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Sample records for microscopy avaliacao das

  1. Microscopy

    Treesearch

    Patricia A. Moss; Les Groom

    2001-01-01

    Microscopy is the study and interpretation of images produced by a microscope. "Interpretation" is the keyword, because the microscope enables one to see structures that are too small or too close together to be resolved by the unaided eye. (The human eye cannot separate two points or lines that are closer together than 0.1 mm.) it is important to...

  2. DAS performance analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, G.; Bodine, S.; Carroll, T.; Keller, M.

    1984-02-01

    This report begins with an overview of the Data Acquisition System (DAS), which supports several of PPPL's experimental devices. Performance measurements which were taken on DAS and the tools used to make them are then described.

  3. Electron Microscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beer, Michael

    1980-01-01

    Reviews technical aspects of structure determination in biological electron microscopy (EM). Discusses low dose EM, low temperature microscopy, electron energy loss spectra, determination of mass or molecular weight, and EM of labeled systems. Cites 34 references. (CS)

  4. Analytical Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2006-06-01

    In the Analytical Microscopy group, within the National Center for Photovoltaic's Measurements and Characterization Division, we combine two complementary areas of analytical microscopy--electron microscopy and proximal-probe techniques--and use a variety of state-of-the-art imaging and analytical tools. We also design and build custom instrumentation and develop novel techniques that provide unique capabilities for studying materials and devices. In our work, we collaborate with you to solve materials- and device-related R&D problems. This sheet summarizes the uses and features of four major tools: transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, the dual-beam focused-ion-beam workstation, and scanning probe microscopy.

  5. Correlative Microscopy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Microscopy and Imaging offers many opportunities to collaborate and cooperate with scientists in many different fields nationally and internationally. Images have proven to be very important components in basic research, product development and understanding structure/function relationships in addit...

  6. Correlative microscopy.

    PubMed

    Loussert Fonta, Céline; Humbel, Bruno M

    2015-09-01

    In recent years correlative microscopy, combining the power and advantages of different imaging system, e.g., light, electrons, X-ray, NMR, etc., has become an important tool for biomedical research. Among all the possible combinations of techniques, light and electron microscopy, have made an especially big step forward and are being implemented in more and more research labs. Electron microscopy profits from the high spatial resolution, the direct recognition of the cellular ultrastructure and identification of the organelles. It, however, has two severe limitations: the restricted field of view and the fact that no live imaging can be done. On the other hand light microscopy has the advantage of live imaging, following a fluorescently tagged molecule in real time and at lower magnifications the large field of view facilitates the identification and location of sparse individual cells in a large context, e.g., tissue. The combination of these two imaging techniques appears to be a valuable approach to dissect biological events at a submicrometer level. Light microscopy can be used to follow a labelled protein of interest, or a visible organelle such as mitochondria, in time, then the sample is fixed and the exactly same region is investigated by electron microscopy. The time resolution is dependent on the speed of penetration and fixation when chemical fixatives are used and on the reaction time of the operator for cryo-fixation. Light microscopy can also be used to identify cells of interest, e.g., a special cell type in tissue or cells that have been modified by either transfections or RNAi, in a large population of non-modified cells. A further application is to find fluorescence labels in cells on a large section to reduce searching time in the electron microscope. Multiple fluorescence labelling of a series of sections can be correlated with the ultrastructure of the individual sections to get 3D information of the distribution of the marked proteins: array

  7. DAS User Manual

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Østensen, Roy

    2008-10-01

    The HELAS Database for AsteroSeismology (DAS) is one of the deliverables of the Work Package NA5: Asteroseismology of the European Coordination Action in Helio- and Asteroseismology (HELAS). The DAS aims to provide easy access to publicly available asteroseismological timeseries data, both photometric and spectroscopic. In particular, the DAS and the HELAS software package FAMIAS are ideally suited to train Master and PhD students in asteroseismic data analysis and to build longterm datasets. The number of stars in the system is still limited and reflects the willingness of data owners to provide their data after publication. Work continues to populate the database with contributions from the community, and at present the number of stars in the database is 82

  8. Expansion Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fei; Tillberg, Paul W.; Boyden, Edward S.

    2014-01-01

    In optical microscopy, fine structural details are resolved by using refraction to magnify images of a specimen. Here we report the discovery that, by synthesizing a swellable polymer network within a specimen, it can be physically expanded, resulting in physical magnification. By covalently anchoring specific labels located within the specimen directly to the polymer network, labels spaced closer than the optical diffraction limit can be isotropically separated and optically resolved, a process we call expansion microscopy (ExM). Thus, this process can be used to perform scalable super-resolution microscopy with diffraction-limited microscopes. We demonstrate ExM with effective ~70 nm lateral resolution in both cultured cells and brain tissue, performing three-color super-resolution imaging of ~107 μm3 of the mouse hippocampus with a conventional confocal microscope. PMID:25592419

  9. Positron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hulett, L.D. Jr.; Xu, J.

    1995-02-01

    The negative work function property that some materials have for positrons make possible the development of positron reemission microscopy (PRM). Because of the low energies with which the positrons are emitted, some unique applications, such as the imaging of defects, can be made. The history of the concept of PRM, and its present state of development will be reviewed. The potential of positron microprobe techniques will be discussed also.

  10. Das DNA-Puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchner, Stefan

    Im Jahre 1953 wurde von James Watson und Francis Crick erstmalig der strukturelle Aufbau der sogenannten DNA (Desoxyribonukleinsäure) beschrieben, welche das Erbgut jedes Lebewesens enthält. Der wesentliche Teil des Erbguts wird dabei durch eine sehr lange Folge der vier Basen Adenin (A), Cytosin (C), Guanin (G) und Thymin (T) codiert. Seit einigen Jahren ist es möglich, die Folge der vier Basen zu einer gegebenen DNA zu bestimmen. Biologen bezeichnen diesen Vorgang als Sequenzierung.

  11. Das Zwillingsparadoxon: Gedankenexperimente

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genz, Henning

    2002-09-01

    Das vermeintliche Zwillingsparadoxon ist ein Gedankenexperiment mit einem Zwillingspaar: Ein Zwilling reist mit hoher Geschwindigkeit von der Erde weg und kehrt nach einiger Zeit zurück, sein Partner bleibt auf der Erde. Dabei altert der Reisende langsamer als der Ruhende - warum nicht umgekehrt? Ein Vergleich von Uhren, die sich mit konstanter Geschwindigkeit bewegen, zeigt: Der Effekt hängt nur von Geschwindigkeiten und nicht von Beschleunigungen ab. Er beruht also allein auf der Speziellen Relativitätstheorie. Tauschen die Zwillinge in regelmäßigen Abständen Lichtsignale aus, können sie ihr asymmetrisches Altern sogar in Zeitschritten mitprotokollieren.

  12. Das Allgemeine Statistische Archiv

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinne, Horst

    Das Allgemeine Statistische Archiv1, nachfolgend kurz Archiv genannt, ist die älteste, ausschließlich der Statistik gewidmete deutschsprachige wissenschaftliche Fachzeitschrift. Sie ist gut zwanzig Jahre älter als die Deutsche Statistische Gesellschaft, zu deren Publikationsorgan sie mit der Gründung der Gesellschaft im Jahre 1911 wurde. Zeitschrift und Gesellschaft blicken auf eine sehr wechselvolle, aber erfolgreiche gemeinsame Geschichte zurück. Die wissenschaftliche Arbeit der Gesellschaft ist im Archiv und seinen Sonderheften für nachfolgende Generationen dokumentiert.

  13. Connecting the Dots in DAS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Tracy

    2012-01-01

    Many institutions implement a distributed antenna system (DAS) as part of a holistic approach to providing better wireless coverage and capacity on campus. A DAS provides wireless service within a particular area or structure via a network of separate antenna nodes that are connected to a common source through fiber or coaxial cable. Because DAS…

  14. Connecting the Dots in DAS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Tracy

    2012-01-01

    Many institutions implement a distributed antenna system (DAS) as part of a holistic approach to providing better wireless coverage and capacity on campus. A DAS provides wireless service within a particular area or structure via a network of separate antenna nodes that are connected to a common source through fiber or coaxial cable. Because DAS…

  15. MyDas, an extensible Java DAS server.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Gustavo A; García, Leyla J; Jones, Philip; Jimenez, Rafael C; Quinn, Antony F; Jenkinson, Andrew M; Mulder, Nicola; Martin, Maria; Hunter, Sarah; Hermjakob, Henning

    2012-01-01

    A large number of diverse, complex, and distributed data resources are currently available in the Bioinformatics domain. The pace of discovery and the diversity of information means that centralised reference databases like UniProt and Ensembl cannot integrate all potentially relevant information sources. From a user perspective however, centralised access to all relevant information concerning a specific query is essential. The Distributed Annotation System (DAS) defines a communication protocol to exchange annotations on genomic and protein sequences; this standardisation enables clients to retrieve data from a myriad of sources, thus offering centralised access to end-users.We introduce MyDas, a web server that facilitates the publishing of biological annotations according to the DAS specification. It deals with the common functionality requirements of making data available, while also providing an extension mechanism in order to implement the specifics of data store interaction. MyDas allows the user to define where the required information is located along with its structure, and is then responsible for the communication protocol details.

  16. Bridging fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Development of new fluorescent probes and fluorescence microscopes has led to new ways to study cell biology. With the emergence of specialized microscopy units at most universities and research centers, the use of these techniques is well within reach for a broad research community. A major breakthrough in fluorescence microscopy in biology is the ability to follow specific targets on or in living cells, revealing dynamic localization and/or function of target molecules. One of the inherent limitations of fluorescence microscopy is the resolution. Several efforts are undertaken to overcome this limit. The traditional and most well-known way to achieve higher resolution imaging is by electron microscopy. Moreover, electron microscopy reveals organelles, membranes, macromolecules, and thus aids in the understanding of cellular complexity and localization of molecules of interest in relation to other structures. With the new probe development, a solid bridge between fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy is being built, even leading to correlative imaging. This connection provides several benefits, both scientifically as well as practically. Here, I summarize recent developments in bridging microscopy. PMID:18575880

  17. Dictionary of Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Julian

    2005-10-01

    The past decade has seen huge advances in the application of microscopy in all areas of science. This welcome development in microscopy has been paralleled by an expansion of the vocabulary of technical terms used in microscopy: terms have been coined for new instruments and techniques and, as microscopes reach even higher resolution, the use of terms that relate to the optical and physical principles underpinning microscopy is now commonplace. The Dictionary of Microscopy was compiled to meet this challenge and provides concise definitions of over 2,500 terms used in the fields of light microscopy, electron microscopy, scanning probe microscopy, x-ray microscopy and related techniques. Written by Dr Julian P. Heath, Editor of Microscopy and Analysis, the dictionary is intended to provide easy navigation through the microscopy terminology and to be a first point of reference for definitions of new and established terms. The Dictionary of Microscopy is an essential, accessible resource for: students who are new to the field and are learning about microscopes equipment purchasers who want an explanation of the terms used in manufacturers' literature scientists who are considering using a new microscopical technique experienced microscopists as an aide mémoire or quick source of reference librarians, the press and marketing personnel who require definitions for technical reports.

  18. Basic confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Carolyn L

    2011-07-01

    This unit introduces the reader to the basic principles of confocal microscopy and the design and capabilities of current confocal microscopes. The advantages and disadvantages of confocal microscopy compared to other techniques for fluorescence imaging are described. There are also practical guidelines for sample preparation and optimization of imaging parameters, as well as examples of some of the applications of confocal microscopy.

  19. Comparison of the DAS28-CRP and DAS28-ESR in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Sengul, Ilker; Akcay-Yalbuzdag, Seniz; Ince, Bugra; Goksel-Karatepe, Altinay; Kaya, Taciser

    2015-07-01

    To compare the Disease Activity Score with 28 joint (DAS28) using erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) (DAS28-ESR) and DAS28 using C-reactive protein (CRP) (DAS28-CRP) with thresholds validated for DAS28-ESR in Turkish patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The DAS28 data of 112 patients with rheumatoid arthritis followed in a local outpatient clinic were used. First, the correlation between DAS28-CRP and DAS28-ESR and the correlation between their unique components ([0.36 × In (CRP + 1) + 0.96] and [0.70 × In (ESR)]) were analyzed. Second, a Bland-Altman plot was constructed for the evaluation of the level of agreement between DAS28-CRP and DAS28-ESR. Lastly, the agreement between these two methods was analyzed by κ coefficient. Although there was a strong correlation between DAS28-CRP and DAS28-ESR, the correlation between their unique components was fair. Although more than 95% of the point data fall between the upper and lower bounds of the limit of agreement, the percentage error (46%) was higher than the acceptable proportion of 30%. The κ coefficient of agreement between DAS28- ESR and DAS28-CRP with validated thresholds for DAS28-ESR was 0.42, which was close to the lower boundary for moderate agreement. The results of this study demonstrated that there is discordance between DAS28-ESR and DAS28-CRP with the validated thresholds for DAS28-ESR. Using the DAS28-CRP with threshold values validated for DAS28-ESR may lead to errors in the determination of disease activity and therefore may lead to errors in the management of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. © 2015 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. Basic confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Carolyn L

    2008-01-01

    This unit introduces the reader to the basic principles of confocal microscopy and the design and capabilities of current confocal microscopes. The advantages and disadvantages of confocal microscopy compared to other techniques for fluorescence imaging are described. There are also practical guidelines for sample preparation and optimization of imaging parameters, as well as examples of some of the applications of confocal microscopy. (c) 2008 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  1. Fluorescence (Multiwave) Confocal Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Welzel, J; Kästle, Raphaela; Sattler, Elke C

    2016-10-01

    In addition to reflectance confocal microscopy, multiwave confocal microscopes with different laser wavelengths in combination with exogenous fluorophores allow fluorescence mode confocal microscopy in vivo and ex vivo. Fluorescence mode confocal microscopy improves the contrast between the epithelium and the surrounding soft tissue and allows the depiction of certain structures, like epithelial tumors, nerves, and glands. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Correlation mapping microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, James; Alexandrov, Sergey; Owens, Peter; Subhash, Hrebesh M.; Leahy, Martin J.

    2015-03-01

    Changes in the microcirculation are associated with conditions such as Raynauds disease. Current modalities used to assess the microcirculation such as nailfold capillaroscopy are limited due to their depth ambiguity. A correlation mapping technique was recently developed to extend the capabilities of Optical Coherence Tomography to generate depth resolved images of the microcirculation. Here we present the extension of this technique to microscopy modalities, including confocal microscopy. It is shown that this correlation mapping microscopy technique can extend the capabilities of conventional microscopy to enable mapping of vascular networks in vivo with high spatial resolution.

  3. Light sheet microscopy.

    PubMed

    Weber, Michael; Mickoleit, Michaela; Huisken, Jan

    2014-01-01

    This chapter introduces the concept of light sheet microscopy along with practical advice on how to design and build such an instrument. Selective plane illumination microscopy is presented as an alternative to confocal microscopy due to several superior features such as high-speed full-frame acquisition, minimal phototoxicity, and multiview sample rotation. Based on our experience over the last 10 years, we summarize the key concepts in light sheet microscopy, typical implementations, and successful applications. In particular, sample mounting for long time-lapse imaging and the resulting challenges in data processing are discussed in detail.

  4. Axial Plane Optical Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tongcang; Ota, Sadao; Kim, Jeongmin; Wong, Zi Jing; Wang, Yuan; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    We present axial plane optical microscopy (APOM) that can, in contrast to conventional microscopy, directly image a sample's cross-section parallel to the optical axis of an objective lens without scanning. APOM combined with conventional microscopy simultaneously provides two orthogonal images of a 3D sample. More importantly, APOM uses only a single lens near the sample to achieve selective-plane illumination microscopy, as we demonstrated by three-dimensional (3D) imaging of fluorescent pollens and brain slices. This technique allows fast, high-contrast, and convenient 3D imaging of structures that are hundreds of microns beneath the surfaces of large biological tissues. PMID:25434770

  5. Lasers for nonlinear microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wise, Frank

    2013-03-01

    Various versions of nonlinear microscopy are revolutionizing the life sciences, almost all of which are made possible because of the development of ultrafast lasers. In this article, the main properties and technical features of short-pulse lasers used in nonlinear microscopy are summarized. Recent research results on fiber lasers that will impact future instruments are also discussed.

  6. Superresolution microscopy for microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Coltharp, Carla; Xiao, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Summary This review provides a practical introduction to superresolution microscopy from the perspective of microbiological research. Because of the small sizes of bacterial cells, superresolution methods are particularly powerful and suitable for revealing details of cellular structures that are not resolvable under conventional fluorescence light microscopy. Here we describe the methodological concepts behind three major categories of super-resolution light microscopy: photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) and stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM), structured illumination microscopy (SIM) and stimulated emission-depletion (STED) microscopy. We then present recent applications of each of these techniques to microbial systems, which have revealed novel conformations of cellular structures and described new properties of in vivo protein function and interactions. Finally, we discuss the unique issues related to implementing each of these superresolution techniques with bacterial specimens and suggest avenues for future development. The goal of this review is to provide the necessary technical background for interested microbiologists to choose the appropriate super-resolution method for their biological systems, and to introduce the practical considerations required for designing and analysing superresolution imaging experiments. PMID:22947061

  7. Super resolution fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bo; Bates, Mark; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2010-01-01

    Achieving a spatial resolution that is not limited by the diffraction of light, recent developments of super-resolution fluorescence microscopy techniques allow the observation of many biological structures not resolvable in conventional fluorescence microscopy. New advances in these techniques now give them the ability to image three-dimensional (3D) structures, measure interactions by multicolor colocalization, and record dynamic processes in living cells at the nanometer scale. It is anticipated that super-resolution fluorescence microscopy will become a widely used tool for cell and tissue imaging to provide previously unobserved details of biological structures and processes. PMID:19489737

  8. Clinical specular microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hirst, L.W.; Laing, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    This book provides the general ophthalmologist with a guide to the clinical applications of specular microscopy. Important material is included on laser injury, cataract surgery, corneal transplants, glaucoma, uveitis, and trauma.

  9. Photothermal imaging scanning microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Chinn, Diane; Stolz, Christopher J.; Wu, Zhouling; Huber, Robert; Weinzapfel, Carolyn

    2006-07-11

    Photothermal Imaging Scanning Microscopy produces a rapid, thermal-based, non-destructive characterization apparatus. Also, a photothermal characterization method of surface and subsurface features includes micron and nanoscale spatial resolution of meter-sized optical materials.

  10. Stimulated Emission Depletion Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Blom, Hans; Widengren, Jerker

    2017-06-14

    Despite its short history, diffraction-unlimited fluorescence microscopy techniques have already made a substantial imprint in the biological sciences. In this review, we describe how stimulated emission depletion (STED) imaging originally evolved, how it compares to other optical super-resolution imaging techniques, and what advantages it provides compared to previous golden-standards for biological microscopy, such as diffraction-limited optical microscopy and electron microscopy. We outline the prerequisites for successful STED imaging experiments, emphasizing the equally critical roles of instrumentation, sample preparation, and photophysics, and describe major evolving strategies for how to push the borders of STED imaging even further in life science. Finally, we provide examples of how STED nanoscopy can be applied, within three different fields with particular potential for STED imaging experiments: neuroscience, plasma membrane biophysics, and subcellular clinical diagnostics. In these areas, and in many more, STED imaging can be expected to play an increasingly important role in the future.

  11. Data Acquisition System(DAS) Sustaining Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents general information describing the Data Acquisition System contract, a summary of objectives, tasks performed and completed. The hardware deliverables which are comprised of: 1) Two ground DAS units; 2) Two flight DAS units; 3) Logistic spares; and 4) Shipping containers are described. Also included are the data requirements and scope of the contract.

  12. Nonlinear vibrational microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Holtom, Gary R.; Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney; Zumbusch, Andreas

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for microscopic vibrational imaging using coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering or Sum Frequency Generation. Microscopic imaging with a vibrational spectroscopic contrast is achieved by generating signals in a nonlinear optical process and spatially resolved detection of the signals. The spatial resolution is attained by minimizing the spot size of the optical interrogation beams on the sample. Minimizing the spot size relies upon a. directing at least two substantially co-axial laser beams (interrogation beams) through a microscope objective providing a focal spot on the sample; b. collecting a signal beam together with a residual beam from the at least two co-axial laser beams after passing through the sample; c. removing the residual beam; and d. detecting the signal beam thereby creating said pixel. The method has significantly higher spatial resolution then IR microscopy and higher sensitivity than spontaneous Raman microscopy with much lower average excitation powers. CARS and SFG microscopy does not rely on the presence of fluorophores, but retains the resolution and three-dimensional sectioning capability of confocal and two-photon fluorescence microscopy. Complementary to these techniques, CARS and SFG microscopy provides a contrast mechanism based on vibrational spectroscopy. This vibrational contrast mechanism, combined with an unprecedented high sensitivity at a tolerable laser power level, provides a new approach for microscopic investigations of chemical and biological samples.

  13. Interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ralston, Tyler S.; Marks, Daniel L.; Carney, P. Scott; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    State-of-the-art methods in high-resolution three-dimensional optical microscopy require that the focus be scanned through the entire region of interest. However, an analysis of the physics of the light–sample interaction reveals that the Fourier-space coverage is independent of depth. Here we show that, by solving the inverse scattering problem for interference microscopy, computed reconstruction yields volumes with a resolution in all planes that is equivalent to the resolution achieved only at the focal plane for conventional high-resolution microscopy. In short, the entire illuminated volume has spatially invariant resolution, thus eliminating the compromise between resolution and depth of field. We describe and demonstrate a novel computational image-formation technique called interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM). ISAM has the potential to broadly impact real-time three-dimensional microscopy and analysis in the fields of cell and tumour biology, as well as in clinical diagnosis where in vivo imaging is preferable to biopsy. PMID:25635181

  14. Optical imaging. Expansion microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fei; Tillberg, Paul W; Boyden, Edward S

    2015-01-30

    In optical microscopy, fine structural details are resolved by using refraction to magnify images of a specimen. We discovered that by synthesizing a swellable polymer network within a specimen, it can be physically expanded, resulting in physical magnification. By covalently anchoring specific labels located within the specimen directly to the polymer network, labels spaced closer than the optical diffraction limit can be isotropically separated and optically resolved, a process we call expansion microscopy (ExM). Thus, this process can be used to perform scalable superresolution microscopy with diffraction-limited microscopes. We demonstrate ExM with apparent ~70-nanometer lateral resolution in both cultured cells and brain tissue, performing three-color superresolution imaging of ~10(7) cubic micrometers of the mouse hippocampus with a conventional confocal microscope.

  15. Spectrally encoded confocal microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tearney, G.J.; Webb, R.H.; Bouma, B.E.

    1998-08-01

    An endoscope-compatible, submicrometer-resolution scanning confocal microscopy imaging system is presented. This approach, spectrally encoded confocal microscopy (SECM), uses a quasi-monochromatic light source and a transmission diffraction grating to detect the reflectivity simultaneously at multiple points along a transverse line within the sample. Since this method does not require fast spatial scanning within the probe, the equipment can be miniaturized and incorporated into a catheter or endoscope. Confocal images of an electron microscope grid were acquired with SECM to demonstrate the feasibility of this technique. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital Optical Society of America}

  16. Conventional transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Winey, Mark; Meehl, Janet B.; O'Toole, Eileen T.; Giddings, Thomas H.

    2014-01-01

    Researchers have used transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to make contributions to cell biology for well over 50 years, and TEM continues to be an important technology in our field. We briefly present for the neophyte the components of a TEM-based study, beginning with sample preparation through imaging of the samples. We point out the limitations of TEM and issues to be considered during experimental design. Advanced electron microscopy techniques are listed as well. Finally, we point potential new users of TEM to resources to help launch their project. PMID:24482357

  17. Video Telescope Operating Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Divers, Stephen J

    2015-09-01

    Exotic pet veterinarians frequently have to operate on small animals, and magnification is commonly used. Existing endoscopy equipment can be used with a mechanical arm and telescope to enable video telescope operating microscopy. The additional equipment items and their specifics are described, and several case examples are provided. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Scanning ultrafast electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ding-Shyue; Mohammed, Omar F; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2010-08-24

    Progress has been made in the development of four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy, which enables space-time imaging of structural dynamics in the condensed phase. In ultrafast electron microscopy, the electrons are accelerated, typically to 200 keV, and the microscope operates in the transmission mode. Here, we report the development of scanning ultrafast electron microscopy using a field-emission-source configuration. Scanning of pulses is made in the single-electron mode, for which the pulse contains at most one or a few electrons, thus achieving imaging without the space-charge effect between electrons, and still in ten(s) of seconds. For imaging, the secondary electrons from surface structures are detected, as demonstrated here for material surfaces and biological specimens. By recording backscattered electrons, diffraction patterns from single crystals were also obtained. Scanning pulsed-electron microscopy with the acquired spatiotemporal resolutions, and its efficient heat-dissipation feature, is now poised to provide in situ 4D imaging and with environmental capability.

  19. Scanning ultrafast electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ding-Shyue; Mohammed, Omar F.; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2010-01-01

    Progress has been made in the development of four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy, which enables space-time imaging of structural dynamics in the condensed phase. In ultrafast electron microscopy, the electrons are accelerated, typically to 200 keV, and the microscope operates in the transmission mode. Here, we report the development of scanning ultrafast electron microscopy using a field-emission-source configuration. Scanning of pulses is made in the single-electron mode, for which the pulse contains at most one or a few electrons, thus achieving imaging without the space-charge effect between electrons, and still in ten(s) of seconds. For imaging, the secondary electrons from surface structures are detected, as demonstrated here for material surfaces and biological specimens. By recording backscattered electrons, diffraction patterns from single crystals were also obtained. Scanning pulsed-electron microscopy with the acquired spatiotemporal resolutions, and its efficient heat-dissipation feature, is now poised to provide in situ 4D imaging and with environmental capability. PMID:20696933

  20. Principles of multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Kenneth W; Young, Pamela A

    2006-01-01

    Multiphoton fluorescence microscopy is a powerful, important tool in biomedical research that offers low photon toxicity and higher spatial and temporal resolution than other in vivo imaging modalities. The capability to collect images hundreds of micrometers into biological tissues provides an invaluable tool for studying cellular and subcellular processes in the context of tissues and organs in living animals. Multiphoton microscopy is based upon two-photon excitation of fluorescence that occurs only in a sub-femtoliter volume at the focus; by scanning the focus through a sample, 2- and 3-dimensional images can be collected. The complex 3-dimensional organization of the kidney makes it especially appropriate for multiphoton microscopic analysis, which has been used to characterize numerous aspects of renal physiology and pathophysiology in living rats and mice. However, the ability to collect fluorescence images deep into biological tissues raises unique problems not encountered in other forms of optical microscopy, including issues of probe access, and tissue optics. Future improvements in multiphoton fluorescence microscopy will involve optimizing objectives for the unique characteristics of multiphoton fluorescence imaging, improving the speed at which images may be collected and extending the depth to which imaging may be conducted. Copyright 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Light microscopy digital imaging.

    PubMed

    Joubert, James; Sharma, Deepak

    2011-10-01

    This unit presents an overview of digital imaging hardware used in light microscopy. CMOS, CCD, and EMCCDs are the primary sensors used. The strengths and weaknesses of each define the primary applications for these sensors. Sensor architecture and formats are also reviewed. Color camera design strategies and sensor window cleaning are also described in the unit.

  2. Photoacoustic computed microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Lei; Xi, Lei; Jiang, Huabei

    2014-01-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) is emerging as a powerful technique for imaging microvasculature at depths beyond the ~1 mm depth limit associated with confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy and optical coherence tomography. PAM, however, is currently qualitative in nature and cannot quantitatively measure important functional parameters including oxyhemoglobin (HbO2), deoxyhemoglobin (HbR), oxygen saturation (sO2), blood flow (BF) and rate of oxygen metabolism (MRO2). Here we describe a new photoacoustic microscopic method, termed photoacoustic computed microscopy (PACM) that combines current PAM technique with a model-based inverse reconstruction algorithm. We evaluate the PACM approach using tissue-mimicking phantoms and demonstrate its in vivo imaging ability of quantifying HbO2, HbR, sO2, cerebral BF and cerebral MRO2 at the small vessel level in a rodent model. This new technique provides a unique tool for neuroscience research and for visualizing microvasculature dynamics involved in tumor angiogenesis and in inflammatory joint diseases. PMID:24828539

  3. Polarized Light Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frandsen, Athela F.

    2016-01-01

    Polarized light microscopy (PLM) is a technique which employs the use of polarizing filters to obtain substantial optical property information about the material which is being observed. This information can be combined with other microscopy techniques to confirm or elucidate the identity of an unknown material, determine whether a particular contaminant is present (as with asbestos analysis), or to provide important information that can be used to refine a manufacturing or chemical process. PLM was the major microscopy technique in use for identification of materials for nearly a century since its introduction in 1834 by William Fox Talbot, as other techniques such as SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy), FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy), XPD (X-ray Powder Diffraction), and TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) had not yet been developed. Today, it is still the only technique approved by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for asbestos analysis, and is often the technique first applied for identification of unknown materials. PLM uses different configurations in order to determine different material properties. With each configuration additional clues can be gathered, leading to a conclusion of material identity. With no polarizing filter, the microscope can be used just as a stereo optical microscope, and view qualities such as morphology, size, and number of phases. With a single polarizing filter (single polars), additional properties can be established, such as pleochroism, individual refractive indices, and dispersion staining. With two polarizing filters (crossed polars), even more can be deduced: isotropy vs. anisotropy, extinction angle, birefringence/degree of birefringence, sign of elongation, and anomalous polarization colors, among others. With the use of PLM many of these properties can be determined in a matter of seconds, even for those who are not highly trained. McCrone, a leader in the field of polarized light microscopy, often

  4. Quad stereo-microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hay, Rebecca F.; Gibson, Graham M.; Lee, Michael P.; Padgett, Miles J.; Phillips, David B.

    2014-09-01

    Stereo-microscopy is a technique that enables a sample to be imaged from two directions simultaneously, allowing the tracking of microscopic objects in three dimensions. This is achieved by illuminating the sample from different directions, each illumination direction producing an individual image. These images are superimposed in the image plane but can be easily separated using a diffractive optical element in the Fourier plane of the imaging arm. Therefore this enables 3-dimensional coordinates to be reconstructed using simple 2-dimensional image tracking and parallax. This is a powerful technique when combined with holographic optical tweezers (HOT), where multiple objects can be trapped and tracked simultaneously in three dimensions. In this work, we extend this concept to four different illumination directions: quad stereo-microscopy. This allows us to measure the accuracy of tracking in three dimensions, and to optimise the system.

  5. Quantitative deconvolution microscopy.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Paul C

    2014-01-01

    The light microscope is an essential tool for the study of cells, organelles, biomolecules, and subcellular dynamics. A paradox exists in microscopy whereby the higher the needed lateral resolution, the more the image is degraded by out-of-focus information. This creates a significant need to generate axial contrast whenever high lateral resolution is required. One strategy for generating contrast is to measure or model the optical properties of the microscope and to use that model to algorithmically reverse some of the consequences of high-resolution imaging. Deconvolution microscopy implements model-based methods to enable the full diffraction-limited resolution of the microscope to be exploited even in complex and living specimens.

  6. Multimodal Nonlinear Optical Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Shuhua; Slipchenko, Mikhail N.; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2013-01-01

    Because each nonlinear optical (NLO) imaging modality is sensitive to specific molecules or structures, multimodal NLO imaging capitalizes the potential of NLO microscopy for studies of complex biological tissues. The coupling of multiphoton fluorescence, second harmonic generation, and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) has allowed investigation of a broad range of biological questions concerning lipid metabolism, cancer development, cardiovascular disease, and skin biology. Moreover, recent research shows the great potential of using CARS microscope as a platform to develop more advanced NLO modalities such as electronic-resonance-enhanced four-wave mixing, stimulated Raman scattering, and pump-probe microscopy. This article reviews the various approaches developed for realization of multimodal NLO imaging as well as developments of new NLO modalities on a CARS microscope. Applications to various aspects of biological and biomedical research are discussed. PMID:24353747

  7. DAS28-CRP and DAS28-ESR cut-offs for high disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis are not interchangeable

    PubMed Central

    Fleischmann, Roy M; van der Heijde, Désirée; Gardiner, Philip V; Szumski, Annette; Marshall, Lisa; Bananis, Eustratios

    2017-01-01

    Background In most patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), Disease Activity Score 28-joint count C reactive protein (DAS28-CRP) is lower than DAS28 erythrocyte sedimentation rate (DAS28-ESR), suggesting that use of the DAS28-ESR cut-off to assess high disease activity (HDA) with DAS28-CRP may underestimate the number of patients with HDA. We determined the DAS28-CRP value corresponding to the validated DAS28-ESR cut-off for HDA. Methods Baseline data were pooled from 2 clinical studies evaluating etanercept (ETN) plus methotrexate (MTX) or MTX in early RA; DAS28-CRP and DAS28-ESR were obtained, allowing the determination of the DAS28-CRP HDA value best corresponding to the DAS28-ESR cut-off of >5.1. Results At baseline, as expected, fewer patients had HDA by DAS28-CRP than DAS28-ESR; DAS28-CRP>5.1 and DAS28-ESR>5.1 had only modest agreement (κ coefficients 0.45–0.54). Mean DAS28-CRP and DAS28-ESR were 5.7 and 6.2, respectively, in the ETN+MTX group (n=571), and 6.0 and 6.5 in the MTX group (n=262). A DAS28-CRP cut-off of 4.6 corresponded to a DAS28-ESR cut-off of 5.1. Conclusions We have shown that a DAS28-CRP of 4.6 corresponds to 5.1 for DAS28-ESR. Since this is substantially lower than the DAS28-ESR cut-off of 5.1, using 5.1 as the cut-off for DAS28-CRP underestimates disease activity in RA. Trial registration number NCT00195494; NCT00913458. PMID:28255449

  8. Blind digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Patrick N.; Wiegandt, Florian; Treacher, Daniel J.; Mang, Matthias M.; Gianani, Ilaria; Schiavi, Andrea; Lloyd, David T.; O'Keeffe, Kevin; Hooker, Simon M.; Walmsley, Ian A.

    2017-03-01

    A blind variant of digital holographic microscopy is presented that removes the requirement for a well-characterized, highly divergent reference beam. This is achieved by adopting an off-axis recording geometry where a sequence of holograms is recorded as the reference is tilted, and an iterative algorithm that estimates the amplitudes and phases of both beams while simultaneously enhancing the numerical aperture. Numerical simulations have demonstrated the accuracy and robustness of this approach when applied to the coherent imaging problem.

  9. Ion photon emission microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, P.; Doyle, B. L.; Banks, J. C.; Battistella, A.; Gennaro, G.; McDaniel, F. D.; Mellon, M.; Vittone, E.; Vizkelethy, G.; Wing, N. D.

    2003-09-01

    A new ion-induced emission microscopy has been invented and demonstrated, which is called ion photon emission microscopy (IPEM). It employs a low current, broad ion beam impinging on a sample, previously coated or simply covered with a few microns of a fast, highly efficient phosphor layer. The light produced at the single ion impact point is collected with an optical microscope and projected at high magnification onto a single photon position sensitive detector (PSD). This allows maps of the ion strike effects to be produced, effectively removing the need for a microbeam. Irradiation in air and even the use of alpha particle sources with no accelerator are possible. Potential applications include ion beam induced charge collection studies of semiconducting and insulating materials, single event upset studies on microchips and even biological cells in radiobiological effectiveness experiments. We describe the IPEM setup, including a 60× OM-40 microscope with a 1.5 mm hole for the beam transmission and a Quantar PSD with 60 μm pixel. Bicron plastic scintillator blades of 10 μm were chosen as a phosphor for their nanosecond time resolution, homogeneity, utility and commercial availability. The results given in this paper are for a prototype IPEM system. They indicate a resolution of ˜12 μm, the presence of a spatial halo and a He-ion efficiency of ˜20%. This marks the first time that nuclear microscopy has been performed with a radioactive source.

  10. Multimodal multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Légaré, François; Pfeffer, Christian P.; Ganikhanov, Feruz

    2009-02-01

    Multiphoton microscopy is a powerful technique for high spatial resolution thick tissue imaging. In its simple version, it uses a high repetition rate femtosecond oscillator laser source focussed and scanned across biological sample that contains fluorophores. However, not every biological structure is inherently fluorescent or can be stained without causing biochemical changes. To circumvent these limitations, other non-invasive nonlinear optical imaging approaches are currently being developed and investigated with regard to different applications. These techniques are: (1) second harmonic generation (SHG), (2) third harmonic generation (THG), and (3) coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. The main advantage of the above mentioned techniques is that they derive their imaging contrast from optical nonlinearities that do not involve fluorescence process. As a particular application example we investigated collagen arrays. We show that combining SHG-THG-CARS onto a single imaging platform provides complementary information about the sub-micron architecture of the tissue. SHG microscopy reveals the fibrillar architecture of collagen arrays and confirm a rather high degree of heterogeneity of χ(2) within the focal volume, THG highlights the boundaries between the collagen sheets, and CH2 spectroscopic contrast with CARS.

  11. Light Microscopy Microscope Experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-02-04

    Ground testing for the first confocal Light Microscopy Microscope (LMM) Experiment. Procter and Gamble is working with NASA Glenn scientists to prepare for a study that examines product stabilizers in a microgravity environment. The particles in the tube glow orange because they have been fluorescently tagged with a dye that reacts to green laser lights to allow construction of a 3D image point by point. The experiment, which will be sent to the ISS later this year, will help P&G develop improved product stabilizers to extend shelf life and develop more environmentally friendly packaging.

  12. Fourier plane imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez, Daniel Peralta, Luis Grave de; Alharbi, Nouf; Alhusain, Mdhaoui; Bernussi, Ayrton A.

    2014-09-14

    We show how the image of an unresolved photonic crystal can be reconstructed using a single Fourier plane (FP) image obtained with a second camera that was added to a traditional compound microscope. We discuss how Fourier plane imaging microscopy is an application of a remarkable property of the obtained FP images: they contain more information about the photonic crystals than the images recorded by the camera commonly placed at the real plane of the microscope. We argue that the experimental results support the hypothesis that surface waves, contributing to enhanced resolution abilities, were optically excited in the studied photonic crystals.

  13. Electrochemical force microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen; Collins, Liam F.; Rodriguez, Brian J.

    2017-01-10

    A system and method for electrochemical force microscopy are provided. The system and method are based on a multidimensional detection scheme that is sensitive to forces experienced by a biased electrode in a solution. The multidimensional approach allows separation of fast processes, such as double layer charging, and charge relaxation, and slow processes, such as diffusion and faradaic reactions, as well as capturing the bias dependence of the response. The time-resolved and bias measurements can also allow probing both linear (small bias range) and non-linear (large bias range) electrochemical regimes and potentially the de-convolution of charge dynamics and diffusion processes from steric effects and electrochemical reactivity.

  14. Dasty3, a WEB framework for DAS

    PubMed Central

    Villaveces, Jose M.; Jimenez, Rafael C.; Garcia, Leyla J.; Salazar, Gustavo A.; Gel, Bernat; Mulder, Nicola; Martin, Maria; Garcia, Alexander; Hermjakob, Henning

    2011-01-01

    Motivation: Dasty3 is a highly interactive and extensible Web-based framework. It provides a rich Application Programming Interface upon which it is possible to develop specialized clients capable of retrieving information from DAS sources as well as from data providers not using the DAS protocol. Dasty3 provides significant improvements on previous Web-based frameworks and is implemented using the 1.6 DAS specification. Availability: Dasty3 is an open-source tool freely available at http://www.ebi.ac.uk/dasty/ under the terms of the GNU General public license. Source and documentation can be found at http://code.google.com/p/dasty/. Contact: hhe@ebi.ac.uk PMID:21798964

  15. Silver stain for electron microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corbett, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Ammoniacal silver stain used for light microscopy was adapted advantageously for use with very thin biological sections required for electron microscopy. Silver stain can be performed in short time, has more contrast, and is especially useful for low power electron microscopy.

  16. Multi-pass microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Juffmann, Thomas; Klopfer, Brannon B.; Frankort, Timmo L.I.; Haslinger, Philipp; Kasevich, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Microscopy of biological specimens often requires low light levels to avoid damage. This yields images impaired by shot noise. An improved measurement accuracy at the Heisenberg limit can be achieved exploiting quantum correlations. If sample damage is the limiting resource, an equivalent limit can be reached by passing photons through a specimen multiple times sequentially. Here we use self-imaging cavities and employ a temporal post-selection scheme to present full-field multi-pass polarization and transmission micrographs with variance reductions of 4.4±0.8 dB (11.6±0.8 dB in a lossless setup) and 4.8±0.8 dB, respectively, compared with the single-pass shot-noise limit. If the accuracy is limited by the number of detected probe particles, our measurements show a variance reduction of 25.9±0.9 dB. The contrast enhancement capabilities in imaging and in diffraction studies are demonstrated with nanostructured samples and with embryonic kidney 293T cells. This approach to Heisenberg-limited microscopy does not rely on quantum state engineering. PMID:27670525

  17. Inducible fluorescent speckle microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar, Paulo; Belsley, Michael; Maiato, Helder

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of cytoskeleton dynamics has benefited from the capacity to generate fluorescent fiducial marks on cytoskeleton components. Here we show that light-induced imprinting of three-dimensional (3D) fluorescent speckles significantly improves speckle signal and contrast relative to classic (random) fluorescent speckle microscopy. We predict theoretically that speckle imprinting using photobleaching is optimal when the laser energy and fluorophore responsivity are related by the golden ratio. This relation, which we confirm experimentally, translates into a 40% remaining signal after speckle imprinting and provides a rule of thumb in selecting the laser power required to optimally prepare the sample for imaging. This inducible speckle imaging (ISI) technique allows 3D speckle microscopy to be performed in readily available libraries of cell lines or primary tissues expressing fluorescent proteins and does not preclude conventional imaging before speckle imaging. As a proof of concept, we use ISI to measure metaphase spindle microtubule poleward flux in primary cells and explore a scaling relation connecting microtubule flux to metaphase duration. PMID:26783303

  18. Magnetic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Passeri, Daniele; Dong, Chunhua; Reggente, Melania; Angeloni, Livia; Barteri, Mario; Scaramuzzo, Francesca A; De Angelis, Francesca; Marinelli, Fiorenzo; Antonelli, Flavia; Rinaldi, Federica; Marianecci, Carlotta; Carafa, Maria; Sorbo, Angela; Sordi, Daniela; Arends, Isabel WCE; Rossi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is an atomic force microscopy (AFM) based technique in which an AFM tip with a magnetic coating is used to probe local magnetic fields with the typical AFM spatial resolution, thus allowing one to acquire images reflecting the local magnetic properties of the samples at the nanoscale. Being a well established tool for the characterization of magnetic recording media, superconductors and magnetic nanomaterials, MFM is finding constantly increasing application in the study of magnetic properties of materials and systems of biological and biomedical interest. After reviewing these latter applications, three case studies are presented in which MFM is used to characterize: (i) magnetoferritin synthesized using apoferritin as molecular reactor; (ii) magnetic nanoparticles loaded niosomes to be used as nanocarriers for drug delivery; (iii) leukemic cells labeled using folic acid-coated core-shell superparamagnetic nanoparticles in order to exploit the presence of folate receptors on the cell membrane surface. In these examples, MFM data are quantitatively analyzed evidencing the limits of the simple analytical models currently used. Provided that suitable models are used to simulate the MFM response, MFM can be used to evaluate the magnetic momentum of the core of magnetoferritin, the iron entrapment efficiency in single vesicles, or the uptake of magnetic nanoparticles into cells. PMID:25050758

  19. Multi-pass microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juffmann, Thomas; Klopfer, Brannon B.; Frankort, Timmo L. I.; Haslinger, Philipp; Kasevich, Mark A.

    2016-09-01

    Microscopy of biological specimens often requires low light levels to avoid damage. This yields images impaired by shot noise. An improved measurement accuracy at the Heisenberg limit can be achieved exploiting quantum correlations. If sample damage is the limiting resource, an equivalent limit can be reached by passing photons through a specimen multiple times sequentially. Here we use self-imaging cavities and employ a temporal post-selection scheme to present full-field multi-pass polarization and transmission micrographs with variance reductions of 4.4+/-0.8 dB (11.6+/-0.8 dB in a lossless setup) and 4.8+/-0.8 dB, respectively, compared with the single-pass shot-noise limit. If the accuracy is limited by the number of detected probe particles, our measurements show a variance reduction of 25.9+/-0.9 dB. The contrast enhancement capabilities in imaging and in diffraction studies are demonstrated with nanostructured samples and with embryonic kidney 293T cells. This approach to Heisenberg-limited microscopy does not rely on quantum state engineering.

  20. Image Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajapaksa, Indrajith

    In this thesis we describe an enhancement to the Atomic force microscope (AFM) to simultaneously gather topographic features and spectroscopic information .Compared to the current state of the art of near-field excitation and far-field detection AFM imaging techniques our system uses a radical new approach near-field excitation and near-field detection. By placing the detector in the near-field we achieve high signal to noise and single molecular resolution. The origin of our near-field detector signal is the image force gradient due to the interaction of the stimulated molecular dipole with its image on the metal probe. We designed and built an optical and electronic system to capture this signal and simultaneously image nano-scale surface topography and optical image force gradient. By varying the wavelength of the excitation beam we measure the induced optical image force gradient spectra of molecules on surface. These spectra show good agreement with the absorption spectra of the bulk molecules measured by conventional absorption spectroscopy. We show that image force gradient is directly proportional to the optical absorption dipole strength. Using Finite Element 3D electromagnetic simulations and using Lorentz model for the excited molecular dipole we showed that the image force gradient has a decay length of 1nm, making the theoretical resolution of this microscopy technique approximately 1 nm. This rapid decay was measured experimentally .This resolution was seen by the high contrasting spectroscopic images of molecules on the surface. In follow on experiments this technique was extended to provide surface Raman spectroscopy and microscopy at molecular resolution. We create an image force gradient interaction through optical parametric down conversion between stimulated Raman excited molecules on a surface and a cantilevered nanometer scale probe brought very close to it. Spectroscopy and microscopy on clusters of molecules have been performed. Single

  1. Applications of subsurface microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tetard, Laurene; Passian, Ali; Farahi, Rubye H; Voy, Brynn H; Thundat, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Exploring the interior of a cell is of tremendous importance in order to assess the effects of nanomaterials on biological systems. Outside of a controlled laboratory environment, nanomaterials will most likely not be conveniently labeled or tagged so that their translocation within a biological system cannot be easily identified and quantified. Ideally, the characterization of nanomaterials within a cell requires a nondestructive, label-free, and subsurface approach. Subsurface nanoscale imaging represents a real challenge for instrumentation. Indeed the tools available for high resolution characterization, including optical, electron or scanning probe microscopies, mainly provide topography images or require taggants that fluoresce. Although the intercellular environment holds a great deal of information, subsurface visualization remains a poorly explored area. Recently, it was discovered that by mechanically perturbing a sample, it was possible to observe its response in time with nanoscale resolution by probing the surface with a micro-resonator such as a microcantilever probe. Microcantilevers are used as the force-sensing probes in atomic force microscopy (AFM), where the nanometer-scale probe tip on the microcantilever interacts with the sample in a highly controlled manner to produce high-resolution raster-scanned information of the sample surface. Taking advantage of the existing capabilities of AFM, we present a novel technique, mode synthesizing atomic force microscopy (MSAFM), which has the ability to probe subsurface structures such as non-labeled nanoparticles embedded in a cell. In MSAFM mechanical actuators (PZTs) excite the probe and the sample at different frequencies as depicted in the first figure of this chapter. The nonlinear nature of the tip-sample interaction, at the point of contact of the probe and the surface of the sample, in the contact mode AFM configuration permits the mixing of the elastic waves. The new dynamic system comprises new

  2. Characterization of Polymer Blends: Optical Microscopy (*Polarized, Interference and Phase Contrast Microscopy*) and Confocal Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanathan, Nathan Muruganathan; Darling, Seth B.

    2015-01-01

    Chapter 15 surveys the characterization of macro, micro and meso morphologies of polymer blends by optical microscopy. Confocal Microscopy offers the ability to view the three dimensional morphology of polymer blends, popular in characterization of biological systems. Confocal microscopy uses point illumination and a spatial pinhole to eliminate out-of focus light in samples that are thicker than the focal plane.

  3. Snapshot Hyperspectral Volumetric Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jiamin; Xiong, Bo; Lin, Xing; He, Jijun; Suo, Jinli; Dai, Qionghai

    2016-01-01

    The comprehensive analysis of biological specimens brings about the demand for capturing the spatial, temporal and spectral dimensions of visual information together. However, such high-dimensional video acquisition faces major challenges in developing large data throughput and effective multiplexing techniques. Here, we report the snapshot hyperspectral volumetric microscopy that computationally reconstructs hyperspectral profiles for high-resolution volumes of ~1000 μm × 1000 μm × 500 μm at video rate by a novel four-dimensional (4D) deconvolution algorithm. We validated the proposed approach with both numerical simulations for quantitative evaluation and various real experimental results on the prototype system. Different applications such as biological component analysis in bright field and spectral unmixing of multiple fluorescence are demonstrated. The experiments on moving fluorescent beads and GFP labelled drosophila larvae indicate the great potential of our method for observing multiple fluorescent markers in dynamic specimens. PMID:27103155

  4. Snapshot Hyperspectral Volumetric Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiamin; Xiong, Bo; Lin, Xing; He, Jijun; Suo, Jinli; Dai, Qionghai

    2016-04-01

    The comprehensive analysis of biological specimens brings about the demand for capturing the spatial, temporal and spectral dimensions of visual information together. However, such high-dimensional video acquisition faces major challenges in developing large data throughput and effective multiplexing techniques. Here, we report the snapshot hyperspectral volumetric microscopy that computationally reconstructs hyperspectral profiles for high-resolution volumes of ~1000 μm × 1000 μm × 500 μm at video rate by a novel four-dimensional (4D) deconvolution algorithm. We validated the proposed approach with both numerical simulations for quantitative evaluation and various real experimental results on the prototype system. Different applications such as biological component analysis in bright field and spectral unmixing of multiple fluorescence are demonstrated. The experiments on moving fluorescent beads and GFP labelled drosophila larvae indicate the great potential of our method for observing multiple fluorescent markers in dynamic specimens.

  5. Microscopy of photoionisation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aseyev, S. A.; Mironov, B. N.; Minogin, V. G.; Cherkun, Aleksandr P.; Chekalin, Sergei V.

    2013-04-01

    A method is demonstrated which combines the ionisation of free molecules by a sharply focused femtosecond laser beam and projection microscopy in a divergent electric field. The electric field is produced in vacuum between a metallic tip and a flat positionsensitive charged particle detector. The method enables investigation of photoionisation processes in low-density gases with a subdiffraction spatial resolution and can be used as well in profile measurements for sharply focused, intense laser beams. In a demonstration experiment, a femtosecond laser beam with a peak intensity of ~1014 W cm-2 was focused to a 40-μm-diameter waist in vacuum near a millimetre-size tip and ~2-μm spatial resolution was achieved. According to our estimates, the use of a sharper tip will ensure a submicron spatial resolution, which is a crucial condition for the spatial diagnostics of sharply focused short-wavelength VUV radiation and X-rays.

  6. Waveguide optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, Alexandre A.

    1997-08-01

    The theoretical aspects of the light scattering on the statistical irregularities of the planar optical waveguide are described. The analysis of direct and inverse light scattering problems is accomplished. The theoretical investigation predicts: the lateral resolution can attain approximately 20 nm and the vertical resolution (in rms height) can attain approximately 1 angstrom. The limiting lateral resolution is a approximately 15-times less than Abbe's diffraction limit. Thus the superresolution may be accomplished by the waveguide optical microscopy (WOM). The increasing of WOM's resolution depends on a-priori information of the irregularities and on a sufficiently high signal-to-noise ratio. A possible using of WOM for bioecological researchers has been mentioned.

  7. Hyperspectral light sheet microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahr, Wiebke; Schmid, Benjamin; Schmied, Christopher; Fahrbach, Florian O.; Huisken, Jan

    2015-09-01

    To study the development and interactions of cells and tissues, multiple fluorescent markers need to be imaged efficiently in a single living organism. Instead of acquiring individual colours sequentially with filters, we created a platform based on line-scanning light sheet microscopy to record the entire spectrum for each pixel in a three-dimensional volume. We evaluated data sets with varying spectral sampling and determined the optimal channel width to be around 5 nm. With the help of these data sets, we show that our setup outperforms filter-based approaches with regard to image quality and discrimination of fluorophores. By spectral unmixing we resolved overlapping fluorophores with up to nanometre resolution and removed autofluorescence in zebrafish and fruit fly embryos.

  8. Photon scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Goudonnet, J.P.; Salomon, L.; De Fornel, F.; Chabrier, G. . Lab. de Physique du Solide); Warmack, R.J.; Ferrell, T.L. )

    1990-01-01

    The Photon Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (PSTM) is the photon analogue of the electron Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM). It uses the evanescent field due to the total internal reflection of a light beam in a Total Internal Reflection (TIR) prism. The sample, mounted on the base of the prism, modulates the evanescent field. A sharpened optical fiber probes this field, and the collected light is processed to generate an image of the topography and the chemical composition of the surface. We give, in this paper, a description of the microscope and discuss the influence of several parameters such as -- polarization of light, angle of incidence, shape of the end of the fiber -- on the resolution. Images of various samples -- glass samples, teflon spheres -- are presented. 8 refs., 7 figs.

  9. Sensitivity of photoacoustic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Building on its high spatial resolution, deep penetration depth and excellent image contrast, 3D photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) has grown tremendously since its first publication in 2005. Integrating optical excitation and acoustic detection, PAM has broken through both the optical diffusion and optical diffraction limits. PAM has 100% relative sensitivity to optical absorption (i.e., a given percentage change in the optical absorption coefficient yields the same percentage change in the photoacoustic amplitude), and its ultimate detection sensitivity is limited only by thermal noise. Focusing on the engineering aspects of PAM, this Review discusses the detection sensitivity of PAM, compares the detection efficiency of different PAM designs, and summarizes the imaging performance of various endogenous and exogenous contrast agents. It then describes representative PAM applications with high detection sensitivity, and outlines paths to further improvement. PMID:25302158

  10. [Confocal laser scanning microscopy].

    PubMed

    Ulrich, M

    2015-07-01

    Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) allows the in vivo evaluation of melanocytic and nonmelanocytic skin tumours with high sensitivity and specificity. RCM represents an optical imaging technique, which enables us to examine the skin at high resolution. Today, RCM represents not only an interesting tool for dermatologic research but has also been introduced as a diagnostic tool in every day clinical practice. As such, RCM is applied for improvement of skin cancer diagnosis adjunct to clinical and dermatoscopic examination. In combination with dermatoscopy RCM has shown an increased specificity with similar sensitivity. In this regard RCM helps to decrease the rate of unnecessary biopsies of benign lesions. Despite its use in dermatooncology RCM may also be used for diagnosis and monitoring of inflammatory diseases. Future developments include technical improvements, teledermatology solutions and the application of ex vivo RCM in Moh's micrographic surgery.

  11. Interference reflection microscopy.

    PubMed

    Barr, Valarie A; Bunnell, Stephen C

    2009-12-01

    Interference reflection microscopy (IRM) is an optical technique used to study cell adhesion or cell mobility on a glass coverslip. The interference of reflected light waves generates images with high contrast and definition. IRM can be used to examine almost any cell that will rest upon a glass surface, although it is most useful in examining sites of close contact between a cell and substratum. This unit presents methods for obtaining IRM images of cells with particular emphasis on IRM imaging with a laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM), as most LSCM are already capable of recording these images without any modification of the instrument. Techniques are presented for imaging fixed and live cells, as well as simultaneous multi-channel capture of fluorescence and reflection images. Copyright 2009 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  12. GHRSST-14 DAS-TAG Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Edward; Piolle, Jean Francois

    2013-01-01

    The DAS-TAG provides the informatics and data management expertise in emerging information technologies for the GHRSST community. It provides expertise in data and metadata formats and standards, fosters improvements for GHRSST data curation, experiments with new data processing paradigms, and evaluates services and tools for data usage. It provides a forum for producer and distributor data management issues and coordination.

  13. Physik gestern und heute Das Eiskalorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heering, P.

    2003-07-01

    Kalorimetrische Messungen gehören heute zum experimentellen Standardrepertoire im Bereich der Thermodynamik und der physikalischen Chemie. Das erste Gerät für derartige Messungen entwickelten Ende des 18. Jahrhunderts die französischen Wissenschaftler Antoine Laurent Lavoisier und Pierre Simon de Laplace.

  14. GHRSST-14 DAS-TAG Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Edward; Piolle, Jean Francois

    2013-01-01

    The DAS-TAG provides the informatics and data management expertise in emerging information technologies for the GHRSST community. It provides expertise in data and metadata formats and standards, fosters improvements for GHRSST data curation, experiments with new data processing paradigms, and evaluates services and tools for data usage. It provides a forum for producer and distributor data management issues and coordination.

  15. Extraterrestrial optical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Soffen, G A

    1969-07-01

    An examination of the literature concerned with the use of microscopy for planetary investigation reveals a serious deficiency of current efforts. Many scientists have recommended the use of a microscope for planetary investigation [Biology and the Exploration of Mars, C. S. Pittendrigh, W. Vishniac, and J. P. T. Pearman, Eds. (National Academy of Science-National Research Council, Washington, D. C., 1966), (a) D. Mazia, p. 31; (b) J. Lederberg, p. 137; (c) S. Fox, pp. 219, 226; (d) D. Glaser, p. 326; (e) D. Glaser, J. McCarthy, and M. Minsky, pp. 333, 341; (f) D. G. Rea, pp. 347-426; (g) P. G. Conger, pp. 409-414; (h) M. H. Fernandez, pp. 414-425; (i) D. Schwartz, pp.425-426 . H. P. Klein, Some Biological Problems in the Search for Extraterrestrial Life (American Astronautical Society, Washington, D. C., 1968).] but few are involved in developing the experiment. Since this is a particularly timely period for the preparation of planetary lander experiments, the reasons for this lack of effort would appear to be limited resources or an unclear course of action, rather than lack of interest. Microscopy used for planetary investigation is chiefly the interest of the biologist and the mineralogist. In both cases the desire to use magnifying optics in order to observe objects of submillimeter size is based upon the rich body of knowledge we have acquired from observing the terrestrial microcosm. In addition to purely imaging, certain special optical techniques, e.g., polarimetry, colorimetry, phase contrast, etc., can be used to enhance the interpretation of microscopic imaging data. This interaction of the optical with the chemical or structural aspects of nature can be used to great advantage in the exploration of extraterrestrial biology and mineralogy.

  16. Ultrasonic Force Microscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolosov, Oleg; Briggs, Andrew

    Ultrasonic Force Microscopy, or UFM, allows combination of two apparently mutually exclusive requirements for the nanomechanical probe—high stiffness for the efficient indentation and high mechanical compliance that brings force sensitivity. Somewhat inventively, UFM allows to combine these two virtues in the same cantilever by using indention of the sample at high frequency, when cantilever is very rigid, but detecting the result of this indention at much lower frequency. That is made possible due to the extreme nonlinearity of the nanoscale tip-surface junction force-distance dependence, that acts as "mechanical diode" detecting ultrasound in AFM. After introducing UFM principles, we discuss features of experimental UFM implementation, and the theory of contrast in this mode, progressing to quantitative measurements of contact stiffness. A variety of UFM applications ranging from semiconductor quantum nanostructures, graphene, very large scale integrated circuits, and reinforced ceramics to polymer composites and biological materials is presented via comprehensive imaging gallery accompanied by the guidance for the optimal UFM measurements of these materials. We also address effects of adhesion and topography on the elasticity imaging and the approaches for reducing artifacts connected with these effects. This is complemented by another extremely useful feature of UFM—ultrasound induced superlubricity that allows damage free imaging of materials ranging from stiff solid state devices and graphene to biological materials. Finally, we proceed to the exploration of time-resolved nanoscale phenomena using nonlinear mixing of multiple vibration frequencies in ultrasonic AFM—Heterodyne Force Microscopy, or HFM, that also include mixing of ultrasonic vibration with other periodic physical excitations, eg. electrical, photothermal, etc. Significant section of the chapter analyzes the ability of UFM and HFM to detect subsurface mechanical inhomogeneities, as well as

  17. Progress in the Correlative Atomic Force Microscopy and Optical Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lulu; Cai, Mingjun; Tong, Ti; Wang, Hongda

    2017-04-24

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has evolved from the originally morphological imaging technique to a powerful and multifunctional technique for manipulating and detecting the interactions between molecules at nanometer resolution. However, AFM cannot provide the precise information of synchronized molecular groups and has many shortcomings in the aspects of determining the mechanism of the interactions and the elaborate structure due to the limitations of the technology, itself, such as non-specificity and low imaging speed. To overcome the technical limitations, it is necessary to combine AFM with other complementary techniques, such as fluorescence microscopy. The combination of several complementary techniques in one instrument has increasingly become a vital approach to investigate the details of the interactions among molecules and molecular dynamics. In this review, we reported the principles of AFM and optical microscopy, such as confocal microscopy and single-molecule localization microscopy, and focused on the development and use of correlative AFM and optical microscopy.

  18. Progress in the Correlative Atomic Force Microscopy and Optical Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lulu; Cai, Mingjun; Tong, Ti; Wang, Hongda

    2017-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has evolved from the originally morphological imaging technique to a powerful and multifunctional technique for manipulating and detecting the interactions between molecules at nanometer resolution. However, AFM cannot provide the precise information of synchronized molecular groups and has many shortcomings in the aspects of determining the mechanism of the interactions and the elaborate structure due to the limitations of the technology, itself, such as non-specificity and low imaging speed. To overcome the technical limitations, it is necessary to combine AFM with other complementary techniques, such as fluorescence microscopy. The combination of several complementary techniques in one instrument has increasingly become a vital approach to investigate the details of the interactions among molecules and molecular dynamics. In this review, we reported the principles of AFM and optical microscopy, such as confocal microscopy and single-molecule localization microscopy, and focused on the development and use of correlative AFM and optical microscopy. PMID:28441775

  19. Virtual microscopy in pathology education.

    PubMed

    Dee, Fred R

    2009-08-01

    Technology for acquisition of virtual slides was developed in 1985; however, it was not until the late 1990s that desktop computers had enough processing speed to commercialize virtual microscopy and apply the technology to education. By 2000, the progressive decrease in use of traditional microscopy in medical student education had set the stage for the entry of virtual microscopy into medical schools. Since that time, it has been successfully implemented into many pathology courses in the United States and around the world, with surveys indicating that about 50% of pathology courses already have or expect to implement virtual microscopy. Over the last decade, in addition to an increasing ability to emulate traditional microscopy, virtual microscopy has allowed educators to take advantage of the accessibility, efficiency, and pedagogic versatility of the computer and the Internet. The cost of virtual microscopy in education is now quite reasonable after taking into account replacement cost for microscopes, maintenance of glass slides, and the fact that 1-dimensional microscope space can be converted to multiuse computer laboratories or research. Although the current technology for implementation of virtual microscopy in histopathology education is very good, it could be further improved upon by better low-power screen resolution and depth of field. Nevertheless, virtual microscopy is beginning to play an increasing role in continuing education, house staff education, and evaluation of competency in histopathology. As Z-axis viewing (focusing) becomes more efficient, virtual microscopy will also become integrated into education in cytology, hematology, microbiology, and urinalysis.

  20. Sample preparation for STED microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wurm, Christian A; Neumann, Daniel; Schmidt, Roman; Egner, Alexander; Jakobs, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Since the discovery of the diffraction barrier in the late nineteenth century, it has been commonly accepted that with far-field optical microscopy it is not possible to resolve structural details considerably finer than half the wavelength of light. The emergence of STED microscopy showed that, at least for fluorescence imaging, these limits can be overcome. Since STED microscopy is a far-field technique, in principle, the same sample preparation as for conventional confocal microscopy may be utilized. The increased resolution, however, requires additional precautions to ensure the structural preservation of the specimen. We present robust protocols to generate test samples for STED microscopy. These protocols for bead samples and immunolabeled mammalian cells may be used as starting points to adapt existing labeling strategies for the requirements of sub-diffraction resolution microscopy.

  1. In vivo microscopy.

    PubMed

    Peti-Peterdi, János

    2016-04-01

    This article summarizes the past, present, and future promise of multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy for intravital kidney imaging. During the past 15years, several high-power visual research approaches have been developed using multiphoton imaging to study the normal functions of the healthy, intact, living kidney, and the various molecular and cellular mechanisms of the development of kidney diseases. In this review, the main focus will be on intravital multiphoton imaging of the glomerulus, the structure and function of the glomerular filtration barrier, especially the podocyte. Examples will be given for the combination of two powerful research tools, in vivo multiphoton imaging and mouse genetics using commercially available whole animal models for the detailed characterization of glomerular cell types, their function and fate, and for the better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of glomerular pathologies. One of the new modalities of multiphoton imaging, serial imaging of the same glomerulus in the same animal over several days will be emphasized for its potential for further advancing the field of nephrology research.

  2. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Shimon; Chemla, Daniel S.; Ogletree, D. Frank; Botkin, David

    1995-01-01

    An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample.

  3. Microscopy of semiconducting materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennycook, S. J.

    1991-04-01

    The purpose of the trip was to present an invited talk at the 7th Oxford Conference on Microscopy of Semiconducting Materials entitled, High-Resolution Z-Contrast Imaging of Heterostructures and Superlattices, (Oxford, United Kingdom) and to visit VG Microscopes, East Grinstead, for discussions on the progress of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) 300-kV high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM), which is currently on order. The traveler also visited three other institutions with 100-kV STEMs that either have or intend to purchase the necessary modifications to provide Z-contrast capability similar to that of the existing ORNL machine. Specifically, Max-Planck Institut fuer Metallforschung (Stuttgart, Germany); Cambridge University, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy (Cambridge, United Kingdom); and Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge University (Cambridge, United Kingdom) were visited. In addition, discussions were held with C. Humphreys on the possibility of obtaining joint funding for collaborative research involving electron beam writing and Z-contrast imaging in the Cambridge and Oak Ridge STEMs, respectively.

  4. Nuclear microscopy: biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, Frank; Landsberg, Judith P.

    1993-05-01

    Recent developments in high energy ion beam techniques and technology have enabled the scanning proton microprobe (SPM) to make advances in biomedical research. In particular the combination of proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) to measure the elemental concentrations of inorganic elements, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) to characterise the organic matrix, and scanning transmission ion microscopy (STIM) to provide information on the density and structure of the sample, represents a powerful set of techniques which can be applied simultaneously to the specimen under investigation. This paper reviews briefly the biomedical work using the proton microprobe that has been carried out since the 2nd Int. Conf. on Nuclear Microprobe Technology and Applications held in Melbourne, 1990. Three recent and diverse examples of medical research are also presented from work carried out using the Oxford SPM. The first is a preliminary experiment carried out using human hair as a monitor for potential toxicity, using PIXE elemental mapping across the hair cross section to differentiate between elements contained within the hair and contamination from external sources. The second example is in the use of STIM to map individual cells in freeze-dried tissue, showing the possibility of the in situ microanalysis of cells and their extracellular environment. The third is the use of PIXE, RBS and STIM to identify and analyse the elemental constituents of neuritic plaque cores in untreated freeze-dried Alzheimer's tissue. This work resolves a current controversy by revealing an absence of aluminium levels in plaque cores at the 15 ppm level.

  5. Mueller polarimetric microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laude-Boulesteix, Blandine; De Martino, Antonello; Le Naour, Gilles; Genestie, Catherine; Schwartz, Laurent; Garcia-Caurel, Enric; Drevillon, Bernard

    2004-07-01

    We present a multispectral polarimetric imaging system well suited for complete Mueller matrix microscopy. The source is a spectrally filtered halogen light bulb, and the image is formed on a fast CCD camera The light polarization is modulated before the sample and analyzed after the sample by using nematic liquid crystal modulators.. The whole Mueller matrix image of the sample is typically measured over 5 seconds for a good signal-to-noise ratio. The instrument design, together with an original and easy-to-operate calibration procedure provides a high polarimetric accuracy over wide ranges of wavelengths and magnifications. Mueller polarimetry provides separate images of scalar and vector retardation and dichroism of the sample, together with its depolarizing power, while all these effects do contribute simultaneously to the contrasts observed in standard polarized microsopy. Polarimetric images of several samples, namely an unstained rabbit cornea, a picrosirius red stained hepatic biopsy, and a rat artery specifically stained for collagen III are shown and discussed

  6. Microscopy of photoionisation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Aseyev, S A; Mironov, B N; Minogin, V G; Cherkun, Aleksandr P; Chekalin, Sergei V

    2013-04-30

    A method is demonstrated which combines the ionisation of free molecules by a sharply focused femtosecond laser beam and projection microscopy in a divergent electric field. The electric field is produced in vacuum between a metallic tip and a flat positionsensitive charged particle detector. The method enables investigation of photoionisation processes in low-density gases with a subdiffraction spatial resolution and can be used as well in profile measurements for sharply focused, intense laser beams. In a demonstration experiment, a femtosecond laser beam with a peak intensity of {approx}10{sup 14} W cm{sup -2} was focused to a 40-{mu}m-diameter waist in vacuum near a millimetre-size tip and {approx}2-{mu}m spatial resolution was achieved. According to our estimates, the use of a sharper tip will ensure a submicron spatial resolution, which is a crucial condition for the spatial diagnostics of sharply focused short-wavelength VUV radiation and X-rays. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  7. Ultrafast scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Botkin, D.A. |

    1995-09-01

    I have developed an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope (USTM) based on uniting stroboscopic methods of ultrafast optics and scanned probe microscopy to obtain nanometer spatial resolution and sub-picosecond temporal resolution. USTM increases the achievable time resolution of a STM by more than 6 orders of magnitude; this should enable exploration of mesoscopic and nanometer size systems on time scales corresponding to the period or decay of fundamental excitations. USTM consists of a photoconductive switch with subpicosecond response time in series with the tip of a STM. An optical pulse from a modelocked laser activates the switch to create a gate for the tunneling current, while a second laser pulse on the sample initiates a dynamic process which affects the tunneling current. By sending a large sequence of identical pulse pairs and measuring the average tunnel current as a function of the relative time delay between the pulses in each pair, one can map the time evolution of the surface process. USTM was used to measure the broadband response of the STM`s atomic size tunnel barrier in frequencies from tens to hundreds of GHz. The USTM signal amplitude decays linearly with the tunnel junction conductance, so the spatial resolution of the time-resolved signal is comparable to that of a conventional STM. Geometrical capacitance of the junction does not appear to play an important role in the measurement, but a capacitive effect intimately related to tunneling contributes to the measured signals and may limit the ultimate resolution of the USTM.

  8. Photon scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Reddick, R.C.; Warmack, R.J.; Chilcott, D.W.; Sharp, S.L.; Ferrell, T.L. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN )

    1990-12-01

    An optical tunneling microscope is presented that operates in exactly the same way as the electron scanning tunneling microscope (ESTM). It takes advantage of evanescent fields generated by the total internal reflection (TIR) of light at the interface between materials of different optical densities. The photon scanning tunneling microscope (PSTM) employs an optically conducting probe tip to map spatial variations in the evanescent and scattered field intensity distributions adjacent to a sample surface, which forms or is placed on the TIR surface. These variations are due to the local topography, morphology, and optical activity of the surface and form the basis of imaging. Evanescent field theory is discussed and the evanescent field intensity as a function of surface-probe separation is calculated using several probe tip models. After a description of PSTM construction and operation, evanescent field intensity measurements are shown to agree with the model calculations. PSTM images of various sample surfaces demonstrate subwavelength resolution exceeding that of conventional optical microscopy, especially in the vertical dimension. Limitations and interpretation of PSTM images are discussed as well as the PSTMs applicability to other forms of surface analysis.

  9. Intrinsic Friction Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knorr, Daniel; Overney, Rene

    2008-03-01

    A novel scanning probe methodology based on lateral force microscopy is presented wherein kinetic friction measurements, obtained as a function of velocity for various temperatures, are used to deduce apparent Arrhenius-type activation energies for surface and subsurface molecular mobilities. Depending on the coupling strength (cooperativity) between molecular mobilities involved the dissipation energy can carry a significant entropic energy contribution, accounting for the majority of the apparent Arrhenius activation energy. The intrinsic friction methodology also provides a means of directly separating enthalpic energy contributions from entropic ones by employing absolute rate theory. As such, the degree of cooperativity in the system is readily apparent. This methodology is illustrated with nanoscale tribological experiments on two systems, (1) monodisperse, atactic polystyrene and (2) self assembling molecular glassy chromophores. In polystyrene, dissipation was found to be a discrete function of loading, where the γ-relaxation (phenyl group rotation) was recovered for ultra low loads and the β-relaxation (local backbone translation) for higher loads in the same temperature range, indicating sensitivity to surface and subsurface mobilities. For self assembling glassy chromophores, the degree of intermolecular cooperativity was deduced using the methodology, resulting in an increased understanding of the interactions between self assembling molecules.

  10. Grueneisen Relaxation Photoacoustic Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lidai; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-10-01

    The temperature-dependent property of the Grueneisen parameter has been employed in photoacoustic imaging mainly to measure tissue temperature. Here we explore this property using a different approach and develop Grueneisen relaxation photoacoustic microscopy (GR-PAM), a technique that images nonradiative absorption with confocal optical resolution. GR-PAM sequentially delivers two identical laser pulses with a microsecond-scale time delay. The first laser pulse generates a photoacoustic signal and thermally tags the in-focus absorbers. When the second laser pulse excites the tagged absorbers within the thermal relaxation time, a photoacoustic signal stronger than the first one is produced, owing to the temperature dependence of the Grueneisen parameter. GR-PAM detects the amplitude difference between the two colocated photoacoustic signals, confocally imaging the nonradiative absorption. We greatly improved axial resolution from 45 μm to 2.3 μm and, at the same time, slightly improved lateral resolution from 0.63 μm to 0.41 μm. In addition, the optical sectioning capability facilitates the measurement of the absolute absorption coefficient without fluence calibration.

  11. NMR imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-10-01

    In the past several years, proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging has become an established technique in diagnostic medicine and biomedical research. Although much of the work in this field has been directed toward development of whole-body imagers, James Aguayo, Stephen Blackband, and Joseph Schoeninger of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine working with Markus Hintermann and Mark Mattingly of Bruker Medical Instruments, recently developed a small-bore NMR microscope with sufficient resolution to image a single African clawed toad cell (Nature 1986, 322, 190-91). This improved resolution should lead to increased use of NMR imaging for chemical, as well as biological or physiological, applications. The future of NMR microscopy, like that of many other newly emerging techniques, is ripe with possibilities. Because of its high cost, however, it is likely to remain primarily a research tool for some time. ''It's like having a camera,'' says Smith. ''You've got a way to look at things at very fine levels, and people are going to find lots of uses for it. But it is a very expensive technique - it costs $100,000 to add imaging capability once you have a high-resolution NMR, which itself is at least a $300,000 instrument. If it can answer even a few questions that can't be answered any other way, though, it may be well worth the cost.''

  12. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, S.; Chemla, D.S.; Ogletree, D.F.; Botkin, D.

    1995-05-16

    An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method is described for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample. 6 Figs.

  13. Moisture Forecast Bias Correction in GEOS DAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dee, D.

    1999-01-01

    Data assimilation methods rely on numerous assumptions about the errors involved in measuring and forecasting atmospheric fields. One of the more disturbing of these is that short-term model forecasts are assumed to be unbiased. In case of atmospheric moisture, for example, observational evidence shows that the systematic component of errors in forecasts and analyses is often of the same order of magnitude as the random component. we have implemented a sequential algorithm for estimating forecast moisture bias from rawinsonde data in the Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System (GEOS DAS). The algorithm is designed to remove the systematic component of analysis errors and can be easily incorporated in an existing statistical data assimilation system. We will present results of initial experiments that show a significant reduction of bias in the GEOS DAS moisture analyses.

  14. Epi-Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Donna J.; Brown, Claire M.

    2012-01-01

    Epi-fluorescence microscopy is available in most life sciences research laboratories, and when optimized can be a central laboratory tool. In this chapter, the epi-fluorescence light path is introduced and the various components are discussed in detail. Recommendations are made for incident lamp light sources, excitation and emission filters, dichroic mirrors, objective lenses, and charge-coupled device (CCD) cameras in order to obtain the most sensitive epi-fluorescence microscope. The even illumination of metal-halide lamps combined with new “hard” coated filters and mirrors, a high resolution monochrome CCD camera, and a high NA objective lens are all recommended for high resolution and high sensitivity fluorescence imaging. Recommendations are also made for multicolor imaging with the use of monochrome cameras, motorized filter turrets, individual filter cubes, and corresponding dyes that are the best choice for sensitive, high resolution multicolor imaging. Images should be collected using Nyquist sampling and should be corrected for background intensity contributions and nonuniform illumination across the field of view. Photostable fluorescent probes and proteins that absorb a lot of light (i.e., high extinction co-efficients) and generate a lot of fluorescence signal (i.e., high quantum yields) are optimal. A neuronal immune-fluorescence labeling protocol is also presented. Finally, in order to maximize the utility of sensitive wide-field microscopes and generate the highest resolution images with high signal-to-noise, advice for combining wide-field epi-fluorescence imaging with restorative image deconvolution is presented. PMID:23026996

  15. Electronic Blending in Virtual Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maybury, Terrence S.; Farah, Camile S.

    2010-01-01

    Virtual microscopy (VM) is a relatively new technology that transforms the computer into a microscope. In essence, VM allows for the scanning and transfer of glass slides from light microscopy technology to the digital environment of the computer. This transition is also a function of the change from print knowledge to electronic knowledge, or as…

  16. Multi-contrast Photoacoustic Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Junjie

    Photoacoustic microscopy is a hybrid imaging modality with high spatial resolution, moderate imaging depth, excellent imaging contrast and functional imaging capability. Taking full advantage of this powerful weapon, we have investigated different anatomical, functional, flow dynamic and metabolic parameter measurements using photoacoustic microscopy. Specifically, Evans-blue dye was used to enhance photoacoustic microscopy of capillaries; label-free transverse and axial blood flow was measured based on bandwidth broadening and time shift of the photoacoustic signals; metabolic rate of oxygen was quantified in vivo from all the five parameters measured by photoacoustic microcopy; whole cross-sectional imaging of small intestine was achieved on a double-illumination photoacoustic microscopy with extended depth of focus and imaging depth; hemodynamic imaging was performed on a MEMS-mirror enhanced photoacoustic microscopy with a cross-sectional imaging rate of 400 Hz. As a maturing imaging technique, PAM is expected to find new applications in both fundamental life science and clinical practice.

  17. Studies in scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarid, Dror

    1995-06-01

    The following is a final report on our work in the field of Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM), which has been funded by the AFOSR under Contract #F49620-92-J-0164. The AFOSR funding was instrumental in the establishment of a multi-lab facility at the Optical Sciences Center, which performs research in SPM using two ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) STM facilities, and several Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) facilities. The fabrication and characterization work performed in the SPM Laboratory is supplemented by infrared (IR) spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), available in other departments on campus. The report covers the following areas: (1) GaAs and CdSe Structures, (2) Optical Interactions on a nm and nsec Scales, (3) Fullerenes on Gold, (4) Fullerenes on MoS2, (5) Fullerenes on Si, (6) SiC, (7) Nanotubes, (8) Scanning Force Microscopy, and (9) Biology.

  18. Spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM).

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuo; Millet, Larry; Mir, Mustafa; Ding, Huafeng; Unarunotai, Sakulsuk; Rogers, John; Gillette, Martha U; Popescu, Gabriel

    2011-01-17

    We present spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM) as a new optical microscopy technique, capable of measuring nanoscale structures and dynamics in live cells via interferometry. SLIM combines two classic ideas in light imaging: Zernike's phase contrast microscopy, which renders high contrast intensity images of transparent specimens, and Gabor's holography, where the phase information from the object is recorded. Thus, SLIM reveals the intrinsic contrast of cell structures and, in addition, renders quantitative optical path-length maps across the sample. The resulting topographic accuracy is comparable to that of atomic force microscopy, while the acquisition speed is 1,000 times higher. We illustrate the novel insight into cell dynamics via SLIM by experiments on primary cell cultures from the rat brain. SLIM is implemented as an add-on module to an existing phase contrast microscope, which may prove instrumental in impacting the light microscopy field at a large scale.

  19. Chip-scale microscopy imaging.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guoan

    2012-08-01

    Chip-scale microscopy imaging platforms are pivotal for improving the efficiency of modern biomedical and bioscience experiments. Their integration with other lab-on-a-chip techniques would allow rapid, reliable and high-throughput sample analysis for applications in diverse disciplines. In typical chip-scale microscopy imaging platforms, the light path can be generalized to the following steps: photons leave the light source, interact with the sample and finally are detected by the sensor. Based on the light path of these platforms, the current review aims to provide some insights on design strategies for chip-scale microscopy. Specifically, we analyze current chip-scale microscopy approaches from three aspects: illumination design, sample manipulation and substrate/imager modification. We also discuss some opportunities for future developments of chip-scale microscopy, such as time multiplexed structured illumination and hydrodynamic focusing for high throughput sample manipulation.

  20. Atomic force microscopy combined with optical microscopy for cells investigation.

    PubMed

    Cascione, Mariafrancesca; de Matteis, Valeria; Rinaldi, Rosaria; Leporatti, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    This review reports on the combined use of the atomic force microscopy (AFM) and several type of optical/fluorescence/laser scanning microscopy for investigating cells. It is shown that the hybrid systems of AFM with optical-derived microscopies enable to study in detail cell surface properties (such as topography), their mechanical properties (e.g., Young's modulus) mechanotransduction phenomena and allow to gain insight into biological-related pathways and mechanisms in the complex nanoworld of cells. Microsc. Res. Tech. 80:109-123, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Array confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, Shaun

    Confocal microscopes utilize point illumination and pinhole detection to reject out-of-focus light. Because of the point illumination and detection pinhole, confocal microscopes typically utilize point scanning for imaging, which limits the overall acquisition speed. Due to the excellent optical sectioning capabilities of confocal microscopes, they are excellent tools for the study of three-dimensional objects at the microscopic scale. Fluorescence confocal microscopy is especially useful in biomedical imaging due to its high sensitivity and specificity. However, all designs for confocal microscopes must balance tradeoffs between the numerical aperture (NA), field of view (FOV), acquisition speed, and cost during the design process. In this dissertation, two different designs for an array confocal microscope are proposed to significantly increase the acquisition speed of confocal microscopes. An array confocal microscope scans an array of beams in the object plane to parallelize the confocal microscope to significantly reduce the acquisition time. If N beams are used in the array confocal microscope, the acquisition time is reduced by a factor of N. The first design scans an array of miniature objectives over the object plane to overcome the trade-off between FOV and NA. The array of objectives is laterally translated and each objective scans a small portion of the total FOV. Therefore, the number of objectives used in the array limits the FOV, and the FOV is increased without sacrificing NA. The second design utilizes a single objective with a high NA, large FOV, and large working distance designed specifically for whole brain imaging. This array confocal microscope is designed to speed up the acquisition time required for whole brain imaging. Utilizing an objective with a large FOV and scanning using multiple beams in the array significantly reduces the time required to image large three-dimensional volumes. Both array confocal microscope designs use beam

  2. Microscopy techniques in flavivirus research.

    PubMed

    Chong, Mun Keat; Chua, Anthony Jin Shun; Tan, Terence Tze Tong; Tan, Suat Hoon; Ng, Mah Lee

    2014-04-01

    The Flavivirus genus is composed of many medically important viruses that cause high morbidity and mortality, which include Dengue and West Nile viruses. Various molecular and biochemical techniques have been developed in the endeavour to study flaviviruses. However, microscopy techniques still have irreplaceable roles in the identification of novel virus pathogens and characterization of morphological changes in virus-infected cells. Fluorescence microscopy contributes greatly in understanding the fundamental viral protein localizations and virus-host protein interactions during infection. Electron microscopy remains the gold standard for visualizing ultra-structural features of virus particles and infected cells. New imaging techniques and combinatory applications are continuously being developed to push the limit of resolution and extract more quantitative data. Currently, correlative live cell imaging and high resolution three-dimensional imaging have already been achieved through the tandem use of optical and electron microscopy in analyzing biological specimens. Microscopy techniques are also used to measure protein binding affinities and determine the mobility pattern of proteins in cells. This chapter will consolidate on the applications of various well-established microscopy techniques in flavivirus research, and discuss how recently developed microscopy techniques can potentially help advance our understanding in these membrane viruses.

  3. Fluorescence confocal microscopy for pathologists.

    PubMed

    Ragazzi, Moira; Piana, Simonetta; Longo, Caterina; Castagnetti, Fabio; Foroni, Monica; Ferrari, Guglielmo; Gardini, Giorgio; Pellacani, Giovanni

    2014-03-01

    Confocal microscopy is a non-invasive method of optical imaging that may provide microscopic images of untreated tissue that correspond almost perfectly to hematoxylin- and eosin-stained slides. Nowadays, following two confocal imaging systems are available: (1) reflectance confocal microscopy, based on the natural differences in refractive indices of subcellular structures within the tissues; (2) fluorescence confocal microscopy, based on the use of fluorochromes, such as acridine orange, to increase the contrast epithelium-stroma. In clinical practice to date, confocal microscopy has been used with the goal of obviating the need for excision biopsies, thereby reducing the need for pathological examination. The aim of our study was to test fluorescence confocal microscopy on different types of surgical specimens, specifically breast, lymph node, thyroid, and colon. The confocal images were correlated to the corresponding histological sections in order to provide a morphologic parallel and to highlight current limitations and possible applications of this technology for surgical pathology practice. As a result, neoplastic tissues were easily distinguishable from normal structures and reactive processes such as fibrosis; the use of fluorescence enhanced contrast and image quality in confocal microscopy without compromising final histologic evaluation. Finally, the fluorescence confocal microscopy images of the adipose tissue were as accurate as those of conventional histology and were devoid of the frozen-section-related artefacts that can compromise intraoperative evaluation. Despite some limitations mainly related to black/white images, which require training in imaging interpretation, this study confirms that fluorescence confocal microscopy may represent an alternative to frozen sections in the assessment of margin status in selected settings or when the conservation of the specimen is crucial. This is the first study to employ fluorescent confocal microscopy on

  4. Research With Scanning Tip Microscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-31

    08ro P noiwe bae?041Le Research With Scanning Tip Microscopy AFOSR-89-0498 V AUTHOS)i Professor Dror Sarid 7. PFOUImNG 00ANIZATION NAMEIS) AND...forces and (b) surfaces. UNCLASS UNCLASS UNCLASS UL FINAL REPORT TO THE AFOSR ൱-, to J4ti. r Aat io Research in Scanning Tip Microscopy Dror Sarid Dtst...microscopy have been used to investigate (a) forces and (b) surfaces. a. Forces 1. Dror Sarid , Douglas lams, Volker Weissenberger, and L. Stephen Bell

  5. Horizontal microscopy in square capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroz, Pavel E.

    1992-07-01

    Intracellular protoplasmic movements may, due to gravity, have a vertical component greater or different from the horizontal one. This makes horizontal microscopy indispensable in the search for the cellular sensor of gravity. The possibility of the latter being a cell organelle assigns special significance to high-resolution microscopy. A horizontal suction device for picking up a cell and its high-resolution horizontal microscopy in a rectangular capillary may be helpful for detection of gravity-related shifts of cellular organelles in vivo.

  6. Soil microstructure and electron microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, P.; Fryer, J. R.

    1988-01-01

    As part of the process of comparing Martian soils with terrestial soils, high resolution electron microscopy and associated techniques should be used to examine the finer soil particles, and various techniques of electron and optical microscopy should be used to examine the undisturbed structure of Martian soils. To examine the structure of fine grained portions of the soil, transmission electron microscopy may be required. A striking feature of many Martian soils is their red color. Although the present-day Martian climate appears to be cold, this color is reminiscent of terrestial tropical red clays. Their chemical contents are broadly similar.

  7. PoroTomo: DAS Vibroseis Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kurt Feigl

    2016-03-25

    The submitted data correspond to the monitored vibrations caused by a vibroseis seismically exciting the ground in the vertical direction and captured by the DAS horizontal and vertical arrays during the PoroTomo Experiment. The data also include a file with the acceleration record at the Vibroseis. Vibroseis Sweep Details: Sweep on location T84 Stage 4 (Mode P 60 s long record ) Time: 2016-03-25 14:01:15 (UTC) Location: 39.80476089N, -119.0027625W Elevation: 1272.0M (on ground surface at the site) Sweep length: 20 seconds Frequencies: 5 Hz to 20 Hz

  8. Das CARNOTsche Paradigma und seine erkenntnistheoretischen Implikationen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöpf, Hans-Georg

    Der vorliegende historisch-kritische Essay führt die Eigentümlichkeiten der klassischen phänomenologischen Thermodynamik auf das von CARNOT geschaffene Paradigma zurück und greift einige damit zusammenhängende Fragen auf.Translated AbstractCARNOT's Paradigm and its Epistemological ImplicationsThe present historic-critical essay traces the pecularities of classical phenomenological thermodynamics back to the paradigm, created by CARNOT, and takes up some questions to which this paradigm gives rise.

  9. Histochemistry of Centroorhynchus falconis (Das, 1950).

    PubMed

    Rengaraju, V; Das, E N

    1976-01-01

    With a view to augment the understanding of the animal mucosubstances in general and Acanthocephalan mucosubstances in particular, Acanthocephalan worms of (Centrorhynchus falconis, Das, 1950) were investigated histochemically by employing recent techniques. Variations in the intensity of histochemical reactions in different tissues revealed a heterogenous distribution of mucosubstances. The cuticle contained a mixture of periodate reactive neutral mucosubstances and sulfomucins, whereas the subcuticle contained only glycogen. Retractor muscles contained glycogen together with some acidic mucosubstances which exhibited alcianophilia only at high pH. Cement glands elaborated a mixture of glycogen and galactogen. Histochemical methods revealed two types of acanthors: Some contained only glycogen, whereas others contained glycogen and galactogen.

  10. PoroTomo Project - Subatask 6.2: Deploy and Operate DAS and DTS arrays - DAS Earthquake Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kurt Feigl

    2016-03-21

    The submitted data correspond to the vibration caused by a 3.4 M earthquake and captured by the DAS horizontal and vertical arrays during the PoroTomo Experiment. Earthquake information : M 4.3 - 23km ESE of Hawthorne, Nevada Time: 2016-03-21 07:37:10 (UTC) Location: 38.479°N 118.366°W Depth: 9.9 km Files for horizontal DAS array (each file is 30 s long and contain 8700 channels): PoroTomo_iDAS16043_160321073721.sgy PoroTomo_iDAS16043_160321073751.sgy Files for vertical DAS Array (each file is 30 s long and contain 380 channels): PoroTomo_iDAS025_160321073717.sgy PoroTomo_iDAS025_160321073747.sgy

  11. Correlative microscopy of detergent granules.

    PubMed

    van Dalen, G; Nootenboom, P; Heussen, P C M

    2011-03-01

    The microstructure of detergent products for textile cleaning determines to a large extent the physical properties of these products. Correlative microscopy was used to reveal the microstructure by reconciling images obtained by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray analysis, X-ray microtomography and Fourier transform infrared microscopy. These techniques were applied on the same location of a subsample of a spray-dried detergent base powder embedded in polyacrylate. In this way, the three-dimensional internal and external structure of detergent granules could be investigated from milli to nano scale with detailed spatial information about the components present. This will generate knowledge how to design optimal microstructures for laundry products to obtain product properties demanded by the market. This method is also very useful for other powder systems used in a large variety of industries (e.g. for pharmaceutical, food, ceramic and metal industries). © 2010 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2010 The Royal Microscopical Society.

  12. Studies in Scanning Probe Microscopy.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    refereed journals, as well as two books titled Scanning Force Microscopy, With Applications to Electric, Magnetic, and Atomic Forces published by Oxford University Press in 1991 and a revised edition in 1994.

  13. Fluorescence Microscopy of Single Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmermann, Jan; van Dorp, Arthur; Renn, Alois

    2004-01-01

    The investigation of photochemistry and photophysics of individual quantum systems is described with the help of a wide-field fluorescence microscopy approach. The fluorescence single molecules are observed in real time.

  14. En face coherence microscopy [Invited

    PubMed Central

    Thouvenin, Olivier; Grieve, Kate; Xiao, Peng; Apelian, Clement; Boccara, A. Claude

    2017-01-01

    En face coherence microscopy or flying spot or full field optical coherence tomography or microscopy (FF-OCT/FF-OCM) belongs to the OCT family because the sectioning ability is mostly linked to the source coherence length. In this article we will focus our attention on the advantages and the drawbacks of the following approaches: en face versus B scan tomography in terms of resolution, coherent versus incoherent illumination and influence of aberrations, and scanning versus full field imaging. We then show some examples to illustrate the diverse applications of en face coherent microscopy and show that endogenous or exogenous contrasts can add valuable information to the standard morphological image. To conclude we discuss a few domains that appear promising for future development of en face coherence microscopy. PMID:28270972

  15. Fluorescence Microscopy of Single Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmermann, Jan; van Dorp, Arthur; Renn, Alois

    2004-01-01

    The investigation of photochemistry and photophysics of individual quantum systems is described with the help of a wide-field fluorescence microscopy approach. The fluorescence single molecules are observed in real time.

  16. Vertically scanned laser sheet microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dong, Di; Arranz, Alicia; Zhu, Shouping; Yang, Yujie; Shi, Liangliang; Wang, Jun; Shen, Chen; Tian, Jie; Ripoll, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Laser sheet microscopy is a widely used imaging technique for imaging the three-dimensional distribution of a fluorescence signal in fixed tissue or small organisms. In laser sheet microscopy, the stripe artifacts caused by high absorption or high scattering structures are very common, greatly affecting image quality. To solve this problem, we report here a two-step procedure which consists of continuously acquiring laser sheet images while vertically displacing the sample, and then using the variational stationary noise remover (VSNR) method to further reduce the remaining stripes. Images from a cleared murine colon acquired with a vertical scan are compared with common stitching procedures demonstrating that vertically scanned light sheet microscopy greatly improves the performance of current light sheet microscopy approaches without the need for complex changes to the imaging setup and allows imaging of elongated samples, extending the field of view in the vertical direction.

  17. Computer microscopy in lymphoma diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozhenkova, A. V.; Tupitsin, N. N.; Frenkel, M. A.; Falaleeva, N. A.; Nikitaev, V. G.; Polyakov, E. V.

    2017-01-01

    The article describes the application of computer microscopy with multi-spectral camera for the comparative characteristics of normal lymphocytes and lymphoid cells in follicular lymphoma. Wavelet functions are used to quantify parameters of the cells nuclei images.

  18. Confocal microscopy in transmitted light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodt, Hans-Ulrich; Becker, Klaus

    2003-10-01

    We developed a confocal microscope for transmitted light to visualize fine details in phase objects like unstained biological specimens. The main difficulty of confocal microscopy in transmission is the alignment of illumination and detector pinholes. This alignment was achieved by using "electronic pinholes" on the detector side. As a first step, we were able to image cells in onion skin at greater depths and with higher resolution than by using conventional microscopy.

  19. Magnetic Force Microscopy in Liquids.

    PubMed

    Ares, Pablo; Jaafar, Miriam; Gil, Adriana; Gómez-Herrero, Julio; Asenjo, Agustina

    2015-09-01

    In this work, the use of magnetic force microscopy (MFM) to acquire images of magnetic nanostructures in liquid environments is presented. Optimization of the MFM signal acquisition in liquid media is performed and it is applied to characterize the magnetic signal of magnetite nanoparticles. The ability for detecting magnetic nanostructures along with the well-known capabilities of atomic force microscopy in liquids suggests potential applications in fields such as nanomedicine, nanobiotechnology, or nanocatalysis.

  20. In vivo correlation mapping microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, James; Alexandrov, Sergey; Owens, Peter; Subhash, Hrebesh; Leahy, Martin

    2016-04-01

    To facilitate regular assessment of the microcirculation in vivo, noninvasive imaging techniques such as nailfold capillaroscopy are required in clinics. Recently, a correlation mapping technique has been applied to optical coherence tomography (OCT), which extends the capabilities of OCT to microcirculation morphology imaging. This technique, known as correlation mapping optical coherence tomography, has been shown to extract parameters, such as capillary density and vessel diameter, and key clinical markers associated with early changes in microvascular diseases. However, OCT has limited spatial resolution in both the transverse and depth directions. Here, we extend this correlation mapping technique to other microscopy modalities, including confocal microscopy, and take advantage of the higher spatial resolution offered by these modalities. The technique is achieved as a processing step on microscopy images and does not require any modification to the microscope hardware. Results are presented which show that this correlation mapping microscopy technique can extend the capabilities of conventional microscopy to enable mapping of vascular networks in vivo with high spatial resolution in both the transverse and depth directions.

  1. Structured line illumination Raman microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Kozue; Palonpon, Almar F.; Smith, Nicholas I.; Chiu, Liang-da; Kasai, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Hitoshi; Kawata, Satoshi; Fujita, Katsumasa

    2015-01-01

    In the last couple of decades, the spatial resolution in optical microscopy has increased to unprecedented levels by exploiting the fluorescence properties of the probe. At about the same time, Raman imaging techniques have emerged as a way to image inherent chemical information in a sample without using fluorescent probes. However, in many applications, the achievable resolution is limited to about half the wavelength of excitation light. Here we report the use of structured illumination to increase the spatial resolution of label-free spontaneous Raman microscopy, generating highly detailed spatial contrast from the ensemble of molecular information in the sample. Using structured line illumination in slit-scanning Raman microscopy, we demonstrate a marked improvement in spatial resolution and show the applicability to a range of samples, including both biological and inorganic chemical component mapping. This technique is expected to contribute towards greater understanding of chemical component distributions in organic and inorganic materials. PMID:26626144

  2. Computational 'microscopy' of cellular membranes.

    PubMed

    Ingólfsson, Helgi I; Arnarez, Clément; Periole, Xavier; Marrink, Siewert J

    2016-01-15

    Computational 'microscopy' refers to the use of computational resources to simulate the dynamics of a molecular system. Tuned to cell membranes, this computational 'microscopy' technique is able to capture the interplay between lipids and proteins at a spatio-temporal resolution that is unmatched by other methods. Recent advances allow us to zoom out from individual atoms and molecules to supramolecular complexes and subcellular compartments that contain tens of millions of particles, and to capture the complexity of the crowded environment of real cell membranes. This Commentary gives an overview of the main concepts of computational 'microscopy' and describes the state-of-the-art methods used to model cell membrane processes. We illustrate the power of computational modelling approaches by providing a few in-depth examples of large-scale simulations that move up from molecular descriptions into the subcellular arena. We end with an outlook towards modelling a complete cell in silico.

  3. Instantaneous Spatial Light Interference Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ding, Huafeng; Popescu, Gabriel

    2010-01-18

    We present Instantaneous Spatial Light Interference Microscopy (iSLIM) as a new quantitative phase method that combines the benefits of white light illumination in Zernike's phase contrast microscopy and phase stability associated diffraction phase microscopy. iSLIM is implemented as an add-on module to a commercial phase contrast microscope, and enables new features to quantitative phase imaging: diminished speckle effects due to white light illumination, multimodal investigation potential due to overlaying with other modalities of the microscope (e.g. fluorescence, DIC, phase contrast), and spectroscopic potential due to the broad band light. We show proof of principle results by multicolor phase imaging of microsphere and red blood cells, and dynamic imaging of nanoscale cell membrane fluctuations.

  4. SPECTROSCOPY/MICROSCOPY: Nonlinear Raman microscopy eyes clinical application

    PubMed Central

    Yakovlev, V. V.

    2011-01-01

    Nonlinear Raman microscopy is an emerging technique in biomedical imaging. An inexpensive prototype system, based on coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), demonstrates value for real-time, minimally invasive chemical analysis of cells and tissues. It overcomes drawbacks of both Raman and CARS, and in doing so demonstrates potential for clinical application–including blood analysis and breast cancer detection. PMID:26435878

  5. Confocal microscopy and exfoliative cytology

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Shyam Prasad; Ramani, Pratibha; Nainani, Purshotam

    2013-01-01

    Context: Early detection of potentially malignant lesions and invasive squamous-cell carcinoma in the oral cavity could be greatly improved through techniques that permit visualization of subtle cellular changes indicative of the neoplastic transformation process. One such technique is confocal microscopy. Combining rapidity with reliability, an innovative idea has been put forward using confocal microscope in exfoliative cytology. Aims: The main objective of this study was to assess confocal microscopy for cytological diagnosis and the results were compared with that of the standard PAP stain. Settings and Design: Confocal microscope, acridine orange (AO) stain, PAP (Papanicolaou) stain. The study was designed to assess confocal microscopy for cytological diagnosis. In the process, smears of patients with (clinically diagnosed and/or suspected) oral squamous cell carcinoma as well as those of controls (normal people) were stained with acridine orange and observed under confocal microscope. The results were compared with those of the standard PAP method. Materials and Methods: Samples of buccal mucosa smears from normal patients and squamous cell carcinoma patients were made, fixed in 100% alcohol, followed by AO staining. The corresponding set of smears was stained with PAP stain using rapid PAP stain kit. The results obtained were compared with those obtained with AO confocal microscopy. Results: The study had shown nuclear changes (malignant cells) in the smears of squamous cell carcinoma patients as increased intensity of fluorescence of the nucleus, when observed under confocal microscope. Acridine orange confocal microscopy showed good amount of sensitivity and specificity (93%) in identifying malignant cells in exfoliative cytological smears. Conclusion: Confocal microscopy was found to have good sensitivity in the identification of cancer (malignant) cells in exfoliative cytology, at par with the PAP method. The rapidity of processing and screening a

  6. Confocal microscopy and exfoliative cytology.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Shyam Prasad; Ramani, Pratibha; Nainani, Purshotam

    2013-05-01

    Early detection of potentially malignant lesions and invasive squamous-cell carcinoma in the oral cavity could be greatly improved through techniques that permit visualization of subtle cellular changes indicative of the neoplastic transformation process. One such technique is confocal microscopy. Combining rapidity with reliability, an innovative idea has been put forward using confocal microscope in exfoliative cytology. The main objective of this study was to assess confocal microscopy for cytological diagnosis and the results were compared with that of the standard PAP stain. Confocal microscope, acridine orange (AO) stain, PAP (Papanicolaou) stain. The study was designed to assess confocal microscopy for cytological diagnosis. In the process, smears of patients with (clinically diagnosed and/or suspected) oral squamous cell carcinoma as well as those of controls (normal people) were stained with acridine orange and observed under confocal microscope. The results were compared with those of the standard PAP method. Samples of buccal mucosa smears from normal patients and squamous cell carcinoma patients were made, fixed in 100% alcohol, followed by AO staining. The corresponding set of smears was stained with PAP stain using rapid PAP stain kit. The results obtained were compared with those obtained with AO confocal microscopy. The study had shown nuclear changes (malignant cells) in the smears of squamous cell carcinoma patients as increased intensity of fluorescence of the nucleus, when observed under confocal microscope. Acridine orange confocal microscopy showed good amount of sensitivity and specificity (93%) in identifying malignant cells in exfoliative cytological smears. Confocal microscopy was found to have good sensitivity in the identification of cancer (malignant) cells in exfoliative cytology, at par with the PAP method. The rapidity of processing and screening a specimen resulted in saving of time. It added a certain amount of objectivity to the

  7. DHMI: dynamic holographic microscopy interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xuefei; Zheng, Yujie; Lee, Woei Ming

    2016-12-01

    Digital holographic microscopy (DHM) is a powerful in-vitro biological imaging tool. In this paper, we report a fully automated off-axis digital holographic microscopy system completed with a graphical user interface in the Matlab environment. The interface primarily includes Fourier domain processing, phase reconstruction, aberration compensation and autofocusing. A variety of imaging operations such as region of interest selection, de-noising mode (filtering and averaging), low frame rate imaging for immediate reconstruction and high frame rate imaging routine ( 27 fps) are implemented to facilitate ease of use.

  8. The future of electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Yimei; Durr, Hermann

    2015-04-01

    Seeing is believing. So goes the old adage and seen evidence is undoubtedly satisfying because it can be interpreted easily, though not always correctly. For centuries, humans have developed such instruments as telescopes that observe the heavens and microscopes that reveal bacteria and viruses. The 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to Eric Betzig, Stefan Hell, and William Moerner for their foundational work on superresolution fluorescence microscopy in which they overcame the Abbe diffraction limit for the resolving power of conventional light microscopes. (See Physics Today, December 2014, page 18.) That breakthrough enabled discoveries in biological research and testifies to the importance of modern microscopy.

  9. The future of electron microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Zhu, Yimei; Durr, Hermann

    2015-04-01

    Seeing is believing. So goes the old adage and seen evidence is undoubtedly satisfying because it can be interpreted easily, though not always correctly. For centuries, humans have developed such instruments as telescopes that observe the heavens and microscopes that reveal bacteria and viruses. The 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to Eric Betzig, Stefan Hell, and William Moerner for their foundational work on superresolution fluorescence microscopy in which they overcame the Abbe diffraction limit for the resolving power of conventional light microscopes. (See Physics Today, December 2014, page 18.) That breakthrough enabled discoveries in biological research and testifiesmore » to the importance of modern microscopy.« less

  10. Optical microscopy versus scanning electron microscopy in urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Marickar, Y M Fazil; Lekshmi, P R; Varma, Luxmi; Koshy, Peter

    2009-10-01

    Stone analysis is incompletely done in many clinical centers. Identification of the stone component is essential for deciding future prophylaxis. X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) still remains a distant dream for routine hospital work. It is in this context that optical microscopy is suggested as an alternate procedure. The objective of this article was to assess the utility of an optical microscope which gives magnification of up to 40x and gives clear picture of the surface of the stones. In order to authenticate the morphological analysis of urinary stones, SEM and elemental distribution analysis were performed. A total of 250 urinary stones of different compositions were collected from stone clinic, photographed, observed under an optical microscope, and optical photographs were taken at different angles. Twenty-five representative samples among these were gold sputtered to make them conductive and were fed into the SEM machine. Photographs of the samples were taken at different angles at magnifications up to 4,000. Elemental distribution analysis (EDAX) was done to confirm the composition. The observations of the two studies were compared. The different appearances of the stones under optical illuminated microscopy were mostly standardized appearances, namely bosselations of pure whewellite, spiculations of weddellite, bright yellow colored appearance of uric acid, and dirty white amorphous appearance of phosphates. SEM and EDAX gave clearer pictures and gave added confirmation of the stone composition. From the references thus obtained, it was possible to confirm the composition by studying the optical microscopic pictures. Higher magnification capacity of the SEM and the EDAX patterns are useful to give reference support for performing optical microscopy work. After standardization, routine analysis can be performed with optical microscopy. The advantage of the optical microscope is that, it

  11. "Das Konkrete ist das Abstrakte, an das man sich schließlich gewöhnt hat." (Laurent Schwartz) Über den Ablauf des mathematischen Verstehens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowsky, Martin

    Die im Titel genannte Aussage findet sich in den Lebenserinnerungen von Laurent Schwartz (1915-2002), einem der fruchtbarsten Mathematiker, Mitglied der Gruppe Bourbaki. Im Original lautet die Aussage: "un objet concret est un objet abstrait auquel on a fini par s'habituer." Schwartz erläutert sie am Beispiel des Integrals über {e^{-1/2{x^2}}} , das den Wert Wurzel aus 2π hat und in dem sich also die Zahlen e und π verknüpfen. Was Schwartz aber vor allem ausdrücken will, ist dies: Das mathematische Verständnisd geht langsam vor sich und es bedarf der Anstrengung. "Es ist eine Frage der Zeit und der Energie", sagt Schwartz, und gerade dies mache es so schwer, die höhere Mathematik unter das Volk zu bringen. Das Lernen und Lehren von Mathematik laufe eben mühevoll und langsam ab.

  12. Four-dimensional electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zewail, Ahmed H

    2010-04-09

    The discovery of the electron over a century ago and the realization of its dual character have given birth to one of the two most powerful imaging instruments: the electron microscope. The electron microscope's ability to resolve three-dimensional (3D) structures on the atomic scale is continuing to affect different fields, including materials science and biology. In this Review, we highlight recent developments and inventions made by introducing the fourth dimension of time in electron microscopy. Today, ultrafast electron microscopy (4D UEM) enables a resolution that is 10 orders of magnitude better than that of conventional microscopes, which are limited by the video-camera rate of recording. After presenting the central concept involved, that of single-electron stroboscopic imaging, we discuss prototypical applications, which include the visualization of complex structures when unfolding on different length and time scales. The developed UEM variant techniques are several, and here we illucidate convergent-beam and near-field imaging, as well as tomography and scanning-pulse microscopy. We conclude with current explorations in imaging of nanomaterials and biostructures and an outlook on possible future directions in space-time, 4D electron microscopy.

  13. Color-televised medical microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, M. A.; Peck, J. C.

    1968-01-01

    Color television microscopy used at laboratory range magnifications, reproduces a slide image with sufficient fidelity for medical laboratory and instructional use. The system is used for instant pathological reporting between operating room and remotely located pathologist viewing a biopsy through this medium.

  14. Recent Advances In Light Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Shinya

    1989-12-01

    The combination of the light microscope with modern electronic imaging, storage, and processing devices has brought about a virtual revolution in microscopy. Dynamic structures in living cells can now be visualized with a clarity, speed, and resolution never before achieved in differential interference. contrast OTC or Nomarsky), fluorescence, polarized light, dark field, and other modes of microscopy (Fig. 1); the gliding motion, and growth and shortening, of individual molecular filaments of microtubules and factin can be followed in real time, directly on the monitor screen, (Fig. 2); and the changing concentration, and distribution. of ions and specific protein molecules can be followed, moment by moment, in physiologically active cells.1,2 In polarized light and phase contrast microscopy, optical sections as thin as 0.1 um are now attainable (Fig. 3). These images can be viewed as through-focal stacks or stereo pairs, revealing 3-dimensional architecture of biological fine structure at very high. resolution (Fig. 4). The basic principles and methods of application of video microscopy are discussed in inoue,3 and recent developments have been summarized in a conference proceedings4 (see also ref. 5,6,7).

  15. Second harmonic microscopy of axonemes.

    PubMed

    Odin, Christophe; Heichette, Claire; Chretien, Denis; Le Grand, Yann

    2009-05-25

    We performed Second Harmonic Microscopy of axonemes obtained from sea urchin sperm. Using polarization analysis and a trade-off between signal and photodamage, we were able to determine, for the first time to our knowledge, the nonlinear susceptibility chizxx/chixzx = 1.1+/-0.2 and chizzz/chixzx = 4+/-0.5 of axonemes.

  16. Stochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy (STORM).

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianquan; Ma, Hongqiang; Liu, Yang

    2017-07-05

    Super-resolution (SR) fluorescence microscopy, a class of optical microscopy techniques at a spatial resolution below the diffraction limit, has revolutionized the way we study biology, as recognized by the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 2014. Stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM), a widely used SR technique, is based on the principle of single molecule localization. STORM routinely achieves a spatial resolution of 20 to 30 nm, a ten-fold improvement compared to conventional optical microscopy. Among all SR techniques, STORM offers a high spatial resolution with simple optical instrumentation and standard organic fluorescent dyes, but it is also prone to image artifacts and degraded image resolution due to improper sample preparation or imaging conditions. It requires careful optimization of all three aspects-sample preparation, image acquisition, and image reconstruction-to ensure a high-quality STORM image, which will be extensively discussed in this unit. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  17. Pedagogical Basis of DAS Formalism in Engineering Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiltunen, J.; Heikkinen, E.-P.; Jaako, J.; Ahola, J.

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents a new approach for a bachelor-level curriculum structure in engineering. The approach is called DAS formalism according to its three phases: description, analysis and synthesis. Although developed specifically for process and environmental engineering, DAS formalism has a generic nature and it could also be used in other…

  18. Evidence of Motor Programming Deficits in Children Diagnosed with DAS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nijland, Lian; Maassen, Ben; van der Meulen, Sjoeke

    2003-01-01

    Five children with developmental apraxia of speech (DAS), 5 controls (ages 5-6), and 6 adults produced utterances in a normal condition and in a bite-block condition in which the mandible was in a fixed position. In children with DAS, the bite-block had large effects on coarticulatory patterns and vowel quality. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  19. Pedagogical Basis of DAS Formalism in Engineering Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiltunen, J.; Heikkinen, E.-P.; Jaako, J.; Ahola, J.

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents a new approach for a bachelor-level curriculum structure in engineering. The approach is called DAS formalism according to its three phases: description, analysis and synthesis. Although developed specifically for process and environmental engineering, DAS formalism has a generic nature and it could also be used in other…

  20. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Microscopy: Computed Imaging for Scanned Coherent Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Brynmor. J.; Marks, Daniel. L.; Ralston, Tyler. S.; Carney, P. Scott; Boppart, Stephen. A.

    2008-01-01

    Three-dimensional image formation in microscopy is greatly enhanced by the use of computed imaging techniques. In particular, Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Microscopy (ISAM) allows the removal of out-of-focus blur in broadband, coherent microscopy. Earlier methods, such as optical coherence tomography (OCT), utilize interferometric ranging, but do not apply computed imaging methods and therefore must scan the focal depth to acquire extended volumetric images. ISAM removes the need to scan the focus by allowing volumetric image reconstruction from data collected at a single focal depth. ISAM signal processing techniques are similar to the Fourier migration methods of seismology and the Fourier reconstruction methods of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR). In this article ISAM is described and the close ties between ISAM and SAR are explored. ISAM and a simple strip-map SAR system are placed in a common mathematical framework and compared to OCT and radar respectively. This article is intended to serve as a review of ISAM, and will be especially useful to readers with a background in SAR. PMID:20948975

  1. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Microscopy: Computed Imaging for Scanned Coherent Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Davis, Brynmor J; Marks, Daniel L; Ralston, Tyler S; Carney, P Scott; Boppart, Stephen A

    2008-06-01

    Three-dimensional image formation in microscopy is greatly enhanced by the use of computed imaging techniques. In particular, Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Microscopy (ISAM) allows the removal of out-of-focus blur in broadband, coherent microscopy. Earlier methods, such as optical coherence tomography (OCT), utilize interferometric ranging, but do not apply computed imaging methods and therefore must scan the focal depth to acquire extended volumetric images. ISAM removes the need to scan the focus by allowing volumetric image reconstruction from data collected at a single focal depth. ISAM signal processing techniques are similar to the Fourier migration methods of seismology and the Fourier reconstruction methods of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR). In this article ISAM is described and the close ties between ISAM and SAR are explored. ISAM and a simple strip-map SAR system are placed in a common mathematical framework and compared to OCT and radar respectively. This article is intended to serve as a review of ISAM, and will be especially useful to readers with a background in SAR.

  2. Nonlinear microscopy for material characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Reed Alan

    Making use of femtosecond laser sources, nonlinear microscopy provides access to previously unstudied aspects of materials. By probing third order nonlinear optical signals determined by the nonlinear susceptibility chi (3), which is present in all materials, we gain insight not available by conventional linear or electron microscopy. Third-harmonic (TH) microscopy is applied to supplement laser-induced damage studies of dielectric oxide thin film optical coatings. We present high contrast (S/N> 100 : 1) TH imaging of ≈17 nm nanoindentations, individual 10 nm gold nanoparticles, nascent scandia and hafnia films, and laser induced material modification both above and below damage threshold conditions in hafnia thin-films. These results imply that TH imaging is potentially sensitive to laser-induced strain as well as to nanoscale defects or contamination in oxide films. Compared to other sensitive imaging techniques such as Nomarski and dark field, TH imaging exhibits dramatically increased sensitivity to typical material modifications undergone during the formation of optical damage as evidenced by a dynamic range ≈106 : 1. Four-wave mixing (FWM) microscopy is employed to investigate delay dependent FWM signals and their implied characteristic resonant response times in multiple solvents. Mathematical modeling of resonant coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), coherent Stokes Raman scattering (CSRS) and stimulated parametric emission (SPE) processes supplement the FWM studies and suggest a resonant CARS process that accounts for ≈95% of the total visible FWM signal which probes a characteristic material response time ≈100 fs. This signal enhancement likely indicates the net effects of probing several Raman active C-H stretch bands near 2950 cm-1. This FWM technique may be applied to characterize the dominant resonant response of the sample under study. Furthermore this technique presents the newfound capability to provide estimates of characteristic

  3. Electron microscopy of electromagnetic waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabov, A.; Baum, P.

    2016-07-01

    Rapidly changing electromagnetic fields are the basis of almost any photonic or electronic device operation. We report how electron microscopy can measure collective carrier motion and fields with subcycle and subwavelength resolution. A collimated beam of femtosecond electron pulses passes through a metamaterial resonator that is previously excited with a single-cycle electromagnetic pulse. If the probing electrons are shorter in duration than half a field cycle, then time-frozen Lorentz forces distort the images quasi-classically and with subcycle time resolution. A pump-probe sequence reveals in a movie the sample’s oscillating electromagnetic field vectors with time, phase, amplitude, and polarization information. This waveform electron microscopy can be used to visualize electrodynamic phenomena in devices as small and fast as available.

  4. Image Processing in Medical Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Preston, Kendall

    1986-01-01

    Full automation in medical microscopy has been accomplished in the field of clinical determination of the white blood cell differential count. Manufacture of differential counting microscopes commenced in 1974, and approximately 1,000 of these robots are now in the field. They analyze images of human white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets at the global rate of approximately 100,000 slides per day. This incredible throughout represents automated image analysis and pattern recognition at the rate of 5 billion images per year and represents a major accomplishments in the application of machine vision in medicine. In other areas, such as cytology and cytogenetics, automated computer vision is still in the research phase. This paper discusses the state of the art in blood smear analysis automation and in other related areas including multi-resolution microscopy where images are currently being generated over a 64:1 magnification containing from one-quarter megapixel to one gigapixel in full color.

  5. Dynamic imaging with electron microscopy

    ScienceCinema

    Campbell, Geoffrey; McKeown, Joe; Santala, Melissa

    2016-07-12

    Livermore researchers have perfected an electron microscope to study fast-evolving material processes and chemical reactions. By applying engineering, microscopy, and laser expertise to the decades-old technology of electron microscopy, the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) team has developed a technique that can capture images of phenomena that are both very small and very fast. DTEM uses a precisely timed laser pulse to achieve a short but intense electron beam for imaging. When synchronized with a dynamic event in the microscope's field of view, DTEM allows scientists to record and measure material changes in action. A new movie-mode capability, which earned a 2013 R&D 100 Award from R&D Magazine, uses up to nine laser pulses to sequentially capture fast, irreversible, even one-of-a-kind material changes at the nanometer scale. DTEM projects are advancing basic and applied materials research, including such areas as nanostructure growth, phase transformations, and chemical reactions.

  6. Contact microscopy with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Panessa-Warren, B.J.

    1985-10-01

    Soft x-ray contact microscopy with synchrotron radiation offers the biologist and especially the microscopist, a way to morphologically study specimens that could not be imaged by conventional TEM, STEM or SEM methods (i.e. hydrated samples, samples easily damaged by an electron beam, electron dense samples, thick specimens, unstained low contrast specimens) at spatial resolutions approaching those of the TEM, with the additional possibility to obtain compositional (elemental) information about the sample as well. Although flash x-ray sources offer faster exposure times, synchrotron radiation provides a highly collimated, intense radiation that can be tuned to select specific discrete ranges of x-ray wavelengths or specific individual wavelengths which optimize imaging or microanalysis of a specific sample. This paper presents an overview of the applications of x-ray contact microscopy to biological research and some current research results using monochromatic synchrotron radiation to image biological samples. 24 refs., 10 figs.

  7. Bilateral fitting subtracting confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weiqian; Sheng, Zhong; Qiu, Lirong; Wang, Yun; Shao, Rongjun

    2016-12-20

    This paper proposes a bilateral fitting subtracting confocal microscopy (BFSCM) based on the optical arrangement of conventional confocal microscopy (CM). BFSCM first uses the data in both sides of a confocal axial response curve, which are very sensitive to the axial position of the sample, for respective linear fitting to obtain two fitting straight lines, and then obtains a difference confocal line by subtraction of the two fitting lines. Finally, it calculates the zero position of the difference confocal line to precisely capture the focus position of the confocal system, and thereby achieving a high-precision measurement of the 3D structure of the sample. The theoretical analyses and experiments indicate that BFSCM can improve the axial resolution, and has anti-interference capability and focusing ability with bipolar absolute zero point tracking, while it does not change the structure and lateral resolution of CM. BFSCM provides a novel method for the improvement of CM axial resolution.

  8. Materials science through electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Hiroshi

    1992-03-01

    Electron microscopy has greatly contributed as a powerful tool in both the characterization and identification of materials in the atomic scale. In these contributions, the most important advantage is it's ability for dynamic study of phenomena, i.e., in situ experiments. This research has been carried out using high voltage electron microscopes, but some results have been obtained with high resolution electron microscopes under critical conditions. Electron microscopy has been improved further to become an indispensable ?Micro-Laboratory? in which formation of various advance materials can also be carried out precisely in the atomic scale. Electron beam science and engineering is a typical example in this research field, and detailed processes of crystalline-amorphous transition and electron irradiation induced foreign atom implantation have been clarified by this method. Recently, new applications to the research fields of non-linear material behavior, such as the behavior of atom clusters and the role of electric dipoles on diffusion, have been carried out.

  9. Selective sensitivity in Kerr microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldatov, I. V.; Schäfer, R.

    2017-07-01

    A new technique for contrast separation in wide-field magneto-optical Kerr microscopy is introduced. Utilizing the light from eight light emitting diodes, guided to the microscope by glass fibers and being switched synchronously with the camera exposure, domain images with orthogonal in-plane sensitivity can be displayed simultaneously at real-time, and images with pure in-plane or polar contrast can be obtained. The benefit of this new method of contrast separation is demonstrated for Permalloy films, a NdFeB sinter magnet, and a cobalt crystal. Moreover, the new technique is shown to strongly enhance the sensitivity of Kerr microscopy by eliminating parasitic contrast contributions occurring in conventional setups. A doubling of the in-plane domain contrast and a sensitivity to Kerr rotations as low as 0.6 mdeg is demonstrated.

  10. Scanning Probe Microscopy Markup Language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolhuis, T.; Pasop, J. R.; Abelmann, L.; Lodder, J. C.

    2003-12-01

    The numerous, proprietary file formats for Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM) have caused problems in the field of both off-line quantitative, data analysis and comparison, as well as long-term archiving of measurement results. Because of the eminent roll SPM's are playing in the multidisciplinary scientific world of today, an open, XML-based, standard SPM data format, called Scanning Probe Microscopy Markup Language (SPML) is proposed. XML (eXtensible Markup Language) has proven to be well applicable for standardized, structured, scientific data formats in many other disciplines. The structure of SPML will be explained briefly. The versatility of SPML as well as the possibilities of documenting, publishing, searching and exchanging SPM-data will be shown in examples. This paper gives an overview of the proposed data format, while the complete description can be found at http://spml.net.

  11. Dynamic imaging with electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Geoffrey; McKeown, Joe; Santala, Melissa

    2014-02-20

    Livermore researchers have perfected an electron microscope to study fast-evolving material processes and chemical reactions. By applying engineering, microscopy, and laser expertise to the decades-old technology of electron microscopy, the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) team has developed a technique that can capture images of phenomena that are both very small and very fast. DTEM uses a precisely timed laser pulse to achieve a short but intense electron beam for imaging. When synchronized with a dynamic event in the microscope's field of view, DTEM allows scientists to record and measure material changes in action. A new movie-mode capability, which earned a 2013 R&D 100 Award from R&D Magazine, uses up to nine laser pulses to sequentially capture fast, irreversible, even one-of-a-kind material changes at the nanometer scale. DTEM projects are advancing basic and applied materials research, including such areas as nanostructure growth, phase transformations, and chemical reactions.

  12. Holographic microscopy studies of emulsions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witherow, W. K.

    1981-01-01

    A holographic microscopy system that records and observes the dynamic properties of separation of dispersed immiscible fluids is described. The holographic construction system and reconstruction system that were used to obtain particle size and distribution information from the holograms are discussed. The holographic microscopy system is used to observed the phase separating processes in immiscible fluids that were isothermally cooled into the two phase region. Nucleation, growth rates, coalescence, and particle motion are successfully demonstrated with this system. Thus a holographic particle sizing system with a resolution of 2 micrometers and a field of view of 100 cu cm was developed that provides the capability of testing the theories of separating immiscible fluids for particle number densities in the range of 10 to 10 to the 7th power particles.

  13. Rotational scanning atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ulčinas, A; Vaitekonis, Š

    2017-03-10

    A non-raster scanning technique for atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging which combines rotational and translational motion is presented. The use of rotational motion for the fast scan axis allows us to significantly increase the scanning speed while imaging a large area (diameter > 30 μm). An image reconstruction algorithm and the factors influencing the resolution of the technique are discussed. The experimental results show the potential of the rotational scanning technique for high-throughput large area AFM investigation.

  14. Rotational scanning atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulčinas, A.; Vaitekonis, Š.

    2017-03-01

    A non-raster scanning technique for atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging which combines rotational and translational motion is presented. The use of rotational motion for the fast scan axis allows us to significantly increase the scanning speed while imaging a large area (diameter > 30 μm). An image reconstruction algorithm and the factors influencing the resolution of the technique are discussed. The experimental results show the potential of the rotational scanning technique for high-throughput large area AFM investigation.

  15. Hyperspectral holographic Fourier-microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kalenkov, G S; Kalenkov, S G; Shtan'ko, A E

    2015-04-30

    A detailed theory of the method of holographic recording of hyperspectral wave fields is developed. New experimentally obtained hyperspectral holographic images of microscopic objects are presented. The possibilities of the method are demonstrated experimentally using the examples of urgent microscopy problems: speckle noise suppression, obtaining hyperspectral image of a microscopic object, as well as synthesis of a colour image and obtaining an optical profile of a phase object. (holography)

  16. Electron Microscopy of Intracellular Protozoa.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    the erythrocytes infected with P. falciparum. Scannning electron microscopy demonstrated numerous cone-shaped knobs evenly distributed over the entire...Mystromys albicaudatus and are being used as an excellent model of American cutaneous leishmaniasis In anti-leishmanial drug screen tests at WRAIR1 s...available liquid media for rapid cultivation. J Parasitol 1978, 76:309- .316. - 16 - I- ~. . . ... .. . . " " :" "". . REFERENCES (cont’d) 17. Cohn ZA

  17. A history of urine microscopy.

    PubMed

    Cameron, J Stewart

    2015-11-01

    The naked-eye appearance of the urine must have been studied by shamans and healers since the Stone Age, and an elaborate interpretation of so-called Uroscopy began around 600 AD as a form of divination. A 1000 years later, the first primitive monocular and compound microscopes appeared in the Netherlands, and along with many other objects and liquids, urine was studied from around 1680 onwards as the enlightenment evolved. However, the crude early instruments did not permit fine study because of chromatic and linear/spherical blurring. Only after complex multi-glass lenses which avoided these problems had been made and used in the 1820s in London by Lister, and in Paris by Chevalier and Amici, could urinary microscopy become a practical, clinically useful tool in the 1830s. Clinical urinary microscopy was pioneered by Rayer and his pupils in Paris (especially Vigla), in the late 1830s, and spread to UK and Germany in the 1840s, with detailed descriptions and interpretations of cells and formed elements of the urinary sediment by Nasse, Henle, Robinson and Golding Bird. Classes were held, most notably by Donné in Paris. After another 50 years, optical microscopy had reached its apogee, with magnifications of over 1000 times obtainable free of aberration, using immersion techniques. Atlases of the urinary sediment were published in all major European countries and in the US. Polarised light and phase contrast was used also after 1900 to study urine, and by the early 20th century, photomicroscopy (pioneered by Donné and Daguerre 50 years previously, but then ignored) became usual for teaching and recording. In the 1940s electron microscopy began, followed by detection of specific proteins and cells using immunofluorescent antibodies. All this had been using handheld methodology. Around 1980, machine-assisted observations began, and have dominated progress since.

  18. Multi-photon excitation microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Diaspro, Alberto; Bianchini, Paolo; Vicidomini, Giuseppe; Faretta, Mario; Ramoino, Paola; Usai, Cesare

    2006-01-01

    Multi-photon excitation (MPE) microscopy plays a growing role among microscopical techniques utilized for studying biological matter. In conjunction with confocal microscopy it can be considered the imaging workhorse of life science laboratories. Its roots can be found in a fundamental work written by Maria Goeppert Mayer more than 70 years ago. Nowadays, 2PE and MPE microscopes are expected to increase their impact in areas such biotechnology, neurobiology, embryology, tissue engineering, materials science where imaging can be coupled to the possibility of using the microscopes in an active way, too. As well, 2PE implementations in noninvasive optical bioscopy or laser-based treatments point out to the relevance in clinical applications. Here we report about some basic aspects related to the phenomenon, implications in three-dimensional imaging microscopy, practical aspects related to design and realization of MPE microscopes, and we only give a list of potential applications and variations on the theme in order to offer a starting point for advancing new applications and developments. PMID:16756664

  19. Multi-photon excitation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Diaspro, Alberto; Bianchini, Paolo; Vicidomini, Giuseppe; Faretta, Mario; Ramoino, Paola; Usai, Cesare

    2006-06-06

    Multi-photon excitation (MPE) microscopy plays a growing role among microscopical techniques utilized for studying biological matter. In conjunction with confocal microscopy it can be considered the imaging workhorse of life science laboratories. Its roots can be found in a fundamental work written by Maria Goeppert Mayer more than 70 years ago. Nowadays, 2PE and MPE microscopes are expected to increase their impact in areas such biotechnology, neurobiology, embryology, tissue engineering, materials science where imaging can be coupled to the possibility of using the microscopes in an active way, too. As well, 2PE implementations in noninvasive optical bioscopy or laser-based treatments point out to the relevance in clinical applications. Here we report about some basic aspects related to the phenomenon, implications in three-dimensional imaging microscopy, practical aspects related to design and realization of MPE microscopes, and we only give a list of potential applications and variations on the theme in order to offer a starting point for advancing new applications and developments.

  20. Multiphoton microscopy of atheroslcerotic plaques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilledahl, Magnus B.; de Lange Davies, Catharina; Haugen, Olav A.; Svaasand, Lars O.

    2007-02-01

    Multiphoton microscopy is a techniques that fascilitates three dimensional imaging of intact, unstained tissue. Especially connective tissue has a relatively strong nonlinear optical response and can easily be imaged. Atherosclerosis is a disease where lipids accumulate in the vessel wall and there is a thickening of the intima by growth of a cap of connective tissue. The mechanical strength of this fibrous cap is of clinically importance. If the cap ruptures a thrombosis forms which can block a coronary vessel and therby causing myocardial infarction. Multiphoton microscopy can be used to image the fibrous cap and thereby determine the thickness of the cap and the structure of the connective fibres. This could possibly be developed into a diagnostic and clincal tool to monitor the vulnerability of a plaque and also to better understand the development of a plaque and effects of treatment. We have collected multiphoton microscopy images from atherosclerotic plaque in human aorta, both two photon excited fluorescens and second harmonic generated signal. The feasability of using this technique to determine the state of the plaque is explored.

  1. Paleomagnetic Analysis Using SQUID Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, Benjamin P.; Lima, Eduardo A.; Fong, Luis E.; Baudenbacher, Franz J.

    2007-01-01

    Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscopes are a new generation of instruments that map magnetic fields with unprecedented spatial resolution and moment sensitivity. Unlike standard rock magnetometers, SQUID microscopes map magnetic fields rather than measuring magnetic moments such that the sample magnetization pattern must be retrieved from source model fits to the measured field data. In this paper, we presented the first direct comparison between paleomagnetic analyses on natural samples using joint measurements from SQUID microscopy and moment magnetometry. We demonstrated that in combination with apriori geologic and petrographic data, SQUID microscopy can accurately characterize the magnetization of lunar glass spherules and Hawaiian basalt. The bulk moment magnitude and direction of these samples inferred from inversions of SQUID microscopy data match direct measurements on the same samples using moment magnetometry. In addition, these inversions provide unique constraints on the magnetization distribution within the sample. These measurements are among the most sensitive and highest resolution quantitative paleomagnetic studies of natural remanent magnetization to date. We expect that this technique will be able to extend many other standard paleomagnetic techniques to previously inaccessible microscale samples.

  2. Holographic opto-fluidic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bishara, Waheb; Zhu, Hongying; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2010-12-20

    Over the last decade microfluidics has created a versatile platform that has significantly advanced the ways in which micro-scale organisms and objects are controlled, processed and investigated, by improving the cost, compactness and throughput aspects of analysis. Microfluidics has also expanded into optics to create reconfigurable and flexible optical devices such as reconfigurable lenses, lasers, waveguides, switches, and on-chip microscopes. Here we present a new opto-fluidic microscopy modality, i.e., Holographic Opto-fluidic Microscopy (HOM), based on lensless holographic imaging. This imaging modality complements the miniaturization provided by microfluidics and would allow the integration of microscopy into existing on-chip microfluidic devices with various functionalities. Our imaging modality utilizes partially coherent in-line holography and pixel super-resolution to create high-resolution amplitude and phase images of the objects flowing within micro-fluidic channels, which we demonstrate by imaging C. elegans, Giardia lamblia, and Mulberry pollen. HOM does not involve complicated fabrication processes or precise alignment, nor does it require a highly uniform flow of objects within microfluidic channels.

  3. Paleomagnetic Analysis Using SQUID Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, Benjamin P.; Lima, Eduardo A.; Fong, Luis E.; Baudenbacher, Franz J.

    2007-01-01

    Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscopes are a new generation of instruments that map magnetic fields with unprecedented spatial resolution and moment sensitivity. Unlike standard rock magnetometers, SQUID microscopes map magnetic fields rather than measuring magnetic moments such that the sample magnetization pattern must be retrieved from source model fits to the measured field data. In this paper, we presented the first direct comparison between paleomagnetic analyses on natural samples using joint measurements from SQUID microscopy and moment magnetometry. We demonstrated that in combination with apriori geologic and petrographic data, SQUID microscopy can accurately characterize the magnetization of lunar glass spherules and Hawaiian basalt. The bulk moment magnitude and direction of these samples inferred from inversions of SQUID microscopy data match direct measurements on the same samples using moment magnetometry. In addition, these inversions provide unique constraints on the magnetization distribution within the sample. These measurements are among the most sensitive and highest resolution quantitative paleomagnetic studies of natural remanent magnetization to date. We expect that this technique will be able to extend many other standard paleomagnetic techniques to previously inaccessible microscale samples.

  4. 3D structured illumination microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dougherty, William M.; Goodwin, Paul C.

    2011-03-01

    Three-dimensional structured illumination microscopy achieves double the lateral and axial resolution of wide-field microscopy, using conventional fluorescent dyes, proteins and sample preparation techniques. A three-dimensional interference-fringe pattern excites the fluorescence, filling in the "missing cone" of the wide field optical transfer function, thereby enabling axial (z) discrimination. The pattern acts as a spatial carrier frequency that mixes with the higher spatial frequency components of the image, which usually succumb to the diffraction limit. The fluorescence image encodes the high frequency content as a down-mixed, moiré-like pattern. A series of images is required, wherein the 3D pattern is shifted and rotated, providing down-mixed data for a system of linear equations. Super-resolution is obtained by solving these equations. The speed with which the image series can be obtained can be a problem for the microscopy of living cells. Challenges include pattern-switching speeds, optical efficiency, wavefront quality and fringe contrast, fringe pitch optimization, and polarization issues. We will review some recent developments in 3D-SIM hardware with the goal of super-resolved z-stacks of motile cells.

  5. Electron Microscopy of Living Cells During in Situ Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liv, Nalan; van Oosten Slingeland, Daan S. B.; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre; Kruit, Pieter; Piston, David W.; Hoogenboom, Jacob P.

    2016-01-01

    We present an approach toward dynamic nanoimaging: live fluorescence of cells encapsulated in a bionanoreactor is complemented with in situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM) on an integrated microscope. This allows us to take SEM snapshots on-demand, that is, at a specific location in time, at a desired region of interest, guided by the dynamic fluorescence imaging. We show that this approach enables direct visualization, with EM resolution, of the distribution of bioconjugated quantum dots on cellular extensions during uptake and internalization. PMID:26580231

  6. Near-Field Scanning Optical Microscopy and Raman Microscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harootunian, Alec Tate

    1987-09-01

    Both a one dimensional near-field scanning optical microscope and Raman microprobe were constructed. In near -field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) a subwavelength aperture is scanned in the near-field of the object. Radiation transmitted through the aperture is collected to form an image as the aperture scans over the object. The resolution of an NSOM system is essentially wavelength independent and is limited by the diameter of the aperture used to scan the object. NSOM was developed in an effort to provide a nondestructive in situ high spatial resolution probe while still utilizing photons at optical wavelengths. The Raman microprobe constructed provided vibrational Raman information with spatial resolution equivalent that of a conventional diffraction limited microscope. Both transmission studies and near-field diffration studies of subwavelength apertures were performed. Diffraction theories for a small aperture in an infinitely thin conducting screen, a slit in a thick conducting screen, and an aperture in a black screen were examined. All three theories indicate collimation of radiation to the size to the size of the subwavelength aperture or slit in the near-field. Theoretical calculations and experimental results indicate that light transmitted through subwavelength apertures is readily detectable. Light of wavelength 4579 (ANGSTROM) was transmitted through apertures with diameters as small as 300 (ANGSTROM). These studies indicate the feasibility of constructing an NSOM system. One dimensional transmission and fluorescence NSOM systems were constructed. Apertures in the tips of metallized glass pipettes width inner diameters of less than 1000 (ANGSTROM) were used as a light source in the NSOM system. A tunneling current was used to maintain the aperture position in the near-field. Fluorescence NSOM was demonstrated for the first time. Microspectroscopic and Raman microscopic studies of turtle cone oil droplets were performed. Both the Raman vibrational

  7. Fluorescence-integrated transmission electron microscopy images: integrating fluorescence microscopy with transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sims, Paul A; Hardin, Jeff D

    2007-01-01

    This chapter describes high-pressure freezing (HPF) techniques for correlative light and electron microscopy on the same sample. Laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) is exploited for its ability to collect fluorescent, as well as transmitted and back scattered light (BSL) images at the same time. Fluorescent information from a whole mount (preembedding) or from thin sections (post-embedding) can be displayed as a color overlay on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. Fluorescence-integrated TEM (F-TEM) images provide a fluorescent perspective to TEM images. The pre-embedding method uses a thin two-part agarose pad to immobilize live Caenorhabditis elegans embryos for LSCM, HPF, and TEM. Pre-embedding F-TEM images display fluorescent information collected from a whole mount of live embryos onto all thin sections collected from that sample. In contrast, the postembedding method uses HPF and freeze substitution with 1% paraformaldehyde in 95% ethanol followed by low-temperature embedding in methacrylate resin. This procedure preserves the structure and function of green fluorescent protein (GFP) as determined by immunogold labeling of GFP, when compared with GFP expression, both demonstrated in the same thin section.

  8. Magnetic resonance microscopy versus light microscopy in human embryology teaching.

    PubMed

    Puerta-Fonollá, J; Vázquez-Osorio, T; Ruiz-Cabello, J; Murillo-González, J; Peña-Melián, A

    2004-07-01

    A study was carried out on the application of magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) in teaching prenatal human development. Human embryos measuring 8 mm, 15 mm, 18.5 mm, and 22 mm were fixed in a 4% paraformaldehyde solution and sections obtained with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were compared to those prepared for light microscopy (LM), using the same embryos. The MRM and LM slices were of a similar quality. In the MRM sections, embryonic organs and systems were clearly visible, particularly the peripheral and central nervous systems, and the cardiovascular and digestive systems. The digitalization and clarity of the MRM images make them an ideal teaching aid that is suitable for students during the first years of a health-science degree, particularly medicine. As well as providing students with their first experience of MRM, these images allow students to access, at any time, all embryos used, to assess changes in the positions of different organs throughout their stages of development, and to acquire spatial vision, an absolute requirement in the study of human anatomy. We recommend that this technique be incorporated into the wealth of standard embryonic teaching methods already in use. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Twenty‐eight‐joint counts invalidate the DAS28 remission definition owing to the omission of the lower extremity joints: a comparison with the original DAS remission

    PubMed Central

    Landewé, R; van der Heijde, D; van der Linden, S; Boers, M

    2006-01-01

    Objective To compare 28 joint disease activity score (DAS28) remission with comprehensive joint count DAS remission in rheumatoid arthritis. Methods 620 actually measured paired observations of DAS28 and DAS were analysed in 155 patients. Discordant observations (either DAS or DAS28 below remission cut off level: 1.6 for DAS and 2.6 for DAS28) and concordant observations (both DAS and DAS28 below their remission cut off level) were analysed separately. Results 91 of 620 paired DAS observations (15%) were discordant; 87 (in 53 patients) comprised observations in which the DAS28 remission criterion, but not the DAS remission criterion, was met. The reverse was found in only four observations, which were therefore omitted. With the original DAS as standard, DAS28 sensitivity was 95% and specificity 84%. Probability plots showed a swollen joint count >0 in 75% of discordant pairs v 48% of concordant pairs. The same was found for total joint count (TJC >0 in 90% v 40%; median TJC, 0 v 6) and patient global assessment, but not for ESR. Individual joint analysis showed that 51% of discordant v 18% of concordant observations (p<0.0005) had involvement of lower extremity joints that are not included in the DAS28. Conclusions DAS remission is more conservative than DAS28 remission. Activity (tenderness and swelling) in joints not included in the reduced joint counts (ankles, feet) mainly account for the discrepancy between the two assessments. DAS28 remission at a cut off level of 2.6 has insufficient construct validity and should be used with caution in clinical practice and clinical trials. PMID:16219709

  10. Combining fluorescence and bioluminescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Goda, Kazuhito; Hatta-Ohashi, Yoko; Akiyoshi, Ryutaro; Sugiyama, Takashi; Sakai, Ikuko; Takahashi, Takeo; Suzuki, Hirobumi

    2015-08-01

    Bioluminescence microscopy has revealed that gene expression in individual cells can respond differently to the same stimulus. To understand this phenomenon, it is important to sequentially observe the series of events from cellular signal transduction to gene expression regulated by specific transcription factors derived from signaling cascades in individual cells. However, these processes have been separately analyzed with fluorescence and bioluminescence microscopy. Furthermore, in culture medium, the background fluorescence of luciferin-a substrate of luciferase in promoter assays of gene expression in cultured cells-confounds the simultaneous observation of fluorescence and bioluminescence. Therefore, we optimized conditions for optical filter sets based on spectral properties and the luciferin concentration based on cell permeability for fluorescence observation combined with bioluminescence microscopy. An excitation and emission filter set (492-506 nm and 524-578 nm) was suitable for green fluorescent protein and yellow fluorescent protein imaging of cells, and >100 μM luciferin was acceptable in culture medium based on kinetic constants and the estimated intracellular concentration. Using these parameters, we present an example of sequential fluorescence and bioluminescence microscopic observation of signal transduction (translocation of protein kinase C alpha from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane) coupled with activation of gene expression by nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide B in individual cells and show that the gene expression response is not completely concordant with upstream signaling following stimulation with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate. Our technique is a powerful imaging tool for analysis of heterogeneous gene expression together with upstream signaling in live single cells.

  11. Visual-servoing optical microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Callahan, Daniel E [Martinez, CA; Parvin, Bahram [Mill Valley, CA

    2011-05-24

    The present invention provides methods and devices for the knowledge-based discovery and optimization of differences between cell types. In particular, the present invention provides visual servoing optical microscopy, as well as analysis methods. The present invention provides means for the close monitoring of hundreds of individual, living cells over time; quantification of dynamic physiological responses in multiple channels; real-time digital image segmentation and analysis; intelligent, repetitive computer-applied cell stress and cell stimulation; and the ability to return to the same field of cells for long-term studies and observation. The present invention further provides means to optimize culture conditions for specific subpopulations of cells.

  12. Visual-servoing optical microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Callahan, Daniel E; Parvin, Bahram

    2013-10-01

    The present invention provides methods and devices for the knowledge-based discovery and optimization of differences between cell types. In particular, the present invention provides visual servoing optical microscopy, as well as analysis methods. The present invention provides means for the close monitoring of hundreds of individual, living cells over time; quantification of dynamic physiological responses in multiple channels; real-time digital image segmentation and analysis; intelligent, repetitive computer-applied cell stress and cell stimulation; and the ability to return to the same field of cells for long-term studies and observation. The present invention further provides means to optimize culture conditions for specific subpopulations of cells.

  13. Visual-servoing optical microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Callahan, Daniel E.; Parvin, Bahram

    2009-06-09

    The present invention provides methods and devices for the knowledge-based discovery and optimization of differences between cell types. In particular, the present invention provides visual servoing optical microscopy, as well as analysis methods. The present invention provides means for the close monitoring of hundreds of individual, living cells over time: quantification of dynamic physiological responses in multiple channels; real-time digital image segmentation and analysis; intelligent, repetitive computer-applied cell stress and cell stimulation; and the ability to return to the same field of cells for long-term studies and observation. The present invention further provides means to optimize culture conditions for specific subpopulations of cells.

  14. Synthetic incoherence for electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Levine, Zachary H; Dunstan, Robyn M

    2007-08-01

    Tomographic studies of submicrometer samples in materials science using electron microscopy have been inhibited by diffraction effects. In the present work, we describe a practical method for ameliorating these effects. First, we find an analytic expression for the mutual coherence function for hollow-cone illumination. Then, we use this analytic expression to propose a Gaussian weighting of hollow-cone illumination, which we name tapered solid-cone illumination, and present an analytic expression for its mutual coherence function. Finally, we investigate numerically an n-ring approximation to tapered solid-cone illumination. The results suggest a method for removing diffraction effects and hence enabling tomography.

  15. Scanning probe microscopy in catalysis.

    PubMed

    Yeung, King Lun; Yao, Nan

    2004-09-01

    This review discusses the recent progress in the application of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) in catalysis. SPM proves to be an invaluable technique for imaging catalytic surfaces and interfaces. Most SPM research is related to the structural and morphological transformation associated with catalyst preparation and use. Real-time SPM observation of surface dynamics including adsorption, diffusion and reaction, provides invaluable insights to the mechanism of catalysis. SPM is also used to shape and manipulate surfaces and surface processes. Fabrication of nanostructured catalysts, direct manipulation of adsorbed atoms and molecules and tip-mediated reactions are some examples of new SPM approach in catalyst research.

  16. Quantum state atomic force microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Passian, Ali; Siopsis, George

    2017-04-10

    New classical modalities of atomic force microscopy continue to emerge to achieve higher spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution for nanometrology of materials. Here, we introduce the concept of a quantum mechanical modality that capitalizes on squeezed states of probe displacement. We show that such squeezing is enabled nanomechanically when the probe enters the van der Waals regime of interaction with a sample. The effect is studied in the non-contact mode, where we consider the parameter domains characterizing the attractive regime of the probe-sample interaction force.

  17. Confocal microscopy in microgravity research.

    PubMed

    Goede, A P; Brakenhoff, G J; Woldringh, C L; Aalders, J W; Imhof, J P; van Kralingen, P; Mels, W A; Schreinemakers, P; Zegers, A

    1992-01-01

    We have studied the application and the feasibility of confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) in microgravity research. Its superior spatial resolution and 3D imaging capabilities and its use of light as a probe, render this instrument ideally suited for the study of living biological material on a (sub-)cellular level. In this paper a number of pertinent biological microgravity experiments is listed, concentrating on the direct observation of developing cells and cellular structures under microgravity condition. A conceptual instrument design is also presented, aimed at sounding rocket application followed by Biorack/Biolab application at a later stage.

  18. Superresolved spatially multiplexed interferometric microscopy.

    PubMed

    Picazo-Bueno, José Ángel; Zalevsky, Zeev; García, Javier; Micó, Vicente

    2017-03-01

    Superresolution capability by angular and time multiplexing is implemented onto a regular microscope. The technique, named superresolved spatially multiplexed interferometric microscopy (S2MIM), follows our previously reported SMIM technique [Opt. Express22, 14929 (2014)OPEXFF1094-408710.1364/OE.22.014929, J. Biomed. Opt.21, 106007 (2016)JBOPFO1083-366810.1117/1.JBO.21.10.106007] improved with superresolved imaging. All together, S2MIM updates a commercially available non-holographic microscope into a superresolved holographic one. Validation is presented for an Olympus BX-60 upright microscope with resolution test targets.

  19. Advances in multiphoton microscopy technology

    PubMed Central

    Hoover, Erich E.; Squier, Jeff A.

    2013-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has enabled unprecedented dynamic exploration in living organisms. A significant challenge in biological research is the dynamic imaging of features deep within living organisms, which permits the real-time analysis of cellular structure and function. To make progress in our understanding of biological machinery, optical microscopes must be capable of rapid, targeted access deep within samples at high resolution. In this Review, we discuss the basic architecture of a multiphoton microscope capable of such analysis and summarize the state-of-the-art technologies for the quantitative imaging of biological phenomena. PMID:24307915

  20. Twin-photon confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Simon, D S; Sergienko, A V

    2010-10-11

    A recently introduced two-channel confocal microscope with correlated detection promises up to 50% improvement in transverse spatial resolution [Simon, Sergienko, Optics Express 18, 9765 (2010)] via the use of photon correlations. Here we achieve similar results in a different manner, introducing a triple-confocal correlated microscope which exploits the correlations present in optical parametric amplifiers. It is based on tight focusing of pump radiation onto a thin sample positioned in front of a nonlinear crystal, followed by coincidence detection of signal and idler photons, each focused onto a pinhole. This approach offers further resolution enhancement in confocal microscopy.

  1. Aperture scanning Fourier ptychographic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Xiaoze; Chung, Jaebum; Horstmeyer, Roarke; Yang, Changhuei

    2016-01-01

    Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM) is implemented through aperture scanning by an LCOS spatial light modulator at the back focal plane of the objective lens. This FPM configuration enables the capturing of the complex scattered field for a 3D sample both in the transmissive mode and the reflective mode. We further show that by combining with the compressive sensing theory, the reconstructed 2D complex scattered field can be used to recover the 3D sample scattering density. This implementation expands the scope of application for FPM and can be beneficial for areas such as tissue imaging and wafer inspection. PMID:27570705

  2. Holographic techniques for cellular fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Myung K.

    2017-04-01

    We have constructed a prototype instrument for holographic fluorescence microscopy (HFM) based on self-interference incoherent digital holography (SIDH) and demonstrate novel imaging capabilities such as differential 3D fluorescence microscopy and optical sectioning by compressive sensing.

  3. Image scanning microscopy with radially polarized light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yun; Zhang, Yunhai; Wei, Tongda; Huang, Wei; Shi, Yaqin

    2017-03-01

    In order to improve the resolution of image scanning microscopy, we present a method based on image scanning microscopy and radially polarized light. According to the theory of image scanning microscopy, we get the effective point spread function of image scanning microscopy with the longitudinal component of radially polarized light and a 1 AU detection area, and obtain imaging results of the analyzed samples using this method. Results show that the resolution can be enhanced by 7% compared with that in image scanning microscopy with circularly polarized light, and is 1.54-fold higher than that in confocal microscopy with a pinhole of 1 AU. Additionally, the peak intensity of ISM is 1.54-fold higher than that of a confocal microscopy with a pinhole of 1 AU. In conclusion, the combination of the image scanning microscopy and the radially polarized light could improve the resolution, and it could realize high-resolution and high SNR imaging at the same time.

  4. Nanocharacterization: Atomic Scale Visualization with Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadbridge, Christine

    2007-10-01

    This workshop will include an overview presentation of nanotechnology and nanocharacterization tools (electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy) as well as examples of curricular components for middle and high school teachers. Tours/demonstrations of microscopy facilities in the IMS facility at UConn will be provided.

  5. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K+ channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44+ EGFR+ KV1.1+ MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44- EGFR- KV1.1+ 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third, the developed

  6. Virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Changho; Lee, Donghyun; Zhou, Qifa; Kim, Jeehyun; Kim, Chulhong

    2015-07-01

    A virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy at 1064 nm wavelength (VISPAM) system was designed and fabricated by integrating a commercial type surgical microscope and laser scanning photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) with a 1064 nm pulsed laser. Based on simple augmented reality device, VISPAM could simultaneously provide 2D depth-resolved photoacoustic and magnified microscope images of surgery regions on the same vision of surgeon via an eyepiece of the microscope. The invisible 1064 nm laser removed the interruption of surgical sight due to visible laser scanning of previous report, and decreased the danger of tissue damage caused by over irradiated laser. In addition, to approach the real practical surgery application, a needle-type transducer was utilized without a water bath for PA signal coupling. In order to verify our system's performance, we conducted needle guiding as ex vivo phantom study and needle guiding and injection of carbon particles mixtures into a melanoma tumor region as in vivo study. We expect that VISPAM can be essential tool of brain and ophthalmic microsurgery.

  7. Cluster computing for digital microscopy.

    PubMed

    Carrington, Walter A; Lisin, Dimitri

    2004-06-01

    Microscopy is becoming increasingly digital and dependent on computation. Some of the computational tasks in microscopy are computationally intense, such as image restoration (deconvolution), some optical calculations, image segmentation, and image analysis. Several modern microscope technologies enable the acquisition of very large data sets. 3D imaging of live cells over time, multispectral imaging, very large tiled 3D images of thick samples, or images from high throughput biology all can produce extremely large images. These large data sets place a very large burden on laboratory computer resources. This combination of computationally intensive tasks and larger data sizes can easily exceed the capability of single personal computers. The large multiprocessor computers that are the traditional technology for larger tasks are too expensive for most laboratories. An alternative approach is to use a number of inexpensive personal computers as a cluster; that is, use multiple networked computers programmed to run the problem in parallel on all the computers in the cluster. By the use of relatively inexpensive over-the-counter hardware and open source software, this approach can be much more cost effective for many tasks. We discuss the different computer architectures available, and their advantages and disadvantages.

  8. Plasmonics Enhanced Smartphone Fluorescence Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qingshan; Acuna, Guillermo; Kim, Seungkyeum; Vietz, Carolin; Tseng, Derek; Chae, Jongjae; Shir, Daniel; Luo, Wei; Tinnefeld, Philip; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2017-05-18

    Smartphone fluorescence microscopy has various applications in point-of-care (POC) testing and diagnostics, ranging from e.g., quantification of immunoassays, detection of microorganisms, to sensing of viruses. An important need in smartphone-based microscopy and sensing techniques is to improve the detection sensitivity to enable quantification of extremely low concentrations of target molecules. Here, we demonstrate a general strategy to enhance the detection sensitivity of a smartphone-based fluorescence microscope by using surface-enhanced fluorescence (SEF) created by a thin metal-film. In this plasmonic design, the samples are placed on a silver-coated glass slide with a thin spacer, and excited by a laser-diode from the backside through a glass hemisphere, generating surface plasmon polaritons. We optimized this mobile SEF system by tuning the metal-film thickness, spacer distance, excitation angle and polarization, and achieved ~10-fold enhancement in fluorescence intensity compared to a bare glass substrate, which enabled us to image single fluorescent particles as small as 50 nm in diameter and single quantum-dots. Furthermore, we quantified the detection limit of this platform by using DNA origami-based brightness standards, demonstrating that ~80 fluorophores per diffraction-limited spot can be readily detected by our mobile microscope, which opens up new opportunities for POC diagnostics and sensing applications in resource-limited-settings.

  9. Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy (LSFM).

    PubMed

    Adams, Michael W; Loftus, Andrew F; Dunn, Sarah E; Joens, Matthew S; Fitzpatrick, James A J

    2015-01-05

    The development of confocal microscopy techniques introduced the ability to optically section fluorescent samples in the axial dimension, perpendicular to the image plane. These approaches, via the placement of a pinhole in the conjugate image plane, provided superior resolution in the axial (z) dimension resulting in nearly isotropic optical sections. However, increased axial resolution, via pinhole optics, comes at the cost of both speed and excitation efficiency. Light sheet fluorescent microscopy (LSFM), a century-old idea made possible with modern developments in both excitation and detection optics, provides sub-cellular resolution and optical sectioning capabilities without compromising speed or excitation efficiency. Over the past decade, several variations of LSFM have been implemented each with its own benefits and deficiencies. Here we discuss LSFM fundamentals and outline the basic principles of several major light-sheet-based imaging modalities (SPIM, inverted SPIM, multi-view SPIM, Bessel beam SPIM, and stimulated emission depletion SPIM) while considering their biological relevance in terms of intrusiveness, temporal resolution, and sample requirements. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  10. RGB digital lensless holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Sucerquia, Jorge

    2013-11-01

    The recent introduction of color digital lensless holographic microscopy (CDLHM) has shown the possibility of imaging microscopic specimens at full color without the need of lenses. Owing to the simplicity, robustness, and compactness of the digital lensless holographic microscopes (DLHM), they have been presented as the ideal candidates to being developed into portable holographic microscopes. However, in the case of CDLHM the utilization of three independent lasers hinders the portability option for this microscope. In this contribution an alternative to reduce the complexity of CDLHM aimed to recover the portability of this microscopy technology is presented. A super-bright white-light light-emitting diode (LED) is spectrally and spatially filtered to produce the needed illumination by CDLHM to work. CDLHM with LED illumination is used to image at full color a section of the head of a drosophila melanogaster fly (fruit fly). The LED-CDLHM method shows the capability of imaging objects of 2μm size in comparison with the micrometer resolution reported for LASER-CDLHM.

  11. Nonlinear microscopy of collagen fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strupler, M.; Pena, A.-M.; Hernest, M.; Tharaux, P.-L.; Fabre, A.; Marchal-Somme, J.; Crestani, B.; Débarre, D.; Martin, J.-L.; Beaurepaire, E.; Schanne-Klein, M.-C.

    2007-02-01

    We used intrinsic Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) by fibrillar collagen to visualize the three-dimensional architecture of collagen fibrosis at the micrometer scale using laser scanning nonlinear microscopy. We showed that SHG signals are highly specific to fibrillar collagen and provide a sensitive probe of the micrometer-scale structural organization of collagen in tissues. Moreover, recording simultaneously other nonlinear optical signals in a multimodal setup, we visualized the tissue morphology using Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence (2PEF) signals from endogenous chromophores such as NADH or elastin. We then compared different methods to determine accurate indexes of collagen fibrosis using nonlinear microscopy, given that most collagen fibrils are smaller than the microscope resolution and that second harmonic generation is a coherent process. In order to define a robust method to process our three-dimensional images, we either calculated the fraction of the images occupied by a significant SHG signal, or averaged SHG signal intensities. We showed that these scores provide an estimation of the extension of renal and pulmonary fibrosis in murine models, and that they clearly sort out the fibrotic mice.

  12. Developing Photo Activated Localization Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Harald

    2015-03-01

    Photo Activated Localization Microscopy, PALM, acquires super-resolution images by activating a subset of activatable fluorescent labels and estimating the center of the each molecular label to sub-diffractive accuracy. When this process is repeated thousands of times for different subsets of molecules, then an image can be rendered from all the center coordinates of the molecules. I will describe the circuitous story of its development that began with another super-resolution technique, NSOM, developed by my colleague Eric Betzig, who imaged single molecules at room temperature, and later we spectrally resolved individual luminescent centers of quantum wells. These two observations inspired a generalized path to localization microscopy, but that path was abandoned because no really useful fluorescent labels were available. After a decade of nonacademic industrial pursuits and the subsequent freedom of unemployment, we came across a class of genetically expressible fluorescent proteins that were switchable or convertible that enabled the concept to be implemented and be biologically promising. The past ten years have been very active with many groups exploring applications and enhancements of this concept. Demonstrating significant biological relevance will be the metric if its success.

  13. Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy (LSFM)

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Michael W.; Loftus, Andrew F.; Dunn, Sarah E.; Joens, Matthew S.; Fitzpatrick, James A.J.

    2015-01-01

    The development of confocal microscopy techniques introduced the ability to optically section fluorescent samples in the axial dimension, perpendicular to the image plane. These approaches, via the placement of a pinhole in the conjugate image plane, provided superior resolution in the axial (z) dimension resulting in nearly isotropic optical sections. However, increased axial resolution, via pinhole optics, comes at the cost of both speed and excitation efficiency. Light Sheet Fluorescent Microscopy (LSFM), a century old idea (Siedentopf and Zsigmondy, 1902) made possible with modern developments in both excitation and detection optics, provides sub-cellular resolution and optical sectioning capabilities without compromising speed or excitation efficiency. Over the past decade, several variations of LSFM have been implemented each with its own benefits and deficiencies. Here we discuss LSFM fundamentals and outline the basic principles of several major light sheet based imaging modalities (SPIM, inverted SPIM, multi-view SPIM, Bessel beam SPIM, and stimulated emission depletion SPIM while considering their biological relevance in terms of intrusiveness, temporal resolution, and sample requirements. PMID:25559221

  14. Multiphoton fluorescence microscopy in biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heikal, Ahmed A.; Webb, Watt W.

    2002-11-01

    The inherent advantages of nonlinear excitation make multiphoton fluorescence microscopy (MPFM) awell-suited imaging technique for extracting valuable information from turbid and thick biological samples. These advantages include high three-dimensional spatial resolution, large penetration depth, minimum out-of-focus cellular photodamage, and high signal-to-noise contrast. We have investigated the nonlinear spectroscopy of biologically important molecules such as NADH, flavins, and intrinsically fluorescent proteins. Fundamental understanding of the molecular spectroscopy and dynamics of these biomolecules is essential for advancing their applications in biological research. MPFM has been utilized for monitoring a large spectrum of biological processes including metabolic activity and exocytosis. We will discuss two-photon (2P) redox fluorescence microscopy of NADH, which gives a quantitative measure of the respiratory chain activity, thus allowing functional imaging of energy metabolism in neurons and native brain tissue. Finally, a rational design strategy, based on donor-acceptor-donor configuration, will be elucidated for fluorescent probes with large 2P-excitation cross-section. These dyes are water-soluble, yet possess a high affinity to organic phases with site-specific labeling and Ca+2 sensitivity (Kd ~ 350 nM). A brief account on the biological application of nanocrystals and second harmonic imaging will be reviewed.

  15. Atomic force microscopy as nanorobot.

    PubMed

    Xi, Ning; Fung, Carmen Kar Man; Yang, Ruiguo; Lai, King Wai Chiu; Wang, Donna H; Seiffert-Sinha, Kristina; Sinha, Animesh A; Li, Guangyong; Liu, Lianqing

    2011-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a powerful and widely used imaging technique that can visualize single molecules under physiological condition at the nanometer scale. In this chapter, an AFM-based nanorobot for biological studies is introduced. Using the AFM tip as an end effector, the AFM can be modified into a nanorobot that can manipulate biological objects at the single-molecule level. By functionalizing the AFM tip with specific antibodies, the nanorobot is able to identify specific types of receptors on the cell membrane. It is similar to the fluorescent optical microscopy but with higher resolution. By locally updating the AFM image based on interaction force information and objects' model during nanomanipulation, real-time visual feedback is obtained through the augmented reality interface. The development of the AFM-based nanorobotic system enables us to conduct in situ imaging, sensing, and manipulation simultaneously at the nanometer scale (e.g., protein and DNA levels). The AFM-based nanorobotic system offers several advantages and capabilities for studying structure-function relationships of biological specimens. As a result, many biomedical applications can be achieved by the AFM-based nanorobotic system.

  16. Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy in liquid using Electrochemical Force Microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Collins, Liam; Jesse, Stephen; Kilpatrick, J.; ...

    2015-01-01

    Conventional closed loop-Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) has emerged as a powerful technique for probing electric and transport phenomena at the solid-gas interface. The extension of KPFM capabilities to probe electrostatic and electrochemical phenomena at the solid–liquid interface is of interest for a broad range of applications from energy storage to biological systems. However, the operation of KPFM implicitly relies on the presence of a linear lossless dielectric in the probe-sample gap, a condition which is violated for ionically-active liquids (e.g., when diffuse charge dynamics are present). Here, electrostatic and electrochemical measurements are demonstrated in ionically-active (polar isopropanol, milli-Q watermore » and aqueous NaCl) and ionically-inactive (non-polar decane) liquids by electrochemical force microscopy (EcFM), a multidimensional (i.e., bias- and time-resolved) spectroscopy method. In the absence of mobile charges (ambient and non-polar liquids), KPFM and EcFM are both feasible, yielding comparable contact potential difference (CPD) values. In ionically-active liquids, KPFM is not possible and EcFM can be used to measure the dynamic CPD and a rich spectrum of information pertaining to charge screening, ion diffusion, and electrochemical processes (e.g., Faradaic reactions). EcFM measurements conducted in isopropanol and milli-Q water over Au and highly ordered pyrolytic graphite electrodes demonstrate both sample- and solvent-dependent features. Finally, the feasibility of using EcFM as a local force-based mapping technique of material-dependent electrostatic and electrochemical response is investigated. The resultant high dimensional dataset is visualized using a purely statistical approach that does not require a priori physical models, allowing for qualitative mapping of electrostatic and electrochemical material properties at the solid–liquid interface.« less

  17. Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy in liquid using Electrochemical Force Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Liam; Jesse, Stephen; Kilpatrick, J.; Tselev, Alexander; Okatan, Mahmut Baris; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Rodriguez, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Conventional closed loop-Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) has emerged as a powerful technique for probing electric and transport phenomena at the solid-gas interface. The extension of KPFM capabilities to probe electrostatic and electrochemical phenomena at the solid–liquid interface is of interest for a broad range of applications from energy storage to biological systems. However, the operation of KPFM implicitly relies on the presence of a linear lossless dielectric in the probe-sample gap, a condition which is violated for ionically-active liquids (e.g., when diffuse charge dynamics are present). Here, electrostatic and electrochemical measurements are demonstrated in ionically-active (polar isopropanol, milli-Q water and aqueous NaCl) and ionically-inactive (non-polar decane) liquids by electrochemical force microscopy (EcFM), a multidimensional (i.e., bias- and time-resolved) spectroscopy method. In the absence of mobile charges (ambient and non-polar liquids), KPFM and EcFM are both feasible, yielding comparable contact potential difference (CPD) values. In ionically-active liquids, KPFM is not possible and EcFM can be used to measure the dynamic CPD and a rich spectrum of information pertaining to charge screening, ion diffusion, and electrochemical processes (e.g., Faradaic reactions). EcFM measurements conducted in isopropanol and milli-Q water over Au and highly ordered pyrolytic graphite electrodes demonstrate both sample- and solvent-dependent features. Finally, the feasibility of using EcFM as a local force-based mapping technique of material-dependent electrostatic and electrochemical response is investigated. The resultant high dimensional dataset is visualized using a purely statistical approach that does not require a priori physical models, allowing for qualitative mapping of electrostatic and electrochemical material properties at the solid–liquid interface.

  18. Algorithmic methods in diffraction microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibault, Pierre

    Recent diffraction imaging techniques use properties of coherent sources (most notably x-rays and electrons) to transfer a portion of the imaging task to computer algorithms. "Diffraction microscopy" is a method which consists in reconstructing the image of a specimen from its diffraction pattern. Because only the amplitude of a wavefield incident on a detector is measured, reconstruction of the image entails to recovering the lost phases. This extension of the 'phase problem" commonly met in crystallography is solved only if additional information is available. The main topic of this thesis is the development of algorithmic techniques in diffraction microscopy. In addition to introducing new methods, it is meant to be a review of the algorithmic aspects of the field of diffractive imaging. An overview of the scattering approximations used in the interpretation of diffraction datasets is first given, as well as a numerical propagation tool useful in conditions where known approximations fail. Concepts central to diffraction microscopy---such as oversampling---are then introduced and other similar imaging techniques described. A complete description of iterative reconstruction algorithms follows, with a special emphasis on the difference map, the algorithm used in this thesis. The formalism, based on constraint sets and projection onto these sets, is then defined and explained. Simple projections commonly used in diffraction imaging are then described. The various ways experimental realities can affect reconstruction methods will then be enumerated. Among the diverse sources of algorithmic difficulties, one finds that noise, missing data and partial coherence are typically the most important. Other related difficulties discussed are the detrimental effects of crystalline domains in a specimen, and the convergence problems occurring when the support of a complex-valued specimen is not well known. The last part of this thesis presents reconstruction results; an

  19. Multiphoton microscopy in life sciences.

    PubMed

    König, K

    2000-11-01

    Near infrared (NIR) multiphoton microscopy is becoming a novel optical tool of choice for fluorescence imaging with high spatial and temporal resolution, diagnostics, photochemistry and nanoprocessing within living cells and tissues. Three-dimensional fluorescence imaging based on non-resonant two-photon or three-photon fluorophor excitation requires light intensities in the range of MW cm(-2) to GW cm(-2), which can be derived by diffraction limited focusing of continuous wave and pulsed NIR laser radiation. NIR lasers can be employed as the excitation source for multifluorophor multiphoton excitation and hence multicolour imaging. In combination with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), this novel approach can be used for multi-gene detection (multiphoton multicolour FISH). Owing to the high NIR penetration depth, non-invasive optical biopsies can be obtained from patients and ex vivo tissue by morphological and functional fluorescence imaging of endogenous fluorophores such as NAD(P)H, flavin, lipofuscin, porphyrins, collagen and elastin. Recent botanical applications of multiphoton microscopy include depth-resolved imaging of pigments (chlorophyll) and green fluorescent proteins as well as non-invasive fluorophore loading into single living plant cells. Non-destructive fluorescence imaging with multiphoton microscopes is limited to an optical window. Above certain intensities, multiphoton laser microscopy leads to impaired cellular reproduction, formation of giant cells, oxidative stress and apoptosis-like cell death. Major intracellular targets of photodamage in animal cells are mitochondria as well as the Golgi apparatus. The damage is most likely based on a two-photon excitation process rather than a one-photon or three-photon event. Picosecond and femtosecond laser microscopes therefore provide approximately the same safe relative optical window for two-photon vital cell studies. In labelled cells, additional phototoxic effects may occur via

  20. DAS: A Data Management System for Instrument Tests and Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frailis, M.; Sartor, S.; Zacchei, A.; Lodi, M.; Cirami, R.; Pasian, F.; Trifoglio, M.; Bulgarelli, A.; Gianotti, F.; Franceschi, E.; Nicastro, L.; Conforti, V.; Zoli, A.; Smart, R.; Morbidelli, R.; Dadina, M.

    2014-05-01

    The Data Access System (DAS) is a and data management software system, providing a reusable solution for the storage of data acquired both from telescopes and auxiliary data sources during the instrument development phases and operations. It is part of the Customizable Instrument WorkStation system (CIWS-FW), a framework for the storage, processing and quick-look at the data acquired from scientific instruments. The DAS provides a data access layer mainly targeted to software applications: quick-look displays, pre-processing pipelines and scientific workflows. It is logically organized in three main components: an intuitive and compact Data Definition Language (DAS DDL) in XML format, aimed for user-defined data types; an Application Programming Interface (DAS API), automatically adding classes and methods supporting the DDL data types, and providing an object-oriented query language; a data management component, which maps the metadata of the DDL data types in a relational Data Base Management System (DBMS), and stores the data in a shared (network) file system. With the DAS DDL, developers define the data model for a particular project, specifying for each data type the metadata attributes, the data format and layout (if applicable), and named references to related or aggregated data types. Together with the DDL user-defined data types, the DAS API acts as the only interface to store, query and retrieve the metadata and data in the DAS system, providing both an abstract interface and a data model specific one in C, C++ and Python. The mapping of metadata in the back-end database is automatic and supports several relational DBMSs, including MySQL, Oracle and PostgreSQL.

  1. Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy in Neuroscience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte, Albert; Nebel, Michaela; Schuhmann, Wolfgang

    2010-07-01

    This article reviews recent work involving the application of scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) to the study of individual cultured living cells, with an emphasis on topographical and functional imaging of neuronal and secretory cells of the nervous and endocrine system. The basic principles of biological SECM and associated negative amperometric-feedback and generator/collector-mode SECM imaging are discussed, and successful use of the methodology for screening soft and fragile membranous objects is outlined. The drawbacks of the constant-height mode of probe movement and the benefits of the constant-distance mode of SECM operation are described. Finally, representative examples of constant-height and constant-distance mode SECM on a variety of live cells are highlighted to demonstrate the current status of single-cell SECM in general and of SECM in neuroscience in particular.

  2. Recent advances in Lorentz microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Phatak, C.; Petford-Long, A. K.; De Graef, M.

    2016-01-05

    Lorentz transmission electron microscopy (LTEM) has evolved from a qualitative magnetic domain observation technique to a quantitative technique for the determination of the magnetization state of a sample. Here, we describe recent developments in techniques and imaging modes, including the use of spherical aberration correction to improve the spatial resolution of LTEM into the single nanometer range, and novel in situ observation modes. We also review recent advances in the modeling of the wave optical magnetic phase shift as well as in the area of phase reconstruction by means of the Transport of Intensity Equation (TIE) approach, and discuss vectormore » field electron tomography, which has emerged as a powerful tool for the 3D reconstruction of magnetization configurations. Finally, we conclude this review with a brief overview of recent LTEM applications.« less

  3. Recent advances in Lorentz microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Phatak, C.; Petford-Long, A. K.; De Graef, M.

    2016-01-05

    Lorentz transmission electron microscopy (LTEM) has evolved from a qualitative magnetic domain observation technique to a quantitative technique for the determination of the magnetization state of a sample. Here, we describe recent developments in techniques and imaging modes, including the use of spherical aberration correction to improve the spatial resolution of LTEM into the single nanometer range, and novel in situ observation modes. We also review recent advances in the modeling of the wave optical magnetic phase shift as well as in the area of phase reconstruction by means of the Transport of Intensity Equation (TIE) approach, and discuss vector field electron tomography, which has emerged as a powerful tool for the 3D reconstruction of magnetization configurations. Finally, we conclude this review with a brief overview of recent LTEM applications.

  4. Differential Multiphoton Laser Scanning Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Field, Jeffrey J.; Sheetz, Kraig E.; Chandler, Eric V.; Hoover, Erich E.; Young, Michael D.; Ding, Shi-you; Sylvester, Anne W.; Kleinfeld, David; Squier, Jeff A.

    2016-01-01

    Multifocal multiphoton microscopy (MMM) in the biological and medical sciences has become an important tool for obtaining high resolution images at video rates. While current implementations of MMM achieve very high frame rates, they are limited in their applicability to essentially those biological samples that exhibit little or no scattering. In this paper, we report on a method for MMM in which imaging detection is not necessary (single element point detection is implemented), and is therefore fully compatible for use in imaging through scattering media. Further, we demonstrate that this method leads to a new type of MMM wherein it is possible to simultaneously obtain multiple images and view differences in excitation parameters in a single shot. PMID:27390511

  5. The cellular microscopy phenotype ontology.

    PubMed

    Jupp, Simon; Malone, James; Burdett, Tony; Heriche, Jean-Karim; Williams, Eleanor; Ellenberg, Jan; Parkinson, Helen; Rustici, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypic data derived from high content screening is currently annotated using free-text, thus preventing the integration of independent datasets, including those generated in different biological domains, such as cell lines, mouse and human tissues. We present the Cellular Microscopy Phenotype Ontology (CMPO), a species neutral ontology for describing phenotypic observations relating to the whole cell, cellular components, cellular processes and cell populations. CMPO is compatible with related ontology efforts, allowing for future cross-species integration of phenotypic data. CMPO was developed following a curator-driven approach where phenotype data were annotated by expert biologists following the Entity-Quality (EQ) pattern. These EQs were subsequently transformed into new CMPO terms following an established post composition process. CMPO is currently being utilized to annotate phenotypes associated with high content screening datasets stored in several image repositories including the Image Data Repository (IDR), MitoSys project database and the Cellular Phenotype Database to facilitate data browsing and discoverability.

  6. Phase Aberrations in Diffraction Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Marchesini, S; Chapman, H N; Barty, A; Howells, M R; Spence, J H; Cui, C; Weierstall, U; Minor, A M

    2005-09-29

    In coherent X-ray diffraction microscopy the diffraction pattern generated by a sample illuminated with coherent x-rays is recorded, and a computer algorithm recovers the unmeasured phases to synthesize an image. By avoiding the use of a lens the resolution is limited, in principle, only by the largest scattering angles recorded. However, the imaging task is shifted from the experiment to the computer, and the algorithm's ability to recover meaningful images in the presence of noise and limited prior knowledge may produce aberrations in the reconstructed image. We analyze the low order aberrations produced by our phase retrieval algorithms. We present two methods to improve the accuracy and stability of reconstructions.

  7. Superresolution microscopy with transient binding.

    PubMed

    Molle, Julia; Raab, Mario; Holzmeister, Susanne; Schmitt-Monreal, Daniel; Grohmann, Dina; He, Zhike; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2016-06-01

    For single-molecule localization based superresolution, the concentration of fluorescent labels has to be thinned out. This is commonly achieved by photophysically or photochemically deactivating subsets of molecules. Alternatively, apparent switching of molecules can be achieved by transient binding of fluorescent labels. Here, a diffusing dye yields bright fluorescent spots when binding to the structure of interest. As the binding interaction is weak, the labeling is reversible and the dye ligand construct diffuses back into solution. This approach of achieving superresolution by transient binding (STB) is reviewed in this manuscript. Different realizations of STB are discussed and compared to other localization-based superresolution modalities. We propose the development of labeling strategies that will make STB a highly versatile tool for superresolution microscopy at highest resolution.

  8. Differential Multiphoton Laser Scanning Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Jeffrey J.; Sheetz, Kraig E.; Chandler, Eric V.; Hoover, Erich E.; Young, Michael D.; Ding, Shi-you; Sylvester, Anne W.; Kleinfeld, David; Squier, Jeff A.

    2012-01-01

    Multifocal multiphoton laser scanning microscopy (mfMPLSM) in the biological and medical sciences has the potential to become a ubiquitous tool for obtaining high-resolution images at video rates. While current implementations of mfMPLSM achieve very high frame rates, they are limited in their applicability to essentially those biological samples that exhibit little or no scattering. In this paper, we report on a method for mfMPLSM in which whole-field detection with a single detector, rather than detection with a matrix of detectors, such as a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera, is implemented. This advance makes mfMPLSM fully compatible for use in imaging through scattering media. Further, we demonstrate that this method makes it possible to simultaneously obtain multiple images and view differences in excitation parameters in a single scan of the specimen.

  9. Epoxy Resins in Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Finck, Henry

    1960-01-01

    A method of embedding biological specimens in araldite 502 (Ciba) has been developed for materials available in the United States. Araldite-embedded tissues are suitable for electron microscopy, but the cutting qualities of the resin necessitates more than routine attention during microtomy. The rather high viscosity of araldite 502 also seems to be an unnecessary handicap. The less viscous epoxy epon 812 (Shell) produces specimens with improved cutting qualities, and has several features—low shrinkage and absence of specimen damage during cure, minimal compression of sections, relative absence of electron beam-induced section damage, etc.—which recommends it as a routine embedding material. The hardness of the cured resin can be easily adjusted by several methods to suit the materials embedded in it. Several problems and advantages of working with sections of epoxy resins are also discussed. PMID:13822825

  10. Multifocal interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yang; Chng, Xiong Kai Benjamin; Adie, Steven G.; Boppart, Stephen A.; Scott Carney, P.

    2014-01-01

    There is an inherent trade-off between transverse resolution and depth of field (DOF) in optical coherence tomography (OCT) which becomes a limiting factor for certain applications. Multifocal OCT and interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM) each provide a distinct solution to the trade-off through modification to the experiment or via post-processing, respectively. In this paper, we have solved the inverse problem of multifocal OCT and present a general algorithm for combining multiple ISAM datasets. Multifocal ISAM (MISAM) uses a regularized combination of the resampled datasets to bring advantages of both multifocal OCT and ISAM to achieve optimal transverse resolution, extended effective DOF and improved signal-to-noise ratio. We present theory, simulation and experimental results. PMID:24977909

  11. Compressed sensing traction force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Brask, Jonatan Bohr; Singla-Buxarrais, Guillem; Uroz, Marina; Vincent, Romaric; Trepat, Xavier

    2015-10-01

    Adherent cells exert traction forces on their substrate, and these forces play important roles in biological functions such as mechanosensing, cell differentiation and cancer invasion. The method of choice to assess these active forces is traction force microscopy (TFM). Despite recent advances, TFM remains highly sensitive to measurement noise and exhibits limited spatial resolution. To improve the resolution and noise robustness of TFM, here we adapt techniques from compressed sensing (CS) to the reconstruction of the traction field from the substrate displacement field. CS enables the recovery of sparse signals at higher resolution from lower resolution data. Focal adhesions (FAs) of adherent cells are spatially sparse implying that traction fields are also sparse. Here we show, by simulation and by experiment, that the CS approach enables circumventing the Nyquist-Shannon sampling theorem to faithfully reconstruct the traction field at a higher resolution than that of the displacement field. This allows reaching state-of-the-art resolution using only a medium magnification objective. We also find that CS improves reconstruction quality in the presence of noise. A great scientific advance of the past decade is the recognition that physical forces determine an increasing list of biological processes. Traction force microscopy which measures the forces that cells exert on their surroundings has seen significant recent improvements, however the technique remains sensitive to measurement noise and severely limited in spatial resolution. We exploit the fact that the force fields are sparse to boost the spatial resolution and noise robustness by applying ideas from compressed sensing. The novel method allows high resolution on a larger field of view. This may in turn allow better understanding of the cell forces at the multicellular level, which are known to be important in wound healing and cancer invasion. Copyright © 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier

  12. Resolution enhancement techniques in microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremer, Christoph; Masters, Barry R.

    2013-05-01

    We survey the history of resolution enhancement techniques in microscopy and their impact on current research in biomedicine. Often these techniques are labeled superresolution, or enhanced resolution microscopy, or light-optical nanoscopy. First, we introduce the development of diffraction theory in its relation to enhanced resolution; then we explore the foundations of resolution as expounded by the astronomers and the physicists and describe the conditions for which they apply. Then we elucidate Ernst Abbe's theory of optical formation in the microscope, and its experimental verification and dissemination to the world wide microscope communities. Second, we describe and compare the early techniques that can enhance the resolution of the microscope. Third, we present the historical development of various techniques that substantially enhance the optical resolution of the light microscope. These enhanced resolution techniques in their modern form constitute an active area of research with seminal applications in biology and medicine. Our historical survey of the field of resolution enhancement uncovers many examples of reinvention, rediscovery, and independent invention and development of similar proposals, concepts, techniques, and instruments. Attribution of credit is therefore confounded by the fact that for understandable reasons authors stress the achievements from their own research groups and sometimes obfuscate their contributions and the prior art of others. In some cases, attribution of credit is also made more complex by the fact that long term developments are difficult to allocate to a specific individual because of the many mutual connections often existing between sometimes fiercely competing, sometimes strongly collaborating groups. Since applications in biology and medicine have been a major driving force in the development of resolution enhancing approaches, we focus on the contribution of enhanced resolution to these fields.

  13. Electronic detectors for electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Faruqi, A R; McMullan, G

    2011-08-01

    Electron microscopy (EM) is an important tool for high-resolution structure determination in applications ranging from condensed matter to biology. Electronic detectors are now used in most applications in EM as they offer convenience and immediate feedback that is not possible with film or image plates. The earliest forms of electronic detector used routinely in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were charge coupled devices (CCDs) and for many applications these remain perfectly adequate. There are however applications, such as the study of radiation-sensitive biological samples, where film is still used and improved detectors would be of great value. The emphasis in this review is therefore on detectors for use in such applications. Two of the most promising candidates for improved detection are: monolithic active pixel sensors (MAPS) and hybrid pixel detectors (of which Medipix2 was chosen for this study). From the studies described in this review, a back-thinned MAPS detector appears well suited to replace film in for the study of radiation-sensitive samples at 300 keV, while Medipix2 is suited to use at lower energies and especially in situations with very low count rates. The performance of a detector depends on the energy of electrons to be recorded, which in turn is dependent on the application it is being used for; results are described for a wide range of electron energies ranging from 40 to 300 keV. The basic properties of detectors are discussed in terms of their modulation transfer function (MTF) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) as a function of spatial frequency.

  14. Interference techniques in fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, Mehmet

    We developed a set of interference-based optical microscopy techniques to study biological structures through nanometer-scale axial localization of fluorescent biomarkers. Spectral self-interference fluorescence microscopy (SSFM) utilizes interference of direct and reflected waves emitted from fluorescent molecules in the vicinity of planar reflectors to reveal the axial position of the molecules. A comprehensive calculation algorithm based on Green's function formalism is presented to verify the validity of approximations used in a far-field approach that describes the emission of fluorescent markers near interfaces. Using the validated model, theoretical limits of axial localization were determined with emphasis given to numerical aperture (NA) dependence of localization uncertainty. SSFM was experimentally demonstrated in conformational analysis of nucleoproteins. In particular, interaction between surface-tethered 75-mer double strand DNA and integration host factor (IHF) protein was probed on Si-SiO2 substrates by determining the axial position of fluorescent labels attached to the free ends of DNA molecules. Despite its sub-nanometer precision axial localization capability, SSFM lacks high lateral resolution due to the low-NA requirement for planar reflectors. We developed a second technique, 4Pi-SSFM, which improves the lateral resolution of a conventional SSFM system by an order of magnitude while achieving nanometer-scale axial localization precision. Using two opposing high-NA objectives, fluorescence signal is interferometrically collected and spectral interference pattern is recorded. Axial position of emitters is found from analysis of the spectra. The 4Pi-SSFM technique was experimentally demonstrated by determining the surface profiles of fabricated glass surfaces and outer membranes of Shigella, a type of Gram-negative bacteria. A further discussion is presented to localize surface O antigen, which is an important oligosaccharide structure in the

  15. Pedagogical basis of DAS formalism in engineering education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiltunen, J.; Heikkinen, E.-P.; Jaako, J.; Ahola, J.

    2011-03-01

    The paper presents a new approach for a bachelor-level curriculum structure in engineering. The approach is called DAS formalism according to its three phases: description, analysis and synthesis. Although developed specifically for process and environmental engineering, DAS formalism has a generic nature and it could also be used in other engineering fields. The motivation for this new curriculum structure originates from the urge to solve the problems that engineering education has faced during the past decades, e.g. student recruitment problems and dissatisfactory learning outcomes. The focus of this paper is on the structure of the curriculum but the content is also discussed when it has an effect on the structure and its implementation. The presented structure, i.e. DAS formalism, builds upon the ideas of some classical pedagogical theories, which have regularly been applied at course level but seldom used to solve curriculum-level issues.

  16. Scanning Tunneling Optical Resonance Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila; Wilt, Dave; Raffaelle, Ryne; Gennett, Tom; Tin, Padetha; Lau, Janice; Castro, Stephanie; Jenkins, Philip; Scheiman, Dave

    2003-01-01

    Scanning tunneling optical resonance microscopy (STORM) is a method, now undergoing development, for measuring optoelectronic properties of materials and devices on the nanoscale by means of a combination of (1) traditional scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) with (2) tunable laser spectroscopy. In STORM, an STM tip probing a semiconductor is illuminated with modulated light at a wavelength in the visible-to-near-infrared range and the resulting photoenhancement of the tunneling current is measured as a function of the illuminating wavelength. The photoenhancement of tunneling current occurs when the laser photon energy is sufficient to excite charge carriers into the conduction band of the semiconductor. Figure 1 schematically depicts a proposed STORM apparatus. The light for illuminating the semiconductor specimen at the STM would be generated by a ring laser that would be tunable across the wavelength range of interest. The laser beam would be chopped by an achromatic liquid-crystal modulator. A polarization-maintaining optical fiber would couple the light to the tip/sample junction of a commercial STM. An STM can be operated in one of two modes: constant height or constant current. A STORM apparatus would be operated in the constant-current mode, in which the height of the tip relative to the specimen would be varied in order to keep the tunneling current constant. In this mode, a feedback control circuit adjusts the voltage applied to a piezoelectric actuator in the STM that adjusts the height of the STM tip to keep the tunneling current constant. The exponential relationship between the tunneling current and tip-to-sample distance makes it relatively easy to implement this mode of operation. The choice of method by which the photoenhanced portion of the tunneling current would be measured depends on choice of the frequency at which the input illumination would be modulated (chopped). If the frequency of modulation were low enough (typically < 10 Hz) that the

  17. Developments in optical coherence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolland, J. P.; Meemon, P.; Thompson, K. P.; Murali, S.; Lee, K. S.

    2010-11-01

    Optical Coherence Microscopy (OCM) utilizes a high NA microscope objective in the sample arm to achieve an axially and laterally high resolution OCT image. An increase in NA, however, leads to a dramatically decreased depth of focus (DOF), and hence shortens the imaging depth range so that high lateral resolution is maintained only within a small depth region around the focal plane. One solution to increase the depth of imaging while keeping a high lateral resolution is dynamic-focusing. Utilizing the voltage controlled refocus capability of a liquid lens, we have recently presented a solution for invariant high resolution imaging using the liquid lens embedded within a fixed optics hand-held custom microscope designed specifically for optical imaging systems using a broadband light source centered at 800 nm with a 120 nm bandwidth. Subsequently, we have developed a Gabor-Domain Optical Coherence Microscopy (GD-OCM) that utilizes the high speed imaging of spectral domain OCT, the high lateral resolution of OCM, and the ability of real time refocusing of our custom design variable focus objective. Finally, key developments in Phase-Resolved Doppler OCT (PR-DOCT) are key enablers to combine high-resolution structural imaging with functional imaging. In this paper we review achievements in GD-OCM and detail how portions of in-focus cross-sectional images can be extracted and fused to form an invariant lateral resolution image with multiple cross-sectional images acquired corresponding to a discrete refocusing step along depth enabled by the varifocal device. We demonstrate sub-cellular resolution imaging of an African frog tadpole (Xenopus Laevis) taken from a 500 μm × 500 μm cross-section as well as cellular imaging in in vivo skin. Finally, A novel dual-detection full-range Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography system was developed that provides 7 μm axial resolution (in air) at about 90 kHz axial scan rate for mirror-image phase resolved Doppler imaging

  18. Advances in quantitative Kerr microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldatov, I. V.; Schäfer, R.

    2017-01-01

    An advanced wide-field Kerr microscopy approach to the vector imaging of magnetic domains is demonstrated. Utilizing the light from eight monochrome light emitting diodes, guided to the microscope by glass fibers, and being properly switched in synchronization with the camera exposure, domain images with orthogonal in-plane sensitivity are obtained simultaneously at real time. After calibrating the Kerr contrast under the same orthogonal sensitivity conditions, the magnetization vector field of complete magnetization cycles along the hysteresis loop can be calculated and plotted as a coded color or vector image. In the pulsed mode also parasitic, magnetic field-dependent Faraday rotations in the microscope optics are eliminated, thus increasing the accuracy of the measured magnetization angles to better than 5∘. The method is applied to the investigation of the magnetization process in a patterned Permalloy film element. Furthermore it is shown that the effective magnetic anisotropy axes in a GaMnAs semiconducting film can be quantitatively measured by vectorial analysis of the domain structure.

  19. Holographic microscopy in low coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmelík, Radim; Petráček, Jiří; Slabá, Michala; Kollárová, Věra; Slabý, Tomáš; Čolláková, Jana; Komrska, Jiří; Dostál, Zbyněk.; Veselý, Pavel

    2016-03-01

    Low coherence of the illumination substantially improves the quality of holographic and quantitative phase imaging (QPI) by elimination of the coherence noise and various artefacts and by improving the lateral resolution compared to the coherent holographic microscopy. Attributes of coherence-controlled holographic microscope (CCHM) designed and built as an off-axis holographic system allowing QPI within the range from complete coherent to incoherent illumination confirmed these expected advantages. Low coherence illumination also furnishes the coherence gating which constraints imaging of some spatial frequencies of an object axially thus forming an optical section in the wide sense. In this way the depth discrimination capability of the microscope is introduced at the price of restricting the axial interval of possible numerical refocusing. We describe theoretically these effects for the whole range of illumination coherence. We also show that the axial refocusing constraints can be overcome using advanced mode of imaging based on mutual lateral shift of reference and object image fields in CCHM. Lowering the spatial coherence of illumination means increasing its numerical aperture. We study how this change of the illumination geometry influences 3D objects QPI and especially the interpretation of live cells QPI in terms of the dry mass density measurement. In this way a strong dependence of the imaging process on the light coherence is demonstrated. The theoretical calculations and numerical simulations are supported by experimental data including a chance of time-lapse watching of live cells even in optically turbid milieu.

  20. Nanorheology by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tai-De; Chiu, Hsiang-Chih; Ortiz-Young, Deborah; Riedo, Elisa

    2014-12-01

    We present an Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based method to investigate the rheological properties of liquids confined within a nanosize gap formed by an AFM tip apex and a solid substrate. In this method, a conventional AFM cantilever is sheared parallel to a substrate surface by means of a lock-in amplifier while it is approaching and retracting from the substrate in liquid. The normal solvation forces and lateral viscoelastic shear forces experienced by the AFM tip in liquid can be simultaneously measured as a function of the tip-substrate distance with sub-nanometer vertical resolution. A new calibration method is applied to compensate for the linear drift of the piezo transducer and substrate system, leading to a more precise determination of the tip-substrate distance. By monitoring the phase lag between the driving signal and the cantilever response in liquid, the frequency dependent viscoelastic properties of the confined liquid can also be derived. Finally, we discuss the results obtained with this technique from different liquid-solid interfaces. Namely, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane and water on mica and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

  1. Liquid Cell Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hong-Gang; Zheng, Haimei

    2016-05-27

    Liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has attracted significant interest in recent years. With nanofabricated liquid cells, it has been possible to image through liquids using TEM with subnanometer resolution, and many previously unseen materials dynamics have been revealed. Liquid cell TEM has been applied to many areas of research, ranging from chemistry to physics, materials science, and biology. So far, topics of study include nanoparticle growth and assembly, electrochemical deposition and lithiation for batteries, tracking and manipulation of nanoparticles, catalysis, and imaging of biological materials. In this article, we first review the development of liquid cell TEM and then highlight progress in various areas of research. In the study of nanoparticle growth, the electron beam can serve both as the illumination source for imaging and as the input energy for reactions. However, many other research topics require the control of electron beam effects to minimize electron beam damage. We discuss efforts to understand electron beam-liquid matter interactions. Finally, we provide a perspective on future challenges and opportunities in liquid cell TEM.

  2. Disposable optics for microscopy diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Vilmi, Pauliina; Varjo, Sami; Sliz, Rafal; Hannuksela, Jari; Fabritius, Tapio

    2015-01-01

    The point-of-care testing (POCT) is having increasing role on modern health care systems due to a possibility to perform tests for patients conveniently and immediately. POCT includes lot of disposable devices because of the environment they are often used. For a disposable system to be reasonably utilized, it needs to be high in quality but low in price. Optics based POCT systems are interesting approach to be developed, and here we describe a low-cost fabrication process for microlens arrays for microscopy. Lens arrays having average lens diameter of 222 μm with 300 μm lens pitch were fabricated. The lenses were characterized to have standard deviation of 0.06 μm in height and 4.61 μm in diameter. The resolution limit of 3.9μm is demonstrated with real images, and the images were compared with ones made with glass and polycarbonate lens arrays. The image quality is at the same level than with the glass lenses and the manufacturing costs are very low, thus making them suitable for POCT applications. PMID:26586153

  3. Autofocusing in digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langehanenberg, Patrik; von Bally, Gert; Kemper, Björn

    2011-03-01

    Many applications in non-destructive testing at a microscopic level and in live cell imaging require automated focusing due to unstable environmental conditions, moving specimen or the limited depth of field of the applied optical imaging systems. Digital holography permits the recording and the numerical reconstruction of optical wave fields in amplitude and phase. This enables imaging of multiple focal planes from a single recorded hologram without mechanical realignment. The combination of numerical refocusing with image sharpness quantification algorithms yields subsequent autofocusing. With calibrated optical imaging systems this feature can be used also to determine the position and axial displacements of a sample. In order to show the application potential of digital holographic autofocusing in microscopy the method and results from investigations on several amplitude and phase objects are reviewed. This includes a demonstration of the reliability of automated refocusing, multi-focus quantitative phase contrast imaging of suspended cells, refocusing of quantitative phase contrast images during the analysis of the temporal dependency of cell spreading on surfaces and the quantification of toxin mediated morphological cell alterations during long-term observations. It is also shown for the example of sedimenting red blood cells that the method can be applied for minimally-invasive tracking of multiple particles. Finally, the usage of numerical autofocus for quantitative migration analysis of arbitrary shaped cells in a three-dimensional collagen matrix is demonstrated. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  4. Spectroscopic imaging in electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pennycook, Stephen J; Colliex, C.

    2012-01-01

    In the scanning transmission electron microscope, multiple signals can be simultaneously collected, including the transmitted and scattered electron signals (bright field and annular dark field or Z-contrast images), along with spectroscopic signals such as inelastically scattered electrons and emitted photons. In the last few years, the successful development of aberration correctors for the electron microscope has transformed the field of electron microscopy, opening up new possibilities for correlating structure to functionality. Aberration correction not only allows for enhanced structural resolution with incident probes into the sub-angstrom range, but can also provide greater probe currents to facilitate mapping of intrinsically weak spectroscopic signals at the nanoscale or even the atomic level. In this issue of MRS Bulletin, we illustrate the power of the new generation of electron microscopes with a combination of imaging and spectroscopy. We show the mapping of elemental distributions at atomic resolution and also the mapping of electronic and optical properties at unprecedented spatial resolution, with applications ranging from graphene to plasmonic nanostructures, and oxide interfaces to biology.

  5. Nanorheology by atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tai-De; Chiu, Hsiang-Chih; Ortiz-Young, Deborah; Riedo, Elisa

    2014-12-15

    We present an Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based method to investigate the rheological properties of liquids confined within a nanosize gap formed by an AFM tip apex and a solid substrate. In this method, a conventional AFM cantilever is sheared parallel to a substrate surface by means of a lock-in amplifier while it is approaching and retracting from the substrate in liquid. The normal solvation forces and lateral viscoelastic shear forces experienced by the AFM tip in liquid can be simultaneously measured as a function of the tip-substrate distance with sub-nanometer vertical resolution. A new calibration method is applied to compensate for the linear drift of the piezo transducer and substrate system, leading to a more precise determination of the tip-substrate distance. By monitoring the phase lag between the driving signal and the cantilever response in liquid, the frequency dependent viscoelastic properties of the confined liquid can also be derived. Finally, we discuss the results obtained with this technique from different liquid-solid interfaces. Namely, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane and water on mica and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

  6. Electron microscopy and forensic practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotrlý, Marek; Turková, Ivana

    2013-05-01

    Electron microanalysis in forensic practice ranks among basic applications used in investigation of traces (latents, stains, etc.) from crime scenes. Applying electron microscope allows for rapid screening and receiving initial information for a wide range of traces. SEM with EDS/WDS makes it possible to observe topography surface and morphology samples and examination of chemical components. Physical laboratory of the Institute of Criminalistics Prague use SEM especially for examination of inorganic samples, rarely for biology and other material. Recently, possibilities of electron microscopy have been extended considerably using dual systems with focused ion beam. These systems are applied mainly in study of inner micro and nanoparticles , thin layers (intersecting lines in graphical forensic examinations, analysis of layers of functional glass, etc.), study of alloys microdefects, creating 3D particles and aggregates models, etc. Automated mineralogical analyses are a great asset to analysis of mineral phases, particularly soils, similarly it holds for cathode luminescence, predominantly colour one and precise quantitative measurement of their spectral characteristics. Among latest innovations that are becoming to appear also at ordinary laboratories are TOF - SIMS systems and micro Raman spectroscopy with a resolution comparable to EDS/WDS analysis (capable of achieving similar level as through EDS/WDS analysis).

  7. Lensfree microscopy on a cellphone.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Derek; Mudanyali, Onur; Oztoprak, Cetin; Isikman, Serhan O; Sencan, Ikbal; Yaglidere, Oguzhan; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2010-07-21

    We demonstrate lensfree digital microscopy on a cellphone. This compact and light-weight holographic microscope installed on a cellphone does not utilize any lenses, lasers or other bulky optical components and it may offer a cost-effective tool for telemedicine applications to address various global health challenges. Weighing approximately 38 grams (<1.4 ounces), this lensfree imaging platform can be mechanically attached to the camera unit of a cellphone where the samples are loaded from the side, and are vertically illuminated by a simple light-emitting diode (LED). This incoherent LED light is then scattered from each micro-object to coherently interfere with the background light, creating the lensfree hologram of each object on the detector array of the cellphone. These holographic signatures captured by the cellphone permit reconstruction of microscopic images of the objects through rapid digital processing. We report the performance of this lensfree cellphone microscope by imaging various sized micro-particles, as well as red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets and a waterborne parasite (Giardia lamblia).

  8. Thermal radiation scanning tunnelling microscopy.

    PubMed

    De Wilde, Yannick; Formanek, Florian; Carminati, Rémi; Gralak, Boris; Lemoine, Paul-Arthur; Joulain, Karl; Mulet, Jean-Philippe; Chen, Yong; Greffet, Jean-Jacques

    2006-12-07

    In standard near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM), a subwavelength probe acts as an optical 'stethoscope' to map the near field produced at the sample surface by external illumination. This technique has been applied using visible, infrared, terahertz and gigahertz radiation to illuminate the sample, providing a resolution well beyond the diffraction limit. NSOM is well suited to study surface waves such as surface plasmons or surface-phonon polaritons. Using an aperture NSOM with visible laser illumination, a near-field interference pattern around a corral structure has been observed, whose features were similar to the scanning tunnelling microscope image of the electronic waves in a quantum corral. Here we describe an infrared NSOM that operates without any external illumination: it is a near-field analogue of a night-vision camera, making use of the thermal infrared evanescent fields emitted by the surface, and behaves as an optical scanning tunnelling microscope. We therefore term this instrument a 'thermal radiation scanning tunnelling microscope' (TRSTM). We show the first TRSTM images of thermally excited surface plasmons, and demonstrate spatial coherence effects in near-field thermal emission.

  9. Liquid Cell Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Hong-Gang; Zheng, Haimei

    2016-05-01

    Liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has attracted significant interest in recent years. With nanofabricated liquid cells, it has been possible to image through liquids using TEM with subnanometer resolution, and many previously unseen materials dynamics have been revealed. Liquid cell TEM has been applied to many areas of research, ranging from chemistry to physics, materials science, and biology. So far, topics of study include nanoparticle growth and assembly, electrochemical deposition and lithiation for batteries, tracking and manipulation of nanoparticles, catalysis, and imaging of biological materials. In this article, we first review the development of liquid cell TEM and then highlight progress in various areas of research. In the study of nanoparticle growth, the electron beam can serve both as the illumination source for imaging and as the input energy for reactions. However, many other research topics require the control of electron beam effects to minimize electron beam damage. We discuss efforts to understand electron beam-liquid matter interactions. Finally, we provide a perspective on future challenges and opportunities in liquid cell TEM.

  10. Picosecond Fresnel transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schliep, Karl B.; Quarterman, P.; Wang, Jian-Ping; Flannigan, David J.

    2017-05-01

    We report the demonstration of picosecond Fresnel imaging with an ultrafast transmission electron microscope (UEM). By operating with a low instrument repetition rate (5 kHz) and without objective-lens excitation, the picosecond demagnetization of an FePt film, via in situ, femtosecond laser excitation, is directly imaged. The dynamics are quantified and monitored as a time-dependent change in the degree of electron coherence within the magnetic domain walls. The relative coherence of conventional (thermionic) Fresnel transmission electron microscopy is also directly compared to that of Fresnel UEM through the domain-wall size. Further, the robustness and reversibility of the domain-wall dynamics are illustrated by repeating the picosecond image scans at defocus values having the same magnitude but different signs (e.g., +25 mm vs. -25 mm). Control experiments and approaches to identifying and isolating systematic errors and sources of artifacts are also described. This work, and continued future developments also described here, opens the way to direct correlation of transient structure, morphology, and magnetic dynamics in magnetic thin films and spintronic devices.

  11. Disposable optics for microscopy diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Vilmi, Pauliina; Varjo, Sami; Sliz, Rafal; Hannuksela, Jari; Fabritius, Tapio

    2015-11-20

    The point-of-care testing (POCT) is having increasing role on modern health care systems due to a possibility to perform tests for patients conveniently and immediately. POCT includes lot of disposable devices because of the environment they are often used. For a disposable system to be reasonably utilized, it needs to be high in quality but low in price. Optics based POCT systems are interesting approach to be developed, and here we describe a low-cost fabrication process for microlens arrays for microscopy. Lens arrays having average lens diameter of 222 μm with 300 μm lens pitch were fabricated. The lenses were characterized to have standard deviation of 0.06 μm in height and 4.61 μm in diameter. The resolution limit of 3.9μm is demonstrated with real images, and the images were compared with ones made with glass and polycarbonate lens arrays. The image quality is at the same level than with the glass lenses and the manufacturing costs are very low, thus making them suitable for POCT applications.

  12. Nanorheology by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Tai-De; Chiu, Hsiang-Chih; Ortiz-Young, Deborah; Riedo, Elisa

    2014-12-01

    We present an Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based method to investigate the rheological properties of liquids confined within a nanosize gap formed by an AFM tip apex and a solid substrate. In this method, a conventional AFM cantilever is sheared parallel to a substrate surface by means of a lock-in amplifier while it is approaching and retracting from the substrate in liquid. The normal solvation forces and lateral viscoelastic shear forces experienced by the AFM tip in liquid can be simultaneously measured as a function of the tip-substrate distance with sub-nanometer vertical resolution. A new calibration method is applied to compensate for the linear drift of the piezo transducer and substrate system, leading to a more precise determination of the tip-substrate distance. By monitoring the phase lag between the driving signal and the cantilever response in liquid, the frequency dependent viscoelastic properties of the confined liquid can also be derived. Finally, we discuss the results obtained with this technique from different liquid-solid interfaces. Namely, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane and water on mica and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

  13. Photoacoustic microscopy of human teeth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Bin; Cai, Xin; Favazza, Christopher; Yao, Junjie; Li, Li; Duong, Steven; Liaw, Lih-Huei; Holtzman, Jennifer; Wilder-Smith, Petra; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-03-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) utilizes short laser pulses to deposit energy into light absorbers and sensitively detects the ultrasonic waves the absorbers generate in response. PAM directly renders a three-dimensional spatial distribution of sub-surface optical absorbers. Unlike other optical imaging technologies, PAM features label-free optical absorption contrast and excellent imaging depths. Standard dental imaging instruments are limited to X-ray and CCD cameras. Subsurface optical dental imaging is difficult due to the highly-scattering enamel and dentin tissue. Thus, very few imaging methods can detect dental decay or diagnose dental pulp, which is the innermost part of the tooth, containing the nerves, blood vessels, and other cells. Here, we conducted a feasibility study on imaging dental decay and dental pulp with PAM. Our results showed that PAM is sensitive to the color change associated with dental decay. Although the relative PA signal distribution may be affected by surface contours and subsurface reflections from deeper dental tissue, monitoring changes in the PA signals (at the same site) over time is necessary to identify the progress of dental decay. Our results also showed that deep-imaging, near-infrared (NIR) PAM can sensitively image blood in the dental pulp of an in vitro tooth. In conclusion, PAM is a promising tool for imaging both dental decay and dental pulp.

  14. Vallabhaneni Sita Rama Das, 1933-2010: teacher and mentor.

    PubMed

    Elchuri, Sailaja V; Govindjee

    2016-05-01

    We present here the life and research of V. S. Rama Das, a distinguished Indian botanist who specialized in photosynthesis. He was the first to purify chloroplasts that were free of mitochondrial contamination. He then studied C4, C3-C4 intermediate and CAM pathways, as well as their taxonomic distribution in tropical climates. His most valuable legacy is that he, as a philosopher, inspired and guided many students to pursue their research career in India. Also see Narayana and Pullaiah (Eminent Indian Botanists: Past and present: Biographies and contributions, pp 394-401, 2010) and Raghavendra and Reddy (Curr Sci 101:798-799, 2011) for further information on Rama Das.

  15. Confocal diffraction phase microscopy of live cells.

    PubMed

    Lue, Niyom; Choi, Wonshik; Badizadegan, Kamran; Dasari, Ramachandra R; Feld, Michael S; Popescu, Gabriel

    2008-09-15

    We present a new quantitative phase microscopy technique, confocal diffraction phase microscopy, which provides quantitative phase measurements from localized sites on a sample with high sensitivity. The technique combines common-path interferometry with confocal microscopy in a transmission geometry. The capability of the technique for static imaging is demonstrated by imaging polystyrene microspheres and live HT29 cells, while dynamic imaging is demonstrated by quantifying the nanometer scale fluctuations of red blood cell membranes.

  16. Enhanced effects with scanning force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howells, S.; Chen, T.; Gallagher, M.; Yi, L.; Sarid, D.

    1991-05-01

    A general theory that describes the operation of scanning force microscopy in the contact force regime is presented. It is shown that force derivatives along the surface of a sample produce images that can be dramatically enhanced relative to those of surface topography. For scanning tunneling microscopy atomic force microscopy configurations, the spring constant of the cantilever and the force derivatives perpendicular to the surface of the sample determine the enhancement, respectively.

  17. Scanning Tip Microscopy With Applications To Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarid, Dror; Thall, Edmond H.; Iams, Douglas A.; Ingle, Jeffery T.; Henson, Tammy D.; Lee, Y. C.; Bell, L. Stephen

    1989-06-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy and atomic force microscopy, denoted here scanning tip microscopy, are two powerful novel techniques for imaging surfaces with atomic resolution. We describe the underlying principles of these two techniques with special emphasis on an instrument developed in our laboratory that uses a laser diode to detect minute deflections of a tip as it raster scans the surface of a sample. Applications of these techniques to research in biology are assessed and their relative merits discussed.

  18. Wavelength Independent Optical Microscopy and Lithography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-31

    Leviatan , Y., J. Appl. Phys. 60, 1577 (1986). 7. Harootunian, A., Near-Field Scanning Optical Microscopy and Raman Microscopy, Cornell University Ph.D...although the approach used may not be valid in the Another potential problem concerns the effect of the near field. More recently, Leviatan 21...Massey, "Microscopy and Pattern Generation With Scanned Evanescent Waves," AppL. Opt. 23, 658 (1984). The authors wish to thank Yehuda Leviatan for 21

  19. Scanning Optical Microscopy Applied To Fluorometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roblin, Gerard; Bernstein, Leon

    1987-08-01

    Scanning Optical Microscopy, able to reconstruct, pixel after pixel, low noise images with the expected microscope resolution, is especially suitable for quantitative microscopy. Use of a bright, monochromatic spot of light extends its field of application to fluo-rescence Microscopy. Description of a typical device is given and the problems encountered to realize the scan of the laser beam are discussed. Results relating to transmitted light images as well as to epifluorescence images and spectral analysis are shown.

  20. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Quasicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Russell S.; Kortan, A. Refik

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * EXPERIMENTAL * X-RAY DIFFRACTION * SCANNING TUNNELING MICROSCOPY * STRUCTURE MODELLING BASED ON STM * COMPARISON WITH MODELS BASED ON BULK STUDIES * CONCLUSION * REFERENCES

  1. The development of the disease activity score (DAS) and the disease activity score using 28 joint counts (DAS28).

    PubMed

    van Riel, P L C M

    2014-01-01

    In rheumatoid arthritis, disease activity cannot be measured using a single variable. The Disease Activity Score (DAS) has been developed as a quantitative index to be able to measure, study and manage disease activity in RA in daily clinical practice, clinical trials, and long term observational studies. The DAS is a continuous measure of RA disease activity that combines information from swollen joints, tender joints, acute phase response and patient self-report of general health. Cut points were developed to classify patients in remission, as well as low, moderate, and severe disease activity in the 1990s. DAS-based EULAR response criteria were primarily developed to be used in clinical trials to classify individual patients as non-, moderate, or good responders, depending on the magnitude of change and absolute level of disease activity at the conclusion of the test.

  2. The 2015 super-resolution microscopy roadmap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hell, Stefan W.; Sahl, Steffen J.; Bates, Mark; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Heintzmann, Rainer; Booth, Martin J.; Bewersdorf, Joerg; Shtengel, Gleb; Hess, Harald; Tinnefeld, Philip; Honigmann, Alf; Jakobs, Stefan; Testa, Ilaria; Cognet, Laurent; Lounis, Brahim; Ewers, Helge; Davis, Simon J.; Eggeling, Christian; Klenerman, David; Willig, Katrin I.; Vicidomini, Giuseppe; Castello, Marco; Diaspro, Alberto; Cordes, Thorben

    2015-11-01

    Far-field optical microscopy using focused light is an important tool in a number of scientific disciplines including chemical, (bio)physical and biomedical research, particularly with respect to the study of living cells and organisms. Unfortunately, the applicability of the optical microscope is limited, since the diffraction of light imposes limitations on the spatial resolution of the image. Consequently the details of, for example, cellular protein distributions, can be visualized only to a certain extent. Fortunately, recent years have witnessed the development of ‘super-resolution’ far-field optical microscopy (nanoscopy) techniques such as stimulated emission depletion (STED), ground state depletion (GSD), reversible saturated optical (fluorescence) transitions (RESOLFT), photoactivation localization microscopy (PALM), stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM), structured illumination microscopy (SIM) or saturated structured illumination microscopy (SSIM), all in one way or another addressing the problem of the limited spatial resolution of far-field optical microscopy. While SIM achieves a two-fold improvement in spatial resolution compared to conventional optical microscopy, STED, RESOLFT, PALM/STORM, or SSIM have all gone beyond, pushing the limits of optical image resolution to the nanometer scale. Consequently, all super-resolution techniques open new avenues of biomedical research. Because the field is so young, the potential capabilities of different super-resolution microscopy approaches have yet to be fully explored, and uncertainties remain when considering the best choice of methodology. Thus, even for experts, the road to the future is sometimes shrouded in mist. The super-resolution optical microscopy roadmap of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics addresses this need for clarity. It provides guidance to the outstanding questions through a collection of short review articles from experts in the field, giving a thorough

  3. ProServer: a simple, extensible Perl DAS server.

    PubMed

    Finn, Robert D; Stalker, James W; Jackson, David K; Kulesha, Eugene; Clements, Jody; Pettett, Roger

    2007-06-15

    The increasing size and complexity of biological databases has led to a growing trend to federate rather than duplicate them. In order to share data between federated databases, protocols for the exchange mechanism must be developed. One such data exchange protocol that is widely used is the Distributed Annotation System (DAS). For example, DAS has enabled small experimental groups to integrate their data into the Ensembl genome browser. We have developed ProServer, a simple, lightweight, Perl-based DAS server that does not depend on a separate HTTP server. The ProServer package is easily extensible, allowing data to be served from almost any underlying data model. Recent additions to the DAS protocol have enabled both structure and alignment (sequence and structural) data to be exchanged. ProServer allows both of these data types to be served. ProServer can be downloaded from http://www.sanger.ac.uk/proserver/ or CPAN http://search.cpan.org/~rpettett/. Details on the system requirements and installation of ProServer can be found at http://www.sanger.ac.uk/proserver/.

  4. Digital microscopy. Bringing new technology into focus.

    PubMed

    2010-06-01

    Digital microscopy enables the scanning of microscope slides so that they can be viewed, analyzed, and archived on a computer. While the technology is not yet widely accepted by pathologists, a switch to digital microscopy systems seems to be inevitable in the near future.

  5. Analytical transmission electron microscopy in materials science

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, H.L.

    1980-01-01

    Microcharacterization of materials on a scale of less than 10 nm has been afforded by recent advances in analytical transmission electron microscopy. The factors limiting accurate analysis at the limit of spatial resolution for the case of a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy are examined in this paper.

  6. Microscopy & microanalysis 2016 in Columbus, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, Joseph R.

    2016-01-08

    The article provides information about an upcoming conference from the program chair. The Microscopy Society of America (MSA), the Microanalysis Society (MAS), and the International Metallographic Society (IMS) invite participation in Microscopy & Microanalysis 2016 in Columbus, Ohio, July 24 through July 28, 2016.

  7. Microscopy & microanalysis 2016 in Columbus, Ohio

    DOE PAGES

    Michael, Joseph R.

    2016-01-08

    The article provides information about an upcoming conference from the program chair. The Microscopy Society of America (MSA), the Microanalysis Society (MAS), and the International Metallographic Society (IMS) invite participation in Microscopy & Microanalysis 2016 in Columbus, Ohio, July 24 through July 28, 2016.

  8. Optical super-resolution microscopy in neurobiology.

    PubMed

    Sigrist, Stephan J; Sabatini, Bernardo L

    2012-02-01

    Understanding the highly plastic nature of neurons requires the dynamic visualization of their molecular and cellular organization in a native context. However, due to the limited resolution of standard light microscopy, many of the structural specializations of neurons cannot be resolved. A recent revolution in light microscopy has given rise to several super-resolution light microscopy methods yielding 2-10-fold higher resolution than conventional microscopy. We here describe the principles behind these techniques as well as their application to the analysis of the molecular architecture of the synapse. Furthermore, we discuss the potential for continued development of super-resolution microscopy as necessary for live imaging of neuronal structure and function in the brain.

  9. Super-resolution microscopy of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Jakobs, Stefan; Wurm, Christian A

    2014-06-01

    Mitochondria, the powerhouses of the cell, are essential organelles in eukaryotic cells. With their complex inner architecture featuring a smooth outer and a highly convoluted inner membrane, they are challenging objects for microscopy. The diameter of mitochondria is generally close to the resolution limit of conventional light microscopy, rendering diffraction-unlimited super-resolution light microscopy (nanoscopy) for imaging submitochondrial protein distributions often mandatory. In this review, we discuss what can be expected when imaging mitochondria with conventional diffraction-limited and diffraction-unlimited microscopy. We provide an overview on recent studies using super-resolution microscopy to investigate mitochondria and discuss further developments and challenges in mitochondrial biology that might by addressed with these technologies in the future.

  10. Gabor domain optical coherence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murali, Supraja

    Time domain Optical Coherence Tomography (TD-OCT), first reported in 1991, makes use of the low temporal coherence properties of a NIR broadband laser to create depth sectioning of up to 2mm under the surface using optical interferometry and point to point scanning. Prior and ongoing work in OCT in the research community has concentrated on improving axial resolution through the development of broadband sources and speed of image acquisition through new techniques such as Spectral domain OCT (SD-OCT). In SD-OCT, an entire depth scan is acquired at once with a low numerical aperture (NA) objective lens focused at a fixed point within the sample. In this imaging geometry, a longer depth of focus is achieved at the expense of lateral resolution, which is typically limited to 10 to 20 mum. Optical Coherence Microscopy (OCM), introduced in 1994, combined the advantages of high axial resolution obtained in OCT with high lateral resolution obtained by increasing the NA of the microscope placed in the sample arm. However, OCM presented trade-offs caused by the inverse quadratic relationship between the NA and the DOF of the optics used. For applications requiring high lateral resolution, such as cancer diagnostics, several solutions have been proposed including the periodic manual re-focusing of the objective lens in the time domain as well as the spectral domain C-mode configuration in order to overcome the loss in lateral resolution outside the DOF. In this research, we report for the first time, high speed, sub-cellular imaging (lateral resolution of 2 mum) in OCM using a Gabor domain image processing algorithm with a custom designed and fabricated dynamic focus microscope interfaced to a Ti:Sa femtosecond laser centered at 800 nm within an SD-OCM configuration. It is envisioned that this technology will provide a non-invasive replacement for the current practice of multiple biopsies for skin cancer diagnosis. The research reported here presents three important advances

  11. Introduction to Modern Methods in Light Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Joel; Gerhold, Abby R; Boudreau, Vincent; Smith, Lydia; Maddox, Paul S

    2017-01-01

    For centuries, light microscopy has been a key method in biological research, from the early work of Robert Hooke describing biological organisms as cells, to the latest in live-cell and single-molecule systems. Here, we introduce some of the key concepts related to the development and implementation of modern microscopy techniques. We briefly discuss the basics of optics in the microscope, super-resolution imaging, quantitative image analysis, live-cell imaging, and provide an outlook on active research areas pertaining to light microscopy.

  12. Visualizing quantitative microscopy data: History and challenges.

    PubMed

    Sailem, Heba Z; Cooper, Sam; Bakal, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Data visualization is a fundamental aspect of science. In the context of microscopy-based studies, visualization typically involves presentation of the images themselves. However, data visualization is challenging when microscopy experiments entail imaging of millions of cells, and complex cellular phenotypes are quantified in a high-content manner. Most well-established visualization tools are inappropriate for displaying high-content data, which has driven the development of new visualization methodology. In this review, we discuss how data has been visualized in both classical and high-content microscopy studies; as well as the advantages, and disadvantages, of different visualization methods.

  13. Techniques in electron microscopy of animal tissue.

    PubMed

    Cheville, N F; Stasko, J

    2014-01-01

    Technical improvements in electron microscopy, both instrumental and preparative, permit increasingly accurate analyses. Digital images for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) can be processed by software programs that automate tasks and create custom tools that allow for image enhancement for brightness, contrast and coloration; for creation of rectangular, ellipsoidal or irregular area selections; and for measurement of mean area and standard deviation. Sample preparation remains a source of error since organelles and spatial arrangements of macromolecules rapidly change after anoxia. Guidelines for maintaining consistency in preparation, examination and interpretation are presented for different electron microscopy (EM) modalities.

  14. Soft x-ray holographic microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Stickler, Daniel; Froemter, Robert; Stillrich, Holger; Menk, Christian; Oepen, Hans Peter; Tieg, Carsten; Streit-Nierobisch, Simone; Sprung, Michael; Gutt, Christian; Stadler, Lorenz-M.; Leupold, Olaf; Gruebel, Gerhard

    2010-01-25

    We present a new x-ray microscopy technique based on Fourier transform holography (FTH), where the sample is separate from the optics part of the setup. The sample can be shifted with respect to the holography optics, thus large-scale or randomly distributed objects become accessible. As this extends FTH into a true microscopy technique, we call it x-ray holographic microscopy (XHM). FTH allows nanoscale imaging without the need for nanometer-size beams. Simple Fourier transform yields an unambiguous image reconstruction. We demonstrate XHM by studying the magnetic domain evolution of a Co/Pt multilayer film as function of locally varied iron overlayer thickness.

  15. Latest advances in commercially available STED microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouquet, Wernher; Giske, Arnold

    2012-02-01

    STimulated Emission Depletion (STED) microscopy enables imaging of biological samples combining significantly improved optical resolution with all benefits of confocal microscopy. Especially, by combining multi-channel image acquisition with high spatial resolution opens up a new understanding of co-localization experiments on nanoscales. Such a microscope provides new insights in various fields of biology, such as cell and membrane biology, neurobiology and physiology. We present new developments and a variety of biological examples for STED microscopy, showing structural details on scales well below 70nm and give an overview of possible field of applications, mainly focused on live cell imaging.

  16. Probing the Proton with Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Jerome I.

    2014-01-01

    This article is written as a tribute and memorial to Dr. Akira Tonomura who was an outstanding experimental physicist and a friend. Early in his career, he opened a new era in electron microscopy by demonstrating in 1968 that electron holography, proposed by Gabor in 1949, was possible; and later he developed Lorentz "phase" microscopy, which allows one to generate real-space, real-time images. All through his career, he perfected these designs into superb instruments that he employed to investigate fundamental questions in physics. Dr. Tonomura set world standards for electron microscopy.

  17. On the Law of Inertia. Translation of: Ueber das Beharrungsgesetz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Ludwig

    2014-04-01

    This article is a translation of Ludwig Lange: "Ueber das Beharrungsgesetz" in: Berichte ueber Verhandlungen der Koenigl. Saechsischen Gesellschaft der Wissenschaften, math.-physik. Klasse (Leipzig, 1885), SS. 333-351. Translated by Herbert Pfister, Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Tübingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 14, 72076 Tübingen, Germany; herbert.pfister@uni-tuebingen.de. Kind assistance by Julian Barbour is acknowledged.

  18. Using hydrogels in microscopy: A tutorial.

    PubMed

    Flood, Peter; Page, Henry; Reynaud, Emmanuel G

    2016-05-01

    Sample preparation for microscopy is a crucial step to ensure the best experimental outcome. It often requires the use of specific mounting media that have to be tailored to not just the sample but the chosen microscopy technique. The media must not damage the sample or impair the optical path, and may also have to support the correct physiological function/development of the sample. For decades, researchers have used embedding media such as hydrogels to maintain samples in place. Their ease of use and transparency has promoted them as mainstream mounting media. However, they are not as straightforward to implement as assumed. They can contain contaminants, generate forces on the sample, have complex diffusion and structural properties that are influenced by multiple factors and are generally not designed for microscopy in mind. This short review will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using hydrogels for microscopy sample preparation and highlight some of the less obvious problems associated with the area.

  19. Multiphoton microscopy: an introduction to gastroenterologists.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hye Jin; Chun, Hoon Jai; Kim, Eun Sun; Cho, Bong Rae

    2011-10-28

    Multiphoton microscopy, relying on the simultaneous absorption of two or more photons by a fluorophore, has come to occupy a prominent place in modern biomedical research with its ability to allow real-time observation of a single cell and molecules in intact tissues. Multiphoton microscopy exhibits nonlinear optical contrast properties, which can make it possible to provide an exceptionally large depth penetration with less phototoxicity. This system becomes more and more an inspiring tool for a non-invasive imaging system to realize "optical biopsy" and to examine the functions of living cells. In this review, we briefly present the physical principles and properties of multiphoton microscopy as well as the current applications in biological fields. In addition, we address what we see as the future potential of multiphoton microscopy for gastroenterologic research.

  20. Theoretical simulation of scanning probe microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tsukada, Masaru

    2011-01-01

    Methods of theoretical simulation of scanning probe microscopy, including scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), atomic force microscopy(AFM) and Kelvin prove force microscopy (KPFM) have been reviewed with recent topics as case studies. For the case of the STM simulation, the importance of the tip electronic states is emphasized and some advanced formalism is presented based on the non-equilibrium Green's function theory beyond Bardeen's perturbation theory. For the simulation of AFM, we show examples of 3D-force map for AFM in water, and theoretical analyses for a nano-mechanical experiment on a protein molecule. An attempt to simulate KPFM images based on the electrostatic multi-pole interaction between a tip and a sample is also introduced.

  1. Polarization-sensitive interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy

    PubMed Central

    South, Fredrick A.; Liu, Yuan-Zhi; Xu, Yang; Shemonski, Nathan D.; Carney, P. Scott; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional optical microscopy suffers from the well-known compromise between transverse resolution and depth-of-field. This is true for both structural imaging methods and their functional extensions. Interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM) is a solution to the 3D coherent microscopy inverse problem that provides depth-independent transverse resolution. We demonstrate the extension of ISAM to polarization sensitive imaging, termed polarization-sensitive interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (PS-ISAM). This technique is the first functionalization of the ISAM method and provides improved depth-of-field for polarization-sensitive imaging. The basic assumptions of polarization-sensitive imaging are explored, and refocusing of birefringent structures is experimentally demonstrated. PS-ISAM enables high-resolution volumetric imaging of birefringent materials and tissue. PMID:26648593

  2. Transmission electron microscopy: Imaging of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.

    1988-10-01

    This report was an invited paper for a symposium and only covers general aspects of transmission electron microscopy. A history, and examples of work done on ceramics and alloys are covered. 6 refs., 44 figs. (JL)

  3. Multiphoton microscopy in defining liver function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorling, Camilla A.; Crawford, Darrell; Burczynski, Frank J.; Liu, Xin; Liau, Ian; Roberts, Michael S.

    2014-09-01

    Multiphoton microscopy is the preferred method when in vivo deep-tissue imaging is required. This review presents the application of multiphoton microscopy in defining liver function. In particular, multiphoton microscopy is useful in imaging intracellular events, such as mitochondrial depolarization and cellular metabolism in terms of NAD(P)H changes with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. The morphology of hepatocytes can be visualized without exogenously administered fluorescent dyes by utilizing their autofluorescence and second harmonic generation signal of collagen, which is useful in diagnosing liver disease. More specific imaging, such as studying drug transport in normal and diseased livers are achievable, but require exogenously administered fluorescent dyes. If these techniques can be translated into clinical use to assess liver function, it would greatly improve early diagnosis of organ viability, fibrosis, and cancer.

  4. Developments and applications of mass microscopy.

    PubMed

    Setou, Mitsutoshi; Shrivas, Kamlesh; Sroyraya, Morakot; Yang, Hyunjeong; Sugiura, Yuki; Moribe, Junji; Kondo, Akira; Tsutsumi, Koji; Kimura, Yoshishige; Kurabe, Nobuya; Hayasaka, Takahiro; Goto-Inoue, Naoko; Zaima, Nobuhiro; Ikegami, Koji; Sobhon, Prasert; Konishi, Yoshiyuki

    2010-03-01

    We have developed a mass microscopy technique, i.e., a microscope combined with high-resolution matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS), which is a powerful tool for investigating the spatial distribution of biomolecules without any time-consuming extraction, purification, and separation procedures for biological tissue sections. Mass microscopy provides clear images about the distribution of hundreds of biomolecules in a single measurement and also helps in understanding the cellular profile of the biological system. The sample preparation and the spatial resolution and speed of the technique are all important steps that affect the identification of biomolecules in mass microscopy. In this Award Lecture Review, we focus on some of the recent developments in clinical applications to show how mass microscopy can be employed to assess medical molecular morphology.

  5. Biomolecular Imaging with Coherent Nonlinear Vibrational Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Chao-Yu; Boik, John; Potma, Eric O.

    2014-01-01

    Optical imaging with spectroscopic vibrational contrast is a label-free solution for visualizing, identifying, and quantifying a wide range of biomolecular compounds in biological materials. Both linear and nonlinear vibrational microscopy techniques derive their imaging contrast from infrared active or Raman allowed molecular transitions, which provide a rich palette for interrogating chemical and structural details of the sample. Yet nonlinear optical methods, which include both second-order sum-frequency generation (SFG) and third-order coherent Raman scattering (CRS) techniques, offer several improved imaging capabilities over their linear precursors. Nonlinear vibrational microscopy features unprecedented vibrational imaging speeds, provides strategies for higher spatial resolution, and gives access to additional molecular parameters. These advances have turned vibrational microscopy into a premier tool for chemically dissecting live cells and tissues. This review discusses the molecular contrast of SFG and CRS microscopy and highlights several of the advanced imaging capabilities that have impacted biological and biomedical research. PMID:23245525

  6. Lensless Digital Holographic Microscopy for Life Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serabyn, E.; Liewer, K.; Wallace, J. K.; Rider, S.; Lindensmith, C.; Nadeau, J.

    2016-10-01

    Microscopy capable of volume imaging can be used to search for microbial life on ocean worlds. Here we discuss our recent digital holographic microscope (DHM) systems, which provide micron-scale resolution in a very compact package.

  7. Atomic resolution 3D electron diffraction microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Jianwei; Ohsuna, Tetsu; Terasaki, Osamu; O'Keefe, Michael A.

    2002-03-01

    Electron lens aberration is the major barrier limiting the resolution of electron microscopy. Here we describe a novel form of electron microscopy to overcome electron lens aberration. By combining coherent electron diffraction with the oversampling phasing method, we show that the 3D structure of a 2 x 2 x 2 unit cell nano-crystal (framework of LTA [Al12Si12O48]8) can be ab initio determined at the resolution of 1 Angstrom from a series of simulated noisy diffraction pattern projections with rotation angles ranging from -70 degrees to +70 degrees in 5 degrees increments along a single rotation axis. This form of microscopy (which we call 3D electron diffraction microscopy) does not require any reference waves, and can image the 3D structure of nanocrystals, as well as non-crystalline biological and materials science samples, with the resolution limited only by the quality of sample diffraction.

  8. Saturated pattern-illuminated Fourier ptychography microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yue; Chen, Youhua; Kuang, Cuifang; Xiu, Peng; Liu, Qiulan; Ge, Baoliang; Liu, Xu

    2017-01-01

    We report a series of simulation studies which extends pattern-illuminated Fourier ptychography microscopy by integrating with the nonlinearity arising from saturation of the fluorophore excited state for super-resolution fluorescence imaging. This extended technique, termed Saturated pattern-illuminated Fourier ptychography (SpiFP) microscopy, could achieve a resolution four times that of wide field when the illuminating light intensity approaches the saturation threshold in simulations. Increasing light intensity leads to further resolution enhancement. In order to demonstrate the performance of SpiFP, we make a comparison between SpiFP and saturated structure illumination microscopy in simulations, and prove that the SpiFP exhibits superior robustness to noise, aberration correcting ability, and pattern’s flexibility. Introducing the saturation of the fluorescent emission brings in notable improvements in imaging performance, implying its potential in nanoscale-sized biological observations by wide-field microscopy.

  9. Dispersion-enhanced third-harmonic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, Christian; Zlatanov, Kaloyan; Halfmann, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    We demonstrate strong enhancements of signal yield and image contrast in third-harmonic microscopy by appropriate choice of driving laser wavelength to modulate the phase-matching conditions of the conversion process by dispersion control. Tuning the laser wavelength in the range of 1010 - 1350 nm at samples containing interfaces with water and glass, we obtained large signal enhancements up to a factor of 19, and improvements in the image contrast by an order of magnitude. The effect is most pronounced at interfaces with media of small and/or not too different nonlinear optical susceptibilities, e.g., as it is the case in typical samples in harmonic microscopy. Beyond the demonstration of this new variant of third-harmonic microscopy, our findings are also of relevance to a proper choice of laser systems for harmonic microscopy setups.

  10. Rotary-scanning optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Weizhi; Xi, Lei

    2016-10-01

    Optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy (ORPAM) is currently one of the fastest evolving photoacoustic imaging modalities. It has a comparable spatial resolution to pure optical microscopic techniques such as epifluorescence microscopy, confocal microscopy, and two-photon microscopy, but also owns a deeper penetration depth. In this paper, we report a rotary-scanning (RS)-ORPAM that utilizes a galvanometer scanner integrated with objective to achieve rotary laser scanning. A 15 MHz cylindrically focused ultrasonic transducer is mounted onto a motorized rotation stage to follow optical scanning traces synchronously. To minimize the loss of signal to noise ratio, the acoustic focus is precisely adjusted to reach confocal with optical focus. Black tapes and carbon fibers are firstly imaged to evaluate the performance of the system, and then in vivo imaging of vasculature networks inside the ears and brains of mice is demonstrated using this system.

  11. Imaging DNA Structure by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pyne, Alice L B; Hoogenboom, Bart W

    2016-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a microscopy technique that uses a sharp probe to trace a sample surface at nanometre resolution. For biological applications, one of its key advantages is its ability to visualize substructure of single molecules and molecular complexes in an aqueous environment. Here, we describe the application of AFM to determine superstructure and secondary structure of surface-bound DNA. The method is also readily applicable to probe DNA-DNA interactions and DNA-protein complexes.

  12. Coatings and alternatives for SEM microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.H.

    1995-03-01

    Several methods of preparing samples of low electrical conductivity for conventional scanning electron microscopy are reviewed. Two new methods are chromium sputter-coating and low-voltage electron microscopy with a field emission gun. Photomicrographs of different coatings at high magnification show the structure of each coating. Advantages and disadvantages of each material are presented. Results with sputtered coatings are compared to an evaporated carbon coating.

  13. Magnetic resonance microscopy in biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Serša, I

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) microscopy is a special modality of MRI with an emphasis on high spatial resolution. While its main principle is identical to conventional clinical MRI, there are several differences between the two that are mainly associated with a use of stronger magnets and gradients. MR microscopy has numerous interesting applications in material and bio sciences in which high spatial resolution is demanded and long experiment times are allowed.

  14. Investigation of wear phenomena by microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    The various wear mechanisms involved in the loss of material from metallic and nonmetallic surfaces are discussed. The results presented indicate how various microscopy techniques used in conjunction with other analytical tools can assist in the elucidation of a wear mechanism. Without question, microscopy is the single most important tool for the study of the wear of surfaces, to assess and address inherent mechanisms of the material removal process.

  15. Subwavelength optical microscopy in the far field

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Qingqing; Zubairy, M. Suhail; Al-Amri, M.; Scully, Marlan O.

    2011-06-15

    We present a procedure for subwavelength optical microscopy. The identical atoms are distributed on a plane and shined with a standing wave. We rotate the plane to different angles and record the resonant fluorescence spectra in the far field, from which we can obtain their distance and location information. This procedure also works for atomic separation above one wavelength and therefore provides a seamless microscopy.

  16. Development and testing of hyperbaric atomic force microscopy (AFM) and fluorescence microscopy for biological applications.

    PubMed

    D'Agostino, D P; McNally, H A; Dean, J B

    2012-05-01

    A commercially available atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscope were installed and tested inside a custom-designed hyperbaric chamber to provide the capability to study the effects of hyperbaric gases on biological preparations, including cellular mechanism of oxidative stress. In this report, we list details of installing and testing atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscopy inside a hyperbaric chamber. The pressure vessel was designed to accommodate a variety of imaging equipment and ensures full functionality at ambient and hyperbaric conditions (≤85 psi). Electrical, gas and fluid lines were installed to enable remote operation of instrumentation under hyperbaric conditions, and to maintain viable biological samples with gas-equilibrated superfusate and/or drugs. Systems were installed for vibration isolation and temperature regulation to maintain atomic force microscopy performance during compression and decompression. Results of atomic force microscopy testing demonstrate sub-nanometre resolution at hyperbaric pressure in dry scans and fluid scans, in both contact mode and tapping mode. Noise levels were less when measurements were taken under hyperbaric pressure with air, helium (He) and nitrogen (N(2) ). Atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscopy measurements were made on a variety of living cell cultures exposed to hyperbaric gases (He, N(2) , O(2) , air). In summary, atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscopy were installed and tested for use at hyperbaric pressures and enables the study of cellular and molecular effects of hyperbaric gases and pressure per se in biological preparations. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2012 Royal Microscopical Society.

  17. Non-contact lateral force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weymouth, A. J.

    2017-08-01

    The goal of atomic force microscopy (AFM) is to measure the short-range forces that act between the tip and the surface. The signal recorded, however, includes long-range forces that are often an unwanted background. Lateral force microscopy (LFM) is a branch of AFM in which a component of force perpendicular to the surface normal is measured. If we consider the interaction between tip and sample in terms of forces, which have both direction and magnitude, then we can make a very simple yet profound observation: over a flat surface, long-range forces that do not yield topographic contrast have no lateral component. Short-range interactions, on the other hand, do. Although contact-mode is the most common LFM technique, true non-contact AFM techniques can be applied to perform LFM without the tip depressing upon the sample. Non-contact lateral force microscopy (nc-LFM) is therefore ideal to study short-range forces of interest. One of the first applications of nc-LFM was the study of non-contact friction. A similar setup is used in magnetic resonance force microscopy to detect spin flipping. More recently, nc-LFM has been used as a true microscopy technique to systems unsuitable for normal force microscopy.

  18. Backside absorbing layer microscopy: Watching graphene chemistry.

    PubMed

    Campidelli, Stéphane; Abou Khachfe, Refahi; Jaouen, Kevin; Monteiller, Jean; Amra, Claude; Zerrad, Myriam; Cornut, Renaud; Derycke, Vincent; Ausserré, Dominique

    2017-05-01

    The rapid rise of two-dimensional nanomaterials implies the development of new versatile, high-resolution visualization and placement techniques. For example, a single graphene layer becomes observable on Si/SiO2 substrates by reflected light under optical microscopy because of interference effects when the thickness of silicon oxide is optimized. However, differentiating monolayers from bilayers remains challenging, and advanced techniques, such as Raman mapping, atomic force microscopy (AFM), or scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are more suitable to observe graphene monolayers. The first two techniques are slow, and the third is operated in vacuum; hence, in all cases, real-time experiments including notably chemical modifications are not accessible. The development of optical microscopy techniques that combine the speed, large area, and high contrast of SEM with the topological information of AFM is therefore highly desirable. We introduce a new widefield optical microscopy technique based on the use of previously unknown antireflection and absorbing (ARA) layers that yield ultrahigh contrast reflection imaging of monolayers. The BALM (backside absorbing layer microscopy) technique can achieve the subnanometer-scale vertical resolution, large area, and real-time imaging. Moreover, the inverted optical microscope geometry allows its easy implementation and combination with other techniques. We notably demonstrate the potentiality of BALM by in operando imaging chemical modifications of graphene oxide. The technique can be applied to the deposition, observation, and modification of any nanometer-thick materials.

  19. Non-contact lateral force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Weymouth, A J

    2017-08-16

    The goal of atomic force microscopy (AFM) is to measure the short-range forces that act between the tip and the surface. The signal recorded, however, includes long-range forces that are often an unwanted background. Lateral force microscopy (LFM) is a branch of AFM in which a component of force perpendicular to the surface normal is measured. If we consider the interaction between tip and sample in terms of forces, which have both direction and magnitude, then we can make a very simple yet profound observation: over a flat surface, long-range forces that do not yield topographic contrast have no lateral component. Short-range interactions, on the other hand, do. Although contact-mode is the most common LFM technique, true non-contact AFM techniques can be applied to perform LFM without the tip depressing upon the sample. Non-contact lateral force microscopy (nc-LFM) is therefore ideal to study short-range forces of interest. One of the first applications of nc-LFM was the study of non-contact friction. A similar setup is used in magnetic resonance force microscopy to detect spin flipping. More recently, nc-LFM has been used as a true microscopy technique to systems unsuitable for normal force microscopy.

  20. Bessel light sheet structured illumination microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noshirvani Allahabadi, Golchehr

    Biomedical study researchers using animals to model disease and treatment need fast, deep, noninvasive, and inexpensive multi-channel imaging methods. Traditional fluorescence microscopy meets those criteria to an extent. Specifically, two-photon and confocal microscopy, the two most commonly used methods, are limited in penetration depth, cost, resolution, and field of view. In addition, two-photon microscopy has limited ability in multi-channel imaging. Light sheet microscopy, a fast developing 3D fluorescence imaging method, offers attractive advantages over traditional two-photon and confocal microscopy. Light sheet microscopy is much more applicable for in vivo 3D time-lapsed imaging, owing to its selective illumination of tissue layer, superior speed, low light exposure, high penetration depth, and low levels of photobleaching. However, standard light sheet microscopy using Gaussian beam excitation has two main disadvantages: 1) the field of view (FOV) of light sheet microscopy is limited by the depth of focus of the Gaussian beam. 2) Light-sheet images can be degraded by scattering, which limits the penetration of the excitation beam and blurs emission images in deep tissue layers. While two-sided sheet illumination, which doubles the field of view by illuminating the sample from opposite sides, offers a potential solution, the technique adds complexity and cost to the imaging system. We investigate a new technique to address these limitations: Bessel light sheet microscopy in combination with incoherent nonlinear Structured Illumination Microscopy (SIM). Results demonstrate that, at visible wavelengths, Bessel excitation penetrates up to 250 microns deep in the scattering media with single-side illumination. Bessel light sheet microscope achieves confocal level resolution at a lateral resolution of 0.3 micron and an axial resolution of 1 micron. Incoherent nonlinear SIM further reduces the diffused background in Bessel light sheet images, resulting in

  1. Scanning transmitted and reflected light microscopy: a novel microscopy for visualizing biomaterials at interfaces.

    PubMed

    Elkady, Ashraf S

    2007-01-01

    Two new types of light microscopy, scanning transmitted light and scanning reflected light microscopy (STLM and SRLM, respectively) were developed. STLM and SRLM are based on optical density recognition (ODR) of the scanned transmitted or reflected light, respectively, from the object to be visualized. The obtained image is a result of enhanced interference between the scanning and transmitted/reflected beams from the object. The new microscopy, in its initial phase, is ideally suited for monitoring macroscopic and sub-millimeter size self-assembly and for elucidating the connection between the macroscopic and nanoscopic worlds if combined with atomic force microscopy (AFM) or electron microscopy (EM). The method is demonstrated by monitoring the growth of 3D crystals from their original liquid phase. Some preliminary measurements carried out using the prototype of the new microscopy are presented and its current and future possible applications are described.

  2. Cryo-scanning electron microscopy and light microscopy for the study of fungi interactions.

    PubMed

    Sempere, F; Santamarina, M P

    2011-03-01

    The application of the cryo-scanning electron microscopy and light microscopy for the study of the interactions at different environmental conditions between Penicillium oxalicum and Fusarium verticillioides is described. A dual microculture was developed for the light microscopy analysis of the interaction. The microscope and macroscopic examinations were compared. Analysis of Petri plates revealed that F. verticillioides was a competitor for space and nutrients while P. oxalicum was a mycoparasite under the microscopic observations.

  3. Grain size quantification by optical microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction, and magnetic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hansheng; Yao, Yin; Warner, Jacob A; Qu, Jiangtao; Yun, Fan; Ye, Zhixiao; Ringer, Simon P; Zheng, Rongkun

    2017-06-13

    Quantification of microstructure, especially grain size, in polycrystalline materials is a vital aspect to understand the structure-property relationships in these materials. In this paper, representative characterization techniques for determining the grain size, including optical microscopy (OM), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) in the scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy/magnetic force microscopy (AFM/MFM), are thoroughly evaluated in comparison, illustrated by rare-earth sintered Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets. Potential applications and additional information achieved by using aforementioned characterization techniques have been discussed and summarized. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. CARS microscopy of Alzheimer's diseased brain tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enejder, Annika; Kiskis, Juris; Fink, Helen; Nyberg, Lena; Thyr, Jakob; Li, Jia-Yi

    2014-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder currently without cure, characterized by the presence of extracellular plaques surrounded by dystrophic neurites. In an effort to understand the underlying mechanisms, biochemical analysis (protein immunoblot) of plaque extracts reveals that they consist of amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptides assembled as oligomers, protofibrils and aggregates. Their spatial distribution has been confirmed by Thioflavin-S or immuno-staining with fluorescence microscopy. However, it is increasingly understood that the protein aggregation is only one of several mechanism that causes neuronal dysfunction and death. This raises the need for a more complete biochemical analysis. In this study, we have complemented 2-photon fluorescence microscopy of Thioflavin-S and Aβ immuno-stained human AD plaques with CARS microscopy. We show that the chemical build-up of AD plaques is more complex and that Aβ staining does not provide the complete picture of the spatial distribution or the molecular composition of AD plaques. CARS images provide important complementary information to that obtained by fluorescence microscopy, motivating a broader introduction of CARS microscopy in the AD research field.

  5. Photoacoustic microscopy: superdepth, superresolution, and superb contrast.

    PubMed

    Yao, Junjie; Song, Liang; Wang, Lihing V

    2015-01-01

    Since its invention in the 17th century, optical microscopy has revolutionized biomedical studies by scrutinizing the biological realm on cellular levels, taking advantage of its excellent light-focusing capability. However, most biological tissues scatter light highly. As light travels in tissue, cumulative scattering events cause the photons to lose their original propagation direction and, thus, their ability to be focused, which has largely limited the penetration depth of optical microscopy. Conventional planar optical microscopy can provide penetration of only ~100 ?m before photons begin to be scattered. The penetration of modern optical microcopy, such as confocal microscopy and multiphoton microscopy, is still limited to approximately the optical diffusion limit (~1 mm in the skin as approximated by one optical transport mean free path), where scattered photons retain a strong memory of the original propagation direction. So far, it still remains a challenge for pure optical methods to achieve high-resolution in vivo imaging beyond the diffusion limit (i.e., superdepth imaging).

  6. Exploring Scanning Probe Microscopy with Mathematica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarid, Dror

    1997-10-01

    This book/software edition provides a complete set of computational models that describe the physical phenomena associated with scanning tunneling microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and related technologies. Its self-contained presentation spares researchers the valuable time spent hunting through the technical literature in search of prior theoretical results required to understand the models presented. Mathematica code for all examples is included both in the book and at the accompanying ftp site, affording the freedom to change, at will, the values and parameters of specific problems or even modify the programs themselves to suit various modeling needs. Exploring Scanning Probe Microscopy with Mathematica is both a solid professional reference and an advanced-level text, beginning with scanning probe microscopy basics and moving on to cutting-edge techniques, experiments, and theory. In the section devoted to atomic force microscopy, Dr. Sarid describes the mechanical properties of cantilevers, atomic force microscope tip-sample interactions, and cantilever vibration characteristics. This is followed by an in-depth treatment of theoretical and practical aspects of tunneling phenomena, including metal-insulator-metal tunneling and Fowler-Nordheim field emission. The final section features chapters covering density of states in arbitrary dimensions, quantum wells and dots, and electrostatics.

  7. Functional photoacoustic microscopy of pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatni, M. Rameez; Yao, Junjie; Danielli, Amos; Favazza, Christopher P.; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-02-01

    pH is a tightly regulated indicator of metabolic activity. In mammalian systems, imbalance of pH regulation may result from or result in serious illness. Even though the regulation system of pH is very robust, tissue pH can be altered in many diseases such as cancer, osteoporosis and diabetes mellitus. Traditional high-resolution optical imaging techniques, such as confocal microscopy, routinely image pH in cells and tissues using pH sensitive fluorescent dyes, which change their fluorescence properties with the surrounding pH. Since strong optical scattering in biological tissue blurs images at greater depths, high-resolution pH imaging is limited to penetration depths of 1mm. Here, we report photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) of commercially available pH-sensitive fluorescent dye in tissue phantoms. Using both opticalresolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM), and acoustic resolution photoacoustic microscopy (AR-PAM), we explored the possibility of recovering the pH values in tissue phantoms. In this paper, we demonstrate that PAM was capable of recovering pH values up to a depth of 2 mm, greater than possible with other forms of optical microscopy.

  8. DIAGNOSIS OF MALARIA BY MAGNETIC DEPOSITION MICROSCOPY

    PubMed Central

    ZIMMERMAN, PETER A.; THOMSON, JODI M.; FUJIOKA, HISASHI; COLLINS, WILLIAM E.; ZBOROWSKI, MACIEJ

    2013-01-01

    Although malaria contributes to a significant public health burden, malaria diagnosis relies heavily on either non-specific clinical symptoms or blood smear microscopy methods developed in the 1930s. These approaches severely misrepresent the number of infected individuals and the reservoir of parasites in malaria-endemic communities and undermine efforts to control disease. Limitations of conventional microscopy-based diagnosis center on time required to examine slides, time required to attain expertise sufficient to diagnose infection accurately, and attrition from the limited number of existing malaria microscopy experts. Earlier studies described magnetic properties of Plasmodium falciparum but did not refine methods to diagnosis infection by all four human malaria parasite species. Here, following specific technical procedures, we show that it is possible to concentrate all four human malaria parasite species, at least 40-fold, on microscope slides using very inexpensive magnets through an approach termed magnetic deposition microscopy. This approach delivered greater sensitivity than a thick smear preparation while maintaining the clarity of a thin smear to simplify species-specific diagnosis. Because the magnetic force necessary to concentrate parasites on the slide is focused at a precise position relative to the magnet surface, it is possible to examine a specific region of the slide for parasitized cells and avoid the time-consuming process of scanning the entire slide surface. These results provide insight regarding new strategies for performing malaria blood smear microscopy. PMID:16606985

  9. Diagnosis of malaria by magnetic deposition microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Peter A; Thomson, Jodi M; Fujioka, Hisashi; Collins, William E; Zborowski, Maciej

    2006-04-01

    Although malaria contributes to a significant public health burden, malaria diagnosis relies heavily on either non-specific clinical symptoms or blood smear microscopy methods developed in the 1930s. These approaches severely misrepresent the number of infected individuals and the reservoir of parasites in malaria-endemic communities and undermine efforts to control disease. Limitations of conventional microscopy-based diagnosis center on time required to examine slides, time required to attain expertise sufficient to diagnose infection accurately, and attrition from the limited number of existing malaria microscopy experts. Earlier studies described magnetic properties of Plasmodium falciparum but did not refine methods to diagnosis infection by all four human malaria parasite species. Here, following specific technical procedures, we show that it is possible to concentrate all four human malaria parasite species, at least 40-fold, on microscope slides using very inexpensive magnets through an approach termed magnetic deposition microscopy. This approach delivered greater sensitivity than a thick smear preparation while maintaining the clarity of a thin smear to simplify species-specific diagnosis. Because the magnetic force necessary to concentrate parasites on the slide is focused at a precise position relative to the magnet surface, it is possible to examine a specific region of the slide for parasitized cells and avoid the time-consuming process of scanning the entire slide surface. These results provide insight regarding new strategies for performing malaria blood smear microscopy.

  10. X-ray microscopy of human malaria

    SciTech Connect

    Magowan, C.; Brown, J.T.; Mohandas, N.; Meyer-Ilse, W.

    1997-04-01

    Associations between intracellular organisms and host cells are complex and particularly difficult to examine. X-ray microscopy provides transmission images of subcellular structures in intact cells at resolutions superior to available methodologies. The spatial resolution is 50-60nm with a 1 micron depth of focus, superior to anything achievable with light microscopy. Image contrast is generated by differences in photoelectric absorption by the atoms in different areas (i.e. subcellular structures) throughout the full thickness of the sample. Absorption due to carbon dominates among all the elements in the sample at 2.4 nm x-ray wavelength. Thus images show features or structures, in a way not usually seen by other types of microscopy. The authors used soft x-ray microscopy to investigate structural development of Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites in normal and genetically abnormal erythrocytes, and in infected erythrocytes treated with compounds that have anti-malarial effects. X-ray microscopy showed newly elaborated structures in the cytosol of unstained, intact erythrocytes, redistribution of mass (carbon) in infected erythrocytes, and aberrant parasite morphology. Better understanding of the process of intracellular parasite maturation and the interactions between the parasite and its host erythrocyte can help define new approaches to the control of this deadly disease.

  11. Disease Activity Score 28 (DAS28) using C-reactive protein underestimates disease activity and overestimates EULAR response criteria compared with DAS28 using erythrocyte sedimentation rate in a large observational cohort of rheumatoid arthritis patients in Japan.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Toshihiro; Kuga, Yoshiaki; Kaneko, Atsushi; Nishino, Jinju; Eto, Yoshito; Chiba, Noriyuki; Yasuda, Masayuki; Saisho, Koichiro; Shimada, Kota; Tohma, Shigeto

    2007-09-01

    To compare disease activity and the improvement of disease activity evaluated between by Disease Activity Score 28 using erythrocyte sedimentation rate (DAS28-ESR) and by DAS28 using C-reactive protein (DAS28-CRP) in Japanese patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Data from 3073 RA patients registered in the large cohort database (NinJa: National Database of Rheumatic Diseases by iR-net in Japan) of 2003 was used to calculate DAS28-ESR and DAS28-CRP and disease activities were evaluated. Improvements in disease activities were also evaluated according to the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) response criteria in 1482 RA patients whose DAS28-ESR and DAS28-CRP could be calculated from data for both 2002 and 2003. The mean value of DAS28-CRP (3.59, SD 1.25) was significantly smaller than that of mean DAS28-ESR (4.31, SD 1.32) (p < 0.0001). The number of patients who satisfied the criteria of remission was 297 (9.7%) in DAS28-ESR versus 705 (22.9%) in DAS28-CRP and the number of patients with high disease activity was 842 (27.4%) versus 357 (11.6%) for DAS28-ESR and DAS28-CRP, respectively; there was a significant difference between the two (p < 0.0001). Change of respective DAS28 was significantly correlated (DeltaDAS28-ESR -0.05, SD 1.14 versus DeltaDAS28-CRP -0.10, SD 1.10) (p < 0.0001); however, the number of "good response" patients was significantly different (p < 0.03) between DAS28-ESR (97 patients, 6.5%) and DAS28-CRP (136 patients, 9.2%). DAS28-CRP significantly underestimated disease activity and overestimated the improvement in disease activity compared with DAS28-ESR. DAS28-CRP should be evaluated using different criteria from that for DAS28-ESR.

  12. Environmental scanning electron microscopy in cell biology.

    PubMed

    McGregor, J E; Staniewicz, L T L; Guthrie Neé Kirk, S E; Donald, A M

    2013-01-01

    Environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) (1) is an imaging technique which allows hydrated, insulating samples to be imaged under an electron beam. The resolution afforded by this technique is higher than conventional optical microscopy but lower than conventional scanning electron microscopy (CSEM). The major advantage of the technique is the minimal sample preparation needed, making ESEM quick to use and the images less susceptible to the artifacts that the extensive sample preparation usually required for CSEM may introduce. Careful manipulation of both the humidity in the microscope chamber and the beam energy are nevertheless essential to prevent dehydration and beam damage artifacts. In some circumstances it is possible to image live cells in the ESEM (2).In the following sections we introduce the fundamental principles of ESEM imaging before presenting imaging protocols for plant epidermis, mammalian cells, and bacteria. In the first two cases samples are imaged using the secondary electron (topographic) signal, whereas a transmission technique is employed to image bacteria.

  13. Space station microscopy: Beyond the box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, N. R.; Pierson, Duane L.; Mishra, S. K.

    1993-01-01

    Microscopy aboard Space Station Freedom poses many unique challenges for in-flight investigations. Disciplines such as material processing, plant and animal research, human reseach, enviromental monitoring, health care, and biological processing have diverse microscope requirements. The typical microscope not only does not meet the comprehensive needs of these varied users, but also tends to require excessive crew time. To assess user requirements, a comprehensive survey was conducted among investigators with experiments requiring microscopy. The survey examined requirements such as light sources, objectives, stages, focusing systems, eye pieces, video accessories, etc. The results of this survey and the application of an Intelligent Microscope Imaging System (IMIS) may address these demands for efficient microscopy service in space. The proposed IMIS can accommodate multiple users with varied requirements, operate in several modes, reduce crew time needed for experiments, and take maximum advantage of the restrictive data/ instruction transmission environment on Freedom.

  14. Intravital microscopy in historic and contemporary immunology.

    PubMed

    Secklehner, Judith; Lo Celso, Cristina; Carlin, Leo M

    2017-07-01

    In this review, we discuss intravital microscopy of immune cells, starting from its historic origins to current applications in diverse organs. It is clear from a quantitative review of the literature that intravital microscopy is a key tool in both historic and contemporary immunological research, providing unique advances in our understanding of immune responses. We have chosen to focus this review on how intravital microscopy methodologies are used to image specific organs or systems and we present recent descriptions of fundamental immunological processes that could not have been achieved by other methods. The following target organs/systems are discussed in more detail: cremaster muscle, skin (ear and dorsal skin fold chamber), lymph node, liver, lung, mesenteric vessels, carotid artery, bone marrow, brain, spleen, foetus and lastly vessels of the knee joint.

  15. Ultrahigh resolution photoacoustic microscopy via transient absorption

    PubMed Central

    Shelton, Ryan L.; Applegate, Brian E.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a novel, hybrid imaging modality, Transient Absorption Ultrasonic Microscopy (TAUM), which takes advantage of the optical nonlinearities afforded by transient absorption to achieve ultrahigh-resolution photoacoustic microscopy. The theoretical point spread function for TAUM is functionally equivalent to confocal and two-photon fluorescence microscopy, potentially enabling cellular/subcellular photoacoustic imaging. A prototype TAUM system was designed, built, and used to image a cross-section through several capillaries in the excised cheek pouch of a Syrian Hamster. The well-resolved capillaries in the TAUM image provided experimental evidence of the spatial resolution. These results suggest that TAUM has excellent potential for producing volumetric images with cellular/subcellular resolution in three dimensions deep inside living tissue. PMID:21258499

  16. Coherent nonlinear optical imaging: beyond fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Min, Wei; Freudiger, Christian W; Lu, Sijia; Xie, X Sunney

    2011-01-01

    The quest for ultrahigh detection sensitivity with spectroscopic contrasts other than fluorescence has led to various novel approaches to optical microscopy of biological systems. Coherent nonlinear optical imaging, especially the recently developed nonlinear dissipation microscopy (including stimulated Raman scattering and two-photon absorption) and pump-probe microscopy (including excited-state absorption, stimulated emission, and ground-state depletion), provides new image contrasts for nonfluorescent species. Thanks to the high-frequency modulation transfer scheme, these imaging techniques exhibit superb detection sensitivity. By directly interrogating vibrational and/or electronic energy levels of molecules, they offer high molecular specificity. Here we review the underlying principles and excitation and detection schemes, as well as exemplary biomedical applications of this emerging class of molecular imaging techniques.

  17. Space station microscopy: Beyond the box

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, N. R.; Pierson, Duane L.; Mishra, S. K.

    Microscopy aboard Space Station Freedom poses many unique challenges for in-flight investigations. Disciplines such as material processing, plant and animal research, human reseach, enviromental monitoring, health care, and biological processing have diverse microscope requirements. The typical microscope not only does not meet the comprehensive needs of these varied users, but also tends to require excessive crew time. To assess user requirements, a comprehensive survey was conducted among investigators with experiments requiring microscopy. The survey examined requirements such as light sources, objectives, stages, focusing systems, eye pieces, video accessories, etc. The results of this survey and the application of an Intelligent Microscope Imaging System (IMIS) may address these demands for efficient microscopy service in space. The proposed IMIS can accommodate multiple users with varied requirements, operate in several modes, reduce crew time needed for experiments, and take maximum advantage of the restrictive data/ instruction transmission environment on Freedom.

  18. [Watching dance of the molecules - CARS microscopy].

    PubMed

    Korczyński, Jaroslaw; Kubiak, Katarzyna; Węgłowska, Edyta

    2017-01-01

    CARS (Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering) microscopy is an imaging method for living cells visualization as well as for food or cosmetics material analysis without the need for staining. The near infrared laser source generates the CARS signal - the characteristic intrinsic vibrational contrast of the molecules in a sample which is no longer caused by staining, but by the molecules themselves. It provides the benefit of a non-toxic, non-destructive and almost noninvasive method for sample imaging. CARS can easily be combined with fluorescence confocal microscopy so it is an excellent complementary imaging method. In this article we showed some of the applications for this technology: imaging of lipid droplets inside human HaCaT cells and analysis of the composition of cosmetic products. Moreover we believe, that soon new fields of application become accessible for this rapidly developing branch of microscopy.

  19. Space station microscopy: Beyond the box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, N. R.; Pierson, Duane L.; Mishra, S. K.

    1993-01-01

    Microscopy aboard Space Station Freedom poses many unique challenges for in-flight investigations. Disciplines such as material processing, plant and animal research, human reseach, enviromental monitoring, health care, and biological processing have diverse microscope requirements. The typical microscope not only does not meet the comprehensive needs of these varied users, but also tends to require excessive crew time. To assess user requirements, a comprehensive survey was conducted among investigators with experiments requiring microscopy. The survey examined requirements such as light sources, objectives, stages, focusing systems, eye pieces, video accessories, etc. The results of this survey and the application of an Intelligent Microscope Imaging System (IMIS) may address these demands for efficient microscopy service in space. The proposed IMIS can accommodate multiple users with varied requirements, operate in several modes, reduce crew time needed for experiments, and take maximum advantage of the restrictive data/ instruction transmission environment on Freedom.

  20. A near-field optical microscopy nanoarray

    SciTech Connect

    Semin, D.J.; Ambrose, W.P.; Goodwin, P.M.; Kwller, A.; Wendt, J.R.

    1996-12-31

    Multiplexing near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) by the use of a nanoarray with parallel imaging is studied. The fabrication, characterization, and utilization of nanoarrays with {approximately} 100 nm diameter apertures spaced 500 nm center-to- center is presented. Extremely uniform nanoarrays with {approximately} 10{sup 8} apertures were fabricated by electron beam lithography and reactive ion etching. The nanoarrays were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In this paper we utilize these nanoarrays in a laser-illuminated microscope with parallel detection on a charge- coupled device (CCD). Detection of B-phycoerythrin (B-PE) molecules using near-field illumination is presented. In principle, our system can be used to obtain high lateral resolution NSOM images over a wide-field of view (e.g. 50-100 {mu}m) within seconds.

  1. Coherent Nonlinear Optical Imaging: Beyond Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Min, Wei; Freudiger, Christian W.; Lu, Sijia; Xie, X. Sunney

    2012-01-01

    The quest for ultrahigh detection sensitivity with spectroscopic contrasts other than fluorescence has led to various novel approaches to optical microscopy of biological systems. Coherent nonlinear optical imaging, especially the recently developed nonlinear dissipation microscopy, including stimulated Raman scattering and two photon absorption, and pump-probe microscopy, including stimulated emission, excited state absorption and ground state depletion, provide distinct and powerful image contrasts for non-fluorescent species. Thanks to high-frequency modulation transfer scheme, they exhibit superb detection sensitivity. By directly interrogating vibrational and/or electronic energy levels of molecules, they offer high molecular specificity. Here we review the underlying principles, excitation and detection schemes, as well as exemplary biomedical applications of this emerging class of molecular imaging techniques. PMID:21453061

  2. Near-infrared hyperspectral reflective confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei; Zhang, Yunhai; Miao, Xin; Xue, Xiaojun; Xiao, Yun

    2016-10-01

    A Near-Infrared HyperSpectral Reflective Confocal Microscopy (NIHS-RCM) is proposed in order to get high resolution images of deep biological tissues such as skin. The microscopy system uses a super-continuum laser for illumination, an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) for rapid selection of near-infrared spectrum, a resonant galvanometer scanner for high speed imaging (15f/s) and near-infrared avalanche diode as detector. Porcine skin and other experiments show that the microscopy system could get deep tissue images (180 μm), and show the different ingredients of tissue with different wavelength of illumination. The system has the ability of selectively imaging of multiple ingredients at deep tissue which can be used in skin diseases diagnosis and other fields.

  3. High-Throughput Nonlinear Optical Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    So, Peter T.C.; Yew, Elijah Y.S.; Rowlands, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution microscopy methods based on different nonlinear optical (NLO) contrast mechanisms are finding numerous applications in biology and medicine. While the basic implementations of these microscopy methods are relatively mature, an important direction of continuing technological innovation lies in improving the throughput of these systems. Throughput improvement is expected to be important for studying fast kinetic processes, for enabling clinical diagnosis and treatment, and for extending the field of image informatics. This review will provide an overview of the fundamental limitations on NLO microscopy throughput. We will further cover several important classes of high-throughput NLO microscope designs with discussions on their strengths and weaknesses and their key biomedical applications. Finally, this review will close with a perspective of potential future technological improvements in this field. PMID:24359736

  4. Spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy of biomass.

    PubMed

    Tetard, L; Passian, A; Farahi, R H; Kalluri, U C; Davison, B H; Thundat, T

    2010-05-01

    Scanning probe microscopy has emerged as a powerful approach to a broader understanding of the molecular architecture of cell walls, which may shed light on the challenge of efficient cellulosic ethanol production. We have obtained preliminary images of both Populus and switchgrass samples using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show distinctive features that are shared by switchgrass and Populus. These features may be attributable to the lignocellulosic cell wall composition, as the collected images exhibit the characteristic macromolecular globule structures attributable to the lignocellulosic systems. Using both AFM and a single case of mode synthesizing atomic force microscopy (MSAFM) to characterize Populus, we obtained images that clearly show the cell wall structure. The results are of importance in providing a better understanding of the characteristic features of both mature cells as well as developing plant cells. In addition, we present spectroscopic investigation of the same samples.

  5. Cryogenics with cement microscopy redefines cement behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, S.; Jones, R. ); Caveny, B. )

    1994-10-03

    Cement microscopy (CM), cryogenics, environmental scanning microscopy (ESM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and other technologies are leading investigators to change their views on cement gelation, hydration, and retardation. Cement samples frozen in a nitrogen slush and viewed with an SEM present a more accurate picture of the setting process. Observations made through this technique have revolutionized ARCO Exploration and Production Technology's and Halliburton Energy Services' oil field cement procurement and slurry design. Findings from this joint study are expected to lead to: optimized waiting on cement (WOC) times; reduced planning and design time; optimized slurry retarder additions; optimized gel times to fit given situations; especially applicable to squeeze operations; improved cement selection (from vendors) for peak performance; and improved cement manufacture. The paper discusses the measuring methods and the findings on the following: cement voids, cement gelation, and retardation mechanisms. It also briefly discusses the impact these discoveries have on operations.

  6. Perspectives on in situ electron microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Zheng, Haimei; Zhu, Yimei

    2017-03-29

    In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with the ability to reveal materials dynamic processes with high spatial and temporal resolution has attracted significant interest. The recent advances in in situ methods, including liquid and gas sample environment, pump-probe ultrafast microscopy, nanomechanics and ferroelectric domain switching the aberration corrected electron optics as well as fast electron detector has opened new opportunities to extend the impact of in situ TEM in broad areas of research ranging from materials science to chemistry, physics and biology. Here in this paper, we highlight the development of liquid environment electron microscopy and its applications in themore » study of colloidal nanoparticle growth, electrochemical processes and others; in situ study of topological vortices in ferroelectric and ferromagnetic materials. At the end, perspectives of future in situ TEM are provided.« less

  7. Fluorescence digital holographic adaptive optics microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Tianlong; Wan, Yuhong; Wang, Dayong

    2015-05-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is widely used in various of practical applications now. High resolution optical sectional microscopic imaging utilized by confocal two- or multi-photon fluorescence microscopy has became an essential tool in biological researches. However, optical aberrations introduced by nonhomogeneity refractive index of tissues degraded the resolution and brightness of the images. Here we present the implementation of self-interference digital holographic adaptive optics in fluorescence microscopy. Wavefront sensing and correction is achieved by holographic recording and numerical processing approach, dispenses with Shack-Hartmann sensor and deformable mirror-based complicated system. The operation speed of the system is enhanced using off-axis Fourier triangular holography. Both the influence of the size and axial position of the guide star on the quality of the corrected images are investigated.

  8. Digital image inpainting and microscopy imaging.

    PubMed

    Stanciu, Stefan G; Hristu, Radu; Stanciu, George A

    2011-11-01

    A considerable amount of image processing techniques known as inpainting techniques have been recently developed aiming to provide solutions for filling in missing or damaged regions in a digital image. Typical such techniques reconstruct a defined area by using information from its neighborhood, for example, by completing inside the missing region the isophote lines arriving at its boundaries. In this article, we show that inpainting techniques have considerable potential usefulness in microscopy imaging, even though experimenting and using them in this domain has been almost entirely neglected up until now. In this purpose, we experiment the "curvature-preserving" partial differential equations as a solution to inpainting regions in images collected by several optical and scanning probe microscopy techniques. The results achieved are presented along with a discussion on typical problematic scenarios of microscopy imaging for which this type of techniques can provide a viable solution. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Light microscopy: an ongoing contemporary revolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisenburger, Siegfried; Sandoghdar, Vahid

    2015-04-01

    The optical microscope is one of the oldest scientific instruments that is still used in forefront research. Ernst Abbe's nineteenth century formulation of the resolution limit in microscopy let generations of scientists believe that optical studies of individual molecules and resolving subwavelength structures were not feasible. The Nobel Prize in 2014 for super-resolution fluorescence microscopy marks a clear recognition that the old beliefs have to be revisited. In this article, we present a critical overview of various recent developments in optical microscopy. In addition to the popular super-resolution fluorescence methods, we discuss the prospects of various other techniques and imaging contrasts and consider some of the fundamental and practical challenges that lie ahead.

  10. Ultrafast Science Opportunities with Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Durr, Hermann

    2016-04-28

    X-rays and electrons are two of the most fundamental probes of matter. When the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the world’s first x-ray free electron laser, began operation in 2009, it transformed ultrafast science with the ability to generate laser-like x-ray pulses from the manipulation of relativistic electron beams. This document describes a similar future transformation. In Transmission Electron Microscopy, ultrafast relativistic (MeV energy) electron pulses can achieve unsurpassed spatial and temporal resolution. Ultrafast temporal resolution will be the next frontier in electron microscopy and can ideally complement ultrafast x-ray science done with free electron lasers. This document describes the Grand Challenge science opportunities in chemistry, material science, physics and biology that arise from an MeV ultrafast electron diffraction & microscopy facility, especially when coupled with linac-based intense THz and X-ray pump capabilities.

  11. Applications of microscopy in Salmonella research.

    PubMed

    Malt, Layla M; Perrett, Charlotte A; Humphrey, Suzanne; Jepson, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is a Gram-negative enteropathogen that can cause localized infections, typically resulting in gastroenteritis, or systemic infection, e.g., typhoid fever, in humans and many other animals. Understanding the mechanisms by which Salmonella induces disease has been the focus of intensive research. This has revealed that Salmonella invasion requires dynamic cross-talk between the microbe and host cells, in which bacterial adherence rapidly leads to a complex sequence of cellular responses initiated by proteins translocated into the host cell by a type 3 secretion system. Once these Salmonella-induced responses have resulted in bacterial invasion, proteins translocated by a second type 3 secretion system initiate further modulation of cellular activities to enable survival and replication of the invading pathogen. Elucidation of the complex and highly dynamic pathogen-host interactions ultimately requires analysis at the level of single cells and single infection events. To achieve this goal, researchers have applied a diverse range of microscopy techniques to analyze Salmonella infection in models ranging from whole animal to isolated cells and simple eukaryotic organisms. For example, electron microscopy and high-resolution light microscopy techniques such as confocal microscopy can reveal the precise location of Salmonella and its relationship to cellular components. Widefield light microscopy is a simpler approach with which to study the interaction of bacteria with host cells and often has advantages for live cell imaging, enabling detailed analysis of the dynamics of infection and cellular responses. Here we review the use of imaging techniques in Salmonella research and compare the capabilities of different classes of microscope to address specific types of research question. We also provide protocols and notes on some microscopy techniques used routinely in our own research.

  12. Advanced Electron Microscopy in Materials Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Y.; Jarausch, K.

    2009-06-01

    Aberration correction has opened a new frontier in electron microscopy by overcoming the limitations of conventional round lenses, providing sub-angstrom-sized probes and extending information limits. The imaging and analytical performance of these corrector-equipped microscopes affords an unprecedented opportunity to study structure-property relationships of matter at the atomic scale. This new generation of microscopes is able to retrieve high-quality structural information comparable to neutron and synchrotron x-ray experiments, but with local atomic resolution. These advances in instrumentation are accelerating the research and development of various functional materials ranging from those for energy generation, conversion, transportation and storage to those for catalysis and nano-device applications. The dramatic improvements in electron-beam illumination and detection also present a host of new challenges for the interpretation and optimization of experiments. During 7-9 November 2007, a workshop, entitled 'Aberration Corrected Electron Microscopy in Material Physics', was convened at the Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Laboratories (BNL) to address these opportunities and challenges. The workshop was co-sponsored by Hitachi High Technologies, a leader in electron microscopy instrumentation, and BNL's Institute of Advanced Electron Microscopy, a leader in materials physics research using electron microscopy. The workshop featured presentations by internationally prominent scientists working at the frontiers of electron microscopy, both on developing instrumentation and applying it in materials physics. The meeting, structured to stimulate scientific exchanges and explore new capabilities, brought together {approx}100 people from over 10 countries. This special issue complies many of the advances in instrument performance and materials physics reported by the invited speakers and attendees at the workshop.

  13. Magnetic exchange force microscopy with atomic resolution.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Uwe; Schwarz, Alexander; Wiesendanger, Roland

    2007-03-29

    The ordering of neighbouring atomic magnetic moments (spins) leads to important collective phenomena such as ferromagnetism and antiferromagnetism. A full understanding of magnetism on the nanometre scale therefore calls for information on the arrangement of spins in real space and with atomic resolution. Spin-polarized scanning tunnelling microscopy accomplishes this but can probe only conducting materials. Force microscopy can be used on any sample independent of its conductivity. In particular, magnetic force microscopy is well suited to exploring ferromagnetic domain structures. However, atomic resolution cannot be achieved because data acquisition involves the sensing of long-range magnetostatic forces between tip and sample. Magnetic exchange force microscopy has been proposed for overcoming this limitation: by using an atomic force microscope with a magnetic tip, it should be possible to detect the short-range magnetic exchange force between tip and sample spins. Here we show for a prototypical antiferromagnetic insulator, the (001) surface of nickel oxide, that magnetic exchange force microscopy can indeed reveal the arrangement of both surface atoms and their spins simultaneously. In contrast with previous attempts to implement this method, we use an external magnetic field to align the magnetic polarization at the tip apex so as to optimize the interaction between tip and sample spins. This allows us to observe the direct magnetic exchange coupling between the spins of the tip atom and sample atom that are closest to each other, and thereby demonstrate the potential of magnetic exchange force microscopy for investigations of inter-spin interactions at the atomic level.

  14. Observation of DNA Molecules Using Fluorescence Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ito, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    This article describes experiments for an undergraduate instrumental analysis laboratory that aim to observe individual double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecules using fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). dsDNA molecules are observed under several different conditions to discuss their chemical and physical properties. In…

  15. Soft X-ray contact microscopy and transmission electron microscopy: Comparative study of biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limongi, T.; Palladino, L.; Bernieri, E.; Tomassetti, G.; Reale, L.; Flora, F.; Cesare, P.; Ercole, C.; Aimola, P.; Ragnelli, A. M.

    2003-03-01

    Isolated cellular organelles (mitochondria, chloroplasts) and cultured bacteria were analysed both by soft X-ray contact microscopy (SXCM), and by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) after negative staining. For each sample, a comparison was performed between images obtained with either technique, with the aim of facilitating the interpretation of SXCM images. The validity and the limits of this comparative approach are discussed.

  16. Observation of DNA Molecules Using Fluorescence Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ito, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    This article describes experiments for an undergraduate instrumental analysis laboratory that aim to observe individual double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecules using fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). dsDNA molecules are observed under several different conditions to discuss their chemical and physical properties. In…

  17. Phase imaging with intermodulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Platz, Daniel; Tholén, Erik A; Hutter, Carsten; von Bieren, Arndt C; Haviland, David B

    2010-05-01

    Intermodulation atomic force microscopy (IMAFM) is a dynamic mode of atomic force microscopy (AFM) with two-tone excitation. The oscillating AFM cantilever in close proximity to a surface experiences the nonlinear tip-sample force which mixes the drive tones and generates new frequency components in the cantilever response known as intermodulation products (IMPs). We present a procedure for extracting the phase at each IMP and demonstrate phase images made by recording this phase while scanning. Amplitude and phase images at intermodulation frequencies exhibit enhanced topographic and material contrast.

  18. Electron Microscopy of Natural and Epitaxial Diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posthill, J. B.; George, T.; Malta, D. P.; Humphreys, T. P.; Rudder, R. A.; Hudson, G. C.; Thomas, R. E.; Markunas, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    Semiconducting diamond films have the potential for use as a material in which to build active electronic devices capable of operating at high temperatures or in high radiation environments. Ultimately, it is preferable to use low-defect-density single crystal diamond for device fabrication. We have previously investigated polycrystalline diamond films with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and homoepitaxial films with SEM-based techniques. This contribution describes some of our most recent observations of the microstructure of natural diamond single crystals and homoepitaxial diamond thin films using TEM.

  19. Flow cytometry using spectrally encoded confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Golan, Lior; Yelin, Dvir

    2010-07-01

    Flow cytometry techniques often rely on detecting fluorescence from single cells flowing through the cross section of a laser beam, providing invaluable information on vast numbers of cells. Such techniques, however, are often limited in their ability to resolve clusters of cells or parallel cell flow through large vessels. We present a confocal imaging technique that images unstained cells flowing in parallel through a wide channel, using spectrally encoded reflectance confocal microscopy that does not require mechanical scanning. Images of red blood cells from our system are compared to conventional transmission microscopy, and imaging of flowing red blood cells in vitro is experimentally demonstrated.

  20. Aberration corrected Lorentz scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    McVitie, S; McGrouther, D; McFadzean, S; MacLaren, D A; O'Shea, K J; Benitez, M J

    2015-05-01

    We present results from an aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscope which has been customised for high resolution quantitative Lorentz microscopy with the sample located in a magnetic field free or low field environment. We discuss the innovations in microscope instrumentation and additional hardware that underpin the imaging improvements in resolution and detection with a focus on developments in differential phase contrast microscopy. Examples from materials possessing nanometre scale variations in magnetisation illustrate the potential for aberration corrected Lorentz imaging as a tool to further our understanding of magnetism on this lengthscale.

  1. Super-resolution optical microscopy: multiple choices.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bo

    2010-02-01

    The recent invention of super-resolution optical microscopy enables the visualization of fine features in biological samples with unprecedented clarity. It creates numerous opportunities in biology because vast amount of previously obscured subcellular processes now can be directly observed. Rapid development in this field in the past two years offers many imaging modalities that address different needs but they also complicates the choice of the 'perfect' method for answering a specific question. Here I will briefly describe the principles of super-resolution optical microscopy techniques and then focus on comparing their characteristics in various aspects of practical applications.

  2. Super-Resolved Traction Force Microscopy (STFM).

    PubMed

    Colin-York, Huw; Shrestha, Dilip; Felce, James H; Waithe, Dominic; Moeendarbary, Emad; Davis, Simon J; Eggeling, Christian; Fritzsche, Marco

    2016-04-13

    Measuring small forces is a major challenge in cell biology. Here we improve the spatial resolution and accuracy of force reconstruction of the well-established technique of traction force microscopy (TFM) using STED microscopy. The increased spatial resolution of STED-TFM (STFM) allows a greater than 5-fold higher sampling of the forces generated by the cell than conventional TFM, accessing the nano instead of the micron scale. This improvement is highlighted by computer simulations and an activating RBL cell model system.

  3. Multimodal CARS microscopy of structured carbohydrate biopolymers

    PubMed Central

    Slepkov, Aaron D.; Ridsdale, Andrew; Pegoraro, Adrian F.; Moffatt, Douglas J.; Stolow, Albert

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate the utility of multimodal coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy for the study of structured condensed carbohydrate systems. Simultaneous second-harmonic generation (SHG) and spectrally-scanned CARS microscopy was used to elucidate structure, alignment, and density in cellulose cotton fibers and in starch grains undergoing rapid heat-moisture swelling. Our results suggest that CARS response of the O-H stretch region (3000 cm−1–3400 cm−1), together with the commonly-measured C-H stretch (2750 cm−1–2970 cm−1) and SHG provide potentially important structural information and contrast in these materials. PMID:21258555

  4. Pseudoexfoliation syndrome: in vivo confocal microscopy analysis.

    PubMed

    Martone, Gianluca; Casprini, Fabrizio; Traversi, Claudio; Lepri, Francesca; Pichierri, Patrizia; Caporossi, Aldo

    2007-08-01

    Pseudoexfoliation (PEX) syndrome is a common ocular disease that also affects the cornea. A case of clinical PEX syndrome, studied by in vivo corneal confocal microscopy is reported. The morphological analysis of the confocal images demonstrated hyper-reflective deposits and several dendritic cells in the basal epithelial layer. A fibrillar subepithelial structure was also found. The endothelial layer showed cell anomalies (polymegathism and pleomorphism) and hyper-reflective small endothelial deposits. Confocal microscopy is an in vivo imaging method that may provide new information on corneal alterations in PEX, and detect early corneal features.

  5. Fidelity imaging for atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosal, Sayan; Salapaka, Murti

    2015-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy is widely employed for imaging material at the nanoscale. However, real-time measures on image reliability are lacking in contemporary atomic force microscopy literature. In this article, we present a real-time technique that provides an image of fidelity for a high bandwidth dynamic mode imaging scheme. The fidelity images define channels that allow the user to have additional authority over the choice of decision threshold that facilitates where the emphasis is desired, on discovering most true features on the sample with the possible detection of high number of false features, or emphasizing minimizing instances of false detections. Simulation and experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of fidelity imaging.

  6. Electron Microscopy of Natural and Epitaxial Diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posthill, J. B.; George, T.; Malta, D. P.; Humphreys, T. P.; Rudder, R. A.; Hudson, G. C.; Thomas, R. E.; Markunas, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    Semiconducting diamond films have the potential for use as a material in which to build active electronic devices capable of operating at high temperatures or in high radiation environments. Ultimately, it is preferable to use low-defect-density single crystal diamond for device fabrication. We have previously investigated polycrystalline diamond films with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and homoepitaxial films with SEM-based techniques. This contribution describes some of our most recent observations of the microstructure of natural diamond single crystals and homoepitaxial diamond thin films using TEM.

  7. Improved Interference configuration for structured illumination microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Houkai; Wei, Shibiao; Wu, Xiaojing; Yang, Yong; Zhang, Yuquan; Du, Luping; Liu, Jun; Zhu, Siwei; Yuan, Xiaocong

    2017-02-01

    We present an improved structured illumination configuration for structured illumination microscopy (SIM) based on spatial light modulator. Precise phase shifts and rotation of illumination fringes can be dynamically controlled using a spatial light modulator. The method is different from the conventional illumination configuration that are based on interference of ±1 diffractive order light. The experimental setup requires less optical elements making it compact, reliable, and suitable for integration. The method has been applied in the standing-wave total internal reflection fluorescent microscopy. High lateral resolution of sub-100 nm was achieved in single directional resolution enhancement experiments.

  8. Analysis of cytokinesis by electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    König, J; Borrego-Pinto, J; Streichert, D; Munzig, M; Lenart, P; Müller-Reichert, T

    2017-01-01

    Following up on a chapter on the Correlative Light and Electron Microscopy of Early Caenorhabditis elegans Embryos in Mitosis (MCB 79, 101-119), we present an adaptation of our established protocol for the ultrastructural analysis of either permeabilized or injected embryonic systems. We prepared both drug-treated early C. elegans embryos and fluorescently labeled sea urchin embryos of Lytechinus pictus for ultrastructural studies on animal cytokinesis. Here we focus on the initial preparation steps of postmitotic embryos for high-pressure freezing and subsequent electron microscopy with an emphasis on electron tomography. The advantages and limitations of our extended protocol will be discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Photobleaching imprinting microscopy: seeing clearer and deeper.

    PubMed

    Gao, Liang; Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro; Liu, Yan; Li, Chiye; Wang, Lihong V

    2014-01-15

    We present a generic sub-diffraction-limited imaging method - photobleaching imprinting microscopy (PIM) - for biological fluorescence imaging. A lateral resolution of 110 nm was measured, more than a twofold improvement over the optical diffraction limit. Unlike other super-resolution imaging techniques, PIM does not require complicated illumination modules or specific fluorescent dyes. PIM is expected to facilitate the conversion of super-resolution imaging into a routine lab tool, making it accessible to a much broader biological research community. Moreover, we show that PIM can increase the image contrast of biological tissue, effectively extending the fundamental depth limit of multi-photon fluorescence microscopy.

  10. Active Pixel Sensors for electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denes, P.; Bussat, J.-M.; Lee, Z.; Radmillovic, V.

    2007-09-01

    The technology used for monolithic CMOS imagers, popular for cell phone cameras and other photographic applications, has been explored for charged particle tracking by the high-energy physics community for several years. This technology also lends itself to certain imaging detector applications in electron microscopy. We have been developing such detectors for several years at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and we and others have shown that this technology can offer excellent point-spread function, direct detection and high readout speed. In this paper, we describe some of the design constraints peculiar to electron microscopy and summarize where such detectors could play a useful role.

  11. Two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    So, P T; Dong, C Y; Masters, B R; Berland, K M

    2000-01-01

    Two-photon fluorescence microscopy is one of the most important recent inventions in biological imaging. This technology enables noninvasive study of biological specimens in three dimensions with submicrometer resolution. Two-photon excitation of fluorophores results from the simultaneous absorption of two photons. This excitation process has a number of unique advantages, such as reduced specimen photodamage and enhanced penetration depth. It also produces higher-contrast images and is a novel method to trigger localized photochemical reactions. Two-photon microscopy continues to find an increasing number of applications in biology and medicine.

  12. Orientation imaging microscopy of polycrystalline sodium chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Staiger, M.P.; Kolbeinsson, I.; Newman, J.; Woodfield, T.; Sato, T.

    2010-04-15

    A novel preparation technique is described that makes possible grain size analysis of polycrystalline NaCl using orientation imaging microscopy via electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). The preparation methodology is specifically developed to overcome difficulties in preparing microporous NaCl for microscopy. The grain size and crystallographic texture of polycrystalline NaCl samples, prepared via solution pressure and sintered in the range of 650-780 deg. C, were able to be measured successfully with EBSD. The limitations of the preparation technique for EBSD analysis of NaCl are also discussed.

  13. Graphene-enabled electron microscopy and correlated super-resolution microscopy of wet cells.

    PubMed

    Wojcik, Michal; Hauser, Margaret; Li, Wan; Moon, Seonah; Xu, Ke

    2015-06-11

    The application of electron microscopy to hydrated biological samples has been limited by high-vacuum operating conditions. Traditional methods utilize harsh and laborious sample dehydration procedures, often leading to structural artefacts and creating difficulties for correlating results with high-resolution fluorescence microscopy. Here, we utilize graphene, a single-atom-thick carbon meshwork, as the thinnest possible impermeable and conductive membrane to protect animal cells from vacuum, thus enabling high-resolution electron microscopy of wet and untreated whole cells with exceptional ease. Our approach further allows for facile correlative super-resolution and electron microscopy of wet cells directly on the culturing substrate. In particular, individual cytoskeletal actin filaments are resolved in hydrated samples through electron microscopy and well correlated with super-resolution results.

  14. Graphene-enabled electron microscopy and correlated super-resolution microscopy of wet cells

    PubMed Central

    Wojcik, Michal; Hauser, Margaret; Li, Wan; Moon, Seonah; Xu, Ke

    2015-01-01

    The application of electron microscopy to hydrated biological samples has been limited by high-vacuum operating conditions. Traditional methods utilize harsh and laborious sample dehydration procedures, often leading to structural artefacts and creating difficulties for correlating results with high-resolution fluorescence microscopy. Here, we utilize graphene, a single-atom-thick carbon meshwork, as the thinnest possible impermeable and conductive membrane to protect animal cells from vacuum, thus enabling high-resolution electron microscopy of wet and untreated whole cells with exceptional ease. Our approach further allows for facile correlative super-resolution and electron microscopy of wet cells directly on the culturing substrate. In particular, individual cytoskeletal actin filaments are resolved in hydrated samples through electron microscopy and well correlated with super-resolution results. PMID:26066680

  15. Statistical Quality Control of Moisture Data in GEOS DAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dee, D. P.; Rukhovets, L.; Todling, R.

    1999-01-01

    A new statistical quality control algorithm was recently implemented in the Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System (GEOS DAS). The final step in the algorithm consists of an adaptive buddy check that either accepts or rejects outlier observations based on a local statistical analysis of nearby data. A basic assumption in any such test is that the observed field is spatially coherent, in the sense that nearby data can be expected to confirm each other. However, the buddy check resulted in excessive rejection of moisture data, especially during the Northern Hemisphere summer. The analysis moisture variable in GEOS DAS is water vapor mixing ratio. Observational evidence shows that the distribution of mixing ratio errors is far from normal. Furthermore, spatial correlations among mixing ratio errors are highly anisotropic and difficult to identify. Both factors contribute to the poor performance of the statistical quality control algorithm. To alleviate the problem, we applied the buddy check to relative humidity data instead. This variable explicitly depends on temperature and therefore exhibits a much greater spatial coherence. As a result, reject rates of moisture data are much more reasonable and homogeneous in time and space.

  16. Statistical Quality Control of Moisture Data in GEOS DAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dee, D. P.; Rukhovets, L.; Todling, R.

    1999-01-01

    A new statistical quality control algorithm was recently implemented in the Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System (GEOS DAS). The final step in the algorithm consists of an adaptive buddy check that either accepts or rejects outlier observations based on a local statistical analysis of nearby data. A basic assumption in any such test is that the observed field is spatially coherent, in the sense that nearby data can be expected to confirm each other. However, the buddy check resulted in excessive rejection of moisture data, especially during the Northern Hemisphere summer. The analysis moisture variable in GEOS DAS is water vapor mixing ratio. Observational evidence shows that the distribution of mixing ratio errors is far from normal. Furthermore, spatial correlations among mixing ratio errors are highly anisotropic and difficult to identify. Both factors contribute to the poor performance of the statistical quality control algorithm. To alleviate the problem, we applied the buddy check to relative humidity data instead. This variable explicitly depends on temperature and therefore exhibits a much greater spatial coherence. As a result, reject rates of moisture data are much more reasonable and homogeneous in time and space.

  17. Einfluss des Internets auf das Informations-, Einkaufs- und Verkehrsverhalten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nerlich, Mark R.; Schiffner, Felix; Vogt, Walter

    Mit Daten aus eigenen Erhebungen können das einkaufsbezogene Informations- und Einkaufsverhalten im Zusammenhang mit den verkehrlichen Aspekten (Distanzen, Verkehrsmittel, Wegekopplungen) dargestellt werden. Die Differenzierung in die drei Produktkategorien des täglichen, mittelfristigen und des langfristigen Bedarfs berücksichtigt in erster Linie die Wertigkeit eines Gutes, die seine Erwerbshäufigkeit unmittelbar bestimmt. Der Einsatz moderner IKT wie das Internet eröffnet dem Endverbraucher neue Möglichkeiten bei Information und Einkauf. Die verkehrliche Relevanz von Online-Shopping wird deutlich, wenn man berücksichtigt, dass im Mittel rund 17% aller Online-Einkäufe, die die Probanden durchgeführt haben, Einkäufe in Ladengeschäften ersetzen. Dies gilt in verstärktem Maße für Online-Informationen: etwa die Hälfte hätte alternativ im stationären Einzelhandel stattgefunden. Da der Erwerb von Gütern des täglichen Bedarfs häufig nahräumlich und in relevantem Anteil nicht-motorisiert erfolgen kann, sind in diesem Segment - im Gegensatz zum mittel- und langfristigen Bedarf - nur geringe Substitutionseffekte zu beobachten.

  18. Atomic force microscopy of biological samples.

    PubMed

    Allison, David P; Mortensen, Ninell P; Sullivan, Claretta J; Doktycz, Mitchel J

    2010-01-01

    The ability to evaluate structural-functional relationships in real time has allowed scanning probe microscopy (SPM) to assume a prominent role in post genomic biological research. In this mini-review, we highlight the development of imaging and ancillary techniques that have allowed SPM to permeate many key areas of contemporary research. We begin by examining the invention of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) by Binnig and Rohrer in 1982 and discuss how it served to team biologists with physicists to integrate high-resolution microscopy into biological science. We point to the problems of imaging nonconductive biological samples with the STM and relate how this led to the evolution of the atomic force microscope (AFM) developed by Binnig, Quate, and Gerber, in 1986. Commercialization in the late 1980s established SPM as a powerful research tool in the biological research community. Contact mode AFM imaging was soon complemented by the development of non-contact imaging modes. These non-contact modes eventually became the primary focus for further new applications including the development of fast scanning methods. The extreme sensitivity of the AFM cantilever was recognized and has been developed into applications for measuring forces required for indenting biological surfaces and breaking bonds between biomolecules. Further functional augmentation to the cantilever tip allowed development of new and emerging techniques including scanning ion-conductance microscopy (SICM), scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM), Kelvin force microscopy (KFM) and scanning near field ultrasonic holography (SNFUH). © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  19. CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: AXIAL RESOLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Confocal Microscopy System Performance: Axial resolution.
    Robert M. Zucker, PhD

    Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Re...

  20. Light Microscopy Module (LMM)-Emulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Howard G.; Smith, Trent M.; Richards, Stephanie E.

    2016-01-01

    The Light Microscopy Module (LMM) is a microscope facility developed at Glenn Research Center (GRC) that provides researchers with powerful imaging capability onboard the International Space Station (ISS). LMM has the ability to have its hardware recongured on-orbit to accommodate a wide variety of investigations, with the capability of remotely acquiring and downloading digital images across multiple levels of magnication.

  1. DNA base identification by electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bell, David C; Thomas, W Kelley; Murtagh, Katelyn M; Dionne, Cheryl A; Graham, Adam C; Anderson, Jobriah E; Glover, William R

    2012-10-01

    Advances in DNA sequencing, based on fluorescent microscopy, have transformed many areas of biological research. However, only relatively short molecules can be sequenced by these technologies. Dramatic improvements in genomic research will require accurate sequencing of long (>10,000 base-pairs), intact DNA molecules. Our approach directly visualizes the sequence of DNA molecules using electron microscopy. This report represents the first identification of DNA base pairs within intact DNA molecules by electron microscopy. By enzymatically incorporating modified bases, which contain atoms of increased atomic number, direct visualization and identification of individually labeled bases within a synthetic 3,272 base-pair DNA molecule and a 7,249 base-pair viral genome have been accomplished. This proof of principle is made possible by the use of a dUTP nucleotide, substituted with a single mercury atom attached to the nitrogenous base. One of these contrast-enhanced, heavy-atom-labeled bases is paired with each adenosine base in the template molecule and then built into a double-stranded DNA molecule by a template-directed DNA polymerase enzyme. This modification is small enough to allow very long molecules with labels at each A-U position. Image contrast is further enhanced by using annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (ADF-STEM). Further refinements to identify additional base types and more precisely determine the location of identified bases would allow full sequencing of long, intact DNA molecules, significantly improving the pace of complex genomic discoveries.

  2. CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: AXIAL RESOLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Confocal Microscopy System Performance: Axial resolution.
    Robert M. Zucker, PhD

    Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Re...

  3. Confocal microscopy imaging of solid tissue

    EPA Science Inventory

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is a technique that is capable of generating serial sections of whole-mount tissue and then reassembling the computer acquired images as a virtual 3-dimensional structure. In many ways CLSM offers an alternative to traditional sectioning ...

  4. Low voltage transmission electron microscopy of graphene.

    PubMed

    Bachmatiuk, Alicja; Zhao, Jiong; Gorantla, Sandeep Madhukar; Martinez, Ignacio Guillermo Gonzalez; Wiedermann, Jerzy; Lee, Changgu; Eckert, Juergen; Rummeli, Mark Hermann

    2015-02-04

    The initial isolation of graphene in 2004 spawned massive interest in this two-dimensional pure sp(2) carbon structure due to its incredible electrical, optical, mechanical, and thermal effects. This in turn led to the rapid development of various characterization tools for graphene. Examples include Raman spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy. However, the one tool with the greatest prowess for characterizing and studying graphene is the transmission electron microscope. State-of-the-art (scanning) transmission electron microscopes enable one to image graphene with atomic resolution, and also to conduct various other characterizations simultaneously. The advent of aberration correctors was timely in that it allowed transmission electron microscopes to operate with reduced acceleration voltages, so that damage to graphene is avoided while still providing atomic resolution. In this comprehensive review, a brief introduction is provided to the technical aspects of transmission electron microscopes relevant to graphene. The reader is then introduced to different specimen preparation techniques for graphene. The different characterization approaches in both transmission electron microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy are then discussed, along with the different aspects of electron diffraction and electron energy loss spectroscopy. The use of graphene for other electron microscopy approaches such as in-situ investigations is also presented.

  5. Examining Thermally Sprayed Coats By Fluorescence Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Street, Kenneth W., Jr.; Leonhardt, Todd A.

    1994-01-01

    True flaws distinquished from those induced by preparation of specimens. Fluorescence microscopy reveals debonding, porosity, cracks, and other flaws in specimens of thermally sprayed coating materials. Specimen illuminated, and dye it contains fluoresces, emitting light at different wavelength. Filters emphasize contrast between excitation light and emission light. Specimen viewed directly or photographed on color film.

  6. Frequency domain photoacoustic and fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Gregor; Buchegger, Bianca; Jacak, Jaroslaw; Klar, Thomas A.; Berer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We report on simultaneous frequency domain optical-resolution photoacoustic and fluorescence microscopy with sub-µm lateral resolution. With the help of a blood smear, we show that photoacoustic and fluorescence images provide complementary information. Furthermore, we compare theoretically predicted signal-to-noise ratios of sinusoidal modulation in frequency domain with pulsed excitation in time domain. PMID:27446698

  7. Atomic force microscopy of biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2010-01-01

    The ability to evaluate structural-functional relationships in real time has allowed scanning probe microscopy (SPM) to assume a prominent role in post genomic biological research. In this mini-review, we highlight the development of imaging and ancillary techniques that have allowed SPM to permeate many key areas of contemporary research. We begin by examining the invention of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) by Binnig and Rohrer in 1982 and discuss how it served to team biologists with physicists to integrate high-resolution microscopy into biological science. We point to the problems of imaging nonconductive biological samples with the STM and relate how this led to the evolution of the atomic force microscope (AFM) developed by Binnig, Quate, and Gerber, in 1986. Commercialization in the late 1980s established SPM as a powerful research tool in the biological research community. Contact mode AFM imaging was soon complemented by the development of non-contact imaging modes. These non-contact modes eventually became the primary focus for further new applications including the development of fast scanning methods. The extreme sensitivity of the AFM cantilever was recognized and has been developed into applications for measuring forces required for indenting biological surfaces and breaking bonds between biomolecules. Further functional augmentation to the cantilever tip allowed development of new and emerging techniques including scanning ion-conductance microscopy (SICM), scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM), Kelvin force microscopy (KFM) and scanning near field ultrasonic holography (SNFUH).

  8. Multiphoton microscopy imaging of developing tooth germs.

    PubMed

    Pan, Pei-Yu; Chen, Rung-Shu; Ting, Chih-Liang; Chen, Wei-Liang; Dong, Chen-Yuan; Chen, Min-Huey

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, tooth germ is observed by histological investigation with hematoxylin and eosin stain and information may loss during the process. The purpose of this study is to use multiphoton laser fluorescence microscopy to observe the developing tooth germs of mice for building up the database of the images of tooth germs and compare with those from conventional histological analysis. Tooth germs were isolated from embryonic and newborn mice with age of Embryonic Day 14.5 and Postnatal Days 1, 3, 5, and 7. Comparison of the images of tooth germ sections in multiphoton microscopy with the images of histology was performed for investigating the molar tooth germs. It was found that various signals arose from different structures of tooth germs. Pre-dentin and dentin have strong second-harmonic generation signals, while ameloblasts and enamel tissues were shown with strong autofluorescence signals. In this study, a novel multiphoton microscopy database of images from developing tooth germs in mice was set up. We confirmed that multiphoton laser microscopy is a powerful tool for investigating the development of tooth germ and is worthy for further application in the study of tooth regeneration. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Digital autofocus methods for automated microscopy.

    PubMed

    Shen, Feimo; Hodgson, Louis; Hahn, Klaus

    2006-01-01

    Automatic focusing of microscope images is an essential part of modern high-throughput microscopy. This chapter describes implementation of a robust autofocus system appropriate for using either air or oil immersion objectives in robotic imaging. Both hardware and software algorithms are described, and caveats of using viscous immersion media with multifield scanning are detailed.

  10. Value of Reflected Light Microscopy in Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pasteris, Jill Dill

    1983-01-01

    Briefly reviews some optical and other physical properties of minerals that can be determined in reflected/incident light. Topics include optical properties of minerals, reflectance, internal reflections, color, bireflectance and reflection pleochroism, anisotropism, zonation, and reflected light microscopy as a teaching tool in undergraduate…

  11. Dark Field Microscopy for Analytical Laboratory Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Augspurger, Ashley E.; Stender, Anthony S.; Marchuk, Kyle; Greenbowe, Thomas J.; Fang, Ning

    2014-01-01

    An innovative and inexpensive optical microscopy experiment for a quantitative analysis or an instrumental analysis chemistry course is described. The students have hands-on experience with a dark field microscope and investigate the wavelength dependence of localized surface plasmon resonance in gold and silver nanoparticles. Students also…

  12. Confocal microscopy imaging of solid tissue

    EPA Science Inventory

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is a technique that is capable of generating serial sections of whole-mount tissue and then reassembling the computer acquired images as a virtual 3-dimensional structure. In many ways CLSM offers an alternative to traditional sectioning ...

  13. (Gene sequencing by scanning molecular exciton microscopy)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This report details progress made in setting up a laboratory for optical microscopy of genes. The apparatus including a fluorescence microscope, a scanning optical microscope, various spectrometers, and supporting computers is described. Results in developing photon and exciton tips, and in preparing samples are presented. (GHH)

  14. Laboratory cryo soft X-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hertz, H M; von Hofsten, O; Bertilson, M; Vogt, U; Holmberg, A; Reinspach, J; Martz, D; Selin, M; Christakou, A E; Jerlström-Hultqvist, J; Svärd, S

    2012-02-01

    Lens-based water-window X-ray microscopy allows two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) imaging of intact unstained cells in their near-native state with unprecedented contrast and resolution. Cryofixation is essential to avoid radiation damage to the sample. Present cryo X-ray microscopes rely on synchrotron radiation sources, thereby limiting the accessibility for a wider community of biologists. In the present paper we demonstrate water-window cryo X-ray microscopy with a laboratory-source-based arrangement. The microscope relies on a λ=2.48-nm liquid-jet high-brightness laser-plasma source, normal-incidence multilayer condenser optics, 30-nm zone-plate optics, and a cryo sample chamber. We demonstrate 2D imaging of test patterns, and intact unstained yeast, protozoan parasites and mammalian cells. Overview 3D information is obtained by stereo imaging while complete 3D microscopy is provided by full tomographic reconstruction. The laboratory microscope image quality approaches that of the synchrotron microscopes, but with longer exposure times. The experimental image quality is analyzed from a numerical wave-propagation model of the imaging system and a path to reach synchrotron-like exposure times in laboratory microscopy is outlined. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Scanning electron microscopy study of Trichomonas gallinae.

    PubMed

    Tasca, Tiana; De Carli, Geraldo A

    2003-12-01

    A scanning electron microscopy (SEM) study of Trichomonas gallinae (Rivolta, 1878), provided more information about the morphology of this flagellated protozoan. SEM showed the morphological features of the trophozoites; the emergence of the anterior flagella, the structure of the undulating membrane, the position and shape of the pelta, axostyle and posterior flagellum. Of special interest were the pseudocyst forms.

  16. Dark Field Microscopy for Analytical Laboratory Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Augspurger, Ashley E.; Stender, Anthony S.; Marchuk, Kyle; Greenbowe, Thomas J.; Fang, Ning

    2014-01-01

    An innovative and inexpensive optical microscopy experiment for a quantitative analysis or an instrumental analysis chemistry course is described. The students have hands-on experience with a dark field microscope and investigate the wavelength dependence of localized surface plasmon resonance in gold and silver nanoparticles. Students also…

  17. Value of Reflected Light Microscopy in Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pasteris, Jill Dill

    1983-01-01

    Briefly reviews some optical and other physical properties of minerals that can be determined in reflected/incident light. Topics include optical properties of minerals, reflectance, internal reflections, color, bireflectance and reflection pleochroism, anisotropism, zonation, and reflected light microscopy as a teaching tool in undergraduate…

  18. In Vivo Confocal Microscopy Use in Endotheliitis.

    PubMed

    Porzukowiak, Tina Renae; Ly, Kelly

    2015-12-01

    The use of in vivo confocal microscopy has been valuable in detecting and managing corneal pathology. This case study documents endotheliitis using in vivo confocal microscopy where apparent resolution of endothelial edema on clinical examination resulted in the discovery of subclinical findings with confocal scanning. The purpose of this case study was to discuss a rare corneal pathology and the clinical value of confocal scanning. A 30-year-old Asian Indian woman presented with unilateral endotheliitis and trabeculitis of presumed varicella zoster virus etiology. She was treated successfully with oral antiviral and topical corticosteroid therapy. Subclinical endotheliitis was detected using in vivo confocal microscopy, prompting the continuation of prophylactic, low-dose, topical corticosteroid therapy and topical hyperosmotics. Further research is warranted to better understand the role of confocal microscopy in endotheliitis therapeutic management, endothelial cell count and morphology, and keratic precipitate characterization. To date, prophylactic oral antivirals and/or topical corticosteroids may play a role in immune suppression of the herpes virus, although prospective, randomized, controlled clinical trials have not focused specifically on endotheliitis cases.

  19. Selective plane illumination microscopy on a chip.

    PubMed

    Paiè, Petra; Bragheri, Francesca; Bassi, Andrea; Osellame, Roberto

    2016-04-26

    Selective plane illumination microscopy can image biological samples at a high spatiotemporal resolution. Complex sample preparation and system alignment normally limit the throughput of the method. Using femtosecond laser micromachining, we created an integrated optofluidic device that allows obtaining continuous flow imaging, three-dimensional reconstruction and high-throughput analysis of large multicellular spheroids at a subcellular resolution.

  20. High-aperture cryogenic light microscopy.

    PubMed

    Le Gros, M A; McDermott, G; Uchida, M; Knoechel, C G; Larabell, C A

    2009-07-01

    We report here the development of instruments and protocols for carrying out high numerical aperture immersion light microscopy on cryogenic specimens. Imaging by this modality greatly increases the lifetimes of fluorescence probes, including those commonly used for protein localization studies, while retaining the ability to image the specimen with high fidelity and spatial resolution. The novel use of a cryogenic immersion fluid also minimizes the refractive index mismatch between the sample and lens, leading to a more efficient coupling of the light from the sample to the image forming system. This enhancement is applicable to both fluorescence and transmitted light microscopy techniques. The design concepts used for the cryogenic microscope can be applied to virtually any existing light-based microscopy technique. This prospect is particularly exciting in the context of 'super-resolution' techniques, where enhanced fluorescence lifetime probes are especially useful. Thus, using this new modality it is now possible to observe dynamic events in a live cell, and then rapidly vitrify the specimen at a specific time point prior to carrying out high-resolution imaging. The techniques described can be used in conjunction with other imaging modalities in correlated studies. We have also developed instrumentation to perform cryo-light imaging together with soft X-ray tomography on the same cryo-fixed specimen as a means of carrying out high content, quantifiable correlated imaging analyses. These methods are equally applicable to correlated light and electron microscopy of frozen biological objects.

  1. High-aperture cryogenic light microscopy

    PubMed Central

    LE GROS, M.A.; McDERMOTT, G.; UCHIDA, M.; KNOECHEL, C.G.; LARABELL, C.A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary We report here the development of instruments and protocols for carrying out high numerical aperture immersion light microscopy on cryogenic specimens. Imaging by this modality greatly increases the lifetimes of fluorescence probes, including those commonly used for protein localization studies, while retaining the ability to image the specimen with high fidelity and spatial resolution. The novel use of a cryogenic immersion fluid also minimizes the refractive index mismatch between the sample and lens, leading to a more efficient coupling of the light from the sample to the image forming system. This enhancement is applicable to both fluorescence and transmitted light microscopy techniques. The design concepts used for the cryogenic microscope can be applied to virtually any existing light-based microscopy technique. This prospect is particularly exciting in the context of ‘super-resolution’ techniques, where enhanced fluorescence lifetime probes are especially useful. Thus, using this new modality it is now possible to observe dynamic events in a live cell, and then rapidly vitrify the specimen at a specific time point prior to carrying out high-resolution imaging. The techniques described can be used in conjunction with other imaging modalities in correlated studies. We have also developed instrumentation to perform cryo-light imaging together with soft X-ray tomography on the same cryo-fixed specimen as a means of carrying out high content, quantifiable correlated imaging analyses. These methods are equally applicable to correlated light and electron microscopy of frozen biological objects. PMID:19566622

  2. Fast Ion Beam Microscopy of Whole Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, Frank; Chen, Xiao; Chen, Ce-Belle; Udalagama, Chammika Nb; Ren, Minqin; Pastorin, G.; Bettiol, Andrew

    2013-08-01

    The way in which biological cells function is of prime importance, and the determination of such knowledge is highly dependent on probes that can extract information from within the cell. Probing deep inside the cell at high resolutions however is not easy: optical microscopy is limited by fundamental diffraction limits, electron microscopy is not able to maintain spatial resolutions inside a whole cell without slicing the cell into thin sections, and many other new and novel high resolution techniques such as atomic force microscopy (AFM) and near field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) are essentially surface probes. In this paper we show that microscopy using fast ions has the potential to extract information from inside whole cells in a unique way. This novel fast ion probe utilises the unique characteristic of MeV ion beams, which is the ability to pass through a whole cell while maintaining high spatial resolutions. This paper first addresses the fundamental difference between several types of charged particle probes, more specifically focused beams of electrons and fast ions, as they penetrate organic material. Simulations show that whereas electrons scatter as they penetrate the sample, ions travel in a straight path and therefore maintain spatial resolutions. Also described is a preliminary experiment in which a whole cell is scanned using a low energy (45 keV) helium ion microscope, and the results compared to images obtained using a focused beam of fast (1.2 MeV) helium ions. The results demonstrate the complementarity between imaging using low energy ions, which essentially produce a high resolution image of the cell surface, and high energy ions, which produce an image of the cell interior. The characteristics of the fast ion probe appear to be ideally suited for imaging gold nanoparticles in whole cells. Using scanning transmission ion microscopy (STIM) to image the cell interior, forward scattering transmission ion microscopy (FSTIM) to improve the

  3. Scanning Probe Microscopy of Organic Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Obadiah G.

    Nanostructured composites of organic semiconductors are a promising class of materials for the manufacture of low-cost solar cells. Understanding how the nanoscale morphology of these materials affects their efficiency as solar energy harvesters is crucial to their eventual potential for large-scale deployment for primary power generation. In this thesis we describe the use of optoelectronic scanning-probe based microscopy methods to study this efficiency-structure relationship with nanoscale resolution. In particular, our objective is to make spatially resolved measurements of each step in the power conversion process from photons to an electric current, including charge generation, transport, and recombination processes, and correlate them with local device structure. We have achieved two aims in this work: first, to develop and apply novel electrically sensitive scanning probe microscopy experiments to study the optoelectronic materials and processes discussed above; and second, to deepen our understanding of the physics underpinning our experimental techniques. In the first case, we have applied conductive-, and photoconductive atomic force (cAFM & pcAFM) microscopy to measure both local photocurrent collection and dark charge transport properties in a variety of model and novel organic solar cell composites, including polymer/fullerene blends, and polymer-nanowire/fullerene blends, finding that local heterogeneity is the rule, and that improvements in the uniformity of specific beneficial nanostructures could lead to large increases in efficiency. We have used scanning Kelvin probe microscopy (SKPM) and time resolved-electrostatic force microscopy (trEFM) to characterize all-polymer blends, quantifying their sensitivity to photochemical degradation and the subsequent formation of local charge traps. We find that while trEFM provides a sensitive measure of local quantum efficiency, SKPM is generally unsuited to measurements of efficiency, less sensitive than tr

  4. Leica solution: CARS microscopy at video rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lurquin, V.

    2008-02-01

    Confocal and multiphoton microscopy are powerful techniques to study morphology and dynamics in cells and tissue, if fluorescent labeling is possible or autofluorescence is strong. For non-fluorescent molecules, Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy provides chemical contrast based on intrinsic and highly specific vibrational properties of molecules eliminating the need for labeling. Just as other multiphoton techniques, CARS microscopy possesses three-dimensional sectioning capabilities. Leica Microsystems has combined the CARS imaging technology with its TCS SP5 confocal microscope to provide several advantages for CARS imaging. For CARS microscopy, two picosecond near-infrared lasers are overlapped spatially and temporally and sent into the scanhead of the confocal system. The software allows programmed, automatic switching between these light sources for multi-modal imaging. Furthermore the Leica TCS SP5 can be equipped with a non-descanned detector which will significantly enhance the signal. The Leica TCS SP5 scanhead combines two technologies in one system: a conventional scanner for maximum resolution and a resonant scanner for high time resolution. The fast scanner allows imaging speeds as high as 25 images/per second at a resolution of 512×512 pixel. This corresponds to true video-rate allowing to follow processes at these time-scales as well as the acquisition of three-dimensional stacks in a few seconds. This time resolution is critical to study live animals or human patients for which heart beat and muscle movements lead to a blurring of the image if the acquisition time is high. Furthermore with the resonant scanhead the sectioning is truly confocal and does not suffer from spatial leakage. In summary, CARS microscopy combined with the tandem scanner makes the Leica TCS SP5 a powerful tool for three-dimensional, label-free imaging of chemical and biological samples in vitro and in vivo.

  5. Simultaneous differential spinning disk fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy and nanomechanical mapping atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Miranda, Adelaide; De Beule, Pieter A. A.

    2015-09-15

    Combined microscopy techniques offer the life science research community a powerful tool to investigate complex biological systems and their interactions. Here, we present a new combined microscopy platform based on fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy through aperture correlation microscopy with a Differential Spinning Disk (DSD) and nanomechanical mapping with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The illumination scheme of the DSD microscope unit, contrary to standard single or multi-point confocal microscopes, provides a time-independent illumination of the AFM cantilever. This enables a distortion-free simultaneous operation of fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy and atomic force microscopy with standard probes. In this context, we discuss sample heating due to AFM cantilever illumination with fluorescence excitation light. Integration of a DSD fluorescence optical sectioning unit with an AFM platform requires mitigation of mechanical noise transfer of the spinning disk. We identify and present two solutions to almost annul this noise in the AFM measurement process. The new combined microscopy platform is applied to the characterization of a DOPC/DOPS (4:1) lipid structures labelled with a lipophilic cationic indocarbocyanine dye deposited on a mica substrate.

  6. M-DAS: System for multispectral data analysis. [in Saginaw Bay, Michigan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. H.

    1975-01-01

    M-DAS is a ground data processing system designed for analysis of multispectral data. M-DAS operates on multispectral data from LANDSAT, S-192, M2S and other sources in CCT form. Interactive training by operator-investigators using a variable cursor on a color display was used to derive optimum processing coefficients and data on cluster separability. An advanced multivariate normal-maximum likelihood processing algorithm was used to produce output in various formats: color-coded film images, geometrically corrected map overlays, moving displays of scene sections, coverage tabulations and categorized CCTs. The analysis procedure for M-DAS involves three phases: (1) screening and training, (2) analysis of training data to compute performance predictions and processing coefficients, and (3) processing of multichannel input data into categorized results. Typical M-DAS applications involve iteration between each of these phases. A series of photographs of the M-DAS display are used to illustrate M-DAS operation.

  7. M-DAS: System for multispectral data analysis. [in Saginaw Bay, Michigan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. H.

    1975-01-01

    M-DAS is a ground data processing system designed for analysis of multispectral data. M-DAS operates on multispectral data from LANDSAT, S-192, M2S and other sources in CCT form. Interactive training by operator-investigators using a variable cursor on a color display was used to derive optimum processing coefficients and data on cluster separability. An advanced multivariate normal-maximum likelihood processing algorithm was used to produce output in various formats: color-coded film images, geometrically corrected map overlays, moving displays of scene sections, coverage tabulations and categorized CCTs. The analysis procedure for M-DAS involves three phases: (1) screening and training, (2) analysis of training data to compute performance predictions and processing coefficients, and (3) processing of multichannel input data into categorized results. Typical M-DAS applications involve iteration between each of these phases. A series of photographs of the M-DAS display are used to illustrate M-DAS operation.

  8. Photoemission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy of Magnetospirillum magnetotacticum's magnetosome chains.

    PubMed

    Keutner, Christoph; von Bohlen, Alex; Berges, Ulf; Espeter, Philipp; Schneider, Claus M; Westphal, Carsten

    2014-10-07

    Magnetotactic bacteria are of great interdisciplinary interest, since a vast field of applications from magnetic recording media to medical nanorobots is conceivable. A key feature for a further understanding is the detailed knowledge about the magnetosome chain within the bacteria. We report on two preparation procedures suitable for UHV experiments in reflective geometry. Further, we present the results of scanning electron microscopy, as well as the first photoemission electron microscopy experiments, both accessing the magnetosomes within intact magnetotactic bacteria and compare these to scanning electron microscopy data from the literature. From the images, we can clearly identify individual magnetosomes within their chains.

  9. Probing cytotoxicity of nanoparticles and organic compounds using scanning proton microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Yongpeng; Li, Changming; Liang, Feng; Chen, Jianmin; Zhang, Hong; Liu, Guoqing; Sun, Huibin; Luong, John H. T.

    2008-12-01

    Scanning proton microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fluorescence microscopy have been used to probe the cytotoxicity effect of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), ethidium bromide (EB) and nanoparticles (ZnO, Al 2O 3 and TiO 2) on a T lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat cell line. The increased calcium ion (from CaCl 2) in the culture medium stimulated the accumulation of BaP and EB inside the cell, leading to cell death. ZnO, Al 2O 3 and TiO 2 nanoparticles, however, showed a protective effect against these two organic compounds. Such inorganic nanoparticles complexed with BaP or EB which became less toxic to the cell. Fe 2O 3 nanoparticles as an insoluble particle model scavenged by macrophage were investigated in rats. They were scavenged out of the lung tissue about 48 h after infection. This result suggest that some insoluble inorganic nanoparticles of PM (particulate matters) showed protective effects on organic toxins induced acute toxic effects as they can be scavenged by macrophage cells. Whereas, some inorganic ions such as calcium ion in PM may help environmental organic toxins to penetrate cell membrane and induce higher toxic effect.

  10. Das Assessment von Vulnerabilitäten, Risiken und Unsicherheiten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkmann, Jörn; Greiving, Stefan; Serdeczny, Olivia Maria

    Die Risiken und möglichen Folgen des Klimawandels für Menschen, Produktions- und Ökosysteme sind eng mit sozioökonomischen Entwicklungen und Rahmenbedingungen verflochten. Die Schlüsselbegriffe "Vulnerabilität", "Risiko" und "Unsicherheit" werden näher beleuchtet, um u. a. deutlich zu machen, wie sie im neueren Risikoansatz des Fünften Sachstandsberichts (AR5) des Weltklimarats (IPCC) genutzt werden. Das Risikokonzept wird vom Vulnerabilitätskonzept unterschieden. In den Fokus rückt die Betrachtung von Gefahr und Exposition. Auch die Frage, was unter Unsicherheit und Bandbreiten möglicher Entwicklungen des Klimas und sogenannter sozioökonomischer Entwicklungspfade zu verstehen ist, spielt dabei eine wichtige Rolle. Bisherige Untersuchungsmethoden zu Risiken im Kontext des Klimawandels und darauf aufbauende Entscheidungsprozesse werden im Hinblick auf künftige Anpassungsmaßnahmen diskutiert.

  11. Das Semantic Web als Werkzeug in der biomedizinischen Forschung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenzhorn, Holger; Samwald, Matthias

    In der biomedizinischen Forschung werden besonders in den letzten Jahren vermehrt enorme Mengen an neuen Daten produziert und diese in Folge verstärkt per Internet veröffentlicht. Viele Experten sehen in dieser Vorgehensweise die Chance zur Entdeckung bisher unbekannter biomedizinischer Erkenntnisse. Um dies jedoch zu ermöglichen, müssen neue Wege gefunden werden, die gewonnenen Daten effizient zu verarbeiten und zu verwalten. In dem vorliegenden Artikel werden die Möglichkeiten betrachtet, die das Semantic Web hierzu anbieten kann. Hierfür werden die relevanten Technologien des Semantic Web im speziellen Kontext der biomedizinischen Forschung betrachtet. Ein Fokus liegt auf der Anwendung von Ontologien in der Biomedizin: Es wird auf deren Vorteile eingegangen, aber auch auf möglichen Probleme, die deren Einsatz in einem erweiterten wissenschaftlichen Umfeld mit sich bringen können.

  12. Molecular expressions: exploring the world of optics and microscopy. http://microscopy.fsu.edu.

    PubMed

    Eliceiri, Kevin W

    2004-08-01

    Our knowledge of the structure, dynamics and physiology of a cell has increased significantly in the last ten years through the emergence of new optical imaging modalities such as optical sectioning microscopy, computer- enhanced video microscopy and laser-scanning microscopy. These techniques together with the use of genetically engineered fluorophores have helped scientists visualize the 3-dimensional dynamic processes of living cells. However as powerful as these imaging tools are, they can often be difficult to understand and fully utilize. Below I will discuss my favorite website: The Molecular Expressions Web Site that endeavors to present the power of microscopy to its visitors. The Molecular Expressions group does a remarkable job of not only clearly presenting the principles behind these techniques in a manner approachable by lay and scientific audiences alike but also provides representative data from each as well.

  13. Reconstruction in interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy: comparison with optical coherence tomography and digital holographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Colin J R; Kou, Shan Shan; Depeursinge, Christian

    2012-03-01

    It is shown that the spatial frequencies recorded in interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy do not correspond to exact backscattering [as they do in unistatic synthetic aperture radar (SAR)] and that the reconstruction process based on SAR is therefore based on an approximation. The spatial frequency response is developed based on the three-dimensional coherent transfer function approach and compared with that in optical coherence tomography and digital holographic microscopy.

  14. Resonance response of scanning force microscopy cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, G.Y.; Warmack, R.J.; Thundat, T.; Allison, D.P. ); Huang, A. )

    1994-08-01

    A variational method is used to calculate the deflection and the fundamental and harmonic resonance frequencies of commercial V-shaped and rectangular atomic force microscopy cantilevers. The effective mass of V-shaped cantilevers is roughly half that calculated for the equivalent rectangular cantilevers. Damping by environmental gases, including air, nitrogen, argon, and helium, affects the frequency of maximum response and to a much greater degree the quality factor [ital Q]. Helium has the lowest viscosity, resulting in the highest [ital Q], and thus provides the best sensitivity in noncontact force microscopy. Damping in liquids is dominated by an increase in effective mass of the cantilever due to an added mass of the liquid being dragged with that cantilever.

  15. Atomically resolved force microscopy at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, Seizo

    2014-04-24

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can now not only image individual atoms but also construct atom letters using atom manipulation method even at room temperature (RT). Therefore, the AFM is the second generation atomic tool following the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). However the AFM can image even insulating atoms, and also directly measure/map the atomic force and potential at the atomic scale. Noting these advantages, we have been developing a bottom-up nanostructuring system at RT based on the AFM. It can identify chemical species of individual atoms and then manipulate selected atom species to the predesigned site one-by-one to assemble complex nanostructures consisted of multi atom species at RT. Here we introduce our results toward atom-by-atom assembly of composite nanostructures based on the AFM at RT including the latest result on atom gating of nano-space for atom-by-atom creation of atom clusters at RT for semiconductor surfaces.

  16. Phase sensitive demodulation in multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Walt G; Piston, David W; Wachter, Eric A

    2002-06-01

    Multiphoton laser scanning microscopy offers advantages in depth of penetration into intact samples over other optical sectioning techniques. To achieve these advantages it is necessary to detect the emitted light without spatial filtering. In this nondescanned (nonconfocal) approach, ambient room light can easily contaminate the signal, forcing experiments to be performed in absolute darkness. For multiphoton microscope systems employing mode-locked lasers, signal processing can be used to reduce such problems by taking advantage of the pulsed characteristics of such lasers. Specifically, by recovering fluorescence generated at the mode-locked frequency, interference from stray light and other ambient noise sources can be significantly reduced. This technology can be adapted to existing microscopes by inserting demodulation circuitry between the detector and data collection system. The improvement in signal-to-noise ratio afforded by this approach yields a more robust microscope system and opens the possibility of moving multiphoton microscopy from the research lab to more demanding settings, such as the clinic.

  17. Understanding liver immunology using intravital microscopy.

    PubMed

    Marques, Pedro Elias; Oliveira, André Gustavo; Chang, Lynne; Paula-Neto, Heitor Affonso; Menezes, Gustavo Batista

    2015-09-01

    The liver has come a long way since it was considered only a metabolic organ attached to the gastrointestinal tract. The simultaneous ascension of immunology and intravital microscopy evidenced the liver as a central axis in the immune system, controlling immune responses to local and systemic agents as well as disease tolerance. The multiple hepatic cell populations are organized in a vascular environment that promotes intimate cellular interactions, including initiation of innate and adaptive immune responses, rapid leukocyte recruitment, pathogen clearance and production of a variety of immune mediators. In this review, we focus on the advances in liver immunology supported by intravital microscopy in diseases such as isquemia/reperfusion, acute liver injury and infections.

  18. Nuclear microscopy of sperm cell elemental structure

    SciTech Connect

    Bench, G.S.; Balhorn, R.; Friz, A.M.; Freeman, S.P.H.T.

    1994-09-28

    Theories suggest there is a link between protamine concentrations in individual sperm and male fertility. Previously, biochemical analyses have used pooled samples containing millions of sperm to determine protamine concentrations. These methods have not been able to determine what percentage of morphologically normal sperm are biochemically defective and potentially infertile. Nuclear microscopy has been utilized to measure elemental profiles at the single sperm level. By measuring the amount of phosphorus and sulfur, the total DNA and protamine content in individual sperm from fertile bull and mouse semen have been determined. These values agree with results obtained from other biochemical analyses. Nuclear microscopy shows promise for measuring elemental profiles in the chromatin of individual sperm. The technique may be able to resolve theories regarding the importance of protamines to male fertility and identify biochemical defects responsible for certain types of male infertility.

  19. Circumventing photodamage in live-cell microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Magidson, Valentin; Khodjakov, Alexey

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy has become an essential tool in cell biology. This technique allows researchers to visualize the dynamics of tissue, cells, individual organelles and macromolecular assemblies inside the cell. Unfortunately, fluorescence microscopy is not completely ‘non-invasive’ as the high-intensity excitation light required for excitation of fluorophores is inherently toxic for live cells. Physiological changes induced by excessive illumination can lead to artifacts and abnormal responses. In this chapter we review major factors that contribute to phototoxicity and discuss practical solutions for circumventing photodamage. These solutions include the proper choice of image acquisition parameters, optimization of filter sets, hardware synchronization, and the use of intelligent illumination to avoid unnecessary light exposure. PMID:23931522

  20. Diffractive elements performance in chromatic confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzón, J.; Duque, D.; Alean, A.; Toledo, M.; Meneses, J.; Gharbi, T.

    2011-01-01

    The Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM) has been widely used in the semiconductor industry and biomedicine because of its depth discrimination capability. Subsequent to this technique has been developed in recent years Chromatic Confocal Microscopy. This method retains the same principle of confocal and offers the added advantage of removing the axial movement of the moving system. This advantage is usually accomplished with an optical element that generates a longitudinal chromatic aberration and a coding system that relates the axial position of each point of the sample with the wavelength that is focused on each. The present paper shows the performance of compact chromatic confocal microscope when some different diffractive elements are used for generation of longitudinal chromatic aberration. Diffractive elements, according to the process and manufacturing parameters, may have different diffraction efficiency and focus a specific wavelength in a specific focal position. The performance assessment is carried out with various light sources which exhibit an incoherent behaviour and a broad spectral width.

  1. Nuclear microscopy of sperm cell elemental structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bench, Graham S.; Balhorn, Rod; Friz, Alexander M.

    1995-05-01

    Theories suggest there is a link between protamine concentrations in individual sperm and male fertility. Previously, biochemical analyses have used pooled samples containing millions of sperm to determine protamine concentrations. These methods have not been able to determine what percentage of morphologically normal sperm are biochemically defective and potentially infertile. Nuclear microscopy has been utilized to measure elemental profiles at the single sperm level. By measuring the amount of phosphorus and sulfur, the total DNA and protamine content in individual sperm from fertile bull and mouse semen have been determined. These values agree with results obtained from other biochemical analyses. Nuclear microscopy shows promise for measuring elemental profiles in the chromatin of individual sperm. The technique may be able to resolve theories regarding the importance of protamines to male fertility and identify biochemical defects responsible for certain types of male infertility.

  2. Frontiers of in situ electron microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Zheng, Haimei; Zhu, Yimei; Meng, Shirley Ying

    2015-01-01

    In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has become an increasingly important tool for materials characterization. It provides key information on the structural dynamics of a material during transformations and the correlation between structure and properties of materials. With the recent advances in instrumentation, including aberration corrected optics, sample environment control, the sample stage, and fast and sensitive data acquisition, in situ TEM characterization has become more and more powerful. In this article, a brief review of the current status and future opportunities of in situ TEM is included. It also provides an introduction to the six articles covered by inmore » this issue of MRS Bulletin explore the frontiers of in situ electron microscopy, including liquid and gas environmental TEM, dynamic four-dimensional TEM, nanomechanics, ferroelectric domain switching studied by in situ TEM, and state-of-the-art atomic imaging of light elements (i.e., carbon atoms) and individual defects.« less

  3. Comparative microscopy study of Vibrio cholerae flagella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konnov, Nikolai P.; Baiburin, Vil B.; Zadnova, Svetlana P.; Volkov, Uryi P.

    1999-06-01

    A fine structure of bacteria flagella is an important problem of molecular cell biology. Bacteria flagella are the self-assembled structures that allow to use the flagellum protein in a number of biotechnological applications. However, at present, there is a little information about high resolution scanning probe microscopy study of flagellum structure, in particular, about investigation of Vibrio cholerae flagella. In our lab have been carried out the high resolution comparative investigation of V. cholerae flagella by means of various microscopes: tunneling (STM), scanning force (SFM) and electron transmission. As a scanning probe microscope is used designed in our lab versatile SPM with replaceable measuring heads. Bacteria were grown, fixed and treated according to the conventional techniques. For STM investigations samples were covered with Pt/Ir thin films by rotated vacuum evaporation, in SFM investigations were used uncovered samples. Electron microscopy of the negatively stained bacteria was used as a test procedure.

  4. Preparation of mineralized tissue for light microscopy.

    PubMed

    Valentine, Gail; Piper, Kim

    2012-01-01

    Production of stained tissue sections for examination by light microscopy is a step-wise process which begins with preservation of tissue (fixation), then dehydration and clearing of the tissue, and finally impregnation with wax (processing). Mineralized tissues such as bone and teeth are subject to a further step (decalcification). Thin sections are then attached to a glass slide for staining and light microscopy.In the UK, it is usual for a preliminary diagnosis to be made using hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. A definitive diagnosis may need further investigation with immunocytochemistry. All of these procedures must allow morphology and tissue structure to remain in tact, as any pathology present must not be compromised.

  5. Scanning Electron Microscopy Sample Preparation and Imaging.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Jenny Ngoc Tran; Harbison, Amanda M

    2017-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopes allow us to reach magnifications of 20-130,000× and resolve compositional and topographical images with intense detail. These images are created by bombarding a sample with electrons in a focused manner to generate a black and white image from the electrons that bounce off of the sample. The electrons are detected using positively charged detectors. Scanning electron microscopy permits three-dimensional imaging of desiccated specimens or wet cells and tissues by using variable pressure chambers. SEM ultrastructural analysis and intracellular imaging supplement light microscopy for molecular profiling of prokaryotes, plants, and mammals. This chapter demonstrates how to prepare and image samples that are (a) desiccated and conductive, (b) desiccated and nonconductive but coated with an electron conductive film using a gold sputter coater, and (c) wet and maintained in a hydrated state using a Deben Coolstage.

  6. Stimulated Raman scattering microscopy for biomedical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Wei; Freudiger, Christian W.; Lu, Sijia; He, Chengwei; Kang, Jing X.; Xie, X. Sunney

    2009-02-01

    Label-free chemical contrast is highly desirable in biomedical imaging. Spontaneous Raman microscopy provides specific vibrational signatures of chemical bonds, but is often hindered by low sensitivity. Here we report a 3D multi-photon vibrational imaging technique based on stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). The sensitivity of SRS is significantly greater than that of spontaneous Raman scattering, and is further enhanced by high-frequency (MHz) phase-sensitive detection. SRS microscopy has a major advantage over previous coherent Raman techniques in that it offers background-free and easily interpretable chemical contrast. We show a variety of biomedical applications, such as differentiating distributions of omega-3 fatty acids and saturated lipids in living cells, imaging of brain and skin tissues based on intrinsic lipid contrast.

  7. Reflectance Confocal Microscopy in Lentigo Maligna.

    PubMed

    Gamo, R; Pampín, A; Floristán, U

    2016-12-01

    Lentigo maligna is the most common type of facial melanoma. Diagnosis is complicated, however, as it shares clinical and dermoscopic characteristics with other cutaneous lesions of the face. Reflectance confocal microscopy is an imaging technique that permits the visualization of characteristic features of lentigo maligna. These include a disrupted honeycomb pattern and pagetoid cells with a tendency to show folliculotropism. These cells typically have a dendritic morphology, although they may also appear as round cells measuring over 20μm with atypical nuclei. Poorly defined dermal papillae and atypical cells may be seen at the dermal-epidermal junction and can form bridges resembling mitochondrial structures. Other characteristic findings include junctional swelling with atypical cells located around the follicles, resembling caput medusae. Reflectance confocal microscopy is a very useful tool for diagnosing lentigo maligna. Copyright © 2016 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Advances in light microscopy for neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Wilt, Brian A; Burns, Laurie D; Wei Ho, Eric Tatt; Ghosh, Kunal K; Mukamel, Eran A; Schnitzer, Mark J

    2009-01-01

    Since the work of Golgi and Cajal, light microscopy has remained a key tool for neuroscientists to observe cellular properties. Ongoing advances have enabled new experimental capabilities using light to inspect the nervous system across multiple spatial scales, including ultrastructural scales finer than the optical diffraction limit. Other progress permits functional imaging at faster speeds, at greater depths in brain tissue, and over larger tissue volumes than previously possible. Portable, miniaturized fluorescence microscopes now allow brain imaging in freely behaving mice. Complementary progress on animal preparations has enabled imaging in head-restrained behaving animals, as well as time-lapse microscopy studies in the brains of live subjects. Mouse genetic approaches permit mosaic and inducible fluorescence-labeling strategies, whereas intrinsic contrast mechanisms allow in vivo imaging of animals and humans without use of exogenous markers. This review surveys such advances and highlights emerging capabilities of particular interest to neuroscientists.

  9. Scanning electron microscopy of lichen sclerosus*

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Hiram Larangeira; Bicca, Eduardo de Barros Coelho; Breunig, Juliano de Avelar; Rocha, Nara Moreira; Silva, Ricardo Marques e

    2013-01-01

    Lichen sclerosus is an acquired inflammatory condition characterized by whitish fibrotic plaques, with a predilection for the genital skin. We performed scanning electron microscopy of the dermis from a lesion of lichen sclerosus. Normal collagen fibers could be easily found in deeper layers of the specimen, as well as the transition to pathologic area, which seems homogenized. With higher magnifications in this transitional area collagen fibers are adherent to each other, and with very high magnifications a pearl chain aspect became evident along the collagen fibers. In the superficial dermis this homogenization is even more evident, collagen fibers are packed together and round structures are also observed. Rupture of collagen fibers and inflammatory cells were not found. These autoimmune changes of the extracellular matrix lead to the aggregation of immune complexes and/or changed matrix proteins along the collagen fibers, the reason why they seem hyalinized when examined by light microscopy. PMID:23739707

  10. Global standardization of scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Daisuke; Itoh, Hiroshi; Ichimura, Shingo; Kurosawa, Tomizo

    2007-02-01

    Recent efforts to achieve global standardization of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) including noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM), especially through the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and related research, are surveyed. Since the unification of terminology for SPM is a prerequisite for standardization, it should have the first priority, followed by the unification of data management and treatment, which will enable access to and processing of SPM data collected by different types of instrument. Among the various SPM analytical methods, the dimensional metrology of SPM is regarded to be the first priority for standardization. This requires solving two basic problems: calibrating the x, y, and z coordinate axes with traceability to the SI unit of length, and eliminating the morphological artefacts caused by the shape of the probe tip. Pre-standardization efforts on restoring distorted images and characterizing the tip shape during use are discussed.

  11. Single molecule fluorescence and force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Schütz, G J; Hinterdorfer, P

    2002-12-01

    The investigation of biomolecules has entered a new age since the development of methodologies capable of studies at the level of single molecules. In biology, most molecules show a complex dynamical behavior, with individual motions and transitions between different states occurring highly correlated in space and time within an arrangement of various elements. Recent advances in the development of new microscopy techniques with sensitivity at the single molecule have gained access to essentially new types of information obtainable from imaging biomolecular samples. These methodologies are described here in terms of their applicability to the in vivo detection and visualization of molecular processes on surfaces, membranes, and cells. First examples of single molecule microscopy on cell membranes revealed new basic insight into the lateral organization of the plasma membrane, providing the captivating perspective of an ultra-sensitive methodology as a general tool to study local processes and heterogeneities in living cells.

  12. Pointwise error estimates in localization microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindén, Martin; Ćurić, Vladimir; Amselem, Elias; Elf, Johan

    2017-05-01

    Pointwise localization of individual fluorophores is a critical step in super-resolution localization microscopy and single particle tracking. Although the methods are limited by the localization errors of individual fluorophores, the pointwise localization precision has so far been estimated using theoretical best case approximations that disregard, for example, motion blur, defocus effects and variations in fluorescence intensity. Here, we show that pointwise localization precision can be accurately estimated directly from imaging data using the Bayesian posterior density constrained by simple microscope properties. We further demonstrate that the estimated localization precision can be used to improve downstream quantitative analysis, such as estimation of diffusion constants and detection of changes in molecular motion patterns. Finally, the quality of actual point localizations in live cell super-resolution microscopy can be improved beyond the information theoretic lower bound for localization errors in individual images, by modelling the movement of fluorophores and accounting for their pointwise localization uncertainty.

  13. Fast interferometric second harmonic generation microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bancelin, Stéphane; Couture, Charles-André; Légaré, Katherine; Pinsard, Maxime; Rivard, Maxime; Brown, Cameron; Légaré, François

    2016-01-01

    We report the implementation of fast Interferometric Second Harmonic Generation (I-SHG) microscopy to study the polarity of non-centrosymmetric structures in biological tissues. Using a sample quartz plate, we calibrate the spatially varying phase shift introduced by the laser scanning system. Compensating this phase shift allows us to retrieve the correct phase distribution in periodically poled lithium niobate, used as a model sample. Finally, we used fast interferometric second harmonic generation microscopy to acquire phase images in tendon. Our results show that the method exposed here, using a laser scanning system, allows to recover the polarity of collagen fibrils, similarly to standard I-SHG (using a sample scanning system), but with an imaging time about 40 times shorter. PMID:26977349

  14. Structured illumination microscopy with interleaved reconstruction (SIMILR).

    PubMed

    Ma, Ying; Li, Di; Smith, Zachary J; Li, Dong; Chu, Kaiqin

    2017-07-13

    Structured illumination microscopy (SIM) is the commonly used super-resolution (SR) technique for imaging subcellular dynamics. However, due to its need for multiple illumination patterns, the frame rate is just a fraction of that of conventional microscopy and is thus too slow for fast dynamic studies. A new SR image reconstruction method that maximizes the use of each subframe of the acquisition series is proposed for improving the super-resolved frame rate by N times for N illumination directions. The method requires no changes in raw data and is appropriate for many versions of SIM setup, including those implementing fast illumination pattern generation mechanism based on spatial light modulator or digital micromirror device. The performance of the proposed method is demonstrated through imaging the highly dynamic endoplasmic reticulum where continuous rapid growths or shape changes of tiny structures are observed. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Speckle-field digital holographic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Park, YongKeun; Choi, Wonshik; Yaqoob, Zahid; Dasari, Ramachandra; Badizadegan, Kamran; Feld, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    The use of coherent light in conventional holographic phase microscopy (HPM) poses three major drawbacks: poor spatial resolution, weak depth sectioning, and fixed pattern noise due to unwanted diffraction. Here, we report a technique which can overcome these drawbacks, but maintains the advantage of phase microscopy - high contrast live cell imaging and 3D imaging. A speckle beam of a complex spatial pattern is used for illumination to reduce fixed pattern noise and to improve optical sectioning capability. By recording of the electric field of speckle, we demonstrate high contrast 3D live cell imaging without the need for axial scanning - neither objective lens nor sample stage. This technique has great potential in studying biological samples with improved sensitivity, resolution and optical sectioning capability. PMID:19654630

  16. Advances in Light Microscopy for Neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    Wilt, Brian A.; Burns, Laurie D.; Ho, Eric Tatt Wei; Ghosh, Kunal K.; Mukamel, Eran A.

    2010-01-01

    Since the work of Golgi and Cajal, light microscopy has remained a key tool for neuroscientists to observe cellular properties. Ongoing advances have enabled new experimental capabilities using light to inspect the nervous system across multiple spatial scales, including ultrastructural scales finer than the optical diffraction limit. Other progress permits functional imaging at faster speeds, at greater depths in brain tissue, and over larger tissue volumes than previously possible. Portable, miniaturized fluorescence microscopes now allow brain imaging in freely behaving mice. Complementary progress on animal preparations has enabled imaging in head-restrained behaving animals, as well as time-lapse microscopy studies in the brains of live subjects. Mouse genetic approaches permit mosaic and inducible fluorescence-labeling strategies, whereas intrinsic contrast mechanisms allow in vivo imaging of animals and humans without use of exogenous markers. This review surveys such advances and highlights emerging capabilities of particular interest to neuroscientists. PMID:19555292

  17. Three-Dimensional Reflectance Traction Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Christopher A. R.; Groves, Nicholas Scott; Sun, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Cells in three-dimensional (3D) environments exhibit very different biochemical and biophysical phenotypes compared to the behavior of cells in two-dimensional (2D) environments. As an important biomechanical measurement, 2D traction force microscopy can not be directly extended into 3D cases. In order to quantitatively characterize the contraction field, we have developed 3D reflectance traction microscopy which combines confocal reflection imaging and partial volume correlation postprocessing. We have measured the deformation field of collagen gel under controlled mechanical stress. We have also characterized the deformation field generated by invasive breast cancer cells of different morphologies in 3D collagen matrix. In contrast to employ dispersed tracing particles or fluorescently-tagged matrix proteins, our methods provide a label-free, computationally effective strategy to study the cell mechanics in native 3D extracellular matrix. PMID:27304456

  18. Interferometric phase microscopy of red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Liang; Sun, Nan; Tang, Xian; Wang, Yin; Wang, Shouyu

    2013-12-01

    Quantitative phase imaging of cells with high accuracy in a completely noninvasive manner is a challenging task. To provide a proper solution to this important need, interferometric phase microscopy is described which relies on the off-axis interferometry, confocal microscopy and high-speed image capture technology. Phase retrieval from the single interferogram is done by algorithms based on the fast Fourier transform, traditional Hilbert transform and two-step Hilbert transform, respectively. Furthermore, a phase aberrations compensation approach is applied to correct the phase distribution of the red blood cells obtained via the three methods mentioned before without the pre-known knowledge for removing the wave front curvature introduced by the microscope objectives, off-axis imaging, etc., which otherwise hinders the phase reconstruction. The improved results reveal the better inner structures of the red blood cells. The development of quantitative phase imaging technique is shedding light on their future directions and applications for basic and clinical research.

  19. Confocal multiview light-sheet microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros, Gustavo de; Norlin, Nils; Gunther, Stefan; Albert, Marvin; Panavaite, Laura; Fiuza, Ulla-Maj; Peri, Francesca; Hiiragi, Takashi; Krzic, Uros; Hufnagel, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Selective-plane illumination microscopy has proven to be a powerful imaging technique due to its unsurpassed acquisition speed and gentle optical sectioning. However, even in the case of multiview imaging techniques that illuminate and image the sample from multiple directions, light scattering inside tissues often severely impairs image contrast. Here we combine multiview light-sheet imaging with electronic confocal slit detection implemented on modern camera sensors. In addition to improved imaging quality, the electronic confocal slit detection doubles the acquisition speed in multiview setups with two opposing illumination directions allowing simultaneous dual-sided illumination. Confocal multiview light-sheet microscopy eliminates the need for specimen-specific data fusion algorithms, streamlines image post-processing, easing data handling and storage. PMID:26602977

  20. A New Twist on Scanning Thermal Microscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-25

    Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, WPAFB, Ohio 45433, United States ‡School of Materials Science and Engineering...bimorphs do not suffer from these setbacks. In fact, thermal bimorphs transduced with an atomic force microscopy (AFM) quadrant photodetector have a...AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Air Force Research Laboratory

  1. Orbital angular momentum light in microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritsch-Marte, Monika

    2017-02-01

    Light with a helical phase has had an impact on optical imaging, pushing the limits of resolution or sensitivity. Here, special emphasis will be given to classical light microscopy of phase samples and to Fourier filtering techniques with a helical phase profile, such as the spiral phase contrast technique in its many variants and areas of application. This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  2. Interactive and automated application of virtual microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kayser, Klaus; Görtler, Jürgen; Borkenfeld, Stephan; Kayser, Gian

    2011-03-30

    Virtual microscopy can be applied in an interactive and an automated manner. Interactive application is performed in close association to conventional microscopy. It includes image standardization suitable to the performance of an individual pathologist such as image colorization, white color balance, or individual adjusted brightness. The steering commands have to include selection of wanted magnification, easy navigation, notification, and simple measurements (distances, areas). The display of the histological image should be adjusted to the physical limits of the human eye, which are determined by a view angle of approximately 35 seconds. A more sophisticated performance should include acoustic commands that replace the corresponding visual commands. Automated virtual microscopy includes so-called microscopy assistants which can be defined similar to the developed assistants in computer based editing systems (Microsoft Word, etc.). These include an automated image standardization and correction algorithms that excludes images of poor quality (for example uni-colored or out-of-focus images), an automated selection of the most appropriate field of view, an automated selection of the best magnification, and finally proposals of the most probable diagnosis. A quality control of the final diagnosis, and feedback to the laboratory determine the proposed system. The already developed tools of such a system are described in detail, as well as the results of first trials. In order to enhance the speed of such a system, and to allow further user-independent development a distributed implementation probably based upon Grid technology seems to be appropriate. The advantages of such a system as well as the present pathology environment and its expectations will be discussed in detail.

  3. Surface Studies by Scanning Probe Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ho-Seob

    The scanning probe microscopy reported here includes scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The scanning tunneling microscope is a novel tool which can reveal the atomic structure and electronic properties of surfaces using a probe with a sharp tip. An additional technique, atomic force microscopy has the potential to record geometric structures for both conducting and non -conducting materials. The first AFM designs utilized short range forces between a small stylus and a sample surface to produce high resolution images of defects and structural features of the surface. The current-voltage characteristics were also investigated during dynamic changes of the tunnel current and barrier height with an additional technology, tunneling spectroscopy. An advanced design for an AFM has been developed which utilizes a dielectric tunnel junction to retain the high sensitivity of tunnel current control over force ranges between 10^{-6} and 10 ^{-11}N. This AFM has been successfully applied to physical and biological samples. Scanning probe techniques have been developed and applied to a range of sample types including conductors, semi-conductors and non-conductors. Each technique utilizes the same electronics, computers, and imaging facilities. A fundamental problem of the atomic structure of graphite has existed since the inception of STM images. The experimental and theoretical hypotheses have been considered and a resolution of the problem has been developed as reported in this dissertation. Unprecedented resolving power, greater than 1A, has confirmed our hypothesis and has been correctly correlated with the structure of graphite surface. This dissertation also presents the results from studies of the surface structure of: MoS_2 , Cu, Au, Ag, Si, CdTe, HgTe, Fe_2 O_3, mica, gypsum, purple membranes with protein chains, and an organic photoconducting material, by scanning probe microscopes.

  4. Dark Field Microscopy for Analytical Laboratory Courses

    SciTech Connect

    Augspurger, Ashley E; Stender, Anthony S; Marchuk, Kyle; Greenbowe, Thomas J; Fang, Ning

    2014-06-10

    An innovative and inexpensive optical microscopy experiment for a quantitative analysis or an instrumental analysis chemistry course is described. The students have hands-on experience with a dark field microscope and investigate the wavelength dependence of localized surface plasmon resonance in gold and silver nanoparticles. Students also observe and measure individual crystal growth during a replacement reaction between copper and silver nitrate. The experiment allows for quantitative, qualitative, and image data analyses for undergraduate students.

  5. Photoacoustic microscopy of ceramic turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khandelwal, P. K.; Kinnick, R. R.; Heitman, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    Scanning photoacoustic microscopy (SPAM) is evaluated as a nondestructive technique for the detection of both surface and subsurface flaws in polycrystalline ceramics, such as those currently under consideration for the high temperature components of small vehicular and industrial gas turbine engines; the fracture strength of these brittle materials is controlled by small, 25-200 micron flaws. Attention is given to the correlation of SPAM-detected flaws with actual, fracture-controlling flaws in ceramic turbine blades.

  6. Application perspectives of localization microscopy in virology.

    PubMed

    Cremer, C; Kaufmann, R; Gunkel, M; Polanski, F; Müller, P; Dierkes, R; Degenhard, S; Wege, C; Hausmann, M; Birk, U

    2014-07-01

    Localization microscopy approaches allowing an optical resolution down to the single-molecule level in fluorescence-labeled biostructures have already found a variety of applications in cell biology, as well as in virology. Here, we focus on some perspectives of a special localization microscopy embodiment, spectral precision distance/position determination microscopy (SPDM). SPDM permits the use of conventional fluorophores or fluorescent proteins together with standard sample preparation conditions employing an aqueous buffered milieu and typically monochromatic excitation. This allowed superresolution imaging and studies on the aggregation state of modified tobacco mosaic virus particles on the nanoscale with a single-molecule localization accuracy of better than 8 nm, using standard fluorescent dyes in the visible spectrum. To gain a better understanding of cell entry mechanisms during influenza A virus infection, SPDM was used in conjunction with algorithms for distance and cluster analyses to study changes in the distribution of virus particles themselves or in the distribution of infection-related proteins, the hepatocyte growth factor receptors, in the cell membrane on the single-molecule level. Not requiring TIRF (total internal reflection) illumination, SPDM was also applied to study the molecular arrangement of gp36.5/m164 glycoprotein (essentially associated with murine cytomegalovirus infection) in the endoplasmic reticulum and the nuclear membrane inside cells with single-molecule resolution. On the basis of the experimental evidence so far obtained, we finally discuss additional application perspectives of localization microscopy approaches for the fast detection and identification of viruses by multi-color SPDM and combinatorial oligonucleotide fluorescence in situ hybridization, as well as SPDM techniques for optimization of virus-based nanotools and biodetection devices.

  7. Real-time interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ralston, Tyler S.; Marks, Daniel L.; Carney, P. Scott; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    An interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM) system design with real-time 2D cross-sectional processing is described in detail. The system can acquire, process, and display the ISAM reconstructed images at frame rates of 2.25 frames per second for 512 × 1024 pixel images. This system provides quantitatively meaningful structural information from previously indistinguishable scattering intensities and provides proof of feasibility for future real-time ISAM systems. PMID:18542337

  8. Biological cryo‐electron microscopy in China

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cryo‐electron microscopy (cryo‐EM) plays an increasingly more important role in structural biology. With the construction of an arm of the Chinese National Protein Science Facility at Tsinghua University, biological cryo‐EM has entered a phase of rapid development in China. This article briefly reviews the history of biological cryo‐EM in China, describes its current status, comments on its impact on the various biological research fields, and presents future outlook. PMID:27534377

  9. Biological cryo-electron microscopy in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Wei; Lei, Jianlin; Shi, Yigong

    2017-01-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) plays an increasingly more important role in structural biology. With the construction of an arm of the Chinese National Protein Science Facility at Tsinghua University, biological cryo-EM has entered a phase of rapid development in China. This article briefly reviews the history of biological cryo-EM in China, describes its current status, comments on its impact on the various biological research fields, and presents future outlook.

  10. Reflection Acoustic Microscopy for Micro-NDE.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-01

    WORDS (Coni, wu rere side. 14 It noeeeey And Idenify1 by block esife) Nondestructive Evaluation Acoustic Microscopy I Subsurface Imaging Pulsecio Cmrsin... subsurface imaging is presented and it is shown that with such lenses it is possible to obtain good focussing performance over a wide depth range...typically few millimeters at 50 MHz. A major problem in subsurface imaging derives from the large reflection obtained frnm the surface, and the small amount

  11. Correlative photoactivated localization and scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kopek, Benjamin G; Shtengel, Gleb; Grimm, Jonathan B; Clayton, David A; Hess, Harald F

    2013-01-01

    The ability to localize proteins precisely within subcellular space is crucial to understanding the functioning of biological systems. Recently, we described a protocol that correlates a precise map of fluorescent fusion proteins localized using three-dimensional super-resolution optical microscopy with the fine ultrastructural context of three-dimensional electron micrographs. While it achieved the difficult simultaneous objectives of high photoactivated fluorophore preservation and ultrastructure preservation, it required a super-resolution optical and specialized electron microscope that is not available to many researchers. We present here a faster and more practical protocol with the advantage of a simpler two-dimensional optical (Photoactivated Localization Microscopy (PALM)) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) system that retains the often mutually exclusive attributes of fluorophore preservation and ultrastructure preservation. As before, cryosections were prepared using the Tokuyasu protocol, but the staining protocol was modified to be amenable for use in a standard SEM without the need for focused ion beam ablation. We show the versatility of this technique by labeling different cellular compartments and structures including mitochondrial nucleoids, peroxisomes, and the nuclear lamina. We also demonstrate simultaneous two-color PALM imaging with correlated electron micrographs. Lastly, this technique can be used with small-molecule dyes as demonstrated with actin labeling using phalloidin conjugated to a caged dye. By retaining the dense protein labeling expected for super-resolution microscopy combined with ultrastructural preservation, simplifying the tools required for correlative microscopy, and expanding the number of useful labels we expect this method to be accessible and valuable to a wide variety of researchers.

  12. Orbital angular momentum light in microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ritsch-Marte, Monika

    2017-02-28

    Light with a helical phase has had an impact on optical imaging, pushing the limits of resolution or sensitivity. Here, special emphasis will be given to classical light microscopy of phase samples and to Fourier filtering techniques with a helical phase profile, such as the spiral phase contrast technique in its many variants and areas of application.This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  13. Observation of Superlubricity by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Motohisa; Shinjo, Kazumasa; Kaneko, Reizo; Murata, Yoshitada

    1997-02-01

    Experimental evidence of superlubricity, the state of vanishing friction, is obtained by examining systems of sliding atomically clean surfaces by using ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy. The experimental results agree with theoretical predictions: Friction is not observed in the superlubricity regime in measurements capable of resolving a friction force of 3×10-9 N, whereas friction of 8×10-8 N, which is comparable to theoretical values, is observed in the friction regime.

  14. Scanning electron microscopy of superficial white onychomycosis*

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida Jr., Hiram Larangeira; Boabaid, Roberta Oliveira; Timm, Vitor; Silva, Ricardo Marques e; de Castro, Luis Antonio Suita

    2015-01-01

    Superficial white onychomycosis is characterized by opaque, friable, whitish superficial spots on the nail plate. We examined an affected halux nail of a 20-year-old male patient with scanning electron microscopy. The mycological examination isolated Trichophyton mentagrophytes. Abundant hyphae with the formation of arthrospores were found on the nail's surface, forming small fungal colonies. These findings showed the great capacity for dissemination of this form of onychomycosis. PMID:26560225

  15. Image Correlation Microscopy for Uniform Illumination

    PubMed Central

    Gaborski, Thomas R.; Sealander, Michael N.; Ehrenberg, Morton; Waugh, Richard E.; McGrath, James L.

    2011-01-01

    Image cross-correlation microscopy (ICM) is a technique that quantifies the motion of fluorescent features in an image by measuring the temporal autocorrelation function decay in a time-lapse image sequence. ICM has traditionally employed laser-scanning microscopes because the technique emerged as an extension of laser-based fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). In this work, we show that image correlation can also be used to measure fluorescence dynamics in uniform illumination or wide-field imaging systems and we call our new approach uniform illumination image correlation microscopy (UI-ICM). Wide-field microscopy is not only a simpler, less expensive imaging modality, but it offers the capability of greater temporal resolution over laser-scanning systems. In traditional laser-scanning ICM, lateral mobility is calculated from the temporal de-correlation of an image, where the characteristic length is the illuminating laser beam width. In wide-field microscopy, the diffusion length is defined by the feature size using the spatial autocorrelation function (SACF). Correlation function decay in time occurs as an object diffuses from its original position. We show that theoretical and simulated comparisons between Gaussian and uniform features indicate the temporal autocorrelation function (TACF) depends strongly on particle size and not particle shape. In this report, we establish the relationships between the SACF feature size, TACF characteristic time and the diffusion coefficient for UI-ICM using analytical, Monte-Carlo and experimental validation with particle tracking algorithms. Additionally, we demonstrate UI-ICM analysis of adhesion molecule domain aggregation and diffusion on the surface of human neutrophils. PMID:20055917

  16. Quantitative imaging of bilirubin by photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yong; Zhang, Chi; Yao, Da-Kang; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-03-01

    Noninvasive detection of both bilirubin concentration and its distribution is important for disease diagnosis. Here we implemented photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) to detect bilirubin distribution. We first demonstrate that our PAM system can measure the absorption spectra of bilirubin and blood. We also image bilirubin distributions in tissuemimicking samples, both without and with blood mixed. Our results show that PAM has the potential to quantitatively image bilirubin in vivo for clinical applications.

  17. Multidepth imaging by chromatic dispersion confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsovsky, Cory A.; Shelton, Ryan L.; Saldua, Meagan A.; Carrasco-Zevallos, Oscar; Applegate, Brian E.; Maitland, Kristen C.

    2012-03-01

    Confocal microscopy has shown potential as an imaging technique to detect precancer. Imaging cellular features throughout the depth of epithelial tissue may provide useful information for diagnosis. However, the current in vivo axial scanning techniques for confocal microscopy are cumbersome, time-consuming, and restrictive when attempting to reconstruct volumetric images acquired in breathing patients. Chromatic dispersion confocal microscopy (CDCM) exploits severe longitudinal chromatic aberration in the system to axially disperse light from a broadband source and, ultimately, spectrally encode high resolution images along the depth of the object. Hyperchromat lenses are designed to have severe and linear longitudinal chromatic aberration, but have not yet been used in confocal microscopy. We use a hyperchromat lens in a stage scanning confocal microscope to demonstrate the capability to simultaneously capture information at multiple depths without mechanical scanning. A photonic crystal fiber pumped with a 830nm wavelength Ti:Sapphire laser was used as a supercontinuum source, and a spectrometer was used as the detector. The chromatic aberration and magnification in the system give a focal shift of 140μm after the objective lens and an axial resolution of 5.2-7.6μm over the wavelength range from 585nm to 830nm. A 400x400x140μm3 volume of pig cheek epithelium was imaged in a single X-Y scan. Nuclei can be seen at several depths within the epithelium. The capability of this technique to achieve simultaneous high resolution confocal imaging at multiple depths may reduce imaging time and motion artifacts and enable volumetric reconstruction of in vivo confocal images of the epithelium.

  18. High-resolution imaging by scanning electron microscopy of semithin sections in correlation with light microscopy.

    PubMed

    Koga, Daisuke; Kusumi, Satoshi; Shodo, Ryusuke; Dan, Yukari; Ushiki, Tatsuo

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we introduce scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of semithin resin sections. In this technique, semithin sections were adhered on glass slides, stained with both uranyl acetate and lead citrate, and observed with a backscattered electron detector at a low accelerating voltage. As the specimens are stained in the same manner as conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the contrast of SEM images of semithin sections was similar to TEM images of ultrathin sections. Using this technique, wide areas of semithin sections were also observed by SEM, without the obstruction of grids, which was inevitable for traditional TEM. This study also applied semithin section SEM to correlative light and electron microscopy. Correlative immunofluorescence microscopy and immune-SEM were performed in semithin sections of LR white resin-embedded specimens using a FluoroNanogold-labeled secondary antibody. Because LR white resin is hydrophilic and electron stable, this resin is suitable for immunostaining and SEM observation. Using correlative microscopy, the precise localization of the primary antibody was demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy and SEM. This method has great potential for studies examining the precise localization of molecules, including Golgi- and ER-associated proteins, in correlation with LM and SEM.

  19. A Comparative Study Between Smartphone-Based Microscopy and Conventional Light Microscopy in 1021 Dermatopathology Specimens.

    PubMed

    Jahan-Tigh, Richard R; Chinn, Garrett M; Rapini, Ronald P

    2016-01-01

    The incorporation of high-resolution cameras into smartphones has allowed for a variety of medical applications including the use of lens attachments that provide telescopic, macroscopic, and dermatoscopic data, but the feasibility and performance characteristics of such a platform for use in dermatopathology have not been described. To determine the diagnostic performance of a smartphone microscope compared to traditional light microscopy in dermatopathology specimens. A simple smartphone microscope constructed with a 3-mm ball lens was used to prospectively evaluate 1021 consecutive dermatopathology cases in a blinded fashion. Referred, consecutive specimens from the community were evaluated at a single university hospital. The performance characteristics of the smartphone platform were calculated by using conventional light microscopy as the gold standard. The sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of melanoma, nonmelanoma skin cancers, and other miscellaneous conditions by the phone microscopy platform, as compared with traditional light microscopy, were calculated. For basal cell carcinoma (n = 136), the sensitivity and specificity of smartphone microscopy were 95.6% and 98.1%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity for squamous cell carcinoma (n = 94) were 89.4% and 97.3%, respectively. The lowest sensitivity was found in melanoma (n = 15) at 60%, although the specificity was high at 99.1%. The accuracy of diagnosis of inflammatory conditions and other neoplasms was variable. Mobile phone-based microscopy has excellent performance characteristics for the inexpensive diagnosis of nonmelanoma skin cancers in a setting where a traditional microscope is not available.

  20. Polarized light microscopy: principles and practice.

    PubMed

    Oldenbourg, Rudolf

    2013-11-01

    Polarized light microscopy provides unique opportunities for analyzing the molecular order in heterogeneous systems, such as living cells and tissues, without using exogenous dyes or labels. This article briefly discusses the theory of polarized light microscopy and elaborates on its practice using a traditional polarized light microscope and more specialized polarization microscopes such as the LC-PolScope, Oosight, or Abrio. The microscope components specific to analyzing the polarization of light, such as polarizer and compensator, are introduced, and quantitative techniques for measuring the birefringence of the specimen point by point using a traditional polarizing microscope are discussed. The new LC-PolScope greatly improves the analytic power of the technique, providing quantitative birefringence data simultaneously for every image point, thereby revealing molecular order with unprecedented sensitivity and at the highest resolution of the light microscope. Practical aspects discussed include the choice of optics, sample preparation, and combining polarized light with differential interference contrast and fluorescence microscopy. A glossary of polarization optical terms is also included to facilitate the discussion of observations made with a polarized light microscope.

  1. Invited Review Article: Pump-probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Martin C.; Wilson, Jesse W.; Robles, Francisco E.; Warren, Warren S.

    2016-03-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has rapidly gained popularity in biomedical imaging and materials science because of its ability to provide three-dimensional images at high spatial and temporal resolution even in optically scattering environments. Currently the majority of commercial and home-built devices are based on two-photon fluorescence and harmonic generation contrast. These two contrast mechanisms are relatively easy to measure but can access only a limited range of endogenous targets. Recent developments in fast laser pulse generation, pulse shaping, and detection technology have made accessible a wide range of optical contrasts that utilize multiple pulses of different colors. Molecular excitation with multiple pulses offers a large number of adjustable parameters. For example, in two-pulse pump-probe microscopy, one can vary the wavelength of each excitation pulse, the detection wavelength, the timing between the excitation pulses, and the detection gating window after excitation. Such a large parameter space can provide much greater molecular specificity than existing single-color techniques and allow for structural and functional imaging without the need for exogenous dyes and labels, which might interfere with the system under study. In this review, we provide a tutorial overview, covering principles of pump-probe microscopy and experimental setup, challenges associated with signal detection and data processing, and an overview of applications.

  2. Efficient illumination for microsecond tracking microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dulin, David; Barland, Stephane; Hachair, Xavier; Pedaci, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The possibility to observe microsecond dynamics at the sub-micron scale, opened by recent technological advances in fast camera sensors, will affect many biophysical studies based on particle tracking in optical microscopy. A main limiting factor for further development of fast video microscopy remains the illumination of the sample, which must deliver sufficient light to the camera to allow microsecond exposure times. Here we systematically compare the main illumination systems employed in holographic tracking microscopy, and we show that a superluminescent diode and a modulated laser diode perform the best in terms of image quality and acquisition speed, respectively. In particular, we show that the simple and inexpensive laser illumination enables less than 1 μs camera exposure time at high magnification on a large field of view without coherence image artifacts, together with a good hologram quality that allows nm-tracking of microscopic beads to be performed. This comparison of sources can guide in choosing the most efficient illumination system with respect to the specific application.

  3. Invited Review Article: Pump-probe microscopy.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Martin C; Wilson, Jesse W; Robles, Francisco E; Warren, Warren S

    2016-03-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has rapidly gained popularity in biomedical imaging and materials science because of its ability to provide three-dimensional images at high spatial and temporal resolution even in optically scattering environments. Currently the majority of commercial and home-built devices are based on two-photon fluorescence and harmonic generation contrast. These two contrast mechanisms are relatively easy to measure but can access only a limited range of endogenous targets. Recent developments in fast laser pulse generation, pulse shaping, and detection technology have made accessible a wide range of optical contrasts that utilize multiple pulses of different colors. Molecular excitation with multiple pulses offers a large number of adjustable parameters. For example, in two-pulse pump-probe microscopy, one can vary the wavelength of each excitation pulse, the detection wavelength, the timing between the excitation pulses, and the detection gating window after excitation. Such a large parameter space can provide much greater molecular specificity than existing single-color techniques and allow for structural and functional imaging without the need for exogenous dyes and labels, which might interfere with the system under study. In this review, we provide a tutorial overview, covering principles of pump-probe microscopy and experimental setup, challenges associated with signal detection and data processing, and an overview of applications.

  4. Invited Review Article: Pump-probe microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Jesse W.; Robles, Francisco E.; Warren, Warren S.

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has rapidly gained popularity in biomedical imaging and materials science because of its ability to provide three-dimensional images at high spatial and temporal resolution even in optically scattering environments. Currently the majority of commercial and home-built devices are based on two-photon fluorescence and harmonic generation contrast. These two contrast mechanisms are relatively easy to measure but can access only a limited range of endogenous targets. Recent developments in fast laser pulse generation, pulse shaping, and detection technology have made accessible a wide range of optical contrasts that utilize multiple pulses of different colors. Molecular excitation with multiple pulses offers a large number of adjustable parameters. For example, in two-pulse pump-probe microscopy, one can vary the wavelength of each excitation pulse, the detection wavelength, the timing between the excitation pulses, and the detection gating window after excitation. Such a large parameter space can provide much greater molecular specificity than existing single-color techniques and allow for structural and functional imaging without the need for exogenous dyes and labels, which might interfere with the system under study. In this review, we provide a tutorial overview, covering principles of pump-probe microscopy and experimental setup, challenges associated with signal detection and data processing, and an overview of applications. PMID:27036751

  5. Single cell elemental analysis using nuclear microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, M. Q.; Thong, P. S. P.; Kara, U.; Watt, F.

    1999-04-01

    The use of Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE), Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM) to provide quantitative elemental analysis of single cells is an area which has high potential, particularly when the trace elements such as Ca, Fe, Zn and Cu can be monitored. We describe the methodology of sample preparation for two cell types, the procedures of cell imaging using STIM, and the quantitative elemental analysis of single cells using RBS and PIXE. Recent work on single cells at the Nuclear Microscopy Research Centre,National University of Singapore has centred around two research areas: (a) Apoptosis (programmed cell death), which has been recently implicated in a wide range of pathological conditions such as cancer, Parkinson's disease etc, and (b) Malaria (infection of red blood cells by the malaria parasite). Firstly we present results on the elemental analysis of human Chang liver cells (ATTCC CCL 13) where vanadium ions were used to trigger apoptosis, and demonstrate that nuclear microscopy has the capability of monitoring vanadium loading within individual cells. Secondly we present the results of elemental changes taking place in individual mouse red blood cells which have been infected with the malaria parasite and treated with the anti-malaria drug Qinghaosu (QHS).

  6. Non-radiative excitation fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riachy, Lina; Vézy, Cyrille; Jaffiol, Rodolphe

    2016-03-01

    Non-radiative Excitation Fluorescence Microscopy (NEFM) constitutes a new way to observe biological samples beyond the diffraction limit. Non-radiative excitation of the samples is achieved by coating the substrate with donor species, such as quantum dots (QDs). Thus the dyes are not excited directly by the laser source, as in common fluorescence microscopy, but through a non-radiative energy transfer. To prevent dewetting of the donor film, we have recently implemented a silanization process to covalently bond the QDs on the substrate. An homogeneous monolayer of QDs was then deposited on only one side of the coverslips. Atomic force microscopy was then used to characterize the QD layer. We highlight the potential of our method through the study of Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUVs) labeled with DiD as acceptor, in interaction with surface functionalized with poly-L-lysine. In the presence of GUVs, we observed a quenching of QDs emission, together with an emission of DiD located in the membrane, which clearly indicated that non-radiative energy transfer from QDs to DiD occurs.

  7. Two-photon microscopy for chemical neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Ellis-Davies, Graham C R

    2011-04-20

    Microscopes using non-linear excitation of chromophores with pulsed near-IR light can generate highly localized foci of molecules in the electronic singlet state that are concentrated in volumes of less than one femtoliter. The three-dimensional confinement of excitation arises from the simultaneous absorption of two IR photons of approximately half the energy required for linear excitation. Two-photon microscopy is especially useful for two types of interrogation of neural processes. First, uncaging of signaling molecules such as glutamate, as stimulation is so refined it can be used to mimic normal unitary synaptic levels. In addition, uncaging allows complete control of the timing and position of stimulation, so the two-photon light beam provides the chemical neuroscientist with an "optical conductor's baton" which can command synaptic activity at will. A second powerful feature of two-photon microscopy is that when used for fluorescence imaging it enables the visualization of cellular structure and function in living animals at depths far beyond that possible with normal confocal microscopes. In this review I provide a survey of the many important applications of two-photon microscopy in these two fields of neuroscience, and suggest some areas for future technical development.

  8. Challenges in quantitative single molecule localization microscopy.

    PubMed

    Shivanandan, A; Deschout, H; Scarselli, M; Radenovic, A

    2014-10-01

    Single molecule localization microscopy (SMLM), which can provide up to an order of magnitude improvement in spatial resolution over conventional fluorescence microscopy, has the potential to be a highly useful tool for quantitative biological experiments. It has already been used for this purpose in varied fields in biology, ranging from molecular biology to neuroscience. In this review article, we briefly review the applications of SMLM in quantitative biology, and also the challenges involved and some of the solutions that have been proposed. Due to its advantages in labeling specificity and the relatively low overcounting caused by photoblinking when photo-activable fluorescent proteins (PA-FPs) are used as labels, we focus specifically on Photo-Activated Localization Microscopy (PALM), even though the ideas presented might be applicable to SMLM in general. Also, we focus on the following three quantitative measurements: single molecule counting, analysis of protein spatial distribution heterogeneity and co-localization analysis. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Intermittent contact hydration scanning probe microscopy.

    PubMed

    Aloisi, G; Bacci, F; Carlà, M; Dolci, D

    2010-07-01

    Hydration scanning probe microscopy is a technique similar to scanning tunneling microscopy, in which the probe current, sustained by the slight surface conduction of a thin hydration layer covering an insulating support surface, is essentially electrochemical in nature instead of electronic tunneling. Such a technique allows the imaging of a great variety of samples, including insulators, provided that they are hydrophilic, as well as the study of molecular samples of biological interest (such as DNA) fixed on a suitable supporting surface. The main problem to obtain stable and reproducible images comes from the very critical determination of the operating conditions under which the probe-hydration layer interaction does not lead to the formation of a relatively large water meniscus. It has been suggested that this issue can be removed by adding a high frequency oscillation to the probe movement, as in tapping atomic force microscopy. Meniscus formation and breakup have been investigated in order to determine the best values for the amplitude and the frequency of the oscillation. Results obtained in this mode are discussed in comparison with the usual continuous contact mode.

  10. Mirror-enhanced super-resolution microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xusan; Xie, Hao; Alonas, Eric; Liu, Yujia; Chen, Xuanze; Santangelo, Philip J; Ren, Qiushi; Xi, Peng; Jin, Dayong

    2016-01-01

    Axial excitation confinement beyond the diffraction limit is crucial to the development of next-generation, super-resolution microscopy. STimulated Emission Depletion (STED) nanoscopy offers lateral super-resolution using a donut-beam depletion, but its axial resolution is still over 500 nm. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy is widely used for single-molecule localization, but its ability to detect molecules is limited to within the evanescent field of ~ 100 nm from the cell attachment surface. We find here that the axial thickness of the point spread function (PSF) during confocal excitation can be easily improved to 110 nm by replacing the microscopy slide with a mirror. The interference of the local electromagnetic field confined the confocal PSF to a 110-nm spot axially, which enables axial super-resolution with all laser-scanning microscopes. Axial sectioning can be obtained with wavelength modulation or by controlling the spacer between the mirror and the specimen. With no additional complexity, the mirror-assisted excitation confinement enhanced the axial resolution six-fold and the lateral resolution two-fold for STED, which together achieved 19-nm resolution to resolve the inner rim of a nuclear pore complex and to discriminate the contents of 120 nm viral filaments. The ability to increase the lateral resolution and decrease the thickness of an axial section using mirror-enhanced STED without increasing the laser power is of great importance for imaging biological specimens, which cannot tolerate high laser power. PMID:27398242

  11. Image Restoration in Cryo-electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Penczek, Pawel A.

    2011-01-01

    Image restoration techniques are used to obtain, given experimental measurements, the best possible approximation of the original object within the limits imposed by instrumental conditions and noise level in the data. In molecular electron microscopy, we are mainly interested in linear methods that preserve the respective relationships between mass densities within the restored map. Here, we describe the methodology of image restoration in structural electron microscopy, and more specifically, we will focus on the problem of the optimum recovery of Fourier amplitudes given electron microscope data collected under various defocus settings. We discuss in detail two classes of commonly used linear methods, the first of which consists of methods based on pseudoinverse restoration, and which is further subdivided into mean-square error, chi-square error, and constrained based restorations, where the methods in the latter two subclasses explicitly incorporates non-white distribution of noise in the data. The second class of methods is based on the Wiener filtration approach. We show that the Wiener filter-based methodology can be used to obtain a solution to the problem of amplitude correction (or “sharpening”) of the electron microscopy map that makes it visually comparable to maps determined by X-ray crystallography, and thus amenable to comparable interpretation. Finally, we present a semi-heuristic Wiener filter-based solution to the problem of image restoration given sets of heterogeneous solutions. We conclude the chapter with a discussion of image restoration protocols implemented in commonly used single particle software packages. PMID:20888957

  12. Diabetes screening by telecentric digital holographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Doblas, A; Roche, E; Ampudia-Blasco, F J; Martínez-Corral, M; Saavedra, G; Garcia-Sucerquia, J

    2016-03-01

    Diabetes is currently the world's fastest growing chronic disease and it is caused by deficient production of insulin by the endocrine pancreas or by abnormal insulin action in peripheral tissues. This results in persistent hyperglycaemia that over time may produce chronic diabetic complications. Determination of glycated haemoglobin level is currently the gold standard method to evaluate and control sustained hyperglycaemia in diabetic people. This measurement is currently made by high-performance liquid chromatography, which is a complex chemical process that requires the extraction of blood from the antecubital vein. To reduce the complexity of that measurement, we propose a fully-optical technique that is based in the fact that there are changes in the optical properties of erythrocytes due to the presence of glucose-derived adducts in the haemoglobin molecule. To evaluate these changes, we propose to perform quantitative phase maps of erythrocytes by using telecentric digital holographic microscopy. Our experiments show that telecentric digital holographic microscopy allows detecting, almost in real time and from a single drop of blood, significant differences between erythrocytes of diabetic patients and healthy patients. Besides, our phase measurements are well correlated with the values of glycated haemoglobin and the blood glucose values. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  13. Video-rate resonant scanning multiphoton microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, Nathaniel D.; Chung, Euiheon; Cook, Daniel C.; Han, Xiaoxing; Gruionu, Gabriel; Liao, Shan; Munn, Lance L.; Padera, Timothy P.; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K.

    2013-01-01

    The abnormal tumor microenvironment fuels tumor progression, metastasis, immune suppression, and treatment resistance. Over last several decades, developments in and applications of intravital microscopy have provided unprecedented insights into the dynamics of the tumor microenvironment. In particular, intravital multiphoton microscopy has revealed the abnormal structure and function of tumor-associated blood and lymphatic vessels, the role of aberrant tumor matrix in drug delivery, invasion and metastasis of tumor cells, the dynamics of immune cell trafficking to and within tumors, and gene expression in tumors. However, traditional multiphoton microscopy suffers from inherently slow imaging rates—only a few frames per second, thus unable to capture more rapid events such as blood flow, lymphatic flow, and cell movement within vessels. Here, we report the development and implementation of a video-rate multiphoton microscope (VR-MPLSM) based on resonant galvanometer mirror scanning that is capable of recording at 30 frames per second and acquiring intravital multispectral images. We show that the design of the system can be readily implemented and is adaptable to various experimental models. As examples, we demonstrate the utility of the system to directly measure flow within tumors, capture metastatic cancer cells moving within the brain vasculature and cells in lymphatic vessels, and image acute responses to changes in a vascular network. VR-MPLSM thus has the potential to further advance intravital imaging and provide new insight into the biology of the tumor microenvironment. PMID:24353926

  14. Mirror-enhanced super-resolution microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xusan; Xie, Hao; Alonas, Eric; Liu, Yujia; Chen, Xuanze; Santangelo, Philip J; Ren, Qiushi; Xi, Peng; Jin, Dayong

    Axial excitation confinement beyond the diffraction limit is crucial to the development of next-generation, super-resolution microscopy. STimulated Emission Depletion (STED) nanoscopy offers lateral super-resolution using a donut-beam depletion, but its axial resolution is still over 500 nm. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy is widely used for single-molecule localization, but its ability to detect molecules is limited to within the evanescent field of ~ 100 nm from the cell attachment surface. We find here that the axial thickness of the point spread function (PSF) during confocal excitation can be easily improved to 110 nm by replacing the microscopy slide with a mirror. The interference of the local electromagnetic field confined the confocal PSF to a 110-nm spot axially, which enables axial super-resolution with all laser-scanning microscopes. Axial sectioning can be obtained with wavelength modulation or by controlling the spacer between the mirror and the specimen. With no additional complexity, the mirror-assisted excitation confinement enhanced the axial resolution six-fold and the lateral resolution two-fold for STED, which together achieved 19-nm resolution to resolve the inner rim of a nuclear pore complex and to discriminate the contents of 120 nm viral filaments. The ability to increase the lateral resolution and decrease the thickness of an axial section using mirror-enhanced STED without increasing the laser power is of great importance for imaging biological specimens, which cannot tolerate high laser power.

  15. Invited Review Article: Pump-probe microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Martin C. Wilson, Jesse W.; Robles, Francisco E.; Warren, Warren S.

    2016-03-15

    Multiphoton microscopy has rapidly gained popularity in biomedical imaging and materials science because of its ability to provide three-dimensional images at high spatial and temporal resolution even in optically scattering environments. Currently the majority of commercial and home-built devices are based on two-photon fluorescence and harmonic generation contrast. These two contrast mechanisms are relatively easy to measure but can access only a limited range of endogenous targets. Recent developments in fast laser pulse generation, pulse shaping, and detection technology have made accessible a wide range of optical contrasts that utilize multiple pulses of different colors. Molecular excitation with multiple pulses offers a large number of adjustable parameters. For example, in two-pulse pump-probe microscopy, one can vary the wavelength of each excitation pulse, the detection wavelength, the timing between the excitation pulses, and the detection gating window after excitation. Such a large parameter space can provide much greater molecular specificity than existing single-color techniques and allow for structural and functional imaging without the need for exogenous dyes and labels, which might interfere with the system under study. In this review, we provide a tutorial overview, covering principles of pump-probe microscopy and experimental setup, challenges associated with signal detection and data processing, and an overview of applications.

  16. Quantitative Aspects of Single Molecule Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ober, Raimund J.; Tahmasbi, Amir; Ram, Sripad; Lin, Zhiping; Ward, E. Sally

    2015-01-01

    Single molecule microscopy is a relatively new optical microscopy technique that allows the detection of individual molecules such as proteins in a cellular context. This technique has generated significant interest among biologists, biophysicists and biochemists, as it holds the promise to provide novel insights into subcellular processes and structures that otherwise cannot be gained through traditional experimental approaches. Single molecule experiments place stringent demands on experimental and algorithmic tools due to the low signal levels and the presence of significant extraneous noise sources. Consequently, this has necessitated the use of advanced statistical signal and image processing techniques for the design and analysis of single molecule experiments. In this tutorial paper, we provide an overview of single molecule microscopy from early works to current applications and challenges. Specific emphasis will be on the quantitative aspects of this imaging modality, in particular single molecule localization and resolvability, which will be discussed from an information theoretic perspective. We review the stochastic framework for image formation, different types of estimation techniques and expressions for the Fisher information matrix. We also discuss several open problems in the field that demand highly non-trivial signal processing algorithms. PMID:26167102

  17. Phase-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Minoda, Hiroki; Tamai, Takayuki; Iijima, Hirofumi; Hosokawa, Fumio; Kondo, Yukihito

    2015-06-01

    This report introduces the first results obtained using phase-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy (P-STEM). A carbon-film phase plate (PP) with a small center hole is placed in the condenser aperture plane so that a phase shift is introduced in the incident electron waves except those passing through the center hole. A cosine-type phase-contrast transfer function emerges when the phase-shifted scattered waves interfere with the non-phase-shifted unscattered waves, which passed through the center hole before incidence onto the specimen. The phase contrast resulting in P-STEM is optically identical to that in phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy that is used to provide high contrast for weak phase objects. Therefore, the use of PPs can enhance the phase contrast of the STEM images of specimens in principle. The phase shift resulting from the PP, whose thickness corresponds to a phase shift of π, has been confirmed using interference fringes displayed in the Ronchigram of a silicon single crystal specimen. The interference fringes were found to abruptly shift at the edge of the PP hole by π. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Benefits of microscopy with super resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisielowski, C.; Principe, E.; Freitag, B.; Hubert, D.

    2001-12-01

    Transmission electron microscopy developed from an imaging tool into a quantitative electron beam characterization tool that locally accesses structure, chemistry, and bonding in materials with sub-Angstrom resolution. Experiments utilize coherently and incoherently scattered electrons. In this contribution, the interface between gallium nitride and sapphire as well as thin silicon gate oxides are studied to understand underlying physical processes and the strength’ of the different microscopy techniques. An investigation of the GaN/sapphire interface benefits largely from the application of phase contrast microscopy that makes it possible to visualize dislocation core structures and single columns of oxygen and nitrogen at a closest spacing of 85 pm. In contrast, it is adequate to investigate Si/SiO xN y/poly-Si interfaces with incoherently scattered electrons and electron spectroscopy because amorphous and poly-crystalline materials are involved. Here, it is demonstrated that the SiO xN y/poly-Si interface is rougher than the Si/SiO x interface, that desirable nitrogen diffusion gradients can be introduced into the gate oxide, and that a nitridation coupled with annealing increases its physical width while reducing the equivalent electrical oxide thickness to values approaching 1.2 nm. Therefore, an amorphous SiN xO y gate dielectric seems to be a suitable substitute for traditional gate oxides to further increase device speed by reducing dimensions in Si technology.

  19. Shaping field for deep tissue microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colon, J.; Lim, H.

    2015-05-01

    Information capacity of a lossless image-forming system is a conserved property determined by two imaging parameters - the resolution and the field of view (FOV). Adaptive optics improves the former by manipulating the phase, or wavefront, in the pupil plane. Here we describe a homologous approach, namely adaptive field microscopy, which aims to enhance the FOV by controlling the phase, or defocus, in the focal plane. In deep tissue imaging, the useful FOV can be severely limited if the region of interest is buried in a thick sample and not perpendicular to the optic axis. One must acquire many z-scans and reconstruct by post-processing, which exposes tissue to excessive radiation and is also time consuming. We demonstrate the effective FOV can be substantially enhanced by dynamic control of the image plane. Specifically, the tilt of the image plane is continuously adjusted in situ to match the oblique orientation of the sample plane within tissue. The utility of adaptive field microscopy is tested for imaging tissue with non-planar morphology. Ocular tissue of small animals was imaged by two-photon excited fluorescence. Our results show that adaptive field microscopy can utilize the full FOV. The freedom to adjust the image plane to account for the geometrical variations of sample could be extremely useful for 3D biological imaging. Furthermore, it could facilitate rapid surveillance of cellular features within deep tissue while avoiding photo damages, making it suitable for in vivo imaging.

  20. Optical microscopy beyond the diffraction limit

    PubMed Central

    Smolyaninov, Igor I.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past century the resolution of far-field optical microscopes, which rely on propagating optical modes, was widely believed to be limited because of diffraction to a value on the order of a half-wavelength λ∕2 of the light used. Although immersion microscopes had slightly improved resolution on the order of λ∕2n, the increased resolution was limited by the small range of refractive indices, n, of available transparent materials. We are experiencing quick demolition of the diffraction limit in optical microscopy. Over the past few years numerous nonlinear optical microscopy techniques based on photoswitching and saturation of fluorescence demonstrated far-field resolution of 20 to 30 nm. The latest exciting example of these techniques has been demonstrated by Huang et al. [Science 319, 810–813 (2008)]. Moreover, recent progress in metamaterials indicates that artificial optical media can be created, which do not exhibit the diffraction limit. Resolution of linear “immersion” microscopes based on such metamaterials appears limited only by losses, which can be compensated by gain media. Thus, optical microscopy is quickly moving towards the 10 nm resolution scale, which should bring about numerous revolutionary advances in biomedical imaging. PMID:19404465

  1. Electron microscopy of Crotalaria pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kay, J. M.; Smith, Paul; Heath, Donald

    1969-01-01

    The lungs of 11 rats fed on Crotalaria spectabilis seeds for periods ranging from 12 to 61 days were examined by both light and electron microscopy. The findings were compared with those obtained from nine control rats given a normal diet. Eight of the 11 test rats showed morphological evidence of pulmonary arterial hypertension in the form of right ventricular hypertrophy; the exceptions were rats killed after receiving the Crotalaria diet for 12, 22, and 29 days respectively. On light microscopy, all the test rats showed exudative lesions in the lungs consisting of eosinophilic alveolar coagulum, intra-alveolar haemorrhage, interstitial fibrosis, and a proliferation of mast cells. Enlarged and proliferated cells were seen to line the alveolar walls or lie free within the alveolar spaces. Electron microscopy showed these cells to be enlarged granular pneumocytes containing enlarged, electron-dense, lamellar secretory inclusions. Scanty macrophages were also seen in the alveolar spaces, in which excessive numbers of myelin figures and lattices were seen: these structures resembled phospholipid membranes and were probably related to pulmonary surfactant. We think that proliferation of granular pneumocytes is a non-specific reaction of the alveolar walls to injury. The alveolar-capillary wall showed interstitial oedema with the formation of intraluminal endothelial vesicles, probably representing the early ultrastructural phase of pulmonary oedema, and more likely to be an effect of the pulmonary hypertension than its cause. Images PMID:5348317

  2. Laser beam shaping for biomedical microscopy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, Alexander; Kaiser, Peter; Laskin, Vadim; Ostrun, Aleksei

    2016-04-01

    Uniform illumination of a working field is very important in optical systems of confocal microscopy and various implementations of fluorescence microscopy like TIR, SSIM, STORM, PALM to enhance performance of these laser-based research techniques. Widely used TEM00 laser sources are characterized by essentially non-uniform Gaussian intensity profile which leads usually to non-uniform intensity distribution in a microscope working field or in a field of microlenses array of a confocal microscope optical system, this non-uniform illumination results in instability of measuring procedure and reducing precision of quantitative measurements. Therefore transformation of typical Gaussian distribution of a TEM00 laser to flat-top (top hat) profile is an actual technical task, it is solved by applying beam shaping optics. Due to high demands to optical image quality the mentioned techniques have specific requirements to a uniform laser beam: flatness of phase front and extended depth of field, - from this point of view the microscopy techniques are similar to holography and interferometry. There are different refractive and diffractive beam shaping approaches used in laser industrial and scientific applications, but only few of them are capable to fulfil the optimum conditions for beam quality required in discussed microscopy techniques. We suggest applying refractive field mapping beam shapers πShaper, which operational principle presumes almost lossless transformation of Gaussian to flat-top beam with flatness of output wavefront, conserving of beam consistency, providing collimated low divergent output beam, high transmittance, extended depth of field, negligible wave aberration, and achromatic design provides capability to work with several lasers with different wavelengths simultaneously. The main function of a beam shaper is transformation of laser intensity profile, further beam transformation to provide optimum for a particular technique spot size and shape has to

  3. Advances in fiber lasers for nonlinear microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, F. W.; Ouzounov, D.; Kieu, K.; Renninger, W.; Chong, A.; Liu, H.

    2008-02-01

    In the past 30 years major advances in medical imaging have been made in areas such as magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, and ultrasound. These techniques have become quite effective for structural imaging at the organ or tissue level, but do not address the clear need for imaging technologies that exploit existing knowledge of the genetic and molecular bases of disease. Techniques that can provide similar information on the cellular and molecular scale would be very powerful, and ultimately the extension of such techniques to in vivo measurements will be desired. The availability of these imaging capabilities would allow monitoring of the early stages of disease or therapy, for example. Optical techniques provide excellent imaging capabilities, with sub-micron spatial resolution, and are noninvasive. An overall goal of biomedical imaging is to obtain diagnostic or functional information about biological structures. The difficulty of acquiring high-resolution images of structures deep in tissue presents a major challenge, however, owing to strong scattering of light. As a consequence, optical imaging has been limited to thin (typically ~0.5 mm) samples or superficial tissue. In contrast, techniques such as ultrasound and magnetic resonance provide images of structures centimeters deep in tissue, with ~100-micron resolution. It is desirable to develop techniques that offer the resolution of optics with the depth-penetration of other techniques. Since 1990, a variety of nonlinear microscopies have been demonstrated. These include 2- and 3-photon fluorescence microscopy, and 2nd- and 3rd-harmonic generation microscopies. These typically employ femtosecond-pulse excitation, for maximum peak power (and thus nonlinear excitation) for a given pulse energy. A relative newcomer to the group is CARS microscopy [1], which exploits resonant vibrational excitation of molecules or bonds. The CARS signal contrast arises from intrinsic elements of cells, and thus

  4. The Disease Activity Score (DAS) and the Disease Activity Score using 28 joint counts (DAS28) in the management of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    van Riel, Piet L C M; Renskers, Lisanne

    2016-01-01

    In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), disease activity cannot be measured in all individual patients according to a single variable. The Disease Activity Score (DAS) and the DAS28 have been developed to measure disease activity in RA both in daily clinical practice as well as in clinical trials on a group as well as individual level. The DAS/DAS28 is a continuous measure of RA disease activity that combines information from swollen joints, tender joints, acute phase response and general health. The DAS-based EULAR response criteria were primarily developed to be used in clinical trials. The EULAR response criteria classify individual patients as non-, moderate, or good responders, dependent on the magnitude of change and level of disease activity reached. In addition, already in the early nineties, cut points were developed to categorise patients in remission. The DAS28 is incorporated in several electronic patient records and web-based systems for monitoring purposes in daily clinical practice. In addition to this, it is being used in combination with patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) to facilitate self-monitoring.

  5. Re-scan confocal microscopy (RCM) improves the resolution of confocal microscopy and increases the sensitivity.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Giulia; Breedijk, Ronald; Hoebe, Ron; Stallinga, Sjoerd; Manders, Erik

    2017-01-25

    Re-scan confocal microscopy (RCM) is a new super-resolution technique based on a standard confocal microscope extended with a re-scan unit in the detection path that projects the emitted light onto a sensitive camera. In this paper the fundamental properties of RCM, lateral resolution, axial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio, are characterized and compared with properties of standard confocal microscopy. The results show that the lateral resolution of RCM is ~170 nm compared to ~240 nm of confocal microscopy for 488 nm excitation and 1.49 NA. As the theory predicts, this improved lateral resolution is independent of the pinhole diameter. In standard confocal microscopy, the same lateral resolution can only be achieved with an almost closed pinhole and, consequently, with a major loss of signal. We show that the sectioning capabilities of the standard confocal microscope are preserved in RCM and that the axial resolution of RCM is slightly better (~15%) than the standard confocal microscope. Furthermore, the signal-to-noise ratio in RCM is a factor of 2 higher than in standard confocal microscopy, also due to the use of highly sensitive modern cameras. In case the pinhole of a confocal microscope is adjusted in such way that the lateral resolution is comparable to that of RCM, the signal-to-noise ratio in RCM is 4 times higher than standard confocal microscopy. Therefore, RCM offers a good alternative to standard confocal microscopy for higher lateral resolution with the main advantage of strongly improved sensitivity.

  6. Re-scan confocal microscopy (RCM) improves the resolution of confocal microscopy and increases the sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Luca, Giulia; Breedijk, Ronald; Hoebe, Ron; Stallinga, Sjoerd; Manders, Erik

    2017-03-01

    Re-scan confocal microscopy (RCM) is a new super-resolution technique based on a standard confocal microscope extended with a re-scan unit in the detection path that projects the emitted light onto a sensitive camera. In this paper the fundamental properties of RCM, lateral resolution, axial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio, are characterized and compared with properties of standard confocal microscopy. The results show that the lateral resolution of RCM is ~170 nm compared to ~240 nm of confocal microscopy for 488 nm excitation and 1.49 NA. As the theory predicts, this improved lateral resolution is independent of the pinhole diameter. In standard confocal microscopy, the same lateral resolution can only be achieved with an almost closed pinhole and, consequently, with a major loss of signal. We show that the sectioning capabilities of the standard confocal microscope are preserved in RCM and that the axial resolution of RCM is slightly better (~15%) than the standard confocal microscope. Furthermore, the signal-to-noise ratio in RCM is a factor of 2 higher than in standard confocal microscopy, also due to the use of highly sensitive modern cameras. In case the pinhole of a confocal microscope is adjusted in such way that the lateral resolution is comparable to that of RCM, the signal-to-noise ratio in RCM is 4 times higher than standard confocal microscopy. Therefore, RCM offers a good alternative to standard confocal microscopy for higher lateral resolution with the main advantage of strongly improved sensitivity.

  7. Detecting Changes Following the Provision of Assistive Devices: Utility of the WHO-DAS II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raggi, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    The World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule II (WHO-DAS II) is a non-disease-specific International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health-based disability assessment instrument developed to measure activity limitations and restrictions to participation. The aim of this pilot study is to evaluate WHO-DAS II…

  8. Psychometric Properties of the Disability Assessment Schedule (DAS) for Behavior Problems: An Independent Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsakanikos, Elias; Underwood, Lisa; Sturmey, Peter; Bouras, Nick; McCarthy, Jane

    2011-01-01

    The present study employed the Disability Assessment Schedule (DAS) to assess problem behaviors in a large sample of adults with ID (N = 568) and evaluate the psychometric properties of this instrument. Although the DAS problem behaviors were found to be internally consistent (Cronbach's [alpha] = 0.87), item analysis revealed one weak item…

  9. Detecting Changes Following the Provision of Assistive Devices: Utility of the WHO-DAS II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raggi, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    The World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule II (WHO-DAS II) is a non-disease-specific International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health-based disability assessment instrument developed to measure activity limitations and restrictions to participation. The aim of this pilot study is to evaluate WHO-DAS II…

  10. Psychometric Properties of the Disability Assessment Schedule (DAS) for Behavior Problems: An Independent Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsakanikos, Elias; Underwood, Lisa; Sturmey, Peter; Bouras, Nick; McCarthy, Jane

    2011-01-01

    The present study employed the Disability Assessment Schedule (DAS) to assess problem behaviors in a large sample of adults with ID (N = 568) and evaluate the psychometric properties of this instrument. Although the DAS problem behaviors were found to be internally consistent (Cronbach's [alpha] = 0.87), item analysis revealed one weak item…

  11. Combined frequency modulated atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy detection for multi-tip scanning probe microscopy applications.

    PubMed

    Morawski, Ireneusz; Spiegelberg, Richard; Korte, Stefan; Voigtländer, Bert

    2015-12-01

    A method which allows scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) tip biasing independent of the sample bias during frequency modulated atomic force microscopy (AFM) operation is presented. The AFM sensor is supplied by an electronic circuit combining both a frequency shift signal and a tunneling current signal by means of an inductive coupling. This solution enables a control of the tip potential independent of the sample potential. Individual tip biasing is specifically important in order to implement multi-tip STM/AFM applications. An extensional quartz sensor (needle sensor) with a conductive tip is applied to record simultaneously topography and conductivity of the sample. The high resonance frequency of the needle sensor (1 MHz) allows scanning of a large area of the surface being investigated in a reasonably short time. A recipe for the amplitude calibration which is based only on the frequency shift signal and does not require the tip being in contact is presented. Additionally, we show spectral measurements of the mechanical vibration noise of the scanning system used in the investigations.

  12. Combined frequency modulated atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy detection for multi-tip scanning probe microscopy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morawski, Ireneusz; Spiegelberg, Richard; Korte, Stefan; Voigtländer, Bert

    2015-12-01

    A method which allows scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) tip biasing independent of the sample bias during frequency modulated atomic force microscopy (AFM) operation is presented. The AFM sensor is supplied by an electronic circuit combining both a frequency shift signal and a tunneling current signal by means of an inductive coupling. This solution enables a control of the tip potential independent of the sample potential. Individual tip biasing is specifically important in order to implement multi-tip STM/AFM applications. An extensional quartz sensor (needle sensor) with a conductive tip is applied to record simultaneously topography and conductivity of the sample. The high resonance frequency of the needle sensor (1 MHz) allows scanning of a large area of the surface being investigated in a reasonably short time. A recipe for the amplitude calibration which is based only on the frequency shift signal and does not require the tip being in contact is presented. Additionally, we show spectral measurements of the mechanical vibration noise of the scanning system used in the investigations.

  13. Combined frequency modulated atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy detection for multi-tip scanning probe microscopy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Morawski, Ireneusz; Spiegelberg, Richard; Korte, Stefan; Voigtländer, Bert

    2015-12-15

    A method which allows scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) tip biasing independent of the sample bias during frequency modulated atomic force microscopy (AFM) operation is presented. The AFM sensor is supplied by an electronic circuit combining both a frequency shift signal and a tunneling current signal by means of an inductive coupling. This solution enables a control of the tip potential independent of the sample potential. Individual tip biasing is specifically important in order to implement multi-tip STM/AFM applications. An extensional quartz sensor (needle sensor) with a conductive tip is applied to record simultaneously topography and conductivity of the sample. The high resonance frequency of the needle sensor (1 MHz) allows scanning of a large area of the surface being investigated in a reasonably short time. A recipe for the amplitude calibration which is based only on the frequency shift signal and does not require the tip being in contact is presented. Additionally, we show spectral measurements of the mechanical vibration noise of the scanning system used in the investigations.

  14. Complete and rapid switch from light microscopy to virtual microscopy for teaching medical histology.

    PubMed

    Krippendorf, Beth B; Lough, John

    2005-07-01

    During the interim between the 2003 and 2004 academic years, the cell and tissue biology and integrated medical neuroscience courses at the Medical College of Wisconsin made a complete and rapid switch from light microscopy- to virtual microscopy-based histology laboratories. This switch was prompted by the difficulties in maintaining and the cost of replacing the college's microscopes and microscope slides, and primarily by the desire to promote and streamline learning for our large classes (n > 200) of first-year medical students. A group of students who used the virtual microscope, another group of students who used the light microscope, and faculty with experience using both tools rated the effectiveness of the virtual microscope for learning and teaching. Also, to determine whether virtual microscopy affected student learning, laboratory examination scores for the 2004 class (n = 209) were compared with those of four previous classes that used light microscopes exclusively (n = 811). The switch from light microscopy to virtual microscopy was very favorably received by both students and faculty. More importantly, data from examination scores and course evaluation surveys indicated that use of the virtual microscope may significantly improve student performance and learning efficiency. Procedures for successfully implementing this change are described.

  15. A Correlative Optical Microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy Approach to Locating Nanoparticles in Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kempen, Paul J.; Kircher, Moritz F.; de la Zerda, Adam; Zavaleta, Cristina L; Jokerst, Jesse V.; Mellinghoff, Ingo K.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Sinclair, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The growing use of nanoparticles in biomedical applications, including cancer diagnosis and treatment, demands the capability to exactly locate them within complex biological systems. In this work a correlative optical and scanning electron microscopy technique was developed to locate and observe multi-modal gold core nanoparticle accumulation in brain tumor models. Entire brain sections from mice containing orthotopic brain tumors injected intravenously with nanoparticles were imaged using both optical microscopy to identify the brain tumor, and scanning electron microscopy to identify the individual nanoparticles. Gold-based nanoparticles were readily identified in the scanning electron microscope using backscattered electron imaging as bright spots against a darker background. This information was then correlated to determine the exact location of the nanoparticles within the brain tissue. The nanoparticles were located only in areas that contained tumor cells, and not in the surrounding healthy brain tissue. This correlative technique provides a powerful method to relate the macro- and micro-scale features visible in light microscopy with the nanoscale features resolvable in scanning electron microscopy. PMID:25464144

  16. A correlative optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy approach to locating nanoparticles in brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Kempen, Paul J; Kircher, Moritz F; de la Zerda, Adam; Zavaleta, Cristina L; Jokerst, Jesse V; Mellinghoff, Ingo K; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Sinclair, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The growing use of nanoparticles in biomedical applications, including cancer diagnosis and treatment, demands the capability to exactly locate them within complex biological systems. In this work a correlative optical and scanning electron microscopy technique was developed to locate and observe multi-modal gold core nanoparticle accumulation in brain tumor models. Entire brain sections from mice containing orthotopic brain tumors injected intravenously with nanoparticles were imaged using both optical microscopy to identify the brain tumor, and scanning electron microscopy to identify the individual nanoparticles. Gold-based nanoparticles were readily identified in the scanning electron microscope using backscattered electron imaging as bright spots against a darker background. This information was then correlated to determine the exact location of the nanoparticles within the brain tissue. The nanoparticles were located only in areas that contained tumor cells, and not in the surrounding healthy brain tissue. This correlative technique provides a powerful method to relate the macro- and micro-scale features visible in light microscopy with the nanoscale features resolvable in scanning electron microscopy.

  17. Resolution doubling using confocal microscopy via analogy with structured illumination microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Shinichi

    2016-08-01

    Structured illumination microscopy (SIM) is a super-resolution fluorescence microscopy with a 2-fold higher lateral resolution than conventional wide-field fluorescence (WF) microscopy. Confocal fluorescence (CF) microscopy has approximately the same optical cutoff frequency as SIM; however, the maximum theoretical increase in lateral resolution over that of WF is 1.4-fold with an infinitesimal pinhole diameter. Quantitative comparisons based on an analytical imaging formula revealed that modulation transfer functions (MTFs) of SIM reconstructed images before postprocessing are nearly identical to those of CF images recorded with an infinitesimal pinhole diameter. Here, we propose a new method using an adequate pinhole diameter combined with the use of an apodized Fourier inverse filter to increase the lateral resolution of CF images to as much as that SIM images without significant noise degradation in practice. Furthermore, the proposed method does not require a posteriori parameterization and has reproducibility. This approach can be easily applied to conventional laser scanning CF, spinning disk CF, and multiphoton microscopies.

  18. New Approaches in Renal Microscopy: Volumetric Imaging and Super-resolution Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Alfred H.J.; Suleiman, Hani; Shaw, Andrey S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Histologic and electron microscopic analysis of the kidney has provided tremendous insight into structures such as the glomerulus and nephron. Recent advances in imaging, such as deep volumetric approaches and super-resolution microscopy, have the capacity to dramatically enhance our current understanding of the structure and function of the kidney. Volumetric imaging can generate images millimeters below the surface of the intact kidney. Super-resolution microscopy breaks the diffraction barrier inherent in traditional light microscopy, enabling for the visualization of fine structures. Here, we describe new approaches to deep volumetric and super-resolution microscopy of the kidney. Recent findings Rapid advances in lasers, microscopic objectives, and tissue preparation have transformed our ability to deep volumetric image the kidney. Innovations in sample preparation have allowed for super-resolution imaging with electron microscopy correlation, providing unprecedented insight into the structures within the glomerulus. Summary Technological advances in imaging have revolutionized our capacity to image both large volumes of tissue and the finest structural details of a cell. These new advances have the potential to provide additional profound observations into the normal and pathologic functions of the kidney. PMID:27023834

  19. Das Programm Oder 2006. Hochwasserschutz in Polen im Zuge der EU-Osterweiterung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühne, Olaf

    Hochwasser ist ein natürliches Ereignis: Seit jeher sind die Menschen mit Hochwasser und seinen Auswirkungen konfrontiert. Das Ausmaß von Hochwasser reicht dabei von Straßenüberschwemmungen bis zur Überflutung ganzer Landesteile. Auch im Oderflußsystem waren und sind Überschwemmungen keine Seltenheit, in den letzten 200 Jahren ereigneten sie sich in den Jahren 1813, 1838, 1854, 1870, 1903, 1958, 1965, 1970, 1972, 1977, 1981, 1985 und 1997. Das Hochwasser von 1997 war jedoch das schwerste im genannten Zeitraum. Als Reaktion auf das Hochwasser von 1997 wurde in der betroffenen Region das Programm 〝Oder 2006`` entwickelt. Mit seiner Hilfe sollen die Auswirkungen künftiger Hochwasserereignisse abgeschwächt werden.

  20. Atomic force microscopy study of tooth surfaces.

    PubMed

    Farina, M; Schemmel, A; Weissmüller, G; Cruz, R; Kachar, B; Bisch, P M

    1999-03-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to study tooth surfaces in order to compare the pattern of particle distribution in the outermost layer of the tooth surfaces. Human teeth and teeth from a rodent (Golden hamster), from a fish (piranha), and from a grazing mollusk (chiton) with distinct feeding habits were analyzed in terms of particle arrangement, packing, and size distribution. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were used for comparison. It was found that AFM gives high-contrast, high-resolution images and is an important tool as a source of complementary and/or new structural information. All teeth were cleaned and some were etched with acidic solutions before analysis. It was observed that human enamel (permanent teeth) presents particles tightly packed in the outer surface, whereas enamel from the hamster (continuously growing teeth) shows particles of less dense packing. The piranha teeth have a thin cuticle covering the long apatite crystals of the underlying enameloid. This cuticle has a rough surface of particles that have a globular appearance after the brief acidic treatment. The similar appearance of the in vivo naturally etched tooth surface suggests that the pattern of globule distribution may be due to the presence of an organic material. Elemental analysis of this cuticle indicated that calcium, phosphorus, and iron are the main components of the structure while electron microdiffraction of pulverized cuticle particles showed a pattern consistent with hydroxyapatite. The chiton mineralized tooth cusp had a smooth surface in an unabraded region and a very rough structure with the magnetite crystals (already known to make part of the structure) protruding from the surface. It was concluded that the structures analyzed are optimized for efficiency in feeding mechanism and life span of the teeth.

  1. Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy of Live Keratinocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegde, V.; Mason, A.; Saliev, T.; Smith, F. J. D.; McLean, W. H. I.; Campbell, P. A.

    2012-07-01

    Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) is perhaps the least well known technique from the scanning probe microscopy (SPM) family of instruments. As with its more familiar counterpart, atomic force microscopy (AFM), the technique provides high-resolution topographic imaging, with the caveat that target structures must be immersed in a conducting solution so that a controllable ion current may be utilised as the basis for feedback. In operation, this non-contact characteristic of SICM makes it ideal for the study of delicate structures, such as live cells. Moreover, the intrinsic architecture of the instrument, incorporating as it does, a scanned micropipette, lends itself to combination approaches with complementary techniques such as patch-clamp electrophysiology: SICM therefore boasts the capability for both structural and functional imaging. For the present observations, an ICnano S system (Ionscope Ltd., Melbourn, UK) operating in 'hopping mode' was used, with the objective of assessing the instrument's utility for imaging live keratinocytes under physiological buffers. In scans employing cultured HaCaT cells (spontaneously immortalised, human keratinocytes), we compared the qualitative differences of live cells imaged with SICM and AFM, and also with their respective counterparts after chemical fixation in 4% paraformaldehyde. Characteristic surface microvilli were particularly prominent in live cell imaging by SICM. Moreover, time lapse SICM imaging on live cells revealed that changes in the pattern of microvilli could be tracked over time. By comparison, AFM imaging on live cells, even at very low contact forces (

  2. Scanning Electron Microscopy of the Presbylarynx.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Tatiana Maria; Dos Santos, Daniela Carvalho; Pessin, Adriana Bueno Benito; Martins, Regina Helena Garcia

    2016-06-01

    To describe the findings on the presbylarynx under scanning electron microscopy. Cadaver study. Universidade Estadual Paulista (Botucatu, São Paulo, Brazil). Sixteen vocal folds were removed during necropsies and distributed into 2 age groups: control (n = 8; aged 30-50 years) and elderly (n = 8; aged 75-92 years). The right vocal fold was dissected, fixed in glutaraldehyde 2.5%, and prepared for scanning electron microscopy. The thickness of the epithelium was measured using a scandium morphometric digital program. In the control group, the epithelium had 5 to 7 overlapped cell layers, rare desquamation cells, and little undulation with protruding intercellular junctions. The lamina propria showed a uniform network of collagen and elastic fibers in the superficial layer. A dense network of collagen was identified in the deeper layer. In the elderly group, the epithelium was atrophic (2-3 cells), with more desquamation cells and intercellular junctions delimited by deep sulci. The epithelial thickness was lower in elderly than in controls (mean [SD], 221.64 [145.90] µm vs 41.79 [21.40] µm, respectively). The lamina propria had a dense and irregular distribution of collagen and elastic fibers in the superficial layer. In the deep layers, the collagen fibers formed a true fibrotic and rigid skeleton. Scanning electron microscopy identified several changes in the elderly larynx, differentiating it from the controls. These alterations are probably related to the aging process of the vocal folds. However, the exact interpretation of these findings requires additional studies, even to the molecular level, having the fibroblasts as targets. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  3. [In vivo confocal microscopy in blepharitis].

    PubMed

    Messmer, E M; Torres Suárez, E; Mackert, M I; Zapp, D M; Kampik, A

    2005-11-01

    Dysfunction of the meibomian glands with inflammation and obstruction has been suggested to be an important factor in the pathogenesis of chronic blepharitis. Few objective tests are, however, available to examine the meibomian glands directly. Nineteen patients with anterior blepharitis, meibomitis, meibomian gland dysfunction or severe keratoconjunctivitis sicca associated with blepharitis as well as 10 patients with normal lid margins were examined with the HRTII/RCM in vivo confocal microscope. Scans of the tear film, the tarsal conjunctiva, the hair follicles and the meibomian glands were analysed by a masked observer. Patients with normal lid margins exhibited a minimal round cell infiltrate in the tarsal conjunctival epithelium and largely normal ducts of the meibomian glands lined with a multilayered epithelium as well as normal gland acini. In patients with anterior blepharitis, blepharitis associated with autoimmune peripheral ulcerative keratitis and blepharitis in the context of severe dry eye, confocal microscopy disclosed normal meibomian glands. In 12 patients with blepharitis/meibomitis or meibomian gland dysfunction, profound pathology was visible with dilatation and obstruction of the meibomian gland ducts. In 15 of 19 patients with blepharitis/meibomitis, but not in meibomian gland dysfunction, an intense inflammation was observed in the tarsal conjunctival epithelium and stroma. In one patient, demodex folliculorum was evident in vivo. In patients with normal lid margins as well as in patients with blepharitis, hair follicles appeared within normal limits. In vivo confocal microscopy allowed the examination of the tear film, the tarsal conjunctiva, the lid margin including the lash follicles and the meibomian glands. In patients with meibomian gland disease pathological changes could be visualised and documented objectively. The presence of an inflammatory infiltrate permitted us to differentiate between meibomitis and meibomian gland

  4. Light Microscopy Module Imaging Tested and Demonstrated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gati, Frank

    2004-01-01

    The Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR), a facility-class payload, and the Light Microscopy Module (LMM), a subrack payload, are integrated research facilities that will fly in the U.S. Laboratory module, Destiny, aboard the International Space Station. Both facilities are being engineered, designed, and developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center by Northrop Grumman Information Technology. The FIR is a modular, multiuser scientific research facility that is one of two racks that make up the Fluids and Combustion Facility (the other being the Combustion Integrated Rack). The FIR has a large volume dedicated for experimental hardware; easily reconfigurable diagnostics, power, and data systems that allow for unique experiment configurations; and customizable software. The FIR will also provide imagers, light sources, power management and control, command and data handling for facility and experiment hardware, and data processing and storage. The first payload in the FIR will be the LMM. The LMM integrated with the FIR is a remotely controllable, automated, on-orbit microscope subrack facility, with key diagnostic capabilities for meeting science requirements--including video microscopy to observe microscopic phenonema and dynamic interactions, interferometry to make thin-film measurements with nanometer resolution, laser tweezers to manipulate micrometer-sized particles, confocal microscopy to provide enhanced three-dimensional visualization of structures, and spectrophotometry to measure the photonic properties of materials. Vibration disturbances were identified early in the LMM development phase as a high risk for contaminating the science microgravity environment. An integrated FIR-LMM test was conducted in Glenn's Acoustics Test Laboratory to assess mechanical sources of vibration and their impact to microscopic imaging. The primary purpose of the test was to characterize the LMM response at the sample location, the x-y stage within the microscope, to vibration

  5. Spectro-microscopy of living plant cells.

    PubMed

    Harter, Klaus; Meixner, Alfred J; Schleifenbaum, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Spectro-microscopy, a combination of fluorescence microscopy with spatially resolved spectroscopic techniques, provides new and exciting tools for functional cell biology in living organisms. This review focuses on recent developments in spectro-microscopic applications for the investigation of living plant cells in their native tissue context. The application of spectro-microscopic methods led to the recent discovery of a fast signal response pathway for the brassinosteroide receptor BRI1 in the plasma membrane of living plant cells. Moreover, the competence of different plant cell types to respond to environmental or endogenous stimuli was determined in vivo by correlation analysis of different optical and spectroscopic readouts such as fluorescence lifetime (FLT). Furthermore, a new spectro-microscopic technique, fluorescence intensity decay shape analysis microscopy (FIDSAM), has been developed. FIDSAM is capable of imaging low-expressed fluorophore-tagged proteins at high spatial resolution and precludes the misinterpretation of autofluorescence artifacts. In addition, FIDSAM provides a very effective and sensitive tool on the basis of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) for the qualitative and quantitative determination of protein-protein interaction. Finally, we report on the quantitative analysis of the photosystem I and II (PSI/PSII) ratio in the chloroplasts of living Arabidopsis plants at room temperature, using high-resolution, spatially resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. With this technique, it was not only possible to measure PSI/PSII ratios, but also to demonstrate the differential competence of wild-type and carbohydrate-deficient plants to adapt the PSI/PSII ratio to different light conditions. In summary, the information content of standard microscopic images is extended by several dimensions by the use of spectro-microscopic approaches. Therefore, novel cell physiological and molecular topics can be addressed and valuable insights into

  6. SESAM: exploring the frontiers of electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Koch, Christoph T; Sigle, Wilfried; Höschen, Rainer; Rühle, Manfred; Essers, Erik; Benner, Gerd; Matijevic, Marko

    2006-12-01

    We report on the sub-electron-volt-sub-angstrom microscope (SESAM), a high-resolution 200-kV FEG-TEM equipped with a monochromator and an in-column MANDOLINE filter. We report on recent results obtained with this instrument, demonstrating its performance (e.g., 87-meV energy resolution at 10-s exposure time, or a transmissivity of the energy filter of T1 ev = 11,000 nm2). New opportunities to do unique experiments that may advance the frontiers of microscopy in areas such as energy-filtered TEM, spectroscopy, energy-filtered electron diffraction and spectroscopic profiling are also discussed.

  7. Structured illumination fluorescence Fourier ptychographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiu, Peng; Chen, Youhua; Kuang, Cuifang; Fang, Yue; Wang, Yifan; Fan, Jiannan; Xu, Yingke; Liu, Xu

    2016-12-01

    We apply a Fourier ptychographic algorithm for fluorescent samples using structured illumination. The samples are illuminated with structured light patterns and the raw imaging data using traditional structured illumination fluorescence microscopy (SIM) are acquired. We then extract equivalent oblique illuminated images of fluorescent samples from the SIM images. An optimized Fourier ptychography algorithm is proposed, which ensures the fidelity of the reconstructed the super-resolution results. This method can break the diffraction limit to a resolution of λ/4, and has a better signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) than SIM, especially when the background noise is high.

  8. Laser-induced air ionization microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Zhang, N.; Yang, J.; Zhu, X.

    2006-06-01

    A nonlinear scanning imaging method is introduced that uses the highly localized air ionization initiated by photoelectrons from the sample surface under irradiation of femtosecond laser pulses as the microprobe. This type of microscopy with realizable subdiffraction spatial resolution has the unique advantages of being highly sensitive to both elemental and topographical properties of the samples of interest. Microscopic images of a femtosecond laser ablated micropattern, the cross section and the side view profile of an optical fiber, and a fresh mulberry leaf are obtained with this imaging technique, which demonstrate this technique's broad applicability in microscopic studies of different materials.

  9. Magnetic force microscopy of superparamagnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Sharon; Savla, Mayur; Pelekhov, Denis V; Iscru, Daniel F; Selcu, Camelia; Hammel, P Chris; Agarwal, Gunjan

    2008-02-01

    The use of magnetic force microscopy (MFM) to detect probe-sample interactions from superparamagnetic nanoparticles in vitro in ambient atmospheric conditions is reported here. By using both magnetic and nonmagnetic probes in dynamic lift-mode imaging and by controlling the direction and magnitude of the external magnetic field applied to the samples, it is possible to detect and identify the presence of superparamagnetic nanoparticles. The experimental results shown here are in agreement with the estimated sensitivity of the MFM technique. The potential and challenges for localizing nanoscale magnetic domains in biological samples is discussed.

  10. Stimulated emission depletion microscopy with optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Lu

    Imaging at the nanoscale and/or at remote locations holds great promise for studies in fields as disparate as the life sciences and materials sciences. One such microscopy technique, stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy, is one of several fluorescence based imaging techniques that offers resolution beyond the diffraction-limit. All current implementations of STED microscopy, however, involve the use of free-space beam shaping devices to achieve the Gaussian- and donut-shaped Orbital Angular Momentum (OAM) carrying beams at the desired colors -- a challenging prospect from the standpoint of device assembly and mechanical stability during operation. A fiber-based solution could address these engineering challenges, and perhaps more interestingly, it may facilitate endoscopic implementation of in vivo STED imaging, a prospect that has thus far not been realized because optical fibers were previously considered to be incapable of transmitting the OAM beams that are necessary for STED. In this thesis, we investigate fiber-based STED systems to enable endoscopic nanoscale imaging. We discuss the design and characteristics of a novel class of fibers supporting and stably propagating Gaussian and OAM modes. Optimization of the design parameters leads to stable excitation and depletion beams propagating in the same fiber in the visible spectral range, for the first time, with high efficiency (>99%) and mode purity (>98%). Using the fabricated vortex fiber, we demonstrate an all-fiber STED system with modes that are tolerant to perturbations, and we obtain naturally self-aligned PSFs for the excitation and depletion beams. Initial experiments of STED imaging using our device yields a 4-fold improvement in lateral resolution compared to confocal imaging. In an experiment in parallel, we show the means of using q-plates as free-space mode converters that yield alignment tolerant STED microscopy systems at wavelengths covering the entire visible spectrum, and hence

  11. Parallel phase-shifting digital holographic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tahara, Tatsuki; Ito, Kenichi; Kakue, Takashi; Fujii, Motofumi; Shimozato, Yuki; Awatsuji, Yasuhiro; Nishio, Kenzo; Ura, Shogo; Kubota, Toshihiro; Matoba, Osamu

    2010-01-01

    We propose parallel phase-shifting digital holographic microscopy (PPSDHM) which has the ability of three-dimensional (3-D) motion measurement using space-division multiplexing technique. By the PPSDHM, instantaneous information of both the 3-D structure and the phase distributions of specimens can be simultaneously acquired with a single-shot exposure. We constructed a parallel phase-shifting digital holographic microscope consisting of an optical interferometer and an image sensor on which micro polarizers are attached pixel by pixel. The validity of the PPSDHM was experimentally verified by demonstrating the single-shot 3-D imaging and phase-imaging ability of the constructed microscope. PMID:21258494

  12. In vivo virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Seunghoon Kim, Sehui Kim, Jeehyun E-mail: chulhong@postech.edu; Lee, Changho Jeon, Mansik; Kim, Chulhong E-mail: chulhong@postech.edu

    2013-11-11

    We developed a virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy system by combining with a commercial surgical microscope and photoacoustic microscope (PAM). By sharing the common optical path in the microscope and PAM system, we could acquire the PAM and microscope images simultaneously. Moreover, by employing a beam projector to back-project 2D PAM images onto the microscope view plane as augmented reality, the conventional microscopic and 2D cross-sectional PAM images are concurrently mapped on the plane via an ocular lens of the microscope in real-time. Further, we guided needle insertion into phantom ex vivo and mice skins in vivo.

  13. Fibreoptic fluorescent microscopy in studying biological objects

    SciTech Connect

    Morozov, A N; Turchin, Il'ya V; Kamenskii, V A; Fiks, I I; Lazutkin, A A; Bezryadkov, D V; Ivanova, A A; Toptunov, D M; Anokhin, K V

    2010-11-13

    The method of fluorescent microscopy is developed based on employment of a single-mode fibreoptic channel to provide high spatial resolution 3D images of large cleared biological specimens using the 488-nm excitation laser line. The transverse and axial resolution of the setup is 5 and 13 {mu}m, respectively. The transversal sample size under investigation is up to 10 mm. The in-depth scanning range depends on the sample transparency and reaches 4 mm in the experiment. The 3D images of whole mouse organs (heart, lungs, brain) and mouse embryos obtained using autofluorescence or fluorescence of exogenous markers demonstrate a high contrast and cellular-level resolution.

  14. Mudrocks examined by backscattered electron microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pye, K.; Krinsley, D.

    1983-01-01

    A method of studying mudrocks is developed using backscattered electrons (BSE) in scanning electron microscopy. Commercially available detectors are utilized to mix the BSE and secondary electron signals in order to obtain the optimum image for a particular material. Thin sections or polished rock chip surfaces are examined with BSE which provides both the atomic number contrast and topographic contrast. This technique provides very detailed information about the form and composition of individual grains in the mudrock thin sections and can be used in studies of the source, mode of deposition, diagenesis, and tectonic deformational history of mudrocks.

  15. Traction force microscopy in physics and biology.

    PubMed

    Style, Robert W; Boltyanskiy, Rostislav; German, Guy K; Hyland, Callen; MacMinn, Christopher W; Mertz, Aaron F; Wilen, Larry A; Xu, Ye; Dufresne, Eric R

    2014-06-21

    Adherent cells, crawling slugs, peeling paint, sessile liquid drops, bearings and many other living and non-living systems apply forces to solid substrates. Traction force microscopy (TFM) provides spatially-resolved measurements of interfacial forces through the quantification and analysis of the deformation of an elastic substrate. Although originally developed for adherent cells, TFM has no inherent size or force scale, and can be applied to a much broader range of mechanical systems across physics and biology. In this paper, we showcase the wide range of applicability of TFM, describe the theory, and provide experimental details and code so that experimentalists can rapidly adopt this powerful technique.

  16. Pulse front adaptive optics in multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, B.; Salter, P. S.; Booth, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    The accurate focusing of ultrashort laser pulses is extremely important in multiphoton microscopy. Using adaptive optics to manipulate the incident ultrafast beam in either the spectral or spatial domain can introduce significant benefits when imaging. Here we introduce pulse front adaptive optics: manipulating an ultrashort pulse in both the spatial and temporal domains. A deformable mirror and a spatial light modulator are operated in concert to modify contours of constant intensity in space and time within an ultrashort pulse. Through adaptive control of the pulse front, we demonstrate an enhancement in the measured fluorescence from a two photon microscope.

  17. Materials Contrast in Piezoresponse Force Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinin, Sergei V; Eliseev, E. A.; Morozovska, A. N.

    2006-01-01

    Piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) contrast in transversally isotropic material corresponding to the case of c{sup +}-c{sup -} domains in tetragonal ferroelectrics is analyzed using Green's function theory by Felten et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 96, 563 (2004)]. A simplified expression for PFM signal as a linear combination of relevant piezoelectric constant is obtained. This analysis is extended to piezoelectric material of arbitrary symmetry with weak elastic and dielectric anisotropies. These results provide a framework for interpretation of PFM signals for systems with unknown or poorly known local elastic and dielectric properties, including nanocrystalline materials, ferroelectric polymers, and biopolymers.

  18. Atomic force microscopy on liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahr, Christian; Schulz, Benjamin

    This chapter provides an introduction to the atomic force microscopy (AFM) on thermotropic liquid crystals. We first give a general introduction to the technique of AFM and then describe the special requirements that have to be met for the imaging of liquid-crystalline surfaces. We also discuss the relation between the quality or reliability of the imaging results and various parameters of the scanning conditions. We briey review the existing work on AFM on liquid crystals and finally describe applications beyond the imaging, such as molecular force spectroscopy or manipulation of surface structures.

  19. Embedment-free section electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Hisatake

    2006-08-01

    Because of potential hindrance of clear viewing in epoxy sections of biological entities having an electron density similar to and lower than that of epoxy resin, the author has stressed that the embedment-free section electron microscopy is necessary for re-examination and/or clarification of biological specimen structures, and that the embedment-free electron microscopy is reliably done by using water-soluble polyethylene glycol (PEG) as a transient embedding media and by critical point-drying of embedment-free sections after de-embedment of PEG by immersion of semithin sections into water. With the embedment-free electron microscopy, the author has presented five major findings: the appearance of microtrabecular lattices with different compactnesses in various cells and in intracellular domains of a given cell, the faithful reproduction of microtrabecula-like strand lattices in vitro with increasing compactnesses from artificial protein solutions at correspondingly increasing concentrations, the appearance of more compact lattices from gelated gelatin than from solated gelatin at a given concentration in vitro, the changeability in compactnesses of the microtrabecular lattices by hyper- or hypotonic shock treatments of cells, and the confined appearance of an intracellular protein in the centripetal demilune of centrifuged ganglion cells which is occupied with the microtrabecular lattices of a substantial compactness. From these findings, several conclusions are drawn: individual strands themselves of the microtrabeculae are meaningless, the appearance of microtrabeculae represents the presence of proteins at a certain concentration, and it is therefore likely that the aqueous cytoplasm is equivalent to the aqueous solution. In addition, it is possible that the appearance of two contiguous lattice domains exhibiting different compactnesses in a given cell may represent the occurrence of a contiguity of sol to gel states of cytoplasmic domains. It is thus

  20. Periodicity in bimodal atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Chia-Yun; Santos, Sergio Chiesa, Matteo; Barcons, Victor

    2015-07-28

    Periodicity is fundamental for quantification and the application of conservation principles of many important systems. Here, we discuss periodicity in the context of bimodal atomic force microscopy (AFM). The relationship between the excited frequencies is shown to affect and control both experimental observables and the main expressions quantified via these observables, i.e., virial and energy transfer expressions, which form the basis of the bimodal AFM theory. The presence of a fundamental frequency further simplifies the theory and leads to close form solutions. Predictions are verified via numerical integration of the equation of motion and experimentally on a mica surface.

  1. Scanning electron microscopy study of Tritrichomonas augusta.

    PubMed

    Borges, Fernanda P; Wiltuschnig, Renata C M; Tasca, Tiana; De Carli, Geraldo A

    2004-09-01

    Tritrichomonas augusta is a flagellated protozoan that parasitizes amphibians and reptiles. According to scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the cell shape of T. augusta varies from slender pyriform to ovoidal. Our data show the morphological features of the trophozoites: the emergence of the anterior flagella, the structure of the undulating membrane and the position and shape of the pelta, axostyle and posterior flagellum. In addition, herein we describe spherical forms which are probably pseudocysts. The description of the external structure of T. augusta, as demonstrated by SEM, contributes to the understanding of the biology of this parasite.

  2. Mudrocks examined by backscattered electron microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pye, K.; Krinsley, D.

    1983-01-01

    A method of studying mudrocks is developed using backscattered electrons (BSE) in scanning electron microscopy. Commercially available detectors are utilized to mix the BSE and secondary electron signals in order to obtain the optimum image for a particular material. Thin sections or polished rock chip surfaces are examined with BSE which provides both the atomic number contrast and topographic contrast. This technique provides very detailed information about the form and composition of individual grains in the mudrock thin sections and can be used in studies of the source, mode of deposition, diagenesis, and tectonic deformational history of mudrocks.

  3. In vivo virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Seunghoon; Lee, Changho; Kim, Sehui; Jeon, Mansik; Kim, Jeehyun; Kim, Chulhong

    2013-11-01

    We developed a virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy system by combining with a commercial surgical microscope and photoacoustic microscope (PAM). By sharing the common optical path in the microscope and PAM system, we could acquire the PAM and microscope images simultaneously. Moreover, by employing a beam projector to back-project 2D PAM images onto the microscope view plane as augmented reality, the conventional microscopic and 2D cross-sectional PAM images are concurrently mapped on the plane via an ocular lens of the microscope in real-time. Further, we guided needle insertion into phantom ex vivo and mice skins in vivo.

  4. Optical diffraction microscopy in a teaching laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibault, Pierre; Rankenburg, Ivan C.

    2007-09-01

    We discuss an optics experiment that reproduces all important aspects of diffraction microscopy or coherent diffractive imaging. This technique is used to reconstruct an object's image from its diffraction pattern. The experimental setup is described in detail and only requires material readily available in a well-equipped optics teaching laboratory. The data analysis procedure is explained, in particular the reconstruction part, for which an iterative phase retrieval algorithm is used. The method is illustrated by showing the complex-valued reconstruction of an insect wing from a diffraction pattern measured with this setup.

  5. Electron Microscopy of Young Candida albicans Chlamydospores

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Sara E.; Spurlock, Ben O.; Michaels, G. E.

    1974-01-01

    One- to three-day-old cultures of Candida albicans bearing chlamydospores were grown and harvested by a special technique, free of agar, and prepared for ultramicrotomy and electron microscopy. These young chlamydospores exhibited a subcellular structure similar to that of the yeast phase, e.g., cytoplasmic membrane, ribosomes, and mitochondria. Other structural characteristics unique to chlamydospores were a very thick, layered cell wall, the outer layer of which was continuous with the outer layer of the suspensor cell wall and was covered by hair-like projections; membrane bound organelles; and large lipoid inclusions. Only young chlamydospores less than 3 to 4 days old exhibited these ultrastructural characteristics. Images PMID:4368664

  6. Anal melanosis diagnosed by reflectance confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Cinotti, Elisa; Chol, Christelle; Perrot, Jean Luc; Labeille, Bruno; Forest, Fabien; Cambazard, Frédéric

    2014-11-01

    Until now, in vivo reflectance-mode confocal microscopy (IVCM) has been applied only to pigmented lesions of the vulvar and oral mucosa, but not to anal mucosa lesions. We present the first case in which IVCM has been used to diagnose anal melanosis. Clinical and dermoscopic features were of concern while IVCM found the draped pattern already described for genital melanosis. IVCM adds information to the clinical and dermatoscopic examination and allows skin biopsies to be avoided. Further studies are needed to define the IVCM features of anal melanosis and to compare the performance of IVCM with the findings of histological examinations.

  7. Nonlinear Optical Microscopy of Single Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Libai; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2013-07-01

    We review recent advances in nonlinear optical (NLO) microscopy studies of single nanostructures. NLO signals are intrinsically sensitive to the electronic, vibrational, and structural properties of such nanostructures. Ultrafast excitation allows for mapping of energy relaxation pathways at the single-particle level. The strong nonlinear response of nanostructures makes them highly attractive for applications as novel NLO imaging agents in biological and biomedical research. NLO modalities based on harmonic generation, multiphoton photoluminescence, four-wave mixing, and pump-probe processes are discussed in detail.

  8. Improvement of image quality in holographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Budhiraja, C J; Som, S C

    1981-05-15

    A novel technique of noise reduction in holographic microscopy has been experimentally studied. It has been shown that significant improvement in the holomicroscopic images of actual low-contrast continuous tone biological objects can be achieved without trade off in image resolution. The technique makes use of holographically produced multidirectional phase gratings used as diffusers and the continuous addition of subchannel holograms. It has been shown that the self-imaging property of this type of diffuser makes the use of these diffusers ideal for microscopic objects. Experimental results have also been presented to demonstrate real-time image processing capability of this technique.

  9. Handheld optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Li; Zhang, Pengfei; Xu, Song; Shi, Junhui; Li, Lei; Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lidai; Zou, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2017-04-01

    Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) offers label-free in vivo imaging with high spatial resolution by acoustically detecting optical absorption contrasts via the photoacoustic effect. We developed a compact handheld OR-PAM probe for fast photoacoustic imaging. Different from benchtop microscopes, the handheld probe provides flexibility in imaging various anatomical sites. Resembling a cup in size, the probe uses a two-axis water-immersible microelectromechanical system mirror to scan both the illuminating optical beam and resultant acoustic beam. The system performance was tested in vivo by imaging the capillary bed in a mouse ear and both the capillary bed and a mole on a human volunteer.

  10. Cell surface fluctuations studied with defocusing microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agero, U.; Monken, C. H.; Ropert, C.; Gazzinelli, R. T.; Mesquita, O. N.

    2003-05-01

    Phase objects can become visible by slightly defocusing an optical microscope, a technique seldom used as a useful tool. We revisited the theory of defocusing and apply it to our optical microscope with optics corrected at infinity. In our approximation, we obtain that the image contrast is proportional to the two-dimensional (2D) Laplacian of the phase difference introduced by the phase object. If the index of refraction of the phase object is uniform the image obtained from defocusing microscopy is the image of curvature (Laplacian of the local thickness) of the phase object, while standard phase-contrast microscopy gives information about the thickness of the object. We made artificial phase objects and measured image contrasts with defocusing microscopy. Measured contrasts are in excellent agreement with our theoretical model. We use defocusing microscopy to study curvature fluctuations (ruffles) on the surface of macrophages (cell of the innate immune system), and try to correlate mechanical properties of macrophage surface and phagocytosis. We observe large coherent propagating structures: Their shape, speed, density are measured and curvature energy estimated. Inhomogeneities of cytoskeleton refractive index, curvature modulations due to thermal fluctuations and/or periodic changes in cytoskeleton-membrane interactions cause random fluctuations in image contrast. From the temporal and spatial contrast correlation functions, we obtain the decay time and correlation length of such fluctuations that are related to their size and the viscoelastic properties of the cytoskeleton. In order to associate the dynamics of cytoskeleton with the process of phagocytosis, we use an optical tweezers to grab a zymosan particle and put it into contact with the macrophage. We then measure the time for a single phagocytosis event. We add the drug cytochalasin D that depolymerizes the cytoskeleton F-actin network: It inhibits the large propagating coherent fluctuations on the

  11. Laser microdissection microscopy: application to cell culture.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Ahlam; Cenayko, Cathy; Mitry, Ragai R; Quaglia, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Laser microdissection (LMD) microscopy allows isolation of specific cell populations to target their -molecular profile. There are several different types of LMD microscopes, but they are all based on the same principle. A laser beam is used to cut out cells or tissues of interest from a histological section, cytology preparations, or live cells from tissue cultures. Live cells can be isolated using LMD and processed for downstream molecular work. RNA, DNA, and protein isolation is possible from a small number of cells and the material is suitable for further real-time PCR, ELISA, Western Blotting, and protein microarray analysis.

  12. Super-resolved spatial light interference microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chu, Kaiqin; Smith, Zachary J; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian; Lane, Stephen

    2012-03-01

    We report a scheme to achieve resolution beyond the diffraction limit in spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM). By adding a grating to the optical path, the structured illumination technique can be used to improve the resolution by a factor of 2. We show that a direct application of the structured illumination technique, however, has proved to be unsuccessful. Through two crucial modifications, namely, one to the pupil plane of the objective and the other to the demodulation procedure, faithful phase information of the object is recovered and the resolution is improved by a factor of 2.

  13. [Mobile phone based wireless microscopy imaging technology].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yucheng; Liu, Jing

    2011-03-01

    This article proposes a new device named "Wireless Cellscope" that combining mobile phone and optical microscope together. The established wireless microscope platform consists of mobile phone, network monitor, miniaturized microscope or high resolution microscope etc. A series of conceptual experiments were performed on microscopic observation of ordinary objects and mice tumor tissue slices. It was demonstrated that, the new method could acquire microscopy images via a wireless way, which is spatially independent. With small size and low cost, the device thus developed has rather wide applicability in non-disturbing investigation of cell/tissue culture and long distance observation of dangerous biological sample etc.

  14. Fast electron microscopy via compressive sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Kurt W; Anderson, Hyrum S; Wheeler, Jason W

    2014-12-09

    Various technologies described herein pertain to compressive sensing electron microscopy. A compressive sensing electron microscope includes a multi-beam generator and a detector. The multi-beam generator emits a sequence of electron patterns over time. Each of the electron patterns can include a plurality of electron beams, where the plurality of electron beams is configured to impart a spatially varying electron density on a sample. Further, the spatially varying electron density varies between each of the electron patterns in the sequence. Moreover, the detector collects signals respectively corresponding to interactions between the sample and each of the electron patterns in the sequence.

  15. Reflectance confocal microscopy features of facial angiofibromas

    PubMed Central

    Millán-Cayetano, José-Francisco; Yélamos, Oriol; Rossi, Anthony M.; Marchetti, Michael A.; Jain, Manu

    2017-01-01

    Facial angiofibromas are benign tumors presenting as firm, dome-shaped, flesh-colored to pink papules, typically on the nose and adjoining central face. Clinically and dermoscopically they can mimic melanocytic nevi or basal cell carcinomas (BCC). Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is a noninvasive imaging tool that is useful in diagnosing melanocytic and non-melanocytic facial lesions. To date no studies have described the RCM features of facial angiofibromas. Herein, we present two cases of facial angiofibromas that were imaged with RCM and revealed tumor island-like structures that mimicked BCC, leading to skin biopsy. PMID:28243496

  16. Computer vision for microscopy diagnosis of malaria.

    PubMed

    Tek, F Boray; Dempster, Andrew G; Kale, Izzet

    2009-07-13

    This paper reviews computer vision and image analysis studies aiming at automated diagnosis or screening of malaria infection in microscope images of thin blood film smears. Existing works interpret the diagnosis problem differently or propose partial solutions to the problem. A critique of these works is furnished. In addition, a general pattern recognition framework to perform diagnosis, which includes image acquisition, pre-processing, segmentation, and pattern classification components, is described. The open problems are addressed and a perspective of the future work for realization of automated microscopy diagnosis of malaria is provided.

  17. System analysis of force feedback microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, Mario S.; Chevrier, Joël; Comin, Fabio

    2014-02-07

    It was shown recently that the Force Feedback Microscope (FFM) can avoid the jump-to-contact in Atomic force Microscopy even when the cantilevers used are very soft, thus increasing force resolution. In this letter, we explore theoretical aspects of the associated real time control of the tip position. We take into account lever parameters such as the lever characteristics in its environment, spring constant, mass, dissipation coefficient, and the operating conditions such as controller gains and interaction force. We show how the controller parameters are determined so that the FFM functions at its best and estimate the bandwidth of the system under these conditions.

  18. Chemistry Viewed through the Eyes of High-Resolution Microscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beer, Michael; And Others

    1981-01-01

    This special report, prepared by several chemists working in the field of electron microscopy, provides information regarding the most recent developments in transmission and scanning electron microscopy that have chemical significance. (CS)

  19. Chemistry Viewed through the Eyes of High-Resolution Microscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beer, Michael; And Others

    1981-01-01

    This special report, prepared by several chemists working in the field of electron microscopy, provides information regarding the most recent developments in transmission and scanning electron microscopy that have chemical significance. (CS)

  20. Is bleach-sedimented smear microscopy an alternative to direct microscopy under programme conditions in India?

    PubMed

    Vishnu, P H; Bhat, P; Bansal, A; Satyanarayana, S; Alavadi, U; Ohri, B S; Shrinivas, M S Rao; Desikan, P; Jaju, J; Rao, V G; Moonan, P K

    2013-03-21

    This cross-sectional multi-centric study compared the yield of and potential benefit for detecting smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) by bleach sedimentation (2% sodium-hypochlorite) versus direct microscopy under programme conditions in India. Among 3168 PTB suspects, 684 (21.6%) were detected by bleach sedimentation vs. 625 (19.7%) by direct microscopy, with a proportional overall agreement of 96% (κ = 0.88). While 594 patients were smear-positive with both methods, 31 patients detected by direct microscopy were missed and an additional 90 patients were detected by bleach sedimentation. Overall, bleach sedimentation increased the yield of smear-positive TB detection; however; it also increased the time to results.