Science.gov

Sample records for microsecond polarized atomistic

  1. Temporal evolution of atmosphere pressure plasma jets driven by microsecond pulses with positive and negative polarities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Tao; Yang, Wenjin; Zhang, Cheng; Fang, Zhi; Zhou, Yixiao; Schamiloglu, Edl

    2014-09-01

    Current-voltage characteristics, discharge images, and optical spectra of atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) are studied using a microsecond pulse length generator producing repetitive output pulses with different polarities. The experimental results show that the APPJs excited by the pulses with positive polarity have longer plume, faster propagation speed, higher power, and more excited species, such as \\text{N}2 , O, He, \\text{N}2+ , than that with the negatively excited APPJs. The images taken using an intensified charge-coupled device show that the APPJs excited by pulses with positive polarity are characterized by a bullet-like structure, while the APPJs excited by pulses with negative polarity are continuous. The propagation speed of the APPJs driven by a microsecond pulse length generator is about tens of km/s, which is similar to the APPJs driven by a kHz frequency sinusoidal voltage source. The analysis shows that the space charge accumulation effect plays an important role during the discharge. The transient enhanced electric field induced by the accumulated ions between the needle-like electrode and the nozzle in the APPJs excited by pulses with negative polarity enhances electron field emission from the cathode, which is illustrated by the bright line on the time-integrated images. This makes the shape of the APPJ excited using pulses with negative polarity different from the bullet-like shape of the APPJs excited by pulses with positive polarity.

  2. Coupling between Histone Conformations and DNA Geometry in Nucleosomes on a Microsecond Timescale: Atomistic Insights into Nucleosome Functions.

    PubMed

    Shaytan, Alexey K; Armeev, Grigoriy A; Goncearenco, Alexander; Zhurkin, Victor B; Landsman, David; Panchenko, Anna R

    2016-01-16

    An octamer of histone proteins wraps about 200bp of DNA into two superhelical turns to form nucleosomes found in chromatin. Although the static structure of the nucleosomal core particle has been solved, details of the dynamic interactions between histones and DNA remain elusive. We performed extensively long unconstrained, all-atom microsecond molecular dynamics simulations of nucleosomes including linker DNA segments and full-length histones in explicit solvent. For the first time, we were able to identify and characterize the rearrangements in nucleosomes on a microsecond timescale including the coupling between the conformation of the histone tails and the DNA geometry. We found that certain histone tail conformations promoted DNA bulging near its entry/exit sites, resulting in the formation of twist defects within the DNA. This led to a reorganization of histone-DNA interactions, suggestive of the formation of initial nucleosome sliding intermediates. We characterized the dynamics of the histone tails upon their condensation on the core and linker DNA and showed that tails may adopt conformationally constrained positions due to the insertion of "anchoring" lysines and arginines into the DNA minor grooves. Potentially, these phenomena affect the accessibility of post-translationally modified histone residues that serve as important sites for epigenetic marks (e.g., at H3K9, H3K27, H4K16), suggesting that interactions of the histone tails with the core and linker DNA modulate the processes of histone tail modifications and binding of the effector proteins. We discuss the implications of the observed results on the nucleosome function and compare our results to different experimental studies.

  3. Laser-driven microsecond temperature cycles analyzed by fluorescence polarization microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zondervan, Rob; Kulzer, Florian; van der Meer, Harmen; Disselhorst, Jos A J M; Orrit, Michel

    2006-04-15

    We demonstrate a novel technique to achieve fast thermal cycles of a small sample (a few femtoliters). Modulating a continuous near-infrared laser focused on a metal film, we can drive the local temperature from 130 to 300 K and back, within a few microseconds. By fluorescence microscopy of dyes in a thin glycerol film, we record images of the hot spot, calibrate its temperature, and follow its variations in real time. The temperature dependence of fluorescence anisotropy, due to photophysics and rotational diffusion, gives a steady-state temperature calibration between 200 and 350 K. From 200 to 220 K, we monitor temperature more accurately by fluorescence autocorrelation, a probe for rotational diffusion. Time-resolved measurements of fluorescence anisotropy give heating and cooling times of a few microseconds, short enough to supercool pure water. We designed our method to repeatedly cycle a single (bio)molecule between ambient and cryostat temperatures with microsecond time resolution. Successive measurements of a structurally relevant variable will decompose a dynamical process into structural snapshots. Such temperature-cycle experiments, which combine a high time resolution with long observation times, can thus be expected to yield new insights into complex processes such as protein folding. PMID:16443653

  4. PF2fit: Polar Fast Fourier Matched Alignment of Atomistic Structures with 3D Electron Microscopy Maps.

    PubMed

    Bettadapura, Radhakrishna; Rasheed, Muhibur; Vollrath, Antje; Bajaj, Chandrajit

    2015-10-01

    There continue to be increasing occurrences of both atomistic structure models in the PDB (possibly reconstructed from X-ray diffraction or NMR data), and 3D reconstructed cryo-electron microscopy (3D EM) maps (albeit at coarser resolution) of the same or homologous molecule or molecular assembly, deposited in the EMDB. To obtain the best possible structural model of the molecule at the best achievable resolution, and without any missing gaps, one typically aligns (match and fits) the atomistic structure model with the 3D EM map. We discuss a new algorithm and generalized framework, named PF(2) fit (Polar Fast Fourier Fitting) for the best possible structural alignment of atomistic structures with 3D EM. While PF(2) fit enables only a rigid, six dimensional (6D) alignment method, it augments prior work on 6D X-ray structure and 3D EM alignment in multiple ways: Scoring. PF(2) fit includes a new scoring scheme that, in addition to rewarding overlaps between the volumes occupied by the atomistic structure and 3D EM map, rewards overlaps between the volumes complementary to them. We quantitatively demonstrate how this new complementary scoring scheme improves upon existing approaches. PF(2) fit also includes two scoring functions, the non-uniform exterior penalty and the skeleton-secondary structure score, and implements the scattering potential score as an alternative to traditional Gaussian blurring. Search. PF(2) fit utilizes a fast polar Fourier search scheme, whose main advantage is the ability to search over uniformly and adaptively sampled subsets of the space of rigid-body motions. PF(2) fit also implements a new reranking search and scoring methodology that considerably improves alignment metrics in results obtained from the initial search.

  5. PF2 fit: Polar Fast Fourier Matched Alignment of Atomistic Structures with 3D Electron Microscopy Maps

    PubMed Central

    Bettadapura, Radhakrishna; Rasheed, Muhibur; Vollrath, Antje; Bajaj, Chandrajit

    2015-01-01

    There continue to be increasing occurrences of both atomistic structure models in the PDB (possibly reconstructed from X-ray diffraction or NMR data), and 3D reconstructed cryo-electron microscopy (3D EM) maps (albeit at coarser resolution) of the same or homologous molecule or molecular assembly, deposited in the EMDB. To obtain the best possible structural model of the molecule at the best achievable resolution, and without any missing gaps, one typically aligns (match and fits) the atomistic structure model with the 3D EM map. We discuss a new algorithm and generalized framework, named PF2 fit (Polar Fast Fourier Fitting) for the best possible structural alignment of atomistic structures with 3D EM. While PF2 fit enables only a rigid, six dimensional (6D) alignment method, it augments prior work on 6D X-ray structure and 3D EM alignment in multiple ways: Scoring. PF2 fit includes a new scoring scheme that, in addition to rewarding overlaps between the volumes occupied by the atomistic structure and 3D EM map, rewards overlaps between the volumes complementary to them. We quantitatively demonstrate how this new complementary scoring scheme improves upon existing approaches. PF2 fit also includes two scoring functions, the non-uniform exterior penalty and the skeleton-secondary structure score, and implements the scattering potential score as an alternative to traditional Gaussian blurring. Search. PF2 fit utilizes a fast polar Fourier search scheme, whose main advantage is the ability to search over uniformly and adaptively sampled subsets of the space of rigid-body motions. PF2 fit also implements a new reranking search and scoring methodology that considerably improves alignment metrics in results obtained from the initial search. PMID:26469938

  6. PF2fit: Polar Fast Fourier Matched Alignment of Atomistic Structures with 3D Electron Microscopy Maps.

    PubMed

    Bettadapura, Radhakrishna; Rasheed, Muhibur; Vollrath, Antje; Bajaj, Chandrajit

    2015-10-01

    There continue to be increasing occurrences of both atomistic structure models in the PDB (possibly reconstructed from X-ray diffraction or NMR data), and 3D reconstructed cryo-electron microscopy (3D EM) maps (albeit at coarser resolution) of the same or homologous molecule or molecular assembly, deposited in the EMDB. To obtain the best possible structural model of the molecule at the best achievable resolution, and without any missing gaps, one typically aligns (match and fits) the atomistic structure model with the 3D EM map. We discuss a new algorithm and generalized framework, named PF(2) fit (Polar Fast Fourier Fitting) for the best possible structural alignment of atomistic structures with 3D EM. While PF(2) fit enables only a rigid, six dimensional (6D) alignment method, it augments prior work on 6D X-ray structure and 3D EM alignment in multiple ways: Scoring. PF(2) fit includes a new scoring scheme that, in addition to rewarding overlaps between the volumes occupied by the atomistic structure and 3D EM map, rewards overlaps between the volumes complementary to them. We quantitatively demonstrate how this new complementary scoring scheme improves upon existing approaches. PF(2) fit also includes two scoring functions, the non-uniform exterior penalty and the skeleton-secondary structure score, and implements the scattering potential score as an alternative to traditional Gaussian blurring. Search. PF(2) fit utilizes a fast polar Fourier search scheme, whose main advantage is the ability to search over uniformly and adaptively sampled subsets of the space of rigid-body motions. PF(2) fit also implements a new reranking search and scoring methodology that considerably improves alignment metrics in results obtained from the initial search. PMID:26469938

  7. Defect-mediated polarization switching in ferroelectrics and related materials: from mesoscopic mechanisms to atomistic control.

    PubMed

    Kalinin, Sergei V; Rodriguez, Brian J; Borisevich, Albina Y; Baddorf, Arthur P; Balke, Nina; Chang, Hye Jung; Chen, Long-Qing; Choudhury, Samrat; Jesse, Stephen; Maksymovych, Peter; Nikiforov, Maxim P; Pennycook, Stephen J

    2010-01-19

    The plethora of lattice and electronic behaviors in ferroelectric and multiferroic materials and heterostructures opens vistas into novel physical phenomena including magnetoelectric coupling and ferroelectric tunneling. The development of new classes of electronic, energy-storage, and information-technology devices depends critically on understanding and controlling field-induced polarization switching. Polarization reversal is controlled by defects that determine activation energy, critical switching bias, and the selection between thermodynamically equivalent polarization states in multiaxial ferroelectrics. Understanding and controlling defect functionality in ferroelectric materials is as critical to the future of oxide electronics and solid-state electrochemistry as defects in semiconductors are for semiconductor electronics. Here, recent advances in understanding the defect-mediated switching mechanisms, enabled by recent advances in electron and scanning probe microscopy, are discussed. The synergy between local probes and structural methods offers a pathway to decipher deterministic polarization switching mechanisms on the level of a single atomically defined defect.

  8. Quantum Drude oscillator model of atoms and molecules: Many-body polarization and dispersion interactions for atomistic simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Andrew P.; Crain, Jason; Sokhan, Vlad P.; Whitfield, Troy W.; Martyna, Glenn J.

    2013-04-01

    Treating both many-body polarization and dispersion interactions is now recognized as a key element in achieving the level of atomistic modeling required to reveal novel physics in complex systems. The quantum Drude oscillator (QDO), a Gaussian-based, coarse grained electronic structure model, captures both many-body polarization and dispersion and has linear scale computational complexity with system size, hence it is a leading candidate next-generation simulation method. Here, we investigate the extent to which the QDO treatment reproduces the desired long-range atomic and molecular properties. We present closed form expressions for leading order polarizabilities and dispersion coefficients and derive invariant (parameter-free) scaling relationships among multipole polarizability and many-body dispersion coefficients that arise due to the Gaussian nature of the model. We show that these “combining rules” hold to within a few percent for noble gas atoms, alkali metals, and simple (first-row hydride) molecules such as water; this is consistent with the surprising success that models with underlying Gaussian statistics often exhibit in physics. We present a diagrammatic Jastrow-type perturbation theory tailored to the QDO model that serves to illustrate the rich types of responses that the QDO approach engenders. QDO models for neon, argon, krypton, and xenon, designed to reproduce gas phase properties, are constructed and their condensed phase properties explored via linear scale diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) and path integral molecular dynamics (PIMD) simulations. Good agreement with experimental data for structure, cohesive energy, and bulk modulus is found, demonstrating a degree of transferability that cannot be achieved using current empirical models or fully ab initio descriptions.

  9. General Reactive Atomistic Simulation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Aidan P.

    2004-09-22

    GRASP (General Reactive Atomistic Simulation Program) is primarily intended as a molecular dynamics package for complex force fields, The code is designed to provide good performance for large systems, either in parallel or serial execution mode, The primary purpose of the code is to realistically represent the structural and dynamic properties of large number of atoms on timescales ranging from picoseconds up to a microsecond. Typically the atoms form a representative sample of some material, such as an interface between polycrystalline silicon and amorphous silica. GRASP differs from other parallel molecular dynamics codes primarily due to it’s ability to handle relatively complicated interaction potentials and it’s ability to use more than one interaction potential in a single simulation. Most of the computational effort goes into the calculation of interatomic forces, which depend in a complicated way on the positions of all the atoms. The forces are used to integrate the equations of motion forward in time using the so-called velocity Verlet integration scheme. Alternatively, the forces can be used to find a minimum energy configuration, in which case a modified steepest descent algorithm is used.

  10. General Reactive Atomistic Simulation Program

    2004-09-22

    GRASP (General Reactive Atomistic Simulation Program) is primarily intended as a molecular dynamics package for complex force fields, The code is designed to provide good performance for large systems, either in parallel or serial execution mode, The primary purpose of the code is to realistically represent the structural and dynamic properties of large number of atoms on timescales ranging from picoseconds up to a microsecond. Typically the atoms form a representative sample of some material,more » such as an interface between polycrystalline silicon and amorphous silica. GRASP differs from other parallel molecular dynamics codes primarily due to it’s ability to handle relatively complicated interaction potentials and it’s ability to use more than one interaction potential in a single simulation. Most of the computational effort goes into the calculation of interatomic forces, which depend in a complicated way on the positions of all the atoms. The forces are used to integrate the equations of motion forward in time using the so-called velocity Verlet integration scheme. Alternatively, the forces can be used to find a minimum energy configuration, in which case a modified steepest descent algorithm is used.« less

  11. Cooling rate and stress relaxation in silica melts and glasses via microsecond molecular dyanmics

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, J. Matthew D.

    2015-07-22

    We have conducted extremely long molecular dynamics simulations of glasses to microsecond times, which close the gap between experimental and atomistic simulation time scales by two to three orders of magnitude. The static, thermal, and structural properties of silica glass are reported for glass cooling rates down to 5×109 K/s and viscoelastic response in silica melts and glasses are studied over nine decades of time. We finally present results from relaxation of hydrostatic compressive stress in silica and show that time-temperature superposition holds in these systems for temperatures from 3500 to 1000 K.

  12. Cooling rate and stress relaxation in silica melts and glasses via microsecond molecular dyanmics

    DOE PAGES

    Lane, J. Matthew D.

    2015-07-22

    We have conducted extremely long molecular dynamics simulations of glasses to microsecond times, which close the gap between experimental and atomistic simulation time scales by two to three orders of magnitude. The static, thermal, and structural properties of silica glass are reported for glass cooling rates down to 5×109 K/s and viscoelastic response in silica melts and glasses are studied over nine decades of time. We finally present results from relaxation of hydrostatic compressive stress in silica and show that time-temperature superposition holds in these systems for temperatures from 3500 to 1000 K.

  13. Microsecond dynamics of mismatch repair proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salsbury, Freddie; Thompson, William

    We will present the results of long-time simulations (250ns-1microsecond) of the mismatch repair protein complexes Mutsalpha bound to various substrates, both normal and damaged. We do so to demonstrate the importance of long-range fluctuations and generalized allostery in such systems and how long-scale GPU-enabled simulations can enabled such analysis.

  14. Sub-microsecond-resolution probe microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Ginger, David; Giridharagopal, Rajiv; Moore, David; Rayermann, Glennis; Reid, Obadiah

    2014-04-01

    Methods and apparatus are provided herein for time-resolved analysis of the effect of a perturbation (e.g., a light or voltage pulse) on a sample. By operating in the time domain, the provided method enables sub-microsecond time-resolved measurement of transient, or time-varying, forces acting on a cantilever.

  15. Polar Spinel-Perovskite Interfaces: an atomistic study of Fe3O4(111)/SrTiO3(111) structure and functionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilks, Daniel; McKenna, Keith P.; Nedelkoski, Zlatko; Kuerbanjiang, Balati; Matsuzaki, Kosuke; Susaki, Tomofumi; Lari, Leonardo; Kepaptsoglou, Demie; Ramasse, Quentin; Tear, Steve; Lazarov, Vlado K.

    2016-07-01

    Atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy combined with ab initio electronic calculations are used to determine the structure and properties of the Fe3O4(111)/SrTiO3(111) polar interface. The interfacial structure and chemical composition are shown to be atomically sharp and of an octahedral Fe/SrO3 nature. Band alignment across the interface pins the Fermi level in the vicinity of the conduction band of SrTiO3. Density functional theory calculations demonstrate very high spin-polarization of Fe3O4 in the interface vicinity which suggests that this system may be an excellent candidate for spintronic applications.

  16. Polar Spinel-Perovskite Interfaces: an atomistic study of Fe3O4(111)/SrTiO3(111) structure and functionality.

    PubMed

    Gilks, Daniel; McKenna, Keith P; Nedelkoski, Zlatko; Kuerbanjiang, Balati; Matsuzaki, Kosuke; Susaki, Tomofumi; Lari, Leonardo; Kepaptsoglou, Demie; Ramasse, Quentin; Tear, Steve; Lazarov, Vlado K

    2016-01-01

    Atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy combined with ab initio electronic calculations are used to determine the structure and properties of the Fe3O4(111)/SrTiO3(111) polar interface. The interfacial structure and chemical composition are shown to be atomically sharp and of an octahedral Fe/SrO3 nature. Band alignment across the interface pins the Fermi level in the vicinity of the conduction band of SrTiO3. Density functional theory calculations demonstrate very high spin-polarization of Fe3O4 in the interface vicinity which suggests that this system may be an excellent candidate for spintronic applications. PMID:27411576

  17. Polar Spinel-Perovskite Interfaces: an atomistic study of Fe3O4(111)/SrTiO3(111) structure and functionality

    PubMed Central

    Gilks, Daniel; McKenna, Keith P.; Nedelkoski, Zlatko; Kuerbanjiang, Balati; Matsuzaki, Kosuke; Susaki, Tomofumi; Lari, Leonardo; Kepaptsoglou, Demie; Ramasse, Quentin; Tear, Steve; Lazarov, Vlado K.

    2016-01-01

    Atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy combined with ab initio electronic calculations are used to determine the structure and properties of the Fe3O4(111)/SrTiO3(111) polar interface. The interfacial structure and chemical composition are shown to be atomically sharp and of an octahedral Fe/SrO3 nature. Band alignment across the interface pins the Fermi level in the vicinity of the conduction band of SrTiO3. Density functional theory calculations demonstrate very high spin-polarization of Fe3O4 in the interface vicinity which suggests that this system may be an excellent candidate for spintronic applications. PMID:27411576

  18. Microsecond flares in gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.; Cohen, Justin; Teegarden, Bonnard J.; Cline, Thomas L.; Fishman, Gerald J.; Meegan, Charles A.; Wilson, Robert B.; Paciesas, William S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Matteson, James L.

    1993-01-01

    It has been suggested that gamma-ray burst light curves may consist of many superposed flares with a duration shorter than 30/microsec. If true, the implications for the interpretation of burst data are enormous. With the launch of the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory, four predictions of Mitrofanov's (1989) suggestion can be tested. Our results which contradict this suggestion are (1) the photon arrival times are not correlated between independent detectors, (2) the spectral hardness and intensity does not depend on the detector area, (3) the bursts seen by detectors which measure photon positions do not see microsecond flares, and (4) burst positions deduced from detectors with different projected areas are close to the positions deduced from time-of-flight differences between separated spacecraft. We conclude, therefore, that gamma-ray bursts are not composed of microsecond flares.

  19. Structure and dynamics of DNA loops on nucleosomes studied with atomistic, microsecond-scale molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Pasi, Marco; Lavery, Richard

    2016-01-01

    DNA loop formation on nucleosomes is strongly implicated in chromatin remodeling and occurs spontaneously in nucleosomes subjected to superhelical stress. The nature of such loops depends crucially on the balance between DNA deformation and DNA interaction with the nucleosome core. Currently, no high-resolution structural data on these loops exist. Although uniform rod models have been used to study loop size and shape, these models make assumptions concerning DNA mechanics and DNA–core binding. We present here atomic-scale molecular dynamics simulations for two different loop sizes. The results point to the key role of localized DNA kinking within the loops. Kinks enable the relaxation of DNA bending strain to be coupled with improved DNA–core interactions. Kinks lead to small, irregularly shaped loops that are asymmetrically positioned with respect to the nucleosome core. We also find that loop position can influence the dynamics of the DNA segments at the extremities of the nucleosome. PMID:27098037

  20. Biomembranes in atomistic and coarse-grained simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluhackova, Kristyna; Böckmann, Rainer A.

    2015-08-01

    The architecture of biological membranes is tightly coupled to the localization, organization, and function of membrane proteins. The organelle-specific distribution of lipids allows for the formation of functional microdomains (also called rafts) that facilitate the segregation and aggregation of membrane proteins and thus shape their function. Molecular dynamics simulations enable to directly access the formation, structure, and dynamics of membrane microdomains at the molecular scale and the specific interactions among lipids and proteins on timescales from picoseconds to microseconds. This review focuses on the latest developments of biomembrane force fields for both atomistic and coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, and the different levels of coarsening of biomolecular structures. It also briefly introduces scale-bridging methods applicable to biomembrane studies, and highlights selected recent applications.

  1. Atomistic k ṡ p theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryor, Craig E.; Pistol, M.-E.

    2015-12-01

    Pseudopotentials, tight-binding models, and k ṡ p theory have stood for many years as the standard techniques for computing electronic states in crystalline solids. Here, we present the first new method in decades, which we call atomistic k ṡ p theory. In its usual formulation, k ṡ p theory has the advantage of depending on parameters that are directly related to experimentally measured quantities, however, it is insensitive to the locations of individual atoms. We construct an atomistic k ṡ p theory by defining envelope functions on a grid matching the crystal lattice. The model parameters are matrix elements which are obtained from experimental results or ab initio wave functions in a simple way. This is in contrast to the other atomistic approaches in which parameters are fit to reproduce a desired dispersion and are not expressible in terms of fundamental quantities. This fitting is often very difficult. We illustrate our method by constructing a four-band atomistic model for a diamond/zincblende crystal and show that it is equivalent to the sp3 tight-binding model. We can thus directly derive the parameters in the sp3 tight-binding model from experimental data. We then take the atomistic limit of the widely used eight-band Kane model and compute the band structures for all III-V semiconductors not containing nitrogen or boron using parameters fit to experimental data. Our new approach extends k ṡ p theory to problems in which atomistic precision is required, such as impurities, alloys, polytypes, and interfaces. It also provides a new approach to multiscale modeling by allowing continuum and atomistic k ṡ p models to be combined in the same system.

  2. Microsecond protein dynamics observed at the single-molecule level

    PubMed Central

    Otosu, Takuhiro; Ishii, Kunihiko; Tahara, Tahei

    2015-01-01

    How polypeptide chains acquire specific conformations to realize unique biological functions is a central problem of protein science. Single-molecule spectroscopy, combined with fluorescence resonance energy transfer, is utilized to study the conformational heterogeneity and the state-to-state transition dynamics of proteins on the submillisecond to second timescales. However, observation of the dynamics on the microsecond timescale is still very challenging. This timescale is important because the elementary processes of protein dynamics take place and direct comparison between experiment and simulation is possible. Here we report a new single-molecule technique to reveal the microsecond structural dynamics of proteins through correlation of the fluorescence lifetime. This method, two-dimensional fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy, is applied to clarify the conformational dynamics of cytochrome c. Three conformational ensembles and the microsecond transitions in each ensemble are indicated from the correlation signal, demonstrating the importance of quantifying microsecond dynamics of proteins on the folding free energy landscape. PMID:26151767

  3. Microsecond protein dynamics observed at the single-molecule level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otosu, Takuhiro; Ishii, Kunihiko; Tahara, Tahei

    2015-07-01

    How polypeptide chains acquire specific conformations to realize unique biological functions is a central problem of protein science. Single-molecule spectroscopy, combined with fluorescence resonance energy transfer, is utilized to study the conformational heterogeneity and the state-to-state transition dynamics of proteins on the submillisecond to second timescales. However, observation of the dynamics on the microsecond timescale is still very challenging. This timescale is important because the elementary processes of protein dynamics take place and direct comparison between experiment and simulation is possible. Here we report a new single-molecule technique to reveal the microsecond structural dynamics of proteins through correlation of the fluorescence lifetime. This method, two-dimensional fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy, is applied to clarify the conformational dynamics of cytochrome c. Three conformational ensembles and the microsecond transitions in each ensemble are indicated from the correlation signal, demonstrating the importance of quantifying microsecond dynamics of proteins on the folding free energy landscape.

  4. Microsecond delays on non-real time operating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Angstadt, R.; Estrada, J.; Diehl, H.T.; Flaugher, B.; Johnson, M.; /Fermilab

    2007-05-01

    We have developed microsecond timing and profiling software that runs on standard Windows and Linux based operating systems. This software is orders of magnitudes better than most of the standard native functions in wide use. Our software libraries calibrate RDTSC in microseconds or seconds to provide two different types of delays: a ''Guaranteed Minimum'' and a precision ''Long Delay'', which releases to the kernel. Both return profiling information of the actual delay.

  5. Microsecond linear optical response in the unusual nematic phase of achiral bimesogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, V. P.; Balachandran, R.; Nagaraj, M.; Vij, J. K.; Tamba, M. G.; Kohlmeier, A.; Mehl, G. H.

    2011-12-01

    Some hydrocarbon linked mesogenic dimers are known to exhibit an additional nematic phase (Nx) below a conventional uniaxial nematic (Nu) phase. Although composed of non-chiral molecules, the Nx phase is found to exhibit linear (polar) switching under applied electric field. This switching has remarkably low response time of the order of a few microseconds. Two chiral domains with opposite handedness and consequently opposite responses are found in planar cells. Uniformly lying helix, electroclinic, and flexoelectric effects are given as possible causes for this intriguing phenomenon.

  6. Numerical tools for atomistic simulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, H.; Gullett, Philip Michael; Slepoy, Alexander; Horstemeyer, Mark F.; Baskes, Michael I.; Wagner, Gregory John; Li, Mo

    2004-01-01

    The final report for a Laboratory Directed Research and Development project entitled 'Parallel Atomistic Computing for Failure Analysis of Micromachines' is presented. In this project, atomistic algorithms for parallel computers were developed to assist in quantification of microstructure-property relations related to weapon micro-components. With these and other serial computing tools, we are performing atomistic simulations of various sizes, geometries, materials, and boundary conditions. These tools provide the capability to handle the different size-scale effects required to predict failure. Nonlocal continuum models have been proposed to address this problem; however, they are phenomenological in nature and are difficult to validate for micro-scale components. Our goal is to separately quantify damage nucleation, growth, and coalescence mechanisms to provide a basis for macro-scale continuum models that will be used for micromachine design. Because micro-component experiments are difficult, a systematic computational study that employs Monte Carlo methods, molecular statics, and molecular dynamics (EAM and MEAM) simulations to compute continuum quantities will provide mechanism-property relations associated with the following parameters: specimen size, number of grains, crystal orientation, strain rates, temperature, defect nearest neighbor distance, void/crack size, chemical state, and stress state. This study will quantify sizescale effects from nanometers to microns in terms of damage progression and thus potentially allow for optimized micro-machine designs that are more reliable and have higher fidelity in terms of strength. In order to accomplish this task, several atomistic methods needed to be developed and evaluated to cover the range of defects, strain rates, temperatures, and sizes that a material may see in micro-machines. Therefore we are providing a complete set of tools for large scale atomistic simulations that include pre-processing of

  7. Atomistic Simulation of the Transition from Atomistic to Macroscopic Cratering

    SciTech Connect

    Samela, Juha; Nordlund, Kai

    2008-07-11

    Using large-scale atomistic simulations, we show that the macroscopic cratering behavior emerges for projectile impacts on Au at projectile sizes between 1000 and 10 000 Au atoms at impact velocities comparable to typical meteoroid velocities. In this size regime, we detect a compression of material in Au nanoparticle impacts similar to that observed for hypervelocity macroscopic impacts. The simulated crater volumes agree with the values calculated using the macroscopic crater size scaling law, in spite of a downwards extrapolation over more than 15 orders of magnitude in terms of the impactor volume. The result demonstrates that atomistic simulations can be used as a tool to understand the strength properties of materials in cases where only continuum models have been possible before.

  8. Atomistic Calculation of Mechanical Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ju

    Mechanical behavior is stress-related behavior. This can mean the material response is driven by externally applied stress (or partially), or the underlying processes are mediated by an internal stress field; very often both are true. Due to defects and their collective behavior [1], the spatiotemporal spectrum of stress field in a real material tends to have very large spectral width, with non-trivial coupling between different scales, which is another way of saying that the mechanical behavior of real materials tends to be multiscale. The concept of stress field is usually valid when coarse-grained above a few nm; in favorable circumstances like when crystalline order is preserved locally, it may be applicable down to sub-nm lengthscale [2]. But overall, the atomic scale is where the stress concept breaks down, and atomistic simulations [3-5] provide very important termination or matching condition for stress-based theories. Large-scale atomistic simulations (chap 2.27) are approaching μm lengthscale and are starting to reveal the collective behavior of defects [6]. But studying defect unit processes is still a main task of atomistic simulation.

  9. Mixing MARTINI: electrostatic coupling in hybrid atomistic-coarse-grained biomolecular simulations.

    PubMed

    Wassenaar, Tsjerk A; Ingólfsson, Helgi I; Priess, Marten; Marrink, Siewert J; Schäfer, Lars V

    2013-04-01

    Hybrid molecular dynamics simulations of atomistic (AA) solutes embedded in coarse-grained (CG) environment can substantially reduce the computational cost with respect to fully atomistic simulations. However, interfacing both levels of resolution is a major challenge that includes a balanced description of the relevant interactions. This is especially the case for polar solvents such as water, which screen the electrostatic interactions and thus require explicit electrostatic coupling between AA and CG subsystems. Here, we present and critically test computationally efficient hybrid AA/CG models. We combined the Gromos atomistic force field with the MARTINI coarse-grained force field. To enact electrostatic coupling, two recently developed CG water models with explicit electrostatic interactions were used: the polarizable MARTINI water model and the BMW model. The hybrid model was found to be sensitive to the strength of the AA-CG electrostatic coupling, which was adjusted through the relative dielectric permittivity εr(AA-CG). Potentials of mean force (PMFs) between pairs of amino acid side chain analogues in water and partitioning free enthalpies of uncharged amino acid side chain analogues between apolar solvent and water show significant differences between the hybrid simulations and the fully AA or CG simulations, in particular for charged and polar molecules. For apolar molecules, the results obtained with the hybrid AA/CG models are in better agreement with the fully atomistic results. The structures of atomistic ubiquitin solvated in CG water and of a single atomistic transmembrane α-helix and the transmembrane portion of an atomistic mechanosensitive channel in CG lipid bilayers were largely maintained during 50-100 ns of AA/CG simulations, partly due to an overstabilization of intramolecular interactions. This work highlights some key challenges on the way toward hybrid AA/CG models that are both computationally efficient and sufficiently accurate for

  10. Astropulse: A Search for Microsecond Transient Radio Signals Using Distributed Computing. I. Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Von Korff, J.; Demorest, P.; Heien, E.; Korpela, E.; Werthimer, D.; Cobb, J.; Lebofsky, M.; Anderson, D.; Bankay, B.; Siemion, A.

    2013-04-01

    We are performing a transient, microsecond timescale radio sky survey, called "Astropulse," using the Arecibo telescope. Astropulse searches for brief (0.4 μs to 204.8 μs ), wideband (relative to its 2.5 MHz bandwidth) radio pulses centered at 1420 MHz. Astropulse is a commensal (piggyback) survey, and scans the sky between declinations of -1.°33 and 38.°03. We obtained 1540 hr of data in each of seven beams of the ALFA receiver, with two polarizations per beam. The data are one-bit complex sampled at the Nyquist limit of 0.4 μs per sample. Examination of timescales on the order of microseconds is possible because we used coherent dedispersion, a technique that has frequently been used for targeted observations, but has never been associated with a radio sky survey. The more usual technique, incoherent dedispersion, cannot resolve signals below a minimum timescale which depends on the signal's dispersion measure (DM) and frequency. However, coherent dedispersion requires more intensive computation than incoherent dedispersion. The required processing power was provided by BOINC, the Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing. BOINC is a distributed computing system, allowing us to utilize hundreds of thousands of volunteers' computers to perform the necessary calculations for coherent dedispersion. Astrophysical events that might produce brief radio pulses include giant pulses from pulsars, rotating radio transients, exploding primordial black holes, or new sources yet to be imagined. Radio frequency interference and noise contaminate the data; these are mitigated by a number of techniques including multi-polarization correlation, DM repetition detection, and frequency profiling.

  11. ASTROPULSE: A SEARCH FOR MICROSECOND TRANSIENT RADIO SIGNALS USING DISTRIBUTED COMPUTING. I. METHODOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Von Korff, J.; Heien, E.; Korpela, E.; Werthimer, D.; Cobb, J.; Lebofsky, M.; Anderson, D.; Bankay, B.; Siemion, A.; Demorest, P.

    2013-04-10

    We are performing a transient, microsecond timescale radio sky survey, called 'Astropulse', using the Arecibo telescope. Astropulse searches for brief (0.4 {mu}s to 204.8 {mu}s ), wideband (relative to its 2.5 MHz bandwidth) radio pulses centered at 1420 MHz. Astropulse is a commensal (piggyback) survey, and scans the sky between declinations of -1. Degree-Sign 33 and 38. Degree-Sign 03. We obtained 1540 hr of data in each of seven beams of the ALFA receiver, with two polarizations per beam. The data are one-bit complex sampled at the Nyquist limit of 0.4 {mu}s per sample. Examination of timescales on the order of microseconds is possible because we used coherent dedispersion, a technique that has frequently been used for targeted observations, but has never been associated with a radio sky survey. The more usual technique, incoherent dedispersion, cannot resolve signals below a minimum timescale which depends on the signal's dispersion measure (DM) and frequency. However, coherent dedispersion requires more intensive computation than incoherent dedispersion. The required processing power was provided by BOINC, the Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing. BOINC is a distributed computing system, allowing us to utilize hundreds of thousands of volunteers' computers to perform the necessary calculations for coherent dedispersion. Astrophysical events that might produce brief radio pulses include giant pulses from pulsars, rotating radio transients, exploding primordial black holes, or new sources yet to be imagined. Radio frequency interference and noise contaminate the data; these are mitigated by a number of techniques including multi-polarization correlation, DM repetition detection, and frequency profiling.

  12. Developing Single-Molecule Technique with Microsecond Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhterov, Maxim V.

    Molecular machines like proteins are responsible for many regulatory and catalytic functions. Specifically, molecular motions of proteins and their flexibility determine conformational states required for enzyme catalysis, signal transduction, and protein-protein interactions. However, the mechanisms for protein transitions between conformational states are often poorly understood, especially in the milli- to microsecond ranges where conventional optical techniques and computational modeling are most limited. This work describes development of an electronic single-molecule technique for monitoring microsecond motions of biological molecules. Dynamic changes of conductance through a transistor made of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT-FET) report conformational changes of a protein molecule tethered to the SWNT sidewall. In principle, the high operating speed of SWNT-FETs could allow this technique to resolve molecular events with nanosecond resolution. This project focused on improving the technique to a 200 kHz effective bandwidth in order to resolve microsecond-scale dynamics. The improvement was achieved with a home-built electrochemical flow cell. By minimizing parasitic capacitance due to liquid coupling to electrodes and eliminating noise pickup, the flow cell enabled low-noise, high bandwidth measurement of molecular events as short as 2 mus. The apparatus was used to observe closing and opening motions of lysozyme. Preliminary results suggest that lysozyme has a distribution of possible velocities with the most probable speed approaching our experimental resolution of 2 mus.

  13. Atomistic Properties of Y Uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin Beeler; Chaitanya Deo; Mmichael Baskes; Maria Okuniewski

    2012-02-01

    The properties of the body-centered cubic y phase of uranium (U) are calculated using atomistic simulations. First, a modified embedded-atom method interatomic potential is developed for the high temperature body-centered cubic (y) phase of U. This phase is stable only at high temperatures and is thus relatively inaccessible to first principles calculations and room temperature experiments. Using this potential, equilibrium volume and elastic constants are calculated at 0 K and found to be in close agreement with previous first principles calculations. Further, the melting point, heat capacity, enthalpy of fusion, thermal expansion and volume change upon melting are calculated and found to be in reasonable agreement with experiment. The low temperature mechanical instability of y U is correctly predicted and investigated as a function of pressure. The mechanical instability is suppressed at pressures greater than 17.2 GPa. The vacancy formation energy is analyzed as a function of pressure and shows a linear trend, allowing for the calculation of the extrapolated zero pressure vacancy formation energy. Finally, the self-defect formation energy is analyzed as a function of temperature. This is the first atomistic y calculation of U properties above 0 K with interatomic potentials.

  14. Wire Array Z-pinches on Sphinx Machine: Experimental Results and Relevant Points of Microsecond Implosion Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Calamy, H.; Hamann, F.; Lassalle, F.; Bayol, F.; Mangeant, C.; Morell, A.; Huet, D.; Bedoch, J.P.; Chittenden, J.P.; Lebedev, S.V.; Jennings, C.A.; Bland, S.N.

    2006-01-05

    Centre d'Etudes de Gramat (France) has developed an efficient long implosion time (800 ns) Aluminum plasma radiation source (PRS). Based on the LTD technology, the SPHINX facility is developed as a 1-3MJ, 1{mu}s rise time, 4-10 MA current driver. In this paper, it was used in 1MJ, 4MA configuration to drive Aluminum nested wire arrays Z-pinches with K-shell yield up to 20 kJ and a FWHM of the x-ray pulse of about 50 ns. We present latest SPHINX experiments and some of the main physic issues of the microsecond regime. Experimental setup and results are described with the aim of giving trends that have been obtained. The main features of microsecond implosion of wire arrays can be analyzed thanks to same methods and theories as used for faster Z-pinches. The effect of load polarity was examined. The stability of the implosion , one of the critical point of microsecond wire arrays due to the load dimensions imposed by the time scale, is tackled. A simple scaling from 100 ns Z-pinch results to 800 ns ones gives good results and the use of nested arrays improves dramatically the implosion quality and the Kshell yield of the load. However, additional effects such as the impact of the return current can geometry on the implosion have to be taken into account on our loads. Axial inhomogeneity of the implosion the origin of which is not yet well understood occurs in some shots and impacts the radiation output. The shape of the radiative pulse is discussed and compared with the homogeneity of the implosion. Numerical 2D R-Z and R-{theta} simulations are used to highlight some experimental results and understand the plasma conditions during these microsecond wire arrays implosions.

  15. Wire Array Z-pinches on Sphinx Machine: Experimental Results and Relevant Points of Microsecond Implosion Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calamy, H.; Hamann, F.; Lassalle, F.; Bayol, F.; Mangeant, C.; Morell, A.; Huet, D.; Bedoch, J. P.; Chittenden, J. P.; Lebedev, S. V.; Jennings, C. A.; Bland, S. N.

    2006-01-01

    Centre d'Etudes de Gramat (France) has developed an efficient long implosion time (800 ns) Aluminum plasma radiation source (PRS). Based on the LTD technology, the SPHINX facility is developed as a 1-3MJ, 1μs rise time, 4-10 MA current driver. In this paper, it was used in 1MJ, 4MA configuration to drive Aluminum nested wire arrays Z-pinches with K-shell yield up to 20 kJ and a FWHM of the x-ray pulse of about 50 ns. We present latest SPHINX experiments and some of the main physic issues of the microsecond regime. Experimental setup and results are described with the aim of giving trends that have been obtained. The main features of microsecond implosion of wire arrays can be analyzed thanks to same methods and theories as used for faster Z-pinches. The effect of load polarity was examined. The stability of the implosion , one of the critical point of microsecond wire arrays due to the load dimensions imposed by the time scale, is tackled. A simple scaling from 100 ns Z-pinch results to 800 ns ones gives good results and the use of nested arrays improves dramatically the implosion quality and the Kshell yield of the load. However, additional effects such as the impact of the return current can geometry on the implosion have to be taken into account on our loads. Axial inhomogeneity of the implosion the origin of which is not yet well understood occurs in some shots and impacts the radiation output. The shape of the radiative pulse is discussed and compared with the homogeneity of the implosion. Numerical 2D R-Z and R-θ simulations are used to highlight some experimental results and understand the plasma conditions during these microsecond wire arrays implosions.

  16. Microsecond Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins Involved in the Oxidative Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Cino, Elio A.; Wong-ekkabut, Jirasak; Karttunen, Mikko; Choy, Wing-Yiu

    2011-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are abundant in cells and have central roles in protein-protein interaction networks. Interactions between the IDP Prothymosin alpha (ProTα) and the Neh2 domain of Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), with a common binding partner, Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1(Keap1), are essential for regulating cellular response to oxidative stress. Misregulation of this pathway can lead to neurodegenerative diseases, premature aging and cancer. In order to understand the mechanisms these two disordered proteins employ to bind to Keap1, we performed extensive 0.5–1.0 microsecond atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and isothermal titration calorimetry experiments to investigate the structure/dynamics of free-state ProTα and Neh2 and their thermodynamics of bindings. The results show that in their free states, both ProTα and Neh2 have propensities to form bound-state-like β-turn structures but to different extents. We also found that, for both proteins, residues outside the Keap1-binding motifs may play important roles in stabilizing the bound-state-like structures. Based on our findings, we propose that the binding of disordered ProTα and Neh2 to Keap1 occurs synergistically via preformed structural elements (PSEs) and coupled folding and binding, with a heavy bias towards PSEs, particularly for Neh2. Our results provide insights into the molecular mechanisms Neh2 and ProTα bind to Keap1, information that is useful for developing therapeutics to enhance the oxidative stress response. PMID:22125611

  17. Microsecond yellow laser for subfoveal leaks in central serous chorioretinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ambiya, Vikas; Goud, Abhilash; Mathai, Annie; Rani, Padmaja Kumari; Chhablani, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the role of navigated yellow microsecond laser in treating subfoveal leaks in nonresolving central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC). Methods This prospective study included ten eyes of ten consecutive patients with nonresolving CSC with subfoveal leaks. All eyes were treated with 577 nm navigated yellow microsecond laser (5% duty cycle). Key inclusion criteria include a vision loss for a duration of minimum 3 months duration due to focal subfoveal leak on fluorescein angiography. Key exclusion criteria include prior treatment for CSC and any signs of chronic CSC. Comprehensive examination, in addition to low-contrast visual acuity assessment, microperimetry, autofluorescence, spectral domain optical coherence tomography, and fundus fluorescein angiography, was done at baseline, 1, 3, and 6 months after treatment. Rescue laser was performed as per predefined criteria at 3 months. Results The average best-corrected visual acuity improved from 73.3±16.1 letters to 75.8±14.0 (P=0.69) at 3 months and 76.9±13.0 (P=0.59) at 6 months, but was not statistically significant. Low-contrast visual acuity assessment (logMAR) improved from 0.41±0.32 to 0.35±0.42 (P=0.50) at 3 months and 0.28±0.33 (P=0.18) at 6 months. Average retinal sensitivity significantly improved from baseline 18.93±7.19 dB to 22.49±6.67 dB (P=0.01) at 3 months and 21.46±8.47 dB (P=0.04) at 6 months. Rescue laser was required only in one eye at 3 months; however, laser was required in three eyes at 6 months. Conclusion Microsecond laser is a safe and effective modality for treating cases of nonresolving CSC with subfoveal leaks. PMID:27570446

  18. Microsecond Microfluidic Mixing for Investigation of Protein Folding Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Hertzog, D E; Santiago, J G; Bakajin, O

    2003-06-25

    We have developed and characterized a mixer to study the reaction kinetics of protein folding on a microsecond timescale. The mixer uses hydrodynamic focusing of pressure-driven flow in a microfluidic channel to reduce diffusion times as first demonstrated by Knight et al.[1]. Features of the mixer include 1 {micro}s mixing times, sample consumptions of order 1 nl/s, loading sample volumes on the order of microliters, and the ability to manufacture in fused silica for compatibility with most spectroscopic methods.

  19. Microsecond-resolved SDR-based cavity ring down ellipsometry.

    PubMed

    Sofikitis, D; Spiliotis, A K; Stamataki, K; Katsoprinakis, G E; Bougas, L; Samartzis, P C; Loppinet, B; Rakitzis, T P; Surligas, M; Papadakis, S

    2015-06-20

    We present an experimental apparatus that allows microsecond-resolved ellipsometric and absorption measurements. The apparatus is based on an optical cavity containing a Dove prism, in which light undergoes total internal reflection (TIR), while the data acquisition is based on software defined radio technology and custom-built drivers. We demonstrate the ability to sense rapid variations in the refractive index above the TIR interface for arbitrarily long times with a temporal resolution of at least 2 μs. PMID:26193040

  20. Microsecond Microfluidic Mixing for Investigation of Protein Folding Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Hertzog, D E; Santiago, J G; Bakajin, O

    2005-02-10

    We have developed and characterized a mixer to study the reaction kinetics of protein folding on a microsecond timescale. The mixer uses hydrodynamic focusing of pressure-driven flow in a microfluidic channel to reduce diffusion times as first demonstrated by Knight et al.[1]. Features of the mixer include 1 {micro}s mixing times, sample consumptions of order 1 nl/s, loading sample volumes on the order of microliters, and the ability to manufacture in fused silica for compatibility with most spectroscopic methods.

  1. X-rays from a microsecond X-pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Appartaim, R. K.

    2013-08-28

    The characteristics of x-rays emitted by X-pinches driven by discharging a current of ∼320 kA with a quarter period of 1 μs in crossed 25 μm wires have been investigated. The x-ray emissions are studied using filtered silicon photodiodes, diamond radiation detectors, and pinhole cameras. The results show that predominantly x-rays from the microsecond X-pinch tend to be emitted in two distinct sets of bursts. The first is predominantly “soft,” i.e., with photon energy hν < 5 keV, followed by a second set of bursts beginning up to 100 ns following the initial bursts, and usually consisting of higher photon energies. Our results show, however, that the x-ray emissions do not contain a significant component with hν > 10 keV as might be expected from electron beam activity within the plasma or from the X-pinch diode. High-resolution images obtained with the observed x-rays suggest a well-defined small source of soft x-rays that demonstrates the potential of the microsecond X-pinch.

  2. X-rays from a microsecond X-pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appartaim, R. K.

    2013-08-01

    The characteristics of x-rays emitted by X-pinches driven by discharging a current of ˜320 kA with a quarter period of 1 μs in crossed 25 μm wires have been investigated. The x-ray emissions are studied using filtered silicon photodiodes, diamond radiation detectors, and pinhole cameras. The results show that predominantly x-rays from the microsecond X-pinch tend to be emitted in two distinct sets of bursts. The first is predominantly "soft," i.e., with photon energy hν < 5 keV, followed by a second set of bursts beginning up to 100 ns following the initial bursts, and usually consisting of higher photon energies. Our results show, however, that the x-ray emissions do not contain a significant component with hν > 10 keV as might be expected from electron beam activity within the plasma or from the X-pinch diode. High-resolution images obtained with the observed x-rays suggest a well-defined small source of soft x-rays that demonstrates the potential of the microsecond X-pinch.

  3. Atomistic k ⋅ p theory

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, Craig E.; Pistol, M.-E.

    2015-12-14

    Pseudopotentials, tight-binding models, and k ⋅ p theory have stood for many years as the standard techniques for computing electronic states in crystalline solids. Here, we present the first new method in decades, which we call atomistic k ⋅ p theory. In its usual formulation, k ⋅ p theory has the advantage of depending on parameters that are directly related to experimentally measured quantities, however, it is insensitive to the locations of individual atoms. We construct an atomistic k ⋅ p theory by defining envelope functions on a grid matching the crystal lattice. The model parameters are matrix elements which are obtained from experimental results or ab initio wave functions in a simple way. This is in contrast to the other atomistic approaches in which parameters are fit to reproduce a desired dispersion and are not expressible in terms of fundamental quantities. This fitting is often very difficult. We illustrate our method by constructing a four-band atomistic model for a diamond/zincblende crystal and show that it is equivalent to the sp{sup 3} tight-binding model. We can thus directly derive the parameters in the sp{sup 3} tight-binding model from experimental data. We then take the atomistic limit of the widely used eight-band Kane model and compute the band structures for all III–V semiconductors not containing nitrogen or boron using parameters fit to experimental data. Our new approach extends k ⋅ p theory to problems in which atomistic precision is required, such as impurities, alloys, polytypes, and interfaces. It also provides a new approach to multiscale modeling by allowing continuum and atomistic k ⋅ p models to be combined in the same system.

  4. Microsecond-scale electric field pulses in cloud lightning discharges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villanueva, Y.; Rakov, V. A.; Uman, M. A.; Brook, M.

    1994-01-01

    From wideband electric field records acquired using a 12-bit digitizing system with a 500-ns sampling interval, microsecond-scale pulses in different stages of cloud flashes in Florida and New Mexico are analyzed. Pulse occurrence statistics and waveshape characteristics are presented. The larger pulses tend to occur early in the flash, confirming the results of Bils et al. (1988) and in contrast with the three-stage representation of cloud-discharge electric fields suggested by Kitagawa and Brook (1960). Possible explanations for the discrepancy are discussed. The tendency for the larger pulses to occur early in the cloud flash suggests that they are related to the initial in-cloud channel formation processes and contradicts the common view found in the atmospheric radio-noise literature that the main sources of VLF/LF electromagnetic radiation in cloud flashes are the K processes which occur in the final, or J type, part of the cloud discharge.

  5. Atomistic modeling of dropwise condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikarwar, B. S.; Singh, P. L.; Muralidhar, K.; Khandekar, S.

    2016-05-01

    The basic aim of the atomistic modeling of condensation of water is to determine the size of the stable cluster and connect phenomena occurring at atomic scale to the macroscale. In this paper, a population balance model is described in terms of the rate equations to obtain the number density distribution of the resulting clusters. The residence time is taken to be large enough so that sufficient time is available for all the adatoms existing in vapor-phase to loose their latent heat and get condensed. The simulation assumes clusters of a given size to be formed from clusters of smaller sizes, but not by the disintegration of the larger clusters. The largest stable cluster size in the number density distribution is taken to be representative of the minimum drop radius formed in a dropwise condensation process. A numerical confirmation of this result against predictions based on a thermodynamic model has been obtained. Results show that the number density distribution is sensitive to the surface diffusion coefficient and the rate of vapor flux impinging on the substrate. The minimum drop radius increases with the diffusion coefficient and the impinging vapor flux; however, the dependence is weak. The minimum drop radius predicted from thermodynamic considerations matches the prediction of the cluster model, though the former does not take into account the effect of the surface properties on the nucleation phenomena. For a chemically passive surface, the diffusion coefficient and the residence time are dependent on the surface texture via the coefficient of friction. Thus, physical texturing provides a means of changing, within limits, the minimum drop radius. The study reveals that surface texturing at the scale of the minimum drop radius does not provide controllability of the macro-scale dropwise condensation at large timescales when a dynamic steady-state is reached.

  6. Atomistic simulation of graphene-based polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rissanou, Anastassia N.; Bačová, Petra; Harmandaris, Vagelis

    2016-05-01

    Polymer/graphene nanostructured systems are hybrid materials which have attracted great attention the last years both for scientific and technological reasons. In the present work atomistic Molecular Dynamics simulations are performed for the study of graphene-based polymer nanocomposites composed of pristine, hydrogenated and carboxylated graphene sheets dispersed in polar (PEO) and nonpolar (PE) short polymer matrices (i.e., matrices containing chains of low molecular weight). Our focus is twofold; the one is the study of the structural and dynamical properties of short polymer chains and the way that they are affected by functionalized graphene sheets while the other is the effect of the polymer matrices on the behavior of graphene sheets.

  7. Atomistic Processes of Catalyst Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    2004-11-27

    The purpose of this cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) between Sasol North America, Inc., and the oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was to improve the stability of alumina-based industrial catalysts through the combination of aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) at ORNL and innovative sample preparation techniques at Sasol. Outstanding progress has been made in task 1, 'Atomistic processes of La stabilization'. STEM investigations provided structural information with single-atom precision, showing the lattice location of La dopant atoms, thus enabling first-principles calculations of binding energies, which were performed in collaboration with Vanderbilt University. The stabilization mechanism turns out to be entirely due to a particularly strong binding energy of the La tom to the {gamma}-alumina surface. The large size of the La atom precludes incorporation of La into the bulk alumina and also strains the surface, thus preventing any clustering of La atoms. Thus highly disperse distribution is achieved and confirmed by STEM images. la also affects relative stability of the exposed surfaces of {gamma}-alumina, making the 100 surface more stable for the doped case, unlike the 110 surface for pure {gamma}-alumina. From the first-principles calculations, they can estimate the increase in transition temperature for the 3% loading of La used commercially, and it is in excellent agreement with experiment. This task was further pursued aiming to generate useable recommendations for the optimization of the preparation techniques for La-doped aluminas. The effort was primarily concentrated on the connection between the boehmitre-{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase transition (i.e. catalyst preparation) and the resulting dispersion of La on the {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface. It was determined that the La distribution on boehmite was non-uniform and different from that on the {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and thus

  8. Optical Pumping and Laser Induced Nuclear Orientation of a Microsecond Isomeric Level in BARIUM-134

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Curtis John

    Using optical pumping techniques, on and off-line experiments were performed on a microsecond nuclear isomer (('134m)Ba 10('+) ). Shifts in atomic resonances detected by changes in the angular distribution of characteristic nuclear radiations (expressed as changes in shape and size) yield information on changes in nuclear structure. The 10('+) isomeric state was produced using a 49 MeV pulsed beam of ('13)C on an isotopically enriched ('124)Sn target. The reaction products recoil out of the target and are slowed to thermal velocities in 10 torr of xenon in a region illuminated with circularly polarized light (553.5 nm) from a Coherent 699-21 dye laser. Nuclear parameters measured were the lifetime (3.8(2)(mu)s) and g-factor (g = -.20(1)) of the 10('+) state. Atomic parameters measured for barium were the depolarization cross sections of the ('1)P(,1) atomic level (6.0(6) nm('2)) in xenon, the quenching cross section for hydrogen (0.042(4) nm('2)), and the branching ratio of the metastable (('1,3)D(,1,2,3)) atomic states (0.011(1)). A possible anisotropy signal and the cumulative results (no measurable anisotropy) are presented. Difficulties encountered were insufficient neutralization, and unexpectedly large spatial distribution, and 'trapping' in metastable atomic states.

  9. Microsecond-sustained lasing from colloidal quantum dot solids

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Michael M.; Fan, Fengjia; Sellan, Daniel P.; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Houtepen, Arjan J.; Parrish, Kevin D.; Kanjanaboos, Pongsakorn; Malen, Jonathan A.; Sargent, Edward H.

    2015-01-01

    Colloidal quantum dots have grown in interest as materials for light amplification and lasing in view of their bright photoluminescence, convenient solution processing and size-controlled spectral tunability. To date, lasing in colloidal quantum dot solids has been limited to the nanosecond temporal regime, curtailing their application in systems that require more sustained emission. Here we find that the chief cause of nanosecond-only operation has been thermal runaway: the combination of rapid heat injection from the pump source, poor heat removal and a highly temperature-dependent threshold. We show microsecond-sustained lasing, achieved by placing ultra-compact colloidal quantum dot films on a thermally conductive substrate, the combination of which minimizes heat accumulation. Specifically, we employ inorganic-halide-capped quantum dots that exhibit high modal gain (1,200 cm−1) and an ultralow amplified spontaneous emission threshold (average peak power of ∼50 kW cm−2) and rely on an optical structure that dissipates heat while offering minimal modal loss. PMID:26493282

  10. Detonation initiation on the microsecond time scale: DDTs

    SciTech Connect

    Kuehn, Jeffery A; Kassoy, Dr. David R; Nabity, Mr. Matthew W.; Clarke, Dr. John F.

    2006-01-01

    Spatially resolved, thermal power deposition of limited duration into a finite volume of reactive gas is the initiator for a deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) on the microsecond time scale. The reactive Euler equations with one-step Arrhenius kinetics are used to derive novel formulas for velocity and temperature variation that describe the physical phenomena characteristic of DDTs. A nonlinear transformation of the variables is shown to yield a canonical equation system, independent of the activation energy. Numerical solutions of the reactive Euler equations are used to describe the detailed sequence of reactive gas dynamic processes leading to an overdriven planar detonation far from the power deposition location. Results are presented for deposition into a region isolated from the planar boundary of the reactive gas as well as for that adjacent to the boundary. The role of compressions and shocks reflected from the boundary into the partially reacted hot gas is described. The quantitative dependences of DDT evolution on the magnitude of thermal power deposition and activation energy are identified.

  11. Detonation initiation on the microsecond time scale: DDTs

    SciTech Connect

    Kassoy, Dr. David R; Kuehn, Jeffery A; Nabity, Mr. Matthew W.; Clarke, Dr. John F.

    2008-01-01

    Spatially resolved, thermal power deposition of limited duration into a finite volume of reactive gas is the initiator for a deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) on the microsecond time scale. The reactive Euler equations with one-step Arrhenius kinetics are used to derive novel formulas for velocity and temperature variation that describe the physical phenomena characteristic of DDTs. A transformation of the variables is shown to yield a canonical equation system, independent of the activation energy. Numerical solutions of the reactive Euler equations are used to describe the detailed sequence of reactive gasdynamic processes leading to an overdriven planar detonation far from the power deposition location. Results are presented for deposition into a region isolated from the planar boundary of the reactive gas as well as for that adjacent to the boundary. The role of compressions and shocks reflected from the boundary into the partially reacted hot gas is described. The quantitative dependences of DDT evolution on the magnitude of thermal power deposition and activation energy are identified.

  12. Microsecond-sustained lasing from colloidal quantum dot solids.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Michael M; Fan, Fengjia; Sellan, Daniel P; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Houtepen, Arjan J; Parrish, Kevin D; Kanjanaboos, Pongsakorn; Malen, Jonathan A; Sargent, Edward H

    2015-01-01

    Colloidal quantum dots have grown in interest as materials for light amplification and lasing in view of their bright photoluminescence, convenient solution processing and size-controlled spectral tunability. To date, lasing in colloidal quantum dot solids has been limited to the nanosecond temporal regime, curtailing their application in systems that require more sustained emission. Here we find that the chief cause of nanosecond-only operation has been thermal runaway: the combination of rapid heat injection from the pump source, poor heat removal and a highly temperature-dependent threshold. We show microsecond-sustained lasing, achieved by placing ultra-compact colloidal quantum dot films on a thermally conductive substrate, the combination of which minimizes heat accumulation. Specifically, we employ inorganic-halide-capped quantum dots that exhibit high modal gain (1,200 cm(-1)) and an ultralow amplified spontaneous emission threshold (average peak power of ∼50 kW cm(-2)) and rely on an optical structure that dissipates heat while offering minimal modal loss. PMID:26493282

  13. Hierarchical Biomolecular Dynamics: Picosecond Hydrogen Bonding Regulates Microsecond Conformational Transitions.

    PubMed

    Buchenberg, Sebastian; Schaudinnus, Norbert; Stock, Gerhard

    2015-03-10

    Biomolecules exhibit structural dynamics on a number of time scales, including picosecond (ps) motions of a few atoms, nanosecond (ns) local conformational transitions, and microsecond (μs) global conformational rearrangements. Despite this substantial separation of time scales, fast and slow degrees of freedom appear to be coupled in a nonlinear manner; for example, there is theoretical and experimental evidence that fast structural fluctuations are required for slow functional motion to happen. To elucidate a microscopic mechanism of this multiscale behavior, Aib peptide is adopted as a simple model system. Combining extensive molecular dynamics simulations with principal component analysis techniques, a hierarchy of (at least) three tiers of the molecule's free energy landscape is discovered. They correspond to chiral left- to right-handed transitions of the entire peptide that happen on a μs time scale, conformational transitions of individual residues that take about 1 ns, and the opening and closing of structure-stabilizing hydrogen bonds that occur within tens of ps and are triggered by sub-ps structural fluctuations. Providing a simple mechanism of hierarchical dynamics, fast hydrogen bond dynamics is found to be a prerequisite for the ns local conformational transitions, which in turn are a prerequisite for the slow global conformational rearrangement of the peptide. As a consequence of the hierarchical coupling, the various processes exhibit a similar temperature behavior which may be interpreted as a dynamic transition. PMID:26579778

  14. Precise inhibition is essential for microsecond interaural time difference coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Antje; Behrend, Oliver; Marquardt, Torsten; McAlpine, David; Grothe, Benedikt

    2002-05-01

    Microsecond differences in the arrival time of a sound at the two ears (interaural time differences, ITDs) are the main cue for localizing low-frequency sounds in space. Traditionally, ITDs are thought to be encoded by an array of coincidence-detector neurons, receiving excitatory inputs from the two ears via axons of variable length (`delay lines'), to create a topographic map of azimuthal auditory space. Compelling evidence for the existence of such a map in the mammalian lTD detector, the medial superior olive (MSO), however, is lacking. Equally puzzling is the role of a-temporally very precise-glycine-mediated inhibitory input to MSO neurons. Using in vivo recordings from the MSO of the Mongolian gerbil, we found the responses of ITD-sensitive neurons to be inconsistent with the idea of a topographic map of auditory space. Moreover, local application of glycine and its antagonist strychnine by iontophoresis (through glass pipette electrodes, by means of an electric current) revealed that precisely timed glycine-controlled inhibition is a critical part of the mechanism by which the physiologically relevant range of ITDs is encoded in the MSO. A computer model, simulating the response of a coincidence-detector neuron with bilateral excitatory inputs and a temporally precise contralateral inhibitory input, supports this conclusion.

  15. Microsecond time-resolved 2D X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarvestani, A.; Sauer, N.; Strietzel, C.; Besch, H. J.; Orthen, A.; Pavel, N.; Walenta, A. H.; Menk, R. H.

    2001-06-01

    A method is presented which allows to take two-dimensional X-ray images of repetitive processes with recording times in the sub-microsecond range. Various measurements have been performed with a recently introduced novel two-dimensional single photon counter which has been slightly modified in order to determine the exact arrival time of each detected photon. For this purpose a special clock signal is synchronized with the process and is digitized contemporaneously with each event. This technique can be applied even with rate limited detectors and low flux sources, since—unlike in conventional methods, where chopped beams or gated read out electronics are used—all photons are used for the image formation. For the measurements, rapidly moving mechanical systems and conventional X-ray sources have been used, reaching time resolutions of some 10 μs. The technique presented here opens a variety of new biological, medical and industrial applications which will be discussed. As a first application example, three dimensional tomographic reconstructions of rapidly rotating objects (4000 turns/min) are presented.

  16. Understanding High Voltage Vacuum Insulators for Microsecond Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    J.B., J; D.A., G; T.L., H; E.J., L; R.D., S; L.K., T; G.E., V

    2007-08-15

    High voltage insulation is one of the main areas of pulsed power research and development since the surface of an insulator exposed to vacuum can fail electrically at an applied field more than an order or magnitude below the bulk dielectric strength of the insulator. This is troublesome for applications where high voltage conditioning of the insulator and electrodes is not practical and where relatively long pulses, on the order of several microseconds, are required. Here we give a summary of our approach to modeling and simulation efforts and experimental investigations for understanding flashover mechanism. The computational work is comprised of both filed and particle-in-cell modeling with state-of-the-art commercial codes. Experiments were performed in using an available 100-kV, 10-{micro}s pulse generator and vacuum chamber. The initial experiments were done with polyethylene insulator material in the shape of a truncated cone cut at +45{sup o} angle between flat electrodes with a gap of 1.0 cm. The insulator was sized so there were no flashovers or breakdowns under nominal operating conditions. Insulator flashover or gap closure was induced by introducing a plasma source, a tuft of velvet, in proximity to the insulator or electrode.

  17. Validation of Force Fields of Rubber through Glass-Transition Temperature Calculation by Microsecond Atomic-Scale Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pragati; Roy, Sudip; Karimi-Varzaneh, Hossein Ali

    2016-02-25

    Microsecond atomic-scale molecular dynamics simulation has been employed to calculate the glass-transition temperature (Tg) of cis- and trans-1,4-polybutadiene (PB) and 1,4-polyisoprene (PI). Both all-atomistic and united-atom models have been simulated using force fields, already available in literature. The accuracy of these decade old force fields has been tested by comparing calculated glass-transition temperatures to the corresponding experimental values. Tg depicts the phase transition in elastomers and substantially affects various physical properties of polymers, and hence the reproducibility of Tg becomes very crucial from a thermodynamic point of view. Such validation using Tg also evaluates the ability of these force fields to be used for advanced materials like rubber nanocomposites, where Tg is greatly affected by the presence of fillers. We have calculated Tg for a total of eight systems, featuring all-atom and united-atom models of cis- and trans-PI and -PB, which are the major constituents of natural and synthetic rubber. Tuning and refinement of the force fields has also been done using quantum-chemical calculations to obtain desirable density and Tg. Thus, a set of properly validated force fields, capable of reproducing various macroscopic properties of rubber, has been provided. A novel polymer equilibration protocol, involving potential energy convergence as the equilibration criterion, has been proposed. We demonstrate that not only macroscopic polymer properties like density, thermal expansion coefficient, and Tg but also local structural characteristics like end-to-end distance (R) and radius of gyration (Rg) and mechanical properties like bulk modulus have also been equilibrated using our strategy. Complete decay of end-to-end vector autocorrelation function with time also supports proper equilibration using our strategy. PMID:26836395

  18. Validation of Force Fields of Rubber through Glass-Transition Temperature Calculation by Microsecond Atomic-Scale Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pragati; Roy, Sudip; Karimi-Varzaneh, Hossein Ali

    2016-02-25

    Microsecond atomic-scale molecular dynamics simulation has been employed to calculate the glass-transition temperature (Tg) of cis- and trans-1,4-polybutadiene (PB) and 1,4-polyisoprene (PI). Both all-atomistic and united-atom models have been simulated using force fields, already available in literature. The accuracy of these decade old force fields has been tested by comparing calculated glass-transition temperatures to the corresponding experimental values. Tg depicts the phase transition in elastomers and substantially affects various physical properties of polymers, and hence the reproducibility of Tg becomes very crucial from a thermodynamic point of view. Such validation using Tg also evaluates the ability of these force fields to be used for advanced materials like rubber nanocomposites, where Tg is greatly affected by the presence of fillers. We have calculated Tg for a total of eight systems, featuring all-atom and united-atom models of cis- and trans-PI and -PB, which are the major constituents of natural and synthetic rubber. Tuning and refinement of the force fields has also been done using quantum-chemical calculations to obtain desirable density and Tg. Thus, a set of properly validated force fields, capable of reproducing various macroscopic properties of rubber, has been provided. A novel polymer equilibration protocol, involving potential energy convergence as the equilibration criterion, has been proposed. We demonstrate that not only macroscopic polymer properties like density, thermal expansion coefficient, and Tg but also local structural characteristics like end-to-end distance (R) and radius of gyration (Rg) and mechanical properties like bulk modulus have also been equilibrated using our strategy. Complete decay of end-to-end vector autocorrelation function with time also supports proper equilibration using our strategy.

  19. 10 microsecond time resolution studies of Cygnus X-1

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, H.C.

    1997-06-01

    Time variability analyses have been applied to data composed of event times of X-rays emitted from the binary system Cygnus X-1 to search for unique black hole signatures. The X-ray data analyzed was collected at ten microsecond time resolution or better from two instruments, the High Energy Astrophysical Observatory (HEAO) A-1 detector and the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (XTE) Proportional Counter Array (PCA). HEAO A-1 and RXTE/PCA collected data from 1977--79 and from 1996 on with energy sensitivity from 1--25 keV and 2--60 keV, respectively. Variability characteristics predicted by various models of an accretion disk around a black hole have been searched for in the data. Drop-offs or quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in the Fourier power spectra are expected from some of these models. The Fourier spectral technique was applied to the HEAO A-1 and RXTE/PCA data with careful consideration given for correcting the Poisson noise floor for instrumental effects. Evidence for a drop-off may be interpreted from the faster fall off in variability at frequencies greater than the observed breaks. Both breaks occur within the range of Keplerian frequencies associated with the inner edge radii of advection-dominated accretion disks predicted for Cyg X-1. The break between 10--20 Hz is also near the sharp rollover predicted by Nowak and Wagoner`s model of accretion disk turbulence. No QPOs were observed in the data for quality factors Q > 9 with a 95% confidence level upper limit for the fractional rms amplitude at 1.2% for a 16 M{sub {circle_dot}} black hole.

  20. Towards Microsecond Biological Molecular Dynamics Simulations on Hybrid Processors

    SciTech Connect

    Hampton, Scott S; Agarwal, Pratul K

    2010-01-01

    Biomolecular simulations continue to become an increasingly important component of molecular biochemistry and biophysics investigations. Performance improvements in the simulations based on molecular dynamics (MD) codes are widely desired. This is particularly driven by the rapid growth of biological data due to improvements in experimental techniques. Unfortunately, the factors, which allowed past performance improvements of MD simulations, particularly the increase in microprocessor clock frequencies, are no longer improving. Hence, novel software and hardware solutions are being explored for accelerating the performance of popular MD codes. In this paper, we describe our efforts to port and optimize LAMMPS, a popular MD framework, on hybrid processors: graphical processing units (GPUs) accelerated multi-core processors. Our implementation is based on porting the computationally expensive, non-bonded interaction terms on the GPUs, and overlapping the computation on the CPU and GPUs. This functionality is built on top of message passing interface (MPI) that allows multi-level parallelism to be extracted even at the workstation level with the multi-core CPUs as well as extend the implementation on GPU clusters. The results from a number of typically sized biomolecular systems are provided and analysis is performed on 3 generations of GPUs from NVIDIA. Our implementation allows up to 30-40 ns/day throughput on a single workstation as well as significant speedup over Cray XT5, a high-end supercomputing platform. Moreover, detailed analysis of the implementation indicates that further code optimization and improvements in GPUs will allow {approx}100 ns/day throughput on workstations and inexpensive GPU clusters, putting the widely-desired microsecond simulation time-scale within reach to a large user community.

  1. Atomistic spin dynamics and surface magnons.

    PubMed

    Etz, Corina; Bergqvist, Lars; Bergman, Anders; Taroni, Andrea; Eriksson, Olle

    2015-06-24

    Atomistic spin dynamics simulations have evolved to become a powerful and versatile tool for simulating dynamic properties of magnetic materials. It has a wide range of applications, for instance switching of magnetic states in bulk and nano-magnets, dynamics of topological magnets, such as skyrmions and vortices and domain wall motion. In this review, after a brief summary of the existing investigation tools for the study of magnons, we focus on calculations of spin-wave excitations in low-dimensional magnets and the effect of relativistic and temperature effects in such structures. In general, we find a good agreement between our results and the experimental values. For material specific studies, the atomistic spin dynamics is combined with electronic structure calculations within the density functional theory from which the required parameters are calculated, such as magnetic exchange interactions, magnetocrystalline anisotropy, and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya vectors. PMID:26030259

  2. Long-time atomistic simulations with the Parallel Replica Dynamics method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Danny

    Molecular Dynamics (MD) -- the numerical integration of atomistic equations of motion -- is a workhorse of computational materials science. Indeed, MD can in principle be used to obtain any thermodynamic or kinetic quantity, without introducing any approximation or assumptions beyond the adequacy of the interaction potential. It is therefore an extremely powerful and flexible tool to study materials with atomistic spatio-temporal resolution. These enviable qualities however come at a steep computational price, hence limiting the system sizes and simulation times that can be achieved in practice. While the size limitation can be efficiently addressed with massively parallel implementations of MD based on spatial decomposition strategies, allowing for the simulation of trillions of atoms, the same approach usually cannot extend the timescales much beyond microseconds. In this article, we discuss an alternative parallel-in-time approach, the Parallel Replica Dynamics (ParRep) method, that aims at addressing the timescale limitation of MD for systems that evolve through rare state-to-state transitions. We review the formal underpinnings of the method and demonstrate that it can provide arbitrarily accurate results for any definition of the states. When an adequate definition of the states is available, ParRep can simulate trajectories with a parallel speedup approaching the number of replicas used. We demonstrate the usefulness of ParRep by presenting different examples of materials simulations where access to long timescales was essential to access the physical regime of interest and discuss practical considerations that must be addressed to carry out these simulations. Work supported by the United States Department of Energy (U.S. DOE), Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division.

  3. Ferroelectric vortices from atomistic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellaiche, Laurent

    2011-03-01

    In 2004, the use of a first-principles-based effective Hamiltonian led to the prediction of a novel structure in zero-dimensional ferroelectrics, in which the electric dipoles organize themselves to form a vortex. Such structure exhibits the so-called spontaneous toroidal moment, rather than the spontaneous polarization, as its order parameter. Subsequently, various original phenomena, all related to vortices, were predicted in ferroelectric nanostructures. Examples of such phenomena are: (i) the existence of a new order parameter, denoted as the hypertoroidal moment, that is associated with many complex dipolar structures (such as double-vortex states); (ii) the possible control of single and double vortex states by electric fields, via the formation of original intermediate states [4-8]; (iii) the discovery of a new class of quantum materials (denoted as incipient ferrotoroidics), for which zero-point vibrations wash out the vortex state and yield a complex local structure; (iv) the existence of chiral patterns of oxygen octahedral tiltings that originate from the coupling of these tiltings with the ferroelectric vortices. The purpose of this talk is to discuss some of these striking phenomena, as well as, to reveal others (if time allows). These studies are done in collaboration with A.R. Akbarzadeh, H. Fu, I. Kornev, I. Naumov, I. Ponomareva, S. Prosandeev, Wei Ren and D. Sichuga. These works are supported by the NSF grants DMR 0701558 and DMR-0080054 (C-SPIN), DOE grant DE-SC0002220, and ONR grants N00014-08-1-0915 and N00014-07-1-0825 (DURIP).

  4. Understanding and Improving High Voltage Vacuum Insulators for Microsecond Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Javedani, J B; Goerz, D A; Houck, T L; Lauer, E J; Speer, R D; Tully, L K; Vogtlin, G E; White, A D

    2007-03-05

    High voltage insulation is one of the main areas of pulsed power research and development, and dielectric breakdown is usually the limiting factor in attaining the highest possible performance in pulsed power devices. For many applications the delivery of pulsed power into a vacuum region is the most critical aspect of operation. The surface of an insulator exposed to vacuum can fail electrically at an applied field more than an order or magnitude below the bulk dielectric strength of the insulator. This mode of breakdown, called surface flashover, imposes serious limitations on the power flow into a vacuum region. This is especially troublesome for applications where high voltage conditioning of the insulator and electrodes is not practical and for applications where relatively long pulses, on the order of several microseconds, are required. The goal of this project is to establish a sound fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that lead to surface flashover, and then evaluate the most promising techniques to improve vacuum insulators and enable high voltage operation at stress levels near the intrinsic bulk breakdown limits of the material. The approach we proposed and followed was to develop this understanding through a combination of theoretical and computation methods coupled with experiments to validate and quantify expected behaviors. In this report we summarize our modeling and simulation efforts, theoretical studies, and experimental investigations. The computational work began by exploring the limits of commercially available codes and demonstrating methods to examine field enhancements and defect mechanisms at microscopic levels. Plasma simulations with particle codes used in conjunction with circuit models of the experimental apparatus enabled comparisons with experimental measurements. The large scale plasma (LSP) particle-in-cell (PIC) code was run on multiprocessor platforms and used to simulate expanding plasma conditions in vacuum gap regions

  5. A Metascalable Computing Framework for Large Spatiotemporal-Scale Atomistic Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, K; Seymour, R; Wang, W; Kalia, R; Nakano, A; Vashishta, P; Shimojo, F; Yang, L H

    2009-02-17

    A metascalable (or 'design once, scale on new architectures') parallel computing framework has been developed for large spatiotemporal-scale atomistic simulations of materials based on spatiotemporal data locality principles, which is expected to scale on emerging multipetaflops architectures. The framework consists of: (1) an embedded divide-and-conquer (EDC) algorithmic framework based on spatial locality to design linear-scaling algorithms for high complexity problems; (2) a space-time-ensemble parallel (STEP) approach based on temporal locality to predict long-time dynamics, while introducing multiple parallelization axes; and (3) a tunable hierarchical cellular decomposition (HCD) parallelization framework to map these O(N) algorithms onto a multicore cluster based on hybrid implementation combining message passing and critical section-free multithreading. The EDC-STEP-HCD framework exposes maximal concurrency and data locality, thereby achieving: (1) inter-node parallel efficiency well over 0.95 for 218 billion-atom molecular-dynamics and 1.68 trillion electronic-degrees-of-freedom quantum-mechanical simulations on 212,992 IBM BlueGene/L processors (superscalability); (2) high intra-node, multithreading parallel efficiency (nanoscalability); and (3) nearly perfect time/ensemble parallel efficiency (eon-scalability). The spatiotemporal scale covered by MD simulation on a sustained petaflops computer per day (i.e. petaflops {center_dot} day of computing) is estimated as NT = 2.14 (e.g. N = 2.14 million atoms for T = 1 microseconds).

  6. Atomistically informed solute drag in Al Mg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, F.; Curtin, W. A.

    2008-07-01

    Solute drag in solute-strengthened alloys, caused by diffusion of solute atoms around moving dislocations, controls the stress at deformation rates and temperatures useful for plastic forming processes. In the technologically important Al-Mg alloys, the solute drag stresses predicted by classical theories are much larger than experiments, which is resolved in general by eliminating the singularity of the dislocation core via Peierls-Nabarro-type models. Here, the drag stress versus dislocation velocity is computed numerically using a realistic dislocation core structure obtained from an atomistic model to investigate the role of the core and obtain quantitative stresses for comparison with experiment. The model solves a discrete diffusion equation in a reference frame moving with the dislocation, with input solute enthalpies and diffusion activation barriers in the core computed by or estimated from atomistic studies. At low dislocation velocities, the solute drag stress is controlled by bulk solute diffusion because the core diffusion occurs too quickly. In this regime, the drag stress can be obtained using a Peierls-Nabarro model with a core spreading parameter tuned to best match the atomistic models. At intermediate velocities, both bulk and core diffusion can contribute to the drag, leading to a complex stress-velocity relationship showing two peaks in stress. At high velocities, the drag stress is controlled solely by diffusion within and across the core. Like the continuum models, the drag stress is nearly linear in solute concentration. The Orowan relationship is used to connect dislocation velocity to deformation strain rate. Accounting for the dependence of mobile dislocation density on stress, the simulations are in good agreement with experiments on Al-Mg alloys over a range of concentrations and temperatures.

  7. A robust, coupled approach for atomistic-continuum simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Aubry, Sylvie; Webb, Edmund Blackburn, III; Wagner, Gregory John; Klein, Patrick A.; Jones, Reese E.; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Bammann, Douglas J.; Hoyt, Jeffrey John; Kimmer, Christopher J.

    2004-09-01

    This report is a collection of documents written by the group members of the Engineering Sciences Research Foundation (ESRF), Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project titled 'A Robust, Coupled Approach to Atomistic-Continuum Simulation'. Presented in this document is the development of a formulation for performing quasistatic, coupled, atomistic-continuum simulation that includes cross terms in the equilibrium equations that arise due to kinematic coupling and corrections used for the calculation of system potential energy to account for continuum elements that overlap regions containing atomic bonds, evaluations of thermo-mechanical continuum quantities calculated within atomistic simulations including measures of stress, temperature and heat flux, calculation used to determine the appropriate spatial and time averaging necessary to enable these atomistically-defined expressions to have the same physical meaning as their continuum counterparts, and a formulation to quantify a continuum 'temperature field', the first step towards constructing a coupled atomistic-continuum approach capable of finite temperature and dynamic analyses.

  8. An Optimization-based Atomistic-to-Continuum Coupling Method

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Derek; Bochev, Pavel B.; Luskin, Mitchell; Shapeev, Alexander V.

    2014-08-21

    In this paper, we present a new optimization-based method for atomistic-to-continuum (AtC) coupling. The main idea is to cast the latter as a constrained optimization problem with virtual Dirichlet controls on the interfaces between the atomistic and continuum subdomains. The optimization objective is to minimize the error between the atomistic and continuum solutions on the overlap between the two subdomains, while the atomistic and continuum force balance equations provide the constraints. Separation, rather then blending of the atomistic and continuum problems, and their subsequent use as constraints in the optimization problem distinguishes our approach from the existing AtC formulations. Finally, we present and analyze the method in the context of a one-dimensional chain of atoms modeled using a linearized two-body potential with next-nearest neighbor interactions.

  9. An Optimization-based Atomistic-to-Continuum Coupling Method

    DOE PAGES

    Olson, Derek; Bochev, Pavel B.; Luskin, Mitchell; Shapeev, Alexander V.

    2014-08-21

    In this paper, we present a new optimization-based method for atomistic-to-continuum (AtC) coupling. The main idea is to cast the latter as a constrained optimization problem with virtual Dirichlet controls on the interfaces between the atomistic and continuum subdomains. The optimization objective is to minimize the error between the atomistic and continuum solutions on the overlap between the two subdomains, while the atomistic and continuum force balance equations provide the constraints. Separation, rather then blending of the atomistic and continuum problems, and their subsequent use as constraints in the optimization problem distinguishes our approach from the existing AtC formulations. Finally,more » we present and analyze the method in the context of a one-dimensional chain of atoms modeled using a linearized two-body potential with next-nearest neighbor interactions.« less

  10. Atomistic to continuum modeling of solidification microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Karma, Alain; Tourret, Damien

    2015-09-26

    We summarize recent advances in modeling of solidification microstructures using computational methods that bridge atomistic to continuum scales. We first discuss progress in atomistic modeling of equilibrium and non-equilibrium solid–liquid interface properties influencing microstructure formation, as well as interface coalescence phenomena influencing the late stages of solidification. The latter is relevant in the context of hot tearing reviewed in the article by M. Rappaz in this issue. We then discuss progress to model microstructures on a continuum scale using phase-field methods. We focus on selected examples in which modeling of 3D cellular and dendritic microstructures has been directly linked to experimental observations. Finally, we discuss a recently introduced coarse-grained dendritic needle network approach to simulate the formation of well-developed dendritic microstructures. The approach reliably bridges the well-separated scales traditionally simulated by phase-field and grain structure models, hence opening new avenues for quantitative modeling of complex intra- and inter-grain dynamical interactions on a grain scale.

  11. Atomistic Monte Carlo Simulation of Lipid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Wüstner, Daniel; Sklenar, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Biological membranes are complex assemblies of many different molecules of which analysis demands a variety of experimental and computational approaches. In this article, we explain challenges and advantages of atomistic Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of lipid membranes. We provide an introduction into the various move sets that are implemented in current MC methods for efficient conformational sampling of lipids and other molecules. In the second part, we demonstrate for a concrete example, how an atomistic local-move set can be implemented for MC simulations of phospholipid monomers and bilayer patches. We use our recently devised chain breakage/closure (CBC) local move set in the bond-/torsion angle space with the constant-bond-length approximation (CBLA) for the phospholipid dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC). We demonstrate rapid conformational equilibration for a single DPPC molecule, as assessed by calculation of molecular energies and entropies. We also show transition from a crystalline-like to a fluid DPPC bilayer by the CBC local-move MC method, as indicated by the electron density profile, head group orientation, area per lipid, and whole-lipid displacements. We discuss the potential of local-move MC methods in combination with molecular dynamics simulations, for example, for studying multi-component lipid membranes containing cholesterol. PMID:24469314

  12. Atomistic to continuum modeling of solidification microstructures

    DOE PAGES

    Karma, Alain; Tourret, Damien

    2015-09-26

    We summarize recent advances in modeling of solidification microstructures using computational methods that bridge atomistic to continuum scales. We first discuss progress in atomistic modeling of equilibrium and non-equilibrium solid–liquid interface properties influencing microstructure formation, as well as interface coalescence phenomena influencing the late stages of solidification. The latter is relevant in the context of hot tearing reviewed in the article by M. Rappaz in this issue. We then discuss progress to model microstructures on a continuum scale using phase-field methods. We focus on selected examples in which modeling of 3D cellular and dendritic microstructures has been directly linked tomore » experimental observations. Finally, we discuss a recently introduced coarse-grained dendritic needle network approach to simulate the formation of well-developed dendritic microstructures. The approach reliably bridges the well-separated scales traditionally simulated by phase-field and grain structure models, hence opening new avenues for quantitative modeling of complex intra- and inter-grain dynamical interactions on a grain scale.« less

  13. Web-based implementation of atomistic visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattarai, D.; Czech, W.; Karki, B. B.; Yuen, D. A.

    2008-12-01

    Atomistic (molecular) visualization is one of the most widely studied applications of scientific visualization. It deals with time-varying three dimensional positional data representing snapshots of atomic configurations produced by molecular dynamics simulations of a variety of materials including geomaterials. We have recently developed an efficient scheme, which integrates the analysis and rendering tasks together in order to support interactive visualization at space-time multi-resolution of these data. Our scheme allows us to gain better insight into bonding, radial distribution, atomic coordination, clustering, structural stability and distortion, and diffusion. We are currently extending the support for web-based access to atomistic visualization by developing a three-level distributed application with platform independence and portability. The first layer contains off-screen rendering engine whose functionality is exposed using Web Service. This layer supports batch-style rendering that allows remote analysis of data and provides general way to access service from different types of clients. The second layer is a web application that enables user to interact with data using Web Service as entry point to rendering engine. Finally, the front-end of the system is a web browser (e.g. Firefox, Safari, Internet Explorer). We will also take the advantage of relational database to store simulation results and retrieve them from rendering service. We will present the details of the implementation and applications.

  14. Recovery of the poisoned topoisomerase II for DNA religation: coordinated motion of the cleavage core revealed with the microsecond atomistic simulation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Nan-Lan; Lin, Jung-Hsin

    2015-01-01

    Type II topoisomerases resolve topological problems of DNA double helices by passing one duplex through the reversible double-stranded break they generated on another duplex. Despite the wealth of information in the cleaving operation, molecular understanding of the enzymatic DNA ligation remains elusive. Topoisomerase poisons are widely used in anti-cancer and anti-bacterial therapy and have been employed to entrap the intermediates of topoisomerase IIβ with religatable DNA substrate. We removed drug molecules from the structure and conducted molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the enzyme-mediated DNA religation. The drug-unbound intermediate displayed transitions toward the resealing-compliant configuration: closing distance between the cleaved DNA termini, B-to-A transformation of the double helix, and restoration of the metal-binding motif. By mapping the contact configurations and the correlated motions between enzyme and DNA, we identified the indispensable role of the linker preceding winged helix domain (WHD) in coordinating the movements of TOPRIM, the nucleotide-binding motifs, and the bound DNA substrate during gate closure. We observed a nearly vectorial transition in the recovery of the enzyme and identified the previously uncharacterized roles of Asn508 and Arg677 in DNA rejoining. Our findings delineate the dynamic mechanism of the DNA religation conducted by type II topoisomerases. PMID:26150421

  15. Astropulse: A search for microsecond transient radio signals using distributed computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Korff, Joshua Solomon

    I performed a transient, microsecond timescale radio sky survey, called "Astropulse," using the Arecibo telescope in Puerto Rico. Astropulse searches for brief (0.4 mus to 204.8 mus), wideband (relative to its 2.5 MHz bandwidth) radio pulses centered at 1,420 MHz, a range that includes the hyperfine hydrogen line. Astropulse is a commensal survey, obtaining its data by sharing telescope time with other surveys, such as PALFA. I scanned the sky visible to Arecibo, between declinations of --1.33 and 38.03 degrees, with varying dwell times depending on the requirements of our partner surveys. I analyzed 1,540 hours of data in each of 7 beams of the ALFA receiver, with 2 polarizations per beam, for a total of 21,600 hours of data. The data were 1-bit complex sampled at the Nyquist limit of 0.4 mus per sample. Examination of timescales less than 12.8 mus would have been impossible if not for my use of coherent dedispersion, a technique that has frequently been used for targeted observations, but has never before been associated with a radio sky survey. I performed nonlinear coherent dedispersion, reversing the broadening effects on signals caused by their passage through the interstellar medium (ISM). Coherent dedispersion requires intensive computations, and needs far more processing power than the more usual incoherent dedispersion. This processing power was provided by BOINC, the Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing. BOINC is a distributed computing system, which allowed me to utilize hundreds of thousands of volunteers' computers to perform the necessary calculations for coherent dedispersion. Each volunteer's computer requires about a week to process a single 8 MB "workunit," corresponding to 13 s of data from a single beam and polarization. In all, Astropulse analyzed over 48 TB of data. I did not aim to detect any particular astrophysical source, intending rather to perform a survey of the transient radio sky. Astrophysical events that might produce

  16. Parallel line raster eliminates ambiguities in reading timing of pulses less than 500 microseconds apart

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, A. P.

    1966-01-01

    Parallel horizontal line raster is used for precision timing of events occurring less than 500 microseconds apart for observation of hypervelocity phenomena. The raster uses a staircase vertical deflection and eliminates ambiguities in reading timing of pulses close to the end of each line.

  17. Construction and performance of a photobleaching recovery apparatus with microsecond time resolution.

    PubMed

    Kao, H P; Verkman, A S

    1996-03-01

    A fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) apparatus was constructed to measure sub-millisecond fluorescence recovery processes in living cells. The photobleaching pulse and probe beams were generated by modulating the intensity of a continuous wave Argon laser (4 W) by two acousto-optic modulators in series. The maximum intensity modulation was > 10(6):1 with a rise time of < 1 microsecond and a minimum pulse width of 6 microseconds. Fluorescence was detected by a photomultiplier, amplified by a transimpedance amplifier, and digitized at 1 MHz. During the photobleaching pulse, the photomultiplier gain was reduced by ca. 1500-fold by switching the second dynode voltage ca. 100 V negative with respect to the cathode voltage by computer control of two bidirectional Mosfet optoisolators. The switching circuit produced a optoisolators. The switching circuit produced a transient anode current (t approximately 15 microseconds) which was subtracted for measurement of recoveries of < 50-100 microseconds. The apparatus was coupled to an inverted microscope for measurement of fluorescence by epi-illumination or total internal reflection. Instrument performance was evaluated by measurement of the rapid fluorescence recoveries of fluorescein and fluorescein-dextrans in solutions and living cells.

  18. Plasma Emission Spectra of Opuntia Nopalea Obtained with Microsecond Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Ponce, L.; Flores, T.; Arronte, A.; Flores, A.

    2008-04-15

    Laser-induced Plasma Spectroscopy was performed during the spines ablation of Opuntia by using Nd:YAG microsecond laser pulses. The results show strong absorption in Glochids that causes the intense electronic noise on the spectra. This process is consider suitable for practical elimination of spines in alimentary products like opuntia.

  19. Atomistic modeling of metallic nanowires in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Hoon; Lee, Sunhee; Weber, Bent; Mahapatra, Suddhasatta; Hollenberg, Lloyd C. L.; Simmons, Michelle Y.; Klimeck, Gerhard

    2013-08-01

    Scanning tunneling microscope (STM) lithography has recently demonstrated the ultimate in device scaling with buried, conducting nanowires just a few atoms wide and the realization of single atom transistors, where a single P atom has been placed inside a transistor architecture with atomic precision accuracy. Despite the dimensions of the critical parts of these devices being defined by a small number of P atoms, the device electronic properties are influenced by the surrounding 104 to 106 Si atoms. Such effects are hard to capture with most modeling approaches, and prior to this work no theory existed that could explore the realistic size of the complete device in which both dopant disorder and placement are important. This work presents a comprehensive study of the electronic and transport properties of ultra-thin (<10 nm wide) monolayer highly P δ-doped Si (Si:P) nanowires in a fully atomistic self-consistent tight-binding approach. This atomistic approach covering large device volumes allows for a systematic study of disorder on the physical properties of the nanowires. Excellent quantitative agreement is observed with recent resistance measurements of STM-patterned nanowires [Weber et al., Science, 2012, 335, 64], confirming the presence of metallic behavior at the scaling limit. At high doping densities the channel resistance is shown to be insensitive to the exact channel dopant placement highlighting their future use as metallic interconnects. This work presents the first theoretical study of Si:P nanowires that are realistically extended and disordered, providing a strong theoretical foundation for the design and understanding of atomic-scale electronics.Scanning tunneling microscope (STM) lithography has recently demonstrated the ultimate in device scaling with buried, conducting nanowires just a few atoms wide and the realization of single atom transistors, where a single P atom has been placed inside a transistor architecture with atomic precision

  20. Atomistic Cohesive Zone Models for Interface Decohesion in Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamakov, Vesselin I.; Saether, Erik; Glaessgen, Edward H.

    2009-01-01

    Using a statistical mechanics approach, a cohesive-zone law in the form of a traction-displacement constitutive relationship characterizing the load transfer across the plane of a growing edge crack is extracted from atomistic simulations for use within a continuum finite element model. The methodology for the atomistic derivation of a cohesive-zone law is presented. This procedure can be implemented to build cohesive-zone finite element models for simulating fracture in nanocrystalline or ultrafine grained materials.

  1. Analyzing ion distributions around DNA: sequence-dependence of potassium ion distributions from microsecond molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Pasi, Marco; Maddocks, John H.; Lavery, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Microsecond molecular dynamics simulations of B-DNA oligomers carried out in an aqueous environment with a physiological salt concentration enable us to perform a detailed analysis of how potassium ions interact with the double helix. The oligomers studied contain all 136 distinct tetranucleotides and we are thus able to make a comprehensive analysis of base sequence effects. Using a recently developed curvilinear helicoidal coordinate method we are able to analyze the details of ion populations and densities within the major and minor grooves and in the space surrounding DNA. The results show higher ion populations than have typically been observed in earlier studies and sequence effects that go beyond the nature of individual base pairs or base pair steps. We also show that, in some special cases, ion distributions converge very slowly and, on a microsecond timescale, do not reflect the symmetry of the corresponding base sequence. PMID:25662221

  2. A high-sensitivity femtosecond to microsecond time-resolved infrared vibrational spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Towrie, Michael; Gabrielsson, Anders; Matousek, Pavel; Parker, Anthony W; Rodriguez, Ana Maria Blanco; Vlcek, Antonín

    2005-04-01

    We describe an apparatus that provides, for the first time, a seamless bridge between femtosecond and microsecond time-resolved Raman and infrared vibrational spectroscopy. The laser system comprises an actively Q-switched sub-nanosecond pulsed kilohertz laser electronically synchronized to an ultrafast titanium sapphire regenerative amplifier to within 0.2 ns. The ultrafast amplifier provides the stable probe light source enabling high-sensitivity infrared vibrational spectroscopy of transients. Time-resolved infrared spectra of the excited-state relaxation dynamics of metal carbonyl compounds are presented to illustrate the capability of the apparatus, and transient data is resolved from 1 picosecond to over 100 microseconds. The results are compared to conventional nanosecond Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and laser based flash photolysis time-resolved infrared technology.

  3. Atomistic Simulation of Initiation in Hexanitrostilbene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Tzu-Ray; Wixom, Ryan; Yarrington, Cole; Thompson, Aidan

    2015-06-01

    We report on the effect of cylindrical voids on hot spot formation, growth and chemical reaction initiation in hexanitrostilbene (HNS) crystals subjected to shock. Large-scale, reactive molecular dynamics simulations are performed using the reactive force field (ReaxFF) as implemented in the LAMMPS software. The ReaxFF force field description for HNS has been validated previously by comparing the isothermal equation of state to available diamond anvil cell (DAC) measurements and density function theory (DFT) calculations and by comparing the primary dissociation pathway to ab initio calculations. Micron-scale molecular dynamics simulations of a supported shockwave propagating through the HNS crystal along the [010] orientation are performed with an impact velocity (or particle velocity) of 1.25 km/s, resulting in shockwave propagation at 4.0 km/s in the bulk material and a bulk shock pressure of ~ 11GPa. The effect of cylindrical void sizes varying from 0.02 to 0.1 μm on hot spot formation and growth rate has been studied. Interaction between multiple voids in the HNS crystal and its effect on hot spot formation will also be addressed. Results from the micron-scale atomistic simulations are compared with hydrodynamics simulations. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. DOE National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  4. Robust atomistic calculation of dislocation line tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szajewski, B. A.; Pavia, F.; Curtin, W. A.

    2015-12-01

    The line tension Γ of a dislocation is an important and fundamental property ubiquitous to continuum scale models of metal plasticity. However, the precise value of Γ in a given material has proven difficult to assess, with literature values encompassing a wide range. Here results from a multiscale simulation and robust analysis of the dislocation line tension, for dislocation bow-out between pinning points, are presented for two widely-used interatomic potentials for Al. A central part of the analysis involves an effective Peierls stress applicable to curved dislocation structures that markedly differs from that of perfectly straight dislocations but is required to describe the bow-out both in loading and unloading. The line tensions for the two interatomic potentials are similar and provide robust numerical values for Al. Most importantly, the atomic results show notable differences with singular anisotropic elastic dislocation theory in that (i) the coefficient of the \\text{ln}(L) scaling with dislocation length L differs and (ii) the ratio of screw to edge line tension is smaller than predicted by anisotropic elasticity. These differences are attributed to local dislocation core interactions that remain beyond the scope of elasticity theory. The many differing literature values for Γ are attributed to various approximations and inaccuracies in previous approaches. The results here indicate that continuum line dislocation models, based on elasticity theory and various core-cut-off assumptions, may be fundamentally unable to reproduce full atomistic results, thus hampering the detailed predictive ability of such continuum models.

  5. Atomistic simulations of langmuir monolayer collapse.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Christian D; Travesset, Alex

    2006-11-21

    Monolayers at the vapor/water interface collapse by exploring the third dimension at sufficient lateral compression, either by forming three-dimensional structures or by solubilization into the aqueous solution. In this paper, we provide an atomistic description of collapse from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. More specifically, we investigate monolayers of arachidic acids spread on pure water and in an aqueous solution with Ca2+ ions in the subphase. In both cases, it is found that the collapsed systems generally lead to the formation of multilayer structures, which in the system with Ca2+ ions, proceeds by an intermediate regime where the monolayer exhibits significant roughness (of the order of 4 A). If no roughness is present, the system forms collapsed structures into the aqueous solution. The computational cost of atomic MD limits our simulations to relatively small system sizes, fast compression rates, and temporal scales on the order of a nanosecond. We discuss the issues caused by these limitations and present a detailed discussion of how the collapse regime proceeds at long time scales. We conclude with a summary of the implications of our results for further theoretical and experimental studies. PMID:17106994

  6. Atomistic simulation of oxide dislocations and interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, S. C.; de Leeuw, N. H.; Harris, D. J.; Higgins, F. M.; Oliver, Pe M.; Redfern, S. E.; Watson, G. W.

    Atomistic simulation techniques have been used to study screw dislocations, grain boundaries, thin films and surfaces. The results show that the a/2<110> screw dislocations in bulk MgO and NiO are more stable than the a<100> although the latter are stabilised by vacancies. Adsorption of MgO units at the a<100> spiral dislocation shows a complicated two-layer growth mechanism. Self-diffusion through MgO grain boundaries is shown to be faster than in the bulk crystal, with pipe diffusion the energetically most favourable route. Study of thin iron oxide films on MgO found that the most stable MgO/Fe3O4 /(001) interface is an open structure with closely matching spacing between substrate Mg ions and oxygens of the film. The interaction of water with oxides MgO and SiO2 has been investigated. The dominance of the MgO surface is shown through facetting of the less stable and surfaces. The low-coordinated surface sites hence formed are the most reactive towards adsorption of water and dissolution. Similarly, α-quartz surfaces with dangling bonds are more reactive towards water and NaOH than the fully-coordinated surface sites.

  7. Atomistic simulations of caloric effects in ferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisenkov, Sergey; Ponomareva, Inna

    2013-03-01

    The materials that exhibit large caloric effects have emerged as promising candidates for solid-state refrigeration which is an energy-efficient and environmentally friendly alternative to the conventional refrigeration technology. However, despite recent ground breaking discoveries of giant caloric effects in some materials they appear to remain one of nature's rarities. Here we use atomistic simulations to study electrocaloric and elastocaloric effects in Ba0.5Sr0.5TiO3 and PbTiO3 ferroelectrics. Our study reveals the intrinsic features of such caloric effects in ferroelectrics and their potential to exhibit giant caloric effects. Some of the findings include the coexistence of negative and positive electrocaloric effects in one material and an unusual field-driven transition between them as well as the coexistence of multiple giant caloric effects in Ba0.5Sr0.5TiO3 alloys. These findings could potentially lead to new paradigms for cooling devices. This work is partially supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering under award DE-SC0005245.

  8. NiTi superelasticity via atomistic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Piyas; Ren, Guowu; Sehitoglu, Huseyin

    2015-12-01

    The NiTi shape memory alloys (SMAs) are promising candidates for the next-generation multifunctional materials. These materials are superelastic i.e. they can fully recover their original shape even after fairly large inelastic deformations once the mechanical forces are removed. The superelasticity reportedly stems from atomic scale crystal transformations. However, very few computer simulations have emerged, elucidating the transformation mechanisms at the discrete lattice level, which underlie the extraordinary strain recoverability. Here, we conduct breakthrough molecular dynamics modelling on the superelastic behaviour of the NiTi single crystals, and unravel the atomistic genesis thereof. The deformation recovery is clearly traced to the reversible transformation between austenite and martensite crystals through simulations. We examine the mechanistic origin of the tension-compression asymmetries and the effects of pressure/temperature/strain rate variation isolatedly. Hence, this work essentially brings a new dimension to probing the NiTi performance based on the mesoscale physics under more complicated thermo-mechanical loading scenarios.

  9. Atomistic modeling of thermodynamic equilibrium of plutonium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tongsik; Valone, Steve; Baskes, Mike; Chen, Shao-Ping; Lawson, Andrew

    2012-02-01

    Plutonium metal has complex thermodynamic properties. Among its six allotropes at ambient pressure, the fcc delta-phase exhibits a wide range of anomalous behavior: extraordinarily high elastic anisotropy, largest atomic volume despite the close-packed structure, negative thermal expansion, strong elastic softening at elevated temperature, and extreme sensitivity to dilute alloying. An accurate description of these thermodynamic properties goes far beyond the current capability of first-principle calculations. An elaborate modeling strategy at the atomic level is hence an urgent need. We propose a novel atomistic scheme to model elemental plutonium, in particular, to reproduce the anomalous characteristics of the delta-phase. A modified embedded atom method potential is fitted to two energy-volume curves that represent the distinct electronic states of plutonium in order to embody the mechanism of the two-state model of Weiss, in line with the insight originally proposed by Lawson et al. [Philos. Mag. 86, 2713 (2006)]. By the use of various techniques in Monte Carlo simulations, we are able to provide a unified perspective of diverse phenomenological aspects among thermal expansion, elasticity, and phase stability.

  10. Free energy of steps using atomistic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Rodrigo; Frolov, Timofey; Asta, Mark

    The properties of solid-liquid interfaces are known to play critical roles in solidification processes. Particularly special importance is given to thermodynamic quantities that describe the equilibrium state of these surfaces. For example, on the solid-liquid-vapor heteroepitaxial growth of semiconductor nanowires the crystal nucleation process on the faceted solid-liquid interface is influenced by the solid-liquid and vapor-solid interfacial free energies, and also by the free energies of associated steps at these faceted interfaces. Crystal-growth theories and mesoscale simulation methods depend on quantitative information about these properties, which are often poorly characterized from experimental measurements. In this work we propose an extension of the capillary fluctuation method for calculation of the free energy of steps on faceted crystal surfaces. From equilibrium atomistic simulations of steps on (111) surfaces of Copper we computed accurately the step free energy for different step orientations. We show that the step free energy remains finite at all temperature up to the melting point and that the results obtained agree with the more well established method of thermodynamic integration if finite size effects are taken into account. The research of RF and MA at UC Berkeley were supported by the US National Science Foundation (Grant No. DMR-1105409). TF acknowledges support through a postdoctoral fellowship from the Miller Institute for Basic Research in Science.

  11. Strain Functionals for Characterizing Atomistic Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kober, Edward; Rudin, Sven

    The development of a set of strain tensor functionals that are capable of characterizing arbitrarily ordered atomistic structures is described. This approach defines a Gaussian-weighted neighborhood around each atom and characterizes that local geometry in terms of n-th order strain tensors, which are equivalent to the moments of the neighborhood. Fourth order expansions can distinguish the cubic structures (and deformations thereof), but sixth order expansions are required to fully characterize hexagonal structures. Other methods used to characterize atomic structures, such as the Steinhardt parameters or the centrosymmetry metric, can be derived from this more general approach. These functions are continuous and smooth and much less sensitive to thermal fluctuations than other descriptors based on discrete neighborhoods. They allow material phases, deformations, and a large number of defect structures to be readily identified and classified. Applications to the analysis of shock-loaded samples of Cu, Ta and Ti will be presented. This strain functional basis can also then be used for developing interatomic potential functions, and an initial application to Cu will be presented.

  12. Stress in titania nanoparticles: An atomistic study

    SciTech Connect

    Darkins, Robert; Sushko, Maria L.; Liu, Jun; Duffy, Dorothy M.

    2014-04-24

    Stress engineering is becoming an increasingly important method for controlling electronic, optical, and magnetic properties of nanostructures, although the concept of stress is poorly defined at the nanoscale. We outline a methodology for computing bulk and surface stress in nanoparticles using atomistic simulation. The method is applicable to ionic and non- ionic materials alike and may be extended to other nanostructures. We apply it to spherical anatase nanoparticles ranging from 2 to 6 nm in diameter and obtain a surface stress of 0.89 N/m, in agreement with experimental measurements. Based on the extent that stress inhomogeneities at the surface are transmitted into the bulk, two characteristic length-scales are identified: below 3 nm bulk and surface regions cannot be defined and the available analytic theories for stress are not applicable, and above about 5 nm the stress becomes well-described by the theoretical Young-Laplace equation. The effect of a net surface charge on the bulk stress is also investigated. It is found that moderate surface charges can induce significant bulk stresses, on the order of 100 MPa, in nanoparticles within this size range.

  13. Use of microsecond current prepulse for dramatic improvements of wire array Z-pinch implosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calamy, H.; Lassalle, F.; Loyen, A.; Zucchini, F.; Chittenden, J. P.; Hamann, F.; Maury, P.; Georges, A.; Bedoch, J. P.; Morell, A.

    2008-01-01

    The Sphinx machine [F. Lassalle et al., "Status on the SPHINX machine based on the 1microsecond LTD technology"] based on microsecond linear transformer driver (LTD) technology is used to implode an aluminium wire array with an outer diameter up to 140mm and maximum current from 3.5to5MA. 700to800ns implosion Z-pinch experiments are performed on this driver essentially with aluminium. Best results obtained before the improvement described in this paper were 1-3TW radial total power, 100-300kJ total yield, and 20-30kJ energy above 1keV. An auxiliary generator was added to the Sphinx machine in order to allow a multi microsecond current to be injected through the wire array load before the start of the main current. Amplitude and duration of this current prepulse are adjustable, with maxima ˜10kA and 50μs. This prepulse dramatically changes the ablation phase leading to an improvement of the axial homogeneity of both the implosion and the final radiating column. Total power was multiplied by a factor of 6, total yield by a factor of 2.5 with a reproducible behavior. This paper presents experimental results, magnetohydrodynamic simulations, and analysis of the effect of such a long current prepulse.

  14. Use of microsecond current prepulse for dramatic improvements of wire array Z-pinch implosion

    SciTech Connect

    Calamy, H.; Lassalle, F.; Loyen, A.; Zucchini, F.; Chittenden, J. P.; Hamann, F.; Maury, P.; Georges, A.; Bedoch, J. P.; Morell, A.

    2008-01-15

    The Sphinx machine [F. Lassalle et al., 'Status on the SPHINX machine based on the 1microsecond LTD technology'] based on microsecond linear transformer driver (LTD) technology is used to implode an aluminium wire array with an outer diameter up to 140 mm and maximum current from 3.5 to 5 MA. 700 to 800 ns implosion Z-pinch experiments are performed on this driver essentially with aluminium. Best results obtained before the improvement described in this paper were 1-3 TW radial total power, 100-300 kJ total yield, and 20-30 kJ energy above 1 keV. An auxiliary generator was added to the Sphinx machine in order to allow a multi microsecond current to be injected through the wire array load before the start of the main current. Amplitude and duration of this current prepulse are adjustable, with maxima {approx}10 kA and 50 {mu}s. This prepulse dramatically changes the ablation phase leading to an improvement of the axial homogeneity of both the implosion and the final radiating column. Total power was multiplied by a factor of 6, total yield by a factor of 2.5 with a reproducible behavior. This paper presents experimental results, magnetohydrodynamic simulations, and analysis of the effect of such a long current prepulse.

  15. Pulsed Electron Beam Water Radiolysis for Sub-Microsecond Hydroxyl Radical Protein Footprinting

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Caroline; Janik, Ireneusz; Zhuang, Tiandi; Charvátová, Olga; Woods, Robert J.; Sharp, Joshua S.

    2009-01-01

    Hydroxyl radical footprinting is a valuable technique for studying protein structure, but care must be taken to ensure that the protein does not unfold during the labeling process due to oxidative damage. Footprinting methods based on sub-microsecond laser photolysis of peroxide that complete the labeling process faster than the protein can unfold have been recently described; however, the mere presence of large amounts of hydrogen peroxide can also cause uncontrolled oxidation and minor conformational changes. We have developed a novel method for sub-microsecond hydroxyl radical protein footprinting using a pulsed electron beam from a 2 MeV Van de Graaff electron accelerator to generate a high concentration of hydroxyl radicals by radiolysis of water. The amount of oxidation can be controlled by buffer composition, pulsewidth, dose, and dissolved nitrous oxide gas in the sample. Our results with ubiquitin and β-lactoglobulin A demonstrate that one sub-microsecond electron beam pulse produces extensive protein surface modifications. Highly reactive residues that are buried within the protein structure are not oxidized, indicating that the protein retains its folded structure during the labeling process. Time-resolved spectroscopy indicates that the major part of protein oxidation is complete in a timescale shorter than that of large scale protein motions. PMID:19265387

  16. Atomistic modeling and simulation of nanopolycrystalline solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zidong

    In the past decades, nanostructured materials have opened new and fascinating avenues for research. Nanopolycrystalline solids, which consist of nano-sized crystalline grains and significant volume fractions of amorphous grain boundaries, are believed to have substantially different response to the thermal-mechanical-electric-magnetic loads, as compared to the response of single-crystalline materials. Nanopolycrystalline materials are expected to play a key role in the next generation of smart materials. This research presents a framework (1) to generate full atomistic models, (2) to perform non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, and (3) to study multi-physics phenomena of nanopolycrystalline solids. This work starts the physical model and mathematical representation with the framework of molecular dynamics. In addition to the latest theories and techniques of molecular dynamics simulations, this work implemented principle of objectivity and incorporates multi-physics features. Further, a database of empirical interatomic potentials is established and the combination scheme for potentials is revisited, which enables investigation of a broad spectrum of chemical elements (as in periodic table) and compounds (such as rocksalt, perovskite, wurtzite, diamond, etc.). The configurational model of nanopolycrystalline solids consists of two spatial components: (1) crystalline grains, which can be obtained through crystal structure optimization, and (2) amorphous grain boundaries, which can be obtained through amorphization process. Therefore, multi-grain multi-phase nanopolycrystalline material system can be constructed by partitioning the space for grains, followed by filling the inter-grain space with amorphous grain boundaries. Computational simulations are performed on several representative crystalline materials and their mixture, such as rocksalt, perovskite and diamond. Problems of relaxation, mechanical loading, thermal stability, heat conduction

  17. Microsecond electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Plenert, Matthew L.; Shear, Jason B.

    2003-01-01

    Although analysis strategies exist for probing a diverse array of molecular properties, most of these approaches are not amenable to the study of reaction intermediates and other transient species. Separations in particular can provide detailed information on attributes not readily measured by spectroscopy but typically are performed over time scales much longer than the life span of highly unstable compounds. Here we report the development of an electrophoretic strategy that dramatically extends the practical speed limit for fractionations and demonstrate its utility in examining transient hydroxyindole photoproducts. Fluorescent reaction intermediates are optically generated in femtoliter volumes within a flowing reagent stream and are differentially transported at velocities as large as 1.3 m⋅s−1, thereby minimizing band variance and allowing multicomponent reaction mixtures to be resolved over separation paths as short as 9 μm. Analyte migration times and band variances do not deviate significantly from basic theory for separations performed with fields that exceed 0.1 MV⋅cm−1, indicating that effects from Joule heating are minor. We demonstrate the feasibility of achieving baseline resolution of a binary mixture in <10 μs, nearly 100-fold faster than previously possible. Application of this approach to the study of a range of short-lived molecules should be feasible. PMID:12629208

  18. Concurrent multiscale modelling of atomistic and hydrodynamic processes in liquids

    PubMed Central

    Markesteijn, Anton; Karabasov, Sergey; Scukins, Arturs; Nerukh, Dmitry; Glotov, Vyacheslav; Goloviznin, Vasily

    2014-01-01

    Fluctuations of liquids at the scales where the hydrodynamic and atomistic descriptions overlap are considered. The importance of these fluctuations for atomistic motions is discussed and examples of their accurate modelling with a multi-space–time-scale fluctuating hydrodynamics scheme are provided. To resolve microscopic details of liquid systems, including biomolecular solutions, together with macroscopic fluctuations in space–time, a novel hybrid atomistic–fluctuating hydrodynamics approach is introduced. For a smooth transition between the atomistic and continuum representations, an analogy with two-phase hydrodynamics is used that leads to a strict preservation of macroscopic mass and momentum conservation laws. Examples of numerical implementation of the new hybrid approach for the multiscale simulation of liquid argon in equilibrium conditions are provided. PMID:24982246

  19. An object oriented Python interface for atomistic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynninen, T.; Himanen, L.; Parkkinen, V.; Musso, T.; Corander, J.; Foster, A. S.

    2016-01-01

    Programmable simulation environments allow one to monitor and control calculations efficiently and automatically before, during, and after runtime. Environments directly accessible in a programming environment can be interfaced with powerful external analysis tools and extensions to enhance the functionality of the core program, and by incorporating a flexible object based structure, the environments make building and analysing computational setups intuitive. In this work, we present a classical atomistic force field with an interface written in Python language. The program is an extension for an existing object based atomistic simulation environment.

  20. Stability of polarized states for diamond valleytronics

    SciTech Connect

    Hammersberg, J.; Majdi, S.; Kovi, K. K.; Suntornwipat, N.; Gabrysch, M.; Isberg, J.; Twitchen, D. J.

    2014-06-09

    The stability of valley polarized electron states is crucial for the development of valleytronics. A long relaxation time of the valley polarization is required to enable operations to be performed on the polarized states. Here, we investigate the stability of valley polarized states in diamond, expressed as relaxation time. We have found that the stability of the states can be extremely long when we consider the electron-phonon scattering processes allowed by symmetry considerations. We determine electron-phonon coupling constants by Time-of-Flight measurements and Monte Carlo simulations and use these data to map out the relaxation time temperature dependency. The relaxation time for diamond can be microseconds or longer below 100 K and 100 V/cm due to the strong covalent bond, which is highly encouraging for future use in valleytronic applications.

  1. Microsecond fiber laser pumped, single-frequency optical parametric oscillator for trace gas detection.

    PubMed

    Barria, Jessica Barrientos; Roux, Sophie; Dherbecourt, Jean-Baptiste; Raybaut, Myriam; Melkonian, Jean-Michel; Godard, Antoine; Lefebvre, Michel

    2013-07-01

    We report on the first microsecond doubly resonant optical parametric oscillator (OPO). It is based on a nested cavity OPO architecture allowing single longitudinal mode operation and low oscillation threshold (few microjoule). The combination with a master oscillator-power amplifier fiber pump laser provides a versatile optical source widely tunable in the 3.3-3.5 μm range with an adjustable pulse repetition rate (from 40 to 100 kHz), high duty cycle (~10(-2)) and mean power (up to 25 mW in the idler beam). The potential for trace gas sensing applications is demonstrated through photoacoustic detection of atmospheric methane. PMID:23811865

  2. Hybrid continuum-atomistic approach to model electrokinetics in nanofluidics.

    PubMed

    Amani, Ehsan; Movahed, Saeid

    2016-06-01

    In this study, for the first time, a hybrid continuum-atomistic based model is proposed for electrokinetics, electroosmosis and electrophoresis, through nanochannels. Although continuum based methods are accurate enough to model fluid flow and electric potential in nanofluidics (in dimensions larger than 4 nm), ionic concentration is too low in nanochannels for the continuum assumption to be valid. On the other hand, the non-continuum based approaches are too time-consuming and therefore is limited to simple geometries, in practice. Here, to propose an efficient hybrid continuum-atomistic method of modelling the electrokinetics in nanochannels; the fluid flow and electric potential are computed based on continuum hypothesis coupled with an atomistic Lagrangian approach for the ionic transport. The results of the model are compared to and validated by the results of the molecular dynamics technique for a couple of case studies. Then, the influences of bulk ionic concentration, external electric field, size of nanochannel, and surface electric charge on the electrokinetic flow and ionic mass transfer are investigated, carefully. The hybrid continuum-atomistic method is a promising approach to model more complicated geometries and investigate more details of the electrokinetics in nanofluidics. PMID:27155300

  3. Cascade defect evolution processes: Comparison of atomistic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Haixuan; Stoller, Roger E.; Osetsky, Yury N.

    2013-11-01

    Determining defect evolution beyond the molecular dynamics (MD) time scale is critical to bridging the gap between atomistic simulations and experiments. The recently developed self-evolving atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo (SEAKMC) method provides new opportunities to simulate long-term defect evolution with MD-like fidelity to the atomistic processes involved. To demonstrate this capability, three examples are presented in which SEAKMC has been used to investigate the evolution of typical radiation-induced defects in bcc iron. Depending on the particular example, SEAKMC results are compared with those obtained using two other on-the-fly KMC techniques, object KMC, and MD. The three examples are: (1) evolution of a vacancy-rich region similar to the core of a displacement cascade, (2) the stability of recently reported interstitial clusters with a structure similar to the C15 Laves phase, and (3) long-term aging of atomic displacement cascade debris. In the various examples, the SEAKMC approach provides better agreement with MD simulations, highlights the importance of the underlying atomistic processes, and provides new information on long-term defect evolution in iron.

  4. Atomistic and Coarse-grained Simulations of Hexabenzocoronene Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziogos, G.; Megariotis, G.; Theodorou, D. N.

    2016-08-01

    This study concerns atomistic and coarse-grained Molecular Dynamics simulations of pristine hexabenzocoronene (HBC) molecular crystals. HBC is a symmetric graphene flake of nanometric size that falls in the category of polyaromatic hydrocarbons, finding numerous applications in the field of organic electronics. The HBC molecule is simulated in its crystalline phase initially by means of an all-atom representation, where the molecules self- organize into well aligned molecular stacks, which in turn create a perfect monoclinic molecular crystal. The atomistic model reproduces fairly well the structural experimental properties and thus can be used as a reliable starting point for the development of a coarsegrained model following a bottom-up approach. The coarse-grained model is developed by applying Iterative Boltzmann Inversion, a systematic coarse-graining method which reproduces a set of target atomistic radial distribution functions and intramolecular distributions at the coarser level of description. This model allows the simulation of HBC crystals over longer time and length scales. The crystalline phase is analyzed in terms of the Saupe tensor and thermomechanical properties are probed at the atomistic level.

  5. Microsecond Molecular Simulations Reveal a Transient Proton Pathway in the Calcium Pump.

    PubMed

    Espinoza-Fonseca, L Michel; Ramírez-Salinas, G Lizbeth

    2015-06-10

    The calcium pump sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) counter-transports Ca(2+) and H(+) at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. SERCA uses separate proton and metal ion pathways during active transport to neutralize the highly charged transport site, thus preserving SERCA's structural stability during active Ca(2+) transport. Although separate metal ion and proton pathways have been identified during slow (millisecond) structural transitions of SERCA, the existence of simultaneous metal and proton pathways during fast (microsecond) structural transitions remains unknown. We have analyzed microsecond-long trajectories of E1·H(+)771, a protonated intermediate of the pump populated during SERCA regulation. We found a transiently established hydrophobic pore in the luminal side of the transmembrane helices 6, 8, and 9. This narrow (0.5-0.6 nm) pore connects the transport sites to the sarcoplasmic reticulum lumen through a chain of water molecules. Protein pKa calculations of the transport site residues and structural analysis of the water molecules showed that this pore is suitable for proton transport. This transient proton pathway ensures neutralization of the transport sites during the rapid structural transitions associated with regulation of the pump. We conclude that this transient proton pathway plays a central role in optimizing active Ca(2+) transport by SERCA. Our discovery provides insight into ion-exchange mechanisms through transient hydrophobic pores in P-type ATPases.

  6. Microsecond Time Resolution Optical Photometry using a H.E.S.S. Cherenkov Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Deil, Christoph; Domainko, Wilfried; Hermann, German

    2008-02-22

    We have constructed an optical photometer with microsecond time resolution, which is currently being operated on one of the H.E.S.S. telescopes. H.E.S.S. is an array of four Cherenkov telescopes, each with a 107 m{sup 2} mirror, located in the Khomas highland in Namibia. In its normal mode of operation H.E.S.S. observes Cherenkov light from air showers generated by very high energy gamma-rays in the upper atmosphere. Our detector consists of seven photomultipliers, one in the center to record the lightcurve from the target and six concentric photomultipliers as a veto system to reject disturbing signals e.g. from meteorites or lightning at the horizon. The data acquisition system has been designed to continuously record the signals with zero deadtime. The Crab pulsar has been observed to verify the performance of the instrument and the GPS timing system. Compact galactic targets were observed to search for flares on timescales of a few microseconds to {approx}100 ms. The design and sensitivity of the instrument as well as the data analysis method are presented.

  7. Tuning Neuronal Hardware with Microsecond Precision: Sound Localization in the Barn Owl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hemmen, J. Leo

    1998-03-01

    In auditory and electrosensory neuronal systems, there seems to exist an unresolved paradox: They encode behaviorally relevant signals in the range of a few microseconds with neurons that are at least one order of magnitude slower. The barn owl's auditory system is a prominent example that may serve to provide a solution(W. Gerstner, R. Kempter, J.L. van Hemmen, and H. Wagner, Nature 383) (1996) 76--78 to the above paradox. First, neuronal output is much more accurate than the input, phprovided the presynaptic spikes arrive coherently on the average -- as they do in the adult animal. Second, this coherence in signal arrival times can be attained through unsupervised Hebbian learning (`tuning') during ontogenetic development. The learning rule governing the strength of a synapse is based on the precise timing of input as compared to output spikes. Third, the learning rule also selects the correct delays from two independent groups of input, for example, from the left and right ear and, thus, can explain the tuning to interaural time differences in the microsecond range that underlies sound localization. The relation to stochastic resonance is indicated.

  8. Dynamics of Lipids, Cholesterol, and Transmembrane α-Helices from Microsecond Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Extensive all-atom molecular dynamics (∼24 μs total) allowed exploration of configurational space and calculation of lateral diffusion coefficients of the components of a protein-embedded, cholesterol-containing model bilayer. The three model membranes are composed of an ∼50/50 (by mole) dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC)/cholesterol bilayer and contained an α-helical transmembrane protein (HIV-1 gp41 TM). Despite the high concentration of cholesterol, normal Brownian motion was observed and the calculated diffusion coefficients (on the order of 10–9 cm2/s) are consistent with experiments. Diffusion is sensitive to a variety of parameters, and a temperature difference of ∼4 K from thermostat artifacts resulted in 2–10-fold differences in diffusion coefficients and significant differences in lipid order, membrane thickness, and unit cell area. Also, the specific peptide sequence likely underlies the consistently observed faster diffusion in one leaflet. Although the simulations here present molecular dynamics (MD) an order of magnitude longer than those from previous studies, the three systems did not approach ergodicity. The distributions of cholesterol and DPPC around the peptides changed on the microsecond time scale, but not significantly enough to thoroughly explore configurational space. These simulations support conclusions of other recent microsecond MD in that even longer time scales are needed for equilibration of model membranes and simulations of more realistic cellular or viral bilayers. PMID:25380392

  9. Microsecond Scale Vibrational Spectroscopic Imaging by Multiplex Stimulated Raman Scattering Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chien-Sheng; Slipchenko, Mikhail N.; Wang, Ping; Li, Junjie; Lee, Seung-Young; Oglesbee, Robert A.; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2015-01-01

    Real-time vibrational spectroscopic imaging is desired for monitoring cellular states and cellular processes in a label-free manner. Raman spectroscopic imaging of highly dynamic systems is inhibited by relatively slow spectral acquisition on millisecond to second scale. Here, we report microsecond scale vibrational spectroscopic imaging by lock-in free parallel detection of spectrally dispersed stimulated Raman scattering signal. Using a homebuilt tuned amplifier array, our method enables Raman spectral acquisition, within the window defined by the broadband pulse, at the speed of 32 microseconds and with close to shot-noise limited detection sensitivity. Incorporated with multivariate curve resolution analysis, our platform allows compositional mapping of lipid droplets in single live cells, observation of intracellular retinoid metabolism, discrimination of fat droplets from protein-rich organelles in Caenorhabditis elegans, spectral detection of fast flowing tumor cells, and monitoring drug diffusion through skin tissue in vivo. The reported technique opens new opportunities for compositional analysis of cellular compartment in a microscope setting and high-throughput spectral profiling of single cells in a flow cytometer setting. PMID:26167336

  10. Microsecond acquisition of heterogeneous structure in the folding of a TIM barrel protein

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ying; Kondrashkina, Elena; Kayatekin, Can; Matthews, C. Robert; Bilsel, Osman

    2008-01-01

    The earliest kinetic folding events for (βα)8 barrels reflect the appearance of off-pathway intermediates. Continuous-flow microchannel mixing methods interfaced to small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), circular dichroism (CD), time-resolved Förster resonant energy transfer (trFRET), and time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy (trFLAN) have been used to directly monitor global and specific dimensional properties of the partially folded state in the microsecond time range for a representative (βα)8 barrel protein. Within 150 μs, the α-subunit of Trp synthase (αTS) experiences a global collapse and the partial formation of secondary structure. The time resolution of the folding reaction was enhanced with trFRET and trFLAN to show that, within 30 μs, a distinct and autonomous partially collapsed structure has already formed in the N-terminal and central regions but not in the C-terminal region. A distance distribution analysis of the trFRET data confirmed the presence of a heterogeneous ensemble that persists for several hundreds of microseconds. Ready access to locally folded, stable substructures may be a hallmark of repeat-module proteins and the source of early kinetic traps in these very common motifs. Their folding free-energy landscapes should be elaborated to capture this source of frustration. PMID:18757725

  11. Development of a microsecond X-ray protein footprinting facility at the Advanced Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sayan; Celestre, Richard; Petzold, Christopher J.; Chance, Mark R.; Ralston, Corie

    2014-01-01

    X-ray footprinting (XF) is an important structural biology tool used to determine macromolecular conformations and dynamics of both nucleic acids and proteins in solution on a wide range of timescales. With the impending shut-down of the National Synchrotron Light Source, it is ever more important that this tool continues to be developed at other synchrotron facilities to accommodate XF users. Toward this end, a collaborative XF program has been initiated at the Advanced Light Source using the white-light bending-magnet beamlines 5.3.1 and 3.2.1. Accessibility of the microsecond time regime for protein footprinting is demonstrated at beamline 5.3.1 using the high flux density provided by a focusing mirror in combination with a micro-capillary flow cell. It is further reported that, by saturating samples with nitrous oxide, the radiolytic labeling efficiency is increased and the imprints of bound versus bulk water can be distinguished. These results both demonstrate the suitability of the Advanced Light Source as a second home for the XF experiment, and pave the way for obtaining high-quality structural data on complex protein samples and dynamics information on the microsecond timescale. PMID:24971962

  12. Interface Thermodynamics with Applications to Atomistic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, Timofey

    Interfaces are ubiquitous in natural phenomena. While the description of interfaces in fluid systems is well developed, solid-fluid and solid-solid interfaces are not well understood. This deficiency is especially true for solid-solid interfaces, which play critical roles in materials engineering, solid-state physics and solid-state chemistry. In this thesis, the Gibbs theory of interfaces is generalized to describe phase boundaries under non-hydrostatic stress in multicomponent systems. We obtain equations that describe coherent solid-solid interfaces with shear stresses parallel to the boundary plane, incoherent solid-solid interfaces for certain constraint variations, solid-fluid interfaces, grain boundaries and surfaces. In the second part of the thesis, the developed theory is applied to study particular types of interfaces using atomistic simulations. We modeled solid surface, solid-liquid interface and grain boundaries. The simulations allowed to calculate values of key thermodynamic properties, clarify behavior of these properties with temperature, composition and stress and test the predictions of the theory. Surface surface free energy and surface stress in a single component system were computed as functions of temperature. The values of these two excess properties do not converge near the melting point despite the extensive surface premelting. Solid-liquid interface free energy was computed using the developed thermodynamic integration technique as a function of composition in CuAg binary alloy and as a function of biaxial strain in a single component Cu system. In the later case the equilibrium states between the non-hydrostatically stressed solid and liquid were accurately predicted using the derived Clausius--Clapeyron type equation. We show that for non-hydrostatic equilibrium interfaces stress is not unique and compute different interface stresses using our simulation data. We also studied effects of elastic deformation, temperature and chemical

  13. Simulating the Thermal Response of High Explosives on Time Scales of Days to Microseconds

    SciTech Connect

    Yoh, J J; McClelland, M A

    2003-07-16

    We present an overview of computational techniques for simulating the thermal cookoff of high explosives using a multi-physics hydrodynamics code, ALE3D. Recent improvements to the code have aided our computational capability in modeling the response of energetic materials systems exposed to extreme thermal environments, such as fires. We consider an idealized model process for a confined explosive involving the transition from slow heating to rapid deflagration in which the time scale changes from days to hundreds of microseconds. The heating stage involves thermal expansion and decomposition according to an Arrhenius kinetics model while a pressure-dependent burn model is employed during the explosive phase. We describe and demonstrate the numerical strategies employed to make the transition from slow to fast dynamics.

  14. Progress toward a microsecond duration, repetitive, intense-ion beam for active spectroscopic measurements on ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, H.A.; Bartsch, R.R.; Barnes, C.W.

    1996-06-01

    The authors describe the design of an intense, pulsed, repetitive, neutral beam based on magnetically insulated diode technology for injection into ITER for spectroscopic measurements of thermalizing alpha particle and thermal helium density profiles, ion temperature, plasma rotation, and low Z impurity concentrations in the confinement region. The beam is being developed to enhance low signal-to-noise ratios expected with conventional steady-state ion beams because of severe beam attenuation and intense bremstrahlung emission. A 5 GW (e.g., 100 keV, 50 kA) one-microsecond-duration beam would increase the signal by 10{sup 3} compared to a conventional 5 MW beam with signal-to-noise ratios comparable to those from a chopped conventional beam in one second.

  15. Study of Vacuum Insulator Flashover for Pulse Lengths of Multi-Microseconds

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, T; Goerz, D; Javedani, J; Lauer, E; Tully, L; Vogtlin, G

    2006-07-31

    We are studying the flashover of vacuum insulators for applications where high voltage conditioning of the insulator and electrodes is not practical and for pulse lengths on the order of several microseconds. The study is centered about experiments performed with a 100-kV, 10-ms pulsed power system and supported by a combination of theoretical and computational modeling. The base line geometry is a cylindrically symmetric, +45{sup o} insulator between flat electrodes. In the experiments, flashovers or breakdowns are localized by operating at field stresses slightly below the level needed for explosive emissions with the base line geometry. The electrodes and/or insulator are then seeded with an emission source, e.g. a tuft of velvet, or a known mechanical defect. Various standard techniques are employed to suppress cathode-originating flashovers/breakdowns. We present the results of our experiments and discuss the capabilities of modeling insulator flashover.

  16. Histotripsy Produced by Hundred-Microsecond-Long Focused Ultrasonic Pulses: A Preliminary Study.

    PubMed

    Guan, Yubo; Lu, Mingzhu; Li, Yujiao; Liu, Fenfen; Gao, Ya; Dong, Tengju; Wan, Mingxi

    2016-09-01

    A new strategy is proposed in this study to rapidly generate mechanical homogenized lesions using hundred-microsecond-long pulses. The pulsing scheme was divided into two stages: generating sufficient bubble seed nuclei via acceleration by boiling bubbles and efficiently forming a mechanically homogenized and regularly shaped lesion with a homogenate inside via inertial cavitation. The duty cycle was set at 4.9%/3.9% in stage 1 and 1%/0.88% in stage 2 by changing the pulse duration (PD) and off-time independently. The pulse sequence was 500-μs/400-μs PD with a 100-Hz pulse repetition frequency (PRF) in stage 1, followed by 500-μs/400-μs PD with a 100-Hz PRF and 200-μs PD with a 200-Hz PRF in stage 2. Experiments were conducted on polyacrylamide phantoms with bovine serum albumin and on ex vivo porcine kidney tissues using a single-element 1.06-MHz transducer at an 8-MPa peak negative pressure with shock waves. The lesion evolution and dynamic elastic modulus variation in the phantoms and the histology in the tissue samples were investigated. The results indicate that the two-stage treatment using hundred-microsecond-long pulses can efficiently produce mechanically homogenized lesions with smooth borders, long tear shapes and the total homogenate inside. The time to generate a single mechanically homogenized lesion is shortened from >50 s to 17.1 s. PMID:27318864

  17. From microseconds to seconds and minutes—time computation in insect hearing

    PubMed Central

    Hartbauer, Manfred; Römer, Heiner

    2014-01-01

    The computation of time in the auditory system of insects is of relevance at rather different time scales, covering a large range from microseconds to several minutes. At the one end of this range, only a few microseconds of interaural time differences are available for directional hearing, due to the small distance between the ears, usually considered too small to be processed reliably by simple nervous systems. Synapses of interneurons in the afferent auditory pathway are, however, very sensitive to a time difference of only 1–2 ms provided by the latency shift of afferent activity with changing sound direction. At a much larger time scale of several tens of milliseconds to seconds, time processing is important in the context species recognition, but also for those insects where males produce acoustic signals within choruses, and the temporal relationship between song elements strongly deviates from a random distribution. In these situations, some species exhibit a more or less strict phase relationship of song elements, based on phase response properties of their song oscillator. Here we review evidence on how this may influence mate choice decisions. In the same dimension of some tens of milliseconds we find species of katydids with a duetting communication scheme, where one sex only performs phonotaxis to the other sex if the acoustic response falls within a very short time window after its own call. Such time windows show some features unique to insects, and although its neuronal implementation is unknown so far, the similarity with time processing for target range detection in bat echolocation will be discussed. Finally, the time scale being processed must be extended into the range of many minutes, since some acoustic insects produce singing bouts lasting quite long, and female preferences may be based on total signaling time. PMID:24782783

  18. Advances in turbulent mixing techniques to study microsecond protein folding reactions

    PubMed Central

    Kathuria, Sagar V.; Chan, Alexander; Graceffa, Rita; Nobrega, R. Paul; Matthews, C. Robert; Irving, Thomas C.; Perot, Blair; Bilsel, Osman

    2013-01-01

    Recent experimental and computational advances in the protein folding arena have shown that the readout of the one-dimensional sequence information into three-dimensional structure begins within the first few microseconds of folding. The initiation of refolding reactions has been achieved by several means, including temperature jumps, flash photolysis, pressure jumps and rapid mixing methods. One of the most commonly used means of initiating refolding of chemically-denatured proteins is by turbulent flow mixing with refolding dilution buffer, where greater than 99% mixing efficiency has been achieved within 10’s of microseconds. Successful interfacing of turbulent flow mixers with complementary detection methods, including time-resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy (trFL), Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET), Circular Dichroism (CD), Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS), Hydrogen Exchange (HX) followed by Mass Spectrometry (MS) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (NMR), Infrared Spectroscopy (IR), and Fourier Transform IR Spectroscopy (FTIR), has made this technique very attractive for monitoring various aspects of structure formation during folding. Although continuous-flow (CF) mixing devices interfaced with trFL detection have a dead time of only 30 µs, burst-phases have been detected in this time scale during folding of peptides and of large proteins (e.g., CheY and TIM barrels). Furthermore, a major limitation of CF mixing technique has been the requirement of large quantities of sample. In this brief communication, we will discuss the recent flurry of activity in micromachining and microfluidics, guided by computational simulations, that are likely to lead to dramatic improvements in time resolution and sample consumption for CF mixers over the next few years. PMID:23868289

  19. Atomistic study on dithiolated oligo-phenylenevinylene gated device

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmoud, Ahmed Lugli, Paolo

    2014-11-28

    Thanks to their semiconducting behavior, conjugated molecules are considered as an attractive candidate for future electronic devices. Understanding the charge transport characteristics through such molecules for different device applications would accelerate the progress in the field of molecular electronics. In addition, it would become more feasible to introduce/enhance specific properties of molecular devices. This theoretical paper focuses on atomistic simulation and characterization of novel molecular FET employing dithiolated oligo-phenylenevinylene molecules. The simulation is validated by its agreement with the experimental measurements conducted on the same molecules. The employed molecule has oxygen linkers, which are responsible for the strongly nonlinear current characteristics on the molecular device. We perform a thorough atomistic device analysis to illustrate the principles behind the nonlinear current characteristics and the gating effect.

  20. Atomistic modeling of carbon Cottrell atmospheres in bcc iron.

    PubMed

    Veiga, R G A; Perez, M; Becquart, C S; Domain, C

    2013-01-16

    Atomistic simulations with an EAM interatomic potential were used to evaluate carbon-dislocation binding energies in bcc iron. These binding energies were then used to calculate the occupation probability of interstitial sites in the vicinity of an edge and a screw dislocation. The saturation concentration due to carbon-carbon interactions was also estimated by atomistic simulations in the dislocation core and taken as an upper limit for carbon concentration in a Cottrell atmosphere. We obtained a maximum concentration of 10 ± 1 at.% C at T = 0 K within a radius of 1 nm from the dislocation lines. The spatial carbon distributions around the line defects revealed that the Cottrell atmosphere associated with an edge dislocation is denser than that around a screw dislocation, in contrast with the predictions of the classical model of Cochardt and colleagues. Moreover, the present Cottrell atmosphere model is in reasonable quantitative accord with the three-dimensional atom probe data available in the literature.

  1. Atomistic modeling of carbon Cottrell atmospheres in bcc iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veiga, R. G. A.; Perez, M.; Becquart, C. S.; Domain, C.

    2013-01-01

    Atomistic simulations with an EAM interatomic potential were used to evaluate carbon-dislocation binding energies in bcc iron. These binding energies were then used to calculate the occupation probability of interstitial sites in the vicinity of an edge and a screw dislocation. The saturation concentration due to carbon-carbon interactions was also estimated by atomistic simulations in the dislocation core and taken as an upper limit for carbon concentration in a Cottrell atmosphere. We obtained a maximum concentration of 10 ± 1 at.% C at T = 0 K within a radius of 1 nm from the dislocation lines. The spatial carbon distributions around the line defects revealed that the Cottrell atmosphere associated with an edge dislocation is denser than that around a screw dislocation, in contrast with the predictions of the classical model of Cochardt and colleagues. Moreover, the present Cottrell atmosphere model is in reasonable quantitative accord with the three-dimensional atom probe data available in the literature.

  2. Simulational nanoengineering: Molecular dynamics implementation of an atomistic Stirling engine.

    PubMed

    Rapaport, D C

    2009-04-01

    A nanoscale-sized Stirling engine with an atomistic working fluid has been modeled using molecular dynamics simulation. The design includes heat exchangers based on thermostats, pistons attached to a flywheel under load, and a regenerator. Key aspects of the behavior, including the time-dependent flows, are described. The model is shown to be capable of stable operation while producing net work at a moderate level of efficiency.

  3. Simulational nanoengineering: Molecular dynamics implementation of an atomistic Stirling engine.

    PubMed

    Rapaport, D C

    2009-04-01

    A nanoscale-sized Stirling engine with an atomistic working fluid has been modeled using molecular dynamics simulation. The design includes heat exchangers based on thermostats, pistons attached to a flywheel under load, and a regenerator. Key aspects of the behavior, including the time-dependent flows, are described. The model is shown to be capable of stable operation while producing net work at a moderate level of efficiency. PMID:19518394

  4. Atomistic simulations reveal bubbles, kinks and wrinkles in supercoiled DNA

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, J. S.; Laughton, C. A.; Harris, Sarah A.

    2011-01-01

    Although DNA is frequently bent and supercoiled in the cell, much of the available information on DNA structure at the atomistic level is restricted to short linear sequences. We report atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of a series of DNA minicircles containing between 65 and 110 bp which we compare with a recent biochemical study of structural distortions in these tight DNA loops. We have observed a wealth of non-canonical DNA structures such as kinks, denaturation bubbles and wrinkled conformations that form in response to bending and torsional stress. The simulations show that bending alone is sufficient to induce the formation of kinks in circles containing only 65 bp, but we did not observe any defects in simulations of larger torsionally relaxed circles containing 110 bp over the same MD timescales. We also observed that under-winding in minicircles ranging in size from 65 to 110 bp leads to the formation of single stranded bubbles and wrinkles. These calculations are used to assess the ability of atomistic MD simulations to determine the structure of bent and supercoiled DNA. PMID:21247872

  5. High-power QCW microsecond-pulse solid-state sodium beacon laser with spiking suppression and D2b re-pumping.

    PubMed

    Bian, Qi; Bo, Yong; Zuo, Jun-wei; Guo, Chuan; Xu, Chang; Tu, Wei; Shen, Yu; Zong, Nan; Yuan, Lei; Gao, Hong-wei; Peng, Qin-jun; Chen, Hong-bin; Feng, Lu; Jin, Kai; Wei, Kai; Cui, Da-fu; Xue, Sui-jian; Zhang, Yu-dong; Xu, Zu-yan

    2016-04-15

    A 65 W quasi-continuous-wave microsecond-pulse solid-state sodium beacon laser tuned to the sodium D2a line has been developed with a linewidth of 0.3 GHz, beam quality of M2=1.38, and pulse width of 120 μs at a repetition rate of 500 Hz by sum-frequency mixing 1319 and 1064 nm diode-pumped Nd:YAG master-oscillator power-amplifier systems. The laser wavelength stability is less than ±0.15 GHz through feedback controlling. The laser spiking due to relaxation oscillations is suppressed by inserting frequency doublers in both 1319 and 1064 nm oscillators. Sodium D2b re-pumping is accomplished by tuning the frequency of the electro-optic modulator with the right D2a-D2b offset. A bright sodium laser guide star with a photon return of 1820 photons/cm2/s was achieved with the laser system when a 32 W circular polarized beam was projected to the sky during our field test at the Xinglong Observatory.

  6. High-power QCW microsecond-pulse solid-state sodium beacon laser with spiking suppression and D2b re-pumping.

    PubMed

    Bian, Qi; Bo, Yong; Zuo, Jun-wei; Guo, Chuan; Xu, Chang; Tu, Wei; Shen, Yu; Zong, Nan; Yuan, Lei; Gao, Hong-wei; Peng, Qin-jun; Chen, Hong-bin; Feng, Lu; Jin, Kai; Wei, Kai; Cui, Da-fu; Xue, Sui-jian; Zhang, Yu-dong; Xu, Zu-yan

    2016-04-15

    A 65 W quasi-continuous-wave microsecond-pulse solid-state sodium beacon laser tuned to the sodium D2a line has been developed with a linewidth of 0.3 GHz, beam quality of M2=1.38, and pulse width of 120 μs at a repetition rate of 500 Hz by sum-frequency mixing 1319 and 1064 nm diode-pumped Nd:YAG master-oscillator power-amplifier systems. The laser wavelength stability is less than ±0.15 GHz through feedback controlling. The laser spiking due to relaxation oscillations is suppressed by inserting frequency doublers in both 1319 and 1064 nm oscillators. Sodium D2b re-pumping is accomplished by tuning the frequency of the electro-optic modulator with the right D2a-D2b offset. A bright sodium laser guide star with a photon return of 1820 photons/cm2/s was achieved with the laser system when a 32 W circular polarized beam was projected to the sky during our field test at the Xinglong Observatory. PMID:27082331

  7. Atomistic Simulation of Sea Spray Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokturk, H.

    2012-12-01

    Particles generated by ocean wave spray play an important role in many atmospheric processes such as cloud condensation, cycling of elements like chlorine, and scattering of sunlight reaching the ocean surface [1-2]. Indeed, artificially spraying droplets of seawater to the atmosphere by marine vessels roaming the ocean has been suggested as a geoengineering method to combat global warming [3]. One of the interesting aspects of ocean spray particles is that they include dissolved salt ions. Typically a liter of seawater contains about 3.5 g of salt which is mostly sodium chloride. Hydrated salt ions of the particle create a molecular structure which is different from that of pure water. An objective of this research is to investigate the influence of the dissolved ions on the properties of the particles by using first principle quantum mechanical calculations. Another objective is to probe the interaction of carbon dioxide (CO2) with such particles to understand whether the ions might enhance the absorption of atmospheric CO2 into the particles. Atomic models used in the calculations consist of a salt ion, for example sodium (Na+) ion surrounded by water molecules. Calculations are performed by using the DFT method with B3LYP hybrid functional and Pople type basis sets augmented with polarization and diffuse functions. Results of the calculations indicate that average binding energy of water molecules nearest to the ion is 0.7 eV per molecule for Na+ and 0.5 eV per molecule for Cl-. Water molecules are bound to the ion with significantly greater energy than that of the hydrogen bond (~0.2 eV) which is the binding mechanism of pure water. Higher binding energy of the particles explains why they serve well as condensation nuclei. As expected, binding energy decreases with increasing distance from the ion. It becomes comparable to that of the hydrogen bond at a distance of about 2 nm which corresponds to approximately 7 layers of water molecules surrounding the ion

  8. High-speed angle-resolved imaging of a single gold nanorod with microsecond temporal resolution and one-degree angle precision.

    PubMed

    Enoki, Sawako; Iino, Ryota; Niitani, Yamato; Minagawa, Yoshihiro; Tomishige, Michio; Noji, Hiroyuki

    2015-02-17

    We developed two types of high-speed angle-resolved imaging methods for single gold nanorods (SAuNRs) using objective-type vertical illumination dark-field microscopy and a high-speed CMOS camera to achieve microsecond temporal and one-degree angle resolution. These methods are based on: (i) an intensity analysis of focused images of SAuNR split into two orthogonally polarized components and (ii) the analysis of defocused SAuNR images. We determined the angle precision (statistical error) and accuracy (systematic error) of the resultant SAuNR (80 nm × 40 nm) images projected onto a substrate surface (azimuthal angle) in both methods. Although both methods showed a similar precision of ∼1° for the azimuthal angle at a 10 μs temporal resolution, the defocused image analysis showed a superior angle accuracy of ∼5°. In addition, the polar angle was also determined from the defocused SAuNR images with a precision of ∼1°, by fitting with simulated images. By taking advantage of the defocused image method's full revolution measurement range in the azimuthal angle, the rotation of the rotary molecular motor, F1-ATPase, was measured with 3.3 μs temporal resolution. The time constants of the pauses waiting for the elementary steps of the ATP hydrolysis reaction and the torque generated in the mechanical steps have been successfully estimated. The high-speed angle-resolved SAuNR imaging methods will be applicable to the monitoring of the fast conformational changes of many biological molecular machines.

  9. Investigating the allosteric reverse signalling of PARP inhibitors with microsecond molecular dynamic simulations and fluorescence anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Marchand, Jean-Rémy; Carotti, Andrea; Passeri, Daniela; Filipponi, Paolo; Liscio, Paride; Camaioni, Emidio; Pellicciari, Roberto; Gioiello, Antimo; Macchiarulo, Antonio

    2014-10-01

    The inhibition of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) family members is a strategy pursued for the development of novel therapeutic agents in a range of diseases, including stroke, cardiac ischemia, cancer, inflammation and diabetes. Even though some PARP-1 inhibitors have advanced to clinical setting for cancer therapy, a great deal of attention is being devoted to understand the polypharmacology of current PARP inhibitors. Besides blocking the catalytic activity, recent works have shown that some PARP inhibitors exhibit a poisoning activity, by trapping the enzyme at damaged sites of DNA and forming cytotoxic complexes. In this study we have used microsecond molecular dynamics to study the allosteric reverse signalling that is at the basis of such an effect. We show that Olaparib, but not Veliparib and HYDAMTIQ, is able to induce a specific conformational drift of the WGR domain of PARP-1, which stabilizes PARP-1/DNA complex through the locking of several salt bridge interactions. Fluorescence anisotropy assays support such a mechanism, providing the first experimental evidence that HYDAMTIQ, a potent PARP inhibitor with neuroprotective properties, is less potent than Olaparib to trap PARP-1/DNA complex.

  10. Microsecond regime optical cross connect: 32 port to 32 port scalable device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynn, Brittany; Miles, Alexander; Blanche, Pierre-Alexandre; Wissinger, John; Carothers, Daniel; Norwood, Robert A.; Peyghambarian, N.

    2014-03-01

    Presented here is a 32 × 32 optical switch for telecommunications applications capable of reconfiguring at speeds of up to 12 microseconds. The free space switching mechanism in this interconnect is a digital micromirror device (DMD) consisting of a 2D array of 10.8μm mirrors optimized for implementation at 1.55μm. Hinged along one axis, each micromirror is capable of accessing one of two positions in binary fashion. In general reflection based applications this corresponds to the ability to manifest only two display states with each mirror, but by employing this binary state system to display a set of binary amplitude holograms, we are able to access hundreds of distinct locations in space. We previously demonstrated a 7 × 7 switch employing this technology, providing a proof of concept device validating our initial design principles but exhibiting high insertion and wavelength dependent losses. The current system employs 1920 × 1080 DMD, allowing us to increase the number of accessible ports to 32 × 32. Adjustments in imaging, coupling component design and wavelength control were also made in order to improve the overall loss of the switch. This optical switch performs in a bit-rate and protocol independent manner, enabling its use across various network fabrics and data rates. Additionally, by employing a diffractive switching mechanism, we are able to implement a variety of ancillary features such as dynamic beam pick-off for monitoring purposes, beam division for multicasting applications and in situ attenuation control.

  11. Three-dimensional multispectral hand-held optoacoustic imaging with microsecond-level delayed laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deán-Ben, X. L.; Bay, Erwin; Razansky, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Three-dimensional hand-held optoacoustic imaging comes with important advantages that prompt the clinical translation of this modality, with applications envisioned in cardiovascular and peripheral vascular disease, disorders of the lymphatic system, breast cancer, arthritis or inflammation. Of particular importance is the multispectral acquisition of data by exciting the tissue at several wavelengths, which enables functional imaging applications. However, multispectral imaging of entire three-dimensional regions is significantly challenged by motion artefacts in concurrent acquisitions at different wavelengths. A method based on acquisition of volumetric datasets having a microsecond-level delay between pulses at different wavelengths is described in this work. This method can avoid image artefacts imposed by a scanning velocity greater than 2 m/s, thus, does not only facilitate imaging influenced by respiratory, cardiac or other intrinsic fast movements in living tissues, but can achieve artifact-free imaging in the presence of more significant motion, e.g., abrupt displacements during handheld-mode operation in a clinical environment.

  12. Ultrafast x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in the microsecond time domain

    SciTech Connect

    Höfert, O.; Gleichweit, C.; Steinrück, H.-P.; Papp, C.

    2013-09-15

    We introduce a new approach for ultrafast in situ high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to study surface processes and reaction kinetics on the microsecond timescale. The main idea is to follow the intensity at a fixed binding energy using a commercial 7 channeltron electron analyzer with a modified signal processing setup. This concept allows for flexible switching between measuring conventional XP spectra and ultrafast XPS. The experimental modifications are described in detail. As an example, we present measurements for the adsorption and desorption of CO on Pt(111), performed at the synchrotron radiation facility BESSY II, with a time resolution of 500 μs. Due to the ultrafast measurements, we are able to follow adsorption and desorption in situ at pressures of 2 × 10{sup −6} mbar and temperatures up to 500 K. The data are consistently analyzed using a simple model in line with data obtained with conventional fast XPS at temperatures below 460 K. Technically, our new approach allows measurement on even shorter timescales, down to 20 μs.

  13. Microsecond gain-switched master oscillator power amplifier (1958 nm) with high pulse energy

    SciTech Connect

    Ke Yin; Weiqiang Yang; Bin Zhang; Ying Li; Jing Hou

    2014-02-28

    An all-fibre master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) emitting high-energy pulses at 1958 nm is presented. The seed laser is a microsecond gain-switched thulium-doped fibre laser (TDFL) pumped with a commercial 1550-nm pulsed fibre laser. The TDFL operates at a repetition rate f in the range of 10 to 100 kHz. The two-stage thulium-doped fibre amplifier is built to scale the energy of the pulses generated by the seed laser. The maximum output pulse energy higher than 0.5 mJ at 10 kHz is achieved which is comparable with the theoretical maximum extractable pulse energy. The slope efficiency of the second stage amplifier with respect to the pump power is 30.4% at f = 10 kHz. The wavelength of the output pulse laser is centred near 1958 nm at a spectral width of 0.25 nm after amplification. Neither nonlinear effects nor significant amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) is observed in the amplification experiments. (lasers)

  14. Mechanisms of allosteric gene regulation by NMR quantification of microsecond-millisecond protein dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kleckner, Ian R; Gollnick, Paul; Foster, Mark P

    2012-01-13

    The trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) is a paradigmatic allosteric protein that regulates the tryptophan biosynthetic genes associated with the trp operon in bacilli. The ring-shaped 11-mer TRAP is activated for recognition of a specific trp-mRNA target by binding up to 11 tryptophan molecules. To characterize the mechanisms of tryptophan-induced TRAP activation, we have performed methyl relaxation dispersion (MRD) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments that probe the time-dependent structure of TRAP in the microsecond-to-millisecond "chemical exchange" time window. We find significant side chain flexibility localized to the RNA and tryptophan binding sites of the apo protein and that these dynamics are dramatically reduced upon ligand binding. Analysis of the MRD NMR data provides insights into the structural nature of transiently populated conformations sampled in solution by apo TRAP. The MRD data are inconsistent with global two-state exchange, indicating that conformational sampling in apo TRAP is asynchronous. These findings imply a temporally heterogeneous population of structures that are incompatible with RNA binding and substantiate the study of TRAP as a paradigm for probing and understanding essential dynamics in allosteric, regulatory proteins. PMID:22115774

  15. Studies of the dynamics of a 1-microsecond X-pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appartaim, Richard; Green, Danielle

    2015-11-01

    The 1- μs X-pinch (0.3 kA/ns) has been shown to produce intense soft x-rays with a spatially reproducible source location and fine size (i .e . < 10 μm) . For certain applications these x-rays are comparable in their utility to those produced on pulsed-power devices but have the advantage of a much lower component of hard x-rays. Many of the critical plasma dynamics are also similar to those observed in the fast rise-time (1 kA/ns) experiments. However, the longer rise time of the microsecond discharge can lead to important differences in wire ablation rates and transition to coronal plasma, plasma current distribution and plasma dynamics. We present recent results of these plasma dynamics using optical techniques such as shadowgraphy, schlieren and framing photography, as well as x-ray observation techniques including filtered PCD and Si diode measurements, pinhole photography and x-ray spectroscopy. We demonstrate potential applications including the relevance of the observed plasma jets to astrophysical jets. Supported by DOE Grant DE-FG02-0547253ER.

  16. X-Pinch Measurements Performed on a 1-microsecond Current Generator.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appartaim, Richard; Maakuu, Bulmuo

    2008-11-01

    A 320 kiloamp, 1-microsecond current generator based on a simple L-C discharge has been used to drive 2-wire and 4-wire X-pinches of tungsten, aluminum, titanium, etc., with diameters ranging from 13--25 microns. We report the results of measurements of the characteristics and dynamics of the X-pinch using silicon p-n junction photodiodes, a diamond radiation detector, pinhole cameras, x-ray spectroscopy and interferometry. The time duration of the observed x-ray pulses as well as the difference in the spectral sensitivities of the silicon and diamond radiation detectors provide a way to determine what fraction of the emitted x-rays is soft (e.g. with photon energy from 1 keV to 5 keV that may be emitted from high temperature plasmas at the hot spots) and what fraction is due to dense plasma interactions with electron beams accelerated across mini-diodes near the X-pinch crossing point. We address this issue as well as present the results of spectroscopic measurements of plasma parameters.

  17. Cascade Defect Evolution Processes: Comparison of Atomistic Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Haixuan; Stoller, Roger E; Osetskiy, Yury N

    2013-11-01

    Determining the defect evolution beyond the molecular dynamics (MD) time scale is critical in bridging the gap between atomistic simulations and experiments. The recently developed self-evolving atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo (SEAKMC) method provides new opportunities to simulate long-term defect evolution with MD-like fidelity. In this study, SEAKMC is applied to investigate the cascade defect evolution in bcc iron. First, the evolution of a vacancy rich region is simulated and compared with results obtained using autonomous basin climbing (ABC) +KMC and kinetic activation-relaxation technique (kART) simulations. Previously, it is found the results from kART are orders of magnitude faster than ABC+KMC. The results obtained from SEAKMC are similar to kART but the time predicted is about one order of magnitude faster than kART. The fidelity of SEAKMC is confirmed by statistically relevant MD simulations at multiple higher temperatures, which proves that the saddle point sampling is close to complete in SEAKMC. The second is the irradiation-induced formation of C15 Laves phase nano-size defect clusters. In contrast to previous studies, which claim the defects can grow by capturing self-interstitials, we found these highly stable clusters can transform to <111> glissile configuration on a much longer time scale. Finally, cascade-annealing simulations using SEAKMC is compared with traditional object KMC (OKMC) method. SEAKMC predicts substantially fewer surviving defects compared with OKMC. The possible origin of this difference is discussed and a possible way to improve the accuracy of OKMC based on SEAKMC results is outlined. These studies demonstrate the atomistic fidelity of SEAKMC in comparison with other on-the-fly KMC methods and provide new information on long-term defect evolution in iron.

  18. Structural properties of silver nanowires from atomistic descriptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Jianming; Shi, Daning; Zhao, Jijun; Wang, Baolin

    2007-10-01

    The structural formation process and physical properties of silver nanowires were investigated via an unbiased genetic algorithm search using empirical potential combined with density-functional theory calculations. Some unexpected structural behaviors resulting from the intrinsic properties of silver were revealed. Two kinds of atomic arrangements, i.e., normal and abnormal configurations, appear alternately during the growth of wire, from which a (111) facet-based formation mechanism was observed. The excellent agreements between theoretical results and experimental observations on the structural motif, Young’s modulus, and shell effects of Ag nanowires indicate the importance of objective and precise atomistic descriptions in the study of nanosystems.

  19. Structure identification methods for atomistic simulations of crystalline materials

    DOE PAGES

    Stukowski, Alexander

    2012-05-28

    Here, we discuss existing and new computational analysis techniques to classify local atomic arrangements in large-scale atomistic computer simulations of crystalline solids. This article includes a performance comparison of typical analysis algorithms such as common neighbor analysis (CNA), centrosymmetry analysis, bond angle analysis, bond order analysis and Voronoi analysis. In addition we propose a simple extension to the CNA method that makes it suitable for multi-phase systems. Finally, we introduce a new structure identification algorithm, the neighbor distance analysis, which is designed to identify atomic structure units in grain boundaries.

  20. Atomistic simulation of a superionic transition in UO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korneva, M. A.; Starikov, S. V.

    2016-01-01

    The results of the atomistic simulation of a superionic transition and melting of uranium dioxide are presented. The temperature dependences of the concentration of defects in the oxygen sublattice and changes in the heat capacity and isothermal compressibility upon the superionic transition are calculated. It is shown that the curve of the superionic transition in the PT diagram can be described by the Ehrenfest's equation. The possibility of describing the superionic transition within the framework of the theory of second- order phase transitions is discussed. Based on the results obtained, it is considered that this structural transformation can occur in other materials.

  1. The Landau-Lifshitz equation in atomistic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, M. O. A.; Evans, R. F. L.; Ostler, T. A.; Barker, J.; Atxitia, U.; Chubykalo-Fesenko, O.; Chantrell, R. W.

    2015-09-01

    The Landau-Lifshitz (LL) equation, originally proposed at the macrospin level, is increasingly used in Atomistic Spin Dynamic (ASD) models. These models are based on a spin Hamiltonian featuring atomic spins of fixed length, with the exchange introduced using the Heisenberg formalism. ASD models are proving a powerful approach to the fundamental understanding of ultrafast magnetization dynamics, including the prediction of the thermally induced magnetization switching phenomenon in which the magnetization is reversed using an ultra-fast laser pulse in the absence of an externally applied field. This paper outlines the ASD model approach and considers the role and limitations of the LL equation in this context.

  2. Ion irradiation tolerance of graphene as studied by atomistic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlgren, E. H.; Lehtinen, O.; Kotakoski, J.; Krasheninnikov, A. V.

    2012-06-04

    As impermeable to gas molecules and at the same time transparent to high-energy ions, graphene has been suggested as a window material for separating a high-vacuum ion beam system from targets kept at ambient conditions. However, accumulation of irradiation-induced damage in the graphene membrane may give rise to its mechanical failure. Using atomistic simulations, we demonstrate that irradiated graphene even with a high vacancy concentration does not show signs of such instability, indicating a considerable robustness of graphene windows. We further show that upper and lower estimates for the irradiation damage in graphene can be set using a simple model.

  3. Polarization Maintaining, Very-Large-Mode Area, Er Fiber Amplifier for High Energy Pulses at 1572.3 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholoson, J. W.; DeSantolo, A.; Yan, M. F.; Wisk, P.; Mangan, B.; Puc, G.; Yu, A.; Stephen, M.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the first polarization maintaining, very-large-mode-area Er-doped fiber amplifier with 1000 square micron effective area. The amplifier is core pumped by a Raman fiber laser and is used to generate single frequency one microsecond pulses with pulse energy of 368 microJoules, M2 of 1.1, and polarization extinction greater than 20 dB. The amplifier operates at 1572.3 nm, a wavelength useful for trace atmospheric CO2 detection.

  4. Analysis of the pH-dependent thermodynamic stability, local motions, and microsecond folding kinetics of carbonmonoxycytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-09-15

    This paper analyzes the effect of pH on thermodynamic stability, low-frequency local motions and microsecond folding kinetics of carbonmonoxycytochrome c (Cyt-CO) all across the alkaline pH-unfolding transition of protein. Thermodynamic analysis of urea-induced unfolding transitions of Cyt-CO measured between pH 6 and pH 11.9 reveals that Cyt-CO is maximally stable at pH∼9.5. Dilution of unfolded Cyt-CO into refolding medium forms a native-like compact state (NCO-state), where Fe(2+)-CO interaction persists. Kinetic and thermodynamic parameters measured for slow thermally-driven CO dissociation (NCO→N+CO) and association (N+CO→NCO) reactions between pH 6.5 and pH 13 reveal that the thermal-motions of M80-containing Ω-loop are decreased in subdenaturing limit of alkaline pH. Laser photolysis of Fe(2+)-CO bond in NCO-state triggers the microsecond folding (NCO→N). The microsecond kinetics measured all across the alkaline pH-unfolding transition of Cyt-CO produce rate rollover in the refolding limb of chevron plot, which suggests a glass transition of NCO en route to N. Between pH 7 and pH 11.9, the natural logarithm of the microsecond folding rate varies by < 1.5 units while the natural logarithm of apparent equilibrium constant varies by 11.8 units. This finding indicates that the pH-dependent ionic-interactions greatly affect the global stability of protein but have very small effect on folding kinetics. PMID:27424489

  5. A comparison between characteristics of atmospheric-pressure plasma jets sustained by nanosecond- and microsecond-pulse generators in helium

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Cheng; Shao, Tao Wang, Ruixue; Yan, Ping; Zhou, Zhongsheng; Zhou, Yixiao

    2014-10-15

    Power source is an important parameter that can affect the characteristics of atmospheric-pressure plasma jets (APPJs), because it can play a key role on the discharge characteristics and ionization process of APPJs. In this paper, the characteristics of helium APPJs sustained by both nanosecond-pulse and microsecond-pulse generators are compared from the aspects of plume length, discharge current, consumption power, energy, and optical emission spectrum. Experimental results showed that the pulsed APPJ was initiated near the high-voltage electrode with a small curvature radius, and then the stable helium APPJ could be observed when the applied voltage increased. Moreover, the discharge current of the nanosecond-pulse APPJ was larger than that of the microsecond-pulse APPJ. Furthermore, although the nanosecond-pulse generator consumed less energy than the microsecond-pulse generator, longer plume length, larger instantaneous power per pulse and stronger spectral line intensity could be obtained in the nanosecond-pulse excitation case. In addition, some discussion indicated that the rise time of the applied voltage could play a prominent role on the generation of APPJs.

  6. Atomistic DMD Simulations of Spontaneous Formation of Nematic and Smectic Phase in a Model Liquid Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linhananta, Apichart; Mackay, Ian

    2009-03-01

    We present atomistic discontinuous molecular dynamics (DMD) simulations of the bulk liquid crystal phases of the molecular fluid 8CB. The model is based on previous DMD models of protein folding (A. Linhananta, J. Boer and Ian MacKay, J. Chem. Phys., 2005, 122, 114901) in which all atoms including polar hydrogen, but not nonpolar hydrogen, are represented. Bonded pairs interact by infinite square well, while nonbonded atoms interact by hard-sphere square-well potentials. For the model 8CB, molecular parameters are scaled using AMBER and CHARMM force fields. The hard interaction potentials allow very rapid equilibration of ordered phases. Starting the DMD simulations from initial random states, without positional or orientation order, the 8CB systems spontaneously form ordered nematic and smectic phases. The simulations were performed in a 40 A X 40 A X 40 A box with 100 to 500 8CB molecules. At fixed temperature, as the density increases, the phase change from disorder to nematic to smectic. Finally a density-temperature phase diagram is presented.

  7. Atomistic Modeling of Corrosion Events at the Interface between a Metal and Its Environment

    DOE PAGES

    Taylor, Christopher D.

    2012-01-01

    Atomistic simulation is a powerful tool for probing the structure and properties of materials and the nature of chemical reactions. Corrosion is a complex process that involves chemical reactions occurring at the interface between a material and its environment and is, therefore, highly suited to study by atomistic modeling techniques. In this paper, the complex nature of corrosion processes and mechanisms is briefly reviewed. Various atomistic methods for exploring corrosion mechanisms are then described, and recent applications in the literature surveyed. Several instances of the application of atomistic modeling to corrosion science are then reviewed in detail, including studies ofmore » the metal-water interface, the reaction of water on electrified metallic interfaces, the dissolution of metal atoms from metallic surfaces, and the role of competitive adsorption in controlling the chemical nature and structure of a metallic surface. Some perspectives are then given concerning the future of atomistic modeling in the field of corrosion science.« less

  8. Modeling the atomistic growth behavior of gold nanoparticles in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, C. Heath; Lei, Yu; Bao, Yuping

    2016-04-01

    The properties of gold nanoparticles strongly depend on their three-dimensional atomic structure, leading to an increased emphasis on controlling and predicting nanoparticle structural evolution during the synthesis process. In order to provide this atomistic-level insight and establish a link to the experimentally-observed growth behavior, a kinetic Monte Carlo simulation (KMC) approach is developed for capturing Au nanoparticle growth characteristics. The advantage of this approach is that, compared to traditional molecular dynamics simulations, the atomistic nanoparticle structural evolution can be tracked on time scales that approach the actual experiments. This has enabled several different comparisons against experimental benchmarks, and it has helped transition the KMC simulations from a hypothetical toy model into a more experimentally-relevant test-bed. The model is initially parameterized by performing a series of automated comparisons of Au nanoparticle growth curves versus the experimental observations, and then the refined model allows for detailed structural analysis of the nanoparticle growth behavior. Although the Au nanoparticles are roughly spherical, the maximum/minimum dimensions deviate from the average by approximately 12.5%, which is consistent with the corresponding experiments. Also, a surface texture analysis highlights the changes in the surface structure as a function of time. While the nanoparticles show similar surface structures throughout the growth process, there can be some significant differences during the initial growth at different synthesis conditions.

  9. Modeling the atomistic growth behavior of gold nanoparticles in solution.

    PubMed

    Turner, C Heath; Lei, Yu; Bao, Yuping

    2016-04-28

    The properties of gold nanoparticles strongly depend on their three-dimensional atomic structure, leading to an increased emphasis on controlling and predicting nanoparticle structural evolution during the synthesis process. In order to provide this atomistic-level insight and establish a link to the experimentally-observed growth behavior, a kinetic Monte Carlo simulation (KMC) approach is developed for capturing Au nanoparticle growth characteristics. The advantage of this approach is that, compared to traditional molecular dynamics simulations, the atomistic nanoparticle structural evolution can be tracked on time scales that approach the actual experiments. This has enabled several different comparisons against experimental benchmarks, and it has helped transition the KMC simulations from a hypothetical toy model into a more experimentally-relevant test-bed. The model is initially parameterized by performing a series of automated comparisons of Au nanoparticle growth curves versus the experimental observations, and then the refined model allows for detailed structural analysis of the nanoparticle growth behavior. Although the Au nanoparticles are roughly spherical, the maximum/minimum dimensions deviate from the average by approximately 12.5%, which is consistent with the corresponding experiments. Also, a surface texture analysis highlights the changes in the surface structure as a function of time. While the nanoparticles show similar surface structures throughout the growth process, there can be some significant differences during the initial growth at different synthesis conditions. PMID:27091290

  10. Adaptive resolution simulation of an atomistic protein in MARTINI water

    SciTech Connect

    Zavadlav, Julija; Melo, Manuel Nuno; Marrink, Siewert J.; Praprotnik, Matej

    2014-02-07

    We present an adaptive resolution simulation of protein G in multiscale water. We couple atomistic water around the protein with mesoscopic water, where four water molecules are represented with one coarse-grained bead, farther away. We circumvent the difficulties that arise from coupling to the coarse-grained model via a 4-to-1 molecule coarse-grain mapping by using bundled water models, i.e., we restrict the relative movement of water molecules that are mapped to the same coarse-grained bead employing harmonic springs. The water molecules change their resolution from four molecules to one coarse-grained particle and vice versa adaptively on-the-fly. Having performed 15 ns long molecular dynamics simulations, we observe within our error bars no differences between structural (e.g., root-mean-squared deviation and fluctuations of backbone atoms, radius of gyration, the stability of native contacts and secondary structure, and the solvent accessible surface area) and dynamical properties of the protein in the adaptive resolution approach compared to the fully atomistically solvated model. Our multiscale model is compatible with the widely used MARTINI force field and will therefore significantly enhance the scope of biomolecular simulations.

  11. Atomistic simulation of ion beam patterning with crater functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhangcan; Lively, Michael; Allain, Jean Paul

    2013-07-01

    In this study, an atomistic model is developed to simulate ripple pattern formation when a surface is irradiated by incident low-energy energetic ions. The model treats individual ion impacts using crater functions, which represent the average change in the surface shape due to a single-ion impact. These functions incorporate the complete redistribution of mass along the surface due to an impact, and not just that due to sputtering. While most models only treat erosion, analysis of the craters reveals that the amount of mass redistributed across the surface is an order of magnitude greater than the mass removed by sputtering. Simulations in this study are conducted for 500 eV Ar+ bombardments of Si at angles of 0° to 60° with 5° increment at temperature of 350 K. Initial simulations with this model have shown agreement with prior observations of ripple pattern formation. However, some significant departures from other models based on the Bradley-Harper theory have emerged; the key difference is that the presence of crater rims plays a key role in ripple formation, which could explain phenomena such as maximum ripple amplitudes which most models do not account for. These results show that atomistic crater functions are a viable method for modeling ion beam patterning. They indicate that mass redistribution is a key mechanism for surface patterning.

  12. Void Coalescence Processes Quantified through Atomistic and Multiscale Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, R E; Seppala, E T; Dupuy, L M; Belak, J

    2005-12-31

    Simulation of ductile fracture at the atomic scale reveals many aspects of the fracture process including specific mechanisms associated with void nucleation and growth as a precursor to fracture and the plastic deformation of the material surrounding the voids and cracks. Recently we have studied void coalescence in ductile metals using large-scale atomistic and continuum simulations. Here we review that work and present some related investigations. The atomistic simulations involve three-dimensional strain-controlled multi-million atom molecular dynamics simulations of copper. The correlated growth of two voids during the coalescence process leading to fracture is investigated, both in terms of its onset and the ensuing dynamical interactions. Void interactions are quantified through the rate of reduction of the distance between the voids, through the correlated directional growth of the voids, and through correlated shape evolution of the voids. The critical inter-void ligament distance marking the onset of coalescence is shown to be approximately one void radius based on the quantification measurements used, independent of the initial separation distance between the voids and the strain-rate of the expansion of the system. No pronounced shear flow is found in the coalescence process.

  13. Void Coalescence Processes Quantified Through Atomistic and Multiscale Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, R E; Seppala, E T; Dupuy, L M; Belak, J

    2007-01-12

    Simulation of ductile fracture at the atomic scale reveals many aspects of the fracture process including specific mechanisms associated with void nucleation and growth as a precursor to fracture and the plastic deformation of the material surrounding the voids and cracks. Recently we have studied void coalescence in ductile metals using large-scale atomistic and continuum simulations. Here we review that work and present some related investigations. The atomistic simulations involve three-dimensional strain-controlled multi-million atom molecular dynamics simulations of copper. The correlated growth of two voids during the coalescence process leading to fracture is investigated, both in terms of its onset and the ensuing dynamical interactions. Void interactions are quantified through the rate of reduction of the distance between the voids, through the correlated directional growth of the voids, and through correlated shape evolution of the voids. The critical inter-void ligament distance marking the onset of coalescence is shown to be approximately one void radius based on the quantification measurements used, independent of the initial separation distance between the voids and the strain-rate of the expansion of the system. No pronounced shear flow is found in the coalescence process. We also discuss a technique for optimizing the calculation of fine-scale information on the fly for use in a coarse-scale simulation, and discuss the specific case of a fine-scale model that calculates void growth explicitly feeding into a coarse-scale mechanics model to study damage localization.

  14. Self-evolving atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo: fundamentals and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Haixuan; Osetsky, Yuri N.; Stoller, Roger E.

    2012-09-01

    The fundamentals of the framework and the details of each component of the self-evolving atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo (SEAKMC) are presented. The strength of this new technique is the ability to simulate dynamic processes with atomistic fidelity that is comparable to molecular dynamics (MD) but on a much longer time scale. The observation that the dimer method preferentially finds the saddle point (SP) with the lowest energy is investigated and found to be true only for defects with high symmetry. In order to estimate the fidelity of dynamics and accuracy of the simulation time, a general criterion is proposed and applied to two representative problems. Applications of SEAKMC for investigating the diffusion of interstitials and vacancies in bcc iron are presented and compared directly with MD simulations, demonstrating that SEAKMC provides results that formerly could be obtained only through MD. The correlation factor for interstitial diffusion in the dumbbell configuration, which is extremely difficult to obtain using MD, is predicted using SEAKMC. The limitations of SEAKMC are also discussed. The paper presents a comprehensive picture of the SEAKMC method in both its unique predictive capabilities and technically important details.

  15. Atomistic Simulation of High-Density Uranium Fuels

    DOE PAGES

    Garcés, Jorge Eduardo; Bozzolo, Guillermo

    2011-01-01

    We apply an atomistic modeling approach to deal with interfacial phenomena in high-density uranium fuels. The effects of Si, as additive to Al or as U-Mo-particles coating, on the behavior of the Al/U-Mo interface is modeled by using the Bozzolo-Ferrante-Smith (BFS) method for alloys. The basic experimental features characterizing the real system are identified, via simulations and atom-by-atom analysis. These include (1) the trend indicating formation of interfacial compounds, (2) much reduced diffusion of Al into U-Mo solid solution due to the high Si concentration, (3) Si depletion in the Al matrix, (4) an unexpected interaction between Mo and Simore » which inhibits Si diffusion to deeper layers in the U-Mo solid solution, and (5) the minimum amount of Si needed to perform as an effective diffusion barrier. Simulation results related to alternatives to Si dispersed in the Al matrix, such as the use of C coating of U-Mo particles or Zr instead of the Al matrix, are also shown. Recent experimental results confirmed early theoretical proposals, along the lines of the results reported in this work, showing that atomistic computational modeling could become a valuable tool to aid the experimental work in the development of nuclear fuels.« less

  16. Concurrent atomistic-continuum simulation of polycrystalline strontium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shengfeng; Zhang, Ning; Chen, Youping

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents the new development of a concurrent atomistic-continuum (CAC) method in simulation of the dynamic evolution of defects in polycrystalline polyatomic materials. The CAC method is based on a theoretical formulation that extends Kirkwood's statistical mechanical theory of transport processes to a multiscale description of crystalline materials. It solves for both the deformation of lattice cells and the internal deformation within each lattice cell, making it a suitable method for simulations of polyatomic materials. The simulation results of this work demonstrate that CAC can simulate the nucleation of dislocations and cracks from atomistically resolved grain boundary (GB) regions and the subsequent propagation into coarsely meshed grain interiors in polycrystalline strontium titanate without the need of supplemental constitutive equations or additional numerical treatments. With a significantly reduced computational cost, CAC predicts not only the GB structures, but also the dynamic behaviour of dislocations, cracks and GBs, all of which are comparable with those obtained from atomic-level molecular dynamics simulations. Simulation results also show that dislocations tend to initiate from GBs and triple junctions. The angle between the slip planes and the GB planes plays a key role in determining the GB-dislocation reactions.

  17. 3d visualization of atomistic simulations on every desktop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peled, Dan; Silverman, Amihai; Adler, Joan

    2013-08-01

    Once upon a time, after making simulations, one had to go to a visualization center with fancy SGI machines to run a GL visualization and make a movie. More recently, OpenGL and its mesa clone have let us create 3D on simple desktops (or laptops), whether or not a Z-buffer card is present. Today, 3D a la Avatar is a commodity technique, presented in cinemas and sold for home TV. However, only a few special research centers have systems large enough for entire classes to view 3D, or special immersive facilities like visualization CAVEs or walls, and not everyone finds 3D immersion easy to view. For maximum physics with minimum effort a 3D system must come to each researcher and student. So how do we create 3D visualization cheaply on every desktop for atomistic simulations? After several months of attempts to select commodity equipment for a whole room system, we selected an approach that goes back a long time, even predating GL. The old concept of anaglyphic stereo relies on two images, slightly displaced, and viewed through colored glasses, or two squares of cellophane from a regular screen/projector or poster. We have added this capability to our AViz atomistic visualization code in its new, 6.1 version, which is RedHat, CentOS and Ubuntu compatible. Examples using data from our own research and that of other groups will be given.

  18. Atomistic interpretation of solid solution hardening from spectral analysis.

    PubMed

    Plendl, J N

    1971-05-01

    From analysis of a series of vibrational spectra of ir energy absorption and laser Raman, an attempt is made to interpret solid solution hardening from an atomistic point of view for the system CaF(2)/SrF(2). It is shown to be caused by the combined action of three atomic characteristics, i.e., their changes as a function of composition. They are deformation of the atomic coordination polyhedrons, overlap of the outer electron shells of the atom pairs, and the ratio of the ionic to covalent share of binding. A striking nonlinear behavior of the three characteristics, as a function of composition, gives maximum atomic bond strength to the 55/45 position of the system CaF(2)/SrF(2), in agreement with the measured data of the solid solution hardening. The curve for atomic bond strength, derived from the three characteristics, is almost identical to the curve for measured microhardness data. This result suggests that the atomistic interpretation, put forward in this paper, is correct.

  19. Atomistic Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Crude Oil/Brine Displacement in Calcite Mesopores.

    PubMed

    Sedghi, Mohammad; Piri, Mohammad; Goual, Lamia

    2016-04-12

    Unconventional reservoirs such as hydrocarbon-bearing shale formations and ultratight carbonates generate a large fraction of oil and gas production in North America. The characteristic feature of these reservoirs is their nanoscale porosity that provides significant surface areas between the pore walls and the occupying fluids. To better assess hydrocarbon recovery from these formations, it is crucial to develop an improved insight into the effects of wall-fluid interactions on the interfacial phenomena in these nanoscale confinements. One of the important properties that controls the displacement of fluids inside the pores is the threshold capillary pressure. In this study, we present the results of an integrated series of large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations performed to investigate the effects of wall-fluid interactions on the threshold capillary pressures of oil-water/brine displacements in a calcite nanopore with a square cross section. Fully atomistic models are utilized to represent crude oil, brine, and calcite in order to accommodate electrostatic interactions and H-bonding between the polar molecules and the calcite surface. To this end, we create mixtures of various polar and nonpolar organic molecules to better represent the crude oil. The interfacial tension between oil and water/brine and their contact angle on calcite surface are simulated. We study the effects of oil composition, water salinity, and temperature and pressure conditions on these properties. The threshold capillary pressure values are also obtained from the MD simulations for the calcite nanopore. We then compare the MD results against those generated using the Mayer-Stowe-Princen (MSP) method and explain the differences.

  20. Methods for the Detection and Characterization of Silica Colloids by Microsecond spICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Montaño, Manuel D; Majestic, Brian J; Jämting, Åsa K; Westerhoff, Paul; Ranville, James F

    2016-05-01

    The rapid development of nanotechnology has led to concerns over their environmental risk. Current analytical techniques are underdeveloped and lack the sensitivity and specificity to characterize these materials in complex environmental and biological matrices. To this end, single particle ICP-MS (spICP-MS) has been developed in the past decade, with the capability to detect and characterize nanomaterials at environmentally relevant concentrations in complex environmental and biological matrices. However, some nanomaterials are composed of elements inherently difficult to quantify by quadrupole ICP-MS due to abundant molecular interferences, such as dinitrogen ions interfering with the detection of silicon. Three approaches aimed at reducing the contribution of these background molecular interferences in the analysis of (28)Si are explored in an attempt to detect and characterize silica colloids. Helium collision cell gases and reactive ammonia gas are investigated for their conventional use in reducing the signal generated from the dinitrogen interference and background silicon ions leaching from glass components of the instrumentation. A new approach brought on by the advent of microsecond dwell times in single particle ICP-MS allows for the detection and characterization of silica colloids without the need for these cell gases, as at shorter dwell times the proportion of signal attributed to a nanoparticle event is greater relative to the constant dinitrogen signal. It is demonstrated that the accurate detection and characterization of these materials will be reliant on achieving a balance between reducing the contribution of the background interference, while still registering the maximum amount of signal generated by the particle event. PMID:27055808

  1. Microsecond pulsed hydrogen/deuterium exchange of electrosprayed ubiquitin ions stored in a linear ion trap.

    PubMed

    Rajabi, Khadijeh

    2015-02-01

    A pulse of D2O vapour on the order of microseconds is allowed to react with the +6 to +9 charge states of ubiquitin confined in a linear ion trap (LIT). Two envelopes of peaks are detected for the ions of ubiquitin, corresponding to the ions that exchange more quickly and more slowly. The deuterium uptake of the protonated sites on ubiquitin ions accounts for the ion population with the fast exchange. The hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) kinetics of ubiquitin ions trapped in the LIT for 200 ms showed comparable structural transitions to those trapped for 300 ms. When ions are trapped for longer, i.e. up to 2000 ms, mainly the slow exchanging ion population is detected. In all experiments the +7 ions exchange the most, suggesting a short distance between the surface protonated sites and nearby charged sites, and concomitantly high accessibility of surface protonated sites towards D2O. The +6 ions are more compact than the +7 ions but have one fewer protonated site, therefore fewer surface availabilities for D2O attack. The data suggest that the +6 ions keep most of their solution-phase contacts intact while the hydrophobic core is slightly interrupted in the +7 ions, possibly due to the exposure of charged His68 that is normally buried in the hydrophobic pocket. The +8 and +9 ions have more protonated sites but are less compact than the +7 ions because of Coulombic repulsion, resulting in a larger distance between the protonated sites and the basic sites. The data indicate that the HDX mechanism of ions with the slower exchange corresponding to the second envelope of peaks is primarily governed via a relay mechanism. The results suggest that the pulsed HDX MS method is sampling a population of ubiquitin ions with a similar backbone fold to the solution.

  2. Methods for the Detection and Characterization of Silica Colloids by Microsecond spICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Montaño, Manuel D; Majestic, Brian J; Jämting, Åsa K; Westerhoff, Paul; Ranville, James F

    2016-05-01

    The rapid development of nanotechnology has led to concerns over their environmental risk. Current analytical techniques are underdeveloped and lack the sensitivity and specificity to characterize these materials in complex environmental and biological matrices. To this end, single particle ICP-MS (spICP-MS) has been developed in the past decade, with the capability to detect and characterize nanomaterials at environmentally relevant concentrations in complex environmental and biological matrices. However, some nanomaterials are composed of elements inherently difficult to quantify by quadrupole ICP-MS due to abundant molecular interferences, such as dinitrogen ions interfering with the detection of silicon. Three approaches aimed at reducing the contribution of these background molecular interferences in the analysis of (28)Si are explored in an attempt to detect and characterize silica colloids. Helium collision cell gases and reactive ammonia gas are investigated for their conventional use in reducing the signal generated from the dinitrogen interference and background silicon ions leaching from glass components of the instrumentation. A new approach brought on by the advent of microsecond dwell times in single particle ICP-MS allows for the detection and characterization of silica colloids without the need for these cell gases, as at shorter dwell times the proportion of signal attributed to a nanoparticle event is greater relative to the constant dinitrogen signal. It is demonstrated that the accurate detection and characterization of these materials will be reliant on achieving a balance between reducing the contribution of the background interference, while still registering the maximum amount of signal generated by the particle event.

  3. Microsecond pulsed hydrogen/deuterium exchange of electrosprayed ubiquitin ions stored in a linear ion trap.

    PubMed

    Rajabi, Khadijeh

    2015-02-01

    A pulse of D2O vapour on the order of microseconds is allowed to react with the +6 to +9 charge states of ubiquitin confined in a linear ion trap (LIT). Two envelopes of peaks are detected for the ions of ubiquitin, corresponding to the ions that exchange more quickly and more slowly. The deuterium uptake of the protonated sites on ubiquitin ions accounts for the ion population with the fast exchange. The hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) kinetics of ubiquitin ions trapped in the LIT for 200 ms showed comparable structural transitions to those trapped for 300 ms. When ions are trapped for longer, i.e. up to 2000 ms, mainly the slow exchanging ion population is detected. In all experiments the +7 ions exchange the most, suggesting a short distance between the surface protonated sites and nearby charged sites, and concomitantly high accessibility of surface protonated sites towards D2O. The +6 ions are more compact than the +7 ions but have one fewer protonated site, therefore fewer surface availabilities for D2O attack. The data suggest that the +6 ions keep most of their solution-phase contacts intact while the hydrophobic core is slightly interrupted in the +7 ions, possibly due to the exposure of charged His68 that is normally buried in the hydrophobic pocket. The +8 and +9 ions have more protonated sites but are less compact than the +7 ions because of Coulombic repulsion, resulting in a larger distance between the protonated sites and the basic sites. The data indicate that the HDX mechanism of ions with the slower exchange corresponding to the second envelope of peaks is primarily governed via a relay mechanism. The results suggest that the pulsed HDX MS method is sampling a population of ubiquitin ions with a similar backbone fold to the solution. PMID:25553956

  4. Atomistic simulations to micro-mechanisms of adhesion in automotive applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Fatih Gurcag

    This study aimed at depicting atomistic and microstructural aspects of adhesion and friction that appear in different automotive applications and manufacturing processes using atomistic simulations coupled with tribological tests and surface characterization experiments. Thin films that form at the contact interfaces due to chemical reactions and coatings that are developed to mitigate or enhance adhesion were studied in detail. The adhesion and friction experiments conducted on diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings against Al indicated that F incorporation into DLC decreased the coefficient of friction (COF) by 30% -with respect to H-DLC that is known to have low COF and anti-adhesion properties against Al- to 0.14 owing to formation of repulsive F-F interactions at the sliding interface as shown by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. F atoms transferred to the Al surface with an increase in the contact pressure, and this F transfer led to the formation of a stable AlF3 compound at the Al surface as confirmed by XPS and cross-sectional FIB-TEM. The incorporation of Si and O in a F-containing DLC resulted in humidity independent low COF of 0.08 due to the hydration effect of the Si-O-Si chains in the carbonaceous tribolayers that resulted in repulsive OH-OH interactions at the contact interface. At high temperatures, adhesion of Al was found to be enhanced as a result of superplastic oxide fibers on the Al surface. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of tensile deformation of Al nanowires in oxygen carried out with ReaxFF showed that native oxide of Al has an oxygen deficient, low density structure and in O2, the oxygen diffusion in amorphous oxide healed the broken Al-O bonds during applied strain and resulted in the superplasticity. The oxide shell also provided nucleation sites for dislocations in Al crystal. In fuel cell applications, where low Pt/carbon adhesion is causing durability problems, spin-polarized DFT showed that metals with unfilled d

  5. Flexoelectricity and the polarity of complex ferroelastic twin patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salje, Ekhard K. H.; Li, Suzhi; Stengel, Massimiliano; Gumbsch, Peter; Ding, Xiangdong

    2016-07-01

    We study, by means of an atomistic toy model, the interplay of ferroelastic twin patterns and electrical polarization. Our molecular dynamics simulations reproduce polarity in straight twin walls as observed experimentally. We show, by making contact with continuum theory, that the effect is governed by linear flexoelectricity. Complex twin patterns, with very high densities of kinks and/or junctions, produce winding structures in the dipolar field, which are reminiscent of polarization vortices. By means of a "cold shearing" technique, we produce patches with high vortex densities; these unexpectedly show a net macroscopic polarization even if neither the original sample nor the applied mechanical perturbation breaks inversion symmetry by itself. These results may explain some puzzling experimental observations of "parasitic" polarity in the paraelectric phase of BaTi O3 and LaAl O3 .

  6. The Soft Mode Driven Dynamics in Ferroelectric Perovskites at the Nanoscale: An Atomistic Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCash, Kevin

    The discovery of ferroelectricity at the nanoscale has incited a lot of interest in perovskite ferroelectrics not only for their potential in device application but also for their potential to expand fundamental understanding of complex phenomena at very small size scales. Unfortunately, not much is known about the dynamics of ferroelectrics at this scale. Many of the widely held theories for ferroelectric materials are based on bulk dynamics which break down when applied to smaller scales. In an effort to increase understanding of nanoscale ferroelectric materials we use atomistic resolution computational simulations to investigate the dynamics of polar perovskites. Within the framework of a well validated effective Hamiltonian model we are able to accurately predict many of the properties of ferroelectric materials at the nanoscale including the response of the soft mode to mechanical boundary conditions and the polarization reversal dynamics of ferroelectric nanowires. Given that the focus of our study is the dynamics of ferroelectric perovskites we begin by developing an effective Hamiltonian based model that could simultaneously describe both static and dynamic properties of such materials. Our study reveals that for ferroelectric perovskites that undergo a sequence of phase transitions, such as BaTiO3. for example, the minimal parameter effective Hamiltonian model is unable to reproduce both static and dynamical properties simultaneously. Nevertheless we developed two sets of parameters that accurately describes the static properties and dynamic properties of BaTiO3 independently. By creating a tool that accurately models the dynamical properties of perovskite ferroelectrics we are able to investigate the frequencies of the soft modes in the perovskite crystal. The lowest energy transverse optical soft modes in perovskite ferroelectrics are known to be cause of the ferroelectric phase transition in these materials and affect a number of electrical properties

  7. Material fields in atomistics as pull-backs of spatial distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra Admal, Nikhil; Tadmor, Ellad B.

    2016-04-01

    The various fields defined in continuum mechanics have both a material and a spatial description that are related through the deformation mapping. In contrast, continuum fields defined for atomistic systems using the Irving-Kirkwood or Murdoch-Hardy procedures correspond to a spatial description. It is uncommon to define atomistic fields in the reference configuration due to the lack of a unique definition for the deformation mapping in atomistic systems. In this paper, we construct referential atomistic distributions as pull-backs of the spatial distributions obtained in the Murdoch-Hardy procedure with respect to a postulated deformation mapping that tracks particles. We then show that some of these referential distributions are independent of the choice of the deformation mapping and only depend on the reference and current configuration of particles. Therefore, the fields obtained from these distributions can be calculated without explicitly constructing a deformation map, and by construction they satisfy the balance equations. In particular, we obtain definitions for the first and second atomistic Piola-Kirchhoff stress tensors. We demonstrate the validity of these definitions through a numerical example involving finite deformation of a slab containing a notch under tension. An interesting feature of the atomistic first Piola-Kirchhoff stress tensor is the absence of a kinetic part, which in the atomistic Cauchy stress tensor accounts for thermal fluctuations. We show that this effect is implicitly included in the atomistic first Piola-Kirchhoff stress tensor through the motion of the particles. An open source program to compute the atomistic Cauchy and first Piola-Kirchhoff stress fields called MDStressLab is available online at

  8. Atomistic Hydrodynamics and the Dynamical Hydrophobic Effect in Porous Graphene.

    PubMed

    Strong, Steven E; Eaves, Joel D

    2016-05-19

    Mirroring their role in electrical and optical physics, two-dimensional crystals are emerging as novel platforms for fluid separations and water desalination, which are hydrodynamic processes that occur in nanoscale environments. For numerical simulation to play a predictive and descriptive role, one must have theoretically sound methods that span orders of magnitude in physical scales, from the atomistic motions of particles inside the channels to the large-scale hydrodynamic gradients that drive transport. Here, we use constraint dynamics to derive a nonequilibrium molecular dynamics method for simulating steady-state mass flow of a fluid moving through the nanoscopic spaces of a porous solid. After validating our method on a model system, we use it to study the hydrophobic effect of water moving through pores of electrically doped single-layer graphene. The trend in permeability that we calculate does not follow the hydrophobicity of the membrane but is instead governed by a crossover between two competing molecular transport mechanisms.

  9. Atomistic Simulation of Dislocation-Defect Interactions in Cu

    SciTech Connect

    Wirth, B D; Bulatov, V V; Diaz de la Rubia, T

    2001-01-01

    The mechanisms of dislocation-defect interactions are of practical importance for developing quantitative structure-property relationships, mechanistic understanding of plastic flow localization and predictive models of mechanical behavior in metals under irradiation. In copper and other face centered cubic metals, high-energy particle irradiation produces hardening and shear localization. Post-irradiation microstructural examination in Cu reveals that irradiation has produced a high number density of nanometer sized stacking fault tetrahedra. Thus, the resultant irradiation hardening and shear localization is commonly attributed to the interaction between stacking fault tetrahedra and mobile dislocations, although the mechanism of this interaction is unknown. In this work, we present a comprehensive molecular dynamics simulation study that characterizes the interaction and fate of moving dislocations with stacking fault tetrahedra in Cu using an EAM interatomic potential. This work is intended to produce atomistic input into dislocation dynamics simulations of plastic flow localization in irradiated materials.

  10. Atomistic simulation of static magnetic properties of bit patterned media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbeláez-Echeverri, O. D.; Agudelo-Giraldo, J. D.; Restrepo-Parra, E.

    2016-09-01

    In this work we present a new design of Co based bit pattern media with out-of-plane uni-axial anisotropy induced by interface effects. Our model features the inclusion of magnetic impurities in the non-magnetic matrix. After the material model was refined during three iterations using Monte Carlo simulations, further simulations were performed using an atomistic integrator of Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation with Langevin dynamics to study the behavior of the system paying special attention to the super-paramagnetic limit. Our model system exhibits three magnetic phase transitions, one due to the magnetically doped matrix material and the weak magnetic interaction between the nano-structures in the system. The different magnetic phases of the system as well as the features of its phase diagram are explained.

  11. Atomistic Simulation of Polymer Crystallization at Realistic Length Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, R H; Fried, L E

    2005-01-28

    Understanding the dynamics of polymer crystallization during the induction period prior to crystal growth is a key goal in polymer physics. Here we present the first study of primary crystallization of polymer melts via molecular dynamics simulations at physically realistic (about 46 nm) length scales. Our results show that the crystallization mechanism involves a spinodal decomposition microphase separation caused by an increase in the average length of rigid trans segments along the polymer backbone during the induction period. Further, the characteristic length of the growing dense domains during the induction period is longer than predicted by classical nucleation theory. These results indicate a new 'coexistence period' in the crystallization, where nucleation and growth mechanisms coexist with a phase separation mechanism. Our results provide an atomistic verification of the fringed micelle model.

  12. Emergence of linear elasticity from the atomistic description of matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cakir, Abdullah; Pica Ciamarra, Massimo

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the emergence of the continuum elastic limit from the atomistic description of matter at zero temperature considering how locally defined elastic quantities depend on the coarse graining length scale. Results obtained numerically investigating different model systems are rationalized in a unifying picture according to which the continuum elastic limit emerges through a process determined by two system properties, the degree of disorder, and a length scale associated to the transverse low-frequency vibrational modes. The degree of disorder controls the emergence of long-range local shear stress and shear strain correlations, while the length scale influences the amplitude of the fluctuations of the local elastic constants close to the jamming transition.

  13. Emergence of linear elasticity from the atomistic description of matter.

    PubMed

    Cakir, Abdullah; Pica Ciamarra, Massimo

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the emergence of the continuum elastic limit from the atomistic description of matter at zero temperature considering how locally defined elastic quantities depend on the coarse graining length scale. Results obtained numerically investigating different model systems are rationalized in a unifying picture according to which the continuum elastic limit emerges through a process determined by two system properties, the degree of disorder, and a length scale associated to the transverse low-frequency vibrational modes. The degree of disorder controls the emergence of long-range local shear stress and shear strain correlations, while the length scale influences the amplitude of the fluctuations of the local elastic constants close to the jamming transition. PMID:27497565

  14. Protein displacements under external forces: An atomistic Langevin dynamics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnandt, David; Utz, Nadine; Blumen, Alexander; Koslowski, Thorsten

    2009-02-01

    We present a fully atomistic Langevin dynamics approach as a method to simulate biopolymers under external forces. In the harmonic regime, this approach permits the computation of the long-term dynamics using only the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the Hessian matrix of second derivatives. We apply this scheme to identify polymorphs of model proteins by their mechanical response fingerprint, and we relate the averaged dynamics of proteins to their biological functionality, with the ion channel gramicidin A, a phosphorylase, and neuropeptide Y as examples. In an environment akin to dilute solutions, even small proteins show relaxation times up to 50 ns. Atomically resolved Langevin dynamics computations have been performed for the stretched gramicidin A ion channel.

  15. Analysis of an optimization-based atomistic-to-continuum coupling method for point defects

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Derek; Shapeev, Alexander V.; Bochev, Pavel B.; Luskin, Mitchell

    2015-11-16

    Here, we formulate and analyze an optimization-based Atomistic-to-Continuum (AtC) coupling method for problems with point defects. Application of a potential-based atomistic model near the defect core enables accurate simulation of the defect. Away from the core, where site energies become nearly independent of the lattice position, the method switches to a more efficient continuum model. The two models are merged by minimizing the mismatch of their states on an overlap region, subject to the atomistic and continuum force balance equations acting independently in their domains. We prove that the optimization problem is well-posed and establish error estimates.

  16. Numerical algorithms for the atomistic dopant profiling of semiconductor materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghaei Anvigh, Samira

    In this dissertation, we investigate the possibility to use scanning microscopy such as scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM) and scanning spreading resistance microscopy (SSRM) for the "atomistic" dopant profiling of semiconductor materials. For this purpose, we first analyze the discrete effects of random dopant fluctuations (RDF) on SCM and SSRM measurements with nanoscale probes and show that RDF significantly affects the differential capacitance and spreading resistance of the SCM and SSRM measurements if the dimension of the probe is below 50 nm. Then, we develop a mathematical algorithm to compute the spatial coordinates of the ionized impurities in the depletion region using a set of scanning microscopy measurements. The proposed numerical algorithm is then applied to extract the (x, y, z) coordinates of ionized impurities in the depletion region in the case of a few semiconductor materials with different doping configuration. The numerical algorithm developed to solve the above inverse problem is based on the evaluation of doping sensitivity functions of the differential capacitance, which show how sensitive the differential capacitance is to doping variations at different locations. To develop the numerical algorithm we first express the doping sensitivity functions in terms of the Gâteaux derivative of the differential capacitance, use Riesz representation theorem, and then apply a gradient optimization approach to compute the locations of the dopants. The algorithm is verified numerically using 2-D simulations, in which the C-V curves are measured at 3 different locations on the surface of the semiconductor. Although the cases studied in this dissertation are much idealized and, in reality, the C-V measurements are subject to noise and other experimental errors, it is shown that if the differential capacitance is measured precisely, SCM measurements can be potentially used for the "atomistic" profiling of ionized impurities in doped semiconductors.

  17. An Atomistic Statistically Effective Energy Function for Computational Protein Design.

    PubMed

    Topham, Christopher M; Barbe, Sophie; André, Isabelle

    2016-08-01

    Shortcomings in the definition of effective free-energy surfaces of proteins are recognized to be a major contributory factor responsible for the low success rates of existing automated methods for computational protein design (CPD). The formulation of an atomistic statistically effective energy function (SEEF) suitable for a wide range of CPD applications and its derivation from structural data extracted from protein domains and protein-ligand complexes are described here. The proposed energy function comprises nonlocal atom-based and local residue-based SEEFs, which are coupled using a novel atom connectivity number factor to scale short-range, pairwise, nonbonded atomic interaction energies and a surface-area-dependent cavity energy term. This energy function was used to derive additional SEEFs describing the unfolded-state ensemble of any given residue sequence based on computed average energies for partially or fully solvent-exposed fragments in regions of irregular structure in native proteins. Relative thermal stabilities of 97 T4 bacteriophage lysozyme mutants were predicted from calculated energy differences for folded and unfolded states with an average unsigned error (AUE) of 0.84 kcal mol(-1) when compared to experiment. To demonstrate the utility of the energy function for CPD, further validation was carried out in tests of its capacity to recover cognate protein sequences and to discriminate native and near-native protein folds, loop conformers, and small-molecule ligand binding poses from non-native benchmark decoys. Experimental ligand binding free energies for a diverse set of 80 protein complexes could be predicted with an AUE of 2.4 kcal mol(-1) using an additional energy term to account for the loss in ligand configurational entropy upon binding. The atomistic SEEF is expected to improve the accuracy of residue-based coarse-grained SEEFs currently used in CPD and to extend the range of applications of extant atom-based protein statistical

  18. Experimentally driven atomistic model of 1,2 polybutadiene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkourmpis, Thomas; Mitchell, Geoffrey R.

    2014-02-01

    We present an efficient method of combining wide angle neutron scattering data with detailed atomistic models, allowing us to perform a quantitative and qualitative mapping of the organisation of the chain conformation in both glass and liquid phases. The structural refinement method presented in this work is based on the exploitation of the intrachain features of the diffraction pattern and its intimate linkage with atomistic models by the use of internal coordinates for bond lengths, valence angles, and torsion rotations. Atomic connectivity is defined through these coordinates that are in turn assigned by pre-defined probability distributions, thus allowing for the models in question to be built stochastically. Incremental variation of these coordinates allows for the construction of models that minimise the differences between the observed and calculated structure factors. We present a series of neutron scattering data of 1,2 polybutadiene at the region 120-400 K. Analysis of the experimental data yields bond lengths for CC and C  C of 1.54 Å and 1.35 Å, respectively. Valence angles of the backbone were found to be at 112° and the torsion distributions are characterised by five rotational states, a three-fold trans-skew± for the backbone and gauche± for the vinyl group. Rotational states of the vinyl group were found to be equally populated, indicating a largely atactic chan. The two backbone torsion angles exhibit different behaviour with respect to temperature of their trans population, with one of them adopting an almost all trans sequence. Consequently, the resulting configuration leads to a rather persistent chain, something indicated by the value of the characteristic ratio extrapolated from the model. We compare our results with theoretical predictions, computer simulations, RIS models and previously reported experimental results.

  19. Experimentally driven atomistic model of 1,2 polybutadiene

    SciTech Connect

    Gkourmpis, Thomas; Mitchell, Geoffrey R.

    2014-02-07

    We present an efficient method of combining wide angle neutron scattering data with detailed atomistic models, allowing us to perform a quantitative and qualitative mapping of the organisation of the chain conformation in both glass and liquid phases. The structural refinement method presented in this work is based on the exploitation of the intrachain features of the diffraction pattern and its intimate linkage with atomistic models by the use of internal coordinates for bond lengths, valence angles, and torsion rotations. Atomic connectivity is defined through these coordinates that are in turn assigned by pre-defined probability distributions, thus allowing for the models in question to be built stochastically. Incremental variation of these coordinates allows for the construction of models that minimise the differences between the observed and calculated structure factors. We present a series of neutron scattering data of 1,2 polybutadiene at the region 120–400 K. Analysis of the experimental data yields bond lengths for Cî—¸C and C î—» C of 1.54 Å and 1.35 Å, respectively. Valence angles of the backbone were found to be at 112° and the torsion distributions are characterised by five rotational states, a three-fold trans-skew± for the backbone and gauche± for the vinyl group. Rotational states of the vinyl group were found to be equally populated, indicating a largely atactic chan. The two backbone torsion angles exhibit different behaviour with respect to temperature of their trans population, with one of them adopting an almost all trans sequence. Consequently, the resulting configuration leads to a rather persistent chain, something indicated by the value of the characteristic ratio extrapolated from the model. We compare our results with theoretical predictions, computer simulations, RIS models and previously reported experimental results.

  20. An Atomistic Statistically Effective Energy Function for Computational Protein Design.

    PubMed

    Topham, Christopher M; Barbe, Sophie; André, Isabelle

    2016-08-01

    Shortcomings in the definition of effective free-energy surfaces of proteins are recognized to be a major contributory factor responsible for the low success rates of existing automated methods for computational protein design (CPD). The formulation of an atomistic statistically effective energy function (SEEF) suitable for a wide range of CPD applications and its derivation from structural data extracted from protein domains and protein-ligand complexes are described here. The proposed energy function comprises nonlocal atom-based and local residue-based SEEFs, which are coupled using a novel atom connectivity number factor to scale short-range, pairwise, nonbonded atomic interaction energies and a surface-area-dependent cavity energy term. This energy function was used to derive additional SEEFs describing the unfolded-state ensemble of any given residue sequence based on computed average energies for partially or fully solvent-exposed fragments in regions of irregular structure in native proteins. Relative thermal stabilities of 97 T4 bacteriophage lysozyme mutants were predicted from calculated energy differences for folded and unfolded states with an average unsigned error (AUE) of 0.84 kcal mol(-1) when compared to experiment. To demonstrate the utility of the energy function for CPD, further validation was carried out in tests of its capacity to recover cognate protein sequences and to discriminate native and near-native protein folds, loop conformers, and small-molecule ligand binding poses from non-native benchmark decoys. Experimental ligand binding free energies for a diverse set of 80 protein complexes could be predicted with an AUE of 2.4 kcal mol(-1) using an additional energy term to account for the loss in ligand configurational entropy upon binding. The atomistic SEEF is expected to improve the accuracy of residue-based coarse-grained SEEFs currently used in CPD and to extend the range of applications of extant atom-based protein statistical

  1. Bragg Resonator Cyclotron Resonance Maser Experiments Driven by a Microsecond, Intense Electron Beam Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jin Joo

    The cyclotron resonance maser (CRM) has proven to be attractive for many high power microwave applications such as fusion plasma heating, radar/communications, and high gradient RF accelerators. Most of the previous CRM experiments with MV electron beams have been conducted with short (<0.1 musec) pulses. The present work contains the first comprehensive experimental study on mode competition in a high-Q Bragg resonator CRM employing a microsecond, relativistic electron beam. We have designed and fabricated a high-Q sinusoidal Bragg resonator designed to excite high frequency CARM oscillation of the TE_{31} cylindrical cavity mode at 18.9 GHz. The measured reflectivity of the TE_{31} mode is consistent with the prediction of uncoupled single mode theory. A high quality annular electron beam with low velocity spread and energy spread is produced through an apertured mask-anode. The apertured electron beam has been characterized by the use of glass plate diagnostics. The measured beam velocity ratio, v_{| }/v_{|}, was shown to be in agreement with computer simulation results and the theoretical predictions. Experiments have been performed for 4 cases: (1) Bragg resonator with ripples half-inward, (2) large diameter smooth tube without Bragg resonator, (3) Bragg resonator with ripples fully-outward, and (4) small diameter smooth tube without Bragg resonator. The Bragg resonator with ripples half-inward generated high power microwave radiation from TE_ {11} gyro-BWO interactions, TE _{21} absolute instability, and high harmonic gyrotron modes. Considerably less power from the TE_{11} gyro -BWO was observed for the Bragg resonator with ripples fully -outward. The microwave emission from the TE_ {21} absolute instability in the Bragg resonator with ripples fully-outward was successfully suppressed by lowering the cavity magnetic field. These three undesired oscillations, (TE _{21} absolute instability, TE _{11} gyro-BWO, TE _{51} second and third harmonic), were the most

  2. Polarization developments

    SciTech Connect

    Prescott, C.Y.

    1993-07-01

    Recent developments in laser-driven photoemission sources of polarized electrons have made prospects for highly polarized electron beams in a future linear collider very promising. This talk discusses the experiences with the SLC polarized electron source, the recent progress with research into gallium arsenide and strained gallium arsenide as a photocathode material, and the suitability of these cathode materials for a future linear collider based on the parameters of the several linear collider designs that exist.

  3. Evaluation of number concentration quantification by single-particle inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry: microsecond vs. millisecond dwell times.

    PubMed

    Abad-Álvaro, Isabel; Peña-Vázquez, Elena; Bolea, Eduardo; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar; Castillo, Juan R; Laborda, Francisco

    2016-07-01

    The quality of the quantitative information in single-particle inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SP-ICP-MS) depends directly on the number concentration of the nanoparticles in the sample analyzed, which is proportional to the flux of nanoparticles through the plasma. Particle number concentrations must be selected in accordance with the data acquisition frequency, to control the precision from counting statistics and the bias, which is produced by the occurrence of multiple-particle events recorded as single-particle events. With quadrupole mass spectrometers, the frequency of data acquisition is directly controlled by the dwell time. The effect of dwell times from milli- to microseconds (10 ms, 5 ms, 100 μs, and 50 μs) on the quality of the quantitative data has been studied. Working with dwell times in the millisecond range, precision figures about 5 % were achieved, whereas using microsecond dwell times, the suitable fluxes of nanoparticles are higher and precision was reduced down to 1 %; this was independent of the dwell time selected. Moreover, due to the lower occurrence of multiple-nanoparticle events, linear ranges are wider when dwell times equal to or shorter than 100 μs are used. A calculation tool is provided to determine the optimal concentration for any instrument or experimental conditions selected. On the other hand, the use of dwell times in the microsecond range reduces significantly the contribution of the background and/or the presence of dissolved species, in comparison with the use of millisecond dwell times. Although the use of dwell times equal to or shorter than 100 μs offers improved performance working in single-particle mode, the use of conventional dwell times (3-10 ms) should not be discarded, once their limitations are known.

  4. Neuronal polarization.

    PubMed

    Takano, Tetsuya; Xu, Chundi; Funahashi, Yasuhiro; Namba, Takashi; Kaibuchi, Kozo

    2015-06-15

    Neurons are highly polarized cells with structurally and functionally distinct processes called axons and dendrites. This polarization underlies the directional flow of information in the central nervous system, so the establishment and maintenance of neuronal polarization is crucial for correct development and function. Great progress in our understanding of how neurons establish their polarity has been made through the use of cultured hippocampal neurons, while recent technological advances have enabled in vivo analysis of axon specification and elongation. This short review and accompanying poster highlight recent advances in this fascinating field, with an emphasis on the signaling mechanisms underlying axon and dendrite specification in vitro and in vivo.

  5. Sub microsecond notching of a negative hydrogen beam at low energy utilizing a magnetron ion source with a split extractor

    SciTech Connect

    Moehs, Douglas; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    A technique for sub-microsecond beam notching is being developed at 20 keV utilizing a Magnetron ion source with a slit extraction system and a split extractor. Each half of the extractor is treated as part of a 50 ohm transmission line which can be pulsed at {+-}700 volts creating a 1400 volt gradient. This system along with the associated electronics is electrically floated on top of a pulsed extraction voltage. A beam reduction of 95% has been observed at the end of the Fermilab 400 MeV Linac and 35% notching has recently been achieved in the Booster.

  6. Atomistic-continuum coupling for solid mechanics enforcing momentum balance and continuity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraczek, B.; Johnson, D. D.; Xia, C.; Haber, R. B.

    2004-03-01

    We investigate an atomistic-continuum coupling strategy for solid mechanics based on the theoretical framework of Spacetime Discontinuous Galerkin (SDG) finite element methods. SDG methods weakly enforce momentum balance and continuity over computational cells that directly discretize a spacetime analysis domain. The explicit incorporation of spacetime momentum flux within this formulation supports a straightforward exchange of stress and force between the continuum and atomistic regions with no ad hoc coupling assumptions. We employ a simple MD model for the atomistics and only consider problems in 1d øtimes time. However, this coupling strategy should be applicable to other O(N) atomistic methods and extensible to higher spatial dimensions. We focus on the effects of continuum basis truncation and unresolved length-scales in the present investigation.

  7. Hybrid simulations: combining atomistic and coarse-grained force fields using virtual sites.

    PubMed

    Rzepiela, Andrzej J; Louhivuori, Martti; Peter, Christine; Marrink, Siewert J

    2011-06-14

    Hybrid simulations, in which part of the system is represented at atomic resolution and the remaining part at a reduced, coarse-grained, level offer a powerful way to combine the accuracy associated with the atomistic force fields to the sampling speed obtained with coarse-grained (CG) potentials. In this work we introduce a straightforward scheme to perform hybrid simulations, making use of virtual sites to couple the two levels of resolution. With the help of these virtual sites interactions between molecules at different levels of resolution, i.e. between CG and atomistic molecules, are treated the same way as the pure CG-CG interactions. To test our method, we combine the Gromos atomistic force field with a number of coarse-grained potentials, obtained through several approaches that are designed to obtain CG potentials based on an existing atomistic model, namely iterative Boltzmann inversion, force matching, and a potential of mean force subtraction procedure (SB). We also explore the use of the MARTINI force field for the CG potential. A simple system, consisting of atomistic butane molecules dissolved in CG butane, is used to study the performance of our hybrid scheme. Based on the potentials of mean force for atomistic butane in CG solvent, and the properties of 1:1 mixtures of atomistic and CG butane which should exhibit ideal mixing behavior, we conclude that the MARTINI and SB potentials are particularly suited to be combined with the atomistic force field. The MARTINI potential is subsequently used to perform hybrid simulations of atomistic dialanine peptides in both CG butane and water. Compared to a fully atomistic description of the system, the hybrid description gives similar results provided that the dielectric screening of water is accounted for. Within the field of biomolecules, our method appears ideally suited to study e.g. protein-ligand binding, where the active site and ligand are modeled in atomistic detail and the rest of the protein

  8. Polar Bear

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amstrup, S.D.; ,; Lentfer, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    Polar bears are long-lived, late-maturing carnivores that have relatively low rates of reproduction and natural mortality. Their populations are susceptible to disturbance from human activities, such as the exploration and development of mineral resources or hunting. Polar bear populations have been an important renewable resource available to coastal communities throughout the Arctic for thousands of years.

  9. Polarized rainbow.

    PubMed

    Können, G P; de Boer, J H

    1979-06-15

    The Airy theory of the rainbow is extended to polarized light. For both polarization directions a simple analytic expression is obtained for the intensity distribution as a function of the scattering angle in terms of the Airy function and its derivative. This approach is valid at least down to droplet diameters of 0.3 mm in visible light. The degree of polarization of the rainbow is less than expected from geometrical optics; it increases with droplet size. For a droplet diameter >1 mm the locations of the supernumerary rainbows are equal for both polarization directions, but for a diameter <1 mm the supernumerary rainbows of the weaker polarization component are located between those in the strong component. PMID:20212586

  10. Polarization control at spin-driven ferroelectric domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leo, Naëmi; Bergman, Anders; Cano, Andres; Poudel, Narayan; Lorenz, Bernd; Fiebig, Manfred; Meier, Dennis

    2015-04-01

    Unusual electronic states arise at ferroelectric domain walls due to the local symmetry reduction, strain gradients and electrostatics. This particularly applies to improper ferroelectrics, where the polarization is induced by a structural or magnetic order parameter. Because of the subordinate nature of the polarization, the rigid mechanical and electrostatic boundary conditions that constrain domain walls in proper ferroics are lifted. Here we show that spin-driven ferroelectricity promotes the emergence of charged domain walls. This provides new degrees of flexibility for controlling domain-wall charges in a deterministic and reversible process. We create and position a domain wall by an electric field in Mn0.95Co0.05WO4. With a magnetic field we then rotate the polarization and convert neutral into charged domain walls, while its magnetic properties peg the wall to its location. Using atomistic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert simulations we quantify the polarization changes across the two wall types and highlight their general occurrence.

  11. Polarization control at spin-driven ferroelectric domain walls.

    PubMed

    Leo, Naëmi; Bergman, Anders; Cano, Andres; Poudel, Narayan; Lorenz, Bernd; Fiebig, Manfred; Meier, Dennis

    2015-04-14

    Unusual electronic states arise at ferroelectric domain walls due to the local symmetry reduction, strain gradients and electrostatics. This particularly applies to improper ferroelectrics, where the polarization is induced by a structural or magnetic order parameter. Because of the subordinate nature of the polarization, the rigid mechanical and electrostatic boundary conditions that constrain domain walls in proper ferroics are lifted. Here we show that spin-driven ferroelectricity promotes the emergence of charged domain walls. This provides new degrees of flexibility for controlling domain-wall charges in a deterministic and reversible process. We create and position a domain wall by an electric field in Mn0.95Co0.05WO4. With a magnetic field we then rotate the polarization and convert neutral into charged domain walls, while its magnetic properties peg the wall to its location. Using atomistic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert simulations we quantify the polarization changes across the two wall types and highlight their general occurrence.

  12. Nano sculpt: A methodology for generating complex realistic configurations for atomistic simulations.

    PubMed

    Prakash, A; Hummel, M; Schmauder, S; Bitzek, E

    2016-01-01

    Atomistic simulations have now become commonplace in the study of the deformation and failure of materials. Increase in computing power in recent years has made large-scale simulations with billions, or even trillions, of atoms a possibility. Most simulations to-date, however, are still performed with quasi-2D geometries or rather simplistic 3D setups. Although controlled studies on such well-defined structures are often required to obtain quantitative information from atomistic simulations, for qualitative studies focusing on e.g. the identification of mechanisms, researchers would greatly benefit from a methodology that helps realize more realistic configurations. The ideal scenario would be a one-on-one reconstruction of experimentally observed structures. To this end, we propose a new method and software tool called nano sculpt with the following features:•The method allows for easy sample generation for atomistic simulations from any arbitrarily shaped 3D enclosed volume.•The tool can be used to build atomistic samples from artificial geometries, including CAD geometries and structures obtained from simulation methods other than atomistic simulations.•The tool enables the generation of experimentally informed atomistic samples, by e.g. digitization of micrographs or usage of tomography data.

  13. Quantifying sampling noise and parametric uncertainty in atomistic-to-continuum simulations using surrogate models

    DOE PAGES

    Salloum, Maher N.; Sargsyan, Khachik; Jones, Reese E.; Najm, Habib N.; Debusschere, Bert

    2015-08-11

    We present a methodology to assess the predictive fidelity of multiscale simulations by incorporating uncertainty in the information exchanged between the components of an atomistic-to-continuum simulation. We account for both the uncertainty due to finite sampling in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and the uncertainty in the physical parameters of the model. Using Bayesian inference, we represent the expensive atomistic component by a surrogate model that relates the long-term output of the atomistic simulation to its uncertain inputs. We then present algorithms to solve for the variables exchanged across the atomistic-continuum interface in terms of polynomial chaos expansions (PCEs). We alsomore » consider a simple Couette flow where velocities are exchanged between the atomistic and continuum components, while accounting for uncertainty in the atomistic model parameters and the continuum boundary conditions. Results show convergence of the coupling algorithm at a reasonable number of iterations. As a result, the uncertainty in the obtained variables significantly depends on the amount of data sampled from the MD simulations and on the width of the time averaging window used in the MD simulations.« less

  14. Nano sculpt: A methodology for generating complex realistic configurations for atomistic simulations.

    PubMed

    Prakash, A; Hummel, M; Schmauder, S; Bitzek, E

    2016-01-01

    Atomistic simulations have now become commonplace in the study of the deformation and failure of materials. Increase in computing power in recent years has made large-scale simulations with billions, or even trillions, of atoms a possibility. Most simulations to-date, however, are still performed with quasi-2D geometries or rather simplistic 3D setups. Although controlled studies on such well-defined structures are often required to obtain quantitative information from atomistic simulations, for qualitative studies focusing on e.g. the identification of mechanisms, researchers would greatly benefit from a methodology that helps realize more realistic configurations. The ideal scenario would be a one-on-one reconstruction of experimentally observed structures. To this end, we propose a new method and software tool called nano sculpt with the following features:•The method allows for easy sample generation for atomistic simulations from any arbitrarily shaped 3D enclosed volume.•The tool can be used to build atomistic samples from artificial geometries, including CAD geometries and structures obtained from simulation methods other than atomistic simulations.•The tool enables the generation of experimentally informed atomistic samples, by e.g. digitization of micrographs or usage of tomography data. PMID:27054098

  15. Nanosculpt: A methodology for generating complex realistic configurations for atomistic simulations

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, A.; Hummel, M.; Schmauder, S.; Bitzek, E.

    2016-01-01

    Atomistic simulations have now become commonplace in the study of the deformation and failure of materials. Increase in computing power in recent years has made large-scale simulations with billions, or even trillions, of atoms a possibility. Most simulations to-date, however, are still performed with quasi-2D geometries or rather simplistic 3D setups. Although controlled studies on such well-defined structures are often required to obtain quantitative information from atomistic simulations, for qualitative studies focusing on e.g. the identification of mechanisms, researchers would greatly benefit from a methodology that helps realize more realistic configurations. The ideal scenario would be a one-on-one reconstruction of experimentally observed structures. To this end, we propose a new method and software tool called nanosculpt with the following features:•The method allows for easy sample generation for atomistic simulations from any arbitrarily shaped 3D enclosed volume.•The tool can be used to build atomistic samples from artificial geometries, including CAD geometries and structures obtained from simulation methods other than atomistic simulations.•The tool enables the generation of experimentally informed atomistic samples, by e.g. digitization of micrographs or usage of tomography data. PMID:27054098

  16. Quantifying sampling noise and parametric uncertainty in atomistic-to-continuum simulations using surrogate models

    SciTech Connect

    Salloum, Maher N.; Sargsyan, Khachik; Jones, Reese E.; Najm, Habib N.; Debusschere, Bert

    2015-08-11

    We present a methodology to assess the predictive fidelity of multiscale simulations by incorporating uncertainty in the information exchanged between the components of an atomistic-to-continuum simulation. We account for both the uncertainty due to finite sampling in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and the uncertainty in the physical parameters of the model. Using Bayesian inference, we represent the expensive atomistic component by a surrogate model that relates the long-term output of the atomistic simulation to its uncertain inputs. We then present algorithms to solve for the variables exchanged across the atomistic-continuum interface in terms of polynomial chaos expansions (PCEs). We also consider a simple Couette flow where velocities are exchanged between the atomistic and continuum components, while accounting for uncertainty in the atomistic model parameters and the continuum boundary conditions. Results show convergence of the coupling algorithm at a reasonable number of iterations. As a result, the uncertainty in the obtained variables significantly depends on the amount of data sampled from the MD simulations and on the width of the time averaging window used in the MD simulations.

  17. Three-dimensional Hybrid Continuum-Atomistic Simulations for Multiscale Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wijesinghe, S; Hornung, R; Garcia, A; Hadjiconstantinou, N

    2004-04-15

    We present an adaptive mesh and algorithmic refinement (AMAR) scheme for modeling multi-scale hydrodynamics. The AMAR approach extends standard conservative adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) algorithms by providing a robust flux-based method for coupling an atomistic fluid representation to a continuum model. The atomistic model is applied locally in regions where the continuum description is invalid or inaccurate, such as near strong flow gradients and at fluid interfaces, or when the continuum grid is refined to the molecular scale. The need for such ''hybrid'' methods arises from the fact that hydrodynamics modeled by continuum representations are often under-resolved or inaccurate while solutions generated using molecular resolution globally are not feasible. In the implementation described herein, Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) provides an atomistic description of the flow and the compressible two-fluid Euler equations serve as our continuum-scale model. The AMR methodology provides local grid refinement while the algorithm refinement feature allows the transition to DSMC where needed. The continuum and atomistic representations are coupled by matching fluxes at the continuum-atomistic interfaces and by proper averaging and interpolation of data between scales. Our AMAR application code is implemented in C++ and is built upon the SAMRAI (Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement Application Infrastructure) framework developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. SAMRAI provides the parallel adaptive gridding algorithm and enables the coupling between the continuum and atomistic methods.

  18. Are current atomistic force fields accurate enough to study proteins in crowded environments?

    PubMed

    Petrov, Drazen; Zagrovic, Bojan

    2014-05-01

    The high concentration of macromolecules in the crowded cellular interior influences different thermodynamic and kinetic properties of proteins, including their structural stabilities, intermolecular binding affinities and enzymatic rates. Moreover, various structural biology methods, such as NMR or different spectroscopies, typically involve samples with relatively high protein concentration. Due to large sampling requirements, however, the accuracy of classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in capturing protein behavior at high concentration still remains largely untested. Here, we use explicit-solvent MD simulations and a total of 6.4 µs of simulated time to study wild-type (folded) and oxidatively damaged (unfolded) forms of villin headpiece at 6 mM and 9.2 mM protein concentration. We first perform an exhaustive set of simulations with multiple protein molecules in the simulation box using GROMOS 45a3 and 54a7 force fields together with different types of electrostatics treatment and solution ionic strengths. Surprisingly, the two villin headpiece variants exhibit similar aggregation behavior, despite the fact that their estimated aggregation propensities markedly differ. Importantly, regardless of the simulation protocol applied, wild-type villin headpiece consistently aggregates even under conditions at which it is experimentally known to be soluble. We demonstrate that aggregation is accompanied by a large decrease in the total potential energy, with not only hydrophobic, but also polar residues and backbone contributing substantially. The same effect is directly observed for two other major atomistic force fields (AMBER99SB-ILDN and CHARMM22-CMAP) as well as indirectly shown for additional two (AMBER94, OPLS-AAL), and is possibly due to a general overestimation of the potential energy of protein-protein interactions at the expense of water-water and water-protein interactions. Overall, our results suggest that current MD force fields may distort the

  19. Are Current Atomistic Force Fields Accurate Enough to Study Proteins in Crowded Environments?

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Drazen; Zagrovic, Bojan

    2014-01-01

    The high concentration of macromolecules in the crowded cellular interior influences different thermodynamic and kinetic properties of proteins, including their structural stabilities, intermolecular binding affinities and enzymatic rates. Moreover, various structural biology methods, such as NMR or different spectroscopies, typically involve samples with relatively high protein concentration. Due to large sampling requirements, however, the accuracy of classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in capturing protein behavior at high concentration still remains largely untested. Here, we use explicit-solvent MD simulations and a total of 6.4 µs of simulated time to study wild-type (folded) and oxidatively damaged (unfolded) forms of villin headpiece at 6 mM and 9.2 mM protein concentration. We first perform an exhaustive set of simulations with multiple protein molecules in the simulation box using GROMOS 45a3 and 54a7 force fields together with different types of electrostatics treatment and solution ionic strengths. Surprisingly, the two villin headpiece variants exhibit similar aggregation behavior, despite the fact that their estimated aggregation propensities markedly differ. Importantly, regardless of the simulation protocol applied, wild-type villin headpiece consistently aggregates even under conditions at which it is experimentally known to be soluble. We demonstrate that aggregation is accompanied by a large decrease in the total potential energy, with not only hydrophobic, but also polar residues and backbone contributing substantially. The same effect is directly observed for two other major atomistic force fields (AMBER99SB-ILDN and CHARMM22-CMAP) as well as indirectly shown for additional two (AMBER94, OPLS-AAL), and is possibly due to a general overestimation of the potential energy of protein-protein interactions at the expense of water-water and water-protein interactions. Overall, our results suggest that current MD force fields may distort the

  20. Are current atomistic force fields accurate enough to study proteins in crowded environments?

    PubMed

    Petrov, Drazen; Zagrovic, Bojan

    2014-05-01

    The high concentration of macromolecules in the crowded cellular interior influences different thermodynamic and kinetic properties of proteins, including their structural stabilities, intermolecular binding affinities and enzymatic rates. Moreover, various structural biology methods, such as NMR or different spectroscopies, typically involve samples with relatively high protein concentration. Due to large sampling requirements, however, the accuracy of classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in capturing protein behavior at high concentration still remains largely untested. Here, we use explicit-solvent MD simulations and a total of 6.4 µs of simulated time to study wild-type (folded) and oxidatively damaged (unfolded) forms of villin headpiece at 6 mM and 9.2 mM protein concentration. We first perform an exhaustive set of simulations with multiple protein molecules in the simulation box using GROMOS 45a3 and 54a7 force fields together with different types of electrostatics treatment and solution ionic strengths. Surprisingly, the two villin headpiece variants exhibit similar aggregation behavior, despite the fact that their estimated aggregation propensities markedly differ. Importantly, regardless of the simulation protocol applied, wild-type villin headpiece consistently aggregates even under conditions at which it is experimentally known to be soluble. We demonstrate that aggregation is accompanied by a large decrease in the total potential energy, with not only hydrophobic, but also polar residues and backbone contributing substantially. The same effect is directly observed for two other major atomistic force fields (AMBER99SB-ILDN and CHARMM22-CMAP) as well as indirectly shown for additional two (AMBER94, OPLS-AAL), and is possibly due to a general overestimation of the potential energy of protein-protein interactions at the expense of water-water and water-protein interactions. Overall, our results suggest that current MD force fields may distort the

  1. Microsecond protein folding events revealed by time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer in a microfluidic mixer.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liguo; Zeng, Yan; Sun, Qiqi; Sun, Yueru; Guo, Zhihong; Qu, Jianan Y; Yao, Shuhuai

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate the combination of the time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (tr-FRET) measurement and the ultrarapid hydrodynamic focusing microfluidic mixer. The combined technique is capable of probing the intermolecular distance change with temporal resolution at microsecond level and structural resolution at Angstrom level, and the use of two-photon excitation enables a broader exploration of FRET with spectrum from near-ultraviolet to visible wavelength. As a proof of principle, we used the coupled microfluidic laminar flow and time-resolved two-photon excitation microscopy to investigate the early folding states of Cytochrome c (cyt c) by monitoring the distance between the tryptophan (Trp-59)-heme donor-acceptor (D-A) pair. The transformation of folding states of cyt c in the early 500 μs of refolding was revealed on the microsecond time scale. For the first time, we clearly resolved the early transient state of cyt c, which is populated within the dead time of the mixer (<10 μs) and has a characteristic Trp-59-heme distance of ∼31 Å. We believe this tool can find more applications in studying the early stages of biological processes with FRET as the probe.

  2. Breaking the millisecond barrier on SpiNNaker: implementing asynchronous event-based plastic models with microsecond resolution.

    PubMed

    Lagorce, Xavier; Stromatias, Evangelos; Galluppi, Francesco; Plana, Luis A; Liu, Shih-Chii; Furber, Steve B; Benosman, Ryad B

    2015-01-01

    Spike-based neuromorphic sensors such as retinas and cochleas, change the way in which the world is sampled. Instead of producing data sampled at a constant rate, these sensors output spikes that are asynchronous and event driven. The event-based nature of neuromorphic sensors implies a complete paradigm shift in current perception algorithms toward those that emphasize the importance of precise timing. The spikes produced by these sensors usually have a time resolution in the order of microseconds. This high temporal resolution is a crucial factor in learning tasks. It is also widely used in the field of biological neural networks. Sound localization for instance relies on detecting time lags between the two ears which, in the barn owl, reaches a temporal resolution of 5 μs. Current available neuromorphic computation platforms such as SpiNNaker often limit their users to a time resolution in the order of milliseconds that is not compatible with the asynchronous outputs of neuromorphic sensors. To overcome these limitations and allow for the exploration of new types of neuromorphic computing architectures, we introduce a novel software framework on the SpiNNaker platform. This framework allows for simulations of spiking networks and plasticity mechanisms using a completely asynchronous and event-based scheme running with a microsecond time resolution. Results on two example networks using this new implementation are presented. PMID:26106288

  3. Search of the energetic gamma-ray experiment telescope (EGRET) data for high-energy gamma-ray microsecond bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Bertsch, D. L.; Dingus, B. L.; Esposito, J. A.; Hartman, R. C.; Hunter, S. D.; Kanbach, G.; Kniffen, D. A.; Lin, Y. C.; Mattox, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    Hawking (1974) and Page & Hawking (1976) investigated theoretically the possibility of detecting high-energy gamma rays produced by the quantum-mechanical decay of a small black hole created in the early universe. They concluded that, at the very end of the life of the small black hole, it would radiate a burst of gamma rays peaked near 250 MeV with a total energy of about 10(exp 34) ergs in the order of a microsecond or less. The characteristics of a black hole are determined by laws of physics beyond the range of current particle accelerators; hence, the search for these short bursts of high-energy gamma rays provides at least the possibility of being the first test of this region of physics. The Compton Observatory Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) has the capability of detecting directly the gamma rays from such bursts at a much fainter level than SAS 2, and a search of the EGRET data has led to an upper limit of 5 x 10(exp -2) black hole decays per cu pc per yr, placing constraints on this and other theories predicting microsecond high-energy gamma-ray bursts.

  4. On-the-fly decoding luminescence lifetimes in the microsecond region for lanthanide-encoded suspension arrays

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yiqing; Lu, Jie; Zhao, Jiangbo; Cusido, Janet; Raymo, Françisco M; Yuan, Jingli; Yang, Sean; Leif, Robert C.; Huo, Yujing; Piper, James A.; Paul Robinson, J; Goldys, Ewa M.; Jin, Dayong

    2014-01-01

    Significant multiplexing capacity of optical time-domain coding has been recently demonstrated by tuning luminescence lifetimes of the upconversion nanoparticles called ‘τ-Dots’. It provides a large dynamic range of lifetimes from microseconds to milliseconds, which allows creating large libraries of nanotags/microcarriers. However, a robust approach is required to rapidly and accurately measure the luminescence lifetimes from the relatively slow-decaying signals. Here we show a fast algorithm suitable for the microsecond region with precision closely approaching the theoretical limit and compatible with the rapid scanning cytometry technique. We exploit this approach to further extend optical time-domain multiplexing to the downconversion luminescence, using luminescence microspheres wherein lifetimes are tuned through luminescence resonance energy transfer. We demonstrate real-time discrimination of these microspheres in the rapid scanning cytometry, and apply them to the multiplexed probing of pathogen DNA strands. Our results indicate that tunable luminescence lifetimes have considerable potential in high-throughput analytical sciences. PMID:24796249

  5. Amp: A modular approach to machine learning in atomistic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorshidi, Alireza; Peterson, Andrew A.

    2016-10-01

    Electronic structure calculations, such as those employing Kohn-Sham density functional theory or ab initio wavefunction theories, have allowed for atomistic-level understandings of a wide variety of phenomena and properties of matter at small scales. However, the computational cost of electronic structure methods drastically increases with length and time scales, which makes these methods difficult for long time-scale molecular dynamics simulations or large-sized systems. Machine-learning techniques can provide accurate potentials that can match the quality of electronic structure calculations, provided sufficient training data. These potentials can then be used to rapidly simulate large and long time-scale phenomena at similar quality to the parent electronic structure approach. Machine-learning potentials usually take a bias-free mathematical form and can be readily developed for a wide variety of systems. Electronic structure calculations have favorable properties-namely that they are noiseless and targeted training data can be produced on-demand-that make them particularly well-suited for machine learning. This paper discusses our modular approach to atomistic machine learning through the development of the open-source Atomistic Machine-learning Package (Amp), which allows for representations of both the total and atom-centered potential energy surface, in both periodic and non-periodic systems. Potentials developed through the atom-centered approach are simultaneously applicable for systems with various sizes. Interpolation can be enhanced by introducing custom descriptors of the local environment. We demonstrate this in the current work for Gaussian-type, bispectrum, and Zernike-type descriptors. Amp has an intuitive and modular structure with an interface through the python scripting language yet has parallelizable fortran components for demanding tasks; it is designed to integrate closely with the widely used Atomic Simulation Environment (ASE), which

  6. Physically representative atomistic modeling of atomic-scale friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yalin

    Nanotribology is a research field to study friction, adhesion, wear and lubrication occurred between two sliding interfaces at nano scale. This study is motivated by the demanding need of miniaturization mechanical components in Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS), improvement of durability in magnetic storage system, and other industrial applications. Overcoming tribological failure and finding ways to control friction at small scale have become keys to commercialize MEMS with sliding components as well as to stimulate the technological innovation associated with the development of MEMS. In addition to the industrial applications, such research is also scientifically fascinating because it opens a door to understand macroscopic friction from the most bottom atomic level, and therefore serves as a bridge between science and engineering. This thesis focuses on solid/solid atomic friction and its associated energy dissipation through theoretical analysis, atomistic simulation, transition state theory, and close collaboration with experimentalists. Reduced-order models have many advantages for its simplification and capacity to simulating long-time event. We will apply Prandtl-Tomlinson models and their extensions to interpret dry atomic-scale friction. We begin with the fundamental equations and build on them step-by-step from the simple quasistatic one-spring, one-mass model for predicting transitions between friction regimes to the two-dimensional and multi-atom models for describing the effect of contact area. Theoretical analysis, numerical implementation, and predicted physical phenomena are all discussed. In the process, we demonstrate the significant potential for this approach to yield new fundamental understanding of atomic-scale friction. Atomistic modeling can never be overemphasized in the investigation of atomic friction, in which each single atom could play a significant role, but is hard to be captured experimentally. In atomic friction, the

  7. The non-uniqueness of the atomistic stress tensor and its relationship to the generalized Beltrami representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Admal, Nikhil Chandra; Tadmor, E. B.

    2016-08-01

    The non-uniqueness of the atomistic stress tensor is a well-known issue when defining continuum fields for atomistic systems. In this paper, we study the non-uniqueness of the atomistic stress tensor stemming from the non-uniqueness of the potential energy representation. In particular, we show using rigidity theory that the distribution associated with the potential part of the atomistic stress tensor can be decomposed into an irrotational part that is independent of the potential energy representation, and a traction-free solenoidal part. Therefore, we have identified for the atomistic stress tensor a discrete analog of the continuum generalized Beltrami representation (a version of the vector Helmholtz decomposition for symmetric tensors). We demonstrate the validity of these analogies using a numerical test. A program for performing the decomposition of the atomistic stress tensor called MDStressLab is available online at

  8. Transistor roadmap projection using predictive full-band atomistic modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Salmani-Jelodar, M. Klimeck, G.; Kim, S.; Ng, K.

    2014-08-25

    In this letter, a full band atomistic quantum transport tool is used to predict the performance of double gate metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) over the next 15 years for International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS). As MOSFET channel lengths scale below 20 nm, the number of atoms in the device cross-sections becomes finite. At this scale, quantum mechanical effects play an important role in determining the device characteristics. These quantum effects can be captured with the quantum transport tool. Critical results show the ON-current degradation as a result of geometry scaling, which is in contrast to previous ITRS compact model calculations. Geometric scaling has significant effects on the ON-current by increasing source-to-drain (S/D) tunneling and altering the electronic band structure. By shortening the device gate length from 20 nm to 5.1 nm, the ratio of S/D tunneling current to the overall subthreshold OFF-current increases from 18% to 98%. Despite this ON-current degradation by scaling, the intrinsic device speed is projected to increase at a rate of at least 8% per year as a result of the reduction of the quantum capacitance.

  9. Crystallized Silicon Nanostructures - Experimental Characterization and Atomistic Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Agbo, Solomon; Sutta, Pavol; Calta, Pavel; Biswas, Rana; Pan, Bicai

    2014-07-01

    We have synthesized silicon nanocrystalline structures from thermal annealing of thin film amorphous silicon-based multilayers. The annealing procedure that was carried out in vacuum at temperatures up to 1100 °C is integrated in a X-ray diffraction (XRD) setup for real-time monitoring of the formation phases of the nanostructures. The microstructure of the crystallized films is investigated through experimental measurements combined with atomistic simulations of realistic nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) models. The multilayers consisting of uniformly alternating thicknesses of hydrogenated amorphous silicon and silicon oxide (SiO2) were deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition on crystalline silicon and Corning glass substrates. The crystallized structure consisting of nc-Si structures embedded in an amorphous matrix were further characterized through XRD, Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared measurements. We are able to show the different stages of nanostructure formation and how the sizes and the crystallized mass fraction can be controlled in our experimental synthesis. The crystallized silicon structures with large crystalline filling fractions exceeding 50% have been simulated with a robust classical molecular dynamics technique. The crystalline filling fractions and structural order of nc-Si obtained from this simulation are compared with our Raman and XRD measurements.

  10. AtomEye: an efficient atomistic configuration viewer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ju

    2003-03-01

    AtomEye is free atomistic visualization software for all major UNIX platforms. It is based on a newly developed graphics core library of higher quality than the X-window standard, with area-weighted anti-aliasing. An order-N neighbourlist algorithm is used to compute the bond connectivity. The functionalities of AtomEye include: parallel and perspective projections with full three-dimensional navigation; customizable bond and coordination number calculation; colour-encoding of arbitrary user-defined quantities; local atomic strain invariant; coloured atom tiling and tracing; up to 16 cutting planes; periodic boundary condition translations; high-quality JPEG, PNG and EPS screenshots; and animation scripting. The program is efficient compared to OpenGL hardware acceleration by employing special algorithms to treat spheres (atoms) and cylinders (bonds), in which they are rendered as primitive objects rather than as composites of polygons. AtomEye can handle more than one million atoms on a PC with 1 GB memory. It is a robust, low-cost tool for surveying nanostructures and following their evolutions.

  11. Computer Science Techniques Applied to Parallel Atomistic Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Aiichiro

    1998-03-01

    Recent developments in parallel processing technology and multiresolution numerical algorithms have established large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations as a new research mode for studying materials phenomena such as fracture. However, this requires large system sizes and long simulated times. We have developed: i) Space-time multiresolution schemes; ii) fuzzy-clustering approach to hierarchical dynamics; iii) wavelet-based adaptive curvilinear-coordinate load balancing; iv) multilevel preconditioned conjugate gradient method; and v) spacefilling-curve-based data compression for parallel I/O. Using these techniques, million-atom parallel MD simulations are performed for the oxidation dynamics of nanocrystalline Al. The simulations take into account the effect of dynamic charge transfer between Al and O using the electronegativity equalization scheme. The resulting long-range Coulomb interaction is calculated efficiently with the fast multipole method. Results for temperature and charge distributions, residual stresses, bond lengths and bond angles, and diffusivities of Al and O will be presented. The oxidation of nanocrystalline Al is elucidated through immersive visualization in virtual environments. A unique dual-degree education program at Louisiana State University will also be discussed in which students can obtain a Ph.D. in Physics & Astronomy and a M.S. from the Department of Computer Science in five years. This program fosters interdisciplinary research activities for interfacing High Performance Computing and Communications with large-scale atomistic simulations of advanced materials. This work was supported by NSF (CAREER Program), ARO, PRF, and Louisiana LEQSF.

  12. Atomistic simulation of the differences between calcite and dolomite surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Titiloye, J.O.; Leeuw, N.H. de; Parker, S.C.

    1998-08-01

    Atomistic simulation methods have been used to calculate and compare the surface structures and energies of the {l_brace}10{bar 1}4{r_brace}, {l_brace}0001{r_brace}, {l_brace}10{bar 1}0{r_brace}, {l_brace}11{bar 2}0{r_brace} and {l_brace}10{bar 1}1{r_brace} surfaces of calcite and dolomite and to evaluate their equilibrium morphologies. The calcite {l_brace}10{bar 1}4{r_brace} and the dolomite {l_brace}10{bar 1}0{r_brace} and {l_brace}11{bar 2}0{r_brace} surfaces are the most stable crystal planes. Investigation of the segregation of Mg and Ca ions in the dolomite crystal shows a clear preference for Ca{sup 2+} ions at the surface sites and for Mg{sup 2+} ions in the bulk sites and hence growth onto dolomite results in calcium carbonate or high magnesian calcite crystals which helps explain the difficulty in crystallizing dolomite vs. calcite under laboratory conditions.

  13. Coarse-Grained and Atomistic Modeling of Polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancy, Thomas C.; Hinkley, Jeffrey A.

    2004-01-01

    A coarse-grained model for a set of three polyimide isomers is developed. Each polyimide is comprised of BPDA (3,3,4,4' - biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride) and one of three APB isomers: 1,3-bis(4-aminophenoxy)benzene, 1,4-bis(4-aminophenoxy)benzene or 1,3-bis(3-aminophenoxy)benzene. The coarse-grained model is constructed as a series of linked vectors following the contour of the polymer backbone. Beads located at the midpoint of each vector define centers for long range interaction energy between monomer subunits. A bulk simulation of each coarse-grained polyimide model is performed with a dynamic Monte Carlo procedure. These coarsegrained models are then reverse-mapped to fully atomistic models. The coarse-grained models show the expected trends in decreasing chain dimensions with increasing meta linkage in the APB section of the repeat unit, although these differences were minor due to the relatively short chains simulated here. Considerable differences are seen among the dynamic Monte Carlo properties of the three polyimide isomers. Decreasing relaxation times are seen with increasing meta linkage in the APB section of the repeat unit.

  14. Atomistic mechanisms for bilayer growth of graphene on metal substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wei; Cui, Ping; Zhu, Wenguang; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Gao, Yanfei; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2015-01-08

    Epitaxial growth on metal substrates has been shown to be the most powerful approach in producing large-scale high-quality monolayer graphene, yet it remains a major challenge to realize uniform bilayer graphene growth. Here we carry out a comparative study of the atomistic mechanisms for bilayer graphene growth on the (111) surfaces of Cu and Ni, using multiscale approaches combining first-principles calculations and rate-equation analysis. We first show that the relatively weak graphene-Cu interaction enhances the lateral diffusion and effective nucleation of C atoms underneath the graphene island, thereby making it more feasible to grow bilayer graphene on Cu. In contrast, the stronger graphene-Ni interaction suppresses the lateral mobility and dimerization of C atoms underneath the graphene, making it unlikely to achieve controlled growth of bilayer graphene on Ni. We then determine the critical graphene size beyond which nucleation of the second layer will take place. Intriguingly, the critical size exhibits an effective inverse "Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier" effect, becoming smaller for faster C migration from the Cu surface to the graphene-Cu interface sites across the graphene edge. Lastly, these findings allow us to propose a novel alternating growth scheme to realize mass production of bilayer graphene.

  15. Atomistic mechanisms for bilayer growth of graphene on metal substrates

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Wei; Cui, Ping; Zhu, Wenguang; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Gao, Yanfei; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2015-01-08

    Epitaxial growth on metal substrates has been shown to be the most powerful approach in producing large-scale high-quality monolayer graphene, yet it remains a major challenge to realize uniform bilayer graphene growth. Here we carry out a comparative study of the atomistic mechanisms for bilayer graphene growth on the (111) surfaces of Cu and Ni, using multiscale approaches combining first-principles calculations and rate-equation analysis. We first show that the relatively weak graphene-Cu interaction enhances the lateral diffusion and effective nucleation of C atoms underneath the graphene island, thereby making it more feasible to grow bilayer graphene on Cu. In contrast,more » the stronger graphene-Ni interaction suppresses the lateral mobility and dimerization of C atoms underneath the graphene, making it unlikely to achieve controlled growth of bilayer graphene on Ni. We then determine the critical graphene size beyond which nucleation of the second layer will take place. Intriguingly, the critical size exhibits an effective inverse "Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier" effect, becoming smaller for faster C migration from the Cu surface to the graphene-Cu interface sites across the graphene edge. Lastly, these findings allow us to propose a novel alternating growth scheme to realize mass production of bilayer graphene.« less

  16. An efficient fully atomistic potential model for dense fluid methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chuntao; Ouyang, Jie; Zhuang, Xin; Wang, Lihua; Li, Wuming

    2016-08-01

    A fully atomistic model aimed to obtain a general purpose model for the dense fluid methane is presented. The new optimized potential for liquid simulation (OPLS) model is a rigid five site model which consists of five fixed point charges and five Lennard-Jones centers. The parameters in the potential model are determined by a fit of the experimental data of dense fluid methane using molecular dynamics simulation. The radial distribution function and the diffusion coefficient are successfully calculated for dense fluid methane at various state points. The simulated results are in good agreement with the available experimental data shown in literature. Moreover, the distribution of mean number hydrogen bonds and the distribution of pair-energy are analyzed, which are obtained from the new model and other five reference potential models. Furthermore, the space-time correlation functions for dense fluid methane are also discussed. All the numerical results demonstrate that the new OPLS model could be well utilized to investigate the dense fluid methane.

  17. Atomistic Hydrodynamics and the Dynamical Hydrophobic Effect in Porous Graphene.

    PubMed

    Strong, Steven E; Eaves, Joel D

    2016-05-19

    Mirroring their role in electrical and optical physics, two-dimensional crystals are emerging as novel platforms for fluid separations and water desalination, which are hydrodynamic processes that occur in nanoscale environments. For numerical simulation to play a predictive and descriptive role, one must have theoretically sound methods that span orders of magnitude in physical scales, from the atomistic motions of particles inside the channels to the large-scale hydrodynamic gradients that drive transport. Here, we use constraint dynamics to derive a nonequilibrium molecular dynamics method for simulating steady-state mass flow of a fluid moving through the nanoscopic spaces of a porous solid. After validating our method on a model system, we use it to study the hydrophobic effect of water moving through pores of electrically doped single-layer graphene. The trend in permeability that we calculate does not follow the hydrophobicity of the membrane but is instead governed by a crossover between two competing molecular transport mechanisms. PMID:27139634

  18. Equilibrium at the edge and atomistic mechanisms of graphene growth

    PubMed Central

    Artyukhov, Vasilii I.; Liu, Yuanyue; Yakobson, Boris I.

    2012-01-01

    The morphology of graphene is crucial for its applications, yet an adequate theory of its growth is lacking: It is either simplified to a phenomenological-continuum level or is overly detailed in atomistic simulations, which are often intractable. Here we put forward a comprehensive picture dubbed nanoreactor, which draws from ideas of step-flow crystal growth augmented by detailed first-principles calculations. As the carbon atoms migrate from the feedstock to catalyst to final graphene lattice, they go through a sequence of states whose energy levels can be computed and arranged into a step-by-step map. Analysis begins with the structure and energies of arbitrary edges to yield equilibrium island shapes. Then, it elucidates how the atoms dock at the edges and how they avoid forming defects. The sequence of atomic row assembly determines the kinetic anisotropy of growth, and consequently, graphene island morphology, explaining a number of experimental facts and suggesting how the growth product can further be improved. Finally, this analysis adds a useful perspective on the synthesis of carbon nanotubes and its essential distinction from graphene. PMID:22949702

  19. Micromechanical tests of ion irradiated materials: Atomistic simulations and experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, C.; Jin, H. H.; Kwon, J.

    2012-07-01

    We investigated irradiation effects on Fe-Cr binary alloys by using a nano-indentation combined with a continuous stiffness measurement (CSM) technique. We modeled the nano-indentation test by using a finite element method. We could extract the intrinsic hardness and the yield stress of an irradiation hardened region by using a so-called inverse method. SiC micro-pillars of various sizes were fabricated by mask and inductively coupled plasma etching technique and compressed by using flat punch nano-indentation. Compressive fracture strength showed a clear specimen size effect. Brittle-to-Ductile transition at room temperature was observed as the specimen size decreases. The effect of irradiation on the fracture strength of SiC micro-pillars was evaluated by performing ion irradiation with Si ions. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of nano-indentation and nano-pillar compression tests. Radiation effect was observed which is found to be due to the interaction of dislocations nucleated by spherical indenter with pre-existing radiation defects (voids). These atomistic simulations are expected to significantly contribute to the investigation of the fundamental deformation mechanism of small scale irradiated materials. (authors)

  20. Atomistic modeling of phonon transport in turbostratic graphitic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Rui; Chen, Yifeng; Kim, Ki Wook

    2016-05-01

    Thermal transport in turbostratic graphitic systems is investigated by using an atomistic analytical model based on the 4th-nearest-neighbor force constant approximation and a registry-dependent interlayer potential. The developed model is shown to produce an excellent agreement with the experimental data and ab initio results in the calculation of bulk properties. Subsequent analysis of phonon transport in combination with the Green's function method illustrates the significant dependence of key characteristics on the misorientation angle, clearly indicating the importance of this degree of freedom in multi-stacked structures. Selecting three angles with the smallest commensurate unit cells, the thermal resistance is evaluated at the twisted interface between two AB stacked graphite. The resulting values in the range of 35 × 10-10 K m2/W to 116 × 10-10 K m2/W are as large as those between two dissimilar material systems such as a metal and graphene. The strong rotational effect on the cross-plane thermal transport may offer an effective means of phonon engineering for applications such as thermoelectric materials.

  1. Seawater Pervaporation through Zeolitic Imidazolate Framework Membranes: Atomistic Simulation Study.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Krishna M; Qiao, Zhiwei; Zhang, Kang; Jiang, Jianwen

    2016-06-01

    An atomistic simulation study is reported for seawater pervaporation through five zeolitic imidazolate framework (ZIF) membranes including ZIF-8, -93, -95, -97, and -100. Salt rejection in the five ZIFs is predicted to be 100%. With the largest aperture, ZIF-100 possesses the highest water permeability of 5 × 10(-4) kg m/(m(2) h bar), which is substantially higher compared to commercial reverse osmosis membranes, as well as zeolite and graphene oxide pervaporation membranes. In ZIF-8, -93, -95, and -97 with similar aperture size, water flux is governed by framework hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity; in hydrophobic ZIF-8 and -95, water flux is higher than in hydrophilic ZIF-93 and -97. Furthermore, water molecules in ZIF-93 move slowly and remain in the membrane for a long time but undergo to-and-fro motion in ZIF-100. The lifetime of hydrogen bonds in ZIF-93 is found to be longer than in ZIF-100. This simulation study quantitatively elucidates the dynamic and structural properties of water in ZIF membranes, identifies the key governing factors (aperture size and framework hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity), and suggests that ZIF-100 is an intriguing membrane for seawater pervaporation. PMID:27195441

  2. Atomistic Simulations of Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) Surfactants in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, Lauren J.; Stevens, Mark J.

    2015-03-01

    The amphiphilic polymer poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) displays a sharp phase transition at its LCST around 32 °C, which results from competing interactions of the hydrophobic and hydrophilic groups with water. This thermoresponsive behavior can be exploited in more complex architectures, such as block copolymers or surfactants, to provide responsive PNIPAM head groups. In these systems, however, changes to the hydrophobic/hydrophilic balance can alter the transition behavior. In this work, we perform atomistic simulations of PNIPAM-alkyl surfactants to study the temperature dependence of their structures. A single chain of the surfactant does not show temperature-responsive behavior. Instead, below and above the LCST of PNIPAM, the surfactant folds to bring the hydrophobic alkyl tail in contact with the PNIPAM backbone, shielding it from water. In addition to single chains, we explore the self-assembly of multiple surfactants into micelles and how the temperature-dependent behavior is changed. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  3. Quantifying grain boundary damage tolerance with atomistic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, Daniel; Tucker, Garritt J.

    2016-10-01

    Grain boundaries play a pivotal role in defect evolution and accommodation within materials. Irradiated metals have been observed to form defect denuded zones in the vicinity of grain boundaries. This is especially apparent in nanocrystalline metals, which have an increased grain boundary concentration, as compared to their polycrystalline counterparts. Importantly, the effect of individual grain boundaries on microstructural damage tolerance is related to the character or structural state of the grain boundary. In this work, the damage accommodation behavior of a variety of copper grain boundaries is studied using atomistic simulations. Damage accumulation behavior is found to reach a saturation point where both the free volume and energy of a grain boundary fluctuate within an elliptical manifold, which varies in size for different boundary characters. Analysis of the grain boundaries shows that extrinsic damage accommodation occurs due to localized atomic shuffling accompanied by free volume rearrangement within the boundary. Continuous damage accumulation leads to altered atomic structural states that oscillate around a mean non-equilibrium state, that is energetically metastable. Our results suggest that variation of grain boundary behavior, both from equilibrium and under saturation, is directly related to grain boundary equilibrium energy and some boundaries have a greater propensity to continually accommodate damage, as compared to others.

  4. Equilibrium at the edge and atomistic mechanisms of graphene growth.

    PubMed

    Artyukhov, Vasilii I; Liu, Yuanyue; Yakobson, Boris I

    2012-09-18

    The morphology of graphene is crucial for its applications, yet an adequate theory of its growth is lacking: It is either simplified to a phenomenological-continuum level or is overly detailed in atomistic simulations, which are often intractable. Here we put forward a comprehensive picture dubbed nanoreactor, which draws from ideas of step-flow crystal growth augmented by detailed first-principles calculations. As the carbon atoms migrate from the feedstock to catalyst to final graphene lattice, they go through a sequence of states whose energy levels can be computed and arranged into a step-by-step map. Analysis begins with the structure and energies of arbitrary edges to yield equilibrium island shapes. Then, it elucidates how the atoms dock at the edges and how they avoid forming defects. The sequence of atomic row assembly determines the kinetic anisotropy of growth, and consequently, graphene island morphology, explaining a number of experimental facts and suggesting how the growth product can further be improved. Finally, this analysis adds a useful perspective on the synthesis of carbon nanotubes and its essential distinction from graphene. PMID:22949702

  5. An Atomistic study of Helium Resolution in bcc Iron

    SciTech Connect

    Stoller, Roger E; Stewart, David M

    2011-01-01

    The evolution of gas-stabilized bubbles in irradiated materials can be a significant factor in the microstructural processes that lead to mechanical property and dimensional changes in structural materials exposed to high-energy neutrons. Helium generation and accumulation is particularly important under DT fusion irradiation conditions. Although the process of ballistic resolutioning of gas from bubbles has been long-discussed in the literature, there have been few computational studies of this mechanism. Resolutioning could limit bubble growth by ejecting gas atoms back into the metal matrix. A detailed atomistic study of ballistic He resolutioning from bubbles in bcc iron has been carried out using molecular dynamics. A newly-developed Fe-He interatomic potential was employed, with the iron matrix described by the potential of Ackland and co-workers from 1997. The primary variables examined were: irradiation temperature (100 and 600K), iron knock-on atom energy (5 and 20 keV), bubble radius (~0.5 and 1.0 nm), and He-to-vacancy ratio in the bubble (0.25, 0.5 and 1.0) in order to obtain an assessment of this dynamic resolutioning mechanism. The results presented here focus on the 5 keV cascades which indicate a modest, but potentially significant level of He removal by this process.

  6. Polarizing cues.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Stephen P

    2012-01-01

    People categorize themselves and others, creating ingroup and outgroup distinctions. In American politics, parties constitute the in- and outgroups, and party leaders hold sway in articulating party positions. A party leader's endorsement of a policy can be persuasive, inducing co-partisans to take the same position. In contrast, a party leader's endorsement may polarize opinion, inducing out-party identifiers to take a contrary position. Using survey experiments from the 2008 presidential election, I examine whether in- and out-party candidate cues—John McCain and Barack Obama—affected partisan opinion. The results indicate that in-party leader cues do not persuade but that out-party leader cues polarize. This finding holds in an experiment featuring President Bush in which his endorsement did not persuade Republicans but it polarized Democrats. Lastly, I compare the effect of party leader cues to party label cues. The results suggest that politicians, not parties, function as polarizing cues. PMID:22400143

  7. Ultrafast electrical measurements of polarization dynamics in ferroelectric thin-film capacitors.

    PubMed

    Grigoriev, Alexei; Azad, Mandana Meisami; McCampbell, John

    2011-12-01

    We have developed a new approach to measure fast electrical signals during polarization switching in ferroelectric thin-film capacitors. This article describes a simple method for probing transient currents and voltages in a broad range of time scales from microseconds to hundreds of picoseconds. In order to test our approach, we probed polarization dynamics in commercial PbZr(0.2)Ti(0.8)O(3) ferroelectric capacitors in which the measured switching time was as fast as 1.7 ns.

  8. A spacetime, balance-law formulation of coupled atomistic and continuum dynamics for solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraczek, Brent

    Coupled dynamic atomistic and continuum computational methods for solids have received much interest recently, because many problems are not addressed well by either model alone. In most coupled methods more emphasis has been placed on damping spurious reflections than on balancing momentum and energy. I present a new method for concurrent coupling of dynamic atomistic and continuum simulations of solids that enforces these balance laws on the atom/element level while minimizing spurious reflections. The coupled formulation is composed of the continuum spacetime discontinuous Galerkin (SDG) method and the mathematically consistent, time finite element, atomistic discontinuous Galerkin (ADG) method. On the continuum side I develop a two- and three-field SDG formulations for linearized elastodynamics to illuminate the mathematical structure of the original one-field SDG formulation and to assist in making connections to the atomistic formulation. On the atomistic side I examine connections between the SDG and ADG methods, and then extend this to relationships with the Velocity Verlet integrator. The component SDG and ADG methods are coupled using the same Godunov flux solution as is used by the SDG method, to enforce weakly the jump conditions on momentum balance and kinematic compatibility. To obtain compatible fluxes on the atomistic side of the coupling boundary I define a boundary atomistic trace that can be optimized to minimize boundary reflections. The coupled SDG--ADG formulation preserves the characteristic structure of the hyperbolic problem, guarantees element/atom-wise momentum balance to machine precision and yields energy error that is small, dissipative and controllable. The flux-based coupling can also be used with the Velocity Verlet method in place of the ADG, although the SDG--VV method suffers from uncontrolled energy error for long-time simulations due to the mismatch in the mathematical models. I present the formulations in spacetime, with one

  9. GPUbased, Microsecond Latency, HectoChannel MIMO Feedback Control of Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rath, Nikolaus

    Feedback control has become a crucial tool in the research on magnetic confinement of plasmas for achieving controlled nuclear fusion. This thesis presents a novel plasma feedback control system that, for the first time, employs a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) for microsecond-latency, real-time control computations. This novel application area for GPU computing is opened up by a new system architecture that is optimized for low-latency computations on less than kilobyte sized data samples as they occur in typical plasma control algorithms. In contrast to traditional GPU computing approaches that target complex, high-throughput computations with massive amounts of data, the architecture presented in this thesis uses the GPU as the primary processing unit rather than as an auxiliary of the CPU, and data is transferred from A-D/D-A converters directly into GPU memory using peer-to-peer PCI Express transfers. The described design has been implemented in a new, GPU-based control system for the High-Beta Tokamak - Extended Pulse (HBT-EP) device. The system is built from commodity hardware and uses an NVIDIA GeForce GPU and D-TACQ A-D/D-A converters providing a total of 96 input and 64 output channels. The system is able to run with sampling periods down to 4 μs and latencies down to 8 μs. The GPU provides a total processing power of 1.5 x 1012 floating point operations per second. To illustrate the performance and versatility of both the general architecture and concrete implementation, a new control algorithm has been developed. The algorithm is designed for the control of multiple rotating magnetic perturbations in situations where the plasma equilibrium is not known exactly and features an adaptive system model: instead of requiring the rotation frequencies and growth rates embedded in the system model to be set a priori, the adaptive algorithm derives these parameters from the evolution of the perturbation amplitudes themselves. This results in non-linear control

  10. Atomistic Insight into Tetraalkylphosphonium-Bis(oxalato)borate Ionic Liquid/Water Mixtures. I. Local Microscopic Structure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-Lei; Sarman, Sten; Glavatskih, Sergei; Antzutkin, Oleg N; Rutland, Mark W; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2015-04-23

    Atomistic simulations have been performed to investigate the microscopic structural organization of aqueous solutions of trihexyltetradecylphosphonium bis(oxalato)borate ([P6,6,6,14][BOB]) ionic liquid (IL). The evolution of the microscopic liquid structure and the local ionic organization of IL/water mixtures as a function of the water concentration is visualized and systematically analyzed via radial and spatial distribution functions, coordination numbers, hydrogen bond network, and water clustering analysis. The microscopic liquid structure in neat IL is characterized by a connected apolar network composed of the alkyl chains of [P6,6,6,14] cations and isolated polar domains consisting of the central segments of [P6,6,6,14] cations and [BOB] anions, and the corresponding local ionic environment is described by direct contact ion pairs. In IL/water mixtures with lower water mole fractions, the added water molecules are dispersed and embedded in cavities between neighboring ionic species and the local ionic structure is characterized by solvent-shared ion pairs through cation-water-anion triple complexes. With a gradual increase in the water concentration in IL/water mixtures, the added water molecules tend to aggregate and form small clusters, intermediate chain-like structures, large aggregates, and eventually a water network in water concentrated simulation systems. A further progressive dilution of IL/water mixtures leads to the formation of self-organized micelle-like aggregates characterized by a hydrophobic core and hydrophilic shell consisting of the central polar segments in [P6,6,6,14] cations and [BOB] anions in a highly branched water network. The striking structural evolution of the [P6,6,6,14][BOB] IL/water mixtures is rationalized by the competition between favorable hydrogen bonded interactions and strong electrostatic interactions between the polar segments in ionic species and the dispersion interactions between the hydrophobic alkyl chains in

  11. Functional optoacoustic imaging of moving objects using microsecond-delay acquisition of multispectral three-dimensional tomographic data.

    PubMed

    Deán-Ben, Xosé Luís; Bay, Erwin; Razansky, Daniel

    2014-07-30

    The breakthrough capacity of optoacoustics for three-dimensional visualization of dynamic events in real time has been recently showcased. Yet, efficient spectral unmixing for functional imaging of entire volumetric regions is significantly challenged by motion artifacts in concurrent acquisitions at multiple wavelengths. Here, we introduce a method for simultaneous acquisition of multispectral volumetric datasets by introducing a microsecond-level delay between excitation laser pulses at different wavelengths. Robust performance is demonstrated by real-time volumetric visualization of functional blood parametrers in human vasculature with a handheld matrix array optoacoustic probe. This approach can avert image artifacts imposed by velocities greater than 2 m/s, thus, does not only facilitate imaging influenced by respiratory, cardiac or other intrinsic fast movements in living tissues, but can achieve artifact-free imaging in the presence of more significant motion, e.g. abrupt displacements during handheld-mode operation in a clinical environment.

  12. μABC: a systematic microsecond molecular dynamics study of tetranucleotide sequence effects in B-DNA

    PubMed Central

    Pasi, Marco; Maddocks, John H.; Beveridge, David; Bishop, Thomas C.; Case, David A.; Cheatham, Thomas; Dans, Pablo D.; Jayaram, B.; Lankas, Filip; Laughton, Charles; Mitchell, Jonathan; Osman, Roman; Orozco, Modesto; Pérez, Alberto; Petkevičiūtė, Daiva; Spackova, Nada; Sponer, Jiri; Zakrzewska, Krystyna; Lavery, Richard

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of microsecond molecular dynamics simulations carried out by the ABC group of laboratories on a set of B-DNA oligomers containing the 136 distinct tetranucleotide base sequences. We demonstrate that the resulting trajectories have extensively sampled the conformational space accessible to B-DNA at room temperature. We confirm that base sequence effects depend strongly not only on the specific base pair step, but also on the specific base pairs that flank each step. Beyond sequence effects on average helical parameters and conformational fluctuations, we also identify tetranucleotide sequences that oscillate between several distinct conformational substates. By analyzing the conformation of the phosphodiester backbones, it is possible to understand for which sequences these substates will arise, and what impact they will have on specific helical parameters. PMID:25260586

  13. The action of microsecond-pulsed plasma-activated media on the inactivation of human lung cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Naresh; Park, Ji Hoon; Jeon, Su Nam; Park, Bong Sang; Choi, Eun Ha; Attri, Pankaj

    2016-03-01

    In the present work, we have generated reactive species (RS) through microsecond-pulsed plasma (MPP) in the cell culture media using a Marx generator with point-point electrodes of approximately 0.06 J discharge energy/pulse. RS generated in culture media through MPP have a selective action between growth of the H460 lung cancer cells and L132 normal lung cells. We observed that MPP-activated media (MPP-AM) induced apoptosis on H460 lung cancer cells through an oxidative DNA damage cascade. Additionally, we studied the apoptosis-related mRNA expression, DNA oxidation and polymerase-1 (PARP-1) cleaved analysis from treated cancer cells. The result proves that radicals generated through MPP play a pivotal role in the activation of media that induces the selective killing effect.

  14. Microsecond Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Influenza Neuraminidase Suggest a Mechanism for the Increased Virulence of Stalk-Deletion Mutants

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Deletions in the stalk of the influenza neuraminidase (NA) surface protein are associated with increased virulence, but the mechanisms responsible for this enhanced virulence are unclear. Here we use microsecond molecular dynamics simulations to explore the effect of stalk deletion on enzymatic activity, contrasting NA proteins from the A/swine/Shandong/N1/2009 strain both with and without a stalk deletion. By modeling and simulating neuraminidase apo glycoproteins embedded in complex-mixture lipid bilayers, we show that the geometry and dynamics of the neuraminidase enzymatic pocket may differ depending on stalk length, with possible repercussions on the binding of the endogenous sialylated-oligosaccharide receptors. We also use these simulations to predict previously unrecognized druggable “hotspots” on the neuraminidase surface that may prove useful for future efforts aimed at structure-based drug design. PMID:27141956

  15. Peridynamics as a rigorous coarse-graining of atomistics for multiscale materials design.

    SciTech Connect

    Lehoucq, Richard B.; Aidun, John Bahram; Silling, Stewart Andrew; Sears, Mark P.; Kamm, James R.; Parks, Michael L.

    2010-09-01

    This report summarizes activities undertaken during FY08-FY10 for the LDRD Peridynamics as a Rigorous Coarse-Graining of Atomistics for Multiscale Materials Design. The goal of our project was to develop a coarse-graining of finite temperature molecular dynamics (MD) that successfully transitions from statistical mechanics to continuum mechanics. The goal of our project is to develop a coarse-graining of finite temperature molecular dynamics (MD) that successfully transitions from statistical mechanics to continuum mechanics. Our coarse-graining overcomes the intrinsic limitation of coupling atomistics with classical continuum mechanics via the FEM (finite element method), SPH (smoothed particle hydrodynamics), or MPM (material point method); namely, that classical continuum mechanics assumes a local force interaction that is incompatible with the nonlocal force model of atomistic methods. Therefore FEM, SPH, and MPM inherit this limitation. This seemingly innocuous dichotomy has far reaching consequences; for example, classical continuum mechanics cannot resolve the short wavelength behavior associated with atomistics. Other consequences include spurious forces, invalid phonon dispersion relationships, and irreconcilable descriptions/treatments of temperature. We propose a statistically based coarse-graining of atomistics via peridynamics and so develop a first of a kind mesoscopic capability to enable consistent, thermodynamically sound, atomistic-to-continuum (AtC) multiscale material simulation. Peridynamics (PD) is a microcontinuum theory that assumes nonlocal forces for describing long-range material interaction. The force interactions occurring at finite distances are naturally accounted for in PD. Moreover, PDs nonlocal force model is entirely consistent with those used by atomistics methods, in stark contrast to classical continuum mechanics. Hence, PD can be employed for mesoscopic phenomena that are beyond the realms of classical continuum mechanics and

  16. Microsecond-range optical shutter for unpolarized light with chiral nematic liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammadimasoudi, Mohammad Neyts, Kristiaan; Beeckman, Jeroen; Shin, Jungsoon; Lee, Keechang

    2015-04-15

    A fast electro-optic shutter is fabricated and demonstrated. The device works independently of the polarization state of the incoming light beam. Modulation between 3% transmission and 60% transmission is obtained within a wavelength range of 50 nm with a response time of 20 μs. The device consists of two partly polymerized chiral nematic liquid crystal layers separated by a half wave plate. The transmission modulation is due to a 50 nm wavelength shift of the photonic band gap of the chiral liquid crystal realized by applying an electric field over a mixture of photo-polymerized LC and non-reactive nematic LC containing a chiral dopant. The shutter features high reflectivity in the photonic band gap. We investigate the influence of the amplitude of the applied voltage on the width and the depth of the reflection band.

  17. Organometal halide perovskite solar cell materials rationalized: ultrafast charge generation, high and microsecond-long balanced mobilities, and slow recombination.

    PubMed

    Ponseca, Carlito S; Savenije, Tom J; Abdellah, Mohamed; Zheng, Kaibo; Yartsev, Arkady; Pascher, Tobjörn; Harlang, Tobias; Chabera, Pavel; Pullerits, Tonu; Stepanov, Andrey; Wolf, Jean-Pierre; Sundström, Villy

    2014-04-01

    Organometal halide perovskite-based solar cells have recently been reported to be highly efficient, giving an overall power conversion efficiency of up to 15%. However, much of the fundamental photophysical properties underlying this performance has remained unknown. Here, we apply photoluminescence, transient absorption, time-resolved terahertz and microwave conductivity measurements to determine the time scales of generation and recombination of charge carriers as well as their transport properties in solution-processed CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite materials. We found that electron-hole pairs are generated almost instantaneously after photoexcitation and dissociate in 2 ps forming highly mobile charges (25 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)) in the neat perovskite and in perovskite/alumina blends; almost balanced electron and hole mobilities remain very high up to the microsecond time scale. When the perovskite is introduced into a TiO2 mesoporous structure, electron injection from perovskite to the metal oxide is efficient in less than a picosecond, but the lower intrinsic electron mobility of TiO2 leads to unbalanced charge transport. Microwave conductivity measurements showed that the decay of mobile charges is very slow in CH3NH3PbI3, lasting up to tens of microseconds. These results unravel the remarkable intrinsic properties of CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite material if used as light absorber and charge transport layer. Moreover, finding a metal oxide with higher electron mobility may further increase the performance of this class of solar cells.

  18. Atomistic and model description of nanotube electromechanical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotkin, Slava V.

    2003-03-01

    Nanotubes (NTs), which are natural objects on the size scale compatible with nanodevices and bio-molecules, exhibit several unique properties by themselves and in specific environments such as electronic, bio-chemical or electromechanical nanodevices. A compact continuum model has been developed [1] for the multi-scale calculation of NT behavior in various devices, ranging from Nano-Electromechanical Systems (NEMS)[2] to Light-Controlled Molecular Switches [3]. The continuum model parameterization is based on Molecular Dynamics and microscopic modeling. For example, elements of quantum mechanical consideration were introduced through the calculation of the nanotube polarizability, atomistic capacitance [4], and van der Waals interaction [5]. Quantum-chemistry approach was used for computation of an equilibrium structure of chemically modified NTs. An analytical expression will be discussed for quantum capacitance of metallic NTs with arbitrary lateral deformation. Compact model and a quantum mechanical simulation will be compared for the NT charge density calculation. A scattering probability for a potential of charged impurity and ballistic conductance of NT channel have been computed for a light controlled electronic NT switch. Analytical expression for the pull-in voltage for NT NEMS will be presented with quantum corrections and van der Waals interactions taken into account. This calculation will demonstrate that a principal physical limit exists for fabricating NEMS [6]. 1. N.R.Aluru, et.al., in Handbook of Nanoscience, Engineering and Technology, Eds: W.Goddard, et.al.; CRC Press, 2002 2. M.Dequesnes, S.V.Rotkin, N.R.Aluru, Nanotechnology 13, 2002 3. S.V.Rotkin, I.Zharov, Int.J.of Nanoscience 1(3/4) 2002 4. K.A.Bulashevich, S.V.Rotkin, JETPL 75(4) 2002 5. S.V.Rotkin, K.Hess, J.of Comp.Electronics 1(3) 2002 6. S.V.Rotkin, in Microfabr. Syst. and MEMS, Eds: P. J. Hesketh, et.al. ECS Inc., Pennington, NJ, USA 2002

  19. Atomistic models of amorphous polybutadienes; 3 -- Static free volume

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, S.; Mattice, W.L.

    1993-12-20

    Atomistic models of polybutadiene have been generated using molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics at a bulk density of 0.89 g cm{sup {minus}3}. Four microstructures formed by cis-1,4-polybutadiene, trans-1,4-polybutadiene, 1,2-polybutadiene, and a random copolymer of the three (55% trans, 35% cis, and 10% vinyl) are analyzed for static free volume. The free volume is determined by hard spherical probes that see the atoms as hard spheres of radii which equal 89% of their van der Waals radii. The total free volume, the free volume distribution, and the shape of the voids are analyzed for all four microstructures. The accessible free volume as a function of the probe size is found to be characteristic of voids in disordered packings of hard spheres. The free volume distributions have some common features across the microstructures. In particular, the free volume distributions as probed by a 1-{angstrom} radius probe show void size concentrations around {approximately}7.5 and 15 {angstrom}{sup 3} (with the exception of trans-polybutadiene, which does not display the latter). The shape factors for all four structures decay to the same asymptotic value of 0.67 {+-} 0.1 over the size range of 0--5 {angstrom}{sup 3}. There is a marked difference in the asphericity and the acylindricity of voids in the four microstructures. Analysis of randomly generated shapes suggests that the voids in the polymer microstructures are mostly elongated in comparison with randomly ``grown`` cavities, probably due to the connectivity of the polymer chains.

  20. Linking Atomistic and Mesoscale Simulations of Water Soluble Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, J. L.

    2003-03-01

    There exist a range of techniques for studying surfactants and polymers in the mesoscale regime. One of the challenges is to link mesoscale theories and simulations to other calculation methods which address different length scales of the system. We introduce some mesoscale methods of calculation for polymers and surfactants and then present a case study of where mesoscale modelling is used for mechanistic understanding, by linking the method to high throughput in-silico screening methods. We look at the adsorption onto silica of ethylene oxide (EO)/ propylene oxide (PO) block copolymers (lutrols) which have been modified by end-grafting of short, cationic dimethylamino ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA)chains. Given that the silica surface is negatively charged, it is remarkable that in some circumstances, polymers with longercationic chains have a lower adsorption. The effect is attributed to a competition between strong adsorption of the cationic DMAEMA groups driven by electrostatics, and weaker adsorption of the more numerous EO groups. This then raises the question of how we produce the values for the mesoscale parameters in these models and in the second part of the talk we describe a calculation method for doing this for water soluble polymers. The most promising route, but notoriously costly, is based on free energy calculations at the atomistic level. Free energy calculations are computationally intensive in general, but in an aqueous system one is also faced with the additional problem of using complex continuum models and/or accurate interaction potentials for water. Here we show how potential of mean force (PMF)calculations offer a practical alternative which avoids these drawbacks, though one is still faced with extremely long simulations.

  1. Polarization Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waluschka, Eugene

    1998-01-01

    As light passes through a optical system the reflections and refractions will in general change the polarization state of the light. If we assume that all of the materials in the thin film coatings and substrate are isotropic and homogeneous then calculating the amount of "instrumental" polarization is a relatively straight forward task. In the following sections we will present a of the steps required to perform a 'polarization ray trace' calculation for a single ray and monochromatic and hence polarized light. The thin film portion of the calculation is also shown. The reason for explicitly showing the thin film equations is that there are sign conventions imposed on the boundary value equations by the orientation and handedness of the various coordinate frames which are attached to the geometric rays. The attenuation of light through a optical system, is relatively simple, and requires at the very least a lens (average) reflectivity or transmissivity. Determining the polarization sensitivity of a optical system is still relatively straight forward requiring at least a knowledge of the behavior of the "s" and "p" components at each interface for the chief ray. Determining the thin film induced aberrations of a optical system are somewhat more demanding. Questions about the arithmetic sign of the phase factors and how this relates to the overall "OPD" of a ray are ubiquitous. Many rays are required to construct a wavefront. Thin film codes which modify the OPD's of rays are a requirement for this last mentioned computation. This requires a consistent scheme of coordinate frames and sign conventions and is probably the most demanding task of a polarization ray trace. Only the electric field will used in the discussion. This is not a restriction as the Stokes parameters are functions of the electric field. The following does not attempt to explain, but only to present all of the required concepts and formulas.

  2. Local stress and heat flux in atomistic systems involving three-body forces.

    PubMed

    Chen, Youping

    2006-02-01

    Local densities of fundamental physical quantities, including stress and heat flux fields, are formulated for atomistic systems involving three-body forces. The obtained formulas are calculable within an atomistic simulation, in consistent with the conservation equations of thermodynamics of continuum, and can be applied to systems with general two- and three-body interaction forces. It is hoped that this work may correct some misuse of inappropriate formulas of stress and heat flux in the literature, may clarify the definition of site energy of many-body potentials, and may serve as an analytical link between an atomistic model and a continuum theory. Physical meanings of the obtained formulas, their relation with virial theorem and heat theorem, and the applicability are discussed.

  3. Local stress and heat flux in atomistic systems involving three-body forces.

    PubMed

    Chen, Youping

    2006-02-01

    Local densities of fundamental physical quantities, including stress and heat flux fields, are formulated for atomistic systems involving three-body forces. The obtained formulas are calculable within an atomistic simulation, in consistent with the conservation equations of thermodynamics of continuum, and can be applied to systems with general two- and three-body interaction forces. It is hoped that this work may correct some misuse of inappropriate formulas of stress and heat flux in the literature, may clarify the definition of site energy of many-body potentials, and may serve as an analytical link between an atomistic model and a continuum theory. Physical meanings of the obtained formulas, their relation with virial theorem and heat theorem, and the applicability are discussed. PMID:16468857

  4. Nonadiabatic Dynamics in Atomistic Environments: Harnessing Quantum-Classical Theory with Generalized Quantum Master Equations.

    PubMed

    Pfalzgraff, William C; Kelly, Aaron; Markland, Thomas E

    2015-12-01

    The development of methods that can efficiently and accurately treat nonadiabatic dynamics in quantum systems coupled to arbitrary atomistic environments remains a significant challenge in problems ranging from exciton transport in photovoltaic materials to electron and proton transfer in catalysis. Here we show that our recently introduced MF-GQME approach, which combines Ehrenfest mean field theory with the generalized quantum master equation framework, is able to yield quantitative accuracy over a wide range of charge-transfer regimes in fully atomistic environments. This is accompanied by computational speed-ups of up to 3 orders of magnitude over a direct application of Ehrenfest theory. This development offers the opportunity to efficiently investigate the atomistic details of nonadiabatic quantum relaxation processes in regimes where obtaining accurate results has previously been elusive.

  5. Limitations of reactive atomistic potentials in describing defect structures in oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynninen, Teemu; Musso, Tiziana; Foster, Adam S.

    2016-03-01

    It is difficult to achieve low expense and high accuracy in computational methods, yet it remains a key objective in atomistic approaches. In solid state physics, advanced atomistic potentials using reactive force fields have shown promise in delivering both. However, these methods have not been applied widely beyond their development environment and thus their strengths and weaknesses are not fully understood. In this work we present benchmark calculations on silica (SiO2) and hafnia (HfO2) structures, comparing a leading charge optimized many-body potential to a more advanced density functional calculation. We find that although the atomistic potential gives excellent results for bulk structures, it has severe shortcomings when applied to small systems with low coordinated atoms. We also establish clearly the components of the many-body potential and how these relate to predicted physical properties.

  6. Real-Time Examination of Atomistic Mechanisms during Shock-Induced Structural Transformation in Silicon.

    PubMed

    Turneaure, Stefan J; Sinclair, N; Gupta, Y M

    2016-07-22

    The experimental determination of atomistic mechanisms linking crystal structures during a compression-driven solid-solid phase transformation is a long-standing and challenging scientific objective. Using new capabilities at the Dynamic Compression Sector at the Advanced Photon Source, the structure of shocked Si at 19 GPa was identified as simple hexagonal, and the lattice orientations between ambient cubic diamond and simple hexagonal structures were related. The approach is general and provides a powerful new method for examining atomistic mechanisms during stress-induced structural changes. PMID:27494481

  7. Real-Time Examination of Atomistic Mechanisms during Shock-Induced Structural Transformation in Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turneaure, Stefan J.; Sinclair, N.; Gupta, Y. M.

    2016-07-01

    The experimental determination of atomistic mechanisms linking crystal structures during a compression-driven solid-solid phase transformation is a long-standing and challenging scientific objective. Using new capabilities at the Dynamic Compression Sector at the Advanced Photon Source, the structure of shocked Si at 19 GPa was identified as simple hexagonal, and the lattice orientations between ambient cubic diamond and simple hexagonal structures were related. The approach is general and provides a powerful new method for examining atomistic mechanisms during stress-induced structural changes.

  8. Hypercrosslinked polystyrene networks: An atomistic molecular dynamics simulation combined with a mapping/reverse mapping procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Lazutin, A. A.; Glagolev, M. K.; Vasilevskaya, V. V.; Khokhlov, A. R.

    2014-04-07

    An algorithm involving classical molecular dynamics simulations with mapping and reverse mapping procedure is here suggested to simulate the crosslinking of the polystyrene dissolved in dichloroethane by monochlorodimethyl ether. The algorithm comprises consecutive stages: molecular dynamics atomistic simulation of a polystyrene solution, the mapping of atomistic structure onto coarse-grained model, the crosslink formation, the reverse mapping, and finally relaxation of the structure dissolved in dichloroethane and in dry state. The calculated values of the specific volume and the elastic modulus are in reasonable quantitative correspondence with experimental data.

  9. Atomistic modeling of BN nanofillers for mechanical and thermal properties: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Parashar, Avinash

    2015-12-01

    Due to their exceptional mechanical properties, thermal conductivity and a wide band gap (5-6 eV), boron nitride nanotubes and nanosheets have promising applications in the field of engineering and biomedical science. Accurate modeling of failure or fracture in a nanomaterial inherently involves coupling of atomic domains of cracks and voids as well as a deformation mechanism originating from grain boundaries. This review highlights the recent progress made in the atomistic modeling of boron nitride nanofillers. Continuous improvements in computational power have made it possible to study the structural properties of these nanofillers at the atomistic scale.

  10. Atomistic modeling of BN nanofillers for mechanical and thermal properties: a review.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajesh; Parashar, Avinash

    2016-01-01

    Due to their exceptional mechanical properties, thermal conductivity and a wide band gap (5-6 eV), boron nitride nanotubes and nanosheets have promising applications in the field of engineering and biomedical science. Accurate modeling of failure or fracture in a nanomaterial inherently involves coupling of atomic domains of cracks and voids as well as a deformation mechanism originating from grain boundaries. This review highlights the recent progress made in the atomistic modeling of boron nitride nanofillers. Continuous improvements in computational power have made it possible to study the structural properties of these nanofillers at the atomistic scale. PMID:26607458

  11. Scalable and portable visualization of large atomistic datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ashish; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya

    2004-10-01

    A scalable and portable code named Atomsviewer has been developed to interactively visualize a large atomistic dataset consisting of up to a billion atoms. The code uses a hierarchical view frustum-culling algorithm based on the octree data structure to efficiently remove atoms outside of the user's field-of-view. Probabilistic and depth-based occlusion-culling algorithms then select atoms, which have a high probability of being visible. Finally a multiresolution algorithm is used to render the selected subset of visible atoms at varying levels of detail. Atomsviewer is written in C++ and OpenGL, and it has been tested on a number of architectures including Windows, Macintosh, and SGI. Atomsviewer has been used to visualize tens of millions of atoms on a standard desktop computer and, in its parallel version, up to a billion atoms. Program summaryTitle of program: Atomsviewer Catalogue identifier: ADUM Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADUM Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computer for which the program is designed and others on which it has been tested: 2.4 GHz Pentium 4/Xeon processor, professional graphics card; Apple G4 (867 MHz)/G5, professional graphics card Operating systems under which the program has been tested: Windows 2000/XP, Mac OS 10.2/10.3, SGI IRIX 6.5 Programming languages used: C++, C and OpenGL Memory required to execute with typical data: 1 gigabyte of RAM High speed storage required: 60 gigabytes No. of lines in the distributed program including test data, etc.: 550 241 No. of bytes in the distributed program including test data, etc.: 6 258 245 Number of bits in a word: Arbitrary Number of processors used: 1 Has the code been vectorized or parallelized: No Distribution format: tar gzip file Nature of physical problem: Scientific visualization of atomic systems Method of solution: Rendering of atoms using computer graphic techniques, culling algorithms for data

  12. Atomistic Simulation of Non-Equilibrium Phenomena in Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, Paul Erik

    The goal of this work is to model the heterogeneous recombination of atomic oxygen on silica surfaces, which is of interest for accurately predicting the heating on vehicles traveling at hypersonic speeds. This is accomplished by creating a finite rate catalytic model, which describes recombination with a set of elementary gas-surface reactions. Fundamental to a description of surface catalytic reactions are the in situ chemical structures on the surface where recombination can occur. Using molecular dynamics simulations with the Reax GSISiO potential, we find that the chemical sites active in direct gas-phase reactions on silica surfaces consist of a small number of specific structures (or defects). The existence of these defects on real silica surfaces is supported by experimental results and the structure and energetics of these defects have been verified with quantum chemical calculations. The reactions in the finite rate catalytic model are based on the interaction of molecular and atomic oxygen with these defects. Trajectory calculations are used to find the parameters in the forward rate equations, while a combination of detailed balance and transition state theory are used to find the parameters in the reverse rate equations. The rate model predicts that the oxygen recombination coefficient is relatively constant at T (300-1000 K), in agreement with experimental results. At T > 1000 K the rate model predicts a drop off in the oxygen recombination coefficient, in disagreement with experimental results, which predict that the oxygen recombination coefficient increases with temperature. A discussion of the possible reasons for this disagreement, including non-adiabatic collision dynamics, variable surface site concentrations, and additional recombination mechanisms is presented. This thesis also describes atomistic simulations with Classical Trajectory Calculation Direction Simulation Monte Carlo (CTC-DSMC), a particle based method for modeling non

  13. Communication: Microsecond dynamics of the protein and water affect electron transfer in a bacterial bc1 complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Daniel R.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2015-04-01

    Cross-membrane electron transport between cofactors localized in proteins of mitochondrial respiration and bacterial photosynthesis is the source of all biological energy. The statistics and dynamics of nuclear fluctuations in these protein/membrane/water heterogeneous systems are critical for their energetic efficiency. The results of 13 μs of atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of the membrane-bound bc1 bacterial complex are analyzed here. The reaction is affected by a broad spectrum of nuclear modes, with the slowest dynamics in the range of time-scales ˜0.1-1.6 μs contributing half of the reaction reorganization energy. Two reorganization energies are required to describe protein electron transfer due to dynamical arrest of protein conformations on the observation window. This mechanistic distinction allows significant lowering of activation barriers for reactions in proteins.

  14. Communication: Microsecond dynamics of the protein and water affect electron transfer in a bacterial bc{sub 1} complex

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Daniel R.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2015-04-28

    Cross-membrane electron transport between cofactors localized in proteins of mitochondrial respiration and bacterial photosynthesis is the source of all biological energy. The statistics and dynamics of nuclear fluctuations in these protein/membrane/water heterogeneous systems are critical for their energetic efficiency. The results of 13 μs of atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of the membrane-bound bc{sub 1} bacterial complex are analyzed here. The reaction is affected by a broad spectrum of nuclear modes, with the slowest dynamics in the range of time-scales ∼0.1-1.6 μs contributing half of the reaction reorganization energy. Two reorganization energies are required to describe protein electron transfer due to dynamical arrest of protein conformations on the observation window. This mechanistic distinction allows significant lowering of activation barriers for reactions in proteins.

  15. Atomistic Method Applied to Computational Modeling of Surface Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Abel, Phillip B.

    2000-01-01

    The formation of surface alloys is a growing research field that, in terms of the surface structure of multicomponent systems, defines the frontier both for experimental and theoretical techniques. Because of the impact that the formation of surface alloys has on surface properties, researchers need reliable methods to predict new surface alloys and to help interpret unknown structures. The structure of surface alloys and when, and even if, they form are largely unpredictable from the known properties of the participating elements. No unified theory or model to date can infer surface alloy structures from the constituents properties or their bulk alloy characteristics. In spite of these severe limitations, a growing catalogue of such systems has been developed during the last decade, and only recently are global theories being advanced to fully understand the phenomenon. None of the methods used in other areas of surface science can properly model even the already known cases. Aware of these limitations, the Computational Materials Group at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field has developed a useful, computationally economical, and physically sound methodology to enable the systematic study of surface alloy formation in metals. This tool has been tested successfully on several known systems for which hard experimental evidence exists and has been used to predict ternary surface alloy formation (results to be published: Garces, J.E.; Bozzolo, G.; and Mosca, H.: Atomistic Modeling of Pd/Cu(100) Surface Alloy Formation. Surf. Sci., 2000 (in press); Mosca, H.; Garces J.E.; and Bozzolo, G.: Surface Ternary Alloys of (Cu,Au)/Ni(110). (Accepted for publication in Surf. Sci., 2000.); and Garces, J.E.; Bozzolo, G.; Mosca, H.; and Abel, P.: A New Approach for Atomistic Modeling of Pd/Cu(110) Surface Alloy Formation. (Submitted to Appl. Surf. Sci.)). Ternary alloy formation is a field yet to be fully explored experimentally. The computational tool, which is based on

  16. Cell polarity

    PubMed Central

    Romereim, Sarah M

    2011-01-01

    Despite extensive genetic analysis of the dynamic multi-phase process that transforms a small population of lateral plate mesoderm into the mature limb skeleton, the mechanisms by which signaling pathways regulate cellular behaviors to generate morphogenetic forces are not known. Recently, a series of papers have offered the intriguing possibility that regulated cell polarity fine-tunes the morphogenetic process via orienting cell axes, division planes and cell movements. Wnt5a-mediated non-canonical signaling, which may include planar cell polarity, has emerged as a common thread in the otherwise distinct signaling networks that regulate morphogenesis in each phase of limb development. These findings position the limb as a key model to elucidate how global tissue patterning pathways direct local differences in cell behavior that, in turn, generate growth and form. PMID:22064549

  17. Polar Diving

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    3 July 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows layers exposed by erosion in a trough within the north polar residual cap of Mars, diving beneath a younger covering of polar materials. The layers have, since the Mariner 9 mission in 1972, been interpreted to be composed of a combination of dust and ice in unknown proportions. In this scene, a layer of solid carbon dioxide, which was deposited during the previous autumn and winter, blankets the trough as well as the adjacent terrain. Throughout northern spring, the carbon dioxide will be removed; by summer, the layers will be frost-free.

    Location near: 81.4oN, 352.2oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Spring

  18. Polar Summer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    30 December 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows eroding mesas of frozen carbon dioxide in the martian south polar residual cap. During the summer season, the scarps that bound each pit and mesa in the south polar region become dark as carbon dioxide sublimes away. The darkening might result from the roughening of the surfaces from which ice is subliming, or from the concentration of trace amounts of dust on these slopes, or both.

    Location near: 84.7oS, 48.2oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  19. An atomistically validated continuum model for strain relaxation and misfit dislocation formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X. W.; Ward, D. K.; Zimmerman, J. A.; Cruz-Campa, J. L.; Zubia, D.; Martin, J. E.; van Swol, F.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, molecular dynamics (MD) calculations have been used to examine the physics behind continuum models of misfit dislocation formation and to assess the limitations and consequences of approximations made within these models. Without compromising the physics of misfit dislocations below a surface, our MD calculations consider arrays of dislocation dipoles constituting a mirror imaged "surface". This allows use of periodic boundary conditions to create a direct correspondence between atomistic and continuum representations of dislocations, which would be difficult to achieve with free surfaces. Additionally, by using long-time averages of system properties, we have essentially reduced the errors of atomistic simulations of large systems to "zero". This enables us to deterministically compare atomistic and continuum calculations. Our work results in a robust approach that uses atomistic simulation to accurately calculate dislocation core radius and energy without the continuum boundary conditions typically assumed in the past, and the novel insight that continuum misfit dislocation models can be inaccurate when incorrect definitions of dislocation spacing and Burgers vector in lattice-mismatched systems are used. We show that when these insights are properly incorporated into the continuum model, the resulting energy density expression of the lattice-mismatched systems is essentially indistinguishable from the MD results.

  20. Hybrid Atomistic and Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Polyethylene Glycol (PEG) in Explicit Water.

    PubMed

    Stanzione, Francesca; Jayaraman, Arthi

    2016-05-01

    In-silico design of polymeric biomaterials requires molecular dynamics (MD) simulations that retain essential atomistic/molecular details (e.g., explicit water around the biofunctional macromolecule) while simultaneously achieving large length and time scales pertinent to macroscale function. Such large-scale atomistically detailed macromolecular MD simulations with explicit solvent representation are computationally expensive. One way to overcome this limitation is to use an adaptive resolution scheme (AdResS) in which the explicit solvent molecules dynamically adopt either atomistic or coarse-grained resolution depending on their location (e.g., near or far from the macromolecule) in the system. In this study we present the feasibility and the limitations of AdResS methodology for studying polyethylene glycol (PEG) in adaptive resolution water, for varying PEG length and architecture. We first validate the AdResS methodology for such systems, by comparing PEG and solvent structure with that from all-atom simulations. We elucidate the role of the atomistic zone size and the need for calculating thermodynamic force correction within this AdResS approach to correctly reproduce the structure of PEG and water. Lastly, by varying the PEG length and architecture, we study the hydration of PEG, and the effect of PEG architectures on the structural properties of water. Changing the architecture of PEG from linear to multiarm star, we observe reduction in the solvent accessible surface area of the PEG, and an increase in the order of water molecules in the hydration shells. PMID:27108869

  1. Atomistic study on the FCC/BCC interface structure with {112}KS orientation

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Keonwook; Beyerlein, Irene; Han, Weizhong; Wang, Jian; Mara, Nathan

    2011-09-23

    In this study, atomistic simulation is used to explore the atomic interface structure, the intrinsic defect network, and mechanism of twin formation from the {112}KS Cu-Nb interface. The interface structure of different material systems AI-Fe and AI-Nb are also compared with Cu-Nb interface.

  2. A Mathematical Analysis of Atomistic-to-Continuum (AtC) Multiscale Coupling Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Gunzburger, Max

    2013-11-13

    We have worked on several projects aimed at improving the efficiency and understanding of multiscale methods, especially those applicable to problems involving atomistic-to-continuum coupling. Activities include blending methods for AtC coupling and efficient quasi-continuum methods for problems with long-range interactions.

  3. Molecular cooperativity and compatibility via full atomistic simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwan Yang, Kenny

    Civil engineering has customarily focused on problems from a large-scale perspective, encompassing structures such as bridges, dams, and infrastructure. However, present day challenges in conjunction with advances in nanotechnology have forced a re-focusing of expertise. The use of atomistic and molecular approaches to study material systems opens the door to significantly improve material properties. The understanding that material systems themselves are structures, where their assemblies can dictate design capacities and failure modes makes this problem well suited for those who possess expertise in structural engineering. At the same time, a focus has been given to the performance metrics of materials at the nanoscale, including strength, toughness, and transport properties (e.g., electrical, thermal). Little effort has been made in the systematic characterization of system compatibility -- e.g., how to make disparate material building blocks behave in unison. This research attempts to develop bottom-up molecular scale understanding of material behavior, with the global objective being the application of this understanding into material design/characterization at an ultimate functional scale. In particular, it addresses the subject of cooperativity at the nano-scale. This research aims to define the conditions which dictate when discrete molecules may behave as a single, functional unit, thereby facilitating homogenization and up-scaling approaches, setting bounds for assembly, and providing a transferable assessment tool across molecular systems. Following a macro-scale pattern where the compatibility of deformation plays a vital role in the structural design, novel geometrical cooperativity metrics based on the gyration tensor are derived with the intention to define nano-cooperativity in a generalized way. The metrics objectively describe the general size, shape and orientation of the structure. To validate the derived measures, a pair of ideal macromolecules

  4. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Contrasting characteristics of sub-microsecond pulsed atmospheric air and atmospheric pressure helium-oxygen glow discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. L.; Liu, D. X.; Iza, F.; Rong, M. Z.; Kong, M. G.

    2010-01-01

    Glow discharges in air are often considered to be the ultimate low-temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas for numerous chamber-free applications. This is due to the ubiquitous presence of air and the perceived abundance of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in air plasmas. In this paper, sub-microsecond pulsed atmospheric air plasmas are shown to produce a low concentration of excited oxygen atoms but an abundance of excited nitrogen species, UV photons and ozone molecules. This contrasts sharply with the efficient production of excited oxygen atoms in comparable helium-oxygen discharges. Relevant reaction chemistry analysed with a global model suggests that collisional excitation of O2 by helium metastables is significantly more efficient than electron dissociative excitation of O2, electron excitation of O and ion-ion recombination. These results suggest different practical uses of the two oxygen-containing atmospheric discharges, with air plasmas being well suited for nitrogen and UV based chemistry and He-O2 plasmas for excited atomic oxygen based chemistry.

  5. High longitudinal relaxivity of ultra-small gadolinium oxide prepared by microsecond laser ablation in diethylene glycol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ningqi; Tian, Xiumei; Xiao, Jun; Hu, Wenyong; Yang, Chuan; Li, Li; Chen, Dihu

    2013-04-01

    Ultra-small gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) can be used as T1-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) contrast agent own to its high longitudinal relaxivity (r1) and has attracted intensive attention in these years. In this paper, ultra-small Gd2O3 nanoparticles of 3.8 nm in diameter have been successfully synthesized by a microsecond laser ablating a gadolinium (Gd) target in diethylene glycol (DEG). The growth inhibition effect induced by the large viscosity of DEG makes it possible to synthesize ultra-small Gd2O3 by laser ablation in DEG. The r1 value and T1-weighted MR images are measured by a 3.0 T MRI spectroscope. The results show these nanoparticles with a high r1 value of 9.76 s-1 mM-1 to be good MRI contrast agents. We propose an explanation for the high r1 value of ultra-small Gd2O3 by considering the decreasing factor (surface to volume ratio of the nanoparticles, S/V) and the increasing factor (water hydration number of the Gd3+ on Gd2O3 surface, q), which offer a new look into the relaxivity studies of MRI contrast agents. Our research provides a new approach to preparing ultra-small Gd2O3 of high r1 value by laser ablation in DEG and develops the understanding of high relaxivity of ultra-small Gd2O3 MRI contrast agents.

  6. Preclinical Study of Locoregional Therapy of Hepatocellular Carcinoma by Bioelectric Ablation with Microsecond Pulsed Electric Fields (μsPEFs)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xinhua; Ren, Zhigang; Li, Chengxiang; Guo, Fei; Zhou, Dianbo; Jiang, Jianwen; Chen, Xinmei; Sun, Jihong; Yao, Chenguo; Zheng, Shusen

    2015-01-01

    Unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) needs locoregional ablation as a curative or downstage therapy. Microsecond Pulsed Electric Fields (μsPEFs) is an option. A xenograft tumor model was set up on 48 nude mice by injecting human hepatocellular carcinoma Hep3B cells subcutaneously. The tumor-bearing mice were randomly divided into 3 groups: μsPEFs treated, sham and control group. μsPEFs group was treated by μsPEFs twice in 5 days. Tumor volume, survival, pathology, mitochondria function and cytokines were followed up. μsPEFs was also conducted on 3 swine to determine impact on organ functions. The tumors treated by μsPEFs were completely eradicated while tumors in control and sham groups grew up to 2 cm3 in 3 weeks. The μsPEFs-treated group indicated mitochondrial damage and tumor necrosis as shown in JC-1 test, flow cytometry, H&E staining and TEM. μsPEFs activates CD56+ and CD68+ cells and inhibits tumor proliferating cell nuclear antigen. μsPEFs inhibits HCC growth in the nude mice by causing mitochondria damage, tumor necrosis and non-specific inflammation. μsPEFs treats porcine livers without damaging vital organs. μsPEFs is a feasible minimally invasive locoregional ablation option. PMID:25928327

  7. Aryl-Decorated Ru(II) Polypyridyl-type Photosensitizer Approaching NIR Emission with Microsecond Excited State Lifetimes.

    PubMed

    Schlotthauer, Tina; Suchland, Benedikt; Görls, Helmar; Parada, Giovanny A; Hammarström, Leif; Schubert, Ulrich S; Jäger, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Bis-tridentate Ru(II) complexes based on the dqp scaffold (dqp is 2,6-di(quinolin-8-yl)pyridine) with multiple aryl substituents were explored to tailor the absorption and emission properties. A synthetic methodology was developed for the facile synthesis and purification of homo- and heteroleptic bis-tridentate Ru complexes. The effect of the aryl substituents in the para positions of the pyridine and quinoline subunits was detailed by X-ray crystallography, steady state and time-resolved spectroscopy, electrochemistry, and computational methods. The attachment of the aryl groups results in enhanced molar extinction coefficients with the largest effect in the pyridine position, whereas the quinoline substituent leads to red-shifted emission tailing into the NIR region (up to 800 nm). Notably, the excited state lifetimes remain in the microsecond time scale even in the presence of O2, whereas the emission quantum yields are slightly increased with respect to the parental complex [Ru(dqp)2](2+). The peripheral functional groups (Br, Me, OMe) have only a minor impact on the optical properties and are attractive to utilize such complexes as functional building blocks. PMID:27228222

  8. Preclinical Study of Locoregional Therapy of Hepatocellular Carcinoma by Bioelectric Ablation with Microsecond Pulsed Electric Fields (μsPEFs).

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinhua; Ren, Zhigang; Li, Chengxiang; Guo, Fei; Zhou, Dianbo; Jiang, Jianwen; Chen, Xinmei; Sun, Jihong; Yao, Chenguo; Zheng, Shusen

    2015-01-01

    Unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) needs locoregional ablation as a curative or downstage therapy. Microsecond Pulsed Electric Fields (μsPEFs) is an option. A xenograft tumor model was set up on 48 nude mice by injecting human hepatocellular carcinoma Hep3B cells subcutaneously. The tumor-bearing mice were randomly divided into 3 groups: μsPEFs treated, sham and control group. μsPEFs group was treated by μsPEFs twice in 5 days. Tumor volume, survival, pathology, mitochondria function and cytokines were followed up. μsPEFs was also conducted on 3 swine to determine impact on organ functions. The tumors treated by μsPEFs were completely eradicated while tumors in control and sham groups grew up to 2 cm(3) in 3 weeks. The μsPEFs-treated group indicated mitochondrial damage and tumor necrosis as shown in JC-1 test, flow cytometry, H&E staining and TEM. μsPEFs activates CD56+ and CD68+ cells and inhibits tumor proliferating cell nuclear antigen. μsPEFs inhibits HCC growth in the nude mice by causing mitochondria damage, tumor necrosis and non-specific inflammation. μsPEFs treats porcine livers without damaging vital organs. μsPEFs is a feasible minimally invasive locoregional ablation option. PMID:25928327

  9. Polar Landforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    10 August 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows eroded remnants of carbon dioxide ice in the south polar residual cap of Mars. The scarps that outline each small mesa have retreated about 3 meters (10 feet) per Mars year since MGS began orbiting the red planet in 1997.

    Location near: 87.0oS, 31.9oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  10. Polar Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    12 August 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a slope upon which are exposed some of the layered materials that underlie the south polar cap of Mars. The layers are generally considered to be sediments--perhaps dust--that may have been cemented by water ice.

    Location near: 84.1oS, 343.9oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  11. Polar Markings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA02155 Polar Markings

    These bright and dark markings occurred near the end of summer in the south polar region. The dark material is likely dust that has been freed of frost cover.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -76.3N, Longitude 84.9E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  12. Polar Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA02153 Polar Layers

    This image of the south polar region shows layered material. It is not known if the layers are formed yearly or if they form over the period of 10s to 100s of years or more.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -80.3N, Longitude 296.2E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  13. Polar Ridges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03662 Polar Ridges

    This ridge system is located in the south polar region.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -81.7N, Longitude 296.5E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  14. Polar Textures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03638 Polar Textures

    This image illustrates the variety of textures that appear in the south polar region during late summer.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 80.5S, Longitude 57.9E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  15. Polar ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, S.; Grose, W. L.; Jones, R. L.; Mccormick, M. P.; Molina, Mario J.; Oneill, A.; Poole, L. R.; Shine, K. P.; Plumb, R. A.; Pope, V.

    1990-01-01

    The observation and interpretation of a large, unexpected ozone depletion over Antarctica has changed the international scientific view of stratospheric chemistry. The observations which show the veracity, seasonal nature, and vertical structure of the Antarctic ozone hole are presented. Evidence for Arctic and midlatitude ozone loss is also discussed. The chemical theory for Antarctic ozone depletion centers around the occurrence of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) in Antarctic winter and spring; the climatology and radiative properties of these clouds are presented. Lab studies of the physical properties of PSCs and the chemical processes that subsequently influence ozone depletion are discussed. Observations and interpretation of the chemical composition of the Antarctic stratosphere are described. It is shown that the observed, greatly enhanced abundances of chlorine monoxide in the lower stratosphere are sufficient to explain much if not all of the ozone decrease. The dynamic meteorology of both polar regions is given, interannual and interhemispheric variations in dynamical processes are outlined, and their likely roles in ozone loss are discussed.

  16. Polar Terrains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03577 Polar Terrains

    The region surrounding the South Polar Cap contains many different terrain types. This image shows both etched terrain and a region of 'mounds'.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 75S, Longitude 286.5E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  17. The counterreceptor binding site of human CD2 exhibits an extended surface patch with multiple conformations fluctuating with millisecond to microsecond motions.

    PubMed Central

    Wyss, D. F.; Dayie, K. T.; Wagner, G.

    1997-01-01

    We have used 15N NMR relaxation experiments to probe, for the glycosylated human CD2 adhesion domain, the overall molecular motion, as well as very fast nanosecond-picosecond (ns-ps) and slow millisecond-microsecond (ms-microsecond) internal motions. Using a novel analysis method that considers all residues, we obtained a correlation time for the overall motion of 9.5 +/- 0.3 ns. Surprisingly, we found a large contiguous patch of residues in the counterreceptor (CD58) binding site of human CD2 exhibiting slow conformational exchange motions (ms-microsecond). On the other hand, almost none of the residues of the CD58 binding side display fast (ns-ps) internal motions of amplitudes larger than what is seen for well-ordered regions of the structure. Residues close to the N-glycosylation site, and the first N-acetylglucosamine of the high mannose glycan are as rigid as the protein core. Residues conserved in the immunoglobulin superfamily V-set domain are generally very rigid. PMID:9070436

  18. Structural Diversity of Ligand-Binding Androgen Receptors Revealed by Microsecond Long Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Enhanced Sampling.

    PubMed

    Duan, Mojie; Liu, Na; Zhou, Wenfang; Li, Dan; Yang, Minghui; Hou, Tingjun

    2016-09-13

    Androgen receptor (AR) plays important roles in the development of prostate cancer (PCa). The antagonistic drugs, which suppress the activity of AR, are widely used in the treatment of PCa. However, the molecular mechanism of antagonism about how ligands affect the structures of AR remains elusive. To better understand the conformational variability of ARs bound with agonists or antagonists, we performed long time unbiased molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and enhanced sampling simulations for the ligand binding domain of AR (AR-LBD) in complex with various ligands. Based on the simulation results, we proposed an allosteric pathway linking ligands and helix 12 (H12) of AR-LBD, which involves the interactions among the ligands and the residues W741, H874, and I899. The interaction pathway provides an atomistic explanation of how ligands affect the structure of AR-LBD. A repositioning of H12 was observed, but it is facilitated by the C-terminal of H12, instead of by the loop between helix 11 (H11) and H12. The bias-exchange metadynamics simulations further demonstrated the above observations. More importantly, the free energy profiles constructed by the enhanced sampling simulations revealed the transition process between the antagonistic form and agonistic form of AR-LBD. Our results would be helpful for the design of more efficient antagonists of AR to combat PCa. PMID:27560203

  19. Atomistic mechanism leading to complex antiferroelectric and incommensurate perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Kinnary; Prosandeev, Sergey; Yang, Yurong; Xu, Bin; Íñiguez, Jorge; Bellaiche, L.

    2016-08-01

    An atomic interaction is identified in all perovskite compounds, such as A B O3 oxides, that can potentially result in unconventional structures. The term is harmonic in nature and couples the motions of the A cations with the rotations of the oxygen octahedra in the perovskite lattice. When strong enough, this coupling leads to hybrid normal modes that present both (anti)polar and rotational characters, which are keys to understand a variety of exotic phases. For example, we show that not only does this new coupling explain the long-period soft phonons characterizing prototype antiferroelectric PbZrO3, but it also provides us with an unified description of the complex antipolar structures of a variety of perovskites, including the possible occurrence of incommensurate phases. This coupling is further demonstrated to result, in the continuum limit, in an energy invariant adopting an analytical form that has been previously overlooked, to the best of our knowledge.

  20. Polar Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03581 Polar Layers

    This image shows just one example of the bright and dark markings that appear during summer time. The marks are related to the polar layers. If you happen to see a wild-eyed guy sticking his tongue out at you, you'll know why this image qualifies for the old 'art' category of THEMIS releases.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 80.6S, Longitude 34.1E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  1. Temporal and spatial profiles of emission intensities in atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet driven by microsecond pulse: Experiment and simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ruixue; Zhang, Cheng; Yan, Ping; Shao, Tao; Shen, Yuan; Zhu, Weidong; Babaeva, Natalia Yu.; Naidis, George V.

    2015-09-28

    A needle-circular electrode structure helium plasma jet driven by microsecond pulsed power is studied. Spatially resolved emission results show that the emission intensity of He(3{sup 3}S{sub 1}) line decreases monotonically along the axial direction, while those of N{sub 2}(C{sup 3}Π{sub u}), N{sub 2}{sup +}(B{sup 2}∑{sup +}{sub u}), and O(3p{sup 5}P) reach their maxima at 3 cm, 2.6 cm, and 1.4 cm, respectively. The plasma plume of the four species shows different characteristics: The N{sub 2} emission plume travels at a fast speed along the entire plasma jet; the N{sub 2}{sup +} emission plume is composed of a bright head and relatively weak tail and travels a shorter distance than the N{sub 2} emission plume; the He emission plume travels at a slower speed for only a very short distance; propagation of the O emission plume is not observed. Results of calculation of radiation fluxes emitted by positive streamers propagating along helium plasma jets are presented. It is shown, in agreement with the results of the present experiment and with other available experimental data, that the intensities of radiation of N{sub 2}(C{sup 3}Π{sub u}) molecules and He(3{sup 3}S{sub 1}) atoms vary with time (along the plasma jet) quite differently. The factors resulting in this difference are discussed.

  2. High longitudinal relaxivity of ultra-small gadolinium oxide prepared by microsecond laser ablation in diethylene glycol

    SciTech Connect

    Luo Ningqi; Xiao Jun; Hu Wenyong; Chen Dihu; Tian Xiumei; Yang Chuan; Li Li

    2013-04-28

    Ultra-small gadolinium oxide (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) can be used as T{sub 1}-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) contrast agent own to its high longitudinal relaxivity (r{sub 1}) and has attracted intensive attention in these years. In this paper, ultra-small Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles of 3.8 nm in diameter have been successfully synthesized by a microsecond laser ablating a gadolinium (Gd) target in diethylene glycol (DEG). The growth inhibition effect induced by the large viscosity of DEG makes it possible to synthesize ultra-small Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} by laser ablation in DEG. The r{sub 1} value and T{sub 1}-weighted MR images are measured by a 3.0 T MRI spectroscope. The results show these nanoparticles with a high r{sub 1} value of 9.76 s{sup -1} mM{sup -1} to be good MRI contrast agents. We propose an explanation for the high r{sub 1} value of ultra-small Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} by considering the decreasing factor (surface to volume ratio of the nanoparticles, S/V) and the increasing factor (water hydration number of the Gd{sup 3+} on Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface, q), which offer a new look into the relaxivity studies of MRI contrast agents. Our research provides a new approach to preparing ultra-small Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} of high r{sub 1} value by laser ablation in DEG and develops the understanding of high relaxivity of ultra-small Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} MRI contrast agents.

  3. Experiments on a relativistic magnetron driven by a microsecond electron beam accelerator with a ceramic insulating stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Mike Rodriguez

    2003-10-01

    Relativistic magnetron experiments with a 6-vane, Titan tube have generated over 300 MW total microwave output power near 1 GHz. These experiments were driven by a long-pulse, e-beam accelerator. Parameters of the device were voltage = -0.3 to -0.4 MV, current = 1--10 kA, and pulselength = 0.5 microsecond. This body of work investigated pulse-shortening in the relativistic magnetron. Microwave generation with a conventional plastic insulator was compared to that with a new ceramic insulator. The ceramic insulator improved the vacuum by an order of magnitude (1 x 10-7 Torr) and increased voltage stability of the accelerator. The effect of RF breakdown in the waveguide on the intensity and duration of high power microwaves were also investigated. These experiments found that when SF6 gas was introduced into the waveguide, the measured efficiency, power, and pulselength of microwaves increased. Two different microwave extraction mechanisms were used. In the first system, two waveguides were connected to the magnetron pi-radians from each other. The second system used three waveguides to connect to the magnetron's extraction ports at 2pi/3 radians from each other. Microwaves were extracted into and measured from the waveguide. Pulselengths were found to be in the range of 10--200 ns. The theoretical investigation calculates the maximum injected current for a time-independent cycloidal flow in a relativistic, magnetically insulated diode. The analytical theory of Lovelace-Ott was extended by relaxing the space charge limited (SCL) assumption. This theory reduced to Christenson's results in the deeply non-relativistic regime, and to Lovelace-Ott under SCL. This theory has been successfully tested against relativistic PIC code simulations.

  4. Structural and dynamic effects of cholesterol at preferred sites of interaction with rhodopsin identified from microsecond length molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Khelashvili, George; Grossfield, Alan; Feller, Scott E.; Pitman, Michael C.; Weinstein, Harel

    2014-01-01

    An unresolved question about GPCR function is the role of membrane components in receptor stability and activation. In particular, cholesterol is known to affect the function of membrane proteins, but the details of its effect on GPCRs are still elusive. Here, we describe how cholesterol modulates the behavior of the TM1-TM2-TM7-helix 8(H8) functional network that comprises the highly conserved NPxxY(x)5,6F motif, through specific interactions with the receptor. The inferences are based on the analysis of microsecond length molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of rhodopsin in an explicit membrane environment. Three regions on the rhodopsin exhibit the highest cholesterol density throughout the trajectory: the extracellular end of TM7, a location resembling the high-density sterol area from the electron microscopy data; the intracellular parts of TM1, TM2, and TM4, a region suggested as the cholesterol binding site in the recent X-ray crystallography data on β2-adrenergic GPCR; and the intracellular ends of TM2-TM3, a location that was categorized as the high cholesterol density area in multiple independent 100 ns MD simulations of the same system. We found that cholesterol primarily affects specific local perturbations of the helical TM domains such as the kinks in TM1, TM2, and TM7. These local distortions, in turn, relate to rigid-body motions of the TMs in the TM1-TM2-TM7-H8 bundle. The specificity of the effects stems from the nonuniform distribution of cholesterol around the protein. Through correlation analysis we connect local effects of cholesterol on structural perturbations with a regulatory role of cholesterol in the structural rearrangements involved in GPCR function. PMID:19173312

  5. Atomistic simulation and XAS investigation of Mn induced defects in Bi12TiO20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezende, Marcos V. dos S.; Santos, Denise J.; Jackson, Robert A.; Valerio, Mário E. G.; Macedo, Zélia S.

    2016-06-01

    This work reports an investigation of the valence and site occupancy of Mn dopants in Bi12TiO20 (BTO: Mn) host using X-ray Absorption (XAS) and atomistic simulation techniques based on energy minimisation. X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) at the Mn K-edges gave typical results for Mn ions with mixed valences of 3+ and 4+. Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) results indicated that Mn ions are probably substituted at Ti sites. Atomistic simulation was performed assuming the incorporation of Mn2+, Mn3+ and Mn4+ ions at either Bi3+ or Ti4+ sites, and the results were compared to XANES and EXAFS measurements. Electrical conductivity for pure and doped samples was used to evaluate the consistency of the proposed model.

  6. Atomistic Conversion Reaction Mechanism of WO3 in Secondary Ion Batteries of Li, Na, and Ca.

    PubMed

    He, Yang; Gu, Meng; Xiao, Haiyan; Luo, Langli; Shao, Yuyan; Gao, Fei; Du, Yingge; Mao, Scott X; Wang, Chongmin

    2016-05-17

    Intercalation and conversion are two fundamental chemical processes for battery materials in response to ion insertion. The interplay between these two chemical processes has never been directly seen and understood at atomic scale. Here, using in situ HRTEM, we captured the atomistic conversion reaction processes during Li, Na, Ca insertion into a WO3 single crystal model electrode. An intercalation step prior to conversion is explicitly revealed at atomic scale for the first time for Li, Na, Ca. Nanoscale diffraction and ab initio molecular dynamic simulations revealed that after intercalation, the inserted ion-oxygen bond formation destabilizes the transition-metal framework which gradually shrinks, distorts and finally collapses to an amorphous W and Mx O (M=Li, Na, Ca) composite structure. This study provides a full atomistic picture of the transition from intercalation to conversion, which is of essential importance for both secondary ion batteries and electrochromic devices.

  7. Efficient parallelization of analytic bond-order potentials for large-scale atomistic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teijeiro, C.; Hammerschmidt, T.; Drautz, R.; Sutmann, G.

    2016-07-01

    Analytic bond-order potentials (BOPs) provide a way to compute atomistic properties with controllable accuracy. For large-scale computations of heterogeneous compounds at the atomistic level, both the computational efficiency and memory demand of BOP implementations have to be optimized. Since the evaluation of BOPs is a local operation within a finite environment, the parallelization concepts known from short-range interacting particle simulations can be applied to improve the performance of these simulations. In this work, several efficient parallelization methods for BOPs that use three-dimensional domain decomposition schemes are described. The schemes are implemented into the bond-order potential code BOPfox, and their performance is measured in a series of benchmarks. Systems of up to several millions of atoms are simulated on a high performance computing system, and parallel scaling is demonstrated for up to thousands of processors.

  8. Effective elastic properties of nanocomposites using a novel atomistic-continuum interphase model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paliwal, Bhasker; Cherkaoui, Mohammed; Fassi-Fehri, Omar

    We have introduced the concept of interphase and revised classical micromechanics to predict the effective elastic properties of heterogeneous materials containing nano-inhomogeneities. An interphase is described as an additional phase between the matrix and inhomogeneity whose constitutive properties are derived from atomistic simulations and then incorporated in a micromechanics model to compute effective properties of nanocomposites. This scale transition approach bridges the gap between discrete atomic level interactions and continuum mechanics. An advantage of this approach is that it combines atomistic with continuum models that consider inhomogeneity and interphase morphology. It thereby enables us to account simultaneously for both the shape and the anisotropy of a nano-inhomogeneity and interphase at the continuum level when we compute material's overall properties. In so doing, it frees us from making any assumptions about the interface characteristics between matrix and the nano-inhomogeneity.

  9. Simulation of the Richtmyer-Meshkov and Rayleigh-Taylor Instability Using Atomistic Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadau, Kai; Barber, John L.; Germann, Timothy C.; Lomdahl, Peter S.; Holian, Brad Lee; Alder, Berni J.

    2007-06-01

    We present large-scale atomistic simulations [molecular dynamics (MD) and direct simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC)] of fluid instabilities that occur when a fluid interface is subjected to shock loading or gravitation [Richtmyer-Meshkov and Rayleigh-Taylor instability]. The atomistic methods reach the parameter range that is of importance for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules subjected to high energy lasers. The results are compared to existing theoretical and experimental work from which we have strong evidence for the importance of fluctuations in such instabilities. References: 1.) Kai Kadau, Timothy C. Germann , Nicolas G. Hadjiconstantinou , Peter S. Lomdahl *, Guy Dimonte , Brad Lee Holian *, and Berni J. Alder, PNAS 101, 5851 (2004). 2.)K. Kadau et al. submitted (2007).

  10. Sintering Concepts - Atomistic Mass Flow, Microstructure Evolution, and Macroscopic Property Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    German, R. M.

    2002-12-01

    Sintering is the process for bonding contacting particles by the application of thermal energy. At the atomistic level, mass flow is random, yet biased by subtle surface curvature gradients. During sintering microstructure changes become noticable and eventually bulk macroscopic property changes, such as strength increases and pore elimination, can be observed. Computer modeling of sintering has evolved to help understand and link the atomistic and macroscopic aspects. The recent emphasis in sintering models has forced theory to face up to some basic problems. From a perdictive view, the computer models are still behind observations, largely because of errors in our understanding of material property changes and the interactions between the evolving microstructure and kinetics of mass flow. New trends in sintering models will be introduced to show how accurate models require a firm grasp of these issues to predict bulk property changes. The identification of such problems sets in place an agenda for the sintering research community.

  11. Multiscale Modeling of Carbon/Phenolic Composite Thermal Protection Materials: Atomistic to Effective Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, Steven M.; Murthy, Pappu L.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Lawson, John W.; Monk, Joshua D.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    Next generation ablative thermal protection systems are expected to consist of 3D woven composite architectures. It is well known that composites can be tailored to achieve desired mechanical and thermal properties in various directions and thus can be made fit-for-purpose if the proper combination of constituent materials and microstructures can be realized. In the present work, the first, multiscale, atomistically-informed, computational analysis of mechanical and thermal properties of a present day - Carbon/Phenolic composite Thermal Protection System (TPS) material is conducted. Model results are compared to measured in-plane and out-of-plane mechanical and thermal properties to validate the computational approach. Results indicate that given sufficient microstructural fidelity, along with lowerscale, constituent properties derived from molecular dynamics simulations, accurate composite level (effective) thermo-elastic properties can be obtained. This suggests that next generation TPS properties can be accurately estimated via atomistically informed multiscale analysis.

  12. Atomistic electrodynamics simulations of bare and ligand-coated nanoparticles in the quantum size regime.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xing; Moore, Justin E; Zekarias, Meserret; Jensen, Lasse

    2015-01-01

    The optical properties of metallic nanoparticles with nanometre dimensions exhibit features that cannot be described by classical electrodynamics. In this quantum size regime, the near-field properties are significantly modified and depend strongly on the geometric arrangements. However, simulating realistically sized systems while retaining the atomistic description remains computationally intractable for fully quantum mechanical approaches. Here we introduce an atomistic electrodynamics model where the traditional description of nanoparticles in terms of a macroscopic homogenous dielectric constant is replaced by an atomic representation with dielectric properties that depend on the local chemical environment. This model provides a unified description of bare and ligand-coated nanoparticles, as well as strongly interacting nanoparticle dimer systems. The non-local screening owing to an inhomogeneous ligand layer is shown to drastically modify the near-field properties. This will be important to consider in optimization of plasmonic nanostructures for near-field spectroscopy and sensing applications. PMID:26555179

  13. Relaxation of a steep density gradient in a simple fluid: Comparison between atomistic and continuum modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Pourali, Meisam; Maghari, Ali; Meloni, Simone; Magaletti, Francesco; Casciola, Carlo Massimo; Ciccotti, Giovanni

    2014-10-21

    We compare dynamical nonequilibrium molecular dynamics and continuum simulations of the dynamics of relaxation of a fluid system characterized by a non-uniform density profile. Results match quite well as long as the lengthscale of density nonuniformities are greater than the molecular scale (∼10 times the molecular size). In presence of molecular scale features some of the continuum fields (e.g., density and momentum) are in good agreement with atomistic counterparts, but are smoother. On the contrary, other fields, such as the temperature field, present very large difference with respect to reference (atomistic) ones. This is due to the limited accuracy of some of the empirical relations used in continuum models, the equation of state of the fluid in the present example.

  14. Complete atomistic model of a bacterial cytoplasm for integrating physics, biochemistry, and systems biology.

    PubMed

    Feig, Michael; Harada, Ryuhei; Mori, Takaharu; Yu, Isseki; Takahashi, Koichi; Sugita, Yuji

    2015-05-01

    A model for the cytoplasm of Mycoplasma genitalium is presented that integrates data from a variety of sources into a physically and biochemically consistent model. Based on gene annotations, core genes expected to be present in the cytoplasm were determined and a metabolic reaction network was reconstructed. The set of cytoplasmic genes and metabolites from the predicted reactions were assembled into a comprehensive atomistic model consisting of proteins with predicted structures, RNA, protein/RNA complexes, metabolites, ions, and solvent. The resulting model bridges between atomistic and cellular scales, between physical and biochemical aspects, and between structural and systems views of cellular systems and is meant as a starting point for a variety of simulation studies.

  15. Complete Atomistic Model of a Bacterial Cytoplasm for Integrating Physics, Biochemistry, and Systems Biology

    PubMed Central

    Feig, Michael; Harada, Ryuhei; Mori, Takaharu; Yu, Isseki; Takahashi, Koichi; Sugita, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    A model for the cytoplasm of Mycoplasma genitalium is presented that integrates data from a variety of sources into a physically and biochemically consistent model. Based on gene annotations, core genes expected to be present in the cytoplasm were determined and a metabolic reaction network was reconstructed. The set of cytoplasmic genes and metabolites from the predicted reactions were assembled into a comprehensive atomistic model consisting of proteins with predicted structures, RNA, protein/RNA complexes, metabolites, ions, and solvent. The resulting model bridges between atomistic and cellular scales, between physical and biochemical aspects, and between structural and systems views of cellular systems and is meant as a starting point for a variety of simulation studies. PMID:25765281

  16. Atomistic Conversion Reaction Mechanism of WO3 in Secondary Ion Batteries of Li, Na, and Ca.

    PubMed

    He, Yang; Gu, Meng; Xiao, Haiyan; Luo, Langli; Shao, Yuyan; Gao, Fei; Du, Yingge; Mao, Scott X; Wang, Chongmin

    2016-05-17

    Intercalation and conversion are two fundamental chemical processes for battery materials in response to ion insertion. The interplay between these two chemical processes has never been directly seen and understood at atomic scale. Here, using in situ HRTEM, we captured the atomistic conversion reaction processes during Li, Na, Ca insertion into a WO3 single crystal model electrode. An intercalation step prior to conversion is explicitly revealed at atomic scale for the first time for Li, Na, Ca. Nanoscale diffraction and ab initio molecular dynamic simulations revealed that after intercalation, the inserted ion-oxygen bond formation destabilizes the transition-metal framework which gradually shrinks, distorts and finally collapses to an amorphous W and Mx O (M=Li, Na, Ca) composite structure. This study provides a full atomistic picture of the transition from intercalation to conversion, which is of essential importance for both secondary ion batteries and electrochromic devices. PMID:27071488

  17. Atomistic electrodynamics simulations of bare and ligand-coated nanoparticles in the quantum size regime.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xing; Moore, Justin E; Zekarias, Meserret; Jensen, Lasse

    2015-11-10

    The optical properties of metallic nanoparticles with nanometre dimensions exhibit features that cannot be described by classical electrodynamics. In this quantum size regime, the near-field properties are significantly modified and depend strongly on the geometric arrangements. However, simulating realistically sized systems while retaining the atomistic description remains computationally intractable for fully quantum mechanical approaches. Here we introduce an atomistic electrodynamics model where the traditional description of nanoparticles in terms of a macroscopic homogenous dielectric constant is replaced by an atomic representation with dielectric properties that depend on the local chemical environment. This model provides a unified description of bare and ligand-coated nanoparticles, as well as strongly interacting nanoparticle dimer systems. The non-local screening owing to an inhomogeneous ligand layer is shown to drastically modify the near-field properties. This will be important to consider in optimization of plasmonic nanostructures for near-field spectroscopy and sensing applications.

  18. Hypervelocity impact on carbon nanotube reinforced a-SiC composite targets: An atomistic simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makeev, Maxim; Srivastava, Deepak

    2007-03-01

    Atomistic simulation studies, employing the Tersoff many-body reactive potential, have been performed to investigate the hypersonic velocity impact protection properties of carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced a-SiC composites, for a diamond spherical projectile velocities ranging from 1 km/s to 20 km/s. The scaling relations and analytical forms are derived to describe the penetration depth as a function of the velocity and radius of the projectile. A theoretical framework has been developed to describe the penetration depth behavior in the case of impact of hard projectile on hard target material. The atomistic simulation results are found to compare well with the obtained analytical forms. The effects of diamond nanoparticle impact on the a-SiC composites, with CNTs aligned parallel and perpendicular to the impact direction, caused by impact induced shock absorption and damage creation, will be described in this presentation.

  19. Effect of Single-Electron Interface Trapping in Decanano MOSFETs: A 3D Atomistic Simulation Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asenov, Asen; Balasubramaniam, R.; Brown, A. R.; Davies, J. H.

    2000-01-01

    We study the effect of trapping/detrapping of a single-electron in interface states in the channel of n-type MOSFETs with decanano dimensions using 3D atomistic simulation techniques. In order to highlight the basic dependencies, the simulations are carried out initially assuming continuous doping charge, and discrete localized charge only for the trapped electron. The dependence of the random telegraph signal (RTS) amplitudes on the device dimensions and on the position of the trapped charge in the channel are studied in detail. Later, in full-scale, atomistic simulations assuming discrete charge for both randomly placed dopants and the trapped electron, we highlight the importance of current percolation and of traps with strategic position where the trapped electron blocks a dominant current path.

  20. Atomistic theory of hybrid improper ferroelectricity in perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hong Jian; Íñiguez, Jorge; Ren, Wei; Chen, Xiang Ming; Bellaiche, L.

    2014-05-01

    We discuss the so-called hybrid improper ferroelectricity (HIF) appearing in A'BO3/A''BO3 perovskite superlattices. By means of straightforward analytical derivations and/or associated graphical analysis, we demonstrate that two previously-proposed elemental interatomic couplings between the O6 octahedral rotations and the displacements of the A-site cations [Bellaiche and Íñiguez, Phys. Rev. B 88, 014104 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevB.88.014104] naturally reproduce and explain HIF in (A'BO3)1/(A''BO3)1 superlattices composed of layers that are only one unit cell thick. Further, we show that our approach permits an easy treatment of superlattices of arbitrary stacking direction and layer thickness. In particular, this allows us to predict (i) other previously overlooked types of HIF in (A'BO3)1/(A''BO3)1 superlattices and (ii) original and striking effects, such as the possibility of discretizing the magnitude of the spontaneous polarization in (A'BO3)m/(A''BO3)n systems when varying the m and n layer thicknesses. We further show first-principles results confirming the latter predictions.

  1. Polarizability versus mobility: atomistic force field for ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Chaban, Vitaly

    2011-09-21

    Based on classical molecular dynamics simulations, we discuss the impact of Coulombic interactions on a comprehensive set of properties of room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) containing 1,3-dimethylimidazolium (MMIM(+)), N-butylpyridinium (BPY(+)), and bis(trifluoromethane sulfonyl)imide (TFSI(-)) ions. Ionic transport is found to be noticeably hindered by the excessive Coulombic energy, originating from the neglect of electronic polarization in the condensed phase of these RTILs. Starting from the models, recently suggested by Lopes and Padua, we show that realistic ionic dynamics can be achieved by the uniform scaling of electrostatic charges on all interaction sites. The original model systematically overestimates density and heat of vaporization of RTILs. Since density linearly depends on charge scaling, it is possible to use it as a convenient beacon to promptly derive a correct scaling factor. Based on the simulations of [BPY][TFSI] and [MMIM][TFSI] over a wide temperature range, we conclude that the suggested technique is feasible to greatly improve quality of the already existing non-polarizable FFs for RTILs.

  2. Atomistic Simulation of Protein Encapsulation in Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haiyang; Lv, Yongqin; Tan, Tianwei; van der Spoel, David

    2016-01-28

    Fabrication of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with large apertures triggers a brand-new research area for selective encapsulation of biomolecules within MOF nanopores. The underlying inclusion mechanism is yet to be clarified however. Here we report a molecular dynamics study on the mechanism of protein encapsulation in MOFs. Evaluation for the binding of amino acid side chain analogues reveals that van der Waals interaction is the main driving force for the binding and that guest size acts as a key factor predicting protein binding with MOFs. Analysis on the conformation and thermodynamic stability of the miniprotein Trp-cage encapsulated in a series of MOFs with varying pore apertures and surface chemistries indicates that protein encapsulation can be achieved via maintaining a polar/nonpolar balance in the MOF surface through tunable modification of organic linkers and Mg-O chelating moieties. Such modifications endow MOFs with a more biocompatible confinement. This work provides guidelines for selective inclusion of biomolecules within MOFs and facilitates MOF functions as a new class of host materials and molecular chaperones.

  3. Adaptive spacetime method using Riemann jump conditions for coupled atomistic-continuum dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraczek, B.; Miller, S. T.; Haber, R. B.; Johnson, D. D.

    2010-03-01

    We combine the Spacetime Discontinuous Galerkin (SDG) method for elastodynamics with the mathematically consistent Atomistic Discontinuous Galerkin (ADG) method in a new scheme that concurrently couples continuum and atomistic models of dynamic response in solids. The formulation couples non-overlapping continuum and atomistic models across sharp interfaces by weakly enforcing jump conditions, for both momentum balance and kinematic compatibility, using Riemann values to preserve the characteristic structure of the underlying hyperbolic system. Momentum balances to within machine-precision accuracy over every element, on each atom, and over the coupled system, with small, controllable energy dissipation in the continuum region that ensures numerical stability. When implemented on suitable unstructured spacetime grids, the continuum SDG model offers linear computational complexity in the number of elements and powerful adaptive analysis capabilities that readily bridge between atomic and continuum scales in both space and time. A special trace operator for the atomic velocities and an associated atomistic traction field enter the jump conditions at the coupling interface. The trace operator depends on parameters that specify, at the scale of the atomic spacing, the position of the coupling interface relative to the atoms. In a key finding, we demonstrate that optimizing these parameters suppresses spurious reflections at the coupling interface without the use of non-physical damping or special boundary conditions. We formulate the implicit SDG-ADG coupling scheme in up to three spatial dimensions, and describe an efficient iterative solution scheme that outperforms common explicit schemes, such as the Velocity Verlet integrator. Numerical examples, in 1d×time and employing both linear and nonlinear potentials, demonstrate the performance of the SDG-ADG method and show how adaptive spacetime meshing reconciles disparate time steps and resolves atomic-scale signals

  4. Adaptive spacetime method using Riemann jump conditions for coupled atomistic-continuum dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kraczek, B. Miller, S.T. Haber, R.B. Johnson, D.D.

    2010-03-20

    We combine the Spacetime Discontinuous Galerkin (SDG) method for elastodynamics with the mathematically consistent Atomistic Discontinuous Galerkin (ADG) method in a new scheme that concurrently couples continuum and atomistic models of dynamic response in solids. The formulation couples non-overlapping continuum and atomistic models across sharp interfaces by weakly enforcing jump conditions, for both momentum balance and kinematic compatibility, using Riemann values to preserve the characteristic structure of the underlying hyperbolic system. Momentum balances to within machine-precision accuracy over every element, on each atom, and over the coupled system, with small, controllable energy dissipation in the continuum region that ensures numerical stability. When implemented on suitable unstructured spacetime grids, the continuum SDG model offers linear computational complexity in the number of elements and powerful adaptive analysis capabilities that readily bridge between atomic and continuum scales in both space and time. A special trace operator for the atomic velocities and an associated atomistic traction field enter the jump conditions at the coupling interface. The trace operator depends on parameters that specify, at the scale of the atomic spacing, the position of the coupling interface relative to the atoms. In a key finding, we demonstrate that optimizing these parameters suppresses spurious reflections at the coupling interface without the use of non-physical damping or special boundary conditions. We formulate the implicit SDG-ADG coupling scheme in up to three spatial dimensions, and describe an efficient iterative solution scheme that outperforms common explicit schemes, such as the Velocity Verlet integrator. Numerical examples, in 1dxtime and employing both linear and nonlinear potentials, demonstrate the performance of the SDG-ADG method and show how adaptive spacetime meshing reconciles disparate time steps and resolves atomic-scale signals in

  5. Toward Atomistic Resolution Structure of Phosphatidylcholine Headgroup and Glycerol Backbone at Different Ambient Conditions.

    PubMed

    Botan, Alexandru; Favela-Rosales, Fernando; Fuchs, Patrick F J; Javanainen, Matti; Kanduč, Matej; Kulig, Waldemar; Lamberg, Antti; Loison, Claire; Lyubartsev, Alexander; Miettinen, Markus S; Monticelli, Luca; Määttä, Jukka; Ollila, O H Samuli; Retegan, Marius; Róg, Tomasz; Santuz, Hubert; Tynkkynen, Joona

    2015-12-10

    Phospholipids are essential building blocks of biological membranes. Despite a vast amount of very accurate experimental data, the atomistic resolution structures sampled by the glycerol backbone and choline headgroup in phoshatidylcholine bilayers are not known. Atomistic resolution molecular dynamics simulations have the potential to resolve the structures, and to give an arrestingly intuitive interpretation of the experimental data, but only if the simulations reproduce the data within experimental accuracy. In the present work, we simulated phosphatidylcholine (PC) lipid bilayers with 13 different atomistic models, and compared simulations with NMR experiments in terms of the highly structurally sensitive C-H bond vector order parameters. Focusing on the glycerol backbone and choline headgroups, we showed that the order parameter comparison can be used to judge the atomistic resolution structural accuracy of the models. Accurate models, in turn, allow molecular dynamics simulations to be used as an interpretation tool that translates these NMR data into a dynamic three-dimensional representation of biomolecules in biologically relevant conditions. In addition to lipid bilayers in fully hydrated conditions, we reviewed previous experimental data for dehydrated bilayers and cholesterol-containing bilayers, and interpreted them with simulations. Although none of the existing models reached experimental accuracy, by critically comparing them we were able to distill relevant chemical information: (1) increase of choline order parameters indicates the P-N vector tilting more parallel to the membrane, and (2) cholesterol induces only minor changes to the PC (glycerol backbone) structure. This work has been done as a fully open collaboration, using nmrlipids.blogspot.fi as a communication platform; all the scientific contributions were made publicly on this blog. During the open research process, the repository holding our simulation trajectories and files ( https

  6. Atomistic resolution structure and dynamics of lipid bilayers in simulations and experiments.

    PubMed

    Ollila, O H Samuli; Pabst, Georg

    2016-10-01

    Accurate details on the sampled atomistic resolution structures of lipid bilayers can be experimentally obtained by measuring C-H bond order parameters, spin relaxation rates and scattering form factors. These parameters can be also directly calculated from the classical atomistic resolution molecular dynamics simulations (MD) and compared to the experimentally achieved results. This comparison measures the simulation model quality with respect to 'reality'. If agreement is sufficient, the simulation model gives an atomistic structural interpretation of the acquired experimental data. Significant advance of MD models is made by jointly interpreting different experiments using the same structural model. Here we focus on phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers, which out of all model membranes have been studied mostly by experiments and simulations, leading to the largest available dataset. From the applied comparisons we conclude that the acyl chain region structure and rotational dynamics are generally well described in simulation models. Also changes with temperature, dehydration and cholesterol concentration are qualitatively correctly reproduced. However, the quality of the underlying atomistic resolution structural changes is uncertain. Even worse, when focusing on the lipid bilayer properties at the interfacial region, e.g. glycerol backbone and choline structures, and cation binding, many simulation models produce an inaccurate description of experimental data. Thus extreme care must be applied when simulations are applied to understand phenomena where the interfacial region plays a significant role. This work is done by the NMRlipids Open Collaboration project running at https://nmrlipids.blogspot.fi and https://github.com/NMRLipids. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biosimulations edited by Ilpo Vattulainen and Tomasz Róg.

  7. Toward Atomistic Resolution Structure of Phosphatidylcholine Headgroup and Glycerol Backbone at Different Ambient Conditions.

    PubMed

    Botan, Alexandru; Favela-Rosales, Fernando; Fuchs, Patrick F J; Javanainen, Matti; Kanduč, Matej; Kulig, Waldemar; Lamberg, Antti; Loison, Claire; Lyubartsev, Alexander; Miettinen, Markus S; Monticelli, Luca; Määttä, Jukka; Ollila, O H Samuli; Retegan, Marius; Róg, Tomasz; Santuz, Hubert; Tynkkynen, Joona

    2015-12-10

    Phospholipids are essential building blocks of biological membranes. Despite a vast amount of very accurate experimental data, the atomistic resolution structures sampled by the glycerol backbone and choline headgroup in phoshatidylcholine bilayers are not known. Atomistic resolution molecular dynamics simulations have the potential to resolve the structures, and to give an arrestingly intuitive interpretation of the experimental data, but only if the simulations reproduce the data within experimental accuracy. In the present work, we simulated phosphatidylcholine (PC) lipid bilayers with 13 different atomistic models, and compared simulations with NMR experiments in terms of the highly structurally sensitive C-H bond vector order parameters. Focusing on the glycerol backbone and choline headgroups, we showed that the order parameter comparison can be used to judge the atomistic resolution structural accuracy of the models. Accurate models, in turn, allow molecular dynamics simulations to be used as an interpretation tool that translates these NMR data into a dynamic three-dimensional representation of biomolecules in biologically relevant conditions. In addition to lipid bilayers in fully hydrated conditions, we reviewed previous experimental data for dehydrated bilayers and cholesterol-containing bilayers, and interpreted them with simulations. Although none of the existing models reached experimental accuracy, by critically comparing them we were able to distill relevant chemical information: (1) increase of choline order parameters indicates the P-N vector tilting more parallel to the membrane, and (2) cholesterol induces only minor changes to the PC (glycerol backbone) structure. This work has been done as a fully open collaboration, using nmrlipids.blogspot.fi as a communication platform; all the scientific contributions were made publicly on this blog. During the open research process, the repository holding our simulation trajectories and files ( https

  8. Toward Atomistic Resolution Structure of Phosphatidylcholine Headgroup and Glycerol Backbone at Different Ambient Conditions†

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Phospholipids are essential building blocks of biological membranes. Despite a vast amount of very accurate experimental data, the atomistic resolution structures sampled by the glycerol backbone and choline headgroup in phoshatidylcholine bilayers are not known. Atomistic resolution molecular dynamics simulations have the potential to resolve the structures, and to give an arrestingly intuitive interpretation of the experimental data, but only if the simulations reproduce the data within experimental accuracy. In the present work, we simulated phosphatidylcholine (PC) lipid bilayers with 13 different atomistic models, and compared simulations with NMR experiments in terms of the highly structurally sensitive C–H bond vector order parameters. Focusing on the glycerol backbone and choline headgroups, we showed that the order parameter comparison can be used to judge the atomistic resolution structural accuracy of the models. Accurate models, in turn, allow molecular dynamics simulations to be used as an interpretation tool that translates these NMR data into a dynamic three-dimensional representation of biomolecules in biologically relevant conditions. In addition to lipid bilayers in fully hydrated conditions, we reviewed previous experimental data for dehydrated bilayers and cholesterol-containing bilayers, and interpreted them with simulations. Although none of the existing models reached experimental accuracy, by critically comparing them we were able to distill relevant chemical information: (1) increase of choline order parameters indicates the P–N vector tilting more parallel to the membrane, and (2) cholesterol induces only minor changes to the PC (glycerol backbone) structure. This work has been done as a fully open collaboration, using nmrlipids.blogspot.fi as a communication platform; all the scientific contributions were made publicly on this blog. During the open research process, the repository holding our simulation trajectories and files (https

  9. Atomistic resolution structure and dynamics of lipid bilayers in simulations and experiments.

    PubMed

    Ollila, O H Samuli; Pabst, Georg

    2016-10-01

    Accurate details on the sampled atomistic resolution structures of lipid bilayers can be experimentally obtained by measuring C-H bond order parameters, spin relaxation rates and scattering form factors. These parameters can be also directly calculated from the classical atomistic resolution molecular dynamics simulations (MD) and compared to the experimentally achieved results. This comparison measures the simulation model quality with respect to 'reality'. If agreement is sufficient, the simulation model gives an atomistic structural interpretation of the acquired experimental data. Significant advance of MD models is made by jointly interpreting different experiments using the same structural model. Here we focus on phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers, which out of all model membranes have been studied mostly by experiments and simulations, leading to the largest available dataset. From the applied comparisons we conclude that the acyl chain region structure and rotational dynamics are generally well described in simulation models. Also changes with temperature, dehydration and cholesterol concentration are qualitatively correctly reproduced. However, the quality of the underlying atomistic resolution structural changes is uncertain. Even worse, when focusing on the lipid bilayer properties at the interfacial region, e.g. glycerol backbone and choline structures, and cation binding, many simulation models produce an inaccurate description of experimental data. Thus extreme care must be applied when simulations are applied to understand phenomena where the interfacial region plays a significant role. This work is done by the NMRlipids Open Collaboration project running at https://nmrlipids.blogspot.fi and https://github.com/NMRLipids. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biosimulations edited by Ilpo Vattulainen and Tomasz Róg. PMID:26809025

  10. Atomistic mechanisms of rapid energy transport in light-harvesting molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmura, Satoshi; Koga, Shiro; Akai, Ichiro; Shimojo, Fuyuki; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya

    2011-03-01

    Synthetic supermolecules such as π-conjugated light-harvesting dendrimers efficiently harvest energy from sunlight, which is of significant importance for the global energy problem. Key to their success is rapid transport of electronic excitation energy from peripheral antennas to photochemical reaction cores, the atomistic mechanisms of which remains elusive. Here, quantum-mechanical molecular dynamics simulation incorporating nonadiabatic electronic transitions reveals the key molecular motion that significantly accelerates the energy transport based on the Dexter mechanism.

  11. Self-evolving atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of defects in materials

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Haixuan; Beland, Laurent K.; Stoller, Roger E.; Osetskiy, Yury N.

    2015-01-29

    The recent development of on-the-fly atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo methods has led to an increased amount attention on the methods and their corresponding capabilities and applications. In this review, the framework and current status of Self-Evolving Atomistic Kinetic Monte Carlo (SEAKMC) are discussed. SEAKMC particularly focuses on defect interaction and evolution with atomistic details without assuming potential defect migration/interaction mechanisms and energies. The strength and limitation of using an active volume, the key concept introduced in SEAKMC, are discussed. Potential criteria for characterizing an active volume are discussed and the influence of active volume size on saddle point energies is illustrated. A procedure starting with a small active volume followed by larger active volumes was found to possess higher efficiency. Applications of SEAKMC, ranging from point defect diffusion, to complex interstitial cluster evolution, to helium interaction with tungsten surfaces, are summarized. A comparison of SEAKMC with molecular dynamics and conventional object kinetic Monte Carlo is demonstrated. Overall, SEAKMC is found to be complimentary to conventional molecular dynamics, especially when the harmonic approximation of transition state theory is accurate. However it is capable of reaching longer time scales than molecular dynamics and it can be used to systematically increase the accuracy of other methods such as object kinetic Monte Carlo. Furthermore, the challenges and potential development directions are also outlined.

  12. A study of conditions for dislocation nucleation in coarser-than-atomistic scale models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Akanksha; Acharya, Amit; Maloney, Craig E.

    2015-02-01

    We perform atomistic simulations of dislocation nucleation in defect free crystals in 2 and 3 dimensions during indentation with circular (2D) or spherical (3D) indenters. The kinematic structure of the theory of Field Dislocation Mechanics (FDM) is shown to allow the identification of a local feature of the atomistic velocity field in these simulations as indicative of dislocation nucleation. It predicts the precise location of the incipient spatially distributed dislocation field, as shown for the cases of the Embedded Atom Method potential for Al and the Lennard-Jones pair potential. We demonstrate the accuracy of this analysis for two crystallographic orientations in 2D and one in 3D. Apart from the accuracy in predicting the location of dislocation nucleation, the FDM based analysis also demonstrates superior performance than existing nucleation criteria in not persisting in time beyond the nucleation event, as well as differentiating between phase boundary/shear band and dislocation nucleation. Our analysis is meant to facilitate the modeling of dislocation nucleation in coarser-than-atomistic scale models of the mechanics of materials.

  13. Controllable atomistic graphene oxide model and its application in hydrogen sulfide removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Liangliang; Seredych, Mykola; Bandosz, Teresa J.; van Duin, Adri C. T.; Lu, Xiaohua; Gubbins, Keith E.

    2013-11-01

    The determination of an atomistic graphene oxide (GO) model has been challenging due to the structural dependence on different synthesis methods. In this work we combine temperature-programmed molecular dynamics simulation techniques and the ReaxFF reactive force field to generate realistic atomistic GO structures. By grafting a mixture of epoxy and hydroxyl groups to the basal graphene surface and fine-tuning their initial concentrations, we produce in a controllable manner the GO structures with different functional groups and defects. The models agree with structural experimental data and with other ab initio quantum calculations. Using the generated atomistic models, we perform reactive adsorption calculations for H2S and H2O/H2S mixtures on GO materials and compare the results with experiment. We find that H2S molecules dissociate on the carbonyl functional groups, and H2O, CO2, and CO molecules are released as reaction products from the GO surface. The calculation reveals that for the H2O/H2S mixtures, H2O molecules are preferentially adsorbed to the carbonyl sites and block the potential active sites for H2S decomposition. The calculation agrees well with the experiments. The methodology and the procedure applied in this work open a new door to the theoretical studies of GO and can be extended to the research on other amorphous materials.

  14. Phase field crystal modelling of the order-to-disordered atomistic structure transition of metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Mi, J.

    2016-03-01

    Bulk metallic glass composites are a new class of metallic alloy systems that have very high tensile strength, ductility and fracture toughness. This unique combination of mechanical properties is largely determined by the presence of crystalline phases uniformly distributed within the glassy matrix. However, there have been very limited reports on how the crystalline phases are nucleated in the super-cooled liquid and their growth dynamics, especially lack of information on the order-to-disordered atomistic structure transition across the crystalline-amorphous interface. In this paper, we use phase field crystal (PFC) method to study the nucleation and growth of the crystalline phases and the glass formation of the super cooled liquid of a binary alloy. The study is focused on understanding the order-to-disordered transition of atomistic configuration across the interface between the crystalline phases and amorphous matrix of different chemical compositions at different thermal conditions. The capability of using PFC to simulate the order-to-disorder atomistic transition in the bulk material or across the interface is discussed in details.

  15. Phase field crystal modeling as a unified atomistic approach to defect dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Joel; Provatas, Nikolas; Rottler, Jörg; Sinclair, Chad W.

    2014-06-01

    Material properties controlled by evolving defect structures, such as mechanical response, often involve processes spanning many length and time scales which can not be modeled using a single approach. We present a variety of results that demonstrate the ability of phase field crystal (PFC) models to describe complex defect evolution phenomena on atomistic length scales and over long, diffusive time scales. Primary emphasis is given to the unification of conservative and nonconservative dislocation creation mechanisms in three-dimensional fcc and bcc materials. These include Frank-Read-type glide mechanisms involving closed dislocation loops or grain boundaries as well as Bardeen-Herring-type climb mechanisms involving precipitates, inclusions, and/or voids. Both source classes are naturally and simultaneously captured at the atomistic level by PFC descriptions, with arbitrarily complex defect configurations, types, and environments. An unexpected dipole-to-quadrupole source transformation is identified, as well as various complex geometrical features of loop nucleation via climb from spherical particles. Results for the strain required to nucleate a dislocation loop from such a particle are in agreement with analytic continuum theories. Other basic features of fcc and bcc dislocation structure and dynamics are also outlined, and initial results for dislocation-stacking fault tetrahedron interactions are presented. These findings together highlight various capabilities of the PFC approach as a coarse-grained atomistic tool for the study of three-dimensional crystal plasticity.

  16. Self-evolving atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of defects in materials

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, Haixuan; Beland, Laurent K.; Stoller, Roger E.; Osetskiy, Yury N.

    2015-01-29

    The recent development of on-the-fly atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo methods has led to an increased amount attention on the methods and their corresponding capabilities and applications. In this review, the framework and current status of Self-Evolving Atomistic Kinetic Monte Carlo (SEAKMC) are discussed. SEAKMC particularly focuses on defect interaction and evolution with atomistic details without assuming potential defect migration/interaction mechanisms and energies. The strength and limitation of using an active volume, the key concept introduced in SEAKMC, are discussed. Potential criteria for characterizing an active volume are discussed and the influence of active volume size on saddle point energies ismore » illustrated. A procedure starting with a small active volume followed by larger active volumes was found to possess higher efficiency. Applications of SEAKMC, ranging from point defect diffusion, to complex interstitial cluster evolution, to helium interaction with tungsten surfaces, are summarized. A comparison of SEAKMC with molecular dynamics and conventional object kinetic Monte Carlo is demonstrated. Overall, SEAKMC is found to be complimentary to conventional molecular dynamics, especially when the harmonic approximation of transition state theory is accurate. However it is capable of reaching longer time scales than molecular dynamics and it can be used to systematically increase the accuracy of other methods such as object kinetic Monte Carlo. Furthermore, the challenges and potential development directions are also outlined.« less

  17. General library-based Monte Carlo technique enables equilibrium sampling of semi-atomistic protein models.

    PubMed

    Mamonov, Artem B; Bhatt, Divesh; Cashman, Derek J; Ding, Ying; Zuckerman, Daniel M

    2009-08-01

    We introduce "library-based Monte Carlo" (LBMC) simulation, which performs Boltzmann sampling of molecular systems based on precalculated statistical libraries of molecular-fragment configurations, energies, and interactions. The library for each fragment can be Boltzmann distributed and thus account for all correlations internal to the fragment. LBMC can be applied to both atomistic and coarse-grained models, as we demonstrate in this "proof-of-principle" report. We first verify the approach in a toy model and in implicitly solvated all-atom polyalanine systems. We next study five proteins, up to 309 residues in size. On the basis of atomistic equilibrium libraries of peptide-plane configurations, the proteins are modeled with fully atomistic backbones and simplified Go-like interactions among residues. We show that full equilibrium sampling can be obtained in days to weeks on a single processor, suggesting that more accurate models are well within reach. For the future, LBMC provides a convenient platform for constructing adjustable or mixed-resolution models: the configurations of all atoms can be stored at no run-time cost, while an arbitrary subset of interactions is "turned on". PMID:19594147

  18. Atomistic modeling of the dislocation dynamics and evaluation of static yield stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karavaev, A. V.; Dremov, V. V.; Ionov, G. V.

    2015-09-01

    Static strength characteristics of structural materials are of great importance for the analysis of the materials behaviour under mechanical loadings. Mechanical characteristics of structural materials such as elastic limit, strength limit, ultimate tensile strength, plasticity are, unlike elastic moduli, very sensitive to the presence of impurities and defects of crystal structure. Direct atomistic modeling of the static mechanical strength characteristics of real materials is an extremely difficult task since the typical time scales available for the direct modeling in the frames of classical molecular dynamics do not exceed a hundred of nanoseconds. This means that the direct atomistic modeling of the material deformation can be done for the regimes with rather high strain rates at which the yield stress and other mechanical strength characteristics are controlled by microscopic mechanisms different from those at low (quasi-static) strain rates. In essence, the plastic properties of structural materials are determined by the dynamics of the extended defects of crystal structure (edge and screw dislocations) and by interactions between them and with the other defects in the crystal. In the present work we propose a method that is capable to model the dynamics of edge dislocations in the fcc and hcp materials at dynamic deformations and to estimate the material static yield stress in the states of interest in the frames of the atomistic approach. The method is based on the numerical characterization of the stress relaxation processes in specially generated samples containing solitary edge dislocations.

  19. Bridging the Gap between Quantum Mechanics and Large-Scale Atomistic Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Moriarty, J A

    2004-08-16

    The prospect of modeling across disparate length and time scales to achieve a predictive multiscale description of real materials properties has attracted widespread research interest in the last decade. To be sure, the challenges in such multiscale modeling are many, and in demanding cases, such as mechanical properties or dynamic phase transitions, multiple bridges extending from the atomic level all the way to the continuum level must be built. Although often overlooked in this process, one of the most fundamental and important problems in multiscale modeling is that of bridging the gap between first-principles quantum mechanics, from which true predictive power for real materials emanates, and the large-scale atomistic simulation of thousands or millions of atoms, which is usually essential to describe the complex atomic processes that link to higher length and time scales. For example, to model single-crystal plasticity at micron length scales via dislocation-dynamics simulations that evolve the detailed dislocation microstructure requires accurate large-scale atomistic information on the mobility and interaction of individual dislocations. Similarly, modeling the kinetics of structural phase transitions requires linking accurate large-scale atomistic information on nucleation processes with higher length and time scale growth processes.

  20. Hybrid Simulation Strategy for Simulating Self-Assembled Morphologies at the Atomistic Length Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethuraman, Vaidyanathan; Ganesan, Venkat

    In the context of Lithium-ion batteries, an enhancement in both ionic conductivity and mechanical properties, were observed for block copolymer electrolytes with increasing MW. On the contrary, when homopolymers were used as electrolytes, the ionic conductivity decreased with increasing MW. However, the origins of such increase in conductivity are unclear and are speculated to be tied to both the morphology and the atomistic details of the copolymer themselves. Motivated by such issues, we present a strategy to create ordered morphologies of block copolymers at the atomistic level using a combination of coarse-graining and inverse coarse-graining techniques. A mapping which is developed using the long-ranged structural mapping in the disordered phases will be utilized to generate self-assembled morphologies. In particular we focus on generating self-assembled morphologies of PS-PEO at the atomistic length scales. Statics and dynamics of such self-assembled morphologies will be presented and the effect of self assembly on the transport properties of ions will also be explored. Funded by NSF.

  1. Polarized internal target apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Holt, Roy J.

    1986-01-01

    A polarized internal target apparatus with a polarized gas target of improved polarization and density achieved by mixing target gas atoms with a small amount of alkali metal gas atoms, and passing a high intensity polarized light source into the mixture to cause the alkali metal gas atoms to become polarized which interact in spin exchange collisions with target gas atoms yielding polarized target gas atoms.

  2. Polarized internal target apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Holt, R.J.

    1984-10-10

    A polarized internal target apparatus with a polarized gas target of improved polarization and density (achieved by mixing target gas atoms with a small amount of alkali metal gas atoms, and passing a high intensity polarized light source into the mixture to cause the alkali metal gas atoms to become polarized which interact in spin exchange collisions with target gas atoms yielding polarized target gas atoms) is described.

  3. Pulpal Effects of Enamel Ablation With a Microsecond Pulsed λ=9.3-μm CO2 Laser

    PubMed Central

    Staninec, Michal; Darling, Cynthia L.; Goodis, Harold E.; Pierre, Daniel; Cox, Darren P.; Fan, Kenneth; Larson, Michael; Parisi, Renaldo; Hsu, Dennis; Manesh, Saman K.; Ho, Chi; Hosseini, Mehran; Fried, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives In vitro studies have shown that CO2 lasers operating at the highly absorbed 9.3 and 9.6-μm wavelengths with a pulse duration in the range of 10–20-microsecond are well suited for the efficient ablation of enamel and dentin with minimal peripheral thermal damage. Even though these CO2 lasers are highly promising, they have yet to receive FDA approval. Clinical studies are necessary to determine if excessive heat deposition in the tooth may have any detrimental pulpal effects, particularly at higher ablative fluencies. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the pulpal safety of laser irradiation of tooth occlusal surfaces under the conditions required for small conservative preparations confined to enamel. Study Design/Materials and Methods Test subjects requiring removal of third molar teeth were recruited and teeth scheduled for extraction were irradiated using a pulsed CO2 laser at a wavelength of 9.3 μm operating at 25 or 50 Hz using a incident fluence of 20 J/cm2 for a total of 3,000 laser pulses (36 J) for both rates with water cooling. Two control groups were used, one with no treatment and one with a small cut made with a conventional high-speed hand-piece. No anesthetic was used for any of the procedures and tooth vitality was evaluated prior to treatment by heat, cold and electrical testing. Short term effects were observed on teeth extracted within 72 hours after treatment and long term effects were observed on teeth extracted 90 days after treatment. The pulps of the teeth were fixed with formalin immediately after extraction and subjected to histological examination. Additionally, micro-thermocouple measurements were used to estimate the potential temperature rise in the pulp chamber of extracted teeth employing the same irradiation conditions used in vivo. Results Pulpal thermocouple measurements showed the internal temperature rise in the tooth was within safe limits, 3.3±4°C without water cooling versus 1.7±6

  4. Polar Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 3 May 2004 This nighttime visible color image was collected on January 1, 2003 during the Northern Summer season near the North Polar Troughs.

    This daytime visible color image was collected on September 4, 2002 during the Northern Spring season in Vastitas Borealis. The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the martian surface using its five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from the use of multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 79, Longitude 346 East (14 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with

  5. Linearly polarized fiber amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Kliner, Dahv A.; Koplow, Jeffery P.

    2004-11-30

    Optically pumped rare-earth-doped polarizing fibers exhibit significantly higher gain for one linear polarization state than for the orthogonal state. Such a fiber can be used to construct a single-polarization fiber laser, amplifier, or amplified-spontaneous-emission (ASE) source without the need for additional optical components to obtain stable, linearly polarized operation.

  6. Preparation of polarized molecules using coherent infrared multicolor ladder excitation.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Nandini; Zare, Richard N

    2010-04-21

    A density matrix treatment is presented for a general process of preparing polarized molecules through their coherent interaction with two or more infrared photons of different frequencies, each tuned to cause a transition between real levels. This process, which might be called infrared stimulated Raman adiabatic passage, allows complete population transfer to selected rotational-vibrational levels and controls the direction of the rotational angular momentum vector J of the molecule with the possibility of preparing higher moments of the J spatial distribution. HCl molecules in a supersonic molecular beam are considered as a candidate system. Theory predicts that under collision-free conditions two infrared laser pulses of microsecond duration and milliwatt power are able to achieve complete population transfer and alignment of HCl (v=2, J=2, and M=0) for mutually parallel excitation and HCl (v=2, J=2, and M=+/-1) for mutually perpendicular excitation. Orientation of the HCl (v=2, J=2, and M=+/-2) can also be achieved using two circularly polarized pulses of the same helicity. For simplicity, our treatment ignores nuclear spin depolarization, which would be the case for molecules such as (12)C(16)O and (12)C(16)OO(2). Polarized molecules in higher vibrational levels can be prepared using additional infrared pulses.

  7. Nondiffracting transversally polarized beam.

    PubMed

    Yuan, G H; Wei, S B; Yuan, X-C

    2011-09-01

    Generation of a nondiffracting transversally polarized beam by means of transmitting an azimuthally polarized beam through a multibelt spiral phase hologram and then highly focusing by a high-NA lens is presented. A relatively long depth of focus (∼4.84λ) of the electric field with only radial and azimuthal components is achieved. The polarization of the wavefront near the focal plane is analyzed in detail by calculating the Stokes polarization parameters. It is found that the polarization is spatially varying and entirely transversally polarized, and the polarization singularity disappears at the beam center, which makes the central bright channel possible. PMID:21886250

  8. Polarization control at spin-driven ferroelectric domain walls.

    PubMed

    Leo, Naëmi; Bergman, Anders; Cano, Andres; Poudel, Narayan; Lorenz, Bernd; Fiebig, Manfred; Meier, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Unusual electronic states arise at ferroelectric domain walls due to the local symmetry reduction, strain gradients and electrostatics. This particularly applies to improper ferroelectrics, where the polarization is induced by a structural or magnetic order parameter. Because of the subordinate nature of the polarization, the rigid mechanical and electrostatic boundary conditions that constrain domain walls in proper ferroics are lifted. Here we show that spin-driven ferroelectricity promotes the emergence of charged domain walls. This provides new degrees of flexibility for controlling domain-wall charges in a deterministic and reversible process. We create and position a domain wall by an electric field in Mn0.95Co0.05WO4. With a magnetic field we then rotate the polarization and convert neutral into charged domain walls, while its magnetic properties peg the wall to its location. Using atomistic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert simulations we quantify the polarization changes across the two wall types and highlight their general occurrence. PMID:25868608

  9. Crossed elliptical polarization undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Shigemi

    1997-05-01

    The first switching of polarization direction is possible by installing two identical helical undulators in series in a same straight section in a storage ring. By setting each undulator in a circular polarization mode in opposite handedness, one can obtain linearly polarized radiation with any required polarization direction depending on the modulator setting between two undulators. This scheme can be used without any major degradation of polarization degree in any low energy low emittance storage ring.

  10. Polarization-balanced beamsplitter

    DOEpatents

    Decker, D.E.

    1998-02-17

    A beamsplitter assembly is disclosed that includes several beamsplitter cubes arranged to define a plurality of polarization-balanced light paths. Each polarization-balanced light path contains one or more balanced pairs of light paths, where each balanced pair of light paths includes either two transmission light paths with orthogonal polarization effects or two reflection light paths with orthogonal polarization effects. The orthogonal pairing of said transmission and reflection light paths cancels polarization effects otherwise caused by beamsplitting. 10 figs.

  11. Polarization-balanced beamsplitter

    DOEpatents

    Decker, Derek E.

    1998-01-01

    A beamsplitter assembly that includes several beamsplitter cubes arranged to define a plurality of polarization-balanced light paths. Each polarization-balanced light path contains one or more balanced pairs of light paths, where each balanced pair of light paths includes either two transmission light paths with orthogonal polarization effects or two reflection light paths with orthogonal polarization effects. The orthogonal pairing of said transmission and reflection light paths cancels polarization effects otherwise caused by beamsplitting.

  12. Molecular dynamics of a κB DNA element: base flipping via cross-strand intercalative stacking in a microsecond-scale simulation

    PubMed Central

    Mura, Cameron; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The sequence-dependent structural variability and conformational dynamics of DNA play pivotal roles in many biological milieus, such as in the site-specific binding of transcription factors to target regulatory elements. To better understand DNA structure, function, and dynamics in general, and protein···DNA recognition in the ‘κB’ family of genetic regulatory elements in particular, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of a 20-bp DNA encompassing a cognate κB site recognized by the proto-oncogenic ‘c-Rel’ subfamily of NF-κB transcription factors. Simulations of the κB DNA in explicit water were extended to microsecond duration, providing a broad, atomically detailed glimpse into the structural and dynamical behavior of double helical DNA over many timescales. Of particular note, novel (and structurally plausible) conformations of DNA developed only at the long times sampled in this simulation—including a peculiar state arising at ≈0.7 μs and characterized by cross-strand intercalative stacking of nucleotides within a longitudinally sheared base pair, followed (at ≈1 μs) by spontaneous base flipping of a neighboring thymine within the A-rich duplex. Results and predictions from the microsecond-scale simulation include implications for a dynamical NF-κB recognition motif, and are amenable to testing and further exploration via specific experimental approaches that are suggested herein. PMID:18653524

  13. SCT: a suite of programs for comparing atomistic models with small-angle scattering data

    PubMed Central

    Wright, David W.; Perkins, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering techniques characterize proteins in solution and complement high-resolution structural studies. They are of particular utility when large proteins cannot be crystallized or when the structure is altered by solution conditions. Atomistic models of the averaged structure can be generated through constrained modelling, a technique in which known domain or subunit structures are combined with linker models to produce candidate global conformations. By randomizing the configuration adopted by the different elements of the model, thousands of candidate structures are produced. Next, theoretical scattering curves are generated for each model for trial-and-error fits to the experimental data. From these, a small family of best-fit models is identified. In order to facilitate both the computation of theoretical scattering curves from atomistic models and their comparison with experiment, the SCT suite of tools was developed. SCT also includes programs that provide sequence-based estimates of protein volume (either incorporating hydration or not) and add a hydration layer to models for X-ray scattering modelling. The original SCT software, written in Fortran, resulted in the first atomistic scattering structures to be deposited in the Protein Data Bank, and 77 structures for antibodies, complement proteins and anionic oligosaccharides were determined between 1998 and 2014. For the first time, this software is publicly available, alongside an easier-to-use reimplementation of the same algorithms in Python. Both versions of SCT have been released as open-source software under the Apache 2 license and are available for download from https://github.com/dww100/sct. PMID:26089768

  14. Cholesterol-induced suppression of membrane elastic fluctuations at the atomistic level.

    PubMed

    Molugu, Trivikram R; Brown, Michael F

    2016-09-01

    Applications of solid-state NMR spectroscopy for investigating the influences of lipid-cholesterol interactions on membrane fluctuations are reviewed in this paper. Emphasis is placed on understanding the energy landscapes and fluctuations at an emergent atomistic level. Solid-state (2)H NMR spectroscopy directly measures residual quadrupolar couplings (RQCs) due to individual C-(2)H labeled segments of the lipid molecules. Moreover, residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) of (13)C-(1)H bonds are obtained in separated local-field NMR spectroscopy. The distributions of RQC or RDC values give nearly complete profiles of the order parameters as a function of acyl segment position. Measured equilibrium properties of glycerophospholipids and sphingolipids including their binary and tertiary mixtures with cholesterol show unequal mixing associated with liquid-ordered domains. The entropic loss upon addition of cholesterol to sphingolipids is less than for glycerophospholipids and may drive the formation of lipid rafts. In addition relaxation time measurements enable one to study the molecular dynamics over a wide time-scale range. For (2)H NMR the experimental spin-lattice (R1Z) relaxation rates follow a theoretical square-law dependence on segmental order parameters (SCD) due to collective slow dynamics over mesoscopic length scales. The functional dependence for the liquid-crystalline lipid membranes is indicative of viscoelastic properties as they emerge from atomistic-level interactions. A striking decrease in square-law slope upon addition of cholesterol denotes stiffening relative to the pure lipid bilayers that is diminished in the case of lanosterol. Measured equilibrium properties and relaxation rates infer opposite influences of cholesterol and detergents on collective dynamics and elasticity at an atomistic scale that potentially affects lipid raft formation in cellular membranes. PMID:27154600

  15. Acoustic energy dissipation and thermalization in carbon nanotubes: Atomistic modeling and mesoscopic description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, William M.; Nicholson, David A.; Zemer, Hagit; Volkov, Alexey N.; Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    2012-10-01

    The exchange of energy between low-frequency mechanical oscillations and high-frequency vibrational modes in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is a process that plays an important role in a range of dynamic phenomena involving the dissipation of mechanical energy in both individual CNTs and CNT-based materials. The rates and channels through which acoustic energy deposited instantaneously in individual CNTs is dissipated are investigated in a series of atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. Several distinct regimes of energy dissipation, dependent on the initial stretching or bending deformations, are established. The onset of axial or bending buckling marks the transition from a regime of slow thermalization to a regime in which the energy associated with longitudinal and bending oscillations is rapidly damped. In the case of stretching vibrations, an intermediate regime is revealed in which dynamic coupling between longitudinal vibrational modes and the radial “squash” mode causes delayed axial buckling followed by a rapid transfer of energy to high-frequency vibrations. The results of the atomistic simulations are used in the design and parameterization of a “heat bath” description of thermal energy in a mesoscopic model, which is capable of simulating systems consisting of thousands of interacting CNTs. Two complementary methods for the description of mechanical energy dissipation in the mesoscopic model are developed. The relatively slow dissipation of acoustic vibrations in the absence of buckling is described by adding a damping force to the equations of motion of the dynamic elements of the mesoscopic model. The sharp increase in the energy dissipation rate at the onset of buckling is reproduced by incorporating a hysteresis loop into the strain energy that accounts for localized thermalization in the vicinity of buckling kinks. The ability of the mesoscopic model to reproduce the complex multistep processes of acoustic energy dissipation predicted by the

  16. Reflection-free atomistic-continuum coupling for solid mechanics employing spacetime discontinuous finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraczek, B.

    2005-03-01

    We present a means for coupling dynamic atomistic and continuum simulations via a spacetime discontinuous Galerkin (SDG) finite element method. Our scheme allows the SDG method to couple a general MD simulation using Verlet time-stepping through the flux conditions on the element boundaries at the interface. These flux conditions ensure weak balance of momentum and energy to achieve reflection-free transfer of disturbance across the interface. Our work is supported by the National Science Foundation (ITR grant DMR-0121695) on Process Simulation and Design and, in part, by the Materials Computation Center (FRG grant DMR-99-76550)

  17. Gilbert-like damping caused by time retardation in atomistic magnetization dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thonig, Danny; Henk, Jürgen; Eriksson, Olle

    2015-09-01

    Gilbert-like damping in magnetization dynamics is commonly attributed to the interplay of the spin, the electron, and the phonon reservoirs. Spatial correlations within the spin reservoir itself, for example magnons, mediate damping as well. We show theoretically that temporal correlations within the spin reservoir cause a similar effect. We investigate the role of time retardation in the atomistic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation using two different retardation kernels. Although viscous damping is explicitly excluded, we find both analytically and numerically that damping and higher-order effects emerge due to time retardation. Thus, our results establish a mechanism for damping and inertia in magnetic systems.

  18. Networks of silicon nanowires: A large-scale atomistic electronic structure analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Keleş, Ümit; Bulutay, Ceyhun; Liedke, Bartosz; Heinig, Karl-Heinz

    2013-11-11

    Networks of silicon nanowires possess intriguing electronic properties surpassing the predictions based on quantum confinement of individual nanowires. Employing large-scale atomistic pseudopotential computations, as yet unexplored branched nanostructures are investigated in the subsystem level as well as in full assembly. The end product is a simple but versatile expression for the bandgap and band edge alignments of multiply-crossing Si nanowires for various diameters, number of crossings, and wire orientations. Further progress along this line can potentially topple the bottom-up approach for Si nanowire networks to a top-down design by starting with functionality and leading to an enabling structure.

  19. Thermodynamic Properties of Asphaltenes: A Predictive Approach Based On Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation and Atomistic Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Diallo, Mamadou S.; Cagin, Tahir; Faulon, Jean Loup; Goddard, William A.

    2000-08-01

    The authors describe a new methodology for predicting the thermodynamic properties of petroleum geomacromolecules (asphaltenes and resins). This methodology combines computer assisted structure elucidation (CASE) with atomistic simulations (molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics and statistical mechanics). They use quantitative and qualitative structural data as input to a CASE program (SIGNATURE) to generate a sample of ten asphaltene model structures for a Saudi crude oil (Arab Berri). MM calculations and MD simulations are used to estimate selected volumetric and thermal properties of the model structures.

  20. Predicting growth of graphene nanostructures using high-fidelity atomistic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, Keven F.; Zhou, Xiaowang; Ward, Donald K.; Schultz, Peter A.; Foster, Michael E.; Bartelt, Norman Charles

    2015-09-01

    In this project we developed t he atomistic models needed to predict how graphene grows when carbon is deposited on metal and semiconductor surfaces. We first calculated energies of many carbon configurations using first principles electronic structure calculations and then used these energies to construct an empirical bond order potentials that enable s comprehensive molecular dynamics simulation of growth. We validated our approach by comparing our predictions to experiments of graphene growth on Ir, Cu and Ge. The robustness of ou r understanding of graphene growth will enable high quality graphene to be grown on novel substrates which will expand the number of potential types of graphene electronic devices.

  1. Using a scalar parameter to trace dislocation evolution in atomistic modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jinbo; Zhang, Z F; Osetskiy, Yury N; Stoller, Roger E

    2015-01-01

    A scalar gamma-parameter is proposed from the Nye tensor. Its maximum value occurs along a dislocation line, either straight or curved, when the coordinate system is purposely chosen. This parameter can be easily obtained from the Nye tensor calculated at each atom in atomistic modeling. Using the gamma-parameter, a fully automated approach is developed to determine core atoms and the Burgers vectors of dislocations simultaneously. The approach is validated by revealing the smallest dislocation loop and by tracing the whole formation process of complicated dislocation networks on the fly.

  2. Atomistic simulations of surface relaxations in Ni, Al, and their ordered alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.P.; Voter, A.F.; Srolovitz, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    We have performed a series of simulations to examine the atomistic nature of surface relaxations in pure metals and ordered alloys. The surface relaxations (..delta..d/sub n,n+1/) are shown to be oscillatory and to decay rapidly into the bulk. The period and form of the oscillation may be determined by simple geometrical arguments. The oscillation wavelength is always of order an atomic diameter. In pure metals, the surface layer of atoms always displaces inward. However, in the ordered alloys the larger atom may displace outward. On planes composed of more than one atom types, rippling occurs.

  3. Atomistic simulations of (001) symmetric tilt boundaries in Ni/sub 3/Al

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.P.; Voter, A.F.; Srolovitz, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    We report a systematic atomistic simulation study of (001) symmetric tilt grain boundaries (GB) in Ni/sub 3/Al, Ni, and Al. We found that the grain boundary energies and cohesive energies of Ni/sub 3/Al and pure fcc Ni are approximately the same. Grain boundary energies and cohesive energies in Ni/sub 3/Al depends strongly on the grain boundary composition. The Al-rich boundaries have highest grain boundary energies and lowest cohesive energies. This offers an explanation for the stoichiometric effect on the boron ductilization.

  4. Multiscale Modeling of Grain-Boundary Fracture: Cohesive Zone Models Parameterized From Atomistic Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaessgen, Edward H.; Saether, Erik; Phillips, Dawn R.; Yamakov, Vesselin

    2006-01-01

    A multiscale modeling strategy is developed to study grain boundary fracture in polycrystalline aluminum. Atomistic simulation is used to model fundamental nanoscale deformation and fracture mechanisms and to develop a constitutive relationship for separation along a grain boundary interface. The nanoscale constitutive relationship is then parameterized within a cohesive zone model to represent variations in grain boundary properties. These variations arise from the presence of vacancies, intersticies, and other defects in addition to deviations in grain boundary angle from the baseline configuration considered in the molecular dynamics simulation. The parameterized cohesive zone models are then used to model grain boundaries within finite element analyses of aluminum polycrystals.

  5. Investigations on the mechanical behavior of nanowires with twin boundaries by atomistic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Xia

    2015-03-10

    Atomistic simulations are used to study the deformation behavior of twinned Cu nanowires with a <111> growth orientation under tension. Due to the existence of the twin boundaries, the strength of the twinned nanowires is higher than that of the twin-free nanowire and the yielding stress of twinned nanowires is inversely proportional to the spacings of the twin boundaries. Moreover, The ductility of the twin-free nanowire is the highest of all and it grows with the increasing spacings of the twin boundaries for twinned nanowires. Besides, we find that the twin boundaries can be served as dislocation sources as well as the free surfaces and grain boundaries.

  6. AGU Chapman Conference Hydrogeologic Processes: Building and Testing Atomistic- to Basin-Scale Models

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, B.

    1994-12-31

    This report presents details of the Chapman Conference given on June 6--9, 1994 in Lincoln, New Hampshire. This conference covered the scale of processes involved in coupled hydrogeologic mass transport and a concept of modeling and testing from the atomistic- to the basin- scale. Other topics include; the testing of fundamental atomic level parameterizations in the laboratory and field studies of fluid flow and mass transport and the next generation of hydrogeologic models. Individual papers from this conference are processed separately for the database.

  7. Visualization and analysis of atomistic simulation data with OVITO-the Open Visualization Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stukowski, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    The Open Visualization Tool (OVITO) is a new 3D visualization software designed for post-processing atomistic data obtained from molecular dynamics or Monte Carlo simulations. Unique analysis, editing and animations functions are integrated into its easy-to-use graphical user interface. The software is written in object-oriented C++, controllable via Python scripts and easily extendable through a plug-in interface. It is distributed as open-source software and can be downloaded from the website http://ovito.sourceforge.net/.

  8. Near-ideal strength in metal nanotubes revealed by atomistic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Mingfei; Xiao, Fei; Deng, Chuang

    2013-12-02

    Here we report extraordinary mechanical properties revealed by atomistic simulations in metal nanotubes with hollow interior that have been long overlooked. Particularly, the yield strength in [1 1 1] Au nanotubes is found to be up to 60% higher than the corresponding solid Au nanowire, which approaches the theoretical ideal strength in Au. Furthermore, a remarkable transition from sharp to smooth yielding is observed in Au nanotubes with decreasing wall thickness. The ultrahigh tensile strength in [1 1 1] Au nanotube might originate from the repulsive image force exerted by the interior surface against dislocation nucleation from the outer surface.

  9. Fundamentals of mechanical behavior in structural intermetallics: A synthesis of atomistic and continuum modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, M.H.; Fu, C.L.

    1993-08-01

    After a brief account of the recent advances in computational research on mechanical behavior of structural intermetallics, currently unresolved problems and critical issues are addressed and the knowledge base for potential answers to these problems is discussed. As large-scale problems (e.g., dislocation core structures, grain boundaries, and crack tips) are treated by atomistic simulations, future development of relevant interatomic potentials should be made consistent with the results of first-principles calculations. The bulk and defect properties calculated for intermetallic compounds, both known and as yet untested, can furnish insights to alloy designers in search of new high-temperature structural intermetallics.

  10. Applications of single-layered graphene sheets as mass sensors and atomistic dust detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakhaee-Pour, A.; Ahmadian, M. T.; Vafai, A.

    2008-01-01

    Molecular structural mechanics is implemented to model the vibrational behavior of defect-free single-layered graphene sheets (SLGSs) at constant temperature. To mimic these two-dimensional layers, zigzag and armchair models with cantilever and bridge boundary conditions are adopted. Fundamental frequencies of these nanostructures are calculated, and it is perceived that they are independent of the chirality and aspect ratio. The effects of point mass and atomistic dust on the fundamental frequencies are also considered in order to investigate the possibility of using SLGSs as sensors. The results show that the principal frequencies are highly sensitive to an added mass of the order of 10-6 fg.

  11. Cold melting of beryllium: Atomistic view on Z-machine experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Dremov, V. V. Rykounov, A. A.; Sapozhnikov, F. A.; Karavaev, A. V.; Yakovlev, S. V.; Ionov, G. V.; Ryzhkov, M. V.

    2015-07-21

    Analysis of phase diagram of beryllium at high pressures and temperatures obtained as a result of ab initio calculations and large scale classical molecular dynamics simulations of beryllium shock loading have shown that the so called cold melting takes place when shock wave propagates through polycrystalline samples. Comparison of ab initio calculation results on sound speed along the Hugoniot with experimental data obtained on Z-machine also evidences for possible manifestation of the cold melting. The last may explain the discrepancy between atomistic simulations and experimental data on the onset of the melting on the Hugoniot.

  12. Atomistic Modeling of RuAl and (RuNi) Al Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gargano, Pablo; Mosca, Hugo; Bozzolo, Guillermo; Noebe, Ronald D.; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Atomistic modeling of RuAl and RuAlNi alloys, using the BFS (Bozzolo-Ferrante-Smith) method for alloys is performed. The lattice parameter and energy of formation of B2 RuAl as a function of stoichiometry and the lattice parameter of (Ru(sub 50-x)Ni(sub x)Al(sub 50)) alloys as a function of Ni concentration are computed. BFS based Monte Carlo simulations indicate that compositions close to Ru25Ni25Al50 are single phase with no obvious evidence of a miscibility gap and separation of the individual B2 phases.

  13. Atomistic mechanisms of moisture-induced fracture at copper-silica interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayashankar, Dandapani; Zhu, Hong; Garg, Saurabh; Teki, Ranganath; Ramprasad, R.; Lane, Michael W.; Ramanath, Ganpati

    2011-09-01

    Tailoring the chemo-mechanical properties of metal-dielectric interfaces is crucial for many applications including nanodevice wiring, packaging, composites, and catalysis. Here, we combine moisture-induced fracture tests, electron spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations to reveal fracture toughness partitioning and atomistic delamination mechanisms at copper-silica interfaces. Copper plasticity is supported above a threshold work of adhesion and delamination occurs by moisture-induced Cu-O bond scission in Cu-O-Si bridges. These results provide insights into the effects of the nature of metal-oxygen bonding on moisture-induced delamination of metal-dielectric interfaces.

  14. Atomistic simulation study of transverse domain wall in hexagonal YMnO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ning; Zhang, X.

    2015-11-01

    Using atomistic simulation method, we developed a set of interatomic potential parameters which accurately reproduced the complex atomic structure of multiferroic hexagonal manganite YMnO3. We then demonstrated a systematic study of intrinsic defects, and the fine atomic configurations and local structural distortions of two types of transverse domain wall. Moreover, the energy and structure details of transverse domain walls in oxygen deficient YMnO3 were revealed. Insights into the conductance enhancement was obtained. The present study sheds light on the understanding of structure-property relation in YMnO3.

  15. Human Reliability Analysis in the U.S. Nuclear Power Industry: A Comparison of Atomistic and Holistic Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald L. Boring; David I. Gertman; Jeffrey C. Joe; Julie L. Marble

    2005-09-01

    A variety of methods have been developed to generate human error probabilities for use in the US nuclear power industry. When actual operations data are not available, it is necessary for an analyst to estimate these probabilities. Most approaches, including THERP, ASEP, SLIM-MAUD, and SPAR-H, feature an atomistic approach to characterizing and estimating error. The atomistic approach is based on the notion that events and their causes can be decomposed and individually quantified. In contrast, in the holistic approach, such as found in ATHEANA, the analysis centers on the entire event, which is typically quantified as an indivisible whole. The distinction between atomistic and holistic approaches is important in understanding the nature of human reliability analysis quantification and the utility and shortcomings associated with each approach.

  16. Polarized Electron Source Developments

    SciTech Connect

    Charles K. Sinclair

    1990-02-23

    Presently, only two methods of producing beams of polarized electrons for injection into linear accelerators are in use. Each of these methods uses optical pumping by circularly polarized light to produce electron polarization. In one case, electron polarization is established in metastable helium atoms, while in the other case, the polarized electrons are produced in the conduction band of appropriate semiconductors. The polarized electrons are liberated from the helium metastable by chemi-ionization, and from the semiconductors by lowering the work function at the surface of the material. Developments with each of these sources since the 1988 Spin Physics Conference are reviewed, and the prospects for further improvements discussed.

  17. Analysis of microsecond relaxation dynamics of proteins and viscous media by recording relaxation shifts of phosphorescence spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barinov, A. V.; Goryachev, N. S.; Kotel'nikov, A. I.

    2011-05-01

    We studied the low-temperature dynamics of the Stokes shift of instantaneous phosphorescence spectra of eosin and eosin maleimide covalently bound to hemoglobin in a 66% v/v aqueous solution of glycerol under conditions of pulsed excitation. The kinetics of the Stokes shifts are described using the Cole-Davidson distribution function. From the experimental data, we obtain the parameters τ0 and β, which describe the Cole-Davidson distribution. Values of τ0 and β agree well with data obtained by other methods, and these parameters can be used to describe electron transfer reactions in polar solutions and proteins.

  18. Atomistic molecular-dynamics simulations of the size and shape of polyethylene in hexane at infinite dilution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zifferer, Gerhard; Kornherr, Andreas

    2005-05-01

    Parameters characteristic of size and shape of single polyethylene chains consisting of 15-60 monomer units dissolved in hexane are calculated by use of molecular-dynamics simulations based on a fully atomistic representation of the system. Results are compared with corresponding calculations in vacuum as well as Monte Carlo simulations of coarse-grained chains. The major concern of the study is a careful check of actual limits and possibilities of atomistic simulations of global properties of polymers. As expected such simulations are still restricted to rather small chain lengths but are already large enough to obey the characteristics of polymer coils.

  19. New Developments in the Embedded Statistical Coupling Method: Atomistic/Continuum Crack Propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saether, E.; Yamakov, V.; Glaessgen, E.

    2008-01-01

    A concurrent multiscale modeling methodology that embeds a molecular dynamics (MD) region within a finite element (FEM) domain has been enhanced. The concurrent MD-FEM coupling methodology uses statistical averaging of the deformation of the atomistic MD domain to provide interface displacement boundary conditions to the surrounding continuum FEM region, which, in turn, generates interface reaction forces that are applied as piecewise constant traction boundary conditions to the MD domain. The enhancement is based on the addition of molecular dynamics-based cohesive zone model (CZM) elements near the MD-FEM interface. The CZM elements are a continuum interpretation of the traction-displacement relationships taken from MD simulations using Cohesive Zone Volume Elements (CZVE). The addition of CZM elements to the concurrent MD-FEM analysis provides a consistent set of atomistically-based cohesive properties within the finite element region near the growing crack. Another set of CZVEs are then used to extract revised CZM relationships from the enhanced embedded statistical coupling method (ESCM) simulation of an edge crack under uniaxial loading.

  20. A Simple and Fast Semiautomatic Procedure for the Atomistic Modeling of Complex DNA Polyhedra.

    PubMed

    Alves, Cassio; Iacovelli, Federico; Falconi, Mattia; Cardamone, Francesca; Morozzo Della Rocca, Blasco; de Oliveira, Cristiano L P; Desideri, Alessandro

    2016-05-23

    A semiautomatic procedure to build complex atomistic covalently linked DNA nanocages has been implemented in a user-friendly, free, and fast program. As a test set, seven different truncated DNA polyhedra, composed by B-DNA double helices connected through short single-stranded linkers, have been generated. The atomistic structures, including a tetrahedron, a cube, an octahedron, a dodecahedron, a triangular prism, a pentagonal prism, and a hexagonal prism, have been probed through classical molecular dynamics and analyzed to evaluate their structural and dynamical properties and to highlight possible building faults. The analysis of the simulated trajectories also allows us to investigate the role of the different geometries in defining nanocages stability and flexibility. The data indicate that the cages are stable and that their structural and dynamical parameters measured along the trajectories are slightly affected by the different geometries. These results demonstrate that the constraints imposed by the covalent links induce an almost identical conformational variability independently of the three-dimensional geometry and that the program presented here is a reliable and valid tool to engineer DNA nanostructures. PMID:27050675

  1. Atomistic-continuum interphase model for effective properties of composite materials containing nano-inhomogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paliwal, B.; Cherkaoui, M.

    2011-10-01

    Classical micromechanics were revised to study the elastic properties of heterogeneous materials containing nano-inhomogeneities. Contrary to previous studies, this work introduces the concept of an interphase, in contrast to a sharp interface, to account for the interface excess stress effect at the nano-scale. The interphase's constitutive properties are derived from atomistic simulations within the continuum framework. These properties are then incorporated in a micromechanics-based interphase model to compute the effective properties of nano-composites. This scale transition approach bridges the gap between discrete systems (atomic level interactions) and continuum mechanics. An advantage of this approach is that it combines atomistic with continuum models that consider inhomogeneity and interphase morphology. It thereby enables us to account simultaneously for both the shape and the anisotropy of a nano-inhomogeneity and interphase at the continuum level when we compute a material's overall properties. In so doing, it frees us from making any assumptions about the interface characteristics between matrix and the nano-inhomogeneity.

  2. Intergranular fracture in UO2: derivation of traction-separation law from atomistic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Yongfeng Zhang; Paul C Millett; Michael R Tonks; Xian-Ming Bai; S Bulent Biner

    2013-10-01

    In this study, the intergranular fracture behavior of UO2 was studied by molecular dynamics simulations using the Basak potential. In addition, the constitutive traction-separation law was derived from atomistic data using the cohesive-zone model. In the simulations a bicrystal model with the (100) symmetric tilt E5 grain boundaries was utilized. Uniaxial tension along the grain boundary normal was applied to simulate Mode-I fracture. The fracture was observed to propagate along the grain boundary by micro-pore nucleation and coalescence, giving an overall intergranular fracture behavior. Phase transformations from the Fluorite to the Rutile and Scrutinyite phases were identified at the propagating crack tips. These new phases are metastable and they transformed back to the Fluorite phase at the wake of crack tips as the local stress concentration was relieved by complete cracking. Such transient behavior observed at atomistic scale was found to substantially increase the energy release rate for fracture. Insertion of Xe gas into the initial notch showed minor effect on the overall fracture behavior.

  3. Atomistic Design of Favored Compositions for Synthesizing the Al-Ni-Y Metallic Glasses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Q.; Li, J. H.; Liu, J. B.; Liu, B. X.

    2015-01-01

    For a ternary alloy system promising for obtaining the so-called bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), the first priority issue is to predict the favored compositions, which could then serve as guidance for the appropriate alloy design. Taking the Al-Ni-Y system as an example, here we show an atomistic approach, which is developed based on a recently constructed and proven realistic interatomic potential of the system. Applying the Al-Ni-Y potential, series simulations not only clarify the glass formation mechanism, but also predict in the composition triangle, a hexagonal region, in which a disordered state, i.e., the glassy phase, is favored energetically. The predicted region is defined as glass formation region (GFR) for the ternary alloy system. Moreover, the approach is able to calculate an amorphization driving force (ADF) for each possible glassy alloy located within the GFR. The calculations predict an optimized sub-region nearby a stoichiometry of Al80Ni5Y15, implying that the Al-Ni-Y metallic glasses designed in the sub-region could be the most stable. Interestingly, the atomistic predictions are supported by experimental results observed in the Al-Ni-Y system. In addition, structural origin underlying the stability of the Al-Ni-Y metallic glasses is also discussed in terms of a hybrid packing mode in the medium-range scale. PMID:26592568

  4. Mapping strain rate dependence of dislocation-defect interactions by atomistic simulations

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yue; Osetskiy, Yuri N.; Yip, Sidney; Yildiz, Bilge

    2013-01-01

    Probing the mechanisms of defect–defect interactions at strain rates lower than 106 s−1 is an unresolved challenge to date to molecular dynamics (MD) techniques. Here we propose an original atomistic approach based on transition state theory and the concept of a strain-dependent effective activation barrier that is capable of simulating the kinetics of dislocation–defect interactions at virtually any strain rate, exemplified within 10−7 to 107 s−1. We apply this approach to the problem of an edge dislocation colliding with a cluster of self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) under shear deformation. Using an activation–relaxation algorithm [Kushima A, et al. (2009) J Chem Phys 130:224504], we uncover a unique strain-rate–dependent trigger mechanism that allows the SIA cluster to be absorbed during the process, leading to dislocation climb. Guided by this finding, we determine the activation barrier of the trigger mechanism as a function of shear strain, and use that in a coarse-graining rate equation formulation for constructing a mechanism map in the phase space of strain rate and temperature. Our predictions of a crossover from a defect recovery at the low strain-rate regime to defect absorption behavior in the high strain-rate regime are validated against our own independent, direct MD simulations at 105 to 107 s−1. Implications of the present approach for probing molecular-level mechanisms in strain-rate regimes previously considered inaccessible to atomistic simulations are discussed. PMID:24114271

  5. Intergranular fracture in UO{sub 2}: derivation of traction-separation law from atomistic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yongfeng; Millett, P.C.; Tonks, M.R.; Bai, Xian-Ming; Biner, S.B.

    2013-07-01

    In this study, the intergranular fracture behavior of UO{sub 2} was studied by molecular dynamics simulations using the Basak potential. In addition, the constitutive traction-separation law was derived from atomistic data using the cohesive-zone model. In the simulations a bicrystal model with the (100) symmetric tilt Σ5 grain boundaries was utilized. Uniaxial tension along the grain boundary normal was applied to simulate Mode-I fracture. The fracture was observed to propagate along the grain boundary by micro-pore nucleation and coalescence, giving an overall intergranular fracture behavior. Phase transformations from the Fluorite to the Rutile and Scrutinyite phases were identified at the propagating crack tips. These new phases are metastable and they transformed back to the Fluorite phase at the wake of crack tips as the local stress concentration was relieved by complete cracking. Such transient behavior observed at atomistic scale was found to substantially increase the energy release rate for fracture. Insertion of Xe gas into the initial notch showed minor effect on the overall fracture behavior. (authors)

  6. Atomistic near-field nanoplasmonics: reaching atomic-scale resolution in nanooptics.

    PubMed

    Barbry, M; Koval, P; Marchesin, F; Esteban, R; Borisov, A G; Aizpurua, J; Sánchez-Portal, D

    2015-05-13

    Electromagnetic field localization in nanoantennas is one of the leitmotivs that drives the development of plasmonics. The near-fields in these plasmonic nanoantennas are commonly addressed theoretically within classical frameworks that neglect atomic-scale features. This approach is often appropriate since the irregularities produced at the atomic scale are typically hidden in far-field optical spectroscopies. However, a variety of physical and chemical processes rely on the fine distribution of the local fields at this ultraconfined scale. We use time-dependent density functional theory and perform atomistic quantum mechanical calculations of the optical response of plasmonic nanoparticles, and their dimers, characterized by the presence of crystallographic planes, facets, vertices, and steps. Using sodium clusters as an example, we show that the atomistic details of the nanoparticles morphologies determine the presence of subnanometric near-field hot spots that are further enhanced by the action of the underlying nanometric plasmonic fields. This situation is analogue to a self-similar nanoantenna cascade effect, scaled down to atomic dimensions, and it provides new insights into the limits of field enhancement and confinement, with important implications in the optical resolution of field-enhanced spectroscopies and microscopies.

  7. Representational analysis of extended disorder in atomistic ensembles derived from total scattering data

    PubMed Central

    Neilson, James R.; McQueen, Tyrel M.

    2015-01-01

    With the increased availability of high-intensity time-of-flight neutron and synchrotron X-ray scattering sources that can access wide ranges of momentum transfer, the pair distribution function method has become a standard analysis technique for studying disorder of local coordination spheres and at intermediate atomic separations. In some cases, rational modeling of the total scattering data (Bragg and diffuse) becomes intractable with least-squares approaches, necessitating reverse Monte Carlo simulations using large atomistic ensembles. However, the extraction of meaningful information from the resulting atomistic ensembles is challenging, especially at intermediate length scales. Representational analysis is used here to describe the displacements of atoms in reverse Monte Carlo ensembles from an ideal crystallographic structure in an approach analogous to tight-binding methods. Rewriting the displacements in terms of a local basis that is descriptive of the ideal crystallographic symmetry provides a robust approach to characterizing medium-range order (and disorder) and symmetry breaking in complex and disordered crystalline materials. This method enables the extraction of statistically relevant displacement modes (orientation, amplitude and distribution) of the crystalline disorder and provides directly meaningful information in a locally symmetry-adapted basis set that is most descriptive of the crystal chemistry and physics. PMID:26500465

  8. Fully atomistic molecular-mechanical model of liquid alkane oils: Computational validation.

    PubMed

    Zahariev, Tsvetan K; Slavchov, Radomir I; Tadjer, Alia V; Ivanova, Anela N

    2014-04-15

    Fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations were performed on liquid n-pentane, n-hexane, and n-heptane to derive an atomistic model for middle-chain-length alkanes. All simulations were based on existing molecular-mechanical parameters for alkanes. The computational protocol was optimized, for example, in terms of thermo- and barostat, to reproduce properly the properties of the liquids. The model was validated by comparison of thermal, structural, and dynamic properties of the normal alkane liquids to experimental data. Two different combinations of temperature and pressure coupling algorithms were tested. A simple differential approach was applied to evaluate fluctuation-related properties with sufficient accuracy. Analysis of the data reveals a satisfactory representation of the hydrophobic systems behavior. Thermodynamic parameters are close to the experimental values and exhibit correct temperature dependence. The observed intramolecular geometry corresponds to extended conformations domination, whereas the intermolecular structure demonstrates all characteristics of liquid systems. Cavity size distribution function was calculated from coordinates analysis and was applied to study the solubility of gases in hexane and heptane oils. This study provides a platform for further in-depth research on hydrophobic solutions and multicomponent systems.

  9. Fully atomistic molecular-mechanical model of liquid alkane oils: Computational validation.

    PubMed

    Zahariev, Tsvetan K; Slavchov, Radomir I; Tadjer, Alia V; Ivanova, Anela N

    2014-04-15

    Fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations were performed on liquid n-pentane, n-hexane, and n-heptane to derive an atomistic model for middle-chain-length alkanes. All simulations were based on existing molecular-mechanical parameters for alkanes. The computational protocol was optimized, for example, in terms of thermo- and barostat, to reproduce properly the properties of the liquids. The model was validated by comparison of thermal, structural, and dynamic properties of the normal alkane liquids to experimental data. Two different combinations of temperature and pressure coupling algorithms were tested. A simple differential approach was applied to evaluate fluctuation-related properties with sufficient accuracy. Analysis of the data reveals a satisfactory representation of the hydrophobic systems behavior. Thermodynamic parameters are close to the experimental values and exhibit correct temperature dependence. The observed intramolecular geometry corresponds to extended conformations domination, whereas the intermolecular structure demonstrates all characteristics of liquid systems. Cavity size distribution function was calculated from coordinates analysis and was applied to study the solubility of gases in hexane and heptane oils. This study provides a platform for further in-depth research on hydrophobic solutions and multicomponent systems. PMID:24554590

  10. Atomistic nature in band-to-band tunneling in two-dimensional silicon pn tunnel diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabe, Michiharu; Tan, Hoang Nhat; Mizuno, Takeshi; Muruganathan, Manoharan; Anh, Le The; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Nuryadi, Ratno; Moraru, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    We study low-temperature transport properties of two-dimensional (2D) Si tunnel diodes, or Si Esaki diodes, with a lateral layout. In ordinary Si Esaki diodes, interband tunneling current is severely limited because of the law of momentum conservation, while nanoscale Esaki diodes may behave differently due to the dopants in the narrow depletion region, by atomistic effects which release such current limitation. In thin-Si lateral highly doped pn diodes, we find clear signatures of interband tunneling between 2D-subbands involving phonon assistance. More importantly, the tunneling current is sharply enhanced in a narrow voltage range by resonance via a pair of a donor- and an acceptor-atom in the pn junction region. Such atomistic behavior is recognized as a general feature showing up only in nanoscale tunnel diodes. In particular, a donor-acceptor pair with deeper ground-state energies is likely to be responsible for such a sharply enhanced current peak, tunable by external biases.

  11. Atomistic insight into orthoborate-based ionic liquids: force field development and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-Lei; Shah, Faiz Ullah; Glavatskih, Sergei; Antzutkin, Oleg N; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2014-07-24

    We have developed an all-atomistic force field for a new class of halogen-free chelated orthoborate-phosphonium ionic liquids. The force field is based on an AMBER framework with determination of force field parameters for phosphorus and boron atoms, as well as refinement of several available parameters. The bond and angle force constants were adjusted to fit vibration frequency data derived from both experimental measurements and ab initio calculations. The force field parameters for several dihedral angles were obtained by fitting torsion energy profiles deduced from ab initio calculations. To validate the proposed force field parameters, atomistic simulations were performed for 12 ionic liquids consisting of tetraalkylphosphonium cations and chelated orthoborate anions. The predicted densities for neat ionic liquids and the [P6,6,6,14][BOB] sample, with a water content of approximately 2.3-2.5 wt %, are in excellent agreement with available experimental data. The potential energy components of 12 ionic liquids were discussed in detail. The radial distribution functions and spatial distribution functions were analyzed and visualized to probe the microscopic ionic structures of these ionic liquids. There are mainly four high-probability regions of chelated orthoborate anions distributed around tetraalkylphosphonium cations in the first solvation shell, and such probability distribution functions are strongly influenced by the size of anions. PMID:25020237

  12. A Simple and Fast Semiautomatic Procedure for the Atomistic Modeling of Complex DNA Polyhedra.

    PubMed

    Alves, Cassio; Iacovelli, Federico; Falconi, Mattia; Cardamone, Francesca; Morozzo Della Rocca, Blasco; de Oliveira, Cristiano L P; Desideri, Alessandro

    2016-05-23

    A semiautomatic procedure to build complex atomistic covalently linked DNA nanocages has been implemented in a user-friendly, free, and fast program. As a test set, seven different truncated DNA polyhedra, composed by B-DNA double helices connected through short single-stranded linkers, have been generated. The atomistic structures, including a tetrahedron, a cube, an octahedron, a dodecahedron, a triangular prism, a pentagonal prism, and a hexagonal prism, have been probed through classical molecular dynamics and analyzed to evaluate their structural and dynamical properties and to highlight possible building faults. The analysis of the simulated trajectories also allows us to investigate the role of the different geometries in defining nanocages stability and flexibility. The data indicate that the cages are stable and that their structural and dynamical parameters measured along the trajectories are slightly affected by the different geometries. These results demonstrate that the constraints imposed by the covalent links induce an almost identical conformational variability independently of the three-dimensional geometry and that the program presented here is a reliable and valid tool to engineer DNA nanostructures.

  13. An atomistic model for cross-linked HNBR elastomers used in seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, Nicola; Sutton, Adrian; Stevens, John; Mostofi, Arash

    2015-03-01

    Hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubber (HNBR) is one of the most common elastomeric materials used for seals in the oil and gas industry. These seals sometimes suffer ``explosive decompression,'' a costly problem in which gases permeate a seal at the elevated temperatures and pressures pertaining in oil and gas wells, leading to rupture when the seal is brought back to the surface. The experimental evidence that HNBR and its unsaturated parent NBR have markedly different swelling properties suggests that cross-linking may occur during hydrogenation of NBR to produce HNBR. We have developed a code compatible with the LAMMPS molecular dynamics package to generate fully atomistic HNBR configurations by hydrogenating initial NBR structures. This can be done with any desired degree of cross-linking. The code uses a model of atomic interactions based on the OPLS-AA force-field. We present calculations of the dependence of a number of bulk properties on the degree of cross-linking. Using our atomistic representations of HNBR and NBR, we hope to develop a better molecular understanding of the mechanisms that result in explosive decompression.

  14. Prediction of Material Properties of Nanostructured Polymer Composites Using Atomistic Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkley, J.A.; Clancy, T.C.; Frankland, S.J.V.

    2009-01-01

    Atomistic models of epoxy polymers were built in order to assess the effect of structure at the nanometer scale on the resulting bulk properties such as elastic modulus and thermal conductivity. Atomistic models of both bulk polymer and carbon nanotube polymer composites were built. For the bulk models, the effect of moisture content and temperature on the resulting elastic constants was calculated. A relatively consistent decrease in modulus was seen with increasing temperature. The dependence of modulus on moisture content was less consistent. This behavior was seen for two different epoxy systems, one containing a difunctional epoxy molecule and the other a tetrafunctional epoxy molecule. Both epoxy structures were crosslinked with diamine curing agents. Multifunctional properties were calculated with the nanocomposite models. Molecular dynamics simulation was used to estimate the interfacial thermal (Kapitza) resistance between the carbon nanotube and the surrounding epoxy matrix. These estimated values were used in a multiscale model in order to predict the thermal conductivity of a nanocomposite as a function of the nanometer scaled molecular structure.

  15. Mapping Strain-rate Dependent Dislocation-Defect Interactions by Atomistic Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Yue; Osetskiy, Yury N; Yip, Sidney; Yildiz-Botterud, Bilge

    2013-01-01

    Probing the mechanisms of defect-defect interactions at strain rates lower than 106 s-1 is an unresolved challenge to date to molecular dynamics (MD) techniques. Here we propose a novel atomistic approach based on transition state theory and the concept of a strain-dependent effective activation barrier that is capable of simulating the kinetics of dislocation-defect interactions at virtually any strain rate, exemplified within 10-7 to 107 s-1. We apply this approach to the problem of an edge dislocation colliding with a cluster of self-interstitial atoms (SIA) under shear deformation. Using an activation-relaxation algorithm (1), we uncover a unique strain-rate dependent trigger mechanism that allows the SIA cluster to be absorbed during the process leading to dislocation climb. Guided by this finding, we determine the activation barrier of the trigger mechanism as a function of shear strain, and use that in a coarse-graining rate equation formulation for constructing a mechanism map in the phase space of strain-rate and temperature. Our predictions of a crossover from a defect recovery at the low strain rate regime to defect absorption behavior in the high strain-rate regime are validated against our own independent, direct MD simulations at 105 to 107 s-1. Implications of the present approach for probing molecular-level mechanisms in strain-rate regimes previously considered inaccessible to atomistic simulations are discussed.

  16. Atomistic insight into orthoborate-based ionic liquids: force field development and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-Lei; Shah, Faiz Ullah; Glavatskih, Sergei; Antzutkin, Oleg N; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2014-07-24

    We have developed an all-atomistic force field for a new class of halogen-free chelated orthoborate-phosphonium ionic liquids. The force field is based on an AMBER framework with determination of force field parameters for phosphorus and boron atoms, as well as refinement of several available parameters. The bond and angle force constants were adjusted to fit vibration frequency data derived from both experimental measurements and ab initio calculations. The force field parameters for several dihedral angles were obtained by fitting torsion energy profiles deduced from ab initio calculations. To validate the proposed force field parameters, atomistic simulations were performed for 12 ionic liquids consisting of tetraalkylphosphonium cations and chelated orthoborate anions. The predicted densities for neat ionic liquids and the [P6,6,6,14][BOB] sample, with a water content of approximately 2.3-2.5 wt %, are in excellent agreement with available experimental data. The potential energy components of 12 ionic liquids were discussed in detail. The radial distribution functions and spatial distribution functions were analyzed and visualized to probe the microscopic ionic structures of these ionic liquids. There are mainly four high-probability regions of chelated orthoborate anions distributed around tetraalkylphosphonium cations in the first solvation shell, and such probability distribution functions are strongly influenced by the size of anions.

  17. A Translational Polarization Rotator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuss, David T.; Wollack, Edward J.; Pisano, Giampaolo; Ackiss, Sheridan; U-Yen, Kongpop; Ng, Ming wah

    2012-01-01

    We explore a free-space polarization modulator in which a variable phase introduction between right- and left-handed circular polarization components is used to rotate the linear polarization of the outgoing beam relative to that of the incoming beam. In this device, the polarization states are separated by a circular polarizer that consists of a quarter-wave plate in combination with a wire grid. A movable mirror is positioned behind and parallel to the circular polarizer. As the polarizer-mirror distance is separated, an incident liear polarization will be rotated through an angle that is proportional to the introduced phase delay. We demonstrate a prototype device that modulates Stokes Q and U over a 20% bandwidth.

  18. Polarization at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, M.

    1995-01-01

    A highly polarized electron beam is a key feature. for the Current physics program at SLAC. An electron beam polarization of 80% can now be routinely achieved for typically 5000 hours of machine operation per year. Two main Physics programs utilize the polarized beam. Fixed target experiments in End Station A study the collision of polarized electrons with polarized nuclear targets to elucidate the spin structure of the nucleon and to provide an important test of QCD. Using the SLAC Linear Collider, collisions of polarized electrons with unpolarized positrons allow precise measurements of parity violation in the Z-fermion couplings and provide a very precise measurement of tile weak mixing angle. This paper discusses polarized beam operation at SLAC, and gives an overview of the polarized physics program.

  19. Polarized Light Corridor Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, G. R.

    1990-01-01

    Eleven demonstrations of light polarization are presented. Each includes a brief description of the apparatus and the effect demonstrated. Illustrated are strain patterns, reflection, scattering, the Faraday Effect, interference, double refraction, the polarizing microscope, and optical activity. (CW)

  20. Protein conformational plasticity and complex ligand-binding kinetics explored by atomistic simulations and Markov models

    PubMed Central

    Plattner, Nuria; Noé, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the structural mechanisms of protein–ligand binding and their dependence on protein sequence and conformation is of fundamental importance for biomedical research. Here we investigate the interplay of conformational change and ligand-binding kinetics for the serine protease Trypsin and its competitive inhibitor Benzamidine with an extensive set of 150 μs molecular dynamics simulation data, analysed using a Markov state model. Seven metastable conformations with different binding pocket structures are found that interconvert at timescales of tens of microseconds. These conformations differ in their substrate-binding affinities and binding/dissociation rates. For each metastable state, corresponding solved structures of Trypsin mutants or similar serine proteases are contained in the protein data bank. Thus, our wild-type simulations explore a space of conformations that can be individually stabilized by adding ligands or making suitable changes in protein sequence. These findings provide direct evidence of conformational plasticity in receptors. PMID:26134632

  1. Subnanosecond polarized fluorescence photobleaching: rotational diffusion of acetylcholine receptors on developing muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Y; Axelrod, D

    1995-01-01

    Polarized fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (PFRAP) is a technique for measuring the rate of rotational motion of biomolecules on living, nondeoxygenated cells with characteristic times previously ranging from milliseconds to many seconds. Although very broad, that time range excludes the possibility of quantitatively observing freely rotating membrane protein monomers that typically should have a characteristic decay time of only several microseconds. This report describes an extension of the PFRAP technique to a much shorter time scale. With this new system, PFRAP experiments can be conducted with sample time as short as 0.4 microseconds and detection of possible characteristic times of less than 2 microseconds. The system is tested on rhodamine-alpha-bungarotoxin-labeled acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) on myotubes grown in primary cultures of embryonic rat muscle, in both endogenously clustered and nonclustered regions of AChR distribution. It is found that approximately 40% of the AChRs in nonclustered regions undergoes rotational diffusion fast enough to possibly arise from unrestricted monomer Brownian motion. The AChRs in clusters, on the other hand, are almost immobile. The effects of rat embryonic brain extract (which contains AChR aggregating factors) on the myotube AChR were also examined by the fast PFRAP system. Brain extract is known to abolish the presence of endogenous clusters and to induce the formation of new clusters. It is found here that rotational diffusion of AChR in the extract-induced clusters is as slow as that in endogenous clusters on untreated cells but that rotational diffusion in the nonclustered regions of extract-treated myotubes remains rapid. Images FIGURE 3 PMID:8527682

  2. Graphing Polar Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawes, Jonathan F.

    2013-01-01

    Graphing polar curves typically involves a combination of three traditional techniques, all of which can be time-consuming and tedious. However, an alternative method--graphing the polar function on a rectangular plane--simplifies graphing, increases student understanding of the polar coordinate system, and reinforces graphing techniques learned…

  3. Polarity at Many Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura C.

    2004-01-01

    An attempt is made to find how polarity arises and is maintained, which is a central issue in development. It is a fundamental attribute of living things and cellular polarity is also important in the development of multicellular organisms and controversial new work indicates that polarization in mammals may occur much earlier than previously…

  4. Polarization feedback laser stabilization

    DOEpatents

    Esherick, Peter; Owyoung, Adelbert

    1988-01-01

    A system for locking two Nd:YAG laser oscillators includes an optical path for feeding the output of one laser into the other with different polarizations. Elliptical polarization is incorporated into the optical path so that the change in polarization that occurs when the frequencies coincide may be detected to provide a feedback signal to control one laser relative to the other.

  5. Bumblebees Learn Polarization Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Foster, James J.; Sharkey, Camilla R.; Gaworska, Alicia V.A.; Roberts, Nicholas W.; Whitney, Heather M.; Partridge, Julian C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Foraging insect pollinators such as bees must find and identify flowers in a complex visual environment. Bees use skylight polarization patterns for navigation [1–3], a capacity mediated by the polarization-sensitive dorsal rim area (DRA) of their eye [4, 5]. While other insects use polarization sensitivity to identify appropriate habitats [6], oviposition sites, and food sources [7], to date no nonnavigational functions of polarization vision have been identified in bees. Here we investigated the ability of bumblebees (Bombus terrestris) to learn polarization patterns on artificial “flowers” in order to obtain a food reward. We show that foraging bumblebees can learn to discriminate between two differently polarized targets, but only when the target artificial “flower” is viewed from below. A context for these results is provided by polarization imaging of bee-pollinated flowers, revealing the potential for polarization patterns in real flowers. Bees may therefore have the ability to use polarization vision, possibly mediated by their polarization-sensitive DRA, both for navigation and to learn polarization patterns on flowers, the latter being the first nonnavigational function for bee polarization vision to be identified. PMID:24909321

  6. Calculation of polarization effects

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, A.W.

    1983-09-01

    Basically there are two areas of accelerator applications that involve beam polarization. One is the acceleration of a polarized beam (most likely a proton beam) in a synchrotron. Another concerns polarized beams in an electron storage ring. In both areas, numerical techniques have been very useful.

  7. Polar Ozone Workshop. Abstracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, Arthur C.

    1988-01-01

    Results of the proceedings of the Polar Ozone Workshop held in Snowmass, CO, on May 9 to 13, 1988 are given. Topics covered include ozone depletion, ozonometry, polar meteorology, polar stratospheric clouds, remote sensing of trace gases, atmospheric chemistry and dynamical simulations.

  8. Effect of the Initial Load Parameters on the K-shell Output of Al Planar Wire Arrays Operating in the Microsecond Implosion Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Shishlov, A.; Chaikovsky, S.; Fedunin, A.; Fursov, F.; Kokshenev, V.; Kurmaev, N.; Labetsky, A.; Oreshkin, V.; Rousskikh, A.; Labetskaya, N.

    2009-01-21

    A set of microsecond implosion experiments was carried on the GIT-12 generator to study the radiative performance of Al planar wire arrays. The load parameters such as a wire diameter, a gap between the wires, the number of wires, and the total planar wire mass and width were varied during the experiments, however the implosion time and the peak implosion current were almost the same for all load configurations. This ensured equal energy deposition to the plasma due to kinetic mechanisms for all load configurations. Two implosion regimes with the implosion times of 1050 ns and 850 ns were investigated. The experimental data on the K-shell radiation yield and power at varying load parameters are presented.

  9. Scanning Single-Molecule Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy Enables Kinetics Study of DNA Hairpin Folding with a Time Window from Microseconds to Seconds.

    PubMed

    Bi, Huimin; Yin, Yandong; Pan, Bailong; Li, Geng; Zhao, Xin Sheng

    2016-05-19

    Single-molecule fluorescence measurements have been widely used to explore kinetics and dynamics of biological systems. Among them, single-molecule imaging (SMI) is good at tracking processes slower than tens of milliseconds, whereas fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is good at probing processes faster than submilliseconds. However, there is still shortage of simple yet effective single-molecule fluorescence method to cover the time-scale between submilliseconds and tens of milliseconds. To effectively bridge this millisecond gap, we developed a single-molecule fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (smFCS) method that works on surface-immobilized single molecules through surface scanning. We validated it by monitoring the classical DNA hairpin folding process. With a wide time window from microseconds to seconds, the experimental data are well fitted to the two-state folding model. All relevant molecular parameters, including the relative fluorescence brightness, equilibrium constant, and reaction rate constants, were uniquely determined.

  10. Multiple site optical recording of transmembrane voltage (MSORTV) in patterned growth heart cell cultures: assessing electrical behavior, with microsecond resolution, on a cellular and subcellular scale.

    PubMed Central

    Rohr, S; Salzberg, B M

    1994-01-01

    We have applied multiple site optical recording of transmembrane voltage (MSORTV) to patterned growth cultures of heart cells to analyze the effect of geometry per se on impulse propagation in excitable tissue, with cellular and subcellular resolution. Extensive dye screening led to the choice of di-8-ANEPPS as the most suitable voltage-sensitive dye for this application; it is internalized slowly and permits optical recording with signal-to-noise ratios as high as 40:1 (measured peak-to-peak) and average fractional fluorescence changes of 15% per 100 mV. Using a x 100 objective and a fast data acquisition system, we could resolve impulse propagation on a microscopic scale (15 microns) with high temporal resolution (uncertainty of +/- 5 microseconds). We could observe the decrease in conduction velocity of an impulse propagating along a narrow cell strand as it enters a region of abrupt expansion, and we could explain this phenomenon in terms of the micro-architecture of the tissue. In contrast with the elongated and aligned cells forming the narrow strands, the cells forming the expansions were aligned at random and presented 2.5 times as many cell-to-cell appositions per unit length. If the decrease in conduction velocity results entirely from this increased number of cell-to-cell boundaries per unit length, the mean activation delay introduced by each boundary can be estimated to be 70 microseconds. Using this novel experimental system, we could also demonstrate the electrical coupling of fibroblasts and endotheloid cells to myocytes in culture. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 PMID:7811945

  11. Hybrid polarity SAR architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raney, R. Keith

    2009-05-01

    A space-based synthetic aperture radar (SAR) designed to provide quantitative information on a global scale implies severe requirements to maximize coverage and to sustain reliable operational calibration. These requirements are best served by the hybrid-polarity architecture, in which the radar transmits in circular polarization, and receives on two orthogonal linear polarizations, coherently, retaining their relative phase. This paper summarizes key attributes of hybrid-polarity dual- and quadrature-polarized SARs, reviews the associated advantages, formalizes conditions under which the signal-to-noise ratio is conserved, and describes the evolution of this architecture from first principles.

  12. High energy, 1572.3 nm pulses for CO2 LIDAR from a polarization-maintaining, very-large-mode-area, Er-doped fiber amplifier.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, J W; DeSantolo, A; Yan, M F; Wisk, P; Mangan, B; Puc, G; Yu, A W; Stephen, M A

    2016-08-22

    We demonstrate the first polarization-maintaining, very-large-mode-area, Er-doped fiber amplifier with ~1100 μm2 effective area. The amplifier is core pumped by a Raman fiber laser and is used to generate single-frequency, one-microsecond, pulses with pulse energy of 541 μJ, peak power of 700 W, M2 of 1.1, and polarization extinction > 20 dB. The amplifier operates at 1572.3 nm, a wavelength useful for trace atmospheric CO2 detection.

  13. High energy, 1572.3 nm pulses for CO2 LIDAR from a polarization-maintaining, very-large-mode-area, Er-doped fiber amplifier.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, J W; DeSantolo, A; Yan, M F; Wisk, P; Mangan, B; Puc, G; Yu, A W; Stephen, M A

    2016-08-22

    We demonstrate the first polarization-maintaining, very-large-mode-area, Er-doped fiber amplifier with ~1100 μm2 effective area. The amplifier is core pumped by a Raman fiber laser and is used to generate single-frequency, one-microsecond, pulses with pulse energy of 541 μJ, peak power of 700 W, M2 of 1.1, and polarization extinction > 20 dB. The amplifier operates at 1572.3 nm, a wavelength useful for trace atmospheric CO2 detection. PMID:27557271

  14. Polarization in remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egan, Walter G.

    1992-12-01

    A review of the experimental and theoretical aspects of optical polarization is presented with definitions of the observed polarization characteristics and relationship to the Stokes parameters. A typical terrestrial soil polarization curve is characterized and related to the current theoretical knowledge. This polarization relationship is extended to cover planetary surfaces, such as the Moon, and Mars and terrestrial surfaces composed of farm areas and water surfaces. Instrumentation for imaging and non-imaging polarimetry are described including the use of focal plane arrays. Recent Space Shuttle polarimetric observations of the region around the Island of Hawaii and New Madrid, Missouri are described, as well as concurrent cloud and haze observations. Polarization is a sensitive indicator of cloud particle size distributions, soil texture, farm crops, sea state and atmospheric aerosols and haze. Cloud particle size distributions are uniquely characterized by polarization, and this cannot be achieved with photometry. An extensive bibliography of polarization in remote sensing is appended.

  15. Polarity inversion in polar-nonpolar-polar heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Cho, S; Youn, S J; Kim, Y; DiVenere, A; Wong, G K; Freeman, A J; Ketterson, J B

    2001-09-17

    We have observed an epilayer-thickness-dependent polarity inversion for the growth of CdTe on Sb(Bi)/CdTe(111)B. For films with Sb(Bi) thicknesses of less than 40 A (15 A), the CdTe layer shows a B (Te-terminated) face, but it switches to an A (Cd-terminated) face for thicker layers. On the other hand, a CdTe layer grown on Bi(Sb)/CdTe(111)A always shows the A face regardless of Sb or Bi layer thicknesses. In order to address the observations we have performed ab initio calculations, which suggest that the polarity of a polar material on a nonpolar one results from the binding energy difference between the two possible surface configurations.

  16. A hybrid atomistic electrodynamics-quantum mechanical approach for simulating surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Payton, John L; Morton, Seth M; Moore, Justin E; Jensen, Lasse

    2014-01-21

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a technique that has broad implications for biological and chemical sensing applications by providing the ability to simultaneously detect and identify a single molecule. The Raman scattering of molecules adsorbed on metal nanoparticles can be enhanced by many orders of magnitude. These enhancements stem from a twofold mechanism: an electromagnetic mechanism (EM), which is due to the enhanced local field near the metal surface, and a chemical mechanism (CM), which is due to the adsorbate specific interactions between the metal surface and the molecules. The local field near the metal surface can be significantly enhanced due to the plasmon excitation, and therefore chemists generally accept that the EM provides the majority of the enhancements. While classical electrodynamics simulations can accurately simulate the local electric field around metal nanoparticles, they offer few insights into the spectral changes that occur in SERS. First-principles simulations can directly predict the Raman spectrum but are limited to small metal clusters and therefore are often used for understanding the CM. Thus, there is a need for developing new methods that bridge the electrodynamics simulations of the metal nanoparticle and the first-principles simulations of the molecule to facilitate direct simulations of SERS spectra. In this Account, we discuss our recent work on developing a hybrid atomistic electrodynamics-quantum mechanical approach to simulate SERS. This hybrid method is called the discrete interaction model/quantum mechanics (DIM/QM) method and consists of an atomistic electrodynamics model of the metal nanoparticle and a time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) description of the molecule. In contrast to most previous work, the DIM/QM method enables us to retain a detailed atomistic structure of the nanoparticle and provides a natural bridge between the electronic structure methods and the macroscopic

  17. Finite element analysis of an atomistically derived cohesive model for brittle fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, J. T.; Zimmerman, J. A.; Jones, R. E.; Zhou, X. W.; McDowell, D. L.

    2011-09-01

    In order to apply information from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in problems governed by engineering length and time scales, a coarse graining methodology must be used. In previous work by Zhou et al (2009 Acta Mater. 57 4671-86), a traction-separation cohesive model was developed using results from MD simulations with atomistic-to-continuum measures of stress and displacement. Here, we implement this cohesive model within a combined finite element/cohesive surface element framework (referred to as a finite element approach or FEA), and examine the ability for the atomistically informed FEA to directly reproduce results from MD. We find that FEA shows close agreement of both stress and crack opening displacement profiles at the cohesive interface, although some differences do exist that can be attributed to the stochastic nature of finite temperature MD. The FEA methodology is then used to study slower loading rates that are computationally expensive for MD. We find that the crack growth process initially exhibits a rate-independent relationship between crack length and boundary displacement, followed by a rate-dependent regime where, at a given amount of boundary displacement, a lower applied strain rate produces a longer crack length. Our method is also extended to larger length scales by simulating a compact tension fracture-mechanics specimen with sub-micrometer dimensions. Such a simulation shows a computational speedup of approximately four orders of magnitude over conventional atomistic simulation, while exhibiting the expected fracture-mechanics response. Finally, differences between FEA and MD are explored with respect to ensemble and temperature effects in MD, and their impact on the cohesive model and crack growth behavior. These results enable us to make several recommendations to improve the methodology used to derive cohesive laws from MD simulations. In light of this work, which has critical implications for efforts to derive continuum laws

  18. Atomistic origin of an ordered superstructure induced superconductivity in layered chalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Ang, R; Wang, Z C; Chen, C L; Tang, J; Liu, N; Liu, Y; Lu, W J; Sun, Y P; Mori, T; Ikuhara, Y

    2015-01-27

    Interplay among various collective electronic states such as charge density wave and superconductivity is of tremendous significance in low-dimensional electron systems. However, the atomistic and physical nature of the electronic structures underlying the interplay of exotic states, which is critical to clarifying its effect on remarkable properties of the electron systems, remains elusive, limiting our understanding of the superconducting mechanism. Here, we show evidence that an ordering of selenium and sulphur atoms surrounding tantalum within star-of-David clusters can boost superconductivity in a layered chalcogenide 1T-TaS2-xSex, which undergoes a superconducting transition in the nearly commensurate charge density wave phase. Advanced electron microscopy investigations reveal that such an ordered superstructure forms only in the x area, where the superconductivity manifests, and is destructible to the occurrence of the Mott metal-insulator transition. The present findings provide a novel dimension in understanding the relationship between lattice and electronic degrees of freedom.

  19. Mapping between atomistic simulations and Eshelby inclusions in the shear deformation of an amorphous silicon model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albaret, T.; Tanguy, A.; Boioli, F.; Rodney, D.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we perform quasistatic shear simulations of model amorphous silicon bulk samples with Stillinger-Weber-type potentials. Local plastic rearrangements identified based on local energy variations are fitted through their displacement fields on collections of Eshelby spherical inclusions, allowing determination of their transformation strain tensors. The latter are then used to quantitatively reproduce atomistic stress-strain curves, in terms of both shear and pressure components. We demonstrate that our methodology is able to capture the plastic behavior predicted by different Stillinger-Weber potentials, in particular, their different shear tension coupling. These calculations justify the decomposition of plasticity into shear transformations used so far in mesoscale models and provide atomic-scale parameters that can be used to limit the empiricism needed in such models up to now.

  20. Atomistic and Coarse Grain Topologies for the Cofactors Associated with the Photosystem II Core Complex.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Djurre H; Liguori, Nicoletta; van den Berg, Tom; Arnarez, Clement; Periole, Xavier; Marrink, Siewert J

    2015-06-25

    Electron transfers within and between protein complexes are core processes of the electron transport chains occurring in thylakoid (chloroplast), mitochondrial, and bacterial membranes. These electron transfers involve a number of cofactors. Here we describe the derivation of molecular mechanics parameters for the cofactors associated with the function of the photosystem II core complex: plastoquinone, plastoquinol, heme b, chlorophyll A, pheophytin, and β-carotene. Parameters were also obtained for ubiquinol and ubiquinone, related cofactors involved in the respiratory chain. Parameters were derived at both atomistic and coarse grain (CG) resolutions, compatible with the building blocks of the GROMOS united-atom and Martini CG force fields, respectively. Structural and thermodynamic properties of the cofactors were compared to experimental values when available. The topologies were further tested in molecular dynamics simulations of the cofactors in their physiological environment, e.g., either in a lipid membrane environment or in complex with the heme binding protein bacterioferritin.

  1. Atomistic full-band simulations of monolayer MoS{sub 2} transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Jiwon; Register, Leonard F.; Banerjee, Sanjay K.

    2013-11-25

    We study the transport properties of deeply scaled monolayer MoS{sub 2} n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs), using full-band ballistic quantum transport simulations, with an atomistic tight-binding Hamiltonian obtained from density functional theory. Our simulations suggest that monolayer MoS{sub 2} MOSFETs can provide near-ideal subthreshold slope, suppression of drain-induced barrier lowering, and gate-induced drain leakage. However, these full-band simulations exhibit limited transconductance. These ballistic simulations also exhibit negative differential resistance (NDR) in the output characteristics associated with the narrow width in energy of the lowest conduction band, but this NDR may be substantially reduced or eliminated by scattering in MoS{sub 2}.

  2. Atomistic modeling of the structural components of the blood-brain barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glukhova, O. E.; Grishina, O. A.; Slepchenkov, M. M.

    2015-03-01

    Blood-brain barrier, which is a barrage system between the brain and blood vessels, plays a key role in the "isolation" of the brain of unnecessary information, and reduce the "noise" in the interneuron communication. It is known that the barrier function of the BBB strictly depends on the initial state of the organism and changes significantly with age and, especially in developing the "vascular accidents". Disclosure mechanisms of regulation of the barrier function will develop new ways to deliver neurotrophic drugs to the brain in the newborn. The aim of this work is the construction of atomistic models of structural components of the blood-brain barrier to reveal the mechanisms of regulation of the barrier function.

  3. An atomistic vision of the Mass Action Law: Prediction of carbon/oxygen defects in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Brenet, G.; Timerkaeva, D.; Caliste, D.; Pochet, P.; Sgourou, E. N.; Londos, C. A.

    2015-09-28

    We introduce an atomistic description of the kinetic Mass Action Law to predict concentrations of defects and complexes. We demonstrate in this paper that this approach accurately predicts carbon/oxygen related defect concentrations in silicon upon annealing. The model requires binding and migration energies of the impurities and complexes, here obtained from density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Vacancy-oxygen complex kinetics are studied as a model system during both isochronal and isothermal annealing. Results are in good agreement with experimental data, confirming the success of the methodology. More importantly, it gives access to the sequence of chain reactions by which oxygen and carbon related complexes are created in silicon. Beside the case of silicon, the understanding of such intricate reactions is a key to develop point defect engineering strategies to control defects and thus semiconductors properties.

  4. Integrated atomistic chemical imaging and reactive force field molecular dynamic simulations on silicon oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Dumpala, Santoshrupa; Broderick, Scott R.; Rajan, Krishna; Khalilov, Umedjon; Neyts, Erik C.; Duin, Adri C. T. van; Provine, J; Howe, Roger T.

    2015-01-05

    In this paper, we quantitatively investigate with atom probe tomography, the effect of temperature on the interfacial transition layer suboxide species due to the thermal oxidation of silicon. The chemistry at the interface was measured with atomic scale resolution, and the changes in chemistry and intermixing at the interface were identified on a nanometer scale. We find an increase of suboxide (SiOx) concentration relative to SiO{sub 2} and increased oxygen ingress with elevated temperatures. Our experimental findings are in agreement with reactive force field molecular dynamics simulations. This work demonstrates the direct comparison between atom probe derived chemical profiles and atomistic-scale simulations for transitional interfacial layer of suboxides as a function of temperature.

  5. Calculation and visualization of atomistic mechanical stresses in nanomaterials and biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Fenley, Andrew T; Muddana, Hari S; Gilson, Michael K

    2014-01-01

    Many biomolecules have machine-like functions, and accordingly are discussed in terms of mechanical properties like force and motion. However, the concept of stress, a mechanical property that is of fundamental importance in the study of macroscopic mechanics, is not commonly applied in the biomolecular context. We anticipate that microscopical stress analyses of biomolecules and nanomaterials will provide useful mechanistic insights and help guide molecular design. To enable such applications, we have developed Calculator of Atomistic Mechanical Stress (CAMS), an open-source software package for computing atomic resolution stresses from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The software also enables decomposition of stress into contributions from bonded, nonbonded and Generalized Born potential terms. CAMS reads GROMACS topology and trajectory files, which are easily generated from AMBER files as well; and time-varying stresses may be animated and visualized in the VMD viewer. Here, we review relevant theory and present illustrative applications. PMID:25503996

  6. Calculation and Visualization of Atomistic Mechanical Stresses in Nanomaterials and Biomolecules

    PubMed Central

    Gilson, Michael K.

    2014-01-01

    Many biomolecules have machine-like functions, and accordingly are discussed in terms of mechanical properties like force and motion. However, the concept of stress, a mechanical property that is of fundamental importance in the study of macroscopic mechanics, is not commonly applied in the biomolecular context. We anticipate that microscopical stress analyses of biomolecules and nanomaterials will provide useful mechanistic insights and help guide molecular design. To enable such applications, we have developed Calculator of Atomistic Mechanical Stress (CAMS), an open-source software package for computing atomic resolution stresses from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The software also enables decomposition of stress into contributions from bonded, nonbonded and Generalized Born potential terms. CAMS reads GROMACS topology and trajectory files, which are easily generated from AMBER files as well; and time-varying stresses may be animated and visualized in the VMD viewer. Here, we review relevant theory and present illustrative applications. PMID:25503996

  7. Stabilization of Model Membrane Systems by Disaccharides. Quasielastic Neutron Scattering Experiments and Atomistic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doxastakis, Emmanouil; Garcia Sakai, Victoria; Ohtake, Satoshi; Maranas, Janna K.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2006-03-01

    Trehalose, a disaccharide of glucose, is often used for the stabilization of cell membranes in the absence of water. This work studies the effects of trehalose on model membrane systems as they undergo a melting transition using a combination of experimental methods and atomistic molecular simulations. Quasielastic neutron scattering experiments on selectively deuterated samples provide the incoherent dynamic structure over a wide time range. Elastic scans probing the lipid tail dynamics display clear evidence of a main melting transition that is significantly lowered in the presence of trehalose. Lipid headgroup mobility is considerably restricted at high temperatures and directly associated with the dynamics of the sugar in the mixture. Molecular simulations provide a detailed overview of the dynamics and their spatial and time dependence. The combined simulation and experimental methodology offers a unique, molecular view of the physics of systems commonly employed in cryopreservation and lyophilization processes.

  8. Changes in portlandite morphology with solvent composition: Atomistic simulations and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Galmarini, Sandra Aimable, Anne; Ruffray, Nicolas; Bowen, Paul

    2011-12-15

    Experimental work has been done to determine changes in the particle shape of portlandite grown in the presence of different ions. To quantify the experimentally observed changes in morphology a new analysis tool was developed, allowing the calculation of the relative surface energies of the crystal facets. The observed morphology in the presence of chlorides and nitrates was facetted particles of a similar shape, the addition of sulfates leads to hexagonal platelet morphology and the addition of silicates leads to the formation of large irregular aggregates. In addition to the experimental work, the surfaces of portlandite were studied with atomistic simulation techniques. The empirical force field used has first been validated. The equilibrium morphology of portlandite in vacuum and in water was then calculated. The results indicate that the presence of water stabilizes the [20.3] surface and changes the morphology. This is consistent with the experimental observation of [20.3] surfaces.

  9. The first atomistic modelling-aided reproduction of morphologically defective single walled carbon nanohorns.

    PubMed

    Furmaniak, Sylwester; Terzyk, Artur P; Kaneko, Katsumi; Gauden, Piotr A; Kowlaczyk, Piotr; Itoh, Tsutomu

    2013-01-28

    A new modelling-aided approach for the atomistic model of single walled carbon nanohorn (SWNH) creation is presented, based on experimental evidence, on realistic potential of carbon-carbon interactions and on molecular simulations. A new model of SWNHs is next used to predict Ar adsorption properties and to check the molecular fundamentals of the adsorption mechanism. The influence of the apex angle value, nanohorn diameter and nanohorn length on the shapes of isotherms, enthalpy, high resolution α(s)-plots and adsorption potential distribution curves is checked. Finally the comparison with new experimental Ar adsorption results is shown and the conclusions on the porosity of real SWNH aggregates are given. PMID:23229231

  10. Simulating Cellulose Structure, Properties, Thermodynamics, Synthesis, and Deconstruction with Atomistic and Coarse-Grain Models

    SciTech Connect

    Crowley, M. F.; Matthews, J.; Beckham, G.; Bomble, Y.; Hynninen, A. P.; Ciesielski, P. F.

    2012-01-01

    Cellulose is still a mysterious polymer in many ways: structure of microfibrils, thermodynamics of synthesis and degradation, and interactions with other plant cell wall components. Our aim is to uncover the details and mechanisms of cellulose digestion and synthesis. We report the details of the structure of cellulose 1-beta under several temperature conditions and report here the results of these studies and connections to experimental measurements and the measurement in-silico the free energy of decrystallization of several morphologies of cellulose. In spatially large modeling, we show the most recent work of mapping atomistic and coarse-grain models into tomographic images of cellulose and extreme coarse-grain modeling of interactions of large cellulase complexes with microfibrils. We discuss the difficulties of modeling cellulose and suggest future work both experimental and theoretical to increase our understanding of cellulose and our ability to use it as a raw material for fuels and materials.

  11. Aggregation behaviour of amphiphilic cyclodextrins: the nucleation stage by atomistic molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Raffaini, Giuseppina; Mazzaglia, Antonino; Ganazzoli, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Amphiphilically modified cyclodextrins may form various supramolecular aggregates. Here we report a theoretical study of the aggregation of a few amphiphilic cyclodextrins carrying hydrophobic thioalkyl groups and hydrophilic ethylene glycol moieties at opposite rims, focusing on the initial nucleation stage in an apolar solvent and in water. The study is based on atomistic molecular dynamics methods with a "bottom up" approach that can provide important information about the initial aggregates of few molecules. The focus is on the interaction pattern of amphiphilic cyclodextrin (aCD), which may interact by mutual inclusion of the substituent groups in the hydrophobic cavity of neighbouring molecules or by dispersion interactions at their lateral surface. We suggest that these aggregates can also form the nucleation stage of larger systems as well as the building blocks of micelles, vesicle, membranes, or generally nanoparticles thus opening new perspectives in the design of aggregates correlating their structures with the pharmaceutical properties. PMID:26734094

  12. Fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulation of nanosilica-filled crosslinked polybutadiene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, Alexander S.; Khalatur, Pavel G.

    2016-06-01

    We report on the first fully atomistic simulation of sulfur-crosslinked cis-1,4-polybutadiene (PB) rubbers, both unfilled and nanosilica-filled. A well-integrated network is built by crosslinking the coarse-grained precursor PB chains. The initial configurations for subsequent molecular dynamics simulations are obtained by reverse mapping of well-equilibrated coarse-grained systems. Thermal and mechanical properties of the PB-based elastomers are predicted in reasonable agreement with experiment. The inclusion of silica nanoparticles into the model rubber increases the glass transition temperature and elastic modulus. Under tensile loading conditions, the formation of structural defects (microcavities) within the polymer bulk is observed for nanocomposite at the elastomer/nanoparticle interfaces.

  13. Computer code for the atomistic simulation of lattice defects and dynamics. [COMENT code

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffgens, J.O.; Graves, N.J.; Oster, C.A.

    1980-04-01

    This document has been prepared to satisfy the need for a detailed, up-to-date description of a computer code that can be used to simulate phenomena on an atomistic level. COMENT was written in FORTRAN IV and COMPASS (CDC assembly language) to solve the classical equations of motion for a large number of atoms interacting according to a given force law, and to perform the desired ancillary analysis of the resulting data. COMENT is a dual-purpose intended to describe static defect configurations as well as the detailed motion of atoms in a crystal lattice. It can be used to simulate the effect of temperature, impurities, and pre-existing defects on radiation-induced defect production mechanisms, defect migration, and defect stability.

  14. Aggregation behaviour of amphiphilic cyclodextrins: the nucleation stage by atomistic molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Raffaini, Giuseppina; Mazzaglia, Antonino; Ganazzoli, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Amphiphilically modified cyclodextrins may form various supramolecular aggregates. Here we report a theoretical study of the aggregation of a few amphiphilic cyclodextrins carrying hydrophobic thioalkyl groups and hydrophilic ethylene glycol moieties at opposite rims, focusing on the initial nucleation stage in an apolar solvent and in water. The study is based on atomistic molecular dynamics methods with a "bottom up" approach that can provide important information about the initial aggregates of few molecules. The focus is on the interaction pattern of amphiphilic cyclodextrin (aCD), which may interact by mutual inclusion of the substituent groups in the hydrophobic cavity of neighbouring molecules or by dispersion interactions at their lateral surface. We suggest that these aggregates can also form the nucleation stage of larger systems as well as the building blocks of micelles, vesicle, membranes, or generally nanoparticles thus opening new perspectives in the design of aggregates correlating their structures with the pharmaceutical properties.

  15. Atomistic Modeling of Quaternary Alloys: Ti and Cu in NiAl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Mosca, Hugo O.; Wilson, Allen W.; Noebe, Ronald D.; Garces, Jorge E.

    2002-01-01

    The change in site preference in NiAl(Ti,Cu) alloys with concentration is examined experimentally via ALCHEMI and theoretically using the Bozzolo-Ferrante-Smith (BFS) method for alloys. Results for the site occupancy of Ti and Cu additions as a function of concentration are determined experimentally for five alloys. These results are reproduced with large-scale BFS-based Monte Carlo atomistic simulations. The original set of five alloys is extended to 25 concentrations, which are modeled by means of the BFS method for alloys, showing in more detail the compositional range over which major changes in behavior occur. A simple but powerful approach based on the definition of atomic local environments also is introduced to describe energetically the interactions between the various elements and therefore to explain the observed behavior.

  16. Aggregation behaviour of amphiphilic cyclodextrins: the nucleation stage by atomistic molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Mazzaglia, Antonino; Ganazzoli, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Summary Amphiphilically modified cyclodextrins may form various supramolecular aggregates. Here we report a theoretical study of the aggregation of a few amphiphilic cyclodextrins carrying hydrophobic thioalkyl groups and hydrophilic ethylene glycol moieties at opposite rims, focusing on the initial nucleation stage in an apolar solvent and in water. The study is based on atomistic molecular dynamics methods with a “bottom up” approach that can provide important information about the initial aggregates of few molecules. The focus is on the interaction pattern of amphiphilic cyclodextrin (aCD), which may interact by mutual inclusion of the substituent groups in the hydrophobic cavity of neighbouring molecules or by dispersion interactions at their lateral surface. We suggest that these aggregates can also form the nucleation stage of larger systems as well as the building blocks of micelles, vesicle, membranes, or generally nanoparticles thus opening new perspectives in the design of aggregates correlating their structures with the pharmaceutical properties. PMID:26734094

  17. Calculation and visualization of atomistic mechanical stresses in nanomaterials and biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Fenley, Andrew T; Muddana, Hari S; Gilson, Michael K

    2014-01-01

    Many biomolecules have machine-like functions, and accordingly are discussed in terms of mechanical properties like force and motion. However, the concept of stress, a mechanical property that is of fundamental importance in the study of macroscopic mechanics, is not commonly applied in the biomolecular context. We anticipate that microscopical stress analyses of biomolecules and nanomaterials will provide useful mechanistic insights and help guide molecular design. To enable such applications, we have developed Calculator of Atomistic Mechanical Stress (CAMS), an open-source software package for computing atomic resolution stresses from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The software also enables decomposition of stress into contributions from bonded, nonbonded and Generalized Born potential terms. CAMS reads GROMACS topology and trajectory files, which are easily generated from AMBER files as well; and time-varying stresses may be animated and visualized in the VMD viewer. Here, we review relevant theory and present illustrative applications.

  18. Atomistic view of impurities interacting with a quasi-one-dimensional charge density wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Deok Mahn; Yeom, Han Woong

    2016-06-01

    Atomistic details of the interaction of impurities with quasi-one-dimensional charge density wave (CDW) are revealed by scanning tunneling microscopy. Oxygen and pentacene adsorbates are utilized as strongly and weakly interacting impurities, respectively, on the well-known CDW state of the In atomic wire array on the Si(111) surface. Distinct CDW pinning configurations are identified for oxygen impurities with different atomic structures, indicating the strong pinning. The governing role of local strain field for the strong pinning is elucidated. In contrast, a few different pinning configurations occur for a unique adsorption structure of pentacene indicating a weak pinning. Pentacene molecules commonly induce characteristic phase shifts, which readily couple with other phase defects, in particular, solitons in order to avoid interwire phase misfits. This work provides the mechanism and methodology for the atomic scale control over phases, solitons, and domain boundaries of CDW.

  19. Thermochemistry of organic reactions in microporous oxides by atomistic simulations: benchmarking against periodic B3LYP.

    PubMed

    Bleken, Francesca; Svelle, Stian; Lillerud, Karl Petter; Olsbye, Unni; Arstad, Bjørnar; Swang, Ole

    2010-07-15

    The methylation of ethene by methyl chloride and methanol in the microporous materials SAPO-34 and SSZ-13 has been studied using different periodic atomistic modeling approaches based on density functional theory. The RPBE functional, which earlier has been used successfully in studies of surface reactions on metals, fails to yield a qualitatively correct description of the transition states under study. Employing B3LYP as functional gives results in line with experimental data: (1) Methanol is adsorbed more strongly than methyl chloride to the acid site. (2) The activation energies for the methylation of ethene are slightly lower for SSZ-13. Furthermore, the B3LYP activation energies are lower for methyl chloride than for methanol. PMID:20557090

  20. Elastic anisotropy and shear-induced atomistic deformation of tetragonal silicon carbon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Haiyan; Zhang, Meiguang; Zhao, Yaru; Zhou, Xinchun; Wei, Qun

    2014-07-14

    First-principles calculations are employed to provide a fundamental understanding of the structural features, elastic anisotropy, shear-induced atomistic deformation behaviors, and its electronic origin of the recently proposed superhard t-SiCN. According to the dependences of the elastic modulus on different crystal directions, the t-SiCN exhibits a well-pronounced elastic anisotropy which may impose certain limitations and restrictions on its applications. The further mechanical calculations demonstrated that t-SiCN shows lower elastic moduli and ideal shear strength than those of typical hard substances of TiN and TiC, suggesting that it cannot be intrinsically superhard as claimed in the recent works. We find that the failure modes of t-SiCN at the atomic level during shear deformation can be attributed to the breaking of C-C bonds through the bonding evolution and electronic localization analyses.

  1. Study of the embedded atom method of atomistic calculations for metals and alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.A.

    1990-10-01

    Two projects were completed in the past year. The stability of a series of binary alloys was calculated using the embedded-atom method (EAM) with an analytic form for two-body potentials derived previously. Both disordered alloys and intermetallic compounds with the L1{sub 0} and L1{sub 2} structures were studied. The calculated heats of solution of alloys of Cu, Ag, Au, Ni, and Pt were satisfactory, while results for alloys containing Pd were too high. Atomistic calculations using the EAM were also carried out for point defects in hcp metals. By comparison with results in the literature, it was found that many body effects from the EAM significantly alter predicted physical properties of hcp metals. For example, the EAM calculations yield anisotropic vacancy diffusion with greater vacancy mobility in the basal plane, and imply that diffusion will start at a lower fraction of the melting temperature.

  2. Atomistic studies of point defect migration rates in the iron-chromium system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetherly, Jeffrey

    Generation and migration of helium and other point defects under irradiation causes ferritic steels based on the Fe-Cr system to age and fail. This is motivation to study point defect migration and the He equation of state using atomistic simulations due to the steels' use in future reactors. A new potential for the Fe-Cr-He system developed by collaborators at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was validated using published experimental data. The results for the He equation of state agree well with experimental data. The activation energies for the migration of He- and Fe-interstitials in varying compositions of Fe-Cr lattices agree well with prior work. This research did not find a strong correlation between lattice ordering and interstitial migration energy.

  3. Permutation invariant potential energy surfaces for polyatomic reactions using atomistic neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Brian; Zhao, Bin; Li, Jun; Jiang, Bin; Guo, Hua

    2016-06-01

    The applicability and accuracy of the Behler-Parrinello atomistic neural network method for fitting reactive potential energy surfaces is critically examined in three systems, H + H2 → H2 + H, H + H2O → H2 + OH, and H + CH4 → H2 + CH3. A pragmatic Monte Carlo method is proposed to make efficient choice of the atom-centered mapping functions. The accuracy of the potential energy surfaces is not only tested by fitting errors but also validated by direct comparison in dynamically important regions and by quantum scattering calculations. Our results suggest this method is both accurate and efficient in representing multidimensional potential energy surfaces even when dissociation continua are involved.

  4. Molecular organization in freely suspended nano-thick 8CB smectic films. An atomistic simulation.

    PubMed

    Palermo, Mattia Felice; Muccioli, Luca; Zannoni, Claudio

    2015-10-21

    We present an atomistic molecular dynamics simulation of freely suspended films of the smectic liquid crystal 8CB formed by nl = 2, 3,…,10, 20 theoretical monolayers, determining their orientational and positional order as a function of the film thickness. We find that films are always composed by bilayers of antiparallel molecules, and that in the case of odd nl, the system prefers to self-assemble in (nl + 1)/2 bilayers, with an increase of surface tension with respect to even nl samples. We also show that external layers have higher positional and orientational order, and that upon heating the disordering of the system proceeds from the inside, with the central layers progressively losing their smectic character, while the external ones are more resistant to temperature changes and keep the film from breaking.

  5. Permutation invariant potential energy surfaces for polyatomic reactions using atomistic neural networks.

    PubMed

    Kolb, Brian; Zhao, Bin; Li, Jun; Jiang, Bin; Guo, Hua

    2016-06-14

    The applicability and accuracy of the Behler-Parrinello atomistic neural network method for fitting reactive potential energy surfaces is critically examined in three systems, H + H2 → H2 + H, H + H2O → H2 + OH, and H + CH4 → H2 + CH3. A pragmatic Monte Carlo method is proposed to make efficient choice of the atom-centered mapping functions. The accuracy of the potential energy surfaces is not only tested by fitting errors but also validated by direct comparison in dynamically important regions and by quantum scattering calculations. Our results suggest this method is both accurate and efficient in representing multidimensional potential energy surfaces even when dissociation continua are involved.

  6. Proton transport in functionalised additives for PEM fuel cells: contributions from atomistic simulations.

    PubMed

    Tölle, Pia; Köhler, Christof; Marschall, Roland; Sharifi, Monir; Wark, Michael; Frauenheim, Thomas

    2012-08-01

    The conventional polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) materials for fuel cell applications strongly rely on temperature and pressure conditions for optimal performance. In order to expand the range of operating conditions of these conventional PEM materials, mesoporous functionalised SiO(2) additives are developed. It has been demonstrated that these additives themselves achieve proton conductivities approaching those of conventional materials. However, the proton conduction mechanisms and especially factors influencing charge carrier mobility under different hydration conditions are not well known and difficult to separate from concentration effects in experiments. This tutorial review highlights contributions of atomistic computer simulations to the basic understanding and eventual design of these materials. Some basic introduction to the theoretical and computational framework is provided to introduce the reader to the field, the techniques are in principle applicable to a wide range of other situations as well. Simulation results are directly compared to experimental data as far as possible.

  7. Atomistic full-band simulations of monolayer MoS2 transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jiwon; Register, Leonard F.; Banerjee, Sanjay K.

    2013-11-01

    We study the transport properties of deeply scaled monolayer MoS2 n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs), using full-band ballistic quantum transport simulations, with an atomistic tight-binding Hamiltonian obtained from density functional theory. Our simulations suggest that monolayer MoS2 MOSFETs can provide near-ideal subthreshold slope, suppression of drain-induced barrier lowering, and gate-induced drain leakage. However, these full-band simulations exhibit limited transconductance. These ballistic simulations also exhibit negative differential resistance (NDR) in the output characteristics associated with the narrow width in energy of the lowest conduction band, but this NDR may be substantially reduced or eliminated by scattering in MoS2.

  8. Large-scale atomistic simulations of helium-3 bubble growth in complex palladium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hale, Lucas M.; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Wong, Bryan M.

    2016-05-01

    Palladium is an attractive material for hydrogen and hydrogen-isotope storage applications due to its properties of large storage density and high diffusion of lattice hydrogen. When considering tritium storage, the material's structural and mechanical integrity is threatened by both the embrittlement effect of hydrogen and the creation and evolution of additional crystal defects (e.g., dislocations, stacking faults) caused by the formation and growth of helium-3 bubbles. Using recently developed inter-atomic potentials for the palladium-silver-hydrogen system, we perform large-scale atomistic simulations to examine the defect-mediated mechanisms that govern helium bubble growth. Our simulations show the evolution of a distribution of material defects, and we compare the material behavior displayed with expectations from experiment and theory. We also present density functional theory calculations to characterize ideal tensile and shear strengths for these materials, which enable the understanding of how and why our developed potentials either meet or confound these expectations.

  9. Atomistic simulation study of linear alkylbenzene sulfonates at the water/air interface

    PubMed Central

    He, Xibing; Guvench, Olgun; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Klein, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular Dynamics simulations with the CHARMM atomistic force field have been used to study monolayers of a series of linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS) at the water/air interface. Both the numbers of carbon atoms in the LAS alkyl tail (1 to 11), and the position of attachment of the benzene ring on the alkyl chain have been varied. Totally 36 LAS homologues and isomers have been investigated. The surface tensions of the systems and the average tilt angles of the LAS molecules are found to be related to both the length and the degree of branching of the alkyl tails, whereas the solubility and mobility are mostly determined by the tail length. PMID:20614916

  10. Mechanism of the Cassie-Wenzel transition via the atomistic and continuum string methods.

    PubMed

    Giacomello, Alberto; Meloni, Simone; Müller, Marcus; Casciola, Carlo Massimo

    2015-03-14

    The string method is a general and flexible strategy to compute the most probable transition path for an activated process (rare event). We apply here the atomistic string method in the density field to the Cassie-Wenzel transition, a central problem in the field of superhydrophobicity. We discuss in detail the mechanism of wetting of a submerged hydrophobic cavity of nanometer size and its dependence on the geometry of the cavity. Furthermore, we analyze the algorithmic analogies between the continuum "interface" string method and CREaM [Giacomello et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 226102 (2012)], a method inspired by the string that allows for a faster and simpler computation of the mechanism and of the free-energy profiles of the wetting process.

  11. Mechanism of the Cassie-Wenzel transition via the atomistic and continuum string methods

    SciTech Connect

    Giacomello, Alberto Casciola, Carlo Massimo; Meloni, Simone; Müller, Marcus

    2015-03-14

    The string method is a general and flexible strategy to compute the most probable transition path for an activated process (rare event). We apply here the atomistic string method in the density field to the Cassie-Wenzel transition, a central problem in the field of superhydrophobicity. We discuss in detail the mechanism of wetting of a submerged hydrophobic cavity of nanometer size and its dependence on the geometry of the cavity. Furthermore, we analyze the algorithmic analogies between the continuum “interface” string method and CREaM [Giacomello et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 226102 (2012)], a method inspired by the string that allows for a faster and simpler computation of the mechanism and of the free-energy profiles of the wetting process.

  12. Difference in aggregation between functional and toxic amyloids studied by atomistic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carballo Pacheco, Martin; Ismail, Ahmed E.; Strodel, Birgit

    Amyloids are highly structured protein aggregates, normally associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. In recent years, a number of nontoxic amyloids with physiologically normal functions, called functional amyloids, have been found. It is known that soluble small oligomers are more toxic than large fibrils. Thus, we study with atomistic explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations the oligomer formation of the amyloid- β peptide Aβ25 - 35, associated with Alzheimer's disease, and two functional amyloid-forming tachykinin peptides: kassinin and neuromedin K. Our simulations show that monomeric peptides in extended conformations aggregate faster than those in collapsed hairpin-like conformations. In addition, we observe faster aggregation by functional amyloids than toxic amyloids, which could explain their lack of toxicity.

  13. Methods and numerical aspects of nanoscopic contact area estimation in atomistic tribological simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eder, S.; Vernes, A.; Betz, G.

    2014-01-01

    We show how data obtained from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of nanoscale friction should be treated for producing constitutive system parameters with a proper error estimation. A visualisation scheme for discrete atomistic geometries based on the smooth particle method (SPM) was parametrised and validated to yield an accurate and computationally robust estimation of the contact area between two touching nanoscopic asperities. We present some thoughts on the error estimation of the contact forces occurring due to the load and the shearing motion. The variance in the friction force constitutes the main source of error for the fitting of the constitutive system parameters. The dependence of the constitutive system parameters on the number of available data points was also studied. It was shown that an equal spacing (by load) of the data points can result in better values for the system parameters than the convergence trend suggests.

  14. Mapping between atomistic simulations and Eshelby inclusions in the shear deformation of an amorphous silicon model.

    PubMed

    Albaret, T; Tanguy, A; Boioli, F; Rodney, D

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we perform quasistatic shear simulations of model amorphous silicon bulk samples with Stillinger-Weber-type potentials. Local plastic rearrangements identified based on local energy variations are fitted through their displacement fields on collections of Eshelby spherical inclusions, allowing determination of their transformation strain tensors. The latter are then used to quantitatively reproduce atomistic stress-strain curves, in terms of both shear and pressure components. We demonstrate that our methodology is able to capture the plastic behavior predicted by different Stillinger-Weber potentials, in particular, their different shear tension coupling. These calculations justify the decomposition of plasticity into shear transformations used so far in mesoscale models and provide atomic-scale parameters that can be used to limit the empiricism needed in such models up to now. PMID:27300968

  15. The role of halide ions in the anisotropic growth of gold nanoparticles: a microscopic, atomistic perspective.

    PubMed

    Meena, Santosh Kumar; Celiksoy, Sirin; Schäfer, Philipp; Henkel, Andreas; Sönnichsen, Carsten; Sulpizi, Marialore

    2016-05-21

    We provide a microscopic view of the role of halides in controlling the anisotropic growth of gold nanorods through a combined computational and experimental study. Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations unveil that Br(-) adsorption is not only responsible for surface passivation, but also acts as the driving force for CTAB micelle adsorption and stabilization on the gold surface in a facet-dependent way. The partial replacement of Br(-) by Cl(-) decreases the difference between facets and the surfactant density. Finally, in the CTAC solution, no halides or micellar structures protect the gold surface and further gold reduction should be uniformly possible. Experimentally observed nanoparticle's growth in different CTAB/CTAC mixtures is more uniform and faster as the amount of Cl(-) increases, confirming the picture from the simulations. In addition, the surfactant layer thickness measured on nanorods exposed to CTAB and CTAC quantitatively agrees with the simulation results. PMID:27118188

  16. Emergence of step flow from an atomistic scheme of epitaxial growth in 1 +1 dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jianfeng; Liu, Jian-Guo; Margetis, Dionisios

    2015-03-01

    The Burton-Cabrera-Frank (BCF) model for the flow of line defects (steps) on crystal surfaces has offered useful insights into nanostructure evolution. This model has rested on phenomenological grounds. Our goal is to show via scaling arguments the emergence of the BCF theory for noninteracting steps from a stochastic atomistic scheme of a kinetic restricted solid-on-solid model in one spatial dimension. Our main assumptions are: adsorbed atoms (adatoms) form a dilute system, and elastic effects of the crystal lattice are absent. The step edge is treated as a front that propagates via probabilistic rules for atom attachment and detachment at the step. We formally derive a quasistatic step flow description by averaging out the stochastic scheme when terrace diffusion, adatom desorption, and deposition from above are present.

  17. Atomistic study of diffusion-mediated plasticity and creep using phase field crystal methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Joel; Rottler, Jörg; Sinclair, Chad W.; Provatas, Nikolas

    2015-10-01

    The nonequilibrium dynamics of diffusion-mediated plasticity and creep in materials subjected to constant load at high homologous temperatures is studied atomistically using phase field crystal (PFC) methods. Creep stress and grain size exponents obtained for nanopolycrystalline systems, m ≃1.02 and p ≃1.98 , respectively, closely match those expected for idealized diffusional Nabarro-Herring creep. These exponents are observed in the presence of significant stress-assisted diffusive grain boundary migration, indicating that Nabarro-Herring creep and stress-assisted boundary migration contribute in the same manner to the macroscopic constitutive relation. When plastic response is dislocation-mediated, power-law stress exponents inferred from dislocation climb rates are found to increase monotonically from m ≃3 , as expected for generic climb-mediated natural creep, to m ≃5.8 as the dislocation density ρd is increased beyond typical experimental values. Stress exponents m ≳3 directly measured from simulations that include dislocation nucleation, climb, glide, and annihilation are attributed primarily to these large ρd effects. Extrapolation to lower ρd suggests that m ≃4 -4.5 should be obtained from our PFC description at typical experimental ρd values, which is consistent with expectations for power-law creep via mixed climb and glide. The anomalously large stress exponents observed in our atomistic simulations at large ρd may nonetheless be relevant to systems in which comparable densities are obtained locally within heterogeneous defect domains such as dislocation cell walls or tangles.

  18. Filler reinforcement in cross-linked elastomer nanocomposites: insights from fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, Alexander S; Khalatur, Pavel G

    2016-06-28

    Using a fully atomistic model, we perform large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of sulfur-cured polybutadiene (PB) and nanosilica-filled PB composites. A well-integrated network without sol fraction is built dynamically by cross-linking the coarse-grained precursor chains in the presence of embedded silica nanoparticles. Initial configurations for subsequent atomistic simulations are obtained by reverse mapping of the well-equilibrated coarse-grained systems. Based on the concept of "maximally inflated knot" introduced by Grosberg et al., we show that the networks simulated in this study behave as mechanically isotropic systems. Analysis of the network topology in terms of graph theory reveals that mechanically inactive tree-like structures are the dominant structural components of the weakly cross-linked elastomer, while cycles are mainly responsible for the transmission of mechanical forces through the network. We demonstrate that quantities such as the system density, thermal expansion coefficient, glass transition temperature and initial Young's modulus can be predicted in qualitative and sometimes even in quantitative agreement with experiments. The nano-filled system demonstrates a notable increase in the glass transition temperature and an approximately two-fold increase in the nearly equilibrium value of elastic modulus relative to the unfilled elastomer even at relatively small amounts of filler particles. We also examine the structural rearrangement of the nanocomposite subjected to tensile deformation. Under high strain-rate loading, the formation of structural defects (microcavities) within the polymer bulk is observed. The nucleation and growth of cavities in the post-yielding strain hardening regime mainly take place at the elastomer/nanoparticle interfaces. As a result, the cavities are concentrated just near the embedded nanoparticles. Therefore, while the silica nanofiller increases the elastic modulus of the elastomer, it also creates a more

  19. Filler reinforcement in cross-linked elastomer nanocomposites: insights from fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, Alexander S; Khalatur, Pavel G

    2016-06-28

    Using a fully atomistic model, we perform large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of sulfur-cured polybutadiene (PB) and nanosilica-filled PB composites. A well-integrated network without sol fraction is built dynamically by cross-linking the coarse-grained precursor chains in the presence of embedded silica nanoparticles. Initial configurations for subsequent atomistic simulations are obtained by reverse mapping of the well-equilibrated coarse-grained systems. Based on the concept of "maximally inflated knot" introduced by Grosberg et al., we show that the networks simulated in this study behave as mechanically isotropic systems. Analysis of the network topology in terms of graph theory reveals that mechanically inactive tree-like structures are the dominant structural components of the weakly cross-linked elastomer, while cycles are mainly responsible for the transmission of mechanical forces through the network. We demonstrate that quantities such as the system density, thermal expansion coefficient, glass transition temperature and initial Young's modulus can be predicted in qualitative and sometimes even in quantitative agreement with experiments. The nano-filled system demonstrates a notable increase in the glass transition temperature and an approximately two-fold increase in the nearly equilibrium value of elastic modulus relative to the unfilled elastomer even at relatively small amounts of filler particles. We also examine the structural rearrangement of the nanocomposite subjected to tensile deformation. Under high strain-rate loading, the formation of structural defects (microcavities) within the polymer bulk is observed. The nucleation and growth of cavities in the post-yielding strain hardening regime mainly take place at the elastomer/nanoparticle interfaces. As a result, the cavities are concentrated just near the embedded nanoparticles. Therefore, while the silica nanofiller increases the elastic modulus of the elastomer, it also creates a more

  20. An atomistic methodology of energy release rate for graphene at nanoscale

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhen; Lee, James D.; Wang, Xianqiao

    2014-03-21

    Graphene is a single layer of carbon atoms packed into a honeycomb architecture, serving as a fundamental building block for electric devices. Understanding the fracture mechanism of graphene under various conditions is crucial for tailoring the electrical and mechanical properties of graphene-based devices at atomic scale. Although most of the fracture mechanics concepts, such as stress intensity factors, are not applicable in molecular dynamics simulation, energy release rate still remains to be a feasible and crucial physical quantity to characterize the fracture mechanical property of materials at nanoscale. This work introduces an atomistic simulation methodology, based on the energy release rate, as a tool to unveil the fracture mechanism of graphene at nanoscale. This methodology can be easily extended to any atomistic material system. We have investigated both opening mode and mixed mode at different temperatures. Simulation results show that the critical energy release rate of graphene is independent of initial crack length at low temperature. Graphene with inclined pre-crack possesses higher fracture strength and fracture deformation but smaller critical energy release rate compared with the graphene with vertical pre-crack. Owing to its anisotropy, graphene with armchair chirality always has greater critical energy release rate than graphene with zigzag chirality. The increase of temperature leads to the reduction of fracture strength, fracture deformation, and the critical energy release rate of graphene. Also, higher temperature brings higher randomness of energy release rate of graphene under a variety of predefined crack lengths. The energy release rate is independent of the strain rate as long as the strain rate is small enough.

  1. [Review] Polarization and Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trippe, Sascha

    2014-02-01

    Polarization is a basic property of light and is fundamentally linked to the internal geometry of a source of radiation. Polarimetry complements photometric, spectroscopic, and imaging analyses of sources of radiation and has made possible multiple astrophysical discoveries. In this article I review (i) the physical basics of polarization: electromagnetic waves, photons, and parameterizations; (ii) astrophysical sources of polarization: scattering, synchrotron radiation, active media, and the Zeeman, Goldreich-Kylafis, and Hanle effects, as well as interactions between polarization and matter (like birefringence, Faraday rotation, or the Chandrasekhar-Fermi effect); (iii) observational methodology: on-sky geometry, influence of atmosphere and instrumental polarization, polarization statistics, and observational techniques for radio, optical, and X/γ wavelengths; and (iv) science cases for astronomical polarimetry: solar and stellar physics, planetary system bodies, interstellar matter, astrobiology, astronomical masers, pulsars, galactic magnetic fields, gamma-ray bursts, active galactic nuclei, and cosmic microwave background radiation.

  2. Automatic Bayesian polarity determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugh, D. J.; White, R. S.; Christie, P. A. F.

    2016-07-01

    The polarity of the first motion of a seismic signal from an earthquake is an important constraint in earthquake source inversion. Microseismic events often have low signal-to-noise ratios, which may lead to difficulties estimating the correct first-motion polarities of the arrivals. This paper describes a probabilistic approach to polarity picking that can be both automated and combined with manual picking. This approach includes a quantitative estimate of the uncertainty of the polarity, improving calculation of the polarity probability density function for source inversion. It is sufficiently fast to be incorporated into an automatic processing workflow. When used in source inversion, the results are consistent with those from manual observations. In some cases, they produce a clearer constraint on the range of high-probability source mechanisms, and are better constrained than source mechanisms determined using a uniform probability of an incorrect polarity pick.

  3. Polarization feedback laser stabilization

    DOEpatents

    Esherick, P.; Owyoung, A.

    1987-09-28

    A system for locking two Nd:YAG laser oscillators includes an optical path for feeding the output of one laser into the other with different polarizations. Elliptical polarization is incorporated into the optical path so that the change in polarization that occurs when the frequencies coincide may be detected to provide a feedback signal to control one laser relative to the other. 4 figs.

  4. A multipole-based water potential with implicit polarization for biomolecular simulations.

    PubMed

    Walsh, T R; Liang, T

    2009-04-30

    A new water potential, DMIP (distributed multipoles, implicit polarization), is constructed using distributed multipoles to describe the electrostatic interactions, while accounting for polarization implicitly. In this procedure, small clusters are randomly sampled from atomistic simulations of bulk water using the AMOEBA (Ren and Ponder, J Comput Chem 2002, 23, 1497) potential. The multipole moments of the central water in each cluster are obtained from ab initio densities for each cluster, and the moments are then averaged over all clusters. Properties of bulk water calculated using DMIP compare favorably with existing data from AMOEBA simulations and experiment, with a conservative estimate of reduction in compute time of roughly 40%. The implicit force-field is also shown to work compatibly with existing polarizable multipole-based force-fields for biomolecules.

  5. Polarization at SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, M.L.

    1988-07-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider has been designed to readily accommodate polarized electron beams. Considerable effort has been made to implement a polarized source, a spin rotation system, and a system to monitor the beam polarization. Nearly all major components have been fabricated. At the current time, several source and polarimeter components have been installed. The installation and commissioning of the entire system will take place during available machine shutdown periods as the commissioning of SLC progresses. It is expected that a beam polarization of 45% will be achieved with no loss in luminosity. 13 refs., 15 figs.

  6. Polarized negative ions

    SciTech Connect

    Haeberli, W.

    1981-04-01

    This paper presents a survey of methods, commonly in use or under development, to produce beams of polarized negative ions for injection into accelerators. A short summary recalls how the hyperfine interaction is used to obtain nuclear polarization in beams of atoms. Atomic-beam sources for light ions are discussed. If the best presently known techniques are incorporated in all stages of the source, polarized H/sup -/ and D/sup -/ beams in excess of 10 ..mu..A can probably be achieved. Production of polarized ions from fast (keV) beams of polarized atoms is treated separately for atoms in the H(25) excited state (Lamb-Shift source) and atoms in the H(1S) ground state. The negative ion beam from Lamb-Shift sources has reached a plateau just above 1 ..mu..A, but this beam current is adequate for many applications and the somewhat lower beam current is compensated by other desirable characteristics. Sources using fast polarized ground state atoms are in a stage of intense development. The next sections summarize production of polarized heavy ions by the atomic beam method, which is well established, and by optical pumping, which has recently been demonstrated to yield very large nuclear polarization. A short discussion of proposed ion sources for polarized /sup 3/He/sup -/ ions is followed by some concluding remarks.

  7. Measurement of internal movements of the Escherichia coli ribosome using Forster resonance energy transfer and microsecond, continuous-flow turbulent mixing in micro-fabricated devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, Zigurts Krishna

    We have studied internal movements of the Eschericia coli ribosome with Forster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) using multiple donor-acceptor pairs labeled at specific ribosomal protein residues. We have developed a novel methodology that allows a more quantitative interpretation of distance data from FRET measurements, accounting for specific effects when using fluorescent probes, such as: non-stoichiometric labeling when biochemical separation is not possible, quantification of static and dynamic quenching, changes in extinction coefficients, effects of the orientation factor and the presence of random and systematic errors. From the obtained distance data, 13 donor-acceptor positions (from 18 independent FRET pairs) are used to model internal movements within the 30S subunit upon 70S association. These measurements are also applied to monitoring inter-subunit movements in functional states of the ribosome that are associated with the translocation cycle of the ribosome. This work reveals internal movements of the ribosome observed for the first time in solution, and presents in vitro evidence for large concerted inter-subunit motions associated with ribosome translocation. The second half of this thesis is independent of the above. We present the design, construction and implementation of micro-fabricated, continuous-flow, turbulent mixing devices that can mix two or three fluids to complete homogeneity on the molecular scale in the microsecond range. The prototypical designs are compact, portable, simple to fabricate and consume smaller sample volumes than current technology. We characterize the turbulent mixing process in microfluidic channels with fluorescence intensity and lifetime imaging and show that both the dependence of mixing times and pressure drop on the flow velocity and Reynolds number agree well with theoretical expectations for turbulent pipe flow. The novelties in this work are: the new methods of fabrication which enable production of three

  8. RHIC Polarized proton operation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I.G.; Aschenauer, E.; Atoian, G.; Bai, M.; Bazilevsky, A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; Dion, A.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, K.A.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Gu, X.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.L.; Laster, J.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Makdisi, Y.; Marr, G.J.; Marusic, A.; Meot, F.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R,; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Poblaguev, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ranjibar, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; J.; Severino, F.; Schmidke, B.; Schoefer, V.; Severino, F.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Svirida, D.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J. Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Yip, K.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-03-28

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) operation as the polarized proton collider presents unique challenges since both luminosity(L) and spin polarization(P) are important. With longitudinally polarized beams at the experiments, the figure of merit is LP{sup 4}. A lot of upgrades and modifications have been made since last polarized proton operation. A 9 MHz rf system is installed to improve longitudinal match at injection and to increase luminosity. The beam dump was upgraded to increase bunch intensity. A vertical survey of RHIC was performed before the run to get better magnet alignment. The orbit control is also improved this year. Additional efforts are put in to improve source polarization and AGS polarization transfer efficiency. To preserve polarization on the ramp, a new working point is chosen such that the vertical tune is near a third order resonance. The overview of the changes and the operation results are presented in this paper. Siberian snakes are essential tools to preserve polarization when accelerating polarized beams to higher energy. At the same time, the higher order resonances still can cause polarization loss. As seen in RHIC, the betatron tune has to be carefully set and maintained on the ramp and during the store to avoid polarization loss. In addition, the orbit control is also critical to preserve polarization. The higher polarization during this run comes from several improvements over last run. First we have a much better orbit on the ramp. The orbit feedback brings down the vertical rms orbit error to 0.1mm, much better than the 0.5mm last run. With correct BPM offset and vertical realignment, this rms orbit error is indeed small. Second, the jump quads in the AGS improved input polarization for RHIC. Third, the vertical tune was pushed further away from 7/10 snake resonance. The tune feedback maintained the tune at the desired value through the ramp. To calibrate the analyzing power of RHIC polarimeters at any energy above

  9. Our Polar Past

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clary, Renee; Wandersee, James

    2009-01-01

    The study of polar exploration is fascinating and offers students insights into the history, culture, and politics that affect the developing sciences at the farthest ends of Earth. Therefore, the authors think there is value in incorporating polar exploration accounts within modern science classrooms, and so they conducted research to test their…

  10. The Polar Insulation Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urban-Rich, Juanita

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author developed an activity called "The Polar Insulation Investigation." This activity builds on students' natural interest in "things polar" and introduces them to animal adaptations in a unique way. The aim of the exploration is to determine the role of animal coverings (e.g., blubber, fur, and feathers) and to see which is…

  11. Polar Science Is Cool!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeks, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    Children are fascinated by the fact that polar scientists do research in extremely cold and dangerous places. In the Arctic they might be viewed as lunch by a polar bear. In the Antarctic, they could lose toes and fingers to frostbite and the wind is so fast it can rip skin off. They camp on ice in continuous daylight, weeks from any form of…

  12. Nomenclature of polarized light - Elliptical polarization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, D.

    1974-01-01

    Alternative handedness and sign conventions for relating the orientation of elliptical polarization are discussed. The discussion proceeds under two headings: (1) snapshot picture, where the emphasis for the convention is contained in the concept of handedness; and (2) angular momentum consideration, where the emphasis for the convention is strongly associated with mathematical convention and the sign of the fourth Stokes parameter.

  13. Time-Scaling in Atomistics and the Rate-Dependent Mechanical Behavior of Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xin; Sharma, Pradeep

    2016-06-01

    Conventional molecular dynamics simulations enable the elucidation of an astonishing array of phenomena inherent in the mechanical and chemical behavior of materials. Unfortunately, current computational limitations preclude accounting for processes whose transition times exceed, at best, microseconds. This limitation severely impacts, among others, a realistic assessment of slow-strain-rate mechanical behavior. In this work, using a simple paradigmatical model of a metallic nanopillar that is often the subject of experimental works, we attempt to circumvent the time-scale bottleneck of conventional molecular dynamics and provide novel physical insights into the rate-dependence of mechanical behavior of nanostructures. Using a collection of algorithms that include a recently developed potential energy surface sampling method-the so-called autonomous basin climbing approach, kinetic Monte Carlo, and others, we assess the nanopillar mechanical behavior under strain rates ranging from 1 to 10(8) s(-1). While our results for high-strain rate behavior are consistent with conventional molecular dynamics, we find that the response of nanostructures to slow compression is "liquid-like" and accompanied by extensive surface reconstructions. PMID:27167716

  14. Polarization and polarization fatigue in ferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Xiaofeng

    This thesis addresses some fundamental issues in ferroelectricity and its applications through a computational and experimental effort. It focuses on a variety of perovskite-type ferroelectric oxides and investigates the physical basis for spontaneous polarization, domain wall dynamics, and texture development in thin film applications. The dipole-dipole interactions between ionic species in perovskite-type materials have been calculated to determine the local field and the lattice instability. Different ferroelectric and anti-ferroelectric polarization transitions can be realized by taking into account the structure distortion of the parent perovskites. We find the local field is enhanced by short range disorder and its nature varies from disorder to disorder, causing polarization transitions in non-(100) directions. The molecular field theory has also been extended to layered perovskites, which favors in-plane polarization over c-polarization. These theoretical predictions are in agreement with the experimental observations of various perovskites and layered perovskites in both single crystal and thin film forms. Domain switching in PZT has been studied by probing the frequency dependency of polarization hysteresis. A picture of thermally activated domain wall movement is established from the frequency spectra of coercive field. The field dependence of domain wall bulging and the nature of the binding between pinning obstacles and the walls are inferred from such a study. Consistent with this picture, polarization fatigue can be defined as a process of increasing the resistance from pinning defects to domain wall motion. The chemical species that act as pinning defects have been identified through model experiments that control carrier injection, electrode interfaces, and film compositions. Based on these observations, a methodology is proposed to evaluate and predict the fatigue damage of both PZT and layered perovskite thin films. Processing of layered

  15. Parallel Polarization State Generation

    PubMed Central

    She, Alan; Capasso, Federico

    2016-01-01

    The control of polarization, an essential property of light, is of wide scientific and technological interest. The general problem of generating arbitrary time-varying states of polarization (SOP) has always been mathematically formulated by a series of linear transformations, i.e. a product of matrices, imposing a serial architecture. Here we show a parallel architecture described by a sum of matrices. The theory is experimentally demonstrated by modulating spatially-separated polarization components of a laser using a digital micromirror device that are subsequently beam combined. This method greatly expands the parameter space for engineering devices that control polarization. Consequently, performance characteristics, such as speed, stability, and spectral range, are entirely dictated by the technologies of optical intensity modulation, including absorption, reflection, emission, and scattering. This opens up important prospects for polarization state generation (PSG) with unique performance characteristics with applications in spectroscopic ellipsometry, spectropolarimetry, communications, imaging, and security. PMID:27184813

  16. Parallel Polarization State Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    She, Alan; Capasso, Federico

    2016-05-01

    The control of polarization, an essential property of light, is of wide scientific and technological interest. The general problem of generating arbitrary time-varying states of polarization (SOP) has always been mathematically formulated by a series of linear transformations, i.e. a product of matrices, imposing a serial architecture. Here we show a parallel architecture described by a sum of matrices. The theory is experimentally demonstrated by modulating spatially-separated polarization components of a laser using a digital micromirror device that are subsequently beam combined. This method greatly expands the parameter space for engineering devices that control polarization. Consequently, performance characteristics, such as speed, stability, and spectral range, are entirely dictated by the technologies of optical intensity modulation, including absorption, reflection, emission, and scattering. This opens up important prospects for polarization state generation (PSG) with unique performance characteristics with applications in spectroscopic ellipsometry, spectropolarimetry, communications, imaging, and security.

  17. Polarization of clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goloub, Philippe; Herman, Maurice; Parol, Frederic

    1995-12-01

    This paper reports the main results concerning polarization by clouds derived from POLDER (polarization and directionality of earth's reflectances) airborne version. These results tend to confirm the high information content in the polarization (phase, altimetry). The preliminary results of EUCREX'94 (European Cloud Radiation Experiment) evidenced the drastically different polarized signatures for ice crystals and water droplets. Here we report systematic and statistically significative observations over the whole EUCREX data set. The results show that the cirrus exhibit their own signature. Preliminary observations performed during CLEOPATRA'91 (Cloud Experiment Ober Pfaffenhofen And Transport) and EUCREX'94 campaigns have shown the feasibility of cloud altimetry using spectral information (443 nm and 865 nm) of the polarized light over liquid water droplets clouds. Altimetry technique has been generalized on ASTEX-SOFIA'92 and EUCREX'94 data sets. All these results are presented and discussed in this paper.

  18. Prediction of cosolvent effect on solvation free energies and solubilities of organic compounds in supercritical carbon dioxide based on fully atomistic molecular simulations.

    PubMed

    Frolov, Andrey I; Kiselev, Michael G

    2014-10-01

    The solubility of organic compounds in supercritical fluids can be dramatically affected by addition of a suitable cosolvent (entrainer) at small concentrations. This makes the screening of the best-suited cosolvent an important task for the supercritical technology. The present study aims to improve our fundamental understanding of solvation in supercritical CO2 with cosolvents. We address the following questions: (1) How does the solvation free energy depend on the chemical class of an organic solute and the chemical nature of co-solvents? (2) Which intermolecular interactions determine the effect of a cosolvent on the solubility of organic compounds? We performed extensive calculations of solvation free energies of monofunctional organic molecules at infinite dilution in supercritical media by the Bennett's acceptance ratio method based on fully atomistic molecular dynamics sampling. Sixteen monofunctional organic molecules were solvated in pure sc-CO2 and sc-CO2 with addition of 6 molar % of cosolvents of different chemical nature: ethanol, acetone, and n-hexane. Cosolvent-induced solubility enhancement (CISE) factors were also calculated. It was found that formation of significant number of hydrogen bonds between a solute and cosolvent molecules leads to a profound solubility enhancement. The cosolvent effect is proportional to the number of hydrogen bonds. When polar cosolvents do not form hydrogen bonds with solutes, the CISE correlates with the dipole moment of solute molecules. However, the electrostatic interactions have a small impact on the solubility enhancement compared to hydrogen bonding. Addition of a nonpolar cosolvent, n-hexane, has a very little effect on the solvation Gibbs free energy of studied small organic molecules. The observed trends were discussed in line with available experimental data.

  19. Mono- and polynucleation, atomistic growth, and crystal phase of III-V nanowires under varying group V flow

    SciTech Connect

    Dubrovskii, V. G.

    2015-05-28

    We present a refined model for the vapor-liquid-solid growth and crystal structure of Au-catalyzed III-V nanowires, which revisits several assumptions used so far and is capable of describing the transition from mononuclear to polynuclear regime and ultimately to regular atomistic growth. We construct the crystal phase diagrams and calculate the wurtzite percentages, elongation rates, critical sizes, and polynucleation thresholds of Au-catalyzed GaAs nanowires depending on the As flow. We find a non-monotonic dependence of the crystal phase on the group V flow, with the zincblende structure being preferred at low and high group V flows and the wurtzite structure forming at intermediate group V flows. This correlates with most of the available experimental data. Finally, we discuss the atomistic growth picture which yields zincblende crystal structure and should be very advantageous for fabrication of ternary III-V nanowires with well-controlled composition and heterointerfaces.

  20. Spherical ion oscillations in a positive polarity gridded inertial-electrostatic confinement device

    SciTech Connect

    Bandara, R.; Khachan, J.

    2013-07-15

    A pulsed, positive polarity gridded inertial electrostatic confinement device has been investigated experimentally, using a differential emissive probe and potential traces as primary diagnostics. Large amplitude oscillations in the plasma current and plasma potential were observed within a microsecond of the discharge onset, which are indicative of coherent ion oscillations about a temporarily confined excess of recirculating electron space charge. The magnitude of the depth of the potential well in the established virtual cathode was determined using a differential emissive Langmuir probe, which correlated well to the potential well inferred from the ion oscillation frequency for both hydrogen and argon experiments. It was found that the timescale for ion oscillation dispersion is strongly dependent on the neutral gas density, and weakly dependent on the peak anode voltage. The cessation of the oscillations was found to be due to charge exchange processes converting ions to high velocity neutrals, causing the abrupt de-coherence of the oscillations through an avalanche dispersion in phase space.

  1. Polarization of antiferroelectric ceramics for pulse capacitors under transient electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ran; Xu, Zhuo; Feng, Yujun; Wei, Xiaoyong; Tian, Jingjing; Huang, Dong

    2016-06-01

    The polarization of (Pb0.94La0.04)[(Zr0.7Sn0.3)0.87Ti0.13]O3 antiferroelectric (AFE) ceramics under unipolar pulse electric field was studied, and the transient hysteresis loop was achieved. Compared to the traditional quasi-static results, the forward transition field increases and the backward transition field decreases. The forward and backward phase transitions can be deduced in microseconds scale. Under the transient field, the releasable energy density decreases significantly, while the stored energy density changes slightly. Consequently, the efficiency decreases and the declination of energy density under transient situation is verified by the charge-discharge experiment. The above results prove the necessity of the study of the transient behaviors in AFE and the limitation of quasi-static analysis.

  2. Spherical ion oscillations in a positive polarity gridded inertial-electrostatic confinement device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandara, R.; Khachan, J.

    2013-07-01

    A pulsed, positive polarity gridded inertial electrostatic confinement device has been investigated experimentally, using a differential emissive probe and potential traces as primary diagnostics. Large amplitude oscillations in the plasma current and plasma potential were observed within a microsecond of the discharge onset, which are indicative of coherent ion oscillations about a temporarily confined excess of recirculating electron space charge. The magnitude of the depth of the potential well in the established virtual cathode was determined using a differential emissive Langmuir probe, which correlated well to the potential well inferred from the ion oscillation frequency for both hydrogen and argon experiments. It was found that the timescale for ion oscillation dispersion is strongly dependent on the neutral gas density, and weakly dependent on the peak anode voltage. The cessation of the oscillations was found to be due to charge exchange processes converting ions to high velocity neutrals, causing the abrupt de-coherence of the oscillations through an avalanche dispersion in phase space.

  3. [High current microsecond pulsed hollow cathode lamp excited ionic fluorescence spectrometry of alkaline earth elements in inductively coupled plasma with a Fassel-torch].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shao-Yu; Gong, Zhen-Bin; Huang, Ben-Li

    2006-02-01

    High current microsecond pulsed hollow cathode lamp (HCMP-HCL) excited ionic fluorescence spectrometry (IFS) of alkaline earth elements in inductively coupled plasma (ICP) with a Fassel-torch has been investigated. In wide condition ranges only IFS was observed, whilst atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) was not detectable. More intense ionic fluorescence signal was observed at lower observation heights and at lower incident RF powers. Without introduction of any reduction organic gases into the ICP, the limit of detection (LOD, 3sigma) of Ba was improved by 50-fold over that of a conventional pulsed (CP) HCL with the Baird sleeve-extended torch. For Ca and Sr, the LODs by HCMP-HCL-ICP-IFS and CP-HCL-ICP-AFS show no significant difference. Relative standard deviations were 0.6%-1.4% (0.1-0.2 microg x mL(-1), n = 10) for 5 ionic fluorescence lines. Preliminary studies showed that the intensity of ionic fluorescence could be depressed in the presence of K, Al and P.

  4. Microsecond time-resolved energy-dispersive EXAFS measurement and its application to film the thermolysis of (NH4)2[PtCl6

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Qingyu; Baudelet, Francois; Han, Jun; Chagnot, Sebastien; Barthe, Laurent; Headspith, Jon; Goldsbrough, Roger; Picca, Frederic E.; Spalla, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Microsecond (μs) time-resolved extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) has been developed using an energy-dispersive EXAFS (EDE) setup equipped with a silicon Quantum Detector ULTRA. The feasibility was investigated with a prototypical thermally driven redox reaction, the thermal decomposition of (NH4)2[PtCl6]. EXAFS data were collected with snapshots every 60 μs during the course of the thermolysis reaction, then averaged for 100 times along the reaction to get better signal to noise ratio which reduces the time resolution to 6 millisecond (ms). Our results provide direct structural evidence of cis-PtCl2(NH3)2 as the intermediate, together with continuous electronic and geometric structure dynamics of the reactant, intermediate and final product during the course of the thermolysis of (NH4)2[PtCl6]. The thermal effect on EXAFS signals at high temperatures is considered in the data analysis, which is essential to follow the reaction process correctly. This method could also be applied to other reaction dynamics. PMID:23264880

  5. Interplanetary magnetic sector polarity inferred from polar geomagnetic field observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friis-Christensen, E.; Lassen, K.; Wilcox, J. M.; Gonzalez, W.; Colburn, D. S.

    1971-01-01

    In order to infer the interplanetary sector polarity from polar geomagnetic field diurnal variations, measurements were carried out at Godhavn and Thule (Denmark) Geomagnetic Observatories. The inferred interplanetary sector polarity was compared with the polarity observed at the same time by Explorer 33 and 35 magnetometers. It is shown that the polarity (toward or away from the sun) of the interplanetary magnetic field can be reliably inferred from observations of the polar cap geomagnetic fields.

  6. EPR detected polarization transfer between Gd3+ and protons at low temperature and 3.3 T: the first step of dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Vijayasarathi; Hovav, Yonatan; Feintuch, Akiva; Vega, Shimon; Goldfarb, Daniella

    2010-06-01

    Electron-electron double resonance pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) at 95 GHz (3.3 T) is used to follow the dynamics of the electron spin polarization during the first stages of dynamic nuclear polarization in solids. The experiments were performed on a frozen solution of Gd(+3) (S=7/2) in water/glycerol. Focusing on the central vector -1/2 --> vector +1/2 transition we measured the polarization transfer from the Gd(3+) electron spin to the adjacent (1)H protons. The dependence of the echo detected EPR signal on the length of the microwave irradiation at the EPR "forbidden" transition corresponding to an electron and a proton spin flip is measured for different powers, showing dynamics on the microsecond to millisecond time scales. A theoretical model based on the spin density matrix formalism is suggested to account for this dynamics. The central transition of the Gd(3+) ion is considered as an effective S = 1/2 system and is coupled to (1)H (I = 1/2) nuclei. Simulations based on a single electron-single nucleus four level system are shown to deviate from the experimental results and an alternative approach taking into account the more realistic multinuclei picture is shown to agree qualitatively with the experiments.

  7. Neutron Polarizers Based on Polarized 3He

    SciTech Connect

    William M. Snow

    2005-05-01

    The goal of this work, which is a collaborative effort between Indiana University, NIST, and Hamilton College, is to extend the technique of polarized neutron scattering into new domains by the development and application of polarized 3He-based neutron spin filters. After the IPNS experiment which measured Zeeman sp[litting in surface scattered neutrons using a polarized 3He cell as a polarization analyzer transporterd by car from Bloomington to Chicago, the Indiana work focused on technical developments to improve the 3He polarization of the Indiana compression system. The compression system was rebuilt with a new valve system which allows gas trapped in the dead volume of the compressors at the end of the piston stroke to be exhausted and conducted back to the optical pumping cell where it can be repolarized. We also incorporated a new intermediate storage volume made at NIST from 1720 glass which will reduce polarization losses between the compressors. Furthermore, we improved the stability of the 1083 nm laser by cooling the LMA rod. We achieved 60% 3he polarization in the optical pumping cell and 87% preservation of the polarization during compression. In parallel we built a magnetically-shielded transport solenoid for use on neutron scattering instruments such as POSY which achieves a fractional field uniformity of better than 10-3 per cm. The field was mapped using an automated 3D field mapping system for in-situ measurement of magnetic field gradients Diluted magnetic semiconductors offer many exciting opportunities for investigation of spintronic effects in solids and are certain to be one of the most active areas of condensed matter physics over then next several years. These materials can act as efficient spin injectors for devices that make use of spin-dependent transport phenomena. We just (late July 2002) finished a neutron reflectivity experiment at NIST on a GaMnAs trilayer film. This material is a ferromagnetic semiconductor which is of interest

  8. Exploration of complex multilayer film growth morphologies: STM analysis and predictive atomistic modeling for Ag on Ag(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Maozhi; Chung, P.W.; Cox, E.; Jenks, C.J.; Thiel, P.A.; Evans, J.W.

    2008-01-03

    Scanning tunneling microscopy studies are integrated with development of a realistic atomistic model to both characterize and elucidate the complex mounded morphologies formed by deposition of Ag on Ag(111) at 150 and 180 K. Threefold symmetric lateral shapes of islands and mounds are shown to reflect the influence of a nonuniform step edge barrier inhibiting interlayer transport. Modeling of structure at the mound peaks leads to a sensitive estimate of the magnitude of this large barrier.

  9. Lattice Thermal Conductivity of Ultra High Temperature Ceramics ZrB2 and HfB2 from Atomistic Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, John W.; Murray, Daw S.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    Atomistic Green-Kubo simulations are performed to evaluate the lattice thermal conductivity for single crystals of the ultra high temperature ceramics ZrB2 and HfB2 for a range of temperatures. Recently developed interatomic potentials are used for these simulations. Heat current correlation functions show rapid oscillations which can be identified with mixed metal-Boron optical phonon modes. Agreement with available experimental data is good.

  10. Ultrathin Molecular-Layer-by-Layer Polyamide Membranes: Insights from Atomistic Molecular Simulations.

    PubMed

    Liyana-Arachchi, Thilanga P; Sturnfield, James F; Colina, Coray M

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we present an atomistic simulation study of several physicochemical properties of polyamide (PA) membranes formed from interfacial polymerization or from a molecular-layer-by-layer (mLbL) on a silicon wafer. These membranes are composed of meta-phenylenediamine (MPD) and benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylic acid chloride (TMC) for potential reverse osmosis (RO) applications. The mLbL membrane generation procedure and the force field models were validated, by comparison with available experimental data, for hydrated density, membrane swelling, and pore size distributions of PA membranes formed by interfacial polymerization. Physicochemical properties such as density, free volume, thickness, the degree of cross-linking, atomic compositions, and average molecular orientation (which is relevant for the mLbL membranes) are compared for these different processes. The mLbL membranes are investigated systematically with respect to TMC monomer growth rate per substrate surface area, MPD/TMC ratio, and the number of mLbL deposition cycles. Atomistic simulations show that the mLbL deposition generates membranes with a constant film growth if both the TMC monomer growth rate and MPD/TMC monomer ratio are kept constant. The film growth rate increases with TMC monomer growth rate or MPD/TMC ratio. Furthermore, it was found on one hand that the mLbL membrane density and free volume varies significantly with respect to the TMC monomer growth rate, while on the other hand the degree of cross-linking and the atomic composition varies considerably with the MPD/TMC ratio. Additionally, it was found that both TMC and MPD orient at a tilted angle with respect to the substrate surface, where their angular distribution and average angle orientation depend on both the TMC growth rate and the number of deposition cycles. This study illustrates that molecular simulations can play a crucial role in the understanding of structural properties that can empower the design of the next

  11. Atomistic modeling of nanowires, small-scale fatigue damage in cast magnesium, and materials for MEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, Martin L.; Talmage, Mellisa J.; David L. McDowell; West, Neil; Gullett, Philip Michael; Miller, David C.; Spark, Kevin; Diao, Jiankuai; Horstemeyer, Mark F.; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Gall, K.

    2006-10-01

    Lightweight and miniaturized weapon systems are driving the use of new materials in design such as microscale materials and ultra low-density metallic materials. Reliable design of future weapon components and systems demands a thorough understanding of the deformation modes in these materials that comprise the components and a robust methodology to predict their performance during service or storage. Traditional continuum models of material deformation and failure are not easily extended to these new materials unless microstructural characteristics are included in the formulation. For example, in LIGA Ni and Al-Si thin films, the physical size is on the order of microns, a scale approaching key microstructural features. For a new potential structural material, cast Mg offers a high stiffness-to-weight ratio, but the microstructural heterogeneity at various scales requires a structure-property continuum model. Processes occurring at the nanoscale and microscale develop certain structures that drive material behavior. The objective of the work presented in this report was to understand material characteristics in relation to mechanical properties at the nanoscale and microscale in these promising new material systems. Research was conducted primarily at the University of Colorado at Boulder to employ tightly coupled experimentation and simulation to study damage at various material size scales under monotonic and cyclic loading conditions. Experimental characterization of nano/micro damage will be accomplished by novel techniques such as in-situ environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), 1 MeV transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). New simulations to support experimental efforts will include modified embedded atom method (MEAM) atomistic simulations at the nanoscale and single crystal micromechanical finite element simulations. This report summarizes the major research and development accomplishments for the LDRD project

  12. Ultrathin Molecular-Layer-by-Layer Polyamide Membranes: Insights from Atomistic Molecular Simulations.

    PubMed

    Liyana-Arachchi, Thilanga P; Sturnfield, James F; Colina, Coray M

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we present an atomistic simulation study of several physicochemical properties of polyamide (PA) membranes formed from interfacial polymerization or from a molecular-layer-by-layer (mLbL) on a silicon wafer. These membranes are composed of meta-phenylenediamine (MPD) and benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylic acid chloride (TMC) for potential reverse osmosis (RO) applications. The mLbL membrane generation procedure and the force field models were validated, by comparison with available experimental data, for hydrated density, membrane swelling, and pore size distributions of PA membranes formed by interfacial polymerization. Physicochemical properties such as density, free volume, thickness, the degree of cross-linking, atomic compositions, and average molecular orientation (which is relevant for the mLbL membranes) are compared for these different processes. The mLbL membranes are investigated systematically with respect to TMC monomer growth rate per substrate surface area, MPD/TMC ratio, and the number of mLbL deposition cycles. Atomistic simulations show that the mLbL deposition generates membranes with a constant film growth if both the TMC monomer growth rate and MPD/TMC monomer ratio are kept constant. The film growth rate increases with TMC monomer growth rate or MPD/TMC ratio. Furthermore, it was found on one hand that the mLbL membrane density and free volume varies significantly with respect to the TMC monomer growth rate, while on the other hand the degree of cross-linking and the atomic composition varies considerably with the MPD/TMC ratio. Additionally, it was found that both TMC and MPD orient at a tilted angle with respect to the substrate surface, where their angular distribution and average angle orientation depend on both the TMC growth rate and the number of deposition cycles. This study illustrates that molecular simulations can play a crucial role in the understanding of structural properties that can empower the design of the next

  13. Atomistic methodologies for material properties of 2D materials at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhen

    Research on two dimensional (2D) materials, such as graphene and MoS2, now involves thousands of researchers worldwide cutting across physics, chemistry, engineering and biology. Due to the extraordinary properties of 2D materials, research extends from fundamental science to novel applications of 2D materials. From an engineering point of view, understanding the material properties of 2D materials under various conditions is crucial for tailoring the electrical and mechanical properties of 2D-material-based devices at the nanoscale. Even at the nanoscale, molecular systems typically consist of a vast number of atoms. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations enable us to understand the properties of assemblies of molecules in terms of their structure and the microscopic interactions between them. From a continuum approach, mechanical properties and thermal properties, such as strain, stress, and heat capacity, are well defined and experimentally measurable. In MD simulations, material systems are considered to be discrete, and only interatomic potential, interatomic forces, and atom positions are directly obtainable. Besides, most of the fracture mechanics concepts, such as stress intensity factors, are not applicable since there is no singularity in MD simulations. However, energy release rate still remains to be a feasible and crucial physical quantity to characterize the fracture mechanical property of materials at the nanoscale. Therefore, equivalent definition of a physical quantity both in atomic scale and macroscopic scale is necessary in order to understand molecular and continuum scale phenomena concurrently. This work introduces atomistic simulation methodologies, based on interatomic potential and interatomic forces, as a tool to unveil the mechanical properties, thermal properties and fracture mechanical properties of 2D materials at the nanoscale. Among many 2D materials, graphene and MoS2 have attracted intense interest. Therefore, we applied our

  14. Atomistic modeling of phonon bandstructure and transport for optimal thermal management in nanoscale devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaresan, Sasi Sekaran

    Monte Carlo based statistical approach to solve Boltzmann Transport Equation (BTE) has become a norm to investigate heat transport in semiconductors at sub-micron regime, owing mainly to its ability to characterize realistically sized device geometries qualitatively. One of the primary issues with this technique is that the approach predominantly uses empirically fitted phonon dispersion relations as input to determine the properties of phonons so as to predict the thermal conductivity of specified material geometry. The empirically fitted dispersion relations assume harmonic approximation thereby failing to account for thermal expansion, interaction of lattice waves, effect of strain on spring stiffness, and accurate phonon-phonon interaction. To circumvent this problem, in this work, a coupled molecular mechanics-Monte Carlo (MM-MC) platform has been developed and used to solve the phonon Boltzmann Transport Equation (BTE) for the calculation of thermal conductivity of several novel and emerging nanostructures. The use of the quasi-anharmonic MM approach (as implemented in the open source NEMO 3-D software toolkit) not only allows one to capture the true atomicity of the underlying lattice but also enables the simulation of realistically-sized structures containing millions of atoms. As compared to the approach using an empirically fitted phonon dispersion relation, here, a 17% increase in the thermal conductivity for a silicon nanowire due to the incorporation of atomistic corrections in the LA (longitudinal acoustic) branch alone has been reported. The atomistically derived thermal conductivity as calculated from the MM-MC framework is then used in the modular design and analysis of (i) a silicon nanowire based thermoelectric cooler (TEC) unit, and (ii) a GaN/InN based nanostructured light emitting device (LED). It is demonstrated that the use of empirically fitted phonon bandstructure parameters overestimates the temperature difference between the hot and the

  15. Atomistic-level non-equilibrium model for chemically reactive systems based on steepest-entropy-ascent quantum thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guanchen; Al-Abbasi, Omar; von Spakovsky, Michael R.

    2014-10-01

    This paper outlines an atomistic-level framework for modeling the non-equilibrium behavior of chemically reactive systems. The framework called steepest- entropy-ascent quantum thermodynamics (SEA-QT) is based on the paradigm of intrinsic quantum thermodynamic (IQT), which is a theory that unifies quantum mechanics and thermodynamics into a single discipline with wide applications to the study of non-equilibrium phenomena at the atomistic level. SEA-QT is a novel approach for describing the state of chemically reactive systems as well as the kinetic and dynamic features of the reaction process without any assumptions of near-equilibrium states or weak-interactions with a reservoir or bath. Entropy generation is the basis of the dissipation which takes place internal to the system and is, thus, the driving force of the chemical reaction(s). The SEA-QT non-equilibrium model is able to provide detailed information during the reaction process, providing a picture of the changes occurring in key thermodynamic properties (e.g., the instantaneous species concentrations, entropy and entropy generation, reaction coordinate, chemical affinities, reaction rate, etc). As an illustration, the SEA-QT framework is applied to an atomistic-level chemically reactive system governed by the reaction mechanism F + H2 leftrightarrow FH + H.

  16. Polarization at the SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Moffeit, K.C.

    1988-10-01

    The Stanford Linear collider was designed to accommodate polarized electron beams. Longitudinally polarized electrons colliding with unpolarized positrons at a center of mass energy near the Z/sup 0/ mass can be used as novel and sensitive probes of the electroweak process. A gallium arsenide based photon emission source will provide a beam of longitudinally polarized electrons of about 45 percent polarization. A system of bend magnets and a superconducting solenoid will be used to rotate the spins so that the polarization is preserved while the 1.21 GeV electrons are stored in the damping ring. Another set of bend magnets and two superconducting solenoids orient the spin vectors so that longitudinal polarization of the electrons is achieved at the collision point with the unpolarized positrons. A system to monitor the polarization based on Moller and Compton scattering will be used. Nearly all major components have been fabricated and tested. Subsystems of the source and polarimeters have been installed, and studies are in progress. The installation and commissioning of the entire system will take place during available machine shutdown periods as the commissioning of SLC progresses. 8 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Compton Polarization with Nustar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotti, Simone; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Harrison, Fiona A.; Madsen, Kristin; Perri, Matteo; Puccetti, Simonetta

    In this study we assess the NuSTAR capabilities to detect polarized signals in the Compton regime, through the use of Monte Carlo simulations and comparison with observational data. Both NuSTAR focal plane detectors are equipped with high resolution pixilated CZT arrays, sensitive in the energy range 2.5-80 keV. These units have intrinsic polarization capabilities due to their high quality factor, very low background and scattering angles of ~90°, which is ideal for incident photon energies below 100 keV. However the sensitivity is limited by the very low efficiency of the CZT for Compton interactions and by intrinsic readout systematics, such as charge sharing between pixels. An additional source of degradation is the incompleteness of double events information in the science telemetry. We estimated the Minimum Detectable Polarization of cosmic sources as a function of intensity, and the results obtained were validated through the comparison with the first actual data from the Crab Nebula and Cygnus X-1. We also evaluated the count rate and the background expected for polarization measurements, comparing our estimates with the data measured in flight. Our simulations reproduce well the actual NuSTAR data, showing that the focal plane detectors should be able to detect polarization from highly polarized sources like the Crab and other potential bright sources, dominated by synchrotron and/or SSC emission. The background for polarization measurements was found to be negligible.

  18. Polarization Control of VCSELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostermann, Johannes Michael; Michalzik, Rainer

    In most types of VCSELs, the light output polarization is inherently unstable. While, in case of single-mode oscillation, the emitted light is mainly linearly polarized, its orientation is not well defined. This is because both the resonator and the gain medium are quasi isotropic in the plane of the active layers. Since a stable polarization is required for almost all sensing and some datacom applications, extensive and in-depth investigations have been undertaken during the last twenty years in order to stabilize the polarization of VCSELs without affecting their favorable operation parameters. Polarization control of VCSELs can be achieved by introducing a polarization-dependent gain, an asymmetric resonator, or mirrors with a polarization-dependent reflectivity. It has turned out that the last approach is most promising. It can be realized by incorporating a shallow surface grating in the upper mirror of a top-emitting VCSEL. Several million grating VCSELs are in reliable operation meanwhile, mainly in optical computer mice.

  19. Polarization at the SLC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffeit, Kenneth C.

    1989-05-01

    The Stanford Linear Collider was designed to accommodate polarized electron beams. Longitudinally polarized electrons colliding with unpolarized positrons at a center of mass energy near the Z0 mass can be used as novel and sensitive probes of the electroweak process. A gallium arsenide based photon emission source will provide a beam of longitudinally polarized electrons of about 45 percent polarization. A system of bend magnets and a superconducting solenoid will be used to rotate the spins so that the polarization is preserved while the 1.21 GeV electrons are stored in the damping ring. Another set of bend magnets and two superconducting solenoids orient the spin vectors so that longitudinal polarization of the electrons is achieved at the collision point with the unpolarized positrons. A system to monitor the polarization based on Mo/ller and Compton scattering will be used. Nearly all major components have been fabricated and tested. Subsystems of the source and polarimeters have been installed, and studies are in progress. The installation and commissioning of the entire system will take place during available machine shutdown periods as the commissioning of SLC progresses.

  20. GUIDE FOR POLARIZED NEUTRONS

    DOEpatents

    Sailor, V.L.; Aichroth, R.W.

    1962-12-01

    The plane of polarization of a beam of polarized neutrons is changed by this invention, and the plane can be flipped back and forth quicitly in two directions in a trouble-free manner. The invention comprises a guide having a plurality of oppositely directed magnets forming a gap for the neutron beam and the gaps are spaced longitudinally in a spiral along the beam at small stepped angles. When it is desired to flip the plane of polarization the magnets are suitably rotated to change the direction of the spiral of the gaps. (AEC)

  1. Polarized noble gas MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Brookeman, James R.; Mugler, John P. III; Lange, Eduard E. de; Knight-Scott, Jack; Maier, Therese; Bogorad, Paul; Driehuys, Bastiaan; Cates, Gordon; Happer, William; Daniel, Thomas M.; Truwit, Jonathon D.

    1998-01-20

    The development of convenient methods to polarize liter quantities of the noble gases helium-3 and xenon-129 has provided the opportunity for a new MRI method to visualize the internal air spaces of the human lung. These spaces are usually poorly seen with hydrogen-based MRI, because of the limited water content of the lung and the low thermal polarization of the water protons achieved in conventional magnets. In addition, xenon, which has a relatively high solubility and a sufficiently persistent polarization level in blood and biological tissue, offers the prospect of providing perfusion images of the lung, brain and other organs.

  2. North Polar Dunes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    23 January 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows dark sand dunes in the north polar region of Mars. Surrounding much of the north polar ice cap are fields of sand dunes. In this case, the strongest winds responsible for the dunes blew off the polar cap (not seen here), from the north-northwest (upper left).

    Location near: 76.5oN, 63.7oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Summer

  3. Unfolding proteins with mechanical forces: From toy models to atomistic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, Dmitrii

    2011-03-01

    The remarkable combination of strength and toughness, displayed by certain biological materials (e.g. spider silk) and often unmatched by artificial materials, is believed to originate from the mechanical response of individual load-bearing protein domains. Single-molecule pulling experiments carried out during the last decade showed that those proteins, when loaded, respond in a non-equilibrium fashion and can dissipate large amounts of energy though the breaking of sacrificial bonds. In my talk, I will discuss what structural properties correlate with mechanical strength and toughness at the single-molecule level, how thermodynamic stability is related to the mechanical stability, and why both atomistic simulations and simple models seem to fail to reconcile the mechanical responses of the same proteins measured under varied loading regimes. I will further discuss whether it is easier to unfold a protein mechanically by pulling at its ends or by threading it through a narrow pore. The latter process is believed to commonly occur in living organisms as an intermediate step in protein degradation. Supported by the NSF and the Robert A. Welch Foundation.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulation of oleic acid/oleate bilayers: an atomistic model for a ufasome membrane.

    PubMed

    Han, Sanghwa

    2013-01-01

    When oleic acid and oleate coexist in comparable amounts they form unilamellar vesicles called ufasomes in aqueous phase. Intrinsic pH sensitivity of ufasomes makes it an attractive vehicle for drug delivery. Physical properties of ufasomes have been studied by using spectroscopic techniques but an atomistic model for a ufasome has not been proposed. In this study molecular dynamics simulation was performed on oleic acid/oleate bilayers with the oleate concentration varying from 40 to 70 mol%. All the bilayers reached an equilibrium and stayed stable during a 40 ns simulation. Area per lipid increased with mol% of oleate probably due to charge repulsion between anionic oleate molecules. Oleate was pulled out toward the aqueous phase so that the carboxyl groups of oleic acid and oleate were separated by 0.392 nm in the bilayer of oleic acid/oleate 1:1. Water concentration at the depth of carboxyl group of oleate was five times as high as that of oleic acid. Number of hydrogen bonds between oleic acid and oleate was small in contrast to a proposal that it is an important factor for the bilayer stability. However there was an extensive array of hydrogen bonds between the lipids and water molecules. Acyl chain order was within a normal range for a lipid bilayer but lateral diffusion was an order of magnitude faster in oleic acid/oleate bilayer than in dioleoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer. Cholesterol increased the bilayer thickness and order parameter and decreased the rate of lateral diffusion.

  5. Quantifying the influence of twin boundaries on the deformation of nanocrystalline copper using atomistic simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Tucker, Garritt J.; Foiles, Stephen Martin

    2014-09-22

    Over the past decade, numerous efforts have sought to understand the influence of twin boundaries on the behavior of polycrystalline materials. Early results suggested that twin boundaries within nanocrystalline face-centered cubic metals have a considerable effect on material behavior by altering the activated deformation mechanisms. In this work, we employ molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate the role of twin boundaries on the deformation of <100> columnar nanocrystalline copper at room temperature under uniaxial strain. We leverage non-local kinematic metrics, formulated from continuum mechanics theory, to compute atomically-resolved rotational and strain fields during plastic deformation. These results are then utilized tomore » compute the distribution of various nanoscale mechanisms during straining, and quantitatively resolve their contribution to the total strain accommodation within the microstructure, highlighting the fundamental role of twin boundaries. Our results show that nanoscale twins influence nanocrystalline copper by altering the cooperation of fundamental deformation mechanisms and their contributed role in strain accommodation, and we present new methods for extracting useful information from atomistic simulations. The simulation results suggest a tension–compression asymmetry in the distribution of deformation mechanisms and strain accommodation by either dislocations or twin boundary mechanisms. In highly twinned microstructures, twin boundary migration can become a significant deformation mode, in comparison to lattice dislocation plasticity in non-twinned columnar microstructures, especially during compression.« less

  6. Free energy landscape of the Michaelis complex of lactate dehydrogenase: A network analysis of atomistic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xiaoliang; Schwartz, Steven

    2015-03-01

    It has long been recognized that the structure of a protein is a hierarchy of conformations interconverting on multiple time scales. However, the conformational heterogeneity is rarely considered in the context of enzymatic catalysis in which the reactant is usually represented by a single conformation of the enzyme/substrate complex. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) catalyzes the interconversion of pyruvate and lactate with concomitant interconversion of two forms of the cofactor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH and NAD+). Recent experimental results suggest that multiple substates exist within the Michaelis complex of LDH, and they are catalytic competent at different reaction rates. In this study, millisecond-scale all-atom molecular dynamics simulations were performed on LDH to explore the free energy landscape of the Michaelis complex, and network analysis was used to characterize the distribution of the conformations. Our results provide a detailed view of the kinetic network the Michaelis complex and the structures of the substates at atomistic scale. It also shed some light on understanding the complete picture of the catalytic mechanism of LDH.

  7. Atomistic modeling of structure II gas hydrate mechanics: Compressibility and equations of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasic, Thomas M.; Servio, Phillip; Rey, Alejandro D.

    2016-08-01

    This work uses density functional theory (DFT) to investigate the poorly characterized structure II gas hydrates, for various guests (empty, propane, butane, ethane-methane, propane-methane), at the atomistic scale to determine key structure and mechanical properties such as equilibrium lattice volume and bulk modulus. Several equations of state (EOS) for solids (Murnaghan, Birch-Murnaghan, Vinet, Liu) were fitted to energy-volume curves resulting from structure optimization simulations. These EOS, which can be used to characterize the compressional behaviour of gas hydrates, were evaluated in terms of their robustness. The three-parameter Vinet EOS was found to perform just as well if not better than the four-parameter Liu EOS, over the pressure range in this study. As expected, the Murnaghan EOS proved to be the least robust. Furthermore, the equilibrium lattice volumes were found to increase with guest size, with double-guest hydrates showing a larger increase than single-guest hydrates, which has significant implications for the widely used van der Waals and Platteeuw thermodynamic model for gas hydrates. Also, hydrogen bonds prove to be the most likely factor contributing to the resistance of gas hydrates to compression; bulk modulus was found to increase linearly with hydrogen bond density, resulting in a relationship that could be used predictively to determine the bulk modulus of various structure II gas hydrates. Taken together, these results fill a long existing gap in the material chemical physics of these important clathrates.

  8. Ranking of Molecular Biomarker Interaction with Targeted DNA Nucleobases via Full Atomistic Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenjun; Wang, Ming L.; Cranford, Steven W.

    2016-01-01

    DNA-based sensors can detect disease biomarkers, including acetone and ethanol for diabetes and H2S for cardiovascular diseases. Before experimenting on thousands of potential DNA segments, we conduct full atomistic steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations to screen the interactions between different DNA sequences with targeted molecules to rank the nucleobase sensing performance. We study and rank the strength of interaction between four single DNA nucleotides (Adenine (A), Guanine (G), Cytosine (C), and Thymine (T)) on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) with acetone, ethanol, H2S and HCl. By sampling forward and reverse interaction paths, we compute the free-energy profiles of eight systems for the four targeted molecules. We find that dsDNA react differently than ssDNA to the targeted molecules, requiring more energy to move the molecule close to DNA as indicated by the potential of mean force (PMF). Comparing the PMF values of different systems, we obtain a relative ranking of DNA base for the detection of each molecule. Via the same procedure, we could generate a library of DNA sequences for the detection of a wide range of chemicals. A DNA sensor array built with selected sequences differentiating many disease biomarkers can be used in disease diagnosis and monitoring. PMID:26750747

  9. Atomistically derived cohesive zone model of intergranular fracture in polycrystalline graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guin, Laurent; Raphanel, Jean L.; Kysar, Jeffrey W.

    2016-06-01

    Pristine single crystal graphene is the strongest known two-dimensional material, and its nonlinear anisotropic mechanical properties are well understood from the atomic length scale up to a continuum description. However, experiments indicate that grain boundaries in the polycrystalline form reduce the mechanical behavior of polycrystalline graphene. Herein, we perform atomistic-scale molecular dynamics simulations of the deformation and fracture of graphene grain boundaries and express the results as continuum cohesive zone models (CZMs) that embed notions of the grain boundary ultimate strength and fracture toughness. To facilitate energy balance, we employ a new methodology that simulates a quasi-static controlled crack propagation which renders the kinetic energy contribution to the total energy negligible. We verify good agreement between Griffith's critical energy release rate and the work of separation of the CZM, and we note that the energy of crack edges and fracture toughness differs by about 35%, which is attributed to the phenomenon of bond trapping. This justifies the implementation of the CZM within the context of the finite element method (FEM). To enhance computational efficiency in the FEM implementation, we discuss the use of scaled traction-separation laws (TSLs) for larger element sizes. As a final result, we have established that the failure characteristics of pristine graphene and high tilt angle bicrystals differ by less than 10%. This result suggests that one could use a unique or a few typical TSLs as a good approximation for the CZMs associated with the mechanical simulations of the polycrystalline graphene.

  10. The atomistic mechanism of carbon nanotube cutting catalyzed by nickel under an electron beam.

    PubMed

    Lebedeva, Irina V; Chamberlain, Thomas W; Popov, Andrey M; Knizhnik, Andrey A; Zoberbier, Thilo; Biskupek, Johannes; Kaiser, Ute; Khlobystov, Andrei N

    2014-12-21

    The cutting of single-walled carbon nanotubes by an 80 keV electron beam catalyzed by nickel clusters is imaged in situ using aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Extensive molecular dynamics simulations within the CompuTEM approach provide insight into the mechanism of this process and demonstrate that the combination of irradiation and the nickel catalyst is crucial for the cutting process to take place. The atomistic mechanism of cutting is revealed by a detailed analysis of irradiation-induced reactions of bond reorganization and atom ejection in the vicinity of the nickel cluster, showing a highly complex interplay of different chemical transformations catalysed by the metal cluster. One of the most prevalent pathways includes three consecutive stages: formation of polyyne carbon chains from the carbon nanotube, dissociation of the carbon chains into single and pairs of adatoms adsorbed on the nickel cluster, and ejection of these adatoms leading to the cutting of the nanotube. Significant variations in the atom ejection rate are discovered depending on the process stage and nanotube diameter. The revealed mechanism and kinetic characteristics of the cutting process provide fundamental knowledge for the development of new methodologies for control and manipulation of carbon structures at the nanoscale. PMID:25363681

  11. Atomistic simulation of CO2 solubility in poly(ethylene oxide) oligomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Bingbing; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.

    2014-06-01

    We have performed atomistic molecular dynamics simulations coupled with thermodynamic integration to obtain the excess chemical potential and pressure-composition phase diagrams for CO2 in poly(ethylene oxide) oligomers. Poly(ethylene oxide) dimethyl ether, CH3O(CH2CH2O)nCH3 (PEO for short) is a widely applied physical solvent that forms the major organic constituent of a class of novel nanoparticle-based absorbents. Good predictions were obtained for pressure-composition-density relations for CO2 + PEO oligomers (2 ≤ n ≤ 12), using the Potoff force field for PEO [J. Chem. Phys. 136, 044514 (2012)] together with the TraPPE model for CO2 [AIChE J. 47, 1676 (2001)]. Water effects on Henry's constant of CO2 in PEO have also been investigated. Addition of modest amounts of water in PEO produces a relatively small increase in Henry's constant. Dependence of the calculated Henry's constant on the weight percentage of water falls on a temperature-dependent master curve, irrespective of PEO chain length.

  12. Role of atomistic structure in the stochastic nature of conductivity in substoichiometric tantalum pentoxide

    DOE PAGES

    Bondi, Robert James; Fox, Brian Philip; Marinella, Matthew J.

    2016-03-22

    In this study, first-principles calculations of electrical conductivity (σo) are revisited to determine the atomistic origin of its stochasticity in a distribution generated from sampling 14 ab-initio molecular dynamics configurations from 10 independently quenched models (n = 140) of substoichiometric amorphous Ta2O5, where each structure contains a neutral O monovacancy (VO0). Structural analysis revealed a distinct minimum Ta-Ta separation (dimer/trimer) corresponding to each VO0 location. Bader charge decomposition using a commonality analysis approach based on the σo distribution extremes revealed nanostructural signatures indicating that both the magnitude and distribution of cationic charge on the Ta subnetwork have a profound influencemore » on σo. Furthermore, visualization of local defect structures and their electron densities reinforces these conclusions and suggests σo in the amorphous oxide is best suppressed by a highly charged, compact Ta cation shell that effectively screens and minimizes localized VO0 interaction with the a-Ta2O5 network; conversely, delocalization of VO0 corresponds to metallic character and high σo. The random network of a-Ta2O5 provides countless variations of an ionic configuration scaffold in which small perturbations affect the electronic charge distribution and result in a fixed-stoichiometry distribution of σo; consequently, precisely controlled and highly repeatable oxide fabrication processes are likely paramount for advancement of resistive memory technologies.« less

  13. Development and assessment of atomistic models for predicting static friction coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahangiri, Soran; Heverly-Coulson, Gavin S.; Mosey, Nicholas J.

    2016-08-01

    The friction coefficient relates friction forces to normal loads and plays a key role in fundamental and applied areas of science and technology. Despite its importance, the relationship between the friction coefficient and the properties of the materials forming a sliding contact is poorly understood. We illustrate how simple relationships regarding the changes in energy that occur during slip can be used to develop a quantitative model relating the friction coefficient to atomic-level features of the contact. The slip event is considered as an activated process and the load dependence of the slip energy barrier is approximated with a Taylor series expansion of the corresponding energies with respect to load. The resulting expression for the load-dependent slip energy barrier is incorporated in the Prandtl-Tomlinson (PT) model and a shear-based model to obtain expressions for friction coefficient. The results indicate that the shear-based model reproduces the static friction coefficients μs obtained from first-principles molecular dynamics simulations more accurately than the PT model. The ability of the model to provide atomistic explanations for differences in μs amongst different contacts is also illustrated. As a whole, the model is able to account for fundamental atomic-level features of μs, explain the differences in μs for different materials based on their properties, and might be also used in guiding the development of contacts with desired values of μs.

  14. Intermediate states of the Kv1.2 voltage sensor from atomistic molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Delemotte, Lucie; Tarek, Mounir; Klein, Michael L.; Amaral, Cristiano; Treptow, Werner

    2011-01-01

    The response of a membrane-bound Kv1.2 ion channel to an applied transmembrane potential has been studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Channel deactivation is shown to involve three intermediate states of the voltage sensor domain (VSD), and concomitant movement of helix S4 charges 10–15 Å along the bilayer normal; the latter being enabled by zipper-like sequential pairing of S4 basic residues with neighboring VSD acidic residues and membrane-lipid head groups. During the observed sequential transitions S4 basic residues pass through the recently discovered charge transfer center with its conserved phenylalanine residue, F233. Analysis indicates that the local electric field within the VSD is focused near the F233 residue and that it remains essentially unaltered during the entire process. Overall, the present computations provide an atomistic description of VSD response to hyperpolarization, add support to the sliding helix model, and capture essential features inferred from a variety of recent experiments. PMID:21444776

  15. Integrating atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, experiments, and network analysis to study protein dynamics: strength in unity

    PubMed Central

    Papaleo, Elena

    2015-01-01

    In the last years, we have been observing remarkable improvements in the field of protein dynamics. Indeed, we can now study protein dynamics in atomistic details over several timescales with a rich portfolio of experimental and computational techniques. On one side, this provides us with the possibility to validate simulation methods and physical models against a broad range of experimental observables. On the other side, it also allows a complementary and comprehensive view on protein structure and dynamics. What is needed now is a better understanding of the link between the dynamic properties that we observe and the functional properties of these important cellular machines. To make progresses in this direction, we need to improve the physical models used to describe proteins and solvent in molecular dynamics, as well as to strengthen the integration of experiments and simulations to overcome their own limitations. Moreover, now that we have the means to study protein dynamics in great details, we need new tools to understand the information embedded in the protein ensembles and in their dynamic signature. With this aim in mind, we should enrich the current tools for analysis of biomolecular simulations with attention to the effects that can be propagated over long distances and are often associated to important biological functions. In this context, approaches inspired by network analysis can make an important contribution to the analysis of molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:26075210

  16. Biomolecular interactions modulate macromolecular structure and dynamics in atomistic model of a bacterial cytoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Isseki; Mori, Takaharu; Ando, Tadashi; Harada, Ryuhei; Jung, Jaewoon; Sugita, Yuji; Feig, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Biological macromolecules function in highly crowded cellular environments. The structure and dynamics of proteins and nucleic acids are well characterized in vitro, but in vivo crowding effects remain unclear. Using molecular dynamics simulations of a comprehensive atomistic model cytoplasm we found that protein-protein interactions may destabilize native protein structures, whereas metabolite interactions may induce more compact states due to electrostatic screening. Protein-protein interactions also resulted in significant variations in reduced macromolecular diffusion under crowded conditions, while metabolites exhibited significant two-dimensional surface diffusion and altered protein-ligand binding that may reduce the effective concentration of metabolites and ligands in vivo. Metabolic enzymes showed weak non-specific association in cellular environments attributed to solvation and entropic effects. These effects are expected to have broad implications for the in vivo functioning of biomolecules. This work is a first step towards physically realistic in silico whole-cell models that connect molecular with cellular biology. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19274.001 PMID:27801646

  17. Integrating atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, experiments, and network analysis to study protein dynamics: strength in unity.

    PubMed

    Papaleo, Elena

    2015-01-01

    In the last years, we have been observing remarkable improvements in the field of protein dynamics. Indeed, we can now study protein dynamics in atomistic details over several timescales with a rich portfolio of experimental and computational techniques. On one side, this provides us with the possibility to validate simulation methods and physical models against a broad range of experimental observables. On the other side, it also allows a complementary and comprehensive view on protein structure and dynamics. What is needed now is a better understanding of the link between the dynamic properties that we observe and the functional properties of these important cellular machines. To make progresses in this direction, we need to improve the physical models used to describe proteins and solvent in molecular dynamics, as well as to strengthen the integration of experiments and simulations to overcome their own limitations. Moreover, now that we have the means to study protein dynamics in great details, we need new tools to understand the information embedded in the protein ensembles and in their dynamic signature. With this aim in mind, we should enrich the current tools for analysis of biomolecular simulations with attention to the effects that can be propagated over long distances and are often associated to important biological functions. In this context, approaches inspired by network analysis can make an important contribution to the analysis of molecular dynamics simulations.

  18. Analytical potential for atomistic simulations of silicon, carbon, and silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erhart, Paul; Albe, Karsten

    2005-01-01

    We present an analytical bond-order potential for silicon, carbon, and silicon carbide that has been optimized by a systematic fitting scheme. The functional form is adopted from a preceding work [Phys. Rev. B 65, 195124 (2002)] and is built on three independently fitted potentials for SiSi , CC , and SiC interaction. For elemental silicon and carbon, the potential perfectly reproduces elastic properties and agrees very well with first-principles results for high-pressure phases. The formation enthalpies of point defects are reasonably reproduced. In the case of silicon stuctural features of the melt agree nicely with data taken from literature. For silicon carbide the dimer as well as the solid phases B1, B2, and B3 were considered. Again, elastic properties are very well reproduced including internal relaxations under shear. Comparison with first-principles data on point defect formation enthalpies shows fair agreement. The successful validation of the potentials for configurations ranging from the molecular to the bulk regime indicates the transferability of the potential model and makes it a good choice for atomistic simulations that sample a large configuration space.

  19. Large-scale atomistic simulations of surface nanostructuring by short pulse laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chengping; Shugaev, Maxim; Zhigilei, Leonid

    2015-03-01

    The availability of petascale supercomputing resources has expanded the range of research questions that can be addressed in the simulations and, in particular, enabled large-scale atomistic simulations of short pulse laser nanostructuring of metal surfaces. A series of simulations performed for systems consisting of 108 - 109 atoms is used in this study to investigate the mechanisms responsible for the generation of complex multiscale surface morphology and microstructure. At low laser fluence, just below the spallation threshold, a concurrent occurrence of fast laser melting, dynamic relaxation of laser-induced stresses, and rapid cooling and resolidification of the transiently melted surface region is found to produce a sub-surface porous region covered by a nanocrystalline layer. At higher laser fluences, in the spallation and phase explosion regimes, the material disintegration and ejection driven by the relaxation of laser-induced stresses and/or explosive release of vapor leads to the formation of complex surface morphology that can only be studied in billion-atom simulations. The first result from a billion atom simulation of surface nanostructuring performed on Titan will be discussed in the presentation. Financial support is provided by NSF (DMR-0907247 and CMMI-1301298) and AFOSR (FA9550-10-1-0541). Computational support is provided by the OLCF (MAT048) and NSF XSEDE (TG-DMR110090).

  20. Atomistic Insight on the Charging Energetics in Sub-nanometer Pore Supercacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, Rui; Huang, Jingsong; Sumpter, Bobby G; Meunier, Vincent; Feng, Guang

    2010-01-01

    Electrodes featuring sub-nanometer pores can significantly enhance the capacitance and energy density of supercapacitors. However, ions must pay an energy penalty to enter sub-nanometer pores as they have to shed part of their solvation shell. The magnitude of such energy penalty plays a key role in determining the accessibility and charging/discharging of these sub-nanometer pores. Here we report on the atomistic simulation of Na+ and Cl ions entering a polarizable slit pore with a width of 0.82 nm. We show that the free energy penalty for these ions to enter the pore is less than 14 kJ/mol for both Na+ and Cl ions. The surprisingly small energy penalty is caused by the van der Waals attractions between ion and pore walls, the image charge effects, the moderate (19-26%) de-hydration of the ions inside the pore, and the strengthened interactions between ions and their hydration water molecules in the sub-nanometer pore. The results provide strong impetus for further developing nanoporous electrodes featuring sub- nanometer pores.