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Sample records for microsatellite enriched genomic

  1. Microsatellite markers isolated from the wild medicinal plant Centella asiatica (Apiaceae) from an enriched genomic library.

    PubMed

    Rakotondralambo, Soaharin'ny Ony Raoseta; Lussert, Alexandra; Rivallan, Ronan; Danthu, Pascal; Noyer, Jean-Louis; Baurens, Franc-Christophe

    2012-04-01

    Microsatellite markers for Centella asiatica, an important medicinal herb, were developed and characterized to promote genetic and molecular studies. A GA/GT-enriched genomic library was constructed from an accession from Madagascar. Roughly 75% of the 768 clones of the enriched library contained microsatellites. Eighty sequences containing microsatellites were obtained from 96 positive clones. Specific primers were designed for 20 loci, and 17 of them displayed polymorphism when screened across 17 C. asiatica accessions, with an average of 4.3 alleles per locus. The observed and expected heterozygosity values averaged 0.114 and 0.379, respectively. This is the first report constructing an enriched genomic library and identifying microsatellite markers from C. asiatica. These 17 polymorphic microsatellite markers are a useful resource for this plant, applicable for diversity studies, pedigree analyses, and genetic mapping.

  2. A modified enrichment method to construct microsatellite library from plateau pika genome (Ochotona curzoniae).

    PubMed

    Geng, Jianing; Li, Kexin; Zhang, Yanming; Hu, Songnian

    2010-03-01

    A microsatellite-enriched library of plateau pika (Ochotona curzoniae) was constructed according to the strong affinity between biotin and streptavidin. Firstly, genomic DNA was fragmented by ultrasonication, which is a major improvement over traditional methods. Linker-ligated DNA fragments were hybridized with biotinylated microsatellite probes, and then were subjected to streptavidin-coated magnetic beads. PCR amplification was performed to obtain double-stranded DNA fragments containing microsatellites. Ligation and transformation were carried out by using the pGEM-T Vector System I and Escherichia coli DH10B competent cells. Sequencing results showed that 80.2% of clones contained microsatellite repeat motif. Several modifications make this protocol time-efficient and technically easier than the traditional ones; particularly, composition and relative abundance of microsatellite repeats in plateau pika genome were truly represented through the optimized PCR conditions. This method has also been successfully applied to construct microsatellite-enriched genomic libraries of Chinese hamster (Cricetulus griseus) and small abalone [Haliotis diversicolor (Reeve)] with high rates of positive clones, demonstrating its feasibility and stability. 2010 Beijing Genomics Institute. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Developing new microsatellite markers in walnut (Juglans regia L.) from Juglans nigra genomic GA enriched library

    Treesearch

    Hayat Topcu; Nergiz Coban; Keith Woeste; Mehmet Sutyemez; Salih. Kafkas

    2015-01-01

    We attempted to develop new polymorphic SSR primer pairs in walnut using sequences derived from Juglans nigra L. genomic enriched library with GA repeat. The designed 94 SSR primer pairs were subjected to gradient PCR in 12 walnut cultivars to determine their optimum annealing temperatures and to determine whether they produce bands. Then, the...

  4. Microsatellite markers isolated from Cabomba aquatica s.l. (Cabombaceae) from an enriched genomic library1

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Tiago D. M.; Trad, Rafaela J.; Bajay, Miklos M.; Amaral, Maria C. E.

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite primers were designed for the submersed aquatic plant Cabomba aquatica s.l. (Cabombaceae) and characterized to estimate genetic diversity parameters. Methods and Results: Using a selective hybridization method, we designed and tested 30 simple sequence repeat loci using two natural populations of C. aquatica s.l., resulting in 13 amplifiable loci. Twelve loci were polymorphic, and alleles per locus ranged from two to four across the 49 C. aquatica s.l. individuals. Observed heterozygosity, expected heterozygosity, and fixation index varied from 0.0 to 1.0, 0.0 to 0.5, and −1.0 to −0.0667, respectively, for the Manaus population and from 0.0 to 1.0, 0.0 to 0.6, and −1.0 to 0.4643 for the Viruá population. Conclusions: The developed markers will be used in further taxonomic and population studies within Cabomba. This set of microsatellite primers represents the first report on rapid molecular markers in the genus. PMID:26649271

  5. Informative genomic microsatellite markers for efficient genotyping applications in sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Parida, Swarup K; Kalia, Sanjay K; Kaul, Sunita; Dalal, Vivek; Hemaprabha, G; Selvi, Athiappan; Pandit, Awadhesh; Singh, Archana; Gaikwad, Kishor; Sharma, Tilak R; Srivastava, Prem Shankar; Singh, Nagendra K; Mohapatra, Trilochan

    2009-01-01

    Genomic microsatellite markers are capable of revealing high degree of polymorphism. Sugarcane (Saccharum sp.), having a complex polyploid genome requires more number of such informative markers for various applications in genetics and breeding. With the objective of generating a large set of microsatellite markers designated as Sugarcane Enriched Genomic MicroSatellite (SEGMS), 6,318 clones from genomic libraries of two hybrid sugarcane cultivars enriched with 18 different microsatellite repeat-motifs were sequenced to generate 4.16 Mb high-quality sequences. Microsatellites were identified in 1,261 of the 5,742 non-redundant clones that accounted for 22% enrichment of the libraries. Retro-transposon association was observed for 23.1% of the identified microsatellites. The utility of the microsatellite containing genomic sequences were demonstrated by higher primer designing potential (90%) and PCR amplification efficiency (87.4%). A total of 1,315 markers including 567 class I microsatellite markers were designed and placed in the public domain for unrestricted use. The level of polymorphism detected by these markers among sugarcane species, genera, and varieties was 88.6%, while cross-transferability rate was 93.2% within Saccharum complex and 25% to cereals. Cloning and sequencing of size variant amplicons revealed that the variation in the number of repeat-units was the main source of SEGMS fragment length polymorphism. High level of polymorphism and wide range of genetic diversity (0.16-0.82 with an average of 0.44) assayed with the SEGMS markers suggested their usefulness in various genotyping applications in sugarcane.

  6. The analysis of microsatellites and compound microsatellites in 56 complete genomes of Herpesvirales.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaolong; Zhou, Lan; Zhao, Xiangyan; Tan, Zhongyang

    2014-11-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs), or microsatellites, are special DNA/RNA sequences with repeated unit of 1-6 bp. The genomes of Herpesvirales have many repeating structures, which is an excellent system to study the evolution and roles of microsatellites and compound microsatellites in viruses. Therefore, 56 genomes of Herpesvirales were selected and the occurrence, composition and complexity of different repeats were investigated in the genomes. A total of 63,939 microsatellites and 5825 compound microsatellites were extracted from 56 genomes. It found that GC content has a significant strong correlation with both the counts of microsatellites (CM) and the counts of compound microsatellites (CCM). However, genome size has a moderate correlation only with CM and almost no correlation with CCM. The compound microsatellites occurring in genic regions are obviously more than that in intergenic regions. In general, the number of compound microsatellite decreases with the increase of complexity (C) (the count of individual microsatellites being part of a compound microsatellite) and the complexity hardly exceeds C=4. The vast majority of compound microsatellites exist in intergenic regions, when C≥10. The distributions of SSRs tend to be organism-specific rather than host-specific in herpesvirus genomes. The diversity of microsatellites and compound microsatellites may be helpful for a better understanding of the viral genetic diversity, genotyping, and evolutionary biology in herpesviruses genomes.

  7. Survey of compound microsatellites in multiple Lactobacillus genomes.

    PubMed

    Basharat, Zarrin; Yasmin, Azra

    2015-12-01

    Distinct simple sequence repeats with 2 or more individual microsatellites joined together or lying adjacent to each other are identified as compound microsatellites. Investigation of such composite microsatellites in the genomes of genus Lactobacillus was the aim of this study. In silico inspection of microsatellite clustering in genomes of 14 Lactobacillus species revealed a wealth of compound microsatellites. All of the mined compound microsatellites were imperfect, were composed of variant motifs, and increased in all genomes, with maximum distance (dMAX) increments of 10 to 50. The majority of these repeats were present in the coding regions. A correlation of microsatellite to compound microsatellite density was detected. The difference established in compound microsatellite division among eukaryotes, Escherichia coli, and lactobacilli is suggestive of diverse genomic features and elementary distinction between creation and fixation methods of compound microsatellites among these organisms.

  8. Microsatellites in Pursuit of Microbial Genome Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Abdullah F.; Wang, Rongzhi; Wang, Shihua

    2016-01-01

    Microsatellites or short sequence repeats are widespread genetic markers which are hypermutable 1–6 bp long short nucleotide motifs. Significantly, their applications in genetics are extensive due to their ceaseless mutational degree, widespread length variations and hypermutability skills. These features make them useful in determining the driving forces of evolution by using powerful molecular techniques. Consequently, revealing important questions, for example, what is the significance of these abundant sequences in DNA, what are their roles in genomic evolution? The answers of these important questions are hidden in the ways these short motifs contributed in altering the microbial genomes since the origin of life. Even though their size ranges from 1 –to- 6 bases, these repeats are becoming one of the most popular genetic probes in determining their associations and phylogenetic relationships in closely related genomes. Currently, they have been widely used in molecular genetics, biotechnology and evolutionary biology. However, due to limited knowledge; there is a significant gap in research and lack of information concerning hypermutational mechanisms. These mechanisms play a key role in microsatellite loci point mutations and phase variations. This review will extend the understandings of impacts and contributions of microsatellite in genomic evolution and their universal applications in microbiology. PMID:26779133

  9. Comparison of microsatellite distribution in genomes of Centruroides exilicauda and Mesobuthus martensii.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Kubiak, Lukasz Jakub; Du, Lian-Ming; Li, Wu-Jiao; Jian, Zuo-Yi; Tang, Ce; Fan, Zhen-Xin; Zhang, Xiu-Yue; Yue, Bi-Song

    2016-12-05

    In this study, we characterized the distribution of microsatellites in the genomes and genes of Centruroides exilicauda and Mesobuthus martensii, carried out Gene Ontology (GO) analysis and GO enrichment analysis of coding sequences (CDSs) with microsatellite (SSR). In addition, over-represented GO functions related to environmental interactions, development process and methylation were identified to develop functional markers and facilitate further analysis of microsatellite function in the genes of scorpions. Location analysis indicated that microsatellites were predominantly concentrated at both ends of genes. Most genes containing microsatellite had the SSR present at only one locus, from which we infer that the number of SSRs per gene is limited even though intragenic tandem repeats can generate functional variability. Lastly, we identified 75 SSRs in 64 genes of 54 expanded gene families and 1 SSR in the toxin gene of Mesobuthus martensii, allowing future studies on the effect of microsatellites on gene function.

  10. [Enrichment of giant panda microsatellite markers using dynal magnet beads].

    PubMed

    Shen, Fu-Jun; Watts, Phill; Zhang, Zhi-He; Zhang, An-Ju; Sanderson, Stephanie; Kemp, Steve J; Yue, Bi-Song

    2005-05-01

    The 400 -600 bp DNA fractions of giant panda containing STR sequences were captured by hybridization with the oligonucleotide probes attached to streptavadin coated magnetic beads (Dynal). The enriched DNA were ligated into pGEM-T and then transformed into E. coil JM109 competent cells. In total 260 positive clones were identified from 2 880 transformants in the libraries which were screened by gamma-32 P radiolabelled probes. Finally, we got 54 sequences and successfully designed 37 pairs of STR primers for giant panda. The results showed that this method is very efficient to isolate microsatellite markers.

  11. Detecting microsatellites within genomes: significant variation among algorithms.

    PubMed

    Leclercq, Sébastien; Rivals, Eric; Jarne, Philippe

    2007-04-18

    Microsatellites are short, tandemly-repeated DNA sequences which are widely distributed among genomes. Their structure, role and evolution can be analyzed based on exhaustive extraction from sequenced genomes. Several dedicated algorithms have been developed for this purpose. Here, we compared the detection efficiency of five of them (TRF, Mreps, Sputnik, STAR, and RepeatMasker). Our analysis was first conducted on the human X chromosome, and microsatellite distributions were characterized by microsatellite number, length, and divergence from a pure motif. The algorithms work with user-defined parameters, and we demonstrate that the parameter values chosen can strongly influence microsatellite distributions. The five algorithms were then compared by fixing parameters settings, and the analysis was extended to three other genomes (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Neurospora crassa and Drosophila melanogaster) spanning a wide range of size and structure. Significant differences for all characteristics of microsatellites were observed among algorithms, but not among genomes, for both perfect and imperfect microsatellites. Striking differences were detected for short microsatellites (below 20 bp), regardless of motif. Since the algorithm used strongly influences empirical distributions, studies analyzing microsatellite evolution based on a comparison between empirical and theoretical size distributions should therefore be considered with caution. We also discuss why a typological definition of microsatellites limits our capacity to capture their genomic distributions.

  12. Detecting microsatellites within genomes: significant variation among algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Leclercq, Sébastien; Rivals, Eric; Jarne, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    Background Microsatellites are short, tandemly-repeated DNA sequences which are widely distributed among genomes. Their structure, role and evolution can be analyzed based on exhaustive extraction from sequenced genomes. Several dedicated algorithms have been developed for this purpose. Here, we compared the detection efficiency of five of them (TRF, Mreps, Sputnik, STAR, and RepeatMasker). Results Our analysis was first conducted on the human X chromosome, and microsatellite distributions were characterized by microsatellite number, length, and divergence from a pure motif. The algorithms work with user-defined parameters, and we demonstrate that the parameter values chosen can strongly influence microsatellite distributions. The five algorithms were then compared by fixing parameters settings, and the analysis was extended to three other genomes (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Neurospora crassa and Drosophila melanogaster) spanning a wide range of size and structure. Significant differences for all characteristics of microsatellites were observed among algorithms, but not among genomes, for both perfect and imperfect microsatellites. Striking differences were detected for short microsatellites (below 20 bp), regardless of motif. Conclusion Since the algorithm used strongly influences empirical distributions, studies analyzing microsatellite evolution based on a comparison between empirical and theoretical size distributions should therefore be considered with caution. We also discuss why a typological definition of microsatellites limits our capacity to capture their genomic distributions. PMID:17442102

  13. Ten polymorphic microsatellite loci identified from a small insert genomic library for Peronospora tabacina

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ten polymorphic microsatellite loci for the oomycete obligate, biotrophic pathogen Peronospora tabacina of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) were identified from a small insert genomic library enriched for GT motifs. Eighty-five percent of the loci were composed of dinucleotide repeats, whereas only 4% ...

  14. Microsatellites in the Genome of the Edible Mushroom, Volvariella volvacea

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mingjie; Wang, Hong; Bao, Dapeng

    2014-01-01

    Using bioinformatics software and database, we have characterized the microsatellite pattern in the V. volvacea genome and compared it with microsatellite patterns found in the genomes of four other edible fungi: Coprinopsis cinerea, Schizophyllum commune, Agaricus bisporus, and Pleurotus ostreatus. A total of 1346 microsatellites have been identified, with mono-nucleotides being the most frequent motif. The relative abundance of microsatellites was lower in coding regions with 21 No./Mb. However, the microsatellites in the V. volvacea gene models showed a greater tendency to be located in the CDS regions. There was also a higher preponderance of trinucleotide repeats, especially in the kinase genes, which implied a possible role in phenotypic variation. Among the five fungal genomes, microsatellite abundance appeared to be unrelated to genome size. Furthermore, the short motifs (mono- to tri-nucleotides) outnumbered other categories although these differed in proportion. Data analysis indicated a possible relationship between the most frequent microsatellite types and the genetic distance between the five fungal genomes. PMID:24575404

  15. Evolution of coding microsatellites in primate genomes.

    PubMed

    Loire, Etienne; Higuet, Dominique; Netter, Pierre; Achaz, Guillaume

    2013-01-01

    Microsatellites (SSRs) are highly susceptible to expansions and contractions. When located in a coding sequence, the insertion or the deletion of a single unit for a mono-, di-, tetra-, or penta(nucleotide)-SSR creates a frameshift. As a consequence, one would expect to find only very few of these SSRs in coding sequences because of their strong deleterious potential. Unexpectedly, genomes contain many coding SSRs of all types. Here, we report on a study of their evolution in a phylogenetic context using the genomes of four primates: human, chimpanzee, orangutan, and macaque. In a set of 5,015 orthologous genes unambiguously aligned among the four species, we show that, except for tri- and hexa-SSRs, for which insertions and deletions are frequently observed, SSRs in coding regions evolve mainly by substitutions. We show that the rate of substitution in all types of coding SSRs is typically two times higher than in the rest of coding sequences. Additionally, we observe that although numerous coding SSRs are created and lost by substitutions in the lineages, their numbers remain constant. This last observation suggests that the coding SSRs have reached equilibrium. We hypothesize that this equilibrium involves a combination of mutation, drift, and selection. We thus estimated the fitness cost of mono-SSRs and show that it increases with the number of units. We finally show that the cost of coding mono-SSRs greatly varies from function to function, suggesting that the strength of the selection that acts against them can be correlated to gene functions.

  16. Evolution of Coding Microsatellites in Primate Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Loire, Etienne; Higuet, Dominique; Netter, Pierre; Achaz, Guillaume

    2013-01-01

    Microsatellites (SSRs) are highly susceptible to expansions and contractions. When located in a coding sequence, the insertion or the deletion of a single unit for a mono-, di-, tetra-, or penta(nucleotide)-SSR creates a frameshift. As a consequence, one would expect to find only very few of these SSRs in coding sequences because of their strong deleterious potential. Unexpectedly, genomes contain many coding SSRs of all types. Here, we report on a study of their evolution in a phylogenetic context using the genomes of four primates: human, chimpanzee, orangutan, and macaque. In a set of 5,015 orthologous genes unambiguously aligned among the four species, we show that, except for tri- and hexa-SSRs, for which insertions and deletions are frequently observed, SSRs in coding regions evolve mainly by substitutions. We show that the rate of substitution in all types of coding SSRs is typically two times higher than in the rest of coding sequences. Additionally, we observe that although numerous coding SSRs are created and lost by substitutions in the lineages, their numbers remain constant. This last observation suggests that the coding SSRs have reached equilibrium. We hypothesize that this equilibrium involves a combination of mutation, drift, and selection. We thus estimated the fitness cost of mono-SSRs and show that it increases with the number of units. We finally show that the cost of coding mono-SSRs greatly varies from function to function, suggesting that the strength of the selection that acts against them can be correlated to gene functions. PMID:23315383

  17. Association of microsatellite pairs with segmental duplications in insect genomes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Segmental duplications (SDs), also known as low-copy repeats, are DNA sequences of length greater than 1 kb which are duplicated with a high degree of sequence identity (greater than 90%) causing instability in genomes. SDs are generally found in the genome as mosaic forms of duplicated sequences which are generated by a two-step process: first, multiple duplicated sequences are aggregated at specific genomic regions, and then, these primary duplications undergo multiple secondary duplications. However, the mechanism of how duplicated sequences are aggregated in the first place is not well understood. Results By analyzing the distribution of microsatellite sequences among twenty insect species in a genome-wide manner it was found that pairs of microsatellites along with the intervening sequences were duplicated multiple times in each genome. They were found as low copy repeats or segmental duplications when the duplicated loci were greater than 1 kb in length and had greater than 90% sequence similarity. By performing a sliding-window genomic analysis for number of paired microsatellites and number of segmental duplications, it was observed that regions rich in repetitive paired microsatellites tend to get richer in segmental duplication suggesting a “rich-gets-richer” mode of aggregation of the duplicated loci in specific regions of the genome. Results further show that the relationship between number of paired microsatellites and segmental duplications among the species is independent of the known phylogeny suggesting that association of microsatellites with segmental duplications may be a species-specific evolutionary process. It was also observed that the repetitive microsatellite pairs are associated with gene duplications but those sequences are rarely retained in the orthologous genes between species. Although some of the duplicated sequences with microsatellites as termini were found within transposable elements (TEs) of Drosophila, most of

  18. Genomic Microsatellites as Evolutionary Chronometers: A Test in Wild Cats

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, Carlos A.; Menotti-Raymond, Marilyn; Nelson, George; Goldstein, David; O'Brien, Stephen J.

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear microsatellite loci (2- to 5-bp tandem repeats) would seem to be ideal markers for population genetic monitoring because of their abundant polymorphism, wide dispersal in vertebrate genomes, near selective neutrality, and ease of assessment; however, questions about their mode of generation, mutation rates and ascertainment bias have limited interpretation considerably. We have assessed the patterns of genomic diversity for ninety feline microsatellite loci among previously characterized populations of cheetahs, lions and pumas in recapitulating demographic history. The results imply that the microsatellite diversity measures (heterozygosity, allele reconstitution and microsatellite allele variance) offer proportionate indicators, albeit with large variance, of historic population bottlenecks and founder effects. The observed rate of reconstruction of new alleles plus the growth in the breadth of microsatellite allele size (variance) was used here to develop genomic estimates of time intervals following historic founder events in cheetahs (12,000 yr ago), in North American pumas (10,000–17,000 yr ago), and in Asiatic lions of the Gir Forest (1000–4000 yr ago). [Supplemental material available online at http://rex.nci.nih.gov/lgd/front_page.htm and at http://www.genome.org.] PMID:11875029

  19. Genomic microsatellites as evolutionary chronometers: a test in wild cats.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, Carlos A; Menotti-Raymond, Marilyn; Nelson, George; Goldstein, David; O'Brien, Stephen J

    2002-03-01

    Nuclear microsatellite loci (2- to 5-bp tandem repeats) would seem to be ideal markers for population genetic monitoring because of their abundant polymorphism, wide dispersal in vertebrate genomes, near selective neutrality, and ease of assessment; however, questions about their mode of generation, mutation rates and ascertainment bias have limited interpretation considerably. We have assessed the patterns of genomic diversity for ninety feline microsatellite loci among previously characterized populations of cheetahs, lions and pumas in recapitulating demographic history. The results imply that the microsatellite diversity measures (heterozygosity, allele reconstitution and microsatellite allele variance) offer proportionate indicators, albeit with large variance, of historic population bottlenecks and founder effects. The observed rate of reconstruction of new alleles plus the growth in the breadth of microsatellite allele size (variance) was used here to develop genomic estimates of time intervals following historic founder events in cheetahs (12,000 yr ago), in North American pumas (10,000-17,000 yr ago), and in Asiatic lions of the Gir Forest (1000-4000 yr ago).

  20. Microsatellite landscape evolutionary dynamics across 450 million years of vertebrate genome evolution.

    PubMed

    Adams, Richard H; Blackmon, Heath; Reyes-Velasco, Jacobo; Schield, Drew R; Card, Daren C; Andrew, Audra L; Waynewood, Nyimah; Castoe, Todd A

    2016-05-01

    The evolutionary dynamics of simple sequence repeats (SSRs or microsatellites) across the vertebrate tree of life remain largely undocumented and poorly understood. In this study, we analyzed patterns of genomic microsatellite abundance and evolution across 71 vertebrate genomes. The highest abundances of microsatellites exist in the genomes of ray-finned fishes, squamate reptiles, and mammals, while crocodilian, turtle, and avian genomes exhibit reduced microsatellite landscapes. We used comparative methods to infer evolutionary rates of change in microsatellite abundance across vertebrates and to highlight particular lineages that have experienced unusually high or low rates of change in genomic microsatellite abundance. Overall, most variation in microsatellite content, abundance, and evolutionary rate is observed among major lineages of reptiles, yet we found that several deeply divergent clades (i.e., squamate reptiles and mammals) contained relatively similar genomic microsatellite compositions. Archosauromorph reptiles (turtles, crocodilians, and birds) exhibit reduced genomic microsatellite content and the slowest rates of microsatellite evolution, in contrast to squamate reptile genomes that have among the highest rates of microsatellite evolution. Substantial branch-specific shifts in SSR content in primates, monotremes, rodents, snakes, and fish are also evident. Collectively, our results support multiple major shifts in microsatellite genomic landscapes among vertebrates.

  1. Development of microsatellite loci in Artocarpus altilis (Moraceae) and cross-amplification in congeneric species

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Microsatellite loci were isolated and characterized from enriched genomic libraries of Artocarpus altilis (breadfruit) and tested in three other Artocarpus species and one hybrid. The microsatellite markers provide new tools for further studies in Artocarpus. Nineteen microsatellite primers were tes...

  2. The microsatellites and minisatellites in the genome of Fenneropenaeus chinensis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Huan; Kong, Jie

    2005-12-01

    Through two-time sequencing randomly in Fenneropenaeus chinensis, 2,597,000 bp cumulative length random genomic sequences about occupying 1.23 per thousand of the entire genome are obtained, in which the length of the first time sequencing is 884,000 bp, by cutting the genome DNA with Sau3AI enzyme, and the second is 1,713,000 bp by breaking the genome DNA with the physical method, ultrasonic. Using tandem repeat finder (TRF) soft to analyze the sequences, 4,588 tandem repeats are found, in which the number of microsatellites (1-6 bp) is 3,888, and 700 for minisatellites ( >or= 7 bp). The cumulative length of repeats is 305,555 bp, accounting for 11.72% of total cumulative sequence length, in which the cumulative length of microsatellites is 232,979 bp, accounting for 8.97% of total sequence length, and greater than those of other organisms, such as human and mosquito, etc. The dinucleotide repeat type is dominant in which the dominant repeat class is AT. The second abundant repeat type is trinucleotide, of which the dominant repeat class is AAT. Interestingly, of all of repeat types, the repeat numbers and repeat classes of primer number repeat types, such as pentanucleotide, heptanucleotide, elevennucleotide, etc. are less than those of repeat types beside them. The phenomena may involve the genesis and the evolution of microsatellites and minisatellites.

  3. Genome microsatellite diversity within the Apicomplexa phylum.

    PubMed

    Isaza, Juan Pablo; Alzate, Juan Fernando

    2016-12-01

    The Apicomplexa phylum groups include unicellular and obligate intracellular protozoan parasites with an apical complex used for attachment and invasion to host cells. In this study, we analyze single sequence repeats (SSRs) in the whole genome of 20 apicomplexan organisms that represent four different lineages within the phylum. Only perfect SSRs with at least 12 nucleotides and composed of 2-6 mers were included. To better understand the association of SSR types with the genomic regions, the SSRs were classified accordingly with the genomic location into exon, intron and intergenic categories. Our results showed heterogeneous SSRs density within the studied genomes. However, the most frequent SSRs types were di- and tri-nucleotide repeats. The former was associated with intergenic regions, while the latter was associated with exon regions.

  4. Isolation and characterization of novel microsatellite markers from the sika deer (Cervus nippon) genome.

    PubMed

    Li, Y M; Bai, C Y; Niu, W P; Yu, H; Yang, R J; Yan, S Q; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, M J; Zhao, Z H

    2015-09-28

    Microsatellite markers are widely and evenly distributed, and are highly polymorphic. Rapid and convenient detection through automated analysis means that microsatellite markers are widely used in the construction of plant and animal genetic maps, in quantitative trait loci localization, marker-assisted selection, identification of genetic relationships, and genetic diversity and phylogenetic tree construction. However, few microsatellite markers remain to be isolated. We used streptavidin magnetic beads to affinity-capture and construct a (CA)n microsatellite DNA-enriched library from sika deer. We selected sequences containing more than six repeats to design primers. Clear bands were selected, which were amplified using non-specific primers following PCR amplification to screen polymorphisms in a group of 65 unrelated sika deer. The positive clone rate reached 82.9% by constructing the enriched library, and we then selected positive clones for sequencing. There were 395 sequences with CA repeats, and the CA repeat number was 4-105. We selected sequences containing more than six repeats to design primers, of which 297 pairs were designed. We next selected clear bands and used non-specific primers to amplify following PCR amplification. In total, 245 pairs of primers were screened. We then selected 50 pairs of primers to randomly screen for polymorphisms. We detected 47 polymorphic and 3 monomorphic loci in 65 unrelated sika deer. These newly isolated and characterized microsatellite loci can be used to construct genetic maps and for lineage testing in deer. In addition, they can be used for comparative genomics between Cervidae species.

  5. Low abundance of microsatellite repeats in the genome of the Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Longmire, J.L.; Hahn, D.C.; Roach, J.L.

    1999-01-01

    A cosmid library made from brown-headed cowbird (Molothrus ater) DNA was examined for representation of 17 distinct microsatellite motifs including all possible mono-, di-, and trinucleotide microsatellites, and the tetranucleotide repeat (GATA)n. The overall density of microsatellites within cowbird DNA was found to be one repeat per 89 kb and the frequency of the most abundant motif, (AGC)n, was once every 382 kb. The abundance of microsatellites within the cowbird genome is estimated to be reduced approximately 15-fold compared to humans. The reduced frequency of microsatellites seen in this study is consistent with previous observations indicating reduced numbers of microsatellites and other interspersed repeats in avian DNA. In addition to providing new information concerning the abundance of microsatellites within an avian genome, these results provide useful insights for selecting cloning strategies that might be used in the development of locus-specific microsatellite markers for avian studies.

  6. Genome Variability and Gene Content in Chordopoxviruses: Dependence on Microsatellites

    PubMed Central

    Hatcher, Eneida L.; Wang, Chunlin; Lefkowitz, Elliot J.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate gene loss in poxviruses belonging to the Chordopoxvirinae subfamily, we assessed the gene content of representative members of the subfamily, and determined whether individual genes present in each genome were intact, truncated, or fragmented. When nonintact genes were identified, the early stop mutations (ESMs) leading to gene truncation or fragmentation were analyzed. Of all the ESMs present in these poxvirus genomes, over 65% co-localized with microsatellites—simple sequence nucleotide repeats. On average, microsatellites comprise 24% of the nucleotide sequence of these poxvirus genomes. These simple repeats have been shown to exhibit high rates of variation, and represent a target for poxvirus protein variation, gene truncation, and reductive evolution. PMID:25912716

  7. Analysis of microsatellite markers in the genome of the plant pathogen Ceratocystis fimbriata.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Melissa C; Wilken, P Markus; Coetzee, Martin P A; Wingfield, Michael J; Wingfield, Brenda D

    2013-01-01

    Ceratocystis fimbriata sensu lato represents a complex of cryptic and commonly plant pathogenic species that are morphologically similar. Species in this complex have been described using morphological characteristics, intersterility tests and phylogenetics. Microsatellite markers have been useful to study the population structure and origin of some species in the complex. In this study we sequenced the genome of C. fimbriata. This provided an opportunity to mine the genome for microsatellites, to develop new microsatellite markers, and map previously developed markers onto the genome. Over 6000 microsatellites were identified in the genome and their abundance and distribution was determined. Ceratocystis fimbriata has a medium level of microsatellite density and slightly smaller genome when compared with other fungi for which similar microsatellite analyses have been performed. This is the first report of a microsatellite analysis conducted on a genome sequence of a fungal species in the order Microascales. Forty-seven microsatellite markers have been published for population genetic studies, of which 35 could be mapped onto the C. fimbriata genome sequence. We developed an additional ten microsatellite markers within putative genes to differentiate between species in the C. fimbriata s.l. complex. These markers were used to distinguish between 12 species in the complex.

  8. GLANET: genomic loci annotation and enrichment tool.

    PubMed

    Otlu, Burçak; Firtina, Can; Keles, Sündüz; Tastan, Oznur

    2017-09-15

    Genomic studies identify genomic loci representing genetic variations, transcription factor (TF) occupancy, or histone modification through next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies. Interpreting these loci requires evaluating them with known genomic and epigenomic annotations. We present GLANET as a comprehensive annotation and enrichment analysis tool which implements a sampling-based enrichment test that accounts for GC content and/or mappability biases, jointly or separately. GLANET annotates and performs enrichment analysis on these loci with a rich library. We introduce and perform novel data-driven computational experiments for assessing the power and Type-I error of its enrichment procedure which show that GLANET has attained high statistical power and well-controlled Type-I error rate. As a key feature, users can easily extend its library with new gene sets and genomic intervals. Other key features include assessment of impact of single nucleotide variants (SNPs) on TF binding sites and regulation based pathway enrichment analysis. GLANET can be run using its GUI or on command line. GLANET's source code is available at https://github.com/burcakotlu/GLANET . Tutorials are provided at https://glanet.readthedocs.org . burcak@ceng.metu.edu.tr or oznur.tastan@cs.bilkent.edu.tr. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  9. Effective DNA fragmentation technique for simple sequence repeat detection with a microsatellite-enriched library and high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Keisuke; Ohtake, Rumi; Yoshida, Saki; Shinohara, Takashi

    2017-04-01

    Two different techniques for genomic DNA fragmentation before microsatellite-enriched library construction-restriction enzyme (NlaIII and MseI) digestion and sonication-were compared to examine their effects on simple sequence repeat (SSR) detection using high-throughput sequencing. Tens of thousands of SSR regions from 5 species of the plant family Myrtaceae were detected when the output of individual samples was >1 million paired-end reads. Comparison of the two DNA fragmentation techniques showed that restriction enzyme digestion was superior to sonication for identification of heterozygous genotypes, whereas sonication was superior for detection of various SSR flanking regions with both species-specific and common characteristics. Therefore, choosing the most suitable DNA fragmentation method depends on the type of analysis that is planned.

  10. Genome-wide microsatellite identification in the fungus Anisogramma anomala using Illumina sequencing and genome assembly.

    PubMed

    Cai, Guohong; Leadbetter, Clayton W; Muehlbauer, Megan F; Molnar, Thomas J; Hillman, Bradley I

    2013-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing has been dramatically accelerating the discovery of microsatellite markers (also known as Simple Sequence Repeats). Both 454 and Illumina reads have been used directly in microsatellite discovery and primer design (the "Seq-to-SSR" approach). However, constraints of this approach include: 1) many microsatellite-containing reads do not have sufficient flanking sequences to allow primer design, and 2) difficulties in removing microsatellite loci residing in longer, repetitive regions. In the current study, we applied the novel "Seq-Assembly-SSR" approach to overcome these constraints in Anisogramma anomala. In our approach, Illumina reads were first assembled into a draft genome, and the latter was then used in microsatellite discovery. A. anomala is an obligate biotrophic ascomycete that causes eastern filbert blight disease of commercial European hazelnut. Little is known about its population structure or diversity. Approximately 26 M 146 bp Illumina reads were generated from a paired-end library of a fungal strain from Oregon. The reads were assembled into a draft genome of 333 Mb (excluding gaps), with contig N50 of 10,384 bp and scaffold N50 of 32,987 bp. A bioinformatics pipeline identified 46,677 microsatellite motifs at 44,247 loci, including 2,430 compound loci. Primers were successfully designed for 42,923 loci (97%). After removing 2,886 loci close to assembly gaps and 676 loci in repetitive regions, a genome-wide microsatellite database of 39,361 loci was generated for the fungus. In experimental screening of 236 loci using four geographically representative strains, 228 (96.6%) were successfully amplified and 214 (90.7%) produced single PCR products. Twenty-three (9.7%) were found to be perfect polymorphic loci. A small-scale population study using 11 polymorphic loci revealed considerable gene diversity. Clustering analysis grouped isolates of this fungus into two clades in accordance with their geographic origins. Thus, the

  11. Application of a simplified method of chloroplast enrichment to small amounts of tissue for chloroplast genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Shota; Ueno, Saneyoshi; Tsumura, Yoshihiko; Setoguchi, Hiroaki; Ito, Motomi; Hattori, Chie; Nozoe, Shogo; Takahashi, Daiki; Nakamasu, Riku; Sakagami, Taishi; Lannuzel, Guillaume; Fogliani, Bruno; Wulff, Adrien S; L'Huillier, Laurent; Isagi, Yuji

    2017-05-01

    High-throughput sequencing of genomic DNA can recover complete chloroplast genome sequences, but the sequence data are usually dominated by sequences from nuclear/mitochondrial genomes. To overcome this deficiency, a simple enrichment method for chloroplast DNA from small amounts of plant tissue was tested for eight plant species including a gymnosperm and various angiosperms. Chloroplasts were enriched using a high-salt isolation buffer without any step gradient procedures, and enriched chloroplast DNA was sequenced by multiplexed high-throughput sequencing. Using this simple method, significant enrichment of chloroplast DNA-derived reads was attained, allowing deep sequencing of chloroplast genomes. As an example, the chloroplast genome of the conifer Callitris sulcata was assembled, from which polymorphic microsatellite loci were isolated successfully. This chloroplast enrichment method from small amounts of plant tissue will be particularly useful for studies that use sequencers with relatively small throughput and that cannot use large amounts of tissue (e.g., for endangered species).

  12. Rapid microsatellite identification from illumina paired-end genomic sequencing in two birds and a snake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Castoe, T.A.; Poole, A.W.; de Koning, A. P. J.; Jones, K.L.; Tomback, D.F.; Oyler-McCance, S.J.; Fike, J.A.; Lance, S.L.; Streicher, J.W.; Smith, E.N.; Pollock, D.D.

    2012-01-01

    Identification of microsatellites, or simple sequence repeats (SSRs), can be a time-consuming and costly investment requiring enrichment, cloning, and sequencing of candidate loci. Recently, however, high throughput sequencing (with or without prior enrichment for specific SSR loci) has been utilized to identify SSR loci. The direct "Seq-to-SSR" approach has an advantage over enrichment-based strategies in that it does not require a priori selection of particular motifs, or prior knowledge of genomic SSR content. It has been more expensive per SSR locus recovered, however, particularly for genomes with few SSR loci, such as bird genomes. The longer but relatively more expensive 454 reads have been preferred over less expensive Illumina reads. Here, we use Illumina paired-end sequence data to identify potentially amplifiable SSR loci (PALs) from a snake (the Burmese python, Python molurus bivittatus), and directly compare these results to those from 454 data. We also compare the python results to results from Illumina sequencing of two bird genomes (Gunnison Sage-grouse, Centrocercus minimus, and Clark's Nutcracker, Nucifraga columbiana), which have considerably fewer SSRs than the python. We show that direct Illumina Seq-to-SSR can identify and characterize thousands of potentially amplifiable SSR loci for as little as $10 per sample - a fraction of the cost of 454 sequencing. Given that Illumina Seq-to-SSR is effective, inexpensive, and reliable even for species such as birds that have few SSR loci, it seems that there are now few situations for which prior hybridization is justifiable. ?? 2012 Castoe et al.

  13. Rapid microsatellite identification from Illumina paired-end genomic sequencing in two birds and a snake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Castoe, Todd A.; Poole, Alexander W.; de Koning, A. P. Jason; Jones, Kenneth L.; Tomback, Diana F.; Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; Fike, Jennifer A.; Lance, Stacey L.; Streicher, Jeffrey W.; Smith, Eric N.; Pollock, David D.

    2012-01-01

    Identification of microsatellites, or simple sequence repeats (SSRs), can be a time-consuming and costly investment requiring enrichment, cloning, and sequencing of candidate loci. Recently, however, high throughput sequencing (with or without prior enrichment for specific SSR loci) has been utilized to identify SSR loci. The direct "Seq-to-SSR" approach has an advantage over enrichment-based strategies in that it does not require a priori selection of particular motifs, or prior knowledge of genomic SSR content. It has been more expensive per SSR locus recovered, however, particularly for genomes with few SSR loci, such as bird genomes. The longer but relatively more expensive 454 reads have been preferred over less expensive Illumina reads. Here, we use Illumina paired-end sequence data to identify potentially amplifiable SSR loci (PALs) from a snake (the Burmese python, Python molurus bivittatus), and directly compare these results to those from 454 data. We also compare the python results to results from Illumina sequencing of two bird genomes (Gunnison Sage-grouse, Centrocercus minimus, and Clark's Nutcracker, Nucifraga columbiana), which have considerably fewer SSRs than the python. We show that direct Illumina Seq-to-SSR can identify and characterize thousands of potentially amplifiable SSR loci for as little as $10 per sample – a fraction of the cost of 454 sequencing. Given that Illumina Seq-to-SSR is effective, inexpensive, and reliable even for species such as birds that have few SSR loci, it seems that there are now few situations for which prior hybridization is justifiable.

  14. Rapid Microsatellite Identification from Illumina Paired-End Genomic Sequencing in Two Birds and a Snake

    PubMed Central

    Castoe, Todd A.; Poole, Alexander W.; de Koning, A. P. Jason; Jones, Kenneth L.; Tomback, Diana F.; Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; Fike, Jennifer A.; Lance, Stacey L.; Streicher, Jeffrey W.; Smith, Eric N.; Pollock, David D.

    2012-01-01

    Identification of microsatellites, or simple sequence repeats (SSRs), can be a time-consuming and costly investment requiring enrichment, cloning, and sequencing of candidate loci. Recently, however, high throughput sequencing (with or without prior enrichment for specific SSR loci) has been utilized to identify SSR loci. The direct “Seq-to-SSR” approach has an advantage over enrichment-based strategies in that it does not require a priori selection of particular motifs, or prior knowledge of genomic SSR content. It has been more expensive per SSR locus recovered, however, particularly for genomes with few SSR loci, such as bird genomes. The longer but relatively more expensive 454 reads have been preferred over less expensive Illumina reads. Here, we use Illumina paired-end sequence data to identify potentially amplifiable SSR loci (PALs) from a snake (the Burmese python, Python molurus bivittatus), and directly compare these results to those from 454 data. We also compare the python results to results from Illumina sequencing of two bird genomes (Gunnison Sage-grouse, Centrocercus minimus, and Clark's Nutcracker, Nucifraga columbiana), which have considerably fewer SSRs than the python. We show that direct Illumina Seq-to-SSR can identify and characterize thousands of potentially amplifiable SSR loci for as little as $10 per sample – a fraction of the cost of 454 sequencing. Given that Illumina Seq-to-SSR is effective, inexpensive, and reliable even for species such as birds that have few SSR loci, it seems that there are now few situations for which prior hybridization is justifiable. PMID:22348032

  15. Rapid microsatellite identification from Illumina paired-end genomic sequencing in two birds and a snake.

    PubMed

    Castoe, Todd A; Poole, Alexander W; de Koning, A P Jason; Jones, Kenneth L; Tomback, Diana F; Oyler-McCance, Sara J; Fike, Jennifer A; Lance, Stacey L; Streicher, Jeffrey W; Smith, Eric N; Pollock, David D

    2012-01-01

    Identification of microsatellites, or simple sequence repeats (SSRs), can be a time-consuming and costly investment requiring enrichment, cloning, and sequencing of candidate loci. Recently, however, high throughput sequencing (with or without prior enrichment for specific SSR loci) has been utilized to identify SSR loci. The direct "Seq-to-SSR" approach has an advantage over enrichment-based strategies in that it does not require a priori selection of particular motifs, or prior knowledge of genomic SSR content. It has been more expensive per SSR locus recovered, however, particularly for genomes with few SSR loci, such as bird genomes. The longer but relatively more expensive 454 reads have been preferred over less expensive Illumina reads. Here, we use Illumina paired-end sequence data to identify potentially amplifiable SSR loci (PALs) from a snake (the Burmese python, Python molurus bivittatus), and directly compare these results to those from 454 data. We also compare the python results to results from Illumina sequencing of two bird genomes (Gunnison Sage-grouse, Centrocercus minimus, and Clark's Nutcracker, Nucifraga columbiana), which have considerably fewer SSRs than the python. We show that direct Illumina Seq-to-SSR can identify and characterize thousands of potentially amplifiable SSR loci for as little as $10 per sample--a fraction of the cost of 454 sequencing. Given that Illumina Seq-to-SSR is effective, inexpensive, and reliable even for species such as birds that have few SSR loci, it seems that there are now few situations for which prior hybridization is justifiable.

  16. Discrepancy variation of dinucleotide microsatellite repeats in eukaryotic genomes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Huan; Cai, Shengli; Yan, Binlun; Chen, Baiyao; Yu, Fei

    2009-01-01

    To address whether there are differences of variation among repeat motif types and among taxonomic groups, we present here an analysis of variation and correlation of dinucleotide microsatellite repeats in eukaryotic genomes. Ten taxonomic groups were compared, those being primates, mammalia (excluding primates and rodentia), rodentia, birds, fish, amphibians and reptiles, insects, molluscs, plants and fungi, respectively. The data used in the analysis is from the literature published in the Journal of Molecular Ecology Notes. Analysis of variation reveals that there are no significant differences between AC and AG repeat motif types. Moreover, the number of alleles correlates positively with the copy number in both AG and AC repeats. Similar conclusions can be obtained from each taxonomic group. These results strongly suggest that the increase of SSR variation is almost linear with the increase of the copy number of each repeat motif. As well, the results suggest that the variability of SSR in the genomes of low-ranking species seem to be more than that of high-ranking species, excluding primates and fungi.

  17. Genomic characterization of EmsB microsatellite loci in Echinococcus multilocularis.

    PubMed

    Valot, Benoît; Knapp, Jenny; Umhang, Gérald; Grenouillet, Frédéric; Millon, Laurence

    2015-06-01

    EmsB is a molecular marker applied to Echinococcus multilocularis genotyping studies. This marker has largely been used to investigate the epidemiology of the parasite in different endemic foci. The present study has lifted the veil on the genetic structure of this microsatellite. By in silico analysis on the E. multilocularis genome the microsatellite was described in about 40 copies on the chromosome 5 of the parasite. Similar structure was found in the relative parasite Echinococcus granulosus, where the microsatellite was firstly described. The present study completes the first investigations made on the EmsB microsatellite origins and confirms the reliability of this highly discriminant molecular marker.

  18. Isolation of novel microsatellites using FIASCO by dual probe enrichment from Jatropha curcas L. and study on genetic equilibrium and diversity of Indian population revealed by isolated microsatellites.

    PubMed

    Sudheer, Pamidimarri D V N; Rahman, Hifzur; Mastan, Shaik G; Reddy, Muppala P

    2010-12-01

    Jatropha curcas L. belongs to family Euphorbiaceae, native to South America attained significant importance for its seed oil which can be converted to biodiesel, a renewable energy source alternative to conventional petrodiesel. Very few attempts were made to isolate novel microsatellite markers and assessment of the extent of genetic equilibrium and diversity that exists in J. curcas. Therefore, the present investigation was undertaken to isolate the novel microsatellites and access genetic equilibrium, diversity that exists among 44 diverse germplasm collected from distinct geographical areas in India using isolated microsatellites. The overall efficiency of the enrichment of microsatellite by dual probe in the present study found to be 54% and among the sequences obtained the percentage of sequences having suitable flanking regions for the primer designing was found to be 89.58%. The mean co-efficient of genetic similarity (CGS) was found to be 0.97. The overall diversity obtained by microsatellites was found to be low in comparison with the diversity reported by multilocus markers systems observed in earlier studies; however, the good allele polymorphism was observed. The overall dendrogram of microsatellite analysis resulted in random clustering of germplasm and not in accordance to geographical area of collection. The present study, diversity analysis using microsatellite markers concludes the low genetic diversity and genetic disequlibrium of J. curcas in India and will provide pavement for further intra-population studies on narrow geographical areas to understand the population genetic structure, phylogeography and molecular ecological studies. The germplasm characterized, and the microsatellite markers isolated and characterized in the present study can be employed efficiently in breeding programs for genetic improvement of the species through marker assisted selection and QTL analysis, for further genetic resource management and help in making the J

  19. Genome-wide survey and analysis of microsatellites in the Pacific oyster genome: abundance, distribution, and potential for marker development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiafeng; Qi, Haigang; Li, Li; Zhang, Guofan

    2014-01-01

    Microsatellites are a ubiquitous component of the eukaryote genome and constitute one of the most popular sources of molecular markers for genetic studies. However, no data are currently available regarding microsatellites across the entire genome in oysters, despite their importance to the aquaculture industry. We present the first genome-wide investigation of microsatellites in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas by analysis of the complete genome, resequencing, and expression data. The Pacific oyster genome is rich in microsatellites. A total of 604 653 repeats were identified, in average of one locus per 815 base pairs (bp). A total of 12 836 genes had coding repeats, and 7 332 were expressed normally, including genes with a wide range of molecular functions. Compared with 20 different species of animals, microsatellites in the oyster genome typically exhibited 1) an intermediate overall frequency; 2) relatively uniform contents of (A)n and (C)n repeats and abundant long (C)n repeats (≥24 bp); 3) large average length of (AG)n repeats; and 4) scarcity of trinucleotide repeats. The microsatellite-flanking regions exhibited a high degree of polymorphism with a heterozygosity rate of around 2.0%, but there was no correlation between heterozygosity and microsatellite abundance. A total of 19 462 polymorphic microsatellites were discovered, and dinucleotide repeats were the most active, with over 26% of loci found to harbor allelic variations. In all, 7 451 loci with high potential for marker development were identified. Better knowledge of the microsatellites in the oyster genome will provide information for the future design of a wide range of molecular markers and contribute to further advancements in the field of oyster genetics, particularly for molecular-based selection and breeding.

  20. Genome-wide characterization of microsatellites and marker development in the carcinogenic liver fluke Clonorchis sinensis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thao T B; Arimatsu, Yuji; Hong, Sung-Jong; Brindley, Paul J; Blair, David; Laha, Thewarach; Sripa, Banchob

    2015-06-01

    Clonorchis sinensis is an important carcinogenic human liver fluke endemic in East and Southeast Asia. There are several conventional molecular markers that have been used for identification and genetic diversity; however, no information about microsatellites of this liver fluke is published so far. We here report microsatellite characterization and marker development for a genetic diversity study in C. sinensis, using a genome-wide bioinformatics approach. Based on our search criteria, a total of 256,990 microsatellites (≥12 base pairs) were identified from a genome database of C. sinensis, with hexanucleotide motif being the most abundant (51%) followed by pentanucleotide (18.3%) and trinucleotide (12.7%). The tetranucleotide, dinucleotide, and mononucleotide motifs accounted for 9.75, 7.63, and 0.14%, respectively. The total length of all microsatellites accounts for 0. 72% of 547 Mb of the whole genome size, and the frequency of microsatellites was found to be one microsatellite in every 2.13 kb of DNA. For the di-, tri-, and tetranucleotide, the repeat numbers redundant are six (28%), four (45%), and three (76%), respectively. The ATC repeat is the most abundant microsatellites followed by AT, AAT, and AC, respectively. Within 40 microsatellite loci developed, 24 microsatellite markers showed potential to differentiate between C. sinensis and Opisthorchis viverrini. Seven out of 24 loci showed to be heterozygous with observed heterozygosity that ranged from 0.467 to 1. Four primer sets could amplify both C. sinensis and O. viverrini DNA with different sizes. This study provides basic information of C. sinensis microsatellites, and the genome-wide markers developed may be a useful tool for the genetic study of C. sinensis.

  1. Genome-wide microsatellite characterization and marker development in the sequenced Brassica crop species.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jiaqin; Huang, Shunmou; Zhan, Jiepeng; Yu, Jingyin; Wang, Xinfa; Hua, Wei; Liu, Shengyi; Liu, Guihua; Wang, Hanzhong

    2014-02-01

    Although much research has been conducted, the pattern of microsatellite distribution has remained ambiguous, and the development/utilization of microsatellite markers has still been limited/inefficient in Brassica, due to the lack of genome sequences. In view of this, we conducted genome-wide microsatellite characterization and marker development in three recently sequenced Brassica crops: Brassica rapa, Brassica oleracea and Brassica napus. The analysed microsatellite characteristics of these Brassica species were highly similar or almost identical, which suggests that the pattern of microsatellite distribution is likely conservative in Brassica. The genomic distribution of microsatellites was highly non-uniform and positively or negatively correlated with genes or transposable elements, respectively. Of the total of 115 869, 185 662 and 356 522 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers developed with high frequencies (408.2, 343.8 and 356.2 per Mb or one every 2.45, 2.91 and 2.81 kb, respectively), most represented new SSR markers, the majority had determined physical positions, and a large number were genic or putative single-locus SSR markers. We also constructed a comprehensive database for the newly developed SSR markers, which was integrated with public Brassica SSR markers and annotated genome components. The genome-wide SSR markers developed in this study provide a useful tool to extend the annotated genome resources of sequenced Brassica species to genetic study/breeding in different Brassica species.

  2. Genome-Wide Microsatellite Characterization and Marker Development in the Sequenced Brassica Crop Species

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jiaqin; Huang, Shunmou; Zhan, Jiepeng; Yu, Jingyin; Wang, Xinfa; Hua, Wei; Liu, Shengyi; Liu, Guihua; Wang, Hanzhong

    2014-01-01

    Although much research has been conducted, the pattern of microsatellite distribution has remained ambiguous, and the development/utilization of microsatellite markers has still been limited/inefficient in Brassica, due to the lack of genome sequences. In view of this, we conducted genome-wide microsatellite characterization and marker development in three recently sequenced Brassica crops: Brassica rapa, Brassica oleracea and Brassica napus. The analysed microsatellite characteristics of these Brassica species were highly similar or almost identical, which suggests that the pattern of microsatellite distribution is likely conservative in Brassica. The genomic distribution of microsatellites was highly non-uniform and positively or negatively correlated with genes or transposable elements, respectively. Of the total of 115 869, 185 662 and 356 522 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers developed with high frequencies (408.2, 343.8 and 356.2 per Mb or one every 2.45, 2.91 and 2.81 kb, respectively), most represented new SSR markers, the majority had determined physical positions, and a large number were genic or putative single-locus SSR markers. We also constructed a comprehensive database for the newly developed SSR markers, which was integrated with public Brassica SSR markers and annotated genome components. The genome-wide SSR markers developed in this study provide a useful tool to extend the annotated genome resources of sequenced Brassica species to genetic study/breeding in different Brassica species. PMID:24130371

  3. Comparative analysis of microsatellites in chloroplast genomes of lower and higher plants.

    PubMed

    George, Biju; Bhatt, Bhavin S; Awasthi, Mayur; George, Binu; Singh, Achuit K

    2015-11-01

    Microsatellites, or simple sequence repeats (SSRs), contain repetitive DNA sequence where tandem repeats of one to six base pairs are present number of times. Chloroplast genome sequences have been  shown to possess extensive variations in the length, number and distribution of SSRs. However, a comparative analysis of chloroplast microsatellites is not available. Considering their potential importance in generating genomic diversity, we have systematically analysed the abundance and distribution of simple and compound microsatellites in 164 sequenced chloroplast genomes from wide range of plants. The key findings of these studies are (1) a large number of mononucleotide repeats as compared to SSR(2-6)(di-, tri-, tetra-, penta-, hexanucleotide repeats) are present in all chloroplast genomes investigated, (2) lower plants such as algae show wide variation in relative abundance, density and distribution of microsatellite repeats as compared to flowering plants, (3) longer SSRs are excluded from coding regions of most chloroplast genomes, (4) GC content has a weak influence on number, relative abundance and relative density of mononucleotide as well as SSR(2-6). However, GC content strongly showed negative correlation with relative density (R (2) = 0.5, P < 0.05) and relative abundance (R (2) = 0.6, P < 0.05) of cSSRs. In summary, our comparative studies of chloroplast genomes illustrate the variable distribution of microsatellites and revealed that chloroplast genome of smaller plants possesses relatively more genomic diversity compared to higher plants.

  4. Microsatellite spreading in the human genome: evolutionary mechanisms and structural implications.

    PubMed

    Nadir, E; Margalit, H; Gallily, T; Ben-Sasson, S A

    1996-06-25

    Microsatellites are tandem repeat sequences abundant in the genomes of higher eukaryotes and hitherto considered as "junk DNA." Analysis of a human genome representative data base (2.84 Mb) reveals a distinct juxtaposition of A-rich microsatellites and retroposons and suggests their coevolution. The analysis implies that most microsatellites were generated by a 3'-extension of retrotranscripts, similar to mRNA polyadenylylation, and that they serve in turn as "retroposition navigators," directing the retroposons via homology-driven integration into defined sites. Thus, they became instrumental in the preservation and extension of primordial genomic patterns. A role is assigned to these reiterating A-rich loci in the higher-order organization of the chromatin. The disease-associated triplet repeats are mostly found in coding regions and do not show an association with retroposons, constituting a unique set within the family of microsatellite sequences.

  5. Genome-wide survey and analysis of microsatellites in giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), with a focus on the applications of a novel microsatellite marker system.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jie; Li, Yu-Zhi; Du, Lian-Ming; Yang, Bo; Shen, Fu-Jun; Zhang, He-Min; Zhang, Zhi-He; Zhang, Xiu-Yue; Yue, Bi-Song

    2015-02-07

    The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is a critically endangered species endemic to China. Microsatellites have been preferred as the most popular molecular markers and proven effective in estimating population size, paternity test, genetic diversity for the critically endangered species. The availability of the giant panda complete genome sequences provided the opportunity to carry out genome-wide scans for all types of microsatellites markers, which now opens the way for the analysis and development of microsatellites in giant panda. By screening the whole genome sequence of giant panda in silico mining, we identified microsatellites in the genome of giant panda and analyzed their frequency and distribution in different genomic regions. Based on our search criteria, a repertoire of 855,058 SSRs was detected, with mono-nucleotides being the most abundant. SSRs were found in all genomic regions and were more abundant in non-coding regions than coding regions. A total of 160 primer pairs were designed to screen for polymorphic microsatellites using the selected tetranucleotide microsatellite sequences. The 51 novel polymorphic tetranucleotide microsatellite loci were discovered based on genotyping blood DNA from 22 captive giant pandas in this study. Finally, a total of 15 markers, which showed good polymorphism, stability, and repetition in faecal samples, were used to establish the novel microsatellite marker system for giant panda. Meanwhile, a genotyping database for Chengdu captive giant pandas (n = 57) were set up using this standardized system. What's more, a universal individual identification method was established and the genetic diversity were analysed in this study as the applications of this marker system. The microsatellite abundance and diversity were characterized in giant panda genomes. A total of 154,677 tetranucleotide microsatellites were identified and 15 of them were discovered as the polymorphic and stable loci. The individual

  6. Development of a genome-wide anchored microsatellite map for common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Blair, M W; Pedraza, F; Buendia, H F; Gaitán-Solís, E; Beebe, S E; Gepts, P; Tohme, J

    2003-11-01

    A total of 150 microsatellite markers developed for common bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) were tested for parental polymorphism and used to determine the positions of 100 genetic loci on an integrated genetic map of the species. The value of these single-copy markers was evident in their ability to link two existing RFLP-based genetic maps with a base map developed for the Mesoamerican x Andean population, DOR364 x G19833. Two types of microsatellites were mapped, based respectively on gene-coding and anonymous genomic-sequences. Gene-based microsatellites proved to be less polymorphic (46.3%) than anonymous genomic microsatellites (64.3%) between the parents of two inter-genepool crosses. The majority of the microsatellites produced single bands and detected single loci, however four of the gene-based and three of the genomic microsatellites produced consistent double or multiple banding patterns and detected more than one locus. Microsatellite loci were found on each of the 11 chromosomes of common bean, the number per chromosome ranging from 5 to 17 with an average of ten microsatellites each. Total map length for the base map was 1,720 cM and the average chromosome length was 156.4 cM, with an average distance between microsatellite loci of 19.5 cM. The development of new microsatellites from sequences in the Genbank database and the implication of these results for genetic mapping, quantitative trait locus analysis and marker-assisted selection in common bean are described.

  7. Genome-Wide Identification and Transferability of Microsatellite Markers between Palmae Species

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yong; Xia, Wei; Ma, Jianwei; Mason, Annaliese S.; Fan, Haikuo; Shi, Peng; Lei, Xintao; Ma, Zilong; Peng, Ming

    2016-01-01

    The Palmae family contains 202 genera and approximately 2800 species. Except for Elaeis guineensis and Phoenix dactylifera, almost no genetic and genomic information is available for Palmae species. Therefore, this is an obstacle to the conservation and genetic assessment of Palmae species, especially those that are currently endangered. The study was performed to develop a large number of microsatellite markers which can be used for genetic analysis in different Palmae species. Based on the assembled genome of E. guineensis and P. dactylifera, a total of 814 383 and 371 629 microsatellites were identified. Among these microsatellites identified in E. guineensis, 734 509 primer pairs could be designed from the flanking sequences of these microsatellites. The majority (618 762) of these designed primer pairs had in silico products in the genome of E. guineensis. These 618 762 primer pairs were subsequently used to in silico amplify the genome of P. dactylifera. A total of 7 265 conserved microsatellites were identified between E. guineensis and P. dactylifera. One hundred and thirty-five primer pairs flanking the conserved SSRs were stochastically selected and validated to have high cross-genera transferability, varying from 16.7 to 93.3% with an average of 73.7%. These genome-wide conserved microsatellite markers will provide a useful tool for genetic assessment and conservation of different Palmae species in the future. PMID:27826307

  8. Microsatellite interruptions stabilize primate genomes and exist as population-specific single nucleotide polymorphisms within individual human genomes.

    PubMed

    Ananda, Guruprasad; Hile, Suzanne E; Breski, Amanda; Wang, Yanli; Kelkar, Yogeshwar; Makova, Kateryna D; Eckert, Kristin A

    2014-07-01

    Interruptions of microsatellite sequences impact genome evolution and can alter disease manifestation. However, human polymorphism levels at interrupted microsatellites (iMSs) are not known at a genome-wide scale, and the pathways for gaining interruptions are poorly understood. Using the 1000 Genomes Phase-1 variant call set, we interrogated mono-, di-, tri-, and tetranucleotide repeats up to 10 units in length. We detected ∼26,000-40,000 iMSs within each of four human population groups (African, European, East Asian, and American). We identified population-specific iMSs within exonic regions, and discovered that known disease-associated iMSs contain alleles present at differing frequencies among the populations. By analyzing longer microsatellites in primate genomes, we demonstrate that single interruptions result in a genome-wide average two- to six-fold reduction in microsatellite mutability, as compared with perfect microsatellites. Centrally located interruptions lowered mutability dramatically, by two to three orders of magnitude. Using a biochemical approach, we tested directly whether the mutability of a specific iMS is lower because of decreased DNA polymerase strand slippage errors. Modeling the adenomatous polyposis coli tumor suppressor gene sequence, we observed that a single base substitution interruption reduced strand slippage error rates five- to 50-fold, relative to a perfect repeat, during synthesis by DNA polymerases α, β, or η. Computationally, we demonstrate that iMSs arise primarily by base substitution mutations within individual human genomes. Our biochemical survey of human DNA polymerase α, β, δ, κ, and η error rates within certain microsatellites suggests that interruptions are created most frequently by low fidelity polymerases. Our combined computational and biochemical results demonstrate that iMSs are abundant in human genomes and are sources of population-specific genetic variation that may affect genome stability. The

  9. Identification of common, unique and polymorphic microsatellites among 73 cyanobacterial genomes.

    PubMed

    Kabra, Ritika; Kapil, Aditi; Attarwala, Kherunnisa; Rai, Piyush Kant; Shanker, Asheesh

    2016-04-01

    Microsatellites also known as Simple Sequence Repeats are short tandem repeats of 1-6 nucleotides. These repeats are found in coding as well as non-coding regions of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes and play a significant role in the study of gene regulation, genetic mapping, DNA fingerprinting and evolutionary studies. The availability of 73 complete genome sequences of cyanobacteria enabled us to mine and statistically analyze microsatellites in these genomes. The cyanobacterial microsatellites identified through bioinformatics analysis were stored in a user-friendly database named CyanoSat, which is an efficient data representation and query system designed using ASP.net. The information in CyanoSat comprises of perfect, imperfect and compound microsatellites found in coding, non-coding and coding-non-coding regions. Moreover, it contains PCR primers with 200 nucleotides long flanking region. The mined cyanobacterial microsatellites can be freely accessed at www.compubio.in/CyanoSat/home.aspx. In addition to this 82 polymorphic, 13,866 unique and 2390 common microsatellites were also detected. These microsatellites will be useful in strain identification and genetic diversity studies of cyanobacteria.

  10. Microsatellite analysis in the genome of Acanthaceae: An in silico approach

    PubMed Central

    Kaliswamy, Priyadharsini; Vellingiri, Srividhya; Nathan, Bharathi; Selvaraj, Saravanakumar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acanthaceae is one of the advanced and specialized families with conventionally used medicinal plants. Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) play a major role as molecular markers for genome analysis and plant breeding. The microsatellites existing in the complete genome sequences would help to attain a direct role in the genome organization, recombination, gene regulation, quantitative genetic variation, and evolution of genes. Objective: The current study reports the frequency of microsatellites and appropriate markers for the Acanthaceae family genome sequences. Materials and Methods: The whole nucleotide sequences of Acanthaceae species were obtained from National Center for Biotechnology Information database and screened for the presence of SSRs. SSR Locator tool was used to predict the microsatellites and inbuilt Primer3 module was used for primer designing. Results: Totally 110 repeats from 108 sequences of Acanthaceae family plant genomes were identified, and the occurrence of dinucleotide repeats was found to be abundant in the genome sequences. The essential amino acid isoleucine was found rich in all the sequences. We also designed the SSR-based primers/markers for 59 sequences of this family that contains microsatellite repeats in their genome. Conclusion: The identified microsatellites and primers might be useful for breeding and genetic studies of plants that belong to Acanthaceae family in the future. PMID:25709226

  11. Radiation hybrid mapping of 304 novel microsatellites in the domestic cat genome.

    PubMed

    Menotti-Raymond, M; David, V A; Agarwala, R; Schäffer, A A; Stephens, R; O'Brien, S J; Murphy, W J

    2003-01-01

    Effective utilization of the domestic cat as an animal model for hereditary and infectious disease requires the development and implementation of high quality gene maps incorporating microsatellites and conserved coding gene markers. Previous feline linkage and radiation hybrid maps have lacked sufficient microsatellite coverage on all chromosomes to make effective use of full genome scans. Here we report the isolation and genomic mapping of 304 novel polymorphic repeat loci in the feline genome. The new loci were mapped in the domestic cat radiation hybrid panel using an automated fluorescent TAQ-Man based assay. The addition of these 304 microsatellites brings the total number of microsatellites mapped in the feline genome to 580, and the total number of loci placed onto the RH map to 1,126. Microsatellites now span every autosome with an average spacing of roughly one polymorphic STR every five centimorgans, and full genome coverage of one marker every 2.7 megabases. These loci now provide a useful tool for undertaking full-genome scans to identify genes associated with phenotypes of interest, such as those relating to hereditary disease, coat color, patterning and morphology. These resources can also be extended to the remaining 36 species of the cat family for population genetic and evolutionary genomic analyses.

  12. Genome-wide identification of microsatellites in white clover (Trifolium repens L.) using FIASCO and phpSSRMiner

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; He, Ji; Zhao, Patrick X; Bouton, Joseph H; Monteros, Maria J

    2008-01-01

    Background Allotetraploid white clover (Trifolium repens L.) is an important forage legume widely cultivated in most temperate regions. Only a small number of microsatellite markers are publicly available and can be utilized in white clover breeding programs. The objectives of this study were to develop an integrated approach for microsatellite development and to evaluate the approach for the development of new SSR markers for white clover. Results Genomic libraries containing simple sequence repeat (SSR) sequences were constructed using a modified Fast Isolation by AFLP of Sequences COntaining repeats (FIASCO) procedure and phpSSRMiner was used to develop the microsatellite markers. SSR motifs were isolated using two biotin-labeled probes, (CA)17 and (ATG)12. The sequences of 6,816 clones were assembled into 1,698 contigs, 32% of which represented novel sequences based on BLASTN searches. Approximately 32%, 28%, and 16% of these SSRs contained hexa-, tri-, and di-nucleotide repeats, respectively. The most frequent motifs were the CA and ATG complementary repeats and the associated compound sequences. Primer pairs were designed for 859 SSR loci based on sequences from these genomic libraries and from GenBank white clover nucleotide sequences. A total of 191 SSR primers developed from the two libraries were tested for polymorphism in individual clones from the parental genotypes GA43 ('Durana'), 'SRVR' and six F1 progeny from a mapping population. Ninety two percent produced amplicons and 66% of these were polymorphic. Conclusion The combined approach of identifying SSR-enriched fragments by FIASCO coupled with the primer design and in silico amplification using phpSSRMiner represents an efficient and low cost pipeline for the large-scale development of microsatellite markers in plants. The approach described here could be readily adapted and utilized in other non-related species with none or limited genomic resources. PMID:18631390

  13. Characterization of genome-wide microsatellites of Saccharina japonica based on a preliminary assembly of Illumina sequencing reads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Linan; Peng, Jie; Li, Xiaojie; Cui, Cuiju; Sun, Juan; Yang, Guanpin

    2016-06-01

    Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSR) function widely and locate dependently in genome. However, their characteristics are often ignored due to the lack of genomic sequences of most species. Kelp ( Saccharina japonica), a brown macroalga, is extensively cultured in China. In this study, the genome of S. japonica was surveyed using an Illumina sequencing platform, and its microsatellites were characterized. The preliminarily assembled genome was 469.4 Mb in size, with a scaffold N50 of 20529 bp. Among the 128370 identified microsatellites, 90671, 25726 and 11973 were found in intergenic regions, introns and exons, averaging 339.3, 178.8 and 205.4 microsatellites per Mb, respectively. These microsatellites distributed unevenly in S. japonica genome. Mononucleotide motifs were the most abundant in the genome, while trinucleotide ones were the most prevalent in exons. The microsatellite abundance decreased significantly with the increase of motif repeat numbers, and the microsatellites with a small number of repeats accounted for a higher proportion of the exons than those of the intergenic regions and introns. C/G-rich motifs were more common in exons than in intergenic regions and introns. These characteristics of microsatellites in S. japonica genome may associate with their functions, and ultimately their adaptation and evolution. Among the 120140 pairs of designed microsatellite primers, approximately 75% were predicted to be able to amplify S. japonica DNA. These microsatellite markers will be extremely useful for the genetic breeding and population evolution studies of kelp.

  14. Comparative genome-wide polymorphic microsatellite markers in Antarctic penguins through next generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Vianna, Juliana A.; Noll, Daly; Mura-Jornet, Isidora; Valenzuela-Guerra, Paulina; González-Acuña, Daniel; Navarro, Cristell; Loyola, David E.; Dantas, Gisele P. M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Microsatellites are valuable molecular markers for evolutionary and ecological studies. Next generation sequencing is responsible for the increasing number of microsatellites for non-model species. Penguins of the Pygoscelis genus are comprised of three species: Adélie (P. adeliae), Chinstrap (P. antarcticus) and Gentoo penguin (P. papua), all distributed around Antarctica and the sub-Antarctic. The species have been affected differently by climate change, and the use of microsatellite markers will be crucial to monitor population dynamics. We characterized a large set of genome-wide microsatellites and evaluated polymorphisms in all three species. SOLiD reads were generated from the libraries of each species, identifying a large amount of microsatellite loci: 33,677, 35,265 and 42,057 for P. adeliae, P. antarcticus and P. papua, respectively. A large number of dinucleotide (66,139), trinucleotide (29,490) and tetranucleotide (11,849) microsatellites are described. Microsatellite abundance, diversity and orthology were characterized in penguin genomes. We evaluated polymorphisms in 170 tetranucleotide loci, obtaining 34 polymorphic loci in at least one species and 15 polymorphic loci in all three species, which allow to perform comparative studies. Polymorphic markers presented here enable a number of ecological, population, individual identification, parentage and evolutionary studies of Pygoscelis, with potential use in other penguin species. PMID:28898354

  15. Comparative genome-wide polymorphic microsatellite markers in Antarctic penguins through next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Vianna, Juliana A; Noll, Daly; Mura-Jornet, Isidora; Valenzuela-Guerra, Paulina; González-Acuña, Daniel; Navarro, Cristell; Loyola, David E; Dantas, Gisele P M

    Microsatellites are valuable molecular markers for evolutionary and ecological studies. Next generation sequencing is responsible for the increasing number of microsatellites for non-model species. Penguins of the Pygoscelis genus are comprised of three species: Adélie (P. adeliae), Chinstrap (P. antarcticus) and Gentoo penguin (P. papua), all distributed around Antarctica and the sub-Antarctic. The species have been affected differently by climate change, and the use of microsatellite markers will be crucial to monitor population dynamics. We characterized a large set of genome-wide microsatellites and evaluated polymorphisms in all three species. SOLiD reads were generated from the libraries of each species, identifying a large amount of microsatellite loci: 33,677, 35,265 and 42,057 for P. adeliae, P. antarcticus and P. papua, respectively. A large number of dinucleotide (66,139), trinucleotide (29,490) and tetranucleotide (11,849) microsatellites are described. Microsatellite abundance, diversity and orthology were characterized in penguin genomes. We evaluated polymorphisms in 170 tetranucleotide loci, obtaining 34 polymorphic loci in at least one species and 15 polymorphic loci in all three species, which allow to perform comparative studies. Polymorphic markers presented here enable a number of ecological, population, individual identification, parentage and evolutionary studies of Pygoscelis, with potential use in other penguin species.

  16. Microsatellite DNA in genomic survey sequences and UniGenes of loblolly pine

    Treesearch

    Craig S Echt; Surya Saha; Dennis L Deemer; C Dana Nelson

    2011-01-01

    Genomic DNA sequence databases are a potential and growing resource for simple sequence repeat (SSR) marker development in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.). Loblolly pine also has many expressed sequence tags (ESTs) available for microsatellite (SSR) marker development. We compared loblolly pine SSR densities in genome survey sequences (GSSs) to those in non-redundant...

  17. Genome-wide characterization of microsatellites in Triticeae species: abundance, distribution and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Pingchuan; Wang, Meng; Feng, Kewei; Cui, Licao; Tong, Wei; Song, Weining; Nie, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Microsatellites are an important constituent of plant genome and distributed across entire genome. In this study, genome-wide analysis of microsatellites in 8 Triticeae species and 9 model plants revealed that microsatellite characteristics were similar among the Triticeae species. Furthermore, genome-wide microsatellite markers were designed in wheat and then used to analyze the evolutionary relationship of wheat and other Triticeae species. Results displayed that Aegilops tauschii was found to be the closest species to Triticum aestivum, followed by Triticum urartu, Triticum turgidum and Aegilops speltoides, while Triticum monococcum, Aegilops sharonensis and Hordeum vulgare showed a relatively lower PCR amplification effectivity. Additionally, a significantly higher PCR amplification effectivity was found in chromosomes at the same subgenome than its homoeologous when these markers were subjected to search against different chromosomes in wheat. After a rigorous screening process, a total of 20,666 markers showed high amplification and polymorphic potential in wheat and its relatives, which were integrated with the public available wheat markers and then anchored to the genome of wheat (CS). This study not only provided the useful resource for SSR markers development in Triticeae species, but also shed light on the evolution of polyploid wheat from the perspective of microsatellites. PMID:27561724

  18. Identification and Characterization of Microsatellite Markers Derived from the Whole Genome Analysis of Taenia solium

    PubMed Central

    Pajuelo, Mónica J.; Eguiluz, María; Dahlstrom, Eric; Requena, David; Guzmán, Frank; Ramirez, Manuel; Sheen, Patricia; Frace, Michael; Sammons, Scott; Cama, Vitaliano; Anzick, Sarah; Bruno, Dan; Mahanty, Siddhartha; Wilkins, Patricia; Nash, Theodore; Gonzalez, Armando; García, Héctor H.; Gilman, Robert H.; Porcella, Steve; Zimic, Mirko

    2015-01-01

    Background Infections with Taenia solium are the most common cause of adult acquired seizures worldwide, and are the leading cause of epilepsy in developing countries. A better understanding of the genetic diversity of T. solium will improve parasite diagnostics and transmission pathways in endemic areas thereby facilitating the design of future control measures and interventions. Microsatellite markers are useful genome features, which enable strain typing and identification in complex pathogen genomes. Here we describe microsatellite identification and characterization in T. solium, providing information that will assist in global efforts to control this important pathogen. Methods For genome sequencing, T. solium cysts and proglottids were collected from Huancayo and Puno in Peru, respectively. Using next generation sequencing (NGS) and de novo assembly, we assembled two draft genomes and one hybrid genome. Microsatellite sequences were identified and 36 of them were selected for further analysis. Twenty T. solium isolates were collected from Tumbes in the northern region, and twenty from Puno in the southern region of Peru. The size-polymorphism of the selected microsatellites was determined with multi-capillary electrophoresis. We analyzed the association between microsatellite polymorphism and the geographic origin of the samples. Results The predicted size of the hybrid (proglottid genome combined with cyst genome) T. solium genome was 111 MB with a GC content of 42.54%. A total of 7,979 contigs (>1,000 nt) were obtained. We identified 9,129 microsatellites in the Puno-proglottid genome and 9,936 in the Huancayo-cyst genome, with 5 or more repeats, ranging from mono- to hexa-nucleotide. Seven microsatellites were polymorphic and 29 were monomorphic within the analyzed isolates. T. solium tapeworms were classified into two genetic groups that correlated with the North/South geographic origin of the parasites. Conclusions/Significance The availability of draft

  19. Identification and Characterization of Microsatellite Markers Derived from the Whole Genome Analysis of Taenia solium.

    PubMed

    Pajuelo, Mónica J; Eguiluz, María; Dahlstrom, Eric; Requena, David; Guzmán, Frank; Ramirez, Manuel; Sheen, Patricia; Frace, Michael; Sammons, Scott; Cama, Vitaliano; Anzick, Sarah; Bruno, Dan; Mahanty, Siddhartha; Wilkins, Patricia; Nash, Theodore; Gonzalez, Armando; García, Héctor H; Gilman, Robert H; Porcella, Steve; Zimic, Mirko

    2015-12-01

    Infections with Taenia solium are the most common cause of adult acquired seizures worldwide, and are the leading cause of epilepsy in developing countries. A better understanding of the genetic diversity of T. solium will improve parasite diagnostics and transmission pathways in endemic areas thereby facilitating the design of future control measures and interventions. Microsatellite markers are useful genome features, which enable strain typing and identification in complex pathogen genomes. Here we describe microsatellite identification and characterization in T. solium, providing information that will assist in global efforts to control this important pathogen. For genome sequencing, T. solium cysts and proglottids were collected from Huancayo and Puno in Peru, respectively. Using next generation sequencing (NGS) and de novo assembly, we assembled two draft genomes and one hybrid genome. Microsatellite sequences were identified and 36 of them were selected for further analysis. Twenty T. solium isolates were collected from Tumbes in the northern region, and twenty from Puno in the southern region of Peru. The size-polymorphism of the selected microsatellites was determined with multi-capillary electrophoresis. We analyzed the association between microsatellite polymorphism and the geographic origin of the samples. The predicted size of the hybrid (proglottid genome combined with cyst genome) T. solium genome was 111 MB with a GC content of 42.54%. A total of 7,979 contigs (>1,000 nt) were obtained. We identified 9,129 microsatellites in the Puno-proglottid genome and 9,936 in the Huancayo-cyst genome, with 5 or more repeats, ranging from mono- to hexa-nucleotide. Seven microsatellites were polymorphic and 29 were monomorphic within the analyzed isolates. T. solium tapeworms were classified into two genetic groups that correlated with the North/South geographic origin of the parasites. The availability of draft genomes for T. solium represents a significant step

  20. Chromosomal distribution of microsatellite repeats in Amazon cichlids genome (Pisces, Cichlidae)

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Carlos Henrique; Gross, Maria Claudia; Terencio, Maria Leandra; de Tavares, Édika Sabrina Girão Mitozo; Martins, Cesar; Feldberg, Eliana

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Fish of the family Cichlidae are recognized as an excellent model for evolutionary studies because of their morphological and behavioral adaptations to a wide diversity of explored ecological niches. In addition, the family has a dynamic genome with variable structure, composition and karyotype organization. Microsatellites represent the most dynamic genomic component and a better understanding of their organization may help clarify the role of repetitive DNA elements in the mechanisms of chromosomal evolution. Thus, in this study, microsatellite sequences were mapped in the chromosomes of Cichla monoculus Agassiz, 1831, Pterophyllum scalare Schultze, 1823, and Symphysodon discus Heckel, 1840. Four microsatellites demonstrated positive results in the genome of Cichla monoculus and Symphysodon discus, and five demonstrated positive results in the genome of Pterophyllum scalare. In most cases, the microsatellite was dispersed in the chromosome with conspicuous markings in the centromeric or telomeric regions, which suggests that sequences contribute to chromosome structure and may have played a role in the evolution of this fish family. The comparative genome mapping data presented here provide novel information on the structure and organization of the repetitive DNA region of the cichlid genome and contribute to a better understanding of this fish family’s genome. PMID:26753076

  1. Chromosomal distribution of microsatellite repeats in Amazon cichlids genome (Pisces, Cichlidae).

    PubMed

    Schneider, Carlos Henrique; Gross, Maria Claudia; Terencio, Maria Leandra; de Tavares, Édika Sabrina Girão Mitozo; Martins, Cesar; Feldberg, Eliana

    2015-01-01

    Fish of the family Cichlidae are recognized as an excellent model for evolutionary studies because of their morphological and behavioral adaptations to a wide diversity of explored ecological niches. In addition, the family has a dynamic genome with variable structure, composition and karyotype organization. Microsatellites represent the most dynamic genomic component and a better understanding of their organization may help clarify the role of repetitive DNA elements in the mechanisms of chromosomal evolution. Thus, in this study, microsatellite sequences were mapped in the chromosomes of Cichla monoculus Agassiz, 1831, Pterophyllum scalare Schultze, 1823, and Symphysodon discus Heckel, 1840. Four microsatellites demonstrated positive results in the genome of Cichla monoculus and Symphysodon discus, and five demonstrated positive results in the genome of Pterophyllum scalare. In most cases, the microsatellite was dispersed in the chromosome with conspicuous markings in the centromeric or telomeric regions, which suggests that sequences contribute to chromosome structure and may have played a role in the evolution of this fish family. The comparative genome mapping data presented here provide novel information on the structure and organization of the repetitive DNA region of the cichlid genome and contribute to a better understanding of this fish family's genome.

  2. No Variation at 29 Microsatellites in the Genome of Jatropha curcas.

    PubMed

    Yue, Gen Hua; Lo, Loong Chueng; Sun, Fei; Cao, Su Ying; Yi, Cheng Xin; Hong, Yan; Sun, Wei Bang

    2014-01-01

    Genetic variation in the genome of a given species is the basis for natural selection and genetic improvement through selective breeding. We applied 29 microsatellites located on 11 linkage groups to study genetic variation in 276 accessions of J. curcas collected from nine locations in five countries in South America, Asia and Africa to initiate a breeding program. To our surprise, we did not detect any genetic diversity at all 29 microsatellites loci. All the 276 accessions were homozygous at all loci and shared the same genotype at each locus, suggesting no microsatellite variation in the genome of Jatropha curcas. This result is quite unusual, and may have a profound influence on the breeding strategies and genome study of this species.

  3. Development of highly transferable microsatellites for Panax ginseng (Araliaceae) using whole-genome data1

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Peng; Shi, Feng-Xue; Li, Ya-Ling; Liu, Bao; Li, Lin-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Highly transferable expressed sequence tag (EST) microsatellites were developed for Panax ginseng (Araliaceae), one of the most celebrated traditional Chinese medicines and an endangered species in East Asia, using whole-genome data. Methods and Results: Twenty-one EST microsatellites were characterized from next-generation sequencing and were composed of di- and trinucleotide repeats. Polymorphisms and genetic diversity were evaluated for 45 accessions of three ginseng landraces. The number of alleles for each locus ranged from one to five among the landraces, and the polymorphism information content varied from 0.0000 to 0.6450. These microsatellites were also tested for congeneric amplification with P. notoginseng, P. stipuleanatus, P. quinquefolius, P. bipinnatifidus, and the closely related species Aralia elata. Conclusions: These novel EST-derived microsatellite markers will facilitate further population genetic studies of the genera Panax and Aralia. PMID:27843725

  4. Whole-genome linkage analysis in mapping alcoholism genes using single-nucleotide polymorphisms and microsatellites.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuang; Huang, Song; Liu, Nianjun; Chen, Liang; Oh, Cheongeun; Zhao, Hongyu

    2005-12-30

    There is currently a great interest in using single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genetic linkage and association studies because of the abundance of SNPs as well as the availability of high-throughput genotyping technologies. In this study, we compared the performance of whole-genome scans using SNPs with microsatellites on 143 pedigrees from the Collaborative Studies on Genetics of Alcoholism provided by Genetic Analysis Workshop 14. A total of 315 microsatellites and 10,081 SNPs from Affymetrix on 22 autosomal chromosomes were used in our analyses. We found that the results from the two scans had good overall concordance. One region on chromosome 2 and two regions on chromosome 7 showed significant linkage signals (i.e., NPL >or= 2) for alcoholism from both the SNP and microsatellite scans. The different results observed between the two scans may be explained by the difference observed in information content between the SNPs and the microsatellites.

  5. FANCJ is essential to maintain microsatellite structure genome-wide during replication stress

    PubMed Central

    Barthelemy, Joanna; Hanenberg, Helmut; Leffak, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Microsatellite DNAs that form non-B structures are implicated in replication fork stalling, DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and human disease. Fanconi anemia (FA) is an inherited disorder in which mutations in at least nineteen genes are responsible for the phenotypes of genome instability and cancer predisposition. FA pathway proteins are active in the resolution of non-B DNA structures including interstrand crosslinks, G quadruplexes and DNA triplexes. In FANCJ helicase depleted cells, we show that hydroxyurea or aphidicolin treatment leads to loss of microsatellite polymerase chain reaction signals and to chromosome recombination at an ectopic hairpin forming CTG/CAG repeat in the HeLa genome. Moreover, diverse endogenous microsatellite signals were also lost upon replication stress after FANCJ depletion, and in FANCJ null patient cells. The phenotype of microsatellite signal instability is specific for FANCJ apart from the intact FA pathway, and is consistent with DSBs at microsatellites genome-wide in FANCJ depleted cells following replication stress. PMID:27179029

  6. Whole genome shotgun sequences for microsatellite discovery and application in cultivated and wild Macadamia (Proteaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Nock, Catherine J.; Elphinstone, Martin S.; Ablett, Gary; Kawamata, Asuka; Hancock, Wayne; Hardner, Craig M.; King, Graham J.

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Next-generation sequencing (NGS) data are widely used for single-nucleotide polymorphism discovery and genetic marker development in species with limited available genome information. We developed microsatellite primers for the Proteaceae nut crop species Macadamia integrifolia and assessed cross-species transferability in all congeners to investigate genetic identification of cultivars and gene flow. • Methods and Results: Primers were designed from both raw and assembled Illumina NGS paired-end reads. The final 12 microsatellite markers selected were polymorphic among wild individuals of all four Macadamia species—M. integrifolia, M. tetraphylla, M. ternifolia, and M. jansenii—and in commercial macadamia cultivars including hybrids. • Conclusions: We demonstrate the utility of raw and assembled Illumina NGS reads from total genomic DNA for the rapid development of microsatellites in Macadamia. These primers will facilitate future studies of population structure, hybridization, parentage, and cultivar identification in cultivated and wild Macadamia populations. PMID:25202615

  7. Whole genome shotgun sequences for microsatellite discovery and application in cultivated and wild Macadamia (Proteaceae).

    PubMed

    Nock, Catherine J; Elphinstone, Martin S; Ablett, Gary; Kawamata, Asuka; Hancock, Wayne; Hardner, Craig M; King, Graham J

    2014-04-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) data are widely used for single-nucleotide polymorphism discovery and genetic marker development in species with limited available genome information. We developed microsatellite primers for the Proteaceae nut crop species Macadamia integrifolia and assessed cross-species transferability in all congeners to investigate genetic identification of cultivars and gene flow. • Primers were designed from both raw and assembled Illumina NGS paired-end reads. The final 12 microsatellite markers selected were polymorphic among wild individuals of all four Macadamia species-M. integrifolia, M. tetraphylla, M. ternifolia, and M. jansenii-and in commercial macadamia cultivars including hybrids. • We demonstrate the utility of raw and assembled Illumina NGS reads from total genomic DNA for the rapid development of microsatellites in Macadamia. These primers will facilitate future studies of population structure, hybridization, parentage, and cultivar identification in cultivated and wild Macadamia populations.

  8. Microsatellite Interruptions Stabilize Primate Genomes and Exist as Population-Specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms within Individual Human Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Ananda, Guruprasad; Hile, Suzanne E.; Breski, Amanda; Wang, Yanli; Kelkar, Yogeshwar; Makova, Kateryna D.; Eckert, Kristin A.

    2014-01-01

    Interruptions of microsatellite sequences impact genome evolution and can alter disease manifestation. However, human polymorphism levels at interrupted microsatellites (iMSs) are not known at a genome-wide scale, and the pathways for gaining interruptions are poorly understood. Using the 1000 Genomes Phase-1 variant call set, we interrogated mono-, di-, tri-, and tetranucleotide repeats up to 10 units in length. We detected ∼26,000–40,000 iMSs within each of four human population groups (African, European, East Asian, and American). We identified population-specific iMSs within exonic regions, and discovered that known disease-associated iMSs contain alleles present at differing frequencies among the populations. By analyzing longer microsatellites in primate genomes, we demonstrate that single interruptions result in a genome-wide average two- to six-fold reduction in microsatellite mutability, as compared with perfect microsatellites. Centrally located interruptions lowered mutability dramatically, by two to three orders of magnitude. Using a biochemical approach, we tested directly whether the mutability of a specific iMS is lower because of decreased DNA polymerase strand slippage errors. Modeling the adenomatous polyposis coli tumor suppressor gene sequence, we observed that a single base substitution interruption reduced strand slippage error rates five- to 50-fold, relative to a perfect repeat, during synthesis by DNA polymerases α, β, or η. Computationally, we demonstrate that iMSs arise primarily by base substitution mutations within individual human genomes. Our biochemical survey of human DNA polymerase α, β, δ, κ, and η error rates within certain microsatellites suggests that interruptions are created most frequently by low fidelity polymerases. Our combined computational and biochemical results demonstrate that iMSs are abundant in human genomes and are sources of population-specific genetic variation that may affect genome stability. The

  9. MICAS: a fully automated web server for microsatellite extraction and analysis from prokaryote and viral genomic sequences.

    PubMed

    Sreenu, Vattipally B; Ranjitkumar, Gundu; Swaminathan, Sugavanam; Priya, Sasidharan; Bose, Buddhaditta; Pavan, Mogili N; Thanu, Geeta; Nagaraju, Javaregowda; Nagarajaram, Hampapathalu A

    2003-01-01

    MICAS is a web server for extracting microsatellite information from completely sequenced prokaryote and viral genomes, or user-submitted sequences. This server provides an integrated platform for MICdb (database of prokaryote and viral microsatellites), W-SSRF (simple sequence repeat finding program) and Autoprimer (primer design software). MICAS, through dynamic HTML page generation, helps in the systematic extraction of microsatellite information from selected genomes hosted on MICdb or from user-submitted sequences. Further, it assists in the design of primers with the help of Autoprimer, for sequences containing selected microsatellite tracts.

  10. The Landscape of Microsatellite Instability in Colorectal and Endometrial Cancer Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Min; Laird, Peter W.; Park, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Microsatellites - simple tandem repeats present at millions of sites in the human genome - can shorten or lengthen due to a defect in DNA mismatch repair. We present here the first comprehensive genome-wide analysis of the prevalence, mutational spectrum and functional consequences of microsatellite instability (MSI) in cancer genomes. We analyzed MSI in 277 colorectal and endometrial cancer genomes (including 57 microsatellite-unstable ones) using exome and whole-genome sequencing data. Recurrent MSI events in coding sequences showed tumor type-specificity, elevated frameshift-to-inframe ratios, and lower transcript levels than wildtype alleles. Moreover, genome-wide analysis revealed differences in the distribution of MSI versus point mutations, including overrepresentation of MSI in euchromatic and intronic regions compared to heterochromatic and intergenic regions, respectively, and depletion of MSI at nucleosome-occupied sequences. Our results provide a panoramic view of MSI in cancer genomes, highlighting their tumor type-specificity, impact on gene expression, and the role of chromatin organization. PMID:24209623

  11. Development of genomic microsatellites in Gleditsia triacanthos (Fabaceae) using illumina sequencing

    Treesearch

    Sandra A. Owusu; Margaret Staton; Tara N. Jennings; Scott Schlarbaum; Mark V. Coggeshall; Jeanne Romero-Severson; John E. Carlson; Oliver. Gailing

    2013-01-01

    Premise of the study: Fourteen genomic microsatellite markers were developed and characterized in honey locust, Gleditsia triacanthos, using Illumina sequencing. Due to their high variability, these markers can be applied in analyses of genetic diversity and structure, and in mating system and gene flow studies.

  12. De novo genome assembly of Cercospora beticola for microsatellite marker development and validation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cercospora leaf spot caused by Cercospora beticola is a significant threat to the production of sugar and table beet worldwide. A de novo genome assembly of C. beticola was used to develop eight polymorphic and reproducible microsatellite markers for population genetic analyses. These markers were u...

  13. Assessing Genetic Diversity in Gossypium Arboreum L. Cultivars Using Genomic and EST-Derived Microsatellites.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The cultivated diploid, Gossypium arboreum L., (A genome) is an invaluable genetic resource for improving modern tetraploid cotton (G. hirsutum L. and G. barbadense L.) cultivars. The objective of this research is to select a set of informative and robust microsatellites for studying genetic relatio...

  14. Development of genome- and transcriptome-derived microsatellites in related species of snapping shrimps with highly duplicated genomes.

    PubMed

    Gaynor, Kaitlyn M; Solomon, Joseph W; Siller, Stefanie; Jessell, Linnet; Duffy, J Emmett; Rubenstein, Dustin R

    2017-08-04

    Molecular markers are powerful tools for studying patterns of relatedness and parentage within populations and for making inferences about social evolution. However, the development of molecular markers for simultaneous study of multiple species presents challenges, particularly when species exhibit genome duplication or polyploidy. We developed microsatellite markers for Synalpheus shrimp, a genus in which species exhibit not only great variation in social organization, but also interspecific variation in genome size and partial genome duplication. From the four primary clades within Synalpheus, we identified microsatellites in the genomes of four species and in the consensus transcriptome of two species. Ultimately, we designed and tested primers for 143 microsatellite markers across 25 species. Although the majority of markers were disomic, many markers were polysomic for certain species. Surprisingly, we found no relationship between genome size and the number of polysomic markers. As expected, markers developed for a given species amplified better for closely related species than for more distant relatives. Finally, the markers developed from the transcriptome were more likely to work successfully and to be disomic than those developed from the genome, suggesting that consensus transcriptomes are likely to be conserved across species. Our findings suggest that the transcriptome, particularly consensus sequences from multiple species, can be a valuable source of molecular markers for taxa with complex, duplicated genomes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Ancient whole genome enrichment using baits built from modern DNA.

    PubMed

    Enk, Jacob M; Devault, Alison M; Kuch, Melanie; Murgha, Yusuf E; Rouillard, Jean-Marie; Poinar, Hendrik N

    2014-05-01

    We report metrics from complete genome capture of nuclear DNA from extinct mammoths using biotinylated RNAs transcribed from an Asian elephant DNA extract. Enrichment of the nuclear genome ranged from 1.06- to 18.65-fold, to an apparent maximum threshold of ∼80% on-target. This projects an order of magnitude less costly complete genome sequencing from long-dead organisms, even when a reference genome is unavailable for bait design.

  16. G-IMEx: A comprehensive software tool for detection of microsatellites from genome sequences

    PubMed Central

    Mudunuri, Suresh B; Kumar, Pankaj; Rao, Allam Appa; Pallamsetty, S; Nagarajaram, H A

    2010-01-01

    Microsatellites are ubiquitous short tandem repeats found in all known genomes and are known to play a very important role in various studies and fields including DNA fingerprinting, paternity studies, evolutionary studies, virulence and adaptation of certain bacteria and viruses etc. Due to the sequencing of several genomes and the availability of enormous amounts of sequence data during the past few years, computational studies of microsatellites are of interest for many researchers. In this context, we developed a software tool called Imperfect Microsatellite Extractor (IMEx), to extract perfect, imperfect and compound microsatellites from genome sequences along with their complete statistics. Recently we developed a user-friendly graphical-interface using JAVA for IMEx to be used as a stand-alone software named G-IMEx. G-IMEx takes a nucleotide sequence as an input and the results are produced in both html and text formats. The Linux version of G-IMEx can be downloaded for free from http://www.cdfd.org.in/imex PMID:21364802

  17. Gene enrichment in plant genomic shotgun libraries.

    PubMed

    Rabinowicz, Pablo D; McCombie, W Richard; Martienssen, Robert A

    2003-04-01

    The Arabidopsis genome (about 130 Mbp) has been completely sequenced; whereas a draft sequence of the rice genome (about 430 Mbp) is now available and the sequencing of this genome will be completed in the near future. The much larger genomes of several important crop species, such as wheat (about 16,000 Mbp) or maize (about 2500 Mbp), may not be fully sequenced with current technology. Instead, sequencing-analysis strategies are being developed to obtain sequencing and mapping information selectively for the genic fraction (gene space) of complex plant genomes.

  18. A web-based microsatellite database for the Magnaporthe oryzae genome

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Singh, Akshay; Pawar, Deepak V.; Devanna, B. N.; Singh, Jyoti; Sharma, Vinay; Sharma, Tilak R.

    2016-01-01

    Microsatellites have been widely utilized for molecular marker development. Codominant and multiallelic nature of these simple repeats have several advantages over other types of molecular markers. Their broad applicability in the area of molecular biology like gene mapping, genome characterization, genome evolution, and gene regulation has been reported in various crop plants, animals and fungi. Considering these benefits of the SSR markers, a MMDB (Magnaporthe oryzae Microsatellite Database) was developed to help in understanding about the pathogen and its diversity at strains level of a particular geographic region, which can help us to make a proper utilization of blast resistance genes in the region. This microsatellite database is based on whole genome sequence of two M. oryzae isolates, RML-29 (2665 SSRs from 43037792 bp) and RP-2421 (3169 SSRs from 45510614 bp). Although, first M. oryzae genome (70-15) was sequenced in 2005, but this sequenced isolate is not a true field isolate of M. oryzae. Therefore, MMDB has great potential in the study of diversification and characterization of M. oryzae and other related fungi. Availability: http://14.139.229.199/home.aspx PMID:28293068

  19. DNA Slippage Occurs at Microsatellite Loci without Minimal Threshold Length in Humans: A Comparative Genomic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Leclercq, Sébastien; Rivals, Eric; Jarne, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    The dynamics of microsatellite, or short tandem repeats (STRs), is well documented for long, polymorphic loci, but much less is known for shorter ones. For example, the issue of a minimum threshold length for DNA slippage remains contentious. Model-fitting methods have generally concluded that slippage only occurs over a threshold length of about eight nucleotides, in contradiction with some direct observations of tandem duplications at shorter repeated sites. Using a comparative analysis of the human and chimpanzee genomes, we examined the mutation patterns at microsatellite loci with lengths as short as one period plus one nucleotide. We found that the rates of tandem insertions and deletions at microsatellite loci strongly deviated from background rates in other parts of the human genome and followed an exponential increase with STR size. More importantly, we detected no lower threshold length for slippage. The rate of tandem duplications at unrepeated sites was higher than expected from random insertions, providing evidence for genome-wide action of indel slippage (an alternative mechanism generating tandem repeats). The rate of point mutations adjacent to STRs did not differ from that estimated elsewhere in the genome, except around dinucleotide loci. Our results suggest that the emergence of STR depends on DNA slippage, indel slippage, and point mutations. We also found that the dynamics of tandem insertions and deletions differed in both rates and size at which these mutations take place. We discuss these results in both evolutionary and mechanistic terms. PMID:20624737

  20. Tissue enrichment analysis for C. elegans genomics.

    PubMed

    Angeles-Albores, David; N Lee, Raymond Y; Chan, Juancarlos; Sternberg, Paul W

    2016-09-13

    Over the last ten years, there has been explosive development in methods for measuring gene expression. These methods can identify thousands of genes altered between conditions, but understanding these datasets and forming hypotheses based on them remains challenging. One way to analyze these datasets is to associate ontologies (hierarchical, descriptive vocabularies with controlled relations between terms) with genes and to look for enrichment of specific terms. Although Gene Ontology (GO) is available for Caenorhabditis elegans, it does not include anatomical information. We have developed a tool for identifying enrichment of C. elegans tissues among gene sets and generated a website GUI where users can access this tool. Since a common drawback to ontology enrichment analyses is its verbosity, we developed a very simple filtering algorithm to reduce the ontology size by an order of magnitude. We adjusted these filters and validated our tool using a set of 30 gold standards from Expression Cluster data in WormBase. We show our tool can even discriminate between embryonic and larval tissues and can even identify tissues down to the single-cell level. We used our tool to identify multiple neuronal tissues that are down-regulated due to pathogen infection in C. elegans. Our Tissue Enrichment Analysis (TEA) can be found within WormBase, and can be downloaded using Python's standard pip installer. It tests a slimmed-down C. elegans tissue ontology for enrichment of specific terms and provides users with a text and graphic representation of the results.

  1. Application of a simplified method of chloroplast enrichment to small amounts of tissue for chloroplast genome sequencing1

    PubMed Central

    Sakaguchi, Shota; Ueno, Saneyoshi; Tsumura, Yoshihiko; Setoguchi, Hiroaki; Ito, Motomi; Hattori, Chie; Nozoe, Shogo; Takahashi, Daiki; Nakamasu, Riku; Sakagami, Taishi; Lannuzel, Guillaume; Fogliani, Bruno; Wulff, Adrien S.; L’Huillier, Laurent; Isagi, Yuji

    2017-01-01

    Premise of the study: High-throughput sequencing of genomic DNA can recover complete chloroplast genome sequences, but the sequence data are usually dominated by sequences from nuclear/mitochondrial genomes. To overcome this deficiency, a simple enrichment method for chloroplast DNA from small amounts of plant tissue was tested for eight plant species including a gymnosperm and various angiosperms. Methods: Chloroplasts were enriched using a high-salt isolation buffer without any step gradient procedures, and enriched chloroplast DNA was sequenced by multiplexed high-throughput sequencing. Results: Using this simple method, significant enrichment of chloroplast DNA-derived reads was attained, allowing deep sequencing of chloroplast genomes. As an example, the chloroplast genome of the conifer Callitris sulcata was assembled, from which polymorphic microsatellite loci were isolated successfully. Discussion: This chloroplast enrichment method from small amounts of plant tissue will be particularly useful for studies that use sequencers with relatively small throughput and that cannot use large amounts of tissue (e.g., for endangered species). PMID:28529832

  2. Development of genomic microsatellites in Gleditsia triacanthos (Fabaceae) using Illumina sequencing.

    PubMed

    Owusu, Sandra A; Staton, Margaret; Jennings, Tara N; Schlarbaum, Scott; Coggeshall, Mark V; Romero-Severson, Jeanne; Carlson, John E; Gailing, Oliver

    2013-12-01

    Fourteen genomic microsatellite markers were developed and characterized in honey locust, Gleditsia triacanthos, using Illumina sequencing. Due to their high variability, these markers can be applied in analyses of genetic diversity and structure, and in mating system and gene flow studies. • Thirty-six individuals from across the species range were included in a genetic diversity analysis and yielded three to 20 alleles per locus. Observed heterozygosity and expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.214 to 0.944 and from 0.400 to 0.934, respectively, with minimal occurrence of null alleles. Regular segregation of maternal alleles was observed at seven loci and moderate segregation distortion at four of 11 loci that were heterozygous in the seed parent. • Honey locust is an important agroforestry tree capable of very fast growth and tolerance of poor site conditions. This is the first report of genomic microsatellites for this species.

  3. Development of genomic microsatellites in Gleditsia triacanthos (Fabaceae) using Illumina sequencing1

    PubMed Central

    Owusu, Sandra A.; Staton, Margaret; Jennings, Tara N.; Schlarbaum, Scott; Coggeshall, Mark V.; Romero-Severson, Jeanne; Carlson, John E.; Gailing, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Fourteen genomic microsatellite markers were developed and characterized in honey locust, Gleditsia triacanthos, using Illumina sequencing. Due to their high variability, these markers can be applied in analyses of genetic diversity and structure, and in mating system and gene flow studies. • Methods and Results: Thirty-six individuals from across the species range were included in a genetic diversity analysis and yielded three to 20 alleles per locus. Observed heterozygosity and expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.214 to 0.944 and from 0.400 to 0.934, respectively, with minimal occurrence of null alleles. Regular segregation of maternal alleles was observed at seven loci and moderate segregation distortion at four of 11 loci that were heterozygous in the seed parent. • Conclusions: Honey locust is an important agroforestry tree capable of very fast growth and tolerance of poor site conditions. This is the first report of genomic microsatellites for this species. PMID:25202504

  4. Microsatellite loci for Gossypium davidsonii (Malvaceae) and other D-genome, Sonoran Desert endemic cotton species.

    PubMed

    Kuester, Adam P; Nason, John D

    2012-03-01

    Microsatellite primers previously developed for domesticated cotton (Gossypium hirsutum; tetraploid) were screened for their utility in investigating genetic structure and gene flow within G. davidsonii and five other wild, Mexican, D-genome cotton species (all diploid). We screened 50 microsatellite primer pairs from the Cotton Marker Database, identifying 10 loci as polymorphic within G. davidsonii. In genotyping approximately 200 individuals from four populations, we found that the number of alleles per locus ranged from seven to 17, and mean observed and expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.145 to 0.492 and from 0.436 to 0.734, respectively. We genotyped six to 20 individuals from each of the remaining species, finding these 10 loci to cross-amplify in all cases and in most cases to be polymorphic. These markers may be useful for further investigation of population genetics of G. davidsonii and other wild D-genome cotton species.

  5. Characterization of microsatellites and gene contents from genome shotgun sequences of mungbean (Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek)

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Mungbean is an important economical crop in Asia. However, genomic research has lagged behind other crop species due to the lack of polymorphic DNA markers found in this crop. The objective of this work is to develop and characterize microsatellite or simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers from genome shotgun sequencing of mungbean. Result We have generated and characterized a total of 470,024 genome shotgun sequences covering 100.5 Mb of the mungbean (Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek) genome using 454 sequencing technology. We identified 1,493 SSR motifs that could be used as potential molecular markers. Among 192 tested primer pairs in 17 mungbean accessions, 60 loci revealed polymorphism with polymorphic information content (PIC) values ranging from 0.0555 to 0.6907 with an average of 0.2594. Majority of microsatellite markers were transferable in Vigna species, whereas transferability rates were only 22.90% and 24.43% in Phaseolus vulgaris and Glycine max, respectively. We also used 16 SSR loci to evaluate phylogenetic relationship of 35 genotypes of the Asian Vigna group. The genome survey sequences were further analyzed to search for gene content. The evidence suggested 1,542 gene fragments have been sequence tagged, that fell within intersected existing gene models and shared sequence homology with other proteins in the database. Furthermore, potential microRNAs that could regulate developmental stages and environmental responses were discovered from this dataset. Conclusion In this report, we provided evidence of generating remarkable levels of diverse microsatellite markers and gene content from high throughput genome shotgun sequencing of the mungbean genomic DNA. The markers could be used in germplasm analysis, accessing genetic diversity and linkage mapping of mungbean. PMID:19930676

  6. Genome-wide mining and comparative analysis of microsatellites in three macaque species.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sanxu; Hou, Wei; Sun, Tianlin; Xu, Yongtao; Li, Peng; Yue, Bisong; Fan, Zhenxin; Li, Jing

    2017-06-01

    Microsatellites are found in taxonomically different organisms, and such repeats are related with genomic structure, function and certain diseases. To characterize microsatellites for macaques, we searched and compared SSRs with 1-6 bp nucleotide motifs in rhesus, cynomolgus and pigtailed macaque. A total of 1395671, 1284929 and 1266348 perfect SSRs were mined, respectively. The most frequent perfect SSRs were mononucleotide SSRs. The most GC-content was in dinucleotide SSRs and the least was in the mononucleotide SSRs. Chromosome size was positively correlated with SSR number and negatively correlated with the relative frequency and density of SSRs. The GC content of chromosome SSRs were negatively correlated with relative frequency of SSRs and GC content of chromosome sequences. The features of microsatellite distribution in assembled genomes of the three species were greatly similar, which revealed that the distributional pattern of microsatellites is probably conservative in genus Macaca. The degenerated number of repeat motifs was found to be different in pentanucleotide and hexanucleotide repeats. Species-specific motifs for each macaque were significantly underrepresented. Overall, SSR frequencies of each chromosome in rhesus macaque were higher than in cynomolgus macaque. The maximum repeat times of mono- to pentanucleotide repeats in cynomolgus macaque was more than other two macaques. These results emphasize the genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationship of genus Macaca species. Our data will be beneficial for comparative genome mapping, understanding the distribution of SSRs and genome structure between these animal models, and provide a foundation for further development and identification of more macaque-specific SSRs.

  7. Microsatellite marker development by partial sequencing of the sour passion fruit genome (Passiflora edulis Sims).

    PubMed

    Araya, Susan; Martins, Alexandre M; Junqueira, Nilton T V; Costa, Ana Maria; Faleiro, Fábio G; Ferreira, Márcio E

    2017-07-21

    The Passiflora genus comprises hundreds of wild and cultivated species of passion fruit used for food, industrial, ornamental and medicinal purposes. Efforts to develop genomic tools for genetic analysis of P. edulis, the most important commercial Passiflora species, are still incipient. In spite of many recognized applications of microsatellite markers in genetics and breeding, their availability for passion fruit research remains restricted. Microsatellite markers in P. edulis are usually limited in number, show reduced polymorphism, and are mostly based on compound or imperfect repeats. Furthermore, they are confined to only a few Passiflora species. We describe the use of NGS technology to partially assemble the P. edulis genome in order to develop hundreds of new microsatellite markers. A total of 14.11 Gbp of Illumina paired-end sequence reads were analyzed to detect simple sequence repeat sites in the sour passion fruit genome. A sample of 1300 contigs containing perfect repeat microsatellite sequences was selected for PCR primer development. Panels of di- and tri-nucleotide repeat markers were then tested in P. edulis germplasm accessions for validation. DNA polymorphism was detected in 74% of the markers (PIC = 0.16 to 0.77; number of alleles/locus = 2 to 7). A core panel of highly polymorphic markers (PIC = 0.46 to 0.77) was used to cross-amplify PCR products in 79 species of Passiflora (including P. edulis), belonging to four subgenera (Astrophea, Decaloba, Distephana and Passiflora). Approximately 71% of the marker/species combinations resulted in positive amplicons in all species tested. DNA polymorphism was detected in germplasm accessions of six closely related Passiflora species (P. edulis, P. alata, P. maliformis, P. nitida, P. quadrangularis and P. setacea) and the data used for accession discrimination and species assignment. A database of P. edulis DNA sequences obtained by NGS technology was examined to identify microsatellite repeats in

  8. Genomic DNA repeat from Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis (Venezuelan strain) containing simple repeats and microsatellites.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, N; De Lima, H; Rodriguez, A; Brewster, S; Barker, D C

    1997-10-01

    In this paper the Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis complex is defined as containing all species of the actual subgenus Viannia. Organisms of the L. (V) braziliensis complex are the causative agents of localized human cutaneous and mucocutaneous leishmaniasis in South America, much of Central America and some ares of North America. In our search for better species and subspecies diagnostic probes we focused our research on repetitive DNA, since it provides a greater number of target sites for hybridization. In this work we report the isolation and sequencing of a 1.8 kb DNA region, LbJ38, which is probably tandemly repeated or dispersed at least 4 times along one chromosome and is naturally present in L. (V) braziliensis genomic DNA. This region contains microsatellites and simple repeat DNA sequences and was isolated by screening a genomic DNA cosmid library with complex- and species-specific probes. No homology was found with other Leishmania microsatellite or repetitive DNA. The utility of this repetitive sequence and primers derived from it in the identification of L. (V) braziliensis is demonstrated. As far as we are aware, this is the first report of sequence characterized repetitive microsatellite and GC rich simple repeat DNA from the nuclear genome of New World Leishmania.

  9. Whole genome association study of rheumatoid arthritis using 27 039 microsatellites.

    PubMed

    Tamiya, Gen; Shinya, Minori; Imanishi, Tadashi; Ikuta, Tomoki; Makino, Satoshi; Okamoto, Koichi; Furugaki, Koh; Matsumoto, Toshiko; Mano, Shuhei; Ando, Satoshi; Nozaki, Yasuyuki; Yukawa, Wataru; Nakashige, Ryo; Yamaguchi, Daisuke; Ishibashi, Hideo; Yonekura, Manabu; Nakami, Yuu; Takayama, Seiken; Endo, Takaho; Saruwatari, Takuya; Yagura, Masaru; Yoshikawa, Yoko; Fujimoto, Kei; Oka, Akira; Chiku, Suenori; Linsen, Samuel E V; Giphart, Marius J; Kulski, Jerzy K; Fukazawa, Toru; Hashimoto, Hiroshi; Kimura, Minoru; Hoshina, Yuuichi; Suzuki, Yasuo; Hotta, Tomomitsu; Mochida, Joji; Minezaki, Takatoshi; Komai, Koichiro; Shiozawa, Shunichi; Taniguchi, Atsuo; Yamanaka, Hisashi; Kamatani, Naoyuki; Gojobori, Takashi; Bahram, Seiamak; Inoko, Hidetoshi

    2005-08-15

    A major goal of current human genome-wide studies is to identify the genetic basis of complex disorders. However, the availability of an unbiased, reliable, cost efficient and comprehensive methodology to analyze the entire genome for complex disease association is still largely lacking or problematic. Therefore, we have developed a practical and efficient strategy for whole genome association studies of complex diseases by charting the human genome at 100 kb intervals using a collection of 27,039 microsatellites and the DNA pooling method in three successive genomic screens of independent case-control populations. The final step in our methodology consists of fine mapping of the candidate susceptible DNA regions by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) analysis. This approach was validated upon application to rheumatoid arthritis, a destructive joint disease affecting up to 1% of the population. A total of 47 candidate regions were identified. The top seven loci, withstanding the most stringent statistical tests, were dissected down to individual genes and/or SNPs on four chromosomes, including the previously known 6p21.3-encoded Major Histocompatibility Complex gene, HLA-DRB1. Hence, microsatellite-based genome-wide association analysis complemented by end stage SNP typing provides a new tool for genetic dissection of multifactorial pathologies including common diseases.

  10. Development of microsatellite markers for six Tetranychus species by transfer from Tetranychus urticae genome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia; Sun, Jing-Tao; Jin, Peng-Yu; Hong, Xiao-Yue

    2016-09-01

    Microsatellite markers are frequently used to explore the population genetic structure of organisms. Spider mites (genus Tetranychus) are important agricultural pests. Several markers have been developed for T. urticae, but for other spider mites, few such markers are available, hampering studies of their population genetics. In this study, we developed and characterized microsatellite markers for six non-model spider mite species (T. truncatus, T. kanzawai, T. ludeni, T. piercei, T. phaselus and T. pueraricola) by cross-species amplification of markers in the T. urticae genome, in order to better understand the population structure of Tetranychus species. Among 228 screened loci, many were polymorphic, including 13 loci in T. urticae, 11 loci in T. truncatus, 15 loci in T. pueraricola, 23 loci in T. kanzawai, 19 loci in T. piercei, 11 loci in T. phaselus and 9 loci in T. ludeni. Sequence analysis determined that the fragment length variations of the transferred microsatellites were mainly due to the variations of the numbers of repeats. These new microsatellite markers should be useful for studying the population genetics of the seven Tetranychus species.

  11. MICdb3.0: a comprehensive resource of microsatellite repeats from prokaryotic genomes.

    PubMed

    Mudunuri, Suresh B; Patnana, Sujan; Nagarajaram, Hampapathalu A

    2014-01-01

    The MICdb is a comprehensive relational database of perfect microsatellites extracted from completely sequenced and annotated genomes of bacteria and archaea. The current version MICdb3.0 is an updated and revised version of MICdb2.0. As compared with the previous version MICdb2.0, the current release is significantly improved in terms of much larger coverage of genomes, improved presentation of queried results, user-friendly administration module to manage Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) data such as addition of new genomes, deletion of obsolete data, etc., and also removal of certain features deemed to be redundant. The new web-interface to the database called Microsatellite Analysis Server (MICAS) version 3.0 has been improved by the addition of powerful high-quality visualization tools to view the query results in the form of pie charts and bar graphs. All the query results and graphs can be exported in different formats so that the users can use them for further analysis. MICAS3.0 is also equipped with a unique genome comparison module using which users can do pair-wise comparison of genomes with regard to their microsatellite distribution. The advanced search module can be used to filter the repeats based on certain criteria such as filtering repeats of a particular motif/repeat size, extracting repeats of coding/non-coding regions, sort repeats, etc. The MICdb database has, therefore, been made portable to be administered by a person with the necessary administrative privileges. The MICdb3.0 database and analysis server can be accessed for free from www.cdfd.org.in/micas. Database URL: http://www.cdfd.org.in/micas.

  12. Patterns of microsatellite evolution inferred from the Helianthus annuus (Asteraceae) transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Pramod, Sreepriya; Perkins, Andy D; Welch, Mark E

    2014-08-01

    The distribution of microsatellites in exons, and their association with gene ontology (GO) terms is explored to elucidate patterns of microsatellite evolution in the common sunflower, Helianthus annuus. The relative position, motif, size and level of impurity were estimated for each microsatellite in the unigene database available from the Compositae Genome Project (CGP), and statistical analyses were performed to determine if differences in microsatellite distributions and enrichment within certain GO terms were significant. There are more translated than untranslated microsatellites, implying that many bring about structural changes in proteins. However, the greatest density is observed within the UTRs, particularly 5'UTRs. Further, UTR microsatellites are purer and longer than coding region microsatellites. This suggests that UTR microsatellites are either younger and under more relaxed constraints, or that purifying selection limits impurities, and directional selection favours their expansion. GOs associated with response to various environmental stimuli including water deprivation and salt stress were significantly enriched with microsatellites. This may suggest that these GOs are more labile in plant genomes, or that selection has favoured the maintenance of microsatellites in these genes over others. This study shows that the distribution of transcribed microsatellites in H. annuus is nonrandom, the coding region microsatellites are under greater constraint compared to the UTR microsatellites, and that these sequences are enriched within genes that regulate plant responses to environmental stress and stimuli.

  13. [Induced germ line genomic instability at mini- and micro-satellites in animals].

    PubMed

    Bezlepkin, V G; Gaziev, A I

    2001-01-01

    The recent data on the phenomenon of the induced germline genomic instability at mini- and microsatellites in animals were considered. Natural hypervariability of the minisatellites and microsatellites and their abundance in eukaryotic genome provide it's utility as the useful genetic markers for evaluation of the germline mutation frequency induced by treatment with different type of genotoxic factors at the low doses. High sensitivity of assays and possibility for direct determinations of the mutations, without the necessity to use extrapolation, are ensured. Some discussion is presented on the role of non-targeted mechanisms for the radiation-prone DNA lesions in the induction of germline genomic instability and also on the involving in this process the recombination events upon meiosis or during the early development stages of embryos. It is proposed that quantitative determination of germline genomic instability rate may be used as an acceptable variant for the genetic risk assessment and as indicator of increased probability for cancer and other pathologies at the offspring born to irradiated parents.

  14. Fluorescence-based resource for semiautomated genomic analyses using microsatellite markers

    SciTech Connect

    Levitt, R.C.; Kiser, M.B.; Dragwa, C.

    1994-11-15

    To facilitate the practical application of highly-efficient semiautomated methods for general application in genomic analyses, the authors have developed a fluorescence-based microsatellite marker resource. Ninety highly polymorphic microsatellite markers were combined to provide a rapid, accurate, and highly efficient initial genome-wide screening system. These markers are spaced on average every 33 cM, with a mean heterozygosity of 81% (range 65-94%), covering 22 autosomes and the X and Y chromosomes. Less than 10% of the genome lies beyond 20 cM of the nearest marker. Since this genomic analysis system is fully compatible with automated fragment analyzers using simultaneous four-color fluorescence-based detection systems, the 5 groups of 18 markers can be detected concurrently. This multiplex detection provides a throughput of 1944 genotypes daily per instrument. This system will be highly beneficial in a number of clinical and research applications including linkage, cancer genetics, forensics, and cytogenetics. 16 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  15. Estimating genomic diversity and population differentiation - an empirical comparison of microsatellite and SNP variation in Arabidopsis halleri.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Martin C; Rellstab, Christian; Leuzinger, Marianne; Roumet, Marie; Gugerli, Felix; Shimizu, Kentaro K; Holderegger, Rolf; Widmer, Alex

    2017-01-11

    Microsatellite markers are widely used for estimating genetic diversity within and differentiation among populations. However, it has rarely been tested whether such estimates are useful proxies for genome-wide patterns of variation and differentiation. Here, we compared microsatellite variation with genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to assess and quantify potential marker-specific biases and derive recommendations for future studies. Overall, we genotyped 180 Arabidopsis halleri individuals from nine populations using 20 microsatellite markers. Twelve of these markers were originally developed for Arabidopsis thaliana (cross-species markers) and eight for A. halleri (species-specific markers). We further characterized 2 million SNPs across the genome with a pooled whole-genome re-sequencing approach (Pool-Seq). Our analyses revealed that estimates of genetic diversity and differentiation derived from cross-species and species-specific microsatellites differed substantially and that expected microsatellite heterozygosity (SSR-H e) was not significantly correlated with genome-wide SNP diversity estimates (SNP-H e and θ Watterson) in A. halleri. Instead, microsatellite allelic richness (A r) was a better proxy for genome-wide SNP diversity. Estimates of genetic differentiation among populations (F ST) based on both marker types were correlated, but microsatellite-based estimates were significantly larger than those from SNPs. Possible causes include the limited number of microsatellite markers used, marker ascertainment bias, as well as the high variance in microsatellite-derived estimates. In contrast, genome-wide SNP data provided unbiased estimates of genetic diversity independent of whether genome- or only exome-wide SNPs were used. Further, we inferred that a few thousand random SNPs are sufficient to reliably estimate genome-wide diversity and to distinguish among populations differing in genetic variation. We recommend that future analyses of

  16. Genome-wide characterization of perfect microsatellites in yak (Bos grunniens).

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhijie

    2015-08-01

    Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSRs) constitute a significant portion of genomes and play an important role in gene function and genome organization. The availability of a complete genome sequence for yak (Bos grunniens) has made it possible to carry out genome-wide analysis of microsatellites in this species. We analyzed the abundance and density of perfect SSRs in the yak genome. We found a total of 723,172 SSRs with 1-6 bp nucleotide motifs, indicating that about 0.47 % of the yak whole genome sequence (2.66 Gb) comprises perfect SSRs, the average length of which was 17.34 bp/Mb. The average frequency and density of perfect SSRs was 272.18 loci/Mb and 4719.25 bp/Mb, respectively. The proportion of the six classes of perfect SSRs was not evenly distributed in the yak genome. Mononucleotide repeats (44.04 %) with a total number of 318,435 and a average length of 14.71 bp appeared to be the most abundant SSRs class, while the percentages of dinucleotide, trinucleotide, pentanucleotide, tetranucleotide and hexanucleotide repeats was 24.11 %, 15.80 %, 9.50 %, 6.40 % and 0.15 %, respectively. Different repeat classes of SSRs varied in their repeat number with the highest being 1206. Our results suggest that 15 motifs comprised the predominant categories with a frequency above 1 loci/Mb: A, AC, AT, AG, AGC, AAC, AAT, ACC, ATTT, GTTT, AATG, CTTT, ATGG, AACTG and ATCTG.

  17. A genome-wide view of microsatellite instability: old stories of cancer mutations revisited with new sequencing technologies

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Min; Park, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Microsatellites are simple tandem repeats that are present at millions of loci in the human genome. Microsatellite instability (MSI) refers to DNA slippage events on microsatellites that occur frequently in cancer genomes when there is a defect in the DNA mismatch repair system. These somatic mutations can result in inactivation of tumor suppressor genes or disrupt other non-coding regulatory sequences, thereby playing a role in carcinogenesis. Here, we will discuss the ways in which high-throughput sequencing data can facilitate a genome- or exome-wide discovery and more detailed investigation of MSI events in microsatellite-unstable cancer genomes. We will address the methodological aspects of this approach and highlight insights from recent analyses of colorectal and endometrial cancer genomes from The Cancer Genome Atlas project. These include identification of novel MSI targets within and across tumor types and the relationship between the likelihood of MSI events to chromatin structure. Given the increasing popularity of exome and genome sequencing of cancer genomes, a comprehensive characterization of MSI may serve as a valuable marker of cancer evolution and aid in a search for therapeutic targets. PMID:25371413

  18. Genome-wide cross-amplification of domestic sheep microsatellites in bighorn sheep and mountain goats.

    PubMed

    Poissant, J; Shafer, A B A; Davis, C S; Mainguy, J; Hogg, J T; Côté, S D; Coltman, D W

    2009-07-01

    We tested for cross-species amplification of microsatellite loci located throughout the domestic sheep (Ovis aries) genome in two north American mountain ungulates (bighorn sheep, Ovis canadensis, and mountain goats, Oreamnos americanus). We identified 247 new polymorphic markers in bighorn sheep (≥ 3 alleles in one of two study populations) and 149 in mountain goats (≥ 2 alleles in a single study population) using 648 and 576 primer pairs, respectively. Our efforts increased the number of available polymorphic microsatellite markers to 327 for bighorn sheep and 180 for mountain goats. The average distance between successive polymorphic bighorn sheep and mountain goat markers inferred from the Australian domestic sheep genome linkage map (mean ± 1 SD) was 11.9 ± 9.2 and 15.8 ± 13.8 centimorgans, respectively. The development of genomic resources in these wildlife species enables future studies of the genetic architecture of trait variation.

  19. Development and validation of microsatellite markers for Brachiaria ruziziensis obtained by partial genome assembly of Illumina single-end reads

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Brachiaria ruziziensis is one of the most important forage species planted in the tropics. The application of genomic tools to aid the selection of superior genotypes can provide support to B. ruziziensis breeding programs. However, there is a complete lack of information about the B. ruziziensis genome. Also, the availability of genomic tools, such as molecular markers, to support B. ruziziensis breeding programs is rather limited. Recently, next-generation sequencing technologies have been applied to generate sequence data for the identification of microsatellite regions and primer design. In this study, we present a first validated set of SSR markers for Brachiaria ruziziensis, selected from a de novo partial genome assembly of single-end Illumina reads. Results A total of 85,567 perfect microsatellite loci were detected in contigs with a minimum 10X coverage. We selected a set of 500 microsatellite loci identified in contigs with minimum 100X coverage for primer design and synthesis, and tested a subset of 269 primer pairs, 198 of which were polymorphic on 11 representative B. ruziziensis accessions. Descriptive statistics for these primer pairs are presented, as well as estimates of marker transferability to other relevant brachiaria species. Finally, a set of 11 multiplex panels containing the 30 most informative markers was validated and proposed for B. ruziziensis genetic analysis. Conclusions We show that the detection and development of microsatellite markers from genome assembled Illumina single-end DNA sequences is highly efficient. The developed markers are readily suitable for genetic analysis and marker assisted selection of Brachiaria ruziziensis. The use of this approach for microsatellite marker development is promising for species with limited genomic information, whose breeding programs would benefit from the use of genomic tools. To our knowledge, this is the first set of microsatellite markers developed for this important species

  20. Developing informative microsatellite makers for non-model species using reference mapping against a model species’ genome

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chih-Ming; Yu, Ai-Yun; Lai, Yu-Ting; Shaner, Pei-Jen L.

    2016-01-01

    Microsatellites have a wide range of applications from behavioral biology, evolution, to agriculture-based breeding programs. The recent progress in the next-generation sequencing technologies and the rapidly increasing number of published genomes may greatly enhance the current applications of microsatellites by turning them from anonymous to informative markers. Here we developed an approach to anchor microsatellite markers of any target species in a genome of a related model species, through which the genomic locations of the markers, along with any functional genes potentially linked to them, can be revealed. We mapped the shotgun sequence reads of a non-model rodent species Apodemus semotus against the genome of a model species, Mus musculus, and presented 24 polymorphic microsatellite markers with detailed background information for A. semotus in this study. The developed markers can be used in other rodent species, especially those that are closely related to A. semotus or M. musculus. Compared to the traditional approaches based on DNA cloning, our approach is likely to yield more loci for the same cost. This study is a timely demonstration of how a research team can efficiently generate informative (neutral or function-associated) microsatellite markers for their study species and unique biological questions. PMID:26976328

  1. Developing informative microsatellite makers for non-model species using reference mapping against a model species' genome.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chih-Ming; Yu, Ai-Yun; Lai, Yu-Ting; Shaner, Pei-Jen L

    2016-03-15

    Microsatellites have a wide range of applications from behavioral biology, evolution, to agriculture-based breeding programs. The recent progress in the next-generation sequencing technologies and the rapidly increasing number of published genomes may greatly enhance the current applications of microsatellites by turning them from anonymous to informative markers. Here we developed an approach to anchor microsatellite markers of any target species in a genome of a related model species, through which the genomic locations of the markers, along with any functional genes potentially linked to them, can be revealed. We mapped the shotgun sequence reads of a non-model rodent species Apodemus semotus against the genome of a model species, Mus musculus, and presented 24 polymorphic microsatellite markers with detailed background information for A. semotus in this study. The developed markers can be used in other rodent species, especially those that are closely related to A. semotus or M. musculus. Compared to the traditional approaches based on DNA cloning, our approach is likely to yield more loci for the same cost. This study is a timely demonstration of how a research team can efficiently generate informative (neutral or function-associated) microsatellite markers for their study species and unique biological questions.

  2. Negative heterozygosity-fitness correlations observed with microsatellites located in functional areas of the genome.

    PubMed

    Szulkin, Marta; David, Patrice

    2011-10-01

    Genome-wide heterozygosity inferred from neutral markers such as microsatellites is often expected to (i) reflect individual inbreeding and (ii) covary positively with fitness, generating positive heterozygosity-fitness correlations (HFCs). The often forgotten other end of the inbreeding-outbreeding continuum is outbreeding depression: past a certain degree of heterozygosity, heterozygotes tend to have lower fitness than homozygotes. Outbreeding depression arises from the breakup of co-adapted gene complexes and/or the introgression of nonlocally adapted genes. Provided that a correlation in heterozygosity exists across loci, outbreeding depression will be reflected in negative HFCs. In this issue, Olano-Marin et al. (2011a) describe negative heterozygosity-fitness correlations (HFCs) in blue tits Cyanistes caeruleus (Fig. 1), whereby heterozygosity has a significant, negative effect on female hatching success and recruitment. This study, together with a similar study by the same authors published in Evolution (Olano-Marin et al. 2011b), forms an original contribution in two respects. First, in the same population, positive and negative HFCs were recorded, revealing both inbreeding and outbreeding depression depending on the trait studied (whereby both processes were reliant on unknown, and possibly different, sets of coding loci). Second, a large number of microsatellite markers were split into two functional groups: microsatellite markers were either designed using zebra finch expressed sequence tags (ESTs) or derived using traditional cloning methods and presumed to be neutral. Contrasting large classes of loci and their varying levels of polymorphism, rather than looking for one locus that would stand out among tens of randomly selected markers, pave the way for a more elegant and powerful approach to explore how HFCs vary across traits and among regions of the genome. [Figure: see text]. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. A novel genome-wide microsatellite resource for species of Eucalyptus with linkage-to-physical correspondence on the reference genome sequence.

    PubMed

    Grattapaglia, Dario; Mamani, Eva M C; Silva-Junior, Orzenil B; Faria, Danielle A

    2015-03-01

    Keystone species in their native ranges, eucalypts, are ecologically and genetically very diverse, growing naturally along extensive latitudinal and altitudinal ranges and variable environments. Besides their ecological importance, eucalypts are also the most widely planted trees for sustainable forestry in the world. We report the development of a novel collection of 535 microsatellites for species of Eucalyptus, 494 designed from ESTs and 41 from genomic libraries. A selected subset of 223 was evaluated for individual identification, parentage testing, and ancestral information content in the two most extensively studied species, Eucalyptus grandis and Eucalyptus globulus. Microsatellites showed high transferability and overlapping allele size range, suggesting they have arisen still in their common ancestor and confirming the extensive genome conservation between these two species. A consensus linkage map with 437 microsatellites, the most comprehensive microsatellite-only genetic map for Eucalyptus, was built by assembling segregation data from three mapping populations and anchored to the Eucalyptus genome. An overall colinearity between recombination-based and physical positioning of 84% of the mapped microsatellites was observed, with some ordering discrepancies and sporadic locus duplications, consistent with the recently described whole genome duplication events in Eucalyptus. The linkage map covered 95.2% of the 605.8-Mbp assembled genome sequence, placing one microsatellite every 1.55 Mbp on average, and an overall estimate of physical to recombination distance of 618 kbp/cM. The genetic parameters estimates together with linkage and physical position data for this large set of microsatellites should assist marker choice for genome-wide population genetics and comparative mapping in Eucalyptus.

  4. Methods comparison for microsatellite marker development: Different isolation methods, different yield efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Aibin; Bao, Zhenmin; Hu, Xiaoli; Lu, Wei; Hu, Jingjie

    2009-06-01

    Microsatellite markers have become one kind of the most important molecular tools used in various researches. A large number of microsatellite markers are required for the whole genome survey in the fields of molecular ecology, quantitative genetics and genomics. Therefore, it is extremely necessary to select several versatile, low-cost, efficient and time- and labor-saving methods to develop a large panel of microsatellite markers. In this study, we used Zhikong scallop ( Chlamys farreri) as the target species to compare the efficiency of the five methods derived from three strategies for microsatellite marker development. The results showed that the strategy of constructing small insert genomic DNA library resulted in poor efficiency, while the microsatellite-enriched strategy highly improved the isolation efficiency. Although the mining public database strategy is time- and cost-saving, it is difficult to obtain a large number of microsatellite markers, mainly due to the limited sequence data of non-model species deposited in public databases. Based on the results in this study, we recommend two methods, microsatellite-enriched library construction method and FIASCO-colony hybridization method, for large-scale microsatellite marker development. Both methods were derived from the microsatellite-enriched strategy. The experimental results obtained from Zhikong scallop also provide the reference for microsatellite marker development in other species with large genomes.

  5. Microsatellite isolation and marker development in carrot - genomic distribution, linkage mapping, genetic diversity analysis and marker transferability across Apiaceae

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Apiaceae family includes several vegetable and spice crop species among which carrot is the most economically important member, with ~21 million tons produced yearly worldwide. Despite its importance, molecular resources in this species are relatively underdeveloped. The availability of informative, polymorphic, and robust PCR-based markers, such as microsatellites (or SSRs), will facilitate genetics and breeding of carrot and other Apiaceae, including integration of linkage maps, tagging of phenotypic traits and assisting positional gene cloning. Thus, with the purpose of isolating carrot microsatellites, two different strategies were used; a hybridization-based library enrichment for SSRs, and bioinformatic mining of SSRs in BAC-end sequence and EST sequence databases. This work reports on the development of 300 carrot SSR markers and their characterization at various levels. Results Evaluation of microsatellites isolated from both DNA sources in subsets of 7 carrot F2 mapping populations revealed that SSRs from the hybridization-based method were longer, had more repeat units and were more polymorphic than SSRs isolated by sequence search. Overall, 196 SSRs (65.1%) were polymorphic in at least one mapping population, and the percentage of polymophic SSRs across F2 populations ranged from 17.8 to 24.7. Polymorphic markers in one family were evaluated in the entire F2, allowing the genetic mapping of 55 SSRs (38 codominant) onto the carrot reference map. The SSR loci were distributed throughout all 9 carrot linkage groups (LGs), with 2 to 9 SSRs/LG. In addition, SSR evaluations in carrot-related taxa indicated that a significant fraction of the carrot SSRs transfer successfully across Apiaceae, with heterologous amplification success rate decreasing with the target-species evolutionary distance from carrot. SSR diversity evaluated in a collection of 65 D. carota accessions revealed a high level of polymorphism for these selected loci, with an

  6. A genomic approach for isolating chloroplast microsatellite markers for Pachyptera kerere (Bignoniaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Francisco, Jessica N. C.; Nazareno, Alison G.; Lohmann, Lúcia G.

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: In this study, we developed chloroplast microsatellite markers (cpSSRs) for Pachyptera kerere (Bignoniaceae) to investigate the population structure and genetic diversity of this species. Methods and Results: We used Illumina HiSeq data to reconstruct the chloroplast genome of P. kerere by a combination of de novo and reference-guided assembly. We then used the chloroplast genome to develop a set of cpSSRs from intergenic regions. Overall, 24 primer pairs were designed, 21 of which amplified successfully and were polymorphic, presenting three to nine alleles per locus. The unbiased haploid diversity per locus varied from 0.207 (Pac28) to 0.817 (Pac04). All but one locus amplified for all other taxa of Pachyptera. Conclusions: The markers reported here will serve as a basis for studies to assess the genetic structure and phylogeographic history of Pachyptera. PMID:27672522

  7. Developing genome-wide microsatellite markers of bamboo and their applications on molecular marker assisted taxonomy for accessions in the genus Phyllostachys

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hansheng; Yang, Li; Peng, Zhenhua; Sun, Huayu; Yue, Xianghua; Lou, Yongfeng; Dong, Lili; Wang, Lili; Gao, Zhimin

    2015-01-01

    Morphology-based taxonomy via exiguously reproductive organ has severely limitation on bamboo taxonomy, mainly owing to infrequent and unpredictable flowering events of bamboo. Here, we present the first genome-wide analysis and application of microsatellites based on the genome of moso bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis) to assist bamboo taxonomy. Of identified 127,593 microsatellite repeat-motifs, the primers of 1,451 microsatellites were designed and 1,098 markers were physically mapped on the genome of moso bamboo. A total of 917 markers were successfully validated in 9 accessions with ~39.8% polymorphic potential. Retrieved from validated microsatellite markers, 23 markers were selected for polymorphic analysis among 78 accessions and 64 alleles were detected with an average of 2.78 alleles per primers. The cluster result indicated the majority of the accessions were consistent with their current taxonomic classification, confirming the suitability and effectiveness of the developed microsatellite markers. The variations of microsatellite marker in different species were confirmed by sequencing and in silico comparative genome mapping were investigated. Lastly, a bamboo microsatellites database (http://www.bamboogdb.org/ssr) was implemented to browse and search large information of bamboo microsatellites. Consequently, our results of microsatellite marker development are valuable for assisting bamboo taxonomy and investigating genomic studies in bamboo and related grass species. PMID:25620112

  8. Developing genome-wide microsatellite markers of bamboo and their applications on molecular marker assisted taxonomy for accessions in the genus Phyllostachys.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hansheng; Yang, Li; Peng, Zhenhua; Sun, Huayu; Yue, Xianghua; Lou, Yongfeng; Dong, Lili; Wang, Lili; Gao, Zhimin

    2015-01-26

    Morphology-based taxonomy via exiguously reproductive organ has severely limitation on bamboo taxonomy, mainly owing to infrequent and unpredictable flowering events of bamboo. Here, we present the first genome-wide analysis and application of microsatellites based on the genome of moso bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis) to assist bamboo taxonomy. Of identified 127,593 microsatellite repeat-motifs, the primers of 1,451 microsatellites were designed and 1,098 markers were physically mapped on the genome of moso bamboo. A total of 917 markers were successfully validated in 9 accessions with ~39.8% polymorphic potential. Retrieved from validated microsatellite markers, 23 markers were selected for polymorphic analysis among 78 accessions and 64 alleles were detected with an average of 2.78 alleles per primers. The cluster result indicated the majority of the accessions were consistent with their current taxonomic classification, confirming the suitability and effectiveness of the developed microsatellite markers. The variations of microsatellite marker in different species were confirmed by sequencing and in silico comparative genome mapping were investigated. Lastly, a bamboo microsatellites database (http://www.bamboogdb.org/ssr) was implemented to browse and search large information of bamboo microsatellites. Consequently, our results of microsatellite marker development are valuable for assisting bamboo taxonomy and investigating genomic studies in bamboo and related grass species.

  9. Microsatellite markers for raspberry and blackberry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    welve microsatellites were isolated from SSR-enriched genomic libraries of Rubus idaeus L.‘Meeker’ red raspberry (diploid) and R. loganobaccus L. H. Bailey ‘Marion’ blackberry-raspberry hybrid (hexaploid). These primer pairs, with the addition of one developed from a GenBank R. idaeus sequence, we...

  10. Microsatellite Markers for Raspberries and Blackberries

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Twelve microsatellites were isolated from SSR-enriched genomic libraries of Rubus idaeus L.‘Meeker’ red raspberry (diploid) and R. loganobaccus L. H. Bailey ‘Marion’ blackberry-raspberry hybrid (hexaploid). These primer pairs, with the addition of one developed from a GenBank R. idaeus sequence, w...

  11. Origin and genome evolution of polyploid green toads in Central Asia: evidence from microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Betto-Colliard, C; Sermier, R; Litvinchuk, S; Perrin, N; Stöck, M

    2015-03-01

    Polyploidization, which is expected to trigger major genomic reorganizations, occurs much less commonly in animals than in plants, possibly because of constraints imposed by sex-determination systems. We investigated the origins and consequences of allopolyploidization in Palearctic green toads (Bufo viridis subgroup) from Central Asia, with three ploidy levels and different modes of genome transmission (sexual versus clonal), to (i) establish a topology for the reticulate phylogeny in a species-rich radiation involving several closely related lineages and (ii) explore processes of genomic reorganization that may follow polyploidization. Sibship analyses based on 30 cross-amplifying microsatellite markers substantiated the maternal origins and revealed the paternal origins and relationships of subgenomes in allopolyploids. Analyses of the synteny of linkage groups identified three markers affected by translocation events, which occurred only within the paternally inherited subgenomes of allopolyploid toads and exclusively affected the linkage group that determines sex in several diploid species of the green toad radiation. Recombination rates did not differ between diploid and polyploid toad species, and were overall much reduced in males, independent of linkage group and ploidy levels. Clonally transmitted subgenomes in allotriploid toads provided support for strong genetic drift, presumably resulting from recombination arrest. The Palearctic green toad radiation seems to offer unique opportunities to investigate the consequences of polyploidization and clonal transmission on the dynamics of genomes in vertebrates.

  12. Molecular genomics resource for the parasitic nematode Spirocerca lupi: Identification of 149 microsatellite loci using FIASCO and next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Reid, Kerry; Mitha, Janishtha R; Greeff, Jaco M; de Waal, Pamela J

    2015-01-01

    Understanding genetic diversity and movement patterns in parasitic organisms is paramount to establish control and management strategies. In this study we developed a microsatellite resource as well as a diagnostic multiplex for the cosmopolitan parasitic nematode Spirocerca lupi, known to cause spirocercosis in canids. A combination of microsatellite enrichment and 454 sequencing was used to identify 149 unique microsatellite loci in S. lupi. Twenty loci were characterized further in two sampling sites in South Africa, with 10 loci identified as polymorphic (allele ranges from 4 to 17). These loci were designed into a single diagnostic multiplex suitable for species identification and population genetics studies. The markers were also successful in cross-species amplification in Cylicospirura felineus, Philonema oncorhynchi and Gongylonema pulchrum. Our resource provides a large set of candidate loci for a number of nematode studies as well as loci suitable for diversity and population genetics studies of S. lupi within the South African context as well as globally.

  13. Targeted Genome-Wide Enrichment of Functional Regions

    PubMed Central

    Senapathy, Periannan; Bhasi, Ashwini; Mattox, Jeffrey; Dhandapany, Perundurai S.; Sadayappan, Sakthivel

    2010-01-01

    Only a small fraction of large genomes such as that of the human contains the functional regions such as the exons, promoters, and polyA sites. A platform technique for selective enrichment of functional genomic regions will enable several next-generation sequencing applications that include the discovery of causal mutations for disease and drug response. Here, we describe a powerful platform technique, termed “functional genomic fingerprinting” (FGF), for the multiplexed genomewide isolation and analysis of targeted regions such as the exome, promoterome, or exon splice enhancers. The technique employs a fixed part of a uniquely designed Fixed-Randomized primer, while the randomized part contains all the possible sequence permutations. The Fixed-Randomized primers bind with full sequence complementarity at multiple sites where the fixed sequence (such as the splice signals) occurs within the genome, and multiplex amplify many regions bounded by the fixed sequences (e.g., exons). Notably, validation of this technique using cardiac myosin binding protein-C (MYBPC3) gene as an example strongly supports the application and efficacy of this method. Further, assisted by genomewide computational analyses of such sequences, the FGF technique may provide a unique platform for high-throughput sample production and analysis of targeted genomic regions by the next-generation sequencing techniques, with powerful applications in discovering disease and drug response genes. PMID:20585402

  14. [Analysis of microsatellite loci of the chloroplast genome in the genus Capsicum (Pepper)].

    PubMed

    Ryzhova, N N; Kochieva, E Z

    2004-08-01

    Six plastome microsatellites were examined in 43 accessions of the genus Capsicum. In total, 33 allelic variants were detected. A specific haplotype of chloroplast DNA was identified for each Capsicum species. Species-specific allelic variants were found for most wild Capsicum species. The highest intraspecific variation was observed for the C. baccatum plastome. Low cpDNA polymorphism was characteristic of C. annuum: the cpSSRs were either monomorphic or dimorphic. The vast majority of C. annuum accessions each had alleles of one type. Another allele type was rare and occurred only in wild accessions. The results testified again to genetic conservation of C. annuum and especially its cultivated forms. The phylogenetic relationships established for the Capsicum species on the basis of plastome analysis were similar to those inferred from the morphological traits, isozyme patterns, and molecular analysis of the nuclear genome.

  15. Genomic and genotyping characterization of haplotype-based polymorphic microsatellites in Prunus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Efficient utilization of microsatellites in genetic studies remains impeded largely due to the unknown status of their primer reliability, chromosomal location, and allele polymorphism. Discovery and characterization of microsatellite polymorphisms in a taxon will disclose the unknowns and gain new ...

  16. Microsatellite markers for species of genus Dionda (Cyprinidae) from the American southwest

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Thirty-eight microsatellite markers were developed from an enriched genomic DNA library of the cyprinid fish (minnow) Dionda episcopa. The microsatellites include 31 perfect-repeat motifs (29 dinucleotide, 1 trinucleotide, and 1 tetranucleotide) and seven imperfect-repeat dinucleotide motifs. The ...

  17. The incidence of mini- and micro-satellite repetitive DNA in the canine genome.

    PubMed

    Rothuizen, J; Wolfswinkel, J; Lenstra, J A; Frants, R R

    1994-10-01

    We have estimated the incidence of microand mini-satellites in the dog genome. A genomic phage library from canine liver, with an average insert size of 16 kb, was screened to detect potentially polymorphic microand mini-satellite sequences, which may be useful for the development of markers of inherited diseases, for fingerprinting, or for population genetics. Synthetic oligonucleotide probes were used to search for microsatellite sequences, and minisatellites were investigated with eight heterologous VNTR probes. (CA)n.(GT)n sequences were by far the most frequent, with a calculated average distance between consecutive loci of 42 kb. The average distance between loci of tri- or tetra-nucleotide repeats was about 330 kb. Mean inter-locus distances were 320 kb for (GGC)n, 205 kb for (GTG)n, 563 kb for (AGG)n, 320 kb for (TCG)n, 233 kb for (TTA)n, 384 kb for (CCTA)n, 368 kb for (CTGT)n, 122 kb for (TTCC)n, 565 kb for (TCTA)n, and 229 kb for (TAGG)n. Cross-hybridization with eight human minisatellite probes was found at average distances of 1400 kb; only one did not hybridize at all. We conclude that the di-, tri and tetra-nucleotide short tandem repeats, as well as some minisatellite sequences, are potentially useful as genetic markers, for mapping of the canine genome, and also for paternity testing and the analysis of population characteristics.

  18. Genome-wide linkage analysis for uric acid in families enriched for hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Rule, Andrew D.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Hunt, Steven C.; Asmann, Yan; Boerwinkle, Eric; Pankow, James S.; Mosley, Thomas H.; Turner, Stephen T.

    2009-01-01

    Background. Uric acid is heritable and associated with hypertension and insulin resistance. We sought to identify genomic regions influencing serum uric acid in families in which two or more siblings had hypertension. Methods. Uric acid levels and microsatellite markers were assayed in the Genetic Epidemiology Network of Arteriopathy (GENOA) cohort (1075 whites and 1333 blacks) and the Hypertension Genetic Epidemiology Network (HyperGEN) cohort (1542 whites and 1627 blacks). Genome-wide linkage analyses of uric acid and bivariate linkage analyses of uric acid with an additional surrogate of insulin resistance were completed. Pathway analysis explored gene sets enriched at loci influencing uric acid. Results. In the GENOA white cohort, loci influencing uric acid were identified on chromosome 8 at 135 cM [multipoint logarithm of odds score (MLS) = 2.4], on chromosome 9 at 113 cM (MLS = 3.7) and on chromosome 16 at 93 cM (MLS = 2.3), but did not replicate in HyperGEN. At these loci, there was evidence of pleiotropy with other surrogates of insulin resistance and genes in the fructose and mannose metabolism pathway were enriched. In the HyperGEN-black cohort, there was some evidence of a locus for uric acid on chromosome 4 at 135 cM (MLS = 2.4) that had modest replication in GENOA (MLS = 1.2). Conclusions. Several novel loci linked to uric acid were identified but none showed clear replication. Widespread diuretic use, a medication that raises uric acid levels, was an important study limitation. Bivariate linkage analyses and pathway analysis were consistent with genes regulating insulin resistance and fructose metabolism contributing to the heritability of uric acid. PMID:19258383

  19. Comparison of microsatellites versus single-nucleotide polymorphisms in a genome linkage screen for prostate cancer-susceptibility Loci.

    PubMed

    Schaid, Daniel J; Guenther, Jennifer C; Christensen, Gerald B; Hebbring, Scott; Rosenow, Carsten; Hilker, Christopher A; McDonnell, Shannon K; Cunningham, Julie M; Slager, Susan L; Blute, Michael L; Thibodeau, Stephen N

    2004-12-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers among men and has long been recognized to occur in familial clusters. Brothers and sons of affected men have a 2-3-fold increased risk of developing prostate cancer. However, identification of genetic susceptibility loci for prostate cancer has been extremely difficult. Although the suggestion of linkage has been reported for many chromosomes, the most promising regions have been difficult to replicate. In this study, we compare genome linkage scans using microsatellites with those using single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), performed in 467 men with prostate cancer from 167 families. For the microsatellites, the ABI Prism Linkage Mapping Set version 2, with 402 microsatellite markers, was used, and, for the SNPs, the Early Access Affymetrix Mapping 10K array was used. Our results show that the presence of linkage disequilibrium (LD) among SNPs can lead to inflated LOD scores, and this seems to be an artifact due to the assumption of linkage equilibrium that is required by the current genetic-linkage software. After excluding SNPs with high LD, we found a number of new LOD-score peaks with values of at least 2.0 that were not found by the microsatellite markers: chromosome 8, with a maximum model-free LOD score of 2.2; chromosome 2, with a LOD score of 2.1; chromosome 6, with a LOD score of 4.2; and chromosome 12, with a LOD score of 3.9. The LOD scores for chromosomes 6 and 12 are difficult to interpret, because they occurred only at the extreme ends of the chromosomes. The greatest gain provided by the SNP markers was a large increase in the linkage information content, with an average information content of 61% for the SNPs, versus an average of 41% for the microsatellite markers. The strengths and weaknesses of microsatellite versus SNP markers are illustrated by the results of our genome linkage scans.

  20. Genotype-environment interactions in microsatellite stable/microsatellite instability-low colorectal cancer: results from a genome-wide association study.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Jane C; Lewinger, Juan Pablo; Song, Chi; Campbell, Peter T; Conti, David V; Edlund, Christopher K; Duggan, Dave J; Rangrej, Jagadish; Lemire, Mathieu; Hudson, Thomas; Zanke, Brent; Cotterchio, Michelle; Gallinger, Steven; Jenkins, Mark; Hopper, John; Haile, Robert; Newcomb, Polly; Potter, John; Baron, John A; Le Marchand, Loic; Casey, Graham

    2011-05-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have led to the identification of a number of common susceptibility loci for colorectal cancer (CRC); however, none of these GWAS have considered gene-environment (G × E) interactions. Therefore, it is unclear whether current hits are modified by environmental exposures or whether there are additional hits whose effects are dependent on environmental exposures. We conducted a systematic search for G × E interactions using genome wide data from the Colon Cancer Family Registry that included 1,191 cases of microsatellite stable (MSS) or microsatellite instability-low (MSI-L) CRC and 999 controls genotyped using either the Illumina Human1M or Human1M-Duo BeadChip. We tested for interactions between genotypes and 14 environmental factors using 3 methods: a traditional case-control test, a case-only test, and the recently proposed 2-step method by Murcray and colleagues. All potentially significant findings were replicated in the ARCTIC Study. No G × E interactions were identified that reached genome-wide significance by any of the 3 methods. When analyzing previously reported susceptibility loci, 7 significant G × E interactions were found at a 5% significance level. We investigated these 7 interactions in an independent sample and none of the interactions were replicated. Identifying G × E interactions will present challenges in a GWAS setting. Our power calculations illustrate the need for larger sample sizes; however, as CRC is a heterogeneous disease, a tradeoff between increasing sample size and heterogeneity needs to be considered. The results from this first genome-wide analysis of G × E in CRC identify several challenges, which may be addressed by large consortium efforts. ©2011 AACR.

  1. Hyb-Seq: combining target enrichment and genome skimming for plant phylogenomics

    Treesearch

    Kevin Weitemier; Shannon C.K. Straub; Richard C. Cronn; Mark Fishbein; Roswitha Schmickl; Angela McDonnell; Aaron. Liston

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Hyb-Seq, the combination of target enrichment and genome skimming, allows simultaneous data collection for low-copy nuclear genes and high-copy genomic targets for plant systematics and evolution studies. • Methods and Results: Genome and transcriptome assemblies for milkweed ( Asclepias syriaca ) were used to design enrichment probes for 3385...

  2. Mapping DNA-protein interactions in large genomes by sequence tag analysis of genomic enrichment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jonghwan; Bhinge, Akshay A; Morgan, Xochitl C; Iyer, Vishwanath R

    2005-01-01

    Identifying the chromosomal targets of transcription factors is important for reconstructing the transcriptional regulatory networks underlying global gene expression programs. We have developed an unbiased genomic method called sequence tag analysis of genomic enrichment (STAGE) to identify the direct binding targets of transcription factors in vivo. STAGE is based on high-throughput sequencing of concatemerized tags derived from target DNA enriched by chromatin immunoprecipitation. We first used STAGE in yeast to confirm that RNA polymerase III genes are the most prominent targets of the TATA-box binding protein. We optimized the STAGE protocol and developed analysis methods to allow the identification of transcription factor targets in human cells. We used STAGE to identify several previously unknown binding targets of human transcription factor E2F4 that we independently validated by promoter-specific PCR and microarray hybridization. STAGE provides a means of identifying the chromosomal targets of DNA-associated proteins in any sequenced genome.

  3. Characterization of perfect microsatellite based on genome-wide and chromosome level in Rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Xu, Yongtao; Hu, Zongxiu; Wang, Chen; Zhang, Xiuyue; Li, Jing; Yue, Bisong

    2016-11-05

    Microsatellite studies based on chromosomes level would contribute to the biometric correlation analysis of chromosome and microsatellite applications on the specific chromosome. In this study, the total microsatellite length of 1,141,024 loci was 21.8Mb, which covered about 0.74% of the male Rhesus monkey genome. Perfect mononucleotide SSRs were the most abundant, followed by the pattern: perfect di->tetra->tri->penta->hexanucleotide SSRs. The main range of repeat times focused on 12-32 times (mono-), 7-23 times (di-), 5-10 times (tri-), 4-14 times (tetra-), 4-9 times (penta-), 4-8 times (hexa-), respectively. The largest SSRs number was found in chromosome 1 with 94,347 loci, followed by chromosome 3, 2, 7 and 5, and the smallest number was in chromosome 18. The predominant repeat types in male Rhesus monkey genome and chromosome Y were basically A, AC, AG, AAT, AAC, AAAT, AAAC, AAAG, AAACA and AAACAA. SSRs number of all chromosomes was closely positively correlated with chromosome sequence size (r=0.969, p<0.01), and significantly negatively correlated with abundance (r=-0.24, 0.01microsatellite density (r=-0.456, 0.01microsatellites structural function, composition mode and molecular markers development in Rhesus monkey genome.

  4. Multiplexed microsatellite recovery using massively parallel sequencing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jennings, T.N.; Knaus, B.J.; Mullins, T.D.; Haig, S.M.; Cronn, R.C.

    2011-01-01

    Conservation and management of natural populations requires accurate and inexpensive genotyping methods. Traditional microsatellite, or simple sequence repeat (SSR), marker analysis remains a popular genotyping method because of the comparatively low cost of marker development, ease of analysis and high power of genotype discrimination. With the availability of massively parallel sequencing (MPS), it is now possible to sequence microsatellite-enriched genomic libraries in multiplex pools. To test this approach, we prepared seven microsatellite-enriched, barcoded genomic libraries from diverse taxa (two conifer trees, five birds) and sequenced these on one lane of the Illumina Genome Analyzer using paired-end 80-bp reads. In this experiment, we screened 6.1 million sequences and identified 356958 unique microreads that contained di- or trinucleotide microsatellites. Examination of four species shows that our conversion rate from raw sequences to polymorphic markers compares favourably to Sanger- and 454-based methods. The advantage of multiplexed MPS is that the staggering capacity of modern microread sequencing is spread across many libraries; this reduces sample preparation and sequencing costs to less than $400 (USD) per species. This price is sufficiently low that microsatellite libraries could be prepared and sequenced for all 1373 organisms listed as 'threatened' and 'endangered' in the United States for under $0.5M (USD).

  5. Multiplexed microsatellite recovery using massively parallel sequencing.

    PubMed

    Jennings, T N; Knaus, B J; Mullins, T D; Haig, S M; Cronn, R C

    2011-11-01

    Conservation and management of natural populations requires accurate and inexpensive genotyping methods. Traditional microsatellite, or simple sequence repeat (SSR), marker analysis remains a popular genotyping method because of the comparatively low cost of marker development, ease of analysis and high power of genotype discrimination. With the availability of massively parallel sequencing (MPS), it is now possible to sequence microsatellite-enriched genomic libraries in multiplex pools. To test this approach, we prepared seven microsatellite-enriched, barcoded genomic libraries from diverse taxa (two conifer trees, five birds) and sequenced these on one lane of the Illumina Genome Analyzer using paired-end 80-bp reads. In this experiment, we screened 6.1 million sequences and identified 356,958 unique microreads that contained di- or trinucleotide microsatellites. Examination of four species shows that our conversion rate from raw sequences to polymorphic markers compares favourably to Sanger- and 454-based methods. The advantage of multiplexed MPS is that the staggering capacity of modern microread sequencing is spread across many libraries; this reduces sample preparation and sequencing costs to less than $400 (USD) per species. This price is sufficiently low that microsatellite libraries could be prepared and sequenced for all 1373 organisms listed as 'threatened' and 'endangered' in the United States for under $0.5 M (USD).

  6. A Genome-Wide Scan of Selective Sweeps and Association Mapping of Fruit Traits Using Microsatellite Markers in Watermelon

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Umesh K.; Abburi, Lavanya; Abburi, Venkata Lakshmi; Saminathan, Thangasamy; Cantrell, Robert; Vajja, Venkata Gopinath; Reddy, Rishi; Tomason, Yan R.; Levi, Amnon; Wehner, Todd C.; Nimmakayala, Padma

    2015-01-01

    Our genetic diversity study uses microsatellites of known map position to estimate genome level population structure and linkage disequilibrium, and to identify genomic regions that have undergone selection during watermelon domestication and improvement. Thirty regions that showed evidence of selective sweep were scanned for the presence of candidate genes using the watermelon genome browser (www.icugi.org). We localized selective sweeps in intergenic regions, close to the promoters, and within the exons and introns of various genes. This study provided an evidence of convergent evolution for the presence of diverse ecotypes with special reference to American and European ecotypes. Our search for location of linked markers in the whole-genome draft sequence revealed that BVWS00358, a GA repeat microsatellite, is the GAGA type transcription factor located in the 5′ untranslated regions of a structure and insertion element that expresses a Cys2His2 Zinc finger motif, with presumed biological processes related to chitin response and transcriptional regulation. In addition, BVWS01708, an ATT repeat microsatellite, located in the promoter of a DTW domain-containing protein (Cla002761); and 2 other simple sequence repeats that association mapping link to fruit length and rind thickness. PMID:25425675

  7. Genome-Wide Survey and Analysis of Microsatellite Sequences in Bovid Species

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Wen-Hua; Jiang, Xue-Mei; Du, Lian-Ming; Xiao, Guo-Sheng; Hu, Ting-Zhang; Yue, Bi-Song; Quan, Qiu-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSRs) have become the most popular source of genetic markers, which are ubiquitously distributed in many eukaryotic and prokaryotic genomes. This is the first study examining and comparing SSRs in completely sequenced genomes of the Bovidae. We analyzed and compared the number of SSRs, relative abundance, relative density, guanine-cytosine (GC) content and proportion of SSRs in six taxonomically different bovid species: Bos taurus, Bubalus bubalis, Bos mutus, Ovis aries, Capra hircus, and Pantholops hodgsonii. Our analysis revealed that, based on our search criteria, the total number of perfect SSRs found ranged from 663,079 to 806,907 and covered from 0.44% to 0.48% of the bovid genomes. Relative abundance and density of SSRs in these Bovinae genomes were non-significantly correlated with genome size (Pearson, r < 0.420, p > 0.05). Perfect mononucleotide SSRs were the most abundant, followed by the pattern: perfect di- > tri- > penta- > tetra- > hexanucleotide SSRs. Generally, the number of SSRs, relative abundance, and relative density of SSRs decreased as the motif repeat length increased in each species of Bovidae. The most GC-content was in trinucleotide SSRs and the least was in the mononucleotide SSRs in the six bovid genomes. The GC-contents of tri- and pentanucleotide SSRs showed a great deal of similarity among different chromosomes of B. taurus, O. aries, and C. hircus. SSR number of all chromosomes in the B. taurus, O.aries, and C. hircus is closely positively correlated with chromosome sequence size (Pearson, r > 0.980, p < 0.01) and significantly negatively correlated with GC-content (Pearson, r < -0.638, p < 0.01). Relative abundance and density of SSRs in all chromosomes of the three species were significantly negatively correlated with GC-content (Pearson, r < -0.333, P < 0.05) but not significantly correlated with chromosome sequence size (Pearson, r < -0.185, P > 0.05). Relative abundances of the same

  8. Ultraconserved Elements Sequencing as a Low-Cost Source of Complete Mitochondrial Genomes and Microsatellite Markers in Non-Model Amniotes

    PubMed Central

    Raposo do Amaral, Fábio; Neves, Leandro G.; Resende, Márcio F. R.; Mobili, Flávia; Miyaki, Cristina Y.; Pellegrino, Katia C. M.; Biondo, Cibele

    2015-01-01

    Sequence capture of ultraconserved elements (UCEs) associated with massively parallel sequencing has become a common source of nuclear data for studies of animal systematics and phylogeography. However, mitochondrial and microsatellite variation are still commonly used in various kinds of molecular studies, and probably will complement genomic data in years to come. Here we show that besides providing abundant genomic data, UCE sequencing is an excellent source of both sequences for microsatellite loci design and complete mitochondrial genomes with high sequencing depth. Identification of dozens of microsatellite loci and assembly of complete mitogenomes is exemplified here using three species of Poospiza warbling finches from southern and southeastern Brazil. This strategy opens exciting opportunities to simultaneously analyze genome-wide nuclear datasets and traditionally used mtDNA and microsatellite markers in non-model amniotes at no additional cost. PMID:26379155

  9. Patterns of Evolutionary Conservation of Microsatellites (SSRs) Suggest a Faster Rate of Genome Evolution in Hymenoptera Than in Diptera

    PubMed Central

    Stolle, Eckart; Kidner, Jonathan H.; Moritz, Robin F.A.

    2013-01-01

    Microsatellites, or simple sequence repeats (SSRs), are common and widespread DNA elements in genomes of many organisms. However, their dynamics in genome evolution is unclear, whereby they are thought to evolve neutrally. More available genome sequences along with dated phylogenies allowed for studying the evolution of these repetitive DNA elements along evolutionary time scales. This could be used to compare rates of genome evolution. We show that SSRs in insects can be retained for several hundred million years. Different types of microsatellites seem to be retained longer than others. By comparing Dipteran with Hymenopteran species, we found very similar patterns of SSR loss during their evolution, but both taxa differ profoundly in the rate. Relative to divergence time, Diptera lost SSRs twice as fast as Hymenoptera. The loss of SSRs on the Drosophila melanogaster X-chromosome was higher than on the other chromosomes. However, accounting for generation time, the Diptera show an 8.5-fold slower rate of SSR loss than the Hymenoptera, which, in contrast to previous studies, suggests a faster genome evolution in the latter. This shows that generation time differences can have a profound effect. A faster genome evolution in these insects could be facilitated by several factors very different to Diptera, which is discussed in light of our results on the haplodiploid D. melanogaster X-chromosome. Furthermore, large numbers of SSRs can be found to be in synteny and thus could be exploited as a tool to investigate genome structure and evolution. PMID:23292136

  10. Development of microsatellite markers for Hancornia speciosa Gomes (Apocynaceae).

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, A J L; Yamaguishi, A T; Chaves, L J; Coelho, A S G; Lima, J S; Telles, M P C

    2015-07-03

    Herein, we describe 34 microsatellite loci developed using an enrichment genomic library for the tree species Hancornia speciosa Gomes (Apocynaceae). Thirty-five individuals were genotyped using 34 primers to analyze the polymorphisms at each locus. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 4 to 20. The average number of alleles was 8.11, and the expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.62 to 0.94. These microsatellite primers will be useful in population genetics studies for this species.

  11. Isolation and characterization of genomic microsatellite markers for small cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum Maton) for utility in genetic diversity analysis.

    PubMed

    Cyriac, Anu; Paul, Ritto; Anupama, K; Senthil Kumar, R; Sheeja, T E; Nirmal Babu, K; Parthasarathy, V A

    2016-04-01

    Microsatellite markers in small cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum Maton) were developed using the selective hybridization enrichment method. A total of 140 microsatellite repeats were identified from 270 clones. Primers were designed for 58 microsatellites and 44 primer pairs amplified products of expected size in cardamom. These markers were used for studying the diversity of 20 important small cardamom genotypes, and six markers were found to be polymorphic. The number of alleles ranged from 2 to 7 with an average of 3.6 per locus. Polymorphic information content values ranged from 0.14 to 0.38 based on dominant scoring. The two markers ECM 47a and ECMG 28 generated specific banding patterns for the genotypes MCC7 (Pink tiller) and APG434 (MA18) respectively. Dendrogram illustrated the genetic similarity between different genotypes of Kerala and Karnataka regions. It differentiated the closely related genotypes and released varieties into separate groups. Principal coordinate analysis revealed PV1 and ICRI 1 as the most divergent genotypes. The study demonstrated that these markers are informative and can be further utilized for generating reliable molecular data for assisting the crop improvement of small cardamom. Cross generic transferability (71.4 %) of the developed primers proved that they are useful for phylogenetic studies in the family Zingiberaceae. This is the first report of de novo isolation, characterisation and utilization of microsatellite markers for the genetic diversity analysis of small cardamom.

  12. D5S2500 is an ambiguously characterized STR: Identification and description of forensic microsatellites in the genomics age.

    PubMed

    Phillips, C; Parson, W; Amigo, J; King, J L; Coble, M D; Steffen, C R; Vallone, P M; Gettings, K B; Butler, J M; Budowle, B

    2016-07-01

    In the process of establishing short tandem repeat (STR) sequence variant nomenclature guidelines in anticipation of expanded forensic multiplexes for massively parallel sequencing (MPS), it was discovered that the STR D5S2500 has multiple positions and genomic characteristics reported. This ambiguity is because the marker named D5S2500 consists of two different microsatellites forming separate components in the capillary electrophoresis multiplexes of Qiagen's HDplex (Hilden, Germany) and AGCU ScienTech's non-CODIS STR 21plex (Wuxi, Jiangsu, China). This study outlines the genomic details used to identify each microsatellite and reveals the D5S2500 marker in HDplex has the correctly assigned STR name, while the D5S2500 marker in the AGCU 21plex, closely positioned a further 1643 nucleotides in the human reference sequence, is an unnamed microsatellite. The fact that the D5S2500 marker has existed as two distinct STR loci undetected for almost ten years, even with reported discordant genotypes for the standard control DNA, underlines the need for careful scrutiny of the genomic properties of forensic STRs, as they become adapted for sequence analysis with MPS systems. We make the recommendation that precise chromosome location data must be reported for any forensic marker under development but not in common use, so that the genomic characteristics of the locus are validated to the same level of accuracy as its allelic variation and forensic performance. To clearly differentiate each microsatellite, we propose the name D5S2800 be used to identify the Chromosome-5 STR in the AGCU 21plex.

  13. Development of novel microsatellite markers for the BBCC Oryza genome (Poaceae) using high-throughput sequencing technology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Caihong; Liu, Xiaojiao; Peng, Suotang; Xu, Qun; Yuan, Xiaoping; Feng, Yue; Yu, Hanyong; Wang, Yiping; Wei, Xinghua

    2014-01-01

    Wild species of Oryza are extremely valuable sources of genetic material that can be used to broaden the genetic background of cultivated rice, and to increase its resistance to abiotic and biotic stresses. Until recently, there was no sequence information for the BBCC Oryza genome; therefore, no special markers had been developed for this genome type. The lack of suitable markers made it difficult to search for valuable genes in the BBCC genome. The aim of this study was to develop microsatellite markers for the BBCC genome. We obtained 13,991 SSR-containing sequences and designed 14,508 primer pairs. The most abundant was hexanuclelotide (31.39%), followed by trinucleotide (27.67%) and dinucleotide (19.04%). 600 markers were selected for validation in 23 accessions of Oryza species with the BBCC genome. A set of 495 markers produced clear amplified fragments of the expected sizes. The average number of alleles per locus (Na) was 2.5, ranging from 1 to 9. The genetic diversity per locus (He) ranged from 0 to 0.844 with a mean of 0.333. The mean polymorphism information content (PIC) was 0.290, and ranged from 0 to 0.825. Of the 495 markers, 12 were only found in the BB genome, 173 were unique to the CC genome, and 198 were also present in the AA genome. These microsatellite markers could be used to evaluate the phylogenetic relationships among different Oryza genomes, and to construct a genetic linkage map for locating and identifying valuable genes in the BBCC genome, and would also for marker-assisted breeding programs that included accessions with the AA genome, especially Oryza sativa.

  14. Development of Novel Microsatellite Markers for the BBCC Oryza Genome (Poaceae) Using High-Throughput Sequencing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Suotang; Xu, Qun; Yuan, Xiaoping; Feng, Yue; Yu, Hanyong; Wang, Yiping; Wei, Xinghua

    2014-01-01

    Wild species of Oryza are extremely valuable sources of genetic material that can be used to broaden the genetic background of cultivated rice, and to increase its resistance to abiotic and biotic stresses. Until recently, there was no sequence information for the BBCC Oryza genome; therefore, no special markers had been developed for this genome type. The lack of suitable markers made it difficult to search for valuable genes in the BBCC genome. The aim of this study was to develop microsatellite markers for the BBCC genome. We obtained 13,991 SSR-containing sequences and designed 14,508 primer pairs. The most abundant was hexanuclelotide (31.39%), followed by trinucleotide (27.67%) and dinucleotide (19.04%). 600 markers were selected for validation in 23 accessions of Oryza species with the BBCC genome. A set of 495 markers produced clear amplified fragments of the expected sizes. The average number of alleles per locus (Na) was 2.5, ranging from 1 to 9. The genetic diversity per locus (He) ranged from 0 to 0.844 with a mean of 0.333. The mean polymorphism information content (PIC) was 0.290, and ranged from 0 to 0.825. Of the 495 markers, 12 were only found in the BB genome, 173 were unique to the CC genome, and 198 were also present in the AA genome. These microsatellite markers could be used to evaluate the phylogenetic relationships among different Oryza genomes, and to construct a genetic linkage map for locating and identifying valuable genes in the BBCC genome, and would also for marker-assisted breeding programs that included accessions with the AA genome, especially Oryza sativa. PMID:24632997

  15. Whole-genome scan, in a complex disease, using 11,245 single-nucleotide polymorphisms: comparison with microsatellites.

    PubMed

    John, Sally; Shephard, Neil; Liu, Guoying; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Cao, Manqiu; Chen, Wenwei; Vasavda, Nisha; Mills, Tracy; Barton, Anne; Hinks, Anne; Eyre, Steve; Jones, Keith W; Ollier, William; Silman, Alan; Gibson, Neil; Worthington, Jane; Kennedy, Giulia C

    2004-07-01

    Despite the theoretical evidence of the utility of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for linkage analysis, no whole-genome scans of a complex disease have yet been published to directly compare SNPs with microsatellites. Here, we describe a whole-genome screen of 157 families with multiple cases of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), performed using 11,245 genomewide SNPs. The results were compared with those from a 10-cM microsatellite scan in the same cohort. The SNP analysis detected HLA*DRB1, the major RA susceptibility locus (P=.00004), with a linkage interval of 31 cM, compared with a 50-cM linkage interval detected by the microsatellite scan. In addition, four loci were detected at a nominal significance level (P<.05) in the SNP linkage analysis; these were not observed in the microsatellite scan. We demonstrate that variation in information content was the main factor contributing to observed differences in the two scans, with the SNPs providing significantly higher information content than the microsatellites. Reducing the number of SNPs in the marker set to 3,300 (1-cM spacing) caused several loci to drop below nominal significance levels, suggesting that decreases in information content can have significant effects on linkage results. In contrast, differences in maps employed in the analysis, the low detectable rate of genotyping error, and the presence of moderate linkage disequilibrium between markers did not significantly affect the results. We have demonstrated the utility of a dense SNP map for performing linkage analysis in a late-age-at-onset disease, where DNA from parents is not always available. The high SNP density allows loci to be defined more precisely and provides a partial scaffold for association studies, substantially reducing the resource requirement for gene-mapping studies.

  16. Genomic microsatellites identify shared Jewish ancestry intermediate between Middle Eastern and European populations

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Genetic studies have often produced conflicting results on the question of whether distant Jewish populations in different geographic locations share greater genetic similarity to each other or instead, to nearby non-Jewish populations. We perform a genome-wide population-genetic study of Jewish populations, analyzing 678 autosomal microsatellite loci in 78 individuals from four Jewish groups together with similar data on 321 individuals from 12 non-Jewish Middle Eastern and European populations. Results We find that the Jewish populations show a high level of genetic similarity to each other, clustering together in several types of analysis of population structure. Further, Bayesian clustering, neighbor-joining trees, and multidimensional scaling place the Jewish populations as intermediate between the non-Jewish Middle Eastern and European populations. Conclusion These results support the view that the Jewish populations largely share a common Middle Eastern ancestry and that over their history they have undergone varying degrees of admixture with non-Jewish populations of European descent. PMID:19995433

  17. Development of Multiple Polymorphic Microsatellite Markers for Ceratina calcarata (Hymenoptera: Apidae) Using Genome-Wide Analysis.

    PubMed

    Shell, Wyatt A; Rehan, Sandra M

    2016-01-01

    The small carpenter bee, Ceratina calcarata (Robertson), is a widespread native pollinator across eastern North America. The behavioral ecology and nesting biology of C. calcarata has been relatively well-studied and the species is emerging as a model organism for both native pollinator and social evolution research. C. calcarata is subsocial: reproductively mature females provide extended maternal care to their brood. As such, studies of C. calcarata may also reveal patterns of relatedness and demography unique to primitively social Hymenoptera. Here, we present 21 microsatellite loci, isolated from the recently completed C. calcarata genome. Screening in 39 individuals across their distribution revealed that no loci were in linkage disequilibrium, nor did any deviate significantly from Hardy-Weinberg following sequential Bonferroni correction. Allele count ranged from 2 to 14, and observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.08 to 0.82 (mean 0.47) and 0.26 to 0.88 (mean 0.56), respectively. These markers will enable studies of population-wide genetic structuring across C. calcarata's distribution. Such tools will also allow for exploration of between and within-colony relatedness in this subsocial native pollinator.

  18. Development of Multiple Polymorphic Microsatellite Markers for Ceratina calcarata (Hymenoptera: Apidae) Using Genome-Wide Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shell, Wyatt A.; Rehan, Sandra M.

    2016-01-01

    The small carpenter bee, Ceratina calcarata (Robertson), is a widespread native pollinator across eastern North America. The behavioral ecology and nesting biology of C. calcarata has been relatively well-studied and the species is emerging as a model organism for both native pollinator and social evolution research. C. calcarata is subsocial: reproductively mature females provide extended maternal care to their brood. As such, studies of C. calcarata may also reveal patterns of relatedness and demography unique to primitively social Hymenoptera. Here, we present 21 microsatellite loci, isolated from the recently completed C. calcarata genome. Screening in 39 individuals across their distribution revealed that no loci were in linkage disequilibrium, nor did any deviate significantly from Hardy-Weinberg following sequential Bonferroni correction. Allele count ranged from 2 to 14, and observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.08 to 0.82 (mean 0.47) and 0.26 to 0.88 (mean 0.56), respectively. These markers will enable studies of population-wide genetic structuring across C. calcarata’s distribution. Such tools will also allow for exploration of between and within-colony relatedness in this subsocial native pollinator. PMID:27324584

  19. Distribution of genome-wide linkage disequilibrium based on microsatellite loci in the Samoan population

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Whole genome-wide scanning for susceptibility loci based on linkage disequilibrium (LD) has been proposed as a powerful strategy for mapping common complex diseases, especially in isolated populations. We recruited 389 individuals from 175 families in the US territory of American Samoa, and 96 unrelated individuals from American Samoa and the independent country of Samoa in order to examine background LD by using a 10 centimorgan (cM) map containing 381 autosomal and 18 X-linked microsatellite markers. We tested the relationship between LD and recombination fraction by fitting a regression model. We estimated a slope of -0.021 (SE 0.00354; p < 0.0001). Based on our results, LD in the Samoan population decays steadily as the recombination fraction between autosomal markers increases. The patterns of LD observed in the Samoan population are quite similar to those previously observed in Palau but markedly contrast with those observed in a non-isolated Caucasian sample, where there is essentially no marker-to-marker LD. Our analyses support the hypothesis of a recent bottleneck, which is consistent with the known demographic history of the Samoan population. Furthermore, population substructure tests support the hypothesis that self-identified Samoans represent one homogenous genetic population. PMID:15588493

  20. Selective enrichment of damaged DNA molecules for ancient genome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Contamination by present-day human and microbial DNA is one of the major hindrances for large-scale genomic studies using ancient biological material. We describe a new molecular method, U selection, which exploits one of the most distinctive features of ancient DNA—the presence of deoxyuracils—for selective enrichment of endogenous DNA against a complex background of contamination during DNA library preparation. By applying the method to Neanderthal DNA extracts that are heavily contaminated with present-day human DNA, we show that the fraction of useful sequence information increases ∼10-fold and that the resulting sequences are more efficiently depleted of human contamination than when using purely computational approaches. Furthermore, we show that U selection can lead to a four- to fivefold increase in the proportion of endogenous DNA sequences relative to those of microbial contaminants in some samples. U selection may thus help to lower the costs for ancient genome sequencing of nonhuman samples also. PMID:25081630

  1. Localization and Characterization of 170 BAC-derived clones and mapping of Ninety-Four Microsatellites in the Hessian Fly

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ninety-four microsatellites from enriched genomic libraries of Hessian fly (Mayetiola destructor (Say)) were localized to 170 cognate clones in a Hessian fly bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library. These microsatellite-positive BAC clones were physically mapped to polytene chromosomes by fl...

  2. Polymorphic Microsatellite Markers for the Tetrapolar Anther-Smut Fungus Microbotryum saponariae Based on Genome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Fortuna, Taiadjana M.; Snirc, Alodie; Badouin, Hélène; Gouzy, Jérome; Siguenza, Sophie; Esquerre, Diane; Le Prieur, Stéphanie; Shykoff, Jacqui A.; Giraud, Tatiana

    2016-01-01

    Background Anther-smut fungi belonging to the genus Microbotryum sterilize their host plants by aborting ovaries and replacing pollen by fungal spores. Sibling Microbotryum species are highly specialized on their host plants and they have been widely used as models for studies of ecology and evolution of plant pathogenic fungi. However, most studies have focused, so far, on M. lychnidis-dioicae that parasitizes the white campion Silene latifolia. Microbotryum saponariae, parasitizing mainly Saponaria officinalis, is an interesting anther-smut fungus, since it belongs to a tetrapolar lineage (i.e., with two independently segregating mating-type loci), while most of the anther-smut Microbotryum fungi are bipolar (i.e., with a single mating-type locus). Saponaria officinalis is a widespread long-lived perennial plant species with multiple flowering stems, which makes its anther-smut pathogen a good model for studying phylogeography and within-host multiple infections. Principal Findings Here, based on a generated genome sequence of M. saponariae we developed 6 multiplexes with a total of 22 polymorphic microsatellite markers using an inexpensive and efficient method. We scored these markers in fungal individuals collected from 97 populations across Europe, and found that the number of their alleles ranged from 2 to 11, and their expected heterozygosity from 0.01 to 0.58. Cross-species amplification was examined using nine other Microbotryum species parasitizing hosts belonging to Silene, Dianthus and Knautia genera. All loci were successfully amplified in at least two other Microbotryum species. Significance These newly developed markers will provide insights into the population genetic structure and the occurrence of within-host multiple infections of M. saponariae. In addition, the draft genome of M. saponariae, as well as one of the described markers will be useful resources for studying the evolution of the breeding systems in the genus Microbotryum and the

  3. Characterization of 35 novel microsatellite DNA markers from the duck (Anas platyrhynchos) genome and cross-amplification in other birds

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yinhua; Tu, Jianfeng; Cheng, Xuebo; Tang, Bo; Hu, Xiaoxiang; Liu, Zhaoliang; Feng, Jidong; Lou, Yankun; Lin, Li; Xu, Ke; Zhao, Yulong; Li, Ning

    2005-01-01

    In order to study duck microsatellites, we constructed a library enriched for (CA)n, (CAG)n, (GCC)n and (TTTC)n. A total of 35 pairs of primers from these microsatellites were developed and used to detect polymorphisms in 31 unrelated Peking ducks. Twenty-eight loci were polymorphic and seven loci were monomorphic. A total of 117 alleles were observed from these polymorphic microsatellite markers, which ranged from 2 to 14 with an average of 4.18 per locus. The frequencies of the 117 alleles ranged from 0.02 to 0.98. The highest heterozygosity (0.97) was observed at the CAUD019 microsatellite locus and the lowest heterozygosity (0.04) at the CAUD008 locus, and 11 loci had heterozygosities greater than 0.50 (46.43%). The polymorphism information content (PIC) of 28 loci ranged from 0.04 to 0.88 with an average of 0.42. All the above markers were used to screen the polymorphism in other bird species. Two markers produced specific monomorphic products with the chicken DNA. Fourteen markers generated specific fragments with the goose DNA: 5 were polymorphic and 9 were monomorphic. But no specific product was detected with the peacock DNA. Based on sequence comparisons of the flanking sequence and repeat, we conclude that 2 chicken loci and 14 goose loci were true homologous loci of the duck loci. The microsatellite markers identified and characterized in the present study will contribute to the genetic map, quantitative traits mapping, and phylogenetic analysis in the duck and goose. PMID:15943922

  4. Genome-wide SNP and microsatellite variation illuminate population-level epidemiology in the Leishmania donovani species complex

    PubMed Central

    Downing, Tim; Stark, Olivia; Vanaerschot, Manu; Imamura, Hideo; Sanders, Mandy; Decuypere, Saskia; de Doncker, Simonne; Maes, Ilse; Rijal, Suman; Sundar, Shyam; Dujardin, Jean-Claude; Berriman, Matthew; Schönian, Gabriele

    2012-01-01

    The species of the Leishmania donovani species complex cause visceral leishmaniasis, a debilitating infectious disease transmitted by sandflies. Understanding molecular changes associated with population structure in these parasites can help unravel their epidemiology and spread in humans. In this study, we used a panel of standard microsatellite loci and genome-wide SNPs to investigate population-level diversity in L. donovani strains recently isolated from a small geographic area spanning India, Bihar and Nepal, and compared their variation to that found in diverse strains of the L. donovani complex isolates from Europe, Africa and Asia. Microsatellites and SNPs could clearly resolve the phylogenetic relationships of the strains between continents, and microsatellite phylogenies indicated that certain older Indian strains were closely related to African strains. In the context of the anti-malaria spraying campaigns in the 1960s, this was consistent with a pattern of episodic population size contractions and clonal expansions in these parasites that was supported by population history simulations. In sharp contrast to the low resolution provided by microsatellites, SNPs retained a much more fine-scale resolution of population-level variability to the extent that they identified four different lineages from the same region one of which was more closely related to African and European strains than to Indian or Nepalese ones. Joining results of in vitro testing the antimonial drug sensitivity with the phylogenetic signals from the SNP data highlighted protein-level mutations revealing a distinct drug-resistant group of Nepalese and Indian L. donovani. This study demonstrates the power of genomic data for exploring parasite population structure. Furthermore, markers defining different genetic groups have been discovered that could potentially be applied to investigate drug resistance in clinical Leishmania strains. PMID:22119748

  5. Microsatellites for Lindera species

    Treesearch

    Craig S. Echt; D. Deemer; T.L. Kubisiak; C.D. Nelson

    2006-01-01

    Microsatellite markers were developed for conservation genetic studies of Lindera melissifolia (pondberry), a federally endangered shrub of southern bottomland ecosystems. Microsatellite sequences were obtained from DNA libraries that were enriched for the (AC)n simple sequence repeat motif. From 35 clone sequences, 20 primer...

  6. Chloroplast microsatellite markers for Pseudotaxus chienii developed from the whole chloroplast genome of Taxus chinensis var. mairei (Taxaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Qi; Zhang, Hanrui; He, Yipeng; Wang, Ting; Su, Yingjuan

    2017-01-01

    Premise of the study: Pseudotaxus chienii (Taxaceae) is an old rare species endemic to China that has adapted well to ecological heterogeneity with high genetic diversity in its nuclear genome. However, the genetic variation in its chloroplast genome is unknown. Methods and Results: Eighteen chloroplast microsatellite markers (cpSSRs) were developed from the whole chloroplast genome of Taxus chinensis var. mairei and successfully amplified in four P. chienii populations and one T. chinensis var. mairei population. Of these loci, 10 were polymorphic in P. chienii, whereas six were polymorphic in T. chinensis var. mairei. The unbiased haploid diversity per locus ranged from 0.000 to 0.641 and 0.000 to 0.545 for P. chienii and T. chinensis var. mairei, respectively. Conclusions: The 18 cpSSRs will be used to further investigate the chloroplast genetic structure and adaptive evolution in P. chienii populations. PMID:28337394

  7. Genome-wide In Silico Analysis, Characterization and Identification of Microsatellites in Spodoptera littoralis Multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (SpliMNPV)

    PubMed Central

    Atia, Mohamed A. M.; Osman, Gamal H.; Elmenofy, Wael H.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we undertook a survey to analyze the distribution and frequency of microsatellites or Simple Sequence Repeats (SSRs) in Spodoptera littoralis multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (SpliMNPV) genome (isolate AN–1956). Out of the 55 microsatellite motifs, identified in the SpliMNPV-AN1956 genome using in silico analysis (inclusive of mono-, di-, tri- and hexa-nucleotide repeats), 39 were found to be distributed within coding regions (cSSRs), whereas 16 were observed to lie within intergenic or noncoding regions. Among the 39 motifs located in coding regions, 21 were located in annotated functional genes whilst 18 were identified in unknown functional genes (hypothetical proteins). Among the identified motifs, trinucleotide (80%) repeats were found to be the most abundant followed by dinucleotide (13%), mononucleotide (5%) and hexanucleotide (2%) repeats. The 39 motifs located within coding regions were further validated in vitro by using PCR analysis, while the 21 motifs located within known functional genes (15 genes) were characterized using nucleotide sequencing. A comparison of the sequence analysis data of the 21 sequenced cSSRs with the published sequences is presented. Finally, the developed SSR markers of the 39 motifs were further mapped/localized onto the SpliMNPV-AN1956 genome. In conclusion, the SSR markers specific to SpliMNPV, developed in this study, could be a useful tool for the identification of isolates and analysis of genetic diversity and viral evolutionary status. PMID:27650818

  8. Genomic sequencing and microsatellite marker development for Boswellia papyrifera, an economically important but threatened tree native to dry tropical forests

    PubMed Central

    Addisalem, A. B.; Esselink, G. Danny; Bongers, F.; Smulders, M. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Microsatellite (or simple sequence repeat, SSR) markers are highly informative DNA markers often used in conservation genetic research. Next-generation sequencing enables efficient development of large numbers of SSR markers at lower costs. Boswellia papyrifera is an economically important tree species used for frankincense production, an aromatic resinous gum exudate from bark. It grows in dry tropical forests in Africa and is threatened by a lack of rejuvenation. To help guide conservation efforts for this endangered species, we conducted an analysis of its genomic DNA sequences using Illumina paired-end sequencing. The genome size was estimated at 705 Mb per haploid genome. The reads contained one microsatellite repeat per 5.7 kb. Based on a subset of these repeats, we developed 46 polymorphic SSR markers that amplified 2–12 alleles in 10 genotypes. This set included 30 trinucleotide repeat markers, four tetranucleotide repeat markers, six pentanucleotide markers and six hexanucleotide repeat markers. Several markers were cross-transferable to Boswellia pirrotae and B. popoviana. In addition, retrotransposons were identified, the reads were assembled and several contigs were identified with similarity to genes of the terpene and terpenoid backbone synthesis pathways, which form the major constituents of the bark resin. PMID:25573702

  9. Microsatellite primers resource developed from the mapped sequence scaffolds of Nisqually-1 genome. Submitted to New Phytologist

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Tongming; ZHANG, Dr. XINYE; Gunter, Lee E; Li, Shuxian; Wullschleger, Stan D; Huang, Prof. Minren; Tuskan, Gerald A

    2009-01-01

    In this study, 148 428 simple sequence repeat (SSR) primer pairs were designed from the unambiguously mapped sequence scaffolds of the Nisqually-1 genome. The physical position of the priming sites were identified along each of the 19 Populus chromosomes, and it was specified whether the priming sequences belong to intronic, intergenic, exonic or UTR regions. A subset of 150 SSR loci were amplified and a high amplification success rate (72%) was obtained in P. tremuloides, which belongs to a divergent subgenus of Populus relative to Nisqually-1. PCR reactions showed that the amplification success rate of exonic primer pairs was much higher than that of the intronic/intergenic primer pairs. Applying ANOVA and regression analyses to the flanking sequences of microsatellites, the repeat lengths, the GC contents of the repeats, the repeat motif numbers, the repeat motif length and the base composition of the repeat motif, it was determined that only the base composition of the repeat motif and the repeat motif length significantly affect the microsatellite variability in P. tremuloides samples. The SSR primer resource developed in this study provides a database for selecting highly transferable SSR markers with known physical position in the Populus genome and provides a comprehensive genetic tool to extend the genome sequence of Nisqually-1 to genetic studies in different Populus species.

  10. Whole genome amplification and microsatellite genotyping of herbarium DNA revealed the identity of an ancient grapevine cultivar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malenica, Nenad; Šimon, Silvio; Besendorfer, Višnja; Maletić, Edi; Karoglan Kontić, Jasminka; Pejić, Ivan

    2011-09-01

    Reconstruction of the grapevine cultivation history has advanced tremendously during the last decade. Identification of grapevine cultivars by using microsatellite DNA markers has mostly become a routine. The parentage of several renowned grapevine cultivars, like Cabernet Sauvignon and Chardonnay, has been elucidated. However, the assembly of a complete grapevine genealogy is not yet possible because missing links might no longer be in cultivation or are even extinct. This problem could be overcome by analyzing ancient DNA from grapevine herbarium specimens and other historical remnants of once cultivated varieties. Here, we present the first successful genotyping of a grapevine herbarium specimen and the identification of the corresponding grapevine cultivar. Using a set of nine grapevine microsatellite markers, in combination with a whole genome amplification procedure, we found the 90-year-old Tribidrag herbarium specimen to display the same microsatellite profile as the popular American cultivar Zinfandel. This work, together with information from several historical documents, provides a new clue of Zinfandel cultivation in Croatia as early as the beginning of fifteenth century, under the native name Tribidrag. Moreover, it emphasizes substantial information potential of existing grapevine and other herbarium collections worldwide.

  11. Genome-wide survey and analysis of microsatellites in nematodes, with a focus on the plant-parasitic species Meloidogyne incognita

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Microsatellites are the most popular source of molecular markers for studying population genetic variation in eukaryotes. However, few data are currently available about their genomic distribution and abundance across the phylum Nematoda. The recent completion of the genomes of several nematode species, including Meloidogyne incognita, a major agricultural pest worldwide, now opens the way for a comparative survey and analysis of microsatellites in these organisms. Results Using MsatFinder, the total numbers of 1-6 bp perfect microsatellites detected in the complete genomes of five nematode species (Brugia malayi, Caenorhabditis elegans, M. hapla, M. incognita, Pristionchus pacificus) ranged from 2,842 to 61,547, and covered from 0.09 to 1.20% of the nematode genomes. Under our search criteria, the most common repeat motifs for each length class varied according to the different nematode species considered, with no obvious relation to the AT-richness of their genomes. Overall, (AT)n, (AG)n and (CT)n were the three most frequent dinucleotide microsatellite motifs found in the five genomes considered. Except for two motifs in P. pacificus, all the most frequent trinucleotide motifs were AT-rich, with (AAT)n and (ATT)n being the only common to the five nematode species. A particular attention was paid to the microsatellite content of the plant-parasitic species M. incognita. In this species, a repertoire of 4,880 microsatellite loci was identified, from which 2,183 appeared suitable to design markers for population genetic studies. Interestingly, 1,094 microsatellites were identified in 801 predicted protein-coding regions, 99% of them being trinucleotides. When compared against the InterPro domain database, 497 of these CDS were successfully annotated, and further assigned to Gene Ontology terms. Conclusions Contrasted patterns of microsatellite abundance and diversity were characterized in five nematode genomes, even in the case of two closely related

  12. Enrichment of Targetable Mutations in the Relapsed Neuroblastoma Genome

    PubMed Central

    Ostrovnaya, Irina; Rubnitz, Kaitlyn R.; Ali, Siraj M.; Miller, Vincent A.; Mossé, Yael P.; Maris, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is characterized by a relative paucity of recurrent somatic mutations at diagnosis. However, recent studies have shown that the mutational burden increases at relapse, likely as a result of clonal evolution of mutation-carrying cells during primary treatment. To inform the development of personalized therapies, we sought to further define the frequency of potentially actionable mutations in neuroblastoma, both at diagnosis and after chemotherapy. We performed a retrospective study to determine mutation frequency, the only inclusion criterion being availability of cancer gene panel sequencing data from Foundation Medicine. We analyzed 151 neuroblastoma tumor samples: 44 obtained at diagnosis, 42 at second look surgery or biopsy for stable disease after chemotherapy, and 59 at relapse (6 were obtained at unknown time points). Nine patients had multiple tumor biopsies. ALK was the most commonly mutated gene in this cohort, and we observed a higher frequency of suspected oncogenic ALK mutations in relapsed disease than at diagnosis. Patients with relapsed disease had, on average, a greater number of mutations reported to be recurrent in cancer, and a greater number of mutations in genes that are potentially targetable with available therapeutics. We also observed an enrichment of reported recurrent RAS/MAPK pathway mutations in tumors obtained after chemotherapy. Our data support recent evidence suggesting that neuroblastomas undergo substantial mutational evolution during therapy, and that relapsed disease is more likely to be driven by a targetable oncogenic pathway, highlighting that it is critical to base treatment decisions on the molecular profile of the tumor at the time of treatment. However, it will be necessary to conduct prospective clinical trials that match sequencing results to targeted therapeutic intervention to determine if cancer genomic profiling improves patient outcomes. PMID:27997549

  13. [Research progress in developing reporter systems for the enrichment of positive cells with targeted genome modification].

    PubMed

    Bai, Yichun; Xu, Kun; Wei, Zehui; Ma, Zheng; Zhang, Zhiying

    2016-01-01

    Targeted genome editing technology plays an important role in studies of gene function, gene therapy and transgenic breeding. Moreover, the efficiency of targeted genome editing is increased dramatically with the application of recently developed artificial nucleases such as ZFNs, TALENs and CRISPR/Cas9. However, obtaining positive cells with targeted genome modification is restricted to some extent by nucleases expression plasmid transfection efficiency, nucleases expression and activity, and repair efficiency after genome editing. Thus, the enrichment and screening of positive cells with targeted genome modification remains a problem that need to be solved. Surrogate reporter systems could be used to reflect the efficiency of nucleases indirectly and enrich genetically modified positive cells effectively, which may increase the efficiency of the enrichment and screening of positive cells with targeted genome modification. In this review, we mainly summarized principles and applications of reporter systems based on NHEJ and SSA repair mechanisms, which may provide references for related studies in future.

  14. Survey and analysis of simple sequence repeats in the Laccaria bicolor genome, with development of microsatellite markers

    SciTech Connect

    Labbe, Jessy L; Murat, Claude; Morin, Emmanuelle; Le Tacon, F; Martin, Francis

    2011-01-01

    It is becoming clear that simple sequence repeats (SSRs) play a significant role in fungal genome organization, and they are a large source of genetic markers for population genetics and meiotic maps. We identified SSRs in the Laccaria bicolor genome by in silico survey and analyzed their distribution in the different genomic regions. We also compared the abundance and distribution of SSRs in L. bicolor with those of the following fungal genomes: Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Coprinopsis cinerea, Ustilago maydis, Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus nidulans, Magnaporthe grisea, Neurospora crassa and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using the MISA computer program, we detected 277,062 SSRs in the L. bicolor genome representing 8% of the assembled genomic sequence. Among the analyzed basidiomycetes, L. bicolor exhibited the highest SSR density although no correlation between relative abundance and the genome sizes was observed. In most genomes the short motifs (mono- to trinucleotides) were more abundant than the longer repeated SSRs. Generally, in each organism, the occurrence, relative abundance, and relative density of SSRs decreased as the repeat unit increased. Furthermore, each organism had its own common and longest SSRs. In the L. bicolor genome, most of the SSRs were located in intergenic regions (73.3%) and the highest SSR density was observed in transposable elements (TEs; 6,706 SSRs/Mb). However, 81% of the protein-coding genes contained SSRs in their exons, suggesting that SSR polymorphism may alter gene phenotypes. Within a L. bicolor offspring, sequence polymorphism of 78 SSRs was mainly detected in non-TE intergenic regions. Unlike previously developed microsatellite markers, these new ones are spread throughout the genome; these markers could have immediate applications in population genetics.

  15. Development and Integration of Genome-Wide Polymorphic Microsatellite Markers onto a Reference Linkage Map for Constructing a High-Density Genetic Map of Chickpea.

    PubMed

    Khajuria, Yash Paul; Saxena, Maneesha S; Gaur, Rashmi; Chattopadhyay, Debasis; Jain, Mukesh; Parida, Swarup K; Bhatia, Sabhyata

    2015-01-01

    The identification of informative in silico polymorphic genomic and genic microsatellite markers by comparing the genome and transcriptome sequences of crop genotypes is a rapid, cost-effective and non-laborious approach for large-scale marker validation and genotyping applications, including construction of high-density genetic maps. We designed 1494 markers, including 1016 genomic and 478 transcript-derived microsatellite markers showing in-silico fragment length polymorphism between two parental genotypes (Cicer arietinum ICC4958 and C. reticulatum PI489777) of an inter-specific reference mapping population. High amplification efficiency (87%), experimental validation success rate (81%) and polymorphic potential (55%) of these microsatellite markers suggest their effective use in various applications of chickpea genetics and breeding. Intra-specific polymorphic potential (48%) detected by microsatellite markers in 22 desi and kabuli chickpea genotypes was lower than inter-specific polymorphic potential (59%). An advanced, high-density, integrated and inter-specific chickpea genetic map (ICC4958 x PI489777) having 1697 map positions spanning 1061.16 cM with an average inter-marker distance of 0.625 cM was constructed by assigning 634 novel informative transcript-derived and genomic microsatellite markers on eight linkage groups (LGs) of our prior documented, 1063 marker-based genetic map. The constructed genome map identified 88, including four major (7-23 cM) longest high-resolution genomic regions on LGs 3, 5 and 8, where the maximum number of novel genomic and genic microsatellite markers were specifically clustered within 1 cM genetic distance. It was for the first time in chickpea that in silico FLP analysis at genome-wide level was carried out and such a large number of microsatellite markers were identified, experimentally validated and further used in genetic mapping. To best of our knowledge, in the presently constructed genetic map, we mapped highest

  16. Development and Integration of Genome-Wide Polymorphic Microsatellite Markers onto a Reference Linkage Map for Constructing a High-Density Genetic Map of Chickpea

    PubMed Central

    Gaur, Rashmi; Chattopadhyay, Debasis; Jain, Mukesh; Parida, Swarup K.; Bhatia, Sabhyata

    2015-01-01

    The identification of informative in silico polymorphic genomic and genic microsatellite markers by comparing the genome and transcriptome sequences of crop genotypes is a rapid, cost-effective and non-laborious approach for large-scale marker validation and genotyping applications, including construction of high-density genetic maps. We designed 1494 markers, including 1016 genomic and 478 transcript-derived microsatellite markers showing in-silico fragment length polymorphism between two parental genotypes (Cicer arietinum ICC4958 and C. reticulatum PI489777) of an inter-specific reference mapping population. High amplification efficiency (87%), experimental validation success rate (81%) and polymorphic potential (55%) of these microsatellite markers suggest their effective use in various applications of chickpea genetics and breeding. Intra-specific polymorphic potential (48%) detected by microsatellite markers in 22 desi and kabuli chickpea genotypes was lower than inter-specific polymorphic potential (59%). An advanced, high-density, integrated and inter-specific chickpea genetic map (ICC4958 x PI489777) having 1697 map positions spanning 1061.16 cM with an average inter-marker distance of 0.625 cM was constructed by assigning 634 novel informative transcript-derived and genomic microsatellite markers on eight linkage groups (LGs) of our prior documented, 1063 marker-based genetic map. The constructed genome map identified 88, including four major (7–23 cM) longest high-resolution genomic regions on LGs 3, 5 and 8, where the maximum number of novel genomic and genic microsatellite markers were specifically clustered within 1 cM genetic distance. It was for the first time in chickpea that in silico FLP analysis at genome-wide level was carried out and such a large number of microsatellite markers were identified, experimentally validated and further used in genetic mapping. To best of our knowledge, in the presently constructed genetic map, we mapped highest

  17. Optimizing selection of microsatellite loci from 454 pyrosequencing via post-sequencing bioinformatic analyses.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Silva, Iria; Toonen, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    The comparatively low cost of massive parallel sequencing technology, also known as next-generation sequencing (NGS), has transformed the isolation of microsatellite loci. The most common NGS approach consists of obtaining large amounts of sequence data from genomic DNA or enriched microsatellite libraries, which is then mined for the discovery of microsatellite repeats using bioinformatics analyses. Here, we describe a bioinformatics approach to isolate microsatellite loci, starting from the raw sequence data through a subset of microsatellite primer pairs. The primary difference to previously published approaches includes analyses to select the most accurate sequence data and to eliminate repetitive elements prior to the design of primers. These analyses aim to minimize the testing of primer pairs by identifying the most promising microsatellite loci.

  18. Ten polymorphic microsatellite loci identified from a small insert genomic library for Peronospora tabacina

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Eleven polymorphic microsatellite loci for the oomycete obligate biotrophic pathogen Peronospora tabacina of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) were developed. Loci were characterized using 44 isolates of P. tabacina collected from tobacco plants growing in Europe, Near East, and North and South America. ...

  19. A microsatellite genetic linkage map of black rockfish ( Sebastes schlegeli)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Guannan; Jiang, Liming; He, Yan; Yu, Haiyang; Wang, Zhigang; Jiang, Haibin; Zhang, Quanqi

    2014-12-01

    Ovoviviparous black rockfish ( Sebastes schlegeli) is an important marine fish species for aquaculture and fisheries in China. Genetic information of this species is scarce because of the lack of microsatellite markers. In this study, a large number of microsatellite markers of black rockfish were isolated by constructing microsatellite-enriched libraries. Female- and male-specific genetic linkage maps were constructed using 435 microsatellite markers genotyped in a full-sib family of the fish species. The female linkage map contained 140 microsatellite markers, in which 23 linkage groups had a total genetic length of 1334.1 cM and average inter-marker space of 13.3 cM. The male linkage map contained 156 microsatellite markers, in which 25 linkage groups had a total genetic length of 1359.6 cM and average inter-marker distance of 12.4 cM. The genome coverage of the female and male linkage maps was 68.6% and 69.3%, respectively. The female-to-male ratio of the recombination rate was approximately 1.07:1 in adjacent microsatellite markers. This paper presents the first genetic linkage map of microsatellites in black rockfish. The collection of polymorphic markers and sex-specific linkage maps of black rockfish could be useful for further investigations on parental assignment, population genetics, quantitative trait loci mapping, and marker-assisted selection in related breeding programs.

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Antarctic Methanogen Enriched from Dry Valley Permafrost

    PubMed Central

    Buongiorno, Joy; Bird, Jordan T.; Krivushin, Kirill; Oshurkova, Victoria; Shcherbakova, Victoria; Rivkina, Elizaveta M.

    2016-01-01

    A genomic reconstruction belonging to the genus Methanosarcina was assembled from metagenomic data from a methane-producing enrichment of Antarctic permafrost. This is the first methanogen genome reported from permafrost of the Dry Valleys and can help shed light on future climate-affected methane dynamics. PMID:27932654

  1. New Holland honeyeater (Phylidonyris novaehollandiae) microsatellites: isolation and characterization of 15 novel markers using an enrichment method.

    PubMed

    Myers, Steven A; Gardner, Michael G; Donnellan, Stephen; Kleindorfer, Sonia

    2009-05-01

    The New Holland honeyeater (Phylidonyris novaehollandiae) plays a significant role in the pollination and sustainability of Australia's endemic flora, and hence fauna. Despite this key ecosystem function, knowledge of P. novaehollandiae life-history traits and population dynamics remain poorly understood. We describe the development of primers amplifying 22 P. novaehollandiae microsatellite loci. Fifteen of the loci were found to be polymorphic, with observed heterozygosity between 0.500 and 1.000, and from four to 17 alleles per locus in adult birds from the study site.

  2. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of an endemic monotypic genus Hagenia (Rosaceae): structural comparative analysis, gene content and microsatellite detection

    PubMed Central

    Saina, Josphat K.; Long, Zhicheng; Hu, Guangwan; Gituru, Robert W.

    2017-01-01

    Hagenia is an endangered monotypic genus endemic to the topical mountains of Africa. The only species, Hagenia abyssinica (Bruce) J.F. Gmel, is an important medicinal plant producing bioactive compounds that have been traditionally used by African communities as a remedy for gastrointestinal ailments in both humans and animals. Complete chloroplast genomes have been applied in resolving phylogenetic relationships within plant families. We employed high-throughput sequencing technologies to determine the complete chloroplast genome sequence of H. abyssinica. The genome is a circular molecule of 154,961 base pairs (bp), with a pair of Inverted Repeats (IR) 25,971 bp each, separated by two single copies; a large (LSC, 84,320 bp) and a small single copy (SSC, 18,696). H. abyssinica’s chloroplast genome has a 37.1% GC content and encodes 112 unique genes, 78 of which code for proteins, 30 are tRNA genes and four are rRNA genes. A comparative analysis with twenty other species, sequenced to-date from the family Rosaceae, revealed similarities in structural organization, gene content and arrangement. The observed size differences are attributed to the contraction/expansion of the inverted repeats. The translational initiation factor gene (infA) which had been previously reported in other chloroplast genomes was conspicuously missing in H. abyssinica. A total of 172 microsatellites and 49 large repeat sequences were detected in the chloroplast genome. A Maximum Likelihood analyses of 71 protein-coding genes placed Hagenia in Rosoideae. The availability of a complete chloroplast genome, the first in the Sanguisorbeae tribe, is beneficial for further molecular studies on taxonomic and phylogenomic resolution within the Rosaceae family. PMID:28097059

  3. Development and cross-species/genera transferability of microsatellite markers discovered using 454 genome sequencing in chokecherry (Prunus virginiana L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongxia; Walla, James A; Zhong, Shaobin; Huang, Danqiong; Dai, Wenhao

    2012-11-01

    Chokecherry (Prunus virginiana L.) (2n = 4x = 32) is a unique Prunus species for both genetics and disease-resistance research due to its tetraploid nature and X-disease resistance. However, no genetic and genomic information on chokecherry is available. A partial chokecherry genome was sequenced using Roche 454 sequencing technology. A total of 145,094 reads covering 4.8 Mbp of the chokecherry genome were generated and 15,113 contigs were assembled, of which 11,675 contigs were larger than 100 bp in size. A total of 481 SSR loci were identified from 234 (out of 11,675) contigs and 246 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primer pairs were designed. Of 246 primers, 212 (86.2 %) effectively produced amplification from the genomic DNA of chokecherry. All 212 amplifiable chokecherry primers were used to amplify genomic DNA from 11 other rosaceous species (sour cherry, sweet cherry, black cherry, peach, apricot, plum, apple, crabapple, pear, juneberry, and raspberry). Thus, chokecherry SSR primers can be transferable across Prunus species and other rosaceous species. An average of 63.2 and 58.7 % of amplifiable chokecherry primers amplified DNA from cherry and other Prunus species, respectively, while 47.2 % of amplifiable chokecherry primers amplified DNA from other rosaceous species. Using random genome sequence data generated from next-generation sequencing technology to identify microsatellite loci appears to be rapid and cost-efficient, particularly for species with no sequence information available. Sequence information and confirmed transferability of the identified chokecherry SSRs among species will be valuable for genetic research in Prunus and other rosaceous species. Key message A total of 246 SSR primers were identified from chokecherry genome sequences. Of which, 212 were confirmed amplifiable both in chokecherry and other 11 other rosaceous species.

  4. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of an endemic monotypic genus Hagenia (Rosaceae): structural comparative analysis, gene content and microsatellite detection.

    PubMed

    Gichira, Andrew W; Li, Zhizhong; Saina, Josphat K; Long, Zhicheng; Hu, Guangwan; Gituru, Robert W; Wang, Qingfeng; Chen, Jinming

    2017-01-01

    Hagenia is an endangered monotypic genus endemic to the topical mountains of Africa. The only species, Hagenia abyssinica (Bruce) J.F. Gmel, is an important medicinal plant producing bioactive compounds that have been traditionally used by African communities as a remedy for gastrointestinal ailments in both humans and animals. Complete chloroplast genomes have been applied in resolving phylogenetic relationships within plant families. We employed high-throughput sequencing technologies to determine the complete chloroplast genome sequence of H. abyssinica. The genome is a circular molecule of 154,961 base pairs (bp), with a pair of Inverted Repeats (IR) 25,971 bp each, separated by two single copies; a large (LSC, 84,320 bp) and a small single copy (SSC, 18,696). H. abyssinica's chloroplast genome has a 37.1% GC content and encodes 112 unique genes, 78 of which code for proteins, 30 are tRNA genes and four are rRNA genes. A comparative analysis with twenty other species, sequenced to-date from the family Rosaceae, revealed similarities in structural organization, gene content and arrangement. The observed size differences are attributed to the contraction/expansion of the inverted repeats. The translational initiation factor gene (infA) which had been previously reported in other chloroplast genomes was conspicuously missing in H. abyssinica. A total of 172 microsatellites and 49 large repeat sequences were detected in the chloroplast genome. A Maximum Likelihood analyses of 71 protein-coding genes placed Hagenia in Rosoideae. The availability of a complete chloroplast genome, the first in the Sanguisorbeae tribe, is beneficial for further molecular studies on taxonomic and phylogenomic resolution within the Rosaceae family.

  5. Population Structure in a Comprehensive Genomic Data Set on Human Microsatellite Variation

    PubMed Central

    Pemberton, Trevor J.; DeGiorgio, Michael; Rosenberg, Noah A.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past two decades, microsatellite genotypes have provided the data for landmark studies of human population-genetic variation. However, the various microsatellite data sets have been prepared with different procedures and sets of markers, so that it has been difficult to synthesize available data for a comprehensive analysis. Here, we combine eight human population-genetic data sets at the 645 microsatellite loci they share in common, accounting for procedural differences in the production of the different data sets, to assemble a single data set containing 5795 individuals from 267 worldwide populations. We perform a systematic analysis of genetic relatedness, detecting 240 intra-population and 92 inter-population pairs of previously unidentified close relatives and proposing standardized subsets of unrelated individuals for use in future studies. We then augment the human data with a data set of 84 chimpanzees at the 246 loci they share in common with the human samples. Multidimensional scaling and neighbor-joining analyses of these data sets offer new insights into the structure of human populations and enable a comparison of genetic variation patterns in chimpanzees with those in humans. Our combined data sets are the largest of their kind reported to date and provide a resource for use in human population-genetic studies. PMID:23550135

  6. Use of microsatellite markers for the assessment of bambara groundnut breeding system and varietal purity before genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ho, Wai Kuan; Muchugi, Alice; Muthemba, Samuel; Kariba, Robert; Mavenkeni, Busiso Olga; Hendre, Prasad; Song, Bo; Van Deynze, Allen; Massawe, Festo; Mayes, Sean

    2016-06-01

    Maximizing the research output from a limited investment is often the major challenge for minor and underutilized crops. However, such crops may be tolerant to biotic and abiotic stresses and are adapted to local, marginal, and low-input environments. Their development through breeding will provide an important resource for future agricultural system resilience and diversification in the context of changing climates and the need to achieve food security. The African Orphan Crops Consortium recognizes the values of genomic resources in facilitating the improvement of such crops. Prior to beginning genome sequencing there is a need for an assessment of line varietal purity and to estimate any residual heterozygosity. Here we present an example from bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc.), an underutilized drought tolerant African legume. Two released varieties from Zimbabwe, identified as potential genotypes for whole genome sequencing (WGS), were genotyped with 20 species-specific SSR markers. The results indicate that the cultivars are actually a mix of related inbred genotypes, and the analysis allowed a strategy of single plant selection to be used to generate non-heterogeneous DNA for WGS. The markers also confirmed very low levels of heterozygosity within individual plants. The application of a pre-screen using co-dominant microsatellite markers is expected to substantially improve the genome assembly, compared to a cultivar bulking approach that could have been adopted.

  7. Genome-Wide Development and Use of Microsatellite Markers for Large-Scale Genotyping Applications in Foxtail Millet [Setaria italica (L.)

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Garima; Misra, Gopal; Kumari, Kajal; Gupta, Sarika; Parida, Swarup Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Debasis; Prasad, Manoj

    2013-01-01

    The availability of well-validated informative co-dominant microsatellite markers and saturated genetic linkage map has been limited in foxtail millet (Setaria italica L.). In view of this, we conducted a genome-wide analysis and identified 28 342 microsatellite repeat-motifs spanning 405.3 Mb of foxtail millet genome. The trinucleotide repeats (∼48%) was prevalent when compared with dinucleotide repeats (∼46%). Of the 28 342 microsatellites, 21 294 (∼75%) primer pairs were successfully designed, and a total of 15 573 markers were physically mapped on 9 chromosomes of foxtail millet. About 159 markers were validated successfully in 8 accessions of Setaria sp. with ∼67% polymorphic potential. The high percentage (89.3%) of cross-genera transferability across millet and non-millet species with higher transferability percentage in bioenergy grasses (∼79%, Switchgrass and ∼93%, Pearl millet) signifies their importance in studying the bioenergy grasses. In silico comparative mapping of 15 573 foxtail millet microsatellite markers against the mapping data of sorghum (16.9%), maize (14.5%) and rice (6.4%) indicated syntenic relationships among the chromosomes of foxtail millet and target species. The results, thus, demonstrate the immense applicability of developed microsatellite markers in germplasm characterization, phylogenetics, construction of genetic linkage map for gene/quantitative trait loci discovery, comparative mapping in foxtail millet, including other millets and bioenergy grass species. PMID:23382459

  8. A targeted enrichment strategy for massively parallel sequencing of angiosperm plastid genomes1

    PubMed Central

    Stull, Gregory W.; Moore, Michael J.; Mandala, Venkata S.; Douglas, Norman A.; Kates, Heather-Rose; Qi, Xinshuai; Brockington, Samuel F.; Soltis, Pamela S.; Soltis, Douglas E.; Gitzendanner, Matthew A.

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: We explored a targeted enrichment strategy to facilitate rapid and low-cost next-generation sequencing (NGS) of numerous complete plastid genomes from across the phylogenetic breadth of angiosperms. • Methods and Results: A custom RNA probe set including the complete sequences of 22 previously sequenced eudicot plastomes was designed to facilitate hybridization-based targeted enrichment of eudicot plastid genomes. Using this probe set and an Agilent SureSelect targeted enrichment kit, we conducted an enrichment experiment including 24 angiosperms (22 eudicots, two monocots), which were subsequently sequenced on a single lane of the Illumina GAIIx with single-end, 100-bp reads. This approach yielded nearly complete to complete plastid genomes with exceptionally high coverage (mean coverage: 717×), even for the two monocots. • Conclusions: Our enrichment experiment was highly successful even though many aspects of the capture process employed were suboptimal. Hence, significant improvements to this methodology are feasible. With this general approach and probe set, it should be possible to sequence more than 300 essentially complete plastid genomes in a single Illumina GAIIx lane (achieving ∼50× mean coverage). However, given the complications of pooling numerous samples for multiplex sequencing and the limited number of barcodes (e.g., 96) available in commercial kits, we recommend 96 samples as a current practical maximum for multiplex plastome sequencing. This high-throughput approach should facilitate large-scale plastid genome sequencing at any level of phylogenetic diversity in angiosperms. PMID:25202518

  9. Characterization of microsatellite loci in Himatanthus drasticus (Apocynaceae), a medicinal plant from the Brazilian savanna.

    PubMed

    Baldauf, Cristina; Ciampi, Maísa B; Vigna, Bianca B Z; Mori, Gustavo M; Guedes, Julian P P; De Souza, Anete P; Dos Santos, Flavio A M

    2011-09-01

    We developed a new set of microsatellite markers for studying the genome of the janaguba tree, Himatanthus drasticus (Mart.) Plumel, which is used in folk medicine in northeastern Brazil. These novel markers are being used to evaluate the effect of harvesting on the genetic structure and diversity of natural populations of this species. • Microsatellite loci were isolated from an enriched H. drasticus genomic library. Nine primer pairs successfully amplified polymorphic microsatellite regions, with an average of 8.5 alleles per locus. The average values of observed and expected heterozygosity were 0.456 and 0.601, respectively. • The microsatellite markers described here are valuable tools for population genetics studies of H. drasticus. The majority of the primers also amplified sequences in the genome of another species of the same genus. This new set of markers may be useful in designing a genetic conservation strategy and a sustainable management plan for the species.

  10. A microsatellite-based genetic linkage map and putative sex-determining genomic regions in Lake Victoria cichlids.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Yu; Nikaido, Masato; Kondo, Azusa; Suzuki, Hikoyu; Yoshida, Kohta; Kikuchi, Kiyoshi; Okada, Norihiro

    2015-04-15

    Cichlid fishes in East Africa have undergone extensive adaptive radiation, which has led to spectacular diversity in their morphology and ecology. To date, genetic linkage maps have been constructed for several tilapias (riverine), Astatotilapia burtoni (Lake Tanganyika), and hybrid lines of Lake Malawi cichlids to facilitate genome-wide comparative analyses. In the present study, we constructed a genetic linkage map of the hybrid line of Lake Victoria cichlids, so that maps of cichlids from all the major areas of East Africa will be available. The genetic linkage map shown here is derived from the F2 progeny of an interspecific cross between Haplochromis chilotes and Haplochromis sauvagei and is based on 184 microsatellite and two single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. Most of the microsatellite markers used in the present study were originally designed for other genetic linkage maps, allowing us to directly compare each linkage group (LG) among different cichlid groups. We found 25 LGs, the total length of which was 1133.2cM with an average marker spacing of about 6.09cM. Our subsequent linkage mapping analysis identified two putative sex-determining loci in cichlids. Interestingly, one of these two loci is located on cichlid LG5, on which the female heterogametic ZW locus and several quantitative trait loci (QTLs) related to adaptive evolution have been reported in Lake Malawi cichlids. We also found that V1R1 and V1R2, candidate genes for the fish pheromone receptor, are located very close to the recently detected sex-determining locus on cichlid LG5. The genetic linkage map study presented here may provide a valuable foundation for studying the chromosomal evolution of East African cichlids and the possible role of sex chromosomes in generating their genomic diversity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Distribution and localization of microsatellites in the Perigord black truffle genome and identification of new molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Murat, C; Riccioni, C; Belfiori, B; Cichocki, N; Labbé, J; Morin, E; Tisserant, E; Paolocci, F; Rubini, A; Martin, F

    2011-06-01

    The level of genetic diversity and genetic structure in the Perigord black truffle (Tuber melanosporum Vittad.) has been debated for several years, mainly due to the lack of appropriate genetic markers. Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are important for the genome organisation, phenotypic diversity and are one of the most popular molecular markers. In this study, we surveyed the T. melanosporum genome (1) to characterise its SSR pattern; (2) to compare it with SSR patterns found in 48 other fungal and three oomycetes genomes and (3) to identify new polymorphic SSR markers for population genetics. The T. melanosporum genome is rich in SSRs with 22,425 SSRs with mono-nucleotides being the most frequent motifs. SSRs were found in all genomic regions although they are more frequent in non-coding regions (introns and intergenic regions). Sixty out of 135 PCR-amplified mono-, di-, tri-, tetra, penta, and hexa-nucleotides were polymorphic (44%) within black truffle populations and 27 were randomly selected and analysed on 139 T. melanosporum isolates from France, Italy and Spain. The number of alleles varied from 2 to 18 and the expected heterozygosity from 0.124 to 0.815. One hundred and thirty-two different multilocus genotypes out of the 139 T. melanosporum isolates were identified and the genotypic diversity was high (0.999). Polymorphic SSRs were found in UTR regulatory regions of fruiting bodies and ectomycorrhiza regulated genes, suggesting that they may play a role in phenotypic variation. In conclusion, SSRs developed in this study were highly polymorphic and our results showed that T. melanosporum is a species with an important genetic diversity, which is in agreement with its recently uncovered heterothallic mating system.

  12. Hyb-Seq: Combining target enrichment and genome skimming for plant phylogenomics1

    PubMed Central

    Weitemier, Kevin; Straub, Shannon C. K.; Cronn, Richard C.; Fishbein, Mark; Schmickl, Roswitha; McDonnell, Angela; Liston, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Hyb-Seq, the combination of target enrichment and genome skimming, allows simultaneous data collection for low-copy nuclear genes and high-copy genomic targets for plant systematics and evolution studies. • Methods and Results: Genome and transcriptome assemblies for milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) were used to design enrichment probes for 3385 exons from 768 genes (>1.6 Mbp) followed by Illumina sequencing of enriched libraries. Hyb-Seq of 12 individuals (10 Asclepias species and two related genera) resulted in at least partial assembly of 92.6% of exons and 99.7% of genes and an average assembly length >2 Mbp. Importantly, complete plastomes and nuclear ribosomal DNA cistrons were assembled using off-target reads. Phylogenomic analyses demonstrated signal conflict between genomes. • Conclusions: The Hyb-Seq approach enables targeted sequencing of thousands of low-copy nuclear exons and flanking regions, as well as genome skimming of high-copy repeats and organellar genomes, to efficiently produce genome-scale data sets for phylogenomics. PMID:25225629

  13. Development and characterization of microsatellite loci in the pantropical fern Hypolepis punctata (Dennstaedtiaceae).

    PubMed

    Shang, Hui; Wang, Ying; Yan, Yue-Hong

    2015-09-01

    Microsatellite loci were isolated in Hypolepis punctata (Dennstaedtiaceae) to further study the reproductive ecology of this species. We developed 16 microsatellite loci from one sample of H. punctata using an enriched genomic library. These loci were characterized in 28 individuals. The number of alleles per locus ranged from two to 10, and the expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.036 to 0.845. The results indicate that the microsatellite markers can facilitate further studies on inferring the phylogeography and population genetics of H. punctata and related species.

  14. Development and characterization of microsatellite loci in the pantropical fern Hypolepis punctata (Dennstaedtiaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Hui; Wang, Ying; Yan, Yue-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite loci were isolated in Hypolepis punctata (Dennstaedtiaceae) to further study the reproductive ecology of this species. Methods and Results: We developed 16 microsatellite loci from one sample of H. punctata using an enriched genomic library. These loci were characterized in 28 individuals. The number of alleles per locus ranged from two to 10, and the expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.036 to 0.845. Conclusions: The results indicate that the microsatellite markers can facilitate further studies on inferring the phylogeography and population genetics of H. punctata and related species. PMID:26421252

  15. Genome-wide conserved non-coding microsatellite (CNMS) marker-based integrative genetical genomics for quantitative dissection of seed weight in chickpea

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Deepak; Saxena, Maneesha S.; Kujur, Alice; Das, Shouvik; Badoni, Saurabh; Tripathi, Shailesh; Upadhyaya, Hari D.; Gowda, C. L. L.; Sharma, Shivali; Singh, Sube; Tyagi, Akhilesh K.; Parida, Swarup K.

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenetic footprinting identified 666 genome-wide paralogous and orthologous CNMS (conserved non-coding microsatellite) markers from 5′-untranslated and regulatory regions (URRs) of 603 protein-coding chickpea genes. The (CT)n and (GA)n CNMS carrying CTRMCAMV35S and GAGA8BKN3 regulatory elements, respectively, are abundant in the chickpea genome. The mapped genic CNMS markers with robust amplification efficiencies (94.7%) detected higher intraspecific polymorphic potential (37.6%) among genotypes, implying their immense utility in chickpea breeding and genetic analyses. Seventeen differentially expressed CNMS marker-associated genes showing strong preferential and seed tissue/developmental stage-specific expression in contrasting genotypes were selected to narrow down the gene targets underlying seed weight quantitative trait loci (QTLs)/eQTLs (expression QTLs) through integrative genetical genomics. The integration of transcript profiling with seed weight QTL/eQTL mapping, molecular haplotyping, and association analyses identified potential molecular tags (GAGA8BKN3 and RAV1AAT regulatory elements and alleles/haplotypes) in the LOB-domain-containing protein- and KANADI protein-encoding transcription factor genes controlling the cis-regulated expression for seed weight in the chickpea. This emphasizes the potential of CNMS marker-based integrative genetical genomics for the quantitative genetic dissection of complex seed weight in chickpea. PMID:25504138

  16. Genome-wide conserved non-coding microsatellite (CNMS) marker-based integrative genetical genomics for quantitative dissection of seed weight in chickpea.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Deepak; Saxena, Maneesha S; Kujur, Alice; Das, Shouvik; Badoni, Saurabh; Tripathi, Shailesh; Upadhyaya, Hari D; Gowda, C L L; Sharma, Shivali; Singh, Sube; Tyagi, Akhilesh K; Parida, Swarup K

    2015-03-01

    Phylogenetic footprinting identified 666 genome-wide paralogous and orthologous CNMS (conserved non-coding microsatellite) markers from 5'-untranslated and regulatory regions (URRs) of 603 protein-coding chickpea genes. The (CT)n and (GA)n CNMS carrying CTRMCAMV35S and GAGA8BKN3 regulatory elements, respectively, are abundant in the chickpea genome. The mapped genic CNMS markers with robust amplification efficiencies (94.7%) detected higher intraspecific polymorphic potential (37.6%) among genotypes, implying their immense utility in chickpea breeding and genetic analyses. Seventeen differentially expressed CNMS marker-associated genes showing strong preferential and seed tissue/developmental stage-specific expression in contrasting genotypes were selected to narrow down the gene targets underlying seed weight quantitative trait loci (QTLs)/eQTLs (expression QTLs) through integrative genetical genomics. The integration of transcript profiling with seed weight QTL/eQTL mapping, molecular haplotyping, and association analyses identified potential molecular tags (GAGA8BKN3 and RAV1AAT regulatory elements and alleles/haplotypes) in the LOB-domain-containing protein- and KANADI protein-encoding transcription factor genes controlling the cis-regulated expression for seed weight in the chickpea. This emphasizes the potential of CNMS marker-based integrative genetical genomics for the quantitative genetic dissection of complex seed weight in chickpea.

  17. Characterization of 11 new microsatellite loci in taro (Colocasia esculenta).

    PubMed

    Hu, Kan; Huang, Xing Fang; Ke, Wei Dong; Ding, Yi

    2009-03-01

    Eleven new microsatellite markers were isolated from taro, Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott, a root crop widely distributed all over the world. Forty-eight primer pairs were designed from a microsatellite-enriched genomic library, of which 11 primer pairs have polymorphisms in 30 individuals tested from a population in China, which revealed two to six alleles per locus with the observed and expected heterozygosity levels ranging from 0 to 0.733 and from 0.381 to 0.731, respectively. These new genetic markers will be useful for the study of taro germplasm management and population evolution in the future.

  18. Polymorphic microsatellite loci for Japanese Spanish mackerel (Scomberomorus niphonius).

    PubMed

    Lin, L; Zhu, L; Liu, S-F; Tang, Q-S; Su, Y-Q; Zhuang, Z-M

    2012-05-08

    We isolated and characterized 21 polymorphic microsatellite loci in Japanese Spanish mackerel (Scomberomorus niphonius) using a (GT)(13)-enriched genomic library. Forty individuals were collected from Qingdao, China. We found 3 to 24 alleles per locus, with a mean of 8.8. The observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.263 to 0.975 and from 0.385 to 0.946, with means of 0.655 and 0.685, respectively. Deviation from Hardy-Weinberg proportions was detected at three loci. Two loci showed evidence for null alleles. These microsatellite markers will be useful for population genetic analysis of Japanese Spanish mackerel.

  19. In-silico analysis of simple and imperfect microsatellites in diverse tobamovirus genomes.

    PubMed

    Alam, Chaudhary Mashhood; Singh, Avadhesh Kumar; Sharfuddin, Choudhary; Ali, Safdar

    2013-11-10

    An in-silico analysis of simple sequence repeats (SSRs) in 30 species of tobamoviruses was done. SSRs (mono to hexa) were present with variant frequency across species. Compound microsatellites, primarily of variant motifs accounted for up to 11.43% of the SSRs. Motif duplications were observed for A, T, AT, and ACA repeats. (AG)-(TC) was the most prevalent SSR-couple. SSRs were differentially localized in the coding region with ~54% on the 128 kDa protein while 20.37% was exclusive to 186 kDa protein. Characterization of such variations is important for elucidating the origin, sequence variations, and structure of these widely used, but incompletely understood sequences.

  20. Analysis of simple sequence repeats in the Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici genome and the development of microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Feng, Yanxia; Sun, Haiyan; Deng, Yuanyu; Yu, Hanshou; Chen, Huaigu

    2014-11-01

    Understanding the genetic structure of Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici is essential for the establishment of efficient disease control strategies. It is becoming clear that microsatellites, or simple sequence repeats (SSRs), play an important role in genome organization and phenotypic diversity, and are a large source of genetic markers for population genetics and meiotic maps. In this study, we examined the G. graminis var. tritici genome (1) to analyze its pattern of SSRs, (2) to compare it with other plant pathogenic filamentous fungi, such as Magnaporthe oryzae and M. poae, and (3) to identify new polymorphic SSR markers for genetic diversity. The G. graminis var. tritici genome was rich in SSRs; a total 13,650 SSRs have been identified with mononucleotides being the most common motifs. In coding regions, the densities of tri- and hexanucleotides were significantly higher than in noncoding regions. The di-, tri-, tetra, penta, and hexanucleotide repeats in the G. graminis var. tritici genome were more abundant than the same repeats in M. oryzae and M. poae. From 115 devised primers, 39 SSRs are polymorphic with G. graminis var. tritici isolates, and 8 primers were randomly selected to analyze 116 isolates from China. The number of alleles varied from 2 to 7 and the expected heterozygosity (He) from 0.499 to 0.837. In conclusion, SSRs developed in this study were highly polymorphic, and our analysis indicated that G. graminis var. tritici is a species with high genetic diversity. The results provide a pioneering report for several applications, such as the assessment of population structure and genetic diversity of G. graminis var. tritici.

  1. A Genome-Wide Survey of the Microsatellite Content of the Globe Artichoke Genome and the Development of a Web-Based Database.

    PubMed

    Portis, Ezio; Portis, Flavio; Valente, Luisa; Moglia, Andrea; Barchi, Lorenzo; Lanteri, Sergio; Acquadro, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    The recently acquired genome sequence of globe artichoke (Cynara cardunculus var. scolymus) has been used to catalog the genome's content of simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. More than 177,000 perfect SSRs were revealed, equivalent to an overall density across the genome of 244.5 SSRs/Mbp, but some 224,000 imperfect SSRs were also identified. About 21% of these SSRs were complex (two stretches of repeats separated by <100 nt). Some 73% of the SSRs were composed of dinucleotide motifs. The SSRs were categorized for the numbers of repeats present, their overall length and were allocated to their linkage group. A total of 4,761 perfect and 6,583 imperfect SSRs were present in 3,781 genes (14.11% of the total), corresponding to an overall density across the gene space of 32,5 and 44,9 SSRs/Mbp for perfect and imperfect motifs, respectively. A putative function has been assigned, using the gene ontology approach, to the set of genes harboring at least one SSR. The same search parameters were applied to reveal the SSR content of 14 other plant species for which genome sequence is available. Certain species-specific SSR motifs were identified, along with a hexa-nucleotide motif shared only with the other two Compositae species (sunflower (Helianthus annuus) and horseweed (Conyza canadensis)) included in the study. Finally, a database, called "Cynara cardunculus MicroSatellite DataBase" (CyMSatDB) was developed to provide a searchable interface to the SSR data. CyMSatDB facilitates the retrieval of SSR markers, as well as suggested forward and reverse primers, on the basis of genomic location, genomic vs genic context, perfect vs imperfect repeat, motif type, motif sequence and repeat number. The SSR markers were validated via an in silico based PCR analysis adopting two available assembled transcriptomes, derived from contrasting globe artichoke accessions, as templates.

  2. Constructing gene-enriched plant genomic libraries using methylation filtration technology.

    PubMed

    Rabinowicz, Pablo D

    2003-01-01

    Full genome sequencing in higher plants is a very difficult task, because their genomes are often very large and repetitive. For this reason, gene targeted partial genomic sequencing becomes a realistic option. The method reported here is a simple approach to generate gene-enriched plant genomic libraries called methylation filtration. This technique takes advantage of the fact that repetitive DNA is heavily methylated and genes are hypomethylated. Then, by simply using an Escherichia coli host strain harboring a wild-type modified cytosine restriction (McrBC) system, which cuts DNA containing methylcytosine, repetitive DNA is eliminated from these genomic libraries, while low copy DNA (i.e., genes) is recovered. To prevent cloning significant proportions of organelle DNA, a crude nuclear preparation must be performed prior to purifying genomic DNA. Adaptor-mediated cloning and DNA size fractionation are necessary for optimal results.

  3. New microsatellite loci in the dwarf yams Dioscorea group Epipetrum (Dioscoreaceae).

    PubMed

    Viruel, Juan; Catalán, Pilar; Segarra-Moragues, José Gabriel

    2010-11-01

    Microsatellite loci were isolated and characterized from enriched genomic libraries of two taxa of the Chilean Epipetrum group of Dioscorea to assess their levels of genetic diversity and population differentiation. • Eleven microsatellite loci were identified. Six out of nine microsatellites from D. biloba amplified in D. humilis, and the two microsatellites from D. humilis amplified in both taxa. Two different sets of eight loci amplified in each of the two tested taxa, D. biloba and D. humilis. The average number of alleles was 5.75 and 5 for D. biloba and D. humilis, respectively. Higher levels of mean genetic diversity were found in D. biloba (H(E) = 0.639) than in D. humilis (H(E) = 0.414). • These microsatellite primers will be useful in population genetic studies and to establish conservation strategies in the endangered taxa of the Epipetrum group of Dioscorea.

  4. Development of microsatellite loci in Artocarpus altilis (Moraceae) and cross-amplification in congeneric species.

    PubMed

    Witherup, Colby; Ragone, Diane; Wiesner-Hanks, Tyr; Irish, Brian; Scheffler, Brian; Simpson, Sheron; Zee, Francis; Zuberi, M Iqbal; Zerega, Nyree J C

    2013-07-01

    Microsatellite loci were isolated and characterized from enriched genomic libraries of Artocarpus altilis (breadfruit) and tested in four Artocarpus species and one hybrid. The microsatellite markers provide new tools for further studies in Artocarpus. • A total of 25 microsatellite loci were evaluated across four Artocarpus species and one hybrid. Twenty-one microsatellite loci were evaluated on A. altilis (241), A. camansi (34), A. mariannensis (15), and A. altilis × mariannensis (64) samples. Nine of those loci plus four additional loci were evaluated on A. heterophyllus (jackfruit, 426) samples. All loci are polymorphic for at least one species. The average number of alleles ranges from two to nine within taxa. • These microsatellite primers will facilitate further studies on the genetic structure and evolutionary and domestication history of Artocarpus species. They will aid in cultivar identification and establishing germplasm conservation strategies for breadfruit and jackfruit.

  5. Development of microsatellite loci in Artocarpus altilis (Moraceae) and cross-amplification in congeneric species1

    PubMed Central

    Witherup, Colby; Ragone, Diane; Wiesner-Hanks, Tyr; Irish, Brian; Scheffler, Brian; Simpson, Sheron; Zee, Francis; Zuberi, M. Iqbal; Zerega, Nyree J. C.

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Microsatellite loci were isolated and characterized from enriched genomic libraries of Artocarpus altilis (breadfruit) and tested in four Artocarpus species and one hybrid. The microsatellite markers provide new tools for further studies in Artocarpus. • Methods and Results: A total of 25 microsatellite loci were evaluated across four Artocarpus species and one hybrid. Twenty-one microsatellite loci were evaluated on A. altilis (241), A. camansi (34), A. mariannensis (15), and A. altilis × mariannensis (64) samples. Nine of those loci plus four additional loci were evaluated on A. heterophyllus (jackfruit, 426) samples. All loci are polymorphic for at least one species. The average number of alleles ranges from two to nine within taxa. • Conclusions: These microsatellite primers will facilitate further studies on the genetic structure and evolutionary and domestication history of Artocarpus species. They will aid in cultivar identification and establishing germplasm conservation strategies for breadfruit and jackfruit. PMID:25202565

  6. Comparative genomics of two newly isolated Dehalococcoides strains and an enrichment using a genus microarray

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Patrick K H; Cheng, Dan; Hu, Ping; West, Kimberlee A; Dick, Gregory J; Brodie, Eoin L; Andersen, Gary L; Zinder, Stephen H; He, Jianzhong; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    Comparative genomics of Dehalococcoides strains and an enrichment were performed using a microarray targeting genes from all available sequenced genomes of the Dehalococcoides genus. The microarray was designed with 4305 probe sets to target 98.6% of the open-reading frames from strains 195, CBDB1, BAV1 and VS. The microarrays were validated and applied to query the genomes of two recently isolated Dehalococcoides strains, ANAS1 and ANAS2, and their enrichment source (ANAS) to understand the genome–physiology relationships. Strains ANAS1 and ANAS2 can both couple the reduction of trichloroethene, cis-dichloroethene (DCE) and 1,1-DCE, but not tetrachloroethene and trans-DCE with growth, whereas only strain ANAS2 couples vinyl chloride reduction to growth. Comparative genomic analysis showed that the genomes of both strains are similar to each other and to strain 195, except for genes that are within the previously defined integrated elements or high-plasticity regions. Combined results of the two isolates closely matched the results obtained using genomic DNA of the ANAS enrichment. The genome similarities, together with the distinct chlorinated ethene usage of strains ANAS1, ANAS2 and 195 demonstrate that closely phylogenetically related strains can be physiologically different. This incongruence between physiology and core genome phylogeny seems to be related to the presence of distinct reductive dehalogenase-encoding genes with assigned chlorinated ethene functions (pceA, tceA in strain 195; tceA in strain ANAS1; vcrA in strain ANAS2). Overall, the microarrays are a valuable high-throughput tool for comparative genomics of unsequenced Dehalococcoides-containing samples to provide insights into their gene content and dechlorination functions. PMID:21228894

  7. Genome-wide mining, characterization, and development of microsatellite markers in Marsupenaeus japonicus by genome survey sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xia; Luan, Sheng; Kong, Jie; Hu, Longyang; Mao, Yong; Zhong, Shengping

    2017-01-01

    The kuruma prawn, Marsupenaeus japonicus, is one of the most cultivated and consumed species of shrimp. However, very few molecular genetic/genomic resources are publically available for it. Thus, the characterization and distribution of simple sequence repeats (SSRs) remains ambiguous and the use of SSR markers in genomic studies and marker-assisted selection is limited. The goal of this study is to characterize and develop genome-wide SSR markers in M. japonicus by genome survey sequencing for application in comparative genomics and breeding. A total of 326 945 perfect SSRs were identified, among which dinucleotide repeats were the most frequent class (44.08%), followed by mononucleotides (29.67%), trinucleotides (18.96%), tetranucleotides (5.66%), hexanucleotides (1.07%), and pentanucleotides (0.56%). In total, 151 541 SSR loci primers were successfully designed. A subset of 30 SSR primer pairs were synthesized and tested in 42 individuals from a wild population, of which 27 loci (90.0%) were successfully amplified with specific products and 24 (80.0%) were polymorphic. For the amplified polymorphic loci, the alleles ranged from 5 to 17 (with an average of 9.63), and the average PIC value was 0.796. A total of 58 256 SSR-containing sequences had significant Gene Ontology annotation; these are good functional molecular marker candidates for association studies and comparative genomic analysis. The newly identified SSRs significantly contribute to the M. japonicus genomic resources and will facilitate a number of genetic and genomic studies, including high density linkage mapping, genome-wide association analysis, marker-aided selection, comparative genomics analysis, population genetics, and evolution.

  8. (GAA)n microsatellite as an indicator of the A genome reorganization during wheat evolution and domestication.

    PubMed

    Adonina, Irina G; Goncharov, Nikolay P; Badaeva, Ekaterina D; Sergeeva, Ekaterina M; Petrash, Nadezhda V; Salina, Elena A

    2015-01-01

    Although the wheat A genomes have been intensively studied over past decades, many questions concerning the mechanisms of their divergence and evolution still remain unsolved. In the present study we performed comparative analysis of the A genome chromosomes in diploid (Triticum urartu Tumanian ex Gandilyan, 1972, Triticum boeoticum Boissier, 1874 and Triticum monococcum Linnaeus, 1753) and polyploid wheat species representing two evolutionary lineages, Timopheevi (Triticum timopheevii (Zhukovsky) Zhukovsky, 1934 and Triticum zhukovskyi Menabde & Ericzjan, 1960) and Emmer (Triticum dicoccoides (Körnicke ex Ascherson & Graebner) Schweinfurth, 1908, Triticum durum Desfontaines, 1798, and Triticum aestivum Linnaeus, 1753) using a new cytogenetic marker - the pTm30 probe cloned from Triticum monococcum genome and containing (GAA)56 microsatellite sequence. Up to four pTm30 sites located on 1AS, 5AS, 2AS, and 4AL chromosomes have been revealed in the wild diploid species, although most accessions contained one-two (GAA)n sites. The domesticated diploid species Triticum monococcum differs from the wild diploid species by almost complete lack of polymorphism in the distribution of (GAA)n site. Only one (GAA)n site in the 4AL chromosome has been found in Triticum monococcum. Among three wild emmer (Triticum dicoccoides) accessions we detected 4 conserved and 9 polymorphic (GAA)n sites in the A genome. The (GAA)n loci on chromosomes 2AS, 4AL, and 5AL found in of Triticum dicoccoides were retained in Triticum durum and Triticum aestivum. In species of the Timopheevi lineage, the only one, large (GAA)n site has been detected in the short arm of 6A(t) chromosome. (GAA)n site observed in Triticum monococcum are undetectable in the A(b) genome of Triticum zhukovskyi, this site could be eliminated over the course of amphiploidization, while the species was established. We also demonstrated that changes in the distribution of (GAA)n sequence on the A-genome chromosomes of diploid

  9. (GAA)n microsatellite as an indicator of the A genome reorganization during wheat evolution and domestication

    PubMed Central

    Adonina, Irina G.; Goncharov, Nikolay P.; Badaeva, Ekaterina D.; Sergeeva, Ekaterina M.; Petrash, Nadezhda V.; Salina, Elena A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although the wheat A genomes have been intensively studied over past decades, many questions concerning the mechanisms of their divergence and evolution still remain unsolved. In the present study we performed comparative analysis of the A genome chromosomes in diploid (Triticum urartu Tumanian ex Gandilyan, 1972, Triticum boeoticum Boissier, 1874 and Triticum monococcum Linnaeus, 1753) and polyploid wheat species representing two evolutionary lineages, Timopheevi (Triticum timopheevii (Zhukovsky) Zhukovsky, 1934 and Triticum zhukovskyi Menabde & Ericzjan, 1960) and Emmer (Triticum dicoccoides (Körnicke ex Ascherson & Graebner) Schweinfurth, 1908, Triticum durum Desfontaines, 1798, and Triticum aestivum Linnaeus, 1753) using a new cytogenetic marker – the pTm30 probe cloned from Triticum monococcum genome and containing (GAA)56 microsatellite sequence. Up to four pTm30 sites located on 1AS, 5AS, 2AS, and 4AL chromosomes have been revealed in the wild diploid species, although most accessions contained one–two (GAA)n sites. The domesticated diploid species Triticum monococcum differs from the wild diploid species by almost complete lack of polymorphism in the distribution of (GAA)n site. Only one (GAA)n site in the 4AL chromosome has been found in Triticum monococcum. Among three wild emmer (Triticum dicoccoides) accessions we detected 4 conserved and 9 polymorphic (GAA)n sites in the A genome. The (GAA)n loci on chromosomes 2AS, 4AL, and 5AL found in of Triticum dicoccoides were retained in Triticum durum and Triticum aestivum. In species of the Timopheevi lineage, the only one, large (GAA)n site has been detected in the short arm of 6At chromosome. (GAA)n site observed in Triticum monococcum are undetectable in the Ab genome of Triticum zhukovskyi, this site could be eliminated over the course of amphiploidization, while the species was established. We also demonstrated that changes in the distribution of (GAA)n sequence on the A-genome chromosomes

  10. Development of novel simple sequence repeat markers in bitter gourd (Momordica charantia L.) through enriched genomic libraries and their utilization in analysis of genetic diversity and cross-species transferability.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Swati; Singh, Archana; Archak, Sunil; Behera, Tushar K; John, Joseph K; Meshram, Sudhir U; Gaikwad, Ambika B

    2015-01-01

    Microsatellite or simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers are the preferred markers for genetic analyses of crop plants. The availability of a limited number of such markers in bitter gourd (Momordica charantia L.) necessitates the development and characterization of more SSR markers. These were developed from genomic libraries enriched for three dinucleotide, five trinucleotide, and two tetranucleotide core repeat motifs. Employing the strategy of polymerase chain reaction-based screening, the number of clones to be sequenced was reduced by 81 % and 93.7 % of the sequenced clones contained in microsatellite repeats. Unique primer-pairs were designed for 160 microsatellite loci, and amplicons of expected length were obtained for 151 loci (94.4 %). Evaluation of diversity in 54 bitter gourd accessions at 51 loci indicated that 20 % of the loci were polymorphic with the polymorphic information content values ranging from 0.13 to 0.77. Fifteen Indian varieties were clearly distinguished indicative of the usefulness of the developed markers. Markers at 40 loci (78.4 %) were transferable to six species, viz. Momordica cymbalaria, Momordica subangulata subsp. renigera, Momordica balsamina, Momordica dioca, Momordica cochinchinesis, and Momordica sahyadrica. The microsatellite markers reported will be useful in various genetic and molecular genetic studies in bitter gourd, a cucurbit of immense nutritive, medicinal, and economic importance.

  11. A Genome-Wide Survey of the Microsatellite Content of the Globe Artichoke Genome and the Development of a Web-Based Database

    PubMed Central

    Portis, Ezio; Portis, Flavio; Valente, Luisa; Moglia, Andrea; Barchi, Lorenzo; Lanteri, Sergio; Acquadro, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    The recently acquired genome sequence of globe artichoke (Cynara cardunculus var. scolymus) has been used to catalog the genome’s content of simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. More than 177,000 perfect SSRs were revealed, equivalent to an overall density across the genome of 244.5 SSRs/Mbp, but some 224,000 imperfect SSRs were also identified. About 21% of these SSRs were complex (two stretches of repeats separated by <100 nt). Some 73% of the SSRs were composed of dinucleotide motifs. The SSRs were categorized for the numbers of repeats present, their overall length and were allocated to their linkage group. A total of 4,761 perfect and 6,583 imperfect SSRs were present in 3,781 genes (14.11% of the total), corresponding to an overall density across the gene space of 32,5 and 44,9 SSRs/Mbp for perfect and imperfect motifs, respectively. A putative function has been assigned, using the gene ontology approach, to the set of genes harboring at least one SSR. The same search parameters were applied to reveal the SSR content of 14 other plant species for which genome sequence is available. Certain species-specific SSR motifs were identified, along with a hexa-nucleotide motif shared only with the other two Compositae species (sunflower (Helianthus annuus) and horseweed (Conyza canadensis)) included in the study. Finally, a database, called “Cynara cardunculus MicroSatellite DataBase” (CyMSatDB) was developed to provide a searchable interface to the SSR data. CyMSatDB facilitates the retrieval of SSR markers, as well as suggested forward and reverse primers, on the basis of genomic location, genomic vs genic context, perfect vs imperfect repeat, motif type, motif sequence and repeat number. The SSR markers were validated via an in silico based PCR analysis adopting two available assembled transcriptomes, derived from contrasting globe artichoke accessions, as templates. PMID:27648830

  12. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci from the yellow-eyed penguin (Megadyptes antipodes).

    PubMed

    Boessenkool, S; King, T M; Seddon, P J; Waters, J M

    2008-09-01

    Twelve microsatellite loci were isolated and characterized in the endangered yellow-eyed penguin (Megadyptes antipodes) using enriched genomic libraries. Polymorphic loci revealed two to eight alleles per locus and observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.21 to 0.77. These loci will be suitable for assessing current and historical patterns of genetic variability in yellow-eyed penguins.

  13. Eight microsatellite loci in Phaedranassa schizantha Baker (Amaryllidaceae) and cross-amplification in other Phaedranassa species

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Phaedranassa schizantha is a species endemic to Ecuador from which eight polymorphic microsatellite loci were isolated from an enriched genomic library. A total of 31 alleles with an average of four alleles per locus were detected across 29 individuals from a single natural population of P. schizan...

  14. Development of diagnostic microsatellite markers from whole-genome sequences of Ammodramus sparrows for assessing admixture in a hybrid zone

    PubMed Central

    Kovach, Adrienne I; Walsh, Jennifer; Ramsdell, Jordan; Kelley Thomas, W

    2015-01-01

    Studies of hybridization and introgression and, in particular, the identification of admixed individuals in natural populations benefit from the use of diagnostic genetic markers that reliably differentiate pure species from each other and their hybrid forms. Such diagnostic markers are often infrequent in the genomes of closely related species, and genomewide data facilitate their discovery. We used whole-genome data from Illumina HiSeqS2000 sequencing of two recently diverged (600,000 years) and hybridizing, avian, sister species, the Saltmarsh (Ammodramus caudacutus) and Nelson's (A. nelsoni) Sparrow, to develop a suite of diagnostic markers for high-resolution identification of pure and admixed individuals. We compared the microsatellite repeat regions identified in the genomes of the two species and selected a subset of 37 loci that differed between the species in repeat number. We screened these loci on 12 pure individuals of each species and report on the 34 that successfully amplified. From these, we developed a panel of the 12 most diagnostic loci, which we evaluated on 96 individuals, including individuals from both allopatric populations and sympatric individuals from the hybrid zone. Using simulations, we evaluated the power of the marker panel for accurate assignments of individuals to their appropriate pure species and hybrid genotypic classes (F1, F2, and backcrosses). The markers proved highly informative for species discrimination and had high accuracy for classifying admixed individuals into their genotypic classes. These markers will aid future investigations of introgressive hybridization in this system and aid conservation efforts aimed at monitoring and preserving pure species. Our approach is transferable to other study systems consisting of closely related and incipient species. PMID:26078861

  15. Development of diagnostic microsatellite markers from whole-genome sequences of Ammodramus sparrows for assessing admixture in a hybrid zone.

    PubMed

    Kovach, Adrienne I; Walsh, Jennifer; Ramsdell, Jordan; Kelley Thomas, W

    2015-06-01

    Studies of hybridization and introgression and, in particular, the identification of admixed individuals in natural populations benefit from the use of diagnostic genetic markers that reliably differentiate pure species from each other and their hybrid forms. Such diagnostic markers are often infrequent in the genomes of closely related species, and genomewide data facilitate their discovery. We used whole-genome data from Illumina HiSeqS2000 sequencing of two recently diverged (600,000 years) and hybridizing, avian, sister species, the Saltmarsh (Ammodramus caudacutus) and Nelson's (A. nelsoni) Sparrow, to develop a suite of diagnostic markers for high-resolution identification of pure and admixed individuals. We compared the microsatellite repeat regions identified in the genomes of the two species and selected a subset of 37 loci that differed between the species in repeat number. We screened these loci on 12 pure individuals of each species and report on the 34 that successfully amplified. From these, we developed a panel of the 12 most diagnostic loci, which we evaluated on 96 individuals, including individuals from both allopatric populations and sympatric individuals from the hybrid zone. Using simulations, we evaluated the power of the marker panel for accurate assignments of individuals to their appropriate pure species and hybrid genotypic classes (F1, F2, and backcrosses). The markers proved highly informative for species discrimination and had high accuracy for classifying admixed individuals into their genotypic classes. These markers will aid future investigations of introgressive hybridization in this system and aid conservation efforts aimed at monitoring and preserving pure species. Our approach is transferable to other study systems consisting of closely related and incipient species.

  16. Development of 304 new microsatellite markers for carrot. Analysis of their potential for linkage mapping, assessment of genetic diversity and cross-taxa utilization

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two different approaches were used to isolate carrot SSRs: 1) Construction and analysis of a genomic DNA library enriched for SSR loci (GSSRs) and 2) Bioinformatic mining for SSR motifs in a 1.7 Mb BAC-end sequence database (BSSR). The SSR-enriched library yielded microsatellites with more repeats b...

  17. Sonication-based isolation and enrichment of Chlorella protothecoides chloroplasts for illumina genome sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Angelova, Angelina; Park, Sang-Hycuk; Kyndt, John; Fitzsimmons, Kevin; Brown, Judith K

    2013-09-01

    With the increasing world demand for biofuel, a number of oleaginous algal species are being considered as renewable sources of oil. Chlorella protothecoides Krüger synthesizes triacylglycerols (TAGs) as storage compounds that can be converted into renewable fuel utilizing an anabolic pathway that is poorly understood. The paucity of algal chloroplast genome sequences has been an important constraint to chloroplast transformation and for studying gene expression in TAGs pathways. In this study, the intact chloroplasts were released from algal cells using sonication followed by sucrose gradient centrifugation, resulting in a 2.36-fold enrichment of chloroplasts from C. protothecoides, based on qPCR analysis. The C. protothecoides chloroplast genome (cpDNA) was determined using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencing platform and found to be 84,576 Kb in size (8.57 Kb) in size, with a GC content of 30.8 %. This is the first report of an optimized protocol that uses a sonication step, followed by sucrose gradient centrifugation, to release and enrich intact chloroplasts from a microalga (C. prototheocoides) of sufficient quality to permit chloroplast genome sequencing with high coverage, while minimizing nuclear genome contamination. The approach is expected to guide chloroplast isolation from other oleaginous algal species for a variety of uses that benefit from enrichment of chloroplasts, ranging from biochemical analysis to genomics studies.

  18. A robust genomic signature for the detection of colorectal cancer patients with microsatellite instability phenotype and high mutation frequency#

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Sun; Roepman, Paul; Popovici, Vlad; Michaut, Magali; Majewski, Ian; Salazar, Ramon; Santos, Cristina; Rosenberg, Robert; Nitsche, Ulrich; Mesker, Wilma E; Bruin, Sjoerd; Tejpar, Sabine; Delorenzi, Mauro; Bernards, Rene; Simon, Iris

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Microsatellite instability (MSI) occurs in 10–20% of colorectal tumours and is associated with good prognosis. Here we describe the development and validation of a genomic signature that identifies colorectal cancer patients with MSI caused by DNA mismatch repair deficiency with high accuracy. Microsatellite status for 276 stage II and III colorectal tumours has been determined. Full-genome expression data was used to identify genes that correlate with MSI status. A subset of these samples (n = 73) had sequencing data for 615 genes available. An MSI gene signature of 64 genes was developed and validated in two independent validation sets: the first consisting of frozen samples from 132 stage II patients; and the second consisting of FFPE samples from the PETACC-3 trial (n = 625). The 64-gene MSI signature identified MSI patients in the first validation set with a sensitivity of 90.3% and an overall accuracy of 84.8%, with an AUC of 0.942 (95% CI, 0.888–0.975). In the second validation, the signature also showed excellent performance, with a sensitivity 94.3% and an overall accuracy of 90.6%, with an AUC of 0.965 (95% CI, 0.943–0.988). Besides correct identification of MSI patients, the gene signature identified a group of MSI-like patients that were MSS by standard assessment but MSI by signature assessment. The MSI-signature could be linked to a deficient MMR phenotype, as both MSI and MSI-like patients showed a high mutation frequency (8.2% and 6.4% of 615 genes assayed, respectively) as compared to patients classified as MSS (1.6% mutation frequency). The MSI signature showed prognostic power in stage II patients (n = 215) with a hazard ratio of 0.252 (p = 0.0145). Patients with an MSI-like phenotype had also an improved survival when compared to MSS patients. The MSI signature was translated to a diagnostic microarray and technically and clinically validated in FFPE and frozen samples. Copyright © 2012 Pathological Society of Great Britain and

  19. Hybridization Capture Using Short PCR Products Enriches Small Genomes by Capturing Flanking Sequences (CapFlank)

    PubMed Central

    Tsangaras, Kyriakos; Wales, Nathan; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas; Rasmussen, Simon; Michaux, Johan; Ishida, Yasuko; Morand, Serge; Kampmann, Marie-Louise; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Greenwood, Alex D.

    2014-01-01

    Solution hybridization capture methods utilize biotinylated oligonucleotides as baits to enrich homologous sequences from next generation sequencing (NGS) libraries. Coupled with NGS, the method generates kilo to gigabases of high confidence consensus targeted sequence. However, in many experiments, a non-negligible fraction of the resulting sequence reads are not homologous to the bait. We demonstrate that during capture, the bait-hybridized library molecules add additional flanking library sequences iteratively, such that baits limited to targeting relatively short regions (e.g. few hundred nucleotides) can result in enrichment across entire mitochondrial and bacterial genomes. Our findings suggest that some of the off-target sequences derived in capture experiments are non-randomly enriched, and that CapFlank will facilitate targeted enrichment of large contiguous sequences with minimal prior target sequence information. PMID:25275614

  20. Enrichment of genomic DNA for polymorphism detection in a non-model highly polyploid crop plant.

    PubMed

    Bundock, Peter C; Casu, Rosanne E; Henry, Robert J

    2012-08-01

    Large polyploid genomes of non-model species remain challenging targets for DNA polymorphism discovery despite the increasing throughput and continued reductions in cost of sequencing with new technologies. For these species especially, there remains a requirement to enrich genomic DNA to discover polymorphisms in regions of interest because of large genome size and to provide the sequence depth to enable estimation of copy number. Various methods of enriching DNA have been utilised, but some recent methods enable the efficient sampling of large regions (e.g. the exome). We have utilised one of these methods, solution-based hybridization (Agilent SureSelect), to capture regions of the genome of two sugarcane genotypes (one Saccharum officinarum and one Saccharum hybrid) based mainly on gene sequences from the close relative Sorghum bicolor. The capture probes span approximately 5.8 megabases (Mb). The enrichment over whole-genome shotgun sequencing was 10-11-fold for the two genotypes tested. This level of enrichment has important consequences for detecting single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from a single lane of Illumina (Genome Analyzer) sequence reads. The detection of polymorphisms was enabled by the depth of sequence at or near probe sites and enabled the detection of 270 000-280 000 SNPs within each genotype from a single lane of sequence using stringent detection parameters. The SNPs were present in 13 000-16 000 targeted genes, which would enable mapping of a large number of these chosen genes. SNP validation from 454 sequencing and between-genotype confirmations gave an 87%-91% validation rate.

  1. Robotic Enrichment Processing of Roche 454 Titanium Emlusion PCR at the DOE Joint Genome Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Matthew; Wilson, Steven; Bauer, Diane; Miller, Don; Duffy-Wei, Kecia; Hammon, Nancy; Lucas, Susan; Pollard, Martin; Cheng, Jan-Fang

    2010-05-28

    Enrichment of emulsion PCR product is the most laborious and pipette-intensive step in the 454 Titanium process, posing the biggest obstacle for production-oriented scale up. The Joint Genome Institute has developed a pair of custom-made robots based on the Microlab Star liquid handling deck manufactured by Hamilton to mediate the complexity and ergonomic demands of the 454 enrichment process. The robot includes a custom built centrifuge, magnetic deck positions, as well as heating and cooling elements. At present processing eight emulsion cup samples in a single 2.5 hour run, these robots are capable of processing up to 24 emulsion cup samples. Sample emulsions are broken using the standard 454 breaking process and transferred from a pair of 50ml conical tubes to a single 2ml tube and loaded on the robot. The robot performs the enrichment protocol and produces beads in 2ml tubes ready for counting. The robot follows the Roche 454 enrichment protocol with slight exceptions to the manner in which it resuspends beads via pipette mixing rather than vortexing and a set number of null bead removal washes. The robotic process is broken down in similar discrete steps: First Melt and Neutralization, Enrichment Primer Annealing, Enrichment Bead Incubation, Null Bead Removal, Second Melt and Neutralization and Sequencing Primer Annealing. Data indicating our improvements in enrichment efficiency and total number of bases per run will also be shown.

  2. Use of microsatellite markers derived from whole genome sequence data for identifying polymorphism in Phytophthora ramorum

    Treesearch

    Kelly Ivors; Matteo Garbelotto; Ineke De Vries; Peter Bonants

    2006-01-01

    Investigating the population genetics of Phytophthora ramorum, the causal agent of sudden oak death (SOD), is critical to understanding the biology and epidemiology of this important phytopathogen. Raw sequence data (445,000 reads) of P. ramorum was provided by the Joint Genome Institute. Our objective was to develop and utilize...

  3. A Glance at Microsatellite Motifs from 454 Sequencing Reads of Watermelon Genomic DNA

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A single 454 (Life Sciences Sequencing Technology) run of Charleston Gray watermelon (Citrullus lanatus var. lanatus) genomic DNA was performed and sequence data were assembled. A large scale identification of simple sequence repeat (SSR) was performed and SSR sequence data were used for the develo...

  4. Genome-wide association study of IgA nephropathy using 23 465 microsatellite markers in a Japanese population.

    PubMed

    Saka, Sanae; Hirawa, Nobuhito; Oka, Akira; Yatsu, Keisuke; Hirukawa, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Ryohei; Matsusaka, Taiji; Imai, Enyu; Narita, Ichiei; Endoh, Masayuki; Ichikawa, Iekuni; Umemura, Satoshi; Inoko, Hidetoshi

    2015-10-01

    Immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common form of primary glomerulonephritis in many parts of the world. Although previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identified the major susceptibility loci for IgAN, the causal genes currently remain unknown. We performed a GWAS using 23 465 microsatellite (MS) markers to identify genes related to IgAN in a Japanese population. A pooled sample analysis was conducted in three-stage screenings of three independent case-control populations, and after the final step of individual typing, 11 markers survived. Of these, we focused on two regions on 6p21 and 12q21 because they (i) showed the strongest relationship with IgAN, and (ii) appeared to be highly relevant to IgAN in view of several previous studies. These regions contained the HLA, TSPAN8 and PTPRR genes. This study on GWAS, using >20 000 MS markers, provides a new approach regarding susceptible genes for IgAN for investigators seeking new tools for the prevention and treatment of IgAN.

  5. Genetic diversity of Atlantic Bluefin tuna in the Mediterranean Sea: insights from genome-wide SNPs and microsatellites.

    PubMed

    Antoniou, Aglaia; Kasapidis, Panagiotis; Kotoulas, Georgios; Mylonas, Constantinos C; Magoulas, Antonios

    2017-12-01

    Elucidating the patterns of the Atlantic Bluefin tuna [ABFT, Thunnus thynnus (Linnaeus, 1758)] population structure constitutes a challenging task of great importance. Most of the unique challenges stem from its biology, as well as the attributes of the marine realm in which it disperses. Accurate information is urgently needed for stock assessment, and the identification of critical features to the persistence and adaptation of populations in order to formulate and adopt effective strategies for ABFT conservation and management. Conclusions of a great number of ABFT genetic studies on the Mediterranean Sea stock structure are rather controversial and not yet conclusive. In this study, ABFT genomic diversity was investigated in the Mediterranean Sea, which is the most important area for the species' reproduction. Analyzing genome-wide SNPs and microsatellites from ABFT samples collected throughout the Mediterranean Sea did not provide strong evidence of genetic structure, pointing towards the existence of a single panmictic unit. An alternative view would recognize a failure to reject the null hypothesis of a panmictic unit as an effect of the study's sampling design, the type of markers used, and the effectiveness/suitability of analysis methods in respect to the species biological characteristics or any combination of the above. Unravelling the drivers of ABFT population diversity would require the consideration of important aspects of the species spawning behavior for the determination of the appropriate sampling design. Novel approaches and methods of analysis that will bring together experts in genetics/-omics, ecology and oceanography are deemed necessary. Analyzing ABFT genetic data under the discipline of seascape genetics could provide the analysis framework under which major abiotic and biotic forces controlling ABFT recruitment could be identified, elucidating the complicated population dynamics of the species, while multiple and continuous fisheries

  6. An Expressed Sequence Tag (EST)-enriched genetic map of turbot (Scophthalmus maximus): a useful framework for comparative genomics across model and farmed teleosts

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) is a relevant species in European aquaculture. The small turbot genome provides a source for genomics strategies to use in order to understand the genetic basis of productive traits, particularly those related to sex, growth and pathogen resistance. Genetic maps represent essential genomic screening tools allowing to localize quantitative trait loci (QTL) and to identify candidate genes through comparative mapping. This information is the backbone to develop marker-assisted selection (MAS) programs in aquaculture. Expressed sequenced tag (EST) resources have largely increased in turbot, thus supplying numerous type I markers suitable for extending the previous linkage map, which was mostly based on anonymous loci. The aim of this study was to construct a higher-resolution turbot genetic map using EST-linked markers, which will turn out to be useful for comparative mapping studies. Results A consensus gene-enriched genetic map of the turbot was constructed using 463 SNP and microsatellite markers in nine reference families. This map contains 438 markers, 180 EST-linked, clustered at 24 linkage groups. Linkage and comparative genomics evidences suggested additional linkage group fusions toward the consolidation of turbot map according to karyotype information. The linkage map showed a total length of 1402.7 cM with low average intermarker distance (3.7 cM; ~2 Mb). A global 1.6:1 female-to-male recombination frequency (RF) ratio was observed, although largely variable among linkage groups and chromosome regions. Comparative sequence analysis revealed large macrosyntenic patterns against model teleost genomes, significant hits decreasing from stickleback (54%) to zebrafish (20%). Comparative mapping supported particular chromosome rearrangements within Acanthopterygii and aided to assign unallocated markers to specific turbot linkage groups. Conclusions The new gene-enriched high-resolution turbot map represents a

  7. Genomes of two new ammonia-oxidizing archaea enriched from deep marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Park, Soo-Je; Ghai, Rohit; Martín-Cuadrado, Ana-Belén; Rodríguez-Valera, Francisco; Chung, Won-Hyong; Kwon, KaeKyoung; Lee, Jung-Hyun; Madsen, Eugene L; Rhee, Sung-Keun

    2014-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) are ubiquitous and abundant and contribute significantly to the carbon and nitrogen cycles in the ocean. In this study, we assembled AOA draft genomes from two deep marine sediments from Donghae, South Korea, and Svalbard, Arctic region, by sequencing the enriched metagenomes. Three major microorganism clusters belonging to Thaumarchaeota, Epsilonproteobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria were deduced from their 16S rRNA genes, GC contents, and oligonucleotide frequencies. Three archaeal genomes were identified, two of which were distinct and were designated Ca. "Nitrosopumilus koreensis" AR1 and "Nitrosopumilus sediminis" AR2. AR1 and AR2 exhibited average nucleotide identities of 85.2% and 79.5% to N. maritimus, respectively. The AR1 and AR2 genomes contained genes pertaining to energy metabolism and carbon fixation as conserved in other AOA, but, conversely, had fewer heme-containing proteins and more copper-containing proteins than other AOA. Most of the distinctive AR1 and AR2 genes were located in genomic islands (GIs) that were not present in other AOA genomes or in a reference water-column metagenome from the Sargasso Sea. A putative gene cluster involved in urea utilization was found in the AR2 genome, but not the AR1 genome, suggesting niche specialization in marine AOA. Co-cultured bacterial genome analysis suggested that bacterial sulfur and nitrogen metabolism could be involved in interactions with AOA. Our results provide fundamental information concerning the metabolic potential of deep marine sedimentary AOA.

  8. Development of Genomic Microsatellite Markers in Carthamus tinctorius L. (Safflower) Using Next Generation Sequencing and Assessment of Their Cross-Species Transferability and Utility for Diversity Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Variath, Murali Tottekkad; Joshi, Gopal; Bali, Sapinder; Agarwal, Manu; Kumar, Amar; Jagannath, Arun; Goel, Shailendra

    2015-01-01

    Background Safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.), an Asteraceae member, yields high quality edible oil rich in unsaturated fatty acids and is resilient to dry conditions. The crop holds tremendous potential for improvement through concerted molecular breeding programs due to the availability of significant genetic and phenotypic diversity. Genomic resources that could facilitate such breeding programs remain largely underdeveloped in the crop. The present study was initiated to develop a large set of novel microsatellite markers for safflower using next generation sequencing. Principal Findings Low throughput genome sequencing of safflower was performed using Illumina paired end technology providing ~3.5X coverage of the genome. Analysis of sequencing data allowed identification of 23,067 regions harboring perfect microsatellite loci. The safflower genome was found to be rich in dinucleotide repeats followed by tri-, tetra-, penta- and hexa-nucleotides. Primer pairs were designed for 5,716 novel microsatellite sequences with repeat length ≥ 20 bases and optimal flanking regions. A subset of 325 microsatellite loci was tested for amplification, of which 294 loci produced robust amplification. The validated primers were used for assessment of 23 safflower accessions belonging to diverse agro-climatic zones of the world leading to identification of 93 polymorphic primers (31.6%). The numbers of observed alleles at each locus ranged from two to four and mean polymorphism information content was found to be 0.3075. The polymorphic primers were tested for cross-species transferability on nine wild relatives of cultivated safflower. All primers except one showed amplification in at least two wild species while 25 primers amplified across all the nine species. The UPGMA dendrogram clustered C. tinctorius accessions and wild species separately into two major groups. The proposed progenitor species of safflower, C. oxyacantha and C. palaestinus were genetically closer to

  9. Development of Genomic Microsatellite Markers in Carthamus tinctorius L. (Safflower) Using Next Generation Sequencing and Assessment of Their Cross-Species Transferability and Utility for Diversity Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ambreen, Heena; Kumar, Shivendra; Variath, Murali Tottekkad; Joshi, Gopal; Bali, Sapinder; Agarwal, Manu; Kumar, Amar; Jagannath, Arun; Goel, Shailendra

    2015-01-01

    Safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.), an Asteraceae member, yields high quality edible oil rich in unsaturated fatty acids and is resilient to dry conditions. The crop holds tremendous potential for improvement through concerted molecular breeding programs due to the availability of significant genetic and phenotypic diversity. Genomic resources that could facilitate such breeding programs remain largely underdeveloped in the crop. The present study was initiated to develop a large set of novel microsatellite markers for safflower using next generation sequencing. Low throughput genome sequencing of safflower was performed using Illumina paired end technology providing ~3.5X coverage of the genome. Analysis of sequencing data allowed identification of 23,067 regions harboring perfect microsatellite loci. The safflower genome was found to be rich in dinucleotide repeats followed by tri-, tetra-, penta- and hexa-nucleotides. Primer pairs were designed for 5,716 novel microsatellite sequences with repeat length ≥ 20 bases and optimal flanking regions. A subset of 325 microsatellite loci was tested for amplification, of which 294 loci produced robust amplification. The validated primers were used for assessment of 23 safflower accessions belonging to diverse agro-climatic zones of the world leading to identification of 93 polymorphic primers (31.6%). The numbers of observed alleles at each locus ranged from two to four and mean polymorphism information content was found to be 0.3075. The polymorphic primers were tested for cross-species transferability on nine wild relatives of cultivated safflower. All primers except one showed amplification in at least two wild species while 25 primers amplified across all the nine species. The UPGMA dendrogram clustered C. tinctorius accessions and wild species separately into two major groups. The proposed progenitor species of safflower, C. oxyacantha and C. palaestinus were genetically closer to cultivated safflower and formed a

  10. Significant variance in genetic diversity among populations of Schistosoma haematobium detected using microsatellite DNA loci from a genome-wide database

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Urogenital schistosomiasis caused by Schistosoma haematobium is widely distributed across Africa and is increasingly being targeted for control. Genome sequences and population genetic parameters can give insight into the potential for population- or species-level drug resistance. Microsatellite DNA loci are genetic markers in wide use by Schistosoma researchers, but there are few primers available for S. haematobium. Methods We sequenced 1,058,114 random DNA fragments from clonal cercariae collected from a snail infected with a single Schistosoma haematobium miracidium. We assembled and aligned the S. haematobium sequences to the genomes of S. mansoni and S. japonicum, identifying microsatellite DNA loci across all three species and designing primers to amplify the loci in S. haematobium. To validate our primers, we screened 32 randomly selected primer pairs with population samples of S. haematobium. Results We designed >13,790 primer pairs to amplify unique microsatellite loci in S. haematobium, (available at http://www.cebio.org/projetos/schistosoma-haematobium-genome). The three Schistosoma genomes contained similar overall frequencies of microsatellites, but the frequency and length distributions of specific motifs differed among species. We identified 15 primer pairs that amplified consistently and were easily scored. We genotyped these 15 loci in S. haematobium individuals from six locations: Zanzibar had the highest levels of diversity; Malawi, Mauritius, Nigeria, and Senegal were nearly as diverse; but the sample from South Africa was much less diverse. Conclusions About half of the primers in the database of Schistosoma haematobium microsatellite DNA loci should yield amplifiable and easily scored polymorphic markers, thus providing thousands of potential markers. Sequence conservation among S. haematobium, S. japonicum, and S. mansoni is relatively high, thus it should now be possible to identify markers that are universal among Schistosoma

  11. Organellar genome, nuclear ribosomal DNA repeat unit, and microsatellites isolated from a small-scale of 454 GS FLX sequencing on two mosses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Forrest, Laura L; Bainard, Jillian D; Budke, Jessica M; Goffinet, Bernard

    2013-03-01

    Recent innovations in high-throughput DNA sequencing methodology (next generation sequencing technologies [NGS]) allow for the generation of large amounts of high quality data that may be particularly critical for resolving ambiguous relationships such as those resulting from rapid radiations. Application of NGS technology to bryology is limited to assembling entire nuclear or organellar genomes of selected exemplars of major lineages (e.g., classes). Here we outline how organellar genomes and the entire nuclear ribosomal DNA repeat can be obtained from minimal amounts of moss tissue via small-scale 454 GS FLX sequencing. We sampled two Funariaceae species, Funaria hygrometrica and Entosthodon obtusus, and assembled nearly complete organellar genomes and the whole nuclear ribosomal DNA repeat unit (18S-ITS1-5.8S-ITS2-26S-IGS1-5S-IGS2) for both taxa. Sequence data from these species were compared to sequences from another Funariaceae species, Physcomitrella patens, revealing low overall degrees of divergence of the organellar genomes and nrDNA genes with substitutions spread rather evenly across their length, and high divergence within the external spacers of the nrDNA repeat. Furthermore, we detected numerous microsatellites among the 454 assemblies. This study demonstrates that NGS methodology can be applied to mosses to target large genomic regions and identify microsatellites. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Polymorphic microsatellites for forensic identification of agarwood (Aquilaria crassna).

    PubMed

    Eurlings, Marcel C M; van Beek, Henry Heuveling; Gravendeel, Barbara

    2010-04-15

    Tropical agarwood (Aquilaria) is in danger of extinction in the wild due to illegal logging. Its resin (Gaharu) is used for the production of highly valued incense throughout Asia. We have isolated and characterized microsatellite loci of Aquilaria crassna to detect the geographic origin of agarwood for forensic applications using a modified enrichment procedure based on the capture of repetitive sequences from restricted genomic DNA. We assessed the polymorphisms of five microsatellites amplified from fresh leaves of 22 trees from seven plantations in Vietnam and Thailand and dried leaves of a herbarium specimen of one wild tree. Cross specificity of these markers was confirmed on two related Aquilaria species occurring in China and Vietnam and one microsatellite locus was successfully amplified from wood and incense samples. Four of the loci were polymorphic and the number of alleles ranged from 3 to 15. The loci characterized here can provide a starting point for forensic identification of traded material and certification of sustainably produced agarwood.

  13. Target enrichment of ultraconserved elements from arthropods provides a genomic perspective on relationships among Hymenoptera.

    PubMed

    Faircloth, Brant C; Branstetter, Michael G; White, Noor D; Brady, Seán G

    2015-05-01

    Gaining a genomic perspective on phylogeny requires the collection of data from many putatively independent loci across the genome. Among insects, an increasingly common approach to collecting this class of data involves transcriptome sequencing, because few insects have high-quality genome sequences available; assembling new genomes remains a limiting factor; the transcribed portion of the genome is a reasonable, reduced subset of the genome to target; and the data collected from transcribed portions of the genome are similar in composition to the types of data with which biologists have traditionally worked (e.g. exons). However, molecular techniques requiring RNA as a template, including transcriptome sequencing, are limited to using very high-quality source materials, which are often unavailable from a large proportion of biologically important insect samples. Recent research suggests that DNA-based target enrichment of conserved genomic elements offers another path to collecting phylogenomic data across insect taxa, provided that conserved elements are present in and can be collected from insect genomes. Here, we identify a large set (n = 1510) of ultraconserved elements (UCEs) shared among the insect order Hymenoptera. We used in silico analyses to show that these loci accurately reconstruct relationships among genome-enabled hymenoptera, and we designed a set of RNA baits (n = 2749) for enriching these loci that researchers can use with DNA templates extracted from a variety of sources. We used our UCE bait set to enrich an average of 721 UCE loci from 30 hymenopteran taxa, and we used these UCE loci to reconstruct phylogenetic relationships spanning very old (≥220 Ma) to very young (≤1 Ma) divergences among hymenopteran lineages. In contrast to a recent study addressing hymenopteran phylogeny using transcriptome data, we found ants to be sister to all remaining aculeate lineages with complete support, although this result could be explained by

  14. Rapid enrichment of leucocytes and genomic DNA from blood based on bifunctional core shell magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xin; Nie, Xiaorong; Yu, Bingbin; Zhang, Xu

    2007-04-01

    A series of protocols are proposed to extract genomic DNA from whole blood at different scales using carboxyl-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles as solid-phase absorbents. The enrichment of leucocytes and the adsorption of genomic DNA can be achieved with the same carboxyl-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles. The DNA bound to the bead surfaces can be used directly as PCR templates. By coupling cell separation and DNA purification, the whole operation can be accomplished in a few minutes. Our simplified protocols proved to be rapid, low cost, and biologically and chemically non-hazardous, and are therefore promising for microfabrication of a DNA-preparation chip and routine laboratory use.

  15. SBMDb: first whole genome putative microsatellite DNA marker database of sugarbeet for bioenergy and industrial applications

    PubMed Central

    Iquebal, Mir Asif; Jaiswal, Sarika; Angadi, U.B.; Sablok, Gaurav; Arora, Vasu; Kumar, Sunil; Rai, Anil; Kumar, Dinesh

    2015-01-01

    DNA marker plays important role as valuable tools to increase crop productivity by finding plausible answers to genetic variations and linking the Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) of beneficial trait. Prior approaches in development of Short Tandem Repeats (STR) markers were time consuming and inefficient. Recent methods invoking the development of STR markers using whole genomic or transcriptomics data has gained wide importance with immense potential in developing breeding and cultivator improvement approaches. Availability of whole genome sequences and in silico approaches has revolutionized bulk marker discovery. We report world’s first sugarbeet whole genome marker discovery having 145 K markers along with 5 K functional domain markers unified in common platform using MySQL, Apache and PHP in SBMDb. Embedded markers and corresponding location information can be selected for desired chromosome, location/interval and primers can be generated using Primer3 core, integrated at backend. Our analyses revealed abundance of ‘mono’ repeat (76.82%) over ‘di’ repeats (13.68%). Highest density (671.05 markers/Mb) was found in chromosome 1 and lowest density (341.27 markers/Mb) in chromosome 6. Current investigation of sugarbeet genome marker density has direct implications in increasing mapping marker density. This will enable present linkage map having marker distance of ∼2 cM, i.e. from 200 to 2.6 Kb, thus facilitating QTL/gene mapping. We also report e-PCR-based detection of 2027 polymorphic markers in panel of five genotypes. These markers can be used for DUS test of variety identification and MAS/GAS in variety improvement program. The present database presents wide source of potential markers for developing and implementing new approaches for molecular breeding required to accelerate industrious use of this crop, especially for sugar, health care products, medicines and color dye. Identified markers will also help in improvement of bioenergy trait

  16. An exhaustive DNA micro-satellite map of the human genome using high performance computing.

    PubMed

    Collins, Jack R; Stephens, Robert M; Gold, Bert; Long, Bill; Dean, Michael; Burt, Stanley K

    2003-07-01

    The current pace of the generation of sequence data requires the development of software tools that can rapidly provide full annotation of the data. We have developed a new method for rapid sequence comparison using the exact match algorithm without repeat masking. As a demonstration, we have identified all perfect simple tandem repeats (STR) within the draft sequence of the human genome. The STR elements (chromosome, position, length and repeat subunit) have been placed into a relational database. Repeat flanking sequence is also publicly accessible at http://grid.abcc.ncifcrf.gov. To illustrate the utility of this complete set of STR elements, we documented the increased density of potentially polymorphic markers throughout the genome. The new STR markers may be useful in disease association studies because so many STR elements manifest multiallelic polymorphism. Also, because triplet repeat expansions are important for human disease etiology, we identified trinucleotide repeats that exist within exons of known genes. This resulted in a list that includes all 14 genes known to undergo polynucleotide expansion, and 48 additional candidates. Several of these are non-polyglutamine triplet repeats. Other examinations of the STR database demonstrated repeats spanning splice junctions and identified SNPs within repeat elements.

  17. Development of genomic microsatellite multiplex PCR using dye-labeled universal primer and its validation in pedigree analysis of Pacific oyster ( Crassostrea gigas)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ting; Li, Qi; Song, Junlin; Yu, Hong

    2017-02-01

    There is an increasing requirement for traceability of aquaculture products, both for consumer protection and for food safety. There are high error rates in the conventional traceability systems depending on physical labels. Genetic traceability technique depending on DNA-based tracking system can overcome this problem. Genealogy information is essential for genetic traceability, and microsatellite DNA marker is a good choice for pedigree analysis. As increasing genotyping throughput of microsatellites, microsatellite multiplex PCR has become a fast and cost-effective technique. As a commercially important cultured aquatic species, Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas has the highest global production. The objective of this study was to develop microsatellite multiplex PCR panels with dye-labeled universal primer for pedigree analysis in C. gigas, and these multiplex PCRs were validated using 12 full-sib families with known pedigrees. Here we developed six informative multiplex PCRs using 18 genomic microsatellites in C. gigas. Each multiplex panel contained a single universal primer M13(-21) used as a tail on each locus-specific forward primer and a single universal primer M13(-21) labeled with fluorophores. The polymorphisms of the markers were moderate, with an average of 10.3 alleles per locus and average polymorphic information content of 0.740. The observed heterozygosity per locus ranged from 0.492 to 0.822. Cervus simulations revealed that the six panels would still be of great value when massive families were analysed. Pedigree analysis of real offspring demonstrated that 100% of the offspring were unambiguously allocated to their parents when two multiplex PCRs were used. The six sets of multiplex PCRs can be an important tool for tracing cultured individuals, population genetic analysis, and selective breeding program in C. gigas.

  18. Deep subsurface life from North Pond: Enrichment, isolation, characterization and genomes of heterotrophic bacteria

    DOE PAGES

    Russell, Joseph A.; Leon-Zayas, Rosa; Wrighton, Kelly; ...

    2016-05-10

    Studies of subsurface microorganisms have yielded few environmentally relevant isolates for laboratory studies. In order to address this lack of cultivated microorganisms, we initiated several enrichments on sediment and underlying basalt samples from North Pond, a sediment basin ringed by basalt outcrops underlying an oligotrophic watercolumn west of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 22° N. In contrast to anoxic enrichments, growth was observed in aerobic, heterotrophic enrichments from sediment of IODP Hole U1382B at 4 and 68 m below seafloor (mbsf). These sediment depths, respectively, correspond to the fringes of oxygen penetration from overlying seawater in the top of the sedimentmore » column and upward migration of oxygen from oxic seawater from the basalt aquifer below the sediment. Here we report the enrichment, isolation, initial characterization and genomes of three isolated aerobic heterotrophs from North Pond sediments; an Arthrobacter species from 4 mbsf, and Paracoccus and Pseudomonas species from 68 mbsf. These cultivated bacteria are represented in the amplicon 16S rRNA gene libraries created from whole sediments, albeit at low (up to 2%) relative abundance. We provide genomic evidence from our isolates demonstrating that the Arthrobacter and Pseudomonas isolates have the potential to respire nitrate and oxygen, though dissimilatory nitrate reduction could not be confirmed in laboratory cultures. Furthermore, the cultures from this study represent members of abundant phyla, as determined by amplicon sequencing of environmental DNA extracts, and allow for further studies into geochemical factors impacting life in the deep subsurface.« less

  19. Deep Subsurface Life from North Pond: Enrichment, Isolation, Characterization and Genomes of Heterotrophic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Joseph A.; León-Zayas, Rosa; Wrighton, Kelly; Biddle, Jennifer F.

    2016-01-01

    Studies of subsurface microorganisms have yielded few environmentally relevant isolates for laboratory studies. In order to address this lack of cultivated microorganisms, we initiated several enrichments on sediment and underlying basalt samples from North Pond, a sediment basin ringed by basalt outcrops underlying an oligotrophic water-column west of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 22°N. In contrast to anoxic enrichments, growth was observed in aerobic, heterotrophic enrichments from sediment of IODP Hole U1382B at 4 and 68 m below seafloor (mbsf). These sediment depths, respectively, correspond to the fringes of oxygen penetration from overlying seawater in the top of the sediment column and upward migration of oxygen from oxic seawater from the basalt aquifer below the sediment. Here we report the enrichment, isolation, initial characterization and genomes of three isolated aerobic heterotrophs from North Pond sediments; an Arthrobacter species from 4 mbsf, and Paracoccus and Pseudomonas species from 68 mbsf. These cultivated bacteria are represented in the amplicon 16S rRNA gene libraries created from whole sediments, albeit at low (up to 2%) relative abundance. We provide genomic evidence from our isolates demonstrating that the Arthrobacter and Pseudomonas isolates have the potential to respire nitrate and oxygen, though dissimilatory nitrate reduction could not be confirmed in laboratory cultures. The cultures from this study represent members of abundant phyla, as determined by amplicon sequencing of environmental DNA extracts, and allow for further studies into geochemical factors impacting life in the deep subsurface. PMID:27242705

  20. Genomic features of uncultured methylotrophs in activated-sludge microbiomes grown under different enrichment procedures

    PubMed Central

    Fujinawa, Kazuki; Asai, Yusuke; Miyahara, Morio; Kouzuma, Atsushi; Abe, Takashi; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2016-01-01

    Methylotrophs are organisms that are able to grow on C1 compounds as carbon and energy sources. They play important roles in the global carbon cycle and contribute largely to industrial wastewater treatment. To identify and characterize methylotrophs that are involved in methanol degradation in wastewater-treatment plants, methanol-fed activated-sludge (MAS) microbiomes were subjected to phylogenetic and metagenomic analyses, and genomic features of dominant methylotrophs in MAS were compared with those preferentially grown in laboratory enrichment cultures (LECs). These analyses consistently indicate that Hyphomicrobium plays important roles in MAS, while Methylophilus occurred predominantly in LECs. Comparative analyses of bin genomes reconstructed for the Hyphomicrobium and Methylophilus methylotrophs suggest that they have different C1-assimilation pathways. In addition, function-module analyses suggest that their cell-surface structures are different. Comparison of the MAS bin genome with genomes of closely related Hyphomicrobium isolates suggests that genes unnecessary in MAS (for instance, genes for anaerobic respiration) have been lost from the genome of the dominant methylotroph. We suggest that genomic features and coded functions in the MAS bin genome provide us with insights into how this methylotroph adapts to activated-sludge ecosystems. PMID:27221669

  1. Reconstructing rare soil microbial genomes using in situ enrichments and metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    Delmont, Tom O.; Eren, A. Murat; Maccario, Lorrie; Prestat, Emmanuel; Esen, Özcan C.; Pelletier, Eric; Le Paslier, Denis; Simonet, Pascal; Vogel, Timothy M.

    2015-01-01

    Despite extensive direct sequencing efforts and advanced analytical tools, reconstructing microbial genomes from soil using metagenomics have been challenging due to the tremendous diversity and relatively uniform distribution of genomes found in this system. Here we used enrichment techniques in an attempt to decrease the complexity of a soil microbiome prior to sequencing by submitting it to a range of physical and chemical stresses in 23 separate microcosms for 4 months. The metagenomic analysis of these microcosms at the end of the treatment yielded 540 Mb of assembly using standard de novo assembly techniques (a total of 559,555 genes and 29,176 functions), from which we could recover novel bacterial genomes, plasmids and phages. The recovered genomes belonged to Leifsonia (n = 2), Rhodanobacter (n = 5), Acidobacteria (n = 2), Sporolactobacillus (n = 2, novel nitrogen fixing taxon), Ktedonobacter (n = 1, second representative of the family Ktedonobacteraceae), Streptomyces (n = 3, novel polyketide synthase modules), and Burkholderia (n = 2, includes mega-plasmids conferring mercury resistance). Assembled genomes averaged to 5.9 Mb, with relative abundances ranging from rare (<0.0001%) to relatively abundant (>0.01%) in the original soil microbiome. Furthermore, we detected them in samples collected from geographically distant locations, particularly more in temperate soils compared to samples originating from high-latitude soils and deserts. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first successful attempt to assemble multiple bacterial genomes directly from a soil sample. Our findings demonstrate that developing pertinent enrichment conditions can stimulate environmental genomic discoveries that would have been impossible to achieve with canonical approaches that focus solely upon post-sequencing data treatment. PMID:25983722

  2. Microsatellite polymorphism among Chrysanthemum sp. polyploids: the influence of whole genome duplication

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haibin; Qi, Xiangyu; Gao, Ri; Wang, Jingjing; Dong, Bin; Jiang, Jiafu; Chen, Sumei; Guan, Zhiyong; Fang, Weimin; Liao, Yuan; Chen, Fadi

    2014-01-01

    Polyploidy is common among flowering plants, including the Asteraceae, a relatively recent angiosperm group. EST-SSRs were used to characterize polymorphism among 29 Chrysanthemum and Ajania spp. accessions of various ploidy levels. Most EST-SSR loci were readily transferable between the species, 29 accessions were separated into three groups in terms of the number of fragments. It inferred that the formation from tetraploid to hexaploid and from octoploid to decaploid may be a recent event, while from the diploid to the tetraploid may be an ancient one in the Chrysanthemum lineage. EST-SSR polymorphism was found and some transcripts containing an SSR were transcribed differently in the de novo autotetraploid C. nankingense and C. lavandulifolium than in their progenitor diploid. EST-SSR could provide a potential molecular basis of adaptation during evolution, while whole genome duplication has a major effect on the mutational dynamics of EST-SSR loci, which could also affect gene regulation. PMID:25339092

  3. A genome-wide study of allelic imbalance in human testicular germ cell tumors using microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Bergthorsson, Jon Thor; Agnarsson, Bjarni Agnar; Gudbjartsson, Tomas; Magnusson, Kjartan; Thoroddsen, Asgeir; Palsson, Birgir; Bjornsson, Johannes; Stefansson, Kari; Gulcher, Jeffrey; Einarsson, Gudmundur Vikar; Amundadottir, Laufey Thora; Barkardottir, Rosa Bjork

    2006-01-01

    Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT) arise by multistep carcinogenesis pathways involving selective losses and gains of chromosome material. To locate cancer genes underlying this selection, we performed a genome-wide study of allelic imbalance (AI) in 32 tumors, using 710 microsatellite markers. The highest prevalence of AI was found at 12p, in line with previous studies finding consistent gain of the region in TGCTs. High frequency of AI was also observed at chromosome arms 4p, 9q, 10p, 11q, 11p, 13q, 16q, 18p, and 22q. Within 39 candidate regions identified by mapping of smallest regions of overlap (SROs), the highest frequency of AI was at 12p11.21 approximately p11.22 (62%), 12p12.1 approximately p13.1 (53%), 12p13.1 approximately p13.2 (53%), 11q14.1 approximately q14.2 (53%), 11p13 approximately p14.3 (47%), 9q21.13 approximately q21.32 (47%), and 4p15.1 approximately p15.2 (44%). Two genes known to be involved in cancer reside in these regions, ETV6 at 12p13.2 (TEL oncogene) and WT1 at 11p13. We also found a significant association (P = 0.02) between AI at 10q21.1 approximately q22.2 and higher clinical stage. This study contributes to the ongoing search for genes involved in transformation of germ cells and provides a useful reference point to previous studies using cytogenetic techniques to map chromosome changes in TGCTs.

  4. Cell Context Dependent p53 Genome-Wide Binding Patterns and Enrichment at Repeats

    DOE PAGES

    Botcheva, Krassimira; McCorkle, Sean R.

    2014-11-21

    The p53 ability to elicit stress specific and cell type specific responses is well recognized, but how that specificity is established remains to be defined. Whether upon activation p53 binds to its genomic targets in a cell type and stress type dependent manner is still an open question. Here we show that the p53 binding to the human genome is selective and cell context-dependent. We mapped the genomic binding sites for the endogenous wild type p53 protein in the human cancer cell line HCT116 and compared them to those we previously determined in the normal cell line IMR90. We reportmore » distinct p53 genome-wide binding landscapes in two different cell lines, analyzed under the same treatment and experimental conditions, using the same ChIP-seq approach. This is evidence for cell context dependent p53 genomic binding. The observed differences affect the p53 binding sites distribution with respect to major genomic and epigenomic elements (promoter regions, CpG islands and repeats). We correlated the high-confidence p53 ChIP-seq peaks positions with the annotated human repeats (UCSC Human Genome Browser) and observed both common and cell line specific trends. In HCT116, the p53 binding was specifically enriched at LINE repeats, compared to IMR90 cells. The p53 genome-wide binding patterns in HCT116 and IMR90 likely reflect the different epigenetic landscapes in these two cell lines, resulting from cancer-associated changes (accumulated in HCT116) superimposed on tissue specific differences (HCT116 has epithelial, while IMR90 has mesenchymal origin). In conclusion, our data support the model for p53 binding to the human genome in a highly selective manner, mobilizing distinct sets of genes, contributing to distinct pathways.« less

  5. Cell Context Dependent p53 Genome-Wide Binding Patterns and Enrichment at Repeats

    SciTech Connect

    Botcheva, Krassimira; McCorkle, Sean R.

    2014-11-21

    The p53 ability to elicit stress specific and cell type specific responses is well recognized, but how that specificity is established remains to be defined. Whether upon activation p53 binds to its genomic targets in a cell type and stress type dependent manner is still an open question. Here we show that the p53 binding to the human genome is selective and cell context-dependent. We mapped the genomic binding sites for the endogenous wild type p53 protein in the human cancer cell line HCT116 and compared them to those we previously determined in the normal cell line IMR90. We report distinct p53 genome-wide binding landscapes in two different cell lines, analyzed under the same treatment and experimental conditions, using the same ChIP-seq approach. This is evidence for cell context dependent p53 genomic binding. The observed differences affect the p53 binding sites distribution with respect to major genomic and epigenomic elements (promoter regions, CpG islands and repeats). We correlated the high-confidence p53 ChIP-seq peaks positions with the annotated human repeats (UCSC Human Genome Browser) and observed both common and cell line specific trends. In HCT116, the p53 binding was specifically enriched at LINE repeats, compared to IMR90 cells. The p53 genome-wide binding patterns in HCT116 and IMR90 likely reflect the different epigenetic landscapes in these two cell lines, resulting from cancer-associated changes (accumulated in HCT116) superimposed on tissue specific differences (HCT116 has epithelial, while IMR90 has mesenchymal origin). In conclusion, our data support the model for p53 binding to the human genome in a highly selective manner, mobilizing distinct sets of genes, contributing to distinct pathways.

  6. Cell context dependent p53 genome-wide binding patterns and enrichment at repeats.

    PubMed

    Botcheva, Krassimira; McCorkle, Sean R

    2014-01-01

    The p53 ability to elicit stress specific and cell type specific responses is well recognized, but how that specificity is established remains to be defined. Whether upon activation p53 binds to its genomic targets in a cell type and stress type dependent manner is still an open question. Here we show that the p53 binding to the human genome is selective and cell context-dependent. We mapped the genomic binding sites for the endogenous wild type p53 protein in the human cancer cell line HCT116 and compared them to those we previously determined in the normal cell line IMR90. We report distinct p53 genome-wide binding landscapes in two different cell lines, analyzed under the same treatment and experimental conditions, using the same ChIP-seq approach. This is evidence for cell context dependent p53 genomic binding. The observed differences affect the p53 binding sites distribution with respect to major genomic and epigenomic elements (promoter regions, CpG islands and repeats). We correlated the high-confidence p53 ChIP-seq peaks positions with the annotated human repeats (UCSC Human Genome Browser) and observed both common and cell line specific trends. In HCT116, the p53 binding was specifically enriched at LINE repeats, compared to IMR90 cells. The p53 genome-wide binding patterns in HCT116 and IMR90 likely reflect the different epigenetic landscapes in these two cell lines, resulting from cancer-associated changes (accumulated in HCT116) superimposed on tissue specific differences (HCT116 has epithelial, while IMR90 has mesenchymal origin). Our data support the model for p53 binding to the human genome in a highly selective manner, mobilizing distinct sets of genes, contributing to distinct pathways.

  7. Cell Context Dependent p53 Genome-Wide Binding Patterns and Enrichment at Repeats

    PubMed Central

    Botcheva, Krassimira; McCorkle, Sean R.

    2014-01-01

    The p53 ability to elicit stress specific and cell type specific responses is well recognized, but how that specificity is established remains to be defined. Whether upon activation p53 binds to its genomic targets in a cell type and stress type dependent manner is still an open question. Here we show that the p53 binding to the human genome is selective and cell context-dependent. We mapped the genomic binding sites for the endogenous wild type p53 protein in the human cancer cell line HCT116 and compared them to those we previously determined in the normal cell line IMR90. We report distinct p53 genome-wide binding landscapes in two different cell lines, analyzed under the same treatment and experimental conditions, using the same ChIP-seq approach. This is evidence for cell context dependent p53 genomic binding. The observed differences affect the p53 binding sites distribution with respect to major genomic and epigenomic elements (promoter regions, CpG islands and repeats). We correlated the high-confidence p53 ChIP-seq peaks positions with the annotated human repeats (UCSC Human Genome Browser) and observed both common and cell line specific trends. In HCT116, the p53 binding was specifically enriched at LINE repeats, compared to IMR90 cells. The p53 genome-wide binding patterns in HCT116 and IMR90 likely reflect the different epigenetic landscapes in these two cell lines, resulting from cancer-associated changes (accumulated in HCT116) superimposed on tissue specific differences (HCT116 has epithelial, while IMR90 has mesenchymal origin). Our data support the model for p53 binding to the human genome in a highly selective manner, mobilizing distinct sets of genes, contributing to distinct pathways. PMID:25415302

  8. Polymorphic microsatellite markers in the brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus.

    PubMed

    Candeias, Rui; Casado-Amezúa, Pilar; Pearson, Gareth A; Serrão, Ester A; Teixeira, Sara

    2015-03-08

    Fucus vesiculosus is a brown seaweed dominant on temperate rocky shores of the northern hemisphere and, is typically distributed in the mid-upper intertidal zone. It is an external fertilizer that reproduces sexually, providing an excellent model to address conflicting theories related to mating systems and sexual selection. Microsatellite markers have been reported for several Fucus species, however the genomic libraries from where these markers have been isolated, have originated from two or more species pooled together (F. vesiculosus and F. serratus in one library; F. vesiculosus, F. serratus and Ascophyllum nodosum in a second library), or when the genomic DNA originated from only one species it was from Fucus spiralis. Although these markers cross-amplify F. vesiculosus individuals, the level of polymorphism has been low for relatedness studies. The microsatellite markers described here were obtained from an enriched genomic library, followed by 454 pyrosequencing. A total of 9 microsatellite markers were tested across 44 individuals from the North of Portugal. The mean number of alleles across loci was 8.7 and the gene diversity 0.67. The high variability displayed by these microsatellite loci should be useful for paternity analysis, assessing variance of reproductive success and in estimations of genetic variation within and between populations.

  9. Development of new genomic microsatellite markers from robusta coffee (Coffea canephora Pierre ex A. Froehner) showing broad cross-species transferability and utility in genetic studies

    PubMed Central

    Hendre, Prasad Suresh; Phanindranath, Regur; Annapurna, V; Lalremruata, Albert; Aggarwal, Ramesh K

    2008-01-01

    Background Species-specific microsatellite markers are desirable for genetic studies and to harness the potential of MAS-based breeding for genetic improvement. Limited availability of such markers for coffee, one of the most important beverage tree crops, warrants newer efforts to develop additional microsatellite markers that can be effectively deployed in genetic analysis and coffee improvement programs. The present study aimed to develop new coffee-specific SSR markers and validate their utility in analysis of genetic diversity, individualization, linkage mapping, and transferability for use in other related taxa. Results A small-insert partial genomic library of Coffea canephora, was probed for various SSR motifs following conventional approach of Southern hybridisation. Characterization of repeat positive clones revealed a very high abundance of DNRs (1/15 Kb) over TNRs (1/406 kb). The relative frequencies of different DNRs were found as AT >> AG > AC, whereas among TNRs, AGC was the most abundant repeat. The SSR positive sequences were used to design 58 primer pairs of which 44 pairs could be validated as single locus markers using a panel of arabica and robusta genotypes. The analysis revealed an average of 3.3 and 3.78 alleles and 0.49 and 0.62 PIC per marker for the tested arabicas and robustas, respectively. It also revealed a high cumulative PI over all the markers using both sib-based (10-6 and 10-12 for arabicas and robustas respectively) and unbiased corrected estimates (10-20 and 10-43 for arabicas and robustas respectively). The markers were tested for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, linkage dis-equilibrium, and were successfully used to ascertain generic diversity/affinities in the tested germplasm (cultivated as well as species). Nine markers could be mapped on robusta linkage map. Importantly, the markers showed ~92% transferability across related species/genera of coffee. Conclusion The conventional approach of genomic library was successfully

  10. Development of new genomic microsatellite markers from robusta coffee (Coffea canephora Pierre ex A. Froehner) showing broad cross-species transferability and utility in genetic studies.

    PubMed

    Hendre, Prasad Suresh; Phanindranath, Regur; Annapurna, V; Lalremruata, Albert; Aggarwal, Ramesh K

    2008-04-30

    Species-specific microsatellite markers are desirable for genetic studies and to harness the potential of MAS-based breeding for genetic improvement. Limited availability of such markers for coffee, one of the most important beverage tree crops, warrants newer efforts to develop additional microsatellite markers that can be effectively deployed in genetic analysis and coffee improvement programs. The present study aimed to develop new coffee-specific SSR markers and validate their utility in analysis of genetic diversity, individualization, linkage mapping, and transferability for use in other related taxa. A small-insert partial genomic library of Coffea canephora, was probed for various SSR motifs following conventional approach of Southern hybridisation. Characterization of repeat positive clones revealed a very high abundance of DNRs (1/15 Kb) over TNRs (1/406 kb). The relative frequencies of different DNRs were found as AT > AG > AC, whereas among TNRs, AGC was the most abundant repeat. The SSR positive sequences were used to design 58 primer pairs of which 44 pairs could be validated as single locus markers using a panel of arabica and robusta genotypes. The analysis revealed an average of 3.3 and 3.78 alleles and 0.49 and 0.62 PIC per marker for the tested arabicas and robustas, respectively. It also revealed a high cumulative PI over all the markers using both sib-based (10-6 and 10-12 for arabicas and robustas respectively) and unbiased corrected estimates (10-20 and 10-43 for arabicas and robustas respectively). The markers were tested for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, linkage dis-equilibrium, and were successfully used to ascertain generic diversity/affinities in the tested germplasm (cultivated as well as species). Nine markers could be mapped on robusta linkage map. Importantly, the markers showed ~92% transferability across related species/genera of coffee. The conventional approach of genomic library was successfully employed although with low

  11. Microsatellite analysis of malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Orjuela-Sánchez, Pamela; Brandi, Michelle C; Ferreira, Marcelo U

    2013-01-01

    Microsatellites have been increasingly used to investigate the population structure of malaria parasites, to map genetic loci contributing to phenotypes such as drug resistance and virulence in laboratory crosses and genome-wide association studies and to distinguish between treatment failures and new infections in clinical trials. Here, we provide optimized protocols for genotyping highly polymorphic microsatellites sampled from across the genomes of the human malaria parasites Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax that have been extensively used in research laboratories worldwide.

  12. Microsatellite loci from the endemic Southern Ocean octopus Adelieledone polymorpha (Robson, 1930).

    PubMed

    Strugnell, Jan M; Allcock, A Louise; Watts, Phillip C

    2009-05-01

    To determine the pattern of spatial genetic structure in the endemic Southern Ocean octopus Adelieledone polymorpha, microsatellite loci were isolated from partial genomic libraries enriched for repetitive DNA motifs. Seven dinucleotide and two trinucleotide microsatellite loci were isolated successfully and levels of polymorphism were quantified in 34 individuals sampled from the Southern Ocean near South Georgia. No pairs of microsatellite loci were linked significantly; however, one locus deviated (P < 0.05) from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Overall, the nine loci produced between five and 16 alleles, with observed and expected heterozygosities varying between 0.22 and 0.86 and between 0.21 and 0.94 respectively. This is the first description of microsatellite loci from an octopus endemic to the Southern Ocean, and these genetic markers are being used to quantify spatial structure within A. polymorpha.

  13. Genomes of Two New Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea Enriched from Deep Marine Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soo-Je; Ghai, Rohit; Martín-Cuadrado, Ana-Belén; Rodríguez-Valera, Francisco; Chung, Won-Hyong; Kwon, KaeKyoung; Lee, Jung-Hyun; Madsen, Eugene L.; Rhee, Sung-Keun

    2014-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) are ubiquitous and abundant and contribute significantly to the carbon and nitrogen cycles in the ocean. In this study, we assembled AOA draft genomes from two deep marine sediments from Donghae, South Korea, and Svalbard, Arctic region, by sequencing the enriched metagenomes. Three major microorganism clusters belonging to Thaumarchaeota, Epsilonproteobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria were deduced from their 16S rRNA genes, GC contents, and oligonucleotide frequencies. Three archaeal genomes were identified, two of which were distinct and were designated Ca. “Nitrosopumilus koreensis” AR1 and “Nitrosopumilus sediminis” AR2. AR1 and AR2 exhibited average nucleotide identities of 85.2% and 79.5% to N. maritimus, respectively. The AR1 and AR2 genomes contained genes pertaining to energy metabolism and carbon fixation as conserved in other AOA, but, conversely, had fewer heme-containing proteins and more copper-containing proteins than other AOA. Most of the distinctive AR1 and AR2 genes were located in genomic islands (GIs) that were not present in other AOA genomes or in a reference water-column metagenome from the Sargasso Sea. A putative gene cluster involved in urea utilization was found in the AR2 genome, but not the AR1 genome, suggesting niche specialization in marine AOA. Co-cultured bacterial genome analysis suggested that bacterial sulfur and nitrogen metabolism could be involved in interactions with AOA. Our results provide fundamental information concerning the metabolic potential of deep marine sedimentary AOA. PMID:24798206

  14. Whole genome sequencing of enriched chloroplast DNA using the Illumina GAII platform

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Complete chloroplast genome sequences provide a valuable source of molecular markers for studies in molecular ecology and evolution of plants. To obtain complete genome sequences, recent studies have made use of the polymerase chain reaction to amplify overlapping fragments from conserved gene loci. However, this approach is time consuming and can be more difficult to implement where gene organisation differs among plants. An alternative approach is to first isolate chloroplasts and then use the capacity of high-throughput sequencing to obtain complete genome sequences. We report our findings from studies of the latter approach, which used a simple chloroplast isolation procedure, multiply-primed rolling circle amplification of chloroplast DNA, Illumina Genome Analyzer II sequencing, and de novo assembly of paired-end sequence reads. Results A modified rapid chloroplast isolation protocol was used to obtain plant DNA that was enriched for chloroplast DNA, but nevertheless contained nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. Multiply-primed rolling circle amplification of this mixed template produced sufficient quantities of chloroplast DNA, even when the amount of starting material was small, and improved the template quality for Illumina Genome Analyzer II (hereafter Illumina GAII) sequencing. We demonstrate, using independent samples of karaka (Corynocarpus laevigatus), that there is high fidelity in the sequence obtained from this template. Although less than 20% of our sequenced reads could be mapped to chloroplast genome, it was relatively easy to assemble complete chloroplast genome sequences from the mixture of nuclear, mitochondrial and chloroplast reads. Conclusions We report successful whole genome sequencing of chloroplast DNA from karaka, obtained efficiently and with high fidelity. PMID:20920211

  15. Enrichment of Root Endophytic Bacteria from Populus deltoides and Single-Cell-Genomics Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Utturkar, Sagar M.; Cude, W. Nathan; Robeson, Michael S.; Yang, Zamin K.; Klingeman, Dawn M.; Land, Miriam L.; Allman, Steve L.; Lu, Tse-Yuan S.; Brown, Steven D.; Schadt, Christopher W.; Podar, Mircea; Doktycz, Mitchel J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial endophytes that colonize Populus trees contribute to nutrient acquisition, prime immunity responses, and directly or indirectly increase both above- and below-ground biomasses. Endophytes are embedded within plant material, so physical separation and isolation are difficult tasks. Application of culture-independent methods, such as metagenome or bacterial transcriptome sequencing, has been limited due to the predominance of DNA from the plant biomass. Here, we describe a modified differential and density gradient centrifugation-based protocol for the separation of endophytic bacteria from Populus roots. This protocol achieved substantial reduction in contaminating plant DNA, allowed enrichment of endophytic bacteria away from the plant material, and enabled single-cell genomics analysis. Four single-cell genomes were selected for whole-genome amplification based on their rarity in the microbiome (potentially uncultured taxa) as well as their inferred abilities to form associations with plants. Bioinformatics analyses, including assembly, contamination removal, and completeness estimation, were performed to obtain single-amplified genomes (SAGs) of organisms from the phyla Armatimonadetes, Verrucomicrobia, and Planctomycetes, which were unrepresented in our previous cultivation efforts. Comparative genomic analysis revealed unique characteristics of each SAG that could facilitate future cultivation efforts for these bacteria. IMPORTANCE Plant roots harbor a diverse collection of microbes that live within host tissues. To gain a comprehensive understanding of microbial adaptations to this endophytic lifestyle from strains that cannot be cultivated, it is necessary to separate bacterial cells from the predominance of plant tissue. This study provides a valuable approach for the separation and isolation of endophytic bacteria from plant root tissue. Isolated live bacteria provide material for microbiome sequencing, single-cell genomics, and analyses

  16. A microsatellite linkage map for the cultivated strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) suggests extensive regions of homozygosity in the genome that may have resulted from breeding and selection.

    PubMed

    Sargent, D J; Passey, T; Surbanovski, N; Lopez Girona, E; Kuchta, P; Davik, J; Harrison, R; Passey, A; Whitehouse, A B; Simpson, D W

    2012-05-01

    The linkage maps of the cultivated strawberry, Fragaria × ananassa (2n = 8x = 56) that have been reported to date have been developed predominantly from AFLPs, along with supplementation with transferrable microsatellite (SSR) markers. For the investigation of the inheritance of morphological characters in the cultivated strawberry and for the development of tools for marker-assisted breeding and selection, it is desirable to populate maps of the genome with an abundance of transferrable molecular markers such as microsatellites (SSRs) and gene-specific markers. Exploiting the recent release of the genome sequence of the diploid F. vesca, and the publication of an extensive number of polymorphic SSR markers for the genus Fragaria, we have extended the linkage map of the 'Redgauntlet' × 'Hapil' (RG × H) mapping population to include a further 330 loci, generated from 160 primer pairs, to create a linkage map for F. × ananassa containing 549 loci, 490 of which are transferrable SSR or gene-specific markers. The map covers 2140.3 cM in the expected 28 linkage groups for an integrated map (where one group is composed of two separate male and female maps), which represents an estimated 91% of the cultivated strawberry genome. Despite the relative saturation of the linkage map on the majority of linkage groups, regions of apparent extensive homozygosity were identified in the genomes of 'Redgauntlet' and 'Hapil' which may be indicative of allele fixation during the breeding and selection of modern F. × ananassa cultivars. The genomes of the octoploid and diploid Fragaria are largely collinear, but through comparison of mapped markers on the RG × H linkage map to their positions on the genome sequence of F. vesca, a number of inversions were identified that may have occurred before the polyploidisation event that led to the evolution of the modern octoploid strawberry species.

  17. The Complete Chloroplast Genome of 17 Individuals of Pest Species Jacobaea vulgaris: SNPs, Microsatellites and Barcoding Markers for Population and Phylogenetic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Doorduin, Leonie; Gravendeel, Barbara; Lammers, Youri; Ariyurek, Yavuz; Chin-A-Woeng, Thomas; Vrieling, Klaas

    2011-01-01

    Invasive individuals from the pest species Jacobaea vulgaris show different allocation patterns in defence and growth compared with native individuals. To examine if these changes are caused by fast evolution, it is necessary to identify native source populations and compare these with invasive populations. For this purpose, we are in need of intraspecific polymorphic markers. We therefore sequenced the complete chloroplast genomes of 12 native and 5 invasive individuals of J. vulgaris with next generation sequencing and discovered single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and microsatellites. This is the first study in which the chloroplast genome of that many individuals within a single species was sequenced. Thirty-two SNPs and 34 microsatellite regions were found. For none of the individuals, differences were found between the inverted repeats. Furthermore, being the first chloroplast genome sequenced in the Senecioneae clade, we compared it with four other members of the Asteraceae family to identify new regions for phylogentic inference within this clade and also within the Asteraceae family. Five markers (ndhC-trnV, ndhC-atpE, rps18-rpl20, clpP and psbM-trnD) contained parsimony-informative characters higher than 2%. Finally, we compared two procedures of preparing chloroplast DNA for next generation sequencing. PMID:21444340

  18. Enriching Genomic Resources and Marker Development from Transcript Sequences of Jatropha curcas for Microgravity Studies

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Wenlan; Paudel, Dev

    2017-01-01

    Jatropha (Jatropha curcas L.) is an economically important species with a great potential for biodiesel production. To enrich the jatropha genomic databases and resources for microgravity studies, we sequenced and annotated the transcriptome of jatropha and developed SSR and SNP markers from the transcriptome sequences. In total 1,714,433 raw reads with an average length of 441.2 nucleotides were generated. De novo assembling and clustering resulted in 115,611 uniquely assembled sequences (UASs) including 21,418 full-length cDNAs and 23,264 new jatropha transcript sequences. The whole set of UASs were fully annotated, out of which 59,903 (51.81%) were assigned with gene ontology (GO) term, 12,584 (10.88%) had orthologs in Eukaryotic Orthologous Groups (KOG), and 8,822 (7.63%) were mapped to 317 pathways in six different categories in Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genome (KEGG) database, and it contained 3,588 putative transcription factors. From the UASs, 9,798 SSRs were discovered with AG/CT as the most frequent (45.8%) SSR motif type. Further 38,693 SNPs were detected and 7,584 remained after filtering. This UAS set has enriched the current jatropha genomic databases and provided a large number of genetic markers, which can facilitate jatropha genetic improvement and many other genetic and biological studies. PMID:28154822

  19. Enrichment of Root Endophytic Bacteria from Populus deltoides and Single-Cell-Genomics Analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Utturkar, Sagar M.; Cude, W. Nathan; Robeson, Jr., Michael S.; ...

    2016-07-15

    Bacterial endophytes that colonize Populus trees contribute to nutrient acquisition, prime immunity responses, and directly or indirectly increase both above- and below-ground biomasses. Endophytes are embedded within plant material, so physical separation and isolation are difficult tasks. Application of culture-independent methods, such as metagenome or bacterial transcriptome sequencing, has been limited due to the predominance of DNA from the plant biomass. In this paper, we present a modified differential and density gradient centrifugation-based protocol for the separation of endophytic bacteria from Populus roots. This protocol achieved substantial reduction in contaminating plant DNA, allowed enrichment of endophytic bacteria away from themore » plant material, and enabled single-cell genomics analysis. Four single-cell genomes were selected for whole-genome amplification based on their rarity in the microbiome (potentially uncultured taxa) as well as their inferred abilities to form associations with plants. Bioinformatics analyses, including assembly, contamination removal, and completeness estimation, were performed to obtain single-amplified genomes (SAGs) of organisms from the phyla Armatimonadetes, Verrucomicrobia, and Planctomycetes, which were unrepresented in our previous cultivation efforts. Finally, comparative genomic analysis revealed unique characteristics of each SAG that could facilitate future cultivation efforts for these bacteria.« less

  20. Enrichment of Root Endophytic Bacteria from Populus deltoides and Single-Cell-Genomics Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Utturkar, Sagar M.; Cude, W. Nathan; Robeson, Jr., Michael S.; Yang, Zamin Koo; Klingeman, Dawn Marie; Land, Miriam L.; Allman, Steve L.; Lu, Tse-Yuan S.; Brown, Steven D.; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Podar, Mircea; Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Pelletier, Dale A.

    2016-07-15

    Bacterial endophytes that colonize Populus trees contribute to nutrient acquisition, prime immunity responses, and directly or indirectly increase both above- and below-ground biomasses. Endophytes are embedded within plant material, so physical separation and isolation are difficult tasks. Application of culture-independent methods, such as metagenome or bacterial transcriptome sequencing, has been limited due to the predominance of DNA from the plant biomass. In this paper, we present a modified differential and density gradient centrifugation-based protocol for the separation of endophytic bacteria from Populus roots. This protocol achieved substantial reduction in contaminating plant DNA, allowed enrichment of endophytic bacteria away from the plant material, and enabled single-cell genomics analysis. Four single-cell genomes were selected for whole-genome amplification based on their rarity in the microbiome (potentially uncultured taxa) as well as their inferred abilities to form associations with plants. Bioinformatics analyses, including assembly, contamination removal, and completeness estimation, were performed to obtain single-amplified genomes (SAGs) of organisms from the phyla Armatimonadetes, Verrucomicrobia, and Planctomycetes, which were unrepresented in our previous cultivation efforts. Finally, comparative genomic analysis revealed unique characteristics of each SAG that could facilitate future cultivation efforts for these bacteria.

  1. Deep subsurface life from North Pond: Enrichment, isolation, characterization and genomes of heterotrophic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Joseph A.; Leon-Zayas, Rosa; Wrighton, Kelly; Biddle, Jennifer F.

    2016-05-10

    Studies of subsurface microorganisms have yielded few environmentally relevant isolates for laboratory studies. In order to address this lack of cultivated microorganisms, we initiated several enrichments on sediment and underlying basalt samples from North Pond, a sediment basin ringed by basalt outcrops underlying an oligotrophic watercolumn west of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 22° N. In contrast to anoxic enrichments, growth was observed in aerobic, heterotrophic enrichments from sediment of IODP Hole U1382B at 4 and 68 m below seafloor (mbsf). These sediment depths, respectively, correspond to the fringes of oxygen penetration from overlying seawater in the top of the sediment column and upward migration of oxygen from oxic seawater from the basalt aquifer below the sediment. Here we report the enrichment, isolation, initial characterization and genomes of three isolated aerobic heterotrophs from North Pond sediments; an Arthrobacter species from 4 mbsf, and Paracoccus and Pseudomonas species from 68 mbsf. These cultivated bacteria are represented in the amplicon 16S rRNA gene libraries created from whole sediments, albeit at low (up to 2%) relative abundance. We provide genomic evidence from our isolates demonstrating that the Arthrobacter and Pseudomonas isolates have the potential to respire nitrate and oxygen, though dissimilatory nitrate reduction could not be confirmed in laboratory cultures. Furthermore, the cultures from this study represent members of abundant phyla, as determined by amplicon sequencing of environmental DNA extracts, and allow for further studies into geochemical factors impacting life in the deep subsurface.

  2. Whole-Genome Enrichment Provides Deep Insights into Vibrio cholerae Metagenome from an African River.

    PubMed

    Vezzulli, L; Grande, C; Tassistro, G; Brettar, I; Höfle, M G; Pereira, R P A; Mushi, D; Pallavicini, A; Vassallo, P; Pruzzo, C

    2017-04-01

    The detection and typing of Vibrio cholerae in natural aquatic environments encounter major methodological challenges related to the fact that the bacterium is often present in environmental matrices at very low abundance in nonculturable state. This study applied, for the first time to our knowledge, a whole-genome enrichment (WGE) and next-generation sequencing (NGS) approach for direct genotyping and metagenomic analysis of low abundant V. cholerae DNA (<50 genome unit/L) from natural water collected in the Morogoro river (Tanzania). The protocol is based on the use of biotinylated RNA baits for target enrichment of V. cholerae metagenomic DNA via hybridization. An enriched V. cholerae metagenome library was generated and sequenced on an Illumina MiSeq platform. Up to 1.8 × 10(7) bp (4.5× mean read depth) were found to map against V. cholerae reference genome sequences representing an increase of about 2500 times in target DNA coverage compared to theoretical calculations of performance for shotgun metagenomics. Analysis of metagenomic data revealed the presence of several V. cholerae virulence and virulence associated genes in river water including major virulence regions (e.g. CTX prophage and Vibrio pathogenicity island-1) and genetic markers of epidemic strains (e.g. O1-antigen biosynthesis gene cluster) that were not detectable by standard culture and molecular techniques. Overall, besides providing a powerful tool for direct genotyping of V. cholerae in complex environmental matrices, this study provides a 'proof of concept' on the methodological gap that might currently preclude a more comprehensive understanding of toxigenic V. cholerae emergence from natural aquatic environments.

  3. Detection of molecular signatures of selection at microsatellite loci in the South African abalone (Haliotis midae) using a population genomic approach.

    PubMed

    Rhode, Clint; Vervalle, Jessica; Bester-van der Merwe, Aletta E; Roodt-Wilding, Rouvay

    2013-06-01

    Identifying genomic regions that may be under selection is important for elucidating the genetic architecture of complex phenotypes underlying adaptation to heterogeneous environments. A population genomic approach, using a classical neutrality test and various Fst-outlier detection methods was employed to evaluate genome-wide polymorphism data in order to identify loci that may be candidates for selection amongst six populations (three cultured and three wild) of the South African abalone, Haliotis midae. Approximately 9% of the genome-wide microsatellite markers were putatively subject to directional selection, whilst 6-18% of the genome is thought to be influenced by balancing selection. Genetic diversity estimates for candidate loci under directional selection was significantly reduced in comparison to candidate neutral loci, whilst candidate balancing selection loci demonstrated significantly higher levels of genetic diversity (Kruskal-Wallis test, P<0.05). Pairwise Fst estimates based on candidate directional selection loci also demonstrated increased levels of differentiation between study populations. Various candidate loci under selection showed significant inter-chromosomal linkage disequilibrium, suggesting possible gene-networks underling adaptive phenotypes. Furthermore, several loci had significant hits to known genes when performing BLAST searches to NCBI's non-redundant databases, whilst others are known to be derived from expressed sequences even though homology to a known gene could not be established. A number of loci also demonstrated relatively high similarity to transposable elements. The association of these loci to functional and genomically active sequences could in part explain the observed signatures of selection.

  4. Development and validation of polymorphic microsatellite loci for the NA2 lineage of Phytophthora ramorum from whole genome sequence data

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Phytophthora ramorum is the causal agent of sudden oak death and sudden larch death, and is also responsible for causing ramorum blight on woody ornamental plants. Many microsatellite markers are available to characterize the genetic diversity and population structure of P. ramorum. However, only tw...

  5. Gowinda: unbiased analysis of gene set enrichment for genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Kofler, Robert; Schlötterer, Christian

    2012-08-01

    An analysis of gene set [e.g. Gene Ontology (GO)] enrichment assumes that all genes are sampled independently from each other with the same probability. These assumptions are violated in genome-wide association (GWA) studies since (i) longer genes typically have more single-nucleotide polymorphisms resulting in a higher probability of being sampled and (ii) overlapping genes are sampled in clusters. Herein, we introduce Gowinda, a software specifically designed to test for enrichment of gene sets in GWA studies. We show that GO tests on GWA data could result in a substantial number of false-positive GO terms. Permutation tests implemented in Gowinda eliminate these biases, but maintain sufficient power to detect enrichment of GO terms. Since sufficient resolution for large datasets requires millions of permutations, we use multi-threading to keep computation times reasonable. Gowinda is implemented in Java (v1.6) and freely available on http://code.google.com/p/gowinda/ christian.schloetterer@vetmeduni.ac.at Manual: http://code.google.com/p/gowinda/wiki/Manual. Test data and tutorial: http://code.google.com/p/gowinda/wiki/Tutorial. http://code.google.com/p/gowinda/wiki/VALIDATION.

  6. Microsatellite markers for Dayaoshania cotinifolia (Gesneriaceae), a critically endangered perennial herb.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bing; Wang, Hong-Wei; Cheng, Yue-Qin; Ye, Yong-Zhong; Wang, Zhao-Shan

    2011-09-01

    Microsatellite primers were developed for the critically endangered species Dayaoshania cotinifolia (Gesneriaceae) to evaluate population genetic diversity and detect population history. • In our study, 15 primer sets were developed using an enriched genomic library. These are the first microsatellite loci developed for this genus. Genetic diversity was measured using 40 individuals. The number of alleles per locus ranged from one to six, and the incidence of observed heterozygosities was 0.365 and 0.410 in two populations. • The described markers will be useful in future population genetics studies of this critically endangered species.

  7. Outlier analysis of functional genomic profiles enriches for oncology targets and enables precision medicine.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhou; Ihle, Nathan T; Rejto, Paul A; Zarrinkar, Patrick P

    2016-06-13

    Genome-scale functional genomic screens across large cell line panels provide a rich resource for discovering tumor vulnerabilities that can lead to the next generation of targeted therapies. Their data analysis typically has focused on identifying genes whose knockdown enhances response in various pre-defined genetic contexts, which are limited by biological complexities as well as the incompleteness of our knowledge. We thus introduce a complementary data mining strategy to identify genes with exceptional sensitivity in subsets, or outlier groups, of cell lines, allowing an unbiased analysis without any a priori assumption about the underlying biology of dependency. Genes with outlier features are strongly and specifically enriched with those known to be associated with cancer and relevant biological processes, despite no a priori knowledge being used to drive the analysis. Identification of exceptional responders (outliers) may not lead only to new candidates for therapeutic intervention, but also tumor indications and response biomarkers for companion precision medicine strategies. Several tumor suppressors have an outlier sensitivity pattern, supporting and generalizing the notion that tumor suppressors can play context-dependent oncogenic roles. The novel application of outlier analysis described here demonstrates a systematic and data-driven analytical strategy to decipher large-scale functional genomic data for oncology target and precision medicine discoveries.

  8. A novel ammonia-oxidizing archaeon from wastewater treatment plant: Its enrichment, physiological and genomic characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuyang; Ding, Kun; Wen, Xianghua; Zhang, Bing; Shen, Bo; Yang, Yunfeng

    2016-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) are recently found to participate in the ammonia removal processes in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), similar to their bacterial counterparts. However, due to lack of cultivated AOA strains from WWTPs, their functions and contributions in these systems remain unclear. Here we report a novel AOA strain SAT1 enriched from activated sludge, with its physiological and genomic characteristics investigated. The maximal 16S rRNA gene similarity between SAT1 and other reported AOA strain is 96% (with “Ca. Nitrosotenuis chungbukensis”), and it is affiliated with Wastewater Cluster B (WWC-B) based on amoA gene phylogeny, a cluster within group I.1a and specific for activated sludge. Our strain is autotrophic, mesophilic (25 °C–33 °C) and neutrophilic (pH 5.0–7.0). Its genome size is 1.62 Mb, with a large fragment inversion (accounted for 68% genomic size) inside. The strain could not utilize urea due to truncation of the urea transporter gene. The lack of the pathways to synthesize usual compatible solutes makes it intolerant to high salinity (>0.03%), but could adapt to low salinity (0.005%) environments. This adaptation, together with possibly enhanced cell-biofilm attachment ability, makes it suitable for WWTPs environment. We propose the name “Candidatus Nitrosotenuis cloacae” for the strain SAT1. PMID:27030530

  9. A novel ammonia-oxidizing archaeon from wastewater treatment plant: Its enrichment, physiological and genomic characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuyang; Ding, Kun; Wen, Xianghua; Zhang, Bing; Shen, Bo; Yang, Yunfeng

    2016-03-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) are recently found to participate in the ammonia removal processes in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), similar to their bacterial counterparts. However, due to lack of cultivated AOA strains from WWTPs, their functions and contributions in these systems remain unclear. Here we report a novel AOA strain SAT1 enriched from activated sludge, with its physiological and genomic characteristics investigated. The maximal 16S rRNA gene similarity between SAT1 and other reported AOA strain is 96% (with “Ca. Nitrosotenuis chungbukensis”), and it is affiliated with Wastewater Cluster B (WWC-B) based on amoA gene phylogeny, a cluster within group I.1a and specific for activated sludge. Our strain is autotrophic, mesophilic (25 °C–33 °C) and neutrophilic (pH 5.0–7.0). Its genome size is 1.62 Mb, with a large fragment inversion (accounted for 68% genomic size) inside. The strain could not utilize urea due to truncation of the urea transporter gene. The lack of the pathways to synthesize usual compatible solutes makes it intolerant to high salinity (>0.03%), but could adapt to low salinity (0.005%) environments. This adaptation, together with possibly enhanced cell-biofilm attachment ability, makes it suitable for WWTPs environment. We propose the name “Candidatus Nitrosotenuis cloacae” for the strain SAT1.

  10. Universal Human Papillomavirus Typing Assay: Whole-Genome Sequencing following Target Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tengguo; Unger, Elizabeth R.; Batra, Dhwani; Sheth, Mili; Steinau, Martin; Jasinski, Jean; Jones, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We designed a universal human papillomavirus (HPV) typing assay based on target enrichment and whole-genome sequencing (eWGS). The RNA bait included 23,941 probes targeting 191 HPV types and 12 probes targeting beta-globin as a control. We used the Agilent SureSelect XT2 protocol for library preparation, Illumina HiSeq 2500 for sequencing, and CLC Genomics Workbench for sequence analysis. Mapping stringency for type assignment was determined based on 8 (6 HPV-positive and 2 HPV-negative) control samples. Using the optimal mapping conditions, types were assigned to 24 blinded samples. eWGS results were 100% concordant with Linear Array (LA) genotyping results for 9 plasmid samples and fully or partially concordant for 9 of the 15 cervical-vaginal samples, with 95.83% overall type-specific concordance for LA genotyping. eWGS identified 7 HPV types not included in the LA genotyping. Since this method does not involve degenerate primers targeting HPV genomic regions, PCR bias in genotype detection is minimized. With further refinements aimed at reducing cost and increasing throughput, this first application of eWGS for universal HPV typing could be a useful method to elucidate HPV epidemiology. PMID:27974548

  11. Effect of microsatellite selection on individual and population genetic inferences: an empirical study using cross-specific and species-specific amplifications.

    PubMed

    Queirós, J; Godinho, R; Lopes, S; Gortazar, C; de la Fuente, J; Alves, P C

    2015-07-01

    Although whole-genome sequencing is becoming more accessible and feasible for nonmodel organisms, microsatellites have remained the markers of choice for various population and conservation genetic studies. However, the criteria for choosing microsatellites are still controversial due to ascertainment bias that may be introduced into the genetic inference. An empirical study of red deer (Cervus elaphus) populations, in which cross-specific and species-specific microsatellites developed through pyrosequencing of enriched libraries, was performed for this study. Two different strategies were used to select the species-specific panels: randomly vs. highly polymorphic markers. The results suggest that reliable and accurate estimations of genetic diversity can be obtained using random microsatellites distributed throughout the genome. In addition, the results reinforce previous evidence that selecting the most polymorphic markers leads to an ascertainment bias in estimates of genetic diversity, when compared with randomly selected microsatellites. Analyses of population differentiation and clustering seem less influenced by the approach of microsatellite selection, whereas assigning individuals to populations might be affected by a random selection of a small number of microsatellites. Individual multilocus heterozygosity measures produced various discordant results, which in turn had impacts on the heterozygosity-fitness correlation test. Finally, we argue that picking the appropriate microsatellite set should primarily take into account the ecological and evolutionary questions studied. Selecting the most polymorphic markers will generally overestimate genetic diversity parameters, leading to misinterpretations of the real genetic diversity, which is particularly important in managed and threatened populations.

  12. The chromosomal distribution of microsatellite repeats in the genome of the wolf fish Hoplias malabaricus, focusing on the sex chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Cioffi, M B; Kejnovsky, E; Bertollo, L A C

    2011-01-01

    Distribution of 12 mono-, di- and tri-nucleotide microsatellites on the chromosomes of 2 karyomorphs with 2 distinct sex chromosome systems (a simple XX/XY - karyomorph B and a multiple X(1)X(1)X(2)X(2)/X(1)X(2)Y - karyomorph D) in Hoplias malabaricus, commonly referred to as wolf fish, was studied using their physical mapping with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The distribution patterns of different microsatellites along the chromosomes varied considerably. Strong hybridization signals were observed at subtelomeric and heterochromatic regions of several autosomes, with a different accumulation on the sex chromosomes. A massive accumulation was found in the heterochromatic region of the X chromosome of karyomorph B, whereas microsatellites were gathered at centromeres of both X chromosomes as well as in corresponding regions of the neo-Y chromosome in karyomorph D. Our findings are likely in agreement with models that predict the accumulation of repetitive DNA sequences in regions with very low recombination. This process is however in contrast with what was observed in multiple systems, where such a reduction might be facilitated by the chromosomal rearrangements that are directly associated with the origin of these systems.

  13. Rarity of microsatellite genomic instability in B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas in hepatitis C virus-infected patients.

    PubMed

    De Vita, S; Gasparotto, D; Pivetta, B; Vukosavljevic, T; Zagonel, V; Carbone, A; Boiocchi, M

    1997-05-01

    Several groups have emphasized the likely implication of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) in a fraction of B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. Since only a minority of patients with HCV infection and monoclonal mixed cryoglobulinaemia develop overt lymphoma, the identification of predisposing factors has relevant clinical implications. The replication error phenotype (RER+), as revealed by widespread microsatellite instability, is caused by defects in DNA mismatch repair genes, and has been frequently disclosed in subsets of B-cell lymphomas with underlying infection and chronic inflammation. We therefore investigated the occurrence of the RER+ phenotype in a series of eight consecutive B-cell NHLs in patients with chronic infection by HCV. A polymerase chain reaction-based assay was used to analyse an extended panel of 15 microsatellite loci. Microsatellite instability was not observed in six tumour samples in any locus; the two remaining cases showed instability at only one locus. Therefore genetic instability by defects in DNA mismatch repair genes should not represent the general mechanism predisposing to overt lymphoma in HCV-infected patients. Although a clearer definition of HCV-related B-cell disorders should better address future studies on genetic instability in larger series, we recommend additional oncogenetic pathways as the target of further research.

  14. Polymorphic microsatellite markers in Anthoxanthum (Poaceae) and cross-amplification in the Eurasian complex of the genus1

    PubMed Central

    Lema-Suárez, Irene; Sahuquillo, Elvira; Marí-Mena, Neus; Pimentel, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Nonplastid microsatellite primers were developed for the first time in the Euro-Siberian complex of Anthoxanthum (Poaceae), a genus of temperate grasses in which reticulate evolution is common. Methods and Results: A microsatellite-enriched genomic DNA library allowed the detection of 500 fragments containing a microsatellite motif. Fifteen primer pairs were selected for an extended primer test. A preliminary analysis was conducted on the Eurasian diploid lineages of Anthoxanthum, with special emphasis on three populations of the Mediterranean A. aristatum–A. ovatum complex. Thirteen out of 15 markers tested were polymorphic in the complex, with successful cross-amplification in A. odoratum (93% polymorphic loci), A. amarum (73% polymorphic), A. alpinum (73% polymorphic), and A. maderense (60% polymorphic). Conclusions: These microsatellite markers will enable the analysis of evolution and phylogeography in diploid and polyploid lineages of this important genus. PMID:27785386

  15. Development of microsatellites from Fothergilla ×intermedia (Hamamelidaceae) and cross transfer to four other genera within Hamamelidaceae1

    PubMed Central

    Hatmaker, E. Anne; Wadl, Phillip A.; Mantooth, Kristie; Scheffler, Brian E.; Ownley, Bonnie H.; Trigiano, Robert N.

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: We developed microsatellites from Fothergilla ×intermedia to establish loci capable of distinguishing species and cultivars, and to assess genetic diversity for use by ornamental breeders and to transfer within Hamamelidaceae. Methods and Results: We sequenced a small insert genomic library enriched for microsatellites to develop 12 polymorphic microsatellite loci. The number of alleles detected ranged from four to 15 across five genera within Hamamelidaceae. Shannon’s information index ranged from 0.07 to 0.14. Conclusions: These microsatellite loci provide a set of markers to evaluate genetic diversity of natural and cultivated collections and assist ornamental plant breeders for genetic studies of five popular genera of woody ornamental plants. PMID:25909044

  16. Genome-wide enrichment analysis between endometriosis and obesity-related traits reveals novel susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Rahmioglu, Nilufer; Macgregor, Stuart; Drong, Alexander W.; Hedman, Åsa K.; Harris, Holly R.; Randall, Joshua C.; Prokopenko, Inga; Nyholt, Dale R.; Morris, Andrew P.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Missmer, Stacey A.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Zondervan, Krina T.

    2015-01-01

    Endometriosis is a chronic inflammatory condition in women that results in pelvic pain and subfertility, and has been associated with decreased body mass index (BMI). Genetic variants contributing to the heritable component have started to emerge from genome-wide association studies (GWAS), although the majority remain unknown. Unexpectedly, we observed an intergenic locus on 7p15.2 that was genome-wide significantly associated with both endometriosis and fat distribution (waist-to-hip ratio adjusted for BMI; WHRadjBMI) in an independent meta-GWAS of European ancestry individuals. This led us to investigate the potential overlap in genetic variants underlying the aetiology of endometriosis, WHRadjBMI and BMI using GWAS data. Our analyses demonstrated significant enrichment of common variants between fat distribution and endometriosis (P = 3.7 × 10−3), which was stronger when we restricted the investigation to more severe (Stage B) cases (P = 4.5 × 10−4). However, no genetic enrichment was observed between endometriosis and BMI (P = 0.79). In addition to 7p15.2, we identify four more variants with statistically significant evidence of involvement in both endometriosis and WHRadjBMI (in/near KIFAP3, CAB39L, WNT4, GRB14); two of these, KIFAP3 and CAB39L, are novel associations for both traits. KIFAP3, WNT4 and 7p15.2 are associated with the WNT signalling pathway; formal pathway analysis confirmed a statistically significant (P = 6.41 × 10−4) overrepresentation of shared associations in developmental processes/WNT signalling between the two traits. Our results demonstrate an example of potential biological pleiotropy that was hitherto unknown, and represent an opportunity for functional follow-up of loci and further cross-phenotype comparisons to assess how fat distribution and endometriosis pathogenesis research fields can inform each other. PMID:25296917

  17. Core and region-enriched networks of behaviorally regulated genes and the singing genome

    PubMed Central

    Whitney, Osceola; Pfenning, Andreas R.; Howard, Jason T.; Blatti, Charles A; Liu, Fang; Ward, James M.; Wang, Rui; Audet, Jean-Nicolas; Kellis, Manolis; Mukherjee, Sayan; Sinha, Saurabh; Hartemink, Alexander J.; West, Anne E.; Jarvis, Erich D.

    2015-01-01

    Songbirds represent an important model organism for elucidating molecular mechanisms that link genes with complex behaviors, in part because they have discrete vocal learning circuits that have parallels with those that mediate human speech. We found that ~10% of the genes in the avian genome were regulated by singing, and we found a striking regional diversity of both basal and singing-induced programs in the four key song nuclei of the zebra finch, a vocal learning songbird. The region-enriched patterns were a result of distinct combinations of region-enriched transcription factors (TFs), their binding motifs, and presinging acetylation of histone 3 at lysine 27 (H3K27ac) enhancer activity in the regulatory regions of the associated genes. RNA interference manipulations validated the role of the calcium-response transcription factor (CaRF) in regulating genes preferentially expressed in specific song nuclei in response to singing. Thus, differential combinatorial binding of a small group of activity-regulated TFs and predefined epigenetic enhancer activity influences the anatomical diversity of behaviorally regulated gene networks. PMID:25504732

  18. Genome Survey Sequencing of Luffa Cylindrica L. and Microsatellite High Resolution Melting (SSR-HRM) Analysis for Genetic Relationship of Luffa Genotypes.

    PubMed

    An, Jianyu; Yin, Mengqi; Zhang, Qin; Gong, Dongting; Jia, Xiaowen; Guan, Yajing; Hu, Jin

    2017-09-11

    Luffa cylindrica (L.) Roem. is an economically important vegetable crop in China. However, the genomic information on this species is currently unknown. In this study, for the first time, a genome survey of L. cylindrica was carried out using next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology. In total, 43.40 Gb sequence data of L. cylindrica, about 54.94× coverage of the estimated genome size of 789.97 Mb, were obtained from HiSeq 2500 sequencing, in which the guanine plus cytosine (GC) content was calculated to be 37.90%. The heterozygosity of genome sequences was only 0.24%. In total, 1,913,731 contigs (>200 bp) with 525 bp N50 length and 1,410,117 scaffolds (>200 bp) with 885.01 Mb total length were obtained. From the initial assembled L. cylindrica genome, 431,234 microsatellites (SSRs) (≥5 repeats) were identified. The motif types of SSR repeats included 62.88% di-nucleotide, 31.03% tri-nucleotide, 4.59% tetra-nucleotide, 0.96% penta-nucleotide and 0.54% hexa-nucleotide. Eighty genomic SSR markers were developed, and 51/80 primers could be used in both "Zheda 23" and "Zheda 83". Nineteen SSRs were used to investigate the genetic diversity among 32 accessions through SSR-HRM analysis. The unweighted pair group method analysis (UPGMA) dendrogram tree was built by calculating the SSR-HRM raw data. SSR-HRM could be effectively used for genotype relationship analysis of Luffa species.

  19. Nineteen polymorphic microsatellite markers developed for Trachinotus ovatus.

    PubMed

    Xie, Z Z; Huang, M W; Xu, W; Peng, C; He, J N; Meng, Z N; Zhang, Y; Li, S S; Lin, H R

    2014-12-12

    To evaluate the population genetic diversity of the ovate pompano, we isolated and characterized 19 microsatellite markers using a (CA)13-enriched genomic library. Polymorphism was assessed in 30 individuals from a single population collected from the Daya Bay Aquaculture Center, Guangdong, China. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 2 to 18 with an average of 7.8. The observed and expected heterozygosities varied from 0.2667 to 1.000 and from 0.3960 to 0.9435, respectively. Sixteen of 19 loci conformed to Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, and no significant linkage disequilibrium was detected between any locus pairs. Our study supplies candidate microsatellite markers that can be useful for studying the population genetic structure of ovate pompano.

  20. Polymorphic microsatellite loci for the razor clam, Sinonovacula constricta.

    PubMed

    Ma, H-T; Jiang, H-B; Liu, X-Q; Wu, X-P; Wei, X-M

    2015-01-15

    The razor clam, Sinonovacula constricta, is an important commercial bivalve and a popular mollusca food in China. Twelve polymorphic microsatellite markers were isolated from the razor clam using a partial genomic library enriched for tandem repeat sequences of (CA)16, (GA)16. Polymorphisms of these loci were evaluated in a wild population of 30 individuals. The allele number of these polymorphic markers ranged from 5-15 per locus with an average of 9.333. Observed and expected heterozygosity values ranged from 0.192-1.000 and 0.219-0.906. Polymorphism information content ranged from 0.209-0.892 with an average of 0.704. Three loci significantly deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium after Bonferroni correction. No significant linkage disequilibrium was detected between these loci. This set of microsatellite loci are useful for genetic studies in S. constricta.

  1. Isolation and characterization of the bovine microsatellite loci.

    PubMed

    Chung, H Y; Kim, T H; Choi, B H; Jang, G W; Lee, J W; Lee, K T; Ha, J M

    2006-12-01

    Microsatellite loci were isolated using five repetitive probes for Korean native cattle. Eleven microsatellite loci were developed based on a biotin hybrid capture method, and enrichment of the genomic libraries (AAAT, TG, AG, T, and TGC repeats) was performed using Sau3AI adapters. The isolated markers were tested in two half-sib Korean cattle families and four imported breeds (Angus, Limousine, Holstein, and Shorthorn). Nine informative microsatellite loci were observed, and two microsatellite loci were revealed as monomorphic in Korean cattle. In the imported breeds, however, all of the markers were informative. In total, 213 alleles were obtained at the 11 loci across five breeds, and the average number of alleles found per locus, considering all populations, was 4.26. Heterozygosity was 0.71 (expected) and 0.57 (observed). The range of the polymorphic information content for the markers in all cattle populations was 0.43-0.69. Eleven percent of genetic variation was attributed to differentiation between populations as determined by the mean F (ST) values. The remaining 89% corresponded to differences among individuals. The isolated markers may be used to identify and classify the local breeds on a molecular basis.

  2. PineElm_SSRdb: a microsatellite marker database identified from genomic, chloroplast, mitochondrial and EST sequences of pineapple (Ananas comosus (L.) Merrill).

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Sakshi; Mishra, Bharat Kumar; Vivek, Thiruvettai; Magadum, Santoshkumar; Yasin, Jeshima Khan

    2016-01-01

    Simple Sequence Repeats or microsatellites are resourceful molecular genetic markers. There are only few reports of SSR identification and development in pineapple. Complete genome sequence of pineapple available in the public domain can be used to develop numerous novel SSRs. Therefore, an attempt was made to identify SSRs from genomic, chloroplast, mitochondrial and EST sequences of pineapple which will help in deciphering genetic makeup of its germplasm resources. A total of 359511 SSRs were identified in pineapple (356385 from genome sequence, 45 from chloroplast sequence, 249 in mitochondrial sequence and 2832 from EST sequences). The list of EST-SSR markers and their details are available in the database. PineElm_SSRdb is an open source database available for non-commercial academic purpose at http://app.bioelm.com/ with a mapping tool which can develop circular maps of selected marker set. This database will be of immense use to breeders, researchers and graduates working on Ananas spp. and to others working on cross-species transferability of markers, investigating diversity, mapping and DNA fingerprinting.

  3. Near-Complete Genome Sequence of Thalassospira sp. Strain KO164 Isolated from a Lignin-Enriched Marine Sediment Microcosm

    DOE PAGES

    Woo, Hannah L.; O’Dell, Kaela B.; Utturkar, Sagar; ...

    2016-11-23

    We isolated Thalassospirasp. strain KO164 from eastern Mediterranean seawater and sediment laboratory microcosms enriched on insoluble organosolv lignin under oxic conditions. Furthermore, an analysis of the deep-ocean bacterium’s ability to degrade recalcitrant organics such as lignin near-complete genome sequence, will be presented here.

  4. Near-Complete Genome Sequence of Thalassospira sp. Strain KO164 Isolated from a Lignin-Enriched Marine Sediment Microcosm

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Hannah L.; O’Dell, Kaela B.; Utturkar, Sagar; McBride, Kathryn R.; Huntemann, Marcel; Clum, Alicia; Pillay, Manoj; Palaniappan, Krishnaveni; Varghese, Neha; Mikhailova, Natalia; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T. B. K.; Ngan, Chew Yee; Daum, Chris; Shapiro, Nicole; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Woyke, Tanja; Brown, Steven D.

    2016-01-01

    Thalassospira sp. strain KO164 was isolated from eastern Mediterranean seawater and sediment laboratory microcosms enriched on insoluble organosolv lignin under oxic conditions. The near-complete genome sequence presented here will facilitate analyses into this deep-ocean bacterium’s ability to degrade recalcitrant organics such as lignin. PMID:27881538

  5. Near-Complete Genome Sequence of Thalassospira sp. Strain KO164 Isolated from a Lignin-Enriched Marine Sediment Microcosm.

    PubMed

    Woo, Hannah L; O'Dell, Kaela B; Utturkar, Sagar; McBride, Kathryn R; Huntemann, Marcel; Clum, Alicia; Pillay, Manoj; Palaniappan, Krishnaveni; Varghese, Neha; Mikhailova, Natalia; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T B K; Ngan, Chew Yee; Daum, Chris; Shapiro, Nicole; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Woyke, Tanja; Brown, Steven D; Hazen, Terry C

    2016-11-23

    Thalassospira sp. strain KO164 was isolated from eastern Mediterranean seawater and sediment laboratory microcosms enriched on insoluble organosolv lignin under oxic conditions. The near-complete genome sequence presented here will facilitate analyses into this deep-ocean bacterium's ability to degrade recalcitrant organics such as lignin.

  6. Development of highly polymorphic simple sequence repeat markers using genome-wide microsatellite variant analysis in Foxtail millet [Setaria italica (L.) P. Beauv].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuo; Tang, Chanjuan; Zhao, Qiang; Li, Jing; Yang, Lifang; Qie, Lufeng; Fan, Xingke; Li, Lin; Zhang, Ning; Zhao, Meicheng; Liu, Xiaotong; Chai, Yang; Zhang, Xue; Wang, Hailong; Li, Yingtao; Li, Wen; Zhi, Hui; Jia, Guanqing; Diao, Xianmin

    2014-01-28

    Foxtail millet (Setaria italica (L.) Beauv.) is an important gramineous grain-food and forage crop. It is grown worldwide for human and livestock consumption. Its small genome and diploid nature have led to foxtail millet fast becoming a novel model for investigating plant architecture, drought tolerance and C4 photosynthesis of grain and bioenergy crops. Therefore, cost-effective, reliable and highly polymorphic molecular markers covering the entire genome are required for diversity, mapping and functional genomics studies in this model species. A total of 5,020 highly repetitive microsatellite motifs were isolated from the released genome of the genotype 'Yugu1' by sequence scanning. Based on sequence comparison between S. italica and S. viridis, a set of 788 SSR primer pairs were designed. Of these primers, 733 produced reproducible amplicons and were polymorphic among 28 Setaria genotypes selected from diverse geographical locations. The number of alleles detected by these SSR markers ranged from 2 to 16, with an average polymorphism information content of 0.67. The result obtained by neighbor-joining cluster analysis of 28 Setaria genotypes, based on Nei's genetic distance of the SSR data, showed that these SSR markers are highly polymorphic and effective. A large set of highly polymorphic SSR markers were successfully and efficiently developed based on genomic sequence comparison between different genotypes of the genus Setaria. The large number of new SSR markers and their placement on the physical map represent a valuable resource for studying diversity, constructing genetic maps, functional gene mapping, QTL exploration and molecular breeding in foxtail millet and its closely related species.

  7. Development of highly polymorphic simple sequence repeat markers using genome-wide microsatellite variant analysis in Foxtail millet [Setaria italica (L.) P. Beauv.

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Foxtail millet (Setaria italica (L.) Beauv.) is an important gramineous grain-food and forage crop. It is grown worldwide for human and livestock consumption. Its small genome and diploid nature have led to foxtail millet fast becoming a novel model for investigating plant architecture, drought tolerance and C4 photosynthesis of grain and bioenergy crops. Therefore, cost-effective, reliable and highly polymorphic molecular markers covering the entire genome are required for diversity, mapping and functional genomics studies in this model species. Result A total of 5,020 highly repetitive microsatellite motifs were isolated from the released genome of the genotype 'Yugu1’ by sequence scanning. Based on sequence comparison between S. italica and S. viridis, a set of 788 SSR primer pairs were designed. Of these primers, 733 produced reproducible amplicons and were polymorphic among 28 Setaria genotypes selected from diverse geographical locations. The number of alleles detected by these SSR markers ranged from 2 to 16, with an average polymorphism information content of 0.67. The result obtained by neighbor-joining cluster analysis of 28 Setaria genotypes, based on Nei’s genetic distance of the SSR data, showed that these SSR markers are highly polymorphic and effective. Conclusions A large set of highly polymorphic SSR markers were successfully and efficiently developed based on genomic sequence comparison between different genotypes of the genus Setaria. The large number of new SSR markers and their placement on the physical map represent a valuable resource for studying diversity, constructing genetic maps, functional gene mapping, QTL exploration and molecular breeding in foxtail millet and its closely related species. PMID:24472631

  8. Distribution and localization of microsatellites in the Perigord black truffle genome and identification of new molecular markers (2010) Fungal Genetics and Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Murat, Claude; Riccioni, C; Belfiori, B; Cichocki, N; Labbe, Jessy L; Morin, Emmanuelle; Tisserant, Emilie; Paolocci, F; Rubini, A; Martin, Francis

    2011-01-01

    The level of genetic diversity and genetic structure in the Perigord black truffle (Tuber melanosporum Vittad.) has been debated for several years, mainly due to the lack of appropriate genetic markers. Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are important for the genome organisation, phenotypic diversity and are one of the most popular molecular markers. In this study, we surveyed the T. melanosporum genome (1) to characterise its SSR pattern; (2) to compare it with SSR patterns found in 48 other fungal and three oomycetes genomes and (3) to identify new polymorphic SSR markers for population genetics. The T. melanosporum genome is rich in SSRs with 22,425 SSRs with mono-nucleotides being the most frequent motifs. SSRs were found in all genomic regions although they are more frequent in non-coding regions (introns and intergenic regions). Sixty out of 135 PCR-amplified mono-, di-, tri-, tetra, penta, and hexanucleotides were polymorphic (44%) within black truffle populations and 27 were randomly selected and analysed on 139 T. melanosporum isolates from France, Italy and Spain. The number of alleles varied from 2 to 18 and the expected heterozygosity from 0.124 to 0.815. One hundred and thirty-two different multilocus genotypes out of the 139 T. melanosporum isolates were identified and the genotypic diversity was high (0.999). Polymorphic SSRs were found in UTR regulatory regions of fruiting bodies and ectomycorrhiza regulated genes, suggesting that they may play a role in phenotypic variation. In conclusion, SSRs developed in this study were highly polymorphic and our results showed that T. melanosporum is a species with an important genetic diversity, which is in agreement with its recently uncovered heterothallic mating system.

  9. Development, inheritance, and linkage-group assignment of 60 novel microsatellite markers for the gray, short-tailed opossum Monodelphis domestica.

    PubMed

    Gouin, Nicolas; Westenberger, Scott J; Mahaney, Susan M; Lindley, Peter; VandeBerg, John L; Samollow, Paul B

    2005-12-01

    Short-tandem-repeat (SSR) or microsatellite polymorphisms are some of the most extensively employed genetic markers in contemporary linkage mapping studies. To date, only a limited number of microsatellites have been isolated in the gray, short-tailed opossum Monodelphis domestica, a South American marsupial widely used for comparative biological and biomedical research. To increase the number of potentially useful mapping markers, we screened 2 microsatellite-enriched genomic libraries containing alternatively (CA)n or (GA)n repeats. A total of 184 clones were sequenced, from which 60 polymorphic microsatellite markers were successfully optimized. The efficiency of this enrichment protocol for M. domestica microsatellite isolation is discussed, and suggestions to improve the outcome are made. All 60 loci showed high allelic diversity, with allele numbers ranging from 2 to 10 in a subset of 33 unrelated animals. Normal Mendelian inheritance was confirmed for all loci by analyzing allelic segregation in 5 two-generation families. One microsatellite appeared to be X linked, and null alleles were found in 5 others. Two-point linkage analyses were implemented using the data on the 5 families, leading to the assignment of 59 of these loci to the existing linkage groups. The 60 novel microsatellites developed in this study will contribute significantly to the M. domestica linkage map, and further QTL mapping studies.

  10. Candidate genes for obesity-susceptibility show enriched association within a large genome-wide association study for BMI

    PubMed Central

    Vimaleswaran, Karani S.; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Zhao, Jing Hua; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Dudbridge, Frank; Loos, Ruth J.F.

    2012-01-01

    Before the advent of genome-wide association studies (GWASs), hundreds of candidate genes for obesity-susceptibility had been identified through a variety of approaches. We examined whether those obesity candidate genes are enriched for associations with body mass index (BMI) compared with non-candidate genes by using data from a large-scale GWAS. A thorough literature search identified 547 candidate genes for obesity-susceptibility based on evidence from animal studies, Mendelian syndromes, linkage studies, genetic association studies and expression studies. Genomic regions were defined to include the genes ±10 kb of flanking sequence around candidate and non-candidate genes. We used summary statistics publicly available from the discovery stage of the genome-wide meta-analysis for BMI performed by the genetic investigation of anthropometric traits consortium in 123 564 individuals. Hypergeometric, rank tail-strength and gene-set enrichment analysis tests were used to test for the enrichment of association in candidate compared with non-candidate genes. The hypergeometric test of enrichment was not significant at the 5% P-value quantile (P = 0.35), but was nominally significant at the 25% quantile (P = 0.015). The rank tail-strength and gene-set enrichment tests were nominally significant for the full set of genes and borderline significant for the subset without SNPs at P < 10−7. Taken together, the observed evidence for enrichment suggests that the candidate gene approach retains some value. However, the degree of enrichment is small despite the extensive number of candidate genes and the large sample size. Studies that focus on candidate genes have only slightly increased chances of detecting associations, and are likely to miss many true effects in non-candidate genes, at least for obesity-related traits. PMID:22791748

  11. Genetic variation at microsatellite loci in the tropical herb Aphelandra aurantiaca (Acanthaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-Montes, Pilar; Tapia-López, Rosalinda; Núñez-Farfán, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: To assess the effect of forest fragmentation on genetic variation and population structure of Aphelandra aurantiaca (Acanthaceae), a tropical and ornamental herbaceous perennial plant, we developed the first microsatellite primers for the species. Methods and Results: Fourteen microsatellite markers were isolated and characterized from A. aurantiaca genomic libraries enriched for di-, tri-, and tetranucleotide repeat motifs. Polymorphism was evaluated in 107 individuals from four natural populations. Twelve out of 14 genetic markers were polymorphic. The number of alleles per locus ranged from two to 12, and the observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.22 to 0.96 and from 0.20 to 0.87, respectively. Fixation indices ranged from −0.41 to 0.44. Conclusions: These newly developed microsatellite markers for A. aurantiaca will be useful for future population genetic studies, specifically to detect the possible loss of genetic diversity due to habitat fragmentation. PMID:26649265

  12. Isolation of microsatellite primers for Melampyrum sylvaticum (Orobanchaceae), an endangered plant in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Crichton, Rhiannon J; Squirrell, Jane; Woodin, Sarah J; Dalrymple, Sarah E; Hollingsworth, Peter M

    2012-11-01

    Microsatellite markers were developed for the hemiparasitic plant Melampyrum sylvaticum to investigate the breeding system, genetic diversity, and structure of populations in the United Kingdom, Sweden, and Norway. Microsatellites were isolated from genomic DNA using an enrichment protocol. Twenty-nine loci were characterized in two individuals from each of 15 geographically disparate populations ("global"). Seven polymorphic loci were further characterized in one population ("local"). The number of alleles per locus ranged from two to 12 in the global sample and one to seven in the local sample. The expected heterozygosity ranged from 0-0.75, the observed heterozygosity from 0-0.1, and the inbreeding coefficient from 0.84-1 in the local sample. The results show the utility of these novel polymorphic microsatellite markers for further conservation genetic analyses. The strong deficit of heterozygosity across all loci in the local sample suggests the species may be inbreeding.

  13. Development of new microsatellite markers from Mango (Mangifera indica) and cross-species amplification.

    PubMed

    Ravishankar, Kundapura Venkataramana; Mani, Bellam Hanumantha-Reddy; Anand, Lalitha; Dinesh, Makki Ramachandra

    2011-04-01

    Microsatellite markers were developed and characterized to assess the genetic diversity among mango (Mangifera indica) cultivars and to test their amplification in closely related species. Thirty-six microsatellite (simple sequence repeats; SSR) loci were isolated by a microsatellite-enriched partial genomic library method. Primers designed for these loci were characterized using 30 diverse mango cultivars. The number of alleles ranged from 3 to 19 with an average of 9.2 alleles per locus. Polymorphic information content values ranged from 0.185 to 0.920 with a mean of 0.687. The total value for the probability of identity was 2.42 × 10(-31). The newly identified SSRs would be useful in genetic diversity studies, finger-printing, and mapping. Loci from five related species, M. odorata, M. anadamanica, M. zeylanica, M. camptosperma, and M. griffithii, were successfully amplified using these SSR primers, showing their potential utility across species.

  14. Microsatellite primers for red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In this note, we document polymerase-chain-reaction (PCR) primer pairs for 101, nuclear-encoded microsatellites designed and developed from a red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) genomic library. The 101 microsatellites (Genbank Accession Numbers EU015882-EU015982) were amplified successfully and used to...

  15. Pre-capture multiplexing improves efficiency and cost-effectiveness of targeted genomic enrichment

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Targeted genomic enrichment (TGE) is a widely used method for isolating and enriching specific genomic regions prior to massively parallel sequencing. To make effective use of sequencer output, barcoding and sample pooling (multiplexing) after TGE and prior to sequencing (post-capture multiplexing) has become routine. While previous reports have indicated that multiplexing prior to capture (pre-capture multiplexing) is feasible, no thorough examination of the effect of this method has been completed on a large number of samples. Here we compare standard post-capture TGE to two levels of pre-capture multiplexing: 12 or 16 samples per pool. We evaluated these methods using standard TGE metrics and determined the ability to identify several classes of genetic mutations in three sets of 96 samples, including 48 controls. Our overall goal was to maximize cost reduction and minimize experimental time while maintaining a high percentage of reads on target and a high depth of coverage at thresholds required for variant detection. Results We adapted the standard post-capture TGE method for pre-capture TGE with several protocol modifications, including redesign of blocking oligonucleotides and optimization of enzymatic and amplification steps. Pre-capture multiplexing reduced costs for TGE by at least 38% and significantly reduced hands-on time during the TGE protocol. We found that pre-capture multiplexing reduced capture efficiency by 23 or 31% for pre-capture pools of 12 and 16, respectively. However efficiency losses at this step can be compensated by reducing the number of simultaneously sequenced samples. Pre-capture multiplexing and post-capture TGE performed similarly with respect to variant detection of positive control mutations. In addition, we detected no instances of sample switching due to aberrant barcode identification. Conclusions Pre-capture multiplexing improves efficiency of TGE experiments with respect to hands-on time and reagent use compared

  16. Chronic periodontitis genome-wide association studies: gene-centric and gene set enrichment analyses.

    PubMed

    Rhodin, K; Divaris, K; North, K E; Barros, S P; Moss, K; Beck, J D; Offenbacher, S

    2014-09-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of chronic periodontitis (CP) offer rich data sources for the investigation of candidate genes, functional elements, and pathways. We used GWAS data of CP (n = 4,504) and periodontal pathogen colonization (n = 1,020) from a cohort of adult Americans of European descent participating in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study and employed a MAGENTA approach (i.e., meta-analysis gene set enrichment of variant associations) to obtain gene-centric and gene set association results corrected for gene size, number of single-nucleotide polymorphisms, and local linkage disequilibrium characteristics based on the human genome build 18 (National Center for Biotechnology Information build 36). We used the Gene Ontology, Ingenuity, KEGG, Panther, Reactome, and Biocarta databases for gene set enrichment analyses. Six genes showed evidence of statistically significant association: 4 with severe CP (NIN, p = 1.6 × 10(-7); ABHD12B, p = 3.6 × 10(-7); WHAMM, p = 1.7 × 10(-6); AP3B2, p = 2.2 × 10(-6)) and 2 with high periodontal pathogen colonization (red complex-KCNK1, p = 3.4 × 10(-7); Porphyromonas gingivalis-DAB2IP, p = 1.0 × 10(-6)). Top-ranked genes for moderate CP were HGD (p = 1.4 × 10(-5)), ZNF675 (p = 1.5 × 10(-5)), TNFRSF10C (p = 2.0 × 10(-5)), and EMR1 (p = 2.0 × 10(-5)). Loci containing NIN, EMR1, KCNK1, and DAB2IP had showed suggestive evidence of association in the earlier single-nucleotide polymorphism-based analyses, whereas WHAMM and AP2B2 emerged as novel candidates. The top gene sets included severe CP ("endoplasmic reticulum membrane," "cytochrome P450," "microsome," and "oxidation reduction") and moderate CP ("regulation of gene expression," "zinc ion binding," "BMP signaling pathway," and "ruffle"). Gene-centric analyses offer a promising avenue for efficient interrogation of large-scale GWAS data. These results highlight genes in previously identified loci and new candidate genes and pathways

  17. Characterization of 24 microsatellite markers in 11 species of fire ants in the genus Solenopsis (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).

    PubMed

    Ascunce, Marina S; Bouwma, Andrew M; Shoemaker, Dewayne

    2009-11-01

    The social parasite ant Solenopsis daguerrei infests colonies of several mound-building fire ant species. Twenty-four microsatellite markers were isolated from a repeat-enriched genomic library of S. daguerrei. Eleven loci were polymorphic in this ant with two to six alleles per locus. Expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.0222 to 0.7940 among loci. Most microsatellites amplified successfully across the 11 Solenopsis species tested and will be useful for evolutionary genetic studies in this diverse ant group. Published 2009. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  18. Characterization of 32 novel microsatellite loci for population and mating system studies using Campostoma anomalum (central stoneroller).

    PubMed

    Landis, J B; Hudman, S P; Grose, M J; Skalski, G T; Wiley, E O

    2009-01-01

    The central stoneroller (Campostoma anomalum) is an abundant, widespread and sexually dimorphic stream minnow that is a useful model for mating system studies as well as a sentinel species for understanding population-level processes for fishes in headwater communities. We developed one genomic library enriched for dinucleotide repeats and isolated 48 putative, novel microsatellite loci. Of those, we present 32 polymorphic and independent microsatellite markers with 3 to 16 alleles per locus and heterozygosity ranging from 0.23 to 0.95. Hence, these markers will be useful for future behavioural, ecological and evolutionary studies using C. anomalum. © 2008 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Genome-wide association analysis and pathways enrichment for lactation persistency in Canadian Holstein cattle.

    PubMed

    Do, D N; Bissonnette, N; Lacasse, P; Miglior, F; Sargolzaei, M; Zhao, X; Ibeagha-Awemu, E M

    2017-03-01

    Lactation persistency (LP), defined as the rate of declining milk yield after milk peak, is an economically important trait for dairy cattle. Improving LP is considered a good alternative method for increasing overall milk production because it does not cause the negative energy balance and other health issues that cows experience during peak milk production. However, little is known about the biology of LP. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) and pathway enrichment were used to explore the genetic mechanisms underlying LP. The GWAS was performed using a univariate regression mixed linear model on LP data of 3,796 cows and 44,100 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP). Eight and 47 SNP were significantly and suggestively associated with LP, respectively. The 2 most important quantitative trait loci regions for LP were (1) a region from 106 to 108 Mb on Bos taurus autosome (BTA) 5, where the most significant SNP (ARS-BFGL-NGS-2399) was located and also formed a linkage disequilibrium block with 3 other SNP; and (2) a region from 29.3 to 31.3 Mb on BTA 20, which contained 3 significant SNP. Based on physical positions, MAN1C1, MAP3K5, HCN1, TSPAN9, MRPS30, TEX14, and CCL28 are potential candidate genes for LP because the significant SNP were located in their intronic regions. Enrichment analyses of a list of 536 genes in 0.5-Mb flanking regions of significant and suggestive SNP indicates that synthesis of milk components, regulation of cell apoptosis processes and insulin, and prolactin signaling pathways are important for LP. Upstream regulators relevant for LP positional candidate genes were prolactin (PRL), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG), and Erb-B2 receptor tyrosine kinase 2 (ERBB2). Several networks related to cellular development, proliferation and death were significantly enriched for LP positional candidate genes. In conclusion, this study detected several SNP, genes, and interesting regions for fine mapping and validation of

  20. Highly Informative Single-Copy Nuclear Microsatellite DNA Markers Developed Using an AFLP-SSR Approach in Black Spruce (Picea mariana) and Red Spruce (P. rubens)

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yong-Zhong; Forneris, Natascha; Rajora, Om P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are highly informative molecular markers for various biological studies in plants. In spruce (Picea) and other conifers, the development of single-copy polymorphic genomic microsatellite markers is quite difficult, owing primarily to the large genome size and predominance of repetitive DNA sequences throughout the genome. We have developed highly informative single-locus genomic microsatellite markers in black spruce (Picea mariana) and red spruce (Picea rubens) using a simple but efficient method based on a combination of AFLP and microsatellite technologies. Principal Findings A microsatellite-enriched library was constructed from genomic AFLP DNA fragments of black spruce. Sequencing of the 108 putative SSR-containing clones provided 94 unique sequences with microsatellites. Twenty-two of the designed 34 primer pairs yielded scorable amplicons, with single-locus patterns. Fourteen of these microsatellite markers were characterized in 30 black spruce and 30 red spruce individuals drawn from many populations. The number of alleles at a polymorphic locus ranged from 2 to 18, with a mean of 9.3 in black spruce, and from 3 to 15, with a mean of 6.2 alleles in red spruce. The polymorphic information content or expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.340 to 0.909 (mean = 0.67) in black spruce and from 0.161 to 0.851 (mean = 0.62) in red spruce. Ten SSR markers showing inter-parental polymorphism inherited in a single-locus Mendelian mode, with two cases of distorted segregation. Primer pairs for almost all polymorphic SSR loci resolved microsatellites of comparable size in Picea glauca, P. engelmannii, P. sitchensis, and P. abies. Significance The AFLP-based microsatellite-enriched library appears to be a rapid, cost-effective approach for isolating and developing single-locus informative genomic microsatellite markers in black spruce. The markers developed should be useful in black spruce, red spruce

  1. Genome-wide characterization of microsatellites in Cucumis hystrix and in silico identification of polymorphic SSR markers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cucumis hystrix (2n = 2x = 24, genome HH) is a wild relative of cucumber (C. sativus L., 2n = 2x = 14) that possesses multiple disease resistances and has a great potential for cucumber improvement. Despite its importance, there is no genomic resource currently available for C. hystrix. To expedite ...

  2. Genome-wide analysis of loss of heterozygosity in breast infiltrating ductal carcinoma distant normal tissue highlights arm specific enrichment and expansion across tumor stages.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Xiaoyang; Liu, Hongfang; Boardman, Lisa; Kocher, Jean-Pierre A

    2014-01-01

    Studies have shown concurrent loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in breast infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC) and adjacent or distant normal tissue. However, the overall extent of LOH in normal tissue and their significance to tumorigenesis remain unknown, as existing studies are largely based on selected microsatellite markers. Here we present the first autosome-wide study of LOH in IDC and distant normal tissue using informative loci deduced from SNP array-based and sequencing-based techniques. We show a consistently high LOH concurrence rate in IDC (mean = 24%) and distant normal tissue (m = 54%), suggesting for most patients (31/33) histologically normal tissue contains genomic instability that can be a potential marker of increased IDC risk. Concurrent LOH is more frequent in fragile site related genes like WWOX (9/31), NTRK2 (10/31), and FHIT (7/31) than traditional genetic markers like BRCA1 (0/23), BRCA2 (2/29) and TP53 (1/13). Analysis at arm level shows distant normal tissue has low level but non-random enrichment of LOH (topped by 8p and 16q) significantly correlated with matched IDC (Pearson r = 0.66, p = 3.5E-6) (topped by 8p, 11q, 13q, 16q, 17p, and 17q). The arm-specific LOH enrichment was independently observed in tumor samples from 548 IDC patients when stratified by tumor size based T stages. Fine LOH structure from sequencing data indicates LOH in low order tissues non-randomly overlap (∼67%) with LOH that usually has longer tract length (the length of genomic region affected by LOH) in high order tissues. The consistent observations from multiple datasets suggest progressive LOH in the development of IDC potentially through arm-specific pile up effect with discernible signature in normal tissue. Our finding also suggests that LOH detected in IDC by comparing to paired adjacent or distant normal tissue are more likely underestimated.

  3. Genome editing using FACS enrichment of nuclease-expressing cells and indel detection by amplicon analysis.

    PubMed

    Lonowski, Lindsey A; Narimatsu, Yoshiki; Riaz, Anjum; Delay, Catherine E; Yang, Zhang; Niola, Francesco; Duda, Katarzyna; Ober, Elke A; Clausen, Henrik; Wandall, Hans H; Hansen, Steen H; Bennett, Eric P; Frödin, Morten

    2017-03-01

    This protocol describes methods for increasing and evaluating the efficiency of genome editing based on the CRISPR-Cas9 (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR-associated 9) system, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) or zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs). First, Indel Detection by Amplicon Analysis (IDAA) determines the size and frequency of insertions and deletions elicited by nucleases in cells, tissues or embryos through analysis of fluorophore-labeled PCR amplicons covering the nuclease target site by capillary electrophoresis in a sequenator. Second, FACS enrichment of cells expressing nucleases linked to fluorescent proteins can be used to maximize knockout or knock-in editing efficiencies or to balance editing efficiency and toxic/off-target effects. The two methods can be combined to form a pipeline for cell-line editing that facilitates the testing of new nuclease reagents and the generation of edited cell pools or clonal cell lines, reducing the number of clones that need to be generated and increasing the ease with which they are screened. The pipeline shortens the time line, but it most prominently reduces the workload of cell-line editing, which may be completed within 4 weeks.

  4. Development of SSR markers derived from SSR-enriched genomic library of eggplant (Solanum melongena L.).

    PubMed

    Nunome, Tsukasa; Negoro, Satomi; Kono, Izumi; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Miyatake, Koji; Yamaguchi, Hirotaka; Ohyama, Akio; Fukuoka, Hiroyuki

    2009-10-01

    Eggplant (Solanum melongena L.), also known as aubergine or brinjal, is an important vegetable in many countries. Few useful molecular markers have been reported for eggplant. We constructed simple sequence repeat (SSR)-enriched genomic libraries in order to develop SSR markers, and sequenced more than 14,000 clones. From these sequences, we designed 2,265 primer pairs to flank SSR motifs. We identified 1,054 SSR markers from amplification of 1,399 randomly selected primer pairs. The markers have an average polymorphic information content of 0.27 among eight lines of S. melongena. Of the 1,054 SSR markers, 214 segregated in an intraspecific mapping population. We constructed cDNA libraries from several eggplant tissues and obtained 6,144 expressed sequence tag (EST) sequences. From these sequences, we designed 209 primer pairs, 7 of which segregated in the mapping population. On the basis of the segregation data, we constructed a linkage map, and mapped the 236 segregating markers to 14 linkage groups. The linkage map spans a total length of 959.1 cM, with an average marker distance of 4.3 cM. The markers should be a useful resource for qualitative and quantitative trait mapping and for marker-assisted selection in eggplant breeding.

  5. Genome-wide enrichment screening reveals multiple targets and resistance genes for triclosan in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yu, Byung Jo; Kim, Jung Ae; Ju, Hyun Mok; Choi, Soo-Kyung; Hwang, Seung Jin; Park, Sungyoo; Kim, Euijoong; Pan, Jae-Gu

    2012-10-01

    Triclosan is a widely used biocide effective against different microorganisms. At bactericidal concentrations, triclosan appears to affect multiple targets, while at bacteriostatic concentrations, triclosan targets FabI. The site-specific antibiotic-like mode-of-action and a widespread use of triclosan in household products claimed to possibly induce cross-resistance to other antibiotics. Thus, we set out to define more systematically the genes conferring resistance to triclosan; A genomic library of Escherichia coli strain W3110 was constructed and enriched in a selective medium containing a lethal concentration of triclosan. The genes enabling growth in the presence of triclosan were identified by using a DNA microarray and confirmed consequently by ASKA clones overexpressing the selected 62 candidate genes. Among these, forty-seven genes were further confirmed to enhance the resistance to triclosan; these genes, including the FabI target, were involved in inner or outer membrane synthesis, cell-surface material synthesis, transcriptional activation, sugar phosphotransferase (PTS) systems, various transporter systems, cell division, and ATPase and reductase/dehydrogenase reactions. In particular, overexpression of pgsA, rcsA, or gapC conferred to E. coli cells a similar level of triclosan resistance induced by fabI overexpression. These results indicate that triclosan may have multiple targets other than well-known FabI and that there are several undefined novel mechanisms for the resistance development to triclosan, thus probably inducing cross antibiotic resistance.

  6. Genome-wide survey of ds exonization to enrich transcriptomes and proteomes in plants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li-Yu Daisy; Charng, Yuh-Chyang

    2012-01-01

    Insertion of transposable elements (TEs) into introns can lead to their activation as alternatively spliced cassette exons, an event called exonization which can enrich the complexity of transcriptomes and proteomes. Previously, we performed the first experimental assessment of TE exonization by inserting a Ds element into each intron of the rice epsps gene. Exonization of Ds in plants was biased toward providing splice donor sites from the beginning of the inserted Ds sequence. Additionally, Ds inserted in the reverse direction resulted in a continuous splice donor consensus region by offering 4 donor sites in the same intron. The current study involved genome-wide computational analysis of Ds exonization events in the dicot Arabidopsis thaliana and the monocot Oryza sativa (rice). Up to 71% of the exonized transcripts were putative targets for the nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) pathway. The insertion patterns of Ds and the polymorphic splice donor sites increased the transcripts and subsequent protein isoforms. Protein isoforms contain protein sequence due to unspliced intron-TE region and/or a shift of the reading frame. The number of interior protein isoforms would be twice that of C-terminal isoforms, on average. TE exonization provides a promising way for functional expansion of the plant proteome.

  7. Genome-wide Target Enrichment-aided Chip Design: a 66 K SNP Chip for Cashmere Goat.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Xian; Su, Rui; Wang, Yang; Wang, Ruijun; Yang, Ting; Li, Xiaokai; Chen, Wei; He, Shiyang; Jiang, Yu; Xu, Qiwu; Wan, Wenting; Zhang, Yaolei; Zhang, Wenguang; Chen, Jiang; Liu, Bin; Liu, Xin; Fan, Yixing; Chen, Duoyuan; Jiang, Huaizhi; Fang, Dongming; Liu, Zhihong; Wang, Xiaowen; Zhang, Yanjun; Mao, Danqing; Wang, Zhiying; Di, Ran; Zhao, Qianjun; Zhong, Tao; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jian; Wang, Wen; Dong, Yang; Chen, Xiaoli; Xu, Xun; Li, Jinquan

    2017-08-17

    Compared with the commercially available single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chip based on the Bead Chip technology, the solution hybrid selection (SHS)-based target enrichment SNP chip is not only design-flexible, but also cost-effective for genotype sequencing. In this study, we propose to design an animal SNP chip using the SHS-based target enrichment strategy for the first time. As an update to the international collaboration on goat research, a 66 K SNP chip for cashmere goat was created from the whole-genome sequencing data of 73 individuals. Verification of this 66 K SNP chip with the whole-genome sequencing data of 436 cashmere goats showed that the SNP call rates was between 95.3% and 99.8%. The average sequencing depth for target SNPs were 40X. The capture regions were shown to be 200 bp that flank target SNPs. This chip was further tested in a genome-wide association analysis of cashmere fineness (fiber diameter). Several top hit loci were found marginally associated with signaling pathways involved in hair growth. These results demonstrate that the 66 K SNP chip is a useful tool in the genomic analyses of cashmere goats. The successful chip design shows that the SHS-based target enrichment strategy could be applied to SNP chip design in other species.

  8. Microsatellite flanking region similarities among different loci within insect species.

    PubMed

    Meglécz, E; Anderson, S J; Bourguet, D; Butcher, R; Caldas, A; Cassel-Lundhagen, A; d'Acier, A C; Dawson, D A; Faure, N; Fauvelot, C; Franck, P; Harper, G; Keyghobadi, N; Kluetsch, C; Muthulakshmi, M; Nagaraju, J; Patt, A; Péténian, F; Silvain, J-F; Wilcock, H R

    2007-04-01

    Although microsatellites are ubiquitous in eukaryota, the number of available markers varies strongly among taxa. This meta-analysis was conducted on 32 insect species. Sequences were obtained from two assembled whole genomes, whole genome shotgun (WGS) sequences from 10 species and screening partial genomic libraries for microsatellites from 23 species. We have demonstrated: (1) strong differences in the abundance of microsatellites among species; (2) that microsatellites within species are often grouped into families based on similarities in their flanking sequences; (3) that the proportion of microsatellites grouped into families varies strongly among taxa; and (4) that microsatellite families were significantly more often associated with transposable elements - or their remnants - than unique microsatellite sequences.

  9. Genome sequence of Candidatus Nitrososphaera evergladensis from group I.1b enriched from Everglades soil reveals novel genomic features of the ammonia-oxidizing archaea.

    PubMed

    Zhalnina, Kateryna V; Dias, Raquel; Leonard, Michael T; Dorr de Quadros, Patricia; Camargo, Flavio A O; Drew, Jennifer C; Farmerie, William G; Daroub, Samira H; Triplett, Eric W

    2014-01-01

    The activity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) leads to the loss of nitrogen from soil, pollution of water sources and elevated emissions of greenhouse gas. To date, eight AOA genomes are available in the public databases, seven are from the group I.1a of the Thaumarchaeota and only one is from the group I.1b, isolated from hot springs. Many soils are dominated by AOA from the group I.1b, but the genomes of soil representatives of this group have not been sequenced and functionally characterized. The lack of knowledge of metabolic pathways of soil AOA presents a critical gap in understanding their role in biogeochemical cycles. Here, we describe the first complete genome of soil archaeon Candidatus Nitrososphaera evergladensis, which has been reconstructed from metagenomic sequencing of a highly enriched culture obtained from an agricultural soil. The AOA enrichment was sequenced with the high throughput next generation sequencing platforms from Pacific Biosciences and Ion Torrent. The de novo assembly of sequences resulted in one 2.95 Mb contig. Annotation of the reconstructed genome revealed many similarities of the basic metabolism with the rest of sequenced AOA. Ca. N. evergladensis belongs to the group I.1b and shares only 40% of whole-genome homology with the closest sequenced relative Ca. N. gargensis. Detailed analysis of the genome revealed coding sequences that were completely absent from the group I.1a. These unique sequences code for proteins involved in control of DNA integrity, transporters, two-component systems and versatile CRISPR defense system. Notably, genomes from the group I.1b have more gene duplications compared to the genomes from the group I.1a. We suggest that the presence of these unique genes and gene duplications may be associated with the environmental versatility of this group.

  10. Genome Sequence of Candidatus Nitrososphaera evergladensis from Group I.1b Enriched from Everglades Soil Reveals Novel Genomic Features of the Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Zhalnina, Kateryna V.; Dias, Raquel; Leonard, Michael T.; Dorr de Quadros, Patricia; Camargo, Flavio A. O.; Drew, Jennifer C.; Farmerie, William G.; Daroub, Samira H.; Triplett, Eric W.

    2014-01-01

    The activity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) leads to the loss of nitrogen from soil, pollution of water sources and elevated emissions of greenhouse gas. To date, eight AOA genomes are available in the public databases, seven are from the group I.1a of the Thaumarchaeota and only one is from the group I.1b, isolated from hot springs. Many soils are dominated by AOA from the group I.1b, but the genomes of soil representatives of this group have not been sequenced and functionally characterized. The lack of knowledge of metabolic pathways of soil AOA presents a critical gap in understanding their role in biogeochemical cycles. Here, we describe the first complete genome of soil archaeon Candidatus Nitrososphaera evergladensis, which has been reconstructed from metagenomic sequencing of a highly enriched culture obtained from an agricultural soil. The AOA enrichment was sequenced with the high throughput next generation sequencing platforms from Pacific Biosciences and Ion Torrent. The de novo assembly of sequences resulted in one 2.95 Mb contig. Annotation of the reconstructed genome revealed many similarities of the basic metabolism with the rest of sequenced AOA. Ca. N. evergladensis belongs to the group I.1b and shares only 40% of whole-genome homology with the closest sequenced relative Ca. N. gargensis. Detailed analysis of the genome revealed coding sequences that were completely absent from the group I.1a. These unique sequences code for proteins involved in control of DNA integrity, transporters, two-component systems and versatile CRISPR defense system. Notably, genomes from the group I.1b have more gene duplications compared to the genomes from the group I.1a. We suggest that the presence of these unique genes and gene duplications may be associated with the environmental versatility of this group. PMID:24999826

  11. Successful enrichment and recovery of whole mitochondrial genomes from ancient human dental calculus

    PubMed Central

    Ozga, Andrew T.; Nieves‐Colón, Maria A.; Honap, Tanvi P.; Sankaranarayanan, Krithivasan; Hofman, Courtney A.; Milner, George R.; Lewis, Cecil M.; Stone, Anne C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives Archaeological dental calculus is a rich source of host‐associated biomolecules. Importantly, however, dental calculus is more accurately described as a calcified microbial biofilm than a host tissue. As such, concerns regarding destructive analysis of human remains may not apply as strongly to dental calculus, opening the possibility of obtaining human health and ancestry information from dental calculus in cases where destructive analysis of conventional skeletal remains is not permitted. Here we investigate the preservation of human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in archaeological dental calculus and its potential for full mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) reconstruction in maternal lineage ancestry analysis. Materials and Methods Extracted DNA from six individuals at the 700‐year‐old Norris Farms #36 cemetery in Illinois was enriched for mtDNA using in‐solution capture techniques, followed by Illumina high‐throughput sequencing. Results Full mitogenomes (7–34×) were successfully reconstructed from dental calculus for all six individuals, including three individuals who had previously tested negative for DNA preservation in bone using conventional PCR techniques. Mitochondrial haplogroup assignments were consistent with previously published findings, and additional comparative analysis of paired dental calculus and dentine from two individuals yielded equivalent haplotype results. All dental calculus samples exhibited damage patterns consistent with ancient DNA, and mitochondrial sequences were estimated to be 92–100% endogenous. DNA polymerase choice was found to impact error rates in downstream sequence analysis, but these effects can be mitigated by greater sequencing depth. Discussion Dental calculus is a viable alternative source of human DNA that can be used to reconstruct full mitogenomes from archaeological remains. Am J Phys Anthropol 160:220–228, 2016. © 2016 The Authors American Journal of Physical Anthropology

  12. Successful enrichment and recovery of whole mitochondrial genomes from ancient human dental calculus.

    PubMed

    Ozga, Andrew T; Nieves-Colón, Maria A; Honap, Tanvi P; Sankaranarayanan, Krithivasan; Hofman, Courtney A; Milner, George R; Lewis, Cecil M; Stone, Anne C; Warinner, Christina

    2016-06-01

    Archaeological dental calculus is a rich source of host-associated biomolecules. Importantly, however, dental calculus is more accurately described as a calcified microbial biofilm than a host tissue. As such, concerns regarding destructive analysis of human remains may not apply as strongly to dental calculus, opening the possibility of obtaining human health and ancestry information from dental calculus in cases where destructive analysis of conventional skeletal remains is not permitted. Here we investigate the preservation of human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in archaeological dental calculus and its potential for full mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) reconstruction in maternal lineage ancestry analysis. Extracted DNA from six individuals at the 700-year-old Norris Farms #36 cemetery in Illinois was enriched for mtDNA using in-solution capture techniques, followed by Illumina high-throughput sequencing. Full mitogenomes (7-34×) were successfully reconstructed from dental calculus for all six individuals, including three individuals who had previously tested negative for DNA preservation in bone using conventional PCR techniques. Mitochondrial haplogroup assignments were consistent with previously published findings, and additional comparative analysis of paired dental calculus and dentine from two individuals yielded equivalent haplotype results. All dental calculus samples exhibited damage patterns consistent with ancient DNA, and mitochondrial sequences were estimated to be 92-100% endogenous. DNA polymerase choice was found to impact error rates in downstream sequence analysis, but these effects can be mitigated by greater sequencing depth. Dental calculus is a viable alternative source of human DNA that can be used to reconstruct full mitogenomes from archaeological remains. Am J Phys Anthropol 160:220-228, 2016. © 2016 The Authors American Journal of Physical Anthropology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Development and characterization of microsatellite markers for Lychnophora pinaster: a study for the conservation of a native medicinal plant.

    PubMed

    Haber, L H; Cavallari, M M; Santos, F R C; Marques, M O M; Gimenes, M A; Zucchi, M I

    2009-05-01

    Lychnophora pinaster Mart. (Asteraceae) is a Brazilian medicinal plant, extensively employed in popular medicine as an anti-inflammatory, analgesic and healing agent. Thirteen polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed and optimized for L. pinaster from an enriched genomic library. The markers were used to analyse 37 plants from two native populations, generating an average number of 6.6 alleles per polymorphic locus. These loci are important tools for future studies of population genetics.

  14. Genome-wide linkage disequilibruim revealed by microsatellite markers and association study of fiber quality traits in cotton

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The application of association mapping based on existing genome-wide linkage disequilibrium (LD) between DNA polymorphisms and genes underlying traits is becoming powerful tool that overcome many limitations (high cost, poor resolution, requirement for bi-parentally crossed lines assessing only two ...

  15. Microsatellite markers for genetic studies of the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda.

    PubMed

    Pavinato, V A C; Martinelli, S; de Lima, P F; Zucchi, M I; Omoto, C

    2013-02-08

    We developed six microsatellite markers for the fall armyworm Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). The SSR loci were isolated with enriched genomic library protocol by using native individuals as a genome source for markers. These loci were characterized in 48 individuals and they were tested for the ability to identify candidate migrants exchanged among the samples. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 5 to 18 (10.8 on average). The observed polymorphism information content ranged from 0.172 to 0.891. Beside the lower efficiency to obtain SSR loci, the six microsatellites were polymorphic and sufficiently discriminant for the genetic studies of S. frugiperda; it allowed us to identify migrants with both NJ clustering and the Bayesian methods. These markers will be useful for molecular ecology studies of this highly polyphagous species in order to understand the processes that determine genetic differentiation in the complex agro-ecosystems that it infests and improve local integrated pest management practices.

  16. Novel microsatellite markers acquired from Rubus coreanus Miq. and cross-amplification in other Rubus species.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gi-An; Song, Jae Young; Choi, Heh-Ran; Chung, Jong-Wook; Jeon, Young-Ah; Lee, Jung-Ro; Ma, Kyung-Ho; Lee, Myung-Chul

    2015-04-10

    The Rubus genus consists of more than 600 species that are distributed globally. Only a few Rubus species, including raspberries and blueberries, have been domesticated. Genetic diversity within and between Rubus species is an important resource for breeding programs. We developed genomic microsatellite markers using an SSR-enriched R. coreanus library to study the diversity of the Rubus species. Microsatellite motifs were discovered in 546 of 646 unique clones, and a dinucleotide repeat was the most frequent (75.3%) type of repeat. From 97 microsatellite loci with reproducible amplicons, we acquired 29 polymorphic microsatellite markers in the Rubus coreanus collection. The transferability values ranged from 59.8% to 84% across six Rubus species, and Rubus parvifolius had the highest transferability value (84%). The average number of alleles and the polymorphism information content were 5.7 and 0.541, respectively, in the R. coreanus collection. The diversity index of R. coreanus was similar to the values reported for other Rubus species. A phylogenetic dendrogram based on SSR profiles revealed that seven Rubus species could be allocated to three groups, and that R. coreanus was genetically close to Rubus crataegifolius (mountain berry). These new microsatellite markers might prove useful in studies of the genetic diversity, population structure, and evolutionary relationships among Rubus species.

  17. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci in the Chinese Cobra Naja atra (Elapidae).

    PubMed

    Lin, Long-Hui; Mao, Lu-Xi; Luo, Xia; Qu, Yan-Fu; Ji, Xiang

    2011-01-01

    We characterize thirteen polymorphic microsatellite loci isolated from Naja atra genomic libraries, which were enriched for AC-motif microsatellites. The thirteen loci were screened on a group of 48 individuals from two populations, one in Yong'an and the other in Ganzhou. These markers revealed a relatively high degree of genetic diversity (4-12 alleles per locus) and heterozygosity (Ho ranged from 0.213-0.854 and He ranged from 0.301-0.838). Tests for departure from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and for linkage disequilibrium were conducted for each of the two populations separately. After sequential Bonferroni correction, none of the 13 loci showed significant departures from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Hierarchical analysis of molecular variance indicated that a small but significant (P < 0.001) proportion (16.0%) of the total variation in the microsatellite DNA data were attributable to differences among populations, indicating geographical structuring and restricted gene flow. It could be attributable to the Wuyi mountains in the area having a sufficiently isolating effect to significantly reduce gene flow. Our microsatellite data also showed a low N(m) (1.31) value in the two populations from mainland China. Thus, the Yong'an and Ganzhou populations could be treated as distinct evolutionarily significant units (ESUs). The high level of polymorphism revealed by these microsatellite markers will be useful for the study of gene flow, population structure and evolutionary history of N. atra.

  18. Alzheimer's Disease Variants with the Genome-Wide Significance are Significantly Enriched in Immune Pathways and Active in Immune Cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qinghua; Jin, Shuilin; Jiang, Yongshuai; Liao, Mingzhi; Feng, Rennan; Zhang, Liangcai; Liu, Guiyou; Hao, Junwei

    2017-01-01

    The existing large-scale genome-wide association studies (GWAS) datasets provide strong support for investigating the mechanisms of Alzheimer's disease (AD) by applying multiple methods of pathway analysis. Previous studies using selected single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with several thresholds of nominal significance for pathway analysis determined that the threshold chosen for SNPs can reflect the disease model. Presumably, then, pathway analysis with a stringent threshold to define "associated" SNPs would test the hypothesis that highly associated SNPs are enriched in one or more particular pathways. Here, we selected 599 AD variants (P < 5.00E-08) to investigate the pathways in which these variants are enriched and the cell types in which these variants are active. Our results showed that AD variants are significantly enriched in pathways of the immune system. Further analysis indicated that AD variants are significantly enriched for enhancers in a number of cell types, in particular the B-lymphocyte, which is the most substantially enriched cell type. This cell type maintains its dominance among the strongest enhancers. AD SNPs also display significant enrichment for DNase in 12 cell types, among which the top 6 significant signals are from immune cell types, including 4 B cells (top 4 significant signals) and CD14+ and CD34+ cells. In summary, our results show that these AD variants with P < 5.00E-08 are significantly enriched in pathways of the immune system and active in immune cells. To a certain degree, the genetic predisposition for development of AD is rooted in the immune system, rather than in neuronal cells.

  19. Heterozygosity increases microsatellite mutation rate

    PubMed Central

    Amos, William

    2016-01-01

    Whole genome sequencing of families of Arabidopsis has recently lent strong support to the heterozygote instability (HI) hypothesis that heterozygosity locally increases mutation rate. However, there is an important theoretical difference between the impact on base substitutions, where mutation rate increases in regions surrounding a heterozygous site, and the impact of HI on sequences such as microsatellites, where mutations are likely to occur at the heterozygous site itself. At microsatellite loci, HI should create a positive feedback loop, with heterozygosity and mutation rate mutually increasing each other. Direct support for HI acting on microsatellites is limited and contradictory. I therefore analysed AC microsatellites in 1163 genome sequences from the 1000 genomes project. I used the presence of rare alleles, which are likely to be very recent in origin, as a surrogate measure of mutation rate. I show that rare alleles are more likely to occur at locus-population combinations with higher heterozygosity even when all populations carry exactly the same number of alleles. PMID:26740567

  20. BAC-End Microsatellites from Intra and Inter-Genic Regions of the Common Bean Genome and Their Correlation with Cytogenetic Features

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Matthew Wohlgemuth; Córdoba, Juana Marcela; Muñóz, Claritza; Yuyó, Deissy K.

    2014-01-01

    Highly polymorphic markers such as simple sequence repeats (SSRs) or microsatellites are very useful for genetic mapping. In this study novel SSRs were identified in BAC-end sequences (BES) from non-contigged, non-overlapping bacterial artificial clones (BACs) in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). These so called “singleton” BACs were from the G19833 Andean gene pool physical map and the new BES-SSR markers were used for the saturation of the inter-gene pool, DOR364×G19833 genetic map. A total of 899 SSR loci were found among the singleton BES, but only 346 loci corresponded to the single di- or tri-nucleotide motifs that were likely to be polymorphic (ATT or AG motifs, principally) and useful for primer design and individual marker mapping. When these novel SSR markers were evaluated in the DOR364×G19833 population parents, 136 markers revealed polymorphism and 106 were mapped. Genetic mapping resulted in a map length of 2291 cM with an average distance between markers of 5.2 cM. The new genetic map was compared to the most recent cytogenetic analysis of common bean chromosomes. We found that the new singleton BES-SSR were helpful in filling peri-centromeric spaces on the cytogenetic map. Short genetic distances between some new singleton-derived BES-SSR markers was common showing suppressed recombination in these regions compared to other parts of the genome. The correlation of singleton-derived SSR marker distribution with other cytogenetic features of the bean genome is discussed. PMID:25254501

  1. Ontology and diversity of transcript-associated microsatellites mined from a globe artichoke EST database

    PubMed Central

    Scaglione, Davide; Acquadro, Alberto; Portis, Ezio; Taylor, Christopher A; Lanteri, Sergio; Knapp, Steven J

    2009-01-01

    Background The globe artichoke (Cynara cardunculus var. scolymus L.) is a significant crop in the Mediterranean basin. Despite its commercial importance and its both dietary and pharmaceutical value, knowledge of its genetics and genomics remains scant. Microsatellite markers have become a key tool in genetic and genomic analysis, and we have exploited recently acquired EST (expressed sequence tag) sequence data (Composite Genome Project - CGP) to develop an extensive set of microsatellite markers. Results A unigene assembly was created from over 36,000 globe artichoke EST sequences, containing 6,621 contigs and 12,434 singletons. Over 12,000 of these unigenes were functionally assigned on the basis of homology with Arabidopsis thaliana reference proteins. A total of 4,219 perfect repeats, located within 3,308 unigenes was identified and the gene ontology (GO) analysis highlighted some GO term's enrichments among different classes of microsatellites with respect to their position. Sufficient flanking sequence was available to enable the design of primers to amplify 2,311 of these microsatellites, and a set of 300 was tested against a DNA panel derived from 28 C. cardunculus genotypes. Consistent amplification and polymorphism was obtained from 236 of these assays. Their polymorphic information content (PIC) ranged from 0.04 to 0.90 (mean 0.66). Between 176 and 198 of the assays were informative in at least one of the three available mapping populations. Conclusion EST-based microsatellites have provided a large set of de novo genetic markers, which show significant amounts of polymorphism both between and within the three taxa of C. cardunculus. They are thus well suited as assays for phylogenetic analysis, the construction of genetic maps, marker-assisted breeding, transcript mapping and other genomic applications in the species. PMID:19785740

  2. Raalin, a transcript enriched in the honey bee brain, is a remnant of genomic rearrangement in Hymenoptera.

    PubMed

    Tirosh, Y; Morpurgo, N; Cohen, M; Linial, M; Bloch, G

    2012-06-01

    We identified a predicted compact cysteine-rich sequence in the honey bee genome that we called 'Raalin'. Raalin transcripts are enriched in the brain of adult honey bee workers and drones, with only minimum expression in other tissues or in pre-adult stages. Open-reading frame (ORF) homologues of Raalin were identified in the transcriptomes of fruit flies, mosquitoes and moths. The Raalin-like gene from Drosophila melanogaster encodes for a short secreted protein that is maximally expressed in the adult brain with negligible expression in other tissues or pre-imaginal stages. Raalin-like sequences have also been found in the recently sequenced genomes of six ant species, but not in the jewel wasp Nasonia vitripennis. As in the honey bee, the Raalin-like sequences of ants do not have an ORF. A comparison of the genome region containing Raalin in the genomes of bees, ants and the wasp provides evolutionary support for an extensive genome rearrangement in this sequence. Our analyses identify a new family of ancient cysteine-rich short sequences in insects in which insertions and genome rearrangements may have disrupted this locus in the branch leading to the Hymenoptera. The regulated expression of this transcript suggests that it has a brain-specific function. © 2012 The Authors. Insect Molecular Biology © 2012 The Royal Entomological Society.

  3. Genome scans for divergent selection in natural populations of the widespread hardwood species Eucalyptus grandis (Myrtaceae) using microsatellites

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhijiao; Zhang, Miaomiao; Li, Fagen; Weng, Qijie; Zhou, Chanpin; Li, Mei; Li, Jie; Huang, Huanhua; Mo, Xiaoyong; Gan, Siming

    2016-01-01

    Identification of loci or genes under natural selection is important for both understanding the genetic basis of local adaptation and practical applications, and genome scans provide a powerful means for such identification purposes. In this study, genome-wide simple sequence repeats markers (SSRs) were used to scan for molecular footprints of divergent selection in Eucalyptus grandis, a hardwood species occurring widely in costal areas from 32° S to 16° S in Australia. High population diversity levels and weak population structure were detected with putatively neutral genomic SSRs. Using three FST outlier detection methods, a total of 58 outlying SSRs were collectively identified as loci under divergent selection against three non-correlated climatic variables, namely, mean annual temperature, isothermality and annual precipitation. Using a spatial analysis method, nine significant associations were revealed between FST outlier allele frequencies and climatic variables, involving seven alleles from five SSR loci. Of the five significant SSRs, two (EUCeSSR1044 and Embra394) contained alleles of putative genes with known functional importance for response to climatic factors. Our study presents critical information on the population diversity and structure of the important woody species E. grandis and provides insight into the adaptive responses of perennial trees to climatic variations. PMID:27748400

  4. Mining non-model genomic libraries for microsatellites: BAC versus EST libraries and the generation of allelic richness

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are tandemly repeated sequence motifs common in genomic nucleotide sequence that often harbor significant variation in repeat number. Frequently used as molecular markers, SSRs are increasingly identified via in silico approaches. Two common classes of genomic resources that can be mined are bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries and expressed sequence tag (EST) libraries. Results 288 SSR loci were screened in the rapidly radiating Hawaiian swordtail cricket genus Laupala. SSRs were more densely distributed and contained longer repeat structures in BAC library-derived sequence than in EST library-derived sequence, although neither repeat density nor length was exceptionally elevated despite the relatively large genome size of Laupala. A non-random distribution favoring AT-rich SSRs was observed. Allelic diversity of SSRs was positively correlated with repeat length and was generally higher in AT-rich repeat motifs. Conclusion The first large-scale survey of Orthopteran SSR allelic diversity is presented. Selection contributes more strongly to the size and density distributions of SSR loci derived from EST library sequence than from BAC library sequence, although all SSRs likely are subject to similar physical and structural constraints, such as slippage of DNA replication machinery, that may generate increased allelic diversity in AT-rich sequence motifs. Although in silico approaches work well for SSR locus identification in both EST and BAC libraries, BAC library sequence and AT-rich repeat motifs are generally superior SSR development resources for most applications. PMID:20624300

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Paenibacillus sp. Strain DMB5, Acclimatized and Enriched for Catabolizing Anthropogenic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jenny; Shah, Binal; Jain, Kunal; Parmar, Nidhi; Hinsu, Ankit; Patel, Namrata

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome sequence of Paenibacillus sp. strain DMB5, isolated from polluted sediments of the Kharicut Canal, Vatva, India, having a genome size of 7.5 Mbp and 7,077 coding sequences. The genome of this dye-degrading bacterium provides valuable information on the microbe-mediated biodegradation of anthropogenic compounds. PMID:27034501

  6. [Identification of mutations associated with coronary artery lesion susceptibility in Kawasaki disease by targeted enrichment of genomic region sequencing technique].

    PubMed

    Zhu, D Y; Song, S R; Xie, L J; Qiu, F; Yang, J; Xiao, T T; Huang, M

    2017-07-02

    Objective: To screen and identify the mutations in Kawasaki disease by targeted enrichment of genomic region sequencing technique and investigate susceptibility genes associated with coronary artery lesion. Method: This was a case-control study.A total of 114 patients diagnosed as Kawasaki disease treated in Shanghai Children's Hospital between December 2015 and November 2016 were studied and another 45 healthy children who were physically examined in outpatient department were enrolled as control group. Patients were divided into two groups based on the results of echocardiogram. Peripheral venous blood was obtained from patients and controls. Genomic DNA was extracted. SeqCap EZ Choice libraries were prepared by targeted enrichment of genomic region technology. Then the libraries were sequenced to identify susceptibility genes associated with coronary artery lesion in patients diagnosed as Kawasaki disease.Susceptible genes were identified by Burden test, Pearson chi-square test or Fisher's exact probability test. Result: There was statistically significant difference in TNFRSF11B(rs2073618)G>C(p.N3K)mutation and GG/GC/CC genotype between Kawasaki disease group and control group(χ(2)=15.52, P=0.00). There was statistically significant difference in TNFRSF13B(rs34562254)C>T(p.P251L)mutation(χ(2)=10.40, P=0.01)and LEFTY1(rs360057)T>G(p.D322A)mutation(χ(2)=8.505, P=0.01)between patients with coronary artery lesions and those without. Conclusion: Targeted enrichment of genomic region sequencing technology can be used to do primary screening for the susceptible genes associated with coronary artery lesions in Chinese Kawasaki patients and may provide theoretical basis for larger sample investigation of risk prediction score standard in Kawasaki disease.

  7. Transpecific microsatellites for hard pines.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, M.; Cross, M.; Maguire, L.; Dieters, J.; Williams, G.; Henry, J.

    2002-04-01

    Microsatellites are difficult to recover from large plant genomes so cross-specific utilisation is an important source of markers. Fifty microsatellites were tested for cross-specific amplification and polymorphism to two New World hard pine species, slash pine ( Pinus elliottii var. elliottii) and Caribbean pine ( P. caribaea var. hondurensis). Twenty-nine (58%) markers amplified in both hard pine species, and 23 of these 29 were polymorphic. Soft pine (subgenus Strobus) microsatellite markers did amplify, but none were polymorphic. Pinus elliottii var. elliottii and P. caribaea var. hondurensis showed mutational changes in the flanking regions and the repeat motif that were informative for Pinus spp. phylogenetic relationships. Most allele length variation could be attributed to variability in repeat unit number. There was no evidence for ascertainment bias.

  8. Development and characterization of microsatellite markers (SSR) in Sesamum (Sesamum indicum L.) species.

    PubMed

    Spandana, B; Reddy, V Prathap; Prasanna, G John; Anuradha, G; Sivaramakrishnan, S

    2012-11-01

    Microsatellites, also known as simple sequence repeats (SSRs), are the class of repetitive DNA sequences present throughout the genome of many plant and animal species. Recent advances in molecular genetics had been the introduction of microsatellite markers to investigate the genetic structuring of natural plant populations. We have employed an enrichment strategy for microsatellite isolation by using multi-enzymes digestion, microsatellite oligoprobes, and streptavidin magnetic beads in Sesamum (Sesamum indicum L.). More than 200 SSR motifs were detected (SSR motifs ≥2 repeat units or 6 bp); 80 % of the clones contained SSR motifs. When regarding SSRs with four or more repeat units and a minimum length of 10 bp, 132 of them showed repeats. Eighteen SSR markers were initially characterized for optimum annealing temperature using a gradient PCR technique. Among the 18 SSR markers characterized, five were found to be polymorphic and used to analyze 60 Sesamum germplasm accessions. The maximum number of alleles detected was four with a single primer and the least number of two alleles with three primers with an average PIC value of 0.77. SSRs are a valuable tool for estimating genetic diversity and analyzing the evolutionary and historical development of cultivars at the genomic level in sesame breeding programs.

  9. Survey and analysis of simple sequence repeats in the Ustilaginoidea virens genome and the development of microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Mina; Yu, Junjie; Li, Huanhuan; Wang, Yahui; Yin, Xiaole; Bo, Huiwen; Ding, Hui; Zhou, Yuxin; Liu, Yongfeng

    2016-07-01

    Ustilaginoidea virens is the causal agent of rice false smut, causing quantitative and qualitative losses in rice industry. However, the development and application of simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers for genetic diversity studies in U. virens were limited. This study is the first to perform large-scale development of SSR markers of this pathogen at the genome level, to (1) compare these SSR markers with those of other fungi, (2) analyze the pattern of the SSRs, and (3) obtain more informative genetic markers. U. virens is rich in SSRs, and 13,778 SSRs were identified with a relative abundance of 349.7SSRs/Mb. The most common motifs in the genome or in noncoding regions were mononucleotides, whereas trinucleotides in coding sequences. A total of 6 out of 127 primers were randomly selected to be used to analyze 115 isolates, and these 6 primers showed high polymorphism in U. virens. This study may serve as an important resource for molecular genetic studies in U. virens.

  10. Pulling out the 1%: Whole-Genome Capture for the Targeted Enrichment of Ancient DNA Sequencing Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Meredith L.; Buenrostro, Jason D.; Valdiosera, Cristina; Schroeder, Hannes; Allentoft, Morten E.; Sikora, Martin; Rasmussen, Morten; Gravel, Simon; Guillén, Sonia; Nekhrizov, Georgi; Leshtakov, Krasimir; Dimitrova, Diana; Theodossiev, Nikola; Pettener, Davide; Luiselli, Donata; Sandoval, Karla; Moreno-Estrada, Andrés; Li, Yingrui; Wang, Jun; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Willerslev, Eske; Greenleaf, William J.; Bustamante, Carlos D.

    2013-01-01

    Most ancient specimens contain very low levels of endogenous DNA, precluding the shotgun sequencing of many interesting samples because of cost. Ancient DNA (aDNA) libraries often contain <1% endogenous DNA, with the majority of sequencing capacity taken up by environmental DNA. Here we present a capture-based method for enriching the endogenous component of aDNA sequencing libraries. By using biotinylated RNA baits transcribed from genomic DNA libraries, we are able to capture DNA fragments from across the human genome. We demonstrate this method on libraries created from four Iron Age and Bronze Age human teeth from Bulgaria, as well as bone samples from seven Peruvian mummies and a Bronze Age hair sample from Denmark. Prior to capture, shotgun sequencing of these libraries yielded an average of 1.2% of reads mapping to the human genome (including duplicates). After capture, this fraction increased substantially, with up to 59% of reads mapped to human and enrichment ranging from 6- to 159-fold. Furthermore, we maintained coverage of the majority of regions sequenced in the precapture library. Intersection with the 1000 Genomes Project reference panel yielded an average of 50,723 SNPs (range 3,062–147,243) for the postcapture libraries sequenced with 1 million reads, compared with 13,280 SNPs (range 217–73,266) for the precapture libraries, increasing resolution in population genetic analyses. Our whole-genome capture approach makes it less costly to sequence aDNA from specimens containing very low levels of endogenous DNA, enabling the analysis of larger numbers of samples. PMID:24568772

  11. Pulling out the 1%: whole-genome capture for the targeted enrichment of ancient DNA sequencing libraries.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Meredith L; Buenrostro, Jason D; Valdiosera, Cristina; Schroeder, Hannes; Allentoft, Morten E; Sikora, Martin; Rasmussen, Morten; Gravel, Simon; Guillén, Sonia; Nekhrizov, Georgi; Leshtakov, Krasimir; Dimitrova, Diana; Theodossiev, Nikola; Pettener, Davide; Luiselli, Donata; Sandoval, Karla; Moreno-Estrada, Andrés; Li, Yingrui; Wang, Jun; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Willerslev, Eske; Greenleaf, William J; Bustamante, Carlos D

    2013-11-07

    Most ancient specimens contain very low levels of endogenous DNA, precluding the shotgun sequencing of many interesting samples because of cost. Ancient DNA (aDNA) libraries often contain <1% endogenous DNA, with the majority of sequencing capacity taken up by environmental DNA. Here we present a capture-based method for enriching the endogenous component of aDNA sequencing libraries. By using biotinylated RNA baits transcribed from genomic DNA libraries, we are able to capture DNA fragments from across the human genome. We demonstrate this method on libraries created from four Iron Age and Bronze Age human teeth from Bulgaria, as well as bone samples from seven Peruvian mummies and a Bronze Age hair sample from Denmark. Prior to capture, shotgun sequencing of these libraries yielded an average of 1.2% of reads mapping to the human genome (including duplicates). After capture, this fraction increased substantially, with up to 59% of reads mapped to human and enrichment ranging from 6- to 159-fold. Furthermore, we maintained coverage of the majority of regions sequenced in the precapture library. Intersection with the 1000 Genomes Project reference panel yielded an average of 50,723 SNPs (range 3,062-147,243) for the postcapture libraries sequenced with 1 million reads, compared with 13,280 SNPs (range 217-73,266) for the precapture libraries, increasing resolution in population genetic analyses. Our whole-genome capture approach makes it less costly to sequence aDNA from specimens containing very low levels of endogenous DNA, enabling the analysis of larger numbers of samples. Copyright © 2013 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Genome engineering uncovers 54 evolutionarily conserved and testis-enriched genes that are not required for male fertility in mice.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Haruhiko; Castaneda, Julio M; Fujihara, Yoshitaka; Yu, Zhifeng; Archambeault, Denise R; Isotani, Ayako; Kiyozumi, Daiji; Kriseman, Maya L; Mashiko, Daisuke; Matsumura, Takafumi; Matzuk, Ryan M; Mori, Masashi; Noda, Taichi; Oji, Asami; Okabe, Masaru; Prunskaite-Hyyrylainen, Renata; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Satouh, Yuhkoh; Zhang, Qian; Ikawa, Masahito; Matzuk, Martin M

    2016-07-12

    Gene-expression analysis studies from Schultz et al. estimate that more than 2,300 genes in the mouse genome are expressed predominantly in the male germ line. As of their 2003 publication [Schultz N, Hamra FK, Garbers DL (2003) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 100(21):12201-12206], the functions of the majority of these testis-enriched genes during spermatogenesis and fertilization were largely unknown. Since the study by Schultz et al., functional analysis of hundreds of reproductive-tract-enriched genes have been performed, but there remain many testis-enriched genes for which their relevance to reproduction remain unexplored or unreported. Historically, a gene knockout is the "gold standard" to determine whether a gene's function is essential in vivo. Although knockout mice without apparent phenotypes are rarely published, these knockout mouse lines and their phenotypic information need to be shared to prevent redundant experiments. Herein, we used bioinformatic and experimental approaches to uncover mouse testis-enriched genes that are evolutionarily conserved in humans. We then used gene-disruption approaches, including Knockout Mouse Project resources (targeting vectors and mice) and CRISPR/Cas9, to mutate and quickly analyze the fertility of these mutant mice. We discovered that 54 mutant mouse lines were fertile. Thus, despite evolutionary conservation of these genes in vertebrates and in some cases in all eukaryotes, our results indicate that these genes are not individually essential for male mouse fertility. Our phenotypic data are highly relevant in this fiscally tight funding period and postgenomic age when large numbers of genomes are being analyzed for disease association, and will prevent unnecessary expenditures and duplications of effort by others.

  13. Genomic DNA Enrichment Using Sequence Capture Microarrays: a Novel Approach to Discover Sequence Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNP) in Brassica napus L

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Wayne E.; Parkin, Isobel A.; Gajardo, Humberto A.; Gerhardt, Daniel J.; Higgins, Erin; Sidebottom, Christine; Sharpe, Andrew G.; Snowdon, Rod J.; Federico, Maria L.; Iniguez-Luy, Federico L.

    2013-01-01

    Targeted genomic selection methodologies, or sequence capture, allow for DNA enrichment and large-scale resequencing and characterization of natural genetic variation in species with complex genomes, such as rapeseed canola (Brassica napus L., AACC, 2n=38). The main goal of this project was to combine sequence capture with next generation sequencing (NGS) to discover single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in specific areas of the B. napus genome historically associated (via quantitative trait loci –QTL– analysis) to traits of agronomical and nutritional importance. A 2.1 million feature sequence capture platform was designed to interrogate DNA sequence variation across 47 specific genomic regions, representing 51.2 Mb of the Brassica A and C genomes, in ten diverse rapeseed genotypes. All ten genotypes were sequenced using the 454 Life Sciences chemistry and to assess the effect of increased sequence depth, two genotypes were also sequenced using Illumina HiSeq chemistry. As a result, 589,367 potentially useful SNPs were identified. Analysis of sequence coverage indicated a four-fold increased representation of target regions, with 57% of the filtered SNPs falling within these regions. Sixty percent of discovered SNPs corresponded to transitions while 40% were transversions. Interestingly, fifty eight percent of the SNPs were found in genic regions while 42% were found in intergenic regions. Further, a high percentage of genic SNPs was found in exons (65% and 64% for the A and C genomes, respectively). Two different genotyping assays were used to validate the discovered SNPs. Validation rates ranged from 61.5% to 84% of tested SNPs, underpinning the effectiveness of this SNP discovery approach. Most importantly, the discovered SNPs were associated with agronomically important regions of the B. napus genome generating a novel data resource for research and breeding this crop species. PMID:24312619

  14. Genomic DNA enrichment using sequence capture microarrays: a novel approach to discover sequence nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in Brassica napus L.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Wayne E; Parkin, Isobel A; Gajardo, Humberto A; Gerhardt, Daniel J; Higgins, Erin; Sidebottom, Christine; Sharpe, Andrew G; Snowdon, Rod J; Federico, Maria L; Iniguez-Luy, Federico L

    2013-01-01

    Targeted genomic selection methodologies, or sequence capture, allow for DNA enrichment and large-scale resequencing and characterization of natural genetic variation in species with complex genomes, such as rapeseed canola (Brassica napus L., AACC, 2n=38). The main goal of this project was to combine sequence capture with next generation sequencing (NGS) to discover single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in specific areas of the B. napus genome historically associated (via quantitative trait loci -QTL- analysis) to traits of agronomical and nutritional importance. A 2.1 million feature sequence capture platform was designed to interrogate DNA sequence variation across 47 specific genomic regions, representing 51.2 Mb of the Brassica A and C genomes, in ten diverse rapeseed genotypes. All ten genotypes were sequenced using the 454 Life Sciences chemistry and to assess the effect of increased sequence depth, two genotypes were also sequenced using Illumina HiSeq chemistry. As a result, 589,367 potentially useful SNPs were identified. Analysis of sequence coverage indicated a four-fold increased representation of target regions, with 57% of the filtered SNPs falling within these regions. Sixty percent of discovered SNPs corresponded to transitions while 40% were transversions. Interestingly, fifty eight percent of the SNPs were found in genic regions while 42% were found in intergenic regions. Further, a high percentage of genic SNPs was found in exons (65% and 64% for the A and C genomes, respectively). Two different genotyping assays were used to validate the discovered SNPs. Validation rates ranged from 61.5% to 84% of tested SNPs, underpinning the effectiveness of this SNP discovery approach. Most importantly, the discovered SNPs were associated with agronomically important regions of the B. napus genome generating a novel data resource for research and breeding this crop species.

  15. Rapid microsatellite development for tree peony and its implications

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Microsatellites are ubiquitous in genomes of various organisms. With the realization that they play roles in developmental and physiological processes, rather than exist as ‘junk’ DNA, microsatellites are receiving increasing attention. Next-generation sequencing allows acquisition of large-scale microsatellite information, and is especially useful for plants without reference genome sequences. Results In this study, enriched DNA libraries of tree peony, a well-known ornamental woody shrub, were used for high-throughput microsatellite development by 454 GS-FLX Titanium pyrosequencing. We obtained 675,221 reads with an average length of 356 bp. The total size of examined sequences was 240,672,018 bp, from which 237,134 SSRs were identified. Of these sequences, 164,043 contained SSRs, with 27% featuring more than one SSR. Interestingly, a high proportion of SSRs (43%) were present in compound formation. SSRs with repeat motifs of 1–4 bp (mono-, di-, tri-, and tetra-nucleotide repeats) accounted for 99.8% of SSRs. Di-nucleotide repeats were the most abundant. As in most plants, the predominant motif in tree peony was (A/T)n, with (G/C)n less common. The lengths of SSRs were classified into 11 groups. The shortest SSRs (10 bp) represented 1% of the total number, whereas SSRs 21–30 and 101–110 bp long accounted for 26% and 29%, respectively, of all SSRs. Many sequences (42,111) were mapped to CDS (coding domain sequence) regions using Arabidopsis as a reference. GO annotation analysis predicted that CDSs with SSRs performed various functions associated with cellular components, molecular functions, and biological processes. Of 100 validated primer pairs, 24 were selected for polymorphism analysis among 23 genotypes; cluster analysis of the resulting data grouped genotypes according to known relationships, confirming the usefulness of the developed SSR markers. Conclusions The results of our large-scale SSR marker development using tree peony

  16. Target identification in Fusobacterium nucleatum by subtractive genomics approach and enrichment analysis of host-pathogen protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Thotakura, Pragna Lakshmi; Tiwary, Basant Kumar; Krishna, Ramadas

    2016-05-12

    Fusobacterium nucleatum, a well studied bacterium in periodontal diseases, appendicitis, gingivitis, osteomyelitis and pregnancy complications has recently gained attention due to its association with colorectal cancer (CRC) progression. Treatment with berberine was shown to reverse F. nucleatum-induced CRC progression in mice by balancing the growth of opportunistic pathogens in tumor microenvironment. Intestinal microbiota imbalance and the infections caused by F. nucleatum might be regulated by therapeutic intervention. Hence, we aimed to predict drug target proteins in F. nucleatum, through subtractive genomics approach and host-pathogen protein-protein interactions (HP-PPIs). We also carried out enrichment analysis of host interacting partners to hypothesize the possible mechanisms involved in CRC progression due to F. nucleatum. In subtractive genomics approach, the essential, virulence and resistance related proteins were retrieved from RefSeq proteome of F. nucleatum by searching against Database of Essential Genes (DEG), Virulence Factor Database (VFDB) and Antibiotic Resistance Gene-ANNOTation (ARG-ANNOT) tool respectively. A subsequent hierarchical screening to identify non-human homologous, metabolic pathway-independent/pathway-specific and druggable proteins resulted in eight pathway-independent and 27 pathway-specific druggable targets. Co-aggregation of F. nucleatum with host induces proinflammatory gene expression thereby potentiates tumorigenesis. Hence, proteins from IBDsite, a database for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) research and those involved in colorectal adenocarcinoma as interpreted from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) were retrieved to predict drug targets based on HP-PPIs with F. nucleatum proteome. Prediction of HP-PPIs exhibited 186 interactions contributed by 103 host and 76 bacterial proteins. Bacterial interacting partners were accounted as putative targets. And enrichment analysis of host interacting partners showed statistically

  17. Cross-genome screening of novel sequence-specific non-LTR retrotransposons: various multicopy RNA genes and microsatellites are selected as targets.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Kenji K; Fujiwara, Haruhiko

    2004-02-01

    Although most LINEs (long interspersed nuclear elements), which are autonomous non-long-terminal-repeat retrotransposons, are inserted throughout the host genome, three groups of LINEs, the early-branched group, the Tx group, and the R1 clade, are inserted into specific sites within the target sequence. We previously characterized the sequence specificity of the R1 clade elements. In this study, we screened the other two groups of sequence-specific LINEs from public DNA databases, reconstructed elements from fragmented sequences, identified their target sequences, and analyzed them phylogenetically. We characterized 13 elements in the early-branched group and 13 in the Tx group. In the early-branched group, we identified R2 elements from sea squirts and zebrafish in this study, although R2 has not been characterized outside the arthropod group to date. This is the first evidence of cross-phylum distribution of sequence-specific LINEs. The Dong element also occurs across phyla, among arthropods and mollusks. In the Tx group, we characterized five novel sequence-specific families: Kibi for TC repeats, Koshi for TTC repeats, Keno for the U2 snRNA gene, Dewa for the tRNA tandem arrays, and Mutsu for the 5S rRNA gene. Keno and Mutsu insert into the highly conserved region within small RNA genes and destroy the targets. Several copies of Dewa insert different positions of tRNA tandem array, which indicates a certain "site specifier" other than sequence-specific endonuclease. In all three groups, LINEs specific for the rRNA genes or microsatellites can occur as multiple families in one organism. This indicates that the copy number of a target sequence is the primary factor to restrict the variety of sequence specificity of LINEs.

  18. Mining online genomic resources in Anolis carolinensis facilitates rapid and inexpensive development of cross-species microsatellite markers for the Anolis lizard genus.

    PubMed

    Wordley, Claire; Slate, Jon; Stapley, Jessica

    2011-01-01

    Online sequence databases can provide valuable resources for the development of cross-species genetic markers. In particular, mining expressed tag sequences (EST) for microsatellites and developing conserved cross-species microsatellite markers can provide a rapid and relatively inexpensive method to develop new markers for a range of species. Here, we adopt this approach to develop cross-species microsatellite markers in Anolis lizards, which is a model genus in evolutionary biology and ecology. Using EST sequences from Anolis carolinensis, we identified 127 microsatellites that satisfied our criteria, and tested 49 of these in five species of Anolis (carolinensis, distichus, apletophallus, porcatus and sagrei). We identified between 8 and 25 new variable genetic markers for five Anolis species. These markers will be a valuable resource for studies of population genetics, comparative mapping, mating systems, behavioural ecology and adaptive radiations in this diverse lineage.

  19. Somatic intronic microsatellite loci differentiate glioblastoma from lower-grade gliomas.

    PubMed

    Karunasena, Enusha; McIver, Lauren J; Rood, Brian R; Wu, Xiaowei; Zhu, Hongxiao; Bavarva, Jasmin H; Garner, Harold R

    2014-08-15

    Genomic studies of glioma sub-types have amassed new disease specific mutations, yet these only partially explain how mutations are linked to predisposition or progression. We hypothesized that microsatellite variation could expand the understanding of glioma etiology. Furthermore, germline markers for gliomas are typically undetectable; therefore we also hypothesize that the predictability of cancer-associated microsatellite loci in germline DNA may support the current hypothesis of a glioma cell of origin. In this study, "normal" germline exome sequenced DNA from the 1000 Genomes Project (n=390) were compared with exome sequences from germlines of subjects with WHO grade II and III lower-grade glioma (LGG, n=136) and WHO grade IV glioblastoma (GBM, n=252) from The Cancer Genome Atlas to identify microsatellite loci non-randomly associated with glioma. From germline data, we identified 48 GBM-specific loci, 42 Lower-grade glioma specific loci and 29 loci that distinguish GBM from LGG (p≤ 0.01). We then attempted to distinguish WHO grade II glioma (n=67) from GBM resulting in 8 informative loci. Significantly, in all glioma grades, comparisons between tumor and matched germline sequences demonstrated no significant differences in these variants (p≥ 0.01). Therefore, these microsatellite loci are considered to be components of grade-specific signatures for glioma which distinguish germline sequences of individuals with cancer from those of individuals that are "normal". In order to better understand the significance of these loci, we identified biological processes enriched in genes with these variants. Most strikingly, six helicase genes were enriched in the GBM cohort (p≤ 1.0 x10⁻³). The preservation of these glioma-specific loci could therefore serve as valuable diagnostic and therapeutic markers; especially since the heterogeneity of tumor cell populations can obscure the identification of mutations preceding a metastatic phenotype.

  20. Sequence determinants of human microsatellite variability

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Microsatellite loci are frequently used in genomic studies of DNA sequence repeats and in population studies of genetic variability. To investigate the effect of sequence properties of microsatellites on their level of variability we have analyzed genotypes at 627 microsatellite loci in 1,048 worldwide individuals from the HGDP-CEPH cell line panel together with the DNA sequences of these microsatellites in the human RefSeq database. Results Calibrating PCR fragment lengths in individual genotypes by using the RefSeq sequence enabled us to infer repeat number in the HGDP-CEPH dataset and to calculate the mean number of repeats (as opposed to the mean PCR fragment length), under the assumption that differences in PCR fragment length reflect differences in the numbers of repeats in the embedded repeat sequences. We find the mean and maximum numbers of repeats across individuals to be positively correlated with heterozygosity. The size and composition of the repeat unit of a microsatellite are also important factors in predicting heterozygosity, with tetra-nucleotide repeat units high in G/C content leading to higher heterozygosity. Finally, we find that microsatellites containing more separate sets of repeated motifs generally have higher heterozygosity. Conclusions These results suggest that sequence properties of microsatellites have a significant impact in determining the features of human microsatellite variability. PMID:20015383

  1. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite markers in the Serra Spanish mackerel, Scomberomorus brasiliensis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Thirteen nuclear-encoded microsatellites from a genomic DNA library of Serra Spanish mackerel, Scomberomorus brasiliensis, were isolated and characterized. The microsatellites include 10 perfect repeats (8 tetranucleotide and 2 dinucleotide) and 3 imperfect repeats (2 tetranucleotide and 1 dinucleo...

  2. Characterization of polymorphic chloroplast microsatellites in Prunus species and maternal lineages in peach genotypes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Several available Prunus chloroplast genomes have not been exploited to develop polymorphic chloroplast microsatellites that could be useful in Prunus maternal lineage and phylogenetic analysis. In this study, using available bioinformatics tools, 80, 75, and 78 microsatellites were identified from ...

  3. Microsatellites as targets of natural selection.

    PubMed

    Haasl, Ryan J; Payseur, Bret A

    2013-02-01

    The ability to survey polymorphism on a genomic scale has enabled genome-wide scans for the targets of natural selection. Theory that connects patterns of genetic variation to evidence of natural selection most often assumes a diallelic locus and no recurrent mutation. Although these assumptions are suitable to selection that targets single nucleotide variants, fundamentally different types of mutation generate abundant polymorphism in genomes. Moreover, recent empirical results suggest that mutationally complex, multiallelic loci including microsatellites and copy number variants are sometimes targeted by natural selection. Given their abundance, the lack of inference methods tailored to the mutational peculiarities of these types of loci represents a notable gap in our ability to interrogate genomes for signatures of natural selection. Previous theoretical investigations of mutation-selection balance at multiallelic loci include assumptions that limit their application to inference from empirical data. Focusing on microsatellites, we assess the dynamics and population-level consequences of selection targeting mutationally complex variants. We develop general models of a multiallelic fitness surface, a realistic model of microsatellite mutation, and an efficient simulation algorithm. Using these tools, we explore mutation-selection-drift equilibrium at microsatellites and investigate the mutational history and selective regime of the microsatellite that causes Friedreich's ataxia. We characterize microsatellite selective events by their duration and cost, note similarities to sweeps from standing point variation, and conclude that it is premature to label microsatellites as ubiquitous agents of efficient adaptive change. Together, our models and simulation algorithm provide a powerful framework for statistical inference, which can be used to test the neutrality of microsatellites and other multiallelic variants.

  4. Microsatellites as Targets of Natural Selection

    PubMed Central

    Haasl, Ryan J.; Payseur, Bret A.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to survey polymorphism on a genomic scale has enabled genome-wide scans for the targets of natural selection. Theory that connects patterns of genetic variation to evidence of natural selection most often assumes a diallelic locus and no recurrent mutation. Although these assumptions are suitable to selection that targets single nucleotide variants, fundamentally different types of mutation generate abundant polymorphism in genomes. Moreover, recent empirical results suggest that mutationally complex, multiallelic loci including microsatellites and copy number variants are sometimes targeted by natural selection. Given their abundance, the lack of inference methods tailored to the mutational peculiarities of these types of loci represents a notable gap in our ability to interrogate genomes for signatures of natural selection. Previous theoretical investigations of mutation-selection balance at multiallelic loci include assumptions that limit their application to inference from empirical data. Focusing on microsatellites, we assess the dynamics and population-level consequences of selection targeting mutationally complex variants. We develop general models of a multiallelic fitness surface, a realistic model of microsatellite mutation, and an efficient simulation algorithm. Using these tools, we explore mutation-selection-drift equilibrium at microsatellites and investigate the mutational history and selective regime of the microsatellite that causes Friedreich’s ataxia. We characterize microsatellite selective events by their duration and cost, note similarities to sweeps from standing point variation, and conclude that it is premature to label microsatellites as ubiquitous agents of efficient adaptive change. Together, our models and simulation algorithm provide a powerful framework for statistical inference, which can be used to test the neutrality of microsatellites and other multiallelic variants. PMID:23104080

  5. Survey of microsatellite DNA in pine

    Treesearch

    Craig S. Echt; P. May-Marquardt

    1997-01-01

    A large insert genomic library from eastern white pine (Pinus strobus) was probed for the microsatellite motifs (AC)n and (AG)n, all 10 trinucleotide motifs, and 22 of the 33 possible tetranucleotide motifs. For comparison with a species from a different subgenus, a loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) genomic...

  6. USE OF COMPETITIVE GENOMIC HYBRIDIZATION TO ENRICH FOR GENOME-SPECIFIC DIFFERENCES BETWEEN TWO CLOSELY RELATED HUMAN FECAL INDICATOR BACTERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Enterococci are frequently used as indicators of fecal pollution in surface waters. To accelerate the identification of Enterococcus faecalis-specific DNA sequences, we employed a comparative genomic strategy utilizing a positive selection process to compare E. faec...

  7. USE OF COMPETITIVE GENOMIC HYBRIDIZATION TO ENRICH FOR GENOME-SPECIFIC DIFFERENCES BETWEEN TWO CLOSELY RELATED HUMAN FECAL INDICATOR BACTERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Enterococci are frequently used as indicators of fecal pollution in surface waters. To accelerate the identification of Enterococcus faecalis-specific DNA sequences, we employed a comparative genomic strategy utilizing a positive selection process to compare E. faec...

  8. Triplet-repeat microsatellites shared among hard and soft pines.

    PubMed

    Kutil, B L; Williams, C G

    2001-01-01

    Vascular plant species have shown a low level of microsatellite conservation compared to many animal species. Finding trans-specific microsatellites for plants may be improved by using a priori knowledge of genome organization. Fifteen triplet-repeat microsatellites from hard pine (Pinus taeda L.) were tested for trans-specific amplification across seven hard pines (P. palustris Mill., P. echinata Mill., P. radiata D. Don., P. patula Schiede et Deppe, P. halepensis Mill., P. kesiya Royle), a soft pine (P. strobus L.), and Picea rubens Sargent. Seven of 15 microsatellites had trans-specific amplification in both hard and soft pine subgenera. Two P. taeda microsatellites had conserved flanking regions and repeat motifs in all seven hard pines, soft pine P. strobus, and P. rubens. Perfect triplet-repeat P. taeda microsatellites appear to be better candidates for trans-specific polymorphism than compound microsatellites. Not all perfect triplet-repeat microsatellites were conserved, but all conserved microsatellites had perfect repeat motifs. Persistent microsatellites PtTX2123 and PtTX3020 had highly conserved flanking regions and a conserved repeat motif composition with variable repeat unit numbers. Using trinucleotide microsatellites improved trans-specific microsatellite recovery among hard and soft pine species.

  9. Gap Closing/Finishing by Targeted Genomic Region Enrichment and Sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Kanwar; Froula, Jeff; Trice, Hope; Pennacchio, Len A.; Chen, Feng

    2010-05-27

    Gap Closing/Finishing of draft genome assemblies is a labor and cost intensive process where several rounds of repetitious amplification and sequencing are required. Here we demonstrate a high throughput procedure where custom primers flanking gaps in draft genomes are designed. Primer libraries containing up to 4,000 unique pairs in independent droplets are merged with a fragmented genomic template. From this millions of picoliter scale droplets are formed, each one being the functional equivalent of an individual PCR reaction. The PCR products are concatenated and sequenced by Illumina which is then assembled and used for gap closure. Here we present an overall experimental strategy, primer design algorithm and initial results.

  10. Characterization of microsatellite markers in eastern white pine

    Treesearch

    C. S. Echt; P. May-Marquardt; M. Hseih; R. Zahorchak

    1996-01-01

    An enrichment cloning method was evaluated for the isolation of microsatellite loci from eastern white pine and the resulting markers were examined for polymorphisms. A 200-fold enrichment was achieved for highly abundant (AC)n repeats, but for much less abundant (ACAG)n repeats an enrichment of only 20-fold was obtained....

  11. Characterization of microsatellite markers in eastern white pine

    Treesearch

    Craig S. Echt; P. May-Marquardt; M. Hseih; R. Zahorchak

    1996-01-01

    An enrichment cloning method was evaluated for the isolation of microsatellite loci from eastern white pine and the resulting markers were examined for polymorphisms. A 200-fold enrichment was achieved for highly abundant (AC), repeats, but for much less abundant (ACAG), repeats an enrichment of only 20-fold was obtained. Using a single set of PCR conditions, 19...

  12. High frequency of submicroscopic chromosomal imbalances in patients with syndromic craniosynostosis detected by a combined approach of microsatellite segregation analysis, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and array-based comparative genome hybridisation.

    PubMed

    Jehee, F S; Krepischi-Santos, A C V; Rocha, K M; Cavalcanti, D P; Kim, C A; Bertola, D R; Alonso, L G; D'Angelo, C S; Mazzeu, J F; Froyen, G; Lugtenberg, D; Vianna-Morgante, A M; Rosenberg, C; Passos-Bueno, M R

    2008-07-01

    We present the first comprehensive study, to our knowledge, on genomic chromosomal analysis in syndromic craniosynostosis. In total, 45 patients with craniosynostotic disorders were screened with a variety of methods including conventional karyotype, microsatellite segregation analysis, subtelomeric multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification) and whole-genome array-based comparative genome hybridisation. Causative abnormalities were present in 42.2% (19/45) of the samples, and 27.8% (10/36) of the patients with normal conventional karyotype carried submicroscopic imbalances. Our results include a wide variety of imbalances and point to novel chromosomal regions associated with craniosynostosis. The high incidence of pure duplications or trisomies suggests that these are important mechanisms in craniosynostosis, particularly in cases involving the metopic suture.

  13. Cost-effective enrichment hybridization capture of chloroplast genomes at deep multiplexing levels for population genetics and phylogeography studies.

    PubMed

    Mariac, Cédric; Scarcelli, Nora; Pouzadou, Juliette; Barnaud, Adeline; Billot, Claire; Faye, Adama; Kougbeadjo, Ayite; Maillol, Vincent; Martin, Guillaume; Sabot, François; Santoni, Sylvain; Vigouroux, Yves; Couvreur, Thomas L P

    2014-11-01

    Biodiversity, phylogeography and population genetic studies will be revolutionized by access to large data sets thanks to next-generation sequencing methods. In this study, we develop an easy and cost-effective protocol for in-solution enrichment hybridization capture of complete chloroplast genomes applicable at deep-multiplexed levels. The protocol uses cheap in-house species-specific probes developed via long-range PCR of the entire chloroplast. Barcoded libraries are constructed, and in-solution enrichment of the chloroplasts is carried out using the probes. This protocol was tested and validated on six economically important West African crop species, namely African rice, pearl millet, three African yam species and fonio. For pearl millet, we also demonstrate the effectiveness of this protocol to retrieve 95% of the sequence of the whole chloroplast on 95 multiplexed individuals in a single MiSeq run at a success rate of 95%. This new protocol allows whole chloroplast genomes to be retrieved at a modest cost and will allow unprecedented resolution for closely related species in phylogeography studies using plastomes.

  14. IDENTIFICATION OF AVIAN-SPECIFIC FECAL METAGENOMIC SEQUENCES USING GENOME FRAGMENT ENRICHMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sequence analysis of microbial genomes has provided biologists the opportunity to compare genetic differences between closely related microorganisms. While random sequencing has also been used to study natural microbial communities, metagenomic comparisons via sequencing analysis...

  15. IDENTIFICATION OF AVIAN-SPECIFIC FECAL METAGENOMIC SEQUENCES USING GENOME FRAGMENT ENRICHMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sequence analysis of microbial genomes has provided biologists the opportunity to compare genetic differences between closely related microorganisms. While random sequencing has also been used to study natural microbial communities, metagenomic comparisons via sequencing analysis...

  16. Electrochemical and genomic analysis of novel electroactive isolates obtained via potentiostatic enrichment from tropical sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Lucinda E.; Yung, Pui Yi; Mitra, Sumitra D.; Wuertz, Stefan; Williams, Rohan B. H.; Lauro, Federico M.; Marsili, Enrico

    2017-07-01

    Enrichment of electrochemically-active microorganisms (EAM) to date has mostly relied on microbial fuel cells fed with wastewater. This study aims to enrich novel EAM by exposing tropical sediment, not frequently reported in the literature, to sustained anodic potentials. Voltamperometric techniques and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, performed over a wide range of potentials, characterise extracellular electron transfer (EET) over time. Applied potential is found to affect biofilm electrochemical signature. Geobacter metallireducens is heavily enriched on the electrodes, as determined by metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analysis, in the first report of the species in a lactate-fed system. Two novel isolates are grown in pure culture from the enrichment, identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing as Aeromonas and Enterobacter, respectively. The names proposed are Aeromonas sp. CL-1 and Enterobacter sp. EA-1. Both isolates are capable of EET on carbon felt and screen-printed carbon electrodes without the addition of exogenous redox mediators. Enterobacter sp. EA-1 can also perform mediated electron transfer using the soluble redox mediator 2-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (HNQ). Both isolates are able to use acetate and lactate as electron donors. This work outlines a comprehensive methodology for characterising novel EAM from unconventional inocula.

  17. Integrating molecular QTL data into genome-wide genetic association analysis: Probabilistic assessment of enrichment and colocalization

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    We propose a novel statistical framework for integrating the result from molecular quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping into genome-wide genetic association analysis of complex traits, with the primary objectives of quantitatively assessing the enrichment of the molecular QTLs in complex trait-associated genetic variants and the colocalizations of the two types of association signals. We introduce a natural Bayesian hierarchical model that treats the latent association status of molecular QTLs as SNP-level annotations for candidate SNPs of complex traits. We detail a computational procedure to seamlessly perform enrichment, fine-mapping and colocalization analyses, which is a distinct feature compared to the existing colocalization analysis procedures in the literature. The proposed approach is computationally efficient and requires only summary-level statistics. We evaluate and demonstrate the proposed computational approach through extensive simulation studies and analyses of blood lipid data and the whole blood eQTL data from the GTEx project. In addition, a useful utility from our proposed method enables the computation of expected colocalization signals using simple characteristics of the association data. Using this utility, we further illustrate the importance of enrichment analysis on the ability to discover colocalized signals and the potential limitations of currently available molecular QTL data. The software pipeline that implements the proposed computation procedures, enloc, is freely available at https://github.com/xqwen/integrative. PMID:28278150

  18. Development of microsatellite loci for the endangered species Pityopsis ruthii (Asteraceae)1

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite loci were developed for the endangered species Pityopsis ruthii and will permit genetic and conservation studies of the species. Methods and Results:A microsatellite enriched library was used to develop 12 polymorphic microsatellite loci for P. ruthii. The loci ...

  19. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite Loci for Cornus sanguniea (Cornaceae) 1

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite loci were developed for Cornus sanguinea and will permit genetic and conservation studies of the species. Methods and Results: A microsatellite-enriched library was used to develop 16 polymorphic microsatellite loci for C. sanguinea. The loci amplified 5-11 allel...

  20. Enriching public descriptions of marine phages using the Genomic Standards Consortium MIGS standard

    PubMed Central

    Duhaime, Melissa Beth; Kottmann, Renzo; Field, Dawn; Glöckner, Frank Oliver

    2011-01-01

    In any sequencing project, the possible depth of comparative analysis is determined largely by the amount and quality of the accompanying contextual data. The structure, content, and storage of this contextual data should be standardized to ensure consistent coverage of all sequenced entities and facilitate comparisons. The Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC) has developed the “Minimum Information about Genome/Metagenome Sequences (MIGS/MIMS)” checklist for the description of genomes and here we annotate all 30 publicly available marine bacteriophage sequences to the MIGS standard. These annotations build on existing International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration (INSDC) records, and confirm, as expected that current submissions lack most MIGS fields. MIGS fields were manually curated from the literature and placed in XML format as specified by the Genomic Contextual Data Markup Language (GCDML). These “machine-readable” reports were then analyzed to highlight patterns describing this collection of genomes. Completed reports are provided in GCDML. This work represents one step towards the annotation of our complete collection of genome sequences and shows the utility of capturing richer metadata along with raw sequences. PMID:21677864

  1. Enriching public descriptions of marine phages using the Genomic Standards Consortium MIGS standard.

    PubMed

    Duhaime, Melissa Beth; Kottmann, Renzo; Field, Dawn; Glöckner, Frank Oliver

    2011-04-29

    In any sequencing project, the possible depth of comparative analysis is determined largely by the amount and quality of the accompanying contextual data. The structure, content, and storage of this contextual data should be standardized to ensure consistent coverage of all sequenced entities and facilitate comparisons. The Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC) has developed the "Minimum Information about Genome/Metagenome Sequences (MIGS/MIMS)" checklist for the description of genomes and here we annotate all 30 publicly available marine bacteriophage sequences to the MIGS standard. These annotations build on existing International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration (INSDC) records, and confirm, as expected that current submissions lack most MIGS fields. MIGS fields were manually curated from the literature and placed in XML format as specified by the Genomic Contextual Data Markup Language (GCDML). These "machine-readable" reports were then analyzed to highlight patterns describing this collection of genomes. Completed reports are provided in GCDML. This work represents one step towards the annotation of our complete collection of genome sequences and shows the utility of capturing richer metadata along with raw sequences.

  2. Genomic Contributors to Rhythm Outcome of Atrial Fibrillation Catheter Ablation – Pathway Enrichment Analysis of GWAS Data

    PubMed Central

    Ueberham, Laura; Dinov, Borislav; Sommer, Philipp; Arya, Arash; Hindricks, Gerhard; Bollmann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background Left atrial enlargement and persistent atrial fibrillation (AF) are well-known predictors for arrhythmia recurrence after AF catheter ablation (LRAF). In this study, by using pathway enrichment analysis of GWAS data, we tested the hypothesis that genetic pathways associated with these phenotypes are also associated with LRAF. Methods Samples from 660 patients with paroxysmal (n = 370) or persistent AF (n = 290) undergoing de-novo AF catheter ablation were genotyped for ~1,000,000 SNPs. SNPs found to be significantly associated with left atrial diameter (LAD) or AF type were used for gene-based association tests in a systematic biological Knowledge-based mining system for Genome-wide Genetic studies (KGG). Associated genes were tested for pathway enrichment using WEB-based Gene SeT AnaLysis Toolkit (WebGestalt), the Gene Annotation Tool to Help Explain Relationships (GATHER) and the databases provided by Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG). In a second step, the association of consistently enriched pathways and LRAF was tested. Results By using sequential 7-day Holter ECGs, LRAF between 3 and 12 months was observed in 48% and was associated with LAD (B = 1.801, 95% CI 0.760–2.841, p = 1.0E-3) and persistent AF (OR = 2.1; 95% CI 1.567–2.931, p = 2.0E-6). WebGestalt (adj. p = 2.7E-22) and GATHER (adj. p = 5.2E-3) identified the calcium signaling pathway (hsa04020) as the only consistently enriched pathway for LAD, while the extracellular matrix (ECM) -receptor interaction pathway (hsa04512) was the only consistently enriched pathway for AF type (adj. p = 2.1E-15 in WebGestalt; adj. p = 9.3E-4 in GATHER). Both calcium signaling (adj. p = 2.2E-17 in WebGestalt; adj. p = 2.9E-2 in GATHER) and ECM-receptor interaction (adj. p = 1.2E-10 in WebGestalt; adj. p = 2.9E-2 in GATHER) were significantly associated with LRAF. Conclusions Calcium signaling and ECM-receptor interaction pathways are associated with LAD and AF type and, in turn, with LRAF

  3. Comparative analysis of microsatellites and compound microsatellites in T4-like viruses.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lan; Deng, Liang; Fu, Yongzhuo; Wu, Xiaolong; Zhao, Xiangyan; Chen, Yubao; Li, Mingfu; Tan, Zhongyang

    2016-01-10

    Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are known to present ubiquitously in genomes of eukaryotes and prokaryotes, as well as viruses. A comprehensive analysis of microsatellites and compound microsatellites (CM) was performed for 67 T4-like bacteriophage genomes. We found that the number of repeats was generally proportional to the size of the genome. CM were more abundant in genic regions, while their relative abundance was higher in intergenic regions. Meanwhile, the number of CM rapidly decreased with the increase of complexity but gradually increased with higher dMAX (maximum distance between any two adjacent microsatellites). (A)n/(T)n, (AT)n/(TA)n and (AAG)n were the most abundant repeats of mono-, di- and trinucleotide microsatellites, respectively. The number of microsatellites in reference sequences was significantly lower than that in corresponding random sequences. This result was mainly attributed to mono- and dinucleotide repeats which hardly exceeded 6bp in T4-like viruses. These observations may be helpful to understand the distribution of microsatellites and viral genetic diversity in T4-like viruses.

  4. Methylation-sensitive linking libraries enhance gene-enriched sequencing of complex genomes and map DNA methylation domains

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, William; Luo, Meizhong; Ma, Jianxin; Estep, Matt; Estill, James; He, Ruifeng; Talag, Jayson; Sisneros, Nicholas; Kudrna, David; Kim, HyeRan; Ammiraju, Jetty SS; Collura, Kristi; Bharti, Arvind K; Messing, Joachim; Wing, Rod A; SanMiguel, Phillip; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L; Soderlund, Carol

    2008-01-01

    Background Many plant genomes are resistant to whole-genome assembly due to an abundance of repetitive sequence, leading to the development of gene-rich sequencing techniques. Two such techniques are hypomethylated partial restriction (HMPR) and methylation spanning linker libraries (MSLL). These libraries differ from other gene-rich datasets in having larger insert sizes, and the MSLL clones are designed to provide reads localized to "epigenetic boundaries" where methylation begins or ends. Results A large-scale study in maize generated 40,299 HMPR sequences and 80,723 MSLL sequences, including MSLL clones exceeding 100 kb. The paired end reads of MSLL and HMPR clones were shown to be effective in linking existing gene-rich sequences into scaffolds. In addition, it was shown that the MSLL clones can be used for anchoring these scaffolds to a BAC-based physical map. The MSLL end reads effectively identified epigenetic boundaries, as indicated by their preferential alignment to regions upstream and downstream from annotated genes. The ability to precisely map long stretches of fully methylated DNA sequence is a unique outcome of MSLL analysis, and was also shown to provide evidence for errors in gene identification. MSLL clones were observed to be significantly more repeat-rich in their interiors than in their end reads, confirming the correlation between methylation and retroelement content. Both MSLL and HMPR reads were found to be substantially gene-enriched, with the SalI MSLL libraries being the most highly enriched (31% align to an EST contig), while the HMPR clones exhibited exceptional depletion of repetitive DNA (to ~11%). These two techniques were compared with other gene-enrichment methods, and shown to be complementary. Conclusion MSLL technology provides an unparalleled approach for mapping the epigenetic status of repetitive blocks and for identifying sequences mis-identified as genes. Although the types and natures of epigenetic boundaries are barely

  5. Identification of differentially methylated regions using streptavidin bisulfite ligand methylation enrichment (SuBLiME), a new method to enrich for methylated DNA prior to deep bisulfite genomic sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Jason P.; Shaw, Jan M.; Molloy, Peter L.

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a method that enriches for methylated cytosines by capturing the fraction of bisulfite-treated DNA with unconverted cytosines. The method, called streptavidin bisulfite ligand methylation enrichment (SuBLiME), involves the specific labeling (using a biotin-labeled nucleotide ligand) of methylated cytosines in bisulfite-converted DNA. This step is then followed by affinity capture, using streptavidin-coupled magnetic beads. SuBLiME is highly adaptable and can be combined with deep sequencing library generation and/or genomic complexity-reduction. In this pilot study, we enriched methylated DNA from Csp6I-cut complexity-reduced genomes of colorectal cancer cell lines (HCT-116, HT-29 and SW-480) and normal blood leukocytes with the aim of discovering colorectal cancer biomarkers. Enriched libraries were sequenced with SOLiD-3 technology. In pairwise comparisons, we scored a total of 1,769 gene loci and 33 miRNA loci as differentially methylated between the cell lines and leukocytes. Of these, 516 loci were differently methylated in at least two promoter-proximal CpG sites over two discrete Csp6I fragments. Identified methylated gene loci were associated with anatomical development, differentiation and cell signaling. The data correlated with good agreement to a number of published colorectal cancer DNA methylation biomarkers and genomic data sets. SuBLiME is effective in the enrichment of methylated nucleic acid and in the detection of known and novel biomarkers. PMID:23257838

  6. Genome-Wide Analyses in Bacteria Show Small-RNA Enrichment for Long and Conserved Intergenic Regions

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chen-Hsun; Liao, Rick; Chou, Brendan; Palumbo, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Interest in finding small RNAs (sRNAs) in bacteria has significantly increased in recent years due to their regulatory functions. Development of high-throughput methods and more sophisticated computational algorithms has allowed rapid identification of sRNA candidates in different species. However, given their various sizes (50 to 500 nucleotides [nt]) and their potential genomic locations in the 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions as well as in intergenic regions, identification and validation of true sRNAs have been challenging. In addition, the evolution of bacterial sRNAs across different species continues to be puzzling, given that they can exert similar functions with various sequences and structures. In this study, we analyzed the enrichment patterns of sRNAs in 13 well-annotated bacterial species using existing transcriptome and experimental data. All intergenic regions were analyzed by WU-BLAST to examine conservation levels relative to species within or outside their genus. In total, more than 900 validated bacterial sRNAs and 23,000 intergenic regions were analyzed. The results indicate that sRNAs are enriched in intergenic regions, which are longer and more conserved than the average intergenic regions in the corresponding bacterial genome. We also found that sRNA-coding regions have different conservation levels relative to their flanking regions. This work provides a way to analyze how noncoding RNAs are distributed in bacterial genomes and also shows conserved features of intergenic regions that encode sRNAs. These results also provide insight into the functions of regions surrounding sRNAs and into optimization of RNA search algorithms. PMID:25313390

  7. Genome-wide analyses in bacteria show small-RNA enrichment for long and conserved intergenic regions.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chen-Hsun; Liao, Rick; Chou, Brendan; Palumbo, Michael; Contreras, Lydia M

    2015-01-01

    Interest in finding small RNAs (sRNAs) in bacteria has significantly increased in recent years due to their regulatory functions. Development of high-throughput methods and more sophisticated computational algorithms has allowed rapid identification of sRNA candidates in different species. However, given their various sizes (50 to 500 nucleotides [nt]) and their potential genomic locations in the 5' and 3' untranslated regions as well as in intergenic regions, identification and validation of true sRNAs have been challenging. In addition, the evolution of bacterial sRNAs across different species continues to be puzzling, given that they can exert similar functions with various sequences and structures. In this study, we analyzed the enrichment patterns of sRNAs in 13 well-annotated bacterial species using existing transcriptome and experimental data. All intergenic regions were analyzed by WU-BLAST to examine conservation levels relative to species within or outside their genus. In total, more than 900 validated bacterial sRNAs and 23,000 intergenic regions were analyzed. The results indicate that sRNAs are enriched in intergenic regions, which are longer and more conserved than the average intergenic regions in the corresponding bacterial genome. We also found that sRNA-coding regions have different conservation levels relative to their flanking regions. This work provides a way to analyze how noncoding RNAs are distributed in bacterial genomes and also shows conserved features of intergenic regions that encode sRNAs. These results also provide insight into the functions of regions surrounding sRNAs and into optimization of RNA search algorithms.

  8. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci for Cornus sanguinea (Cornaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Wadl, Phillip A.; Hatmaker, E. Anne; Fussi, Barbara; Scheffler, Brian E.; Trigiano, Robert N.

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: To facilitate genetic and conservation research of Cornus sanguinea, microsatellite loci were isolated and 29 individuals from 11 German populations were genotyped. • Methods and Results: Sixteen microsatellite loci were characterized from an enriched small insert genomic library. The number of alleles detected ranged from five to 11 per locus, observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.00 to 1.00, expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.65 to 0.90, and polymorphic information content ranged from 0.59 to 0.88. • Conclusions: The markers described in the study will allow further investigation of population dynamics and the degree of clonal reproduction within populations of C. sanguinea. PMID:25202583

  9. Development and characterization of 32 microsatellite loci in Genipa americana (Rubiaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Manoel, Ricardo O.; Freitas, Miguel L. M.; Barreto, Mariana A.; Moraes, Mário L. T.; Souza, Anete P.; Sebbenn, Alexandre M.

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Microsatellite primers were developed for the tree species Genipa americana (Rubiaceae) for further population genetic studies. • Methods and Results: We identified 144 clones containing 65 repeat motifs from a genomic library enriched for (CT)8 and (GT)8 motifs. Primer pairs were developed for 32 microsatellite loci and validated in 40 individuals of two natural G. americana populations. Seventeen loci were polymorphic, revealing from three to seven alleles per locus. The observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.24 to 1.00 and from 0.22 to 0.78, respectively. • Conclusions: The 17 primers identified as polymorphic loci are suitable to study the genetic diversity and structure, mating system, and gene flow in G. americana. PMID:25202610

  10. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci for Bixa orellana, an important source of natural dyes.

    PubMed

    Dequigiovanni, G; Ramos, S L F; Zucchi, M I; Bajay, M M; Pinheiro, J B; Fabri, E G; Bressan, E A; Veasey, E A

    2014-10-31

    Annatto (Bixa orellana) is a plant native from the American continental tropical zone. The seeds are used to produce a carotenoid-based yellow to orange food coloring. Microsatellite markers were developed for the Brazilian native species Bixa orellana to describe its genetic diversity and structure as well as to support conservation studies. Twenty-five microsatellite loci were isolated and characterized using an enriched genomic library. Ten loci were polymorphic in the 50 accessions sampled in this study, while 15 were considered monomorphic. The mean number of alleles per locus was 3.8, ranging from 2 to 6 alleles per locus. Mean values for the observed and expected heterozygosities were 0.541 (ranging from 0 to 0.658) and 0.639 (ranging from 0.422 to 0.787), respectively. All markers described in this study will be useful in further studies evaluating the genetic diversity, population dynamics, and conservation genetics of Bixa orellana.

  11. Development of microsatellite markers using pyrosequencing in Galium trifidum (Rubiaceae), a rare species in Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Szczecińska, Monika; Kwaśniewski, Mirosław; Sawicki, Jakub; Chwiałkowska, Karolina; Szandar, Kamil; Pisarek, Włodzimierz

    2012-01-01

    We identify a large number of microsatellites from Galium trfidum, a plant species considered rare and endangered in Central and Western Europe. Using a combination of a total enriched genomic library and small-scale 454 pyrosequencing, we determined 9755 contigs with a length of 100 to 6192 bp. Within this dataset, we identified 153 SSR motifs in 144 contigs. Here, we tested 14 microsatellite loci in 2 populations of G. trifidum. The number of alleles and expected heterozygosity were 1-8 (mean 3.2) and 0.00-0.876 (0.549 on average), respectively. The markers described in this study will be useful for evaluating genetic diversity within and between populations, and gene flow between G. trifidum populations. These markers could also be applied to investigate the biological aspects of G. trifidum, such as the population dynamics and clonal structure, and to develop effective conservation programs for the Central European populations of this species.

  12. Development of Microsatellite Markers Using Pyrosequencing in Galium trifidum (Rubiaceae), a Rare Species in Central Europe

    PubMed Central

    Szczecińska, Monika; Kwaśniewski, Mirosław; Sawicki, Jakub; Chwiałkowska, Karolina; Szandar, Kamil; Pisarek, Włodzimierz

    2012-01-01

    We identify a large number of microsatellites from Galium trfidum, a plant species considered rare and endangered in Central and Western Europe. Using a combination of a total enriched genomic library and small-scale 454 pyrosequencing, we determined 9755 contigs with a length of 100 to 6192 bp. Within this dataset, we identified 153 SSR motifs in 144 contigs. Here, we tested 14 microsatellite loci in 2 populations of G. trifidum. The number of alleles and expected heterozygosity were 1–8 (mean 3.2) and 0.00–0.876 (0.549 on average), respectively. The markers described in this study will be useful for evaluating genetic diversity within and between populations, and gene flow between G. trifidum populations. These markers could also be applied to investigate the biological aspects of G. trifidum, such as the population dynamics and clonal structure, and to develop effective conservation programs for the Central European populations of this species. PMID:22949837

  13. Characterization of 10 new nuclear microsatellite markers in Acca sellowiana (Myrtaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Klabunde, Gustavo H. F.; Olkoski, Denise; Vilperte, Vinicius; Zucchi, Maria I.; Nodari, Rubens O.

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Microsatellite primers were identified and characterized in Acca sellowiana in order to expand the limited number of pre-existing polymorphic markers for use in population genetic studies for conservation, phylogeography, breeding, and domestication. • Methods and Results: A total of 10 polymorphic microsatellite primers were designed from clones obtained from a simple sequence repeat (SSR)–enriched genomic library. The primers amplified di- and trinucleotide repeats with four to 27 alleles per locus. In all tested populations, the observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.269 to 1.0. • Conclusions: These new polymorphic SSR markers will allow future genetic studies to be denser, either for genetic structure characterization of natural populations or for studies involving genetic breeding and domestication process in A. sellowiana. PMID:25202632

  14. Development and characterization of microsatellite markers for Piptadenia gonoacantha (Fabaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Grando, Carolina; Bajay, Miklos M.; Bajay, Stephanie K.; Schwarcz, Kaiser D.; Campos, Jaqueline B.; Brancalion, Pedro H. S.; Pinheiro, José B.; Rodrigues, Ricardo R.; Souza, Anete P.; Zucchi, Maria I.

    2015-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Microsatellite primers were designed for Piptadenia gonoacantha (Fabaceae) and characterized to estimate genetic diversity parameters. The species is a native tree from the Atlantic Forest biome commonly used in forest restoration; it has medicinal potential and the wood is economically useful. • Methods and Results: Twenty-eight microsatellite loci were identified from an enriched genomic library. Fifteen loci resulted in successful amplifications and were characterized in a natural population of 94 individuals. Twelve loci were polymorphic, with allele numbers ranging from three to 15 per locus, and expected and observed heterozygosities ranging from 0.2142 to 0.8325 and 0.190 to 0.769, respectively. • Conclusions: The developed markers will be used in further studies of population genetics of P. gonoacantha, aimed at conservation and management of the species in natural populations and in forest restoration projects. PMID:25699220

  15. Isolation and Characterization of Twelve Polymorphic Microsatellite Loci for the Cocoa Mirid Bug Sahlbergella Singularis

    PubMed Central

    Babin, Régis; Fenouillet, Catherine; Legavre, Thierry; Blondin, Laurence; Calatayud, Caroline; Risterucci, Ange-Marie; Chapuis, Marie-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Mirids are the primary pests affecting cocoa production in Africa, but no genetic studies have been conducted on these insects. Here we report the isolation and characterization of 12 polymorphic microsatellite loci for Sahlbergella singularis. A microsatellite-enriched genomic DNA library was developed and screened to identify marker loci. Twelve polymorphic loci were identified by screening 28 individuals collected from one presumed population in cocoa plantations in Southern Cameroon. The number of alleles ranged from 5 to 25, whereas the observed and the expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.179 to 0.786 and from 0.671 to 0.946, respectively. Tests showed significant deviations from HW equilibrium for four loci, but no linkage disequilibrium was detected at any of the loci. No cross-species amplification was observed in two other mirid pests in Africa. PMID:22605986

  16. Isolation and characterization of novel microsatellite markers for Avena sativa (Poaceae) (oat).

    PubMed

    Wu, Bin; Zhang, Zongwen; Chen, Lingyun; He, Minggao

    2012-02-01

    A new set of microsatellite primers was developed for Avena sativa and characterized to assess the level of genetic diversity among cultivars and wild genotypes. Using an enrichment genomic library, 14 simple sequence repeat markers were identified. The loci of these markers were characterized and found to be polymorphic in size among 48 genotypes of oat from diverse geographical locations. The number of alleles per locus ranged from two to eight, while the observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.031 to 0.75. These newly identified microsatellite markers will facilitate genetic diversity studies, fingerprinting, and genetic mapping of oat. Moreover, these new primers for A. sativa will aid future studies of polyploidy and hybridization in other species in this genus.

  17. Characterization of 10 new nuclear microsatellite markers in Acca sellowiana (Myrtaceae).

    PubMed

    Klabunde, Gustavo H F; Olkoski, Denise; Vilperte, Vinicius; Zucchi, Maria I; Nodari, Rubens O

    2014-06-01

    Microsatellite primers were identified and characterized in Acca sellowiana in order to expand the limited number of pre-existing polymorphic markers for use in population genetic studies for conservation, phylogeography, breeding, and domestication. • A total of 10 polymorphic microsatellite primers were designed from clones obtained from a simple sequence repeat (SSR)-enriched genomic library. The primers amplified di- and trinucleotide repeats with four to 27 alleles per locus. In all tested populations, the observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.269 to 1.0. • These new polymorphic SSR markers will allow future genetic studies to be denser, either for genetic structure characterization of natural populations or for studies involving genetic breeding and domestication process in A. sellowiana.

  18. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite markers in Acca sellowiana (Berg) Burret.

    PubMed

    Santos, K L; Santos, M O; Laborda, P R; Souza, A P; Peroni, N; Nodari, R O

    2008-09-01

    Acca sellowiana has commercial potential due to the quality and the unique flavor of its fruit. Conservation of natural populations and management of breeding programmes would benefit from the availability of molecular markers that could be used to characterize levels and distribution of genetic variability. Thus, 13 microsatellite markers were developed from an enriched genomic library of A. sellowiana. They were characterized using 40 samples. The expected and observed heterozygosities ranged from 0.513 to 0.913 and from 0.200 to 0.889, respectively. These are the first microsatellite loci characterized from A. sellowiana that will contribute to improve researches on its genetic conservation, characterization and breeding. © 2008 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite markers in Acca sellowiana (Berg) Burret.

    PubMed

    Santos, K L; Santos, M O; Laborda, P R; Souza, A P; Peroni, N; Nodari, R O

    2008-11-01

    Acca sellowiana has commercial potential because of the quality and the unique flavor of its fruit. Conservation of natural populations and management of breeding programmes would benefit from the availability of molecular markers that could be used to characterize levels and distribution of genetic variability. Thus, 13 microsatellite markers were developed from an enriched genomic library of A. sellowiana. They were characterized using 40 samples. The expected and observed heterozygosities ranged from 0.513 to 0.913 and from 0.200 to 0.889, respectively. These are the first microsatellite loci characterized from A. sellowiana that will contribute to improve researches on the genetic conservation, characterization and breeding. Journal compilation © 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd. No claim to original US government works.

  20. Development of microsatellite markers for Hyacinth macaw (Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus) and their cross-amplification in other parrot species.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Helder E; Presti, Flavia T; Wasko, Adriane P; Pinhal, Danillo

    2015-12-01

    Hyacinth macaw Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus is the largest parrot of the world and is considered vulnerable to extinction due to its habitat loss and illegal trade associated to the international pet market demand. Genetic studies on this species are still incipient to generate a consistent characterization of the population dynamics and to develop appropriate conservation strategies. In this sense, microsatellite markers may support the detection of a population genetic structure for this bird species. However, at this time, none Hyacinth macaw species-specific primers for microsatellite loci have been so far established. This study aimed to develop and characterize polymorphic microsatellite markers for A. hyacinthinus and to check for their cross-amplification in other parrot species. Sequences containing repeated dinucleotide motifs were prospected and optimized from a genomic library that was enriched for microsatellites using magnetic beads. The analyses of 43-57 samples from wild individuals of three distinct Brazilian subpopulations led to the characterization of five polymorphic microsatellite loci. Allele richness per locus ranged from two to 12. Three loci exhibited observed heterozygosity values higher than 50%, but the overall average value among all loci was close to 45%. In addition, successful primer cross-amplification was verified in seven other investigated species of Neotropical parrots. The newly developed markers have shown to be potentially useful for in situ and ex situ population studies to support future conservation actions of Hyacinth macaw and other parrots.

  1. Characterization of polymorphic microsatellite loci in the Antarctic krill Euphausia superba

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba is a pelagic crustacean, abundant in high-density swarms (10 000 – 30 000 ind/m2) with a circumpolar distribution and a key role in the food web of the Southern Ocean. Only three EST derived microsatellite markers have been used in previous genetic studies, hence we developed additional highly polymorphic microsatellite markers to allow robust studies of the genetic variability and population differentiation within this species. Findings The microsatellite markers described here were obtained through an enriched genomic library, followed by 454 pyrosequencing. A total of 10 microsatellite markers were tested in 32 individuals from the Antarctic Peninsula. One of the tested loci was fixed for one allele while the other was variable. Of the remaining nine markers, seven showed no departure from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The mean number of alleles was 14.9. Conclusions These markers open perspectives for population genetic studies of this species to unravel genetic structure, dispersal and population biology, vital information for future conservation. PMID:24490686

  2. Characterization of polymorphic microsatellite loci in the Antarctic krill Euphausia superba.

    PubMed

    Candeias, Rui; Teixeira, Sara; Duarte, Carlos M; Pearson, Gareth A

    2014-02-03

    The Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba is a pelagic crustacean, abundant in high-density swarms (10,000 - 30,000 ind/m2) with a circumpolar distribution and a key role in the food web of the Southern Ocean. Only three EST derived microsatellite markers have been used in previous genetic studies, hence we developed additional highly polymorphic microsatellite markers to allow robust studies of the genetic variability and population differentiation within this species. The microsatellite markers described here were obtained through an enriched genomic library, followed by 454 pyrosequencing. A total of 10 microsatellite markers were tested in 32 individuals from the Antarctic Peninsula. One of the tested loci was fixed for one allele while the other was variable. Of the remaining nine markers, seven showed no departure from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The mean number of alleles was 14.9. These markers open perspectives for population genetic studies of this species to unravel genetic structure, dispersal and population biology, vital information for future conservation.

  3. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci in Sisyrinchium (Iridaceae) and cross amplification in other genera.

    PubMed

    Miz, R B; Tacuatiá, L O; Cidade, F W; de Souza, A P; Bered, F; Eggers, L; de Souza-Chies, T T

    2016-09-16

    Recent phylogenetic studies on Sisyrinchium strongly suggest that species classified in section Hydastylus and section Viperella belong to a single group of plants in recent adaptive radiation (Clade IV). These species neither present clear morphological differentiation among them nor show clear identification using DNA barcode markers. Thus, the main goal of this study was to develop a set of polymorphic microsatellite markers compatible for representative species of both sections to ensure variability that could be revealed by SSR markers. Therefore, microsatellite primers were isolated and characterized for Sisyrinchium palmifolium and S. marchioides. In addition, transferability of the developed primers was tested in Iridoideae, primarily in closely related species of Sisyrinchium. Sixteen microsatellite loci were developed from enriched genomic libraries, of which ten were polymorphic. GST values indicated higher differentiation among subpopulations of S. palmifolium than those from S. marchioides. Major transferability was obtained using primers isolated from S. marchioides. All primers exhibited higher rates of cross-amplification for species belonging to Clade IV of Sisyrinchium, as well as to the genera Calydorea and Herbertia. These developed microsatellite markers can be used as an efficient tool for characterization of genetic variability in species belonging to Iridoideae, as well as for studies on population dynamics, genetic structure, and mating system in other Sisyrinchium species.

  4. Microsatellites in the endangered species Dyckia distachya (Bromeliaceae) and cross-amplification in other bromeliads.

    PubMed

    Zanella, Camila M; Janke, Aline; Paggi, Gecele M; Goetze, Márcia; Reis, Mauricio S; Bered, Fernanda

    2012-11-27

    Microsatellite markers were isolated in Dyckia distachya, an endangered bromeliad from southern Brazil, which will be useful to assess the population genetic structure and reproductive success in introduced and natural populations of this species. Twenty microsatellite loci were developed from an enriched genomic library, and nine of these were amplified. The loci were characterized in 43 individuals from introduced and wild D. distachya populations. All nine loci were polymorphic, with four to ten alleles per locus. In an introduced population the observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.136-0.667 and 0.543-0.877, respectively, while in a wild population it ranged from 0.000 to 0.895 and from 0.050 to 0.811, respectively. The development of these microsatellite markers will contribute to investigations of the reproductive potential and viability of introduced populations of D. distachya as well as the single known wild population. Cross-amplification in other Bromeliaceae species was successful, with high rates in four loci, demonstrating the applicability of these microsatellite markers in other taxa.

  5. Microsatellites in the Endangered Species Dyckia distachya (Bromeliaceae) and Cross-Amplification in Other Bromeliads

    PubMed Central

    Zanella, Camila M.; Janke, Aline; Paggi, Gecele M.; Goetze, Márcia; Reis, Mauricio S.; Bered, Fernanda

    2012-01-01

    Microsatellite markers were isolated in Dyckia distachya, an endangered bromeliad from southern Brazil, which will be useful to assess the population genetic structure and reproductive success in introduced and natural populations of this species. Twenty microsatellite loci were developed from an enriched genomic library, and nine of these were amplified. The loci were characterized in 43 individuals from introduced and wild D. distachya populations. All nine loci were polymorphic, with four to ten alleles per locus. In an introduced population the observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.136–0.667 and 0.543–0.877, respectively, while in a wild population it ranged from 0.000 to 0.895 and from 0.050 to 0.811, respectively. The development of these microsatellite markers will contribute to investigations of the reproductive potential and viability of introduced populations of D. distachya as well as the single known wild population. Cross-amplification in other Bromeliaceae species was successful, with high rates in four loci, demonstrating the applicability of these microsatellite markers in other taxa. PMID:23443098

  6. Development of 10 microsatellite markers from Pantala flavescens and their applicability in studying genetics diversity.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lingzhen; Fu, Xiaowei; Wu, Kongming

    2015-08-01

    Pantala flavescens (Fabricius 1798) is one of the most common species among migration dragonflies. It is often encountered in large swarms during migration or directed dispersal flights. For a better understanding of its gene flow, genetic structure and migration patterns throughout the world, 10 polymorphic microsatellite markers were isolated in this study. We respectively collected 32 P. flavescens from three places (Hunan, Liaoning and Heilongjiang) and 20 P. flavescens from Beijing. Partial genomic libraries containing microsatellite sequences were constructed with magnetic-bead enrichment method. By screening, sequence analysis, PCR amplification and so on, ten 10 polymorphic microsatellite markers were isolated. In order to assess their applicability, genetic diversity of these novel markers was tested in 96 individuals from three populations in China (Hunan, Liaoning and Heilongjiang). These markers were highly polymorphic, with 3-12 alleles per markers. The observed (Ho) and expected (He) heterozygosities ranged 0.321-0.667 and from 0.531 to 0.948 respectively. The genetic difference between Hunan and Liaoning is 0.429, while the genetic difference between Liaoning and Heilongjiang is 0.0508. These microsatellite markers for P. flavescens were developed for the first time, and will be a powerful tool for studying population genetic diversity and dispersal behavior of P. flavescens in China and worldwide.

  7. Development of 23 polymorphic microsatellite loci in invasive silver wattle, Acacia dealbata (Fabaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Guillemaud, Thomas; Broadhurst, Linda; Legoff, Isabelle; Henery, Martin; Blin, Aurélie; Ducatillion, Catherine; Ferrando, Nathalie; Malausa, Thibaut

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite markers were developed for silver wattle, Acacia dealbata (Fabaceae), which is both an ornamental and an invasive weed species. It is native to southeastern Australia and invasive in Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Americas. Methods and Results: The pyrosequencing of a microsatellite-enriched genomic DNA library of A. dealbata produced 33,290 sequences and allowed the isolation of 201 loci with a minimum of seven repeats of microsatellite motifs. Amplification tests led to the setup of two multiplex PCR mixes allowing the amplification of 21 loci. The polymorphism of these markers was evaluated on a sample of 32 individuals collected in southeastern Australia. The number of alleles and the expected heterozygosity varied between two and 11, and between 0.11 and 0.88, respectively. Conclusions: The level of polymorphism of this set of 23 microsatellites is large enough to provide valuable information on the genetic structure and the invasion history of A. dealbata. PMID:25995979

  8. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci in the intertidal sponge Halichondria panicea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knowlton, A.L.; Pierson, Barbara J.; Talbot, S.L.; Highsmith, R.C.

    2003-01-01

    GA- and CA-enriched genomic libraries were constructed for the intertidal sponge Halichondria panicea. Unique repeat motifs identified varied from the expected simple dinucleotide repeats to more complex repeat units. All sequences tended to be highly repetitive but did not necessarily contain the targeted motifs. Seven microsatellite loci were evaluated on sponges from the clone source population. All seven were polymorphic with 5.43??0.92 mean number of alleles. Six of the seven loci that could be resolved had mean heterozygosities of 0.14-0.68. The loci identified here will be useful for population studies.

  9. Characterization of microsatellite loci in the European pond turtle Emys orbicularis.

    PubMed

    Ciofi, Claudio; Tzika, Athanasia C; Natali, Chiara; Chelazzi, Guido; Naziridis, Theodorus; Milinkovitch, Michel C

    2009-01-01

    A set of eight highly polymorphic microsatellite markers was isolated and characterized from a genomic library enriched for dinucleotide repeats in the European pond turtle, Emys orbicularis. The markers were tested for polymorphism in a total of 33 turtles sampled in two natural ponds in the nature reserve of Kerkini, northern Greece. Number of alleles varied from 10 to 18, and expected heterozygosity ranged between 0.738 and 0.921. This novel set of loci will be particularly useful to assess fine-scale population structure and for parentage analysis in E. orbicularis. © 2008 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Thirty polymorphic microsatellite loci from the critically endangered kakapo (Strigops habroptilus).

    PubMed

    Robertson, Bruce C; Frauenfelder, Nathalie; Eason, Daryl K; Elliott, Graeme; Moorhouse, Ron

    2009-03-01

    Thirty polymorphic microsatellite loci were developed from the critically endangered kakapo (Strigops habroptilus), using an enriched genomic library. Characterization of loci using 90 kakapo revealed an average of 3.3 alleles per locus (range: 2-5) and an average expected heterozygosity of 0.47 (range: 0.17-0.70). The probability of identity (7.2 × 10(-15) ) and probability of exclusion (0.999999) demonstrate that these loci are a highly informative marker set that can aid the genetic management of the kakapo. © 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. The next generation of target capture technologies - large DNA fragment enrichment and sequencing determines regional genomic variation of high complexity.

    PubMed

    Dapprich, Johannes; Ferriola, Deborah; Mackiewicz, Kate; Clark, Peter M; Rappaport, Eric; D'Arcy, Monica; Sasson, Ariella; Gai, Xiaowu; Schug, Jonathan; Kaestner, Klaus H; Monos, Dimitri

    2016-07-09

    The ability to capture and sequence large contiguous DNA fragments represents a significant advancement towards the comprehensive characterization of complex genomic regions. While emerging sequencing platforms are capable of producing several kilobases-long reads, the fragment sizes generated by current DNA target enrichment technologies remain a limiting factor, producing DNA fragments generally shorter than 1 kbp. The DNA enrichment methodology described herein, Region-Specific Extraction (RSE), produces DNA segments in excess of 20 kbp in length. Coupling this enrichment method to appropriate sequencing platforms will significantly enhance the ability to generate complete and accurate sequence characterization of any genomic region without the need for reference-based assembly. RSE is a long-range DNA target capture methodology that relies on the specific hybridization of short (20-25 base) oligonucleotide primers to selected sequence motifs within the DNA target region. These capture primers are then enzymatically extended on the 3'-end, incorporating biotinylated nucleotides into the DNA. Streptavidin-coated beads are subsequently used to pull-down the original, long DNA template molecules via the newly synthesized, biotinylated DNA that is bound to them. We demonstrate the accuracy, simplicity and utility of the RSE method by capturing and sequencing a 4 Mbp stretch of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). Our results show an average depth of coverage of 164X for the entire MHC. This depth of coverage contributes significantly to a 99.94 % total coverage of the targeted region and to an accuracy that is over 99.99 %. RSE represents a cost-effective target enrichment method capable of producing sequencing templates in excess of 20 kbp in length. The utility of our method has been proven to generate superior coverage across the MHC as compared to other commercially available methodologies, with the added advantage of producing longer sequencing

  12. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite markers in Beilschmiedia roxburghiana (Lauraceae).

    PubMed

    Liu, Lu; Wang, Zheng-Feng; Li, Qiao-Ming; Ye, Wan-Hui; Cao, Hong-Lin; Wang, Zhang-Ming

    2013-08-01

    Although there are as many as 250 species in the genus Beilschmiedia, their genetic diversity has been poorly investigated. Our objective was to develop microsatellite markers for B. roxburghiana to study its genetic diversity for the sustainable management of this species. • Using the microsatellite-enriched library and PCR-based screening method, 22 microsatellite markers were developed and 10 showed high polymorphism in a population. The number of alleles per locus for these 10 microsatellites ranged from five to 19. The observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.298 to 1.000 and from 0.314 to 0.878, respectively. • Our results from the 10 highly polymorphic microsatellites indicate that the principal reproductive mode of B. roxburghiana is clonal in the studied population. These microsatellites will facilitate further studies on genetic diversity and structure in B. roxburghiana.

  13. Polymorphic microsatellite markers for the endangered fish, the slender shiner Pseudopungtungia tenuicorpa and cross-species amplification across five related species.

    PubMed

    Kim, K S; Moon, S J; Han, S H; Kim, K Y; Bang, I C

    2016-09-02

    The slender shiner Pseudopungtungia tenuicorpa (Cypriniformes; Cyprinidae; Gobioninae) is an endangered freshwater fish species endemic to Korea. The current strategies for its conservation involve the study of population genetic characters and identification of management units. These strategies require suitable molecular markers to study genetic diversity and genetic structure. Here, we developed nine polymorphic microsatellite markers for P. tenuicorpa for the first time by applying an enrichment method from a size-selected genomic library. The developed microsatellite markers produced a total of 101 alleles (average 11.2). The observed and expected heterozygosities averaged 0.805 and 0.835, respectively. Among the nine identified markers, five markers showed successful amplification across five related Korean Gobioninae species. Thus, the microsatellite markers developed in this study will be useful to establish conservation strategies for both P. tenuicorpa and other related species.

  14. Microsatellite markers for the yam bean Pachyrhizus (Fabaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Delêtre, Marc; Soengas, Beatriz; Utge, José; Lambourdière, Josie; Sørensen, Marten

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Microsatellite loci were developed for the understudied root crop yam bean (Pachyrhizus spp.) to investigate intraspecific diversity and interspecific relationships within the genus Pachyrhizus. • Methods and Results: Seventeen nuclear simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers with perfect di- and trinucleotide repeats were developed from 454 pyrosequencing of SSR-enriched genomic libraries. Loci were characterized in P. ahipa and wild and cultivated populations of four closely related species. All loci successfully cross-amplified and showed high levels of polymorphism, with number of alleles ranging from three to 12 and expected heterozygosity ranging from 0.095 to 0.831 across the genus. • Conclusions: By enabling rapid assessment of genetic diversity in three native neotropical crops, P. ahipa, P. erosus, and P. tuberosus, and two wild relatives, P. ferrugineus and P. panamensis, these markers will allow exploration of the genetic diversity and evolutionary history of the genus Pachyrhizus. PMID:25202568

  15. Genome wide analysis of Silurana (Xenopus) tropicalis development reveals dynamic expression using network enrichment analysis.

    PubMed

    Langlois, Valérie S; Martyniuk, Christopher J

    2013-01-01

    Development involves precise timing of gene expression and coordinated pathways for organogenesis and morphogenesis. Functional and sub-network enrichment analysis provides an integrated approach for identifying networks underlying development. The objectives of this study were to characterize early gene regulatory networks over Silurana tropicalis development from NF stage 2 to 46 using a custom Agilent 4×44K microarray. There were >8000 unique gene probes that were differentially expressed between Nieuwkoop-Faber (NF) stage 2 and stage 16, and >2000 gene probes differentially expressed between NF 34 and 46. Gene ontology revealed that genes involved in nucleosome assembly, cell division, pattern specification, neurotransmission, and general metabolism were increasingly regulated throughout development, consistent with active development. Sub-network enrichment analysis revealed that processes such as membrane hyperpolarisation, retinoic acid, cholesterol, and dopamine metabolic gene networks were activated/inhibited over time. This study identifies RNA transcripts that are potentially maternally inherited in an anuran species, provides evidence that the expression of genes involved in retinoic acid receptor signaling may increase prior to those involved in thyroid receptor signaling, and characterizes novel gene expression networks preceding organogenesis which increases understanding of the spatiotemporal embryonic development in frogs.

  16. Identification of Susceptible Loci and Enriched Pathways for Bipolar II Disorder Using Genome-Wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Chung-Feng; Chen, Hui-Wen; Chen, Hsi-Chung; Yang, Jenn-Hwai; Huang, Ming-Chyi; Chiu, Yi-Hang; Lin, Shih-Ku; Lee, Ya-Chin; Liu, Chih-Min; Chuang, Li-Chung; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Wu, Jer-Yuarn

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to identify susceptible loci and enriched pathways for bipolar disorder subtype II. Methods: We conducted a genome-wide association scan in discovery samples with 189 bipolar disorder subtype II patients and 1773 controls, and replication samples with 283 bipolar disorder subtype II patients and 500 controls in a Taiwanese Han population using Affymetrix Axiom Genome-Wide CHB1 Array. We performed single-marker and gene-based association analyses, as well as calculated polygeneic risk scores for bipolar disorder subtype II. Pathway enrichment analyses were employed to reveal significant biological pathways. Results: Seven markers were found to be associated with bipolar disorder subtype II in meta-analysis combining both discovery and replication samples (P<5.0×10–6), including markers in or close to MYO16, HSP90AB3P, noncoding gene LOC100507632, and markers in chromosomes 4 and 10. A novel locus, ETF1, was associated with bipolar disorder subtype II (P<6.0×10–3) in gene-based association tests. Results of risk evaluation demonstrated that higher genetic risk scores were able to distinguish bipolar disorder subtype II patients from healthy controls in both discovery (P=3.9×10–4~1.0×10–3) and replication samples (2.8×10–4~1.7×10–3). Genetic variance explained by chip markers for bipolar disorder subtype II was substantial in the discovery (55.1%) and replication (60.5%) samples. Moreover, pathways related to neurodevelopmental function, signal transduction, neuronal system, and cell adhesion molecules were significantly associated with bipolar disorder subtype II. Conclusion: We reported novel susceptible loci for pure bipolar subtype II disorder that is less addressed in the literature. Future studies are needed to confirm the roles of these loci for bipolar disorder subtype II. PMID:27450446

  17. Identification of Susceptible Loci and Enriched Pathways for Bipolar II Disorder Using Genome-Wide Association Studies.

    PubMed

    Kao, Chung-Feng; Chen, Hui-Wen; Chen, Hsi-Chung; Yang, Jenn-Hwai; Huang, Ming-Chyi; Chiu, Yi-Hang; Lin, Shih-Ku; Lee, Ya-Chin; Liu, Chih-Min; Chuang, Li-Chung; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Lu, Ru-Band; Kuo, Po-Hsiu

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to identify susceptible loci and enriched pathways for bipolar disorder subtype II. We conducted a genome-wide association scan in discovery samples with 189 bipolar disorder subtype II patients and 1773 controls, and replication samples with 283 bipolar disorder subtype II patients and 500 controls in a Taiwanese Han population using Affymetrix Axiom Genome-Wide CHB1 Array. We performed single-marker and gene-based association analyses, as well as calculated polygeneic risk scores for bipolar disorder subtype II. Pathway enrichment analyses were employed to reveal significant biological pathways. Seven markers were found to be associated with bipolar disorder subtype II in meta-analysis combining both discovery and replication samples (P<5.0×10(-6)), including markers in or close to MYO16, HSP90AB3P, noncoding gene LOC100507632, and markers in chromosomes 4 and 10. A novel locus, ETF1, was associated with bipolar disorder subtype II (P<6.0×10(-3)) in gene-based association tests. Results of risk evaluation demonstrated that higher genetic risk scores were able to distinguish bipolar disorder subtype II patients from healthy controls in both discovery (P=3.9×10(-4)~1.0×10(-3)) and replication samples (2.8×10(-4)~1.7×10(-3)). Genetic variance explained by chip markers for bipolar disorder subtype II was substantial in the discovery (55.1%) and replication (60.5%) samples. Moreover, pathways related to neurodevelopmental function, signal transduction, neuronal system, and cell adhesion molecules were significantly associated with bipolar disorder subtype II. We reported novel susceptible loci for pure bipolar subtype II disorder that is less addressed in the literature. Future studies are needed to confirm the roles of these loci for bipolar disorder subtype II. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  18. A microsatellite-based genome-wide analysis of genetic diversity and linkage disequilibrium in Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) cultivars from major cotton-growing countries

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To better understand the genetic diversity of the cultivated Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) and its structure at the molecular level, 193 Upland cotton cultivars collected from 26 countries were genotyped using 448 microsatellite markers. These markers were selected based on their mapping po...

  19. A Genomic and Protein-Protein Interaction Analyses of Nonsyndromic Hearing Impairment in Cameroon Using Targeted Genomic Enrichment and Massively Parallel Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Lebeko, Kamogelo; Manyisa, Noluthando; Chimusa, Emile R; Mulder, Nicola; Dandara, Collet; Wonkam, Ambroise

    2017-02-01

    Hearing impairment (HI) is one of the leading causes of disability in the world, impacting the social, economic, and psychological well-being of the affected individual. This is particularly true in sub-Saharan Africa, which carries one of the highest burdens of this condition. Despite this, there are limited data on the most prevalent genes or mutations that cause HI among sub-Saharan Africans. Next-generation technologies, such as targeted genomic enrichment and massively parallel sequencing, offer new promise in this context. This study reports, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, on the prevalence of novel mutations identified through a platform of 116 HI genes (OtoSCOPE(®)), among 82 African probands with HI. Only variants OTOF NM_194248.2:c.766-2A>G and MYO7A NM_000260.3:c.1996C>T, p.Arg666Stop were found in 3 (3.7%) and 5 (6.1%) patients, respectively. In addition and uniquely, the analysis of protein-protein interactions (PPI), through interrogation of gene subnetworks, using a custom script and two databases (Enrichr and PANTHER), and an algorithm in the igraph package of R, identified the enrichment of sensory perception and mechanical stimulus biological processes, and the most significant molecular functions of these variants pertained to binding or structural activity. Furthermore, 10 genes (MYO7A, MYO6, KCTD3, NUMA1, MYH9, KCNQ1, UBC, DIAPH1, PSMC2, and RDX) were identified as significant hubs within the subnetworks. Results reveal that the novel variants identified among familial cases of HI in Cameroon are not common, and PPI analysis has highlighted the role of 10 genes, potentially important in understanding HI genomics among Africans.

  20. Enrichment analysis of Alu elements with different spatial chromatin proximity in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Gu, Zhuoya; Jin, Ke; Crabbe, M James C; Zhang, Yang; Liu, Xiaolin; Huang, Yanyan; Hua, Mengyi; Nan, Peng; Zhang, Zhaolei; Zhong, Yang

    2016-04-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) have no longer been totally considered as "junk DNA" for quite a time since the continual discoveries of their multifunctional roles in eukaryote genomes. As one of the most important and abundant TEs that still active in human genome, Alu, a SINE family, has demonstrated its indispensable regulatory functions at sequence level, but its spatial roles are still unclear. Technologies based on 3C (chromosome conformation capture) have revealed the mysterious three-dimensional structure of chromatin, and make it possible to study the distal chromatin interaction in the genome. To find the role TE playing in distal regulation in human genome, we compiled the new released Hi-C data, TE annotation, histone marker annotations, and the genome-wide methylation data to operate correlation analysis, and found that the density of Alu elements showed a strong positive correlation with the level of chromatin interactions (hESC: r = 0.9, P < 2.2 × 10(16); IMR90 fibroblasts: r = 0.94, P < 2.2 × 10(16)) and also have a significant positive correlation with some remote functional DNA elements like enhancers and promoters (Enhancer: hESC: r = 0.997, P = 2.3 × 10(-4); IMR90: r = 0.934, P = 2 × 10(-2); Promoter: hESC: r = 0.995, P = 3.8 × 10(-4); IMR90: r = 0.996, P = 3.2 × 10(-4)). Further investigation involving GC content and methylation status showed the GC content of Alu covered sequences shared a similar pattern with that of the overall sequence, suggesting that Alu elements also function as the GC nucleotide and CpG site provider. In all, our results suggest that the Alu elements may act as an alternative parameter to evaluate the Hi-C data, which is confirmed by the correlation analysis of Alu elements and histone markers. Moreover, the GC-rich Alu sequence can bring high GC content and methylation flexibility to the regions with more distal chromatin contact, regulating the transcription of tissue-specific genes.

  1. Comprehensive profiling of retroviral integration sites using target enrichment methods from historical koala samples without an assembled reference genome.

    PubMed

    Cui, Pin; Löber, Ulrike; Alquezar-Planas, David E; Ishida, Yasuko; Courtiol, Alexandre; Timms, Peter; Johnson, Rebecca N; Lenz, Dorina; Helgen, Kristofer M; Roca, Alfred L; Hartman, Stefanie; Greenwood, Alex D

    2016-01-01

    Background. Retroviral integration into the host germline results in permanent viral colonization of vertebrate genomes. The koala retrovirus (KoRV) is currently invading the germline of the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) and provides a unique opportunity for studying retroviral endogenization. Previous analysis of KoRV integration patterns in modern koalas demonstrate that they share integration sites primarily if they are related, indicating that the process is currently driven by vertical transmission rather than infection. However, due to methodological challenges, KoRV integrations have not been comprehensively characterized. Results. To overcome these challenges, we applied and compared three target enrichment techniques coupled with next generation sequencing (NGS) and a newly customized sequence-clustering based computational pipeline to determine the integration sites for 10 museum Queensland and New South Wales (NSW) koala samples collected between the 1870s and late 1980s. A secondary aim of this study sought to identify common integration sites across modern and historical specimens by comparing our dataset to previously published studies. Several million sequences were processed, and the KoRV integration sites in each koala were characterized. Conclusions. Although the three enrichment methods each exhibited bias in integration site retrieval, a combination of two methods, Primer Extension Capture and hybridization capture is recommended for future studies on historical samples. Moreover, identification of integration sites shows that the proportion of integration sites shared between any two koalas is quite small.

  2. Genome-wide identification of splicing QTLs in the human brain and their enrichment among schizophrenia-associated loci

    PubMed Central

    Takata, Atsushi; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Kato, Tadafumi

    2017-01-01

    Detailed analyses of transcriptome have revealed complexity in regulation of alternative splicing (AS). These AS events often undergo modulation by genetic variants. Here we analyse RNA-sequencing data of prefrontal cortex from 206 individuals in combination with their genotypes and identify cis-acting splicing quantitative trait loci (sQTLs) throughout the genome. These sQTLs are enriched among exonic and H3K4me3-marked regions. Moreover, we observe significant enrichment of sQTLs among disease-associated loci identified by GWAS, especially in schizophrenia risk loci. Closer examination of each schizophrenia-associated loci revealed four regions (each encompasses NEK4, FXR1, SNAP91 or APOPT1), where the index SNP in GWAS is in strong linkage disequilibrium with sQTL SNP(s), suggesting dysregulation of AS as the underlying mechanism of the association signal. Our study provides an informative resource of sQTL SNPs in the human brain, which can facilitate understanding of the genetic architecture of complex brain disorders such as schizophrenia. PMID:28240266

  3. Comprehensive profiling of retroviral integration sites using target enrichment methods from historical koala samples without an assembled reference genome

    PubMed Central

    Alquezar-Planas, David E.; Ishida, Yasuko; Courtiol, Alexandre; Timms, Peter; Johnson, Rebecca N.; Lenz, Dorina; Helgen, Kristofer M.; Roca, Alfred L.; Hartman, Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    Background. Retroviral integration into the host germline results in permanent viral colonization of vertebrate genomes. The koala retrovirus (KoRV) is currently invading the germline of the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) and provides a unique opportunity for studying retroviral endogenization. Previous analysis of KoRV integration patterns in modern koalas demonstrate that they share integration sites primarily if they are related, indicating that the process is currently driven by vertical transmission rather than infection. However, due to methodological challenges, KoRV integrations have not been comprehensively characterized. Results. To overcome these challenges, we applied and compared three target enrichment techniques coupled with next generation sequencing (NGS) and a newly customized sequence-clustering based computational pipeline to determine the integration sites for 10 museum Queensland and New South Wales (NSW) koala samples collected between the 1870s and late 1980s. A secondary aim of this study sought to identify common integration sites across modern and historical specimens by comparing our dataset to previously published studies. Several million sequences were processed, and the KoRV integration sites in each koala were characterized. Conclusions. Although the three enrichment methods each exhibited bias in integration site retrieval, a combination of two methods, Primer Extension Capture and hybridization capture is recommended for future studies on historical samples. Moreover, identification of integration sites shows that the proportion of integration sites shared between any two koalas is quite small. PMID:27069793

  4. Chloroplast microsatellite primers for cacao (Theobroma cacao) and other Malvaceae.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ji Y; Motilal, Lambert A; Dempewolf, Hannes; Maharaj, Kamaldeo; Cronk, Q C B

    2011-12-01

    Chloroplast microsatellites were developed in Theobroma cacao to examine the genetic diversity of cacao cultivars in Trinidad and Tobago. Nine polymorphic microsatellites were designed from the chloroplast genomes of two T. cacao accessions. These microsatellites were tested in 95 hybrid accessions from Trinidad and Tobago. An average of 2.9 alleles per locus was found. These chloroplast microsatellites, particularly the highly polymorphic pentameric repeat, were useful in assessing genetic variation in T. cacao. In addition, these markers should also prove to be useful for population genetic studies in other species of Malvaceae.

  5. PCR primer pairs for 100 microsatellites in red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    One hundred nuclear-encoded microsatellites from a genomic DNA library of red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) were isolated and characterized. Eight of the microsatellites had tetra-nucleotide motifs, while 92 had di-nucleotide motifs. The average number of alleles at the 100 microsatellites among a sa...

  6. Enrichment of low-frequency functional variants revealed by whole-genome sequencing of multiple isolated European populations

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yali; Mezzavilla, Massimo; Haber, Marc; McCarthy, Shane; Chen, Yuan; Narasimhan, Vagheesh; Gilly, Arthur; Ayub, Qasim; Colonna, Vincenza; Southam, Lorraine; Finan, Christopher; Massaia, Andrea; Chheda, Himanshu; Palta, Priit; Ritchie, Graham; Asimit, Jennifer; Dedoussis, George; Gasparini, Paolo; Palotie, Aarno; Ripatti, Samuli; Soranzo, Nicole; Toniolo, Daniela; Wilson, James F.; Durbin, Richard; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Zeggini, Eleftheria

    2017-01-01

    The genetic features of isolated populations can boost power in complex-trait association studies, and an in-depth understanding of how their genetic variation has been shaped by their demographic history can help leverage these advantageous characteristics. Here, we perform a comprehensive investigation using 3,059 newly generated low-depth whole-genome sequences from eight European isolates and two matched general populations, together with published data from the 1000 Genomes Project and UK10K. Sequencing data give deeper and richer insights into population demography and genetic characteristics than genotype-chip data, distinguishing related populations more effectively and allowing their functional variants to be studied more fully. We demonstrate relaxation of purifying selection in the isolates, leading to enrichment of rare and low-frequency functional variants, using novel statistics, DVxy and SVxy. We also develop an isolation-index (Isx) that predicts the overall level of such key genetic characteristics and can thus help guide population choice in future complex-trait association studies. PMID:28643794

  7. Efficiency of whole genome amplification of single circulating tumor cells enriched by CellSearch and sorted by FACS.

    PubMed

    Swennenhuis, Joost F; Reumers, Joke; Thys, Kim; Aerssens, Jeroen; Terstappen, Leon Wmm

    2013-01-01

    Tumor cells in the blood of patients with metastatic carcinomas are associated with poor survival. Knowledge of the cells' genetic make-up can help to guide targeted therapy. We evaluated the efficiency and quality of isolation and amplification of DNA from single circulating tumor cells (CTC). The efficiency of the procedure was determined by spiking blood with SKBR-3 cells, enrichment with the CellSearch system, followed by single cell sorting by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and whole genome amplification. A selection of single cell DNA from fixed and unfixed SKBR-3 cells was exome sequenced and the DNA quality analyzed. Single CTC from patients with lung cancer were used to demonstrate the potential of single CTC molecular characterization. The overall efficiency of the procedure from spiked cell to amplified DNA was approximately 20%. Losses attributed to the CellSearch system were around 20%, transfer to FACS around 25%, sorting around 5% and DNA amplification around 25%. Exome sequencing revealed that the quality of the DNA was affected by the fixation of the cells, amplification, and the low starting quantity of DNA. A single fixed cell had an average coverage at 20× depth of 30% when sequencing to an average of 40× depth, whereas a single unfixed cell had 45% coverage. GenomiPhi-amplified genomic DNA had a coverage of 72% versus a coverage of 87% of genomic DNA. Twenty-one percent of the CTC from patients with lung cancer identified by the CellSearch system could be isolated individually and amplified. CTC enriched by the CellSearch system were sorted by FACS, and DNA retrieved and amplified with an overall efficiency of 20%. Analysis of the sequencing data showed that this DNA could be used for variant calling, but not for quantitative measurements such as copy number detection. Close to 55% of the exome of single SKBR-3 cells were successfully sequenced to 20× depth making it possible to call 72% of the variants. The overall coverage was

  8. Near-Complete Genome Sequence of Thalassospira sp. Strain KO164 Isolated from a Lignin-Enriched Marine Sediment Microcosm

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Hannah L.; O’Dell, Kaela B.; Utturkar, Sagar; McBride, Kathryn R.; Huntemann, Marcel; Clum, Alicia; Pillay, Manoj; Palaniappan, Krishnaveni; Varghese, Neha; Mikhailova, Natalia; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T. B. K.; Ngan, Chew Yee; Daum, Chris; Shapiro, Nicole; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Woyke, Tanja; Brown, Steven D.; Hazen, Terry C.

    2016-11-23

    We isolated Thalassospirasp. strain KO164 from eastern Mediterranean seawater and sediment laboratory microcosms enriched on insoluble organosolv lignin under oxic conditions. Furthermore, an analysis of the deep-ocean bacterium’s ability to degrade recalcitrant organics such as lignin near-complete genome sequence, will be presented here.

  9. Genome Sequence of Halomonas sp. Strain KO116, an Ionic Liquid- Tolerant Marine Bacterium Isolated from a Lignin-Enriched Seawater Microcosm

    SciTech Connect

    O'Dell, Kaela; Woo, Hannah L.; Utturkar, Sagar M.; Klingeman, Dawn Marie; Brown, Steven D.; Hazen, Terry C.

    2015-05-07

    Halomonas sp. strain KO116 was isolated from Nile Delta Mediterranean Sea surface water enriched with insoluble organosolv lignin. It was further screened for growth on alkali lignin minimal salts medium agar. The strain tolerates the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate. Its complete genome sequence is presented in this report.

  10. Genome Sequence of Halomonas sp. Strain KO116, an Ionic Liquid- Tolerant Marine Bacterium Isolated from a Lignin-Enriched Seawater Microcosm

    DOE PAGES

    O'Dell, Kaela; Woo, Hannah L.; Utturkar, Sagar M.; ...

    2015-05-07

    Halomonas sp. strain KO116 was isolated from Nile Delta Mediterranean Sea surface water enriched with insoluble organosolv lignin. It was further screened for growth on alkali lignin minimal salts medium agar. The strain tolerates the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate. Its complete genome sequence is presented in this report.

  11. [Microsatellite markers and their application in genetic diversity research of Plasmodium spp].

    PubMed

    Li, Jun-Wei; Zhou, Shui-Sen; Huang, Fang

    2012-04-01

    Microsatellites, namely simple sequence repeats (SSR), are simple tandemly repeated sequences with repeat units of 1-6 bp in length. As genetic markers, microsatellites are abundant and distributed throughout the eukaryotic genomes. Their advantages include high polymorphism and abundance, co-dominance, selective neutrality and high reliability. In recent years, microsatellite markers are often used to study the biologically genetic diversity. In this paper, we briefly review the application of microsatellite technique in the study of Plasmodium spp. genetic diversity.

  12. New softwares for automated microsatellite marker development

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Wellington; de Sousa, Daniel; Proite, Karina; Guimarães, Patrícia; Moretzsohn, Marcio; Bertioli, David

    2006-01-01

    Microsatellites are repeated small sequence motifs that are highly polymorphic and abundant in the genomes of eukaryotes. Often they are the molecular markers of choice. To aid the development of microsatellite markers we have developed a module that integrates a program for the detection of microsatellites (TROLL), with the sequence assembly and analysis software, the Staden Package. The module has easily adjustable parameters for microsatellite lengths and base pair quality control. Starting with large datasets of unassembled sequence data in the form of chromatograms and/or text data, it enables the creation of a compact database consisting of the processed and assembled microsatellite containing sequences. For the final phase of primer design, we developed a program that accepts the multi-sequence ‘experiment file’ format as input and produces a list of primer pairs for amplification of microsatellite markers. The program can take into account the quality values of consensus bases, improving success rate of primer pairs in PCR. The software is freely available and simple to install in both Windows and Unix-based operating systems. Here we demonstrate the software by developing primer pairs for 427 new candidate markers for peanut. PMID:16493138

  13. New softwares for automated microsatellite marker development.

    PubMed

    Martins, Wellington; de Sousa, Daniel; Proite, Karina; Guimarães, Patrícia; Moretzsohn, Marcio; Bertioli, David

    2006-02-21

    Microsatellites are repeated small sequence motifs that are highly polymorphic and abundant in the genomes of eukaryotes. Often they are the molecular markers of choice. To aid the development of microsatellite markers we have developed a module that integrates a program for the detection of microsatellites (TROLL), with the sequence assembly and analysis software, the Staden Package. The module has easily adjustable parameters for microsatellite lengths and base pair quality control. Starting with large datasets of unassembled sequence data in the form of chromatograms and/or text data, it enables the creation of a compact database consisting of the processed and assembled microsatellite containing sequences. For the final phase of primer design, we developed a program that accepts the multi-sequence 'experiment file' format as input and produces a list of primer pairs for amplification of microsatellite markers. The program can take into account the quality values of consensus bases, improving success rate of primer pairs in PCR. The software is freely available and simple to install in both Windows and Unix-based operating systems. Here we demonstrate the software by developing primer pairs for 427 new candidate markers for peanut.

  14. Survey of microsatellite DNA in pine

    Treesearch

    C. S. Echt; P. May-Marquardt

    1997-01-01

    A large insert genomic library from eastern white pine (Pinus strobus) was probed for the microsatellite motifs (AC)n and (AG)n, all 10 trinucleotide motifs, and 22 of the 33 possible tetranucleotide motifs. For comparison with a species from a different subgenus, a loblolly pine (Pinus taeda...

  15. Targeted genomic enrichment and sequencing of CyHV-3 from carp tissues confirms low nucleotide diversity and mixed genotype infections

    PubMed Central

    Hammoumi, Saliha; Vallaeys, Tatiana; Santika, Ayi; Leleux, Philippe; Borzym, Ewa; Klopp, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Koi herpesvirus disease (KHVD) is an emerging disease that causes mass mortality in koi and common carp, Cyprinus carpio L. Its causative agent is Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3), also known as koi herpesvirus (KHV). Although data on the pathogenesis of this deadly virus is relatively abundant in the literature, still little is known about its genomic diversity and about the molecular mechanisms that lead to such a high virulence. In this context, we developed a new strategy for sequencing full-length CyHV-3 genomes directly from infected fish tissues. Total genomic DNA extracted from carp gill tissue was specifically enriched with CyHV-3 sequences through hybridization to a set of nearly 2 million overlapping probes designed to cover the entire genome length, using KHV-J sequence (GenBank accession number AP008984) as reference. Applied to 7 CyHV-3 specimens from Poland and Indonesia, this targeted genomic enrichment enabled recovery of the full genomes with >99.9% reference coverage. The enrichment rate was directly correlated to the estimated number of viral copies contained in the DNA extracts used for library preparation, which varied between ∼5000 and ∼2×107. The average sequencing depth was >200 for all samples, thus allowing the search for variants with high confidence. Sequence analyses highlighted a significant proportion of intra-specimen sequence heterogeneity, suggesting the presence of mixed infections in all investigated fish. They also showed that inter-specimen genetic diversity at the genome scale was very low (>99.95% of sequence identity). By enabling full genome comparisons directly from infected fish tissues, this new method will be valuable to trace outbreaks rapidly and at a reasonable cost, and in turn to understand the transmission routes of CyHV-3. PMID:27703859

  16. Targeted genomic enrichment and sequencing of CyHV-3 from carp tissues confirms low nucleotide diversity and mixed genotype infections.

    PubMed

    Hammoumi, Saliha; Vallaeys, Tatiana; Santika, Ayi; Leleux, Philippe; Borzym, Ewa; Klopp, Christophe; Avarre, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Koi herpesvirus disease (KHVD) is an emerging disease that causes mass mortality in koi and common carp, Cyprinus carpio L. Its causative agent is Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3), also known as koi herpesvirus (KHV). Although data on the pathogenesis of this deadly virus is relatively abundant in the literature, still little is known about its genomic diversity and about the molecular mechanisms that lead to such a high virulence. In this context, we developed a new strategy for sequencing full-length CyHV-3 genomes directly from infected fish tissues. Total genomic DNA extracted from carp gill tissue was specifically enriched with CyHV-3 sequences through hybridization to a set of nearly 2 million overlapping probes designed to cover the entire genome length, using KHV-J sequence (GenBank accession number AP008984) as reference. Applied to 7 CyHV-3 specimens from Poland and Indonesia, this targeted genomic enrichment enabled recovery of the full genomes with >99.9% reference coverage. The enrichment rate was directly correlated to the estimated number of viral copies contained in the DNA extracts used for library preparation, which varied between ∼5000 and ∼2×10(7). The average sequencing depth was >200 for all samples, thus allowing the search for variants with high confidence. Sequence analyses highlighted a significant proportion of intra-specimen sequence heterogeneity, suggesting the presence of mixed infections in all investigated fish. They also showed that inter-specimen genetic diversity at the genome scale was very low (>99.95% of sequence identity). By enabling full genome comparisons directly from infected fish tissues, this new method will be valuable to trace outbreaks rapidly and at a reasonable cost, and in turn to understand the transmission routes of CyHV-3.

  17. Microsatellite markers for Urochloa humidicola (Poaceae) and their transferability to other Urochloa species.

    PubMed

    Santos, Jean C S; Barreto, Mariana A; Oliveira, Fernanda A; Vigna, Bianca B Z; Souza, Anete P

    2015-03-15

    Urochloa humidicola is a warm-season grass commonly used as forage in the tropics and is recognized for its tolerance to seasonal flooding. This grass is an important forage species for the Cerrado and Amazon regions of Brazil. U. humidicola is a polyploid species with variable ploidy (6X-9X) and facultative apomixis with high phenotypic plasticity. However, this apomixis and ploidy, as well as the limited knowledge of the genetic basis of the germplasm collection, have constrained genetic breeding activities, yet microsatellite markers may enable a better understanding of the species' genetic composition. This study aimed to develop and characterize new polymorphic microsatellite molecular markers in U. humidicola and to evaluate their transferability to other Urochloa species. A set of microsatellite markers for U. humidicola was identified from two new enriched genomic DNA libraries: the first library was constructed from a single sexual genotype and the second from a pool of eight apomictic genotypes selected on the basis of previous results. Of the 114 loci developed, 72 primer pairs presented a good amplification product, and 64 were polymorphic among the 34 genotypes tested. The number of bands per simple sequence repeat (SSR) locus ranged from 1 to 29, with a mean of 9.6 bands per locus. The mean polymorphism information content (PIC) of all loci was 0.77, and the mean discrimination power (DP) was 0.87. STRUCTURE analysis revealed differences among U. humidicola accessions, hybrids, and other Urochloa accessions. The transferability of these microsatellites was evaluated in four species of the genus, U. brizantha, U. decumbens, U. ruziziensis, and U. dictyoneura, and the percentage of transferability ranged from 58.33% to 69.44% depending on the species. This work reports new polymorphic microsatellite markers for U. humidicola that can be used for breeding programs of this and other Urochloa species, including genetic linkage mapping, quantitative trait

  18. Survey and Analysis of Microsatellites in the Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, M. Dharma; Muthulakshmi, M.; Madhu, M.; Archak, Sunil; Mita, K.; Nagaraju, J.

    2005-01-01

    We studied microsatellite frequency and distribution in 21.76-Mb random genomic sequences, 0.67-Mb BAC sequences from the Z chromosome, and 6.3-Mb EST sequences of Bombyx mori. We mined microsatellites of ≥15 bases of mononucleotide repeats and ≥5 repeat units of other classes of repeats. We estimated that microsatellites account for 0.31% of the genome of B. mori. Microsatellite tracts of A, AT, and ATT were the most abundant whereas their number drastically decreased as the length of the repeat motif increased. In general, tri- and hexanucleotide repeats were overrepresented in the transcribed sequences except TAA, GTA, and TGA, which were in excess in genomic sequences. The Z chromosome sequences contained shorter repeat types than the rest of the chromosomes in addition to a higher abundance of AT-rich repeats. Our results showed that base composition of the flanking sequence has an influence on the origin and evolution of microsatellites. Transitions/transversions were high in microsatellites of ESTs, whereas the genomic sequence had an equal number of substitutions and indels. The average heterozygosity value for 23 polymorphic microsatellite loci surveyed in 13 diverse silkmoth strains having 2–14 alleles was 0.54. Only 36 (18.2%) of 198 microsatellite loci were polymorphic between the two divergent silkworm populations and 10 (5%) loci revealed null alleles. The microsatellite map generated using these polymorphic markers resulted in 8 linkage groups. B. mori microsatellite loci were the most conserved in its immediate ancestor, B. mandarina, followed by the wild saturniid silkmoth, Antheraea assama. PMID:15371363

  19. Genome-Wide Association Studies Suggest Limited Immune Gene Enrichment in Schizophrenia Compared to 5 Autoimmune Diseases.

    PubMed

    Pouget, Jennie G; Gonçalves, Vanessa F; Spain, Sarah L; Finucane, Hilary K; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Kennedy, James L; Knight, Jo

    2016-09-01

    There has been intense debate over the immunological basis of schizophrenia, and the potential utility of adjunct immunotherapies. The major histocompatibility complex is consistently the most powerful region of association in genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of schizophrenia and has been interpreted as strong genetic evidence supporting the immune hypothesis. However, global pathway analyses provide inconsistent evidence of immune involvement in schizophrenia, and it remains unclear whether genetic data support an immune etiology per se. Here we empirically test the hypothesis that variation in immune genes contributes to schizophrenia. We show that there is no enrichment of immune loci outside of the MHC region in the largest genetic study of schizophrenia conducted to date, in contrast to 5 diseases of known immune origin. Among 108 regions of the genome previously associated with schizophrenia, we identify 6 immune candidates (DPP4, HSPD1, EGR1, CLU, ESAM, NFATC3) encoding proteins with alternative, nonimmune roles in the brain. While our findings do not refute evidence that has accumulated in support of the immune hypothesis, they suggest that genetically mediated alterations in immune function may not play a major role in schizophrenia susceptibility. Instead, there may be a role for pleiotropic effects of a small number of immune genes that also regulate brain development and plasticity. Whether immune alterations drive schizophrenia progression is an important question to be addressed by future research, especially in light of the growing interest in applying immunotherapies in schizophrenia. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center.

  20. Retrotransposon- and microsatellite sequence-associated genomic changes in early 2 generations of a newly synthesized allotetraploid cucumis × hytivus Chen & Kirkbride

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Allopolyploidization is considered an essential evolutionary process in plants that could trigger genomic shock in allopolyploid genome through activation of transcription of retrotransposons, which may be important in plant evolution. Two retrotransposon-based markers, inter-retrotransposon amplifi...

  1. Isolation and characterization of microsatellites for the yam Dioscorea cayenensis (Dioscoreaceae) and cross-amplification in D. rotundata.

    PubMed

    Silva, L R G; Bajay, M M; Monteiro, M; Mezette, T F; Nascimento, W F; Zucchi, M I; Pinheiro, J B; Veasey, E A

    2014-04-14

    Dioscorea cayenensis and Dioscorea rotundata are among the most important yam species for the humid and sub-humid tropics. We isolated nine polymorphic microsatellite markers using a microsatellite-enriched genomic library technique. The nine primer pairs were validated in 22 D. cayenensis accessions, and were tested for transferability in 26 D. rotundata accessions. The number of bands ranged from 2 to 4, with a mean of 3.11. D. cayenensis gave primer polymorphism information content values ranging from 0.37 to 0.62, while for D. rotundata the values ranged from 0.15 to 0.66. The D parameter in D. cayenensis ranged from 0.14 to 0.40, while in D. rotundata it ranged from 0.05 to 0.34. These SSR markers will be useful to characterize genetic diversity in D. cayenensis and D. rotundata accessions.

  2. Development and characterization of microsatellite markers for the medicinal plant Smilax brasiliensis (Smilacaceae) and related species1

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Aline R.; Abreu, Aluana G.; Bajay, Miklos M.; Villela, Priscilla M. S.; Batista, Carlos E. A.; Monteiro, Mariza; Alves-Pereira, Alessandro; Figueira, Glyn M.; Pinheiro, José B.; Appezzato-da-Glória, Beatriz; Zucchi, Maria I.

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: A new set of microsatellite or simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were developed for Smilax brasiliensis, which is popularly known as sarsaparilla and used in folk medicine as a tonic, antirheumatic, and antisyphilitic. Smilax brasiliensis is sold in Brazilian pharmacies, and its origin and effectiveness are not subject to quality control. • Methods and Results: Using a protocol for genomic library enrichment, primer pairs were developed for 26 microsatellite loci and validated in 17 accessions of S. brasiliensis. Thirteen loci were polymorphic and four were monomorphic. The primers successfully amplified alleles in the congeners S. campestris, S. cissoides, S. fluminensis, S. goyazana, S. polyantha, S. quinquenervia, S. rufescens, S. subsessiliflora, and S. syphilitica. • Conclusions: The new SSR markers described herein are informative tools for genetic diversity and gene flow studies in S. brasiliensis and several congeners. PMID:25202555

  3. Development and characterization of microsatellite markers for analysis of population differentiation in the tree legume Acacia koa (Fabaceae: Mimosoideae) in the Hawaiian Islands.

    PubMed

    Fredua-Agyeman, Rudolph; Adamski, Daniel; Liao, Richard Junfu; Morden, Clifford; Borthakur, Dulal

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this research was to develop and use microsatellite markers to characterize the high-value timber tree Acacia koa (koa), which is endemic to the Hawaiian Islands. Genomic DNA fragments of 300-1000 bp were cloned and sequenced following enrichment for microsatellite motifs by PCR using 7 oligonucleotide repeat primers in separate reactions. Among 96 sequences analyzed, 63 contained unique microsatellite motifs flanked by variable sequences. A dual PCR method involving a primer walking step was used to develop 15 primer pairs. Another 16 primer pairs were developed directly from the variable sequences on both sides of the microsatellite motifs. These 31 primer pairs were tested on 172 koa plants representing 11 populations collected from 4 of the major Hawaiian Islands. Nine of the primers that identified polymorphic microsatellite loci and 3 that detected unique alleles exclusively in some populations were used for genetic diversity studies of koa. Cluster analysis and multidimensional scaling of the allelic phenotype data revealed that koa from Kauai formed a distinct group separate from koa of the neighboring islands of Oahu, Maui, and Hawaii. The oldest of the four islands, Kauai, also had the most diverse populations of koa.

  4. Microsatellites from kousa dogwood (Cornus kousa).

    PubMed

    Wadl, Phillip A; Wang, Xinwang; Scheffler, Brian E; Rinehart, Timothy A; Trigiano, Robert N

    2008-07-01

    Microsatellite loci were identified from Cornus kousa'National'. Primer pairs for 86 loci were developed and of these, eight were optimized and screened using genomic DNA from 22 kousa cultivars. All optimized loci were polymorphic and the number of alleles per locus ranged from three to 17. Observed heterozygosity ranged from 0 to 0.3 and expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.38 to 0.91. These microsatellites will be useful in population studies, and a breeding programme for cultivar development of Cornus species. © 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd. No claim to original US government works.

  5. PMDBase: a database for studying microsatellite DNA and marker development in plants

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jingyin; Dossa, Komivi; Wang, Linhai; Zhang, Yanxin; Wei, Xin; Liao, Boshou; Zhang, Xiurong

    2017-01-01

    Microsatellite DNAs (or SSRs) are important genomic components involved in many important biological functions. SSRs have been extensively exploited as molecular markers for diverse applications including genetic diversity, linkage/association mapping of gene/QTL, marker-assisted selection, variety identification and evolution analysis. However, a comprehensive database or web service for studying microsatellite DNAs and marker development in plants is lacking. Here, we developed a database, PMDBase, which integrates large amounts of microsatellite DNAs from genome sequenced plant species and includes a web service for microsatellite DNAs identification. In PMDBase, 26 230 099 microsatellite DNAs were identified spanning 110 plant species. Up to three pairs of primers were supplied for every microsatellite DNA. For 81 species, genomic features of the microsatellite DNAs (genic or non-genic) were supplied with the corresponding genes or transcripts from public databases. Microsatellite DNAs can be explored through browsing and searching modules with a user-friendly web interface and customized software. Furthermore, we developed MISAweb and embedded Primer3web to help users to identify microsatellite DNAs and design corresponding primers in their own genomic sequences online. All datasets of microsatellite DNAs can be downloaded conveniently. PMDBase will be updated regularly with new available genome data and can be accessed freely via the address http://www.sesame-bioinfo.org/PMDBase. PMID:27733507

  6. Microsatellite markers from the 'South American fruit fly' Anastrepha fraterculus: a valuable tool for population genetic analysis and SIT applications

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Anastrepha fraterculus Wiedemann is a horticultural pest which causes significant economic losses in the fruit-producing areas of the American continent and limits the access of products to international markets. The use of environmentally friendly control strategies against this pest is constrained due to the limited knowledge of its population structure. Results We developed microsatellite markers for A. fraterculus from four genomic libraries, which were enriched in CA, CAA, GA and CAT microsatellite motifs. Fifty microsatellite regions were evaluated and 14 loci were selected for population genetics studies. Genotypes of 122 individuals sampled from four A. fraterculus populations were analyzed. The level of polymorphism ranged from three to 13 alleles per locus and the mean expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.60 to 0.64. Comparison between allelic and genotypic frequencies showed significant differences among all pairs of populations. Conclusions This novel set of microsatellite markers provides valuable information for the description of genetic variability and population structure of wild populations and laboratory strains of A. fraterculus. This information will be used to identify and characterize candidate strains suitable to implement effective pest control strategies and might represent a first step towards having a more comprehensive knowledge about the genetics of this pest. PMID:25471285

  7. Characterization of ten highly polymorphic microsatellite loci for the intertidal mussel Perna perna, and cross species amplification within the genus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The brown mussel Perna perna (Linnaeus, 1758) is a dominant constituent of intertidal communities and a strong invader with multiple non-native populations distributed around the world. In a previous study, two polymorphic microsatellite loci were developed and used to determine population-level genetic diversity in invasive and native P. perna populations. However, higher number of microsatellite markers are required for reliable population genetic studies. In this context, in order to understand P. perna origins and history of invasion and to compare population genetic structure in native versus invaded areas, we developed 10 polymorphic microsatellite markers. Findings Described microsatellite markers were developed from an enriched genomic library. Analyses and characterization of loci using 20 individuals from a population in Western Sahara revealed on average 11 alleles per locus (range: 5–27) and mean gene diversity of 0.75 (range: 0.31 - 0.95). One primer pair revealed possible linkage disequilibrium while heterozygote deficiency was significant at four loci. Six of these markers cross-amplified in P. canaliculus (origin: New Zealand). Conclusions Developed markers will be useful in addressing a variety of questions concerning P. perna, including dispersal scales, genetic variation and population structure, in both native and invaded areas. PMID:23039168

  8. Polymorphic microsatellite loci for the sand pocket mouse Chaetodipus arenarius, an endemic from the Baja California Peninsula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Munguia-Vega, A.; Rodriguez-Estrella, R.; Nachman, M.; Culver, M.

    2009-01-01

    Fifteen polymorphic microsatellite loci were isolated from an enriched genomic library of the sand pocket mouse Chaetodipus arenarius. The mean number of alleles per locus was 11.53 (range five to 19) and the average observed heterozygosity was 0.764 (range 0.121 to 1.0). The markers will be used for detecting the impact of human-induced habitat fragmentation on patterns of gene flow, genetic structure, and extinction risk. In addition, these markers will be useful across the genus because most of the loci cross-amplified and were polymorphic in three other species of Chaetodipus. ?? 2008 The Authors.

  9. PERMANENT GENETIC RESOURCES: Characterization of eight microsatellite loci in the woolly mouse opossum, Micoureus paraguayanus, isolated from Micoureus demerarae.

    PubMed

    Dias, I M G; Amato, G; Carvalho, M R S; Cunha, H M; Paglia, A P; Desalle, R; Fonseca, C G

    2008-03-01

    Eight novel microsatellite markers were isolated from the woolly mouse opossum from the Amazon Forest in Peru, Micoureus demerarae, using a partial genomic DNA library and an enrichment protocol. These loci were polymorphic in M. demerarae and Micoureus paraguayanus populations from the Atlantic Forest in Brazil with the number of alleles ranging from two to 23. Those eight loci plus another five already described for M. paraguayanus will allow for the evaluation of genetic diversity of populations from the 'Rio Doce' Park, one of the last Atlantic Forest fragments in Minas Gerais state, Brazil. © 2007 The Authors.

  10. Microsatellite genotyping reveals a signature in breast cancer exomes.

    PubMed

    McIver, L J; Fonville, N C; Karunasena, E; Garner, H R

    2014-06-01

    Genomic instability at microsatellite loci is a hallmark of many cancers, including breast cancer. However, much of the genomic variation and many of the hereditary components responsible for breast cancer remain undetected. We hypothesized that variation at microsatellites could provide additional genomic markers for breast cancer risk assessment. A total of 1,345 germline and tumor DNA samples from individuals diagnosed with breast cancer, exome sequenced as part of The Cancer Genome Atlas, were analyzed for microsatellite variation. The comparison group for our analysis, representing healthy individuals, consisted of 249 females which were exome sequenced as part of the 1,000 Genomes Project. We applied our microsatellite-based genotyping pipeline to identify 55 microsatellite loci that can distinguish between the germline of individuals diagnosed with breast cancer and healthy individuals with a sensitivity of 88.4 % and a specificity of 77.1 %. Further, we identified additional microsatellite loci that are potentially useful for distinguishing between breast cancer subtypes, revealing a possible fifth subtype. These findings are of clinical interest as possible risk diagnostics and reveal genes that may be of potential therapeutic value, including genes previously not associated with breast cancer.

  11. Highly polymorphic microsatellite markers for Radix balthica (Linnaeus 1758).

    PubMed

    Salinger, M; Pfenninger, M

    2009-07-01

    We present data for eight polymorphic microsatellite markers isolated from a microsatellite-enriched DNA library for the freshwater snail Radix balthica. Three of them were specific for R. balthica while five also amplified polymorphic products in two congeneric species. Test application on populations from all over the species range has shown that these loci are highly informative for analysing population structure and estimating migration rates. Observed deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium are attributed to a mixed mating system.

  12. All SNPs are not created equal: genome-wide association studies reveal a consistent pattern of enrichment among functionally annotated SNPs.

    PubMed

    Schork, Andrew J; Thompson, Wesley K; Pham, Phillip; Torkamani, Ali; Roddey, J Cooper; Sullivan, Patrick F; Kelsoe, John R; O'Donovan, Michael C; Furberg, Helena; Schork, Nicholas J; Andreassen, Ole A; Dale, Anders M

    2013-04-01

    Recent results indicate that genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have the potential to explain much of the heritability of common complex phenotypes, but methods are lacking to reliably identify the remaining associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We applied stratified False Discovery Rate (sFDR) methods to leverage genic enrichment in GWAS summary statistics data to uncover new loci likely to replicate in independent samples. Specifically, we use linkage disequilibrium-weighted annotations for each SNP in combination with nominal p-values to estimate the True Discovery Rate (TDR = 1-FDR) for strata determined by different genic categories. We show a consistent pattern of enrichment of polygenic effects in specific annotation categories across diverse phenotypes, with the greatest enrichment for SNPs tagging regulatory and coding genic elements, little enrichment in introns, and negative enrichment for intergenic SNPs. Stratified enrichment directly leads to increased TDR for a given p-value, mirrored by increased replication rates in independent samples. We show this in independent Crohn's disease GWAS, where we find a hundredfold variation in replication rate across genic categories. Applying a well-established sFDR methodology we demonstrate the utility of stratification for improving power of GWAS in complex phenotypes, with increased rejection rates from 20% in height to 300% in schizophrenia with traditional FDR and sFDR both fixed at 0.05. Our analyses demonstrate an inherent stratification among GWAS SNPs with important conceptual implications that can be leveraged by statistical methods to improve the discovery of loci.

  13. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite markers for Axonopus compressus (Sw.) Beauv. (Poaceae) using 454 sequencing technology.

    PubMed

    Wang, X-L; Li, Y; Liao, L; Bai, C-J; Wang, Z-Y

    2015-05-11

    Axonopus compressus (Sw.) Beauv. is a perennial herb widely used as a garden lawn grass. In this study, we used Roche 454 pyrosequencing, combined with the magnetic bead enrichment method FIASCO, to isolate simple sequence repeat markers from the A. compressus genome. A total of 1942 microsatellite loci were identified, with 53,193 raw sequencing reads. One hundred micro-satellite loci were selected to test the primer amplification efficiency in 24 individuals; 14 primer pairs yielded polymorphic amplification products. The number of observed alleles ranged from two to six, with an average of 3.5. Shannon's Information index values ranged from 0.169 to 0.650, with an average of 0.393. Nei's genetic diversity values ranged from 0.108 to 0.457, with an average of 0.271. This first set of microsatellite markers developed for Axonopus will assist in the development of molecular marker-assisted breeding and the assessment of genetic diversity in A. compressus.

  14. Microsatellite markers for an endemic Atlantic Forest tree, Manilkara multifida (Sapotaceae).

    PubMed

    Moraes, Ramiris C S; Vivas, Caio V; Oliveira, Fernanda A; Menezes, Ivandilson P P; van den Berg, Cassio; Gaiotto, Fernanda A

    2013-01-01

    Manilkara multifida is a tropical tree that is endemic to the Atlantic forests of southern Bahia, Brazil. Currently, populations of this species are restricted to fragmented landscapes that are susceptible to anthropogenic disturbances. Considering this issue, and that there is no genetic information available for this endangered species, we developed microsatellite markers for M. multifida to provide resources for future conservation genetics studies. Using an enriched genomic library, we isolated eight polymorphic microsatellite loci and optimized the amplification conditions for M. multifida. For each locus, we estimated the number of alleles, H E and H O, paternity exclusion Q, individual identity I and fixation index F, and examined the presence of null alleles. The mean number of alleles was 11.9, and the heterozygosity was high at all loci (average H E = 0.809 and H O = 0.777). The combined values for both paternity exclusion and individual identity were Q = 0.9959 and I = 5.45 × 10(-11), respectively. No evidence of null alleles was detected. The results of our analysis indicated that all eight microsatellites are promising for assessing questions involving inbreeding, gene flow, co-ancestry and mating patterns in M. multifida.

  15. Microsatellite markers for an endemic Atlantic Forest tree, Manilkara multifida (Sapotaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Moraes, Ramiris C. S.; Vivas, Caio V.; Oliveira, Fernanda A.; Menezes, Ivandilson P. P.; van den Berg, Cassio; Gaiotto, Fernanda A.

    2013-01-01

    Manilkara multifida is a tropical tree that is endemic to the Atlantic forests of southern Bahia, Brazil. Currently, populations of this species are restricted to fragmented landscapes that are susceptible to anthropogenic disturbances. Considering this issue, and that there is no genetic information available for this endangered species, we developed microsatellite markers for M. multifida to provide resources for future conservation genetics studies. Using an enriched genomic library, we isolated eight polymorphic microsatellite loci and optimized the amplification conditions for M. multifida. For each locus, we estimated the number of alleles, HE and HO, paternity exclusion Q, individual identity I and fixation index F, and examined the presence of null alleles. The mean number of alleles was 11.9, and the heterozygosity was high at all loci (average HE = 0.809 and HO = 0.777). The combined values for both paternity exclusion and individual identity were Q = 0.9959 and I = 5.45 × 10–11, respectively. No evidence of null alleles was detected. The results of our analysis indicated that all eight microsatellites are promising for assessing questions involving inbreeding, gene flow, co-ancestry and mating patterns in M. multifida. PMID:23487575

  16. Evolutionary Dynamics of Microsatellite Distribution in Plants: Insight from the Comparison of Sequenced Brassica, Arabidopsis and Other Angiosperm Species

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jiaqin; Huang, Shunmou; Fu, Donghui; Yu, Jinyin; Wang, Xinfa; Hua, Wei; Liu, Shengyi; Liu, Guihua; Wang, Hanzhong

    2013-01-01

    Despite their ubiquity and functional importance, microsatellites have been largely ignored in comparative genomics, mostly due to the lack of genomic information. In the current study, microsatellite distribution was characterized and compared in the whole genomes and both the coding and non-coding DNA sequences of the sequenced Brassica, Arabidopsis and other angiosperm species to investigate their evolutionary dynamics in plants. The variation in the microsatellite frequencies of these angiosperm species was much smaller than those for their microsatellite numbers and genome sizes, suggesting that microsatellite frequency may be relatively stable in plants. The microsatellite frequencies of these angiosperm species were significantly negatively correlated with both their genome sizes and transposable elements contents. The pattern of microsatellite distribution may differ according to the different genomic regions (such as coding and non-coding sequences). The observed differences in many important microsatellite characteristics (especially the distribution with respect to motif length, type and repeat number) of these angiosperm species were generally accordant with their phylogenetic distance, which suggested that the evolutionary dynamics of microsatellite distribution may be generally consistent with plant divergence/evolution. Importantly, by comparing these microsatellite characteristics (especially the distribution with respect to motif type) the angiosperm species (aside from a few species) all clustered into two obviously different groups that were largely represented by monocots and dicots, suggesting a complex and generally dichotomous evolutionary pattern of microsatellite distribution in angiosperms. Polyploidy may lead to a slight increase in microsatellite frequency in the coding sequences and a significant decrease in microsatellite frequency in the whole genome/non-coding sequences, but have little effect on the microsatellite distribution with

  17. Evolutionary dynamics of microsatellite distribution in plants: insight from the comparison of sequenced brassica, Arabidopsis and other angiosperm species.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jiaqin; Huang, Shunmou; Fu, Donghui; Yu, Jinyin; Wang, Xinfa; Hua, Wei; Liu, Shengyi; Liu, Guihua; Wang, Hanzhong

    2013-01-01

    Despite their ubiquity and functional importance, microsatellites have been largely ignored in comparative genomics, mostly due to the lack of genomic information. In the current study, microsatellite distribution was characterized and compared in the whole genomes and both the coding and non-coding DNA sequences of the sequenced Brassica, Arabidopsis and other angiosperm species to investigate their evolutionary dynamics in plants. The variation in the microsatellite frequencies of these angiosperm species was much smaller than those for their microsatellite numbers and genome sizes, suggesting that microsatellite frequency may be relatively stable in plants. The microsatellite frequencies of these angiosperm species were significantly negatively correlated with both their genome sizes and transposable elements contents. The pattern of microsatellite distribution may differ according to the different genomic regions (such as coding and non-coding sequences). The observed differences in many important microsatellite characteristics (especially the distribution with respect to motif length, type and repeat number) of these angiosperm species were generally accordant with their phylogenetic distance, which suggested that the evolutionary dynamics of microsatellite distribution may be generally consistent with plant divergence/evolution. Importantly, by comparing these microsatellite characteristics (especially the distribution with respect to motif type) the angiosperm species (aside from a few species) all clustered into two obviously different groups that were largely represented by monocots and dicots, suggesting a complex and generally dichotomous evolutionary pattern of microsatellite distribution in angiosperms. Polyploidy may lead to a slight increase in microsatellite frequency in the coding sequences and a significant decrease in microsatellite frequency in the whole genome/non-coding sequences, but have little effect on the microsatellite distribution with

  18. Development and characterization of polymorphic microsatellite markers in taro (Colocasia esculenta).

    PubMed

    Mace, Emma S; Godwin, Ian D

    2002-10-01

    Microsatellite-containing sequences were isolated from enriched genomic libraries of taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott). The sequencing of 269 clones yielded 77 inserts containing repeat motifs. The majority of these (81.7%) were dinucleotide or trinucleotide repeats. The GT/CA repeat motif was the most common, accounting for 42% of all repeat types. From a total of 43 primer pairs designed, 41 produced markers within the expected size range. Sixteen (39%) were polymorphic when screened against a restricted set of taro genotypes from Southeast Asia and Oceania, with an average of 3.2 alleles detected on each locus. These markers represent a useful resource for taro germplasm management, genome mapping, and marker-assisted selection.

  19. Functionally relevant microsatellites in sugarcane unigenes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Unigene sequences constitute a rich source of functionally relevant microsatellites. The present study was undertaken to mine the microsatellites in the available unigene sequences of sugarcane for understanding their constitution in the expressed genic component of its complex polyploid/aneuploid genome, assessing their functional significance in silico, determining the extent of allelic diversity at the microsatellite loci and for evaluating their utility in large-scale genotyping applications in sugarcane. Results The average frequency of perfect microsatellite was 1/10.9 kb, while it was 1/44.3 kb for the long and hypervariable class I repeats. GC-rich trinucleotides coding for alanine and the GA-rich dinucleotides were the most abundant microsatellite classes. Out of 15,594 unigenes mined in the study, 767 contained microsatellite repeats and for 672 of these putative functions were determined in silico. The microsatellite repeats were found in the functional domains of proteins encoded by 364 unigenes. Its significance was assessed by establishing the structure-function relationship for the beta-amylase and protein kinase encoding unigenes having repeats in the catalytic domains. A total of 726 allelic variants (7.42 alleles per locus) with different repeat lengths were captured precisely for a set of 47 fluorescent dye labeled primers in 36 sugarcane genotypes and five cereal species using the automated fragment analysis system, which suggested the utility of designed primers for rapid, large-scale and high-throughput genotyping applications in sugarcane. Pair-wise similarity ranging from 0.33 to 0.84 with an average of 0.40 revealed a broad genetic base of the Indian varieties in respect of functionally relevant regions of the large and complex sugarcane genome. Conclusion Microsatellite repeats were present in 4.92% of sugarcane unigenes, for most (87.6%) of which functions were determined in silico. High level of allelic diversity in repeats

  20. Genomic-Bioinformatic Analysis of Transcripts Enriched in the Third-Stage Larva of the Parasitic Nematode Ascaris suum

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Cui-Qin; Gasser, Robin B.; Cantacessi, Cinzia; Nisbet, Alasdair J.; Zhong, Weiwei; Sternberg, Paul W.; Loukas, Alex; Mulvenna, Jason; Lin, Rui-Qing; Chen, Ning; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2008-01-01

    Differential transcription in Ascaris suum was investigated using a genomic-bioinformatic approach. A cDNA archive enriched for molecules in the infective third-stage larva (L3) of A. suum was constructed by suppressive-subtractive hybridization (SSH), and a subset of cDNAs from 3075 clones subjected to microarray analysis using cDNA probes derived from RNA from different developmental stages of A. suum. The cDNAs (n = 498) shown by microarray analysis to be enriched in the L3 were sequenced and subjected to bioinformatic analyses using a semi-automated pipeline (ESTExplorer). Using gene ontology (GO), 235 of these molecules were assigned to ‘biological process’ (n = 68), ‘cellular component’ (n = 50), or ‘molecular function’ (n = 117). Of the 91 clusters assembled, 56 molecules (61.5%) had homologues/orthologues in the free-living nematodes Caenorhabditis elegans and C. briggsae and/or other organisms, whereas 35 (38.5%) had no significant similarity to any sequences available in current gene databases. Transcripts encoding protein kinases, protein phosphatases (and their precursors), and enolases were abundantly represented in the L3 of A. suum, as were molecules involved in cellular processes, such as ubiquitination and proteasome function, gene transcription, protein–protein interactions, and function. In silico analyses inferred the C. elegans orthologues/homologues (n = 50) to be involved in apoptosis and insulin signaling (2%), ATP synthesis (2%), carbon metabolism (6%), fatty acid biosynthesis (2%), gap junction (2%), glucose metabolism (6%), or porphyrin metabolism (2%), although 34 (68%) of them could not be mapped to a specific metabolic pathway. Small numbers of these 50 molecules were predicted to be secreted (10%), anchored (2%), and/or transmembrane (12%) proteins. Functionally, 17 (34%) of them were predicted to be associated with (non-wild-type) RNAi phenotypes in C. elegans, the majority being embryonic lethality

  1. A linear time algorithm for detecting long genomic regions enriched with a specific combination of epigenetic states

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Epigenetic modifications are essential for controlling gene expression. Recent studies have shown that not only single epigenetic modifications but also combinations of multiple epigenetic modifications play vital roles in gene regulation. A striking example is the long hypomethylated regions enriched with modified H3K27me3 (called, "K27HMD" regions), which are exposed to suppress the expression of key developmental genes relevant to cellular development and differentiation during embryonic stages in vertebrates. It is thus a biologically important issue to develop an effective optimization algorithm for detecting long DNA regions (e.g., >4 kbp in size) that harbor a specific combination of epigenetic modifications (e.g., K27HMD regions). However, to date, optimization algorithms for these purposes have received little attention, and available methods are still heuristic and ad hoc. Results In this paper, we propose a linear time algorithm for calculating a set of non-overlapping regions that maximizes the sum of similarities between the vector of focal epigenetic states and the vectors of raw epigenetic states at DNA positions in the set of regions. The average elapsed time to process the epigenetic data of any of human chromosomes was less than 2 seconds on an Intel Xeon CPU. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the algorithm, we estimated large K27HMD regions in the medaka and human genomes using our method, ChromHMM, and a heuristic method. Conclusions We confirmed that the advantages of our method over those of the two other methods. Our method is flexible enough to handle other types of epigenetic combinations. The program that implements the method is called "CSMinfinder" and is made available at: http://mlab.cb.k.u-tokyo.ac.jp/~ichikawa/Segmentation/ PMID:25708947

  2. Microsatellite Organization in the Grasshopper Abracris flavolineata (Orthoptera: Acrididae) Revealed by FISH Mapping: Remarkable Spreading in the A and B Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Milani, Diogo; Cabral-de-Mello, Diogo Cavalcanti

    2014-01-01

    With the aim of acquiring deeper knowledge about repetitive DNAs chromosomal organization in grasshoppers, we used fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) to map the distribution of 16 microsatellite repeats, including mono-, di-, tri- and tetra-nucleotides, in the chromosomes of the species Abracris flavolineata (Acrididae), which harbors B chromosome. FISH revealed two main patterns: (i) exclusively scattered signals, and (ii) scattered and specific signals, forming evident blocks. The enrichment was observed in both euchromatic and heterochromatic areas and only the motif (C)30 was absent in heterochromatin. The A and B chromosomes were enriched with all the elements that were mapped, being observed in the B chromosome more distinctive blocks for (GA)15 and (GAG)10. For A complement distinctive blocks were noticed for (A)30, (CA)15, (CG)15, (GA)15, (CAC)10, (CAA)10, (CGG)10, (GAA)10, (GAC)10 and (GATA)8. These results revealed an intense spreading of microsatellites in the A. flavolineata genome that was independent of the A+T or G+C enrichment in the repeats. The data indicate that the microsatellites compose the B chromosome and could be involved in the evolution of this element in this species, although no specific relationship with any A chromosome was observed to discuss about its origin. The systematic analysis presented here contributes to the knowledge of repetitive DNA chromosomal organization among grasshoppers including the B chromosomes. PMID:24871300

  3. Development and characterization of highly polymorphic long TC repeat microsatellite markers for genetic analysis of peanut

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) is a crop of economic and social importance, mainly in tropical areas, and developing countries. Its molecular breeding has been hindered by a shortage of polymorphic genetic markers due to a very narrow genetic base. Microsatellites (SSRs) are markers of choice in peanut because they are co-dominant, highly transferrable between species and easily applicable in the allotetraploid genome. In spite of substantial effort over the last few years by a number of research groups, the number of SSRs that are polymorphic for A. hypogaea is still limiting for routine application, creating the demand for the discovery of more markers polymorphic within cultivated germplasm. Findings A plasmid genomic library enriched for TC/AG repeats was constructed and 1401 clones sequenced. From the sequences obtained 146 primer pairs flanking mostly TC microsatellites were developed. The average number of repeat motifs amplified was 23. These 146 markers were characterized on 22 genotypes of cultivated peanut. In total 78 of the markers were polymorphic within cultivated germplasm. Most of those 78 markers were highly informative with an average of 5.4 alleles per locus being amplified. Average gene diversity index (GD) was 0.6, and 66 markers showed a GD of more than 0.5. Genetic relationship analysis was performed and corroborated the current taxonomical classification of A. hypogaea subspecies and varieties. Conclusions The microsatellite markers described here are a useful resource for genetics and genomics in Arachis. In particular, the 66 markers that are highly polymorphic in cultivated peanut are a significant step towards routine genetic mapping and marker-assisted selection for the crop. PMID:22305491

  4. Enrichment and genome sequence of the group I.1a ammonia-oxidizing Archaeon "Ca. Nitrosotenuis uzonensis" representing a clade globally distributed in thermal habitats.

    PubMed

    Lebedeva, Elena V; Hatzenpichler, Roland; Pelletier, Eric; Schuster, Nathalie; Hauzmayer, Sandra; Bulaev, Aleksandr; Grigor'eva, Nadezhda V; Galushko, Alexander; Schmid, Markus; Palatinszky, Marton; Le Paslier, Denis; Daims, Holger; Wagner, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) of the phylum Thaumarchaeota and the high abundance of archaeal ammonia monooxygenase subunit A encoding gene sequences in many environments have extended our perception of nitrifying microbial communities. Moreover, AOA are the only aerobic ammonia oxidizers known to be active in geothermal environments. Molecular data indicate that in many globally distributed terrestrial high-temperature habits a thaumarchaeotal lineage within the Nitrosopumilus cluster (also called "marine" group I.1a) thrives, but these microbes have neither been isolated from these systems nor functionally characterized in situ yet. In this study, we report on the enrichment and genomic characterization of a representative of this lineage from a thermal spring in Kamchatka. This thaumarchaeote, provisionally classified as "Candidatus Nitrosotenuis uzonensis", is a moderately thermophilic, non-halophilic, chemolithoautotrophic ammonia oxidizer. The nearly complete genome sequence (assembled into a single scaffold) of this AOA confirmed the presence of the typical thaumarchaeotal pathways for ammonia oxidation and carbon fixation, and indicated its ability to produce coenzyme F420 and to chemotactically react to its environment. Interestingly, like members of the genus Nitrosoarchaeum, "Candidatus N. uzonensis" also possesses a putative artubulin-encoding gene. Genome comparisons to related AOA with available genome sequences confirmed that the newly cultured AOA has an average nucleotide identity far below the species threshold and revealed a substantial degree of genomic plasticity with unique genomic regions in "Ca. N. uzonensis", which potentially include genetic determinants of ecological niche differentiation.

  5. Functional Classification, Genomic Organization, Putatively cis-Acting Regulatory Elements, and Relationship to Quantitative Trait Loci, of Sorghum Genes with Rhizome-Enriched Expression1[W

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Cheol Seong; Kamps, Terry L.; Skinner, D. Neil; Schulze, Stefan R.; Vencill, William K.; Paterson, Andrew H.

    2006-01-01

    Rhizomes are organs of fundamental importance to plant competitiveness and invasiveness. We have identified genes expressed at substantially higher levels in rhizomes than other plant parts, and explored their functional categorization, genomic organization, regulatory motifs, and association with quantitative trait loci (QTLs) conferring rhizomatousness. The finding that genes with rhizome-enriched expression are distributed across a wide range of functional categories suggests some degree of specialization of individual members of many gene families in rhizomatous plants. A disproportionate share of genes with rhizome-enriched expression was implicated in secondary and hormone metabolism, and abiotic stimuli and development. A high frequency of unknown-function genes reflects our still limited knowledge of this plant organ. A putative oligosaccharyl transferase showed the highest degree of rhizome-specific expression, with several transcriptional or regulatory protein complex factors also showing high (but lesser) degrees of specificity. Inferred by the upstream sequences of their putative rice (Oryza sativa) homologs, sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) genes that were relatively highly expressed in rhizome tip tissues were enriched for cis-element motifs, including the pyrimidine box, TATCCA box, and CAREs box, implicating the gibberellins in regulation of many rhizome-specific genes. From cDNA clones showing rhizome-enriched expression, expressed sequence tags forming 455 contigs were plotted on the rice genome and aligned to QTL likelihood intervals for ratooning and rhizomatous traits in rice and sorghum. Highly expressed rhizome genes were somewhat enriched in QTL likelihood intervals for rhizomatousness or ratooning, with specific candidates including some of the most rhizome-specific genes. Some rhizomatousness and ratooning QTLs were shown to be potentially related to one another as a result of ancient duplication, suggesting long-term functional conservation of

  6. Genome-Wide Discovery of Microsatellite Markers from Diploid Progenitor Species, Arachis duranensis and A. ipaensis, and Their Application in Cultivated Peanut (A. hypogaea).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chuanzhi; Qiu, Jingjing; Agarwal, Gaurav; Wang, Jiangshan; Ren, Xuezhen; Xia, Han; Guo, Baozhu; Ma, Changle; Wan, Shubo; Bertioli, David J; Varshney, Rajeev K; Pandey, Manish K; Wang, Xingjun

    2017-01-01

    Despite several efforts in the last decade toward development of simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers in peanut, there is still a need for more markers for conducting different genetic and breeding studies. With the effort of the International Peanut Genome Initiative, the availability of reference genome for both the diploid progenitors of cultivated peanut allowed us to identify 135,529 and 199,957 SSRs from the A (Arachis duranensis) and B genomes (Arachis ipaensis), respectively. Genome sequence analysis showed uneven distribution of the SSR motifs across genomes with variation in parameters such as SSR type, repeat number, and SSR length. Using the flanking sequences of identified SSRs, primers were designed for 51,354 and 60,893 SSRs with densities of 49 and 45 SSRs per Mb in A. duranensis and A. ipaensis, respectively. In silico PCR analysis of these SSR markers showed high transferability between wild and cultivated Arachis species. Two physical maps were developed for the A genome and the B genome using these SSR markers, and two reported disease resistance quantitative trait loci (QTLs), qF2TSWV5 for tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) and qF2LS6 for leaf spot (LS), were mapped in the 8.135 Mb region of chromosome A04 of A. duranensis. From this genomic region, 719 novel SSR markers were developed, which provide the possibility for fine mapping of these QTLs. In addition, this region also harbors 652 genes and 49 of these are defense related genes, including two NB-ARC genes, three LRR receptor-like genes and three WRKY transcription factors. These disease resistance related genes could contribute to resistance to viral (such as TSWV) and fungal (such as LS) diseases in peanut. In summary, this study not only provides a large number of molecular markers for potential use in peanut genetic map development and QTL mapping but also for map-based gene cloning and molecular breeding.

  7. Genome-Wide Discovery of Microsatellite Markers from Diploid Progenitor Species, Arachis duranensis and A. ipaensis, and Their Application in Cultivated Peanut (A. hypogaea)

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chuanzhi; Qiu, Jingjing; Agarwal, Gaurav; Wang, Jiangshan; Ren, Xuezhen; Xia, Han; Guo, Baozhu; Ma, Changle; Wan, Shubo; Bertioli, David J.; Varshney, Rajeev K.; Pandey, Manish K.; Wang, Xingjun

    2017-01-01

    Despite several efforts in the last decade toward development of simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers in peanut, there is still a need for more markers for conducting different genetic and breeding studies. With the effort of the International Peanut Genome Initiative, the availability of reference genome for both the diploid progenitors of cultivated peanut allowed us to identify 135,529 and 199,957 SSRs from the A (Arachis duranensis) and B genomes (Arachis ipaensis), respectively. Genome sequence analysis showed uneven distribution of the SSR motifs across genomes with variation in parameters such as SSR type, repeat number, and SSR length. Using the flanking sequences of identified SSRs, primers were designed for 51,354 and 60,893 SSRs with densities of 49 and 45 SSRs per Mb in A. duranensis and A. ipaensis, respectively. In silico PCR analysis of these SSR markers showed high transferability between wild and cultivated Arachis species. Two physical maps were developed for the A genome and the B genome using these SSR markers, and two reported disease resistance quantitative trait loci (QTLs), qF2TSWV5 for tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) and qF2LS6 for leaf spot (LS), were mapped in the 8.135 Mb region of chromosome A04 of A. duranensis. From this genomic region, 719 novel SSR markers were developed, which provide the possibility for fine mapping of these QTLs. In addition, this region also harbors 652 genes and 49 of these are defense related genes, including two NB-ARC genes, three LRR receptor-like genes and three WRKY transcription factors. These disease resistance related genes could contribute to resistance to viral (such as TSWV) and fungal (such as LS) diseases in peanut. In summary, this study not only provides a large number of molecular markers for potential use in peanut genetic map development and QTL mapping but also for map-based gene cloning and molecular breeding. PMID:28769940

  8. Gene-enriched draft genome of the cattle tick Rhipicephalus microplus: Assembly by the hybrid Pacific Biosciences/Illumina approach enabled analysis of the highly repetitive genome

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The genome of the cattle tick R. microplus, an ectoparasite with global distribution, is estimated to be 7.1 Gbp and consists of ~70% repetitive DNA. We report the first assembly of a tick genome that utilized a hybrid sequencing and assembly approach to capture the repetitive fractions of the genom...

  9. Microsatellite loci development in mycoheterotrophic Corallorhiza maculata with amplification in C. mertensiana

    Treesearch

    Sarah E. Hopkins; D. Lee. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    Microsatellite primers were developed for the first time in the species Corallorhiza maculata, a nonphotosynthetic orchid that is becoming a model for studying mycorrhizal specificity. Eight polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed using an enrichment and cloning protocol. The number of alleles for each locus ranged from two to seven. The...

  10. KENeV: A web-application for the automated reconstruction and visualization of the enriched metabolic and signaling super-pathways deriving from genomic experiments

    PubMed Central

    Pilalis, Eleftherios; Koutsandreas, Theodoros; Valavanis, Ioannis; Athanasiadis, Emmanouil; Spyrou, George; Chatziioannou, Aristotelis

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression analysis, using high throughput genomic technologies,has become an indispensable step for the meaningful interpretation of the underlying molecular complexity, which shapes the phenotypic manifestation of the investigated biological mechanism. The modularity of the cellular response to different experimental conditions can be comprehended through the exploitation of molecular pathway databases, which offer a controlled, curated background for statistical enrichment analysis. Existing tools enable pathway analysis, visualization, or pathway merging but none integrates a fully automated workflow, combining all above-mentioned modules and destined to non-programmer users. We introduce an online web application, named KEGG Enriched Network Visualizer (KENeV), which enables a fully automated workflow starting from a list of differentially expressed genes and deriving the enriched KEGG metabolic and signaling pathways, merged into two respective, non-redundant super-networks. The final networks can be downloaded as SBML files, for further analysis, or instantly visualized through an interactive visualization module. In conclusion, KENeV (available online at http://www.grissom.gr/kenev) provides an integrative tool, suitable for users with no programming experience, for the functional interpretation, at both the metabolic and signaling level, of differentially expressed gene subsets deriving from genomic experiments. PMID:26925206

  11. All SNPs Are Not Created Equal: Genome-Wide Association Studies Reveal a Consistent Pattern of Enrichment among Functionally Annotated SNPs

    PubMed Central

    Schork, Andrew J.; Thompson, Wesley K.; Pham, Phillip; Torkamani, Ali; Roddey, J. Cooper; Sullivan, Patrick F.; Kelsoe, John R.; O'Donovan, Michael C.; Furberg, Helena; Schork, Nicholas J.; Andreassen, Ole A.; Dale, Anders M.

    2013-01-01

    Recent results indicate that genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have the potential to explain much of the heritability of common complex phenotypes, but methods are lacking to reliably identify the remaining associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We applied stratified False Discovery Rate (sFDR) methods to leverage genic enrichment in GWAS summary statistics data to uncover new loci likely to replicate in independent samples. Specifically, we use linkage disequilibrium-weighted annotations for each SNP in combination with nominal p-values to estimate the True Discovery Rate (TDR = 1−FDR) for strata determined by different genic categories. We show a consistent pattern of enrichment of polygenic effects in specific annotation categories across diverse phenotypes, with the greatest enrichment for SNPs tagging regulatory and coding genic elements, little enrichment in introns, and negative enrichment for intergenic SNPs. Stratified enrichment directly leads to increased TDR for a given p-value, mirrored by increased replication rates in independent samples. We show this in independent Crohn's disease GWAS, where we find a hundredfold variation in replication rate across genic categories. Applying a well-established sFDR methodology we demonstrate the utility of stratification for improving power of GWAS in complex phenotypes, with increased rejection rates from 20% in height to 300% in schizophrenia with traditional FDR and sFDR both fixed at 0.05. Our analyses demonstrate an inherent stratification among GWAS SNPs with important conceptual implications that can be leveraged by statistical methods to improve the discovery of loci. PMID:23637621

  12. Lessons learned from microsatellite development for nonmodel organisms using 454 pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Schoebel, C N; Brodbeck, S; Buehler, D; Cornejo, C; Gajurel, J; Hartikainen, H; Keller, D; Leys, M; Ríčanová, S; Segelbacher, G; Werth, S; Csencsics, D

    2013-03-01

    Microsatellites, also known as simple sequence repeats (SSRs), are among the most commonly used marker types in evolutionary and ecological studies. Next Generation Sequencing techniques such as 454 pyrosequencing allow the rapid development of microsatellite markers in nonmodel organisms. 454 pyrosequencing is a straightforward approach to develop a high number of microsatellite markers. Therefore, developing microsatellites using 454 pyrosequencing has become the method of choice for marker development. Here, we describe a user friendly way of microsatellite development from 454 pyrosequencing data and analyse data sets of 17 nonmodel species (plants, fungi, invertebrates, birds and a mammal) for microsatellite repeats and flanking regions suitable for primer development. We then compare the numbers of successfully lab-tested microsatellite markers for the various species and furthermore describe diverse challenges that might arise in different study species, for example, large genome size or nonpure extraction of genomic DNA. Successful primer identification was feasible for all species. We found that in species for which large repeat numbers are uncommon, such as fungi, polymorphic markers can nevertheless be developed from 454 pyrosequencing reads containing small repeat numbers (five to six repeats). Furthermore, the development of microsatellite markers for species with large genomes was also with Next Generation Sequencing techniques more cost and time-consuming than for species with smaller genomes. In this study, we showed that depending on the species, a different amount of 454 pyrosequencing data might be required for successful identification of a sufficient number of microsatellite markers for ecological genetic studies.

  13. Development and characterization of microsatellite primers for Zanthoxylum schinifolium (Rutaceae).

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Mi; Jo, Aruna; Jeong, Ji Hee; Kwon, Yong Rak; Kim, Ho Bang

    2017-07-01

    Polymorphic microsatellite markers of Zanthoxylum schinifolium (Rutaceae), a promising medicinal plant with effective antibacterial, anticancer, and anti-inflammatory compounds, were developed and evaluated for further genetic studies based on genetic variation among individuals or populations. Following the selective hybridization method, microsatellite-enrichment libraries were constructed. Using these libraries, we obtained 15 polymorphic and three monomorphic microsatellite markers for Z. schinifolium. The number of alleles observed in each of the 15 polymorphic loci ranged from two to eight, and the observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.070 to 0.677 and from 0.093 to 0.688, respectively. Eleven of these developed markers were successfully amplified for Z. piperitum, a related species. These microsatellite markers can be valuable tools for further genetic studies of Z. schinifolium, such as genetic resource conservation for maintaining breeding material and individual identification for breeding program improvement and variety management.

  14. PERMANENT GENETIC RESOURCES: PCR primers for 100 microsatellites in red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus).

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Sten; Renshaw, Mark A; Rexroad Iii, Caird E; Gold, John R

    2008-03-01

    One hundred nuclear-encoded microsatellites from a genomic library of red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) were isolated and characterized. Eight microsatellites had tetranucleotide motifs; 92 had dinucleotide motifs. The average number of alleles per microsatellite (sample of 22-24 fish) was 17.7 (range = 2-30); gene diversity averaged 0.796 (range = 0.227-1.000). Following Bonferroni correction, genotype frequencies at 90 microsatellites did not deviate significantly from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium expectations. Occurrence of null alleles was inferred at 15 microsatellites; alleles differing by only a single base were observed at 11 microsatellites. The microsatellites developed should prove useful for population-genetic studies of 'wild' red drum and in construction of a genetic map.

  15. De novo development and characterization of polymorphic microsatellite markers in a schilbid catfish, Silonia silondia (Hamilton, 1822) and their validation for population genetic studies.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Sangeeta; Jena, J K; Singh, Rajeev K; Mohindra, Vindhya; Lakra, W S; Deshmukhe, Geetanjali; Pathak, Abhinav; Lal, Kuldeep K

    2016-02-01

    The stock characterization of wild populations of Silonia silondia is important for its scientific management. At present, the information on genetic parameters of S. silondia is very limited. The species-specific microsatellite markers were developed in current study. The validated markers were used to genotype individuals from four distant rivers. To develop de novo microsatellite loci, an enriched genomic library was constructed for S. silondia using affinity-capture approach. The markers were validated for utility in population genetics. A total number of 76 individuals from four natural riverine populations were used to generate data for population analysis. The screening of isolated repeat sequences yielded eleven novel polymorphic microsatellite loci. The microsatellite loci exhibited high level of polymorphism, with 6-24 alleles per locus and the PIC value ranged from 0.604 to 0.927. The observed (Ho) and expected (He) heterozygosities ranged from 0.081 to 0.84 and 0.66 to 0.938, respectively. The AMOVA analysis indicated significant genetic differentiation among riverine populations (overall FST = 0.075; P < 0.0001) with maximum variation (92.5%) within populations. Cross-priming assessment revealed successful amplification (35-38 %) of heterologous loci in four related species viz. Clupisoma garua, C. taakree, Ailia coila and Eutropiichthys vacha. The results demonstrated that these de novo polymorphic microsatellite loci are promising for population genetic variation and diversity studies in S. silondia. Cross-priming results indicated that these primers can help to get polymorphic microsatellite loci in the related catfish species of family Schilbidae.

  16. Development of microsatellite markers for Dimorphandra mollis (Leguminosae), a widespread tree from the Brazilian cerrado.

    PubMed

    Souza, Helena A V; Collevatti, Rosane G; Lemos-Filho, José P; Santos, Fabrício R; Lovato, Maria Bernadete

    2012-03-01

    Microsatellite markers were developed for Dimorphandra mollis (Leguminosae), a widespread tree in the Brazilian cerrado (a savanna-like vegetation). Microsatellite markers were developed from an enriched library. The analyses of polymorphism were based on 56 individuals from three populations. Nine microsatellite loci were polymorphic, with the number of alleles per locus ranging from three to 10 across populations. The observed and expected heterozygosities per locus and population ranged from 0.062 to 0.850 and from 0.062 to 0.832, respectively. These microsatellites provide an efficient tool for population genetics studies and will be used to assess the genetic diversity and spatial genetic structure of D. mollis.

  17. Sequencing and comparative genomic analysis of 1227 Felis catus cDNA sequences enriched for developmental, clinical and nutritional phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The feline genome is valuable to the veterinary and model organism genomics communities because the cat is an obligate carnivore and a model for endangered felids. The initial public release of the Felis catus genome assembly provided a framework for investigating the genomic basis of feline biology. However, the entire set of protein coding genes has not been elucidated. Results We identified and characterized 1227 protein coding feline sequences, of which 913 map to public sequences and 314 are novel. These sequences have been deposited into NCBI's genbank database and complement public genomic resources by providing additional protein coding sequences that fill in some of the gaps in the feline genome assembly. Through functional and comparative genomic analyses, we gained an understanding of the role of these sequences in feline development, nutrition and health. Specifically, we identified 104 orthologs of human genes associated with Mendelian disorders. We detected negative selection within sequences with gene ontology annotations associated with intracellular trafficking, cytoskeleton and muscle functions. We detected relatively less negative selection on protein sequences encoding extracellular networks, apoptotic pathways and mitochondrial gene ontology annotations. Additionally, we characterized feline cDNA sequences that have mouse orthologs associated with clinical, nutritional and developmental phenotypes. Together, this analysis provides an overview of the value of our cDNA sequences and enhances our understanding of how the feline genome is similar to, and different from other mammalian genomes. Conclusions The cDNA sequences reported here expand existing feline genomic resources by providing high-quality sequences annotated with comparative genomic information providing functional, clinical, nutritional and orthologous gene information. PMID:22257742

  18. Development of a multiplex PCR assay for fine-scale population genetic analysis of the Komodo monitor Varanus komodoensis based on 18 polymorphic microsatellite loci.

    PubMed

    Ciofi, Claudio; Tzika, Athanasia C; Natali, Chiara; Watts, Phillip C; Sulandari, Sri; Zein, Moch S A; Milinkovitch, Michel C

    2011-05-01

    Multiplex PCR assays for the coamplification of microsatellite loci allow rapid and cost-effective genetic analyses and the production of efficient screening protocols for international breeding programs. We constructed a partial genomic library enriched for di-nucleotide repeats and characterized 14 new microsatellite loci for the Komodo monitor (or Komodo dragon, Varanus komodoensis). Using these novel microsatellites and four previously described loci, we developed multiplex PCR assays that may be loaded on a genetic analyser in three separate panels. We tested the novel set of microsatellites for polymorphism using 69 individuals from three island populations and evaluated the resolving power of the entire panel of 18 loci by conducting (i) a preliminary assignment test to determine population(s) of origin and (ii) a parentage analysis for 43 captive Komodo monitors. This panel of polymorphic loci proved useful for both purposes and thus can be exploited for fine-scale population genetic analyses and as part of international captive breeding programs directed at maintaining genetically viable ex situ populations and reintroductions.

  19. Improving the genome annotation of the acarbose producer Actinoplanes sp. SE50/110 by sequencing enriched 5'-ends of primary transcripts.

    PubMed

    Schwientek, Patrick; Neshat, Armin; Kalinowski, Jörn; Klein, Andreas; Rückert, Christian; Schneiker-Bekel, Susanne; Wendler, Sergej; Stoye, Jens; Pühler, Alfred

    2014-11-20

    Actinoplanes sp. SE50/110 is the producer of the alpha-glucosidase inhibitor acarbose, which is an economically relevant and potent drug in the treatment of type-2 diabetes mellitus. In this study, we present the detection of transcription start sites on this genome by sequencing enriched 5'-ends of primary transcripts. Altogether, 1427 putative transcription start sites were initially identified. With help of the annotated genome sequence, 661 transcription start sites were found to belong to the leader region of protein-coding genes with the surprising result that roughly 20% of these genes rank among the class of leaderless transcripts. Next, conserved promoter motifs were identified for protein-coding genes with and without leader sequences. The mapped transcription start sites were finally used to improve the annotation of the Actinoplanes sp. SE50/110 genome sequence. Concerning protein-coding genes, 41 translation start sites were corrected and 9 novel protein-coding genes could be identified. In addition to this, 122 previously undetermined non-coding RNA (ncRNA) genes of Actinoplanes sp. SE50/110 were defined. Focusing on antisense transcription start sites located within coding genes or their leader sequences, it was discovered that 96 of those ncRNA genes belong to the class of antisense RNA (asRNA) genes. The remaining 26 ncRNA genes were found outside of known protein-coding genes. Four chosen examples of prominent ncRNA genes, namely the transfer messenger RNA gene ssrA, the ribonuclease P class A RNA gene rnpB, the cobalamin riboswitch RNA gene cobRS, and the selenocysteine-specific tRNA gene selC, are presented in more detail. This study demonstrates that sequencing of enriched 5'-ends of primary transcripts and the identification of transcription start sites are valuable tools for advanced genome annotation of Actinoplanes sp. SE50/110 and most probably also for other bacteria.

  20. Mature Microsatellites: Mechanisms Underlying Dinucleotide Microsatellite Mutational Biases in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Baptiste, Beverly A.; Ananda, Guruprasad; Strubczewski, Noelle; Lutzkanin, Andrew; Khoo, Su Jen; Srikanth, Abhinaya; Kim, Nari; Makova, Kateryna D.; Krasilnikova, Maria M.; Eckert, Kristin A.

    2013-01-01

    Dinucleotide microsatellites are dynamic DNA sequences that affect genome stability. Here, we focused on mature microsatellites, defined as pure repeats of lengths above the threshold and unlikely to mutate below it in a single mutational event. We investigated the prevalence and mutational behavior of these sequences by using human genome sequence data, human cells in culture, and purified DNA polymerases. Mature dinucleotides (≥10 units) are present within exonic sequences of >350 genes, resulting in vulnerability to cellular genetic integrity. Mature dinucleotide mutagenesis was examined experimentally using ex vivo and in vitro approaches. We observe an expansion bias for dinucleotide microsatellites up to 20 units in length in somatic human cells, in agreement with previous computational analyses of germ-line biases. Using purified DNA polymerases and human cell lines deficient for mismatch repair (MMR), we show that the expansion bias is caused by functional MMR and is not due to DNA polymerase error biases. Specifically, we observe that the MutSα and MutLα complexes protect against expansion mutations. Our data support a model wherein different MMR complexes shift the balance of mutations toward deletion or expansion. Finally, we show that replication fork progression is stalled within long dinucleotides, suggesting that mutational mechanisms within long repeats may be distinct from shorter lengths, depending on the biochemistry of fork resolution. Our work combines computational and experimental approaches to explain the complex mutational behavior of dinucleotide microsatellites in humans. PMID:23450065

  1. Mature microsatellites: mechanisms underlying dinucleotide microsatellite mutational biases in human cells.

    PubMed

    Baptiste, Beverly A; Ananda, Guruprasad; Strubczewski, Noelle; Lutzkanin, Andrew; Khoo, Su Jen; Srikanth, Abhinaya; Kim, Nari; Makova, Kateryna D; Krasilnikova, Maria M; Eckert, Kristin A

    2013-03-01

    Dinucleotide microsatellites are dynamic DNA sequences that affect genome stability. Here, we focused on mature microsatellites, defined as pure repeats of lengths above the threshold and unlikely to mutate below it in a single mutational event. We investigated the prevalence and mutational behavior of these sequences by using human genome sequence data, human cells in culture, and purified DNA polymerases. Mature dinucleotides (≥10 units) are present within exonic sequences of >350 genes, resulting in vulnerability to cellular genetic integrity. Mature dinucleotide mutagenesis was examined experimentally using ex vivo and in vitro approaches. We observe an expansion bias for dinucleotide microsatellites up to 20 units in length in somatic human cells, in agreement with previous computational analyses of germ-line biases. Using purified DNA polymerases and human cell lines deficient for mismatch repair (MMR), we show that the expansion bias is caused by functional MMR and is not due to DNA polymerase error biases. Specifically, we observe that the MutSα and MutLα complexes protect against expansion mutations. Our data support a model wherein different MMR complexes shift the balance of mutations toward deletion or expansion. Finally, we show that replication fork progression is stalled within long dinucleotides, suggesting that mutational mechanisms within long repeats may be distinct from shorter lengths, depending on the biochemistry of fork resolution. Our work combines computational and experimental approaches to explain the complex mutational behavior of dinucleotide microsatellites in humans.

  2. Phylogenetic marker development for target enrichment from transcriptome and genome skim data: the pipeline and its application in southern African Oxalis (Oxalidaceae).

    PubMed

    Schmickl, Roswitha; Liston, Aaron; Zeisek, Vojtěch; Oberlander, Kenneth; Weitemier, Kevin; Straub, Shannon C K; Cronn, Richard C; Dreyer, Léanne L; Suda, Jan

    2016-09-01

    Phylogenetics benefits from using a large number of putatively independent nuclear loci and their combination with other sources of information, such as the plastid and mitochondrial genomes. To facilitate the selection of orthologous low-copy nuclear (LCN) loci for phylogenetics in nonmodel organisms, we created an automated and interactive script to select hundreds of LCN loci by a comparison between transcriptome and genome skim data. We used our script to obtain LCN genes for southern African Oxalis (Oxalidaceae), a speciose plant lineage in the Greater Cape Floristic Region. This resulted in 1164 LCN genes greater than 600 bp. Using target enrichment combined with genome skimming (Hyb-Seq), we obtained on average 1141 LCN loci, nearly the whole plastid genome and the nrDNA cistron from 23 southern African Oxalis species. Despite a wide range of gene trees, the phylogeny based on the LCN genes was very robust, as retrieved through various gene and species tree reconstruction methods as well as concatenation. Cytonuclear discordance was strong. This indicates that organellar phylogenies alone are unlikely to represent the species tree and stresses the utility of Hyb-Seq in phylogenetics.

  3. Enrichment and Genome Sequence of the Group I.1a Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaeon “Ca. Nitrosotenuis uzonensis” Representing a Clade Globally Distributed in Thermal Habitats

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, Eric; Schuster, Nathalie; Hauzmayer, Sandra; Bulaev, Aleksandr; Grigor’eva, Nadezhda V.; Galushko, Alexander; Schmid, Markus; Palatinszky, Marton; Le Paslier, Denis; Daims, Holger; Wagner, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) of the phylum Thaumarchaeota and the high abundance of archaeal ammonia monooxygenase subunit A encoding gene sequences in many environments have extended our perception of nitrifying microbial communities. Moreover, AOA are the only aerobic ammonia oxidizers known to be active in geothermal environments. Molecular data indicate that in many globally distributed terrestrial high-temperature habits a thaumarchaeotal lineage within the Nitrosopumilus cluster (also called “marine” group I.1a) thrives, but these microbes have neither been isolated from these systems nor functionally characterized in situ yet. In this study, we report on the enrichment and genomic characterization of a representative of this lineage from a thermal spring in Kamchatka. This thaumarchaeote, provisionally classified as “Candidatus Nitrosotenuis uzonensis”, is a moderately thermophilic, non-halophilic, chemolithoautotrophic ammonia oxidizer. The nearly complete genome sequence (assembled into a single scaffold) of this AOA confirmed the presence of the typical thaumarchaeotal pathways for ammonia oxidation and carbon fixation, and indicated its ability to produce coenzyme F420 and to chemotactically react to its environment. Interestingly, like members of the genus Nitrosoarchaeum, “Candidatus N. uzonensis” also possesses a putative artubulin-encoding gene. Genome comparisons to related AOA with available genome sequences confirmed that the newly cultured AOA has an average nucleotide identity far below the species threshold and revealed a substantial degree of genomic plasticity with unique genomic regions in “Ca. N. uzonensis”, which potentially include genetic determinants of ecological niche differentiation. PMID:24278328

  4. Length and sequence dependent accumulation of simple sequence repeats in vertebrates: potential role in genome organization and regulation.

    PubMed

    Ramamoorthy, Senthilkumar; Garapati, Hita Sony; Mishra, Rakesh Kumar

    2014-11-10

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) or microsatellites are tandemly repeated short DNA sequence motifs found to be abundant in higher eukaryotes. Enrichment of SSRs with increasing genome complexity points to a positive selection and their functional relevance. We analyzed genomes of 24 organisms to find features that may help understand the functional relevance of SSRs. Of the 501 possible SSRs, only 73 show length specific enrichment. We also noticed that ~45 bp is the optimum length for a majority of them particularly in the human genome. Finally, we observed non-random distribution of ACG and CCG, enriched around transcriptional start sites (TSSs) in several species. Taken together, these results suggest that SSRs are functionally relevant with potential regulatory role. We propose that such repeats are evolving under positive selection pressure like any other functional element in the genome.

  5. Novel microsatellite control system

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, K.R.; Frigo, J.R.; Tilden, M.W.

    1996-12-31

    The authors are developing extremely simple yet quite capable analog pulse-coded neural networks for smaller-faster-cheaper spacecraft attitude and control systems. They will demonstrate a prototype microsatellite that uses the novel control system to autonomously stabilize itself in the ambient magnetic field and point itself at the brightest available light source.

  6. Polymorphic DNA microsatellite markers for forensic individual identification and parentage analyses of seven threatened species of parrots (family Psittacidae)

    PubMed Central

    Jan, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    The parrot family represents one of the bird group with the largest number of endangered species, as a result of habitat destruction and illegal trade. This illicit traffic involves the smuggling of eggs and animals, and the laundering through captive breeding facilities of wild-caught animals. Despite the huge potential of wildlife DNA forensics to determine with conclusive evidence illegal trade, current usage of DNA profiling approaches in parrots has been limited by the lack of suitable molecular markers specifically developed for the focal species and by low cross-species polymorphism. In this study, we isolated DNA microsatellite markers in seven parrot species threatened with extinction (Amazona brasiliensis, A. oratrix, A. pretrei, A. rhodocorytha, Anodorhynchus leari, Ara rubrogenys and Primolius couloni). From an enriched genomic library followed by 454 pyrosequencing, we characterized a total of 106 polymorphic microsatellite markers (mostly tetranucleotides) in the seven species and tested them across an average number of 19 individuals per species. The mean number of alleles per species and across loci varied from 6.4 to 8.3, with the mean observed heterozygosities ranging from 0.65 to 0.84. Identity and parentage exclusion probabilities were highly discriminatory. The high variability displayed by these microsatellite loci demonstrates their potential utility to perform individual genotyping and parentage analyses, in order to develop a DNA testing framework to determine illegal traffic in these threatened species. PMID:27688959

  7. Isolation and characterization of 45 Polymorphie microsatellite loci of turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus) and cross-species amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Shiying; Ma, Aijun; Wang, Xin'an; Huang, Zhihui; Xue, Baogui; Yang, Zhi; Qu, Jiangbo

    2011-03-01

    Turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus) is a flatfish species commercially important for aquaculture. In this study, we generated a microsatellite-enriched genomic DNA library for Scophthalmus maximus, and then isolated and characterized 45 microsatellite loci by genotyping 30 individuals. The observed number of alleles ranged from 2 to 19 with an average of 6.24, while the effective number of alleles ranged from 1.30 to 11.11 with an average of 3.66. The expected heterozygosities varied from 0.235 to 0.925 4 and Polymorphie information content ranged from 0.2044 to 0.903 3, with an average of 0.622. Twelve loci deviated significantly