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Sample records for microsphere induced gastrointestinal

  1. Encapsulation in alginate-skim milk microspheres improves viability of Lactobacillus bulgaricus in stimulated gastrointestinal conditions.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ling-Xia; Fang, Xiu-Juan; Yu, Zhen; Xin, Yang; Liu, Xiao-Ying; Shi, Lu-E; Tang, Zhen-Xing

    2013-05-01

    Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus (L. bulgaricus) was encapsulated in alginate-skim milk microspheres. Characteristics of encapsulated L. bulgaricus, such as pH stability, bile stability, storage stability and release property, were studied in this paper. The viability of free L. bulgaricus was not observed after 1 min in simulated gastric fluids (SGF) at pH 2.5 or 2.0. Compared with that of free L. bulgaricus, the viability of encapsulated L. bulgaricus only decreased 0.7 log CFU/g and 2 log CFU/g after 2.0 h incubation in SGF at pH 2.5 and pH 2.0, respectively. L. bulgaricus was also sensitive to bile solution. The viability of free L. bulgaricus was fully lost after 1 h incubation in 1 and 2% bile solution, while the viability of encapsulated L. bulgaricus was only lost 2 log CFU/g and 2.6 log CFU/g in 1 and 2% bile solution at the same time, respectively. Encapsulated L. bulgaricus could be completely released from microspheres in simulated intestinal fluid (pH 6.8) within 2 h. The viability of encapsulated L. bulgaricus retained around 8 log CFU/g when stored at 4°C for 30 days. The current encapsulation technique enables a large proportion of L. bulgaricus to remain good bioactive in a simulated gastrointestinal tract environment.

  2. Microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Vital information on a person's physical condition can be obtained by identifying and counting the population of T-cells and B-cells, lymphocytes of the same shape and size that help the immune system protect the body from the invasion of disease. The late Dr. Alan Rembaum developed a method for identifying the cells. The method involved tagging the T-cells and B-cells with microspheres of different fluorescent color. Microspheres, which have fluorescent dye embedded in them, are chemically treated so that they can link with antibodies. With the help of a complex antibody/antigen reaction, the microspheres bind themselves to specific 'targets,' in this case the T-cells or B-cells. Each group of cells can then be analyzed by a photoelectronic instrument at different wavelengths emitted by the fluorescent dyes. Same concept was applied to the separation of cancer cells from normal cells. Microspheres were also used to conduct many other research projects. Under a patent license Magsphere, Inc. is producing a wide spectrum of microspheres on a large scale and selling them worldwide for various applications.

  3. Mechanisms of Obesity-induced Gastrointestinal Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Eusebi, Leonardo H.; Ricciardiello, Luigi; Patidar, Kavish; Sanyal, Arun J.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is among the fastest growing diseases worldwide; treatment is inadequate and associated disorders, including gastrointestinal cancers, have high morbidity and mortality. An increased understanding of the mechanisms of obesity-induced carcinogenesis is required to develop methods to prevent or treat these cancers. We review the mechanisms of obesity-associated colorectal, esophageal, gastric, and pancreatic cancers and potential treatment strategies. PMID:24315827

  4. Mechanisms of obesity-induced gastrointestinal neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Alemán, José O; Eusebi, Leonardo H; Ricciardiello, Luigi; Patidar, Kavish; Sanyal, Arun J; Holt, Peter R

    2014-02-01

    Obesity is among the fastest growing diseases worldwide; treatment is inadequate, and associated disorders, including gastrointestinal cancers, have high morbidity and mortality. An increased understanding of the mechanisms of obesity-induced carcinogenesis is required to develop methods to prevent or treat these cancers. In this report, we review the mechanisms of obesity-associated colorectal, esophageal, gastric, and pancreatic cancers and potential treatment strategies. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Unilateral intracarotid injection of holmium microspheres to induce bilateral MRI-validated cerebral embolization in rats.

    PubMed

    de Lange, Fellery; Dieleman, Jan M; Blezer, Erwin L A; Houston, Ralph J F; Kalkman, Cor J; Nijsen, J Frank W

    2009-01-30

    Cerebral embolization models have been hindered by the fact that delivery is predominantly one-sided and cannot be quantified easily. We have developed a model for bilateral cerebral micro-embolization. By using holmium microspheres, it is possible to quantify intracerebral delivery using MRI. To validate the quantification of holmium microspheres a phantom study was performed in which concentration of microspheres in solution was compared with the number of holmium-induced artifacts on MRI. After that identical microspheres were administered by unilateral injection in the carotid artery, while the opposite carotid artery was clamped. On post-injection MRI scans, intracerebral delivery and right/left distribution of the microspheres was determined. In the phantom study it was shown that quantification by MRI is possible and that MRI artifacts represent single microspheres. In the rat brain, about one-third of the injected dose was consistently located on the contralateral side. The administration was reproducible regarding distribution and number of microspheres. The use of holmium microspheres enables quantification of delivered dose as single microspheres induce artifacts on MRI. By clamping the contralateral carotid artery, one-third of the dose is diverted to the contralateral hemisphere.

  6. Effects of slow-releasing colistin microspheres on endotoxin-induced sepsis.

    PubMed

    Nanjo, Yuta; Ishii, Yoshikazu; Kimura, Soichiro; Fukami, Toshiro; Mizoguchi, Masahiro; Suzuki, Toyofumi; Tomono, Kazuo; Akasaka, Yoshikiyo; Ishii, Toshiharu; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Tateda, Kazuhiro; Yamaguchi, Keizo

    2013-08-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a major contributing factor to endotoxic shock. Colistin specifically binds to LPS. However, it has the disadvantages that adverse reactions are common and it has a short half-life. To overcome these disadvantages, we prepared slow-releasing colistin microspheres and examined the efficacy of these colistin microspheres in a mouse model of endotoxin-induced sepsis. We prepared the colistin microspheres using poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid. For acute toxicity investigations, mice were overdosed with colistin sulfate or colistin microspheres. The group administered with colistin microspheres was associated with less acute toxicity and fewer nephrotoxic changes on histopathological examination compared to the group administered with colistin sulfate alone. For pharmacokinetic analysis, mice were subcutaneously administered with colistin microspheres or colistin sulfate alone. The plasma concentration of colistin was higher in the colistin microspheres group than in the colistin sulfate group at 12 and 24 h after administration. Moreover, mice were intraperitoneally injected with LPS and then immediately subcutaneously administered with blank microspheres, colistin microspheres or colistin sulfate alone. The levels of endotoxin in the sera and cytokine in the spleens were then measured. A significant reduction in the serum endotoxin level in the colistin microspheres group was observed at 24 h. The reduced endotoxin levels in the sera were correlated with the lower cytokine levels in the spleens of mice treated with colistin microspheres. Our results suggest that the use of colistin microspheres may help to maintain a higher colistin concentration in blood, reduce the levels of endotoxin and cytokines in endotoxin-induced sepsis, and lead to decreased toxicity.

  7. Nanojet-induced modes in 1D chains of microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapitonov, A. M.; Astratov, V. N.

    2007-02-01

    We report on the light transport phenomena in linear chains composed of several tens of touching spherical microcavities. A new optical mode type, namely nanojet-induced modes (NIMs) is observed. These modes result from the optical coupling of microspheres acting as a series of micro-lenses, which periodically focus propagating wave into photonic nanojets. Theoretically, formation of periodic nanojets has been predicted in Z. Chen et al., Opt. Lett. 31, 389 (2006). The chains were produced by means of the self-assembly directed by micro-flows of water suspension of polystyrene microspheres. The mean size of spheres was varied in the 2-10 micron range. To couple light to NIMs we used built-in emission sources formed by several locally excited dye-doped microcavities from the same chain. Conversion of modes emitted by the light source into the NIMs results in losses of several dB per sphere in the vicinity (first few tens of spheres) of such sources. At longer distances we found an attenuation rate as small as 0.5 dB per sphere that reveals low intrinsic propagation loss for NIMs. The NIMs have potential applications for coupling and guiding of light in compact arrays of spherical cavities with extremely high quality (Q) whispering gallery modes.

  8. Measure of blood flow by the multiple radioactive microsphere technique in radiated gastrointestinal tissue.

    PubMed

    Delgado, G; Butterfield, A B; Dritschilo, A; Hummel, S; Harbert, J; Petrilli, E S; Kot, P A

    1983-08-01

    In this study, two different radioactive microspheres were used to measure blood flow of an irradiated segment of small intestine in four dogs before, and 12 days after, irradiation with 2000 rad. The technique and implications are discussed. Using multiple radioactive microspheres, the study demonstrated an increased blood flow in irradiated tissues twelve days after a single dose of 2000 rad. There was also an increase in blood flow to adjoining nonradiated segments of intestine in the same animal. These observations may be of significance in clinical applications of radiation therapy and surgery. A major surgical concern is the impaired healing of irradiated tissue in the immediate postradiation period. The mechanism of this has generally implicated decreases in the perfusion of irradiated tissue. No decrease in blood flow was shown in this study, suggesting that other mechanisms, e.g., stem cell depletion, should be considered. Further studies of this type are recommended to increase understanding of the blood flow in irradiated tissue.

  9. Protective effects of alginate–chitosan microspheres loaded with alkaloids from Coptis chinensis Franch. and Evodia rutaecarpa (Juss.) Benth. (Zuojin Pill) against ethanol-induced acute gastric mucosal injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiang-Song; Zhu, Xiao-Ning; Jiang, Heng-Li; Wang, Gui-Fang; Cui, Yuan-Lu

    2015-01-01

    Zuojin Pill (ZJP), a traditional Chinese medicine formula, consists of Coptis chinensis Franch. and Evodia rutaecarpa (Juss.) Benth. in a ratio of 6:1 (w/w) and was first recorded in “Danxi’s experiential therapy” for treating gastrointestinal disorders in the 15th century. However, the poor solubility of alkaloids from ZJP restricted the protective effect in treating gastritis and gastric ulcer. The aim of the study was to investigate the protective mechanism of mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids from C. chinensis Franch. and E. rutaecarpa (Juss.) Benth. on ethanol-induced acute gastric mucosal injury in rats. Surface morphology, particle size, drug loading, encapsulation efficiency, in vitro drug release, mucoadhesiveness, and fluorescent imaging of the microspheres in gastrointestinal tract were studied. The results showed that the mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids could sustain the release of drugs beyond 12 hours and had gastric mucoadhesive property with 82.63% retention rate in vitro. The fluorescence tracer indicated high retention of mucoadhesive microspheres within 12 hours in vivo. The mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids could reduce the gastric injury by decreasing the mucosal lesion index, increasing the percentage of inhibition and increasing the amount of mucus in the gastric mucosa in an ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injury rat model. Moreover, the mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids reduce the inflammatory response by decreasing the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin 1β (IL-1β), downregulating the mRNA expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, TNF-α, and IL-1β in gastric mucosa. All the results indicate that mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids could not only increase the residence time of alkaloids in rat stomach, but also exert gastroprotective effects through reducing the inflammatory response on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal damage. Thus

  10. Protective effects of alginate-chitosan microspheres loaded with alkaloids from Coptis chinensis Franch. and Evodia rutaecarpa (Juss.) Benth. (Zuojin Pill) against ethanol-induced acute gastric mucosal injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang-Song; Zhu, Xiao-Ning; Jiang, Heng-Li; Wang, Gui-Fang; Cui, Yuan-Lu

    2015-01-01

    Zuojin Pill (ZJP), a traditional Chinese medicine formula, consists of Coptis chinensis Franch. and Evodia rutaecarpa (Juss.) Benth. in a ratio of 6:1 (w/w) and was first recorded in "Danxi's experiential therapy" for treating gastrointestinal disorders in the 15th century. However, the poor solubility of alkaloids from ZJP restricted the protective effect in treating gastritis and gastric ulcer. The aim of the study was to investigate the protective mechanism of mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids from C. chinensis Franch. and E. rutaecarpa (Juss.) Benth. on ethanol-induced acute gastric mucosal injury in rats. Surface morphology, particle size, drug loading, encapsulation efficiency, in vitro drug release, mucoadhesiveness, and fluorescent imaging of the microspheres in gastrointestinal tract were studied. The results showed that the mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids could sustain the release of drugs beyond 12 hours and had gastric mucoadhesive property with 82.63% retention rate in vitro. The fluorescence tracer indicated high retention of mucoadhesive microspheres within 12 hours in vivo. The mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids could reduce the gastric injury by decreasing the mucosal lesion index, increasing the percentage of inhibition and increasing the amount of mucus in the gastric mucosa in an ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injury rat model. Moreover, the mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids reduce the inflammatory response by decreasing the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin 1β (IL-1β), downregulating the mRNA expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, TNF-α, and IL-1β in gastric mucosa. All the results indicate that mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids could not only increase the residence time of alkaloids in rat stomach, but also exert gastroprotective effects through reducing the inflammatory response on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal damage. Thus, these

  11. Uniform and amorphous rifampicin microspheres obtained by freezing induced LLPS during lyophilization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun; Kong, Chao; Wu, Guoliang; Zhu, Junhao; Javid, Babak; Qian, Feng

    2015-11-10

    By lyophilization of rifampicin (RIF) solution in TBA/water with various solvent compositions, uniform and amorphous rifampicin (RIF) microspheres were produced. Using 55% TBA solution, the obtained RIF microspheres have a mono-dispersive size distribution with diameters range from 1 to 3 μm. The RIF microspheres are found to be amorphous by X-ray diffraction, and are expected to dissolve much faster than the crystalline RIF upon inhalation. Mechanistic investigation revealed that the amorphous RIF microspheres were formed due to liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) occurred during the freezing of the TBA/water solution. We also observed that the RIF microspheres can be readily phagocytized by activated THP-1 cells within 15 min. The suitable size distribution, high solubility, and readiness for phagocytosis by macrophages, all suggest that the lyophilized amorphous RIF microspheres could be potentially used as an anti-tuberculosis inhalation therapy. In addition, similar process was used to lyophilize TBA/water solutions of several other drugs, including rifaximin, rifapentine, paclitaxel, and isoniazid. We found that for drugs with appropriate physiochemical properties, such as paclitaxel and rifaximin, mono-dispersive microspheres could be obtained as well, which demonstrated that freezing induced LLPS could be utilized as a novel particle engineering methodology to produce drug microspheres by lyophilization.

  12. Asbestos-Induced Gastrointestinal Cancer: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seok Jo; Williams, David; Cheresh, Paul; Kamp, David W

    2016-01-01

    Asbestos-related diseases, such as malignancies and asbestosis, remain a significant occupational and public health concern. Asbestos is still widely used in many developing countries despite being a recognized carcinogen that has been banned over 50 countries. The prevalence and mortality from asbestos-related diseases continue to pose challenges worldwide. Many countries are now experiencing an epidemic of asbestos-related disease that is the legacy of occupational exposure during the 20th century because of the long latency period (up to 40 years) between initial asbestos exposure and exhibition of disease. However, the gastrointestinal (GI) cancers resulting from asbestos exposure are not as clearly defined. In this review, we summarize some of the recent epidemiology of asbestos-related diseases and then focus on the evidence implicating asbestos in causing GI malignancies. We also briefly review the important new pathogenic information that has emerged over the past several years that may account for asbestos-related gastrointestinal cancers. All types of asbestos fibers have been implicated in the mortality and morbidity from GI malignancies but the collective evidence to date is mixed. Although the molecular basis of GI cancers arising from asbestos exposure is unclear, there have been significant advances in our understanding of mesothelioma and asbestosis that may contribute to the pathophysiology underlying asbestos-induced GI cancers. The emerging new evidence into the pathogenesis of asbestos toxicity is providing insights into the molecular basis for developing novel therapeutic strategies for asbestos-related diseases in future management. PMID:27158561

  13. Biodegradable polylactide microspheres enhance specific immune response induced by Hepatitis B surface antigen

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Shaohui; Wei, Qiang; Liang, Zhenglun; Ma, Guanghui; Wang, Lianyan; An, Wenqi; Ma, Xiaowei; Fang, Xin; He, Peng; Li, Hemin; Hu, Zhongyu

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B (HB) infection caused by Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is the most common liver disease in the world. HB vaccine, when administered in conjunction with alum adjuvants, induces Th2 immunity that confers protection against HBV. However, currently available vaccine formulations and adjuvants do not elicit adequate Th1 and CTL responses that are important for prevention of maternal transmission of the virus. Microspheres synthesized from poly (D, L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) or poly (D, L-lactide) (PLA) polymers have been considered as promising tools for in vivo delivery of antigens and drugs. Here we describe PLA microspheres synthesized by premix membrane emulsification method and their application in formulating a new microsphere based HB vaccine. To evaluate the immunogenicity of this microsphere vaccine, BALB/c mice were immunized with microsphere vaccine and a series of immunological assays were conducted. Results of Enzyme-linked ImmunoSpot (ELISPOT) assays revealed that the number of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ)-producing splenocytes and CD8+ T cells increased significantly in the microsphere vaccine group. Microsphere vaccine group showed enhanced specific cell lysis when compared with HB surface antigen (HBsAg) only group in 51Cr cytotoxicity assays. Moreover, microsphere vaccine elicited a comparable level of antibody production as that of HB vaccine administered with alum adjuvant. We show that phagocytosis of HBsAg by dendritic cells is more pronounced in microsphere vaccine group when compared with other control groups. These results clearly demonstrate the potential of using PLA microspheres as effective HB vaccine adjuvants for an enhanced Th1 immune response. PMID:25424942

  14. Biodegradable polylactide microspheres enhance specific immune response induced by Hepatitis B surface antigen.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Shaohui; Wei, Qiang; Liang, Zhenglun; Ma, Guanghui; Wang, Lianyan; An, Wenqi; Ma, Xiaowei; Fang, Xin; He, Peng; Li, Hemin; Hu, Zhongyu

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B (HB) infection caused by Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is the most common liver disease in the world. HB vaccine, when administered in conjunction with alum adjuvants, induces Th2 immunity that confers protection against HBV. However, currently available vaccine formulations and adjuvants do not elicit adequate Th1 and CTL responses that are important for prevention of maternal transmission of the virus. Microspheres synthesized from poly (D, L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) or poly (D, L-lactide) (PLA) polymers have been considered as promising tools for in vivo delivery of antigens and drugs. Here we describe PLA microspheres synthesized by premix membrane emulsification method and their application in formulating a new microsphere based HB vaccine. To evaluate the immunogenicity of this microsphere vaccine, BALB/c mice were immunized with microsphere vaccine and a series of immunological assays were conducted. Results of Enzyme-linked ImmunoSpot (ELISPOT) assays revealed that the number of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ)-producing splenocytes and CD8(+) T cells increased significantly in the microsphere vaccine group. Microsphere vaccine group showed enhanced specific cell lysis when compared with HB surface antigen (HBsAg) only group in (51)Cr cytotoxicity assays. Moreover, microsphere vaccine elicited a comparable level of antibody production as that of HB vaccine administered with alum adjuvant. We show that phagocytosis of HBsAg by dendritic cells is more pronounced in microsphere vaccine group when compared with other control groups. These results clearly demonstrate the potential of using PLA microspheres as effective HB vaccine adjuvants for an enhanced Th1 immune response.

  15. Preparation of monodisperse microspheres from the Laplace pressure induced droplet formation in micromolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Chang-Hyung; Kim, Jongmin; Kang, Sung-Min; Lee, Jinkee; Lee, Chang-Soo

    2013-03-01

    Monodisperse microspheres play critical roles in many applications such as micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS), chemical release systems, optical materials and various biological applications. Although microfluidic systems have been developed for producing monodisperse microspheres, it still definitely requires pressure driven flow for continuous fluid injection as well as use of surfactant to achieve their uniformity. Here, we present a novel molding method that generates monodisperse microspheres through surface-tension-induced flow. Two immiscible fluids that consist of photocurable monomer and hydrophobic oil are sequentially applied onto the mold. The mold geometry results in Laplace pressure induced droplet formation, and these droplets formed are individually localized into each micromold. Photopolymerization of the droplets allow for the formation of polymer microspheres with narrow size distribution (CV =1.9%). We obtain the microspheres with diameter ranging from 20 to 300 μm by modulating mold dimensions. We provide a synthesis method to produce microspheres in micromolds for various reaction schemes: UV-polymerization, sol-gel reactions and colloidal assemblies.

  16. Depletion-Induced Encapsulation by Dumbbell-Shaped Patchy Colloids Stabilize Microspheres against Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the stabilization of polystyrene microspheres by encapsulating them with dumbbell-shaped colloids with a sticky and a nonsticky lobe. Upon adding a depletant, an effective short ranged attraction is induced between the microspheres and the smaller, smooth lobes of the dumbbells, making those specifically sticky, whereas the interaction with the larger lobes of the dumbbells is considerably less attractive due to their rough surface, which reduces the overlap volume and leaves them nonsticky. The encapsulation of the microspheres by these rough-smooth patchy dumbbells is investigated using a combination of experiments and computer simulations, both resulting in partial coverage of the template particles. For larger microspheres, the depletion attraction is stronger, resulting in a larger fraction of dumbbells that are attached with both lobes to the surface of microspheres. We thus find a template curvature dependent orientation of the dumbbells. In the Monte Carlo simulations, the introduction of such a small, curvature dependent attraction between the rough lobes of the dumbbells resulted in an increased coverage. However, kinetic constraints imposed by the dumbbell geometry seem to prevent optimal packing of the dumbbells on the template particles under all investigated conditions in experiments and simulations. Despite the incomplete coverage, the encapsulation by dumbbell particles does prevent aggregation of the microspheres, thus acting as a colloid-sized steric stabilizer. PMID:28272895

  17. Depletion-Induced Encapsulation by Dumbbell-Shaped Patchy Colloids Stabilize Microspheres against Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Wolters, Joost R; Verweij, Joanne E; Avvisati, Guido; Dijkstra, Marjolein; Kegel, Willem K

    2017-04-04

    In this paper, we demonstrate the stabilization of polystyrene microspheres by encapsulating them with dumbbell-shaped colloids with a sticky and a nonsticky lobe. Upon adding a depletant, an effective short ranged attraction is induced between the microspheres and the smaller, smooth lobes of the dumbbells, making those specifically sticky, whereas the interaction with the larger lobes of the dumbbells is considerably less attractive due to their rough surface, which reduces the overlap volume and leaves them nonsticky. The encapsulation of the microspheres by these rough-smooth patchy dumbbells is investigated using a combination of experiments and computer simulations, both resulting in partial coverage of the template particles. For larger microspheres, the depletion attraction is stronger, resulting in a larger fraction of dumbbells that are attached with both lobes to the surface of microspheres. We thus find a template curvature dependent orientation of the dumbbells. In the Monte Carlo simulations, the introduction of such a small, curvature dependent attraction between the rough lobes of the dumbbells resulted in an increased coverage. However, kinetic constraints imposed by the dumbbell geometry seem to prevent optimal packing of the dumbbells on the template particles under all investigated conditions in experiments and simulations. Despite the incomplete coverage, the encapsulation by dumbbell particles does prevent aggregation of the microspheres, thus acting as a colloid-sized steric stabilizer.

  18. Observation of thermally induced tuning of lasing emission from melamine–formaldehyde resin microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hanyang; Liu, Shuangqiang; Peng, Feng; Yang, Jun; Li, Jin; Zhang, Yundong

    2017-03-01

    We report on the observation of the thermally induced tuning of the whispering gallery mode lasing emission from active microcavities. Melamine–formaldehyde resin microspheres were doped with a fluorescent dye and pumped by a 532 nm pulse laser. We show that microspheres with different sizes display lasing emissions in different parts of the spectrum, with a varying number of lasing modes present in the spectrum. The dominant thermo-optic effect leads to a blue shift of the whispering gallery mode lasing. The thermal sensing with a sensitivity of 0.33 nm/°C is higher than that of conventional polymer microcavities.

  19. Coupled-resonator-induced transparency in two microspheres as the element of angular velocity sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Kun; Tang, Jun; Guo, Hao; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Jian-Hua; Liu, Jun; Xue, Chen-Yang; Zhang, Wen-Dong

    2016-11-01

    We proposed a two-coupled microsphere resonator structure as the element of angular velocity sensing under the Sagnac effect. We analyzed the theoretical model of the two coupled microspheres, and derived the coupled-resonator-induced transparency (CRIT) transfer function, the effective phase shift, and the group delay. Experiments were also carried out to demonstrate the CRIT phenomenon in the two-coupled microsphere resonator structure. We calculated that the group index of the two-coupled sphere reaches n g = 180.46, while the input light at a wavelength of 1550 nm. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51225504, 61171056, and 91123036) and the Program for the Top Young Academic Leaders of Higher Learning Institutions of Shanxi Province, China.

  20. A novel, smart microsphere with K(+)-induced shrinking and aggregating properties based on a responsive host-guest system.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ming-Yue; Ju, Xiao-Jie; Fang, Lu; Liu, Zhuang; Yu, Hai-Rong; Jiang, Lu; Wang, Wei; Xie, Rui; Chen, Qianming; Chu, Liang-Yin

    2014-01-01

    A novel type of smart microspheres with K(+)-induced shrinking and aggregating properties is designed and developed on the basis of a K(+)-recognition host-guest system. The microspheres are composed of cross-linked poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acryloylamidobenzo-15-crown-5) (P(NIPAM-co-AAB15C5)) networks. Due to the formation of stable 2:1 "sandwich-type" host-guest complexes between 15-crown-5 units and K(+) ions, the P(NIPAM-co-AAB15C5) microspheres significantly exhibit isothermally and synchronously K(+)-induced shrinking and aggregating properties at a low K(+) concentration, while other cations (e.g., Na(+), H(+), NH4(+), Mg(2+), or Ca(2+)) cannot trigger such response behaviors. Effects of chemical compositions of microspheres on the K(+)-induced shrinking and aggregating behaviors are investigated systematically. The K(+)-induced aggregating sensitivity of the P(NIPAM-co-AAB15C5) microspheres can be enhanced by increasing the content of crown ether units in the polymeric networks; however, it is nearly not influenced by varying the monomer and cross-linker concentrations in the microsphere preparation. State diagrams of the dispersed-to-aggregated transformation of P(NIPAM-co-AAB15C5) microspheres in aqueous solutions as a function of temperature and K(+) concentration are constructed, which provide valuable information for tuning the dispersed/aggregated states of microspheres by varying environmental K(+) concentration and temperature. The microspheres with synchronously K(+)-induced shrinking and aggregating properties proposed in this study provide a brand-new model for designing novel targeted drug delivery systems.

  1. Sodium alginate inhibits methotrexate-induced gastrointestinal mucositis in rats.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Atsuki; Itoh, Tomokazu; Nasu, Reishi; Kajiwara, Eiji; Nishida, Ryuichi

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal mucositis is one of the most prevalent side effects of chemotherapy. Methotrexate is a pro-oxidant compound that depletes dihydrofolate pools and is widely used in the treatment of leukemia and other malignancies. Through its effects on normal tissues with high rates of proliferation, methotrexate treatment leads to gastrointestinal mucositis. In rats, methotrexate-induced gastrointestinal mucositis is histologically characterized by crypt loss, callus fusion and atrophy, capillary dilatation, and infiltration of mixed inflammatory cells. The water-soluble dietary fiber sodium alginate (AL-Na) is derived from seaweed and has demonstrated muco-protective and hemostatic effects on upper gastrointestinal ulcers. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of AL-Na on methotrexate-induced small intestinal mucositis in rats. Animals were subcutaneously administered methotrexate at a dosage of 2.5 mg/kg once daily for 3 d. Rats were treated with single oral doses of AL-Na 30 min before and 6 h after methotrexate administration. On the 4th day, small intestines were removed and weighed. Subsequently, tissues were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and bromodeoxyuridine. AL-Na significantly prevented methotrexate-induced small intestinal mucositis. Moreover, AL-Na prevented decreases in red blood cell numbers, hemoglobin levels, and hematocrit levels. These results suggest the potential of AL-Na as a therapy for methotrexate-induced small intestinal mucositis.

  2. Microwave-induced fast crystallization of amorphous hierarchical anatase microspheres.

    PubMed

    Calatayud, David G; Jardiel, Teresa; Peiteado, Marco; Caballero, Amador C; Fernández-Hevia, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The fabrication of hierarchical anatase microspheres with potential photocatalytic properties eventually comprises a consolidation step in which a high degree of crystalline order is typically achieved through conventional electric heating treatments. This however entails a substantial reduction in the specific surface area and porosity of the powders, with the consequent deterioration in their photocatalytic response. Here, we have tested the employ of microwave heating as an alternative energy-saving sintering method to promote fast crystallization. The results obtained suggest that under the microwave radiation, the TiO2 hierarchical structures can effectively crystallize in a drastically reduced heating time, allowing the specific surface area and the porosity to be kept in the high values required for an improved photocatalytic performance.

  3. Microwave-induced fast crystallization of amorphous hierarchical anatase microspheres

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The fabrication of hierarchical anatase microspheres with potential photocatalytic properties eventually comprises a consolidation step in which a high degree of crystalline order is typically achieved through conventional electric heating treatments. This however entails a substantial reduction in the specific surface area and porosity of the powders, with the consequent deterioration in their photocatalytic response. Here, we have tested the employ of microwave heating as an alternative energy-saving sintering method to promote fast crystallization. The results obtained suggest that under the microwave radiation, the TiO2 hierarchical structures can effectively crystallize in a drastically reduced heating time, allowing the specific surface area and the porosity to be kept in the high values required for an improved photocatalytic performance. PMID:24948894

  4. Radioembolization with 90Y glass microspheres for the treatment of unresectable metastatic liver disease from chemotherapy-refractory gastrointestinal cancers: final report of a prospective pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Kerlan, Robert K.; Hawkins, Randall A.; Pampaloni, Miguel; Taylor, Andrew G.; Kohi, Maureen P.; Kolli, K. Pallav; Atreya, Chloe E.; Bergsland, Emily K.; Kelley, R. Kate; Ko, Andrew H.; Korn, W. Michael; Van Loon, Katherine; McWhirter, Ryan M.; Luan, Jennifer; Johanson, Curt; Venook, Alan P.

    2016-01-01

    Background This prospective pilot single-institution study was undertaken to document the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of radioembolization of liver-dominant metastatic gastrointestinal cancer using 90Y glass microspheres. Methods Between June 2010 and October 2013, 42 adult patients (26 men, 16 women; median age 60 years) with metastatic chemotherapy-refractory unresectable colorectal (n=21), neuroendocrine (n=11), intrahepatic bile duct (n=7), pancreas (n=2), and esophageal (n=1) carcinomas underwent 60 lobar or segmental administrations of 90Y glass microspheres. Data regarding clinical and laboratory adverse events (AE) were collected prospectively for up to 5.5 years after radioembolization. Radiographic responses were evaluated using Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST), version 1.1. Time to maximum response, response duration, progression-free survival (PFS) (hepatic and extrahepatic), and overall survival (OS) were measured. Results Median target dose and activity were 109.4 Gy and 2.6 GBq per treatment session, respectively. Majority of clinical AE were grade 1 or 2 in severity. Patients with colorectal cancer had hepatic objective response rate (ORR) of 25% and a hepatic disease control rate (DCR) of 80%. Median PFS and OS were 1.0 and 4.4 months, respectively. Patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NET) had hepatic ORR and DCR of 73% and 100%, respectively. Median PFS was 8.9 months for this cohort. DCR and median PFS and OS for patients with cholangiocarcinoma were 86%, 1.1 months, and 6.7 months, respectively. Conclusions 90Y glass microspheres device has a favorable safety profile, and achieved prolonged disease control of hepatic tumor burden in a subset of patients, including all patients enrolled in the neuroendocrine cohort. PMID:28078110

  5. Metal ion-induced alginate-locust bean gum IPN microspheres for sustained oral delivery of aceclofenac.

    PubMed

    Jana, Sougata; Gandhi, Arijit; Sheet, Subrata; Sen, Kalyan Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The alginate microspheres represent a useful tool for sustained oral delivery of drugs but exhibit several problems associated with the stability and rapid release of drugs at higher pH values. To overcome these drawbacks, alginate-locust bean gum (LBG) interpenetrating microspheres were prepared by calcium ion (Ca(+2)) induced ionotropic gelation technique for prolonged release of aceclofenac. The drug entrapment efficiency of these microspheres was found to be 59-93%. The microspheres lied in the size range of 406-684μm. Scanning electron microscopy revealed spherical shape of the microspheres. No drug-polymer interaction was evident after infrared spectroscopy analysis. The microspheres provided sustained release of aceclofenac in phosphate buffer solution (pH 6.8) over a period of 8h. The drug release data were fitted into the Korsmeyer-Peppas model and the drug release was found to follow anomalous (non-Fickian) diffusion mechanism. Pharmacodynamic study of the microspheres showed a prolonged anti-inflammatory activity in carrageenan-induced rat paw model following oral administration. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Polymeric microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Walt, David R.; Mandal, Tarun K.; Fleming, Michael S.

    2004-04-13

    The invention features core-shell microsphere compositions, hollow polymeric microspheres, and methods for making the microspheres. The microspheres are characterized as having a polymeric shell with consistent shell thickness.

  7. Gastrointestinal damage induced by celecoxib and rofecoxib in rats.

    PubMed

    Laudanno, O M; Cesolari, J A; Esnarriaga, J; Rista, L; Piombo, G; Maglione, C; Aramberry, L; Sambrano, J; Godoy, A; Rocaspana, A

    2001-04-01

    Five experimental models were developed in different groups of Wistar rats (N = 15) to study selective COX-2-inhibitor NSAIDs such as celecoxib and rofecoxib, as follows: (1) dose-dependent oral Celecoxib and Rofecoxib for 5 days, and 24 hr after oral indomethacin; (2) Same as 1 but subcutaneously; (3) gastric ulcer induced by glacial acetic acid; (4) duodenal ulcer induced by cysteamine; and (5) stress by immobilization and immersion in water at 15 degrees C for 6 hr. Celecoxib and Rofecoxib, either orally or subcutaneously, did not produce necrotic lesions in healthy gastrointestinal mucosa (0%), showing normal histology. In contrast, previously indomethacin-induced lesions were aggravated (90%, P < 0.001). Total necrosis in the small intestine as well as increased ulcers and perforation of gastric and duodenal ulcers induced by acetic acid and cysteamine were observed. There was also aggravation of the necrotic gastric area in stress (60-90%, P < 0.05). Celecoxib and rofecoxib showed neutrophilia (5000/mm3) similar to that with indomethacin. In contrast, there was no leukocyte infiltration in the gastric múcosa; thus, we can consider it a selective COX-2 NSAID. In conclusion, celecoxib and rofecoxib at doses causing COX-2 but not COX-1 inhibition did not produce toxic lesions in healthy gastrointestinal mucosa, yielding a broad therapeutic margin. In contrast, when administered in altered gastrointestinal mucosa, they aggravated and complicated gastric ulcers as well as necrosis in the small intestine, consequently restricting their clinical use.

  8. Laplace pressure induced droplet generation in micromold for synthesizing monodisperse microspheres.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Chang-Hyung; Lee, Jinkee; Lee, Chang-Soo

    2012-02-01

    Microspheres are widely used in applications such MEMS, chemical release systems, optical materials and various biological applications. Here, we report the new micromolding technique for synthesizing spherical monodisperse particles through surface-tension-induced flow. The spherical droplets were prepared using Laplace pressure difference, which is highly depending on geometries of the mold shape, without any pumping system to make flow. We calculated the minimum pressure difference to make the flow moves and form the droplets. It provides a synthetic tool for generating the microspheres using different reaction schemes; UV-polymerization, sol-gel reaction and colloidal assemblies. The monodisperse spherical particles, which are made of various materials, were successfully generated without any surfactant because each droplet can be separately positioned in mold patterns during solidification process.

  9. Capacitive behavior of carbon nanotube thin film induced by deformed ZnO microspheres.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Rahul; Majji, Shanmukh Naidu; Ghosh, Rituparna; Nandi, Sukanta; Boruah, Buddha D; Misra, Abha

    2017-09-27

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are uniformly distributed with piezoelectric microspheres. This leads to a large strain gradient due to an induced capacitive response, providing a 250% enhancement in electromechanical response compared with pristine CNTs. The fabricated large-area flexible thin film exhibits excellent pressure sensitivity, which can even detect an arterial pulse with a much faster response time (∼79 ms) in a bendable configuration. In addition, the film shows a rapid relaxation time (∼0.4 s), high stability and excellent durability with a rapid loading-unloading cycle. The dominant contribution of piezoelectric microspheres in a CNT matrix as opposed to nanoparticles showed a much higher sensitivity due to the large change in capacitance. Therefore, hybrid microstructures have various potential applications in wearable smart electronics, including detection of human motion and wrist pulses.

  10. Capacitive behavior of carbon nanotube thin film induced by deformed ZnO microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Rahul; Naidu Majji, Shanmukh; Ghosh, Rituparna; Nandi, Sukanta; Boruah, Buddha D.; Misra, Abha

    2017-09-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are uniformly distributed with piezoelectric microspheres. This leads to a large strain gradient due to an induced capacitive response, providing a 250% enhancement in electromechanical response compared with pristine CNTs. The fabricated large-area flexible thin film exhibits excellent pressure sensitivity, which can even detect an arterial pulse with a much faster response time (∼79 ms) in a bendable configuration. In addition, the film shows a rapid relaxation time (∼0.4 s), high stability and excellent durability with a rapid loading–unloading cycle. The dominant contribution of piezoelectric microspheres in a CNT matrix as opposed to nanoparticles showed a much higher sensitivity due to the large change in capacitance. Therefore, hybrid microstructures have various potential applications in wearable smart electronics, including detection of human motion and wrist pulses.

  11. Imaging of Drug-induced Complications in the Gastrointestinal System.

    PubMed

    McGettigan, Melissa J; Menias, Christine O; Gao, Zhenqiang J; Mellnick, Vincent M; Hara, Amy K

    2016-01-01

    Drug-induced injury commonly affects the gastrointestinal and hepatobiliary systems because of the mechanisms of absorption and metabolism. In pill esophagitis, injury is frequently related to direct contact with the esophageal mucosa, resulting in small superficial ulcers in the mid esophagus. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can lead to gastrointestinal tract ulcers and small bowel mucosal diaphragms (thin weblike strictures). Injury to the pancreatic and hepatobiliary systems can manifest as pancreatitis, acute or chronic hepatitis, cholestasis, or steatosis and steatohepatitis (which may progress to cirrhosis). Various drugs may also insult the hepatic vasculature, resulting in Budd-Chiari and sinusoidal obstructive syndromes. Focal lesions such as hepatic adenomas may develop after use of oral contraceptives or anabolic steroids. Ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging can aid in diagnosis of drug-induced injuries and often are necessary to exclude other causes.

  12. PLGA‐PNIPAM Microspheres Loaded with the Gastrointestinal Nutrient NaB Ameliorate Cardiac Dysfunction by Activating Sirt3 in Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Panke; Zeng, Wen; Li, Li; Huo, Da; Zeng, Lingqing; Tan, Ju; Zhou, Jingting; Sun, Jiansen; Liu, Ge; Li, Yanzhao; Guan, Ge; Wang, Yuxin

    2016-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is the death of cardiomyocytes caused by a lack of energy due to ischemia. Nutrients supplied by the blood are the main source of cellular energy for cardiomyocytes. Sodium butyrate (NaB), a gastrointestinal nutrient, is a short‐chain fatty acid (butyric acid) that may act as an energy source in AMI therapy. Poly(lactic‐co‐glycolic acid)‐Poly (N‐isopropylacrylamide) microspheres loaded with NaB (PP‐N) are synthesized to prolong the release of NaB and are injected into ischemic zones in a Sprague–Dawley rat AMI model. Here, this study shows that PP‐N can significantly ameliorate cardiac dysfunction in AMI, and NaB can specially bind to Sirt3 structure, activating its deacetylation ability and inhibiting the generation of reactive oxygen species, autophagy, and angiogenesis promotion. The results indicate that NaB, acting as a nutrient, can protect cardiomyocytes in AMI. These results suggest that the gastrointestinal nutrient NaB may be a new therapy for AMI treatment, and PP‐N may be the ideal therapeutic regimen. PMID:27981013

  13. Ondansetron and metformin-induced gastrointestinal side effects.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Irene S; Roa, Magaly; Torrico, Fatima; Cubeddu, Luigi X

    2003-01-01

    Treatment with metformin is associated with a high incidence of gastrointestinal side effects of unknown mechanism. Metformin is a biguanide derivative, which resembles 5-HT3-receptor agonists in its structure. Activation of 5-HT3 receptors is known to induce nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. In this study, we investigated if the gastrointestinal side effects produced by metformin were antagonized by ondansetron, a selective antagonist of 5-HT3 receptors. Patients experiencing gastrointestinal side effects were randomized to ondansetron (4 mg bid p.o.) or placebo while maintained on metformin (double-blind, parallel-group design). If side effects persisted or worsened, metformin was discontinued and the patient considered a therapeutic failure. Of the 98 subjects treated with metformin, 22 developed side effects to match the study entry criteria. Diarrhea was the most frequent side effect. Subjects were randomized to ondansetron (10/2 F/M, 42.8 +/- 2.3 years, 28.6 +/- 1.1 kg/m2, 2585 +/- 35 mg/d metformin) or placebo (9/1 F/M, 43 +/- 4.3 years, 29.7 +/- 1.8 kg/m2, 2715 +/- 71 mg/d metformin). Ondansetron showed no efficacy against metformin-induced side effects. A comparable number of therapeutic failures were observed in ondansetron (8/12; 66%) and placebo-treated subjects (5/10; 50%) (P<0.1). Mean nausea scores (numeric analog scale) before and during treatment with ondansetron were 6.3 +/- 1 and 6.9 +/- 1 cm, respectively. Nausea scores averaged 7.3 +/- 1.5 and 5.9 +/- 1.5 cm, before and during treatment with placebo (P>0.1). In conclusion, 5-HT3 receptors do not seem to play a role in metformin-induced gastrointestinal side effects.

  14. [Gastrointestinal damage induced by celecoxib and rofecoxib in rats].

    PubMed

    Laudanno, O M; Cesolari, J A; Esnarriaga, J; Rista, L; Piombo, G; Maglione, C; Aramberry, L J; Sambrano, J S; Godoy, A; Rocaspana, A

    2000-01-01

    Five experimental models were carried out in different groups of Wistar rats (n = 15) in order to study selective (cyclo-oxygenase) COX-2 non-steroid antiinflammatory inhibitors, such as celecoxib and rofecoxib, as follows: 1) Dose-dependent oral celecoxib and rofecoxib for 5 days, and 24 hours after oral indomethacin. 2) Same as 1, but subcutaneously. 3) Gastric ulcer induced by means of glacial acetic acid. 4) Duodenal ulcer induced by means of cysteamine. 5) Stress due to being kept under restraint and immersion in water at 15 degrees C for 6 hours. Celecoxib and rofecoxib, either orally or subcutaneously, did not produce necrotic injuries in healthy gastrointestinal mucosa (0%), showing normal histology. On the other hand, the injuries previously induced by indomethacin worsened (90%, p < 0.001). Total necrosis of small intestine as well as increased ulcer and perforation of gastric and duodenal ulcers induced by acetic acid and cysteamine were observed. There was also worsening of gastric necrotic area with stress (60-90%, p < 0.05). Celecoxib and rofecoxib showed neutrophilia (5,000/mm3) similar to that presented by indomethacin, but there was no leukocyte infiltration in the gastric mucosa; thus we can consider it a COX-2 selective NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug). Dose-dependent administration of celecoxib and rofecoxib as COX-2 inhibitors and non-COX-1 inhibitors, respectively, did not produce toxic injuries on healthy gastrointestinal mucosa, thus providing a broad therapeutic spectre. On the other hand, when administered in presence of altered gastrointestinal mucosa, they worsened and complicated gastric ulcers, and also induced necrosis in the small intestine, thereby restricting their clinical use.

  15. Ghrelin improves burn-induced delayed gastrointestinal transit in rats.

    PubMed

    Sallam, H S; Oliveira, H M; Gan, H T; Herndon, D N; Chen, J D Z

    2007-01-01

    Delayed gastrointestinal transit is common in patients with severe burn. Ghrelin is a potent prokinetic peptide. We aimed at testing the effect of ghrelin on burn-induced delayed gastrointestinal transit in rats. Gastric emptying (GE), intestinal transit (IT), and colonic transit (CT) studies were performed in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were randomized into two main groups as follows: sham injury and ghrelin-treated burn injury with doses of 0, 2, 5, and 10 nmol/rat ip 6 h after burn. Sham/burn injury was induced under anesthesia. Rats received a phenol red meal 20 min following ghrelin injection. Based on the most effective ghrelin dose, 1 mg/kg sc atropine was given 30 min before the ghrelin in one group of rats for each study. The rats in each group were killed 30-90 min later; their stomachs, intestines, and colons were harvested immediately, and the amount of phenol red recovered was measured. Percentage of gastric emptying (GE%) and geometric center for IT and CT were calculated. We found 1) severe cutaneous burn injury significantly delayed GE, IT, and CT compared with sham injury (P < 0.05); 2) ghrelin normalized both GE and IT, but not the CT; 3) the most effective dose of ghrelin was 2 nmol/rat; and 4) atropine blocked the prokinetic effects of ghrelin on GE% and IT. In conclusion, ghrelin normalizes burn-induced delayed GE and IT but has no effect on CT in rats. The prokinetic effects of ghrelin are exerted via the cholinergic pathway. Ghrelin may have a therapeutic potential for burn patients with delayed upper gastrointestinal transit.

  16. Recombinant human collagen-based microspheres mitigate cardiac conduction slowing induced by adipose tissue-derived stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Smit, Nicoline W; Ten Sande, Judith N; Parvizi, Mojtaba; van Amersfoorth, Shirley C M; Plantinga, Josée A; van Spreuwel-Goossens, Carolien A F M; van Dongen, Elisabeth M W M; van Dessel, Pascal F H M; Kluijtmans, Sebastianus G J M; Meijborg, Veronique M F; de Bakker, Jacques M T; Harmsen, Martin C; Coronel, Ruben

    2017-01-01

    Stem cell therapy to improve cardiac function after myocardial infarction is hampered by poor cell retention, while it may also increase the risk of arrhythmias by providing an arrhythmogenic substrate. We previously showed that porcine adipose tissue-derived-stromal cells (pASC) induce conduction slowing through paracrine actions, whereas rat ASC (rASC) and human ASC (hASC) induce conduction slowing by direct coupling. We postulate that biomaterial microspheres mitigate the conduction slowing influence of pASC by interacting with paracrine signaling. To investigate the modulation of ASC-loaded recombinant human collagen-based microspheres, on the electrophysiological behavior of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVM). Unipolar extracellular electrograms, derived from microelectrode arrays (8x8 electrodes) containing NRVM, co-cultured with ASC or ASC loaded microspheres, were used to determine conduction velocity (CV) and conduction heterogeneity. Conditioned medium (Cme) of (co)cultures was used to assess paracrine mechanisms. Microspheres did not affect CV in control (NRVM) monolayers. In co-cultures of NRVM and rASC, hASC or pASC, CV was lower than in controls (14.4±1.0, 13.0±0.6 and 9.0± 1.0 vs. 19.5±0.5 cm/s respectively, p<0.001). Microspheres loaded with either rASC or hASC still induced conduction slowing compared to controls (13.5±0.4 and 12.6±0.5 cm/s respectively, p<0.001). However, pASC loaded microspheres increased CV of NRVM compared to pASC and NRMV co-cultures (16.3±1.3 cm/s, p< 0.001) and did not differ from controls (p = NS). Cme of pASC reduced CV in control monolayers of NRVM (10.3±1.1 cm/s, p<0.001), similar to Cme derived from pASC-loaded microspheres (11.1±1.7 cm/s, p = 1.0). The presence of microspheres in monolayers of NRVM abolished the CV slowing influence of Cme pASC (15.9±1.0 cm/s, p = NS vs. control). The application of recombinant human collagen-based microspheres mitigates indirect paracrine conduction slowing through

  17. Recombinant human collagen-based microspheres mitigate cardiac conduction slowing induced by adipose tissue-derived stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    van Amersfoorth, Shirley C. M.; Plantinga, Josée A.; van Spreuwel-Goossens, Carolien A. F. M.; van Dongen, Elisabeth M. W. M.; van Dessel, Pascal F. H. M.; Kluijtmans, Sebastianus G. J. M.; Meijborg, Veronique M. F.; de Bakker, Jacques M. T.; Harmsen, Martin C.; Coronel, Ruben

    2017-01-01

    Background Stem cell therapy to improve cardiac function after myocardial infarction is hampered by poor cell retention, while it may also increase the risk of arrhythmias by providing an arrhythmogenic substrate. We previously showed that porcine adipose tissue-derived-stromal cells (pASC) induce conduction slowing through paracrine actions, whereas rat ASC (rASC) and human ASC (hASC) induce conduction slowing by direct coupling. We postulate that biomaterial microspheres mitigate the conduction slowing influence of pASC by interacting with paracrine signaling. Aim To investigate the modulation of ASC-loaded recombinant human collagen-based microspheres, on the electrophysiological behavior of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVM). Method Unipolar extracellular electrograms, derived from microelectrode arrays (8x8 electrodes) containing NRVM, co-cultured with ASC or ASC loaded microspheres, were used to determine conduction velocity (CV) and conduction heterogeneity. Conditioned medium (Cme) of (co)cultures was used to assess paracrine mechanisms. Results Microspheres did not affect CV in control (NRVM) monolayers. In co-cultures of NRVM and rASC, hASC or pASC, CV was lower than in controls (14.4±1.0, 13.0±0.6 and 9.0± 1.0 vs. 19.5±0.5 cm/s respectively, p<0.001). Microspheres loaded with either rASC or hASC still induced conduction slowing compared to controls (13.5±0.4 and 12.6±0.5 cm/s respectively, p<0.001). However, pASC loaded microspheres increased CV of NRVM compared to pASC and NRMV co-cultures (16.3±1.3 cm/s, p< 0.001) and did not differ from controls (p = NS). Cme of pASC reduced CV in control monolayers of NRVM (10.3±1.1 cm/s, p<0.001), similar to Cme derived from pASC-loaded microspheres (11.1±1.7 cm/s, p = 1.0). The presence of microspheres in monolayers of NRVM abolished the CV slowing influence of Cme pASC (15.9±1.0 cm/s, p = NS vs. control). Conclusion The application of recombinant human collagen-based microspheres mitigates indirect

  18. Heparin as a pharmacologic intervention to induce positive scintiscan in occult gastrointestinal bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, T.K.; Brantly, M.

    1984-04-01

    The value of using heparin as a pharmacologic intervention to induce a positive scintiscan was studied in a patient with chronic occult gastrointestinal bleeding. When all standard diagnostic tests (upper and lower gastrointestinal series, upper and lower endoscopy, and conventional noninterventional Tc-99m RBC imaging) fail to detect and localize gastrointestinal bleeding in a patient who has definite clinical evidence (guaiac positive stool and dropping hemoglobin, hematocrit) of chronic occult gastrointestinal oozing, heparin may be used (with proper precaution) as a last resort to aid in the scintigraphic detection and localization of chronic occult gastrointestinal bleeding.

  19. Child and parent perceived food-induced gastrointestinal symptoms and quality of life in children with functional gastrointestinal disorders

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    It is unknown whether children with functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorders identify specific foods that exacerbate their GI symptoms. The objectives of this study were to determine the perceived role of food on GI symptoms and to determine the impact of food-induced symptoms on quality of life (...

  20. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding: gallstone-induced auto-sphincterotomy

    PubMed Central

    Kalipershad, Sujala; Chung, Kin Tong; Jehangir, Ernest

    2012-01-01

    A 67-year-old gentleman with no significant medical history of note presented with sudden onset of epigastric pain, coffee ground vomiting and passing black tarry stool. A series of investigations including blood tests, ultrasound scan, CT abdomen and pelvis with contrast and endoscopy failed to reveal any site of active bleeding. The mystery remained and the patient continued to have upper gastrointestinal bleeding. A second CT abdomen and pelvis with contrast was carried out and showed evidence of contrast extravasation into the duodenum (figure 3). An exploratory laparotomy showed no obvious site of haemorrhage and a loop jejunostomy was performed. The diagnosis of gallstone-induced auto-sphincterotomy was only made, using gastroscope via jejunostomy, when a big gallstone was found in the third part of the duodenum and the papilla was ruptured (figure 5). PMID:22914239

  1. Oral immunotherapy induces local protective mechanisms in the gastrointestinal mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Stephanie A.; Martos, Gustavo; Wang, Wei; Nowak-Węgrzyn, Anna; Berin, M. Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    Background Oral immunotherapy (OIT) is a promising treatment for food allergy. Studies are needed to elucidate mechanisms of clinical protection, and to identify safer and potentially more efficacious methods for desensitizing patients to food allergens. Objective We established a mouse model of OIT in order to determine how dose or form of antigen may affect desensitization, and to identify mechanisms of desensitization. Methods Increasing doses of egg white or ovomucoid as OIT were administered orally to sensitized mice. Impact of OIT on anaphylaxis elicited by oral allergen challenge was determined. Allergen-specific antibody and cytokine responses, and mast cell and basophil activation in response to OIT was measured. Gene expression in the small intestine was studied by microarray and real-time PCR. Results OIT resulted in desensitization but not tolerance of mice to the allergen. OIT did not result in desensitization of systemic effector cells, and protection was localized to the gastrointestinal tract. OIT was associated with significant changes in gene expression in the jejunum, including genes expressed by intestinal epithelial cells. Extensively heated ovomucoid that does not trigger anaphylaxis when given orally to sensitized mice was as efficacious as native ovomucoid in desensitizing mice. Conclusions OIT results in clinical protection against food-induced anaphylaxis through a novel mechanism that is localized to the intestinal mucosa and is associated with significant changes in small intestinal gene expression. Extensively heating egg allergen decreases allergenicity and increases safety while still retaining the ability to induce effective desensitization. PMID:22554705

  2. The sinomenine enteric-coated microspheres suppressed the TLR/NF-κB signaling in DSS-induced experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Huifang; Tian, Liang; Zhao, Zihan; Chen, Shuping; Zhao, Qiaoyun; Hong, Junbo; Xie, Yong; Zhou, Nanjin; Fu, Yingjun

    2017-09-01

    Sinomenine is a pure alkaloid with immunosuppressive effects that is extracted from the Chinese medicinal plant Sinomenium acutum. We studied the therapeutic effects of sinomenine on inflammatory bowel disease. In this study, we randomly divided mice into the following ten groups: Control group; DSS-induced colitis group; Salicylazosulfapyridine (SASP)-treated group; Chitosan-treated group; low-, medium-, and high-dose sinomenine-treated and sinomenine enteric-coated microspheres-treated groups. We recorded changes in colon length, disease activity index (DAI), and colon pathology, measured TLR4, MyD88, SIGIRR, NF-κB p65 protein levels and inflammatory serum cytokine levels. Except for the Control group, the weight of mice in each group decreased, the DAI of the DSS-induced colitis group was significantly higher than the other groups, and the DAIs of the sinomenine- and sinomenine enteric-coated microspheres-treated groups were significantly lower than that of the SASP-treated group. TLR4, MyD88, NF-κB p65 and proinflammatory cytokine expressions decreased dose dependently in the sinomenine and sinomenine enteric-coated microspheres-treated groups and were generally lower in the sinomenine enteric-coated microspheres groups. However, SIGIRR and anti-inflammatory IL-10 expressions exhibited the opposite pattern. Based on the superior therapeutic effect, sinomenine enteric-coated microspheres might regulate TLR/NF-κB signaling and would be beneficial for an effective and safe therapy of inflammatory bowel disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Systematic review: exercise-induced gastrointestinal syndrome-implications for health and intestinal disease.

    PubMed

    Costa, R J S; Snipe, R M J; Kitic, C M; Gibson, P R

    2017-08-01

    "Exercise-induced gastrointestinal syndrome" refers to disturbances of gastrointestinal integrity and function that are common features of strenuous exercise. To systematically review the literature to establish the impact of acute exercise on markers of gastrointestinal integrity and function in healthy populations and those with chronic gastrointestinal conditions. Search literature using five databases (PubMed, EBSCO, Web of Science, SPORTSdiscus, and Ovid Medline) to review publications that focused on the impact of acute exercise on markers of gastrointestinal injury, permeability, endotoxaemia, motility and malabsorption in healthy populations and populations with gastrointestinal diseases/disorders. As exercise intensity and duration increases, there is considerable evidence for increases in indices of intestinal injury, permeability and endotoxaemia, together with impairment of gastric emptying, slowing of small intestinal transit and malabsorption. The addition of heat stress and running mode appears to exacerbate these markers of gastrointestinal disturbance. Exercise stress of ≥2 hours at 60% VO2max appears to be the threshold whereby significant gastrointestinal perturbations manifest, irrespective of fitness status. Gastrointestinal symptoms, referable to upper- and lower-gastrointestinal tract, are common and a limiting factor in prolonged strenuous exercise. While there is evidence for health benefits of moderate exercise in patients with inflammatory bowel disease or functional gastrointestinal disorders, the safety of more strenuous exercise has not been established. Strenuous exercise has a major reversible impact on gastrointestinal integrity and function of healthy populations. The safety and health implications of prolonged strenuous exercise in patients with chronic gastrointestinal diseases/disorders, while hypothetically worrying, has not been elucidated and requires further investigation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Oral immunotherapy induces local protective mechanisms in the gastrointestinal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Stephanie A; Martos, Gustavo; Wang, Wei; Nowak-Węgrzyn, Anna; Berin, M Cecilia

    2012-06-01

    Oral immunotherapy (OIT) is a promising treatment for food allergy. Studies are needed to elucidate mechanisms of clinical protection and to identify safer and potentially more efficacious methods for desensitizing patients to food allergens. We established a mouse model of OIT to determine how the dose or form of antigen may affect desensitization and to identify mechanisms of desensitization. Increasing doses of egg white or ovomucoid as OIT were administered orally to sensitized mice. The impact of OIT on anaphylaxis elicited by oral allergen challenge was determined. Allergen-specific antibody and cytokine responses and mast cell and basophil activation in response to OIT were measured. Gene expression in the small intestine was studied by microarray and real-time PCR. OIT resulted in desensitization but not tolerance of mice to the allergen. OIT did not result in desensitization of systemic effector cells, and protection was localized to the gastrointestinal tract. OIT was associated with significant changes in gene expression in the jejunum, including genes expressed by intestinal epithelial cells. Extensively heated ovomucoid that does not trigger anaphylaxis when given orally to sensitized mice was as efficacious as native ovomucoid in desensitizing mice. OIT results in clinical protection against food-induced anaphylaxis through a novel mechanism that is localized to the intestinal mucosa and is associated with significant changes in small intestinal gene expression. Extensively heating egg allergen decreases allergenicity and increases safety while still retaining the ability to induce effective desensitization. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Diet and Gastrointestinal Bypass–Induced Weight Loss

    PubMed Central

    Chandarana, Keval; Gelegen, Cigdem; Karra, Efthimia; Choudhury, Agharul I.; Drew, Megan E.; Fauveau, Veronique; Viollet, Benoit; Andreelli, Fabrizio; Withers, Dominic J.; Batterham, Rachel L.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Bariatric surgery causes durable weight loss. Gut hormones are implicated in obesity pathogenesis, dietary failure, and mediating gastrointestinal bypass (GIBP) surgery weight loss. In mice, we determined the effects of diet-induced obesity (DIO), subsequent dieting, and GIBP surgery on ghrelin, peptide YY (PYY), and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). To evaluate PYY’s role in mediating weight loss post-GIBP, we undertook GIBP surgery in PyyKO mice. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Male C57BL/6 mice randomized to a high-fat diet or control diet were killed at 4-week intervals. DIO mice underwent switch to ad libitum low-fat diet (DIO-switch) or caloric restriction (CR) for 4 weeks before being killed. PyyKO mice and their DIO wild-type (WT) littermates underwent GIBP or sham surgery and were culled 10 days postoperatively. Fasting acyl-ghrelin, total PYY, active GLP-1 concentrations, stomach ghrelin expression, and colonic Pyy and glucagon expression were determined. Fasting and postprandial PYY and GLP-1 concentrations were assessed 30 days postsurgery in GIBP and sham pair-fed (sham.PF) groups. RESULTS DIO progressively reduced circulating fasting acyl-ghrelin, PYY, and GLP-1 levels. CR and DIO-switch caused weight loss but failed to restore circulating PYY to weight-appropriate levels. After GIBP, WT mice lost weight and exhibited increased circulating fasting PYY and colonic Pyy and glucagon expression. In contrast, the acute effects of GIBP on body weight were lost in PyyKO mice. Fasting PYY and postprandial PYY and GLP-1 levels were increased in GIBP mice compared with sham.PF mice. CONCLUSIONS PYY plays a key role in mediating the early weight loss observed post-GIBP, whereas relative PYY deficiency during dieting may compromise weight-loss attempts. PMID:21292870

  6. Synthesis of nanofibrous gelatin/silica bioglass composite microspheres using emulsion coupled with thermally induced phase separation.

    PubMed

    Noh, Da-Young; An, Young-Hyeon; Jo, In-Hwan; Koh, Young-Hag; Kim, Hyoun-Ee

    2016-05-01

    This study proposes an innovative way of synthesizing porous gelatin/silica bioglass composite microspheres with a nanofibrous structure using emulsion coupled with thermally induced phase separation (TIPS). In particular, a mixture of the solvent (water) and non-solvent (ethanol) was used to induce a unique phase separation of gelatin/silica mixtures (i.e. gelatin/silica hybrid-rich and liquid-rich phases) at -70 °C for the creation of a nanofibrous structure. All the composite microspheres synthesized with silica contents of 10 wt.%, 15 wt.%, and 20 wt.% had well-defined spherical shapes between 124 and 136 μm in size. In addition, they were comprised of nanofibrous gelatin/silica composite walls (several tens of nanometers in thickness), where the sol-gel derived silica bioglass phase was uniformly distributed throughout the gelatin matrix. The in vitro apatite-forming ability and biocompatibility of the nanofibrous gelatin/silica bioglass composite microspheres was significantly enhanced with an increase in silica content, demonstrating their great potential for the promotion of bone tissue regeneration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Coupling Light from a High-Q Microsphere Resonator Using a UV-induced Surface Grating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilchenko, V. S.; Starodubov, D. S.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Maleki, L.; Feinberg, J.

    2000-01-01

    High-Q microspheres with whispering-gallery modes have very narrow resonances that can be used for fiber-optic filters, ultra-compact narrow-linewidth lasers and optical/microwave oscillators. Whispering-gallery modes were previously excited in microspheres using evanescent optical fields. The necessary phase synchronism was obtained by adjusting the incident angle of input light beam (prism coupler) or adjustment of the waveguide propagation constant (fiber taper coupler). For many applications, however, bulky near-field couplers are undesirable. They compromise the symmetry and generate stray fields. Also, the control of coupling is crucial for the performance of microsphere resonators: in analogy with radio frequency circuits, the loading Q-factor should be less than the intrinsic Q-factor, Q(sub L) less than or equal to Q(sub O). Ideally one should combine a stable coupling element and a resonator into a single microsphere component.

  8. Epicutaneous immunotherapy induces gastrointestinal LAP(+) regulatory T cells and prevents food-induced anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Tordesillas, Leticia; Mondoulet, Lucie; Blazquez, Ana Belen; Benhamou, Pierre-Henri; Sampson, Hugh A; Berin, M Cecilia

    2017-01-01

    The attempt to induce oral tolerance as a treatment for food allergy has been hampered by a lack of sustained clinical protection. Immunotherapy by nonoral routes, such as the skin, may be more effective for the development of maintained tolerance to food allergens. We sought to determine the efficacy and mechanism of tolerance induced by epicutaneous immunotherapy (EPIT) in a model of food-induced anaphylaxis. C3H/HeJ mice were sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA) orally or through the skin and treated with EPIT using OVA-Viaskin patches or oral immunotherapy using OVA. Mice were orally challenged with OVA to induce anaphylaxis. Antigen-specific regulatory T (Treg)-cell induction was assessed by flow cytometry using a transgenic T-cell transfer model. By using an adjuvant-free model of food allergy generated by epicutaneous sensitization and reactions triggered by oral allergen challenge, we found that EPIT induced sustained protection against anaphylaxis. We show that the gastrointestinal tract is deficient in de novo generation of Treg cells in allergic mice. This defect was tissue-specific, and epicutaneous application of antigen generated a population of gastrointestinal-homing LAP(+)Foxp3(-) Treg cells. The mechanism of protection was found to be a novel pathway of direct TGF-β-dependent Treg-cell suppression of mast cell activation, in the absence of modulation of T- or B-cell responses. Our data highlight the immune communication between skin and gastrointestinal tract, and identifies novel mechanisms by which epicutaneous tolerance can suppress food-induced anaphylaxis. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Herbal Mixture adsorbed to Polyethylene Glycol Microspheres induces Apoptotic Effects on Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Aliny Aparecida Lopes; da Silva, Fabiana Helen; de Melo Cotrim, Aron Carlos; Deluque, Alessandra Lima; de Marchi, Patrícia Gelli Feres; Fagundes, Danny Laura Gomes; de Sousa Pereira, Claudia; França, Eduardo Luzía; Honorio-França, Adenilda Cristina

    2017-10-02

    The combination of medicinal plants and polymeric matrices raised the possibility of obtaining new drugs to treat a number of diseases, including cancer. Breast cancer is one of the most frequent diseases among women, but the effective treatments is still a challenge. Thus, this study investigated the effect of herbal mixture adsorbed to PEG microspheres on MCF-7 human breast cancer cells and these cells in co-culture of blood MN cells. The MCF-7 cells and the blood mononuclear [MN] Cells from volunteer donors. MN cells, MCF-7 cells and co-culture [MN and MCF-7 cells] were pre-incubated for 24 h with or without herbal mixture [HM], polyethylene glycol [PEG] microspheres or herbal mixture adsorbed in PEG microspheres [PEG-HM]. Viability, intracellular calcium and apoptosis were determined by flow cytometry. The herbal mixture adsorbed in PEG microspheres reduce the viability of MCF-7 cells. The lowest viability índex was observed in co-culture incubated with herbal mixture adsorbed to PEG microspheres. MN cells, MCF-7 cells and co-culture showed higher intracellular Ca2+ release when were incubated with herbal mixture adsorbed to PEG microspheres. The apoptosis index was higher in MCF-7 cells that were treated with herbal mixture. The highest apoptosis index was observed in co-culture of these cells incubated with herbal mixture adsorbed to PEG microspheres. These data suggest that herbal mixture adsorbed to PEG microspheres have apoptotic effects on human MCF-7 breast cancer cells and is therefore a possible therapeutic alternative. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  10. Efficacy of Ropinirole-Loaded PLGA Microspheres For The Reversion Of Rotenone-Induced Parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Negro, Sofía; Boeva, Liudmilla; Slowing, Karla; Fernández-Carballido, Ana; García-García, Luis; Barcia, Emilia

    2016-09-28

    A new controlled delivery system is developed for ropinirole (RP) for the treatment of Parkinson´s disease (PD) consisting in PLGA microparticles (MPs) which exhibited in vitro constant release of RP (78.23 µg/day/10 mg MPs) for 19 days. The neuroprotective effects of RP released from MPs are evaluated in SKN-AS cells after exposure to rotenone (20 μM). Cell apoptosis was significantly reduced by RP (100-120 μM). Daily doses of rotenone (2 mg/kg) given i.p. to rats induced neuronal and behavioral changes similar to those of PD. After 15 days animals received RP in saline (1 mg/kg/day for 45 days) or as MPs at two dose levels (amount of MPs equivalent to 7.5 mg/kg or 15 mg/kg RP given on days 15 and 30). Brain immunochemistry (Nissl-staining, GFAP and TH immunohistochemistry) and behavioral testing (catalepsy, akinesia, rotarod and swim test) showed that animals receiving RP either in solution or encapsulated within MPs reverted PD symptoms with the best results obtained in animals receiving RP microspheres at the highest dose assayed, thereby confirming the potential therapeutic interest of the new RP delivery system.

  11. Radiation microsphere-induced GI ulcers after selective internal radiation therapy for hepatic tumors: an underrecognized clinical entity.

    PubMed

    Konda, Amulya; Savin, Michael A; Cappell, Mitchell S; Duffy, Michael C

    2009-09-01

    Intra-arterial infusion of yttrium-90 (Y-90) microspheres is locoregional radiation therapy for unresectable hepatic neoplasms. Literature on GI complications of this novel therapy is sparse. Clinically and pictorially characterize selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT)-induced GI injury and review the published literature. Retrospective chart analysis. Single-center tertiary referral community hospital. One hundred three patients treated with SIRT for hepatic neoplasms between 2006 and 2008. SIRT for unresectable hepatic neoplasms followed by upper endoscopy with biopsy in symptomatic patients. GI ulcers after SIRT. Five patients with suspected GI injury after SIRT were identified. Significant postprocedural symptoms included nausea/vomiting, odynophagia, hematemesis, and melena. Radiation ulcers occurred mostly in the gastric antrum, pylorus, and duodenum. Biopsy specimens of ulcer margins in 4 patients showed pathognomonic radiation microspheres. Angiographic review of the fifth patient revealed a previously unrecognized arterial branch supplying the corresponding region of GI ulceration noted on endoscopy. Small retrospective study and follow-up limited by terminal disease states in most patients. The reported incidence of GI complications after SIRT for hepatic neoplasia varies from 3% to 24% of patients. Incidence can be minimized by strict adherence to published SIRT protocols. Diagnosis requires a high degree of clinical suspicion along with endoscopy and biopsy of ulcer margins. Characteristic radiation microspheres in biopsy specimens are pathognomonic. Gastroenterologists and pathologists must be cognizant of this complication.

  12. Polycation-decorated PLA microspheres induce robust immune responses via commonly used parenteral administration routes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoming; Wang, Lianyan; Liu, Qi; Jia, Jilei; Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Weifeng; Ma, Guanghui; Su, Zhiguo

    2014-12-01

    Recombinant viral subunit-based vaccines have gained increasing attention due to their enhanced safety over the classic live-attenuated or inactivated vaccines. The low immunogenicity of the subunit antigen alone, however, requires the addition of an adjuvant to induce immunity. Particulate-based delivery systems have great potential for developing new vaccine adjuvants, compared to traditional aluminum-based saline adjuvants. The physicochemical properties of particulate vaccines have been extensively investigated; however, few studies have focused on how the administration route of various adjuvant-antigen combinations impacts the efficacy of the immune response. Here, for the first time, the viral Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) was combined with aluminum-based or cationic-microsphere (MP) based adjuvants to investigate the characteristics of immune responses elicited after immunization via the subcutaneous, intramuscular, or intraperitoneal routes respectively. In vitro, the MP-based vaccine significantly increased dendritic cell (DC) activation with up-regulated CD40 and CD80 expression and IL-12 production compared to alum-based vaccine. After immunization, both MP and alum-based vaccines produced increased IgG titers in mice. The administration route of these vaccines did influenced immune responses. The MP-based vaccine delivered via the intramuscular route yielded the highest levels of the IgG2a isotype. The alum-based vaccine, delivered via the same route, produced an IgG1-dominated humoral immune response. Moreover, subcutaneous and intramuscular immunizations with MP-based vaccine augmented Granzyme B, Th1-type cytokines (IL-2, IL-12, and IFN-γ), and Th2 cytokine IL-4 secretions. These results demonstrate that MP-based vaccines have the capacity to induce higher cellular and humoral immune response especially via an intramuscular administration route than an alum-based vaccine.

  13. Controlled Release of Interleukin-1 Receptor Antagonist from Hyaluronic Acid-Chitosan Microspheres Attenuates Interleukin-1β-Induced Inflammation and Apoptosis in Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Bo; Gong, Ming; He, Qi-Ting

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the protective effect of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) released from hyaluronic acid chitosan (HA-CS) microspheres in a controlled manner on IL-1β-induced inflammation and apoptosis in chondrocytes. The IL-1Ra release kinetics was characterized by an initial burst release, which was reduced to a linear release over eight days. Chondrocytes were stimulated with 10 ng/ml IL-1β and subsequently incubated with HA-CS-IL-1Ra microspheres. The cell viability was decreased by IL-1β, which was attenuated by HA-CS-IL-1Ra microspheres as indicated by an MTT assay. ELISA showed that HA-CS-IL-1Ra microspheres inhibited IL-1β-induced inflammation by attenuating increases in NO2− and prostaglandin E2 levels as well as increase in glycosaminoglycan release. A terminal deoxyribonucleotide transferase deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling assay revealed that the IL-1β-induced chondrocyte apoptosis was decreased by HA-CS-IL-1Ra microspheres. Moreover, HA-CS-IL-1Ra microspheres blocked IL-1β-induced chondrocyte apoptosis by increasing B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and decreasing Bcl-2-associated X protein and caspase-3 expressions at mRNA and protein levels, as indicated by reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis, respectively. The results of the present study indicated that HA-CS-IL-1Ra microspheres as a controlled release system of IL-1Ra possess potential anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic properties in rat chondrocytes due to their ability to regulate inflammatory factors and apoptosis associated genes. PMID:27872853

  14. Differential shrinkage induced formation of yolk-shell carbon microspheres toward enhanced microwave absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Chunhua; Du, Yunchen; Xu, Haiyan; Xue, Jianlei; Chu, Wenlei; Qiang, Rong; Han, Xijiang; Xu, Ping

    2017-09-01

    Rational design of the microstructure paves new ways for microwave absorbing materials because it can create more facilities for the attenuation of incident electromagnetic waves. In this study, a simple method is proposed to prepare yolk-shell carbon microspheres through differential shrinkage in the internal cores and external shells of polypyrrole microspheres with the assistance of outermost SiO2 coating. This method simplifies the preparation procedures and avoids strictly controlled conditions. The electromagnetic parameters, such as relative complex permittivity and permeability, of the as-prepared yolk-shell carbon microspheres, are investigated in the frequency range of 2.0-18.0 GHz. Compared with solid carbon microspheres, yolk-shell carbon microspheres exhibit significantly enhanced microwave absorption properties in terms of both the reflection loss intensity and absorption bandwidth. The minimum reflection loss value can reach up to -27.5 dB at 8.32 GHz with an absorber thickness of 2.96 mm. The absorption bandwidth over -10.0 dB is in the range of 11.3-16.2 GHz at the typical thickness of 2.0 mm. The enhanced microwave absorption properties may be attributed to the good attenuation ability and well matched characteristic impedance. This work not only provides a promising candidate for microwave absorption, but also provides an attractive strategy to prepare various yolk-shell composites.

  15. Screening and identification of proteins mediating senna induced gastrointestinal motility enhancement in mouse colon

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Zhong, Yue-Xia; Lan, Mei; Zhang, Zong-You; Shi, Yong-Quan; Lu, Ju; Ding, Jie; Wu, Kai-Cun; Jin, Jian-Ping; Pan, Bo-Rong; Fan, Dai Min

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To isolate the proteins involved in pharmacologic action of senna extract (SE) from mouse gastrointestinal tract and to explore the molecular mechanism of gastrointestinal motility change induced by SE. METHODS: SE was administrated to mice by different routes. Gastrointestinal motility of mice was observed using cathartic, gastrointestinal propellant movement experiments and X-ray analysis. Mouse model for gastrointestinal motility enhancement was established through continuous gastric administration of SE at progressively increased dose. At 3 h and week 3, 4, 6 and 10, morphological changes of gastrointestinal tissues were found under light microscope. Ultrastructural changes of intestinal and colonic tissues at week 6 were observed under transmission electron microscope. The colonic proteomic changes in model mice were examined by two-dimension polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with immobilized pH gradient isoelectric focusing to screen the differentially expressed proteins, and their molecular masses and isoelectric points were determined. Two N-terminal sequences of the samples were also determined by mass spectrometry. RESULTS: SE (0.3 g) caused diarrhea after gastric administration in 1-6 h and enhanced gastrointestinal propellant (65.1% ± 7.5%; 45.8% ± 14.6%,P < 0.01) in mice, but intramuscular and hypodermic injection had no cathartic effect. X-ray analysis of gastrointestinal motility demonstrated that gastric administration of SE enhanced gastric evacuation and gastrointestinal transferring function. At 3 h and week 3 and 4 after gastric administration of SE, light microscopic examination revealed no apparent change in gastrointestinal mucosal tissues, but transmission electron microscopic examination revealed inflammatory changes in whole layer of intestinal and colonic wall. Twenty differential proteins were detected in the colonic tissues of the model mice by two-dimensional electrophoresis, and the N-terminal amino acid sequences of two

  16. Gastrointestinal infectious disease complications following transplantation and their differentiation from immunosuppressant-induced gastrointestinal toxicities.

    PubMed

    Rubin, R H

    2001-01-01

    It is often very difficult to distinguish between infection-related and immunosuppression-related gastrointestinal (GI) complications after transplantation. The risk of infection itself is determined by the patient's net state of immunosuppression as well as the presence of anatomic or technical abnormalities and the patient's epidemiological exposures. Of the anatomic abnormalities, diverticulitis is a particular problem in transplant patients, with a high rate of perforation and abscess formation. The causes of infectious disease syndromes are very different immediately after, early after, and late after transplantation. Infection during the first month may result from a pre-existing infection in the donor or recipient, or from the surgical wound, endotracheal tube, vascular access or drainage. During 1-6 months after transplantation, viruses attack and, with sustained immunosuppression, make opportunistic infections possible. Beyond 6 months after transplantation, the 80% of patients with good result from the transplant are at risk primarily for community-acquired microbes, including such enteric pathogens as Salmonella. Of the remaining patients, 10% have chronic viral infections and the 10% who have poor allograft function are at greatest risk for opportunistic infection. This time line is helpful in determining whether a GI complication is likely to be related to infection rather than a specific effect of an immunosuppressant drug. Fever, inflammatory cells in the stool, abnormalities on endoscopy or computed tomography and leukocytosis can be useful in the diagnosis but are inconsistent markers for an infectious cause.

  17. Child and Parent Perceived Food-Induced Gastrointestinal Symptoms and Quality of Life in Children with Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Michelle J.; Moore, Carolyn E.; Tsai, Cynthia M.; Shulman, Robert J.; Chumpitazi, Bruno P.

    2014-01-01

    It is unknown whether children with functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) identify specific foods that exacerbate their gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms. The objectives of this study were to determine the perceived role of food on GI symptoms and to determine the impact of food-induced symptoms on quality of life (QOL) in children with FGIDs. Between August and November 2010, 25 children ages 11–17 years old with FGIDs and a parent completed a food symptom association questionnaire and validated questionnaires assessing FGID symptoms and QOL. In addition, children completed a 24-hour food recall, participated in focus groups to identify problematic foods and any coping strategies, and discussed how their QOL was affected. Statistical analyses were conducted using chi-squared, t-testing, Mann-Whitney U, Wilcoxon signed-rank, and Spearman’s rho. Children identified a median of 11 (range 2–25) foods as exacerbating a GI symptom, with the most commonly identified foods being spicy foods, cow’s milk, and pizza. Several coping strategies were identified including consuming smaller portions, modifying foods, and avoiding a median of 8 (range 1–20) foods. Children reported that food-induced symptoms interfered with school performance, sports, and social activities. Although the parent’s assessment of their child’s QOL negatively correlated with the number of perceived symptom-inducing foods in their child, this relationship was not found in the children. Findings suggest that specific foods are perceived to exacerbate GI symptoms in children with FGIDs. Moreover, despite use of several coping strategies, food-induced symptoms may adversely impact children’s QOL in several important areas. PMID:24360501

  18. Ibuprofen-loaded porous microspheres suppressed the progression of monosodium iodoacetate-induced osteoarthritis in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Park, Jang Won; Yun, Young-Pil; Park, Kyeongsoon; Lee, Jae Yong; Kim, Hak-Jun; Kim, Sung Eun; Song, Hae-Ryong

    2016-11-01

    The objectives of this study were (1) to fabricate ibuprofen-loaded porous microspheres (IBU/PMSs), (2) to evaluate the in vitro anti-inflammatory effects of the microspheres using LPS-induced inflammation in cultured synoviocytes, and (3) to evaluate the in vivo effect of the IBU/PMSs on the progression of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA)-induced osteoarthritis (OA) in a rat model. A dose-dependent in vitro anti-inflammatory effect on pro-inflammatory cytokine markers (matrix metallopeptidase-3 (MMP-3), matrix metallopeptidase-13 (MMP-13), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs-5 (ADAMTS-5)), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) was observed by confirming with real-time PCR analyses. In vivo, treatment with IBU/PMSs reduced MIA-stimulated mRNA expression of MMP-3, MMP-13, COX-2, ADAMTS-5, IL-6, and TNF-α in rat synoviocytes. In addition, we demonstrated that intra-articular IBU/PMSs suppressed the progression of MIA-induced OA in the rat model via anti-inflammatory mechanisms. In conclusion, IBU/PMSs are a promising therapeutic material to control the pain and progression of OA.

  19. Defect induced nickel, nitrogen-codoped mesoporous TiO2 microspheres with enhanced visible light photocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Mingming; Feng, Lu; Ganeshraja, Ayyakannu Sundaram; Xiong, Fengqiang; Yang, Minghui

    2016-10-01

    Nickel, nitrogen-codoped mesoporous TiO2 microspheres (Ni-N-TiO2) with high surface area, and an effective direct band gap energy of ∼2.58 eV. Nickel sulfate used as the Ni source and ammonia gas as the N source here. The efficiency of the as-prepared samples was investigated by monitoring the degradation of Rhodamine B under visible light irradiation. The experimental results indicate that Ni-doped mesoporous TiO2 microspheres show higher photocatalytic activity than mesoporous TiO2 microspheres under visible light irradiation. It mainly due to that the electron trap level (Ni2+/Ni+) promoting the separation of charge carriers and the oxygen vacancies inducing the visible light absorption. In addition, Ni-N-TiO2 shows enhanced activity compared with Ni-TiO2. Codopants and dopants are found to be uniformly distributed in TiO2 matrix. Among the all samples the 0.5% molar quantity of Ni dopant and 500 °C 2 h nitriding condition gives the highest photocatalytic activity. The treatment of ammonia gas on Ni-TiO2 sample induced oxygen vancancies, substitutional and interstitial N. A suitable treatment by ammonia gas also promote separation of charge carriers and the absorption of visible light. The active species generated in the photocatalytic system were also investigated. The strategy presented here gives a promising route towards the development of a metal and non-metal codoped semiconductor materials for applied photocatalysis and related applications.

  20. Carbohydrate-Dependent, Exercise-Induced Gastrointestinal Distress

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Erick Prado; Burini, Roberto C.

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) problems are a common concern of athletes during intense exercise. Ultimately, these symptoms can impair performance and possibly prevent athletes from winning or even finishing a race. The main causes of GI problems during exercise are mechanical, ischemic and nutritional factors. Among the nutritional factors, a high intake of carbohydrate and hyperosmolar solutions increases GI problems. A number of nutritional manipulations have been proposed to minimize gastrointestinal symptoms, including the use of multiple transportable carbohydrates. This type of CHO intake increases the oxidation rates and can prevent the accumulation of carbohydrate in the intestine. Glucose (6%) or glucose plus fructose (8%–10%) beverages are recommended in order to increase CHO intake while avoiding the gastric emptying delay. Training the gut with high intake of CHO may increase absorption capacity and probably prevent GI distress. CHO mouth rinse may be a good strategy to enhance performance without using GI tract in exercises lasting less than an hour. Future strategies should be investigated comparing different CHO types, doses, and concentration in exercises with the same characteristics. PMID:25314645

  1. Gastrointestinal Hormones and Bariatric Surgery-induced Weight Loss

    PubMed Central

    Ionut, Viorica; Burch, Miguel; Youdim, Adrienne; Bergman, Richard N.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity continues to be a major public health problem in the United States and worldwide. While recent statistics have demonstrated that obesity rates have begun to plateau, more severe classes of obesity are accelerating at a faster pace with important implications in regards to treatment. Bariatric surgery has a profound and durable effect on weight loss, being to date one of the most successful interventions for obesity. Objective To provide updates to the possible role of gut hormones in post bariatric surgery weight loss and weight loss maintenance. Design and Methods The current review examines the changes in gastro-intestinal hormones with bariatric surgery and the potential mechanisms by which these changes could result in decreased weight and adiposity. Results The mechanism by which bariatric surgery results in body weight changes is incompletely elucidated, but it clearly goes beyond caloric restriction and malabsorption. Conclusion Changes in gastro-intestinal hormones, including increases in GLP-1, PYY, and oxyntomodulin, decreases in GIP and ghrelin, or the combined action of all these hormones might play a role in induction and long-term maintenance of weight loss. PMID:23512841

  2. Polyacrolein microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    Microspheres of acrolein homopolymers and copolymer with hydrophillic comonomers such as methacrylic acid and/or hydroxyethylmethacrylate are prepared by cobalt gamma irradiation of dilute aqueous solutions of the monomers in presence of suspending agents, especially alkyl sulfates such as sodium dodecyl sulfate. Amine or hydroxyl modification is achieved by forming adducts with diamines or alkanol amines. Carboxyl modification is effected by oxidation with peroxides. Pharmaceuticals or other aldehyde reactive materials can be coupled to the microspheres. The microspheres directly form antibody adducts without agglomeration.

  3. Polyacrolein microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Microspheres of acrolein homopolymers and copolymer with hydrophillic comonomers such as methacrylic acid and/or hydroxyethylmethacrylate are prepared by cobalt gamma irradiation of dilute aqueous solutions of the monomers in presence of suspending agents, especially alkyl sulfates such as sodium dodecyl sulfate. Amine or hydroxyl modification is achieved by forming adducts with diamines or alkanol amines. Carboxyl modification is effected by oxidation with peroxides. Pharmaceuticals or other aldehyde reactive materials can be coupled to the microspheres. The microspheres directly form antibody adducts without agglomeration.

  4. Polyacrolein microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    Microspheres of acrolein homopolymers and co-polymer with hydrophillic comonomers such as methacrylic acid and/or hydroxyethylmethacrylate are prepared by cobalt gamma irradiation of dilute aqueous solutions of the monomers in presence of suspending agents, especially alkyl sulfates such as sodium dodecyl sulfate. Amine or hydroxyl modification is achieved by forming adducts with diamines or alkanol amines. Carboxyl modification is effected by oxidation with peroxides. Pharmaceuticals or other aldehyde reactive materials can be coupled to the microspheres. The microspheres directly form antibody adducts without agglomeration.

  5. Pili in Microspheres Protect Rabbits From Diarrhoea Induced by E. Coli Strain RDEC-1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    antigens during passage through the gastro- MATERIALS AND METHODS Bacteria *Parts of these data were presented during Digestive Disease Nalidixic acid ...probably by interfering with adherence of the bacteria to the intestinal mucosa. The interference might have been due to the presence of specific...model. The RDEC-I adhesin, AF/RJ, incorporated lo w into poy’(D,L- lactide -co-glycolide) microspheres, was administered intraduodenally. Vac- cinated and

  6. Involvement of Cannabinoid Signaling in Vincristine-Induced Gastrointestinal Dysmotility in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Vera, Gema; López-Pérez, Ana E.; Uranga, José A.; Girón, Rocío; Martín-Fontelles, Ma Isabel; Abalo, Raquel

    2017-01-01

    Background: In different models of paralytic ileus, cannabinoid receptors are overexpressed and endogenous cannabinoids are massively released, contributing to gastrointestinal dysmotility. The antitumoral drug vincristine depresses gastrointestinal motility and a similar mechanism could participate in this effect. Therefore, our aim was to determine, using CB1 and CB2 antagonists, whether an increased endocannabinoid tone is involved in vincristine-induced gastrointestinal ileus. Methods: First, we confirmed the effects of vincristine on the gut mucosa, by conventional histological techniques, and characterized its effects on motility, by radiographic means. Conscious male Wistar rats received an intraperitoneal injection of vincristine (0.1–0.5 mg/kg), and barium sulfate (2.5 ml; 2 g/ml) was intragastrically administered 0, 24, or 48 h later. Serial X-rays were obtained at different time-points (0–8 h) after contrast. X-rays were used to build motility curves for each gastrointestinal region and determine the size of stomach and caecum. Tissue samples were taken for histology 48 h after saline or vincristine (0.5 mg/kg). Second, AM251 (a CB1 receptor antagonist) and AM630 (a CB2 receptor antagonist) were used to determine if CB1 and/or CB2 receptors are involved in vincristine-induced gastrointestinal dysmotility. Key results: Vincristine induced damage to the mucosa of ileum and colon and reduced gastrointestinal motor function at 0.5 mg/kg. The effect on motor function was particularly evident when the study started 24 h after administration. AM251, but not AM630, significantly prevented vincristine effect, particularly in the small intestine, when administered thrice. AM251 alone did not significantly alter gastrointestinal motility. Conclusions: The fact that AM251, but not AM630, is capable of reducing the effect of vincristine suggests that, like in other experimental models of paralytic ileus, an increased cannabinoid tone develops and is at least

  7. Involvement of Cannabinoid Signaling in Vincristine-Induced Gastrointestinal Dysmotility in the Rat.

    PubMed

    Vera, Gema; López-Pérez, Ana E; Uranga, José A; Girón, Rocío; Martín-Fontelles, Ma Isabel; Abalo, Raquel

    2017-01-01

    Background: In different models of paralytic ileus, cannabinoid receptors are overexpressed and endogenous cannabinoids are massively released, contributing to gastrointestinal dysmotility. The antitumoral drug vincristine depresses gastrointestinal motility and a similar mechanism could participate in this effect. Therefore, our aim was to determine, using CB1 and CB2 antagonists, whether an increased endocannabinoid tone is involved in vincristine-induced gastrointestinal ileus. Methods: First, we confirmed the effects of vincristine on the gut mucosa, by conventional histological techniques, and characterized its effects on motility, by radiographic means. Conscious male Wistar rats received an intraperitoneal injection of vincristine (0.1-0.5 mg/kg), and barium sulfate (2.5 ml; 2 g/ml) was intragastrically administered 0, 24, or 48 h later. Serial X-rays were obtained at different time-points (0-8 h) after contrast. X-rays were used to build motility curves for each gastrointestinal region and determine the size of stomach and caecum. Tissue samples were taken for histology 48 h after saline or vincristine (0.5 mg/kg). Second, AM251 (a CB1 receptor antagonist) and AM630 (a CB2 receptor antagonist) were used to determine if CB1 and/or CB2 receptors are involved in vincristine-induced gastrointestinal dysmotility. Key results: Vincristine induced damage to the mucosa of ileum and colon and reduced gastrointestinal motor function at 0.5 mg/kg. The effect on motor function was particularly evident when the study started 24 h after administration. AM251, but not AM630, significantly prevented vincristine effect, particularly in the small intestine, when administered thrice. AM251 alone did not significantly alter gastrointestinal motility. Conclusions: The fact that AM251, but not AM630, is capable of reducing the effect of vincristine suggests that, like in other experimental models of paralytic ileus, an increased cannabinoid tone develops and is at least

  8. Acid sphingomyelinase deficiency protects from cisplatin-induced gastrointestinal damage.

    PubMed

    Rebillard, A; Rioux-Leclercq, N; Muller, C; Bellaud, P; Jouan, F; Meurette, O; Jouan, E; Vernhet, L; Le Quément, C; Carpinteiro, A; Schenck, M; Lagadic-Gossmann, D; Gulbins, E; Dimanche-Boitrel, M T

    2008-11-20

    Cisplatin is one of the most effectively used chemotherapeutic agents for cancer treatment. However, in humans, important cytotoxic side effects are observed including dose-limiting renal damage and profound gastrointestinal symptomatology. The toxic responses to cisplatin in mice are similar to those in human patients. Here, we evaluated whether the acid sphingomyelinase (Asm) mediates at least some of the toxic in vivo effects of cisplatin. To this end, we determined the toxic effects of a single intraperitoneal dose of cisplatin (27 mg/kg) in wild type (Asm(+/+)) and Asm-deficient mice (Asm(-/-)). Tissue injury and apoptosis were determined histologically on hematoxylin-eosin and TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated nick end labeling) stainings 3, 12, 36 and 72 h after treatment. Our results revealed severe toxicity of cisplatin in Asm(+/+) mice with increased numbers of apoptotic cells in the thymus and small intestine. In marked contrast, Asm(-/-) mice were resistant to cisplatin and no apoptosis was observed in these organs after treatment. Moreover, cisplatin treatment primarily triggered apoptosis of endothelial cells in microvessels of intestine and thymus, an effect that was absent in mice lacking Asm. The data thus suggest that at least some toxic effects of cisplatin are mediated by the Asm in vivo resulting in early death of endothelial cells and consecutive organ damage.

  9. Nabumetone induces less gastrointestinal mucosal changes than diclofenac retard.

    PubMed

    Becvár, R; Urbanová, Z; Vlasáková, V; Vítová, J; Rybár, I; Maldyk, H; Filipowicz-Sosnowska, A; Bernacka, K; Mackiewicz, S; Gömör, B; Rojkovich, B; Siro, B; Bereczki, J; Toth, K; Sukenik, S; Green, L; Ehrenfeld, M; Pavelka, K

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the efficacy and the effects on the mucosa of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of nabumetone and diclofenac retard in patients with osteoarthritis (OA). An open, multicentre, randomised, comparative, endoscopy-blind parallel group study included 201 patients with nabumetone and 193 patients with diclofenac retard suffering from moderate to severe OA of the knee or hip joint. Twelve clinical efficacy variables were assessed and a portion of the population underwent gastroduodenoscopy. All patients exhibited significant improvement in pain severity and pain relief (p < 0.001 and p < 0.0001, respectively) but there were no differences between the groups for all the efficacy variables. Eleven per cent of patients on nabumetone and 19% on diclofenac experienced GIT side-effects. Sixty-nine patients with nabumetone and 61 with diclofenac underwent gastroduodenoscopy. The differences in the mucosal grade for the oesophagus, stomach and duodenum at baseline were not significant. In the oesophagus there were significantly less changes after treatment with nabumetone (p = 0.007) than with diclofenac; there were similar findings in the stomach (p < 0.001) but the difference in the duodenum was not significant. This study indicates that nabumetone and diclofenac retard have similar efficacy in the treatment of OA, but nabumetone has significantly fewer GIT side-effects.

  10. Food-dependent, exercise-induced gastrointestinal distress

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Among athletes strenuous exercise, dehydration and gastric emptying (GE) delay are the main causes of gastrointestinal (GI) complaints, whereas gut ischemia is the main cause of their nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain and (blood) diarrhea. Additionally any factor that limits sweat evaporation, such as a hot and humid environment and/or body dehydration, has profound effects on muscle glycogen depletion and risk for heat illness. A serious underperfusion of the gut often leads to mucosal damage and enhanced permeability so as to hide blood loss, microbiota invasion (or endotoxemia) and food-born allergen absorption (with anaphylaxis). The goal of exercise rehydration is to intake more fluid orally than what is being lost in sweat. Sports drinks provide the addition of sodium and carbohydrates to assist with intestinal absorption of water and muscle-glycogen replenishment, respectively. However GE is proportionally slowed by carbohydrate-rich (hyperosmolar) solutions. On the other hand, in order to prevent hyponatremia, avoiding overhydration is recommended. Caregiver's responsibility would be to inform athletes about potential dangers of drinking too much water and also advise them to refrain from using hypertonic fluid replacements. PMID:21955383

  11. Child and parent perceived food-induced gastrointestinal symptoms and quality of life in children with functional gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Michelle J; Moore, Carolyn E; Tsai, Cynthia M; Shulman, Robert J; Chumpitazi, Bruno P

    2014-03-01

    It is unknown whether children with functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorders identify specific foods that exacerbate their GI symptoms. The objectives of this study were to determine the perceived role of food on GI symptoms and to determine the impact of food-induced symptoms on quality of life (QOL) in children with functional GI disorders. Between August and November 2010, 25 children ages 11 to 17 years old with functional GI disorders and a parent completed a food symptom association questionnaire and validated questionnaires assessing FGID symptoms and QOL. In addition, children completed a 24-hour food recall, participated in focus groups to identify problematic foods and any coping strategies, and discussed how their QOL was affected. Statistical analyses were conducted using χ2, t test, Mann-Whitney U test, Wilcoxon signed rank, and Spearman's ρ. Children identified a median of 11 (range=2 to 25) foods as exacerbating a GI symptom, with the most commonly identified foods being spicy foods, cow's milk, and pizza. Several coping strategies were identified, including consuming smaller portions, modifying foods, and avoiding a median of 8 (range=1 to 20) foods. Children reported that food-induced symptoms interfered with school performance, sports, and social activities. Although the parent's assessment of their child's QOL negatively correlated with the number of perceived symptom-inducing foods in their child, this relationship was not found in the children. Findings suggest that specific foods are perceived to exacerbate GI symptoms in children with functional GI disorders. In addition, despite use of several coping strategies, food-induced symptoms can adversely impact children's QOL in several important areas.

  12. Scutellaria baicalensis and a constituent flavonoid, baicalein, attenuate ritonavir-induced gastrointestinal side-effects

    PubMed Central

    Mehendale, Sangeeta; Aung, Han; Wang, Chong-Zhi; Tong, Robin; Foo, Adela; Xie, Jing-Tian; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2009-01-01

    Ritonavir, a protease inhibitor drug, is commonly used in AIDS therapy. As with other chemotherapeutic drugs that cause gastrointestinal adverse effects, ritonavir treatment is associated with significant nausea and vomiting. This study investigated whether Scutellaria baicalensis, and its active flavonoid constituent, baicalein, attenuate the gastrointestinal effects of ritonavir. The effects of herb administration were evaluated in ritonavir-treated rats using a rat pica model, which simulates nausea and vomiting in humans. The effects of herb administration on gastric emptying in rats were also measured. Ritonavir treatment resulted in increased kaolin intake or severe pica, the intensity of which was reduced significantly with S. baicalensis administration (1 mg kg−1; P < 0.05). High-performance liquid chromatography analysis of S. baicalensis showed the presence of an extremely potent flavonoid constituent, baicalein. The study aimed to determine if baicalein contributed to the anti-pica effect of the extract. It was observed that baicalein dose-dependently decreased pica in ritonavir-treated rats (P < 0.001). In addition to inducing pica, ritonavir also significantly delayed gastric emptying, which could contribute to ritonavir-induced gastrointestinal dysfunction. When S. baicalensis extract was administered to ritonavir-treated rats the delayed gastric emptying was significantly attenuated (P < 0.05). The results suggest that S. baicalensis and the constituent baicalein reduce the gastrointestinal dysfunction caused by ritonavir. It is concluded that S. baicalensis may potentially have a role to play in reducing drug-induced adverse effects. PMID:17976269

  13. Antiobese effects of capsaicin-chitosan microsphere (CCMS) in obese rats induced by high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Tan, Sirong; Gao, Bing; Tao, Yi; Guo, Jiao; Su, Zheng-quan

    2014-02-26

    Chitosan (CTS) and capsaicin (CAP) are two kinds of effective ingredients for antiobesity, which are extracted from crab shells and Capsicum annuum. However, the strong taste of CAP makes it difficult to consume, and the antiobesity ability of CTS is limited. In this study, we prepared capsaicin-chitosan microspheres (CCMSs) by ion-cross-linking and spray drying and examined the antiobesity ability of CCMSs in obese rats. The effects of CCMSs on body weight, Lee's index, body fat, and serum lipids were investigated. The mRNA expression of PPARα, PPARγ, leptin, UCP2, GPR120, FTO, and adiponectin in the liver was determined by quantitative real-time PCR, and the protein expression of adiponectin, leptin, PPARα, UCP2, and hepatic lipase in serum was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. CCMSs were prepared with 85.17% entrapment efficiency and 8.87% mean drug loading. Compared with chitosan microspheres, CAP, and Orlistat, the CCMSs showed better ability to control body weight, body mass index, organ index, body fat, proportion of fat to body weight, and serum lipids. The CCMSs upregulated the expressions of PPARα, PPARγ, UCP2, and adiponectin and downregulated the expression of leptin. CCMSs may thus be considered novel, safe, effective, and natural weight loss substances, and there is an additive effect between CTMS and capsaicin.

  14. Life-threatening clozapine-induced gastrointestinal hypomotility: an analysis of 102 cases.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Susanna E; McLean, Rachael M; Ellis, Peter M; Harrison-Woolrych, Mira

    2008-05-01

    To raise awareness of potentially lethal clozapine-induced gastrointestinal hypomotility (CIGH) by reviewing cases from the literature and unpublished pharmacovigilance data and to offer strategies aimed at prevention and early treatment. Databases (PsycINFO, 1967-2007; MEDLINE, 1950-2007; and EMBASE, 1988-2007) were searched using the term clozapine together with each of the following: gastrointestinal, dysmotility, constipation, obstipation, fecal impaction, fecaloma, paralytic ileus, adynamic ileus, subileus, ischemic colitis, colon ischemia, bowel ischemia, gastrointestinal ischemia, gut ischemia, obstruction, necrosis, gangrene, bowel perforation, micro-perforation, megacolon, toxic megacolon, acquired megacolon, pseudo-obstruction, Ogilvie, and Ogilvie's syndrome. We analyzed the electronic database entries held by the Adverse Drug Reactions Advisory Committee and the New Zealand Intensive Medicines Monitoring Program, which cited suspected clozapine-related gastrointestinal side effects, as well as all relevant published case reports. We reviewed the literature on the treatment of gastrointestinal hypomotility and constipation. We compiled a database of 102 cases of suspected life-threatening CIGH. There was a mortality rate of 27.5% and considerable morbidity, largely due to bowel resection. Within Australasia, at least 15 patients have died of CIGH. Probable risk factors are identified as recent instigation of clozapine, high clozapine dose or serum level, concomitant anticholinergic use, or intercurrent illness. The paucity of literature on CIGH suggests that the significance of this uncommon but important and frequently fatal side effect has not been recognized. Clozapine can affect the entire gastrointestinal system, from esophagus to rectum, and may cause bowel obstruction, ischemia, perforation, and aspiration. The mechanism is likely to be anticholinergic and antiserotonergic. Clozapine prescribing should be accompanied by regular physical monitoring

  15. Effects of analgecine on oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity in patients with gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meng-Yan; Huang, Xin-En

    2015-01-01

    As the third generation of platinum-based antineoplastic agent aginst gastrointestinal cancer, oxaliplatin is considered to be associated with severe sensory neurotoxicity. Acorrding to previous studies, vitaminE, intravenous Ca/Mg and glutamine may partly reduce the incidence and severity of oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity. The aim of this study was to investigate the safety and efficacy of analgecine for preventing oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity in the patients with gastrointestinal tumors. In this study, patients undergoing oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy were assigned to analgecine (experimental) group or control group. Analgecine 6ml was administered once a day for seven days from the day of oxaliplatin treatment. The National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (NCI CTCAE; version 3) was used to evaluate oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity. The incidence rates and grade of neurotoxicity of patients were assessed before and during (after four and eight cycles) treatment. Totally, 82 patients were enrolled in this study, 42 in experimental group and 40 in control group. The occurrence of each grade neurotoxicity in the experimental group was significantly lower than that in control group. The overall occurrence rate was 31% vs 55% (P=0.043) after 4 cycles and 52% vs 75% (P=0.050) after 8 cycles. Analgecine appears could be effective in reducing oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity and be applicated for patients with gastrointestinal tumors who would be treated with oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy.

  16. Alginate microspheres encapsulated with autoclaved Leishmania major (ALM) and CpG-ODN induced partial protection and enhanced immune response against murine model of leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Tafaghodi, Mohsen; Eskandari, Maryam; Khamesipour, Ali; Jaafari, Mahmoud R

    2011-10-01

    A suitable adjuvant and delivery system are needed to enhance efficacy of vaccines against leishmaniasis. In this study, alginate microspheres as an antigen delivery system and CpG-ODN as an immunoadjuvant were used to enhance immune response and induce protection against an experimental autoclaved Leishmania major (ALM) vaccine. Alginate microspheres were prepared by an emulsification technique and the characteristics of the preparation such as size, encapsulation efficiency and release profile of encapsulates were studied. Mean diameter of microspheres was determined using SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy) and particle size analyzer. The encapsulation efficiency was determined using Lowry protein assay method. The integrity of ALM antigens was assessed using SDS-PAGE. Mean diameter of microspheres was 1.8±1.0μm. BALB/c mice were immunized three times in 3-weeks intervals with ALM+CpG-ODN loaded microspheres [(ALM+CpG)(ALG)], ALM encapsulated alginate microspheres [(ALM)(ALG)], (ALM)(ALG)+CpG, ALM+CpG, ALM alone or PBS. The intensity of infection induced by L. major challenge was assessed by measuring size of footpad swelling. The strongest protection was observed in group of mice immunized with (ALM+CpG)(ALG). The groups of mice received (ALM+CpG)(ALG), (ALM)(ALG)+CpG, (ALM)(ALG) and ALM+CpG were also showed a significantly (P<0.05) smaller footpad swelling compared with the group that received either ALM alone or PBS. The mice immunized with (ALM+CpG)(ALG) or ALM+CpG showed the significantly (P<0.05) highest IgG2a/IgG1 ratio. The IFN-γ level was significantly (P<0.0001) highest in group of mice immunized with either (ALM)(ALG)+CpG or ALM+CpG. It is concluded that alginate microspheres and CpG-ODN adjuvant when are used simultaneously induced protection and enhanced immune response against ALM antigen.

  17. Joule heating induced transient temperature field and its effects on electroosmosis in a microcapillary packed with microspheres.

    PubMed

    Kang, Y; Yang, C; Huang, X

    2005-08-02

    The Joule heating induced transient temperature field and its effect on the electroosmotic flow in a capillary packed with microspheres is analyzed numerically using the control-volume-based finite difference method. The model incorporates the coupled momentum equation for the electroosmotic velocity, the energy equations for the Joule heating induced temperature distributions in both the packed column and the capillary wall, and the mass and electric current continuity equations. The temperature-dependent physical properties of the electrolyte solution are taken into consideration. The characteristics of the Joule heating induced transient development of temperature and electroosmotic flow fields are studied. Specifically, the simulation shows that the presence of Joule heating causes a noticeable axial temperature gradient in the thermal entrance region and elevates a significant temperature increment inside the microcapillary. The temperature changes in turn greatly affect the electroosmotic velocity by means of the temperature-dependent fluid viscosity, dielectric constant, and local electric field strength. Furthermore, the model predicts an induced pressure gradient to counterbalance the axial variation of the electroosmotic velocity so as to maintain the fluid mass continuity. In addition, under specific conditions, the present model is validated by comparing with the existing analytical model and experimental data from the literature.

  18. Antioxidant effect of zinc chloride against ethanol-induced gastrointestinal lesions in rats.

    PubMed

    Ineu, Rafael Porto; Oliveira, Cláudia Sirlene; Oliveira, Vitor Antunes; Moraes-Silva, Lucélia; da Luz, Sônia Cristina Almeida; Pereira, Maria Ester

    2013-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possible effects of zinc chloride against the gastrointestinal lesions caused by oral administration of ethanol in rats. Rats were divided into five groups, namely, saline, ethanol, zn, zn+ethanol and ethanol+zn. Ethanol 70% (2 mL/kg) was administered by gavage in 36 h fasted rats. Zinc chloride (27 mg/kg, ~13 mg/kg of zinc) was given by gavage 1h before or 1h after the administration of ethanol. Oral administration of ethanol consistently induced damage in the rat glandular stomach and intestine. Zinc did not demonstrate effect per se and significantly reduced gastrointestinal lesions when administered either before or after lesion induction. Ethanol induced enhancement of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance and reactive species levels, diminished the ascorbic acid and total protein SH content as well as superoxide dismutase and catalase activity in stomach and intestine of rats. Zinc treatment prevented and reversed these alterations induced by ethanol. Stomach and intestine of rats treated with zinc presented higher zinc content than the tissues of rats treated only with ethanol. Non-protein SH content was not altered by any treatment. Results suggested that the gastrointestinal protective effect of zinc in this experimental model could be due to its antioxidant effect. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Protective effects of silymarin on epirubicin-induced mucosal barrier injury of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Sasu, Alciona; Herman, Hildegard; Mariasiu, Teodora; Rosu, Marcel; Balta, Cornel; Anghel, Nicoleta; Miutescu, Eftimie; Cotoraci, Coralia; Hermenean, Anca

    2015-10-01

    Mucositis is a serious disorder of the gastrointestinal tract that results from cancer chemotherapy. We investigated the protective effects of silymarin on epirubicin-induced mucosal barrier injury in CD-1 mice. Immunohistochemical activity of both pro-apoptotic Bax and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 markers, together with p53, cyt-P450 expression and DNA damage analysis on stomach, small intestine and colon were evaluated. Our results indicated stronger expression for cyt P450 in all analyzed gastrointestinal tissues of Epi group, which demonstrate intense drug detoxification. Bax immunopositivity was intense in the absorptive enterocytes and lamina connective cells of the small intestine, surface epithelial cells of the stomach and also in the colonic epithelium and lamina concomitant with a decreased Bcl-2 expression in all analyzed tissues. Epirubicin-induced gastrointestinal damage was verified by a goblet cell count and morphology analysis on histopathological sections stained for mucins. In all analyzed tissues, Bax immunopositivity has been withdrawn by highest dose of silymarin concomitant with reversal of Bcl-2 intensity at a level comparable with control. p53 expression was found in all analyzed tissues and decreased by high dose of silymarin. Also, DNA internucleosomal fragmentation was observed in the Epi groups for all analyzed tissues was almost suppressed at 100 mg/kg Sy co-treatment. Histological aspect and goblet cell count were restored at a highest dose of Sy for both small and large intestine. In conclusion, our findings suggest that silymarin may prevent cellular damage of epirubicin-induced toxicity and was effective in reducing the severity indicators of gastrointestinal mucositis in mice.

  20. Fluorescent microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A.

    1978-01-01

    Latex particles with attached antibodies have potential biochemical and environmental applications. Human red blood cells and lymphocytes have been labeled with fluorescent microspheres by either direct or indirect immunological technique. Immunolatex spheres can also be used for detecting and localizing specific cell surface receptors. Hormones and toxins may also be bondable.

  1. Reduction in heat-induced gastrointestinal hyperpermeability in rats by bovine colostrum and goat milk powders.

    PubMed

    Prosser, C; Stelwagen, K; Cummins, R; Guerin, P; Gill, N; Milne, C

    2004-02-01

    Male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to one of three dietary groups [standard diet (Cont; n = 8), standard diet plus bovine colostrum powder (BColost 1.7 g/kg; n = 8), or goat milk powder (GMilk 1.7 g/kg; n = 8)] to determine the ability of these supplements to reduce gastrointestinal hyperpermeability induced by heat. Raising core body temperature of rats to 41.5 degrees C increased transfer of (51)Cr-EDTA from gut into blood 34-fold relative to the ambient temperature value (P < 0.05) in the Cont group of rats, indicative of increased gastrointestinal permeability. Significantly less (P < 0.01) (51)Cr-EDTA was transferred into the blood of rats in either the BColost (27% of Cont) or GMilk group (10% of Cont) after heating, showing that prior supplementation with either bovine colostrum or goat milk powder significantly reduced the impact of heat stress on gastrointestinal permeability. The changes in the BColost group were not significantly different than those of the GMilk group. The potential mechanism of the protective effect of bovine colostrum and goat milk powders may involve modulation of tight junction permeability, because both powders were able to maintain transepithelial resistance in Madin Darby canine kidney cells challenged with EGTA compared with cells maintained in media only. The results show that bovine colostrum powder can partially alleviate the effects of hyperthermia on gastrointestinal permeability in the intact animal. Moreover, goat milk powder was equally as effective as bovine colostrum powder, and both may be of benefit in other situations where gastrointestinal barrier function is compromised.

  2. PELA microspheres with encapsulated arginine-chitosan/pBMP-2 nanoparticles induce pBMP-2 controlled-release, transfected osteoblastic progenitor cells, and promoted osteogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaolong; Qiu, Sujun; Zhang, Yuxian; Yin, Jie; Min, Shaoxiong

    2017-03-01

    Repair of the bone injury remains a challenge in clinical practices. Recent progress in tissue engineering and therapeutic gene delivery systems have led to promising new strategies for successful acceleration of bone repair process. The aim of this study was to create a controlled-release system to slowly release the arginine-chitosan/plasmid DNA nanoparticles encoding BMP-2 gene (Arg-CS/pBMP-2 NPs), efficiently transfect osteoblastic progenitor cells, secrete functional BMP-2 protein, and promote osteogenic differentiation. In this study, chitosan was conjugated with arginine to generate arginine-chitosan polymer (Arg-CS) for gene delivery. Mix the Arg-CS with pBMP-2 to condense pBMP-2 into nano-sized particles. In vitro transfection assays demonstrated that the transfection efficiency of Arg-CS/pBMP-2 nanoparticles and the expression level of BMP-2 was obviously exceed control groups. Further, PELA microspheres as the controlled-release carrier for the nanoparticles were used to encapsulate Arg-CS/pBMP-2 NPs. We demonstrated that the Arg-CS/pBMP-2 NPs could slowly release from the PELA microspheres at least for 42 d. During the co-culture with the PELA microspheres, the content of BMP-2 protein secreted by MC3T3-E1 reached the peak at 7 d. After 21d, the secretion of BMP-2 protein still maintain a higher level. The alkaline phosphatase activity, alizarin red staining, and osteogenesis-related gene expression by real-time quantitative PCR analysis all showed the PELA microspheres entrapping with Arg-CS/pBMP-2 NPs can obviously induce the osteogenic differentiation. The results indicated that the Arg-CS is a suitable gene vector which can promote the gene transfection. And the novel PELA microspheres-nanoparticle controlled-release system has potential clinical application in the future after further research.

  3. Nausea and vomiting induced by gastrointestinal radiation therapy: current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Kristopher; Poon, Michael; Chow, Edward

    2015-06-01

    Radiation therapy-induced nausea and vomiting (RINV) are common and troublesome symptoms among patients receiving radiation therapy for gastrointestinal cancers. Their impact on function, quality of life and, ultimately, cancer control warrant a review of their incidence, underlying mechanisms, treatments and research themes. Research in RINV is underrepresented relative to that in chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. The incidence of RINV among patients receiving modern day radiation therapy is questioned and supportive care practice patterns vary among radiation oncologists. Antiemetic guideline recommendations for prophylactic and rescue therapy are based solely on the anatomic region being irradiated and not other patient-related, radiation therapy-related, or organ-specific dosimetric factors that likely modulate the risk of RINV. Dosimetric predictors are likely the most attainable biomarker moving forward, but only early steps have been taken. The small bowel and stomach will be the best first candidates for study among patients with gastrointestinal cancers. Studies of the mechanisms underlying RINV are conspicuously lacking. A new generation of observational studies and therapeutic clinical trials is needed, and more attention must be given to the relative impact of nausea and vomiting on the function and quality of life among specific homogeneous patient populations. Optimal supportive care strategies for RINV following radiation therapy for gastrointestinal cancers are lacking, and will not be known until future research answers the many open questions regarding the mechanisms underlying RINV, the true incidence and impact of these symptoms among patients and the best way to predict and mitigate them.

  4. Gastrointestinal protective effect of dietary spices during ethanol-induced oxidant stress in experimental rats.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Usha N S; Srinivasan, Krishnapura

    2010-04-01

    Spices are traditionally known to have digestive stimulant action and to cure digestive disorders. In this study, the protective effect of dietary spices with respect to activities of antioxidant enzymes in gastric and intestinal mucosa was examined. Groups of Wistar rats were fed for 8 weeks with diets containing black pepper (0.5%), piperine (0.02%), red pepper (3.0%), capsaicin (0.01%), and ginger (0.05%). All these spices significantly enhanced the activities of antioxidant enzymes--superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione reductase, and glutathione-S-transferase--in both gastric and intestinal mucosa, suggesting a gastrointestinal protective role for these spices. In a separate study, these dietary spices were found to alleviate the diminished activities of antioxidant enzymes in gastric and intestinal mucosa under conditions of ethanol-induced oxidative stress. The gastroprotective effect of the spices was also reflected in their positive effect on mucosal glycoproteins, thereby lowering mucosal injury. The amelioration of the ethanol-induced decrease in the activities of antioxidant enzymes in gastric and intestinal mucosa by dietary spices suggests their beneficial gastrointestinal protective role. This is the first report on the gastrointestinal protective potential of dietary spices.

  5. Melatonin Attenuates Noise Stress-induced Gastrointestinal Motility Disorder and Gastric Stress Ulcer: Role of Gastrointestinal Hormones and Oxidative Stress in Rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Gong, Ji T; Zhang, Hu Q; Song, Quan H; Xu, Guang H; Cai, Lei; Tang, Xiao D; Zhang, Hai F; Liu, Fang-E; Jia, Zhan S; Zhang, Hong W

    2015-03-30

    There are increasing evidences for gastrointestinal motility disorder (GIMD) and gastric stress ulcer induced by noise stress. The present study was to investigate the reversed effect of melatonin on GIMD and gastric stress ulcer induced by noise stress and potential mechanism. Noise stress was induced on rats, and melatonin (15 mg/kg) was administered to rats by intraperitoneal injection. Differences were assessed in gastric residual rate (GRR), small intestine propulsion rate (SPR), Guth injury score, cortisol, gastrointestinal hormones (calcitonin-gene-related peptide and motilin) and oxidative stress markers (superoxide dismutase and malondialde hyde) in blood plasma as well as gastric mucosa homogenate with or without melatonin. The pathological examination of gastric mucosa was also performed. The GRR and SPR were improved by noise stress compared with control (P < 0.05). The pathological examination and Guth injury score revealed gastric stress ulcer. Moreover, the levels of cortisol, motilin and malondialdehyde in blood plasma and ma-londialdehyde in gastric mucosa homogenate were increased by noise stress (P < 0.05). CGRP and superoxide dismutase activ-ity in both of blood plasma and gastric mucosa homogenate were significantly decreased (P< 0.05). Furthermore, melatonin reversed changes in GRR, SPR, pathological examination, Guth injury score, cortisol, motilin, CGRP, superoxide dismutase activity and malondialdehyde (P < 0.05). Melatonin is effective in reversing the GIMD and gastric stress ulcer induced by noise stress. The underlying mechanism may be involved in oxidative stress and gastrointestinal hormones.

  6. Melatonin Attenuates Noise Stress-induced Gastrointestinal Motility Disorder and Gastric Stress Ulcer: Role of Gastrointestinal Hormones and Oxidative Stress in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Gong, Ji T; Zhang, Hu Q; Song, Quan H; Xu, Guang H; Cai, Lei; Tang, Xiao D; Zhang, Hai F; Liu, Fang-E; Jia, Zhan S; Zhang, Hong W

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims There are increasing evidences for gastrointestinal motility disorder (GIMD) and gastric stress ulcer induced by noise stress. The present study was to investigate the reversed effect of melatonin on GIMD and gastric stress ulcer induced by noise stress and potential mechanism. Methods Noise stress was induced on rats, and melatonin (15 mg/kg) was administered to rats by intraperitoneal injection. Differences were assessed in gastric residual rate (GRR), small intestine propulsion rate (SPR), Guth injury score, cortisol, gastrointestinal hormones (calcitonin-gene-related peptide and motilin) and oxidative stress markers (superoxide dismutase and malondialde hyde) in blood plasma as well as gastric mucosa homogenate with or without melatonin. The pathological examination of gastric mucosa was also performed. Results The GRR and SPR were improved by noise stress compared with control (P < 0.05). The pathological examination and Guth injury score revealed gastric stress ulcer. Moreover, the levels of cortisol, motilin and malondialdehyde in blood plasma and malondialdehyde in gastric mucosa homogenate were increased by noise stress (P < 0.05). CGRP and superoxide dismutase activity in both of blood plasma and gastric mucosa homogenate were significantly decreased (P< 0.05). Furthermore, melatonin reversed changes in GRR, SPR, pathological examination, Guth injury score, cortisol, motilin, CGRP, superoxide dismutase activity and malondialdehyde (P < 0.05). Conclusions Melatonin is effective in reversing the GIMD and gastric stress ulcer induced by noise stress. The underlying mechanism may be involved in oxidative stress and gastrointestinal hormones. PMID:25537679

  7. Field instability in high-quality dielectric sphere and disk: implication to the problem of laser-induced damage of microsphere and microdisk resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruzdev, Vitali E.; Libenson, Mikhail N.

    1999-04-01

    The problem of initiating of laser-induced damage (LID) of microspherical and microdisk resonators and nature of processes limiting ultimate pump intensity of the resonators are considered. Electrodynamic processes rather than absorption-induced heating are shown to play major role in initiating of LID of ideal passive resonators. Theoretical model to describe local increasing of high-power electromagnetic field in the microresonator is presented to study the processes. It is based on idea of formation of unstable field structure in resonant dielectric microcavity connected with formation of positive feedbacks resulting in light-induced variation of quality factor and its spectrum.

  8. Keratinocyte growth factor protects mice from chemotherapy and radiation-induced gastrointestinal injury and mortality.

    PubMed

    Farrell, C L; Bready, J V; Rex, K L; Chen, J N; DiPalma, C R; Whitcomb, K L; Yin, S; Hill, D C; Wiemann, B; Starnes, C O; Havill, A M; Lu, Z N; Aukerman, S L; Pierce, G F; Thomason, A; Potten, C S; Ulich, T R; Lacey, D L

    1998-03-01

    Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) stimulates the proliferation and differentiation of epithelial cells including those of the gastrointestinal tract. Although chemotherapeutics and radiation exposure kill rapidly proliferating tumor cells, rapidly dividing normal cells of the host's gastrointestinal tract are also frequently damaged, leading to the clinical condition broadly termed "mucositis." In this report, recombinant human KGF used as a pretreatment in several mouse models of chemotherapy and/or radiation-induced gastrointestinal injury significantly improved mouse survival. Using multiple-dose 5-fluorouracil, methotrexate, and radiation in combination and total body radiation alone models, KGF increased survival by 55% or greater. In the models that used chemotherapy with or without radiation, KGF significantly ameliorated weight loss after injury and accelerated weight gain during recovery. The basis of these systemic benefits appears to be due in part to the trophic effects of the growth factor on the intestinal epithelium because KGF pretreatment caused an increase in measures of mucosal thickness (villus height and crypt depth) that persisted during the course of 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy. Treatment with KGF also afforded a 3.5-fold improvement in crypt survival in the small intestine, suggesting that KGF also has a direct effect on the crypt stem cells. These data indicate that KGF may be therapeutically useful to lessen the intestinal side effects of current cancer therapy regimens.

  9. Drug-induced gastrointestinal injury (DIGI). Updates, reflections and key points.

    PubMed

    De Petris, G; De Marco, L; López, J I

    2017-06-01

    The goals of this short narrative review are 1) to provide an update in recent developments in the field of drug-induced gastrointestinal injury (DIGI), and 2) to distill few key points to approach with confidence a difficult and vast area of gastrointestinal pathology. DIGI is a challenging diagnosis as it can produce almost any pattern of the injury of the gastrointestinal tract. The recognition of a pattern and the knowledge of which drugs can produce that pattern, are the first step of the diagnostic process; communication with the clinical team and a high level of suspicion are then paramount. The pathologist can be the leading clinicians of the care team in few situations in which she/he can recognize the drug at the microscope. Knowledge of the most relevant differential diagnoses of DIGI is essential to avoid significant pitfalls. Finally, several DIGIs due to recently developed immunomodulators used in oncology have shown relevance given their sometimes fatal outcome and the accumulating evidence of a common morphological appearance among them. © Copyright Società Italiana di Anatomia Patologica e Citopatologia Diagnostica, Divisione Italiana della International Academy of Pathology.

  10. Adsorption of Cr(VI) using cellulose microsphere-based adsorbent prepared by radiation-induced grafting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cancan; Zhang, Youwei; Peng, Jing; Wu, Hao; Li, Jiuqiang; Zhai, Maolin

    2012-08-01

    Cellulose microsphere (CMS) adsorbent was prepared by radiation-induced grafting of dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) onto CMS followed by a protonation process. The FTIR spectra analysis proved that PDMAEMA was grafted successfully onto CMS. The adsorption of Cr(VI) onto the resulting adsorbent was very fast, the equilibrium adsorption could be achieved within 15 min. The adsorption capacity strongly depended on the pH of the solution, which was attributed to the change of both the existed forms of Cr(VI) and the tertiary-ammonium group of PDMAEMA grafted CMS with the pH. A maximum Cr(VI) uptake (ca. 78 mg g-1) was obtained as the pH was in the range of 3.0-6.0. However, even in strong acid media (pH 1.3), the adsorbents still showed a Cr(VI) uptake of 30 mg g-1. The adsorption behavior of the resultant absorbent could be described with the Langmuir mode. This adsorbent has potential application for removing heavy metal ion pollutants (e.g. Cr(VI)) from wastewater.

  11. Prevention of acrylonitrile-induced gastrointestinal bleeding by sulfhydryl compounds, atropine and cimetidine

    SciTech Connect

    Ghanayem, B.I.; Ahmed, A.E.

    1986-07-01

    We have recently demonstrated that acrylonitrile (VCN) causes acute gastric hemorrhage and mucosal erosions. The current studies were undertaken to investigate the effects of the sulfhydryl-containing compounds, cysteine and cysteamine, the cholinergic blocking agent atropine and the histamine H2 receptor antagonist, cimetidine on the VCN-induced gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in rats. Our data shows that pretreatment with L-cysteine, cysteamine, atropine or cimetidine has significantly protected rats against the VCN-induced GI bleeding. A possible mechanism of the VCN-induced GI bleeding may involve the interaction of VCN with critical sulfhydryl groups that, in turn, causes alteration of acetylcholine muscarinic receptors to lead to gastric hemorrhagic lesions and bleeding.

  12. Microradiographic microsphere manipulator

    DOEpatents

    Singleton, R.M.

    A method and apparatus is disclosed for radiographic characterization of small hollow spherical members (microspheres), constructed of either optically transparent or opaque materials. The apparatus involves a microsphere manipulator which holds a batch of microspheres between two parallel thin plastic films for contact microradiographic characterization or projection microradiography thereof. One plastic film is translated relative to and parallel to the other to roll the microspheres through any desired angle to allow different views of the microspheres.

  13. Microradiographic microsphere manipulator

    DOEpatents

    Singleton, Russell M.

    1980-01-01

    A method and apparatus for radiographic characterization of small hollow spherical members (microspheres), constructed of either optically transparent or opaque materials. The apparatus involves a microsphere manipulator which holds a batch of microspheres between two parallel thin plastic films for contact microradiographic characterization or projection microradiography thereof. One plastic film is translated to relative to and parallel to the other to roll the microspheres through any desired angle to allow different views of the microspheres.

  14. Hybrid microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Richard C. K. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Substrates, particularly inert synthetic organic resin beads (10) or sheet (12) such as polystyrene are coated with a covalently bound layer (24) of polyacrolein by irradiation a solution (14) of acrolein or other aldehyde with high intensity radiation. Individual microspheres (22) are formed which attach to the surface to form the aldehyde containing layer (24). The aldehyde groups can be converted to other functional groups by reaction with materials such as hydroxylamine. Adducts of proteins such as antibodies or enzymes can be formed by direct reaction with the surface aldehyde groups.

  15. Amelioration of radiation-induced hematopoietic and gastrointestinal damage by Ex-RAD(R) in mice.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sanchita P; Kulkarni, Shilpa; Perkins, Michael W; Hieber, Kevin; Pessu, Roli L; Gambles, Kristen; Maniar, Manoj; Kao, Tzu-Cheg; Seed, Thomas M; Kumar, K Sree

    2012-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess recovery from hematopoietic and gastrointestinal damage by Ex-RAD(®), also known as ON01210.Na (4-carboxystyryl-4-chlorobenzylsulfone, sodium salt), after total body radiation. In our previous study, we reported that Ex-RAD, a small-molecule radioprotectant, enhances survival of mice exposed to gamma radiation, and prevents radiation-induced apoptosis as measured by the inhibition of radiation-induced protein 53 (p53) expression in cultured cells. We have expanded this study to determine best effective dose, dose-reduction factor (DRF), hematological and gastrointestinal protection, and in vivo inhibition of p53 signaling. A total of 500 mg/kg of Ex-RAD administered at 24 h and 15 min before radiation resulted in a DRF of 1.16. Ex-RAD ameliorated radiation-induced hematopoietic damage as monitored by the accelerated recovery of peripheral blood cells, and protection of granulocyte macrophage colony-forming units (GM-CFU) in bone marrow. Western blot analysis on spleen indicated that Ex-RAD treatment inhibited p53 phosphorylation. Ex-RAD treatment reduces terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay (TUNEL)-positive cells in jejunum compared with vehicle-treated mice after radiation injury. Finally, Ex-RAD preserved intestinal crypt cells compared with the vehicle control at 13 and 14 Gy. The results demonstrated that Ex-RAD ameliorates radiation-induced peripheral blood cell depletion, promotes bone marrow recovery, reduces p53 signaling in spleen and protects intestine from radiation injury.

  16. Sodium selenosulfate at an innocuous dose markedly prevents cisplatin-induced gastrointestinal toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jun; Sun, Kang; Ni, Lijuan; Wang, Xufang; Wang, Dongxu; Zhang, Jinsong

    2012-02-01

    Our previous studies in mice revealed that two weeks short-term toxicity of sodium selenosulfate was significantly lower than that of sodium selenite, but selenium repletion efficacy of both compounds was equivalent. In addition, we showed that sodium selenosulfate reduced nephrotoxicity of cisplatin (CDDP) without compromising its anticancer activity, thus leading to a dramatic increase of cancer cure rate from 25% to 75%. Hydration has been used in clinical practice to reduce CDDP-induced nephrotoxicity, but it cannot mitigate CDDP-induced gastrointestinal toxicity. The present work investigated whether sodium selenosulfate is a potential preventive agent for the gastrointestinal toxicity. In tumor-bearing mice, sodium selenosulfate was administered at a dose of 9.5 μmol/kg daily for 11 days, CDDP alone resulted in diarrhea by 88% on day 12, whereas the co-administration of CDDP and sodium selenosulfate dramatically reduced diarrhea to 6% (p < 0.0001). Such a prominent protective effect promoted us to evaluate the safety potential of long-term sodium selenosulfate application. Mice were administered with sodium selenosulfate or sodium selenite for 55 days at the doses of 12.7 and 19 μmol/kg. The low-dose sodium selenite caused growth suppression and hepatotoxicity which were aggravated by the high-dose, leading to 40% mortality rate, but no toxic symptoms were observed in the two sodium selenosulfate groups. Altogether these results clearly show that sodium selenosulfate at an innocuous dose can markedly prevent CDDP-induced gastrointestinal toxicity. -- Highlights: ►Cisplatin resulted in diarrhea in mice by 88%. ►i.p. selenosulfate at 9.5 μmol/kg daily for 11 days reduced diarrhea to 6%. ►i.p. selenosulfate at 19 μmol/kg daily for 55 days was not toxic. ►i.p. selenite at 19 μmol/kg daily for 55 days was lethal. ►Innocuous dose of selenosulfate greatly prevents cisplatin-induced diarrhea.

  17. Breakthrough disseminated zygomycosis induced massive gastrointestinal bleeding in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia receiving micafungin.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kei; Sugawara, Yumiko; Sekine, Takao; Nakase, Kazunori; Katayama, Naoyuki

    2014-11-01

    A 69-year-old man, who had been receiving prednisolone for 11 months for treatment of interstitial pneumonia, was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia. During induction therapy, he developed severe pneumonia. Although meropenem and micafungin were started, he died of circulatory failure owing to massive gastrointestinal bleeding. Autopsy specimens obtained from the stomach revealed fungal hyphae, which had invaded diffusely into submucosal vessels and caused the massive gastric bleeding. The same hyphae were also observed in both lungs. A diagnosis of disseminated zygomycosis was confirmed by its characteristic histopathological findings. Because zygomycetes are spontaneously resistant to the newer antifungal agents, such as voriconazole or micafungin, it seems likely that the prevalence of zygomycosis as a breakthrough infection may increase in the future. Zygomycosis is a rare, but life-threatening, deep fungal infection that appears in immunologically or metabolically compromised hosts. Its manifestations are clinically similar to those of invasive aspergillosis. In addition to the well-established epidemiology of zygomycosis, this case suggests the following new characteristics. (1) Although the gastrointestinal manifestation of zygomycosis is relatively rare, it is observed more frequently than invasive aspergillosis. (2) Gastrointestinal zygomycosis occasionally leads to the development of necrotic ulcers and may induce hemorrhagic shock.(3) We should be cautious of an occurrence of breakthrough zygomycosis when we use echinocandins for patients with known risk factors, especially steroid use and neutropenia. (4) For patients who are receiving broad-spectrum antibiotics and echinocandins, who are negative for culture studies and aspergillus antigen, and who present with unresolved fever, it is important to make a prompt clinical diagnosis of zygomycosis.

  18. Chronic gastrointestinal inflammation induces anxiety-like behavior and alters central nervous system biochemistry in mice.

    PubMed

    Bercik, Premysl; Verdu, Elena F; Foster, Jane A; Macri, Joseph; Potter, Murray; Huang, Xiaxing; Malinowski, Paul; Jackson, Wendy; Blennerhassett, Patricia; Neufeld, Karen A; Lu, Jun; Khan, Waliul I; Corthesy-Theulaz, Irene; Cherbut, Christine; Bergonzelli, Gabriela E; Collins, Stephen M

    2010-12-01

    Clinical and preclinical studies have associated gastrointestinal inflammation and infection with altered behavior. We investigated whether chronic gut inflammation alters behavior and brain biochemistry and examined underlying mechanisms. AKR mice were infected with the noninvasive parasite Trichuris muris and given etanercept, budesonide, or specific probiotics. Subdiaphragmatic vagotomy was performed in a subgroup of mice before infection. Gastrointestinal inflammation was assessed by histology and quantification of myeloperoxidase activity. Serum proteins were measured by proteomic analysis, circulating cytokines were measured by fluorescence activated cell sorting array, and serum tryptophan and kynurenine were measured by liquid chromatography. Behavior was assessed using light/dark preference and step-down tests. In situ hybridization was used to assess brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the brain. T muris caused mild to moderate colonic inflammation and anxiety-like behavior that was associated with decreased hippocampal BDNF messenger RNA (mRNA). Circulating tumor necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ, as well as the kynurenine and kynurenine/tryptophan ratio, were increased. Proteomic analysis showed altered levels of several proteins related to inflammation and neural function. Administration of etanercept, and to a lesser degree of budesonide, normalized behavior, reduced cytokine and kynurenine levels, but did not influence BDNF expression. The probiotic Bifidobacterium longum normalized behavior and BDNF mRNA but did not affect cytokine or kynurenine levels. Anxiety-like behavior was present in infected mice after vagotomy. Chronic gastrointestinal inflammation induces anxiety-like behavior and alters central nervous system biochemistry, which can be normalized by inflammation-dependent and -independent mechanisms, neither of which requires the integrity of the vagus nerve. Copyright © 2010 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc

  19. Ginger for Prevention of Antituberculosis-induced Gastrointestinal Adverse Reactions Including Hepatotoxicity: A Randomized Pilot Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Emrani, Zahra; Shojaei, Esphandiar; Khalili, Hossein

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the potential benefits of ginger in preventing antituberculosis drug-induced gastrointestinal adverse reactions including hepatotoxicity have been evaluated in patients with tuberculosis. Patients in the ginger and placebo groups (30 patients in each group) received either 500 mg ginger (Zintoma)(®) or placebo one-half hour before each daily dose of antituberculosis drugs for 4 weeks. Patients' gastrointestinal complaints (nausea, vomiting, dyspepsia, and abdominal pain) and antituberculosis drug-induced hepatotoxicity were recorded during the study period. In this cohort, nausea was the most common antituberculosis drug-induced gastrointestinal adverse reactions. Forty eight (80%) patients experienced nausea. Nausea was more common in the placebo than the ginger group [27 (90%) vs 21 (70%), respectively, p = 0.05]. During the study period, 16 (26.7%) patients experienced antituberculosis drug-induced hepatotoxicity. Patients in the ginger group experienced less, but not statistically significant, antituberculosis drug-induced hepatotoxicity than the placebo group (16.7% vs 36.7%, respectively, p = 0.07). In conclusion, ginger may be a potential option for prevention of antituberculosis drug-induced gastrointestinal adverse reactions including hepatotoxicity. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Fast and reversible lithium-induced electrochemical alloying in tin-based composite oxide hierarchical microspheres assembled by nanoplate building blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; Wen, Zhenhai; Li, Jinghong

    To benefit from the large capacity gain advantages offered by lithium-induced electrochemical alloying and to overcome poor kinetics, a novel concept to tackle such issues by using porous hierarchical microspheres with an interconnected network of nanoplate building blocks, has been introduced and demonstrated with Sn 1.0P 1.17O 4.72 glass as an example. Such desired three-dimensional microarchitectures with exciting nanosize effects can be exploited to fabricate next generation of lithium-ion batteries where outstanding rate capability and sustained reversible capacity are achieved.

  1. Mucoadhesivity Characterization of Isabgol Husk Mucilage Microspheres Crosslinked by Glutaraldehyde.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vipin Kumar; Sharma, Prince Prashant; Mazumder, Bhasker; Bhatnagar, Aseem; Singh, Thakuri

    2015-01-01

    The microspheres of Isabgol husk were prepared by emulsification-crosslinking technique and the gastrointestinal transition behavior of the formulation was studied by gamma scintigraphy. The impact of different process variables such as amount of glutaraldehyde, concentration of Isabgol husk and temperature was studied on surface morphology and mucoadhesion. In vitro mucoadhesive testing of formulations was performed by determination of zeta potential, mucus glycoprotein assay and mucus adsorption isotherms. The effect of feeding on retention of microspheres in the gastrointestinal track (GIT) was studied in albino rabbits by gamma scintigraphy study. The results indicated the formation of microspheres as observed by scanning electron microscopy. The smooth and round surfaces of microspheres were obtained on increasing Isabgol husk and glutaraldehyde amount. The positive zeta potential of all formulations indicated the electrostatic interaction as a mechanism of mucoadhesion between the mucus of GIT membranes and the microspheres surfaces. The influence of electrostatic interaction on mucoadhesion of microspheres was again ascertained when the mucin equilibrium adsorption on preparations indicated well fitness in Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms. During gamma scintigraphy, the stability of (99m)Tc-sodium pertechnetate was found 98.82% at pH 6.8 and 96.78% at pH 7.2, respectively. It indicated the minimal leaching of bound radionuclide from microspheres during gastrointestinal transition as observed in gamma scintigraphic images of the rabbits. The microspheres retained in GIT even after 24 hrs of oral administration. The results indicated the applicability of Isabgol husk mucilage in the development of mucoadhesive microspheres.

  2. Blackberry subjected to in vitro gastrointestinal digestion affords protection against Ethyl Carbamate-induced cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Xu, Yang; Zhang, Lingxia; Su, Hongming; Zheng, Xiaodong

    2016-12-01

    Ethyl Carbamate (EC) was detected in many fermented foods. Previous studies indicated that frequent exposure to ethyl carbamate may increase the risk to suffer from cancers. Blackberry is rich in polyphenols and possesses potent antioxidant activity. This study aims to investigate the protective effect of blackberry homogenates produced before (BH) and after in vitro simulated gastrointestinal digestion (BD) on EC-induced toxicity in Caco-2 cells. Our results showed that blackberry homogenates after digestion (BD) was more effective than that before digestion (BH) in ameliorating EC-induced toxicity in Caco-2 cells. Further investigation revealed that BD remarkably attenuated EC-induced toxicity through restoring mitochondrial function, inhibiting glutathione depletion and decreasing overproduction of intracellular reactive oxygen species. Additionally, LC-MS result implied that the better protective capacity of BD may be related to the increased content of two anthocyanins (cyanidin-3-glucoside and cyanidin-3-dioxalyglucoside). Overall, the present study may give implication to prevent EC-induced health problem.

  3. Blockade of TLR3 protects mice from lethal radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Takemura, Naoki; Kawasaki, Takumi; Kunisawa, Jun; Sato, Shintaro; Lamichhane, Aayam; Kobiyama, Kouji; Aoshi, Taiki; Ito, Junichi; Mizuguchi, Kenji; Karuppuchamy, Thangaraj; Matsunaga, Kouta; Miyatake, Shoichiro; Mori, Nobuko; Tsujimura, Tohru; Satoh, Takashi; Kumagai, Yutaro; Kawai, Taro; Standley, Daron M.; Ishii, Ken J.; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Akira, Shizuo; Uematsu, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    High-dose ionizing radiation induces severe DNA damage in the epithelial stem cells in small intestinal crypts and causes gastrointestinal syndrome (GIS). Although the tumour suppressor p53 is a primary factor inducing death of crypt cells with DNA damage, its essential role in maintaining genome stability means inhibiting p53 to prevent GIS is not a viable strategy. Here we show that the innate immune receptor Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) is critical for the pathogenesis of GIS. Tlr3−/− mice show substantial resistance to GIS owing to significantly reduced radiation-induced crypt cell death. Despite showing reduced crypt cell death, p53-dependent crypt cell death is not impaired in Tlr3−/− mice. p53-dependent crypt cell death causes leakage of cellular RNA, which induces extensive cell death via TLR3. An inhibitor of TLR3–RNA binding ameliorates GIS by reducing crypt cell death. Thus, we propose blocking TLR3 activation as a novel approach to treat GIS. PMID:24637670

  4. PHD inhibition mitigates and protects against radiation-induced gastrointestinal toxicity via HIF2.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Cullen M; Miao, Yu Rebecca; Diep, Anh N; Wu, Colleen; Rankin, Erinn B; Atwood, Todd F; Xing, Lei; Giaccia, Amato J

    2014-05-14

    Radiation-induced gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity can be a major source of morbidity and mortality after radiation exposure. There is an unmet need for effective preventative or mitigative treatments against the potentially fatal diarrhea and water loss induced by radiation damage to the GI tract. We report that prolyl hydroxylase inhibition by genetic knockout or pharmacologic inhibition of all PHD (prolyl hydroxylase domain) isoforms by the small-molecule dimethyloxallyl glycine (DMOG) increases hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) expression, improves epithelial integrity, reduces apoptosis, and increases intestinal angiogenesis, all of which are essential for radioprotection. HIF2, but not HIF1, is both necessary and sufficient to prevent radiation-induced GI toxicity and death. Increased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression contributes to the protective effects of HIF2, because inhibition of VEGF function reversed the radioprotection and radiomitigation afforded by DMOG. Additionally, mortality from abdominal or total body irradiation was reduced even when DMOG was given 24 hours after exposure. Thus, prolyl hydroxylase inhibition represents a treatment strategy to protect against and mitigate GI toxicity from both therapeutic radiation and potentially lethal radiation exposures.

  5. Melatonin attenuates (60) Co γ-ray-induced hematopoietic, immunological and gastrointestinal injuries in C57BL/6 male mice.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shahanshah; Adhikari, Jawahar Singh; Rizvi, Moshahid Alam; Chaudhury, Nabo Kumar

    2017-02-01

    Protection of hematopoietic, immunological, and gastrointestinal injuries from deleterious effects of ionizing radiation is prime rational for developing radioprotector. The objective of this study, therefore, was to evaluate the radioprotective potential of melatonin against damaging effects of radiation-induced hematopoietic, immunological, and gastrointestinal injuries in mice. C57BL/6 male mice were intraperitoneally administered with melatonin (50-150 mg/kg) 30 min prior to whole-body radiation exposure of 5 and 7.5 Gy using (60) Co-teletherapy unit. Thirty-day survival against 7.5 Gy was monitored. Melatonin (100 mg/kg) pretreatment showed 100% survival against 7.5 Gy radiation dose. Melatonin pretreatment expanded femoral HPSCs, and inhibited spleenocyte DNA strands breaks and apoptosis in irradiated mice. At this time, it also protected radiation-induced loss of T cell sub-populations in spleen. In addition, melatonin pretreatment enhanced crypts regeneration and increased villi number and length in irradiated mice. Translocation of gut bacteria to spleen, liver and kidney were controlled in irradiated mice pretreated with melatonin. Radiation-induced gastrointestinal DNA strand breaks, lipid peroxidation, and expression of proapoptotic-p53, Bax, and antiapoptotic-Bcl-xL proteins were reversed in melatonin pretreated mice. This increase of Bcl-xL was associated with the decrease of Bax/Bcl-xL ratio. ABTS and DPPH radical assays revealed that melatonin treatment alleviated total antioxidant capacity in hematopoietic and gastrointestinal tissues. Present study demonstrated that melatonin pretreatment was able to prevent hematopoietic, immunological, and gastrointestinal radiation-induced injury, therefore, overcoming lethality in mice. These results suggest potential of melatonin in developing radioprotector for protection of bone marrow, spleen, and gastrointestine in planned radiation exposure scenarios including radiotherapy. © 2016 Wiley

  6. Gastrointestinal Symptoms and Altered Intestinal Permeability Induced by Combat Training Are Associated with Distinct Metabotypic Changes.

    PubMed

    Phua, Lee Cheng; Wilder-Smith, Clive H; Tan, Yee Min; Gopalakrishnan, Theebarina; Wong, Reuben K; Li, Xinhua; Kan, Mary E; Lu, Jia; Keshavarzian, Ali; Chan, Eric Chun Yong

    2015-11-06

    Physical and psychological stress have been shown to modulate multiple aspects of gastrointestinal (GI) physiology, but its molecular basis remains elusive. We therefore characterized the stress-induced metabolic phenotype (metabotype) in soldiers during high-intensity combat training and correlated the metabotype with changes in GI symptoms and permeability. In a prospective, longitudinal study, urinary metabotyping was conducted on 38 male healthy soldiers during combat training and a rest period using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The urinary metabotype during combat training was clearly distinct from the rest period (partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLSDA) Q(2) = 0.581), confirming the presence of a unique stress-induced metabotype. Differential metabolites related to combat stress were further uncovered, including elevated pyroglutamate and fructose, and reduced gut microbial metabolites, namely, hippurate and m-hydroxyphenylacetate (p < 0.05). The extent of pyroglutamate upregulation exhibited a positive correlation with an increase in IBS-SSS in soldiers during combat training (r = 0.5, p < 0.05). Additionally, the rise in fructose levels was positively correlated with an increase in intestinal permeability (r = 0.6, p < 0.005). In summary, protracted and mixed psychological and physical combat-training stress yielded unique metabolic changes that corresponded with the incidence and severity of GI symptoms and alteration in intestinal permeability. Our study provided novel molecular insights into stress-induced GI perturbations, which could be exploited for future biomarker research or development of therapeutic strategies.

  7. PHD Inhibition Mitigates and Protects Against Radiation-Induced Gastrointestinal Toxicity via HIF2

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Cullen M.; Miao, Yu Rebecca; Diep, Anh N.; Wu, Colleen; Rankin, Erinn B.; Atwood, Todd F.; Xing, Lei; Giaccia, Amato J.

    2014-01-01

    Radiation-induced gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity can be a major source of morbidity and mortality after radiation exposure. There is an unmet need for effective preventative or mitigative treatments against the potentially fatal diarrhea and water loss induced by radiation damage to the GI tract. We report that prolyl hydroxylase inhibition by genetic knockout or pharmacologic inhibition of all PHD isoforms by the small molecule dimethyloxyallylglycine (DMOG) increases HIF expression, improves epithelial integrity, reduces apoptosis, and increases intestinal angiogenesis, all of which are essential for radioprotection. HIF2, but not HIF1, is both necessary and sufficient to prevent radiation-induced GI toxicity and death. Increased VEGF expression contributes to the protective effects of HIF2, since inhibition of VEGF function reversed the radioprotection and radiomitigation afforded by DMOG. Additionally, mortality is reduced from abdominal or total body irradiation even when DMOG is given 24 hours after exposure. Thus, prolyl hydroxylase inhibition represents a new treatment strategy to protect against and mitigate GI toxicity from both therapeutic radiation and potentially lethal radiation exposures. PMID:24828078

  8. Carboplatin/taxane-induced gastrointestinal toxicity: a pharmacogenomics study on the SCOTROC1 trial.

    PubMed

    He, Y J; Winham, S J; Hoskins, J M; Glass, S; Paul, J; Brown, R; Motsinger-Reif, A; McLeod, H L

    2016-06-01

    Carboplatin/taxane combination is first-line therapy for ovarian cancer. However, patients can encounter treatment delays, impaired quality of life, even death because of chemotherapy-induced gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. A candidate gene study was conducted to assess potential association of genetic variants with GI toxicity in 808 patients who received carboplatin/taxane in the Scottish Randomized Trial in Ovarian Cancer 1 (SCOTROC1). Patients were randomized into discovery and validation cohorts consisting of 404 patients each. Clinical covariates and genetic variants associated with grade III/IV GI toxicity in discovery cohort were evaluated in replication cohort. Chemotherapy-induced GI toxicity was significantly associated with seven single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the ATP7B, GSR, VEGFA and SCN10A genes. Patients with risk genotypes were at 1.53 to 18.01 higher odds to develop carboplatin/taxane-induced GI toxicity (P<0.01). Variants in the VEGF gene were marginally associated with survival time. Our data provide potential targets for modulation/inhibition of GI toxicity in ovarian cancer patients.

  9. Hepatitis C virus E2 protein encapsulation into poly d, l-lactic-co-glycolide microspheres could induce mice cytotoxic T-cell response.

    PubMed

    Roopngam, Piyachat; Liu, Kewei; Mei, Lin; Zheng, Yi; Zhu, Xianbing; Tsai, Hsiang-I; Huang, Laiqiang

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is known to cause hepatitis and hepatocellular carcinoma. E2 envelope glycoprotein of HCV type (HCV-E2) has been reported to bind human host cells and is a major target for developing anti-HCV vaccines. However, the therapeutic vaccine for infected patients still needs further development. The vaccine aims to provide cytotoxic T-cells to eliminate infected cells and hepatocellular carcinoma. Currently, there is no effective HCV therapeutic vaccine because most chronically infected patients rarely generate cytotoxic T-cells, even though they have high levels of neutralizing antibodies. Therefore, the adjuvant must be applied to enhance the efficacy of the therapeutic vaccine. In this study, we constructed HCV1b-E2 recombinant protein, a truncated form of peptide, to combine with an effective vaccine adjuvant and delivery system by using poly d,l-lactic-co-glycolide (PLGA) microspheres. HCV1b-E2 protein was effectively encapsulated into PLGA microspheres (HCV1b-E2-PLGA) as a strategy to deliver an insoluble form of HCV1b-E2 protein. The size and shape of PLGA microspheres were generated properly to carry an insoluble form of viral peptide in vivo. The encapsulated viral protein was slowly and continuously released from PLGA microspheres, which indicated the property of the adjuvant. HCV1b-E2-PLGA can trigger a cell-mediated immune response by inducing an expression of mice CD8(+) T-cells. Our results demonstrated that HCV1b-E2-PLGA-immunized mice have a significantly increased CD8(+) T-cell number, whereas HCV1b-E2-immunized mice have a lower number of CD8(+) T-cells. Moreover, HCV1b-E2-PLGA could induce a specific antibody to viral protein, and the immune cells could secrete IFN-γ, which is a significant cytokine for viral response. Thus, HCV1b-E2-PLGA is shown to have adjuvant property and efficacy in the murine model, which is a good strategy to develop HCV prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines.

  10. Hepatitis C virus E2 protein encapsulation into poly d, l-lactic-co-glycolide microspheres could induce mice cytotoxic T-cell response

    PubMed Central

    Roopngam, Piyachat; Liu, Kewei; Mei, Lin; Zheng, Yi; Zhu, Xianbing; Tsai, Hsiang-I; Huang, Laiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is known to cause hepatitis and hepatocellular carcinoma. E2 envelope glycoprotein of HCV type (HCV-E2) has been reported to bind human host cells and is a major target for developing anti-HCV vaccines. However, the therapeutic vaccine for infected patients still needs further development. The vaccine aims to provide cytotoxic T-cells to eliminate infected cells and hepatocellular carcinoma. Currently, there is no effective HCV therapeutic vaccine because most chronically infected patients rarely generate cytotoxic T-cells, even though they have high levels of neutralizing antibodies. Therefore, the adjuvant must be applied to enhance the efficacy of the therapeutic vaccine. In this study, we constructed HCV1b-E2 recombinant protein, a truncated form of peptide, to combine with an effective vaccine adjuvant and delivery system by using poly d,l-lactic-co-glycolide (PLGA) microspheres. HCV1b-E2 protein was effectively encapsulated into PLGA microspheres (HCV1b-E2-PLGA) as a strategy to deliver an insoluble form of HCV1b-E2 protein. The size and shape of PLGA microspheres were generated properly to carry an insoluble form of viral peptide in vivo. The encapsulated viral protein was slowly and continuously released from PLGA microspheres, which indicated the property of the adjuvant. HCV1b-E2-PLGA can trigger a cell-mediated immune response by inducing an expression of mice CD8+ T-cells. Our results demonstrated that HCV1b-E2-PLGA-immunized mice have a significantly increased CD8+ T-cell number, whereas HCV1b-E2-immunized mice have a lower number of CD8+ T-cells. Moreover, HCV1b-E2-PLGA could induce a specific antibody to viral protein, and the immune cells could secrete IFN-γ, which is a significant cytokine for viral response. Thus, HCV1b-E2-PLGA is shown to have adjuvant property and efficacy in the murine model, which is a good strategy to develop HCV prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines. PMID:27789948

  11. Kinetics of piroxicam release from low-methylated pectin/zein hydrogel microspheres

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The kinetics of a model drug (piroxicam) release from pectin/zein hydrogel microspheres was studied under conditions simulating the gastrointestinal tract. It is established that the rate-limiting step in the release mechanism is drug diffusion out of the microspheres rather than its dissolution. ...

  12. Up-conversion cell imaging and pH-induced thermally controlled drug release from NaYF4/Yb3+/Er3+@hydrogel core-shell hybrid microspheres.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yunlu; Ma, Ping'an; Cheng, Ziyong; Kang, Xiaojiao; Zhang, Xiao; Hou, Zhiyao; Li, Chunxia; Yang, Dongmei; Zhai, Xuefeng; Lin, Jun

    2012-04-24

    In this study, we report a new controlled release system based on up-conversion luminescent microspheres of NaYF(4):Yb(3+)/Er(3+) coated with the smart hydrogel poly[(N-isopropylacrylamide)-co-(methacrylic acid)] (P(NIPAM-co-MAA)) (prepared using 5 mol % of MAA) shell. The hybrid microspheres show bright up-conversion fluorescence under 980 nm laser excitation, and turbidity measurements show that the low critical solution temperature of the polymer shell is thermo- and pH-dependent. We have exploited the hybrid microspheres as carriers for Doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX) due to its stimuli-responsive property as well as good biocompatibility via MTT assay. It is found that the drug release behavior is pH-triggered thermally sensitive. Changing the pH to mildly acidic condition at physiological temperature deforms the structure of the shell, causing the release of a large number of DOX from the microspheres. The drug-loaded microspheres exhibit an obvious cytotoxic effect on SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells. The endocytosis process of drug-loaded microspheres is observed using confocal laser scanning microscopy and up-conversion luminescence microscopy. Meanwhile, the as-prepared NaYF(4):Yb(3+)/Er(3+)@SiO(2)@P(NIPAM-co-MAA) microspheres can be used as a luminescent probe for cell imaging. In addition, the extent of drug release can be monitored by the change of up-conversion emission intensity. These pH-induced thermally controlled drug release systems have potential to be used for in vivo bioimaging and cancer therapy by the pH of the microenvironment changing from 7.4 (normal physiological environment) to acidic microenvironments (such as endosome and lysosome compartments) owing to endocytosis.

  13. Radioprotective potential of Lagenaria siceraria extract against radiation-induced gastrointestinal injury.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Dhara; Goel, Harish Chandra; Chauhan, Sonal

    2016-12-01

    The cucurbits (prebiotics) were investigated as novel agents for radio-modification against gastrointestinal injury. The cell-cycle fractions and DNA damage were monitored in HCT-15 cells. A cucurbit extract was added to culture medium 2 h before irradiation (6 Gy) and was substituted by fresh medium at 4 h post-irradiation. The whole extract of the fruits of Lagenaria siceraria, Luffa cylindrica, or Cucurbita pepo extract enhanced G2 fractions (42%, 34%, and 37%, respectively) as compared with control (20%) and irradiated control (31%). With cucurbits, the comet tail length remained shorter (L. siceraria, 28 μm; L. cylindrica, 34.2 μm; C. pepo, 36.75 μm) than irradiated control (41.75 μm). For in vivo studies, L. siceraria extract (2 mg/kg body weight) was administered orally to mice at 2 h before and 4 and 24 h after whole-body irradiation (10 Gy). L. siceraria treatment restored the glutathione contents to 48.8 μmol/gm as compared with control (27.6 μmol/gm) and irradiated control (19.6 μmol/gm). Irradiation reduced the villi height from 379 to 350 μm and width from 54 to 27 μm. L. siceraria administration countered the radiation effects (length, 366 μm; width, 30 μm, respectively) and improved the villi morphology and tight junction integrity. This study reveals the therapeutic potential of cucurbits against radiation-induced gastrointestinal injury.

  14. Feeding difficulties in children with food protein-induced gastrointestinal allergies.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Rosan; Rommel, Nathalie; Van Oudenhove, Lukas; Fleming, Catharine; Dziubak, Robert; Shah, Neil

    2014-10-01

    There is paucity of data on the prevalence of feeding difficulties in Food Protein-Induced Gastrointestinal Allergies (FPIGA) and their clinical characteristics. However, it is a commonly reported problem by clinicians. We set out to establish the occurrence of feeding difficulties in children with FPIGA, the association with gastrointestinal and extra-intestinal symptoms and number of foods eliminated from the diet. This retrospective observational analysis was performed in patients seen between 2002 and 2009 at Great Ormond Street Children's Hospital, Gastroenterology Department, London. Medical records where FPIGA was documented using the terms from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease and National Institute of Clinical Excellence and confirmed using an elimination diet, followed by a challenge were included. Feeding difficulties were assessed using a criteria previously used in healthy toddlers in the UK. Data from 437 children (203 female) were collected. Significantly more children with feeding difficulties presented with abdominal distention and bloating (P = 0.002), vomiting (P < 0.0001), weight loss (P < 0.0001), rectal bleeding (P = 0.025), and constipation (P < 0.0001). We also found that having extra-intestinal manifestations were significantly (P < 0.0001) associated with the presence of feeding difficulties. Additionally, a significantly higher number of foods eliminated from the diet in the children with/without feeding difficulties (P = 0.028). Clinical manifestations like vomiting, constipation, rectal bleeding, weight loss, and the presence of extra-intestinal manifestations in addition to the number of foods avoided are in our FPIGA population linked to feeding difficulties. © 2014 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. Ghrelin improves delayed gastrointestinal transit in alloxan-induced diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Wen-Cai; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Lv, Ran; Wang, Wei-Gang; Han, Xiao-Dong; Yan, Jun; Wang, Yu; Zheng, Qi; Ai, Kai-Xing

    2008-04-28

    To investigate the effects of ghrelin on delayed gastrointestinal transit in alloxan-induced diabetic mice. A diabetic mouse model was established by intraperitoneal injection with alloxan. Mice were randomized into two main groups: normal mice group and diabetic mice group treated with ghrelin at doses of 0, 20, 50, 100 and 200 mug/kg ip. Gastric emptying (GE), intestinal transit (IT), and colonic transit (CT) were studied in mice after they had a phenol red meal following injection of ghrelin. Based on the most effective ghrelin dosage, atropine was given at 1 mg/kg 15 min before the ghrelin injection for each measurement. The mice in each group were sacrificed 20 min later and their stomachs, intestines, and colons were harvested immediately. The amount of phenol red was measured. Percentages of GE, IT, and CT were calculated. Percentages of GE, IT, and CT were significantly decreased in diabetic mice as compared to control mice (22.9 +/- 1.4 vs 28.1 +/- 1.3, 33.5 +/- 1.2 vs 43.2 +/- 1.9, 29.5 +/- 1.9 vs 36.3 +/- 1.6, P < 0.05). In the diabetic mice, ghrelin improved both GE and IT, but not CT. The most effective dose of ghrelin was 100 mug/kg and atropine blocked the prokinetic effects of ghrelin on GE and IT. Ghrelin accelerates delayed GE and IT but has no effect on CT in diabetic mice. Ghrelin may exert its prokinetic effects via the cholinergic pathway in the enteric nervous system, and therefore has therapeutic potential for diabetic patients with delayed upper gastrointestinal transit.

  16. Triton X-100 induced cuboid-like BiVO4 microsphere with high photocatalytic performance.

    PubMed

    Suwanchawalit, Cheewita; Buddee, Supat; Wongnawa, Sumpun

    2017-05-01

    A highly active visible light-induced BiVO4 photocatalyst was prepared by a simple co-precipitation method using ammonia solution as a pH adjustor and Triton X-100 (TX100) as a structure directing agent. The physical properties of the prepared BiVO4 photocatalyst were investigated by several techniques such as X-ray diffractometer (XRD), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area measurement, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive analysis (EDS), Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), photoluminescence (PL), and UV-Vis diffused reflectance spectroscopy (DRS). XRD results revealed the existence of a monoclinic scheelite structure in both the unmodified and the modified samples. The TX100 played a crucial role to control the cuboid-like shape morphology of BiVO4. The DRS results showed that the as-prepared cuboid BiVO4 possessed enhanced visible light absorption range compared with that of the unmodified BiVO4. The photocatalytic activity was evaluated via indigo carmine (IC) degradation under visible light irradiation. The modified BiVO4 showed higher photocatalytic efficiency than the unmodified BiVO4 and the commercial P25-TiO2 which could be ascribed to the better charge separation efficiency. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Colon targeted oral drug delivery system based on alginate-chitosan microspheres loaded with icariin in the treatment of ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang-Song; Wang, Gui-Fang; Zhou, Jie; Gao, Li-Na; Cui, Yuan-Lu

    2016-12-30

    In recent years, oral colon specific drug delivery system has been paid more attention in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). As the special pH condition in gastrointestinal tract, the challenge for treatment of IBD was that the colon drug delivery system should endure the low pH in stomach and release drugs quickly in high pH in colon. Icariin with the poor solubility and low bioavailability limited the treatment of many diseases in clinic. In this study, the protective mechanism of alginate-chitosan microspheres loaded with icariin were investigated with trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)/ethanol induced colonic mucosal injury in rats. The results of drug release showed that the icariin loaded into microspheres released only 10% in simulated gastric fluid and a high amount of 65.6% released in simulated colonic fluid. The fluorescence tracer indicated high retention of targeted microspheres more than 12h in colon. The microspheres loaded with icariin could not only reduce the colonic injury by decreasing the colon mucosa damage index in rats, but also reduce the inflammatory response by reducing the production and gene expression of inflammatory mediators and cytokines in colonic mucosa. All the results indicate that targeted microspheres loaded with icariin could exert the colon-protective effects through reducing the inflammatory response, which would be developed as a potential drug controlled release system for treatment of ulcerative colitis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Hydrogel microspheres for stabilization of an antioxidant enzyme: effect of emulsion cross-linking of a dual polysaccharide system on the protection of enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Tang, Deh-Wei; Yu, Shu-Huei; Wu, Wen-Shin; Hsieh, Hao-Ying; Tsai, Yi-Chin; Mi, Fwu-Long

    2014-01-01

    Catalase is an antioxidant enzyme abundant in natural resources. However, the enzyme is usually inactivated by gastric acid and digestive enzymes after oral ingestion. In this study, carboxymethyl chitosan (CM-chitosan) and hyaluronic acid (HA) conjugate hydrogel microspheres have been prepared by an emulsion cross-linking technique to retain the activity of catalase in simulated gastrointestinal (GI) fluids. Cross-linking reduced the swelling capability and increased the resistance toward hyaluronidase digestion of prepared HA-CM-chitosan hydrogel microspheres. Catalase entrapped in the hydrogel microspheres exhibited superior stability over a wide pH range (pH 2.0 and 6.0-8.0) as compared to the native enzyme. The entrapped catalase was also protected against degradation by digestive enzymes. Following the treatments, the catalase-loaded microspheres, in contrast to native catalase, could effectively decrease the intracellular H2O2 level and protect HT-29 colonic epithelial cells against H2O2-induced oxidative damage to preserve cell viability. These results suggested that the HA-CM-chitosan hydrogel microspheres can be used for entrapment, protection and intestinal delivery of catalase for H2O2 scavenging.

  19. Lung dendritic cells induce migration of protective T cells to the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Ruane, Darren; Brane, Lucas; Reis, Bernardo Sgarbi; Cheong, Cheolho; Poles, Jordan; Do, Yoonkyung; Zhu, Hongfa; Velinzon, Klara; Choi, Jae-Hoon; Studt, Natalie; Mayer, Lloyd; Lavelle, Ed C; Steinman, Ralph M; Mucida, Daniel; Mehandru, Saurabh

    2013-08-26

    Developing efficacious vaccines against enteric diseases is a global challenge that requires a better understanding of cellular recruitment dynamics at the mucosal surfaces. The current paradigm of T cell homing to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract involves the induction of α4β7 and CCR9 by Peyer's patch and mesenteric lymph node (MLN) dendritic cells (DCs) in a retinoic acid-dependent manner. This paradigm, however, cannot be reconciled with reports of GI T cell responses after intranasal (i.n.) delivery of antigens that do not directly target the GI lymphoid tissue. To explore alternative pathways of cellular migration, we have investigated the ability of DCs from mucosal and nonmucosal tissues to recruit lymphocytes to the GI tract. Unexpectedly, we found that lung DCs, like CD103(+) MLN DCs, up-regulate the gut-homing integrin α4β7 in vitro and in vivo, and induce T cell migration to the GI tract in vivo. Consistent with a role for this pathway in generating mucosal immune responses, lung DC targeting by i.n. immunization induced protective immunity against enteric challenge with a highly pathogenic strain of Salmonella. The present report demonstrates novel functional evidence of mucosal cross talk mediated by DCs, which has the potential to inform the design of novel vaccines against mucosal pathogens.

  20. Diet-induced obesity suppresses ghrelin in rat gastrointestinal tract and serum.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Ibrahim; Aydin, Suleyman; Ozkan, Yusuf; Dagli, Adile Ferda; Akin, Kadir Okhan; Guzel, Saadet Pilten; Catak, Zekiye; Ozercan, Mehmet Resat

    2011-09-01

    The aims of the present study were to examine ghrelin expression in serum and gastrointestinal tract (GIT) tissues, and to measure tissue ghrelin levels and obesity-related alterations in some serum biochemical variables in rats with diet-induced obesity (DIO). The study included 12 male rats, 60 days old. The rats were randomly allocated to two groups (n = 6). Rats in the DIO group were fed a cafeteria-style diet to induce obesity, while those in the control group were fed on standard rat pellets. After a 12 week diet program including an adaptation period all rats were decapitated, tissues were individually fixed, ghrelin expression was examined by immunohistochemistry , and tissue and serum ghrelin levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. Serum biochemical variables were measured using an autoanalyzer. When the baseline and week 12 body mass index and GIT ghrelin expression were compared between DIO and control rats, BMI had increased and ghrelin expression decreased due to obesity. The RIA results were consistent with these findings. Serum glucose, LDL cholesterol, and total cholesterol levels were elevated and HDL cholesterol significantly decreased in the DIO group. A comparison of GIT tissues between the control and obese groups demonstrated that ghrelin was decreased in all tissues of the latter. This decrease was brought about a decline in the circulating ghrelin pool. This suggests that rather than being associated with a change in a single tissue, obesity is a pathological condition in which ghrelin expression is changed in all tissues.

  1. Optimization of sustained release aceclofenac microspheres using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Rameshwar K; Naik, Jitendra B

    2015-03-01

    Polymeric microspheres containing aceclofenac were prepared by single emulsion (oil-in-water) solvent evaporation method using response surface methodology (RSM). Microspheres were prepared by changing formulation variables such as the amount of Eudragit® RS100 and the amount of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) by statistical experimental design in order to enhance the encapsulation efficiency (E.E.) of the microspheres. The resultant microspheres were evaluated for their size, morphology, E.E., and in vitro drug release. The amount of Eudragit® RS100 and the amount of PVA were found to be significant factors respectively for determining the E.E. of the microspheres. A linear mathematical model equation fitted to the data was used to predict the E.E. in the optimal region. Optimized formulation of microspheres was prepared using optimal process variables setting in order to evaluate the optimization capability of the models generated according to IV-optimal design. The microspheres showed high E.E. (74.14±0.015% to 85.34±0.011%) and suitably sustained drug release (minimum; 40% to 60%; maximum) over a period of 12h. The optimized microspheres formulation showed E.E. of 84.87±0.005 with small error value (1.39). The low magnitudes of error and the significant value of R(2) in the present investigation prove the high prognostic ability of the design. The absence of interactions between drug and polymers was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray powder diffractometry (XRPD) revealed the dispersion of drug within microspheres formulation. The microspheres were found to be discrete, spherical with smooth surface. The results demonstrate that these microspheres could be promising delivery system to sustain the drug release and improve the E.E. thus prolong drug action and achieve the highest healing effect with minimal gastrointestinal side effects.

  2. microsphere assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña-Flores, Jesús I.; Palomec-Garfias, Abraham F.; Márquez-Beltrán, César; Sánchez-Mora, Enrique; Gómez-Barojas, Estela; Pérez-Rodríguez, Felipe

    2014-09-01

    The effect of Fe ion concentration on the morphological, structural, and optical properties of TiO2 films supported on silica (SiO2) opals has been studied. TiO2:Fe2O3 films were prepared by the sol-gel method in combination with a vertical dip coating procedure; precursor solutions of Ti and Fe were deposited on a monolayer of SiO2 opals previously deposited on a glass substrate by the same procedure. After the dip coating process has been carried out, the samples were thermally treated to obtain the TiO2:Fe2O3/SiO2 composites at the Fe ion concentrations of 1, 3, and 5 wt%. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs show the formation of colloidal silica microspheres of about 50 nm diameter autoensembled in a hexagonal close-packed fashion. Although the X-ray diffractograms show no significant effect of Fe ion concentration on the crystal structure of TiO2, the μ-Raman and reflectance spectra do show that the intensity of a phonon vibration mode and the energy bandgap of TiO2 decrease as the Fe+3 ion concentration increases.

  3. M-cell targeting of whole killed bacteria induces protective immunity against gastrointestinal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Chionh, Yok-Teng; Wee, Janet L K; Every, Alison L; Ng, Garrett Z; Sutton, Philip

    2009-07-01

    As the majority of human pathogens infect via a mucosal surface, delivery of killed vaccines by mucosal routes could potentially improve protection against many such organisms. Our ability to develop effective killed mucosal vaccines is inhibited by a lack of adjuvants that are safe and effective in humans. The Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-I) lectin specifically binds M cells lining the murine gastrointestinal tract. We explored the potential for M-cell-targeted vaccination of whole, killed Helicobacter pylori, the main causative agent of peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer, and Campylobacter jejuni, the most common cause of diarrhea. Oral delivery of UEA-I-agglutinated H. pylori or C. jejuni induced a significant increase in both serum and intestinal antibody levels. This elevated response (i) required the use of whole bacteria, as it did not occur with lysate; (ii) was not mediated by formation of particulate clumps, as agglutination with a lectin with a different glycan specificity had no effect; and (iii) was not due to lectin-mediated, nonspecific immunostimulatory activity, as UEA-I codelivery with nonagglutinated bacteria did not enhance the response. Vaccination with UEA-I-agglutinated, killed whole H. pylori induced a protective response against subsequent live challenge that was as effective as that induced by cholera toxin adjuvant. Moreover, vaccination against C. jejuni by this approach resulted in complete protection against challenge in almost all animals. We believe that this is the first demonstration that targeting of whole killed bacteria to mucosal M cells can induce protective immunity without the addition of an immunostimulatory adjuvant.

  4. Central apelin mediates stress-induced gastrointestinal motor dysfunction in rats.

    PubMed

    Bülbül, Mehmet; İzgüt-Uysal, V Nimet; Sinen, Osman; Birsen, İlknur; Tanrıöver, Gamze

    2016-02-15

    Apelin, an endogenous ligand for APJ receptor, has been reported to be upregulated in paraventricular nucleus (PVN) following stress. Central apelin is known to stimulate release of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) via APJ receptor. We tested the hypothesis that stress-induced gastrointestinal (GI) dysfunction is mediated by central apelin. We also assessed the effect of exogenous apelin on GI motility under nonstressed (NS) conditions in conscious rats. Prior to solid gastric emptying (GE) and colon transit (CT) measurements, APJ receptor antagonist F13A was centrally administered under NS conditions and following acute stress (AS), chronic homotypic stress (CHS), and chronic heterotypic stress (CHeS). Plasma corticosterone was assayed. Strain gage transducers were implanted on serosal surfaces of antrum and distal colon to record postprandial motility. Stress exposure induced coexpression of c-Fos and apelin in hypothalamic PVN. Enhanced hypothalamic apelin and CRF levels in microdialysates were detected following AS and CHeS, which were negatively and positively correlated with GE and CT, respectively. Central F13A administration abolished delayed GE and accelerated CT induced by AS and CHeS. Central apelin-13 administration increased the plasma corticosterone and inhibited GE and CT by attenuating antral and colonic contractions. The inhibitory effect elicited by apelin-13 was abolished by central pretreatment of CRF antagonist CRF9-41 in antrum, but not in distal colon. Central endogenous apelin mediates stress-induced changes in gastric and colonic motor functions through APJ receptor. The inhibitory effects of central exogenous apelin-13 on GI motility appear to be partly CRF dependent. Apelin-13 inhibits colon motor functions through a CRF-independent pathway. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  5. M-Cell Targeting of Whole Killed Bacteria Induces Protective Immunity against Gastrointestinal Pathogens▿

    PubMed Central

    Chionh, Yok-Teng; Wee, Janet L. K.; Every, Alison L.; Ng, Garrett Z.; Sutton, Philip

    2009-01-01

    As the majority of human pathogens infect via a mucosal surface, delivery of killed vaccines by mucosal routes could potentially improve protection against many such organisms. Our ability to develop effective killed mucosal vaccines is inhibited by a lack of adjuvants that are safe and effective in humans. The Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-I) lectin specifically binds M cells lining the murine gastrointestinal tract. We explored the potential for M-cell-targeted vaccination of whole, killed Helicobacter pylori, the main causative agent of peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer, and Campylobacter jejuni, the most common cause of diarrhea. Oral delivery of UEA-I-agglutinated H. pylori or C. jejuni induced a significant increase in both serum and intestinal antibody levels. This elevated response (i) required the use of whole bacteria, as it did not occur with lysate; (ii) was not mediated by formation of particulate clumps, as agglutination with a lectin with a different glycan specificity had no effect; and (iii) was not due to lectin-mediated, nonspecific immunostimulatory activity, as UEA-I codelivery with nonagglutinated bacteria did not enhance the response. Vaccination with UEA-I-agglutinated, killed whole H. pylori induced a protective response against subsequent live challenge that was as effective as that induced by cholera toxin adjuvant. Moreover, vaccination against C. jejuni by this approach resulted in complete protection against challenge in almost all animals. We believe that this is the first demonstration that targeting of whole killed bacteria to mucosal M cells can induce protective immunity without the addition of an immunostimulatory adjuvant. PMID:19380476

  6. Improved optical limiting performance of laser-ablation-generated metal nanoparticles due to silica-microsphere-induced local field enhancement.

    PubMed

    Du, Zheren; Chen, Lianwei; Kao, Tsung-Sheng; Wu, Mengxue; Hong, Minghui

    2015-01-01

    For practical application, optical limiting materials must exhibit a fast response and a low threshold in order to be used for the protection of the human eye and electro-optical sensors against intense light. Many nanomaterials have been found to exhibit optical limiting properties. Laser ablation offers the possibility of fabricating nanoparticles from a wide range of target materials. For practical use of these materials, their optical limiting performance, including optical limiting threshold and the ability to efficiently attenuate high intensity light, needs to be improved. In this paper, we fabricate nanoparticles of different metals by laser ablation in liquid. We study the optical nonlinear properties of the laser-generated nanoparticle dispersion. Silica microspheres are used to enhance the optical limiting performance of the nanoparticle dispersion. The change in the optical nonlinear properties of the laser-generated nanoparticle dispersion caused by silica microspheres is studied. It is found that the incident laser beam is locally focused by the microspheres, leading to an increased optical nonlinearity of the nanoparticle dispersion.

  7. A Novel Method for Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells into Smooth Muscle-Like Cells on Clinically Deliverable Thermally Induced Phase Separation Microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Parmar, Nina; Ahmadi, Raheleh

    2015-01-01

    Muscle degeneration is a prevalent disease, particularly in aging societies where it has a huge impact on quality of life and incurs colossal health costs. Suitable donor sources of smooth muscle cells are limited and minimally invasive therapeutic approaches are sought that will augment muscle volume by delivering cells to damaged or degenerated areas of muscle. For the first time, we report the use of highly porous microcarriers produced using thermally induced phase separation (TIPS) to expand and differentiate adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AdMSCs) into smooth muscle-like cells in a format that requires minimal manipulation before clinical delivery. AdMSCs readily attached to the surface of TIPS microcarriers and proliferated while maintained in suspension culture for 12 days. Switching the incubation medium to a differentiation medium containing 2 ng/mL transforming growth factor beta-1 resulted in a significant increase in both the mRNA and protein expression of cell contractile apparatus components caldesmon, calponin, and myosin heavy chains, indicative of a smooth muscle cell-like phenotype. Growth of smooth muscle cells on the surface of the microcarriers caused no change to the integrity of the polymer microspheres making them suitable for a cell-delivery vehicle. Our results indicate that TIPS microspheres provide an ideal substrate for the expansion and differentiation of AdMSCs into smooth muscle-like cells as well as a microcarrier delivery vehicle for the attached cells ready for therapeutic applications. PMID:25205072

  8. Transformation and bioaccessibility of lead induced by steamed bread feed in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Kan, Junhong; Sima, Jingke; Cao, Xinde

    2017-03-01

    Accidental ingestion of contaminated soil has been recognized as an important pathway of human exposure to lead (Pb), especially for children through hand-to-mouth activities. Intake of food following the soil ingestion may affect the bioaccessibility of Pb in the gastrointestinal tract. In this study, the effect of steamed bread on the transformation and subsequent bioaccessibility of Pb in two soils was determined by the physiologically based extraction test (PBET). Two compounds, Pb(NO3)2 and PbCO3, were included in the evaluation for comparison. In the gastric phase, Pb bioaccessibility decreased as the steamed bread increased due to the sorption of Pb on the undissolved steamed bread, especially in PbCO3, Pb bioaccessibility decreased from 95.03% to 85.40%. Whereas in the intestinal phase, Pb bioaccessibility increased from 1.85% to 5.66% and from 0.89% to 1.80% for Pb(NO3)2 and PbCO3, respectively. The increase was attributed to the transformation of formed Pb carbonates into soluble organic-Pb complexes induced by the dissolved steamed bread at neutral pH as indicated by MINTEQ modeling. For the PbCO3-contaminated soil, the change in Pb bioaccessibility in both gastric and intestinal phases behaved like that in the pure PbCO3 compound, the steamed bread increased the bioaccessibility of Pb in the intestinal phase, but the decreased bioaccessibility of Pb was observed in the gastric phase after the steamed bread was added. However, in the soil contaminated with free Pb(2+) or sorbed Pb forms, the steamed bread increased the Pb bioaccessibility in both gastric and intestinal phases. This was probably due to the higher dissolved organic carbon induced transformation of sorbed Pb (Pb sorbed by Fe/Mn oxides) into soluble Pb-organic complex. Results from this study indicated that steamed bread had an influence on the Pb speciation transformation, correspondingly affecting Pb bioaccessibility in the gastrointestinal tract.

  9. Irinotecan-Induced Gastrointestinal Dysfunction Is Associated with Enteric Neuropathy, but Increased Numbers of Cholinergic Myenteric Neurons

    PubMed Central

    McQuade, Rachel M.; Stojanovska, Vanesa; Donald, Elizabeth L.; Rahman, Ahmed A.; Campelj, Dean G.; Abalo, Raquel; Rybalka, Emma; Bornstein, Joel C.; Nurgali, Kulmira

    2017-01-01

    Gastrointestinal dysfunction is a common side-effect of chemotherapy leading to dose reductions and treatment delays. These side-effects may persist up to 10 years post-treatment. A topoisomerase I inhibitor, irinotecan (IRI), commonly used for the treatment of colorectal cancer, is associated with severe acute and delayed-onset diarrhea. The long-term effects of IRI may be due to damage to enteric neurons innervating the gastrointestinal tract and controlling its functions. Balb/c mice received intraperitoneal injections of IRI (30 mg/kg−1) 3 times a week for 14 days, sham-treated mice received sterile water (vehicle) injections. In vivo analysis of gastrointestinal transit via serial x-ray imaging, facal water content, assessment of gross morphological damage and immunohistochemical analysis of myenteric neurons were performed at 3, 7 and 14 days following the first injection and at 7 days post-treatment. Ex vivo colonic motility was analyzed at 14 days following the first injection and 7 days post-treatment. Mucosal damage and inflammation were found following both short and long-term treatment with IRI. IRI-induced neuronal loss and increases in the number and proportion of ChAT-IR neurons and the density of VAChT-IR fibers were associated with changes in colonic motility, gastrointestinal transit and fecal water content. These changes persisted in post-treatment mice. Taken together this work has demonstrated for the first time that IRI-induced inflammation, neuronal loss and altered cholinergic expression is associated with the development of IRI-induced long-term gastrointestinal dysfunction and diarrhea. PMID:28642718

  10. Assembly of functional gold nanoparticle on silica microsphere.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsuan-Lan; Lee, Fu-Cheng; Tang, Tse-Yu; Zhou, Chenguang; Tsai, De-Hao

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a controlled synthesis of silica microsphere with the surface-decorated functional gold nanoparticles. Surface of silica microsphere was modified by 3-aminopropypltriethoxysilane and 3-aminopropyldimethylethoxysilane to generate a positive electric field, by which the gold nanoparticles with the negative charges (unconjugated, thiolated polyethylene glycol functionalized with the traceable packing density and conformation) were able to be attracted to the silica microsphere. Results show that both the molecular conjugation on gold nanoparticle and the uniformity in the amino-silanization of silica microsphere influenced the loading and the homogeneity of gold nanoparticles on silica microsphere. The 3-aminopropyldimethylethoxysilane-functionalized silica microsphere provided an uniform field to attract gold nanoparticles. Increasing the ethanol content in aminosilane solution significantly improved the homogeneity and the loading of gold nanoparticles on the surface of silica microsphere. For the gold nanoparticle, increasing the molecular mass of polyethylene glycol yielded a greater homogeneity but a lower loading on silica microsphere. Bovine serum albumin induced the desorption of gold nanoparticles from silica microsphere, where the extent of desorption was suppressed by the presence of high-molecular mass polyethylene glycol on gold nanoparticles. This work provides the fundamental understanding for the synthesis of gold nanoparticle-silica microsphere constructs useful to the applications in chemo-radioactive therapeutics.

  11. Basophil-mediated protection against gastrointestinal helminths requires IgE-induced cytokine secretion

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Christian; Turqueti-Neves, Adriana; Hartmann, Susanne; Yu, Philipp; Nimmerjahn, Falk; Voehringer, David

    2014-01-01

    Basophils orchestrate protection against reinfections with gastrointestinal helminths and ticks, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. We investigated the role of Fc receptors on basophils, the antibody isotypes IgG1 and IgE, and basophil-derived IL-4/IL-13 during challenge infections with Heligmosomoides polygyrus and Nippostrongylus brasiliensis. Using mixed bone marrow chimeras, we found that activating Fc receptors on basophils were required for protective immunity but not for regulation of basophil homeostasis. Furthermore, rapid worm expulsion was impaired in IgE-deficient but not in IgG1-deficient mice. Basophils promoted the recruitment of other effector cells into the small intestine and induced expression of the antihelminthic proteins resistin-like molecule β and mucin 5ac. Selective deletion of IL-4/IL-13 in basophils resulted in impaired worm expulsion. Collectively, our results indicate that IgE-mediated activation of basophils and the release of basophil-derived IL-4/IL-13 are critical steps in protective immunity against helminths. Therefore, development of effective vaccines against helminths should consider boosting the IL-4/IgE/basophil axis of the immune system. PMID:25404305

  12. Ionizing irradiation induces acute haematopoietic syndrome and gastrointestinal syndrome independently in mice

    PubMed Central

    Leibowitz, Brian J.; Wei, Liang; Zhang, Lin; Ping, Xiaochun; Epperly, Michael; Greenberger, Joel; Cheng, Tao; Yu, Jian

    2015-01-01

    The role of bone marrow (BM) and BM-derived cells in radiation-induced acute gastrointestinal (GI) syndrome is controversial. Here we use bone marrow transplantation (BMT), total body irradiation (TBI) and abdominal irradiation (ABI) models to demonstrate a very limited, if any, role of BM-derived cells in acute GI injury and recovery. Compared with WT BM recipients, mice receiving BM from radiation-resistant PUMA KO mice show no protection from crypt and villus injury or recovery after 15 or 12 Gy TBI, but have a significant survival benefit at 12 Gy TBI. PUMA KO BM significantly protects donor-derived pan-intestinal haematopoietic (CD45 +) and endothelial (CD105 +) cells after IR. We further show that PUMA KO BM fails to enhance animal survival or crypt regeneration in radiosensitive p21 KO-recipient mice. These findings clearly separate the effects of radiation on the intestinal epithelium from those on the BM and endothelial cells in dose-dependent acute radiation toxicity. PMID:24637717

  13. Ionizing irradiation induces acute haematopoietic syndrome and gastrointestinal syndrome independently in mice.

    PubMed

    Leibowitz, Brian J; Wei, Liang; Zhang, Lin; Ping, Xiaochun; Epperly, Michael; Greenberger, Joel; Cheng, Tao; Yu, Jian

    2014-03-18

    The role of bone marrow (BM) and BM-derived cells in radiation-induced acute gastrointestinal (GI) syndrome is controversial. Here we use bone marrow transplantation (BMT), total body irradiation (TBI) and abdominal irradiation (ABI) models to demonstrate a very limited, if any, role of BM-derived cells in acute GI injury and recovery. Compared with WT BM recipients, mice receiving BM from radiation-resistant PUMA KO mice show no protection from crypt and villus injury or recovery after 15 or 12 Gy TBI, but have a significant survival benefit at 12 Gy TBI. PUMA KO BM significantly protects donor-derived pan-intestinal haematopoietic (CD45+) and endothelial (CD105+) cells after IR. We further show that PUMA KO BM fails to enhance animal survival or crypt regeneration in radiosensitive p21 KO-recipient mice. These findings clearly separate the effects of radiation on the intestinal epithelium from those on the BM and endothelial cells in dose-dependent acute radiation toxicity.

  14. [Incidence and treatment of chemotherapy-induced nausea and emesis in gastrointestinal cancer].

    PubMed

    Lorenzen, S; Spörl, S; Lordick, F

    2014-08-01

    The incidence of gastrointestinal (GI) cancer is increasing, with approximately 2 million new cases diagnosed worldwide and about 1.2 million patients dying per year. In Europe, about 500 ,000 people per year are newly diagnosed with GI cancer. The most frequent cancer types that undergo chemotherapy include cancer of the oesophagus, stomach, pancreas, biliary tract and colorectum. In the last years, various new agents and combinations have been demonstrated to improve the prognosis of patients with GI cancer. However, with the introduction of new and more effective systemic treatments, the need for supportive treatment has become more complex. There has been significant improvement in the management of nausea and vomiting arising from highly and moderately emetogenic chemotherapy. Nevertheless, vomiting and especially nausea continue to be two of the most distressing side effects of antineoplastic treatment. For the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in highly emetogenic therapy, a triple therapy including a 5-HT3-receptor antagonist (RA), dexamethasone and an NK1-RA, aprepitant or fosaprepitant are recommended. In moderately emetogenic regimens, updated guidelines recommend the combination of the second-generation 5-HT3-RA palonosetron with dexamethasone, providing improved protection against acute nausea and vomiting, and demonstrating superior prevention in the delayed phase. This review provides an update of the revised clinical guidelines for antiemetic treatment and prophylaxis in GI cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. No Significant Endothelial Apoptosis in the Radiation-Induced Gastrointestinal Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Schuller, Bradley W.; Rogers, Arlin B.; Cormier, Kathleen S.; Riley, Kent J.; Binns, Peter J.; Julius, Richard; Hawthorne, M. Frederick; Coderre, Jeffrey A. . E-mail: coderre@mit.edu

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: This report addresses the incidence of vascular endothelial cell apoptosis in the mouse small intestine in relation to the radiation-induced gastrointestinal (GI) syndrome. Methods and Materials: Nonanesthetized mice received whole-body irradiation at doses above and below the threshold for death from the GI syndrome with 250 kVp X-rays, {sup 137}Cs gamma rays, epithermal neutrons alone, or a unique approach for selective vascular irradiation using epithermal neutrons in combination with boronated liposomes that are restricted to the blood. Both terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase biotin-dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining for apoptosis and dual-fluorescence staining for apoptosis and endothelial cells were carried out in jejunal cross-sections at 4 h postirradiation. Results: Most apoptotic cells were in the crypt epithelium. The number of TUNEL-positive nuclei per villus was low (1.62 {+-} 0.03, mean {+-} SEM) for all irradiation modalities and showed no dose-response as a function of blood vessel dose, even as the dose crossed the threshold for death from the GI syndrome. Dual-fluorescence staining for apoptosis and endothelial cells verified the TUNEL results and identified the apoptotic nuclei in the villi as CD45-positive leukocytes. Conclusion: These data do not support the hypothesis that vascular endothelial cell apoptosis is the cause of the GI syndrome.

  16. Balancing opioid-induced gastrointestinal side effects with pain management: Insights from the online community.

    PubMed

    Whitman, Cynthia B; Reid, Mark W; Arnold, Corey; Patel, Haridarshan; Ursos, Lyann; Sa'adon, Roee; Pourmorady, Jonathan; Spiegel, Brennan M R

    2015-01-01

    Opioids cause gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, pain, and (in 40 percent) constipation that diminish patients' quality of life. Outside traditional surveys, little is known about the opioid-induced constipation (OIC) patient experience and its impact on pain management. The purpose of this study was to use data from social media platforms to qualitatively examine patient beliefs about OIC and other prominent GI side effects, their impact on effective pain management and doctor-patient interaction. The authors collected Tweets from March 25 to July 31, 2014, and e-forum posts from health-related social networking sites regardless of timestamp. The authors identified specific keywords related to opioids and GI side effects to locate relevant content in the dataset, which was then manually coded using ATLAS.ti software. The authors examined 2,519,868 Tweets and more than 1.8 billion e-forum posts, of which, 88,586 Tweets and 9,767 posts satisfied the search criteria. Three thousand three individuals experienced opioidinduced GI side effects, mostly related to phenanthrenes (n = 1,589), and 1,274 (42.4 percent) individuals described constipation. Over-the-counter medications and nonevidence-based natural approaches were most commonly used to alleviate constipation. Many individuals questioned, rotated, reduced, or stopped their opioid treatments as a result of their GI side effects. Investigation of social media reveals a struggle to balance pain management with opioid-induced GI side effects, especially constipation. Individuals are often unprepared to treat OIC, to modify opioid regiments without medical advice, and to resort to using natural remedies and treatments lacking scientific evidence of effectiveness. These results identify opportunities to improve physician-patient communication and explore effective treatment alternatives.

  17. Keratinocyte growth factor induces proliferation of hepatocytes and epithelial cells throughout the rat gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Housley, R M; Morris, C F; Boyle, W; Ring, B; Biltz, R; Tarpley, J E; Aukerman, S L; Devine, P L; Whitehead, R H; Pierce, G F

    1994-11-01

    Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), a member of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family, was identified as a specific keratinocyte mitogen after isolation from a lung fibroblast line. Recently, recombinant (r)KGF was found to influence proliferation and differentiation patterns of multiple epithelial cell lineages within skin, lung, and the reproductive tract. In the present study, we designed experiments to identify additional target tissues, and focused on the rat gastrointestinal (GI) system, since a putative receptor, K-sam, was originally identified in a gastric carcinoma. Expression of KGF receptor and KGF mRNA was detected within the entire GI tract, suggesting the gut both synthesized and responded to KGF. Therefore, rKGF was administered to adult rats and was found to induce markedly increased proliferation of epithelial cells from the foregut to the colon, and of hepatocytes, one day after systemic treatment. Daily treatment resulted in the marked selective induction of mucin-producing cell lineages throughout the GI tract in a dose-dependent fashion. Other cell lineages were either unaffected (e.g., Paneth cells), or relatively decreased (e.g., parietal cells, enterocytes) in rKGF-treated rats. The direct effect of rKGF was confirmed by demonstrating markedly increased carcinoembryonic antigen production in a human colon carcinoma cell line, LIM1899. Serum levels of albumin were specifically and significantly elevated after daily treatment. These results demonstrate rKGF can induce epithelial cell activation throughout the GI tract and liver. Further, endogenous KGF may be a normal paracrine mediator of growth within the gut.

  18. Laser-assisted fabrication of highly viscous alginate microsphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yafu; Huang, Yong

    2011-04-01

    Encapsulated microspheres have been widely used in various biomedical applications. However, fabrication of encapsulated microspheres from highly viscous materials has always been a manufacturing challenge. The objective of this study is to explore a novel metallic foil-assisted laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT), a laser-assisted fabrication technique, to make encapsulated microspheres using high sodium alginate concentration solutions. The proposed four-layer approach includes a quartz disk, a sacrificial and adhesive layer, a metallic foil, and a transferred suspension layer. It is found that the proposed four-layer modified LIFT approach provides a promising fabrication technology for making of bead-encapsulated microspheres from highly viscous solutions. During the process, the microsphere only can be formed if the direct-writing height is larger than the critical direct-writing height; otherwise, tail structured droplets are formed; and the encapsulated microsphere diameter linearly increases with the laser fluence and decreases with the sodium alginate concentration.

  19. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of mucoadhesive microspheres consisting of dextran derivatives and cellulose acetate butyrate.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Yasunori; Ogihara, Kanako; Yakou, Shigeru; Nagai, Tsuneji; Takayama, Kozo

    2003-06-04

    The objective of this study was to evaluate mucoadhesive properties and gastrointestinal transit of microspheres made of oppositely charged dextran derivatives and cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB). The microspheres were prepared by emulsion solvent evaporation method. A reference microsphere was made of lactose instead of dextran derivatives. Microspheres with a diameter of 425-710 microm were examined for in vitro mucoadhesion by the everted sac method. The results indicated that the percentage of adherence to the rat small intestine was affected by the amount of dextran derivatives in the microspheres. After 1.5h, the adhering percent of the reference microspheres and the microspheres containing 50% of dextran derivatives were 34 and 74%, respectively. Then gastrointestinal transit after oral administration to rats was evaluated by counting the microspheres remaining in the stomach and small intestine. The microspheres containing 40% of dextran derivatives adhered to the stomach rather than the small intestine. Mathematical analysis revealed that the time required for 50% of microspheres to leave the stomach was 1.42h, three times longer than the reference. These findings suggest that the microsphere is a promising device as a multiple-unit mucoadhesive system.

  20. Mechanical oscillations in lasing microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toncelli, A.; Capuj, N. E.; Garrido, B.; Sledzinska, M.; Sotomayor-Torres, C. M.; Tredicucci, A.; Navarro-Urrios, D.

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the feasibility of activating coherent mechanical oscillations in lasing microspheres by modulating the laser emission at a mechanical eigenfrequency. To this aim, 1.5%Nd3+:Barium-Titanium-Silicate microspheres with diameters around 50 μm were used as high quality factor (Q > 106) whispering gallery mode lasing cavities. We have implemented a pump-and-probe technique in which the pump laser used to excite the Nd3+ ions is focused on a single microsphere with a microscope objective and a probe laser excites a specific optical mode with the evanescent field of a tapered fibre. The studied microspheres show monomode and multi-mode lasing action, which can be modulated in the best case up to 10 MHz. We have optically transduced thermally activated mechanical eigenmodes appearing in the 50-70 MHz range, the frequency of which decreases with increasing the size of the microspheres. In a pump-and-probe configuration, we observed modulation of the probe signal up to the maximum pump modulation frequency of our experimental setup, i.e., 20 MHz. This modulation decreases with frequency and is unrelated to lasing emission, pump scattering, or thermal effects. We associate this effect to free-carrier-dispersion induced by multiphoton pump light absorption. On the other hand, we conclude that, in our current experimental conditions, it was not possible to resonantly excite the mechanical modes. Finally, we discuss on how to overcome these limitations by increasing the modulation frequency of the lasing emission and decreasing the frequency of the mechanical eigenmodes displaying a strong degree of optomechanical coupling.

  1. Patterning of silica microsphere monolayers with focused femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Wenjian; Piestun, Rafael

    2006-03-13

    We demonstrate the patterning of monolayer silica microsphere lattices with tightly focused femtosecond laser pulses. We selectively removed microspheres from a lattice and characterized the effect on the lattice and the substrate. The proposed physical mechanism for the patterning process is laser-induced breakdown followed by ablation of material. We show that a microsphere focuses radiation in its interior and in the near field. This effect plays an important role in the patterning process by enhancing resolution and accuracy and by reducing the pulse energy threshold for damage. Microsphere patterning could create controlled defects within self-assembled opal photonic crystals.

  2. Stimulation and inhibition of gastrointestinal propulsion induced by substance P and substance K in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Holzer, P.

    1985-01-01

    Substance P and substance K (neurokinin A) (dose range: 0.08-80 nmol kg-1) were tested for their effects on gastrointestinal propulsion in the rat. The peptides were given by intraperitoneal injection concurrently with the intragastric administration of a test meal containing charcoal and 51Cr. Examination 3 min after the test meal showed that high doses of substance P (greater than 0.74 nmol kg-1) and substance K (greater than 8.8 nmol kg-1) inhibited gastric emptying and gastrointestinal transit. This inhibitory effect was changed to a stimulant effect by pretreatment of the rats with atropine (3.5 mumol kg-1). Guanethidine pretreatment (67 mumol kg-1) revealed a facilitatory effect of low doses of the two tachykinins (about 1 nmol kg-1) on gastrointestinal propulsion. Examination 15 min after the test meal demonstrated that substance P (greater than 0.74 nmol kg-1) dose-dependently enhanced gastrointestinal propulsion, an effect that was also seen after atropine pretreatment. Low doses of substance K (about 1 nmol kg-1) also stimulated gastrointestinal propulsion but this effect was abolished by atropine. In addition, atropine pretreatment revealed a stimulant effect of high doses of substance K (88 nmol kg-1) on gastric emptying. These results show that the effects of substance P and substance K on gastrointestinal propulsion vary with dose and time and involve, at least partly, activation of the autonomic nervous system. PMID:2413940

  3. Interference induced periodic oscillation of convolutional-surface-plasmon resonance for a metal nanoparticle encapsulated by a dielectric microsphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Song; Liu, Huizhe; Wu, Lin; Eng Png, Ching; Bai, Ping

    2016-07-01

    A theoretical study is performed on the plasmonic properties of a metal nanoparticle encapsulated by a large microsphere, where the microsphere’s diameter is comparable with or larger than the incident wavelength. Due to interaction between the reflected and refracted waves, we show that a unique optical interference (or whisper-gallery-mode-like) pattern is generated inside the microsphere. Such an interference pattern further interacts with the metal nanoparticle embedded inside, which modifies the spectral response of the metal NP and creates a convolutional-surface-plasmon resonance (cSPR). The peak of resultant cSPR oscillates periodically with respect to the microsphere’s diameter due to the repeated occurrence of the constructive and destructive interferences. Our results also show that the periodicity of oscillation is mainly determined by the microsphere’s refractive index, but is less independent on the metal nanoparticle’s size. These findings might be potentially utilized in designing multi-scale plasmon structures in various applications such as sensors, drug delivery and photocatalysis.

  4. Metallic coating of microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, S.F.

    1980-08-15

    Extremely smooth, uniform metal coatings of micrometer thicknesses on microscopic glass spheres (microspheres) are often needed as targets for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments. The first part of this paper reviews those methods used successfully to provide metal coated microspheres for ICF targets, including magnetron sputtering, electro- and electroless plating, and chemical vapor pyrolysis. The second part of this paper discusses some of the critical aspects of magnetron sputter coating of microspheres, including substrate requirements, the sticking of microspheres during coating (preventing a uniform coating), and the difficulties in growing the desired dense, smooth, uniform microstructure on continuously moving spherical substrates.

  5. Case Study: Utilizing a Low FODMAP Diet to Combat Exercise-Induced Gastrointestinal Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Lis, Dana; Ahuja, Kiran D K; Stellingwerff, Trent; Kitic, Cecilia M; Fell, James

    2016-10-01

    Athletes employ various dietary strategies in attempts to attenuate exercise-induced gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms to ensure optimal performance. This case-study outlines one of these GI-targeted approaches via the implementation of a short-term low FODMAP (Fermentable Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides and Polyols) diet, with the aim to attenuate persistent running specific GI symptoms in a recreationally competitive multisport athlete (male, 86 kg, 57.9 ml·kg·min(-1) V02max, 10-15 hr/week training, with no diagnosed GI disorder). Using a single-blinded approach a habitual diet was compared with a 6-day low FODMAP intervention diet (81 ± 5g vs 7.2 ± 5.7g FODMAP s/day) for their effect on GI symptoms and perceptual wellbeing. Training was similar during the habitual and dietary intervention periods. Postexercise (During) GI symptom ratings were recorded immediately following training. Daily GI symptoms and the Daily Analysis of Life Demands for Athletes (DALDA) were recorded at the end of each day. Daily and During GI symptom scores (scale 0-9) ranged from 0-4 during the habitual dietary period while during the low FODMAP dietary period all scores were 0 (no symptoms at all). DALDA scores for worse than normal ranged from 3-10 vs 0-8 in the habitual and low FODMAP dietary periods, respectively, indicating improvement. This intervention was effective for this GI symptom prone athlete; however, randomized-controlled trials are required to assess the suitability of low FODMAP diets for reducing GI distress in other symptomatic athletes.

  6. Diet and gastrointestinal bypass-induced weight loss: the roles of ghrelin and peptide YY.

    PubMed

    Chandarana, Keval; Gelegen, Cigdem; Karra, Efthimia; Choudhury, Agharul I; Drew, Megan E; Fauveau, Veronique; Viollet, Benoit; Andreelli, Fabrizio; Withers, Dominic J; Batterham, Rachel L

    2011-03-01

    Bariatric surgery causes durable weight loss. Gut hormones are implicated in obesity pathogenesis, dietary failure, and mediating gastrointestinal bypass (GIBP) surgery weight loss. In mice, we determined the effects of diet-induced obesity (DIO), subsequent dieting, and GIBP surgery on ghrelin, peptide YY (PYY), and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). To evaluate PYY's role in mediating weight loss post-GIBP, we undertook GIBP surgery in PyyKO mice. Male C57BL/6 mice randomized to a high-fat diet or control diet were killed at 4-week intervals. DIO mice underwent switch to ad libitum low-fat diet (DIO-switch) or caloric restriction (CR) for 4 weeks before being killed. PyyKO mice and their DIO wild-type (WT) littermates underwent GIBP or sham surgery and were culled 10 days postoperatively. Fasting acyl-ghrelin, total PYY, active GLP-1 concentrations, stomach ghrelin expression, and colonic Pyy and glucagon expression were determined. Fasting and postprandial PYY and GLP-1 concentrations were assessed 30 days postsurgery in GIBP and sham pair-fed (sham.PF) groups. DIO progressively reduced circulating fasting acyl-ghrelin, PYY, and GLP-1 levels. CR and DIO-switch caused weight loss but failed to restore circulating PYY to weight-appropriate levels. After GIBP, WT mice lost weight and exhibited increased circulating fasting PYY and colonic Pyy and glucagon expression. In contrast, the acute effects of GIBP on body weight were lost in PyyKO mice. Fasting PYY and postprandial PYY and GLP-1 levels were increased in GIBP mice compared with sham.PF mice. PYY plays a key role in mediating the early weight loss observed post-GIBP, whereas relative PYY deficiency during dieting may compromise weight-loss attempts.

  7. Ex vivo optical coherence tomography and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy imaging of murine gastrointestinal tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariri, Lida; Tumlinson, Alexandre R.; Wade, Norman; Besselsen, David; Utzinger, Urs; Gerner, Eugene; Barton, Jennifer

    2005-04-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy (LIF) have separately been found to have clinical potential in identifying human gastrointestinal (GI) pathologies, yet their diagnostic capability in mouse models of human disease is unknown. We combine the two modalities to survey the GI tract of a variety of mouse strains and sample dysplasias and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) of the small and large intestine. Segments of duodenum and lower colon 2.5 cm in length and the entire esophagus from 10 mice each of two colon cancer models (ApcMin and AOM treated A/J) and two IBD models (Il-2 and Il-10) and 5 mice each of their respective controls were excised. OCT images and LIF spectra were obtained simultaneously from each tissue sample within 1 hour of extraction. Histology was used to classify tissue regions as normal, Peyer"s patch, dysplasia, adenoma, or IBD. Features in corresponding regions of OCT images were analyzed. Spectra from each of these categories were averaged and compared via the student's t-test. Features in OCT images correlated to histology in both normal and diseased tissue samples. In the diseased samples, OCT was able to identify early stages of mild colitis and dysplasia. In the sample of IBD, the LIF spectra displayed unique peaks at 635nm and 670nm, which were attributed to increased porphyrin production in the proliferating bacteria of the disease. These peaks have the potential to act as a diagnostic for IBD. OCT and LIF appear to be useful and complementary modalities for imaging mouse models.

  8. Detection of Treatment-Induced Changes in Signaling Pathways in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors using Transcriptomic Data

    PubMed Central

    Ochs, Michael F.; Rink, Lori; Tarn, Chi; Mburu, Sarah; Taguchi, Takahiro; Eisenberg, Burton; Godwin, Andrew K.

    2009-01-01

    Cell signaling plays a central role in the etiology of cancer. Numerous therapeutics in use or under development target signaling proteins, however off-target effects often limit assignment of positive clinical response to the intended target. As direct measurements of signaling protein activity are not generally feasible during treatment, there is a need for more powerful methods to determine if therapeutics inhibit their targets and when off-target effects occur. We have used the Bayesian Decomposition algorithm and data on transcriptional regulation to create a novel methodology, DESIDE (Differential Expression for SIgnaling DEtermination), for inferring signaling activity from microarray measurements. We applied DESIDE to deduce signaling activity in gastrointestinal stromal tumor cell lines treated with the targeted therapeutic imatinib mesylate (Gleevec). We detected the expected reduced activity in the KIT pathway, as well as unexpected changes in the P53 pathway. Pursuing these findings, we have determined that imatinib-induced DNA damage is responsible for the increased activity of P53, identifying a novel off-target activity for this drug. We then used DESIDE on data from resected, post-imatinib treatment tumor samples and identified a pattern in these tumors similar to that at late time points in the cell lines, and this pattern correlated with initial clinical response. The pattern showed increased activity of ELK1 and STAT3 transcription factors, which are associated with the growth of side population cells. DESIDE infers the global reprogramming of signaling networks during treatment, permitting treatment modification that leverages ongoing drug development efforts, which is crucial for personalized medicine. PMID:19903850

  9. Relationship between Helicobacter pylori infection and vomiting induced by gastrointestinal cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yiwei; Ji, Chushu; He, Yifu; Pan, Yueyin

    2017-07-01

    Nausea and vomiting are the most common adverse reactions to chemotherapy. To discuss the relationship between Helicobacter pylori and chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). A total of 112 patients with malignant tumours of the gastrointestinal tract was selected. Based on the 14C-urea breath test results, the patients were divided into H. pylori-positive (n = 59) and H. pylori-negative (n = 53) groups. Both groups received prophylactic antiemetic treatment during chemotherapy. The incidence of nausea and vomiting and their effects on the patients' life functions was recorded using the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC) Antiemetic Tool (MAT) and the Functional Living Index Emesis (FLIE) from 0-120 h after chemotherapy. Records of the H. pylori-positive and H. pylori-negative groups were compared. The rates of nausea and vomiting remission were higher in the H. pylori -negative group than in the H. pylori -positive group. The proportions of no effect in daily life (NIDL) patients in the nausea and vomiting section were 73.4 and 75.5% in the H. pylori -negative group respectively. There was a higher proportion of NIDL patients in the H. pylori -negative group than in the H. pylori -positive group (P < 0.001, P = 0.046). A multivariate unconditional logistic regression analysis was performed, and the results showed that H. pylori infection was a factor affecting the nausea scores on the FLIE (odds ratio = 0.757, 95% confidence interval 0.597-0.960, P = 0.021). H. pylori infection in patients with cancer may be a factor that increases CINV. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  10. A Sulfated-Polysaccharide Fraction from Seaweed Gracilaria birdiae Prevents Naproxen-Induced Gastrointestinal Damage in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Renan O.; Santana, Ana Paula M.; Carvalho, Nathalia S.; Bezerra, Talita S.; Oliveira, Camila B.; Damasceno, Samara R. B.; Chaves, Luciano S.; Freitas, Ana Lúcia P.; Soares, Pedro M. G.; Souza, Marcellus H. L. P.; Barbosa, André Luiz R.; Medeiros, Jand-Venes R.

    2012-01-01

    Red seaweeds synthesize a great variety of sulfated galactans. Sulfated polysaccharides (PLSs) from seaweed are comprised of substances with pharmaceutical and biomedical potential. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the protective effect of the PLS fraction extracted from the seaweed Gracilaria birdiae in rats with naproxen-induced gastrointestinal damage. Male Wistar rats were pretreated with 0.5% carboxymethylcellulose (control group—vehicle) or PLS (10, 30, and 90 mg/kg, p.o.) twice daily (at 09:00 and 21:00) for 2 days. After 1 h, naproxen (80 mg/kg, p.o.) was administered. The rats were killed on day two, 4 h after naproxen treatment. The stomachs were promptly excised, opened along the greater curvature, and measured using digital calipers. Furthermore, the guts of the animals were removed, and a 5-cm portion of the small intestine (jejunum and ileum) was used for the evaluation of macroscopic scores. Samples of the stomach and the small intestine were used for histological evaluation, morphometric analysis and in assays for glutathione (GSH) levels, malonyldialdehyde (MDA) concentration, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. PLS treatment reduced the macroscopic and microscopic naproxen-induced gastrointestinal damage in a dose-dependent manner. Our results suggest that the PLS fraction has a protective effect against gastrointestinal damage through mechanisms that involve the inhibition of inflammatory cell infiltration and lipid peroxidation. PMID:23342384

  11. A sulfated-polysaccharide fraction from seaweed Gracilaria birdiae prevents naproxen-induced gastrointestinal damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Silva, Renan O; Santana, Ana Paula M; Carvalho, Nathalia S; Bezerra, Talita S; Oliveira, Camila B; Damasceno, Samara R B; Chaves, Luciano S; Freitas, Ana Lúcia P; Soares, Pedro M G; Souza, Marcellus H L P; Barbosa, André Luiz R; Medeiros, Jand-Venes R

    2012-12-01

    Red seaweeds synthesize a great variety of sulfated galactans. Sulfated polysaccharides (PLSs) from seaweed are comprised of substances with pharmaceutical and biomedical potential. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the protective effect of the PLS fraction extracted from the seaweed Gracilaria birdiae in rats with naproxen-induced gastrointestinal damage. Male Wistar rats were pretreated with 0.5% carboxymethylcellulose (control group-vehicle) or PLS (10, 30, and 90 mg/kg, p.o.) twice daily (at 09:00 and 21:00) for 2 days. After 1 h, naproxen (80 mg/kg, p.o.) was administered. The rats were killed on day two, 4 h after naproxen treatment. The stomachs were promptly excised, opened along the greater curvature, and measured using digital calipers. Furthermore, the guts of the animals were removed, and a 5-cm portion of the small intestine (jejunum and ileum) was used for the evaluation of macroscopic scores. Samples of the stomach and the small intestine were used for histological evaluation, morphometric analysis and in assays for glutathione (GSH) levels, malonyldialdehyde (MDA) concentration, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. PLS treatment reduced the macroscopic and microscopic naproxen-induced gastrointestinal damage in a dose-dependent manner. Our results suggest that the PLS fraction has a protective effect against gastrointestinal damage through mechanisms that involve the inhibition of inflammatory cell infiltration and lipid peroxidation.

  12. In vitro osteogenesis of synovium mesenchymal cells induced by controlled release of alendronate and dexamethasone from a sintered microspherical scaffold.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingjun; Shi, Xuetao; Ren, Li; Yao, Yongchang; Wang, Dong-An

    2010-01-01

    In vitro osteogenesis was successfully achieved with synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells (SMSCs), which intrinsically have a strong chondrogenic tendency, by in situ release of alendronate (AL) and dexamethasone (Dex) from poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)/hydroxyapatite (HA) sintered microspherical scaffold (PLGA/HA-SMS). Cumulative release profiles of AL and Dex from PLGA/HA-SMS and the influence on SMSCs osteogenic commitment were investigated. SMSCs seeded in Al-/Dex-loaded PLGA/HA-SMS (PLGA/HA-Com-SMS) exhibited significant osteogenic differentiation, as indicated by high yields of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and bone calcification. In addition, mechanical properties (compressional) of PLGA/HA-Com-SMSs were also evaluated and approved. In conclusion, by promoting osteogenic commitment of SMSCs in vitro, this newly designed controlled-release system opens a new door to bone reparation and regeneration.

  13. Systemic treatment-induced gastrointestinal toxicity: incidence, clinical presentation and management

    PubMed Central

    Boussios, Stergios; Pentheroudakis, George; Katsanos, Konstantinos; Pavlidis, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    The toxicity of cancer chemotherapy is among the most important factors limiting its use. Clear delineation and communication of benefits and risks is an essential component of treatment decisions. Gastrointestinal toxicity during chemotherapy is frequent and contributes to dose reductions, delays and cessation of cancer treatment. The development of intervention strategies that could eliminate an expected side effect of chemotherapy is vital. Physiologic changes that can increase the toxicity of chemotherapy are decreased stem cell reserves, decreased ability to repair cell damage, progressive loss of body protein, and accumulation of body fat. Symptoms only arise when physiological functions are altered. The gastrointestinal symptoms arising during cancer chemotherapy can often be cured if newly acquired, and if gastrointestinal physiological deficits are identified. Developing new chemotherapy regimens with similar efficacy but less toxicity should be a priority for future research. PMID:24713845

  14. Making Polymeric Microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, Won-Kyu; Hyson, Michael T.; Chung, Sang-Kun; Colvin, Michael S.; Chang, Manchium

    1989-01-01

    Combination of advanced techniques yields uniform particles for biomedical applications. Process combines ink-jet and irradiation/freeze-polymerization techniques to make polymeric microspheres of uniform size in diameters from 100 to 400 micrometer. Microspheres used in chromatography, cell sorting, cell labeling, and manufacture of pharmaceutical materials.

  15. Making Polymeric Microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, Won-Kyu; Hyson, Michael T.; Chung, Sang-Kun; Colvin, Michael S.; Chang, Manchium

    1989-01-01

    Combination of advanced techniques yields uniform particles for biomedical applications. Process combines ink-jet and irradiation/freeze-polymerization techniques to make polymeric microspheres of uniform size in diameters from 100 to 400 micrometer. Microspheres used in chromatography, cell sorting, cell labeling, and manufacture of pharmaceutical materials.

  16. Bone Marrow-Derived Cells May Not Be the Original Cells for Carcinogen-Induced Mouse Gastrointestinal Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chen; Gu, Liankun; Deng, Dajun

    2013-01-01

    Aim It has been reported that bone marrow-derived cells (BMDC) can be original cells of mouse gastric cancers induced by Helicobacter felis (H. felis) infection. However, it is unknown whether BMDCs are also the original cells of mouse gastrointestinal cancers induced by gastric carcinogens N-nitroso-N-methylurea (NMU) and H. felis infection. Methods C57BL/6 recipient mice were initially irradiated with 10Gy X-ray, reconstituted with bone marrow cells from the C57BL/6-Tg (CAG-EGFP) donor mice to label BMDCs with green fluorescence protein (GFP). After 4 weeks of recovery, the bone marrow-transplanted mice were given NMU in drinking water (240 ppm) and subsequently infected with H. felis by gavage. Eighty weeks later, all mice were euthanized for pathological examination. The BMDCs expressing GFP were detected in tissues using direct GFP fluorescence confocal microscopy analysis and immunohistochemistry staining (IHC) assays. Results Neoplastic lesions were induced by NMU treatment and/or H. felis infection at the antrum of the glandular stomach and small intestine. In the direct GFP fluorescence confocal assay, GFP(+) epithelial cell cluster or glands were not observed in these gastrointestinal tumors, however, most GFP(+) BMDCs sporadically located in the tumor stromal tissues. Some of these GFP(+) stromal BMDCs co-expressed the hematopoietic marker CD45 or myofibroblasts markers αSMA and SRF. In the indirect GFP IHC assay, similar results were observed among 11 gastric intraepithelial neoplasia lesions and 2 small intestine tumors. Conclusion These results demonstrated that BMDCs might not be the source of gastrointestinal tumor cells induced by NMU and/or H. felis infection. PMID:24260263

  17. Production of hollow aerogel microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhye, R.S.; Henning, S.A.

    1990-12-31

    A method is described for making hollow aerogel microspheres of 800--1200{mu} diameter and 100--300{mu} wall thickness by forming hollow alcogel microspheres during the sol/gel process in a catalytic atmosphere and capturing them on a foam surface containing catalyst. Supercritical drying of the formed hollow alcogel microspheres yields hollow aerogel microspheres which are suitable for ICF targets.

  18. Production of hollow aerogel microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Upadhye, Ravindra S.; Henning, Sten A.

    1993-01-01

    A method is described for making hollow aerogel microspheres of 800-1200 .mu. diameter and 100-300 .mu. wall thickness by forming hollow alcogel microspheres during the sol/gel process in a catalytic atmosphere and capturing them on a foam surface containing catalyst. Supercritical drying of the formed hollow alcogel microspheres yields hollow aerogel microspheres which are suitable for ICF targets.

  19. In vitro gastrointestinal digestion promotes the protective effect of blackberry extract against acrylamide-induced oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Su, Hongming; Xu, Yang; Jin, Chao

    2017-01-01

    Acrylamide (AA)-induced toxicity has been associated with accumulation of excessive reactive oxygen species. The present study was therefore undertaken to investigate the protective effect of blackberry digests produced after (BBD) in vitro gastrointestinal (GI) digestion against AA-induced oxidative damage. The results indicated that the BBD (0.5 mg/mL) pretreatment significantly suppressed AA-induced intracellular ROS generation (56.6 ± 2.9% of AA treatment), mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) decrease (297 ± 18% of AA treatment) and glutathione (GSH) depletion (307 ± 23% of AA treatment), thereby ameliorating cytotoxicity. Furthermore, LC/MS/MS analysis identified eight phenolic compounds with high contents in BBD, including ellagic acid, ellagic acid pentoside, ellagic acid glucuronoside, methyl-ellagic acid pentoside, methyl-ellagic acid glucuronoside, cyanidin glucoside, gallic acid and galloyl esters, as primary active compounds responsible for antioxidant action. Collectively, our study uncovered that the protective effect of blackberry was reserved after gastrointestinal digestion in combating exogenous pollutant-induced oxidative stress. PMID:28084406

  20. In vitro gastrointestinal digestion promotes the protective effect of blackberry extract against acrylamide-induced oxidative stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Su, Hongming; Xu, Yang; Jin, Chao

    2017-01-01

    Acrylamide (AA)-induced toxicity has been associated with accumulation of excessive reactive oxygen species. The present study was therefore undertaken to investigate the protective effect of blackberry digests produced after (BBD) in vitro gastrointestinal (GI) digestion against AA-induced oxidative damage. The results indicated that the BBD (0.5 mg/mL) pretreatment significantly suppressed AA-induced intracellular ROS generation (56.6 ± 2.9% of AA treatment), mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) decrease (297 ± 18% of AA treatment) and glutathione (GSH) depletion (307 ± 23% of AA treatment), thereby ameliorating cytotoxicity. Furthermore, LC/MS/MS analysis identified eight phenolic compounds with high contents in BBD, including ellagic acid, ellagic acid pentoside, ellagic acid glucuronoside, methyl-ellagic acid pentoside, methyl-ellagic acid glucuronoside, cyanidin glucoside, gallic acid and galloyl esters, as primary active compounds responsible for antioxidant action. Collectively, our study uncovered that the protective effect of blackberry was reserved after gastrointestinal digestion in combating exogenous pollutant-induced oxidative stress.

  1. Metabolism of proteinoid microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakashima, T.; Fox, S. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1987-01-01

    The literature of metabolism in proteinoids and proteinoid microspheres is reviewed and criticized from a biochemical and experimental point of view. Closely related literature is also reviewed in order to understand the function of proteinoids and proteinoid microspheres. Proteinoids or proteinoid microspheres have many activities. Esterolysis, decarboxylation, amination, deamination, and oxidoreduction are catabolic enzyme activities. The formation of ATP, peptides or oligonucleotides is synthetic enzyme activities. Additional activities are hormonal and inhibitory. Selective formation of peptides is an activity of nucleoproteinoid microspheres; these are a model for ribosomes. Mechanisms of peptide and oligonucleotide syntheses from amino acids and nucleotide triphosphate by proteinoid microspheres are tentatively proposed as an integrative consequence of reviewing the literature.

  2. Metabolism of proteinoid microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakashima, T.; Fox, S. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1987-01-01

    The literature of metabolism in proteinoids and proteinoid microspheres is reviewed and criticized from a biochemical and experimental point of view. Closely related literature is also reviewed in order to understand the function of proteinoids and proteinoid microspheres. Proteinoids or proteinoid microspheres have many activities. Esterolyis, decarboxylation, amination, deamination, and oxidoreduction are catabolic enzyme activities. The formation of ATP, peptides or oligonucleotides is synthetic enzyme activities. Additional activities are hormonal and inhibitory. Selective formation of peptides is an activity of nucleoproteinoid microspheres; these are a model for ribosomes. Mechanisms of peptide and oligonucleotide syntheses from amino acids and nucleotide triphosphate by proteinoid microspheres are tentatively proposed as an integrative consequence of reviewing the literature.

  3. Metabolism of proteinoid microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakashima, T.; Fox, S. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1987-01-01

    The literature of metabolism in proteinoids and proteinoid microspheres is reviewed and criticized from a biochemical and experimental point of view. Closely related literature is also reviewed in order to understand the function of proteinoids and proteinoid microspheres. Proteinoids or proteinoid microspheres have many activities. Esterolyis, decarboxylation, amination, deamination, and oxidoreduction are catabolic enzyme activities. The formation of ATP, peptides or oligonucleotides is synthetic enzyme activities. Additional activities are hormonal and inhibitory. Selective formation of peptides is an activity of nucleoproteinoid microspheres; these are a model for ribosomes. Mechanisms of peptide and oligonucleotide syntheses from amino acids and nucleotide triphosphate by proteinoid microspheres are tentatively proposed as an integrative consequence of reviewing the literature.

  4. Metabolism of proteinoid microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakashima, T.; Fox, S. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1987-01-01

    The literature of metabolism in proteinoids and proteinoid microspheres is reviewed and criticized from a biochemical and experimental point of view. Closely related literature is also reviewed in order to understand the function of proteinoids and proteinoid microspheres. Proteinoids or proteinoid microspheres have many activities. Esterolysis, decarboxylation, amination, deamination, and oxidoreduction are catabolic enzyme activities. The formation of ATP, peptides or oligonucleotides is synthetic enzyme activities. Additional activities are hormonal and inhibitory. Selective formation of peptides is an activity of nucleoproteinoid microspheres; these are a model for ribosomes. Mechanisms of peptide and oligonucleotide syntheses from amino acids and nucleotide triphosphate by proteinoid microspheres are tentatively proposed as an integrative consequence of reviewing the literature.

  5. Attenuation of radiation-induced gastrointestinal damage by epidermal growth factor and bone marrow transplantation in mice.

    PubMed

    Pejchal, Jaroslav; Šinkorová, Zuzana; Tichý, Aleš; Kmochová, Adéla; Ďurišová, Kamila; Kubelková, Klára; Pohanka, Miroslav; Bureš, Jan; Tachecí, Ilja; Kuča, Kamil; Vávrová, Jiřina

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effect of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and bone marrow transplantation (BMT) on gastrointestinal damage after high-dose irradiation of mice. C57Black/6 mice were used. Two survival experiments were performed (12 and 13 Gy; (60)Co, 0.59-0.57 Gy/min). To evaluate BMT and EGF action, five groups were established - 0 Gy, 13 Gy, 13 Gy + EGF (at 2 mg/kg, first dose 24 h after irradiation and then every 48 h), 13 Gy + BMT (5 × 10(6) cells from green fluorescent protein [GFP] syngenic mice, 4 h after irradiation), and 13 Gy + BMT + EGF. Survival data, blood cell counts, gastrointestine and liver parameters and GFP positive cell migration were measured. BMT and EGF (three doses, at 2 mg/kg, administered 1, 3 and 5 days after irradiation) significantly increased survival (13 Gy). In blood, progressive cytopenia was observed with BMT, EGF or their combination having no improving effect early after irradiation. In gastrointestinal system, BMT, EGF and their combination attenuated radiation-induced atrophy and increased regeneration during first week after irradiation with the combination being most effective. Signs of systemic inflammatory reaction were observed 30 days after irradiation. Our data indicate that BMT together with EGF is a promising strategy in the treatment of high-dose whole-body irradiation damage.

  6. Efficacy of oral afoxolaner plus milbemycin oxime chewables against induced gastrointestinal nematode infections in dogs.

    PubMed

    Fankhauser, Rebecca; Hamel, Dietmar; Dorr, Paul; Reinemeyer, Craig R; Crafford, Dionne; Bowman, Dwight D; Ulrich, Michael; Yoon, Stephen; Larsen, Diane L

    2016-07-30

    The efficacy of oral afoxolaner plus milbemycin oxime combination chewables against induced gastrointestinal nematode infections in dogs was evaluated in six separate studies. Two studies were performed to evaluate the efficacy of the product against Toxocara canis, two studies evaluated the efficacy against Toxascaris leonina, one study evaluated the efficacy against Ancylostoma braziliense, and one study evaluated the efficacy against Ancylostoma caninum. In the A. caninum study, the efficacy of milbemycin oxime alone and afoxolaner alone was also evaluated. Dogs in all studies were inoculated with infective eggs or larvae and confirmed to have patent infections based on a fecal examination prior to allocation to study group and treatment. Each study utilized a randomized block design with blocks based on pre-treatment body weight. All dogs were assigned to blocks based on body weight, and then each dog within a block was randomly assigned to treatment group. There were two groups of 10 dogs each in the T. canis, T. leonina, and A. braziliense studies: 1) an untreated (control) group and 2) a group treated with afoxolaner plus milbemycin oxime chewables (NexGard Spectra(®), Merial). This group was treated at a dose as close as possible to the minimum effective dose of afoxolaner and milbemycin oxime (2.5mg+0.5mg per kg body weight, respectively) once on Day 0 using whole chews. There were four groups of 10 dogs each in the A. caninum study: 1) untreated (control), 2) NexGard Spectra(®) as described above, 3) milbemycin oxime alone (dose of at least 0.5mg per kg of body weight) and 4) afoxalaner alone (dose of at least 2.5mg per kg body weight). For parasite recovery and counts, dogs were euthanized humanely and necropsied seven days after treatment. The efficacy of the afoxolaner plus milbemycin oxime combination was ≥98% against T. canis, ≥95.8% against T. leonina, and 90.2% against A. braziliense. Efficacy of the combination against A. caninum was 99

  7. Ganglioside-monosialic acid (GM1) prevents oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neurotoxicity in patients with gastrointestinal tumors.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yanyun; Yang, Junlan; Jiao, Shunchang; Ji, Tiefeng

    2013-01-25

    Oxaliplatin, an effective antineoplastic agent againstgastrointestinal tumors, can cause severe peripheral neurotoxicity, which seriously limits its clinical application. To date, there are no effective treatments for this complication. Ganglioside-monosialic acid (GM1) has been shown to protect neurons against injuries and degeneration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of GM1 on preventing oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity in patients with gastrointestinal tumors. In this study, 120 patients with gastrointestinal tumors were enrolled, andthey received the treatment of XELOX (oxaliplatin and capecitabine) and FOLFOX4 (oxaliplatin, leukovolin and 5-fluorouracil). The patients were randomly divided into two groups, the experimental group and control group, with60 patients ineach. On the day chemotherapy was initiated, the experimental group received GM1 intravenously (100 mg once daily) for 3 days, while no neuroprotective agents were applied in the control group. The incidence rates and classification of neurotoxicity in the two groups were evaluated and the differences between the two groups were examined. Furthermore, whether GM1 affected the therapeutic effects of chemotherapy was also examined. The grade of neurotoxicity in the experimental group was significantly lower than in the control group (P<0.05, Mann-Whitney U test). The probability of occurrence of low-grade neurotoxicity (grade 0 and 1) in the experimental group was higher than that in the control group (logistic ordinal regression); whereas the probability of occurrence of high-grade neurotoxicity (grade 2 and 3) in the experimental group was lower than in the control group (logistic ordinal regression). The data suggested that GM1 could reduce the grade of oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity and was an effective neuroprotective agent against oxaliplatin-induced high-grade neurotoxicity in patients with gastrointestinal tumors.

  8. Ganglioside-monosialic acid (GM1) prevents oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neurotoxicity in patients with gastrointestinal tumors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Oxaliplatin, an effective antineoplastic agent againstgastrointestinal tumors, can cause severe peripheral neurotoxicity, which seriously limits its clinical application. To date, there are no effective treatments for this complication. Ganglioside-monosialic acid (GM1) has been shown to protect neurons against injuries and degeneration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of GM1 on preventing oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity in patients with gastrointestinal tumors. Methods In this study, 120 patients with gastrointestinal tumors were enrolled, andthey received the treatment of XELOX (oxaliplatin and capecitabine) and FOLFOX4 (oxaliplatin, leukovolin and 5-fluorouracil). The patients were randomly divided into two groups, the experimental group and control group, with60 patients ineach. On the day chemotherapy was initiated, the experimental group received GM1 intravenously (100 mg once daily) for 3 days, while no neuroprotective agents were applied in the control group. The incidence rates and classification of neurotoxicity in the two groups were evaluated and the differences between the two groups were examined. Furthermore, whether GM1 affected the therapeutic effects of chemotherapy was also examined. Results The grade of neurotoxicity in the experimental group was significantly lower than in the control group (P<0.05, Mann–Whitney U test). The probability of occurrence of low-grade neurotoxicity (grade 0 and 1) in the experimental group was higher than that in the control group (logistic ordinal regression); whereas the probability of occurrence of high-grade neurotoxicity (grade 2 and 3) in the experimental group was lower than in the control group (logistic ordinal regression). Conclusion The data suggested that GM1 could reduce the grade of oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity and was an effective neuroprotective agent against oxaliplatin-induced high-grade neurotoxicity in patients with gastrointestinal tumors. PMID:23351188

  9. GASTROINTESTINAL EOSINOPHILIA

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Li; Rothenberg, Marc E.

    2007-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Gastrointestinal eosinophilia, as a broad term for abnormal eosinophil accumulation in the GI tract, involves many different disease identities. These diseases include primary eosinophil associated gastrointestinal diseases, gastrointestinal eosinophilia in HES and all gastrointestinal eosinophilic states associated with known causes. Each of these diseases has its unique features but there is no absolute boundary between them. All three groups of GI eosinophila are described in this chapter although the focus is on primary gastrointestinal eosinophilia, i.e. EGID. PMID:17868858

  10. Poor awareness of preventing aspirin-induced gastrointestinal injury with combined protective medications.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ling-Ling; Xu, Ling-Cheng; Chen, Yan; Zhou, Quan; Zeng, Su

    2012-06-28

    To investigate prescribing pattern in low-dose aspirin users and physician awareness of preventing aspirin-induced gastrointestinal (GI) injury with combined protective medications. A retrospective drug utilization study was conducted in the 2nd Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University. The hospital has 2300 beds and 2.5 million outpatient visits annually. Data mining was performed on all aspirin prescriptions for outpatients and emergency patients admitted in 2011. Concomitant use of proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs), histamine 2-receptor antagonists (H2RA) and mucoprotective drugs (MPs) were analyzed. A defined daily dose (DDD) methodology was applied to each MP. A further investigation was performed in aspirin users on combination use of GI injurious medicines [non-steoid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), corticosteroids and clopidogrel and warfarin] or intestinal protective drugs (misoprostol, rebamipide, teprenone and gefarnate). Data of major bleeding episodes were derived from medical records and adverse drug reaction monitoring records. The annual incidence of major GI bleeding due to low-dose aspirin was estimated for outpatients. Prescriptions for aspirin users receiving PPIs, H2RA and MPs (n = 1039) accounted for only 3.46% of total aspirin prescriptions (n = 30 015). The ratios of coadministration of aspirin/PPI, aspirin/H2RA, aspirin/MP and aspirin/PPI/MP to the total aspirin prescriptions were 2.82%, 0.12%, 0.40% and 0.12%, respectively. No statistically significant difference was observed in age between patients not receiving any GI protective medications and patients receiving PPIs, H2RA or MPs. The combined medication of aspirin and PPI was used more frequently than that of aspirin and MPs (2.82% vs 0.40%, P < 0.05) and aspirin/H2RA (2.82% vs 0.12%, P < 0.05). The values of DDDs of MPs in descending order were as follows: gefarnate, hydrotalcite > teprenone > sucralfate oral suspension > L-glutamine and sodium gualenate granules

  11. Poor awareness of preventing aspirin-induced gastrointestinal injury with combined protective medications

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ling-Ling; Xu, Ling-Cheng; Chen, Yan; Zhou, Quan; Zeng, Su

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate prescribing pattern in low-dose aspirin users and physician awareness of preventing aspirin-induced gastrointestinal (GI) injury with combined protective medications. METHODS: A retrospective drug utilization study was conducted in the 2nd Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University. The hospital has 2300 beds and 2.5 million outpatient visits annually. Data mining was performed on all aspirin prescriptions for outpatients and emergency patients admitted in 2011. Concomitant use of proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs), histamine 2-receptor antagonists (H2RA) and mucoprotective drugs (MPs) were analyzed. A defined daily dose (DDD) methodology was applied to each MP. A further investigation was performed in aspirin users on combination use of GI injurious medicines [non-steoid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), corticosteroids and clopidogrel and warfarin] or intestinal protective drugs (misoprostol, rebamipide, teprenone and gefarnate). Data of major bleeding episodes were derived from medical records and adverse drug reaction monitoring records. The annual incidence of major GI bleeding due to low-dose aspirin was estimated for outpatients. RESULTS: Prescriptions for aspirin users receiving PPIs, H2RA and MPs (n = 1039) accounted for only 3.46% of total aspirin prescriptions (n = 30 015). The ratios of coadministration of aspirin/PPI, aspirin/H2RA, aspirin/MP and aspirin/PPI/MP to the total aspirin prescriptions were 2.82%, 0.12%, 0.40% and 0.12%, respectively. No statistically significant difference was observed in age between patients not receiving any GI protective medications and patients receiving PPIs, H2RA or MPs. The combined medication of aspirin and PPI was used more frequently than that of aspirin and MPs (2.82% vs 0.40%, P < 0.05) and aspirin/H2RA (2.82% vs 0.12%, P < 0.05). The values of DDDs of MPs in descending order were as follows: gefarnate, hydrotalcite > teprenone > sucralfate oral suspension > L-glutamine and sodium

  12. Trichostrongylus colubriformis larvae induce necrosis and release of IL33 from intestinal epithelial cells in vitro: implications for gastrointestinal nematode vaccine design.

    PubMed

    Andronicos, Nicholas M; McNally, Jody; Kotze, Andrew C; Hunt, Peter W; Ingham, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    Gastrointestinal nematodes represent a major production problem for ruminant livestock. Enhancing immunity to gastrointestinal nematodes through vaccination is desirable but mechanistic understanding of initial host responses that facilitate gastrointestinal nematode protective immunity is limited. We hypothesise that gastrointestinal nematode invasion induces mucosal epithelium damage and alarmin (e.g. IL33) release, thereby contributing to initiation of protective gastrointestinal nematode immunity. To test this, an in vitro air-liquid interface human HT-29 epithelial cell-Trichostrongylus colubriformis co-culture system was developed. Exsheathed L3 T. colubriformis exhibited both sinusoidal and burrowing motions in the co-culture system. Burrowing parasites, but not ivermectin-paralysed larvae, induced necrotic death of epithelial cells (annexin V(+)/propidium iodide(+)/caspase 3/7(-)). Microscopy confirmed that larvae consumed labelled necrotic epithelial cell contents. Trichostrongylus colubriformis larvae and their post-exsheathment antigens (excretory/secretory products) significantly induced IL33 mRNA expression in the epithelial cells. Immunoblot confirmed that IL33 was released from epithelial cells due to the damage caused by motile larvae. Exposure of HT-29 cells to alum or Sigma proprietary adjuvants induced significant epithelial cell IL33 mRNA expression without inducing cellular necrosis. Hence, the intracellular contents were not released externally where they might exert alarmin activity and this may limit their ability to trigger a protective anti-gastrointestinal nematode response. We conclude that T. colubriformis motion at the infection site induces intestinal epithelial cell necrosis which facilitates the release of intracellular contents, including IL33, and may be fundamental to the initiation of an appropriate host response to gastrointestinal nematodes. Our co-culture model is useful for studying initial epithelial cell

  13. β1/2 or M2/3 Receptors Are Required for Different Gastrointestinal Motility Responses Induced by Acupuncture at Heterotopic or Homotopic Acupoints

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaochun; Cui, Changxiang; Yang, Zhaokun; Shi, Hong; Jing, Xianghong; Zhu, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Acupuncture at homotopic acupoints or heterotopic acupoints is known to either inhibit or facilitate gastrointestinal motility, depending on the acupoint location. However, little effort has been made to investigate the roles of specific receptors (such as adrenergic and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors) in mediating the effects of acupuncture at heterotopic and homotopic acupoints. Different adrenergic receptor subtypes or cholinergic receptor subtypes are predominantly expressed in various sections of the gut, resulting in variations between the effects of acupuncture at heterotopic or homotopic acupoints on gastrointestinal motility. Here, we investigated the role of β1/β2 receptors and M2/M3 receptors in gastrointestinal motility regulated by acupuncture at ST37, a heterotopic acupoint, and ST25, a homotopic acupoint, by simultaneously recording intraluminal pressures in the distal colon and stomach or jejunum and examining fecal phenol red excretion in β1/2 receptor-knockout mice and M2/3 receptor-knockout mice. We found that knockout of the M2/3 receptor significantly inhibited ST37 acupuncture-induced enhancement of gastric motility, jejunal motility, and colonic motility. Additionally, knocking out of the β1/2 receptor significantly diminished the ST25 acupuncture-induced inhibition of gastric motility and jejunal motility without significantly altering the enhancement of colonic motility induced by acupuncture at ST25. Acupuncture at ST37 significantly accelerated gastrointestinal transition in β1/2 receptor-knockout mice and their wild-type littermates. However, this acceleration of gastrointestinal transition was markedly diminished in M2/3 receptor-knockout mice relative to their wild-type littermates. Acupuncture at ST25 significantly increased gastrointestinal transition in β1/2 receptor-knockout mice and significantly decreased gastrointestinal transition in M2/3 receptor-knockout mice without altering gastrointestinal transition in wild

  14. In situ growth of copper nanocrystals from carbonaceous microspheres with electrochemical glucose sensing properties

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xiaoliang; Yan, Zhengguang Han, Xiaodong

    2014-02-01

    Graphical abstract: In situ growth of copper nanoparticles from hydrothermal copper-containing carbonaceous microspheres was induced by annealing or electron beam irradiation. Obtained micro-nano carbon/copper composite microspheres show electrochemical glucose sensing properties. - Highlights: • We synthesized carbonaceous microspheres containing non-nanoparicle copper species through a hydrothermal route. • By annealing or electron beam irradiation, copper nanoparticles would form from the carbonaceous microspheres in situ. • By controlling the annealing temperature, particle size of copper could be controlled in the range of 50–500 nm. • The annealed carbon/copper hierarchical composite microspheres were used to fabricate an electrochemical glucose sensor. - Abstract: In situ growth of copper nanocrystals from carbon/copper microspheres was observed in a well-controlled annealing or an electron beam irradiation process. Carbonaceous microspheres containing copper species with a smooth appearance were yielded by a hydrothermal synthesis using copper nitrate and ascorbic acid as reactants. When annealing the carbonaceous microspheres under inert atmosphere, copper nanoparticles were formed on carbon microspheres and the copper particle sizes can be increased to a range of 50–500 nm by altering the heating temperature. Similarly, in situ formation of copper nanocrystals from these carbonaceous microspheres was observed on the hydrothermal product carbonaceous microspheres with electron beam irradiation in a vacuum transmission electron microscopy chamber. The carbon/copper composite microspheres obtained through annealing were used to modify a glassy carbon electrode and tested as an electrochemical glucose sensor.

  15. Protective effect of wild raspberry (Rubus hirsutus Thunb.) extract against acrylamide-induced oxidative damage is potentiated after simulated gastrointestinal digestion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Su, Hongming; Xu, Yang; Bao, Tao; Zheng, Xiaodong

    2016-04-01

    Raspberry is well known as rich source of antioxidants, such as polyphenols and flavonoids. However, after consumption, the antioxidants are subjected to digestive conditions within the gastrointestinal tract that may result in structural and functional alterations. Our previous study indicated that acrylamide (AA)-induced cytotoxicity was associated with oxidative stress. However, the protective effect of wild raspberry extract produced before and after in vitro gastrointestinal digestion against AA-induced oxidative damage is unclear. In the present study, we found that wild raspberry extract produced after digestion (RD) had a pronounced protective effect against AA-induced cytotoxicity compared with that produced before digestion (RE). Further investigation indicated that RD significantly inhibited AA-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) collapse and glutathione (GSH) depletion. Moreover, LC-MS analysis revealed that wild raspberry underwent gastrointestinal digestion significantly increased the contents of esculin, kaempferol hexoside and pelargonidin hexoside.

  16. Highly Efficient visible-light-induced photoactivity of magnetically retrievable Fe3O4@SiO2@Bi2WO6@g-C3N4 hierarchical microspheres for the degradation of organic pollutant and production of hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Dingze; Wang, Hongmei; Shen, Qingqing; Kondamareddy, Kiran Kumar; Neena D

    2017-07-01

    The new multifunctional composite Fe3O4@SiO2@Bi2WO6@g-C3N4 (FSBG) hierarchical microspheres with Bi2WO6/g-C3N4 heterostructure as an outer shell and Fe3O4@SiO2 as a magnetic core have been synthesized and characterized for photocatalytic applications. An efficient and adoptable approach of synthesizing magnetic Bi2WO6/g-C3N4 hierarchical microspheres of grape-like morphology is realized. The as-synthesized structures exhibit highly efficient visible-light absorption and separation efficiency of photo-induced charge. The visible-light-induced photocatalytic activity of g-C3N4, Fe3O4@SiO2@Bi2WO6, and FSBG is evaluated by investigating the photodegradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) and hydrogen (H2) out of water. The comparative study reveals that the FSBG microspheres exhibit an optimum visible-light-induced photocatalytic activity in degrading Rhodamin B (RhB), which is 3.06 and 1.92 times to that of g-C3N4 and Fe3O4@SiO2@Bi2WO6 systems respectively and 3.89 and 2.31 times in the production of hydrogen (H2) out of water, respectively. The FSBG composite microspheres also exhibit good magnetic recoverability. An alternate mechanism for the enhanced visible-light photocatalytic activity is given in the present manuscript.

  17. Electric-field-induced transport of microspheres in the isotropic and chiral nematic phase of liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Jiyoung; Gleeson, Helen F.; Dierking, Ingo

    2017-02-01

    The application of an electric field to microspheres suspended in a liquid crystal causes particle translation in a plane perpendicular to the applied field direction. Depending on applied electric field amplitude and frequency, a wealth of different motion modes may be observed above a threshold, which can lead to linear, circular, or random particle trajectories. We present the stability diagram for these different translational modes of particles suspended in the isotropic and the chiral nematic phase of a liquid crystal and investigate the angular velocity, circular diameter, and linear velocity as a function of electric field amplitude and frequency. In the isotropic phase a narrow field amplitude-frequency regime is observed to exhibit circular particle motion whose angular velocity increases with applied electric field amplitude but is independent of applied frequency. The diameter of the circular trajectory decreases with field amplitude as well as frequency. In the cholesteric phase linear as well as circular particle motion is observed. The former exhibits an increasing velocity with field amplitude, while decreasing with frequency. For the latter, the angular velocity exhibits an increase with field amplitude and frequency. The rotational sense of the particles on a circular trajectory in the chiral nematic phase is independent of the helicity of the liquid crystalline structure, as is demonstrated by employing a cholesteric twist inversion compound.

  18. Mycobacterium hsp65 DNA entrapped into TDM-loaded PLGA microspheres induces protection in mice against Leishmania (Leishmania) major infection.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Eduardo Antonio Ferraz; Tavares, Carlos Alberto Pereira; Lima, Karla de Melo; Silva, Célio Lopes; Rodrigues, José Maciel; Fernandes, Ana Paula

    2006-05-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are highly conserved among different organisms. A mycobacterial HSP65 DNA vaccine was previously shown to have prophylactic and immunotherapeutic effects against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in mice. Here, BALB/c mice were immunized with mycobacterial DNA-hsp65 or with DNA-hsp65 and trehalose dymicolate (TDM), both carried by biodegradable microspheres (MHSP/TDM), and challenged with Leishmania (Leishmania) major. MHSP/TDM conferred protection against L. major infection, as indicated by a significant reduction of edema and parasite loads in infected tissues. Although high levels of interferon-gamma and low levels of interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-10 were detected in mice immunized with DNA-hsp65 or MHSP/TDM, only animals immunized with MHSP/TDM displayed a consistent Th1 immune response, i.e., significantly higher levels of anti-soluble Leishmania antigen (SLA) immunoglobulin G (IgG)2a and low anti-SLA IgG1 antibodies. These findings indicate that encapsulated MHSP/TDM is more immunogenic than naked hsp65 DNA, and has great potential to improve vaccine effectiveness against leishmaniasis and tuberculosis.

  19. Electric-field-induced transport of microspheres in the isotropic and chiral nematic phase of liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jiyoung; Gleeson, Helen F; Dierking, Ingo

    2017-02-01

    The application of an electric field to microspheres suspended in a liquid crystal causes particle translation in a plane perpendicular to the applied field direction. Depending on applied electric field amplitude and frequency, a wealth of different motion modes may be observed above a threshold, which can lead to linear, circular, or random particle trajectories. We present the stability diagram for these different translational modes of particles suspended in the isotropic and the chiral nematic phase of a liquid crystal and investigate the angular velocity, circular diameter, and linear velocity as a function of electric field amplitude and frequency. In the isotropic phase a narrow field amplitude-frequency regime is observed to exhibit circular particle motion whose angular velocity increases with applied electric field amplitude but is independent of applied frequency. The diameter of the circular trajectory decreases with field amplitude as well as frequency. In the cholesteric phase linear as well as circular particle motion is observed. The former exhibits an increasing velocity with field amplitude, while decreasing with frequency. For the latter, the angular velocity exhibits an increase with field amplitude and frequency. The rotational sense of the particles on a circular trajectory in the chiral nematic phase is independent of the helicity of the liquid crystalline structure, as is demonstrated by employing a cholesteric twist inversion compound.

  20. Microsphere Insulation Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohling, R.; Allen, M.; Baumgartner, R.

    2006-01-01

    Microsphere insulation panels (MIPs) have been developed as lightweight, longlasting replacements for the foam and vacuum-jacketed systems heretofore used for thermally insulating cryogenic vessels and transfer ducts. The microsphere core material of a typical MIP consists of hollow glass bubbles, which have a combination of advantageous mechanical, chemical, and thermal-insulation properties heretofore available only separately in different materials. In particular, a core filling of glass microspheres has high crush strength and low density, is noncombustible, and performs well in soft vacuum.

  1. [Prevention and treatment of NSAIDs-induced gastrointestinal complications by prostaglandin derivatives].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yasuo; Saito, Eiko; Wakabayashi, Takayuki; Suwa, Akira

    2007-10-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs(NSAIDs) are widely used for the treatment of many rheumatic diseases. Gastrointestinal ulcers are the most important complication during long-term NSAIDs therapy and sometimes, serious complications, such as perforation, stenosis, and bleeding occurs. Recently, use of COX-2 selective NSAIDs reduced such complications, however the increase of cardiovascular risks has been reported. Administration of misoprostol, one of the prostaglandin derivatives has been proven to be effective for both prevention and treatment of gastrointestinal ulcers associated with NSAIDs therapy and is recommended by the Japanese guidelines. In addition, the reduction of NSAIDs-related serious complications, such as perforation, stenosis, and bleeding have been reported with misoprostol therapy. The important side effects include abdominal pain, flatulence, and diarrhea.

  2. T2-Shortening of 3He Gas by Magnetic Microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Minard, Kevin R; Timchalk, Chuck; Corley, Rick A

    2005-03-01

    In the interconnected pores of a material like the lung the transverse relaxation time (T2) for 3He gas is shortened by the deposition of magnetic microspheres and rapid molecular diffusion through induced field distortions. Here, this unique relaxation process is described theoretically and predicted T2-shortening is validated using pressurized 3He gas in a foam model of lung tissue. Results demonstrate that – 1) significant T2-shortening is induced by microsphere deposition, 2) shortened T2’s are accurately predicted, and 3) measured relaxation times are exploitable for quantifying the local volume fraction of magnetic microspheres deposited in gas-filled spaces.

  3. An oral DNA vaccine against infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) encapsulated in alginate microspheres induces dose-dependent immune responses and significant protection in rainbow trout (Oncorrhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, Natalia A; Alonso, Marta; Saint-Jean, Sylvia Rodríguez; Perez-Prieto, Sara I

    2015-08-01

    Administered by intramuscular injection, a DNA vaccine (pIRF1A-G) containing the promoter regions upstream of the rainbow trout interferon regulatory factor 1A gene (IRF1A) driven the expression of the infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) glycoprotein (G) elicited protective immune responses in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). However, less laborious and cost-effective routes of DNA vaccine delivery are required to vaccinate large numbers of susceptible farmed fish. In this study, the pIRF1A-G vaccine was encapsulated into alginate microspheres and orally administered to rainbow trout. At 1, 3, 5, and 7 d post-vaccination, IHNV G transcripts were detected by quantitative real-time PCR in gills, spleen, kidney and intestinal tissues of vaccinated fish. This result suggested that the encapsulation of pIRF1A-G in alginate microparticles protected the DNA vaccine from degradation in the fish stomach and ensured vaccine early delivery to the hindgut, vaccine passage through the intestinal mucosa and its distribution thought internal and external organs of vaccinated fish. We also observed that the oral route required approximately 20-fold more plasmid DNA than the injection route to induce the expression of significant levels of IHNV G transcripts in kidney and spleen of vaccinated fish. Despite this limitation, increased IFN-1, TLR-7 and IgM gene expression was detected by qRT-PCR in kidney of vaccinated fish when a 10 μg dose of the oral pIRF1A-G vaccine was administered. In contrast, significant Mx-1, Vig-1, Vig-2, TLR-3 and TLR-8 gene expression was only detected when higher doses of pIRF1A-G (50 and 100 μg) were orally administered. The pIRF1A-G vaccine also induced the expression of several markers of the adaptive immune response (CD4, CD8, IgM and IgT) in kidney and spleen of immunized fish in a dose-dependent manner. When vaccinated fish were challenged by immersion with live IHNV, evidence of a dose-response effect of the oral vaccine could also

  4. Gastrointestinal bleed induced by a fixed dose combination of rabeprazole and diclofenac sodium.

    PubMed

    Tandon, Vishal R; Chandail, Vijant; Khajuria, Vijay; Gillani, Zahid

    2014-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are known to cause gastrointestinal (GI) bleed. Co-administration of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) has been widely suggested as one of the strategies to prevent these GI complications among NSAIDs users. Herein, we present a case of severe GI bleeding in a patient taking fixed dose combination (FDC) of rabeprazole (20 mg) and diclofenac sodium (100 SR).

  5. Gastrointestinal bleed induced by a fixed dose combination of rabeprazole and diclofenac sodium

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Vishal R.; Chandail, Vijant; Khajuria, Vijay; Gillani, Zahid

    2014-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are known to cause gastrointestinal (GI) bleed. Co-administration of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) has been widely suggested as one of the strategies to prevent these GI complications among NSAIDs users. Herein, we present a case of severe GI bleeding in a patient taking fixed dose combination (FDC) of rabeprazole (20 mg) and diclofenac sodium (100 SR). PMID:25298591

  6. Surface Wrinkling on Polydimethylsiloxane Microspheres via Wet Surface Chemical Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jian; Han, Xue; Cao, Yanping; Lu, Conghua

    2014-01-01

    Here we introduce a simple low-cost yet robust method to realize spontaneously wrinkled morphologies on spherical surfaces. It is based on surface chemical oxidation of aqueous-phase-synthesized polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microspheres in the mixed H2SO4/HNO3/H2O solution. Consequently, curvature and overstress-sensitive wrinkles including dimples and labyrinth patterns are successfully induced on the resulting oxidized PDMS microspheres. A power-law dependence of the wrinkling wavelength on the microsphere radius exists. The effects of experimental parameters on these tunable spherical wrinkles have been systematically investigated, when the microspheres are pre-deposited on a substrate. These parameters include the radius and modulus of microspheres, the mixed acid solution composition, the oxidation duration, and the water washing post-treatment. Meanwhile, the complicated chemical oxidation process has also been well studied by in-situ optical observation via the microsphere system, which represents an intractable issue in a planar system. Furthermore, we realize surface wrinkled topographies on the whole microspheres at a large scale, when microspheres are directly dispersed in the mixed acid solution for surface oxidation. These results indicate that the introduced wet surface chemical oxidation has the great potential to apply to other complicated curved surfaces for large-scale generation of well-defined wrinkling patterns, which endow the solids with desired physical properties. PMID:25028198

  7. Surface wrinkling on polydimethylsiloxane microspheres via wet surface chemical oxidation.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jian; Han, Xue; Cao, Yanping; Lu, Conghua

    2014-07-16

    Here we introduce a simple low-cost yet robust method to realize spontaneously wrinkled morphologies on spherical surfaces. It is based on surface chemical oxidation of aqueous-phase-synthesized polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microspheres in the mixed H2SO4/HNO3/H2O solution. Consequently, curvature and overstress-sensitive wrinkles including dimples and labyrinth patterns are successfully induced on the resulting oxidized PDMS microspheres. A power-law dependence of the wrinkling wavelength on the microsphere radius exists. The effects of experimental parameters on these tunable spherical wrinkles have been systematically investigated, when the microspheres are pre-deposited on a substrate. These parameters include the radius and modulus of microspheres, the mixed acid solution composition, the oxidation duration, and the water washing post-treatment. Meanwhile, the complicated chemical oxidation process has also been well studied by in-situ optical observation via the microsphere system, which represents an intractable issue in a planar system. Furthermore, we realize surface wrinkled topographies on the whole microspheres at a large scale, when microspheres are directly dispersed in the mixed acid solution for surface oxidation. These results indicate that the introduced wet surface chemical oxidation has the great potential to apply to other complicated curved surfaces for large-scale generation of well-defined wrinkling patterns, which endow the solids with desired physical properties.

  8. Nerve-induced release of nitric oxide in the rabbit gastrointestinal tract as measured by in vivo microdialysis

    PubMed Central

    Iversen, Henrik H; Celsing, Fredrik; Leone, Anna M; Gustafsson, Lars E; Wiklund, N Peter

    1997-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been suggested as a gastrointestinal neurotransmitter, mediating the gastric receptive relaxation and the relaxation in the peristaltic reflex. The aim of the present study was to measure nerve-induced NO formation in vivo in the gastrointestinal tract.Formation of the nitric oxide oxidation products nitrite and nitrate during vagal nerve stimulation were measured in the anaesthetized rabbit. Microdialysis probes were inserted into the wall of the stomach and proximal colon, and nitrite and nitrate in dialysate measured by capillary electrophoresis.During bilateral vagal nerve stimulation there was an increase in nitrite and nitrate formation at the level of the stomach and in nitrite formation at the level of the colon. This increase was inhibited by intravenous administration of the NO synthase inhibitor Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME 30 mg kg−1). Furthermore, L-NAME significantly increased nerve-induced gastric and colonic contractions, as well as spontaneous colonic contractions.In summary, we present a new methodological procedure for quantification of small changes in nitric oxide formation in vivo. This study provides evidence that nitric oxide is released in the stomach and colonic wall during vagal nerve activity, at concentrations able to cause inhibition of smooth muscle contractions in vivo. PMID:9051311

  9. Organic aerogel microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, S.T.; Kong, F.M.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1999-06-01

    Organic aerogel microspheres are disclosed which can be used in capacitors, batteries, thermal insulation, adsorption/filtration media, and chromatographic packings, having diameters ranging from about 1 micron to about 3 mm. The microspheres can be pyrolyzed to form carbon aerogel microspheres. This method involves stirring the aqueous organic phase in mineral oil at elevated temperature until the dispersed organic phase polymerizes and forms nonstick gel spheres. The size of the microspheres depends on the collision rate of the liquid droplets and the reaction rate of the monomers from which the aqueous solution is formed. The collision rate is governed by the volume ratio of the aqueous solution to the mineral oil and the shear rate, while the reaction rate is governed by the chemical formulation and the curing temperature.

  10. Organic aerogel microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, Steven T.; Kong, Fung-Ming; Pekala, Richard W.; Kaschmitter, James L.

    1999-01-01

    Organic aerogel microspheres which can be used in capacitors, batteries, thermal insulation, adsorption/filtration media, and chromatographic packings, having diameters ranging from about 1 micron to about 3 mm. The microspheres can be pyrolyzed to form carbon aerogel microspheres. This method involves stirring the aqueous organic phase in mineral oil at elevated temperature until the dispersed organic phase polymerizes and forms nonsticky gel spheres. The size of the microspheres depends on the collision rate of the liquid droplets and the reaction rate of the monomers from which the aqueous solution is formed. The collision rate is governed by the volume ratio of the aqueous solution to the mineral oil and the shear rate, while the reaction rate is governed by the chemical formulation and the curing temperature.

  11. Beneficial effects of Camellia Oil (Camellia oleifera Abel.) on ketoprofen-induced gastrointestinal mucosal damage through upregulation of HO-1 and VEGF.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Ting; Wu, Shu-Li; Ho, Cheng-Ying; Huang, Shang-Ming; Cheng, Chun-Lung; Yen, Gow-Chin

    2014-01-22

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as ketoprofen, are generally used to treat pain and inflammation and as pyretic agents in clinical medicine. However, the usage of these drugs may lead to oxidative injury to the gastrointestinal mucosa. Camellia oil ( Camellia oleifera Abel.) is commonly used in Taiwan and China as cooking oil. Traditional remedies containing this oil exert beneficial health effects on the bowel, stomach, liver, and lungs. However, the effects of camellia oil on ketoprofen-induced oxidative gastrointestinal mucosal lesions remain unknown. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of camellia oil on ketoprofen-induced acute gastrointestinal ulcers. The results showed that treatment of Int-407 cells with camellia oil (50-75 μg/mL) not only increased the levels of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) mRNA expression but also increased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) protein secretion, which served as a mucosal barrier against gastrointestinal oxidative injury. Moreover, Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats treated with camellia oil (2 mL/kg/day) prior to the administration of ketoprofen (50 mg/kg/day) successfully inhibited COX-2 protein expression, inhibited the production of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and nitrite oxide (NO), reversed the impairment of the antioxidant system, and decreased oxidative damage in the gastrointestinal mucosa. More importantly, pretreatment of SD rats with camellia oil strongly inhibited gastrointestinal mucosal injury induced by ketoprofen, which was proved by the histopathological staining of gastrointestinal tissues. Our data suggest that camellia oil exerts potent antiulcer effects against oxidative damage in the stomach and intestine induced by ketoprofen.

  12. Yielding behavior and temperature-induced on-field oscillatory rheological studies in a novel MR suspension containing polymer-capped Fe3Ni alloy microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arief, Injamamul; Mukhopadhyay, P. K.

    2017-05-01

    Magnetic Bimetallic alloy nanoparticles of 3d elements are known for their tunable shape, size and magnetic anisotropy and find extensive applications ranging from magneto-mechanical to biomedical devices. This paper reports the polyol-mediated synthesis of Fe-rich polyacrylic acid (PAA)-Fe3Ni alloyed microspheres and its morphological and structural characterizations with scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction studies. Magnetorheological fluid was prepared by dispersing the 10 vol% microparticles in silicone oil. The room temperature viscoelastic characterization of the fluid was performed under different magnetic fields. The field-dependent yield stresses were scaled using Klingenberg model and found that static yield stress was more accurately described by an M3 dependence, where M is particle magnetization. We proposed a multipolar contribution and ascertained the fact that simple dipolar description was insufficient to describe the trend in a complex rheological fluid. Temperature-dependent oscillatory rheological studies under various fields were also investigated. This demonstrated a strong temperature-induced thinning effect. The temperature-thinning in complex moduli and viscosity were more pronounced for the samples at higher magnetic field owing to quasi-solid behavior.

  13. Compartmentalization in proteinoid microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooke, S.; Fox, S. W.

    1977-01-01

    Proteinoid microspheres with stable internal compartments and internal structure are made from acidic proteinoid and basic proteinoid with calcium. The populations of microspheres are characterized by a wide diversity of structure. A model of primitive intracellular communication is suggested by the observed movement of internal particles between compartments of a multicompartmentalized unit. Differential response to pH change and to temperature change has been demonstrated within one population and suggests one mode of adaptive selection among primordial cell populations.

  14. Temporary balloon occlusion of the common hepatic artery for yttrium-90 glass microspheres administration in a patient with hepatocellular cancer and renal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Smith, Justin; Murthy, Ravi; Lahoti, Amit; Odisio, Bruno; Avritscher, Rony; Chasen, Beth; Mahvash, Armeen

    2013-01-01

    The most severe complication of yttrium-90 therapy is gastrointestinal ulceration caused by extrahepatic dispersion of microspheres. Standard pretreatment planning requires extensive angiographic evaluation of the hepatic circulation and embolization of hepatoenteric collaterals; however, in patients with severe renal insufficiency, this evaluation may lead to acute renal failure. In order to minimize iodinated contrast utilization in a patient with preexisting severe renal insufficiency, the authors describe the use of a balloon catheter for temporary occlusion of the common hepatic artery to induce transient redirection of flow of the hepatoenteric arteries towards the liver, in lieu of conventional coil embolization.

  15. Treatment of Staphylococcus aureus-induced chronic osteomyelitis with bone-like hydroxyapatite/poly amino acid loaded with rifapentine microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ling; Jiang, Dian-Ming; Cao, Zhi-Dong; Wu, Jun; Wang, Xin; Wang, Zheng-Long; Li, Ya-Jun; Yi, Yong-Fen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the curative effect of bone-like hydroxyapatite/poly amino acid (BHA/PAA) as a carrier for poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-coated rifapentine microsphere (RPM) in the treatment of rabbit chronic osteomyelitis induced by Staphylococcus aureus. Methods RPM was prepared through an oil-in-water emulsion solvent evaporation method, and RPM was combined with BHA/PAA to obtain drug-loaded, slow-releasing materials. Twenty-six New Zealand white rabbits were induced to establish the animal model of chronic osteomyelitis. After debridement, the animals were randomly divided into three groups (n=8): the experimental group (with RPM-loaded BHA/PAA), the control group (with BHA/PAA), and the blank group. The RPM-loaded BHA/PAA was evaluated for antibacterial activity, dynamics of drug release, and osteogenic ability through in vitro and in vivo experiments. Results In vitro, RPM-loaded BHA/PAA released the antibiotics slowly, inhibiting the bacterial growth of S. aureus for up to 5 weeks. In vivo, at week 4, the bacterial colony count was significantly lower in the experimental group than in the control and blank groups (P<0.01). At week 12, the chronic osteomyelitis was cured and the bone defect was repaired in the experimental group, whereas the infection and bone defect persisted in the control and blank groups. Conclusion In vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated that RPM-loaded BHA/PAA effectively cured S. aureus-induced chronic osteomyelitis. Therefore, BHA/PAA has potential value as a slow-releasing material in clinical setting. Further investigation is needed to determine the optimal dosage for loading rifapentine. PMID:26213463

  16. Imatinib-induced Ototoxicity in a Patient with Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST)

    PubMed Central

    Wasif, Komal; Wasif, Nawal

    2016-01-01

    Imatinib (Gleevec) is a biological agent that is approved for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) as well as gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). The most frequently seen adverse effects in patients treated with imatinib include superficial edema, muscle cramps, musculoskeletal pain, rash, fatigue, headache, abdominal pain, and joint pain. Ototoxicity has rarely been reported except in two cases. We report a case of bilateral irreversible sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) caused by imatinib in a patient receiving this agent in the adjuvant setting. This case underlines the importance of early recognition of this potential toxicity that can impact the quality of life. PMID:27909636

  17. POROUS WALL, HOLLOW GLASS MICROSPHERES

    SciTech Connect

    Sexton, W.

    2012-06-30

    magnitude, which can result in unique properties in areas such as hydrogen storage, gas transport, gas separations and purifications, sensors, global warming applications, new drug delivery systems and so on. One of the most interesting porous glass products that SRNL has developed and patented is Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs) that are being studied for many different applications. The European Patent Office (EPO) just recently notified SRS that the continuation-in-part patent application for the PW-HGMs has been accepted. The original patent, which was granted by the EPO on June 2, 2010, was validated in France, Germany and the United Kingdom. The microspheres produced are generally in the range of 2 to 100 microns, with a 1 to 2 micron wall. What makes the SRNL microspheres unique from all others is that the team in Figure 1 has found a way to induce and control porosity through the thin walls on a scale of 100 to 3000 {angstrom}. This is what makes the SRNL HW-HGMs one-of-a-kind, and is responsible for many of their unique properties and potential for various applications, including those in tritium storage, gas separations, H-storage for vehicles, and even a variety of new medical applications in the areas of drug delivery and MRI contrast agents. SRNL Hollow Glass Microspheres, and subsequent, Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres are fabricated using a flame former apparatus. Figure 2 is a schematic of the apparatus.

  18. Probiotic-induced changes in the intestinal epithelium: implications in gastrointestinal disease.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishna, B S

    2009-01-01

    There is resurgent interest in the use of probiotics to maintain gastrointestinal and systemic health, driven by recent advances in knowledge of bacterial interactions with the epithelium and innate immune system of the intestine. The effects of probiotic bacteria on the intestinal epithelium and their downstream consequences are reviewed. Probiotics prevent pathogen adherence and invasion of the epithelium, partly by blocking adherence sites but also by upregulating gene expression of MUC2 and of antimicrobial peptides. Metabolic effects of probiotics on the intestinal epithelium include production of short chain fatty acids which influence epithelial cell metabolism, turnover and apoptosis. Bacterial metabolism of unabsorbed dietary constituents with production of free radicals and phenolic metabolites can lead to DNA damage and cancer; probiotics restore eubiosis and potentially prevent this. Probiotics alter expression and redistribution of tight junction proteins and reduce intestinal permeability limiting absorption of noxious molecules from the gut lumen. Most studied are the effects of probiotics on epithelial cells which are the first line of innate immune-capable cells that encounter luminal flora. Probiotics, through secreted molecules, influence the innate inflammatory response of epithelial cells to stimuli from the gut lumen, and reduce mucosal inflammation. Through effects on dendritic, and possibly epithelial, cells they influence naïve T cells in the lamina propria of the gut and thus influence adaptive immunity. These varied effects of probiotics have implications for the treatment of several gastrointestinal diseases including antibiotic-associated colitis, acute gastroenteritis, inflammatory bowel disease, colon cancer, and irritable bowel syndrome.

  19. Effect of plants used in Mexico to treat gastrointestinal disorders on charcoal-gum acacia-induced hyperperistalsis in rats.

    PubMed

    Calzada, Fernando; Arista, Ramón; Pérez, Halley

    2010-03-02

    A total of 28 plant extracts, belonging to 26 different plant species are commonly used in Traditional Mexican Medicine for the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders such as diarrhea. To evaluate the effect of medicinal plant extracts on induced hyperperistalsis in rats. Charcoal meal test was used in this study. Extracts were tested at a dose of 300mg/kg. From all the plant extracts tested, only Geranium mexicanum (roots) showed 100% of inhibition. The extracts of Artemisia absinthium, Matricaria recutita, Caesalpinia pulcherrima, Lygodium venustum, Chenopodium ambrosoides (green variety), Aloysia triphylla, Artemisia ludoviciana, Chiranthodendron pentadactylon, and Cocos nucifera showed moderate inhibitory activity with values ranging from 30 to 57%. Their activities were greater than that of or equal to loperamide (34% of inhibition at doses of 10mg/kg) drug used as control. The remaining plants exhibited marginal or null inhibitory effect on hyperpropulsive movement of the small intestine. The results obtained in this study give some scientific support to the popular use of 23 of the plants tested for the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders such as diarrhea in Mexican traditional medicine. However, roots of Geranium mexicanum should be used in herbal medicine with care to avoid toxicity. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. An orally active motilin receptor antagonist, MA-2029, inhibits motilin-induced gastrointestinal motility, increase in fundic tone, and diarrhea in conscious dogs without affecting gastric emptying.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Ken-ichi; Onoma, Mitsu; Muramatsu, Hiroyasu; Sudo, Hirokazu; Yoshida, Shoshin; Shiokawa, Rie; Yogo, Kenji; Kamei, Kenshi; Cynshi, Osamu; Kuromaru, Osamu; Peeters, Theo L; Takanashi, Hisanori

    2009-08-01

    The pharmacological properties of MA-2029, a selective and competitive motilin receptor antagonist, were investigated in conscious dogs after oral administration. Gastrointestinal contractile activity was recorded by chronically implanted force transducers. The proximal gastric volume was measured with a barostat under constant pressure. Gastric emptying was examined using the paracetamol absorption test. MA-2029 (0.3-10 mg/kg, p.o.) administered in the interdigestive state inhibited gastrointestinal contractions induced by motilin (3 microg/kg, i.v.) in a dose-dependent manner. MA-2029 (0.3-3 mg/kg, p.o.) also inhibited the occurrence of spontaneous phase III contractions, even though MA-2029 had no effect on basal gastrointestinal motility or basal gastric emptying even at 10 and 30 mg/kg p.o. The inhibitory effect of MA-2029 on motilin-induced gastrointestinal motility corresponded to its plasma concentration. Motilin (0.3 microg/kg/h, i.v. infusion) reduced the proximal gastric volume by about 50% of control during isobaric distension. This effect was also inhibited by MA-2029 (1-10 mg/kg, p.o.) in a dose-dependent manner. In the digestive state, injection of motilin (3 microg/kg, i.v.) induced diarrhea in 9 of 11 dogs. MA-2029 (1-30 mg/kg, p.o.) reduced the incidence of diarrhea induced by motilin in a dose-dependent manner. The results indicate that MA-2029 inhibits hypermotility induced by motilin in conscious dogs without having an effect on the basal gastrointestinal tone or gastric emptying rate. MA-2029 may be useful in treating gastrointestinal disorders in which the pathogenesis involves the elevation of circulating motilin.

  1. Method for sizing hollow microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Farnum, E.H.; Fries, R.J.

    1975-10-29

    Hollow Microspheres may be effectively sized by placing them beneath a screen stack completely immersed in an ultrasonic bath containing a liquid having a density at which the microspheres float and ultrasonically agitating the bath.

  2. Amorphous Ni(OH)2/CQDs microspheres for highly sensitive non-enzymatic glucose detection prepared via CQDs induced aggregation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jiajie; Yin, Haoyong; Cui, Zhenzhen; Qin, Dongyu; Gong, Jianying; Nie, Qiulin

    2017-10-01

    Non-enzymatic electrochemical sensors for the detection of glucose were designed based on amorphous Ni(OH)2/CQDs microspheres. The amorphous Ni(OH)2/CQDs microspheres were prepared by a CQDs assistant crystallization inhibition process. The morphologies and composition of the microspheres were characterized by SEM, TEM, XRD, EDS, and TG/DSC. The results showed that the microspheres had uniform heterogeneous phases with amorphous Ni(OH)2 and CQDs. The sensor based on amorphous Ni(OH)2/CQDs microspheres showed remarkable electrocatalytic activity towards glucose oxidation comparing to the conventional crystalline Ni(OH)2, which included two linear range (20 μM-350 μM and 0.45mM-2.5 mM) with high selectivity of 2760.05 and 1853.64 μA mM-1cm-2. Moreover, the interference from the commonly interfering species such as urea, ascorbic acid, NaCl, L-proline and L-Valine, can be effectively avoided. The high sensitivity, wide glucose detection range and good selectivity of the electrode may be due to their synergistic effect of amorphous phase and CQDs incorporation. These findings may promote the application of amorphous Ni(OH)2 as advanced electrochemical glucose sensing materials.

  3. Endoscopic detection of early malignancies in the upper gastrointestinal tract using laser-induced fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukowski, Uwe; Ebert, Bernd; Ortner, Marianne; Zumbusch, Katharina; Mueller, Karsten; Fleige, Barbara; Lochs, Herbert; Rinneberg, Herbert H.

    2001-01-01

    Fluorescence images were recorded simultaneously with white light images to detect dyspasia or early malignancies during regular endoscopy of the upper gastrointestinal tract, after topical administration of 5-aminolaevulinic acid. Biopsies were taken at locations where fluorescence intensity were high compared with the mean fluorescence intensity of the image. Prompt and delayed fluorescence spectra of biopsies were subsequently recorded ex vivo, and normalized fluorescence intensities of Protoporphyrin IX derived from these spectra were compared with routine histology. In contrast to routine endoscopy, one early carcinoma and one signet-ring carcinoma were found in the stomach, and malignancies in a duodenal polyp. In addition, intestinal metaplasia could be visualized in the stomach of two patients, which had not been detected in biopsies taken prior to fluorescence endoscopy.

  4. Influence of indomethacin on endotoxin-induced changes in gastrointestinal myoelectrical activity and some haematological and clinical parameters in the conscious piglet.

    PubMed

    De Saedeleer, V; Wechsung, E; Houvenaghel, A

    1992-01-01

    The effect of indomethacin, administered intravenously at 5 mg/kg, on the changes in gastrointestinal myoelectrical activity, rectal body temperature, clinical appearance and some haematological parameters induced by intravenous bolus injection of endotoxin, at 10 micrograms/kg, was examined in conscious piglets with electrodes implanted in the antrum pylori, duodenum, jejunum and ileum. Indomethacin inhibited the endotoxin-induced febrile response and the accompanying clinical signs. However, it was without influence on the induced leukopenia and shift to the left. Indomethacin both delayed the onset of and shortened the endotoxin-induced increase in the duration of the antral inhibitory phase and the duodenal phase I activity. It therefore appears that prostanoids are probably not the main factors involved in the endotoxin-induced haematological and gastrointestinal myoelectrical activity changes in the piglet.

  5. Novel Regenerative Peptide TP508 Mitigates Radiation-Induced Gastrointestinal Damage By Activating Stem Cells and Preserving Crypt Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Kantara, Carla; Moya, Stephanie M.; Houchen, Courtney W.; Umar, Shahid; Ullrich, Robert L.; Singh, Pomila; Carney, Darrell H.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, increasing threats of radiation exposure and nuclear disasters have become a significant concern for the United States and countries worldwide. Exposure to high doses of radiation triggers a number of potentially lethal effects. Among the most severe is the gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity syndrome caused by the destruction of the intestinal barrier, resulting in bacterial translocation, systemic bacteremia, sepsis and death. The lack of effective radioprotective agents capable of mitigating radiation-induced damage has prompted a search for novel countermeasures that can mitigate the effects of radiation post-exposure, accelerate tissue repair in radiation-exposed individuals, and prevent mortality. We report that a single injection of regenerative peptide TP508 (rusalatide acetate, Chrysalin®) 24h after lethal radiation exposure (9Gy, LD100/15) appears to significantly increase survival and delay mortality by mitigating radiation-induced intestinal and colonic toxicity. TP508 treatment post-exposure prevents the disintegration of gastrointestinal crypts, stimulates the expression of adherens junction protein E-cadherin, activates crypt cell proliferation, and decreases apoptosis. TP508 post-exposure treatment also up-regulates the expression of DCLK1 and LGR5 markers of stem cells that have been shown to be responsible for maintaining and regenerating intestinal crypts. Thus, TP508 appears to mitigate the effects of GI toxicity by activating radioresistant stem cells and increasing the stemness potential of crypts to maintain and restore intestinal integrity. These results suggest that TP508 may be an effective emergency nuclear countermeasure that could be delivered within 24h post-exposure to increase survival and delay mortality, giving victims time to reach clinical sites for advanced medical treatment. PMID:26280221

  6. Induction of gastrin expression in gastrointestinal cells by hypoxia or cobalt is independent of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF).

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lin; Kovac, Suzana; Chang, Mike; Shulkes, Arthur; Baldwin, Graham S; Patel, Oneel

    2012-07-01

    Gastrin and its precursors have been shown to promote mitogenesis and angiogenesis in gastrointestinal tumors. Hypoxia stimulates tumor growth, but its effect on gastrin gene regulation has not been examined in detail. Here we have investigated the effect of hypoxia on the transcription of the gastrin gene in human gastric cancer (AGS) cells. Gastrin mRNA was measured by real-time PCR, gastrin peptides were measured by RIA, and gastrin promoter activity was measured by dual-luciferase reporter assay. Exposure to a low oxygen concentration (1%) increased gastrin mRNA concentrations in wild-type AGS cells (AGS) and in AGS cells overexpressing the gastrin receptor (AGS-cholecystokinin receptor 2) by 2.1 ± 0.4- and 4.1 ± 0.3-fold (P < 0.05), respectively. The hypoxia mimetic, cobalt chloride (300 μM), increased gastrin promoter activity in AGS cells by 2.4 ± 0.3-fold (P < 0.05), and in AGS-cholecystokinin receptor 2 cells by 4.0 ± 0.3-fold (P < 0.05), respectively. The observations that either deletion from the gastrin promoter of the putative binding sites for the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) or knockdown of either the HIF-1α or HIF-1β subunit did not affect gastrin promoter inducibility under hypoxia indicated that the hypoxic activation of the gastrin gene is likely HIF independent. Mutational analysis of previously identified Sp1 regulatory elements in the gastrin promoter also failed to abrogate the induction of promoter activity by hypoxia. The observations that hypoxia up-regulates the gastrin gene in AGS cells by HIF-independent mechanisms, and that this effect is enhanced by the presence of gastrin receptors, provide potential targets for gastrointestinal cancer therapy.

  7. Preparation and evaluation of a novel gastric mucoadhesive sustained-release acyclovir microsphere.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongfei; Pan, Weisan; Ke, Peng; Dong, Yixiang; Ji, Lijun

    2010-09-01

    The objective of this study was to prepare a novel gastric mucoadhesive sustained-release acyclovir (AV)-resinate microsphere. First, AV absorption ratio was quantified in a rat gastrointestinal (GI) tract model. AV-resinate was prepared by bath method and used as cores to prepare microspheres by an emulsion solvent diffusion technique with carbopol 934 as coating material. GI transit test of the prepared microspheres was carried out in rats and beagle dogs, followed by the in vivo bioavailability evaluation of the microspheres in beagle dogs. The AV absorption ratio in different segments of rat's GI track for 3 hours was as following: stomach 9.46 +/- 0.62%, duodenum 20.22 +/- 1.50%, jejunum 15.7 +/- 1.33%, ileum 9.15 +/- 1.01%, and colon 4.59 +/- 0.48%. These results showed that AV was mainly absorbed in the stomach and upper intestine. The average diameter of the microspheres was 115.3 microm. The microspheres had a drug content of 33.3 +/- 0.7% (w/w) and a sustained-release profile for 12 hours in vitro. The mucoadhesive test in rats and beagle dogs showed that most of the microspheres were retained in the stomach 6 hours after oral administration. The in vivo pharmacokinetics test revealed that the microsphere and reference (AV tablets) preparations have no significant difference for C(max). The t(max) has increased from 2.33 hours (reference) to 5 hours (test). Meanwhile, the relative bioavailability of AV microspheres was 145%. A novel AV-resinate microsphere was prepared. The microspheres were proved to be gastric mucoadhesive and sustained-release with higher bioavailability.

  8. Age-dependent reduction of ghrelin- and motilin-induced contractile activity in the chicken gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Takio; Yoshida, Akiko; Tamano, Takuya; Teraoka, Hiroki; Kaiya, Hiroyuki

    2013-05-01

    Ghrelin is an endogenous ligand for growth hormone secretagogue-receptor 1a (GHS-R1a) and stimulates gastrointestinal (GI) motility in the chicken. Since ghrelin stimulates GH release, which regulates growth, it might be interesting to compare ghrelin-induced responses in GI tract of different-aged chickens. Motilin is a ghrelin-related gut peptide that induces strong contraction in the small intestine. Aim of this study was to clarify age-dependent changes in ghrelin- and motilin-induced contractions of the chicken GI tract and expression of their receptor mRNAs. Chicken ghrelin caused contraction of the crop and proventriculus. Ghrelin-induced contraction in the proventriculus decreased gradually up to 100 days after hatching, but the responses to ghrelin in the crop were the same during the growth period. GHS-R1a mRNA expression in the crop tended to increase, but that in the proventriculus decreased depending on the age. Chicken motilin caused contraction of the chicken GI tract. Atropine decreased the responses to motilin in the proventriculus but not in the ileum. Motilin-induced contraction in the proventriculus but not that in the ileum decreased depending on post-hatching days. On the other hand, motilin receptor mRNA expression in every region of the GI tract decreased with age, but the decrease was more marked in the proventriculus than in the ileum. In conclusion, ghrelin- and motilin-induced GI contractions selectively decreased in the chicken proventriculus depending on post-hatching days, probably due to the age-related decrease in respective receptors expression. The results suggest an age-related contribution of ghrelin and motilin to the regulation of chicken GI motility.

  9. Extract of green tea leaves partially attenuates streptozotocin-induced changes in antioxidant status and gastrointestinal functioning in rats.

    PubMed

    Juśkiewicz, Jerzy; Zduńczyk, Zenon; Jurgoński, Adam; Brzuzan, Łucja; Godycka-Kłos, Irena; Zary-Sikorska, Ewa

    2008-05-01

    Rats with severe streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes were subjected to dietary green tea extract supplementation at 2 doses (0.01% and 0.2%; GTL and GTH groups, respectively) to evaluate their effects on antioxidant, gastrointestinal, and renal parameters of experimental animals. The lower dietary supplementation reflects daily consumption of 3 cups of green tea for an average adult weighing 70 kg. Supplementation of a diet with green tea extract had no influence on elevated food intake, body weight loss, increased glucose concentration, or declined antioxidant capacity of water-soluble substances in plasma in the diabetic rats. In cases of intestinal maltase activity, attenuation of liver and kidney hypertrophy, triacylglycerol concentration, and aspartate aminotransferase activity in the serum, both dietary treatments normalized metabolic disorders caused by STZ injection to a similar extent. Unlike the GTL group, the GTH treatment significantly ameliorated development of diabetes-induced abnormal values for small intestinal saccharase and lactase activities, renal microalbuminuria, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance content in kidney tissue, as well as total antioxidant status in the serum of rats. The GTH group was also characterized by higher antioxidant capacity of lipid-soluble substances in plasma and superoxide dismutase activity in the serum. Although the higher dose of green tea extract did not completely protect against STZ-induced hyperglycemia and oxidative stress in experimental rats, this study suggests that green tea extract ingested at high amounts may prove to be a useful therapeutic option in the reversal of diabetic dysfunction.

  10. Cysteamine-induced reduction in gastrointestinal somatostatin: evidence for a region-specific loss in immunoreactivity.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, C H; Bakich, V; Bokenfohr, K; DiScala-Guenot, D; Kwok, Y N; Brown, J C

    1988-06-01

    Administration of cysteamine (beta-mercaptoethylamine; 2-aminoethanethiol) to rats has been shown to decrease the levels of somatostatin-like immunoreactivity (SLI) in the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas but its mode of action is unclear. In the current study the effect of cysteamine on gastrointestinal and pancreatic SLI has been studied using two antisera with different regional specificities. In addition, the in vitro effect of cysteamine on SS-14 and SS-28 has been studied by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Characterization of the two antisera (AS 26.3.2 and AS 1001) with a range of analogs of SS-14 revealed that both were directed against the midportion of the molecule but that AS 1001 was also sensitive to changes at the N- and C-termini. Tissue extracts from cysteamine-treated rats measured with AS 26.3.2 showed no significant change for the stomach, jejunum or pancreas but duodenal levels were reduced. With AS 1001 SLI levels were reduced in all tissues. Gel permeation chromatography of stomach extracts measured with AS 1001 showed a reduction in both SS-14 and SS-28. With AS 26.3.2 an increase in SLI eluting prior to the SS-14 peak occurred explaining why no significant reduction in total SLI was detected. With duodenal extracts the elution profiles with AS 1001 reflected the large reduction in total SLI whereas with AS 26.3.2 a smaller reduction occurred. Both SS-14 and SS-28 were reduced. HPLC analysis of SS-14 and SS-28 following incubation with cysteamine in vitro showed a time-dependent decrease in both somatostatin species with absorbance at 280 nm was measured. New peptide peaks which developed were not all detectable by radioimmunoassay with either antibody. The results suggest that cysteamine causes a change in the structure of somatostatin which probably first involves a reduction of the disulphide bridge and then the N- and C-terminal regions of the molecule thus making it unmeasurable by antisera sensitive to changes in these

  11. Method for preparing hollow metal oxide microsphere

    DOEpatents

    Schmitt, C.R.

    1974-02-12

    Hollow refractory metal oxide microspheres are prepared by impregnating resinous microspheres with a metallic compound, drying the impregnated microspheres, heating the microspheres slowly to carbonize the resin, and igniting the microspheres to remove the carbon and to produce the metal oxide. Zirconium oxide is given as an example. (Official Gazette)

  12. Optical imaging of breast tumors and of gastrointestinal cancer by laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Bernd; Grosenick, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Optical imaging offers a high potential for noninvasive detection of cancer in humans. Recent advances in instrumentation for diffuse optical imaging have led to new capabilities for the detection of cancer in highly scattering tissue such as the female breast. We review recent developments in the detection of breast cancer in humans by fluorescent contrast agents. So far, the unspecific contrast agents indocyanine green (ICG) and omocyanine have been applied, whereas molecular probes for direct targeted imaging of this disease are still in preclinical research. We discuss recent improvements in the differentiation of malignant and benign lesions with ICG based on its enhanced extravasation in breast cancer. Whereas fluorescence imaging in thick tissue layers is hampered by strong light scattering, tissue surfaces can be investigated with high spatial resolution. As an example for superficial tumors, lesions of the gastrointestinal tract (GI) are discussed. In these investigations, protoporphyrin IX is used as a tumor-specific (due to its strong enhancement in tumor cells) target for spectroscopic identification and imaging. We present a time-gated method for fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy with strong suppression of tissue autofluorescence and show results on patients with Barrett's esophagus and with colitis ulcerosa.

  13. Sangre de grado Croton palanostigma induces apoptosis in human gastrointestinal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Manuel; Okuhama, Nataly N; Clark, Melinda; Angeles, Fausto M; Lao, Juan; Bustamante, Sergio; Miller, Mark J S

    2002-05-01

    Sangre de grado is an ethnomedicinal red tree sap obtained from Croton spp. that is used to treat gastrointestinal ulcers, cancer and to promote wound healing. To evaluate the potential role of sangre de grado (SdG) in cancer we examined its effects on human cancer cells, AGS (stomach), HT29 and T84 (colon). Viability of cells treated with SdG (10-200 microg/ml) decreased (P<0.01) in a dose dependent manner measured over a 24-h period. Cell proliferation at 48 h decreased (P<0.01) in all cells treated with SdG (>100 microg/ml). When cells in suspension were treated with SdG (100 microg/ml) cell adherence was severely compromised (>85%). Cells treated with SdG (100 microg/ml) underwent apoptosis as detected by nucleus condensation and DNA fragmentation determined by ELISA, and flow cytometry. Morphological changes as assessed by acridine orange. These effects were similar to that observed with Taxol (30 microM). A significant alteration of microtubular architecture was equally observed in both stomach and colon cancer cells exposed to SdG (100 microg/ml). The induction of apoptosis and microtubule damage in AGS, HT29 and T84 cells suggest that sangre de grado should be evaluated further as a potential source of anti-cancer agents.

  14. p53 controls radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome in mice independent of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Kirsch, David G; Santiago, Philip M; di Tomaso, Emmanuelle; Sullivan, Julie M; Hou, Wu-Shiun; Dayton, Talya; Jeffords, Laura B; Sodha, Pooja; Mercer, Kim L; Cohen, Rhianna; Takeuchi, Osamu; Korsmeyer, Stanley J; Bronson, Roderick T; Kim, Carla F; Haigis, Kevin M; Jain, Rakesh K; Jacks, Tyler

    2010-01-29

    Acute exposure to ionizing radiation can cause lethal damage to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, a condition called the GI syndrome. Whether the target cells affected by radiation to cause the GI syndrome are derived from the epithelium or endothelium and whether the target cells die by apoptosis or other mechanisms are controversial issues. Studying mouse models, we found that selective deletion of the proapoptotic genes Bak1 and Bax from the GI epithelium or from endothelial cells did not protect mice from developing the GI syndrome after sub-total-body gamma irradiation. In contrast, selective deletion of p53 from the GI epithelium, but not from endothelial cells, sensitized irradiated mice to the GI syndrome. Transgenic mice overexpressing p53 in all tissues were protected from the GI syndrome after irradiation. These results suggest that the GI syndrome is caused by the death of GI epithelial cells and that these epithelial cells die by a mechanism that is regulated by p53 but independent of apoptosis.

  15. Development of a new minipig model to study radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome and its application in clinical research.

    PubMed

    Shim, Sehwan; Jang, Won-Suk; Lee, Sun-Joo; Jin, Sungho; Kim, Jin; Lee, Seung-Sook; Bang, Ho Yoon; Jeon, Byung Suk; Park, Sunhoo

    2014-04-01

    Because of insufficient clinical data regarding acute radiation damage after single high-dose radiation exposure, acute radiation-induced gastrointestinal (GI) syndrome remains difficult to treat. The goal of this study was to establish an appropriate and efficient minipig model to study high-dose radiation-induced GI syndrome after radiation exposure. For endoscopic access to the ileum, ileocutaneous anastomosis was performed 3 weeks before irradiation in six male Göttingen minipigs. Minipigs were locally irradiated at the abdominal area using a gamma source as follows: 1,000 cGy (n = 3) and 1,500 cGy (n = 3). Endoscopic evaluation for the terminal ileum was periodically performed via the ileocutaneous anastomosis tract. Pieces of tissue were serially taken for histological examination. The irradiated intestine presented characteristic morphological changes over time. The most obvious changes in the ileum were mucosal atrophy and telangiectasia from day 1 to day 17 after abdominal irradiation. Microscopic findings were characterized as architectural disorganization, loss of villi and chronic active inflammation. Increase in cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression was closely correlated with severity of tissue damage and inflammation. Particularly, the plasma citrulline level (PCL), a potential marker for radiation-induced intestinal damage, was significantly decreased the day after irradiation and recovered when irradiated mucosa was normalized. Our results also showed that PCL changes were positively correlated with microscopic changes and the endoscopic score in radiation-induced mucosal damage. In conclusion, the ileocutaneous anastomosis model using the minipig mimics human GI syndrome and allows the study of sequential changes in the ileum, the main target tissue of abdominal irradiation. In addition, PCL could be a simple biomarker for radiation-induced intestinal damage.

  16. Use of electronic personal health records to identify patients at risk for aspirin-induced gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Anita N; Kogut, Stephen

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe the utility of electronic personal health records (ePHRs) to identify patients with potential risk factors for aspirin-induced upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB). ER-Card, LLC. a for-profit ePHR company located in Rhode Island from October 2008 to May 2010. Clinical pharmacists reviewed the records of 615 patients enrolled in an ePHR service. Records included patient self-report of all known medical conditions, current prescription medications, and self-care therapies utilized. Pharmacists reviewed ePHR profiles for actual or potential medication-related problems. Patients taking low-dose aspirin (81 mg-325 mg daily) were screened for known additional risk factors for aspirin-induced UGIB. Patients identified were notified to contact their provider for information and/or providers were contacted directly by pharmacists with therapy recommendations. Number of patients at increased risk for aspirin-induced UGIB as a result of concomitant medications. Ninety-seven patients (16% of total records screened) with an average age of 72.1 years had risk factors for aspirin induced UGIB. In addition to daily aspirin therapy patients reported regular use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors (38%), other antiplatelet agents (22%), anticoagulants (24%), corticosteroids (4%), or a combination of these medications (12%). None of the patients included in this analysis reported use of prescribed or overthe-counter gastroprotective therapy (such as proton-pump inhibitors or histamine-2 receptor antagonists). Pharmacist screening of patient self-reported health information as part of an ePHR service can result in the detection of a significant number of patients at increased risk for aspirin-induced UGIB.

  17. SRNL POROUS WALL GLASS MICROSPHERES

    SciTech Connect

    Wicks, G; Leung Heung, L; Ray Schumacher, R

    2008-04-15

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has developed a new medium for storage of hydrogen and other gases. This involves fabrication of thin, Porous Walled, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs), with diameters generally in the range of 1 to several hundred microns. What is unique about the glass microballons is that porosity has been induced and controlled within the thin, one micron thick walls, on the scale of 10 to several thousand Angstroms. This porosity results in interesting properties including the ability to use these channels to fill the microballons with special absorbents and other materials, thus providing a contained environment even for reactive species. Gases can now enter the microspheres and be retained on the absorbents, resulting in solid-state and contained storage of even reactive species. Also, the porosity can be altered and controlled in various ways, and even used to filter mixed gas streams within a system. SRNL is involved in about a half dozen different programs involving these PW-HGMs and an overview of some of these activities and results emerging are presented.

  18. Intratumoural GM-CSF microspheres and CTLA-4 blockade enhance the antitumour immunity induced by thermal ablation in a subcutaneous murine hepatoma model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zubing; Shen, Shiqiang; Peng, Baogang; Tao, Jianpin

    2009-08-01

    We evaluated the effect of a new antitumour immunity regimen that included microwave ablation, intratumoural microspheres encapsulating granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and blockade of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4). C57BL6 mice with an established subcutaneous Hepa 1-6 hepatoma underwent microwave ablation, followed by intratumoural injection of GM-CSF microspheres, and intraperitoneal injection of anti-CTLA-4 antibodies. The therapeutic effects were evaluated by tumour growth, survival analysis, and cytotoxicity of T lymphocytes against Hepa 1-6. The co-administration of microwave thermal ablation, GM-CSF microspheres, and anti-CTLA-4 rejected tumour rechallenge in 90% of treated mice in a subcutaneous murine Hepa 1-6 model, and cured established distant tumour in 50% of the treated mice. This antitumour immune response was tumour-specific and mediated by natural killer (NK), CD4+, and CD8+ T cells. Microwave ablation, followed by intratumoural GM-CSF microspheres, and anti-CTLA-4 antibodies results in the local eradication of tumours, rejection of tumours following rechallenge, and cures established distant tumours, suggesting that this is a promising regimen and one that is readily applicable in the clinic.

  19. Diet-induced regulation of bitter taste receptor subtypes in the mouse gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Vegezzi, Gaia; Anselmi, Laura; Huynh, Jennifer; Barocelli, Elisabetta; Rozengurt, Enrique; Raybould, Helen; Sternini, Catia

    2014-01-01

    Bitter taste receptors and signaling molecules, which detect bitter taste in the mouth, are expressed in the gut mucosa. In this study, we tested whether two distinct bitter taste receptors, the bitter taste receptor 138 (T2R138), selectively activated by isothiocyanates, and the broadly tuned bitter taste receptor 108 (T2R108) are regulated by luminal content. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that T2R138 transcript is more abundant in the colon than the small intestine and lowest in the stomach, whereas T2R108 mRNA is more abundant in the stomach compared to the intestine. Both transcripts in the stomach were markedly reduced by fasting and restored to normal levels after 4 hours re-feeding. A cholesterol-lowering diet, mimicking a diet naturally low in cholesterol and rich in bitter substances, increased T2R138 transcript, but not T2R108, in duodenum and jejunum, and not in ileum and colon. Long-term ingestion of high-fat diet increased T2R138 RNA, but not T2R108, in the colon. Similarly, α-gustducin, a bitter taste receptor signaling molecule, was reduced by fasting in the stomach and increased by lowering cholesterol in the small intestine and by high-fat diet in the colon. These data show that both short and long term changes in the luminal contents alter expression of bitter taste receptors and associated signaling molecules in the mucosa, supporting the proposed role of bitter taste receptors in luminal chemosensing in the gastrointestinal tract. Bitter taste receptors might serve as regulatory and defensive mechanism to control gut function and food intake and protect the body from the luminal environment.

  20. A role of CB1R in inducing θ-rhythm coordination between the gustatory and gastrointestinal insula.

    PubMed

    Kang, Youngnam; Sato, Hajime; Saito, Mitsuru; Yin, Dong Xu; Park, Sook Kyung; Oh, Seog Bae; Bae, Yong Chul; Toyoda, Hiroki

    2016-09-01

    Anandamide (AEA) and N-oleoylethanolamine (OEA) are produced in the intestine and brain during fasting and satiety, respectively. Subsequently, AEA facilitates food intake via activation of cannabinoid type-1 receptors (CB1Rs) while OEA decreases food intake via activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) and/or G-protein-coupled receptor 119 (GPR119). Neuronal activity in the gastrointestinal region of the autonomic insula (GI-Au-I) that rostrally adjoins the gustatory insula (Gu-I) increases during fasting, enhancing appetite while umami and sweet taste sensations in Gu-I enhances appetite in GI-Au-I, strongly suggesting the presence of a neural interaction between the Gu-I and GI-Au-I which changes depending on the concentrations of AEA and OEA. However, this possibility has never been investigated. In rat slice preparations, we demonstrate with voltage-sensitive dye imaging that activation of CB1Rs by AEA induces θ-rhythm oscillatory synchronization in the Gu-I which propagates into the GI-Au-I but stops at its caudal end, displaying an oscillatory coordination. The AEA-induced oscillation was abolished by a CB1R antagonist or OEA through activation of GPR119. Our results demonstrate that the neural coordination between the Gu-I and GI-Au-I is generated or suppressed by the opposing activities between CB1R and GPR119. This mechanism may be involved in the feeding behavior based on taste recognition.

  1. Doped zinc oxide microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Jr., Wesley D.; Bond, Walter D.; Lauf, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    A new composition and method of making same for a doped zinc oxide microsphere and articles made therefrom for use in an electrical surge arrestor which has increased solid content, uniform grain size and is in the form of a gel.

  2. Doped zinc oxide microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, W.D. Jr.; Bond, W.D.; Lauf, R.J.

    1993-12-14

    A new composition and method of making same for a doped zinc oxide microsphere and articles made therefrom for use in an electrical surge arrestor which has increased solid content, uniform grain size and is in the form of a gel. 4 figures.

  3. Microsphere insulation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Mark S. (Inventor); Willen, Gary S. (Inventor); Mohling, Robert A. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A new insulation system is provided that contains microspheres. This insulation system can be used to provide insulated panels and clamshells, and to insulate annular spaces around objects used to transfer, store, or transport cryogens and other temperature-sensitive materials. This insulation system provides better performance with reduced maintenance than current insulation systems.

  4. Polyvinyl pyridine microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Gupta, Amitava (Inventor); Volksen, Willi (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    Microspheres are produced by cobalt gamma radiation initiated polymerization of a dilute aqueous vinyl pyridine solution. Addition of cross-linking agent provides higher surface area beads. Addition of monomers such as hydroxyethylmethacrylate acrylamide or methacrylamide increases hydrophilic properties and surface area of the beads. High surface area catalytic supports are formed in the presence of controlled pore glass substrate.

  5. Polyvinyl pyridine microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Gupta, Amitava (Inventor); Volksen, Willi (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Microspheres are produced by cobalt gamma radiation initiated polymerization of a dilute aqueous vinyl pyridine solution. Addition of cross-linking agent provides higher surface area beads. Addition of monomers such as hydroxyethylmethacrylate acrylamide or methacrylamide increases hydrophilic properties and surface area of the beads. High surface area catalytic supports are formed in the presence of controlled pore glass substrate.

  6. Fusion microsphere targets

    SciTech Connect

    Koo, J.C.

    1980-07-28

    It was shown that a microsphere within the structure limitations is hydrodynamically stable. To insure its perfect formation, the initial chemical compositions must have a blowing capability, more important, the resultant liquid compositions must also have sufficient surface tension and low viscosity.

  7. Sodium alginate ameliorates indomethacin-induced gastrointestinal mucosal injury via inhibiting translocation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Atsuki; Itoh, Tomokazu; Nasu, Reishi; Nishida, Ryuichi

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of sodium alginate (AL-Na) on indomethacin-induced small intestinal lesions in rats. METHODS: Gastric injury was assessed by measuring ulcerated legions 4 h after indomethacin (25 mg/kg) administration. Small intestinal injury was assessed by measuring ulcerated legions 24 h after indomethacin (10 mg/kg) administration. AL-Na and rebamipide were orally administered. Myeloperoxidase activity in the stomach and intestine were measured. Microvascular permeability, superoxide dismutase content, glutathione peroxidase activity, catalase activity, red blood cell count, white blood cell count, mucin content and enterobacterial count in the small intestine were measured. RESULTS: AL-Na significantly reduced indomethacin-induced ulcer size and myeloperoxidase activity in the stomach and small intestine. AL-Na prevented increases in microvascular permeability, superoxide dismutase content, glutathione peroxidase activity and catalase activity in small intestinal injury induced by indomethacin. AL-Na also prevented decreases in red blood cells and white blood cells in small intestinal injury induced by indomethacin. Moreover, AL-Na suppressed mucin depletion by indomethacin and inhibited infiltration of enterobacteria into the small intestine. CONCLUSION: These results indicate that AL-Na ameliorates non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced small intestinal enteritis via bacterial translocation. PMID:24627600

  8. Autophagy is involved in endogenous and NVP-AUY922-induced KIT degradation in gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Hsueh, Yuan-Shuo; Yen, Chueh-Chuan; Shih, Neng-Yao; Chiang, Nai-Jung; Li, Chien-Feng; Chen, Li-Tzong

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is a prototype of mutant KIT oncogene-driven tumor. Prolonged tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment may result in a resistant phenotype through acquired secondary KIT mutation. Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90AA1) is a chaperone protein responsible for protein maturation and stability, and KIT is a known client protein of HSP90AA1. Inhibition of HSP90AA1 has been shown to destabilize KIT protein by enhancing its degradation via the proteasome-dependent pathway. In this study, we demonstrated that NVP-AUY922 (AUY922), a new class of HSP90AA1 inhibitor, is effective in inhibiting the growth of GIST cells expressing mutant KIT protein, the imatinib-sensitive GIST882 and imatinib-resistant GIST48 cells. The growth inhibition was accompanied with a sustained reduction of both total and phosphorylated KIT proteins and the induction of apoptosis in both cell lines. Surprisingly, AUY922-induced KIT reduction could be partially reversed by pharmacological inhibition of either autophagy or proteasome degradation pathway. The blockade of autophagy alone led to the accumulation of the KIT protein, highlighting the role of autophagy in endogenous KIT turnover. The involvement of autophagy in endogenous and AUY922-induced KIT protein turnover was further confirmed by the colocalization of KIT with MAP1LC3B-, acridine orange- or SQSTM1-labeled autophagosome, and by the accumulation of KIT in GIST cells by silencing either BECN1 or ATG5 to disrupt autophagosome activity. Therefore, the results not only highlight the potential application of AUY922 for the treatment of KIT-expressing GISTs, but also provide the first evidence for the involvement of autophagy in endogenous and HSP90AA1 inhibitor-induced KIT degradation. PMID:23196876

  9. THE EFFECTS OF Syzygium aromaticum-DERIVED TRITERPENES ON GASTROINTESTINAL GHRELIN EXPRESSION IN STREPTOZOTOCIN-INDUCED DIABETIC RATS.

    PubMed

    Luvuno, Mluleki; Mbongwa, Hlengiwe Prosperity; Khathi, Andile

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic polyphagia has been associated with elevated plasma ghrelin levels in experimental type 1 diabetes. This increase in food consumption contributes to chronic hyperglycaemia in diabetes thus contributing to the development of micro- and macrovascular complications. We have reported that plant-derived oleanolic acid (OA) and maslinic acid (MA) reduce blood glucose levels, in part, through the inhibition of intestinal carbohydrate hydrolyzing enzymes and glucose transporters. However, their effects on food intake and plasma ghrelin concentrations are unclear. Accordingly, we investigated the effects of these triterpenes on food intake and ghrelin expression in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. The effects of OA and MA on blood glucose concentration; food and water intake were monitored over five weeks after which plasma ghrelin concentrations were measured. Additionally, the expression of ghrelin in the various sections of the GIT was determined using Western blot analysis. Ghrelin concentrations in untreated STZ-induced diabetic rats were significantly higher in comparison to the non-diabetic control. Interestingly, the administration of OA and MA reduced food intake, blood glucose levels and plasma ghrelin levels in STZ-induced diabetic rats. This was further complemented by significant reductions in the gastrointestinal expression of ghrelin suggesting that the anti-diabetic properties of these triterpenes are mediated, in part, through the reduction of food intake and the modulation of ghrelin expression. The findings of the study suggest that the control of food intake through the reduction of ghrelin expression by plant-derived OA and MA may constitute an avenue of glycaemic control in diabetes mellitus.

  10. Pertuzumab in gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Oh, Do-Youn; Bang, Yung-Jue

    2016-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and HER3 are altered in multiple tumor types, including gastrointestinal cancer. The HER2/HER3 dimer is crucial for HER2-mediated signaling in HER2-positive tumors. HER2-targeting agents, including trastuzumab, lapatinib, trastuzumab emtansine, and pertuzumab, have been approved for the treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer, with trastuzumab also approved for the treatment of HER2-positive gastric cancer. Pertuzumab, a recombinant humanized immunoglobulin (Ig) G1 monoclonal antibody targeting HER-2, binds to the dimerization domain (extracellular domain II) of HER2, which leads to blocking of ligand-induced HER2 heterodimerization. It is under investigation in gastrointestinal cancers, including HER2-positive gastric cancer. In this review, the authors summarize the biology of HER2/HER3 and its alterations in gastrointestinal cancers. The authors focus specifically on the current status of development of pertuzumab in gastrointestinal cancers. The HER2/HER3 alteration in gastrointestinal cancers is quite interesting. In HER2-positive gastric cancer, the dual blockade of HER2 and HER3 using trastuzumab and pertuzumab is being tested in an international phase III trial, the JACOB study. This strategy may benefit HER2-positive gastric cancer patients more as in the case of HER2-positive breast cancer. In other gastrointestinal cancers, including biliary tract cancer, esophageal cancer, pancreatic cancer, and colorectal cancer, there is huge room for the development of pertuzumab.

  11. Ghrelin induces fasted motor activity of the gastrointestinal tract in conscious fed rats

    PubMed Central

    Fujino, Kazunori; Inui, Akio; Asakawa, Akihiro; Kihara, Naoki; Fujimura, Masaki; Fujimiya, Mineko

    2003-01-01

    Ghrelin is a newly discovered orexigenic peptide originating from the stomach. However, its action in regulating the fed and fasted motor activity of the digestive tract is not fully understood. In the present study, we examined the effects of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) and intravenous (i.v.) injection of ghrelin on the physiological fed and fasted motor activities in the stomach and duodenum of freely moving conscious rats. i.c.v. and i.v. injection of ghrelin induced fasted motor activity in the duodenum in normal fed rats, while i.v. injection of ghrelin induced fasted motor activity in both the stomach and duodenum in vagotomized rats. The effects of i.c.v. and i.v. injected ghrelin were blocked by growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R) antagonist given by the same route and also blocked by immunoneutralization of neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the brain. The effects of i.v. injected ghrelin were not altered by i.c.v. injection of GHS-R antagonist in vagotomized rats. Injection of GHS-R antagonist blocked the fasted motor activity in both the stomach and duodenum in vagotomized rats but did not affect the fasted motor activity in normal rats. Low intragastric pH inhibited the effect of ghrelin. The present results indicate that ghrelin is involved in regulation of fasted motor activity in the stomach and duodenum. Peripheral ghrelin may induce the fasted motor activity by activating the NPY neurons in the brain, probably through ghrelin receptors on vagal afferent neurons. Once the brain mechanism is eliminated by truncal vagotomy, ghrelin might be primarily involved in the regulation of fasted motor activity through ghrelin receptors on the stomach and duodenum. The action of ghrelin to induce fasted motor activity is strongly affected by intragastric pH; low pH inhibits the action. PMID:12837928

  12. Multivariate discriminating algorithm for analyzing laser-induced fluorescence spectra of human gastrointestinal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Wei, Guang Hui

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of this study has been to evaluate the laser- induced fluorescence characters of normal and malignant stomach tissue in Vitro and in Vivo. The stepwise multivariate discrimination analysis was used to make a multivariate statistical algorithm for analyzing the diagnostic parameters of human stomach tissues fluorescence spectrum. The resulting spectra could be differentiating histologically stomach abnormal tissue from normal tissue with a sensitivity and specificity value of 95% and 97%. The diagnosis results were in excellent agreement with histopathological results.

  13. Porous microsphere and its applications

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yunpeng; Chen, Yinghui; Hong, Xiaoyun; Liu, Zhenguo; Yuan, Weien

    2013-01-01

    Porous microspheres have drawn great attention in the last two decades for their potential applications in many fields, such as carriers for drugs, absorption and desorption of substances, pulmonary drug delivery, and tissue regeneration. The application of porous microspheres has become a feasible way to address existing problems. In this essay, we give a brief introduction of the porous microsphere, its characteristics, preparation methods, applications, and a brief summary of existing problems and research tendencies. PMID:23515359

  14. Systematic review: the role of the gut microbiota in chemotherapy- or radiation-induced gastrointestinal mucositis - current evidence and potential clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Touchefeu, Y; Montassier, E; Nieman, K; Gastinne, T; Potel, G; Bruley des Varannes, S; Le Vacon, F; de La Cochetière, M F

    2014-09-01

    Gastrointestinal mucositis is defined as inflammation and/or ulcers of the gastrointestinal tract occurring as a complication of chemotherapy and radiation therapy, and affects about 50% of all cancer patients. To assess the role of gut microbiota in the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal mucositis and the potential for manipulations of the microbiota to prevent and to treat mucositis. Search of the literature published in English using Medline, Scopus and the Cochrane Library, with main search terms 'intestinal microbiota', 'bacteremia', 'mucositis', 'chemotherapy-induced diarrhoea', 'chemotherapy-induced mucositis', 'radiotherapy-induced mucositis'. The gut microbiota plays a major role in the maintenance of intestinal homoeostasis and integrity. Patients receiving cytotoxic and radiation therapy exhibit marked changes in intestinal microbiota, with most frequently, decrease in Bifidobacterium, Clostridium cluster XIVa, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, and increase in Enterobacteriaceae and Bacteroides. These modifications may contribute to the development of mucositis, particularly diarrhoea and bacteraemia. The prevention of cancer therapy-induced mucositis by probiotics has been investigated in randomised clinical trials with some promising results. Three of six trials reported a significantly decreased incidence of diarrhoea. One trial reported a decrease in infectious complications. The gut microbiota may play a major role in the pathogenesis of mucositis through the modification of intestinal barrier function, innate immunity and intestinal repair mechanisms. Better knowledge of these effects may lead to new therapeutic approaches and to the identification of predictive markers of mucositis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Irinotecan-Induced Gastrointestinal Dysfunction and Pain Are Mediated by Common TLR4-Dependent Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wardill, Hannah R; Gibson, Rachel J; Van Sebille, Ysabella Z A; Secombe, Kate R; Coller, Janet K; White, Imogen A; Manavis, Jim; Hutchinson, Mark R; Staikopoulos, Vasiliki; Logan, Richard M; Bowen, Joanne M

    2016-06-01

    Strong epidemiological data indicate that chemotherapy-induced gut toxicity and pain occur in parallel, indicating common underlying mechanisms. We have recently outlined evidence suggesting that TLR4 signaling may contribute to both side effects. We therefore aimed to determine if genetic deletion of TLR4 improves chemotherapy-induced gut toxicity and pain. Forty-two female wild-type (WT) and 42 Tlr4 null (-/-) BALB/c mice weighing between 18 and 25 g (10-13 weeks) received a single 270 mg/kg (i.p.) dose of irinotecan hydrochloride or vehicle control and were killed at 6, 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours. Bacterial sequencing was conducted on cecal samples of control animals to determine the gut microbiome profile. Gut toxicity was assessed using validated clinical and histopathologic markers, permeability assays, and inflammatory markers. Chemotherapy-induced pain was assessed using the validated rodent facial grimace criteria, as well as immunologic markers of glial activation in the lumbar spinal cord. TLR4 deletion attenuated irinotecan-induced gut toxicity, with improvements in weight loss (P = 0.0003) and diarrhea (P < 0.0001). Crypt apoptosis was significantly decreased in BALB/c-Tlr4(-/-billy) mice (P < 0.0001), correlating with lower mucosal injury scores (P < 0.005). Intestinal permeability to FITC-dextran (4 kDa) and LPS translocation was greater in WT mice than in BALB/c-Tlr4(-/-billy) (P = 0.01 and P < 0.0001, respectively). GFAP staining in the lumbar spinal cord, indicative of astrocytic activation, was increased at 6 and 72 hours in WT mice compared with BALB/c-Tlr4(-/-billy) mice (P = 0.008, P = 0.01). These data indicate that TLR4 is uniquely positioned to mediate irinotecan-induced gut toxicity and pain, highlighting the possibility of a targetable gut/CNS axis for improved toxicity outcomes. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(6); 1376-86. ©2016 AACR.

  16. Treatment of rape-induced urogenital and lower gastrointestinal lesions among girls aged 5 years or younger.

    PubMed

    Mukwege, Denis; Alumeti, Desiré; Himpens, Jacques; Cadière, Guy-Bernard

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate outcomes after treatment of rape-induced urogenital and lower gastrointestinal lesions among young girls. In a retrospective study, data were assessed from girls aged 5 years or younger who were treated for sexual-assault-related injuries at the General Referral Hospital, Panzi, Bukavu, Democratic Republic of Congo, between 2004 and 2014. Data were obtained from review of charts, records of the mother's impressions and physical examinations, and photographic evidence. Elective surgery had been reserved for patients experiencing fecal and/or urinary incontinence. Overall, 205 girls aged 5 years or younger presented with rape injuries: 162 (79.1%) had only mucocutaneous lesions, 22 (10.7%) had musculocutaneous lesions, and 21 (10.2%) had musculocutaneous lesions complicated by fecal and/or urinary incontinence. Among the 21 girls who underwent perineal surgery, two with fecal and urinary incontinence and perforation of the peritoneum of Douglas pouch were additionally treated by laparoscopy. Among 16 patients with fecal incontinence, the continence score had improved significantly at 10.4 months after surgery (P<0.001). Concomitant urinary incontinence subsided for four of five patients but persisted for one who had a gunshot wound to the vagina. Cosmetic outcome was normal in 19 cases. For rape survivors aged 5 years or younger, a treatment strategy by which surgery is reserved for incontinent patients provided good cosmetic and functional outcomes. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. p21 Protects “Super p53” Mice from the Radiation-Induced Gastrointestinal Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Julie M.; Jeffords, Laura B.; Lee, Chang-Lung; Rodrigues, Rafaela; Ma, Yan; Kirsch, David G.

    2012-01-01

    Exposure of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract to high doses of radiation can lead to lethality from the GI syndrome. Although the molecular mechanism regulating the GI syndrome remains to be fully defined, we have recently demonstrated that p53 within the GI epithelial cells controls the radiation-induced GI syndrome. Mice lacking p53 in the GI epithelium were sensitized to the GI syndrome, while transgenic mice with one additional copy of p53 called “Super p53” mice were protected from the GI syndrome. Here, we cross “Super p53” mice to p21−/− mice that lack the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21. Super p53; p21−/− mice are sensitized to the GI syndrome compared to Super p53 mice that retain one p21 allele. In addition, mice lacking p21 are not protected from the GI syndrome with one extra copy of p53. These results suggest that p21 protects “Super p53” mice from the GI syndrome. PMID:22165824

  18. Basal and inducible CYP1 mRNA quantitation and protein localization throughout the mouse gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Uno, Shigeyuki; Dragin, Nadine; Miller, Marian L; Dalton, Timothy P; Gonzalez, Frank J; Nebert, Daniel W

    2008-02-15

    The CYP1A1, CYP1A2, and CYP1B1 enzymes are inducible by benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD); metabolism of BaP by these enzymes leads to electrophilic intermediates and genotoxicity. Throughout the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, we systematically compared basal and inducible levels of the CYP1 mRNAs by Q-PCR, and localized the CYP1 proteins by immunohistochemistry. Cyp1(+/+) wild-type were compared with the Cyp1a1(-/-), Cyp1a2(-/-), and Cyp1b1(-/-) single-knockout and Cyp1a1/1b1(-/-) and Cyp1a2/1b1(-/-) double-knockout mice. Oral BaP was compared with intraperitoneal TCDD. In general, maximal CYP1A1 mRNA levels were 3-10 times greater than CYP1B1, which were 3-10 times greater than CYP1A2 mRNA levels. Highest inducible concentrations of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 occurred in proximal small intestine, whereas the highest basal and inducible levels of CYP1B1 mRNA occurred in esophagus, forestomach, and glandular stomach. Ablation of either Cyp1a2 or Cyp1b1 gene resulted in a compensatory increase in CYP1A1 mRNA - but only in small intestine. Also in small intestine, although BaP- and TCDD-mediated CYP1A1 inductions were roughly equivalent, oral BaP-mediated CYP1A2 mRNA induction was approximately 40-fold greater than TCDD-mediated CYP1A2 induction. CYP1B1 induction by TCDD in Cyp1(+/+) and Cyp1a2(-/-) mice was 4-5 times higher than that by BaP; however, in Cyp1a1(-/-) animals CYP1B1 induction by TCDD or BaP was approximately equivalent. CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 proteins were generally localized nearer to the lumen than CYP1B1 proteins, in both squamous and glandular epithelial cells. These GI tract data suggest that the inducible CYP1A1 enzyme, both in concentration and in location, might act as a "shield" in detoxifying oral BaP and, hence, protecting the animal.

  19. Gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Marek, T A

    2011-11-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding remains one of the most important emergencies in gastroenterology. Despite this, only about 100 abstracts concerning gastrointestinal bleeding (excluding bleeding complicating endoscopic procedures) were presented at this year's Digestive Disease Week (DDW; 7-10 May 2011; Chicago, Illinois, USA), accounting for less than 2% of all presented lectures and posters. It seems that the number of such abstracts has been decreasing over recent years. This may be due in part to the high level of medical care already achieved, especially in the areas of pharmacotherapy and endoscopic treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding. In this review of gastrointestinal bleeding, priority has been given to large epidemiological studies reflecting "real life," and abstracts dealing more or less directly with endoscopic management. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Gastrointestinal manifestations.

    PubMed

    Tanowitz, H B; Simon, D; Weiss, L M; Noyer, C; Coyle, C; Wittner, M

    1996-11-01

    Gastrointestinal disease is a common problem in the setting of HIV-1 infection. As patients live longer and other opportunistic pathogens are suppressed, these problems are becoming even more important in the quality of life.

  1. Gastrointestinal tattoos.

    PubMed

    Snider, T E; Goodell, W M; Pulitzer, D R

    1994-06-01

    Tattooing of the gastrointestinal tract is used to facilitate the relocation of biopsy sites or other sites of interest at the time of subsequent biopsy or surgery. Submucosal injection of sterile india ink produces a zone of blue-black coloration that is grossly visible from both the mucosal and serosal surfaces. The pathology of gastrointestinal tattoos has only been briefly mentioned previously in the medical literature. We report two cases of gastrointestinal tattooing: one that was done to mark the margin of resection in a patient with gastric lymphoma, and the second that occurred unintentionally following the administration of activated charcoal for drug overdosage in a patient with undiagnosed active inflammatory bowel disease. Unintentional tattooing of the gastrointestinal tract has, therefore, not been reported.

  2. Radiotherapy combined with TLR7/8 activation induces strong immune responses against gastrointestinal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Tietz, Alexandra; Rahbari, Nuh N.; Bork, Ulrich; Schmidt, Thomas; Kahlert, Christoph; Haberkorn, Uwe; Tomai, Mark A.; Lipson, Kenneth E.; Carretero, Rafael; Weitz, Jürgen; Koch, Moritz; Huber, Peter E.

    2015-01-01

    In addition to local cytotoxic activity, radiotherapy may also elicit local and systemic antitumor immunity, which may be augmented by immunotherapeutic agents including Toll-like receptor (TLR) 7/8 agonists. Here, we investigated the ability of 3M-011 (854A), a TLR7/8 agonist, to boost the antigen-presenting activity of dendritic cells (DC) as an adjuvant to radiotherapy. The combined treatment induced marked local and systemic responses in subcutaneous and orthotopic mouse models of colorectal and pancreatic cancer. In vitro cytotoxicity assays as well as in vivo depletion experiments with monoclonal antibodies identified NK and CD8 T cells as the cell populations mediating the cytotoxic effects of the treatment, while in vivo depletion of CD11c+ dendritic cells (DC) in CD11c-DTR transgenic mice revealed DC as the pivotal immune hub in this setting. The specificity of the immune reaction was confirmed by ELISPOT assays. TLR7/8 agonists therefore seem to be potent adjuvants to radiotherapy, inducing strong local and profound systemic immune responses to tumor antigens released by conventional therapy. PMID:25609199

  3. Comparison of the upper gastrointestinal safety of Arthrotec 75 and nabumetone in osteoarthritis patients at high risk for developing nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced gastrointestinal ulcers.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, N M; Caldwell, J; Kivitz, A J; Weaver, A L; Bocanegra, T S; Ball, J; Dhadda, S; Hurley, S; Hancock, L

    1999-04-01

    A 6-week, multicenter, double-masked, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study compared the upper gastrointestinal (UGI) safety of Arthrotec 75 (diclofenac sodium 75 mg-misoprostol 200 microg; G.D. Searle & Co., Skokie, Illinois) administered twice daily with that of nabumetone 1500 mg administered once daily in 1203 patients with symptomatic osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip or knee. All patients had a documented clinical history of endoscopically confirmed gastric, pyloric-channel, or duodenal ulcer or > or = 10 erosions in the stomach or duodenum. UGI endoscopy was performed at baseline and again at week 6 or early withdrawal. Treatment with Arthrotec 75 resulted in a significantly lower combined incidence of endoscopically confirmed gastric and duodenal ulcers compared with nabumetone (4% vs 11%), and its rate of endoscopically confirmed ulceration was equivalent to that of placebo. The incidence of gastric ulcers alone was also significantly lower with Arthrotec 75 than with nabumetone (1% vs 9%). The incidence of duodenal ulcer with Arthrotec 75 was not significantly different from that with nabumetone (4% vs 3%). Types of adverse events were similar for all treatment groups, with GI adverse events predominating. Arthrotec 75 was well tolerated by the majority of patients. The results of this study demonstrate that Arthrotec 75 has a superior UGI safety profile, causing significantly fewer UGI ulcers, in comparison with nabumetone in patients with symptomatic OA and a documented history of ulcers or > or = 10 erosions.

  4. [Gastrointestinal bleeding].

    PubMed

    Lanas, Ángel

    2015-09-01

    In the Digestive Disease Week in 2015 there have been some new contributions in the field of gastrointestinal bleeding that deserve to be highlighted. Treatment of celecoxib with a proton pump inhibitor is safer than treatment with nonselective NSAID and a proton pump inhibitor in high risk gastrointestinal and cardiovascular patients who mostly also take acetylsalicylic acid. Several studies confirm the need to restart the antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy at an early stage after a gastrointestinal hemorrhage. The need for urgent endoscopy before 6-12 h after the onset of upper gastrointestinal bleeding episode may be beneficial in patients with hemodynamic instability and high risk for comorbidity. It is confirmed that in Western but not in Japanese populations, gastrointestinal bleeding episodes admitted to hospital during weekend days are associated with a worse prognosis associated with delays in the clinical management of the events. The strategy of a restrictive policy on blood transfusions during an upper GI bleeding event has been challenged. Several studies have shown the benefit of identifying the bleeding vessel in non varicose underlying gastric lesions by Doppler ultrasound which allows direct endoscopic therapy in the patient with upper GI bleeding. Finally, it has been reported that lower gastrointestinal bleeding diverticula band ligation or hemoclipping are both safe and have the same long-term outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. A role of CB1R in inducing θ-rhythm coordination between the gustatory and gastrointestinal insula

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Youngnam; Sato, Hajime; Saito, Mitsuru; Yin, Dong Xu; Park, Sook Kyung; Oh, Seog Bae; Bae, Yong Chul; Toyoda, Hiroki

    2016-01-01

    Anandamide (AEA) and N-oleoylethanolamine (OEA) are produced in the intestine and brain during fasting and satiety, respectively. Subsequently, AEA facilitates food intake via activation of cannabinoid type-1 receptors (CB1Rs) while OEA decreases food intake via activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) and/or G-protein-coupled receptor 119 (GPR119). Neuronal activity in the gastrointestinal region of the autonomic insula (GI-Au-I) that rostrally adjoins the gustatory insula (Gu-I) increases during fasting, enhancing appetite while umami and sweet taste sensations in Gu-I enhances appetite in GI-Au-I, strongly suggesting the presence of a neural interaction between the Gu-I and GI-Au-I which changes depending on the concentrations of AEA and OEA. However, this possibility has never been investigated. In rat slice preparations, we demonstrate with voltage-sensitive dye imaging that activation of CB1Rs by AEA induces θ-rhythm oscillatory synchronization in the Gu-I which propagates into the GI-Au-I but stops at its caudal end, displaying an oscillatory coordination. The AEA-induced oscillation was abolished by a CB1R antagonist or OEA through activation of GPR119. Our results demonstrate that the neural coordination between the Gu-I and GI-Au-I is generated or suppressed by the opposing activities between CB1R and GPR119. This mechanism may be involved in the feeding behavior based on taste recognition. PMID:27581068

  6. Sodium butyrate attenuates high-fat diet-induced steatohepatitis in mice by improving gut microbiota and gastrointestinal barrier.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Da; Pan, Qin; Xin, Feng-Zhi; Zhang, Rui-Nan; He, Chong-Xin; Chen, Guang-Yu; Liu, Chang; Chen, Yuan-Wen; Fan, Jian-Gao

    2017-01-07

    To investigate whether gut microbiota metabolite sodium butyrate (NaB) is an effective substance for attenuating non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and the internal mechanisms. Male C57BL/6J mice were divided into three groups, normal control were fed standard chow and model group were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) for 16 wk, the intervention group were fed HFD for 16 wk and treated with NaB for 8 wk. Gut microbiota from each group were detected at baseline and at 16 wk, liver histology were evaluated and gastrointestinal barrier indicator such as zonula occluden-1 (ZO-1) were detected by immunohistochemistry and realtime-PCR, further serum or liver endotoxin were determined by ELISA and inflammation- or metabolism-associated genes were quantified by real-time PCR. NaB corrected the HFD-induced gut microbiota imbalance in mice, while it considerably elevated the abundances of the beneficial bacteria Christensenellaceae, Blautia and Lactobacillus. These bacteria can produce butyric acid in what seems like a virtuous circle. And butyrate restored HFD induced intestinal mucosa damage, increased the expression of ZO-1 in small intestine, further decreased the levels of gut endotoxin in serum and liver compared with HF group. Endotoxin-associated genes such as TLR4 and Myd88, pro-inflammation genes such as MCP-1, TNF-α, IL-1, IL-2, IL-6 and IFN-γ in liver or epididymal fat were obviously downregulated after NaB intervention. Liver inflammation and fat accumulation were ameliorated, the levels of TG and cholesterol in liver were decreased after NaB intervention, NAS score was significantly decreased, metabolic indices such as FBG and HOMA-IR and liver function indicators ALT and AST were improved compared with HF group. NaB may restore the dysbiosis of gut microbiota to attenuate steatohepatitis, which is suggested to be a potential gut microbiota modulator and therapeutic substance for NAFLD.

  7. Novel regenerative peptide TP508 mitigates radiation-induced gastrointestinal damage by activating stem cells and preserving crypt integrity.

    PubMed

    Kantara, Carla; Moya, Stephanie M; Houchen, Courtney W; Umar, Shahid; Ullrich, Robert L; Singh, Pomila; Carney, Darrell H

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, increasing threats of radiation exposure and nuclear disasters have become a significant concern for the United States and countries worldwide. Exposure to high doses of radiation triggers a number of potentially lethal effects. Among the most severe is the gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity syndrome caused by the destruction of the intestinal barrier, resulting in bacterial translocation, systemic bacteremia, sepsis, and death. The lack of effective radioprotective agents capable of mitigating radiation-induced damage has prompted a search for novel countermeasures that can mitigate the effects of radiation post exposure, accelerate tissue repair in radiation-exposed individuals, and prevent mortality. We report that a single injection of regenerative peptide TP508 (rusalatide acetate, Chrysalin) 24 h after lethal radiation exposure (9 Gy, LD100/15) appears to significantly increase survival and delay mortality by mitigating radiation-induced intestinal and colonic toxicity. TP508 treatment post exposure prevents the disintegration of GI crypts, stimulates the expression of adherens junction protein E-cadherin, activates crypt cell proliferation, and decreases apoptosis. TP508 post-exposure treatment also upregulates the expression of DCLK1 and LGR5 markers of stem cells that have been shown to be responsible for maintaining and regenerating intestinal crypts. Thus, TP508 appears to mitigate the effects of GI toxicity by activating radioresistant stem cells and increasing the stemness potential of crypts to maintain and restore intestinal integrity. These results suggest that TP508 may be an effective emergency nuclear countermeasure that could be delivered within 24 h post exposure to increase survival and delay mortality, giving victims time to reach clinical sites for advanced medical treatment.

  8. Functional magnetic microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Landel, Robert F. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Functional magnetic particles are formed by dissolving a mucopolysaccharide such as chitosan in acidified aqueous solution containing a mixture of ferrous chloride and ferric chloride. As the pH of the solution is raised magnetite is formed in situ in the solution by raising the pH. The dissolved chitosan is a polyelectrolyte and forms micelles surrounding the granules at pH of 8-9. The chitosan precipitates on the granules to form microspheres containing the magnetic granules. On addition of the microspheres to waste aqueous streams containing dissolved ions, the hydroxyl and amine functionality of the chitosan forms chelates binding heavy metal cations such as lead, copper, and mercury and the chelates in turn bind anions such as nitrate, fluoride, phosphate and borate.

  9. Sulphate-reducing bacteria from ulcerative colitis patients induce apoptosis of gastrointestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Coutinho, Cláudia Mara Lara Melo; Coutinho-Silva, Robson; Zinkevich, Vitally; Pearce, Callum B; Ojcius, David M; Beech, Iwona

    2017-09-28

    The human microbiome consists of a multitude of bacterial genera and species which continuously interact with one another and their host establishing a metabolic equilibrium. The dysbiosis can lead to the development of pathology, such as inflammatory bowel diseases. Sulfide-producing prokaryotes, including sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) constituting different genera, including the Desulfovibrio, are commonly detected within the human microbiome recovered from fecal material or colonic biopsy samples. It has been proposed that SRB likely contribute to colonic pathology, for example ulcerative colitis (UC). The interaction of SRB with the human colon and intestinal epithelial cell lines has been investigated using Desulfovibrio indonesiensis as a model mono-culture and in a co-culture with E. coli isolate, and with SRB consortia from human biopsy samples. We find that D. indonesiensis, whether as a mono- or co-culture, was internalized and induced apoptosis in colon epithelial cells. This effect was enhanced in the presence of E. coli. The SRB combination obtained through enrichment of biopsies from UC patients induced apoptosis of a human intestinal epithelial cell line. This response was not observed in SRB enrichments from healthy (non-UC) controls. Importantly, apoptosis was detected in epithelial cells from UC patients and was not seen in epithelial cells of healthy donors. Furthermore, the antibody raised against exopolysaccharides (EPS) of D. indonesiensis cross reacted with the SRB population from UC patients but not with the SRB combination from non-UC controls. This study reinforces a correlation between the presence of sulphate-reducing bacteria and an inflammatory response in UC sufferers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Alterations in the Porcine Colon Microbiota Induced by the Gastrointestinal Nematode Trichuris suis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Sitao; Li, Weizhong; Navarro, Karl; Couch, Robin D.; Hill, Dolores; Urban, Joseph F.

    2012-01-01

    Helminth parasites ensure their survival by regulating host immunity through mechanisms that dampen inflammation. These properties have recently been exploited therapeutically to treat human diseases. The biocomplexity of the intestinal lumen suggests that interactions between the parasite and the intestinal microbiota would also influence inflammation. In this study, we characterized the microbiota in the porcine proximal colon in response to Trichuris suis (whipworm) infection using 16S rRNA gene-based and whole-genome shotgun (WGS) sequencing. A 21-day T. suis infection in four pigs induced a significant change in the composition of the proximal colon microbiota compared to that of three parasite-naive pigs. Among the 15 phyla identified, the abundances of Proteobacteria and Deferribacteres were changed in infected pigs. The abundances of approximately 13% of genera were significantly altered by infection. Changes in relative abundances of Succinivibrio and Mucispirillum, for example, may relate to alterations in carbohydrate metabolism and niche disruptions in mucosal interfaces induced by parasitic infection, respectively. Of note, infection by T. suis led to a significant shift in the metabolic potential of the proximal colon microbiota, where 26% of all metabolic pathways identified were affected. Besides carbohydrate metabolism, lysine biosynthesis was repressed as well. A metabolomic analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the luminal contents showed a relative absence in infected pigs of cofactors for carbohydrate and lysine biosynthesis, as well as an accumulation of oleic acid, suggesting altered fatty acid absorption contributing to local inflammation. Our findings should facilitate development of strategies for parasitic control in pigs and humans. PMID:22493085

  11. Dual growth factor-immobilized microspheres for tissue reinnervation: in vitro and preliminary in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Ho; Oh, Se Heang; An, Dan Bi; Lee, Ji Youl; Lee, Jin Ho

    2015-01-01

    Growth factors (GFs) (basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and/or nerve growth factor (NGF))-immobilized polycaprolactone (PCL)/Pluronic F127 microspheres were prepared using an isolated particulate-melting method and the sequential binding of heparin and GFs onto the microspheres. The GFs immobilized on the microspheres were released in a sustained manner over 28 days, regardless of GF type. From the in vitro culture of muscle-derived stem cells, it was observed that the NGF-immobilized microspheres induced more neurogenic differentiation than the bFGF-immobilized microspheres, as evidenced by a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction using specific neurogenic markers (Nestin, GFAP, β-tubulin, and MAP2) and Western blot (Nestin and β-tubulin) analyses. The dual bFGF/NGF-immobilized microspheres showed better neurogenic differentiation than the microspheres immobilized with single bFGF or NGF. From the preliminary animal study, the dual bFGF/NGF-immobilized microsphere group also showed effective nerve regeneration, as evaluated by immunocytochemistry using a marker - β-tubulin. The dual bFGF/NGF-immobilized PCL/Pluronic F127 microspheres may be a promising candidate for nerve regeneration in certain target tissues (i.e. muscles) leading to sufficient reinnervation.

  12. Helicobacter pylori-Induced Changes in Gastric Acid Secretion and Upper Gastrointestinal Disease.

    PubMed

    Smolka, Adam J; Schubert, Mitchell L

    Appropriate management of Helicobacter pylori infection of the human stomach is evolving and remains a significant clinical challenge. Acute infection results in hypochlorhydria, whereas chronic infection results in either hypo- or hyperchlorhydria, depending upon the anatomic site of infection. Acute hypochlorhydria facilitates survival of the bacterium and its infection of the stomach. Interestingly, most patients chronically infected with H. pylori manifest a pangastritis with reduced acid secretion due to bacterial virulence factors, inflammatory cytokines, and various degrees of gastric atrophy. While these patients are predisposed to develop gastric adenocarcinoma (~1%), there is increasing evidence from population studies that they are also protected from gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), Barrett's esophagus (BE), and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). Eradication of H. pylori, in these patients, may provoke GERD in predisposed individuals and may be a contributory factor for the rising incidence of refractory GERD, BE, and EAC observed in Westernized societies. Only ~10% of chronically infected patients, mainly the young, manifest an antral predominant gastritis with increased acid secretion due to a decrease in somatostatin and increase in gastrin secretion; these patients are predisposed to develop peptic ulcer disease. H. pylori-induced changes in acid secretion, in particular hypochlorhydria, may allow ingested microorganisms to survive transit through the stomach and colonize the distal intestine and colon. Such perturbation of gut microbiota, i.e. dysbiosis, may influence human health and disease.

  13. Mechanism of gastrointestinal abnormal motor activity induced by cisplatin in conscious dogs

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Hiroyuki; Mochiki, Erito; Ohno, Tetsuro; Yanai, Mitsuhiro; Toyomasu, Yoshitaka; Ogata, Kyoichi; Tabe, Yuichi; Aihara, Ryuusuke; Nakabayashi, Toshihiro; Asao, Takayuki; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin; 5-HT) is involved in mediating abnormal motor activity in dogs after cisplatin administration. METHODS: After the dogs had been given a 2-wk recovery period, all of them were administered cisplatin, and the motor activity was recorded using strain gauge force transducers. Blood and intestinal fluid samples were collected to measure 5-HT for 24 h. To determine whether 5-HT in plasma or that in intestinal fluids is more closely related to abnormal motor activity we injected 5-HT into the bloodstream and the intestinal tract of the dogs. RESULTS: Cisplatin given intravenously produced abnormal motor activity that lasted up to 5 h. From 3 to 4 h after cisplatin administration, normal intact dogs exhibited retropropagation of motor activity accompanied by emesis. The concentration of 5-HT in plasma reached the peak at 4 h, and that in intestinal fluids reached the peak at 3 h. In normal intact dogs with resection of the vagus nerve that were administered kytril, cisplatin given intravenously did not produce abnormal motor activity. Intestinal serotonin administration did not produce abnormal motor activity, but intravenous serotonin administration did. CONCLUSION: After the intravenous administration of cisplatin, abnormal motor activity was produced in the involved vagus nerve and in the involved serotonergic neurons via another pathway. This study was the first to determine the relationship between 5-HT and emesis-induced motor activity. PMID:25400453

  14. Prevention and management of glucocorticoid-induced side effects: A comprehensive review: Gastrointestinal and endocrinologic side effects.

    PubMed

    Caplan, Avrom; Fett, Nicole; Rosenbach, Misha; Werth, Victoria P; Micheletti, Robert G

    2017-01-01

    Part 2 of this 4-part continuing medical education series continues with a discussion of the prevention and management of gastrointestinal side effects associated with corticosteroid use, including peptic ulcer disease, gastrointestinal bleeding, and pancreatitis, followed by a review of corticosteroid-related endocrinologic side effects, such as diabetes, adrenal suppression, and Cushing syndrome. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Protective Effects of Tinospora cordifolia on Hepatic and Gastrointestinal Toxicity Induced by Chronic and Moderate Alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Bhawana; Dabur, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Heavy alcohol intake depletes the plasma vitamins due to hepatotoxicity and decreased intestinal absorption. However, moderate alcohol intake is often thought to be healthy. Therefore, effects of chronic moderate alcohol intake on liver and intestine were studied using urinary vitamin levels. Furthermore, effects of Tinospora cordifolia water extract (TCE) (hepatoprotective) on vitamin excretion and intestinal absorption were also studied. In the study, asymptomatic moderate alcoholics (n = 12) without chronic liver disease and healthy volunteers (n = 14) of mean age 39 ± 2.2 (mean ± SD) were selected and divided into three groups. TCE treatment was performed for 14 days. The blood and urine samples were collected on Day 0 and 14 after treatment with TCE and analyzed. In alcoholics samples, a significant increase in the levels of gamma-glutamyl transferase, aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase, Triglyceride, Cholesterol, HDL and LDL (P < 0.05) was observed but their level get downregulated after TCE intervention. Multivariate analysis of metabolites without missing values showed an increased excretion of 7-dehydrocholesterol, orotic acid, pyridoxine, lipoamide and niacin and TCE intervention depleted their levels (P < 0.05). In contrast, excretion of biotin, xanthine, vitamin D2 and 2-O-p-coumaroyltartronic acid (CA, an internal marker of intestinal absorption) were observed to be decreased in alcoholic samples; however, TCE intervention restored the CA and biotin levels. Vitamin metabolism biomarkers, i.e. homocysteine and xanthurenic acid, were also normalized after TCE intervention. Overall data depict that moderate alcohol intake is also hepatotoxic and decreases intestinal absorption. However, TCE treatment effectively increased the intestinal absorption and retaining power of liver that regulated alcohol-induced multivitamin deficiency. © The Author 2015. Medical Council on Alcohol and Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  16. Deposition of differently sized airborne microspheres in the respiratory tract of chickens.

    PubMed

    Corbanie, E A; Matthijs, M G R; van Eck, J H H; Remon, J P; Landman, W J M; Vervaet, C

    2006-12-01

    As a part of the development of an efficient dry powder aerosol vaccine for poultry, the objective of this study was to accurately determine the deposition pattern of nebulized microspheres in the airways of unanaesthetized chickens of different ages (1 day, 2 weeks and 4 weeks old). In the first part of the study, the aerosol administration method was characterized: the influence of different nebulizers and nebulizing protocols on the relative humidity in the exposure chamber, the particle size distributions, the microsphere output and single microsphere percentage were determined. In the second part, birds were exposed to nebulized fluorescently labelled polystyrene microspheres (1 to 20 microm). Respiratory and gastro-intestinal tract tissue samples were collected and the number of fluorescent microspheres per sample was determined. In 2-week-old and 4-week-old chickens, microspheres of 5 and 10 microm, respectively, were too large for deposition in the lungs and air sacs as less than 5% of these microspheres penetrated into the lower airways. The larger size of microspheres reaching the lower airways of 4-week-old birds was explained by increasing airway dimensions with age. For 1-day-old chickens, deposition in the lungs decreased from 17 to 3% with increasing particle size (1 to 20 microm), but increased in the air sacs from 6 to 20%. Consequently, the total deposition percentage in the lower airways was independent of microsphere size and even 20 microm particles were able to penetrate into the lower airways, which was attributed to mouth breathing of the 1-day-old chickens.

  17. Clozapine-Induced Gastrointestinal Hypomotility: A 22-Year Bi-National Pharmacovigilance Study of Serious or Fatal 'Slow Gut' Reactions, and Comparison with International Drug Safety Advice.

    PubMed

    Every-Palmer, Susanna; Ellis, Pete M

    2017-08-01

    Clozapine is the preferred antipsychotic for treatment-resistant schizophrenia, but has significant adverse effects, including gastrointestinal hypomotility or 'slow gut', which may result in severe constipation, ileus, bowel obstruction, and even death. These gastrointestinal effects remain inadequately recognized. We reviewed all reports of serious clozapine-induced gastrointestinal hypomotility (CIGH) submitted to the Australian Therapeutic Goods Administration and New Zealand Pharmacovigilance Centre between 1992 and 2013. We extracted relevant demographic, clinical, and outcome data and derived a numerator from clozapine registries. We examined whether clozapine drug safety information in Australia, New Zealand, the US, and the UK was adequate and consistent with pharmacoepidemiologic evidence. A total of 43,132 people commenced clozapine over the study period. 160 were reported as having serious gastrointestinal hypomotility with clozapine the suspected cause (37/10,000 clozapine users). Of these, 66.3% were male, age range was 17-76 years, clozapine dose range 25-1000 mg/day (mean 439 mg/day) and median duration of clozapine treatment 2.5 years. Few had received laxatives. At least 29 patients died (7/10,000 clozapine users), a reported case fatality rate of 18%. The CIGH prevalence, while similar to other smaller studies, differs significantly from clozapine prescribing information issued by regulators and pharmaceutical companies, none of which mention CIGH, and which report serious gastrointestinal complications at rates of <1/10,000, almost a 40-fold difference. This is the largest study to date of serious CIGH. The reported prevalence of serious CIGH was 37/10,000, a likely underestimation of true prevalence. Current prescribing guidelines provide inadequate information on CIGH. This may be contributing to poor awareness and high associated morbidity and mortality. It is time regulators and manufacturers update their guidance.

  18. Metal containing polymeric functional microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Molday, Robert S. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Polymeric functional microspheres containing metal or metal compounds are formed by addition polymerization of a covalently bondable olefinic monomer such as hydroxyethylmethacrylate in the presence of finely divided metal or metal oxide particles, such as iron, gold, platinum or magnetite, which are embedded in the resulting microspheres. The microspheres can be covalently bonded to chemotherapeutic agents, antibodies, or other proteins providing a means for labeling or separating labeled cells. Labeled cells or microspheres can be concentrated at a specific body location such as in the vicinity of a malignant tumor by applying a magnetic field to the location and then introducing the magnetically attractable microspheres or cells into the circulatory system of the subject. Labeled cells can be separated from a cell mixture by applying a predetermined magnetic field to a tube in which the mixture is flowing. After collection of the labeled cells, the magnetic field is discontinued and the labeled sub-cell population recovered.

  19. Immunofluorescence detection methods using microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szurdoki, Ferenc; Michael, Karri L.; Agrawal, Divya; Taylor, Laura C.; Schultz, Sandra L.; Walt, David R.

    1999-01-01

    Microsphere-based immunoassays were devised for compounds of agricultural and biomedical interest (e.g., digoxin, theophylline, and zearalenone). Commercially available microspheres with surface functional groups for chemical derivatization were used as solid carriers. After immobilizing the target substances, the surface of the haptenized microspheres was blocked by a protein to reduce aspecific binding. Competitive immunoassays were performed using the functionalized microspheres and antibodies labeled with horseradish peroxidase. Immunofluorescence signal amplification was achieved by enzyme-catalyzed reporter deposition (CARD). An epifluorescence microscope, a CCD camera interfaced with a computer, and microscopy image analysis software were employed for quantitative detection of fluorescent light emitted from individual microspheres. Integration of several such immunoassays and application of an optical encoding method enabled multianalyte determination. These immunoassays can also be utilized in an immunosensor array format. This immunoarray format could facilitate miniaturization and automation of multianalyte immunoassays.

  20. Nutrient-induced gastrointestinal hyperemia and specific dynamic action in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)--importance of proteins and lipids.

    PubMed

    Seth, Henrik; Sandblom, Erik; Axelsson, Michael

    2009-02-01

    Mechanical gastric distension induces a dorsal aortic pressor response in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) with no change in gastrointestinal blood flow. To elucidate what role chemical stimuli from the digested food has on the postprandial cardiovascular response, a new method was developed to investigate the contribution of individual nutrient components. Three predigested experimental diets were injected directly into the proximal intestine of rainbow trout and cardiac output (CO), gut blood flow (Qcma), heart rate (HR), and stroke volume (SV) were recorded. Specific dynamic action (SDA) was estimated by measuring oxygen consumption. When a balanced diet (50% protein, 25% fat, 15% carbohydrate) was injected, Qcma and CO increased within 1 h by 45 and 27%, respectively. The response to a high-protein diet (70% protein, 5% fat, 15% carbohydrate) was quantitatively similar but delayed, with a maximal blood flow response after 2 h. With a high-lipid diet (60% fat, 15% protein, 15% carbohydrate), the peak increase in Qcma by 22% occurred after 30 min and thereafter declined rapidly. The SDA response (19%) to the balanced diet was temporally matched with the hyperemia. With a high-protein diet, the response is delayed and enlarged (34%) compared with the balanced diet. The high-lipid diet gave no significant SDA response. We conclude that the chemical composition of the food influences the postprandial hyperemia and the SDA, such that the components appear to work in a synergistic fashion. The present results also demonstrate that both redistribution of blood flow and an overall increase in CO contribute to the postprandial increase in gut blood flow in this species.

  1. Utilization of gastroprotective strategies for nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced gastrointestinal events in a major teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hooi Leng; Chua, Siew Siang; Mahadeva, Sanjiv

    2016-01-01

    Clinical guidelines recommend the prescribing of gastroprotective strategies in nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) users with risk factors for gastrointestinal (GI) ulcer or ulcer complications. However, these guidelines are not often translated into clinical practice. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the utilization of gastroprotective strategies for NSAID-induced upper GI events in at-risk users in a major teaching hospital. A cross-sectional, observational, pharmacy-based study was conducted in a major Asian institution with both primary and secondary health care services. This study involved the screening of prescriptions for regular NSAIDs, and patients who met the inclusion criteria were recruited and interviewed using a questionnaire. Of the 409 participants recruited, 83.1% had at least one GI risk factor, of whom 70.3% did not receive appropriate gastroprotection. The most common GI risk factor was the use of high-dose NSAIDs (69.2%), followed by participants aged 65 years and older (22%) and concomitant use of low-dose aspirin (11.7%). Appropriate gastroprotective strategies utilized consisted of the use of a cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitor alone or a nonselective NSAID plus a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) in the moderate-risk group and a COX-2 inhibitor plus a PPI in the high-risk group. Gastroprotective strategies were underutilized in 67.1% of at-risk participants and overutilized in 59.4% of those without risk factors. Co-prescription of a histamine-2 receptor antagonist at lower-than-recommended doses constituted 59% of the inappropriate gastroprotective agents used. Logistic regression analysis revealed patients aged 65 years and older (odds ratio, 1.89; 95% CI =1.15-3.09) as a predictor for the prescribing of gastroprotection by the clinicians. Approximately 70% of at-risk NSAID users, mainly on high-dose NSAIDs, were not prescribed appropriate gastroprotective strategies. Further measures are warranted to improve the

  2. Rebamipide attenuates nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) induced lipid peroxidation by the manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) overexpression in gastrointestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Y; Matsui, H; Shimokawa, O; Hirayama, A; Tamura, M; Nakamura, Y; Kaneko, T; Rai, K; Indo, H P; Majima, H J; Hyodo, I

    2012-04-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) often cause gastrointestinal complications such as gastric ulcers and erosions. Recent studies on the pathogenesis have revealed that NSAIDs induce lipid peroxidation in gastric epithelial cells by generating superoxide anion in mitochondria, independently with cyclooxygenase-inhibition and the subsequent prostaglandin deficiency. Although not clearly elucidated, the impairment of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, or uncoupling, by NSAIDs is associated with the generation of superoxide anion. Physiologically, superoxide is immediately transformed into hydrogen peroxide and diatomic oxygen with manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD). Rebamipide is an antiulcer agent that showed protective effects against NSAID-induced lipid peroxidation in gastrointestinal tracts. We hypothesized that rebamipide may attenuate lipid peroxidation by increasing the expression of MnSOD protein in mitochondria and decreasing the leakage of superoxide anion in NSAID-treated gastric and small intestinal epithelial cells. Firstly, to examine rebamipide increases the expression of MnSOD proteins in mitochondria of gastrointestinal epithelial cells, we underwent Western blotting analysis against anti-MnSOD antibody in gastric RGM1 cells and small intestinal IEC6 cells. Secondly, to examine whether the pretreatment of rebamipide decreases NSAID-induced mitochondrial impairment and lipid peroxidation, we treated these cells with NSAIDs with or without rebamipide pretreatment, and examined with specific fluorescent indicators. Finally, to examine whether pretreatment of rebamipide attenuates NSAID-induced superoxide anion leakage from mitochondria, we examined the mitochondria from indomethacin-treated RGM1 cells with electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy using a specific spin-trapping reagent, CYPMPO. Rebamipide increased the expression of MnSOD protein, and attenuated NSAID-induced mitochondrial impairment and lipid peroxidation in RGM1

  3. Sodium butyrate attenuates high-fat diet-induced steatohepatitis in mice by improving gut microbiota and gastrointestinal barrier

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Da; Pan, Qin; Xin, Feng-Zhi; Zhang, Rui-Nan; He, Chong-Xin; Chen, Guang-Yu; Liu, Chang; Chen, Yuan-Wen; Fan, Jian-Gao

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate whether gut microbiota metabolite sodium butyrate (NaB) is an effective substance for attenuating non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and the internal mechanisms. METHODS Male C57BL/6J mice were divided into three groups, normal control were fed standard chow and model group were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) for 16 wk, the intervention group were fed HFD for 16 wk and treated with NaB for 8 wk. Gut microbiota from each group were detected at baseline and at 16 wk, liver histology were evaluated and gastrointestinal barrier indicator such as zonula occluden-1 (ZO-1) were detected by immunohistochemistry and realtime-PCR, further serum or liver endotoxin were determined by ELISA and inflammation- or metabolism-associated genes were quantified by real-time PCR. RESULTS NaB corrected the HFD-induced gut microbiota imbalance in mice, while it considerably elevated the abundances of the beneficial bacteria Christensenellaceae, Blautia and Lactobacillus. These bacteria can produce butyric acid in what seems like a virtuous circle. And butyrate restored HFD induced intestinal mucosa damage, increased the expression of ZO-1 in small intestine, further decreased the levels of gut endotoxin in serum and liver compared with HF group. Endotoxin-associated genes such as TLR4 and Myd88, pro-inflammation genes such as MCP-1, TNF-α, IL-1, IL-2, IL-6 and IFN-γ in liver or epididymal fat were obviously downregulated after NaB intervention. Liver inflammation and fat accumulation were ameliorated, the levels of TG and cholesterol in liver were decreased after NaB intervention, NAS score was significantly decreased, metabolic indices such as FBG and HOMA-IR and liver function indicators ALT and AST were improved compared with HF group. CONCLUSION NaB may restore the dysbiosis of gut microbiota to attenuate steatohepatitis, which is suggested to be a potential gut microbiota modulator and therapeutic substance for NAFLD. PMID:28104981

  4. Photonic nanojet-induced modes in chains of size-disordered microspheres with an attenuation of only 0.08 dB per sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Seungmoo; Astratov, Vasily N.

    2008-06-01

    By using spatially resolved spectroscopy the authors demonstrate that the periodical focusing of light in straight chains of touching 5μm polystyrene microspheres is characterized with the periodicity of photonic nanojets corresponding to the size of two spheres. In transmission spectra of long (>20 spheres) chains they observe Fabry-Pérot fringes with propagation losses of only 0.08dB per sphere in the maxima of transmission peaks. Due to mechanical robustness, tight focusing of the beam, high optical throughput, and broad spectral transmission properties such chains can be used in a variety of biomedical applications as optical microprobes with subwavelength spatial resolution.

  5. The Porirua Protocol in the Treatment of Clozapine-Induced Gastrointestinal Hypomotility and Constipation: A Pre- and Post-Treatment Study.

    PubMed

    Every-Palmer, Susanna; Ellis, Pete M; Nowitz, Mike; Stanley, James; Grant, Eve; Huthwaite, Mark; Dunn, Helen

    2017-01-01

    Clozapine, an antipsychotic used in treatment-resistant schizophrenia, causes slow gastrointestinal transit in 50-80% of patients. Clozapine-induced gastrointestinal hypomotility is both common and serious, and potential complications include severe constipation, ileus, bowel obstruction and related complications, with a higher mortality rate than clozapine-related agranulocytosis. Little evidence exists on its prevention and management. Using a well-validated radiopaque marker ('Metcalf') method, we compared colonic transit times (CTTs) of clozapine-treated inpatients not receiving laxatives with their transit times when receiving laxatives, with treatment prescribed according to the Porirua Protocol for clozapine-related constipation (docusate and senna augmented by macrogol 3350 in treatment-resistant cases). The median age of participants was 35 years, and median clozapine dose, plasma level and duration of treatment were 575 mg/day, 506 ng/mL and 2.5 years, respectively. Overall, 14 participants (10 male) were enrolled and all completed the study. Transit times improved markedly with laxative treatment. Median colonic transit without laxatives was 110 h (95% confidence interval [CI] 76-144 h), over four times longer than normative values (p < 0.0001). Median CTT with laxatives was 62 h (95% CI 27-96 h), a 2-day reduction in average transit time (p = 0.009). The prevalence of gastrointestinal hypomotility decreased from 86% pre-treatment to 50% post-treatment (p = 0.061). Severe gastrointestinal hypomotility decreased from 64 to 21% (p = 0.031). Subjective reporting of constipation did not correlate well with objective hypomotility, and did not change significantly with treatment. Treating clozapine-treated patients with docusate and senna augmented by macrogol appears effective in reducing CTTs in clozapine-induced constipation. Randomised controlled trials are the next step. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry ACTRN12616001405404

  6. Chalcogenide glass microsphere laser.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Gregor R; Murugan, G Senthil; Wilkinson, James S; Zervas, Michalis N; Hewak, Daniel W

    2010-12-06

    Laser action has been demonstrated in chalcogenide glass microsphere. A sub millimeter neodymium-doped gallium lanthanum sulphide glass sphere was pumped at 808 nm with a laser diode and single and multimode laser action demonstrated at wavelengths between 1075 and 1086 nm. The gallium lanthanum sulphide family of glass offer higher thermal stability compared to other chalcogenide glasses, and this, along with an optimized Q-factor for the microcavity allowed laser action to be achieved. When varying the pump power, changes in the output spectrum suggest nonlinear and/or thermal effects have a strong effect on laser action.

  7. Photonic crystal microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhokhov, A. A.; Masalov, V. M.; Sukhinina, N. S.; Matveev, D. V.; Dolganov, P. V.; Dolganov, V. K.; Emelchenko, G. A.

    2015-11-01

    Spherical samples of photonic crystals formed by colloidal SiO2 nanoparticles were synthesized. Synthesis of microspheres from 160 nm, 200 nm and 430 nm diameter colloidal nanoparticles was performed over a wide size range, from 5 μm to 50 μm. The mechanism of formation of void microparticles exceeding 50 μm is discussed. The spectral measurements verified the association of the spectra with the peaks of selective reflection from the cubic lattice planes. The microparticle morphology is characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  8. Uvangoletin induces mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in HL-60 cells in vitro and in vivo without adverse reactions of myelosuppression, leucopenia and gastrointestinal tract disturbances.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhuanzhen; Qiao, Zhenhua; Gong, Rong; Wang, Yalin; Zhang, Yiqun; Ma, Yanping; Zhang, Li; Lu, Yujin; Jiang, Bo; Li, Guoxia; Dong, Chunxia; Chen, Wenliang

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the cytotoxic effect of uvangoletin on HL-60 cells, and the effects of uvangoletin on myelosuppression, leucopenia, gastrointestinal tract disturbances and the possible cytotoxic mechanisms by using CCK-8, flow cytometry, western blot, xenograft, cyclophosphamide-induced leucopenia, copper sulfate-induced emesis and ethanol-induced gastric mucosal lesions assays. The results of CCK-8, flow cytometry and western blot assays indicated that uvangoletin showed the cytotoxic effect on HL-60 cells and induced the apoptosis of HL-60 cells by downregulating the expression levels of anti-apoptotic proteins (Survivin, Bcl-xl and Bcl-2), upregulating the expression levels of pro-apoptotic proteins (Smac, Bax, Bad, c-caspase-3 and c-caspase-9), and promoting the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria to cytoplasm. Further, the results of xenograft assay suggested that uvangoletin inhibited the HL-60-induced tumor growth without adverse effect on body weight of nude mice in vivo by regulating the expression levels of above apoptotic proteins. The results indicated that the reductions of WBCs count and thighbone marrow granulocytes percentage in cyclophosphamide-induced leucopenia assay, the incubation period and number of emesis in copper sulfate-induced emesis assay and the gastric mucosal lesions in ethanol-induced gastric mucosal lesions assay were not exacerbated or reversed by uvangoletin. In conclusion, the research preliminarily indicated that uvangoletin induced apoptosis of HL-60 cells in vitro and in vivo without adverse reactions of myelosuppression, leucopenia and gastrointestinal tract disturbances, and the pro-apoptotic mechanisms may be related to mitochondria-mediated apoptotic pathway.

  9. "Downhill" Esophageal Varices due to Dialysis Catheter-Induced Superior Vena Caval Occlusion: A Rare Cause of Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Nayudu, Suresh Kumar; Dev, Anil; Kanneganti, Kalyan

    2013-01-01

    "Downhill" varices are a rare cause of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Rarely these varices are reported in patients receiving hemodialysis as a complication of chronic dialysis vascular access. We present a case of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding in an individual with end-stage renal disease receiving hemodialysis. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed "downhill" varices in the upper third of the esophagus without any active bleeding at the time of the procedure. An angiogram was performed disclosing superior vena caval occlusion, which was treated with balloon angioplasty. Gastroenterologists should have a high index of suspicion for these rare "downhill" varices when dealing with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients receiving hemodialysis and manage it appropriately using endoscopic, radiological, and surgical interventions.

  10. Gastrointestinal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, B.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 33 selections. Some of the titles are: The natural history of colorectal cancer; opportunities for intervention; Radiotherapy for early rectal cancer; Intraoperative irradiation for gastrointestinal cancers; Hepatocellular carcinoma; clinical presentation, etiology, and prevention; and Current issues in the treatment of patients with gastric cancer.

  11. In situ fabrication of a perfect Pd/ZnO@ZIF-8 core-shell microsphere as an efficient catalyst by a ZnO support-induced ZIF-8 growth strategy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lu; Zhang, Tong; Liu, Haiou; Qiu, Jieshan; Zhang, Xiongfu

    2015-05-07

    Controllable encapsulation of nanoparticles with metal organic frameworks (MOFs) has been an efficient way to impart the unique chemical and physical properties of the nanoparticles to metal organic frameworks and create new types of multifunctional MOF core-shell materials with enhanced properties. Here, a novel ZnO support-induced encapsulation strategy is reported to efficiently fabricate a Pd/ZnO@ZIF-8 core-shell catalyst, with Pd/ZnO as the core and ZIF-8 as the shell. The novel synthesis procedure involves first loading Pd nanoparticles onto the surface of the ZnO microsphere to form a Pd/ZnO core and then coating the core with a layer of defect-free ZIF-8 shell via ZnO-induced in situ ZIF-8 growth to obtain the Pd/ZnO@ZIF-8 core-shell catalyst. It was crucial that the ZIF-8 was in situ formed from the ZnO core in an ethanol solution only containing 2-methylimidazole under mild conditions. This strategy allowed for the growth of ZIF-8 right on the surface of Pd/ZnO via the reaction between ZnO and the 2-methylimidazole ligands, and thus avoided the random deposition of ZIF-8 crystals on the Pd/ZnO core as in the case of the conventional ZIF-8 synthesis solution. Furthermore, use of ethanol as the solvent also favored achievement of the well-defined Pd/ZnO@ZIF-8 structure, since the ethanol solution of 2-methylimidazole was able to keep the balance between ZnO dissolution and ZIF-8 formation. The as-prepared Pd/ZnO@ZIF-8 core-shell microsphere as an efficient catalyst displayed excellent performance in terms of size-selectivity, stability and anti-poisoning in the liquid hydrogenations of alkenes.

  12. In situ fabrication of a perfect Pd/ZnO@ZIF-8 core-shell microsphere as an efficient catalyst by a ZnO support-induced ZIF-8 growth strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Lu; Zhang, Tong; Liu, Haiou; Qiu, Jieshan; Zhang, Xiongfu

    2015-04-01

    Controllable encapsulation of nanoparticles with metal organic frameworks (MOFs) has been an efficient way to impart the unique chemical and physical properties of the nanoparticles to metal organic frameworks and create new types of multifunctional MOF core-shell materials with enhanced properties. Here, a novel ZnO support-induced encapsulation strategy is reported to efficiently fabricate a Pd/ZnO@ZIF-8 core-shell catalyst, with Pd/ZnO as the core and ZIF-8 as the shell. The novel synthesis procedure involves first loading Pd nanoparticles onto the surface of the ZnO microsphere to form a Pd/ZnO core and then coating the core with a layer of defect-free ZIF-8 shell via ZnO-induced in situ ZIF-8 growth to obtain the Pd/ZnO@ZIF-8 core-shell catalyst. It was crucial that the ZIF-8 was in situ formed from the ZnO core in an ethanol solution only containing 2-methylimidazole under mild conditions. This strategy allowed for the growth of ZIF-8 right on the surface of Pd/ZnO via the reaction between ZnO and the 2-methylimidazole ligands, and thus avoided the random deposition of ZIF-8 crystals on the Pd/ZnO core as in the case of the conventional ZIF-8 synthesis solution. Furthermore, use of ethanol as the solvent also favored achievement of the well-defined Pd/ZnO@ZIF-8 structure, since the ethanol solution of 2-methylimidazole was able to keep the balance between ZnO dissolution and ZIF-8 formation. The as-prepared Pd/ZnO@ZIF-8 core-shell microsphere as an efficient catalyst displayed excellent performance in terms of size-selectivity, stability and anti-poisoning in the liquid hydrogenations of alkenes.

  13. Surface modification of PLGA microspheres.

    PubMed

    Müller, M; Vörös, J; Csúcs, G; Walter, E; Danuser, G; Merkle, H P; Spencer, N D; Textor, M

    2003-07-01

    Microspheres made of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) are biocompatible and biodegradable, rendering them a promising tool in the context of drug delivery. However, nonspecific adsorption of plasma proteins on PLGA micro- and nanospheres is a main limitation of drug targeting. Poly(L-lysine)-g-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLL-g-PEG), physisorbed on flat metal oxide surfaces, has previously been shown to suppress protein adsorption drastically. The goal of our work was to characterize the efficiency of the protein repellent character of PLL-g-PEG on PLGA microspheres and to show the feasibility of introducing functional groups on the PLGA microspheres via functionalized PLL-g-PEG. To quantify the adsorbed amount of protein, a semiquantitative method that uses confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) was applied. The first part of the experiment confirms the feasibility of introducing specific functional groups on PLL-g-PEG-coated PLGA microspheres. In the second part of the experiment, PLL-g-PEG-coated PLGA microspheres show a drastic decrease of adsorbed proteins by two orders of magnitude in comparison to uncoated PLGA microspheres. Low protein-binding, functionalizable microspheres provide a fundamental basis for the design of drug delivery and biosensor systems. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Imaging Radiation-Induced Gastrointestinal, Bone Marrow Injury and Recovery Kinetics Using 18F-FDG PET

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Tien T.; Rendon, David A.; Zawaski, Janice A.; Afshar, Solmaz F.; Kaffes, Caterina K.; Sabek, Omaima M.

    2017-01-01

    Positron emission tomography using 18F-Fluro-deoxy-glucose (18F-FDG) is a useful tool to detect regions of inflammation in patients. We utilized this imaging technique to investigate the kinetics of gastrointestinal recovery after radiation exposure and the role of bone marrow in the recovery process. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were either sham irradiated, irradiated with their upper half body shielded (UHBS) at a dose of 7.5 Gy, or whole body irradiated (WBI) with 4 or 7.5 Gy. Animals were imaged using 18F-FDG PET/CT at 5, 10 and 35 days post-radiation exposure. The gastrointestinal tract and bone marrow were analyzed for 18F-FDG uptake. Tissue was collected at all-time points for histological analysis. Following 7.5 Gy irradiation, there was a significant increase in inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract as indicated by the significantly higher 18F-FDG uptake compared to sham. UHBS animals had a significantly higher activity compared to 7.5 Gy WBI at 5 days post-exposure. Animals that received 4 Gy WBI did not show any significant increase in uptake compared to sham. Analysis of the bone marrow showed a significant decrease of uptake in the 7.5 Gy animals 5 days post-irradiation, albeit not observed in the 4 Gy group. Interestingly, as the metabolic activity of the gastrointestinal tract returned to sham levels in UHBS animals it was accompanied by an increase in metabolic activity in the bone marrow. At 35 days post-exposure both gastrointestinal tract and bone marrow 18F-FDG uptake returned to sham levels. 18F-FDG imaging is a tool that can be used to study the inflammatory response of the gastrointestinal tract and changes in bone marrow metabolism caused by radiation exposure. The recovery of the gastrointestinal tract coincides with an increase in bone marrow metabolism in partially shielded animals. These findings further demonstrate the relationship between the gastrointestinal syndrome and bone marrow recovery, and that this interaction can be studied

  15. Modular scaffolds assembled around living cells using poly(ethylene glycol) microspheres with macroporation via a non-cytotoxic porogen

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Evan A.; Nichols, Michael D.; Kuntz-Willits, Rebecca; Elbert, Donald L.

    2009-01-01

    Modular, bioactive, macroporous scaffolds were formed by crosslinking poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) microspheres around living cells. Hydrogel microspheres were produced from reactive PEG derivatives in aqueous sodium sulfate solutions without the use of surfactants or copolymers. Microspheres were formed following thermally induced phase separation if the gel point was reached prior to extensive coarsening of the PEG-rich domains. Three types of PEG microspheres with different functionalities were used to form scaffolds. One type of PEG microsphere provided mechanical support, the second type provided controlled delivery of the angiogenesis-promoting molecule, sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), and the third type served as a slowly dissolving non-cytotoxic porogen. Scaffolds were formed by centrifuging microspheres in the presence of HepG2 hepatoma cells, resulting in a homogenous distribution of cells. During overnight incubation at 37°C, the microspheres reacted with serum proteins in cell culture medium to stabilize the scaffolds. Within two days in culture, macropores formed due to the dissolution of the porogenic PEG microspheres, without affecting cell viability. Gradients in porosity were produced by varying the buoyancy of the porogenic microspheres. Conjugated RGD cell adhesion peptides and delivery of sphingosine 1-phosphate promoted endothelial cell infiltration through macropores in the scaffolds. The scaffolds presented here differ from previous hydrogel scaffolds in that: 1) cells are not encapsulated in hydrogel, 2) macropores form in the presence of cells, and 3) scaffold properties are controlled by the modular assembly of different microspheres that perform distinct functions. PMID:19607945

  16. Wild Raspberry Subjected to Simulated Gastrointestinal Digestion Improves the Protective Capacity against Ethyl Carbamate-Induced Oxidative Damage in Caco-2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Xu, Yang; Zhang, Lingxia; Li, Ya; Zheng, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    Ethyl carbamate (EC), a probable human carcinogen, occurs widely in many fermented foods. Previous studies indicated that EC-induced cytotoxicity was associated with oxidative stress. Wild raspberries are rich in polyphenolic compounds, which possess potent antioxidant activity. This study was conducted to investigate the protective effect of wild raspberry extracts produced before (RE) and after in vitro simulated gastrointestinal digestion (RD) on EC-induced oxidative damage in Caco-2 cells. Our primary data showed that ethyl carbamate could result in cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in Caco-2 cells and raspberry extract after digestion (RD) may be more effective than that before digestion (RE) in attenuating toxicity caused by ethyl carbamate. Further investigation by fluorescence microscope revealed that RD may significantly ameliorate EC-induced oxidative damage by scavenging the overproduction of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), maintaining mitochondrial function and preventing glutathione (GSH) depletion. In addition, HPLC-ESI-MS results showed that the contents of identified polyphenolic compounds (esculin, kaempferol O-hexoside, and pelargonidin O-hexoside) were remarkably increased after digestion, which might be related to the better protective effect of RD. Overall, our results demonstrated that raspberry extract undergoing simulated gastrointestinal digestion may improve the protective effect against EC-induced oxidative damage in Caco-2 cells.

  17. Wild Raspberry Subjected to Simulated Gastrointestinal Digestion Improves the Protective Capacity against Ethyl Carbamate-Induced Oxidative Damage in Caco-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Xu, Yang; Zhang, Lingxia; Li, Ya; Zheng, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    Ethyl carbamate (EC), a probable human carcinogen, occurs widely in many fermented foods. Previous studies indicated that EC-induced cytotoxicity was associated with oxidative stress. Wild raspberries are rich in polyphenolic compounds, which possess potent antioxidant activity. This study was conducted to investigate the protective effect of wild raspberry extracts produced before (RE) and after in vitro simulated gastrointestinal digestion (RD) on EC-induced oxidative damage in Caco-2 cells. Our primary data showed that ethyl carbamate could result in cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in Caco-2 cells and raspberry extract after digestion (RD) may be more effective than that before digestion (RE) in attenuating toxicity caused by ethyl carbamate. Further investigation by fluorescence microscope revealed that RD may significantly ameliorate EC-induced oxidative damage by scavenging the overproduction of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), maintaining mitochondrial function and preventing glutathione (GSH) depletion. In addition, HPLC-ESI-MS results showed that the contents of identified polyphenolic compounds (esculin, kaempferol O-hexoside, and pelargonidin O-hexoside) were remarkably increased after digestion, which might be related to the better protective effect of RD. Overall, our results demonstrated that raspberry extract undergoing simulated gastrointestinal digestion may improve the protective effect against EC-induced oxidative damage in Caco-2 cells. PMID:26788245

  18. Microsphere based saliva diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rissin, David M.; DiCesare, Christopher; Hayman, Ryan B.; Blicharz, Timothy M.; Walt, David R.

    2005-11-01

    Saliva presents a minimally invasive alternative medium to blood for performing diagnostics1. Microsphere sensors for ions, small organic molecules, and proteins are currently being developed and optical microarrays containing thousands of these sensors will be used for simultaneous multi-analyte analysis. The fiber bundle platform in use is 1mm in diameter and contains approximately 50,000 individually addressable 3.1μm fibers, each with an etched well capable of housing a single 3.1μm microsphere sensor. Micron-sized bead-based chemistries are produced in house, followed by deposition onto a fiber-optic bundle platform, allowing for multiplexed analysis. The ultimate goal is to develop a universal diagnostic system using saliva as the diagnostic medium. This platform will permit multiplexed analysis of a sample by integrating microfluidics with the optical arrays loaded with sensors capable of detecting relevant biomarkers associated with a wide range of disease states. Disease states that are currently under investigation include end stage renal disease (ESRD) and Sjoegrens Syndrome (SS).

  19. Towards Monodispersed Polymer Microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senuma, Yoshinori; Hilborn, Jons

    1998-03-01

    Uniform polymer microspheres prepared by Spinning Disk Atomization Our spinning disk atomization (SDA) can, relative to other existing techniques, produce micron-sized particles of very narrow size distribution. Around the edge of the disk, small teeth channel the flow into identical droplets that are flung off over the disk rim. These solidify during flight to form spherical particles. Applications for spheres produced by SDA can be found in areas such as adhesives, powder coatings, food, biomedical use, drug delivery systems, etc. We have atomized polyethyleneglycol into very narrowly dispersed microspheres ranging from 50 to 500 =B5m. The aim of this work is to model the droplet formation occurring at the rim of the spinning disk in order to better understand the experimental results. The viscosity contribution in the fluid breakup is qualitatively analyzed and is adapted to the theoretical model to show how it affects the droplet size. We have used the pendant drop model (Ramesh Babu, S. Journal of Colloid and Interface Science 116, 350-372 (1987).) for spinning disk atomization to describe the drop-shape evolution during growth.

  20. Highly efficient optical coupling and transport phenomena in chains of dielectric microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhigang; Taflove, Allen; Backman, Vadim

    2006-02-01

    Using the generalized multiparticle Mie theory, we investigate optical coupling and transport through chains of dielectric microspheres. We identify two distinct coupling mechanisms of optical transport in terms of the coupling efficiency between neighboring microspheres, namely, evanescent coupling and nanojet coupling. We demonstrate that perfect whispering gallery mode propagation through a chain of evanescently coupled microspheres can be achieved. However, optical coupling and transport through a chain of nanojet-inducing microspheres is less efficient due to the radiative nature of photonic nanojets. Understanding these two optical coupling mechanisms is critical for selecting appropriate microspheres to build coupled resonator optical waveguides and other photon-manipulation devices for effective and low-loss guiding of photons.

  1. Highly efficient optical coupling and transport phenomena in chains of dielectric microspheres.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhigang; Taflove, Allen; Backman, Vadim

    2006-02-01

    Using the generalized multiparticle Mie theory, we investigate optical coupling and transport through chains of dielectric microspheres. We identify two distinct coupling mechanisms of optical transport in terms of the coupling efficiency between neighboring microspheres, namely, evanescent coupling and nanojet coupling. We demonstrate that perfect whispering gallery mode propagation through a chain of evanescently coupled microspheres can be achieved. However, optical coupling and transport through a chain of nanojet-inducing microspheres is less efficient due to the radiative nature of photonic nanojets. Understanding these two optical coupling mechanisms is critical for selecting appropriate microspheres to build coupled resonator optical waveguides and other photon-manipulation devices for effective and low-loss guiding of photons.

  2. Plasmon-modulated light scattering from gold nanocrystal-decorated hollow mesoporous silica microspheres.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Manda; Chen, Huanjun; Ming, Tian; Shao, Lei; Wang, Jianfang

    2010-11-23

    Localized surface plasmon resonances of noble metal nanocrystals are powerful in enhancing a variety of linear and nonlinear optical signals and photorelated processes. Here we demonstrate the plasmonic enhancement of the light scattering from hollow mesoporous silica microspheres by attaching a dense layer of gold nanocrystals onto the outer surface of the microspheres. The attachment of gold nanocrystals induces both the shift and intensity increase in the resonant scattering peaks of the microspheres. The spectral region of the resonant scattering enhancement can be controlled by using gold nanocrystals with different plasmon resonance wavelengths. The spectral region of the enhancement is independent of the microsphere diameter. The scattering enhancement factor ranges from 20 to 130, depending on the plasmonic properties and surface coverage of the attached gold nanocrystals. The systematic evolution of the scattering spectra of the individual microspheres is also revealed by chemically etching away the attached gold nanocrystals gradually.

  3. Microvascular injury in persistent gastric ulcers after yttrium-90 microsphere radioembolization for liver malignancies.

    PubMed

    Sun, Belinda; Lapetino, Shawn R; Diffalha, Sameer A L; Yong, Sherri; Gaba, Ron C; Bui, James T; Koppe, Sean; Garzon, Steven; Guzman, Grace

    2016-04-01

    Yttrium-90 microsphere radioembolization ((90)Y MRE) is a therapy for liver malignancies by permanently implanting (90)Y-containing microspheres into tumors via hepatic artery. The etiology of persistent gastric ulcerations in patients presenting months after treatment remains unclear. Three patients who presented with gastric ulceration 4 to 13 months after (90)Y MRE were examined by esophagogastroduodenoscopy and biopsies. Pathological examinations showed multiple (90)Y microspheres scattered within the lamina propria and submucosa. Most of the microspheres were distributed in a linear fashion, consistent with an intravascular location; however, the vascular lumen and endothelial cells were not present. The microspheres were surrounded by fibrotic tissue infiltrated by chronic inflammatory cells and rare neutrophils. Epithelial granulation without pititis and miniaturized glands with intervening fibrosis were noted, compatible with chronic ischemic changes. These findings suggest that the persistent gastric ulceration is a result of localized ischemic injury in response to (90)Y MRE-induced vascular damage.

  4. Utilization of gastroprotective strategies for nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced gastrointestinal events in a major teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hooi Leng; Chua, Siew Siang; Mahadeva, Sanjiv

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Clinical guidelines recommend the prescribing of gastroprotective strategies in nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) users with risk factors for gastrointestinal (GI) ulcer or ulcer complications. However, these guidelines are not often translated into clinical practice. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the utilization of gastroprotective strategies for NSAID-induced upper GI events in at-risk users in a major teaching hospital. Patients and methods A cross-sectional, observational, pharmacy-based study was conducted in a major Asian institution with both primary and secondary health care services. This study involved the screening of prescriptions for regular NSAIDs, and patients who met the inclusion criteria were recruited and interviewed using a questionnaire. Results Of the 409 participants recruited, 83.1% had at least one GI risk factor, of whom 70.3% did not receive appropriate gastroprotection. The most common GI risk factor was the use of high-dose NSAIDs (69.2%), followed by participants aged 65 years and older (22%) and concomitant use of low-dose aspirin (11.7%). Appropriate gastroprotective strategies utilized consisted of the use of a cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitor alone or a nonselective NSAID plus a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) in the moderate-risk group and a COX-2 inhibitor plus a PPI in the high-risk group. Gastroprotective strategies were underutilized in 67.1% of at-risk participants and overutilized in 59.4% of those without risk factors. Co-prescription of a histamine-2 receptor antagonist at lower-than-recommended doses constituted 59% of the inappropriate gastroprotective agents used. Logistic regression analysis revealed patients aged 65 years and older (odds ratio, 1.89; 95% CI =1.15–3.09) as a predictor for the prescribing of gastroprotection by the clinicians. Conclusion Approximately 70% of at-risk NSAID users, mainly on high-dose NSAIDs, were not prescribed appropriate

  5. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta regulates Snail and β-catenin expression during Fas-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Haoxuan; Li, Wenjing; Wang, Yadong; Liu, Zhizhong; Cai, Yidong; Xie, Tingting; Shi, Meng; Wang, Zhiqing; Jiang, Bo

    2013-08-01

    Fas signalling has been shown to induce the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) to promote gastrointestinal (GI) cancer metastasis, but its mechanism of action is still unknown. The effects of Fas-ligand (FasL) treatment and inhibition of Fas signalling on GI cancer cells were tested using invasion assay, immunofluorescence, immunoblot, Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR), quantitative Real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), immunoprecipitation and luciferase reporter assay. Immunohistochemistry was used to analyse the EMT-associated molecules in GI cancer specimens. FasL treatment inhibited E-cadherin transcription by upregulation of Snail in GI cancer cells. The nuclear expression and transcriptional activity of Snail and β-catenin were increased by inhibitory phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK-3β) at Ser9 by FasL-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling. Snail associated with β-catenin in the nucleus and, thus, increased β-catenin transcriptional activity. Evaluation of human GI cancer specimens showed that the expression of FasL, phospho-GSK-3β, Snail and β-catenin increase during GI cancer progression. An EMT phenotype was shown to correlate with an advanced cancer stage, and a non-EMT phenotype significantly correlated with a better prognosis. Collectively, these data indicate that GSK-3β regulates Snail and β-catenin expression during Fas-induced EMT in gastrointestinal cancer.

  6. [Gastrointestinal bezoars].

    PubMed

    Espinoza González, Ricardo

    2016-08-01

    Gastrointestinal bezoars are a concretion of indigested material that can be found in the gastrointestinal tract of humans and some animals. This material forms an intraluminal mass, more commonly located in the stomach. During a large period of history animal bezoars were considered antidotes to poisons and diseases. We report a historical overview since bezoars stones were thought to have medicinal properties. This magic conception was introduced in South America by Spanish conquerors. In Chile, bezoars are commonly found in a camelid named guanaco (Lama guanicoe). People at Central Chile and the Patagonia believed that bezoar stones had magical properties and they were traded at very high prices. In Santiago, during the eighteenth century the Jesuit apothecary sold preparations of bezoar stones. The human bezoars may be formed by non-digestible material like cellulose (phytobezoar), hair (trichobezoar), conglomerations of medications or his vehicles (pharmacobezoar or medication bezoar), milk and mucus component (lactobezoar) or other varieties of substances. This condition may be asymptomatic or can produce abdominal pain, ulceration, gastrointestinal bleeding, gastric outlet obstruction, perforation and mechanical intestinal obstruction. We report their classification, diagnostic modalities and treatment.

  7. Glass microsphere lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geiger, Michelle; Goode, Henry; Ohanlon, Sean; Pieloch, Stuart; Sorrells, Cindy; Willette, Chris

    1991-01-01

    The harsh lunar environment eliminated the consideration of most lubricants used on earth. Considering that the majority of the surface of the moon consists of sand, the elements that make up this mixture were analyzed. According to previous space missions, a large portion of the moon's surface is made up of fine grained crystalline rock, about 0.02 to 0.05 mm in size. These fine grained particles can be divided into four groups: lunar rock fragments, glasses, agglutinates (rock particles, crystals, or glasses), and fragments of meteorite material (rare). Analysis of the soil obtained from the missions has given chemical compositions of its materials. It is about 53 to 63 percent oxygen, 16 to 22 percent silicon, 10 to 16 percent sulfur, 5 to 9 percent aluminum, and has lesser amounts of magnesium, carbon, and sodium. To be self-supporting, the lubricant must utilize one or more of the above elements. Considering that the element must be easy to extract and readily manipulated, silicon or glass was the most logical choice. Being a ceramic, glass has a high strength and excellent resistance to temperature. The glass would also not contaminate the environment as it comes directly from it. If sand entered a bearing lubricated with grease, the lubricant would eventually fail and the shaft would bind, causing damage to the system. In a bearing lubricated with a solid glass lubricant, sand would be ground up and have little effect on the system. The next issue was what shape to form the glass in. Solid glass spheres was the only logical choice. The strength of the glass and its endurance would be optimal in this form. To behave as an effective lubricant, the diameter of the spheres would have to be very small, on the order of hundreds of microns or less. This would allow smaller clearances between the bearing and the shaft, and less material would be needed. The production of glass microspheres was divided into two parts, production and sorting. Production includes the

  8. Bortezomib-induced paralytic ileus is a potential gastrointestinal side effect of this first-in-class anticancer proteasome inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Perfetti, Vittorio; Palladini, Giovanni; Brunetti, Laura; Sgarella, Adele; Brugnatelli, Silvia; Gobbi, Paolo G; Corazza, Gino Roberto

    2007-07-01

    Bortezomib is the first anticancer proteasome inhibitor introduced into clinical practice. It has been recently approved for the treatment of multiple myeloma, an incurable plasma cell tumour that accounts for 10-15% of all haematologic malignancies and for approximately 20% of deaths. Gastrointestinal toxicity associated with the use of this drug is common but generally mild to moderate. Paralytic ileus in patients undergoing bortezomib treatment has been reported, although a definite attribution to bortezomib administration has not been established. We report a myeloma patient who developed severe paralytic ileus during bortezomib therapy, which presented in the context of progressive constipation without other known causes and which regressed promptly with medical management after drug cessation, suggesting a direct causal relationship. Awareness of the various potential gastrointestinal toxic effects of bortezomib is of relevance given the growing number of patients undergoing treatment with this important and effective new cancer drug.

  9. Corneal Confocal Microscopy Detects Small Fibre Neuropathy in Patients with Upper Gastrointestinal Cancer and Nerve Regeneration in Chemotherapy Induced Peripheral Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Ferdousi, Maryam; Azmi, Shazli; Petropoulos, Ioannis Nikolaos; Fadavi, Hassan; Ponirakis, Georgios; Marshall, Andrew; Tavakoli, Mitra; Malik, Imaan; Mansoor, Wasat; Malik, Rayaz Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    There are multiple neurological complications of cancer and its treatment. This study assessed the utility of the novel non-invasive ophthalmic technique of corneal confocal microscopy in identifying neuropathy in patients with upper gastrointestinal cancer before and after platinum based chemotherapy. In this study, 21 subjects with upper gastrointestinal (oesophageal or gastric) cancer and 21 healthy control subjects underwent assessment of neuropathy using the neuropathy disability score, quantitative sensory testing for vibration perception threshold, warm and cold sensation thresholds, cold and heat induced pain thresholds, nerve conduction studies and corneal confocal microscopy. Patients with gastro-oesophageal cancer had higher heat induced pain (P = 0.04) and warm sensation (P = 0.03) thresholds with a significantly reduced sural sensory (P<0.01) and peroneal motor (P<0.01) nerve conduction velocity, corneal nerve fibre density (CNFD), nerve branch density (CNBD) and nerve fibre length (CNFL) (P<0.0001). Furthermore, CNFD correlated significantly with the time from presentation with symptoms to commencing chemotherapy (r = -0.54, P = 0.02), and CNFL (r = -0.8, P<0.0001) and CNBD (r = 0.63, P = 0.003) were related to the severity of lymph node involvement. After the 3rd cycle of chemotherapy, there was no change in any measure of neuropathy, except for a significant increase in CNFL (P = 0.003). Corneal confocal microscopy detects a small fibre neuropathy in this cohort of patients with upper gastrointestinal cancer, which was related to disease severity. Furthermore, the increase in CNFL after the chemotherapy may indicate nerve regeneration.

  10. Corneal Confocal Microscopy Detects Small Fibre Neuropathy in Patients with Upper Gastrointestinal Cancer and Nerve Regeneration in Chemotherapy Induced Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Ferdousi, Maryam; Azmi, Shazli; Petropoulos, Ioannis Nikolaos; Fadavi, Hassan; Ponirakis, Georgios; Marshall, Andrew; Tavakoli, Mitra; Malik, Imaan; Mansoor, Wasat; Malik, Rayaz Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    There are multiple neurological complications of cancer and its treatment. This study assessed the utility of the novel non-invasive ophthalmic technique of corneal confocal microscopy in identifying neuropathy in patients with upper gastrointestinal cancer before and after platinum based chemotherapy. In this study, 21 subjects with upper gastrointestinal (oesophageal or gastric) cancer and 21 healthy control subjects underwent assessment of neuropathy using the neuropathy disability score, quantitative sensory testing for vibration perception threshold, warm and cold sensation thresholds, cold and heat induced pain thresholds, nerve conduction studies and corneal confocal microscopy. Patients with gastro-oesophageal cancer had higher heat induced pain (P = 0.04) and warm sensation (P = 0.03) thresholds with a significantly reduced sural sensory (P<0.01) and peroneal motor (P<0.01) nerve conduction velocity, corneal nerve fibre density (CNFD), nerve branch density (CNBD) and nerve fibre length (CNFL) (P<0.0001). Furthermore, CNFD correlated significantly with the time from presentation with symptoms to commencing chemotherapy (r = -0.54, P = 0.02), and CNFL (r = -0.8, P<0.0001) and CNBD (r = 0.63, P = 0.003) were related to the severity of lymph node involvement. After the 3rd cycle of chemotherapy, there was no change in any measure of neuropathy, except for a significant increase in CNFL (P = 0.003). Corneal confocal microscopy detects a small fibre neuropathy in this cohort of patients with upper gastrointestinal cancer, which was related to disease severity. Furthermore, the increase in CNFL after the chemotherapy may indicate nerve regeneration. PMID:26430773

  11. Ultrasonic atomization for spray drying: a versatile technique for the preparation of protein loaded biodegradable microspheres.

    PubMed

    Bittner, B; Kissel, T

    1999-01-01

    Bovine serum albumin (BDA) loaded microspheres with a spherical shape and smooth surface structure were successfully prepared from poly(lactide-co-glycolide) using an ultrasonic nozzle installed in a Niro laboratory spray dryer. Process and formulation parameters were investigated with respect to their influence on microsphere characteristics, such as particle size, loading capacity, and release properties. Preparation of microspheres in yields of more than 50% was achieved using an ultrasonic atomizer connected to a stream of carrier air. Microsphere characteristics could be modified by changing several technological parameters. An increased polymer concentration of the feed generated larger particles with a significantly reduced initial release of the protein. Moreover, microspheres with a smooth surface structure were obtained from the organic polymer solution with the highest viscosity. Microparticles with a low BSA loading showed a large central cavity surrounded by a thin polymer layer in scanning electron microspheres. A high protein loading led to an enlargement of the shell layer, or even to dense particles without any cavities. A continuous in vitro release pattern of BSA was obtained from the particles with low protein loading. Glass transition temperatures (Tg) of the microspheres before and after lyophilization did not differ from those of the BSA loaded particles prepared by spray drying with a rotary atomizer. Analysis of the polymer by gel permeation chromatography indicated that ultrasonication had no effect on polymer molecular weight. Molecular weight and polydispersity of the pure polymer, placebo microspheres prepared by spray drying, and placebo microspheres prepared using the ultrasonic nozzle were in the same range. In conclusion, ultrasonic atomization represents a versatile and reliable technique for the production of protein loaded biodegradable microspheres without inducing a degradation of the polymer matrix. Particle characteristics

  12. Determination of the adequate dosage of rebamipide, a gastric mucoprotective drug, to prevent low-dose aspirin-induced gastrointestinal mucosal injury

    PubMed Central

    Ota, Kazuhiro; Takeuchi, Toshihisa; Nouda, Sadaharu; Ozaki, Haruhiko; Kawaguchi, Shinpei; Takahashi, Yoshiaki; Harada, Satoshi; Edogawa, Shoko; Kojima, Yuichi; Kuramoto, Takanori; Higuchi, Kazuhide

    2016-01-01

    Small intestinal mucosal injury caused by low-dose aspirin is a common cause of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. We aimed to investigate the protective effects and optimal dose of rebamipide for low-dose aspirin-induced gastrointestinal mucosal injury. In this prospective randomized trial, 45 healthy volunteers (aged 20–65 years) were included and divided into three groups. The groups received enteric-coated aspirin 100 mg (low-dose aspirin) plus omeprazole 10 mg (Group A: proton pump inhibitor group), low-dose aspirin plus rebamipide 300 mg (Group B: standard-dose group), or low-dose aspirin plus rebamipide 900 mg (Group C: high-dose group). Esophagogastroduodenoscopy and video capsule endoscopy were performed, and the fecal occult blood reaction and fecal calprotectin levels were measured before and two weeks after drug administration. Although the fecal calprotectin levels increased significantly in Group A, they did not increase in Groups B and C. The esophagogastroduodenoscopic and video capsule endoscopic findings and the fecal occult blood test findings did not differ significantly among the three groups. In conclusion, standard-dose rebamipide is sufficient for preventing mucosal injury of the small intestine induced by low-dose aspirin, indicating that high-dose rebamipide is not necessary. PMID:27895392

  13. Determination of the adequate dosage of rebamipide, a gastric mucoprotective drug, to prevent low-dose aspirin-induced gastrointestinal mucosal injury.

    PubMed

    Ota, Kazuhiro; Takeuchi, Toshihisa; Nouda, Sadaharu; Ozaki, Haruhiko; Kawaguchi, Shinpei; Takahashi, Yoshiaki; Harada, Satoshi; Edogawa, Shoko; Kojima, Yuichi; Kuramoto, Takanori; Higuchi, Kazuhide

    2016-11-01

    Small intestinal mucosal injury caused by low-dose aspirin is a common cause of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. We aimed to investigate the protective effects and optimal dose of rebamipide for low-dose aspirin-induced gastrointestinal mucosal injury. In this prospective randomized trial, 45 healthy volunteers (aged 20-65 years) were included and divided into three groups. The groups received enteric-coated aspirin 100 mg (low-dose aspirin) plus omeprazole 10 mg (Group A: proton pump inhibitor group), low-dose aspirin plus rebamipide 300 mg (Group B: standard-dose group), or low-dose aspirin plus rebamipide 900 mg (Group C: high-dose group). Esophagogastroduodenoscopy and video capsule endoscopy were performed, and the fecal occult blood reaction and fecal calprotectin levels were measured before and two weeks after drug administration. Although the fecal calprotectin levels increased significantly in Group A, they did not increase in Groups B and C. The esophagogastroduodenoscopic and video capsule endoscopic findings and the fecal occult blood test findings did not differ significantly among the three groups. In conclusion, standard-dose rebamipide is sufficient for preventing mucosal injury of the small intestine induced by low-dose aspirin, indicating that high-dose rebamipide is not necessary.

  14. Fabrication of glass microspheres with conducting surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Elsholz, W.E.

    1982-09-30

    A method for making hollow glass microspheres with conducting surfaces by adding a conducting vapor to a region of the glass fabrication furnace. As droplets or particles of glass forming material pass through multiple zones of different temperature in a glass fabrication furnace, and are transformed into hollow glass microspheres, the microspheres pass through a region of conducting vapor, forming a conducting coating on the surface of the microspheres.

  15. Fabrication of glass microspheres with conducting surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Elsholz, William E.

    1984-01-01

    A method for making hollow glass microspheres with conducting surfaces by adding a conducting vapor to a region of the glass fabrication furnace. As droplets or particles of glass forming material pass through multiple zones of different temperature in a glass fabrication furnace, and are transformed into hollow glass microspheres, the microspheres pass through a region of conducting vapor, forming a conducting coating on the surface of the microspheres.

  16. Development of enteric-coated microspheres of embelin for their beneficial pharmacological potential in ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Nidhi; Dadwal, Ankita; Hallan, Supandeep Singh; Sharma, Saurabh; Mishra, Neeraj

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the present study is to develop embelin-loaded enteric-coated microspheres and investigate their pharmacological potential in acetic acid induced ulcerative colitis. The optimized formulation of embelin-loaded microspheres has shown significant sustained release of embelin. Further this formulation significantly reduced the ulcer activity score and oxidative stress, and attenuated the inflammatory changes. Thus it may be concluded that embelin-loaded enteric-coated microspheres have shown delayed release capacity than plain embelin and exerts colon ulcer protective effect in rats.

  17. Enhancement of Raman scattering by two orders of magnitude using photonic nanojet of a microsphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dantham, V. R.; Bisht, P. B.; Namboodiri, C. K. R.

    2011-05-01

    The enhancement of Raman signal is observed on excitation through a single microsphere. The dependence of the enhancement ratio (ER) on various parameters viz., numerical aperture (NA) of the microscopic objective lens, pump wavelength, size and refractive index of the microsphere has been studied. The enhancement has been explained due to interaction of the increased field of the photonic nanojet emerging from the single microsphere. The photonic nanojet induced ER of Raman peaks of silicon wafer and cadmium ditelluride is reported here. It is observed for the first time that by suitable selection of the experimental parameters, it is possible to enhance the Raman signal by approximately two orders of magnitude.

  18. Formulation and Evaluation of Propranolol Hydrochloride-Loaded Carbopol-934P/Ethyl Cellulose Mucoadhesive Microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Jayvadan; Patel, Darshna; Raval, Jignyasha

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to formulate and systemically evaluate in-vitro and in-vivo performances of mucoadhesive propranolol hydrochloride microspheres for its potential use in the treatment of hypertension, myocardial infraction and cardiac arrhythmias. Propranolol hydrochloride mucoadhesive microspheres, containing carbopol-934P as mucoadhesive polymer and ethyl cellulose as carrier polymer, were prepared by an emulsion-solvent evaporation technique. Results of preliminary trials indicated that the quantity of emulsifying agent, time for stirring, drug-to-polymers ratio, and speed of rotation affected various characteristics of microspheres. Microspheres were discrete, spherical, free-flowing and showed a good percentage of drug entrapment efficiency. An in-vitro mucoadhesive test showed that propranolol hydrochloride mucoadhesive microspheres adhered more strongly to the gastric mucous layer and could be retained in the gastrointestinal tract for an extended period of time. A 32 full factorial design was employed to study the effect of independent variables, drug-to-polymer-to-polymer ratio (propranolol hydrochloride-ethyl cellulose-carbopol-934P) (X1), and stirring speed (X2) on dependent variables, i.e. percentage of mucoadhesion, drug entrapment efficiency, particle size and t80. The best batch exhibited a high drug entrapment efficiency of 54 %; 82% mucoadhesion after 1 h and particle size of 110 μm. A sustained pattern of drug release was obtained for more than 12 h. The drug-to-polymer-to-polymer ratio had a more significant effect on the dependent variables. The morphological characteristics of the mucoadhesive microspheres were studied under a scanning electron microscope. In-vivo evaluation studies on propranolol hydrochloride mucoadhesive microspheres and propranolol hydrochloride powder were performed on normal healthy rabbits. The results showed a sustained anti-hypertensive effect over a longer period of time in case of mucoadhesive

  19. Controlled drug release from a novel injectable biodegradable microsphere/scaffold composite based on poly(propylene fumarate).

    PubMed

    Kempen, Diederik H R; Lu, Lichun; Kim, Choll; Zhu, Xun; Dhert, Wouter J A; Currier, Bradford L; Yaszemski, Michael J

    2006-04-01

    The ideal biomaterial for the repair of bone defects is expected to have good mechanical properties, be fabricated easily into a desired shape, support cell attachment, allow controlled release of bioactive factors to induce bone formation, and biodegrade into nontoxic products to permit natural bone formation and remodeling. The synthetic polymer poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF) holds great promise as such a biomaterial. In previous work we developed poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and PPF microspheres for the controlled delivery of bioactive molecules. This study presents an approach to incorporate these microspheres into an injectable, porous PPF scaffold. Model drug Texas red dextran (TRD) was encapsulated into biodegradable PLGA and PPF microspheres at 2 microg/mg microsphere. Five porous composite formulations were fabricated via a gas foaming technique by combining the injectable PPF paste with the PLGA or PPF microspheres at 100 or 250 mg microsphere per composite formulation, or a control aqueous TRD solution (200 microg per composite). All scaffolds had an interconnected pore network with an average porosity of 64.8 +/- 3.6%. The presence of microspheres in the composite scaffolds was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy and confocal microscopy. The composite scaffolds exhibited a sustained release of the model drug for at least 28 days and had minimal burst release during the initial phase of release, as compared to drug release from microspheres alone. The compressive moduli of the scaffolds were between 2.4 and 26.2 MPa after fabrication, and between 14.9 and 62.8 MPa after 28 days in PBS. The scaffolds containing PPF microspheres exhibited a significantly higher initial compressive modulus than those containing PLGA microspheres. Increasing the amount of microspheres in the composites was found to significantly decrease the initial compressive modulus. The novel injectable PPF-based microsphere/scaffold composites developed in this study

  20. Mycophenolate mofetil alters the antioxidant status in duodenum of rats: Implication for silymarin usage in mycophenolate mofetil-induced gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Sheikhzadeh, Sanaz; Malekinejad, Hassan; Hobbenaghi, Rahim

    2013-01-01

    Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) as an immunosuppressive agent is used to prevent graft rejection. One of the adverse effects of long time administration of MMF is the gastrointestinal disorder. This study aimed to investigate the gastroprotective effect of silymarin (SMN) on MMF-induced gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. Twenty-four adult female Wistar rats were assigned into three groups including the control and test groups. The control animals received saline (5 mL kg(-1)) and the test animals were treated with MMF (40 mg kg(-1), orally) and saline, MMF and silymarin (SMN, 50 mg kg(-1), orally) for 14 consecutive days, respectively. To evaluate the GI disorders due to the MMF-induced oxidative stress and subsequently the protective effect of SMN, malondialdehyde (MDA), total thiol molecules (TTM) levels and total anti-oxidant capacity (TAC) were determined. Additionally, histopathological examinations in the duodenal region of small intestine were performed. The MMF-increased level of MDA was reduced by SMN administration, while the MMF-reduced level of TTM increased significantly (p < 0.05) by SMN administration. Histopathological examinations showed the goblet cell reduction and congestion in the MMF-received animals; while SMN was able to improve the MMF-induced goblet cell reduction and congestion. Our data suggest that the MMF-induced GI disorders are characterized by changes in antioxidant status, which presented by the elevation of MDA level and reduction of TTM concentration. Moreover, the improved biochemical alterations and histopathologic damages by SMN indicating its gastroprotective and antioxidant effects.

  1. Microspheres and their methods of preparation

    DOEpatents

    Bose, Anima B; Yang, Junbing

    2015-03-24

    Carbon microspheres are doped with boron to enhance the electrical and physical properties of the microspheres. The boron-doped carbon microspheres are formed by a CVD process in which a catalyst, carbon source and boron source are evaporated, heated and deposited onto an inert substrate.

  2. Formulation and evaluation of clarithromycin microspheres for eradication of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Rajinikanth, Paruvathanahalli Siddalingam; Karunagaran, Lakshmi Narayanan; Balasubramaniam, Jagdish; Mishra, Brahmeshwar

    2008-12-01

    The objective of the study was to develop a stomach-specific drug delivery system for controlled release of clarithromycin for eradication of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). Floating-bioadhesive microspheres of clarithromycin (FBMC) were prepared by emulsification-solvent evaporation method using ethylcellulose as matrix polymer and Carbopol 934P as mucoadhesive polymer. The prepared microspheres were subjected to evaluation for particle size, incorporation efficiency, in vitro buoyancy, in vitro mucoadhesion and in vitro drug release characteristics. The prepared microspheres showed a strong mucoadhesive property with good buoyancy. The formulation variables like polymer concentration and drug concentration influenced the in vitro drug release significantly in simulated gastric fluid (pH. 2.0). The in vivo H. pylori clearance efficiency of prepared FBMC in reference to clarithromycin suspension following repeated oral administration to H. pylori infected Mongolian gerbils was examined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique and by a microbial culture method. The FBMC showed a significant anti-H. pylori effect in the in vivo gerbil model. It was also noted that the required amount of clarithromycin for eradication of H. pylori was significantly less in FBMC than from corresponding clarithromycin suspension. The results further substantiated that FBMC improved the gastric stability of clarithromycin (due to entrapment within the microsphere) and eradicated H. pylori from the gastrointestinal tract more effectively than clarithromycin suspension because of the prolonged gastrointestinal residence time of the formulation.

  3. Protocol for a randomised control trial of methylnaltrexone for the treatment of opioid-induced constipation and gastrointestinal stasis in intensive care patients (MOTION)

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Parind B; Brett, Stephen J; O'Callaghan, David; Anjum, Aisha; Cross, Mary; Warwick, Jane; Gordon, Anthony C

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Gastrointestinal dysmotility and constipation are common problems in intensive care patients. The majority of critical care patients are sedated with opioids to facilitate tolerance of endotracheal tubes and mechanical ventilation, which inhibit gastrointestinal motility and lead to adverse outcomes. Methylnaltrexone is a peripheral opioid antagonist that does not cross the blood–brain barrier and can reverse the peripheral side effects of opioids without affecting the desired central properties. This trial will investigate whether methylnaltrexone can reverse opioid-induced constipation and gastrointestinal dysmotility. Methods This is a single-centre, multisite, double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial. 84 patients will be recruited from 4 intensive care units (ICUs) within Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust. Patients will receive intravenous methylnaltrexone or placebo on a daily basis if they are receiving opioid infusion to facilitate mechanical ventilation and have not opened their bowels for 48 hours. All patients will receive standard laxatives as per the clinical ICU bowel protocol prior to randomisation. The primary outcome of the trial will be time to significant rescue-free laxation following randomisation. Secondary outcomes will include tolerance of enteral feed, gastric residual volumes, incidence of pneumonia, blood stream and Clostridium difficile infection, and any reversal of central opioid effects. Ethics and dissemination The trial protocol, the patient/legal representative information sheets and consent forms have been reviewed and approved by the Harrow Research Ethics Committee (REC Reference 14/LO/2004). An independent Trial Steering Committee and Data Monitoring Committee are in place, with patient representation. On completion, the trial results will be published in peer-reviewed journals and presented at national and international scientific meetings. Trial registration number 2014-004687-37; Pre

  4. Pentadecapeptide BPC 157 positively affects both non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent-induced gastrointestinal lesions and adjuvant arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Sikiric, P; Seiwerth, S; Grabarevic, Z; Rucman, R; Petek, M; Jagic, V; Turkovic, B; Rotkvic, I; Mise, S; Zoricic, I; Konjevoda, P; Perovic, D; Simicevic, V; Separovic, J; Hanzevacki, M; Ljubanovic, D; Artukovic, B; Bratulic, M; Tisljar, M; Rekic, B; Gjurasin, M; Miklic, P; Buljat, G

    1997-01-01

    Besides a superior protection of the pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (an essential fragment of an organoprotective gastric juice peptide BPC) against different gastrointestinal and liver lesions, an acute anti-inflammatory and analgetic activity was also noted. Consequently, its effect on chronic inflammation lesions, such as adjuvant arthritis, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIAs)-induced gastrointestinal lesions was simultaneously studied in rats. In gastrointestinal lesions (indomethacin (30 mg/kg s.c.), aspirin (400 mg/kg i.g.) and diclofenac (125 mg/kg i.p.) studies, BPC 157 (10 micrograms or 10 ng/kg i.p.) was regularly given simultaneously and/or 1 h prior to drug application (indomethacin). In the adjuvant arthritis (tail-application of 0.2 mL of Freund's adjuvant) studies (14 days, 30 days, 1 year) BPC 157 (10 micrograms or 10 ng/kg i.p.), it was given as a single application (at 1 h either before or following the application of Freund's adjuvant) or in a once daily regimen (0-14th day, 14-30th day, 14th day-1 year). Given with the investigated NSAIAs, BPC 157 consistently reduced the otherwise prominent lesions in the stomach of the control rats, as well as the lesions in the small intestine in the indomethacin groups. In the adjuvant arthritis studies, the lesion's development seems to be considerably reduced after single pentadecapeptide medication, and even more attenuated in rats daily treated with BPC 157. As a therapy of already established adjuvant arthritis, its salutary effect consistently appeared already after 2 weeks of medication and it could be clearly seen also after 1 year of application. Taking together all these results, the data likely point to a special anti-inflammatory and mucosal integrity protective effect.

  5. Multilayered polymer microspheres by thermal imprinting during microsphere growth.

    PubMed

    Takekoh, Ryu; Li, Wen-Hui; Burke, Nicholas A D; Stöver, Harald D H

    2006-01-11

    Modulation of the polymerization temperature in precipitation polymerizations was used to form onion-type polymer microspheres consisting of multiple nested layers. Specifically, the copolymerization of chloromethylstyrene and divinylbenzene-55 in acetonitrile, at temperatures ramping between 65 and 75 degrees C, led to monodisperse, cross-linked microspheres of about 10 mum diameter that have radial density profiles closely reflecting the thermal profiles used. This thermal imprinting is attributed to the copolymer formed being close to its theta point during the polymerization. As the microspheres grow by continuously capturing oligomers from solution, the resulting transient surface gel layer expands and contracts with temperature, and thus records the reaction temperature profile in the form of a corresponding density profile, even as it cross-links.

  6. Advances in Microsphere Insulation Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, M. S.; Baumgartner, R. G.; Fesmire, J. E.; Augustynowicz, S. D.

    2004-06-01

    Microsphere insulation, typically consisting of hollow glass bubbles, combines in a single material the desirable properties that other insulations only have individually. The material has high crush strength, low density, is noncombustible, and performs well in soft vacuum. Microspheres provide robust, low-maintenance insulation systems for cryogenic transfer lines and dewars. They also do not suffer from compaction problems typical of perlite that result in the necessity to reinsulate dewars because of degraded thermal performance and potential damage to its support system. Since microspheres are load bearing, autonomous insulation panels enveloped with lightweight vacuum-barrier materials can be created. Comprehensive testing performed at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory located at the NASA Kennedy Space Center demonstrated competitive thermal performance with other bulk materials. Test conditions were representative of actual-use conditions and included cold vacuum pressure ranging from high vacuum to no vacuum and compression loads from 0 to 20 psi. While microspheres have been recognized as a legitimate insulation material for decades, actual implementation has not been pursued. Innovative microsphere insulation system configurations and applications are evaluated.

  7. Interaction Induced High Catalytic Activities of CoO Nanoparticles Grown on Nitrogen-Doped Hollow Graphene Microspheres for Oxygen Reduction and Evolution Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhong-Jie; Jiang, Zhongqing

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen doped graphene hollow microspheres (NGHSs) have been used as the supports for the growth of the CoO nanoparticles. The nitrogen doped structure favors the nucleation and growth of the CoO nanoparticles and the CoO nanoparticles are mostly anchored on the quaternary nitrogen doped sites of the NGHSs with good monodispersity since the higher electron density of the quaternary nitrogen favors the nucleation and growth of the CoO nanoparticles through its coordination and electrostatic interactions with the Co2+ ions. The resulting NGHSs supported CoO nanoparticles (CoO/NGHSs) are highly active for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) with activity and stability higher than the Pt/C and for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) with activity and stability comparable to the most efficient catalysts reported to date. This indicates that the CoO/NGHSs could be used as efficient bi-functional catalysts for ORR and OER. Systematic analysis shows that the superior catalytic activities of the CoO/NGHSs for ORR and OER mainly originate from the nitrogen doped structure of the NGHSs, the small size of the CoO nanoparticles, the higher specific and electroactive surface area of the CoO/NGHSs, the good electric conductivity of the CoO/NGHSs, the strong interaction between the CoO nanoparticles and the NGHSs, etc. PMID:27255562

  8. Inflammation-induced drug release by using a pH-responsive gas-generating hollow-microsphere system for the treatment of osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ming-Fan; Chia, Wei-Tso; Liu, Hung-Yi; Hsiao, Chun-Wen; Hsiao, Hsu-Chan; Yang, Chih-Man; Sung, Hsing-Wen

    2014-11-01

    In the conventional treatment of osteomyelitis, the penetration of antibiotics into the infected bone is commonly poor. To ensure that the local antibiotic concentration is adequate, this work develops an injectable calcium phosphate (CP) cement in which is embedded pH-responsive hollow microspheres (HMs) that can control the release of a drug according to the local pH. The HMs are fabricated using a microfluidic device, with a shell of poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and an aqueous core that contains vancomycin (Van) and NaHCO3. At neutral pH, the CP/HM cement elutes a negligible concentration of the drug. In an acidic environment, the NaHCO3 that is encapsulated in the HMs reacts with the acid rapidly to generate CO2 bubbles, disrupting the PLGA shells and thereby releasing Van locally in excess of a therapeutic threshold. The feasibility of using this CP/HM cement to treat osteomyelitis is studied using a rabbit model. Analytical results reveal that the CP/HM cement provides highly effective local antibacterial activity. Histological examination further verifies the efficacy of the treatment by the CP/HM cement. The above findings suggest that the CP/HM cement is a highly efficient system for the local delivery of antibiotics in the treatment of osteomyelitis.

  9. New strategy of tacrolimus administration in animal model based on tacrolimus-loaded microspheres.

    PubMed

    Zamorano-Leon, Jose J; Hernandez-Fisac, Ines; Guerrero, Sandra; Tamarit-Rodriguez, Jorge; Santos-Sancho, Juana M; Sopeña, Bernardo; Escolar, Ginés; López-Vilchez, Irene; Duarte, Juan; Barrientos, Alberto; López-Farré, Antonio J

    2016-05-01

    New strategies for tacrolimus administration that conserve its immunosuppressive effect but avoiding fluctuations in tacrolimus circulating levels are needed. The aim was to analyze if subcutaneous biodegradable tacrolimus-loaded microspheres injection promoted a significant immunosuppressive response in rats. Rats received two subcutaneous tacrolimus-loaded microspheres injections at different days, the first injection was done at day 0 and the second injection was done 12 days after. Plasma circulating levels of tacrolimus, interleukin-2 (IL-2) and calcineurin phosphatase (PP2B) activity in mononuclear cells were measured. Tacrolimus plasma levels were significantly increased from the day after tacrolimus-loaded microspheres injection and remained increased during 10days. Compared to control, plasma IL-2 levels and PP2B activity in mononuclear cells were significantly decreased during ten days. At day 12, a new subcutaneous injection of tacrolimus-loaded microspheres was performed and two days after injection, tacrolimus plasma levels were again increased and both IL-2 plasma levels and PP2B activity decreased. A single subcutaneous tacrolimus-loaded microspheres injection was enough to reduce tacrolimus-related immunosuppressive parameters. These results open the possibility of new therapeutic strategies to administrate calcineurin inhibitors reducing the variability of their circulating levels related to gastrointestinal drug absorption/metabolism modifications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Mitigation of indomethacin-induced gastrointestinal damages in fat-1 transgenic mice via gate-keeper action of ω-3-polyunsaturated fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Han, Young-Min; Park, Jong-Min; Kang, Jing X.; Cha, Ji-Young; Lee, Ho-Jae; Jeong, Migeyong; Go, Eun-Jin; Hahm, Ki Baik

    2016-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) damage the gastrointestinal (GI) epithelial cell membranes by inducing several signals through lipid raft organization after membrane incorporation, whereas ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) relieve inflammation, reduce oxidative stress, and provide cytoprotection, consequent to lipid raft disorganization. Therefore, we hypothesized that ω-3 PUFAs can protect the GI from NSAID-induced damages by initiating the gatekeeper action of cell membranes, subsequent to anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative actions. Administration of indomethacin (IND) leads to the formation of lipid rafts and activation of caveolin-1; however, no such observations were made upon co-administration of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and IND. In addition, the EPA-induced lipid raft disorganization, caveolin-1 inactivation, and cellular cytotoxicity were inhibited when target cells were knocked-out using G-protein coupled receptor 120 (GPR 120). EPA significantly attenuated IND-induced oxidative damage and apoptosis. IND administration induced significant ulceration, bleeding, and oedema in the stomach or small intestine of wild-type (WT) mice; however, such severe damages to the GI significantly decreased in fat-1 transgenic (TG) mice (P < 0.001), which exhibited decreased cyclooxygenase-2 expression and apoptosis, decreased interleukin-1β and FAS concentrations, and increased heme oxygenase-1 concentration. Our study indicates that the gatekeeper function of ω-3 PUFAs improves GI safety when administered with NSAID. PMID:27658533

  11. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli protein secretion is induced in response to conditions similar to those in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, B; Abe, A; Stein, M; Finlay, B B

    1997-01-01

    The pathogenicity of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is associated with the expression and secretion of specific bacterial factors. EspB is one such secreted protein which is required to trigger host signaling pathways resulting in effacement of microvilli and cytoskeletal rearrangements. These events presumably contribute to the ensuing diarrhea associated with EPEC infections. EPEC encounters several environmental changes and stimuli during its passage from the external environment into the host gastrointestinal tract. In this paper we show that the secretion of EspB is subject to environmental regulation, and maximal secretion occurs under conditions reminiscent of those in the gastrointestinal tract. Thus, secretion is maximal at 37 degrees C, pH 7, and physiological osmolarity. In addition, maximal secretion requires the presence of sodium bicarbonate and calcium and is stimulated by millimolar concentrations of Fe(NO3)3. The secretion of the four other EPEC-secreted proteins appears to be modulated in a manner similar to that of EspB. Our results also show that secretion is not dependent on CO2, as originally reported by Haigh et al. (FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 129: 63-67, 1995), but that CO2 more likely acts as a component of the medium buffering system, since CO2 dependence was abolished by the use of alternative buffers. PMID:9199427

  12. Gastrointestinal gas.

    PubMed Central

    Fardy, J; Sullivan, S

    1988-01-01

    Complaints related to gastrointestinal gas are commonly encountered in clinical practice. Various therapies have been proposed, yet none has appeared to be extremely effective. A review of the literature revealed little hard evidence to support the use of simethicone, pancreatic enzymes, anticholinergic agents or antibiotics. Evidence supporting the use of prokinetic agents has been the strongest, and there may be a pathophysiologic basis for the use of these agents if the complaints are related to abnormal intestinal motility. The use of activated charcoal for adsorbing intestinal gas has been effective in healthy subjects but has not been properly investigated in patients with gas complaints. Dietary modification may be beneficial in certain cases. Additional controlled trials are necessary to clarify the issues in the treatment of this common problem. PMID:3058280

  13. Angiogenic microspheres promote neural regeneration and motor function recovery after spinal cord injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shukui; Yao, Shenglian; Wen, Yujun; Wang, Ying; Wang, Hao; Xu, Qunyuan

    2016-01-01

    This study examined sustained co-delivery of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), angiopoietin-1 and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) encapsulated in angiogenic microspheres. These spheres were delivered to sites of spinal cord contusion injury in rats, and their ability to induce vessel formation, neural regeneration and improve hindlimb motor function was assessed. At 2–8 weeks after spinal cord injury, ELISA-determined levels of VEGF, angiopoietin-1, and bFGF were significantly higher in spinal cord tissues in rats that received angiogenic microspheres than in those that received empty microspheres. Sites of injury in animals that received angiogenic microspheres also contained greater numbers of isolectin B4-binding vessels and cells positive for nestin or β III-tubulin (P < 0.01), significantly more NF-positive and serotonergic fibers, and more MBP-positive mature oligodendrocytes. Animals receiving angiogenic microspheres also suffered significantly less loss of white matter volume. At 10 weeks after injury, open field tests showed that animals that received angiogenic microspheres scored significantly higher on the Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan scale than control animals (P < 0.01). Our results suggest that biodegradable, biocompatible PLGA microspheres can release angiogenic factors in a sustained fashion into sites of spinal cord injury and markedly stimulate angiogenesis and neurogenesis, accelerating recovery of neurologic function. PMID:27641997

  14. ZnO microspheres-reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite for photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Jiaqian; Zhang, Xinyu; Yang, Chengwu; Cao, Meng; Ma, Mingzhen; Liu, Riping

    2017-01-01

    In this work, ZnO microspheres-reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanocomposites were synthesized via a simple solution method and used for the photodegradation of methylene blue (MB) dye from water under UV light. The SEM and TEM observations demonstrate that the microsphere morphologies of the ZnO microspheres-rGO nanocomposite is composed of ZnO microspheres anchored on rGO sheets, confirming the formation of ZnO microspheres-rGO composites. Raman spectra and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveal that both of the reduction of GO tight contact between ZnO and rGO are achieved during the high temperature calcination process. During the photocatalytic test, in comparison with ZnO microspheres and P25 TiO2, the ZnO microspheres-rGO nanocomposite shows improved photodegradation of MB dye, because the rGO sheets could reduce the charge recombination in electron-transfer processes. According to the scavenger experiments, the possible MB degradation mechanism is contributed mainly to the generation of active species induced by the photogenerated holes (h+) and superoxide radicals (rad O2-).

  15. Prolonged inhibition of inflammation in osteoarthritis by triamcinolone acetonide released from a polyester amide microsphere platform.

    PubMed

    Rudnik-Jansen, Imke; Colen, Sascha; Berard, Julien; Plomp, Saskia; Que, Ivo; van Rijen, Mattie; Woike, Nina; Egas, Annelies; van Osch, Gerjo; van Maarseveen, Erik; Messier, Ken; Chan, Alan; Thies, Jens; Creemers, Laura

    2017-03-09

    Controlled biomaterial-based corticosteroid release might circumvent multiple injections and the accompanying risks, such as hormone imbalance and muscle weakness, in osteoarthritic (OA) patients. For this purpose, microspheres were prepared from an amino acid-based polyester amide (PEA) platform and loaded with triamcinolone acetonide (TAA). TAA loaded microspheres were shown to release TAA for over 60days in PBS. Furthermore, the bioactivity lasted at least 28days, demonstrated by a 80-95% inhibition of PGE2 production using TNFα-stimulated chondrocyte culture, indicating inhibition of inflammation. Microspheres loaded with the near infrared marker NIR780-iodide injected in healthy rat joints or joints with mild collagenase-induced OA showed retention of the microspheres up till 70days after injection. After intra-articular injection of TAA-loaded microspheres, TAA was detectable in the serum until day seven. Synovial inflammation was significantly lower in OA joints injected with TAA-loaded microspheres based on histological Krenn scores. Injection of TAA-loaded nor empty microspheres had no effect on cartilage integrity as determined by Mankin scoring. In conclusion, the PEA platform shows safety and efficacy upon intra-articular injection, and its extended degradation and release profiles compared to the currently used PLGA platforms may render it a good alternative. Even though further in vivo studies may need to address dosing and readout parameters such as pain, no effect on cartilage pathology was found and inflammation was effectively lowered in OA joints.

  16. Effects of early enteral nutrition on the gastrointestinal motility and intestinal mucosal barrier of patients with burn-induced invasive fungal infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Gu, Fang; Wang, Fengxian; Zhang, Yuanda

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of early enteral nutrition on the gastrointestinal motility and intestinal mucosal barrier of patients with burn-induced invasive fungal infection. Methods: A total of 120 patients with burn-induced invasive fungal infection were randomly divided into an early enteral nutrition (EN) group and a parenteral nutrition (PN) group (n=60). The patients were given nutritional support intervention for 14 days, and the expression levels of serum transferrin, albumin, total protein, endotoxin, D-lactic acid and inflammatory cytokines were detected on the 1st, 7th and 14th days respectively. Results: As the treatment progressed, the levels of serum transferrin, albumin and total protein of the EN group were significantly higher than those of the PN group (P<0.05), while the levels of serum endotoxin and D-lactic acid of the form group were significantly lower (P<0.05). After treatment, the expression levels of IL-6 and TNF-α were decreased in the EN group, which were significantly different from those of the PN group (P<0.05). During treatment, the incidence rates of complications such as abdominal distension, diarrhea, sepsis, nausea, vomiting and gastric retention were similar. The mean healing time of wound surface was 9.34±0.78 days in the EN group and 12.46±2.19 days in the PN group, i.e. such time of the former was significantly shorter than that of the latter (P<0.05). Conclusion: Treating patients having burn-induced invasive fungal infection by early enteral nutrition support with arginine can safely alleviate malnutrition and stress reaction, strengthen cellular immune function and promote wound healing, thereby facilitating the recovery of gastrointestinal motility and the function of intestinal mucosal barrier. PMID:27375697

  17. Modeling the Formation of Polyimide Microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pipes, R. B.; Weiser, E. S.; Gonsoulin, B.; Hubert, P.

    2002-01-01

    High temperature polyimide microspheres have been developed from polyimide solid residuum by a simple inflation process. Microspheres have been fabricated from several polyimide precursors through the use of a circulating air oven. Microsphere formation and final physical property characterization have been limited to simple mechanical and thermal testing. The present paper focuses on developing an understanding of microsphere formation through simple geometric rules for an incompressible polymeric material and microscopic observations of precursor residuum inflation. Inflation kinematics of the hollow polyimide microspheres as a function of time and temperature is discussed.

  18. Polarization Dependent Whispering Gallery Modes in Microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, Grigory (Inventor); Wrbanek, Susan Y. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A tunable resonant system is provided and includes a microsphere that receives an incident portion of a light beam generated via a light source, the light beam having a fundamental mode, a waveguide medium that transmits the light beam from the light source to the microsphere, and a polarizer disposed in a path of the waveguide between the light source and the microsphere. The incident portion of the light beam creates a fundamental resonance inside the microsphere. A change in a normalized frequency of the wavelength creates a secondary mode in the waveguide and the secondary mode creates a secondary resonance inside the microsphere.

  19. Production of monodisperse, polymeric microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Rhim, Won-Kyu (Inventor); Hyson, Michael T. (Inventor); Chang, Manchium (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    Very small, individual polymeric microspheres with very precise size and a wide variation in monomer type and properties are produced by deploying a precisely formed liquid monomer droplet, suitably an acrylic compound such as hydroxyethyl methacrylate into a containerless environment. The droplet which assumes a spheroid shape is subjected to polymerizing radiation such as ultraviolet or gamma radiation as it travels through the environment. Polymeric microspheres having precise diameters varying no more than plus or minus 5 percent from an average size are recovered. Many types of fillers including magnetic fillers may be dispersed in the liquid droplet.

  20. Absolute brightness of fluorescent microspheres.

    PubMed

    Finger, Isaac; Phillips, Scott; Mobley, Elizabeth; Tucker, Robert; Hess, Henry

    2009-02-07

    The absolute brightness of fluorescent particles, such as dye-containing nano- and microspheres or quantum dots, is a critical design parameter for many applications relying on fluorescence detection. The absolute brightness, defined as the ratio of radiant intensity of emission to illumination intensity of excitation, of nile-red fluorescent microspheres with a 1 micrometre diameter is measured to be 4.2 +/- 1 x 10(-16) m(2)/sr, and the implications for the design of kinesin motor protein-powered "smart dust" devices and the remote detection of fluorescence are discussed.

  1. Effects of delayed treatment with nebracetam on neurotransmitters in brain regions after microsphere embolism in rats

    PubMed Central

    Takeo, Satoshi; Hayashi, Hideki; Miyake, Keiko; Takagi, Kaori; Tadokoro, Mina; Takagi, Norio; Oshikawa, Sayuri

    1997-01-01

    The effects of delayed treatment with nebracetam, a novel nootropic drug, on neurotransmitters of brain regions were examined in rats with microsphere embolism-induced cerebral ischaemia. Cerebral ischaemia was induced by administration of 900 microspheres (48 μm) into the internal carotid artery. The rats with stroke-like symptoms were treated p.o. with 30 mg kg−1 nebracetam twice daily. The levels of acetylcholine, dopamine, noradrenaline, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and their metabolites in the cerebral cortex, striatum and hippocampus of animals with microsphere embolism were determined by high performance liquid chromatography (h.p.l.c.) on the 3rd and 7th days after the operation. Although the microsphere embolism induced significant changes in most of the neurotransmitters and some of their metabolites in the brain regions, the delayed treatment with nebracetam partially restored only the hippocampal 5-HT and the striatal dopamine metabolite contents on the 3rd day. The hippocampal in vivo 5-HT synthesis, but not the striatal dopamine synthesis, was attenuated in rats with microsphere embolism on the 3rd day, but was restored by treatment with nebracetam. In vivo striatal dopamine turnover rate of the rats with microsphere embolism was inhibited on the 3rd day irrespective of treatment with nebracetam. The present study provides evidence for a possible action of nebracetam on 5-HT metabolism in the ischaemic brain. PMID:9179389

  2. A Microsphere-Based Vaccine Prevents and Reverses New-Onset Autoimmune Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Brett; Nylander, Karen; Harnaha, Jo; Machen, Jennifer; Lakomy, Robert; Styche, Alexis; Gillis, Kimberly; Brown, Larry; Gallo, Michael; Knox, Janet; Hogeland, Kenneth; Trucco, Massimo; Giannoukakis, Nick

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study was aimed at ascertaining the efficacy of antisense oligonucleotide-formulated microspheres to prevent type 1 diabetes and to reverse new-onset disease. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Microspheres carrying antisense oligonucleotides to CD40, CD80, and CD86 were delivered into NOD mice. Glycemia was monitored to determine disease prevention and reversal. In recipients that remained and/or became diabetes free, spleen and lymph node T-cells were enriched to determine the prevalence of Foxp3+ putative regulatory T-cells (Treg cells). Splenocytes from diabetes-free microsphere-treated recipients were adoptively cotransferred with splenocytes from diabetic NOD mice into NOD-scid recipients. Live animal in vivo imaging measured the microsphere accumulation pattern. To rule out nonspecific systemic immunosuppression, splenocytes from successfully treated recipients were pulsed with β-cell antigen or ovalbumin or cocultured with allogeneic splenocytes. RESULTS The microspheres prevented type 1 diabetes and, most importantly, exhibited a capacity to reverse clinical hyperglycemia, suggesting reversal of new-onset disease. The microspheres augmented Foxp3+ Treg cells and induced hyporesponsiveness to NOD-derived pancreatic β-cell antigen, without compromising global immune responses to alloantigens and nominal antigens. T-cells from successfully treated mice suppressed adoptive transfer of disease by diabetogenic splenocytes into secondary immunodeficient recipients. Finally, microspheres accumulated within the pancreas and the spleen after either intraperitoneal or subcutaneous injection. Dendritic cells from spleen of the microsphere-treated mice exhibit decreased cell surface CD40, CD80, and CD86. CONCLUSIONS This novel microsphere formulation represents the first diabetes-suppressive and reversing nucleic acid vaccine that confers an immunoregulatory phenotype to endogenous dendritic cells. PMID:18316361

  3. Gastrointestinal food allergies.

    PubMed

    Heine, Ralf G

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal food allergies present during early childhood with a diverse range of symptoms. Cow's milk, soy and wheat are the three most common gastrointestinal food allergens. Several clinical syndromes have been described, including food protein-induced enteropathy, proctocolitis and enterocolitis. In contrast with immediate, IgE-mediated food allergies, the onset of gastrointestinal symptoms is delayed for at least 1-2 hours after ingestion in non-IgE-mediated allergic disorders. The pathophysiology of these non-IgE-mediated allergic disorders is poorly understood, and useful in vitro markers are lacking. The results of the skin prick test or measurement of the food-specific serum IgE level is generally negative, although low-positive results may occur. Diagnosis therefore relies on the recognition of a particular clinical phenotype as well as the demonstration of clear clinical improvement after food allergen elimination and the re-emergence of symptoms upon challenge. There is a significant clinical overlap between non-IgE-mediated food allergy and several common paediatric gastroenterological conditions, which may lead to diagnostic confusion. The treatment of gastrointestinal food allergies requires the strict elimination of offending food allergens until tolerance has developed. In breast-fed infants, a maternal elimination diet is often sufficient to control symptoms. In formula-fed infants, treatment usually involves the use an extensively hydrolysed or amino acid-based formula. Apart from the use of hypoallergenic formulae, the solid diets of these children also need to be kept free of specific food allergens, as clinically indicated. The nutritional progress of infants and young children should be carefully monitored, and they should undergo ongoing, regular food protein elimination reassessments by cautious food challenges to monitor for possible tolerance development.

  4. Levodopa/benserazide microsphere (LBM) prevents L-dopa induced dyskinesia by inactivation of the DR1/PKA/P-tau pathway in 6-OHDA-lesioned Parkinson's rats.

    PubMed

    Xie, Cheng-long; Wang, Wen-Wen; Zhang, Su-fang; Yuan, Ming-Lu; Che, Jun-Yi; Gan, Jing; Song, Lu; Yuan, Wei-En; Liu, Zhen-Guo

    2014-12-16

    L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-dopa) is the gold standard for symptomatic treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD), but long-term therapy is associated with the emergence of L-dopa-induced dyskinesia (LID). In the present study, L-dopa and benserazide were loaded by poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) microspheres (LBM), which can release levodopa and benserazide in a sustained manner in order to continuous stimulate dopaminergic receptors. We investigated the role of striatal DR1/PKA/P-tau signal transduction in the molecular event underlying LID in the 6-OHDA-lesioned rat model of PD. We found that animals rendered dyskinetic by L-dopa treatment, administration of LBM prevented the severity of AIM score, as well as improvement in motor function. Moreover, we also showed L-dopa elicits profound alterations in the activity of three LID molecular markers, namely DR1/PKA/P-tau (ser396). These modifications are totally prevented by LBM treatment, a similar way to achieve continuous dopaminergic delivery (CDD). In conclusion, our experiments provided evidence that intermittent administration of L-dopa, but not continuous delivery, and DR1/PKA/p-tau (ser396) activation played a critical role in the molecular and behavioural induction of LID in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. In addition, LBM treatment prevented the development of LID by inhibiting the expression of DR1/PKA/p-tau, as well as PPEB mRNA in dyskintic rats.

  5. Celecoxib-induced gastrointestinal, liver and brain lesions in rats, counteraction by BPC 157 or L-arginine, aggravation by L-NAME.

    PubMed

    Drmic, Domagoj; Kolenc, Danijela; Ilic, Spomenko; Bauk, Lara; Sever, Marko; Zenko Sever, Anita; Luetic, Kresimir; Suran, Jelena; Seiwerth, Sven; Sikiric, Predrag

    2017-08-07

    To counteract/reveal celecoxib-induced toxicity and NO system involvement. Celecoxib (1 g/kg b.w. ip) was combined with therapy with stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (known to inhibit these lesions, 10 μg/kg, 10 ng/kg, or 1 ng/kg ip) and L-arginine (100 mg/kg ip), as well as NOS blockade [N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME)] (5 mg/kg ip) given alone and/or combined immediately after celecoxib. Gastrointestinal, liver, and brain lesions and liver enzyme serum values in rats were assessed at 24 h and 48 h thereafter. This high-dose celecoxib administration, as a result of NO system dysfunction, led to gastric, liver, and brain lesions and increased liver enzyme serum values. The L-NAME-induced aggravation of the lesions was notable for gastric lesions, while in liver and brain lesions the beneficial effect of L-arginine was blunted. L-arginine counteracted gastric, liver and brain lesions. These findings support the NO system mechanism(s), both NO system agonization (L-arginine) and NO system antagonization (L-NAME), that on the whole are behind all of these COX phenomena. An even more complete antagonization was identified with BPC 157 (at both 24 h and 48 h). A beneficial effect was evident on all the increasingly negative effects of celecoxib and L-NAME application and in all the BPC 157 groups (L-arginine + BPC 157; L-NAME + BPC 157; L-NAME + L-arginine + BPC 157). Thus, these findings demonstrated that BPC 157 may equally counteract both COX-2 inhibition (counteracting the noxious effects of celecoxib on all lesions) and additional NOS blockade (equally counteracting the noxious effects of celecoxib + L-NAME). BPC 157 and L-arginine alleviate gastrointestinal, liver and brain lesions, redressing NSAIDs' post-surgery application and NO system involvement.

  6. Electrogastrography in experimental pigs: the influence of gastrointestinal injury induced by dextran sodium sulphate on porcine gastric erythromycin-stimulated myoelectric activity.

    PubMed

    Tachecí, Ilja; Kvetina, Jaroslav; Kunes, Martin; Edakkanambeth Varayil, Jithinraj; Ali, Shahzad Marghoob; Pavlik, Michal; Kopacova, Marcela; Rejchrt, Stanislav; Bures, Jan; Pleskot, Miloslav

    2011-01-01

    Electrogastrography (EGG) is a non-invasive investigation of gastric myoelectrical activity. The aim of study was to evaluate the impact of erythromycin on EGG in gastrointestinal toxic injury induced by dextran sodium sulphate (DSS) in experimental pigs. The experiments were carried out on 12 adult pigs (weighing 30-35 kg). EGG was recorded using Digitrapper equipment (Synectics Medical AB, Stockholm). Running spectrum activity was used for EGG evaluation. There were two groups of animals: Group I: 6 controls with erythromycin administration (1,600 mg intragastrically); Group II: 6 animals treated with DSS (for 5 days, 0.25 g/kg per day in a dietary bolus) followed by erythromycin administration. Baseline and subsequent six separate 30-minute EGG-recordings (from time 0 to 360 min) were accomplished in each animal. A total of 84 records were analysed. Baseline dominant frequency of slow waves was fully comparable in both groups. In Group I, there was a significant increase in dominant frequency after erythromycin administration (maximum between 240-360 min). There was a flat non-significant and delayed increase in dominant frequency after erythromycin administration in Group II. The difference between Group I and II at particular time intervals was not significant but a diverse trend was evident. EGG recording enables us to register a gastric myoelectrical effect of prokinetic drugs. Erythromycin induced a significant increase in the dominant frequency of slow waves. DSS caused toxic injury to the porcine gastrointestinal tract responsible for the delayed and weaker myoelectrical effect of erythromycin in experimental animals.

  7. Optical super-resolution imaging by high-index microspheres embedded in elastomers.

    PubMed

    Darafsheh, Arash; Guardiola, Consuelo; Palovcak, Averie; Finlay, Jarod C; Cárabe, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrated feasibility of super-resolution imaging through high-index microspheres embedded in transparent elastomers. We performed imaging, with resolution improvement by a factor of two, by using implanted barium titanate glass microspheres (diameters ∼30-150  μm and refractive index ∼1.9-2.1) in a thin film of polydimethylsiloxane elastomer placed over the specimen. Microsphere-assisted imaging technique is a promising candidate for applications in cancer research. As a proof-of-principle, we used microsphere-assisted imaging technique for the observation of radiation-induced γ-H2AX foci formation in U87 human glioblastoma cells irradiated by clinical proton beams.

  8. Highly Sensitive and Reproducible SERS Performance from Uniform Film Assembled by Magnetic Noble Metal Composite Microspheres.

    PubMed

    Niu, Chunyu; Zou, Bingfang; Wang, Yongqiang; Cheng, Lin; Zheng, Haihong; Zhou, Shaomin

    2016-01-26

    To realize highly sensitive and reproducible SERS performance, a new route was put forward to construct uniform SERS film by using magnetic composite microspheres. In the experiment, monodisperse Fe3O4@SiO2@Ag microspheres with hierarchical surface were developed and used as building block of SERS substrate, which not only realized fast capturing analyte through dispersion and collection under external magnet but also could be built into uniform film through magnetically induced self-assembly. By using R6G as probe molecule, the as-obtained uniform film exhibited great improvement on SERS performance in both sensitivity and reproducibility when compared with nonuniform film, demonstrating the perfect integration of high sensitivity of hierarchal noble metal microspheres and high reproducibility of ordered microspheres array. Furthermore, the as-obtained product was used to detect pesticide thiram and also exhibited excellent SERS performance for trace detection.

  9. Development of Risperidone PLGA Microspheres

    PubMed Central

    D'Souza, Susan; Faraj, Jabar A.; Giovagnoli, Stefano; DeLuca, Patrick P.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to design and evaluate biodegradable PLGA microspheres for sustained delivery of Risperidone, with an eventual goal of avoiding combination therapy for the treatment of schizophrenia. Two PLGA copolymers (50 : 50 and 75 : 25) were used to prepare four microsphere formulations of Risperidone. The microspheres were characterized by several in vitro techniques. In vivo studies in male Sprague-Dawley rats at 20 and 40 mg/kg doses revealed that all formulations exhibited an initial burst followed by sustained release of the active moiety. Additionally, formulations prepared with 50 : 50 PLGA had a shorter duration of action and lower cumulative AUC levels than the 75 : 25 PLGA microspheres. A simulation of multiple dosing at weekly or 15-day regimen revealed pulsatile behavior for all formulations with steady state being achieved by the second dose. Overall, the clinical use of Formulations A, B, C, or D will eliminate the need for combination oral therapy and reduce time to achieve steady state, with a smaller washout period upon cessation of therapy. Results of this study prove the suitability of using PLGA copolymers of varying composition and molecular weight to develop sustained release formulations that can tailor in vivo behavior and enhance pharmacological effectiveness of the drug. PMID:24616812

  10. Multifunctionalized biocompatible microspheres for sensing.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Martín, Rosario M; Alexander, Lois; Bradley, Mark

    2008-01-01

    We present our achievements in the synthesis and application of multifunctionalized, cross-linked, polystyrene microspheres, which remarkably and quite generally are taken up by all cell types studied to date. Importantly, the nature of these synthetic beads allows multistep solid-phase chemistry and the ability to bind essentially any molecule/sensor/nucleic acid to them. These microspheres have a number of advantages over other cellular delivery approaches. First, a diverse range of compounds can be attached to the microspheres, and we have demonstrated that these materials are effectively delivered into cells; second, the cellular cargo can be modulated through modification of bead loading; third, they are large enough to be visualized using standard microscopy techniques; and fourth, their cargos are not diluted within the cell. Populations of cells containing beads can be readily sorted from other cells for subsequent analysis with very high, but controllable, uptake rates, which can be modulated through modulation of the bead size and incubation time. Recent work has focused on the development of these microspheres as sensors for intracellular calcium and pH.

  11. Microspheres and nanoparticles from ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Won Hyuk

    Improved preparations of various examples of monodispersed, porous, hollow, and core-shell metal and semiconductor nanoparticles or nanowires have been developed. Now titania microspheres and nanoparticles and silica microspheres can be synthesized using an inexpensive high frequency (1.7 MHz) ultrasonic generator (household humidifier; ultrasonic spray pyrolysis; USP). Morphology and pore size of titania microspheres were controlled by the silica to Ti(IV) ratio and silica particle size. Fine tuning the precursor ratio affords sub-50 nm titania nanoparticles as well. In terms of silica microspheres, morphology was controlled by the silica to organic monomer ratio. In liquids irradiated with high intensity ultrasound (20 kHz; HIUS), acoustic cavitation produces high energy chemistry through intense local heating inside the gas phase of collapsing bubbles in the liquid. HIUS and USP confine the chemical reactions to isolated sub-micron reaction zones, but sonochemistry does so in a heated gas phase within a liquid, while USP uses a hot liquid droplet carried by a gas flow. Thus, USP can be viewed as a method of phase-separated synthesis using submicron-sized droplets as isolated chemical reactors for nanomaterial synthesis. While USP has been used to create both titania and silica spheres separately, there are no prior reports of titania-silica composites. Such nanocomposites of metal oxides have been produced, and by further manipulation, various porous structures with fascinating morphologies were generated. Briefly, a precursor solution was nebulized using a commercially available household ultrasonic humidifier (1.7 MHz ultrasound generator), and the resulting mist was carried in a gas stream of air through a quartz glass tube in a hot furnace. After exiting the hot zone, these microspheres are porous or hollow and in certain cases magnetically responsive. In the case of titania microspheres, they are rapidly taken up into the cytoplasm of mammalian cells and

  12. Influence of neutron irradiation on holmium acetylacetonate loaded poly(L-lactic acid) microspheres.

    PubMed

    Nijsen, J F; van Het Schip, A D; van Steenbergen, M J; Zielhuis, S W; Kroon-Batenburg, L M J; van de Weert, M; van Rijk, P P; Hennink, W E

    2002-04-01

    Holmium-loaded microspheres are useful systems in radio-embolization therapy of liver metastases. For administration to a patient, the holmium-loaded microspheres have to be irradiated in a nuclear reactor to become radioactive. In this paper. the influence of neutron irradiation on poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) microspheres and films, with or without holmium acetylacetonate (HoAcAc), is investigated, in particular using differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC), scanning electron microscopy, gel permeation chromatography (GPC), infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. After irradiation of the microspheres, only minor surface changes were seen using scanning electron microscopy, and the holmium complex remained immobilized in the polymer matrix as reflected by a relatively small release of this complex. GPC and MDSC measurements showed a decrease in molecular weight and crystallinity of the PLLA, respectively, which can be ascribed to radiation induced chain scission. Irradiation of the HoAcAc loaded PLLA matrices resulted in evaporation of the non-coordinated and one coordinated water molecule of the HoAcAc complex, as evidenced by MDSC and X-ray diffraction analysis. Infrared spectroscopy indicated that some degradation of the acetylacetonate anion occurred after irradiation. Although some radiation induced damage of both the PLLA matrix and the embedded HoAcAc-complex occurs, the microspheres retain their favourable properties (no marginal release of Ho, preservation of the microsphere size), which make these systems interesting candidates for the treatment of tumours by radio-embolization.

  13. Bortezomib enhances the therapeutic efficacy of dasatinib by promoting c-KIT internalization-induced apoptosis in gastrointestinal stromal tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ying; Liang, Chao; Zhang, Bo; Ma, Jianjuan; He, Xuexin; Chen, Siyu; Zhang, Xianning; Chen, Wei

    2015-05-28

    Dasatinib-based therapy is often used as a second-line therapeutic strategy for imatinib-resistance gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs); however, acquired aberrant activation of dasatinib target proteins, such as c-KIT and PDGFRβ, attenuates the therapeutic efficiency of dasatinib. Combination therapy which inhibits the activation of dasatinib target proteins may enhance the cytotoxicity of dasatinib in GISTs. Bortezomib, a proteasome inhibitor, significantly inhibited cell viability and promoted apoptosis of dasatinib-treated GIST-T1 cells, whereas GIST-T1 cells showed little dasatinib cytotoxicity when treated with dasatinib alone, as the upregulation of c-KIT caused by dasatinib itself interfered with the inhibition of c-KIT and PDGFRβ phosphorylation by dasatinib. Bortezomib induced internalization and degradation of c-KIT by binding c-KIT to Cbl, an E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase, and the subsequent release of Apaf-1, which was originally bound to the c-KIT-Hsp90β-Apaf-1 complex, induced primary apoptosis in GIST-T1 cells. Combined treatment with bortezomib plus dasatinib caused cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase through inactivation of PDGFRβ and promoted bortezomib-induced apoptosis in GIST-T1 cells. Our data suggest that combination therapy exerts better efficiency for eradicating GIST cells and may be a promising strategy for the future treatment of GISTs.

  14. Comparative pharmacokinetics of (S)-MP3950, a novel 5-HT4 receptor agonist, in normal and atropine-induced gastrointestinal motility disorders rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Binjie; Sun, Xiaoyang; Wang, Shixiao; Guo, Ping; Li, Shujuan; Zhang, Meiyu; Zhao, Longshan; Chen, Xiaohui

    2017-08-30

    1. (S)-MP3950 is the (S)-enantiomer of active metabolite of mosapride, which exhibits higher 5-HT4 receptor agonistic effect than mosapride. It shows promise to become a novel drug candidate for the treatment of gastrointestinal motility disorders (GMDs). However, the pharmacokinetic behavior of (S)-MP3950 in the pathological state of GMDs remains unclear. Herein, we investigated the comparative pharmacokinetics of (S)-MP3950 in normal and GMDs rats. 2. The comparative pharmacokinetics of (S)-MP3950 in normal and atropine-induced GMD rats were studied by ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). The validated UPLC-MS/MS method was successfully applied to investigate the pharmacokinetic profiles of (S)-MP3950 in normal and atropine-induced GMDs rats. Results showed that comparing to normal rats, Cmax reduced by 73.8%, AUC0-t decreased by 57.6% and AUC0-∞ declined by 56.8% in model rats. Additionally, the elimination half-life (t1/2) and Tmax were prolonged slightly. 3. The pharmacokinetic results demonstrated that the atropine-induced GMDs reduced the absorption of (S)-MP3950. The pharmacokinetics research in the pathological state might provide more useful information for further study of novel gastric motility candidates.

  15. DJ-1 plays an important role in caffeic acid-mediated protection of the gastrointestinal mucosa against ketoprofen-induced oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Ting; Ho, Cheng-Ying; Jhang, Jhih-Jia; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Yen, Gow-Chin

    2014-10-01

    Ketoprofen is widely used to alleviate pain and inflammation in clinical medicine; however, this drug may cause oxidative stress and lead to gastrointestinal (GI) ulcers. We previously reported that nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) plays a crucial role in protecting cells against reactive oxygen species, and it facilitates the prevention of ketoprofen-induced GI mucosal ulcers. Recent reports suggested that Nrf2 becomes unstable in the absence of DJ-1/PARK7, attenuating the activity of Nrf2-regulated downstream antioxidant enzymes. Thus, increasing Nrf2 translocation by DJ-1 may represent a novel means for GI protection. In vitro, caffeic acid increases the nuclear/cytosolic Nrf2 ratio and the mRNA expression of the downstream antioxidant enzymes, ϒ-glutamyl cysteine synthetase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and heme oxygenase-1, by activating the JNK/p38 pathway in Int-407 cells. Moreover, knockdown of DJ-1 also reversed caffeic acid-induced nuclear Nrf2 protein expression in a JNK/p38-dependent manner. Our results also indicated that treatment of Sprague-Dawley rats with caffeic acid prior to the administration of ketoprofen inhibited oxidative damage and reversed the inhibitory effects of ketoprofen on the antioxidant system and DJ-1 protein expression in the GI mucosa. Our observations suggest that DJ-1 plays an important role in caffeic acid-mediated protection against ketoprofen-induced oxidative damage in the GI mucosa.

  16. Randomized controlled trial of dietary fiber for the prevention of radiation-induced gastrointestinal toxicity during pelvic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wedlake, Linda; Shaw, Clare; McNair, Helen; Lalji, Amyn; Mohammed, Kabir; Klopper, Tanya; Allan, Lindsey; Tait, Diana; Hawkins, Maria; Somaiah, Navita; Lalondrelle, Susan; Taylor, Alexandra; VanAs, Nicholas; Stewart, Alexandra; Essapen, Sharadah; Gage, Heather; Whelan, Kevin; Andreyev, H Jervoise N

    2017-09-01

    Background: Therapeutic radiotherapy is an important treatment of pelvic cancers. Historically, low-fiber diets have been recommended despite a lack of evidence and potentially beneficial mechanisms of fiber.Objective: This randomized controlled trial compared low-, habitual-, and high-fiber diets for the prevention of gastrointestinal toxicity in patients undergoing pelvic radiotherapy.Design: Patients were randomly assigned to low-fiber [≤10 g nonstarch polysaccharide (NSP)/d], habitual-fiber (control), or high-fiber (≥18 g NSP/d) diets and received individualized counseling at the start of radiotherapy to achieve these targets. The primary endpoint was the difference between groups in the change in the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire-Bowel Subset (IBDQ-B) score between the starting and nadir (worst) score during treatment. Other measures included macronutrient intake, stool diaries, and fecal short-chain fatty acid concentrations.Results: Patients were randomly assigned to low-fiber (n = 55), habitual-fiber (n = 55), or high-fiber (n = 56) dietary advice. Fiber intakes were significantly different between groups (P < 0.001). The difference between groups in the change in IBDQ-B scores between the start and nadir was not significant (P = 0.093). However, the change in score between the start and end of radiotherapy was smaller in the high-fiber group (mean ± SD: -3.7 ± 12.8) than in the habitual-fiber group (-10.8 ± 13.5; P = 0.011). At 1-y postradiotherapy (n = 126) the difference in IBDQ-B scores between the high-fiber (+0.1 ± 14.5) and the habitual-fiber (-8.4 ± 13.3) groups was significant (P = 0.004). No significant differences were observed in stool frequency or form or in short-chain fatty acid concentrations. Significant reductions in energy, protein, and fat intake occurred in the low- and habitual-fiber groups only.Conclusions: Dietary advice to follow a high-fiber diet during pelvic radiotherapy resulted in reduced gastrointestinal

  17. Conferring Natural-Derived Porous Microspheres with Surface Multifunctionality through Facile Coordination-Enabled Self-Assembly Process.

    PubMed

    Han, Pingping; Shi, Jiafu; Nie, Teng; Zhang, Shaohua; Wang, Xueyan; Yang, Pengfei; Wu, Hong; Jiang, Zhongyi

    2016-03-01

    In this study, multifunctional chitin microspheres are synthesized and utilized as a platform for multiple potential applications in enzyme immobilization, catalytic reduction and adsorption. Porous chitin microspheres with an average diameter of 111.5 μm and a porous architecture are fabricated through a thermally induced phase separation method. Then, the porous chitin microspheres are conferred with surface multifunctionality through facile coordination-enabled self-assembly of tannic acid (TA) and titanium (Ti(IV)) bis(ammonium lactate)dihydroxide (Ti-BALDH). The multipoint hydrogen bonds between TA and chitin microspheres confer the TA-Ti(IV) coating with high adhesion capability to adhere firmly to the surface of the chitin microspheres. In view of the biocompatibility, porosity and surface activity, the multifunctional chitin microspheres are used as carriers for enzyme immobilization. The enzyme-conjugated multifunctional porous microspheres exhibit high catalytic performance (102.8 U·mg(-1) yeast alcohol dehydrogenase). Besides, the multifunctional chitin microspheres also find potential applications in the catalytic reduction (e.g., reduction of silver ions to silver nanoparticles) and efficient adsorption of heavy metal ions (e.g., Pb(2+)) taking advantages of their porosity, reducing capability and chelation property.

  18. Unsymmetrical DMH - an isomer of 1,2 DMH - is it potent to induce gastrointestinal carcinoma in rats?

    PubMed

    Christudoss, Pamela; Selvakumar, R; Pulimood, Anna B; Fleming, J J; Mathew, George

    2008-04-01

    Very few animal studies have used 1,1-dimethyl hydrazine (unsymmetrical dimethyl hydrazine - UDMH) as a carcinogen. This study was designed to investigate the carcinogenicity of UDMH in the gastrointestinal tract in a rat model. We wanted to observe if there were any changes in tissue zinc levels and tissue copper zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) enzyme activity during the carcinogenic process, and to compare these values with those of control rats in the medium- and long-term. Six-week-old Wistar rats were given a subcutaneous injection of UDMH (30mg/kg body wt) twice a week for 20 weeks, and sacrificed after 5 and 9 months of treatment. Tissue zinc levels showed a significant decrease (p<0.05) in the large intestine at 9 months, whereas in the stomach and small intestine there were no significant changes at 5 and 9 months. Tissue CuZnSOD enzyme activity in the stomach, small intestine and large intestine showed no significant decrease at 5 and 9 months as compared to controls. Histologically, the large intestine was normal at 9 months. This study suggests that UDMH administered at the above dosage was not carcinogenic in this model.

  19. The serotonin receptor mediates changes in autonomic neurotransmission and gastrointestinal transit induced by heat-killed Lactobacillus brevis SBC8803.

    PubMed

    Horii, Y; Nakakita, Y; Misonou, Y; Nakamura, T; Nagai, K

    2015-01-01

    Lactobacilli exhibit several health benefits in mammals, including humans. Our previous reports established that heat-killed Lactobacillus brevis SBC8803 (SBC8803) increased both efferent gastric vagal nerve activity and afferent intestinal vagal nerve activity in rats. We speculated that this strain could be useful for the treatment of gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. In this study, we examined the effects of SBC8803 on peristalsis and the activity of the efferent celiac vagal nerve innervating the intestine in rats. First, we examined the effects of intraduodenal (ID) administration of SBC8803 on efferent celiac vagal nerve activity (efferent CVNA) in urethane-anesthetised rats using electrophysiological studies. The effects of intravenous injection of the serotonin 5-HT3 receptor antagonist granisetron on changes in efferent CVNA due to ID administration of SBC8803 were also investigated. Finally, the effects of oral gavage of SBC8803 on GI transit were analysed using the charcoal propulsion method in conscious rats treated with or without granisetron. ID administration of SBC8803 increased efferent CVNA. Pretreatment with granisetron eliminated SBC8803-dependent changes in efferent CVNA. Furthermore, oral gavage of SBC8803 significantly accelerated GI transit, while pretreatment with granisetron inhibited GI transit. Our findings suggested that SBC8803 increased efferent CVNA and GI transit of charcoal meal via 5-HT3 receptors. Moreover, SBC8803 enhanced the activity of efferent vagal nerve innervating the intestine and promoted peristalsis via 5-HT3 receptors.

  20. Preparation and in vitro/in vivo characterization of curcumin microspheres intended to treat colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Madhavi, M.; Madhavi, K.; Jithan, A. V.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the present investigation was to prepare colon targeted curcumin microspheres using Eudragit S100 and evaluate the same for in vitro/in vivo properties. Materials and Methods: A “O/O solvent evaporation” technique was used in the preparation of microspheres. The influence of various process variables including stirring speed, drug:polymer ratio and percentage of emulsifier on the fabrication were investigated and the formulation was optimized. Prepared microspheres were evaluated for in vitro and in vivo properties. Surface morphology, particle size, percentage drug entrapment, percentage yield, drug polymer interaction, in vitro drug release in simulated gastrointestinal transit conditions and stability were the in vitro parameters investigated. Using an optimized formulation, drug release into the systemic circulation and organ distribution were investigated as in vivo parameters. In vivo parameters were estimated in male albino rats. Results: Curcumin microspheres of Eudragit S100 were successfully prepared using o/o solvent evaporation method. Microspheres prepared using 1:2 drug:polymer ratio, with a stirring speed of 1000 rpm, and using 1.0% w/v concentration of emulsifying agent was selected as an optimized formulation. The release studies with optimized formulation demonstrated that aqueous solubility of curcumin was enhanced by 8 times with the formulation. FTIR studies demonstrated no change in drug characteristics upon microsphere fabrication. The enhancement in solubility is thus due to the increase in the surface area of the drug substance and not due to a change of drug to a different physical state. This was further confirmed by scanning electron microsphere pictures. Drug release followed Korsmeyer and Peppas release model. Accelerated stability studies indicated that the drug is stable in the formulation for a period of atleast 14 weeks at room temperature. In vivo studies demonstrated a sustained drug release into

  1. Effects of Dietary Honey andArdehCombination on Chemotherapy- Induced Gastrointestinal and Infectious Complications in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Double-Blind Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Mahmoud; Allahyari, Abolghasem; Ebrahimi, Mohsen; Hesam, Hesam; Hosseini, Golkoo; Karimi, Mohammad; Rezaiean, Amin; Kazemi, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the effects of dietary combination of honey and Ardeh on chemotherapy-induced complications in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). A total of 107 AML patients who underwent chemotherapy for at least 30 consecutive dayswere recruited to this double-blind randomized placebo-controlled clinical-trial which was conducted in the Imam Reza and Ghaem teaching hospitals (Mashhad, Iran). They weredivided into two age and sex-matched groups: 58 treated and 49 untreated patients. A combination of 50 grams of honey and 150 grams of Ardehwas added to the treated group’s diet for 30consecutive days, three times each day; while the untreated group received their regular diet.Both groups received their standard medication for AML as well. After one month, they were all examined and lab tests were done on them by an internist and laboratory technicians who were blinded to the subject allocations. Mean value of WBC count in treated group was significantly lower than that of untreated group. Duration of fever and admission in the hospital due to fever were both significantly lower in the treated group (P=0.014, P=0.032 respectively). Total gastrointestinal complications were significantly less in the treated group one month after therapy with the special honey and Ardeh compound.No unusual or unexpected side effects were observed. Honey and Ardehare easily accessible materials that can be helpfully administered in AML patientsreceiving chemotherapy, since their useful effects in ameliorating gastrointestinal complications and reducingfever and neutropenia in AML patients have been shown. PMID:27642340

  2. Filling Porous Microspheres With Magnetic Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Manchium; Colvin, Michael S.

    1990-01-01

    New process produces magnetic microspheres with controllable sizes, compositions, and properties for use in medical diagnostic tests, biological research, and chemical processes. Paramagnetic microspheres also made with process. Porous plastic microspheres prepared by polymerization of monomer in diluent by cross-linking agent. When diluent removed, it leaves tiny pores throughout polymerized spheres. Size and distribution of pores determined by amount and type of diluent and cross-linking agent.

  3. Magnetoresponsive Photonic Microspheres with Structural Color Gradient.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Yeol; Choi, Jongkook; Jeong, Jong-Ryul; Shin, Jung H; Kim, Shin-Hyun

    2017-02-06

    Photonic Janus particles are created by alternately sputtering silica and titania on microspheres in order to obtain a structural color gradient. In addition, the microspheres are rendered magnetoresponsive. The Janus microspheres with optical and magnetic anisotropy enable on-demand control over orientation and structural color through manipulation of an external magnetic field, thereby being useful as active color pigments for reflection-mode displays.

  4. Microsphere coated substrate containing reactive aldehyde groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Richard C. K. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A synthetic organic resin is coated with a continuous layer of contiguous, tangential, individual microspheres having a uniform diameter preferably between 100 Angstroms and 2000 Angstroms. The microspheres are an addition polymerized polymer of an unsaturated aldehyde containing 4 to 20 carbon atoms and are covalently bonded to the substrate by means of high energy radiation grafting. The microspheres contain reactive aldehyde groups and can form conjugates with proteins such as enzymes or other aldehyde reactive materials.

  5. Glass microspheres for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conzone, Samuel David

    Radioactive dysprosium lithium borate glass microspheres have been developed as biodegradable radiation delivery vehicles for the radiation synovectomy treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Once injected into a diseased joint, the microspheres deliver a potent dose of radiation to the diseased tissue, while a non-uniform chemical reaction converts the glass into an amorphous, porous, hydrated dysprosium phosphate reaction product. The non-radioactive, lithium-borate component is dissolved from the glass (up to 94% weight loss), while the radioactive 165Dy reacts with phosphate anions in the body fluids, and becomes "chemically" trapped in a solid, dysprosium phosphate reaction product that has the same size as the un-reacted glass microsphere. Ethylene diamine tetraacetate (EDTA) chelation therapy can be used to dissolve the dysprosium phosphate reaction product after the radiation delivery has subsided. The dysprosium phosphate reaction product, which formed in vivo in the joint of a Sprague-Dawley rat, was dissolved by EDTA chelation therapy in <1 week, without causing any detectable joint damage. The combination of dysprosium lithium borate glass microspheres and EDTA chelation therapy provides an unique "tool" for the medical community, which can deliver a large dose (>100 Gy) of localized beta radiation to a treatment site within the body, followed by complete biodegradability. The non-uniform reaction process is a desirable characteristic for a biodegradable radiation delivery vehicle, but it is also a novel material synthesis technique that can convert a glass to a highly porous materials with widely varying chemical composition by simple, low-temperature, glass/solution reaction. The reaction product formed by nonuniform reaction occupies the same volume as the un-reacted glass, and after drying for 1 h at 300°C, has a specific surface area of ≈200 m2/g, a pore size of ≈30 nm, and a nominal crushing strength of ≈10 MPa. Finally, rhenium glass

  6. Quantitative Evaluation of the Compatibility Effects of Huangqin Decoction on the Treatment of Irinotecan-Induced Gastrointestinal Toxicity Using Untargeted Metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Dong-Ni; Wang, Xu; Chen, Jia-Qing; Lv, Bo; Zhang, Pei; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Zun-Jian; Xu, Feng-Guo

    2017-01-01

    Huangqin decoction (HQD), a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), has been widely used to treat gastrointestinal syndrome in China for thousands of years. Chemotherapy drug irinotecan (CPT-11) is used clinically to treat various kinds of cancers but limited by its side effects, especially delayed diarrhea. Nowadays, HQD has been proved to be effective in attenuating the intestinal toxicity induced by CPT-11. HQD consists of four medicinal herbs including Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch, Paeonia lactiflora Pall, and Ziziphus jujuba Mill. Due to its complexity, the role of each herb and the multi-herb synergistic effects of the formula are poorly understood. In order to quantitatively assess the compatibility effects of HQD, mass spectrometry-based untargeted metabolomics studies were performed. The serum metabolic profiles of rats administered with HQD, single S. baicalensis decoction, S. baicalensis-free decoction and baicalin/baicalein combination were compared. A time-dependent trajectory upon principal component analysis was firstly used to visualize the overall differences. Then metabolites deregulation score and relative area under the curve were calculated and used as parameters to quantitatively evaluate the compatibility effects of HQD from the aspect of global metabolic profile and the specifically altered metabolites, respectively. The collective results indicated that S. baicalensis played a crucial role in the therapeutic effect of HQD on irinotecan-induced diarrhea. Both HQD and SS decoction regulated glycine, serine and threonine pathway. This study demonstrated that metabolomics was a promising tool to elucidate the compatibility effects of TCM or combinatorial drugs. PMID:28484391

  7. Molecular mechanisms of gastrointestinal protection by quercetin against indomethacin-induced damage: role of NF-κB and Nrf2.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-Pozo, Catalina; Castillo, Rodrigo L; Beltrán, Caroll; Miranda, Alfonso; Fuentes, Jocelyn; Gotteland, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the gastrointestinal protection by quercetin against indomethacin-induced oxidative stress and inflammation, with specific interest in studying the underlying molecular mechanisms. We hypothesized that the quercetin-protective effect relies on its antioxidant and antiinflammatory properties. Rats were pretreated with quercetin (50- or 100-mg/kg, ig single dose), 30 min before INDO administration (40-mg/kg ig single dose). Caco-2 cells were treated with INDO (250 and 500 μM) in the absence or presence of quercetin (10 μg/ml). Quercetin prevented the decrease in nuclear translocation of Nrf2, a key regulator of the antioxidant response, and the increase in reactive oxygen species levels induced by INDO by inhibiting the enhancement of NADPH oxidase and xanthine oxidase activities as well as the reduction in superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities in gastric and ileal tissues. Quercetin also prevented INDO-induced ICAM-1 and P-selectin expressions and the increase of myeloperoxidase activity in gastric and ileal tissues and NF-κB activation and IL-8 production in Caco-2 cells. Quercetin did not affect the inhibition of TNFα-mediated production of prostaglandin E2 induced by INDO in Caco-2 cells. The protective effects of quercetin observed in the gastric and ileal mucosa of rats as well as in Caco-2 cells relied on the ability of this flavonol to prevent NF-κB activation and increase Nrf2 translocation. This study supports the concept that quercetin may be useful in the prevention and/or treatment of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug-associated side effects, without interfering with their therapeutic efficacy.

  8. Coupling system to a microsphere cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iltchenko, Vladimir (Inventor); Maleki, Lute (Inventor); Yao, Steve (Inventor); Wu, Chi (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A system of coupling optical energy in a waveguide mode, into a resonator that operates in a whispering gallery mode. A first part of the operation uses a fiber in its waveguide mode to couple information into a resonator e.g. a microsphere. The fiber is cleaved at an angle .PHI. which causes total internal reflection within the fiber. The energy in the fiber then forms an evanescent field and a microsphere is placed in the area of the evanescent field. If the microsphere resonance is resonant with energy in the fiber, then the information in the fiber is effectively transferred to the microsphere.

  9. The Effect of Ergotamine on Tissue Blood Flow and the Arteriovenous Shunting of Radioactive Microspheres in the Head

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Barbara M.; Saxena, P.R.

    1978-01-01

    1 The radioactive microsphere method was used to study the effects of ergotamine (5, 10 and 20 μg/kg, i.v.) on systemic and regional haemodynamic variables in chloralose-urethane anaesthetized cats. The influence of the drug was also studied on the number of 15 μm microspheres escaping entrapment in the head to emerge in the left external jugular vein. 2 Ergotamine decreased the heart rate and cardiac output. Since arterial blood pressure remained unchanged, calculated total peripheral resistance increased. 3 The regional distribution of cardiac output obtained with 15 μm microspheres agreed well with previous studies in cats where 25 μm spheres were used. The most pronounced difference was that in the present investigation more microspheres, apparently escaping through arteriovenous anastomoses (AVAs), were detected in the lungs than when larger spheres had been used. 4 Coronary blood flow decreased, while uterine blood flow was increased by the drug. The microsphere content of the lungs, which receive the spheres not only via bronchial arteries but also via AVAs, was greatly reduced by all doses of ergotamine. Ergotamine did not influence tissue blood flow to other major organs such as the brain, kidneys, skin, liver, skeletal muscle or the gastrointestinal tract. 5 In the 16 experiments, 0.46 ± 0.05 (s.e. mean)% of the total microspheres injected (equivalent to 11.7 ± 1.4% of microspheres detected in the left-side of the head) appeared within 2 min of microsphere injection into the left external jugular vein. The highest dose of ergotamine significantly reduced the shunting of the microspheres in the head. 6 Since 15 μm microspheres are only likely to reach the lungs by passing into the venous circulation through large glomus-type AVAs, we conclude that ergotamine reduces the fraction of microspheres appearing in the lungs by causing strong vasoconstriction in the AVAs in the head. 7 In conformity with the closure of head AVAs is the finding that

  10. BMP2-loaded hollow hydroxyapatite microspheres exhibit enhanced osteoinduction and osteogenicity in large bone defects

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Long; Zeng, Jianhua; Yao, Aihua; Tu, Qiquan; Li, Jingtang; Yan, Liang; Tang, Zhiming

    2015-01-01

    The regeneration of large bone defects is an osteoinductive, osteoconductive, and osteogenic process that often requires a bone graft for support. Limitations associated with naturally autogenic or allogenic bone grafts have demonstrated the need for synthetic substitutes. The present study investigates the feasibility of using novel hollow hydroxyapatite microspheres as an osteoconductive matrix and a carrier for controlled local delivery of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2), a potent osteogenic inducer of bone regeneration. Hollow hydroxyapatite microspheres (100±25 μm) with a core (60±18 μm) and a mesoporous shell (180±42 m2/g surface area) were prepared by a glass conversion technique and loaded with recombinant human BMP2 (1 μg/mg). There was a gentle burst release of BMP2 from microspheres into the surrounding phosphate-buffered saline in vitro within the initial 48 hours, and continued at a low rate for over 40 days. In comparison with hollow hydroxyapatite microspheres without BMP2 or soluble BMP2 without a carrier, BMP2-loaded hollow hydroxyapatite microspheres had a significantly enhanced capacity to reconstitute radial bone defects in rabbit, as shown by increased serum alkaline phosphatase; quick and complete new bone formation within 12 weeks; and great biomechanical flexural strength. These results indicate that BMP2-loaded hollow hydroxyapatite microspheres could be a potential new option for bone graft substitutes in bone regeneration. PMID:25609957

  11. Size-dependent optical imaging properties of high-index immersed microsphere lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Minglei; Ye, Yong-Hong; Hou, Jinglei; Du, Bintao

    2016-03-01

    The imaging properties of high-index immersed microsphere lenses in the diameter range of 5-300 µm are experimentally studied. Our experimental results show that shifting the focal plane of the objective lens can result in different optical properties. When light beams generated from the objective lens are focused near the low surface of the microsphere lens, interference rings can be observed by a conventional optical microscopy, and its diameter and ring number increase with the diameter of microspheres, which can be similarly described by conventional wave optics. When the focal plane of the objective lens is further turned down about several microns, the Blu-ray disk with sub-wavelength structures can be discerned with a magnification up to 4.5 × and field of view up to 14 µm. The image contrast and resolution decrease as the microsphere diameter increases. Calculations of the electric field distributions indicate that the "photonic nanojet" induced by the microsphere performs an important role in sub-wavelength imaging. The surrounding medium can be expected to improve the formation of both the sub-wavelength images and the interference rings. Our studies will help the understanding of the imaging mechanisms in microsphere lenses.

  12. Dose-rate distribution of {sup 32}P-glass microspheres for intra-arterial brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Guimaraes, Carla C.; Moralles, Mauricio; Sene, Frank F.; Martinelli, Jose R.

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: The intra-arterial administration of radioactive glass microspheres is an alternative therapy option for treating primary hepatocellular carcinoma, the main cause of liver cancer death, and metastatic liver cancer, another important kind of cancer induced in the liver. The technique involves the administration of radioactive microspheres in the hepatic artery, which are trapped preferentially in the tumor. Methods: In this work the GEANT4 toolkit was used to calculate the radial dose-rate distributions in water from {sup 32}P-loaded glass microspheres and also from {sup 90}Y-loaded glass microspheres. To validate the toolkit for this application, the authors compared the dose-rate distribution of {sup 32}P and {sup 90}Y point sources in water with data from the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements report 72. Results: Tables of radial dose-rate distributions are provided for practical use in brachytherapy planning with these microspheres. Conclusions: The simulations with the microspheres show that the shape of the beta ray energy spectra with respect to the {sup 32}P and {sup 90}Y sources is significantly modified by the glass matrix.

  13. Investigation on efficient adsorption of cationic dyes on porous magnetic polyacrylamide microspheres.

    PubMed

    Yao, Tong; Guo, Song; Zeng, Changfeng; Wang, Chongqing; Zhang, Lixiong

    2015-07-15

    We report here the preparation of porous magnetic polyacrylamide microspheres for efficient removal of cationic dyes by a simple polymerization-induced phase separation method. Characterizations by various techniques indicate that the microspheres show porous structures and magnetic properties. They can adsorb methylene blue with high efficiency, with adsorption capacity increasing from 263 to 1977 mg/g as the initial concentration increases from 5 to 300 mg/L. Complete removal of methylene blue can be obtained even at very low concentrations. The equilibrium data is well described by the Langmuir isotherm models, exhibiting a maximum adsorption capacity of 1990 mg/g. The adsorption capacity increases with increasing initial pH and reaches a maximum at pH 8, revealing an electrostatic interaction between the microspheres and the methylene blue molecules. The microspheres also show high adsorption capacities for neutral red and gentian violet of 1937 and 1850 mg/g, respectively, as well as high efficiency in adsorption of mixed-dye solutions. The dye-adsorbed magnetic polyacrylamide microspheres can be easily desorbed, and can be repeatedly used for at least 6 cycles without losing the adsorption capacity. The adsorption capacity and efficiency of the microspheres are much higher than those of reported adsorbents, which exhibits potential practical application in removing cationic dyes.

  14. Electrospray synthesis and properties of hierarchically structured PLGA TIPS microspheres for use as controlled release technologies.

    PubMed

    Malik, Salman A; Ng, Wing H; Bowen, James; Tang, Justin; Gomez, Alessandro; Kenyon, Anthony J; Day, Richard M

    2016-04-01

    Microsphere-based controlled release technologies have been utilized for the long-term delivery of proteins, peptides and antibiotics, although their synthesis poses substantial challenges owing to formulation complexities, lack of scalability, and cost. To address these shortcomings, we used the electrospray process as a reproducible, synthesis technique to manufacture highly porous (>94%) microspheres while maintaining control over particle structure and size. Here we report a successful formulation recipe used to generate spherical poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) microspheres using the electrospray (ES) coupled with a novel thermally induced phase separation (TIPS) process with a tailored Liquid Nitrogen (LN2) collection scheme. We show how size, shape and porosity of resulting microspheres can be controlled by judiciously varying electrospray processing parameters and we demonstrate examples in which the particle size (and porosity) affect release kinetics. The effect of electrospray treatment on the particles and their physicochemical properties are characterized by scanning electron microscopy, confocal Raman microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and mercury intrusion porosimetry. The microspheres manufactured here have successfully demonstrated long-term delivery (i.e. 1week) of an active agent, enabling sustained release of a dye with minimal physical degradation and have verified the potential of scalable electrospray technologies for an innovative TIPS-based microsphere production protocol.

  15. Tagless remote refractometric sensor based on WGMs in quantum dot-embedded microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Shuo; Meissner, Kenith E.

    2008-02-01

    Optical resonances in microspheres have recently been applied to biosensing applications. The resonances, known as Whispering Gallery Modes (WGMs) result from the total internal reflection of the light propagating inside the high index spherical surface within a lower index medium. The evanescent field of the WGM, which extends beyond the microsphere surface, is sensitive to the changes in the local refractive index in the surrounding medium. The high Q factor associated with WGMs enables a highly sensitive sensor element. Here we present a refractometric sensor with high sensitivity based on quantum dot (QD) embedded polystyrene microspheres. Ultrashort laser pulses are used to induce two photon excited luminescence from the QDs inside the microspheres. By optimizing the detection area of the microsphere, an enhanced resonance signal to background ratio can be achieved. Theoretical calculations of the resonance peak shifts are compared with the experimental data. Refractometric sensing based on WGMs is a technique that does not require analyte labeling. In this work, QDs are used as a local, broadband light source within the microspheres to enable remote excitation of the resonant modes. The sensor has great potential in many biosensing applications.

  16. Patient Selection and Activity Planning Guide for Selective Internal Radiotherapy With Yttrium-90 Resin Microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Wan-Yee; Kennedy, Andrew S.; Kim, Yun Hwan; Lai, Hee Kit; Lee, Rheun-Chuan; Leung, Thomas W.T.; Liu, Ching-Sheng; Salem, Riad; Sangro, Bruno; Shuter, Borys; Wang, Shih-Chang

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Selective internal radiotherapy (SIRT) with yttrium-90 ({sup 90}Y) resin microspheres can improve the clinical outcomes for selected patients with inoperable liver cancer. This technique involves intra-arterial delivery of {beta}-emitting microspheres into hepatocellular carcinomas or liver metastases while sparing uninvolved structures. Its unique mode of action, including both {sup 90}Y brachytherapy and embolization of neoplastic microvasculature, necessitates activity planning methods specific to SIRT. Methods and Materials: A panel of clinicians experienced in {sup 90}Y resin microsphere SIRT was convened to integrate clinical experience with the published data to propose an activity planning pathway for radioembolization. Results: Accurate planning is essential to minimize potentially fatal sequelae such as radiation-induced liver disease while delivering tumoricidal {sup 90}Y activity. Planning methods have included empiric dosing according to degree of tumor involvement, empiric dosing adjusted for the body surface area, and partition model calculations using Medical Internal Radiation Dose principles. It has been recommended that at least two of these methods be compared when calculating the microsphere activity for each patient. Conclusions: Many factors inform {sup 90}Y resin microsphere SIRT activity planning, including the therapeutic intent, tissue and vasculature imaging, tumor and uninvolved liver characteristics, previous therapies, and localization of the microsphere infusion. The influence of each of these factors has been discussed.

  17. BMP2-loaded hollow hydroxyapatite microspheres exhibit enhanced osteoinduction and osteogenicity in large bone defects.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Long; Zeng, Jianhua; Yao, Aihua; Tu, Qiquan; Li, Jingtang; Yan, Liang; Tang, Zhiming

    2015-01-01

    The regeneration of large bone defects is an osteoinductive, osteoconductive, and osteogenic process that often requires a bone graft for support. Limitations associated with naturally autogenic or allogenic bone grafts have demonstrated the need for synthetic substitutes. The present study investigates the feasibility of using novel hollow hydroxyapatite microspheres as an osteoconductive matrix and a carrier for controlled local delivery of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2), a potent osteogenic inducer of bone regeneration. Hollow hydroxyapatite microspheres (100±25 μm) with a core (60±18 μm) and a mesoporous shell (180±42 m(2)/g surface area) were prepared by a glass conversion technique and loaded with recombinant human BMP2 (1 μg/mg). There was a gentle burst release of BMP2 from microspheres into the surrounding phosphate-buffered saline in vitro within the initial 48 hours, and continued at a low rate for over 40 days. In comparison with hollow hydroxyapatite microspheres without BMP2 or soluble BMP2 without a carrier, BMP2-loaded hollow hydroxyapatite microspheres had a significantly enhanced capacity to reconstitute radial bone defects in rabbit, as shown by increased serum alkaline phosphatase; quick and complete new bone formation within 12 weeks; and great biomechanical flexural strength. These results indicate that BMP2-loaded hollow hydroxyapatite microspheres could be a potential new option for bone graft substitutes in bone regeneration.

  18. Mechanisms of in vivo release of triamcinolone acetonide from PLGA microspheres.

    PubMed

    Doty, Amy C; Weinstein, David G; Hirota, Keiji; Olsen, Karl F; Ackermann, Rose; Wang, Yan; Choi, Stephanie; Schwendeman, Steven P

    2017-03-22

    Little is known about the underlying effects controlling in vitro-in vivo correlations (IVIVCs) for biodegradable controlled release microspheres. Most reports of IVIVCs that exist are empirical in nature, typically based on a mathematical relationship between in vitro and in vivo drug release, with the latter often estimated by deconvolution of pharmacokinetic data. In order to improve the ability of in vitro release tests to predict microsphere behavior in vivo and develop more meaningful IVIVCs, the in vivo release mechanisms need to be characterized. Here, two poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microsphere formulations encapsulating the model steroid triamcinolone acetonide (Tr-A) were implanted subcutaneously in rats by using a validated cage model, allowing for free fluid and cellular exchange and microsphere retrieval during release. Release kinetics, as well as mechanistic indicators of release such as hydrolysis and mass loss, was measured by direct analysis of the recovered microspheres. Release of Tr-A from both formulations was greatly accelerated in vivo compared to in vitro using agitated phosphate buffered saline +0.02% Tween 80 pH7.4, including rate of PLGA hydrolysis, mass loss and water uptake. Both microsphere formulations exhibited erosion-controlled release in vitro, indicated by similar polymer mass loss kinetics, but only one of the formulations (low molecular weight, free acid terminated) exhibited the same mechanism in vivo. The in vivo release of Tr-A from microspheres made of a higher molecular weight, ester end-capped PLGA displayed an osmotically induced/pore diffusion mechanism based on confocal micrographs of percolating pores in the polymer, not previously observed in vitro. This research indicates the need to fully understand the in vivo environment and how it causes drug release from biodegradable microspheres. This understanding can then be applied to develop in vitro release tests which better mimic this environment and cause

  19. Near-infrared light triggers release of Paclitaxel from biodegradable microspheres: photothermal effect and enhanced antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    You, Jian; Shao, Ruping; Wei, Xin; Gupta, Sanjay; Li, Chun

    2010-05-07

    Despite advances in controlled drug delivery, reliable methods for activatable, high-resolution control of drug release are needed. The hypothesis that the photothermal effect mediated by a near-infrared (NIR) laser and hollow gold nanospheres (HAuNSs) could modulate the release of anticancer agents is tested with biodegradable and biocompatible microspheres (1-15 microm) containing the antitumor drug paclitaxel (PTX) and HAuNSs (approximately 35 nm in diameter), which display surface plasmon absorbance in the NIR region. HAuNS-containing microspheres exhibit a NIR-induced thermal effect similar to that of plain HAuNSs. Rapid, repetitive PTX release from the PTX/HAuNS-containing microspheres is observed upon irradiation with NIR light (808 nm), whereas PTX release is insignificant when the NIR light is switched off. The release of PTX from the microspheres is readily controlled by the output power of the NIR laser, duration of irradiation, treatment frequency, and concentration of HAuNSs embedded inside the microspheres. In vitro, cancer cells incubated with PTX/HAuNS-loaded microspheres and irradiated with NIR light display significantly greater cytotoxic effects than cells incubated with the microspheres alone or cells irradiated with NIR light alone, owing to NIR-light-triggered drug release. Treatment of human U87 gliomas and MDA-MB-231 mammary tumor xenografts in nude mice with intratumoral injections of PTX/HAuNS-loaded microspheres followed by NIR irradiation results in significant tumor-growth delay compared to tumors treated with HAuNS-loaded microspheres (no PTX) and NIR irradiation or with PTX/HAuNS-loaded microspheres alone. The data support the feasibility of a therapeutic approach in which NIR light is used for simultaneous modulation of drug release and induction of photothermal cell killing.

  20. Sustained release of PTH(1-34) from PLGA microspheres suppresses osteoarthritis progression in rats.

    PubMed

    Eswaramoorthy, Rajalakshmanan; Chang, Chia-Chi; Wu, Shun-Cheng; Wang, Gwo-Jaw; Chang, Je-Ken; Ho, Mei-Ling

    2012-07-01

    We previously reported that PTH(1-34) inhibits the terminal differentiation of articular chondrocytes and, in turn, suppresses the progression of osteoarthritis (OA). However, this treatment requires an injection of PTH(1-34) once every 3 days over the treatment period. In this study, we studied the effect of sustained administration of PTH(1-34) in a papain-induced OA rat model. We developed an effective controlled-release system for prolonging the treatment duration of an intra-articular injection for OA treatment in rats. The effects of released PTH(1-34) from PLGA(65:35)-encapsulated PTH(1-34) microspheres (PTH/PLGA) on papain-induced OA in rat knees were studied. Microsphere morphology was observed in vitro by scanning electron microscopy, and microsphere size was determined with a particle size analyzer. The PTH(1-34) encapsulation efficiency and release profile, as well as the toxicity of PTH/PLGA, were examined. The bioactivity of released PTH(1-34) was tested by examining cAMP levels in MC3T3E1 cells. In vivo, we evaluated the changes of localized GAG, Col II, and Col X in the articular cartilage of rat knees. Our results demonstrated that the surface of the PLGA microspheres was smooth, and the size of the microspheres was in the range of 51-127 μm. PTH/PLGA microspheres sustainably released PTH(1-34) for 19 days with a concentration range of 0.01-100 nM that covered the expected concentration of 10nM at 37°C. The cAMP levels of MC3T3E1 cells were elevated in the response to released PTH(1-34) from PTH/PLGA microspheres, indicating that the released PTH(1-34) is bioactive. Most importantly, intra-articular treatment with either PTH(1-34) (0.1-100 nM) 3 days/injection or PTH/PLGA microspheres (15 days/injection) for 5 weeks revealed the similar effect on suppressing papain-induced OA changes (decreasing GAG and Col II and increasing Col X) in rat knee cartilage. The effect of PTH/PLGA microspheres on suppressing OA progression was similar to that of a

  1. Compression molding of aerogel microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, R.W.; Hrubesh, L.W.

    1998-03-24

    An aerogel composite material produced by compression molding of aerogel microspheres (powders) mixed together with a small percentage of polymer binder to form monolithic shapes in a cost-effective manner is disclosed. The aerogel composites are formed by mixing aerogel microspheres with a polymer binder, placing the mixture in a mold and heating under pressure, which results in a composite with a density of 50--800 kg/m{sup 3} (0.05--0.80 g/cc). The thermal conductivity of the thus formed aerogel composite is below that of air, but higher than the thermal conductivity of monolithic aerogels. The resulting aerogel composites are attractive for applications such as thermal insulation since fabrication thereof does not require large and expensive processing equipment. In addition to thermal insulation, the aerogel composites may be utilized for filtration, ICF target, double layer capacitors, and capacitive deionization. 4 figs.

  2. Compression molding of aerogel microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, Richard W.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.

    1998-03-24

    An aerogel composite material produced by compression molding of aerogel microspheres (powders) mixed together with a small percentage of polymer binder to form monolithic shapes in a cost-effective manner. The aerogel composites are formed by mixing aerogel microspheres with a polymer binder, placing the mixture in a mold and heating under pressure, which results in a composite with a density of 50-800 kg/m.sup.3 (0.05-0.80 g/cc). The thermal conductivity of the thus formed aerogel composite is below that of air, but higher than the thermal conductivity of monolithic aerogels. The resulting aerogel composites are attractive for applications such as thermal insulation since fabrication thereof does not require large and expensive processing equipment. In addition to thermal insulation, the aerogel composites may be utilized for filtration, ICF target, double layer capacitors, and capacitive deionization.

  3. Microspherical resonators for biophotonic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenci, M.; Calzolai, R.; Cosi, F.; Nunzi Conti, G.; Pelli, S.; Righini, G. C.

    2006-02-01

    Nowadays biological sensing is representing a very active area of research due to the many possible applications in environmental control, food testing, pharmaceutical screening, and genetic analysis. A particular need exists for miniature biosensors for the detection of proteins, DNA, toxins and, more generally, infectious agents. Several optical techniques have proven to be quite effective, and biophotonics is a continuously growing discipline. Here we provide a quick overview of the recent progresses in the development of optical biosensors based on resonant cavities constituted by dielectric microspheres, where light propagation occurs through whispering-gallery modes (WGMs). The effect of any perturbation to the optical resonance structure of a microsphere is such that a very high sensitivity can be achieved.

  4. Nonaggregating Microspheres Containing Aldehyde Groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan

    1989-01-01

    Cobalt gamma irradiation of hydrophilic monomers in presence of acrolein yields exceptionally-stable, nonaggregating microspheres. Mixtures of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and acrolein form homogeneous solutions in distilled water containing 0.4 percent polyethylene oxide (PEO). After deaeration with nitrogen, mixtures irradiated at room temperature with gamma rays from cobalt source; total exposure time 4 hours, at rate of 0.2 milliroentgen per hour. Reaction product centrifuged three times for purification and kept in distilled water.

  5. Making Latex Microspheres in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kornfeld, D. M.; Vanderhoff, J. W.; El-Aasser, M. S.; Micale, F. J.; Sudol, E. D.; Tseng, C. M.; Silwanowicz, A.

    1986-01-01

    Equipment yields larger, more uniform particles. Two NASA reports describe first commercial product to be manufactured in space. Product monodisperse latex, suspension of spherical particles of essentially same diameter. Carried aboard Space Shuttle on its orbital missions, monodisperse latex reactor (MLR) produces spheres of much larger size than possible on Earth. Mircospheres 30 micrometers in diameter produced, whereas 5 micrometers is limit for Earthbound reactors. Microspheres as large as 100 micrometers scheduled for production in MLR.

  6. Microspheres in Plasma Display Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Filling small bubbles of molten glass with gases is just as difficult as it sounds, but the technical staff at NASA is not known to shy away from a difficult task. When Microsphere Systems, Inc. (MSI), of Ypsilanti, Michigan, and Imaging Systems Technology, Inc. (IST), of Toledo, Ohio, were trying to push the limits of plasma displays but were having difficulty with the designs, NASA s Glenn Garrett Morgan Commercialization Initiative (GMCI) assembled key personnel at Glenn Research Center and Ohio State University for a brainstorming session to come up with a solution for the companies. They needed a system that could produce hollow, glass micro-sized spheres (microspheres) that could be filled with a variety of gasses. But the extremely high temperature required to force the micro-sized glass bubbles to form at the tip of a metal nozzle resulted in severe discoloration of the microspheres. After countless experiments on various glass-metal combinations, they had turned to the GMCI for help. NASA experts in advanced metals, ceramics, and glass concluded that a new design approach was necessary. The team determined that what was needed was a phosphate glass composition that would remain transparent, and they went to work on a solution. Six weeks later, using the design tips from the NASA team, Tim Henderson, president of MSI, had designed a new system in which all surfaces in contact with the molten glass would be ceramic instead of metal. Meanwhile, IST was able to complete a Phase I Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and supply a potential customer with samples of the microspheres for evaluation as filler materials for high-performance insulations.

  7. Making Latex Microspheres in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kornfeld, D. M.; Vanderhoff, J. W.; El-Aasser, M. S.; Micale, F. J.; Sudol, E. D.; Tseng, C. M.; Silwanowicz, A.

    1986-01-01

    Equipment yields larger, more uniform particles. Two NASA reports describe first commercial product to be manufactured in space. Product monodisperse latex, suspension of spherical particles of essentially same diameter. Carried aboard Space Shuttle on its orbital missions, monodisperse latex reactor (MLR) produces spheres of much larger size than possible on Earth. Mircospheres 30 micrometers in diameter produced, whereas 5 micrometers is limit for Earthbound reactors. Microspheres as large as 100 micrometers scheduled for production in MLR.

  8. Preparation, Drug Releasing Property and Pharmacodynamics of Soy Isoflavone-Loaded Chitosan Microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Du, Zhongyan; Dou, Xiaobing; Huang, Chenyun; Gao, Jia; Hu, Linfeng; Zhu, Jiazhen; Qian, Ying; Dou, Minhua; Fan, Chunlei

    2013-01-01

    Soybean isoflavone (SIF) has anti-aging properties and many other biological functions; however, SIF is difficult to reach higher blood concentration due to its rapid metabolism. Therefore, it is of great value to design and produce a sustained-release formulation that is able to maintain a stable level of plasma concentrations. In this paper, soybean isoflavone sustained-release microsphere from chitosan and sodium alginate was prepared successfully. The important factors that determined the quality of the microspheres were the sodium alginate concentration in solution B, the ratio of soybean isoflavone to chitosan and the mixing speed. The relative yield, encapsulation efficiency and drug loading capability of SIF were much higher than the existing commercial formulations. In real gastrointestinal conditions, compared with the non-sustained release group, the release rate of SIF slowed down and the reaction time was prolonged. Animal experiments showed that sustained-release microspheres intensified the anti-aging potentials of SIF. Compared with the Non-sustained release (NSR) group mice, oral SIF/CHI microsphere treated mice were better in the Morris Water Maze Test (MWMT), the MDA level in the both plasma and brain of the sustained release(SR) group mice decreased, and SOD content was remarkably improved. PMID:24244544

  9. Oral Delivery of Exenatide via Microspheres Prepared by Cross-Linking of Alginate and Hyaluronate

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Baojie; He, Dongyang; Fan, Yu; Liu, Nan; Chen, Yijun

    2014-01-01

    Exenatide is an FDA-approved glucose-lowering peptide drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes by subcutaneous injection. To address the issues on the inconvenience for patient use and the difficulty of oral administration of peptide drugs, chemical cross-linking of two pH-responsive biomaterials, alginate and hyaluronate, was carried out to prepare a new material for the encapsulation of exenatide as a form of microspheres. The exenatide-loaded microspheres exhibited spherical structures with excellent loading and release behaviors in the simulated gastrointestinal tract environments. After oral administration of the microspheres in db/db mice, maximum plasma concentration of exenatide appeared at 4 hours, and blood glucose was effectively reduced to a normal level within 2 hours and maintained for another 4 hours. The bioavailability of the exenatide-loaded microspheres, relative to subcutaneous injection of exenatide, reached 10.2%. Collectively, the present study demonstrated the feasibility of orally delivering exenatide with the new cross-linked biomaterial and formulation, and showed therapeutic potential for clinical applications. PMID:24465870

  10. Activation of hindbrain neurons in response to gastrointestinal lipid is attenuated by high fat, high energy diets in mice prone to diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Michael J; Paulino, Gabriel; Raybould, Helen E

    2009-01-12

    Food intake is controlled by peripheral signals from the gastrointestinal tract and adipocytes, which are integrated within the central nervous system. There is evidence that signals from the GI tract are modulated by long term changes in diet, possibly leading to hyperphagia and increased body weight. We tested the hypothesis that diet-induced obese-prone (DIO-P) and obese-resistant (DIO-R) mice strains differ in the long term adaptive response of the gut-brain pathway to a high fat diet. Immunochemical detection of Fos protein was used as a measure of neuronal activation in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) in response to intragastric administration of lipid in DIO-P (C57Bl6) and DIO-R (129sv) mouse strains maintained on chow or high fat, high energy diets (45% or 60% kcal from fat). Intragastric lipid administration activated neurons in the NTS in both DIO-P and DIO-R mice; the number of activated neurons was significantly greater in DIO-P than in DIO-R mice (P<0.001). However, lipid-induced activation of NTS neurons in DIO-P mice was attenuated by approximately 30% after maintenance on either 45% or 60% HF diet, for 4 or 8 weeks, compared to chow fed controls (P<0.05). In contrast, in DIO-R mice, maintenance on a HF diet (45% or 60%) had no effect on lipid-induced activation of NTS neurons. These results demonstrate that DIO-P and DIO-R mice strains differ in the adaptation of the pathway to long term ingestion of high fat diets, which may contribute to decrease satiation and increased food intake.

  11. Molecular mechanism of telokin-mediated disinhibition of myosin light chain phosphatase and cAMP/cGMP-induced relaxation of gastrointestinal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Khromov, Alexander S; Momotani, Ko; Jin, Li; Artamonov, Mykhaylo V; Shannon, John; Eto, Masumi; Somlyo, Avril V

    2012-06-15

    Phospho-telokin is a target of elevated cyclic nucleotide concentrations that lead to relaxation of gastrointestinal and some vascular smooth muscles (SM). Here, we demonstrate that in telokin-null SM, both Ca(2+)-activated contraction and Ca(2+) sensitization of force induced by a GST-MYPT1(654-880) fragment inhibiting myosin light chain phosphatase were antagonized by the addition of recombinant S13D telokin, without changing the inhibitory phosphorylation status of endogenous MYPT1 (the regulatory subunit of myosin light chain phosphatase) at Thr-696/Thr-853 or activity of Rho kinase. Cyclic nucleotide-induced relaxation of force in telokin-null ileum muscle was reduced but not correlated with a change in MYPT1 phosphorylation. The 40% inhibited activity of phosphorylated MYPT1 in telokin-null ileum homogenates was restored to nonphosphorylated MYPT1 levels by addition of S13D telokin. Using the GST-MYPT1 fragment as a ligand and SM homogenates from WT and telokin KO mice as a source of endogenous proteins, we found that only in the presence of endogenous telokin, thiophospho-GST-MYPT1 co-precipitated with phospho-20-kDa myosin regulatory light chain 20 and PP1. Surface plasmon resonance studies showed that S13D telokin bound to full-length phospho-MYPT1. Results of a protein ligation assay also supported interaction of endogenous phosphorylated MYPT1 with telokin in SM cells. We conclude that the mechanism of action of phospho-telokin is not through modulation of the MYPT1 phosphorylation status but rather it contributes to cyclic nucleotide-induced relaxation of SM by interacting with and activating the inhibited full-length phospho-MYPT1/PP1 through facilitating its binding to phosphomyosin and thus accelerating 20-kDa myosin regulatory light chain dephosphorylation.

  12. Zinc and gastrointestinal disease

    PubMed Central

    Skrovanek, Sonja; DiGuilio, Katherine; Bailey, Robert; Huntington, William; Urbas, Ryan; Mayilvaganan, Barani; Mercogliano, Giancarlo; Mullin, James M

    2014-01-01

    This review is a current summary of the role that both zinc deficiency and zinc supplementation can play in the etiology and therapy of a wide range of gastrointestinal diseases. The recent literature describing zinc action on gastrointestinal epithelial tight junctions and epithelial barrier function is described. Zinc enhancement of gastrointestinal epithelial barrier function may figure prominently in its potential therapeutic action in several gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:25400994

  13. Risk factors associated with NSAID-induced upper gastrointestinal bleeding resulting in hospital admissions: A cross-sectional, retrospective, case series analysis in valencia, spain

    PubMed Central

    Marco, José Luis; Amariles, Pedro; Boscá, Beatriz; Castelló, Ana

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background NSAIDs are a significant cause of drug-related hospital admissions and deaths. The therapeutic effects of NSAIDs have been associated with the risk for developing adverse events, mainly in the gastrointestinal tract. Objectives The focus of this study was to identify the most common risk factors associated with NSAID-induced upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) resulting in hospital admissions. A secondary end point was the relationship between use of gastroprotective treatment and relevant risk factors to NSAID-induced UGIB in the selected population. Methods This study was a cross-sectional, retrospective, case-series analysis of NSAID-induced UGIB resulting in hospital admission to the Requena General Hospital, Valencia, Spain, occurring from 1997 to 2005. International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes were used to identify UGIB admissions associated with NSAIDs. To estimate the probability of association between UGIB and the use of NSAIDs, the Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability was used. Patients were categorized as high-risk to develop UGIB if they met ≥1 of the following risk criteria (relevant risk factors): aged ≥65 years (age risk factor); peptic ulcer disease or NSAID gastropathy occurring in the year before their hospital admission (history risk factor); and concomitant use of other NSAIDs, systemic corticoids, oral anticoagulants, or platelet aggregation inhibitors (concomitant medication risk factor). Patients were categorized as candidates to use gastroprotections if they met ≥1 of the relevant risk factors. Patients were categorized as users of gastroprotective treatment if they used proton pump inhibitors, histamine H2-receptor antagonists, or misoprostol at hospital admission. Results This study comprised 209 cases of NSAID-induced UGIB (129 men, 80 women: mean [SD] age, 71.5 [13.8] years; 128 [61.2%] receiving acetyl salicylic acid [ASA], with 72 [34.4%] receiving low

  14. 15-Hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase, a COX-2 oncogene antagonist, is a TGF-β-induced suppressor of human gastrointestinal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Min; Rerko, Ronald M.; Platzer, Petra; Dawson, Dawn; Willis, Joseph; Tong, Min; Lawrence, Earl; Lutterbaugh, James; Lu, Shilong; Willson, James K. V.; Luo, Guangbin; Hensold, Jack; Tai, Hsin-Hsiung; Wilson, Keith; Markowitz, Sanford D.

    2004-01-01

    Marked increased expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), a prostaglandin-synthesizing enzyme that is pharmacologically inhibited by nonsteroid anti-inflammatory-type drugs, is a major early oncogenic event in the genesis of human colon neoplasia. We report that, in addition to inducing expression of COX-2, colon cancers further target the prostaglandin biogenesis pathway by ubiquitously abrogating expression of 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH), a prostaglandin-degrading enzyme that physiologically antagonizes COX-2. We find that 15-PGDH transcript and protein are both highly expressed by normal colonic epithelia but are nearly undetectable in colon cancers. Using gene transfection to restore 15-PGDH expression in colon cancer cells strongly inhibits the ability of these cells to form tumors in immune-deficient mice and demonstrates 15-PGDH to have functional colon cancer tumor suppressor activity. In interrogating the mechanism for 15-PGDH expression loss in colon cancer, we determined that colonic 15-PGDH expression is directly controlled and strongly induced by activation of the TGF-β tumor suppressor pathway. These findings thus delineate an enzymatic pathway that induces colon cancer suppression, a pathway that is activated by TGF-β and mediated by 15-PGDH. PMID:15574495

  15. Taste masking microspheres for orally disintegrating tablets.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianchen; Bovet, Li Li; Zhao, Kang

    2008-07-09

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of microspheres for taste masking when incorporated into orally disintegrating tablets. The microspheres were produced by spray drying a mixture of the model compound (famotidine) with taste masking material. The spray process was optimized using a central composite design for two variables to obtain microspheres with desirable characteristics. Then the microspheres were mixed with other excipients to form orally disintegrating tablets. The optimal spray-drying process parameters were 34mg/ml for solid concentration and 7ml/min for feed rate. The drug encapsulation efficiency of the spray-dried microspheres ranges from of 37.59 to 61.56%, with a mean diameter of less than 10microm size and low moisture content (less than 4%). Results from an evaluation by a panel of six human volunteers demonstrated that the orally disintegrating tablets with taste masking microspheres improved the taste significantly. Furthermore, an in vivo study in rats showed that the microspheres neither decrease the bioavailability nor retard the release of famotidine significantly. In conclusion, spray-dried microspheres can effectively mask the bitter taste of the active pharmaceutical ingredients in combination with the orally disintegrating tablets.

  16. 21 CFR 870.1360 - Trace microsphere.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Trace microsphere. 870.1360 Section 870.1360 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... and Drug Administration on or before December 26, 1996 for any trace microsphere that was...

  17. 21 CFR 870.1360 - Trace microsphere.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Trace microsphere. 870.1360 Section 870.1360 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... and Drug Administration on or before December 26, 1996 for any trace microsphere that was...

  18. Microsphere estimates of blood flow: Methodological considerations

    SciTech Connect

    von Ritter, C.; Hinder, R.A.; Womack, W.; Bauerfeind, P.; Fimmel, C.J.; Kvietys, P.R.; Granger, D.N.; Blum, A.L. Louisianna State Univ. Medical Center, Shreveport Universitaire Vaudois )

    1988-02-01

    The microsphere technique is a standard method for measuring blood flow in experimental animals. Sporadic reports have appeared outlining the limitations of this method. In this study the authors have systematically assessed the effect of blood withdrawals for reference sampling, microsphere numbers, and anesthesia on blood flow estimates using radioactive microspheres in dogs. Experiments were performed on 18 conscious and 12 anesthetized dogs. Four blood flow estimates were performed over 120 min using 1 {times} 10{sup 6} microspheres each time. The effects of excessive numbers of microspheres pentobarbital sodium anesthesia, and replacement of volume loss for reference samples with dextran 70 were assessed. In both conscious and anesthetized dogs a progressive decrease in gastric mucosal blood flow and cardiac output was observed over 120 min. This was also observed in the pancreas in conscious dogs. The major factor responsible for these changes was the volume loss due to the reference sample withdrawals. Replacement of the withdrawn blood with dextran 70 led to stable blood flows to all organs. The injection of excessive numbers of microspheres did not modify hemodynamics to a greater extent than did the injection of 4 million microspheres. Anesthesia exerted no influence on blood flow other than raising coronary flow. The authors conclude that although blood flow to the gastric mucosa and the pancreas is sensitive to the minor hemodynamic changes associated with the microsphere technique, replacement of volume loss for reference samples ensures stable blood flow to all organs over a 120-min period.

  19. 21 CFR 870.1360 - Trace microsphere.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Trace microsphere. 870.1360 Section 870.1360 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1360 Trace microsphere. (a...

  20. 21 CFR 870.1360 - Trace microsphere.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Trace microsphere. 870.1360 Section 870.1360 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1360 Trace microsphere. (a...

  1. 21 CFR 870.1360 - Trace microsphere.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Trace microsphere. 870.1360 Section 870.1360 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1360 Trace microsphere. (a...

  2. A Model for Precise and Uniform Pelvic- and Limb-Sparing Abdominal Irradiation to Study the Radiation-Induced Gastrointestinal Syndrome in Mice Using Small Animal Irradiation Systems

    PubMed Central

    Brodin, N. Patrik; Velcich, Anna; Guha, Chandan

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Currently, no readily available mitigators exist for acute abdominal radiation injury. Here, we present an animal model for precise and homogenous limb-sparing abdominal irradiation (LSAIR) to study the radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome (RIGS). Materials and Methods: The LSAIR technique was developed using the small animal radiation research platform (SARRP) with image guidance capabilities. We delivered LSAIR at doses between 14 and 18 Gy on 8- to 10-week-old male C57BL/6 mice. Histological analysis was performed to confirm that the observed mortality was due to acute abdominal radiation injury. Results: A steep dose–response relationship was found for survival, with no deaths seen at doses below 16 Gy and 100% mortality at above 17 Gy. All deaths occurred between 6 and 10 days after irradiation, consistent with the onset of RIGS. This was further confirmed by histological analysis showing clear differences in the number of regenerative intestinal crypts between animals receiving sublethal (14 Gy) and 100% lethal (18 Gy) radiation. Conclusion: The developed LSAIR technique provides uniform dose delivery with a clear dose response, consistent with acute abdominal radiation injury on histological examination. This model can provide a useful tool for researchers investigating the development of mitigators for accidental or clinical high-dose abdominal irradiation. PMID:28203121

  3. Gastrectomy for the treatment of refractory gastric ulceration after radioembolization with 90Y microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Sun Young; Jung, Jin Yong; Kim, Chang Ha; Seo, Yeon Seok; Yim, Hyung Joon; Um, Soon Ho; Ryu, Ho Sang; Kim, Yun Hwan; Kim, Chong Suk; Shin, Eun

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter arterial radioembolization (TARE) with Yttrium-90 (90Y)-labeled microspheres has an emerging role in treatment of patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma. Although complication of TARE can be minimized by aggressive pre-evaluation angiography and preventive coiling of aberrant vessels, radioembolization-induced gastroduodenal ulcer can be irreversible and can be life-threatening. Treatment of radioembolization-induced gastric ulcer is challenging because there is a few reported cases and no consensus for management. We report a case of severe gastric ulceration with bleeding that eventually required surgery due to aberrant deposition of microspheres after TARE. PMID:25320734

  4. A pilot-scale study of Cryptosporidium-sized microsphere removals from swimming pools via sand filtration.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ping; Amburgey, James E

    2016-02-01

    Cryptosporidium species are the most common cause of gastrointestinal illness in treated recreational water venues. In order to protect public health during swimming, Cryptosporidium-sized microsphere removals by high-rate sand filtration with six coagulants were evaluated with a 5.5 m(3) pilot-scale swimming pool. A sand filter without coagulation removed 20-63% of Cryptosporidium-sized microspheres. Cryptosporidium-sized microsphere removals exceeded 98% by sand filtration with five of the six tested coagulants. Continuously feeding coagulants A, B, and F (i.e., organic polymers) led to coagulant accumulation in the system and decreased removals over time (<2 days). Coagulant E (polyaluminum chloride) consistently removed more than 90% of microspheres at 30 m/h while the removals dropped to approximately 50% at a filtration rate of 37 m/h. Coagulant C was a chitosan-based product that removed fewer microspheres compared with other products, <75%, under the studied conditions. Results indicated aluminum-based coagulants (coagulants D and E) had an overall performance advantage over the organic polymer based coagulants primarily in terms of their tendency not to accumulate in the water and cease to be effective at improving filter efficiency.

  5. Integrated Cryogenic Experiment (ICE) microsphere investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spradley, I.; Read, D.

    1989-09-01

    The main objective is to determine the performance of microsphere insulation in a 0-g environment and compare its performance to reference insulations such as multilayer insulation. The Lockheed Helium Extended-Life Dewar (HELD) is used to provide superfluid-helium cold sink for the experiment. The use of HELD allows the low-g dynamic properties of Passive Orbital Disconnect Struts (PODS) to be characterized and provides a flight demonstration of the PODS system. The thermal performance of microspheres in 1 and 0 g was predicted, a flight experiment was designed to determine microsphere thermal performance, and the interface was also designed between the experimental package and the shuttle through HELD and the Hitchhiker-M carrier. A single test cell was designed and fabricated. The cell was filled with uncoated glass microspheres and tested with a liquid-nitrogen cold sink. The data were found to agree with predictions of microsphere performance in 1 g.

  6. Integrated Cryogenic Experiment (ICE) microsphere investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spradley, I.; Read, D.

    1989-01-01

    The main objective is to determine the performance of microsphere insulation in a 0-g environment and compare its performance to reference insulations such as multilayer insulation. The Lockheed Helium Extended-Life Dewar (HELD) is used to provide superfluid-helium cold sink for the experiment. The use of HELD allows the low-g dynamic properties of Passive Orbital Disconnect Struts (PODS) to be characterized and provides a flight demonstration of the PODS system. The thermal performance of microspheres in 1 and 0 g was predicted, a flight experiment was designed to determine microsphere thermal performance, and the interface was also designed between the experimental package and the shuttle through HELD and the Hitchhiker-M carrier. A single test cell was designed and fabricated. The cell was filled with uncoated glass microspheres and tested with a liquid-nitrogen cold sink. The data were found to agree with predictions of microsphere performance in 1 g.

  7. Thermal response of chalcogenide microsphere resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, H; Aryanfar, I; Lim, K S; Chong, W Y; Harun, S W

    2012-05-31

    A chalcogenide microsphere resonator (CMR) used for temperature sensing is proposed and demonstrated. The CMR is fabricated using a simple technique of heating chalcogenide glass and allowing the molten glass to form a microsphere on the waist of a tapered silica fibre. The thermal responses of the CMR is investigated and compared to that of a single-mode-fibre (SMF) based microsphere resonator. It is observed that the CMR sensitivity to ambient temperature changes is 8 times higher than that of the SMF-based microsphere resonator. Heating the chalcogenide microsphere with a laser beam periodically turned on and off shows periodic shifts in the transmission spectrum of the resonator. By injecting an intensity-modulated cw signal through the resonator a thermal relaxation time of 55 ms is estimated.

  8. N-nitroso compounds in the gastrointestinal tract of rats and in the feces of mice with induced colitis or fed hot dogs or beef.

    PubMed

    Mirvish, Sidney S; Haorah, James; Zhou, Lin; Hartman, Melissa; Morris, Chantey R; Clapper, Marge L

    2003-03-01

    Because colonic N-nitroso compounds (NOC) may be a cause of colon cancer, we determined total NOC levels by Walters' method in the gastrointestinal tract and feces of rodents: (i) feces of C57BL mice fed chow and semi-purified diets contained 3.2 +/- 0.4 and 0.46 +/- 0.06 NOC/g, respectively (P < 0.01, mean +/- SD). (ii) NOC levels for gastrointestinal contents of three groups of Sprague-Dawley rats fed chow diet were 0.9 +/- 0.05 (diet), 0.2 +/- 0 (stomach), 0.3-0.4 (small intestine), 0.7-1.6 (cecum and colon) and 2.6 +/- 0.6 (feces) nmol/g. NOC precursor (NOCP) levels (measured as NOC after mild nitrosation) for two rat groups fed chow diet showed a 16-fold increase from stomach to proximal small intestine (mean, 6.2 micromol/g), and a 1.7-fold increase from distal colon to feces (mean, 11.6 micromol/g). (iii) Eight Min and five C57BL/6J mice received 4% dextran sulfate sodium in drinking water on days 1-4 to induce acute colitis. This increased fecal NOC levels 1.9-fold on day 5 in both strains (P < or = 0.04), probably due to NO synthase-derived nitrosating agents in the colon. (iv) Following studies on humans fed beef [Hughes et al. (2001) Carcinogenesis, 22, 199], Swiss mice received semi-purified diets mixed with 18% of beef plus pork hot dogs or sautéed beef for 7 days. On day 7, individual 24-h fecal NOC outputs were determined. In three hot dog and two beef groups with 5 mice/group, mean fecal NOC output/day was 3.7-5.0 (hot dog) and 2.0-2.9 (beef) times that for control groups fed semi-purified diet alone (P < 0.002 for each of combined groups). These groups showed little change in fecal NOCP output. (v) Initial purification of rat fecal NOCP by adsorption-desorption and HPLC is described. Results should help evaluate the view that colonic NOC causes colon cancer associated with colitis and ingestion of red and nitrite-preserved meat.

  9. Treatment with Saccharomyces boulardii reduces the inflammation and dysfunction of the gastrointestinal tract in 5-fluorouracil-induced intestinal mucositis in mice.

    PubMed

    Justino, Priscilla F C; Melo, Luis F M; Nogueira, Andre F; Costa, Jose V G; Silva, Luara M N; Santos, Cecila M; Mendes, Walber O; Costa, Marina R; Franco, Alvaro X; Lima, Aldo A; Ribeiro, Ronaldo A; Souza, Marcellus H L P; Soares, Pedro M G

    2014-05-01

    Intestinal mucositis is an important toxic side effect of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) treatment. Saccharomyces boulardii is known to protect from intestinal injury via an effect on the gastrointestinal microbiota. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of S. boulardii on intestinal mucositis induced by 5-FU in a murine model. Mice were divided into saline, saline (control)+5-FU or 5-FU+S. boulardii (16 × 10⁹ colony-forming units/kg) treatment groups, and the jejunum and ileum were removed after killing of mice for the evaluation of histopathology, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and non-protein sulfhydryl group (mainly reduced glutathione; GSH), nitrite and cytokine concentrations. To determine gastric emptying, phenol red was administered orally, mice were killed 20 min after administration, and the absorbance of samples collected from the mice was measured by spectrophotometry. Intestinal permeability was measured by the urinary excretion rate of lactulose and mannitol following oral administration. S. boulardii significantly reversed the histopathological changes in intestinal mucositis induced by 5-FU and reduced the inflammatory parameters: neutrophil infiltration (control 1·73 (SEM 0·37) ultrastructural MPO (UMPO)/mg, 5-FU 7·37 (SEM 1·77) UMPO/mg and 5-FU+S. boulardii 4·15 (SEM 0·73) UMPO/mg); nitrite concentration (control 37·00 (SEM 2·39) μm, 5-FU 59·04 (SEM 11·41) μm and 5-FU+S. boulardii 37·90 (SEM 5·78) μm); GSH concentration (control 477·60 (SEM 25·25) μg/mg, 5-FU 270·90 (SEM 38·50) μg/mg and 5-FU+S. boulardii 514·00 (SEM 38·64) μg/mg). Treatment with S. Boulardii significantly reduced the concentrations of TNF-α and IL-1β by 48·92 and 32·21 % in the jejunum and 38·92 and 61·79 % in the ileum. In addition, S. boulardii decreased the concentrations of chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 by 5-fold in the jejunum and 3-fold in the ileum. Interestingly, S. boulardii reduced the delay in gastric emptying

  10. Magnetically separable and recyclable Fe3O4-polydopamine hybrid hollow microsphere for highly efficient peroxidase mimetic catalysts.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shujun; Fu, Jianwei; Wang, Minghuan; Yan, Ya; Xin, Qianqian; Cai, Lu; Xu, Qun

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic Fe3O4-polydopamine (PDA) hybrid hollow microspheres, in which Fe3O4 nanoparticles were firmly incorporated in the cross-linked PDA shell, have been prepared through the formation of core/shell PS/Fe3O4-PDA composites based on template-induced covalent assembly method, followed by core removal in a tetrahydrofuran solution. The morphology, composition, thermal property and magnetic property of the magnetic hybrid hollow microspheres were characterized by SEM, TEM, FT-IR, XRD, TGA, and vibrating sample magnetometer, respectively. Results revealed that the magnetic hybrid hollow microspheres had about 380 nm of inner diameter and about 30 nm of shell thickness, and 13.6 emu g(-1) of magnetization saturation. More importantly, the Fe3O4-PDA hybrid hollow microspheres exhibited intrinsic peroxidase-like activity, as they could quickly catalyze the oxidation of typical substrates 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Compared with PDA/Fe3O4 composites where Fe3O4 nanoparticles were loaded on the surface of PDA microspheres, the stability of Fe3O4-PDA hybrid hollow microspheres was greatly improved. As-prepared magnetic hollow microspheres might open up a new application field in biodetection, biocatalysis, and environmental monitoring. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Budesonide-Loaded Guar Gum Microspheres for Colon Delivery: Preparation, Characterization and in Vitro/in Vivo Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ye; Zhou, Hong

    2015-01-01

    A novel budesonide (BUD) colon delivery release system was developed by using a natural polysaccharide, guar gum. The rigidity of the microspheres was induced by a chemical cross-linking method utilizing glutaraldehyde as the cross-linker. The mean particle size of the microspheres prepared was found to be 15.21 ± 1.32 µm. The drug loading and entrapment efficiency of the formulation were 17.78% ± 2.31% and 81.6% ± 5.42%, respectively. The microspheres were spherical in shape with a smooth surface, and the size was uniform. The in vitro release profiles indicated that the release of BUD from the microspheres exhibited a sustained release behavior. The model that fitted best for BUD released from the microspheres was the Higuchi kinetic model with a correlation coefficient r = 0.9993. A similar phenomenon was also observed in a pharmacokinetic study. The prolongation of the half-life (t1/2), enhanced residence time (mean residence time, MRT) and decreased total clearance (CL) indicated that BUD microspheres could prolong the acting time of BUD in vivo. In addition, BUD guar gum microspheres are thought to have the potential to maintain BUD concentration within target ranges for a long time, decreasing the side effects caused by concentration fluctuation, ensuring the efficiency of treatment and improving patient compliance by reducing dosing frequency. None of the severe signs, like the appearance of epithelial necrosis and the sloughing of epithelial cells, were detected. PMID:25629228

  12. Microentrapment of probiotic bacteria in a Ca(2+)-induced whey protein gel and effects on their viability in a dynamic gastro-intestinal model.

    PubMed

    Ainsley Reid, A; Vuillemard, J C; Britten, M; Arcand, Y; Farnworth, E; Champagne, C P

    2005-09-01

    Entrapping probiotic bacteria in gels with ionic cross-linking is typically achieved with polysaccharides (alginate, pectin, carraghenan). In this study, whey proteins were used for this purpose by carrying out the Ca(2+)-induced gelation of pre-heated whey protein isolate (WPI). A Lactobacillus rhamnosus cell suspension was added in a denatured WPI solution in a 30 : 70 volume ratio. Gelation was carried out by extrusion of the cell suspension in a CaCl(2) solution. Beads of approximately 3 mm diameter were formed. The population in the beads was 8.0 x 10(8) cells g(-1). Entrapment efficiency in gel beads was 96%, with a survival level of 23%. Scanning electron microscopy of beads before freeze-drying showed a tight protein network containing encapsulated Lb. rhamnosus cells homogeneously distributed throughout the matrix. The survival to freeze-drying of the bead-entrapped cells was 41%. Viability of microentrapped cells in a dynamic gastro-intestinal (GI) model was studied and the results were compared to free cells freeze-dried in a milk-based cryoprotective solution, as well as in a pre-denatured WPI solution. Results showed that protein gelation provided protection against acidic conditions in the stomach after 90 min, as well as against bile after 30, 60 and 90 min in the duodenum. Moreover, the milk-based cryoprotective solution was equally effective after 90 min in the duodenum. It is concluded that the gelation of whey proteins induced by Ca(2+) ions can protect the cells against adverse conditions of the GI system. However, certain stages in the entrapment process, particularly extrusion in the solution of CaCl(2), still need to be optimized in order to reduce the mortality of the cells during gelation.

  13. Chemotherapy-induced gastrointestinal toxicity is associated with changes in serum and urine metabolome and fecal microbiota in male Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Forsgård, Richard A; Marrachelli, Vannina G; Korpela, Katri; Frias, Rafael; Collado, Maria Carmen; Korpela, Riitta; Monleon, Daniel; Spillmann, Thomas; Österlund, Pia

    2017-08-01

    Chemotherapy-induced gastrointestinal toxicity (CIGT) is a complex process that involves multiple pathophysiological mechanisms. We have previously shown that commonly used chemotherapeutics 5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and irinotecan damage the intestinal mucosa and increase intestinal permeability to iohexol. We hypothesized that CIGT is associated with alterations in fecal microbiota and metabolome. Our aim was to characterize these changes and examine how they relate to the severity of CIGT. A total of 48 male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected intraperitoneally either with 5-fluorouracil (150 mg/kg), oxaliplatin (15 mg/kg), or irinotecan (200 mg/kg). Body weight change was measured daily after drug administration and the animals were euthanized after 72 h. Blood, urine, and fecal samples were collected at baseline and at the end of the experiment. The changes in the composition of fecal microbiota were analyzed with 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Metabolic changes in serum and urine metabolome were measured with 1 mm proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H-NMR). Irinotecan increased the relative abundance of Fusobacteria and Proteobacteria, while 5-FU and oxaliplatin caused only minor changes in the composition of fecal microbiota. All chemotherapeutics increased the levels of serum fatty acids and N(CH3)3 moieties and decreased the levels of Krebs cycle metabolites and free amino acids. Chemotherapeutic drugs, 5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and irinotecan, induce several microbial and metabolic changes which may play a role in the pathophysiology of CIGT. The observed changes in intestinal permeability, fecal microbiota, and metabolome suggest the activation of inflammatory processes.

  14. miRNA-221 and miRNA-222 induce apoptosis via the KIT/AKT signalling pathway in gastrointestinal stromal tumours.

    PubMed

    Ihle, Michaela Angelika; Trautmann, Marcel; Kuenstlinger, Helen; Huss, Sebastian; Heydt, Carina; Fassunke, Jana; Wardelmann, Eva; Bauer, Sebastian; Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich; Buettner, Reinhard; Merkelbach-Bruse, Sabine

    2015-08-01

    Aberrantly expressed microRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in many diseases including cancer. In gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) expression of miR-221 and miR-222 is reduced compared to control tissue and other sarcomas but the functional effects of this downregulation are not fully understood. This study aimed at evaluating the miR-221 and miR-222 expression profiles in different GIST subtypes and the functional role of these miRNAs. Expression of miR-221 and miR-222 was analysed in six KIT exon 9 and three KIT exon 11 mutated and nine wildtype GISTs by qPCR. Viability and apoptosis were examined in three different, KIT positive GIST cell lines (GIST882, GIST-T1 and GIST48) after overexpression of these miRNAs. The modulation of KIT and the PI3K/AKT pathways was determined by Western blot. Wildtype and KIT mutated GISTs revealed reduced miRNA expression compared to adequate control tissue. miRNA expression was lower for wildtype compared to mutated GISTs. Transient transfection of miR-221 and miR-222 reduced viability and induced apoptosis by inhibition of KIT expression and its phosphorylation and activation of caspases 3 and 7 in all three GIST cell lines. p-AKT, AKT and BCL2 expression was reduced after miRNA transfection whereas only slight influence on p-MTOR, MTOR and BCL2L11 (BIM) was detected. Our results demonstrate that miR-221 and miR-222 which are downregulated in wildtype and mutated GISTs, induce apoptosis in vitro by a signalling cascade involving KIT, AKT and BCL2. Therefore, overexpression of these miRNAs seems to functionally counteract oncogenic signalling pathways in GIST.

  15. Animals models of gastrointestinal and liver diseases. Animal models of alcohol-induced liver disease: pathophysiology, translational relevance, and challenges.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Stephanie; Xu, Mingjiang; Wang, Hua; Bertola, Adeline; Gao, Bin

    2014-05-15

    Over the last four decades, chronic ethanol feeding studies in rodents using either ad libitum feeding or intragastric infusion models have significantly enhanced our understanding of the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Recently, we developed a chronic plus binge alcohol feeding model in mice that is similar to the drinking patterns of many alcoholic hepatitis patients: a history of chronic drinking and recent excessive alcohol consumption. Chronic+binge ethanol feeding synergistically induced steatosis, liver injury, and neutrophil infiltration in mice, which may be useful for the study of early alcoholic liver injury and inflammation. Using this chronic+binge model, researchers have begun to identify novel mechanisms that participate in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver injury, thereby revealing novel therapeutic targets. In this review article, we briefly discuss several mouse models of ALD with a focus on the chronic+binge ethanol feeding model.

  16. Selective gastrointestinal uptake of ALA and its benefits for laserlight-induced fluorescence diagnostics (LIFD) and photodynamic therapy (PDT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pressmar, Jochen; Stern, Josef; Boehm, J.; Kohl, B.; Gahlen, Johannes

    1997-12-01

    LIFD and PDT are based on the selective uptake of photosensitizers resp. the selective metabolism of their precursors in malignant tissue. Excitation with laserlight results in fluorescence or phototoxic reactions which can be used for the detection or destruction of colorectal carcinoma and dysplasia. General photosensibilization resulting in an increased photosensitivity of the whole body represents the main side and necessitates avoidance of daylight for days up to weeks. Local application of (delta) - aminolevulinic acid (ALA) may reduce systemic uptake. Rats with DMH induced colorectal cancer were photosensitized for LIFD by oral, intravenous or local application of ALA. Urine concentrations of ALA and porphobilinogen (PBG) representing systemic photosensibilization were determined by two-column chromatography. Local colon application of ALA not only increases the quality of LIFD of colorectal cancer, it also provokes three times lower concentrations of PBG in comparison to oral or intravenous administration and reduces in consequence general photosensibilization.

  17. Microsphere-based scaffolds encapsulating chondroitin sulfate or decellularized cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vineet; Tenny, Kevin M; Barragan, Marilyn; Berkland, Cory J; Detamore, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular matrix materials such as decellularized cartilage (DCC) and chondroitin sulfate (CS) may be attractive chondrogenic materials for cartilage regeneration. The goal of the current study was to investigate the effects of encapsulation of DCC and CS in homogeneous microsphere-based scaffolds, and to test the hypothesis that encapsulation of these extracellular matrix materials would induce chondrogenesis of rat bone marrow stromal cells. Four different types of homogeneous scaffolds were fabricated from microspheres of poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid): Blank (poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) only; negative control), transforming growth factor-β3 encapsulated (positive control), DCC encapsulated, and CS encapsulated. These scaffolds were then seeded with rat bone marrow stromal cells and cultured for 6 weeks. The DCC and CS encapsulation altered the morphological features of the microspheres, resulting in higher porosities in these groups. Moreover, the mechanical properties of the scaffolds were impacted due to differences in the degree of sintering, with the CS group exhibiting the highest compressive modulus. Biochemical evidence suggested a mitogenic effect of DCC and CS encapsulation on rat bone marrow stromal cells with the matrix synthesis boosted primarily by the inherently present extracellular matrix components. An important finding was that the cell seeded CS and DCC groups at week 6 had up to an order of magnitude higher glycosaminoglycan contents than their acellular counterparts. Gene expression results indicated a suppressive effect of DCC and CS encapsulation on rat bone marrow stromal cell chondrogenesis with differences in gene expression patterns existing between the DCC and CS groups. Overall, DCC and CS were easily included in microsphere-based scaffolds; however, there is a requirement to further refine their concentrations to achieve the differentiation profiles we seek in vitro. PMID:27358376

  18. Solid evacuated microspheres of hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Turnbull, Robert J.; Foster, Christopher A.; Hendricks, Charles D.

    1982-01-01

    A method is provided for producing solid, evacuated microspheres comprised of hydrogen. The spheres are produced by forming a jet of liquid hydrogen and exciting mechanical waves on the jet of appropriate frequency so that the jet breaks up into drops with a bubble formed in each drop by cavitation. The drops are exposed to a pressure less than the vapor pressure of the liquid hydrogen so that the bubble which is formed within each drop expands. The drops which contain bubbles are exposed to an environment having a pressure just below the triple point of liquid hydrogen and they thereby freeze giving solid, evacuated spheres of hydrogen.

  19. Nuclear fuel microsphere gamma analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Valentine, Kenneth H.; Long, Jr., Ernest L.; Willey, Melvin G.

    1977-01-01

    A gamma analyzer system is provided for the analysis of nuclear fuel microspheres and other radioactive particles. The system consists of an analysis turntable with means for loading, in sequence, a plurality of stations within the turntable; a gamma ray detector for determining the spectrum of a sample in one section; means for analyzing the spectrum; and a receiver turntable to collect the analyzed material in stations according to the spectrum analysis. Accordingly, particles may be sorted according to their quality; e.g., fuel particles with fractured coatings may be separated from those that are not fractured, or according to other properties.

  20. Facile fabrication of porous ZnO microspheres by thermal treatment of ZnS microspheres.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao; Li, KunWei; Wang, Hao

    2010-02-15

    Porous ZnO microspheres with an average size of around 500 nm had been synthesized by thermal treatment of ZnS microspheres in an air atmosphere. The ZnS spheres had been synthesized at a low temperature of 100 degrees C by using L-cysteine (an ordinary amino acid) as a sulfur source with the assist of gelatin. By combining the results of X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), and Fourier transformation infrared spectra (FTIR), a structural and morphological characterization of the products was performed. The photocatalytic activity of ZnS microspheres and porous ZnO microspheres have been tested by degradation of Rhodamine-B (RB) under UV light, indicating that the porous ZnO microspheres showed enhanced photocatalytic performance compared to ZnS microspheres and commercial Degussa P25 TiO(2).

  1. Adipose-Derived Stem Cell Delivery into Collagen Gels Using Chitosan Microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Natesan, Shanmugasundaram; Baer, David G.; Walters, Thomas J.; Babu, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Integration of stem cells to injured tissues requires an appropriate delivery device and scaffolding system. In the present study we have developed an in vitro strategy to load and release adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASC) from chitosan microspheres (CSM) into a collagen gel scaffold. Porous CSM of uniform size and composition were prepared and used as a stem cell carrier. ASC were allowed to attach to the microspheres and infiltrate through the microsphere pores. The number of viable cells was counted in vitro, using MTT and Calcein acetoxymethyl ester (AM) assays, and it showed a proportional increase with seeding density and reached a maximum cell number by 24 h. The cells inside the microspheres remained metabolically active and viable, could be retrieved from the spheres, and maintained expression of stem-cell-specific markers. Electron microscopic evaluation of the cell–microsphere complex showed that the CSM were able to support cell attachment and that the cells had infiltrated into the pores of the microspheres. The ability of the cells to proliferate and differentiate into adipogenic- and osteogenic-like precursors indicates that the cells have maintained their multipotency after migration out of the microspheres. To mimic cell delivery into a tissue, ASC-loaded CSM were embedded in type-1 collagen scaffold by mixing them with type-1 collagen solution while inducing gelation. By 14 days the cells released into the collagen gel and were able to populate the entire scaffold. When observed through transmission electron microscopy, the cells align along the collagen fibrils with a characteristic fibroblast-like morphology. This study provides a model to capture pluripotent stem cells, expand their cell number within a biomaterial scaffold in vitro, and deliver within an appropriate matrix to repair damaged tissue. PMID:19916819

  2. Microsphere microscopic imaging with the coherent light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Sha; Wang, Yunxin; Wang, Dayong; Lin, Qiaowen; Rong, Lu

    2016-10-01

    The microsphere has great potential to improve the resolution of the system. The high frequency information of the object can be collected by the microsphere to enhance the imaging resolution. However, the unavoidable chromatic dispersion exists in the microsphere incoherence imaging, which reduces the image quality. In this paper, the microsphere microscopy system is designed with the coherent light. The polystyrene (PS) microspheres with the diameter of 50μm and 90μm are applied, and their refractive index is 1.59. The object is a transmission grating with a cycle of 1.2μm and line spacing of 600 nm. The result indicates that the grating can be clearly detected, and the magnification of the microsphere with the diameter of 50μm and 90μm is 2.33 and 1.96 respectively. Comparing with the traditional white light microscopy, the imaging contrast has been improved though the speckle noise is introduced for coherent light. Therefore the microsphere has the potential to improve the resolution of the phase-contrast imaging.

  3. Bisphosphonate release profiles from magnetite microspheres.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Toshiki; Inoue, Tatsuya; Shirosaki, Yuki; Kawashita, Masakazu; Matsubara, Takao; Matsumine, Akihiko

    2014-10-01

    Hyperthermia has been suggested as a novel, minimally invasive cancer treatment method. After implantation of magnetic nano- or microparticles around a tumour through blood vessels, irradiation with alternating magnetic fields facilitates the efficient in situ hyperthermia even for deep-seated tumours. On the basis of this idea, if the microspheres are capable of delivering drugs, they could be promising multifunctional biomaterials effective for chemotherapy as well as hyperthermia. In the present study, magnetite microspheres were prepared by aggregation of the iron oxide colloid in water-in-oil (W/O) emulsion. The release behaviour of alendronate, a typical bisphosphonate, from the microspheres was examined in vitro as a model of the bone tumour prevention and treatment system. The alendronate was successfully incorporated onto the porous magnetite microspheres in vacuum conditions. The drug-loaded microspheres maintained their original spherical shapes even after shaking in ultrapure water for 3 days, suggesting that they have sufficient mechanical integrity for clinical use. It was attributed to high aggregation capability of the magnetite nanoparticles through van der Waals and weak magnetic attractions. The microspheres showed slow release of the alendronate in vitro, resulting from tight covalent or ionic interaction between the magnetite and the alendronate. The release rate was diffusion-controlled type and well controlled by the alendronate concentration in drug incorporation to the microspheres.

  4. [The effects of high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet on body weight and the expression of gastrointestinal hormones in diet-induced obesity rat].

    PubMed

    Chen, Hai-yan; Ma, Li-chuan; Li, Yin-yin; Zhao, Jia-jun; Li, Ming-long

    2011-02-01

    To investigate the effects of long-term high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet on body weight and the expression of gastrointestinal hormones in diet-induced obesity rats. Twenty-four diet-induced obesity rat models were established by feeding fat-enriched diet, then were randomly divided into two groups by stratified sampling method by weight: the high-protein diet group (HP, 36.7% of energy from protein), and the normal chow group (NC, 22.4% of energy from protein), 12 rats in each group. The total calorie intake of each rat per day was similar and was maintained for 24 weeks, then body weight, visceral fat mass, fasting plasma ghrelin and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) were determined, as well as protein expression of ghrelin in stomach, GLP-1 in ileum were detected by immunohistochemistry. After 24 weeks, body weight of HP, NC groups were (490.92 ± 39.47) g and (545.55 ± 31.08) g, respectively (t = -3.664, P < 0.01); visceral fat mass were (22.42 ± 7.04) g and (32.33 ± 9.27) g, respectively (t = -2.503, P < 0.05); plasma ghrelin level were (2.36 ± 0.82) and (1.95 ± 0.64) ng/ml, respectively (t = 1.337, P > 0.05), and plasma ghrelin level was negatively correlated to body weight (r = -0.370, t = -1.899, P < 0.05), visceral fat mass (r = -0.454, t = -2.52, P < 0.01); plasma GLP-1 concentration were (0.52 ± 0.13) and (0.71 ± 0.19) ng/ml, respectively(t = -2.758, P < 0.05); ghrelin protein expression in stomach were 25 473 ± 8701 and 10 526 ± 6194, respectively (t = 2.501, P < 0.05); GLP-1 protein expression in ileum were 27 431 ± 5813 and 36 601 ± 5083, respectively (t = -1.833, P = 0.081). Long-term isocaloric high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet can reduce body weight and visceral fat, increase the expression of ghrelin, and decline GLP-1 expression in diet-induced obesity rats.

  5. Silver clear nylon dressing is effective in preventing radiation-induced dermatitis in patients with lower gastrointestinal cancer: results from a phase III study.

    PubMed

    Niazi, Tamim M; Vuong, Te; Azoulay, Laurant; Marijnen, Corrie; Bujko, Kryzstof; Nasr, Elie; Lambert, Christine; Duclos, Marie; Faria, Sergio; David, Marc; Cummings, Bernard

    2012-11-01

    For patients with anal canal and advanced rectal cancer, chemoradiation therapy is a curative modality or an important adjunct to surgery. Nearly all patients treated with chemoradiation experience some degree of radiation-induced dermatitis (RID). Prevention and effective treatment of RID, therefore, is of considerable clinical relevance. The present phase III randomized trial compared the efficacy of silver clear nylon dressing (SCND) with that of standard skin care for these patients. A total of 42 rectal or anal canal cancer patients were randomized to either a SCND or standard skin care group. SCND was applied from Day 1 of radiation therapy (RT) until 2 weeks after treatment completion. In the control arm, sulfadiazine cream was applied at the time of skin dermatitis. Printed digital photographs taken 2 weeks prior to, on the last day, and two weeks after the treatment completion were scored by 10 blinded readers, who used the common toxicity scoring system for skin dermatitis. The radiation dose ranged from 50.4 to 59.4 Gy, and there were no differences between the 2 groups. On the last day of RT, when the most severe RID occurs, the mean dermatitis score was 2.53 (standard deviation [SD], 1.17) for the standard and 1.67 (SD, 1.2; P=.01) for the SCND arm. At 2 weeks after RT, the difference was 0.39 points in favor of SCND (P=.39). There was considerable intraclass correlation among the 10 observers. Silver clear nylon dressing is effective in reducing RID in patients with lower gastrointestinal cancer treated with combined chemotherapy and radiation treatment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Silver Clear Nylon Dressing is Effective in Preventing Radiation-Induced Dermatitis in Patients With Lower Gastrointestinal Cancer: Results From a Phase III Study

    SciTech Connect

    Niazi, Tamim M.; Vuong, Te; Azoulay, Laurant; Marijnen, Corrie; Bujko, Kryzstof; Nasr, Elie; Lambert, Christine; Duclos, Marie; Faria, Sergio; David, Marc; Cummings, Bernard

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: For patients with anal canal and advanced rectal cancer, chemoradiation therapy is a curative modality or an important adjunct to surgery. Nearly all patients treated with chemoradiation experience some degree of radiation-induced dermatitis (RID). Prevention and effective treatment of RID, therefore, is of considerable clinical relevance. The present phase III randomized trial compared the efficacy of silver clear nylon dressing (SCND) with that of standard skin care for these patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 42 rectal or anal canal cancer patients were randomized to either a SCND or standard skin care group. SCND was applied from Day 1 of radiation therapy (RT) until 2 weeks after treatment completion. In the control arm, sulfadiazine cream was applied at the time of skin dermatitis. Printed digital photographs taken 2 weeks prior to, on the last day, and two weeks after the treatment completion were scored by 10 blinded readers, who used the common toxicity scoring system for skin dermatitis. Results: The radiation dose ranged from 50.4 to 59.4 Gy, and there were no differences between the 2 groups. On the last day of RT, when the most severe RID occurs, the mean dermatitis score was 2.53 (standard deviation [SD], 1.17) for the standard and 1.67 (SD, 1.2; P=.01) for the SCND arm. At 2 weeks after RT, the difference was 0.39 points in favor of SCND (P=.39). There was considerable intraclass correlation among the 10 observers. Conclusions: Silver clear nylon dressing is effective in reducing RID in patients with lower gastrointestinal cancer treated with combined chemotherapy and radiation treatment.

  7. Postnatal weight gain induced by overfeeding pups and maternal high-fat diet during the lactation period modulates glucose metabolism and the production of pancreatic and gastrointestinal peptides.

    PubMed

    Du, Qinwen; Hosoda, Hiroshi; Umekawa, Takashi; Kinouchi, Toshi; Ito, Natsuki; Miyazato, Mikiya; Kangawa, Kenji; Ikeda, Tomoaki

    2015-08-01

    The impact of rapid weight gain on glucose metabolism during the early postnatal period remains unclear. We investigated the influence of rapid weight gain under different nutritional conditions on glucose metabolism, focusing on the production of pancreatic and gastric peptides. On postnatal day (PND) 2, C57BL/6N pups were divided into three groups: control (C) pups whose dams were fed a control diet (10%kcal fat) and nursed 10 pups each; maternal high-fat diet (HFD) pups whose dams were fed an HFD (45%kcal fat) and nursed 10 pups each; and overfeeding (OF) pups whose dams were fed the control diet and nursed 4 pups each. Data were collected on PND 7, 14 and 21. The body weight gains of the HFD and OF pups were 1.2 times higher than that of the C pups. On PND 14, the HFD pups had higher blood glucose levels, but there were no significant differences in serum insulin levels between the HFD and C pups. The OF pups had higher blood glucose and serum insulin levels than that of the C pups. Insulin resistance was found in the HFD and OF pups. On PND 14, the content of incretins in the jejunum was increased in the OF pups, and acyl ghrelin in the stomach was upregulated in the HFD and OF pups. These results suggest that neonatal weight gain induced by overfeeding pups and maternal high-fat diet during the early postnatal period modulates the insulin sensitivity and the production of pancreatic and gastrointestinal peptides.

  8. Detection of DSS-induced gastrointestinal mucositis in mice by non-invasive optical near-infrared (NIR) imaging of cathepsin activity.

    PubMed

    Finnberg, Niklas K; Liu, Yvette; El-Deiry, Wafik S

    2013-08-01

    Approximately 1.4 million people of the US population suffer from Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) of which the most common conditions are ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn disease (CD). Colonoscopy and small bowel follow through are considered the current gold standard in diagnosing IBD. However, improved imaging and increased diagnostic sensitivity could be beneficial. Optical molecular imaging has the potential to become a powerful and practical tool for early detection, image-guided biopsy, and surgery in diagnosing and treating patients with IBD. Here we used a well characterized chemical model to initiate experimental IBD in mice by feeding with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) containing drinking water in an attempt to investigate the utility of non-invasive infrared (NIR) optical imaging in the detection gastrointestinal (GI) injury. We employed a "smart probe" (ProSense680) cleaved and fluorescently activated in the NIR-spectrum by various forms of secreted cathepsins. This probe has previously been shown to serve as a biomarker for the homing of inflammatory cells to injury. Our investigation suggests that NIR optical imaging can detect cathepsin-dependent probe cleavage non-invasively in animals with DSS-induced IBD. Increased tissue probe-retention and fluorescence was associated with increased infiltration of inflammatory cells, epithelial atrophy and sterilization of the mucosa. Furthermore, using NIR-imaging ex vivo we were able to document regional "hot spots" of inflammatory damage to the large intestine suggesting this method potentially could be coupled with colonoscopy investigation to aid in the sampling and the diagnostics of IBD.

  9. Gastrointestinal Morbidity in Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Andres; Camilleri, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a complex disease that results from increased energy intake and decreased energy expenditure. The gastrointestinal system plays a key role in the pathogenesis of obesity and facilitates caloric imbalance. Changes in gastrointestinal hormones and the inhibition of mechanisms that curtail caloric intake result in weight gain. It is not clear if the gastrointestinal role in obesity is a cause or an effect of this disease. Obesity is often associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Obesity is also associated with gastrointestinal disorders, which are more frequent and present earlier than T2DM and CVD. Diseases such as gastro-esophageal reflux disease, cholelithiasis or non-alcoholic steatohepatitis are directly related to body weight and abdominal adiposity. Our objective is to assess the role of each gastrointestinal organ in obesity and the gastrointestinal morbidity resulting in those organs from effects of obesity. PMID:24602085

  10. Aggregation, Gelation and Glass Transition in Mixed Suspension of Polystyrene Microsphere and Poly(N-isopropyl-acrylamide) Microgel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Guangcui; Zhao, Chuanzhuang; Han, Charles; Joint Laboratory Of Polymer Science; Materials, Iccas Team

    2013-03-01

    Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) microgel is adsorbable to the polystyrene microsphere surface. The saturated adsorption concentration of microgel (Φ*MG) is in a linear relationship with the given concentration of microsphere (ΦMS) . Depending on the concentration of microgel (ΦMG) added into the suspension microspheres, the microgel can induce bridging (ΦMG < Φ*MG) , stabilizing (ΦMG = Φ*MG) and depletion (ΦMG > Φ*MG) effect. With combination of various ΦMS and ΦMG/ Φ*MG , different structures including stable solution, bridging and depletion cluster, bridging and depletion gel, attractive glass and repulsive glass, were obtained. The transitions between these states were investigated by rheology and microscopy. Two-step yielding behavior was observed in attractive glass, which was contributed from bridging bonds of microgels and caging effect of dense microspheres. This work is supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (973 Program, 2012CB821503)

  11. Long-Term Subconjunctival Delivery of Brimonidine Tartrate for Glaucoma Treatment Using a Microspheres/Carrier System.

    PubMed

    Pek, Y Shona; Wu, Hong; Mohamed, Siti Thaharah; Ying, Jackie Y

    2016-11-01

    Core-shell polymer microspheres with poly(d,l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) core and poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) shell are developed for the long-term subconjunctival release of brimonidine tartrate (BT) in order to reduce intraocular pressure (IOP) in the treatment of glaucoma. The PLLA-rich shell acts as a diffusion barrier, enabling linear release of BT over an extended period of 40 d. The microspheres are encased in a porous non-degradable methacrylate-based carrier for ease of subconjunctival implantation in a glaucoma-induced rabbit model. In vivo release of BT from the microspheres/carrier system has enabled a significant, immediate IOP reduction of 20 mmHg, which is sustained for 55 d. Long-term IOP reduction may be maintained by periodic replacement of the microspheres/carrier system.

  12. Fiber taper coupling to chalcogenide microsphere modes

    SciTech Connect

    Grillet, Christian; Bian Shuning; Magi, Eric C.; Eggleton, Benjamin J.

    2008-04-28

    We report the fabrication and optical characterization of microsphere in chalcogenide (As{sub 2}Se{sub 3}). We show that high Q modes of a 9.2 {mu}m diameter chalcogenide glass can be efficiently excited via evanescent coupling using a silica tapered fiber. Loaded Q factors of more than 20 000 have been measured. Fine analysis of the coupling spectrum around 1619 nm led to an estimation of the microsphere eccentricity of less than 1%. Owing to the unique combination properties of chalcogenide glass and the microspheres geometry, we expect this architecture to offer an ideal environment for versatile applications on both the telecommunication and midinfrared wavelength windows.

  13. Electrorotation of titanium microspheres.

    PubMed

    Arcenegui, Juan J; Ramos, Antonio; García-Sánchez, Pablo; Morgan, Hywel

    2013-04-01

    Electrorotation (ROT) data for solid titanium micrometer-sized spheres in an electrolyte are presented for three different ionic conductivities, over the frequency range of 10 Hz to 100 kHz. The direction of rotation was found to be opposite to the direction of rotation of the electric field vector (counterfield electrorotation), with a single rotation peak. The maximum rotation rate occurs at a frequency of the order of the reciprocal RC time constant for charging the particle double layer capacitance through the resistor of the electrolyte bulk. A model for the electrical torque acting on a metallic sphere is presented, using a constant phase element impedance to describe the metal/electrolyte interface. The titanium spheres are much denser than the electrolyte and rest on the bottom substrate. Therefore, the electrical and viscous torques near a wall are considered in the analysis. Good agreement is found between the predicted and measured rotational speed as a function of frequency. Theory shows that there is no effect of induced charge electroosmotic flow on the ROT, as observed experimentally.

  14. Characterization of a Polyamine Microsphere and Its Adsorption for Protein

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Liu, Pei; Nie, Tingting; Wei, Huixian; Cui, Zhenggang

    2013-01-01

    A novel polyamine microsphere, prepared from the water-in-oil emulsion of polyethylenimine, was characterized. The investigation of scanning electron microscopy showed that the polyamine microsphere is a regular ball with a smooth surface. The diameter distribution of the microsphere is 0.37–4.29 μm. The isoelectric point of the microsphere is 10.6. The microsphere can adsorb proteins through the co-effect of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. Among the proteins tested, the highest value of adsorption of microsphere, 127.8 mg·g−1 microsphere, was obtained with lipase. In comparison with other proteins, the hydrophobic force is more important in promoting the adsorption of lipase. The microsphere can preferentially adsorb lipase from an even mixture of proteins. The optimum temperature and pH for the selective adsorption of lipase by the microsphere was 35 °C and pH 7.0. PMID:23344018

  15. Cytotoxicity and antitumour activity of 5-fluorouracil-loaded polyhydroxybutyrate and cellulose acetate phthalate blend microspheres.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Kiran; Tripathi, Santosh Kumar; Kulkarni, Anandrao R; Aminabhavi, Tejraj M

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and antitumour activity of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-loaded polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) and cellulose acetate phthalate (CAP) blend microspheres were investigated in chemically induced colorectal cancer in albino male Wistar rats and compared with pristine 5-FU given as a suspension. The microspheres were characterised for particle size, encapsulation efficiency, in vitro release and in vitro cytotoxicity on human HT-29 colon cancer cell line. Spherical particles with a mean size of 44 ± 11 µm were obtained that showed sustained release of 5-FU. A high concentration of 5-FU was achieved in colonic tissues and significant reduction in tumour volume and multiplicity were observed in animals treated with 5-FU-loaded microspheres. The decreased levels of plasma albumin, creatinine, leucocytopenia and thrombocytopenia were observed in animals for 5-FU microspheres compared to the standard 5-FU formulation. The results suggest the extended release of 5-FU from the PHB-CAP blend microspheres in colonic region to enhance the antitumour efficacy.

  16. The Gastrointestinal Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Engen, Phillip A.; Green, Stefan J.; Voigt, Robin M.; Forsyth, Christopher B.; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The excessive use of alcohol is a global problem causing many adverse pathological health effects and a significant financial health care burden. This review addresses the effect of alcohol consumption on the microbiota in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Although data are limited in humans, studies highlight the importance of changes in the intestinal microbiota in alcohol-related disorders. Alcohol-induced changes in the GIT microbiota composition and metabolic function may contribute to the well-established link between alcohol-induced oxidative stress, intestinal hyperpermeability to luminal bacterial products, and the subsequent development of alcoholic liver disease (ALD), as well as other diseases. In addition, clinical and preclinical data suggest that alcohol-related disorders are associated with quantitative and qualitative dysbiotic changes in the intestinal microbiota and may be associated with increased GIT inflammation, intestinal hyperpermeability resulting in endotoxemia, systemic inflammation, and tissue damage/organ pathologies including ALD. Thus, gut-directed interventions, such as probiotic and synbiotic modulation of the intestinal microbiota, should be considered and evaluated for prevention and treatment of alcohol-associated pathologies. PMID:26695747

  17. The efficacy of an ivermectin/closantel injection against experimentally induced infections and field infections with gastrointestinal nematodes and liver fluke in cattle.

    PubMed

    Borgsteede, Fred H M; Taylor, Stuart M; Gaasenbeek, Cor P H; Couper, Alistair; Cromie, Lillian

    2008-08-17

    Three studies were performed to test the efficacy of an ivermectin/closantel injection (200 microg/kg(-1) ivermectin and 5 mg/kg(-1) closantel) in cattle. Two were experimentally induced infections of Ostertagia ostertagi, Cooperia oncophora and Fasciola hepatica in calves, and the third had natural field infections in cattle with several species of gastrointestinal nematodes and F. hepatica. In the two studies with artificial infections, four groups of 8 calves were used. All calves were infected with metacercariae on Day 0. Infection with the nematodes took place on Day 33 in groups 1 and 2 and on Day 54 in groups 3 and 4. Treatment was given to calves of group 1 on Day 63 and to calves of group 3 on Day 84. Calves of groups 2 and 4 served as untreated control groups. Calves of groups 1 and 2 were sacrificed on Day 84, calves of groups 3 and 4 on Day 105. The field study was carried out on a commercial farm in the Netherlands. Six groups of cattle were used. Groups A and B consisted of 10 parasite free calves, introduced to the farm and grazed for four weeks on pastures naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematode larvae and liver fluke metacercariae. Group C were the farmers own calves (15), group D heifers (10), group E dry cows (6) and group F milking cows (20). Treatment was given to animals of group A, C, D and E 10 weeks after housing of group A and B. Animals of groups B and F served as untreated controls. Calves of groups A and B were sacrificed 14 days after treatment. The efficacy of the treatment was calculated on basis of the post-mortem fluke and nematode worm counts in the first two studies and on a combination of post-mortem fluke and nematode worm counts and faecal egg output in the field study. In the two experimental studies, the efficacy of the treatment against F. hepatica was 99.2% and 94.5% for 9-week-old flukes and 98.4% and 99.5% for 12-week-old flukes. For O. ostertagi in both studies efficacy was 100% and against C. oncophora in

  18. Organic aerogel microspheres and fabrication method therefor

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, Steven T.; Kong, Fung-Ming; Pekala, Richard W.; Kaschmitter, James L.

    1996-01-01

    Organic aerogel microspheres which can be used in capacitors, batteries, thermal insulation, adsorption/filtration media, and chromatographic packings, having diameters ranging from about 1 micron to about 3 mm. The microspheres can be pyrolyzed to form carbon aerogel microspheres. This method involves stirring the aqueous organic phase in mineral oil at elevated temperature until the dispersed organic phase polymerizes and forms nonsticky gel spheres. The size of the microspheres depends on the collision rate of the liquid droplets and the reaction rate of the monomers from which the aqueous solution is formed. The collision rate is governed by the volume ratio of the aqueous solution to the mineral oil and the shear rate, while the reaction rate is governed by the chemical formulation and the curing temperature.

  19. Organic aerogel microspheres and fabrication method therefor

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, S.T.; Kong, F.M.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1996-04-16

    Organic aerogel microspheres which can be used in capacitors, batteries, thermal insulation, adsorption/filtration media, and chromatographic packings, having diameters ranging from about 1 micron to about 3 mm. The microspheres can be pyrolyzed to form carbon aerogel microspheres. This method involves stirring the aqueous organic phase in mineral oil at elevated temperature until the dispersed organic phase polymerizes and forms nonsticky gel spheres. The size of the microspheres depends on the collision rate of the liquid droplets and the reaction rate of the monomers from which the aqueous solution is formed. The collision rate is governed by the volume ratio of the aqueous solution to the mineral oil and the shear rate, while the reaction rate is governed by the chemical formulation and the curing temperature.

  20. Paraneoplastic thrombocytosis in gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Baranyai, Zsolt; Jósa, Valéria; Tóth, Ambrus; Szilasi, Zsuzsanna; Tihanyi, Balazs; Zaránd, Attila; Harsanyi, Laszlo; Szállási, Zoltán

    2016-06-01

    It has been demonstrated recently in several solid tumors that thrombocytosis at diagnosis may correlate with tumor invasion, metastatic progression and worse outcome. Several details of the pathomechanism of the relationship of thrombocytosis and cancer have been elucidated; however, the complete process is not clearly understood. Several hypotheses have been proposed. Recently, it was suggested that in ovarian cancer elevated IL-6 production by the tumor may induce increased megakaryopoiesis via hepatic thrombopoietin production leading to thrombocytosis. The importance of the prognostic power of elevated platelet count is still debated in gastrointestinal cancer. The aims of this review were to evaluate the prognostic significance of thrombocytosis in gastrointestinal tumors, to see whether clinical practice confirmed the hypotheses and to reveal the causes of the inconsistent findings.

  1. Microsphere-chain waveguides: Focusing and transport properties

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Kenneth W. Astratov, Vasily N.; Darafsheh, Arash; Abolmaali, Farzaneh; Mojaverian, Neda; Limberopoulos, Nicholaos I.; Lupu, Anatole

    2014-07-14

    It is shown that the focusing properties of polystyrene microsphere-chain waveguides (MCWs) formed by sufficiently large spheres (D ≥ 20λ, where D is the sphere diameter and λ is the wavelength of light) scale with the sphere diameter as predicted by geometrical optics. However, this scaling behavior does not hold for mesoscale MCWs with D ≤ 10λ resulting in a periodical focusing with gradually reducing beam waists and in extremely small propagation losses. The observed effects are related to properties of nanojet-induced and periodically focused modes in such structures. The results can be used for developing focusing microprobes, laser scalpels, and polarization filters.

  2. The design of pH-sensitive chitosan-based formulations for gastrointestinal delivery.

    PubMed

    Du, Hongliang; Liu, Mengrui; Yang, Xiaoye; Zhai, Guangxi

    2015-08-01

    Chitosan, a nontoxic and biocompatible polysaccharide, has been widely explored for the gastrointestinal delivery of drugs, proteins, peptides and genes for different therapeutic purposes. Because a pH gradient exists in the gastrointestinal tract, chitosan-based formulations in response to specific pH conditions, such as the low pH in the stomach and a high pH in the intestine, have been developed as a general strategy for disease diagnosis and therapy. Tailored pH-responsive drug release in the gastrointestinal tract can be achieved with various chitosan-based formulations such as nanoparticles, microspheres, hydrogels and nanocomposites. This review focuses on the most recent development of chitosan-based pH-sensitive formulations for gastrointestinal delivery, covering various types of chitosan-based formulations, their pH-responsive mechanisms and biomedical applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Carbon microsphere-filled Pyrrone foams.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimmel, B. G.

    1973-01-01

    Syntactic foam formulations were prepared from mixtures of Pyrrone prepolymers and hollow carbon microspheres. Very low curing shrinkages were obtained for high volume loadings of microspheres. The resulting syntactic foams were found to be remarkably stable over a wide range in temperature. A technique was developed for the emplacement of these foam formulations in polyimide-fiberglass, titanium alloy and stainless steel honeycomb without sacrificing low curing shrinkage or thermal stability.

  4. A microsphere suspension model of metamaterial fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Qian; Li, Sucheng; Hou, Bo

    2017-05-01

    Drawing an analogy to the liquid phase of natural materials, we theoretically propose a microsphere suspension model to realize a metamaterial fluid with artificial electromagnetic indexes. By immersing high-ɛ, micrometer-sized dielectric spheres in a low-ɛ insulating oil, the structured fluid exhibits liquid-like properties from dispersing phase as well as the isotropic negative electromagnetic parameters caused by Mie resonances from dispersed microspheres. The work presented here will benefit the development of structured fluids toward metamaterials.

  5. Hydrogen transport and storage in engineered microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Rambach, G.; Hendricks, C.

    1996-10-01

    This project is a collaboration between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and W.J. Schafer Associates (WJSA). The authors plan to experimentally verify the performance characteristics of engineered glass microspheres that are relevant to the storage and transport of hydrogen for energy applications. They will identify the specific advantages of hydrogen transport by microspheres, analyze the infrastructure implications and requirements, and experimentally measure their performance characteristics in realistic, bulk storage situations.

  6. Method for introduction of gases into microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Charles D.; Koo, Jackson C.; Rosencwaig, Allan

    1981-01-01

    A method for producing small hollow glass spheres filled with a gas by introduction of the gas during formation of the hollow glass spheres. Hollow glass microspheres having a diameter up to about 500.mu. with both thin walls (0.5 to 4.mu.) and thick walls (5 to 20.mu.) that contain various fill gases, such as Ar, Kr, Xe, Br, DT, H.sub.2, D.sub.2, He, N.sub.2, Ne, CO.sub.2, etc. in the interior thereof, can be produced by the diffusion of the fill gas or gases into the microsphere during the formation thereof from a liquid droplet of glass-forming solution. This is accomplished by filling at least a portion of the multiple-zone drop-furnace used in producing hollow microspheres with the gas or gases of interest, and then taking advantage of the high rate of gaseous diffusion of the fill gas through the wall of the gel membrane before it transforms into a glass microsphere as it is processed in the multiple-zone furnace. Almost any gas can be introduced into the inner cavity of a glass microsphere by this method during the formation of the microsphere provided that the gas is diffused into the gel membrane or microsphere prior to its transformation into glass. The process of this invention provides a significant savings of time and related expense of filling glass microspheres with various gases. For example, the time for filling a glass microballoon with 1 atmosphere of DT is reduced from about two hours to a few seconds.

  7. Synthesis of sodium caseinate-calcium carbonate microspheres and their mineralization to bone-like apatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhewu; Liang, Guobin; Jin, Lin; Wang, Zhenling; Xing, Chao; Jiange, Qing; Zhang, Zhiguang

    2014-06-01

    Phosphoproteins can induce and stabilize calcium carbonate (CaCO3) vaterite, which has desirable features for high reactivity. The purpose of this study was to synthesize bioactive CaCO3 microspheres for bone regeneration. Sodium caseinate (NaCas)-containing CaCO3 microspheres, with the crystal phase of vaterite, were synthesized by fast precipitation in an aqueous solution of CaCl2, Na2CO3, and 2 mg/mL of NaCas. The uniform microspheres exhibited rougher surfaces and lower negative charges than CaCO3 particles without NaCas addition. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) of the microspheres showed characteristic peaks or bands corresponding to phosphate and hydroxyl groups. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) curves exhibited approximately 5% weight loss below 600 °C due to the decomposition of NaCas. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images showed lath-like hydroxyapatite (HAp) on the surface after soaking in simulated body fluid (SBF) at 37 °C for 5 and 10 days. Energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) revealed that the agglomerates were composed of Ca, C, O, P, Na, and Mg elements, and the Ca/P ratios ranged from 1.53 to 1.56. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns exhibited peaks characteristic of hydroxyapatite. The results of this study demonstrated that the addition of NaCas induced the formation of vaterite microspheres which possesses an enhanced apatite formation after soaking in SBF at 37 °C for 5 and 10 days. These NaCas-CaCO3 microspheres may be a potential biomaterial for bone regeneration.

  8. Holmium-lipiodol-alginate microspheres for fluoroscopy-guided embolotherapy and multimodality imaging.

    PubMed

    Oerlemans, Chris; Seevinck, Peter R; Smits, Maarten L; Hennink, Wim E; Bakker, Chris J G; van den Bosch, Maurice A A J; Nijsen, J Frank W

    2015-03-30

    Embolotherapy is a minimally invasive transcatheter technique aiming at reduction or complete obstruction of the blood flow by infusion of micro-sized particles in order to induce tumor regression. A major drawback of the current commercially available and clinically used microspheres is that they cannot be detected in vivo with medical imaging techniques, impeding intra- and post-procedural feedback. It can be expected that real-time monitoring of microsphere infusion and post-procedural imaging will result in better predictability and higher efficacy of the treatment. In this study, a novel microsphere formulation has been developed that can be visualized with fluoroscopy, X-ray computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The microspheres were prepared with the JetCutter technique and consist of alginate (matrix-forming polymer), holmium (cross-linking and MRI contrast agent), lipiodol (radiopaque contrast agent) and Pluronic F-68 (surfactant). The mean size (±SEM) of the hydrated holmium-lipiodol-alginate microspheres (Ho-lip-ams) was 570±12 μm with a holmium content of 0.38±0.01% (w/w). Stability studies showed that the microspheres remained intact during incubation for two weeks in fetal calf serum (FCS) at 37 °C. The inclusion of lipiodol in the microspheres rendered excellent visualization capabilities for fluoroscopy and CT, whereas the holmium ions, which keep the alginate network together, also allow MR imaging. In this study it was shown that single sphere detection was possible by fluoroscopy, CT and MRI. The Ho-lip-ams were visualized in real-time, during infusion in a porcine kidney using fluoroscopy, and post-procedural, the deposition of the microspheres was examined with fluoroscopy, (cone beam rotational) CT and MRI. The different imaging modalities showed similar deposition patterns of the microspheres within the organ. The combination of intra-procedural visualization, multimodality imaging for patient follow-up and the

  9. Primary gastrointestinal lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ghimire, Prasanna; Wu, Guang-Yao; Zhu, Ling

    2011-01-01

    Gastrointestinal tract is the most common extranodal site involved by lymphoma with the majority being non-Hodgkin type. Although lymphoma can involve any part of the gastrointestinal tract, the most frequent sites in order of its occurrence are the stomach followed by small intestine and ileocecal region. Gastrointestinal tract lymphoma is usually secondary to the widespread nodal diseases and primary gastrointestinal tract lymphoma is relatively rare. Gastrointestinal lymphomas are usually not clinically specific and indistinguishable from other benign and malignant conditions. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is the most common pathological type of gastrointestinal lymphoma in essentially all sites of the gastrointestinal tract, although recently the frequency of other forms has also increased in certain regions of the world. Although some radiological features such as bulky lymph nodes and maintenance of fat plane are more suggestive of lymphoma, they are not specific, thus mandating histopathological analysis for its definitive diagnosis. There has been a tremendous leap in the diagnosis, staging and management of gastrointestinal lymphoma in the last two decades attributed to a better insight into its etiology and molecular aspect as well as the knowledge about its critical signaling pathways. PMID:21390139

  10. Advances in gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Lanas, Ángel

    2016-09-01

    The main innovations of the latest meeting of the Gastroenterological Association (2016) concerning upper gastrointestinal bleeding from the clinician's perspective can be summarised as follows: a) The Glasgow-Blatchford scale has the best accuracy in predicting the need for surgical intervention and hospital mortality; b) Prognostic scales for non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding are also useful for lower gastrointestinal bleeding; c) Preliminary data suggest that treatment with hemospray does not seem to be superior to current standard treatment in controlling active peptic ulcer bleeding; d) Either famotidine or a proton pump inhibitor may be effective in preventing haemorrhagic recurrence in patients taking aspirin, but this finding needs to be confirmed in further studies; e) There was confirmation of the need to re-introduce antiplatelet therapy as early as possible in patients with antiplatelet-associated gastrointestinal bleeding in order to prevent cardiovascular mortality; f) Routine clinical practice suggests that gastrointestinal or cardiovascular complications with celecoxib or traditional NSAIDs are very low; g) Dabigatran is associated with an increased incidence of gastrointestinal bleeding compared with apixaban or warfarin. At least half of the episodes are located in the lower gastrointestinal tract; h) Implant devices for external ventricular circulatory support are associated with early gastrointestinal bleeding in up to one third of patients; the bleeding is often secondary to arteriovenous malformations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Preparation and Characterization of Silica Aerogel Microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qifeng; Wang, Hui; Sun, Luyi

    2017-01-01

    Silica aerogel microspheres based on alkali silica sol were synthesized using the emulsion method. The experimental results revealed that the silica aerogel microspheres (4–20 µm in diameter) were mesoporous solids with an average pore diameter ranging from 6 to 35 nm. The tapping densities and specific surface areas of the aerogel microspheres are in the range of 0.112–0.287 g/cm3 and 207.5–660.6 m2/g, respectively. The diameter of the silica aerogel microspheres could be tailored by varying the processing conditions including agitation rate, water/oil ratio, mass ratio of Span 80: Tween 80, and emulsifier concentration. The effects of these parameters on the morphology and textural properties of the synthesized silica aerogel microspheres were systematically investigated. Such silica aerogel microspheres can be used to prepare large-scale silica aerogels at an ambient pressure for applications in separation and high efficiency catalysis, which requires features of high porosity and easy fill and recovery. PMID:28772795

  12. Immobilization of silver nanoparticles on silica microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chih-Kai; Chen, Chia-Yin; Han, Jin-Lin; Chen, Chii-Chang; Jiang, Meng-Dan; Hsu, Jen-Sung; Chan, Chia-Hua; Hsieh, Kuo-Huang

    2010-01-01

    The silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) have been immobilized onto silica microspheres through the adsorption and subsequent reduction of Ag+ ions on the surfaces of the silica microspheres. The neat silica microspheres that acted as the core materials were prepared through sol-gel processing; their surfaces were then functionalized using 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTMS). The major aims of this study were to immobilize differently sized Ag particles onto the silica microspheres and to understand the mechanism of formation of the Ag nano-coatings through the self-assembly/adsorption behavior of Ag NPs/Ag+ ions on the silica spheres. The obtained Ag NP/silica microsphere conglomerates were characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Their electromagnetic wave shielding effectiveness were also tested and studied. The average particle size of the obtained Ag NPs on the silica microsphere was found that could be controllable (from 2.9 to 51.5 nm) by adjusting the ratio of MPTMS/TEOS and the amount of AgNO3.

  13. Metronidazole loaded pectin microspheres for colon targeting.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Ankur; Jain, Aviral; Khare, Piush; Agrawal, Ram K; Jain, Sanjay K

    2009-11-01

    A multiparticulate system having pH-sensitive property and specific enzyme biodegradability for colon-targeted delivery of metronidazole was developed. Pectin microspheres were prepared using emulsion-dehydration technique. These microspheres were coated with Eudragit(R) S-100 using oil-in-oil solvent evaporation method. The SEM was used to characterize the surface of these microspheres and a distinct coating over microspheres could be seen. The in vitro drug release studies exhibited no drug release at gastric pH, however continuous release of drug was observed from the formulation at colonic pH. Further, the release of drug from formulation was found to be higher in the presence of rat caecal contents, indicating the effect of colonic enzymes on the pectin microspheres. The in vivo studies were also performed by assessing the drug concentration in various parts of the GIT at different time intervals which exhibited the potentiality of formulation for colon targeting. Hence, it can be concluded that Eudragit coated pectin microspheres can be used for the colon specific delivery of drug. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association

  14. Demonstration of Microsphere Insulation in Cryogenic Vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, R. G.; Myers, E. A.; Fesmire, J. E.; Morris, D. L.; Sokalski, E. R.

    2006-04-01

    While microspheres have been recognized as a legitimate insulation material for decades, actual use in full-scale cryogenic storage tanks has not been demonstrated until now. The performance and life-cycle-cost advantages previously predicted have now been proven. Most bulk cryogenic storage tanks are insulated with either multilayer insulation (MLI) or perlite. Microsphere insulation, consisting of hollow glass bubbles, combines in a single material the desirable properties that other insulations only have individually. The material has high crush strength, low density, is noncombustible, and performs well in soft vacuum. These properties were proven during recent field testing of two 22,700-L (6,000-gallon) liquid nitrogen tanks, one insulated with microsphere insulation and the other with perlite. Normal evaporation rates (NER) for both tanks were monitored with precision test equipment and insulation levels within the tanks were observed through view ports as an indication of insulation compaction. Specific industrial applications were evaluated based on the test results and beneficial properties of microsphere insulation. Over-the-road trailers previously insulated with perlite will benefit not only from the reduced heat leak, but also the reduced mass of microsphere insulation. Economic assessments for microsphere-insulated cryogenic vessels including life-cycle cost are also presented.

  15. Radiologic diagnosis of gastrointestinal perforation.

    PubMed

    Rubesin, Stephen E; Levine, Marc S

    2003-11-01

    Perforations of the gastrointestinal tract have many causes. Holes in the wall of gastrointestinal organs can be created by blunt or penetrating trauma, iatrogenic injury, inflammatory conditions that penetrate the serosa or adventitia, extrinsic neoplasms that invade the gastrointestinal tract, or primary neoplasms that penetrate outside the wall of gastrointestinal organs. This article provides a radiologic approach for investigating the wide variety of gastrointestinal perforations. General principles about contrast agents and studies are reviewed, and then perforations in specific gastrointestinal organs are discussed.

  16. Observation of defect-assisted enhanced visible whispering gallery modes in ytterbium-doped ZnO microsphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanum, Rizwana; Moirangthem, Rakesh S.; Das, Nayan Mani

    2017-06-01

    Smooth surfaced and crystalline undoped and ytterbium doped zinc oxide (ZnO) microspheres having an approximate size of 3-5 μm were synthesized by hydrothermal process. Out of these microspheres, a single microparticle was chosen and engaged as a whispering gallery wave microresonator. The defect induced luminescence from an individual ZnO microsphere was investigated with micro-photoluminescence measurement in the spectral range of 565 to 740 nm under the excitation of a green laser having a centered wavelength at 532 nm. The defects-related emissions from a single ZnO microsphere show optical resonance peaks so-called "whispering gallery modes" (WGMs) which are confirmed with the theoretical calculation. Further, ZnO microspheres were chemically doped with the different molar percentages of Ytterbium (Yb), and enhancement in their emission properties was investigated. Our experimental results show that ZnO microspheres with 0.5 mol. % doping of Yb gives the strongest optical emission and has highest Q-factor which can be employed in the development of WGM based optical biosensor or laser.

  17. The Effect of Temozolomide/Poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)/Nano-Hydroxyapatite Microspheres on Glioma U87 Cells Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dongyong; Tian, Ang; Xue, Xiangxin; Wang, Mei; Qiu, Bo; Wu, Anhua

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of temozolomide (TMZ)/Poly (lactide-co-glycolide)(PLGA)/nano-hydroxyapatite microspheres on the behavior of U87 glioma cells. The microspheres were fabricated by the “Solid/Water/Oil” method, and they were characterized by using X-Ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. The proliferation, apoptosis and invasion of glioma cells were evaluated by MTT, flow cytometry assay and Transwell assay. The presence of the key invasive gene, αVβ3 integrin, was detected by the RT-PCR and Western blot method. It was found that the temozolomide/PLGA/nano-hydroxyapatite microspheres have a significantly diminished initial burst of drug release, compared to the TMZ laden PLGA microspheres. Our results suggest they can significantly inhibit the proliferation and invasion of glioma cells, and induce their apoptosis. Additionally, αVβ3 integrin was also reduced by the microspheres. These data suggest that by inhibiting the biological behavior of glioma cells in vitro, the newly designed temozolomide/PLGA/nano-hydroxyapatite microspheres, as controlled drug release carriers, have promising potential in treating glioma. PMID:22312307

  18. Carboxymethyl starch/alginate microspheres containing diamine oxidase for intestinal targeting.

    PubMed

    Blemur, Lindsay; Le, Tien Canh; Marcocci, Lucia; Pietrangeli, Paola; Mateescu, Mircea Alexandru

    2016-05-01

    The association of carboxymethyl starch (CMS) and alginate is proposed as a novel matrix for the entrapment of bioactive agents in microspheres affording their protection against gastrointestinal degradation. In this study, the enzyme diamine oxidase (DAO) from white pea (Lathyrus sativus) was immobilized by inclusion in microspheres formed by ionotropic gelation of CMS/alginate by complexation with Ca(2+) . The association of CMS to alginate generated a more compact structure presenting a lesser porosity, thus decreasing the access of gastric fluid inside the microspheres and preventing the loss of entrapped enzyme. Moreover, the immobilized enzyme remained active and was able to oxidize the polyamine substrates even in the presence of degrading proteases of pancreatin. The inclusion yield in terms of entrapped protein was of about 82%-95%. The DAO entrapped in calcium CMS/alginate beads retained up to 70% of its initial activity in simulated gastric fluid (pH 2.0). In simulated intestinal fluid (pH 7.2) with pancreatin, an overall retention of 65% of activity for the immobilized DAO was observed over 24 H, whereas in similar conditions the free enzyme was totally inactivated. Our project proposes the vegetal DAO as an antihistaminic agent orally administered to treat food histaminosis and colon inflammation.

  19. Salvage radioembolization of liver-dominant metastases with a resin-based microsphere: initial outcomes.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Jourdan E; Tan, Benjamin; Myerson, Robert J; Garcia-Ramirez, Jose; Goddu, Sreekrishna M; Pilgram, Thomas K; Brown, Daniel B

    2008-10-01

    The use of radioembolization of hepatic metastases with yttrium-90 ((90)Y) microspheres is increasing. The present report describes the outcomes in a cohort of patients with metastatic liver tumors treated with a resin-based microsphere agent. Thirty patients with colon (n = 13), breast (n = 7), and other primary cancers (n = 10) were treated after the failure of first- and second-line therapy. Overall survival (OS), time to progression (TTP), and time to treatment failure (TTTF) were calculated from the first treatment. Response was measured according to Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors at interval follow-up imaging. Thirty patients underwent 56 infusions of (90)Y, and 18 remained alive at the end of the study. Fourteen patients (47%) had a partial response or stable disease. OS (604 vs 251 days), TTP (223 vs 87 days), and TTTF (363 vs 87 days) were all significantly longer for patients who had a partial response or stable disease (P < .05). Median OS, TTP, and TTTF for patients with colorectal carcinoma were 357, 112, and 107 days, respectively, versus 638, 118, and 363 days in patients with other metastatic sources. Median survival was not reached for patients with breast carcinoma, and the TTP and TTTF were each 282 days. One patient (3%) experienced grade 3 toxicity (gastrointestinal ulceration). (90)Y microsphere therapy produced promising survival rates compared with systemic salvage options, with minimal toxicity.

  20. Carboxymethyl starch/alginate microspheres containing diamine oxidase for intestinal targeting

    PubMed Central

    Blemur, Lindsay; Le, Tien Canh; Marcocci, Lucia; Pietrangeli, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The association of carboxymethyl starch (CMS) and alginate is proposed as a novel matrix for the entrapment of bioactive agents in microspheres affording their protection against gastrointestinal degradation. In this study, the enzyme diamine oxidase (DAO) from white pea (Lathyrus sativus) was immobilized by inclusion in microspheres formed by ionotropic gelation of CMS/alginate by complexation with Ca2+. The association of CMS to alginate generated a more compact structure presenting a lesser porosity, thus decreasing the access of gastric fluid inside the microspheres and preventing the loss of entrapped enzyme. Moreover, the immobilized enzyme remained active and was able to oxidize the polyamine substrates even in the presence of degrading proteases of pancreatin. The inclusion yield in terms of entrapped protein was of about 82%–95%. The DAO entrapped in calcium CMS/alginate beads retained up to 70% of its initial activity in simulated gastric fluid (pH 2.0). In simulated intestinal fluid (pH 7.2) with pancreatin, an overall retention of 65% of activity for the immobilized DAO was observed over 24 H, whereas in similar conditions the free enzyme was totally inactivated. Our project proposes the vegetal DAO as an antihistaminic agent orally administered to treat food histaminosis and colon inflammation. PMID:25779356

  1. Effect of natural polymers on the survival of Lactobacillus casei encapsulated in alginate microspheres.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Fábio J; Omura, Michele H; Cedran, Marina F; Dekker, Robert F H; Barbosa-Dekker, Aneli M; Garcia, Sandra

    2017-08-01

    Linseed and okra mucilages, the fungal exopolysaccharide botryosphaeran, and commercial fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) were used to microencapsulate Lactobacillus casei LC-01 and L. casei BGP 93 in sodium alginate microspheres by the extrusion technique in calcium chloride. The addition of carbohydrate biopolymers from linseed, okra and the fungal exocellular (1 → 3)(1 → 6)-β-D-glucan, named botryosphaeran provided higher encapsulation efficiency (EE) (>93% and >86%) for L. casei LC 01 and L. casei BGP 93, respectively. The use of linseed, okra and botryosphaeran improved the stability of probiotics encapsulated in the microspheres during the storage period over 15 d at 5 °C when compared to microspheres formulated with sodium alginate alone as the main encapsulating agent (p ≤ 0.05). In in vitro gastrointestinal simulation tests, the use of FOS combined with linseed mucilage was shown to be more effective in protecting L. casei cells LC-01 and L. casei BGP 93.

  2. Formulation and evaluation of Bacillus coagulans-loaded hypromellose mucoadhesive microspheres.

    PubMed

    Alli, Sk Md Athar

    2011-01-01

    Development of a novel delivery system has been attempted to deliver viable probiotic cells into the gut for a prolonged period of time while maintaining high numbers of viable cells within the formulation throughout the shelf-life of the product and during the gastrointestinal transit. Core mucoadhesive microspheres of Bacillus coagulans were developed employing several grades of hypromellose, a mucoadhesive polymer, following coacervation and phase separation technique and were subsequently enteric-coated with hypromellose phthalate. Microspheres were evaluated for percent yield; entrapment efficiency; in vitro swelling; surface morphology; particle size, size distribution, and zeta potential; flow property, mucoadhesion property by the ex vivo mucoadhesive strength test and the in vitro wash off test; in vitro release profile and release kinetic; in vivo probiotic activity; and stability. The values for the kinetic constant and regression coefficient of model-dependent approaches and the difference factor (f(1)), the similarity factor (f(2)), and the Rescigno index (ξ(1) and ξ(2)) of model independent approaches were determined for comparing in vitro dissolution profiles. Freeze dried B. coagulans cells were successfully formulated as enteric-coated mucoadhesive microspheres with satisfactory physical structure and yield. The viability of B. coagulans was maintained in the simulated gastric conditions and during processing; in simulated intestinal conditions exhibiting mucoadhesion, and controlling and extending the viable cell release following zero-order; and was satisfactorily stable at room temperature. Test results depict statistically significant effects of the hypromellose grade and their concentration on the performance and release profile of formulations.

  3. Enhanced Probiotic Potential of Lactobacillus reuteri When Delivered as a Biofilm on Dextranomer Microspheres That Contain Beneficial Cargo

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Jason B.; Mashburn-Warren, Lauren; Bakaletz, Lauren O.; Bailey, Michael T.; Goodman, Steven D.

    2017-01-01

    As with all orally consumed probiotics, the Gram-positive bacterium Lactobacillus reuteri encounters numerous challenges as it transits through the gastrointestinal tract of the host, including low pH, effectors of the host immune system, as well as competition with commensal and pathogenic bacteria, all of which can greatly reduce the availability of live bacteria for therapeutic purposes. Recently we showed that L. reuteri, when adhered in the form of a biofilm to a semi-permeable biocompatible dextranomer microsphere, reduces the incidence of necrotizing enterocolitis by 50% in a well-defined animal model following delivery of a single prophylactic dose. Herein, using the same semi-permeable microspheres, we showed that providing compounds beneficial to L. reuteri as diffusible cargo within the microsphere lumen resulted in further advantageous effects including glucosyltransferase-dependent bacterial adherence to the microsphere surface, resistance of bound bacteria against acidic conditions, enhanced adherence of L. reuteri to human intestinal epithelial cells in vitro, and facilitated production of the antimicrobial compound reuterin and the anti-inflammatory molecule histamine. These data support continued development of this novel probiotic formulation as an adaptable and effective means for targeted delivery of cargo beneficial to the probiotic bacterium. PMID:28396655

  4. Injectable hydrogels embedded with alginate microspheres for controlled delivery of bone morphogenetic protein-2.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Youjia; Wang, Jiulong; Wu, Jingjing; Zhang, Jun; Wan, Ying; Wu, Hua

    2016-03-23

    Some delivery carriers with injectable characteristics were built using the thermosensitive chitosan/dextran-polylactide/glycerophosphate hydrogel and selected alginate microspheres for the controllable release of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2). BMP-2 was first loaded into the microspheres with an average size of around 20 μm and the resulting microspheres were then embedded into the gel in order to achieve well-controlled BMP-2 release. The microsphere-embedded gels show their incipient gelation temperature at around 32 °C and pH at about 7.1. Some gels had their elastic modulus close to 1400 Pa and the ratio of elastic modulus to viscous modulus at around 34, revealing that they behaved like mechanically strong gels. Optimized microsphere-embedded gels were found to be able to administer the BMP-2 release without significant initial burst release in an approximately linear manner over a period of time longer than four weeks. The release rate and the released amount of BMP-2 from these gels could be regulated individually or cooperatively by the initial BMP-2 load and the dextran-polylactide content in the gels. Measurements of the BMP-2 induced alkaline phosphatase activity in C2C12 cells confirmed that C2C12 cells responded to BMP-2 in a dose-dependent way and the released BMP-2 from the microsphere-embedded gels well retained their bioactivity. In vivo assessment of some gels revealed that the released BMP-2 maintained its osteogenesis functions.

  5. Studies on the preparation, characterization and pharmacological evaluation of tolterodine PLGA microspheres.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fengying; Sui, Cheng; Teng, Lesheng; Liu, Ximing; Teng, Lirong; Meng, Qingfan; Li, Youxin

    2010-09-15

    In this study, poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microspheres of tolterodine depot formulation were prepared using oil in water (o/w) method to investigate their potential pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic advantages over tolterodine l-tartrate tablets. Morphological studies of the microspheres showed a spherical shape and smooth surface with mean size of 50.69-83.01 microm, and the encapsulation efficiency was improved from 62.55 to 79.10% when the polymer concentration increased from 180 to 230 mg/ml. The addition of stearic or palmitic acids could significantly raise the drug entrapment efficiency but only slightly affected the in vitro release. A low initial burst followed by a proximately constant release of tolterodine was noticed in the in vitro release profiles. The in vivo study was carried out by intramuscular (i.m.) administration of tolterodine-loaded microspheres on beagle dogs, and a sustained release of drug from the PLGA microspheres was achieved until the 18th day with a low initial burst. Since the absence of hepatic first pass metabolism, only a single active compound-tolterodine was detected in the plasma. This avoided the coexistence of two active compounds in plasma in the case of oral administration of tolterodine, which may lead to a difficulty in dose control due to the different metabolic capacity of patients. In the pharmacodynamic study, the influence of tolterodine PLGA microspheres on the inhibition of carbachol-induced rat urinary bladder contraction was more significant than that of tolterodine l-tartrate tablets. There were invisible changes in rat bladder slices between tolterodine-loaded PLGA microspheres group and tolterodine l-tartrate tablets group. These results indicate that the continuous inhibition of muscarinic receptor may offer an alternative therapy of urge incontinence.

  6. Synthesis of biodegradable polymer-mesoporous silica composite microspheres for DNA prime-protein boost vaccination.

    PubMed

    Ho, Jenny; Huang, Yi; Danquah, Michael K; Wang, Huanting; Forde, Gareth M

    2010-03-18

    DNA vaccines or proteins are capable of inducing specific immunity; however, the translation to the clinic has generally been problematic, primarily due to the reduced magnitude of immune response and poor pharmacokinetics. Herein we demonstrate a composite microsphere formulation, composed of mesoporous silica spheres (MPS) and poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA), enables the controlled delivery of a prime-boost vaccine via the encapsulation of plasmid DNA (pDNA) and protein in different compartments. Method with modified dual-concentric-feeding needles attached to a 40 kHz ultrasonic atomizer was studied. These needles focus the flow of two different solutions, which passed through the ultrasonic atomizer. The process synthesis parameters, which are important to the scale-up of composite microspheres, were also studied. These parameters include polymer concentration, feed flowrate, and volumetric ratio of polymer and pDNA-PEI/MPS-BSA. This fabrication technique produced composite microspheres with mean D[4,3] ranging from 6 to 34 microm, depending upon the microsphere preparation. The resultant physical morphology of composite microspheres was largely influenced by the volumetric ratio of pDNA-PEI/MPS-BSA to polymer, and this was due to the precipitation of MPS at the surface of the microspheres. The encapsulation efficiencies were predominantly in the range of 93-98% for pDNA and 46-68% for MPS. In the in vitro studies, the pDNA and protein showed different release kinetics in a 40 day time frame. The dual-concentric-feeding in ultrasonic atomization was shown to have excellent reproducibility. It was concluded that this fabrication technique is an effective method to prepare formulations containing a heterologous prime-boost vaccine in a single delivery system.

  7. Gastrointestinal Parasitic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Embil, Juan A.; Embil, John M.

    1988-01-01

    This article surveys the most important gastrointestinal parasites that affect humans. The modes of acquisition, pathology, epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment are all briefly examined. Gastrointestinal parasites have become increasingly important in the differential diagnosis of gastrointestinal disease, as a result of a number of circumstances. These circumstances include: increasing travel to developing countries; increased numbers, for one reason or another, of immunocompromised individuals; increased consumption of raw or partially cooked ethnic delicacies; more crowding in day-care centres; increased immigration from developing countries; and an endemic pocket of individuals with certain unhygienic or unsanitary practices. PMID:21253148

  8. Cannabinoids and the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    PERTWEE, R

    2001-01-01

    The enteric nervous system of several species, including the mouse, rat, guinea pig and humans, contains cannabinoid CB1 receptors that depress gastrointestinal motility, mainly by inhibiting ongoing contractile transmitter release. Signs of this depressant effect are, in the whole organism, delayed gastric emptying and inhibition of the transit of non-absorbable markers through the small intestine and, in isolated strips of ileal tissue, inhibition of evoked acetylcholine release, peristalsis, and cholinergic and non-adrenergic non-cholinergic (NANC) contractions of longitudinal or circular smooth muscle. These are contractions evoked electrically or by agents that are thought to stimulate contractile transmitter release either in tissue taken from morphine pretreated animals (naloxone) or in unpretreated tissue (γ-aminobutyric acid and 5-hydroxytryptamine). The inhibitory effects of cannabinoid receptor agonists on gastric emptying and intestinal transit are mediated to some extent by CB1 receptors in the brain as well as by enteric CB1 receptors. Gastric acid secretion is also inhibited in response to CB1 receptor activation, although the detailed underlying mechanism has yet to be elucidated. Cannabinoid receptor agonists delay gastric emptying in humans as well as in rodents and probably also inhibit human gastric acid secretion. Cannabinoid pretreatment induces tolerance to the inhibitory effects of cannabinoid receptor agonists on gastrointestinal motility. Findings that the CB1 selective antagonist/inverse agonist SR141716A produces in vivo and in vitro signs of increased motility of rodent small intestine probably reflect the presence in the enteric nervous system of a population of CB1 receptors that are precoupled to their effector mechanisms. SR141716A has been reported not to behave in this manner in the myenteric plexus-longitudinal muscle preparation (MPLM) of human ileum unless this has first been rendered cannabinoid tolerant. Nor has it been

  9. Gastrointestinal radiation injury: Prevention and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Shadad, Abobakr K; Sullivan, Frank J; Martin, Joseph D; Egan, Laurence J

    2013-01-01

    With the recent advances in detection and treatment of cancer, there is an increasing emphasis on the efficacy and safety aspects of cancer therapy. Radiation therapy is a common treatment for a wide variety of cancers, either alone or in combination with other treatments. Ionising radiation injury to the gastrointestinal tract is a frequent side effect of radiation therapy and a considerable proportion of patients suffer acute or chronic gastrointestinal symptoms as a result. These side effects often cause morbidity and may in some cases lower the efficacy of radiotherapy treatment. Radiation injury to the gastrointestinal tract can be minimised by either of two strategies: technical strategies which aim to physically shift radiation dose away from the normal intestinal tissues, and biological strategies which aim to modulate the normal tissue response to ionising radiation or to increase its resistance to it. Although considerable improvement in the safety of radiotherapy treatment has been achieved through the use of modern optimised planning and delivery techniques, biological techniques may offer additional further promise. Different agents have been used to prevent or minimize the severity of gastrointestinal injury induced by ionising radiation exposure, including biological, chemical and pharmacological agents. In this review we aim to discuss various technical strategies to prevent gastrointestinal injury during cancer radiotherapy, examine the different therapeutic options for acute and chronic gastrointestinal radiation injury and outline some examples of research directions and considerations for prevention at a pre-clinical level. PMID:23345942

  10. Patterning Poly(dimethylsiloxane) Microspheres via Combination of Oxygen Plasma Exposure and Solvent Treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiaoyuan; Han, Xue; Hou, Jing; Yin, Jian; Jiang, Shichun; Lu, Conghua

    2015-10-22

    Here a simple low-cost yet robust route has been developed to prepare poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microspheres with various surface wrinkle patterns. First, the aqueous-phase-synthesized PDMS microspheres are exposed to oxygen plasma (OP), yielding the oxidized SiOx layer and the corresponding stiff shell/compliant core system. The subsequent solvent swelling and solvent evaporation induce the spontaneous formation of a series of curvature and overstress-sensitive spherical wrinkles such as dimples, short rodlike depressions, and herringbone and labyrinth patterns. The effects of the experimental parameters, including the radius and Young's modulus of the microspheres, the OP exposure duration, and the nature of the solvents, on these tunable spherical wrinkles have been systematically studied. The experimental results reveal that a power-law dependence of the wrinkling wavelength on the microsphere radius exists. Furthermore, the induced wrinkling patterns are inherently characteristic of a memory effect and good reversibility. Meanwhile, the corresponding phase diagram of the wrinkle morphologies on the spherical surfaces vs the normalized radius of curvature and the excess swelling degree has been demonstrated. It is envisioned that the introduced strategy in principle could be applied to other curved surfaces for expeditious generation of well-defined wrinkle morphologies, which not only enables the fabrication of solids with multifunctional surface properties, but also provides important implications for the morphogenesis in soft materials and tissues.

  11. Experimental induction of recurrent airway obstruction with inhaled fungal spores, lipopolysaccharide, and silica microspheres in horses.

    PubMed

    Beeler-Marfisi, Janet; Clark, Mary Ellen; Wen, Xin; Sears, William; Huber, Leslie; Ackerley, Cameron; Viel, Laurent; Bienzle, Dorothee

    2010-06-01

    To evaluate experimental induction of recurrent airway obstruction (RAO) with inhaled fungal spores, lipopolysaccharide, and silica microspheres in horses. 7 horses with and 3 horses without a history of RAO. RAO-susceptible horses ranged in age from 17 to approximately 30 years, and control horses ranged in age from 7 to approximately 15 years. Pure mold cultures were derived from repeated culture of hay and identified via gene amplification and sequencing. Pulmonary function testing and bronchoalveolar lavage were performed before and after nebulization with a suspension of spores derived from 3 fungi, lipopolysaccharide, and 1-microm silica microspheres in all horses. This was followed by a 4-month washout period and a further pulmonary function test followed by saline (0.9% NaCl) solution challenge and bronchoalveolar lavage. Lichtheimia corymbifera, Aspergillus fumigatus, and Eurotium amstelodami were consistently identified in cultures of moldy hay. Nebulization with fungal spores, lipopolysaccharide, and microspheres induced significant increases in pleural pressure in RAO-susceptible but not control horses. Airway neutrophilia developed in both groups of horses with exposure to challenge material but more severely in RAO-susceptible horses. Results indicated that inhalation of fungal spores in combination with lipopolysaccharide and silica microspheres can induce disease exacerbation in susceptible horses and may thus be a useful model for future standardized studies of RAO in horses.

  12. Flexible Microsphere-Embedded Film for Microsphere-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Xing, Cheng; Yan, Yinzhou; Feng, Chao; Xu, Jiayu; Dong, Peng; Guan, Wei; Zeng, Yong; Zhao, Yan; Jiang, Yijian

    2017-09-27

    Dielectric microspheres with extraordinary microscale optical properties, such as photonic nanojets, optical whispering-gallery modes (WGMs), and directional antennas, have drawn interest in many research fields. Microsphere-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (MERS) is an alternative approach for enhanced Raman detection by dielectric microstructures. Unfortunately, fabrication of microsphere monolayer arrays is the major challenge of MERS for practical applications on various specimen surfaces. Here we report a microsphere-embedded film (MF) by immersing a highly refractive microsphere monolayer array in the poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) film as a flexible MERS sensing platform for one- to three-dimensional (1D to 3D) specimen surfaces. The directional antennas and wave-guided whispering-gallery modes (WG-WGMs) contribute to the majority of Raman enhancement by the MFs. Moreover, the MF can be coupled with surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) to provide an extra >10-fold enhancement. The limit of detection is therefore improved for sensing of crystal violet (CV) and Sudan I molecules in aqueous solutions at concentrations down to 10(-7) M. A hybrid dual-layer microsphere enhancer, constructed by depositing a MF onto a microsphere monolayer array, is also demonstrated, wherein the WG-WGMs become dominant and boost the enhancement ratio >50-fold. The present work opens up new opportunities for design of cost-effective and flexible MERS sensing platforms as individual or associated techniques toward practical applications in ultrasensitive Raman detection.

  13. Osteoporosis and Gastrointestinal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Weinerman, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    Gastrointestinal disease is often overlooked or simply forgotten as a cause of osteoporosis. Yet, the consequences of osteoporotic fractures can be devastating. Although the bulk of the published experience regarding osteoporosis is derived from the postmenopausal population, this review will focus on gastrointestinal disorders implicated in osteoporosis, with an emphasis on inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease. The unique aspects of gastrointestinal diseases associated with osteoporosis include early onset of disease (and, therefore, prolonged exposure to risk factors for developing osteoporosis, particularly with inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease), malabsorption, and maldigestion of nutrients necessary for bone health and maintenance (eg, calcium, vitamin D), as well as the impact of glucocorticoids. These factors, when added to smoking, a sedentary lifestyle, hypogonadism, and a family history of osteoporosis, accumulate into an imposing package of predictors for osteoporotic fracture. This paper will review the identification and treatment strategies for patients with gastrointestinal disorders and osteoporosis. PMID:20978554

  14. Nano-functionalization of protein microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Sungkwon; Nichols, William T.

    2014-08-01

    Protein microspheres are promising building blocks for the assembly of complex functional materials. Here we demonstrate a set of three techniques that add functionality to the surface of protein microspheres. In the first technique, a positive surface charge on the protein spheres is deposited by electrostatic adsorption. Negatively charged silica and gold nanoparticle colloids can then electrostatically bind reversibly to the microsphere surface. In the second technique, nanoparticles are covalently anchored to the protein shell using a simple one-pot process. The strong covalent bond between sulfur groups in cysteine in the protein shell irreversibly binds to the gold nanoparticles. In the third technique, surface morphology of the protein microsphere is tuned through hydrodynamic instability at the water-oil interface. This is accomplished through the degree of solubility of the oil phase in water. Taken together these three techniques form a platform to create nano-functionalized protein microspheres, which can then be used as building blocks for the assembly of more complex macroscopic materials.

  15. Dosimetry of in situ activated dysprosium microspheres.

    PubMed

    Adnani, N

    2004-03-07

    This paper presents the results of a study aimed at investigating the dosimetry of stable dysprosium microspheres activated, in situ, by a linac generated photon beam. In phantom measurements of the neutron flux within an 18 MV photon beam were performed using CR-39 detectors and gold activation. The results were used in conjunction with a Monte Carlo computer simulation to investigate the dose distribution resulting from the activation of dysprosium (Dy) microspheres using an 18 MV photon beam. Different depths, lesion volumes and volume concentrations of microspheres are investigated. The linac lower collimator jaws are assumed completely closed to shield the tumour volume from the photon dose. Using a single AP field with 0 x 0 cm2 field size (closed jaws), a photon dose rate of 600 MU min(-1) and 80 cm SSD for 10 min, an average dose exceeding 1 Gy can be delivered to spherical lesions of 0.5 cm and higher diameter. The variation of the average dose with the size of the lesion reaches saturation for tumour volumes exceeding 1 cm in diameter. This report shows that the photon beam of a high-energy linac can be used to activate Dy microspheres in situ and, as a result, deliver a significant dose of beta radiation. Non-radioactive Dy microspheres do not have the toxicity and imaging problems associated with commercially available yttrium-90 based products.

  16. Vasculitis and gastrointestinal involvement.

    PubMed

    Casella, G; Bronzino, B; Cutrino, L; Montani, N; Somma, A; Baldini, V

    2006-06-01

    The incidence of gastrointestinal involvement is relatively observed in patients with vasculitis processes. Vasculitis can be primary (necrotising or hypersensitivity) or secondary to another primary disease. Gastrointestinal involvement is present in up to 50% of the various forms of systemic vasculitis. Primary or secondary vasculitic process, according to the classification in necrotizing and hypersensitivity vasculitis, are described in this paper. A review of the literature on the the subject is also presented.

  17. Growth Factor Gradients via Microsphere Delivery in Biopolymer Scaffolds for Osteochondral Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoqin; Wenk, Esther; Zhang, Xiaohui; Meinel, Lorenz; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Kaplan, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Temporally and spatially controlled delivery of growth factors in polymeric scaffolds is crucial for engineering composite tissue structures, such as osteochondral constructs. In the present study, microsphere-mediated growth factor delivery in polymer scaffolds and its impact on osteochondral differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) was evaluated. Two growth factors, bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP-2) and insulin-like growth factor I (rhIGF-I), were incorporated as a single concentration gradient or reverse gradient combining two factors in the scaffolds. To assess the gradient making system and the delivery efficiency of polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) and silk fibroin microspheres, initially an alginate gel was fabricated into a cylinder shape with microspheres incorporated as gradients. Compared to PLGA microspheres, silk microspheres were more efficient in delivering rhBMP-2, probably due to sustained release of the growth factor, while less efficient in delivering rhIGF-I, likely due to loading efficiency. The growth factor gradients formed were shallow, inducing non-gradient trends in hMSC osteochondral differentiation. Aqueous-derived silk porous scaffolds were used to incorporate silk microspheres using the same gradient process. Both growth factors formed deep and linear concentration gradients in the scaffold, as shown by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). After seeding with hMSCs and culturing for 5 weeks in a medium containing osteogenic and chondrogenic components, hMSCs exhibited osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation along the concentration gradients of rhBMP-2 in the single gradient of rhBMP-2 and reverse gradient of rhBMP-2/rhIGF-I, but not the rhIGF-I gradient system, confirming that silk microspheres were more efficient in delivering rhBMP-2 than rhIGF-I for hMSCs osteochondrogenesis. This novel silk microsphere/scaffold system offers a new option for the delivery of multiple growth factors

  18. Mycobiota in gastrointestinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Pranab K; Sendid, Boualem; Hoarau, Gautier; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric; Poulain, Daniel; Ghannoum, Mahmoud A

    2015-02-01

    New insights gained through the use of state-of-the-art technologies, including next-generation sequencing, are starting to reveal that the association between the gastrointestinal tract and the resident mycobiota (fungal community) is complex and multifaceted, in which fungi are active participants influencing health and disease. Characterizing the human mycobiome (the fungi and their genome) in healthy individuals showed that the gastrointestinal tract contains 66 fungal genera and 184 fungal species, with Candida as the dominant fungal genera. Although fungi have been associated with a number of gastrointestinal diseases, characterization of the mycobiome has mainly been focused on patients with IBD and graft-versus-host disease. In this Review, we summarize the findings from studies investigating the relationship between the gut mycobiota and gastrointestinal diseases, which indicate that fungi contribute to the aggravation of the inflammatory response, leading to increased disease severity. A model explaining the mechanisms underlying the role of the mycobiota in gastrointestinal diseases is also presented. Our understanding of the contribution of the mycobiota to health and disease is still in its infancy and leaves a number of questions to be addressed. Answering these questions might lead to novel approaches to prevent and/or manage acute as well as chronic gastrointestinal disease.

  19. Asbestos and Gastrointestinal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Robert W.; Foliart, Donna E.; Wong, Otto

    1985-01-01

    Exposure to asbestos is among several factors cited as possible causes of esophageal, gastric and colorectal cancer. More than 45 published studies have presented mortality data on asbestos-exposed workers. For each cohort, we listed the observed and expected rates of deaths from types of gastrointestinal cancer based on the latest published follow-up. Summary standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were then derived. Finally, we calculated summary SMRs for total gastrointestinal tract cancer for three occupational groups: asbestos factory workers, insulators/shipyard workers and asbestos miners. Statistically significant elevations in summary SMRs were found for esophageal, stomach and total gastrointestinal tract cancer in all asbestos-exposed workers. Esophageal cancer summary SMRs remained significantly elevated when data were reanalyzed to include only those cohorts with death certificate diagnoses for cause of observed deaths. However, summary SMRs were not statistically significant for stomach and total gastrointestinal tract cancer after reanalysis. Summary SMRs by occupational group showed a significant elevation for total gastrointestinal cancer in insulators/shipyard workers. The elevation was not significant after reanalysis. Based on the results after reanalysis, the elevations in summary SMRs for stomach and total gastrointestinal tract cancer are of a magnitude that could result from diagnostic and investigator error. We conclude that more studies are required before stomach and colorectal cancers are documented as asbestos-related diseases. PMID:4036114

  20. Poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) core-shell microspheres with enhanced controllability of drug encapsulation and release rate.

    PubMed

    Cha, Chaenyung; Jeong, Jae Hyun; Kong, Hyunjoon

    2015-01-01

    Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres have been widely used as drug carriers for minimally invasive, local, and sustained drug delivery. However, their use is often plagued by limited controllability of encapsulation efficiency, initial burst, and release rate of drug molecules, which cause unsatisfactory outcomes and several side effects including inflammation. This study presents a new strategy of tuning the encapsulation efficiency and the release rate of protein drugs from a PLGA microsphere by filling the hollow core of the microsphere with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels of varying cross-linking density. The PEG gel cores were prepared by inducing in situ cross-linking reactions of PEG monoacrylate solution within the PLGA microspheres. The resulting PEG-PLGA core-shell microspheres exhibited (1) increased encapsulation efficiency, (2) decreased initial burst, and (3) a more sustained release of protein drugs, as the cross-linking density of the PEG gel core was increased. In addition, implantation of PEG-PLGA core-shell microspheres encapsulated with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) onto a chicken chorioallantoic membrane resulted in a significant increase in the number of new blood vessels at an implantation site, while minimizing inflammation. Overall, this strategy of introducing PEG gel into PLGA microspheres will be highly useful in tuning release rates and ultimately in improving the therapeutic efficacy of a wide array of protein drugs.

  1. A facile synthesis of luminescent YVO4:Eu3+ hollow microspheres in virtue of template function of the SDS-PEG soft clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Juan; Yan, Yinglin; Hojamberdiev, Mirabbos; Ruan, Xiaoguang; Cai, Anjiang; Xu, Yunhua

    2012-08-01

    Hollow europium-doped yttrium orthovanadate (YVO4:Eu3+) microspheres were fabricated via a sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyethylene glycol (PEG)-assisted hydrothermal technique. The as-synthesized hollow YVO4:Eu3+ microspheres were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). The obtained results showed that the morphology and size of the hollow microspheres have a strong dependence on the hydrothermal reaction time of the YVO4:Eu3+ powders. It is believed that the SDS-PEG clusters perform a function of dual soft-template that results in a unique template-induced secondary assembly in the one-pot synthesis of hollow YVO4:Eu3+ microspheres. The photoluminescence measurement revealed that the YVO4:Eu3+ powders with a spherical hollow shape have better red luminescence compared to the YVO4:Eu3+ solid microspheres. As a result, the controlled synthesis of hollow YVO4:Eu3+ microspheres not only has a great theoretical significance in studying the three-dimensional control and selective synthesis of inorganic materials but also benefits the potential applications based on hollow YVO4:Eu3+ microspheres owing to reducing the usage of expensive rare-earth elements.

  2. Characterization and evaluation of triamcinolone, raloxifene, and their dual-loaded microspheres as prospective local treatment system in rheumatic rat joints.

    PubMed

    Ocal, Yigit; Kurum, Baris; Karahan, Siyami; Tezcaner, Aysen; Ozen, Seza; Keskin, Dilek

    2014-08-01

    In this study, injectable microspheres were developed for the local treatment of joint degeneration in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Microspheres loaded with triamcinolone (TA), a corticosteroid drug, and/or raloxifene (Ral), a cartilage regenerative drug, were prepared with a biodegradable and biocompatible polymer, polycaprolactone (PCL). Microspheres were optimized for particle size, structural properties, drug release, and loading properties. In vitro release of Ral was very slow because of the low solubility of the drug and hydrophobic nature of PCL. However, when coloaded with TA, both drugs were released at higher amounts compared with their single forms. Smallest particle sizes were obtained in dual drug-loaded microspheres. In vitro cytotoxicity tests showed biocompatibility of microspheres. In vivo bioefficacy of these microspheres was also examined in adjuvant-induced arthritis model in rats. In vivo histological studies of control groups showed development of RA with high median lesion score (5.0). Compared with control and intra-articular free drug injections, microsphere treatment groups showed lower lesion scores and better healing outcomes in histological evaluations. Results suggest that a controlled delivery system of TA and RAL by a single injection in inflamed joints holds pr