons, relatively large hyperpolarizing potentials that were characterized by a mean amplitude of 3.5 +/- 0.4 mV (mean +/- S.E.M.), a mean latency-to-peak of 43.0 +/- 0.8 ms, and an average duration of 34.4 +/- 1.7 ms. These potentials were capable of blocking the generation of orthodromic spikes elicited by sciatic nerve stimulation. When anodal current or chloride was passed through the recording electrode, the hyperpolarizing potentials decreased in amplitude, and in some cases their polarity was reversed. These results indicate that the active sleep-specific hyperpolarizing potentials were inhibitory postsynaptic potentials. Thus, the NRGc possesses the capability of providing a postsynaptic inhibitory drive that is directed toward lumbar motoneurons which is dependent on the occurrence of the behavioral state of active sleep.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3779411

  2. Single cell laser dissection with molecular beacon polymerase chain reaction identifies 2A as the predominant serotonin receptor subtype in hypoglossal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Zhan, G; Shaheen, F; Mackiewicz, M; Fenik, P; Veasey, S C

    2002-01-01

    We hypothesize that sleep state-dependent withdrawal of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) at upper airway (UAW) dilator motoneurons contributes significantly to sleep-related suppression of dilator muscle activity in obstructive sleep apnea. Identification of 5-HT receptor subtypes involved in postsynaptic facilitation of UAW motoneuron activity may provide pharmacotherapies for this prevalent disorder. We have adapted two assays to provide semi-quantitative measurements of mRNA copy numbers for 5-HT receptor subtypes in single UAW motoneurons. Specifically, soma of 111 hypoglossal (XII) motoneurons in 10 adult male rats were captured using a laser dissection microscope, and then used individually in single round molecular beacon polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for real-time quantitation of 5-HT(2A), 5-HT(2C), 5-HT(3), 5-HT(4), 5-HT(5A), 5-HT(5B), 5-HT(6) or 5-HT(7) receptor. Receptor mRNA copy numbers from single XII motoneurons were compared to control samples from within the XII nucleus and lateral medulla. All 20 motoneuronal soma assayed for the 5-HT(2A) receptor had measurable copy numbers (7028+/-2656 copies/cell). In contrast, copy numbers for the 5-HT(2A) receptor in XII non-motoneuronal (n=17) and lateral medulla (n=15) samples were 81+/-51 copies and 83+/-35 copies, respectively, P<0.05. Seven of 13 XII motoneurons assayed had measurable 5-HT(2C) receptor copy numbers of mRNA (287+/-112 copies/cell). XII soma had minimal 5-HT(3), 5-HT(4), 5-HT(5A), 5-HT(5B), 5-HT(6) or 5-HT(7) receptor mRNA. 5-HT(2A) receptor mRNA presence within XII motoneurons was confirmed with digoxigenin-labeled in situ hybridization. In summary, combined use of laser dissection and molecular beacon PCR revealed 5-HT(2A) receptor as the predominant 5-HT receptor mRNA in XII motoneurons, and identified small quantities of 5-HT(2C) receptor. This information will allow a more complete understanding of serotonergic control of respiratory activity.

  3. Afferent projections to pharynx and soft palate motoneurons: a light and electron microscopical tracing study in the cat.

    PubMed

    Boers, Jose; Hulshoff, Antoinette C; de Weerd, Henk; Mouton, Leonora J; Kuipers, Rutger; Holstege, Gert

    2005-05-23

    Pharynx and soft palate are muscles for respiration, vocalization, swallowing, and vomiting. In cat, motoneurons innervating pharynx/soft palate are located in the dorsal group of the nucleus ambiguus (dgNA) in the medulla oblongata. In cat, dgNA is the only part of nucleus ambiguus that can be distinguished as a separate cell group, which makes it possible to study its afferent input. In two cats, WGA-HRP injections in dgNA and surrounding tegmentum resulted in retrogradely labeled cells at several levels of the neuraxis. In 170 cases anterograde tracers were injected in areas in which the cells of origin were identified. Results demonstrate that dgNA afferents originate from the tegmentum dorsolateral to the superior olivary complex, medullary ventromedial tegmentum, caudal raphe nuclei, medullary lateral tegmental field, nucleus retroambiguus (NRA), and adjoining tegmentum, extending into the first cervical segment of the spinal cord. In order to determine whether periaqueductal gray (PAG) and parabrachial nuclei (PB) make synaptic contacts with dgNA, ultrastructural studies combined anterograde tracing from PAG, PB, and NRA with retrograde tracing of pharyngeal and soft palate motoneurons. The results showed that PB, but not PAG, projects to the dgNA and that NRA afferent synapses are three times as numerous as those from PB. The morphology of PB and NRA synapses is consistent with excitatory input. In conclusion, pharyngeal and soft palate motoneurons receive their afferents almost exclusively from the pontine and medullary tegmentum and first cervical spinal segment.

  4. Passive electrophysiological properties of aged and axotomized cat spinal cord motoneurons: the effect of cell size and electrode shunt.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, J K; Chase, M H

    1992-07-01

    Intracellular recordings were obtained from intact and axotomized lumbar motoneurons of aged cats. The sub-threshold electrical properties of these cells were measured, including input resistance, resting membrane potential, and the first two equalizing time constants as well as their associated amplitude constants. These data were used in a semi-infinite cable model of the motoneuron to estimate the size of the shunt resistance (Rshunt) which is created when the electrode penetrates the cell membrane. The average Rshunt for intact aged cells was 5.35 +/- 1.01 M omega, while that for the axotomized aged cells was 8.93 +/- 1.20 M omega. The statistically significant difference in mean shunt magnitude did not affect the measurements of membrane time constant because this constant is independent of the shunt in this model of the motoneuron. However, the determination of cell input resistance, which is not independent of the shunt, was shown to underestimate the real cell input resistance by 23-29%. We therefore conclude that the shunt resistance is an important factor which should be taken into account when measuring input resistance. PMID:1508398

  5. Specification of motoneuron fate in Drosophila: integration of positive and negative transcription factor inputs by a minimal eve enhancer.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Jocelyn A; Fujioka, Miki; Odden, Joanne P; Jaynes, James B; Doe, Chris Q

    2003-11-01

    We are interested in the mechanisms that generate neuronal diversity within the Drosophila central nervous system (CNS), and in particular in the development of a single identified motoneuron called RP2. Expression of the homeodomain transcription factor Even-skipped (Eve) is required for RP2 to establish proper connectivity with its muscle target. Here we investigate the mechanisms by which eve is specifically expressed within the RP2 motoneuron lineage. Within the NB4-2 lineage, expression of eve first occurs in the precursor of RP2, called GMC4-2a. We identify a small 500 base pair eve enhancer that mediates eve expression in GMC4-2a. We show that four different transcription factors (Prospero, Huckebein, Fushi tarazu, and Pdm1) are all expressed in GMC4-2a, and are required to activate eve via this minimal enhancer, and that one transcription factor (Klumpfuss) represses eve expression via this element. All four positively acting transcription factors act independently, regulating eve but not each other. Thus, the eve enhancer integrates multiple positive and negative transcription factor inputs to restrict eve expression to a single precursor cell (GMC4-2a) and its RP2 motoneuron progeny.

  6. Estimation of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic conductance variations in motoneurons during locomotor-like rhythmic activity.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Ryota; Nishimaru, Hiroshi; Nishijo, Hisao

    2016-10-29

    The rhythmic activity of motoneurons (MNs) that underlies locomotion in mammals is generated by synaptic inputs from the locomotor network in the spinal cord. Thus, the quantitative estimation of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic conductances is essential to understand the mechanism by which the network generates the functional motor output. Conductance estimation is obtained from the voltage-current relationship measured by voltage-clamp- or current-clamp-recording with knowledge of the leak parameters of the recorded neuron. However, it is often difficult to obtain sufficient data to estimate synaptic conductances due to technical difficulties in electrophysiological experiments using in vivo or in vitro preparations. To address this problem, we estimated the average variations in excitatory and inhibitory synaptic conductance during a locomotion cycle from a single voltage trace without measuring the leak parameters. We found that the conductance variations can be accurately reconstructed from a voltage trace of 10 cycles by analyzing synthetic data generated from a computational model. Next, the conductance variations were estimated from mouse spinal MNs in vitro during drug-induced-locomotor-like activity. We found that the peak of excitatory conductance occurred during the depolarizing phase of the locomotor cycle, whereas the peak of inhibitory conductance occurred during the hyperpolarizing phase. These results suggest that the locomotor-like activity is generated by push-pull modulation via excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs. PMID:27561702

  7. Corticospinal and reciprocal inhibition actions on human soleus motoneuron activity during standing and walking.

    PubMed

    Hanna-Boutros, Berthe; Sangari, Sina; Giboin, Louis-Solal; El Mendili, Mohamed-Mounir; Lackmy-Vallée, Alexandra; Marchand-Pauvert, Véronique; Knikou, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Reciprocal Ia inhibition constitutes a key segmental neuronal pathway for coordination of antagonist muscles. In this study, we investigated the soleus H-reflex and reciprocal inhibition exerted from flexor group Ia afferents on soleus motoneurons during standing and walking in 15 healthy subjects following transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). The effects of separate TMS or deep peroneal nerve (DPN) stimulation and the effects of combined (TMS + DPN) stimuli on the soleus H-reflex were assessed during standing and at mid- and late stance phases of walking. Subthreshold TMS induced short-latency facilitation on the soleus H-reflex that was present during standing and at midstance but not at late stance of walking. Reciprocal inhibition was increased during standing and at late stance but not at the midstance phase of walking. The effects of combined TMS and DPN stimuli on the soleus H-reflex significantly changed between tasks, resulting in an extra facilitation of the soleus H-reflex during standing and not during walking. Our findings indicate that corticospinal inputs and Ia inhibitory interneurons interact at the spinal level in a task-dependent manner, and that corticospinal modulation of reciprocal Ia inhibition is stronger during standing than during walking. PMID:25825912

  8. Laser ablation of Drosophila embryonic motoneurons causes ectopic innervation of target muscle fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, T. N.; Keshishian, H.

    1996-01-01

    We have tested the effects of neuromuscular denervation in Drosophila by laser-ablating the RP motoneurons in intact embryos before synaptogenesis. We examined the consequences of this ablation on local synaptic connectivity in both 1st and 3rd instar larvae. We find that the partial or complete loss of native innervation correlates with the appearance of alternate inputs from neighboring motor endings and axons. These collateral inputs are found at ectopic sites on the denervated target muscle fibers. The foreign motor endings are electrophysiologically functional and are observed on the denervated muscle fibers by the 1st instar larval stage. Our data are consistent with the existence of a local signal from the target environment, which is regulated by innervation and influences synaptic connectivity. Our results show that, despite the stereotypy of Drosophila neuromuscular connections, denervation can induce local changes in connectivity in wild-type Drosophila, suggesting that mechanisms of synaptic plasticity may also be involved in normal Drosophila neuromuscular development.

  9. Locomotor corollary activation of trigeminal motoneurons: coupling of discrete motor behaviors.

    PubMed

    Hänzi, Sara; Banchi, Roberto; Straka, Hans; Chagnaud, Boris P

    2015-06-01

    During motor behavior, corollary discharges of the underlying motor commands inform sensory-motor systems about impending or ongoing movements. These signals generally limit the impact of self-generated sensory stimuli but also induce motor reactions that stabilize sensory perception. Here, we demonstrate in isolated preparations of Xenopus laevis tadpoles that locomotor corollary discharge provokes a retraction of the mechanoreceptive tentacles during fictive swimming. In the absence of sensory feedback, these signals activate a cluster of trigeminal motoneurons that cause a contraction of the tentacle muscle. This corollary discharge encodes duration and strength of locomotor activity, thereby ensuring a reliable coupling between locomotion and tentacle motion. The strict phase coupling between the trigeminal and spinal motor activity, present in many cases, suggests that the respective corollary discharge is causally related to the ongoing locomotor output and derives at least in part from the spinal central pattern generator; however, additional contributions from midbrain and/or hindbrain locomotor centers are likely. The swimming-related retraction might protect the touch-receptive Merkel cells on the tentacle from sensory over-stimulation and damage and/or reduce the hydrodynamic drag. The intrinsic nature of the coupling of tentacle retraction to locomotion is an excellent example of a context-dependent, direct link between otherwise discrete motor behaviors.

  10. Contribution of the Runx1 transcription factor to axonal pathfinding and muscle innervation by hypoglossal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Masaaki; Hirabayashi, Mizuki; Ito, Ryota; Ozaki, Shigeru; Aizawa, Shin; Masuda, Tomoyuki; Senzaki, Kouji; Shiga, Takashi

    2015-11-01

    The runt-related transcription factor Runx1 contributes to cell type specification and axonal targeting projections of the nociceptive dorsal root ganglion neurons. Runx1 is also expressed in the central nervous system, but little is known of its functions in brain development. At mouse embryonic day (E) 17.5, Runx1-positive neurons were detected in the ventrocaudal subdivision of the hypoglossal nucleus. Runx1-positive neurons lacked calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) expression, whereas Runx1-negative neurons expressed CGRP. Expression of CGRP was not changed in Runx1-deficient mice at E17.5, suggesting that Runx1 alone does not suppress CGRP expression. Hypoglossal axon projections to the intrinsic vertical (V) and transverse (T) tongue muscles were sparser in Runx1-deficient mice at E17.5 compared to age-matched wild-type littermates. Concomitantly, vesicular acetylcholine transporter-positive axon terminals and acetylcholine receptor clusters were less dense in the V and T tongue muscles of Runx1-deficient mice. These abnormalities in axonal projection were not caused by a reduction in the total number hypoglossal neurons, failed synaptogenesis, or tongue muscles deficits. Our results implicate Runx1 in the targeting of ventrocaudal hypoglossal axons to specific tongue muscles. However, Runx1 deficiency did not alter neuronal survival or the expression of multiple motoneuron markers as in other neuronal populations. Thus, Runx1 appears to have distinct developmental functions in different brain regions.

  11. Lhx3 and Lhx4 suppress Kolmer–Agduhr interneuron characteristics within zebrafish axial motoneurons

    PubMed Central

    Seredick, Steve; Hutchinson, Sarah A.; Van Ryswyk, Liesl; Talbot, Jared C.; Eisen, Judith S.

    2014-01-01

    A central problem in development is how fates of closely related cells are segregated. Lineally related motoneurons (MNs) and interneurons (INs) express many genes in common yet acquire distinct fates. For example, in mouse and chick Lhx3 plays a pivotal role in the development of both cell classes. Here, we utilize the ability to recognize individual zebrafish neurons to examine the roles of Lhx3 and its paralog Lhx4 in the development of MNs and ventral INs. We show that Lhx3 and Lhx4 are expressed by post-mitotic axial MNs derived from the MN progenitor (pMN) domain, p2 domain progenitors and by several types of INs derived from pMN and p2 domains. In the absence of Lhx3 and Lhx4, early-developing primary MNs (PMNs) adopt a hybrid fate, with morphological and molecular features of both PMNs and pMN-derived Kolmer–Agduhr′ (KA′) INs. In addition, we show that Lhx3 and Lhx4 distinguish the fates of two pMN-derived INs. Finally, we demonstrate that Lhx3 and Lhx4 are necessary for the formation of late-developing V2a and V2b INs. In conjunction with our previous work, these data reveal that distinct transcription factor families are deployed in post-mitotic MNs to unequivocally assign MN fate and suppress the development of alternative pMN-derived IN fates. PMID:25231761

  12. Glial changes in the phrenic nucleus following superimposed cervical spinal cord hemisection and peripheral chronic phrenicotomy injuries in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Gould, D J; Goshgarian, H G

    1997-11-01

    The objective of the present study was to characterize the microglial and astroglial reaction in the phrenic nucleus following either an ipsilateral C2 spinal cord hemisection, a peripheral phrenicotomy, or a combination of the two injuries in the same adult rat. The present study used three different fluorescent markers and a confocal laser image analysis system to study glial cells and phrenic motoneurons at the light microscopic level. Young adult female rats were divided into one combined injury group (left phrenicotomy and left C2 spinal hemisection with periods of 1 to 4 weeks between injuries, N = 12) and three other groups consisting of noninjured animals (N = 3), animals that received C2 hemisection only (N = 3), and animals with phrenicotomy only (survival periods of 2 (N = 3) and 4 (N = 3) weeks after phrenicotomy). Fluorogold was injected into the diaphragm to label phrenic motoneurons in all animals. Microglia and astrocytes were labeled with Texas red and fluorescein, respectively, and were visualized simultaneously along with phrenic motoneurons. The results suggest that the microglial and astrocytic response in the superimposed injury model are similar to the glial reactions characteristically seen in a peripheral axotomy alone model. These reactions include proliferation and migration of microglial cells along the perineuronal surface (peaking at 2 weeks) and the hypertrophy of astrocytes (peaking at 4 weeks). In addition, the increase in astrocytic tissue, which is characteristically seen in response to axotomy alone, is significantly enhanced in the superimposed injury model. Also, there is a large and rapid increase in GFAP-positive astrocytes within 24 hours after hemisection alone. The information gained from the present study will aid in determining, predicting, and eventually manipulating central nervous system responses to multiple injuries with the objective of reestablishing function in the damaged CNS.

  13. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... injuries internal head injuries, which may involve the skull, the blood vessels within the skull, or the brain Fortunately, most childhood falls or ... knock the brain into the side of the skull or tear blood vessels. Some internal head injuries ...

  14. Eye Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    The structure of your face helps protect your eyes from injury. Still, injuries can damage your eye, sometimes severely enough that you could lose your vision. Most eye injuries are preventable. If you play sports or ...

  15. Blast Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... Service Members & Veterans Family & Caregivers Medical Providers Blast Injuries U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Gustavo Olgiati How ... tertiary injury Does a blast cause different brain injuries than blunt trauma? There currently is no evidence ...

  16. Sports Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... sometimes you can injure yourself when you play sports or exercise. Accidents, poor training practices, or improper ... can also lead to injuries. The most common sports injuries are Sprains and strains Knee injuries Swollen ...

  17. Hamstring injuries.

    PubMed

    Ropiak, Christopher R; Bosco, Joseph A

    2012-01-01

    Hamstring injuries are a frequent injury in athletes. Proximal injuries are common, ranging from strain to complete tear. Strains are managed nonoperatively, with rest followed by progressive stretching and strengthening. Reinjury is a concern. High grade complete tears are better managed surgically, with reattachment to the injured tendon or ischial tuberosity. Distal hamstring injury is usually associated with other knee injuries, and isolated injury is rare.

  18. Human Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) overexpression in mice causes mitochondrial vacuolization, axonal degeneration, and premature motoneuron death and accelerates motoneuron disease in mice expressing a familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis mutant SOD1.

    PubMed

    Jaarsma, D; Haasdijk, E D; Grashorn, J A; Hawkins, R; van Duijn, W; Verspaget, H W; London, J; Holstege, J C

    2000-12-01

    Cytosolic Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) is a ubiquitous small cytosolic metalloenzyme that catalyzes the conversion of superoxide anion to hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). Mutations in the SOD1 gene cause a familial form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (fALS). The mechanism by which mutant SOD1s causes ALS is not understood. Transgenic mice expressing multiple copies of fALS-mutant SOD1s develop an ALS-like motoneuron disease resembling ALS. Here we report that transgenic mice expressing a high concentration of wild-type human SOD1 (hSOD1(WT)) develop an array of neurodegenerative changes consisting of (1) swelling and vacuolization of mitochondria, predominantly in axons in the spinal cord, brain stem, and subiculum; (2) axonal degeneration in a number of long fiber tracts, predominantly the spinocerebellar tracts; and (3) at 2 years of age, a moderate loss of spinal motoneurons. Parallel to the development of neurodegenerative changes, hSOD1(WT) mice also develop mild motor abnormalities. Interestingly, mitochondrial vacuolization was associated with accumulation of hSOD1 immunoreactivity, suggesting that the development of mitochondrial pathology is associated with disturbed SOD1 turnover. In this study we also crossed hSOD1(WT) mice with a line of fALS-mutant SOD1 mice (hSOD1(G93A)) to generate "double" transgenic mice that express high levels of both wild-type and G93A mutant hSOD1. The "double" transgenic mice show accelerated motoneuron death, earlier onset of paresis, and earlier death as compared with hSOD1(G93A) littermates. Thus in vivo expression of high levels of wild-type hSOD1 is not only harmful to neurons in itself, but also increases or facilitates the deleterious action of a fALS-mutant SOD1. Our data indicate that it is important for motoneurons to control the SOD1 concentration throughout their processes, and that events that lead to improper synthesis, transport, or breakdown of SOD1 causing its accumulation are potentially dangerous.

  19. Alterations in acetylcholinesterase and choline acetyltransferase activities and neuropeptide levels in the ventral spinal cord of the Wobbler mouse during inherited motoneuron disease.

    PubMed

    Yung, K K; Tang, F; Vacca-Galloway, L L

    1994-02-28

    Enzymatic assays for acetylcholine esterase (AChE) and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) were applied to dorsal and ventral cervical spinal cord regions taken from the Wobbler mouse, a model for inherited motoneuron disease. Early in the disease, ChAT (but not AChE) activity is significantly greater compared with the control littermate specimens. The high ChAT activity correlates with the high thyrotropin releasing hormone (also leucine-enkephalin) concentrations measured in the Wobbler ventral horn early in the disease. Late in the motoneuron disease, both AChE and ChAT activities are significantly lower than in the control littermate specimens. These data correlate with the high substance P, methionine and leucine enkephalin concentrations measured in the Wobbler ventral horn late in the motoneuron disease.

  20. Age-Related Changes in Pre- and Postsynaptic Partners of the Cholinergic C-Boutons in Wild-Type and SOD1G93A Lumbar Motoneurons

    PubMed Central

    Milan, Léa; Courtand, Gilles; Cardoit, Laura; Masmejean, Frédérique; Barrière, Grégory; Cazalets, Jean-René; Garret, Maurice; Bertrand, Sandrine S.

    2015-01-01

    Large cholinergic synaptic terminals known as C-boutons densely innervate the soma and proximal dendrites of motoneurons that are prone to neurodegeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Studies using the Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) mouse model of ALS have generated conflicting data regarding C-bouton alterations exhibited during ALS pathogenesis. In the present work, a longitudinal study combining immunohistochemistry, biochemical approaches and extra- and intra-cellular electrophysiological recordings revealed that the whole spinal cholinergic system is modified in the SOD1 mouse model of ALS compared to wild type (WT) mice as early as the second postnatal week. In WT motoneurons, both C-bouton terminals and associated M2 postsynaptic receptors presented a complex age-related dynamic that appeared completely disrupted in SOD1 motoneurons. Indeed, parallel to C-bouton morphological alterations, analysis of confocal images revealed a clustering process of M2 receptors during WT motoneuron development and maturation that was absent in SOD1 motoneurons. Our data demonstrated for the first time that the lamina X cholinergic interneurons, the neuronal source of C-boutons, are over-abundant in high lumbar segments in SOD1 mice and are subject to neurodegeneration in the SOD1 animal model. Finally, we showed that early C-bouton system alterations have no physiological impact on the cholinergic neuromodulation of newborn motoneurons. Altogether, these data suggest a complete reconfiguration of the spinal cholinergic system in SOD1 spinal networks that could be part of the compensatory mechanisms established during spinal development. PMID:26305672

  1. Remodeling of membrane properties and dendritic architecture accompanies the postembryonic conversion of a slow into a fast motoneuron.

    PubMed

    Duch, C; Levine, R B

    2000-09-15

    The postembryonic acquisition of behavior requires alterations in neuronal circuitry, which ultimately must be understood as specific changes in neuronal structure, membrane properties, and synaptic connectivity. This study addresses this goal by describing the postembryonic remodeling of the excitability and dendritic morphology of an identified motoneuron, MN5, which during the metamorphosis of Manduca sexta (L.) changes from a slow motoneuron that is involved in larval-crawling behavior into a fast adult flight motoneuron. A fivefold lower input resistance, a higher firing threshold, and an increase in voltage-activated K(+) current contribute to a lower excitability of the adult MN5, which is a prerequisite for its newly acquired behavioral role. In addition, the adult MN5 displays larger Ca(2+) currents. The dendrites of MN5 undergo extensive remodeling. Drastic regression of larval dendrites during early pupal stages is followed by rapid growth of new dendrites. Critical changes in excitability take place during the onset of adult dendrite formation. Larval Ca(2+) currents are absent when dendritic remodeling is most dramatic but increase markedly during later development. Changes in Ca(2+) and K(+) currents follow different time courses, allowing the transient occurrence of Ca(2+) spikes during pupal stages when new dendritic branching ceases. The adult MN5 can produce prolonged Ca(2+) spikes after K(+) currents are reduced. We suggest that alterations in Ca(2+) and K(+) currents are necessary for the participation of MN5 in flight behavior and that the transient production of Ca(2+) spikes may influence postembryonic dendritic remodeling.

  2. Modulation of spontaneous locomotor and respiratory drives to hindlimb motoneurons temporally related to sympathetic drives as revealed by Mayer waves

    PubMed Central

    Wienecke, Jacob; Enríquez Denton, Manuel; Stecina, Katinka; Kirkwood, Peter A.; Hultborn, Hans

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigated how the networks mediating respiratory and locomotor drives to lumbar motoneurons interact and how this interaction is modulated in relation to periodic variations in blood pressure (Mayer waves). Seven decerebrate cats, under neuromuscular blockade, were used to study central respiratory drive potentials (CRDPs, usually enhanced by added CO2) and spontaneously occurring locomotor drive potentials (LDPs) in hindlimb motoneurons, together with hindlimb and phrenic nerve discharges. In four of the cats both drives and their voltage-dependent amplification were absent or modest, but in the other three, one or other of these drives was common and the voltage-dependent amplification was frequently strong. Moreover, in these three cats the blood pressure showed marked periodic variation (Mayer waves), with a slow rate (periods 9–104 s, mean 39 ± 17 SD). Profound modulation, synchronized with the Mayer waves was seen in the occurrence and/or in the amplification of the CRDPs or LDPs. In one animal, where CRDPs were present in most cells and the amplification was strong, the CRDP consistently triggered sustained plateaux at one phase of the Mayer wave cycle. In the other two animals, LDPs were common, and the occurrence of the locomotor drive was gated by the Mayer wave cycle, sometimes in alternation with the respiratory drive. Other interactions between the two drives involved respiration providing leading events, including co-activation of flexors and extensors during post-inspiration or a locomotor drive gated or sometimes entrained by respiration. We conclude that the respiratory drive in hindlimb motoneurons is transmitted via elements of the locomotor central pattern generator. The rapid modulation related to Mayer waves suggests the existence of a more direct and specific descending modulatory control than has previously been demonstrated. PMID:25713515

  3. Influence of active dendritic currents on input-output processing in spinal motoneurons in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lee, R H; Kuo, J J; Jiang, M C; Heckman, C J

    2003-01-01

    The extensive dendritic tree of the adult spinal motoneuron generates a powerful persistent inward current (PIC). We investigated how this dendritic PIC influenced conversion of synaptic input to rhythmic firing. A linearly increasing, predominantly excitatory synaptic input was generated in triceps ankle extensor motoneurons by slow stretch (duration: 2-10 s) of the Achilles tendon in the decerebrate cat preparation. The firing pattern evoked by stretch was measured by injecting a steady current to depolarize the cell to threshold for firing. The effective synaptic current (I(N), the net synaptic current reaching the soma of the cell) evoked by stretch was measured during voltage clamp. Hyperpolarized holding potentials were used to minimize the activation of the dendritic PIC and thus estimate stretch-evoked I(N) for a passive dendritic tree (I(N,PASS)). Depolarized holding potentials that approximated the average membrane potential during rhythmic firing allowed strong activation of the dendritic PIC and thus resulted in marked enhancement of the total stretch-evoked I(N) (I(N,TOT)). The net effect of the dendritic PIC on the generation of rhythmic firing was assessed by plotting stretch-evoked firing (strong PIC activation) versus stretch-evoked I(N,PASS) (minimal PIC activation). The gain of this input-output function for the neuron (I-O(N)) was found to be ~2.7 times as high as for the standard injected frequency current (F-I) function in low-input conductance neurons. However, about halfway through the stretch, firing rate tended to become constant, resulting in a sharp saturation in I-O(N) that was not present in F-I. In addition, the gain of I-O(N) decreased sharply with increasing input conductance, resulting in much lower stretch-evoked firing rates in high-input conductance cells. All three of these phenomena (high initial gain, saturation, and differences in low- and high-input conductance cells) were also readily apparent in the differences between

  4. Topochemical differences in the amount of RNA in the motoneurons of the spinal chord in hypoxia and hypokinesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brumberg, V. A.; Gazenko, O. G.; Demin, N. N.; Malkin, V. B.; Pevzner, L. Z.

    1980-01-01

    Reactions to hypoxia and hypoknesia were compared by measuring charges in the amount of ribonucleic acid (RNA) in the cytoplasm of neurons of the intumescentia cervicalis and lumbalis. Animals were subjected to hypoxia, hypokinesia and both combined and a control group to neither. A total of two groups of motoneurons were compared, one innervating the respiratory musculature, the other the musculature of the lower extremities, so that hypoxic hypoxia would probably affect the first group primarily and hypokinesia the second. Results indicate that neither affect the amount of RNA in the neurons of the first group but a significant increase is noted in neurons of the second group. Other significant results are reported.

  5. Lithium prevents excitotoxic cell death of motoneurons in organotypic slice cultures of spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Calderó, J; Brunet, N; Tarabal, O; Piedrafita, L; Hereu, M; Ayala, V; Esquerda, J E

    2010-02-17

    Several studies have reported the neuroprotective effects of lithium (Li) suggesting its potential in the treatment of neurological disorders, among of them amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Although the cause of motoneuron (MN) death in ALS remains unknown, there is evidence that glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity plays an important role. In the present study we used an organotypic culture system of chick embryo spinal cord to explore the presumptive neuroprotective effects of Li against kainate-induced excitotoxic MN death. We found that chronic treatment with Li prevented excitotoxic MN loss in a dose dependent manner and that this effect was mediated by the inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta) signaling pathway. This neuroprotective effect of Li was potentiated by a combined treatment with riluzole. Nevertheless, MNs rescued by Li displayed structural changes including accumulation of neurofilaments, disruption of the rough endoplasmic reticulum and free ribosome loss, and accumulation of large dense core vesicles and autophagic vacuoles. Accompanying these changes there was an increase in immunostaining for (a) phosphorylated neurofilaments, (b) calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and (c) the autophagic marker LC3. Chronic Li treatment also resulted in a reduction in the excitotoxin-induced rise in intracellular Ca(2+) in MNs. In contrast to the neuroprotection against excitotoxicity, Li was not able to prevent normal programmed (apoptotic) MN death in the chick embryo when chronically administered in ovo. In conclusion, these results show that although Li is able to prevent excitotoxic MN death by targeting GSK-3beta, this neuroprotective effect is associated with conspicuous cytopathological changes.

  6. Current injection and receptor-mediated excitation produce similar maximal firing rates in hypoglossal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Wakefield, Hilary E; Fregosi, Ralph F; Fuglevand, Andrew J

    2016-03-01

    The maximum firing rates of motoneurons (MNs), activated in response to synaptic drive, appear to be much lower than that elicited by current injection. It could be that the decrease in input resistance associated with increased synaptic activity (but not current injection) might blunt overall changes in membrane depolarization and thereby limit spike-frequency output. To test this idea, we recorded, in the same cells, maximal firing responses to current injection and to synaptic activation. We prepared 300 μm medullary slices in neonatal rats that contained hypoglossal MNs and used whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology to record their maximum firing rates in response to triangular-ramp current injections and to glutamate receptor-mediated excitation. Brief pressure pulses of high-concentration glutamate led to significant depolarization, high firing rates, and temporary cessation of spiking due to spike inactivation. In the same cells, we applied current clamp protocols that approximated the time course of membrane potential change associated with glutamate application and with peak current levels large enough to cause spike inactivation. Means (SD) of maximum firing rates obtained in response to glutamate application were nearly identical to those obtained in response to ramp current injection [glutamate 47.1 ± 12.0 impulses (imp)/s, current injection 47.5 ± 11.2 imp/s], even though input resistance was 40% less during glutamate application compared with current injection. Therefore, these data suggest that the reduction in input resistance associated with receptor-mediated excitation does not, by itself, limit the maximal firing rate responses in MNs.

  7. Changes in corticospinal drive to spinal motoneurones following tablet-based practice of manual dexterity.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Lisbeth H; Jensen, Thor; Christensen, Mark S; Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper; Langberg, Henning; Nielsen, Jens B

    2016-02-01

    The use of touch screens, which require a high level of manual dexterity, has exploded since the development of smartphone and tablet technology. Manual dexterity relies on effective corticospinal control of finger muscles, and we therefore hypothesized that corticospinal drive to finger muscles can be optimized by tablet-based motor practice. To investigate this, sixteen able-bodied females practiced a tablet-based game (3 × 10 min) with their nondominant hand requiring incrementally fast and precise pinching movements involving the thumb and index fingers. The study was designed as a semirandomized crossover study where the participants attended one practice- and one control session. Before and after each session electrophysiological recordings were obtained during three blocks of 50 precision pinch movements in a standardized setup resembling the practiced task. Data recorded during movements included electroencephalographic (EEG) activity from primary motor cortex and electromyographic (EMG) activity from first dorsal interosseous (FDI) and abductor pollicis brevis (APB) muscles. Changes in the corticospinal drive were evaluated from coupling in the frequency domain (coherence) between EEG-EMG and EMG-EMG activity. Following motor practice performance improved significantly and a significant increase in EEG-EMGAPB and EMGAPB-EMGFDI coherence in the beta band (15-30 Hz) was observed. No changes were observed after the control session. Our results show that tablet-based motor practice is associated with changes in the common corticospinal drive to spinal motoneurons involved in manual dexterity. Tablet-based motor practice may be a motivating training tool for stroke patients who struggle with loss of dexterity.

  8. Effects of gravitational unloading on activity of motoneurones of m. soleus in man

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakirova, Albina; Shigueva, Tatiana; Tomilovskaya, Elena

    The aim of recent work was to study of participation of spinal and supraspinal structures (motor cortex) in the development of hypogravitational hyperreflexia of stretch reflexes observed under weightlessness (Kozlovskaya I.B. et. al., 1981; Reschke M.F. et al., 1984; Saenko I.V., 2007). Methods. 11 healthy volunteers took part in the research. Dry immersion (DI) with the duration of 3 and 5 days was used as onground model of weightlessness. Before and after DI thresholds and amplitudes of m. soleus H-reflex; as well as thresholds and amplitudes of m. soleus motor potentials (MEPs) evoked by magnetic stimulation of spinal roots at L5-S1 segments and cortex motor zones were defined. Results. Exposure to DI was accompanied with significant decrease of the H-reflex threshold by 23.8±8.2%, and with an increase of the relative H-reflex amplitudes by 12.89±8.3% in comparison with background. At the same time thresholds of spinal MEPs were reduced by 5% as well as and their amplitudes were increased significantly by 13.8±4.2%. The obtained data indicate an increase of motoneurones pool’s excitability of m. soleus under gravitational unloading conditions. At the same time after DI exposure a tendency to increase of thresholds of cortical MEPs was observed by 11.7±6.8% from background, and their amplitudes didn’t change in comparison with background, which gives evidence of a non-changed excitability of the motor cortex structures. In general the results of the experiments indicate the spinal nature of the hypogravitational hyperreflexia. The work was supported by RFBR projects NN 13-04-12091 Ofi-m and 11-04-01240-а.

  9. Mechanisms underlying the early phase of spike frequency adaptation in mouse spinal motoneurones.

    PubMed

    Miles, G B; Dai, Y; Brownstone, R M

    2005-07-15

    Spike frequency adaptation (SFA) is a fundamental property of repetitive firing in motoneurones (MNs). Early SFA (occurring over several hundred milliseconds) is thought to be important in the initiation of muscular contraction. To date the mechanisms underlying SFA in spinal MNs remain unclear. In the present study, we used both whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of MNs in lumbar spinal cord slices prepared from motor functionally mature mice and computer modelling of spinal MNs to investigate the mechanisms underlying SFA. Pharmacological blocking agents applied during whole-cell recordings in current-clamp mode demonstrated that the medium AHP conductance (apamin), BK-type Ca2+ -dependent K+ channels (iberiotoxin), voltage-activated Ca2+ channels (CdCl2), M-current (linopirdine) and persistent Na+ currents (riluzole) are all unnecessary for SFA. Measurements of Na+ channel availability including action potential amplitude, action potential threshold and maximum depolarization rate of the action potential were found to correlate with instantaneous firing frequency suggesting that the availability of fast, inactivating Na+ channels is involved in SFA. Characterization of this Na+ conductance in voltage-clamp mode demonstrated that it undergoes slow inactivation with a time course similar to that of SFA. When experimentally measured parameters for the fast, inactivating Na+ conductance (including slow inactivation) were incorporated into a MN model, SFA could be faithfully reproduced. The removal of slow inactivation from this model was sufficient to remove SFA. These data indicate that slow inactivation of the fast, inactivating Na+ conductance is likely to be the key mechanism underlying early SFA in spinal MNs.

  10. Electrical stimulation accelerates and enhances expression of regeneration-associated genes in regenerating rat femoral motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Al-Majed, Abdulhakeem A; Tam, Siu Lin; Gordon, Tessa

    2004-06-01

    1. In this study we investigated whether electrical stimulation accelerates the upregulation of Talpha1-tubulin and GAP-43 (regeneration-associated genes; RAGs) and the downregulation of the medium-molecular-weight neurofilament (NFM), in concert with stimulation-induced acceleration of BDNF and trkB gene expression and axonal regeneration. 2. Two weeks prior to unilateral femoral nerve transection and suture, fluorogold (Fluorochrome Inc., Denver) or fluororuby (Dextran tetramethylrhodamine, Mol. Probes, D-1817, Eugene, OR) was injected into quadriceps muscles of the left and right hindlimbs to label the femoral motoneuron pools as previously described. Over a period of 7 days, fresh spinal cords were processed for semiquantitation of mRNA by using in situ hybridization. 3. There was an increase in Talpha1-tubulin and GAP-43 mRNA and a decline in the NFM mRNA at 7 days after nerve suture and sham stimulation but not in intact nerves. In contrast, 1-h stimulation of sutured but not intact nerves dramatically accelerated the changes in gene expression: mRNA levels of Talpha1-tubulin and GAP-43 were significantly elevated above control levels by 2 days while NFM mRNA was significantly reduced by 2 days in the sutured nerves. Thereby, the neurofilament/tubulin expression ratio was reduced at 2 days after suture and stimulation, possibly allowing more tubulin to be transported faster into the growing axons to accelerate the elongation rate following stimulation. Importantly, the changes in RAGs and NFM gene expression were delayed relative to the accelerated upregulation of BDNF and trkB mRNA by electrical stimulation. 4. The temporal sequence of upregulation of BDNF and trkB, altered gene expression of RAGs and NFM, and accelerated axonal outgrowth from the proximal nerve stump are consistent with a key role of BDNF and trkB in mediating the altered expression of RAGs and, in turn, the promotion of axonal outgrowth after electrical stimulation.

  11. Neurotrophic Factor-Secreting Autologous Muscle Stem Cell Therapy for the Treatment of Laryngeal Denervation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Halum, Stacey L.; McRae, Bryan; Bijangi-Vishehsaraei, Khadijeh; Hiatt, Kelly

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To determine if the spontaneous reinnervation that characteristically ensues after recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury could be selectively promoted and directed to certain laryngeal muscles with the use of neurotrophic factor (NF)-secreting muscle stem cell (MSC) vectors while antagonistic reinnervation is inhibited with vincristine (VNC). Study Design Basic science investigations involving primary cell cultures, gene cloning/transfer, and animal experiments. Methods (i.) MSC survival assays were used to test multiple individual NFs in vitro. (ii.) Motoneuron outgrowth assays assessed the trophic effects of identified NF on cranial nerve X-derived (CNX) motoneurons in vitro. (iii.) Therapeutic NF was cloned into a lentiviral vector, and MSCs were tranduced to secrete NF. 60 rats underwent left RLN transection injury, and at 3 weeks received injections of either MSCs (n=24), MSCs secreting NF (n=24), or saline (n=12) into the left thyroarytenoid muscle complex (TA); half of the animals in the MSC groups simultaneously received left posterior cricoarytenoid (PCA) injections of vincristine (VNC) while half the animals received saline. Results (i.) Ciliary-derived neurotrophic factor (CNTF) had the greatest survival-promoting effect on MSCs in culture. (ii.) Addition of CNTF (50 ng/mL) to CN X motoneuron cultures resulted in enhanced neurite outgrowth and branching. (iii.) In the animal model, the injected MSCs fused with the denervated myofibers, immunohistochemistry demonstrated enhanced reinnervation based on motor endplate to nerve contact, and RT-PCR confirmed stable CNTF expression at longest follow-up (4 months) in the CNTF-secreting MSC treated groups. Conclusions MSC therapy may have a future role in selectively promoting and directing laryngeal reinnervation after RLN injury. Level of evidence: NA PMID:22965802

  12. A functional model and simulation of spinal motor pools and intrafascicular recordings of motoneuron activity in peripheral nerve

    PubMed Central

    Abdelghani, Mohamed N.; Abbas, James J.; Horch, Kenneth W.; Jung, Ranu

    2014-01-01

    Decoding motor intent from recorded neural signals is essential for the development of effective neural-controlled prostheses. To facilitate the development of online decoding algorithms we have developed a software platform to simulate neural motor signals recorded with peripheral nerve electrodes, such as longitudinal intrafascicular electrodes (LIFEs). The simulator uses stored motor intent signals to drive a pool of simulated motoneurons with various spike shapes, recruitment characteristics, and firing frequencies. Each electrode records a weighted sum of a subset of simulated motoneuron activity patterns. As designed, the simulator facilitates development of a suite of test scenarios that would not be possible with actual data sets because, unlike with actual recordings, in the simulator the individual contributions to the simulated composite recordings are known and can be methodically varied across a set of simulation runs. In this manner, the simulation tool is suitable for iterative development of real-time decoding algorithms prior to definitive evaluation in amputee subjects with implanted electrodes. The simulation tool was used to produce data sets that demonstrate its ability to capture some features of neural recordings that pose challenges for decoding algorithms. PMID:25452711

  13. Neuroprotection through excitability and mTOR required in ALS motoneurons to delay disease and extend survival.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Smita; Roselli, Francesco; Singh, Katyayani; Leptien, Kerstin; Julien, Jean-Pierre; Gros-Louis, Francois; Caroni, Pico

    2013-10-01

    Delaying clinical disease onset would greatly reduce neurodegenerative disease burden, but the mechanisms influencing early preclinical progression are poorly understood. Here, we show that in mouse models of familial motoneuron (MN) disease, SOD1 mutants specifically render vulnerable MNs dependent on endogenous neuroprotection signaling involving excitability and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). The most vulnerable low-excitability FF MNs already exhibited evidence of pathology and endogenous neuroprotection recruitment early postnatally. Enhancing MN excitability promoted MN neuroprotection and reversed misfolded SOD1 (misfSOD1) accumulation and MN pathology, whereas reducing MN excitability augmented misfSOD1 accumulation and accelerated disease. Inhibiting metabotropic cholinergic signaling onto MNs reduced ER stress, but enhanced misfSOD1 accumulation and prevented mTOR activation in alpha-MNs. Modulating excitability and/or alpha-MN mTOR activity had comparable effects on the progression rates of motor dysfunction, denervation, and death. Therefore, excitability and mTOR are key endogenous neuroprotection mechanisms in motoneurons to counteract clinically important disease progression in ALS.

  14. Splicing changes in SMA mouse motoneurons and SMN-depleted neuroblastoma cells: Evidence for involvement of splicing regulatory proteins

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Qing; Kayikci, Melis; Odermatt, Philipp; Meyer, Kathrin; Michels, Olivia; Saxena, Smita; Ule, Jernej; Schümperli, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is caused by deletions or mutations in the Survival Motor Neuron 1 (SMN1) gene. The second gene copy, SMN2, produces some, but not enough, functional SMN protein. SMN is essential to assemble small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) that form the spliceosome. However, it is not clear whether SMA is caused by defects in this function that could lead to splicing changes in all tissues, or by the impairment of an additional, less well characterized, but motoneuron-specific SMN function. We addressed the first possibility by exon junction microarray analysis of motoneurons (MNs) isolated by laser capture microdissection from a severe SMA mouse model. This revealed changes in multiple U2-dependent splicing events. Moreover, splicing appeared to be more strongly affected in MNs than in other cells. By testing mutiple genes in a model of progressive SMN depletion in NB2a neuroblastoma cells, we obtained evidence that U2-dependent splicing changes occur earlier than U12-dependent ones. As several of these changes affect genes coding for splicing regulators, this may acerbate the splicing response induced by low SMN levels and induce secondary waves of splicing alterations. PMID:25692239

  15. Pancreatic injury.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Nasim; Vernick, Jerome J

    2009-12-01

    Injury to the pancreas, because of its retroperitoneal location, is a rare occurrence, most commonly seen with penetrating injuries (gun shot or stab wounds). Blunt trauma to the pancreas accounts for only 25% of the cases. Pancreatic injuries are associated with high morbidity and mortality due to accompanying vascular and duodenal injuries. Pancreatic injuries are not always easy to diagnose resulting in life threatening complications. Physical examination as well as serum amylase is not diagnostic following blunt trauma. Computed tomography (CT) scan can delineate the injury or transaction of the pancreas. Endoscopic retrograde pancreaticography (ERCP) is the main diagnostic modality for evaluation of the main pancreatic duct. Unrecognized ductal injury leads to pancreatic pseudocyst, fistula, abscess, and other complications. Management depends upon the severity of the pancreatic injury as well as associated injuries. Damage control surgery in hemodynamic unstable patients reduces morbidity and mortality.

  16. Snowboard injuries.

    PubMed

    Pino, E C; Colville, M R

    1989-01-01

    A retrospective survey of 267 snowboarders was undertaken to determine the population at risk and types and mechanisms of injuries sustained in this sport. Snowboarders are young (average age, 21 years), male (greater than 90%), view themselves in average or above average physical condition (96%), and have varied sports interests. One hundred ten injuries that resulted in a physician visit were reported. Ligament sprains, fractures, and contusions were the most frequent types of injury. Fifty percent of all injuries occurred in the lower extremities, with ankle injuries being the most common. Snowboard riders using equipment with increased ankle support seem to be more protected from lower extremity injuries. The lower extremity injuries were concentrated in the forward limb of the snowboarder, where the rider's weight is disproportionately distributed. Differences in the mechanism and spectrum of injury between snowboarding and skiing injuries were noted, including: impact rather than torsion as the major mechanism of injury, a significant lack of thumb injuries, comparative increase in ankle injuries, a decrease in knee injuries, and a higher percentage of upper extremity injuries.

  17. Human spinal cord injury: motor unit properties and behaviour.

    PubMed

    Thomas, C K; Bakels, R; Klein, C S; Zijdewind, I

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in widespread variation in muscle function. Review of motor unit data shows that changes in the amount and balance of excitatory and inhibitory inputs after SCI alter management of motoneurons. Not only are units recruited up to higher than usual relative forces when SCI leaves few units under voluntary control, the force contribution from recruitment increases due to elevation of twitch/tetanic force ratios. Force gradation and precision are also coarser with reduced unit numbers. Maximal unit firing rates are low in hand muscles, limiting voluntary strength, but are low, normal or high in limb muscles. Unit firing rates during spasms can exceed voluntary rates, emphasizing that deficits in descending drive limit force production. SCI also changes muscle properties. Motor unit weakness and fatigability seem universal across muscles and species, increasing the muscle weakness that arises from paralysis of units, motoneuron death and sensory impairment. Motor axon conduction velocity decreases after human SCI. Muscle contractile speed is also reduced, which lowers the stimulation frequencies needed to grade force when paralysed muscles are activated with patterned electrical stimulation. This slowing does not necessarily occur in hind limb muscles after cord transection in cats and rats. The nature, duration and level of SCI underlie some of these species differences, as do variations in muscle function, daily usage, tract control and fibre-type composition. Exploring this diversity is important to promote recovery of the hand, bowel, bladder and locomotor function most wanted by people with SCI. PMID:23901835

  18. [The contribution of glycine and GABA(A) receptors to generation of the inhibitory postsynaptic potentials in the frog spinal cord motoneurones].

    PubMed

    Kurchavyĭ, G G; Kalinina, N I; Veselkin, N P

    2010-06-01

    The contribution of glycine and GABA(A) receptors to generation of the inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) evoked by microstimulation of the inhibitory fibers was studied intracellularly in the motoneurones of the isolated frog spinal cord. IPSPs were isolated by bloking EPSPs with kynurenate or CNQX and AP-5. The reversion under the small depolarising current (1-10) nA was used for the identification of IPSPs. The selective GlyR antagonist strychnine (1-5 microM) reduced the amplitude of IPSPs by a factor of 4.7 on the average in all studied motoneurones, while the selective GABA(A)R antagonist bicuculline (50-70 microM)--only by a factor of 1.6 and had no effect in 44% of motoneurones. Sequential applications of strychnine and bicuculline completely blocked the IPSPs. The results suggest that postsynaptic inhibition in the frog motoneurones is mediated by glycine (predominantly) and GABA(A) (to a smaller extent) receptors. It is possible the GABA(A) receptors are partly extrasynaptic. PMID:20795472

  19. Basketball injuries.

    PubMed

    Newman, Joel S; Newberg, Arthur H

    2010-11-01

    Basketball injuries are most prevalent in the lower extremity, especially at the ankle and knee. Most basketball injuries are orthopedic in nature and commonly include ligament sprains, musculotendinous strains, and overuse injuries including stress fractures. By virtue of its excellent contrast resolution and depiction of the soft tissues and trabecular bone, magnetic resonance imaging has become the principal modality for evaluating many basketball injuries. In this article, commonly encountered basketball injuries and their imaging appearances are described. The epidemiology of basketball injuries across various age groups and levels of competition and between genders are reviewed.

  20. Skateboard injuries.

    PubMed

    Cass, D T; Ross, F

    1990-08-01

    The recent increase in skateboard injuries is causing concern. Over a 30-month period there were 80 admissions (69 children) to Westmead Hospital because of skateboard injuries. Among children most injuries were minor, involving fractures to the upper limbs (47) or minor head injuries (8). The only serious injuries were a ruptured urethra and a closed head injury. Over the same time period skateboard riding caused five deaths in New South Wales. These all involved head injuries and in four instances collisions with cars. The data strongly support other studies that show skateboard riding is particularly dangerous near traffic and should be proscribed. However, in parkland and around the home the skateboard is an enjoyable toy with an acceptable risk of minor injury. Helmets should be worn and would have prevented all the head injury admissions in this series. Children under 10 have a higher risk of fractures and head injuries due to insufficient motor development to control the boards and the resultant falls. Skateboard injuries are an example of injuries caused by a "fad epidemic". To cope with these types of periodic events up-to-date data collection is needed, followed rapidly by an intervention programme so that serious injuries can be kept to a minimum.

  1. Generation of BAC Transgenic Tadpoles Enabling Live Imaging of Motoneurons by Using the Urotensin II-Related Peptide (ust2b) Gene as a Driver

    PubMed Central

    Bougerol, Marion; Auradé, Frédéric; Lambert, François M.; Le Ray, Didier; Combes, Denis; Thoby-Brisson, Muriel; Relaix, Frédéric; Pollet, Nicolas; Tostivint, Hervé

    2015-01-01

    Xenopus is an excellent tetrapod model for studying normal and pathological motoneuron ontogeny due to its developmental morpho-physiological advantages. In mammals, the urotensin II-related peptide (UTS2B) gene is primarily expressed in motoneurons of the brainstem and the spinal cord. Here, we show that this expression pattern was conserved in Xenopus and established during the early embryonic development, starting at the early tailbud stage. In late tadpole stage, uts2b mRNA was detected both in the hindbrain and in the spinal cord. Spinal uts2b+ cells were identified as axial motoneurons. In adult, however, the uts2b expression was only detected in the hindbrain. We assessed the ability of the uts2b promoter to drive the expression of a fluorescent reporter in motoneurons by recombineering a green fluorescent protein (GFP) into a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone containing the entire X. tropicalis uts2b locus. After injection of this construction in one-cell stage embryos, a transient GFP expression was observed in the spinal cord of about a quarter of the resulting animals from the early tailbud stage and up to juveniles. The GFP expression pattern was globally consistent with that of the endogenous uts2b in the spinal cord but no fluorescence was observed in the brainstem. A combination of histological and electrophysiological approaches was employed to further characterize the GFP+ cells in the larvae. More than 98% of the GFP+ cells expressed choline acetyltransferase, while their projections were co-localized with α-bungarotoxin labeling. When tail myotomes were injected with rhodamine dextran amine crystals, numerous double-stained GFP+ cells were observed. In addition, intracellular electrophysiological recordings of GFP+ neurons revealed locomotion-related rhythmic discharge patterns during fictive swimming. Taken together our results provide evidence that uts2b is an appropriate driver to express reporter genes in larval motoneurons of the

  2. Gene expression changes in spinal motoneurons of the SOD1G93A transgenic model for ALS after treatment with G-CSF

    PubMed Central

    Henriques, Alexandre; Kastner, Stefan; Chatzikonstantinou, Eva; Pitzer, Claudia; Plaas, Christian; Kirsch, Friederike; Wafzig, Oliver; Krüger, Carola; Spoelgen, Robert; Gonzalez De Aguilar, Jose-Luis; Gretz, Norbert; Schneider, Armin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is an incurable fatal motoneuron disease with a lifetime risk of approximately 1:400. It is characterized by progressive weakness, muscle wasting, and death ensuing 3–5 years after diagnosis. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a drug candidate for ALS, with evidence for efficacy from animal studies and interesting data from pilot clinical trials. To gain insight into the disease mechanisms and mode of action of G-CSF, we performed gene expression profiling on isolated lumbar motoneurons from SOD1G93A mice, the most frequently studied animal model for ALS, with and without G-CSF treatment. Results: Motoneurons from SOD1G93A mice present a distinct gene expression profile in comparison to controls already at an early disease stage (11 weeks of age), when treatment was initiated. The degree of deregulation increases at a time where motor symptoms are obvious (15 weeks of age). Upon G-CSF treatment, transcriptomic deregulations of SOD1G93A motoneurons were notably restored. Discriminant analysis revealed that SOD1 mice treated with G-CSF has a transcriptom close to presymptomatic SOD1 mice or wild type mice. Some interesting genes modulated by G-CSF treatment relate to neuromuscular function such as CCR4-NOT or Prss12. Conclusions: Our data suggest that G-CSF is able to re-adjust gene expression in symptomatic SOD1G93A motoneurons. This provides further arguments for G-CSF as a promising drug candidate for ALS. PMID:25653590

  3. Goji fruit (Lycium barbarum) protects sciatic nerve function against crush injury in a model of diabetic stress.

    PubMed

    Simonyan, K V; Avetisyan, L G; Chavushyan, V A

    2016-09-01

    Excess fructose consumption causes changes in functioning of the central and peripheral nervous systems, which increase the vulnerability of peripheral nerves to traumatic injury. The aim of this study was to evaluate the electrophysiological parameters of responses of motoneurons of the spinal cord at high-frequency stimulation of the distal part of the injured sciatic nerve in a model of diabetic stress under action of Lycium barbarum (LB). Male albino rats were given with drinking water with 50% concentration of dietary fructose for 6 weeks. Starting on the 7th week a crush injury of the left sciatic nerve was carried out. Some of the animals received fructose post-injury for 3 weeks and some of the animals received fructose+dry LB fruits for 3 weeks. In the fructose+crush+LВ group a relatively proportional division of tetanic and posttetanic potentiation and depression in responses of ipsilateral and contralateral motoneurons was observed, which would suggest the modulatory role of LB in short-term synaptic plasticity formation. Generally, LB fruit is able to modulate central nervous system reorganization, amplifying positive adaptive changes that improve functional recovery and promote selective target reinnervation in high fructose-diet rats with sciatic nerve crush-injury. PMID:27424529

  4. Corneal injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... as sand or dust Ultraviolet injuries: Caused by sunlight, sun lamps, snow or water reflections, or arc- ... a corneal injury if you: Are exposed to sunlight or artificial ultraviolet light for long periods of ...

  5. Inhalation Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... you can inhale that can cause acute internal injuries. Particles in the air from fires and toxic ... and lung diseases worse. Symptoms of acute inhalation injuries may include Coughing and phlegm A scratchy throat ...

  6. Spinal injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... head. Alternative Names Spinal cord injury; SCI Images Skeletal spine Vertebra, cervical (neck) Vertebra, lumbar (low back) Vertebra, thoracic (mid back) Vertebral column Central nervous system Spinal cord injury Spinal anatomy Two person roll - ...

  7. Overexpression of neurotrophin-3 in skeletal muscle alters normal and injury-induced limb control.

    PubMed

    Taylor, M D; Vancura, R; Williams, J M; Riekhof, J T; Taylor, B K; Wright, D E

    2001-01-01

    Transgenic overexpression of neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) in mice increases the number of surviving proprioceptive sensory components, including primary sensory neurons, gamma motoneurons and muscle spindles. The numbers of surviving alpha motoneurons are not affected by NT-3 overexpression (Wright et al., Neuron 19: 503-517, 1997). We have assessed the consequences NT-3-stimulated increase in the proprioceptive sensory system by measuring locomotive abilities of mice that overexpress NT-3 in all skeletal muscles (myo/NT-3 mice). In adulthood, one myo/NT-3 transgenic line continues to express NT-3 at high levels in muscle and maintains a hypertrophied proprioceptive system (high-OE myo/NT-3 mice). Compared to wildtypes, high-OE myo/NT-3 mice have nine times the amount of NT-3 protein in the medial gastrocnemius at six weeks of age. Although appearing normal during ordinary activity, high-OE myo/NT-3 mice display a distinct clasping phenotype when lifted by the tail. High-OE myo/NT-3 mice show severe locomotor deficits when performing beam walking and rotorod testing. These mice also demonstrate aberrant foot positioning during normal walking. However, following sciatic nerve crush, overexpression of NT-3 prevents further abnormalities in paw positioning, suggesting NT-3 may attenuate sensorimotor deficits that occur in response to sciatic nerve injury. Our results suggest that increases in proprioceptive sensory neurons, spindles and gamma motoneurons, along with continued postnatal NT-3 overexpression in muscle significantly disrupt normal locomotor control. Importantly, however, NT-3 may lessen initial deficits and thus improve functional recovery after peripheral nerve injury, suggesting these mice may serve as a good model to study NT-3's role in neuroprotection of proprioceptive afferents. PMID:11794730

  8. Head injury.

    PubMed

    Hureibi, K A; McLatchie, G R

    2010-05-01

    Head injury is one of the commonest injuries in sport. Most are mild but some can have serious outcomes. Sports medicine doctors should be able to recognise the clinical features and evaluate athletes with head injury. It is necessary during field assessment to recognise signs and symptoms that help in assessing the severity of injury and making a decision to return-to-play. Prevention of primary head injury should be the aim. This includes protective equipment like helmets and possible rule changes. PMID:20533694

  9. Bicycling injuries.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Marc R

    2013-01-01

    Bicycling injuries can be classified into bicycle contact, traumatic, and overuse injuries. Despite the popularity of cycling, there are few scientific studies regarding injuries. Epidemiological studies are difficult to compare due to different methodologies and the diverse population of cyclists studied. There are only three studies conducted on top level professionals. Ninety-four percent of professionals in 1 year have experienced at least one overuse injury. Most overuse injuries are mild with limited time off the bike. The most common site of overuse injury is the knee, and the most common site of traumatic injury is the shoulder, with the clavicle having the most common fracture. Many overuse and bicycle contact ailments are relieved with simple bike adjustments.

  10. Anatomical evidence for red nucleus projections to motoneuronal cell groups in the spinal cord of the monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holstege, Gert; Blok, Bertil F.; Ralston, Diane Daly

    1988-01-01

    In four rhesus monkeys wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) injections were made in the mesencephalic tegmentum. In three cases with injections involving the red nucleus (RN), rubrospinal fibers descended mainly contralaterally to terminate in laminae V, VI and dorsal VII of the spinal cord and in the lateral motoneuronal cell groups at the level of the cervical and lumbosacral enlargements. In all four cases the area of the interstitial nucleus of Cajal (INC) was injected, which resulted in labeled interstitiospinal fibers in the medial part of the ipsilateral ventral funiculus of the spinal cord. The results indicate that there is no major qualitative difference between the mesencephalic (RN and INC) and motor cortical projections to the spinal cord.

  11. High-frequency oscillations in membrane potentials of medullary inspiratory and expiratory neurons (including laryngeal motoneurons).

    PubMed

    Huang, W X; Cohen, M I; Yu, Q; See, W R; He, Q

    1996-09-01

    1. In midcollicular decerebrate, unanesthetized, paralyzed cats ventilated with a cycle-triggered pump system, the properties of high-frequency oscillations (HFOs, 50-100 Hz) in membrane potentials (MPs) of medullary inspiratory (I) and expiratory (E) cells were studied. Simultaneous recordings were taken from bilateral phrenic and recurrent laryngeal (RL) nerves and from cells in the intermediate ventral respiratory group (intVRG, 0-1 mm rostral to the obex) or the caudal ventral respiratory group (cVRG, 2-4 mm caudal to the obex). 2. Spectral coherence analyses were used to detect the presence of HFOs during I in I and E cell MPs. Cross-correlation histograms (CCHs) between the cell and phrenic signals were used to ascertain cell-nerve HFO phase relations and to identify cells as RL motoneurons. Of the 103 cells that had significant HFOs (cell-phrenic coherences > or = 0.1), measurable HFO peak lags in the CCH were seen in 53 cells: 1) RL cells (9 I cells and 7 E cells); and 2) other types of cell (8 intVRG I cells, 18 intVRG E cells, and 11 cVRG E cells). These cells had high HFO correlations; the cell-phrenic coherence range was 0.35-0.94, with a mean HFO frequency of 58 Hz. 3. The cell-phrenic HFO lag (in ms) was measured in the CCH as the lag of the primary peak (peak located nearest to 0 lag). The phase lag was defined as (lag of primary peak in ms)/(HFO period in ms). The phase lags differed markedly between two subsets of cells: 1) RL I cells had HFO depolarization peaks that lagged the phrenic HFO peaks (average cell-phrenic phase lag = -0.18); and 2) the non-RL cells, regardless of location (intVRG or cVRG) and type (I or E), had HFO depolarization peaks leading (preceding) the phrenic HFO peaks (average cell-phrenic phase lag = 0.28). In addition, the cVRG E cells had significantly shorter cell-phrenic phase lags than the intVRG E cells (0.23 vs. 0.31, respectively). 4. These lags can be compared with the (I unit)-phrenic phase lags (average

  12. Effects of support unloading on inhibitory processes in motoneurons pools of postural muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shigueva, Tatiana; Zakirova, Albina; Tomilovskaya, Elena

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of support unloading on characteristics of shin extensor muscles (m.soleus and m.gastrocnemius lat.) motor units` (MU) activity evoked by electrical stimulation and intensity of spinal inhibitory processes. Conditions of support unloading were reproduced by "dry" immersion (DI), that it seen to be is the most adequate ground simulation model of weightlessness [Shulzhenko E.B. et al, 1976]. The experiments were performed with participation of 10 healthy men of 20-27 years old. The subjects were divided into 2 groups. In the first one (control group) the subjects stayed in DI for 3 days without any other influences; in the second one (experimental group) in the course of DI the mechanical stimulation of soles’ support zones in the regimen of locomotion was applied daily for 20 min at the beginning of each hour for 6 hours per day [Kozlovskaya I.B., 2007]. MUs’ activity of shin muscles (mm. gastrocnemius lat. and soleus) was recorded with needle concentric electrodes during execution of the task of maintaining a small plantar flexion effort (not stronger than 7% of maximal voluntary contraction force). Single electrical pulses 0,1 ms duration were applied to n.tibialis during spontaneous MU activity. The duration of silent period (SP) following H-reflex response and presence of rebound phenomenon - an increase of MU activity at the end of SP, that is usually observed under normal conditions and reflects trace of inhibitory and excitatory processes in motoneurons pools, were analyzed [Person R.S., 1985]. Experiments were performed before, on the 2nd and 3d day of DI and on the 2nd day after its accomplishment. The Wilcoxon nonparametric criteria were used for statistical data analysis. Exposure to the conditions of support unloading was followed by significant decline of SP duration. The mean of SP duration in shin muscles before DI was 227±31,4 ms. On the 2nd and 3rd days of DI in the control group it

  13. Role of Direct vs. Indirect Pathways from the Motor Cortex to Spinal Motoneurons in the Control of Hand Dexterity

    PubMed Central

    Isa, Tadashi; Kinoshita, Masaharu; Nishimura, Yukio

    2013-01-01

    Evolutionally, development of the direct connection from the motor cortex to spinal motoneurons [corticomotoneuronal (CM) pathway] parallels the ability of hand dexterity. Damage to the corticofugal fibers in higher primates resulted in deficit of fractionated digit movements. Based on such observations, it was generally believed that the CM pathway plays a critical role in the control of hand dexterity. On the other hand, a number of “phylogenetically older” indirect pathways from the motor cortex to motoneurons still exist in primates. The indirect pathways are mediated by intercalated neurons such as segmental interneurons (sINs), propriospinal neurons (PNs) reticulospinal neurons (RSNs), or rubrospinal neurons (RuSNs). However, their contribution to hand dexterity remains elusive. Lesion of the brainstem pyramid sparing the transmission through the RuSNs and RSNs, resulted in permanent deficit of fractionated digit movements in macaque monkeys. On the other hand, in our recent study, after lesion of the dorsolateral funiculus (DLF) at the C5 segment, which removed the lateral corticospinal tract (l-CST) including the CM pathway and the transmission through sINs and RuSNs but spared the processing through the PNs and RSNs, fractionated digit movements recovered within several weeks. These results suggest that the PNs can be involved in the recovery of fractionated digit movements, but the RSNs and RuSNs have less capacity in this regard. However, on closer inspection, it was found that the activation pattern of hand and arm muscles considerably changed after the C5 lesion, suggesting limitation of PNs for the compensation of hand dexterity. Altogether, it is suggested that PNs, RSNs RuSNs, and the CM pathway (plus sINs) make a different contribution to the hand dexterity and appearance of motor deficit of the hand dexterity caused by damage to the corticofugal fibers and potential of recovery varies depending on the rostrocaudal level of the lesion. PMID

  14. Population synaptic potentials evoked in lumbar motoneurons following stimulation of the nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis during carbachol-induced atonia.

    PubMed

    Yamuy, J; Jiménez, I; Morales, F; Rudomin, P; Chase, M

    1994-03-14

    The effect of electrical stimulation of the medullary nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis (NRGc) on lumbar spinal cord motoneurons was studied in the decerebrate cat using sucrose-gap recordings from ventral roots. The NRGc was stimulated ipsi- and contralaterally before and during atonia elicited by the microinjection of carbachol into the pontine reticular formation. Prior to carbachol administration, the NRGc-induced response recorded from the sucrose-gap consisted of two consecutive excitatory population synaptic potentials followed by a long-lasting, small amplitude inhibitory population synaptic potential. Following carbachol injection, the same NRGc stimulus evoked a distinct, large amplitude inhibitory population synaptic potential, whereas the excitatory population synaptic potentials decreased in amplitude. In addition, after carbachol administration, the amplitude of the monosynaptic excitatory population synaptic potential, which was evoked by stimulation of group Ia afferents in hindlimb nerves, was reduced by 18 to 43%. When evoked at the peak of the NRGc-induced inhibitory response, this potential was further decreased in amplitude. Systemic strychnine administration (0.07-0.1 mg/kg, i.v.) blocked the NRGc-induced inhibitory population synaptic potential and promoted an increase in the amplitude of the excitatory population synaptic potentials induced by stimulation of the NRGc and group Ia afferents. These data indicate that during the state of carbachol-induced atonia, the NRGc effects on ipsi- and contralateral spinal cord motoneurons are predominantly inhibitory and that glycine is likely to be involved in this inhibitory process. These results support the hypothesis that the nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis is part of the system responsible for state-dependent somatomotor inhibition that occurs during active sleep. PMID:8205484

  15. Castration-induced upregulation of muscle ERα supports estrogen sensitivity of motoneuron dendrites in a sexually dimorphic neuromuscular system.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Lauren M; Sengelaub, Dale R

    2013-12-01

    The spinal cord of rats contains the sexually dimorphic motoneurons of the spinal nucleus of the bulbocavernosus (SNB). In males, SNB dendrites fail to grow after castration, but androgen or estrogen treatment supports dendritic growth in castrated males. Estrogenic support of SNB dendrite growth is mediated by estrogen receptors (ER) in the target muscle. ERα expression in cells lacking a basal lamina (referred to as "extra-muscle fiber cells") of the SNB target musculature coincides with the period of estrogen-dependent SNB dendrite growth. In the SNB target muscle, extra-muscle fiber ERα expression declines with age and is typically absent after postnatal (P) day 21 (P21). Given that estradiol downregulates ERα in skeletal muscle, we tested the hypothesis that depleting gonadal hormones would prevent the postnatal decline in ERα expression in the SNB target musculature. We castrated male rats at P7 and assessed ERα immunolabeling at P21; ERα expression was significantly greater in castrated males compared with normal animals. Because ERα expression in SNB target muscles mediates estrogen-dependent SNB dendrogenesis, we further hypothesized that the castration-induced increase in muscle ERα would heighten the estrogen sensitivity of SNB dendrites. Male rats were castrated at P7 and treated with estradiol from P21 to P28; estradiol treatment in castrates resulted in dendritic hypertrophy in SNB motoneurons compared with normal males. We conclude that early castration results in an increase in ERα expression in the SNB target muscle, and this upregulation of ERα supports estrogen sensitivity of SNB dendrites, allowing for hypermasculinization of SNB dendritic arbors.

  16. Reinnervation by axon collaterals from single facial motoneurons to multiple muscle targets following axotomy in the adult guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Ito, M; Kudo, M

    1994-01-01

    To study the process of recovery from facial palsy experimentally, the location of cranial motoneurons supplying the posterior belly of the digastric muscle (PDG) and the extratemporal portion of the facial nerve trunk was examined in a double-labeling paradigm using two retrograde tracers in the adult guinea pig of which the facial nerve had been surgically injured. In different stages after the induced facial palsy had recovered functionally (4-13 weeks after the surgical operation), wheat germ-agglutinated horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) was injected into the PDG and Fluoro-Ruby (FR) was applied to the proximal cut end of the extratemporal portion of the facial nerve trunk. Distribution of neurons retrogradely labeled with WGA-HRP and/or FR was plotted in the brainstem and compared with that of the controls. In the intact cases, HRP-labeled neurons were restrictedly seen in the accessory facial nucleus (Acs7), while FR-labeled neurons were found within the main facial nucleus (FMN). In the axotomized cases: (1) HRP-labeled neurons were seen diffusely in the Acs7 as well as in the FMN, where normal myotopical representation no longer seemed to be maintained. (2) FR-labeled neurons were also observed diffusely in the FMN and the Acs7. (3) A considerable number of neurons were doubly labeled with WGA-HRP and FR in both the Acs and the FMN in cases with shorter survival periods (4-7 weeks), but not in cases with longer survival periods (12-13 weeks). Thus, new findings show that connections are temporarily maintained by single, facial motoneurons with axon collaterals to multiple muscle targets in adult mammals.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Effects of excitation of sensory pathways on the membrane potential of cat masseter motoneurons before and during cholinergically induced motor atonia.

    PubMed

    Kohlmeier, K A; López-Rodríguez, F; Morales, F R; Chase, M H

    1998-09-01

    Electrical stimulation of the nucleus pontis oralis during wakefulness enhances somatic reflex activity; identical stimuli during the motor atonia of active (rapid eye movement) sleep induces reflex suppression. This phenomenon, which is called reticular response-reversal, is based upon the generation of excitatory postsynaptic potential activity in motoneurons during wakefulness and inhibitory postsynaptic potential activity during the motor atonia of active sleep. In the present study, instead of utilizing artificial electrical stimulation to directly excite brainstem structures, we sought to examine the effects on motoneurons of activation of sensory pathways by exogenously applied stimuli (auditory) and by stimulation of a peripheral (sciatic) nerve. Accordingly, we examined the synaptic response of masseter motoneurons prior to and during cholinergically induced motor atonia in a pharmacological model of active sleep-specific motor atonia, the alpha-chloralose-anesthetized cat, to two different types of afferent input, one of which has been previously demonstrated to elicit excitatory motor responses during wakefulness. Following the pontine injection of carbachol, auditory stimuli (95 dB clicks) elicited a hyperpolarizing potential in masseter motoneurons. Similar responses were obtained upon stimulation of the sciatic nerve. Responses of this nature were never seen prior to the injection of carbachol. Thus, stimulation of two different afferent pathways (auditory and somatosensory) that produce excitatory motor responses during wakefulness instead, during motor atonia, results in the inhibition of masseter motoneurons. The switching of the net result of the synaptic response from one of potential motor excitation to primarily inhibition in response to the activation of sensory pathways was comparable to the phenomenon of reticular response-reversal. This is the first report to examine the synaptic mechanisms whereby exogenously or peripherally applied

  18. Skiing Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, L. H.

    1975-01-01

    In the broad spectrum of orthopedic skiing injuries, ‘second aid’ on the mountain and at the base by the physician is very important. All skiing physicians should carry minimal medical supplies, including narcotic medication. Diagnosis and treatment of injuries at the hospital are outlined. Most ski fractures of the tibia can be treated by conservative methods. A more aggressive approach to diagnosis and treatment of ligamentous injuries of the knee is recommended. PMID:20469236

  19. Diving injuries.

    PubMed

    Dickey, L S

    1984-01-01

    This is a collective review about the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of SCUBA and diving injuries by the emergency physician. These injuries can be classified into those resulting from the toxic effects of the inhaled gas, from the pressure changes in the water and gas mixture while diving, and from decompression sickness. With the increasing popularity of SCUBA diving, it is hoped that this discussion will enable a recognition of these injuries and therefore minimize the morbidity and mortality from them.

  20. CGP 35348 and CGP 55845A block the baclofen-induced depression of dorsal root evoked potentials in lumbar motoneurons of the neonatal rat.

    PubMed

    Vinay, L; Clarac, F

    1996-08-23

    In vitro brainstem-spinal cord preparations isolated from neonatal (0-5 days old) rats were used to investigate the GABAB receptor-mediated modulation of the dorsal root evoked potentials in lumbar motoneurons recorded intracellularly. The GABAB receptor agonist, baclofen, at low concentrations (1-10 microM), caused a reduction of the amplitude of the monosynaptic excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP), in a concentration-dependent manner. The depression of EPSPs was likely exerted at a presynaptic level since it occurred without any significant change of the passive membrane properties of the motoneurons. The two GABAB receptor antagonists, CGP 35348 and CGP 55845A blocked the effects of baclofen. These two compounds may be useful tools to study the evolution of GABAB receptor-mediated presynaptic inhibition during ontogenesis.

  1. Expiratory-modulated laryngeal motoneurons exhibit a hyperpolarization preceding depolarization during superior laryngeal nerve stimulation in the in vivo adult rat.

    PubMed

    Bautista, Tara G; Sun, Qi-Jian; Pilowsky, Paul M

    2012-03-22

    Swallowing requires the sequential activation of tongue, pharyngeal and esophageal muscles to propel the food bolus towards the stomach. Aspiration during swallow is prevented by adduction of the vocal cords during the oropharyngeal phase. Expiratory-modulated laryngeal motoneurons (ELM) exhibit a burst of action potentials during swallows elicited by electrical stimulation of the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN). Here we sought to investigate changes in membrane potential in ELM during superior laryngeal nerve stimulation in the anaesthetised, in vivo adult rat preparation. Intracellular recordings of ELM in the caudal nucleus ambiguus (identified by antidromic activation from the recurrent laryngeal nerve) demonstrated that ELM bursting activity following SLN stimulation is associated with a depolarization that is preceded by a small hyperpolarization. During spontaneous ELM bursts, the preceding hyperpolarization separated the bursting activity from its usual post-inspiratory activity. These findings demonstrate that the in vivo adult rat preparation is suitable for the study of swallow-related activity in laryngeal motoneurons. PMID:22326041

  2. Genetically Defined Inhibitory Neurons in the Mouse Spinal Cord Dorsal Horn: A Possible Source of Rhythmic Inhibition of Motoneurons during Fictive Locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Jennifer M.; Blagovechtchenski, Evgueni; Brownstone, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    To ensure alternation of flexor and extensor muscles during locomotion, the spinal locomotor network provides rhythmic inhibition to motoneurons. The source of this inhibition in mammals is incompletely defined. We have identified a population of GABAergic inter-neurons located in medial laminae V/VI that express green fluorescent protein (GFP) in glutamic acid decarboxylase-65::GFP transgenic mice. Immunohistochemical studies revealed GFP + terminals in apposition to motoneuronal somata, neurons in Clarke’s column, and in laminae V/VI where they apposed GFP + interneurons, thus forming putative reciprocal connections. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from GFP + interneurons in spinal cord slices revealed a range of electrophysiological profiles, including sag and postinhibitory rebound potentials. Most neurons fired tonically in response to depolarizing current injection. Calcium transients demonstrated by two-photon excitation microscopy in the hemisected spinal cord were recorded in response to low-threshold dorsal root stimulation, indicating these neurons receive primary afferent input. Following a locomotor task, the number of GFP + neurons expressing Fos increased, indicating that these neurons are active during locomotion. During fictive locomotion induced in the hemisected spinal cord, two-photon excitation imaging demonstrated rhythmic calcium activity in these interneurons, which correlated with the termination of ventral root bursts. We suggest that these dorsomedial GABAergic interneurons are involved in spinal locomotor networks, and may provide direct rhythmic inhibitory input to motoneurons during locomotion. PMID:20089922

  3. A Fab fragment directed against the neural cell adhesion molecule L1 enhances functional recovery after injury of the adult mouse spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Loers, Gabriele; Cui, Yi-Fang; Neumaier, Irmgard; Schachner, Melitta; Skerra, Arne

    2014-06-15

    Lack of permissive mechanisms and abundance of inhibitory molecules in the lesioned central nervous system of adult mammals contribute to the failure of functional recovery, which leads to severe disabilities in motor functions or pain. Previous studies have indicated that the neural cell adhesion molecule L1 constitutes a viable target to promote regeneration. In the present study, we describe the cloning, functional expression in Escherichia coli cells and purification of a recombinant αL1 Fab fragment that binds to L1 with comparable activity as the function-triggering monoclonal antibody 557.B6 and induces neurite outgrowth and neuronal survival in cultured neurons, despite its monovalent function. Infusion of αL1 Fab into the lesioned spinal cord of mice enhanced functional recovery after thoracic spinal cord compression injury. αL1 Fab treatment resulted in reduced scar volume, enhanced number of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive axons and increased linear density of VGLUT1 (vesicular glutamate transporter 1) on motoneurons. Furthermore, the number and soma size of ChAT (choline acetyltransferase)-positive motoneurons and the linear density of ChAT-positive boutons on motoneurons as well as parvalbumin-positive interneurons in the lumbar spinal cord were elevated. Stimulation of endogenous L1 by application of the αL1 Fab opens new avenues for recombinant antibody technology, offering prospects for therapeutic applications after traumatic nervous system lesions.

  4. A Fab fragment directed against the neural cell adhesion molecule L1 enhances functional recovery after injury of the adult mouse spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Loers, Gabriele; Cui, Yi-Fang; Neumaier, Irmgard; Schachner, Melitta; Skerra, Arne

    2014-06-15

    Lack of permissive mechanisms and abundance of inhibitory molecules in the lesioned central nervous system of adult mammals contribute to the failure of functional recovery, which leads to severe disabilities in motor functions or pain. Previous studies have indicated that the neural cell adhesion molecule L1 constitutes a viable target to promote regeneration. In the present study, we describe the cloning, functional expression in Escherichia coli cells and purification of a recombinant αL1 Fab fragment that binds to L1 with comparable activity as the function-triggering monoclonal antibody 557.B6 and induces neurite outgrowth and neuronal survival in cultured neurons, despite its monovalent function. Infusion of αL1 Fab into the lesioned spinal cord of mice enhanced functional recovery after thoracic spinal cord compression injury. αL1 Fab treatment resulted in reduced scar volume, enhanced number of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive axons and increased linear density of VGLUT1 (vesicular glutamate transporter 1) on motoneurons. Furthermore, the number and soma size of ChAT (choline acetyltransferase)-positive motoneurons and the linear density of ChAT-positive boutons on motoneurons as well as parvalbumin-positive interneurons in the lumbar spinal cord were elevated. Stimulation of endogenous L1 by application of the αL1 Fab opens new avenues for recombinant antibody technology, offering prospects for therapeutic applications after traumatic nervous system lesions. PMID:24673421

  5. Injury Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christophersen, Edward R.

    1989-01-01

    Injuries are now the cause of more deaths to children than the next six most frequent causes combined. Reviews the research evidence on the effectiveness of approaches to injury control such as legislation, health education, and behavioral strategies. Suggests avenues of further research. (Author/BJV)

  6. Rowing Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Hosea, Timothy M.; Hannafin, Jo A.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Rowing is one of the original modern Olympic sports and was one of the most popular spectator sports in the United States. Its popularity has been increasing since the enactment of Title IX. The injury patterns in this sport are unique because of the stress applied during the rowing stroke. Evidence Acquisition: This review summarizes the existing literature describing the biomechanics of the rowing stroke and rowing-related injury patterns. Data were obtained from previously published peer-reviewed literature through a search of the entire PubMed database (up to December, 2011) as well as from textbook chapters and rowing coaching manuals. Results: Rowing injuries are primarily overuse related. The knee, lumbar spine, and ribs are most commonly affected. The injury incidence is directly related to the volume of training and technique. Conclusion: Familiarity of the injury patterns and the biomechanical forces affecting the rowing athlete will aid in prompt diagnosis and appropriate management. PMID:23016093

  7. Spatiotemporal neuromodulation therapies engaging muscle synergies improve motor control after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Wenger, Nikolaus; Moraud, Eduardo Martin; Gandar, Jerome; Musienko, Pavel; Capogrosso, Marco; Baud, Laetitia; Le Goff, Camille G; Barraud, Quentin; Pavlova, Natalia; Dominici, Nadia; Minev, Ivan R; Asboth, Leonie; Hirsch, Arthur; Duis, Simone; Kreider, Julie; Mortera, Andrea; Haverbeck, Oliver; Kraus, Silvio; Schmitz, Felix; DiGiovanna, Jack; van den Brand, Rubia; Bloch, Jocelyne; Detemple, Peter; Lacour, Stéphanie P; Bézard, Erwan; Micera, Silvestro; Courtine, Grégoire

    2016-02-01

    Electrical neuromodulation of lumbar segments improves motor control after spinal cord injury in animal models and humans. However, the physiological principles underlying the effect of this intervention remain poorly understood, which has limited the therapeutic approach to continuous stimulation applied to restricted spinal cord locations. Here we developed stimulation protocols that reproduce the natural dynamics of motoneuron activation during locomotion. For this, we computed the spatiotemporal activation pattern of muscle synergies during locomotion in healthy rats. Computer simulations identified optimal electrode locations to target each synergy through the recruitment of proprioceptive feedback circuits. This framework steered the design of spatially selective spinal implants and real-time control software that modulate extensor and flexor synergies with precise temporal resolution. Spatiotemporal neuromodulation therapies improved gait quality, weight-bearing capacity, endurance and skilled locomotion in several rodent models of spinal cord injury. These new concepts are directly translatable to strategies to improve motor control in humans. PMID:26779815

  8. Spatiotemporal neuromodulation therapies engaging muscle synergies improve motor control after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Wenger, Nikolaus; Moraud, Eduardo Martin; Gandar, Jerome; Musienko, Pavel; Capogrosso, Marco; Baud, Laetitia; Le Goff, Camille G; Barraud, Quentin; Pavlova, Natalia; Dominici, Nadia; Minev, Ivan R; Asboth, Leonie; Hirsch, Arthur; Duis, Simone; Kreider, Julie; Mortera, Andrea; Haverbeck, Oliver; Kraus, Silvio; Schmitz, Felix; DiGiovanna, Jack; van den Brand, Rubia; Bloch, Jocelyne; Detemple, Peter; Lacour, Stéphanie P; Bézard, Erwan; Micera, Silvestro; Courtine, Grégoire

    2016-02-01

    Electrical neuromodulation of lumbar segments improves motor control after spinal cord injury in animal models and humans. However, the physiological principles underlying the effect of this intervention remain poorly understood, which has limited the therapeutic approach to continuous stimulation applied to restricted spinal cord locations. Here we developed stimulation protocols that reproduce the natural dynamics of motoneuron activation during locomotion. For this, we computed the spatiotemporal activation pattern of muscle synergies during locomotion in healthy rats. Computer simulations identified optimal electrode locations to target each synergy through the recruitment of proprioceptive feedback circuits. This framework steered the design of spatially selective spinal implants and real-time control software that modulate extensor and flexor synergies with precise temporal resolution. Spatiotemporal neuromodulation therapies improved gait quality, weight-bearing capacity, endurance and skilled locomotion in several rodent models of spinal cord injury. These new concepts are directly translatable to strategies to improve motor control in humans.

  9. Spatiotemporal neuromodulation therapies engaging muscle synergies improve motor control after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Wenger, Nikolaus; Moraud, Eduardo Martin; Gandar, Jerome; Musienko, Pavel; Capogrosso, Marco; Baud, Laetitia; Le Goff, Camille G.; Barraud, Quentin; Pavlova, Natalia; Dominici, Nadia; Minev, Ivan R.; Asboth, Leonie; Hirsch, Arthur; Duis, Simone; Kreider, Julie; Mortera, Andrea; Haverbeck, Oliver; Kraus, Silvio; Schmitz, Felix; DiGiovanna, Jack; van den Brand, Rubia; Bloch, Jocelyne; Detemple, Peter; Lacour, Stéphanie P.; Bézard, Erwan; Micera, Silvestro; Courtine, Grégoire

    2016-01-01

    Electrical neuromodulation of lumbar segments improves motor control after spinal cord injury in animal models and humans. However, the physiological principles underlying the effect of this intervention remain poorly understood, which has limited this therapeutic approach to continuous stimulation applied to restricted spinal cord locations. Here, we developed novel stimulation protocols that reproduce the natural dynamics of motoneuron activation during locomotion. For this, we computed the spatiotemporal activation pattern of muscle synergies during locomotion in healthy rats. Computer simulations identified optimal electrode locations to target each synergy through the recruitment of proprioceptive feedback circuits. This framework steered the design of spatially selective spinal implants and real–time control software that modulate extensor versus flexor synergies with precise temporal resolution. Spatiotemporal neuromodulation therapies improved gait quality, weight–bearing capacities, endurance and skilled locomotion in multiple rodent models of spinal cord injury. These new concepts are directly translatable to strategies to improve motor control in humans. PMID:26779815

  10. Mechanisms intrinsic to 5-HT2B receptor-induced potentiation of NMDA receptor responses in frog motoneurones.

    PubMed

    Holohean, Alice M; Hackman, John C

    2004-10-01

    In the presence of NMDA receptor open-channel blockers [Mg(2+); (+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine maleate (MK-801); 1-amino-3,5-dimethyladamantane (memantine)] and TTX, high concentrations (30-100 microm) of either 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) or alpha-methyl-5-hydroxytryptamine (alpha-Me-5-HT) significantly potentiated NMDA-induced depolarizations of frog spinal cord motoneurones. Potentiation was blocked by LY-53,857 (10-30 microm), SB 206553 (10 microm), and SB 204741 (30 microm), but not by spiroxatrine (10 microm), WAY 100,635 (1-30 microm), ketanserin (10 microm), RS 102221 (10 microm), or RS 39604 (10-20 microm). Therefore, alpha-Me-5-HT's facilitatory effects appear to involve 5-HT(2B) receptors. These effects were G-protein dependent as they were prevented by prior treatment with guanylyl-5'-imidodiphosphate (GMP-PNP, 100 microm) and H-Arg-Pro-Lys-Pro-Gln-Gln-D-Trp-Phe-D-Trp-D-Trp-Met-NH(2) (GP antagonist 2A, 3-6 microm), but not by pertussis toxin (PTX, 3-6 ng ml(-1), 48 h preincubation). This potentiation was not reduced by protein kinase C inhibition with staurosporine (2.0 microm), U73122 (10 microm) or N-(2-aminoethyl)-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide HCl (H9) (77 microm) or by intracellular Ca(2+) depletion with thapsigargin (0.1 microm) (which inhibits Ca(2+)/ATPase). Exposure of the spinal cord to the L-type Ca(2+) channel blockers nifedipine (10 microm), KN-62 (5 microm) or gallopamil (100 microm) eliminated alpha-Me-5-HT's effects. The calmodulin antagonist N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphtalenesulfonamide (W7) (100 microm) diminished the potentiation. However, the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaM Kinase II) blocker KN-93 (10 microm) did not block the 5-HT enhancement of the NMDA responses. In summary, activation of 5-HT(2B) receptors by alpha-Me-5-HT facilitates NMDA-depolarizations of frog motoneurones via a G-protein, a rise in [Ca(2+)](i) from the entry of extracellular Ca(2+) through L-type Ca(2

  11. Reactive oxygen species trigger motoneuron death in non-cell-autonomous models of ALS through activation of c-Abl signaling.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Fabiola; Gonzalez, David; Cortes, Nicole; Ampuero, Estibaliz; Hernández, Diego E; Fritz, Elsa; Abarzua, Sebastián; Martinez, Alexis; Elorza, Alvaro A; Alvarez, Alejandra; Court, Felipe; van Zundert, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease in which pathogenesis and death of motor neurons are triggered by non-cell-autonomous mechanisms. We showed earlier that exposing primary rat spinal cord cultures to conditioned media derived from primary mouse astrocyte conditioned media (ACM) that express human SOD1(G93A) (ACM-hSOD1(G93A)) quickly enhances Nav channel-mediated excitability and calcium influx, generates intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and leads to death of motoneurons within days. Here we examined the role of mitochondrial structure and physiology and of the activation of c-Abl, a tyrosine kinase that induces apoptosis. We show that ACM-hSOD1(G93A), but not ACM-hSOD1(WT), increases c-Abl activity in motoneurons, interneurons and glial cells, starting at 60 min; the c-Abl inhibitor STI571 (imatinib) prevents this ACM-hSOD1(G93A)-mediated motoneuron death. Interestingly, similar results were obtained with ACM derived from astrocytes expressing SOD1(G86R) or TDP43(A315T). We further find that co-application of ACM-SOD1(G93A) with blockers of Nav channels (spermidine, mexiletine, or riluzole) or anti-oxidants (Trolox, esculetin, or tiron) effectively prevent c-Abl activation and motoneuron death. In addition, ACM-SOD1(G93A) induces alterations in the morphology of neuronal mitochondria that are related with their membrane depolarization. Finally, we find that blocking the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore with cyclosporine A, or inhibiting mitochondrial calcium uptake with Ru360, reduces ROS production and c-Abl activation. Together, our data point to a sequence of events in which a toxic factor(s) released by ALS-expressing astrocytes rapidly induces hyper-excitability, which in turn increases calcium influx and affects mitochondrial structure and physiology. ROS production, mediated at least in part through mitochondrial alterations, trigger c-Abl signaling and lead to motoneuron death. PMID

  12. Retinoic Acid-Mediated Regulation of GLI3 Enables Efficient Motoneuron Derivation from Human ESCs in the Absence of Extrinsic SHH Activation

    PubMed Central

    Calder, Elizabeth L.; Steinbeck, Julius A.; Tu, Edmund; Keros, Sotirios; Ying, Shui-Wang; Jaiswal, Manoj K.; Cornacchia, Daniela; Goldstein, Peter A.; Tabar, Viviane

    2015-01-01

    The derivation of somatic motoneurons (MNs) from ES cells (ESCs) after exposure to sonic hedgehog (SHH) and retinoic acid (RA) is one of the best defined, directed differentiation strategies to specify fate in pluripotent lineages. In mouse ESCs, MN yield is particularly high after RA + SHH treatment, whereas human ESC (hESC) protocols have been generally less efficient. In an effort to optimize yield, we observe that functional MNs can be derived from hESCs at high efficiencies if treated with patterning molecules at very early differentiation steps before neural induction. Remarkably, under these conditions, equal numbers of human MNs were obtained in the presence or absence of SHH exposure. Using pharmacological and genetic strategies, we demonstrate that early RA treatment directs MN differentiation independently of extrinsic SHH activation by suppressing the induction of GLI3. We further demonstrate that neural induction triggers a switch from a poised to an active chromatin state at GLI3. Early RA treatment prevents this switch by direct binding of the RA receptor at the GLI3 promoter. Furthermore, GLI3 knock-out hESCs can bypass the requirement for early RA patterning to yield MNs efficiently. Our data demonstrate that RA-mediated suppression of GLI3 is sufficient to generate MNs in an SHH-independent manner and that temporal changes in exposure to patterning factors such as RA affect chromatin state and competency of hESC-derived lineages to adopt specific neuronal fates. Finally, our work presents a streamlined platform for the highly efficient derivation of human MNs from ESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Our study presents a rapid and efficient protocol to generate human motoneurons from embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells. Surprisingly, and in contrast to previous work, motoneurons are generated in the presence of retinoic acid but in the absence of factors that activate sonic hedgehog signaling. We

  13. Reactive oxygen species trigger motoneuron death in non-cell-autonomous models of ALS through activation of c-Abl signaling

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Fabiola; Gonzalez, David; Cortes, Nicole; Ampuero, Estibaliz; Hernández, Diego E.; Fritz, Elsa; Abarzua, Sebastián; Martinez, Alexis; Elorza, Alvaro A.; Alvarez, Alejandra; Court, Felipe; van Zundert, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease in which pathogenesis and death of motor neurons are triggered by non-cell-autonomous mechanisms. We showed earlier that exposing primary rat spinal cord cultures to conditioned media derived from primary mouse astrocyte conditioned media (ACM) that express human SOD1G93A (ACM-hSOD1G93A) quickly enhances Nav channel-mediated excitability and calcium influx, generates intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and leads to death of motoneurons within days. Here we examined the role of mitochondrial structure and physiology and of the activation of c-Abl, a tyrosine kinase that induces apoptosis. We show that ACM-hSOD1G93A, but not ACM-hSOD1WT, increases c-Abl activity in motoneurons, interneurons and glial cells, starting at 60 min; the c-Abl inhibitor STI571 (imatinib) prevents this ACM-hSOD1G93A-mediated motoneuron death. Interestingly, similar results were obtained with ACM derived from astrocytes expressing SOD1G86R or TDP43A315T. We further find that co-application of ACM-SOD1G93A with blockers of Nav channels (spermidine, mexiletine, or riluzole) or anti-oxidants (Trolox, esculetin, or tiron) effectively prevent c-Abl activation and motoneuron death. In addition, ACM-SOD1G93A induces alterations in the morphology of neuronal mitochondria that are related with their membrane depolarization. Finally, we find that blocking the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore with cyclosporine A, or inhibiting mitochondrial calcium uptake with Ru360, reduces ROS production and c-Abl activation. Together, our data point to a sequence of events in which a toxic factor(s) released by ALS-expressing astrocytes rapidly induces hyper-excitability, which in turn increases calcium influx and affects mitochondrial structure and physiology. ROS production, mediated at least in part through mitochondrial alterations, trigger c-Abl signaling and lead to motoneuron death. PMID:26106294

  14. Badminton injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Krøner, K; Schmidt, S A; Nielsen, A B; Yde, J; Jakobsen, B W; Møller-Madsen, B; Jensen, J

    1990-01-01

    In a one year period, from 1 January 1986 to 31 December 1986, 4303 patients with sports injuries were treated at Aarhus Amtssygehus and Aarhus Kommunehospital. The mean age was 21.6 years (range 7-72 years) and 2830 were men. Two hundred and seventeen badminton injuries occurred in 208 patients (136 men) with a mean age of 29.6 years (range 7-57 years), constituting 4.1 percent of all sport injuries in Aarhus. Joints and ligaments were injured in 58.5 percent of the patients, most frequently located in the lower limb and significantly more often among patients younger than 30 years of age. Muscle injury occurred in 19.8 percent of the patients. This type of injury was significantly more frequent among patients older than 30 years of age. Most injuries were minor. However, 6.8 percent of the patients were hospitalized and 30.9 percent received additional treatment by a physician. As the risk of injury varies with age, attempts to plan training individually and to institute prophylactic measures should be made. PMID:2078802

  15. Propeller injuries.

    PubMed

    Mann, R J

    1976-05-01

    Water skiing, boat racing, skin and scuba diving, and pleasure boat cruising are increasing in popularity. As a result the incidence of injuries secondary to motor propellers is becoming more frequent. In a ten-year period from 1963 to 1973, I collected a total of nine cases. In some amputations were necessary, and in other cases amputations occurred at the time of injury. Problems with bacterial flora occurring in open sea water versus salt water enclosed near docks and fresh lake water are discussed. A review of the orthopedic literature revealed sparse information regarding propeller injuries.

  16. Respiratory function following bilateral mid-cervical contusion injury in the adult rat

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Michael A.; Lee, Kun-Ze; Salazar, Krystal; O’Steen, Barbara E.; Bloom, David C.; Fuller, David D.; Reier, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    The consequences of spinal cord injury (SCI) are often viewed as the result of white matter damage. However, injuries occurring at any spinal level, especially in cervical and lumbar enlargement regions, also entail segmental neuronal loss. Yet, the contributions of gray matter injury and plasticity to functional outcomes are poorly understood. The present study addressed this issue by investigating changes in respiratory function following bilateral C3/C4 contusion injuries at the level of the phoenix motoneuron (PhMN) pool which in the adult rat extends from C3–C5/6 and provides innervation to the diaphragm. Despite extensive white and gray matter pathology associated with two magnitudes of injury severity, ventilation was relatively unaffected during both quiet breathing and respiratory challenge (hypercapnia). On the other hand, bilateral diaphragm EMG recordings revealed that the ability to increase diaphragm activity during respiratory challenge was substantially, and chronically, impaired. This deficit has not been seen following predominantly white matter lesions at higher cervical levels. Thus, the impact of gray matter damage relative to PhMNs and/or interneurons becomes evident during conditions associated with increased respiratory drive. Unaltered ventilatory behavior, despite significant deficits in diaphragm function, suggests compensatory neuroplasticity involving recruitment of other spinal respiratory networks which may entail remodeling of connections. Transynaptic tracing, using pseudorabies virus (PRV), revealed changes in PhMN-related interneuronal labeling rostral to the site of injury, thus offering insight into the potential anatomical reorganization and spinal plasticity following cervical contusion. PMID:21963673

  17. Specification of Dendritogenesis Site in Drosophila aCC Motoneuron by Membrane Enrichment of Pak1 through Dscam1.

    PubMed

    Kamiyama, Daichi; McGorty, Ryan; Kamiyama, Rie; Kim, Michael D; Chiba, Akira; Huang, Bo

    2015-10-12

    Precise positioning of dendritic branches is a critical step in the establishment of neuronal circuitry. However, there is limited knowledge on how environmental cues translate into dendrite initiation or branching at a specific position. Here, through a combination of mutation, RNAi, and imaging experiments, we found that a Dscam-Dock-Pak1 hierarchical interaction defines the stereotypical dendrite growth site in the Drosophila aCC motoneuron. This interaction localizes the Cdc42 effector Pak1 to the plasma membrane at the dendrite initiation site before the activation of Cdc42. Ectopic expression of membrane-anchored Pak1 overrides this spatial specification of dendritogenesis, confirming its function in guiding Cdc42 signaling. We further discovered that Dscam1 localization in aCC occurs through an inter-neuronal contact that involves Dscam1 in the partner MP1 neuron. These findings elucidate a mechanism by which Dscam1 controls neuronal morphogenesis through spatial regulation of Cdc42 signaling and, subsequently, cytoskeletal remodeling.

  18. A Toll receptor-FoxO pathway represses Pavarotti/MKLP1 to promote microtubule dynamics in motoneurons.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Colleen N; Nechipurenko, Inna V; Liu, Nan; Broihier, Heather T

    2016-08-15

    FoxO proteins are evolutionarily conserved regulators of neuronal structure and function, yet the neuron-specific pathways within which they act are poorly understood. To elucidate neuronal FoxO function in Drosophila melanogaster, we first screened for FoxO's upstream regulators and downstream effectors. On the upstream side, we present genetic and molecular pathway analyses indicating that the Toll-6 receptor, the Toll/interleukin-1 receptor domain adaptor dSARM, and FoxO function in a linear pathway. On the downstream side, we find that Toll-6-FoxO signaling represses the mitotic kinesin Pavarotti/MKLP1 (Pav-KLP), which itself attenuates microtubule (MT) dynamics. We next probed in vivo functions for this novel pathway and found that it is essential for axon transport and structural plasticity in motoneurons. We demonstrate that elevated expression of Pav-KLP underlies transport and plasticity phenotypes in pathway mutants, indicating that Toll-6-FoxO signaling promotes MT dynamics by limiting Pav-KLP expression. In addition to uncovering a novel molecular pathway, our work reveals an unexpected function for dynamic MTs in enabling rapid activity-dependent structural plasticity. PMID:27502486

  19. Preferential distribution of nociceptive input to motoneurons with muscle units in the cranial portion of the upper trapezius muscle.

    PubMed

    Dideriksen, Jakob L; Holobar, Ales; Falla, Deborah

    2016-08-01

    Pain is associated with changes in the neural drive to muscles. For the upper trapezius muscle, surface electromyography (EMG) recordings have indicated that acute noxious stimulation in either the cranial or the caudal region of the muscle leads to a relative decrease in muscle activity in the cranial region. It is, however, not known if this adaption reflects different recruitment thresholds of the upper trapezius motor units in the cranial and caudal region or a nonuniform nociceptive input to the motor units of both regions. This study investigated these potential mechanisms by direct motor unit identification. Motor unit activity was investigated with high-density surface EMG signals recorded from the upper trapezius muscle of 12 healthy volunteers during baseline, control (intramuscular injection of isotonic saline), and painful (hypertonic saline) conditions. The EMG was decomposed into individual motor unit spike trains. Motor unit discharge rates decreased significantly from control to pain conditions by 4.0 ± 3.6 pulses/s (pps) in the cranial region but not in the caudal region (1.4 ± 2.8 pps; not significant). These changes were compatible with variations in the synaptic input to the motoneurons of the two regions. These adjustments were observed, irrespective of the location of noxious stimulation. These results strongly indicate that the nociceptive synaptic input is distributed in a nonuniform way across regions of the upper trapezius muscle. PMID:27226455

  20. Reflex transmission to lumbar α-motoneurones in the mouse similar and different to those in the cat.

    PubMed

    Schomburg, Eike D; Kalezic, Ivana; Dibaj, Payam; Steffens, Heinz

    2013-07-01

    Investigation and interpretation of defective motor circuitries in transgenic mice required further basic results from wild-type mice. Therefore, we investigated the lumbar motor reflex pattern in anaesthetised mice using intracellular motoneuronal recording and monosynaptic reflex testing. Thresholds and latencies in mice were similar to those in cats: thresholds for monosynaptic (group I) EPSPs were slightly above 1T (T=threshold for the lowest threshold fibres), around 1.5T for group II EPSPs and above 10T for group III EPSPs; group I EPSPs were maximal with a stimulus strength around 2T, group II EPSPs were maximal with 5-8T; latencies to the group I incoming volley were below 1ms for monosynaptic group I EPSPs, around 3ms for polysynaptic group II EPSPs and above 4ms for polysynaptic group III EPSPs. In contrast to reflex actions in the cat, monosynaptic gastrocnemius-soleus reflexes were facilitated by conditioning stimulation of the peroneal, sural and tibial nerves, i.e. by a variety of different, probably flexor reflex afferents. This facilitation persisted after high lumbar spinalisation indicating an independency to supraspinal influences. Nociceptive muscle afferents facilitated the peroneal monosynaptic reflex while nociceptive cutaneous afferents from the foot sole inhibited the ipsilateral but facilitated the contralateral peroneal reflex.

  1. Distinct and developmentally regulated activity-dependent plasticity at descending glutamatergic synapses on flexor and extensor motoneurons

    PubMed Central

    Lenschow, Constanze; Cazalets, Jean-René; Bertrand, Sandrine S.

    2016-01-01

    Activity-dependent synaptic plasticity (ADSP) is paramount to synaptic processing and maturation. However, identifying the ADSP capabilities of the numerous synapses converging onto spinal motoneurons (MNs) remain elusive. Using spinal cord slices from mice at two developmental stages, 1–4 and 8–12 postnatal days (P1–P4; P8–P12), we found that high-frequency stimulation of presumed reticulospinal neuron axons in the ventrolateral funiculus (VLF) induced either an NMDA receptor-dependent-long-term depression (LTD), a short-term depression (STD) or no synaptic modulation in limb MNs. Our study shows that P1–P4 cervical MNs expressed the same plasticity profiles as P8–P12 lumbar MNs rather than P1–P4 lumbar MNs indicating that ADSP expression at VLF-MN synapses is linked to the rostrocaudal development of spinal motor circuitry. Interestingly, we observed that the ADSP expressed at VLF-MN was related to the functional flexor or extensor MN subtype. Moreover, heterosynaptic plasticity was triggered in MNs by VLF axon tetanisation at neighbouring synapses not directly involved in the plasticity induction. ADSP at VLF-MN synapses specify differential integrative synaptic processing by flexor and extensor MNs and could contribute to the maturation of spinal motor circuits and developmental acquisition of weight-bearing locomotion. PMID:27329279

  2. Spinal inhibition of phrenic motoneurones by stimulation of afferents from leg muscle in the cat: blockade by strychnine.

    PubMed

    Eldridge, F L; Millhorn, D E; Waldrop, T

    1987-08-01

    1. Phrenic nerve responses to stimulation of calf muscle receptors or their afferents were studied in paralysed high (C1) spinal cats whose phrenic nerve activity was evoked by activation of the intercostal-to-phrenic reflex. End-tidal PCO2 was maintained at a constant level by means of a servo-controlled ventilator. 2. Physical stimulation of calf muscles or electrical stimulation of the tibial nerve uniformly caused inhibition of phrenic activity evoked by facilitatory conditioning stimuli. The degree of inhibition gradually decreased as muscle stimulation continued, and there was a post-stimulus augmentation of phrenic activity. 3. Pre-treatment with subconvulsive doses of strychnine, an antagonist of the neurotransmitter glycine, partially or completely blocked the inhibitory effects on phrenic activity of muscle-afferent stimulation. The blockade was reversible with time. 4. Pre-treatment with a subconvulsive dose of bicuculline, an antagonist of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), had no effect on the inhibitory mechanism. 5. We conclude that glycine is an important transmitter of the inhibition of phrenic motoneurones induced by muscle-afferent stimulation, but that GABA is not involved in this inhibitory mechanism. PMID:3681723

  3. Patterns of locomotor drive to motoneurons and last-order interneurons: clues to the structure of the CPG.

    PubMed

    Burke, R E; Degtyarenko, A M; Simon, E S

    2001-07-01

    We have examined the linkage between patterns of activity in several hindlimb motor pools and the modulation of oligosynaptic cutaneous reflex pathways during fictive locomotion in decerebrate unanesthetized cats to assess the notion that such linkages can shed light on the structure of the central pattern generator (CPG) for locomotion. We have concentrated attention on the cutaneous reflex pathways that project to the flexor digitorum longus (FDL) motor pool because of that muscle's unique variable behavior during normal and fictive locomotion in the cat. Differential locomotor control of last-order excitatory interneurons in pathways from low-threshold cutaneous afferents in the superficial peroneal and medial plantar afferents to FDL motoneurons is fully documented for the first time. The qualitative patterns of differential control are shown to remain the same whether the FDL muscle is active in early flexion, as usually found, or during the extension phase of fictive locomotion, which is less common during fictive stepping. The patterns of motor pool activity and of reflex pathway modulation indicate that the flexion phase of fictive locomotion has distinct early versus late components. Observations during "normal" and unusual patterns of fictive stepping suggest that some aspects of locomotor pattern formation can be separated from rhythm generation, implying that these two CPG functions may be embodied, at least in part, in distinct neural organizations. The results are discussed in relation to a provisional circuit diagram that could explain the experimental findings.

  4. Activity blockade and GABAA receptor blockade produce synaptic scaling through chloride accumulation in embryonic spinal motoneurons and interneurons.

    PubMed

    Lindsly, Casie; Gonzalez-Islas, Carlos; Wenner, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic scaling represents a process whereby the distribution of a cell's synaptic strengths are altered by a multiplicative scaling factor. Scaling is thought to be a compensatory response that homeostatically controls spiking activity levels in the cell or network. Previously, we observed GABAergic synaptic scaling in embryonic spinal motoneurons following in vivo blockade of either spiking activity or GABAA receptors (GABAARs). We had determined that activity blockade triggered upward GABAergic scaling through chloride accumulation, thus increasing the driving force for these currents. To determine whether chloride accumulation also underlies GABAergic scaling following GABAAR blockade we have developed a new technique. We expressed a genetically encoded chloride-indicator, Clomeleon, in the embryonic chick spinal cord, which provides a non-invasive fast measure of intracellular chloride. Using this technique we now show that chloride accumulation underlies GABAergic scaling following blockade of either spiking activity or the GABAAR. The finding that GABAAR blockade and activity blockade trigger scaling via a common mechanism supports our hypothesis that activity blockade reduces GABAAR activation, which triggers synaptic scaling. In addition, Clomeleon imaging demonstrated the time course and widespread nature of GABAergic scaling through chloride accumulation, as it was also observed in spinal interneurons. This suggests that homeostatic scaling via chloride accumulation is a common feature in many neuronal classes within the embryonic spinal cord and opens the possibility that this process may occur throughout the nervous system at early stages of development.

  5. Sports Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart, to help decrease swelling. The Body’s Healing Process From the moment a bone breaks or a ... what happens at each stage of the healing process: At the moment of injury: Chemicals are released ...

  6. Cold injuries.

    PubMed

    Kruse, R J

    1995-01-01

    There are two categories of cold injury. The first is hypothermia, which is a systemic injury to cold, and the second is frostbite, which is a local injury. Throughout history, entire armies, from George Washington to the Germans on the Russian Front in World War II, have fallen prey to prolonged cold exposure. Cold injury is common and can occur in all seasons if ambient temperature is lower than the core body temperature. In the 1985 Boston Marathon, even though it was 76 degrees and sunny, there were 75 runners treated for hypothermia. In general, humans adapt poorly to cold exposure. Children are at particular risk because of their relatively greater surface area/body mass ratio, causing them to cool even more rapidly than adults. Because of this, the human's best defense against cold injury is to limit his/her exposure to cold and to dress appropriately. If cold injury has occurred and is mild, often simple passive rewarming such as dry blankets and a warm room are sufficient treatment.

  7. Electric injury, Part II: Specific injuries.

    PubMed

    Fish, R M

    2000-01-01

    Electric injury can cause disruption of cardiac rhythm and breathing, burns, fractures, dislocations, rhabdomyolysis, eye and ear injury, oral and gastrointestinal injury, vascular damage, disseminated intravascular coagulation, peripheral and spinal cord injury, and Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy. Secondary trauma from falls, fires, flying debris, and inhalation injury can complicate the clinical picture. Diagnostic and treatment considerations for electric injuries are described in this article, which is the second part of a three-part series on electric injuries.

  8. Electric injury, Part II: Specific injuries.

    PubMed

    Fish, R M

    2000-01-01

    Electric injury can cause disruption of cardiac rhythm and breathing, burns, fractures, dislocations, rhabdomyolysis, eye and ear injury, oral and gastrointestinal injury, vascular damage, disseminated intravascular coagulation, peripheral and spinal cord injury, and Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy. Secondary trauma from falls, fires, flying debris, and inhalation injury can complicate the clinical picture. Diagnostic and treatment considerations for electric injuries are described in this article, which is the second part of a three-part series on electric injuries. PMID:10645833

  9. A Consistent, Quantifiable, and Graded Rat Lumbosacral Spinal Cord Injury Model

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Junxiang; Sun, Dongming; Tan, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study is to develop a rat lumbosacral spinal cord injury (SCI) model that causes consistent motoneuronal loss and behavior deficits. Most SCI models focus on the thoracic or cervical spinal cord. Lumbosacral SCI accounts for about one third of human SCI but no standardized lumbosacral model is available for evaluating therapies. Twenty-six adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to three groups: sham (n=9), 25 mm (n=8), and 50 mm (n=9). Sham rats had laminectomy only, while 25 mm and 50 mm rats were injured by dropping a 10 g rod from a height of 25 mm or 50 mm, respectively, onto the L4-5 spinal cord at the T13/L1 vertebral junction. We measured footprint length (FL), toe spreading (TS), intermediate toe spreading (ITS), and sciatic function index (SFI) from walking footprints, and static toe spreading (STS), static intermediate toe spreading (SITS), and static sciatic index (SSI) from standing footprints. At six weeks, we assessed neuronal and white matter loss, quantified axons, diameter, and myelin thickness in the peroneal and tibial nerves, and measured cross-sectional areas of tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius muscle fibers. The result shows that peroneal and tibial motoneurons were respectively distributed in 4.71 mm and 5.01 mm columns in the spinal cord. Dropping a 10-g weight from 25 mm or 50 mm caused 1.5 mm or 3.75 mm gaps in peroneal and tibial motoneuronal columns, respectively, and increased spinal cord white matter loss. Fifty millimeter contusions significantly increased FL and reduced TS, ITS, STS, SITS, SFI, and SSI more than 25 mm contusions, and resulted in smaller axon and myelinated axon diameters in tibial and peroneal nerves and greater atrophy of gastrocnemius and anterior tibialis muscles, than 25 mm contusions. This model of lumbosacral SCI produces consistent and graded loss of white matter, motoneuronal loss, peripheral nerve axonal changes, and anterior tibialis

  10. A consistent, quantifiable, and graded rat lumbosacral spinal cord injury model.

    PubMed

    Wen, Junxiang; Sun, Dongming; Tan, Jun; Young, Wise

    2015-06-15

    The purpose of this study is to develop a rat lumbosacral spinal cord injury (SCI) model that causes consistent motoneuronal loss and behavior deficits. Most SCI models focus on the thoracic or cervical spinal cord. Lumbosacral SCI accounts for about one third of human SCI but no standardized lumbosacral model is available for evaluating therapies. Twenty-six adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to three groups: sham (n=9), 25 mm (n=8), and 50 mm (n=9). Sham rats had laminectomy only, while 25 mm and 50 mm rats were injured by dropping a 10 g rod from a height of 25 mm or 50 mm, respectively, onto the L4-5 spinal cord at the T13/L1 vertebral junction. We measured footprint length (FL), toe spreading (TS), intermediate toe spreading (ITS), and sciatic function index (SFI) from walking footprints, and static toe spreading (STS), static intermediate toe spreading (SITS), and static sciatic index (SSI) from standing footprints. At six weeks, we assessed neuronal and white matter loss, quantified axons, diameter, and myelin thickness in the peroneal and tibial nerves, and measured cross-sectional areas of tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius muscle fibers. The result shows that peroneal and tibial motoneurons were respectively distributed in 4.71 mm and 5.01 mm columns in the spinal cord. Dropping a 10-g weight from 25 mm or 50 mm caused 1.5 mm or 3.75 mm gaps in peroneal and tibial motoneuronal columns, respectively, and increased spinal cord white matter loss. Fifty millimeter contusions significantly increased FL and reduced TS, ITS, STS, SITS, SFI, and SSI more than 25 mm contusions, and resulted in smaller axon and myelinated axon diameters in tibial and peroneal nerves and greater atrophy of gastrocnemius and anterior tibialis muscles, than 25 mm contusions. This model of lumbosacral SCI produces consistent and graded loss of white matter, motoneuronal loss, peripheral nerve axonal changes, and anterior tibialis and

  11. Recovery of neuronal and network excitability after spinal cord injury and implications for spasticity

    PubMed Central

    D'Amico, Jessica M.; Condliffe, Elizabeth G.; Martins, Karen J. B.; Bennett, David J.; Gorassini, Monica A.

    2014-01-01

    The state of areflexia and muscle weakness that immediately follows a spinal cord injury (SCI) is gradually replaced by the recovery of neuronal and network excitability, leading to both improvements in residual motor function and the development of spasticity. In this review we summarize recent animal and human studies that describe how motoneurons and their activation by sensory pathways become hyperexcitable to compensate for the reduction of functional activation of the spinal cord and the eventual impact on the muscle. Specifically, decreases in the inhibitory control of sensory transmission and increases in intrinsic motoneuron excitability are described. We present the idea that replacing lost patterned activation of the spinal cord by activating synaptic inputs via assisted movements, pharmacology or electrical stimulation may help to recover lost spinal inhibition. This may lead to a reduction of uncontrolled activation of the spinal cord and thus, improve its controlled activation by synaptic inputs to ultimately normalize circuit function. Increasing the excitation of the spinal cord with spared descending and/or peripheral inputs by facilitating movement, instead of suppressing it pharmacologically, may provide the best avenue to improve residual motor function and manage spasticity after SCI. PMID:24860447

  12. Cold injuries.

    PubMed

    Long, William B; Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Britt, L D

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to cold can produce a variety of injuries that occur as a result of man's inability to adapt to cold. These injuries can be divided into localized injury to a body part, systemic hypothermia, or a combination of both. Body temperature may fall as a result of heat loss by radiation, evaporation, conduction, and convection. Hypothermia or systemic cold injury occurs when the core body temperature has decreased to 35 degrees C (95 degrees F) or less. The causes of hypothermia are either primary or secondary. Primary, or accidental, hypothermia occurs in healthy individuals inadequately clothed and exposed to severe cooling. In secondary hypothermia, another illness predisposes the individual to accidental hypothermia. Hypothermia affects multiple organs with symptoms of hypothermia that vary according to the severity of cold injury. The diagnosis of hypothermia is easy if the patient is a mountaineer who is stranded in cold weather. However, it may be more difficult in an elderly patient who has been exposed to a cold environment. In either case, the rectal temperature should be checked with a low-reading thermometer. The general principals of prehospital management are to (1) prevent further heat loss, (2) rewarm the body core temperature in advance of the shell, and (3) avoid precipitating ventricular fibrillation. There are two general techniques of rewarming--passive and active. The mechanisms of peripheral cold injury can be divided into phenomena that affect cells and extracellular fluids (direct effects) and those that disrupt the function of the organized tissue and the integrity of the circulation (indirect effects). Generally, no serious damage is seen until tissue freezing occurs. The mildest form of peripheral cold injury is frostnip. Chilblains represent a more severe form of cold injury than frostnip and occur after exposure to nonfreezing temperatures and damp conditions. Immersion (trench) foot, a disease of the sympathetic nerves and blood

  13. Cold injuries.

    PubMed

    Long, William B; Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Britt, L D

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to cold can produce a variety of injuries that occur as a result of man's inability to adapt to cold. These injuries can be divided into localized injury to a body part, systemic hypothermia, or a combination of both. Body temperature may fall as a result of heat loss by radiation, evaporation, conduction, and convection. Hypothermia or systemic cold injury occurs when the core body temperature has decreased to 35 degrees C (95 degrees F) or less. The causes of hypothermia are either primary or secondary. Primary, or accidental, hypothermia occurs in healthy individuals inadequately clothed and exposed to severe cooling. In secondary hypothermia, another illness predisposes the individual to accidental hypothermia. Hypothermia affects multiple organs with symptoms of hypothermia that vary according to the severity of cold injury. The diagnosis of hypothermia is easy if the patient is a mountaineer who is stranded in cold weather. However, it may be more difficult in an elderly patient who has been exposed to a cold environment. In either case, the rectal temperature should be checked with a low-reading thermometer. The general principals of prehospital management are to (1) prevent further heat loss, (2) rewarm the body core temperature in advance of the shell, and (3) avoid precipitating ventricular fibrillation. There are two general techniques of rewarming--passive and active. The mechanisms of peripheral cold injury can be divided into phenomena that affect cells and extracellular fluids (direct effects) and those that disrupt the function of the organized tissue and the integrity of the circulation (indirect effects). Generally, no serious damage is seen until tissue freezing occurs. The mildest form of peripheral cold injury is frostnip. Chilblains represent a more severe form of cold injury than frostnip and occur after exposure to nonfreezing temperatures and damp conditions. Immersion (trench) foot, a disease of the sympathetic nerves and blood

  14. Computational estimation of the distribution of L-type Ca(2+) channels in motoneurons based on variable threshold of activation of persistent inward currents.

    PubMed

    Bui, Tuan V; Ter-Mikaelian, Maria; Bedrossian, Diane; Rose, P Ken

    2006-01-01

    In the presence of neuromodulators such as serotonin and noradrenaline, motoneurons exhibit persistent inward currents (PICs) that serve to amplify synaptic inputs. A major component of these PICs is mediated by L-type Ca(2+) channels. Estimates based on electrophysiological studies indicate that these channels are located on the dendrites, but immunohistochemical studies of their precise distribution have yielded different results. Our goal was to determine the distribution of these channels using computational methods. A theoretical analysis of the activation of PICs by a somatic current injection in the absence or presence of synaptic activity suggests that L-type Ca(2+) channels may be segregated to discrete hot spots 25-200 microm long and centered 100-400 microm from the soma in the dendritic tree. Compartmental models based on detailed anatomical measurements of the structure of feline neck motoneurons with L-type Ca(2+) channels incorporated in these regions produced plateau potentials resulting from PIC activation. Furthermore, we replicated the experimental observation that the somatic threshold at which PICs were activated was depolarized by tonic activation of inhibitory synapses and hyperpolarized by tonic activation of excitatory synapses. Models with L-type Ca(2+) channels distributed uniformly were unable to replicate the change in somatic threshold of PIC activation. Therefore we conclude that the set of L-type Ca(2+) channels mediating plateau potentials is restricted to discrete regions in the dendritic tree. Furthermore, this distribution leads to the compartmentalization of the dendritic tree of motoneurons into subunits whose sequential activation lead to the graded amplification of synaptic inputs.

  15. Hamstring injuries

    PubMed Central

    Guanche, Carlos A.

    2015-01-01

    There is a continuum of hamstring injuries that can range from musculotendinous strains to avulsion injuries. Although the proximal hamstring complex has a strong bony attachment on the ischial tuberosity, hamstring injuries are common in athletic population and can affect all levels of athletes. Nonoperative treatment is mostly recommended in the setting of low-grade partial tears and insertional tendinosis. However, failure of nonoperative treatment of partial tears may benefit from surgical debridement and repair. The technique presented on this article allows for the endoscopic management of proximal hamstring tears and chronic ischial bursitis, which until now has been managed exclusively with much larger open approaches. The procedure allows for complete exposure of the posterior aspect of the hip in a safe, minimally invasive fashion. PMID:27011828

  16. Fingertip injuries

    PubMed Central

    Saraf, Sanjay; Tiwari, VK

    2007-01-01

    Background: Fingertip injuries are extremely common. Out of the various available reconstructive options, one needs to select an option which achieves a painless fingertip with durable and sensate skin cover. The present analysis was conducted to evaluate the management and outcome of fingertip injuries. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study of 150 cases of fingertip Injuries of patients aged six to 65 years managed over a period of two years. Various reconstructive options were considered for the fingertip lesions greater than or equal to 1 cm2. The total duration of treatment varied from two to six weeks with follow-up from two months to one year. Results: The results showed preservation of finger length and contour, retention of sensation and healing without significant complication. Conclusion: The treatment needs to be individualized and all possible techniques of reconstruction must be known to achieve optimal recovery. PMID:21139772

  17. Wrestling injuries.

    PubMed

    Halloran, Laurel

    2008-01-01

    The sport of wrestling has a history dating back to ancient times as one of the original Olympic sports. It particularly appeals to adolescents as equally matched opponents engage in competition. There can be no argument that participation in sports helps promote a physically active lifestyle. However, despite the documented health benefits of increased physical activity, those who participate in athletics are at risk for sports-related injuries. This article will discuss wrestling injuries and recommend prevention strategies to keep athletes safe. PMID:18521035

  18. The motor system plays the violin: a musical metaphor inferred from the oscillatory activity of the α-motoneuron pools during locomotion.

    PubMed

    Chiovetto, Enrico

    2011-04-01

    Despite substantial advances in the field, particularly resulting from physiological studies in animals, the neural mechanisms underlying the generation of many motor behaviors in humans remain unclear. A recent study (Cappellini G et al. J Neurophysiol 104: 3064-3073, 2010) sheds more light on this topic. Like the string of a violin, the α-motoneuron pools in the spinal cord during locomotion show continuous and oscillatory patterns of activation. In this report, the implications and relevance of this finding are discussed in a general framework that includes neurophysiology, optimal control theory, and robotics. PMID:21273310

  19. Effect of restricted mobility on RNA content and nucleotide composition and on protein content in motoneurons of spinal cord anterior horns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorbunova, A. V.

    1980-01-01

    An investigation into the effect of hypokinesia on the ribonucleic acid (RNA) content, the nucleotide composition, and dynamics of protein content in the motoneuron of the rat spinal cord anterior horns is described. Methodology and findings are presented. The study results showed that the nucleotide composition of the total cellular RNA at all the studied periods of hypokinesia remained unchanged and is characteristic for the cytoplasmic, high polymer ribosomal RNA. This means that with a change in the functional state of the neuron the newly formed RNA of the nerve cell has the same composition of bases as the original RNA that belongs to the ribosomal type.

  20. The motor system plays the violin: a musical metaphor inferred from the oscillatory activity of the α-motoneuron pools during locomotion.

    PubMed

    Chiovetto, Enrico

    2011-04-01

    Despite substantial advances in the field, particularly resulting from physiological studies in animals, the neural mechanisms underlying the generation of many motor behaviors in humans remain unclear. A recent study (Cappellini G et al. J Neurophysiol 104: 3064-3073, 2010) sheds more light on this topic. Like the string of a violin, the α-motoneuron pools in the spinal cord during locomotion show continuous and oscillatory patterns of activation. In this report, the implications and relevance of this finding are discussed in a general framework that includes neurophysiology, optimal control theory, and robotics.

  1. Modulation of the input–output function by GABAA receptor-mediated currents in rat oculomotor nucleus motoneurons

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Torrelo, Julio; Torres, Blas; Carrascal, Livia

    2014-01-01

    The neuronal input–output function depends on recruitment threshold and gain of the firing frequency–current (f–I) relationship. These two parameters are positively correlated in ocular motoneurons (MNs) recorded in alert preparation and inhibitory inputs could contribute to this correlation. Phasic inhibition mediated by γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) occurs when a high concentration of GABA at the synaptic cleft activates postsynaptic GABAA receptors, allowing neuronal information transfer. In some neuronal populations, low concentrations of GABA activate non-synaptic GABAA receptors and generate a tonic inhibition, which modulates cell excitability. This study determined how ambient GABA concentrations modulate the input–output relationship of rat oculomotor nucleus MNs. Superfusion of brain slices with GABA (100 μm) produced a GABAA receptor-mediated current that reduced the input resistance, increased the recruitment threshold and shifted the f–I relationship rightward without any change in gain. These modifications did not depend on MN size. In absence of exogenous GABA, gabazine (20 μm; antagonist of GABAA receptors) abolished spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents and revealed a tonic current in MNs. Gabazine increased input resistance and decreased recruitment threshold mainly in larger MNs. The f–I relationship shifted to the left, without any change in gain. Gabazine effects were chiefly due to MN tonic inhibition because tonic current amplitude was five-fold greater than phasic. This study demonstrates a tonic inhibition in ocular MNs that modulates cell excitability depending on cell size. We suggest that GABAA tonic inhibition acting concurrently with glutamate receptors activation could reproduce the positive covariation between threshold and gain reported in alert preparation. PMID:25194049

  2. Diminution of Voltage Threshold Plays a Key Role in Determining Recruitment of Oculomotor Nucleus Motoneurons during Postnatal Development

    PubMed Central

    Carrascal, Livia; Nieto-González, Jose Luis; Torres, Blas; Nunez-Abades, Pedro

    2011-01-01

    The size principle dictates the orderly recruitment of motoneurons (Mns). This principle assumes that Mns of different sizes have a similar voltage threshold, cell size being the crucial property in determining neuronal recruitment. Thus, smaller neurons have higher membrane resistance and require a lower depolarizing current to reach spike threshold. However, the cell size contribution to recruitment in Mns during postnatal development remains unknown. To investigate this subject, rat oculomotor nucleus Mns were intracellularly labeled and their electrophysiological properties recorded in a brain slice preparation. Mns were divided into 2 age groups: neonatal (1–7 postnatal days, n = 14) and adult (20–30 postnatal days, n = 10). The increase in size of Mns led to a decrease in input resistance with a strong linear relationship in both age groups. A well-fitted inverse correlation was also found between input resistance and rheobase in both age groups. However, input resistance versus rheobase did not correlate when data from neonatal and adult Mns were combined in a single group. This lack of correlation is due to the fact that decrease in input resistance of developing Mns did not lead to an increase in rheobase. Indeed, a diminution in rheobase was found, and it was accompanied by an unexpected decrease in voltage threshold. Additionally, the decrease in rheobase co-varied with decrease in voltage threshold in developing Mns. These data support that the size principle governs the recruitment order in neonatal Mns and is maintained in adult Mns of the oculomotor nucleus; but during postnatal development the crucial property in determining recruitment order in these Mns was not the modifications of cell size-input resistance but of voltage threshold. PMID:22174887

  3. Reliability of the interval death rate analysis for estimating the time course of the motoneurone afterhyperpolarization in humans.

    PubMed

    MacDonell, Christopher William; Ivanova, Tanya Dimitrova; Garland, S Jayne

    2007-05-15

    The reliability of the afterhyperpolarization (AHP) time course, as estimated by the interval death rate (IDR) analysis was evaluated both within and between investigators. The IDR analysis uses the firing history of a single motor unit train at low tonic firing rates to calculate an estimate of the AHP time course [Matthews PB. Relationship of firing intervals of human motor units to the trajectory of post-spike after-hyperpolarization and synaptic noise. J Physiol 1996;492:597-628]. Single motor unit trains were collected from the tibialis anterior (TA) to determine intra-rater reliability (within investigator). Data from the first dorsal interosseus (FDI), collected in a previous investigation [Gossen ER, Ivanova TD, Garland SJ. The time course of the motoneurone afterhyperpolarization is related to motor unit twitch speed in human skeletal muscle. J Physiol 2003;552:657-64], were used to examine the inter-rater reliability (between investigators). The lead author was blinded to the original time constants and file identities for the re-analysis. The intra-rater reliability of the AHP time constant in the TA data was high (r(2)=0.88; p<0.001; ICC=0.91). The inter-rater reliability for the FDI data was also strong (r(2)=0.92; p<0.001; ICC=0.95). The standard error of measurement was 0.61 ms for the TA and 0.55 ms for FDI. It is concluded that the interval death rate analysis is a reliable tool for estimating the AHP time course with experienced investigators.

  4. Afferent and motoneuron activity in response to single neuromast stimulation in the posterior lateral line of larval zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Haehnel-Taguchi, Melanie; Akanyeti, Otar; Liao, James C

    2014-09-15

    The lateral line system of fishes contains mechanosensory receptors along the body surface called neuromasts, which can detect water motion relative to the body. The ability to sense flow informs many behaviors, such as schooling, predator avoidance, and rheotaxis. Here, we developed a new approach to stimulate individual neuromasts while either recording primary sensory afferent neuron activity or swimming motoneuron activity in larval zebrafish (Danio rerio). Our results allowed us to characterize the transfer functions between a controlled lateral line stimulus, its representation by primary sensory neurons, and its subsequent behavioral output. When we deflected the cupula of a neuromast with a ramp command, we found that the connected afferent neuron exhibited an adapting response which was proportional in strength to deflection velocity. The maximum spike rate of afferent neurons increased sigmoidally with deflection velocity, with a linear range between 0.1 and 1.0 μm/ms. However, spike rate did not change when the cupula was deflected below 8 μm, regardless of deflection velocity. Our findings also reveal an unexpected sensitivity in the larval lateral line system: stimulation of a single neuromast could elicit a swimming response which increased in reliability with increasing deflection velocities. At high deflection velocities, we observed that lateral line evoked swimming has intermediate values of burst frequency and duty cycle that fall between electrically evoked and spontaneous swimming. An understanding of the sensory capabilities of a single neuromast will help to build a better picture of how stimuli are encoded at the systems level and ultimately translated into behavior.

  5. Afferent and motoneuron activity in response to single neuromast stimulation in the posterior lateral line of larval zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Haehnel-Taguchi, Melanie; Akanyeti, Otar

    2014-01-01

    The lateral line system of fishes contains mechanosensory receptors along the body surface called neuromasts, which can detect water motion relative to the body. The ability to sense flow informs many behaviors, such as schooling, predator avoidance, and rheotaxis. Here, we developed a new approach to stimulate individual neuromasts while either recording primary sensory afferent neuron activity or swimming motoneuron activity in larval zebrafish (Danio rerio). Our results allowed us to characterize the transfer functions between a controlled lateral line stimulus, its representation by primary sensory neurons, and its subsequent behavioral output. When we deflected the cupula of a neuromast with a ramp command, we found that the connected afferent neuron exhibited an adapting response which was proportional in strength to deflection velocity. The maximum spike rate of afferent neurons increased sigmoidally with deflection velocity, with a linear range between 0.1 and 1.0 μm/ms. However, spike rate did not change when the cupula was deflected below 8 μm, regardless of deflection velocity. Our findings also reveal an unexpected sensitivity in the larval lateral line system: stimulation of a single neuromast could elicit a swimming response which increased in reliability with increasing deflection velocities. At high deflection velocities, we observed that lateral line evoked swimming has intermediate values of burst frequency and duty cycle that fall between electrically evoked and spontaneous swimming. An understanding of the sensory capabilities of a single neuromast will help to build a better picture of how stimuli are encoded at the systems level and ultimately translated into behavior. PMID:24966296

  6. Segmental organization of vestibulospinal inputs to spinal interneurons mediating crossed activation of thoracolumbar motoneurons in the neonatal mouse.

    PubMed

    Kasumacic, Nedim; Lambert, François M; Coulon, Patrice; Bras, Helene; Vinay, Laurent; Perreault, Marie-Claude; Glover, Joel C

    2015-05-27

    Vestibulospinal pathways activate contralateral motoneurons (MNs) in the thoracolumbar spinal cord of the neonatal mouse exclusively via axons descending ipsilaterally from the vestibular nuclei via the lateral vestibulospinal tract (LVST; Kasumacic et al., 2010). Here we investigate how transmission from the LVST to contralateral MNs is mediated by descending commissural interneurons (dCINs) in different spinal segments. We test the polysynaptic nature of this crossed projection by assessing LVST-mediated ventral root (VR) response latencies, manipulating synaptic responses pharmacologically, and tracing the pathway transynaptically from hindlimb extensor muscles using rabies virus (RV). Longer response latencies in contralateral than ipsilateral VRs, near-complete abolition of LVST-mediated calcium responses in contralateral MNs by mephenesin, and the absence of transsynaptic RV labeling of contralateral LVST neurons within a monosynaptic time window all indicate an overwhelmingly polysynaptic pathway from the LVST to contralateral MNs. Optical recording of synaptically mediated calcium responses identifies LVST-responsive ipsilateral dCINs that exhibit segmental differences in proportion and dorsoventral distribution. In contrast to thoracic and lower lumbar segments, in which most dCINs are LVST responsive, upper lumbar segments stand out because they contain a much smaller and more ventrally restricted subpopulation of LVST-responsive dCINs. A large proportion of these upper lumbar LVST-responsive dCINs project to contralateral L5, which contains many of the hindlimb extensor MNs activated by the LVST. A selective channeling of LVST inputs through segmentally and dorsoventrally restricted subsets of dCINs provides a mechanism for targeting vestibulospinal signals differentially to contralateral trunk and hindlimb MNs in the mammalian spinal cord.

  7. Temporal coherency between receptor expression, neural activity and AP-1-dependent transcription regulates Drosophila motoneuron dendrite development

    PubMed Central

    Vonhoff, Fernando; Kuehn, Claudia; Blumenstock, Sonja; Sanyal, Subhabrata; Duch, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Neural activity has profound effects on the development of dendritic structure. Mechanisms that link neural activity to nuclear gene expression include activity-regulated factors, such as CREB, Crest or Mef2, as well as activity-regulated immediate-early genes, such as fos and jun. This study investigates the role of the transcriptional regulator AP-1, a Fos-Jun heterodimer, in activity-dependent dendritic structure development. We combine genetic manipulation, imaging and quantitative dendritic architecture analysis in a Drosophila single neuron model, the individually identified motoneuron MN5. First, Dα7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and AP-1 are required for normal MN5 dendritic growth. Second, AP-1 functions downstream of activity during MN5 dendritic growth. Third, using a newly engineered AP-1 reporter we demonstrate that AP-1 transcriptional activity is downstream of Dα7 nAChRs and Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) signaling. Fourth, AP-1 can have opposite effects on dendritic development, depending on the timing of activation. Enhancing excitability or AP-1 activity after MN5 cholinergic synapses and primary dendrites have formed causes dendritic branching, whereas premature AP-1 expression or induced activity prior to excitatory synapse formation disrupts dendritic growth. Finally, AP-1 transcriptional activity and dendritic growth are affected by MN5 firing only during development but not in the adult. Our results highlight the importance of timing in the growth and plasticity of neuronal dendrites by defining a developmental period of activity-dependent AP-1 induction that is temporally locked to cholinergic synapse formation and dendritic refinement, thus significantly refining prior models derived from chronic expression studies. PMID:23293292

  8. Modulation of the input-output function by GABAA receptor-mediated currents in rat oculomotor nucleus motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Torres-Torrelo, Julio; Torres, Blas; Carrascal, Livia

    2014-11-15

    The neuronal input-output function depends on recruitment threshold and gain of the firing frequency-current (f-I) relationship. These two parameters are positively correlated in ocular motoneurons (MNs) recorded in alert preparation and inhibitory inputs could contribute to this correlation. Phasic inhibition mediated by γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) occurs when a high concentration of GABA at the synaptic cleft activates postsynaptic GABAA receptors, allowing neuronal information transfer. In some neuronal populations, low concentrations of GABA activate non-synaptic GABAA receptors and generate a tonic inhibition, which modulates cell excitability. This study determined how ambient GABA concentrations modulate the input-output relationship of rat oculomotor nucleus MNs. Superfusion of brain slices with GABA (100 μm) produced a GABAA receptor-mediated current that reduced the input resistance, increased the recruitment threshold and shifted the f-I relationship rightward without any change in gain. These modifications did not depend on MN size. In absence of exogenous GABA, gabazine (20 μm; antagonist of GABAA receptors) abolished spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents and revealed a tonic current in MNs. Gabazine increased input resistance and decreased recruitment threshold mainly in larger MNs. The f-I relationship shifted to the left, without any change in gain. Gabazine effects were chiefly due to MN tonic inhibition because tonic current amplitude was five-fold greater than phasic. This study demonstrates a tonic inhibition in ocular MNs that modulates cell excitability depending on cell size. We suggest that GABAA tonic inhibition acting concurrently with glutamate receptors activation could reproduce the positive covariation between threshold and gain reported in alert preparation.

  9. Eye Injuries at Home

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Stories Español Eye Health / Tips & Prevention Eye Injuries Sections Preventing Eye Injuries Recognizing and Treating Eye ... Sports Eye Injuries by the Numbers — Infographic Eye Injuries at Home Reviewed by: Brenda Pagan-Duran MD ...

  10. Spinal Cord Injury Map

    MedlinePlus

    ... on the severity of the injury. Tap this spinal column to see how the level of injury affects loss of function and control. Learn more about spinal cord injuries. A spinal cord injury affects the ...

  11. Electrical Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... your injuries are depends on how strong the electric current was, what type of current it was, how it moved through your body, and how long you were exposed. Other factors include how ... you should see a doctor. You may have internal damage and not realize it.

  12. Patient Injuries?

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    An injured patient may be the last thing dentists want to think about. However, in reality, patients can be injured during dental treatment or as the result of an incident such as a slip and fall in the office. Treatment-related injuries can run the gamut and include burns, lacerations, swallowed objects and allergic reactions, according to The Dentists Insurance Company.

  13. Long-term effects of a lumbosacral ventral root avulsion injury on axotomized motor neurons and avulsed ventral roots in a non-human primate model of cauda equina injury.

    PubMed

    Ohlsson, M; Nieto, J H; Christe, K L; Havton, L A

    2013-10-10

    Here, we have translated from the rat to the non-human primate a unilateral lumbosacral injury as a model for cauda equina injury. In this morphological study, we have investigated retrograde effects of a unilateral L6-S2 ventral root avulsion (VRA) injury as well as the long-term effects of Wallerian degeneration on avulsed ventral roots at 6-10 months post-operatively in four adult male rhesus monkeys. Immunohistochemistry for choline acetyl transferase and glial fibrillary acidic protein demonstrated a significant loss of the majority of the axotomized motoneurons in the affected L6-S2 segments and signs of an associated astrocytic glial response within the ventral horn of the L6 and S1 spinal cord segments. Quantitative analysis of the avulsed ventral roots showed that they exhibited normal size and were populated by a normal number of myelinated axons. However, the myelinated axons in the avulsed ventral roots were markedly smaller in caliber compared to the fibers of the intact contralateral ventral roots, which served as controls. Ultrastructural studies confirmed the presence of small myelinated axons and a population of unmyelinated axons within the avulsed roots. In addition, collagen fibers were readily identified within the endoneurium of the avulsed roots. In summary, a lumbosacral VRA injury resulted in retrograde motoneuron loss and astrocytic glial activation in the ventral horn. Surprisingly, the Wallerian degeneration of motor axons in the avulsed ventral roots was followed by a repopulation of the avulsed roots by small myelinated and unmyelinated fibers. We speculate that the small axons may represent sprouting or axonal regeneration by primary afferents or autonomic fibers. PMID:23830908

  14. Neuronal network analysis based on arrival times of active-sleep specific inhibitory postsynaptic potentials in spinal cord motoneurons of the cat.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, J K; Chase, M H

    2001-07-20

    The neuronal network responsible for motoneuron inhibition and loss of muscle tone during active (REM) sleep can be activated by the injection of the cholinergic agonist carbachol into a circumscribed region of the brainstem reticular formation. In the present report, we studied the arrival times of inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) observed in intracellular recordings from cat spinal cord motoneurons. These recordings were obtained during episodes of motor inhibition induced by carbachol or during motor inhibition associated with naturally occurring active sleep. When the observed IPSP arrival times were analyzed as a superposition of renewal processes occurring in a pool of pre-motor inhibitory interneurons, it was possible to estimate the following parameters: (1) the number of independent sources of the IPSPs; (2) the rate at which each source was bombarded with excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs); and (3) the number of EPSPs required to bring each source to threshold. From the data based upon the preceding parameters and the unusually large amplitudes of the active sleep-specific IPSPs, we suggest that each source is a cluster of synchronously discharging pre-motor inhibitory interneurons. The analysis of IPSP arrival times as a superposition of renewal processes, therefore, provides quantitative information regarding neuronal activity that is as far as two synapses upstream from the site of the recording electrode. Consequently, we suggest that a study of the temporal evolution of these parameters could provide a basis for dynamic analyses of this neuronal network and, in the future, for other neuronal networks as well. PMID:11457433

  15. cGMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Inhibition Extends the Upper Temperature Limit of Stimulus-Evoked Calcium Responses in Motoneuronal Boutons of Drosophila melanogaster Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Dawson-Scully, Ken

    2016-01-01

    While the mammalian brain functions within a very narrow range of oxygen concentrations and temperatures, the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has employed strategies to deal with a much wider range of acute environmental stressors. The foraging (for) gene encodes the cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG), has been shown to regulate thermotolerance in many stress-adapted species, including Drosophila, and could be a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of hyperthermia in mammals. Whereas previous thermotolerance studies have looked at the effects of PKG variation on Drosophila behavior or excitatory postsynaptic potentials at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ), little is known about PKG effects on presynaptic mechanisms. In this study, we characterize presynaptic calcium ([Ca2+]i) dynamics at the Drosophila larval NMJ to determine the effects of high temperature stress on synaptic transmission. We investigated the neuroprotective role of PKG modulation both genetically using RNA interference (RNAi), and pharmacologically, to determine if and how PKG affects presynaptic [Ca2+]i dynamics during hyperthermia. We found that PKG activity modulates presynaptic neuronal Ca2+ responses during acute hyperthermia, where PKG activation makes neurons more sensitive to temperature-induced failure of Ca2+ flux and PKG inhibition confers thermotolerance and maintains normal Ca2+ dynamics under the same conditions. Targeted motoneuronal knockdown of PKG using RNAi demonstrated that decreased PKG expression was sufficient to confer thermoprotection. These results demonstrate that the PKG pathway regulates presynaptic motoneuronal Ca2+ signaling to influence thermotolerance of presynaptic function during acute hyperthermia. PMID:27711243

  16. Loss of the Coffin-Lowry syndrome-associated gene RSK2 alters ERK activity, synaptic function and axonal transport in Drosophila motoneurons

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Katherina; Ehmann, Nadine; Andlauer, Till F. M.; Ljaschenko, Dmitrij; Strecker, Katrin; Fischer, Matthias; Kittel, Robert J.; Raabe, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Plastic changes in synaptic properties are considered as fundamental for adaptive behaviors. Extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-mediated signaling has been implicated in regulation of synaptic plasticity. Ribosomal S6 kinase 2 (RSK2) acts as a regulator and downstream effector of ERK. In the brain, RSK2 is predominantly expressed in regions required for learning and memory. Loss-of-function mutations in human RSK2 cause Coffin-Lowry syndrome, which is characterized by severe mental retardation and low IQ scores in affected males. Knockout of RSK2 in mice or the RSK ortholog in Drosophila results in a variety of learning and memory defects. However, overall brain structure in these animals is not affected, leaving open the question of the pathophysiological consequences. Using the fly neuromuscular system as a model for excitatory glutamatergic synapses, we show that removal of RSK function causes distinct defects in motoneurons and at the neuromuscular junction. Based on histochemical and electrophysiological analyses, we conclude that RSK is required for normal synaptic morphology and function. Furthermore, loss of RSK function interferes with ERK signaling at different levels. Elevated ERK activity was evident in the somata of motoneurons, whereas decreased ERK activity was observed in axons and the presynapse. In addition, we uncovered a novel function of RSK in anterograde axonal transport. Our results emphasize the importance of fine-tuning ERK activity in neuronal processes underlying higher brain functions. In this context, RSK acts as a modulator of ERK signaling. PMID:26398944

  17. Loss of the Coffin-Lowry syndrome-associated gene RSK2 alters ERK activity, synaptic function and axonal transport in Drosophila motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Beck, Katherina; Ehmann, Nadine; Andlauer, Till F M; Ljaschenko, Dmitrij; Strecker, Katrin; Fischer, Matthias; Kittel, Robert J; Raabe, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Plastic changes in synaptic properties are considered as fundamental for adaptive behaviors. Extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-mediated signaling has been implicated in regulation of synaptic plasticity. Ribosomal S6 kinase 2 (RSK2) acts as a regulator and downstream effector of ERK. In the brain, RSK2 is predominantly expressed in regions required for learning and memory. Loss-of-function mutations in human RSK2 cause Coffin-Lowry syndrome, which is characterized by severe mental retardation and low IQ scores in affected males. Knockout of RSK2 in mice or the RSK ortholog in Drosophila results in a variety of learning and memory defects. However, overall brain structure in these animals is not affected, leaving open the question of the pathophysiological consequences. Using the fly neuromuscular system as a model for excitatory glutamatergic synapses, we show that removal of RSK function causes distinct defects in motoneurons and at the neuromuscular junction. Based on histochemical and electrophysiological analyses, we conclude that RSK is required for normal synaptic morphology and function. Furthermore, loss of RSK function interferes with ERK signaling at different levels. Elevated ERK activity was evident in the somata of motoneurons, whereas decreased ERK activity was observed in axons and the presynapse. In addition, we uncovered a novel function of RSK in anterograde axonal transport. Our results emphasize the importance of fine-tuning ERK activity in neuronal processes underlying higher brain functions. In this context, RSK acts as a modulator of ERK signaling.

  18. Dense transient receptor potential cation channel, vanilloid family, type 2 (TRPV2) immunoreactivity defines a subset of motoneurons in the dorsal lateral nucleus of the spinal cord, the nucleus ambiguus and the trigeminal motor nucleus in rat.

    PubMed

    Lewinter, R D; Scherrer, G; Basbaum, A I

    2008-01-01

    The transient receptor potential cation channel, vanilloid family, type 2 (TRPV2) is a member of the TRPV family of proteins and is a homologue of the capsaicin/vanilloid receptor (transient receptor potential cation channel, vanilloid family, type 1, TRPV1). Like TRPV1, TRPV2 is expressed in a subset of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons that project to superficial laminae of the spinal cord dorsal horn. Because noxious heat (>52 degrees C) activates TRPV2 in transfected cells this channel has been implicated in the processing of high intensity thermal pain messages in vivo. In contrast to TRPV1, however, which is restricted to small diameter DRG neurons, there is significant TRPV2 immunoreactivity in a variety of CNS regions. The present report focuses on a subset of neurons in the brainstem and spinal cord of the rat including the dorsal lateral nucleus (DLN) of the spinal cord, the nucleus ambiguus, and the motor trigeminal nucleus. Double label immunocytochemistry with markers of motoneurons, combined with retrograde labeling, established that these cells are, in fact, motoneurons. With the exception of their smaller diameter, these cells did not differ from other motoneurons, which are only lightly TRPV2-immunoreactive. As for the majority of DLN neurons, the densely-labeled populations co-express androgen receptor and follow normal DLN ontogeny. The functional significance of the very intense TRPV2 expression in these three distinct spinal cord and brainstem motoneurons groups remains to be determined.

  19. Voltage behavior along the irregular dendritic structure of morphologically and physiologically characterized vagal motoneurons in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Nitzan, R; Segev, I; Yarom, Y

    1990-02-01

    1. Intracellular recordings from neurons in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (vagal motoneurons, VMs) obtained in the guinea pig brain stem slice preparation were used for both horseradish peroxidase (HRP) labeling of the neurons and for measurements of their input resistance (RN) and time constant (tau 0). Based on the physiological data and on the morphological reconstruction of the labeled cells, detailed steady-state and compartmental models of VM were built and utilized to estimate the range of membrane resistivity, membrane capacitance, and cytoplasm resistivity values (Rm, Cm, and Ri, respectively) and to explore the integrative properties of these cells. 2. VMs are relatively small cells with a simple dendritic structure. Each cell has an average of 5.3 smooth (nonspiny), short (251 microns) dendrites with a low order (2) of branching. The average soma-dendritic surface area of VMs is 9,876 microns 2. 3. Electrically, VMs show remarkably linear membrane properties in the hyperpolarizing direction; they have an average RN of 67 +/- 23 (SD) M omega and a tau 0 of 9.4 +/- 4.1 ms. Several unfavorable experimental conditions precluded the possibility of faithfully recovering ("peeling") the first equalizing time constant (tau 1) and, thereby, of estimating the electrotonic length (Lpeel) of VMs. 4. Reconciling VM morphology with the measured RN and tau 0 through the models, assuming an Ri of 70 omega.cm and a spatially uniform Rm, yielded an Rm estimate of 5,250 omega.cm2 and a Cm of 1.8 microF/cm2. Peeling theoretical transients produced by these models result in an Lpeel of 1.35. Because of marked differences in the length of dendrites within a single cell, this value is larger than the maximal cable length of the dendrites and is twice as long as their average cable length. 5. The morphological and physiological data could be matched indistinguishably well if a possible soma shunt (i.e., Rm, soma less than Rm, dend) was included in the model. Although

  20. Progranulin modulates zebrafish motoneuron development in vivo and rescues truncation defects associated with knockdown of Survival motor neuron 1

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Progranulin (PGRN) encoded by the GRN gene, is a secreted glycoprotein growth factor that has been implicated in many physiological and pathophysiological processes. PGRN haploinsufficiency caused by autosomal dominant mutations within the GRN gene leads to progressive neuronal atrophy in the form of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). This form of the disease is associated with neuronal inclusions that bear the ubiquitinated TAR DNA Binding Protein-43 (TDP-43) molecular signature (FTLD-U). The neurotrophic properties of PGRN in vitro have recently been reported but the role of PGRN in neurons is not well understood. Here we document the neuronal expression and functions of PGRN in spinal cord motoneuron (MN) maturation and branching in vivo using zebrafish, a well established model of vertebrate embryonic development. Results Whole-mount in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical analyses of zebrafish embryos revealed that zfPGRN-A is expressed within the peripheral and central nervous systems including the caudal primary (CaP) MNs within the spinal cord. Knockdown of zfPGRN-A mRNA translation mediated by antisense morpholino oligonucleotides disrupted normal CaP MN development resulting in both truncated MNs and inappropriate early branching. Ectopic over-expression of zfPGRN-A mRNA resulted in increased MN branching and rescued the truncation defects brought about by knockdown of zfPGRN-A expression. The ability of PGRN to interact with established MN developmental pathways was tested. PGRN over-expression was found to reverse the truncation defect resulting from knockdown of Survival of motor neuron 1 (smn1). This is involved in small ribonucleoprotein biogenesis RNA processing, mutations of which cause Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) in humans. It did not reverse the MN defects caused by interfering with the neuronal guidance pathway by knockdown of expression of NRP-1, a semaphorin co-receptor. Conclusions Expression of PGRN within MNs and

  1. Myelin-associated glycoprotein modulates apoptosis of motoneurons during early postnatal development via NgR/p75NTR receptor-mediated activation of RhoA signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Palandri, A; Salvador, V R; Wojnacki, J; Vivinetto, A L; Schnaar, R L; Lopez, P H H

    2015-01-01

    Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) is a minor constituent of nervous system myelin, selectively expressed on the periaxonal myelin wrap. By engaging multiple axonal receptors, including Nogo-receptors (NgRs), MAG exerts a nurturing and protective effect the axons it ensheaths. Pharmacological activation of NgRs has a modulatory role on p75NTR-dependent postnatal apoptosis of motoneurons (MNs). However, it is not clear whether this reflects a physiological role of NgRs in MN development. NgRs are part of a multimeric receptor complex, which includes p75NTR, Lingo-1 and gangliosides. Upon ligand binding, this multimeric complex activates RhoA/ROCK signaling in a p75NTR-dependent manner. The aim of this study was to analyze a possible modulatory role of MAG on MN apoptosis during postnatal development. A time course study showed that Mag-null mice suffer a loss of MNs during the first postnatal week. Also, these mice exhibited increased susceptibility in an animal model of p75NTR-dependent MN apoptosis induced by nerve-crush injury, which was prevented by treatment with a soluble form of MAG (MAG-Fc). The protective role of MAG was confirmed in in vitro models of p75NTR-dependent MN apoptosis using the MN1 cell line and primary cultures. Lentiviral expression of shRNA sequences targeting NgRs on these cells abolished protection by MAG-Fc. Analysis of RhoA activity using a FRET-based RhoA biosensor showed that MAG-Fc activates RhoA. Pharmacological inhibition of p75NTR/RhoA/ROCK pathway, or overexpression of a p75NTR mutant unable to activate RhoA, completely blocked MAG-Fc protection against apoptosis. The role of RhoA/ROCK signaling was further confirmed in the nerve-crush model, where pretreatment with ROCK inhibitor Y-27632 blocked the pro-survival effect of MAG-Fc. These findings identify a new protective role of MAG as a modulator of apoptosis of MNs during postnatal development by a mechanism involving the p75NTR/RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway. Also, our results

  2. Pharmacological evaluation of glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) mediated neuroprotection following cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rajkumar; Mishra, Vikas; Sasmal, Dinakar; Raghubir, Ram

    2010-07-25

    Recently glutamate transporters have emerged as a potential therapeutic target in a wide range of acute and chronic neurological disorders, owing to their novel mode of action. The modulation of GLT-1, a major glutamate transporter has been shown to exert neuroprotection in various models of ischemic injury and motoneuron degeneration. Therefore, an attempt was made to explore its neuroprotective potential in cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury using ceftriaxone, a GLT-1 modulator. Pre-treatment with ceftriaxone (100mg/kg. i.v) for five days resulted in a significant reduction (P<0.01) in neurological deficit as well as cerebral infarct volume after 1h of ischemia followed by 24h of reperfusion injury. It also caused a significant (P<0.05) upregulation of GLT-1 mRNA, protein and glutamine synthetase (GS) activity. Furthermore, inhibition of ceftriaxone-mediated increased glutamine synthetase activity by dihydrokainate (DHK), a GLT-1 specific inhibitor, confirms the specific effect of ceftriaxone on GLT-1 activity. In addition, ceftriaxone also induced a significant (P<0.01) increase in [(3)H]-glutamate uptake, mediated by GLT-1 in glial enriched preparation, as evidenced by use of DHK and DL-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartate (DL-TBOA). Thus, the present study provides overwhelming evidence that modulation of GLT-1 protein expression and activity confers neuroprotection in cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury.

  3. Traumatic Brain Injury

    MedlinePlus

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) happens when a bump, blow, jolt, or other head injury causes damage to the brain. Every year, millions of people in the U.S. suffer brain injuries. More than half are bad enough that ...

  4. Traumatic Brain Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... Center PTACs Workspaces Log-in Search for: Traumatic Brain Injury A legacy resource from NICHCY Disability Fact ... in her. Back to top What is Traumatic Brain Injury? A traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an ...

  5. Eye Injuries at Work

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bureau of Labor Statistics, more than 20,000 workplace eye injuries happen each year. Injuries on the job often ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) reports that workplace eye injuries cost an estimated $300 million a year in ...

  6. Wounds and Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    An injury is damage to your body. It is a general term that refers to harm caused by accidents, ... millions of people injure themselves every year. These injuries range from minor to life-threatening. Injuries can ...

  7. Nerve Injuries in Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Kathryn; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Over a two-year period this study evaluated the condition of 65 athletes with nerve injuries. These injuries represent the spectrum of nerve injuries likely to be encountered in sports medicine clinics. (Author/MT)

  8. Spinal injury - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - spinal injury ... The following organizations are good resources for information on spinal injury : National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www.ninds.nih.gov The National Spinal Cord Injury ...

  9. Head injury. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, P.R.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 22 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Radiographic Evaluation; Epidemiology of Head Injury; Emergency Care and Initial Evaluation; Skull Fracture and Traumatic Cerebrospinal Fluid Fistulas; Mild Head Injury; and Injuries of the Cranial Nerves.

  10. Basketball Injuries: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apple Jr., David F.

    1988-01-01

    This article discusses reasons for the increase in basketball-related injuries, describes common injuries, outlines steps for diagnosis and treatment, and offers recovery and prevention strategies. (IAH)

  11. Baseball and softball injuries.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quincy

    2006-05-01

    Baseball and softball injuries can be a result of both acute and overuse injuries. Soft tissue injuries include contusions, abrasions, and lacerations. Return to play is allowed when risk of further injury is minimized. Common shoulder injuries include those to the rotator cuff, biceps tendon, and glenoid labrum. Elbow injuries are common in baseball and softball and include medial epicondylitis, ulnar collateral ligament injury, and osteochondritis dissecans. Typically conservative treatment with relative rest, medication, and a rehabilitation program will allow return to play. Surgical intervention may be needed for certain injuries or conservative treatment failure.

  12. Sports injuries of the ear.

    PubMed

    Wagner, G A

    1972-07-01

    The author describes common sports injuries involving the ear. Such injuries include hematoma, lacerations, foreign bodies (tattoo), and thermal injuries. Ear canal injuries include swimmer's ear and penetrating injuries. Tympanum injuries include tympanic membrane perforations, ossicular discontinuity, eustachian tube dysfunction, temporal bone fractures and traumatic facial nerve palsy. Inner ear injuries include traumatic sensorineural deafness. The author emphasizes the management of these injuries.

  13. Facilitation from hand muscles innervated by the ulnar nerve to the extensor carpi radialis motoneurone pool in humans: a study with an electromyogram-averaging technique.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Ogawa, Keiichi; Sato, Toshiaki; Nakano, Haruki; Fujii, Hiromi; Shindo, Masaomi; Naito, Akira

    2012-10-01

    Effects of low-threshold afferents of hand muscles innervated by the ulnar nerve on an excitability of the extensor carpi radialis (ECR) motoneurone pool in humans were examined using an electromyogram-averaging (EMG-A) technique. Changes of EMG-A of ECR exhibiting 10% of the maximum contraction by electrical stimulation to the ulnar nerve at the wrist (ES-UN) and mechanical stimulation to the hypothenar muscles (MS-HTM) and first dorsal interosseus (MS-FDI) were evaluated in eight normal human subjects. The ES-UN with the intensity immediately below the motor threshold and MS-HTM and -FDI with the intensity below the threshold of the tendon(T)-reflex were delivered. Early and significant peaks in EMG-A were produced by ES-UN, MS-HTM, and MS-FDI in eight of eight subjects. The mean amplitudes of the peaks by ES-UN, MS-HTM, and MS-FDI were, respectively, 121.9%, 139.3%, and 149.9% of the control EMG (100%). The difference between latencies of the peaks by ES-UN and MS-HTM, and ES-UN and MS-FDI was almost equivalent to that of the Hoffmann(H)- and T-reflexes of HTM and FDI, respectively. The peaks by ES-UN, MS-HTM, and MS-FDI diminished with tonic vibration stimulation (TVS) to HTM and FDI, respectively. These findings suggest that group Ia afferents of the hand muscles facilitate the ECR motoneurone pool.

  14. Dissecting the effects of endogenous brain IL-2 and normal versus autoreactive T lymphocytes on microglial responsiveness and T cell trafficking in response to axonal injury.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhi; Meola, Danielle; Petitto, John M

    2012-09-27

    IL-2 is essential for T-helper regulatory (Treg) cell function and self-tolerance, and dysregulation of both endogenous brain and peripheral IL-2 gene expression may have important implications for neuronal injury and repair. We used an experimental approach combining mouse congenic breeding and immune reconstitution to test the hypothesis that the response of motoneurons to injury is modulated by the combined effects of IL2-mediated processes in the brain that modulate its endogenous neuroimmunological milieu, and IL2-mediated processes in the peripheral immune system that regulate T cell function (i.e., normal versus autoreactive Treg-deficient T cells). This experimental strategy enabled us to test our hypothesis by disentangling the effect of normal versus autoreactive T lymphocytes from the effect of endogenous brain IL-2 on microglial responsiveness (microglial phagocytic clusters normally associated with dead motoneurons and MHC2(+) activated microglia) and T cell trafficking, using the facial nerve axotomy model of injury. The results demonstrate that the loss of both brain and peripheral IL-2 had an additive effect on numbers of microglial phagocytic clusters at day 14 following injury, whereas the autoreactive status of peripheral T cells was the primary factor that determined the degree to which T cells entered the injured brain and contributed to increased microglial phagocytic clusters. Changes in activated MHC2(+) microglial in the injured FMN were associated with loss of endogenous brain IL-2 and/or peripheral IL-2. This model may provide greater understanding of the mechanisms involved in determining if T cells entering the injured central nervous system (CNS) have damaging or proregenerative effects.

  15. Injury surveillance in construction: eye injuries.

    PubMed

    Welch, L S; Hunting, K L; Mawudeku, A

    2001-07-01

    Occupational eye injuries are both common and preventable. About 20% of occupational eye injuries occur in construction. To investigate the nature of eye injuries among construction workers, we analyzed a large data set of construction worker injuries. In addition, we interviewed 62 workers with eye injuries to further explore circumstances of eye injury and workers' attitudes and behavior toward the use of eye protection. Eleven percent (363 cases) of the 3,390 construction workers in our data set were treated for eye injuries. Welders, plumbers, insulators, painters/glaziers, supervisors, and electricians had a higher proportion of all injuries due to eye injuries than other trades. Nearly half of the diagnoses were abrasions (46%) followed by foreign objects or splash in the eye (29%), conjunctivitis (10%), and burns (5%). In the interviews with 62 workers, we found that employers very frequently required eye protection for all tasks or for high-risk tasks, and workers report wearing eye protection regularly. However, most did not wear eye protection with top and side shields; if we believe the injuries occurred because a particle or liquid passed between the glasses and the workers' faces, increased use of goggles or full shields would have prevented two-thirds of this group of injuries.

  16. Head Injuries in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennington, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    School nurses play a crucial role in injury prevention and initial treatment when injuries occur at school. The role of school nurses includes being knowledgeable about the management of head injuries, including assessment and initial treatment. The school nurse must be familiar with the outcomes of a head injury and know when further evaluation…

  17. Sports-specific injuries.

    PubMed

    Plancher, K D; Minnich, J M

    1996-04-01

    Injuries to the upper extremities can happen in any sport. Injury patterns are common to specific sports. Understanding which injuries occur with these sports allows the examiner to diagnose and treat the athlete easily. This article reviews some of the injuries common in sports such as bicycling, golf, gymnastics, martial arts, racquet sports, and weightlifting.

  18. Eye injuries in childhood.

    PubMed

    Grin, T R; Nelson, L B; Jeffers, J B

    1987-07-01

    A 3-year survey was conducted of all children with eye injuries admitted to Wills Eye Hospital to determine demographic, etiologic, and prophylactic factors. There were 278 cases, representing 22% of all ocular injuries in children requiring admission. The frequency of childhood ocular injuries is high, often resulting in serious visual impairment. Many of these injuries are preventable. The causes of pediatric eye injuries and preventive measures are discussed.

  19. Pediatric Hand Injuries.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Matthew A; Cogan, Charles J; Adkinson, Joshua M

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric hand injuries are extremely common. Although many hand injuries are adequately managed in the emergency department, some may need evaluation and treatment by a pediatric hand surgeon to ensure a good functional outcome. This article discusses the diagnosis and management of the most common pediatric hand maladies: fingertip injuries/amputation, tendon injuries, and phalangeal and metacarpal fractures. The plastic surgery nurse should be familiar with hand injuries that require intervention to facilitate efficient management and optimal postoperative care. PMID:27606586

  20. Function-triggering antibodies to the adhesion molecule L1 enhance recovery after injury of the adult mouse femoral nerve.

    PubMed

    Guseva, Daria; Loers, Gabriele; Schachner, Melitta

    2014-01-01

    L1 is among the few adhesion molecules that favors repair after trauma in the adult central nervous system of vertebrates by promoting neuritogenesis and neuronal survival, among other beneficial features. In the peripheral nervous system, L1 is up-regulated in Schwann cells and regrowing axons after nerve damage, but the functional consequences of this expression remain unclear. Our previous study of L1-deficient mice in a femoral nerve injury model showed an unexpected improved functional recovery, attenuated motoneuronal cell death, and enhanced Schwann cell proliferation, being attributed to the persistent synthesis of neurotrophic factors. On the other hand, transgenic mice over-expressing L1 in neurons led to improved remyelination, but not improved functional recovery. The present study was undertaken to investigate whether the monoclonal L1 antibody 557 that triggers beneficial L1 functions in vitro would trigger these also in femoral nerve repair. We analyzed femoral nerve regeneration in C57BL/6J mice that received this antibody in a hydrogel filled conduit connecting the cut and sutured nerve before its bifurcation, leading to short-term release of antibody by diffusion. Video-based quantitative analysis of motor functions showed improved recovery when compared to mice treated with conduits containing PBS in the hydrogel scaffold, as a vehicle control. This improved recovery was associated with attenuated motoneuron loss, remyelination and improved precision of preferential motor reinnervation. We suggest that function-triggering L1 antibodies applied to the lesion site at the time of injury over a limited time period will not only be beneficial in peripheral, but also central nervous system regeneration. PMID:25393007

  1. Bodygraphic Injury Surveillance System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuboi, Toshiki; Kitamura, Koji; Nishida, Yoshihumi; Motomura, Yoichi; Takano, Tachio; Yamanaka, Tatsuhiro; Mizoguchi, Hiroshi

    This paper proposes a new technology,``a bodygraphic injury surveillance system (BISS)'' that not only accumulates accident situation data but also represents injury data based on a human body coordinate system in a standardized and multilayered way. Standardized and multilayered representation of injury enables accumulation, retrieval, sharing, statistical analysis, and modeling causalities of injury across different fields such as medicine, engineering, and industry. To confirm the effectiveness of the developed system, the authors collected 3,685 children's injury data in cooperation with a hospital. As new analyses based on the developed BISS, this paper shows bodygraphically statistical analysis and childhood injury modeling using the developed BISS and Bayesian network technology.

  2. Upper extremity golf injuries.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Michael A; Lee, Steven K; Strauss, Eric J

    2013-01-01

    Golf is a global sport enjoyed by an estimated 60 million people around the world. Despite the common misconception that the risk of injury during the play of golf is minimal, golfers are subject to a myriad of potential pathologies. While the majority of injuries in golf are attributable to overuse, acute traumatic injuries can also occur. As the body's direct link to the golf club, the upper extremities are especially prone to injury. A thorough appreciation of the risk factors and patterns of injury will afford accurate diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of further injury.

  3. Neuropathophysiology of Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Quillinan, Nidia; Herson, Paco S; Traystman, Richard J

    2016-09-01

    Every year in the United States, millions of individuals incur ischemic brain injury from stroke, cardiac arrest, or traumatic brain injury. These acquired brain injuries can lead to death or long-term neurologic and neuropsychological impairments. The mechanisms of ischemic and traumatic brain injury that lead to these deficiencies result from a complex interplay of interdependent molecular pathways, including excitotoxicity, acidotoxicity, ionic imbalance, oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis. This article reviews several mechanisms of brain injury and discusses recent developments. Although much is known from animal models of injury, it has been difficult to translate these effects to humans. PMID:27521191

  4. Rehabilitation of basketball injuries.

    PubMed

    Malanga, Gerard A; Chimes, Gary P

    2006-08-01

    Basketball is one of the most popular sports in the United States and throughout the world, and therefore represents one of the most common sources of sports-related injuries. Basketball injuries should be managed by the same general rehabilitation principles as other sports injuries. Additionally, the clinician should be aware not only of general sports injuries but of those injuries most commonly seen in basketball players. By maintaining knowledge of the most common basketball injuries as well as their diagnosis and treatment, the clinician can help to optimize the athlete's return to play and enjoyment of the sport.

  5. Direct Spinal Ventral Root Repair following Avulsion: Effectiveness of a New Heterologous Fibrin Sealant on Motoneuron Survival and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Barbizan, Roberta; Seabra Ferreira, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Axonal injuries at the interface between central and peripheral nervous system, such as ventral root avulsion (VRA), induce important degenerative processes, mostly resulting in neuronal and motor function loss. In the present work, we have compared two different fibrin sealants, one derived from human blood and another derived from animal blood and Crotalus durissus terrificus venom, as a promising treatment for this type of injury. Lewis rats were submitted to VRA (L4–L6) and had the avulsed roots reimplanted to the surface of the spinal cord, with the aid of fibrin sealant. The spinal cords were processed to evaluate neuronal survival, synaptic stability, and glial reactivity, 4 and 12 weeks after lesion. Sciatic nerves were processed to investigate Schwann cell activity by p75NTR expression (4 weeks after surgery) and to count myelinated axons and morphometric evaluation (12 weeks after surgery). Walking track test was used to evaluate gait recovery, up to 12 weeks. The results indicate that both fibrin sealants are similarly efficient. However, the snake-derived fibrin glue is a potentially safer alternative for being a biological and biodegradable product which does not contain human blood derivatives. Therefore, the venom glue can be a useful tool for the scientific community due to its advantages and variety of applications.

  6. Direct Spinal Ventral Root Repair following Avulsion: Effectiveness of a New Heterologous Fibrin Sealant on Motoneuron Survival and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Barbizan, Roberta; Seabra Ferreira, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Axonal injuries at the interface between central and peripheral nervous system, such as ventral root avulsion (VRA), induce important degenerative processes, mostly resulting in neuronal and motor function loss. In the present work, we have compared two different fibrin sealants, one derived from human blood and another derived from animal blood and Crotalus durissus terrificus venom, as a promising treatment for this type of injury. Lewis rats were submitted to VRA (L4–L6) and had the avulsed roots reimplanted to the surface of the spinal cord, with the aid of fibrin sealant. The spinal cords were processed to evaluate neuronal survival, synaptic stability, and glial reactivity, 4 and 12 weeks after lesion. Sciatic nerves were processed to investigate Schwann cell activity by p75NTR expression (4 weeks after surgery) and to count myelinated axons and morphometric evaluation (12 weeks after surgery). Walking track test was used to evaluate gait recovery, up to 12 weeks. The results indicate that both fibrin sealants are similarly efficient. However, the snake-derived fibrin glue is a potentially safer alternative for being a biological and biodegradable product which does not contain human blood derivatives. Therefore, the venom glue can be a useful tool for the scientific community due to its advantages and variety of applications. PMID:27642524

  7. Direct Spinal Ventral Root Repair following Avulsion: Effectiveness of a New Heterologous Fibrin Sealant on Motoneuron Survival and Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Vidigal de Castro, Mateus; Barbizan, Roberta; Seabra Ferreira, Rui; Barraviera, Benedito; Leite Rodrigues de Oliveira, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Axonal injuries at the interface between central and peripheral nervous system, such as ventral root avulsion (VRA), induce important degenerative processes, mostly resulting in neuronal and motor function loss. In the present work, we have compared two different fibrin sealants, one derived from human blood and another derived from animal blood and Crotalus durissus terrificus venom, as a promising treatment for this type of injury. Lewis rats were submitted to VRA (L4-L6) and had the avulsed roots reimplanted to the surface of the spinal cord, with the aid of fibrin sealant. The spinal cords were processed to evaluate neuronal survival, synaptic stability, and glial reactivity, 4 and 12 weeks after lesion. Sciatic nerves were processed to investigate Schwann cell activity by p75(NTR) expression (4 weeks after surgery) and to count myelinated axons and morphometric evaluation (12 weeks after surgery). Walking track test was used to evaluate gait recovery, up to 12 weeks. The results indicate that both fibrin sealants are similarly efficient. However, the snake-derived fibrin glue is a potentially safer alternative for being a biological and biodegradable product which does not contain human blood derivatives. Therefore, the venom glue can be a useful tool for the scientific community due to its advantages and variety of applications. PMID:27642524

  8. Brachial Plexus Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Brachial Plexus Injuries Information Page Synonym(s): Erb's Palsy Table of Contents ( ... done? Clinical Trials Organizations What are Brachial Plexus Injuries? The brachial plexus is a network of nerves ...

  9. Teeth Injuries (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy First Aid: Teeth Injuries KidsHealth > For Parents > First Aid: Teeth Injuries ... or young child injures the gums or baby teeth: Apply pressure to the area (if it's bleeding) ...

  10. Experimental traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury, a leading cause of death and disability, is a result of an outside force causing mechanical disruption of brain tissue and delayed pathogenic events which collectively exacerbate the injury. These pathogenic injury processes are poorly understood and accordingly no effective neuroprotective treatment is available so far. Experimental models are essential for further clarification of the highly complex pathology of traumatic brain injury towards the development of novel treatments. Among the rodent models of traumatic brain injury the most commonly used are the weight-drop, the fluid percussion, and the cortical contusion injury models. As the entire spectrum of events that might occur in traumatic brain injury cannot be covered by one single rodent model, the design and choice of a specific model represents a major challenge for neuroscientists. This review summarizes and evaluates the strengths and weaknesses of the currently available rodent models for traumatic brain injury. PMID:20707892

  11. What Are Sports Injuries?

    MedlinePlus

    ... 06:02 Size: 11.7 MB November 2014 What Are Sports Injuries? Fast Facts: An Easy-to- ... Research Is Being Done on Treating Sports Injuries? What’s the Difference Between an Acute and a Chronic ...

  12. Football injuries: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Olson, David E; Sikka, Robby Singh; Hamilton, Abigail; Krohn, Austin

    2011-01-01

    Football is one of the most popular sports in the United States and is the leading cause of sports-related injury. A large focus in recent years has been on concussions, sudden cardiac death, and heat illness, all thought to be largely preventable health issues in the young athlete. Injury prevention through better understanding of injury mechanisms, education, proper equipment, and practice techniques and preseason screening may aid in reducing the number of injuries. Proper management of on-field injuries and health emergencies can reduce the morbidity associated with these injuries and may lead to faster return to play and reduced risk of future injury. This article reviews current concepts surrounding frequently seen football-related injuries.

  13. Facial Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Face injuries and disorders can cause pain and affect how you look. In severe cases, they can affect sight, ... your nose, cheekbone and jaw, are common facial injuries. Certain diseases also lead to facial disorders. For ...

  14. Hip Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... or falling can all sometimes lead to hip injuries. These include Strains Bursitis Dislocations Fractures Certain diseases also lead to hip injuries or problems. Osteoarthritis can cause pain and limited ...

  15. Arm Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... of muscles, joints, tendons and other connective tissue. Injuries to any of these parts of the arm ... a fall or an accident. Types of arm injuries include Tendinitis and bursitis Sprains Dislocations Broken bones ...

  16. Hand Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... the wrist, often making your fingers feel numb Injuries that result in fractures, ruptured ligaments and dislocations ... deformity Tendinitis - irritation of the tendons Disorders and injuries of your fingers and thumb

  17. Brachial Plexus Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the shoulder, arm, and hand. Brachial plexus injuries are caused by damage to those nerves. Symptoms ... sensation in the arm or hand Brachial plexus injuries can occur as a result of shoulder trauma, ...

  18. Recreational softball injuries.

    PubMed

    Shesser, R; Smith, M; Ellis, P; Brett, S; Ott, J E

    1985-05-01

    Every patient who presented to an urban teaching hospital's emergency department during one season complaining of an injury sustained while playing softball was interviewed to determine the parameters of play associated with the injury. Trends were noticed toward increased frequency of injury to experienced players late in the season. A fall was the most common mechanism of injury, and player location at the time of injury was equally divided between the basepath and defense. Very few players were injured at bat. No conclusion could be drawn about the protection afforded a player from the use of a mitt or cleats. The relative rate of injury was estimated to be 2.26 injuries per 1,000 players per day, making the risk of injury for softball participants about 50% of that for recreational skiers.

  19. Head Injuries in Soccer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Karl B.

    1989-01-01

    This article reviews the medical literature on head injuries in soccer and concludes that protective headgear to reduce these injuries may not be as effective as rule changes and other measures, such as padding goal posts. (IAH)

  20. Eye Injuries in Sports

    MedlinePlus

    ... these injuries can be prevented. Overall, basketball and baseball cause the most eye injuries, followed by water ... involve body contact. Some high-risk sports are baseball, basketball, hockey, football, lacrosse, tennis and other racquet ...

  1. Softball Pitching and Injury.

    PubMed

    Lear, Aaron; Patel, Niraj

    2016-01-01

    The windmill softball pitch generates considerable forces about the athlete's shoulder and elbow. The injury pattern of softball pitchers seems to be primarily overuse injury, and they seem not to suffer the same volume of injury that baseball pitchers do. This article will explore softball pitching techniques, kinetics and kinematics of the windmill pitch, epidemiology of softball pitchers, and discuss possible etiologies of softball pitching injuries.

  2. Baseball/lacrosse injuries.

    PubMed

    Casazza, B A; Rossner, K

    1999-02-01

    With the expansion of baseball into all age groups, the game is becoming as much a recreational sport as a youth sport. Throwing arm injuries eventually limit the participation of most players. Analysis is made of these injuries with the goal of complete rehabilitation for the baseball player. Lacrosse has also seen an increase in popularity as a recreational sport. Analysis of lacrosse injuries and rehabilitation of the most common injuries is reviewed.

  3. Softball Pitching and Injury.

    PubMed

    Lear, Aaron; Patel, Niraj

    2016-01-01

    The windmill softball pitch generates considerable forces about the athlete's shoulder and elbow. The injury pattern of softball pitchers seems to be primarily overuse injury, and they seem not to suffer the same volume of injury that baseball pitchers do. This article will explore softball pitching techniques, kinetics and kinematics of the windmill pitch, epidemiology of softball pitchers, and discuss possible etiologies of softball pitching injuries. PMID:27618243

  4. Assessment of Ankle Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mai, Nicholas; Cooper, Leslie

    2009-01-01

    School nurses are faced with the challenge of identifying and treating ankle injuries in the school setting. There is little information guiding the assessment and treatment of these children when an injury occurs. It is essential for school nurses to understand ankle anatomy, pathophysiology of the acute ankle injury, general and orthopedic…

  5. Prevention of Football Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Kirkendall, Donald T; Junge, Astrid; Dvorak, Jiri

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Every sport has a unique profile of injury and risk of injury. In recent years, there have been numerous attempts at conducting injury prevention trials for specific injuries or for injuries within specific sports to provide evidence useful to the sports medicine and sport community. Football has been a focus of a number of randomized injury prevention trials. Methods MEDLINE was searched with the first order keywords of “injury prevention” and “sport”. This list was restricted to “clinical trial” or “randomized controlled trial” which had been conducted on children and adults whose goal was preventing common football injuries. Our objective was to find studies with an exercise-based training program, thus projects that used mechanical interventions were excluded. Results A structured, generalized warm-up has been shown to be effective at preventing common injuries in football, reducing injuries by about one-third. Conclusion The huge participation numbers in the worldwide family of football would suggest that any reduction in injury should have a public health impact. Professionals in sports medicine need to promote injury prevention programs that have been shown to be effective. PMID:22375195

  6. Spinal Cord Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... your body and your brain. A spinal cord injury disrupts the signals. Spinal cord injuries usually begin with a blow that fractures or ... bone disks that make up your spine. Most injuries don't cut through your spinal cord. Instead, ...

  7. Rotator Cuff Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Many baseball players suffer from shoulder injuries related to the rotator cuff muscles. These injuries may be classified as muscular strain, tendonitis or tenosynovitis, and impingement syndrome. Treatment varies from simple rest to surgery, so it is important to be seen by a physician as soon as possible. In order to prevent these injuries, the…

  8. Repetitive Stress Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... any problems since. What Are Repetitive Stress Injuries? Repetitive stress injuries (RSIs) are injuries that happen when too much stress is placed on a part of the body, resulting in inflammation (pain and swelling), muscle strain, or tissue damage. This stress generally occurs from ...

  9. Non-motoneurons in the facial and motor trigeminal nuclei projecting to the cerebellar flocculus in the cat. A fluorescent double-labelling and WGA-HRP study.

    PubMed

    Røste, G K

    1989-01-01

    The cerebellar projection from the facial and motor trigeminal nuclei was studied in the cat by means of retrograde axonal transport of wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase and fluorescent tracers. The feline facial nucleus was cytoarchitectonically subdivided into ventromedial, ventrolateral, lateral, dorsal, intermediate and medial divisions (see Papez 1927), and the motor trigeminal nucleus into medial, ventral, intermediate, lateral and dorsal divisions. The neurons in the facial and motor trigeminal nuclei were classified as small (ovoid to round cells with a maximum diameter of the cell body of about 20 microns) or large (polygonal to round cells with maximum diameter of about 40 microns). After floccular injections of the wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase complex, retrogradely labelled cells were found throughout the facial nucleus, but especially in its medial and dorsal divisions. In the motor trigeminal nucleus, labelled neurons were found only in the ventral, intermediate and lateral divisions. Cases with tracer deposition (implants or injections) in other parts of the cerebellar cortex or nuclei were all negative. All facial and motor trigeminal neurons labelled after floccular injections were smaller than the neurons labelled after injections in the facial mimic and masticatory muscles, and only single-labelled neurons were found following floccular injections of Fluoro-Gold and muscular injections of rhodamine-B-isothiocyanate in the same animals. These observations strongly suggest that the neurons in the facial and motor trigeminal nuclei which project to flocculus are of the non-motoneuron type. PMID:2470610

  10. Inactivation of cytochrome c oxidase by mutant SOD1s in mouse motoneuronal NSC-34 cells is independent from copper availability but is because of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Arciello, Mario; Capo, Concetta Rosa; Cozzolino, Mauro; Ferri, Alberto; Nencini, Monica; Carrì, Maria Teresa; Rossi, Luisa

    2010-01-01

    The copper-enzyme cytochrome c oxidase (Cytox) has been indicated as a primary molecular target of mutant copper, zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1) in familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (fALS); however, the mechanism underlying its inactivation is still unclear. As the toxicity of mutant SOD1s could arise from their selective recruitment to mitochondria, it is conceivable that they might compete with Cytox for the mitochondrial copper pool causing Cytox inactivation. To investigate this issue, we used mouse motoneuronal neuroblastoma x spinal cord cell line-34, stably transfected for the inducible expression of low amounts of wild-type or mutant (G93A, H46R, and H80R) human SOD1s and compared the effects observed on Cytox with those obtained by copper depletion. We demonstrated that all mutants analyzed induced cell death and decreased the Cytox activity, but not the protein content of the Cytox subunit II, at difference with copper depletion that also affected subunit II protein. Copper supplementation did not counteract mutant hSOD1s toxicity. Otherwise, the treatment of neuroblastoma x spinal cord cell line-34 expressing G93A, H46R, or H80R hSOD1 mutants, and showing constitutive expression of iNOS and nNOS, with either a NO scavenger, or NOS inhibitors prevented the inhibition of Cytox activity and rescued cell viability. These results support the involvement of NO in mutant SOD1s-induced Cytox damage, and mitochondrial toxicity. PMID:19845829

  11. ALS Patient Stem Cells for Unveiling Disease Signatures of Motoneuron Susceptibility: Perspectives on the Deadly Mitochondria, ER Stress and Calcium Triad

    PubMed Central

    Kaus, Anjoscha; Sareen, Dhruv

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a largely sporadic progressive neurodegenerative disease affecting upper and lower motoneurons (MNs) whose specific etiology is incompletely understood. Mutations in superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1), TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TARDBP/TDP-43) and C9orf72, have been identified in subsets of familial and sporadic patients. Key associated molecular and neuropathological features include ubiquitinated TDP-43 inclusions, stress granules, aggregated dipeptide proteins from mutant C9orf72 transcripts, altered mitochondrial ultrastructure, dysregulated calcium homeostasis, oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and an unfolded protein response (UPR). Such impairments have been documented in ALS animal models; however, whether these mechanisms are initiating factors or later consequential events leading to MN vulnerability in ALS patients is debatable. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are a valuable tool that could resolve this “chicken or egg” causality dilemma. Relevant systems for probing pathophysiologically affected cells from large numbers of ALS patients and discovering phenotypic disease signatures of early MN susceptibility are described. Performing unbiased ‘OMICS and high-throughput screening in relevant neural cells from a cohort of ALS patient iPSCs, and rescuing mitochondrial and ER stress impairments, can identify targeted therapeutics for increasing MN longevity in ALS. PMID:26635528

  12. [Trampoline injuries in children].

    PubMed

    Sinikumpu, Juha-Jaakko; Antila, Eeva; Korhonen, Jussi; Rättyä, Johanna; Serlo, Willy

    2012-01-01

    Trampolines for home use have become common in Finland during the past ten years, being especially favored by children. Trampoline jumping is beneficial and constructive physical exercise, but poses a significant risk for injuries. The most common injuries include sprains and strains. During summertime, trampoline injuries account for as many as 13% of children's accidents requiring hospital care. Fractures are by far the most common trampoline injuries requiring hospital care. Injuries can be prevented by using safety nets. Only one child at a time is allowed to jump on the trampoline.

  13. Indoor racquet sports injuries.

    PubMed

    Silko, G J; Cullen, P T

    1994-08-01

    Family physicians can care for most patients injured while participating in indoor racquet sports. However, patients with injuries to the eye usually require ophthalmologic referral. The most common injuries that occur in persons participating in indoor racquet sports include contusions, sprains and strains, lacerations, eye injuries, bursitis and tendinitis. Musculoskeletal injuries that merit special consideration include lateral epicondylitis, DeQuervain's tenosynovitis, wrist intersection syndrome, patellar pain syndrome, meniscal injuries, Achilles tendinitis and plantar fasciitis. The family physician plays a critical role in providing patients with information about preventive measures.

  14. Triathlon: running injuries.

    PubMed

    Spiker, Andrea M; Dixit, Sameer; Cosgarea, Andrew J

    2012-12-01

    The running portion of the triathlon represents the final leg of the competition and, by some reports, the most important part in determining a triathlete's overall success. Although most triathletes spend most of their training time on cycling, running injuries are the most common injuries encountered. Common causes of running injuries include overuse, lack of rest, and activities that aggravate biomechanical predisposers of specific injuries. We discuss the running-associated injuries in the hip, knee, lower leg, ankle, and foot of the triathlete, and the causes, presentation, evaluation, and treatment of each.

  15. Injuries in Swedish skydiving

    PubMed Central

    Westman, Anton; Björnstig, Ulf

    2007-01-01

    Objective To create a basis for prevention of modern skydiving injuries. Design Descriptive epidemiological study. Setting National total material. Patients Data on all reported injury events (n = 257) in Swedish skydiving 1999–2003 (total 539 885 jumps) were retrieved from the Swedish Parachute Association. Non‐fatally injured skydivers were sent a questionnaire asking for event and injury details (response rate 89%), and supplementary hospital records were retrieved for the most serious injuries (n = 85). Human, equipment and environmental factors were assessed for risk. Main Outcome Measurements Frequency and severity of injuries. Results Incidence of non‐fatal injury events was 48 per 100 000 jumps. The lower extremities, spine and shoulders were important regions of injury. The most serious injuries were experienced by licensed skydivers, but students in training had a higher injury rate and more often left the sport because of the injury. Of two student‐training systems, one had an incidence less than half that of the other. Conclusions A basis for prevention was created, showing a potential for reduction of frequency and severity of injuries with training and technical interventions. PMID:17224436

  16. Spinal injuries in children.

    PubMed

    Babcock, J L

    1975-05-01

    Spinal injuries with neurologic sequelae are a rare but catastrophic injury. Many of these injuries might be preventable through proper parent and child education, particularly in water sports and vehicles accidents. A significant number of neurologic injuries are incomplete at the time of injury and proper rescue and initial care may make the difference between life as a quadriplegic and life as a normal individual. Because of the complexity of the management of the child with spinal injuries and their relative rarity, the definitive care is best undertaken at hospitals which specialize in the care of spinal injuries. Progressive deformity of the spine, a problem unique to childhood and adolescent paralysis, is often preventable with prolonged immobilization and protection of the spine. Progressive deformities which interfere with function or result in neurologic deterioration require an aggressive surgical approach. PMID:1124228

  17. Recreational mountain biking injuries.

    PubMed

    Aitken, S A; Biant, L C; Court-Brown, Charles M

    2011-04-01

    Mountain biking is increasing in popularity worldwide. The injury patterns associated with elite level and competitive mountain biking are known. This study analysed the incidence, spectrum and risk factors for injuries sustained during recreational mountain biking. The injury rate was 1.54 injuries per 1000 biker exposures. Men were more commonly injured than women, with those aged 30-39 years at highest risk. The commonest types of injury were wounding, skeletal fracture and musculoskeletal soft tissue injury. Joint dislocations occurred more commonly in older mountain bikers. The limbs were more commonly injured than the axial skeleton. The highest hospital admission rates were observed with head, neck and torso injuries. Protective body armour, clip-in pedals and the use of a full-suspension bicycle may confer a protective effect. PMID:20659880

  18. Acute disposition of neck injuries.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Leslie

    2005-02-01

    Neck injuries can be some of the most serious and anxiety-producing injuries that occur during sporting events. It is important for the team physician to be prepared for the care of these injuries and be able to identify some of the more serious injuries. Proper care of these injuries can be life saving and prevent further injury and permanent disability. This article reviews the principles of management and latest evidence for acute neck injuries.

  19. Injuries in Irish dance.

    PubMed

    Stein, Cynthia J; Tyson, Kesley D; Johnson, Victor M; Popoli, David M; d'Hemecourt, Pierre A; Micheli, Lyle J

    2013-12-01

    Irish dance is growing in popularity and competitiveness; however, very little research has focused specifically on this genre of dance. The purpose of this study was to analyze the types of dance injuries incurred by Irish dancers. A chart review was performed to identify all injuries associated with Irish dance seen in the sports medicine or orthopaedic clinics at the investigators' hospital over an 11-year period. "Injury" was defined as any dance-related pain or disorder that led to evaluation in the clinics. Survey data were also collected from study participants. Ultimately, 255 patients from over 30 different schools of dance were seen with injuries directly related (726 clinic visits) or partially related (199 visits) to Irish dance. Participants ranged in age from 4 to 47, with 95% (243/255) under the age of 19. These 255 patients received 437 diagnoses. Almost 80% of the injuries (348/437) were attributable to overuse, and 20.4% were acute and traumatic injuries (89/437). Ninety-five percent (95.9%) of injuries involved the hip or lower extremity. The most common sites were the foot (33.2%), ankle (22.7%), knee (19.7%), and hip (14.4%). Typical diagnoses were tendon injury (13.3%), apophysitis (11.4%), patellofemoral pain and instability (10.8%), stress injury (10.1%), and muscle injury (7.8%). The majority of traumatic injuries were seen in clinic within 3 weeks, but less than a quarter of overuse injuries were seen that quickly. The most common treatment, prescribed to 84.3% of patients, was physical therapy and home exercises, and the majority of dancers (64.3%) were able to return to full dance activity after injury.

  20. Quantitative differences among EMG activities of muscles innervated by subpopulations of hypoglossal and upper spinal motoneurons during non-REM sleep - REM sleep transitions: a window on neural processes in the sleeping brain.

    PubMed

    Rukhadze, I; Kamani, H; Kubin, L

    2011-12-01

    In the rat, a species widely used to study the neural mechanisms of sleep and motor control, lingual electromyographic activity (EMG) is minimal during non-rapid eye movement (non-REM) sleep and then phasic twitches gradually increase after the onset of REM sleep. To better characterize the central neural processes underlying this pattern, we quantified EMG of muscles innervated by distinct subpopulations of hypoglossal motoneurons and nuchal (N) EMG during transitions from non-REM sleep to REM sleep. In 8 chronically instrumented rats, we recorded cortical EEG, EMG at sites near the base of the tongue where genioglossal and intrinsic muscle fibers predominate (GG-I), EMG of the geniohyoid (GH) muscle, and N EMG. Sleep-wake states were identified and EMGs quantified relative to their mean levels in wakefulness in successive 10 s epochs. During non-REM sleep, the average EMG levels differed among the three muscles, with the order being N>GH>GG-I. During REM sleep, due to different magnitudes of phasic twitches, the order was reversed to GG-I>GH>N. GG-I and GH exhibited a gradual increase of twitching that peaked at 70-120 s after the onset of REM sleep and then declined if the REM sleep episode lasted longer. We propose that a common phasic excitatory generator impinges on motoneuron pools that innervate different muscles, but twitching magnitudes are different due to different levels of tonic motoneuronal hyperpolarization. We also propose that REM sleep episodes of average durations are terminated by intense activity of the central generator of phasic events, whereas long REM sleep episodes end as a result of a gradual waning of the tonic disfacilitatory and inhibitory processes.

  1. Increased spinal reflex excitability is associated with enhanced central activation during voluntary lengthening contractions in human spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyosub E; Corcos, Daniel M; Hornby, T George

    2015-07-01

    This study of chronic incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI) subjects investigated patterns of central motor drive (i.e., central activation) of the plantar flexors using interpolated twitches, and modulation of soleus H-reflexes during lengthening, isometric, and shortening muscle actions. In a recent study of the knee extensors, SCI subjects demonstrated greater central activation ratio (CAR) values during lengthening (i.e., eccentric) maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs), compared with during isometric or shortening (i.e., concentric) MVCs. In contrast, healthy controls demonstrated lower lengthening CAR values compared with their isometric and shortening CARs. For the present investigation, we hypothesized SCI subjects would again produce their highest CAR values during lengthening MVCs, and that these increases in central activation were partially attributable to greater efficacy of Ia-α motoneuron transmission during muscle lengthening following SCI. Results show SCI subjects produced higher CAR values during lengthening vs. isometric or shortening MVCs (all P < 0.001). H-reflex testing revealed normalized H-reflexes (maximal SOL H-reflex-to-maximal M-wave ratios) were greater for SCI than controls during passive (P = 0.023) and active (i.e., 75% MVC; P = 0.017) lengthening, suggesting facilitation of Ia transmission post-SCI. Additionally, measures of spinal reflex excitability (passive lengthening maximal SOL H-reflex-to-maximal M-wave ratio) in SCI were positively correlated with soleus electromyographic activity and CAR values during lengthening MVCs (both P < 0.05). The present study presents evidence that patterns of dynamic muscle activation are altered following SCI, and that greater central activation during lengthening contractions is partly due to enhanced efficacy of Ia-α motoneuron transmission. PMID:25972590

  2. Injuries are not accidents

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, María Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Injuries are the result of an acute exposure to exhort of energy or a consequence of a deficiency in a vital element that exceeds physiological thresholds resulting threatens life. They are classified as intentional or unintentional. Injuries are considered a global health issue because they cause more than 5 million deaths per year worldwide and they are an important contributor to the burden of disease, especially affecting people of low socioeconomic status in low- and middle-income countries. A common misconception exists where injuries are thought to be the same as accidents; however, accidents are largely used as chance events, without taken in consideration that all these are preventable. This review discusses injuries and accidents in the context of road traffic and emphasizes injuries as preventable events. An understanding of the essence of injuries enables the standardization of terminology in public use and facilitates the development of a culture of prevention among all of us. PMID:25386040

  3. Perioperative Organ Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bartels, Karsten; Karhausen, Jörn; Clambey, Eric T.; Grenz, Almut; Eltzschig, Holger K.

    2014-01-01

    In spite of the fact that a surgical procedure may have been performed for the appropriate indication and in a technically perfect manner, patients are threatened by perioperative organ injury. For example, stroke, myocardial infarction, acute respiratory distress syndrome, acute kidney injury, or acute gut injury are among the most common causes for morbidity and mortality in surgical patients. In the present review, we discuss the pathogenesis of perioperative organ injury, and provide select examples for novel treatment concepts that have emerged over the past decade. Indeed, we believe that research to provide mechanistic insight into acute organ injury and to identify novel therapeutic approaches for the prevention or treatment of perioperative organ injury represents the most important opportunity to improve outcomes of anesthesia and surgery. PMID:24126264

  4. Penetrating eye injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Patel, B C

    1989-01-01

    A review of all penetrating eye injuries treated at the Manchester Royal Eye Hospital over four years (1 January 1982-31 December 1985) was undertaken. A total of 202 penetrating eye injuries were seen of which 68 (34%) were in children under the age of 15 years. Airgun, dart, and knife injuries accounted for 28 (41%) of the injuries. Thirty seven patients (54%) achieved a good visual result (6/12 or better) and eight (12%) had enucleations. The period of inpatient treatment ranged from two to 18 days. From the analysis of the activities at the time of the injury, many of the injuries can be considered to be preventable. PMID:2705791

  5. Soccer injuries in children.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Anne

    2009-12-01

    Soccer is the most popular sport in the world, with FIFA recognising more than 265 million amateur players. Despite the fact that soccer is a contact sport, it is perceived to be relatively safe to play, a factor that has contributed to its status as the fastest growing team sport in the USA. Acute and minor injuries predominate in the statistics, with contusions and abrasions being the most commonly recorded. As would be expected, the majority of soccer injuries are to the lower limbs, with serious truncal and spinal trauma being rare. This article examines the type and anatomic location of injuries sustained by children and adolescents who play soccer, and the main mechanisms whereby such injuries occur. The risk factors underpinning injury occurrence are considered, along with injury avoidance tactics.

  6. Injuries in women's basketball.

    PubMed

    Trojian, Thomas H; Ragle, Rosemary B

    2008-03-01

    Women's basketball has changed over time. It is a faster paced game than it was 30 years ago. Greatplayers, like Anne Meyers,who was the first, and only, woman to be signed to an NBA contract, would agree today's game is different. The game is played mostly "below the rim" but with players like Candice Parker, Sylvia Fowles and Maya Moore able to dunk the ball, the game is still changing. The one thing that remains constant in basketball, especially women's basketball, is injury. The majority of injuries in women's basketball are similar to those in men's basketball. Studies at the high school and college level show similar injury rates between women and men. ACL injuries are one exception, with female athletes having atwo to four times higher rate ofACL injuries. In this article, we review the common injuries in women's basketball. We discuss treatment issues and possible preventive measures.

  7. Injuries in Swedish elite basketball.

    PubMed

    Colliander, E; Eriksson, E; Herkel, M; Sköld, P

    1986-02-01

    All Swedish male and female elite basketball players were interviewed concerning their injuries during 1981/1982. Fifty-eight percent of the male and 62% of the female players reported injuries. The injury frequency was 2.5 injuries/1,000 activity-hours in male and 2.85 injuries/1,000 hours of activity in female players. This corresponds to 8.6 injuries/male team/season and 7.5 injuries/female team/season. An ankle twist was the most common injury (52%) while a knee injury was involved in 18%. Prophylactic orthoses for knee and ankle are suggested.

  8. The Possible Role of TASK Channels in Rank-Ordered Recruitment of Motoneurons in the Dorsolateral Part of the Trigeminal Motor Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Keiko; Emura, Norihito; Sato, Hajime; Fukatsu, Yuki; Saito, Mitsuru; Tanaka, Chie; Morita, Yukako; Nishimura, Kayo; Kuramoto, Eriko; Xu Yin, Dong; Furutani, Kazuharu; Okazawa, Makoto; Kurachi, Yoshihisa; Kaneko, Takeshi; Maeda, Yoshinobu; Yamashiro, Takashi; Takada, Kenji; Toyoda, Hiroki; Kang, Youngnam

    2016-01-01

    Because a rank-ordered recruitment of motor units occurs during isometric contraction of jaw-closing muscles, jaw-closing motoneurons (MNs) may be recruited in a manner dependent on their soma sizes or input resistances (IRs). In the dorsolateral part of the trigeminal motor nucleus (dl-TMN) in rats, MNs abundantly express TWIK (two-pore domain weak inwardly rectifying K channel)-related acid-sensitive-K(+) channel (TASK)-1 and TASK3 channels, which determine the IR and resting membrane potential. Here we examined how TASK channels are involved in IR-dependent activation/recruitment of MNs in the rat dl-TMN by using multiple methods. The real-time PCR study revealed that single large MNs (>35 μm) expressed TASK1 and TASK3 mRNAs more abundantly compared with single small MNs (15-20 μm). The immunohistochemistry revealed that TASK1 and TASK3 channels were complementarily distributed in somata and dendrites of MNs, respectively. The density of TASK1 channels seemed to increase with a decrease in soma diameter while there were inverse relationships between the soma size of MNs and IR, resting membrane potential, or spike threshold. Dual whole-cell recordings obtained from smaller and larger MNs revealed that the recruitment of MNs depends on their IRs in response to repetitive stimulation of the presumed Ia afferents. 8-Bromoguanosine-cGMP decreased IRs in small MNs, while it hardly changed those in large MNs, and subsequently decreased the difference in spike-onset latency between the smaller and larger MNs, causing a synchronous activation of MNs. These results suggest that TASK channels play critical roles in rank-ordered recruitment of MNs in the dl-TMN. PMID:27482536

  9. The Possible Role of TASK Channels in Rank-Ordered Recruitment of Motoneurons in the Dorsolateral Part of the Trigeminal Motor Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Keiko; Emura, Norihito; Sato, Hajime; Fukatsu, Yuki; Tanaka, Chie; Morita, Yukako; Nishimura, Kayo; Kuramoto, Eriko; Xu Yin, Dong; Kurachi, Yoshihisa; Kaneko, Takeshi; Maeda, Yoshinobu; Yamashiro, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Because a rank-ordered recruitment of motor units occurs during isometric contraction of jaw-closing muscles, jaw-closing motoneurons (MNs) may be recruited in a manner dependent on their soma sizes or input resistances (IRs). In the dorsolateral part of the trigeminal motor nucleus (dl-TMN) in rats, MNs abundantly express TWIK (two-pore domain weak inwardly rectifying K channel)-related acid-sensitive-K+ channel (TASK)-1 and TASK3 channels, which determine the IR and resting membrane potential. Here we examined how TASK channels are involved in IR-dependent activation/recruitment of MNs in the rat dl-TMN by using multiple methods. The real-time PCR study revealed that single large MNs (>35 μm) expressed TASK1 and TASK3 mRNAs more abundantly compared with single small MNs (15–20 μm). The immunohistochemistry revealed that TASK1 and TASK3 channels were complementarily distributed in somata and dendrites of MNs, respectively. The density of TASK1 channels seemed to increase with a decrease in soma diameter while there were inverse relationships between the soma size of MNs and IR, resting membrane potential, or spike threshold. Dual whole-cell recordings obtained from smaller and larger MNs revealed that the recruitment of MNs depends on their IRs in response to repetitive stimulation of the presumed Ia afferents. 8-Bromoguanosine-cGMP decreased IRs in small MNs, while it hardly changed those in large MNs, and subsequently decreased the difference in spike-onset latency between the smaller and larger MNs, causing a synchronous activation of MNs. These results suggest that TASK channels play critical roles in rank-ordered recruitment of MNs in the dl-TMN. PMID:27482536

  10. Distal Spike Initiation Zone Location Estimation by Morphological Simulation of Ionic Current Filtering Demonstrated in a Novel Model of an Identified Drosophila Motoneuron

    PubMed Central

    Günay, Cengiz; Sieling, Fred H.; Dharmar, Logesh; Lin, Wei-Hsiang; Wolfram, Verena; Marley, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Studying ion channel currents generated distally from the recording site is difficult because of artifacts caused by poor space clamp and membrane filtering. A computational model can quantify artifact parameters for correction by simulating the currents only if their exact anatomical location is known. We propose that the same artifacts that confound current recordings can help pinpoint the source of those currents by providing a signature of the neuron’s morphology. This method can improve the recording quality of currents initiated at the spike initiation zone (SIZ) that are often distal to the soma in invertebrate neurons. Drosophila being a valuable tool for characterizing ion currents, we estimated the SIZ location and quantified artifacts in an identified motoneuron, aCC/MN1-Ib, by constructing a novel multicompartmental model. Initial simulation of the measured biophysical channel properties in an isopotential Hodgkin-Huxley type neuron model partially replicated firing characteristics. Adding a second distal compartment, which contained spike-generating Na+ and K+ currents, was sufficient to simulate aCC’s in vivo activity signature. Matching this signature using a reconstructed morphology predicted that the SIZ is on aCC’s primary axon, 70 μm after the most distal dendritic branching point. From SIZ to soma, we observed and quantified selective morphological filtering of fast activating currents. Non-inactivating K+ currents are filtered ∼3 times less and despite their large magnitude at the soma they could be as distal as Na+ currents. The peak of transient component (NaT) of the voltage-activated Na+ current is also filtered more than the magnitude of slower persistent component (NaP), which can contribute to seizures. The corrected NaP/NaT ratio explains the previously observed discrepancy when the same channel is expressed in different cells. In summary, we used an in vivo signature to estimate ion channel location and recording artifacts

  11. Injuries from hovercraft racing.

    PubMed

    Cattermole, H R

    1997-01-01

    A 31-year-old man presented with a potentially serious neck injury following a racing hovercraft accident. Previous reports of hovercrafting injuries could not be found, and a review of the sport's own records was undertaken. This shows there to be a wide range of injuries sustained from the sport, although most of them are minor. However, there are some worrying trends, and further studies are being undertaking in order to improve the sport's safety record. PMID:9196622

  12. Lap seat belt injuries.

    PubMed

    Hingston, G R

    1996-08-01

    Over a 4 month period, three patients presented acutely to Whangarei Area Hospital after receiving severe abdominal injuries caused directly by lap seat belts. They were involved in road traffic crashes and were all seated in the middle rear seat of the car. The aim of this paper is to alert people to the injuries that can occur from two point lap belts. To this end, the patients and injuries sustained are described and a review of the literature is presented.

  13. Basketball Injuries: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Apple, D F

    1988-12-01

    In brief: Why have basketball injuries escalated? The author points out that before 1960 basketball was largely a no-contact sport. Since then the amount of body contact allowed has increased, players are larger, and more athletes are playing basketball. In addition to these and other possible reasons for the increase in injuries, the author describes common basketball injuries-contusions, sprains, strains, inflammatory conditions, and stress fractures. He also outlines steps for diagnosis and treatment and makes recommendations.

  14. Injury Patterns in Youth Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Barry

    1989-01-01

    Presents statistics on injury patterns in youth sports, recommending that physicians who care for young athletes understand the kinds of injuries likely to be sustained. Awareness of injury patterns helps medical professionals identify variables associated with injury, anticipate or prevent injuries, plan medical coverage, and compare individual…

  15. Penetrating Cardiac Injury: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Lateef Wani, Mohd; Ahangar, Ab Gani; Wani, Shadab Nabi; Irshad, Ifat; Ul-Hassan, Nayeem

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac injury presents a great challenge to the emergency resident because these injuries require urgent intervention to prevent death. Sometimes serious cardiac injury may manifest only subtle or occult symptoms or signs. As there is an epidemic of cardiac injuries in Kashmir valley due to problems of law and order, we herein present a review on management of such injuries. PMID:24829887

  16. Imaging of Physeal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Jawetz, Shari T.; Shah, Parina H.; Potter, Hollis G.

    2015-01-01

    Context: As the intensity of youth participation in athletic activities continues to rise, the number of overuse injuries has also increased. A subset of overuse injuries involves the physis, which is extremely susceptible to injury. This paper aims to review the utility of the various imaging modalities in the diagnosis and management of physeal injuries in the skeletally immature population. Evidence Acquisition: A search for the keywords pediatric, physis, growth plate, x-ray, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and overuse injury was performed using the PubMed database. No limits were set for the years of publication. Articles were reviewed for relevance with an emphasis on the imaging of growth plate injuries. Study Design: Retrospective literature review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: Three major imaging modalities (radiographs, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging) complement each other in the evaluation of pediatric patients with overuse injuries. However, magnetic resonance imaging is the only modality that offers direct visualization of the physis, and it also offers the best soft tissue contrast for evaluating the other periarticular structures for concomitant injury. Conclusion: Imaging has an important role in the diagnosis of physeal injuries, and the information it provides has a tremendous impact on the subsequent management of these patients. PMID:25984260

  17. Acute injuries in Taekwondo.

    PubMed

    Schlüter-Brust, K; Leistenschneider, P; Dargel, J; Springorum, H P; Eysel, P; Michael, J W-P

    2011-08-01

    Although Taekwondo is becoming an increasingly popular sport, there is a lack of reliable epidemiologic data on Taekwondo injuries. To perform an epidemiologic study on the variety of types of injury in professional and amateur Taekwondo athletes and to find a relation between Taekwondo style, skill level, weight-class and warm-up routine and the occurrence of injuries, we analysed the injury data using a 7-page questionnaire from a total of 356 Taekwondo athletes who were randomly selected. Overall, we registered a total of 2,164 injuries in 356 athletes. Most traumas were contusions and sprains in the lower extremities. Professional Taekwondo athletes have an increased risk of injury in comparison to recreational athletes. Taekwondo style, weight class and tournament frequency have an influence on the athlete's injury profile. Warm-up routines were found to have a positive effect on injury rates. Overall, Taekwondo may be considered a rather benign activity, if injuries during Taekwondo tournaments can be avoided. If not, Taekwondo can result in serious musculoskeletal problems.

  18. MUSCLE INJURIES IN ATHLETES

    PubMed Central

    Barroso, Guilherme Campos; Thiele, Edilson Schwansee

    2015-01-01

    This article had the aim of demonstrating the physiology, diagnosis and treatment of muscle injuries, focusing on athletes and their demands and expectations. Muscle injuries are among the most common complaints in orthopedic practice, occurring both among athletes and among non-athletes. These injuries present a challenge for specialists, due to the slow recovery, during which time athletes are unable to take part in training and competitions, and due to frequent sequelae and recurrences of the injuries. Most muscle injuries (between 10% and 55% of all injuries) occur during sports activities. The muscles most commonly affected are the ischiotibial, quadriceps and gastrocnemius. These muscles go across two joints and are more subject to acceleration and deceleration forces. The treatment for muscle injuries varies from conservative treatment to surgery. New procedures are being used, like the hyperbaric chamber and the use of growth factors. However, there is still a high rate of injury recurrence. Muscle injury continues to be a topic of much controversy. New treatments are being researched and developed, but prevention through muscle strengthening, stretching exercises and muscle balance continues to be the best “treatment”. PMID:27027021

  19. Lightning and thermal injuries.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Arthur; Gamelli, Richard L

    2014-01-01

    Electrical burns are classified as either high voltage (1000 volts and higher) or low voltage (<1000 volts). The typical injury with a high-voltage electrical contact is one where subcutaneous fat, muscles, and even bones are injured. Lower voltages may have lesser injuries. The electrical current has the potential to injure via three mechanisms: injury caused by current flow, an arc injury as the current passes from source to an object, and a flame injury caused by ignition of material in the local environment. Different tissues also have different resistance to the conduction of electricity. Voltage, current (amperage), type of current (alternating or direct), path of current flow across the body, duration of contact, and individual susceptibility all determine what final injury will occur. Devitalized tissue must be evaluated and debrided. Ocular cataracts may develop over time following electrical injury. Lightning strikes may conduct millions of volts of electricity, yet the effects can range from minimal cutaneous injuries to significant injury comparable to a high-voltage industrial accident. Lightning strikes commonly result in cardiorespiratory arrest, for which CPR is effective when begun promptly. Neurologic complications from electrical and lightning injuries are highly variable and may present early or late (up to 2 years) after the injury. The prognosis for electricity-related neurologic injuries is generally better than for other types of traumatic causes, suggesting a conservative approach with serial neurologic examinations after an initial CT scan to rule out correctable causes. One of the most common complications of electrical injury is a cardiac dysrhythmia. Because of the potential for large volumes of muscle loss and the release of myoglobin, the presence of heme pigments in the urine must be evaluated promptly. Presence of these products of breakdown of myoglobin and hemoglobin puts the injured at risk for acute renal failure and must be

  20. Lightning and thermal injuries.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Arthur; Gamelli, Richard L

    2014-01-01

    Electrical burns are classified as either high voltage (1000 volts and higher) or low voltage (<1000 volts). The typical injury with a high-voltage electrical contact is one where subcutaneous fat, muscles, and even bones are injured. Lower voltages may have lesser injuries. The electrical current has the potential to injure via three mechanisms: injury caused by current flow, an arc injury as the current passes from source to an object, and a flame injury caused by ignition of material in the local environment. Different tissues also have different resistance to the conduction of electricity. Voltage, current (amperage), type of current (alternating or direct), path of current flow across the body, duration of contact, and individual susceptibility all determine what final injury will occur. Devitalized tissue must be evaluated and debrided. Ocular cataracts may develop over time following electrical injury. Lightning strikes may conduct millions of volts of electricity, yet the effects can range from minimal cutaneous injuries to significant injury comparable to a high-voltage industrial accident. Lightning strikes commonly result in cardiorespiratory arrest, for which CPR is effective when begun promptly. Neurologic complications from electrical and lightning injuries are highly variable and may present early or late (up to 2 years) after the injury. The prognosis for electricity-related neurologic injuries is generally better than for other types of traumatic causes, suggesting a conservative approach with serial neurologic examinations after an initial CT scan to rule out correctable causes. One of the most common complications of electrical injury is a cardiac dysrhythmia. Because of the potential for large volumes of muscle loss and the release of myoglobin, the presence of heme pigments in the urine must be evaluated promptly. Presence of these products of breakdown of myoglobin and hemoglobin puts the injured at risk for acute renal failure and must be

  1. Burn injury in children.

    PubMed

    Zámecníková, I; Stĕtinský, J; Tymonová, J; Kadlcík, M

    2005-01-01

    The authors have analyzed the data files of 580 child patients up to 15 years of age who were hospitalized at the Burn Center of the FNsP Hospital in Ostrava in the years 1999 - 2003. The authors focused on mechanisms of burn injury in relation to the age of a child as well as extent, depth, localization, and local treatment of the injury. The data file was divided to four age groups: up to two years of age, 2 - 5 years of age, 5 - 10 years of age, and 10 - 15 years of age. As regards the mechanisms of injury, the authors have analyzed scalding by hot liquids, burns due to contact with a hot object, burns due to electric current, explosion, and injury caused by burning clothing. Injury by scalding prevails to a very significant degree in the youngest children. In the second age group the incidence of burn following contact with hot objects increases, as does the percentage of children injured by burning of clothing in children aged 5 - 10. The older children have increased prevalence of injuries caused by explosions. The greatest average extent of an injury is from burning of clothing. Most of the areas are burned deeply, localized in more areas of the body, and almost half of the cases required surgical intervention. Scalding comes second in terms of average extent of an injury. More than half of the injured areas are superficial, and areas of injury are different in the individual age groups. We addressed about a fifth of the cases surgically. The explosion of combustible materials caused a smaller extent of injury, on average, taking third place. The injuries were predominantly superficial, most commonly involving the head, trunk, and upper extremities. In none of the cases it was necessary for us to operate. Burn injuries caused by contact with hot objects are of a smaller extent. More than half of the burned areas are deep, localized most commonly in the upper extremities. Surgical intervention was necessary in more than half the cases. In terms of average

  2. Hand injuries as an indicator of other associated severe injuries.

    PubMed

    Vossoughi, Faranak; Krantz, Brent; Fann, Stephen

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the incidence of disabling or life-threatening injuries in patients with hand injuries. Retrospective data were collected from a level 1 trauma center registry. A total of 472 patients with hand injuries were admitted to the trauma unit between January 2000 and March 2004. Forty-four per cent of patients with hand injuries had life-threatening injuries. Fifty-one per cent of them had motor vehicle crash-related injuries. Motorcycle crashes were the next most common cause followed by explosions, falls, gunshots, machinery, stabs, bites, crushes, and so on. Frequency of associated injuries was as follows: head injuries, 31 per cent, including skull fractures, 22 per cent; spine injuries, 18 per cent, including spine fractures 18 per cent; chest injuries, 36 per cent, including rib fractures, 15 per cent; and abdominal injuries, 13 per cent. The authors focused on the incidence of disabling or life-threatening injuries in patients with hand injuries. Motor vehicle crashes were most common cause of hand injuries. The most common organs to be injured were chest and head. The most common head injury was skull fracture. Other injuries in decreasing order were spine and rib fractures. These data may be helpful in assessing ambulatory patients in the emergency room, in those hand injuries maybe indicative of other simultaneous life-threatening or disabling injuries.

  3. Injury Free Coalition for Kids

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sites Awards Safety Resources Staff Donate Online! Injury Free News The Great Trade-In Event Returns to ... Free Site -- Injury Free Call for Proposals Injury Free is supported by the generous contributions of organizations ...

  4. What Are Growth Plate Injuries?

    MedlinePlus

    ... activities. Other reasons for growth plate injuries are:  Child abuse  Injury from extreme cold (for example, frostbite)  Radiation ( ... problems) treats most growth plate injuries. At other times, the child will see a pediatric orthopaedic surgeon (a doctor ...

  5. What Are Growth Plate Injuries?

    MedlinePlus

    ... activities. Other reasons for growth plate injuries are: Child abuse Injury from extreme cold (for example, frostbite) Radiation ( ... problems) treats most growth plate injuries. At other times, the child will see a pediatric orthopaedic surgeon (a doctor ...

  6. Conquering Athletic Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Paul M., Ed.; Taylor, Diane K., Ed.

    The purpose of this book is to be a source of complete, reliable, and practical sports medicine information. Experts from the American Running and Fitness Association describe in clear language how overuse injuries occur, how to recognize and self-treat them, when to seek professional help, and how to prevent future injuries. The book also…

  7. Severe chainsaw injuries.

    PubMed

    Macfarlane, I; Harry, N

    1977-04-01

    A survey of 47 patients who sustained severe chainsaw injuries has been carried out. It shows that this machine, while an extremely useful one, is hazardous. Most of the patients were young, and over half of the injuries involved a hand. One fatality was recorded.

  8. Epidemiology of waterskiing injuries.

    PubMed

    Banta, J V

    1979-06-01

    Coast Guard statistics indicate a national boating fatality rate of 9.6 deaths per 100,000 crafts. In 1977 in California, five fatalities and 70 serious injuries were directly attributable to waterskiing. The four cases reported here include three patients with propeller injuries, including one nearly fatal amputation. In each case basic measures for boating safety were overlooked.

  9. Management of Tracheobronchial Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Altinok, Tamer; Can, Atilla

    2014-01-01

    Tracheobronchial injury is one of cases which are relatively uncommon, but must be suspected to make the diagnosis and managed immediately. In such a case, primary initial goals are to stabilize the airway and localize the injury and then determine its extend. These can be possible mostly with flexible bronchoscopy conducted by a surgeon who can repair the injury. Most of the penetrating injuries occur in the cervical region. On the other hand, most of the blunt injuries occur in the distal trachea and right main bronchus and they can be best approached by right posterolateral thoracotomy. The selection of the manner and time of approaching depends on the existence and severity of additional injuries. Most of the injuries can be restored by deploying simple techniques such as individual sutures, while some of them requires complex reconstruction techniques. Apart from paying attention to the pulmonary toilet, follow-up is crucial for determination of anastomotic technique or stenosis. Conservative treatment may be considered an option with a high probability of success in patients meeting the criteria, especially in patients with iatrogenic tracheobronchial injury. PMID:25610327

  10. Healing of Genital Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkowitz, Carol D.

    2011-01-01

    Child sexual abuse as well as accidental trauma may cause acute injuries in the anogenital area. Most data on residual findings following genital trauma come from longitudinal studies of children who have been sexually assaulted, undergone surgical procedures, or experienced accidental trauma. Like injuries in other part parts of the body, such…

  11. Injuries in Preschool Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obeng, Cecilia

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The primary purpose of this paper is to examine the kinds of injuries that preschool teachers working in Indiana, USA, believed to be the most common in their preschool (3-6 year olds) classrooms, the causes of such injuries, and the most important precautions they take to prevent them. Also examined are the measures the teachers take…

  12. Preventing Eye Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Injuries Reviewed by: Brenda Pagan-Duran MD Mar. 01, 2016 Protecting your eyes from injury is one of the most basic things you can do to keep your vision healthy throughout your life. You may be somewhat aware of the possible ...

  13. Sports injuries and society.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    Injuries are classified and examples of the ways in which they can arise are given. Treatment, rehabilitation and the value of exercise are considered. A review of the effects of increasing leisure time and sports have been given, the value of legislation, education, protective clothing and close supervision in preventing the occurrence of injuries in sport is discussed. Images p80-a PMID:7248691

  14. Traumatic Brain Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... a concussion may feel dazed and may lose vision or balance for a while after the injury A brain contusion is a bruise of the brain. This ... consciousness Headache Confusion Feeling dizzy or lightheaded Blurry vision ... or severe traumatic brain injury include all of the symptoms listed above ...

  15. Wrist injuries in sport.

    PubMed

    Howse, C

    1994-03-01

    The wrist is a complex joint that biomechanically transmits forces generated at the hand through to the forearm. The radial side of the wrist carries 80% of the axial load and the ulnar side the remaining 20% of the load. The incidence of wrist (and hand) injuries in the sporting population is approximately 25%. This tends to be higher in those sports using the hand and wrist, and when the potential for trauma is present. The injuries are divided into 4 categories: overuse, nerve (and vascular), traumatic, and weight-bearing injuries. Overuse injuries are common in sports involving the hand and wrist, such as racquet sports, netball, basketball and volleyball. Nerve injuries are more commonly compressive neuropathies, and are seen with cyclists who may compress the ulnar nerve in Guyon's canal. Vascular injuries are uncommon and usually result from a high velocity impact from balls. Traumatic injuries are the most common and are due to either a fall on to the wrist, a direct blow, or combination of a rotatory and torsional force. The weight-bearing injuries are more specific to gymnastics, and result from repetitive excessive compressive and rotational forces across the wrist. The pommel horse event is associated with a high incidence of wrist pain in male competitors. Arthroscopy of the wrist provides direct inspection of intra-articular structures and diagnosis of conditions that may be unclear with other investigations. As techniques advance, more conditions may be treated arthroscopically and potentially facilitate an earlier return to sport.

  16. Prevention of pediatric sports injuries.

    PubMed

    Demorest, Rebecca A; Landry, Gregory L

    2003-12-01

    With over 30 million children participating in sports each year across the United States, a number of significant injuries are to be expected. Although mild injuries such as strains, sprains, and contusions predominate, catastrophic injuries do occur. Young athletes are at an increased risk for growth plate and apophyseal injuries, overuse injuries, and heat illness. Many of these sports injuries can be prevented. Prevention strategies include protective equipment, rule changes, preseason and season prevention interventions, safety measures, better coaching, education, and a societal awareness of injury and prevention. This article discusses current injury prevention for children participating in baseball, football, soccer, and ice hockey.

  17. Mole gun injury.

    PubMed

    Pistré, V; Rezzouk, J

    2013-09-01

    A mole gun is a weapon, which is used to trap and kill moles. This report provides an overview of the state of knowledge of mole gun injuries, comparable to blast injuries caused by fireworks, explosive or gunshot. Over a 2-year period, the authors reported their experience with ten hand injuries caused by mole gun. Radial side of the hand was often concerned, particularly the thumb. The authors explain their choices in the management of such lesions. Surgery was performed primarily and a large debridement currently seemed to offer the best outcome for the patient. Blast, crush, burns and lacerations may explain the higher rate of amputation to the digits. A long period of physiotherapy, specifically of the hand, was needed before the patient could return to work. This ballistic hand trauma encountered by surgeons requires knowledge and understanding of these injuries. It should be in accordance with firearms law because of severe injuries encountered and possible lethal wounds. PMID:23746826

  18. Mole gun injury.

    PubMed

    Pistré, V; Rezzouk, J

    2013-09-01

    A mole gun is a weapon, which is used to trap and kill moles. This report provides an overview of the state of knowledge of mole gun injuries, comparable to blast injuries caused by fireworks, explosive or gunshot. Over a 2-year period, the authors reported their experience with ten hand injuries caused by mole gun. Radial side of the hand was often concerned, particularly the thumb. The authors explain their choices in the management of such lesions. Surgery was performed primarily and a large debridement currently seemed to offer the best outcome for the patient. Blast, crush, burns and lacerations may explain the higher rate of amputation to the digits. A long period of physiotherapy, specifically of the hand, was needed before the patient could return to work. This ballistic hand trauma encountered by surgeons requires knowledge and understanding of these injuries. It should be in accordance with firearms law because of severe injuries encountered and possible lethal wounds.

  19. [Epidemiology of basketball injuries].

    PubMed

    Engel, J; Baharav, U; Modan, M

    1990-09-01

    The players of an elite basketball team were followed during the course of a season which included 71 games and 250 training sessions. All injuries were noted and were correlated with age, height and other physical parameters of the players, as well as with degree of fatigue during games and during training sessions. The lower extremity was the most common site of injury. Ligamentous injuries of the knee are more common in basketball than in soccer players, but they have fewer meniscal injuries than the latter. However, the upper extremity, especially the hand, is more frequently injured in basketball than in other sports. The age, height and personality of the player affect the injury pattern.

  20. Prevention of youth injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Laraque, D.; Barlow, B.; Durkin, M.

    1999-01-01

    There are four categories of causes responsible for the majority of injuries in youth 10-19 years of age: 1) motor vehicle traffic; 2) violence (intra-familial, extra-familial, self, pregnancy-related); 3) recreational; and 4) occupational. This article presents data from the National Center for Health Statistics mortality data and the National Pediatric Trauma Registry morbidity data. Nationwide, the pediatric injury death rate is highest among adolescents 15-19 years of age. Motor vehicle-related deaths account for 41% and firearm-related deaths account for 36% of injury deaths in this age group. For youths aged 10-14 years, motor vehicle-related deaths account for 38% and; firearm-related deaths account for 26% of injury deaths. For both age groups, occupant motor vehicle-related deaths account for the majority of deaths and underscore the need for seat belt use. Using theoretical principles based on the Haddon matrix and a knowledge of adolescent development, proposed interventions to decrease injuries and deaths related to motor vehicles and firearms include graduated licensing, occupant restraint, speed limits, conflict resolution, and gun control. Occupational injuries, particularly injury associated with agricultural production, account for an estimated 100,000 injuries per year. Preventive strategies include OSHA regulations imposing standards for protective devices and further study for guidelines for adolescent work in agriculture. Injuries related to recreation include drowning and sports injuries. Preventive strategies may include proper supervision and risk reduction with respect to use of alcohol/drugs. The data presented support the use of primary prevention to achieve the most effective, safe community interventions targeting adolescents. PMID:10599188

  1. Muscle strain injuries.

    PubMed

    Garrett, W E

    1996-01-01

    One of the most common injuries seen in the office of the practicing physician is the muscle strain. Until recently, little data were available on the basic science and clinical application of this basic science for the treatment and prevention of muscle strains. Studies in the last 10 years represent action taken on the direction of investigation into muscle strain injuries from the laboratory and clinical fronts. Findings from the laboratory indicate that certain muscles are susceptible to strain injury (muscles that cross multiple joints or have complex architecture). These muscles have a strain threshold for both passive and active injury. Strain injury is not the result of muscle contraction alone, rather, strains are the result of excessive stretch or stretch while the muscle is being activated. When the muscle tears, the damage is localized very near the muscle-tendon junction. After injury, the muscle is weaker and at risk for further injury. The force output of the muscle returns over the following days as the muscle undertakes a predictable progression toward tissue healing. Current imaging studies have been used clinically to document the site of injury to the muscle-tendon junction. The commonly injured muscles have been described and include the hamstring, the rectus femoris, gastrocnemius, and adductor longus muscles. Injuries inconsistent with involvement of a single muscle-tendon junction proved to be at tendinous origins rather than within the muscle belly. Important information has also been provided regarding injuries with poor prognosis, which are potentially repairable surgically, including injuries to the rectus femoris muscle, the hamstring origin, and the abdominal wall. Data important to the management of common muscle injuries have been published. The risks of reinjury have been documented. The early efficacy and potential for long-term risks of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents have been shown. New data can also be applied to the field

  2. Sports injuries and adolescent athletes.

    PubMed

    Axe, M J; Newcomb, W A; Warner, D

    1991-06-01

    A one-year study was undertaken investigating adolescent sports injury experiences at a major sports clinic in the state of Delaware. A total of 619 athletes sustained 870 injuries, for an overall injury rate of 1.4 injuries per athlete. The largest number of injuries was recorded in football (40.2 percent), followed by boys' soccer, wrestling, baseball and girls' basketball. Severity of injury was measured by the number of days lost per injury. Cheerleading had the highest average days lost per injury (28.8), followed by girls' basketball, wrestling, boys' cross-country and girls' tennis. Inflammation, fractures and dislocations comprised 50.6 percent of all the injuries, while 50.5 percent of the injuries were located in the knee, thigh, and shoulder. Twenty-seven of the 870 injuries required surgery. PMID:1874345

  3. Sports injuries and adolescent athletes.

    PubMed

    Axe, M J; Newcomb, W A; Warner, D

    1991-06-01

    A one-year study was undertaken investigating adolescent sports injury experiences at a major sports clinic in the state of Delaware. A total of 619 athletes sustained 870 injuries, for an overall injury rate of 1.4 injuries per athlete. The largest number of injuries was recorded in football (40.2 percent), followed by boys' soccer, wrestling, baseball and girls' basketball. Severity of injury was measured by the number of days lost per injury. Cheerleading had the highest average days lost per injury (28.8), followed by girls' basketball, wrestling, boys' cross-country and girls' tennis. Inflammation, fractures and dislocations comprised 50.6 percent of all the injuries, while 50.5 percent of the injuries were located in the knee, thigh, and shoulder. Twenty-seven of the 870 injuries required surgery.

  4. Triathlon related musculoskeletal injuries: the status of injury prevention knowledge.

    PubMed

    Gosling, Cameron McR; Gabbe, Belinda J; Forbes, Andrew B

    2008-07-01

    Triathlon is a popular participation sport that combines swimming, cycling and running into a single event. A number of studies have investigated the incidence of injury, profile of injuries sustained and factors contributing to triathlon injury. This paper summarises the published literature in the context of the evidence base for the prevention of triathlon related injuries. Relevant articles on triathlon injuries were sourced from peer-reviewed English language journals and assessed using the Translating Research into Injury Prevention Practice (TRIPP) framework. This review highlights the significant knowledge gap that exists in the published literature describing the incidence of injury, the profile of injuries sustained and evidence for the prevention of injury in triathlon. Despite the number of studies undertaken to address TRIPP Stages 1 and 2 (injury surveillance, aetiology and mechanism of injury), most triathlon studies have been limited by retrospective designs with substantial, and unvalidated, recall periods, inconsistency in the definitions used for a reportable injury and exposure to injury, or a failure to capture exposure data at all. Overall, the paucity of quality, prospective studies investigating the incidence of injury in triathlon and factors contributing to their occurrence has led to an inability to adequately inform the development of injury prevention strategies (TRIPP Stages 3-6) for this sport, a situation that must be rectified if gains are to be made in reducing the burden of triathlon related injury.

  5. Power lawnmower injuries.

    PubMed

    Robertson, William W

    2003-04-01

    Power lawnmowers are among the most ubiquitous household tools, yet they pose significant danger to operator and bystanders. Despite of the United States Consumer Products Safety Commission's push to have safety standards established for walk-behind mowers in 1982 and for ride-on mowers in 1986, by 2000 approximately 80,000 injuries nationwide were estimated to be associated with power mowers. Large numbers of these injuries are thought to be preventable, especially those to individuals younger than 14 years. Orthopaedic surgeons treat a significant number of the injuries associated with mower use including lacerations, amputations, fractures, infections, and skin defects. Therefore, the orthopaedic community has a stake in the prevention and outcome of these injuries. To date, changes in mower design have seemed to be more successful than user education programs in decreasing the numbers of these injuries. Involving orthopaedists in safety education programs to help prevent injuries associated with power mower use may be one method of increasing user knowledge and preventing injury. PMID:12671483

  6. Recovery of sensorimotor function and activities of daily living after cervical spinal cord injury: the influence of age.

    PubMed

    Wirz, Markus; Dietz, Volker

    2015-02-01

    This retrospective study was designed to examine the influence of age on the outcome of motor function and activities of daily living (ADLs) in patients with a cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). The study is based on the data registry of the European Multicenter Study of Spinal Cord Injury (EMSCI) study group. Initial upper-extremity motor score (UEMS) and its change over 5 months, as well as the initial Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM) score, did not differ between younger adults (20-39 years) and elderly (60-79 years) patients. However, the change in SCIM score over 5 months was significantly greater in the younger patient group. Initial UEMS, SCIM, and ulnar compound motor action potentials (CMAP), reflecting peripheral nerve damage (motoneurons and roots), were significantly greater in incomplete, compared to complete, SCI, regardless of age group. The initial assessment of UEMS in combination with CMAP recordings allows an early prediction of ADLs outcomes in both younger adults and elderly subjects. The impaired translation of gain in motor score into increased ADL independence in elderly patients requires specifically tailored rehabilitation programs.

  7. Skateboard and scooter injuries.

    PubMed

    2002-03-01

    Skateboard-related injuries account for an estimated 50 000 emergency department visits and 1500 hospitalizations among children and adolescents in the United States each year. Nonpowered scooter-related injuries accounted for an estimated 9400 emergency department visits between January and August 2000, and 90% of these patients were children younger than 15 years. Many such injuries can be avoided if children and youth do not ride in traffic, if proper protective gear is worn, and if, in the absence of close adult supervision, skateboards and scooters are not used by children younger than 10 and 8 years, respectively.

  8. [Skateboard injuries (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Stürz, H; Rosemeyer, B

    1979-04-01

    Following the introduction of skateboards into Germany in 1976 an increasing number of accidents and injuries have been noted, affecting mainly children 10 to 14 years of age. The causes were lack of experience and the careless use of the boards on public streets. More than 30% of injuries were fractures mainly affecting the upper limb. Because of the frequent involvement of the epiphyseal plates the post-accidental growth may be seriously disturbed. Severe and sometimes fatal head or abdominal injuries have been reported, mainly after collision with cars.

  9. Closed kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Viola, Tracey A

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the prevalence of blunt renal trauma and the nature of the problem, including the risk of renal injury with sports participation and epidemiology. Patient history of mechanism of injury, as well as examination findings, will risk-stratify patients to determine who needs immediate surgical intervention, who requires imaging, and what patients do not need further imaging. Computed tomography is readily available, fast, and accurate in the diagnosis of renal injury. Discussion of the athlete with congenital renal disease and the solitary kidney concludes this article.

  10. Gunshot and Explosion Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Peleg, Kobi; Aharonson-Daniel, Limor; Stein, Michael; Michaelson, Moshe; Kluger, Yoram; Simon, Daniel; Noji, Eric K.

    2004-01-01

    Context: An increase of terror-related activities may necessitate treatment of mass casualty incidents, requiring a broadening of existing skills and knowledge of various injury mechanisms. Objective: To characterize and compare injuries from gunshot and explosion caused by terrorist acts. Methods: A retrospective cohort study of patients recorded in the Israeli National Trauma Registry (ITR), all due to terror-related injuries, between October 1, 2000, to June 30, 2002. The ITR records all casualty admissions to hospitals, in-hospital deaths, and transfers at 9 of the 23 trauma centers in Israel. All 6 level I trauma centers and 3 of the largest regional trauma centers in the country are included. The registry includes the majority of severe terror-related injuries. Injury diagnoses, severity scores, hospital resource utilization parameters, length of stay (LOS), survival, and disposition. Results: A total of 1155 terror-related injuries: 54% by explosion, 36% gunshot wounds (GSW), and 10% by other means. This paper focused on the 2 larger patient subsets: 1033 patients injured by terror-related explosion or GSW. Seventy-one percent of the patients were male, 84% in the GSW group and 63% in the explosion group. More than half (53%) of the patients were 15 to 29 years old, 59% in the GSW group and 48% in the explosion group. GSW patients suffered higher proportions of open wounds (63% versus 53%) and fractures (42% versus 31%). Multiple body-regions injured in a single patient occurred in 62% of explosion victims versus 47% in GSW patients. GSW patients had double the proportion of moderate injuries than explosion victims. Explosion victims have a larger proportion of minor injuries on one hand and critical to fatal injuries on the other. LOS was longer than 2 weeks for 20% (22% in explosion, 18% in GSW). Fifty-one percent of the patients underwent a surgical procedure, 58% in the GSW group and 46% in explosion group. Inpatient death rate was 6.3% (65 patients), 7

  11. Recreational scuba diving injuries.

    PubMed

    Clenney, T L; Lassen, L F

    1996-04-01

    Because of the increasing popularity of recreational scuba diving, primary care physicians should be familiar with common diving injuries. One form of barotrauma, middle ear squeeze, is the most common diving injury. Other important diving injuries include inner ear barotrauma and pulmonary barotrauma. Arterial gas embolism, a potentially life-threatening form of pulmonary barotrauma, requires hyperbaric treatment. Decompression sickness is the result of bubble formation in body tissue. Symptoms of decompression sickness range from joint pain to neurologic or pulmonary problems. Recompression is the mainstay of treatment.

  12. Fast pitch softball injuries.

    PubMed

    Meyers, M C; Brown, B R; Bloom, J A

    2001-01-01

    The popularity of fast pitch softball in the US and throughout the world is well documented. Along with this popularity, there has been a concomitant increase in the number of injuries. Nearly 52% of cases qualify as major disabling injuries requiring 3 weeks or more of treatment and 2% require surgery. Interestingly, 75% of injuries occur during away games and approximately 31% of traumas occur during nonpositional and conditioning drills. Injuries range from contusions and tendinitis to ligamentous disorders and fractures. Although head and neck traumas account for 4 to 12% of cases, upper extremity traumas account for 23 to 47% of all injuries and up to 19% of cases involve the knee. Approximately 34 to 42% of injuries occur when the athlete collides with another individual or object. Other factors involved include the quality of playing surface, athlete's age and experience level, and the excessive physical demands associated with the sport. Nearly 24% of injuries involve base running and are due to poor judgement, sliding technique, current stationary base design, unorthodox joint and extremity position during ground impact and catching of cleats. The increasing prevalence of overtraining syndrome among athletes has been attributed to an unclear definition of an optimal training zone, poor communication between player and coach, and the limited ability of bone and connective tissue to quickly respond to match the demands of the sport. This has led routinely to arm, shoulder and lumbar instability, chronic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use and time loss injuries in 45% of pitching staff during a single season. Specific attention to a safer playing environment, coaching and player education, and sport-specific training and conditioning would reduce the risk, rate and severity of fast pitch traumas. Padding of walls, backstops, rails and dugout areas, as well as minimising use of indoor facilities, is suggested to decrease the number of collision

  13. Fast pitch softball injuries.

    PubMed

    Meyers, M C; Brown, B R; Bloom, J A

    2001-01-01

    The popularity of fast pitch softball in the US and throughout the world is well documented. Along with this popularity, there has been a concomitant increase in the number of injuries. Nearly 52% of cases qualify as major disabling injuries requiring 3 weeks or more of treatment and 2% require surgery. Interestingly, 75% of injuries occur during away games and approximately 31% of traumas occur during nonpositional and conditioning drills. Injuries range from contusions and tendinitis to ligamentous disorders and fractures. Although head and neck traumas account for 4 to 12% of cases, upper extremity traumas account for 23 to 47% of all injuries and up to 19% of cases involve the knee. Approximately 34 to 42% of injuries occur when the athlete collides with another individual or object. Other factors involved include the quality of playing surface, athlete's age and experience level, and the excessive physical demands associated with the sport. Nearly 24% of injuries involve base running and are due to poor judgement, sliding technique, current stationary base design, unorthodox joint and extremity position during ground impact and catching of cleats. The increasing prevalence of overtraining syndrome among athletes has been attributed to an unclear definition of an optimal training zone, poor communication between player and coach, and the limited ability of bone and connective tissue to quickly respond to match the demands of the sport. This has led routinely to arm, shoulder and lumbar instability, chronic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use and time loss injuries in 45% of pitching staff during a single season. Specific attention to a safer playing environment, coaching and player education, and sport-specific training and conditioning would reduce the risk, rate and severity of fast pitch traumas. Padding of walls, backstops, rails and dugout areas, as well as minimising use of indoor facilities, is suggested to decrease the number of collision

  14. Epidemiology of paediatric injury.

    PubMed Central

    Mazurek, A J

    1994-01-01

    Thousands of young lives are lost every year as a result of accidents, and trauma remains the number one cause of paediatric death. There is a pattern and regularity to children's injury: boys are more often victims than the girls, most injuries occur during the summer months, the pedestrian child has usually been the victim of a road traffic accident (RTA) and, in 75% of these cases, has suffered head injury. The research into paediatric trauma is still very young. For instance, socio-economic and ethnic factors play a significant role in the statistics of accidental death. In order to take effective preventative measures more factors must be determined. PMID:7921561

  15. Catastrophic pediatric sports injuries.

    PubMed

    Luckstead, Eugene F; Patel, Dilip R

    2002-06-01

    The high school sports of wrestling, gymnastics, ice hockey, baseball, track, and cheerleading should receive closer attention to prevent injury. Safer equipment and sport-specific conditioning should be provided and injuries strictly monitored. Greater attention must also be paid to swimming and diving techniques, and continued observation is needed for heat stroke and heat intolerance in sports such as football, wrestling, basketball, track and field, and cross-country. An increased awareness of commotio cordis in sports other than baseball should include ice hockey, football, track field events, and lacrosse. American football because of the sheer numbers and associated catastrophic injury potential must continue to be monitored at the highest medical levels!

  16. Injuries in Elite Figure Skaters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Robert M.; Striowski, Catherine C.

    1986-01-01

    A questionnaire was used to examine the number, nature, and etiology of injuries to 60 Canadian nationally ranked figure skaters over a one-year period. Twenty-eight of the respondents reported having a significant injury during the year. Forty-three percent of the injuries were overuse injuries. (MT)

  17. Prevention and Control of Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuchfarber, Barbara S.; Zins, Joseph E.; Jason, Leonard A.

    Childhood injury continues to be a major public health crisis in the United States, with a large percentage of injuries being preventable and controllable. This chapter provides information related to understanding child and youth injury. Studies have shown that injuries affect identifiable high-risk groups. Such host factors that put children at…

  18. Adjustment to Spinal Cord Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... of injury are alive and easily get educational information on the Internet. Web happy. sites such as the National Spinal Cord Injury Association (www.spinalcord.org) and SPINAL CORD Injury ♦ “Because of my injury, it is now impossible for me Information Network (www.spinalcord.uab.edu) have to ever ...

  19. Facial injuries in basketball players.

    PubMed

    Guyette, R F

    1993-04-01

    As the popularity of basketball increases and the style of the game becomes more physical, there is an increasing number of basketball-related injuries. Although most facial injuries sustained while playing basketball are relatively minor, severe and permanent injuries do occur. This article reviews the most common facial injuries incurred by basketball players with emphasis on diagnosis, early treatment, and prevention.

  20. Depression of involuntary activity in muscles paralyzed by spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Butler, Jane E; Godfrey, Sharlene; Thomas, Christine K

    2006-05-01

    Involuntary muscle contractions are common after spinal cord injury (SCI). Increased sensitivity to Ia muscle afferent input may contribute to the development of these spasms. Since tendon vibration results in a period of postactivation depression of the Ia synapse, we sought to determine whether Achilles tendon vibration (80 HZ for 2 s) altered involuntary contractions evoked by superficial peroneal nerve (SPN) stimulation (5 pulses at 300 HZ) in paralyzed leg muscles of subjects with chronic (>1 year) SCI. Responses to SPN stimulation that were conditioned by vibration were reduced in 66% of trials (by 33+/-12% in tibialis anterior and 40+/-16% in soleus). These reductions in electromyographic activity are unlikely to be mediated by changes at the Ia synapse or motoneuron because vibration did not alter the magnitude of the soleus H reflex. The electromyographic reductions may involve long-lasting neuromodulatory effects on spinal inhibitory interneurons or synapses involved in the flexor reflex pathway. Vibration-evoked depression of electromyographic activity may be clinically useful in controlling involuntary muscle contractions after SCI. PMID:16421880

  1. Delivery of Alginate Scaffold Releasing Two Trophic Factors for Spinal Cord Injury Repair

    PubMed Central

    Grulova, I.; Slovinska, L.; Blaško, J.; Devaux, S.; Wisztorski, M.; Salzet, M.; Fournier, I.; Kryukov, O.; Cohen, S.; Cizkova, D.

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) has been implicated in neural cell loss and consequently functional motor and sensory impairment. In this study, we propose an alginate -based neurobridge enriched with/without trophic growth factors (GFs) that can be utilized as a therapeutic approach for spinal cord repair. The bioavailability of key GFs, such as Epidermal Growth factor (EGF) and basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (bFGF) released from injected alginate biomaterial to the central lesion site significantly enhanced the sparing of spinal cord tissue and increased the number of surviving neurons (choline acetyltransferase positive motoneurons) and sensory fibres. In addition, we document enhanced outgrowth of corticospinal tract axons and presence of blood vessels at the central lesion. Tissue proteomics was performed at 3, 7 and 10 days after SCI in rats indicated the presence of anti-inflammatory factors in segments above the central lesion site, whereas in segments below, neurite outgrowth factors, inflammatory cytokines and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan of the lectican protein family were overexpressed. Collectively, based on our data, we confirm that functional recovery was significantly improved in SCI groups receiving alginate scaffold with affinity-bound growth factors (ALG +GFs), compared to SCI animals without biomaterial treatment. PMID:26348665

  2. Unilateral microinjection of acrolein into thoracic spinal cord produces acute and chronic injury and functional deficits.

    PubMed

    Gianaris, Alexander; Liu, Nai-Kui; Wang, Xiao-Fei; Oakes, Eddie; Brenia, John; Gianaris, Thomas; Ruan, Yiwen; Deng, Ling-Xiao; Goetz, Maria; Vega-Alvarez, Sasha; Lu, Qing-Bo; Shi, Riyi; Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2016-06-21

    Although lipid peroxidation has long been associated with spinal cord injury (SCI), the specific role of lipid peroxidation-derived byproducts such as acrolein in mediating damage remains to be fully understood. Acrolein, an α-β unsaturated aldehyde, is highly reactive with proteins, DNA, and phospholipids and is considered as a second toxic messenger that disseminates and augments initial free radical events. Previously, we showed that acrolein increased following traumatic SCI and injection of acrolein induced tissue damage. Here, we demonstrate that microinjection of acrolein into the thoracic spinal cord of adult rats resulted in dose-dependent tissue damage and functional deficits. At 24h (acute) after the microinjection, tissue damage, motoneuron loss, and spinal cord swelling were observed on sections stained with Cresyl Violet. Luxol fast blue staining further showed that acrolein injection resulted in dose-dependent demyelination. At 8weeks (chronic) after the microinjection, cord shrinkage, astrocyte activation, and macrophage infiltration were observed along with tissue damage, neuron loss, and demyelination. These pathological changes resulted in behavioral impairments as measured by both the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor rating scale and grid walking analysis. Electron microscopy further demonstrated that acrolein induced axonal degeneration, demyelination, and macrophage infiltration. These results, combined with our previous reports, strongly suggest that acrolein may play a critical causal role in the pathogenesis of SCI and that targeting acrolein could be an attractive strategy for repair after SCI. PMID:27058147

  3. Motor imagery reinforces brain compensation of reach-to-grasp movement after cervical spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Mateo, Sébastien; Di Rienzo, Franck; Bergeron, Vance; Guillot, Aymeric; Collet, Christian; Rode, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) that causes tetraplegia are challenged with dramatic sensorimotor deficits. However, certain rehabilitation techniques may significantly enhance their autonomy by restoring reach-to-grasp movements. Among others, evidence of motor imagery (MI) benefits for neurological rehabilitation of upper limb movements is growing. This literature review addresses MI effectiveness during reach-to-grasp rehabilitation after tetraplegia. Among articles from MEDLINE published between 1966 and 2015, we selected ten studies including 34 participants with C4 to C7 tetraplegia and 22 healthy controls published during the last 15 years. We found that MI of possible non-paralyzed movements improved reach-to-grasp performance by: (i) increasing both tenodesis grasp capabilities and muscle strength; (ii) decreasing movement time (MT), and trajectory variability; and (iii) reducing the abnormally increased brain activity. MI can also strengthen motor commands by potentiating recruitment and synchronization of motoneurons, which leads to improved recovery. These improvements reflect brain adaptations induced by MI. Furthermore, MI can be used to control brain-computer interfaces (BCI) that successfully restore grasp capabilities. These results highlight the growing interest for MI and its potential to recover functional grasping in individuals with tetraplegia, and motivate the need for further studies to substantiate it. PMID:26441568

  4. Imaging Assessment of Gunshot Injuries.

    PubMed

    Clark, Kevin R

    2016-07-01

    Gunshot wounds are the third-leading cause of injury-related death nationwide. Most people with gunshot injuries undergo diagnostic imaging to evaluate their injuries in the clinical or forensic setting. Radiologic technologists must be knowledgeable about common injuries associated with gunshot wounds. Digital radiography and computed tomography play essential roles in the assessment of gunshot injuries. When clinically indicated, magnetic resonance imaging also is a valuable imaging modality for evaluating these injuries. Radiologic technologists should obtain quality images to assist with proper assessment of gunshot injuries. PMID:27390231

  5. Imaging Assessment of Gunshot Injuries.

    PubMed

    Clark, Kevin R

    2016-07-01

    Gunshot wounds are the third-leading cause of injury-related death nationwide. Most people with gunshot injuries undergo diagnostic imaging to evaluate their injuries in the clinical or forensic setting. Radiologic technologists must be knowledgeable about common injuries associated with gunshot wounds. Digital radiography and computed tomography play essential roles in the assessment of gunshot injuries. When clinically indicated, magnetic resonance imaging also is a valuable imaging modality for evaluating these injuries. Radiologic technologists should obtain quality images to assist with proper assessment of gunshot injuries.

  6. Iatrogenic Hepatopancreaticobiliary Injuries: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Vachhani, Prasanti G.; Copelan, Alexander; Remer, Erick M.; Kapoor, Baljendra

    2015-01-01

    Iatrogenic hepatopancreaticobiliary injuries occur after various types of surgical and nonsurgical procedures. Symptomatically, these injuries may lead to a variety of clinical presentations, including tachycardia and hypotension from hemobilia or hemorrhage. Iatrogenic injuries may be identified during the intervention, immediately afterwards, or have a delayed presentation. These injuries are categorized into nonvascular and vascular injuries. Nonvascular injuries include biliary injuries such as biliary leak or stricture, pancreatic injury, and the development of fluid collections such as abscesses. Vascular injuries include pseudoaneurysms, arteriovenous fistulas, dissection, and perforation. Imaging studies such as ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and digital subtraction angiography are critical for proper diagnosis of these conditions. In this article, we describe the clinical and imaging presentations of these iatrogenic injuries and the armamentarium of minimally invasive procedures (percutaneous drainage catheter placement, balloon dilatation, stenting, and coil embolization) that are useful in their management. PMID:26038625

  7. Photobiomodulation on sports injuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-Guang; Liu, Timon C.; Jiao, Jian-Ling; Li, Cheng-Zhang; Xu, Xiao-Yang

    2003-12-01

    Sports injuries healing has long been an important field in sports medicine. The stimulatory effects of Low intensity laser (LIL) irradiation have been investigated in several medical fields, such as cultured cell response, wound healing, hormonal or neural stimulation, pain relief and others. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether LIL irradiation can accelerate sports injuries healing. Some experimental and clinical studies have shown the laser stimulation effects on soft tissues and cartilage, however, controversy still exists regarding the role of LIL when used as a therapeutic device. Summarizing the data of cell studies and animal experiments and clinic trials by using the biological information model of photobiomodulation, we conclude that LIL irradiation is a valuable treatment for superficial and localized sports injuries and that the injuries healing effects of the therapy depend on the dosage of LIL irradiation.

  8. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    MedlinePlus

    ... is "Braingate" research? What is the status of stem-cell research? How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? When can we expect ...

  9. Preventing Children's Sports Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... ups and training sessions before practices and before games. This will help ensure that they have fun ... be allowed periods of rest during practices and games. previous continue Common Types of Sports Injuries Three ...

  10. Biomarkers of Lung Injury

    EPA Science Inventory

    Unlike the hepatic, cardiovascular, nervous, or excretory organ systems, where there .ls a strong contribution of host factors or extracellular biochemical milieu in causing organ damage, the causes of lung injuries and subsequent diseases are primarily from direct environmental ...

  11. Toe Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Corns and bunions Ingrown toenails Sprains and dislocations Fractures Treatments for toe injuries and disorders vary. They might include shoe inserts or special shoes, padding, taping, medicines, rest, and in severe cases, surgery.

  12. Injury reduction at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Griffing, Bill; /Fermilab

    2005-06-01

    In a recent DOE Program Review, Fermilab's director presented results of the laboratory's effort to reduce the injury rate over the last decade. The results, shown in the figure below, reveal a consistent and dramatic downward trend in OSHA recordable injuries at Fermilab. The High Energy Physics Program Office has asked Fermilab to report in detail on how the laboratory has achieved the reduction. In fact, the reduction in the injury rate reflects a change in safety culture at Fermilab, which has evolved slowly over this period, due to a series of events, both planned and unplanned. This paper attempts to describe those significant events and analyze how each of them has shaped the safety culture that, in turn, has reduced the rate of injury at Fermilab to its current value.

  13. Spinal Cord Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dramatically Improves Function After Spinal Cord Injury in Rats May 2004 press release on an experimental treatment ... NINDS). Signaling Molecule Improves Nerve Cell Regeneration in Rats August 2002 news summary on a signaling molecule ...

  14. Traumatic Brain Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... disabilities include problems with cognition (thinking, memory, and reasoning), sensory processing (sight, hearing, touch, taste, and smell), ... barrier. NIH Patient Recruitment for Traumatic Brain Injury Clinical Trials At NIH Clinical Center Throughout the U.S. ...

  15. Head injury - first aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... and circulation. If necessary, begin rescue breathing and CPR . If the person's breathing and heart rate are normal but the person is unconscious, treat as if there is a spinal injury . Stabilize the head and neck by placing your ...

  16. Swimming injuries. An overview.

    PubMed

    McMaster, W C

    1996-11-01

    Most injuries and complaints encountered in swimming athletes are repetitive microtrauma or overuse, and successful management does not usually require surgical intervention. Rest and other measures to reduce inflammation are often required. Many injuries originate from faulty techniques or mechanisms, and an assessment must be made of the swimming biomechanics of any injured athlete to identify faults that may contribute to injury. It is also important to look at the total training programme of the athlete to identify other factors, such as weight training or dry land programmes, that may be contributing to injury. It is important to understand that, while rest or reduced training may be necessary, every effort to keep the swimmer "in the water' should be made, as cessation of training may lead to a rapid detraining effect.

  17. Leg Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your legs are made up of bones, blood vessels, muscles, and other connective tissue. They are important for motion ... falling, or having an accident can damage your legs. Common leg injuries include sprains and strains, joint ...

  18. Spine Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... They include Infections Injuries Tumors Conditions, such as ankylosing spondylitis and scoliosis Bone changes that come with age, such as spinal stenosis and herniated disks Spinal diseases often cause pain when bone changes put pressure ...

  19. Discounting compensation for injuries.

    PubMed

    Price, C

    2000-12-01

    The reasons commonly given for discounting future costs and benefits are doubtfully applicable to future injuries: in particular, time preference justifies neither inter- nor intragenerational discounting. The cost of future injuries could be discounted on grounds that a smaller sum, invested at interest, is needed to pay a given level of ex post monetary compensation the further in the future the injury occurs. This effect is offset, however, by the diminishing marginal utility of compensation, if consumption is otherwise increasing. Depending on the elasticity of marginal utility of consumption, on whether consumption is growing at an optimal rate, and on the time period considered, the implicit discount rate may be positive, zero, or negative (even indefinitely so). There is no prospect of conventional discounting dealing appropriately with the cost of injuries to either future or present generations.

  20. Baseball bat assault injuries.

    PubMed

    Groleau, G A; Tso, E L; Olshaker, J S; Barish, R A; Lyston, D J

    1993-03-01

    The baseball bat, according to Baltimore City police crime statistics, is a commonly used weapon. To assess the severity of injuries inflicted by this modern-day club, we retrospectively reviewed 75 charts of patients treated at the University of Maryland Medical Systems Hospital for baseball bat injuries from January 1990 through July 1991. Multisystem trauma was documented, with craniocerebral injury being the most frequent and the most frequent cause of death. Of the victims struck on the head, 26% sustained an intracranial hemorrhage. In our series, the history of loss of consciousness and the Glasgow Coma Scale score failed to reliably identify the patients with serious injuries. Seventeen percent of our patients with intracranial hemorrhages had both a negative or uncertain history of loss of consciousness and a normal Glasgow Coma Scale score on arrival.

  1. [Traumatic brain injury].

    PubMed

    Hackenberg, K; Unterberg, A

    2016-02-01

    Since traumatic brain injury is the most common cause of long-term disability and death among young adults, it represents an enormous socio-economic and healthcare burden. As a consequence of the primary lesion, a perifocal brain edema develops causing an elevation of the intracranial pressure due to the limited intracranial space. This entails a reduction of the cerebral perfusion pressure and the cerebral blood flow. A cerebral perfusion deficit below the threshold for ischemia leads to further ischemic lesions and to a progression of the contusion. As the irreversible primary lesion can only be inhibited by primary prevention, the therapy of traumatic brain injury focuses on the secondary injuries. The treatment consists of surgical therapy evacuating the space-occupying intracranial lesion and conservative intensive medical care. Due to the complex pathophysiology the therapy of traumatic brain injury should be rapidly performed in a neurosurgical unit. PMID:26810405

  2. Neurologic injury in snowmobiling

    PubMed Central

    Plog, Benjamin A.; Pierre, Clifford A.; Srinivasan, Vasisht; Srinivasan, Kaushik; Petraglia, Anthony L.; Huang, Jason H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Snowmobiles are increasingly popular recreational, all-terrain utility vehicles that require skill and physical strength to operate given their inherent maneuverability, acceleration, and top speed capabilities. These same characteristics increase the risk of injury with the operation of these vehicles, particularly neurological injury. We characterize our series of 107 patients involved in snowmobiling accidents. Methods: From January 2004 to January 2012, all snowmobiling-related injuries referred to our regional trauma center were reviewed. Information had been recorded in the hospital's trauma registry and medical records were retrospectively reviewed for data pertaining to the injuries, with particular emphasis on neurological injuries and any associated details. Results: A total of 107 patients were identified. Ninety percent of injured riders were male. The mean age was 34.4 years (range 10-70), with 7% younger than age 16. The mean Injury Severity Score was 12.0 ± 0.69 (range 1-34). Although not documented in all patients, alcohol use was found in 7.5% of the patients and drug use found in one patient. Documentation of helmet use was available for only 31 of the patients; of which 13% were not helmeted. Causes included being thrown, flipped, or roll-over (33%), striking a stationary object (27%), being struck by a snowmobile (9%), striking another snowmobile (5.5%) or a car, train, or truck (5.5%), being injured by the machine itself (9%), other (2%) or unspecified (18%). Head injuries occurred in 35% patients, including concussion, subarachnoid hemorrhage, subdural hematoma, contusion, and facial/skull fracture. Spinal fractures occurred in 21% of the patients. Fractures to the thoracic spine were the most common (50%), followed by the cervical (41%) and lumbar (36%) spine. There were also three brachial plexus injuries, one tibial nerve injury, and one internal carotid artery dissection. Average length of stay was 4.98 ± 0.56 days

  3. Pars Injuries in Athletes.

    PubMed

    Oren, Jonathan H; Gallina, Jason M

    2016-03-01

    Pars injuries are common causes of low back pain in adolescent athletes. Workup traditionally has included lumbar radiographs with oblique views and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). However, recent literature has demonstrated the accuracy of MRI as a diagnostic modality. Acute injuries may be amenable to bracing with the goal of a healed lesion. Most cases of spondylolysis will result in asymptomatic non-union, though pars repair is an option for symptomatic pars defects without spondylolisthesis. PMID:26977552

  4. Hysteria following brain injury.

    PubMed Central

    Eames, P

    1992-01-01

    Of 167 patients referred to a unit treating severe behaviour disorders after brain injury, 54 showed clinical features closely resembling those of gross hysteria as described by Charcot. Close correlation was found with very diffuse insults (hypoxia and hypoglycaemia), but not with severity of injury or with family or personal history of hysterical or other psychiatric disorder. The findings may have implications for the understanding of the nature of hysteria. PMID:1469401

  5. Scuba diving injuries.

    PubMed

    Replogle, W H; Sanders, S D; Keeton, J E; Phillips, D M

    1988-06-01

    Scuba diving has become increasingly popular, and family physicians may encounter patients who have been injured in a dive. Manifestations of diving injuries may not occur until 12 hours or more after a dive. Initial treatment, based on knowledge of the pathophysiology of decompression sickness, lung expansion injuries and ear barotrauma, may prevent severe and permanent sequelae. Decompression sickness and air embolism are medical emergencies.

  6. Catastrophic spine injuries in sports.

    PubMed

    Boden, Barry P; Prior, Chris

    2005-02-01

    Catastrophic spine injuries in sports are rare but tragic events. The sports with the highest risk of catastrophic spinal injuries are football, ice hockey, wrestling, diving, skiing and snowboarding, rugby, cheerleading, and baseball. A common mechanism of injury for all at-risk sports is an axial compression force to the top of the head with the neck slightly flexed. We review common mechanisms of injury and prevention strategies for spine injuries in the at-risk sports.

  7. Peroxisomes and Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Peroxisomes are organelles present in most eukaryotic cells. The organs with the highest density of peroxisomes are the liver and kidneys. Peroxisomes possess more than fifty enzymes and fulfill a multitude of biological tasks. They actively participate in apoptosis, innate immunity, and inflammation. In recent years, a considerable amount of evidence has been collected to support the involvement of peroxisomes in the pathogenesis of kidney injury. Recent Advances: The nature of the two most important peroxisomal tasks, beta-oxidation of fatty acids and hydrogen peroxide turnover, functionally relates peroxisomes to mitochondria. Further support for their communication and cooperation is furnished by the evidence that both organelles share the components of their division machinery. Until recently, the majority of studies on the molecular mechanisms of kidney injury focused primarily on mitochondria and neglected peroxisomes. Critical Issues: The aim of this concise review is to introduce the reader to the field of peroxisome biology and to provide an overview of the evidence about the contribution of peroxisomes to the development and progression of kidney injury. The topics of renal ischemia–reperfusion injury, endotoxin-induced kidney injury, diabetic nephropathy, and tubulointerstitial fibrosis, as well as the potential therapeutic implications of peroxisome activation, are addressed in this review. Future Directions: Despite recent progress, further studies are needed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms induced by dysfunctional peroxisomes and the role of the dysregulated mitochondria–peroxisome axis in the pathogenesis of renal injury. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 217–231. PMID:26972522

  8. Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Schaller, Alexandra L; Lakhani, Saquib A; Hsu, Benson S

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a better understanding of pediatric traumatic brain injury and its management. Within the pediatric age group, ages 1 to 19, injuries are the number one cause of death with traumatic brain injury being involved in almost 50 percent of these cases. This, along with the fact that the medical system spends over $1 billion annually on pediatric traumatic brain injury, makes this issue both timely and relevant to health care providers. Over the course of this article the epidemiology, physiology, pathophysiology, and treatment of pediatric traumatic brain injury will be explored. Emphasis will be placed on the role of the early responder and the immediate interventions that should be considered and/or performed. The management discussed in this article follows the most recent recommendations from the 2012 edition of the Guidelines for the Acute Medical Management of Severe Traumatic Brain Injury in Infants, Children, and Adolescents. Despite the focus of this article, it is important not to lose sight of the fact that an ounce of prevention is worth a pound--or, to be more precise and use the average human's brain measurements, just above three pounds--of cure. PMID:26630835

  9. Laser eye injuries.

    PubMed

    Barkana, Y; Belkin, M

    2000-01-01

    Laser instruments are used in many spheres of human activity, including medicine, industry, laboratory research, entertainment, and, notably, the military. This widespread use of lasers has resulted in many accidental injuries. Injuries are almost always retinal, because of the concentration of visible and near-infrared radiation on the retina. The retina is therefore the body tissue most vulnerable to laser radiation. The nature and severity of this type of retinal injury is determined by multiple laser-related and eye-related factors, the most important being the duration and amount of energy delivered and the retinal location of the lesion. The clinical course of significant retinal laser injuries is characterized by sudden loss of vision, often followed by marked improvement over a few weeks, and occasionally severe late complications. Medical and surgical treatment is limited. Laser devices hazardous to the human eye are currently in widespread use by armed forces. Furthermore, lasers may be employed specifically for visual incapacitation on future battlefields. Adherence to safety practices effectively prevents accidental laser-induced ocular injuries. However, there is no practical way to prevent injuries that are maliciously inflicted, as expected from laser weapons.

  10. Thoracoabdominal musculoskeletal injuries in racquet sports.

    PubMed

    Lehman, R C

    1988-04-01

    Thoracoabdominal musculoskeletal injuries are separated into rectus abdominus injuries and lower thoracic muscular injuries. Localized rectus injuries may be treated by steroid injection. Diffuse rectus injuries and thoracic injuries are treated by aggressive rehabilitation. The mechanisms of injury are different in each case, and prevention of these forces is necessary to allow soft-tissue healing.

  11. Dancers' and musicians' injuries.

    PubMed

    Rietveld, A B M Boni

    2013-04-01

    This overview is based on the over 30 years of performing arts medicine experience of the author, an orthopaedic surgeon who devoted his professional life entirely to the prevention, diagnostics, and treatment of dancers' and musicians' injuries. After a short introduction on the specific demands of professional dance and music making, it describes some general principles of orthopaedic dance medicine and causes of injuries in dancers. The relation of dance injuries with compensatory mechanisms for insufficient external rotation in the hips is explained, as well as hypermobility and the importance of 'core-stability'. As a general principle of treatment, the physician must respect the 'passion' of the dancer and never give an injured dancer the advice to stop dancing. Mental practice helps to maintain dance technical capabilities. The specific orthopaedic dance-medicine section deals with some common injuries of the back and lower extremities in dancers. An important group of common dance injuries form the causes of limited and painful 'relevé' in dancers, like 'dancer's heel' (posterior ankle impingement syndrome), 'dancer's tendinitis' (tenovaginitis of the m.flexor hallucis longus) and hallux rigidus. The second half of the overview deals with the general principles of orthopaedic musicians' medicine and causes of injuries in musicians, like a sudden change in the 'musical load' or a faulty playing posture. Hypermobility in musicians is both an asset and a risk factor. As a general principle of treatment, early specialized medical assessment is essential to rule out specific injuries. Making the diagnosis in musicians is greatly facilitated by examining the patient during playing the musical instrument. The playing posture, stabilisation of the trunk and shoulder girdle and practising habits should always be checked. Musicians in general are intelligent and the time spent on extensive explanation and advice is well spent. In overuse injuries, relative rest

  12. Spinal electro-magnetic stimulation combined with transgene delivery of neurotrophin NT-3 and exercise: novel combination therapy for spinal contusion injury.

    PubMed

    Petrosyan, Hayk A; Alessi, Valentina; Hunanyan, Arsen S; Sisto, Sue A; Arvanian, Victor L

    2015-11-01

    Our recent terminal experiments revealed that administration of a single train of repetitive spinal electromagnetic stimulation (sEMS; 35 min) enhanced synaptic plasticity in spinal circuitry following lateral hemisection spinal cord injury. In the current study, we have examined effects of repetitive sEMS applied as a single train and chronically (5 wk, every other day) following thoracic T10 contusion. Chronic studies involved examination of systematic sEMS administration alone and combined with exercise training and transgene delivery of neurotrophin [adeno-associated virus 10-neurotrophin 3 (AAV10-NT3)]. Electrophysiological intracellular/extracellular recordings, immunohistochemistry, behavioral testing, and anatomical tracing were performed to assess effects of treatments. We found that administration of a single sEMS train induced transient facilitation of transmission through preserved lateral white matter to motoneurons and hindlimb muscles in chronically contused rats with effects lasting for at least 2 h. These physiological changes associated with increased immunoreactivity of GluR1 and GluR2/3 glutamate receptors in lumbar neurons. Systematic administration of sEMS alone for 5 wk, however, was unable to induce cumulative improvements of transmission in spinomuscular circuitry or improve impaired motor function following thoracic contusion. Encouragingly, chronic administration of sEMS, followed by exercise training (running in an exercise ball and swimming), induced the following: 1) sustained strengthening of transmission to lumbar motoneurons and hindlimb muscles, 2) better retrograde transport of anatomical tracer, and 3) improved locomotor function. Greatest improvements were seen in the group that received exercise combined with sEMS and AAV-NT3. PMID:26424579

  13. Spinal electro-magnetic stimulation combined with transgene delivery of neurotrophin NT-3 and exercise: novel combination therapy for spinal contusion injury.

    PubMed

    Petrosyan, Hayk A; Alessi, Valentina; Hunanyan, Arsen S; Sisto, Sue A; Arvanian, Victor L

    2015-11-01

    Our recent terminal experiments revealed that administration of a single train of repetitive spinal electromagnetic stimulation (sEMS; 35 min) enhanced synaptic plasticity in spinal circuitry following lateral hemisection spinal cord injury. In the current study, we have examined effects of repetitive sEMS applied as a single train and chronically (5 wk, every other day) following thoracic T10 contusion. Chronic studies involved examination of systematic sEMS administration alone and combined with exercise training and transgene delivery of neurotrophin [adeno-associated virus 10-neurotrophin 3 (AAV10-NT3)]. Electrophysiological intracellular/extracellular recordings, immunohistochemistry, behavioral testing, and anatomical tracing were performed to assess effects of treatments. We found that administration of a single sEMS train induced transient facilitation of transmission through preserved lateral white matter to motoneurons and hindlimb muscles in chronically contused rats with effects lasting for at least 2 h. These physiological changes associated with increased immunoreactivity of GluR1 and GluR2/3 glutamate receptors in lumbar neurons. Systematic administration of sEMS alone for 5 wk, however, was unable to induce cumulative improvements of transmission in spinomuscular circuitry or improve impaired motor function following thoracic contusion. Encouragingly, chronic administration of sEMS, followed by exercise training (running in an exercise ball and swimming), induced the following: 1) sustained strengthening of transmission to lumbar motoneurons and hindlimb muscles, 2) better retrograde transport of anatomical tracer, and 3) improved locomotor function. Greatest improvements were seen in the group that received exercise combined with sEMS and AAV-NT3.

  14. Pediatric elbow injuries in athletes.

    PubMed

    Makhni, Eric C; Jegede, Kola A; Ahmad, Christopher S

    2014-09-01

    Elbow injuries in pediatric and adolescent population represent a spectrum of pathology that can range from medial tension injuries to posterior shear injuries. Elbow injuries in this population continue to rise in parallel with the increase in youth participation in sports both throughout the calendar year and across multiple sports. Many of these injuries are noncontact and are attributed to overuse. Evaluation and management of youth and adolescent athletic elbow injuries requires knowledge of developmental anatomy, injury pathophysiology, and established treatment algorithms. Furthermore, risk factors contributing to elbow injuries must be recognized, with education and recommendations for safe play continually advocated. This education--of parents, athletes, and coaches--is paramount in reducing the climbing incidence of elbow injuries in our youth athletes.

  15. Laryngeal war injuries.

    PubMed

    Danić, D; Milicić, D; Prgomet, D; Leović, D

    1995-01-01

    During the war in Croatia in the region of Brodska Posavina at the Medical Center in Slavonski Brod, 7,043 wounded were treated. The Otolaryngology and Oral Surgery Service treated 728 wounded, of whom 20 had laryngeal injuries. Most of the injuries were caused by shrapnel from shells, mines, and hand grenades. Nineteen wounded had associated injuries of the neck, head, and the neck and/or other parts of the body. The authors performed in 8 surgical explorations and immediate reconstruction with the median layer of the deep cervical fascia (MLDCF). Upon termination of the treatment, the nineteen wounded had good respiration without signs of stenosis of the larynx. Twelve had good phonation, five satisfactory phonation, and two bad. None had swallowing difficulties. Among the eight wounded on whom the reconstruction of the larynx was done with cervical fascia, four had very good phonation, three satisfactory, and the eight died on the sixth postoperative day because of associated injuries to the cervical spine. The cervical fascia proved itself to be a suitable material in the immediate reconstruction of exogenous war injuries of the larynx.

  16. Ocular injury in hurling

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, T; Fennessy, K; Horgan, N; Walsh, B; O'Connell, E; Cleary, P; Beatty, S; MacEwan, C

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the clinical characteristics of ocular injuries sustained in hurling in the south of Ireland and to investigate reasons for non-use of protective headgear and eye wear. Results: Hurling related eye injuries occurred most commonly in young men. Fifty two patients (17%) required hospital admission, with hyphaema accounting for 71% of admissions. Ten injuries required intraocular surgical intervention: retinal detachment repair (5); macular hole surgery (1); repair of partial thickness corneal laceration (1); repair of globe perforation (1); enucleation (1); trabeculectomy for post-traumatic glaucoma (1). Fourteen eyes (4.5%) had a final best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of <6/12 and six (2%) had BCVA <3/60. In the survey, 63 players (48.5%) reported wearing no protective facemask while playing hurling. Impairment of vision was the most common reason cited for non-use. Conclusions: Hurling related injury is a significant, and preventable, cause of ocular morbidity in young men in Ireland. The routine use of appropriate protective headgear and faceguards would result in a dramatic reduction in the incidence and severity of these injuries, and should be mandatory. PMID:16046328

  17. Rationalizing vaccine injury compensation.

    PubMed

    Mello, Michelle M

    2008-01-01

    Legislation recently adopted by the United States Congress provides producers of pandemic vaccines with near-total immunity from civil lawsuits without making individuals injured by those vaccines eligible for compensation through the Vaccine Injury Compensation Program. The unusual decision not to provide an alternative mechanism for compensation is indicative of a broader problem of inconsistency in the American approach to vaccine-injury compensation policy. Compensation policies have tended to reflect political pressures and economic considerations more than any cognizable set of principles. This article identifies a set of ethical principles bearing on the circumstances in which vaccine injuries should be compensated, both inside and outside public health emergencies. A series of possible bases for compensation rules, some grounded in utilitarianism and some nonconsequentialist, are discussed and evaluated. Principles of fairness and reasonableness are found to constitute the strongest bases. An ethically defensible compensation policy grounded in these principles would make a compensation fund available to all individuals with severe injuries and to individuals with less-severe injuries whenever the vaccination was required by law or professional duty.

  18. Spinal injuries in contact sports.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Joseph B; Zarzour, Robert; Moorman, Claude T

    2006-02-01

    Contact and collision sports such as American football expose the athlete to a wide array of potential injuries. Knee injuries garner much of the attention, but spinal injuries are potentially catastrophic and all levels of medical coverage of football must be knowledgeable and prepared to attend to an athlete with a neck injury. Of the other possible spinal conditions, some resolve on their own, others might require conservative therapy, and still others might require surgical intervention. The spectrum of potential injury is wide, yet the medical team must practice and prepare to treat the possible catastrophic neck injury.

  19. Catastrophic pediatric sports injuries.

    PubMed

    Luckstead, Eugene F; Patel, Dilip R

    2002-06-01

    The high school sports of wrestling, gymnastics, ice hockey, baseball, track, and cheerleading should receive closer attention to prevent injury. Safer equipment and sport-specific conditioning should be provided and injuries strictly monitored. Greater attention must also be paid to swimming and diving techniques, and continued observation is needed for heat stroke and heat intolerance in sports such as football, wrestling, basketball, track and field, and cross-country. An increased awareness of commotio cordis in sports other than baseball should include ice hockey, football, track field events, and lacrosse. American football because of the sheer numbers and associated catastrophic injury potential must continue to be monitored at the highest medical levels! PMID:12119866

  20. Iatrogenic accessory nerve injury.

    PubMed Central

    London, J.; London, N. J.; Kay, S. P.

    1996-01-01

    Accessory nerve injury produces considerable disability. The nerve is most frequently damaged as a complication of radical neck dissection, cervical lymph node biopsy and other surgical procedures. The problem is frequently compounded by a failure to recognise the error immediately after surgery when surgical repair has the greatest chance of success. We present cases which outline the risk of accessory nerve injury, the spectrum of clinical presentations and the problems produced by a failure to recognise the deficit. Regional anatomy, consequences of nerve damage and management options are discussed. Diagnostic biopsy of neck nodes should not be undertaken as a primary investigation and, when indicated, surgery in this region should be performed by suitably trained staff under well-defined conditions. Awareness of iatrogenic injury and its consequences would avoid delays in diagnosis and treatment. Images Figure 2 PMID:8678450