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Sample records for microscopic optical model

  1. Optical modeling of Fresnel zoneplate microscopes.

    PubMed

    Naulleau, Patrick P; Mochi, Iacopo; Goldberg, Kenneth A

    2011-07-10

    Defect free masks remain one of the most significant challenges facing the commercialization of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. Progress on this front requires high-performance wavelength-specific metrology of EUV masks, including high-resolution and aerial-image microscopy performed near the 13.5 nm wavelength. Arguably the most cost-effective and rapid path to proliferating this capability is through the development of Fresnel zoneplate-based microscopes. Given the relative obscurity of such systems, however, modeling tools are not necessarily optimized to deal with them and their imaging properties are poorly understood. Here we present a modeling methodology to analyze zoneplate microscopes based on commercially available optical modeling software and use the technique to investigate the imaging performance of an off-axis EUV microscope design. The modeling predicts that superior performance can be achieved by tilting the zoneplate, making it perpendicular to the chief ray at the center of the field, while designing the zoneplate to explicitly work in that tilted plane. Although the examples presented here are in the realm of EUV mask inspection, the methods described and analysis results are broadly applicable to zoneplate microscopes in general, including full-field soft-x-ray microscopes routinely used in the synchrotron community.

  2. Optical modeling of Fresnel zoneplate microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Naulleau, Patrick P.; Mochi, Iacopo; Goldberg, Kenneth A.

    2011-07-10

    Defect free masks remain one of the most significant challenges facing the commercialization of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. Progress on this front requires high-performance wavelength-specific metrology of EUV masks, including high-resolution and aerial-image microscopy performed near the 13.5 nm wavelength. Arguably the most cost-effective and rapid path to proliferating this capability is through the development of Fresnel zoneplate-based microscopes. Given the relative obscurity of such systems, however, modeling tools are not necessarily optimized to deal with them and their imaging properties are poorly understood. Here we present a modeling methodology to analyze zoneplate microscopes based on commercially available optical modeling software and use the technique to investigate the imaging performance of an off-axis EUV microscope design. The modeling predicts that superior performance can be achieved by tilting the zoneplate, making it perpendicular to the chief ray at the center of the field, while designing the zoneplate to explicitly work in that tilted plane. Although the examples presented here are in the realm of EUV mask inspection, the methods described and analysis results are broadly applicable to zoneplate microscopes in general, including full-field soft-x-ray microscopes routinely used in the synchrotron community.

  3. Optical modeling of Fresnel zoneplate microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Naulleau, Patrick; Mochi, Iacopo; Goldberg, Kenneth A.

    2011-04-06

    Defect free masks remain one of the most significant challenges facing the commercialization of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. Progress on this front requires high-performance wavelength-specific metrology of EUV masks, including high-resolution and aerial-image microscopy performed near the 13.5 nm wavelength. Arguably the most cost-effective and rapid path to proliferating this capability is through the development of Fresnel zoneplate-based microscopes. Given the relative obscurity of such systems, however, modeling tools are not necessarily optimized to deal with them and their imaging properties are poorly understood. Here we present a modeling methodology to analyze zoneplate microscopes based on commercially available optical modeling software and use the technique to investigate the imaging performance of an off-axis EUV microscope design. The modeling predicts that superior performance can be achieved by tilting the zoneplate, making it perpendicular to the chief ray at the center of the field, while designing the zoneplate to explicitly work in that tilted plane. Although the examples presented here are in the realm of EUV mask inspection, the methods described and analysis results are broadly applicable to zoneplate microscopes in general, including full-field soft-x-ray microscopes rou tinely used in the synchrotron community.

  4. Microscopic model for all optical switching in ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelissen, T. D.; Córdoba, R.; Koopmans, B.

    2016-04-01

    The microscopic mechanism behind the all optical switching (AOS) in ferromagnets has triggered intense scientific debate. Here, the microscopic three-temperature model is utilized to describe AOS in a perpendicularly magnetized ferromagnetic Co/Pt system. We demonstrate that AOS in such a ferromagnet can be explained with the Inverse Faraday Effect (IFE). The influence of the strength and lifetime of the IFE induced field pulse on the switching process are investigated. We found that because of strong spin-orbit coupling, the minimal lifetime of the IFE needed to obtain switching is of the order of 0.1 ps, which is shorter than previously assumed. Moreover, spatial images of the domain pattern after AOS in Co/Pt, as well as their dependence on applying an opposite magnetic field, are qualitatively reproduced.

  5. Anisotropic contrast optical microscope.

    PubMed

    Peev, D; Hofmann, T; Kananizadeh, N; Beeram, S; Rodriguez, E; Wimer, S; Rodenhausen, K B; Herzinger, C M; Kasputis, T; Pfaunmiller, E; Nguyen, A; Korlacki, R; Pannier, A; Li, Y; Schubert, E; Hage, D; Schubert, M

    2016-11-01

    An optical microscope is described that reveals contrast in the Mueller matrix images of a thin, transparent, or semi-transparent specimen located within an anisotropic object plane (anisotropic filter). The specimen changes the anisotropy of the filter and thereby produces contrast within the Mueller matrix images. Here we use an anisotropic filter composed of a semi-transparent, nanostructured thin film with sub-wavelength thickness placed within the object plane. The sample is illuminated as in common optical microscopy but the light is modulated in its polarization using combinations of linear polarizers and phase plate (compensator) to control and analyze the state of polarization. Direct generalized ellipsometry data analysis approaches permit extraction of fundamental Mueller matrix object plane images dispensing with the need of Fourier expansion methods. Generalized ellipsometry model approaches are used for quantitative image analyses. These images are obtained from sets of multiple images obtained under various polarizer, analyzer, and compensator settings. Up to 16 independent Mueller matrix images can be obtained, while our current setup is limited to 11 images normalized by the unpolarized intensity. We demonstrate the anisotropic contrast optical microscope by measuring lithographically defined micro-patterned anisotropic filters, and we quantify the adsorption of an organic self-assembled monolayer film onto the anisotropic filter. Comparison with an isotropic glass slide demonstrates the image enhancement obtained by our method over microscopy without the use of an anisotropic filter. In our current instrument, we estimate the limit of detection for organic volumetric mass within the object plane of ≈49 fg within ≈7 × 7 μm(2) object surface area. Compared to a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation instrumentation, where contemporary limits require a total load of ≈500 pg for detection, the instrumentation demonstrated here improves

  6. Anisotropic contrast optical microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peev, D.; Hofmann, T.; Kananizadeh, N.; Beeram, S.; Rodriguez, E.; Wimer, S.; Rodenhausen, K. B.; Herzinger, C. M.; Kasputis, T.; Pfaunmiller, E.; Nguyen, A.; Korlacki, R.; Pannier, A.; Li, Y.; Schubert, E.; Hage, D.; Schubert, M.

    2016-11-01

    An optical microscope is described that reveals contrast in the Mueller matrix images of a thin, transparent, or semi-transparent specimen located within an anisotropic object plane (anisotropic filter). The specimen changes the anisotropy of the filter and thereby produces contrast within the Mueller matrix images. Here we use an anisotropic filter composed of a semi-transparent, nanostructured thin film with sub-wavelength thickness placed within the object plane. The sample is illuminated as in common optical microscopy but the light is modulated in its polarization using combinations of linear polarizers and phase plate (compensator) to control and analyze the state of polarization. Direct generalized ellipsometry data analysis approaches permit extraction of fundamental Mueller matrix object plane images dispensing with the need of Fourier expansion methods. Generalized ellipsometry model approaches are used for quantitative image analyses. These images are obtained from sets of multiple images obtained under various polarizer, analyzer, and compensator settings. Up to 16 independent Mueller matrix images can be obtained, while our current setup is limited to 11 images normalized by the unpolarized intensity. We demonstrate the anisotropic contrast optical microscope by measuring lithographically defined micro-patterned anisotropic filters, and we quantify the adsorption of an organic self-assembled monolayer film onto the anisotropic filter. Comparison with an isotropic glass slide demonstrates the image enhancement obtained by our method over microscopy without the use of an anisotropic filter. In our current instrument, we estimate the limit of detection for organic volumetric mass within the object plane of ≈49 fg within ≈7 × 7 μm2 object surface area. Compared to a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation instrumentation, where contemporary limits require a total load of ≈500 pg for detection, the instrumentation demonstrated here improves

  7. Solid state optical microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Ian T.

    1983-01-01

    A solid state optical microscope wherein wide-field and high-resolution images of an object are produced at a rapid rate by utilizing conventional optics with a charge-coupled photodiode array. A galvanometer scanning mirror, for scanning in one of two orthogonal directions is provided, while the charge-coupled photodiode array scans in the other orthogonal direction. Illumination light from the object is incident upon the photodiodes, creating packets of electrons (signals) which are representative of the illuminated object. The signals are then processed, stored in a memory, and finally displayed as a video signal.

  8. Solid state optical microscope

    DOEpatents

    Young, I.T.

    1983-08-09

    A solid state optical microscope wherein wide-field and high-resolution images of an object are produced at a rapid rate by utilizing conventional optics with a charge-coupled photodiode array. A galvanometer scanning mirror, for scanning in one of two orthogonal directions is provided, while the charge-coupled photodiode array scans in the other orthogonal direction. Illumination light from the object is incident upon the photodiodes, creating packets of electrons (signals) which are representative of the illuminated object. The signals are then processed, stored in a memory, and finally displayed as a video signal. 2 figs.

  9. Microscopic modeling of the effect of phonons on the optical properties of solid-state emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norambuena, Ariel; Reyes, Sebastián A.; Mejía-Lopéz, José; Gali, Adam; Maze, Jerónimo R.

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the effect of vibrations in optically active nanosystems is crucial for successfully implementing applications in molecular-based electro-optical devices, quantum information communications, single photon sources, and fluorescent markers for biological measurements. Here, we present a first-principles microscopic description of the role of phonons on the isotopic shift presented in the optical emission spectrum associated to the negatively charged silicon-vacancy color center in diamond. We use the spin-boson model and estimate the electron-phonon interactions using a symmetrized molecular description of the electronic states and a force-constant model to describe molecular vibrations. Group theoretical arguments and dynamical symmetry breaking are presented in order to explain the optical properties of the zero-phonon line and the isotopic shift of the phonon sideband.

  10. Increasing student understanding of microscope optics by building and testing the limits of simple, hand-made model microscopes.

    PubMed

    Drace, Kevin; Couch, Brett; Keeling, Patrick J

    2012-01-01

    The ability to effectively use a microscope to observe microorganisms is a crucial skill required for many disciplines within biology, especially general microbiology and cell biology. A basic understanding of the optical properties of light microscopes is required for students to use microscopes effectively, but this subject can also be a challenge to make personally interesting to students. To explore basic optical principles of magnification and resolving power in a more engaging and hands-on fashion, students constructed handmade lenses and microscopes based on Antony van Leeuwenhoek's design using simple materials-paper, staples, glass, and adhesive putty. Students determined the power of their lenses using a green laser pointer to magnify a copper grid of known size, which also allowed students to examine variables affecting the power and resolution of a lens such as diameter, working distance, and wavelength of light. To assess the effectiveness of the laboratory's learning objectives, four sections of a general microbiology course were given a brief pre-activity assessment quiz to determine their background knowledge on the subject. One week after the laboratory activity, students were given the same quiz (unannounced) under similar conditions. Students showed significant gains in their understanding of microscope optics.

  11. Proton Spectroscopic Factors Deduced from Helium-3 Global Phenomenological and Microscopic Optical Model Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenny, Lee; Pang, Dan-Yang; Han, Yin-Lu; B. Tsang, M.

    2014-09-01

    Global phenomenological GDP08 and microscopic helium-3 optical model potentials have been recently derived. We evaluate these two potential sets by comparing the elastic scattering data of 25 MeV 3He on 16O, 18O, 19F, 23Na, 24Mg, 25Mg, 26Mg, 27Al, 28Si, 30Si, 31P, 32S, 34S, 35Cl, 37Cl, and 39K isotopes. Using the deuteron angular distributions calculated with the distorted wave Born approximation model, we extract the ground-state proton spectroscopic factors from (3He, d) reactions on the same set of nuclei. The extracted proton spectroscopic factors are compared with the large-basis shell-model calculations.

  12. Microscopic optical model potentials for p-nucleus scattering at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect

    Hemalatha, M.; Gambhir, Y. K.; Kailas, S.; Haider, W.

    2007-03-15

    A comparative study of the microscopic optical potentials viz., semimicroscopic with extended Jeukenne-Lejeune-Mahaux interaction and microscopic Brueckner theory using Hamada-Johnston as well as Urbana V14 soft-core internucleon interactions, has been carried out. These microscopic optical potentials are compared with that of Dirac phenomenology (DP) for the polarized proton-{sup 40}Ca elastic scattering at 35 MeV and 200 MeV. These potentials have different shapes for 200 MeV below 4 fm. In particular, for the real part of the central potential, only the Dirac phenomenology and the microscopic optical potential calculated with the Hamada-Johnston interaction exhibit the well known wine-bottle-bottom shape. It is found that the calculated observables (cross section, analyzing power and spin rotation function) using these potentials having different shapes, compare well with the experiment.

  13. Modeling a Miniaturized Scanning Electron Microscope Focusing Column - Lessons Learned in Electron Optics Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loyd, Jody; Gregory, Don; Gaskin, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    This presentation discusses work done to assess the design of a focusing column in a miniaturized Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) developed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for use in-situ on the Moon-in particular for mineralogical analysis. The MSFC beam column design uses purely electrostatic fields for focusing, because of the severe constraints on mass and electrical power consumption imposed by the goals of lunar exploration and of spaceflight in general. The resolution of an SEM ultimately depends on the size of the focused spot of the scanning beam probe, for which the stated goal here is a diameter of 10 nanometers. Optical aberrations are the main challenge to this performance goal, because they blur the ideal geometrical optical image of the electron source, effectively widening the ideal spot size of the beam probe. In the present work the optical aberrations of the mini SEM focusing column were assessed using direct tracing of non-paraxial rays, as opposed to mathematical estimates of aberrations based on paraxial ray-traces. The geometrical ray-tracing employed here is completely analogous to ray-tracing as conventionally understood in the realm of photon optics, with the major difference being that in electron optics the lens is simply a smoothly varying electric field in vacuum, formed by precisely machined electrodes. Ray-tracing in this context, therefore, relies upon a model of the electrostatic field inside the focusing column to provide the mathematical description of the "lens" being traced. This work relied fundamentally on the boundary element method (BEM) for this electric field model. In carrying out this research the authors discovered that higher accuracy in the field model was essential if aberrations were to be reliably assessed using direct ray-tracing. This led to some work in testing alternative techniques for modeling the electrostatic field. Ultimately, the necessary accuracy was attained using a BEM

  14. Solid-state optical microscope

    DOEpatents

    Young, I.T.

    1981-01-07

    A solid state optical microscope is described wherein wide-field and high-resolution images of an object are produced at a rapid rate by utilizing conventional optics with a charge-coupled photodiode array. Means for scanning in one of two orthogonal directions are provided, while the charge-coupled photodiode array scans in the other orthogonal direction. Illumination light from the object is incident upon the photodiodes, creating packets of electrons (signals) which are representative of the illuminated object. The signals are then processed, stored in a memory, and finally displayed as a video signal.

  15. Microscopic Model of the Optical Absorption of Carbon Nanotubes Functionalized with Molecular Spiropyran Photoswitches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malic, E.; Weber, C.; Richter, M.; Atalla, V.; Klamroth, T.; Saalfrank, P.; Reich, S.; Knorr, A.

    2011-03-01

    The adsorption of molecules to the surface of carbon nanostructures opens a new field of hybrid systems with distinct and controllable properties. We present a microscopic study of the optical absorption in carbon nanotubes functionalized with molecular spiropyran photoswitches. The switching process induces a change in the dipole moment leading to a significant coupling to the charge carriers in the nanotube. As a result, the absorption spectra of functionalized tubes reveal a considerable redshift of transition energies depending on the switching state of the spiropyran molecule. Our results suggest that carbon nanotubes are excellent substrates for the optical readout of spiropyran-based molecular switches. The gained insights can be applied to other noncovalently functionalized one-dimensional nanostructures in an externally induced dipole field.

  16. Optical Analysis of Microscope Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biles, Jonathan R.

    Microscope images were analyzed with coherent and incoherent light using analog optical techniques. These techniques were found to be useful for analyzing large numbers of nonsymbolic, statistical microscope images. In the first part phase coherent transparencies having 20-100 human multiple myeloma nuclei were simultaneously photographed at 100 power magnification using high resolution holographic film developed to high contrast. An optical transform was obtained by focussing the laser onto each nuclear image and allowing the diffracted light to propagate onto a one dimensional photosensor array. This method reduced the data to the position of the first two intensity minima and the intensity of successive maxima. These values were utilized to estimate the four most important cancer detection clues of nuclear size, shape, darkness, and chromatin texture. In the second part, the geometric and holographic methods of phase incoherent optical processing were investigated for pattern recognition of real-time, diffuse microscope images. The theory and implementation of these processors was discussed in view of their mutual problems of dimness, image bias, and detector resolution. The dimness problem was solved by either using a holographic correlator or a speckle free laser microscope. The latter was built using a spinning tilted mirror which caused the speckle to change so quickly that it averaged out during the exposure. To solve the bias problem low image bias templates were generated by four techniques: microphotography of samples, creation of typical shapes by computer graphics editor, transmission holography of photoplates of samples, and by spatially coherent color image bias removal. The first of these templates was used to perform correlations with bacteria images. The aperture bias was successfully removed from the correlation with a video frame subtractor. To overcome the limited detector resolution it is necessary to discover some analog nonlinear intensity

  17. The Scanning Optical Microscope: An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kino, G. S.; Corte, T. R.; Xiao, G. Q.

    1988-07-01

    In the last few years there has been a resurgence in research on optical microscopes. One reason stems from the invention of the acoustic microscope by Quate and Lemons,1 and the realization that some of the same principles could be applied to the optical microscope. The acoustic microscope has better transverse definition for the same wavelength than the standard optical microscope and at the same time has far better range definition. Consequently, Kompfner, who was involved with the work on the early acoustic microscope, decided to try out similar scanning microscope principles with optics, and started a group with Wilson and Sheppard to carry out such research at Oxford.2 Sometime earlier, Petran et a13 had invented the tandem scanning microscope which used many of the same principles. Now, in our laboratory at Stanford, these ideas on the tandem scanning microscope and the scanning optical microscope are converging. Another aspect of this work, which stems from the earlier experience with the acoustic microscope, involves measurement of both phase and amplitude of the optical beam. It is also possible to use scanned optical microscopy for other purposes. For instance, an optical beam can be used to excite electrons and holes in semiconductors, and the generated current can be measured. By scanning the optical beam over the semiconductor, an image can be obtained of the regions where there is strong or weak electron hole generation. This type of microscope is called OBIC (Optical Beam Induced Current). A second application involves fluorescent imaging of biological materials. Here we have the excellent range definition of a scanning optical microscope which eliminates unwanted glare from regions of the material where the beam is unfocused.3 A third application is focused on the heating effect of the light beam. With such a system, images can be obtained which are associated with changes in the thermal properties of a material, changes in recombination rates in

  18. Microscopic Modeling of Intersubband Optical Processes in Type II Semiconductor Quantum Wells: Linear Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jian-Zhong; Kolokolov, Kanstantin I.; Ning, Cun-Zheng

    2003-01-01

    Linear absorption spectra arising from intersubband transitions in semiconductor quantum well heterostructures are analyzed using quantum kinetic theory by treating correlations to the first order within Hartree-Fock approximation. The resulting intersubband semiconductor Bloch equations take into account extrinsic dephasing contributions, carrier-longitudinal optical phonon interaction and carrier-interface roughness interaction which is considered with Ando s theory. As input for resonance lineshape calculation, a spurious-states-free 8-band kp Hamiltonian is used, in conjunction with the envelop function approximation, to compute self-consistently the energy subband structure of electrons in type II InAs/AlSb single quantum well structures. We demonstrate the interplay of nonparabolicity and many-body effects in the mid-infrared frequency range for such heterostructures.

  19. The optics of microscope image formation.

    PubMed

    Wolf, David E

    2013-01-01

    Although geometric optics gives a good understanding of how the microscope works, it fails in one critical area, which is explaining the origin of microscope resolution. To accomplish this, one must consider the microscope from the viewpoint of physical optics. This chapter describes the theory of the microscope-relating resolution to the highest spatial frequency that a microscope can collect. The chapter illustrates how Huygens' principle or construction can be used to explain the propagation of a plane wave. It is shown that this limit increases with increasing numerical aperture (NA). As a corollary to this, resolution increases with decreasing wavelength because of how NA depends on wavelength. The resolution is higher for blue light than red light. Resolution is dependent on contrast, and the higher the contrast, the higher the resolution. This last point relates to issues of signal-to-noise and dynamic range. The use of video and new digital cameras has necessitated redefining classical limits such as those of Rayleigh's criterion.

  20. Optics of high-performance electron microscopes.

    PubMed

    Rose, H H

    2008-01-01

    During recent years, the theory of charged particle optics together with advances in fabrication tolerances and experimental techniques has lead to very significant advances in high-performance electron microscopes. Here, we will describe which theoretical tools, inventions and designs have driven this development. We cover the basic theory of higher-order electron optics and of image formation in electron microscopes. This leads to a description of different methods to correct aberrations by multipole fields and to a discussion of the most advanced design that take advantage of these techniques. The theory of electron mirrors is developed and it is shown how this can be used to correct aberrations and to design energy filters. Finally, different types of energy filters are described.

  1. Optics of high-performance electron microscopes*

    PubMed Central

    Rose, H H

    2008-01-01

    During recent years, the theory of charged particle optics together with advances in fabrication tolerances and experimental techniques has lead to very significant advances in high-performance electron microscopes. Here, we will describe which theoretical tools, inventions and designs have driven this development. We cover the basic theory of higher-order electron optics and of image formation in electron microscopes. This leads to a description of different methods to correct aberrations by multipole fields and to a discussion of the most advanced design that take advantage of these techniques. The theory of electron mirrors is developed and it is shown how this can be used to correct aberrations and to design energy filters. Finally, different types of energy filters are described. PMID:27877933

  2. Microscopic optical buffering in a harmonic potential

    PubMed Central

    Sumetsky, M.

    2015-01-01

    In the early days of quantum mechanics, Schrödinger noticed that oscillations of a wave packet in a one-dimensional harmonic potential well are periodic and, in contrast to those in anharmonic potential wells, do not experience distortion over time. This original idea did not find applications up to now since an exact one-dimensional harmonic resonator does not exist in nature and has not been created artificially. However, an optical pulse propagating in a bottle microresonator (a dielectric cylinder with a nanoscale-high bump of the effective radius) can exactly imitate a quantum wave packet in the harmonic potential. Here, we propose a tuneable microresonator that can trap an optical pulse completely, hold it as long as the material losses permit, and release it without distortion. This result suggests the solution of the long standing problem of creating a microscopic optical buffer, the key element of the future optical signal processing devices. PMID:26689546

  3. Spin microscope based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    DOEpatents

    Berman, Gennady P.; Chernobrod, Boris M.

    2010-07-13

    The invention relates to scanning magnetic microscope which has a photoluminescent nanoprobe implanted in the tip apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and exhibits optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in the vicinity of unpaired electron spins or nuclear magnetic moments in the sample material. The described spin microscope has demonstrated nanoscale lateral resolution and single spin sensitivity for the AFM and STM embodiments.

  4. Spin microscope based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    DOEpatents

    Berman, Gennady P.; Chernobrod, Boris M.

    2010-06-29

    The invention relates to scanning magnetic microscope which has a photoluminescent nanoprobe implanted in the tip apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and exhibits optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in the vicinity of unpaired electron spins or nuclear magnetic moments in the sample material. The described spin microscope has demonstrated nanoscale lateral resolution and single spin sensitivity for the AFM and STM embodiments.

  5. Spin microscope based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    DOEpatents

    Berman, Gennady P.; Chernobrod, Boris M.

    2009-11-10

    The invention relates to scanning magnetic microscope which has a photoluminescent nanoprobe implanted in the tip apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and exhibits optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in the vicinity of impaired electron spins or nuclear magnetic moments in the sample material. The described spin microscope has demonstrated nanoscale lateral resolution and single spin sensitivity for the AFM and STM embodiments.

  6. Spin microscope based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    DOEpatents

    Berman, Gennady P.; Chernobrod, Boris M.

    2007-12-11

    The invention relates to scanning magnetic microscope which has a photoluminescent nanoprobe implanted in the tip apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and exhibits optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in the vicinity of unpaired electron spins or nuclear magnetic moments in the sample material. The described spin microscope has demonstrated nanoscale lateral resolution and single spin sensitivity for the AFM and STM embodiments.

  7. Spin microscope based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, Gennady P.; Chernobrod, Boris M.

    2009-10-27

    The invention relates to scanning magnetic microscope which has a photoluminescent nanoprobe implanted in the tip apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and exhibits optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in the vicinity of unpaired electron spins or nuclear magnetic moments in the sample material. The described spin microscope has demonstrated nanoscale lateral resolution and single spin sensitivity for the AFM and STM embodiments.

  8. Miniature electron microscope beam column optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loyd, Jody Stuart

    This investigation is in the area of electrostatic lens design with the overarching goal of contributing to the creation of a miniaturized scanning electron microscope (SEM) for use in mineralogical analysis or detection of signs of life on the surface of Mars. Such an instrument could also have application in the exploration of Earth's moon, planetary moons, asteroids, or comets. Other embodiments could include tabletop or field portable SEMs for use on Earth. The scope of this research is in the design of a beam column that attains focusing, demagnification, and aberration control within the smallest achievable package. The goals of planetary exploration and of spaceflight in general impose severe constraints on the instrument's mass and electrical power consumption, while favoring a robust design of small size and high rigidity that is also simple to align. To meet these requirements a design using electrostatic lenses was favored because of the lower power requirement and mass of electrostatic versus magnetic lenses, their relatively simple construction, as well as inherently easier shielding from extraneous fields. In modeling the lens field, a hybrid of a Boundary Element Method (BEM) and a Fourier series solution was employed, whereby an initial solution from the BEM is used to derive the bounding potential of a cylindrical subdomain for the subsequent Fourier series solution. The approach is applicable to many problems in physics and combines the inherent precision of this series solution with the flexibility of BEM to describe practical, non-idealized electrode shapes. The resulting lens field in the Fourier series subdomain is of higher precision, thereby allowing smaller errors in subsequent calculations of electron ray paths. The effects of aberrations are thus easier to observe in tracing non-paraxial rays. A significant speed increase in tracing rays is also observed. The modeling technique has been validated by reproducing example ray-traces through

  9. Development of an ultrasound microscope combined with optical microscope for multiparametric characterization of a single cell.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Mototaka; Shikama, Joe; Yoshida, Koki; Nagaoka, Ryo; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Saijo, Yoshifumi

    2015-09-01

    Biomechanics of the cell has been gathering much attention because it affects the pathological status in atherosclerosis and cancer. In the present study, an ultrasound microscope system combined with optical microscope for characterization of a single cell with multiple ultrasound parameters was developed. The central frequency of the transducer was 375 MHz and the scan area was 80 × 80 μm with up to 200 × 200 sampling points. An inverted optical microscope was incorporated in the design of the system, allowing for simultaneous optical observations of cultured cells. Two-dimensional mapping of multiple ultrasound parameters, such as sound speed, attenuation, and acoustic impedance, as well as the thickness, density, and bulk modulus of specimen/cell under investigation, etc., was realized by the system. Sound speed and thickness of a 3T3-L1 fibroblast cell were successfully obtained by the system. The ultrasound microscope system combined with optical microscope further enhances our understanding of cellular biomechanics.

  10. Teaching Optics to Biology Students Through Constructing a Light Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Jennifer

    2015-03-01

    The microscope is familiar to many disciplines, including physics, materials science, chemistry, and the life sciences. It demonstrates fundamental aspects of ray and wave optics, making it an ideal system to help educate students in the basic concepts of optics and in measurement principles and techniques. We present an experimental system developed to teach students the basics of ray and wave optics. The students design, build, and test a light microscope made from optics components. We describe the equipment and the basic measurements that students can perform to develop experimental techniques to understand optics principles. Students measure the magnification and test the resolution of the microscope. The system is open and versatile to allow advanced projects such as epi-fluorescence, total internal reflection fluorescence, and optical trapping. We have used this equipment in an optics course, an advanced laboratory course, and graduate-level training modules.

  11. Wave-Based Inversion & Imaging for the Optical Quadrature Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, S K

    2005-10-27

    The Center for Subsurface Sensing & Imaging System's (CenSSIS) Optical Quadrature Microscope (OQM) is a narrow band visible light microscope capable of measuring both amplitude and phase of a scattered field. We develop a diffraction tomography, that is, wave-based, scattered field inversion and imaging algorithm, for reconstructing the refractive index of the scattering object.

  12. X-ray-optical analytical microscope with two Kumakhov lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, G. I.; Kondratenko, R. I.; Odinov, B. V.; Pukhov, A. V.

    2005-07-01

    On the basis of research microscope equipped with a 3D sample stage and two x-ray micro analyzers fitted with Kumakhov polycapillary optics, an x-ray optical scanning microscope (ROCAM) has been developed. The instrument is designed for investigation ofheterogeneous objects in optic and x-ray spectra of photon radiation. Examples of ROCAM application for forensic studies and in mineralogy are shown. The instrument can be used in medicine and biology, metal studies, nuclear power, ecology, micro electronics, in customs, for investigation of pieces of art and so on.

  13. Ultrafast superresolution fluorescence imaging with spinning disk confocal microscope optics

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Shinichi; Okada, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    Most current superresolution (SR) microscope techniques surpass the diffraction limit at the expense of temporal resolution, compromising their applications to live-cell imaging. Here we describe a new SR fluorescence microscope based on confocal microscope optics, which we name the spinning disk superresolution microscope (SDSRM). Theoretically, the SDSRM is equivalent to a structured illumination microscope (SIM) and achieves a spatial resolution of 120 nm, double that of the diffraction limit of wide-field fluorescence microscopy. However, the SDSRM is 10 times faster than a conventional SIM because SR signals are recovered by optical demodulation through the stripe pattern of the disk. Therefore a single SR image requires only a single averaged image through the rotating disk. On the basis of this theory, we modified a commercial spinning disk confocal microscope. The improved resolution around 120 nm was confirmed with biological samples. The rapid dynamics of micro­tubules, mitochondria, lysosomes, and endosomes were observed with temporal resolutions of 30–100 frames/s. Because our method requires only small optical modifications, it will enable an easy upgrade from an existing spinning disk confocal to a SR microscope for live-cell imaging. PMID:25717185

  14. Ultrafast superresolution fluorescence imaging with spinning disk confocal microscope optics.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shinichi; Okada, Yasushi

    2015-05-01

    Most current superresolution (SR) microscope techniques surpass the diffraction limit at the expense of temporal resolution, compromising their applications to live-cell imaging. Here we describe a new SR fluorescence microscope based on confocal microscope optics, which we name the spinning disk superresolution microscope (SDSRM). Theoretically, the SDSRM is equivalent to a structured illumination microscope (SIM) and achieves a spatial resolution of 120 nm, double that of the diffraction limit of wide-field fluorescence microscopy. However, the SDSRM is 10 times faster than a conventional SIM because SR signals are recovered by optical demodulation through the stripe pattern of the disk. Therefore a single SR image requires only a single averaged image through the rotating disk. On the basis of this theory, we modified a commercial spinning disk confocal microscope. The improved resolution around 120 nm was confirmed with biological samples. The rapid dynamics of micro-tubules, mitochondria, lysosomes, and endosomes were observed with temporal resolutions of 30-100 frames/s. Because our method requires only small optical modifications, it will enable an easy upgrade from an existing spinning disk confocal to a SR microscope for live-cell imaging.

  15. Optical inversions based on polarization parameters indirect microscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guoyan; Gao, Kun; Liu, Xuefeng; Huang, Zicheng; Ni, Guoqiang

    2016-10-01

    The resolution of conventional optical microscope is intrinsically limited by the optical diffraction, therefore it cannot be used in the measurement of sub-100nm shape and structural detection. Non-optical imaging techniques are not limited by the optical diffraction. For example, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), but both of them have the weakness of narrow view field, low efficiency, and excessive cost. To detect nanoscale material, a new microscopic imaging technique is introduced in this paper, i.e. the polarization parameter indirect microscopic imaging technique. A conventional reflection microscopic system is used as the basic optical system, with polarization-modulation mechanics being inserted into it. The near-field structural characteristics can be delivered by optical wave and material coupling. According to coupling and conduction physics, changes of the optical wave parameters can be calculated, and then curves of the image intensity can be obtained. By analyzing the near-field polarization parameters in nanoscale, indirect polarization parameter imaging can be established.

  16. Near Field Magneto-Optical Microscope

    DOEpatents

    Vlasko-Vlasov, Vitalii K.; Welp, Ulrich; Crabtree, George W.

    2005-12-06

    A device and method for mapping magnetic fields of a sample at a resolution less than the wavelength of light without altering the magnetic field of the sample is disclosed. A device having a tapered end portion with a magneto-optically active particle positioned at the distal end thereof in communication with a fiber optic for transferring incoming linearly polarized light from a source thereof to the particle and for transferring reflected light from the particle is provided. The fiber optic has a reflective material trapping light within the fiber optic and in communication with a light detector for determining the polarization of light reflected from the particle as a function of the strength and direction of the magnetic field of the sample. Linearly polarized light from the source thereof transferred to the particle positioned proximate the sample is affected by the magnetic field of the sample sensed by the particle such that the difference in polarization of light entering and leaving the particle is due to the magnetic field of the sample. Relative movement between the particle and sample enables mapping.

  17. Near-Field Magneto-Optical Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Vlasko-Vlasov, Vitalii; Welp, Ulrich; and Crabtree, George W.

    2005-12-06

    A device and method for mapping magnetic fields of a sample at a resolution less than the wavelength of light without altering the magnetic field of the sample is disclosed. A device having a tapered end portion with a magneto-optically active particle positioned at the distal end thereof in communication with a fiber optic for transferring incoming linearly polarized light from a source thereof to the particle and for transferring reflected light from the particle is provided. The fiber optic has a reflective material trapping light within the fiber optic and in communication with a light detector for determining the polarization of light reflected from the particle as a function of the strength and direction of the magnetic field of the sample. Linearly polarized light from the source thereof transferred to the particle positioned proximate the sample is affected by the magnetic field of the sample sensed by the particle such that the difference in polarization of light entering and leaving the particle is due to the magnetic field of the sample. Relative movement between the particle and sample enables mapping.

  18. Research and application of ergonomics to optical microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xue-kun; Xiao, Ze-xin; Zhang, Jie

    2008-03-01

    The characteristics of the human and the microscope, and their integrated characteristic have been studied respectively in this paper. Our results indicated that the correspondence of (i) focusing installment with human body arm, (ii) the height of ocular with eyes, (iii) visual characteristic with illuminative condition of the optical microscope, should obey the theory of the ergonomics. This was reflected in the structural design and the produce of the product, and therefore, improved the property of the amenity of the machine.

  19. Fast optical monitoring of microscopic excitation patterns in cardiac muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Müller, W; Windisch, H; Tritthart, H A

    1989-01-01

    Many vital processes depend on the generation, changes, and conduction of cellular transmembrane potentials. Optical monitoring systems are well suited to detect such cellular electrical activities in networks of excitable cells and also tissues simultaneously at multiple sites. Here, an exceptionally fast array system (16 x 16 photodiodes, up to 4,000,000 samples per second, 12-bit resolution) for imaging voltage-sensitive dye fluorescence, permitted real time measurements of excitation patterns at a microscopic size scale (256 pixels within an area of 1.8-8 mm2), in rat cardiac muscle in vitro. Results emphasize a recent hypothesis for cardiac impulse conduction, based on cardiac structural complexities, that is contradictory to all continuous cable theory models. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:2790142

  20. HOMER: the Holographic Optical Microscope for Education and Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luviano, Anali

    Holography was invented in 1948 by Dennis Gabor and has undergone major advancements since the 2000s leading to the development of commercial digital holographic microscopes (DHM). This noninvasive form of microscopy produces a three-dimensional (3-D) digital model of a sample without altering or destroying the sample, thus allowing the same sample to be studied multiple times. HOMER-the Holographic Optical Microscope for Education and Research-produces a 3-D image from a two-dimensional (2-D) interference pattern captured by a camera that is then put through reconstruction software. This 2-D pattern is created when a reference wave interacts with the sample to produce a secondary wave that interferes with the unaltered part of the reference wave. I constructed HOMER to be an efficient, portable in-line DHM using inexpensive material and free reconstruction software. HOMER uses three different-colored LEDs as light sources. I am testing the performance of HOMER with the goal of producing tri-color images of samples. I'm using small basic biological samples to test the effectiveness of HOMER and plan to transition to complex cellular and biological specimens as I pursue my interest in biophysics. Norwich University.

  1. Microscopic optical potentials for He4 scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egashira, Kei; Minomo, Kosho; Toyokawa, Masakazu; Matsumoto, Takuma; Yahiro, Masanobu

    2014-06-01

    We present a reliable double-folding (DF) model for He4-nucleus scattering, using the Melbourne g-matrix nucleon-nucleon interaction that explains nucleon-nucleus scattering with no adjustable parameter. In the DF model, only the target density is taken as the local density in the Melbourne g matrix. For He4 elastic scattering from Ni58 and Pb208 targets in a wide range of incident energies from 20 to 200 MeV/nucleon, the DF model with the target-density approximation (TDA) yields much better agreement with the experimental data than the usual DF model with the frozen-density approximation in which the sum of projectile and target densities is taken as the local density. We also discuss the relation between the DF model with the TDA and the conventional folding model in which the nucleon-nucleus potential is folded with the He4 density.

  2. Scanning optical microscope with long working distance objective

    DOEpatents

    Cloutier, Sylvain G.

    2010-10-19

    A scanning optical microscope, including: a light source to generate a beam of probe light; collimation optics to substantially collimate the probe beam; a probe-result beamsplitter; a long working-distance, infinity-corrected objective; scanning means to scan a beam spot of the focused probe beam on or within a sample; relay optics; and a detector. The collimation optics are disposed in the probe beam. The probe-result beamsplitter is arranged in the optical paths of the probe beam and the resultant light from the sample. The beamsplitter reflects the probe beam into the objective and transmits resultant light. The long working-distance, infinity-corrected objective is also arranged in the optical paths of the probe beam and the resultant light. It focuses the reflected probe beam onto the sample, and collects and substantially collimates the resultant light. The relay optics are arranged to relay the transmitted resultant light from the beamsplitter to the detector.

  3. Multimodal optical workstation for simultaneous linear, nonlinear microscopy and nanomanipulation: upgrading a commercial confocal inverted microscope.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Manoj; Santos, Susana I C O; Zalvidea, Dobryna; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo

    2009-07-01

    In this work we propose and build a multimodal optical workstation that extends a commercially available confocal microscope (Nikon Confocal C1-Si) to include nonlinear/multiphoton microscopy and optical manipulation/stimulation tools such as nanosurgery. The setup allows both subsystems (confocal and nonlinear) to work independently and simultaneously. The workstation enables, for instance, nanosurgery along with simultaneous confocal and brightfield imaging. The nonlinear microscopy capabilities are added around the commercial confocal microscope by exploiting all the flexibility offered by this microscope and without need for any mechanical or electronic modification of the confocal microscope systems. As an example, the standard differential interference contrast condenser and diascopic detector in the confocal microscope are readily used as a forward detection mount for second harmonic generation imaging. The various capabilities of this workstation, as applied directly to biology, are demonstrated using the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans.

  4. A Microscopic Optically Tracking Navigation System That Uses High-resolution 3D Computer Graphics.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Masanori; Saito, Toki; Kin, Taichi; Nakagawa, Daichi; Nakatomi, Hirofumi; Oyama, Hiroshi; Saito, Nobuhito

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) computer graphics (CG) are useful for preoperative planning of neurosurgical operations. However, application of 3D CG to intraoperative navigation is not widespread because existing commercial operative navigation systems do not show 3D CG in sufficient detail. We have developed a microscopic optically tracking navigation system that uses high-resolution 3D CG. This article presents the technical details of our microscopic optically tracking navigation system. Our navigation system consists of three components: the operative microscope, registration, and the image display system. An optical tracker was attached to the microscope to monitor the position and attitude of the microscope in real time; point-pair registration was used to register the operation room coordinate system, and the image coordinate system; and the image display system showed the 3D CG image in the field-of-view of the microscope. Ten neurosurgeons (seven males, two females; mean age 32.9 years) participated in an experiment to assess the accuracy of this system using a phantom model. Accuracy of our system was compared with the commercial system. The 3D CG provided by the navigation system coincided well with the operative scene under the microscope. Target registration error for our system was 2.9 ± 1.9 mm. Our navigation system provides a clear image of the operation position and the surrounding structures. Systems like this may reduce intraoperative complications.

  5. Low-price optical microscope for school science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshimiya, Tsutomu; Kumagai, Masaaki

    2007-06-01

    In schools, scientific education with an optical microscope is popularly used. However, scanning apparatus for the microscope is very expensive such that the price is several times higher than the microscope itself. In order to activate children's interest in science, a low-price scanning and imaging function unit compatible to conventional optical microscopes used in schools was designed and manufactured using a personal computer (PC) used in all elementally and middle school education. The designing of imaging apparatus includes two choices: (i) using imaging device (reflection-type), or (ii) using photo-sensor and scanning device (transmission-type). In this paper, the latter method is adopted, considering the educational effect using "Lambert-Beer's law". This apparatus measures optical transmittance of modulated visible light with a photo-detector, and uses audio-input unit of PC as an A/D converter. Scanning unit with a pair of pulse motor drives was also used. Control software was built on Knoppix (an operating system based on freeware Linux), however it is very easy to rewrite to Windows application. By these reasons, this apparatus is low-price (less than microscope price) so that it is one of the best candidates for science education application in schools. As a biological specimen, a wing of spider wasp (Pompilidae) was used. Measured region was 10mm×10mm and the resolution was 100×100 pixels. The photograph of original specimen and the obtained image were shown in Figures (a) and (b), respectively. The obtained image showed a well-resolved detailed structure of the wing. Scanning was done by an external scanning apparatus. However, feeding of scanning pulses through printer port to stepping motor will be available based on the same method.

  6. Some optical principles of the clinical specular microscope.

    PubMed

    Bourne, W M; Enoch, J M

    1976-01-01

    The clinical specular microscope is used to examine and photograph human endothelial cells in vivo. An optical analysis is presented here in simple form to aid the ophthalmologist or visual scientist in understanding how this instrument can be used in a quantitative manner to measure the size of the magnified endothelial cells and the thickness of the overlying cornea. An error analysis is discussed in order to demonstrate some aspects of the precision of the determination.

  7. A super-oscillatory lens optical microscope for subwavelength imaging.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Edward T F; Lindberg, Jari; Roy, Tapashree; Savo, Salvatore; Chad, John E; Dennis, Mark R; Zheludev, Nikolay I

    2012-03-25

    The past decade has seen an intensive effort to achieve optical imaging resolution beyond the diffraction limit. Apart from the Pendry-Veselago negative index superlens, implementation of which in optics faces challenges of losses and as yet unattainable fabrication finesse, other super-resolution approaches necessitate the lens either to be in the near proximity of the object or manufactured on it, or work only for a narrow class of samples, such as intensely luminescent or sparse objects. Here we report a new super-resolution microscope for optical imaging that beats the diffraction limit of conventional instruments and the recently demonstrated near-field optical superlens and hyperlens. This non-invasive subwavelength imaging paradigm uses a binary amplitude mask for direct focusing of laser light into a subwavelength spot in the post-evanescent field by precisely tailoring the interference of a large number of beams diffracted from a nanostructured mask. The new technology, which--in principle--has no physical limits on resolution, could be universally used for imaging at any wavelength and does not depend on the luminescence of the object, which can be tens of micrometres away from the mask. It has been implemented as a straightforward modification of a conventional microscope showing resolution better than λ/6.

  8. Theoretical model of the helium pinhole microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palau, Adrià Salvador; Bracco, Gianangelo; Holst, Bodil

    2016-12-01

    In recent years, the development of neutral helium microscopes has gained increasing interest. The low energy, charge neutrality, and inertness of the helium atoms makes helium microscopy an attractive candidate for the imaging of a range of samples. The simplest neutral helium microscope is the so-called pinhole microscope. It consists of a supersonic expansion helium beam collimated by two consecutive apertures (skimmer and pinhole), which together determine the beam spot size and hence the resolution at a given working distance to the sample. Due to the high ionization potential of neutral helium atoms, it is difficult to build efficient helium detectors. Therefore, it is crucial to optimize the microscope design to maximize the intensity for a given resolution and working distance. Here we present an optimization model for the helium pinhole microscope system. We show that for a given resolution and working distance, there is a single intensity maximum. Further we show that with present-day state-of-the-art detector technology (ionization efficiency 1 ×10-3 ), a resolution of the order of 600 nm at a working distance of 3 mm is possible. In order to make this quantification, we have assumed a Lambertian reflecting surface and calculated the beam spot size that gives a signal 100 cts/s within a solid angle of 0.02 π sr, following an existing design. Reducing the working distance to the micron range leads to an improved resolution of around 40 nm.

  9. Development of a new type of optical microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ji-jun; Hou, Su-xia; Wang, Lian-feng; Sun, Hong-hui

    2007-12-01

    Along with the development and application of nanometer technology, a machine that allows deterministic position and manufacturing at the atomic level is required. An optical microscope of the machine was designed particularly to locate line features on a grid plate. It was designed to achieve nanometer level repeatability. The microscope uses a modulated light-emitting diode as its light source. It has two channels for optical imaging: one consists of two slits for precision measurement of line positions and the other of a camera for direct visual observation. A lock-in amplifier is used for demodulating the electrical signal from the photodiodes behind the slits. Initial experiments locating crosses on a grid plate indicate a repeatability of approximately 1 nm, one standard deviation. It was found that the measured line position is related not only to the focus but also to the illumination. There exists a particular orientation of the illumination where the measured line position is relatively insensitive to the focus, because of which the microscope is able to achieve nanometer level repeatability. Repeated measurements were performed on both an uncalibrated and a calibrated plate. Repeatabilities of better than 1 nm were obtained over time periods of several days; however, the ultimate accuracy of the machine still has to be demonstrated.

  10. Dynamic-focusing microscope objective for optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murali, Supraja; Rolland, Jannick

    2007-01-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a novel optical imaging technique that has assumed significant importance in bio-medical imaging in the last two decades because it is non-invasive and provides accurate, high resolution images of three dimensional cross-sections of body tissue, exceeding the capabilities of the current predominant imaging technique - ultrasound. In this paper, the application of high resolution OCT, known as optical coherence microscopy (OCM) is investigated for in vivo detection of abnormal skin pathology for the early diagnosis of cancer. A main challenge in OCM is maintaining invariant resolution throughout the sample. The technology presented is based on a dynamic focusing microscope imaging probe conceived for skin imaging and the detection of abnormalities in the epithelium. A novel method for dynamic focusing in the biological sample is presented using variable-focus lens technology to obtain three dimensional images with invariant resolution throughout the cross-section and depth of the sample is presented and discussed. A low coherence broadband source centered at near IR wavelengths is used to illuminate the sample. The design, analysis and predicted performance of the dynamic focusing microscope objective designed for dynamic three dimensional imaging at 5μm resolution for the chosen broadband spectrum is presented.

  11. Quantitative optical microscopy: measurement of cellular biophysical features with a standard optical microscope.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Kevin G; Baker-Groberg, Sandra M; McCarty, Owen J T

    2014-04-07

    We describe the use of a standard optical microscope to perform quantitative measurements of mass, volume, and density on cellular specimens through a combination of bright field and differential interference contrast imagery. Two primary approaches are presented: noninterferometric quantitative phase microscopy (NIQPM), to perform measurements of total cell mass and subcellular density distribution, and Hilbert transform differential interference contrast microscopy (HTDIC) to determine volume. NIQPM is based on a simplified model of wave propagation, termed the paraxial approximation, with three underlying assumptions: low numerical aperture (NA) illumination, weak scattering, and weak absorption of light by the specimen. Fortunately, unstained cellular specimens satisfy these assumptions and low NA illumination is easily achieved on commercial microscopes. HTDIC is used to obtain volumetric information from through-focus DIC imagery under high NA illumination conditions. High NA illumination enables enhanced sectioning of the specimen along the optical axis. Hilbert transform processing on the DIC image stacks greatly enhances edge detection algorithms for localization of the specimen borders in three dimensions by separating the gray values of the specimen intensity from those of the background. The primary advantages of NIQPM and HTDIC lay in their technological accessibility using "off-the-shelf" microscopes. There are two basic limitations of these methods: slow z-stack acquisition time on commercial scopes currently abrogates the investigation of phenomena faster than 1 frame/minute, and secondly, diffraction effects restrict the utility of NIQPM and HTDIC to objects from 0.2 up to 10 (NIQPM) and 20 (HTDIC) μm in diameter, respectively. Hence, the specimen and its associated time dynamics of interest must meet certain size and temporal constraints to enable the use of these methods. Excitingly, most fixed cellular specimens are readily investigated with

  12. Optically Sectioning Ocular Fluorometer Microscope: Applications To The Cornea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, Barry R.

    1988-06-01

    An optically sectioning ocular fluorometer microscope is described with the capability of measuring the emission spectra of molecules in planes along the microscope axis. Its unique feature is that the objective is attached to a piezoelectric driver and scans from the tear film to the aqueous humor. This permits measurements on living animals and adoption for clinical use. The excitation light from a laser (nitrogen, dye, argon or helium cadmium) couples to the microscope via a quartz optical fiber. The light is projected through a 100 PM slit on the excitation side, through one half of the objective. The emitted light is collected by the second half of the objective and passes a second 100 pm slit in the conjugate plane of the eyepiece. The depth resolution is 6 um with an 100x objective, and 18 PM with a 50 power objective. The fluorescence is coupled by a quartz fiber to an optical spectrum analyzer. It consists of a monochromator with two microchannel plates attached to a linear diode array. The photocathode of the detector is gated for use with pulsed lasers or it can operate in the continuous mode. The applications include fluorescence measurements on thin layered structures. The present study involves the noninvasive measurement of oxidative metabolism of the component layers of the in vivo cornea. This is based on fluorescence measurements of the reduced pyridine nucleotide in the cornea. The fluorescence signals from the corneal epithelial (30 μm) and endothelial (4 μm) are clearly defined. Other applications to ophthalmology include studies of the fluorescence form the component layers of the ocular lens. Support from N.I.I. EY06958.

  13. Global Microscopic Models for Nuclear Reaction Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Goriely, S.

    2005-05-24

    Important effort has been devoted in the last decades to measuring reaction cross sections. Despite such effort, many nuclear applications still require the use of theoretical predictions to estimate experimentally unknown cross sections. Most of the nuclear ingredients in the calculations of reaction cross sections need to be extrapolated in an energy and/or mass domain out of reach of laboratory simulations. In addition, some applications often involve a large number of unstable nuclei, so that only global approaches can be used. For these reasons, when the nuclear ingredients to the reaction models cannot be determined from experimental data, it is highly recommended to consider preferentially microscopic or semi-microscopic global predictions based on sound and reliable nuclear models which, in turn, can compete with more phenomenological highly-parameterized models in the reproduction of experimental data. The latest developments made in deriving such microscopic models for practical applications are reviewed. It mainly concerns nuclear structure properties (masses, deformations, radii, etc.), level densities at the equilibrium deformation, {gamma}-ray strength, as well as fission barriers and level densities at the fission saddle points.

  14. Iterative deconvolution technique for measurements of diffraction-limited images on optical microscopes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wenlong; Chang, Ming; Chen, Po-Cheng; Luo, Wun-Mao

    2014-12-12

    Diffraction limit is usually a thorny problem in an optical inspection system. In this investigation, a model-based deconvolution technique was developed to recover diffraction-limited images, where images with sizes smaller than the diffraction limit could be recognized. Experiments were carried out with a traditional microscope at 200× magnification coupled with a halogen light source for a series of line width samples. The point spread function of the imaging optics was first obtained from an estimated model and then combined with a nonlinear deconvolution algorithm to calculate the full width at half maximum and reconstruct the line widths. Experimental results indicate that a measurement error below one pixel size of the measurement system is achievable. Accordingly, the target of nanoscale line width inspection based on a low cost and real-time image processing technique can be fulfilled, which greatly increases the ability of nanoscaling on optical microscopes.

  15. High-voltage scanning ion microscope: Beam optics and design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magilin, D.; Ponomarev, A.; Rebrov, V.; Ponomarov, A.

    2015-05-01

    This article is devoted to the conceptual design of a compact high-voltage scanning ion microscope (HVSIM). In an HVSIM design, the ion optical system is based on a high-brightness ion source. Specifically, the ion optical system is divided into two components: an ion injector and a probe-forming system (PFS) that consists of an accelerating tube and a multiplet of quadrupole lenses. The crossover is formed and controlled by the injector, which acts as an object collimator, and is focused on the image plane by the PFS. The ion microprobe has a size of 0.1 μm and an energy of 2 MeV. When the influence of the chromatic and third-order aberrations is theoretically taken into account, the HVSIM forms an ion microprobe.

  16. Optical label-free and model-free probe of the surface potential of nanoscale and microscopic objects in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lütgebaucks, Cornelis; Gonella, Grazia; Roke, Sylvie

    2016-11-01

    The electrostatic environment of aqueous systems is an essential ingredient for the function of any living system. To understand the electrostatic properties and their molecular foundation in soft, living, and three-dimensional systems, we developed a table-top model-free method to determine the surface potential of nano- and microscopic objects in aqueous solutions. Angle-resolved nonresonant second harmonic (SH) scattering measurements contain enough information to determine the surface potential unambiguously, without making assumptions on the structure of the interfacial region. The scattered SH light that is emitted from both the particle interface and the diffuse double layer can be detected in two different polarization states that have independent scattering patterns. The angular shape and intensity are determined by the surface potential and the second-order surface susceptibility. Calibrating the response with the SH intensity of bulk water, a single, unique surface potential value can be extracted. We demonstrate the method with 80 nm bare oil droplets in water and ˜50 nm dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) and dioleoylphosphatidylserine (DOPS) liposomes at various ionic strengths.

  17. Microscopic modeling of nitride intersubband absorbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montano, Ines; Allerman, A. A.; Wierer, J. J.; Moseley, M.; Skogen, E. J.; Tauke-Pedretti, A.; Vawter, G. A.

    III-nitride intersubband structures have recently attracted much interest because of their potential for a wide variety of applications ranging from electro-optical modulators to terahertz quantum cascade lasers. To overcome present simulation limitations we have developed a microscopic absorbance simulator for nitride intersubband devices. Our simulator calculates the band structure of nitride intersubband systems using a fully coupled 8x8 k.p Hamiltonian and determines the material response of a single period in a density-matrix-formalism by solving the Heisenberg equation including many-body and dephasing contributions. After calculating the polarization due to intersubband transitions in a single period, the resulting absorbance of a superlattice structure including radiative coupling between the different periods is determined using a non-local Green's-function formalism. As a result our simulator allows us to predict intersubband absorbance of superlattice structures with microscopically determined lineshapes and linewidths accounting for both many-body and correlation contributions. This work is funded by Sandia National Laboratories Laboratory Directed Research and Development program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin.

  18. Microscopic models for bridging electrostatics and currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghi, L.; DeAmbrosis, A.; Mascheretti, P.

    2007-03-01

    A teaching sequence based on the use of microscopic models to link electrostatic phenomena with direct currents is presented. The sequence, devised for high school students, was designed after initial work carried out with student teachers attending a school of specialization for teaching physics at high school, at the University of Pavia. The results obtained with them are briefly presented, because they directed our steps for the development of the teaching sequence. For both the design of the experiments and their interpretation, we drew inspiration from the original works of Alessandro Volta; in addition, a structural model based on the particular role of electrons as elementary charges both in electrostatic phenomena and in currents was proposed. The teaching sequence starts from experiments on charging objects by rubbing and by induction, and engages students in constructing microscopic models to interpret their observations. By using these models and by closely examining the ideas of tension and capacitance, the students acknowledge that a charging (or discharging) process is due to the motion of electrons that, albeit for short time intervals, represent a current. Finally, they are made to see that the same happens in transients of direct current circuits.

  19. Transmission electron microscope sample holder with optical features

    DOEpatents

    Milas, Mirko [Port Jefferson, NY; Zhu, Yimei [Stony Brook, NY; Rameau, Jonathan David [Coram, NY

    2012-03-27

    A sample holder for holding a sample to be observed for research purposes, particularly in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), generally includes an external alignment part for directing a light beam in a predetermined beam direction, a sample holder body in optical communication with the external alignment part and a sample support member disposed at a distal end of the sample holder body opposite the external alignment part for holding a sample to be analyzed. The sample holder body defines an internal conduit for the light beam and the sample support member includes a light beam positioner for directing the light beam between the sample holder body and the sample held by the sample support member.

  20. Performance evaluation of a sensorless adaptive optics multiphoton microscope.

    PubMed

    Skorsetz, Martin; Artal, Pablo; Bueno, Juan M

    2016-03-01

    A wavefront sensorless adaptive optics technique was combined with a custom-made multiphoton microscope to correct for specimen-induced aberrations. A liquid-crystal-on-silicon (LCoS) modulator was used to systematically generate Zernike modes during image recording. The performance of the instrument was evaluated in samples providing different nonlinear signals and the benefit of correcting higher order aberrations was always noticeable (in both contrast and resolution). The optimum aberration pattern was stable in time for the samples here involved. For a particular depth location within the sample, the wavefront to be precompensated was independent on the size of the imaged area (up to ∼ 360 × 360 μm(2)). The mode combination optimizing the recorded image depended on the Zernike correction control sequence; however, the final images hardly differed. At deeper locations, a noticeable dominance of spherical aberration was found. The influence of other aberration terms was also compared to the effect of the spherical aberration.

  1. Microscopic model for ultrafast remagnetization dynamics.

    PubMed

    Chimata, Raghuveer; Bergman, Anders; Bergqvist, Lars; Sanyal, Biplab; Eriksson, Olle

    2012-10-12

    In this Letter, we provide a microscopic model for the ultrafast remagnetization of atomic moments already quenched above the Stoner-Curie temperature by a strong laser fluence. Combining first-principles density functional theory, atomistic spin dynamics utilizing the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation, and a three-temperature model, we analyze the temporal evolution of atomic moments as well as the macroscopic magnetization of bcc Fe and hcp Co covering a broad time scale, ranging from femtoseconds to picoseconds. Our simulations show a variety of complex temporal behavior of the magnetic properties resulting from an interplay between electron, spin, and lattice subsystems, which causes an intricate time evolution of the atomic moment, where longitudinal and transversal fluctuations result in a macrospin moment that evolves highly nonmonotonically.

  2. Microscopic optical potential for exotic isotopes from chiral effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, J. W.; Kaiser, N.; Miller, G. A.

    2016-06-01

    We compute the isospin-asymmetry dependence of microscopic optical model potentials from realistic chiral two- and three-body interactions over a range of resolution scales Λ ≃400 -500 MeV. We show that at moderate projectile energies, E =110 -200 MeV, the real isovector part of the optical potential changes sign, a phenomenon referred to as isospin inversion. We also extract the strength and energy dependence of the imaginary isovector optical potential and find no evidence for an analogous phenomenon over the range of energies, E ≤200 MeV, considered in the present work. Finally, we compute for the first time the leading (quadratic) corrections to the Lane parametrization for the isospin-asymmetry dependence of the optical potential and observe an enhanced importance at low scattering energies.

  3. Sub-nanosecond time-resolved near-field scanning magneto-optical microscope.

    PubMed

    Rudge, J; Xu, H; Kolthammer, J; Hong, Y K; Choi, B C

    2015-02-01

    We report on the development of a new magnetic microscope, time-resolved near-field scanning magneto-optical microscope, which combines a near-field scanning optical microscope and magneto-optical contrast. By taking advantage of the high temporal resolution of time-resolved Kerr microscope and the sub-wavelength spatial resolution of a near-field microscope, we achieved a temporal resolution of ∼50 ps and a spatial resolution of <100 nm. In order to demonstrate the spatiotemporal magnetic imaging capability of this microscope, the magnetic field pulse induced gyrotropic vortex dynamics occurring in 1 μm diameter, 20 nm thick CoFeB circular disks has been investigated. The microscope provides sub-wavelength resolution magnetic images of the gyrotropic motion of the vortex core at a resonance frequency of ∼240 MHz.

  4. Inspection strategy for LIGA microstructures using a programmable optical microscope.

    SciTech Connect

    Kurfess, Thomas R; Aigeldinger, Georg; Ceremuga, Joseph T.

    2004-07-01

    The LIGA process has the ability to fabricate very precise, high aspect ratio mesoscale structures with microscale features [l]. The process consists of multiple steps before a final part is produced. Materials native to the LIGA process include metals and photoresists. These structures are routinely measured for quality control and process improvement. However, metrology of LIGA structures is challenging because of their high aspect ratio and edge topography. For the scale of LIGA structures, a programmable optical microscope is well suited for lateral (XU) critical dimension measurements. Using grayscale gradient image processing with sub-pixel interpolation, edges are detected and measurements are performed. As with any measurement, understanding measurement uncertainty is necessary so that appropriate conclusions are drawn from the data. Therefore, the abilities of the inspection tool and the obstacles presented by the structures under inspection should be well understood so that precision may be quantified. This report presents an inspection method for LIGA microstructures including a comprehensive assessment of the uncertainty for each inspection scenario.

  5. Comparison of local, semi-microscopic, and microscopic three-cluster models

    SciTech Connect

    Theeten, M.; Baye, D.; Descouvemont, P.

    2006-10-15

    Two different three-body models are compared with a fully antisymmetrized microscopic three-cluster model. The local model makes use of local effective interactions involving forbidden states among the three particles. In the semi-microscopic model, nonlocal two-body interactions are derived within the resonating-group method from the same nucleon-nucleon effective forces as in the microscopic model. In both cases, calculations are performed in hyperspherical coordinates with the Lagrange-mesh method. The role of forbidden states and their elimination are discussed. The models are applied to an {alpha}{alpha}n description of {sup 9}Be and an {alpha}nn description of {sup 6}He. The local model results are affected by almost forbidden states and may be unrealistic for {sup 9}Be. A comparison of the microscopic and semi-microscopic models shows that the effect of exchanges involving the three clusters is weak. An overbinding of {sup 9}Be cannot be avoided with nucleon-nucleon forces reproducing {alpha}n and {alpha}{alpha} scattering properties. On the contrary, {sup 6}He is underbound under the same conditions. This can probably be attributed to a lack of three-nucleon forces.

  6. Theoretical model of the helium zone plate microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvador Palau, Adrià; Bracco, Gianangelo; Holst, Bodil

    2017-01-01

    Neutral helium microscopy is a new technique currently under development. Its advantages are the low energy, charge neutrality, and inertness of the helium atoms, a potential large depth of field, and the fact that at thermal energies the helium atoms do not penetrate into any solid material. This opens the possibility, among others, for the creation of an instrument that can measure surface topology on the nanoscale, even on surfaces with high aspect ratios. One of the most promising designs for helium microscopy is the zone plate microscope. It consists of a supersonic expansion helium beam collimated by an aperture (skimmer) focused by a Fresnel zone plate onto a sample. The resolution is determined by the focal spot size, which depends on the size of the skimmer, the optics of the system, and the velocity spread of the beam through the chromatic aberrations of the zone plate. An important factor for the optics of the zone plate is the width of the outermost zone, corresponding to the smallest opening in the zone plate. The width of the outermost zone is fabrication limited to around 10 nm with present-day state-of-the-art technology. Due to the high ionization potential of neutral helium atoms, it is difficult to build efficient helium detectors. Therefore, it is crucial to optimize the microscope design to maximize the intensity for a given resolution and width of the outermost zone. Here we present an optimization model for the helium zone plate microscope. Assuming constant resolution and width of the outermost zone, we are able to reduce the problem to a two-variable problem (zone plate radius and object distance) and we show that for a given beam temperature and pressure, there is always a single intensity maximum. We compare our model with the highest-resolution zone plate focusing images published and show that the intensity can be increased seven times. Reducing the width of the outermost zone to 10 nm leads to an increase in intensity of more than 8000

  7. Quantitative assessment of canalicular bile formation in isolated hepatocyte couplets using microscopic optical planimetry.

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, A; Ng, O C; Strazzabosco, M; Boyer, J L

    1989-01-01

    Isolated rat hepatocyte couplets (IRHC) are primary units of bile secretion that accumulate fluid in an enclosed canalicular space with time in culture. We have quantitated the rate of canalicular secretion in IRHC cultured for 4-8 h by measuring the change in canalicular space volume by video-microscopic optical planimetry using high resolution Nomarski optics. Electron microscopic morphometric studies revealed significant increases in canalicular membrane area after 4-6 h in culture. Canalicular secretion in basal L-15 medium (3.8 +/- 1.3 fl/min) increased significantly with the choleretic bile salts (10 microM), taurocholate, and ursodeoxycholate (14 +/- 7 fl/min each). Secretion rates after exposure to bile acids correlated directly with the canalicular surface area before stimulation. In contrast, expansion times after stimulation varied inversely with initial canalicular volumes. Ursodeoxycholic acid failed to produce a hypercholeresis at 10-, 100-, or 200-microM concentrations compared with taurocholate, either in normal or taurine-depleted IRHC. The present findings establish that rates of canalicular bile secretion can be quantitated in IRHC by serial optical planimetry, both in the basal state and after stimulation with bile acids. Furthermore, ursodeoxycholate does not acutely induce hypercholeresis at the canalicular level in this model. Rather, both taurocholic and ursodeoxycholic acids induced secretion in proportion to the surface area of the canalicular membrane. The IRHC are a useful model to identify canalicular choleretics and for studies of canalicular bile formation. Images PMID:2913052

  8. Macroscopic model of scanning force microscope

    DOEpatents

    Guerra-Vela, Claudio; Zypman, Fredy R.

    2004-10-05

    A macroscopic version of the Scanning Force Microscope is described. It consists of a cantilever under the influence of external forces, which mimic the tip-sample interactions. The use of this piece of equipment is threefold. First, it serves as direct way to understand the parts and functions of the Scanning Force Microscope, and thus it is effectively used as an instructional tool. Second, due to its large size, it allows for simple measurements of applied forces and parameters that define the state of motion of the system. This information, in turn, serves to compare the interaction forces with the reconstructed ones, which cannot be done directly with the standard microscopic set up. Third, it provides a kinematics method to non-destructively measure elastic constants of materials, such as Young's and shear modules, with special application for brittle materials.

  9. Examples of electrostatic electron optics: the Farrand and Elektros microscopes and electron mirrors.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, P W

    2012-08-01

    The role of Gertrude Rempfer in the design of the Farrand and Elektros microscopes is evoked. The study of electron mirror optics, aberration correction using mirrors and the development of microscopes employing electron mirrors are recapitulated, accompanied by a full bibliography, of earlier publications in particular.

  10. Interferometric and optical tests of water window imaging x ray microscopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. Barry

    1993-01-01

    Interferometric tests of Schwarzchild X-ray Microscope are performed to evaluate the optical properties and alignment of the components. Photographic measurements of the spatial resolution, focal properties, and vignetting characteristics of the prototype Water Window Imaging X-ray Microscope are made and analyzed.

  11. Hard X-Ray Scanning Microscope with Multilayer Laue Lens Nanofocusing Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Nazaretski, Evgeny

    2016-11-08

    Evgeny Nazaretski, a physicist at Brookhaven Lab’s National Synchrotron Light Source II, spearheaded the development of a one-of-a-kind x-ray microscope with novel nanofocusing optics called multilayer Laue lenses.

  12. Hard X-Ray Scanning Microscope with Multilayer Laue Lens Nanofocusing Optics

    ScienceCinema

    Nazaretski, Evgeny

    2016-11-23

    Evgeny Nazaretski, a physicist at Brookhaven Lab’s National Synchrotron Light Source II, spearheaded the development of a one-of-a-kind x-ray microscope with novel nanofocusing optics called multilayer Laue lenses.

  13. In vivo imaging of the Drosophila Melanogaster heart using a novel optical coherence tomography microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izatt, Susan D.; Choma, Michael A.; Israel, Steven; Wessells, Robert J.; Bodmer, Rolf; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2005-03-01

    Real time in vivo optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging of the adult fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster heart using a newly designed OCT microscope allows accurate assessment of cardiac anatomy and function. D. melanogaster has been used extensively in genetic research for over a century, but in vivo evaluation of the heart has been limited by available imaging technology. The ability to assess phenotypic changes with micrometer-scale resolution noninvasively in genetic models such as D. melanogaster is needed in the advancing fields of developmental biology and genetics. We have developed a dedicated small animal OCT imaging system incorporating a state-of-the-art, real time OCT scanner integrated into a standard stereo zoom microscope which allows for simultaneous OCT and video imaging. System capabilities include A-scan, B-scan, and M-scan imaging as well as automated 3D volumetric acquisition and visualization. Transverse and sagittal B-mode scans of the four chambered D. melanogaster heart have been obtained with the OCT microscope and are consistent with detailed anatomical studies from the literature. Further analysis by M-mode scanning is currently under way to assess cardiac function as a function of age and sex by determination of shortening fraction and ejection fraction. These studies create control cardiac data on the wild type D. melanogaster, allowing subsequent evaluation of phenotypic cardiac changes in this model after regulated genetic mutation.

  14. Microscopic models of traveling wave equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunet, Eric; Derrida, Bernard

    1999-09-01

    Reaction-diffusion problems are often described at a macroscopic scale by partial derivative equations of the type of the Fisher or Kolmogorov-Petrovsky-Piscounov equation. These equations have a continuous family of front solutions, each of them corresponding to a different velocity of the front. By simulating systems of size up to N=1016 particles at the microscopic scale, where particles react and diffuse according to some stochastic rules, we show that a single velocity is selected for the front. This velocity converges logarithmically to the solution of the F-KPP equation with minimal velocity when the number N of particles increases. A simple calculation of the effect introduced by the cutoff due to the microscopic scale allows one to understand the origin of the logarithmic correction.

  15. Building 3D aerial image in photoresist with reconstructed mask image acquired with optical microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, C. S.; Tang, Y. P.; Chu, F. S.; Huang, W. C.; Liu, R. G.; Gau, T. S.

    2012-03-01

    Calibration of mask images on wafer becomes more important as features shrink. Two major types of metrology have been commonly adopted. One is to measure the mask image with scanning electron microscope (SEM) to obtain the contours on mask and then simulate the wafer image with optical simulator. The other is to use an optical imaging tool Aerial Image Measurement System (AIMSTM) to emulate the image on wafer. However, the SEM method is indirect. It just gathers planar contours on a mask with no consideration of optical characteristics such as 3D topography structures. Hence, the image on wafer is not predicted precisely. Though the AIMSTM method can be used to directly measure the intensity at the near field of a mask but the image measured this way is not quite the same as that on the wafer due to reflections and refractions in the films on wafer. Here, a new approach is proposed to emulate the image on wafer more precisely. The behavior of plane waves with different oblique angles is well known inside and between planar film stacks. In an optical microscope imaging system, plane waves can be extracted from the pupil plane with a coherent point source of illumination. Once plane waves with a specific coherent illumination are analyzed, the partially coherent component of waves could be reconstructed with a proper transfer function, which includes lens aberration, polarization, reflection and refraction in films. It is a new method that we can transfer near light field of a mask into an image on wafer without the disadvantages of indirect SEM measurement such as neglecting effects of mask topography, reflections and refractions in the wafer film stacks. Furthermore, with this precise latent image, a separated resist model also becomes more achievable.

  16. A Microscopic Optical Potential Approach to {sup 6,8}He+p Elastic Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Lukyanov, V. K.; Zemlyanaya, E. V.; Lukyanov, K. V.; Kadrev, D. N.; Antonov, A. N.; Gaidarov, M. K.; Massen, S. E.

    2009-08-26

    A microscopic approach to calculate the optical potential (OP) with the real part obtained by a folding procedure and with the imaginary part inherent in the high-energy approximation (HEA) is applied to study the {sup 6,8}He+p elastic scattering data at energies of tens of MeV/N. The OP's and the cross sections are calculated using different models for the neutron and proton densities of {sup 6,8}He. The role of the spin-orbit (SO) potential and effects of the energy and density dependence of the effective NN forces are studied. Comparison of the calculations with the available experimental data on the elastic scattering differential cross sections at beam energies <100 MeV/N is performed and conclusions on the role of the aforesaid effects are made. It is shown that the present approach, which uses only parameters that renormalize the depths of the OP, can be applied along with other methods like that from the microscopic g-matrix description of the complex proton optical potential.

  17. Decoupling criterion based on limited energy loss condition for groove measurement using optical scanning microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian; Li, Mengzhou; Li, Qiang; Tan, Jiubin

    2016-12-01

    In confocal metrology, the lateral and axial responses are coupled in narrow regions near groove edges. This coupling results in an area with an uncertain profile, particularly for measurements of tight structures or deep grooves. In this paper, to delineate the area with measurement accuracy loss, an analytical model depicting the coupling relationships between the groove depth, the coupled portions and the NA of the objective used is introduced. Based on this model, the limited energy lost (LEL) decoupling criterion is presented that can enable users to choose suitable numerical apertures before performing measurements, predict the extents of the areas with measurement accuracy loss, and identify readout areas that yield accurate height measurements. The theory was verified by using confocal microscopes and is also applicable to far-field optical scanning metrology.

  18. A sample holder with integrated laser optics for an ELMITEC photoemission electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Gierster, L.; Pape, L.; Ünal, A. A.; Kronast, F.

    2015-02-15

    We present a new sample holder compatible with ELMITEC Photoemission Electron Microscopes (PEEMs) containing an optical lens and a mirror. With the integrated optical elements, a laser beam is focused from the back side of the sample at normal incidence, yielding a minimum spot size of about 1 μm. This opens up new possibilities for local laser excitations in PEEM experiments such as imaging all-optical magnetization switching at a small length scale.

  19. A microscopic steam engine implemented in an optical tweezer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinto-Su, Pedro A.

    2014-12-01

    The introduction of improved steam engines at the end of the 18th century marked the start of the industrial revolution and the birth of classical thermodynamics. Currently, there is great interest in miniaturizing heat engines, but so far traditional heat engines operating with the expansion and compression of gas have not reached length scales shorter than one millimeter. Here, a micrometer-sized piston steam engine is implemented in an optical tweezer. The piston is a single colloidal microparticle that is driven by explosive vapourization of the surrounding liquid (cavitation bubbles) and by optical forces at a rate between a few tens of Hertz and one kilo-Hertz. The operation of the engine allows to exert impulsive forces with optical tweezers and induce streaming in the liquid, similar to the effect of transducers when driven at acoustic and ultrasound frequencies.

  20. A microscopic steam engine implemented in an optical tweezer.

    PubMed

    Quinto-Su, Pedro A

    2014-12-19

    The introduction of improved steam engines at the end of the 18th century marked the start of the industrial revolution and the birth of classical thermodynamics. Currently, there is great interest in miniaturizing heat engines, but so far traditional heat engines operating with the expansion and compression of gas have not reached length scales shorter than one millimeter. Here, a micrometer-sized piston steam engine is implemented in an optical tweezer. The piston is a single colloidal microparticle that is driven by explosive vapourization of the surrounding liquid (cavitation bubbles) and by optical forces at a rate between a few tens of Hertz and one kilo-Hertz. The operation of the engine allows to exert impulsive forces with optical tweezers and induce streaming in the liquid, similar to the effect of transducers when driven at acoustic and ultrasound frequencies.

  1. Ultrafast Electron Microscopes: Design Criteria, Electron Sources, and Column Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Joel A.

    Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscopy, and its picosecond/femtosecond subclass Ultrafast Electron Microscopy, is an emerging field in instrumentation science. It attempts to combine the nanoscale spatial resolution of transmission electron microscopes with the temporal resolution of modern ultrafast lasers. In this thesis, I present my contributions to this young field. These include a novel model for simulating the dynamics of ultrafast electron pulses in electron microscope systems, design criteria for constructing such a system, and theoretical and experimental groundwork geared towards selecting a useful photocathode for electron pulse generation. I also present the prototype ultrafast electron microscope system being built at UIC.

  2. Single-pulse CARS based multimodal nonlinear optical microscope for bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunil; Kamali, Tschackad; Levitte, Jonathan M; Katz, Ori; Hermann, Boris; Werkmeister, Rene; Považay, Boris; Drexler, Wolfgang; Unterhuber, Angelika; Silberberg, Yaron

    2015-05-18

    Noninvasive label-free imaging of biological systems raises demand not only for high-speed three-dimensional prescreening of morphology over a wide-field of view but also it seeks to extract the microscopic functional and molecular details within. Capitalizing on the unique advantages brought out by different nonlinear optical effects, a multimodal nonlinear optical microscope can be a powerful tool for bioimaging. Bringing together the intensity-dependent contrast mechanisms via second harmonic generation, third harmonic generation and four-wave mixing for structural-sensitive imaging, and single-beam/single-pulse coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering technique for chemical sensitive imaging in the finger-print region, we have developed a simple and nearly alignment-free multimodal nonlinear optical microscope that is based on a single wide-band Ti:Sapphire femtosecond pulse laser source. Successful imaging tests have been realized on two exemplary biological samples, a canine femur bone and collagen fibrils harvested from a rat tail. Since the ultra-broad band-width femtosecond laser is a suitable source for performing high-resolution optical coherence tomography, a wide-field optical coherence tomography arm can be easily incorporated into the presented multimodal microscope making it a versatile optical imaging tool for noninvasive label-free bioimaging.

  3. Comparisons between conventional optical imaging and parametric indirect microscopic imaging on human skin detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guoyan; Gao, Kun; Liu, Xuefeng; Ni, Guoqiang

    2016-10-01

    We report a new method, polarization parameters indirect microscopic imaging with a high transmission infrared light source, to detect the morphology and component of human skin. A conventional reflection microscopic system is used as the basic optical system, into which a polarization-modulation mechanics is inserted and a high transmission infrared light source is utilized. The near-field structural characteristics of human skin can be delivered by infrared waves and material coupling. According to coupling and conduction physics, changes of the optical wave parameters can be calculated and curves of the intensity of the image can be obtained. By analyzing the near-field polarization parameters in nanoscale, we can finally get the inversion images of human skin. Compared with the conventional direct optical microscope, this method can break diffraction limit and achieve a super resolution of sub-100nm. Besides, the method is more sensitive to the edges, wrinkles, boundaries and impurity particles.

  4. Vortex microscope: analytical model and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masajada, Jan; Popiołek-Masajada, Agnieszka; Szatkowski, Mateusz; Plociniczak, Łukasz

    2015-11-01

    We present the analytical model describing the Gaussian beam propagation through the off axis vortex lens and the set of axially positioned ideal lenses. The model is derived on the base of Fresnel diffraction integral. The model is extended to the case of vortex lens with any topological charge m. We have shown that the Gaussian beam propagation can be represented by function G which depends on four coefficients. When propagating from one lens to another the function holds its form but the coefficient changes.

  5. Imaging of quantum Hall edge states under quasiresonant excitation by a near-field scanning optical microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, H.; Shibata, Y.; Mamyoda, S.; Ootuka, Y.; Nomura, S.; Kashiwaya, S.; Yamaguchi, M.; Akazaki, T.; Tamura, H.

    2013-12-04

    A high resolution mapping of quantum Hall edge states has been performed by locally creating electrons with small excess energies with a near-field scanning optical microscope in a dilution refrigerator. We have observed fine structures parallel to the edge in photovoltage signals, which appear only at low temperature. The observed fine structures near sample edges have been seen to shift inward with increase in magnetic field in accordance with Chklovskii Shklovskii, and Glazman model.

  6. The standardization of super resolution optical microscopic images based on DICOM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Wei; Gao, Xin

    2015-03-01

    Super resolution optical microscopy allows the capture of images with a higher resolution than the diffraction limit. However, due to the lack of a standard format, the processing, visualization, transfer, and exchange of Super Resolution Optical Microscope (SROM) images are inconvenient. In this work, we present an approach to standardize the SROM images based on the Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM) standard. The SROM images and associated information are encapsulated and converted to DICOM images based on the Visible Light Microscopic Image Information Object Definition of DICOM. The new generated SROM images in DICOM format can be displayed, processed, transferred, and exchanged by using most medical image processing tools.

  7. Ultrafast chirped optical waveform recorder using a time microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Corey Vincent

    2015-04-21

    A new technique for capturing both the amplitude and phase of an optical waveform is presented. This technique can capture signals with many THz of bandwidths in a single shot (e.g., temporal resolution of about 44 fs), or be operated repetitively at a high rate. That is, each temporal window (or frame) is captured single shot, in real time, but the process may be run repeatedly or single-shot. By also including a variety of possible demultiplexing techniques, this process is scalable to recoding continuous signals.

  8. Microscopic Abrams Strogatz model of language competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauffer, Dietrich; Castelló, Xavier; Eguíluz, Víctor M.; San Miguel, Maxi

    2007-02-01

    The differential equation of Abrams and Strogatz for the competition between two languages is compared with agent-based Monte Carlo simulations for fully connected networks as well as for lattices in one, two and three dimensions, with up to 109 agents. In the case of socially equivalent languages, agent-based models and a mean-field approximation give grossly different results.

  9. Mechanism for improving the signal-to-noise ratio in scanning optical microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milster, Tom D.; Walker, Edwin P.

    1996-08-01

    We demonstrate an improved signal-to-noise ratio in a scanning optical microscope used to read out information from a magneto-optical data storage layer. By placing a shading band in the return path of the optical system we can reduce noise by as much as 3 dB in certain spatial frequency ranges. The signal-to-noise ratio improvement arises from differences in the signal and noise distributions in the pupil of the optical system. Although the experimental results are shown only in one dimension, the concept is applicable to two-dimensional scanning of low-contrast samples.

  10. Observation of Amorphous Recording Marks Using Reflection-Mode Near-Field Scanning Optical Microscope Supported by Optical Interference Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Masaru; Mononobe, Shuji; Yusu, Keiichiro; Tadokoro, Toshiyasu; Saiki, Toshiharu

    2005-09-01

    A signal enhancing technique for a reflection-mode near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) is proposed. Optical interference between the signal light, from an aperture at the tip of a tapered optical fiber, and the reflected light, from a metallic coating around the aperture, enhances the signal intensity. We used a rewritable high-definition digital versatile disc (HD DVD) with dual recording layers as a sample medium, and demonstrated observation of amorphous recording marks on the semitransparent (the first) recording layer. In spite of low optical contrast between the crystal region and the amorphous region on this layer, we successfully observed recording marks with good contrast.

  11. Chamber for the optical manipulation of microscopic particles

    DOEpatents

    Buican, Tudor N.; Upham, Bryan D.

    1992-01-01

    A particle control chamber enables experiments to be carried out on biological cells and the like using a laser system to trap and manipulate the particles. A manipulation chamber provides a plurality of inlet and outlet ports for the particles and for fluids used to control or to contact the particles. A central manipulation area is optically accessible by the laser and includes first enlarged volumes for containing a selected number of particles for experimentation. A number of first enlarged volumes are connected by flow channels through second enlarged volumes. The second enlarged volumes act as bubble valves for controlling the interconnections between the first enlarged volumes. Electrode surfaces may be applied above the first enlarged volumes to enable experimentation using the application of electric fields within the first enlarged volumes. A variety of chemical and environmental conditions may be established within individual first enlarged volumes to enable experimental conditions for small scale cellular interactions.

  12. Multi-modal miniaturized microscope: successful merger of optical, MEMS, and electronic technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkaczyk, Tomasz S.; Rogers, Jeremy D.; Rahman, Mohammed; Christenson, Todd C.; Gaalema, Stephen; Dereniak, Eustace L.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Descour, Michael R.

    2005-12-01

    The multi-modal miniature microscope (4M) device for early cancer detection is based on micro-optical table (MOT) platform which accommodates on a chip: optical, micro-mechanical, and electronic components. The MOT is a zeroalignment optical-system concept developed for a wide variety of opto-mechanical instruments. In practical terms this concept translates into assembly errors that are smaller than the tolerances on the performance of the optical system. This paper discusses all major system elements: optical system, custom high speed CMOS detector and comb drive actuator. It also points to mutual relations between different technologies. The hybrid sol-gel lenses, their fabrication and assembling techniques, optical system parameters, and various operation modes are also discussed. A particularly interesting mode is a structured illumination technique that delivers confocal-imaging capabilities and may be used for optical sectioning. Structured illumination is produced with LIGA fabricated actuator scanning in resonance and reconstructed using sine approximation algorithm.

  13. Microscopic to Macroscopic Dynamical Models of Sociality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solis Salas, Citlali; Woolley, Thomas; Pearce, Eiluned; Dunbar, Robin; Maini, Philip; Social; Evolutionary Neuroscience Research Group (Senrg) Collaboration

    To help them survive, social animals, such as humans, need to share knowledge and responsibilities with other members of the species. The larger their social network, the bigger the pool of knowledge available to them. Since time is a limited resource, a way of optimising its use is meeting amongst individuals whilst fulfilling other necessities. In this sense it is useful to know how many, and how often, early humans could meet during a given period of time whilst performing other necessary tasks, such as food gathering. Using a simplified model of these dynamics, which comprehend encounter and memory, we aim at producing a lower-bound to the number of meetings hunter-gatherers could have during a year. We compare the stochastic agent-based model to its mean-field approximation and explore some of the features necessary for the difference between low population dynamics and its continuum limit. We observe an emergent property that could have an inference in the layered structure seen in each person's social organisation. This could give some insight into hunter-gatherer's lives and the development of the social layered structure we have today. With support from the Mexican Council for Science and Technology (CONACyT), the Public Education Secretariat (SEP), and the Mexican National Autonomous University's Foundation (Fundacion UNAM).

  14. Novel microscope-integrated stereoscopic heads-up display for intrasurgical optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Shen, Liangbo; Carrasco-Zevallos, Oscar; Keller, Brenton; Viehland, Christian; Waterman, Gar; Hahn, Paul S; Kuo, Anthony N; Toth, Cynthia A; Izatt, Joseph A

    2016-05-01

    Intra-operative optical coherence tomography (OCT) requires a display technology which allows surgeons to visualize OCT data without disrupting surgery. Previous research and commercial intrasurgical OCT systems have integrated heads-up display (HUD) systems into surgical microscopes to provide monoscopic viewing of OCT data through one microscope ocular. To take full advantage of our previously reported real-time volumetric microscope-integrated OCT (4D MIOCT) system, we describe a stereoscopic HUD which projects a stereo pair of OCT volume renderings into both oculars simultaneously. The stereoscopic HUD uses a novel optical design employing spatial multiplexing to project dual OCT volume renderings utilizing a single micro-display. The optical performance of the surgical microscope with the HUD was quantitatively characterized and the addition of the HUD was found not to substantially effect the resolution, field of view, or pincushion distortion of the operating microscope. In a pilot depth perception subject study, five ophthalmic surgeons completed a pre-set dexterity task with 50.0% (SD = 37.3%) higher success rate and in 35.0% (SD = 24.8%) less time on average with stereoscopic OCT vision compared to monoscopic OCT vision. Preliminary experience using the HUD in 40 vitreo-retinal human surgeries by five ophthalmic surgeons is reported, in which all surgeons reported that the HUD did not alter their normal view of surgery and that live surgical maneuvers were readily visible in displayed stereoscopic OCT volumes.

  15. Novel microscope-integrated stereoscopic heads-up display for intrasurgical optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Liangbo; Carrasco-Zevallos, Oscar; Keller, Brenton; Viehland, Christian; Waterman, Gar; Hahn, Paul S.; Kuo, Anthony N.; Toth, Cynthia A.; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    Intra-operative optical coherence tomography (OCT) requires a display technology which allows surgeons to visualize OCT data without disrupting surgery. Previous research and commercial intrasurgical OCT systems have integrated heads-up display (HUD) systems into surgical microscopes to provide monoscopic viewing of OCT data through one microscope ocular. To take full advantage of our previously reported real-time volumetric microscope-integrated OCT (4D MIOCT) system, we describe a stereoscopic HUD which projects a stereo pair of OCT volume renderings into both oculars simultaneously. The stereoscopic HUD uses a novel optical design employing spatial multiplexing to project dual OCT volume renderings utilizing a single micro-display. The optical performance of the surgical microscope with the HUD was quantitatively characterized and the addition of the HUD was found not to substantially effect the resolution, field of view, or pincushion distortion of the operating microscope. In a pilot depth perception subject study, five ophthalmic surgeons completed a pre-set dexterity task with 50.0% (SD = 37.3%) higher success rate and in 35.0% (SD = 24.8%) less time on average with stereoscopic OCT vision compared to monoscopic OCT vision. Preliminary experience using the HUD in 40 vitreo-retinal human surgeries by five ophthalmic surgeons is reported, in which all surgeons reported that the HUD did not alter their normal view of surgery and that live surgical maneuvers were readily visible in displayed stereoscopic OCT volumes. PMID:27231616

  16. Optical scatter imaging: a microscopic modality for the rapid morphological assay of living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boustany, Nada N.

    2007-02-01

    Tumors derived from epithelial cells comprise the majority of human tumors and their growth results from the accumulation of multiple mutations affecting cellular processes critical for tissue homeostasis, including cell proliferation and cell death. To understand these processes and address the complexity of cancer cell function, multiple cellular responses to different experimental conditions and specific genetic mutations must be analyzed. Fundamental to this endeavor is the development of rapid cellular assays in genetically defined cells, and in particular, the development of optical imaging methods that allow dynamic observation and real-time monitoring of cellular processes. In this context, we are developing an optical scatter imaging technology that is intended to bridge the gap between light and electron microscopy by rapidly providing morphometric information about the relative size and shape of non-spherical organelles, with sub-wavelength resolution. Our goal is to complement current microscopy techniques used to study cells in-vitro, especially in long-term time-lapse studies of living cells, where exogenous labels can be toxic, and electron microscopy will destroy the sample. The optical measurements are based on Fourier spatial filtering in a standard microscope, and could ultimately be incorporated into existing high-throughput diagnostic platforms for cancer cell research and histopathology of neoplastic tissue arrays. Using an engineered epithelial cell model of tumor formation, we are currently studying how organelle structure and function are altered by defined genetic mutations affecting the propensity for cell death and oncogenic potential, and by environmental conditions promoting tumor growth. This talk will describe our optical scatter imaging technology and present results from our studies on apoptosis, and the function of BCL-2 family proteins.

  17. Development of a super-resolution optical microscope for directional dark matter search experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, A.; Asada, T.; Consiglio, L.; D`Ambrosio, N.; De Lellis, G.; Di Crescenzo, A.; Di Marco, N.; Furuya, S.; Hakamata, K.; Ishikawa, M.; Katsuragawa, T.; Kuwabara, K.; Machii, S.; Naka, T.; Pupilli, F.; Sirignano, C.; Tawara, Y.; Tioukov, V.; Umemoto, A.; Yoshimoto, M.

    2016-07-01

    Nuclear emulsion is a perfect choice for a detector for directional DM search because of its high density and excellent position accuracy. The minimal detectable track length of a recoil nucleus in emulsion is required to be at least 100 nm, making the resolution of conventional optical microscopes insufficient to resolve them. Here we report about the R&D on a super-resolution optical microscope to be used in future directional DM search experiments with nuclear emulsion as a detector media. The microscope will be fully automatic, will use novel image acquisition and analysis techniques, will achieve the spatial resolution of the order of few tens of nm and will be capable of reconstructing recoil tracks with the length of at least 100 nm with high angular resolution.

  18. Development of hard X-ray dark-field microscope using full-field optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Hidekazu; Azuma, Hiroaki; Shimomura, Sho; Tsuji, Takuya; Tsusaka, Yoshiyuki; Kagoshima, Yasushi

    2016-10-01

    We develop a dark-field X-ray microscope using full-field optics based on a synchrotron beamline. Our setup consists of a condenser system and a microscope objective with an angular acceptance larger than that of the condenser. The condenser system is moved downstream from its regular position such that the focus of the condenser is behind the objective. The dark-field microscope optics are configured by excluding the converging beam from the condenser at the focal point. The image properties of the system are evaluated by observing and calculating a Siemens star test chart with 10 keV X-rays. Our setup allows easy switching to bright-field imaging.

  19. Acousto-Optic Tunable Filter Hyperspectral Microscope Imaging Method for Characterizing Spectra from Foodborne Pathogens.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hyperspectral microscope imaging (HMI) method, which provides both spatial and spectral characteristics of samples, can be effective for foodborne pathogen detection. The acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF)-based HMI method can be used to characterize spectral properties of biofilms formed by Salmon...

  20. Calculations of {sup 8}He+p elastic cross sections using a microscopic optical potential

    SciTech Connect

    Lukyanov, V. K.; Zemlyanaya, E. V.; Lukyanov, K. V.; Kadrev, D. N.; Antonov, A. N.; Gaidarov, M. K.; Massen, S. E.

    2009-08-15

    An approach to calculate microscopic optical potential with the real part obtained by a folding procedure and with the imaginary part inherent in the high-energy approximation is applied to study the {sup 8}He+p elastic-scattering data at energies of tens of MeV/nucleon. The neutron and proton density distributions obtained in different models for {sup 8}He are used in the calculations of the differential cross sections. The role of the spin-orbit potential is studied. Comparison of the calculations with the available experimental data on the elastic-scattering differential cross sections at beam energies of 15.7, 26.25, 32, 66, and 73 MeV/nucleon is performed. The problem of the ambiguities of the depths of each component of the optical potential is considered by means of the imposed physical criterion related to the known behavior of the volume integrals as functions of the incident energy. It is shown also that the role of the surface absorption is rather important, in particular for the lowest incident energies (e.g., 15.7 and 26.25 MeV/nucleon)

  1. The development of an adaptive optics system and its application to biological microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Masayuki; Tamada, Yosuke

    2016-10-01

    The improvement of the optical devices in this decade, such as the MEMS-SLM ( Micro Electro Mechanical Systems- Spatial Light Modulator ) and wave front sensor with micro lens device, is making adaptive optics commonly available. It also gives the new basis of the design of adaptive optics with the improved accuracy and the compactness. We have developed an adaptive optics bench from such a point of view, and the application to the optical microscope has attained effective results in the observation of the live cell samples. In this presentation, our recent results will be shown. The result includes analysis of blur by the fine structures in biological sample and result of the image correction by the adaptive optics.

  2. A method to determine the number of nanoparticles in a cluster using conventional optical microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Hyeonggon; Attota, Ravikiran Tondare, Vipin; Vladár, András E.; Kavuri, Premsagar

    2015-09-07

    We present a method that uses conventional optical microscopes to determine the number of nanoparticles in a cluster, which is typically not possible using traditional image-based optical methods due to the diffraction limit. The method, called through-focus scanning optical microscopy (TSOM), uses a series of optical images taken at varying focus levels to achieve this. The optical images cannot directly resolve the individual nanoparticles, but contain information related to the number of particles. The TSOM method makes use of this information to determine the number of nanoparticles in a cluster. Initial good agreement between the simulations and the measurements is also presented. The TSOM method can be applied to fluorescent and non-fluorescent as well as metallic and non-metallic nano-scale materials, including soft materials, making it attractive for tag-less, high-speed, optical analysis of nanoparticles down to 45 nm diameter.

  3. The construction and characterization of optical traps for manipulating microscopic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Tiffany; Behringer, Ernest

    2011-04-01

    Optical traps use tightly focused laser light to manipulate microscopic particles and have applications in nanofabrication, characterizing DNA, and in vitro fertilization [1]. We will describe the design, construction, and characterization of an optical trap that is capable of trapping and imaging 3 μm polystyrene spheres using a 12 mW HeNe laser. The design was based on previous work [2,3] describing how to build affordable optical traps. We will discuss trapping forces and their calibration. [4pt] [1] D.G. Grier, "A Revolution in Optical Manipulation," Nature 424, 810-816 (2003). [0pt] [2] S.P. Smith et al., "Inexpensive optical tweezers for undergraduate laboratories," Am. J. Phys. 67 (1), 26-35 (1999).[0pt] [3] J. Bechhoefer et al., "Faster, cheaper, safer optical tweezers for the undergraduate laboratory," Am. J. Phys. 70 (4), 393-400 (2001).

  4. An Auto-Focusing Method in a Microscopic Testbed for Optical Discs.

    PubMed

    Tang, X; L'Hostis, P; Xiao, Y

    2000-01-01

    An auto-focusing method in a digital image system is demonstrated that uses a standard deviation of pixel gray levels as a feedback signal. In this system, an optical microscope and a charge coupled device (CCD) camera are used to create clear pit images of optical discs. A dynamic focusing scheme is designed in the system-control software, which is able to eliminate environmental disturbances and other noises so that a fast and stable focus can be achieved. The method shows an excellent focusing accuracy. The performance and possible applications of this method are discussed. The test results for optical discs are given in this paper.

  5. Detection of Luminescent Nanodiamonds Using a Scanning Near-Field Optical Microscope with an Aperture Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shershulin, V. A.; Samoylenko, S. R.; Shenderova, O. A.; Vlasov, I. I.; Konov, V. I.

    2016-09-01

    Scanning near-fi eld optical microscopy (SNOM) with an aperture probe has been used to map the luminescence of isolated submicron diamond crystallites. 532-nm laser light was used to excite luminescence of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers. The sizes of the analyzed diamond crystallites were determined with an atomic-force microscope. The optical resolution for the lateral dimensions of the luminescing diamond crystallites was doubled on going from confocal luminescence microscopy to scanning near-fi eld optical microscopy with a 290-nm probe aperture diameter.

  6. Students' modeling of friction at the microscopic level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corpuz, Edgar De Guzman

    Research that investigates the dynamics of knowledge construction by students as they model phenomena at the microscopic level has not been extensively conducted in physics and science education in general. This research wherein I investigated the dynamics of knowledge construction of students in the context of microscopic friction is an attempt to do so. The study commenced with an investigation of the variations in the existing models of students about microscopic friction (phase I of the study). Clinical interviews were conducted with introductory physics students in order to elicit their models. A phenomenographic approach of data analysis was employed to establish the variations in students' models. Results show that students' mental models of friction at the atomic level are dominated by their macroscopic experiences. Friction at the atomic level according to most students is due to mechanical interactions (interlocking or rubbing of atoms). Can we build on these macroscopic ideas of students in order to help them construct more scientific explanations of friction at the atomic level? The second phase of the research was an investigation of the dynamics of knowledge construction of students as they constructed models of friction at the atomic level while building on their prior ideas. Individual as well as group teaching interviews were conducted with introductory physics students in order to investigate students learning trajectories and the processes they undergo as they created new models of friction at the atomic level. Results show that the span, zone of proximal development and the epistemological orientations of the students greatly influenced the extent to which they utilize scaffolding afforded to them during the model-building process. Moreover, results show that students undergo the process of incorporation and displacement during their model construction and reconstruction. In the third phase, an instructional material geared towards helping

  7. Wolter X-Ray Microscope Computed Tomography Ray-Trace Model with Preliminary Simulation Results

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, J A

    2006-02-27

    It is proposed to build a Wolter X-ray Microscope Computed Tomography System in order to characterize objects to sub-micrometer resolution. Wolter Optics Systems use hyperbolic, elliptical, and/or parabolic mirrors to reflect x-rays in order to focus or magnify an image. Wolter Optics have been used as telescopes and as microscopes. As microscopes they have been used for a number of purposes such as measuring emission x-rays and x-ray fluoresce of thin biological samples. Standard Computed Tomography (CT) Systems use 2D radiographic images, from a series of rotational angles, acquired by passing x-rays through an object to reconstruct a 3D image of the object. The x-ray paths in a Wolter X-ray Microscope will be considerably different than those of a standard CT system. There is little information about the 2D radiographic images that can be expected from such a system. There are questions about the quality, resolution and focusing range of an image created with such a system. It is not known whether characterization information can be obtained from these images and whether these 2D images can be reconstructed to 3D images of the object. A code has been developed to model the 2D radiographic image created by an object in a Wolter X-ray Microscope. This code simply follows the x-ray through the object and optics. There is no modeling at this point of other effects, such as scattering, reflection losses etc. Any object, of appropriate size, can be used in the model code. A series of simulations using a number of different objects was run to study the effects of the optics. The next step will be to use this model to reconstruct an object from the simulated data. Funding for the project ended before this goal could be accomplished. The following documentation includes: (1) background information on current X-ray imaging systems, (2) background on Wolter Optics, (3) description of the Wolter System being used, (4) purpose, limitations and development of the modeling

  8. Low Temperature Apertureless Near-field Scanning Optical Microscope for Optical Spectroscopy of Single Ge/Si Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Henry; Patil, N. G.; Levy, Jeremy

    2001-03-01

    A low-temperature apertureless near-field scanning optical microscope has been designed and constructed for the purpose of investigating the optical properties of individual Ge/Si quantum dots. The microscope fits in the 37 mm bore of a Helium vapor magneto-optic cryostat, allowing operations down to liquid helium temperatures in magnetic fields up to 8 Tesla. An in situ microscope objective focuses light onto the sample, which is scanned in the three spatial directions using a compact modular stage. An AFM/STM tip resides on the top; feedback is achieved using a quartz tuning fork oscillator. Both tip and objective are attached to inertial sliding motors that can move in fine (10 nm) steps to achieve touchdown and focus. A femtosecond optical parametric oscillator is used to excite carriers in the quantum dots both resonantly and non-resonantly; scattered luminescence from the AFM/STM tip is collected and analyzed spectrally using a 1/2 meter imaging spectrometer and a LN_2-cooled InGaAs array. We gratefully acknowledge NSF (DMR-9701725, IMR-9802784) and DARPA (DAAD-16-99-C1036) for financial support of this work.

  9. Development of a Near-Field Scanning Optical Microscope for Imaging Biological Samples in Physiological Buffer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seibel, Eric Jeffrey

    A near-field scanning optical microscope was constructed for imaging intact biological samples in physiological buffer at a resolution beyond the optical diffraction limit. Images are formed by raster scanning the sample within the near -field of the optical probe, which emits collimated light for a limited distance. The technical challenges that were encountered were making the probe, micropositioning the probe and sample with piezoelectrics, and maintaining the sample-probe separation to within the near-field ( <200 nm). By recording the measurement of probe-sample separation during a scan, a topographic image is generated simultaneously with the near-field optical image. The microscope having both imaging modalities was tested and judged fully operational by imaging fluorescently -labeled microspheres under water. The potential of near-field scanning optical microscopy for future biological research was investigated by imaging a fluorescently-labeled, biological test specimen, the single myofibril. Imaging the intact myofibril in buffered saline without chemical fixation provides a challenging, practical test for the microscope. Near-field fluorescence and topographic images of single myofibrils produced image resolution of <=q300 nm, versus ~500 nm for conventional optical microscopy. Interpretation of the images is facilitated by the protein-specific fluorescence labeling. Increasing sample thickness degrades the resolution of the fluorescence images only. Thus, biological samples having > 1 μm thickness, are the practical limit of sample thickness for generating high resolution near-field optical images, when fluorescence is collected in transmission. In contrast, the method of generating the topographic images (called lateral shear-force microscopy), has the advantage of being insensitive to sample thickness. In the topographic images of myofibrils, the change in topography and/or stiffness from the binding of antibodies was detected. The results of this

  10. Tracking sub-micron fluorescent particles in three dimensions with a microscope objective under non-design optical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, R.; Sun, Y. F.; Peng, X. F.; Yang, X. Y.

    2006-06-01

    A microscope objective designed for air medium has been used under non-design optical conditions to focus an exciting laser beam on sub-micron fluorescent particles with the emitted fluorescence received through a glass layer with a mismatched refractive index. The diffraction pattern with several clear interference fringes generated from the fluorescence emitted from a fluorescent particle changed with the particle's position along the optical axis. A scalar diffraction model developed by Gibson and Lanni (1991 J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 8 1601-13) was used to predict the diffraction patterns for various aberration conditions and to analyse the effects of the coherence properties of the fluorescence on the details of the diffraction pattern. The particle position along the optical axis, i.e. its defocus distance, could be determined based on the characteristic sizes of the particle's diffraction pattern to track the particle in three dimensions.

  11. The Development of a Heated-Stage Optical Microscope for ZBLAN Microgravity Crystallization Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Anthony; Barr, Reuben

    2016-08-01

    A heated-stage optical microscope has been developed for in-situ crystallization observation of ZBLAN glass. Traditional crystallization studies on most materials, including ZBLAN, are completed following high temperature heat treatment. The modern heated-stage microscope developed in this study permits high temperature sample microscopy data to be collected in real time. The heated stage has a high-end temperature limit of 520 ∘C with a heating ramp rate of 2.2 ∘C/second. The stage was also fitted with liquid nitrogen for rapid cooling and sample annealing up to -190 ∘C. The stage was customized to fit a Keyence VHX-2000 digital microscope with a magnification range of 100X-1000X. The microscope also has the ability to image samples using Differential Interference Contrasts (DIC) microscopy, which is used to elucidate key crystalline features not apparent with traditional optical microscopy. Additionally, the experiment was constructed to be operated on a microgravity parabolic aircraft to study the effects of microgravity on the crystallization of ZBLAN.

  12. Programmable Colored Illumination Microscopy (PCIM): A practical and flexible optical staining approach for microscopic contrast enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Chao; Sun, Jiasong; Feng, Shijie; Hu, Yan; Chen, Qian

    2016-03-01

    Programmable colored illumination microscopy (PCIM) has been proposed as a flexible optical staining technique for microscopic contrast enhancement. In this method, we replace the condenser diaphragm of a conventional microscope with a programmable thin film transistor-liquid crystal display (TFT-LCD). By displaying different patterns on the LCD, numerous established imaging modalities can be realized, such as bright field, dark field, phase contrast, oblique illumination, and Rheinberg illuminations, which conventionally rely on intricate alterations in the respective microscope setups. Furthermore, the ease of modulating both the color and the intensity distribution at the aperture of the condenser opens the possibility to combine multiple microscopic techniques, or even realize completely new methods for optical color contrast staining, such as iridescent dark-field and iridescent phase-contrast imaging. The versatility and effectiveness of PCIM is demonstrated by imaging of several transparent colorless specimens, such as unstained lung cancer cells, diatom, textile fibers, and a cryosection of mouse kidney. Finally, the potentialities of PCIM for RGB-splitting imaging with stained samples are also explored by imaging stained red blood cells and a histological section.

  13. Fractal evaluation of drug amorphicity from optical and scanning electron microscope images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavriloaia, Bogdan-Mihai G.; Vizireanu, Radu C.; Neamtu, Catalin I.; Gavriloaia, Gheorghe V.

    2013-09-01

    Amorphous materials are metastable, more reactive than the crystalline ones, and have to be evaluated before pharmaceutical compound formulation. Amorphicity is interpreted as a spatial chaos, and patterns of molecular aggregates of dexamethasone, D, were investigated in this paper by using fractal dimension, FD. Images having three magnifications of D were taken from an optical microscope, OM, and with eight magnifications, from a scanning electron microscope, SEM, were analyzed. The average FD for pattern irregularities of OM images was 1.538, and about 1.692 for SEM images. The FDs of the two kinds of images are less sensitive of threshold level. 3D images were shown to illustrate dependence of FD of threshold and magnification level. As a result, optical image of single scale is enough to characterize the drug amorphicity. As a result, the OM image at a single scale is enough to characterize the amorphicity of D.

  14. Construction of a High Resolution Microscope with Conventional and Holographic Optical Trapping Capabilities

    PubMed Central

    Butterfield, Jacqualine; Hong, Weili; Mershon, Leslie; Vershinin, Michael

    2013-01-01

    High resolution microscope systems with optical traps allow for precise manipulation of various refractive objects, such as dielectric beads 1 or cellular organelles 2,3, as well as for high spatial and temporal resolution readout of their position relative to the center of the trap. The system described herein has one such "traditional" trap operating at 980 nm. It additionally provides a second optical trapping system that uses a commercially available holographic package to simultaneously create and manipulate complex trapping patterns in the field of view of the microscope 4,5 at a wavelength of 1,064 nm. The combination of the two systems allows for the manipulation of multiple refractive objects at the same time while simultaneously conducting high speed and high resolution measurements of motion and force production at nanometer and piconewton scale. PMID:23629580

  15. Construction of a high resolution microscope with conventional and holographic optical trapping capabilities.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Jacqualine; Hong, Weili; Mershon, Leslie; Vershinin, Michael

    2013-04-22

    High resolution microscope systems with optical traps allow for precise manipulation of various refractive objects, such as dielectric beads (1) or cellular organelles (2,3), as well as for high spatial and temporal resolution readout of their position relative to the center of the trap. The system described herein has one such "traditional" trap operating at 980 nm. It additionally provides a second optical trapping system that uses a commercially available holographic package to simultaneously create and manipulate complex trapping patterns in the field of view of the microscope (4,5) at a wavelength of 1,064 nm. The combination of the two systems allows for the manipulation of multiple refractive objects at the same time while simultaneously conducting high speed and high resolution measurements of motion and force production at nanometer and piconewton scale.

  16. Full-field transmission-type angle-deviation optical microscope with reflectivity-height transformation

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Ming-Hung; Tan, Chen-Tai; Tsai, Ming-Hung; Yang, Ya-Hsin

    2015-01-01

    This full-field transmission-type three-dimensional (3D) optical microscope is constructed based on the angle deviation method (ADM) and the algorithm of reflectivity-height transformation (RHT). The surface height is proportional to the deviation angle of light passing through the object. The angle deviation and surface height can be measured based on the reflectivity closed to the critical angle using a parallelogram prism and two CCDs. PMID:26504645

  17. Optical characterization of individual semiconductor nanostructures using a scanning tunneling microscope.

    PubMed

    Tsuruoka, Tohru; Ushioda, Sukekatsu

    2004-01-01

    By injecting low-energy minority carriers from the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and analyzing the light emitted from the tip-sample gap of the STM, it is possible to study the optical and electronic properties of individual semiconductor nanostructures with an extremely high spatial resolution close to the atomic scale. This technique has been applied to investigate the transport properties of hot electrons injected into AlGaAs/GaAs quantum well structures and the optical properties of single self-assembled InAs/AlGaAs quantum dots. The physical principles, usefulness and future expectations of this novel technique are discussed.

  18. Fabrication of optical multilayer for two-color phase plate in super-resolution microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Iketaki, Yoshinori; Kitagawa, Katsuichi; Hidaka, Kohjiro; Kato, Naoki; Hirabayashi, Akira; Bokor, Nandor

    2014-07-15

    In super-resolution microscopy based on fluorescence depletion, the two-color phase plate (TPP) is an indispensable optical element, which can independently control the phase shifts for two beams of different color, i.e., the pump and erase beams. By controlling a phase shift of the erase beam through the TPP, the erase beam can be modulated into a doughnut shape, while the pump beam maintains the initial Gaussian shape. To obtain a reliable optical multiplayer (ML) for the TPP, we designed a ML with only two optical layers by performing numerical optimization. The measured phase shifts generated by the fabricated ML using interferometry correspond to the design values. The beam profiles in the focal plane are also consistent with theoretical results. Although the fabricated ML consists of only two optical layers, the ML can provide a suitable phase modulation function for the TPP in a practical super-resolution microscope.

  19. On the optical stability of high-resolution transmission electron microscopes.

    PubMed

    Barthel, J; Thust, A

    2013-11-01

    In the recent two decades the technique of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy experienced an unprecedented progress through the introduction of hardware aberration correctors and by the improvement of the achievable resolution to the sub-Ångström level. The important aspect that aberration correction at a given resolution requires also a well defined amount of optical stability has received little attention so far. Therefore we investigate the qualification of a variety of high-resolution electron microscopes to maintain an aberration corrected optical state in terms of an optical lifetime. We develop a comprehensive statistical framework for the estimation of the optical lifetime and find remarkably low values between tens of seconds and a couple of minutes. Probability curves are introduced, which inform the operator about the chance to work still in the fully aberration corrected state.

  20. Fabrication of optical multilayer for two-color phase plate in super-resolution microscope.

    PubMed

    Iketaki, Yoshinori; Kitagawa, Katsuichi; Hidaka, Kohjiro; Kato, Naoki; Hirabayashi, Akira; Bokor, Nandor

    2014-07-01

    In super-resolution microscopy based on fluorescence depletion, the two-color phase plate (TPP) is an indispensable optical element, which can independently control the phase shifts for two beams of different color, i.e., the pump and erase beams. By controlling a phase shift of the erase beam through the TPP, the erase beam can be modulated into a doughnut shape, while the pump beam maintains the initial Gaussian shape. To obtain a reliable optical multiplayer (ML) for the TPP, we designed a ML with only two optical layers by performing numerical optimization. The measured phase shifts generated by the fabricated ML using interferometry correspond to the design values. The beam profiles in the focal plane are also consistent with theoretical results. Although the fabricated ML consists of only two optical layers, the ML can provide a suitable phase modulation function for the TPP in a practical super-resolution microscope.

  1. Fission barriers in a macroscopic-microscopic model

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrowolski, A.; Pomorski, K.; Bartel, J.

    2007-02-15

    In the framework of the macroscopic-microscopic model, this study investigates fission barriers in the region of actinide nuclei. A very effective four-dimensional shape parametrization for fissioning nuclei is proposed. Taking, in particular, the left-right mass asymmetric and nonaxial shapes into account is demonstrated to have a substantial effect on fission barrier heights. The influence of proton versus neutron deformation differences on the potential energy landscape of fissioning nuclei is also discussed.

  2. A self-adaptive and nonmechanical motion autofocusing system for optical microscopes.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yufu; Zhu, Shenyu; Zhang, Ping

    2016-11-01

    For the design of a passive autofocusing (AF) system for optical microscopes, many time-consuming and tedious experiments have been performed to determine and design a better focus criterion function, owing to the sample-dependence of this function. To accelerate the development of the AF systems in optical microscopes and to increase AF speed as well as maintain the AF accuracy, this study proposes a self-adaptive and nonmechanical motion AF system. The presented AF system does not require the selection and design of a focus criterion function when it is developed. Instead, the system can automatically determine a better focus criterion function for an observed sample by analyzing the texture features of the sample and subsequently perform an AF procedure to bring the sample into focus in the objective of an optical microscope. In addition, to increase the AF speed, the Z axis scanning of the mechanical motion of the sample or the objective is replaced by focusing scanning performed by a liquid lens, which is driven by an electrical current and does not involve mechanical motion. Experiments show that the reproducibility of the results obtained with the proposed self-adaptive and nonmechanical motion AF system is better than that provided by that of traditional AF systems, and that the AF speed is 10 times faster than that of traditional AF systems. Also, the self-adaptive function increased the speed of AF process by an average of 10.5% than Laplacian and Tenegrad functions.

  3. Microscopic three-cluster model of 10Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lashko, Yu. A.; Filippov, G. F.; Vasilevsky, V. S.

    2017-02-01

    We investigate spectrum of bound and resonance states in 10Be, and scattering of alpha-particles on 6He. For this aim we make use of a three-cluster microscopic model. This model incorporates Gaussian and oscillator basis functions and reduces three-cluster Schrödinger equation to a two-body like many-channel problem with the two-cluster subsystem being in a bound or a pseudo-bound state. Much attention is given to the effects of cluster polarization on spectrum of bound and resonance states in 10Be, and on elastic and inelastic 6He + α scattering.

  4. Multifocal fluorescence microscope for fast optical recordings of neuronal action potentials.

    PubMed

    Shtrahman, Matthew; Aharoni, Daniel B; Hardy, Nicholas F; Buonomano, Dean V; Arisaka, Katsushi; Otis, Thomas S

    2015-02-03

    In recent years, optical sensors for tracking neural activity have been developed and offer great utility. However, developing microscopy techniques that have several kHz bandwidth necessary to reliably capture optically reported action potentials (APs) at multiple locations in parallel remains a significant challenge. To our knowledge, we describe a novel microscope optimized to measure spatially distributed optical signals with submillisecond and near diffraction-limit resolution. Our design uses a spatial light modulator to generate patterned illumination to simultaneously excite multiple user-defined targets. A galvanometer driven mirror in the emission path streaks the fluorescence emanating from each excitation point during the camera exposure, using unused camera pixels to capture time varying fluorescence at rates that are ∼1000 times faster than the camera's native frame rate. We demonstrate that this approach is capable of recording Ca(2+) transients resulting from APs in neurons labeled with the Ca(2+) sensor Oregon Green Bapta-1 (OGB-1), and can localize the timing of these events with millisecond resolution. Furthermore, optically reported APs can be detected with the voltage sensitive dye DiO-DPA in multiple locations within a neuron with a signal/noise ratio up to ∼40, resolving delays in arrival time along dendrites. Thus, the microscope provides a powerful tool for photometric measurements of dynamics requiring submillisecond sampling at multiple locations.

  5. Multifocal Fluorescence Microscope for Fast Optical Recordings of Neuronal Action Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Shtrahman, Matthew; Aharoni, Daniel B.; Hardy, Nicholas F.; Buonomano, Dean V.; Arisaka, Katsushi; Otis, Thomas S.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, optical sensors for tracking neural activity have been developed and offer great utility. However, developing microscopy techniques that have several kHz bandwidth necessary to reliably capture optically reported action potentials (APs) at multiple locations in parallel remains a significant challenge. To our knowledge, we describe a novel microscope optimized to measure spatially distributed optical signals with submillisecond and near diffraction-limit resolution. Our design uses a spatial light modulator to generate patterned illumination to simultaneously excite multiple user-defined targets. A galvanometer driven mirror in the emission path streaks the fluorescence emanating from each excitation point during the camera exposure, using unused camera pixels to capture time varying fluorescence at rates that are ∼1000 times faster than the camera’s native frame rate. We demonstrate that this approach is capable of recording Ca2+ transients resulting from APs in neurons labeled with the Ca2+ sensor Oregon Green Bapta-1 (OGB-1), and can localize the timing of these events with millisecond resolution. Furthermore, optically reported APs can be detected with the voltage sensitive dye DiO-DPA in multiple locations within a neuron with a signal/noise ratio up to ∼40, resolving delays in arrival time along dendrites. Thus, the microscope provides a powerful tool for photometric measurements of dynamics requiring submillisecond sampling at multiple locations. PMID:25650920

  6. Ozone enema: a model of microscopic colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Eliakim, R; Karmeli, F; Rachmilewitz, D; Cohen, P; Zimran, A

    2001-11-01

    Ozone is one of the most powerful oxidants available, with many applications in industry and medicine. Medically relevant features of ozone include bacterial and virucidal properties, disinfection, sterilization, circulatory stimulation, and disruption of malignant cells. Ozone therapy is administered in various ways, including intravenously, intramuscularly, and intrarectally. The latter modality is used for the treatment of colitis and hepatitis. Our aim was to examine the effect of ozone water enema on normal and inflamed rat colonic mucosa. Ozone water (20 microg/ml) was prepared via ozone generator and administered intrarectally (0.5 ml) daily. Rats were killed one, three, and seven days after rectal ozone water administration, and their colons resected, rinsed, and weighed (grams per 10 cm). Damage was assessed macro- and microscopically and tissue processed for myeloperoxidase and nitric oxide synthase activity. Rats receiving saline served as controls. In an additional experiment colitis was induced by intrarectal iodoacetamide. Ozone therapy caused no macroscopic damage. Ozone therapy induced microscopic colitis, which lasted for at least a week and was accompanied by increase in segmental weight, myeloperoxidase and nitric oxide activity, and prostaglandin E2 generation. Ozone therapy had no protective effect on inflamed mucosa. In conclusion, ozone water therapy had a deleterious effect on normal colonic mucosa, suggesting intrarectal administration be reevaluated. Ozone water enema may serve as a model of microscopic colitis.

  7. Dual-mode optical microscope based on single-pixel imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, A. D.; Clemente, P.; Tajahuerce, E.; Lancis, J.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate an inverted microscope that can image specimens in both reflection and transmission modes simultaneously with a single light source. The microscope utilizes a digital micromirror device (DMD) for patterned illumination altogether with two single-pixel photosensors for efficient light detection. The system, a scan-less device with no moving parts, works by sequential projection of a set of binary intensity patterns onto the sample that are codified onto a modified commercial DMD. Data to be displayed are geometrically transformed before written into a memory cell to cancel optical artifacts coming from the diamond-like shaped structure of the micromirror array. The 24-bit color depth of the display is fully exploited to increase the frame rate by a factor of 24, which makes the technique practicable for real samples. Our commercial DMD-based LED-illumination is cost effective and can be easily coupled as an add-on module for already existing inverted microscopes. The reflection and transmission information provided by our dual microscope complement each other and can be useful for imaging non-uniform samples and to prevent self-shadowing effects.

  8. Ultra-high resolution water window x ray microscope optics design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shealy, David L.; Wang, C.

    1993-01-01

    This project has been focused on the design and analysis of an ultra-high resolution water window soft-x-ray microscope. These activities have been accomplished by completing two tasks contained in the statement of work of this contract. The new results from this work confirm: (1) that in order to achieve resolutions greater than three times the wavelength of the incident radiation, it will be necessary to use spherical mirror surfaces and to use graded multilayer coatings on the secondary in order to accommodate the large variations of the angle of incidence over the secondary when operating the microscope at numerical apertures of 0.35 or greater; (2) that surface contour errors will have a significant effect on the optical performance of the microscope and must be controlled to a peak-to-valley variation of 50-100 A and a frequency of 8 periods over the surface of a mirror; and (3) that tolerance analysis of the spherical Schwarzschild microscope has been shown that the water window operations will require 2-3 times tighter tolerances to achieve a similar performance of operations with 130 A radiation. These results have been included in a manuscript included in the appendix.

  9. Wide-band acousto-optic deflectors for large field of view two-photon microscope.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Runhua; Zhou, Zhenqiao; Lv, Xiaohua; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2012-04-01

    Acousto-optic deflector (AOD) is an attractive scanner for two-photon microscopy because it can provide fast and versatile laser scanning and does not involve any mechanical movements. However, due to the small scan range of available AOD, the field of view (FOV) of the AOD-based microscope is typically smaller than that of the conventional galvanometer-based microscope. Here, we developed a novel wide-band AOD to enlarge the scan angle. Considering the maximum acceptable acoustic attenuation in the acousto-optic crystal, relatively lower operating frequencies and moderate aperture were adopted. The custom AOD was able to provide 60 MHz 3-dB bandwidth and 80% peak diffraction efficiency at 840 nm wavelength. Based on a pair of such AOD, a large FOV two-photon microscope was built with a FOV up to 418.5 μm (40× objective). The spatiotemporal dispersion was compensated simultaneously with a single custom-made prism. By means of dynamic power modulation, the variation of laser intensity within the FOV was reduced below 5%. The lateral and axial resolution of the system were 0.58-2.12 μm and 2.17-3.07 μm, respectively. Pollen grain images acquired by this system were presented to demonstrate the imaging capability at different positions across the entire FOV.

  10. Field programmable gate array based reconfigurable scanning probe/optical microscope.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Derek B; Lawrence, A J; Dzegede, Zechariah K; Hiester, Justin C; Kim, Cliff; Sánchez, Erik J

    2011-10-01

    The increasing popularity of nanometrology and nanospectroscopy has pushed researchers to develop complex new analytical systems. This paper describes the development of a platform on which to build a microscopy tool that will allow for flexibility of customization to suit research needs. The novelty of the described system lies in its versatility of capabilities. So far, one version of this microscope has allowed for successful near-field and far-field fluorescence imaging with single molecule detection sensitivity. This system is easily adapted for reflection, polarization (Kerr magneto-optical (MO)), Raman, super-resolution techniques, and other novel scanning probe imaging and spectroscopic designs. While collecting a variety of forms of optical images, the system can simultaneously monitor topographic information of a sample with an integrated tuning fork based shear force system. The instrument has the ability to image at room temperature and atmospheric pressure or under liquid. The core of the design is a field programmable gate array (FPGA) data acquisition card and a single, low cost computer to control the microscope with analog control circuitry using off-the-shelf available components. A detailed description of electronics, mechanical requirements, and software algorithms as well as examples of some different forms of the microscope developed so far are discussed.

  11. The microscopic (optical and SEM) examination of putrefaction fluid deposits (PFD). Potential interest in forensic anthropology.

    PubMed

    Charlier, P; Georges, P; Bouchet, F; Huynh-Charlier, I; Carlier, R; Mazel, V; Richardin, P; Brun, L; Blondiaux, J; Lorin de la Grandmaison, G

    2008-10-01

    This article describes the potential interest in physical and forensic anthropology of the microscopic analysis of residues of putrefaction fluid, a calcified deposit frequently found associated with bone rests. Its sampling and analysis seem straightforward and relatively reproducible. Samples came from archeological material (Monterenzio Vecchia, an Etruscan necropolis from the north of Italy dated between the fifth and third century B.C.; body rests of Agnès Sorel, royal mistress died in 1450 A.D.; skull and grave of French King Louis the XI and Charlotte of Savoy dated from 1483 A.D.). All samples were studied by direct optical microscope and scanning electron microscopy. Many cytological, histological, and elemental analysis were possible, producing precious data for the identification of these remains and, in some cases, the cause of death.

  12. Microscope-integrated optical coherence tomography for image-aided positioning of glaucoma surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiqi; Wei, Ling; Dong, Xuechuan; Huang, Ping; Zhang, Chun; He, Yi; Shi, Guohua; Zhang, Yudong

    2015-07-01

    Most glaucoma surgeries involve creating new aqueous outflow pathways with the use of a small surgical instrument. This article reported a microscope-integrated, real-time, high-speed, swept-source optical coherence tomography system (SS-OCT) with a 1310-nm light source for glaucoma surgery. A special mechanism was designed to produce an adjustable system suitable for use in surgery. A two-graphic processing unit architecture was used to speed up the data processing and real-time volumetric rendering. The position of the surgical instrument can be monitored and measured using the microscope and a grid-inserted image of the SS-OCT. Finally, experiments were simulated to assess the effectiveness of this integrated system. Experimental results show that this system is a suitable positioning tool for glaucoma surgery.

  13. Connections between the dynamical symmetries in the microscopic shell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgieva, A. I.; Drumev, K. P.

    2016-03-01

    The dynamical symmetries of the microscopic shell model appear as the limiting cases of a symmetry adapted Pairing-Plus-Quadrupole Model /PQM/, with a Hamiltonian containing isoscalar and isovector pairing and quadrupole interactions. We establish a correspondence between each of the three types of pairing bases and Elliott's SU(3) basis, that describes collective rotation of nuclear systems with quadrupole deformation. It is derived from their complementarity to the same LS coupling chain of the shell model number conserving algebra. The probability distribution of the S U(3) basis states within the pairing eigenstates is also obtained through a numerical diagonalization of the PQM Hamiltonian in each limit. We introduce control parameters, which define the phase diagram of the model and determine the role of each term of the Hamiltonian in the correct reproduction of the experimental data for the considered nuclei.

  14. Real-time restoration of white-light confocal microscope optical sections

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, Madhusudhanan; Iyengar, S. Sitharama; Beuerman, Roger W.; Reynaud, Juan; Wolenski, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Confocal microscopes (CM) are routinely used for building 3-D images of microscopic structures. Nonideal imaging conditions in a white-light CM introduce additive noise and blur. The optical section images need to be restored prior to quantitative analysis. We present an adaptive noise filtering technique using Karhunen–Loéve expansion (KLE) by the method of snapshots and a ringing metric to quantify the ringing artifacts introduced in the images restored at various iterations of iterative Lucy–Richardson deconvolution algorithm. The KLE provides a set of basis functions that comprise the optimal linear basis for an ensemble of empirical observations. We show that most of the noise in the scene can be removed by reconstructing the images using the KLE basis vector with the largest eigenvalue. The prefiltering scheme presented is faster and does not require prior knowledge about image noise. Optical sections processed using the KLE prefilter can be restored using a simple inverse restoration algorithm; thus, the methodology is suitable for real-time image restoration applications. The KLE image prefilter outperforms the temporal-average prefilter in restoring CM optical sections. The ringing metric developed uses simple binary morphological operations to quantify the ringing artifacts and confirms with the visual observation of ringing artifacts in the restored images. PMID:20186290

  15. Optical three-dimensional vibrometer microscope with picometer-resolution in x, y, and z

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rembe, Christian; Kowarsch, Robert; Ochs, Wanja; Dräbenstedt, Alexander; Giesen, Moritz; Winter, Marcus

    2014-03-01

    The state-of-the-art technique for optical vibration analysis of macroscopic structures is laser-Doppler vibrometry in which a single-laser beam measures the motion in the beam direction. Thus, three laser beams are necessary to investigate three-dimensional (3-D) motions. The laser spots can be separated on macroscopic specimens with scattering surfaces to prevent optical crosstalk between the measurement beams, but such separation is impossible for a microscopic scatter point. We demonstrate a solution for this problem: an optical 3-D vibrometer microscope with a single-impinging laser beam, which collects scattered light from at least three directions. We prove that it is possible to realize a small laser focus of <3.5-μm diameter on a proper scatter point such as an etch hole of a microelectromechanical-systems device to obtain real-time, 3-D vibration measurements with megahertz vibration bandwidth and picometer amplitude resolution. A first measurement of operational-deflection shapes is presented.

  16. Inspection of commercial optical devices for data storage using a three Gaussian beam microscope interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, J. Mauricio; Cywiak, Moises; Servin, Manuel; Juarez P, Lorenzo

    2008-09-20

    Recently, an interferometric profilometer based on the heterodyning of three Gaussian beams has been reported. This microscope interferometer, called a three Gaussian beam interferometer, has been used to profile high quality optical surfaces that exhibit constant reflectivity with high vertical resolution and lateral resolution near {lambda}. We report the use of this interferometer to measure the profiles of two commercially available optical surfaces for data storage, namely, the compact disk (CD-R) and the digital versatile disk (DVD-R). We include experimental results from a one-dimensional radial scan of these devices without data marks. The measurements are taken by placing the devices with the polycarbonate surface facing the probe beam of the interferometer. This microscope interferometer is unique when compared with other optical measuring instruments because it uses narrowband detection, filters out undesirable noisy signals, and because the amplitude of the output voltage signal is basically proportional to the local vertical height of the surface under test, thus detecting with high sensitivity. We show that the resulting profiles, measured with this interferometer across the polycarbonate layer, provide valuable information about the track profiles, making this interferometer a suitable tool for quality control of surface storage devices.

  17. Inspection of commercial optical devices for data storage using a three Gaussian beam microscope interferometer.

    PubMed

    Flores, J Mauricio; Cywiak, Moisés; Servín, Manuel; Juárez, Lorenzo

    2008-09-20

    Recently, an interferometric profilometer based on the heterodyning of three Gaussian beams has been reported. This microscope interferometer, called a three Gaussian beam interferometer, has been used to profile high quality optical surfaces that exhibit constant reflectivity with high vertical resolution and lateral resolution near lambda. We report the use of this interferometer to measure the profiles of two commercially available optical surfaces for data storage, namely, the compact disk (CD-R) and the digital versatile disk (DVD-R). We include experimental results from a one-dimensional radial scan of these devices without data marks. The measurements are taken by placing the devices with the polycarbonate surface facing the probe beam of the interferometer. This microscope interferometer is unique when compared with other optical measuring instruments because it uses narrowband detection, filters out undesirable noisy signals, and because the amplitude of the output voltage signal is basically proportional to the local vertical height of the surface under test, thus detecting with high sensitivity. We show that the resulting profiles, measured with this interferometer across the polycarbonate layer, provide valuable information about the track profiles, making this interferometer a suitable tool for quality control of surface storage devices.

  18. A Microscopic Quantal Model for Nuclear Collective Rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Gulshani, P.

    2007-10-26

    A microscopic, quantal model to describe nuclear collective rotation in two dimensions is derived from the many-nucleon Schrodinger equation. The Schrodinger equation is transformed to a body-fixed frame to decompose the Hamiltonian into a sum of intrinsic and rotational components plus a Coriolis-centrifugal coupling term. This Hamiltonian (H) is expressed in terms of space-fixed-frame particle coordinates and momenta by using commutator of H with a rotation angle. A unified-rotational-model type wavefunction is used to obtain an intrinsic Schrodinger equation in terms of angular momentum quantum number and two-body operators. A Hartree-Fock mean-field representation of this equation is then obtained and, by means of a unitary transformation, is reduced to a form resembling that of the conventional semi-classical cranking model when exchange terms and intrinsic spurious collective excitation are ignored.

  19. Enhanced microscopic nonlinear optical properties of novel Y-type chromophores with dual electron donor groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiang; Pan, Lin; Jia, Kun; Tang, Xianzhong

    2016-03-01

    In this Letter, novel Y-type chromophores with dual electron donor groups, containing either styryl or azobenzene based π-conjugated bridge structures, were synthesized and their chemical structures, molecular configuration, microscopic optical properties as well as thermal properties were systematically characterized. The experimental results indicated that eight times increasing of second-order molecular hyperpolarizability as well as 50-100 nm blue shift of maximum absorption band for azobenzene based chromophore were observed by introducing Y-type dual electron donor groups, which was derived from the highly efficient 'total charge transfer' in this kind of chromophore as confirmed by the density functional theory calculation.

  20. Electron microscopic and optical studies of prism faces of synthetic quartz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buzek, B. C.; Vagh, A. S.

    1977-01-01

    Application of electron and optical microscopic techniques to the study of growth spirals on quartz crystal faces is described. Attention is centered on the centers of the spirals and on screw ledges; overhanging kinks are revealed on one side of the spiral centers. The possibility that these special features may have developed after growth of the crystals went to completion is explored. The conjecture is raised that such structures might result from adsorption of growth-inhibiting impurities at the center of the growth spiral on the quartz habit faces.

  1. Full-field optical coherence tomography using immersion Mirau interference microscope.

    PubMed

    Lu, Sheng-Hua; Chang, Chia-Jung; Kao, Ching-Fen

    2013-06-20

    In this study, an immersion Mirau interference microscope was developed for full-field optical coherence tomography (FFOCT). Both the reference and measuring arms of the Mirau interferometer were filled with water to prevent the problems associated with imaging a sample in air with conventional FFOCT systems. The almost-common path interferometer makes the tomographic system less sensitive to environmental disturbances. En face OCT images at various depths were obtained with phase-shifting interferometry and Hariharan algorithm. This immersion interferometric method improves depth and quality in three-dimensional OCT imaging of scattering tissue.

  2. Fiber-optic laser-Doppler anemometer microscope applied to the cerebral microcirculation in rats.

    PubMed

    Seki, J; Sasaki, Y; Oyama, T; Yamamoto, J

    1996-01-01

    We have applied our developed fiber-optic laser-Doppler anemometer microscope (FLDAM) for the study of the cerebral microcirculation in the rat. The red cell velocity in single pial microvessels was successfully measured through a closed cranial window for the vessel diameter range from 7.8 to 230 microns. The temporal resolution of the FLDAM was sufficiently high to detect the pulsation in the arterioles. Arterio-venous distributions of the temporal mean red cell velocity and wall shear rate are also described.

  3. 2D microscopic model of graphene fracture properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Peter

    2015-05-01

    An analytical two-dimensional (2D) microscopic fracture model based on Morse-type interaction is derived containing no adjustable parameter. From the 2D Young’s moduli and 2D intrinsic strengths of graphene measured by nanoindentation based on biaxial tension and calculated by density functional theory for uniaxial tension the widely unknown breaking force, line or edge energy, surface energy, fracture toughness, and strain energy release rate were determined. The simulated line energy agrees well with ab initio calculations and the fracture toughness of perfect graphene sheets is in good agreement with molecular dynamics simulations and the fracture toughness evaluated for defective graphene using the Griffith relation. Similarly, the estimated critical strain energy release rate agrees well with result of various theoretical approaches based on the J-integral and surface energy. The 2D microscopic model, connecting 2D and three-dimensional mechanical properties in a consistent way, provides a versatile relationship to easily access all relevant fracture properties of pristine 2D solids.

  4. A stereo-compound hybrid microscope for combined intracellular and optical recording of invertebrate neural network activity

    PubMed Central

    Frost, William N.; Wang, Jean; Brandon, Christopher J.

    2007-01-01

    Optical recording studies of invertebrate neural networks with voltage-sensitive dyes seldom employ conventional intracellular electrodes. This may in part be due to the traditional reliance on compound microscopes for such work. While such microscopes have high light-gathering power, they do not provide depth of field, making working with sharp electrodes difficult. Here we describe a hybrid microscope design, with switchable compound and stereo objectives, that eases the use of conventional intracellular electrodes in optical recording experiments. We use it, in combination with a voltage-sensitive dye and photodiode array, to identify neurons participating in the swim motor program of the marine mollusk Tritonia. This microscope design should be applicable to optical recording studies in many preparations. PMID:17306887

  5. Binary pseudorandom test standard to determine the modulation transfer function of optical microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Novak, Erik; Trolinger, James D.; Lacey, Ian; Anderson, Erik H.; Artemiev, Nikolay A.; Babin, Sergey; Cabrini, Stefano; Calafiore, Guiseppe; Chan, Elaine R.; McKinney, Wayne R.; Peroz, Christophe; Takacs, Peter Z.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2015-09-01

    This work reports on the development of a binary pseudo-random test sample optimized to calibrate the MTF of optical microscopes. The sample consists of a number of 1-D and 2-D patterns, with different minimum sizes of spatial artifacts from 300 nm to 2 microns. We describe the mathematical background, fabrication process, data acquisition and analysis procedure to return spatial frequency based instrument calibration. We show that the developed samples satisfy the characteristics of a test standard: functionality, ease of specification and fabrication, reproducibility, and low sensitivity to manufacturing error. © (2015) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.

  6. Optical lever calibration in atomic force microscope with a mechanical lever.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hui; Vitard, Julien; Haliyo, Sinan; Régnier, Stéphane

    2008-09-01

    A novel method that uses a small mechanical lever has been developed to directly calibrate the lateral sensitivity of the optical lever in the atomic force microscope (AFM). The mechanical lever can convert the translation into a nanoscale rotation angle with a flexible hinge that provides an accurate conversion between the photodiode voltage output and torsional angle of a cantilever. During the calibration, the cantilever is mounted on a holder attached on the lever, which brings the torsional axis of the cantilever and rotation axis of the lever into line. By making use of its nanomotion on the Z-axis and using an external motion on the barrier, this device can complete the local and full-range lateral sensitivity calibrations of the optical lever without modifying the actual AFM or the cantilevers.

  7. Nonscanning three-dimensional optical microscope based on the reflectivity-height transformation for biological measurements.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Ming-Hung; Tan, Chen-Tai; Lee, Tsuan-Shih; Lee, Jain-Cheng

    2013-04-01

    We propose a nonscanning three-dimensional (3D) optical microscope based on reflectivity-height transformation in applications of biological and transparent plate measurements. The reflectivity of a prism can be transformed to the surface height of the specimen based on geometrical optics and the principle of internal reflection. Thus, the pattern of reflectivity is representative of the surface profile. Using charge-coupled device cameras to obtain the two-dimensional image patterns and combining with its reflectivity pattern, the 3D profile can be generated. The lateral resolution is determined by the diffraction limit, and the vertical resolution is better than several nanometers according to the incident angle and polarization used.

  8. Microscopic vision modeling method by direct mapping analysis for micro-gripping system with stereo light microscope.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuezong; Zhao, Zhizhong; Wang, Junshuai

    2016-04-01

    We present a novel and high-precision microscopic vision modeling method, which can be used for 3D data reconstruction in micro-gripping system with stereo light microscope. This method consists of four parts: image distortion correction, disparity distortion correction, initial vision model and residual compensation model. First, the method of image distortion correction is proposed. Image data required by image distortion correction comes from stereo images of calibration sample. The geometric features of image distortions can be predicted though the shape deformation of lines constructed by grid points in stereo images. Linear and polynomial fitting methods are applied to correct image distortions. Second, shape deformation features of disparity distribution are discussed. The method of disparity distortion correction is proposed. Polynomial fitting method is applied to correct disparity distortion. Third, a microscopic vision model is derived, which consists of two models, i.e., initial vision model and residual compensation model. We derive initial vision model by the analysis of direct mapping relationship between object and image points. Residual compensation model is derived based on the residual analysis of initial vision model. The results show that with maximum reconstruction distance of 4.1mm in X direction, 2.9mm in Y direction and 2.25mm in Z direction, our model achieves a precision of 0.01mm in X and Y directions and 0.015mm in Z direction. Comparison of our model with traditional pinhole camera model shows that two kinds of models have a similar reconstruction precision of X coordinates. However, traditional pinhole camera model has a lower precision of Y and Z coordinates than our model. The method proposed in this paper is very helpful for the micro-gripping system based on SLM microscopic vision.

  9. Camera, handlens, and microscope optical system for imaging and coupled optical spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mungas, Greg S. (Inventor); Boynton, John (Inventor); Sepulveda, Cesar A. (Inventor); Nunes de Sepulveda, legal representative, Alicia (Inventor); Gursel, Yekta (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An optical system comprising two lens cells, each lens cell comprising multiple lens elements, to provide imaging over a very wide image distance and within a wide range of magnification by changing the distance between the two lens cells. An embodiment also provides scannable laser spectroscopic measurements within the field-of-view of the instrument.

  10. Camera, handlens, and microscope optical system for imaging and coupled optical spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mungas, Greg S. (Inventor); Boynton, John (Inventor); Sepulveda, Cesar A. (Inventor); Nunes de Sepulveda, Alicia (Inventor); Gursel, Yekta (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An optical system comprising two lens cells, each lens cell comprising multiple lens elements, to provide imaging over a very wide image distance and within a wide range of magnification by changing the distance between the two lens cells. An embodiment also provides scannable laser spectroscopic measurements within the field-of-view of the instrument.

  11. A single-pixel optical-sectioning programmable array microscope (SP-PAM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Ye, P.; Arce, G. R.; Prather, D. W.

    2010-02-01

    Programmable array microscopes (PAMs) use "multi-pinhole" masks in confocal image planes to introduce illumination and block the "out-of-focus light". Compared to traditional confocal microscopes (CM), PAM systems have higher efficiency in utilizing the signal light and faster image acquisition speed. However, these advantages are gained at the cost of using more complicated optics and detectors. Compressive sampling (CS) measurement patterns can be used as pinhole masks in PAM systems. With CS patterns, the light collected after the detector mask can be summed up and used to reconstruct the imaging scene via solving an l1-minimization problem. Only a simple relay-lens and a singlepixel detector are needed to measure the intensity of the summed light. Therefore the optical complexity associated with conventional PAM systems can be reduced. Since only a single-pixel detector is needed, this system can also be called a single-pixel PAM or SP-PAM system. In this work, we introduce the design and fabrication of a prototype SP-PAM system. In this system, scrambled-block Hadamard ensembles (SBHE) are used as CS measurement patterns and a digital micromirror device (DMD) is employed to realize these patterns.

  12. Holographic microscope for measuring displacements of vibrating microbeams using time-averaged, electro-optic holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Gordon C.; Pryputniewicz, Ryszard J.

    1998-05-01

    An optical microscope, utilizing the principles of time- averaged hologram interferometry, is described for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) applications. MEMS are devices fabricated via techniques such as microphotolithography to create miniature actuators and sensors. Many of these sensors are currently deployed in automotive applications which rely on, or depend on, the dynamic behavior of the sensor, e.g., airbag sensors, ride monitoring suspensions sensors, etc. Typical dimensions of current MEMS devices are measured in micrometers, a small fraction of the diameter of a human hair, and the current trends is to further decrease the size of MEMS devices to submicrometer dimensions. However, the smaller MEMS become, the more challenging it is to measure with accuracy the dynamic characteristics of these devices. An electro-optic holographic microscope (EOHM) for the purpose of studying the dynamic behavior of MEMS type devices is described. Additionally, by performing phase measurements within an EOHM image, object displacements are determined as illustrated by representative examples. With the EOHM, devices with surface sizes ranging from approximately 35 X 400 to 5 X 18 micrometers are studied while undergoing resonant vibrations at frequencies as high as 2 MHz.

  13. Three-dimensional phase-contrast X-ray microtomography with scanning-imaging X-ray microscope optics.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Akihisa; Uesugi, Kentaro; Suzuki, Yoshio

    2013-09-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) X-ray tomographic micro-imaging system has been developed. The optical system is based on a scanning-imaging X-ray microscope (SIXM) optics, which is a hybrid system consisting of a scanning microscope optics with a one-dimensional (1D) focusing (line-focusing) device and an imaging microscope optics with a 1D objective. In the SIXM system, each 1D dataset of a two-dimensional (2D) image is recorded independently. An object is illuminated with a line-focused beam. Positional information of the region illuminated by the line-focused beam is recorded with the 1D imaging microscope optics as line-profile data. By scanning the object with the line focus, 2D image data are obtained. In the same manner as for a scanning microscope optics with a multi-pixel detector, imaging modes such as phase contrast and absorption contrast can be arbitrarily configured after the image data acquisition. By combining a tomographic scan method and the SIXM system, quantitative 3D imaging is performed. Results of a feasibility study of the SIXM for 3D imaging are shown.

  14. Optical microscope using an interferometric source of two-color, two-beam entangled photons

    DOEpatents

    Dress, William B.; Kisner, Roger A.; Richards, Roger K.

    2004-07-13

    Systems and methods are described for an optical microscope using an interferometric source of multi-color, multi-beam entangled photons. A method includes: downconverting a beam of coherent energy to provide a beam of multi-color entangled photons; converging two spatially resolved portions of the beam of multi-color entangled photons into a converged multi-color entangled photon beam; transforming at least a portion of the converged multi-color entangled photon beam by interaction with a sample to generate an entangled photon specimen beam; and combining the entangled photon specimen beam with an entangled photon reference beam within a single beamsplitter. An apparatus includes: a multi-refringent device providing a beam of multi-color entangled photons; a condenser device optically coupled to the multi-refringent device, the condenser device converging two spatially resolved portions of the beam of multi-color entangled photons into a converged multi-color entangled photon beam; a beam probe director and specimen assembly optically coupled to the condenser device; and a beam splitter optically coupled to the beam probe director and specimen assembly, the beam splitter combining an entangled photon specimen beam from the beam probe director and specimen assembly with an entangled photon reference beam.

  15. Quantum coherent optical phase modulation in an ultrafast transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Feist, Armin; Echternkamp, Katharina E; Schauss, Jakob; Yalunin, Sergey V; Schäfer, Sascha; Ropers, Claus

    2015-05-14

    Coherent manipulation of quantum systems with light is expected to be a cornerstone of future information and communication technology, including quantum computation and cryptography. The transfer of an optical phase onto a quantum wavefunction is a defining aspect of coherent interactions and forms the basis of quantum state preparation, synchronization and metrology. Light-phase-modulated electron states near atoms and molecules are essential for the techniques of attosecond science, including the generation of extreme-ultraviolet pulses and orbital tomography. In contrast, the quantum-coherent phase-modulation of energetic free-electron beams has not been demonstrated, although it promises direct access to ultrafast imaging and spectroscopy with tailored electron pulses on the attosecond scale. Here we demonstrate the coherent quantum state manipulation of free-electron populations in an electron microscope beam. We employ the interaction of ultrashort electron pulses with optical near-fields to induce Rabi oscillations in the populations of electron momentum states, observed as a function of the optical driving field. Excellent agreement with the scaling of an equal-Rabi multilevel quantum ladder is obtained, representing the observation of a light-driven 'quantum walk' coherently reshaping electron density in momentum space. We note that, after the interaction, the optically generated superposition of momentum states evolves into a train of attosecond electron pulses. Our results reveal the potential of quantum control for the precision structuring of electron densities, with possible applications ranging from ultrafast electron spectroscopy and microscopy to accelerator science and free-electron lasers.

  16. Aggressive orbital optic nerve meningioma with benign microscopic features: a case report.

    PubMed

    Amoli, F Asadi; Mehrabani, P Mansouri; Tari, A Sadeghi

    2007-12-01

    Primary optic nerve meningiomas occur at lower ages than meningiomas arising from the coverings of the brain and spinal cord. Here we report the case of a 20-year-old female with an aggressive orbital meningioma referred to the Ophthalmology Department of the Farabi Hospital in Tehran. The patient had a history of orbital meningioma from 10 years ago and several surgical resections due to tumor recurrence during these 10 years. On admission, the patient had a large orbital mass and severe proptosis. MRI images revealed a large left orbital mass with optic nerve involvement and extension to the left maxillary sinus, pterygoid fossa and the dura in the floor of the anterior fossa. Fine-needle aspiration cytology of the mass confirmed tumor recurrence. The patient first received radiotherapy due to the inoperable mass, and the tumor was resected 1.5 month later. Microscopic study showed meningotheliomatous meningioma with extensive involvement of the optic nerve and invasion of the optic disc, sclera and choroid. The interesting aspect of this case was the aggressive behavior of the tumor with intraocular invasion, despite its benign histopathological features, which led to wide exenteration of the eye together with resection of the upper and lower lids.

  17. Novel failure analysis techniques using photon probing with a scanning optical microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, E.I. Jr.; Soden, J.M.; Rife, J.L.; Barton, D.L.; Henderson, C.L.

    1993-12-31

    Three new failure analysis techniques for integrated circuits (ICs) have been developed using localized photon probing with a scanning optical microscope (SOM). The first two are light-induced voltage alteration (LIVA) imaging techniques that (1) localize open-circuited and damaged junctions and (2) image transistor logic states. The third technique uses the SOM to control logic states optically from the IC backside. LIVA images are produced by monitoring the voltage fluctuations of a constant current power supply as a laser beam is scanned over the IC. High selectivity for localizing defects has been demonstrated using the LIVA approach. Logic state mapping results, similar to previous work using biased optical beam induced current (OBIC) and laser probing approaches have also been produced using LIVA. Application of the two LIVA based techniques to backside failure analysis has been demonstrated using an infrared laser source. Optical logic state control is based upon earlier work examining transistor response to photon injection. The physics of each method and their applications for failure analysis are described.

  18. Quantum coherent optical phase modulation in an ultrafast transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feist, Armin; Echternkamp, Katharina E.; Schauss, Jakob; Yalunin, Sergey V.; Schäfer, Sascha; Ropers, Claus

    2015-05-01

    Coherent manipulation of quantum systems with light is expected to be a cornerstone of future information and communication technology, including quantum computation and cryptography. The transfer of an optical phase onto a quantum wavefunction is a defining aspect of coherent interactions and forms the basis of quantum state preparation, synchronization and metrology. Light-phase-modulated electron states near atoms and molecules are essential for the techniques of attosecond science, including the generation of extreme-ultraviolet pulses and orbital tomography. In contrast, the quantum-coherent phase-modulation of energetic free-electron beams has not been demonstrated, although it promises direct access to ultrafast imaging and spectroscopy with tailored electron pulses on the attosecond scale. Here we demonstrate the coherent quantum state manipulation of free-electron populations in an electron microscope beam. We employ the interaction of ultrashort electron pulses with optical near-fields to induce Rabi oscillations in the populations of electron momentum states, observed as a function of the optical driving field. Excellent agreement with the scaling of an equal-Rabi multilevel quantum ladder is obtained, representing the observation of a light-driven `quantum walk' coherently reshaping electron density in momentum space. We note that, after the interaction, the optically generated superposition of momentum states evolves into a train of attosecond electron pulses. Our results reveal the potential of quantum control for the precision structuring of electron densities, with possible applications ranging from ultrafast electron spectroscopy and microscopy to accelerator science and free-electron lasers.

  19. An Alternative Tapping Scanning Near-Field Optical Microscope Setup Enabling the Study of Biological Systems in Liquid Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girasole, M.; Longo, G.; Cricenti, A.

    2006-03-01

    A new aperture scanning near-field optical microscope operating in the intermittent contact mode using a non-bent optical fiber is introduced. The microscope was built modifying a classical scanning near-field optical microscope (SNOM) unit introducing a patented probe-holder (MTP) which contains a piezo-motor and a bimorph-transductor. The main advantages of the present set-up in terms of stability, versatility, optical resolution, and quality of the collected signals are described. The instrument works properly while exerting a minimum perturbation on the sample thus overcoming the major drawbacks of different SNOM-based imaging modes and allowing to study very delicate samples including living cells in physiological environment.

  20. X-ray excited optical luminescence detection by scanning near-field optical microscope: a new tool for nanoscience.

    PubMed

    Larcheri, Silvia; Rocca, Francesco; Jandard, Frank; Pailharey, Daniel; Graziola, Roberto; Kuzmin, Alexei; Purans, Juris

    2008-01-01

    Investigations of complex nanostructured materials used in modern technologies require special experimental techniques able to provide information on the structure and electronic properties of materials with a spatial resolution down to the nanometer scale. We tried to address these needs through the combination of x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) using synchrotron radiation microbeams with scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) detection of the x-ray excited optical luminescence (XEOL) signal. This new instrumentation offers the possibility to carry out a selective structural analysis of the sample surface with the subwavelength spatial resolution determined by the SNOM probe aperture. In addition, the apex of the optical fiber plays the role of a topographic probe, and chemical and topographic mappings can be simultaneously recorded. Our working XAS-SNOM prototype is based on a quartz tuning-fork head mounted on a high stability nanopositioning system; a coated optical fiber tip, operating as a probe in shear-force mode; a detection system coupled with the microscope head control system; and a dedicated software/hardware setup for synchronization of the XEOL signal detection with the synchrotron beamline acquisition system. We illustrate the possibility to obtain an element-specific contrast and to perform nano-XAS experiments by detecting the Zn K and W L(3) absorption edges in luminescent ZnO and mixed ZnWO(4)-ZnO nanostructured thin films.

  1. Delays, inaccuracies and anticipation in microscopic traffic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treiber, Martin; Kesting, Arne; Helbing, Dirk

    2006-01-01

    We generalize a wide class of time-continuous microscopic traffic models to include essential aspects of driver behaviour not captured by these models. Specifically, we consider (i) finite reaction times, (ii) estimation errors, (iii) looking several vehicles ahead (spatial anticipation), and (iv) temporal anticipation. The estimation errors are modelled as stochastic Wiener processes and lead to time-correlated fluctuations of the acceleration. We show that the destabilizing effects of reaction times and estimation errors can essentially be compensated for by spatial and temporal anticipation, that is, the combination of stabilizing and destabilizing effects results in the same qualitative macroscopic dynamics as that of the, respectively, underlying simple car-following model. In many cases, this justifies the use of simplified, physics-oriented models with a few parameters only. Although the qualitative dynamics is unchanged, multi-anticipation increase both spatial and temporal scales of stop-and-go waves and other complex patterns of congested traffic in agreement with real traffic data. Remarkably, the anticipation allows accident-free smooth driving in complex traffic situations even if reaction times exceed typical time headways.

  2. Microscopic Origin of Shear Relaxation in a Model Viscoelastic Liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashwin, J.; Sen, Abhijit

    2015-02-01

    An atomistic description of shear stress relaxation in a viscoelastic liquid is developed from first principles through accurate molecular dynamic simulations in a model Yukawa system. It is shown that the relaxation time τMex of the excess part of the shear stress autocorrelation function provides a correct measure of the relaxation process. Below a certain critical value Γc of the Coulomb coupling strength, the lifetime of local atomic connectivity τLC converges to τMex and is the microscopic origin of the relaxation. At Γ ≫Γc, i.e., in the potential energy dominated regime, τMex→τM (the Maxwell relaxation time) and can, therefore, fully account for the elastic or "solidlike" behavior. Our results can help provide a better fundamental understanding of viscoelastic behavior in a variety of strongly coupled systems such as dusty plasmas, colloids, and non-Newtonian fluids.

  3. Geometric model from microscopic theory for nuclear absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    John, Sarah; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Wilson, John W.; Tripathi, Ram K.

    1993-01-01

    A parameter-free geometric model for nuclear absorption is derived herein from microscopic theory. The expression for the absorption cross section in the eikonal approximation, taken in integral form, is separated into a geometric contribution that is described by an energy-dependent effective radius and two surface terms that cancel in an asymptotic series expansion. For collisions of light nuclei, an expression for the effective radius is derived from harmonic oscillator nuclear density functions. A direct extension to heavy nuclei with Woods-Saxon densities is made by identifying the equivalent half-density radius for the harmonic oscillator functions. Coulomb corrections are incorporated, and a simplified geometric form of the Bradt-Peters type is obtained. Results spanning the energy range from 1 MeV/nucleon to 1 GeV/nucleon are presented. Good agreement with experimental results is obtained.

  4. A microscopic lane changing process model for multilane traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Wei; Song, Wei-guo; Liu, Xiao-dong; Ma, Jian

    2013-03-01

    In previous simulations lane-changing behavior is usually assumed as an instantaneous action. However, in real traffic, lane changing is a continuing process which can seriously affect the following cars. In this paper, a microscopic lane-changing process (LCP) model is clearly described. A new idea of simplifying the lane-changing process to the car-following framework is presented by controlling fictitious cars. To verify the model, the results of flow, lane-changing frequency, and single-car velocity are extracted from experimental observations and are compared with corresponding simulation. It is found that the LCP model agrees well with actual traffic flow and lane-changing behaviors may induce a 12%-18% reduction of traffic flow. The results also reflect that most of the drivers on the two roads in a city are conservative but not aggressive to change lanes. Investigation of lane-changing frequency shows that the largest lane-changing frequency occurs at a medium density range from 15 vehs km lane to 35 vehs km lane. It also implies that the lane-changing process might strengthen velocity variation at medium density and weaken velocity variation at high density. It is hoped that the idea of this study may be helpful to promote the modeling and simulation study of traffic flow.

  5. Macrophage with gold nanorod visualized by optical-resolution and acoustic-resolution photoacoustic microscopes.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Rena; Ogasawara, Koetsu; Fujiwara, Mitsuhiro; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Saijo, Yoshifumi

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages play a key role in inflammation and they are frequently observed in vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque. In the present study, macrophages phagocytosing gold nanorod (AuNR) were observed by optical-resolution (OR) and acoustic-resolution (AR) photoacoustic microscope (PAM). The OR-PAM consisted of diode laser optically focused to 60 micron and planar ultrasonic transducer with the central frequency of 8 MHz placed under the object. AR-PAM consisted of concave ultrasonic transducer with the central frequency of 20 MHz and optical fiber through the center hole of the transducer for laser irradiation. First, PA signal from gold, silver and copper wire were measured in order to determine the best metal substrate for enhancing PA contrast. Gold generated largest PA signal. AuNR with the resonance wavelength of 1064 nm was co-cultured with the macrophages for phagocytosis. PA signal was successfully detected from macrophages with AuNR by both OR-PAM and AR-PAM. PA imaging of the macrophages with AuNR indicates inflammation in the vulnerable plaque and AR-PAM method would be applicable for clinical settings.

  6. Microscopic model for fracture of crystalline Si nanopillars during lithiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Ill; Lee, Seok Woo; Gao, Huajian; Cui, Yi; Nix, William D.

    2014-06-01

    Silicon (Si) nanostructures are attractive candidates for electrodes for Li-ion batteries because they provide both large specific charging capacity and less constraint on the volume changes that occur during Li charging. Recent experiments show that crystalline Si anodes expand highly anisotropically through the motion of a sharp phase boundary between the crystalline Si core and the lithiated amorphous Si shell. Here, we present a microscopic model to describe the size-dependent fracture of crystalline Si nanopillars (NPs) during lithiation. We derive a traction-separation law based on the plastic growth of voids, which, in turn, is used in a cohesive zone-finite element model. The model allows for both the initiation of cracking and crack growth. The initial size and spacing of the nanovoids, assumed to be responsible for the fracture, together with the computed facture toughness, are chosen to conform to recent experiments which showed the critical diameter of Si NPs to be 300-400 nm. The anisotropy of the expansion is taken into account and that leads naturally to the observed anisotropy of fracture. The computed work of fracture shows good agreement with recent experimental results and it may be possible to use it to describe the failure for other loading and geometries.

  7. Theoretical and Experimental Studies of the Electro-Optic Effect: Toward a Microscopic Understanding.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    The electro - optic effect is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The theoretical approach is based upon W.A. Harrison’s ’Bond-Orbital...Model’. The separate electronic and lattice contributions to the second-order, electro - optic susceptibility are examined within the context of this...frequency (dc) electric field is outlined. Finally, experimental measurements of the electro - optic effects in TeO2 and tl3AsAs3 have been performed and the results of these measurements are presented. (Author)

  8. Quantitative measurements of electromechanical response with a combined optical beam and interferometric atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Labuda, Aleksander; Proksch, Roger

    2015-06-22

    An ongoing challenge in atomic force microscope (AFM) experiments is the quantitative measurement of cantilever motion. The vast majority of AFMs use the optical beam deflection (OBD) method to infer the deflection of the cantilever. The OBD method is easy to implement, has impressive noise performance, and tends to be mechanically robust. However, it represents an indirect measurement of the cantilever displacement, since it is fundamentally an angular rather than a displacement measurement. Here, we demonstrate a metrological AFM that combines an OBD sensor with a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) to enable accurate measurements of the cantilever velocity and displacement. The OBD/LDV AFM allows a host of quantitative measurements to be performed, including in-situ measurements of cantilever oscillation modes in piezoresponse force microscopy. As an example application, we demonstrate how this instrument can be used for accurate quantification of piezoelectric sensitivity—a longstanding goal in the electromechanical community.

  9. Animated Optical Microscope Zoom in from Phoenix Launch to Martian Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation

    This animated camera view zooms in from NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander launch site all the way to Phoenix's Microscopy and Electrochemistry and C Eonductivity Analyzer (MECA) aboard the spacecraft on the Martian surface. The final frame shows the soil sample delivered to MECA as viewed through the Optical Microscope (OM) on Sol 17 (June 11, 2008), or the 17th Martian day.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  10. Quantitative measurements of electromechanical response with a combined optical beam and interferometric atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labuda, Aleksander; Proksch, Roger

    2015-06-01

    An ongoing challenge in atomic force microscope (AFM) experiments is the quantitative measurement of cantilever motion. The vast majority of AFMs use the optical beam deflection (OBD) method to infer the deflection of the cantilever. The OBD method is easy to implement, has impressive noise performance, and tends to be mechanically robust. However, it represents an indirect measurement of the cantilever displacement, since it is fundamentally an angular rather than a displacement measurement. Here, we demonstrate a metrological AFM that combines an OBD sensor with a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) to enable accurate measurements of the cantilever velocity and displacement. The OBD/LDV AFM allows a host of quantitative measurements to be performed, including in-situ measurements of cantilever oscillation modes in piezoresponse force microscopy. As an example application, we demonstrate how this instrument can be used for accurate quantification of piezoelectric sensitivity—a longstanding goal in the electromechanical community.

  11. Microscopic models for the study of taxpayer audit effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertotti, Maria Letizia; Modanese, Giovanni

    2016-03-01

    A microscopic dynamic model is here constructed and analyzed, describing the evolution of the income distribution in the presence of taxation and redistribution in a society in which also tax evasion and auditing processes occur. The focus is on effects of enforcement regimes, characterized by different choices of the audited taxpayer fraction and of the penalties imposed to noncompliant individuals. A complex systems perspective is adopted: society is considered as a system composed by a large number of heterogeneous individuals. These are divided into income classes and may as well have different tax evasion behaviors. The variation in time of the number of individuals in each class is described by a system of nonlinear differential equations of the kinetic discretized Boltzmann type involving transition probabilities. A priori, one could think that audits and fines should have a positive effect on the reduction of economic inequality and correspondingly of the Gini index G. According to our model, however, such effect is rather small. In contrast, the effect on the increase of the tax revenue may be significant.

  12. Advantages of microscope-integrated intraoperative online optical coherence tomography: usage in Boston keratoprosthesis type I surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebelmann, Sebastian; Steven, Philipp; Hos, Deniz; Hüttmann, Gereon; Lankenau, Eva; Bachmann, Björn; Cursiefen, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Boston keratoprosthesis (KPro) type I is a technique to treat patients with corneal diseases that are not amenable to conventional keratoplasty. Correct assembly and central implantation of the prosthesis are crucial for postoperative visual recovery. This study investigates the potential benefit of intraoperative optical coherence tomography (OCT) to monitor KPro surgery. Retrospective case series are presented for two patients who underwent Boston KPro type I implantation. The surgery in both patients was monitored intraoperatively using a commercially available intraoperative OCT (iOCT) device mounted on a surgical microscope. Microscope-integrated intraoperative OCT was able to evaluate the correct assembly and implantation of the KPro. All parts of the prosthesis were visible, and interfaces between the corneal graft and titanium backplate or anterior optics were clearly depictable. Moreover, iOCT visualized a gap between the backplate and graft in one case, and in the other case, a gap between the anterior optic and graft. Neither gap was visible with a conventional surgical microscope. The gap between the anterior optic and the graft could easily be corrected. Microscope-integrated iOCT delivers enhanced information, adding to the normal surgical microscope view during KPro surgery. Correct assembly can be controlled as well as the correct placement of the Boston KPro into the anterior chamber.

  13. Microscope basics.

    PubMed

    Sluder, Greenfield; Nordberg, Joshua J

    2013-01-01

    This chapter provides information on how microscopes work and discusses some of the microscope issues to be considered in using a video camera on the microscope. There are two types of microscopes in use today for research in cell biology-the older finite tube-length (typically 160mm mechanical tube length) microscopes and the infinity optics microscopes that are now produced. The objective lens forms a magnified, real image of the specimen at a specific distance from the objective known as the intermediate image plane. All objectives are designed to be used with the specimen at a defined distance from the front lens element of the objective (the working distance) so that the image formed is located at a specific location in the microscope. Infinity optics microscopes differ from the finite tube-length microscopes in that the objectives are designed to project the image of the specimen to infinity and do not, on their own, form a real image of the specimen. Three types of objectives are in common use today-plan achromats, plan apochromats, and plan fluorite lenses. The concept of mounting video cameras on the microscope is also presented in the chapter.

  14. Mirror-field entanglement in a microscopic model for quantum optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Kanupriya; Lin, Shih-Yuin; Hu, B. L.

    2015-08-01

    We use a microscopic model, the mirror-oscillator-field (MOF) model proposed by C. R. Galley, R. O. Behunin, and B. L. Hu [Phys. Rev. A 87, 043832 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevA.87.043832], to describe the quantum entanglement between a mirror's center-of-mass (c.m.) motion and a field. In contrast with the conventional approach where the mirror-field entanglement is understood as arising from the radiation pressure of an optical field inducing the motion of the mirror's c.m., the MOF model incorporates the dynamics of the internal degrees of freedom of the mirror that couple to the optical field directly. The major advantage in this approach is that it provides a self-consistent treatment of the three pertinent subsystems (the mirror's c.m. motion, its internal degrees of freedom, and the field) including their back-actions on each other, thereby giving a more accurate account of the quantum correlations between the individual subsystems. The optical and the mechanical properties of a mirror arising from its dynamical interaction with a quantum field are obtained without imposing any boundary conditions on the field additionally, as is done in the conventional way. As one of the new physical features that arise from this self-consistent treatment of the coupled optics and mechanics behavior we observe a coherent transfer of quantum correlations from the field to the mirror via its internal degrees of freedom. We find the quantum entanglement between the optical field and the mirror's center-of-mass motion upon coarse-graining over the internal degree of freedom. Further, we show that in certain parameter regimes the mirror-field entanglement is enhanced when the field interacts resonantly with the mirror's internal degree of freedom, a result which highlights the importance of including the internal structure of the mirror in quantum optomechanical considerations.

  15. Bright-field Nanoscopy: Visualizing Nano-structures with Localized Optical Contrast Using a Conventional Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suran, Swathi; Bharadwaj, Krishna; Raghavan, Srinivasan; Varma, Manoj M.

    2016-04-01

    Most methods for optical visualization beyond the diffraction limit rely on fluorescence emission by molecular tags. Here, we report a method for visualization of nanostructures down to a few nanometers using a conventional bright-field microscope without requiring additional molecular tags such as fluorophores. The technique, Bright-field Nanoscopy, is based on the strong thickness dependent color of ultra-thin germanium on an optically thick gold film. We demonstrate the visualization of grain boundaries in chemical vapour deposited single layer graphene and the detection of single 40 nm Ag nanoparticles. We estimate a size detection limit of about 2 nm using this technique. In addition to visualizing nano-structures, this technique can be used to probe fluid phenomena at the nanoscale, such as transport through 2D membranes. We estimated the water transport rate through a 1 nm thick polymer film using this technique, as an illustration. Further, the technique can also be extended to study the transport of specific ions in the solution. It is anticipated that this technique will find use in applications ranging from single-nanoparticles resolved sensing to studying nanoscale fluid-solid interface phenomena.

  16. Bright-field Nanoscopy: Visualizing Nano-structures with Localized Optical Contrast Using a Conventional Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Suran, Swathi; Bharadwaj, Krishna; Raghavan, Srinivasan; Varma, Manoj M.

    2016-01-01

    Most methods for optical visualization beyond the diffraction limit rely on fluorescence emission by molecular tags. Here, we report a method for visualization of nanostructures down to a few nanometers using a conventional bright-field microscope without requiring additional molecular tags such as fluorophores. The technique, Bright-field Nanoscopy, is based on the strong thickness dependent color of ultra-thin germanium on an optically thick gold film. We demonstrate the visualization of grain boundaries in chemical vapour deposited single layer graphene and the detection of single 40 nm Ag nanoparticles. We estimate a size detection limit of about 2 nm using this technique. In addition to visualizing nano-structures, this technique can be used to probe fluid phenomena at the nanoscale, such as transport through 2D membranes. We estimated the water transport rate through a 1 nm thick polymer film using this technique, as an illustration. Further, the technique can also be extended to study the transport of specific ions in the solution. It is anticipated that this technique will find use in applications ranging from single-nanoparticles resolved sensing to studying nanoscale fluid-solid interface phenomena. PMID:27112966

  17. A multipurpose scanning near-field optical microscope: Reflectivity and photocurrent on semiconductor and biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cricenti, A.; Generosi, R.; Barchesi, C.; Luce, M.; Rinaldi, M.

    1998-09-01

    A multipurpose scanning near field optical microscope (SNOM) operating at ambient pressure is described with the aim of characterizing the inner parts of biological molecules and any semiconductor or metal microstructure. Therefore, in addition to the requirements of reliability and mechanical stability we have carefully considered analyzing a sample with all available geometries for input/output of photons, in order to get as much information as possible. The SNOM unit consists of two separable cylindrical supports; the lower one contains the sample holder mounted on top of a piezoelectric scanner which is contained in a motor controlled x-y-z stage. A piezo-modulated stretched optical fiber with a few tens of nanometer pinhole and a shear-force apparatus mounted inside the top cylinder allow for topography measurements. The reflectivity of the sample can be measured by applying different methods: the sample can be illuminated on top by an external source, as well as by the optical fiber used for the detection of the reflectivity signal. An aperture in the lower cylinder allows for illumination of the sample on the back: in this case the fiber collects the evanescent wave induced at the top of the sample. Another aperture in the lower cylinder allows measurement of the reflected light which includes a contribution due to the interaction with the fiber. Also photocurrent experiments can be easily performed by illuminating the sample with the fiber and detecting the transmitted signal using a current-voltage converter mounted inside the top cylinder. A video-camera that can reach 170 enlargements is mounted on the top cylinder for positioning the fiber on particular regions of the sample. Reflectivity and photocurrent measurements have been performed on uncoated neurons, CsI compound, Au/GaAs, and PtSi/Si systems, reaching a resolution well below the diffraction limit.

  18. Fast photoacoustic imaging with a line scanning optical-acoustical resolution photoacoustic microscope (LS-OAR-PAM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuster, Robert; Paltauf, Guenther

    2015-07-01

    We present the concept, the setup and a preliminary experiment using optical ultrasound detection with a CCD camera combined with focused line excitation for photoacoustic microscopy. The line scanning optical-acoustical resolution photoacoustic microscope (LS-OAR-PAM) with optical ultrasound detection is capable of real-time B-scan imaging providing acoustical resolution within the individual B-scans and optical out of plane resolution up to a depth limited by optical diffusion. A 3D image is composed of reconstructed B-scan images recorded while scanning the excitation line along the sample surface. Proof of concept is shown by imaging a phantom containing black human hairs and carbon fibers. The obtained C-scan image clearly shows the different resolution in the two perpendicular directions, namely diffraction limited by optical focusing in scan direction and acoustically limited in direction parallel to line orientation by the properties of acoustic wave propagation.

  19. New tools for high-precision positioning of optical elements in high-NA microscope objectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heil, Joachim; Bauer, Tobias; Mueller, Willi; Sure, Thomas; Wesner, Joachim

    2004-02-01

    The precise positioning of the individual optical elements is essential for attaining diffraction limited performance in high-numerical-aperture (high-NA) microscope objectives. Tolerances are in the micron range or lower for high-end objectives, e.g. for broad-band scanning confocal applications, metrology objectives in general, and especially for deep ultraviolet (DUV) applications. The ever increasing demands on imaging performance ask for the continuous development and improvement of specialized measurement equipment for the production line. Our award-winning 150x/0.90-DUV-AT-infinity/0 objective for wafer inspection and metrology at 248nm employs air spacings in its doublets because of the instability of optical cements against DUV radiation. This comes however at the cost of a higher number of surfaces and even higher precision demands on their geometry, orientation and positioning. We present several tools enabling us to meet these requirements. A Fourier transform fringe analysis scheme is adapted to high-NA Fizeau interferometry for surface characterization. A white light Mirau interferometer for dimensional measurements on lens groups with sub-μm resolution enables us to keep surface distance errors lower than 2 μm. Residual aberrations of the objective are compensated for by translating special correction elements under observation of the wave-front using a DUV-Twyman-Green interferometer, which also incorporates a 903nm branch for the parfocal adjustment of the infrared (IR) autofocus feature of the objective. To adjust the shifting element for the elimination of on-axis coma, we compute an artificial (real-time) star test from the interferogram, allowing interactive manipulations of the element while monitoring their influence on the point spread function (PSF).

  20. Wave optics theory and 3-D deconvolution for the light field microscope.

    PubMed

    Broxton, Michael; Grosenick, Logan; Yang, Samuel; Cohen, Noy; Andalman, Aaron; Deisseroth, Karl; Levoy, Marc

    2013-10-21

    Light field microscopy is a new technique for high-speed volumetric imaging of weakly scattering or fluorescent specimens. It employs an array of microlenses to trade off spatial resolution against angular resolution, thereby allowing a 4-D light field to be captured using a single photographic exposure without the need for scanning. The recorded light field can then be used to computationally reconstruct a full volume. In this paper, we present an optical model for light field microscopy based on wave optics, instead of previously reported ray optics models. We also present a 3-D deconvolution method for light field microscopy that is able to reconstruct volumes at higher spatial resolution, and with better optical sectioning, than previously reported. To accomplish this, we take advantage of the dense spatio-angular sampling provided by a microlens array at axial positions away from the native object plane. This dense sampling permits us to decode aliasing present in the light field to reconstruct high-frequency information. We formulate our method as an inverse problem for reconstructing the 3-D volume, which we solve using a GPU-accelerated iterative algorithm. Theoretical limits on the depth-dependent lateral resolution of the reconstructed volumes are derived. We show that these limits are in good agreement with experimental results on a standard USAF 1951 resolution target. Finally, we present 3-D reconstructions of pollen grains that demonstrate the improvements in fidelity made possible by our method.

  1. Wave optics theory and 3-D deconvolution for the light field microscope

    PubMed Central

    Broxton, Michael; Grosenick, Logan; Yang, Samuel; Cohen, Noy; Andalman, Aaron; Deisseroth, Karl; Levoy, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Light field microscopy is a new technique for high-speed volumetric imaging of weakly scattering or fluorescent specimens. It employs an array of microlenses to trade off spatial resolution against angular resolution, thereby allowing a 4-D light field to be captured using a single photographic exposure without the need for scanning. The recorded light field can then be used to computationally reconstruct a full volume. In this paper, we present an optical model for light field microscopy based on wave optics, instead of previously reported ray optics models. We also present a 3-D deconvolution method for light field microscopy that is able to reconstruct volumes at higher spatial resolution, and with better optical sectioning, than previously reported. To accomplish this, we take advantage of the dense spatio-angular sampling provided by a microlens array at axial positions away from the native object plane. This dense sampling permits us to decode aliasing present in the light field to reconstruct high-frequency information. We formulate our method as an inverse problem for reconstructing the 3-D volume, which we solve using a GPU-accelerated iterative algorithm. Theoretical limits on the depth-dependent lateral resolution of the reconstructed volumes are derived. We show that these limits are in good agreement with experimental results on a standard USAF 1951 resolution target. Finally, we present 3-D reconstructions of pollen grains that demonstrate the improvements in fidelity made possible by our method. PMID:24150383

  2. Four-dimensional microscope- integrated optical coherence tomography to enhance visualization in glaucoma surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Pasricha, Neel Dave; Bhullar, Paramjit Kaur; Shieh, Christine; Viehland, Christian; Carrasco-Zevallos, Oscar Mijail; Keller, Brenton; Izatt, Joseph Adam; Toth, Cynthia Ann; Challa, Pratap; Kuo, Anthony Nanlin

    2017-01-01

    We report the first use of swept-source microscope-integrated optical coherence tomography (SS-MIOCT) capable of live four-dimensional (4D) (three-dimensional across time) imaging intraoperatively to directly visualize tube shunt placement and trabeculectomy surgeries in two patients with severe open-angle glaucoma and elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) that was not adequately managed by medical intervention or prior surgery. We performed tube shunt placement and trabeculectomy surgery and used SS-MIOCT to visualize and record surgical steps that benefitted from the enhanced visualization. In the case of tube shunt placement, SS-MIOCT successfully visualized the scleral tunneling, tube shunt positioning in the anterior chamber, and tube shunt suturing. For the trabeculectomy, SS-MIOCT successfully visualized the scleral flap creation, sclerotomy, and iridectomy. Postoperatively, both patients did well, with IOPs decreasing to the target goal. We found the benefit of SS-MIOCT was greatest in surgical steps requiring depth-based assessments. This technology has the potential to improve clinical outcomes. PMID:28300743

  3. Magnetic microscopic imaging with an optically pumped magnetometer and flux guides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young Jin; Savukov, Igor; Huang, Jen-Huang; Nath, Pulak

    2017-01-01

    By combining an optically pumped magnetometer (OPM) with flux guides (FGs) and by installing a sample platform on automated translation stages, we have implemented an ultra-sensitive FG-OPM scanning magnetic imaging system that is capable of detecting magnetic fields of ˜20 pT with spatial resolution better than 300 μm (expected to reach ˜10 pT sensitivity and ˜100 μm spatial resolution with optimized FGs). As a demonstration of one possible application of the FG-OPM device, we conducted magnetic imaging of micron-size magnetic particles. Magnetic imaging of such particles, including nano-particles and clusters, is very important for many fields, especially for medical cancer diagnostics and biophysics applications. For rapid, precise magnetic imaging, we constructed an automatic scanning system, which holds and moves a target sample containing magnetic particles at a given stand-off distance from the FG tips. We show that the device was able to produce clear microscopic magnetic images of 10 μm-size magnetic particles. In addition, we also numerically investigated how the magnetic flux from a target sample at a given stand-off distance is transmitted to the OPM vapor cell.

  4. Magnetic microscopic imaging with an optically pumped magnetometer and flux guides

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Young Jin; Savukov, Igor Mykhaylovich; Huang, Jen -Huang; ...

    2017-01-23

    Here, by combining an optically pumped magnetometer (OPM) with flux guides (FGs) and by installing a sample platform on automated translation stages, we have implemented an ultra-sensitive FG-OPM scanning magnetic imaging system that is capable of detecting magnetic fields of ~20 pT with spatial resolution better than 300 μm (expected to reach ~10 pT sensitivity and ~100 μm spatial resolution with optimized FGs). As a demonstration of one possible application of the FG-OPM device, we conducted magnetic imaging of micron-size magnetic particles. Magnetic imaging of such particles, including nano-particles and clusters, is very important for many fields, especially for medicalmore » cancer diagnostics and biophysics applications. For rapid, precise magnetic imaging, we constructed an automatic scanning system, which holds and moves a target sample containing magnetic particles at a given stand-off distance from the FG tips. We show that the device was able to produce clear microscopic magnetic images of 10 μm-size magnetic particles. In addition, we also numerically investigated how the magnetic flux from a target sample at a given stand-off distance is transmitted to the OPM vapor cell.« less

  5. Hybrid metrology co-optimization of critical dimension scanning electron microscope and optical critical dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaid, Alok; Osorio, Carmen; Tsai, Jamie; Bozdog, Cornel; Sendelbach, Matthew; Grubner, Eyal; Koret, Roy; Wolfling, Shay

    2014-10-01

    Work using the concept of a co-optimization-based metrology hybridization is presented. Hybrid co-optimization involves the combination of data from two or more metrology tools such that the output of each tool is improved by the output of the other tool. Here, the image analysis parameters from a critical dimension scanning electron microscope (CD-SEM) are modulated by the profile information from optical critical dimension (OCD, or scatterometry), while the OCD-extracted profile is concurrently optimized through addition of the CD-SEM CD results. The test vehicle utilized is the 14-nm technology node-based FinFET high-k/interfacial layer (HK/IL) structure. When compared with the nonhybrid approach, the correlation to reference measurements of the HK layer thickness measurement using hybrid co-optimization resulted in an improvement in relative accuracy of about 40% and in R2 from 0.81 to 0.91. The measurement of the IL thickness also shows an improvement with hybrid co-optimization: better matching to the expected conditions as well as data that contain less noise.

  6. Microscopic characteristics of the Ag(111)/ZnO(0001) interface present in optical coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zheshuai; Bristowe, Paul D.

    2007-05-01

    A first-principles computational method is used to investigate the microscopic properties of the Ag(111)/ZnO(0001) interface that is often present in optical coatings designed for solar-control windows. The mechanical stability of the interface is important and therefore the ideal work of separation has been calculated for several structural variants of the interface which have different lattice mismatches and in-plane orientations. The process by which silver atoms are deposited, cluster, and form layers on the ZnO(0001) surface has also been studied. It is found that interfaces with the O-terminated ZnO surface are stronger than those with the Zn-terminated surface. In addition, incoherent interfaces with small lattice mismatch and minimal strain are preferred. In particular, the large period (9×8) Ag/ZnO coincidence superstructure (0.1% mismatch) is found to have a significantly higher work of separation than the coherent (1×1) interface (11% mismatch). A rotated variant of the interface (2×√3) R30 (2.6% mismatch) has a work of separation that is comparable with the coincidence superstructure. Both the (9×8) and (2×√3) R30 Ag/ZnO interfaces have been observed in deposition experiments and which one is seen depends on the ambient conditions and strain state of the interface. The calculated works of separation are consistent with measured works of adhesion obtained from cantilever beam experiments.

  7. Development and Optical Testing of the Camera, Hand Lens, and Microscope Probe with Scannable Laser Spectroscopy (CHAMP-SLS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mungas, Greg S.; Gursel, Yekta; Sepulveda, Cesar A.; Anderson, Mark; La Baw, Clayton; Johnson, Kenneth R.; Deans, Matthew; Beegle, Luther; Boynton, John

    2008-01-01

    Conducting high resolution field microscopy with coupled laser spectroscopy that can be used to selectively analyze the surface chemistry of individual pixels in a scene is an enabling capability for next generation robotic and manned spaceflight missions, civil, and military applications. In the laboratory, we use a range of imaging and surface preparation tools that provide us with in-focus images, context imaging for identifying features that we want to investigate at high magnification, and surface-optical coupling that allows us to apply optical spectroscopic analysis techniques for analyzing surface chemistry particularly at high magnifications. The camera, hand lens, and microscope probe with scannable laser spectroscopy (CHAMP-SLS) is an imaging/spectroscopy instrument capable of imaging continuously from infinity down to high resolution microscopy (resolution of approx. 1 micron/pixel in a final camera format), the closer CHAMP-SLS is placed to a feature, the higher the resultant magnification. At hand lens to microscopic magnifications, the imaged scene can be selectively interrogated with point spectroscopic techniques such as Raman spectroscopy, microscopic Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (micro-LIBS), laser ablation mass-spectrometry, Fluorescence spectroscopy, and/or Reflectance spectroscopy. This paper summarizes the optical design, development, and testing of the CHAMP-SLS optics.

  8. Development and optical testing of the camera, hand lens, and microscope probe with scannable laser spectroscopy (CHAMP-SLS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mungas, Greg S.; Gürsel, Yekta; Sepulveda, Cesar A.; Anderson, Mark; La Baw, Clayton; Johnson, Kenneth R.; Deans, Matthew; Beegle, Luther; Boynton, John

    2008-08-01

    Conducting high resolution field microscopy with coupled laser spectroscopy that can be used to selectively analyze the surface chemistry of individual pixels in a scene is an enabling capability for next generation robotic and manned spaceflight missions, civil, and military applications. In the laboratory, we use a range of imaging and surface preparation tools that provide us with in-focus images, context imaging for identifying features that we want to investigate at high magnification, and surface-optical coupling that allows us to apply optical spectroscopic analysis techniques for analyzing surface chemistry particularly at high magnifications. The camera, handlens, and microscope probe with scannable laser spectroscopy (CHAMP-SLS) is an imaging/spectroscopy instrument capable of imaging continuously from infinity down to high resolution microscopy (resolution of ~1 micron/pixel in a final camera format), the closer CHAMP-SLS is placed to a feature, the higher the resultant magnification. At hand lens to microscopic magnifications, the imaged scene can be selectively interrogated with point spectroscopic techniques such as Raman spectroscopy, microscopic Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (micro-LIBS), laser ablation mass-spectrometry, Fluorescence spectroscopy, and/or Reflectance spectroscopy. This paper summarizes the optical design, development, and testing of the CHAMP-SLS optics.

  9. Optical Inverted Microscope Imaging System for Biological and Non-Biological Samples

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-11

    scaffold . The microscope has enabled us to obtain some high quality images of mammalian cells growing on patterned silk films. This work was published...in Langmuir. Currently, the microscope is been used to observed the binding of phage displaying specific peptides to various fibers (silk and cotton ...Phage peptides that have an affinity for silk or cotton fibers were obtained using a phage display library. The microscope allows the researchers

  10. Analysis of Zebrafish Kidney Development with Time-lapse Imaging Using a Dissecting Microscope Equipped for Optical Sectioning

    PubMed Central

    Perner, Birgit; Schnerwitzki, Danny; Graf, Michael; Englert, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    In order to understand organogenesis, the spatial and temporal alterations that occur during development of tissues need to be recorded. The method described here allows time-lapse analysis of normal and impaired kidney development in zebrafish embryos by using a fluorescence dissecting microscope equipped for structured illumination and z-stack acquisition. To visualize nephrogenesis, transgenic zebrafish (Tg(wt1b:GFP)) with fluorescently labeled kidney structures were used. Renal defects were triggered by injection of an antisense morpholino oligonucleotide against the Wilms tumor gene wt1a, a factor known to be crucial for kidney development. The advantage of the experimental setup is the combination of a zoom microscope with simple strategies for re-adjusting movements in x, y or z direction without additional equipment. To circumvent focal drift that is induced by temperature variations and mechanical vibrations, an autofocus strategy was applied instead of utilizing a usually required environmental chamber. In order to re-adjust the positional changes due to a xy-drift, imaging chambers with imprinted relocation grids were employed. In comparison to more complex setups for time-lapse recording with optical sectioning such as confocal laser scanning or light sheet microscopes, a zoom microscope is easy to handle. Besides, it offers dissecting microscope-specific benefits such as high depth of field and an extended working distance. The method to study organogenesis presented here can also be used with fluorescence stereo microscopes not capable of optical sectioning. Although limited for high-throughput, this technique offers an alternative to more complex equipment that is normally used for time-lapse recording of developing tissues and organ dynamics. PMID:27078207

  11. Analysis of Zebrafish Kidney Development with Time-lapse Imaging Using a Dissecting Microscope Equipped for Optical Sectioning.

    PubMed

    Perner, Birgit; Schnerwitzki, Danny; Graf, Michael; Englert, Christoph

    2016-04-07

    In order to understand organogenesis, the spatial and temporal alterations that occur during development of tissues need to be recorded. The method described here allows time-lapse analysis of normal and impaired kidney development in zebrafish embryos by using a fluorescence dissecting microscope equipped for structured illumination and z-stack acquisition. To visualize nephrogenesis, transgenic zebrafish (Tg(wt1b:GFP)) with fluorescently labeled kidney structures were used. Renal defects were triggered by injection of an antisense morpholino oligonucleotide against the Wilms tumor gene wt1a, a factor known to be crucial for kidney development. The advantage of the experimental setup is the combination of a zoom microscope with simple strategies for re-adjusting movements in x, y or z direction without additional equipment. To circumvent focal drift that is induced by temperature variations and mechanical vibrations, an autofocus strategy was applied instead of utilizing a usually required environmental chamber. In order to re-adjust the positional changes due to a xy-drift, imaging chambers with imprinted relocation grids were employed. In comparison to more complex setups for time-lapse recording with optical sectioning such as confocal laser scanning or light sheet microscopes, a zoom microscope is easy to handle. Besides, it offers dissecting microscope-specific benefits such as high depth of field and an extended working distance. The method to study organogenesis presented here can also be used with fluorescence stereo microscopes not capable of optical sectioning. Although limited for high-throughput, this technique offers an alternative to more complex equipment that is normally used for time-lapse recording of developing tissues and organ dynamics.

  12. Predictions for RHIC: Critical Overview of Microscopic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyulassy, Miklos

    1998-10-01

    The first measurements of inverse alchemy (Au+Auarrow; ?) at E_cm=200 AGeV will begin next year at RHIC. Some theorists are sticking their necks out to predicthadronic observables in this unknown energy domain, rather than fit fireballs to data as is popular at SPS. I will focus on the key uncertain assumptions and dynamical elements in current microscopic event generators and hadronic/partonic transport codes which are likely to cause neck aches next year. Topics will include entropy production and transverse energy systematics, baryon stopping, and flavor equilibration.

  13. Global analysis of isospin dependent microscopic nucleon-nucleus optical potentials in a Dirac-Brueckner-Hartree-Fock approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ruirui; Ma, Zhongyu; Zhang, Yue; Tian, Yuan; van Dalen, E. N. E.; Müther, H.

    2016-09-01

    Background: For the study of exotic nuclei it is important to have an optical model potential that is reliable not only for stable nuclei but can also be extrapolated to nuclear systems with exotic numbers of protons and neutrons. An efficient way to obtain such a potential is to develop a microscopic optical potential (MOP) based on a fundamental theory with a minimal number of free parameters, which are adjusted to describe stable nuclei all over the nuclide chart. Purpose: The choice adopted in the present work is to develop the MOP within a relativistic scheme which provides a natural and consistent relation between the spin-orbit part and the central part of the potential. The Dirac-Brueckner-Hartree-Fock (DBHF) approach provides such a microscopic relativistic scheme, which is based on a realistic nucleon-nucleon interaction and reproduces the saturation properties of symmetric nuclear matter without any adjustable parameter. Its solution using the projection technique within the subtracted T -matrix representation provides a reliable extension to asymmetric nuclear matter, which is important to describe the features of isospin asymmetric nuclei. The present work performs a global analysis of the isospin dependent nucleon-nucleus MOP based on the DBHF calculation in symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matter. Methods: The DBHF approach is used to evaluate the relativistic structure of the nucleon self-energies in nuclear matter at various densities and asymmetries. The Schrödinger equivalent potentials of finite nuclei are derived from these Dirac components by a local density approximation (LDA). The density distributions of finite nuclei are taken from the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approach with Gogny D1S force. An improved LDA approach (ILDA) is employed to get a better prediction of the scattering observables. A χ2 assessment system based on the global simulated annealing algorithm is developed to optimize the very few free components in this study. Results

  14. Angle of incidence averaging in reflectance measurements with optical microscopes for studying layered two-dimensional materials.

    PubMed

    Saigal, Nihit; Mukherjee, Amlan; Sugunakar, Vasam; Ghosh, Sandip

    2014-07-01

    Reflectance spectrum measured using an optical microscope with a large numerical aperture objective lens is shown to get modified. The change is most prominent when there are optical interference related features in the spectrum. This modification is shown to arise primarily due to the wide range of angles of incidence involved in the measurement and a simple formulation is provided to correct for this in simulations. The importance of such analysis is brought out through a reflectance contrast spectroscopy based study for identifying mono-layer and bi-layer graphene and MoS2.

  15. In-situ optical transmission electron microscope study of exciton phonon replicas in ZnO nanowires by cathodoluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shize; Tian, Xuezeng; Wang, Lifen; Wei, Jiake; Qi, Kuo; Li, Xiaomin; Xu, Zhi E-mail: xdbai@iphy.ac.cn Wang, Wenlong; Zhao, Jimin; Bai, Xuedong E-mail: xdbai@iphy.ac.cn; Wang, Enge E-mail: xdbai@iphy.ac.cn

    2014-08-18

    The cathodoluminescence spectrum of single zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires is measured by in-situ optical Transmission Electron Microscope. The coupling between exciton and longitudinal optical phonon is studied. The band edge emission varies for different excitation spots. This effect is attributed to the exciton propagation along the c axis of the nanowire. Contrary to free exciton emission, the phonon replicas are well confined in ZnO nanowire. They travel along the c axis and emit at the end surface. Bending strain increases the relative intensity of second order phonon replicas when excitons travel along the c-axis.

  16. Photon path distribution and optical responses of turbid media: theoretical analysis based on the microscopic Beer-Lambert law.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Y

    2001-08-01

    A concise theoretical treatment has been developed to describe the optical responses of a highly scattering inhomogeneous medium using functions of the photon path distribution (PPD). The treatment is based on the microscopic Beer-Lambert law and has been found to yield a complete set of optical responses by time- and frequency-domain measurements. The PPD is defined for possible photons having a total zigzag pathlength of l between the points of light input and detection. Such a distribution is independent of the absorption properties of the medium and can be uniquely determined for the medium under quantification. Therefore, the PPD can be calculated with an imaginary reference medium having the same optical properties as the medium under quantification except for the absence of absorption. One of the advantages of this method is that the optical responses, the total attenuation, the mean pathlength, etc are expressed by functions of the PPD and the absorption distribution.

  17. Dual-modal three-dimensional imaging of single cells with isometric high resolution using an optical projection tomography microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Qin; Rahn, J. Richard; Tourovskaia, Anna; Meyer, Michael G.; Neumann, Thomas; Nelson, Alan C.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2009-11-01

    The practice of clinical cytology relies on bright-field microscopy using absorption dyes like hematoxylin and eosin in the transmission mode, while the practice of research microscopy relies on fluorescence microscopy in the epi-illumination mode. The optical projection tomography microscope is an optical microscope that can generate 3-D images of single cells with isometric high resolution both in absorption and fluorescence mode. Although the depth of field of the microscope objective is in the submicron range, it can be extended by scanning the objective's focal plane. The extended depth of field image is similar to a projection in a conventional x-ray computed tomography. Cells suspended in optical gel flow through a custom-designed microcapillary. Multiple pseudoprojection images are taken by rotating the microcapillary. After these pseudoprojection images are further aligned, computed tomography methods are applied to create 3-D reconstruction. 3-D reconstructed images of single cells are shown in both absorption and fluorescence mode. Fluorescence spatial resolution is measured at 0.35 μm in both axial and lateral dimensions. Since fluorescence and absorption images are taken in two different rotations, mechanical error may cause misalignment of 3-D images. This mechanical error is estimated to be within the resolution of the system.

  18. Microscopic reversibility and macroscopic irreversibility: A lattice gas model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Cárdenas, Fernando C.; Resca, Lorenzo; Pegg, Ian L.

    2016-09-01

    We present coarse-grained descriptions and computations of the time evolution of a lattice gas system of indistinguishable particles, whose microscopic laws of motion are exactly reversible, in order to investigate how or what kind of macroscopically irreversible behavior may eventually arise. With increasing coarse-graining and number of particles, relative fluctuations of entropy rapidly decrease and apparently irreversible behavior unfolds. Although that behavior becomes typical in those limits and within a certain range, it is never absolutely irreversible for any individual system with specific initial conditions. Irreversible behavior may arise in various ways. We illustrate one possibility by replacing detailed integer occupation numbers at lattice sites with particle probability densities that evolve diffusively.

  19. An evaluation of a combined scanning probe and optical microscope for lunar regolith studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, S.; Pike, W. T.; Staufer, U.; Claus, D.; Rodenburg, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    The microscopic properties of the lunar regolith such as the shape, the surface texture and the size distribution are required for an understanding of both past surface processes and potential hazards for future human exploration [1]. To reveal the particle morphology at the sub micrometer scale, scanning-probe microscopy (SPM), first used on the 2008 Phoenix mission [1], is a proven approach; however, there are two main challenges for the measurement of lunar particles. Firstly, the SPM tip is liable to move particles during scanning, even when using the lower contact forces of the dynamic-mode imaging. Hence the particles need to be stabilised during imaging. Secondly, typically the AFM tip extends about 10 μm from its cantilever, so larger particles protruding more than this height above their substrates cannot be scanned completely. To immobilize particles and eliminate large particles during SPM scanning, micromachined Si substrates, which have been successfully applied in the Phoenix project for Mars investigation in 2008 [2], have been investigated for lunar analogue material. On these substrates micrometer pits are patterned and serve as traps to enhance the stability of the AFM scanning by grasping the particles. In addition, the diameter of pits can determine the size of dusts to be captured and reduce the adhesion for the larger dust and so eliminate the oversized particles. To extend the imaging range and assist in selecting scan areas for the SPM, we use a type of lensless optical imaging (LOM) which uses ptychographic diffractive imaging [3] to eliminate the restrictions and performance limitations of conventional focusing devices. As a reference, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) which minimizes particle-probe interactions and has the advantage of an extended depth of field, is employed to image the same particle fields at resolutions covering both the SPM and LOM. By comparing the differences and the similarities between SEM and LOM images, the

  20. Optical Detection System Model.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-01

    cases the wavelength 7 II TABLE 2 SAMPLE CONTENTS OF OPTICAL MATERIAL FILE ODSOPT.INP SRF2 3.000 0.120 13.000 9.000 0.120 0.100 0.130 0.600 0.200 0.850...N THESE ARE THE AVAILABLE FILTER TYPES: CORNING VYCOR SILICA MGF2 SRF2 VYC7905 INFRASIL SAPPHIRE MGO 1102 CDISE CBS CDTE SE ZNSE CAF2 DIAMOND

  1. Optofluidic microscopy--a method for implementing a high resolution optical microscope on a chip.

    PubMed

    Heng, Xin; Erickson, David; Baugh, L Ryan; Yaqoob, Zahid; Sternberg, Paul W; Psaltis, Demetri; Yang, Changhuei

    2006-10-01

    We report a novel microfluidics-based lensless imaging technique, termed optofluidic microscopy (OFM), and demonstrate Caenorhabditis elegans imaging with an OFM prototype that gives comparable resolution to a conventional microscope and a measured resolution limit of 490 +/- 40 nm.

  2. 14O+p elastic scattering in a microscopic cluster model

    SciTech Connect

    Descouvemont, P.; Baye, D.; Leo, F.

    2006-04-26

    The 14O+p elastic scattering is analyzed in a fully microscopic cluster model. With the Resonating Group Method associated with the microscopic R-matrix theory, phase shifts and cross sections are calculated. Data on 16O+p are used to test the precision of the model. For the 14O+p elastic scattering, an excellent agreement is found with recent experimental data. Resonances properties in 15F are discussed.

  3. The relation between a microscopic threshold-force model and macroscopic models of adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulikal, Srivatsan; Bhattacharya, Kaushik; Lapusta, Nadia

    2017-01-01

    This paper continues our recent work on the relationship between discrete contact interactions at the microscopic scale and continuum contact interactions at the macroscopic scale (Hulikal et al., J. Mech. Phys. Solids 76, 144-161, 2015). The focus of this work is on adhesion. We show that a collection of a large number of discrete elements governed by a threshold-force based model at the microscopic scale collectively gives rise to continuum fracture mechanics at the macroscopic scale. A key step is the introduction of an efficient numerical method that enables the computation of a large number of discrete contacts. Finally, while this work focuses on scaling laws, the methodology introduced in this paper can also be used to study rough-surface adhesion.

  4. a Scanning Near-Field Optical Microscope with Magneto-Optic Kerr Effect Contrast for the Imaging of Magnetic Domains with 200 Angstrom Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Thomas Joseph

    We describe the development of a scanning near -field optical microscope for magnetic domain imaging in thin-film materials. The near-field probe is a 20-40 nm Ag particle which is optically excited near the surface plasmon resonance frequency. The plasmon resonance in individual Ag particles is characterized by optical spectroscopy for light scattered from single Ag particles. The existence of a near-field form of the magneto-optic Kerr effect is confirmed. In the final form of the microscope, the Ag particle is mounted on a hemispherical glass substrate and brought to within near-field proximity of a flat sample surface. The separation of the probe and sample is regulated by a Newton ring interferometer in closed loop feedback control of a piezoelectric translator. Separation stability can be kept to less than one nanometer. Near-field magneto -optic interactions are measured with a shot-noise limited modulating ellipsometer. We measured the dependence of the near-field Kerr signal on the separation of the probe and sample for longitudinal magnetization, and suggest a potential resolution of 20-40 nm. Two-dimensional images are presented of thermo-magnetically recorded domains in a Co/Pt multilayer material, with less than 100 nm resolution. Domains with a 0.5 micron diameter and one micron spacing are clearly resolved. We discuss future improvements of the instrument and propose an ultimate resolution of 140 A.

  5. Optical-Microphysical Cirrus Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichardt, J.; Reichardt, S.; Lin, R.-F.; Hess, M.; McGee, T. J.; Starr, D. O.

    2008-01-01

    A model is presented that permits the simulation of the optical properties of cirrus clouds as measured with depolarization Raman lidars. It comprises a one-dimensional cirrus model with explicit microphysics and an optical module that transforms the microphysical model output to cloud and particle optical properties. The optical model takes into account scattering by randomly oriented or horizontally aligned planar and columnar monocrystals and polycrystals. Key cloud properties such as the fraction of plate-like particles and the number of basic crystals per polycrystal are parameterized in terms of the ambient temperature, the nucleation temperature, or the mass of the particles. The optical-microphysical model is used to simulate the lidar measurement of a synoptically forced cirrostratus in a first case study. It turns out that a cirrus cloud consisting of only monocrystals in random orientation is too simple a model scenario to explain the observations. However, good agreement between simulation and observation is reached when the formation of polycrystals or the horizontal alignment of monocrystals is permitted. Moreover, the model results show that plate fraction and morphological complexity are best parameterized in terms of particle mass, or ambient temperature which indicates that the ambient conditions affect cirrus optical properties more than those during particle formation. Furthermore, the modeled profiles of particle shape and size are in excellent agreement with in situ and laboratory studies, i.e., (partly oriented) polycrystalline particles with mainly planar basic crystals in the cloud bottom layer, and monocrystals above, with the fraction of columns increasing and the shape and size of the particles changing from large thin plates and long columns to small, more isometric crystals from cloud center to top. The findings of this case study corroborate the microphysical interpretation of cirrus measurements with lidar as suggested previously.

  6. Acoustic Models of Optical Mirrors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, V. V.; Varaksina, E. I.

    2014-01-01

    Students form a more exact idea of the action of optical mirrors if they can observe the wave field being formed during reflection. For this purpose it is possible to organize model experiments with flexural waves propagating in thin elastic plates. The direct and round edges of the plates are used as models of plane, convex and concave mirrors.…

  7. Design and Development of a Microscopic Model for Polarization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petridou, E.; Psillos, D.; Hatzikraniotis, E.; Viiri, J.

    2009-01-01

    As research shows that the knowledge and use of models and modelling by teachers is limited, particularly for predicting phenomena, we developed and applied a sequence of three representations of a simulated model focusing on polarization and specifically showing the behaviour of an atom, and forces exerted on a dipole and an insulator, when a…

  8. Prevention of electron beam transmittance for biological cell imaging using electron beam excitation-assisted optical microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuta, Masahiro; Nawa, Yasunori; Inami, Wataru; Kawata, Yoshimasa

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrated the high-spatial-resolution imaging of label-free biological cells using an electron beam excitation-assisted optical (EXA) microscope without irradiation damage by the electron beam. An EXA microscope can be used to observe a specimen with a nanometric light source excited in the Si3N4 membrane by an electron beam. The incident electron beam penetrates the Si3N4 membrane and damages the specimen. To suppress the irradiation damage of the specimen, we prevented the transmittance of the electron beam by coating the Si3N4 membrane with a gold thin film. To obtain an electron beam transmittance through the Si3N4 of 0%, a gold film of 15 nm thickness was required. By adding the gold layer, a label-free cellular structure was observed with 135-nm spatial resolution.

  9. Generalized model for incoherent detection in confocal optical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hammoum, Rachid; Hamady, Sidi Ould Saad; Fontana, Marc D

    2010-06-01

    We develop a generalized model in order to calculate the point spread functions in both the focal and the detection planes for the electric field strengths. In these calculations, based on the generalized Jones matrices, we introduce all of the interdependent parameters that could influence the spatial resolution of a confocal optical microscope. Our proposed model is more nearly complete, since we make no approximations of the scattered electric fields. These results can be successfully applied to standard confocal optical techniques to get a better understanding for more quantitative interpretations of the probe.

  10. Microscopic probabilistic model for the simulation of secondary electron emission

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, M.A.; Pivi, M.T.F.

    2002-07-29

    We provide a detailed description of a model and its computational algorithm for the secondary electron emission process. The model is based on a broad phenomenological fit to data for the secondary emission yield (SEY) and the emitted-energy spectrum. We provide two sets of values for the parameters by fitting our model to two particular data sets, one for copper and the other one for stainless steel.

  11. Model based control of dynamic atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chibum; Salapaka, Srinivasa M.

    2015-04-01

    A model-based robust control approach is proposed that significantly improves imaging bandwidth for the dynamic mode atomic force microscopy. A model for cantilever oscillation amplitude and phase dynamics is derived and used for the control design. In particular, the control design is based on a linearized model and robust H∞ control theory. This design yields a significant improvement when compared to the conventional proportional-integral designs and verified by experiments.

  12. Model based control of dynamic atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chibum; Salapaka, Srinivasa M

    2015-04-01

    A model-based robust control approach is proposed that significantly improves imaging bandwidth for the dynamic mode atomic force microscopy. A model for cantilever oscillation amplitude and phase dynamics is derived and used for the control design. In particular, the control design is based on a linearized model and robust H(∞) control theory. This design yields a significant improvement when compared to the conventional proportional-integral designs and verified by experiments.

  13. Model based control of dynamic atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chibum; Salapaka, Srinivasa M.

    2015-04-15

    A model-based robust control approach is proposed that significantly improves imaging bandwidth for the dynamic mode atomic force microscopy. A model for cantilever oscillation amplitude and phase dynamics is derived and used for the control design. In particular, the control design is based on a linearized model and robust H{sub ∞} control theory. This design yields a significant improvement when compared to the conventional proportional-integral designs and verified by experiments.

  14. Microscopic model analysis of the 6He, 6Li+28Si total reaction cross sections at the energy range 5-50 A MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Lukyanov, K. V.; Kukhtina, I. N.; Lukyanov, V. K.; Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.; Sobolev, Yu. G.; Zemlyanaya, E. V.

    2007-05-22

    The existing and some preliminary experimental data on the total cross sections of the 4,6He, 6,7Li+28Si reactions at energies E=5-50 A MeV are demonstrated. The data on 6Li,6He+28Si are analyzed in the framework of the microscopic optical potential with real and imaginary parts obtained with a help of the double-folding procedure and by using the current models of densities of the projectile nuclei. Besides, the microscopic double-folding Coulomb potential is calculated and its effect on cross sections is compared with that when one applies the traditional Coulomb potential of the uniform charge distribution. The semi-microscopic potentials are constructed from both the renormalized microscopic potentials and their derivatives to take into account collective motion effect and to improve an agreement with experimental data.

  15. Chronic monitoring of cortical hemodynamics in behaving, freely-moving rats using a miniaturized head-mounted optical microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigal, Iliya; Gad, Raanan; Koletar, Margaret; Ringuette, Dene; Stefanovic, Bojana; Levi, Ofer

    2016-03-01

    Growing interest within the neurophysiology community in assessing healthy and pathological brain activity in animals that are awake and freely-behaving has triggered the need for optical systems that are suitable for such longitudinal studies. In this work we report label-free multi-modal imaging of cortical hemodynamics in the somatosensory cortex of awake, freely-behaving rats, using a novel head-mounted miniature optical microscope. The microscope employs vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) at three distinct wavelengths (680 nm, 795 nm, and 850 nm) to provide measurements of four hemodynamic markers: blood flow speeds, HbO, HbR, and total Hb concentration, across a > 2 mm field of view. Blood flow speeds are extracted using Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging (LSCI), while oxygenation measurements are performed using Intrinsic Optical Signal Imaging (IOSI). Longitudinal measurements on the same animal are made possible over the course of > 6 weeks using a chronic window that is surgically implanted into the skull. We use the device to examine changes in blood flow and blood oxygenation in superficial cortical blood vessels and tissue in response to drug-induced absence-like seizures, correlating motor behavior with changes in blood flow and blood oxygenation in the brain.

  16. Dynamic nano-imaging of label-free living cells using electron beam excitation-assisted optical microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuta, Masahiro; Kanamori, Satoshi; Furukawa, Taichi; Nawa, Yasunori; Inami, Wataru; Lin, Sheng; Kawata, Yoshimasa; Terakawa, Susumu

    2015-11-01

    Optical microscopes are effective tools for cellular function analysis because biological cells can be observed non-destructively and non-invasively in the living state in either water or atmosphere condition. Label-free optical imaging technique such as phase-contrast microscopy has been analysed many cellular functions, and it is essential technology for bioscience field. However, the diffraction limit of light makes it is difficult to image nano-structures in a label-free living cell, for example the endoplasmic reticulum, the Golgi body and the localization of proteins. Here we demonstrate the dynamic imaging of a label-free cell with high spatial resolution by using an electron beam excitation-assisted optical (EXA) microscope. We observed the dynamic movement of the nucleus and nano-scale granules in living cells with better than 100 nm spatial resolution and a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) around 10. Our results contribute to the development of cellular function analysis and open up new bioscience applications.

  17. Microscopic pressure-cooker model for studying molecules in confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santamaria, Ruben; Adamowicz, Ludwik; Rosas-Acevedo, Hortensia

    2015-04-01

    A model for a system of a finite number of molecules in confinement is presented and expressions for determining the temperature, pressure, and volume of the system are derived. The present model is a generalisation of the Zwanzig-Langevin model because it includes pressure effects in the system. It also has general validity, preserves the ergodic hypothesis, and provides a formal framework for previous studies of hydrogen clusters in confinement. The application of the model is illustrated by an investigation of a set of prebiotic compounds exposed to varying pressure and temperature. The simulations performed within the model involve the use of a combination of molecular dynamics and density functional theory methods implemented on a computer system with a mixed CPU-GPU architecture.

  18. Modeling an optical micromachine probe

    SciTech Connect

    Mittas, A.; Dickey, F.M.; Holswade, S.C.

    1997-08-01

    Silicon micromachines are fabricated using Surface Micro-Machining (SMM) techniques. Silicon micromachines include engines that consist of orthogonally oriented linear comb drive actuators mechanically connected to a rotating gear. These gears are as small a 50-{micro}m in diameter and can be driven at rotation rates exceeding 300,000-rpm. Measuring and analyzing microengine performance is basic to micromachine development and system applications. Optical techniques offer the potential for measuring long term statistical performance data and transient responses needed to optimize designs and manufacturing techniques. The authors describe the modeling of an optical probe developed at Sandia National Laboratories. Experimental data will be compared with output from the model.

  19. Dark-gray soliton transformations: possibility to study microscopic quantum phenomena by nonlinear optical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Tenorio, C.; Serkin, V. N.; Belyaeva, T. L.; Peña-Moreno, R.; Morales-Lara, L.

    2015-01-01

    The nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) model with an external harmonic potential is one of the most important in modern science. This model makes it possible to analyze a variety of nonlinear phenomena, in nonlinear optics and laser physics, biophysics and in the theory of Bose-Einstein condensation of atoms. It is shown that the main specific feature of the dynamics of dark GP matter wave solitons in a parabolic trap is the formation of solitons with dynamically changing form-factors producing the periodic variation in the modulation depth (the degree of "blackness") of dark solitons. In general, the period of dark soliton oscillations in trapping potential depends on the specific conditions of the experiment and does not coincide with the oscillation period of a linear quantum-mechanical oscillator. In the case of an immobile pedestal in the trap, the oscillation period of the black soliton considerably increases because of the periodic transformation of the black soliton to the gray one and vice versa. Surprisingly, that if the dark soliton is superimposed on the base pedestal oscillating in the trap and displaced from the trap center, the oscillation period of the dark soliton coincides with the period of oscillations of the linear harmonic oscillator, while the dynamics of the dark soliton is similar to that of a classical particle obeying the Newton mechanics laws.

  20. Improvement of tapping-mode scanning near-field optical microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, Wenjiang; Li, Qin; Sun, Jialin; Xu, Jianhua; Zhao, Jun; Guo, Jihua

    2000-10-01

    The commercial crystal tuning fork glued with an optical fiber probe is used as the sensitive detecting element for the tapping-mode scanning near-field optical microscopy. Firstly, the single-mode optical fiber is etched down to a small diameter to decrease the burden of the tuning fork. Secondary, the fiber is etched for the second time to form the sharp tip with large cone angle. Thirdly, the fiber probe, with nanometric tip and high light throughput, is glued to tuning fork by Cyanoacrylate Adhesive. The measured quality factor, Q, of the tuning fork/optical fiber probe assembly prepared in this way is higher than 300. The optical signal is modulated to the frequency of the tuning fork by optical fiber probe as it is detecting the topography of sample. The high-resolution of the tapping- mode detector is proved by imaging the topography of the grating and biological cell.

  1. Microscopic Simulation and Macroscopic Modeling for Thermal and Chemical Non-Equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yen; Panesi, Marco; Vinokur, Marcel; Clarke, Peter

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with the accurate microscopic simulation and macroscopic modeling of extreme non-equilibrium phenomena, such as encountered during hypersonic entry into a planetary atmosphere. The state-to-state microscopic equations involving internal excitation, de-excitation, dissociation, and recombination of nitrogen molecules due to collisions with nitrogen atoms are solved time-accurately. Strategies to increase the numerical efficiency are discussed. The problem is then modeled using a few macroscopic variables. The model is based on reconstructions of the state distribution function using the maximum entropy principle. The internal energy space is subdivided into multiple groups in order to better describe the non-equilibrium gases. The method of weighted residuals is applied to the microscopic equations to obtain macroscopic moment equations and rate coefficients. The modeling is completely physics-based, and its accuracy depends only on the assumed expression of the state distribution function and the number of groups used. The model makes no assumption at the microscopic level, and all possible collisional and radiative processes are allowed. The model is applicable to both atoms and molecules and their ions. Several limiting cases are presented to show that the model recovers the classical twotemperature models if all states are in one group and the model reduces to the microscopic equations if each group contains only one state. Numerical examples and model validations are carried out for both the uniform and linear distributions. Results show that the original over nine thousand microscopic equations can be reduced to 2 macroscopic equations using 1 to 5 groups with excellent agreement. The computer time is decreased from 18 hours to less than 1 second.

  2. Use of scanning near-field optical microscope with an aperture probe for detection of luminescent nanodiamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shershulin, V. A.; Samoylenko, S. R.; Shenderova, O. A.; Konov, V. I.; Vlasov, I. I.

    2017-02-01

    The suitability of scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) to image photoluminescent diamond nanoparticles with nanoscale resolution is demonstrated. Isolated diamond nanocrystals with an average size of 100 nm, containing negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV-) centers, were chosen as tested material. The NV- luminescence was stimulated by continuous 532 nm laser light. Sizes of analyzed crystallites were monitored by an atomic force microscope. The lateral resolution of the order of 100 nm was reached in SNOM imaging of diamond nanoparticles using 150 nm square aperture of the probe.

  3. Laboratory-size three-dimensional water-window x-ray microscope with Wolter type I mirror optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohsuka, Shinji; Ohba, Akira; Onoda, Shinobu; Nakamoto, Katsuhiro; Nakano, Tomoyasu; Miyoshi, Motosuke; Soda, Keita; Hamakubo, Takao

    2016-01-01

    We constructed a laboratory-size three-dimensional water-window x-ray microscope that combines wide-field transmission x-ray microscopy with tomographic reconstruction techniques. It consists of an electron-impact x-ray source emitting oxygen Kα x-rays, Wolter type I grazing incidence mirror optics, and a back-illuminated CCD for x-ray imaging. A spatial resolution limit better than 1.0 line pairs per micrometer was obtained for two-dimensional transmission images, and 1-μm-scale three-dimensional fine structures were resolved.

  4. Laboratory-size three-dimensional water-window x-ray microscope with Wolter type I mirror optics

    SciTech Connect

    Ohsuka, Shinji; Ohba, Akira; Onoda, Shinobu; Nakamoto, Katsuhiro; Nakano, Tomoyasu; Miyoshi, Motosuke; Soda, Keita; Hamakubo, Takao

    2016-01-28

    We constructed a laboratory-size three-dimensional water-window x-ray microscope that combines wide-field transmission x-ray microscopy with tomographic reconstruction techniques. It consists of an electron-impact x-ray source emitting oxygen Kα x-rays, Wolter type I grazing incidence mirror optics, and a back-illuminated CCD for x-ray imaging. A spatial resolution limit better than 1.0 line pairs per micrometer was obtained for two-dimensional transmission images, and 1-μm-scale three-dimensional fine structures were resolved.

  5. A stochastic microscopic model for the dynamics of antigenic variation.

    PubMed

    Guerberoff, Gustavo; Alvarez-Valin, Fernando

    2015-09-07

    We present a novel model that describes the within-host evolutionary dynamics of parasites undergoing antigenic variation. The approach uses a multi-type branching process with two types of entities defined according to their relationship with the immune system: clans of resistant parasitic cells (i.e. groups of cells sharing the same antigen not yet recognized by the immune system) that may become sensitive, and individual sensitive cells that can acquire a new resistance thus giving rise to the emergence of a new clan. The simplicity of the model allows analytical treatment to determine the subcritical and supercritical regimes in the space of parameters. By incorporating a density-dependent mechanism the model is able to capture additional relevant features observed in experimental data, such as the characteristic parasitemia waves. In summary our approach provides a new general framework to address the dynamics of antigenic variation which can be easily adapted to cope with broader and more complex situations.

  6. A microscopic modeling of the instant coffee effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isoda, M.; Nishimori, Y.

    2014-03-01

    So-called the instant coffee effect is well known in the field of the physics education. The effect is explained that the sound yielded by touching the cup with a spoon is shifted to low-pitched by adulterating bubble owing to putting a spoon of instant coffee into hot water. The phenomenon has been interpreted with the averaged density and compressibility of the fluid in the macroscopic relation for the sound velocity, . We introduce the linear coupled oscillator model with finite oscillators including the impurity air-mass oscillator. The model may well reproduce the increase in the shift of the eigen frequency accompanying with the amount of bubble.

  7. Improved AWG Fourier optics model.

    PubMed

    Molina-Fernández, I; Wangüemert-Pérez, J

    2004-10-04

    In this paper we present an improved Fourier Optics model to calculate the transmission characteristics between any arbitrary pair of input/output ports (IOPs) of an Arrayed Waveguide Grating (AWG). In this model the input and output sections of the AWG are modeled using the same approximations, thus removing some reciprocity-related inconsistencies present in previously existing models. The expressions which summarize the model are compact and easily interpretable. Simple quasi-analytical expressions are also derived under the Gaussian approximation of the mode field profiles.

  8. Density dependence of microscopic nucleon optical potential in first order Brueckner theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saliem, S. M.; Haider, W.

    2002-06-01

    In the present work we apply the lowest order Brueckner theory of infinite nuclear matter to obtain nucleon-nucleus optical potential for p-40Ca elastic scattering at 200 MeV using Urbana V14 soft core internucleon potential. We have investigated the effect of target density on the calculated nucleon-nucleus optical potential. We find that the calculated optical potentials depend quite sensitively on the density distribution of the target nucleus. The important feature is that the real part of calculated central optical potential for all densities shows a wine-bottle-bottom type behaviour at this energy. We also discuss the effect of our new radial dependent effective mass correction. Finally, we compare the prediction of our calculated nucleon optical potential using V14 with the prediction using older hard core Hamada-Johnston internucleon potential for p-40Ca elastic scattering at 200 MeV.

  9. Signal of microstrip scanning near-field optical microscope in far- and near-field zones.

    PubMed

    Morozov, Yevhenii M; Lapchuk, Anatoliy S

    2016-05-01

    An analytical model of interference between an electromagnetic field of fundamental quasi-TM(EH)00-mode and an electromagnetic field of background radiation at the apex of a near-field probe based on an optical plasmon microstrip line (microstrip probe) has been proposed. The condition of the occurrence of electromagnetic energy reverse flux at the apex of the microstrip probe was obtained. It has been shown that the nature of the interference depends on the length of the probe. Numerical simulation of the sample scanning process was conducted in illumination-reflection and illumination-collection modes. Results of numerical simulation have shown that interference affects the scanning signal in both modes. However, in illumination-collection mode (pure near-field mode), the signal shape and its polarity are practically insensible to probe length change; only signal amplitude (contrast) is slightly changed. However, changing the probe length strongly affects the signal amplitude and shape in the illumination-reflection mode (the signal formed in the far-field zone). Thus, we can conclude that even small background radiation can significantly influence the signal in the far-field zone and has practically no influence on a pure near-field signal.

  10. An effective model for microscopic intrinsic localized modes.

    SciTech Connect

    Kalosakas, G.; Bishop, A. R.

    2001-01-01

    We present a system of coupled degrees of freedom that can effectively describe the localization of intra-molecular excitations in the charge transfer solid PtCl. These excitations correspond to the Raman active motion of chlorines (symmetric Pt - Cl stretching). By fitting two parameters of the model we obtain an accurate description of the strong red-shifts that appear in the overtone Raman spectra of the isotopically pure material. The resulting intrinsic localized modes extend on length scales of the order of nanometers. With the same set of parameters the model can reproduce the specific structure of the Raman spectra of naturally abundant PtCl, which contains a random distribution of chloride isotopes.

  11. From microscopic taxation and redistribution models to macroscopic income distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertotti, Maria Letizia; Modanese, Giovanni

    2011-10-01

    We present here a general framework, expressed by a system of nonlinear differential equations, suitable for the modeling of taxation and redistribution in a closed society. This framework allows one to describe the evolution of income distribution over the population and to explain the emergence of collective features based on knowledge of the individual interactions. By making different choices of the framework parameters, we construct different models, whose long-time behavior is then investigated. Asymptotic stationary distributions are found, which enjoy similar properties as those observed in empirical distributions. In particular, they exhibit power law tails of Pareto type and their Lorenz curves and Gini indices are consistent with some real world ones.

  12. Microscopic Shell Model Calculations for sd-Shell Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Bruce R.; Dikmen, Erdal; Maris, Pieter; Shirokov, Andrey M.; Smirnova, Nadya A.; Vary, James P.

    Several techniques now exist for performing detailed and accurate calculations of the structure of light nuclei, i.e., A ≤ 16. Going to heavier nuclei requires new techniques or extensions of old ones. One of these is the so-called No Core Shell Model (NCSM) with a Core approach, which involves an Okubo-Lee-Suzuki (OLS) transformation of a converged NCSM result into a single major shell, such as the sd-shell. The obtained effective two-body matrix elements can be separated into core and single-particle (s.p.) energies plus residual two-body interactions, which can be used for performing standard shell-model (SSM) calculations. As an example, an application of this procedure will be given for nuclei at the beginning ofthe sd-shell.

  13. A novel optical microscope for imaging large embryos and tissue volumes with sub-cellular resolution throughout

    PubMed Central

    McConnell, Gail; Trägårdh, Johanna; Amor, Rumelo; Dempster, John; Reid, Es; Amos, William Bradshaw

    2016-01-01

    Current optical microscope objectives of low magnification have low numerical aperture and therefore have too little depth resolution and discrimination to perform well in confocal and nonlinear microscopy. This is a serious limitation in important areas, including the phenotypic screening of human genes in transgenic mice by study of embryos undergoing advanced organogenesis. We have built an optical lens system for 3D imaging of objects up to 6 mm wide and 3 mm thick with depth resolution of only a few microns instead of the tens of microns currently attained, allowing sub-cellular detail to be resolved throughout the volume. We present this lens, called the Mesolens, with performance data and images from biological specimens including confocal images of whole fixed and intact fluorescently-stained 12.5-day old mouse embryos. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18659.001 PMID:27661778

  14. Three-dimensional force microscope: A nanometric optical tracking and magnetic manipulation system for the biomedical sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, J. K.; Cummings, J. R.; Desai, K. V.; Vicci, L.; Wilde, B.; Keller, K.; Weigle, C.; Bishop, G.; Taylor, R. M.; Davis, C. W.; Boucher, R. C.; O'Brien, E. Timothy; Superfine, R.

    2005-05-01

    We report here the development of a three-dimensional (3D) magnetic force microscope for applying forces to and measuring responses of biological systems and materials. This instrument combines a conventional optical microscope with a free-floating or specifically bound magnetic bead used as a mechanical probe. Forces can be applied by the bead to microscopic structures of interest (specimens), while the reaction displacement of the bead is measured. This enables 3D mechanical manipulations and measurements to be performed on specimens in fluids. Force is generated by the magnetically permeable bead in reaction to fields produced by external electromagnets. The displacement is measured by interferometry using forward light scattered by the bead from a focused laser beam. The far-field interference pattern is imaged on a quadrant photodetector from which the 3D displacement can be computed over a limited range about the focal point. The bead and specimen are mounted on a 3D translation stage and feedback techniques are used to keep the bead within this limited range. We demonstrate the system with application to beads attached to cilia in human lung cell cultures.

  15. Nanocluster: photothermal bubble as optical probes for cytometric and microscopic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapotko, Dmitri O.; Lukianova-Hleb, Ekaterina Y.; Hafner, Jason H.

    2007-06-01

    The ability to detect optical signals form a cellular target depends upon the amount of optical energy that can be generated by this target as the signal. Given that the sensitivity of optical detectors has some finite limit, further increase of the sensitivity of optical diagnostic methods requires increasing the energy of target-generated signal. Usually this energy is converted by the cellular target upon its optical excitation and is limited by many factors such as: cell and target damage thresholds, efficiency of excitation energy conversion, size of the target etc. All these put principal limitation on sensing small targets (like molecules) in living cells with any optical method because the energy that can be safely converted by the target into a signal is limited. To overcome this limitation and to improve the sensitivity of optical microscopy of living cells (and cytometry in general) we propose the concept of intracellular amplification of the optical signal. This concept includes two major steps. First, primary (pump) optical radiation interacts with the target (a probe molecule) to generate a transient target. Second, the transient target is sensed with additional optical radiation that does not interact strongly with primary target or the cell, and, hence, may have high enough energy to increase the signal from transient target even above the energy of pump radiation, which is limited by cell and target damage thresholds. We propose to use optical scattering from clusters of gold nanoparticles (the target) that are selectively formed in specific cells through antibody-receptor interaction and through endocytosis. To amplify this optical signal we propose to generate photothermal bubbles (the transient target) around those clusters. In experiments with water suspensions and with individual tumor K562 cells we have achieved optical signal amplification in individual cells (relatively to the scattering signal from intact cells): with gold nanorod

  16. Nano Goes to School: A Teaching Model of the Atomic Force Microscope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Planinsic, Gorazd; Kovac, Janez

    2008-01-01

    The paper describes a teaching model of the atomic force microscope (AFM), which proved to be successful in the role of an introduction to nanoscience in high school. The model can demonstrate the two modes of operation of the AFM (contact mode and oscillating mode) as well as some basic principles that limit the resolution of the method. It can…

  17. Three-body model of light nuclei with microscopic nonlocal interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Theeten, M.; Baye, D.; Matsumura, H.; Orabi, M.; Descouvemont, P.; Fujiwara, Y.; Suzuki, Y.

    2007-11-15

    A three-body cluster model involving microscopic nonlocal interactions is developed and compared with a fully microscopic cluster model. The energy-independent nonlocal interactions are obtained from a renormalization of the energy-dependent kernels of the resonating-group method. Such interactions are derived for the {alpha}{alpha} and {alpha}n systems. The role and importance of nonlocality are discussed. These interactions are employed in three-body studies of the {alpha}nn,{alpha}{alpha}n, and 3{alpha} descriptions of the {sup 6}He, {sup 9}Be, and {sup 12}C nuclei. A comparison with fully microscopic calculations provides a measure of the importance of three-cluster exchanges in those states. The differences between both cluster-model calculations are in general small, except in the densities at short distances.

  18. Microscopic formulation of the interacting boson model for rotational nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, Kosuke; Shimizu, Noritaka; Otsuka, Takaharu; Guo, Lu

    2011-04-15

    We propose a novel formulation of the interacting boson model (IBM) for rotational nuclei with axially symmetric, strong deformation. The intrinsic structure represented by the potential-energy surface (PES) of a given multinucleon system has a certain similarity to that of the corresponding multiboson system. Based on this feature, one can derive an appropriate boson Hamiltonian, as already reported. This prescription, however, has a major difficulty in the rotational spectra of strongly deformed nuclei: the bosonic moment of inertia is significantly smaller than the corresponding nucleonic one. We present that this difficulty originates in the difference between the rotational response of a nucleon system and that of the corresponding boson system, and could arise even if the PESs of the two systems were identical. We further suggest that the problem can be solved by implementing the L{center_dot}L term into the IBM Hamiltonian, with the coupling constant derived from the cranking approach of Skyrme mean-field models. The validity of the method is confirmed for rare-earth and actinoid nuclei, as their experimental rotational yrast bands are reproduced nicely.

  19. Microscopic Shell Model Calculations for the Fluorine Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Bruce R.; Dikmen, Erdal; Maris, Pieter; Vary, James P.; Shirokov, Andrey M.

    2015-10-01

    Using a formalism based on the No Core Shell Model (NCSM), we have determined miscroscopically the core and single-particle energies and the effective two-body interactions that are the input to standard shell model (SSM) calculations. The basic idea is to perform a succession of a Okubo-Lee-Suzuki (OLS) transformation, a NCSM calculation, and a second OLS transformation to a further reduced space, such as the sd-shell, which allows the separation of the many-body matrix elements into an ``inert'' core part plus a few valence-nucleons calculation. In the present investigation we use this technique to calculate the properties of the nuclides in the Fluorine isotopic chain, using the JISP16 nucleon-nucleon interaction. The obtained SSM input, along with the results of the SSM calculations for the Fluorine isotopes, will be presented. This work supported in part by TUBITAK-BIDEB, the US DOE, the US NSF, NERSC, and the Russian Ministry of Education and Science.

  20. Laser beam modeling in optical storage systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treptau, J. P.; Milster, T. D.; Flagello, D. G.

    1991-01-01

    A computer model has been developed that simulates light propagating through an optical data storage system. A model of a laser beam that originates at a laser diode, propagates through an optical system, interacts with a optical disk, reflects back from the optical disk into the system, and propagates to data and servo detectors is discussed.

  1. Phases and phase transitions in the algebraic microscopic shell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgieva, A. I.; Drumev, K. P.

    2016-01-01

    We explore the dynamical symmetries of the shell model number conserving algebra, which define three types of pairing and quadrupole phases, with the aim to obtain the prevailing phase or phase transition for the real nuclear systems in a single shell. This is achieved by establishing a correspondence between each of the pairing bases with the Elliott's SU(3) basis that describes collective rotation of nuclear systems. This allows for a complete classification of the basis states of different number of particles in all the limiting cases. The probability distribution of the SU(3) basis states within theirs corresponding pairing states is also obtained. The relative strengths of dynamically symmetric quadrupole-quadrupole interaction in respect to the isoscalar, isovector and total pairing interactions define a control parameter, which estimates the importance of each term of the Hamiltonian in the correct reproduction of the experimental data for the considered nuclei.

  2. A simple but precise method for quantitative measurement of the quality of the laser focus in a scanning optical microscope

    PubMed Central

    MACRAE, K.; TRAVIS, C.; AMOR, R.; NORRIS, G.; WILSON, S.H.; OPPO, G.‐L.; MCCONNELL, G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary We report a method for characterizing the focussing laser beam exiting the objective in a laser scanning microscope. This method provides the size of the optical focus, the divergence of the beam, the ellipticity and the astigmatism. We use a microscopic‐scale knife edge in the form of a simple transmission electron microscopy grid attached to a glass microscope slide, and a light‐collecting optical fibre and photodiode underneath the specimen. By scanning the laser spot from a reflective to a transmitting part of the grid, a beam profile in the form of an error function can be obtained and by repeating this with the knife edge at different axial positions relative to the beam waist, the divergence and astigmatism of the postobjective laser beam can be obtained. The measured divergence can be used to quantify how much of the full numerical aperture of the lens is used in practice. We present data of the beam radius, beam divergence, ellipticity and astigmatism obtained with low (0.15, 0.7) and high (1.3) numerical aperture lenses and lasers commonly used in confocal and multiphoton laser scanning microscopy. Our knife‐edge method has several advantages over alternative knife‐edge methods used in microscopy including that the knife edge is easy to prepare, that the beam can be characterized also directly under a cover slip, as necessary to reduce spherical aberrations for objectives designed to be used with a cover slip, and it is suitable for use with commercial laser scanning microscopes where access to the laser beam can be limited. PMID:25864964

  3. Low noise optical lattices for a Li-6 Fermi gas microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazurenko, Anton; Parsons, Maxwell; Chiu, Christie; Huber, Florian; Blatt, Sebastian; Greiner, Markus

    2015-05-01

    We report on recent progress towards single-site resolved imaging of fermions in an optical lattice. Fermionic 6-Li atoms are trapped in an optical lattice 10 μm below a high-quality reference surface in the image plane of a high resolution (NA 0.85) imaging system. We have created a highly intensity-stable optical lattice whose depth remains adjustable over three orders of magnitude. The high optical resolution enables a band mapping technique that allows detection of less than 1000 atoms in the ground band of the lattice. We use this technique to measure the decay of the radial ground band population and find lifetimes up to 70 seconds, limited by spontaneous scattering of lattice light. ARO DARPA OLE, ARO MURI, NSF, AFOSR MURI, and The Moore Foundation.

  4. Three-dimensional interactive graphics for displaying and modelling microscopic data.

    PubMed

    Basinski, M; Deatherage, J F

    1990-09-01

    EUCLID is a three-dimensional (3D) general purpose graphics display package for interactive manipulation of vector, surface and solid drawings on Evans and Sutherland PS300 series graphics processors. It is useful for displaying, comparing, measuring and modelling 3D microscopic images in real time. EUCLID can assemble groups of drawings into a composite drawing, while retaining the ability to operate upon the individual drawings within the composite drawing separately. EUCLID is capable of real time geometrical transformations (scaling, translation and rotation in two coordinate frames) and stereo and perspective viewing transformations. Because of its flexibility, EUCLID is especially useful for fitting models into 3D microscopic images.

  5. Imaging of InGaN inhomogeneities using visible aperturelessnear-field scanning optical microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Stebounova, Larissa V.; Romanyuk, Yaroslav E.; Chen, Dongxue; Leone, Stephen R.

    2007-06-14

    The optical properties of epitaxially grown islands of InGaN are investigated with nanometer-scale spatial resolution using visible apertureless near-field scanning optical microscopy. Scattered light from the tip-sample system is modulated by cantilever oscillations and detected at the third harmonic of the oscillation frequency to distinguish the near-field signal from unwanted scattered background light. Scattered near-field measurements indicate that the as-grown InGaN islanded film may exhibit both inhomogeneous In composition and strain-induced changes that affect the optical signal at 633 nm and 532 nm. Changes are observed in the optical contrast for large 3D InGaN islands (100's of nm) of the same height. Near-field optical mapping of small grains on a finer scale reveals InGaN composition or strain-induced irregularities in features with heights of only 2 nm, which exhibit different near-field signals at 633 nm and 532 nm incident wavelengths. Optical signal contrast from topographic features as small as 30 nm is detected.

  6. Microscopic thin film optical anisotropy imaging at the solid-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Adelaide; De Beule, Pieter A A

    2016-04-01

    Optical anisotropy of thin films has been widely investigated through ellipsometry, whereby typically an optical signal is averaged over a ∼1 cm(2) elliptical area that extends with increasing angle-of-incidence (AOI). Here, we report on spectroscopic imaging ellipsometry at the solid-liquid interface applied to a supported lipid bilayer (SLB). We detail how a differential spectrally resolved ellipsometry measurement, between samples with and without optically anisotropic thin film on an absorbing substrate, can be applied to recover in and out of plane refractive indices of the thin film with known film thickness, hence determining the thin film optical anisotropy. We also present how optimal wavelength and AOI settings can be determined ensuring low parameter cross correlation between the refractive indices to be determined from a differential measurement in Δ ellipsometry angle. Furthermore, we detail a Monte Carlo type analysis that allows one to determine the minimal required optical ellipsometry resolution to recover a given thin film anisotropy. We conclude by presenting a new setup for a spectroscopic imaging ellipsometry based on fiber supercontinuum laser technology, multi-wavelength diode system, and an improved liquid cell design, delivering a 5 ×-10 × ellipsometric noise reduction over state-of-the-art. We attribute this improvement to increased ellipsometer illumination power and a reduced light path in liquid through the use of a water dipping objective.

  7. Single-spin microscope with sub-nanoscale resolution based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, Gennady P; Chernobrod, Boris

    2009-01-01

    Invention of scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) initiated a new era of material science and technology characterized by 2-D imaging with atomic resolution and manipulation of individual atoms. However, for further progress in material science, and in particular in structural biology, 3-D imaging with sub-nanometer resolution is very desirable. Currently the most promising technique for 3-D imaging is magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM), which senses individual electron spins [1,2] with nanoscale resolution and can detect collective magnetization of about 100 nuclear spins [3]. The highest sensitivity demonstrated by MRFM is based on a time modulation technique called the oscillating cantilever-driven adiabatic reversals (OSCAAR) which requires a long phase relaxation time T 2 of measured spins, which usually corresponds to rather low temperature. For example, a temperature of 300 mK was used in the case of 3D imaging of the tobacco mosaic virus [3]. This limitation is incompatible with the room-temperature operation needed for the study of biological systems under physiological conditions.

  8. Multiple-order imaging for optical critical dimension metrology using microscope characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Jing; Zhou, Hui; Barnes, Bryan M.; Goasmat, Francois; Dixson, Ronald; Silver, Richard M.

    2012-10-01

    There has been much recent work in developing advanced optical metrology applications that use imaging optics for optical critical dimension (OCD) measurements, defect detection, and for potential use with in-die metrology applications. We have previously reported quantitative measurements for sub-50 nm CD dense arrays which scatter only the 0th-order specular diffraction component using angle-resolved scatterfield microscopy. Through angle-resolved and focus-resolved imaging, we now measure OCD targets with three-dimensional scattered fields that contain multiple Fourier frequencies. Experimental sensitivity to nanometer scale linewidth changes is presented, supported by simulation studies. A new, more advanced approach to tool normalization is coupled with rigorous electromagnetic simulations and library based regression fitting that potentially enables OCD measurements with sub-nanometer uncertainties for targets that scatter multiple Fourier frequencies.

  9. The Scanning Theremin Microscope: A Model Scanning Probe Instrument for Hands-On Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quardokus, Rebecca C.; Wasio, Natalie A.; Kandel, S. Alex

    2014-01-01

    A model scanning probe microscope, designed using similar principles of operation to research instruments, is described. Proximity sensing is done using a capacitance probe, and a mechanical linkage is used to scan this probe across surfaces. The signal is transduced as an audio tone using a heterodyne detection circuit analogous to that used in…

  10. Microscopic [ital T]-Violating Optical Potential: Implications for Neutron-Transmission Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J.; Gould, C.R.; Hnizdo, V. Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina 27708 Department of Physics and Schonland Research Centre for Nuclear Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, 2050 )

    1994-12-26

    We derive a [ital T]-violating [ital P]-conserving optical potential for neutron-nucleus scattering, starting from a uniquely determined two-body [rho]-exchange interaction with the same symmetry. We then obtain limits on the [ital T]-violating [rho]-nucleon coupling [ital [bar g

  11. A cryogenic scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscope.

    PubMed

    Yang, Honghua U; Hebestreit, Erik; Josberger, Erik E; Raschke, Markus B

    2013-02-01

    Scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) provides few nanometer optical spatial resolution and is compatible with nearly any form of linear and nonlinear optical spectroscopy. We have developed a versatile s-SNOM instrument operating under cryogenic and variable temperature (∼20-500 K) and compatible with high magnetic fields (up to 7 T). The instrument features independent tip and sample scanning and free-space light delivery with an integrated off-axis parabolic mirror for tip-illumination and signal collection with a numerical aperture of N.A. = 0.45. The optics operate from the UV to THz range allowing for continuous wave, broadband, and ultrafast s-SNOM spectroscopy, including different variants of tip-enhanced spectroscopy. We discuss the instrument design, implementation, and demonstrate its performance with mid-infrared Drude response s-SNOM probing of the domain formation associated with the metal-insulator transitions of VO2 (TMIT ≃ 340 K) and V2O3 (TMIT ≃ 150 K). This instrument enables the study of mesoscopic order and domains of competing quantum phases in correlated electron materials over a wide range of controlled electric and magnetic fields, strain, current, and temperature.

  12. Development of the water window imaging X-ray microscope utilizing normal-incidence multilayer optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Shealy, David L.; Brinkley, B. R.; Baker, Phillip C.; Barbee, Troy W., Jr.; Walker, Arthur B. C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A water-window imaging X-ray telescope configured with normal-incidence multilayer X-ray mirrors has been developed to obtain images with unprecedented spatial resolution and contrast of carbon-based microstructures within living cells. The narrow bandpass response inherent in multilayer X-ray optics is accurately tuned to wavelengths within the water window.

  13. Effect of microscopic modeling of skin in electrical and thermal analysis of transcranial direct current stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Tames, Jose; Sugiyama, Yukiya; Laakso, Ilkka; Tanaka, Satoshi; Koyama, Soichiro; Sadato, Norihiro; Hirata, Akimasa

    2016-12-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a neuromodulation scheme where a small current is delivered to the brain via two electrodes attached to the scalp. The electrode design is an important topic, not only as regards efficacy, but also from a safety perspective, as tDCS may be related to skin lesions that are sometimes observed after stimulation. Previous computational models of tDCS have omitted the effects of microscopic structures in the skin, and the different soak conditions of the electrodes, and model validation has been limited. In this study, multiphysics and multiscale analysis are proposed to demonstrate the importance of microscopic modeling of the skin, in order to clarify the effects of the internal electric field, and to examine temperature elevation around the electrodes. This novel microscopic model of the skin layer took into consideration the effect of saline/water penetration in hair follicles and sweat ducts on the field distribution around the electrodes. The temperature elevation in the skin was then computed by solving the bioheat equation. Also, a multiscale model was introduced to account for macroscopic and microscopic tissues of the head and skin, which was validated by measurement of the head resistance during tDCS. As a result, the electric field in the microscopic model of the skin was less localized when the follicles/ducts were filled with saline instead of hair or tap water. Temperature elevation was also lessened with saline, in comparison with other substances. Saline, which may penetrate the hair follicles and sweat ducts, suppressed the field concentration around the electrodes. For conventional magnitudes of current injection, and a head resistance of less than 10 kΩ, the temperature elevation in the skin when using saline-soaked electrodes was low, less than 0.1 °C, and unlikely to cause adverse thermal effects.

  14. Microscopic analysis of 11 Li elastic scattering on protons and breakup processes within 9Li+2n cluster model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spasova, K.; Lukyanov, V. K.; Kadrev, D. N.; Antonov, A. N.; Zemlyanaya, E. V.; Lukyanov, K. V.; Gaidarov, M. K.

    2014-09-01

    Theoretical analysis of the elastic scattering and breakup in interactions of the 11Li nucleus with protons are presented. The hybrid model of the microscopic optical potential (OP) is applied. The OP includes the single-folding real part, while its imaginary part is derived within the high-energy approximation (HEA) theory. The spin-orbit contribution to the OP is also included. The differential cross sections of 11Li+p elastic scattering and the total reaction cross sections are calculated at energies of 62, 68.4, and 75 MeV/nucleon and are compared with the available experimental data. The breakup cross sections at 62 MeV/nucleon and the momentum distributions of the fragments using a two cluster model of the 11 Li nucleus are obtained. An analysis of the single-particle density of 11Li is performed.

  15. Effect of cantilever geometry on the optical lever sensitivities and thermal noise method of the atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Sader, John E.; Lu, Jianing; Mulvaney, Paul

    2014-11-15

    Calibration of the optical lever sensitivities of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers is especially important for determining the force in AFM measurements. These sensitivities depend critically on the cantilever mode used and are known to differ for static and dynamic measurements. Here, we calculate the ratio of the dynamic and static sensitivities for several common AFM cantilevers, whose shapes vary considerably, and experimentally verify these results. The dynamic-to-static optical lever sensitivity ratio is found to range from 1.09 to 1.41 for the cantilevers studied – in stark contrast to the constant value of 1.09 used widely in current calibration studies. This analysis shows that accuracy of the thermal noise method for the static spring constant is strongly dependent on cantilever geometry – neglect of these dynamic-to-static factors can induce errors exceeding 100%. We also discuss a simple experimental approach to non-invasively and simultaneously determine the dynamic and static spring constants and optical lever sensitivities of cantilevers of arbitrary shape, which is applicable to all AFM platforms that have the thermal noise method for spring constant calibration.

  16. Effect of cantilever geometry on the optical lever sensitivities and thermal noise method of the atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Sader, John E; Lu, Jianing; Mulvaney, Paul

    2014-11-01

    Calibration of the optical lever sensitivities of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers is especially important for determining the force in AFM measurements. These sensitivities depend critically on the cantilever mode used and are known to differ for static and dynamic measurements. Here, we calculate the ratio of the dynamic and static sensitivities for several common AFM cantilevers, whose shapes vary considerably, and experimentally verify these results. The dynamic-to-static optical lever sensitivity ratio is found to range from 1.09 to 1.41 for the cantilevers studied - in stark contrast to the constant value of 1.09 used widely in current calibration studies. This analysis shows that accuracy of the thermal noise method for the static spring constant is strongly dependent on cantilever geometry - neglect of these dynamic-to-static factors can induce errors exceeding 100%. We also discuss a simple experimental approach to non-invasively and simultaneously determine the dynamic and static spring constants and optical lever sensitivities of cantilevers of arbitrary shape, which is applicable to all AFM platforms that have the thermal noise method for spring constant calibration.

  17. Free radical erythrocyte damage in tumoral disease assessed by He-Ne laser and optical microscope through "Heinz Bodies" method.

    PubMed

    Broccio, M; Della Rovere, F; Granata, A; Wanderlingh, U; Zirilli, A; Tanzariello, A; Pirrone, G; Broccio, G

    1998-01-01

    Results obtained from blood sample readings by optical microscopy and He-Ne laser (lambda = 630.1 mW), have confirmed the reduction in Heinz Bodies (HB) formation time and the Transmittance Reduction Degree (TRD), in malignancies. The results of spectrometric readings in colorectum polyposis, (TRD = 0.07) and fibrocystic mastopathy (TRD = 0.08) gave results overlapping with controls (TRD = 0.08). In neoplasias, the early HB formation in erythrocytes observed by optical microscope corresponded to TRD increase = 0.17 (P < 0.01). TRD increase was statistically significant (P < 0.01), as well as the reduction in the time of HB appearance (< 0.01). The relationship between optical and laser readings was exponential in tumors, while it was linear in controls, in polyposis and mastopathies. The values of the correlation coefficients obtained by both methods were significant (P < 0.01) for all the studied groups. Moreover, these research data further support the existence, even in the earlier stages of the disease, of the labile state of the red cell membrane due to strong lipid peroxidation by FRs.

  18. Fabrication of bright and thin Zn₂SiO₄ luminescent film for electron beam excitation-assisted optical microscope.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Taichi; Kanamori, Satoshi; Fukuta, Masahiro; Nawa, Yasunori; Kominami, Hiroko; Nakanishi, Yoichiro; Sugita, Atsushi; Inami, Wataru; Kawata, Yoshimasa

    2015-07-13

    We fabricated a bright and thin Zn₂SiO₄ luminescent film to serve as a nanometric light source for high-spatial-resolution optical microscopy based on electron beam excitation. The Zn₂SiO₄ luminescent thin film was fabricated by annealing a ZnO film on a Si₃N₄ substrate at 1000 °C in N₂. The annealed film emitted bright cathodoluminescence compared with the as-deposited film. The film is promising for nano-imaging with electron beam excitation-assisted optical microscopy. We evaluated the spatial resolution of a microscope developed using this Zn₂SiO₄ luminescent thin film. This is the first report of the investigation and application of ZnO/Si₃N₄ annealed at a high temperature (1000 °C). The fabricated Zn₂SiO₄ film is expected to enable high-frame-rate dynamic observation with ultra-high resolution using our electron beam excitation-assisted optical microscopy.

  19. Parallel force measurement with a polymeric microbeam array using an optical microscope and micromanipulator.

    PubMed

    Sasoglu, F Mert; Bohl, Andrew J; Allen, Kathleen B; Layton, Bradley E

    2009-01-01

    An image analysis method and its validation are presented for tracking the displacements of parallel mechanical force sensors. Force is measured using a combination of beam theory, optical microscopy, and image analysis. The primary instrument is a calibrated polymeric microbeam array mounted on a micromanipulator with the intended purpose of measuring traction forces on cell cultures or cell arrays. One application is the testing of hypotheses involving cellular mechanotransduction mechanisms. An Otsu-based image analysis code calculates displacement and force on cellular or other soft structures by using edge detection and image subtraction on digitally captured optical microscopy images. Forces as small as 250+/-50 nN and as great as 25+/-2.5 microN may be applied and measured upon as few as one or as many as hundreds of structures in parallel. A validation of the method is provided by comparing results from a rigid glass surface and a compliant polymeric surface.

  20. Note: A stand on the basis of atomic force microscope to study substrates for imaging optics

    SciTech Connect

    Chkhalo, N. I.; Salashchenko, N. N.; Zorina, M. V.

    2015-01-15

    A description of a stand based on atomic force microscopy (AFM) for roughness measurements of large optical components with arbitrary surfaces is given. The sample under study is mounted on a uniaxial goniometer which allows the sample to be tilted in the range of ±30°. The inclination enables the local normal along the axis of the probe to be established at any point of the surface under study. A comparison of the results of the measurement of noise and roughness of a flat quartz sample, in the range of spatial frequencies 0.025–70 μm{sup −1}, obtained from “standard” AFM and developed versions is given. Within the experimental error, the measurement results were equivalent. Examples of applications of the stand for the study of substrates for X-ray optics are presented.

  1. Time-domain model of quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifiers for wideband optical signals.

    PubMed

    Puris, D; Schmidt-Langhorst, C; Lüdge, K; Majer, N; Schöll, E; Petermann, K

    2012-11-19

    We present a novel theoretical time-domain model for a quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifier, that allows to simulate subpicosecond pulse propagation including power-based and phase-based effects. Static results including amplified spontaneous emission spectra, continuous wave amplification, and four-wave mixing experiments in addition to dynamic pump-probe simulations are presented for different injection currents. The model uses digital filters to describe the frequency dependent gain and microscopically calculated carrier-carrier scattering rates for the interband carrier dynamics. It can be used to calculate the propagation of multiple signals with different wavelengths or one wideband signal with high bitrate.

  2. ELECTRON ABSORBED FRACTIONS IN AN IMAGE-BASED MICROSCOPIC SKELETAL DOSIMETRY MODEL OF CHINESE ADULT MALE.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shenshen; Ren, Li; Qiu, Rui; Wu, Zhen; Li, Chunyan; Li, Junli

    2017-01-10

    Based on the Chinese reference adult male voxel model, a set of microscopic skeletal models of Chinese adult male is constructed through the processes of computed tomography (CT) imaging, bone coring, micro-CT imaging, image segmentation, merging into macroscopic bone model and implementation in Geant4. At the step of image segmentation, a new bone endosteum (BE) segmentation method is realized by sampling. The set of model contains 32 spongiosa samples with voxel size of 19 μm cubes. The microscopic spongiosa bone data for Chinese adult male are provided. Electron absorbed fractions in red bone marrow (RBM) and BE are calculated. Source tissues include the bone marrow (red and yellow), trabecular bone (surfaces and volumes) and cortical bone (surfaces and volumes). Target tissues include RBM and BE. Electron energies range from 10 keV to 10 MeV. Additionally, comparison of the result with other investigations is provided.

  3. Extended optical model for fission

    SciTech Connect

    Sin, M.; Capote, R.; Herman, M. W.; Trkov, A.

    2016-03-07

    A comprehensive formalism to calculate fission cross sections based on the extension of the optical model for fission is presented. It can be used for description of nuclear reactions on actinides featuring multi-humped fission barriers with partial absorption in the wells and direct transmission through discrete and continuum fission channels. The formalism describes the gross fluctuations observed in the fission probability due to vibrational resonances, and can be easily implemented in existing statistical reaction model codes. The extended optical model for fission is applied for neutron induced fission cross-section calculations on 234,235,238U and 239Pu targets. A triple-humped fission barrier is used for 234,235U(n,f), while a double-humped fission barrier is used for 238U(n,f) and 239Pu(n,f) reactions as predicted by theoretical barrier calculations. The impact of partial damping of class-II/III states, and of direct transmission through discrete and continuum fission channels, is shown to be critical for a proper description of the measured fission cross sections for 234,235,238U(n,f) reactions. The 239Pu(n,f) reaction can be calculated in the complete damping approximation. Calculated cross sections for 235,238U(n,f) and 239Pu(n,f) reactions agree within 3% with the corresponding cross sections derived within the Neutron Standards least-squares fit of available experimental data. Lastly, the extended optical model for fission can be used for both theoretical fission studies and nuclear data evaluation.

  4. Extended optical model for fission

    DOE PAGES

    Sin, M.; Capote, R.; Herman, M. W.; ...

    2016-03-07

    A comprehensive formalism to calculate fission cross sections based on the extension of the optical model for fission is presented. It can be used for description of nuclear reactions on actinides featuring multi-humped fission barriers with partial absorption in the wells and direct transmission through discrete and continuum fission channels. The formalism describes the gross fluctuations observed in the fission probability due to vibrational resonances, and can be easily implemented in existing statistical reaction model codes. The extended optical model for fission is applied for neutron induced fission cross-section calculations on 234,235,238U and 239Pu targets. A triple-humped fission barrier ismore » used for 234,235U(n,f), while a double-humped fission barrier is used for 238U(n,f) and 239Pu(n,f) reactions as predicted by theoretical barrier calculations. The impact of partial damping of class-II/III states, and of direct transmission through discrete and continuum fission channels, is shown to be critical for a proper description of the measured fission cross sections for 234,235,238U(n,f) reactions. The 239Pu(n,f) reaction can be calculated in the complete damping approximation. Calculated cross sections for 235,238U(n,f) and 239Pu(n,f) reactions agree within 3% with the corresponding cross sections derived within the Neutron Standards least-squares fit of available experimental data. Lastly, the extended optical model for fission can be used for both theoretical fission studies and nuclear data evaluation.« less

  5. Extended optical model for fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sin, M.; Capote, R.; Herman, M. W.; Trkov, A.

    2016-03-01

    A comprehensive formalism to calculate fission cross sections based on the extension of the optical model for fission is presented. It can be used for description of nuclear reactions on actinides featuring multi-humped fission barriers with partial absorption in the wells and direct transmission through discrete and continuum fission channels. The formalism describes the gross fluctuations observed in the fission probability due to vibrational resonances, and can be easily implemented in existing statistical reaction model codes. The extended optical model for fission is applied for neutron induced fission cross-section calculations on 234,235,238U and 239Pu targets. A triple-humped fission barrier is used for U,235234(n ,f ) , while a double-humped fission barrier is used for 238U(n ,f ) and 239Pu(n ,f ) reactions as predicted by theoretical barrier calculations. The impact of partial damping of class-II/III states, and of direct transmission through discrete and continuum fission channels, is shown to be critical for a proper description of the measured fission cross sections for 234,235,238U(n ,f ) reactions. The 239Pu(n ,f ) reaction can be calculated in the complete damping approximation. Calculated cross sections for U,238235(n ,f ) and 239Pu(n ,f ) reactions agree within 3% with the corresponding cross sections derived within the Neutron Standards least-squares fit of available experimental data. The extended optical model for fission can be used for both theoretical fission studies and nuclear data evaluation.

  6. Deterministic and Stochastic Study for a Microscopic Angiogenesis Model: Applications to the Lewis Lung Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bodnar, Marek; Piotrowska, Monika J.

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis modelling is an important tool to understand the underlying mechanisms yielding tumour growth. Nevertheless, there is usually a gap between models and experimental data. We propose a model based on the intrinsic microscopic reactions defining the angiogenesis process to link experimental data with previous macroscopic models. The microscopic characterisation can describe the macroscopic behaviour of the tumour, which stability analysis reveals a set of predicted tumour states involving different morphologies. Additionally, the microscopic description also gives a framework to study the intrinsic stochasticity of the reactive system through the resulting Langevin equation. To follow the goal of the paper, we use available experimental information on the Lewis lung carcinoma to infer meaningful parameters for the model that are able to describe the different stages of the tumour growth. Finally we explore the predictive capabilities of the fitted model by showing that fluctuations are determinant for the survival of the tumour during the first week and that available treatments can give raise to new stable tumour dormant states with a reduced vascular network. PMID:27182891

  7. Mathmatical modeling for diffractive optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobson, David; Cox, J. Allen

    1993-01-01

    We consider a 'diffractive optic' to be a biperiodic surface separating two half-spaces, each having constant constitutive parameters; within a unit cell of the periodic surface and across the transition zone between the two half-spaces, the constitutive parameters can be a continuous, complex-valued function. Mathematical models for diffractive optics have been developed, and implemented as numerical codes, both for the 'direct' problem and for the 'inverse' problem. In problems of the 'direct' class, the diffractive optic is specified, and the full set of Maxwell's equations is cast in a variational form and solved numerically by a finite element approach. This approach is well-posed in the sense that existence and uniqueness of the solution can be proved and specific convergence conditions can be derived. An example of a metallic grating at a Wood anomaly is presented as a case where other approaches are known to have convergence problems. In problems of the 'inverse' class, some information about the diffracted field (e.g., the far-field intensity) is given, and the problem is to find the periodic structure in some optimal sense. Two approaches are described: phase reconstruction in the far-field approximation; and relaxed optimal design based on the Helmholtz equation. Practical examples are discussed for each approach to the inverse problem, including array generators in the far-field case and antireflective structures for the relaxed optimal design.

  8. [Sensitivity, precision and resolution of the optical microscope in the study of environmental pollution by asbestos fibers].

    PubMed

    Maddalon, G; Patroni, M; Trimarchi, R; Clerici, C; Occella, E

    1991-01-01

    The authors comment on the methods and equipment used in two Italian laboratories for sampling and microscopic phase contrast analysis of asbestos and other respirable fibres in the air of the general environment, i.e., the Dust Analysis Laboratory, Industrial Hygiene and Toxicology Department of the Institute of Occupational Health (Clinica del Lavoro), University of Milan and the Technical Microscopy Laboratory, Ground Resources and Land Control (Georisorse e Territorio) Department of Turin Polytechnic, which use identical methods. Airborne dust samples are taken with personal samplers, 1 l/min air flow (sample duration 4-8 h), filtering air on 25 mm diameter, 0.8 micropore cellulose filters (about 300 mm total net surface of dust deposit). The following equipment is used for counting and analysis of fibres: a) Clinica del Lavoro, Milan: Polyvar Reichert-Jung microscope, 500 magnitudes, Zernike positive phase contrast; numerical counting on 100 whole ocular fields, equal to 6.38% of the total net surface of dust deposit on the membrane; b) Turin Polytechnic: Leitz Ortholux microscope, 500 magnitudes, Heine and Zernike phase contrast with mean standard contrast; numerical counting on square grid, with explored surface total equal to 1.68% of the total net surface of dust deposit on the membrane. Measurements performed: Clinica del Lavoro, Milan: 2,980 since 1960; Turin Polytechnic: 875 since 1965. The sensitivity of the methods for counting airborne fibres is discussed, concluding that the methods used by the two laboratories have a sensitivity between 0.05 and 1.6 fibre/litre of air, according to the overall dustiness of the environment under study. Analysis of the accuracy of the optic determinations, based on the repeated counts, shows a repeatability of 0.4 (40%) within 95% confidence limits. A resolution power of 0.35 microns is reported; however, the possibility exists (and is normally achieved in analytical practice in both laboratories) of identifying and

  9. Imaging and detection of early stage dental caries with an all-optical photoacoustic microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, D. A.; Sampathkumar, A.; Longbottom, C.; Kirk, K. J.

    2015-01-01

    Tooth decay, at its earliest stages, manifests itself as small, white, subsurface lesions in the enamel. Current methods for detection in the dental clinic are visual and tactile investigations, and bite-wing X-ray radiographs. These techniques suffer from poor sensitivity and specificity at the earliest (and reversible) stages of the disease due to the small size (<100μm) of the lesion. A fine-resolution (600 nm) ultra-broadband (200 MHz) all-optical photoacoustic microscopy system was is used to image the early signs of tooth decay. Ex-vivo tooth samples exhibiting white spot lesions were scanned and were found to generate a larger (one order of magnitude) photoacoustic (PA) signal in the lesion regions compared to healthy enamel. The high contrast in the PA images potentially allows lesions to be imaged and measured at a much earlier stage than current clinical techniques allow. PA images were cross referenced with histology photographs to validate our experimental results. Our PA system provides a noncontact method for early detection of white-spot lesions with a high detection bandwidth that offers advantages over previously demonstrated ultrasound methods. The technique provides the sensing depth of an ultrasound system, but with the spatial resolution of an optical system.

  10. Micro optical power meter for direct in situ measurement of light transmitted from microscopic systems and focused on micro-samples.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gangping; Huang, Yao-Xiong

    2012-08-01

    This paper reports a micro optical power meter which is able to perform effective and precise measurement on the optical power at the focus of different microscopic systems. The power meter can be easily placed on the stages of different microscopes and even partly immersed into solution to directly measure the optical power transmitted from the microscope objective and focused on the sample suspended in solution. The testing experiments demonstrated that the power meter has the characteristics of high precision, excellent linearity, high sensitivity, good stability, and high responding speed. It can accurately measure power levels from 0.1 to 50 mW in visible wavelength in various conditions and environments, which may encounter in practical applications. The optical power measurements using the power meter performed in some biological cell culturing solutions and in air for the same laser light reveal the first time that the powers measured in solutions were about 5%-8% greater than that measured in air at the same position. This not only suggests the necessity of performing direct measurement in situ in solution to obtain the real optical power projected on the suspended samples, but also indicates that such a micro optical power meter can meet almost all the requirements of optical power measurement in different fields from biomedicine to material sciences.

  11. Coherent double-color interference microscope for traceable optical surface metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinovski, I.; França, R. S.; Bessa, M. S.; Silva, C. R.; Couceiro, I. B.

    2016-06-01

    Interference microscopy is an important field of dimensional surface metrology because it provides direct traceability of the measurements to the SI base unit definition of the metre. With a typical measurement range from micrometres to nanometres interference microscopy (IM) covers the gap between classic metrology and nanometrology, providing continuous transfer of dimensional metrology into new areas of nanoscience and nanotechnology. Therefore IM is considered to be an indispensable tool for traceable transfer of the metre unit to different instruments. We report here the metrological study of an absolute Linnik interference microscope (IM) based on two frequency stabilized lasers. The design permits the flexible use of both lasers for measurements depending on the demand of the concrete measurement task. By principle of operation IM is combination of imaging and phase-shifting interferometry (PSI). The traceability is provided by the wavelength reference, that is, a He-Ne 633 nm stabilized laser. The second laser source, that is, a Blue-Green 488 nm grating stabilized laser diode, is used for improvements of resolution, and also for resolving integer fringe discontinuities on sharp features of the surface. The IM was optimized for surface height metrology. We have performed the study of the systematic effects of the measurements. This study allowed us to improve the hardware and software of IM and to find corrections for main systematic errors. The IM is purposed for 1D to 3D height metrology and surface topography in an extended range from nanometres to micrometres. The advantages and disadvantages of the design and developed methods are discussed.

  12. Ultrafast chirped optical waveform recorder using referenced heterodyning and a time microscope

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Corey Vincent [Livermore, CA

    2011-11-22

    A new technique for capturing both the amplitude and phase of an optical waveform is presented. This technique can capture signals with many THz of bandwidths in a single shot (e.g., temporal resolution of about 44 fs), or be operated repetitively at a high rate. That is, each temporal window (or frame) is captured single shot, in real time, but the process may be run repeatedly or single-shot. This invention expands upon previous work in temporal imaging by adding heterodyning, which can be self-referenced for improved precision and stability, to convert frequency chirp (the second derivative of phase with respect to time) into a time varying intensity modulation. By also including a variety of possible demultiplexing techniques, this process is scalable to recoding continuous signals.

  13. Ultrafast chirped optical waveform recording using referenced heterodyning and a time microscope

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Corey Vincent

    2010-06-15

    A new technique for capturing both the amplitude and phase of an optical waveform is presented. This technique can capture signals with many THz of bandwidths in a single shot (e.g., temporal resolution of about 44 fs), or be operated repetitively at a high rate. That is, each temporal window (or frame) is captured single shot, in real time, but the process may be run repeatedly or single-shot. This invention expands upon previous work in temporal imaging by adding heterodyning, which can be self-referenced for improved precision and stability, to convert frequency chirp (the second derivative of phase with respect to time) into a time varying intensity modulation. By also including a variety of possible demultiplexing techniques, this process is scalable to recoding continuous signals.

  14. Extending the Chemical and Optical Sensitivity of the Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Arthur

    This dissertation discusses the theoretical basis and experimental applications to improving the capability of the STM in chemical and optical sensitivity. Traditional STM methods have achieved unprecedented spatial resolution, but suffer from a lack of sensitivity to chemical structure and composition. A new method of imaging, based on inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) measurement of hydrogen molecules is developed. The interaction of plasmon excitations to electronic states of a metal nano-cluster is also studied, allowing for better understanding of the mechanisms involved in the plasmon -- electron coupling. Since its application at the single molecule level in the STM was realized, IETS has been used to identify different molecules through their vibrational signal. In recent experiments, rotational excitation of H2 was detected on metal and insulator surfaces. It was found that the energy of these excitations depend sensitively on the local chemical environment. By monitoring the rotational and vibrational IETS signal of the H2 across the molecule, a more chemically sensitive image can be constructed. When the method is applied to imaging magnesium porphyrin (MgP) on Au (110), different components of the molecule can be observed at different energies. These differences are indication of how the various components interact with the H2. Optical sensitivity of the STM manifests in the detection of photons emitted from the tunnel junction. Previous experiments have shown that we can map the excitation of molecular fluorescence with sub-Angstrom resolution. For applications in photochemistry and catalysis, understanding how plasmons interact with photons and electrons is crucial. Light emission from Au nanoclusters on oxide shows strong correlation with their electronic states. The interaction between plasmon mode in the junction and electronic states of the nano-clusters is further studied through clusters of different sizes and dimers. Emission of

  15. Resolving three-dimensional shape of sub-50 nm wide lines with nanometer-scale sensitivity using conventional optical microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Attota, Ravikiran Dixson, Ronald G.

    2014-07-28

    We experimentally demonstrate that the three-dimensional (3-D) shape variations of nanometer-scale objects can be resolved and measured with sub-nanometer scale sensitivity using conventional optical microscopes by analyzing 4-D optical data using the through-focus scanning optical microscopy (TSOM) method. These initial results show that TSOM-determined cross-sectional (3-D) shape differences of 30 nm–40 nm wide lines agree well with critical-dimension atomic force microscope measurements. The TSOM method showed a linewidth uncertainty of 1.22 nm (k = 2). Complex optical simulations are not needed for analysis using the TSOM method, making the process simple, economical, fast, and ideally suited for high volume nanomanufacturing process monitoring.

  16. Microscopic cluster model analysis of 14O+p elastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baye, D.; Descouvemont, P.; Leo, F.

    2005-08-01

    The 14O+p elastic scattering is discussed in detail in a fully microscopic cluster model. The 14O cluster is described by a closed p shell for protons and a closed p3/2 subshell for neutrons in the translation-invariant harmonic-oscillator model. The exchange and spin-orbit parameters of the effective forces are tuned on the energy levels of the 15C mirror system. With the generator-coordinate and microscopic R-matrix methods, phase shifts and cross sections are calculated for the 14O+p elastic scattering. An excellent agreement is found with recent experimental data. A comparison is performed with phenomenological R-matrix fits. Resonances properties in 15F are discussed.

  17. Microscopic cluster model analysis of {sup 14}O+p elastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Baye, D.; Descouvemont, P.; Leo, F.

    2005-08-01

    The {sup 14}O+p elastic scattering is discussed in detail in a fully microscopic cluster model. The {sup 14}O cluster is described by a closed p shell for protons and a closed p3/2 subshell for neutrons in the translation-invariant harmonic-oscillator model. The exchange and spin-orbit parameters of the effective forces are tuned on the energy levels of the {sup 15}C mirror system. With the generator-coordinate and microscopic R-matrix methods, phase shifts and cross sections are calculated for the {sup 14}O+p elastic scattering. An excellent agreement is found with recent experimental data. A comparison is performed with phenomenological R-matrix fits. Resonances properties in {sup 15}F are discussed.

  18. Microscopic modeling of energy relaxation and decoherence in quantum optoelectronic devices at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taj, D.; Iotti, R. C.; Rossi, F.

    2009-12-01

    We shall review and discuss the key problem of providing a microscopic modeling of state-of-the-art electronic quantum devices. In particular we shall focus on the description of energy-relaxation and decoherence phenomena, explicitly showing the intrinsic limitations of some of the existing treatments (the conventional Markovian approach) via analytical results, and proposing an alternative formulation of the problem in terms of a generalized Fermi's Golden Rule.

  19. Microscopic spin model for the dynamics of the return distribution of the Korean stock market index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jae-Suk; Chae, Seungbyung; Jung, Woo-Sung; Moon, Hie-Tae

    2006-05-01

    In this paper, we studied the dynamics of the log-return distribution of the Korean Composition Stock Price Index (KOSPI) from 1992 to 2004. Based on the microscopic spin model, we found that while the index during the late 1990s showed a power-law distribution, the distribution in the early 2000s was exponential. This change in distribution shape was caused by the duration and velocity, among other parameters, of the information that flowed into the market.

  20. Continuum-kinetic-microscopic model of lung clearance due to core-annular fluid entrainment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitran, Sorin

    2013-07-01

    The human lung is protected against aspirated infectious and toxic agents by a thin liquid layer lining the interior of the airways. This airway surface liquid is a bilayer composed of a viscoelastic mucus layer supported by a fluid film known as the periciliary liquid. The viscoelastic behavior of the mucus layer is principally due to long-chain polymers known as mucins. The airway surface liquid is cleared from the lung by ciliary transport, surface tension gradients, and airflow shear forces. This work presents a multiscale model of the effect of airflow shear forces, as exerted by tidal breathing and cough, upon clearance. The composition of the mucus layer is complex and variable in time. To avoid the restrictions imposed by adopting a viscoelastic flow model of limited validity, a multiscale computational model is introduced in which the continuum-level properties of the airway surface liquid are determined by microscopic simulation of long-chain polymers. A bridge between microscopic and continuum levels is constructed through a kinetic-level probability density function describing polymer chain configurations. The overall multiscale framework is especially suited to biological problems due to the flexibility afforded in specifying microscopic constituents, and examining the effects of various constituents upon overall mucus transport at the continuum scale.

  1. Fiber-optic laser-Doppler anemometer microscope developed for the measurement of microvascular red cell velocity.

    PubMed

    Seki, J

    1990-11-01

    A fiber-optic laser-Doppler anemometer microscope (FLDAM) was developed and its applicability to the study of microvascular blood flow was examined by measuring red cell velocities in vivo and in vitro. The FLDAM consists of an intravital microscope equipped with a fringe-mode back-scatter LDA. A data processing method of the Doppler signal which used frequency averaging over the entire frequency range of the power spectrum was developed. Spatial resolution of the FLDAM varied from 17 to 200 microns with 50X to 5X objectives. In vitro experiments showed that the red cell velocity obtained by the FLDAM was equal to the mean flow velocity, within the accuracy of the measurements, for tube diameters from 35 to 100 microns, mean velocity from 0.7 to 17 mm/sec, and feed hematocrit of 20%, when 10X or 20X objectives were used. In vivo red cell velocity measurements conducted with the FLDAM in microvessels of rat mesentery with diameters from 6.5 to 49 microns showed that red cell velocities were about 1/1.6 times smaller than those obtained by the two-slit technique, which also suggests that the velocity obtained by the FLDAM corresponds to the mean flow velocity. This relationship was also established from theoretical considerations for the case where the FLDAM sampling volume covers the entire vessel cross section. Furthermore the frequency response of the FLDAM was established to be about 20 Hz, which was sufficient for measurement of pulsatile velocities in rat mesenteric microvessels.

  2. Lattice model for the calculation of the angle of repose from microscopic grain properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, J. J.; Hovi, J.-P.; Herrmann, H. J.

    1998-07-01

    We study a simple lattice model for granular heap, which aims at calculating the macroscopic angle of repose from the microscopic grain properties. The model includes the effects of dissipation of the energy in the particle-particle collisions, and sticking of the particles to the pile. We obtain that, due to the discretization of the space, the angle of repose of the pile behaves as a complete devil's staircase as a function of the model parameters. We present numerical and analytical considerations which characterize the properties of this staircase.

  3. Power spectrum analysis with least-squares fitting: amplitude bias and its elimination, with application to optical tweezers and atomic force microscope cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Nørrelykke, Simon F; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2010-07-01

    Optical tweezers and atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers are often calibrated by fitting their experimental power spectra of Brownian motion. We demonstrate here that if this is done with typical weighted least-squares methods, the result is a bias of relative size between -2/n and +1/n on the value of the fitted diffusion coefficient. Here, n is the number of power spectra averaged over, so typical calibrations contain 10%-20% bias. Both the sign and the size of the bias depend on the weighting scheme applied. Hence, so do length-scale calibrations based on the diffusion coefficient. The fitted value for the characteristic frequency is not affected by this bias. For the AFM then, force measurements are not affected provided an independent length-scale calibration is available. For optical tweezers there is no such luck, since the spring constant is found as the ratio of the characteristic frequency and the diffusion coefficient. We give analytical results for the weight-dependent bias for the wide class of systems whose dynamics is described by a linear (integro)differential equation with additive noise, white or colored. Examples are optical tweezers with hydrodynamic self-interaction and aliasing, calibration of Ornstein-Uhlenbeck models in finance, models for cell migration in biology, etc. Because the bias takes the form of a simple multiplicative factor on the fitted amplitude (e.g. the diffusion coefficient), it is straightforward to remove and the user will need minimal modifications to his or her favorite least-squares fitting programs. Results are demonstrated and illustrated using synthetic data, so we can compare fits with known true values. We also fit some commonly occurring power spectra once-and-for-all in the sense that we give their parameter values and associated error bars as explicit functions of experimental power-spectral values.

  4. Modeling the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waluschka, Eugene; Pedersen, Trace R.; McNamara, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Creating an optical model of the Laser Interferometer Space antenna which can be used to predict optical sensitivities and set tolerances sufficiently well such that picometer level displacements can be reliably seen poses certain challenges. In part, because the distances between key optical elements, the proof masses, are constantly changing, at speeds of meters/second, the separation between them is about 5 million kilometers and a contributing factor to optical jitter is the self-gravity of the spacecraft. A discussion of the current state and future approach(s) to the creation of such an optical model will be presented.

  5. Studying PMMA films on silica surfaces with generic microscopic and mesoscale models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Mukherji, D.; Daoulas, K. Ch.

    2016-10-01

    Polymer films on solid substrates present significant interest for fundamental polymer physics and industrial applications. For their mesoscale study, we develop a hybrid particle-based representation where polymers are modeled as worm-like chains and non-bonded interactions are introduced through a simple density functional. The mesoscale description is parameterized to match a generic microscopic model, which nevertheless can represent real materials. Choosing poly (methyl methacrylate) adsorbed on silica as a case study, the consistency of both models in describing conformational and structural properties in polymer films is investigated. We compare selected quantifiers of chain-shape, the structure of the adsorbed layer, as well as the statistics of loops, tails, and trains. Overall, the models are found to be consistent with each other. Some deviations in conformations and structure of adsorbed layer can be attributed to the simplified description of polymer/surface interactions and local liquid packing in the mesoscale model. These results are encouraging for a future development of pseudo-dynamical schemes, parameterizing the kinetics in the hybrid model via the dynamics of the generic microscopic model.

  6. Investigating Students' Mental Models and Knowledge Construction of Microscopic Friction. I. Implications for Curriculum Design and Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corpuz, Edgar D.; Rebello, N. Sanjay

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the first phase of a multiphase study aimed at investigating the dynamics of students' knowledge construction in the context of unfamiliar physical phenomenon--microscopic friction. The first phase of this study involved the investigation of the variations in students' mental models of microscopic friction. Clinical…

  7. Optical models of the human eye.

    PubMed

    Atchison, David A; Thibos, Larry N

    2016-03-01

    Optical models of the human eye have been used in visual science for purposes such as providing a framework for explaining optical phenomena in vision, for predicting how refraction and aberrations are affected by change in ocular biometry and as computational tools for exploring the limitations imposed on vision by the optical system of the eye. We address the issue of what is understood by optical model eyes, discussing the 'encyclopaedia' and 'toy train' approaches to modelling. An extensive list of purposes of models is provided. We discuss many of the theoretical types of optical models (also schematic eyes) of varying anatomical accuracy, including single, three and four refracting surface variants. We cover the models with lens structure in the form of nested shells and gradient index. Many optical eye models give accurate predictions only for small angles and small fields of view. If aberrations and image quality are important to consider, such 'paraxial' model eyes must be replaced by 'finite model' eyes incorporating features such as aspheric surfaces, tilts and decentrations, wavelength-dependent media and curved retinas. Many optical model eyes are population averages and must become adaptable to account for age, gender, ethnicity, refractive error and accommodation. They can also be customised for the individual when extensive ocular biometry and optical performance data are available. We consider which optical model should be used for a particular purpose, adhering to the principle that the best model is the simplest fit for the task. We provide a glimpse into the future of optical models of the human eye. This review is interwoven with historical developments, highlighting the important people who have contributed so richly to our understanding of visual optics.

  8. Microscope collision protection apparatus

    DOEpatents

    DeNure, Charles R.

    2001-10-23

    A microscope collision protection apparatus for a remote control microscope which protects the optical and associated components from damage in the event of an uncontrolled collision with a specimen, regardless of the specimen size or shape. In a preferred embodiment, the apparatus includes a counterbalanced slide for mounting the microscope's optical components. This slide replaces the rigid mounts on conventional upright microscopes with a precision ball bearing slide. As the specimen contacts an optical component, the contacting force will move the slide and the optical components mounted thereon. This movement will protect the optical and associated components from damage as the movement causes a limit switch to be actuated, thereby stopping all motors responsible for the collision.

  9. Simple model for transport phenomena: microscopic construction of Maxwell demonlike engine.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Jyotipratim Ray; Chattopadhyay, Sudip; Banik, Suman Kumar

    2007-12-14

    We present a microscopic Hamiltonian framework to develop Maxwell demonlike engine. Our model consists of an equilibrium thermal bath and a nonequilibrium bath, latter generated by driving with an external stationary, Gaussian noise. The engine we develop can be considered as a device to extract work by modifying internal fluctuations. Our theoretical analysis focuses on finding the essential ingredients necessary for generating fluctuation induced transport under nonequilibrium condition. An important outcome of our model is that the net motion occurs when the nonlinear bath is modulated by the external noise, creating the nonzero effective temperature even when the temperature of both the baths are the same.

  10. Enhanced defect detection capability using learning system for extreme ultraviolet lithography mask inspection tool with projection electron microscope optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Ryoichi; Hatakeyama, Masahiro; Terao, Kenji; Watanabe, Hidehiro

    2016-04-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) patterned mask defect detection is a major issue that must be addressed to realize EUVL-based device fabrication. We have designed projection electron microscope (PEM) optics for integration into a mask inspection system, and the resulting PEM system performs well in half-pitch (hp) 16-nm-node EUVL patterned mask inspection applications. A learning system has been used in this PEM patterned mask inspection tool. The PEM identifies defects using the "defectivity" parameter that is derived from the acquired image characteristics. The learning system has been developed to reduce the labor and the costs associated with adjustment of the PEM's detection capabilities to cope with newly defined mask defects. The concepts behind this learning system and the parameter optimization flow are presented here. The learning system for the PEM is based on a library of registered defects. The learning system then optimizes the detection capability by reconciling previously registered defects with newly registered defects. Functional verification of the learning system is also described, and the system's detection capability is demonstrated by applying it to the inspection of hp 11-nm EUV masks. We can thus provide a user-friendly mask inspection system with reduced cost of ownership.

  11. New aspects of the structure of human hair on the basis of optical microscopic observations of disassembled hair parts.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Asao; Yamauchi, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Infant' and adult' scalp hair fibers were disassembled to various cellular components and blocks by chemical and enzymatic treatments, followed by random scission with rapidly rotating cutters. The hair fibers were also fractured by the use of a vise. The optical microscopic inspection of these specimens led to the discovery of many previously unknown structures in the hair shaft. In particular, a cuticular cell (Cu) was found to take a trowel-like shape consisting of a part with a blade-like shape (CuB) and a part with a handle-like shape (CuH), where CuB overlapped one another and fused partially to build the honeycomb-like structure on a large cuticular thin plate (CuP). Whereas CuH was closely similar to the cortical cell in dimensions and richness of macrofibrils (Mf). It was considered that human hair is stabilized structurally and physicochemically by the presence of the honeycomb-like structure, the CuP and the Mf.

  12. Optical models of the molecular atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuev, V. E.; Makushkin, Y. S.; Mitsel, A. A.; Ponomarev, Y. N.; Rudenko, V. P.; Firsov, K. M.

    1986-01-01

    The use of optical and laser methods for performing atmospheric investigations has stimulated the development of the optical models of the atmosphere. The principles of constructing the optical models of molecular atmosphere for radiation with different spectral composition (wideband, narrowband, and monochromatic) are considered in the case of linear and nonlinear absorptions. The example of the development of a system which provides for the modeling of the processes of optical-wave energy transfer in the atmosphere is presented. Its physical foundations, structure, programming software, and functioning were considered.

  13. Modeling of image formation of a low-cost white-light bench microscope with a linear CMOS image sensor: its application in metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macedo, Milton P.; Barata, António J.; Fernandes, Ana G.; Correia, Carlos M.

    2007-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) microscopy techniques are essentially imaging methods but owing to its ability to get depth information they are widely used in optical metrology. Although the fact that there are numerous examples of applications of confocal microscopy for metrology systems those 3D techniques that more recently came up are very sparse in this field despite its similar optical sectioning ability. In particular there is no report in literature to our knowledge of metrology systems taking advantage of the low-cost, versatility and easy integration of CMOS linear image sensors. We have developed a bench-microscope prototype using LIS-1024 linear sensor (Panavision ©) and have built a model of microscope image formation using Matlab ((Mathworks ©) that is currently being tested in order to optimize sensor performance. The prototype comprises commercial and low-cost mechanical and optical components and a developed sensor readout board based on PIC16F876 microcontroller (Microchip Inc.) allowing its integration in the optical setup. This stage-scanning microscope builds the image through the movement of the specimen in one lateral, in opposition to confocal microscopy that demands scanning in both lateral directions, and in axial direction. Both the actuators control for positioning the object stage and the sensor readout for image acquisition are commanded from a Matlab application in a PC. This paper aims at showing the effectiveness of this model of image formation for the application of this low-cost prototype using a linear sensor also in metrology field. Results will be presented from tests that are being carried out with micromachined components.

  14. Predicting vehicular emissions in high spatial resolution using pervasively measured transportation data and microscopic emissions model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyhan, Marguerite; Sobolevsky, Stanislav; Kang, Chaogui; Robinson, Prudence; Corti, Andrea; Szell, Michael; Streets, David; Lu, Zifeng; Britter, Rex; Barrett, Steven R. H.; Ratti, Carlo

    2016-09-01

    Air pollution related to traffic emissions pose an especially significant problem in cities; this is due to its adverse impact on human health and well-being. Previous studies which have aimed to quantify emissions from the transportation sector have been limited by either simulated or coarsely resolved traffic volume data. Emissions inventories form the basis of urban pollution models, therefore in this study, Global Positioning System (GPS) trajectory data from a taxi fleet of over 15,000 vehicles were analyzed with the aim of predicting air pollution emissions for Singapore. This novel approach enabled the quantification of instantaneous drive cycle parameters in high spatio-temporal resolution, which provided the basis for a microscopic emissions model. Carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen oxides (NOx), volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and particulate matter (PM) emissions were thus estimated. Highly localized areas of elevated emissions levels were identified, with a spatio-temporal precision not possible with previously used methods for estimating emissions. Relatively higher emissions areas were mainly concentrated in a few districts that were the Singapore Downtown Core area, to the north of the central urban region and to the east of it. Daily emissions quantified for the total motor vehicle population of Singapore were found to be comparable to another emissions dataset. Results demonstrated that high-resolution spatio-temporal vehicle traces detected using GPS in large taxi fleets could be used to infer highly localized areas of elevated acceleration and air pollution emissions in cities, and may become a complement to traditional emission estimates, especially in emerging cities and countries where reliable fine-grained urban air quality data is not easily available. This is the first study of its kind to investigate measured microscopic vehicle movement in tandem with microscopic emissions modeling for a substantial study domain.

  15. Integrating the Advanced Human Eye Model (AHEM) and optical instrument models to model complete visual optical systems inclusive of the typical or atypical eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, William J., III

    2012-06-01

    PURPOSE: To present a commercially available optical modeling software tool to assist the development of optical instrumentation and systems that utilize and/or integrate with the human eye. METHODS: A commercially available flexible eye modeling system is presented, the Advanced Human Eye Model (AHEM). AHEM is a module that the engineer can use to perform rapid development and test scenarios on systems that integrate with the eye. Methods include merging modeled systems initially developed outside of AHEM and performing a series of wizard-type operations that relieve the user from requiring an optometric or ophthalmic background to produce a complete eye inclusive system. Scenarios consist of retinal imaging of targets and sources through integrated systems. Uses include, but are not limited to, optimization, telescopes, microscopes, spectacles, contact and intraocular lenses, ocular aberrations, cataract simulation and scattering, and twin eye model (binocular) systems. RESULTS: Metrics, graphical data, and exportable CAD geometry are generated from the various modeling scenarios.

  16. Relating the microscopic rules in coalescence-fragmentation models to the cluster-size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruszczycki, B.; Burnett, B.; Zhao, Z.; Johnson, N. F.

    2009-11-01

    Coalescence-fragmentation problems are now of great interest across the physical, biological, and social sciences. They are typically studied from the perspective of rate equations, at the heart of which are the rules used for coalescence and fragmentation. Here we discuss how changes in these microscopic rules affect the macroscopic cluster-size distribution which emerges from the solution to the rate equation. Our analysis elucidates the crucial role that the fragmentation rule can play in such dynamical grouping models. We focus our discussion on two well-known models whose fragmentation rules lie at opposite extremes. In particular, we provide a range of generalizations and new analytic results for the well-known model of social group formation developed by Eguíluz and Zimmermann, [Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 5659 (2000)]. We develop analytic perturbation treatments of this original model, and extend the analytic analysis to the treatment of growing and declining populations.

  17. Microscopic Description of the Granular Fluidity Field in Nonlocal Flow Modeling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiong; Kamrin, Ken

    2017-02-03

    A recent granular rheology based on an implicit "granular fluidity" field has been shown to quantitatively predict many nonlocal phenomena. However, the physical nature of the field has not been identified. Here, the granular fluidity is found to be a kinematic variable given by the velocity fluctuation and packing fraction. This is verified with many discrete element simulations, which show that the operational fluidity definition, solutions of the fluidity model, and the proposed microscopic formula all agree. Kinetic theoretical and Eyring-like explanations shed insight into the obtained form.

  18. Microscopic Description of the Granular Fluidity Field in Nonlocal Flow Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiong; Kamrin, Ken

    2017-02-01

    A recent granular rheology based on an implicit "granular fluidity" field has been shown to quantitatively predict many nonlocal phenomena. However, the physical nature of the field has not been identified. Here, the granular fluidity is found to be a kinematic variable given by the velocity fluctuation and packing fraction. This is verified with many discrete element simulations, which show that the operational fluidity definition, solutions of the fluidity model, and the proposed microscopic formula all agree. Kinetic theoretical and Eyring-like explanations shed insight into the obtained form.

  19. Photography through the Microscope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, D. W.

    1992-01-01

    Describes how to illuminate and optically stain slides for microscope use and how to interface a 35mm camera with a microscope using an adaptor. Provides equipment descriptions and sources, details about illumination, image formation, darkfield adaptors, centerable filter adaptors, darkfield stops, rheinburg filters, and choosing specimens to…

  20. Assessment of Petrological Microscopes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathison, Charter Innes

    1990-01-01

    Presented is a set of procedures designed to check the design, ergonomics, illumination, function, optics, accessory equipment, and image quality of a microscope being considered for purchase. Functions for use in a petrology or mineralogy laboratory are stressed. (CW)

  1. Nonequilibrium structure and dynamics in a microscopic model of thin-film active gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Head, D. A.; Briels, W. J.; Gompper, Gerhard

    2014-03-01

    In the presence of adenosine triphosphate, molecular motors generate active force dipoles that drive suspensions of protein filaments far from thermodynamic equilibrium, leading to exotic dynamics and pattern formation. Microscopic modeling can help to quantify the relationship between individual motors plus filaments to organization and dynamics on molecular and supramolecular length scales. Here, we present results of extensive numerical simulations of active gels where the motors and filaments are confined between two infinite parallel plates. Thermal fluctuations and excluded-volume interactions between filaments are included. A systematic variation of rates for motor motion, attachment, and detachment, including a differential detachment rate from filament ends, reveals a range of nonequilibrium behavior. Strong motor binding produces structured filament aggregates that we refer to as asters, bundles, or layers, whose stability depends on motor speed and differential end detachment. The gross features of the dependence of the observed structures on the motor rate and the filament concentration can be captured by a simple one-filament model. Loosely bound aggregates exhibit superdiffusive mass transport, where filament translocation scales with lag time with nonunique exponents that depend on motor kinetics. An empirical data collapse of filament speed as a function of motor speed and end detachment is found, suggesting a dimensional reduction of the relevant parameter space. We conclude by discussing the perspectives of microscopic modeling in the field of active gels.

  2. Continuum modelling of pedestrian flows: From microscopic principles to self-organised macroscopic phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoogendoorn, Serge P.; van Wageningen-Kessels, Femke L. M.; Daamen, Winnie; Duives, Dorine C.

    2014-12-01

    The dynamics of pedestrian flows can be captured in a continuum modelling framework. However, compared to vehicular flow, this is a much more challenging task. In particular the integration of flow propagation and path choice are known to be problematic. Furthermore, pedestrian flow is characterised by different self-organised phenomena, such as the formation of dynamic lanes and diagonal stripes, which have not yet been captured in a continuum modelling framework. This contribution puts forward a novel multi-class continuum model that captures some of the key features of pedestrian flows. It considers path choice behaviour on both the strategic (pre-trip) and tactical (en-route) level. To achieve this, we present a methodology to derive a continuum model from a microscopic walker model, in this case the social forces model. In doing so, we show that the interaction term present in the social forces model introduces a local path choice component in the equilibrium velocity. Having derived the model, we analyse its properties both by means of mathematical analyses and simulation studies. This reveals the general behaviour of the model, as well as the ability of the model to reproduce self-organised structures, and phase transitions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first continuum model that is able to reproduce these self-organised structures.

  3. Electron Microscopic Analysis of Hippocampal Axo‐Somatic Synapses in a Chronic Stress Model for Depression

    PubMed Central

    Csabai, Dávid; Seress, László; Varga, Zsófia; Ábrahám, Hajnalka; Miseta, Attila; Wiborg, Ove

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Stress can alter the number and morphology of excitatory synapses in the hippocampus, but nothing is known about the effect of stress on inhibitory synapses. Here, we used an animal model for depression, the chronic mild stress model, and quantified the number of perisomatic inhibitory neurons and their synapses. We found reduced density of parvalbumin‐positive (PV+) neurons in response to stress, while the density of cholecystokinin‐immunoreactive (CCK+) neurons was unaffected. We did a detailed electron microscopic analysis to quantify the frequency and morphology of perisomatic inhibitory synapses in the hippocampal CA1 area. We analyzed 1100 CA1 pyramidal neurons and 4800 perisomatic terminals in five control and four chronically stressed rats. In the control animals we observed the following parameters: Number of terminals/soma = 57; Number of terminals/100 µm cell perimeter = 10; Synapse/terminal ratio = 32%; Synapse number/100 terminal = 120; Average terminal length = 920nm. None of these parameters were affected by the stress exposure. Overall, these data indicate that despite the depressive‐like behavior and the decrease in the number of perisomatic PV+ neurons in the light microscopic preparations, the number of perisomatic inhibitory synapses on CA1 pyramidal cells was not affected by stress. In the electron microscope, PV+ neurons and the axon terminals appeared to be normal and we did not find any apoptotic or necrotic cells. This data is in sharp contrast to the remarkable remodeling of the excitatory synapses on spines that has been reported in response to stress and depressive‐like behavior. © 2016 The Authors Hippocampus Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27571571

  4. Models of the optical properties of solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tropf, William J.; Thomas, Michael E.

    1992-12-01

    Physically-based optical property models of solids are a convenient means of representing the complex index of refraction as a function of frequency and temperature. This modeling approach is especially convenient considering the wide spread use of personal computers and the uncomplicated mathematical form of the models. Models provide a convenient method of cataloging measurements and interpolated between measurements. Several useful models covering absorption and scattering phenomena are presented. Together, these models allow prediction of optical properties over the spectral range from microwaves to the electronic band gap. Temperature dependence of the optical properties cover a more restricted range, but some models predict optical properties from liquid helium to melting temperatures. We have developed an optical properties code incorporating the following models: the classical (one- phonon) oscillator model, our multi-phonon model, the Urbach tail and weak absorption tail models, free-carrier model, and an empirical scatter model. These models require measured parameters which are given for common materials. Comparisons of model calculations of the refractive index, the absorption coefficient, and scattering coefficient to experimental data are presented.

  5. Intrasurgical Human Retinal Imaging With Manual Instrument Tracking Using a Microscope-Integrated Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Device

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Paul; Carrasco-Zevallos, Oscar; Cunefare, David; Migacz, Justin; Farsiu, Sina; Izatt, Joseph A.; Toth, Cynthia A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize the first in-human intraoperative imaging using a custom prototype spectral-domain microscope-integrated optical coherence tomography (MIOCT) device during vitreoretinal surgery with instruments in the eye. Methods: Under institutional review board approval for a prospective intraoperative study, MIOCT images were obtained at surgical pauses with instruments held static in the vitreous cavity and then concurrently with surgical maneuvers. Postoperatively, MIOCT images obtained at surgical pauses were compared with images obtained with a high-resolution handheld spectral-domain OCT (HHOCT) system with objective endpoints, including acquisition of images acceptable for analysis and identification of predefined macular morphologic or pathologic features. Results: Human MIOCT images were successfully obtained before incision and during pauses in surgical maneuvers. MIOCT imaging confirmed preoperative diagnoses, such as epiretinal membrane, full-thickness macular hole, and vitreomacular traction and demonstrated successful achievement of surgical goals. MIOCT and HHOCT images obtained at surgical pauses in two cohorts of five patients were comparable with greater than or equal to 80% correlation in 80% of patients. Real-time video-imaging concurrent with surgical manipulations enabled, for the first time using this device, visualization of dynamic instrument-retina interaction with targeted OCT tracking. Conclusion: MIOCT is successful for imaging at surgical pauses and for real-time image guidance with implementation of targeted OCT tracking. Even faster acquisition speeds are currently being developed with incorporation of a swept-source MIOCT engine. Further refinements and investigations will be directed toward continued integration for real-time volumetric imaging of surgical maneuvers. Translational Relevance: Ongoing development of seamless MIOCT systems will likely transform surgical visualization, approaches, and decision-making. PMID

  6. 3D registration of intravascular optical coherence tomography and cryo-image volumes for microscopic-resolution validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhu, David; Mehanna, Emile; Gargesha, Madhusudhana; Wen, Di; Brandt, Eric; van Ditzhuijzen, Nienke S.; Chamie, Daniel; Yamamoto, Hirosada; Fujino, Yusuke; Farmazilian, Ali; Patel, Jaymin; Costa, Marco; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2016-03-01

    High resolution, 100 frames/sec intravascular optical coherence tomography (IVOCT) can distinguish plaque types, but further validation is needed, especially for automated plaque characterization. We developed experimental and 3D registration methods, to provide validation of IVOCT pullback volumes using microscopic, brightfield and fluorescent cryoimage volumes, with optional, exactly registered cryo-histology. The innovation was a method to match an IVOCT pullback images, acquired in the catheter reference frame, to a true 3D cryo-image volume. Briefly, an 11-parameter, polynomial virtual catheter was initialized within the cryo-image volume, and perpendicular images were extracted, mimicking IVOCT image acquisition. Virtual catheter parameters were optimized to maximize cryo and IVOCT lumen overlap. Local minima were possible, but when we started within reasonable ranges, every one of 24 digital phantom cases converged to a good solution with a registration error of only +1.34+/-2.65μm (signed distance). Registration was applied to 10 ex-vivo cadaver coronary arteries (LADs), resulting in 10 registered cryo and IVOCT volumes yielding a total of 421 registered 2D-image pairs. Image overlays demonstrated high continuity between vascular and plaque features. Bland- Altman analysis comparing cryo and IVOCT lumen area, showed mean and standard deviation of differences as 0.01+/-0.43 mm2. DICE coefficients were 0.91+/-0.04. Finally, visual assessment on 20 representative cases with easily identifiable features suggested registration accuracy within one frame of IVOCT (+/-200μm), eliminating significant misinterpretations introduced by 1mm errors in the literature. The method will provide 3D data for training of IVOCT plaque algorithms and can be used for validation of other intravascular imaging modalities.

  7. 3D registration of intravascular optical coherence tomography and cryo-image volumes for microscopic-resolution validation

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, David; Mehanna, Emile; Gargesha, Madhusudhana; Wen, Di; Brandt, Eric; van Ditzhuijzen, Nienke S.; Chamie, Daniel; Yamamoto, Hirosada; Fujino, Yusuke; Farmazilian, Ali; Patel, Jaymin; Costa, Marco; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2016-01-01

    High resolution, 100 frames/sec intravascular optical coherence tomography (IVOCT) can distinguish plaque types, but further validation is needed, especially for automated plaque characterization. We developed experimental and 3D registration methods, to provide validation of IVOCT pullback volumes using microscopic, brightfield and fluorescent cryo-image volumes, with optional, exactly registered cryo-histology. The innovation was a method to match an IVOCT pull-back images, acquired in the catheter reference frame, to a true 3D cryo-image volume. Briefly, an 11-parameter, polynomial virtual catheter was initialized within the cryo-image volume, and perpendicular images were extracted, mimicking IVOCT image acquisition. Virtual catheter parameters were optimized to maximize cryo and IVOCT lumen overlap. Local minima were possible, but when we started within reasonable ranges, every one of 24 digital phantom cases converged to a good solution with a registration error of only +1.34±2.65μm (signed distance). Registration was applied to 10 ex-vivo cadaver coronary arteries (LADs), resulting in 10 registered cryo and IVOCT volumes yielding a total of 421 registered 2D-image pairs. Image overlays demonstrated high continuity between vascular and plaque features. Bland-Altman analysis comparing cryo and IVOCT lumen area, showed mean and standard deviation of differences as 0.01±0.43 mm2. DICE coefficients were 0.91±0.04. Finally, visual assessment on 20 representative cases with easily identifiable features suggested registration accuracy within one frame of IVOCT (±200μm), eliminating significant misinterpretations introduced by 1mm errors in the literature. The method will provide 3D data for training of IVOCT plaque algorithms and can be used for validation of other intravascular imaging modalities. PMID:27162417

  8. Rate turnover in mechano-catalytic coupling: A model and its microscopic origin

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Mahua; Grazioli, Gianmarc; Andricioaei, Ioan

    2015-07-28

    A novel aspect in the area of mechano-chemistry concerns the effect of external forces on enzyme activity, i.e., the existence of mechano-catalytic coupling. Recent experiments on enzyme-catalyzed disulphide bond reduction in proteins under the effect of a force applied on the termini of the protein substrate reveal an unexpected biphasic force dependence for the bond cleavage rate. Here, using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations combined with Smoluchowski theory, we propose a model for this behavior. For a broad range of forces and systems, the model reproduces the experimentally observed rates by solving a reaction-diffusion equation for a “protein coordinate” diffusing in a force-dependent effective potential. The atomistic simulations are used to compute, from first principles, the parameters of the model via a quasiharmonic analysis. Additionally, the simulations are also used to provide details about the microscopic degrees of freedom that are important for the underlying mechano-catalysis.

  9. Relativistic Brownian motion: from a microscopic binary collision model to the Langevin equation.

    PubMed

    Dunkel, Jörn; Hänggi, Peter

    2006-11-01

    The Langevin equation (LE) for the one-dimensional relativistic Brownian motion is derived from a microscopic collision model. The model assumes that a heavy pointlike Brownian particle interacts with the lighter heat bath particles via elastic hard-core collisions. First, the commonly known, nonrelativistic LE is deduced from this model, by taking into account the nonrelativistic conservation laws for momentum and kinetic energy. Subsequently, this procedure is generalized to the relativistic case. There, it is found that the relativistic stochastic force is still delta correlated (white noise) but no longer corresponds to a Gaussian white noise process. Explicit results for the friction and momentum-space diffusion coefficients are presented and discussed.

  10. Optical Hall effect-model description: tutorial.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Mathias; Kühne, Philipp; Darakchieva, Vanya; Hofmann, Tino

    2016-08-01

    The optical Hall effect is a physical phenomenon that describes the occurrence of magnetic-field-induced dielectric displacement at optical wavelengths, transverse and longitudinal to the incident electric field, and analogous to the static electrical Hall effect. The electrical Hall effect and certain cases of the optical Hall effect observations can be explained by extensions of the classic Drude model for the transport of electrons in metals. The optical Hall effect is most useful for characterization of electrical properties in semiconductors. Among many advantages, while the optical Hall effect dispenses with the need of electrical contacts, electrical material properties such as effective mass and mobility parameters, including their anisotropy as well as carrier type and density, can be determined from the optical Hall effect. Measurement of the optical Hall effect can be performed within the concept of generalized ellipsometry at an oblique angle of incidence. In this paper, we review and discuss physical model equations, which can be used to calculate the optical Hall effect in single- and multiple-layered structures of semiconductor materials. We define the optical Hall effect dielectric function tensor, demonstrate diagonalization approaches, and show requirements for the optical Hall effect tensor from energy conservation. We discuss both continuum and quantum approaches, and we provide a brief description of the generalized ellipsometry concept, the Mueller matrix calculus, and a 4×4 matrix algebra to calculate data accessible by experiment. In a follow-up paper, we will discuss strategies and approaches for experimental data acquisition and analysis.

  11. Combined use of optical and electron microscopic techniques for the measurement of hygroscopic property, chemical composition, and morphology of individual aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Kang-Ho; Kim, Sun-Man; Jung, Hae-Jin; Lee, Mi-Jung; Eom, Hyo-Jin; Maskey, Shila; Ro, Chul-Un

    2010-10-01

    In this work, an analytical method for the characterization of the hygroscopic property, chemical composition, and morphology of individual aerosol particles is introduced. The method, which is based on the combined use of optical and electron microscopic techniques, is simple and easy to apply. An optical microscopic technique was used to perform the visual observation of the phase transformation and hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles on a single particle level. A quantitative energy-dispersive electron probe X-ray microanalysis, named low-Z particle EPMA, was used to perform a quantitative chemical speciation of the same individual particles after the measurement of the hygroscopic property. To validate the analytical methodology, the hygroscopic properties of artificially generated NaCl, KCl, (NH(4))(2)SO(4), and Na(2)SO(4) aerosol particles of micrometer size were investigated. The practical applicability of the analytical method for studying the hygroscopic property, chemical composition, and morphology of ambient aerosol particles is demonstrated.

  12. Optical Storage Performance Modeling and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behera, Bailochan; Singh, Harpreet

    1990-01-01

    Evaluates different types of storage media for long-term archival storage of large amounts of data. Existing storage media are reviewed, including optical disks, optical tape, magnetic storage, and microfilm; three models are proposed based on document storage requirements; performance analysis is considered; and cost effectiveness is discussed.…

  13. Memory effects in microscopic traffic models and wide scattering in flow-density data.

    PubMed

    Treiber, Martin; Helbing, Dirk

    2003-10-01

    By means of microscopic simulations we show that noninstantaneous adaptation of the driving behavior to the traffic situation together with the conventional method to measure flow-density data provides a possible explanation for the observed inverse-lambda shape and the wide scattering of flow-density data in "synchronized" congested traffic. We model a memory effect in the response of drivers to the traffic situation for a wide class of car-following models by introducing an additional dynamical variable (the "subjective level of service") describing the adaptation of drivers to the surrounding traffic situation during the past few minutes and couple this internal state to parameters of the underlying model that are related to the driving style. For illustration, we use the intelligent-driver model (IDM) as the underlying model, characterize the level of service solely by the velocity, and couple the internal variable to the IDM parameter "time gap" to model an increase of the time gap in congested traffic ("frustration effect"), which is supported by single-vehicle data. We simulate open systems with a bottleneck and obtain flow-density data by implementing "virtual detectors." The shape, relative size, and apparent "stochasticity" of the region of the scattered data points agree nearly quantitatively with empirical data. Wide scattering is even observed for identical vehicles, although the proposed model is a time-continuous, deterministic, single-lane car-following model with a unique fundamental diagram.

  14. Modeling of silica nanowires for optical sensing.

    PubMed

    Lou, Jingyi; Tong, Limin; Ye, Zhizhen

    2005-03-21

    Based on evanescent-wave guiding properties of nanowire waveguides, we propose to use single-mode subwavelength-diameter silica nanowires for optical sensing. Phase shift of the guided mode caused by index change is obtained by solving Maxwell's equation, and is used as a criterion for sensitivity estimation. Nanowire sensor employing a wire-assembled Mach-Zehnder structure is modeled. The result shows that optical nanowires, especially those fabricated by taper drawing of optical fibers, are promising for developing miniaturized optical sensors with high sensitivity.

  15. Particle-hole symmetry in generalized seniority, microscopic interacting boson (fermion) model, nucleon-pair approximation, and other models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, L. Y.

    2016-06-01

    The particle-hole symmetry (equivalence) of the full shell-model Hilbert space is straightforward and routinely used in practical calculations. In this work I show that this symmetry is preserved in the subspace truncated up to a certain generalized seniority and give the explicit transformation between the states in the two types (particle and hole) of representations. Based on the results, I study particle-hole symmetry in popular theories that could be regarded as further truncations on top of the generalized seniority, including the microscopic interacting boson (fermion) model, the nucleon-pair approximation, and other models.

  16. Modeling the microscopic electrical properties of thrombin binding aptamer (TBA) for label-free biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfinito, Eleonora; Reggiani, Lino; Cataldo, Rosella; De Nunzio, Giorgio; Giotta, Livia; Guascito, Maria Rachele

    2017-02-01

    Aptamers are chemically produced oligonucleotides, able to bind a variety of targets such as drugs, proteins and pathogens with high sensitivity and selectivity. Therefore, aptamers are largely employed for producing label-free biosensors (aptasensors), with significant applications in diagnostics and drug delivery. In particular, the anti-thrombin aptamers are biomolecules of high interest for clinical use, because of their ability to recognize and bind the thrombin enzyme. Among them, the DNA 15-mer aptamer (TBA), has been widely explored around the possibility of using it in aptasensors. This paper proposes a microscopic model of the electrical properties of TBA and of the aptamer-thrombin complex, combining information from both structure and function, following the issues addressed in an emerging branch of electronics known as proteotronics. The theoretical results are compared and validated with measurements reported in the literature. Finally, the model suggests resistance measurements as a novel tool for testing aptamer-target affinity.

  17. Modeling the microscopic electrical properties of thrombin binding aptamer (TBA) for label-free biosensors.

    PubMed

    Alfinito, Eleonora; Reggiani, Lino; Cataldo, Rosella; De Nunzio, Giorgio; Giotta, Livia; Guascito, Maria Rachele

    2017-02-10

    Aptamers are chemically produced oligonucleotides, able to bind a variety of targets such as drugs, proteins and pathogens with high sensitivity and selectivity. Therefore, aptamers are largely employed for producing label-free biosensors (aptasensors), with significant applications in diagnostics and drug delivery. In particular, the anti-thrombin aptamers are biomolecules of high interest for clinical use, because of their ability to recognize and bind the thrombin enzyme. Among them, the DNA 15-mer aptamer (TBA), has been widely explored around the possibility of using it in aptasensors. This paper proposes a microscopic model of the electrical properties of TBA and of the aptamer-thrombin complex, combining information from both structure and function, following the issues addressed in an emerging branch of electronics known as proteotronics. The theoretical results are compared and validated with measurements reported in the literature. Finally, the model suggests resistance measurements as a novel tool for testing aptamer-target affinity.

  18. Goldstino and sgoldstino in microscopic models and the constrained superfields formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniadis, I.; Dudas, E.; Ghilencea, D. M.

    2012-04-01

    We examine the exact relation between the superconformal symmetry breaking chiral superfield ( X) and the goldstino superfield in microscopic models of an arbitrary Kahler potential ( K) and in the presence of matter fields. We investigate the decoupling of the massive sgoldstino and scalar matter fields and the offshell/onshell-SUSY expressions of their superfields in terms of the fermions composites. For general K of two superfields, we study the properties of the superfield X after integrating out these scalar fields, to show that in the infrared it satisfies (offshell) the condition X=0 and X≠0. We then compare our results to those of the well-known method of constrained superfields discussed in the literature, based on the conjecture X=0. Our results can be used in applications, to couple offshell the (s)goldstino fields to realistic models such as the MSSM.

  19. New deconvolution method for microscopic images based on the continuous Gaussian radial basis function interpolation model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhaoxue; Chen, Hao

    2014-01-01

    A deconvolution method based on the Gaussian radial basis function (GRBF) interpolation is proposed. Both the original image and Gaussian point spread function are expressed as the same continuous GRBF model, thus image degradation is simplified as convolution of two continuous Gaussian functions, and image deconvolution is converted to calculate the weighted coefficients of two-dimensional control points. Compared with Wiener filter and Lucy-Richardson algorithm, the GRBF method has an obvious advantage in the quality of restored images. In order to overcome such a defect of long-time computing, the method of graphic processing unit multithreading or increasing space interval of control points is adopted, respectively, to speed up the implementation of GRBF method. The experiments show that based on the continuous GRBF model, the image deconvolution can be efficiently implemented by the method, which also has a considerable reference value for the study of three-dimensional microscopic image deconvolution.

  20. Structure analysis and models for optical constants of discontinuous metallic silver films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, R. R.; Leitner, A.; Aussenegg, F. R.

    1995-02-01

    Existing models for optical properties of metallic particle films differ in their treatment of the mechanisms for particle interaction. For model comparison and improvement we fit the calculated optical spectra to obtained ones experimentally by variation of several structural parameters. The deviation of the model's structure parameters from those obtained experimentally (by analysis of transmission electron microscope pictures) permits comparison of models. We find that for thermally treated silver island films in the mass thickness range 1-6 nm the particle interaction is described best by a quasi-static dipole-dipole interaction, neglecting retardation effects and mirror dipole effects.

  1. Model-independent link between the macroscopic and microscopic descriptions of multidentate macromolecular binding: relationship between stepwise, intrinsic, and microscopic equilibrium constants.

    PubMed

    Lluís Garcés, Josep; Rey-Castro, Carlos; David, Calin; Madurga, Sergio; Mas, Francesc; Pastor, Isabel; Puy, Jaume

    2009-11-19

    The binding of ions or other small molecules to macromolecules and surfaces can be macroscopically characterized by means of the stepwise (or stoichiometric) equilibrium constants, which can be obtained experimentally from coverage versus concentration data. The present work presents a novel, simple, and direct interpretation of the stepwise constants in terms of the microscopic, site-specific, stability constants. This formalism can be applied to the most general case, including the heterogeneity of the sites, interactions among them, multicomponent adsorption, and so forth, and, in particular, to chelate complexation. We show that the stepwise equilibrium constants can be expressed as a product of two factors, (i) the average number of free potential sites (per bound ion) of the microscopic species to be complexed (stoichiometric factor) and (ii) the average of the microscopic stability constants of their free potential sites. The latter factor generalizes the concept of the intrinsic equilibrium constant to systems with chelate complexation and reduces to the standard definition for monodentate binding. However, in the case of heterogeneous multidentate complexation, the stoichiometric factor cannot be known a priori, so that the finding of the intrinsic constants is not trivial. One option is to approximate the stoichiometric factor by the value that would correspond to identical active centers. We investigate the accuracy of this assumption by comparing the resulting approximate intrinsic constants to those obtained by Monte Carlo simulation of several binding models. For the cases investigated, it is found that the assumption is quite accurate when no correlated structures (typical of short-range interactions) are formed along the chain. For adsorption of particles attached to a large number of active centers, the formalism presented here leads to the Widom particle insertion method.

  2. Modeling of Macroscopic/Microscopic Transport and Growth Phenomena in Zeolite Crystal Solutions Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatsonis, Nikos A.; Alexandrou, Andreas; Shi, Hui; Ongewe, Bernard; Sacco, Albert, Jr.

    1999-01-01

    . At the same time, however, there is increased urgency to develop such an understanding in order to more accurately quantify the process. In order to better understand the results obtained from our prior space experiments, and design future experiments, a detailed fluid dynamic model simulating the crystal growth mechanism is required. This will not only add to the fundamental knowledge on the crystallization of zeolites, but also be useful in predicting the limits of size and growth of these important industrial materials. Our objective is to develop macro/microscopic theoretical and computational models to study the effect of transport phenomena in the growth of crystals grown in solutions. Our effort has concentrated so far in the development of separate macroscopic and microscopic models. The major highlights of our accomplishments are described.

  3. Calibration of microscopic traffic-flow models using multiple data sources.

    PubMed

    Hoogendoorn, Serge; Hoogendoorn, Raymond

    2010-10-13

    Parameter identification of microscopic driving models is a difficult task. This is caused by the fact that parameters--such as reaction time, sensitivity to stimuli, etc.--are generally not directly observable from common traffic data, but also due to the lack of reliable statistical estimation techniques. This contribution puts forward a new approach to identifying parameters of car-following models. One of the main contributions of this article is that the proposed approach allows for joint estimation of parameters using different data sources, including prior information on parameter values (or the valid range of values). This is achieved by generalizing the maximum-likelihood estimation approach proposed by the authors in previous work. The approach allows for statistical analysis of the parameter estimates, including the standard error of the parameter estimates and the correlation of the estimates. Using the likelihood-ratio test, models of different complexity (defined by the number of model parameters) can be cross-compared. A nice property of this test is that it takes into account the number of parameters of a model as well as the performance. To illustrate the workings, the approach is applied to two car-following models using vehicle trajectories of a Dutch freeway collected from a helicopter, in combination with data collected with a driving simulator.

  4. A stacking-fault based microscopic model for platelets in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonelli, Alex; Nunes, Ricardo

    2005-03-01

    We propose a new microscopic model for the 001 planar defects in diamond commonly called platelets. This model is based on the formation of a metastable stacking fault, which can occur because of the ability of carbon to stabilize in different bonding configurations. In our model the core of the planar defect is basically a double layer of three-fold coordinated sp^2 carbon atoms embedded in the common sp^3 diamond structure. The properties of the model were determined using ab initio total energy calculations. All significant experimental signatures attributed to the platelets, namely, the lattice displacement along the [001] direction, the asymmetry between the [110] and the [11 0] directions, the infrared absorption peak B^' , and broad luminescence lines that indicate the introduction of levels in the band gap, are naturally accounted for in our model. The model is also very appealing from the point of view of kinetics, since naturally occurring shearing processes will lead to the formation of the metastable fault.Authors acknowledge financial support from the Brazilian agencies FAPESP, CNPq, FAEP-UNICAMP, FAPEMIG, and Instituto do Milênio em Nanociências-MCT

  5. Is the stokeslet model sufficient for finding nutrient uptake of microscopic suspension feeders?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutton, Alexander T.; Pepper, Rachel E.

    2016-11-01

    Microscopic sessile suspension feeders are part of many aquatic ecosystems. They are single-celled, vary in size from a few to about 100 microns in length, live attached to substrates, and serve important ecological roles as both food for larger organisms and consumers of bacteria and other small particles. These organisms create currents in order to bring food toward them. Understanding these currents may allow us not only deeper insight into the ecology of aquatic ecosystems, but also may enable innovation in water treatment. Simulations of the feeding currents of these organisms typically use a simple model that places a stokeslet above an infinite plane boundary representing the surface of attachment. This model produces a useful approximation for the flow field of the organism, but may be of limited accuracy when the organism is near the boundary. We create a different model composed of a stokeslet and a potential dipole, which form a sphere. This sphere has a sin(θ) tangential velocity boundary condition, accounting for the cell body. Using nutrient flux to the organism as our metric, we investigate the discrepancy between the spherical and stokeslet models in order to determine the efficacy of the stokeslet model as an approximation of single-celled suspension feeders.

  6. Measurement with microscopic MRI and simulation of flow in different aneurysm models

    SciTech Connect

    Edelhoff, Daniel Frank, Frauke; Heil, Marvin; Suter, Dieter; Walczak, Lars; Weichert, Frank; Schmitz, Inge

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: The impact and the development of aneurysms depend to a significant degree on the exchange of liquid between the regular vessel and the pathological extension. A better understanding of this process will lead to improved prediction capabilities. The aim of the current study was to investigate fluid-exchange in aneurysm models of different complexities by combining microscopic magnetic resonance measurements with numerical simulations. In order to evaluate the accuracy and applicability of these methods, the fluid-exchange process between the unaltered vessel lumen and the aneurysm phantoms was analyzed quantitatively using high spatial resolution. Methods: Magnetic resonance flow imaging was used to visualize fluid-exchange in two different models produced with a 3D printer. One model of an aneurysm was based on histological findings. The flow distribution in the different models was measured on a microscopic scale using time of flight magnetic resonance imaging. The whole experiment was simulated using fast graphics processing unit-based numerical simulations. The obtained simulation results were compared qualitatively and quantitatively with the magnetic resonance imaging measurements, taking into account flow and spin–lattice relaxation. Results: The results of both presented methods compared well for the used aneurysm models and the chosen flow distributions. The results from the fluid-exchange analysis showed comparable characteristics concerning measurement and simulation. Similar symmetry behavior was observed. Based on these results, the amount of fluid-exchange was calculated. Depending on the geometry of the models, 7% to 45% of the liquid was exchanged per second. Conclusions: The result of the numerical simulations coincides well with the experimentally determined velocity field. The rate of fluid-exchange between vessel and aneurysm was well-predicted. Hence, the results obtained by simulation could be validated by the experiment. The

  7. Local detection efficiency of a NbN superconducting single photon detector explored by a scattering scanning near-field optical microscope.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Renema, Jelmer J; Engel, Andreas; van Exter, Martin P; de Dood, Michiel J A

    2015-09-21

    We propose an experiment to directly probe the local response of a superconducting single photon detector using a sharp metal tip in a scattering scanning near-field optical microscope. The optical absorption is obtained by simulating the tip-detector system, where the tip-detector is illuminated from the side, with the tip functioning as an optical antenna. The local detection efficiency is calculated by considering the recently introduced position-dependent threshold current in the detector. The calculated response for a 150 nm wide detector shows a peak close to the edge that can be spatially resolved with an estimated resolution of ∼ 20 nm, using a tip with parameters that are experimentally accessible.

  8. A Microscopic Model for Diffusion of a Polymer Chain in the Entangled Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canpolat, Murat; Erzan, Ayþe; Pekcan, Önder

    1997-01-01

    In the entangled regime the reptation concept [1,2] is the most successful in describing the dynamical behavior of a single chain. Using scaling concepts some quantities such as translational diffussion coefficient for the polymer center of mass Dtr, and renewal time {t} [3] have been calculated in the reptation model. This model is used for representing the low-frequency motions of a polymer molecule in a fluid of entangled chains, neglecting rapid relaxation processes that are attributed to local conformal transitions of backbone. Helfand and collabrators have studied the kinetics of conformational transitions in chain molecules, and they find that single-bond rotations followed by the compensating rearrangement of neigboring units are predominantly responsible for local motions [4]. Such models have also been considered by Erman and co-workers [5]. The purpose of this study to understand reptation at a microscopic level. We consedir rapid relaxation processes, that are singlet- or double -bond rotations; motion along the contour of the chain is due to displacments caused by rearangements of the neighboring units. We recover the usual scaling behavior of the diffusion coefficients and relaxation times with the chain mass. Moreover, the effective activation energy that is found from the local jump model for translational motion of the chain center of mass compares favorably with experiment and is independent of the molecular weight for large enough chains [6]. We are also able to account for the apparent temperature of this "activation energy".

  9. Two-dimensional simulation and modeling in scanning electron microscope imaging and metrology research.

    PubMed

    Postek, Michael T; Vladár, András E; Lowney, Jeremiah R; Keery, William J

    2002-01-01

    Traditional Monte Carlo modeling of the electron beam-specimen interactions in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) produces information about electron beam penetration and output signal generation at either a single beam-landing location, or multiple landing positions. If the multiple landings lie on a line, the results can be graphed in a line scan-like format. Monte Carlo results formatted as line scans have proven useful in providing one-dimensional information about the sample (e.g., linewidth). When used this way, this process is called forward line scan modeling. In the present work, the concept of image simulation (or the first step in the inverse modeling of images) is introduced where the forward-modeled line scan data are carried one step further to construct theoretical two-dimensional (2-D) micrographs (i.e., theoretical SEM images) for comparison with similar experimentally obtained micrographs. This provides an ability to mimic and closely match theory and experiment using SEM images. Calculated and/or measured libraries of simulated images can be developed with this technique. The library concept will prove to be very useful in the determination of dimensional and other properties of simple structures, such as integrated circuit parts, where the shape of the features is preferably measured from a single top-down image or a line scan. This paper presents one approach to the generation of 2-D simulated images and presents some suggestions as to their application to critical dimension metrology.

  10. Memory effects in microscopic traffic models and wide scattering in flow-density data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treiber, Martin; Helbing, Dirk

    2003-10-01

    By means of microscopic simulations we show that noninstantaneous adaptation of the driving behavior to the traffic situation together with the conventional method to measure flow-density data provides a possible explanation for the observed inverse-λ shape and the wide scattering of flow-density data in “synchronized” congested traffic. We model a memory effect in the response of drivers to the traffic situation for a wide class of car-following models by introducing an additional dynamical variable (the “subjective level of service”) describing the adaptation of drivers to the surrounding traffic situation during the past few minutes and couple this internal state to parameters of the underlying model that are related to the driving style. For illustration, we use the intelligent-driver model (IDM) as the underlying model, characterize the level of service solely by the velocity, and couple the internal variable to the IDM parameter “time gap” to model an increase of the time gap in congested traffic (“frustration effect”), which is supported by single-vehicle data. We simulate open systems with a bottleneck and obtain flow-density data by implementing “virtual detectors.” The shape, relative size, and apparent “stochasticity” of the region of the scattered data points agree nearly quantitatively with empirical data. Wide scattering is even observed for identical vehicles, although the proposed model is a time-continuous, deterministic, single-lane car-following model with a unique fundamental diagram.

  11. Low-energy microscopic models for iron-based superconductors: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Rafael M.; Chubukov, Andrey V.

    2017-01-01

    The development of sensible microscopic models is essential to elucidate the normal-state and superconducting properties of the iron-based superconductors. Because these materials are mostly metallic, a good starting point is an effective low-energy model that captures the electronic states near the Fermi level and their interactions. However, in contrast to cuprates, iron-based high-T c compounds are multi-orbital systems with Hubbard and Hund interactions, resulting in a rather involved 10-orbital lattice model. Here we review different minimal models that have been proposed to unveil the universal features of these systems. We first review minimal models defined solely in the orbital basis, which focus on a particular subspace of orbitals, or solely in the band basis, which rely only on the geometry of the Fermi surface. The former, while providing important qualitative insight into the role of the orbital degrees of freedom, do not distinguish between high-energy and low-energy sectors and, for this reason, generally do not go beyond mean-field. The latter allow one to go beyond mean-field and investigate the interplay between superconducting and magnetic orders as well as Ising-nematic order. However, they cannot capture orbital-dependent features like spontaneous orbital order. We then review recent proposals for a minimal model that operates in the band basis but fully incorporates the orbital composition and symmetries of the low-energy excitations. We discuss the results of the renormalization group study of such a model, particularly of the interplay between superconductivity, magnetism, and spontaneous orbital order, and compare theoretical predictions with experiments on iron pnictides and chalcogenides. We also discuss the impact of the glide-plane symmetry on the low-energy models, highlighting the key role played by the spin-orbit coupling.

  12. Electromagnetic model for near-field microwave microscope with atomic resolution: Determination of tunnel junction impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Reznik, Alexander N.

    2014-08-25

    An electrodynamic model is proposed for the tunneling microwave microscope with subnanometer space resolution as developed by Lee et al. [Appl. Phys. Lett. 97, 183111 (2010)]. Tip-sample impedance Z{sub a} was introduced and studied in the tunneling and non-tunneling regimes. At tunneling breakdown, the microwave current between probe and sample flows along two parallel channels characterized by impedances Z{sub p} and Z{sub t} that add up to form overall impedance Z{sub a}. Quantity Z{sub p} is the capacitive impedance determined by the near field of the probe and Z{sub t} is the impedance of the tunnel junction. By taking into account the distance dependences of effective tip radius r{sub 0}(z) and tunnel resistance R{sub t}(z) = Re[Z{sub t}(z)], we were able to explain the experimentally observed dependences of resonance frequency f{sub r}(z) and quality factor Q{sub L}(z) of the microscope. The obtained microwave resistance R{sub t}(z) and direct current tunnel resistance R{sub t}{sup dc}(z) exhibit qualitatively similar behavior, although being largely different in both magnitude and the characteristic scale of height dependence. Interpretation of the microwave images of the atomic structure of test samples proved possible by taking into account the inductive component of tunnel impedance ImZ{sub t} = ωL{sub t}. Relation ωL{sub t}/R{sub t} ≈ 0.235 was obtained.

  13. Empirical study of the metal-nitride-oxide-semiconductor device characteristics deduced from a microscopic model of memory traps

    SciTech Connect

    Ngai, K.L.; Hsia, Y.

    1982-07-15

    A graded-nitride gate dielectric metal-nitride-oxide-semiconductor (MNOS) memory transistor exhibiting superior device characteristics is presented and analyzed based on a qualitative microscopic model of the memory traps. The model is further reviewed to interpret some generic properties of the MNOS memory transistors including memory window, erase-write speed, and the retention-endurance characteristic features.

  14. Empirical study of the metal-nitride-oxide-semiconductor device characteristics deduced from a microscopic model of memory traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngai, Kia L.; Hsia, Yukun

    1982-07-01

    A graded-nitride gate dielectric metal-nitride-oxide-semiconductor (MNOS) memory transistor exhibiting superior device characteristics is presented and analyzed based on a qualitative microscopic model of the memory traps. The model is further reviewed to interpret some generic properties of the MNOS memory transistors including memory window, erase-write speed, and the retention-endurance characteristic features.

  15. A Study of the Nature of Students' Models of Microscopic Processes in the Context of Modern Physics Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thacker, Beth Ann

    2003-01-01

    Interviews university students in modern physics about their understanding of three fundamental experiments. Explores their development of models of microscopic processes. Uses interactive demonstrations to probe student understanding of modern physics experiments in two high school physics classes. Analyzes the nature of students' models and the…

  16. Tip-enhanced near-field optical microscope with side-on and ATR-mode sample excitation for super-resolution Raman imaging of surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilman, A. L.; Gordon, M. J.

    2016-06-01

    A tip-enhanced near-field optical microscope with side-on and attenuated total reflectance (ATR) excitation and collection is described and used to demonstrate sub-diffraction-limited (super-resolution) optical and chemical characterization of surfaces. ATR illumination is combined with an Au optical antenna tip to show that (i) the tip can quantitatively transduce the optical near-field (evanescent waves) above the surface by scattering photons into the far-field, (ii) the ATR geometry enables excitation and characterization of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs), whose associated optical fields are shown to enhance Raman scattering from a thin layer of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc), and (iii) SPPs can be used to plasmonically excite the tip for super-resolution chemical imaging of patterned CuPc via tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). ATR-illumination TERS is also quantitatively compared with the more conventional side-on illumination scheme. In both cases, spatial resolution was better than 40 nm and tip on/tip off Raman enhancement factors were >6500. Furthermore, ATR illumination was shown to provide similar Raman signal levels at lower "effective" pump powers due to additional optical energy delivered by SPPs to the active region in the tip-surface gap.

  17. An analytic model for accurate spring constant calibration of rectangular atomic force microscope cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Ye, Hongfei; Zhang, Weisheng; Ma, Guojun; Su, Yewang

    2015-10-29

    Spring constant calibration of the atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever is of fundamental importance for quantifying the force between the AFM cantilever tip and the sample. The calibration within the framework of thin plate theory undoubtedly has a higher accuracy and broader scope than that within the well-established beam theory. However, thin plate theory-based accurate analytic determination of the constant has been perceived as an extremely difficult issue. In this paper, we implement the thin plate theory-based analytic modeling for the static behavior of rectangular AFM cantilevers, which reveals that the three-dimensional effect and Poisson effect play important roles in accurate determination of the spring constants. A quantitative scaling law is found that the normalized spring constant depends only on the Poisson's ratio, normalized dimension and normalized load coordinate. Both the literature and our refined finite element model validate the present results. The developed model is expected to serve as the benchmark for accurate calibration of rectangular AFM cantilevers.

  18. Numerical characterization of non-Abelian Moore-Read state in the microscopic lattice boson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wei; Gong, Shoushu; Haldane, F. D. M.; Sheng, D. N.

    2015-03-01

    Identifying the interacting systems that host the non-Abelian (NA) topological phases have attracted intense attention in physics. Theoretically, it is possible to realize the NA Moore-Read (MR) state in bosonic system or double-layer system by coupling two Abelian fractional quantum Hall (FQH) states together. Here, based on the density matrix renormalization group and exact diagonalization calculations, we study two such examples in the microscopic lattice models and investigate their NA nature. In the first example, we provide a thorough characterization of the universal properties of MR state on Haldane honeycomb lattice model, including both the edge spectrum and the bulk anyonic quasiparticle statistics. By inspecting the entanglement spectral response to the U (1) flux, it is found that two of Abelian ground states can be adiabatically connected through a charge unit quasiparticle pumping from one edge to the other. In the second example, we study a double-layer bosonic FQH system built from the π-flux lattice model. Some evidences of NA nature has been identified, including the groundstate degeneracy and finite drag Hall conductance. The numerical methods we developed here provides a useful and practical way for detecting the full information of NA topological order. This research is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Grant No. DE-FG02-06ER46305.

  19. Estimation of the Breakup Cross-Sections in 6He + 12C Reaction Within High-Energy Approximation and Microscopic Optical Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukyanov, V. K.; Zemlyanaya, E. V.; Lukyanov, K. V.

    The breakup cross-sections in the reaction 6He + 12C are calculated at about 40 MeV/nucleon using the high-energy approximation (HEA) and with the help of microscopic optical potentials (OP) of interaction with the target nucleus 12C of the projectile nucleus fragments 4He and 2n. Considering the di-neutron h = 2n as a single particle the relative motion hα wave function is estimated so that to explain both the separation energy of h in 6He and the rms radius of the latter. The stripping and absorbtion total cross-sections are calculated and their sum is compared with the total reaction cross-section obtained within a double-folding microscopic OP for the 6He + 12C scattering. It is concluded that the breakup cross-sections contribute to about 50% of the total reaction cross-section.

  20. The connective tissue and glial framework in the optic nerve head of the normal human eye: light and scanning electron microscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Tokuhide; Abe, Haruki; Ushiki, Tatsuo

    2006-12-01

    The arrangement of connective tissue components (i.e., collagen, reticular, and elastic fibers) and glial elements in the optic nerve head of the human eye was investigated by the combined use of light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Light-microscopically, the optic nerve head could be subdivided into four parts from the different arrangements of the connective tissue framework: a surface nerve fiber layer, and prelaminar, laminar, and postlaminar regions. The surface nerve fiber layer only possessed connective tissue elements around blood vessels. In the prelaminar region, collagen fibrils, together with delicate elastic fibers, formed thin interrupted sheaths for accommodating small nerve bundles. Immunohistochemistry for the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) showed that GFAP-positive cells formed columnar structures (i.e., glial columns), with round cell bodies piled up into layers. These glial columns were located in the fibrous sheaths of collagen fibrils and elastic fibers. In the laminar region, collagen fibrils and elastic fibers ran transversely to the optic nerve axis to form a thick membranous layer - the lamina cribrosa - which had numerous round openings for accommodating optic nerve fiber bundles. GFAP-positive cellular processes also ran transversely in association with collagen and elastin components. The postlaminar region had connective tissues which linked the lamina cribrosa with fibrous sheaths for accommodating nerve bundles in the extraocular optic nerve, where GFAP-positive cells acquired characteristics typical of fibrous astrocytes. These findings indicate that collagen fibrils, as a whole, form a continuous network which serves as a skeletal framework of the optic nerve head for protecting optic nerve fibers from mechanical stress as well as for sustaining blood vessels in the optic nerve. The lamina cribrosa containing elastic fibers are considered to be plastic against the mechanical force affected by elevation

  1. Modeling of coherent ultrafast magneto-optical experiments: Light-induced molecular mean-field model

    SciTech Connect

    Hinschberger, Y.; Hervieux, P.-A.

    2015-12-28

    We present calculations which aim to describe coherent ultrafast magneto-optical effects observed in time-resolved pump-probe experiments. Our approach is based on a nonlinear semi-classical Drude-Voigt model and is used to interpret experiments performed on nickel ferromagnetic thin film. Within this framework, a phenomenological light-induced coherent molecular mean-field depending on the polarizations of the pump and probe pulses is proposed whose microscopic origin is related to a spin-orbit coupling involving the electron spins of the material sample and the electric field of the laser pulses. Theoretical predictions are compared to available experimental data. The model successfully reproduces the observed experimental trends and gives meaningful insight into the understanding of magneto-optical rotation behavior in the ultrafast regime. Theoretical predictions for further experimental studies are also proposed.

  2. Biophotonic Modelling of Cardiac Optical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Martin J; Plank, Gernot

    2015-01-01

    Computational models have been recently applied to simulate and better understand the nature of fluorescent photon scattering and optical signal distortion during cardiac optical imaging. The goal of such models is both to provide a useful post-processing tool to facilitate a more accurate and faithful comparison between computational simulations of electrical activity and experiments, as well as providing essential insight into the mechanisms underlying this distortion, suggesting ways in which it may be controlled or indeed utilised to maximise the information derived from the recorded fluorescent signal. Here, we present different modelling methodologies developed and used in the field to simulate both the explicit processes involved in optical signal synthesis and the resulting consequences of the effects of photon scattering within the myocardium upon the optically-detected signal. We focus our attentions to two main types of modelling approaches used to simulate light transport in cardiac tissue, specifically continuous (reaction-diffusion) and discrete stochastic (Monte Carlo) methods. For each method, we provide both a summary of the necessary methodological details of such models, in addition to brief reviews of relevant application studies which have sought to apply these methods to elucidate important information regarding experimentally-recorded optical signals under different circumstances.

  3. Analysis of a Thin Optical Lens Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivchenko, Vladimir V.

    2011-01-01

    In this article a thin optical lens model is considered. It is shown that the limits of its applicability are determined not only by the ratio between the thickness of the lens and the modules of the radii of curvature, but above all its geometric type. We have derived the analytical criteria for the applicability of the model for different types…

  4. 21 CFR 884.6190 - Assisted reproductive microscopes and microscope accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction.... Assisted reproduction microscopes and microscope accessories (excluding microscope stage warmers, which are classified under assisted reproduction accessories) are optical instruments used to enlarge images of...

  5. 21 CFR 884.6190 - Assisted reproductive microscopes and microscope accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction.... Assisted reproduction microscopes and microscope accessories (excluding microscope stage warmers, which are classified under assisted reproduction accessories) are optical instruments used to enlarge images of...

  6. 21 CFR 884.6190 - Assisted reproductive microscopes and microscope accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction.... Assisted reproduction microscopes and microscope accessories (excluding microscope stage warmers, which are classified under assisted reproduction accessories) are optical instruments used to enlarge images of...

  7. 21 CFR 884.6190 - Assisted reproductive microscopes and microscope accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction.... Assisted reproduction microscopes and microscope accessories (excluding microscope stage warmers, which are classified under assisted reproduction accessories) are optical instruments used to enlarge images of...

  8. 21 CFR 884.6190 - Assisted reproductive microscopes and microscope accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction.... Assisted reproduction microscopes and microscope accessories (excluding microscope stage warmers, which are classified under assisted reproduction accessories) are optical instruments used to enlarge images of...

  9. Microscopic model of the Knight shift in anisotropic and correlated metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Bianca E.; Klemm, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    We present a microscopic model of nuclear magnetic resonance in metals. The spin-1/2 local nucleus and its surrounding orbital electrons interact with the arbitrary constant \\boldsymbol{B}{0} and perpendicular time-oscillatory magnetic inductions \\boldsymbol{B}{1}(t) and with each other via an anisotropic hyperfine interaction. An Anderson-like Hamiltonian describes the excitations of the relevant occupied local orbital electrons into the conduction bands, each band described by an anisotropic effective mass with corresponding Landau orbits and an anisotropic spin \\boldsymbol{g} tensor. Local orbital electron correlation effects are included using the mean-field decoupling procedure of Lacroix. The Knight resonance frequency and corresponding linewidth shifts are evaluated to leading orders in the hyperfine and Anderson excitation interactions. While respectively proportional to {{≤ft({{B}1}/{{B}0}\\right)}2} and a constant for weak {{B}0}\\gg {{B}1} , both highly anisotropic shifts depend strongly upon \\boldsymbol{B}{0} when a Landau level is near the Fermi energy. Electron correlations affect the anisotropy of the linewidth shift. The model is easily generalizable to arbitrary nuclear spin I.

  10. Fission properties of Po isotopes in different macroscopic-microscopic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartel, J.; Pomorski, K.; Nerlo-Pomorska, B.; Schmitt, Ch

    2015-11-01

    Fission-barrier heights of nuclei in the Po isotopic chain are investigated in several macroscopic-microscopic models. Using the Yukawa-folded single-particle potential, the Lublin-Strasbourg drop (LSD) model, the Strutinsky shell-correction method to yield the shell corrections and the BCS theory for the pairing contributions, fission-barrier heights are calculated and found in quite good agreement with the experimental data. This turns out, however, to be only the case when the underlying macroscopic, liquid-drop (LD) type, theory is well chosen. Together with the LSD approach, different LD parametrizations proposed by Moretto et al are tested. Four deformation parameters describing respectively elongation, neck-formation, reflectional-asymmetric, and non-axiality of the nuclear shape thus defining the so called modified Funny Hills shape parametrization are used in the calculation. The present study clearly demonstrates that nuclear fission-barrier heights constitute a challenging and selective tool to discern between such different macroscopic approaches.

  11. Some new results on the Levy, Levy and Solomon microscopic stock market model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zschischang, Elmar; Lux, Thomas

    2001-03-01

    We report some findings from our simulations of the Levy, Levy and Solomon microscopic stock market model. Our results cast doubts on some of the results published in the original papers (i.e., chaotic stock price movements). We also point out the possibility of sensitive dependence on initial conditions of the emerging wealth distribution among agents. Extensions of the model set-up show that with varying degrees of risk aversion, the less risk averse traders will tend to dominate the market. Similarly, when introducing a new trader group (or even a single trader) with a constant share of stocks in their portfolio, the latter will eventually take over and marginalize the other groups. The better performance of the more sober investors is in accordance with traditional perceptions in financial economics. Hence, the survival of ‘noise traders’ looking at short-term trends and patterns remains as much of a puzzle in this framework as in the traditional Efficient Market Theory.

  12. Microscopic model calculations for the magnetization process of layered triangular-lattice quantum antiferromagnets.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Daisuke; Marmorini, Giacomo; Danshita, Ippei

    2015-01-16

    Magnetization processes of spin-1/2 layered triangular-lattice antiferromagnets (TLAFs) under a magnetic field H are studied by means of a numerical cluster mean-field method with a scaling scheme. We find that small antiferromagnetic couplings between the layers give rise to several types of extra quantum phase transitions among different high-field coplanar phases. Especially, a field-induced first-order transition is found to occur at H≈0.7H_{s}, where H_{s} is the saturation field, as another common quantum effect of ideal TLAFs in addition to the well-established one-third plateau. Our microscopic model calculation with appropriate parameters shows excellent agreement with experiments on Ba_{3}CoSb_{2}O_{9} [T. Susuki et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 267201 (2013)]. Given this fact, we suggest that the Co^{2+}-based compounds may allow for quantum simulations of intriguing properties of this simple frustrated model, such as quantum criticality and supersolid states.

  13. Modeling and model-aware signal processing methods for enhancement of optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksoylar, Aydan

    Theoretical and numerical modeling of optical systems are increasingly being utilized in a wide range of areas in physics and engineering for characterizing and improving existing systems or developing new methods. This dissertation focuses on determining and improving the performance of imaging and non-imaging optical systems through modeling and developing model-aware enhancement methods. We evaluate the performance, demonstrate enhancements in terms of resolution and light collection efficiency, and improve the capabilities of the systems through changes to the system design and through post-processing techniques. We consider application areas in integrated circuit (IC) imaging for fault analysis and malicious circuitry detection, and free-form lens design for creating prescribed illumination patterns. The first part of this dissertation focuses on sub-surface imaging of ICs for fault analysis using a solid immersion lens (SIL) microscope. We first derive the Green's function of the microscope and use it to determine its resolution limits for bulk silicon and silicon-on-insulator (SOI) chips. We then propose an optimization framework for designing super-resolving apodization masks that utilizes the developed model and demonstrate the trade-offs in designing such masks. Finally, we derive the full electromagnetic model of the SIL microscope that models the image of an arbitrary sub-surface structure. With the rapidly shrinking dimensions of ICs, we are increasingly limited in resolving the features and identifying potential modifications despite the resolution improvements provided by the state-of-the-art microscopy techniques and enhancement methods described here. In the second part of this dissertation, we shift our focus away from improving the resolution and consider an optical framework that does not require high resolution imaging for detecting malicious circuitry. We develop a classification-based high-throughput gate identification method that utilizes

  14. Anti-drift and auto-alignment mechanism for an astigmatic atomic force microscope system based on a digital versatile disk optical head.

    PubMed

    Hwu, E-T; Illers, H; Wang, W-M; Hwang, I-S; Jusko, L; Danzebrink, H-U

    2012-01-01

    In this work, an anti-drift and auto-alignment mechanism is applied to an astigmatic detection system (ADS)-based atomic force microscope (AFM) for drift compensation and cantilever alignment. The optical path of the ADS adopts a commercial digital versatile disc (DVD) optical head using the astigmatic focus error signal. The ADS-based astigmatic AFM is lightweight, compact size, low priced, and easy to use. Furthermore, the optical head is capable of measuring sub-atomic displacements of high-frequency AFM probes with a sub-micron laser spot (~570 nm, FWHM) and a high-working bandwidth (80 MHz). Nevertheless, conventional DVD optical heads suffer from signal drift problems. In a previous setup, signal drifts of even thousands of nanometers had been measured. With the anti-drift and auto-alignment mechanism, the signal drift is compensated by actuating a voice coil motor of the DVD optical head. A nearly zero signal drift was achieved. Additional benefits of this mechanism are automatic cantilever alignment and simplified design.

  15. A rabbit model of fatal hypothyroidism mimicking "myxedema coma" established by microscopic total thyroidectomy.

    PubMed

    Ono, Yosuke; Fujita, Masanori; Ono, Sachiko; Ogata, Sho; Tachibana, Shoichi; Tanaka, Yuji

    2016-06-30

    Myxedema coma (MC) is a life-threatening endocrine crisis caused by severe hypothyroidism. However, validated diagnostic criteria and treatment guidelines for MC have not been established owing to its rarity. Therefore, a valid animal model is required to investigate the pathologic and therapeutic aspects of MC. The aim of the present study was to establish an animal model of MC induced by total thyroidectomy. We utilized 14 male New Zealand White rabbits anesthetized via intramuscular ketamine and xylazine administration. A total of 7 rabbits were completely thyroidectomized under a surgical microscope (thyroidectomized group) and the remainder underwent sham operations (control group). The animals in both groups were monitored without thyroid hormone replacement for 15 weeks. Pulse rate, blood pressure, body temperature, and electrocardiograms (ECG) were recorded and blood samples were taken from the jugular vein immediately prior to the thyroidectomy and 2 and 4 weeks after surgery. The thyroidectomized rabbits showed a marked reduction of serum thyroxine levels at 4 weeks after the surgical procedure vs. controls (0.50±0.10 vs. 3.32±0.68 μg/dL, p<0.001). Additionally, thyroidectomized rabbits exhibited several signs of hypothyroidism such as hypothermia, systolic hypotension, bradycardia, and low voltage on ECGs, compared with controls. Of the 7 rabbits with severe hypothyroidism, 6 died from 4 to 14 weeks after the thyroidectomy possibly owing to heart failure, because histopathologic examinations revealed a myxedema heart. In summary, we have established a rabbit model of fatal hypothyroidism mimicking MC, which may facilitate pathophysiological and molecular investigations of MC and evaluations of new therapeutic interventions.

  16. [Microscopic colitis].

    PubMed

    Bohr, Johan

    2002-02-11

    Microscopic colitis is an umbrella term for a newly described group of colitides, belonging to the inflammatory bowel diseases, which are only diagnosable by microscopic evaluation of a macroscopically normal colon mucosa. Collagenous colitis and lymphocytic colitis are the most common of these colitides. Microscopic colitis is characterised clinically by chronic non-bloody watery diarrhoea. Crampy abdominal pain, nocturnal diarrhoea, urgency, and initial weight loss are usual. Concomitant diseases of autoimmune origin and arthralgia are commonly seen. Treatment of microscopic colitis follows the guidelines for treatment of other inflammatory bowel diseases, but a substantial part of the patients with microscopic colitis enter spontaneous remission after some years. A minor part, however, have very troublesome symptoms and are almost refractory to treatment. Microscopic colitis has apparently no malignant potential.

  17. A Customized Light Sheet Microscope to Measure Spatio-Temporal Protein Dynamics in Small Model Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Rieckher, Matthias; Kourmoulakis, Georgios; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Ripoll, Jorge; Zacharakis, Giannis

    2015-01-01

    We describe a customizable and cost-effective light sheet microscopy (LSM) platform for rapid three-dimensional imaging of protein dynamics in small model organisms. The system is designed for high acquisition speeds and enables extended time-lapse in vivo experiments when using fluorescently labeled specimens. We demonstrate the capability of the setup to monitor gene expression and protein localization during ageing and upon starvation stress in longitudinal studies in individual or small groups of adult Caenorhabditis elegans nematodes. The system is equipped to readily perform fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), which allows monitoring protein recovery and distribution under low photobleaching conditions. Our imaging platform is designed to easily switch between light sheet microscopy and optical projection tomography (OPT) modalities. The setup permits monitoring of spatio-temporal expression and localization of ageing biomarkers of subcellular size and can be conveniently adapted to image a wide range of small model organisms and tissue samples. PMID:26000610

  18. Microscopic model analysis of {sup 11}Li+p elastic scattering at 62, 68.4, and 75 MeV/nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, M. Y. M.; Farag, M. Y. H.; Esmael, E. H.; Maridi, H. M.

    2009-01-15

    {sup 11}Li+p elastic scattering data at three energies, 62, 68.4, and 75 MeV/nucleon, are analyzed with density-dependent M3Y and KH effective nucleon-nucleon (NN) interactions in the framework of the single folding model. The parameters of the density-dependent term are adjusted to fulfill saturation of nuclear matter. The optical potentials (OP's) and cross sections are calculated using four model densities of {sup 11}Li, G (one-parameter Gaussian), GG (Gaussian-Gaussian), GO (Gaussian- oscillator), and the COSMA (cluster orbital shell model approximation). Comparative studies are performed for real, imaginary, and spin-orbit potentials with the phenomenological and microscopic forms. The microscopic volume and surface imaginary potentials are constructed from both the renormalized folded potentials and their derivatives. The sensitivity of the differential cross section to the four densities is tested. It is found that the {sup 11}Li+p elastic scattering cross sections depend strongly upon the behavior of the corresponding potentials. The GG and GO densities obtained from analyzing the data, using Glauber multiple scattering theory at high energies, give good results at energies below 100 MeV/nucleon in the framework of the folding model. The OP's calculated in the microscopic form using few parameters give good agreement with the data. Thus, it is not necessary to introduce a large number of arbitrary fitting parameters as done in the phenomenological and semimicroscopic OP's. The KH effective interaction successfully describes {sup 11}Li+p elastic scattering as the popular M3Y interaction. The obtained results of the reaction cross section are in good agreement with previous calculations.

  19. Competitive heterogeneous nucleation onto a microscopic impurity in a Potts model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asuquo, Cletus C.; McArthur, Danielle; Bowles, Richard K.

    2016-08-01

    Many metastable systems can nucleate to multiple competing stable or intermediate metastable states. In this work, a Potts model, subject to external fields, is used to study the competitive nucleation of two phases attempting to grow on a microscopic impurity. Monte Carlo simulations are used to calculate the free energy surfaces for the system under different conditions, where the relative stability of the phases is adjusted by changing the interaction parameters, and the nucleation rates obtained using multicomponent transition state theory (TST) are compared with the rates measured using the survival probability method. We find that the two methods predict similar nucleation rates when the free energy barrier used in the transition state theory is defined as the work required to form a critical embryo from the metastable phase. An analysis of the free energy surfaces also reveals that the competition between the nucleating phases leads to an effective drying of the impurity which slows down the nucleation rate compared to the single phase case.

  20. Modeling of Electronic Transport in Scanning Tunneling Microscope Tip-Carbon Nanotube Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Toshishige; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A model is proposed for two observed current-voltage (I-V) patterns in a recent experiment with a scanning tunneling microscope tip and a carbon nanotube. We claim that there are two mechanical contact modes for a tip (metal) -nanotube (semiconductor) junction (1) with or (2) without a tiny vacuum gap (0.1 - 0.2 nm). With the tip grounded, the tunneling case in (1) would produce large dI/dV with V > 0, small dI/dV with V < 0, and I = 0 near V = 0 for an either n- or p-nanotube; the Schottky mechanism in (2) would result in I does not equal 0 only with V < 0 for an n-nanotube, and the bias polarities would be reversed for a p-nanotube. The two observed I-V patterns are thus entirely explained by a tip-nanotube contact of the two types, where the nanotube must be n-type.

  1. Global properties of even-even superheavy nuclei in macroscopic-microscopic models

    SciTech Connect

    Baran, Andrzej; Lojewski, Zdzislaw; Sieja, Kamila; Kowal, Michal

    2005-10-01

    A systematic study of global properties of superheavy nuclei in the framework of macroscopic-microscopic method is performed. Equilibrium deformations, masses, quadrupole moments, radii, shell energies, fission barriers and half-lives are calculated using the following macroscopic models: Myers-Swiatecki liquid drop, droplet, Yukawa-plus-exponential, and Lublin-Strasbourg drop. Shell and pairing energies are calculated in Woods-Saxon potential with a universal set of parameters. The analysis covers a wide range of even-even superheavy nuclei from Z=100 to 122. Magic and semimagic numbers occurring in this region are indicated and their influence on the observables is discussed. The strongest shell effects appear at proton number Z=114 and at neutron number N=184. Deformed shell closures are found at N=152 and 162. Spontaneous fission half-lives are calculated in a dynamical approach where the full minimization of the action integral in a three-dimensional deformation space of {beta} deformations is performed. The fission half-lives obtained this way are two orders of magnitude smaller than the ones resulting from static calculations. The agreement of theoretical results and experimental data is satisfying.

  2. A compact "water-window" microscope with 60-nm spatial resolution based on a double stream gas-puff target and Fresnel zone plate optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Torrisi, Alfio; Nawaz, Muhammad F.; Adjei, Daniel; Bartnik, Andrzej; Kostecki, Jerzy; Wegrzynski, Łukasz; Vondrová, Šárka; Turňová, Jana; Fok, Tomasz; Jančarek, Alexandr; Fiedorowicz, Henryk

    2015-05-01

    Radiation with shorter illumination wavelength allows for extension of the diffraction limit towards nanometer scale, which is a straightforward way to significantly improve a spatial resolution in photon based microscopes. Soft X-ray (SXR) radiation, from the so called "water window" spectral range, λ=2.3-4.4 nm, which is particularly suitable for biological imaging due to natural optical contrast, providing much better spatial resolution than one obtained with visible light microscopes. The high contrast is obtained because of selective absorption of radiation by carbon and water, being constituents of the biological samples. We present a desk-top system, capable of resolving 60 nm features in few seconds exposure time. We exploit the advantages of a compact, laser-plasma SXR source, based on a double stream nitrogen gas puff target, developed at the Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology. The source, emitting quasi-monochromatic, incoherent radiation, in the "water widow" spectral range at λ = 2.88 nm, is coupled with ellipsoidal, grazing incidence condenser and Fresnel zone plate objective. The construction of the microscope with some recent images of test and real samples will be presented and discussed.

  3. Optical Computing Based on Neuronal Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-01

    walking, and cognition are far too complex for existing sequential digital computers. Therefore new architectures, hardware, and algorithms modeled...collective behavior, and iterative processing into optical processing and artificial neurodynamical systems. Another intriguing promise of neural nets is...with architectures, implementations, and programming; and material research s -7- called for. Our future research in neurodynamics will continue to

  4. Provenance study through analysis of microstructural characteristics using an optical microscope and scanning electron microscopy for Goryeo celadon excavated from the seabed.

    PubMed

    Min-su, Han

    2013-08-01

    This paper aims at identifying the provenance of Goryeo celadons by understanding its microstructural characteristics, such as particles, blisters, forms and amount of pores, and the presence of crystal formation, bodies, and glazes and its boundary, using an optical microscope and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The analysis of the reproduced samples shows that the glazed layer of the sherd fired at higher temperatures has lower viscosity and therefore it encourages the blisters to be combined together and the layer to become more transparent. In addition, the result showed that the vitrification and melting process of clay minerals such as feldspars and quartzs on the bodies was accelerated for those samples. To factor such characteristics of the microstructure and apply it to the sherds, the samples could be divided into six categories based on status, such as small particles with many small pores or mainly large and small circular pores in the bodies, only a limited number of varied sized blisters in the glazes, and a few blisters and needle-shaped crystals on the boundary surface. In conclusion, the analysis of the microstructural characteristics using an optical microscope and SEM have proven to be useful as a categorizing reference factor in a provenance study on Goryeo celadons.

  5. Simulation and experimental results of optical and thermal modeling of gold nanoshells.

    PubMed

    Ghazanfari, Lida; Khosroshahi, Mohammad E

    2014-09-01

    This paper proposes a generalized method for optical and thermal modeling of synthesized magneto-optical nanoshells (MNSs) for biomedical applications. Superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles with diameter of 9.5 ± 1.4 nm are fabricated using co-precipitation method and subsequently covered by a thin layer of gold to obtain 15.8 ± 3.5 nm MNSs. In this paper, simulations and detailed analysis are carried out for different nanoshell geometry to achieve a maximum heat power. Structural, magnetic and optical properties of MNSs are assessed using vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-VIS spectrophotometer, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Magnetic saturation of synthesized magnetite nanoparticles are reduced from 46.94 to 11.98 emu/g after coating with gold. The performance of the proposed optical-thermal modeling technique is verified by simulation and experimental results.

  6. Optical Performance Models for FDDI Links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimball, Robert M.

    1990-01-01

    A loss budget model to predict optical performance of Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI) type networks in the premises distribution environment has been developed. This model tailors existing statistical loss budget models to the FDDI standard. It is expected that as FDDI becomes popular, fiber based distribution systems will become common. When designing a fiber distribution system it is important to understand the constraints placed on link performance by the cable plant. To determine these constraints, the model is examined numerically using a large range of initial conditions. The total link length is used as the dependent variable. This set of initial conditions corresponds to an ensemble of possible link configurations. These link configurations are studied in the context of the premises distribution environment. The model is extended to include the use of optical bypass switches. Laboratory measurement data is presented to verify the accuracy of the bypass switch model. The extended model, including the bypass switch, is examined numerically for a similar set of initial conditions. These constraints are applied to the use of bypass switches in wiring closets, between floors, and at the work location. Distance limitations are determined for FDDI links utilizing optical bypass switches.

  7. Air Mass Considerations in Fog Optical Modeling.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-01

    military forces are increasingly relying on new sophis - ticated weapons systems which employ electro-optical (EO) sensors or systems in their principles of...infrared extinction coefficients. Several authors (Stewart,10 Turner et all’) have shown that models which depend upon visibility alone can lead to...Extinction by Fog, TR-77-9, Technology Laboratory, Physical Science Directorate, Redstone Arsenal, AL 11R. E. Turner et al, 1978, Model Development for E-O

  8. Optical models for silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, T.; Sopori, B.

    1995-08-01

    Light trapping is an important design feature for high-efficiency silicon solar cells. Because light trapping can considerably enhance optical absorption, a thinner substrate can be used which, in turn, can lower the bulk carrier recombination and concommitantly increase open-circuit voltage, and fill factor of the cell. The basic concepts of light trapping are similar to that of excitation of an optical waveguide, where a prism or a grating structure increases the phase velocity of the incoming optical wave such that waves propagated within the waveguide are totally reflected at the interfaces. Unfortunately, these concepts break down because the entire solar cell is covered with such a structure, making it necessary to develop new analytical approaches to deal with incomplete light trapping in solar cells. This paper describes two models that analyze light trapping in thick and thin solar cells.

  9. Instruction manual, Optical Effects Module, Model OEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The Optical Effects Module Model OEM-1, a laboratory prototype instrument designed for the automated measurement of radiation transmission and scattering through optical samples, is described. The system comprises two main components: the Optical Effects Module Enclosure (OEME) and the Optical Effects Module Electronic Controller and Processor (OEMCP). The OEM is designed for operation in the near UV at approximately 2540A, corresponding to the most intense spectral line activated by the mercury discharge lamp used for illumination. The radiation from this source is detected in transmission and reflection through a number of selectable samples. The basic objective of this operation is to monitor in real time the accretion of possible contamination on the surface of these samples. The optical samples are exposed outside of the OEME proper to define exposure conditions and to separate exposure and measurement environments. Changes in the transmissivity of the sample are attributable to surface contamination or to bulk effects due to radiation. Surface contamination will increase radiation scattering due to Rayleigh-Gans effect or to other phenomena, depending on the characteristics size of the particulate contaminants. Thus, also scattering from the samples becomes a part of the measurement program.

  10. An optical model for composite nuclear scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Townsend, L. W.

    1981-01-01

    The optical model of composite particle scattering is considered and compared to the accuracies of other models. A nonrelativistic Schroedinger equation with two-body potentials is used for the scattering of a single particle by an energy-dependent local potential. The potential for the elastic channel is composed of matrix elements of a single scattering operator taken between the ground states of the projectile and the target; the coherent amplitude is considered as dominating the scattering in the forward direction. A multiple scattering series is analytically explored and formally summed by the solution of an equivalent Schroedinger equation. Cross sections of nuclear scattering are then determined for He-4 and C-12 nuclei at 3.6 GeV/nucleus and O-16 projectiles at 2.1 GeV/nucleus, and the optical model approximations are found to be consistently lower and more accurate than approximations made by use of Glauber's theory.

  11. Microscopic, electrical and optical studies on InGaN/GaN quantum wells based LED devices

    SciTech Connect

    Mutta, Geeta Rani; Venturi, Giulia; Castaldini, Antonio; Cavallini, Anna

    2014-02-21

    We report here on the micro structural, electronic and optical properties of a GaN-based InGaN/GaN MQW LED grown by the MOVPE method. The present study shows that the threading dislocations present in these LED structures are terminated as V pits at the surface and have an impact on the electrical and optical activity of these devices. It has been pointed that these dislocations were of edge, screw and mixed types. EBIC maps suggest that the electrically active defects are screw and mixed dislocations and behave as nonradiative recombinant centres.

  12. A theoretical comparison of macroscopic and microscopic modeling of singlet oxygen during Photofrin and HPPH mediated-PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Baochang; Kim, Michele M.; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2013-03-01

    Mathematic models were developed to simulate the complex dynamic process of photodynamic therapy (PDT). Macroscopic or microscopic modeling of singlet oxygen (1O2) is particularly of interest because it is the major cytotoxic agent causing biological effects during PDT. Our previously introduced macroscopic PDT model incorporates the diffusion equation for the light propagation in tissue and the macroscopic kinetic equations for the production of the 1O2. The distance-dependent distribution of 3O2 and reacted 1O2 can be numerically calculated using finite-element method (FEM). We recently improved the model to include microscopic kinetic equations of oxygen diffusion from uniformly distributed blood vessels and within tissue. In the model, the cylindrical blood capillary has radius in the range of 2-5 μm and a mean length of 300 μm, and supplies oxygen into tissue. The blood vessel network is assumed to form a 2-D square grid perpendicular to a linear light source. The spacing of the grid is 60 μm. Oxygen can also diffuse along the radius and the longitudinal axial of the cylinder within tissue. The oxygen depletion during Photofrin-PDT PDT can be simulated using both macroscopic and microscopic approaches. The comparison of the simulation results have reasonable agreements when velocity of blood flow is reduced during PDT.

  13. RxGen General Optical Model Prescription Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sigrist, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    RxGen is a prescription generator for JPL's in-house optical modeling software package called MACOS (Modeling and Analysis for Controlled Optical Systems), which is an expert optical analysis software package focusing on modeling optics on dynamic structures, deformable optics, and controlled optics. The objectives of RxGen are to simplify and automate MACOS prescription generations, reducing errors associated with creating such optical prescriptions, and improving user efficiency without requiring MACOS proficiency. RxGen uses MATLAB (a high-level language and interactive environment developed by MathWorks) as the development and deployment platform, but RxGen can easily be ported to another optical modeling/analysis platform. Running RxGen within the modeling environment has the huge benefit that variations in optical models can be made an integral part of the modeling state. For instance, optical prescription parameters determined as external functional dependencies, optical variations by controlling the in-/exclusion of optical components like sub-systems, and/or controlling the state of all components. Combining the mentioned capabilities and flexibilities with RxGen's optical abstraction layer completely eliminates the hindering aspects for requiring proficiency in writing/editing MACOS prescriptions, allowing users to focus on the modeling aspects of optical systems, i.e., increasing productivity and efficiency. RxGen provides significant enhancements to MACOS and delivers a framework for fast prototyping as well as for developing very complex controlled optical systems.

  14. A hybrid high-speed atomic force-optical microscope for visualizing single membrane proteins on eukaryotic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colom, Adai; Casuso, Ignacio; Rico, Felix; Scheuring, Simon

    2013-07-01

    High-speed atomic force microscopy is a powerful tool for studying structure and dynamics of proteins. So far, however, high-speed atomic force microscopy was restricted to well-controlled molecular systems of purified proteins. Here we integrate an optical microscopy path into high-speed atomic force microscopy, allowing bright field and fluorescence microscopy, without loss of high-speed atomic force microscopy performance. This hybrid high-speed atomic force microscopy/optical microscopy setup allows positioning of the high-speed atomic force microscopy tip with high spatial precision on an optically identified zone of interest on cells. We present movies at 960 ms per frame displaying aquaporin-0 array and single molecule dynamics in the plasma membrane of intact eye lens cells. This hybrid setup allows high-speed atomic force microscopy imaging on cells about 1,000 times faster than conventional atomic force microscopy/optical microscopy setups, and allows first time visualization of unlabelled membrane proteins on a eukaryotic cell under physiological conditions. This development advances high-speed atomic force microscopy from molecular to cell biology to analyse cellular processes at the membrane such as signalling, infection, transport and diffusion.

  15. The use of optical microscope equipped with multispectral detector to distinguish different types of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pronichev, A. N.; Polyakov, E. V.; Tupitsyn, N. N.; Frenkel, M. A.; Mozhenkova, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    The article describes the use of a computer optical microscopy with multispectral camera to characterize the texture of blasts bone marrow of patients with different variants of acute lymphoblastic leukemia: B- and T- types. Specific characteristics of the chromatin of the nuclei of blasts for different types of acute lymphoblastic leukemia were obtained.

  16. A Computer-Controlled Classroom Model of an Atomic Force Microscope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engstrom, Tyler A.; Johnson, Matthew M.; Eklund, Peter C.; Russin, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    The concept of "seeing by feeling" as a way to circumvent limitations on sight is universal on the macroscopic scale--reading Braille, feeling one's way around a dark room, etc. The development of the atomic force microscope (AFM) in 1986 extended this concept to imaging in the nanoscale. While there are classroom demonstrations that use…

  17. Microscopic Description of the Exotic Nuclei Reactions by Using Folding model Potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Ibraheem, Awad A.; Hassanain, M. A.; Mokhtar, S. R.; El-Azab Farid, M.; Zaki, M. A.; Mahmoud, Zakaria M. M.

    2011-10-27

    A microscopic folding approach based upon the effective M3Y nucleon-nucleon interaction and the nuclear matter densities of the interacting nuclei has been carried out to explain recently measured experimental data of the {sup 6}He+{sup 120}Sn elastic scattering reaction at four different laboratory energies near the Coulomb barrier. The corresponding reaction cross sections are also considered.

  18. The Analog Atomic Force Microscope: Measuring, Modeling, and Graphing for Middle School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goss, Valerie; Brandt, Sharon; Lieberman, Marya

    2013-01-01

    using an analog atomic force microscope (A-AFM) made from a cardboard box and mailing tubes. Varying numbers of ping pong balls inside the tubes mimic atoms on a surface. Students use a dowel to make macroscale measurements similar to those of a nanoscale AFM tip as it…

  19. A Thermo-Optic Propagation Modeling Capability.

    SciTech Connect

    Schrader, Karl; Akau, Ron

    2014-10-01

    A new theoretical basis is derived for tracing optical rays within a finite-element (FE) volume. The ray-trajectory equations are cast into the local element coordinate frame and the full finite-element interpolation is used to determine instantaneous index gradient for the ray-path integral equation. The FE methodology (FEM) is also used to interpolate local surface deformations and the surface normal vector for computing the refraction angle when launching rays into the volume, and again when rays exit the medium. The method is implemented in the Matlab(TM) environment and compared to closed- form gradient index models. A software architecture is also developed for implementing the algorithms in the Zemax(TM) commercial ray-trace application. A controlled thermal environment was constructed in the laboratory, and measured data was collected to validate the structural, thermal, and optical modeling methods.

  20. Studies of porphyrin-containing specimens using an optical spectrometer connected to a confocal scanning laser microscope.

    PubMed

    Trepte, O; Rokahr, I; Andersson-Engels, S; Carlsson, K

    1994-12-01

    A spectrometer has been developed for use with a confocal scanning laser microscope. With this unit, spectral information from a single point or a user-defined region within the microscope specimen can be recorded. A glass prism is used to disperse the spectral components of the recorded light over a linear CCD photodiode array with 256 elements. A regulated cooling unit keeps the detector at 277 K, thereby allowing integration times of up to 60 s. The spectral resolving power, lambda/delta lambda, ranges from 350 at lambda = 400 nm to 100 at lambda = 700 nm. Since the entrance aperture of the spectrometer has the same size as the detector pinhole used during normal confocal scanning, the three-dimensional spatial resolution is equivalent to that of normal confocal scanning. Light from the specimen is deflected to the spectrometer by a solenoid controlled mirror, allowing fast and easy switching between normal confocal scanning and spectrometer readings. With this equipment, studies of rodent liver specimens containing porphyrins have been made. The subcellular localization is of interest for the mechanisms of photodynamic therapy (PDT) of malignant tumours. Spectroscopic detection is necessary to distinguish the porphyrin signal from other fluorescent components in the specimen. Two different substances were administered to the tissue, Photofrin, a haematoporphyrin derivative (HPD) and delta-amino levulinic acid (ALA), a precursor to protoporphyrin IX and haem in the haem cycle. Both are substances under clinical trials for PDT of malignant tumours. Following administration of these compounds to the tissue, the potent photosensitizer and fluorescent compound Photofrin, or protoporphyrin IX, respectively, is accumulated.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Optical Imaging and Radiometric Modeling and Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ha, Kong Q.; Fitzmaurice, Michael W.; Moiser, Gary E.; Howard, Joseph M.; Le, Chi M.

    2010-01-01

    OPTOOL software is a general-purpose optical systems analysis tool that was developed to offer a solution to problems associated with computational programs written for the James Webb Space Telescope optical system. It integrates existing routines into coherent processes, and provides a structure with reusable capabilities that allow additional processes to be quickly developed and integrated. It has an extensive graphical user interface, which makes the tool more intuitive and friendly. OPTOOL is implemented using MATLAB with a Fourier optics-based approach for point spread function (PSF) calculations. It features parametric and Monte Carlo simulation capabilities, and uses a direct integration calculation to permit high spatial sampling of the PSF. Exit pupil optical path difference (OPD) maps can be generated using combinations of Zernike polynomials or shaped power spectral densities. The graphical user interface allows rapid creation of arbitrary pupil geometries, and entry of all other modeling parameters to support basic imaging and radiometric analyses. OPTOOL provides the capability to generate wavefront-error (WFE) maps for arbitrary grid sizes. These maps are 2D arrays containing digital sampled versions of functions ranging from Zernike polynomials to combination of sinusoidal wave functions in 2D, to functions generated from a spatial frequency power spectral distribution (PSD). It also can generate optical transfer functions (OTFs), which are incorporated into the PSF calculation. The user can specify radiometrics for the target and sky background, and key performance parameters for the instrument s focal plane array (FPA). This radiometric and detector model setup is fairly extensive, and includes parameters such as zodiacal background, thermal emission noise, read noise, and dark current. The setup also includes target spectral energy distribution as a function of wavelength for polychromatic sources, detector pixel size, and the FPA s charge

  2. Optimization of a widefield structured illumination microscope for non-destructive assessment and quantification of nuclear features in tumor margins of a primary mouse model of sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Fu, Henry L; Mueller, Jenna L; Javid, Melodi P; Mito, Jeffrey K; Kirsch, David G; Ramanujam, Nimmi; Brown, J Quincy

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is associated with specific cellular morphological changes, such as increased nuclear size and crowding from rapidly proliferating cells. In situ tissue imaging using fluorescent stains may be useful for intraoperative detection of residual cancer in surgical tumor margins. We developed a widefield fluorescence structured illumination microscope (SIM) system with a single-shot FOV of 2.1 × 1.6 mm (3.4 mm(2)) and sub-cellular resolution (4.4 µm). The objectives of this work were to measure the relationship between illumination pattern frequency and optical sectioning strength and signal-to-noise ratio in turbid (i.e. thick) samples for selection of the optimum frequency, and to determine feasibility for detecting residual cancer on tumor resection margins, using a genetically engineered primary mouse model of sarcoma. The SIM system was tested in tissue mimicking solid phantoms with various scattering levels to determine impact of both turbidity and illumination frequency on two SIM metrics, optical section thickness and modulation depth. To demonstrate preclinical feasibility, ex vivo 50 µm frozen sections and fresh intact thick tissue samples excised from a primary mouse model of sarcoma were stained with acridine orange, which stains cell nuclei, skeletal muscle, and collagenous stroma. The cell nuclei were segmented using a high-pass filter algorithm, which allowed quantification of nuclear density. The results showed that the optimal illumination frequency was 31.7 µm(-1) used in conjunction with a 4 × 0.1 NA objective (v=0.165). This yielded an optical section thickness of 128 µm and an 8.9 × contrast enhancement over uniform illumination. We successfully demonstrated the ability to resolve cell nuclei in situ achieved via SIM, which allowed segmentation of nuclei from heterogeneous tissues in the presence of considerable background fluorescence. Specifically, we demonstrate that optical sectioning of fresh intact thick tissues performed

  3. Transmission electron microscope CCD camera

    DOEpatents

    Downing, Kenneth H.

    1999-01-01

    In order to improve the performance of a CCD camera on a high voltage electron microscope, an electron decelerator is inserted between the microscope column and the CCD. This arrangement optimizes the interaction of the electron beam with the scintillator of the CCD camera while retaining optimization of the microscope optics and of the interaction of the beam with the specimen. Changing the electron beam energy between the specimen and camera allows both to be optimized.

  4. Ultrafast supercontinuum fiber-laser based pump-probe scanning magneto-optical Kerr effect microscope for the investigation of electron spin dynamics in semiconductors at cryogenic temperatures with picosecond time and micrometer spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Henn, T.; Kiessling, T. Ossau, W.; Molenkamp, L. W.; Biermann, K.; Santos, P. V.

    2013-12-15

    We describe a two-color pump-probe scanning magneto-optical Kerr effect microscope which we have developed to investigate electron spin phenomena in semiconductors at cryogenic temperatures with picosecond time and micrometer spatial resolution. The key innovation of our microscope is the usage of an ultrafast “white light” supercontinuum fiber-laser source which provides access to the whole visible and near-infrared spectral range. Our Kerr microscope allows for the independent selection of the excitation and detection energy while avoiding the necessity to synchronize the pulse trains of two separate picosecond laser systems. The ability to independently tune the pump and probe wavelength enables the investigation of the influence of excitation energy on the optically induced electron spin dynamics in semiconductors. We demonstrate picosecond real-space imaging of the diffusive expansion of optically excited electron spin packets in a (110) GaAs quantum well sample to illustrate the capabilities of the instrument.

  5. Modeling discrete modulators for optical correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knopp, Jerome

    1995-08-01

    The practical calculation of optical correlation filters in correlators that use spatial light modulators with discrete elements is based on the assumption that the image on the input modulator can be modeled as a modulated 2D comb function or 'bed of nails'. A 2D discrete Fourier transform (DFT) is used to calculate a filter that is also modeled as a modulated bed of nails. The sample values in the comb array are assigned to pixel values in the filter. This approach actually gives fairly good qualitative results in modeling correlation behavior. However, it cannot account in detail for the finite size of pixel elements. The DFT approach has problems when modeling modulators whose pixels' center positions cannot be aligned with corresponding sample values. A modified DFT algorithm and an interpolation scheme for modeling these situations is given. As a practical application of the method, we look at modeling an optical correlator whose pixels are not centered at positions that correspond the DFT sample values.

  6. The microscopic (optical and SEM) examination of dental calculus deposits (DCD). Potential interest in forensic anthropology of a bio-archaeological method.

    PubMed

    Charlier, Philippe; Huynh-Charlier, Isabelle; Munoz, Olivia; Billard, Michel; Brun, Luc; de la Grandmaison, Geoffroy Lorin

    2010-07-01

    This article describes the potential interest in forensic anthropology of the microscopic analysis of dental calculus deposits (DCD), a calcified residue frequently found on the surface of teeth. Its sampling and analysis seem straightforward and relatively reproducible. Samples came from archaeological material (KHB-1 Ra's al-Khabbah and RH-5 Ra's al-Hamra, two Prehistoric graveyards located in the Sultanate of Oman, dated between the 5th and 4th millennium B.C.; Montenzio Vecchia, an Etruscan-Celtic necropolis from the north of Italy, dated between the 5th and 3rd century B.C.; body rests of Agnès Sorel, French royal mistress died in 1450 A.D.; skeleton of Pierre Hazard, French royal notary from the 15th century A.D.). Samples were studies by direct optical microscope (OM) or scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Many cytological, histological and elemental analyses were possible, producing precious data for the identification of these remains, the reconstitution of their alimentation and occupational habits, and propositions for manner of death.

  7. A rapid optical clearing protocol using 2,2'-thiodiethanol for microscopic observation of fixed mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, Yuka; Kawakami, Ryosuke; Osanai, Hisayuki; Hibi, Terumasa; Nemoto, Tomomi

    2015-01-01

    Elucidation of neural circuit functions requires visualization of the fine structure of neurons in the inner regions of thick brain specimens. However, the tissue penetration depth of laser scanning microscopy is limited by light scattering and/or absorption by the tissue. Recently, several optical clearing reagents have been proposed for visualization in fixed specimens. However, they require complicated protocols or long treatment times. Here we report the effects of 2,2'-thiodiethanol (TDE) solutions as an optical clearing reagent for fixed mouse brains expressing a yellow fluorescent protein. Immersion of fixed brains in TDE solutions rapidly (within 30 min in the case of 400-µm-thick fixed brain slices) increased their transparency and enhanced the penetration depth in both confocal and two-photon microscopy. In addition, we succeeded in visualizing dendritic spines along single dendrites at deep positions in fixed thick brain slices. These results suggest that our proposed protocol using TDE solution is a rapid and useful method for optical clearing of fixed specimens expressing fluorescent proteins.

  8. Direct evaluation of anisotropic carrier mobility in uniaxially aligned polymer semiconductor film by time-resolved microscopic optical second-harmonic generation measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Kentaro; Manaka, Takaaki; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa

    2017-01-01

    Mobility anisotropy in uniaxially-aligned fluorene co-polymer thin film was directly observed by using time-resolved microscopic optical second-harmonic generation (TRM-SHG) imaging. Main-chain orientation of fluorene co-polymer was determined by polarized absorption measurement, and the mobilities in the direction parallel and perpendicular to the main-chain were respectively estimated as 4.8× {{10}-3} cm2 Vs-1 and 1.2× {{10}-3} cm2 Vs-1 from the visualized carrier motion starting from a round-shape electrode. These results indicate that the mobility anisotropy of this sample was 4.0. Activation energy for each direction was also evaluated by the temperature dependence measurement as 117 and 94 meV, respectively. The TRM-SHG method enables us to estimate mobility and activation energy of the oriented polymer film in all directions at once.

  9. Second harmonic generation in a KNbO3 nanorod and its detection by using a near-field scanning optical microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, D. J.; Kang, P. G.; Jung, J. H.; Lee, H. H.; Choi, S. B.

    2016-04-01

    We report on an observation of second harmonic generation in an individual KNbO3 nanorod by using a near-field scanning optical microscope. The second harmonic is successfully generated by irradiating with a femtosecond laser having center wavelengths of 1200, 1100, and 972 nm. Such a second harmonic yield shows a clear dependence on the incident laser polarization, where maximum yield is obtained when the incident laser polarization is parallel to the long axis of an individual nanorod. A spatially-resolved second harmonic image shows a bright spot at the edge of the nanorod, which is attributed to the elaborated intensity of both fundamental laser light and second harmonic light inside the nanowire owing to cavity-mode formation.

  10. Hypoxia in Microscopic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Feng; O’Donoghue, Joseph A

    2008-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia has been commonly observed in a broad spectrum of primary solid malignancies. Hypoxia is associated with tumor progression, increased aggressiveness, enhanced metastatic potential and poor prognosis. Hypoxic tumor cells are resistant to radiotherapy and some forms of chemotherapy. Using an animal model, we recently showed that microscopic tumors less than 1 mm diameter were severely hypoxic. In this review, models and techniques for the study of hypoxia in microscopic tumors are discussed. PMID:18384940

  11. HIGH TEMPERATURE MICROSCOPE AND FURNACE

    DOEpatents

    Olson, D.M.

    1961-01-31

    A high-temperature microscope is offered. It has a reflecting optic situated above a molten specimen in a furnace and reflecting the image of the same downward through an inert optic member in the floor of the furnace, a plurality of spaced reflecting plane mirrors defining a reflecting path around the furnace, a standard microscope supported in the path of and forming the end terminus of the light path.

  12. Microscopic Polyangiitis

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Sharon A.; Seo, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis In 1923, Friedrich Wohlwill described two patients with a “microscopic form of periarteritis nodosa”, which was distinct from classical polyarteritis nodosa. This disease, now known as microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), is a primary systemic vasculitis characterized by inflammation of the small-caliber blood vessels and the presence of circulating antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA). Typically, microscopic polyangiitis presents with glomerulonephritis and pulmonary capillaritis, although involvement of the skin, nerves, and gastrointestinal tract is not uncommon. Treatment of MPA generally requires use of a cytotoxic agent (such as cyclophosphamide) in addition to high-dose glucocorticoids. Recent research has focused on identifying alternate treatment strategies that minimize or eliminate exposure to cytotoxic agents. This article will review the history, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, and treatment of MPA. PMID:20688249

  13. Martian Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The microscopic imager (circular device in center) is in clear view above the surface at Meridiani Planum, Mars, in this approximate true-color image taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The image was taken on the 9th sol of the rover's journey. The microscopic imager is located on the rover's instrument deployment device, or arm. The arrow is pointing to the lens of the instrument. Note the dust cover, which flips out to the left of the lens, is open. This approximated color image was created using the camera's violet and infrared filters as blue and red.

  14. Proper alignment of the microscope.

    PubMed

    Rottenfusser, Rudi

    2013-01-01

    The light microscope is merely the first element of an imaging system in a research facility. Such a system may include high-speed and/or high-resolution image acquisition capabilities, confocal technologies, and super-resolution methods of various types. Yet more than ever, the proverb "garbage in-garbage out" remains a fact. Image manipulations may be used to conceal a suboptimal microscope setup, but an artifact-free image can only be obtained when the microscope is optimally aligned, both mechanically and optically. Something else is often overlooked in the quest to get the best image out of the microscope: Proper sample preparation! The microscope optics can only do its job when its design criteria are matched to the specimen or vice versa. The specimen itself, the mounting medium, the cover slip, and the type of immersion medium (if applicable) are all part of the total optical makeup. To get the best results out of a microscope, understanding the functions of all of its variable components is important. Only then one knows how to optimize these components for the intended application. Different approaches might be chosen to discuss all of the microscope's components. We decided to follow the light path which starts with the light source and ends at the camera or the eyepieces. To add more transparency to this sequence, the section up to the microscope stage was called the "Illuminating Section", to be followed by the "Imaging Section" which starts with the microscope objective. After understanding the various components, we can start "working with the microscope." To get the best resolution and contrast from the microscope, the practice of "Koehler Illumination" should be understood and followed by every serious microscopist. Step-by-step instructions as well as illustrations of the beam path in an upright and inverted microscope are included in this chapter. A few practical considerations are listed in Section 3.

  15. Optical levitation and translation of a microscopic particle by use of multiple beams generated by vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser array sources.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Yusuke; Shirai, Nobuhiro; Tanida, Jun

    2002-09-20

    An optical levitation and translation method for a microscopic particle by use of the resultant force induced by multiple light beams is studied. We show dependence of the radiation pressure force on the illuminating distribution by numerical calculation, and we find that the strongest axial force is obtained by a specific spacing period of illuminating beams. Extending the optical manipulation technique by means of vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) array sources [Appl. Opt. 40, 5430 (2001)], we are the first, to our knowledge, to demonstrate levitation of a particle and its translation while levitated by using a VCSEL array. The vertical position of the target particle can be controlled in a range of a few tens of micrometers with an accuracy of 2 microm or less. The analytical and experimental results suggest that use of multiple beams is an effective method to levitate a particle with low total illumination power. Some issues on the manipulation method that uses multiple beams are discussed.

  16. In situ non-destructive measurement of biofilm thickness and topology in an interferometric optical microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Larimer, Curtis; Suter, Jonathan D.; Bonheyo, George; Addleman, Raymond Shane

    2016-03-15

    Biofilms are ubiquitous and deleteriously impact a wide range of industrial processes, medical and dental health issues, and environmental problems such as transport of invasive species and the fuel efficiency of ocean going vessels. Biofilms are difficult to characterize when fully hydrated, especially in a non-destructive manner, because of their soft structure and water-like bulk properties. Herein we describe a non-destructive high resolution method of measuring and monitoring the thickness and topology of live biofilms of using white light interferometric optical microscopy. Using this technique, surface morphology, surface roughness, and biofilm thickness can be measured non-destructively and with high resolution as a function of time without disruption of the biofilm activity and processes. The thickness and surface topology of a P. putida biofilm were monitored growing from initial colonization to a mature biofilm. Typical bacterial growth curves were observed. Increase in surface roughness was a leading indicator of biofilm growth.

  17. [Histology of the living eye : Noninvasive microscopic structure and functional analysis of the retina with adaptive optics].

    PubMed

    Domdei, N; Reiniger, J L; Pfau, M; Charbel Issa, P; Holz, F G; Harmening, W M

    2017-03-01

    Equipping an ophthalmoscope with adaptive optics (AO) offers access to the living human retina with unprecedented spatial resolution. With AO, cellular structures such as the nerve fiber layer, the microvasculature of the smallest retinal capillaries, rod and cone photoreceptors and the mosaic of the retinal pigment epithelium are directly observable. A large number of studies in the normal and diseased retina have already shown that this level of detail offers new insights into disease mechanisms and progression, and promises to identify early disease markers. In conjunction with functional testing of single photoreceptors that is possible with AO microstimulation, a structure-function relationship on the cellular scale is within reach. These technological advances offer new avenues for clinical ophthalmology, interventional efforts, and basic research of the function and dysfunction of vision.

  18. High-dynamic-range microscope imaging based on exposure bracketing in full-field optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Leong-Hoi, Audrey; Montgomery, Paul C; Serio, Bruno; Twardowski, Patrice; Uhring, Wilfried

    2016-04-01

    By applying the proposed high-dynamic-range (HDR) technique based on exposure bracketing, we demonstrate a meaningful reduction in the spatial noise in image frames acquired with a CCD camera so as to improve the fringe contrast in full-field optical coherence tomography (FF-OCT). This new signal processing method thus allows improved probing within transparent or semitransparent samples. The proposed method is demonstrated on 3 μm thick transparent polymer films of Mylar, which, due to their transparency, produce low contrast fringe patterns in white-light interference microscopy. High-resolution tomographic analysis is performed using the technique. After performing appropriate signal processing, resulting XZ sections are observed. Submicrometer-sized defects can be lost in the noise that is present in the CCD images. With the proposed method, we show that by increasing the signal-to-noise ratio of the images, submicrometer-sized defect structures can thus be detected.

  19. Towards coherent manipulation of the ground states of single cesium atom confined in a microscopic far-off-resonance optical dipole trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diao, Wenting; He, Jun; Liu, Bei; Wang, Junmin

    2012-11-01

    This work deals with the cooling and trapping of single cesium (Cs) atoms in a large-magnetic-gradient magneto-optical trap (MOT) and the confinement of single Cs atoms in a far-off-resonance optical dipole trap (FORT). The experiment setup is based on two large-numerical-aperture lens assemblies which allow us to strongly focus a 1064-nm TEM00-mode Gaussian laser beam to a 1/e2 radius of ~ 2.3 μm to form a microscopic FORT for isolating single atom with environment and to efficiently collect the laser-induced-fluorescence photons emitted by single atoms for detecting and recognizing single atom's internal state. We have tried both of "bottom-up" and "top-down" loading schemes to confine single atoms in the microscopic FORT. In the "bottom-up" scheme, we have successfully prepared single Cs atoms in the MOT and transferred it into FORT with a probability of almost 100%. In the "top-down" scheme, we have achieved ~ 74% of single atom loading probability in the FORT using light-assisted collisions induced by blue detuning laser and with prepared many Cs atoms in the MOT. The relaxation time in hyperfine level of ground state of trapped single Cs atom is measured to be ~5.4 s. To coherently manipulate atomic quantum bits (qubit) encoded in the clock states (mF = 0 states in Fg = 3 and 4 hyperfine levels) of single Cs atom via the two-photon simulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP), we have prepared two phase-locked laser beams with a frequency difference of ~ 9.192 GHz by optically injecting an 852-nm master laser to lock the +1-order sideband of a 9-GHz current-modulated slave diode laser. The two phase-locked laser beams are used to drive STIRAP process in the Λ-type three-level system consists of Cs |6S1/2 Fg = 4, mF = 0> and |6S1/2 Fg = 3, mF = 0< long-lived clock states and Cs |6S1/2 Fe = 4, mF = +1 > excited state with the single-photon detuning of ~ -20 GHz. Rabi flopping experiments are in progress.

  20. Optical quantitation of absorbers in variously shaped turbid media based on the microscopic Beer-Lambert law. A new approach to optical computerized tomography.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Y; Urakami, T

    1998-02-09

    To determine the concentrations of an absorber in variously shaped turbid media such as human tissue, we propose analytical expressions for diffuse re-emission in time and frequency domains, based on the microscopic Beer-Lambert law that holds true when we trace a zigzag photon path in the medium. Our expressions are implicit for the scattering properties, the volume shape, and the source-detector separation. We show that three observables are sufficient to determine the changes in the concentration and the absolute concentrations of an absorber in scattering media as long as the scattering property remains constant. The three observables are: the re-emission, the mean pathlength or group delay, and the extinction coefficient of the absorber. We also show that our equations can be extended to describe photon migration in nonuniform media. The validity of the predictions is confirmed by measuring a tissue-like phantom.

  1. Integrated modeling of advanced optical systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Hugh C.; Needels, Laura; Levine, B. Martin

    1993-01-01

    This poster session paper describes an integrated modeling and analysis capability being developed at JPL under funding provided by the JPL Director's Discretionary Fund and the JPL Control/Structure Interaction Program (CSI). The posters briefly summarize the program capabilities and illustrate them with an example problem. The computer programs developed under this effort will provide an unprecedented capability for integrated modeling and design of high performance optical spacecraft. The engineering disciplines supported include structural dynamics, controls, optics and thermodynamics. Such tools are needed in order to evaluate the end-to-end system performance of spacecraft such as OSI, POINTS, and SMMM. This paper illustrates the proof-of-concept tools that have been developed to establish the technology requirements and demonstrate the new features of integrated modeling and design. The current program also includes implementation of a prototype tool based upon the CAESY environment being developed under the NASA Guidance and Control Research and Technology Computational Controls Program. This prototype will be available late in FY-92. The development plan proposes a major software production effort to fabricate, deliver, support and maintain a national-class tool from FY-93 through FY-95.

  2. Bond models in linear and nonlinear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aspnes, D. E.

    2015-08-01

    Bond models, also known as polarizable-point or mechanical models, have a long history in optics, starting with the Clausius-Mossotti relation but more accurately originating with Ewald's largely forgotten work in 1912. These models describe macroscopic phenomena such as dielectric functions and nonlinear-optical (NLO) susceptibilities in terms of the physics that takes place in real space, in real time, on the atomic scale. Their strengths lie in the insights that they provide and the questions that they raise, aspects that are often obscured by quantum-mechanical treatments. Statics versions were used extensively in the late 1960's and early 1970's to correlate NLO susceptibilities among bulk materials. Interest in NLO applications revived with the 2002 work of Powell et al., who showed that a fully anisotropic version reduced by more than a factor of 2 the relatively large number of parameters necessary to describe secondharmonic- generation (SHG) data for Si(111)/SiO2 interfaces. Attention now is focused on the exact physical meaning of these parameters, and to the extent that they represent actual physical quantities.

  3. Optical Model and Cross Section Uncertainties

    SciTech Connect

    Herman,M.W.; Pigni, M.T.; Dietrich, F.S.; Oblozinsky, P.

    2009-10-05

    Distinct minima and maxima in the neutron total cross section uncertainties were observed in model calculations using spherical optical potential. We found this oscillating structure to be a general feature of quantum mechanical wave scattering. Specifically, we analyzed neutron interaction with 56Fe from 1 keV up to 65 MeV, and investigated physical origin of the minima.We discuss their potential importance for practical applications as well as the implications for the uncertainties in total and absorption cross sections.

  4. Fractional-order variational optical flow model for motion estimation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dali; Sheng, Hu; Chen, YangQuan; Xue, Dingyü

    2013-05-13

    A new class of fractional-order variational optical flow models, which generalizes the differential of optical flow from integer order to fractional order, is proposed for motion estimation in this paper. The corresponding Euler-Lagrange equations are derived by solving a typical fractional variational problem, and the numerical implementation based on the Grünwald-Letnikov fractional derivative definition is proposed to solve these complicated fractional partial differential equations. Theoretical analysis reveals that the proposed fractional-order variational optical flow model is the generalization of the typical Horn and Schunck (first-order) variational optical flow model and the second-order variational optical flow model, which provides a new idea for us to study the optical flow model and has an important theoretical implication in optical flow model research. The experiments demonstrate the validity of the generalization of differential order.

  5. Microscopic colitis

    PubMed Central

    Ianiro, Gianluca; Cammarota, Giovanni; Valerio, Luca; Annicchiarico, Brigida Eleonora; Milani, Alessandro; Siciliano, Massimo; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Microscopic colitis may be defined as a clinical syndrome, of unknown etiology, consisting of chronic watery diarrhea, with no alterations in the large bowel at the endoscopic and radiologic evaluation. Therefore, a definitive diagnosis is only possible by histological analysis. The epidemiological impact of this disease has become increasingly clear in the last years, with most data coming from Western countries. Microscopic colitis includes two histological subtypes [collagenous colitis (CC) and lymphocytic colitis (LC)] with no differences in clinical presentation and management. Collagenous colitis is characterized by a thickening of the subepithelial collagen layer that is absent in LC. The main feature of LC is an increase of the density of intra-epithelial lymphocytes in the surface epithelium. A number of pathogenetic theories have been proposed over the years, involving the role of luminal agents, autoimmunity, eosinophils, genetics (human leukocyte antigen), biliary acids, infections, alterations of pericryptal fibroblasts, and drug intake; drugs like ticlopidine, carbamazepine or ranitidine are especially associated with the development of LC, while CC is more frequently linked to cimetidine, non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs and lansoprazole. Microscopic colitis typically presents as chronic or intermittent watery diarrhea, that may be accompanied by symptoms such as abdominal pain, weight loss and incontinence. Recent evidence has added new pharmacological options for the treatment of microscopic colitis: the role of steroidal therapy, especially oral budesonide, has gained relevance, as well as immunosuppressive agents such as azathioprine and 6-mercaptopurine. The use of anti-tumor necrosis factor-α agents, infliximab and adalimumab, constitutes a new, interesting tool for the treatment of microscopic colitis, but larger, adequately designed studies are needed to confirm existing data. PMID:23180940

  6. Optical SED models of galaxy mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Gregory F.; Cox, T. J.; Hayward, Christopher C.; Hernquist, Lars; Jonsson, Patrik

    2012-08-01

    I discuss recent work in which we construct models of poststarburst galaxies by combining fully three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy mergers with radiative transfer calculations of dust attenuation. The poststarburst signatures can occur shortly after a bright starburst phase in gas-rich mergers, and thus offer a unique opportunity to study the formation of bulges and the effects of feedback. Several additional applications of spatially-resolved spectroscopic models of interacting galaxies include multi-wavelength studies of AGN/starburst diagnostics, mock integral field unit data to interpret the evolution of ULIRGs, and the `Green Valley'. Optical spectra of simulated major gas-rich galaxy mergers can be found at http://www.cfa.harvard.edu/~gsnyder

  7. Color Laser Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awamura, D.; Ode, T.; Yonezawa, M.

    1987-04-01

    A color laser microscope utilizing a new color laser imaging system has been developed for the visual inspection of semiconductors. The light source, produced by three lasers (Red; He-Ne, Green; Ar, Blue; He-Cd), is deflected horizontally by an AOD (Acoustic Optical Deflector) and vertically by a vibration mirror. The laser beam is focused in a small spot which is scanned over the sample at high speed. The light reflected back from the sample is reformed to contain linear information by returning to the original vibration mirror. The linear light is guided to the CCD image sensor where it is converted into a video signal. Individual CCD image sensors are used for each of the three R, G, or B color image signals. The confocal optical system with its laser light source yields a color TV monitor image with no flaring and a much sharper resolution than that of the conventional optical microscope. The AOD makes possible a high speed laser scan and a NTSC or PAL TV video signal is produced in real time without any video memory. Since the light source is composed of R, G, and B laser beams, color separation superior to that of white light illumination is achieved. Because of the photometric linearity of the image detector, the R, G, and B outputs of the system are most suitably used for hue analysis. The CCD linear image sensors in the optical system produce no geometrical distortion, and good color registration is available principally. The output signal can be used for high accuracy line width measuring. The many features of the color laser microscope make it ideally suited for the visual inspection of semiconductor processing. A number of these systems have already been installed in such a capacity. The Color Laser Microscope can also be a very useful tool for the fields of material engineering and biotechnology.

  8. Optical Model Potentials for {alpha}-Particles Scattering around the Coulomb Barrier on Medium-Mass Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Avrigeanu, M.; Roman, F.L.; Avrigeanu, V.

    2005-05-24

    Following a semi-microscopic and phenomenological analyses of {alpha}-particle elastic scattering on A{approx}100 nuclei at energies below 32 MeV, a regional optical potential is involved in (n,{alpha}) reaction cross-sections analysis for the stable Mo isotopes. Focus on the uncertainties in the OMP parameters found to describe the {alpha}-particle emission from excited compound residual nuclei is thus obtained, looking for understanding of the related questions on the basis of microscopic models.

  9. Science 101: How Does an Electron Microscope Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Bill

    2013-01-01

    Contrary to popular opinion, electron microscopes are not used to look at electrons. They are used to look for structure in things that are too small to observe with an optical microscope, or to obtain images that are magnified much more than is obtainable with an optical microscope. To understand how electron microscopes work, it will help to go…

  10. Two-zone model for the broadband Crab nebula spectrum: microscopic interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraschetti, F.; Pohl, M.

    2017-03-01

    We develop a simple two-zone interpretation of the broadband baseline Crab nebula spectrum between 10-5 eV and 100 TeV by using two distinct log-parabola energetic electrons distributions. We determine analytically the very-high energy photon spectrum as originated by inverse-Compton scattering of the far-infrared soft ambient photons within the nebula off a first population of electrons energized at the nebula termination shock. The broad and flat 200 GeV peak jointly observed by Fermi/LAT and MAGIC is naturally reproduced. The synchrotron radiation from a second energetic electron population explains the spectrum from the radio range up to 10 keV. We infer from observations the energy dependence of the microscopic probability of remaining in proximity of the shock of the accelerating electrons.

  11. Macroscopic rates, microscopic observations, and molecular models of the dissolution of carbonate phases.

    SciTech Connect

    Duckworth, Owen W.; Cygan, Randall Timothy; Martin, Scot T.

    2004-05-01

    Bulk and surface energies are calculated for endmembers of the isostructural rhombohedral carbonate mineral family, including Ca, Cd, Co, Fe, Mg, Mn, Ni, and Zn compositions. The calculations for the bulk agree with the densities, bond distances, bond angles, and lattice enthalpies reported in the literature. The calculated energies also correlate with measured dissolution rates: the lattice energies show a log-linear relationship to the macroscopic dissolution rates at circumneutral pH. Moreover, the energies of ion pairs translated along surface steps are calculated and found to predict experimentally observed microscopic step retreat velocities. Finally, pit formation excess energies decrease with increasing pit size, which is consistent with the nonlinear dissolution kinetics hypothesized for the initial stages of pit formation.

  12. Microscopic modeling of mass and charge distributions in the spontaneous fission of 240Pu

    DOE PAGES

    Sandhukhan, Jhilam; Nazarewicz, Witold; Schunck, Nicolas

    2016-01-20

    We propose a methodology to calculate microscopically the mass and charge distributions of spontaneous fission yields. We combine the multidimensional minimization of collective action for fission with stochastic Langevin dynamics to track the relevant fission paths from the ground-state configuration up to scission. The nuclear potential energy and collective inertia governing the tunneling motion are obtained with nuclear density functional theory in the collective space of shape deformations and pairing. As a result, we obtain a quantitative agreement with experimental data and find that both the charge and mass distributions in the spontaneous fission of 240Pu are sensitive both tomore » the dissipation in collective motion and to adiabatic fission characteristics.« less

  13. Imaging arrangement and microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Pertsinidis, Alexandros; Chu, Steven

    2015-12-15

    An embodiment of the present invention is an imaging arrangement that includes imaging optics, a fiducial light source, and a control system. In operation, the imaging optics separate light into first and second tight by wavelength and project the first and second light onto first and second areas within first and second detector regions, respectively. The imaging optics separate fiducial light from the fiducial light source into first and second fiducial light and project the first and second fiducial light onto third and fourth areas within the first and second detector regions, respectively. The control system adjusts alignment of the imaging optics so that the first and second fiducial light projected onto the first and second detector regions maintain relatively constant positions within the first and second detector regions, respectively. Another embodiment of the present invention is a microscope that includes the imaging arrangement.

  14. Optical Performance Modeling of FUSE Telescope Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Timo T.; Ohl, Raymond G.; Friedman, Scott D.; Moos, H. Warren

    2000-01-01

    We describe the Metrology Data Processor (METDAT), the Optical Surface Analysis Code (OSAC), and their application to the image evaluation of the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) mirrors. The FUSE instrument - designed and developed by the Johns Hopkins University and launched in June 1999 is an astrophysics satellite which provides high resolution spectra (lambda/Delta(lambda) = 20,000 - 25,000) in the wavelength region from 90.5 to 118.7 nm The FUSE instrument is comprised of four co-aligned, normal incidence, off-axis parabolic mirrors, four Rowland circle spectrograph channels with holographic gratings, and delay line microchannel plate detectors. The OSAC code provides a comprehensive analysis of optical system performance, including the effects of optical surface misalignments, low spatial frequency deformations described by discrete polynomial terms, mid- and high-spatial frequency deformations (surface roughness), and diffraction due to the finite size of the aperture. Both normal incidence (traditionally infrared, visible, and near ultraviolet mirror systems) and grazing incidence (x-ray mirror systems) systems can be analyzed. The code also properly accounts for reflectance losses on the mirror surfaces. Low frequency surface errors are described in OSAC by using Zernike polynomials for normal incidence mirrors and Legendre-Fourier polynomials for grazing incidence mirrors. The scatter analysis of the mirror is based on scalar scatter theory. The program accepts simple autocovariance (ACV) function models or power spectral density (PSD) models derived from mirror surface metrology data as input to the scatter calculation. The end product of the program is a user-defined pixel array containing the system Point Spread Function (PSF). The METDAT routine is used in conjunction with the OSAC program. This code reads in laboratory metrology data in a normalized format. The code then fits the data using Zernike polynomials for normal incidence

  15. Optical trapping of a spherically symmetric sphere in the ray-optics regime: a model for optical tweezers upon cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Yiren; Hsu Long; Chi Sien

    2006-06-01

    Since their invention in 1986, optical tweezers have become a popular manipulation and force measurement tool in cellular and molecular biology. However, until recently there has not been a sophisticated model for optical tweezers on trapping cells in the ray-optics regime. We present a model for optical tweezers to calculate the optical force upon a spherically symmetric multilayer sphere representing a common biological cell. A numerical simulation of this model shows that not only is the magnitude of the optical force upon a Chinese hamster ovary cell significantly three times smaller than that upon a polystyrene bead of the same size, but the distribution of the optical force upon a cell is also much different from that upon a uniform particle, and there is a 30% difference in the optical trapping stiffness of these two cases. Furthermore, under a small variant condition for the refractive indices of any adjacent layers of the sphere, this model provides a simple approximation to calculate the optical force and the stiffness of an optical tweezers system.

  16. [Nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy animal model and its treatment applications].

    PubMed

    Chuman, Hideki

    2014-04-01

    Nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) is one of the most common acute unilaterally onset optic nerve diseases. One management problem in terms of NAION is the difficulty of differential diagnosis between NAION and anterior optic neuritis (ON). A second problem is that there is no established treatment for the acute stage of NAION. A third problem is that there is no preventive treatment for a subsequent attack on the fellow eye, estimated to occur in 15 to 25% of patients with NAION. For differentiation of acute NAION from anterior optic neuritis, we investigated the usefulness of laser speckle flowgraphy (LSFG). In the normal control group, the tissue blood flow did not significantly differ between the right and left eyes. In the NAION group, all 6 patients had 29.5% decreased mean blur rate (MBR), which correlates to optic disc blood flow, of the NAION eye compared with the unaffected eye. In the anterior ON group, all 6 cases had 15.9% increased MBR of the anterior ON eye compared with the unaffected eye. Thus, LSFG showed a difference of the underlying pathophysiology between NAION and anterior ON despite showing disc swelling in both groups and could be useful for differentiating both groups. For the treatment of acute stage of NAION, we tried to reproduce the rodent model of NAION (rNAION) developed by Bernstein and colleagues. To induce rNAION, after the administration of rose bengal(RB) (2.5 mM) into the tail vein of SD rats, the small vessels of the left optic nerve were photoactivated using a 514 nm argon green laser (RB-laser-induction). In the RB-laser-induction eyes, the capillaries within the optic disc were reduced markedly, the optic disc became swollen, and fluorescein angiography showed filling defect in the choroid and the optic disc at an early stage, followed by hyperfluorescence at a late stage. Electrophysiological evaluation revealed that visual evoked potential (VEP) amplitude was significantly decreased but an electroretinogram

  17. Analytical model for a polymer optical fiber under dynamic bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal Junior, Arnaldo G.; Frizera, Anselmo; Pontes, Maria José

    2017-08-01

    Advantages such as sensibility in bending, high fracture toughness, and high sensibility in strain enable the application of polymer optical fibers as sensors for strain, temperature, level, and for angle measurements. In order to enhance the sensor design, this paper presents an analytical model for a side polished polymer optical fiber under dynamic bending. Differently from analytical models that use only the geometrical optics approach with no correction for the stress-optical effects, here the refractive index is corrected at every bending angle to consider the stress-optical effects observed polymer optical fibers. Furthermore, the viscoelastic response of the polymer is also considered. The model is validated in quasi-static and dynamic tests for a polymer optical fiber curvature sensor. Results show good agreement between the model and the experiments.

  18. Dynamic ray tracing for modeling optical cell manipulation.

    PubMed

    Sraj, Ihab; Szatmary, Alex C; Marr, David W M; Eggleton, Charles D

    2010-08-02

    Current methods for predicting stress distribution on a cell surface due to optical trapping forces are based on a traditional ray optics scheme for fixed geometries. Cells are typically modeled as solid spheres as this facilitates optical force calculation. Under such applied forces however, real and non-rigid cells can deform, so assumptions inherent in traditional ray optics methods begin to break down. In this work, we implement a dynamic ray tracing technique to calculate the stress distribution on a deformable cell induced by optical trapping. Here, cells are modeled as three-dimensional elastic capsules with a discretized surface with associated hydrodynamic forces calculated using the Immersed Boundary Method. We use this approach to simulate the transient deformation of spherical, ellipsoidal and biconcave capsules due to external optical forces induced by a single diode bar optical trap for a range of optical powers.

  19. Suppression of single-cesium-atom heating in a microscopic optical dipole trap for demonstration of an 852-nm triggered single-photon source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bei; Jin, Gang; He, Jun; Wang, Junmin

    2016-07-01

    We investigate single-cesium-atom heating owing to the momentum accumulation process induced by the resonant pulsed excitation in a microscopic optical dipole trap formed by a strongly focused 1064-nm laser beam. The heating depends on the trap frequency, which restricts the maximum repetition rate of the pulsed excitation. We experimentally verify the heating of a single atom and then demonstrate how to suppress it with an optimized pulsed excitation and cooling method. The typical trap lifetime of a single cesium atom is extended from 108 ±6 μ s to 2536 ±31 ms , and the corresponding number of excitations increases from ˜108 to ˜360 000 . In applying this faster cooling method, we use the trapped single cesium atom as a triggered single-photon source at an excitation repetition rate of 10 MHz. The second-order intensity correlations of the emitted single photons are characterized by implementing a Hanbury Brown and Twiss setup, and a clear antibunching effect has been observed.

  20. Effects of intracranial pressure on the pial microcirculation in rats studied by a fiber-optic laser-Doppler anemometer microscope.

    PubMed

    Seki, J; Sasaki, Y; Oyama, T; Yamamoto, J

    1999-01-01

    The fiber-optic laser-Doppler anemometer microscope (FLDAM) developed in our laboratory was applied to measure red cell velocity in individual pial microvessels in rats to determine the effect of intracranial pressure (ICP) on the pial microcirculation. The red cell velocity and the vessel diameter of pial microvessels were measured through a closed cranial window at controlled values of ICP between 0 and 50 mmHg. As ICP increased from 0 to 50 mmHg, the average relative diameter of venules with respect to the diameter at an ICP of 5 mmHg decreased from 1.18 +/- 0.12 (mean +/- SD) to 0.74 +/- 0.08 and the average relative velocity increased from 0.80 +/- 0.20 to 1.83 +/- 0.42 monotonically. The changes in diameter and velocity of arterioles with ICP were small, and they were not significantly different from those values at an ICP of 5 mmHg except for the diameter at an ICP of 20 mmHg. The mean volume flow rates calculated assuming a circular vessel cross-section did not show any statistically significant change with ICP between 0 and 50 mmHg in both arterioles and venules, which supports the concept of autoregulation.

  1. A Computer-Controlled Classroom Model of an Atomic Force Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engstrom, Tyler A.; Johnson, Matthew M.; Eklund, Peter C.; Russin, Timothy J.

    2015-12-01

    The concept of "seeing by feeling" as a way to circumvent limitations on sight is universal on the macroscopic scale—reading Braille, feeling one's way around a dark room, etc. The development of the atomic force microscope (AFM) in 1986 extended this concept to imaging in the nanoscale. While there are classroom demonstrations that use a tactile probe to map the topography or some other property of a sample, the rastering of the probe over the sample is manually controlled, which is both tedious and potentially inaccurate. Other groups have used simulation or tele-operation of an AFM probe. In this paper we describe a teaching AFM with complete computer control to map out topographic and magnetic properties of a "crystal" consisting of two-dimensional arrays of spherical marble "atoms." Our AFM is well suited for lessons on the "Big Ideas of Nanoscale" such as tools and instrumentation, as well as a pre-teaching activity for groups with remote access AFM or mobile AFM. The principle of operation of our classroom AFM is the same as that of a real AFM, excepting the nature of the force between sample and probe.

  2. Optical and control modeling for adaptive beam-combining experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gruetzner, J.K.; Tucker, S.D.; Neal, D.R.; Bentley, A.E.; Simmons-Potter, K.

    1995-08-01

    The development of modeling algorithms for adaptive optics systems is important for evaluating both performance and design parameters prior to system construction. Two of the most critical subsystems to be modeled are the binary optic design and the adaptive control system. Since these two are intimately related, it is beneficial to model them simultaneously. Optic modeling techniques have some significant limitations. Diffraction effects directly limit the utility of geometrical ray-tracing models, and transform techniques such as the fast fourier transform can be both cumbersome and memory intensive. The authors have developed a hybrid system incorporating elements of both ray-tracing and fourier transform techniques. In this paper they present an analytical model of wavefront propagation through a binary optic lens system developed and implemented at Sandia. This model is unique in that it solves the transfer function for each portion of a diffractive optic analytically. The overall performance is obtained by a linear superposition of each result. The model has been successfully used in the design of a wide range of binary optics, including an adaptive optic for a beam combining system consisting of an array of rectangular mirrors, each controllable in tip/tilt and piston. Wavefront sensing and the control models for a beam combining system have been integrated and used to predict overall systems performance. Applicability of the model for design purposes is demonstrated with several lens designs through a comparison of model predictions with actual adaptive optics results.

  3. Optimization of a Widefield Structured Illumination Microscope for Non-Destructive Assessment and Quantification of Nuclear Features in Tumor Margins of a Primary Mouse Model of Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Henry L.; Mueller, Jenna L.; Javid, Melodi P.; Mito, Jeffrey K.; Kirsch, David G.; Ramanujam, Nimmi; Brown, J. Quincy

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is associated with specific cellular morphological changes, such as increased nuclear size and crowding from rapidly proliferating cells. In situ tissue imaging using fluorescent stains may be useful for intraoperative detection of residual cancer in surgical tumor margins. We developed a widefield fluorescence structured illumination microscope (SIM) system with a single-shot FOV of 2.1×1.6 mm (3.4 mm2) and sub-cellular resolution (4.4 µm). The objectives of this work were to measure the relationship between illumination pattern frequency and optical sectioning strength and signal-to-noise ratio in turbid (i.e. thick) samples for selection of the optimum frequency, and to determine feasibility for detecting residual cancer on tumor resection margins, using a genetically engineered primary mouse model of sarcoma. The SIM system was tested in tissue mimicking solid phantoms with various scattering levels to determine impact of both turbidity and illumination frequency on two SIM metrics, optical section thickness and modulation depth. To demonstrate preclinical feasibility, ex vivo 50 µm frozen sections and fresh intact thick tissue samples excised from a primary mouse model of sarcoma were stained with acridine orange, which stains cell nuclei, skeletal muscle, and collagenous stroma. The cell nuclei were segmented using a high-pass filter algorithm, which allowed quantification of nuclear density. The results showed that the optimal illumination frequency was 31.7 µm−1 used in conjunction with a 4×0.1 NA objective ( = 0.165). This yielded an optical section thickness of 128 µm and an 8.9×contrast enhancement over uniform illumination. We successfully demonstrated the ability to resolve cell nuclei in situ achieved via SIM, which allowed segmentation of nuclei from heterogeneous tissues in the presence of considerable background fluorescence. Specifically, we demonstrate that optical sectioning of fresh intact thick tissues performed

  4. Performance of signal-to-noise ratio estimation for scanning electron microscope using autocorrelation Levinson-Durbin recursion model.

    PubMed

    Sim, K S; Lim, M S; Yeap, Z X

    2016-07-01

    A new technique to quantify signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) value of the scanning electron microscope (SEM) images is proposed. This technique is known as autocorrelation Levinson-Durbin recursion (ACLDR) model. To test the performance of this technique, the SEM image is corrupted with noise. The autocorrelation function of the original image and the noisy image are formed. The signal spectrum based on the autocorrelation function of image is formed. ACLDR is then used as an SNR estimator to quantify the signal spectrum of noisy image. The SNR values of the original image and the quantified image are calculated. The ACLDR is then compared with the three existing techniques, which are nearest neighbourhood, first-order linear interpolation and nearest neighbourhood combined with first-order linear interpolation. It is shown that ACLDR model is able to achieve higher accuracy in SNR estimation.

  5. Scanned probe microscope for biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baiburin, Vil B.; Konnov, Nikolai P.; Shcherbakov, Anatolyi A.; Malakhaeva, Alina N.; Zadnova, Svetlana P.; Volkov, Yuri P.

    1997-12-01

    In our biophysical laboratory has been developed a new scanned probe microscope (SPM) for biological application. The SPM allows to investigate a biological samples' surface by means of three different near field microscopes: scanning tunneling microscope (STM), atomic force microscope (AFM) and near field scanning optical microscope (NSOM). The SPM is very rigid and can be operated in ordinary laboratory without any vibration isolation. The scanning area of the microscope is about 10 by 10 micrometers. Some different biological objects were visualized by means of the SPM viz. bacteria (E. Coli, plague, cholera, staphylococcus), macromolecules (DNA, plague proteins) and phage (T2).

  6. (Center of excellence: Microlaser microscope)

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, R.H.

    1992-01-01

    This Center-of-Excellence grant has two components: development of an imaging system based on microlaser arrays forms a central project among a group of laser diagnostic and therapeutic efforts primarily funded outside the grant. In these first 8 months we have set up the Microlaser Microscope using small microlaser arrays. We have emphasized the basics of microlaser handling and electronic addressing and the optics of the microscope. Details of electronics and optics given here will be used in the larger arrays which should be available soon. After a description of the central Microlaser Microscope project, we touch briefly on the other projects of the Center, which have been outstandingly fruitful this year. Publications are necessarily concerned with the smaller projects, since the Microlaser Microscope is in its early stages.

  7. Microscopic modeling of high-field charge transport in amorphous Selenium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darbandi, Ali

    Avalanche multiplication of charge carriers as a result of successive impact ionization has led to the development of solid state avalanche photo-detectors. Crystalline based avalanche photodiodes have found a variety of applications including laser range finders and fiber optic telecommunications. Recently, there is a growing interest to employ amorphous semiconductors due to their economically favourbale costs and capability to be readily prepared in the desired size and structure with high efficiency. Selenium is the only material that has been reported to clearly feature the avalanche phenomenon in the amorphous phase in a practical electric field. Selenium based avalanche photo-diodes motivated commercialization of TV camera tubes which are capable of capturing images at extremely low light intensities. In addition, amorphous Selenium exhibits a high potential for development of x-ray and gamma-ray detectors for medical imaging devices. Hence, studying the electronic properties of Selenium is worthwhile for advancement of functional amorphous materials that feature impact ionization. T he energy loss mechanism that prevents the carriers from gaining sufficient kinetic energy to initiate impact ionization is inelastic scattering of electrons and holes with optical phonons. The latter interaction in Selenium is analyzed in this work. To overcome the computational difficulties, a crystalline structure of Selenium was studied, however it is of interest to extend the outcomes to amorphous phase. Here, we assume that the calculated results based on trigonal Selenium structure can be also translated into the amorphous structure. This assumption is supported by further studies of density of states and phonon density of states in both amorphous and crystalline phases of Selenium. In addition, validity of our assumption is further confirmed by simulating an amorphous Selenium structure. Volume deformation potential was studied for both trigonal and the simulated

  8. In vivo functional chronic imaging of a small animal model using optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Song; Maslov, Konstantin; Wang, Lihong V.

    2009-01-01

    Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) has been validated as a valuable tool for label-free volumetric microvascular imaging. More importantly, the advantages of noninvasiveness and measurement consistency suggest the use of OR-PAM for chronic imaging of intact microcirculation. Here, such chronic imaging is demonstrated for the first time by monitoring the healing process of laser-induced microvascular lesions in a small animal model in vivo. The central part of a 1 mm by 1 mm region in a nude mouse ear was treated under a continuous-wave laser to create a microvascular lesion for chronic study. The region of interest was imaged before the laser treatment, immediately after the treatment, and throughout the healing process using both the authors’ OR-PAM system and a commercial transmission-mode optical microscope. Three-dimensional microvascular morphology and blood oxygenation information were imaged simultaneously at capillary-level resolution. Transmission-mode optical microscopic images were acquired for comparison. OR-PAM has potential important applications in microcirculatory physiology or pathophysiology, tumor angiogenesis, laser microsurgery, and neuroscience. PMID:19610320

  9. Modeling for accurate dimensional scanning electron microscope metrology: then and now.

    PubMed

    Postek, Michael T; Vladár, András E

    2011-01-01

    A review of the evolution of modeling for accurate dimensional scanning electron microscopy is presented with an emphasis on developments in the Monte Carlo technique for modeling the generation of the electrons used for imaging and measurement. The progress of modeling for accurate metrology is discussed through a schematic technology timeline. In addition, a discussion of a future vision for accurate SEM dimensional metrology and the requirements to achieve it are presented.

  10. Femtosecond photoelectron point projection microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Quinonez, Erik; Handali, Jonathan; Barwick, Brett

    2013-10-15

    By utilizing a nanometer ultrafast electron source in a point projection microscope we demonstrate that images of nanoparticles with spatial resolutions of the order of 100 nanometers can be obtained. The duration of the emission process of the photoemitted electrons used to make images is shown to be of the order of 100 fs using an autocorrelation technique. The compact geometry of this photoelectron point projection microscope does not preclude its use as a simple ultrafast electron microscope, and we use simple analytic models to estimate temporal resolutions that can be expected when using it as a pump-probe ultrafast electron microscope. These models show a significant increase in temporal resolution when comparing to ultrafast electron microscopes based on conventional designs. We also model the microscopes spectroscopic abilities to capture ultrafast phenomena such as the photon induced near field effect.

  11. Constitutive Modeling of the Mechanical Properties of Optical Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moeti, L.; Moghazy, S.; Veazie, D.; Cuddihy, E.

    1998-01-01

    Micromechanical modeling of the composite mechanical properties of optical fibers was conducted. Good agreement was obtained between the values of Young's modulus obtained by micromechanics modeling and those determined experimentally for a single mode optical fiber where the wave guide and the jacket are physically coupled. The modeling was also attempted on a polarization-maintaining optical fiber (PANDA) where the wave guide and the jacket are physically decoupled, and found not to applicable since the modeling required perfect bonding at the interface. The modeling utilized constituent physical properties such as the Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, and shear modulus to establish bounds on the macroscopic behavior of the fiber.

  12. Acoustic imaging microscope

    DOEpatents

    Deason, Vance A.; Telschow, Kenneth L.

    2006-10-17

    An imaging system includes: an object wavefront source and an optical microscope objective all positioned to direct an object wavefront onto an area of a vibrating subject surface encompassed by a field of view of the microscope objective, and to direct a modulated object wavefront reflected from the encompassed surface area through a photorefractive material; and a reference wavefront source and at least one phase modulator all positioned to direct a reference wavefront through the phase modulator and to direct a modulated reference wavefront from the phase modulator through the photorefractive material to interfere with the modulated object wavefront. The photorefractive material has a composition and a position such that interference of the modulated object wavefront and modulated reference wavefront occurs within the photorefractive material, providing a full-field, real-time image signal of the encompassed surface area.

  13. Ion photon emission microscope

    DOEpatents

    Doyle, Barney L.

    2003-04-22

    An ion beam analysis system that creates microscopic multidimensional image maps of the effects of high energy ions from an unfocussed source upon a sample by correlating the exact entry point of an ion into a sample by projection imaging of the ion-induced photons emitted at that point with a signal from a detector that measures the interaction of that ion within the sample. The emitted photons are collected in the lens system of a conventional optical microscope, and projected on the image plane of a high resolution single photon position sensitive detector. Position signals from this photon detector are then correlated in time with electrical effects, including the malfunction of digital circuits, detected within the sample that were caused by the individual ion that created these photons initially.

  14. Femtosecond scanning tunneling microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, A.J.; Donati, G.P.; Rodriguez, G.; Gosnell, T.R.; Trugman, S.A.; Some, D.I.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). By combining scanning tunneling microscopy with ultrafast optical techniques we have developed a novel tool to probe phenomena on atomic time and length scales. We have built and characterized an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope in terms of temporal resolution, sensitivity and dynamic range. Using a novel photoconductive low-temperature-grown GaAs tip, we have achieved a temporal resolution of 1.5 picoseconds and a spatial resolution of 10 nanometers. This scanning tunneling microscope has both cryogenic and ultra-high vacuum capabilities, enabling the study of a wide range of important scientific problems.

  15. Modeling propagation of coherent optical pulses through molecular vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, B.W.; Eberly, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    Results of modeling the mutual coupling of coherent molecular response and coherent optical pulses during propagation are described. The propagation is treated numerically, with particular emphasis on both continuum and discrete behavior associated with the quasicontinuum model.

  16. Interplay between the pairing and quadrupole interactions in the algebraic realization of the microscopic shell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drumev, Kalin; Georgieva, Ana

    2015-04-01

    We explore the algebraic realization of the Pairing-Plus-Quadrupole Model/PQM/ in the framework of the Elliott‘s SU(3) Model with the aim to obtain the complementary and competing features of the two interactions through the relation between the pairing and the SU(3) bases. First, we establish a correspondence between the SO(8) pairing basis and the Elliott's SU(3) basis. It is derived from their complementarity to the same LST coupling chain of the shell-model number-conserving algebra. The probability distribution of the SU(3) basis states within the SO(8) pairing states is also obtained and allows the investigation of the interplay between the pairing and quadrupole interactions in the Hamiltonian of the PQM, containing both of them as limiting cases. The description of some realistic N∼Z nuclear systems is investigated in a SU(3)-symmetry-adapted basis within a model space of one and two oscillator shells.

  17. Multi-scaling in the Cont-Bouchaud microscopic stock market model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castiglione, Filippo; Stauffer, Dietrich

    2001-11-01

    The Cont-Bouchaud percolation model is one of the simplest microsimulation models yet able to account for the main stylized fact of financial markets, e.g. fat tails of the histogram of log-returns. In the present paper we show that for a certain range of the parameters it is possible to generate price time-series that cannot be described in terms of a unique scaling exponent.

  18. Simulations of Complex and Microscopic Models of Cardiac Electrophysiology Powered by Multi-GPU Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Gouvêa de Barros, Bruno; Sachetto Oliveira, Rafael; Meira, Wagner; Lobosco, Marcelo; Weber dos Santos, Rodrigo

    2012-01-01

    Key aspects of cardiac electrophysiology, such as slow conduction, conduction block, and saltatory effects have been the research topic of many studies since they are strongly related to cardiac arrhythmia, reentry, fibrillation, or defibrillation. However, to reproduce these phenomena the numerical models need to use subcellular discretization for the solution of the PDEs and nonuniform, heterogeneous tissue electric conductivity. Due to the high computational costs of simulations that reproduce the fine microstructure of cardiac tissue, previous studies have considered tissue experiments of small or moderate sizes and used simple cardiac cell models. In this paper, we develop a cardiac electrophysiology model that captures the microstructure of cardiac tissue by using a very fine spatial discretization (8 μm) and uses a very modern and complex cell model based on Markov chains for the characterization of ion channel's structure and dynamics. To cope with the computational challenges, the model was parallelized using a hybrid approach: cluster computing and GPGPUs (general-purpose computing on graphics processing units). Our parallel implementation of this model using a multi-GPU platform was able to reduce the execution times of the simulations from more than 6 days (on a single processor) to 21 minutes (on a small 8-node cluster equipped with 16 GPUs, i.e., 2 GPUs per node). PMID:23227109

  19. Nonanalytic microscopic phase transitions and temperature oscillations in the microcanonical ensemble: An exactly solvable one-dimensional model for evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilbert, Stefan; Dunkel, Jörn

    2006-07-01

    We calculate exactly both the microcanonical and canonical thermodynamic functions (TDFs) for a one-dimensional model system with piecewise constant Lennard-Jones type pair interactions. In the case of an isolated N -particle system, the microcanonical TDFs exhibit (N-1) singular (nonanalytic) microscopic phase transitions of the formal order N/2 , separating N energetically different evaporation (dissociation) states. In a suitably designed evaporation experiment, these types of phase transitions should manifest themselves in the form of pressure and temperature oscillations, indicating cooling by evaporation. In the presence of a heat bath (thermostat), such oscillations are absent, but the canonical heat capacity shows a characteristic peak, indicating the temperature-induced dissociation of the one-dimensional chain. The distribution of complex zeros of the canonical partition may be used to identify different degrees of dissociation in the canonical ensemble.

  20. Macroscopic and microscopic defects and nonlinear optical properties of KH2PO4 crystals with embedded TiO2 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grachev, Valentin G.; Vrable, Ian A.; Malovichko, Galina I.; Pritula, Igor M.; Bezkrovnaya, Olga N.; Kosinova, Anna V.; Yatsyna, Vasyl O.; Gayvoronsky, Vladimir Ya.

    2012-07-01

    Results from the successful growth of high quality KH2PO4 (KDP) crystals with incorporated TiO2 anatase nanoparticles and the characterization of these crystals using several complementary methods are presented. The study allowed the nature and distribution of macroscopic and microscopic defects in the KDP:TiO2 crystals to be clarified. The relationship between these defects and the distribution of TiO2 nanoparticles, and the influence of incorporated nanoparticles on the nonlinear optical properties of composite crystals in comparison with pure crystals were also elucidated. Visual observations, transmission and scanning electron microscopy have shown that the anatase nanoparticles were captured mainly by the pyramidal growth sector and, to a considerably lesser extent, by the prismatic growth sector. Energy dispersive x-ray analysis was able to confirm that the growth layer stacks contain the TiO2 particles. Fourier transformation infrared spectra have clearly shown the presence of an absorption band at about 800 cm-1 in both KDP:TiO2 and TiO2, and the disappearance of the band, associated with hydroxyl OH- groups on the TiO2 surface in KDP:TiO2. Significant variation in the imaginary and real parts of the cubic nonlinear optical susceptibilities and refractive index changes at continuous wave excitation were found in prism and pyramid parts of pure KDP and KDP:TiO2 samples. Deciphering complicated electron paramagnetic resonance spectra in KDP:TiO2 and comparison with published data permitted the identification of paramagnetic defects along with their associated g-factors and zero-field splitting parameters (in some cases for the first time). It was found that the dominant lines belong to four different centers FeA3+, FeB3+, CrR3+, and CrGB3+. From analysis of line intensities it was concluded that the concentration of intrinsic defects like potassium and hydrogen vacancies in KDP:TiO2 is comparatively small, that the concentration of non-controlled impurities

  1. Macroscopic and microscopic defects and nonlinear optical properties of KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} crystals with embedded TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Grachev, Valentin G.; Vrable, Ian A.; Malovichko, Galina I.; Pritula, Igor M.; Bezkrovnaya, Olga N.; Kosinova, Anna V.; Yatsyna, Vasyl O.; Gayvoronsky, Vladimir Ya.

    2012-07-01

    Results from the successful growth of high quality KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} (KDP) crystals with incorporated TiO{sub 2} anatase nanoparticles and the characterization of these crystals using several complementary methods are presented. The study allowed the nature and distribution of macroscopic and microscopic defects in the KDP:TiO{sub 2} crystals to be clarified. The relationship between these defects and the distribution of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles, and the influence of incorporated nanoparticles on the nonlinear optical properties of composite crystals in comparison with pure crystals were also elucidated. Visual observations, transmission and scanning electron microscopy have shown that the anatase nanoparticles were captured mainly by the pyramidal growth sector and, to a considerably lesser extent, by the prismatic growth sector. Energy dispersive x-ray analysis was able to confirm that the growth layer stacks contain the TiO{sub 2} particles. Fourier transformation infrared spectra have clearly shown the presence of an absorption band at about 800 cm{sup -1} in both KDP:TiO{sub 2} and TiO{sub 2}, and the disappearance of the band, associated with hydroxyl OH{sup -} groups on the TiO{sub 2} surface in KDP:TiO{sub 2}. Significant variation in the imaginary and real parts of the cubic nonlinear optical susceptibilities and refractive index changes at continuous wave excitation were found in prism and pyramid parts of pure KDP and KDP:TiO{sub 2} samples. Deciphering complicated electron paramagnetic resonance spectra in KDP:TiO{sub 2} and comparison with published data permitted the identification of paramagnetic defects along with their associated g-factors and zero-field splitting parameters (in some cases for the first time). It was found that the dominant lines belong to four different centers Fe{sub A}{sup 3+}, Fe{sub B}{sup 3+}, Cr{sub R}{sup 3+}, and Cr{sub GB}{sup 3+}. From analysis of line intensities it was concluded that the concentration of intrinsic

  2. Modeling optical absorption for thermoreflectance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jia; Ziade, Elbara; Schmidt, Aaron J.

    2016-03-01

    Optical pump-probe techniques based on thermoreflectance, such as time domain thermoreflectance and frequency domain thermoreflectance (FDTR), have been widely used to characterize the thermal conductivity of thin films and the thermal conductance across interfaces. These techniques typically use a transducer layer to absorb the pump light and improve the thermoreflectance signal. The transducer, however, complicates the interpretation of the measured signal because the approximation that all the energy from the pump beam is deposited at the transducer surface is not always accurate. In this paper, we consider the effect of laser absorption in the top layer of a multilayer sample, and derive an analytical solution for the thermoreflectance signal in the diffusion regime based on volumetric heating. We analyze the measurement sensitivity to the pump absorption depth for transducers with different thermal conductivities, and investigate the additional effect of probe laser penetration depth on the measured signal. We validate our model using FDTR measurements on 490 nm thick amorphous silicon films deposited on fused silica and silicon substrates.

  3. MRI Slice Segmentation and 3D Modelling of Temporomandibular Joint Measured by Microscopic Coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirg, O.; Liberda, O.; Smekal, Z.; Sprlakova-Pukova, A.

    2012-01-01

    The paper focuses on the segmentation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) slices and 3D modelling of the temporomandibular joint disc in order to help physicians diagnose patients with dysfunction of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The TMJ is one of the most complex joints in the human body. The most common joint dysfunction is due to the disc. The disc is a soft tissue, which in principle cannot be diagnosed by the CT method. Therefore, a 3D model is made from the MRI slices, which can image soft tissues. For the segmentation of the disc in individual slices a new method is developed based on spatial distribution and anatomical TMJ structure with automatic thresholding. The thresholding is controlled by a genetic algorithm. The 3D model is realized using the marching cube method.

  4. Lens models under the microscope: comparison of Hubble Frontier Field cluster magnification maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priewe, Jett; Williams, Liliya L. R.; Liesenborgs, Jori; Coe, Dan; Rodney, Steven A.

    2017-02-01

    Using the power of gravitational lensing magnification by massive galaxy clusters, the Hubble Frontier Fields provide deep views of six patches of the high-redshift Universe. The combination of deep Hubble imaging and exceptional lensing strength has revealed the greatest numbers of multiply-imaged galaxies available to constrain models of cluster mass distributions. However, even with O(100) images per cluster, the uncertainties associated with the reconstructions are not negligible. The goal of this paper is to show the diversity of model magnification predictions. We examine seven and nine mass models of Abell 2744 and MACS J0416, respectively, submitted to the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes for public distribution in 2015 September. The dispersion between model predictions increases from 30 per cent at common low magnifications (μ ˜ 2) to 70 per cent at rare high magnifications (μ ˜ 40). MACS J0416 exhibits smaller dispersions than Abell 2744 for 2 < μ < 10. We show that magnification maps based on different lens inversion techniques typically differ from each other by more than their quoted statistical errors. This suggests that some models underestimate the true uncertainties, which are primarily due to various lensing degeneracies. Though the exact mass sheet degeneracy is broken, its generalized counterpart is not broken at least in Abell 2744. Other local degeneracies are also present in both clusters. Our comparison of models is complementary to the comparison of reconstructions of known synthetic mass distributions. By focusing on observed clusters, we can identify those that are best constrained, and therefore provide the clearest view of the distant Universe.

  5. Surface-mode model of the extraordinary optical transmission without plasmons.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yunya; Liu, Haitao; Jia, Hongwei; Zhong, Ying

    2015-03-09

    We propose a microscopic surface-mode model for the extraordinary optical transmission (EOT) through subwavelength metallic slit array covered with a thin dielectric layer under illumination of transverse-electric (TE) polarization. Remarkably, surface plasmon polarizations (SPPs) do not exist for this polarization. It is commonly believed that the waveguide mode in the dielectric layer plays a role similar to that of the SPP in classical EOT. To check the intuitive belief, we derive a surface-mode model by considering the multiple scattering process of the fundamental waveguide mode and neglecting all other residual field in the thin dielectric layer. The model captures the main feature of EOT and provides a phase-matching condition to predict the transmission resonance. Quantitative comparison between fully-vectorial calculations and model predictions shows that besides the fundamental waveguide mode, other residual field in the thin dielectric layer also contributes to the EOT without SPP.

  6. 2D lattice model of a lipid bilayer: Microscopic derivation and thermodynamic exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakobyan, Davit; Heuer, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    Based on all-atom Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of a lipid bilayer we present a systematic mapping on a 2D lattice model. Keeping the lipid type and the chain order parameter as key variables we derive a free energy functional, containing the enthalpic interaction of adjacent lipids as well as the tail entropy. The functional form of both functions is explicitly determined for saturated and polyunsaturated lipids. By studying the lattice model via Monte Carlo simulations it is possible to reproduce the temperature dependence of the distribution of order parameters of the pure lipids, including the prediction of the gel transition. Furthermore, application to a mixture of saturated and polyunsaturated lipids yields the correct phase separation behavior at lower temperatures with a simulation time reduced by approximately 7 orders of magnitude as compared to the corresponding MD simulations. Even the time-dependence of the de-mixing is reproduced on a semi-quantitative level. Due to the generality of the approach we envisage a large number of further applications, ranging from modeling larger sets of lipids, sterols, and solvent proteins to predicting nucleation barriers for the melting of lipids. Particularly, from the properties of the 2D lattice model one can directly read off the enthalpy and entropy change of the 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine gel-to-liquid transition in excellent agreement with experimental and MD results.

  7. The hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) as an experimental model of toxocariasis: histopathological, immunohistochemical, and immunoelectron microscopic findings.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Ana Maria Gonçalves; Chieffi, Pedro Paulo; da Silva, Wellington Luiz Ferreira; Kanashiro, Edite Hatsumi Yamashiro; Rubinsky-Elefant, Guita; Cunha-Neto, Edécio; Mairena, Eliane Conti; De Brito, Thales

    2015-03-01

    Toxocariasis is a globally distributed parasitic infection caused by the larval stage of Toxocara spp. The typical natural hosts of the parasite are dogs and cats, but humans can be infected by the larval stage of the parasite after ingesting embryonated eggs in soil or from contaminated hands or fomites. The migrating larvae are not adapted to complete their life cycle within accidental or paratenic hosts like humans and laboratory animals, respectively, but they are capable of invading viscera or other tissues where they may survive and induce disease. In order to characterize hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) as a model for Toxocara canis infection, histopathological and immunohistochemistry procedures were used to detect pathological lesions and the distribution of toxocaral antigens in the liver, lungs, and kidneys of experimentally infected animals. We also attempted to characterize the immunological parameters of the inflammatory response and correlate them with the histopathological findings. In the kidney, a correlation between glomerular changes and antigen deposits was evaluated using immunoelectron microscopy. The hamster is an adequate model of experimental toxocariasis for short-term investigations and has a good immunological and pathological response to the infection. Lung and liver manifestations of toxocariasis in hamsters approximated those in humans and other experimental animal models. A mixed Th2 immunological response to T. canis infection was predominant. The hamster model displayed a progressive rise of anti-toxocaral antibodies with the formation of immune complexes. Circulating antigens, immunoglobulin, and complement deposits were detected in the kidney without the development of a definite immune complex nephropathy.

  8. A multiphase microscopic diffusion model for stratum corneum permeability. I. Formulation, solution, and illustrative results for representative compounds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tsuo-Feng; Kasting, Gerald B; Nitsche, Johannes M

    2006-03-01

    A two-dimensional microscopic transport model of the stratum corneum (SC) incorporating corneocytes of varying hydration and permeability embedded in an anisotropic lipid matrix is presented. Results are expressed in terms of a dimensionless permeability (P(SC/w)(comp), which is a function of two dimensionless parameters, R and sigma. R is a ratio of transbilayer to lateral molecular flows within a lipid bilayer and sigma is the ratio of (lateral) permeability in the lipid phase, D(lip)K(lip/w), to that in the corneocyte phase, D(cor)K(cor/w.) The shape of the dimensionless permeability surface is also governed by the arrangement of the SC lipids, where Model 1 represents the extreme in which lipid-phase transport can occur with no transbilayer transport, whereas Model 2 entails maximum transbilayer transport. Model calculations are exemplified by characterizing the skin permeability of four representative permeants: water, ethanol, nicotinamide, and testosterone. A comparison with experimental steady state permeability and partition data supports that the transport properties of the SC lipids are highly anisotropic, with lateral diffusivities several orders of magnitude higher than the equivalent diffusivity calculated from transbilayer hopping. Nevertheless, the calculations suggest that corneocyte-phase transport plays a major role for all four permeants. These results confirm our previous calculations on water permeability and present a marked contrast to the commonly stated doctrine that the SC transport pathway is primarily intercellular.

  9. On a Decomposition Model for Optical Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abhau, Jochen; Belhachmi, Zakaria; Scherzer, Otmar

    In this paper we present a variational method for determining cartoon and texture components of the optical flow of a noisy image sequence. The method is realized by reformulating the optical flow problem first as a variational denoising problem for multi-channel data and then by applying decomposition methods. Thanks to the general formulation, several norms can be used for the decomposition. We study a decomposition for the optical flow into bounded variation and oscillating component in greater detail. Numerical examples demonstrate the capabilities of the proposed approach.

  10. Microscopic model for intersubband gain from electrically pumped quantum-dot structures

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, Stephan; Chow, Weng Wah; Schneider, Han Christian

    2014-10-03

    We study theoretically the performance of electrically pumped self-organized quantum dots as a gain material in the mid-infrared range at room temperature. We analyze an AlGaAs/InGaAs based structure composed of dots-in-a-well sandwiched between two quantum wells. We numerically analyze a comprehensive model by combining a many-particle approach for electronic dynamics with a realistic modeling of the electronic states in the whole structure. We investigate the gain both for quasi-equilibrium conditions and current injection. We find, comparing different structures, that steady-state gain can only be realized by an efficient extraction process, which prevents an accumulation of electrons in continuum states, that make the available scattering pathways through the quantum-dot active region too fast to sustain inversion.

  11. Microscopic understanding of heavy-tailed return distributions in an agent-based model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Thilo A.; Schäfer, Rudi; Münnix, Michael C.; Guhr, Thomas

    2012-11-01

    The distribution of returns in financial time series exhibits heavy tails. It has been found that gaps between the orders in the order book lead to large price shifts and thereby to these heavy tails. We set up an agent-based model to study this issue and, in particular, how the gaps in the order book emerge. The trading mechanism in our model is based on a double-auction order book. In situations where the order book is densely occupied with limit orders we do not observe fat-tailed distributions. As soon as less liquidity is available, a gap structure forms which leads to return distributions with heavy tails. We show that return distributions with heavy tails are an order-book effect if the available liquidity is constrained. This is largely independent of specific trading strategies.

  12. Microscopic model for intersubband gain from electrically pumped quantum-dot structures

    DOE PAGES

    Michael, Stephan; Chow, Weng Wah; Schneider, Han Christian

    2014-10-03

    We study theoretically the performance of electrically pumped self-organized quantum dots as a gain material in the mid-infrared range at room temperature. We analyze an AlGaAs/InGaAs based structure composed of dots-in-a-well sandwiched between two quantum wells. We numerically analyze a comprehensive model by combining a many-particle approach for electronic dynamics with a realistic modeling of the electronic states in the whole structure. We investigate the gain both for quasi-equilibrium conditions and current injection. We find, comparing different structures, that steady-state gain can only be realized by an efficient extraction process, which prevents an accumulation of electrons in continuum states, thatmore » make the available scattering pathways through the quantum-dot active region too fast to sustain inversion.« less

  13. Microscopic DTI accurately identifies early glioma cell migration: correlation with multimodal imaging in a new glioma stem cell model.

    PubMed

    Gimenez, Ulysse; Perles-Barbacaru, Adriana-T; Millet, Arnaud; Appaix, Florence; El-Atifi, Michele; Pernet-Gallay, Karin; van der Sanden, Boudewijn; Berger, François; Lahrech, Hana

    2016-11-01

    Monitoring glioma cell infiltration in the brain is critical for diagnosis and therapy. Using a new glioma Glio6 mouse model derived from human stem cells we show how diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) may predict glioma cell migration/invasion. In vivo multiparametric MRI was performed at one, two and three months of Glio6 glioma growth (Glio6 (n = 6), sham (n = 3)). This longitudinal study reveals the existence of a time window to study glioma cell/migration/invasion selectively. Indeed, at two months only Glio6 cell invasion was detected, while tumor mass formation, edema, blood-brain barrier leakage and tumor angiogenesis were detected later, at three months. To robustly confirm the potential of DTI for detecting glioma cell migration/invasion, a microscopic 3D-DTI (80 μm isotropic spatial resolution) technique was developed and applied to fixed mouse brains (Glio6 (n = 6), sham (n = 3)). DTI changes were predominant in the corpus callosum (CC), a known path of cell migration. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and perpendicular diffusivity (D⊥ ) changes derived from ex vivo microscopic 3D-DTI were significant at two months of tumor growth. In the caudate putamen an FA increase of +38% (p < 0.001) was observed, while in the CC a - 28% decrease in FA (p < 0.005) and a + 95% increase in D⊥ (p < 0.005) were observed. In the CC, DTI changes and fluorescent Glio6 cell density obtained by two-photon microscopy in the same brains were correlated (p < 0.001, r = 0.69), validating FA and D⊥ as early quantitative biomarkers to detect glioma cell migration/invasion. The origin of DTI changes was assessed by electron microscopy of the same tract, showing axon bundle disorganization. During the first two months, Glio6 cells display a migratory phenotype without being associated with the constitution of a brain tumor mass. This offers a unique opportunity to apply microscopic 3D-DTI and to validate DTI parameters FA and D⊥ as biomarkers for glioma cell

  14. Generalized classification modeling of activated sludge process based on microscopic image analysis.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Burhan; Nisar, Humaira; Ng, Choon Aun; Lo, Po Kim; Yap, Vooi Voon

    2017-02-24

    The state of activated sludge wastewater treatment process (AS WWTP) is conventionally identified by physico-chemical measurements which are costly, time-consuming and have associated environmental hazards. Image processing and analysis-based linear regression modeling has been used to monitor the AS WWTP. But it is plant- and state-specific in the sense that it cannot be generalized to multiple plants and states. Generalized classification modeling for state identification is the main objective of this work. By generalized classification, we mean that the identification model does not require any prior information about the state of the plant, and the resultant identification is valid for any plant in any state. In this paper, the generalized classification model for the AS process is proposed based on features extracted using morphological parameters of flocs. The images of the AS samples, collected from aeration tanks of nine plants, are acquired through bright-field microscopy. Feature-selection is performed in context of classification using sequential feature selection and least absolute shrinkage and selection operator. A support vector machine (SVM)-based state identification strategy was proposed with a new agreement solver module for imbalanced data of the states of AS plants. The classification results were compared with state-of-the-art multiclass SVMs (one-vs.-one and one-vs.-all), and ensemble classifiers using the performance metrics: accuracy, recall, specificity, precision, F measure and kappa coefficient (κ). The proposed strategy exhibits better results by identification of different states of different plants with accuracy 0.9423, and κ 0.6681 for the minority class data of bulking.

  15. Microscopic first-principles model of strain-induced interaction in concentrated size-mismatched alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuravlev, I. A.; An, J. M.; Belashchenko, K. D.

    2014-12-01

    The harmonic Kanzaki-Krivoglaz-Khachaturyan model of strain-induced interaction is generalized to concentrated size-mismatched alloys and adapted to first-principles calculations. The configuration dependence of both Kanzaki forces and force constants is represented by real-space cluster expansions that can be constructed based on the calculated forces. The model is implemented for the fcc lattice and applied to Cu1 -xAux and Fe1 -xPtx alloys for concentrations x =0.25 , 0.5, and 0.75. The asymmetry between the 3 d and 5 d elements leads to large quadratic terms in the occupation-number expansion of the Kanzaki forces and thereby to strongly non-pairwise long-range interaction. The main advantage of the full configuration-dependent lattice deformation model is its ability to capture this singular many-body interaction. The roles of ordering striction and anharmonicity in Cu-Au and Fe-Pt alloys are assessed. Although the harmonic force constants defined with respect to the unrelaxed lattice are unsuitable for the calculation of the vibrational entropies, the phonon spectra for ordered and disordered alloys are found to be in good agreement with experimental data. The model is further adapted to concentration wave analysis and Monte Carlo simulations by means of an auxiliary multiparametric real-space cluster expansion, which is used to find the ordering temperatures. Good agreement with experiment is found for all systems except CuAu3 (due to the known failure of the generalized gradient approximation) and FePt3, where the discrepancy is likely due to the neglect of magnetic disorder.

  16. Black hole thermodynamics as seen through a microscopic model of a relativistic Bose gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skákala, Jozef; Shankaranarayanan, S.

    2016-02-01

    Equations of gravity when projected on spacetime horizons resemble Navier-Stokes equation of a fluid with a specific equation of state [T. Damour, Surface effects of black hole physics, in Proc. M. Grossman Meeting (North Holland, 1982), p. 587, T. Padmanabhan, Phys. Rev. D 83 (2011) 044048, arXiv:gr-qc/1012.0119, S. Kolekar and T. Padmanabhan, Phys. Rev. D 85 (2011) 024004, arXiv:gr-qc/1012.5421]. We show that this equation of state describes massless ideal relativistic gas. We use these results, and build an explicit and simple molecular model of the fluid living on the Schwarzschild and Reissner-Nordström black hole horizons. For the spin zero Bose gas, our model makes two predictions: (i) The horizon area/entropy is quantized as given by Bekenstein’s quantization rule, (ii) The model explains the correct type of proportionality between horizon area and entropy. However, for the physically relevant range of parameters, the proportionality constant is never equal to 1/4.

  17. Improvement of optical proximity-effect correction model accuracy by hybrid optical proximity-effect correction modeling and shrink correction technique for 10-nm node process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitomi, Keiichiro; Halle, Scott; Miller, Marshal; Graur, Ioana; Saulnier, Nicole; Dunn, Derren; Okai, Nobuhiro; Hotta, Shoji; Yamaguchi, Atuko; Komuro, Hitoshi; Ishimoto, Toru; Koshihara, Shunsuke; Hojo, Yutaka

    2016-07-01

    The model accuracy of optical proximity-effect correction (OPC) was investigated by two modeling methods for a 10-nm node process. The first method is to use contours of two-dimensional structures extracted from critical dimension-scanning electron microscope (CD-SEM) images combined with conventional CDs of one-dimensional structures. The accuracy of this hybrid OPC model was compared with that of a conventional OPC model, which was created with only CD data, in terms of root-mean-square (RMS) error for metal and contact layers of 10-nm node logic devices. Results showed improvement of model accuracy with the use of hybrid OPC modeling by 23% for contact layer and 18% for metal layer, respectively. The second method is to apply a correction technique for resist shrinkage caused by CD-SEM measurement to extracted contours for improving OPC model accuracy. The accuracy of OPC model with shrink correction was compared with that without shrink correction, and total RMS error was decreased by 12% by using the shrink correction technique. It can be concluded that the use of CD-SEM contours and the shrink correction of contours are effective to improve the accuracy of OPC model for the 10-nm node process.

  18. Evaluation of removal of model particulate and oily soils from poly(ethylene terephthalate) films by microscopic image analysis.

    PubMed

    Gotoh, Keiko; Yu, Nagai; Tagawa, Yumiko

    2013-01-01

    The soil removal behavior from poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) films was investigated using a microscopic image analysis system. Carbon black or stearic acid as a model soil was deposited onto a PET film. The PET film was cleaned in various aqueous and non-aqueous solutions by applying stirring or frequency-modulated ultrasound as a mechanical action of soil removal. The amounts of soil deposited on the PET film before and after cleaning were obtained via binary processing of microscopic images, from which the removal efficiency was calculated. Most of the carbon black was deposited on the PET film as submicron aggregates and ultrasound removed them efficiently in a short time, even for relatively smaller aggregates. The removal efficiencies with stirring were less than ca. 10% in all solutions, whereas the removal using ultrasound had high efficiencies that exceeded 80% in the surfactant-free systems. In the case of stearic acid, the removal efficiency with stirring was below 30% in the aqueous solutions, although stearic acid was removed completely in ethanol and n-decane. For ultrasonic cleaning, the removal efficiencies of stearic acid in aqueous solutions became 2-3 times as large as those with the stirring action. To improve soil release in aqueous solutions, the PET film was treated by the dry processing using an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) equipment. The wettability and the surface free energy of the PET film were found to increase due to surface oxidation via the APPJ treatment, which resulted in enhanced removal of carbon black and stearic acid in any aqueous solutions.

  19. Linking microscopic spatial patterns of tissue destruction in emphysema to macroscopic decline in stiffness using a 3D computational model.

    PubMed

    Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Majumdar, Arnab; Suki, Béla

    2011-04-01

    Pulmonary emphysema is a connective tissue disease characterized by the progressive destruction of alveolar walls leading to airspace enlargement and decreased elastic recoil of the lung. However, the relationship between microscopic tissue structure and decline in stiffness of the lung is not well understood. In this study, we developed a 3D computational model of lung tissue in which a pre-strained cuboidal block of tissue was represented by a tessellation of space filling polyhedra, with each polyhedral unit-cell representing an alveolus. Destruction of alveolar walls was mimicked by eliminating faces that separate two polyhedral either randomly or in a spatially correlated manner, in which the highest force bearing walls were removed at each step. Simulations were carried out to establish a link between the geometries that emerged and the rate of decline in bulk modulus of the tissue block. The spatially correlated process set up by the force-based destruction lead to a significantly faster rate of decline in bulk modulus accompanied by highly heterogeneous structures than the random destruction pattern. Using the Karhunen-Loève transformation, an estimator of the change in bulk modulus from the first four moments of airspace cell volumes was setup. Simulations were then obtained for tissue destruction with different idealized alveolar geometry, levels of pre-strain, linear and nonlinear elasticity assumptions for alveolar walls and also mixed destruction patterns where both random and force-based destruction occurs simultaneously. In all these cases, the change in bulk modulus from cell volumes was accurately estimated. We conclude that microscopic structural changes in emphysema and the associated decline in tissue stiffness are linked by the spatial pattern of the destruction process.

  20. Microscopic calculation of interacting boson model parameters by potential-energy surface mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, I.; Frauendorf, S.

    2011-06-15

    A coherent state technique is used to generate an interacting boson model (IBM) Hamiltonian energy surface which is adjusted to match a mean-field energy surface. This technique allows the calculation of IBM Hamiltonian parameters, prediction of properties of low-lying collective states, as well as the generation of probability distributions of various shapes in the ground state of transitional nuclei, the last two of which are of astrophysical interest. The results for krypton, molybdenum, palladium, cadmium, gadolinium, dysprosium, and erbium nuclei are compared with experiment.

  1. Microscopic model of the actin-myosin interaction in muscular contractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaveau, B.; Moreau, M.; Schuman, B.

    2004-01-01

    We define and study a detailed many body model for the muscular contraction taking into account the various myosin heads. The state of the system is defined by the position of the actin and by an internal coordinate of rotation for each myosin head. We write a system of Fokker-Planck equations and calculate the average for the position, the number of attached myosin heads, and the total force exerted on the actin. We also study the correlation between these quantities, in particular between the number of attached myosin heads and the force on the actin.

  2. Novel applications of the dispersive optical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickhoff, W. H.; Charity, R. J.; Mahzoon, M. H.

    2017-03-01

    A review of recent developments of the dispersive optical model (DOM) is presented. Starting from the original work of Mahaux and Sartor, several necessary steps are developed and illustrated which increase the scope of the DOM allowing its interpretation as generating an experimentally constrained functional form of the nucleon self-energy. The method could therefore be renamed as the dispersive self-energy method. The aforementioned steps include the introduction of simultaneous fits of data for chains of isotopes or isotones allowing a data-driven extrapolation for the prediction of scattering cross sections and level properties in the direction of the respective drip lines. In addition, the energy domain for data was enlarged to include results up to 200 MeV where available. An important application of this work was implemented by employing these DOM potentials to the analysis of the (d, p) transfer reaction using the adiabatic distorted wave approximation. We review these calculations which suggest that physically meaningful results are easier to obtain by employing DOM ingredients as compared to the traditional approach which relies on a phenomenologically-adjusted bound-state wave function combined with a global (nondispersive) optical-model potential. Application to the exotic 132Sn nucleus also shows great promise for the extrapolation of DOM potentials towards the drip line with attendant relevance for the physics of FRIB. We note that the DOM method combines structure and reaction information on the same footing providing a unique approach to the analysis of exotic nuclei. We illustrate the importance of abandoning the custom of representing the non-local Hartree–Fock (HF) potential in the DOM by an energy-dependent local potential as it impedes the proper normalization of the solution of the Dyson equation. This important step allows for the interpretation of the DOM potential as representing the nucleon self-energy permitting the calculations of

  3. Microscopic model for intersubband gain from electrically pumped quantum-dot structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, Stephan; Chow, Weng W.; Schneider, Hans Christian

    2014-10-01

    We study theoretically the performance of electrically pumped self-organized quantum dots as a gain material in the mid-IR range at room temperature. We analyze an AlGaAs/InGaAs based structure composed of dots-in-a-well sandwiched between two quantum wells. We numerically analyze a comprehensive model by combining a many-particle approach for electronic dynamics with a realistic modeling of the electronic states in the whole structure. We investigate the gain both for quasiequilibrium conditions and current injection. Comparing different structures, we find that steady-state gain can only be realized by an efficient extraction process, which prevents an accumulation of electrons in continuum states, that make the available scattering pathways through the quantum dot active region too fast to sustain inversion. The tradeoff between different extraction/injection pathways is discussed. Comparing the modal gain to a standard quantum-well structure as used in quantum cascade lasers, our calculations predict reduced threshold current densities of the quantum dot structure for comparable modal gain. Such a comparable modal gain can, however, only be achieved for an inhomogeneous broadening of a quantum-dot ensemble that is close to the lower limit achievable today using self-organized growth.

  4. Optical modeling in Testbed Environment for Space Situational Awareness (TESSA).

    PubMed

    Nikolaev, Sergei

    2011-08-01

    We describe optical systems modeling in the Testbed Environment for Space Situational Awareness (TESSA) simulator. We begin by presenting a brief outline of the overall TESSA architecture and focus on components for modeling optical sensors. Both image generation and image processing stages are described in detail, highlighting the differences in modeling ground- and space-based sensors. We conclude by outlining the applicability domains for the TESSA simulator, including potential real-life scenarios.

  5. Acousto-optic back-projection: Physical-model-based sound field reconstruction from optical projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatabe, Kohei; Ishikawa, Kenji; Oikawa, Yasuhiro

    2017-04-01

    As an alternative to microphones, optical techniques have been studied for measuring a sound field. They enable contactless and non-invasive acoustical observation by detecting density variation of medium caused by sound. Although they have important advantages comparing to microphones, they also have some disadvantages. Since sound affects light at every points on the optical path, the optical methods observe an acoustical quantity as spatial integration. Therefore, point-wise information of a sound field cannot be obtained directly. Ordinarily, the computed tomography (CT) method has been applied for reconstructing a sound field from optically measured data. However, the observation process of the optical methods have not been considered explicitly, which limits the accuracy of the reconstruction. In this paper, a physical-model-based sound field reconstruction method is proposed. It explicitly formulates the physical observation process so that a model mismatch of the conventional methods is eliminated.

  6. Microscopic theories of model macromolecular fluids and fullerenes: The role of thermodynamic consistency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caccamo, Carlo; Pellicane, Giuseppe

    2002-09-01

    We investigate the accuracy of two well-known integral equation theories (IETs) of the fluid state, namely, the modified hypernetted chain (MHNC) approximation and the hybridized mean spherical approximation (HMSA), as applied to systems characterized by short-range interactions. The theoretical approaches are implemented by enforcing their thermodynamic consistency according to two different strategies: in one case the equality of the isothermal compressibility, as calculated via the virial and fluctuation routes from structure to thermodynamics, is imposed ["local" consistency (LC)] in the other case the equality of the pressure as calculated either via the two previous routes, or via the virial and the energy routes, is imposed ["global" consistency (GC)]. We show that for the class of potentials at issue the GC is in general considerably more accurate than the LC. We document this result by investigating the performances of the MHNC and the HMSA, as applied to the calculation of the thermodynamic and structural properties of the hard-core Yukawa (HCY) potential, the Derjaguin-Landau-Vervey-Overbeek (DLVO) potential and the Girifalco potential for fullerenes. The obtained results are then compared with Monte Carlo simulation data, that we also produce for the same model systems. As far as the HCY potential is concerned, the investigation covers a range of the Yukawa inverse decay length, z, spanning from z=1.8 when the interaction mimics the Lennard-Jones 12-6 potential, to z=7 when the potential mimics the "effective" short range interaction between globular proteins in a highly charge-screened aqueous solution. IETs are then applied to the DLVO potential with charge and Hamaker constant values which fit the dynamical interaction factor of lysozyme in a solution of high ionic strength, and to the Girifalco potential with parameters appropriate to model C60 and C70. It emerges from the present study that the GC is able to provide Helmholtz free energies and

  7. Modeling of the signals of an optical particle counter for real nonspherical particles.

    PubMed

    Heintzenberg, Jost; Okada, Kikuo; Trautmann, Thomas; Hoffmann, Peter

    2004-11-01

    An optical particle counter (OPC) was exposed to atmospheric particles of diameters of 200, 300, and 400 nm. The OPC data were combined with the results of single-particle analysis with a transmission electron microscope (TEM) on samples taken in parallel with the OPC measurements. With a T-matrix-based optical model the measured OPC spectra of scattered light pulses could be approximated with good precision. With an algorithm that simulated the response of the OPC to a given population of model particles derived from the TEM results, average absorption properties of different particle types were retrieved. For mobility sizes of 400 nm, higher light absorption was retrieved with the optical model for soot aggregates than for the rest of the morphological particle types. At smaller mobility sizes no compositional information could be derived from the model particles derived from the TEM data. Despite the limited success of the new methodology applied to the present experiment the results encourage the use of OPCs in combination with electrical mobility analyzers to derive more than aerosol-size distributions. With state-of-the-art pulse-height analysis the light-scattering pulses could be resolved with much finer resolution than in the instrument used.

  8. Modeling of the Signals of an Optical Particle Counter for Real Nonspherical Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heintzenberg, Jost; Okada, Kikuo; Trautmann, Thomas; Hoffmann, Peter

    2004-11-01

    An optical particle counter (OPC) was exposed to atmospheric particles of diameters of 200, 300, and 400 nm. The OPC data were combined with the results of single-particle analysis with a transmission electron microscope (TEM) on samples taken in parallel with the OPC measurements. With a T-matrix-based optical model the measured OPC spectra of scattered light pulses could be approximated with good precision. With an algorithm that simulated the response of the OPC to a given population of model particles derived from the TEM results, average absorption properties of different particle types were retrieved. For mobility sizes of 400 nm, higher light absorption was retrieved with the optical model for soot aggregates than for the rest of the morphological particle types. At smaller mobility sizes no compositional information could be derived from the model particles derived from the TEM data. Despite the limited success of the new methodology applied to the present experiment the results encourage the use of OPCs in combination with electrical mobility analyzers to derive more than aerosol-size distributions. With state-of-the-art pulse-height analysis the light-scattering pulses could be resolved with much finer resolution than in the instrument used.

  9. Development of global medium-energy nucleon-nucleus optical model potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Madland, D.G.; Sierk, A.J.

    1997-08-01

    The authors report on the development of new global optical model potentials for nucleon-nucleus scattering at medium energies. Using both Schroedinger and Dirac scattering formalisms, the goal is to construct a physically realistic optical potential describing nucleon-nucleus elastic scattering observables for a projectile energy range of (perhaps) 20 meV to (perhaps) 2 GeV and a target mass range of 16 to 209, excluding regions of strong nuclear deformation. They use a phenomenological approach guided by conclusions from recent microscopic studies. The experimental database consists largely of proton-nucleus elastic differential cross sections, analyzing powers, spin-rotation functions, and total reaction cross sections, and neutron-nucleus total cross sections. They will use this database in a nonlinear least-squares adjustment of optical model parameters in both relativistic equivalent Schroedinger (including relativistic kinematics) and Dirac (second-order reduction) formalisms. Isospin will be introduced through the standard Lane model and a relativistic generalization of that model.

  10. Microscopic model of quantum butterfly effect: Out-of-time-order correlators and traveling combustion waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleiner, Igor L.; Faoro, Lara; Ioffe, Lev B.

    2016-12-01

    We extend the Keldysh technique to enable the computation of out-of-time order correlators such as < O(t) O ˜ (0) O(t) O ˜ (0) > . We show that the behavior of these correlators is described by equations that display initially an exponential instability which is followed by a linear propagation of the decoherence between two initially identically copies of the quantum many body systems with interactions. At large times the decoherence propagation (quantum butterfly effect) is described by a diffusion equation with non-linear dissipation known in the theory of combustion waves. The solution of this equation is a propagating non-linear wave moving with constant velocity despite the diffusive character of the underlying dynamics. Our general conclusions are illustrated by the detailed computations for the specific models describing the electrons interacting with bosonic degrees of freedom (phonons, two-level-systems etc.) or with each other.

  11. Multistep Approach to Microscopic Models for Frustrated Quantum Magnets: The Case of the Natural Mineral Azurite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeschke, Harald; Opahle, Ingo; Kandpal, Hem; Valentí, Roser; Das, Hena; Saha-Dasgupta, Tanusri; Janson, Oleg; Rosner, Helge; Brühl, Andreas; Wolf, Bernd; Lang, Michael; Richter, Johannes; Hu, Shijie; Wang, Xiaoqun; Peters, Robert; Pruschke, Thomas; Honecker, Andreas

    2011-05-01

    The natural mineral azurite Cu3(CO3)2(OH)2 is a frustrated magnet displaying unusual and controversially discussed magnetic behavior. Motivated by the lack of a unified description for this system, we perform a theoretical study based on density functional theory as well as state-of-the-art numerical many-body calculations. We propose an effective generalized spin-1/2 diamond chain model which provides a consistent description of experiments: low-temperature magnetization, inelastic neutron scattering, nuclear magnetic resonance measurements, magnetic susceptibility as well as new specific heat measurements. With this study we demonstrate that the balanced combination of first principles with powerful many-body methods successfully describes the behavior of this frustrated material.

  12. Interrelations between the pairing and quadrupole interactions in the microscopic Shell Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drumev, K. P.; Georgieva, A. I.

    2016-01-01

    We explore the dynamical symmetries of the shell model number conserving algebra, which define three types of pairing and quadrupole phases, with the aim to obtain the prevailing phase or phase transition for the real nuclear systems in a single shell. This is achieved by establishing a correspondence between each of the pairing bases with the Elliott's SU(3) basis that describes collective rotation of nuclear systems. This allows for a complete classification of the basis states of different number of particles in all the limiting cases. The probability distribution of the SU(3) basis states within theirs corresponding pairing states is also obtained. The relative strengths of dynamically symmetric quadrupole-quadrupole interaction in respect to the isoscalar, isovector and total pairing interactions define a control parameter, which estimates the importance of each term of the Hamiltonian in the correct reproduction of the experimental data for the considered nuclei.

  13. Bayesian model for detection and classification of meningioma nuclei in microscopic images.

    PubMed

    Wirjadi, O; Kim, Y-J; Stech, F; Bonfert, L; Wagner, M

    2017-02-01

    Image segmentation aims to determine structures of interest inside a digital picture in biomedical sciences. State-of-the art automatic methods however still fail to provide the segmentation quality achievable by humans who employ expert knowledge and use software to mark target structures on an image. Manual segmentation is time-consuming, tedious and suffers from interoperator variability, thus not serving the requirements of daily use well. Therefore, the approach presented here abandons the goal of full-fledged segmentation and settles for the localization of circular objects in photographs (10 training images and 20 testing images with several hundreds of nuclei each). A fully trainable softcore interaction point process model was hence fit to the most likely locations of nuclei of meningioma cells. The Broad Bioimage Benchmark Collection/SIMCEP data set of virtual cells served as controls. A 'colour deconvolution' algorithm was integrated to determine (based on anti-Ki67 immunohistochemistry) which real cells might have the potential to proliferate. In addition, a density parameter of the underlying Bayesian model was estimated. Immunohistochemistry results were 'simulated'for the virtual cells. The system yielded true positive (TP) rates in the detection and classification of real nuclei and their virtual counterparts. These hits outnumbered those obtained from the public domain image processing software ImageJ by 10%. The method introduced here can be trained to function not only in medicine and morphology-based systems biology but in other application domains as well. The algorithm lends itself to an automated approach that constitutes a valuable tool which is easy to use and generates acceptable results quickly.

  14. Revisiting the CALIOP Mineral Dust Optical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winker, D. M.; Omar, A. H.; Liu, Z.

    2013-12-01

    The standard aerosol extinction retrieval applied to CALIOP observations relies heavily on a priori values of the lidar ratio (the ratio of extinction to 180-degree backscatter) for each of several aerosol types. The original CALIOP aerosol models were developed over 10 years ago, based on a combination of Aeronet retrievals, measurements from ground-based lidars, and theoretical scattering calculations. Both prior to and since the launch of CALIPSO, a number of studies using a variety of approaches have shown lidar ratios of around 40 sr for mineral dust. Ground-based Raman lidar measurements in Europe and Morroco, on the other hand, have consistently shown higher values of 50 to 60 sr. Reasons for this inconsistency have not been clearly identified, but may be due to geographical variability, mixtures of dust with fine-mode aerosol, multiple scattering effects on the CALIOP retrieval, other retrieval artifacts, or a combination of these. The simplest explanation for the difference between ground-based Raman and space-based retrievals of dust lidar ratio would be multiple scattering effects on the CALIOP signals. We have taken advantage of improvements in scattering codes and of recent field campaigns to re-evaluate the CALIOP optical model for mineral dust and to revisit multiple scattering effects. The original scattering phase functions used to predict multiple scattering were based on Dipole-Dipole Approximation (DDA) calculations of size-shape mixtures of irregular dust particles. At the time, the DDA calculations were limited to particles of less than 2 um diameter. Using current T-matrix codes, we are now able to compute scattering from particles as large as 10 um diameter. Applying T-matrix scattering calculations to spheroidal particles with size distributions consistent with those measured during the SAMUM campaign in Morroco, we find multiple scattering effects are similar to those predicted from the original DDA calculations. Thus multiple scattering

  15. Thermal Lens Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchiyama, Kenji; Hibara, Akihide; Kimura, Hiroko; Sawada, Tsuguo; Kitamori, Takehiko

    2000-09-01

    We developed a novel laser microscope based on the thermal lens effect induced by a coaxial beam comprised of excitation and probe beams. The signal generation mechanism was confirmed to be an authentic thermal lens effect from the measurement of signal and phase dependences on optical configurations between the sample and the probe beam focus, and therefore, the thermal lens effect theory could be applied. Two-point spatial resolution was determined by the spot size of the excitation beam, not by the thermal diffusion length. Sensitivity was quite high, and the detection ability, evaluated using a submicron microparticle containing dye molecules, was 0.8 zmol/μm2, hence a distribution image of trace chemical species could be obtained quantitatively. In addition, analytes are not restricted to fluorescent species, therefore, the thermal lens microscope is a promising analytical microscope. A two-dimensional image of a histamine molecule distribution, which was produced in mast cells at the femtomole level in a human nasal mucous polyp, was obtained.

  16. Failure of Stadard Optical Models to Reproduce Neutron Total Cross Section Difference in the W Isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J D; Bauer, R W; Dietrich, F S; Grimes, S M; Finlay, R W; Abfalterer, W P; Bateman, F B; Haight, R C; Morgan, G L; Bauge, E; Delaroche, J P; Romain, P

    2001-11-01

    Recently cross section differences among the isotopes{sup 182,184,186}W have been measured as part of a study of total cross sections in the 5-560 MeV energy range. These measurements show oscillations up to 150 mb between 5 and 100 MeV. Spherical and deformed phenomenological optical potentials with typical radial and isospin dependences show very small oscillations, in disagreement with the data. In a simple Ramsauer model, this discrepancy can be traced to a cancellation between radial and isospin effects. Understanding this problem requires a more detailed model that incorporates a realistic description of the neutron and proton density distributions. This has been done with results of Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov calculations using the Gogny force, together with a microscopic folding model employing a modification of the JLM potential as an effective interaction. This treatment yields a satisfactory interpretation of the observed total cross section differences.

  17. Mathematically Modeling the Involvement of Axons in Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Billy X.; Ross-Cisneros, Fred N.; Carelli, Valerio; Rue, Kelly S.; Salomao, Solange R.; Moraes-Filho, Milton N.; Moraes, Milton N.; Berezovsky, Adriana; Belfort, Rubens; Sadun, Alfredo A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), a mitochondrial disease, has clinical manifestations that reflect the initial preferential involvement of the papillomacular bundle (PMB). The present study seeks to predict the order of axonal loss in LHON optic nerves using the Nerve Fiber Layer Stress Index (NFL-SI), which is a novel mathematical model. Methods. Optic nerves were obtained postmortem from four molecularly characterized LHON patients with varying degrees of neurodegenerative changes and three age-matched controls. Tissues were cut in cross-section and stained with p-phenylenediamine to visualize myelin. Light microscopic images were captured in 32 regions of each optic nerve. Control and LHON tissues were evaluated by measuring axonal dimensions to generate an axonal diameter distribution map. LHON tissues were further evaluated by determining regions of total axonal depletion. Results. A size gradient was evident in the control optic nerves, with average axonal diameter increasing progressively from the temporal to nasal borders. LHON optic nerves showed an orderly loss of axons, starting inferotemporally, progressing centrally, and sparing the superonasal region until the end. Values generated from the NFL-SI equation fit a linear regression curve (R2 = 0.97; P < 0.001). Conclusions. The quantitative histopathologic data from this study revealed that the PMB is most susceptible in LHON, supporting clinical findings seen early in the course of disease onset. The present study also showed that the subsequent progression of axonal loss within the optic nerve can be predicted precisely with the NFL-SI equation. The results presented provided further insight into the pathophysiology of LHON. PMID:23060142

  18. Development and application of a ray-based model of light propagation through a spherical acousto-optic lens.

    PubMed

    Evans, Geoffrey J; Kirkby, Paul A; Naga Srinivas Nadella, K M; Marin, Bóris; Angus Silver, R

    2015-09-07

    A spherical acousto-optic lens (AOL) consists of four acousto-optic deflectors (AODs) that can rapidly and precisely control the focal position of an optical beam in 3D space. Development and application of AOLs has increased the speed at which 3D random access point measurements can be performed with a two-photon microscope. This has been particularly useful for measuring brain activity with fluorescent reporter dyes because neuronal signalling is rapid and sparsely distributed in 3D space. However, a theoretical description of light propagation through AOLs has lagged behind their development, resulting in only a handful of simplified principles to guide AOL design and optimization. To address this we have developed a ray-based computer model of an AOL incorporating acousto-optic diffraction and refraction by anisotropic media. We extended an existing model of a single AOD with constant drive frequency to model a spherical AOL: four AODs in series driven with linear chirps. AOL model predictions of the relationship between optical transmission efficiency and acoustic drive frequency including second order diffraction effects closely matched experimental measurements from a 3D two-photon AOL microscope. Moreover, exploration of different AOL drive configurations identified a new simple rule for maximizing the field of view of our compact AOL design. By providing a theoretical basis for understanding optical transmission through spherical AOLs, our open source model is likely to be useful for comparing and improving different AOL designs, as well as identifying the acoustic drive configurations that provide the best transmission performance over the 3D focal region.

  19. Scanning electron microscope measurement of width and shape of 10nm patterned lines using a JMONSEL-modeled library.

    PubMed

    Villarrubia, J S; Vladár, A E; Ming, B; Kline, R J; Sunday, D F; Chawla, J S; List, S

    2015-07-01

    The width and shape of 10nm to 12 nm wide lithographically patterned SiO2 lines were measured in the scanning electron microscope by fitting the measured intensity vs. position to a physics-based model in which the lines' widths and shapes are parameters. The approximately 32 nm pitch sample was patterned at Intel using a state-of-the-art pitch quartering process. Their narrow widths and asymmetrical shapes are representative of near-future generation transistor gates. These pose a challenge: the narrowness because electrons landing near one edge may scatter out of the other, so that the intensity profile at each edge becomes width-dependent, and the asymmetry because the shape requires more parameters to describe and measure. Modeling was performed by JMONSEL (Java Monte Carlo Simulation of Secondary Electrons), which produces a predicted yield vs. position for a given sample shape and composition. The simulator produces a library of predicted profiles for varying sample geometry. Shape parameter values are adjusted until interpolation of the library with those values best matches the measured image. Profiles thereby determined agreed with those determined by transmission electron microscopy and critical dimension small-angle x-ray scattering to better than 1 nm.

  20. Modeling the effect of microscopic driving behaviors on Kerner's time-delayed traffic breakdown at traffic signal using cellular automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang; Chen, Yan-Yan

    2016-12-01

    The signalized traffic is considerably complex due to the fact that various driving behaviors have emerged to respond to traffic signals. However, the existing cellular automaton models take the signal-vehicle interactions into account inadequately, resulting in a potential risk that vehicular traffic flow dynamics may not be completely explored. To remedy this defect, this paper proposes a more realistic cellular automaton model by incorporating a number of the driving behaviors typically observed when the vehicles are approaching a traffic light. In particular, the anticipatory behavior proposed in this paper is realized with a perception factor designed by considering the vehicle speed implicitly and the gap to its preceding vehicle explicitly. Numerical simulations have been performed based on a signal controlled road which is partitioned into three sections according to the different reactions of drivers. The effects of microscopic driving behaviors on Kerner's time-delayed traffic breakdown at signal (Kerner 2011, 2013) have been investigated with the assistance of spatiotemporal pattern and trajectory analysis. Furthermore, the contributions of the driving behaviors on the traffic breakdown have been statistically examined. Finally, with the activation of the anticipatory behavior, the influences of the other driving behaviors on the formation of platoon have been investigated in terms of the number of platoons, the averaged platoon size, and the averaged flow rate.

  1. Modeling of Cerebral Oxygen Transport Based on In vivo Microscopic Imaging of Microvascular Network Structure, Blood Flow, and Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Louis; Smith, Amy F; Boas, David A; Devor, Anna; Secomb, Timothy W; Sakadžić, Sava

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen is delivered to brain tissue by a dense network of microvessels, which actively control cerebral blood flow (CBF) through vasodilation and contraction in response to changing levels of neural activity. Understanding these network-level processes is immediately relevant for (1) interpretation of functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) signals, and (2) investigation of neurological diseases in which a deterioration of neurovascular and neuro-metabolic physiology contributes to motor and cognitive decline. Experimental data on the structure, flow and oxygen levels of microvascular networks are needed, together with theoretical methods to integrate this information and predict physiologically relevant properties that are not directly measurable. Recent progress in optical imaging technologies for high-resolution in vivo measurement of the cerebral microvascular architecture, blood flow, and oxygenation enables construction of detailed computational models of cerebral hemodynamics and oxygen transport based on realistic three-dimensional microvascular networks. In this article, we review state-of-the-art optical microscopy technologies for quantitative in vivo imaging of cerebral microvascular structure, blood flow and oxygenation, and theoretical methods that utilize such data to generate spatially resolved models for blood flow and oxygen transport. These "bottom-up" models are essential for the understanding of the processes governing brain oxygenation in normal and disease states and for eventual translation of the lessons learned from animal studies to humans.

  2. Modeling of Cerebral Oxygen Transport Based on In vivo Microscopic Imaging of Microvascular Network Structure, Blood Flow, and Oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Louis; Smith, Amy F.; Boas, David A.; Devor, Anna; Secomb, Timothy W.; Sakadžić, Sava

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen is delivered to brain tissue by a dense network of microvessels, which actively control cerebral blood flow (CBF) through vasodilation and contraction in response to changing levels of neural activity. Understanding these network-level processes is immediately relevant for (1) interpretation of functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) signals, and (2) investigation of neurological diseases in which a deterioration of neurovascular and neuro-metabolic physiology contributes to motor and cognitive decline. Experimental data on the structure, flow and oxygen levels of microvascular networks are needed, together with theoretical methods to integrate this information and predict physiologically relevant properties that are not directly measurable. Recent progress in optical imaging technologies for high-resolution in vivo measurement of the cerebral microvascular architecture, blood flow, and oxygenation enables construction of detailed computational models of cerebral hemodynamics and oxygen transport based on realistic three-dimensional microvascular networks. In this article, we review state-of-the-art optical microscopy technologies for quantitative in vivo imaging of cerebral microvascular structure, blood flow and oxygenation, and theoretical methods that utilize such data to generate spatially resolved models for blood flow and oxygen transport. These “bottom-up” models are essential for the understanding of the processes governing brain oxygenation in normal and disease states and for eventual translation of the lessons learned from animal studies to humans. PMID:27630556

  3. Optical Turbulence Characterization by WRF model above Ngari

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Yao, Y.

    2013-09-01

    Atmospheric optical turbulence modeling and forecast for astronomy is a relatively recent discipline, but has played important roles in site survey for astronomical observatories and optimization of large telescope observing tables, and in the applications of adaptive optics technique and atmospheric optical transportation. The numerical approach, by use of meteorological parameters and according to parameterization of optical turbulence, can provide all the optical turbulence parameters related, such as Cn2 profile, coherent length, coherent time, seeing, isoplanatic angle, and outer scale of turbulence. This is particularly interesting for searching new sites without the long and expensive site testing campaigns with instruments. Earlier site survey results by National Astronomical Observatories of China site survey team imply that the south-west Tibet, Ngari, is one of the world best IR and sub-mm sites. For searching the best site in Ngari area of hundreds of kilometers, numerical approach by Weather and Research Forecasting (WRF) model had been used to evaluate the climatology of the optical turbulence. The WRF model is configured over a domain 200km×200km with 1km horizontal resolution and 65 vertical levels from ground to the model top(10millibars) in 2010. The initial and boundary conditions for the model are given by the 1°x1°NCEP Global Final Analysis data. The distribution and seasonal variation of optical turbulence parameters over this area are presented. The field investigation for the potential good site are also given.

  4. Mosaic of Commemorative Microscope Substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Written by electron beam lithography in the Microdevices Laboratory of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, this Optical Microscope substrate helps the Phoenix Mars Mission science team learn how to assemble individual microscope images into a mosaic by aligning rows of text.

    Each line is about 0.1 millimeter tall, the average thickness of a human hair. Except for the Mogensen twins, the names are of babies born and team members lost during the original development of MECA (the Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity Analyzer) for the canceled 2001 Mars lander mission. The plaque also acknowledges the MECA 2001 principal investigator, now retired.

    This image was taken by the MECA Optical Microscope on Sol 111, or the 111th day of the Phoenix mission (Sept. 16, 2008).

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by JPL, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development was by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  5. Microscopic theory of equilibrium polariton condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Fei; Wu, Fengcheng; Xie, Ming; Su, Jung-Jung; MacDonald, A. H.

    2016-12-01

    We present a microscopic theory of the equilibrium polariton condensate state of a semiconductor quantum well in a planar optical cavity. The theory accounts for the adjustment of matter excitations to the presence of a coherent photon field, predicts effective polariton-polariton interaction strengths that are weaker and condensate exciton fractions that are smaller than in the commonly employed exciton-photon model, and yields effective Rabi coupling strengths that depend on the detuning of the cavity-photon energy relative to the bare exciton energy. The dressed quasiparticle bands that appear naturally in the theory provide a mechanism for electrical manipulation of polariton condensates.

  6. The head-mounted microscope.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ting; Dailey, Seth H; Naze, Sawyer A; Jiang, Jack J

    2012-04-01

    Microsurgical equipment has greatly advanced since the inception of the microscope into the operating room. These advancements have allowed for superior surgical precision and better post-operative results. This study focuses on the use of the Leica HM500 head-mounted microscope for the operating phonosurgeon. The head-mounted microscope has an optical zoom from 2× to 9× and provides a working distance from 300 mm to 700 mm. The headpiece, with its articulated eyepieces, adjusts easily to head shape and circumference, and offers a focus function, which is either automatic or manually controlled. We performed five microlaryngoscopic operations utilizing the head-mounted microscope with successful results. By creating a more ergonomically favorable operating posture, a surgeon may be able to obtain greater precision and success in phonomicrosurgery. Phonomicrosurgery requires the precise manipulation of long-handled cantilevered instruments through the narrow bore of a laryngoscope. The head-mounted microscope shortens the working distance compared with a stand microscope, thereby increasing arm stability, which may improve surgical precision. Also, the head-mounted design permits flexibility in head position, enabling operator comfort, and delaying musculoskeletal fatigue. A head-mounted microscope decreases the working distance and provides better ergonomics in laryngoscopic microsurgery. These advances provide the potential to promote precision in phonomicrosurgery.

  7. Modeling The Atmosphere As An Unguided Optical Communications Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuber, Raymond M.

    1989-07-01

    Due to the increasing number of applications for optical communications, methods such as computer simulation are needed for the performance analysis of these systems. The objective of this paper is to propose a system level model for simulating the Earth's atmosphere as an unguided optical communications channel. The major degradations in received optical intensity introduced by the atmosphere are scintillation, beam spreading, beam wander, and atmospheric transmissivity. The model presented here considers scintillation and beam wander to impose random fading in the received signal while beam spreading is a constant loss in intensity. Atmospheric transmissivity is treated as a filter-like channel transfer function. Relationships for the parameters of the model are given in terms of parameters which characterize the optical link. Also included is a description of an implementation of the model.

  8. Combination of microscopic model and VoF-multiphase approach for numerical simulation of nodular cast iron solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subasic, E.; Huang, C.; Jakumeit, J.; Hediger, F.

    2015-06-01

    The ongoing increase in the size and capacity of state-of-the-art wind power plants is highlighting the need to reduce the weight of critical components, such as hubs, main shaft bearing housings, gear box housings and support bases. These components are manufactured as nodular iron castings (spheroid graphite iron, or SGI). A weight reduction of up to 20% is achievable by optimizing the geometry to minimize volume, thus enabling significant downsizing of wind power plants. One method for enhancing quality control in the production of thick-walled SGI castings, and thus reducing tolerances and, consequently, enabling castings of smaller volume is via a casting simulation of mould filling and solidification based on a combination of microscopic model and VoF-multiphase approach. Coupled fluid flow with heat transport and phase transformation kinetics during solidification is described by partial differential equations and solved using the finite volume method. The flow of multiple phases is described using a volume of fluid approach. Mass conservation equations are solved separately for both liquid and solid phases. At the micro-level, the diffusion-controlled growth model for grey iron eutectic grains by Wetterfall et al. is combined with a growth model for white iron eutectic grains. The micro-solidification model is coupled with macro-transport equations via source terms in the energy and continuity equations. As a first step the methodology was applied to a simple geometry to investigate the impact of mould-filling on the grey-to-white transition prediction in nodular cast iron.

  9. A preliminary weather model for optical communications through the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaik, K. S.

    1988-01-01

    A preliminary weather model is presented for optical propagation through the atmosphere. It can be used to compute the attenuation loss due to the atmosphere for desired link availability statistics. The quantitative results that can be obtained from this model provide good estimates for the atmospheric link budget necessary for the design of an optical communication system. The result is extended to provide for the computation of joint attenuation probability for n sites with uncorrelated weather patterns.

  10. ISCHEMIC MODEL OF OPTIC NERVE INJURY

    PubMed Central

    Cioffi, George A

    2005-01-01

    Purpose It is proposed that the anterior optic nerve is specifically susceptible to microcirculatory compromise contributing to the development of glaucomatous optic neuropathy. Methods Ischemic optic neuropathy was induced by delivering endothelin-1 (ET-1) to the retrobulbar space in one eye of 12 primates for 6 to 12 months. Regional ganglion cell axonal sizes and densities were compared with the normal, contralateral eyes. Results Without changes of intraocular pressure, mean axonal density was significantly decreased in ET-1 eyes compared to controls (P = .03, paired t test). Two-way matched-pair analysis of variance showed a significant effect of ET-1 on overall axonal density (P < .0001). Among the animals with significant axonal loss, the mean axonal loss was 11.6%, and loss varied from 4% to 21%. Axonal loss was commonly localized within specific quadrants. Five animals were examined for preferential axonal size loss. As a group, there appears to be a tendency toward preferential large axonal loss, but the mean axonal loss of large and small axons did not meet significant differences (P = .1) However, examination of individual animals with significant loss shows significantly greater loss of large axons as compared to the small axons in three of the animals. Conclusions Chronic optic nerve ischemia causes demonstrable and localized damage of the optic nerve, without intraocular pressure elevation. There is preferential loss of large retinal ganglion cell axons in animals with significant axonal loss. Ischemia-induced focal axonal loss is similar to human glaucoma and may represent a differential regional vulnerability. PMID:17057819

  11. Integrated structural and optical modeling of the orbiting stellar interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaklan, Stuart B.; Yu, Jeffrey W.; Briggs, Hugh C.

    1993-11-01

    The Integrated Modeling of Optical Systems (IMOS) Integration Workbench at JPL has been used to model the effects of structural perturbations on the optics in the proposed Orbiting Stellar Interferometer (OSI). OSI consists of 3 pairs of interferometers and delay lines attached to a 7.5 meter truss. They are interferometrically monitored from a separate boom by a laser metrology system. The spatially distributed nature of the science instrument calls for a high level of integration between the optics and support structure. Because OSI is designed to achieve micro-arcsecond astrometry, many of its alignment, stability, and knowledge tolerances are in the submicron regime. The spacecraft will be subject to vibrations caused by reaction wheels and on-board equipment, as well as thermal strain due to solar and terrestrial heating. These perturbations affect optical parameters such as optical path differences and beam co-parallelism which are critical to instrument performance. IMOS provides an environment that allows one to design and perturb the structure, attach optics to structural or non-structural nodes, trace rays, and analyze the impact of mechanical perturbations on optical performance. This tool makes it simple to change the structure and immediately see performance enhancement/degradation. We have employed IMOS to analyze the effect of reaction wheel disturbances on the optical path difference in both the science and metrology interferometers.

  12. Characterization of the binding of shikonin to human immunoglobulin using scanning electron microscope, molecular modeling and multi-spectroscopic methods.

    PubMed

    He, Wenying; Ye, Xinyu; Yao, Xiaojun; Wu, Xiuli; Lin, Qiang; Huang, Guolei; Hua, Yingjie; Hui, Yang

    2015-11-05

    Shikonin, one of the active components isolated from the root of Arnebia euchroma (Royle) Johnst, have anti-tumor, anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory activities and has been used clinically in phlebitis and vascular purpura. In the present work, the interaction of human immunoglobulin (HIg) with shikonin has been investigated by using scanning electron microscope (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, fluorescence polarization, synchronous and 3D fluorescence spectroscopy in combination with molecular modeling techniques under physiological conditions with drug concentrations of 3.33-36.67 μM. The results of SEM exhibited visually the special effect on aggregation behavior of the complex formed between HIg and shikonin. The fluorescence polarization values indicated that shikonin molecules were found in a motionally unrestricted environment introduced by HIg. Molecular docking showed the shikonin moiety bound to the hydrophobic cavity of HIg, and there are four hydrogen-bonding interactions between shikonin and the residues of protein. The synchronous and 3D fluorescence spectra confirmed that shikonin could quench the intrinsic fluorescence of HIg and has an effect on the microenvironment around HIg in aqueous solution. The changes in the secondary structure of HIg were estimated by qualitative and quantitative FT-IR spectroscopic analysis. The binding constants and thermodynamic parameters for shikonin-HIg systems were obtained under different temperatures (300 K, 310 K and 320 K). The above results revealed the binding mechanism of shikonin and HIg at the ultrastructure and molecular level.

  13. A microscopic model of gemini surfactants: Self-assemblies in water and at air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiti, Prabal K.; Chowdhury, Debashish

    1998-09-01

    We report the results of large scale Monte Carlo simulations of novel microscopic models of gemini surfactants to elucidate (i) their spontaneous aggregation in bulk water and (ii) their spatial organization in a system where water is separated from the air above it by a sharp well-defined interface. We study the variation of the critical micellar concentration (CMC) with the variation of the (a) length of the spacer, (b) length of the hydrophobic tail, and (c) the bending rigidity of the hydrocarbon chains forming the spacer and the tail; some of the trends of variation are counterintuitive but are in excellent agreement with the available experimental results. Our simulations elucidate the effects of the geometrical shape, size, and density of the surfactant molecules, the ionic nature of the heads, and the hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity of the spacer not only on the shapes of the micellar aggregates and the magnitude of the CMC, but also on their conformations close to the air-water interface.

  14. Theoretical model for a Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yin, B.; Shay, T. M.

    1991-01-01

    A model for the Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter is presented. The model predicts a bandwidth of 0.6 GHz and a transmission peak of 0.98 for a filter operating on the Cs (D2) line. The model includes hyperfine effects and is valid for arbitrary magnetic fields.

  15. Optical Propagation Modeling for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, W H; Auerbach, J M; Henesian, M A; Jancaitis, K S; Manes, K R; Mehta, N C; Orth, C D; Sacks, R A; Shaw, M J; Widmayer, C C

    2004-01-12

    Optical propagation modeling of the National Ignition Facility has been utilized extensively from conceptual design several years ago through to early operations today. In practice we routinely (for every shot) model beam propagation starting from the waveform generator through to the target. This includes the regenerative amplifier, the 4-pass rod amplifier, and the large slab amplifiers. Such models have been improved over time to include details such as distances between components, gain profiles in the laser slabs and rods, transient optical distortions due to the flashlamp heating of laser slabs, measured transmitted and reflected wavefronts for all large optics, the adaptive optic feedback loop, and the frequency converter. These calculations allow nearfield and farfield predictions in good agreement with measurements.

  16. A Novel Animal Model of Partial Optic Nerve Transection Established Using an Optic Nerve Quantitative Amputator

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Li, Ying; He, Yan; Liang, Hong-Sheng; Liu, En-Zhong

    2012-01-01

    Background Research into retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration and neuroprotection after optic nerve injury has received considerable attention and the establishment of simple and effective animal models is of critical importance for future progress. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present study, the optic nerves of Wistar rats were semi-transected selectively with a novel optic nerve quantitative amputator. The variation in RGC density was observed with retro-labeled fluorogold at different time points after nerve injury. The densities of surviving RGCs in the experimental eyes at different time points were 1113.69±188.83 RGC/mm2 (the survival rate was 63.81% compared with the contralateral eye of the same animal) 1 week post surgery; 748.22±134.75 /mm2 (46.16% survival rate) 2 weeks post surgery; 505.03±118.67 /mm2 (30.52% survival rate) 4 weeks post surgery; 436.86±76.36 /mm2 (24.01% survival rate) 8 weeks post surgery; and 378.20±66.74 /mm2 (20.30% survival rate) 12 weeks post surgery. Simultaneously, we also measured the axonal distribution of optic nerve fibers; the latency and amplitude of pattern visual evoke potentials (P-VEP); and the variation in pupil diameter response to pupillary light reflex. All of these observations and profiles were consistent with post injury variation characteristics of the optic nerve. These results indicate that we effectively simulated the pathological process of primary and secondary injury after optic nerve injury. Conclusions/Significance The present quantitative transection optic nerve injury model has increased reproducibility, effectiveness and uniformity. This model is an ideal animal model to provide a foundation for researching new treatments for nerve repair after optic nerve and/or central nerve injury. PMID:22973439

  17. Optical Turbulence Characterization by WRF model above Ali, Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongshuai; Yao, Yongqiang; Liu, Liyong; Qian, Xuan; Yin, Jia

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric optical turbulence modeling and forecast for astronomy is a relatively recent discipline, but has played important roles in site survey, optimization of large telescope observing tables, and in the applications of adaptive optics technique. The numerical approach, by using of meteorological parameters and parameterization of optical turbulence, can provide all the optical turbulence parameters related, such as C2n profile, coherent length, wavefront coherent time, seeing, isoplanatic angle, and so on. This is particularly interesting for searching new sites without the long and expensive site testing campaigns with instruments. Earlier site survey results by the site survey team of National Astronomical Observatories of China imply that the south-west Tibet, Ali, is one of the world best IR and sub-mm site. For searching the best site in Ali area, numerical approach by Weather and Research Forecasting (WRF) model had been used to evaluate the climatology of the optical turbulence. The WRF model is configured over a domain 200km×200km with 1km horizontal resolution and 65 vertical levels from ground to the model top(10millibars) in 2010. The initial and boundary conditions for the model are provided by the 1° × 1° Global Final Analysis data from NCEP. The distribution and seasonal variation of optical turbulence parameters over this area are presented.

  18. Computer Modeling for Optical Waveguide Sensors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-15

    COSATI CODES 18 SUBJECT TERMS (Continue on reverse it necessary and cleritify by DIock numnerl FIEL GRUP SB-GOUP Optical waveguide sensors Computer...reflection. The resultant probe beam transmission may be plotted as a function of changes in the refractive index of the surrounding fluid medium. BASIC...all angles of incidence about the critical angle ecr. It should be noted that N in equation (3) is a function of e, since = sin - l sin 8 , see

  19. An electrical model of VCSEL as optical transmitter for optical printed circuit board

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Do-Kyoon; Yoon, Young-Seol; Choi, Jin-Ho; Kim, Kyung-Min; Choi, Young-Wan; Lee, Seok

    2005-03-01

    Optical interconnection is recent issue for high-speed data transmission. The limitation of high-speed electrical data transmission is caused by impedance mismatching, electric field coupling, microwave loss, and different length of the electrical signal lines. To overcome these limitations, the electrical signal in the current electrical system has to be changed by the optical signal. The most suitable optical source in the OPCB (Optical Printed Circuit Board) is VCSEL (Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers) that is low-priced and has the characteristic of vertical surface emitting. In this paper, we propose an electrical model of the VCSEL as E/O converting devices for the OPCB. The equivalent circuit of the VCSEL based on the rate equations includes carrier dynamics and material properties. The rate equation parameters are obtained by full analysis based on rate equation and experiment results. The electrical model of the VCSEL has the series resistance determined by I-V characteristic curve, and the parallel capacitance by the parasitic response of the VCSEL chip. The bandwidth of the optical interconnection is analyzed considering those parameters. We design and fabricate the optical transmitter for OPCB considering proposed electrical model of VCSEL.

  20. Model-based polishing of meter size optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupfer, Jan-Claas; Achtsnick, Marcel; Becker, Elisabeth

    2013-09-01

    In display or semiconductor manufacturing it is a constant drive towards the use of scale effects to reduce costs per unit. For equipment suppliers this leads to ever bigger optical components. To answer this need new cost-efficient technologies are required. In the process chain, the polishing step is one of the most important as it defines the optical surface. In this work the polishing step of a planar surface of a cylindrical component is investigated. A simulation for long scanning optics starting from Preston equation has been derived. By separating the optical surface into several zones, velocity variable polishing paths have been computed. Including pressure differences at the edges so called removal maps have been plotted. At the end, it has been verified that the model approach is able to influence polishing results of meter size optics by velocity controlled polishing.