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Sample records for mid-cretaceous sedimentary rocks

  1. Stratigraphy and paleontology of Mid-Cretaceous rocks in Minnesota and contiguous areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cobban, William Aubrey; Merewether, E.A.

    1983-01-01

    glacial drift and alluvium of Quaternary age. In Minnesota and adjoining areas, formations of mid-Cretaceous age commonly overlap the dissected surface of Precambrian rocks. The thickness of the lower Upper Cretaceous sequence ranges from about 223 m in eastern North Dakota and about 200 m in northeastern Nebraska to a featheredge in Minnesota and Iowa. These lower Upper Cretaceous formations are composed mainly of shale, siltstone, sandstone, and limestone units of marine and nonmarine origin and were deposited near the eastern shore of a transgressing and regressing epicontinental sea in Cenomanian Turonian Coniacian. and Santonian time. During the late Cenoanian, the strandline was in Minnesota and was oriented generally northnortheast. Interpretations of the depositional environments of the strata and of fossils from outcrops and from clasts in glacial drift indicate that the Cretaceous seaway extended from this region northeastward across Canada to Greenland in the Turonian Coniacian, and Santonian. The Cretaceous formations are deformed into broad, shallow synclines in eastern North and South Dakota and in northeastern Nebraska. A west-trending anticline, the Sioux uplift, separates the synclines in southeastern South Dakota. Sparse evidence of minor faulting in the formations exists in northeastern South Dakota, along the strike of a major southwest-trending zone of tectonism in the Precambrian basement rocks. The structural relief in the region, on the top of the Greenhorn Formation, is at least 250 m between eastern North Dakota and northeastern Minnesota, and at least 200 m between northeastern Nebraska and northwestern Iowa. A comparison of the Cretaceous stratigraphy of the Minnesota region and of areas in Wyoming indicates that some marine transgressions and regressions were synchronous in the two regions. The transgression during Greenhorn time, the regression during early Carlile time, and the transgression dur

  2. Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    6 November 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows outcrops of sedimentary rocks in a crater located just north of the Sinus Meridiani region. Perhaps the crater was once the site of a martian lake.

    Location near: 2.9oN, 359.0oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Autumn

  3. Gale Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-439, 1 August 2003

    Gale Crater, located in the Aeolis region near 5.5oS, 222oW, contains a mound of layered sedimentary rock that stands higher than the rim of the crater. This giant mound suggests that the entire crater was not only once filled with sediment, it was also buried beneath sediment. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows some of the eroded remains of the sedimentary rock that once filled Gale Crater. The layers form terraces; wind has eroded the material to form the tapered, pointed yardang ridges seen here. The small circular feature in the lower right quarter of the picture is a mesa that was once a small meteor impact crater that was filled, buried, then exhumed from within the sedimentary rock layers exposed here. This image is illuminated from the left.

  4. Sedimentary Rock Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    29 July 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows knobs of remnant, wind-eroded, layered sedimentary rock that once completely covered the floor of a crater located west of the Sinus Meridiani region of Mars. Sedimentary rock outcrops are common throughout the Sinus Meridiani region and its surrounding cratered terrain.

    Location near: 2.2oN, 7.9oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Autumn

  5. Sedimentary Rocks and Dunes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    25 November 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows buttes composed of light-toned, sedimentary rock exposed by erosion within a crater occurring immediately west of Schiaparelli Basin near 4.0oS, 347.9oW. Surrounding these buttes is a field of dark sand dunes and lighter-toned, very large windblown ripples. The sedimentary rocks might indicate that the crater interior was once the site of a lake. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  6. Sedimentary Rock Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    29 July 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows knobs of remnant, wind-eroded, layered sedimentary rock that once completely covered the floor of a crater located west of the Sinus Meridiani region of Mars. Sedimentary rock outcrops are common throughout the Sinus Meridiani region and its surrounding cratered terrain.

    Location near: 2.2oN, 7.9oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Autumn

  7. Broken Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    18 May 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows broken-up blocks of sedimentary rock in western Candor Chasma. There are several locations in western Candor that exhibit this pattern of broken rock. The manner in which these landforms were created is unknown; it is possible that there was a landslide or a meteoritic impact that broke up the materials. One attribute that is known: in some of these cases, it seems that the rock was broken and then buried by later sedimentary rocks, before later being exhumed so that they can be seen from orbit today.

    Location near: 6.9oS, 75.5oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Winter

  8. Tithonium Chasma's Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-565, 5 December 2003

    Exposures of light-toned, layered, sedimentary rocks are common in the deep troughs of the Valles Marineris system. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an example from western Tithonium Chasma. The banding seen here is an eroded expression of layered rock. Sedimentary rocks can be composed of (1) the detritus of older, eroded and weathered rocks, (2) grains produced by explosive volcanism (tephra, also known as volcanic ash), or (3) minerals that were chemically precipitated out of a body of liquid such as water. These outcrops are located near 4.8oS, 89.7oW. The image covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated from the lower left.

  9. Ancient Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-469, 31 August 2003

    The terraced area in this Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image is an outcropping of ancient, sedimentary rock. It occurs in a crater in western Arabia Terra near 10.8oN, 4.5oW. Sedimentary rocks provide a record of past environments on Mars. Field work will likely be required to begin to get a good understanding of the nature of the record these rocks contain. Their generally uniform thickness and repeated character suggests that deposition of fine sediment in this crater was episodic, if not cyclic. These rocks might be indicators of an ancient lake, or they might have been deposited from grains settling out of an earlier, thicker, martian atmosphere. This image covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) across and is illuminated from the lower left.

  10. Sedimentary Rock Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-348, 2 May 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image acquired in March 2003 shows dozens of repeated layers of sedimentary rock in a western Arabia Terra crater at 8oN, 7oW. Wind has sculpted the layered forms into hills somewhat elongated toward the lower left (southwest). The dark patches at the bottom (south) end of the image are drifts of windblown sand. These sedimentary rocks might indicate that the crater was once the site of a lake--or they may result from deposition by wind in a completely dry, desert environment. Either way, these rocks have something important to say about the geologic history of Mars. The area shown is about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  11. Sedimentary Rock Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-348, 2 May 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image acquired in March 2003 shows dozens of repeated layers of sedimentary rock in a western Arabia Terra crater at 8oN, 7oW. Wind has sculpted the layered forms into hills somewhat elongated toward the lower left (southwest). The dark patches at the bottom (south) end of the image are drifts of windblown sand. These sedimentary rocks might indicate that the crater was once the site of a lake--or they may result from deposition by wind in a completely dry, desert environment. Either way, these rocks have something important to say about the geologic history of Mars. The area shown is about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  12. Gale Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    15 April 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows outcroppings of layered, sedimentary rock in eastern Gale Crater. North-central Gale Crater is the site of a mound that is more than several kilometers thick and largely composed of sedimentary rocks that record a complex history of deposition and erosion. At one time, Gale Crater might have been completely filled and buried beneath the martian surface.

    Location near: 4.9oS, 221.6oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Winter

  13. Schiaparelli's Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    9 October 2004 Schiaparelli Basin is a large, 470 kilometer (292 miles) impact crater located east of Sinus Meridiani. The basin might once have been the site of a large lake--that is, if the sedimentary rocks exposed on its northwestern floor were deposited in water. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a 1.5 meter per pixel (5 ft per pixel) view of some of the light-toned, finely-bedded sedimentary rocks in northwestern Schiaparelli. The image is located near 1.0oS, 346.0oW, and covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  14. Gale Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    15 April 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows outcroppings of layered, sedimentary rock in eastern Gale Crater. North-central Gale Crater is the site of a mound that is more than several kilometers thick and largely composed of sedimentary rocks that record a complex history of deposition and erosion. At one time, Gale Crater might have been completely filled and buried beneath the martian surface.

    Location near: 4.9oS, 221.6oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Winter

  15. Terby Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    27 December 2003 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows layered sedimentary rock outcrops in Terby Crater, located near 27.7oS, 285.4oW. The layered sediments in Terby are several kilometers thick, attesting to a long history of deposition in this ancient basin. The picture covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  16. Eroded Sedimentary Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-372, 26 May 2003

    This high resolution Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows eroded, layered sedimentary rock exposures in an unnamed western Arabia Terra crater at 8oN, 7oW. The dark material is windblown sand; much of the erosion of these layers may have also been caused by wind. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  17. Iani Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    23 February 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows light-toned sedimentary rocks exposed by erosion in the Iani Chaos region of Mars.

    Location near: 4.2oS, 18.7oW Image width: 1 km (0.6 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Winter

  18. Melas Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    17 July 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows layered, sedimentary rock outcrops in southwestern Melas Chasma, one of the troughs of the vast Valles Marineris system. Sunlight illuminates this scene from the upper left; it is located near 9.8oS, 76.0oW, and covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide.

  19. Terby Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    27 December 2003 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows layered sedimentary rock outcrops in Terby Crater, located near 27.7oS, 285.4oW. The layered sediments in Terby are several kilometers thick, attesting to a long history of deposition in this ancient basin. The picture covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  20. Sedimentary Rock Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    27 January 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows layers of sedimentary rock in a crater in western Arabia Terra. Layered rock records the history of a place, but an orbiter image alone cannot tell the entire story. These materials record some past episodes of deposition of fine-grained material in an impact crater that is much larger than the image shown here. The picture is located near 3.4oN, 358.7oW, and covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi.) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  1. Sedimentary Rock Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    27 January 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows layers of sedimentary rock in a crater in western Arabia Terra. Layered rock records the history of a place, but an orbiter image alone cannot tell the entire story. These materials record some past episodes of deposition of fine-grained material in an impact crater that is much larger than the image shown here. The picture is located near 3.4oN, 358.7oW, and covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi.) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  2. Ladon Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    6 June 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows light-toned, layered, sedimentary rocks exposed by the fluids that carved the Ladon Valles system in the Erythraeum region of Mars. These rocks are so ancient that their sediments were deposited, cemented to form rock, and then eroded by the water (or other liquid) that carved Ladon Valles, so far back in Martian history that such liquids could still flow on the planet's surface.

    Location near: 20.8oS, 30.0oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  3. Faulted Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    27 June 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows some of the layered, sedimentary rock outcrops that occur in a crater located at 8oN, 7oW, in western Arabia Terra. Dark layers and dark sand have enhanced the contrast of this scene. In the upper half of the image, one can see numerous lines that off-set the layers. These lines are faults along which the rocks have broken and moved. The regularity of layer thickness and erosional expression are taken as evidence that the crater in which these rocks occur might once have been a lake. The image covers an area about 1.9 km (1.2 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  4. Ladon Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    6 June 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows light-toned, layered, sedimentary rocks exposed by the fluids that carved the Ladon Valles system in the Erythraeum region of Mars. These rocks are so ancient that their sediments were deposited, cemented to form rock, and then eroded by the water (or other liquid) that carved Ladon Valles, so far back in Martian history that such liquids could still flow on the planet's surface.

    Location near: 20.8oS, 30.0oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  5. Evolution of Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veizer, J.; MacKenzie, F. T.

    2003-12-01

    For almost a century, it has been recognized that the present-day thickness and areal extent of Phanerozoic sedimentary strata increase progressively with decreasing geologic age. This pattern has been interpreted either as reflecting an increase in the rate of sedimentation toward the present (Barrell, 1917; Schuchert, 1931; Ronov, 1976) or as resulting from better preservation of the younger part of the geologic record ( Gilluly, 1949; Gregor, 1968; Garrels and Mackenzie, 1971a; Veizer and Jansen, 1979, 1985).Study of the rocks themselves led to similarly opposing conclusions. The observed secular (=age) variations in relative proportions of lithological types and in chemistry of sedimentary rocks (Daly, 1909; Vinogradov et al., 1952; Nanz, 1953; Engel, 1963; Strakhov, 1964, 1969; Ronov, 1964, 1982) were mostly given an evolutionary interpretation. An opposing, uniformitarian, approach was proposed by Garrels and Mackenzie (1971a). For most isotopes, the consensus favors deviations from the present-day steady state as the likely cause of secular trends.This chapter attempts to show that recycling and evolution are not opposing, but complementary, concepts. It will concentrate on the lithological and chemical attributes of sediments, but not deal with the evolution of sedimentary mineral deposits (Veizer et al., 1989) and of life ( Sepkoski, 1989), both well amenable to the outlined conceptual treatment. The chapter relies heavily on Veizer (1988a) for the sections dealing with general recycling concepts, on Veizer (2003) for the discussion of isotopic evolution of seawater, and on Morse and Mackenzie (1990) and Mackenzie and Morse (1992) for discussion of carbonate rock recycling and environmental attributes.

  6. Sedimentary Rocks in Melas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a butte and several other landforms eroded into light-toned, layered, sedimentary rock in southern Melas Chasma. Melas is part of the vast Valles Marineris trough system.

    Location near: 11.8oS, 74.6oW Image width: 3.0 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Southern Spring

  7. Melas Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    28 August 2004 Light-toned, layered, sedimentary rock outcrops are common within the vast martian Valles Marineris trough system. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a recent example from southern Melas Chasma at 1.5 m/pixel (5 ft/pixel) resolution. The image is located near 11.3oS, 73.9oW, and covers an area about 1.8 km (1.1 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  8. Sedimentary Rock in Candor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    11 February 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows dozens of light- and a few dark-toned sedimentary rock layers exposed by faulting and erosion in western Candor Chasma, part of the vast Valles Marineris trough system.

    Location near: 6.5oS, 77.0oW Image width: 3.0 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Autumn

  9. Sedimentary Rocks in Ganges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    13 November 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows portions of two massifs composed of light-toned, sedimentary rock in Ganges Chasma, part of the Valles Marineris trough system. On the steeper slopes in this vista, dry talus shed from the outcrop has formed a series of dark fans. Surrounded by dark, windblown sand, these landforms are located near 8.6oS, 46.8oW. The image covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across and sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  10. Ganges Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    24 May 2004 Mariner 9 images acquired in 1972 first revealed a large, light-toned, layered mound in Ganges Chasma, part of the vast Valles Marineris trough system. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a higher-resolution view of these rocks than was achieved by Mariner 9 or Viking, and higher than can be obtained by Mars Odyssey or Mars Express. The image, with a resolution of about 3.7 meters (12 feet) per pixel, shows eroded layered rock outcrops in Ganges Chasma. These rocks record a history of events that occurred either in Ganges Chasma, or in the rocks brought to the surface by the opening of Ganges Chasma. Either way, the story they might tell could be as fascinating and unprecedented as the story told by sedimentary rocks investigated this year in Meridiani Planum by the Opportunity Mars Exploration Rover ... no one knows. The image is located near 7.3oS, 48.8oW, and covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across. The picture is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  11. Ganges Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    24 May 2004 Mariner 9 images acquired in 1972 first revealed a large, light-toned, layered mound in Ganges Chasma, part of the vast Valles Marineris trough system. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a higher-resolution view of these rocks than was achieved by Mariner 9 or Viking, and higher than can be obtained by Mars Odyssey or Mars Express. The image, with a resolution of about 3.7 meters (12 feet) per pixel, shows eroded layered rock outcrops in Ganges Chasma. These rocks record a history of events that occurred either in Ganges Chasma, or in the rocks brought to the surface by the opening of Ganges Chasma. Either way, the story they might tell could be as fascinating and unprecedented as the story told by sedimentary rocks investigated this year in Meridiani Planum by the Opportunity Mars Exploration Rover ... no one knows. The image is located near 7.3oS, 48.8oW, and covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across. The picture is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  12. Sedimentary Rock Near Coprates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-420, 13 July 2003

    This mosaic of two Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) narrow angle camera images, one from 2001, the other from 2003, shows light-toned, layered, sedimentary rock outcrops exposed on the floor of a trough that parallels Coprates Chasma in the Valles Marineris system. Layered rocks form the pages from which the history of a place can be read. It may be many years before the story is read, but or now at least we know where one of the books of martian history is found. This picture is located near 15.2oS, 60.1oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  13. Sedimentary Rock Outcrops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    16 August 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows eroded layered rock outcrops in a crater north of Meridiani Planum near 2.7oN, 359.1oW. The dozens and dozens of sedimentary rock layers of repeated thickness and similar physical properties at this location suggest that they may have been deposited in a lacustrine (lake) setting. The crater in which these layers occur may once have been completely filled and buried, as is the case for many craters in the Sinus Meridiani region. This image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across; sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  14. Sedimentary Rock Near Coprates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-420, 13 July 2003

    This mosaic of two Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) narrow angle camera images, one from 2001, the other from 2003, shows light-toned, layered, sedimentary rock outcrops exposed on the floor of a trough that parallels Coprates Chasma in the Valles Marineris system. Layered rocks form the pages from which the history of a place can be read. It may be many years before the story is read, but or now at least we know where one of the books of martian history is found. This picture is located near 15.2oS, 60.1oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  15. Schiaparelli Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-403, 26 June 2003

    Some of the most important high resolution imaging results of the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) experiment center on discoveries about the presence and nature of the sedimentary rock record on Mars. This old meteor impact crater in northwestern Schiaparelli Basin exhibits a spectacular view of layered, sedimentary rock. The 2.3 kilometer (1.4 miles) wide crater may have once been completely filled with sediment; the material was later eroded to its present form. Dozens of layers of similar thickness and physical properties are now expressed in a wedding cake-like stack in the middle of the crater. Sunlight illuminating the scene from the left shows that the circle, or mesa top, at the middle of the crater stands higher than the other stair-stepped layers. The uniform physical properties and bedding of these layers might indicate that they were originally deposited in a lake (it is possible that the crater was at the bottom of a much larger lake, filling Schiaparelli Basin); alternatively, the layers were deposited by settling out of the atmosphere in a dry environment. This picture was acquired on June 3, 2003, and is located near 0.9oS, 346.2oW.

  16. Meridiani Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-545, 15 November 2003

    Northern Sinus Meridiani is a region of vast exposures of layered, sedimentary rock. Buried within these layers are many filled impact craters. Erosion has re-exposed several formerly-buried craters in this Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image. Arrows 1 and 2 indicate craters that are still emerging from beneath layered material; arrow 3 indicates a crater that has been fully re-exposed. This image is located near 5.1oN, 2.7oW. The area shown is about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and illuminated from the left/upper left.

  17. Rock Magnetic Cyclostratigraphy of the Mid-Cretaceous Greenhorn Limestone, South-Central Colorado---Influence of Orbitally Induced Climate Variability for Chornostratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellers, T.; Geissman, J. W.; Jackson, J.

    2015-12-01

    We are testing the hypothesis that depositional processes of the mid-Cretaceous Greenhorn Limestone were influenced by orbitally-driven climate variations using rock magnetic data. Correlation of the data, including anhysteretic remanent magnetization (ARM), magnetic susceptibility, isothermal remanent magnetization in different DC fields to saturation, and hysteresis properties, from three continuously exposed sections of the full Greenhorn Limestone provides detailed spatial distribution for the depositional processes and magnetic mineral climate encoding. The Greenhorn Limestone includes the Lincoln Limestone, Hartland Shale, and the Bridge Creek Limestone members and consists of calcareous shales and limestones representing near maximum depths in the Cretaceous interior seaway. The sections, each about 30 m thick, extend from the upper Graneros Shale, through the Greenhorn Formation, to the lower Carlisle Shale, with samples collected at a two to five cm interval and are located at Badito, CO; north of Redwing, CO; and at the Global boundary Stratotype Section and Point (GSSP) at Lake Pueblo, CO. Our over 1000 samples were hand crushed to granule size pieces and packed into 7cc IODP boxes. Bulk magnetic susceptibility, anhysteretic remanent magnetization (ARM) intensity at different peak AF levels, and isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) intensity record variations in magnetic mineral concentration and are proxies to determine orbital scale cycles and precise stratigraphic correlation between sections. ARM intensities in a peak field of 100 mT at both sites range between 1.2 x 10-3 and 1.3 x 10-4 A/m and better define periodic variation within the Greenhorn Limestone displaying differences in ferromagnetic mineral content of detrital origin. Magnetic susceptibility, which ranges from 3.5 x 10-2 to 2.86 x 10-3, also shows periodic variation with a strong correlation among the three sections. Saturation IRM at 100 mT ranges from 3.2 x 10-1 to 1.1x 10-2 A

  18. Martian sediments and sedimentary rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markun, C. D.

    1988-01-01

    Martian sediments and sedimentary rocks, clastic and nonclastic, should represent a high priority target in any future return-sample mission. The discovery of such materials and their subsequent analysis in terrestrial laboratories, would greatly increase the understanding of the Martian paleoclimate. The formation of Martian clastic sedimentary rocks, under either present, low-pressure, xeric conditions or a postulated, high-pressure, hydric environment, depends upon the existence of a supply of particles, various cementing agents and depositional basins. A very high resolution (mm-cm range) photographic reconnaissance of these areas would produce a quantum jump in the understanding of Martian geological history. Sampling would be confined to more horizontal (recent) surfaces. Exploration techniques are suggested for various hypothetical Martian sedimentary rocks.

  19. Stepwise drowning of the urgonian carbonate platform and the sedimentary regime during the Mid-Cretaceous environmental crisis: new evidence from the Helvetic Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linder, P.; Weissert, H.; Funk, H.; Föllmi, K. B.

    2003-04-01

    In the region of Anzeindaz (Ct. Vaud, Switzerland) the sedimentary succession of the so-called "Urgonian" of the Schrattenkalk Formation (late Barremian to early Aptian in age) and of the Garschella Formation (early Aptian to late Cenomanian in age) is well developed. These outcrops in the helvetic Morcles nappe are particularly appropriate to study the drowning events that lead to the disappearance of the urgonian carbonate platform and the subsequent development towards a sedimentary regime of condensation and authigenesis. Cavities with infillings of Garschella Formation sediments penetrating the Schrattenkalk limestone up to 20 meters deep are interpreted as karstic erosional cavities and/or neptunian dikes. The most interesting finding was the special way in which the drowning of the urgonian carbonate platform is documented. At one outcrop (La Corde) thin relics of a bed interpreted as the Upper Orbitolina Bed seem to be integrated in the Garschella Formation since it separates relics of at least two phosphoritic beds, probably the Luitere Bed but also an older bed that was not described by Föllmi and Ouwehand (1987). In fact a diploma student at the University of Neuchâtel, François Gainon (2001) just recently rediscovered and correctly interpreted a similar but less condensed succession in the nearby Rawil region that was first described (but misinterpreted) by Schaub (1936). Gainon named this older phosphoritic horizon of the Rawil region "Plaine Morte Bed" and he was able to date it with an ammonite of the earliest Aptian Weissi/Tuarkyricus Zones. In both the Rawil and Anzeindaz regions the whole ensemble is deposited over an erosive unconformity cutting off the Schrattenkalk limestone. The sedimentary succession of the Garschella Formation in the Anzeindaz region contains equivalents of nearly all beds described and defined in the type outcrops of eastern Switzerland and Austria (Föllmi &Ouwehand 1987). The study of these sediments revealed new

  20. Sedimentary Rocks of Aram Chaos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    4 February 2004 Aram Chaos is a large meteor impact crater that was nearly filled with sediment. Over time, this sediment was hardened to form sedimentary rock. Today, much of the eastern half of the crater has exposures of light-toned sedimentary rock, such as the outcrops shown in this Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image. The picture is located near 2.0oN, 20.3oW, and covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  1. Polygon/Cracked Sedimentary Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    4 December 2004 Exposures of sedimentary rock are quite common on the surface of Mars. Less common, but found in many craters in the regions north and northwest of the giant basin, Hellas, are sedimentary rocks with distinct polygonal cracks in them. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an example from the floor of an unnamed crater near 21.0oS, 311.9oW. Such cracks might have formed by desiccation as an ancient lake dried up, or they might be related to ground ice freeze/thaw cycles or some other stresses placed on the original sediment or the rock after it became lithified. The 300 meter scale bar is about 328 yards long. The scene is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  2. Polygon/Cracked Sedimentary Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    4 December 2004 Exposures of sedimentary rock are quite common on the surface of Mars. Less common, but found in many craters in the regions north and northwest of the giant basin, Hellas, are sedimentary rocks with distinct polygonal cracks in them. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an example from the floor of an unnamed crater near 21.0oS, 311.9oW. Such cracks might have formed by desiccation as an ancient lake dried up, or they might be related to ground ice freeze/thaw cycles or some other stresses placed on the original sediment or the rock after it became lithified. The 300 meter scale bar is about 328 yards long. The scene is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  3. Sedimentary Rocks of Aram Chaos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    10 May 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows outcroppings of light-toned, layered, sedimentary rock within Aram Chaos, an ancient, partly-filled impact crater located near 3.2oN, 19.9oW. This 1.5 meters (5 feet) per pixel picture is illuminated by sunlight from the left and covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across.

  4. Sedimentary Rocks in Ladon Vallis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    25 January 2004 This is a Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) picture of an outcrop of light-toned, layered, sedimentary rock exposed by erosion in Ladon Vallis. These rocks preserve clues to the martian past. However, like books in a library, one needs to go there and check them out if one wishes to read what the layers have to say. This November 2003 picture is located near 21.1oS, 29.8oW, and covers an area 3km (1.9 mi.) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  5. Sedimentary rocks of early Mars.

    PubMed

    Malin, M C; Edgett, K S

    2000-12-08

    Layered and massive outcrops on Mars, some as thick as 4 kilometers, display the geomorphic attributes and stratigraphic relations of sedimentary rock. Repeated beds in some locations imply a dynamic depositional environment during early martian history. Subaerial (such as eolian, impact, and volcaniclastic) and subaqueous processes may have contributed to the formation of the layers. Affinity for impact craters suggests dominance of lacustrine deposition; alternatively, the materials were deposited in a dry, subaerial setting in which atmospheric density, and variations thereof mimic a subaqueous depositional environment. The source regions and transport paths for the materials are not preserved.

  6. Multisensor classification of sedimentary rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Diane

    1988-01-01

    A comparison is made between linear discriminant analysis and supervised classification results based on signatures from the Landsat TM, the Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS), and airborne SAR, alone and combined into extended spectral signatures for seven sedimentary rock units exposed on the margin of the Wind River Basin, Wyoming. Results from a linear discriminant analysis showed that training-area classification accuracies based on the multisensor data were improved an average of 15 percent over TM alone, 24 percent over TIMS alone, and 46 percent over SAR alone, with similar improvement resulting when supervised multisensor classification maps were compared to supervised, individual sensor classification maps. When training area signatures were used to map spectrally similar materials in an adjacent area, the average classification accuracy improved 19 percent using the multisensor data over TM alone, 2 percent over TIMS alone, and 11 percent over SAR alone. It is concluded that certain sedimentary lithologies may be accurately mapped using a single sensor, but classification of a variety of rock types can be improved using multisensor data sets that are sensitive to different characteristics such as mineralogy and surface roughness.

  7. Elastic Properties of Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melendez Martinez, Jaime

    Sedimentary rocks are an important research topic since such rocks are associated to sources of ground water as well as oil, gas, and mineral reservoirs. In this work, elastic and physical properties of a variety of sedimentary samples that include glacial sediments, carbonates, shales, one evaporite, and one argillite from a variety of locations are investigated. Assuming vertical transverse isotropy, ultrasonic compressional- and shear-waves (at 1 MHz central frequency) were measured as a function of confining pressure on all samples with the exception of glacial samples which were tested assuming isotropy. Tensile strength tests (Brazilian test) were also carried out on selected glacial samples and, in addition, static-train measurements were conducted on shales and argillite samples. Lithological and textural features of samples were obtained through thin section techniques, scanning electron microscopy images and micro-tomography images. X-ray diffraction and X-Ray fluorescence provided the mineralogical oxides content information. Porosity, density, and pore structure were studied by using a mercury intrusion porosimeter and a helium pycnometer. The wide range of porosities of the studied samples (ranging from a minimum of 1% for shales to a maximum 45% for some glacial sediments) influence the measured velocities since high porosity sample shows an noticeable velocity increment as confining pressure increases as a consequence of closure of microcracks and pores, unlike low porosity samples where increment is quasi-lineal. Implementation of Gassmann's relation to ultrasonic velocities obtained from glacial samples has negligible impact on them when assuming water saturated samples, which suggests that state of saturation it is no so important in defining such velocities and instead they are mainly frame-controlled. On the other hand, velocities measured on carbonate and evaporite samples show that samples are at best weak anisotropic, thus the intrinsic

  8. Evolution of sedimentary rock formation of a rock association level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, V. G.

    2017-07-01

    The evolution of sedimentary rock formation of a highly organized level (paragenetic rock associations) is more complex than that of a poorly organized level (rocks). Subjacent rock associations are established for the entire geological evolution of the Earth: they varied in time and were obsolescent or, in contrast, nascent and momentary. A certain cyclicity of evolution is identified along with directed changes.

  9. Sedimentary Rock Layers on a Crater Floor

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-05-20

    This image from NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter covers layered sedimentary rocks on the floor of an impact crater north of Eberswalde Crater. There may have been a lake in this crater billions of years ago.

  10. The mid-Cretaceous super plume, carbon dioxide, and global warming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldeira, Ken; Rampino, Michael R.

    1991-01-01

    Carbon-dioxide releases associated with a mid-Cretaceous super plume and the emplacement of the Ontong-Java Plateau have been suggested as a principal cause of the mid-Cretaceous global warming. A carbonate-silicate cycle model is developed to quantify the possible climatic effects of these CO2 releases, utilizing four different formulations for the rate of silicate-rock weathering as a function of atmospheric CO2. CO2 emissions resulting from super-plume tectonics could have produced atmospheric CO2 levels from 3.7 to 14.7 times the modern preindustrial value of 285 ppm. Based on the temperature sensitivity to CO2 increases used in the weathering-rate formulations, this would cause a global warming of from 2.8 to 7.7 C over today's glogal mean temperature. Altered continental positions and higher sea level may have been contributed about 4.8 C to mid-Cretaceous warming. Thus, the combined effects of paleogeographic changes and super-plume related CO2 emissions could be in the range of 7.6 to 12.5 C, within the 6 to 14 C range previously estimated for mid-Cretaceous warming. CO2 releases from oceanic plateaus alone are unlikely to have been directly responsible for more than 20 percent of the mid-Cretaceous increase in atmospheric CO2.

  11. The mid-Cretaceous super plume, carbon dioxide, and global warming

    SciTech Connect

    Caldeira, K. ); Rampino, M.R. NASA Goddard Inst. for Space Studies, New York, NY )

    1991-06-01

    Carbon-dioxide releases associated with a mid-Cretaceous super plume and the emplacement of the Ontong-Java Plateau have been suggested as a principal cause of the mid-Cretaceous global warming. The authors developed a carbonate-silicate cycle model to quantify the possible climatic effects of these CO{sub 2} releases, utilizing four different formulations for the rate of silicate-rock weathering as a function of atmospheric CO{sub 2}. They find that CO{sub 2} emissions resulting from super-plume tectonics could have produced atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels from 3.7 to 14.7 times the modern pre-industrial value of 285 ppm. Based on the temperature sensitivity to CO{sub 2} increases used in the weathering-rate formulations, this would cause a global warming of from 2.8 to 7.7C over today's global mean temperature. Altered continental positions and higher sea level may have been contributed about 4.8C to mid-Cretaceous warming. Thus, the combined effects of paleogeographic changes and super-plume related CO{sub 2} emissions could be in the range of 7.6 to 12.5C, within the 6 to 14C range previously estimated for mid-Cretaceous warming. CO{sub 2} releases from oceanic plateaus alone are unlikely to have been directly responsible for more than 20% of the mid-Cretaceous increase in atmospheric CO{sub 2}.

  12. The mid-Cretaceous super plume, carbon dioxide, and global warming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldeira, Ken; Rampino, Michael R.

    1991-01-01

    Carbon-dioxide releases associated with a mid-Cretaceous super plume and the emplacement of the Ontong-Java Plateau have been suggested as a principal cause of the mid-Cretaceous global warming. A carbonate-silicate cycle model is developed to quantify the possible climatic effects of these CO2 releases, utilizing four different formulations for the rate of silicate-rock weathering as a function of atmospheric CO2. CO2 emissions resulting from super-plume tectonics could have produced atmospheric CO2 levels from 3.7 to 14.7 times the modern preindustrial value of 285 ppm. Based on the temperature sensitivity to CO2 increases used in the weathering-rate formulations, this would cause a global warming of from 2.8 to 7.7 C over today's glogal mean temperature. Altered continental positions and higher sea level may have been contributed about 4.8 C to mid-Cretaceous warming. Thus, the combined effects of paleogeographic changes and super-plume related CO2 emissions could be in the range of 7.6 to 12.5 C, within the 6 to 14 C range previously estimated for mid-Cretaceous warming. CO2 releases from oceanic plateaus alone are unlikely to have been directly responsible for more than 20 percent of the mid-Cretaceous increase in atmospheric CO2.

  13. The mid-Cretaceous super plume, carbon dioxide, and global warming.

    PubMed

    Caldeira, K; Rampino, M R

    1991-06-01

    Carbon-dioxide releases associated with a mid-Cretaceous super plume and the emplacement of the Ontong-Java Plateau have been suggested as a principal cause of the mid-Cretaceous global warming. We developed a carbonate-silicate cycle model to quantify the possible climatic effects of these CO2 releases, utilizing four different formulations for the rate of silicate-rock weathering as a function of atmospheric CO2. We find that CO2 emissions resulting from super-plume tectonics could have produced atmospheric CO2 levels from 3.7 to 14.7 times the modern pre-industrial value of 285 ppm. Based on the temperature sensitivity to CO2 increases used in the weathering-rate formulations, this would cause a global warming of from 2.8 to 7.7 degrees C over today's global mean temperature. Altered continental positions and higher sea level may have been contributed about 4.8 degrees C to mid-Cretaceous warming. Thus, the combined effects of paleogeographic changes and super-plume related CO2 emissions could be in the range of 7.6 to 12.5 degrees C, within the 6 to 14 degrees C range previously estimated for mid-Cretaceous warming. CO2 releases from oceanic plateaus alone are unlikely to have been directly responsible for more than 20% of the mid-Cretaceous increase in atmospheric CO2.

  14. Paleozoic sedimentary rocks in oaxaca, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Pantoja-Alor, J; Robison, R A

    1967-09-01

    Fossiliferous Cambrian, Ordovician, Mississippian, and Pennsylvanian rocks, never before found in southern Mexico, have been discovered in the Nochixtlán region. Superjacent unfossiliferous sedimentary rocks may be Permian in age. Early Paleozoic and late Paleozoic intervals of marine sedimentation were bounded by intervals of positive tectonism and erosion.

  15. Sedimentary Rocks and Methane - Southwest Arabia Terra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Carlton C.; Oehler, Dorothy Z.; Venechuk, Elizabeth M.

    2006-01-01

    We propose to land the Mars Science Laboratory in southwest Arabia Terra to study two key aspects of martian history the extensive record of sedimentary rocks and the continuing release of methane. The results of this exploration will directly address the MSL Scientific Objectives regarding biological potential, geology and geochemistry, and past habitability.

  16. Permanganate diffusion and reaction in sedimentary rocks.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qiuyuan; Dong, Hailiang; Towne, Rachael M; Fischer, Timothy B; Schaefer, Charles E

    2014-04-01

    In situ chemical oxidation using permanganate has frequently been used to treat chlorinated solvents in fractured bedrock aquifers. However, in systems where matrix back-diffusion is an important process, the ability of the oxidant to migrate and treat target contaminants within the rock matrix will likely determine the overall effectiveness of this remedial approach. In this study, a series of diffusion experiments were performed to measure the permanganate diffusion and reaction in four different types of sedimentary rocks (dark gray mudstone, light gray mudstone, red sandstone, and tan sandstone). Results showed that, within the experimental time frame (~2 months), oxidant migration into the rock was limited to distances less than 500 μm. The observed diffusivities for permanganate into the rock matrices ranged from 5.3 × 10(-13) to 1.3 × 10(-11) cm(2)/s. These values were reasonably predicted by accounting for both the rock oxidant demand and the effective diffusivity of the rock. Various Mn minerals formed as surface coatings from reduction of permanganate coupled with oxidation of total organic carbon (TOC), and the nature of the formed Mn minerals was dependent upon the rock type. Post-treatment tracer testing showed that these Mn mineral coatings had a negligible impact on diffusion through the rock. Overall, our results showed that the extent of permanganate diffusion and reaction depended on rock properties, including porosity, mineralogy, and organic carbon. These results have important implications for our understanding of long-term organic contaminant remediation in sedimentary rocks using permanganate. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Understanding redox conditions in the mid-Cretaceous Baffin Bay - a combined model-data approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenniger, M.; Bjerrum, C. J.; Pedersen, G. K.; Azhar, M. Al

    2012-04-01

    Cretaceous events of widespread oceanic anoxia are characterized by perturbations in the global carbon cycle and accompanied increased carbon burial in marine sediments. Their occurrence is thought to have been linked to an interaction of greenhouse conditions, palaeogeography and increased nutrient discharge, which led to enhanced surface productivity and improved conditions for carbon preservation. One of the most widespread oceanic anoxic events is the Cenomanian-Turonian boundary event (OAE2). Evidence for anoxic or even euxinic conditions during OAE2 is mainly observed in the Western Interior Seaway and at low- and mid-palaeolatitudes in the proto-Atlantic. However, our understanding of the distribution and characteristics of OAE2 in high palaeolatitudes is still incomplete. In order to investigate the palaeoceanographic conditions in high palaeolatitudes in the mid-Cretaceous, we studied the Umiivik-I stratigraphic core from West Greenland using an integrated approach combining sedimentology and geochemistry with three dimensional regional ocean modeling. Sedimentary rocks from the Umiivik-I core show relative high TOC contents with values up to about 5 %. The organic carbon-to-pyrite sulphur ratio (C/S-ratio) indicates that the organic matter (OM) is predominantly of normal marine origin. Increased C/S-ratios are caused by intermittent input of terrestrial OM and indicate fluctuations in runoff. Redox sensitive trace metal concentrations (e.g. Mo, U and V) were measured in bulk rock samples in order to reconstruct the redox conditions during the deposition. The concentrations of the trace metals (TM) are relatively low and in the same range as reported for average shale reference material. The low TM concentrations in the Umiivik-I core are indicative of deposition under oxygenated bottom water conditions in contrast to usually observed high TM concentrations in anoxic depositional environments during the mid-Cretaceous. These findings are exceptional due to

  18. Remote sensing of some sedimentary rocks.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brennan, P. A.; Lintz, J., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    Sedimentary rocks including varying sized clastics and carbonates were overflown by aircraft between 1966 and 1971 producing data in the ultraviolet to microwave regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. This paper reports that multispectral analysis increases the ease and rapidity of discrimination of rock types having subtle differences in physical characteristics, but fails to enhance and may degrade distinctions where physical characteristics are significantly different. Brief resumes of color and color IR photographic data are presented. Thermal infrared is found to be useful in the mapping of rock units, but limitations such as moisture variation, soil cover, and vegetation may exceed in one formation the distinction between differing lithologies. A brief review of previously published SLAR data is included for completeness. Remote sensing techniques should reduce field geological effort by as much as 50%.

  19. Triple oxygen isotope variations in sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Naomi E.; Raub, Timothy D.; Dauphas, Nicolas; Eiler, John M.

    2014-08-01

    Relatively large (⩾0.2‰) 17O anomalies in the geologic record have been used to recognize atmospheric processes such as photochemical reactions and to trace changes in the partial pressures of O2 and CO2 in Earth’s atmosphere through time. However, recent oxygen isotope measurements of terrestrial rocks, minerals and waters also reveal common, smaller (but statistically significant) deviations from a single mass-dependent fractionation line. These subtle anomalies have been explained through differences in mass-dependent isotopic fractionations for various equilibrium and kinetic mechanisms. Here we present triple oxygen isotope data on sedimentary silica and oxides, including Archean and Phanerozoic cherts, and iron formations. The distribution of data reflects the mass fractionation laws of low-temperature precipitation reactions during growth of authigenic minerals, variation in Δ17O of the waters from which sedimentary minerals precipitate, and equilibrium exchange after initial authigenic formation. We use these results to illustrate the potential for small, mass-dependent variations in Δ17O values of sedimentary rocks to provide constraints on the environmental and climatic conditions in which they formed.

  20. Copper Deposits in Sedimentary and Volcanogenic Rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tourtelot, Elizabeth B.; Vine, James David

    1976-01-01

    Copper deposits occur in sedimentary and volcanogenic rocks within a wide variety of geologic environments where there may be little or no evidence of hydrothermal alteration. Some deposits may be hypogene and have a deep-seated source for the ore fluids, but because of rapid cooling and dilution during syngenetic deposition on the ocean floor, the resulting deposits are not associated with hydrothermal alteration. Many of these deposits are formed at or near major tectonic features on the Earth's crust, including plate boundaries, rift valleys, and island arcs. The resulting ore bodies may be stratabound and either massive or disseminated. Other deposits form in rocks deposited in shallow-marine, deltaic, and nonmarine environments by the movement and reaction of interstratal brines whose metal content is derived from buried sedimentary and volcanic rocks. Some of the world's largest copper deposits were probably formed in this manner. This process we regard as diagenetic, but some would regard it as syngenetic, if the ore metals are derived from disseminated metal in the host-rock sequence, and others would regard the process as epigenetic, if there is demonstrable evidence of ore cutting across bedding. Because the oxidation associated with diagenetic red beds releases copper to ground-water solutions, red rocks and copper deposits are commonly associated. However, the ultimate size, shape, and mineral zoning of a deposit result from local conditions at the site of deposition - a logjam in fluvial channel sandstone may result in an irregular tabular body of limited size; a petroleum-water interface in an oil pool may result in a copper deposit limited by the size and shape of the petroleum reservoir; a persistent thin bed of black shale may result in a copper deposit the size and shape of that single bed. The process of supergene enrichment has been largely overlooked in descriptions of copper deposits in sedimentary rocks. However, supergene processes may be

  1. Discordant mid-Cretaceous paleomagnetic pole from the Zaza Terrane of central Cuba

    SciTech Connect

    Renne, P.R.; Doppelhammer, S.K.; Hargraves, R.B. ); Scott, G.; Cala, E.L.

    1991-03-01

    Thermal demagnetization of samples from five sites in mid-Cretaceous volcaniclastic and carbonate rocks of south-central Cuba reveals two or more components of magnetization. A pre-folding magnetite borne component is recognized in all, but was difficult to isolate from secondary components in many specimens. Remagnetization circle analysis, using data for 42 specimens from all five sites, yields a pole at 30.7{degree}N Lat., 193.3{degree}E Long. This pole is discordant with respect to the North American APWP, indicating 43{degree} {plus minus} 16{degree} of anticlockwise rotation and 8{degree} {plus minus} 6{degree} of northward displacement since the mid-Cretaceous. This result suggests that part or all of Cuba was transported on the Caribbean plate before accretion to North America in the Eocene.

  2. A Feathered Dinosaur Tail with Primitive Plumage Trapped in Mid-Cretaceous Amber.

    PubMed

    Xing, Lida; McKellar, Ryan C; Xu, Xing; Li, Gang; Bai, Ming; Persons, W Scott; Miyashita, Tetsuto; Benton, Michael J; Zhang, Jianping; Wolfe, Alexander P; Yi, Qiru; Tseng, Kuowei; Ran, Hao; Currie, Philip J

    2016-12-19

    In the two decades since the discovery of feathered dinosaurs [1-3], the range of plumage known from non-avialan theropods has expanded significantly, confirming several features predicted by developmentally informed models of feather evolution [4-10]. However, three-dimensional feather morphology and evolutionary patterns remain difficult to interpret, due to compression in sedimentary rocks [9, 11]. Recent discoveries in Cretaceous amber from Canada, France, Japan, Lebanon, Myanmar, and the United States [12-18] reveal much finer levels of structural detail, but taxonomic placement is uncertain because plumage is rarely associated with identifiable skeletal material [14]. Here we describe the feathered tail of a non-avialan theropod preserved in mid-Cretaceous (∼99 Ma) amber from Kachin State, Myanmar [17], with plumage structure that directly informs the evolutionary developmental pathway of feathers. This specimen provides an opportunity to document pristine feathers in direct association with a putative juvenile coelurosaur, preserving fine morphological details, including the spatial arrangement of follicles and feathers on the body, and micrometer-scale features of the plumage. Many feathers exhibit a short, slender rachis with alternating barbs and a uniform series of contiguous barbules, supporting the developmental hypothesis that barbs already possessed barbules when they fused to form the rachis [19]. Beneath the feathers, carbonized soft tissues offer a glimpse of preservational potential and history for the inclusion; abundant Fe(2+) suggests that vestiges of primary hemoglobin and ferritin remain trapped within the tail. The new finding highlights the unique preservation potential of amber for understanding the morphology and evolution of coelurosaurian integumentary structures.

  3. Mid-Latitude Sedimentary Rock: Spallanzani Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Although most of the best examples of layered sedimentary rock seen on Mars are found at equatorial and sub-tropical latitudes, a few locations seen at mid- and high-latitudes suggest that layered rocks are probably more common than we can actually see from orbit. One extremely good example of these 'atypical' layered rock exposures is found in the 72 km-diameter (45 miles) crater, Spallanzani (58.4oS, 273.5oW). Located southeast of Hellas Planitia, the crater is named for the 18th Century Italian biologist, Lazzaro Spallanzani (1729-1799). Picture A presents a composite of the best Viking orbiter image (VO2-504B55) of the region with 4 pictures obtained June 1999 through January 2001 by the Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC). Each MOC narrow angle image is 3 km across. Taken in the MOC's 'survey mode,' all four images were acquired at roughly 12 meters (39 ft) per pixel. Picture B zooms-in on the portion of the composite image that includes the 4 MOC images (the 100%-size view is 20 m (66 ft) per pixel). Other craters in the region near Spallanzani show features--at Viking Orbiter scale--that are reminiscent of the layering seen in Spallanzani. Exactly what these layers are made of and how they came to be where we see them today are mysteries, but it is possible that they are similar to the materials seen in the many craters and chasms of the equatorial latitudes on Mars.

  4. Mid-Latitude Sedimentary Rock: Spallanzani Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Although most of the best examples of layered sedimentary rock seen on Mars are found at equatorial and sub-tropical latitudes, a few locations seen at mid- and high-latitudes suggest that layered rocks are probably more common than we can actually see from orbit. One extremely good example of these 'atypical' layered rock exposures is found in the 72 km-diameter (45 miles) crater, Spallanzani (58.4oS, 273.5oW). Located southeast of Hellas Planitia, the crater is named for the 18th Century Italian biologist, Lazzaro Spallanzani (1729-1799). Picture A presents a composite of the best Viking orbiter image (VO2-504B55) of the region with 4 pictures obtained June 1999 through January 2001 by the Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC). Each MOC narrow angle image is 3 km across. Taken in the MOC's 'survey mode,' all four images were acquired at roughly 12 meters (39 ft) per pixel. Picture B zooms-in on the portion of the composite image that includes the 4 MOC images (the 100%-size view is 20 m (66 ft) per pixel). Other craters in the region near Spallanzani show features--at Viking Orbiter scale--that are reminiscent of the layering seen in Spallanzani. Exactly what these layers are made of and how they came to be where we see them today are mysteries, but it is possible that they are similar to the materials seen in the many craters and chasms of the equatorial latitudes on Mars.

  5. Reconstructing a mid-Cretaceous landscape from paleosols in western Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ufnar, David F.; Gonzalez, Luis A.; Ludvigson, Greg A.; Brenner, Richard L.; Witzke, B.J.; Leckie, D.

    2005-01-01

    The Albian Stage of the mid-Cretaceous was a time of equable climate conditions with high sea levels and broad shallow epeiric seas that may have had a moderating affect on continental climates. A Late Albian landscape surface that developed during a regression and subsequent sea-level rise in the Western Canada Foreland Basin is reconstructed on the basis of correlation of paleosols penetrated by cores through the Paddy Member of the Peace River Formation. Reconstruction of this landscape refines chronostratigraphic relationships and will benefit future paleoclimatological studies milizing continental sphaerosiderite proxy records. The paleosols developed in estuarine sandstones and mudstones, and they exhibit evidence of a polygenetic history. Upon initial exposure and pedogenesis, the Paddy Member developed deeply weathered, well-drained cumulative soil profiles. Later stages of pedogenesis were characterized by hydromorphic soil conditions. The stages of soil development interpreted for the Paddy Member correlate with inferred stages of pedogenic development in time-equivalent formations located both basinward and downslope (upper Viking Formation), and landward and upslope (Boulder Creek Formation). On the basis of the genetic similarity among paleosols in these three correlative formations, the paleosols are interpreted as having formed along a single, continuous landscape surface. Results of this study indicate that the catena concept of pedogenesis along sloping landscapes is applicable to ancient successions. Sphaerosiderites in the Paddy Mem ber paleosols are used to provide proxy values for meteoric ??18O values at 52?? N paleolatitude in the Cretaceous Western Interior Basin. The meteoric ??18O values are used to refine existing interpretations about the mid-Cretaceous paleolatitudinal gradient in meteoric ?? 18O values, and the mid-Cretaceous hydrologic cycle. Copyright ?? 2005, SEPM (Society for Sedimentary Geology).

  6. Excess europium content in Precambrian sedimentary rocks and continental evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakes, P.; Taylor, S. R.

    1974-01-01

    It is proposed that the europium excess in Precambrian sedimentary rocks, relative to those of younger age, is derived from volcanic rocks of ancient island arcs, which were the source materials for the sediments. Precambrian sedimentary rocks and present-day volcanic rocks of island arcs have similar REE patterns, total REE abundances, and excess Eu, relative to the North American shale composite. The present upper crustal REE pattern, as exemplified by that of sediments, is depleted in Eu, relative to chondrites. This depletion is considered to be a consequence of development of a granodioritic upper crust by partial melting in the lower crust, which selectively retains europium.

  7. A Sedimentary Rock Classification Scheme for Introductory Geology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Larry Eugene; Eves, Robert Leo

    1986-01-01

    Presents a classification scheme for identifying sedimentary rocks in introductory geology laboratories. The key consists of an ordered sequence of tests to perform and observations to make which then suggests a rock name or directs the student to additional tests and/or observations. (ML)

  8. A Sedimentary Rock Classification Scheme for Introductory Geology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Larry Eugene; Eves, Robert Leo

    1986-01-01

    Presents a classification scheme for identifying sedimentary rocks in introductory geology laboratories. The key consists of an ordered sequence of tests to perform and observations to make which then suggests a rock name or directs the student to additional tests and/or observations. (ML)

  9. Clastic sedimentary rocks of the Michipicoten Volcanic-sedimentary belt, Wawa, Ontario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ojakangas, R. W.

    1983-01-01

    The Wawa area, part of the Michipicoten greenstone belt, contains rock assemblages representative of volcanic sedimentary accumulations elsewhere on the shield. Three mafic to felsic metavolcanic sequences and cogenetic granitic rocks range in age from 2749 + or - 2Ma to 2696 + or - 2Ma. Metasedimentary rocks occur between the metavolcanic sequences. The total thickness of the supracrustal rocks may be 10,000 m. Most rocks have been metamorphosed under greenschist conditions. The belt has been studied earlier and is currently being remapped by Sage. The sedimentrologic work has been briefly summarized; two mainfacies associations of clastic sedimentary rocks are present - a Resedimented (Turbidite) Facies Association and a Nonmarine (Alluvial Fan Fluvial) Facies Association.

  10. Folding and faulting of strain-hardening sedimentary rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, A.M.

    1980-01-01

    The question of whether single- or multi-layers of sedimentary rocks will fault or fold when subjected to layer-parallel shortening is investigated by means of the theory of elastic-plastic, strain-hardening materials, which should closely describe the properties of sedimentary rocks at high levels in the Earth's crust. The most attractive feature of the theory is that folding and faulting, intimately related in nature, are different responses of the same idealized material to different conditions. When single-layers of sedimentary rock behave much as strain-hardening materials they are unlikely to fold, rather they tend to fault, because contrasts in elasticity and strength properties of sedimentary rocks are low. Amplifications of folds in such materials are negligible whether contacts between layer and media are bonded or free to slip for single layers of dolomite, limestone, sandstone, or siltstone in media of shale. Multilayers of these same rocks fault rather than fold if contacts are bonded, but they fold readily if contacts between layers are frictionless, or have low yield strengths, for example due to high pore-water pressure. Faults may accompany the folds, occurring where compression is increased in cores of folds. Where there is predominant reverse faulting in sedimentary sequences, there probably were few structural units. ?? 1980.

  11. Sedimentary Rocks of the Buckeye Range, Horlick Mountains, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Long, W E

    1962-04-27

    In the Buckeye Range of the Horlick Mountains, 4000 feet of sedimentary rocks nonconformably overlie a granitic basement and underlie a thick diabasic sill. The sedimentary section consists of Devonian sandstone and shale (Horlick formation), Carboniferous (?) tillite (Buckeye formation), Permian (?) platy and carbonaceous shale (Discovery Ridge formation), and Permian arkose, shale, and numerous coal beds (Mount Glossopteris formation). This apparently is the first report of a Paleozoic tillite in Antarctica.

  12. Fracture of sedimentary rocks under a complex triaxial stress state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karev, V. I.; Klimov, D. M.; Kovalenko, Yu. F.; Ustinov, K. B.

    2016-09-01

    Most sedimentary rocks have layered structure, and their strength properties are therefore anisotropic; as a consequence, the rock strength depends on the direction of the applied stresses. In this case, various fracture mechanisms are possible. The following two possible fracture mechanisms are considered: actions along the bedding planes, which are weakening surfaces, and along the planes where stresses exceeding the total rock strength are attained. A triaxial independent loading test bench was used to study the fracture conditions for layered rocks composed of productive oil-and-gas strata in complex true triaxial loading tests. The study shows a good qualitative agreement between experimental results and theoretical estimates.

  13. Quantitative compositional analysis of sedimentary materials using thermal emission spectroscopy: 1. Application to sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, Michael T.; Rogers, A. Deanne; Bristow, Thomas F.; Pan, Cong

    2015-11-01

    Thermal emission spectroscopy is used to determine the mineralogy of sandstone and mudstone rocks as part of an investigation of linear spectral mixing between sedimentary constituent phases. With widespread occurrences of sedimentary rocks on the surface of Mars, critical examination of the accuracy associated with quantitative models of mineral abundances derived from thermal emission spectra of sedimentary materials is necessary. Although thermal emission spectroscopy has been previously proven to be a viable technique to obtain quantitative mineralogy from igneous and metamorphic materials, sedimentary rocks, with natural variation of composition, compaction, and grain size, have yet to be examined. In this work, we present an analysis of the thermal emission spectral (~270-1650 cm-1) characteristics of a suite of 13 sandstones and 14 mudstones. X-ray diffraction and traditional point counting procedures were all evaluated in comparison with thermal emission spectroscopy. Results from this work are consistent with previous thermal emission spectroscopy studies and indicate that bulk rock mineral abundances can be estimated within 11.2% for detrital grains (i.e., quartz and feldspars) and 14.8% for all other mineral phases present in both sandstones and mudstones, in comparison to common in situ techniques used for determining bulk rock composition. Clay-sized to fine silt-sized grained phase identification is less accurate, with differences from the known ranging from ~5 to 24% on average. Nevertheless, linear least squares modeling of thermal emission spectra is an advantageous technique for determining abundances of detrital grains and sedimentary matrix and for providing a rapid classification of clastic rocks.

  14. Using Aluminum Foil to Record Structures in Sedimentary Rock.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metz, Robert

    1982-01-01

    Aluminum foil can be used to make impressions of structures preserved in sedimentary rock. The impressions can be projected onto a screen, photographed, or a Plaster of Paris model can be made from them. Impressions of ripple marks, mudcracks, and raindrop impressions are provided in photographs illustrating the technique. (Author/JN)

  15. Using Aluminum Foil to Record Structures in Sedimentary Rock.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metz, Robert

    1982-01-01

    Aluminum foil can be used to make impressions of structures preserved in sedimentary rock. The impressions can be projected onto a screen, photographed, or a Plaster of Paris model can be made from them. Impressions of ripple marks, mudcracks, and raindrop impressions are provided in photographs illustrating the technique. (Author/JN)

  16. Chemical composition of sedimentary rocks in California and Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, Thelma P.

    1981-01-01

    A compilation of published chemical analyses of sedimentary rocks of the United States was undertaken by the U.S. Geological Survey in 1952 to make available scattered data that are needed for a wide range of economic and scientific uses. About 20,000-25,000 chemical analyses of sedimentary rocks in the United States have been published. This report brings together 2,312 of these analyses from California and Hawaii. The samples are arranged by general lithologic characteristics and locality. Indexes of stratigraphy, rock name, commercial uses, and minor elements are provided. The sedimentary rocks are classified into groups and into categories according to the chemical analyses. The groups (A through F2) are defined by a system similar to that proposed by Brian Mason in 1952, in which the main parameters are the three major components of sedimentary rocks: (1) uncombined silica, (2) clay (R203 ? 3Si02 ? nH20), and (3) calcium-magnesium carbonate. The categories are based on the degree of admixture of these three major components with other components, such as sulfate, phos- phate, and iron oxide. Common-rock, mixed-rock, and special-rock categories apply to rocks consisting of 85 percent or more, 50-84 percent, and less than 49 percent, respectively, of the three major components combined. Maps show distribution of sample localities by States; triangular diagrams show the lithologic characteristics and classification groups. Cumulative-frequency curves of each constituent in each classification group of the common-rock and mixed-rock categories are also included. The numerous analyses may not adequately represent the geochemical nature of the rock types and formations of the region because of sampling bias. Maps showing distribution of sample localities indicate that many of the localities are in areas where, for economic or other reasons, special problems attracted interest. Most of the analyzed rocks tended to be fairly simple in composition - mainly mixtures of

  17. Mid-Cretaceous unconformity in the Methow basin, north-central Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Haugerud, R.A.; Hurlow, H.A. ); Tabor, R.W. ); Snee, L.W. )

    1993-04-01

    New mapping in the Methow basin demonstrates a significant unconformity beneath mid-Cretaceous strata of the Pasayten Group and may explain stratigraphic contrasts puzzling to earlier workers. The Pasayten Group, defined along regional strike to the north in Manning Park, includes Virginia Ridge Fm. (shallow-marine argillite and chert-clast-rich sandstone and conglomerate), Winthrop Sandstone (fluvial arkose), and Midnight Peak Fm. (redbeds and andesitic volcanic rocks) in ascending stratigraphic order. Local unconformities and lateral gradations amongst Pasayten Group units result in no one unit lying above the unconformity. Hornblende from Midnight Peak andesite on Isabella Ridge yields an [sup 40]Ar-[sup 39]Ar age of 87.0 [+-] 0.4 (1[sigma]) Ma, though Pasayten Group strata elsewhere are intruded by 88--90 Ma plutons and thus much of the unit is older. From west to east the Pasayten Group lies on progressively older strata. In upper Three Fools Creek, west of the Cascade crest, it lies on unnamed marine strata, more than 1 km thick, which conformably overlie 3 km of sand-rich turbidites of the Albian Harts Pass Fm. In the Osceola Peak-Harts Pass area it lies on upper Harts Pass turbidites. Southwest of Monument 85 and west of Hidden Lakes it lies on probable Early Cretaceous (pre-Harts Pass-age) lithic marine sandstone and siltstone. On Isabella Ridge it lies on [approximately]150 Ma tonalite and older volcanic rocks. This unconformity predates most of the conspicuous thrusts and related folds that characterize the Methow basin. Adjacent to the Pasayten fault, pre- and intra-Pasayten Group unconformities have reduced the stratigraphic section to scraps of Winthrop Sandstone and probable lower Cretaceous conglomerate locally preserved between Midnight Peak andesite and older volcanic rocks, suggesting continued early and mid-Cretaceous movement along the Pasayten fault.

  18. Analysis of the Behavior of Sedimentary Rocks Under Impact Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millon, Oliver; Ruiz-Ripoll, Maria Luisa; Hoerth, Tobias

    2016-11-01

    In multiple engineering fields such as rock drilling or building constructions or extreme events like earthquakes or impacts, the dynamic properties of rock play an important role. A way to model these events and define measures to minimize the damage derived from these events is created by means of numerical analysis. Hence, the knowledge of the dynamic material behavior is essential for studying the effects of such a loading scenario. Solid geological materials, from the family of the sedimentary rocks, have been analyzed under quasi-static loads. However, there is a lack of knowledge when high strain rate loadings are involved. Within this context, the paper focuses on the experimental characterization of two sedimentary rocks, sandstone and limestone, under impact loading using the Hopkinson-Bar spallation and compression tests. The analysis encompasses the determination of the tensile and compressive properties as well as the comparison between the quasi-static and dynamic behavior (dynamic increase factors). The paper fills the gap of information existing about dynamic behavior of sedimentary rocks under strain rates between 100 and 5.2 × 102 s-1. Furthermore, the fragmentation under different strain rates is investigated and conclusions with respect to energy absorption capacity are drawn.

  19. Heavy-mineral analysis of sedimentary rocks of northern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morris, Robert Hamilton

    1952-01-01

    The Navy Oil Unit of the United States Geological Survey has been investigating the geology of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 4, northern Alaska. As part of this program, heavy-mineral samples were prepared from cores of the test wells and core holes and studied to determine stratigraphic correlations. Using the following criteria: (1) presence of diagnostic minerals or mineral suites; (2) relative abundance of specific minerals; (3) degree of rounding of mineral grains; (4) distinction as to grain form; eight heavy-mineral zones have been recognized in Triassic, Jurassic, Cretaceous, and Quaternary sedimentary rocks. Correlations based on these zones are shown. Source areas and rocks are discussed in relation to geologic history and genesis of the Mesozoic and Quaternary sedimentary rocks.

  20. Paleostress magnitudes in folded sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amrouch, Khalid; Beaudoin, Nicolas; Lacombe, Olivier; Bellahsen, Nicolas; Daniel, Jean-Marc

    2011-09-01

    Using Sheep Mountain Anticline (Wyoming, USA) as a case study, we propose a new approach to quantify effective paleo-principal stress magnitudes in the uppermost crust. The proposed mechanical scenario relies on a well-documented kinematic and chronological sequence of development of faults, fractures and microstructures in the folded strata. Paleostress orientations and regimes as well as differential stress magnitudes based on calcite twinning paleopiezometry are combined with rock mechanics data in a Mohr construction to derive principal stress magnitudes related to the successive steps of layer-parallel shortening and to late stage fold tightening. Such quantification also provides original insights into the evolution of the fluid (over)pressure and amount of syn-folding erosion.

  1. An evaluation of multiband photography for rock discrimination. [sedimentary rocks of Front Range, Colorado

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, K. (Principal Investigator); Raines, G. L.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. With the advent of ERTS and Skylab satellites, multiband imagery and photography have become readily available to geologists. The ability of multiband photography to discriminate sedimentary rocks was examined. More than 8600 in situ measurements of band reflectance of the sedimentary rocks of the Front Range, Colorado, were acquired. Statistical analysis of these measurements showed that: (1) measurements from one site can be used at another site 100 miles away; (2) there is basically only one spectral reflectance curve for these rocks, with constant amplitude differences between the curves; and (3) the natural variation is so large that at least 150 measurements per formation are required to select best filters. These conclusions are supported by subjective tests with aerial multiband photography. The designed multiband photography concept for rock discrimination is not a practical method of improving sedimentary rock discrimination capabilities.

  2. Diffusive flux and pore anisotropy in sedimentary rocks.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, C E; Towne, R M; Lazouskaya, V; Bishop, M E; Dong, H

    2012-04-01

    Diffusion of dissolved contaminants into or from bedrock matrices can have a substantial impact on both the extent and longevity of dissolved contaminant plumes. For layered rocks, bedding orientation can have a significant impact on diffusion. A series of laboratory experiments was performed on minimally disturbed bedrock cores to measure the diffusive flux both parallel and normal to mineral bedding of four different anisotropic sedimentary rocks. Measured effective diffusion coefficients ranged from 4.9×10(-8) to 6.5×10(-7)cm(2)/s. Effective diffusion coefficients differed by as great as 10-folds when comparing diffusion normal versus parallel to bedding. Differences in the effective diffusion coefficients corresponded to differences in the "apparent" porosity in the orientation of diffusion (determined by determining the fraction of pore cross-sectional area measured using scanning electron microscopy), with the difference in apparent porosity between normal and parallel bedding orientations differing by greater than 2-folds for two of the rocks studied. Existing empirical models failed to provide accurate predictions of the effective diffusion coefficient in either bedding orientation for all four rock types studied, indicating that substantial uncertainty exists when attempting to predict diffusive flux through sedimentary rocks containing mineral bedding. A modified model based on the apparent porosity of the rocks provided a reasonable prediction of the experimental diffusion data. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Determination of petrophysical properties of sedimentary rocks by optical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korte, D.; Kaukler, D.; Fanetti, M.; Cabrera, H.; Daubront, E.; Franko, M.

    2017-04-01

    Petrophysical properties of rocks (thermal diffusivity and conductivity, porosity and density) as well as the correlation between them are of great importance for many geoscientific applications. The porosity of the reservoir rocks and their permeability are the most fundamental physical properties with respect to the storage and transmission of fluids, mainly oil characterization. Accurate knowledge of these parameters for any hydrocarbon reservoir is required for efficient development, management, and prediction of future performance of the oilfield. Thus, the porosity and permeability, as well as the chemical composition must be quantified as precisely as possible. This should be done along with the thermal properties, density, conductivity, diffusivity and effusivity that are intimately related with them. For this reason, photothermal Beam Deflection Spectrometry (BDS) technique for determination of materials' thermal properties together with other methods such as Energy Dispersive X-ray Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM-EDX) for determining the chemical composition and sample structure, as well as optical microscopy to determine the particles size, were applied for characterization of sedimentary rocks. The rocks were obtained from the Andes south flank in the Venezuela's western basin. The validation of BDS applicability for determination of petrophysical properties of three sedimentary rocks of different texture and composition (all from Late Cretaceous associated with the Luna, Capacho and Colón-Mito Juan geological formations) was performed. The rocks' thermal properties were correlated to the microstructures and chemical composition of the examined samples.

  4. Permeability-porosity relationships in sedimentary rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Philip H.

    1994-01-01

    In many consolidated sandstone and carbonate formations, plots of core data show that the logarithm of permeability (k) is often linearly proportional to porosity (??). The slope, intercept, and degree of scatter of these log(k)-?? trends vary from formation to formation, and these variations are attributed to differences in initial grain size and sorting, diagenetic history, and compaction history. In unconsolidated sands, better sorting systematically increases both permeability and porosity. In sands and sandstones, an increase in gravel and coarse grain size content causes k to increase even while decreasing ??. Diagenetic minerals in the pore space of sandstones, such as cement and some clay types, tend to decrease log(k) proportionately as ?? decreases. Models to predict permeability from porosity and other measurable rock parameters fall into three classes based on either grain, surface area, or pore dimension considerations. (Models that directly incorporate well log measurements but have no particular theoretical underpinnings from a fourth class.) Grain-based models show permeability proportional to the square of grain size times porosity raised to (roughly) the fifth power, with grain sorting as an additional parameter. Surface-area models show permeability proportional to the inverse square of pore surface area times porosity raised to (roughly) the fourth power; measures of surface area include irreducible water saturation and nuclear magnetic resonance. Pore-dimension models show permeability proportional to the square of a pore dimension times porosity raised to a power of (roughly) two and produce curves of constant pore size that transgress the linear data trends on a log(k)-?? plot. The pore dimension is obtained from mercury injection measurements and is interpreted as the pore opening size of some interconnected fraction of the pore system. The linear log(k)-?? data trends cut the curves of constant pore size from the pore-dimension models

  5. Underground Research Laboratories for Crystalline Rock and Sedimentary Rock in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Shigeta, N.; Takeda, S.; Matsui, H.; Yamasaki, S.

    2003-02-27

    The Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) has started two off-site (generic) underground research laboratory (URL) projects, one for crystalline rock as a fractured media and the other for sedimentary rock as a porous media. This paper introduces an overview and current status of these projects.

  6. Rhyolitic calderas of the Yukon-Tanana Terrane, east central Alaska: volcanic remnants of a mid-Cretaceous magmatic arc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bacon, C.R.; Foster, H.L.; Smith, James G.

    1990-01-01

    Four large but poorly exposed rhyolitic calderas are present in the Yukon-Tanana terrane (YTT) in east central Alaska. At least two are mid-Cretaceous in age (~93 Ma). Similar volcanic rocks, the South Fork Volcanics, occur northeast of the Tintina fault in Yukon Territory. Evidence for the calderas consists of thick deposits of devitrified crystal- and lithic-rich densely welded tuff, interpreted as caldera fill, associated with lava domes or shallow intrusive rocks. Coeval outflow sheets have been largely stripped by erosion. The calderas are preserved within a northeast trending depression extending across the axis of the elongate mid-Cretaceous plutonic province. Trace element abundances in andesites and rhyolites associated with the caldera structures are similar to those of volcanic and plutonic rocks of subduction-related magmatic arcs developed on continental crust and thus are suggestive of formation in such an environment. Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary igneous rocks in the YTT near the calderas are interpreted to have been emplaced in a more extensional setting when the subduction-related magmatic front was farther oceanward. -Authors

  7. New dinosaurs link southern landmasses in the Mid-Cretaceous.

    PubMed

    Sereno, Paul C; Wilson, Jeffrey A; Conrad, Jack L

    2004-07-07

    Abelisauroid predators have been recorded almost exclusively from South America, India and Madagascar, a distribution thought to document persistent land connections exclusive of Africa. Here, we report fossils from three stratigraphic levels in the Cretaceous of Niger that provide definitive evidence that abelisauroid dinosaurs and their immediate antecedents were also present on Africa. The fossils include an immediate abelisauroid antecedent of Early Cretaceous age (ca. 130-110 Myr ago), early members of the two abelisauroid subgroups (Noasauridae, Abelisauridae) of Mid-Cretaceous age (ca. 110 Myr ago) and a hornless abelisaurid skull of early Late Cretaceous age (ca. 95 Myr ago). Together, these fossils fill in the early history of the abelisauroid radiation and provide key evidence for continued faunal exchange among Gondwanan landmasses until the end of the Early Cretaceous (ca. 100 Myr ago).

  8. Pore water colloid properties in argillaceous sedimentary rocks.

    PubMed

    Degueldre, Claude; Cloet, Veerle

    2016-11-01

    The focus of this work is to evaluate the colloid nature, concentration and size distribution in the pore water of Opalinus Clay and other sedimentary host rocks identified for a potential radioactive waste repository in Switzerland. Because colloids could not be measured in representative undisturbed porewater of these host rocks, predictive modelling based on data from field and laboratory studies is applied. This approach allowed estimating the nature, concentration and size distributions of the colloids in the pore water of these host rocks. As a result of field campaigns, groundwater colloid concentrations are investigated on the basis of their size distribution quantified experimentally using single particle counting techniques. The colloid properties are estimated considering data gained from analogue hydrogeochemical systems ranging from mylonite features in crystalline fissures to sedimentary formations. The colloid concentrations were analysed as a function of the alkaline and alkaline earth element concentrations. Laboratory batch results on clay colloid generation from compacted pellets in quasi-stagnant water are also reported. Experiments with colloids in batch containers indicate that the size distribution of a colloidal suspension evolves toward a common particle size distribution independently of initial conditions. The final suspension size distribution was found to be a function of the attachment factor of the colloids. Finally, calculations were performed using a novel colloid distribution model based on colloid generation, aggregation and sedimentation rates to predict under in-situ conditions what makes colloid concentrations and size distributions batch- or fracture-size dependent. The data presented so far are compared with the field and laboratory data. The colloid occurrence, stability and mobility have been evaluated for the water of the considered potential host rocks. In the pore water of the considered sedimentary host rocks, the clay

  9. Chlorine isotope behavior during prograde metamorphism of sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selverstone, Jane; Sharp, Zachary D.

    2015-05-01

    Chlorine stable isotope compositions of two sedimentary sequences and their metamorphic equivalents were measured in order to study fractionation effects during prograde metamorphism and devolatilization. Protoliths (n = 25) were collected from a 50 m section of Triassic fluvial and playa-lake strata and Jurassic (Liassic) marine black shales in a well-characterized quarry. Low greenschist to middle amphibolite facies equivalents (n > 80) were collected from the Glarus Alps, Urseren Zone, and Lucomagno region. Bulk δ37Cl values are constant within individual sedimentary layers, but vary from -2.0 to + 2.4 ‰ in Triassic rocks and from -3.0 to 0‰ in the black shales. Dolomitic and gypsiferous samples have positive δ37Cl values, but marls and shales are isotopically negative. Bulk Cl contents show only small declines during the earliest stages of metamorphism. Metamorphic equivalents of the Triassic and Liassic protoliths record the same overall ranges in δ37Cl as their protoliths. Samples with highly correlated bulk compositions but different metamorphic grade show no statistically significant difference in δ37Cl. These data lead to the following conclusions: (1) Terrestrial and marine sedimentary rocks display large primary heterogeneities in chlorine isotope composition. As a result, an unambiguous "sedimentary signature" does not exist in the chlorine stable isotope system. (2) No isotopic fractionation is discernable during metamorphic devolatilization, even at low temperatures. Alpine-style metamorphism thus has little to no effect on bulk chlorine isotopic compositions, despite significant devolatilization. (3) Cl is largely retained in the rocks during devolatilization, contrary to the normally assumed hydrophilic behavior of chlorine. Continuous release of mixed-volatile C-O-H fluids likely affected Cl partitioning between fluid and minerals and allowed chlorine to remain in the rocks. (4) There is no evidence for fluid communication across (meta)sedimentary

  10. Predicting the transport properties of sedimentary rocks from microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Schlueter, Erika M.

    1995-01-01

    Understanding transport properties of sedimentary rocks, including permeability, relative permeability, and electrical conductivity, is of great importance for petroleum engineering, waste isolation, environmental restoration, and other applications. These transport properties axe controlled to a great extent by the pore structure. How pore geometry, topology, and the physics and chemistry of mineral-fluid and fluid-fluid interactions affect the flow of fluids through consolidated/partially consolidated porous media are investigated analytically and experimentally. Hydraulic and electrical conductivity of sedimentary rocks are predicted from the microscopic geometry of the pore space. Cross-sectional areas and perimeters of individual pores are estimated from two-dimensional scanning electron microscope (SEM) photomicrographs of rock sections. Results, using Berea, Boise, Massilon, and Saint-Gilles sandstones show close agreement between the predicted and measured permeabilities. Good to fair agreement is found in the case of electrical conductivity. In particular, good agreement is found for a poorly cemented rock such as Saint-Gilles sandstone, whereas the agreement is not very good for well-cemented rocks. The possible reasons for this are investigated. The surface conductance contribution of clay minerals to the overall electrical conductivity is assessed. The effect of partial hydrocarbon saturation on overall rock conductivity, and on the Archie saturation exponent, is discussed. The region of validity of the well-known Kozeny-Carman permeability formulae for consolidated porous media and their relationship to the microscopic spatial variations of channel dimensions are established. It is found that the permeabilities predicted by the Kozeny-Carman equations are valid within a factor of three of the observed values methods.

  11. Subcritical water extraction of organic matter from sedimentary rocks.

    PubMed

    Luong, Duy; Sephton, Mark A; Watson, Jonathan S

    2015-06-16

    Subcritical water extraction of organic matter containing sedimentary rocks at 300°C and 1500 psi produces extracts comparable to conventional solvent extraction. Subcritical water extraction of previously solvent extracted samples confirms that high molecular weight organic matter (kerogen) degradation is not occurring and that only low molecular weight organic matter (free compounds) are being accessed in analogy to solvent extraction procedures. The sedimentary rocks chosen for extraction span the classic geochemical organic matter types. A type I organic matter-containing sedimentary rock produces n-alkanes and isoprenoidal hydrocarbons at 300°C and 1500 psi that indicate an algal source for the organic matter. Extraction of a rock containing type II organic matter at the same temperature and pressure produces aliphatic hydrocarbons but also aromatic compounds reflecting the increased contributions from terrestrial organic matter in this sample. A type III organic matter-containing sample produces a range of non-polar and polar compounds including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and oxygenated aromatic compounds at 300°C and 1500 psi reflecting a dominantly terrestrial origin for the organic materials. Although extraction at 300°C and 1500 psi produces extracts that are comparable to solvent extraction, lower temperature steps display differences related to organic solubility. The type I organic matter produces no products below 300°C and 1500 psi, reflecting its dominantly aliphatic character, while type II and type III organic matter contribute some polar components to the lower temperature steps, reflecting the chemical heterogeneity of their organic inventory. The separation of polar and non-polar organic compounds by using different temperatures provides the potential for selective extraction that may obviate the need for subsequent preparative chromatography steps. Our results indicate that subcritical water extraction can act as a suitable

  12. Consumption and diffusion of dissolved oxygen in sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manaka, M.; Takeda, M.

    2016-10-01

    Fe(II)-bearing minerals (e.g., biotite, chlorite, and pyrite) are a promising reducing agent for the consumption of atmospheric oxygen in repositories for the geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste. To estimate effective diffusion coefficients (De, in m2 s- 1) for dissolved oxygen (DO) and the reaction rates for the oxidation of Fe(II)-bearing minerals in a repository environment, we conducted diffusion-chemical reaction experiments using intact rock samples of Mizunami sedimentary rock. In addition, we conducted batch experiments on the oxidation of crushed sedimentary rock by DO in a closed system. From the results of the diffusion-chemical reaction experiments, we estimated the values of De for DO to lie within the range 2.69 × 10- 11 < De < 6.30 × 10- 11. Values of the second-order rate constant (k, in L mol-1 s- 1) were in the range - 3.66 < log k < - 2.83 (from batch experiments) and in the range - 3.87 < log k < - 2.22 (from diffusion-chemical reaction experiments). Many of these values are within the range of previously published rates for reaction between O2(aq) and Fe(II) surface complexes. The average value for the total concentration of reactive sites was about 10- 4 mol m- 2 from batch experiments. In contrast, the value of reactive sites estimated from the physical surface area was about 10- 8 mol m- 2, indicating that the reaction within intact rock is limited to the sites that originally existed with accessible porosity for O2(aq). This difference arises because the batch experiments used powdered samples, meaning that new sites which formed during milling were added to the original reaction sites. On the basis of these observations and interpretations, diffusion-chemical reaction experiments make it possible to determine the values of the kinetic parameter and diffusivity for an intact rock sample simultaneously.

  13. Hydrogeologic framework of fractured sedimentary rock, Newark Basin, New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lacombe, Pierre J.; Burton, William C.

    2010-01-01

    The hydrogeologic framework of fractured sedimentary bedrock at the former Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC), Trenton, New Jersey, a trichloroethylene (TCE)-contaminated site in the Newark Basin, is developed using an understanding of the geologic history of the strata, gamma-ray logs, and rock cores. NAWC is the newest field research site established as part of the U.S. Geological Survey Toxic Substances Hydrology Program, Department of Defense (DoD) Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program, and DoD Environmental Security Technology Certification Program to investigate contaminant remediation in fractured rock. Sedimentary bedrock at the NAWC research site comprises the Skunk Hollow, Byram, and Ewing Creek Members of the Lockatong Formation and Raven Rock Member of the Stockton Formation. Muds of the Lockatong Formation that were deposited in Van Houten cycles during the Triassic have lithified to form the bedrock that is typical of much of the Newark Basin. Four lithotypes formed from the sediments include black, carbon-rich laminated mudstone, dark-gray laminated mudstone, light-gray massive mudstone, and red massive mudstone. Diagenesis, tectonic compression, off-loading, and weathering have altered the rocks to give some strata greater hydraulic conductivity than other strata. Each stratum in the Lockatong Formation is 0.3 to 8 m thick, strikes N65 degrees E, and dips 25 degrees to 70 degrees NW. The black, carbon-rich laminated mudstone tends to fracture easily, has a relatively high hydraulic conductivity and is associated with high natural gamma-ray count rates. The dark-gray laminated mudstone is less fractured and has a lower hydraulic conductivity than the black carbon-rich laminated mudstone. The light-gray and the red massive mudstones are highly indurated and tend to have the least fractures and a low hydraulic conductivity. The differences in gamma-ray count rates for different mudstones allow gamma-ray logs to be used to correlate and

  14. Reconstruction of Sedimentary Rock Based on MechanicalProperties

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Guodong; Patzek, Tad W.; Silin, Dmitry B.

    2004-05-04

    We describe a general, physics-based approach to numericalreconstruction of the geometrical structure and mechanical properties ofnatural sedimentary rock in 3D. Our procedure consists of three mainsteps: sedimentation, compaction, and diagenesis, followed by theverification of rock mechanical properties. The dynamic geologicprocesses of grain sedimentation and compaction are simulated by solvinga dimensionless form of Newton's equations of motion for an ensemble ofgrains. The diagenetic rock transformation is modeled using a cementationalgorithm, which accounts for the effect of rock grain size on therelative rate of cement overgrowth. Our emphasis is on unconsolidatedsand and sandstone. The main input parameters are the grain sizedistribution, the final rock porosity, the type and amount of cement andclay minerals, and grain mechanical properties: the inter-grain frictioncoefficient, the cement strength, and the grain stiffness moduli. We usea simulated 2D Fontainebleau sandstone to obtain the grain mechanicalproperties. This Fontainebleau sandstone is also used to study theinitiation, growth, and coalescence of micro-cracks under increasingvertical stress. The box fractal dimension of the micro-crackdistribution, and its variation with the applied stress areestimated.

  15. Geochemical evolution of groundwater in sequences of sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Carl D.; Cherry, John A.

    1984-12-01

    A geochemical mass-transfer model (WATEGM-SE) is used to illustrate the effect of several major processes on the chemical evolution of groundwater flowing through hypothetical sequences of sedimentary rocks. Using chemical reactions prevalent in these rock types, the simulations demonstrate the influence of the initial soil PCO 2, temperature, pressure and the sequence of encounter of the mineral phases along the flow path of the groundwater. The evolution of groundwater in different sequences of limestone and dolostone is simulated with a range of initial PCO 2 -values typical of natural soils. Temperatures of 10° and 25°C are used. The simulations indicate that appreciable differences in the chemical composition of the groundwater and the spring-discharge water will occur, depending on whether a limestone or dolostone unit is first encountered. The cases of more complex stratigraphy are represented by three hypothetical sequences in which each stratum has only one reactive mineral phase. The reactions used in these simulations include calcite dissolution and precipitation, gypsum dissolution and precipitation, cation exchange, and the weathering of albite to kaolinite. Sulfate reduction occurs in the last stratum in each of these sequences. The strata in the three sequences are indentical except for the order in which they are encountered by the groundwater. Considerably different hydrochemistries are calculated for each of these sequences even within the same types of rock units. The effect of increasing total pressure is demonstrated with a water initially saturated with both gypsum and calcite under a pressure of 1 bar. The system is then closed and the pressure is increased to 1 kbar while the temperature remains constant at 25°C. The results indicate that pressure has a significant effect above 50 bar or 500 m hydrostatic head. It is commonly expected that groundwater in sedimentary rocks will exhibit trends in chemistry that are the result of the length

  16. Formation of Ocean Sedimentary Rocks as Active Planets and Life-Like Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Y.

    2017-10-01

    Wet shocked rocks are discarded globally and enriched elements in ocean-sedimentary rocks, which is strong indicator of ocean water of other planets. Ocean-sedimentary rocks are strong indicator of water planets and possible exo-life on planet Mars.

  17. Manganese mineralogy and diagenesis in the sedimentary rock record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jena E.; Webb, Samuel M.; Ma, Chi; Fischer, Woodward W.

    2016-01-01

    Oxidation of manganese (II) to manganese (III,IV) demands oxidants with very high redox potentials; consequently, manganese oxides are both excellent proxies for molecular oxygen and highly favorable electron acceptors when oxygen is absent. The first of these features results in manganese-enriched sedimentary rocks (manganese deposits, commonly Mn ore deposits), which generally correspond to the availability of molecular oxygen in Earth surface environments. And yet because manganese reduction is promoted by a variety of chemical species, these ancient manganese deposits are often significantly more reduced than modern environmental manganese-rich sediments. We document the impacts of manganese reduction and the mineral phases that form stable manganese deposits from seven sedimentary examples spanning from modern surface environments to rocks over 2 billion years old. Integrating redox and coordination information from synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray microprobe imaging with scanning electron microscopy and energy and wavelength-dispersive spectroscopy, we find that unlike the Mn(IV)-dominated modern manganese deposits, three manganese minerals dominate these representative ancient deposits: kutnohorite (CaMn(CO3)2), rhodochrosite (MnCO3), and braunite (Mn(III)6Mn(II)O8SiO4). Pairing these mineral and textural observations with previous studies of manganese geochemistry, we develop a paragenetic model of post-depositional manganese mineralization with kutnohorite and calcian rhodochrosite as the earliest diagenetic mineral phases, rhodochrosite and braunite forming secondarily, and later alteration forming Mn-silicates.

  18. The shapes of cold, high mountains in sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruden, D. M.

    2003-09-01

    Terzaghi (Geotechnique 12 (1962) 251) and Young (Young, A., 1972. Slopes. Oliver and Boyd, Edinburgh, 288 pp.) described the stable forms of slopes in sedimentary rock masses, assuming penetrative discontinuities, which are parallel to bedding and joints which are perpendicular to bedding. The only movements considered were slides along bedding. Experience in the Canadian Rockies indicates that the cohesionless rock masses that exist at or above tree line may also move by toppling, buckling and sliding along joints. These processes also act to limit the inclinations of stable slopes. Rock strength is a factor in the critical height of a slope that buckles. The processes can be represented as fields on a process diagram, a plot of slope inclination against bedding dip, using the basic friction angles of the rocks present. The process diagram also separates five common mountain peak shapes, which form on homoclinal sequences of beds. Castellate and Matterhorn mountains occur in sub-horizontal beds, cuestas develop in gently to moderately dipping beds. Hogbacks formed in moderately to steeply dipping beds have similar slope angles on both cataclinal and anaclinal slopes. Dogtooth mountains occur in steeply dipping sub-vertical beds.

  19. Rock property measurements and analysis of selected igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks from worldwide localities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Gordon R.

    1983-01-01

    Dry bulk density and grain density measurements were made on 182 samples of igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks from various world-wide localities. Total porosity values and both water-accessible and helium-accessible porosities were calculated from the density data. Magnetic susceptibility measurements were made on the solid samples and permeability and streaming potentials were concurrently measured on most samples. Dry bulk densities obtained using two methods of volume determination, namely direct measurement and Archlmedes principle, were nearly equivalent for most samples. Grain densities obtained on powdered samples were typically greater than grain densities obtained on solid samples, but differences were usually small. Sedimentary rocks had the highest percentage of occluded porosity per rock volume whereas metamorphic rocks had the highest percentage of occluded porosity per total porosity. There was no apparent direct relationship between permeability and streaming potential for most samples, although there were indications of such a relationship in the rock group consisting of granites, aplites, and syenites. Most rock types or groups of similar rock types of low permeability had, when averaged, comparable levels of streaming potential per unit of permeability. Three calcite samples had negative streaming potentials.

  20. Modeling of the nonlinear resonant response in sedimentary rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Ten Cate, James A; Shankland, Thomas J; Vakhnenko, Vyacheslav O; Vakhnenko, Oleksiy

    2009-04-03

    We suggest a model for describing a wide class of nonlinear and hysteretic effects in sedimentary rocks at longitudinal bar resonance. In particular, we explain: hysteretic behaviour of a resonance curve on both its upward and downward slopes; linear softening of resonant frequency with increase of driving level; gradual (almost logarithmic) recovery of resonant frequency after large dynamical strains; and temporal relaxation of response amplitude at fixed frequency. Starting with a suggested model, we predict the dynamical realization of end-point memory in resonating bar experiments with a cyclic frequency protocol. These theoretical findings were confirmed experimentally at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Sedimentary rocks, particularly sandstones, are distinguished by their grain structure in which each grain is much harder than the intergrain cementation material. The peculiarities of grain and pore structures give rise to a variety of remarkable nonlinear mechanical properties demonstrated by rocks, both at quasistatic and alternating dynamic loading. Thus, the hysteresis earlier established for the stress-strain relation in samples subjected to quasistatic loading-unloading cycles has also been discovered for the relation between acceleration amplitude and driving frequency in bar-shaped samples subjected to an alternating external drive that is frequency-swept through resonance. At strong drive levels there is an unusual, almost linear decrease of resonant frequency with strain amplitude, and there are long-term relaxation phenomena such as nearly logarithmic recovery (increase) of resonant frequency after the large conditioning drive has been removed. In this report we present a short sketch of a model for explaining numerous experimental observations seen in forced longitudinal oscillations of sandstone bars. According to our theory a broad set of experimental data can be understood as various aspects of the same internally consistent pattern. Furthermore

  1. Consumption and diffusion of dissolved oxygen in sedimentary rocks.

    PubMed

    Manaka, M; Takeda, M

    2016-10-01

    Fe(II)-bearing minerals (e.g., biotite, chlorite, and pyrite) are a promising reducing agent for the consumption of atmospheric oxygen in repositories for the geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste. To estimate effective diffusion coefficients (De, in m(2)s(-1)) for dissolved oxygen (DO) and the reaction rates for the oxidation of Fe(II)-bearing minerals in a repository environment, we conducted diffusion-chemical reaction experiments using intact rock samples of Mizunami sedimentary rock. In addition, we conducted batch experiments on the oxidation of crushed sedimentary rock by DO in a closed system. From the results of the diffusion-chemical reaction experiments, we estimated the values of De for DO to lie within the range 2.69×10(-11)rock is limited to the sites that originally existed with accessible porosity for O2(aq). This difference arises because the batch experiments used powdered samples, meaning that new sites which formed during milling were added to the original reaction sites. On the basis of these observations and interpretations, diffusion-chemical reaction experiments make it possible to determine the values of the kinetic parameter and diffusivity for an intact rock sample simultaneously. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A paleomagnetic and magnetic fabric study of the Illapel Plutonic Complex, Coastal Range, central Chile: Implications for emplacement mechanism and regional tectonic evolution during the mid-Cretaceous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrando, Rodolfo; Roperch, Pierrick; Morata, Diego; Arriagada, César; Ruffet, Gilles; Córdova, Maria Loreto

    2014-03-01

    The Illapel Plutonic Complex (IPC), located in the Coastal Range of central Chile (31°-33° S), is composed of different lithologies, ranging from gabbros to trondhjemites, including diorites, tonalites and granodiorites. U/Pb geochronological data shows that the IPC was amalgamated from, at least, four different magmatic pulses between 117 and 90 Ma (Lower to mid-Cretaceous). We present new paleomagnetic results including Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS) from 62 sites in the plutonic rocks, 10 sites in country rocks and 7 sites in a mafic dyke swarm intruding the plutonic rocks.

  3. Test of hyperelasticity in highly nonlinear solids: sedimentary rocks.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, R M; Winkler, K W; Plona, T J; Landsberger, B J; Johnson, D L

    2004-11-19

    We report measurements of three-wave mixing amplitudes on systems whose third order elastic constants have also been measured by means of the elastoacoustic effect. Because attenuation and diffraction are an important aspect of our measurement technique we analyze our results using a modified Khoklhov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov equation in the frequency domain. We find that the value of beta so deduced for polymethyl methacrylate agrees quite well with that predicted from the stress dependent sound speed measurements, establishing that polymethyl methacrylate may be considered as a hyperelastic solid. The beta values of sedimentary rocks, though they are typically 2 orders of magnitude larger than, e.g., polymethyl methacrylates, are still a factor 3-10 less than those predicted from the elastoacoustic effect.

  4. Polarographic determination of tungsten and molybdenum in sedimentary rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Vakhobova, R.U.; Lykova, F.P.; Milyavskii, Yu. S.; Rachinskaya, G.F.

    1985-12-01

    In order to determine microamounts of tungsten and molybdenum, one the most sensitive versions of polarography is used in this paper, called catalytic currents. In the development of a procedure for the determination of tungsten and molybdenum in geochemical items, the reduction of hydroxylamine (HA) is used, catalyzed by tungsten and molybdenum compounds in the presence of pyrocatechol, as on a background of dicarboxylic acids and hydroxy acids the HA reduction half-wave potentials, catalyzed by these elements, coincide. The investigations were conducted on a PPT-1 polarograph in the classical regime in a thermostatically controlled cell with a mercury dripping electrode and a saturated calomel comparison electrode. The authors develop a procedure for the simultaneous determination of n.10/sup -5/-n.10/sup -4/% of tungsten and molybdenum in sedimentary rocks.

  5. Geochemistry of Fine-grained Sediments and Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sageman, B. B.; Lyons, T. W.

    2003-12-01

    The nature of detrital sedimentary (siliciclastic) rocks is determined by geological processes that occur in the four main Earth surface environments encountered over the sediment's history from source to final sink: (i) the site of sediment production (provenance), where interactions among bedrock geology, tectonic uplift, and climate control weathering and erosion processes; (ii) the transport path, where the medium of transport, gradient, and distance to the depositional basin may modify the texture and composition of weathered material; (iii) the site of deposition, where a suite of physical, chemical, and biological processes control the nature of sediment accumulation and early burial modification; and (iv) the conditions of later burial, where diagenetic processes may further alter the texture and composition of buried sediments. Many of these geological processes leave characteristic geochemical signatures, making detrital sedimentary rocks one of the most important archives of geochemical data available for reconstructions of ancient Earth surface environments. Although documentation of geochemical data has long been a part of the study of sedimentation (e.g., Twenhofel, 1926, 1950; Pettijohn, 1949; Trask, 1955), the development and application of geochemical methods specific to sedimentary geological problems blossomed in the period following the Second World War ( Degens, 1965; Garrels and Mackenzie, 1971) and culminated in recent years, as reflected by the publication of various texts on marine geochemistry (e.g., Chester, 1990, 2000), biogeochemistry (e.g., Schlesinger, 1991; Libes, 1992), and organic geochemistry (e.g., Tissot and Welte, 1984; Engel and Macko, 1993).Coincident with the growth of these subdisciplines a new focus has emerged in the geological sciences broadly represented under the title of "Earth System Science" (e.g., Kump et al., 1999). Geochemistry has played the central role in this revolution (e.g., Berner, 1980; Garrels and Lerman

  6. Fracture and Faulting Induced Permeability Change in Porous Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W.-L.

    2012-04-01

    Flow of interstitial fluids exerts important control over seismogenic, sedimentary, and metamorphic processes. Since the seminal work of Hubbert and Rubey [1959] on the motion of thrust sheet, elevated pore fluid pressure has been used to reconcile the heat flow paradox during seismogenic faulting, and more recently, as a possible mechanism for slow slip events observed at subduction zones. Many working hypotheses for generating and maintaining high pore fluid pressure have been proposed. However, one important ingredient still missing in these models is quantitative knowledge of permeability as a dynamics physical property that varies significantly in different tectonic settings. In this study, we conducted systematic laboratory characterization of how permeability and its anisotropy evolve as porous sandstones and limestones undergo the transition from brittle faulting to cataclastic flow. Our data show that highly porous silicate rocks experience permeability reduction during dilatant brittle fracture whereas their low porosity counterparts exhibit permeability enhancement. With increasing confinement, brittle fracture is inhibited and the porous rocks exhibit shear enhanced compaction, resulting in significant porosity reduction accompanied by strain hardening and drastic loss of permeability. Hertzian fracture and pore collapse are the primary micomechanisms responsible for the brittle faulting or pervasive fracturing in porous silicate rocks. In contrast, the stress-induced permeability evolution in porous limestones is markedly different. Because crystal plasticity as well as solution transfer can be activated at relatively low temperatures in calcite compared to quartz, the inelastic behavior and failure mode of carbonate rocks are not only a function of pressure, but also sensitive to temperature. Laboratory measurements show that the presence of water enhances compaction and considerably lower the yield strength of carbonate rocks. The yield cap is

  7. An expert system for qualitative XRD analysis of sedimentary rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, J.H.; Chen, H.C.; Liu, C.L. ); Wright, D. )

    1991-03-01

    Mineral identification using x-ray powder diffractometry (XRD) requires human judgment and heuristics. Thus, the task is admirably suited for an expert system approach. Expert systems are computer programs which emulate human expertise. The power of an expert system is derived from the knowledge the system embodies, rather than from search algorithms. An expert system helps solve problems for which well-defined algorithmic solutions are difficult to obtain. The authors have coded an expert system, XRAYS, to identify minerals via x-ray diffractograms. The system emulates the well-known manual Hanawalt method, thus avoiding the black-box approach of some computer search/match programs. The mineral subfile of the JCPDS file is stored in a database file, from which the Hanawalt groups are created. The expert system then carries out a manual search following exactly the steps prescribed for the Hanawalt method. In the program, both peak positions and intensities are represented by fuzzy numbers. Fuzzy comparisons and fuzzy arithmetic operations are employed in searching for matches. A list of candidate minerals is output in decreasing order of confidence. Other information, such as chemistry, rock type, suspected minerals, etc. can be coded as production rules, thereby further narrowing the list of candidate minerals. Examples composed of typical mineral suites in sedimentary rocks will be given.

  8. Sedimentary rock types: relative proportions as a function of geological time.

    PubMed

    Garrels, R M; Mackenzie, F T

    1969-02-07

    Proportions of sedimentary rock types remaining today differ from period to period. These differences may be chiefly the result of differential rates of deposition and erosion of the various components of the rocks. Lower percentages of limestones and evaporites in Precambrian rocks than in post-Precambrian rocks probably represent selective loss of these more easily removable components from the original deposits.

  9. Glacially induced stresses in sedimentary rocks of northern Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trzeciak, Maciej; Dąbrowski, Marcin

    2016-04-01

    During the Pleistocene large continental ice sheets developed in Scandinavia and North America. Ice-loading caused bending of the lithosphere and outward flow in the mantle. Glacial loading is one of the most prominent tectono-mechanical event in the geological history of northern Poland. The Pomeranian region was subjected several times to a load equivalent of more than 1 km of rocks, which led to severe increase in both vertical and horizontal stresses in the upper crustal rocks. During deglaciation a rapid decrease in vertical stress is observed, which leads to destabilization of the crust - most recent postglacial faults scarps in northern Sweden indicate glacially induced earthquakes of magnitude ~Mw8. The presence of the ice-sheet altered as well the near-surface thermal structure - thermal gradient inversion is still observable in NW Poland. The glacially related processes might have left an important mark in the sedimentary cover of northern Poland, especially with regard to fracture reopening, changes in stress state, and damage development. In the present study, we model lithospheric bending caused by glacial load, but our point of interest lies in the overlying sediments. Typical glacial isostatic studies model the response of (visco-) elastic lithosphere over viscoelastic or viscous asthenosphere subjected to external loads. In our model, we introduce viscoelastic sedimentary layers at the top of this stack and examine the stress relaxation patterns therein. As a case study for our modelling, we used geological profiles from northern Poland, near locality of Wejherowo, which are considered to have unconventional gas potential. The Paleozoic profile of this area is dominated by almost 1 km thick Silurian-Ordovician shale deposits, which are interbedded with thin and strong limestone layers. This sequence is underlain by Cambrian shales and sandstones, and finally at ~3 km depth - Precambrian crystalline rocks. Above the Silurian there are approximately

  10. Weathering of expansive sedimentary rock due to cycles of wetting and drying

    SciTech Connect

    Day, R.W. )

    1994-09-01

    There are several different mechanisms by which sedimentary rock can weather, such as: (1) Rebound: for cut areas, where the overburden has been removed by erosion or during mass-grading operations, the sedimentary rock will rebound due to the release in overburden pressure, the rebound can cause the opening or widening of cracks and joints; (2) Physical Weathering: sedimentary rock can be broken apart by the physical growth of plant roots or by the freezing of water in rock cracks or joints. Studies have also shown that precipitation of gypsum in rock pores, cracks, and joints can cause rock expansion and disintegration. Such conditions occur in arid climates where subsurface moisture evaporates at ground surface, precipitating the minerals in the rock pores. Acicular gypsum crystals have been observed to grow perpendicular to structures and are believed to exert the most force at their growing end (Hawkins and Pinces, 1987). Acicular gypsum growth has even been observed in massive sandstone, which resulted in significant heave (Hollingsworth and Grover, 1992); (3) Chemical Weathering: weathering of sedimentary rock can be due to oxidation, hydration of clay minerals, and the chemical alteration of the silt-size particles to clay. Factors affecting oxidation include the presence of moisture and oxygen (aerobic conditions), biological activity, acidic environment, and temperature (Hollingsworth and Grover, 1992). The purpose of this study was to investigate the weathering of expansive sedimentary rock due to cycles of wetting and drying at temperatures representative of field conditions.

  11. Rapid imbibition of water in fractures within unsaturated sedimentary rock

    DOE PAGES

    Cheng, Chu-Lin; Perfect, Edmund; Donnelly, B.; ...

    2015-01-27

    The spontaneous imbibition of water and other liquids into gas-filled fractures in variably-saturated porous media is important in a variety of engineering and geological contexts. However, surprisingly few studies have investigated this phenomenon. In this paper, we present a theoretical framework for predicting the 1-dimensional movement of water into air-filled fractures within a porous medium based on early-time capillary dynamics and spreading over the rough surfaces of fracture faces. The theory permits estimation of sorptivity values for the matrix and fracture zone, as well as a dispersion parameter which quantifies the extent of spreading of the wetting front. Quantitative datamore » on spontaneous imbibition of water in unsaturated Berea sandstone cores were acquired to evaluate the proposed model. The cores with different permeability classes ranging from 50 to 500 mD and were fractured using the Brazilian method. Spontaneous imbibition in the fractured cores was measured by dynamic neutron radiography at the Neutron Imaging Prototype Facility (beam line CG-1D, HFIR), Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Water uptake into both the matrix and the fracture zone exhibited square-root-of-time behavior. The matrix sorptivities ranged from 2.9 to 4.6 mm s-0.5, and increased linearly as the permeability class increased. The sorptivities of the fracture zones ranged from 17.9 to 27.1 mm s-0.5, and increased linearly with increasing fracture aperture width. The dispersion coefficients ranged from 23.7 to 66.7 mm2 s-1 and increased linearly with increasing fracture aperture width and damage zone width. Both theory and observations indicate that fractures can significantly increase spontaneous imbibition in unsaturated sedimentary rock by capillary action and surface spreading on rough fracture faces. Fractures also increase the dispersion of the wetting front. In conclusion, further research is needed to investigate this phenomenon in other natural and engineered

  12. Rapid imbibition of water in fractures within unsaturated sedimentary rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, C.-L.; Perfect, E.; Donnelly, B.; Bilheux, H. Z.; Tremsin, A. S.; McKay, L. D.; DiStefano, V. H.; Cai, J. C.; Santodonato, L. J.

    2015-03-01

    The spontaneous imbibition of water and other liquids into gas-filled fractures in variably-saturated porous media is important in a variety of engineering and geological contexts. However, surprisingly few studies have investigated this phenomenon. We present a theoretical framework for predicting the 1-dimensional movement of water into air-filled fractures within a porous medium based on early-time capillary dynamics and spreading over the rough surfaces of fracture faces. The theory permits estimation of sorptivity values for the matrix and fracture zone, as well as a dispersion parameter which quantifies the extent of spreading of the wetting front. Quantitative data on spontaneous imbibition of water in unsaturated Berea sandstone cores were acquired to evaluate the proposed model. The cores with different permeability classes ranging from 50 to 500 mD and were fractured using the Brazilian method. Spontaneous imbibition in the fractured cores was measured by dynamic neutron radiography at the Neutron Imaging Prototype Facility (beam line CG-1D, HFIR), Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Water uptake into both the matrix and the fracture zone exhibited square-root-of-time behavior. The matrix sorptivities ranged from 2.9 to 4.6 mm s-0.5, and increased linearly as the permeability class increased. The sorptivities of the fracture zones ranged from 17.9 to 27.1 mm s-0.5, and increased linearly with increasing fracture aperture width. The dispersion coefficients ranged from 23.7 to 66.7 mm2 s-1 and increased linearly with increasing fracture aperture width and damage zone width. Both theory and observations indicate that fractures can significantly increase spontaneous imbibition in unsaturated sedimentary rock by capillary action and surface spreading on rough fracture faces. Fractures also increase the dispersion of the wetting front. Further research is needed to investigate this phenomenon in other natural and engineered porous media.

  13. Biogenic syngenetic pyrite from tuffaceous sedimentary RF3-V rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyreva, Irina; Nikulova, Natalia

    2015-04-01

    Biogenic framboidal pyrite was found in intraformational tuffaceous sedimentary gravelites, within basic volcanites (RF3-V) in Subpolar Urals (Sablya Ridge). Pyrite grains (Fe 44.07-44,33, S 50.22-53.31 wt. %) are composed of ball-like microconcretions, sometimes intergrown with crystals of pentagondodecahedron and cubic habit. The microconcretions (20 to 40 mcm) are roundish and composed of microcrystals, which end faces form spherical surface. The nuclei of the microconcretions are represented by frambohedrons 4-5 mcm in size, which are pyritized cells of sulphate-reducing colonial coccoid microfossils. The formation of the frambohedrons occurred synchronously to sedimentation in stagnant reducing environment at interaction of biogenic hydrogen sulphide with water-dissolved iron. The biogenic hydrogen sulphide is reduced by microorganisms in the conditions of free and unrestricted access of dissolved sulphate ions sourced from sulphur of fumarole gases. Iron came from washed-out basic volcanites. The growth of outer radial parts of microconcretions occurred during compaction of sediments in diagenetic stage. The quantity of dissolved sulphate and iron during pyrite formation exceeded possibilitites of bacterial "starters" which resulted in the formation of pyrites of other morphological varieties. This is confirmed by the accretion of concentric rays of the concretions and cubic microcrystals of pyrite in the aggregate grains. The formation of tuffaceous sediments occurred during temporary decrease of volcanic activity in a continuous linear water flow with stagnant areas composed of water-displaced pebbles from underlying metaterrigenous rocks (RF 1-2), which were exposed beyond the development area of volcanic strata, unchanged clasts of recent and synchronously formed basic and medium volcanites with participation of air-driven ashes and influence of volcanic gases in the presence of sulphate-reducing bacteria. The work is financially supported by the Program

  14. Displacement propagators of brine flowing within different types of sedimentary rock.

    PubMed

    Verganelakis, Dimitris A; Crawshaw, John; Johns, Michael L; Mantle, Michael D; Scheven, Ulrich; Sederman, Andrew J; Gladden, Lynn F

    2005-02-01

    This paper explores the correlation between different microstructural characteristics of porous sedimentary rocks and the flow properties of a Newtonian infiltrating fluid. Preliminary results of displacement propagator measurements of brine solution flowing through two types of sedimentary rock cores are reported. The two types of rocks, Bentheimer and Portland, are characterized by different porosities, pore-size distributions and permeabilities. Propagators have been measured for brine flow rates of 1 and 5 ml/min. Significant differences are seen between the propagators recorded for the two rocks, and these are related to the spatial distribution of porosity within these porous media.

  15. Primary relationships of basaltic intrusive rocks and siliceous sedimentary rocks in the Northern Chichibu Belt, Shikoku Island, southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Tomohiro; Sakakibara, Masayuki; Hori, Rie S.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the primary relationships between basaltic rocks and fossiliferous sedimentary rocks provides direct information on the timing and geologic setting of past oceanic igneous activity. Though the basalts associate with cherts in the Northern Chichibu Belt have been petrographically identified as OIA/OIT or MORB, such primary relationships of them are not well understood.

  16. Organic solvent alteration of hydraulic properties of sedimentary rocks of low permeability: a review

    SciTech Connect

    Sklarew, D.S.

    1985-05-01

    A review of the current literature on hydrophysical interactions of organic solutes with sedimentary rocks of low permeability is presented. The motivation was the premise that low permeability rocks may act as secondary (aquifer) barriers for the containment of hazardous organic wastes, thus preventing these wastes from contaminating the groundwater. However, this premise may be incorrect if organic wastes can affect the hydraulic conductivity of these rocks. The results indicate that very little work has been done concerning interactions of organics with consolidated subsurface materials. Available information on three related topics was summarized: the effect of organic compounds on the hydrophysical properties of clays, case studies concerning the interactions of organic compounds with clays and sedimentary rocks, and the effect of shales on inorganic transport. These studies give an indication of some research areas that need to be explored with regard to the effect of organic compounds on the hydrophysical properties of sedimentary rocks; these research needs are briefly summarized. 42 refs.

  17. Classification scheme for sedimentary and igneous rocks in Gale crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangold, N.; Schmidt, M. E.; Fisk, M. R.; Forni, O.; McLennan, S. M.; Ming, D. W.; Sautter, V.; Sumner, D.; Williams, A. J.; Clegg, S. M.; Cousin, A.; Gasnault, O.; Gellert, R.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Wiens, R. C.

    2017-03-01

    Rocks analyzed by the Curiosity rover in Gale crater include a variety of clastic sedimentary rocks and igneous float rocks transported by fluvial and impact processes. To facilitate the discussion of the range of lithologies, we present in this article a petrological classification framework adapting terrestrial classification schemes to Mars compositions (such as Fe abundances typically higher than for comparable lithologies on Earth), to specific Curiosity observations (such as common alkali-rich rocks), and to the capabilities of the rover instruments. Mineralogy was acquired only locally for a few drilled rocks, and so it does not suffice as a systematic classification tool, in contrast to classical terrestrial rock classification. The core of this classification involves (1) the characterization of rock texture as sedimentary, igneous or undefined according to grain/crystal sizes and shapes using imaging from the ChemCam Remote Micro-Imager (RMI), Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) and Mastcam instruments, and (2) the assignment of geochemical modifiers based on the abundances of Fe, Si, alkali, and S determined by the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) and ChemCam instruments. The aims are to help understand Gale crater geology by highlighting the various categories of rocks analyzed by the rover. Several implications are proposed from the cross-comparisons of rocks of various texture and composition, for instance between in place outcrops and float rocks. All outcrops analyzed by the rover are sedimentary; no igneous outcrops have been observed. However, some igneous rocks are clasts in conglomerates, suggesting that part of them are derived from the crater rim. The compositions of in-place sedimentary rocks contrast significantly with the compositions of igneous float rocks. While some of the differences between sedimentary rocks and igneous floats may be related to physical sorting and diagenesis of the sediments, some of the sedimentary rocks (e

  18. SHRIMP uranium-lead dating of diagenetic xenotime in siliciclastic sedimentary rocks

    PubMed

    McNaughton; Rasmussen; Fletcher

    1999-07-02

    Diagenetic xenotime is common in siliciclastic sedimentary rocks, where it starts to form on detrital zircon shortly after sediment deposition. It is possible to estimate the age of sedimentary rocks by in situ uranium-lead analysis of that xenotime. Two Proterozoic sandstone units from northwestern Australia, previously constrained to the age interval of 1790 to 750 million years ago, have diagenetic xenotime ages of 1704 +/- 7 and 1704 +/- 14 million years ago. This method has potential for dating sedimentary sequences of all ages but should be especially valuable for refining the Precambrian time scale.

  19. Rapid imbibition of water in fractures within unsaturated sedimentary rock

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Chu-Lin; Perfect, Edmund; Donnelly, B.; Bilheux, Hassina Z.; Tremsin, Anton S.; McKay, L. D.; Distefano, Victoria H.; Cai, J. C.; Santodonato, Louis J.

    2015-01-27

    The spontaneous imbibition of water and other liquids into gas-filled fractures in variably-saturated porous media is important in a variety of engineering and geological contexts. However, surprisingly few studies have investigated this phenomenon. In this paper, we present a theoretical framework for predicting the 1-dimensional movement of water into air-filled fractures within a porous medium based on early-time capillary dynamics and spreading over the rough surfaces of fracture faces. The theory permits estimation of sorptivity values for the matrix and fracture zone, as well as a dispersion parameter which quantifies the extent of spreading of the wetting front. Quantitative data on spontaneous imbibition of water in unsaturated Berea sandstone cores were acquired to evaluate the proposed model. The cores with different permeability classes ranging from 50 to 500 mD and were fractured using the Brazilian method. Spontaneous imbibition in the fractured cores was measured by dynamic neutron radiography at the Neutron Imaging Prototype Facility (beam line CG-1D, HFIR), Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Water uptake into both the matrix and the fracture zone exhibited square-root-of-time behavior. The matrix sorptivities ranged from 2.9 to 4.6 mm s-0.5, and increased linearly as the permeability class increased. The sorptivities of the fracture zones ranged from 17.9 to 27.1 mm s-0.5, and increased linearly with increasing fracture aperture width. The dispersion coefficients ranged from 23.7 to 66.7 mm2 s-1 and increased linearly with increasing fracture aperture width and damage zone width. Both theory and observations indicate that fractures can significantly increase spontaneous imbibition in unsaturated sedimentary rock by capillary action and surface spreading on rough fracture faces. Fractures also increase the dispersion of the wetting front. In conclusion, further research is needed to investigate this phenomenon

  20. Elemental geochemistry of sedimentary rocks at Yellowknife Bay, Gale crater, Mars.

    PubMed

    McLennan, S M; Anderson, R B; Bell, J F; Bridges, J C; Calef, F; Campbell, J L; Clark, B C; Clegg, S; Conrad, P; Cousin, A; Des Marais, D J; Dromart, G; Dyar, M D; Edgar, L A; Ehlmann, B L; Fabre, C; Forni, O; Gasnault, O; Gellert, R; Gordon, S; Grant, J A; Grotzinger, J P; Gupta, S; Herkenhoff, K E; Hurowitz, J A; King, P L; Le Mouélic, S; Leshin, L A; Léveillé, R; Lewis, K W; Mangold, N; Maurice, S; Ming, D W; Morris, R V; Nachon, M; Newsom, H E; Ollila, A M; Perrett, G M; Rice, M S; Schmidt, M E; Schwenzer, S P; Stack, K; Stolper, E M; Sumner, D Y; Treiman, A H; VanBommel, S; Vaniman, D T; Vasavada, A; Wiens, R C; Yingst, R A

    2014-01-24

    Sedimentary rocks examined by the Curiosity rover at Yellowknife Bay, Mars, were derived from sources that evolved from an approximately average martian crustal composition to one influenced by alkaline basalts. No evidence of chemical weathering is preserved, indicating arid, possibly cold, paleoclimates and rapid erosion and deposition. The absence of predicted geochemical variations indicates that magnetite and phyllosilicates formed by diagenesis under low-temperature, circumneutral pH, rock-dominated aqueous conditions. Analyses of diagenetic features (including concretions, raised ridges, and fractures) at high spatial resolution indicate that they are composed of iron- and halogen-rich components, magnesium-iron-chlorine-rich components, and hydrated calcium sulfates, respectively. Composition of a cross-cutting dike-like feature is consistent with sedimentary intrusion. The geochemistry of these sedimentary rocks provides further evidence for diverse depositional and diagenetic sedimentary environments during the early history of Mars.

  1. Mid-Cretaceous compressive deformation in Central Chile: The beginning of the Andean building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyce, D. I.; Charrier, R.; Tapia, F.; Farías, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Andean building has been traditionally considered as a consequence of successive orogenic phases mostly occurring during the Cenozoic. However evidence from Peru-northern Chile and southern Argentina have shown a first contractional pulse during the mid to late Cretaceous. Between these regions, however, there are no reports evidencing this event, hence which open the questions about the real impact of this orogeny along the western boundary of South America. Likewise, the occurrence of this event in central Chile-Argentina could be evidencing that this first contractional pulse in the Andes respond to a major synchronous orogeny along the entire former western margin of Gondwana after a long period of extension since the Triassic. In this context, our study, located approximately at the latitude of the Aconcagua mount (32º50'S), reveals the existence of contractional structures, developed east of the Early Cretaceous magmatic arc, deforming Aptian rocks deposited in an extensional setting. Particularly, the geometry exhibited by a regional east-vergent anticline evidences inversion tectonics in which a thick Albian molasse unit is developed in the frontal limb and beyond with growth strata. Later this synorogenic deposits were thrusted and then covered unconformably by Upper Cretaceous volcanic unit, sealing the deformation of the Aptian-Albian rocks. Finally all these deposits were gently deformed and unconformably covered by a Maastrichtian volcanic unit. Studies of provenance indicate a transitional arc origin for the sandstones contained in the synorogenic deposits, which is in agree with the reported exhumation of previous Andean magmatic arc. Our data evidence the beginning of the contractional deformation, marking the onset of the orogeny in central Chile, during the mid-Cretaceous. Therefore we can propose that the Peruvian orogenic phase extended along most of the Southamerican margin. The location farther west, close to the concurrent arc, and it

  2. Chemical Composition of Martian Soil and Rocks: Complex Mixing and Sedimentary Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLennan, Scott M.

    2000-01-01

    Chemical compositions of Martian soil and rocks indicate complex mixing relationships. Mixing of rock and soil clearly takes place and explains some of the chemical variation because sulfur, chlorine, magnesium, and perhaps iron are positively correlated due to their control from a secondary 'sedimentary' mineralogy (e.g., Mg- and possibly Fe-sulfate; Fe-oxides) that is present within the soils. Certain deviations from simple soil-rock mixing are consistent with mineralogical fractionation of detrital iron and titanium oxides during sedimentary transport.

  3. Evaluation of Five Sedimentary Rocks Other Than Salt for Geologic Repository Siting Purposes

    SciTech Connect

    Croff, A.G.; Lomenick, T.F.; Lowrie, R.S.; Stow, S.H.

    2003-11-15

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), in order to increase the diversity of rock types under consideration by the geologic disposal program, initiated the Sedimary ROck Program (SERP), whose immediate objectiv eis to evaluate five types of secimdnary rock - sandstone, chalk, carbonate rocks (limestone and dolostone), anhydrock, and shale - to determine the potential for siting a geologic repository. The evaluation of these five rock types, together with the ongoing salt studies, effectively results in the consideration of all types of relatively impermeable sedimentary rock for repository purposes. The results of this evaluation are expressed in terms of a ranking of the five rock types with respect to their potential to serve as a geologic repository host rock. This comparative evaluation was conducted on a non-site-specific basis, by use of generic information together with rock evaluation criteria (RECs) derived from the DOE siting guidelines for geologic repositories (CFR 1984). An information base relevant to rock evaluation using these RECs was developed in hydrology, geochemistry, rock characteristics (rock occurrences, thermal response, rock mechanics), natural resources, and rock dissolution. Evaluation against postclosure and preclosure RECs yielded a ranking of the five subject rocks with respect to their potential as repository host rocks. Shale was determined to be the most preferred of the five rock types, with sandstone a distant second, the carbonate rocks and anhydrock a more distant third, and chalk a relatively close fourth.

  4. Stratified precambrian rocks (sedimentary ) beneath the midcontinent region of the US

    SciTech Connect

    Hauser, E.C.

    1993-02-01

    A thick sequence of layered rocks occurs beneath the Phanerozoic platform strata which blanket the US midcontinent. Observed on COCORP deep reflection data in southern Illinois and Indiana and in SW Oklahoma and adjacent Texas, this sequence is locally 1--3 times as thick as the overlying Paleozoic cover, but the origin of this sequence and its ultimate lateral extent are unknown. However, the occurrences of Precambrian layered rocks on both the COCORP profiles and reprocessed industry seismic reflection data from the region lie within regions of generally low amplitude and low frequency aeromagnetic anomaly, suggesting an even greater distribution. Unmetamorphosed Precambrian sedimentary rocks have been recovered from drill holes in southwest Ohio and adjacent northern Kentucky and southwesternmost Indiana. These Precambrian sedimentary rocks lie above and may be part of an underlying package of strongly layered rocks imaged on a short and shallow seismic profile in southwest Ohio. These Precambrian sedimentary rocks were originally viewed as part of a late Precambrian (Keweenawan ) rift; however, in light of Grenville foreland structures seen on the COCORP profile to the north in west central Ohio, these Precambrian strata may (1) be part of a heretofore unrecognized Grenville foreland basin, or (2) indicate that unmetamorphosed Precambrian sedimentary material may be an important constituent of the layered rocks observed on COCORP beneath southern Illinois and Indiana.

  5. Stratified precambrian rocks (sedimentary?) beneath the midcontinent region of the US. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Hauser, E.C.

    1993-02-01

    A thick sequence of layered rocks occurs beneath the Phanerozoic platform strata which blanket the US midcontinent. Observed on COCORP deep reflection data in southern Illinois and Indiana and in SW Oklahoma and adjacent Texas, this sequence is locally 1--3 times as thick as the overlying Paleozoic cover, but the origin of this sequence and its ultimate lateral extent are unknown. However, the occurrences of Precambrian layered rocks on both the COCORP profiles and reprocessed industry seismic reflection data from the region lie within regions of generally low amplitude and low frequency aeromagnetic anomaly, suggesting an even greater distribution. Unmetamorphosed Precambrian sedimentary rocks have been recovered from drill holes in southwest Ohio and adjacent northern Kentucky and southwesternmost Indiana. These Precambrian sedimentary rocks lie above and may be part of an underlying package of strongly layered rocks imaged on a short and shallow seismic profile in southwest Ohio. These Precambrian sedimentary rocks were originally viewed as part of a late Precambrian (Keweenawan?) rift; however, in light of Grenville foreland structures seen on the COCORP profile to the north in west central Ohio, these Precambrian strata may (1) be part of a heretofore unrecognized Grenville foreland basin, or (2) indicate that unmetamorphosed Precambrian sedimentary material may be an important constituent of the layered rocks observed on COCORP beneath southern Illinois and Indiana.

  6. Mid-Cretaceous Hawaiian tholeiites preserved in Kamchatka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portnyagin, Maxim; Savelyev, Dmitry; Hoernle, Kaj; Hauff, Folkmar; Garbe-Schönberg, Dieter

    2008-11-01

    We report geochemical data on a peculiar group of Albian-Cenomanian(120-93 Ma) basalts preserved in ophiolites on the KamchatskyMys peninsula (Kamchatka, Russia) that share trace element andisotopic compositions with enriched tholeiites from the Detroitand Meiji Seamounts in the Hawaiian-Emperor Seamount chain.Melt inclusions in chromium spinel from these rocks, representativeof melt composition unaffected by post-magmatic alteration,exhibit Hawaiian-type [Th/Ba]n (0.25-0.77; i.e., distinctivelylow compared to the majority of oceanic island basalts and mid-oceanicridge basalts). Low 208Pb*/206Pb* of ~0.93 in rocks and high[Nb/La]n = 1.1-4.6 in melt inclusions suggest the presenceof a distinctive "Kea"-type component in their source.We propose that the ophiolitic basalts represent older (Earlyto middle Cretaceous) products of the Hawaiian hotspot (olderthan preserved on the northwest Pacific seafloor) that wereaccreted to the forearc of Kamchatka. The presence of similarcompositional components in modern and Cretaceous Hawaiian hotspotlavas suggests a persistent yet heterogeneous composition ofthe mantle plume, which may have sampled ≥15% of the core-mantleboundary layer over the past ~100 m.y.

  7. Mid-Cretaceous carbon cycle perturbations and Oceanic Anoxic Events recorded in southern Tibet

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaolin; Chen, Kefan; Hu, Dongping; Sha, Jingeng

    2016-01-01

    The organic carbon isotope (δ13Corg) curve for ~1.7-km-thick mid-Cretaceous strata of the Chaqiela section in Gamba area, southern Tibet is presented in this study. C-isotopic chemostratigraphic correlation combined with biostratigraphic constraints show that the Chaqiela section spans early Aptian through early Campanian period, and that almost all of the carbon cycle perturbations and Oceanic Anoxic Events during the mid-Cretaceous period are well recorded in the continental margin area of the southeastern Tethys Ocean. Significantly, two levels of methane-derived authigenic carbonates were identified at the onset of OAE1b near the Aptian-Albian boundary. We suggest that an increase in methane release from gas hydrates, potentially driven by sea-level fall and bottom water temperature increase, may have contributed to the large negative δ13Corg excursions and global warming during OAE1b. PMID:28000797

  8. Mid-Cretaceous carbon cycle perturbations and Oceanic Anoxic Events recorded in southern Tibet.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaolin; Chen, Kefan; Hu, Dongping; Sha, Jingeng

    2016-12-21

    The organic carbon isotope (δ(13)Corg) curve for ~1.7-km-thick mid-Cretaceous strata of the Chaqiela section in Gamba area, southern Tibet is presented in this study. C-isotopic chemostratigraphic correlation combined with biostratigraphic constraints show that the Chaqiela section spans early Aptian through early Campanian period, and that almost all of the carbon cycle perturbations and Oceanic Anoxic Events during the mid-Cretaceous period are well recorded in the continental margin area of the southeastern Tethys Ocean. Significantly, two levels of methane-derived authigenic carbonates were identified at the onset of OAE1b near the Aptian-Albian boundary. We suggest that an increase in methane release from gas hydrates, potentially driven by sea-level fall and bottom water temperature increase, may have contributed to the large negative δ(13)Corg excursions and global warming during OAE1b.

  9. Mid-Cretaceous carbon cycle perturbations and Oceanic Anoxic Events recorded in southern Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaolin; Chen, Kefan; Hu, Dongping; Sha, Jingeng

    2016-12-01

    The organic carbon isotope (δ13Corg) curve for ~1.7-km-thick mid-Cretaceous strata of the Chaqiela section in Gamba area, southern Tibet is presented in this study. C-isotopic chemostratigraphic correlation combined with biostratigraphic constraints show that the Chaqiela section spans early Aptian through early Campanian period, and that almost all of the carbon cycle perturbations and Oceanic Anoxic Events during the mid-Cretaceous period are well recorded in the continental margin area of the southeastern Tethys Ocean. Significantly, two levels of methane-derived authigenic carbonates were identified at the onset of OAE1b near the Aptian-Albian boundary. We suggest that an increase in methane release from gas hydrates, potentially driven by sea-level fall and bottom water temperature increase, may have contributed to the large negative δ13Corg excursions and global warming during OAE1b.

  10. Thermal stress microfracturing of crystalline and sedimentary rock

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.F.

    1989-05-01

    The goal of the research program is to understand mechanisms of thermal cracking in granitic rocks. The research plan included development of a theoretical understanding of cracking due to thermal stresses, laboratory work to characterize crack strain in rocks thermally stressed under different conditions (including natural thermal histories), and microscopic work to count and catalog crack occurrences, and geologic application to naturally occurring granites.

  11. First Record of Anisoptera (Insecta: Odonata) from mid-Cretaceous Burmese Amber.

    PubMed

    Schädel, Mario; Bechly, Günter

    2016-04-18

    The fossil dragonfly Burmalindenia imperfecta gen. et sp. nov. is described from mid-Cretaceous Burmese amber as the first record of the odonate suborder Anisoptera for this locality and one of the few records from amber in general. The inclusion comprises two fragments of the two hind wings of a dragonfly. The fossil can be attributed to a new genus and species of the family Gomphidae, presumably in the subfamily Lindeniinae, and features a strange teratological phenomenon in its wing venation.

  12. Geoengineering Research for a Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory in Sedimentary Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauldon, M.

    2004-12-01

    A process to identify world-class research for a Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL) in the USA has been initiated by NSF. While allowing physicists to study, inter alia, dark matter and dark energy, this laboratory will create unprecedented opportunities for biologists to study deep life, geoscientists to study crustal processes and geoengineers to study the behavior of rock, fluids and underground cavities at depth, on time scales of decades. A substantial portion of the nation's future infrastructure is likely to be sited underground because of energy costs, urban crowding and vulnerability of critical surface facilities. Economic and safe development of subsurface space will require an improved ability to engineer the geologic environment. Because of the prevalence of sedimentary rock in the upper continental crust, much of this subterranean infrastructure will be hosted in sedimentary rock. Sedimentary rocks are fundamentally anisotropic due to lithology and bedding, and to discontinuities ranging from microcracks to faults. Fractures, faults and bedding planes create structural defects and hydraulic pathways over a wide range of scales. Through experimentation, observation and monitoring in a sedimentary rock DUSEL, in conjunction with high performance computational models and visualization tools, we will explore the mechanical and hydraulic characteristics of layered rock. DUSEL will permit long-term experiments on 100 m blocks of rock in situ, accessed via peripheral tunnels. Rock volumes will be loaded to failure and monitored for post-peak behavior. The response of large rock bodies to stress relief-driven, time-dependent strain will be monitored over decades. Large block experiments will be aimed at measurement of fluid flow and particle/colloid transport, in situ mining (incl. mining with microbes), remediation technologies, fracture enhancement for resource extraction and large scale long-term rock mass response to induced

  13. Analysis and Discrimination of Sedimentary, Metamorphic, and Igneous Rocks Using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Ab. Kr.; Maurya, G. S.; Kumar, R.; Pathak, A. K.; Pati, J. K.; Rai, Aw. K.

    2017-01-01

    This study deals with the analysis of rocks using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) coupled with principal component analysis. The spectra of sedimentary, metamorphic, and igneous rock samples were recorded in the 200-900 nm spectral range. The atomic lines of elements such as Si, Ca, Mg, Fe, Na, and K along with lighter elements, namely C, H, N, and O, were observed in these spectra. Multivariate analysis in combination with LIBS was used to classify the samples. For principal component analysis, a 12 × 5849 data matrix was formed using the results of LIBS. The plot of the analysis revealed similarities between the sedimentary and metamorphic rock samples compared with the igneous rock sample. Thus, the present study demonstrates that LIBS coupled with principal component analysis can become an important tool for rapid classification and in-situ discrimination of rock samples.

  14. The potassic sedimentary rocks in Gale Crater, Mars, as seen by ChemCam Onboard Curiosity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Le Deit, Laetitia; Mangold, Nicolas; Forni, Olivier; Cousin, Agnes; Lasue, Jeremie; Schröder, Susanne; Wiens, Roger C.; Sumner, Dawn Y.; Fabre, Cecile; Stack, Katherine M.; Anderson, Ryan; Blaney, Diana L.; Clegg, Samuel M.; Dromart, Gilles; Fisk, Martin; Gasnault, Olivier; Grotzinger, John P.; Gupta, Sanjeev; Lanza, Nina; Le Mouélic, Stephane; Maurice, Sylvestre; McLennan, Scott M.; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Nachon, Marion; Newsom, Horton E.; Payre, Valerie; Rapin, William; Rice, Melissa; Sautter, Violaine; Treiman, Alan H.

    2016-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity encountered potassium-rich clastic sedimentary rocks at two sites in Gale Crater, the waypoints Cooperstown and Kimberley. These rocks include several distinct meters thick sedimentary outcrops ranging from fine sandstone to conglomerate, interpreted to record an ancient fluvial or fluvio-deltaic depositional system. From ChemCam Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) chemical analyses, this suite of sedimentary rocks has an overall mean K2O abundance that is more than 5 times higher than that of the average Martian crust. The combined analysis of ChemCam data with stratigraphic and geographic locations reveals that the mean K2O abundance increases upward through the stratigraphic section. Chemical analyses across each unit can be represented as mixtures of several distinct chemical components, i.e., mineral phases, including K-bearing minerals, mafic silicates, Fe-oxides, and Fe-hydroxide/oxyhydroxides. Possible K-bearing minerals include alkali feldspar (including anorthoclase and sanidine) and K-bearing phyllosilicate such as illite. Mixtures of different source rocks, including a potassium-rich rock located on the rim and walls of Gale Crater, are the likely origin of observed chemical variations within each unit. Physical sorting may have also played a role in the enrichment in K in the Kimberley formation. The occurrence of these potassic sedimentary rocks provides additional evidence for the chemical diversity of the crust exposed at Gale Crater.

  15. Dynamic Study on Fracture Problems in Viscoelastic Sedimentary Rocks Using the Numerical Manifold Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhijun; Wong, Louis Ngai Yuen; Fan, Lifeng

    2013-11-01

    The viscoelastic deformation behavior of a sedimentary rock under different loading rates is numerically modeled and investigated by the numerical manifold method (NMM). By incorporating a modified 3-element viscoelastic constitutive mode in the NMM, crack initiation and propagation criteria, and crack identification and evolution techniques, the effects of the loading rates on the cracking behavior of a sedimentary rock, such as crack open displacement, crack sliding displacement, crack initiation, crack propagation and final failure mode, are successfully modeled. The numerical results reveal that under a high loading rate (>1,000 MPa/s), due to the viscoelastic property of the sedimentary rock, not only the structural behavior deviates from that of elastic model, but also different cracking processes and final failure modes are obtained.

  16. Sedimentary Rocks of 8oN, 7oW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    11 September 2004 An impact crater in western Arabia Terra at 8oN, 7oW, exhibits some of the most fantastic sedimentary rock outcrops on Mars. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an example. The crater interior has hundreds of sedimentary rock layers, each of a similar thickness and similar physical properties. The similarities between beds and their repeated nature have been used to suggest that the crater was once the site of a lake. Today, the sedimentary rocks are eroded and dark, windblown sand covers some of them. Faults cut and offset beds in some places. The image covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across and is illuminated by sunlight from the left/lower left.

  17. Analysis for preliminary evaluation of discrete fracture flow and large-scale permeability in sedimentary rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Kanehiro, B.Y.; Lai, C.H.; Stow, S.H.

    1987-05-01

    Conceptual models for sedimentary rock settings that could be used in future evaluation and suitability studies are being examined through the DOE Repository Technology Program. One area of concern for the hydrologic aspects of these models is discrete fracture flow analysis as related to the estimation of the size of the representative elementary volume, evaluation of the appropriateness of continuum assumptions and estimation of the large-scale permeabilities of sedimentary rocks. A basis for preliminary analysis of flow in fracture systems of the types that might be expected to occur in low permeability sedimentary rocks is presented. The approach used involves numerical modeling of discrete fracture flow for the configuration of a large-scale hydrologic field test directed at estimation of the size of the representative elementary volume and large-scale permeability. Analysis of fracture data on the basis of this configuration is expected to provide a preliminary indication of the scale at which continuum assumptions can be made.

  18. Geology, Geochemistry and Geophysics of Sedimentary Rock-Hosted Au Deposits in P.R. China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, Stephen G.

    2002-01-01

    This is the second report concerning results of a joint project between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Tianjin Geological Academy to study sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits in P.R. China. Since the 1980s, Chinese geologists have devoted a large-scale exploration and research effort to the deposits. As a result, there are more than 20 million oz of proven Au reserves in sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits in P.R. China. Additional estimated and inferred resources are present in over 160 deposits and occurrences, which are undergoing exploration. This makes China second to Nevada in contained ounces of Au in Carlin-type deposits. It is likely that many of the Carlin-type Au ore districts in China, when fully developed, could have resource potential comparable to the multi-1,000-tonne Au resource in northern Nevada. The six chapters of this report describe sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits that were visited during the project. Chapters 1 and 2 provide an overview of sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits and Carlin-type Au deposits and also provide a working classification for the sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits. Chapters 3, 4, and 5 provide descriptions that were compiled from the literature in China in three main areas: the Dian-Qian-Gui, the Qinling fold belt, and Middle-Lower Yangtze River areas. Chapter 6 contains a weights-of-evidence (WofE), GIS-based mineral assessment of sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits in the Qinling fold belt and Dian-Qian-Gui areas. Appendices contain scanned aeromagnetic (Appendix I) and gravity (Appendix II) geophysical maps of south and central China. Data tables of the deposits (Appendix III) also are available in the first report as an interactive database at http://geopubs.wr.usgs.gov/open-file/of98-466/. Geochemical analysis of ore samples from the deposits visited are contained in Appendix IV.

  19. A study of uranium favorability of Cenozoic sedimentary rocks, Basin and Range Province, Arizona: Part I, General geology and chronology of pre-late Miocene Cenozoic sedimentary rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scarborough, Robert Bryan; Wilt, Jan Carol

    1979-01-01

    This study focuses attention on Cenozoic sedimentary rocks in the Basin and Range Province of Arizona. The known occurrences of uranium and anomalous radioactivity in these rocks are associated with sediments that accumulated in a low energy environment characterized by fine-grained clastics, including important tuffaceous materials, and carbonate rocks. Most uranium occurrences, in these rocks appear to be stratabound. Emphasis was placed on those sedimentary materials that pre-date the late Cenozoic Basin and Range disturbance. They are deformed and crop out on pedimented range blocks and along the province interface with the Transition Zone. Three tentative age groups are recognized: Group I - Oligocene, pre-22 m.y., Group II - early Miocene - 22 m.y. - 16 m.y., and Group III - middle Miocene - 16 m.y. to 13--10 m.y. Regionally, these three groups contain both coarse to fine-grained red clastics and low energy lighter colored 'lacustrine' phases. Each of the three groups has been the object of uranium exploration. Group II, the early Miocene strata, embraces the Anderson Mine - Artillery region host rocks and also the New River - Cave Creek early Miocene beds-along the boundary with the Transition Zone. These three groups of rocks have been tectonically deformed to the extent that original basins of deposition cannot yet be reconstructed. However, they were considerably more extensive in size than the late Cenozoic basins the origin of which deformed the former. Group II rocks are judged to be of prime interest because of: (1) the development and preservation of organic matter in varying lithologies, (2) apparent contemporaneity with silicic volcanic centers, (3) influence of Precambrian crystalline rocks, and (4) relative outcrop continuity near the stable Transition Zone. The Transition Zone, especially along its boundary with the Basin and Range Province, needs additional geologic investigation, especially as regards the depositional continuity of Group II

  20. Dechlorinating microorganisms in a sedimentary rock matrix contaminated with a mixture of VOCs.

    PubMed

    Lima, Gláucia; Parker, Beth; Meyer, Jessica

    2012-06-05

    Microbiological characterizations of contaminant biodegradation in fractured sedimentary rock have primarily focused on the biomass suspended in groundwater samples and disregarded the biomass attached to fractures and in matrix pores. In fractured sedimentary rock, diffusion causes nearly all contaminant mass to reside in porous, low-permeability matrix. Microorganisms capable of contaminant degradation can grow in the matrix pores if the pores and pore throats are sufficiently large. In this study, the presence of dechlorinating microorganisms in rock matrices was investigated at a site where a fractured, flat-lying, sandstone-dolostone sequence has been contaminated with a mixture of chlorinated and aromatic hydrocarbons for over 40 years. The profile of organic contaminants as well as the distribution and characterization of the microbial community spatial variability was obtained through depth-discrete, high-frequency sampling along a 98-m continuous rock core. Dechlorinating microorganisms, such as Dehalococcoides and Dehalobacter, were detected in the rock matrices away from fracture surfaces, indicating that biodegradation within the rock matrix blocks should be considered as an important component of the system when evaluating the potential for natural attenuation or remediation at similar sedimentary rock sites.

  1. The fate of diamondoids in coals and sedimentary rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wei, Z.; Moldowan, J.M.; Jarvie, D.M.; Hill, R.

    2006-01-01

    Diamondoids were detected in the extracts of a series of coals and rocks varying in maturity, lithology, source input, and depositional environment. At the same maturity level, diamondoids are generally about a magnitude more abundant in source rocks than in coals. The concentrations of diamondoids are maturity dependent. However, while diamondoids become more abundant with the increasing thermal maturity, a diminution in diamondoid concentrations is observed at the maturity value of about Ro = 4.0% in both coals and rocks. The occurrence of diamantane destruction at 550 ??C during pyrolysis suggests that diamondoids may be eventually destroyed at high temperatures in the Earth. Here we propose three main phases of diamondoid life in nature: diamondoid generation (phase I, Ro 4.0%). ?? 2006 Geological Society of America.

  2. The fate of diamondoids in coals and sedimentary rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Z.; Moldowan, J.M.; Jarvie, D.M.; Hill, R.

    2006-12-15

    Diamondoids were detected in the extracts of a series of coals and rocks varying in maturity, lithology, source input, and depositional environment. At the same maturity level, diamondoids are generally about a magnitude more abundant in source rocks than in coals. The concentrations of diamondoids are maturity dependent. However, while diamondoids become more abundant with the increasing thermal maturity, a diminution in diamondoid concentrations is observed at the maturity value of about R{sub o} = 4.0% in both coals and rocks. The occurrence of diamantane destruction at 550{sup o}C during pyrolysis suggests that diamondoids may be eventually destroyed at high temperatures in the Earth. Here we propose three main phases of diamondoid life in nature: diamondoid generation (phase I, R{sub o} < 1.1%), diamondoid generation and enrichment (phase II, 1.1% {le} R{sub o} {le}4.0%), and diamondoid destruction (phase III, R{sub o} > 4.0%).

  3. Experimental measurements of seismic attenuation in microfracture sedimentary rock

    SciTech Connect

    Peacock, S.; McCann, C.; Sothcott, J.; Astin, T.R. . Research Inst. for Sedimentology)

    1994-09-01

    In a previous paper (Peacock et al., 1994), the authors related ultrasonic velocities in water-saturated Carrara Marble to crack densities in polished sections to verify Hudson's (1980, 1981, 1986) theory for velocities in cracked rock. They describe the empirical relationships between attenuation and crack density that they established during these experiments in the hope of clarifying the mechanism of attenuation in rocks with fluid-filled cracks. Relating seismic velocity and attenuation to crack density is important in predicting the productivity of fractured petroleum reservoirs such as the North Sea Brent Field. It also allows cracks to be used as stress indicators throughout the shallow crust (Crampin and Lovell, 1991).

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance in sedimentary rocks: Effect of proton desorption rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendelson, Kenneth S.

    1982-09-01

    In a discussion of nuclear magnetic resonance of protons in the pore fluid of sedimentary rocks, Cohen and Mendelson assumed that the desorption rate of protons from the rock surface is much faster than the relaxation rate of the magnetization for protons on the surface. In the present paper it is shown that this assumption is not necessary and conditions are established under which the analysis of Cohen and Mendelson is valid.

  5. Potential Cement Phases in Sedimentary Rocks Drilled by Curiosity at Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rampe, E. B.; Morris, R. V.; Bish, D. L.; Chipera, S. J.; Ming, D. W.; Blake, D. F.; Vaniman, D. T.; Bristow, T. F.; Cavanagh, P.; Farmer, J. D.; hide

    2015-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity has encountered a variety of sedimentary rocks in Gale crater with different grain sizes, diagenetic features, sedimentary structures, and varying degrees of resistance to erosion. Curiosity has drilled three rocks to date and has analyzed the mineralogy, chemical composition, and textures of the samples with the science payload. The drilled rocks are the Sheepbed mudstone at Yellowknife Bay on the plains of Gale crater (John Klein and Cumberland targets), the Dillinger sandstone at the Kimberley on the plains of Gale crater (Windjana target), and a sedimentary unit in the Pahrump Hills in the lowermost rocks at the base of Mt. Sharp (Confidence Hills target). CheMin is the Xray diffractometer on Curiosity, and its data are used to identify and determine the abundance of mineral phases. Secondary phases can tell us about aqueous alteration processes and, thus, can help to elucidate past aqueous environments. Here, we present the secondary mineralogy of the rocks drilled to date as seen by CheMin and discuss past aqueous environments in Gale crater, the potential cementing agents in each rock, and how amorphous materials may play a role in cementing the sediments.

  6. Discrete Fracture Networks Groundwater Modelling at Bedding Control Fractured Sedimentary Rock mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pin, Yeh; Yuan-Chieh, Wu

    2017-04-01

    Groundwater flow modelling in fractured rock mass is an important challenging work in predicting the transport of contamination. So far as we know about the numerical analysis method was consider for crystalline rock, which means discontinuous are treated as stochastic distribution in homogeneous rock mass. Based on the understanding of geology in Taiwan in past few decades, we know that the hydraulic conductivities of Quaternary and Tertiary system rock mass are strongly controlled by development of sedimentary structures (bedding plane). The main purpose of this study is to understand how Discrete Fracture Networks (DFN) affects numerical results in terms of hydraulic behavior using different DFN generation methods. Base on surface geology investigation and core drilling work (3 boreholes with a total length of 120m), small scale fracture properties with in Cho-lan formation (muddy sandstone) are defined, including gently dip of bedding and 2 sub-vertical joint sets. Two FracMan/MAFIC numerical modellings are conducted, using ECPM approach (Equivalent Continuum Porous Media); case A considered all fracture were Power law distribution with Poisson fracture center; case B considered all bedding plans penetrate into modelling region, and remove the bedding count to recalculate joint fracture parameters. Modelling results show that Case B gives stronger groundwater pathways than Case A and have impact on flow field. This preliminary modelling result implicates the groundwater flow modelling work in some fractured sedimentary rock mass, might be considerate to rock sedimentary structure development itself, discontinuous maybe not follow the same stochastic DFN parameter.

  7. Alteration of immature sedimentary rocks on Earth and Mars. Recording Aqueous and Surface-atmosphere Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, Kenneth M.; Mustard, John F.; Salvatore, Mark R.

    2015-03-05

    The rock alteration and rind formation in analog environments like Antarctica may provide clues to rock alteration and therefore paleoclimates on Mars. Clastic sedimentary rocks derived from basaltic sources have been studied in situ by martian rovers and are likely abundant on the surface of Mars. Moreover, how such rock types undergo alteration when exposed to different environmental conditions is poorly understood compared with alteration of intact basaltic flows. Here we characterize alteration in the chemically immature Carapace Sandstone from Antarctica, a terrestrial analog for martian sedimentary rocks. We employ a variety of measurements similar to those used on previous and current Mars missions. Laboratory techniques included bulk chemistry, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), hyperspectral imaging and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Through these methods we find that primary basaltic material in the Carapace Sandstone is pervasively altered to hydrated clay minerals and palagonite as a result of water–rock interaction. A thick orange rind is forming in current Antarctic conditions, superimposing this previous aqueous alteration signature. The rind exhibits a higher reflectance at visible-near infrared wavelengths than the rock interior, with an enhanced ferric absorption edge likely due to an increase in Fe3+ of existing phases or the formation of minor iron (oxy)hydroxides. This alteration sequence in the Carapace Sandstone results from decreased water–rock interaction over time, and weathering in a cold, dry environment, mimicking a similar transition early in martian history. This transition may be recorded in sedimentary rocks on Mars through a similar superimposition mechanism, capturing past climate changes at the hand sample scale. These results also suggest that basalt-derived sediments could have sourced significant volumes of hydrated minerals on early Mars due to their greater permeability compared with intact igneous rocks.

  8. Alteration of immature sedimentary rocks on Earth and Mars: Recording aqueous and surface-atmosphere processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, Kevin M.; Mustard, John F.; Salvatore, Mark R.

    2015-05-01

    Rock alteration and rind formation in analog environments like Antarctica may provide clues to rock alteration and therefore paleoclimates on Mars. Clastic sedimentary rocks derived from basaltic sources have been studied in situ by martian rovers and are likely abundant on the surface of Mars. However, how such rock types undergo alteration when exposed to different environmental conditions is poorly understood compared with alteration of intact basaltic flows. Here we characterize alteration in the chemically immature Carapace Sandstone from Antarctica, a terrestrial analog for martian sedimentary rocks. We employ a variety of measurements similar to those used on previous and current Mars missions. Laboratory techniques included bulk chemistry, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), hyperspectral imaging and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Through these methods we find that primary basaltic material in the Carapace Sandstone is pervasively altered to hydrated clay minerals and palagonite as a result of water-rock interaction. A thick orange rind is forming in current Antarctic conditions, superimposing this previous aqueous alteration signature. The rind exhibits a higher reflectance at visible-near infrared wavelengths than the rock interior, with an enhanced ferric absorption edge likely due to an increase in Fe3+ of existing phases or the formation of minor iron (oxy)hydroxides. This alteration sequence in the Carapace Sandstone results from decreased water-rock interaction over time, and weathering in a cold, dry environment, mimicking a similar transition early in martian history. This transition may be recorded in sedimentary rocks on Mars through a similar superimposition mechanism, capturing past climate changes at the hand sample scale. Our results also suggest that basalt-derived sediments could have sourced significant volumes of hydrated minerals on early Mars due to their greater permeability compared with intact igneous rocks.

  9. Highly Shocked Low Density Sedimentary Rocks from the Haughton Impact Structure, Devon Island, Nunavut, Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osinski, G. R.; Spray, J. G.

    2001-01-01

    We present the preliminary results of a detailed investigation of the shock effects in highly shocked, low density sedimentary rocks from the Haughton impact structure. We suggest that some textural features can be explained by carbonate-silicate immiscibility. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  10. Late Cretaceous multicolored shales and phosphatic sedimentary rocks in Egypt

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn, C.R.; Garrison, R.E.; Arthur, M.A.

    1983-03-01

    Upper Cretaceous transitional fluvial to marine variegated shale (upper Nubia Formation) and the fully marine Duwi (phosphate) Formation occur as thin, widespread, shallow-marine deposits in an east-west-trending belt spanning the lower-middle latitudes of Egypt. On a larger scale, the phosphoritic rocks in Egypt represent but a small portion of a laterally extensive Middle Eastern-North African phosphogenic province of Upper Cretaceous-Lower Tertiary age that accounts for accumulation of minable marine phosphate in excess of 70 billion tons. Phosphorites, porcelanites/cherts, organic carbon-rich shales, glauconitic sandstones, and bioclastic and fine-grained carbonate rocks variously reflect major hemipelagic and shallow-water carbonate sedimentation. Biosiliceous hemipelagic deposits, now diagenetically altered to procelanite and chert, reflect low energy depositional conditions that were periodically interrupted by high energy, possibly storm-induced currents and/or down-slope redeposition. Both dark shales and porcelanites locally contain abundant organic matter and are commonly finely laminated. Porcelanites and black shales are phosphatic, containing phosphatic grains identical, morphologically and chemically, to those found in associated phosphorites, and are probably the source from which the phosphorites were derived. The organic carbon-rich shales of the Duwi Formation appear to be quite laterally extensive and may, depending on thermal maturity, represent potential hydrocarbon source rocks in other portions of the region (e.g., Western Desert, Gulf of Suez), where they are more deeply buried.

  11. Classification Scheme for Diverse Sedimentary and Igneous Rocks Encountered by MSL in Gale Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, M. E.; Mangold, N.; Fisk, M.; Forni, O.; McLennan, S.; Ming, D. W.; Sumner, D.; Sautter, V.; Williams, A. J.; Gellert, R.

    2015-01-01

    The Curiosity Rover landed in a lithologically and geochemically diverse region of Mars. We present a recommended rock classification framework based on terrestrial schemes, and adapted for the imaging and analytical capabilities of MSL as well as for rock types distinctive to Mars (e.g., high Fe sediments). After interpreting rock origin from textures, i.e., sedimentary (clastic, bedded), igneous (porphyritic, glassy), or unknown, the overall classification procedure (Fig 1) involves: (1) the characterization of rock type according to grain size and texture; (2) the assignment of geochemical modifiers according to Figs 3 and 4; and if applicable, in depth study of (3) mineralogy and (4) geologic/stratigraphic context. Sedimentary rock types are assigned by measuring grains in the best available resolution image (Table 1) and classifying according to the coarsest resolvable grains as conglomerate/breccia, (coarse, medium, or fine) sandstone, silt-stone, or mudstone. If grains are not resolvable in MAHLI images, grains in the rock are assumed to be silt sized or smaller than surface dust particles. Rocks with low color contrast contrast between grains (e.g., Dismal Lakes, sol 304) are classified according to minimum size of apparent grains from surface roughness or shadows outlining apparent grains. Igneous rocks are described as intrusive or extrusive depending on crystal size and fabric. Igneous textures may be described as granular, porphyritic, phaneritic, aphyric, or glassy depending on crystal size. Further descriptors may include terms such as vesicular or cumulate textures.

  12. Geodynamically unusual settings of sedimentary rock and ore formation due to tectonic-decompression effects

    SciTech Connect

    Goryainov, P.M.

    1984-05-01

    The traditional views of terrigenous rocks as products of classical sedimentary cycle, ''mobilization-transport-deposition,'' are not universal. Detrital rocks are sometimes formed due to flaking and fracturation of rocks of rising blocks. The process is produced by tectonic-decompression mechanisms - the origination of a gradient of excessive stress and its discharge. It is incorrect to classify rocks created by this phenomenon with weathering crusts. The origins of certain terrigenous rocks, as well as products of low-temperature chemical processing, are connected with deep-volume decompression (brecciation, stockwork formation, formation of pipes and columns of igneous rocks, and chamber pegmatite and karst formation). The ore concentrations associated with such entities and appearing as stratiform deposits are most likely not exogenous, but they complete the endogenous history of the block concerned. The means and methods tested on typical endogenous deposits may therefore prove valuable in predicting certain varieties of stratiform deposits.

  13. Venera 13 and venera 14: sedimentary rocks on venus?

    PubMed

    Florensky, C P; Basilevsky, A T; Kryuchkov, V P; Kusmin, R O; Nikolaeva, O V; Pronin, A A; Chernaya, I M; Tyuflin, Y S; Selivanov, A S; Naraeva, M K; Ronca, L B

    1983-07-01

    Venera 13 and Venera 14 transmitted almost complete panoramic views of their landing sites. Analyses of the photographs show the presence of rock formations undergoing geomorphic degradation. The formations display ripple marks, thin layering, differential erosion, and curvilinear fracturings. Some of them are interpreted as lithified clastic sediments. The lithification could have taken place at depth or at the surface, resulting in a type of duricrust. The origin of the sediments is unknown but could be aeolian, volcanic, or related to impacts or to turbidity currents.

  14. Predicting the permeability of sedimentary rocks from microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Schlueter, E.M.

    1995-01-01

    Permeability is linked to other properties of porous media such as capillary pressure and relative permeability. In order to understand the relationships, one has to understand how all those properties are conditioned by the connectivity and geometrical properties of the pore space. In this study, we look at a natural porous material which is defined as a two-phase material in which the interconnected pore space constitutes one phase and the solid matrix the other. Laboratory samples are tested using fluid flow experiments to determine the relationship of macroscopic properties such as permeability to rock microstructure. Kozeny-Carman and other equations are developed to further quantify these relationships.

  15. Paleoclimatological implications of Mid-Cretaceous paleosol sphaerosiderites from 70 degrees paleonorth, central Spitsbergen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, T.

    2010-12-01

    Paleoclimatological reconstructions of Mid-Cretaceous greenhouse atmospheric hydrology have been accomplished using a model-data comparison approach based on a stable isotopic tracer version of the GENESIS GCM benchmarked using oxygen isotopic data obtained from paleosol sphaerosiderites. While ample data coverage exists for much of mid-latitude North America, the paleo Arctic realm has thus far been represented by data only from the North Slope, Alaska. The new data presented here provides an additional paleo Arctic data point from central Spitsbergen. Mid-Cretaceous paleosol sphaerosiderites were identified in cores that penetrated the uppermost portions of the Aptian-Cenomanian (?) Carolinefjellet Formation of the Adventdalen Group - the upper age limit of the Carolinefjellet Formation in central Spitsbergen remains undefined near the Albian-Cenomanian boundary. Notably, on the Barents Shelf to the south the coeval Kolmule Formation of the Adventdalen Group is known to range in age into the lower Cenomanian suggesting the possibility that the Carolinefjellet Formation may also contain the Albian-Cenomanian boundary. Seven distinct sphaerosiderite-bearing horizons were identified within a 2.5 meter interval of dominantly light to medium gray siltstone and fine sandstone overlain by dark gray siltstone and black carbonaceous shale. The samples were microdrilled for stable carbon and oxygen isotopic analysis. Sphaerosiderite oxygen isotope values range from -11.6 per mil to -7.9 per mil. A comparison of this data with an Albian-Cenomanian North American data set indicates that amplified paleoatmospheric hydrologic processes are not required to adequately model the Mid-Cretaceous greenhouse atmosphere. The data is further compared and contrasted to similar data for the Paleocene-Eocene boundary to substantiate this conclusion.

  16. Pre-lithification tectonic foliation development in a clastic sedimentary rock sequence from SW Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meere, Patrick; Mulchrone, Kieran; McCarthy, David

    2017-04-01

    The current orthodoxy regarding the development of regionally developed penetrative tectonic cleavage fabrics in sedimentary rocks is that it postdates lithification of those rocks. It is well established that fabric development under these circumstances is achieved by a combination of grain rigid body rotation, crystal-plastic deformation and pressure solution. The latter is believed to be the primary mechanism responsible for the domainal nature of cleavage development commonly observed in low grade metamorphic rocks. While there have been advocates for the development of tectonic cleavages before host rock lithification these are currently viewed as essentially local aberrations without regional significance. In this study we combine new field observations with strain analysis, element mapping and modelling to characterise Acadian (>50%) crustal shortening in a Devonian clastic sedimentary sequence from the Dingle Peninsula of south west Ireland. Fabrics in these rocks reflect significant levels of tectonic shortening are a product of grain translation, rigid body rotation and repacking of intra- and extra-formational clasts during deformation of an unconsolidated clastic sedimentary sequence. There is an absence of the expected domainal cleavage structure and intra-clast deformation expected with conventional cleavage formation. This study requires geologists to consider the possibility such a mechanism contributing to tectonic strain in a wide range of geological settings and to look again at field evidence that indicates early sediment mobility during deformation.

  17. Angstrom-to-millimeter characterization of sedimentary rock microstructure.

    PubMed

    Radlinski, A P; Ioannidis, M A; Hinde, A L; Hainbuchner, M; Baron, M; Rauch, H; Kline, S R

    2004-06-15

    Backscatter SEM imaging and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) data are combined within a statistical framework to quantify the microstructure of a porous solid in terms of a continuous pore-size distribution spanning over five orders of magnitude of length scale, from 10 A to 500 microm. The method is demonstrated on a sample of natural sandstone and the results are tested against mercury porosimetry (MP) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation data. The rock microstructure is fractal (D=2.47) in the pore-size range 10 A-50 microm and Euclidean for larger length scales. The pore-size distribution is consistent with that determined by MP. The NMR data show a bimodal distribution of proton T(2) relaxation times, which is interpreted quantitatively using a model of relaxation in fractal pores. Pore-length scales derived from the NMR data are consistent with the geometrical parameters derived from both the SEM/SANS and MP data. The combined SANS/BSEM method furnishes new microstructural information that should facilitate the study of capillary phenomena in hydrocarbon reservoir rocks and other porous solids exhibiting broad pore-size distributions.

  18. Analysis of well logging methods in volcanic and volcano sedimentary rocks from Pina petroleum field

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriquez, N.

    1996-09-01

    Petrophysical, petrological and geophysical methods have been applied to prospecting and well logging for several petroleum fields in Cuba. The most common reservoir in these fields are carbonate rocks. However, the Pina field, in the Central region of the island, distinguishes itself by the good quality of the oil and the volcano sedimentary and volcanic character of the reservoirs. These rocks have peculiar geophysical responses, which is why the study of these methods and the development of the interpretation methods is very important. Integrated geological and geophysical information was necessary during the drilling of wells in the Pina field in order to evaluate the hydrocarbon potential. GEONUC code permits us to use different ways to solve questions about interpretation of well logging in the volcanic sedimentary rocks. This code gives us the opportunity to analyze complex methods.

  19. The mid-cretaceous water bearer: Isotope mass balance quantification of the Albian hydrologic cycle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ufnar, David F.; Gonzalez, Luis A.; Ludvigson, Greg A.; Brenner, Richard L.; Witzke, B.J.

    2002-01-01

    A latitudinal gradient in meteoric ??18O compositions compiled from paleosol sphaerosiderites throughout the Cretaceous Western Interior Basin (KWIB) (34-75??N paleolatitude) exhibits a steeper, more depleted trend than modern (predicted) values (3.0??? [34??N latitude] to 9.7??? [75??N] lighter). Furthermore, the sphaerosiderite meteoric ??18O latitudinal gradient is significantly steeper and more depleted (5.8??? [34??N] to 13.8??? [75??N] lighter) than a predicted gradient for the warm mid-Cretaceous using modern empirical temperature-??18O precipitation relationships. We have suggested that the steeper and more depleted (relative to the modern theoretical gradient) meteoric sphaerosiderite ??18O latitudinal gradient resulted from increased air mass rainout effects in coastal areas of the KWIB during the mid-Cretaceous. The sphaerosiderite isotopic data have been used to constrain a mass balance model of the hydrologic cycle in the northern hemisphere and to quantify precipitation rates of the equable 'greenhouse' Albian Stage in the KWIB. The mass balance model tracks the evolving isotopic composition of an air mass and its precipitation, and is driven by latitudinal temperature gradients. Our simulations indicate that significant increases in Albian precipitation (34-52%) and evaporation fluxes (76-96%) are required to reproduce the difference between modern and Albian meteoric siderite ??18O latitudinal gradients. Calculations of precipitation rates from model outputs suggest mid-high latitude precipitation rates greatly exceeded modern rates (156-220% greater in mid latitudes [2600-3300 mm/yr], 99% greater at high latitudes [550 mm/yr]). The calculated precipitation rates are significantly different from the precipitation rates predicted by some recent general circulation models (GCMs) for the warm Cretaceous, particularly in the mid to high latitudes. Our mass balance model by no means replaces GCMs. However, it is a simple and effective means of obtaining

  20. Correlating biodegradation to magnetization in oil bearing sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmerton, Stacey; Muxworthy, Adrian R.; Sephton, Mark A.; Aldana, Milagrosa; Costanzo-Alvarez, Vincenzo; Bayona, German; Williams, Wyn

    2013-07-01

    A relationship between hydrocarbons and their magnetic signatures has previously been alluded to but this is the first study to combine extensive geochemical and magnetic data of hydrocarbon-associated samples. We report a detailed study that identifies a connection between magnetic mineralogy and oil biodegradation within oil-bearing sedimentary units from Colombia, Canada Indonesia and the UK. Geochemical data reveal that all the oil samples are derived from mature type-II kerogens deposited in oxygen-poor environments. Biodegradation is evident to some extent in all samples and leads to a decrease in oil quality through the bacterially mediated conversion of aliphatic hydrocarbons to polar constituents. The percentage of oil components and the biodegradation state of the samples were compared to the magnetic susceptibility and magnetic mineralogy. A distinct decrease in magnetic susceptibility is correlated to decreasing oil quality and the amount of extractable organic matter present. Further magnetic characterization revealed that the high quality oils are dominated by pseudo-single domain grains of magnetite and the lower quality oils by larger pseudo-single domain to multidomain grains of magnetite and hematite. Hence, with decreasing oil quality there is a progressive dominance of multidomain magnetite as well as the appearance of hematite. It is concluded that biodegradation is a dual process, firstly, aliphatic hydrocarbons are removed thereby reducing oil quality and secondly, magnetic signatures are both created and destroyed. This complex relationship may explain why controversy has plagued previous attempts to resolve the connection between magnetics and hydrocarbon deposits. These findings reinforce the importance of bacteria within petroleum systems as well as providing a platform for the use of magnetization as a possible exploration tool to identify subsurface reservoirs and a novel proxy of hydrocarbon migration.

  1. Sedimentary basin geochemistry and fluid/rock interactions workshop

    SciTech Connect

    1991-12-31

    Fundamental research related to organic geochemistry, fluid-rock interactions, and the processes by which fluids migrate through basins has long been a part of the U.S. Department of Energy Geosciences program. Objectives of this program were to emphasize those principles and processes which would be applicable to a wide range of problems associated with petroleum discovery, occurrence and extraction, waste disposal of all kinds, and environmental management. To gain a better understanding of the progress being made in understanding basinal fluids, their geochemistry and movement, and related research, and to enhance communication and interaction between principal investigators and DOE and other Federal program managers interested in this topic, this workshop was organized by the School of Geology and Geophysics and held in Norman, Oklahoma in November, 1991.

  2. Predicting the transport properties of sedimentary rocks from microgeometry

    SciTech Connect

    Schlueter, E.M.

    1993-01-01

    We investigate through analysis and experiment how pore geometry, topology, and the physics and chemistry of mineral-fluid and fluid-fluid interactions affect the flow of fluids through consolidated/partially consolidated porous media. Our approach is to measure fluid permeability and electrical conductivity of rock samples using single and multiple fluid phases that can be frozen in place (wetting and nonwetting) over a range of pore pressures. These experiments are analyzed in terms of the microphysics and microchemistry of the processes involved to provide a theoretical basis for the macroscopic constitutive relationships between fluid-flow and geophysical properties that we develop. The purpose of these experiments and their analyses is to advance the understanding of the mechanisms and factors that control fluid transport in porous media. This understanding is important in characterizing porous media properties and heterogeneities before simulating and monitoring the progress of complex flow processes at the field scale in permeable media.

  3. Predicting the transport properties of sedimentary rocks from microgeometry

    SciTech Connect

    Schlueter, E.M.

    1995-02-01

    The author investigates through analysis and experiment how pore geometry, topology, and the physics and chemistry of mineral-fluid and fluid-fluid interactions affect the flow of fluids through consolidated/partially consolidated porous media. The approach is to measure fluid permeability and electrical conductivity of rock samples using single and multiple fluid phases that can be frozen in place (wetting and nonwetting) over a range of pore pressures. These experiments are analyzed in terms of the microphysics and microchemistry of the processes involved to provide a theoretical basis for the macroscopic constitutive relationships between fluid-flow and geophysical properties that the authors develop. The purpose of these experiments and their analyses is to advance the understanding of the mechanisms and factors that control fluid transport in porous media. This understanding is important in characterizing porous media properties and heterogeneities before simulating and monitoring the progress of complex flow processes at the field scale in permeable media.

  4. Characteristics of amorphous kerogens fractionated from terrigenous sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Noriyuki

    1984-02-01

    A preliminary attempt to fractionate amorphous kerogens from terrigenous bulk kerogen by a benzene-water two phase partition method under acidic condition was made. Microscopic observation revealed that amorphous kerogens and structured kerogens were fractionated effectively by this method. Characteristics of the amorphous and structured kerogens fractionated by this method were examined by some chemical analyses and compared with those of the bulk kerogen and humic acid isolated from the same rock sample (Haizume Formation, Pleistocene, Japan). The elemental and infrared (IR) analyses showed that the amorphous kerogen fraction had the highest atomic H/C ratio and the lowest atomic N/C ratio and was the richest in aliphatic structures and carbonyl and carboxyl functional groups. Quantities of fatty acids from the saponification products of each geopolymer were in agreement with the results of elemental and IR analyses. Distribution of the fatty acids was suggestive that more animal lipids participate in the formation of amorphous kerogens because of the abundance of relatively lower molecular weight fatty acids (such as C 16 and C 18 acids) in saponification products of amorphous kerogens. On the other hand, although the amorphous kerogen fraction tends to be rich in aliphatic structures compared with bulk kerogen of the same rock samples, van Krevelen plots of elemental compositions of kerogens from the core samples (Nishiyama Oil Field, Tertiary, Japan) reveal that the amorphous kerogen fraction is not necessarily characterized by markedly high atomic H/C ratio. This was attributed to the oxic environment of deposition and the abundance of biodegraded terrestrial amorphous organic matter in the amorphous kerogen fraction used in this work.

  5. Crustal thickening and clay: Controls on O isotope variation in global magmatism and siliciclastic sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Justin L.; Hand, Martin; Pearson, Norman J.; Barovich, Karin M.; McInerney, David J.

    2015-02-01

    New compilations of global O isotope data from zircon and siliciclastic sedimentary rocks highlight an increasing range in δ18O values in both systems since the late Archean. This is consistent with an increased clay component in sedimentary rocks and subsequent incorporation into igneous rocks. Each of these factors can arguably be achieved by increased crustal thickening in the late Archean resulting in greater burial and melting of supracrustal rocks and increased chemical weathering and recycling of upper crustal rocks. Despite the suggested change in tectonic regimes in the late Archean, stochastic modelling in this study demonstrates that δ18O data do not provide evidence for a secular decrease in the proportion of mantle-derived magmas in granitoid rocks. Instead, best-fit models indicate that juvenile input and reworking of supracrustal material vary with respect to the short term (100-200 Myr) tectonic cycles preserved in the continental crust. Hence, major step changes in global tectonic regimes in the post-Hadean, such as the initiation of subduction in the mid- to late Archean, are not supported by global zircon O isotope datasets and instead minor, progressive changes are indicated for Earth's tectonic regimes.

  6. Periodic Mid-cretaceous Ocean Anoxic Events Linked By Oscillations of The Phosphorus and Oxygen Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenton, T.; Handoh, I.

    A series of ocean anoxic events (OAEs) occurred in the mid-Cretaceous warm period (120-80 Ma) that have been linked with high rates of organic carbon burial, warm high- and low- latitude temperatures and sea-level changes. OAEs have been studied individually, but a causal mechanism that connects them has been lacking. We show that peaks in global reactive phosphorus accumulation rate coincide with OAEs 1d, 2 and 3, and exhibit a 6 Myr periodicity over 100-80 Ma. Oxic-anoxic oscillations of 6 Myr period can be triggered in a model of the coupled N, P, C and O2 biogeochemical cycles, by increasing phosphorus weathering rates. The oscillations are sustained by a positive feedback between phosphate concentration, new production and anoxia and a counteracting but slower negative feedback between atmospheric oxygen and anoxia. We suggest that elevated atmospheric CO2 and global warmth driven by increased tectonic and volcanic activity 120-80 Ma, together with the rise of flowering plants 100 Ma, drove increased phosphorus weathering rates and triggered periodic OAEs in the mid-Cretaceous.

  7. Explosive radiation of Malpighiales supports a mid-cretaceous origin of modern tropical rain forests.

    PubMed

    Davis, Charles C; Webb, Campbell O; Wurdack, Kenneth J; Jaramillo, Carlos A; Donoghue, Michael J

    2005-03-01

    Fossil data have been interpreted as indicating that Late Cretaceous tropical forests were open and dry adapted and that modern closed-canopy rain forest did not originate until after the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K/T) boundary. However, some mid-Cretaceous leaf floras have been interpreted as rain forest. Molecular divergence-time estimates within the clade Malpighiales, which constitute a large percentage of species in the shaded, shrub, and small tree layer in tropical rain forests worldwide, provide new tests of these hypotheses. We estimate that all 28 major lineages (i.e., traditionally recognized families) within this clade originated in tropical rain forest well before the Tertiary, mostly during the Albian and Cenomanian (112-94 Ma). Their rapid rise in the mid-Cretaceous may have resulted from the origin of adaptations to survive and reproduce under a closed forest canopy. This pattern may also be paralleled by other similarly diverse lineages and supports fossil indications that closed-canopy tropical rain forests existed well before the K/T boundary. This case illustrates that dated phylogenies can provide an important new source of evidence bearing on the timing of major environmental changes, which may be especially useful when fossil evidence is limited or controversial.

  8. Measuring the vertical permeability of horizontally- stratified sedimentary rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Novakowski, K.S.; Lapcevic, P.A. ); Reichart, T.M. )

    1993-03-01

    The vertical permeability of horizontally stratified rocks is usually assumed to be significantly less than the permeability of horizontal structural features such as bedding plane partings and sheeting structure. Consequently it is also assumed that this type of media provides suitable vertical barriers to the migration of both aqueous and non-aqueous phase groundwater contaminants. To investigate this assumption, a site adjacent to an inactive dolostone quarry was instrumented using nine boreholes drilled to a depth of approximately 25 m in a 30 x 30 m area. The area is immediately underlain by flat-lying thick-bedded dolostones of Middle-Silurian age. Six of the boreholes were drilled at angle of 45[degree] to intersect two vertical fracture sets oriented at 020[degree] and 110[degree] which were identified by mapping the fractures in the quarry. Detailed hydraulic tests (constant-head method) were conducted in each of the boreholes using a packer spacing of 0.5 m to determine the hydraulic properties of the individual horizontal and vertical fractures and fracture zones. In addition, four pumping tests were conducted in which a fracture zone in one of the vertical boreholes was shut-in and pumped and the hydraulic response was monitored in the observation boreholes using pressure transducer installed in 15 intervals isolated with multiple-packer strings. The results of the constant-head tests show that although the groundwater flow system in the dolostone is dominated by 3--4 horizontal fracture zones, the average permeability of the vertical fractures is only one order of magnitude less than the average permeability of the horizontal fractures. However, this aspect of the flow system is not detected using pumping tests, the results of which suggest that the average permeability is 3--4 orders of magnitude less in the vertical direction.

  9. High Arctic paleoenvironmental and Paleoclimatic changes in the Mid-Cretaceous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrle, Jens; Schröder-Adams, Claudia; Selby, David; Du Vivier, Alice; Flögel, Sascha; McAnena, Alison; Davis, William; Pugh, Adam; Galloway, Jennifer; Hofmann, Peter; Wagner, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    the OAE2 period which shades a new light on temperature gradients during different climate states of the Cretaceous. In contrast, to the Late Cenomanian to Early Turonian the distinct occurrence of several widespread glendonite beds in the Late Aptian to Early Albian support cool bottom waters of about 0°C in the Arctic Sverdrup Basin, consistent with much lower TEX86-SST ~28°C, McAnena et al., 2013) and bottom water temperatures (6°C, Huber et al., 2011) in the low latitude North Atlantic. This supports the global character of the proposed Late Aptian cold snap (Kemper, 1987; Herrle & Mutterlose, 2003; Mutterlose et al. 2009; McAnena et al. 2013) and perhaps a northern hemisphere high-latitude intermediate bottom water source. References Du Vivier, A.C.D., Selby, D., Sageman, B.B., Jarvis, I., Gröcke, D.R., Voigt, S., 2014. Marine 187Os/188Os isotope stratigraphy reveals the interaction of volcanism and ocean circulation during Oceanic Anoxic Event 2. EPSL 389, 23-33. Föllmi, K.B., 2012. Early Cretaceous life, climate and anoxia. Cretaceous Research 35, 230-257. Hay, W.W., 2008. Evolving ideas about the Cretaceous climate and ocean circulation. Cretaceous Research 29, 725-753. Hay, W.W., 2011. Can humans force a return to a "Cretaceous" climate? Sedimentary Geology 235, 5-26. Herrle, J.O. , Mutterlose, J., 2003. Calcareous nannofossils from the Aptian - early Albian of SE France: Paleoecological and biostratigraphic implications. Cretaceous Research 24, 1-22. Huber, B.T., MacLeod, K.G., Gröcke, D.R., Kucera, M., 2011. Paleotemperature and paleosalinity inferences and chemostratigraphy across the Aptian/Albian boundary in the subtropical North Atlantic. Paleoceanography 26, PA4221 doi:10.1029/2011PA002178. McAnena, A., Flögel, S., Hofmann, P., Herrle, J.O., Griesand, A., Pross, J., Talbot, H.M., Rethemeyer, J., Wallmann, K., Wagner, T., 2013. Atlantic cooling associated with a marine biotic crisis during the mid-Cretaceous period. Nature Geoscience 6, 558

  10. [Comparative characteristics of the numbers of microorganisms in soils and their basement sedimentary rocks].

    PubMed

    Zviagintsev, D G; Khlebnikova, G M; Gorin, S E

    1979-01-01

    Comparative studies on the quantitative composition of microorganisms in soils and basement sedimentary rocks have shown that the latter are rich in microorganisms. The number of microorganisms in basement grounds changes with time, thus indicating their activity. The qualitative composition is poor. At the same time, the total quantity of microorganisms in basement layers is equal to that in soil. Basement layers contain 10 times more microorganisms than eutrophic water reservoirs and 1000 times more than oligotrophic water reservoirs.

  11. Paleogeographic implications of Tertiary sedimentary rocks within the northern Rawhide and Artillery Mountains, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Yarnold, J.C.; Dickinson, W.R. . Dept. of Geosciences)

    1993-04-01

    Geologic mapping and analysis of Oligocene-Miocene sedimentary rocks in the upper plate of the Buckskin-Rawhide detachment fault system (west-central Arizona) reveals a complex paleogeographic history during fault displacement. Within the study area, four upper-plate fault blocks are capped by homoclinal sedimentary sections that display fanning dip relationships indicating concurrent tilting and sedimentation. Four sedimentary assemblages recognized within the study area can be correlated between fault blocks. The basal assemblage consists of lacustrine rocks and interfingering fluvial strata composed of detritus derived from the granitic terrane surrounding the northern part of the study area; these sediments were deposited during the earliest stages of tilting of upper-plate fault blocks. The overlying lower assemblage consists of fine-grained lacustrine deposits, sandy conglomerate and breccia. During lower-assemblage deposition, mass-flow-dominated alluvial fans were shed from source areas consisting mainly of Mesozoic and Paleozoic rocks exposed to the south of the study area. Tilting of fault blocks continued during deposition of the lower assemblage and strongly affected dispersal patterns and lithofacies distributions. The middle assemblage consists of conglomerate and sandstone deposited by an extensive south-directed stream system that probably flowed off undistended parts of the hanging wall, across extended parts, and locally onto the footwall. The upper assemblage consists of sandy conglomerate deposited by a northeast-directed system of broad, shallow steams; these deposits display a variety of clast types, including Tertiary mylonitic, sedimentary, and volcanic rocks that were eroded from the upwarped footwall of the core complex and overlying klippen.

  12. Quasi-periodic bedding in the sedimentary rock record of mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewis, K.W.; Aharonson, O.; Grotzinger, J.P.; Kirk, R.L.; McEwen, A.S.; Suer, T.-A.

    2008-01-01

    Widespread sedimentary rocks on Mars preserve evidence of surface conditions different from the modern cold and dry environment, although it is unknown how long conditions favorable to deposition persisted. We used 1-meter stereo topographic maps to demonstrate the presence of rhythmic bedding at several outcrops in the Arabia Terra region. Repeating beds are ???10 meters thick, and one site contains hundreds of meters of strata bundled into larger units at a ???10:1 thickness ratio. This repetition likely points to cyclicity in environmental conditions, possibly as a result of astronomical forcing. If deposition were forced by orbital variation, the rocks may have been deposited over tens of millions of years.

  13. SEDMIN - Microsoft Excel™ spreadsheet for calculating fine-grained sedimentary rock mineralogy from bulk geochemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kackstaetter, Uwe R.

    2014-06-01

    Normative mineralogical calculations from bulk geochemistry of sedimentary rocks are problematic because of variable depositional environments, particle hydraulics and sedimentary source systems. The development of SEDMIN, a Microsoft Excel™ spreadsheet solution, is a practical attempt for a computational routine focusing specifically on smectite, chlorite, kaolinite, illite and the ambiguous sericite within various pelitic sedimentary lithologies. While in essence a mathematical approach, the use of statistical evaluation of empirical lithogeochemical data combined with modal analytical procedures yields reasonable geochemical associations, more precise chemical phases and revised procedural allotment paradigms. Thus, an algorithm using TiO2 as a key to the normative calculation of kaolinite is proposed. Incorporating additional parameters, such as LOI (Loss-on-ignition) in conjunction with carbon, sulfur, carbonate and sulfate, provides that clay phases can be more accurately determined than from bulk oxides alone. Even when presented with atypical sample data, the spreadsheet solution is able to accurately predict predominant clay minerals. Besides some drawbacks, the likely benefit from SEDMIN is the incorporation of results in classification norms and diagrams indicative of sedimentary lithologies. The "SEDMIN Sedimentary Mineral Calculator.xlsx" spreadsheet can be freely downloaded from http://earthscienceeducation.net/SEDMINSedimentaryMineralCalculator.xlsx.

  14. SEDMIN - Microsoft Excel™ spreadsheet for calculating fine-grained sedimentary rock mineralogy from bulk geochemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kackstaetter, Uwe

    2014-06-01

    Normative mineralogical calculations from bulk geochemistry of sedimentary rocks are problematic because of variable depositional environments, particle hydraulics and sedimentary source systems. The development of SEDMIN, a Microsoft Excel™ spreadsheet solution, is a practical attempt for a computational routine focusing specifically on smectite, chlorite, kaolinite, illite and the ambiguous sericite within various pelitic sedimentary lithologies. While in essence a mathematical approach, the use of statistical evaluation of empirical lithogeochemical data combined with modal analytical procedures yields reasonable geochemical associations, more precise chemical phases and revised procedural allotment paradigms. Thus, an algorithm using TiO2 as a key to the normative calculation of kaolinite is proposed. Incorporating additional parameters, such as LOI (Loss-on-ignition) in conjunction with carbon, sulfur, carbonate and sulfate, provides that clay phases can be more accurately determined than from bulk oxides alone. Even when presented with atypical sample data, the spreadsheet solution is able to accurately predict predominant clay minerals. Besides some drawbacks, the likely benefit from SEDMIN is the incorporation of results in classification norms and diagrams indicative of sedimentary lithologies. The "SEDMIN Sedimentary Mineral Calculator.xlsx" spreadsheet can be freely downloaded from http://earthscienceeducation.net/SEDMINSedimentaryMineralCalculator.xlsx.

  15. Thermal Expansion Behavior of Cerro Prieto Sandstones and Other Sedimentary Rocks Under Stress

    SciTech Connect

    Contreras, E.; Bermejo, F.

    1983-12-15

    This paper describes the experimental work and presents the results of a research program carried out to investigate the thermal expansion behavior of sedimentary rocks under high stress conditions. The aspects that were investigated include the effects of temperature, temperature cycling, and confining pressure. Furthermore, the validity of the usual assumption on thermal expansion isotropy was investigated. On the other hand, the matrix thermal expansion concept is analyzed and its physical meaning and aplications are discussed. The effect of temperature on porosity is also a subject investigated regarding experimental methods for its estimation and comparison of earlier results. The experiments carried out consisted basically of thermal strain versus temperature measurements on jacketed and unjacketed samples subjected to different confining pressures and covering the temperature range from 25 C to 280 C and the pressure range from 3.0 MPa to 34.4 MPa. A review of earlier work is included as a reference frame to discuss and compare the results of this work, as well as to emphasize the limited extent of the research on thermal expansion behavior of sedimentary rocks that had been accomplished. Results are presented by means of thermal strain versus temperature curves and tabular data of thermal expansion coefficients. Several important conclusions for laborarory and field applications are reached from each of the aspects investigated. The wide research scope of considerable amount of data reported may represent an important contribution to the knowledge of thermal expansion behavior of sedimentary rocks.

  16. Detecting and correcting for paleomagnetic inclination shallowing of sedimentary rocks: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong-Xiang; Kodama, Kenneth

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic anisotropy and the elongation/inclination (E-I) approaches have been increasingly employed as two important means for detecting and correcting the paleomagnetic inclination shallowing in sedimentary rocks that was first recognized sixty years ago. Both approaches are based on certain assumptions, and thus have advantages and intrinsic limitations in investigating shallow inclinations in sedimentary rocks. The E-I approach is relatively easy to use, but it needs a large dataset to adequately sample paleomagnetic directions due to paleosecular variation of the geomagnetic field. Also, slow sediment accumulation rates and local tectonics could lead to under- or over-corrections using the E-I approach. For the magnetic anisotropy technique, labor-intensive, sophisticated laboratory rock magnetic experiments are required in order to accurately determine both bulk magnetic anisotropy of remanence-carrying grains and magnetic anisotropy of an individual particle, i.e., "a" factor, of samples. Our review shows that, despite the intensive laboratory work necessary for applying anisotropy-based inclination corrections, it is worth investing the effort. In addition, the joint use of magnetic susceptibility and remanence anisotropy measurements as well as detailed rock magnetic measurements for determining the particle anisotropy "a" factor have the advantage of retrieving direct evidence of inclination shallowing and correcting for it with high confidence. We caution against use of either of the two approaches without full appreciation of the underlying assumptions and intrinsic limitations of each technique. The use and comparison of both techniques could provide the most robust inclination shallowing correction for sedimentary rocks.

  17. Sorting out compositional trends in sedimentary rocks of the Bradbury group (Aeolis Palus), Gale crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebach, K. L.; Baker, M. B.; Grotzinger, J. P.; McLennan, S. M.; Gellert, R.; Thompson, L. M.; Hurowitz, J. A.

    2017-02-01

    Sedimentary rocks are composed of detrital grains derived from source rocks, which are altered by chemical weathering, sorted during transport, and cemented during diagenesis. Fluvio-lacustrine sedimentary rocks of the Bradbury group, observed on the floor of Gale crater by the Curiosity rover during its first 860 Martian solar days, show trends in bulk chemistry that are consistent with sorting of mineral grains during transport. The Bradbury group rocks are uniquely suited for sedimentary provenance analysis because they appear to have experienced negligible cation loss (i.e., open-system chemical weathering) at the scale of the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer bulk chemistry analyses based on low Chemical Index of Alteration values and successful modeling of >90% of the (volatile-free) targets as mixtures of primary igneous minerals. Significant compositional variability between targets is instead correlated to grain-size and textural characteristics of the rocks; the coarsest-grained targets are enriched in Al2O3, SiO2, and Na2O, whereas the finer-grained targets are enriched in mafic components. This is consistent with geochemical and mineralogical modeling of the segregation of coarse-grained plagioclase from finer-grained mafic minerals (e.g., olivine and pyroxenes), which would be expected from hydrodynamic sorting of the detritus from mechanical breakdown of subalkaline plagioclase-phyric basalts. While the presence of a distinctive K2O-rich stratigraphic interval shows that input from at least one distinctive alkali-feldspar-rich protolith contributed to basin fill, the dominant compositional trends in the Bradbury group are consistent with sorting of detrital minerals during transport from relatively homogeneous plagioclase-phyric basalts.

  18. Use of structural geology in exploration for and mining of sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, Stephen G.

    2001-01-01

    Structural geology is an important component in regional-, district- and orebody-scale exploration and development of sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits.Identification of timing of important structural events in an ore district allows analysis and classification of fluid conduits and construction of genetic models for ore formation.The most practical uses of structural geology deal with measurement and definition of various elements that comprise orebodies, which can then be directly applied to ore-reserve estimation,ground control,grade control, safety issues,and mine planning.District- and regional-scale structural studies are directly applicable to long-term strategic planning,economic analysis,and land ownership. Orebodies in sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits are discrete, hypogene, epigenetic masses usually hosted in a fault zone,breccia mass, or lithologic bed or unit. These attributes allow structural geology to be directly applied to the mining and exploration of sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits. Internal constituents in orebodies reflect unique episodes relating to ore formation.The main internal constituents in orebodies are ore minerals, gangue, and alteration minerals that usually are mixed with one another in complex patterns, the relations among which may be used to interpret the processes of orebody formation and control.Controls of orebody location and shape usually are due to structural dilatant zones caused by changes in attitude, splays, lithologic contacts,and intersections of the host conduit or unit.In addition,conceptual parameters such as district fabric,predictable distances, and stacking also are used to understand the geometry of orebodies.Controls in ore districts and location and geometry of orebodies in ore districts can be predicted to various degrees by using a number of qualitative concepts such as internal and external orebody plunges,district plunge, district stacking, conduit classification, geochemical, geobarometric and

  19. Recognizing the threshold magnetic anisotropy for inclination shallowing: Implications for correcting inclination errors of sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongxiang; Wang, Shipeng; Fu, Shaoying; Jiao, Wenjun

    2014-05-01

    Post-depositional compaction is an integral part of sedimentary rock formation and thus has been reasonably deemed as a major culprit for the long-recognized inclination-shallowing problem in sedimentary rocks. Although theoretical treatment elegantly envisions magnetic anisotropy (or oblate fabrics) to correspond to the degree of compaction and the magnitude of inclination flattening, such correspondence has rarely been seen in nature quantitavely, which leaves the possibility of misidentification and/or over-correction for inclination shallowing using magnetic anisotropy. This is because the extent to which oblate magnetic fabrics are developed strongly enough for inclination to start becoming shallow is not yet known. Here, we present sedimentary paleomagnetic data from two ~6 m long gravity cores GHE24L and GHE27L from the northern slope of the South China Sea to examine the down-core changes in magnetic anisotropy and inclinations, and to explore the possible connection between the two parameters. The results show that oblate fabrics are dominantly developed at depths >~2m and the degree of anisotropy displays an overall gradual increase with depth. Inclination shallowing occurs in the > 5m segment of the relatively distal core GHE27L and the amount of shallowing largely correlates with the degree of anisotropy, suggesting a causal relation between the development of magnetic anisotropy and the degree of inclination shallowing. Examination of down-core changes in inclination and magnetic anisotropy suggests that a threshold anisotropy of PAMS~1.04 and PAAR~1.10 exists for inclination shallowing in the cores. For PAAR<1.10, over-correction is mostly negligible, but can amount >10° if particle anisotropy is <1.4. This study provides strong field evidence that complements and substantiates the theoretical model and suggests that the threshold anisotropy can be used as a first-order criterion to identify inclination errors of some sedimentary rocks.

  20. Direct stable isotope porewater equilibration and identification of groundwater processes in heterogeneous sedimentary rock.

    PubMed

    David, Katarina; Timms, Wendy; Baker, Andy

    2015-12-15

    The off-axis integrated cavity output spectrometry (ICOS) method to analyse porewater isotopic composition has been successfully applied over the last decade in groundwater studies. This paper applies the off-axis ICOS method to analyse the porewater isotopic composition, attempts to use the isotopic shift in groundwater values along with simple geochemical mixing model to define the groundwater processes in the Sydney Basin, Australia. Complementary data included geophysical, hydrogeological, geochemical, and mineralogical investigations. Porewater from core samples were analysed for δ(18)O and δ(2)H from various sedimentary units in the Basin and compared to endpoint water members. Stable δ(18)O and δ(2)H values of porewaters in the Basin (-9.5 to 2.8‰ for δ(18)O and -41.9 to 7.9‰ for δ(2)H) covered a relatively narrow range in values. The variability in water isotopes reflects the variability of the input signal, which is the synoptic variability in isotopic composition of rainfall, and to a minor extent the subsequent evaporation. The porosity, bulk density and mineralogy data demonstrate the heterogeneity that adds the complexity to variations in the isotope profile with depth. The source of chloride in the sedimentary sequence was related to rock-water and cement/matrix-water interaction rather than to evaporation. The heterogeneous character of the sedimentary rock strata was supported by a change in pore pressures between units, density and variability in rock geochemical analyses obtained by using X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and X-ray power diffraction analyses. This research identified distinct hydrogeological zones in the Basin that were not previously defined by classic hydrogeological investigations. Isotopic signature of porewaters along the detailed vertical profile in combination with mineralogical, geochemical, geophysical and hydrogeological methods can provide useful information on groundwater movement in deep sedimentary environments. The

  1. Geochemistry of ˜1.9 Ga sedimentary rocks from northeastern Labrador, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Ken-Ichiro; Fujisawa, Hiroyuki; Holland, Heinrich D.; Ohmoto, Hiroshi

    1997-10-01

    Fifty-eight rock chips from fifteen samples of sedimentary rocks from the Ramah Group (˜1.9 Ga) in northeastern Labrador, Canada, were analyzed for major and minor elements, including C and S, to elucidate weathering processes on the Earth's surface about 1.9 Ga ago. The samples come from the Rowsell Harbour, Reddick Bight, and Nullataktok Formations. Two rock series, graywacke-gray shales of the Rowsell Harbour, Reddick Bight and Nullataktok Formations, and black shales of the Nullataktok Formation, are distinguishable on the basis of lithology, mineralogy, and major and trace element chemistry. The black shales show lower concentrations than the graywackes-gray shales in TiO 2 (0.3-0.7 wt% vs. 0.7-1.8 wt%), Al 20 3 (9.5-20.1 wt% vs. 13.0-25.0 wt%), and ΣFe (<1 wt% vs. 3.8-13.9 wt% vs FeO). Contents of Zr, Th, U, Nb, Ce, Y, Rb, Y, Co, and Ni are also lower in the black shales. The source rocks for the Ramah Group sediments were probably Archean gneisses with compositions similar to those in Labrador and western Greenland. The major element chemistry of source rocks for the Ramah Group sedimentary rocks was estimated from the Al2O3/TiO2 ratios of the sedimentary rocks and the relationship between the major element contents (e.g., SiO 2 wt%) and Al2O3/TiO2 ratios of the Archean gneisses. This approach is justified, because the Al/Ti ratios of shales generally retain their source rock values; however, the Zr/Al, Zr/Ti, and Cr/Ni ratios fractionate during the transport of sediments. The measured SiO 2 contents of shales in the Ramah Group are generally higher than the estimated SiO 2 contents of source rocks by ˜5 wt%. This correction may also have to be applied when estimating average crustal compositions from shales. Two provenances were recognized for the Ramah Group sediments. Provenance I was comprised mostly of rocks of bimodal compositions, one with SiO 2 contents ˜45 wt% and the other ˜65 wt%, and was the source for most sedimentary rocks of the Ramah

  2. Geochemistry of approximately 1.9 Ga sedimentary rocks from northeastern Labrador, Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayashi, K. I.; Fujisawa, H.; Holland, H. D.; Ohmoto, H.

    1997-01-01

    Fifty-eight rock chips from fifteen samples of sedimentary rocks from the Ramah Group (approximately 1.9 Ga) in northeastern Labrador, Canada, were analyzed for major and minor elements, including C and S, to elucidate weathering processes on the Earth's surface about 1.9 Ga ago. The samples come from the Rowsell Harbour, Reddick Bight, and Nullataktok Formations. Two rock series, graywackes-gray shales of the Rowsell Harbour, Reddick Bight and Nullataktok Formations, and black shales of the Nullataktok Formation, are distinguishable on the basis of lithology, mineralogy, and major and trace element chemistry. The black shales show lower concentrations than the graywackes-gray shales in TiO2 (0.3-0.7 wt% vs. 0.7-1.8 wt%), Al2O3 (9.5-20.1 wt% vs. 13.0-25.0 wt%), and sigma Fe (<1 wt% vs. 3.8-13.9 wt% as FeO). Contents of Zr, Th, U, Nb, Ce, Y, Rb, Y, Co, and Ni are also lower in the black shales. The source rocks for the Ramah Group sediments were probably Archean gneisses with compositions similar to those in Labrador and western Greenland. The major element chemistry of source rocks for the Ramah Group sedimentary rocks was estimated from the Al2O3/TiO2 ratios of the sedimentary rocks and the relationship between the major element contents (e.g., SiO2 wt%) and Al2O3/TiO2 ratios of the Archean gneisses. This approach is justified, because the Al/Ti ratios of shales generally retain their source rock values; however, the Zr/Al, Zr/Ti, and Cr/Ni ratios fractionate during the transport of sediments. The measured SiO2 contents of shales in the Ramah Group are generally higher than the estimated SiO2 contents of source rocks by approximately 5 wt%. This correction may also have to be applied when estimating average crustal compositions from shales. Two provenances were recognized for the Ramah Group sediments. Provenance I was comprised mostly of rocks of bimodal compositions, one with SiO2 contents approximately 45 wt% and the other approximately 65 wt%, and was the

  3. Geochemistry of approximately 1.9 Ga sedimentary rocks from northeastern Labrador, Canada.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, K I; Fujisawa, H; Holland, H D; Ohmoto, H

    1997-01-01

    Fifty-eight rock chips from fifteen samples of sedimentary rocks from the Ramah Group (approximately 1.9 Ga) in northeastern Labrador, Canada, were analyzed for major and minor elements, including C and S, to elucidate weathering processes on the Earth's surface about 1.9 Ga ago. The samples come from the Rowsell Harbour, Reddick Bight, and Nullataktok Formations. Two rock series, graywackes-gray shales of the Rowsell Harbour, Reddick Bight and Nullataktok Formations, and black shales of the Nullataktok Formation, are distinguishable on the basis of lithology, mineralogy, and major and trace element chemistry. The black shales show lower concentrations than the graywackes-gray shales in TiO2 (0.3-0.7 wt% vs. 0.7-1.8 wt%), Al2O3 (9.5-20.1 wt% vs. 13.0-25.0 wt%), and sigma Fe (<1 wt% vs. 3.8-13.9 wt% as FeO). Contents of Zr, Th, U, Nb, Ce, Y, Rb, Y, Co, and Ni are also lower in the black shales. The source rocks for the Ramah Group sediments were probably Archean gneisses with compositions similar to those in Labrador and western Greenland. The major element chemistry of source rocks for the Ramah Group sedimentary rocks was estimated from the Al2O3/TiO2 ratios of the sedimentary rocks and the relationship between the major element contents (e.g., SiO2 wt%) and Al2O3/TiO2 ratios of the Archean gneisses. This approach is justified, because the Al/Ti ratios of shales generally retain their source rock values; however, the Zr/Al, Zr/Ti, and Cr/Ni ratios fractionate during the transport of sediments. The measured SiO2 contents of shales in the Ramah Group are generally higher than the estimated SiO2 contents of source rocks by approximately 5 wt%. This correction may also have to be applied when estimating average crustal compositions from shales. Two provenances were recognized for the Ramah Group sediments. Provenance I was comprised mostly of rocks of bimodal compositions, one with SiO2 contents approximately 45 wt% and the other approximately 65 wt%, and was the

  4. Experiments in a Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL) Hosted in Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burbey, T. J.; Kimballton, M. O.; Science Team

    2004-12-01

    Sedimentary-rock environments, particularly those dominated by carbonate rock, provide unique opportunities for geoscientists, geobiologists, and geophysicists, to perform revolutionary experiments aimed at answering fundamental science questions and satisfying our societal demands for resources and environmental stewardship. As part of the National Science Foundation's DUSEL initiative, the selected site should offer structurally and biologically diverse environments. At the same time, the site should offer host rock capable of providing safely engineered hallways and laboratories at depths as great as 2,200 m for numerous deep underground physics, engineering, and earth science experiments. An ideal sedimentary-rock environment offers the prospect of highly folded, thrusted, and fractured rocks that allow opportunities to study the 3-D behavior of thrusts that propagate parallel to bedding as well as those that ramp across bedding. Flow dynamics along and across deeply buried faults is poorly understood. Experiments will be developed at various scales to assess flow and transport processes to better quantify hydrogeological mechanisms influencing flow and possible aquifer compartmentalization. Seismic reflection images, vertical seismic profiles, and tomograms will provide details of the fault properties and geometry, which can be verified in-situ. Repeated overthrusted sequences provide opportunities for geobiologists to investigate how microbes in rocks of similar age are affected by differences in pressure, temperature, and depth. Carbonate rocks provide opportunities to study energy sources and adaptations for nutrient acquisition, reproduction, stability, survival, and repair under extreme conditions. Results from these investigations will permit comparisons with other foreland fold-thrust belts worldwide. Fossil fuels remain the world's main energy resource and the large majority of these are hosted in sedimentary rocks. Improved methods for reservoir

  5. New earwigs in mid-Cretaceous amber from Myanmar (Dermaptera, Neodermaptera)

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Two new earwigs (Dermaptera) recently discovered in mid-Cretaceous (latest Albian) amber from Myanmar are described and figured. Astreptolabis ethirosomatia gen. et sp. n. is represented by a peculiar pygidicranoid female, assigned to a new subfamily, Astreptolabidinae subfam. n., and differs from other protodermapterans in the structure of the head, pronotum, tegmina, and cercal forceps. Tytthodiplatys mecynocercus gen. et sp. n. is a distinctive form of first-instar nymph of the Diplatyidae, the earliest record for this basal earwig family. The taxon can be distinguished from other Early Cretaceous nymphs by the structure of the head, antennae, legs, and most notably its filamentous and annulate cerci. The character affinities of these taxa among Neodermaptera are generally discussed as is the identity of an enigmatic ‘earwig-like’ species from the Jurassic of China. PMID:22259272

  6. Mid-Cretaceous amber fossils illuminate the past diversity of tropical lizards.

    PubMed

    Daza, Juan D; Stanley, Edward L; Wagner, Philipp; Bauer, Aaron M; Grimaldi, David A

    2016-03-01

    Modern tropical forests harbor an enormous diversity of squamates, but fossilization in such environments is uncommon and little is known about tropical lizard assemblages of the Mesozoic. We report the oldest lizard assemblage preserved in amber, providing insight into the poorly preserved but potentially diverse mid-Cretaceous paleotropics. Twelve specimens from the Albian-Cenomanian boundary of Myanmar (99 Ma) preserve fine details of soft tissue and osteology, and high-resolution x-ray computed tomography permits detailed comparisons to extant and extinct lizards. The extraordinary preservation allows several specimens to be confidently assigned to groups including stem Gekkota and stem Chamaleonidae. Other taxa are assignable to crown clades on the basis of similar traits. The detailed preservation of osteological and soft tissue characters in these specimens may facilitate their precise phylogenetic placement, making them useful calibration points for molecular divergence time estimates and potential keys for resolving conflicts in higher-order squamate relationships.

  7. Mid-Cretaceous amber fossils illuminate the past diversity of tropical lizards

    PubMed Central

    Daza, Juan D.; Stanley, Edward L.; Wagner, Philipp; Bauer, Aaron M.; Grimaldi, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Modern tropical forests harbor an enormous diversity of squamates, but fossilization in such environments is uncommon and little is known about tropical lizard assemblages of the Mesozoic. We report the oldest lizard assemblage preserved in amber, providing insight into the poorly preserved but potentially diverse mid-Cretaceous paleotropics. Twelve specimens from the Albian-Cenomanian boundary of Myanmar (99 Ma) preserve fine details of soft tissue and osteology, and high-resolution x-ray computed tomography permits detailed comparisons to extant and extinct lizards. The extraordinary preservation allows several specimens to be confidently assigned to groups including stem Gekkota and stem Chamaleonidae. Other taxa are assignable to crown clades on the basis of similar traits. The detailed preservation of osteological and soft tissue characters in these specimens may facilitate their precise phylogenetic placement, making them useful calibration points for molecular divergence time estimates and potential keys for resolving conflicts in higher-order squamate relationships. PMID:26973870

  8. A diverse ant fauna from the mid-cretaceous of Myanmar (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).

    PubMed

    Barden, Phillip; Grimaldi, David

    2014-01-01

    A new collection of 24 wingless ant specimens from mid-Cretaceous Burmese amber (Albian-Cenomanian, 99 Ma) comprises nine new species belonging to the genus Sphecomyrmodes Engel and Grimaldi. Described taxa vary considerably with regard to total size, head and body proportion, cuticular sculpturing, and petiole structure while all species are unified by a distinct shared character. The assemblage represents the largest known diversification of closely related Cretaceous ants with respect to species number. These stem-group ants exhibit some characteristics previously known only from their extant counterparts along with presumed plesiomorphic morphology. Consequently, their morphology may inform hypotheses relating to basal relationships and general patterns of ant evolution. These and other uncovered Cretaceous species indicate that stem-group ants are not simply wasp-like, transitional formicids, but rather a group of considerable adaptive diversity, exhibiting innovations analogous to what crown-group ants would echo 100 million years later.

  9. A Diverse Ant Fauna from the Mid-Cretaceous of Myanmar (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

    PubMed Central

    Barden, Phillip; Grimaldi, David

    2014-01-01

    A new collection of 24 wingless ant specimens from mid-Cretaceous Burmese amber (Albian-Cenomanian, 99 Ma) comprises nine new species belonging to the genus Sphecomyrmodes Engel and Grimaldi. Described taxa vary considerably with regard to total size, head and body proportion, cuticular sculpturing, and petiole structure while all species are unified by a distinct shared character. The assemblage represents the largest known diversification of closely related Cretaceous ants with respect to species number. These stem-group ants exhibit some characteristics previously known only from their extant counterparts along with presumed plesiomorphic morphology. Consequently, their morphology may inform hypotheses relating to basal relationships and general patterns of ant evolution. These and other uncovered Cretaceous species indicate that stem-group ants are not simply wasp-like, transitional formicids, but rather a group of considerable adaptive diversity, exhibiting innovations analogous to what crown-group ants would echo 100 million years later. PMID:24699881

  10. Drastic Shrinking of the Hadley circulation in the Mid-Cretaceous Supergreenhouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, H.; Tada, R.; Jiang, X.; Suganuma, Y.; Imsamut, S.; Charusiri, P.; Ichinnorov, N.; Khand, Y.

    2008-12-01

    Understanding the behaviour of the global climate system during extremely warm periods is one of the major targets of paleoclimatology. Paleo-SST proxy data demonstrate that the equator-to-pole temperature gradient was much lower than the present during the mid-Cretaceous "gsupergreenhouse"h period, implying larger meridional heat transport either by atmospheric and/or oceanic circulation. However, reconstruction of the atmospheric circulation during the Cretaceous has been hampered by the lack of appropriate data sets with reliable proxies. Desert distribution directly reflects the position of subtropical high pressure belt, and prevailing surface wind pattern preserved in the desert deposits gives the information on the exact position of its divergent axis that marks the poleward flank of the Hadley circulation. We reconstruct temporal changes in latitude of the subtropical high pressure belt and its divergent axis during the Cretaceous based on the spatio-temporal changes in latitudinal distribution of deserts and prevailing surface wind patterns recorded in the Asian interior (Gobi basin of Mongolia; Ordos, Subei, Jianguan, Sichuan, Simao basins of China; Khorat basin of Thailand). The results reveal poleward shift of the subtropical high pressure belt during the early and late Cretaceous periods, suggesting poleward expansion of Hadley circulation, whereas equatorward shift of such belt during the mid-Cretaceous "gsupergreenhouse"h period, suggesting drastic shrinking of the Hadley circulation. These results in conjunction with recent observations suggest that the Hadley circulation gradually expands poleward in response to the increase in global temperatures and atmospheric pCO2, and when global temperatures and atmospheric pCO2 exceed a certain threshold, the Hadley circulation shrinks drastically.

  11. Mid-Cretaceous polar standstill of the Americas and motion of the Atlantic hotspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somoza, R.

    2008-05-01

    The hotspot (HS) fixity axiom installed early in the plate tectonics as an attractive toll for geodynamic analyzes. In particular, a mid-Cretaceous discrepancy between fixed Indo-Atlantic hotspot and paleomagnetic reference frames has been interpreted as evidence for true polar wander (TPW). Recent paleomagnetic findings (C.B. Zaffarana, this session) indicate that the Americas rotated (with different angular rates) about the spin axis between 125 and at least 100 Ma. This kinematic-paleogeographic scenario points to failure of the above mentioned TPW hypothesis, suggesting that the mid-Cretaceous HS-paleomagnetic discrepancy is related to motion of the Atlantic hotspots. On the other hand, dated outcrops and seamounts in the >2000 km White Mountains - New England trail define a tight cluster with no clear age progression when observed in African coordinates, suggesting that the sub-lithospheric melting anomaly responsible for the New England chain moved little with respect to Africa between 120 and 80 Ma. However, small circles centered in the feeder of the New England seamounts as seen from Africa misfit the 120-80 Ma trend of the Walvis ridge in the African South Atlantic, arguing for ~1 cm/yr inter-Atlantic HS motion, which in turn represents about 30 % the rate of coeval full spreading in the Central Atlantic. These observations suggest that a scenario where sub-lithospheric melting anomalies move and deform in concert with flow in the surrounding mantle needs to be allowed for assaying tectonic and geodynamic models. In agreement with this, reconstruction of Cretaceous poles from the Americas with respect to the moving-hotspot framework developed by O´Neill et al. (G3 6 (4), 2005) reduced to a half the paleopole-spin axis offset observed in fixed-HS coordinates (R. Somoza and C.B. Zaffarana, EPSL, in revision), with the residual offset being similar than that is found when large datasets of Cenozoic poles are observed in moving-HS coordinates.

  12. Early to mid Cretaceous vegetation of northern Gondwana - the onset of angiosperm radiation and climatic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coiffard, Clément; Mohr, Barbara

    2014-05-01

    Early Cretaceous Northern Gondwana seems to be the cradle of many early flowering plants, especially mesangiosperms that include magnoliids and monocots and basal eudicots. So far our knowledge was based mostly on dispersed pollen and small flowering structures. New fossil finds from Brazil include more complete plants with attached roots, leaves and flowers. Taxonomic studies show that these fossils belonged to clades which are, based on macroscopic characters and molecular data, also considered to be rather basal, such as several members of Nymphaeales, Piperales, Laurales, Magnoliales, monocots (Araliaceae) and Ranunculales. Various parameters can be used in order to understand the physiology and habitat of these plants. Adaptations to climate and habitat are partly mirrored in their root anatomy (evidence of tap roots), leaf size and shape, leaf anatomy including presence of glands, and distribution of stomata. An important ecophysiolocical parameter is vein density as an indicator for the plants' cabability to pump water, and the stomatal pore index, representing the proportion of stomatal pore area on the leaf surface, which is related to the water vapor resistance of the leaf epidermis. During the mid-Cretaceous leaf vein density started to surpass that of gymnosperms, one factor that made angiosperms very successful in conquering many kinds of new environments. Using data on these parameters we deduce that during the late Early to mid Cretaceous angiosperms were already diverse, being represented as both herbs, with aquatic members, such as Nymphaeles, helophytes (e.g. some monocots) and plants that may have grown in shady locations. Other life forms included shrubs and perhaps already small trees (e.g. Magnoliales). These flowering plants occupied various habitats, ranging from xeric (e.g. some Magnoliales) to mesic and shady (e.g. Piperales) or aquatic (e.g. Araceae, Nymphaeales). Overall, it seems that several of these plants clearly exhibited some

  13. Mid-Cretaceous Eustatic sea level fall: magnitude and timing in Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Vierbuchen, R.C.; Oestmann, M.A.; Greenlee, S.M.

    1987-05-01

    The magnitude and timing of a mid-Cretaceous sea level fall have been documented on the margins of the Gulf of Mexico in east Texas. Analysis of seismic, log, and paleontologic data from east Texas demonstrates that a fall of 60 to 100 m occurred at the end of Washita (mid-Cenomanian) time. This sea level fall has been identified elsewhere on the shelves of the Gulf of Mexico and is proposed to have caused the mid-Cretaceous unconformity of the deep sea and the termination of Washita carbonate deposition. They conclude that this sea level fall is of regional significance and eustatic origin. The magnitude and timing of the fall agree with those postulated by Vail and others, and Haq and others, who recognized a major sea level fall in mid-Cenomanian time. The magnitude of sea level fall is estimated from the difference in elevation between carbonate buildups on the Buda margin, which accumulated at or near sea level, and fluvial deposits in the lower Woodbine, which immediately overlie Buda carbonates and have been drilled up to 20 km basinward of the shelf margin. After constructing a datum along the preexisting Buda shelf, they measure the thickness of sediment from this datum to the onlapping fluvial, lower Woodbine siliciclastics. This measurement is then corrected for compaction, isostatic subsidence due to sediment loading, and thermotectonic subsidence. The result, 60 m, is considered a minimum estimate. A similar measurement to the lowest seismically identified coastal onlap in the lower Woodbine yields an estimate of 100 m.

  14. Mid-Cretaceous submarine fans of the southwest Bredasdorp basin, South Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, C. )

    1991-03-01

    Mid-Cretaceous lowstand systems tracts, containing varying thicknesses of sandstone, have been identified in the E-G subbasin, south-central Bredasdorp basin, offshore South Africa. These lowstand tracts overlie a type 1 unconformity of Albian age, related to erosion of submarine channels into the lower continental slope. Five boreholes drilled in this area to date were located either at the break of continental slope on this unconformity or slightly distal thereto. Four wells were designed primarily to test Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous rift-fill sequences beneath the drift onset (Gondwanaland breakup) unconformity. The fifth borehole tested mid-Cretaceous lowstand sandstones, following reappraisal of their reservoir quality and hydrocarbon shows, based on the earlier boreholes. Gamma-ray log motifs together with seismic interpretations, petrographic evidence from cores, and sidewall cores and cuttings permit the interpretation of various subenvironments, from proximal feeder channel to distal supra-fan lobe settings of a deep-marine fan or fans. It is proposed that these fans represent the first phase of sedimentation on the Albian type 1 unconformity surface during conditions of falling sea level. Sediment, possibly eroded from highstand fan deltas or shelf sands on a partially exposed shelf to the south, was transported down erosional submarine channels. A proximal source and high gradients favored the high sand:mud ratio encountered in these wells. Local tectonic activity of short duration along faults parallel to the Agulhas fracture zone may have contributed to gradient steepening. Latest drilling results have upgraded similar plays distal to erosional channels in the immediate area.

  15. Diagenesis of skeletal and nonskeletal components of Mid-Cretaceous limestones

    SciTech Connect

    Kyungsik Woo; Anderson, T.F.; Sandberg, P.A. )

    1993-01-01

    Skeletal and nonskeletal components from Mid-Cretaceous limestones have been investigated using coordinated textural, isotopic, and chemical methods to delineate the conditions under which they formed or were altered. The degree of alteration was determined by means of cathodoluminescence, light microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy, along with inferences from isotopic and chemical compositions. Oxygen isotopic values of non-luminescent parts of most bivalves of radiaxial fibrous calcite appear to reflect isotopic equilibrium with contemporaneous Mid-Cretaceous surface seawater. In contrast, oxygen isotopic compositions of non-luminescent, texturally unaltered calcite outer layers of rudists and the calcitic shells of some oysters are significantly lower than luminescent, altered portions of the same specimens of equant calcite cements within skeletal molds. This apparent isotopic reversal suggests that vital effects are involved in the secretion of skeletal calcite in rudists and some oysters. All the radiaxial fibrous calcite (RFC) cements analyzed contain less than 1 mole % MgCO[sub 3]. Retention of a primary marine [delta][sup 18]O signature and the absence of microdolomite inclusions within well-preserved RFC suggest that this cement precipitated as primary low-Mg calcite cements. Isotopic and chemical contents of calcitized skeletons, together with coexisting equant calcite cements indicate that the sediments were mostly stabilized during meteoric-phreatic diagenesis and that effects of deep-burial diagenesis were negligible. The similarity of isotopic and chemical trends in those calcitized skeletons and the equant cements suggests that the skeletons were altered by fluids in a diagenetic system which was open with respect to [sup 18]O, Sr, and Mg, but closed with respect to [sup 13]C, Fe, and Mn.

  16. A tool for obtaining oriented samples of weakly to moderately indurated sedimentary rocks for paleomagnetic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerbekmo, J. F.

    1990-03-01

    The tool is designed to take 1 inch (2.5 cm) diameter cores up to 2 inches (5 cm) in length in sedimentary rocks of moderate induration that cannot normally be sampled by traditional methods. A stainless steel core-barrel with internal scriber is hammered vertically into the rock and twisted out. The core-barrel is attached to an extruder which also holds a plastic bottle. The core is screwed out of the core-barrel directly into the bottle of the same internal diameter. The vial is later cut to an acceptable length for the magnetometer and sealed with a plastic cap. Inasmuch as the sample is never removed from the plastic bottle, fractured and bentonitic rocks which cannot be sampled by means of hand-blocks or by diamond-drilling, can be magnetically measured.

  17. Geophysical anatomy of counter-slope scarps in sedimentary flysch rocks (Outer Western Carpathians)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tábořík, P.; Lenart, J.; Blecha, V.; Vilhelm, J.; Turský, O.

    2017-01-01

    A multidisciplinary geophysical survey, consisting of electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), ground penetrating radar (GPR), shallow seismic refraction (SSR) and gravity survey (GS), was used to investigate the counter-slope scarps, one of the typical manifestations of the relaxed zones of rock massifs, and the possible initial stages of deep-seated landslides (DSLs). Two upper parts of the extensive DSLs within the Moravskoslezské Beskydy Mountains (Outer Western Carpathians - OWC) built by the sedimentary flysch rock were chosen as the testing sites. A combined geophysical survey on the flysch rocks was performed on both localities to enhance our present findings. The survey revealed that the ERT is able to reliably detect underground discontinuities, which are manifested at the ground surface by one of the typical landforms (tension cracks, trenches, pseudokarst sinkholes, double-crested ridges and counter-slope scarps). Previous studies suggested that bedrock discontinuities should be depicted by high-resistivity features within ERT surveying. According to SSR and GS, expected zones of weakened rock massif were not confirmed directly underneath the superficial landforms, but they were shifted. Based on the SSR and GS measurements, the depicted high-contrast transitions between high- and low-resistivity domains within the ERT profiles were newly identified as possible manifestation of bedrock discontinuities. The results of GPR measurements give only limited information on the sedimentary flysch rocks, due to shallow penetrating depth and locally strong signal attenuation. The combined results of multidisciplinary geophysical surveying confirmed an importance of employing more than one geophysical technique for integrated interpretations of measured data. Integrated interpretations of the measured geophysical data provided a new insight into massif disintegration and the geomorphic origin of the landforms related to the DSL.

  18. Late Cenomanian environmental changes in eastern Tethys as inferred from rock magnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong-Xiang; Ma, Lifeng

    2016-04-01

    It is generally believed that widespread occurrence of anoxia occurred in major oceans near the end of Cenomanian in the mid-Cretaceous greenhouse "equable-climate" conditions, leading to enhanced burial of organic-rich sediments, or black shales, in ocean basins and a pronounced carbon isotope excursion (CIE), representing a major climate change in the mid-Cretaceous greenhouse world, i.e., oceanic anoxic event 2 (OAE2). The occurrence of black shales is thus considered a hallmark of this climate event. However, this diagnostic sedimentary feature is absent in the similar interval of a marine succession in Tingri area, southern Tibet, China that was situated in eastern Tethys in the mid-Cretaceous, yet a pronounced CIE characterizing the climate event is present and is correlatable with those from western Tethys. To better understand the environmental change history of this area during late Cenomanian, we have carried out a rock magnetic study of the Upper Cenomanian succession in Tingri area that consists mainly of limestone and marly limestone. A number of rock magnetic parameters including magnetic susceptibility and isothermal remanent magnetization were measured to characterize magnetic mineralogy and abundance of magnetic minerals. Magnetic mineral abundance appears to show an overall gradual decline prior to the climate event and then remains largely constant with fluctuations of small amplitude. Magnetite is the main magnetic mineral phase in the studied section, while hematite and iron sulfide are also present, but appear to occur episodically and vary in abundance. We interpret that these rock magnetic properties indicate variations in oxic and suboxic conditions associated with sea level changes in greenhouse warming conditions.

  19. An Aquatic Journey toward Aeolis Mons (Mount Sharp): Sedimentary Rock Evidence observed by Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Sanjeev; Edgar, Lauren; Williams, Rebecca; Rubin, David; Yingst, Aileen; Lewis, Kevin; Kocurek, Gary; Anderson, Ryan; Dromart, Gilles; Edgett, Ken; Hardgrove, Craig; Kah, Linda; Mangold, Nicolas; Milliken, Ralph; Minitti, Michelle; Palucis, Marisa; Rice, Melissa; Stack, Katie; Sumner, Dawn; Williford, Ken

    2014-05-01

    Since leaving Yellowknife Bay (summer 2013), Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity has investigated a number of key outcrops as it traverses along the Rapid Transit Route toward the entry point to begin its investigations of the extensive rock outcrops at the base of Mount Sharp. Rover observations are characterizing the variability of lithologies and sedimentary facies along the traverse and establishing stratigraphic relationships with the aim of reconstructing depositional processes and palaeoenvironments. Here, we report on sedimentological and stratigraphic observations based on images from the Mastcam and MAHLI instruments at Shaler and the Darwin waypoint. The informally named Shaler outcrop, which forms part of the Glenelg member of the Yellowknife Bay formation [1] is remarkable for the preservation of a rich suite of sedimentary structures and architecture, and was investigated on sols 120-121 and 309-324. The outcrop forms a pebbly sandstone body that is ~0.7 m thick and extends for up to 20 m. Shaler is largely characterized by pebbly sandstone facies showing well-developed decimeter-scale trough cross-stratification. Bedding geometries indicate sub-critical angles of climb, resulting in preservation of only the lee slope deposits. The grain size, and the presence and scale of cross-stratification imply sediment transport and deposition by unidirectional currents in a fluvial sedimentary environment. Curiosity investigated the informally named Darwin waypoint between sols 390 and 401, making detailed Mastcam and MAHLI observations at two separate locations. The Darwin outcrop comprises light-toned sandstone beds separated by darker pebbly sandstones. MAHLI observations permit differentiation of distinct sedimentary facies. The Altar Mountain facies is a poorly sorted pebbly sandstone that is rich in fine pebbles. Pebbles are sub-angular to sub-rounded in shape and show no preferred orientation or fabric. Pebbles and sand grains show clast-to-clast contacts

  20. Radiogenic heat production in sedimentary rocks of the Gulf of Mexico Basin, south Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKenna, T.E.; Sharp, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Radiogenic heat production within the sedimentary section of the Gulf of Mexico basin is a significant source of heat. Radiogenic heat should be included in thermal models of this basin (and perhaps other sedimentary basins). We calculate that radiogenic heat may contribute up to 26% of the overall surface heat-flow density for an area in south Texas. Based on measurements of the radioactive decay rate of ??-particles, potassium concentration, and bulk density, we calculate radiogenic heat production for Stuart City (Lower Cretaceous) limestones, Wilcox (Eocene) sandstones and mudrocks, and Frio (Oligocene) sandstones and mudrocks from south Texas. Heat production rates range from a low of 0.07 ?? 0.01 ??W/m3 in clean Stuart City limestones to 2.21 ?? 0.24??W/m3 in Frio mudrocks. Mean heat production rates for Wilcox sandstones, Frio sandstones, Wilcox mudrocks, and Frio mudrocks are 0.88, 1.19, 1.50, and 1.72 ??W/m3, respectively. In general, the mudrocks produce about 30-40% more heat than stratigraphically equivalent sandstones. Frio rocks produce about 15% more heat than Wilcox rocks per unit volume of clastic rock (sandstone/mudrock). A one-dimensional heat-conduction model indicates that this radiogenic heat source has a significant effect on subsurface temperatures. If a thermal model were calibrated to observed temperatures by optimizing basal heat-flow density and ignoring sediment heat production, the extrapolated present-day temperature of a deeply buried source rock would be overestimated.Radiogenic heat production within the sedimentary section of the Gulf of Mexico basin is a significant source of heat. Radiogenic heat should be included in thermal models of this basin (and perhaps other sedimentary basins). We calculate that radiogenic heat may contribute up to 26% of the overall surface heat-flow density for an area in south Texas. Based on measurements of the radioactive decay rate of ??-particles, potassium concentration, and bulk density, we

  1. Quasi-periodic bedding in the sedimentary rock record of Mars.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Kevin W; Aharonson, Oded; Grotzinger, John P; Kirk, Randolph L; McEwen, Alfred S; Suer, Terry-Ann

    2008-12-05

    Widespread sedimentary rocks on Mars preserve evidence of surface conditions different from the modern cold and dry environment, although it is unknown how long conditions favorable to deposition persisted. We used 1-meter stereo topographic maps to demonstrate the presence of rhythmic bedding at several outcrops in the Arabia Terra region. Repeating beds are approximately 10 meters thick, and one site contains hundreds of meters of strata bundled into larger units at a approximately 10:1 thickness ratio. This repetition likely points to cyclicity in environmental conditions, possibly as a result of astronomical forcing. If deposition were forced by orbital variation, the rocks may have been deposited over tens of millions of years.

  2. A low-temperature hydrothermal maturation mechanism for sedimentary basins associated with volcanic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summer, Neil S.; Verosub, Kenneth L.

    Data from sediments associated with volcanic rocks around the world demonstrate that a generally unrecognized maturation mechanism is operating in certain geologically active areas. This mechanism is hydrothermal in nature and involves the transport of heat away from intrusive bodies or deep penetrating faults by laterally-flowing aquifers. The mechanism accounts for regional maturation and diagenetic effects which cannot be explained by conductive heat transfer. In many cases economically important hydrocarbon accumulations can be associated with volcanism via a hydrothermal maturation model, wherein thermal fluids playa major role in the maturation of source rocks and assist in migration of the evolved hydrocarbons. Applying the model would not only give new insights into the thermal history of basin sediments but may assist in determining areas of highest exploration potential. Overall, volcanism has played a larger role in the thermal maturation of certain sedimentary basins than has previously been assumed.

  3. Heterogeneous arsenic enrichment in meta-sedimentary rocks in central Maine, United States

    PubMed Central

    O’Shea, Beth; Stransky, Megan; Leitheiser, Sara; Brock, Patrick; Marvinney, Robert G.; Zheng, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic is enriched up to 28 times the average crustal abundance of 4.8 mg kg−1 for meta-sedimentary rocks of two adjacent formations in central Maine, USA where groundwater in the bedrock aquifer frequently contains elevated As levels. The Waterville Formation contains higher arsenic concentrations (mean As 32.9 mg kg−1, median 12.1 mg kg−1, n=36) than the neighboring Vassalboro Group (mean As 19.1 mg kg−1, median 6.0 mg kg−1, n=36). The Waterville Formation is a pelitic meta-sedimentary unit with abundant pyrite either visible or observed by scanning electron microprobe. Concentrations of As and S are strongly correlated (r=0.88, p<0.05) in the low grade phyllite rocks, and arsenic is detected up to 1,944 mg kg−1 in pyrite measured by electron microprobe. In contrast, statistically significant (p<0.05) correlations between concentrations of As and S are absent in the calcareous meta-sediments of the Vassalboro Group, consistent with the absence of arsenic-rich pyrite in the protolith. Metamorphism converts the arsenic-rich pyrite to arsenic-poor pyrrhotite (mean As 1 mg kg−1, n=15) during de-sulfidation reactions: the resulting metamorphic rocks contain arsenic but little or no sulfur indicating that the arsenic is now in new mineral hosts. Secondary weathering products such as iron oxides may host As, yet the geochemical methods employed (oxidative and reductive leaching) do not conclusively indicate that arsenic is associated only with these. Instead, silicate minerals such as biotite and garnet are present in metamorphic zones where arsenic is enriched (up to 130.8 mg kg−1 As) where S is 0%. Redistribution of already variable As in the protolith during metamorphism and contemporary water-rock interaction in the aquifers, all combine to contribute to a spatially heterogeneous groundwater arsenic distribution in bedrock aquifers. PMID:24861530

  4. Thin-skinned deformation of sedimentary rocks in Valles Marineris, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metz, Joannah; Grotzinger, John P.; Okubo, Chris; Milliken, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    Deformation of sedimentary rocks is widespread within Valles Marineris, characterized by both plastic and brittle deformation identified in Candor, Melas, and Ius Chasmata. We identified four deformation styles using HiRISE and CTX images: kilometer-scale convolute folds, detached slabs, folded strata, and pull-apart structures. Convolute folds are detached rounded slabs of material with alternating dark- and light-toned strata and a fold wavelength of about 1 km. The detached slabs are isolated rounded blocks of material, but they exhibit only highly localized evidence of stratification. Folded strata are composed of continuously folded layers that are not detached. Pull-apart structures are composed of stratified rock that has broken off into small irregularly shaped pieces showing evidence of brittle deformation. Some areas exhibit multiple styles of deformation and grade from one type of deformation into another. The deformed rocks are observed over thousands of kilometers, are limited to discrete stratigraphic intervals, and occur over a wide range in elevations. All deformation styles appear to be of likely thin-skinned origin. CRISM reflectance spectra show that some of the deformed sediments contain a component of monohydrated and polyhydrated sulfates. Several mechanisms could be responsible for the deformation of sedimentary rocks in Valles Marineris, such as subaerial or subaqueous gravitational slumping or sliding and soft sediment deformation, where the latter could include impact-induced or seismically induced liquefaction. These mechanisms are evaluated based on their expected pattern, scale, and areal extent of deformation. Deformation produced from slow subaerial or subaqueous landsliding and liquefaction is consistent with the deformation observed in Valles Marineris.

  5. Diagenesis of the Cambro-Ordovician sedimentary rocks of west-central Wisconsin

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, T.L.; Hooper, R.L. . Dept. of Geology)

    1994-04-01

    Shales and siltstones of the Cambro-Ordovician sedimentary rocks of west-central Wisconsin record a complex history of diagenesis. This study examined clays and other minerals within clay-rich layers from fresh surface outcrops of the Cambro-Ordovician sedimentary rocks using XRD and SEM/EDX. Feldspar authigenesis in the base of the Mt. Simon Fm. represents the earliest recorded period of authigenesis. These early formed feldspars ([approximately] 60[mu]M in size) have been completely pseudomorphed by kaolinite. These feldspathization and kaolinization events are limited to the lower 80 feet of the Mt. Simon Fm. Later periods of authigenesis resulted in corrosion of the kaolinite, feldspar authigenesis and illitization with production of I/S ([approximately] 90%I) and minor neoformed filamentous illite throughout the section from the base of the Mt Simon Fm. to at least the Glenwood Fm. In rare instances the filamentous illites have been replaced by kaolinite during a second period of kaolinization. Some of the shales contain abundant authigenic pyrite and at least two generations of authigenic gypsum. Complete dissolution of K-feldspars within some of the samples is evidenced by the presence of small euhedral pits in phosphatic brachiopod shells and suggests that organic acids may have played a role in the diagenesis. The complexity of the authigenic relationships identified in these rocks indicates that they have been subjected to multiple periods of diagenesis with fluids of divergent compositions. This is most readily explained if the rocks behaved as an open system with periodic flushing of K-rich and K-poor fluids.

  6. MINLITH—an experience-based algorithm for estimating the likely mineralogical compositions of sedimentary rocks from bulk chemical analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, Oleg M.; Abbyasov, Ali A.; Tipper, John C.

    2004-07-01

    The MINLITH algorithm is a tool for estimating the likely mineralogical compositions of sedimentary rocks, using information from bulk chemical analyses. It is an experience-based algorithm that represents compositions in terms of a simplified set of normative minerals. MINLITH has been designed to be applied principally to mature sedimentary rocks, but it can (with care) be applied also to immature sediments and to metasedimentary rocks; the compositions that MINLITH gives for metasedimentary rocks are approximations to the original (i.e. pre-metamorphic) mineralogical compositions. The experience base on which MINLITH is built is a collection of 600 reference samples of sedimentary rocks. The compositional regularities found in these samples have allowed empirical rules to be developed to predict how the oxides reported in a bulk chemical analysis should be partitioned among the minerals most likely to be present. The discrepancies between MINLITH-estimated compositions and physically determined modal compositions are relatively small for the most widespread types of mature sedimentary rocks; they are comparable in their magnitude to the discrepancies associated with other methods for estimating mineralogical compositions from bulk chemical analyses, and to the discrepancies associated with quantitative X-ray diffractometry. The MINLITH algorithm is of particular value: (1) for providing preliminary estimates of mineralogical composition, prior to precise modal analysis; (2) for identifying systematic compositional variation within suites of samples; (3) in generalised sample classification; (4) in the sedimentological interpretation of metasedimentary rocks.

  7. Ancient bacterial diversity in mid-Cretaceous black shale: DNA records of oceanic euxinic paleoenvironmnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inagaki, F.; Okada, H.; Horikoshi, K.

    2001-12-01

    A record of the history of the planet Earth is hidden in the subsurface biosphere, like the annual rings of an old tree. From limited evidences retrieved from underground, one can infer the geographical, geological and biological events that occurred throughout Earthś history. Biosphere in oceanic subseafloor and terrestrial subsurface environment has been already recognized as the biggest microbial world. Recent progress in approaching deep biosphere revealed that numerable microbial populations were consistently present in the drilling core samples and aquifers recovered from deep subsurface environment. However, the microbial community structures and the relationship between their habitats and geological events have been poorly proved. Molecular phylogenetic analyses have been becoming powerful tool for investigating the naturally occurring microbial communities. Using a combination of culture independent molecular phylogenetic analyses, we sought to recapture the indigenous microbial community of ancient oceanic habitats recovered from a continental drilled core of black shale deposited 100 million years ago. We recovered the drilled core sample of black shale from the continental margin at Serre des Castets, the southern part of France. The recovered black shale contained one phosphate-accumulated strata, defined as a part of the mid-Cretaceous OAE (Oceanic Anoxic Evnets). Indigenous DNA was extracted from the several axis parts of the core, then bacterial ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA) was amplified by PCR. The molecular approaches such as the terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) fingerprinting analysis, phylotype analysis of rDNA clone libraries and the phylogenetic analysis of representative rDNA sequences revealed that the genetic signals from mid-Cretaceous black shale were almost similar to bacterial habitats at deep-seafloor sediments. Furthermore, a number of rDNA clone within the delta-subclass (sulfur-reducing bacteria) and epsilon

  8. Timescales and Mechanisms of Rapid Redox Change in the Mid-Cretaceous Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, T.; Beckmann, B.; Floegel, S.; Hofmann, P.; Schouten, S.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.; Wallmann, K.

    2006-12-01

    Understanding the timing, mechanisms and feedbacks capable of driving parts of the ocean from oxic to either anoxic or sulfidic (euxinic) conditions is critical to identify possible scenarios for the future ocean on a warmer Earth. The mid Cretaceous is well-known as a time of extreme greenhouse conditions, and linked to this were a series of major black shale deposition events associated with global perturbations of the carbon cycle (ocean anoxic events; OAEs). The internal structure of these black shale units potentially document a remarkable record of the driving factors and response of the Earth System to rapid climate change, and have therefore become a focal point for extreme climate research. Recent orbital and shorter time-scale stratigraphic records have demonstrated that the Cretaceous ocean was characterized by repeated rapid changes between oxic and anoxic depositional conditions, which were particularly extreme during black shale deposition and were linked to orbital-driven natural processes. Understanding these short-term redox cycles is essential to improve our understanding of how future predictions of rapid swings in climate may effect ocean chemistry and hence ecosystem stability and climate feedback mechanisms. We present millennial and shorter scale geochemical, isotopic, and molecular records from the low-latitude Atlantic that constrain the effects of orbital-driven fluctuations in continental climate on ocean productivity, chemistry and surface water temperature, and deep ocean carbon burial along the continental margin of the evolving Equatorial Atlantic Gateway and NW-Africa. These marine records cover different critical periods of Mid-Cretaceous extreme warmth (OAE's) and provide evidence on regional to global mechanisms determining tropical African climate, hydrological cycling and continental run-off, and at what time scales the shallow and deep ocean responded to these fluctuations in the atmosphere-land system. The data suggest that

  9. Chlorine Isotope Compositions of Sedimentary Rocks Are Preserved During Prograde Alpine Metamorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selverstone, J.; Sharp, Z. D.

    2013-12-01

    Chlorine stable isotope compositions of two Swiss sedimentary sequences and their metamorphic equivalents were measured in order to study fractionation effects of prograde metamorphism and devolatilization. Protoliths (n=25) were collected from a 50 m section of Triassic deltaic and lagoonal strata and Liassic marine black shales in a well-characterized quarry. Borehole samples through the same sequence (n=12) were acquired from the collection of M. Frey. Low greenschist to middle amphibolite facies equivalents (n>80) were collected from the Glarner Alps, Urseren Zone, and Lukmanier region. δ37Cl values of silicate-bound chloride (SBC) are constant within individual sedimentary layers, but vary from -2.0 to +2.5‰ throughout the Triassic sequence and from -3.0 to 0‰ in the black shales. All dolomitic and gypsiferous samples have positive δ37Cl values. Colored marls and shales from the base of the Triassic sequence are isotopically negative, whereas those from the top are isotopically positive; in each case, however, δ37Cl values are elevated in the most oxidized layers. Water-soluble δ37Cl values are 0.5-3.0‰ lower than SBC values in Triassic samples, but are 0.4-2.4‰ higher than SBC in black shales. Cl- contents range from 5-100 ppm in SBC fractions in both protolith series, and from 5-70 ppm in WSC fractions. Metamorphic equivalents of the Triassic and Liassic protoliths record the same overall ranges in δ37Cl as their protoliths. Samples with similar bulk composition but different metamorphic grades differ in δ37Cl by ≤1‰. More oxidized metamorphic samples record higher δ37Cl than reduced samples from the same localities, consistent with data from the protoliths. These data lead to the following conclusions: (1) Both continental and marine sedimentary rocks display large heterogeneities in δ37Cl. (2) Negative Δ37Cl (SBC-WSC) fractionation in black shales may reflect partitioning between soluble and insoluble organohalogen compounds, in

  10. Determination of total sulfur content of sedimentary rocks by a combustion method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coller, M.E.; Leininger, R.K.

    1955-01-01

    Total sulfur has been determined in common sedimentary rocks by a combustion method. Sulfur contents range from 0.001 to 5.0%. Experiments show that the combustion method can be used in analyzing sedimentary rocks in which sulfur is present as sulfide, sulfate, or both. Pulverized samples from 0.100 to 0.500 gram in weight are used in this method. Each sample is placed in a No. 6 Leco combustion boat and covered with two fluxes: 0.50 gram of standard ingot iron and approximately 1.0 gram of 30-mesh granular tin. The boat with sample then is placed in the combustion tube of a Burrell Unit Package Model T29A tube furnace which is controlled at a temperature of 1310?? to 1320?? C. After the sample has been heated for 1 minute, oxygen is admitted at a rate of about 1 liter per minute. The sulfur dioxide formed is absorbed in a starch solution and is titrated with standard potassium iodate in a Leco sulfur determinator. Thirteen values obtained for National Bureau of Standards standard sample 1a, argillaceous limestone, range from 0.273 to 0.276% sulfur (certificate value 0.27% by calculation).

  11. Interpretation of K-Ar dates of illitic clays from sedimentary rocks aided by modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Srodon, J.; Clauer, Norbert; Eberl, D.D.D.

    2002-01-01

    K-Ar dates of illitic clays from sedimentary rocks may contain "mixed ages," i.e., may have ages that are intermediate between the ages of end-member events. Two phenomena that may cause mixed ages are: (1) long-lasting reaction during the burial illitization of smectite: and (2) physical mixing of detrital and diagenetic components. The first phenomenon was investigated by simulation of illitization reactions using a nucleation and growth mechanism. These calculations indicate that values for mixed ages are related to burial history: for an equivalent length of reaction time, fast burial followed by slow burial produces much older mixed ages than slow burial followed by fast. The type of reaction that occured in a rock can be determined from the distribution of ages with respect to the thickness of illite crystals. Dating of artificial mixtures confirms a non-linear relation between mixed ages and the proportions of the components. Vertical variation of K-Ar age dates from Gulf Coast shales can be modeled by assuming diagenetic illitization that overprints a subtle vertical trend (presumably of sedimentary origin) in detrital mineral content.

  12. Flexure and faulting of sedimentary host rocks during growth of igneous domes, Henry Mountains, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackson, M.D.; Pollard, D.D.

    1990-01-01

    A sequence of sedimentary rocks about 4 km thick was bent, stretched and uplifted during the growth of three igneous domes in the southern Henry Mountains. Mount Holmes, Mount Ellsworth and Mount Hillers are all about 12 km in diameter, but the amplitudes of their domes are about 1.2, 1.85 and 3.0 km, respectively. These mountains record successive stages in the inflation of near-surface diorite intrusions that are probably laccolithic in origin. The host rocks deformed along networks of outcrop-scale faults, or deformation bands, marked by crushed grains, consolidation of the porous sandstone and small displacements of sedimentary beds. Zones of deformation bands oriented parallel to the beds and formation contacts subdivided the overburden into thin mechanical layers that slipped over one another during doming. Measurements of outcrop-scale fault populations at the three mountains reveal a network of faults that strikes at high angles to sedimentary beds which themselves strike tangentially about the domes. These faults have normal and reverse components of slip that accommodated bending and stretching strains within the strata. An early stage of this deformation is displayed at Mount Holmes, where states of stress computed from three fault samples correlate with the theoretical distribution of stresses resulting from bending of thin, circular, elastic plates. Field observations and analysis of frictional driving stresses acting on horizontal planes above an opening-mode dislocation, as well as the paleostress analysis of faulting, indicate that bedding-plane slip and layer flexure were important components of the early deformation. As the amplitude of doming increased, radial and circumferential stretching of the strata and rotation of the older faults in the steepening limbs of the domes increased the complexity of the fault patterns. Steeply-dipping, map-scale faults with dip-slip displacements indicate a late-stage jostling of major blocks over the central

  13. Salinity constraints on subsurface archaeal diversity and methanogenesis in sedimentary rock rich in organic matter.

    PubMed

    Waldron, Patricia J; Petsch, Steven T; Martini, Anna M; Nüsslein, Klaus; Nüslein, Klaus

    2007-07-01

    The diversity of microorganisms active within sedimentary rocks provides important controls on the geochemistry of many subsurface environments. In particular, biodegradation of organic matter in sedimentary rocks contributes to the biogeochemical cycling of carbon and other elements and strongly impacts the recovery and quality of fossil fuel resources. In this study, archaeal diversity was investigated along a salinity gradient spanning 8 to 3,490 mM Cl(-) in a subsurface shale rich in CH(4) derived from biodegradation of sedimentary hydrocarbons. Shale pore waters collected from wells in the main CH(4)-producing zone lacked electron acceptors such as O(2), NO(3)(-), Fe(3+), or SO(4)(2-). Acetate was detected only in high-salinity waters, suggesting that acetoclastic methanogenesis is inhibited at Cl(-) concentrations above approximately 1,000 mM. Most-probable-number series revealed differences in methanogen substrate utilization (acetate, trimethylamine, or H(2)/CO(2)) associated with chlorinity. The greatest methane production in enrichment cultures was observed for incubations with salinity at or close to the native pore water salinity of the inoculum. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses of archaeal 16S rRNA genes from seven wells indicated that there were links between archaeal communities and pore water salinity. Archaeal clone libraries constructed from sequences from 16S rRNA genes isolated from two wells revealed phylotypes similar to a halophilic methylotrophic Methanohalophilus species and a hydrogenotrophic Methanoplanus species at high salinity and a single phylotype closely related to Methanocorpusculum bavaricum at low salinity. These results show that several distinct communities of methanogens persist in this subsurface, CH(4)-producing environment and that each community is adapted to particular conditions of salinity and preferential substrate use and each community induces distinct geochemical signatures in shale formation waters.

  14. Variety and complexity in the mound of sedimentary rock in Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgett, K. S.; Malin, M. C.

    2011-12-01

    NASA's Mars Science Laboratory rover, Curiosity, will be used to explore a portion of the lower stratigraphic record of the northwest side of a mound of layered rock ˜5 km thick in the 155 km-diameter Gale Crater. The rock materials are of a sedimentary origin, though the proportions of clastic sediment, tephra, and chemical precipitates are presently unknown. The mound is usually described as having lower and upper units separated by an erosional unconformity. However, some investigators recognize that it is considerably more complex. The stratigraphy displays vertical and lateral complexity; multiple erosional unconformities; filled, buried, interbedded, and exhumed or partly exhumed impact craters; evidence for deposition along the base of the mound followed by retreat of less-resistant rocks and abandonment of erosion-resistant materials shed from the mound; lithified sediments deposited at the mouths of streams that cut mound rock; inversion of intra-canyon stream channel sediment; and widening of canyons. On the northeast side of the mound there are landslide deposits, shed from the mound, that contain large blocks (10s to 100s of m) of layered rock in various orientations. The mound's highest feature does not exhibit layering and has been interpreted by some as being Gale's impact-generated central peak. However, its highest elevation exceeds that of most of the crater rim, an observation inconsistent with central peaks (where they occur at all) in martian craters of diameters similar to Gale. The layered materials that occur highest in the mound are also at elevations that exceed most of the crater rim; these exhibit repeated stratal packages that drape previously-eroded mound topography; they produce boulders as they erode, attesting to their lithified nature and requiring that a lithification process occurred in materials located ≥ 5 km above the deepest part of Gale. The lower mound strata, including the Curiosity field site, are diverse materials

  15. Unsaturated hydraulic properties of porous sedimentary rocks explained by mercury porosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clementina Caputo, Maria; Turturro, Celeste; Gerke, Horst H.

    2016-04-01

    The understanding of hydraulic properties is essential in the modeling of flow and solute transport including contaminants through the vadose zone, which consists of the soil as well as of the underlying porous sediments or rocks. The aim of this work is to study the relationships between unsaturated hydraulic properties of porous rocks and their pore size distribution. For this purpose, two different lithotypes belonging to Calcarenite di Gravina Formation, a Plio-Pleistocene sedimentary rock of marine origin, were investigated. The two lithotypes differ mainly in texture and came from two distinct quarry districts, Canosa di Puglia (C) and Massafra (M) in southern Italy, respectively. This relatively porous rock formation (porosities range between 43% for C and 41% for M) often constitutes a thick layer of vadose zone in several places of Mediterranean basin. The water retention curves (WRCs) and the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity functions were determined using four different experimental methods that cover the full range from low to high water contents: the WP4 psychrometer test, the Wind's evaporation method, the Stackman's method and the Quasi-steady centrifuge method. Pore size estimation by means of mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) was performed. WRCs were compared with the pore size distributions to understand the influence of fabric, in terms of texture and porosity, features of pores and pore size distribution on the hydraulic behavior of rocks. The preliminary results show that the pore size distributions obtained by MIP do not cover the entire pore size range of the investigated Calcarenite. In fact, some pores in the rock samples of both lithotypes were larger than the maximum size that could be investigated by MIP. This implies that for explaining the unsaturated hydraulic properties over the full moisture range MIP results need to be combined with results obtained by other methods such as image analysis and SEM.

  16. The potassic sedimentary rocks in Gale Crater, Mars, as seen by ChemCam on board Curiosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Deit, L.; Mangold, N.; Forni, O.; Cousin, A.; Lasue, J.; Schröder, S.; Wiens, R. C.; Sumner, D.; Fabre, C.; Stack, K. M.; Anderson, R. B.; Blaney, D.; Clegg, S.; Dromart, G.; Fisk, M.; Gasnault, O.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Gupta, S.; Lanza, N.; Le Mouélic, S.; Maurice, S.; McLennan, S. M.; Meslin, P.-Y.; Nachon, M.; Newsom, H.; Payré, V.; Rapin, W.; Rice, M.; Sautter, V.; Treiman, A. H.

    2016-05-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity encountered potassium-rich clastic sedimentary rocks at two sites in Gale Crater, the waypoints Cooperstown and Kimberley. These rocks include several distinct meters thick sedimentary outcrops ranging from fine sandstone to conglomerate, interpreted to record an ancient fluvial or fluvio-deltaic depositional system. From ChemCam Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) chemical analyses, this suite of sedimentary rocks has an overall mean K2O abundance that is more than 5 times higher than that of the average Martian crust. The combined analysis of ChemCam data with stratigraphic and geographic locations reveals that the mean K2O abundance increases upward through the stratigraphic section. Chemical analyses across each unit can be represented as mixtures of several distinct chemical components, i.e., mineral phases, including K-bearing minerals, mafic silicates, Fe-oxides, and Fe-hydroxide/oxyhydroxides. Possible K-bearing minerals include alkali feldspar (including anorthoclase and sanidine) and K-bearing phyllosilicate such as illite. Mixtures of different source rocks, including a potassium-rich rock located on the rim and walls of Gale Crater, are the likely origin of observed chemical variations within each unit. Physical sorting may have also played a role in the enrichment in K in the Kimberley formation. The occurrence of these potassic sedimentary rocks provides additional evidence for the chemical diversity of the crust exposed at Gale Crater.

  17. Evaluating CO2 mineralization capacity of sedimentary rock Using BCR sequential extraction procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Gang-Ting; Yu, Chi-Wen; Yang, Hsiao-Ming; Chiao, Chung-Hui; Yang, Ming-Wei

    2015-04-01

    To relief the high concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, carbon capture and storage (CCS) is gradually becoming an important concept to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. In IPCC Special Report on CCS, the storage mechanisms for geological formations are categorized into structural/stratigraphic, hydrodynamic and geochemical trappings. Geochemical trapping is considered as a storage mechanism, which can further increase storage capacity, effectiveness and security in terms of permanent CO2 sequestration. The injected CO2 can have geochemical interactions with pore fluid and reservoir rocks and transform into minerals. It is important to evaluate the capacity of reservoir rock for sequestrating CO2. In this study, sedimentary rock samples were collected from a 2-km-deep well in Midwestern Taiwan; and, the BCR sequential extraction experiments developed by European Union Measurement and Testing Programme were conducted. BCR was designed for extracting three major phases from soil, including exchangeable phase and carbonates (the first stage), reducible phase (the second stage) and oxidizable phase (the third stage). The chemistry of extracted solutions and rock residues were measured with ICP-MS and XRF, respectively. According to the results of XRF, considerable amounts of calcium and iron can be extracted by BCR procedures but other cations are negligible. In general, shale has a higher capacity of CO2 sequestration than sandstone. The first stage of extraction can release about 6 (sandstone) to 18.5 (shale) g of calcium from 1 kg rock, which are equivalent to 6.6 and 20.4 g CO2/kg rock, respectively. In the second stage extraction, 0.71 (sandstone) to 1.38 (shale) g/kg rock of iron can be released and can mineralized 0.56 to 1.08 g CO2/kg rock. However, there are no considerable cations extracted in the third stage of BCR as shown by the XRF analysis. In addition, the results of ICP-MS show that Mg can be released in the order of 10-3 g from 1 kg rock

  18. Small scale heterogeneity of Phanerozoic lower crust: evidence from isotopic and geochemical systematics of mid-Cretaceous granulite gneisses, San Gabriel Mountains, southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barth, A.P.; Wooden, J.L.; May, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    An elongate belt of mid-Cretaceous, compositionally banded gneisses and granulites is exposed in Cucamonga terrane, in the southeastern foothills of the San Gabriel Mountains of southern California. Banded gneisses include mafic granulites of two geochemical types: type 1 rocks are similar to high Al arc basalts and andesites but have higher HFSE (high-field-strength-element) abundances and extremely variable LILE (largeion-lithophile-element) abundances, while type 2 rocks are relatively low in Al and similar to alkali rich MOR (midocean-ridge) or intraplate basalts. Intercalated with mafic granulites are paragneisses which include felsic granulites, aluminous gneisses, marble, and calc-silicate gneisses. Type 1 mafic granulites and calcic trondhjemitic pegmatites also oceur as cross-cutting, synmetamorphic dikes or small plutons. Small-scale heterogeneity of deep continental crust is indicated by the lithologic and isotopic diversity of intercalated ortho-and paragneisses exposed in Cucamonga terrane. Geochemical and isotopic data indicate that K, Rb, and U depletion and Sm/Nd fractionation were associated with biotite +/- muscovite dehydration reactions in type 1 mafic granulites and aluminous gneisses during high-grade metamorphism. Field relations and model initial isotopic ratios imply a wide range of protolith ages, ranging from Early Proterozoic to Phanerozoic. ?? 1992 Springer-Verlag.

  19. Overview of the composition of sedimentary rocks along the Curiosity rover traverse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangold, N.

    2014-12-01

    The Curiosity rover has encountered a variety of sedimentary rocks which overall have displayed significant variations in both texture and composition. Sandstones and mudstones, interpreted as having been deposited in a fluvio-lacustrine environment, were observed at Yellowknife Bay, a location identified from orbital images as of significant interest. The fluvial and lacustrine sediments at Yellowknife Bay have a basaltic composition, with main variations only related to diagenetic features including calcium sulfate veins and nodules, and raised ridges with enriched Mg proportion. Conglomerates, interpreted as fluvial in origin, were observed in the initial phase of the mission and later along the traverse from Yellowknife Bay to Mount Sharp. Conglomerates contain granules and clasts with a strong diversity in albedo and textures indicating multiple sources on the Gale crater rims. This includes identification of minerals such as feldspars. Assuming the conglomerates are a mechanically altered product of crustal rocks with relatively little aqueous alteration, the average composition of conglomerates can be considered as a proxy for the source rock composition. This average composition displays a more felsic composition than the Martian average crust as defined by meteorites and orbital data implying that the Gale crater rim is enriched in felsic rocks. More layered sandstones have been observed in the second terrestrial year of investigation in the outcrops named Cooperstown, Kylie and Kimberley, located unconformably over the conglomerates. They have compositions that are distinct from the Yellowknife Bay sandstones with especially enhanced K proportion. The three groups of sediments have been interpreted to be dominated by fluvial transport across Gale crater. They suggest distinct source rocks, and/or a distinct diagenetic history that needs to be considered in the broad context of Gale crater's evolution.

  20. Outcrops of martian sedimentary rocks and polar strata as viewed from orbit at aerial photograph scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgett, Kenneth S.

    2007-04-01

    Mars Global Surveyor has been acquiring airphoto-scale images of Mars since 1997. More recently, in 2006, the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter joined the effort to document martian geology and geomorphology at high spatial resolution. Outcrops of light-toned, layered rock seen from orbit have erosional expressions, physical properties, and bedding styles suggestive of clastic and perhaps chemical sedimentary rocks. Owing to the inability to distinguish clearly from orbit, some of these outcrops may include tephra. Observations from the Mars Exploration Rover, Opportunity, in Meridiani Planum have shown that at least this location presents an example of eolian sandstone with a complex depositional and diagenetic history. Orbiter images of other outcrops reveal unconformities, differences in bedding thickness, repetition, erosional expression, and bedding features in the rock. Bedding features include a few locations with ripples large enough to be seen from orbit. The spacecraft images permit the interpretations that different rock units (formations) occur on Mars; stratigraphy can be mapped (at least to the rudimentary extent that one can accomplish with air photos and no field work); and different depositional settings are represented. A few cases exhibit clear examples of depositional fans or deltas, and some locations include interbedded, filled, buried, and later exhumed and inverted channels. One thing that differs between martian and terrestrial stratigraphic sequences is the abundance of interbedded, filled, buried, and in some cases exhumed, impact craters. Boulder-forming, layered outcrops in the north polar region, which are essentially rock although the cementing agent might be ice, include spectacular erosional unconformities and clearly distinct geologic formations, including one sand-rich unit that is the source for modern windblown dune sediment.

  1. The analysis of forms of sulfur in ancient sediments and sedimentary rocks: comments and cautions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rice, C.A.; Tuttle, M.L.; Reynolds, R.L.

    1993-01-01

    Assumptions commonly made during analysis of the amount of monosulfides [acid-volatile sulfides (AVS)] and disulfides in modern sediments, may not be valid for ancient sedimentary rocks. It is known that ferric iron can oxidize H2S during AVS analysis unless a reducing agent such as stannous chloride is added to the treatment. In addition, some monosulfides such as greigite and pyrrhotite require heat during the AVS analysis in order to dissolve completely. However, the use of heat and/or stannous chloride in the AVS treatment may partially dissolve disulfides and it is generally recommended that stannous chloride not be used in the AVS treatment for modern sediments. Most of the monosulfides are assumed to be recovered as AVS without the addition of stannous chloride. This study investigates the recovery of monosulfides during sulfur speciation analysis with application to ancient sedimentary rocks. Sulfur in samples containing naturally occurring greigite and mackinawite or pyrite was measured using variations of a common sulfur-speciation scheme. The sulfur-speciation scheme analyzes for monosulfide sulfur, disulfide sulfur, elemental sulfur, inorganic sulfate and organically bound sulfur. The effects of heat, stannous chloride and ferric iron on the amounts of acid-volatile sulfide and disulfide recovered during treatment for AVS were investigated. Isotopic compositions of the recovered sulfur species along with yields from an extended sulfur-speciation scheme were used to quantify the effects. Hot 6 N HCl AVS treatment recovers > 60% of the monosulfides as AVS in samples containing pure greigite and mackinawite. The remaining monosulfide sulfur is recovered in a subsequent elemental sulfur extraction. Hot 6 N HCl plus stannous chloride recovers 100% of the monosulfides as AVS. The addition of ferric iron to pure greigite and mackinawite samples during AVS treatment without stannous chloride decreased the amount of monosulfides recovered as AVS and, if present

  2. Seawater as the source of minor elements in black shales, phosphorites and other sedimentary rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piper, D.Z.

    1994-01-01

    Many of the minor elements in seawater today have a concentration-depth profile similar to that of the biologically essential nutrients, NO-3 and PO3-4. They show a relative depletion in the photic zone and enrichment in the deep ocean. The difference between their surface- and deep-ocean values, normalized to the change in PO3-4, approaches the average of measured minor-element: P ratios in marine plankton, although individual analyses of the latter show extreme scatter for a variety of reasons. Despite this scatter in the minor-element analyses of plankton, agreement between the two sets of data shows unequivocally that an important marine flux of many minor elements through the ocean is in the form of biogenic matter, with a composition approaching that of plankton. This interpretation is further supported by sediment studies, particularly of sediments which accumulate in shelf-slope environments where biological productivity in the photic zone is exceptionally high and organic carbon contents of the underlying sediment elevated. The interelement relations observed for some of these sediments approach the average values of plankton. These same interelement relations are observed in many marine sedimentary rocks such as metalliferous black shales and phosphorites, rocks which have a high content of marine fractions (e.g., organic matter, apatite, biogenic silica and carbonates). Many previous studies of the geochemistry of these rocks have concluded that local hydrothermal activity, and/or seawater with an elemental content different from that of the modern ocean, was required to account for their minor-element contents. However, the similarity in several of the minor-element ratios in many of these formations to minor-element ratios in modern plankton demonstrates that these sedimentary rocks accumulated in environments whose marine chemistry was virtually identical to that seen on continental shelf-slopes, or in marginal seas, of the ocean today. The

  3. Clay, Water, and Salt: Controls on the Permeability of Fine-Grained Sedimentary Rocks.

    PubMed

    Bourg, Ian C; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B

    2017-09-19

    The ability to predict the permeability of fine-grained soils, sediments, and sedimentary rocks is a fundamental challenge in the geosciences with potentially transformative implications in subsurface hydrology. In particular, fine-grained sedimentary rocks (shale, mudstone) constitute about two-thirds of the sedimentary rock mass and play important roles in three energy technologies: petroleum geology, geologic carbon sequestration, and radioactive waste management. The problem is a challenging one that requires understanding the properties of complex natural porous media on several length scales. One inherent length scale, referred to hereafter as the mesoscale, is associated with the assemblages of large grains of quartz, feldspar, and carbonates over distances of tens of micrometers. Its importance is highlighted by the existence of a threshold in the core scale mechanical properties and regional scale energy uses of shale formations at a clay content Xclay ≈ 1/3, as predicted by an ideal packing model where a fine-grained clay matrix fills the gaps between the larger grains. A second important length scale, referred to hereafter as the nanoscale, is associated with the aggregation and swelling of clay particles (in particular, smectite clay minerals) over distances of tens of nanometers. Mesoscale phenomena that influence permeability are primarily mechanical and include, for example, the ability of contacts between large grains to prevent the compaction of the clay matrix. Nanoscale phenomena that influence permeability tend to be chemomechanical in nature, because they involve strong impacts of aqueous chemistry on clay swelling. The second length scale remains much less well characterized than the first, because of the inherent challenges associated with the study of strongly coupled nanoscale phenomena. Advanced models of the nanoscale properties of fine-grained media rely predominantly on the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory, a mean field

  4. Sedimentary rock porosity studied by electromagnetic techniques: nuclear magnetic resonance and dielectric permittivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramia, M. E.; Martín, C. A.

    2015-02-01

    The present work involves a comprehensive experimental study of porosity and pore size distribution of sedimentary rocks, from oil fields formations, by means of two electromagnetic techniques, namely proton (1H) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and dielectric complex constant (DCC) as function of the frequency, both providing complementary results. The NMR yields an accurate determination of the relative pore size distribution and both movable and irreducible fluids. The DCC measurement provides the direct current electrical resistivity of the samples with different degrees of hydration. Thus, combining the results of both techniques allows the determination of the tortuosity index, by means of Archie's relation, and from it the average pore channel length. These measurements are performed on fully hydrated (saturated), centrifuged, dried, and cleaned rocks and also on samples with the irreducible fluids. Finally, the results are complemented with capillary pressure measurements to obtain the total volume associated with the pore channels related to the rock permeability. Additionally, the work presents a particular method to use a network analyzer to measure the DCC.

  5. Paleomagnetism of the Upper Carboniferous and Upper Permian sedimentary rocks from Novaya Zemlya Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abashev, Victor V.; Mikhaltsov, Nikolay E.; Vernikovsky, Valery A.; Metelkin, Dmitry V.; Matushkin, Nikolay Yu.; Doubrovine, Pavel V.

    2016-04-01

    Here we present the first paleomagnetic directions and paleomagnetic poles for Upper Permian and Upper Carboniferous sedimentary rocks (sandstones and limestones) of the Novaya Zemlya Archipelago in the Russian High Arctic region. The paleomagnetic directions were obtained through detailed thermal and alternating field demagnetization experiments, using the principal component analysis of demagnetization data. A positive fold test and a positive reversal test indicate that the isolated paleomagnetic directions correspond to the primary magnetization components. Magnetic remanence carriers were characterized through rock-magnetic analyses, including measurements of temperature dependence of low-field magnetic susceptibility, magnetic hysteresis curves, and first-order reversal curves (FORC). We will describe the rock-magnetic properties of different lithological units and discuss their implications for the stability of natural remanent magnetization (NRM) and the veracity of paleomagnetic record. The tectonics implications of the new paleomagnetic data for the evolution of the Barents-Kara continental margin and the Novaya Zemlya Archipelago will be also discussed. The paleomagnetic poles differ slightly from the corresponding section of the APWP for Baltica, which is probably due to inclination shallowing effect or the tectonic features of the region. The study was supported by Russian Science Foundation grant 14-37-00030, the SIU project HNPla-2013/10049 (HEAT) and by Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation grant 5.515.2014/K.

  6. Numerical model of halite precipitation in porous sedimentary rocks adjacent to salt diapirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shiyuan; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Pengyun

    2017-10-01

    Salt diapirs are commonly seen in the North Sea. Below the Zechstein Group exist possibly overpressured salt-anhydrite formations. One explanation as to the salt precipitation in areas with salt diapirs is that salt cementation is thermally driven and occurs strongly in places adjacent to salt diapirs. This paper assumes that the sealing effect of the cap rock above the salt formations is compromised and overpressured fluids, carrying dissolved minerals such as anhydrite (CaSO4) and salt mineral components (NaCl of halite), flow into the porous sedimentary layers above the salt formations. Additionally, a salt-diapir-like structure is assumed to be at one side of the model. The numerical flow and heat transport simulator SHEMAT-Suite was developed and applied to calculating the concentrations of species, and dissolution and precipitation amounts. Results show that the overpressured salt-anhydrite formations have higher pressure heads and the species elements sodium and chlorite are transported into porous sediment rocks through water influx (saturated brine). Halite can precipitate as brine with sodium and chlorite ions flows to the cooler environment. Salt cementation of reservoir rocks leads to decreasing porosity and permeability near salt domes, and cementation of reservoir formations decreases with growing distance to the salt diapir. The proposed approach in this paper can also be used to evaluate precipitation relevant to scaling problems in geothermal engineering.

  7. Relationship between susceptibility induced field inhomogeneities, restricted diffusion, and relaxation in sedimentary rocks.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Robert C; Hürlimann, Martin D

    2006-11-01

    Low field relaxation and diffusion measurements have become essential tools to study the pore space of sedimentary rocks with important practical applications in the field of well logging and hydrocarbon extractions. Even at Larmor frequencies below 2 MHz, diffusion measurements are often affected noticeably by internal field inhomogeneities. These field inhomogeneities are induced by susceptibility contrast between the rock and the fluid and are evident in most sandstones. Using sets of two-dimensional diffusion-relaxation measurements in applied and internal gradients, we study in detail the correlation between the field inhomogeneities, restricted diffusion, and relaxation time in three rocks of different susceptibility. We find that in the sandstone cores, the field inhomogeneities in large pores can be described by a local gradient that scales inversely with relaxation time above 250 ms. At shorter relaxation times, the extracted internal gradients deviate from this scaling relationship and we observe a dependence on diffusion time. This demonstrates that in this case, the internal field has structure on a length scale of a few microns.

  8. Metal accumulation in soils derived from volcano-sedimentary rocks, Rio Itapicuru Greenstone Belt, northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Laíse Milena Ribeiro; Gloaguen, Thomas Vincent; Fadigas, Francisco de Souza; Chaves, Joselisa Maria; Martins, Tamires Moraes Oliveira

    2017-12-01

    Many countries and some Brazilian regions have defined the guideline values for metals in soils. However, the local geological features may be so heterogeneous that global or even regional guideline values cannot be applied. The Greenstone Belts are worldwide geological formations of vast extension, containing mineralization of various metals (e.g., Au, Cr, Ni, and Ag). Natural concentrations of soils must be known to correctly assess the impact of mining. We studied the soils of the Rio Itapicuru Greenstone Belt (RIGB), of Paleoproterozoic age, sampling at 24 sites (0-0.20m) in the areas not or minimally human impacted, equally distributed in the three units of the RIGB: Volcanic Mafic Unit (VMU), Volcanic Felsic Unit (VFU), and Volcano-clastic Sedimentary Unit (SU). The natural pseudo-total concentrations of Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, Pb, Fe, and Mn were obtained by acid digestion (EPA3050b) both in the soil and the particle-size fractions (sand and clay+silt). The concentrations of metals in RIGB soils, especially Cr and Ni, are generally higher than those reported for other regions of Brazil or other countries. Even the sedimentary soils have relatively high metal values, naturally contaminated by the VMU of the RIGB; a potential impact on Mesozoic and Cenozoic sedimentary rocks located near the study region is highly expected. Metals are concentrated (80%) in the fine particle-size fraction, implying an easy availability through surface transport (wind and runoff). We introduced a new index, called the Fe-independent accumulation factor - AF-Fe, which reveals that 90-98% of the dynamics of the trace metals is associated with the iron geochemical cycle. We primarily conclude that determining the guideline values for different soil classes in variable geological/geochemical environment and under semiarid climate is meaningless: the concentration of metals in soils is clearly more related to the source material than to the pedogenesis processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B

  9. Deep crustal sediment study: Widespread Precambrian layered rocks (Sedimentary ?) beneath the US midcontinent

    SciTech Connect

    Hauser, E.C.

    1992-06-01

    A thick sequence of layered rocks occurs beneath the Phanerozoic platform strata which blanket the US midcontinent. Observed on COCORP deep reflection data in southern Illinois and Indiana and in SW Oklahoma and adjacent Texas, this sequence is locally 1--3 times as thick as the overlying Paleozoic cover, but the origin of this sequence, its ultimate lateral extent, and resource potential are unknown. The objective of this project is to seek and reprocess seismic reflection data provided by industry from the US midcontinent and together with the COCORP deep reflection data and information from the scattered basement-penetrating drill holes, to begin to constrain the distribution, origin and evolution of this enigmatic layered sequence, particularly to evaluate if sedimentary material may be an important constituent (i.e., deep gas potential).

  10. Deep crustal sediment study: Widespread Precambrian layered rocks (Sedimentary ) beneath the US midcontinent

    SciTech Connect

    Hauser, E.C.

    1992-01-01

    A thick sequence of layered rocks occurs beneath the Phanerozoic platform strata which blanket the US midcontinent. Observed on COCORP deep reflection data in southern Illinois and Indiana and in SW Oklahoma and adjacent Texas, this sequence is locally 1--3 times as thick as the overlying Paleozoic cover, but the origin of this sequence, its ultimate lateral extent, and resource potential are unknown. The objective of this project is to seek and reprocess seismic reflection data provided by industry from the US midcontinent and together with the COCORP deep reflection data and information from the scattered basement-penetrating drill holes, to begin to constrain the distribution, origin and evolution of this enigmatic layered sequence, particularly to evaluate if sedimentary material may be an important constituent (i.e., deep gas potential).

  11. Rupture Cascades in a Discrete Element Model of a Porous Sedimentary Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kun, Ferenc; Varga, Imre; Lennartz-Sassinek, Sabine; Main, Ian G.

    2014-02-01

    We investigate the scaling properties of the sources of crackling noise in a fully dynamic numerical model of sedimentary rocks subject to uniaxial compression. The model is initiated by filling a cylindrical container with randomly sized spherical particles that are then connected by breakable beams. Loading at a constant strain rate the cohesive elements fail, and the resulting stress transfer produces sudden bursts of correlated failures, directly analogous to the sources of acoustic emissions in real experiments. The source size, energy, and duration can all be quantified for an individual event, and the population can be analyzed for its scaling properties, including the distribution of waiting times between consecutive events. Despite the nonstationary loading, the results are all characterized by power-law distributions over a broad range of scales in agreement with experiments. As failure is approached, temporal correlation of events emerges accompanied by spatial clustering.

  12. Rupture cascades in a discrete element model of a porous sedimentary rock.

    PubMed

    Kun, Ferenc; Varga, Imre; Lennartz-Sassinek, Sabine; Main, Ian G

    2014-02-14

    We investigate the scaling properties of the sources of crackling noise in a fully dynamic numerical model of sedimentary rocks subject to uniaxial compression. The model is initiated by filling a cylindrical container with randomly sized spherical particles that are then connected by breakable beams. Loading at a constant strain rate the cohesive elements fail, and the resulting stress transfer produces sudden bursts of correlated failures, directly analogous to the sources of acoustic emissions in real experiments. The source size, energy, and duration can all be quantified for an individual event, and the population can be analyzed for its scaling properties, including the distribution of waiting times between consecutive events. Despite the nonstationary loading, the results are all characterized by power-law distributions over a broad range of scales in agreement with experiments. As failure is approached, temporal correlation of events emerges accompanied by spatial clustering.

  13. Excavatability Assessment of Weathered Sedimentary Rock Mass Using Seismic Velocity Method

    SciTech Connect

    Bin Mohamad, Edy Tonnizam; Noor, Muhazian Md; Isa, Mohamed Fauzi Bin Md.; Mazlan, Ain Naadia; Saad, Rosli

    2010-12-23

    Seismic refraction method is one of the most popular methods in assessing surface excavation. The main objective of the seismic data acquisition is to delineate the subsurface into velocity profiles as different velocity can be correlated to identify different materials. The physical principal used for the determination of excavatability is that seismic waves travel faster through denser material as compared to less consolidated material. In general, a lower velocity indicates material that is soft and a higher velocity indicates more difficult to be excavated. However, a few researchers have noted that seismic velocity method alone does not correlate well with the excavatability of the material. In this study, a seismic velocity method was used in Nusajaya, Johor to assess the accuracy of this seismic velocity method with excavatability of the weathered sedimentary rock mass. A direct ripping run by monitoring the actual production of ripping has been employed at later stage and compared to the ripper manufacturer's recommendation. This paper presents the findings of the seismic velocity tests in weathered sedimentary area. The reliability of using this method with the actual rippability trials is also presented.

  14. Excavatability Assessment of Weathered Sedimentary Rock Mass Using Seismic Velocity Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bin Mohamad, Edy Tonnizam; Saad, Rosli; Noor, Muhazian Md; Isa, Mohamed Fauzi Bin Md.; Mazlan, Ain Naadia

    2010-12-01

    Seismic refraction method is one of the most popular methods in assessing surface excavation. The main objective of the seismic data acquisition is to delineate the subsurface into velocity profiles as different velocity can be correlated to identify different materials. The physical principal used for the determination of excavatability is that seismic waves travel faster through denser material as compared to less consolidated material. In general, a lower velocity indicates material that is soft and a higher velocity indicates more difficult to be excavated. However, a few researchers have noted that seismic velocity method alone does not correlate well with the excavatability of the material. In this study, a seismic velocity method was used in Nusajaya, Johor to assess the accuracy of this seismic velocity method with excavatability of the weathered sedimentary rock mass. A direct ripping run by monitoring the actual production of ripping has been employed at later stage and compared to the ripper manufacturer's recommendation. This paper presents the findings of the seismic velocity tests in weathered sedimentary area. The reliability of using this method with the actual rippability trials is also presented.

  15. Microbiological Profiles of Deep Terrestrial Sedimentary Rocks Revealed by an Aseptic Drilling Procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Y.; Suko, T.; Fukuda, A.; Kouduka, M.; Nanba, K.; Sakata, S.; Ito, K.

    2009-12-01

    Unlike the near-surface environments, it is difficult to determine the community structure and biogeochemical functions of microorganisms in the deep subsurface mainly due to accessibility without contamination and disturbance. In an inland fore-arc basin in central Japan, we applied a new drilling procedure using deoxygenated and/or filter-sterilized drilling fluid(s). Although DNA-stained and cultivable cell numbers and the contents of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) all indicated the presence of metabolically active microbial populations in sedimentary rocks at a depth range from 200 to 350 m, it was not successful to extract DNA from the drilled core samples. During drilling, drilling fluid used for drilling and coring in the borehole was collected from the borehole bottom and subjected to DNA extraction. Quantitative fluorogenic PCR revealed that bacterial DNA were detected in drilling fluid samples when drilling was performed for siltstone and silty sandstone layers with the limited flow of drilling fluid. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences retrieved from the drilling fluid samples below a depth of 324 m were mostly related to Pseudomonas putida or Flavobacterium succinicans, while those related to other Pseudomonas spp. were predominant at depths of 298 and 299m. PLFA profiles of core samples from a depth range between 250 and 351 m showed the abundance of 16:0, 16:1ω7 and 18:1ω9 fatty acids, which are known as major cellular lipid components of Pseudomonas and Flavobacterium spp. From these results, it was suggested that the members of the genera Pseudomonas and F. succinicans might represent dominant microbial populations that inhabit the deep terrestrial sedimentary rocks in Central Japan. This study was supported by grants from the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency (NISA) and Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES).

  16. Computational Modeling of Ductile Folding in Sedimentary Rocks of the Sheep Mountain Anticline, Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borja, R. I.; Sanz, P. F.; Fiore, P. E.; Pollard, D. D.

    2005-12-01

    Folding of sedimentary rocks occurs at depths in Earth's crust where some layers respond by brittle deformation while others respond by ductile deformation. Folding results from a number of mechanisms including buckling due to lateral tectonic compression and/or slip on thrust faults in the underlying strata. Movements experienced by folded strata are typically very large (tens to hundreds of meters or more) and may include significant rigid body translation and rotation, in addition to the straining of the folded layers. More specific types of straining could include any one or a combination of the following: plate-like bending, in-plane extension, in-plane contraction, and either in-plane or out-of-plane shearing. The stress state resulting from the overburden load, slip on underlying faults, and the associated folding could induce strain localization even as the layer continues to deform plastically. In this paper we present a mathematical model for capturing isothermal ductile folding processes and the accompanying strain localization in sedimentary rocks using nonlinear continuum mechanics and finite element modeling. We use a fully Lagrangian approach along with multiplicative plasticity theory for finite deformations, considering the effects of all three invariants of the stress tensor in the constitutive description. We also simulate the rigid body translation, finite rotation, and subsequent rupturing of preexisting faults using finite deformation kinematics and stick-slip contact mechanics. We apply the technique to simulate the three-dimensional folding of selected Paleozoic and Mesozoic formations located above the Madison limestone in the Sheep Mountain anticline, formed during the Laramide orogeny in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming. Supported by U.S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DE-FG02-03ER15454, and U.S. National Science Foundation, Grant No. CMG-0417521.

  17. Heterogeneous arsenic enrichment in meta-sedimentary rocks in central Maine, United States.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, Beth; Stransky, Megan; Leitheiser, Sara; Brock, Patrick; Marvinney, Robert G; Zheng, Yan

    2015-02-01

    Arsenic is enriched up to 28 times the average crustal abundance of 4.8 mg kg(-1) for meta-sedimentary rocks of two adjacent formations in central Maine, USA where groundwater in the bedrock aquifer frequently contains elevated As levels. The Waterville Formation contains higher arsenic concentrations (mean As 32.9 mg kg(-1), median 12.1 mg kg(-1), n=38) than the neighboring Vassalboro Group (mean As 19.1 mg kg(-1), median 6.0 mg kg(-1), n=38). The Waterville Formation is a pelitic meta-sedimentary unit with abundant pyrite either visible or observed by scanning electron microprobe. Concentrations of As and S are strongly correlated (r=0.88, p<0.05) in the low grade phyllite rocks, and arsenic is detected up to 1944 mg kg(-1) in pyrite measured by electron microprobe. In contrast, statistically significant (p<0.05) correlations between concentrations of As and S are absent in the calcareous meta-sediments of the Vassalboro Group, consistent with the absence of arsenic-rich pyrite in the protolith. Metamorphism converts the arsenic-rich pyrite to arsenic-poor pyrrhotite (mean As 1 mg kg(-1), n=15) during de-sulfidation reactions: the resulting metamorphic rocks contain arsenic but little or no sulfur indicating that the arsenic is now in new mineral hosts. Secondary weathering products such as iron oxides may host As, yet the geochemical methods employed (oxidative and reductive leaching) do not conclusively indicate that arsenic is associated only with these. Instead, silicate minerals such as biotite and garnet are present in metamorphic zones where arsenic is enriched (up to 130.8 mg kg(-1) As) where S is 0%. Redistribution of already variable As in the protolith during metamorphism and contemporary water-rock interaction in the aquifers, all combine to contribute to a spatially heterogeneous groundwater arsenic distribution in bedrock aquifers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Characterizing the hypersiliceous rocks of Belgium used in (pre-)history: a case study on sourcing sedimentary quartzites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veldeman, Isis; Baele, Jean-Marc; Goemaere, Eric; Deceukelaire, Marleen; Dusar, Michiel; De Doncker, H. W. J. A.

    2012-08-01

    Tracking raw material back to its extraction source is a crucial step for archaeologists when trying to deduce migration patterns and trade contacts in (pre-)history. Regarding stone artefacts, the main rock types encountered in the archaeological record of Belgium are hypersiliceous rocks. This is a newly introduced category of rock types comprising those rocks made of at least 90% silica. These are strongly silicified quartz sands or sedimentary quartzites, siliceous rocks of chemical and biochemical origin (e.g. flint), very pure metamorphic quartzites and siliceous volcanic rocks (e.g. obsidian). To be able to distinguish between different extraction sources, ongoing research was started to locate possible extraction sources of hypersiliceous rocks and to characterize rocks collected from these sources. Characterization of these hypersiliceous rocks is executed with the aid of optical polarizing microscopy, optical cold cathodoluminescence and scanning-electron microscopy combined with energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry and with back-scatter electron imaging. In this paper, we focus on various sedimentary quartzites of Paleogene stratigraphical level.

  19. Effects of orbital-scale ITCZ fluctuations on the mid Cretaceous tropical Atlantic region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, P.; Beckmann, B.; Flögel, S.; Wagner, T.

    2009-04-01

    Shifts of the Inter Tropic Convergence Zone (ITCZ) on Milankovitch time scales have profound effects on the climate-ocean system of tropical regions. Changes in wind systems, regional hydrology and continental runoff linked to past fluctuations of the ITCZ are well known to have triggered a complex chain of forcing and feedback mechanisms between the regional biosphere and geosphere. In our study we explore these relationships for the mid-Cretaceous super-greenhouse. We present proxy records from two regions of the Coniacian tropical Atlantic, ODP Site 959 (West Africa off Ivory Coast) and ODP Site 1261 (Northern South America off Suriname) and compare them with results of GENESIS Atmospheric General Circulation modeling. Our data suggest that bioproductivity in the eastern tropical Atlantic mainly followed a precession controlled cyclic pattern which was closely linked to changes in nutrient and freshwater supply via continental runoff from the African continent. Different from that bioproductivity in the western tropical Atlantic shows a strong obliquity and eccentricity cycle pattern. We propose that these differences in the west were mainly caused by fluctuations in wind-driven upwelling off northern South America with a constant and high supply of nutrients from the continent maintaining the ocean redox system anoxic without interruption. Bioproductivity from wind-driven upwelling in the west would have pushed the water column into repetitive sulfidic conditions (euxinia), as confirmed by geochemical evidence. Overall bioproductivity east and west of the tropical Atlantic was high supporting deposition of extensive black shale deposits. The observed differences in depositional patterns on both sides of the Coniacian tropical Atlantic support that (orbital-driven) fluctuations of the ITCZ were mainly responsible, with strong contrasts in regional moisture distribution over Africa and South America and local strengthening of the trade wind system causing

  20. Dynamic topography and eustasy controlled the paleogeographic evolution of northern Africa since the mid-Cretaceous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett-Moore, N.; Hassan, R.; Müller, R. D.; Williams, S. E.; Flament, N.

    2017-05-01

    Northern Africa underwent widespread inundation during the Late Cretaceous. Changes in eustasy do not explain the absence of this inundation across the remainder of Africa, and the timing and location of documented tectonic deformation do not explain the large-scale paleogeographic evolution. We investigate the combined effects of vertical surface displacements predicted by a series of mantle flow models and eustasy on northern African paleoenvironmental change. We compare changes in base level computed as the difference between eustasy and long-wavelength dynamic topography arising from sources of buoyancy deeper than 350 km to the evolution of paleoshorelines derived from two interpolated global data sets since the mid-Cretaceous. We also compare the predicted mantle temperature field of these mantle flow models at present-day to several seismic tomography models. This approach reveals that dynamic subsidence, related to Africa's northward motion away from the buoyant regions overlying the African large low shear velocity province, amplified sea level rise, resulting in maximum inundation of northern Africa during the Cenomanian and Turonian. By the Cenozoic, decreased magnitudes of dynamic subsidence, reflecting the reduced drawdown effects of slab material beneath northern Africa associated with the impact of the Africa-Eurasia collision, combined with a comparatively pronounced progressive sea level fall resulted in ongoing region-wide regression along coastal regions. The temporal match between our preferred model and the paleoshoreline data sets suggests that the paleogeographic evolution of this region since the Late Cretaceous has mainly been influenced by the interplay between eustasy and long-wavelength dynamic topography arising from large-scale, subduction-driven, lower mantle convection.

  1. Evidence for Constructing Continental Crust by Deep Accretion of Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hourigan, J. K.; Brandon, M. T.

    2009-12-01

    The ultimate fate of sediment in subduction zones is not completely understood. The mass balance of continental crust, and thus the growth history thereof, requires better quantification of the fraction of sediment that is subducted into the mantle vs. that which is ultimately underplated or otherwise reincorporated into the continents. Microanalytical zircon U-Th-Pb chronometry has been critical for revealing the age and origin of metasedimentary rocks. We highlight three recent examples from the literature and our own work in the Sredinniy Range of Kamchatka which demonstrate that ultimate fate substantial volumes of sediment that are deeply accreted and become otherwise indistinguishable from average continental crust. These examples are: (1) the Pelona-Orucopia-Rand-Sierra de Salinas schist (e.g., Grove et al, 2009); (2) the Swakane gneiss (Matzel et al, 2004); (3) Pamir xenoliths (Ducea et al.,2003; ); and our work in (4) the Sredinniy Range, Kamchatka (Hourigan et al.,2009); and (5) the Olympic Mtns of Washington. Each of these suites of rocks exhibit a range of detrital zircon ages with young peak that is similar to the age of sediment subduction. The range implies incorporation of isotopically evolved (continental) and relatively juvenile (volcanic arc) source regions. In these cases, subduction, attendant metamorphic transformation and deep accretion of these metasedimentary sequences resulted in reincorporation large volumes of sediment to the base of the crust. In this contribution we summarize the salient features of the literature examples and detail the results of our own work from Kamchatka. There within an Eocene-age arc-continent collision zone Cretaceous and Paleocene sedimentary rocks belonging to the margin of northeastern Russia were deeply buried and subjected to metamorphism at upper amphibolite to granulite facies. Statisitcal similarity of detrital zircon grain-age spectra from these high grade metasediments and Paleogene strata of the NE

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of Cryobacterium arcticum Strain PAMC 27867, Isolated from a Sedimentary Rock Sample in Northern Victoria Land, Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jaejin; Cho, Ahnna; Yang, Jae Young; Woo, Jusun; Lee, Hong Kum; Hong, Soon Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Cryobacterium arcticum PAMC 27867, a psychrotolerant, Gram-positive bacterium, was isolated from a sedimentary rock sample collected at Eureka Spurs in northern Victoria Land, Antarctica. Here, we report the genome sequence of C. arcticum PAMC 27867. PMID:27587812

  3. The Effect of Confining Pressure on the Chemical Osmotic Property of Sedimentary Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, M.; Manaka, M.; Ito, K.

    2011-12-01

    In coastal, sedimentary formations, salinity gradients may induce chemical osmosis, leading to fluid pressure anomalies from hydrostatic pressures. For the precise characterization of the groundwater flow and mass transport systems with heterogeneous salinity distributions, the possibility of chemical osmosis needs to be identified. In order to test the ability of rock to generate pressure anomalies under salinity gradient, the authors developed a laboratory apparatus for measuring the chemically induced osmotic pressure within a rock sample under confining pressure. A series of experiments were performed on a disc-shaped siliceous mudstone, taken from Horonobe area in Hokkaido, under confining pressures ranging from 1 to 20 MPa. The salinity differences between the boundaries of sample are almost consistent in the experiments, and range from 0.110 to 0.118 M NaCl. The differential pressures between the boundaries of sample reached the quasi-steady state within 3 hours in each experiment, and their averaged values range from 9.1 to 26.4 kPa. The reflection coefficients approximated from the salinity and pressure differences using van't Hoff equation range from 0.020 to 0.049, and show the correlation with the confining pressure.

  4. Discrimination between Sedimentary Rocks from Close-Range Visible and Very-Near-Infrared Images

    PubMed Central

    Del Pozo, Susana; Lindenbergh, Roderik; Rodríguez-Gonzálvez, Pablo; Kees Blom, Jan; González-Aguilera, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Variation in the mineral composition of rocks results in a change of their spectral response capable of being studied by imaging spectroscopy. This paper proposes the use of a low-cost handy sensor, a calibrated visible-very near infrared (VIS-VNIR) multispectral camera for the recognition of different geological formations. The spectral data was recorded by a Tetracam Mini-MCA-6 camera mounted on a field-based platform covering six bands in the spectral range of 0.530–0.801 µm. Twelve sedimentary formations were selected in the Rhône-Alpes region (France) to analyse the discrimination potential of this camera for rock types and close-range mapping applications. After proper corrections and data processing, a supervised classification of the multispectral data was performed trying to distinguish four classes: limestones, marlstones, vegetation and shadows. After a maximum-likelihood classification, results confirmed that this camera can be efficiently exploited to map limestone-marlstone alternations in geological formations with this mineral composition. PMID:26147309

  5. Veneers, rinds, and fracture fills: Relatively late alteration of sedimentary rocks at Meridiani Planum, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knoll, A.H.; Jolliff, B.L.; Farrand, W. H.; Bell, J.F.; Clark, B. C.; Gellert, Ralf; Golombek, M.P.; Grotzinger, J.P.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Johson, J.R.; McLennam, S.M.; Morris, Robert; Squyres, S. W.; Sullivan, R.; Tosca, N.J.; Yen, A.; Learner, Z.

    2008-01-01

    Veneers and thicker rinds that coat outcrop surfaces and partially cemented fracture fills formed perpendicular to bedding document relatively late stage alteration of ancient sedimentary rocks at Meridiani Planum, Mars. The chemistry of submillimeter thick, buff-colored veneers reflects multiple processes at work since the establishment of the current plains surface. Veneer composition is dominated by the mixing of silicate-rich dust and sulfate-rich outcrop surface, but it has also been influenced by mineral precipitation, including NaCl, and possibly by limited physical or chemical weathering of sulfate minerals. Competing processes of chemical alteration (perhaps mediated by thin films of water or water vapor beneath blanketing soils) and sandblasting of exposed outcrop surfaces determine the current distribution of veneers. Dark-toned rinds several millimeters thick reflect more extensive surface alteration but also indicate combined dust admixture, halite precipitation, and possible minor sulfate removal. Cemented fracture fills that are differentially resistant to erosion occur along the margins of linear fracture systems possibly related to impact. These appear to reflect limited groundwater activity along the margins of fractures, cementing mechanically introduced fill derived principally from outcrop rocks. The limited thickness and spatial distribution of these three features suggest that aqueous activity has been rare and transient or has operated at exceedingly low rates during the protracted interval since outcropping Meridiani strata were exposed on the plains surface. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. Veneers, rinds, and fracture fills: Relatively late alteration of sedimentary rocks at Meridiani Planum, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoll, Andrew H.; Jolliff, Brad L.; Farrand, William H.; Bell, James F., III; Clark, Benton C.; Gellert, Ralf; Golombek, M. P.; Grotzinger, John P.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; McLennan, Scott M.; Morris, Richard; Squyres, Steven W.; Sullivan, Robert; Tosca, Nicholas J.; Yen, Albert; Learner, Zoe

    2008-05-01

    Veneers and thicker rinds that coat outcrop surfaces and partially cemented fracture fills formed perpendicular to bedding document relatively late stage alteration of ancient sedimentary rocks at Meridiani Planum, Mars. The chemistry of submillimeter thick, buff-colored veneers reflects multiple processes at work since the establishment of the current plains surface. Veneer composition is dominated by the mixing of silicate-rich dust and sulfate-rich outcrop surface, but it has also been influenced by mineral precipitation, including NaCl, and possibly by limited physical or chemical weathering of sulfate minerals. Competing processes of chemical alteration (perhaps mediated by thin films of water or water vapor beneath blanketing soils) and sandblasting of exposed outcrop surfaces determine the current distribution of veneers. Dark-toned rinds several millimeters thick reflect more extensive surface alteration but also indicate combined dust admixture, halite precipitation, and possible minor sulfate removal. Cemented fracture fills that are differentially resistant to erosion occur along the margins of linear fracture systems possibly related to impact. These appear to reflect limited groundwater activity along the margins of fractures, cementing mechanically introduced fill derived principally from outcrop rocks. The limited thickness and spatial distribution of these three features suggest that aqueous activity has been rare and transient or has operated at exceedingly low rates during the protracted interval since outcropping Meridiani strata were exposed on the plains surface.

  7. Estimation of radiation hazard indices from sedimentary rocks in Upper Egypt.

    PubMed

    Abbady, Adel G E

    2004-01-01

    The radiological effects from 103 samples of sedimentary rocks from Upper Egypt were estimated. The mean values of radium equivalent and representative level indices in G. Sarai area are 315.3 Bq/kg and 2.2 while in G. Anz area are 299.4 Bq/kg and 2.1, respectively. The average absorbed dose rate are 136 and 141.4 nGy/h for G. Anz and G. Sarai, respectively. These average values give rise to a mean effective dose 166.8 and 173.5 microSv/y which are just about 16.7% and 17.4% of the 1.0 mSv/y recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (Radiation Protection: 1990 Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection, Pergamon Press, Oxford, 1990) as the maximum annual dose to members of the public. The results indicate no radiological anomaly. The data presented here will serve as a baseline survey for primordial radionuclide concentrations in rocks of the areas.

  8. Discrimination between Sedimentary Rocks from Close-Range Visible and Very-Near-Infrared Images.

    PubMed

    Del Pozo, Susana; Lindenbergh, Roderik; Rodríguez-Gonzálvez, Pablo; Kees Blom, Jan; González-Aguilera, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Variation in the mineral composition of rocks results in a change of their spectral response capable of being studied by imaging spectroscopy. This paper proposes the use of a low-cost handy sensor, a calibrated visible-very near infrared (VIS-VNIR) multispectral camera for the recognition of different geological formations. The spectral data was recorded by a Tetracam Mini-MCA-6 camera mounted on a field-based platform covering six bands in the spectral range of 0.530-0.801 µm. Twelve sedimentary formations were selected in the Rhône-Alpes region (France) to analyse the discrimination potential of this camera for rock types and close-range mapping applications. After proper corrections and data processing, a supervised classification of the multispectral data was performed trying to distinguish four classes: limestones, marlstones, vegetation and shadows. After a maximum-likelihood classification, results confirmed that this camera can be efficiently exploited to map limestone-marlstone alternations in geological formations with this mineral composition.

  9. Enrichment processes of arsenic in oxidic sedimentary rocks - from geochemical and genetic characterization to potential mobility.

    PubMed

    Banning, Andre; Rüde, Thomas R

    2010-11-01

    Sedimentary marine iron ores of Jurassic age and Tertiary marine sandy sediments containing iron hydroxides concretions have been sampled from boreholes and outcrops in two study areas in Germany to examine iron and arsenic accumulation processes. Samples were analyzed for bulk rock geochemistry (INAA/ICP-OES), quantitative mineralogy (XRD with Rietveld analysis), element distribution (electron microprobe) and arsenic fractionation (sequential extraction). Bulk Jurassic ores contain an average arsenic content of 123 μg g(-1) hosted in mainly goethite ooids which slowly formed in times of condensed sedimentation. Enrichment occurred syndepositionally and is therefore characterized as primary. Iron concretions in Tertiary sediments mainly consist of goethite and yield arsenic up to 1860 μg g(-1). The accumulation process is secondary as it took place in the course of oxidation of the originally reduced marine sediments under terrestrial conditions, leading to element redistribution and local enrichment in the near-surface part. The scale of enrichment was assessed calculating Enrichment Factors, indicating that arsenic accumulation was favoured over other potential contaminants. In spite of higher bulk arsenic contents in the oxidic rocks, the mainly pyrite-hosted As pool within the reduced deeper part of the Tertiary sediments is shown to have a higher potential for remobilization and creation of elevated arsenic concentrations in groundwater. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. An Insight into Environment and Provenance from Geochemistry of the Early Cretaceous Sedimentary Rocks, Upper Magdalena Valley, Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, J.; Roy, P. D.; Lozano-SantaCruz, R.; Lopez-Balbiaux, N.; De La Parra, F.

    2016-12-01

    The Basin of the Upper Magdalena Valley is one of the most important petroleum producing basins of Colombia and the sandstones (upper member) of the early Cretaceous Caballos Formation represents one of the well-known reservoirs of this basin. In this study, we used abundances of organic carbon, carbonate and sulfur, and concentrations of major and trace elements in all three members of the Caballos Formation in order to identify the possible provenance and infer paleo-productivity and paleo-environment during the middle Aptian-middle Albian. The sedimentary rocks (i.e., sandstone, siltstone and shale) comprises mainly of quartz, kaolinite, illite, siderite and pyrite. Calcite and dolomite are present in some samples but in scarce amounts. Both the ternary diagrams (A-CN-K and A-C-N) suggest that clastic fractions of the sedimentary rocks were sourced from a source enriched in Ca-bearing plagioclase (anorthite), similar to the andesitic-basaltic lavas of the Jurassic Saldaña Formation. However, the upper and lower members were more and homogenously altered compared to the heterogeneously altered middle member. Calculated indices of alteration (CIA and PIA) indicate extreme alterations for the lower and upper members and moderate to extreme alteration for the middle member. Different degrees of alteration of the sedimentary rocks follows the atmospheric CO2 concentrations inferred for the Aptian-Albian interval. Mineralogical and geochemical data suggest a depositional environment with pH varying between 7 and 9. Higher alteration caused mobility of Si with respect to Al and hence we observed incongruences between lithological and geochemical classifications. Different abundances of siderite and pyrite along with higher organic carbon and redox-sensible trace elements suggest in general anoxic environments of deposition. However, sedimentary rocks of the middle and upper member were deposited in a relatively more anoxic environment compared to sedimentary rocks of

  11. The oxygen isotope composition of granitoid and sedimentary rocks of the southern Snake Range, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, D.E.; Friedman, I.; Gleason, J.D.

    1982-01-01

    Six diverse intrusive igneous types are exposed as discrete outcrops within an area of 900 km2 in the southern Snake Range, White Pine County, Nevada. The previously recognized variety among these igneous types is reflected in the wide range of ??18O values (-1.1 to 13.4 permil) found in these rocks. This range of ??18O values probably results from differences in source material and post-crystallization history of the different intrusive types. The Jurassic intrusive of the Snake Creek-Williams Canyon area represents the chemical equivalent of a large part of a differentiation sequence, with the entire range of composition (63-76 percent SiO2) exposed over a horizontal distance of about five km. The rather regular increase of ??18O values from the most mafic to the most felsic parts of this pluton, together with ??18O values determined for constituent minerals recovered from five of the samples, supports a fractional crystallization model. The high ??18O values found (10.2-12.2 permil) indicate that the magma likely was derived from or assimilated sedimentary materials. Nine samples of the Cretaceous two-mica granite of the Pole Canyon-Can Young Canyon area have ??18O values in the range 10.6-12.1 permil. These high ??18O values, an initial87Sr/86Sr ratio of 0.7165, and the presence of muscovite along with an accessory mineral suite limited to monazite, apatite, zircon, and an allanite-like mineral, characterize this intrusive mass as an S-type granite. It probably formed through anatexis of late Precambrian pelitic rocks. The granitoid rock exposed in the Young Canyon-Kious Basin area is Tertiary (32 m.y.). Most of this intrusive has been cataclastically deformed as a result of late (18 m.y.) movement on the overlying Snake Range decollement. The undeformed portion of this intrusive has ??18O values of 8.7-10.0 permil. However, the deformed portion of this intrusive has ??18O values as low as -1.1 permil, apparently resulting from isotopic exchange between this

  12. Onset of the mid-Cretaceous greenhouse in the Barremian- Aptian: Igneous events and the biological, sedimentary, and geochemical responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Roger L.; Erba, Elisabetta

    1999-12-01

    Basalts and biostratigraphy dated at 125-120 Ma from the Ontong Java and Manihiki Plateaus in the western Pacific evidence the largest volcanic event in Earth history in at least the past 160 m.y. The intervening Nova-Canton Trough rifted at about 121-118 Ma, and a number of guyots and seamounts formed concurrently or slightly later. Geological events that probably were responses to these volcanic/tectonic events occurred in the following chronostratigraphic order. Biotic fluctuations began at about 122.5 Ma. At about 122.0 Ma, 87Sr/86Sr began to decline slowly. Metal concentrations of Co, Mn, Pb, Yb, and Cu in sediments peaked at about 121.5-121.2 Ma. Changes in planktonic communities and sedimentation culminated in a nannoconid "crisis" just prior to 120.5 Ma and in the Selli black shale (OAE la) at about 120.5-119.5 Ma. A sharp drop in δ13C occurred at the beginning of the Selli event and rebounded into a longer positive excursion that reached a peak after the Selli event at about 119.5-118.5 Ma. At 120.5 Ma, 87Sr/86Sr declined rapidly and reached a minimum at about 116-113 Ma. We speculate that the intensity of these latter responses suggests a corresponding peak in volcanic/tectonic activity at about 121-119 Ma.

  13. Chemistry and texture of the rocks at Rocknest, Gale Crater: Evidence for sedimentary origin and diagenetic alteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaney, D. L.; Wiens, R. C.; Maurice, S.; Clegg, S. M.; Anderson, R. B.; Kah, L. C.; Le Mouélic, S.; Ollila, A.; Bridges, N.; Tokar, R.; Berger, G.; Bridges, J. C.; Cousin, A.; Clark, B.; Dyar, M. D.; King, P. L.; Lanza, N.; Mangold, N.; Meslin, P.-Y.; Newsom, H.; Schröder, S.; Rowland, S.; Johnson, J.; Edgar, L.; Gasnault, O.; Forni, O.; Schmidt, M.; Goetz, W.; Stack, K.; Sumner, D.; Fisk, M.; Madsen, M. B.

    2014-09-01

    A suite of eight rocks analyzed by the Curiosity Rover while it was stopped at the Rocknest sand ripple shows the greatest chemical divergence of any potentially sedimentary rocks analyzed in the early part of the mission. Relative to average Martian soil and to the stratigraphically lower units encountered as part of the Yellowknife Bay formation, these rocks are significantly depleted in MgO, with a mean of 1.3 wt %, and high in Fe, averaging over 20 wt % FeOT, with values between 15 and 26 wt % FeOT. The variable iron and low magnesium and rock texture make it unlikely that these are igneous rocks. Rock surface textures range from rough to smooth, can be pitted or grooved, and show various degrees of wind erosion. Some rocks display poorly defined layering while others seem to show possible fractures. Narrow vertical voids are present in Rocknest 3, one of the rocks showing the strongest layering. Rocks in the vicinity of Rocknest may have undergone some diagenesis similar to other rocks in the Yellowknife Bay Formation as indicated by the presence of soluble calcium phases. The most reasonable scenario is that fine-grained sediments, potentially a mixture of feldspar-rich rocks from Bradbury Rise and normal Martian soil, were lithified together by an iron-rich cement.

  14. Chemistry and texture of the rocks at Rocknest, Gale Crater: Evidence for sedimentary origin and diagenetic alteration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blaney, Diana L.; Wiens, R.C.; Maurice, S.; Clegg, S.M.; Anderson, Ryan; Kah, L.C.; Le Mouélic, S.; Ollila, A.; Bridges, N.; Tokar, R.; Berger, G.; Bridges, J.C.; Cousin, A.; Clark, B.; Dyar, M.D.; King, P.L.; Lanza, N.; Mangold, N.; Meslin, P.-Y.; Newsom, H.; Schroder, S.; Rowland, S.; Johnson, J.; Edgar, L.; Gasnault, O.; Forni, O.; Schmidt, M.; Goetz, W.; Stack, K.; Sumner, D.; Fisk, M.; Madsen, M.B.

    2014-01-01

    A suite of eight rocks analyzed by the Curiosity Rover while it was stopped at the Rocknest sand ripple shows the greatest chemical divergence of any potentially sedimentary rocks analyzed in the early part of the mission. Relative to average Martian soil and to the stratigraphically lower units encountered as part of the Yellowknife Bay formation, these rocks are significantly depleted in MgO, with a mean of 1.3 wt %, and high in Fe, averaging over 20 wt % FeOT, with values between 15 and 26 wt % FeOT. The variable iron and low magnesium and rock texture make it unlikely that these are igneous rocks. Rock surface textures range from rough to smooth, can be pitted or grooved, and show various degrees of wind erosion. Some rocks display poorly defined layering while others seem to show possible fractures. Narrow vertical voids are present in Rocknest 3, one of the rocks showing the strongest layering. Rocks in the vicinity of Rocknest may have undergone some diagenesis similar to other rocks in the Yellowknife Bay Formation as indicated by the presence of soluble calcium phases. The most reasonable scenario is that fine-grained sediments, potentially a mixture of feldspar-rich rocks from Bradbury Rise and normal Martian soil, were lithified together by an iron-rich cement.

  15. Reconstructing Past Depositional and Diagenetic Processes through Quantitative Stratigraphic Analysis of the Martian Sedimentary Rock Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stack, Kathryn M.

    High-resolution orbital and in situ observations acquired of the Martian surface during the past two decades provide the opportunity to study the rock record of Mars at an unprecedented level of detail. This dissertation consists of four studies whose common goal is to establish new standards for the quantitative analysis of visible and near-infrared data from the surface of Mars. Through the compilation of global image inventories, application of stratigraphic and sedimentologic statistical methods, and use of laboratory analogs, this dissertation provides insight into the history of past depositional and diagenetic processes on Mars. The first study presents a global inventory of stratified deposits observed in images from the High Resolution Image Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on-board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. This work uses the widespread coverage of high-resolution orbital images to make global-scale observations about the processes controlling sediment transport and deposition on Mars. The next chapter presents a study of bed thickness distributions in Martian sedimentary deposits, showing how statistical methods can be used to establish quantitative criteria for evaluating the depositional history of stratified deposits observed in orbital images. The third study tests the ability of spectral mixing models to obtain quantitative mineral abundances from near-infrared reflectance spectra of clay and sulfate mixtures in the laboratory for application to the analysis of orbital spectra of sedimentary deposits on Mars. The final study employs a statistical analysis of the size, shape, and distribution of nodules observed by the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover team in the Sheepbed mudstone at Yellowknife Bay in Gale crater. This analysis is used to evaluate hypotheses for nodule formation and to gain insight into the diagenetic history of an ancient habitable environment on Mars.

  16. Clumped isotope geochemistry of mid-Cretaceous (Barremian-Aptian) rudist shells: paleoclimatic and paleoenvironmental implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huck, S.; Steuber, T.; Bernasconi, S.; Weissert, H.

    2012-04-01

    . Carbonate clumped isotope geochemistry (thermometry) is not only a robust new tool for reconstructing changes in temperature, but also enables paleoclimatic and paleoenvironmental implications, e.g. estimates about freshwater influx or evaporation intensity at ancient tropical shallow-water settings. In combination with high-resolution δ18O, clumped isotope analysis has the potential to differentiate between temperature and salinity changes and this may help to evaluate the significance of meridional temperature gradients. The assumed strong seasonality of low-latitudinal mid-Cretaceous temperatures, based on intra-shell δ18O variations in sclerochronological sections of rudist bivalves (Steuber et al., 2005), is going to become verified or falsified during the current study.

  17. Pliocene-Pleistocene diatoms in Paleozoic and Mesozoic sedimentary and igneous rocks from Antarctica: A Sirius problem solved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burckle, Lloyd H.; Potter, Noel, Jr.

    1996-03-01

    There are two competing scenarios on the behavior of the East Antarctic ice sheet during the late Tertiary. In one scenario, the ice sheet was very dynamic and underwent major drawdown and renewal as late as the Pliocene. In the other, the ice sheet was relatively stable during the late Neogene. The presence of marine diatoms in Sirius Group sedimentary rocks in East Antarctica is at the center of the disagreement. One side regards the diatoms as the major piece of evidence to support the drawdown and renewal hypothesis and infers that they were introduced into the Sirius during renewed glaciation of East Antarctica; others suggest that these diatoms were likely introduced into the Sirius by atmospheric (largely eolian) processes. We propose a simple test of the eolian hypothesis. If diatoms were introduced into the Sirius by eolian processes, then they should also be present in older (Paleozoic and Mesozoic) sedimentary and igneous rocks. Samples from two units of the Beacon Supergroup (Devonian to Jurassic) from Beacon Valley, East Antarctica, were analyzed: the Beacon Heights Orthoquartzite (Devonian) and the Feather Conglomerate (Permian-Triassic). Also examined was sediment found in cracks of Paleozoic and Mesozoic (Devonian to Cretaceous) igneous rocks from Marie Byrd Land, West Antarctica. Largely Pliocene-Pleistocene planktonic marine diatoms were found in all sample sets. Because neither Beacon Supergroup sedimentary rocks nor igneous rocks from Marie Byrd Land are Pliocene-Pleistocene in age, such findings strongly suggest that diatoms were introduced into them by eolian processes. This same scenario can be applied to Sirius Group sedimentary rocks.

  18. The geological and microbiological controls on the enrichment of Se and Te in sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullock, Liam; Parnell, John; Armstrong, Joseph; Boyce, Adrian; Perez, Magali

    2017-04-01

    sequestered out of seawater into pyritic shales at a higher rate than into crusts. Se enrichment in roll-fronts relates to the initial mobilisation of trace elements in oxidised conditions, and later precipitation downgradient in reduced conditions. Results highlight the potential for sedimentary types of Se- and Te-bearing deposits. The enrichment of elements of high value for future technologies in sedimentary rocks deserve careful assessment for potential future resources, and should be monitored during exploration and mobilisation due to the potential contamination effects. This work forms part of the NERC-funded 'Security of Supply of Mineral Resources' project, which aims to detail the science needed to sustain the security of supply of strategic minerals in a changing environment.

  19. Fluvial geomorphic elements in modern sedimentary basins and their potential preservation in the rock record: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissmann, G. S.; Hartley, A. J.; Scuderi, L. A.; Nichols, G. J.; Owen, A.; Wright, S.; Felicia, A. L.; Holland, F.; Anaya, F. M. L.

    2015-12-01

    Since tectonic subsidence in sedimentary basins provides the potential for long-term facies preservation into the sedimentary record, analysis of geomorphic elements in modern continental sedimentary basins is required to understand facies relationships in sedimentary rocks. We use a database of over 700 modern sedimentary basins to characterize the fluvial geomorphology of sedimentary basins. Geomorphic elements were delineated in 10 representative sedimentary basins, focusing primarily on fluvial environments. Elements identified include distributive fluvial systems (DFS), tributive fluvial systems that occur between large DFS or in an axial position in the basin, lacustrine/playa, and eolian environments. The DFS elements include large DFS (> 30 km in length), small DFS (< 30 km in length), coalesced DFS in bajada or piedmont plains, and incised DFS. Our results indicate that over 88% of fluvial deposits in the evaluated sedimentary basins are present as DFS, with tributary systems covering a small portion (1-12%) of the basin. These geomorphic elements are commonly arranged hierarchically, with the largest transverse rivers forming large DFS and smaller transverse streams depositing smaller DFS in the areas between the larger DFS. These smaller streams commonly converge between the large DFS, forming a tributary system. Ultimately, most transverse rivers become tributary to the axial system in the sedimentary basin, with the axial system being confined between transverse DFS entering the basin from opposite sides of the basin, or a transverse DFS and the edge of the sedimentary basin. If axial systems are not confined by transverse DFS, they will form a DFS. Many of the world's largest rivers are located in the axial position of some sedimentary basins. Assuming uniformitarianism, sedimentary basins from the past most likely had a similar configuration of geomorphic elements. Facies distributions in tributary positions and those on DFS appear to display

  20. The first Mesozoic microwhip scorpion (Palpigradi): a new genus and species in mid-Cretaceous amber from Myanmar.

    PubMed

    Engel, Michael S; Breitkreuz, Laura C V; Cai, Chenyang; Alvarado, Mabel; Azar, Dany; Huang, Diying

    2016-04-01

    A fossil palpigrade is described and figured from mid-Cretaceous (Cenomanian) amber from northern Myanmar. Electrokoenenia yaksha Engel and Huang, gen. n. et sp. n., is the first Mesozoic fossil of its order and the only one known as an inclusion in amber, the only other fossil being a series of individuals encased in Pliocene onyx marble and 94-97 million years younger than E. yaksha. The genus is distinguished from other members of the order but is remarkably consistent in observable morphological details when compared to extant relatives, likely reflecting a consistent microhabitat and biological preferences over the last 100 million years.

  1. The first Mesozoic microwhip scorpion (Palpigradi): a new genus and species in mid-Cretaceous amber from Myanmar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Michael S.; Breitkreuz, Laura C. V.; Cai, Chenyang; Alvarado, Mabel; Azar, Dany; Huang, Diying

    2016-04-01

    A fossil palpigrade is described and figured from mid-Cretaceous (Cenomanian) amber from northern Myanmar. Electrokoenenia yaksha Engel and Huang, gen. n. et sp. n., is the first Mesozoic fossil of its order and the only one known as an inclusion in amber, the only other fossil being a series of individuals encased in Pliocene onyx marble and 94-97 million years younger than E. yaksha. The genus is distinguished from other members of the order but is remarkably consistent in observable morphological details when compared to extant relatives, likely reflecting a consistent microhabitat and biological preferences over the last 100 million years.

  2. Process-based reconstruction of sedimentary rocks, sandy soils and soil aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilyev, Roman; Gerke, Kirill; Čapek, Pavel; Karsanina, Marina; Korost, Dmitry

    2013-04-01

    There are three main approaches to model and reconstruct (using 2D cut(s), grain size distribution or some other limited information/properties) porous media: 1) statistical methods (correlation functions and simulated annealing, multi-point statistics, entropy methods), 2) sequential methods (sphere or other shapes granular packs), and 3) morphological methods. Each method has its own advantages and shortcomings, so there is no readily available solution and methods should be carefully chosen and tested for each particular media. Here we mainly focus on sequential process-based method due to its general simplicity and straightforward usability for different transformation modeling: diagenesis, mechanical compaction, erosion, etc. It is well known that process-based models for sandstone thin-sections give good transport properties after 3D reconstruction. This method is also useful for pore-network extraction validation. At first, polydisperse sphere packs are created using two different techniques: (1) modified Lubachevsky-Stillinger method, and (2) original Øren-Bakke method with global minimal or local minimal energy ballistic disposition rules. The latter are known to create anisotropic packs with kissing numbers different from real sedimentary materials. During the next step, the third phase (clay minerals for rocks and clay and organic matter for soils) is grown within pore space based on Voronoi tesselation to determine distances to the nearest grains. Input parameters, i.e., grain size distributions and porosities are determined using laboratory methods or image analysis for real porous media: sandstones, sandy soils and soil aggregates. To model soil aggregate structure a gravitational algorithm is used there a set of granules falls onto a gravity center in the middle of the aggregate. All further steps are similar to that of sedimentary rocks and soils. Resulted 3D reconstructions are compared with original 3D structures obtained using X

  3. Characteristics of high resolution hydraulic head profiles and vertical gradients in fractured sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Jessica R.; Parker, Beth L.; Cherry, John A.

    2014-09-01

    Accurately identifying the position of vertical hydraulic conductivity (Kv) contrasts is critical to the delineation of hydrogeologic units that serve as the basis for conceptual and numerical models of groundwater flow. High resolution head profiles have identified the position and thickness of Kv contrasts in clayey aquitards but this potential has not yet been thoroughly evaluated in sedimentary rocks. This paper describes an experiment in which head profiles with the highest, technically feasible resolution were obtained using Westbay® multilevel systems (MLS) installed in 15 cored holes at three sedimentary rock research sites with contrasting geologic and flow system conditions. MLSs were installed to maximum depths between 90 and 260 m with 2-5 monitoring zones per 10 m. Head profiles were measured over multiyear periods. The vertical component of hydraulic gradient (i.e., vertical gradient) was calculated for each pair of adjacent monitoring intervals in every MLS and then categorized based on its repeatability to facilitate interpretation of Kv contrasts and comparisons within boreholes, between boreholes at the same site, and between sites. The head and vertical gradient profiles from all three sites display systematic (i.e., simple, geometric) shapes defined by repeatable intervals of no to minimal vertical gradient, indicating relatively high Kv units, bounded by shorter depth intervals with large (up to -50 m/m) vertical gradients, indicating relatively low Kv units. The systematic nature of the profiles suggests flow in regular and interconnected fracture networks rather than dominated by a few key fractures with irregular orientations. The low Kv units were typically thin, with their positions and thicknesses not predicted by lithostratigraphy or detailed lithologic, geophysical, and horizontal hydraulic conductivity data. Hence, the position and thickness of units with contrasting Kv would not be evident if MLSs with the conventional number of

  4. Factors controlling enrichment of vanadium and nickel in the bitumen of organic sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewan, M. D.; Maynard, J. B.

    1982-12-01

    Enriched concentrations of vanadium and nickel have been noted in a variety of naturally occurring organic substances including crude oils, asphalts, and organic matter in some sedimentary rocks. Vanadium and nickel concentrations in bitumens extracted from a variety of organic sedimentary rock types of different geological ages and geographical areas range from less than 0.2 to 4760 ppm and less than 7 to 1240 ppm, respectively. Vanadium concentrations showed a polymodal frequency distribution, while nickel concentrations showed a near-normal frequency distribution. The concentrations of these two metals showed no significant correlations with bitumen content, organic carbon content, or proportionality between bitumen and organic contents. Enriched vanadium and nickel concentrations greater than 100 ppm are only observed in bitumens that are associated with Type II and Type I kerogens. Conversely, bitumens associated with Type III kerogens contained vanadium and nickel concentrations less than 100 ppm. The high stability of vanadium and nickel in crude oils, asphalts, and bitumens suggest that they occur in tetrapyrrole complexes. These complexes may occur as free molecules or assimulated subunits in macromolecules because of their availability in anaerobic systems, small atomic radii, and favorable electron configurations. The potential for an organic sediment to be enriched in these two metals depends upon the amount of tetrapyrroles preserved in its organic matter. Tetrapyrrole preservation preferentially decreases in organic matter as exposure time to aerobic conditions increases. The potential for vanadium and nickel enrichment is therefore the highest in organic matter derived from algae that encountered anaerobic conditions early in their depositional history. Metallation of tetrapyrrole complexes appears to occur within sediments prior to their lithification, and interstitial waters are the most likely source for enriched concentrations of vanadium and

  5. C-isotope stratigraphy and paleoenvironmental changes across OAE2 (mid-Cretaceous) from shallow-water platform carbonates of southern Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elrick, Maya; Molina-Garza, Roberto; Duncan, Robert; Snow, Laura

    2009-01-01

    The stratigraphic and geochemical record of the mid-Cretaceous (Cenomanian-Turonian) Oceanic Anoxic Event 2 (OAE2) has been studied in numerous Tethyan and proto-Atlantic hemi-pelagic/pelagic successions, but little data comes from nearshore carbonate successions from the proto-Pacific region. Here we present the results of a combined stratigraphic and δ13C study of C-T platform carbonates from southern Mexico, which were deposited within the proto-Pacific. Two scales of sedimentary cyclicity are recognized. High-frequency peritidal and subtidal cycles (0.4-8 m) display little evidence of cycle-capping subaerial exposure and are not correlative between sections; these relationships suggest that the amplitudes of high-frequency sea-level changes were minimal during the peak mid-Cretaceous greenhouse. Longer-term transgressive-regressive sequences (18-40 + m) are correlated between sections, and using δ13C trends, can be correlated with sequences developed in northern Europe and India. The Mexican successions were sampled at a high resolution (~ 10 ky) for stable isotopes (inorganic, organic carbon and oxygen), total organic carbon, insoluble residues, and trace metals. The δ13C carb curve matches global trends (including 6 distinct isotopic stages) permitting identification of OAE2 despite the lack of characteristic anoxic facies. Using the δ13C carb trends, we tie the previously identified ammonite, planktonic foram, and nannofossil biostratigraphy from England and the Western Interior seaway of Colorado into the Mexican sections. The initiation of OAE2, defined by an abrupt positive 3-4‰ δ13C shift, coincides with a long-term sea-level rise, though the sedimentary expression of the deepening is no greater than that observed for any of the other sea-level events across the studied interval. OAE2 termination (transition from gradually decreasing to background δ13C values) is not associated with a particular sea-level trend. Stratigraphic changes in insoluble

  6. Development of magnetic fabric in sedimentary rocks: insights from early compactional structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Lasanta, Cristina; Oliva-Urcia, Belén; Román-Berdiel, Teresa; Casas, Antonio M.; Pérez-Lorente, Félix

    2013-07-01

    The timing of development of the magnetic fabric is a major issue in the application of anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) as a strain marker. Analysis of AMS in unconcealed synsedimentary structures can be a sound approximation to this task. In this work, three types of early compactional structures (ECS) were studied by means of AMS, since they can help to understand the timing of development of the magnetic fabric. All three types of ECS are found in fine-grained detrital rocks (to avoid other influences such as palaeocurrents), claystones and marls of the Enciso Group within the Cameros Basin (NE Spain): dinosaur footprints, load structures due to differential compaction and dish-and-flame structures associated with fluid migration related to seismites. In addition, to determine possible influences of lithology on the magnetic fabric, different rock types (siltstones and limestones) were also sampled. In general, the influence of ECS results in scattering of the three magnetic axes, higher at the margins of the structure than at its centre. This fact suggests that ECS occurs during the development of the magnetic fabric, disturbing the incipient magnetic fabric stages, and strongly conditions its later evolution during diagenesis. The later homogeneous compaction process due to sedimentary load and physicochemical processes reorient the susceptibility carriers to some extent (i.e. the magnetic fabric is still under development), but not totally, since AMS still records the previous scattering due to ECS imprint. For the Enciso Group deposits, the magnetic fabric begins to develop at the earliest stages after deposition and it stops when diagenetic processes have finished.

  7. Fracture Network Characteristics Informed by Detailed Studies of Chlorinated Solvent Plumes in Sedimentary Rock Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, B. L.; Chapman, S.

    2015-12-01

    Various numerical approaches have been used to simulate contaminant plumes in fractured porous rock, but the one that allows field and laboratory measurements to be most directly used as inputs to these models is the Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) Approach. To effectively account for fracture-matrix interactions, emphasis must be placed on identifying and parameterizing all of the fractures that participate substantially in groundwater flow and contaminated transport. High resolution plume studies at four primary research sites, where chlorinated solvent plumes serve as long-term (several decades) tracer tests, provide insight concerning the density of the fracture network unattainable by conventional methods. Datasets include contaminant profiles from detailed VOC subsampling informed by continuous core logs, hydraulic head and transmissivity profiles, packer testing and sensitive temperature logging methods in FLUTe™ lined holes. These show presence of many more transmissive fractures, contrasting observations of only a few flow zones per borehole obtained from conventional hydraulic tests including flow metering in open boreholes. Incorporating many more fractures with a wider range of transmissivities is key to predicting contaminant migration. This new understanding of dense fracture networks combined with matrix property measurements have informed 2-D DFN flow and transport modelling using Fractran and HydroGeosphere to simulate plume characteristics ground-truthed by detailed field site plume characterization. These process-based simulations corroborate field findings that plumes in sedimentary rock after decades of transport show limited plume front distances and strong internal plume attenuation by diffusion, transverse dispersion and slow degradation. This successful application of DFN modeling informed by field-derived parameters demonstrates how the DFN Approach can be applied to other sites to inform plume migration rates and remedial efficacy.

  8. Diffusive separation of noble gases and noble gas abundance patterns in sedimentary rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Torgersen, T.; Kennedy, B.M.; van Soest, M.C.

    2004-06-14

    The mechanisms responsible for noble gas concentrations, abundance patterns, and strong retentivity in sedimentary lithologies remain poorly explained. Diffusion-controlled fractionation of noble gases is modeled and examined as an explanation for the absolute and relative abundances of noble gases observed in sediments. Since the physical properties of the noble gases are strong functions of atomic mass, the individual diffusion coefficients, adsorption coefficients and atomic radii combine to impede heavy noble gas (Xe) diffusion relative to light noble gas (Ne) diffusion. Filling of lithic grains/half-spaces by diffusive processes thus produces Ne enrichments in the early and middle stages of the filling process with F(Ne) values similar to that observed in volcanic glasses. Emptying lithic grains/half-spaces produces a Xe-enriched residual in the late (but not final) stages of the process producing F(Xe) values similar to that observed in shales. 'Exotic but unexceptional' shales that exhibit both F(Ne) and F(Xe) enrichments can be produced by incomplete emptying followed by incomplete filling. This mechanism is consistent with literature reported noble gas abundance patterns but may still require a separate mechanism for strong retention. A system of labyrinths-with-constrictions and/or C-, Si-nanotubes when combined with simple adsorption can result in stronger diffusive separation and non-steady-state enrichments that persist for longer times. Enhanced adsorption to multiple C atoms inside C-nanotubes as well as dangling functional groups closing the ends of nanotubes can provide potential mechanisms for 'strong retention'. We need new methods of examining noble gases in rocks to determine the role and function of angstrom-scale structures in both the diffusive enrichment process and the 'strong retention' process for noble gas abundances in terrestrial rocks.

  9. First Palaeogene sedimentary rock palaeomagnetic pole from stable western Eurasia and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Jason R.; Ward, David J.; King, Chris; Abrajevitch, Alexandra

    2003-08-01

    A palaeomagnetic investigation of lower Eocene (ca. 52 Ma) London Clay Formation cemented mudstones from Sheppey (SE England) has yielded a mean direction of Dec. = 1.1°, Inc. = 43.2°, where N= 9, α95 = 6.8° and K= 58.5. This apparently high-quality direction (Q-factor = 5) has an associated palaeopole of 178.6°E, 63.7°N, where A95= 6.8°. The data represent the first pole from post Jurassic stable Eurasia rocks outside of the European North Atlantic Igneous Province (NAIP), of which most results have been obtained from NW Britain and the Faroe Islands. The data can in part be used to constrain the position of Palaeogene Eurasia, in particular the zero-offset declination implying negligible rotation of western Eurasia since the early Cenozoic. This is in contrast with data derived from the European NAIP, which imply small to moderate clockwise rotations for this part of the plate. The inclination angle may provide less useful information as it appears to be anomalously shallow when compared with that associated with the NAIP derived poles. In an attempt to understand the shallowing, we re-examined data from Palaeocene-Eocene sediments recovered in several boreholes (bathyal sediments in DSDP Hole 550, four cores through fluvio-delatic to middle shelf sequences in the London area, and one borehole sequence from East Anglia). In all cases, the sediments show systematic inclination shallowing similar in magnitude to that reported from Sheppey. Tectonic and geomagnetic explanations can be discounted; sediment compaction appears to be the likely cause. In light of the current controversy surrounding the `stable Asia shallow inclination problem', the result reinforces the suggestion that tectonic modelling needs to be done carefully when the supporting data are based exclusively on palaeomagnetic studies of sedimentary rocks.

  10. Thick sequences of silicate and carbonate rocks of sedimentary origin in North America an interim report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, John David

    1956-01-01

    Thick sequences of silicate and carbonate rocks of sedimentary origin have been investigated in 64 areas in North America. The areas containing the thickest and most homogeneous stratigraphic sections more than 1,000 feet thick, buried at depths greater than 10,000 feet are: 1. Uinta Basin, Utah, where the Mancos shale is 1,300 to 5,000 feet thick, the Weber sandstone is 1,000 to 1,600 feet thick, and Mississippian limestones are 1,000 to 1,500 feet thick. 2. Washakie Basin, Wyoming, and Sand Wash Ba.sin, Colorado, where the Lewis shale is 1,000 to 2,000 feet thick and the Cody-Mancos shale is 4,500 to 5,500 feet thick. 3. Green River Basin, Wyoming, where the Cody-Hilliard-Baxter-Mancos shale sequence averages more than 3,000 feet, the siltstone and shale of the Chugwater formation totals 1,000 feet, and the Madison limestone ranges from 1,000 to 1,400 feet thick. 4. Red Desert (Great Divide) Basin, Wyoming, where the Cody shale is 4,000 feet thick. 5. Hanna Basin, Wyoming, where the Steele shale is 4,500 feet thick. 6. Wind River Basin, Wyoming, where the Cody shale is 3,600 to 5,000 feet thick. Geochemical characteristics of these rocks in these areas are poorly known but are being investigated. A summary of the most pertinent recent ana1yses is presented.

  11. Using Resin-Based 3D Printing to Build Geometrically Accurate Proxies of Porous Sedimentary Rocks.

    PubMed

    Ishutov, Sergey; Hasiuk, Franciszek J; Jobe, Dawn; Agar, Susan

    2017-09-28

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is capable of transforming intricate digital models into tangible objects, allowing geoscientists to replicate the geometry of 3D pore networks of sedimentary rocks. We provide a refined method for building scalable pore-network models ("proxies") using stereolithography 3D printing that can be used in repeated flow experiments (e.g., core flooding, permeametry, porosimetry). Typically, this workflow involves two steps, model design and 3D printing. In this study, we explore how the addition of post-processing and validation can reduce uncertainty in the 3D-printed proxy accuracy (difference of proxy geometry from the digital model). Post-processing is a multi-step cleaning of porous proxies involving pressurized ethanol flushing and oven drying. Proxies are validated by: (1) helium porosimetry and (2) digital measurements of porosity from thin-section images of 3D-printed proxies. 3D printer resolution was determined by measuring the smallest open channel in 3D-printed "gap test" wafers. This resolution (400 µm) was insufficient to build porosity of Fontainebleau sandstone (∼13%) from computed tomography data at the sample's natural scale, so proxies were printed at 15-, 23-, and 30-fold magnifications to validate the workflow. Helium porosities of the 3D-printed proxies differed from digital calculations by up to 7% points. Results improved after pressurized flushing with ethanol (e.g., porosity difference reduced to ∼1% point), though uncertainties remain regarding the nature of sub-micron "artifact" pores imparted by the 3D printing process. This study shows the benefits of including post-processing and validation in any workflow to produce porous rock proxies. © 2017, National Ground Water Association.

  12. Occurrence of selenium in sulfides from some sedimentary rocks of the western United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coleman, Robert G.; Delevaux, Maryse

    1956-01-01

    Investigations of the minor- and trace-element content of sulfides associated with uranium ore deposits from sandstone-type deposits have shown that selenium commonly substitutes for sulfur. The Morrison formation and Entrada sandstone of Jurassic age and the Wind River formation of Eocene age seem to be seleniferous stratigraphic zones; sulfides deposited within these formations generally contain abnormal amounts of selenium. The selenium content of the pyrite, marcasite, and chalcocite is much greater than that reported in previously published data. Under the prevailing temperatures and pressures of formation of the Colorado Plateau uranium deposits the maximum amount of Se substituting for S in the pyrite structure was found to be 3 percent by weight. Ferroselite, the iron selenide (FeSe2), was found in two deposits on the Colorado Plateau and it was also established that galena (PbS) forms an isomorphous series with clausthalite (PbSe) in nature. During oxidation of the selenium-bearing sulfides and selenides in the Colorado Plateau and Wyoming, the selenium forms pinkish crusts of either monoclinic or hexagonal native selenium intergrown with soluble sulfates, suggesting that under "normal" oxidizing conditions native selenium is more stable than selenites or selenates. The above-normal selenium content of these sulfides from sedimentary rocks of Mesozoic and Tertiary age is significant. The high selenium in these sulfides is related to periods of volcanic and intrusive activity penecontemporaneous with the formation of the containing sediments.

  13. Absorption and modulus measurements in the seismic frequency and strain range on partially saturated sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paffenholz, Josef; Burkhardt, Hans

    1989-07-01

    The absorptions 1/QE and 1/QS of partially water-saturated sedimentary rocks were determined from phase differences between stress and strain for longitudinal deformation frequencies between 0.03 and 300 Hz and torsional frequencies between 0.03 and 100 Hz. Both longitudinal and shear strain amplitudes were of the order of 10-6. For water saturation between 0 and 50%, Young's moduli and shear moduli were shown to decrease with increasing saturation. In this saturation range both 1/QE and 1/QS increased, but no distinguishable absorption maxima were observed. For saturation percentages greater than 50%, the moduli of the samples appeared independent of the water content. 1/QE increased until full saturation and showed a strong frequency dependence. 1/QS is much less affected by increasing water saturation and has no absorption maxima in general. Since the absorption and the moduli reduction show different saturation dependencies, two different mechanisms for these effects are proposed. The addition of water changes the interaction force between the molecules on opposite walls of thin cracks. This provides a mechanism for the modulus reduction. Calculations based on the Biot-Gardner theory (Gardner, 1962) indicate that part of the observed absorption may be caused by fluid flow due to the limited sample size as proposed by White (1986). Fluid-supported thermorelaxation is proposed, as a possible intrinsic absorption mechanism.

  14. Neutron Imaging of Rapid Water Imbibition in Fractured Sedimentary Rock Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chu-Lin; Perfect, Edmund; Donnelly, Brendan; Bilheux, Hassina; Tremsin, Anton; McKay, Larry; Distefano, Victoria; Cai, Jianchao; Santodonato, Lou

    2015-03-01

    Advances in nondestructive testing methods, such as neutron, nuclear magnetic resonance, and x-ray imaging, have significantly improved experimental capabilities to visualize fracture flow in various important fossil energy contexts, e.g. enhanced oil recovery and shale gas. We present a theoretical framework for predicting the rapid movement of water into air-filled fractures within a porous medium based on early-time capillary dynamics and spreading over rough fracture surfaces. The theory permits estimation of sorptivity values for the matrix and fracture zone, as well as a dispersion parameter which quantifies the extent of spreading of the wetting front. Dynamic neutron imaging of water imbibition in unsaturated fractured Berea sandstone cores was employed to evaluate the proposed model. The experiments were conducted at the Neutron Imaging Prototype Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Water uptake into both the matrix and fracture zone exhibited square-root-of-time behavior. Both theory and neutron imaging data indicated that fractures significantly increase imbibition in unsaturated sedimentary rock by capillary action and surface spreading on rough fracture faces. Fractures also increased the dispersion of the wetting front.

  15. Regional hydrogeology of the Silurian and Ordovician sedimentary rock underlying Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novakowski, Kentner S.; Lapcevic, Patricia A.

    1988-12-01

    Due to concern over the potential for widespread groundwater contamination in the sedimentary rock underlying the Niagara Falls area, this study was done to investigate the hydrogeology of the Silurian and Ordovician stratigraphy underlying the Upper Niagara River and the Eastern Niagara Peninsula. Seven boreholes (up to 150 m deep) were drilled, instrumented with multiple packer casing, tested for permeability, sampled for inorganic and organic solutes and monitored for hydraulic head to provide data for a conceptual model of regional groundwater flow. Results show that there are at least three distinct groundwater flow regimes in the bedrock. The uppermost regime consists of fracture zones in the Guelph and Lockport Formations, within which hydraulic conductivity, hydraulic head measurements and geochemical analyses indicate active groundwater circulation primarily discharging towards the Niagara Gorge and Escarpment. Underlying the Lockport Formation are an overpressured (high hydraulic head) regime in the Clinton-Upper Cataract-Lower Queenston Formation and an underpressured (low hydraulic head) regime in the Lower Cataract-Upper Queenston Formation. In both regimes, geochemical analyses and permeability measurements indicate very old and saline groundwater which probably has undergone minimal migration since pre-Pleistocene time. The implication based on the study so far, is that potential groundwater contamination below the bottom of the Lockport Formation is probably not significant in the Niagara Falls area except adjacent to the Niagara Gorge where vertical permeability in the lower flow regimes may be enhanced.

  16. The Influences Of Grain Sizes And Chemical Weathering Level On Extractability Of Elements From Sedimentary Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Y.; Yamasaki, S.; Tsuchiya, N.

    2008-02-01

    The extractability of elements (Cu, Rb, Sr, La and Pb) from sedimentary rock (black slate) was investigated for establishing reliable extraction method. At first, the influence of the grain sizes on the extractability was examined by using non-weathered sample. Cu, Sr, La and Pb were abundantly extracted from roughly crushed black slate, whereas Rb extraction from powdered one was more effective. Especially, the dissolutions of heavy metals from well-ground slate were drastically lowered maybe due to re-adsorption artifacts. The extraction experiments using the black slate with different weathering levels were also performed for the purpose of investigations of chemical weathering on the dissolution behavior of above elements. The extracted solutions were successively filtered through 0.45 μm, 0.20 μm and 100 kDa. The almost of all elements were extracted from non-weathered as truly dissolved species. On the other hand, the elements extracted from weathered slates were almost completely removed by the ultrafiltration except some of alkali and alkali earth elements, indicating no existence of truly dissolved species. They were adsorbates on Al and Fe-bearing colloidal particles or their components.

  17. Flow enhancement of water-based nanoparticle dispersion through microscale sedimentary rocks.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haiyang; He, Youwei; Li, Peng; Li, Shuang; Zhang, Tiantian; Rodriguez-Pin, Elena; Du, Song; Wang, Chenglong; Cheng, Shiqing; Bielawski, Christopher W; Bryant, Steven L; Huh, Chun

    2015-03-03

    Understanding and controlling fluids flow at the microscale is a matter of growing scientific and technological interest. Flow enhancements of water-based nanoparticle dispersions through microscale porous media are investigated through twelve hydrophilic sedimentary rocks with pore-throat radius between 1.2 and 10 μm, which are quantitatively explained with a simple model with slip length correction for Darcy flow. Both as wetting phase, water exhibited no-slip Darcy flow in all cores; however, flow enhancement of nanoparticle dispersions can be up to 5.7 times larger than that of water, and it increases with the decreasing of pore-throat radius. The experimental data reveals characteristic slip lengths are of order 500 and 1000 nm for 3M® and HNPs-1 nanoparticles, respectively, independent of the lithology or nanoparticle concentration or shear rate. Meanwhile, the phenomenon of flow degradation is observed for HNPs-2 nanoparticles. These results explore the feasible application of using nanoparticle dispersions to control flow at the microscale.

  18. Three wave mixing test of hyperelasticity in highly nonlinear solids: sedimentary rocks.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, R M; Winkler, K W; Johnson, D L

    2008-02-01

    Measurements of three-wave mixing amplitudes on solids whose third order elastic constants have also been measured by means of the elasto-acoustic effect are reported. Because attenuation and diffraction are important aspects of the measurement technique results are analyzed using a frequency domain version of the KZK equation, modified to accommodate an arbitrary frequency dependence to the attenuation. It is found that the value of beta so deduced for poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) agrees quite well with that predicted from the stress-dependent sound speed measurements, establishing that PMMA may be considered a hyperelastic solid, in this context. The beta values of sedimentary rocks, though they are typically two orders of magnitude larger than, e.g., PMMA's, are still a factor of 3-10 less than those predicted from the elasto-acoustic effect. Moreover, these samples exhibit significant heterogeneity on a centimeter scale, which heterogeneity is not apparent from a measurement of the position dependent sound speed.

  19. Organic geochemical characterization of the Lower-Middle Triassic sedimentary rocks from south China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, R.

    2015-12-01

    The most devastated environments and depleted biodiversity on Earth occurred during the Early Triassic epoch following the latest Permian mass extinction. Complete biotic recovery, characterized by a return to pre-extinction diversity levels, took an extraordinarily long time (ca. 5 x 106 yr), probably because harsh conditions developed repeatedly during the Early Triassic. Newly obtained organic geochemistry data from south China area, indicated a variety of biotic (eukaryotic algae, cyanobacteria, bacteria, and archaea) and environmental fluctuations (redox) during the Early Triassic. Remarkably, some sedimentary rocks from Lower Triassic strata contain rare biomarkers such as biphytanes and okenane, whch are biomarkers for archaea and purple sulfur bacteria, respectively. This is the first study to describe in detail primary producers, microbes, and redox conditions in the Early-Early Middle Triassic, on the basis of biomarkers such as steranes, 2-methyl hopanes, hopanes, biphytanes, regular isoprenoids, n-alkanes, okenane, chlorobactane, β-carotane, and γ-carotane. The results greatly not only increase our understanding of the recovery processes that occurred following the Permian mass extinction, but also emphasize an effectiveness of organic geochemistry against the Early Triassic.

  20. Flow enhancement of water-based nanoparticle dispersion through microscale sedimentary rocks

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Haiyang; He, Youwei; Li, Peng; Li, Shuang; Zhang, Tiantian; Rodriguez-Pin, Elena; Du, Song; Wang, Chenglong; Cheng, Shiqing; Bielawski, Christopher W.; Bryant, Steven L.; Huh, Chun

    2015-01-01

    Understanding and controlling fluids flow at the microscale is a matter of growing scientific and technological interest. Flow enhancements of water-based nanoparticle dispersions through microscale porous media are investigated through twelve hydrophilic sedimentary rocks with pore-throat radius between 1.2 and 10 μm, which are quantitatively explained with a simple model with slip length correction for Darcy flow. Both as wetting phase, water exhibited no-slip Darcy flow in all cores; however, flow enhancement of nanoparticle dispersions can be up to 5.7 times larger than that of water, and it increases with the decreasing of pore-throat radius. The experimental data reveals characteristic slip lengths are of order 500 and 1000 nm for 3M® and HNPs-1 nanoparticles, respectively, independent of the lithology or nanoparticle concentration or shear rate. Meanwhile, the phenomenon of flow degradation is observed for HNPs-2 nanoparticles. These results explore the feasible application of using nanoparticle dispersions to control flow at the microscale. PMID:25731805

  1. Linking the Fe-, Mo-, and Cr isotope records with the multiple S isotope record of Archean sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmoto, H.; Watanabe, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Researchers have interpreted the isotopic data of redox sensitive elements (e.g., Fe, Mo and Cr) in Archean- and Proterozoic-aged sedimentary rocks within a framework of an atmospheric O2 evolution model that relied on an interpretation of the multiple sulfur isotopic record of sedimentary rocks. The current paradigm is that the anomalous isotopic fractionations of sulfur (AIF-S, or MIF-S) in sedimentary rocks were created by the UV photolysis of volcanic SO2 in an O2-poor (i.e., pO2 < 1 ppm) atmosphere, and that the rise of atmospheric pO2 to > 1 ppm occurred at ~2.45 Ga. However, this paradigm has recently encountered the following serious problems: (1) UV photolysis of SO2 by a broad-band UV lamp, which simulates the UV spectra of the sun light, produced the δ34S-Δ33S values for the S0 and SO4 that are significantly different from >90% of data on natural samples. (2) Many Archean-age sedimentary rocks do not exhibit AIF-S signatures. (3) Strong AIF-S signatures are typically found in organic C- and pyrite rich Archean-age black shales that were altered by submarine hydrothermal fluids during the early diagenetic stage of the rocks. (4) H2S, rather than SO2, was probably the dominant S-bearing volcanic gas on an anoxic Earth. Yet, UV photolysis of H2S does not generate AIF-S. (5) Some post-2.0 Ga natural samples were found to possess strong AIF-S signatures, such as sulfates in air pollutants that were produced by coal burning in an oxygen-rich atmosphere. Lasaga et al. (2008) demonstrated theoretically that chemisorption reactions between some solid surfaces and S-bearing aqueous (or gaseous) species, such as between organic matter and aqueous sulfate, may generate AIF-S. Watanabe et al. (2009; in prep.) demonstrated experimentally that reactions between simple amino acid crystals and sulfate under hydrothermal conditions produced AIF-S signatures that matched with more than 90% of data on natural samples. These studies, as well as the observed correlations

  2. Geochemistry and diagenesis of Miocene lacustrine siliceous sedimentary and pyroclastic rocks, Mytilinii basin, Samos Island, Greece

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stamatakis, M.G.; Hein, J.R.; Magganas, A.C.

    1989-01-01

    A Late Miocene non-marine stratigraphic sequence composed of limestone, opal-CT-bearing limestone, porcelanite, marlstone, diatomaceous marlstone, dolomite, and tuffite crops out on eastern Samos Island. This lacustrine sequence is subdivided into the Hora Beds and the underlying Pythagorion Formation. The Hora Beds is overlain by the clastic Mytilinii series which contains Turolian (Late Miocene) mammalian fossils. The lacustrine sequence contains volcanic glass and the silica polymorphs opal-A, opal-CT, and quartz. Volcanic glass predominantly occurs in tuffaceous rocks from the lower and upper parts of the lacustrine sequence. Opal-A (diatom frustules) is confined to layers in the upper part of the Hora Beds. Beds rich in opal-CT underlie those containing opal-A. The occurrence of opal-CT is extensive, encompassing the lower Hora Beds and the sedimentary rocks and tuffs of the Pythagorion Formation. A transition zone between the opal-A and opal-CT zones is identified by X-ray diffraction patterns that are intermediate between those of opal-CT and opal-A, perhaps due to a mixture of the two polymorphs. Diagenesis was not advanced enough for opal-CT to transform to quartz or for volcanic glass to transform to opal-C. Based on geochemical and mineralogical data, we suggest that the rate of diagenetic transformation of opal-A to opal-CT was mainly controlled by the chemistry of pore fluids. Pore fluids were characterized by high salinity, moderately high alkalinity, and high magnesium ion activity. These pore fluid characteristics are indicated by the presence of evaporitic salts (halite, sylvite, niter), high boron content in biogenic silica, and by dolomite in both the opal-A and opal-CT-bearing beds. The absence of authigenic K-feldspar, borosilicates, and zeolites also support these pore fluid characteristics. Additional factors that influenced the rate of silica diagenesis were host rock lithology and the relatively high heat flow in the Aegean region from

  3. Geochemical characterisation, provenance, source and depositional environment of ‘Roches Argilo-Talqueuses’ (RAT) and Mines Subgroups sedimentary rocks in the Neoproterozoic Katangan Belt (Congo): Lithostratigraphic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampunzu, A. B.; Cailteux, J. L. H.; Moine, B.; Loris, H. N. B. T.

    2005-07-01

    The chemical characteristics of sedimentary rocks provide important clues to their provenance and depositional environments. Chemical analyses of 192 samples of Katangan sedimentary rocks from Kolwezi, Kambove-Kabolela and Luiswishi in the central African Copperbelt (Katanga, Congo) are used to constrain (1) the source and depositional environment of RAT and Mines Subgroup sedimentary rocks and (2) the geochemical relations between the rocks from these units and the debate on the lithostratigraphic position of the RAT Subgroup within the Katangan sedimentary succession. The geochemical data indicate that RAT, D. Strat., RSF and RSC are extremely poor in alkalis and very rich in MgO. SD are richer in alkalis, especially K 2O. Geochemical characteristics of RAT and Mines Subgroups sedimentary rocks indicate deposition under an evaporitic environment that evolved from oxidizing (Red RAT) to reducing (Grey RAT and Mines Subgroup) conditions. There is no chemical difference between RAT and fine-grained clastic rocks from the lower part of the Mines Subgroup. The geochemical data preclude the genetic model that RAT are syn-orogenic sedimentary rocks originating from Mines Group rocks by erosion and gravity-induced fragmentation in front of advancing nappes.

  4. 87Sr/86Sr ratios in some eugeosynclinal sedimentary rocks and their bearing on the origin of granitic magma in orogenic belts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterman, Z.E.; Hedge, C.E.; Coleman, R.G.; Snavely, P.D.

    1967-01-01

    Rb and Sr contents and 87Sr/86Sr values were determined for samples of eugeosynclinal sedimentary rocks, mostly graywackes, from Oregon and California. These data are compatible with the theory of anataxis of eugeosynclinal sedimentary rocks in orogenic belts to produce granitic magmas provided that the melting occurs within several hundreds of m.y. after sedimentation. The low (87Sr/86Sr)0 values of the eugeosynclinal sedimentary rocks are related to the significant amounts of volcanogenic detritus present which probably were originally derived from the mantle. ?? 1967.

  5. Stratigraphy of mid-Cretaceous formations at drilling sites in Weston and Johnson counties, northeastern Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mereweather, E.A.

    1980-01-01

    The sedimentary rocks of early Late Cretaceous age in Weston County, Wyo., on the east flank of the Powder River Basin, are assigned, in ascending order, to the Belle Fourche Shale, Greenhorn Formation, and Carlile Shale. In Johnson County, on the west flank of the basin, the lower Upper Cretaceous strata are included in the Frontier Formation and the overlying Cody Shale. The Frontier Formation and some of the laterally equivalent strata in the Rocky Mountain region contain major resources of oil and gas. These rocks also include commercial deposits of bentonite. Outcrop sections, borehole logs, and core studies of the lower Upper Cretaceous rocks near Osage, in Weston County, and Kaycee, in Johnson County, supplement comparative studies of the fossils in the formations. Fossils of Cenomanian, Turonian, and Coniacian Age are abundant at these localities and form sequences of species which can be used for the zonation and correlation of strata throughout the region. The Belle Fourche Shale near Osage is about 115 m (meters) thick and consists mainly of noncalcareous shale, which was deposited in offshore-marine environments during Cenomanian time. These strata are overlain by calcareous shale and limestone of the Greenhorn Formation. In this area, the Greenhorn is about 85 m thick and accumulated in offshore, open-marine environments during the Cenomanian and early Turonian. The Carlile Shale overlies the Greenhorn and is composed of, from oldest to youngest, the Pool Creek Member, Turner Sandy Member, and Sage Breaks Member. In boreholes, the Pool Creek Member is about 23 m thick and consists largely of shale. The member was deposited in offshoremarine environments in Turonian time. These rocks are disconformably overlain by the Turner Sandy Member, a sequence about 50 m thick of interstratified shale, siltstone, and sandstone. The Turner accumulated during the Turonian in several shallow-marine environments. Conformably overlying the Turner is the slightly

  6. Fine-grained rutile in the Gulf of Maine - diagenetic origin, source rocks, and sedimentary environment of deposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Valentine, P.C.; Commeau, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    The Gulf of Maine, an embayment of the New England margin, is floored by shallow, glacially scoured basins that are partly filled with late Pleistocene and Holocene silt and clay containing 0.7 to 1.0 wt percent TiO2 chiefly in the form of silt-size rutile. Much of the rutile in the Gulf of Maine mud probably formed diagenetically in poorly cemented Carboniferous and Triassic coarse-grained sedimentary rocks of Nova Scotia and New Brunswick after the dissolution of titanium-rich detrital minerals (ilmenite, ilmenomagnetite). The diagenesis of rutile in coarse sedimentary rocks (especially arkose and graywacke) followed by erosion, segregation, and deposition (and including recycling of fine-grained rutile from shales) can serve as a model for predicting and prospecting for unconsolidated deposits of fine-grained TiO2. -from Authors

  7. Analyses of permeability and porosity of sedimentary rocks in terms of unconventional geothermal resource explorations in Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowiżdżał, Anna; Semyrka, Roman

    2016-06-01

    Petrophysical investigations are fundamental to natural resource exploration. In order to recognise the geothermal potential of sedimentary rocks in central Poland, 259 samples were collected from prospective deep-lying geothermal reservoirs. Parameters measured include bulk density, skeletal density, effective porosity, permeability, average pore diameter and specific surface. Results indicate that at great depths (mostly > 3,000 m below surface) sedimentary rocks show low values of porosity (mainly less than 5%) and permeability (only sporadically in excess of 1 md). These values call for a petrothermal use of reservoirs, for which an Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) was developed. Reservoirs suited for the EGS are Carboniferous and Lower Triassic sandstones in the central part of Poland (Mogilno-Łódź Trough region and a small part of the Kujawy Swell and Fore-Sudetic regions). In addition, Carboniferous limestones in this area are potentially prospective.

  8. Measurement of spatial distribution of total and accessible porosity in sedimentary rocks using isotopic radiation transmission: device design and testing.

    PubMed

    Subudhi, Ranjit K; Hussein, Esam M A; Al, Tom A

    2010-03-01

    An isotopic radiation transmission technique for quantifying the spatial distribution of porosity in sedimentary rocks is presented. A device was designed and constructed to examine rock samples of volumes sufficiently large for studying solute migration in rocks, so that a one-millimeter spatial resolution is attained with measurement acquisition time of one point per second. The paper demonstrates how the device was optimized for these specifications, while abiding by the restrictions implicit in the utilization of the exponential law of radiation attenuation to quantify physical parameters. Total porosity was obtained from measurements of radiation attenuation in dry samples, while solute-accessible porosity was determined from measurements with samples saturated with either KNO(3) or KI solutions. Results are presented for three different rock types to demonstrate the capabilities and limitations of the technique. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. 13C-Depleted carbon microparticles in >3700-Ma sea-floor sedimentary rocks from west greenland

    PubMed

    Rosing

    1999-01-29

    Turbiditic and pelagic sedimentary rocks from the Isua supracrustal belt in west Greenland [more than 3700 million years ago (Ma)] contain reduced carbon that is likely biogenic. The carbon is present as 2- to 5-micrometer graphite globules and has an isotopic composition of delta13C that is about -19 per mil (Pee Dee belemnite standard). These data and the mode of occurrence indicate that the reduced carbon represents biogenic detritus, which was perhaps derived from planktonic organisms.

  10. Diffusive Separation of Noble Gases by adsorption and throat constrictions:Explaining Noble Gas patterns in Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torgersen, T.; Kennedy, B. M.; van Soest, M. C.

    2002-12-01

    Literature reports of noble gas patterns in sedimentary rocks indicate a commonplace occurrence of both Xe- and Ne-enriched endmembers, which occur either separately or together. Laboratory experiments have shown that noble gases appear to rapidly and weakly physi-adsorb on natural rock material. However, the weak physi-adsorption bond quickly changes to a strong chemi-sorption mode, such that adsorption at low temperature requires a higher temperature to extract the adsorbed component. This suggests that mechanisms are operational in sedimentary rocks that appear to first adsorb and then trap noble gases. More recently, based on measurements of both Xe- and Ne-enrichment in fluids from hydrocarbon systems, it has been suggested that the light and heavy noble gas enrichments occur in the fluid due to direct transfer of noble gas enrichments from the reservoir and/or source rock to the fluid with a subsequent evolution of the fluid. We present a simple model, based on labyrinth-with-constrictions (e.g. Wacker et al., 1986), to explain noble gas enrichment patterns in sedimentary rock that does not require any special process and/or unusual conditions yet provides zeroth order explanations for noble enrichments, trapping and geologic release from/to terrestrial rocks. Using estimates of the relative (1) diffusion coefficients, (2) adsorption coefficients and (3) probabilities for noble gas passage through a constricted throat (all functions of atomic mass), we find the above three properties of noble gases combine to allow a diffusive separation of Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe with a change in boundary condition. This simple theory is consistent with literature reported noble gas enrichment and concentrations in sedimentary rocks. Xe enrichments can be produced as a residual in rock following a decrease in exterior noble gas concentration; Ne enrichments can be produced by an increase in exterior noble gas concentration. The time scale for separation is governed by the above

  11. Middle Miocene-early Pliocene paleo-oceanic environment of Japan Sea deduced from geochemical features of sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, S.; Shikazono, N.; Kashiwagi, H.; Nohara, M.

    2004-02-01

    Chemical and isotopic compositions (Sr isotopic ratio, major elements, trace elements, rare earth elements, total carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur contents) of rock samples collected from middle Miocene to early Pliocene sedimentary rocks on the Oga Peninsula, northern Japan, were analyzed to elucidate the paleo-oceanic environment of the Japan Sea. The rocks studied were shales from the Nishikurosawa, Onnagawa and Funakawa formations in stratigraphically ascending order. The Onnagawa sedimentary rocks in the lower (ca. 12.6-11.4 Ma), middle (ca. 10.6-9.0 Ma) and upper (ca. 8.3-7.0 Ma) horizons have high Mo/Al, Ni/Al, and Ba/Al ratios and high total organic carbon as well as high K/Ti and 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios and a positive Eu anomaly. These geochemical variations imply high primary productivity, and reducing conditions indicative of a deep paleo-ocean. The formation of petroleum source rocks on these horizons is attributed to increasing of nutrient delivery from the terrigenous system, which may have been induced by strong wind from Asian continent related to the uplift of Himalayan and Tibetan regions.

  12. Geology and geochemistry of three sedimentary-rock-hosted disseminated gold deposits in Guizhou Province, People's Republic of China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ashley, R.P.; Cunningham, C.G.; Bostick, N.H.; Dean, W.E.; Chou, I.-Ming

    1991-01-01

    Five sedimentary-rock-hosted disseminated gold deposits have been discovered since 1980 in southwestern Guizhou Province (PRC). Submicron-sized gold is disseminated in silty carbonate and carbonaceous shale host rocks of Permian and Triassic age. Arsenic, antimony, mercury, and thallium accompany the gold. Associated hydrothermal alteration resulted in decarbonatization of limestone, silicification, and argillization, and depletion of base metals, barium, and many other elements. Organic material occurs in most host rocks and ores. It was apparently devolatilized during a regional heating event that preceded hydrothermal activity, and thus was not mobilized during mineralization, and did not affect gold deposition. The geologic setting of the Guizhou deposits includes many features that are similar to those of sedimentary-rock-hosted deposits of the Great Basin, western United States. The heavy-element suite that accompanies gold is the same, but base metals are even scarcer in the Guizhou deposits than they are in U.S. deposits. The Guizhou deposits discovered to date are smaller than most U.S. deposits and have no known spatially associated igneous rocks. ?? 1991.

  13. Geophysical modeling of the structural relationships between the Precambrian Reading Prong rocks and the Paleozoic sedimentary sequence, Easton quadrangle, PA

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, D.M.; Malinconico, L.L. Jr. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    This project involves the geophysical modeling of the structural relationships between the Precambrian Reading Prong rocks and the Paleozoic sedimentary cover rocks near Easton, Pennsylvania. The Precambrian rocks have generally been assumed to have been emplaced on the Paleozoic sequence along a shallow thrust fault. However, at present time the attitude of the faults bordering the Precambrian terranes are all very steeply dipping. This was explained by the subsequent folding of the whole sequence during later orogenic activity. The objective of this work is to determine the attitude and depth of the fault contact between the Precambrian crystalline rocks and the Paleozoic sedimentary rocks. A series of traverses (each separated by approximately one mile) were established perpendicular to the strike of the Precambrian rocks. Along each traverse both gravity and magnetic readings were taken at 0.2 kilometer intervals. The data were reduced and presented as profiles and contour maps. Both the magnetic and gravity data show positive anomalies that correlate spatially with the location of the Precambrian rocks. The gravity data have a long wavelength regional trend increasing to the north with a shorter wavelength anomaly of 2 milligals which coincides with the Precambrian rocks. The magnetic data have a single positive anomaly of almost 1,000 gammas which also coincides with the Precambrian terrane. These data will now be used to develop two dimensional density and susceptibility models of the area. From these models, the thickness of each formation and the structural relationships between them, as well as the attitude and depth of the fault contact will be determined.

  14. New approaches in the indirect quantification of thermal rock properties in sedimentary basins: the well-log perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Sven; Balling, Niels; Förster, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Numerical temperature models generated for geodynamic studies as well as for geothermal energy solutions heavily depend on rock thermal properties. Best practice for the determination of those parameters is the measurement of rock samples in the laboratory. Given the necessity to enlarge databases of subsurface rock parameters beyond drill core measurements an approach for the indirect determination of these parameters is developed, for rocks as well a for geological formations. We present new and universally applicable prediction equations for thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and specific heat capacity in sedimentary rocks derived from data provided by standard geophysical well logs. The approach is based on a data set of synthetic sedimentary rocks (clastic rocks, carbonates and evaporates) composed of mineral assemblages with variable contents of 15 major rock-forming minerals and porosities varying between 0 and 30%. Petrophysical properties are assigned to both the rock-forming minerals and the pore-filling fluids. Using multivariate statistics, relationships then were explored between each thermal property and well-logged petrophysical parameters (density, sonic interval transit time, hydrogen index, volume fraction of shale and photoelectric absorption index) on a regression sub set of data (70% of data) (Fuchs et al., 2015). Prediction quality was quantified on the remaining test sub set (30% of data). The combination of three to five well-log parameters results in predictions on the order of <15% for thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity, and of <10% for specific heat capacity. Comparison of predicted and benchmark laboratory thermal conductivity from deep boreholes of the Norwegian-Danish Basin, the North German Basin, and the Molasse Basin results in 3 to 5% larger uncertainties with regard to the test data set. With regard to temperature models, the use of calculated TC borehole profiles approximate measured temperature logs with an

  15. Identification and characterization of yeasts isolated from sedimentary rocks of Union Glacier at the Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Barahona, Salvador; Yuivar, Yassef; Socias, Gabriel; Alcaíno, Jennifer; Cifuentes, Víctor; Baeza, Marcelo

    2016-07-01

    The study of the yeasts that inhabit cold environments, such as Antarctica, is an active field of investigation oriented toward understanding their ecological roles in these ecosystems. In a great part, the interest in cold-adapted yeasts is due to several industrial and biotechnological applications that have been described for them. The aim of this work was to isolate and identify yeasts from sedimentary rock samples collected at the Union Glacier, Antarctica. Furthermore, the yeasts were physiologically characterized, including the production of metabolites of biotechnological interest. The yeasts isolated that were identified at the molecular level belonged to genera Collophora (1 isolate), Cryptococcus (2 isolates), Sporidiobolus (4 isolates), Sporobolomyces (1 isolate) and Torrubiella (2 isolates). The majority of yeasts were basidiomycetous and psychrotolerant. By cross-test assays for anti-yeast activity, it was determined that Collophora sp., Sporidiobolus salmonicolor, and Sporobolomyces roseus secreted a protein factor that kills Sporidiobolus metaroseus. The colored yeasts Sp. salmonicolor, Sp. metaroseus and Collophora sp. produced several carotenoid pigments that were identified as 2,3 dihydroxy-γ-carotene, -carotene, 4-ketotorulene, torulene β-cryptoxanthin and spirilloxanthin. Concerning analysis of mycosporines, these metabolites were only found in the yeasts Torrubiella sp. and Cryptococcus sp. T11-10-1. Furthermore, the yeasts were evaluated for the production of extracellular hydrolytic activities. Of the twelve activities analyzed, alkaline phosphatase, invertase, gelatinase, cellulase, amylase, and protease enzyme activities were detected. The yeasts Cryptococcus sp. T11-10-1 and Sporidiobolus metaroseus showed the highest number of different enzyme activities.

  16. Contact line extraction and length measurements in model sediments and sedimentary rocks.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Elena; Prodanović, Maša; Bryant, Steven L

    2012-02-15

    The mechanisms that govern the transport of colloids in the unsaturated zone of soils are still poorly understood, because of the complexity of processes that occur at pore scale. These mechanisms are of specific interest in quantifying water quality with respect to pathogen transport (e.g. Escherichia coli, Cryptosporidium) between the source (e.g. farms) and human users. Besides straining in pore throats and constrictions of smaller or equivalent size, the colloids can be retained at the interfaces between air, water, and grains. Theories competing to explain this mechanism claim that retention can be caused by adhesion at the air-water-interface (AWI) between sediment grains or by straining at the air-water-solid (AWS) contact line. Currently, there are no established methods for the estimation of pathogen retention in unsaturated media because of the intricate influence of AWI and AWS on transport and retention. What is known is that the geometric configuration and connectivity of the aqueous phase is an important factor in unsaturated transport. In this work we develop a computational method based on level set functions to identify and quantify the AWS contact line (in general the non-wetting-wetting-solid contact line) in any porous material. This is the first comprehensive report on contact line measurement for fluid configurations from both level-set method based fluid displacement simulation and imaged experiments. The method is applicable to any type of porous system, as long as the detailed pore scale geometry is available. We calculated the contact line length in model sediments (packs of spheres) as well as in real porous media, whose geometry is taken from high-resolution images of glass bead packs and sedimentary rocks. We observed a strong dependence of contact line length on the geometry of the sediment grains and the arrangement of the air and water phases. These measurements can help determine the relative contribution of the AWS line to pathogen

  17. Quantification of a greenhouse hydrologic cycle from equatorial to polar latitudes: The mid-Cretaceous water bearer revisited

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Suarez, M.B.; Gonzalez, Luis A.; Ludvigson, Greg A.

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the global hydrologic cycle during the mid-Cretaceous greenhouse by utilizing the oxygen isotopic composition of pedogenic carbonates (calcite and siderite) as proxies for the oxygen isotopic composition of precipitation. The data set builds on the Aptian-Albian sphaerosiderite ??18O data set presented by Ufnar et al. (2002) by incorporating additional low latitude data including pedogenic and early meteoric diagenetic calcite ??18O. Ufnar et al. (2002) used the proxy data derived from the North American Cretaceous Western Interior Basin (KWIB) in a mass balance model to estimate precipitation-evaporation fluxes. We have revised this mass balance model to handle sphaerosiderite and calcite proxies, and to account for longitudinal travel by tropical air masses. We use empirical and general circulation model (GCM) temperature gradients for the mid-Cretaceous, and the empirically derived ??18O composition of groundwater as constraints in our mass balance model. Precipitation flux, evaporation flux, relative humidity, seawater composition, and continental feedback are adjusted to generate model calculated groundwater ??18O compositions (proxy for precipitation ??18O) that match the empirically-derived groundwater ??18O compositions to within ??0.5???. The model is calibrated against modern precipitation data sets.Four different Cretaceous temperature estimates were used: the leaf physiognomy estimates of Wolfe and Upchurch (1987) and Spicer and Corfield (1992), the coolest and warmest Cretaceous estimates compiled by Barron (1983) and model outputs from the GENESIS-MOM GCM by Zhou et al. (2008). Precipitation and evaporation fluxes for all the Cretaceous temperature gradients utilized in the model are greater than modern precipitation and evaporation fluxes. Balancing the model also requires relative humidity in the subtropical dry belt to be significantly reduced. As expected calculated precipitation rates are all greater than modern

  18. La-Ce and Sm-Nd systematics of siliceous sedimentary rocks: A clue to marine environment in their deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Hiroshi Shimizu; Masayo Amano; Akimasa Masuda )

    1991-04-01

    La-Ce isotopic data, together with Sm-Nd isotopic data, were determined on siliceous sedimentary rocks (cherts) in order to elucidate the rare earth element (REE) character of their sources and the nature of their depositional environments. The cherts studied are a late Archean chert from the Gorge Creek Group in the Pilbara block of Western Australia, Triassic cherts from central Japan, and Cretaceous and Paleogene deep-sea cherts from the central Pacific and the Caribbean Sea. The Archean chert from the Gorge Creek Group shows chondritic Ce and Nd isotope ratios at its sedimentation age which indicate that its sources had a time-integrated chondritic REE pattern. Triassic cherts from Japan have initial Ce and Nd isotope ratios that show a direct derivation from their continental source. On the other hand, for Cretaceous and Paleogene deep-sea cherts having negative Ce anomalies in their REE patterns, two different sources for Ce and Nd are revealed from their initial Ce and Nd isotope data: Ce from long-term light-REE-depleted oceanic volcanic rocks and Nd from light-REE-enriched continental rocks. The reverse nature observed for deep-sea cherts is considered to be a reflection of their depositional environment far from a continent. These results confirm that the La-Ce isotope system is highly useful in determining the nature and cause of Ce anomalies observed in marine sedimentary rocks such as chert.

  19. Distribution and environmental impacts of some radionuclides in sedimentary rocks at Wadi Naseib area, southwest Sinai, Egypt.

    PubMed

    El Galy, M M; El Mezayn, A M; Said, A F; El Mowafy, A A; Mohamed, M S

    2008-07-01

    The present study examines the natural radioactivity in some sedimentary rocks and their associated environmental impacts at Wadi Naseib area. Exposure rate (ER), dose rate (DR), radium equivalent activity (Ra(eq)), external hazard index (H(ex)), internal hazard index (H(in)) and radioactivity level index (I(gamma)) were calculated. Wadi Naseib area is covered with sedimentary rocks of early to late Paleozoic age. These rocks are classified into two types: mineralized and non-mineralized sediments. The radiometric investigations revealed that uranium and thorium contents reached up to 710 and 520 ppm, respectively, in the mineralized rocks. This was attributed to the presence of some secondary uranium minerals. All sediments had low values of eTh and K content. The exposure and dose rates exceeded public permissible values in the mineralized sediments. Exposure and dose rates were within the safety range for workers and the public in the non-mineralized sediments. The expected environmental impacts may be low due to the limited occurrence of U-mineralization and corresponding areas for radiation exposure. Some precautions and recommendations were suggested to avoid any possible environmental impacts from areas and/or raw materials of high intensity of natural radiation sources.

  20. Sealing shales versus brittle shales: A threshold in the properties and uses of fine-grained sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourg, I. C.

    2015-12-01

    Fine-grained sedimentary rocks (shale, mudstone) play important roles in global CO2 abatement efforts through their importance in carbon capture and storage (CCS), radioactive waste storage, and shale gas extraction. These different technologies rely on seemingly conflicting premises regarding the sealing properties of shale and mudstone, suggesting that fine-grained rocks that lend themselves to hydrocarbon extraction may not be optimal seals for CCS or radioactive waste storage, and vice versa. In this paper, a compilation of experimental data on the properties of well-characterized shale and mudstone formations is used to demonstrate that clay mineral mass fraction, Xclay, is a master variable that controls key material properties of these formations and that a remarkably sharp threshold at Xclay ~ 1/3 separates fine-grained rocks with very different properties. This threshold coincides with the predictions of a simple conceptual model of the microstructure of sedimentary rocks and is reflected in the applications of shale and mudstone formations for CCS, radioactive waste storage, and shale gas extraction.

  1. Rock Magnetic and Grain Size Variation Along A 50m Cretaceous Sedimentary Section of The Marilia Formation (bauru Basin), Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamrat, E.; Ernesto, M.; Watanabe, J.; Saad, A. R.; Fulfaro, V. J.

    We present a detailed rock magnetic investigation of a sedimentary section from the Marilia Formation of the Bauru Basin (22.22S, 49.96W), Brasil. Sampling was con- ducted over 0.5m interval of a 50m Late Cretaceous sedimentary deposit. The deposits are consists of coarse to conglomeratic sandstones with abundant calciferous cement and nodules. A total of 81 samples from 67 sites have carried out using hysteresis loop and thermomagnetic curves in order to identify the magnetic mineral and distribution of their grain-size. Trends in rock magnetic parameters with remanent saturation be- low 300mT and moderate coercivity of remanence are consistent with a contribution of Pseudo-single domain to small Multi-domain magnetite. High temperature exper- iments of the magnetic susceptibility up to 700C indicate abundant magnetite with minor contribution of titanomaghemite. Changes in hysteresis parameters are consis- tent with changes in the relative amounts of the different magnetite size fractions. On the basis of rock magnetic investigation, a sample of the Marilia Formation appears to be a reliable recorder of the geomagnetic field during sediment deposition. Their straightforward mineralogy and minimal changes in magnetic concentration consti- tute an opportunity to examine not only rock magnetic and grain size variation, but directional changes and magnetostratigraphy data as well.

  2. Extensional deformation of the Guadalquivir Basin: rate of WSW-ward tectonic displacement from Upper Tortonian sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldán, Francisco J.; Azañón, Jose Miguel; Rodríguez-Fernández, Jose; María Mateos, Rosa

    2016-04-01

    The Guadalquivir Basin (Upper Tortonian-Quaternary sedimentary infilling) has been considered the foreland basin of the Betic Orogen built up during its collision with the Sudiberian margin. The basin is currently restricted to its westernmost sector, in the Cadiz Gulf, because the Neogene-Quaternary uplift of the Betic Cordillera has produced the emersion of their central and eastern parts. The upper Tortonian chronostratigraphic unit is the oldest one and it was indistinctly deposited on the South Iberian paleomargin and the External units from the Betic Cordillera. However, these rocks are undeformed on the Sudiberian paleomargin while they are deeply affected by brittle deformation on the External Betic Zone. Outcrops of Upper Tortonian sedimentary rocks on External Betic Zone are severely fragmented showing allocthonous characters with regard to those located on the Sudiberian paleomargin. This post- Upper Tortonian deformation is not well known in the External Zones of the Cordillera where the most prominent feature is the ubiquity of a highly deformed tecto-sedimentary unit outcropping at the basement of the Guadalquivir sedimentary infilling. This tecto-sedimentary unit belongs to the Mass Wasting Extensional Complex (Rodríguez-Fernández, 2014) formed during the collision and westward migration of the Internal Zone of the Betic Cordillera (15-8,5 Ma). In the present work, we show an ensemble of tectonic, geophysical and cartographic data in order to characterize the post-Upper Tortonian deformation. For this, seismic reflection profiles have been interpreted with the help of hidrocarbon boreholes to define the thickness of the Upper Tortonian sedimentary sequence. All these data provide an estimation of the geometrical and kinematic characteristics of the extensional faults, direction of movement and rate of displacement of these rocks during Messinian/Pliocene times. References Rodríguez-Fernández, J., Roldan, F. J., J.M. Azañón y Garcia-Cortes, A

  3. Mid-Cretaceous transtension in the Canadian Cordillera: Evidence from the Rocky Ridge volcanics of the Skeena Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassett, Kari N.; Kleinspehn, Karen L.

    1996-08-01

    The age relations, geochemistry, and sedimentology of the Rocky Ridge Formation of the Skeena Group are used to test competing tectonic reconstructions for the mid-Cretaceous Canadian Cordillera as well as the timing and location of the accretion of the Insular Superterrane. Pollen and macrofossil assemblages indicate that these intrabasinal basalts were erupted along the southern margin of the Bowser basin in the Early Albian to Early Cenomanian. Single-crystal fusion and step-heating 40Ar/39Ar dating of hornblendes in one basalt flow from the uppermost part of the formation yielded Middle Cenomanian ages of 94.3 ± 0.4, 95.6 ± 1.6, and 95.0 ± 1.6 Ma. Vesicular basalt flows interbedded with crystal-rich tuff breccias contain evidence for hot emplacement as pyroclastic flows. Individual eruptive centers are identified by their proximal facies, paleoflow indicators within the lava flows, paleoflow indicators within interbedded volcaniclastic fluvial deposits, geochemical differences, and geographic isolation of volcanic deposits. Major and trace-element geochemistry from 20 sampled lava flows indicates an alkali basalt composition for the volcanics. The basalts of the northern Rocky Ridge volcanic center show enrichment of light rare earth and large ion lithophile elements with strong negative Nb-Ta anomalies whereas the basalts of the southern Tahtsa Lake volcanic center show depletion to slight enrichment of light rare earth elements, slight enrichment of large ion lithophile elements with minimal negative Nb-Ta anomalies. The geochemistry combined with paleogeographic and regional tectonic reconstruction suggests a continental arc setting with intraarc extension. The presence of deeper marine facies to the west and the lack of a western sediment source in the Skeena Group indicate that the technically active Insular Superterrane was not west of the study area during mid-Cretaceous time. Thus we reconsider the Omineca Belt as the main axis of a mid-Cretaceous

  4. Some geochemical features of Caledonian volcanism recorded in sedimentary rocks of the East Baltic area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soesoo, Alvar; Kiipli, Tarmo; Kallaste, Toivo

    2013-04-01

    The Caledonian rocks have formed as a result of a multitude of magmatic and tectonic processes. All these major processes have generated a set of volcanic and magmatic products. While products of intrusive magmatism can still be well recognised in Caledonian mountains, some of the volcanic products can be found in a wide area of the Baltica paleocontinent. The best record of the ancient explosive volcanism can be traced in sedimentary sections adjacent to tectonically active areas. The aim of this study is to describe geochemical evolution of the volcanism near the Baltica plate using bulk geochemistry and phenocryst compositions of the Caledonian volcanic ashes stored in the Lower Palaeozoic sections of the Eastern Baltica. The bentonite samples were collected from several drill cores from Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania. Thickness of the ash beds varies mostly between 0.1 and 10 cm, rarely reaching 20-70 cm. Constructed isopach schemes indicate increase of thickness of ash beds towards the northwest and west. Original sanidine composition in ca 400 samples and biotite from 13 ash beds were analysed from grain fraction of bentonites using X-ray diffractometry. Stratigraphical distribution of volcanic ash beds in the East Baltic area can be subdivided into four major intervals separated by intervals with less frequent signs of volcanism. The above intervals show characteristic geochemical signatures. Over 175 thin altered volcanic ash beds have been recognised by authors in the East Baltic sedimentary sections from the Upper Ordovician (ca. 458 Ma) to the Upper Silurian (ca. 421 Ma). There separate ash units may correspond to distinct volcanic eruptions in Caledonides. Volcanic ashes which reached the East Baltic area fall into four time periods (time intervals distinguished by micro-paleontological methods): (1) Sandbian with main sources at the margins of the Avalonian microcontinent; (2) Katian with sources at the margin of the Baltica in Iapetus Palaeo

  5. Changes in Mineralogy, Microstructure, Compressive Strength and Intrinsic Permeability of Two Sedimentary Rocks Subjected to High-Temperature Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xianfeng; Yuan, Shengyang; Sieffert, Yannick; Fityus, Stephen; Buzzi, Olivier

    2016-08-01

    This study falls in the context of underground coal fires where burning coal can elevate the temperature of a rock mass in excess of 1000°. The objective of the research is to experimentally characterize the change in mechanical behaviour, mineralogy and microstructural texture of two sedimentary rocks when subjected to temperatures up to 1200 °C for 24 h. Specimens of local sandstone and mudstone were comprehensively characterized by X-ray diffraction and thermal-gravimetric analysis. These analyses were complemented by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy on polished thin sections. In addition, pore size distributions of these heated rocks were inferred by means of mercury intrusion porosimetry. These results were extended to an estimation of the intrinsic permeability using the Katz-Thompson model. Investigations at micro scale were followed by mechanical testing (both unconfined and confined compression tests) on cylindrical specimens of heated rocks. Results show that the unconfined compressive strength (UCS) of both rock types tends to increase when the temperatures increases up to 900 °C, beyond which the UCS tends to slightly decrease. As for the permeability, a clear increase in intrinsic permeability was observed for both rocks. The macroscopic behaviour was found to be fully consistent with the changes observed at micro scale.

  6. Classes of organic molecules targeted by a methanogenic microbial consortium grown on sedimentary rocks of various maturities.

    PubMed

    Meslé, Margaux; Dromart, Gilles; Haeseler, Frank; Oger, Philippe M

    2015-01-01

    Organic-rich shales are populated by methanogenic consortia that are able to degrade the fossilized organic matter into methane gas. To identify the organic fraction effectively degraded, we have sequentially depleted two types of organic-rich sedimentary rocks, shale, and coal, at two different maturities, by successive solvent extractions to remove the most soluble fractions (maltenes and asphaltenes) and isolate kerogen. We show the ability of the consortia to produce methane from all rock samples, including those containing the most refractory organic matter, i.e., the kerogen. Shales yielded higher methane production than lignite and coal. Mature rocks yielded more methane than immature rocks. Surprisingly, the efficiency of the consortia was not influenced by the removal of the easily biodegradable fractions contained in the maltenes and asphaltenes. This suggests that one of the limitations of organic matter degradation in situ may be the accessibility to the carbon and energy source. Indeed, bitumen has a colloidal structure that may prevent the microbial consortia from reaching the asphaltenes in the bulk rock. Solvent extractions might favor the access to asphaltenes and kerogen by modifying the spatial organization of the molecules in the rock matrix.

  7. Classes of organic molecules targeted by a methanogenic microbial consortium grown on sedimentary rocks of various maturities

    PubMed Central

    Meslé, Margaux; Dromart, Gilles; Haeseler, Frank; Oger, Philippe M.

    2015-01-01

    Organic-rich shales are populated by methanogenic consortia that are able to degrade the fossilized organic matter into methane gas. To identify the organic fraction effectively degraded, we have sequentially depleted two types of organic-rich sedimentary rocks, shale, and coal, at two different maturities, by successive solvent extractions to remove the most soluble fractions (maltenes and asphaltenes) and isolate kerogen. We show the ability of the consortia to produce methane from all rock samples, including those containing the most refractory organic matter, i.e., the kerogen. Shales yielded higher methane production than lignite and coal. Mature rocks yielded more methane than immature rocks. Surprisingly, the efficiency of the consortia was not influenced by the removal of the easily biodegradable fractions contained in the maltenes and asphaltenes. This suggests that one of the limitations of organic matter degradation in situ may be the accessibility to the carbon and energy source. Indeed, bitumen has a colloidal structure that may prevent the microbial consortia from reaching the asphaltenes in the bulk rock. Solvent extractions might favor the access to asphaltenes and kerogen by modifying the spatial organization of the molecules in the rock matrix. PMID:26136731

  8. The character and significance of basement rocks of the southern Molucca Sea region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Robert; Nichols, Gary; Ballantyne, Paul; Charlton, Tim; Ali, Jason

    Pre-Neogene basement rocks in the southern Molucca Sea region include ophiolitic rocks, arc volcanic rocks and continental rocks. The ophiolitic complexes are associated with arc and forearc igneous and sedimentary rocks. They are interpreted as the oldest parts of the Philippine Sea Plate with equivalents in the ridges and plateaux of the northern Philippine Sea. In the Molucca Sea region igneous components include rocks with a "supra-subduction zone" character, bonintic volcanic rocks and basic volcanic rocks with a "within-plate" character; "MORB-type" rocks are rare or absent. The ophiolitic rocks are overlain by Upper Cretaceous and Eocene sedimentary and volcanic rocks. Plutonic rocks of island arc origin which intrude the ophiolites yield Late Cretaceous radiometric ages and amphibolites with ophiolitic protoliths yield Eocene ages. The "supra-subduction zone" ophiolites are speculated to have originated during a mid-Cretaceous plate reorganization event. For the Late Cretaceous and Eocene the present-day Marianas arc and forearc provides an attractive model. Volcanic rocks from the basement of Morotai, western Halmahera and much of Bacan. These also have an island arc character and are probably of Late Cretaceous-Paleogene age. Both the arc volcanic rocks and the ophiolitic complexes are overlain by shallow water Eocene limestones and an Oligocene rift sequence including basaltic pillow lavas and volcaniclastic turbidites. The distribution of the Eocene-Oligocene sequences indicate pre-Mid/Late Eocene amalgamation of the ophiolitic and arc terranes. Mid Eocene-Oligocene extension appears to be synchronous with opening of the central West Philippine Basin. Continental crust probably arrived in this region in the Late Paleogene-Early Neogene, either due to collision of the Australian margin with Pacific arc-ophiolite terranes or by terrane movement along the Sorong Fault Zone.

  9. Chromium isotopes in siliciclastic sediments and sedimentary rocks as a proxy for Earth surface redox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhard, C. T.; Planavsky, N. J.; Wang, X.; Owens, J. D.; Johnson, T. M.; Fischer, W. W.; Lyons, T. W.

    2013-12-01

    Chromium (Cr) isotopes are an emerging and potentially promising proxy for tracking redox processes at Earth's surface. However, recent efforts to reconstruct the Cr isotope record through time have primarily focused on sporadically deposited iron-rich chemical sediments, with large temporal gaps and limited capacity to explore the Cr isotope record relative to modern and recent marine processes. However, the basic inorganic chemistry of Cr suggests that anoxic marine basins factor prominently in the global Cr cycle, and that likewise sediments deposited within anoxic basins may offer an unexplored Cr isotope archive throughout Earth's history. We present authigenic δ53Cr data from sediments of the Cariaco Basin, Venezuela--a ';type' environment on the modern Earth for large, perennially anoxic basins with relatively strong hydrological connections to the global ocean. Combined with currently available constraints on the δ53Cr composition of modern Atlantic seawater, these data are consistent with the hypothesis that anoxic marine basins can serve as a chemical archive of the first-order features of seawater δ53Cr variation. We employ a simple quantitative model to explore the implications of this hypothesis for global Cr isotope mass balance and the possible utility of authigenic δ53Cr in anoxically deposited siliciclastic sediments and sedimentary rocks as a global paleoredox proxy. Our focus is a basic analysis of the primary controls on seawater δ53Cr as related to both the marine redox landscape and the processes involved in the weathering and aqueous-particulate transport of Cr at Earth's surface. As a case study, we provide analysis of new bulk δ53Cr data through a Cretaceous Oceanic Anoxic Event (OAE-2), which shows a well-defined ~1.0‰ negative excursion during the event coupled with evidence for a drawdown of the marine Cr reservoir. We present a conceptual model to explain these observations, and interpret this shift to suggest a shutdown of

  10. Annual and Longer Sedimentary Rhythms of the Organic Rock Record of Titan's Circumpolar Seas and Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargel, J. S.; Tan, S. P.; Marion, G. M.; Jennings, D. E.; Mastrogiuseppe, M.; Adidharma, H.

    2014-12-01

    Seasonality and phase equilibrium in Titan's lakes and seas will result in predictable sedimentary processes, deposits, and landforms. Calculated using CRYOCHEM, liquids on Titan should exhibit a counter-intuitive behavior where density increases with temperature but decreases with pressure, unless the temperature falls below 89.6 K. For warmer temperatures, the surface liquid of seas should flow toward the hottest spot; return flow may occur beneath the surface. Methane-rich liquid flowing southward from one interconnected northern sea to another will evaporate methane and concentrate ethane and other heavy hydrocarbons. In the north polar and circumpolar regions, a south-flowing river entering a sea from cold northerly uplands will inject a buoyant plume of low-density methane-rich liquid into the sea, unless the liquid at the inlet is heavily charged with dense solid phases or unless the lake is colder than 89.6 K. Generally north of (colder than) the seasonally shifting 89.6K transition (possible during the winter precisely when river discharges are high), a different behavior exists, whereby cold and methane-rich liquid forms denser liquids and flows across the bottom of the sea—possibly forming sub-sea channels as observed at Ligeia Mare. If the river carries clastic sediment denser than the methane liquid, the solids will undergo Stokes settling of the coarser fractions during periods of high river discharge, leaving the finest clastic fraction to undergo slow pelagic sedimentation throughout the year. From late spring to late summer, methane undergoes net evaporation from the sea, and solid organics that were saturated during the winter are likely to precipitate once warm weather starts. Hence, varves in Titan's seas are apt to consist of annual cycles of (1) winter: coarse clastics, (2) all dry season: fine-grained clastics, and (3) summer: evaporites. As Titan undergoes 'Milankovic' type variations in rotational obliquity and Saturn's orbital

  11. The first deep heat flow determination in crystalline basement rocks beneath the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majorowicz, Jacek; Chan, Judith; Crowell, James; Gosnold, Will; Heaman, Larry M.; Kück, Jochem; Nieuwenhuis, Greg; Schmitt, Douglas R.; Unsworth, Martyn; Walsh, Nathaniel; Weides, Simon

    2014-05-01

    Heat flow (Q) determined from bottom-hole temperatures measured in oil and gas wells in Alberta show a large scatter with values ranging from 40 to 90 mW m-2. Only two precise measurements of heat flow were previously reported in Alberta, and were made more than half a century ago. These were made in wells located near Edmonton, Alberta, and penetrated the upper kilometre of clastic sedimentary rocks yielding heat flows values of 61 and 67 mW m-2 (Garland & Lennox). Here, we report a new precise heat flow determination from a 2363-m deep well drilled into basement granite rocks just west of Fort McMurray, Alberta (the Hunt Well). Temperature logs acquired in 2010-2011 show a significant increase in the thermal gradient in the granite due to palaeoclimatic effects. In the case of the Hunt Well, heat flow at depths >2200 m is beyond the influence of the glacial-interglacial surface temperatures. Thermal conductivity and temperature measurements in the Hunt Well have shown that the heat flow below 2.2 km is 51 mW m-2 (±3 mW m-2), thermal conductivity measured by the divided bar method under bottom of the well in situ like condition is 2.5 W m-1 K-1, and 2.7 W m-1 K-1 in ambient conditions), and the geothermal gradient was measured as 20.4 mK m-1. The palaeoclimatic effect causes an underestimate of heat flow derived from measurements collected at depths shallower than 2200 m, meaning other heat flow estimates calculated from basin measurements have likely been underestimated. Heat production (A) was calculated from spectral gamma recorded in the Hunt Well granites to a depth of 1880 m and give an average A of 3.4 and 2.9 μW m-3 for the whole depth range of granites down to 2263 m, based on both gamma and spectral logs. This high A explains the relatively high heat flow measured within the Precambrian basement intersected by the Hunt Well; the Taltson Magmatic Zone. Heat flow and related heat generation from the Hunt Well fits the heat flow-heat generation

  12. Geochemistry of Neogene sedimentary rocks from Borneo Basin, Malaysia: implications on paleo-weathering, provenance and tectonic setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasmay, N.; Roy, P.; MP, J.; Rufino, L.; Franz, L. K.; Viswanathan, P. M.

    2013-05-01

    Multi-element geochemistry and mineralogy are used to characterize the chemical composition, degree of paleo-weathering, provenance and tectonic settingsof the Neogene sedimentary rocks of Borneo Basin from east Malaysia. The sedimentary rocks are classified as extremely weathered sandstones (i.e. wacke, arkose, litharenite, Fe-sandstone and quartz arenite). Higher values of both weathering indices of alteration (i.e. CIA>83 and PIA>89) suggest that the sandstones have undergone extreme chemical weathering. Absence of any feldspar in the mineralogical analysis indicates its degradation during the weathering. Except for the quartz arenite, all other sandstones are characterized by post-depositional K-metasomatism and zircon enrichment through sediment recycling. The geochemical characteristics suggest a mixed-nature provenance for the sandstones with contribution coming from both felsic and mafic igneous rocks. Enriched Cr in quartz arenite and Fe-sandstone are related to contribution from ophiolite or fractionation of Cr-bearing minerals. The inferred tectonic settings are variable and suggest a complex nature of tectonic environment in the basin.

  13. Chemical variations in Yellowknife Bay formation sedimentary rocks analyzed by ChemCam on board the Curiosity rover on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangold, N.; Forni, O.; Dromart, G.; Stack, K.; Wiens, R. C.; Gasnault, O.; Sumner, D. Y.; Nachon, M.; Meslin, P.-Y.; Anderson, R. B.; Barrachough, B.; Bell, J. F., III; Berger, G.; Blaney, D. L.; Bridges, J. C.; Calef, F.; Clark, B.; Clegg, S. M.; Cousin, A.; Edgar, L.; Edgett, K.; Ehlmann, B.; Fabre, C.; Fisk, M.; Grotzinger, J.; Gupta, S.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Hurowitz, J.; Johnson, J. R.; Kah, L. C.; Lanza, N.; Lasue, J.; Le Mouélic, S.; Léveillé, R.; Lewin, E.; Malin, N.; McLennan, S.; Maurice, S.; Melikechi, N.; Mezzacappa, A.; Milliken, R.; Newsom, H.; Allila, A.; Rowland, S. K.; Sautter, V.; Schmidt, M.; Schröder, S.; d'Uston, C.; Vaniman, D.; Williams, R.

    2015-03-01

    The Yellowknife Bay formation represents a ~5 m thick stratigraphic section of lithified fluvial and lacustrine sediments analyzed by the Curiosity rover in Gale crater, Mars. Previous works have mainly focused on the mudstones that were drilled by the rover at two locations. The present study focuses on the sedimentary rocks stratigraphically above the mudstones by studying their chemical variations in parallel with rock textures. Results show that differences in composition correlate with textures and both manifest subtle but significant variations through the stratigraphic column. Though the chemistry of the sediments does not vary much in the lower part of the stratigraphy, the variations in alkali elements indicate variations in the source material and/or physical sorting, as shown by the identification of alkali feldspars. The sandstones contain similar relative proportions of hydrogen to the mudstones below, suggesting the presence of hydrous minerals that may have contributed to their cementation. Slight variations in magnesium correlate with changes in textures suggesting that diagenesis through cementation and dissolution modified the initial rock composition and texture simultaneously. The upper part of the stratigraphy (~1 m thick) displays rocks with different compositions suggesting a strong change in the depositional system. The presence of float rocks with similar compositions found along the rover traverse suggests that some of these outcrops extend further away in the nearby hummocky plains.

  14. Chemical variations in Yellowknife Bay formation sedimentary rocks analyzed by ChemCam on board the Curiosity rover on Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mangold, Nicolas; Forni, Olivier; Dromart, G.; Stack, K.M.; Wiens, Roger C.; Gasnault, Olivier; Sumner, Dawn Y.; Nachon, Marion; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Anderson, Ryan B.; Barraclough, Bruce; Bell, J.F.; Berger, G.; Blaney, D.L.; Bridges, J.C.; Calef, F.; Clark, Brian R.; Clegg, Samuel M.; Cousin, Agnes; Edgar, L.; Edgett, Kenneth S.; Ehlmann, B.L.; Fabre, Cecile; Fisk, M.; Grotzinger, John P.; Gupta, S.C.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.; Hurowitz, J.A.; Johnson, J. R.; Kah, Linda C.; Lanza, Nina L.; Lasue, Jeremie; Le Mouélic, S.; Lewin, Eric; Malin, Michael; McLennan, Scott M.; Maurice, S.; Melikechi, Noureddine; Mezzacappa, Alissa; Milliken, Ralph E.; Newsome, H.L.; Ollila, A.; Rowland, Scott K.; Sautter, Violaine; Schmidt, M.E.; Schroder, S.; D'Uston, C.; Vaniman, Dave; Williams, R.A.

    2015-01-01

    The Yellowknife Bay formation represents a ~5 m thick stratigraphic section of lithified fluvial and lacustrine sediments analyzed by the Curiosity rover in Gale crater, Mars. Previous works have mainly focused on the mudstones that were drilled by the rover at two locations. The present study focuses on the sedimentary rocks stratigraphically above the mudstones by studying their chemical variations in parallel with rock textures. Results show that differences in composition correlate with textures and both manifest subtle but significant variations through the stratigraphic column. Though the chemistry of the sediments does not vary much in the lower part of the stratigraphy, the variations in alkali elements indicate variations in the source material and/or physical sorting, as shown by the identification of alkali feldspars. The sandstones contain similar relative proportions of hydrogen to the mudstones below, suggesting the presence of hydrous minerals that may have contributed to their cementation. Slight variations in magnesium correlate with changes in textures suggesting that diagenesis through cementation and dissolution modified the initial rock composition and texture simultaneously. The upper part of the stratigraphy (~1 m thick) displays rocks with different compositions suggesting a strong change in the depositional system. The presence of float rocks with similar compositions found along the rover traverse suggests that some of these outcrops extend further away in the nearby hummocky plains.

  15. Geochemistry and the Sm-Nd model age of sedimentary rocks from the lower horizon of the cover in the northeastern part of the West Siberian Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, K. S.; Ronkin, Yu. L.; Erokhin, Yu. V.; Pogromskaya, O. E.

    2017-07-01

    The pre-Jurassic basement and lower (Jurassic) horizons of the sedimentary cover in Hole Borovaya 6 were studied. Analysis of rare and rare-earth elements shows that Jurassic sedimentary rocks were most likely formed at the expense of erosion and mixing of heterogeneous materials, namely acid sources of the Siberian Platform and Triassic riftogenic basaltoids. The variations of 147Sm/144Nd (0.1076-0.1250) and 143Nd/144Nd (0.512202-0.512437), as well as the Sm-Nd model ages of Jurassic sediments (1146-1362 Ma), provide certain evidence for participation of the Mesoproterozoic substrate in the formation of the rocks studied. The Sm-Nd model age of pre-Jurassic rocks (1281 Ma) is Mesoproterozoic as well. The Precambrian crystalline basement of the Siberian Platform is a likely source of these sedimentary rocks.

  16. Thermochronology of mid-Cretaceous dioritic granulites adjacent "Big Bend" in Australia-Pacific plate boundary, northern South Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagar, M.; Seward, D.; Heizler, M. T.; Palin, J. M.; Toy, V. G.; Tulloch, A. J.

    2012-12-01

    The Western Fiordland Orthogneiss (WFO), situated south-east of the Australian-Pacific plate boundary (Alpine Fault), southern South Island, New Zealand is the largest suite of plutonic rocks intruded into the Pacific margin of Gondwana during the final stages of arc plutonism preceding break-up of the supercontinent in the Late Cretaceous. Dextral motion of c. 480 km along the Alpine Fault during the Cenozoic has offset originally contiguous Pacific Gondwana margin rocks in northern and southern South Island. The Glenroy Complex in northern South Island, west of the Alpine Fault is dominated by two-pyroxene+hornblende granulite facies monzodioritic gneisses. U-Pb zircon geochronological and geochemical data indicate the Glenroy Complex was emplaced between 128-122 Ma and is a correlative of the WFO. The Glenroy Complex forms the lower-most block bounded by an east-dipping set of imbricate thrusts that developed during the late Cenozoic to the west of the largest S-shaped restraining bend ("Big Bend") in the Alpine Fault. New 40Ar/39Ar and fission-track thermochronological data, combined with previous geological field-mapping, demonstrate that the Glenroy Complex cooled rapidly (c. 30° C/Ma) after emplacement and granulite facies metamorphism (c. 850°C) at c. 120 Ma, through c. 550 °C by c. 110-100 Ma. The average cooling rate during the Late Cretaceous-Cenozoic was relatively slow, and initial exposure in the late Early Miocene (c. 16 Ma) was followed by reburial to c. 3-4 km (c. 80-100 °C) before final exhumation post-Pliocene. This thermal history is similar to the WFO, which cooled rapidly through c. 350 °C during mid-Cretaceous continental extension, followed by slow cooling during the Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic until development of the Australian-Pacific boundary through New Zealand facilitated rapid, exhumation-related cooling from c. 240 °C at c. 20 Ma and final exhumation post-10 Ma (Davids, 1999). However, the Glenroy Complex cooled at a faster

  17. Modeling of laboratory experiments determining the chemico-osmotic, hydraulic and diffusion properties of sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, M.; Hiratsuka, T.; Ito, K.

    2008-12-01

    -osmotic properties of clay-rich materials have been demonstrated in laboratory experiments. However, it remains inconclusive whether chemical osmosis can retain the pressure disequilibrium and so influence groundwater flow in a geologic time scale. Therefore, systematic research involving field-scale investigations of pressure and salinity distributions and experimental estimations of the chemico-osmotic, hydraulic and diffusive properties of formation media is required. This study focuses on the development of a laboratory experimental system and the analytical solutions to estimate the chemico-osmotic, hydraulic and diffusive properties of formation media. The experimental system consists of a flexible-wall permeameter cell that loads confining pressures, along with a closed fluid circuit to perform osmotic, hydraulic and diffusion experiments under background fluid pressures. This experimental design enables simulating underground conditions at the depths required for safety assessments of geological waste disposal. The effectiveness of the experimental system and the analytical solutions are demonstrated with a set of osmotic, hydraulic and diffusion experiments performed using sedimentary rocks.

  18. Zinc and germanium in the sedimentary rocks of Gale Crater on Mars indicate hydrothermal enrichment followed by diagenetic fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Jeff A.; Schmidt, Mariek E.; Gellert, Ralf; Boyd, Nicholas I.; Desouza, Elstan D.; Flemming, Roberta L.; Izawa, Matthew R. M.; Ming, Douglas W.; Perrett, Glynis M.; Rampe, Elizabeth B.; Thompson, Lucy M.; VanBommel, Scott J. V.; Yen, Albert S.

    2017-08-01

    Zinc and germanium enrichments have been discovered in sedimentary rocks in Gale Crater, Mars, by the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer on the rover Curiosity. Concentrations of Zn (910 ± 840 ppm) and Ge (65 ± 58 ppm) are tens to hundreds of times greater than in Martian meteorites and estimates for average silicate Mars. Enrichments occur in diverse rocks including minimally to extensively altered basaltic and alkalic sedimentary rocks. The magnitude of the enrichments indicates hydrothermal fluids, but Curiosity has not discovered unambiguous hydrothermal mineral assemblages. We propose that Zn- and Ge-rich hydrothermal deposits in the source region were dispersed in siliciclastic sediments during transport into the crater. Subsequent diagenetic mobilization and fractionation of Zn and Ge is evident in a Zn-rich sandstone (Windjana; Zn 4000 ppm, Ge 85 ppm) and associated Cl-rich vein (Stephen; Zn 8000 ppm, Ge 60 ppm), in Ge-rich veins (Garden City; Zn 2200 ppm, Ge 650 ppm), and in silica-rich alteration haloes leached of Zn (30-200 ppm). In moderately to highly altered silica-rich rocks, Ge remained immobile relative to leached elements (Fe, Mn, Mg, and Ca), consistent with fluid interaction at pH ≪ 7. In contrast, crosscutting Ge-rich veins at Garden City suggest aqueous mobilization as Ge-F complexes at pH < 2.5. Multiple jarosite detections by the CheMin X-ray diffractometer and variable Zn concentrations indicate diagenesis of lower Mount Sharp bedrock under acidic conditions. The enrichment and fractionation of Zn and Ge constrains fluid events affecting Gale sediments and can aid in unraveling fluid histories as Curiosity's traverse continues.

  19. The Rio Tinto Basin, Spain: Mineralogy, Sedimentary Geobiology, and Implications for Interpretation of Outcrop Rocks at Meridiani Planum, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez-Remolar, David C.; Morris, Richard V.; Gruener, John E.; Amils, Ricardo; Knoll, Andrew H.

    2005-01-01

    Exploration by the NASA rover Opportunity has revealed sulfate- and hematite-rich sedimentary rocks exposed in craters and other surface features of Meridiani Planum, Mars. Modern, Holocene, and Plio-Pleistocene deposits of the Rio Tinto, southwestern Spain, provide at least a partial environmental analog to Meridiani Planum rocks, facilitating our understanding of Meridiani mineral precipitation and diagenesis, while informing considerations of martian astrobiology. Oxidation, thought to be biologically mediated, of pyritic ore bodies by groundwaters in the source area of the Rio Tinto generates headwaters enriched in sulfuric acid and ferric iron. Seasonal evaporation of river water drives precipitation of hydronium jarosite and schwertmannite, while (Mg,Al,Fe(sup 3+))-copiapite, coquimbite, gypsum, and other sulfate minerals precipitate nearby as efflorescences where locally variable source waters are brought to the surface by capillary action. During the wet season, hydrolysis of sulfate salts results in the precipitation of nanophase goethite. Holocene and Plio-Pleistocene terraces show increasing goethite crystallinity and then replacement of goethite with hematite through time. Hematite in Meridiani spherules also formed during diagenesis, although whether these replaced precursor goethite or precipitated directly from groundwaters is not known. The retention of jarosite and other soluble sulfate salts suggests that water limited the diagenesis of Meridiani rocks. Diverse prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms inhabit acidic and seasonally dry Rio Tinto environments. Organic matter does not persist in Rio Tinto sediments, but biosignatures imparted to sedimentary rocks as macroscopic textures of coated microbial streamers, surface blisters formed by biogenic gas, and microfossils preserved as casts and molds in iron oxides help to shape strategies for astrobiological investigation of Meridiani outcrops.

  20. Mid-Cretaceous Frontier Formation near the Moxa arch, southwestern Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Merewether, E.A.; Blackmon, P.D.; Webb, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    Stratigraphic data, paleontologic and petrographic information is presented for the Frontier Formation in the Green River Basin of Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado. In addition, interpretations concerning the areal extent and depositional origin of some strata within the formation are presented. Data indicate that most of the sampled shale units are thermally mature, in terms of oil generation, and some are probably source rocks for oil and gas. 12 figures, 11 tables.

  1. Geochemical and detrital mode evidence for two sources of Early Proterozoic sedimentary rocks from the Tonto Basin Supergroup, central Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condie, Kent C.; Noll, Phillip D.; Conway, Clay M.

    1992-04-01

    The Tonto Basin Supergroup includes up to 6.5 km of Early Proterozoic sedimentary and volcanic rocks that were deposited in a relatively short period of time at about 1.7 Ga in central Arizona. Moderate correlations of rare earth elements (REE) and Ti with Al 2O 3 and REE distributions in detrital sediments of this supergroup suggest that these elements are contained chiefly in clay-mica and/or zircon fractions. REE distributions, including negative Eu anomalies in most Tonto Basin sediments, are similar to those in Phanerozoic shales. Weak to moderate correlations of Fe, Sc, Ni, and Co to Al 2O 3 also suggest a clay-mica control of these elements. Detrital modes and geochemical characteristics of sediments indicate two dominant sources for sedimentary rocks of the Tonto Basin Supergroup: a granitoid source and a volcanic source. The granitoid source was important during deposition of the upper part of the succession (the Mazatzal Group) as shown by increases in K 2O, Al 2O 3, and Th in pelites with stratigraphic height, and increases in Zr and Hf and decreases in Eu/Eu ∗, Cr, and Ni in in pelites of the Maverick Shale. Sediment provenance characteristics and paleocurrent indicators are consistent with deposition of the supergroup in a continental-margin back-arc basin. The granitoid sediment source appears to have been the North American craton on the north, and the volcanic source a more local source from an arc on the south.

  2. Geochemical and detrital mode evidence for two sources of Early Proterozoic sedimentary rocks from the Tonto Basin Supergroup, central Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Condie, K.C.; Noll, P.D.; Conway, C.M.

    1992-01-01

    The Tonto Basin Supergroup includes up to 6.5 km of Early Proterozoic sedimentary and volcanic rocks that were deposited in a relatively short period of time at about 1.7 Ga in central Arizona. Moderate correlations of rare earth elements (REE) and Ti with Al2O3 and REE distributions in detrital sediments of this supergroup suggest that these elements are contained chiefly in clay-mica and/or zircon fractions. REE distributions, including negative Eu anomalies in most Tonto Basin sediments, are similar to those in Phanerozoic shales. Weak to moderate correlations of Fe, Sc, Ni, and Co to Al2O3 also suggest a clay-mica control of these elements. Detrital modes and geochemical characteristics of sediments indicate two dominant sources for sedimentary rocks of the Tonto Basin Supergroup: a granitoid source and a volcanic source. The granitoid source was important during deposition of the upper part of the succession (the Mazatzal Group) as shown by increases in K2O, Al2O3, and Th in pelites with stratigraphic height, and increases in Zr and Hf and decreases in Eu/Eu*, Cr, and Ni in in pelites of the Maverick Shale. Sediment provenance characteristics and paleocurrent indicators are consistent with deposition of the supergroup in a continental-margin back-arc basin. The granitoid sediment source appears to have been the North American craton on the north, and the volcanic source a more local source from an arc on the south. ?? 1992.

  3. Identifying and Interpreting Stratification in Sedimentary Rocks on Mars: Insight from Rover and Orbital Observations and Terrestrial Field Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgar, Lauren A.

    Sedimentary rocks on Mars provide insight into past aqueous and atmospheric processes, climate regimes, and potential habitability. The stratigraphic architecture of sedimentary rocks on Mars is similar to that of Earth, indicating that the processes that govern deposition and erosion on Mars can be reasonably inferred through reference to analogous terrestrial systems. This dissertation aims to understand Martian surface processes through the use of (1) ground-based observations from the Mars Exploration Rovers, (2) orbital data from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, and (3) the use of terrestrial field analogs to understand bedforms and sediment transport on Mars. Chapters 1 and 2 trace the history of aqueous activity at Meridiani Planum, through the reconstruction of eolian bedforms at Victoria crater, and the identification of a potential mudstone facies at Santa Maria crater. Chapter 3 uses Terrestrial Laser Scanning to study cross-bedding in pyroclastic surge deposits on Earth in order to understand sediment transport in these events and to establish criteria for their identification on Mars. The final chapter analyzes stratal geometries in the Martian North Polar Layered Deposits using tools for sequence stratigraphic analysis, to better constrain past surface processes and past climate conditions on Mars.

  4. Vertical distribution of heavy metals in grain size fractions in sedimentary rocks: Mosina-Krajkowo water well field, Poland.

    PubMed

    Frankowski, M; Siepak, M; Zioła, A; Novotný, K; Vaculovic, T; Siepak, J

    2009-08-01

    The paper presents the results of heavy metals determination in samples of sedimentary rocks from the Mosina-Krajkowo water well field (Poland). The concentration of heavy metals was analysed by type of rock (sand, gravel, warp, silt, till, and clay). Variation of heavy metal concentrations with depth was studied taking into account the age series of the rocks (fluvial sediments of the modern Warta River valley, sediments of the Baltic Glaciation, tills of the Middle-Polish Glaciation, sediments of the Masovian Interglacial (Holstein), tills of the Poznań series) and granulometric fractions. The grain sizes considered included: >2.0, 2.0-1.0, 1.0-0.5, 0.5-0.25, 0.25-0.1, 0.1-0.063, and <0.063 mm. The concentrations of the heavy metals studied were found to change with the type of rock, age series, and granulometric fraction. The levels of the metals were determined by the technique of atomic absorption spectrometry with flame atomisation (F-AAS) and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES).

  5. An intermodel comparison of the response of the mid-Cretaceous Arctic climate to CO2 forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, J.; Poulsen, C.

    2010-12-01

    Atmospheric CO2 levels inferred by stomatal index are as high as 4000-5500 ppmv in the mid-Cretaceous. Paleoclimatic proxy data suggests that surface temperatures in the Arctic ocean and on land are ~15°C and up to 10°C, respectively. Previous modeling studies with less than 3000 ppmv CO2 were not able to simulate temperature as warm as those inferred by proxies. In this study, we conduct four simulations with mid-Cretaceous paleogeography using two coupled ocean-atmosphere circulation models, CCSM3 and GENMOM. Atmospheric CO2 levels were prescribed at 10x and 16x pre-industrial levels (PIL; 2800 ppmv and 4480 ppmv). CCSM3 and GENMOM have somewhat different sensitivities to CO2 forcing. From 2800 ppmv to 4480 ppmv, the mean-annual surface temperatures over the Arctic regions increases from 0.7°C to 7°C in GENMOM and from 7.1°C to 8.7°C in CCSM3; mean-annual precipitation rates increases from 1.55 mm/day to 1.97 mm/day in GENMOM and from 1.88 mm/day to 1.99 mm/day in CCSM3. The different sensitivities are associated with differences in sea-ice and snow cover through surface albedo. In the two CCSM3 experiments, surface albedos over the Arctic region are identical due to the absence of substantial sea ice and snow cover. As a result, the temperature increases are about the same in the tropics and Arctic regions. Additionally, there are no appreciable changes in latent heat fluxes and cloud forcing over the Arctic region. However, in the two GENMOM experiments, surface albedo over the Arctic region decreases by 50% from 2800 ppmv to 4480 ppmv. Due to the reduction of sea ice cover, latent heat fluxes as well as convective cloud fraction increase by ~1/3. As a results of those feedbacks, the temperature increase in the Arctic regions is more than twice of that in the tropics. In addition, the intermodel discrepancy decreases with the higher CO2, when both CCSM3 and GENMOM are free of sea ice. A model-proxy comparison will also be discussed in addition to the

  6. The record of global change in mid-Cretaceous (Barremian-Albian) sections from the Sierra Madre, Northeastern Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bralower, T.J.; Cobabe, E.; Clement, B.; Sliter, W.V.; Osburn, C.L.; Longoria, J.

    1999-01-01

    Our current understanding of mid-Cretaceous global change is largely based on investigations of pelagic sections from southern Europe and deep sea drilling sites. Much less information exists from other continents and from hemipelagic sections deposited on continental margins. This investigation seeks to broaden our understanding of mid-Cretaceous global change by focusing on the record from hemipelagic sections deposited along the continental margin of northeastern Mexico. The major goals are to compare the record, timing, and extent of the Oceanic Anoxic Events (OAEs) in Mexico and other areas, and to determine the relationship between these events and the global burial of organic material using carbon isotopes. We have investigated four sections from the Sierra Madre Oriental, integrating biostratigraphy, magnetostratigraphy and carbon isotope stratigraphy. Carbon isotopes, measured on the organic carbon (Corg) fraction, show identical stratigraphic changes to curves from Barremian to lower Albian European and Pacific deep-sea sections. Our results add new detail to the C-isotope stratigraphy of the middle and late Albian interval. Three abrupt peaks in Corg content correlate with OAE1a (early Aptian), OAE1b (early Albian) and an event in the late Aptian Globigerinelloides algerianus Zone. All three events are marked by short-term, 0.5-3 per mil decreases in C-isotope values followed by increases of similar magnitude. The decreases may reflect changes in the type of Corg, the nature of carbon cycling, or an increase in hydrothermal activity. The increases in C-isotope values reflect widespread burial of Corg. The similar shape of the C-isotope curves in Mexico and other areas, and the response of C-isotopes to the OAEs, indicate that the late Aptian episode was extensive, and that OAE1a and OAE1b were global. The three anoxic events appear to correlate with rising relative sea level. OAE1a also corresponds to major changes in nannofossil assemblages; the well

  7. Evaluating Re-Os systematics in organic-rich sedimentary rocks in response to petroleum generation using hydrous pyrolysis experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rooney, Alan D.; Selby, David; Lewan, Michael D.; Lillis, Paul G.; Houzay, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Successful application of the 187Re-187Os geochronometer has enabled the determination of accurate and precise depositional ages for organic-rich sedimentary rocks (ORS) as well as establishing timing constraints of petroleum generation. However, we do not fully understand the systematics and transfer behaviour of Re and Os between ORS and petroleum products (e.g., bitumen and oil). To more fully understand the behaviour of Re-Os systematics in both source rocks and petroleum products we apply hydrous pyrolysis to two immature hydrocarbon source rocks: the Permian Phosphoria Formation (TOC = 17.4%; Type II-S kerogen) and the Jurassic Staffin Formation (TOC = 2.5%; Type III kerogen). The laboratory-based hydrous pyrolysis experiments were carried out for 72 h at 250, 300, 325 and 350 °C. These experiments provided us with whole rock, extracted rock and bitumen and in some cases expelled oil and asphaltene for evaluation of Re-Os isotopic and elemental abundance. The data from these experiments demonstrate that the majority (>95%) of Re and Os are housed within extracted rock and that thermal maturation does not result in significant transfer of Re or Os from the extracted rock into organic phases. Based on existing thermodynamic data our findings suggest that organic chelating sites have a greater affinity for the quadravalent states of Re and Os than sulphides. Across the temperature range of the hydrous pyrolysis experiments both whole rock and extracted rock 187Re/188Os ratios show small variations (3.3% and 4.7%, for Staffin, respectively and 6.3% and 4.9% for Phosphoria, respectively). Similarly, the 187Os/188Os ratios show only minor variations for the Staffin and Phosphoria whole rock and extracted rock samples (0.6% and 1.4% and 1.3% and 2.2%). These isotopic data strongly suggest that crude oil generation through hydrous pyrolysis experiments does not disturb the Re-Os systematics in ORS as supported by various studies on natural systems. The elemental

  8. Evaluating Re-Os systematics in organic-rich sedimentary rocks in response to petroleum generation using hydrous pyrolysis experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rooney, A.D.; Selby, D.; Lewan, M.D.; Lillis, P.G.; Houzay, J.-P.

    2012-01-01

    Successful application of the 187Re–187Os geochronometer has enabled the determination of accurate and precise depositional ages for organic-rich sedimentary rocks (ORS) as well as establishing timing constraints of petroleum generation. However, we do not fully understand the systematics and transfer behaviour of Re and Os between ORS and petroleum products (e.g., bitumen and oil). To more fully understand the behaviour of Re–Os systematics in both source rocks and petroleum products we apply hydrous pyrolysis to two immature hydrocarbon source rocks: the Permian Phosphoria Formation (TOC = 17.4%; Type II-S kerogen) and the Jurassic Staffin Formation (TOC = 2.5%; Type III kerogen). The laboratory-based hydrous pyrolysis experiments were carried out for 72 h at 250, 300, 325 and 350 °C. These experiments provided us with whole rock, extracted rock and bitumen and in some cases expelled oil and asphaltene for evaluation of Re–Os isotopic and elemental abundance. The data from these experiments demonstrate that the majority (>95%) of Re and Os are housed within extracted rock and that thermal maturation does not result in significant transfer of Re or Os from the extracted rock into organic phases. Based on existing thermodynamic data our findings suggest that organic chelating sites have a greater affinity for the quadravalent states of Re and Os than sulphides. Across the temperature range of the hydrous pyrolysis experiments both whole rock and extracted rock 187Re/188Os ratios show small variations (3.3% and 4.7%, for Staffin, respectively and 6.3% and 4.9% for Phosphoria, respectively). Similarly, the 187Os/188Os ratios show only minor variations for the Staffin and Phosphoria whole rock and extracted rock samples (0.6% and 1.4% and 1.3% and 2.2%). These isotopic data strongly suggest that crude oil generation through hydrous pyrolysis experiments does not disturb the Re–Os systematics in ORS as supported by various studies on natural systems. The

  9. From dry to saturated thermal conductivity: mixing-model correction charts and new conversion equations for sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Sven; Schütz, Felina; Förster, Andrea; Förster, Hans-Jürgen

    2013-04-01

    The thermal conductivity (TC) of a rock is, in collaboration with the temperature gradient, the basic parameter to determine the heat flow from the Earth interior. Moreover, it forms the input into models targeted on temperature prognoses for geothermal reservoirs at those depths not yet reached by boreholes. Thus, rock TC is paramount in geothermal exploration and site selection. Most commonly, TC of a rock is determined in the laboratory on samples that are either dry or water-saturated. Because sample saturation is time-consuming, it is desirable, especially if large numbers of samples need to be assessed, to develop an approach that quickly and reliably converts dry-measured bulk TC into the respective saturated value without applying the saturation procedure. Different petrophysical models can be deployed to calculate the matrix TC of a rock from the bulk TC and vice versa, if the effective porosity is known (e.g., from well logging data) and the TC of the saturation fluid (e.g., gas, oil, water) is considered. We have studied for a large suite of different sedimentary rocks the performance of two-component (rock matrix, porosity) models that are widely used in geothermics (arithmetic mean, geometric mean, harmonic mean, Hashin and Shtrikman mean, and effective medium theory mean). The data set consisted of 1147 TC data from three different sedimentary basins (North German Basin, Molasse Basin, Mesozoic platform sediments of the northern Sinai Microplate in Israel). Four lithotypes (sandstone, mudstone, limestone, dolomite) were studied exhibiting bulk TC in the range between 1.0 and 6.5 W/(mK). The quality of fit between measured (laboratory) and calculated bulk TC values was studied separately for the influence of lithotype, saturation fluid (water and isooctane), and rock anisotropy (parallel and perpendicular to bedding). The geometric mean model displays the best correspondence between calculated and measured bulk TC, however, the relation is not

  10. Mid-Cretaceous alluvial-plain incision related to eustasy, southeastern Colorado Plateau

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aubrey, W.M.

    1989-01-01

    Eustatic effects on the deposition of ancient coastal and marine rocks are well known, but eustasy also can affect depositional patterns and processes well inland from the sea and play an important role in the development of nonmarine unconformities. In the southeastern part of the Colorado Plateau, fluvial rocks of the lowermost Cenomanian (lowermost Upper Cretaceous) Encinal Canyon Member at the base of the Dakota Sandstone fill paleovalleys incised into underlying formations. In the latter part of the Early Cretaceous, an epicontinental sea lay about 240 km east of the southeastern Colorado Plateau and was base level for streams in the plateau region. Near the end of the Early Cretaceous, sea level fell, base level was lowered, and streams incised valleys into alluvial deposits of the Burro Canyon Formation and into older formations. The resulting incised paleodrainage surface was preserved as the sub-Dakota unconformity when the succeeding sea-level rise, in earliest Late Cretaceous time, caused Dakota streams to aggrade and backfill the paleovalleys with alluvial sediments of the Encinal Canyon Member. -from Author

  11. The Mid-Cretaceous Frontier Formation near the Moxa Arch, southwestern Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mereweather, E.A.; Blackmon, P.D.; Webb, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    by the shoreward addition of progressively younger sandstone units at the top of the formation during the late Turonian and early Coniacian. The sandstone in cores of the Frontier, from boreholes on the Moxa arch and the northern plunge of the Rock Springs uplift, consists of very fine grained and fine-grained litharenites and sublitharenites that were deposited in deltaic and shallow-water marine environments. These rocks consist mainly of quartz, chert, rock fragments, mixed-layer illite-smectite, mica-illite, and chlorite. Samples of the sandstone have porosities of 4.7 to 23.0 percent and permeabilities of 0.14 to 6.80 millidarcies, and seem to represent poor to fair reservoir beds for oil and gas. The shale in cores of the Frontier Formation and the overlying basal Hilliard Shale, from the Moxa arch, Rock Springs uplift, and overthrust belt, was deposited in deltaic and offshore-marine environments. Samples of the shale are composed largely of quartz, micaillite, mixed-layer illite-smectite, kaolin, and chlorite. They also contain from 0.27 to 4.42 percent organic carbon, in humic and sapropelic organic matter. Most of the sampled shale units are thermally mature, in terms of oil generation, and a few probably are source rocks for oil and gas.

  12. Thermobarometric constraints on mid-Cretaceous to late Cretaceous metamorphic events in the western metamorphic belt of the Coast Mountains complex near Petersburg, southeastern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Himmelberg, Glen R.; Brew, David A.

    2005-01-01

    The western metamorphic belt is part of the Coast Mountains Complex of southeastern Alaska and western Canada. This complex formed as a result of mid-Cretaceous through middle Eocene crustal shortening between the previously amalgamated Wrangellia and Alexander terranes (Insular superterrane) and previously accreted terranes of the North American continental margin (Intermontane superterrane). The western metamorphic belt, which ranges from a few kilometers to several tens of kilometers in width, records a complex sequence of contact-metamorphic and regional metamorphic events, the most significant of which are designated M1R, M2C-R, and M3R. The M1R regional metamorphic event ranged in grade from subgreenschist to greenschist facies and was overprinted by the M2C-R and M3R metamorphic events. The M2C-R metamorphic event is recorded in discrete contact-metamorphic aureoles and regional metamorphic-mineral assemblages related to tonalite-granodiorite plutons of the Admiralty-Revillagigedo plutonic belt. The M3R metamorphic belt, which is adjacent to the M2C-R belt, is characterized by regional Barrovian isograds of garnet, staurolite, kyanite, and sillimanite. Using the THERMOCALC program, pressure-temperature (P-T) conditions for the M2C-R metamorphic event are estimated to be in the ranges 5.3-7.5 kbars and 525-640 deg.C and for the M3R metamorphic event in the ranges 9.4-12.6 kbars and 730-895 deg.C. The M2C-R metamorphic event occurred at approximately 90 Ma, but the timing of the M3R metamorphic event is poorly documented and uncertain. On the basis of an 40Ar/39Ar age on actinolitic amphibole and a Sm-Nd age on garnet core, the timing of metamorphism might be constrained between 90+/-1 and 80+/-9 Ma, although the Sm-Nd age of 80+/-9 m.y. possibly reflects postpeak growth. Thermobarometric data suggest that the two events occurred at different crustal levels and followed different P-T paths. No evidence exists that M2C-R metamorphic-mineral assemblages were

  13. A Megaraptor-like theropod (Dinosauria: Tetanurae) in Australia: support for faunal exchange across eastern and western Gondwana in the Mid-Cretaceous

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Nathan D; Makovicky, Peter J; Agnolin, Federico L; Ezcurra, Martín D; Pais, Diego F; Salisbury, Steven W

    2008-01-01

    The fossil record of Australian dinosaurs in general, and theropods in particular, is extremely sparse. Here we describe an ulna from the Early Cretaceous Eumeralla Formation of Australia that shares unique autapomorphies with the South American theropod Megaraptor. We also present evidence for the spinosauroid affinities of Megaraptor. This ulna represents the first Australian non-avian theropod with unquestionable affinities to taxa from other Gondwanan landmasses, suggesting faunal interchange between eastern and western Gondwana during the Mid-Cretaceous. This evidence counters claims of Laurasian affinities for Early Cretaceous Australian dinosaur faunas, and for the existence of a geographical or climatic barrier isolating Australia from the other Gondwanan continents during this time. The temporal and geographical distribution of Megaraptor and the Eumeralla ulna is also inconsistent with traditional palaeogeographic models for the fragmentation of Gondwana, but compatible with several alternative models positing connections between South America and Antarctica in the Mid-Cretaceous. PMID:18544511

  14. Quasi-periodic mid-Cretaceous Oceanic Anoxic Events linked by oscillations of the phosphorus and oxygen cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenton, T.; Handoh, I.

    2003-04-01

    A series of oceanic anoxic events (OAEs) occurred in the mid-Cretaceous warm period (120-80 Ma) that have been linked with high rates of organic carbon burial, warm high- and low- latitude temperatures and sea-level changes. OAEs have been studied individually, but a causal mechanism that connects them has been lacking. We show that peaks in phosphorus accumulation in marine sediments broadly coincide with OAEs 1a, 1b, 1d, 2 and 3, and exhibit a 5-6 Myr quasi-periodicity, which for reactive-P is prominent over 100-80 Ma. Oxic-anoxic oscillations of this frequency are also found in a model of the coupled N, P, C and O2 biogeochemical cycles. These are maintained by a positive feedback between phosphate concentration, biological productivity and anoxia and a counteracting, but slower, negative feedback between atmospheric oxygen and anoxia. A step increase in phosphorus weathering rate can shift the system into self-sustaining oscillation. This could have been caused by tectonic and volcanic forcing increasing atmospheric CO2 and global warmth 120-80 Ma, augmented by the rise of flowering plants circa 100 Ma. With a plausible forcing scenario, we are able to reproduce the approximate timing of OAEs 1a, 1b, 1d, 2 and 3 in the model.

  15. Periodic mid-Cretaceous oceanic anoxic events linked by oscillations of the phosphorus and oxygen biogeochemical cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handoh, Itsuki C.; Lenton, Timothy M.

    2003-12-01

    A series of oceanic anoxic events (OAEs) occurred in the mid-Cretaceous warm period (120-80 Ma) that have been linked with high rates of organic carbon burial, warm high- and low- latitude temperatures, and sea-level changes. OAEs have been studied individually, but a causal mechanism that connects them has been lacking. We show that peaks in phosphorus accumulation in marine sediments broadly coincide with OAEs 1a, 1b, 1d, 2, and 3, and exhibit a 5-6 Myr periodicity, which for reactive-P is prominent over 100-80 Ma. Oxic-anoxic oscillations of this frequency are also found in a model of the coupled N, P, C, and O2 biogeochemical cycles. These oscillations are maintained by positive feedbacks between phosphate concentration, biological productivity, and anoxia in the global ocean and counteracting, but slower, negative feedbacks involving changes in atmospheric oxygen. An increase in phosphorus weathering rate above a critical threshold can shift the system into self-sustaining oscillation. This could have been caused by tectonic and volcanic forcing increasing atmospheric CO2 and global warmth 120-80 Ma, augmented by the rise of flowering plants around 100 Ma. With a plausible forcing scenario, we are able to reproduce the approximate timing of OAEs 1a, 1b, 1d, 2, and 3 in the model.

  16. New long-proboscid lacewings of the mid-Cretaceous provide insights into ancient plant-pollinator interactions

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiu-Mei; Zhang, Wei-Wei; Liu, Xing-Yue

    2016-01-01

    Many insects with long-proboscid mouthparts are among the pollinators of seed plants. Several cases of the long-proboscid pollination mode are known between fossil insects (e.g., true flies, scorpionflies, and lacewings) and various extinct gymnosperm lineages, beginning in the Early Permian and increasing during the Middle Jurassic to Early Cretaceous. However, details on the morphology of lacewing proboscides and the relevant pollination habit are largely lacking. Here we report on three lacewing species that belong to two new genera and a described genus from mid-Cretaceous (Albian-Cenomanian) amber of Myanmar. All these species possess relatively long proboscides, which are considered to be modified from maxillary and labial elements, probably functioning as a temporary siphon for feeding on nectar. Remarkably, these proboscides range from 0.4–1.0 mm in length and are attributed to the most diminutive ones among the contemporary long-proboscid insect pollinators. Further, they clearly differ from other long-proboscid lacewings which have a much longer siphon. The phylogenetic analysis indicates that these Burmese long-proboscid lacewings belong to the superfamily Psychopsoidea but cannot be placed into any known family. The present findings represent the first description of the mouthparts of long-proboscid lacewings preserved in amber and highlight the evolutionary diversification of the ancient plant-pollinator interactions. PMID:27149436

  17. Porosity and pore size distribution in a sedimentary rock: Implications for the distribution of chlorinated solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Allen M.; Evans, Christopher E.; Hayes, Erin C.

    2017-08-01

    Characterizing properties of the rock matrix that control retention and release of chlorinated solvents is essential in evaluating the extent of contamination and the application of remediation technologies in fractured rock. Core samples from seven closely spaced boreholes in a mudstone subject to trichloroethene (TCE) contamination were analyzed using Mercury Intrusion Porosimetry to investigate porosity and pore size distribution as a function of mudstone characteristics, and depth and lateral extent in the aquifer; organic carbon content was also evaluated to identify the potential for adsorption. Porosity and retardation factor varied over two orders of magnitude, with the largest porosities and largest retardation factors associated with carbon-rich mudstone layers. Larger porosities were also measured in the shallow rock that has been subject to enhanced groundwater flow. Porosity also varied over more than an order of magnitude in spatially continuous mudstone layers. The analyses of the rock cores indicated that the largest pore diameters may be accessible to entry of the nonaqueous form of TCE. Although the porosity associated with the largest pore diameters is small ( 0.1%), that volume of TCE can significantly affect the total TCE that is retained in the rock matrix. The dimensions of the largest pore diameters may also be accessible to microbes responsible for reductive dechlorination; however, the small percentage of the pore space that can accommodate microbes may limit the extent of reductive dechlorination in the rock matrix.

  18. Porosity and pore size distribution in a sedimentary rock: Implications for the distribution of chlorinated solvents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shapiro, Allen M.; Evans, Chrsitopher E.; Hayes, Erin C.

    2017-01-01

    Characterizing properties of the rock matrix that control retention and release of chlorinated solvents is essential in evaluating the extent of contamination and the application of remediation technologies in fractured rock. Core samples from seven closely spaced boreholes in a mudstone subject to trichloroethene (TCE) contamination were analyzed using Mercury Intrusion Porosimetry to investigate porosity and pore size distribution as a function of mudstone characteristics, and depth and lateral extent in the aquifer; organic carbon content was also evaluated to identify the potential for adsorption. Porosity and retardation factor varied over two orders of magnitude, with the largest porosities and largest retardation factors associated with carbon-rich mudstone layers. Larger porosities were also measured in the shallow rock that has been subject to enhanced groundwater flow. Porosity also varied over more than an order of magnitude in spatially continuous mudstone layers. The analyses of the rock cores indicated that the largest pore diameters may be accessible to entry of the nonaqueous form of TCE. Although the porosity associated with the largest pore diameters is small (~ 0.1%), that volume of TCE can significantly affect the total TCE that is retained in the rock matrix. The dimensions of the largest pore diameters may also be accessible to microbes responsible for reductive dechlorination; however, the small percentage of the pore space that can accommodate microbes may limit the extent of reductive dechlorination in the rock matrix.

  19. Porosity and pore size distribution in a sedimentary rock: Implications for the distribution of chlorinated solvents.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Allen M; Evans, Christopher E; Hayes, Erin C

    2017-08-01

    Characterizing properties of the rock matrix that control retention and release of chlorinated solvents is essential in evaluating the extent of contamination and the application of remediation technologies in fractured rock. Core samples from seven closely spaced boreholes in a mudstone subject to trichloroethene (TCE) contamination were analyzed using Mercury Intrusion Porosimetry to investigate porosity and pore size distribution as a function of mudstone characteristics, and depth and lateral extent in the aquifer; organic carbon content was also evaluated to identify the potential for adsorption. Porosity and retardation factor varied over two orders of magnitude, with the largest porosities and largest retardation factors associated with carbon-rich mudstone layers. Larger porosities were also measured in the shallow rock that has been subject to enhanced groundwater flow. Porosity also varied over more than an order of magnitude in spatially continuous mudstone layers. The analyses of the rock cores indicated that the largest pore diameters may be accessible to entry of the nonaqueous form of TCE. Although the porosity associated with the largest pore diameters is small (~0.1%), that volume of TCE can significantly affect the total TCE that is retained in the rock matrix. The dimensions of the largest pore diameters may also be accessible to microbes responsible for reductive dechlorination; however, the small percentage of the pore space that can accommodate microbes may limit the extent of reductive dechlorination in the rock matrix. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Leaching of boron, arsenic and selenium from sedimentary rocks: II. pH dependence, speciation and mechanisms of release.

    PubMed

    Tabelin, Carlito Baltazar; Hashimoto, Ayaka; Igarashi, Toshifumi; Yoneda, Tetsuro

    2014-03-01

    Sedimentary rocks excavated in Japan from road- and railway-tunnel projects contain relatively low concentrations of hazardous trace elements like boron (B), arsenic (As) and selenium (Se). However, these seemingly harmless waste rocks often produced leachates with concentrations of hazardous trace elements that exceeded the environmental standards. In this study, the leaching behaviors and release mechanisms of B, As and Se were evaluated using batch leaching experiments, sequential extraction and geochemical modeling calculations. The results showed that B was mostly partitioned with the residual/crystalline phase that is relatively stable under normal environmental conditions. In contrast, the majority of As and Se were associated with the exchangeable and organics/sulfides phases that are unstable under oxidizing conditions. Dissolution of water-soluble phases controlled the leaching of B, As and Se from these rocks in the short term, but pyrite oxidation, calcite dissolution and adsorption/desorption reactions became more important in the long term. The mobilities of these trace elements were also strongly influenced by the pH of the rock-water system. Although the leaching of Se only increased in the acidic region, those of B and As were enhanced under both acidic and alkaline conditions. Under strongly acidic conditions, the primarily release mechanism of B, As and Se was the dissolution of mineral phases that incorporated and/or adsorbed these elements. Lower concentrations of these trace elements in the circumneutral pH range could be attributed to their strong adsorption onto minerals like Al-/Fe-oxyhydroxides and clays, which are inherently present and/or precipitated in the rock-water system. The leaching of As and B increased under strongly alkaline conditions because of enhanced desorption and pyrite oxidation while that of Se remained minimal due to its adsorption onto Fe-oxyhydroxides and co-precipitation with calcite. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B

  1. Nd Isotopic Provenance of Sedimentary Rocks Along Margins of North America: ten Years of Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patchett, J.; Ross, G. M.

    2001-12-01

    Ten years of effort, principally employing Nd isotopes, have resulted in substantial advances in understanding of the movements of sedimentary material around North America from Cambrian to Cretaceous time. This synthesis has depended upon work of current and former students S. Samson, J. Gleason, N. Boghossian, C. Garzione, M. Roth, B. Canale and E. Rosenberg, as well as collaborators W. Dickinson and A. Embry, among others. Nd isotopes are particularly good at documenting movements of sedimentary material on the largest (continental) scale and over extended times. What has emerged is a picture of a largely exposed North America-Greenland craton from Neoproterozoic to Ordovician time, a partial to complete burial by detritus from Caledonian-Appalachian mountains starting in the Ordovician, a gradual exhumation during Late Paleozoic and Mesozoic time, followed by a partial burial with Cordilleran detritus during Late Jurassic to Tertiary time. One current question is the nature of the Mesozoic and Tertiary sedimentary material eroded from the North American Cordillera, and its relevance for Cordilleran orogenesis. Another current question is the extent to which Caledonian-Appalachian detritus covered the craton in Devonian-Carboniferous time, and the timing and manner of its removal during Mesozoic time. At first glance, available Nd isotopic data appear to suggest that the Canada-Greenland Shield was largely covered during most of Mesozoic time, a conclusion that would have profound effects on models of dynamic topography. However, this conclusion is also very dependent on the relationship between topography and erosion, because in certain situations a geographically-restricted cover sequence could dominate over low-relief cratonic terrain as a sediment source.

  2. Early trace of life from 3.95 Ga sedimentary rocks in Labrador, Canada.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, Takayuki; Ishida, Akizumi; Hori, Masako; Igisu, Motoko; Koike, Mizuho; Méjean, Pauline; Takahata, Naoto; Sano, Yuji; Komiya, Tsuyoshi

    2017-09-27

    The vestiges of life in Eoarchean rocks have the potential to elucidate the origin of life. However, gathering evidence from many terrains is not always possible, and biogenic graphite has thus far been found only in the 3.7-3.8 Ga (gigayears ago) Isua supracrustal belt. Here we present the total organic carbon contents and carbon isotope values of graphite (δ(13)Corg) and carbonate (δ(13)Ccarb) in the oldest metasedimentary rocks from northern Labrador. Some pelitic rocks have low δ(13)Corg values of -28.2, comparable to the lowest value in younger rocks. The consistency between crystallization temperatures of the graphite and metamorphic temperature of the host rocks establishes that the graphite does not originate from later contamination. A clear correlation between the δ(13)Corg values and metamorphic grade indicates that variations in the δ(13)Corg values are due to metamorphism, and that the pre-metamorphic value was lower than the minimum value. We concluded that the large fractionation between the δ(13)Ccarb and δ(13)Corg values, up to 25‰, indicates the oldest evidence of organisms greater than 3.95 Ga. The discovery of the biogenic graphite enables geochemical study of the biogenic materials themselves, and will provide insight into early life not only on Earth but also on other planets.

  3. Tectonics of the circum-Troodos sedimentary cover of Cyprus, from rock magnetic and structural observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagroix, France; Borradaile, Graham J.

    2000-04-01

    The calcareous sedimentary cover of the Troodos Ophiolite Complex dips gently away from the Troodos Complex. It has rare, usually open folds and, locally, stylolitic cleavage ( S1). Stylolitic cleavage is ˜50% more effective than primary bedding-stylolites in removing matrix and the variation in the S1 vergence directions are compatible with gravitational sliding radially away from the Troodos range and into sedimentary basins. Two different types of magnetic fabric, anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) and anisotropy anhysteretic remanence (AARM), reveal the sequence of preferred orientations of different minerals, and the vergence of their magnetic foliations with respect to bedding reveals the sense of over-shearing of the stratigraphic sequence. AMS defines crystallographic alignments of clay minerals and dimensional alignments of magnetite in the limestones. AARM isolates the preferred dimensional orientation of magnetite. Although traces of magnetite dominate the bulk susceptibility, its anisotropy is low in comparison with phyllosilicates so that AMS essentially records the clay-fabric. Throughout the study area, AMS foliation indicates S-vergence and AMS lineation indicates N-S extension. AMS foliation-vergence indicates shearing of the entire sedimentary cover southward from Troodos. This motion is attributed to gravity sliding controlled by regional uplift to the north. In contrast, AARM foliation indicates a subsequent ESE vergence due to later WNW-ESE extension. The NNE, AARM lineation is a composite of bedding and tectonic fabric contributions that do not directly yield a faithful extension direction. The shapes of the magnetic fabrics indicate that AMS (clay) fabrics have a broad range of shapes about the neutral ellipsoid shape, whereas AARM (magnetite) fabrics are bimodal, with equally developed bedding-oblate and tectonic linear-planar ( L= S) components. Hysteresis properties, plotted on a new three-dimensional diagram, show clearly that

  4. Metasomatism and ore formation at contacts of dolerite with saliferous rocks in the sedimentary cover of the southern Siberian platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazurov, M. P.; Grishina, S. N.; Istomin, V. E.; Titov, A. T.

    2007-08-01

    The data on the mineral composition and crystallization conditions of magnesian skarn and magnetite ore at contacts of dolerite with rock salt and dolomite in ore-bearing volcanic—tectonic structures of the Angara—Ilim type have been integrated and systematized. Optical microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, electron microprobe analysis, electron paramagnetic resonance, Raman and IR spectroscopy, and methods of mineralogical thermometry were used for studying minerals and inclusions contained therein. The most diverse products of metasomatic reactions are found in the vicinity of a shallow-seated magma chamber that was formed in Lower Cambrian carbonate and saliferous rocks under a screen of terrigenous sequences. Conformable lodes of spinel-forsterite skarn and calciphyre impregnated with magnesian magnetite replaced dolomite near the central magma conduit and apical portions of igneous bodies. At the postmagmatic stage, the following mineral assemblages were formed at contacts of dolerite with dolomite: (1) spinel + fassaite + forsterite + magnetite (T = 820-740°C), (2) phlogopite + titanite + pargasite + magnetite (T = 600 500°C), And (3) clinochlore + serpentine + pyrrhotite (T = 450°C and lower). Rock salt is transformed at the contact into halitite as an analogue of calciphyre. The specific features of sedimentary, contact-metasomatic, and hydrothermal generations of halite have been established. The primary sedimentary halite contains solid inclusions of sylvite, carnallite, anhydrite, polyhalite, quartz, astrakhanite, and antarcticite; nitrogen, methane, and complex hydrocarbons have been detected in gas inclusions; and the liquid inclusions are largely aqueous, with local hydrocarbon films. The contact-metasomatic halite is distinguished by a fine-grained structure and the occurrence of anhydrous salt phases (CaCl2 · KCl, CaCl2, nMgCl2 · mCaCl2) and high-density gases (CO2, H2S, N2, CH4, etc.) as inclusions. The low

  5. Linking the MIF-S Record of Sedimentary Rocks to the Thermal and Biological Evolutions of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmoto, H.; Watanabe, Y.; Lasaga, A. C.

    2006-05-01

    Many recent geoscientists have accepted that the record of mass independent fractionation of sulfur isotopes (MIF-S) is a smoking gun for the dramatic change from an anoxic (pO2 < 10-5 PAL) to oxic (pO2 > 10-5 PAL) atmosphere ~2.4 Ga ago, based on the acceptance of two dogmas: (I) atmospheric photochemical reactions are the only mechanisms to create MIF-S, and (II) only rocks older than 2.4 Ga in age bear MIF-S signatures. We question the validity of these dogmas because of the following recent discoveries: (1) the presence of MIF-S in some rocks younger than 1.7 Ga; (2) the absence of MIF-S in many rocks older than 2.7 Ga; (3) a systematic geochemical signature coincident with strong MIF-S in shales; (4) large MIFs in the isotopes of many elements (e.g., U, Cr, Mg) accompanying redox reactions, which are attributed to nuclear field shift effect (i.e., nuclear size and shape effects); (5) MIF-S in the H2S generated from the reduction of sulfate by simple amino acids in our experiments at 150-200°C, while a lack of sulfate reduction by more complex amino acids occurred (Watanabe et al., preceeding paper); and (6) agreements in the Δ33 S(sulfide)- Δ33 S(sulfate) relationships predicted from the nuclear field shift theory with those observed in (a) geologic samples, (b) photochemical experimental products, and (c) reaction products in our amino acids - sulfate experiments. The above discoveries suggest the following three possible reasons for a MIF-S signature in a sedimentary rock: (i) an anoxic atmosphere, (ii) a regional explosive volcanic event, or (iii) unique diagenetic reactions (e.g., sulfate reduction by amino acids) in organic-rich sediments. If (i) was the case, it would imply a yo-yo atmosphere, where the atmospheric pO2 fluctuated from anoxic to oxic, during the Archean. However, we suggest the combinations of (ii) and (iii) were the main reasons for MIF-S signatures in sedimentary rocks for the following reasons: (a) reactive amino acids were probably

  6. Paleoclimate and paleoecology of the mid Cretaceous traced by calcareous nannofossils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottini, Cinzia; Erba, Elisabetta

    2016-04-01

    The Aptian - early Turonian time interval was marked by major environmental changes at regional to global scale. Specifically, it was a time of super-greenhouse conditions and the climate-ocean system experienced phases of stability perturbed by transient, sometimes prolonged, anomalies of the global carbon cycle. Several regional to global episodes occurred over this time interval: the early Aptian Oceanic Anoxic Event (OAE) 1a, the early Albian OAE 1b, the latest Albian OAE 1d, the Mid-Cenomanian Event (MCE I) and the Cenomanian - Turonian OAE 2. Decades of multidisciplinary research focused on OAEs since they constitute ideal case-histories for the understanding of our planet functioning during perturbations of the C cycle. They were, in fact, characterized by excess CO2, intense volcanism, and altered climate and oceanic chemistry. A useful tool for reconstructing the marine ecosystem dynamics of the past, is calcareous nannoplankton, since it is extremely sensitive to changes in surface waters parameters like temperature and nutrient content and interacts with the C cycle through biological processes and production of calcareous oozes. Here, we gathered new quantitative nannofossil data for the Tethys Ocean (Umbria Marche Basin, Italy) to derive climatic fluctuations and changes in ocean fertility during the late Albian - early Turonian. Over this time interval, the Tethys Ocean was characterized by phases of rhythmic black shale deposition controlled by orbital forcing. The Pialli Level is the Tethyan sedimentary expression of the latest Albian OAE 1d, characterized by large-scale occurrence of black shales and a δ13C positive excursion recognized in several deep-marine settings. The other prominent δ13C anomaly coincides with the OAE 2 represented, in Italy, by the Bonarelli Level. Between these two main C-isotopic excursions, a double-spiked minor anomaly identifies the MCE I, lithologically represented by a shift to black shales and black chert bands

  7. Geochemical evaluation of Niger Delta sedimentary organic rocks: a new insight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akinlua, Akinsehinwa; Torto, Nelson

    2010-05-01

    A geochemical evaluation of Niger Delta organic matter was carried out using supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) sample preparation procedure. Comparison of geochemical significance of gas chromatographic data of rock extracts of SFE with those of Soxhlet extraction method from previous studies was made in order to establish the usefulness of SFE in geochemical exploration. The assessment of geochemical character of the rock samples from the comparison and interpretation of other geochemical parameters were used to give more insights into understanding the source rocks characteristics of onshore and shelf portions of the Niger Delta Basin. The results of the gas chromatographic (GC) analysis of the rock extracts across the lithostratigraphic units show that Pr/Ph, Pr/nC17, Pr/nC18, CPI and odd/even preference ranged from 0.07 to 12.39, 0.04 to 6.66, 0.05 to 13.80, 0.12 to 8.4 and 0.06 to 8.12, respectively. The Rock-Eval pyrolysis data and geochemical ratios and parameters calculated from the GC data showed that most of the samples are mature and have strong terrestrial provenance while a few samples have strong marine provenance. The few marine source rocks are located in the deeper depth horizon. Pr/Ph and standard geochemical plots indicate that most of samples were derived from organic matter deposited in less reducing conditions, i.e. more of oxidizing conditions while a few samples have predominantly influence of reducing conditions. The results of trace metal analysis of older samples from Agbada Formation also indicate marine and mixed organic matter input deposited in less reducing conditions. The results obtained in this study are comparable with those obtained from previous studies when Soxhlet extraction method was used and also indicated the presence of more than one petroleum systems in the Niger Delta.

  8. Frequency-Based Precursory Acoustic Emission Failure Sequences In Sedimentary And Igneous Rocks Under Uniaxial Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colin, C.; Anderson, R. C.; Chasek, M. D.; Peters, G. H.; Carey, E. M.

    2016-12-01

    Identifiable precursors to rock failure have been a long pursued and infrequently encountered phenomena in rock mechanics and acoustic emission studies. Since acoustic emissions in compressed rocks were found to follow the Gutenberg-Richter law, failure-prediction strategies based on temporal changes in b-value have been recurrent. In this study, we extend on the results of Ohnaka and Mogi [Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 87, No. B5, p. 3873-3884, (1982)], where the bulk frequency characteristics of rocks under incremental uniaxial compression were observed in relation to changes in b-value before and after failure. Based on the proposition that the number of low-frequency acoustic emissions is proportional to the number of high-amplitude acoustic emissions in compressed rocks, Ohnaka and Mogi (1982) demonstrated that b-value changes in granite and andesite cores under incremental uniaxial compression could be expressed in terms of the percent abundance of low-frequency events. In this study, we attempt to demonstrate that the results of Ohnaka and Mogi (1982) hold true for different rock types (basalt, sandstone, and limestone) and different sample geometries (rectangular prisms). In order to do so, the design of the compression tests was kept similar to that of Ohnaka and Mogi (1982). Two high frequency piezoelectric transducers of 1 MHz and a 500 kHz coupled to the sides of the samples detected higher and lower frequency acoustic emission signals. However, rather than gathering parametric data from an analog signal using a counter as per Ohnaka and Mogi (1982), we used an oscilloscope as an analog to digital converter interfacing with LabVIEW 2015 to record the complete waveforms. The digitally stored waveforms were then processed, detecting acoustic emission events using a statistical method, and filtered using a 2nd order Butterworth filter. In addition to calculating the percent abundance of low-frequency events over time, the peak frequency of the

  9. Hydraulic characteristics of the Maastrichtian sedimentary rocks of the southeastern Bida Basin, central Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrbka, Petr; Ojo, Olusola Johnson; Gebhardt, Holler

    1999-12-01

    A set of outcrop samples from the Lokoja and Patti Formations of the southern Bida Basin (Nigeria) was examined for grain size distribution, sedimentary and hydraulic characteristics. Most of the samples are well-sorted with an uniformity coefficient (U) ranging between 1.3 and 6.3. The mean effective grain diameter (d 10) is in the order of 0.11 mm, the mean value of d 90 was determined as 0.66 mm (both geometric mean) and the median grain size (d 50) as 0.23 mm. Based on these values, the sedimentary sequence can be described as 'fine to medium sized sand', having minor amounts of either silt, or coarse sand and some gravel. The total porosity of the samples was determined by laboratory methods to be in the range of 9-29%. The hydraulic conductivity (K) was determined according to Hazen.and Beyer, and by Shepherd's formula, the last resulting in a geometric mean of 3.3 m d -1 or 3.3 darcy. The results are used to estimate local groundwater potential. The entire pore space (potential groundwater reservoir) for the area under study is estimated to be in the order of 290-430 km 3. Because of higher hydraulic conductivities, it is recommended that the Lokoja Formation is concentrated on as a target for groundwater exploration.

  10. Long-term migration of iodine in sedimentary rocks based on iodine speciation and 129I/127I ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Togo, Y.; Takahashi, Y.; Amano, Y.; Matsuzaki, H.; Suzuki, Y.; Muramatsu, Y.; Iwatsuki, T.

    2012-12-01

    [Introduction] 129I is one of the available indexes of long-term migration of groundwater solutes, because of its long half-life (15.7 million years) and low sorption characteristics. The Horonobe underground research center (Japan Atomic Energy Agency), at which are conducted research and development of fundamental techniques on geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste, is an appropriate site for natural analogue studies, because iodine concentration in groundwater is high in this area. To predict iodine behavior in natural systems, speciation of iodine is essential because of different mobility among each species. In this study, we determined iodine speciation and129I/127I isotope ratios of rock and groundwater samples to investigate long term migration of iodine. [Methods] All rock and groundwater samples were collected at Horonobe underground research center. The region is underlain mainly by Neogene to Quaternary marine sedimentary rocks, the Wakkanai Formation (Wk Fm, siliceous mudstones), and the overlying Koetoi Formation (Kt Fm, diatomaceous mudstones). Iodine species in rock samples were determined by iodine K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (SPring-8 BL01B1). Thin sections of rock samples were prepared, and iodine mapping were obtained by micro-XRF analysis (SPring-8 BL37XU). Iodine species (IO3-, I-, and organic I) in groundwater were separately detected by high performance liquid chromatography connected to ICP-MS. The 129I/127I ratios in groundwater and rock samples were measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (MALT, Univ. of Tokyo). Iodine in rock samples were separated by pyrohydrolysis and water extraction. [Results and discussion] Concentration of iodine in groundwater varied widely and was much higher than that of seawater showing a high correlation with that of chlorine (R2 = 0.90). Species of iodine in groundwater was mainly I-. Iodine in rock samples decreased near the boundary between Wk and Kt Fms. Iodine K-edge XANES

  11. Using the U-Pb system of calcretes to date the time of sedimentation of clastic sedimentary rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z.S.; Rasbury, E.T.; Hanson, G.N.; Meyers, W.J.

    1998-08-01

    The time of sedimentation of rapidly deposited clastic sedimentary rocks in fluvial environments may be directly dated with an uncertainty of less than three million years using U-Pb dating of pure micritic calcite from calcretes developed in overbank deposits. This conclusion is based on results obtained for calcretes (soil calcite, caliche) formed in the late Triassic New Haven Arkose, Hartford Basin, Connecticut, USA. The paragenesis of calcrete samples from the New Haven Arkose was determined using plane-polarized light and cathodoluminescence petrography, uranium fission track analysis, as well as trace element and stable isotope geochemistry. These calcretes contain an abundance of paleosol microfabrics and diagenetic calcite. The first-generation micritic calcite and second-generation blocky calcite have characteristics consistent with soil calcite. The third generation blocky calcite is a later diagenetic calcite (post-soil calcite). The U-Pb data for pure micritic calcite (first generation) in a horizontal sheet calcrete in sedimentary rocks of Norian age gives a {sup 238}U/{sup 207}Pb-{sup 206}Pb/{sub 207}Pb isochron age of 211.9 {+-} 2.1 Ma (2-sigma, and used hereafter for all ages). The U-Pb data for two samples of first generation micrite in rhizoliths with about 15% insoluble residues give ages of 7 {+-} 66 Ma and 20 {+-} 36 Ma. These results suggest that relatively recent events disturbed the U-Pb system of these detrital rich samples, perhaps due to redistribution of U during weathering or during chemical dissolution for analysis. The U-Pb data for a sample of pure third generation blocky calcite cement in a rhizolith yields a {sup 206}Pb/{sup 238}U-{sup 207}Pb/{sup 235}U isochron age of 81 {+-} 11 Ma. This age suggests that this sample of third generation blocky calcite precipitated during the late Cretaceous perhaps over an extended period.

  12. A Re-examination of Shallow Paleomagnetic Inclinations From the Cretaceous Valle Group Sedimentary Rocks, Baja California, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Kodama, K. P.; Smith, D. P.

    2001-05-01

    A paleomagnetic, rock magnetic, and sedimentological study was conducted in order to determine whether depositional/compactional processes have caused the shallow inclinations observed in the Valle Group sedimentary rocks. A total of 126 samples (14 sites) were collected from the middle Cenomanian section of the Valle along the northern coast of the Vizcaino Peninsula, Baja California, approximately 20 km east of Punta Eugenia at Campito. Samples were subjected to detailed thermal and alternating field (af) demagnetization, typically in 14 steps to 610° C for thermal demagnetization and ~24 steps to 130 mT for af demagnetization. NRMs were strong for marine sedimentary rocks, typically 10 mA/m. The mean of the site means for the demagnetized data was Inc=54.2° , Dec=306° , α 95=4.8° , N=12, in geographic coordinates, and Inc=20.5° , Dec=341.3° , α 95=4° , N=12 in stratigraphic coordinates. AMS fabrics have minimum axes clustered nearly perpendicular to bedding, typical of primary depositional/compactional fabrics. Some sites exhibited minimum axes clustering about 10° from the vertical and maximum axes clustered about 10° from the horizontal suggesting that currents and/or initial bedding dip affected the magnetization of these samples at deposition. Since the stratigraphy of the Valle Group dips consistently to the NE at approximately 50° , we sampled a tight slump fold at one site in order to constrain the age of magnetization. Both the AMS fabric and the characteristic remanence (ChRM) fail the fold test at the 95% confidence level. At another site, we sampled adjacent beds each approximately 5 cm thick composed of coarse, medium, or fine-grained sandstone. The directions of these beds are within 2° of each other. These results can be interpreted to indicate either a late remagnetization of the Valle group or an acquisition of the Valle's detrital remanence after slumping, but early in the rock's post-depositional history. Smith and Busby's (1993

  13. Sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits of the Dian-Qian-Gui area, Guizhou, and Yunnan Provinces, and Guangxi District, China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, S.G.; Jiazhan, H.; Zhiping, L.; Chenggui, J.

    2007-01-01

    Sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits in the Dian-Qian-Gui area in southwest China are hosted in Paleozoic and early Mesozoic sedimentary rocks along the southwest margin of the Yangtze (South China) Precambrian craton. Most deposits have characteristics similar to Carlin-type Au deposits and are spatially associated, on a regional scale, with deposits of coal, Sb, barite, As, Tl, and Hg. Sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits are disseminated stratabound and(or) structurally controlled. The deposits have many similar characteristics, particularly mineralogy, geochemistry, host rock, and structural control. Most deposits are associated with structural domes, stratabound breccia bodies, unconformity surfaces or intense brittle-ductile deformation zones, such as the Youjiang fault system. Typical characteristics include impure carbonate rock or calcareous and carbonaceous host rock that contains disseminated pyrite, marcasite, and arsenopyrite-usually with ??m-sized Au, commonly in As-rich rims of pyrite and in disseminations. Late realgar, orpiment, stibnite, and Hg minerals are spatially associated with earlier forming sulfide minerals. Minor base-metal sulfides, such as galena, sphalerite, chalcopyrite, and Pb-Sb-As-sulphosalts also are present. The rocks locally are silicified and altered to sericite-clay (illite). Rocks and(or) stream-sediment geochemical signatures typically include elevated concentrations of As, Sb, Hg, Tl, and Ba. A general lack of igneous rocks in the Dian-Qian-Gui area implies non-pluton-related, ore forming processes. Some deposits contain evidence that sources of the metal may have originated in carbonaceous parts of the sedimentary pile or other sedimentary or volcanic horizons. This genetic process may be associated with formation and mobilization of petroleum and Hg in the region and may also be related to As-, Au-, and Tl-bearing coal horizons. Many deposits also contain textures and features indicative of strong structural control by

  14. Upper Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous(?) synorogenic sedimentary rocks in the southern Spring Mountains, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Michael D.

    1980-08-01

    A newly recognized sequence of Upper Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous(?) terrigenous rocks in the Good-springs district, Nevada, was deposited during the emplacement of the Contact thrust plate. Two facies are recognized: (1) interbedded conglomerate and sandstone derived from Mesozoic igneous and terrigenous platform rocks and (2) interbedded carbonate and sandstone-clast conglomerate, quartz sandstone, and red shale. No igneous detritus occurs in the facies with carbonate-clast conglomerate. Carbonate clasts could only have been derived from the Paleozoic carbonate sequence, which was exposed in the area by latest Jurassic to earliest Cretaceous thrusting. The age of rocks from a volcanic unit within the synorogenic sequence was determined radiometrically to be 150 ± 10 m.y. (K-Ar on biotite). The sequence was deposited disconformably on deeply eroded rocks of the early Mesozoic platform and ultimately overridden from the west by the Contact thrust plate. Information from the sequence corroborates previously reported regional data regarding the timing and nature of the Contact-Red Springs thrust event. *Present address: U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, California 94025

  15. [Enrichment and release of uranium during weathering of sedimentary rocks in Wujiang catchments].

    PubMed

    Song, Zhao-Liang; Liu, Cong-Qiang; Han, Gui-Lin; Wang, Zhong-Liang; Yang, Cheng; Liu, Zhan-Min

    2006-11-01

    Thirteen weathering profiles of typical rocks such as limestone, dolomitic limestone, dolomite, sillcalite, black shale and purple sandrock from Wujiang catchments were selected for discussing enrichment and release behavior of uranium (U) during rock weathering, and studying its impact on riverine U distribution in the catchments during weathering of these rocks with methods of correlation analysis and mass balance calculation. The purpose of this study is to improve our understanding on biogechemical cycling of U and set a basis for catchment protection against U pollution. The results show that the enrichment extent of U in soils from the Wujiang catchments is usually higher than that of upper continental crust (UCC), China soil (CS) and world soil (WS). The ability of enrichment and release of U is partly controlled by content of U in bedrocks, contents and adsorption ability of clay minerals and Fe-oxides/hydroxides in weathering profiles. Our study also reveals that release of U mainly from weathering of limestone and partly from weathering of dolomite and clastic rocks exerts an important control on riverine U distribution.

  16. Tracer diffusion coefficients in sedimentary rocks: correlation to porosity and hydraulic conductivity.

    PubMed

    Boving, T B; Grathwohl, P

    2001-12-01

    Matrix diffusion is an important transport process in geologic materials of low hydraulic conductivity. For predicting the fate and transport of contaminants, a detailed understanding of the diffusion processes in natural porous media is essential. In this study, diffusive tracer transport (iodide) was investigated in a variety of geologically different limestone and sandstone rocks. Porosity, structural and mineralogical composition, hydraulic conductivity, and other rock properties were determined. The effective diffusion coefficients were measured using the time-lag method. The results of the diffusion experiments indicate that there is a close relationship between total porosity and the effective diffusion coefficient of a rock (analogous to Archie's Law). Consequently, the tortousity factor can be expressed as a function of total porosity. The relationship fits best for thicker samples (> 1.0 cm) with high porosities (> 20%), because of the reduced influence of heterogeneity in larger samples. In general, these correlations appear to be a simple way to determine tortuosity and the effective diffusion coefficient from easy to determine rock porosity values.

  17. Age and paleoenvironmental reconstruction of partially remagnetized lacustrine sedimentary rocks (Oligocene Aktoprak basin, central Anatolia, Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meijers, Maud J. M.; Strauss, Becky E.; Özkaptan, Murat; Feinberg, Joshua M.; Mulch, Andreas; Whitney, Donna L.; Kaymakçı, Nuretdin

    2016-03-01

    The age and paleoenvironmental record of lacustrine deposits in the Aktoprak basin of south-central Turkey provides information about the evolution of topography, including the timing of development of an orographic rain shadow caused by uplift of the mountain ranges fringing the Central Anatolian Plateau. New magnetostratigraphy-based age estimates, in combination with existing biostratigraphic ages, suggest that the partially remagnetized Kurtulmuş Tepe section of the basin is Chattian (Upper Oligocene). The mean carbon and oxygen stable isotope ratios (δ18O= 24.6 ± 2.0 ‰, δ13C= -4.9 ± 1.1‰) are largely constant through the section and indicative of a subtropical, open freshwater lake. These isotopic values are also similar to those of the Chattian Mut basin to the south, on the Mediterranean side of the modern orographic barrier (Tauride Mountains), and indicate absence of an orographic barrier during Late Oligocene basin deposition. Post-depositional partial remagnetization occurred after tilting of the basin sequence and was mineralogically controlled, affecting grey, carbonate-rich rocks (average %CaCO3= 82), whereas interlayered pink carbonate-poor rocks (average %CaCO3= 38) carry a primary, pretilt magnetization. The pink rocks are rich in clay minerals that may have reduced the permeability of these rocks that carry a primary magnetization, concentrating basinal fluid flow in the carbonate-rich grey layers and leading to the removal and reprecipitation of magnetic minerals. The normal and reverse polarities recorded by the remagnetized rocks suggest that remagnetization occurred over a protracted period of time.

  18. A shallow marine volcaniclastic facies model: an example from sedimentary rocks bounding the subaqueously welded Ordovician Garth Tuff, North Wales, U.K.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, William J.; Howells, Malcolm F.

    1991-11-01

    Volcaniclastic sedimentary rocks bounding the Ordovician Garth Tuff in North Wales were deposited in a shallow marine setting adjacent to a magmatic arc. The volcaniclastic sedimentary rocks are primarily of angular to euhedral quartz, angular euhedral feldspar, and volcanic rock fragments. These grains are of a pyroclastic origin, but have been reworked to various degrees. Sedimentary rock fragments, rounded quartz, muscovite, biotite, iron-rich chlorite and various clay minerals occur in lesser amounts. The sedimentary rocks can be divided into a proximal offshore to foreshore facies association (POFFA) and an offshore to lower shoreface facies association (OLSFA). The sand-dominated POFFA, exposed near Capel Curig, is characterized by large wave ripples, hummocky cross-stratification, co-sets of trough cross-beds, reactivation surfaces, plane beds, and graded turbidite layers in suspension-deposited mudstone. Water depths calculated from bedding plane exposure of large wave ripples and determined by the presence of hummocky cross-stratification and by facies association vary from a few meters to around 30 m (45-50 m theoretical maximum) in a 45 m-thick stratigraphic section beneath the tuff. Eight kilometers to the southeast, the Garth Tuff is bounded by a thick sequence of suspension-deposited laminated mudstone with thin graded beds of siltstone and fine-grained sandstone. This facies association (OLSFA) represents the introduction of material by distal turbidites and by pelagic sedimentation. The OLSFA was deposited in water depths well below storm wave base, possibly in excess of 200 m. No evidence of storm waves or surface-generated currents occur until over 40 m above the tuff. This study documents marine sedimentary rocks, deposited in water depths ranging from foreshore to offshore, as the bounding facies of the Garth Tuff. It is, thus, reasonable to conclude that the Garth Tuff was emplaced and welded in water depths greater than the thickness of the

  19. Paleomagnetism of Cretaceous and Paleocene sedimentary rocks across the Castle Mountain Fault, south central Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamatakos, John A.; Kodama, K. P.; Vittorio, L. F.; Pavlis, T. L.

    Paleomagnetic and rock magnetic analyses on 217 samples from 13 sites in the Paleocene Chickaloon Formation south of the Castle Mountain Fault and 111 samples from 9 sites in the coeval, but lithologically distinct, Arkose Ridge Formation north of this fault indicate that these rocks contain a pre-folding magnetization carried by fine grained (<1.0μm) single domain magnetite. Secondary magnetizations are common, possibly as the result of the presence of authigenic or hydrothermal pyrrhotite. Although characteristic magnetizations were isolated for the Chickaloon and Arkose Ridge rocks, the best results were obtained from demagnetization plane analysis which estimates the location of the paleomagnetic pole for the Chickaloon Formation at 50.5°N, 277.2°E, δm = 12.2°, δP = 7.77deg;, and a paleomagnetic pole for the Arkose Ridge Formation at 60.4°N, 138.6°E, δm = 11.6°, δp = 6.4°. These results suggest that there is no paleomagnetically discernible latitudinal offset across the Castle Mountain Fault since Paleocene time, but that both the Chickaloon and Arkose Ridge rocks, as part of the Peninsular terrane, originated approximately 1600±1200 km south of their present position with respect to North America. One possible explanation of these data is that the Peninsular terrane was accreted to North America at mid-latitudes in the Cretaceous and was subsequently translated northward by right-lateral strike-slip faulting parallel to the North American margin. Hence, the Arkose Ridge and Chickaloon results may be indicative of the cumulative right-hand displacement occurring on these faults since Paleocene time. However, a calculation using the pole to the small circle fit of the present-day curvature of the Tintina-Northern Rocky Mountain Trench and Denali fault systems, and the maximum amount of structurally estimated offset across these fault systems, indicates that motion on these faults can account for no more than half of the paleomagnetically observed

  20. Using leaf margin analysis to estimate the mid-Cretaceous (Albian) paleolatitude of the Baja BC block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Ian M.; Brandon, Mark T.; Hickey, Leo J.

    2006-05-01

    The "Baja BC hypothesis", which postulates that western Washington State, British Columbia and southern Alaska originated at the latitude of Mexico, has pitted paleomagnetic results against long-held interpretations about the tectonic evolution of western North America. In this paper we develop a new paleobotanical method for estimating paleolatitude and apply it to this problem. We start by showing that the modern MAT field for North America is well correlated with latitude, demonstrating the feasibility of using MAT to estimate paleolatitude. A compilation of MAT and floral data from 84 modern sites in Central and North America is used to establish a new prediction relationship, MAT = 1.32 + 28.99 P, where P is the proportion of smooth-margined species within a floral sample at a site. Our analysis also includes a more complete estimate of the uncertainties associated with estimating MAT from a measurement of P. Using modern data, we show that MAT and P can be used to estimate latitude as well. We then apply this approach to resolve the paleolatitude of Baja BC. Eleven floral sites from stable North America are used to establish the latitudinal MAT profile for North America during the Albian and Cenomanian. A floral site from the Winthrop Formation, a mid-Cretaceous (110-100 Ma) fluvial unit in the Methow basin of northern Washington State, is linked to the Baja BC block and predates its proposed northward offset. Forty-three morphospecies of dicotyledonous angiosperm leaves from the Winthrop Formation give P = 0.76, which is equivalent to a MAT of 23.4 °C, indicating a subtropical to tropical climate. We use the North American MAT profile to estimate a paleolatitude of 38.4°N for the Winthrop flora, indicating ˜ 2200 km of northward offset relative to stable North America.

  1. Combined positron emission tomography and computed tomography to visualize and quantify fluid flow in sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernø, M. A.; Gauteplass, J.; Hauge, L. P.; Abell, G. E.; Adamsen, T. C. H.; Graue, A.

    2015-09-01

    Here we show for the first time the combined positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) imaging of flow processes within porous rocks to quantify the development in local fluid saturations. The coupling between local rock structure and displacement fronts is demonstrated in exploratory experiments using this novel approach. We also compare quantification of 3-D temporal and spatial water saturations in two similar CO2 storage tests in sandstone imaged separately with PET and CT. The applicability of each visualization technique is evaluated for a range of displacement processes, and the favorable implementation of combining PET/CT for laboratory core analysis is discussed. We learn that the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is over an order of magnitude higher for PET compared with CT for the studied processes.

  2. Potassium metasomatism of volcanic and sedimentary rocks in rift basins, calderas and detachment terranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapin, C. E.; drographic basins.

    1985-01-01

    The chemical, mineralogical, and oxygen-isotopic changes accompanying K-metasomatism are described. The similarities with diagenetic reactions in both deep marine and alkaline, saline-lake environments are noted. The common occurrence of K-metasomatism in upper-plate rocks of detachment terranes indicates that the early stage of severe regional extension causes crustal downwarping and, in arid to semi-arid regions, development of closed hydrographic basins.

  3. Raman spectroscopy of carbon and solid bitumens in sedimentary and metamorphic rocks.

    PubMed

    Jehlicka, Jan; Urban, Ondrej; Pokorný, Jan

    2003-08-01

    Different types of carbonaceous matter from rocks display Raman spectral features which knowledge permits to obtain structural information of these materials. Application of Raman microspectroscopy to investigate kerogen, bitumen, fossils, highly carbonified amorphous carbon as well as graphite from different environments is reviewed. Differences in Raman spectra and structural differences between carbonaceous samples differing in their metamorphic history are discussed on the basis of new data.

  4. The sedimentary and tectonic setting of the Transvaal Supergroup floor rocks to the Bushveld complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, P. G.; Reczko, B. F. F.

    1995-11-01

    The Palaeoproterozoic Transvaal Supergroup floor to the Bushveld complex comprises protobasinal successions overlain by the Black Reef Formation, Chuniespoort Group and the uppermost Pretoria Group. The protobasinal successions comprise predominantly mafic lavas and pyroclastic rocks, immature alluvial-fluvial braidplain deposits and finer-grained basinal rocks. These thick, laterally restricted protobasinal sequences reflect either strike-slip or small extensional basins formed during the impactogenal rifting and southeasterly-directed tectonic escape, which accompanied collision of the Zimbabwe and Kaapvaal cratons during Ventersdorp times. The erosively-based sheet sandstones of the succeeding Black Reef Formation reflect northwand-directed compression in the south of the basin. Thermal subsidence along the Ventersdorp Supergroup and Transvaal protobasinal fault systems led to shallow epeiric marine deposition of the sheet-like Chuniespoort Group carbonate-BIF platform succession. After an estimated 80 Ma hiatus, characterized by uplift and karstic weathering of the Chuniespoort dolomites, slower thermal subsidence is thought to have formed the Pretoria Group basin. Widespread, closed basin alluvial fan, fluvial braidplain and lacustrine sedimentation, as well as laterally extensive, subaerial andesitic volcanism (Rooihoogte to Strubenkop Formations), gave way to a marine transgression, which laid down the tuffaceous mudrocks, relatively mature sandstones and subordinate subaqueous volcanic rocks of the succeeding Daspoort, Silverton and Magaliesberg Formations. Poorly preserved post-Magaliesberg formations in the Upper Pretoria Group point to possible compressive deformation and concomitant rapid deposition of largely feldspathic detritus within smaller closed basins.

  5. Evaluation of heat generation by radioactive decay of sedimentary rocks in Eastern Desert and Nile Valley, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Abbady, Adel G E

    2010-10-01

    Radioactive heat-production (RHP) data of sedimentary outcrops in Gebel Anz (Eastern Desert) and Gebel Sarai (Nile Valley) are presented. A total of 103 rock samples were investigated, covering all major rock types of the areas. RHP were derived from uranium, thorium and potassium concentrations measured from gamma-radiation originating from the decay of (214)Bi ((238)U series), (208)Tl ((232)Th series) and the primary decay of (40)K, obtained with a NaI (Tl) detector. The heat-production rate of Gebel Anz ranges from 0.94 (Nubai Sandstone ) to 5.22 microW m(-3) (Duwi Formation). In Gebel Sarai it varies from 0.82 (Esna Shale) to 7 microW m(-3) (Duwi Formation). The contribution due to U is about 62%, from Th is 34% and 4% from K in Gebel Anz. The corresponding values in Gebel Sarai are 69.6%, 26.9% and 3.5%, respectively. These data can be used to discuss the effects of the lateral variation of the RHP rate on the heat flux and the temperature fields in the upper crust. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Biogenicity and Syngeneity of Organic Matter in Ancient Sedimentary Rocks: Recent Advances in the Search for Evidence of Past Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oehler, Dorothy Z.; Cady, Sherry L.

    2014-08-01

    The past decade has seen an explosion of new technologies for assessment of biogenicity and syngeneity of carbonaceous material within sedimentary rocks. Advances have been made in techniques for analysis of in situ organic matter as well as for extracted bulk samples of soluble and insoluble (kerogen) organic fractions. The in situ techniques allow analysis of micrometer-to-sub-micrometer-scale organic residues within their host rocks and include Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy/imagery, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and forms of secondary ion/laser-based mass spectrometry, analytical transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray absorption microscopy/spectroscopy. Analyses can be made for chemical, molecular, and isotopic composition coupled with assessment of spatial relationships to surrounding minerals, veins, and fractures. The bulk analyses include improved methods for minimizing contamination and recognizing syngenetic constituents of soluble organic fractions as well as enhanced spectroscopic and pyrolytic techniques for unlocking syngenetic molecular signatures in kerogen. Together, these technologies provide vital tools for the study of some of the oldest and problematic carbonaceous residues and for advancing our understanding of the earliest stages of biological evolution on Earth and the search for evidence of life beyond Earth. We discuss each of these new technologies, emphasizing their advantages and disadvantages, applications, and likely future directions.

  7. Biogenicity and Syngeneity of Organic Matter in Ancient Sedimentary Rocks: Recent Advances in the Search for Evidence of Past Life

    SciTech Connect

    Oehler, Dorothy Z.; Cady, Sherry L.

    2014-12-01

    he past decade has seen an explosion of new technologies for assessment of biogenicity and syngeneity of carbonaceous material within sedimentary rocks. Advances have been made in techniques for analysis of in situ organic matter as well as for extracted bulk samples of soluble and insoluble (kerogen) organic fractions. The in situ techniques allow analysis of micrometer-to-sub-micrometer-scale organic residues within their host rocks and include Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy/imagery, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and forms of secondary ion/laser-based mass spectrometry, analytical transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray absorption microscopy/spectroscopy. Analyses can be made for chemical, molecular, and isotopic composition coupled with assessment of spatial relationships to surrounding minerals, veins, and fractures. The bulk analyses include improved methods for minimizing contamination and recognizing syngenetic constituents of soluble organic fractions as well as enhanced spectroscopic and pyrolytic techniques for unlocking syngenetic molecular signatures in kerogen. Together, these technologies provide vital tools for the study of some of the oldest and problematic carbonaceous residues and for advancing our understanding of the earliest stages of biological evolution on Earth and the search for evidence of life beyond Earth. We discuss each of these new technologies, emphasizing their advantages and disadvantages, applications, and likely future directions.

  8. A re-examination of paleomagnetic results from NA Jurassic sedimentary rocks: Additional evidence for proposed Jurassic MUTO?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Housen, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    Kent and Irving, 2010; and Kent et al, 2015 propose a monster shift in the position of Jurassic (160 to 145 Ma) paleopoles for North America- defined by results from igneous rocks. This monster shift is likely an unrecognized true polar wander occurrence. Although subject to inclination error, results from sedimentary rocks from North America, if corrected for these effects, can be used to supplement the available data for this time period. Steiner (2003) reported results from 48 stratigraphic horizons sampled from the Callovian Summerville Fm, from NE New Mexico. A recalculated mean of these results yields a mean direction of D = 332, I = 39, n=48, k = 15, α95 = 5.4°. These data were analyzed for possible inclination error-although the dataset is small, the E-I results yielded a corrected I = 53. This yields a corrected paleopole for NA at ~165 Ma located at 67° N and 168° E.Paleomagnetic results from the Black Hills- Kilanowski (2002) for the Callovian Hulett Mbr of the Sundance Fm, and Gregiore (2001) the Oxfordian-Tithonian Morrison Fm (Gregiore, 2001) have previously been interpreted to represent Eocene-aged remagnetizations- due to the nearly exact coincidence between the in-situ pole positions of these Jurassic units with the Eocene pole for NA. Both of the tilt-corrected results for these units have high latitude poles (Sundance Fm: 79° N, 146° E; Morrison Fm: 89° N, 165° E). An E-I analysis of these data will be presented- using a provisional inclination error of 10°, corrected paleopoles are: (Sundance Fm: 76° N, 220° E; Morrison Fm: 77° N, 266° E). The Black Hills 165 Ma (Sundance Fm) and 145 Ma (Morrison Fm) poles, provisionally corrected for 10° inclination error- occur fairly close to the NA APWP proposed by Kent et al, 2015- using an updated set of results from kimberlites- the agreement between the Sundance Fm and the Triple-B (158 Ma) pole would be nearly exact with a slightly lesser inclination error. The Summerville Fm- which is

  9. Erosion of Archean continents: The Sm-Nd and Lu-Hf isotopic record of Barberton sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garçon, M.; Carlson, R. W.; Shirey, S. B.; Arndt, N. T.; Horan, M. F.; Mock, T. D.

    2017-06-01

    Knowing the composition, nature and amount of crust at the surface of the early Earth is crucial to understanding the early geodynamics of our planet. Yet our knowledge of the Hadean-Archean crust is far from complete, limited by the poor preservation of Archean terranes, and the fact that less attention has been paid to the sedimentary record that tracks erosion of these ancient remnants. To address this problem and get a more comprehensive view of what an Archean continent may have looked like, we investigated the trace element and Sm-Nd, Lu-Hf isotopic records of Archean metasedimentary rocks from South Africa. We focused our study on sandstone and mudstone from drill core in the Fig Tree Group (3.23-3.26 Ga) of the Barberton granite-greenstone belt, but also analyzed the 3.4 Ga Buck Reef cherts and still older (3.5-3.6 Ga) meta-igneous rocks from the Ancient Gneiss Complex, Swaziland. Based on principal component analysis of major and trace element data, the Fig Tree metasedimentary rocks can be classified into three groups: crustal detritus-rich sediments, Si-rich sediments and Ca-, Fe-rich sediments. The detritus-rich sediments have preserved the Sm-Nd and Lu-Hf isotopic signatures of their continental sources, and hence can be used to constrain the composition of crust eroded in the Barberton area in the Paleoarchean period. Based on Sm/Nd ratios, we estimate that this crust was more mafic than today, with an average SiO2 content of 60.5 ± 2 wt.%. This composition is further supported by isotopic mixing calculations suggesting that the sedimentary source area contained equal proportions of mafic-ultramafic and felsic rocks. This implies that the Archean crust exposed to weathering was more mafic than today but does not exclude a more felsic composition at depth. Neodymium and Hf crustal residence ages show that the eroded crust was, on average, ∼300-400 Ma older than the deposition age of the sediments, which highlights the importance of intracrustal

  10. Influence of the spatial distribution of cementation on the permeability and mechanical attributes of sedimentary and fault rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozley, P.; Yoon, H.; Williams, R. T.; Goodwin, L. B.

    2015-12-01

    The spatial distribution of pore-filling authigenic minerals (cements) is highly variable and controlled in large part by the mineralogy of the cements and host sediment grains. Two end-member distributions of cements that commonly occur in sedimentary material are: (1) concretionary, in which precipitation occurred in specific zones throughout the sediment, with intervening areas largely uncemented; and (2) grain-rimming, in which precipitation occurred on grain-surfaces relatively uniformly throughout the rock. Concretions form in rocks in which sediment grains have a different composition from the cement, whereas rim cements form in those that have the same composition. Both the mechanical attributes and permeability of a given volume of rock are affected to a much greater extent by grain rimming cements, which have a significant impact on properties at even low abundances. Concretionary cements have little impact on bulk properties until relatively large volumes have precipitated (~80% cemented) and concretions begin to link up. Precipitation of cement in fault zones also impacts both mechanical and hydrologic properties. Cementation will stiffen and strengthen unlithified sediment, thereby controlling the locus of fracturing in protolith or damage zones. Where fracture networks form in fault damage zones, they are initially high permeability elements. However, progressive cementation greatly diminishes fracture permeability, resulting in cyclical permeability variation linked to fault slip. To quantitatively describe the interactions of groundwater flow, permeability, and patterns and abundance of cements, we use pore-scale modeling of coupled fluid flow, reactive transport, and heterogeneous mineral-surface reactions. By exploring the effects of varying distributions of porosity and mineralogy, which impact patterns of cementation, we provide mechanistic explanations of the interactions of coupled processes under various flow and chemistry conditions.

  11. Paleomagnetism of Paleozoic sedimentary rocks from the Karatau Range, Southern Kazakhstan: Multiple remagnetization events correlate with phases of deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirscher, U.; Zwing, A.; Alexeiev, D. V.; Echtler, H. P.; Bachtadse, V.

    2013-08-01

    The paleogeography of the Altaids and its kinematic and tectonic evolution during the final collision and amalgamation of Eurasia is still poorly known. Addressing this problem, a paleomagnetic study has been undertaken on Paleozoic sedimentary rocks from the Karatau, Southern Kazakhstan. Stepwise thermal demagnetization reveals the presence of a high-temperature component of magnetization in most samples. Fold tests indicate a syn-folding age of magnetic remanence acquisition at three of the five areas studied. Directional data of Devonian and Permian rocks yield a positive fold test, implying a primary magnetization. Resulting prefolding paleolatitudes for Permian and Devonian rocks show the proximity of the Karatau to Baltica during those times. Syn- and post-folding magnetizations result in paleolatitudes for Karatau, which intersect the paleolatitude curve based on the Baltica apparent polar wander path (APWP), at times, which can be correlated to major deformational events at ~280 Ma, ~260 Ma, and ~230 Ma, respectively. We interpret this with complicated pattern of remagnetization events accompanying deformation, which can include syn-folding remagnetization events and areas of primary magnetic signals. Additionally, the differences between reference declinations based on the APWP for Baltica and observed declinations suggest successive counterclockwise rotational reorganization of the Karatau during the late Paleozoic to Early Mesozoic, with maximal rotation values of ~65° with respect to Baltica. The remagnetization events are correlated with latest intracontinental stages of orogenic evolution in the Ural mountains and thus the Paleozoic amalgamation of the Eurasian continent and suggest synchronous and coherent tectonic evolution in the Urals and Karatau mountains.

  12. Diffusion-relaxation distribution functions of sedimentary rocks in different saturation states.

    PubMed

    Hürlimann, M D; Flaum, M; Venkataramanan, L; Flaum, C; Freedman, R; Hirasaki, G J

    2003-01-01

    We present diffusion-relaxation distribution functions measured on four rock cores that were prepared in a succession of different saturation states of brine and crude oil. The measurements were performed in a static gradient field at a Larmor frequency of 1.76 MHz. The diffusion-relaxation distribution functions clearly separate the contributions from the two fluid phases. The results can be used to identify the wetting and non-wetting phase, to infer fluid properties of the phases, and to obtain additional information on the geometrical arrangement of the phases. We also observe effects due to restricted diffusion and susceptibility induced internal gradients.

  13. Porous grain model and equivalent elastic medium approach for predicting effective elastic properties of sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Franklin J.

    This dissertation presents the results of using different inclusion and granular effective medium models and poroelasticity to predict the elastic properties of rocks with complex microstructures. Effective medium models account for the microstructure and texture of rocks, and can be used to predict the type of rock and microstructure from seismic velocities and densities. We introduce the elastic equivalency approach, using the differential effective medium model, to predict the effective elastic moduli of rocks and attenuation. We introduce the porous grain concept and develop rock physics models for rocks with microporosity. We exploit the porous grain concept to describe a variety of arrangements of uncemented and cemented grains with different degrees of hydraulic connectivity in the pore space. We first investigate the accuracy of the differential effective medium and self-consistent estimations of elastic properties of complex rock matrix using composites as analogs. We test whether the differential effective-medium (DEM) and self-consistent (SC) models can accurately estimate the elastic moduli of a complex rock matrix and compare the results with the average of upper and lower Hashin-Shtrikman bounds. We find that when the material microstructure is consistent with DEM, this model is more accurate than both SC and the bound-average method for a variety of inclusion aspect ratios, concentrations, and modulus contrasts. Based on these results, we next pose a question: can a theoretical inclusion model, specifically, the differential effective-medium model (DEM), be used to match experimental velocity data in rocks that are not necessarily made of inclusions (such as elastics)? We first approach this question by using empirical velocity-porosity equations as proxies for data. By finding a DEM inclusion aspect ratio (AR) to match these equations, we find that the required range of AR is remarkably narrow. Moreover, a constant AR of about 0.13 can be used to

  14. Disintegration of sedimentary rocks used as building material: evaluation and quantification in 4D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewanckele, J.; Boone, M. A.; de Kock, T.; Cnudde, V.; Boone, M. N.; de Witte, Y.; Pieters, K.; van Loo, D.; van Hoorebeke, L.; Jacobs, P.

    2009-04-01

    Many natural building stones are subject to weathering processes that may lead to their disintegration. When rocks are exposed to extreme exogenous factors such as a combination of water and freeze-thaw cycles, they can deteriorate and cause problems concerning the maintenance of the structure. Some rock types are more susceptible to weathering processes than others, in which fluctuating environmental factors as well as the position of the stone in the building and the endogenous or geological parameters of the stone itself play an important role. In order to determine the influencing geological parameters (pore structure and interconnectivity, mineralogy, cementation…) several techniques are available. One of the techniques mainly focused on in this study is X-ray computed tomography (CT). This rapid and easy-to-use method enables to visualize internal rock structures in a non-destructive way and without any sample preparation. The obtained and afterwards processed digital information enables a better understanding in the 3D geometric rock properties. To obtain a CT-scan of the stone, the sample rotates 360˚ while digital radiographs are taken. In this study 800 radiographs were reconstructed (using the Octopus software package) to create virtual cross-sections through the object. Although X-ray CT is a very valuable technique for 3D reconstruction, the single radiographs also contain a lot of information. They can e.g. be used to measure the contact angle of a drop of water and thus be compared to traditional optical contact angle measurement systems. As the sample stays fixed on the rotational stage of the CT-scanner, a drop of water is released onto the stone's surface. Capillary processes change the drop shape changes during time. After the subtraction of the initial dry state from the wet state, the contact angle of the water drop can be calculated. The advantage of this approach is that also the impregnation depth of the water inside the stone can

  15. Improving ground-penetrating radar data in sedimentary rocks using deterministic deconvolution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, J.; Franseen, E.K.; Miller, R.D.; Weis, T.V.; Byrnes, A.P.

    2003-01-01

    Resolution is key to confidently identifying unique geologic features using ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data. Source wavelet "ringing" (related to bandwidth) in a GPR section limits resolution because of wavelet interference, and can smear reflections in time and/or space. The resultant potential for misinterpretation limits the usefulness of GPR. Deconvolution offers the ability to compress the source wavelet and improve temporal resolution. Unlike statistical deconvolution, deterministic deconvolution is mathematically simple and stable while providing the highest possible resolution because it uses the source wavelet unique to the specific radar equipment. Source wavelets generated in, transmitted through and acquired from air allow successful application of deterministic approaches to wavelet suppression. We demonstrate the validity of using a source wavelet acquired in air as the operator for deterministic deconvolution in a field application using "400-MHz" antennas at a quarry site characterized by interbedded carbonates with shale partings. We collected GPR data on a bench adjacent to cleanly exposed quarry faces in which we placed conductive rods to provide conclusive groundtruth for this approach to deconvolution. The best deconvolution results, which are confirmed by the conductive rods for the 400-MHz antenna tests, were observed for wavelets acquired when the transmitter and receiver were separated by 0.3 m. Applying deterministic deconvolution to GPR data collected in sedimentary strata at our study site resulted in an improvement in resolution (50%) and improved spatial location (0.10-0.15 m) of geologic features compared to the same data processed without deterministic deconvolution. The effectiveness of deterministic deconvolution for increased resolution and spatial accuracy of specific geologic features is further demonstrated by comparing results of deconvolved data with nondeconvolved data acquired along a 30-m transect immediately adjacent

  16. New paleomagnetic data from late Paleozoic sedimentary rocks of Novaya Zemlya Archipelago: tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abashev, Victor V.; Metelkin, Dmitry V.; Mikhaltsov, Nikolay E.; Vernikovsky, Valery A.; Matushkin, Nikolay Yu.

    2017-04-01

    New paleomagnetic data for Novaya Zemlya archipelago were obtained by processing the samples collection gathered during the 2014 field season. The paleomagnetic directions and paleomagnetic poles were determined from the Paleozoic sedimentary complexes located on the Southern Island (Upper Permian) and the Northern Island (Lower and Upper Devonian, Upper Carboniferous) of the archipelago. Positive fold and reversal tests indicate that the isolated paleomagnetic directions correspond to the primary magnetization components. The corresponding paleomagnetic pole are in good agreement with poles obtained earlier in the 1980s by E.L. Gurevich and I.A. Pogarskaya. Considering the confidence ovals, the paleomagnetic poles obtained for the sites of the Northern Island are located close to the corresponding path segment of the APWP of Europe. This means that at least since the early Devonian, the northern part of Novaya Zemlya Archipelago had a position that was close to its current position relatively to the Arctic margin of Europe and has not undergone significant shifts or rotations. However, the upper Permian paleomagnetic pole for the Southern Island is very different from the corresponding part of the European APWP. We are considering this pole position within a model, involving significant intraplate movement between the structures of the European and Siberian tectonic provinces until the Late Cretaceous. The sinistral strike-slips inferred by the model could have caused or were accompanying the opening of the Mesozoic rift system in Western Siberia. This event has reached its maximum within the South Kara basin and resulted in the north-westward (in geographic coordinates) displacement of the southern part of the Novaya Zemlya Archipelago in relation to the Arctic margin of Europe and in the deformation of the Pay-Khoy-Novaya Zemlya margin, which caused its modern curved form. The study was supported by the Russian Science Foundation, grant No. 14-37-00030 and the

  17. Effect of confining pressure on diffusion coefficients in clay-rich, low-permeability sedimentary rocks.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Y; Al, T; Mazurek, M

    2016-12-01

    The effect of confining pressure (CP) on the diffusion of tritiated-water (HTO) and iodide (I(-)) tracers through Ordovician rocks from the Michigan Basin, southwestern Ontario, Canada, and Opalinus Clay from Schlattingen, Switzerland was investigated in laboratory experiments. Four samples representing different formations and lithologies in the Michigan Basin were studied: Queenston Formation shale, Georgian Bay Formation shale, Cobourg Formation limestone and Cobourg Formation argillaceous limestone. Estimated in situ vertical stresses at the depths from which the samples were retrieved range from 12.0 to 17.4MPa (Michigan Basin) and from 21 to 23MPa (Opalinus Clay). Effective diffusion coefficients (De) were determined in through-diffusion experiments. With HTO tracer, applying CP resulted in decreases in De of 12.5% for the Queenston Formation shale (CPmax=12MPa), 30% for the Georgian Bay Formation shale (15MPa), 34% for the Cobourg Formation limestone (17.4MPa), 31% for the Cobourg Formation argillaceous limestone (17.4MPa) and 43-46% for the Opalinus Clay (15MPa). Decreases in De were larger for the I(-) tracer: 13.8% for the Queenston shale, 42% for the Georgian Bay shale, 50% for the Cobourg Formation limestone, 55% for the Cobourg Formation argillaceous limestone and 63-68% for the Opalinus Clay. The tracer-specific nature of the response is attributed to an increasing influence of anion exclusion as the pore size decreases at higher CP. Results from the shales (including Opalinus Clay) indicate that the pressure effect on De can be represented by a linear relationship between De and ln(CP), which provides valuable predictive capability. The nonlinearity results in a relatively small change in De at high CP, suggesting that it is not necessary to apply the exact in situ pressure conditions in order to obtain a good estimate of the in situ diffusion coefficient. Most importantly, the CP effect on shale is reversible (±12%) suggesting that, for

  18. Microfacies analysis of foraminifera rich sedimentary rocks from the Desert Plateau, central Egypt.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnitschar, C.; Briguglio, A.; Hohenegger, J.

    2012-04-01

    Microfacies analysis on some samples from the Thebes Group have been carried on by means of thin sections. The study area is included in the Libyan Desert Plateau (central Egypt) at following coordinates N27° 36'30.58" E29° 44'58.34", near the biggest dune of Egypt, the Ghard Abu Muharik. Because of the round shape of the rocks and the desert patina on the surface they could easily be classified as the so called "Melonstones", which are located more southwards and mainly composed by stromatolites. On the contrary, the investigated samples show a completely different fauna and therefore have been separated from the "Melonstones". Even if shape and size are very similar and the desert patina covers all surfaces the same way the differences are impressive. To investigate the samples, two thin-sections have been prepared and analyzed at the microscope. The observed fauna is composed by: agglutinated benthic foraminifera (e.g., Dictyoconus egypticus), complex larger miliolids (e.g., Pseudolacazina cf. danatae, Fabularia sp.), alveolinids (Alveolina vredenburgi), green algae (Dasycladaceae), echinoids and corals. Because of the presence of symbionts bearing larger benthic foraminifera, which need light to feed photosymbionts, the rock was formed in a shallow water environment. With the abundant rock-building benthic foraminifera and calcareous algae the limestone shows a tendency to the packstone/wackestone facies. Based on the presence of Alveolina vredenburgi, the age of the samples can be estimate as lowermost Eocene belonging to the shallow benthic zone 5 (sensu Serra-Kiel et al., 1998). According the obtained data on stratigraphy and palaeoecology, a partial palaeoenvironmental reconstruction is possible for the Libyan Desert Plateau where outcrops are largely missing. Because of the round shape of the samples and the patina which covers them all around it can be assumed that they have been transported from longer distance. According to the geological map of the

  19. Effect of confining pressure on diffusion coefficients in clay-rich, low-permeability sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Y.; Al, T.; Mazurek, M.

    2016-12-01

    The effect of confining pressure (CP) on the diffusion of tritiated-water (HTO) and iodide (I-) tracers through Ordovician rocks from the Michigan Basin, southwestern Ontario, Canada, and Opalinus Clay from Schlattingen, Switzerland was investigated in laboratory experiments. Four samples representing different formations and lithologies in the Michigan Basin were studied: Queenston Formation shale, Georgian Bay Formation shale, Cobourg Formation limestone and Cobourg Formation argillaceous limestone. Estimated in situ vertical stresses at the depths from which the samples were retrieved range from 12.0 to 17.4 MPa (Michigan Basin) and from 21 to 23 MPa (Opalinus Clay). Effective diffusion coefficients (De) were determined in through-diffusion experiments. With HTO tracer, applying CP resulted in decreases in De of 12.5% for the Queenston Formation shale (CPmax = 12 MPa), 30% for the Georgian Bay Formation shale (15 MPa), 34% for the Cobourg Formation limestone (17.4 MPa), 31% for the Cobourg Formation argillaceous limestone (17.4 MPa) and 43-46% for the Opalinus Clay (15 MPa). Decreases in De were larger for the I- tracer: 13.8% for the Queenston shale, 42% for the Georgian Bay shale, 50% for the Cobourg Formation limestone, 55% for the Cobourg Formation argillaceous limestone and 63-68% for the Opalinus Clay. The tracer-specific nature of the response is attributed to an increasing influence of anion exclusion as the pore size decreases at higher CP. Results from the shales (including Opalinus Clay) indicate that the pressure effect on De can be represented by a linear relationship between De and ln(CP), which provides valuable predictive capability. The nonlinearity results in a relatively small change in De at high CP, suggesting that it is not necessary to apply the exact in situ pressure conditions in order to obtain a good estimate of the in situ diffusion coefficient. Most importantly, the CP effect on shale is reversible (± 12%) suggesting that, for

  20. Paleomagnetism and geochronology of volcanogenic-sedimentary rocks of Henrietta Island (De Long Archipelago, Arctic Ocean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernova, A. I.; Metelkin, D. V.; Matushkin, N. Yu.; Vernikovsky, V. A.; Travin, A. V.

    2017-08-01

    The paper presents results of geochronological and paleomagnetic studies of the volcanogenicsedimentary sequence of Henrietta Island in the East Siberian Sea. Our 40Ar/39Ar investigations confirm existing ideas that the bottom part of the section formed in the Ediacaran ( 565 Ma) and that the basalts in the top of the section formed before the middle Cambrian ( 520 Ma). Calculated paleomagnetic data confirm that during the rocks formation the territory of present-day Henrietta Island was located close to the 20° latitude, which lets us adjust some information published earlier on the age and natural remanent magnetization of the dolerite dikes of the nearby Jeannette Island. The new data also let us propose that a regional tectonothermal event, probably caused by accretion-related processes, took place at the beginning of the Ordovician.

  1. Protocol for Identifying Fossil Biofilm Microfabrics in Archean and Martian Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bontognali, T. R. R.; McKenzie, J. A.; Vasconcelos, C.

    2014-12-01

    Microbial communities commonly live and grow in aggregates called biofilm. This slimy material is composed of exopolymeric substances (EPS) secreted from the microbial cell to the surrounding environment. Certain biofilms show internal microscopic fabrics, as for example, regularly shaped alveolar structures. These microfabrics are often considered as artifacts due to the dehydration steps required for scanning electron microscopy. However, recent studies have demonstrated that some microfabrics are not artifacts but actual structures, whose architecture is controlled by the microorganisms. These findings, mainly achieved for medical purposes, may have yet unconsidered implications for the search of early life on Earth and on Mars. Indeed, evidence exists that the microfabrics can be mineralized during early diagenesis, preserving fossil imprints of the original biofilm throughout the geological record. Here, we present the results of microscopic investigations of ancient sediments of various age, composition and metamorphic degree that contain microfabrics that we interpret as fossil biofilms. We compile a list of criteria that need to be evaluated before excluding that the putative fossil biofilms may be artifacts due to sample preparation or late stage contamination of the studied rocks. Additionally, we compare these microfabrics to those produced by pure cultures of microorganism grown in the laboratory, as well as microfabrics present in microbial mats that develop in modern evaporitic environments. Finally, we discuss the hypothesis - and the evidence that already exists in its support - that the micrometric size and the morphology of the EPS fabrics is specific to the organism and the genome concerned. By establishing a linkage between specific microbes and the architecture of the mineralized microfabrics, it may be possible to gain precise taxonomic information on early life, as well as to establish a new type of morphological biosignature to be searched

  2. The roles of organic matter in the formation of uranium deposits in sedimentary rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spirakis, C.S.

    1996-01-01

    alterations. In the case of Precambrian unconformity-related deposits, free thermal convection in the thick sandstones overlying the basement rocks carried uranium to concentrations of organic matter in the basement rocks.

  3. The Finest Particles in the Sedimentary Environments and Fault Zone Rocks, and its implication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, P.; Song, S.; Tsao, T.

    2010-12-01

    Analyzing the particle size, shape and orientation on the faulting material has become a routine but important work. These data provide characters of fragmentation and comminuting process and go further have information of fracture energy. In order to calculate the fracture energy, we need to know the particle size distribution of fault gouge which determine total fracture surface area. However the finest particle of gouge or threshold of lower cut-off particle size is the most important parameter to dominate the amount of surface energy. To give an example, the calculating the fracture energy, Punchbowl fault and Chelungpu fault give the threshold of lower cut-off particle size respectively 1.6 nm and 50 nm. Criteria for determining the threshold of lower cut-off size is the main purpose in this study. Faulted rocks are usually composed of gouge and mineral grains in the repeated deformable process. For comparing the mineral assemblages and the finest particles, we collected the sample from different environments and fault zones and used the wet sieving, sedimentation, ultracentrifugation and automated ultrafiltration device to separate the sizes of particle. Collecting the particles in different size ranges (<2000nm, 450-2000nm, 100-450nm, 50-100nm, < 50nm) and analyze the particle with SEM, TEM and XRD. The result of fault wall rock from TCDP and Punchbowl fault consist predominantly of Quartz, Smectite, Illite, and the minimum particle size collected with the range less than 100 nm. Now we want to adopt the new method, AUD( Automated Ultrafiltertion Device) to collect the particle size less than 50nm and realize the mineralogy.

  4. Using the U-Pb system of calcretes to date the time of sedimentation of clastic sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. S.; Rasbury, E. T.; Hanson, G. N.; Meyers, W. J.

    1998-08-01

    The time of sedimentation of rapidly deposited clastic sedimentary rocks in fluvial environments may be directly dated with an uncertainty of less than three million years using U-Pb dating of pure micritic calcite from calcretes developed in overbank deposits. This conclusion is based on results obtained for calcretes (soil calcite, caliche) formed in the late Triassic New Haven Arkose, Hartford Basin, Connecticut, USA. The paragenesis of calcrete samples from the New Haven Arkose was determined using plane-polarized light and cathodoluminesence petrography, uranium fission track analysis, as well as trace element and stable isotope geochemistry. These calcretes contain an abundance of paleosol microfabrics and diagenetic calcite. The first-generation micritic calcite and second-generation blocky calcite have characteristics consistent with soil calcite. The third generation blocky calcite is a later diagenetic calcite (post-soil calcite). The U-Pb data for pure micritic calcite (first generation) in a horizontal sheet calcrete in sedimentary rocks of Norian age gives a 238U/ 207Pb- 206Pb/ 207Pb isochron age of 211.9 ± 2.1 Ma (2-sigma, and used hereafter for all ages). This age and the stratigraphic position for this sample are in excellent agreement with the ages proposed by Gradstein et al. (1994) for the Norian/Rhaetian boundary of 209.6 ± 4.1 Ma and the Carnian/Norian boundary of 220.7 ± 4.4 Ma. The U-Pb data for two samples of first generation micrite in rhizoliths with about 15% insoluble residues give "ages" of 7 ± 66 Ma and 20 ± 36 Ma. These results suggest that relatively recent events disturbed the U-Pb system of these detrital rich samples, perhaps due to redistribution of U during weathering or during chemical dissolution for analysis. The U-Pb data for a sample of pure third generation blocky calcite cement in a rhizolith yields a 206Pb/ 238U- 207Pb/ 235U isochron age of 81 ± 11 Ma. This age suggests that this sample of third generation blocky

  5. Diffusive anisotropy in low-permeability Ordovician sedimentary rocks from the Michigan Basin in southwest Ontario.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Y; Al, T; Scott, L; Loomer, D

    2013-12-01

    Diffusive anisotropy was investigated using samples from Upper Ordovician shale and argillaceous limestone from the Michigan Basin of southwest Ontario, Canada. Effective diffusion coefficients (De) were determined for iodide (I(-)) and tritiated water (HTO) tracers on paired cm-scale subsamples oriented normal (NB) and parallel to bedding (PB) prepared from preserved drill cores within one year from the date of drilling. For samples with porosity >3%, an X-ray radiography method was used with I(-) tracer for determination of De and porosity accessible to I(-) ions. A through-diffusion method with I(-) and HTO tracers was used for most siltstone and limestone samples with low-porosity (<3%). The De values range from 7.0×10(-13) to 7.7×10(-12) m(2)·s(-1) for shale, 2.1×10(-13) to 1.3×10(-12) m(2)·s(-1) for limestone, and 5.3×10(-14) to 5.6×10(-13) m(2)·s(-1) for siltstone and limestone interbeds within the Georgian Bay Formation shale. The sample-scale anisotropy ratios (De-PB:De-NB) for De values obtained using the I(-) tracer are 0.9 to 4.9, and the anisotropy ratios for the HTO tracer are in the range of 1.1 to 7.0. The influence of porosity distribution on diffusive anisotropy has been investigated using one-dimensional spatially-resolved profiles of I(-)-accessible porosity (shale only) and the use of AgNO3 for fixation of I(-) tracer in the pores, allowing for SEM visualization of I(-)-accessible pore networks. The porosity profiles at the sample scale display greatest variability in the direction normal to bedding which likely reflects sedimentary depositional processes. The SEM imaging suggests that diffusion pathways are preferentially oriented parallel to bedding in the shale and that diffusion occurs dominantly within the argillaceous component of the limestone. However, the fine clay-filled intergranular voids in the dolomitic domains of the limestone are also accessible for diffusive transport. © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights

  6. A Hydraulic Tomography Experiment in Fractured Sedimentary Rocks, Newark Basin, New Jersey, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiedeman, C. R.; Barrash, W.; Thrash, C. J.; Johnson, C. D.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic tomography was performed in July 2015 in contaminated fractured mudstone beds at the former Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC) in the Newark Basin near Trenton, NJ using seven existing wells. The spatial arrangement of wells (in a circle of 9 m radius with one central well), the use of packers to divide the wells into multiple monitoring intervals, and the deployment of fiber optic pressure transducers enabled collection of a hydraulic tomography dataset comprising high-resolution drawdown observations at an unprecedented level of spatial detail for fractured rocks. The experiment involved 45-minute cross-hole aquifer tests, conducted by pumping from a given packer-isolated well interval and continuously monitoring drawdowns in all other well intervals. The collective set of drawdown data from all tests and intervals displays a wide range of behavior suggestive of highly heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity (K) within the tested volume, such as: drawdown curves for different well intervals crossing one another on drawdown-time plots; variable drawdown curve shapes, including linear segments on log-log plots; variable order and magnitude of time-lag and/or drawdown for intervals of a given well in response to pumping from similar fractures or stratigraphic units in different wells; and variable groupings of wells and intervals showing similar responses for different pumping tests. The observed behavior is consistent with previous testing at the NAWC indicating that K within and across individual mudstone beds can vary by orders of magnitude over scales of meters. Preliminary assessment of the drawdown data together with a rich set of geophysical logs suggests an initial conceptual model that includes densely distributed fractures of moderate K at the shallowest depths of the tested volume, connected high-K bedding-plane-parting fractures at intermediate depths, and sparse low-K fractures in the deeper rocks. Future work will involve tomographic inversion of

  7. Quantifying sedimentary and diagenetic controls on fracturing: an application in rock engineering systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiei, Mehrnoush; Rahimpour-Bonab, Hossain; Tavakoli, Vahid; Khorasani, Emad

    2016-12-01

    Several studies have been carried out to understand and justify the influences of depositional and post depositional (diagenetic) processes on the fracturing and its features. However, the effecting parameters are not completely understood yet. In this research, 1440 datasets, obtained from thin sections and cores analysis from one well in the Dalan and Kangan carbonate reservoir are considered to evaluate the effect of various depositional-diagenetic parameters on the fracturing. The considered parameters include lithology, facies, dolomitization (crystal size and shape), porosity, stylolitization and anhydrite nodules and they are further subdivided based on their fracture intensity. Then, the rock engineering systems (RES) approach is employed to weight them. Moreover, an interaction matrix is provided in which the main parameters are arranged along its main diagonal elements while the interrelations between pairs of parameters are distributed in its off-diagonal elements. The weighting coefficient of each parameter is calculated through this matrix. According to the calculations, facies and porosity are the most causal and effected parameters, respectively. The Fracture Index is obtained by using the weighting coefficient and normalized code of the parameters in the classification. Additionally, a polynomial equation with the coefficient of determination (R 2), in FI versus number of fractures (FN) diagram, is gained 0.735 where the number of fractures is enhanced with increase in FI. Finally, 300 datasets of the data are utilized to validate the methodology. The FIs of these data (predicted values) show a proper correlation with FNs (real values).

  8. Analysis of hydromechanical well tests in fractured sedimentary rock at the NAWC site, New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murdoch, L.C.; Hisz, D.B.; Ebenhack, J.F.; Fowler, D.E.; Tiedeman, C.R.; Germanovich, L.N.

    2009-01-01

    Hydromechanical well tests involve measuring and interpreting displacements along with hydraulic heads that result when a hydraulic stress is applied to a well. The motivation behind this type of test is that the displacement measurements provide information about the constitutive properties and structure of the aquifer that go beyond what can be derived from pressure signals alone. We used a borehole extensometer to measure transient displacements with a resolution of +/- 25 nm during well tests in fractured mudstone and sandstone at the former Naval Air Warfare Center in West Trenton, New Jersey. One well showed opening displacements on the order of 300nm during slug tests with maximum head changes of 7 m. Inversion of the transient signals suggest that a conductive fracture (aperture = 380 ??m, normal stiffness = 8??10 8 Pa/m) was largely responsible for the pressure signal, but the displacement signal appears to have resulted from both the fracture and deformation of the enveloping sandstone (E = 5 GPa, permeability = 0.6 md). At another well, an anomalous but repeatable signal was characterized by closing displacements during increasing pressure. This displacement signal can be explained by a hydraulically active fracture below the extensometer that became pressurized and compressed the overly sediments. Poroelastic theoretical analyses were inverted to estimate parameters and verify interpretations. Copyright 2009 ARMA, American Rock Mechanics Association.

  9. The sedimentary organic matter from a Lake Ichkeul core (far northern Tunisia): Rock-Eval and biomarker approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Affouri, Hassène; Sahraoui, Olfa

    2017-05-01

    The vertical distributions of bulk and molecular biomarker composition in samples from a ca. 156 cm sediment core from Lake Ichkeul were determined. Bulk analysis (Rock-Eval pyrolysis, carbonate, lipid extraction) and molecular analysis of saturated fractions were used to characterize the nature, preservation conditions and input of sedimentary organic matter (OM) to this sub-wet lake environment. The sediments are represented mainly by gray-black silty-clay facies where the carbonate (CaCO3) content varies in a range of 10-30% dry sediment. Rock-Eval pyrolysis revealed a homogeneous total organic carbon (TOC) content of ca. 1% sediment, but with down core fluctuation, indicating different anoxic conditions at different depths and material source variation. The values show three periods of relative enrichment, exceeding ca. 1%, at 146-134 cm, 82 cm and 14-0 cm depth. The low Hydrogen Index (HI) values [<119 mg hydrocarbon (HC)/g TOC)] were characteristic of continental Type III OM. The Tmax values in the range 415-420 °C were characteristic of immature OM at an early diagenetic stage. The distributions of n-alkanes (C17 to C34), isoprenoid (iso) alkanes (pristane and phytane), terpanes and steranes showed that the OM is a mixture of marine algal and bacterial source and emergent and floating higher plant origin. In addition, the distributions, as well as several biomarker ratios (n-alkanes, iso-alkanes/n-alkanes), showed that the OM is a mixture of immature and mature. Significant downcore fluctuation was observed in the molecular composition. This indicates intense microbial activity below ca. 50 cm core depth under an anoxic and brackish environment.

  10. Weathering of Igneous, Metamorphic, and Sedimentary Rocks in a Semi-arid Climate - An Engineering Application of Petrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, W. J.; Wendlandt, R. F.

    2003-12-01

    Over the last 10 years, analytical methods have been introduced to students in CSM's undergraduate geological engineering program through a multi-year and multi-course approach. Beginning with principles and simple applications of XRD and SEM in sophomore Mineralogy and building on these skills in subsequent junior and senior year courses, geological engineers acquire proficiency in analytical methods. Essential workplace skills are thus acquired without adding an extra course in the undergraduate program. The following exercise is completed by juniors in an integrated Ig.-Met.-Sed. petrology course. The identification of clay mineral assemblages in soils provides a unique opportunity to demonstrate how basic principles of petrology and geochemistry are applied to engineering design criteria in construction site preparation. Specifically, the problem investigates the conditions leading to the formation of smectite in soils and the resulting construction risk due to soil expansion. Students examine soils developed on igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks near Denver, Colorado. The field locations are areas of suburban growth and several have expansive soil problems. The 2-week exercise includes sample collection, description, and preparation, determining clay mineralogy by XRD, and measurement of Atterberg Plasticity Indices. Teaching materials may be found at: http://serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops/petrology03/. This exercise accomplishes three objectives: First, skills in XRD analysis are developed by introducing students to concepts of particle size separation, particle orientation, and sequential analysis steps which are standard practices in clay characterization. Second, lecture material on the geochemistry of weathering of different rock types is reinforced. Students interpret the origin of clay mineral assemblages developed in soils derived from Precambrian gneisses, lower Paleozoic feldspathic sandstones, upper Paleozoic marine shales, and Tertiary

  11. Stratigraphy, petrography, and provenance of Archean sedimentary rocks of the Nsuze Group, Pongola Supergroup, in the Wit M'folozi Inlier, South Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Gamero de Villarroel, H. ); Lowe, D.R. )

    1993-02-01

    The Upper Archean Pongola Supergroup is a succession of clastic and volcanic rocks that represents the oldest relatively unmetamorphosed sedimentary sequence deposited on the basement of the 3.5-3.2 Ga-old Kaapvaal Craton. The Pongola Supergroup includes two subdivisions, the Nsuze and the Mozaan Groups. The Nsuze Group is composed of clastic rocks, minor carbonate units, and basalt. Nsuze sandstones are dominated by granite-derived sediments, and minor basaltic-derived detritus. Most Nsuze sedimentary rocks are sandstones that include both quartz-fieldspar and lithic-rich varieties. The mineralogy of Nsuze sandstones reflects the mixing of debris derived from two distinctive sources: (1) a sialic plutonic source yielding quartz and microcline and (2) a basaltic source yielding basaltic lithic detritus and plagioclase. The most likely source rocks for the Nsuze sandstones in the Wit M'folozi Inlier were Archean granitic basement, represented by the Mpuluzi batholith, and Nsuze basaltic volcanic rocks. Both continental arc and rift settings have been proposed for the Pongola Supergroup. Nsuze sandstones show similarities to continental arc sandstone suites. However, there is no report of the existence of high standing stratovolcanoes, calc-alkaline plutonism, or contact and regional metamorphism of the intruded volcanic-sedimentary and basement rocks in the Pongola basin, features that are typically associated with continental arcs. The dominance of continent-derived detritus in the Nsuze Group argues that volcanic rocks made up a minor part of the exposed source area and that volcanism was largely restricted to the basin of deposition. Collectively, available evidence favors an intracratonic rift for the depositional setting of the Nsuze Group.

  12. Lithologic discrimination of volcanic and sedimentary rocks by spectral examination of Landsat TM data from the Puma, Central Andes Mountains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fielding, E. J.

    1986-01-01

    The Central Andes are widely used as a modern example of noncollisional mountain-building processes. The Puna is a high plateau in the Chilean and Argentine Central Andes extending southward from the altiplano of Bolivia and Peru. Young tectonic and volcanic features are well exposed on the surface of the arid Puna, making them prime targets for the application of high-resolution space imagery such as Shuttle Imaging Radar B and Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM). Two TM scene quadrants from this area are analyzed using interactive color image processing, examination, and automated classification algorithms. The large volumes of these high-resolution datasets require significantly different techniques than have been used previously for the interpretation of Landsat MSS data. Preliminary results include the determination of the radiance spectra of several volcanic and sedimentary rock units and the use of the spectra for automated classification. Structural interpretations have revealed several previously unknown folds in late Tertiary strata, and key zones have been targeted to be investigated in the field. The synoptic view of space imagery is already filling a critical gap between low-resolution geophysical data and traditional geologic field mapping in the reconnaissance study of poorly mapped mountain frontiers such as the Puna.

  13. Effect of mineral constituents in the bioleaching of uranium from uraniferous sedimentary rock samples, Southwestern Sinai, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Amin, Maisa M; Elaassy, Ibrahim E; El-Feky, Mohamed G; Sallam, Abdel Sattar M; Talaat, Mona S; Kawady, Nilly A

    2014-08-01

    Bioleaching, like Biotechnology uses microorganisms to extract metals from their ore materials, whereas microbial activity has an appreciable effect on the dissolution of toxic metals and radionuclides. Bioleaching of uranium was carried out with isolated fungi from uraniferous sedimentary rocks from Southwestern Sinai, Egypt. Eight fungal species were isolated from different grades of uraniferous samples. The bio-dissolution experiments showed that Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus terreus exhibited the highest leaching efficiencies of uranium from the studied samples. Through monitoring the bio-dissolution process, the uranium grade and mineralogic constituents of the ore material proved to play an important role in the bioleaching process. The tested samples asserted that the optimum conditions of uranium leaching are: 7 days incubation time, 3% pulp density, 30 °C incubation temperature and pH 3. Both fungi produced the organic acids, namely; oxalic, acetic, citric, formic, malonic, galic and ascorbic in the culture filtrate, indicating an important role in the bioleaching processes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Lithologic discrimination of volcanic and sedimentary rocks by spectral examination of Landsat TM data from the Puma, Central Andes Mountains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fielding, E. J.

    1986-01-01

    The Central Andes are widely used as a modern example of noncollisional mountain-building processes. The Puna is a high plateau in the Chilean and Argentine Central Andes extending southward from the altiplano of Bolivia and Peru. Young tectonic and volcanic features are well exposed on the surface of the arid Puna, making them prime targets for the application of high-resolution space imagery such as Shuttle Imaging Radar B and Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM). Two TM scene quadrants from this area are analyzed using interactive color image processing, examination, and automated classification algorithms. The large volumes of these high-resolution datasets require significantly different techniques than have been used previously for the interpretation of Landsat MSS data. Preliminary results include the determination of the radiance spectra of several volcanic and sedimentary rock units and the use of the spectra for automated classification. Structural interpretations have revealed several previously unknown folds in late Tertiary strata, and key zones have been targeted to be investigated in the field. The synoptic view of space imagery is already filling a critical gap between low-resolution geophysical data and traditional geologic field mapping in the reconnaissance study of poorly mapped mountain frontiers such as the Puna.

  15. A Novel Layered Sedimentary Rocks Structure of the Oxygen-Enriched Carbon for Ultrahigh-Rate-Performance Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin-Lin; Li, Huan-Huan; Shi, Yan-Hong; Fan, Chao-Ying; Wu, Xing-Long; Wang, Hai-Feng; Sun, Hai-Zhu; Zhang, Jing-Ping

    2016-02-17

    In this paper, gelatin as a natural biomass was selected to successfully prepare an oxygen-enriched carbon with layered sedimentary rocks structure, which exhibited ultrahigh-rate performance and excellent cycling stability as supercapacitors. The specific capacitance reached 272.6 F g(-1) at 1 A g(-1) and still retained 197.0 F g(-1) even at 100 A g(-1) (with high capacitance retention of 72.3%). The outstanding electrochemical performance resulted from the special layered structure with large surface area (827.8 m(2) g(-1)) and high content of oxygen (16.215 wt %), which effectively realized the synergistic effects of the electrical double-layer capacitance and pseudocapacitance. Moreover, it delivered an energy density of 25.3 Wh kg(-1) even with a high power density of 34.7 kW kg(-1) and ultralong cycling stability (with no capacitance decay even over 10,000 cycles at 2 A g(-1)) in a symmetric supercapacitor, which are highly desirable for their practical application in energy storage devices and conversion.

  16. Novel DNA Extraction Method Unveiled the Ancient Hot Deep Biosphere Concealed in Terrestrial Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouduka, M.; Suko, T.; Okuzawa, K.; Fukuda, A.; Nanba, K.; Yamamoto, M.; Sakata, S.; Ito, K.; Suzuki, Y.

    2009-12-01

    It has been proposed that the hot deep biosphere is distributed deeply in the crust of the Earth. Below the upper limit of life, prokaryotic habitats extend at a depth of 4 km within a typical range of thermal gradients (2.5-3°C/100m). In contrary, large geothermal gradients allow the hot deep biosphere approaching to the Earth’s surface. We conducted aseptic and deoxygenated drilling targeting Miocene marine siliceous rocks in a tectonically stable inland fore-arc basin in central Japan. Although the in-situ groundwater temperature was 30.2°C at a maximum drilling depth of 352 mbgl, opal-CT and clinoptilolite, which commonly form as a result of progressive burial at 30-60°C and over 70°C, respectively, were detected by XRD analysis. However, burial-driven degradation and transformation of sterols (sterene to sterane) was not evident in the core samples. As presented by Y. Suzuki et al. in this meeting, extant microbial populations were dominated by Pseudomonas spp. and Flavobacterium spp. with cell numbers ranging ~107-108 cells/cm3 rock. Despite the abundance of microbial cells, DNA were not extracted from the core samples by conventional methods. We developed a DNA extraction method to avoid binding of DNA onto the siliceous mineral matrix by heating under alkaline conditions, which resulted in the successful retrieval of PCR-amplifiable DNA. Unexpectedly, 16S rRNA gene sequences closely related thermophilic Geobacillus stearothermophilus and Thermus thermophilus were dominant in the clone libraries from 300- and 350-m deep core samples, while those almost identical to the Pseudomonas spp. were minor. Based on the correlation between the GC contents of 16S rRNA gene sequences and growth temperatures of prokaryotes, the estimated growth temperatures were 90.0°C (G+C=66.3%) and 67.5°C (G+C=61.3%) for G. stearothermophilus and T. thermophilus, respectively. From these results, it is implied that temperature rise in the past led to the colonization of

  17. Geophysical methods for locating groundwater in low permeability sedimentary rocks: examples from southeast Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, A. M.; Davies, J.; Peart, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    Geophysical techniques have long been used to help locate rural groundwater supplies in crystalline basement environments. However, as local communities (particularly in sub-Saharan Africa) look to increasingly marginal aquifers for supply, many of the standard procedures for locating groundwater become inappropriate. Areas underlain by low permeability sediments (such as shales and siltstones) are particularly difficult for locating groundwater resources. In response to these difficulties, this study was commissioned to assess both the groundwater potential and methods for siting wells and boreholes in low permeability sediments in Oju, southeast Nigeria. The Oju area suffers from an acute water shortage during a five-month dry season. Low permeability Cretaceous shales, siltstones and sandstones, with occasional intrusions of basic igneous rocks, underlie the area. Three main targets for groundwater have been identified: (i) sandy units within the shales; (ii) fracture zones in areas where the shales are lithified; and (iii) fractures associated with dolerite dykes and sills. The geophysical techniques used to identify these groundwater targets comprise frequency domain conductivity using the Geonics EM34, vertical electrical resistivity sounding (VES) and magnetic profiling (using a proton precession magnetometer). Three areas were studied in detail using a combination of geophysical surveys, exploratory drilling of the characteristics geophysical anomalies identified and test pumping. In the interbedded shale and sandstone areas, sandstones were distinguished as low conductivity zones (< 20 mmhos m -1) using electromagnetic and resistivity techniques. In the lithified mudstones, fracture zones were readily identified using electromagnetic methods as negative anomalies or smaller amplitude 'noisy' profiles. Dolerite intrusions wihin soft shales were identified by their lower electrical conductivity and distinct magnetic anomalies.

  18. The relationships between the velocities, attenuations and petrophysical properties of reservoir sedimentary rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Best, A.I.; McCann, C.; Sothcott, J. . Postgraduate Research Inst. for Sedimentology)

    1994-02-01

    The authors have measured the velocities and attenuations of compressional and shear waves in 29 water-saturated samples of sandstones and shales at a confining pressure of 60 MPa and at frequencies of about 0.85 MHz. The measurements were made using a pulse echo method in which the samples (diameter 5 cm, length 1.5 cm to 2.5 cm) were placed between perspex buffer rods inside a high-pressure cell. The velocity of each seismic wave was determined from the travel time difference of equivalent phase points (corrected for diffraction effects) of the signals reflected from the top and from the base of each samples. Attenuation was determined in a similar way by comparison of the diffraction corrected amplitudes of the signals. The attenuation data are presented as quality factors'': Q[sub p] and Q[sub s] for compressional and shear waves respectively and shear waves respectively. The results show that Qs is strongly correlated with V[sub s], that Q[sub p] is weakly correlated with V[sub p], and that Q[sub p] is strongly correlated with Q[sub s] [center dot] Q[sub p] is strongly dependent on the volume percentage of the assemblage of intra-pore minerals, whether they are clays or carbonates. It is concluded that the attenuation mechanism is due to the local fluid flow arising from the differential dilation of the solid rock frame and the intra-pore mineral assemblage, which is a results of their very different elastic moduli.

  19. Failure mode, strain localization and permeability evolution in porous sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vajdova, Veronika

    investigated on dry samples of Indiana and Tavel limestones. Despite the difference in deformation mechanisms, failure modes in the limestones were similar to that of porous sandstones reported in literature: dilatant brittle faulting and compactioe ductile flow at low and high confining pressures, respectively. The observations were interpreted by two micromechanical models. Our data combined with published data characterize pore collapse in carbonate rocks with porosities between 3% and 45%.

  20. Geological and geochemical characteristics of sedimentary rocks in Kremna, basin (Serbia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perunović, Tamara; Jovančićević, Branimir; Brčeski, Ilija; Šajnović, Aleksandra; Stojanović, Ksenija; Simić, Vlada; Kašanin-Grubin, Milica

    2014-05-01

    Studying lacustrine sediments is important because of their potential economic value since they often bear coal, oil shales and non-metallic mineral raw materials. Besides this, lacustrine sediments offer valuable information on the climate conditions which existed during the sedimentation. In Serbia there are 14 lacustrine basins spanning in age from Oligocene to Lower Pliocene. The aim of this study was to examine Lower Miocene Kremna basin, located in southwest Serbia. Kremna basin is a small basin, covering 15km2, but sedimentologically very interesting. For the purpose of this study, 43 sediment samples were taken from a borehole at different depths, from surface to 343 m depth of the basin. The borehole ended in weathered serpentinite. Mineralogical composition of sediments was determined using thin-sections and X-ray diffraction analysis, contents of macro-and microelements and rare-earth elements were determined by ICP-ES and ICP-MS techniques. Also, elemental analysis was applied to determine the contents of carbon, sulphur and nitrogen and n-alkanes, isoprenoide aliphatic alkanes and bitumen were also determined using GC-MS technique. Mineralogical analyses proved presents of several lithological types in Kremna basin: clastic sediments, tuffs, tuffaceous sediments, marlstones, dolomites, magnezites, and coal of non-economic value. Occurrence of sirlezite and sepiolite was also determined. Furthermore, according to all obtained results two faciae were determined: alluvial-marginal lacustrine and intrabasinal. Alluvial-marginal facies originated from predominantly ultramafic rocks which underlie the basin. Magnezites and Mg-marls and Mg-dolomites are dominant sediments in this facies. These sediments formed under arid, slightly saline conditions. Intrabasinal facies is represented mostly with marls, Mg-marls and dolomitic limestones. These sediments were deposited under a more humid climate with increase in paleoproductivity. The uppermost sediments of

  1. Geochemical Considerations Regarding the Processes Involved in Mineral Deposition in Sedimentary Rock-Hosted Veins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, J. W.; Gledhill, D. K.

    2005-12-01

    In order for mineral deposition to take place in a vein, first the opposite reaction-dissolution of the mineral must occur from some source rock to place the requisite dissolved components into solution. Then the dissolved components must be transported to the vein either by advective or diffusive means before deposition can ensue. Finally conditions must be such in the vein that a supersaturated solution is produced and conditions are favorable for the nucleation and precipitation of the vein filling mineral. Although these general principles are widely accepted, there are many fundamental questions remaining regarding the chemistry that controls these processes. The controlling parameters are far more complex than simple temperature and pressure variations that are readily dealt with by equilibrium thermodynamic models. Answers for many questions reside, at least in a substantial part, in a better understanding of mineral solubility behavior, and precipitation and dissolution kinetics in high ionic strength solutions (brines) typically found in the subsurface. (Fluid inclusions commonly indicate that vein-filling minerals have precipitated from high ionic strength solutions.) We give as an example of the chemical complexities involving mineral reactions in brines the dissolution of calcite. The good news is that the calcite dissolution reaction is close to first order at high ionic strengths. In addition, common inhibitors, such as magnesium, are not very effective in influencing the rate constant, probably as a result of surface site competition. However, the bad news is that the sensitivity of the rate constant to composition increases with increasing carbon dioxide partial pressure and becomes most strongly influenced by total ionic strength. It is hypothesized that this is the result of a depressed water activity in brines that decreases the rate of cation hydration. We also observed that the inhibitory influence of anionic brine components, such as sulfate

  2. Geochemical constraints on the evolution of mafic and felsic rocks in the Bathani volcanic and volcano-sedimentary sequence of Chotanagpur Granite Gneiss Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikia, Ashima; Gogoi, Bibhuti; Ahmad, Mansoor; Ahmad, Talat

    2014-06-01

    The Bathani volcanic and volcano-sedimentary (BVS) sequence is a volcanic and volcano-sedimentary sequence, best exposed near Bathani village in Gaya district of Bihar. It is located in the northern fringe of the Chotanagpur Granite Gneiss Complex (CGGC). The volcano-sedimentary unit comprises of garnet-mica schist, rhyolite, tuff, banded iron formation (BIF) and chert bands with carbonate rocks as enclaves within the rhyolite and the differentiated volcanic sequence comprises of rhyolite, andesite, pillow basalt, massive basalt, tuff and mafic pyroclasts. Emplacement of diverse felsic and mafic rocks together testifies for a multi-stage and multi-source magmatism for the area. The presence of pillow basalt marks the eruption of these rocks in a subaqueous environment. Intermittent eruption of mafic and felsic magmas resulted in the formation of rhyolite, mafic pyroclasts, and tuff. Mixing and mingling of the felsic and mafic magmas resulted in the hybrid rock andesite. Granites are emplaced later, cross-cutting the volcanic sequence and are probably products of fractional crystallization of basaltic magma. The present work characterizes the geochemical characteristics of the magmatic rocks comprising of basalt, andesite, rhyolite, tuff, and granite of the area. Tholeiitic trend for basalt and calc-alkaline affinities of andesite, rhyolite and granite is consistent with their generation in an island arc, subduction related setting. The rocks of the BVS sequence probably mark the collision of the northern and southern Indian blocks during Proterozoic period. The explosive submarine volcanism may be related to culmination of the collision of the aforementioned blocks during the Neoproterozoic (1.0 Ga) as the Grenvillian metamorphism is well established in various parts of CGGC.

  3. Continental fossil vertebrates from the mid-Cretaceous (Albian-Cenomanian) Alcântara Formation, Brazil, and their relationship with contemporaneous faunas from North Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candeiro, Carlos Roberto A.; Fanti, Federico; Therrien, François; Lamanna, Matthew C.

    2011-05-01

    The Albian-Cenomanian Alcântara Formation of northeastern Brazil preserves the most diverse continental vertebrate fauna of this age yet known from northern South America. The Alcântara vertebrate assemblage, consisting of elasmobranchs, actinopterygians, sarcopterygians, turtles, crocodyliforms, pterosaurs, and non-avian dinosaurs, displays close similarities to contemporaneous faunas from North Africa. The co-occurrence of as many as eight freshwater or estuarine fish taxa ( Onchopristis, Bartschichthys, Lepidotes, Stephanodus, Mawsonia, Arganodus, Ceratodus africanus, and possibly Ceratodus humei) and up to seven terrestrial archosaur taxa ( Sigilmassasaurus, Rebbachisauridae, Baryonychinae, Spinosaurinae, Carcharodontosauridae, possibly Pholidosauridae, and doubtfully Bahariasaurus) suggests that a land route connecting northeastern Brazil and North Africa existed at least until the Albian. Interestingly, most components of this mid-Cretaceous northern South American/North African assemblage are not shared with coeval southern South American faunas, which are themselves characterized by a number of distinct freshwater and terrestrial vertebrate taxa (e.g., chelid turtles, megaraptoran and unenlagiine theropods). These results suggest that, although mid-Cretaceous faunal interchange was probably possible between northern South America and North Africa, paleogeographic, paleoclimatic, and/or paleoenvironmental barriers may have hindered continental vertebrate dispersal between northern and southern South America during this time.

  4. Change of tectono-stratigraphic regime in the Australian plate during the 99 Ma (mid-Cretaceous) and 43 Ma (mid-Eocene) swerves of the Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veevers, J. J.

    2000-01-01

    The clockwise bend at 99 Ma (mid-Cretaceous) in linear volcanic chains in the tropical Pacific coincides with a change from pre-99 Ma head-on Chilean-type subduction of the Pacific plate beneath eastern Gondwana to 99 43 Ma sinistral oblique Mariana-type subduction and strike-slip breakup by simple sea-floor spreading between Australia and Antarctica and by backarc spreading in the southwest Pacific. The 99 Ma breakup of Australia from Antarctica is documented by a mid-Cretaceous unconformity. This tectono-stratigraphic change founded modern Australia, with a mountain chain along an upper plate margin in the east and lowlands on the lower plate margin in the south. The counterclockwise bend at 43 Ma (mid-Eocene)—the Emperor-Hawaiian bend—coincides with the onset of structure in the Challenger Rift of New Zealand, the Eromanga-Cooper basin of central Australia, and the oil-shale grabens of coastal Queensland.

  5. Using geochemistry to establish the igneous provenances of the Neogene continental sedimentary rocks in the Central Depression and Altiplano, Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Luisa; Hérail, Gérard; Moine, Bernard; Fontan, François; Charrier, Reynaldo; Dupré, Bernard

    2004-04-01

    Geochemical and mineralogical data from ancient sedimentary strata can be reliable indicators of the provenance of sediments. The heavy mineral assemblages and the major and trace element contents of sedimentary rocks from the Neogene continental successions of the Central Depression in Chile and the Mauri and Corque Basins in the Altiplano of Bolivia reflect volcanic source rocks with different degrees of magmatic differentiation and alkalinity. These results indicate that the source rocks of the Central Depression were less differentiated (andesite to rhyodacite) than those of the Altiplano basins (rhyodacite to rhyolite). The low concentration (cations per formula unit) of total Al (<0.15 pfu) and [Ca+Na] (˜0.82 pfu) in the detrital clinopyroxenes and low [Nb/Y] ratio (<0.7) of whole-rock analyses of sandstones from the Central Depression indicate erosion of a calc-alkaline source rock. By contrast, the high concentration of total Al (>0.15 pfu) and [Ca+Na] (˜0.92 pfu), the variable Ti content (0.01-0.04 pfu) of the clinopyroxenes and the high [Nb/Y] (>0.7) in whole-rock analyses of sandstones from the Mauri Basin indicate erosion of alkaline rock sources. Locally, the low concentration of total Al (<0.15 pfu) in the detrital clinopyroxenes of sandstones from the Corque Basin indicates erosion of a subalkaline source rock. The chemical trends in the sandstones are similar to those in volcanic suites from the Western Cordillera and Eastern Cordillera of the Central Andes.

  6. Mars sedimentary rock erosion rates constrained using crater counts, with applications to organic-matter preservation and to the global dust cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kite, Edwin S.; Mayer, David P.

    2017-04-01

    Small-crater counts on Mars light-toned sedimentary rock are often inconsistent with any isochron; these data are usually plotted then ignored. We show (using an 18-HiRISE-image, > 104-crater dataset) that these non-isochron crater counts are often well-fit by a model where crater production is balanced by crater obliteration via steady exhumation. For these regions, we fit erosion rates. We infer that Mars light-toned sedimentary rocks typically erode at ∼102 nm/yr, when averaged over 10 km2 scales and 107-108 yr timescales. Crater-based erosion-rate determination is consistent with independent techniques, but can be applied to nearly all light-toned sedimentary rocks on Mars. Erosion is swift enough that radiolysis cannot destroy complex organic matter at some locations (e.g. paleolake deposits at SW Melas), but radiolysis is a severe problem at other locations (e.g. Oxia Planum). The data suggest that the relief of the Valles Marineris mounds is currently being reduced by wind erosion, and that dust production on Mars < 3 Gya greatly exceeds the modern reservoir of mobile dust.

  7. Transition in magnetic fabric types in progressively deformed, fine-grained sedimentary rocks of Central Armorica (Brittany, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haerinck, Tom; Hirt, Ann M.; Debacker, Timothy N.; Sintubin, Manuel

    2014-05-01

    The anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) of progressively deformed, fine-grained sedimentary rocks is determined for different tectonometamorphic settings in Central Armorica (Brittany, France). Low-temperature AMS and high-field torque magnetometry on a representative selection of samples indicate that the magnetic fabric is dominantly paramagnetic and the ferromagnetic (s.l.) contribution can be neglected. The AMS documents a progressive transition of intermediate fabrics to tectonic fabrics and increasingly stronger developed tectonic fabrics. An integrated magnetic-mineralogical approach is performed in order to assess whether we can use this evolution as a quantitative indicator for the intensity of cleavage development in Central Armorica. During the magnetic fabric transition, the maximum susceptibility axis (K1) remains stationary oriented parallel to the bedding - cleavage intersection, whereas the minimum susceptibility axis (K3) orientation distribution changes from a moderate girdle distribution in the intermediate fabric types, to a strongly clustered distribution parallel to the cleavage pole for the tectonic fabric types. A Woodcock two-axis ratio plot is used to evaluate this change in K3 distribution. This shows a regional pattern with intermediate fabrics in the southern part of Central Armorica and tectonic fabrics in the northern part of Central Armorica. Quantitative analysis of the observed magnetic fabrics shows that the fabric transition described above is accompanied by an evolution from prolate susceptibility ellipsoids with a relatively low degree of anisotropy to oblate ellipsoid with an increasingly higher degree of anisotropy. In a graph of the shape parameter T against the corrected degree of anisotropy PJ, this evolution has a hockey-stick shaped pattern with the vertical branch reflecting the actual transition from intermediate to tectonic fabric type and the horizontal branch reflecting progressively stronger developed

  8. Raman spectra of carbonaceous materials in a fault zone in the Longmenshan thrust belt, China; comparisons with those of sedimentary and metamorphic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouketsu, Yui; Shimizu, Ichiko; Wang, Yu; Yao, Lu; Ma, Shengli; Shimamoto, Toshihiko

    2017-03-01

    We analyzed micro-Raman spectra of carbonaceous materials (CM) in natural and experimentally deformed fault rocks from Longmenshan fault zone that caused the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake, to characterize degree of disordering of CM in a fault zone. Raman spectral parameters for 12 samples from a fault zone in Shenxigou, Sichuan, China, all show low-grade structures with no graphite. Low crystallinity and δ13C values (-24‰ to -25‰) suggest that CM in fault zone originated from host rocks (Late Triassic Xujiahe Formation). Full width at half maximum values of main spectral bands (D1 and D2), and relative intensities of two subbands (D3 and D4) of CM were variable with sample locations. However, Raman parameters of measured fault rocks fall on established trends of graphitization in sedimentary and metamorphic rocks. An empirical geothermometer gives temperatures of 160-230 °C for fault rocks in Shenxigou, and these temperatures were lower for highly sheared gouge than those for less deformed fault breccia at inner parts of the fault zone. The lower temperature and less crystallinity of CM in gouge might have been caused by the mechanical destruction of CM by severe shearing deformation, or may be due to mixing of host rocks on the footwall. CM in gouge deformed in high-velocity experiments exhibits slight changes towards graphitization characterized by reduction of D3 and D4 intensities. Thus low crystallinity of CM in natural gouge cannot be explained by our experimental results. Graphite formation during seismic fault motion is extremely local or did not occur in the study area, and the CM crystallinity from shallow to deep fault zones may be predicted as a first approximation from the graphitization trend in sedimentary and metamorphic rocks. If that case, graphite may lower the friction of shear zones at temperatures above 300 °C, deeper than the lower part of seismogenic zone.

  9. Evolution of exhumation and erosion in western West Gondwanaland as recorded by detrital zircons of late Neoproterozoic and Cambrian sedimentary rocks of NW and Central Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Hubert; Adams, Christopher; Aceñolaza, Florencio G.; Toselli, Alejandro J.

    2011-04-01

    The evolution of the provenance areas for Late Neoproterozoic, Cambrian and Early Ordovician sedimentary and meta-sedimentary rocks of north central and northwest Argentina is discussed using 123 maximum ages of detrital zircons from 42 samples from this and previously published studies. Most detrital zircon ages fall into two groups: 1,200-900 Ma and 670-545 Ma. These ages are essentially identical for the non- to very low grade metamorphic late Neoproterozoic to Early Cambrian Puncoviscana Formation and the low to high grade metamorphic rocks of Eastern Sierras Pampeanas. Hence, both units are related to similar provenance areas at the same time of sedimentation. The time span from zircon crystallization in the Earth's crust to exhumation and erosion may be very long. This is important when determining maximum ages of sedimentary rocks. Variation of zircon maxima may also be influenced by concurrent sedimentary cover of proposed provenance areas. For the late Mesoproterozoic to early Neoproterozoic zircon age group, an active mountain range of the southwest Brazilian Sunsás orogen is the most probable provenance area. The younger, late Neoproterozoic zircons are related to the continuously developing mountains of the Brasiliano orogen of southwest and south central Brazil. Young zircons, up to 514 Ma, from fossil-bearing Puncoviscana and Suncho Formation outcrops are related to late Early Cambrian volcanism contemporaneous with sedimentation. This situation continues through the Late Cambrian to the Early Ordovician, but the Sunsás orogen provenance diminishes as possible Río de la Plata craton origins become important.

  10. U-Pb ages of detrital zircon of the Paleozoic sedimentary rocks: New constraints on the emplacement time of the Hegenshan ophiolite, NE China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Sheng-Hui; Zhou, Jian-Bo; Li, Long

    2016-11-01

    The Hegenshan ophiolite in the Solonker-Hegenshan belt is the largest ophiolite in the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB). Despite its significance in constraining regional tectonic evolution, the emplacement time of the Hegenshan ophiolite is still under debate. In this study, we provide new detrital zircon ages of the Paleozoic sedimentary rocks that unconformably overlie the Wusinihei ophiolite (northeastern part of the Hegenshan ophiolite) to constrain the lower limit emplacement time of the Hegenshan ophiolite. The zircon ages obtained from the Paleozoic sedimentary rocks range from 298 ± 8 to 363 ± 7 Ma, and show bimodal distribution at 300-320 Ma (peak at 308 Ma) and 320-360 Ma (peak at 330 Ma). The age group of 300-320 Ma coincides with the age range of the volcanic rocks of the Late Paleozoic Gegenaobao Formation. The age group of 320-360 Ma with a peak at 330 Ma may be linked to local mafic-ultramafic rocks of the Hegenshan ophiolite. Accordingly, we suggest that the emplacement time of the Hegenshan ophiolite should have occurred earlier than the deposition of the Gegenaobao Formation, most likely during the time between 308 and 330 Ma, instead of the Silurian, Devonian or Mesozoic as previously considered.

  11. High resolution carbon isotope stratigraphy and glendonite occurrences of the Christopher Formation, Sverdrup Basin (Axel Heiberg Island, Canada): implications for mid Cretaceous high latitude climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrle, Jens O.; Schröder-Adams, Claudia J.; Galloway, Jennifer M.; Pugh, Adam T.

    2013-04-01

    Understanding the evolution of Canada's Arctic region, as a crucial component of Earth's climate system, is fundamental to assess short and long-term climate, environmental, and paleogeographic change. However, the stratigraphy and paleoenvironmental evolution of the Cretaceous Arctic is poorly constrained and a detailed bio- and chemostratigraphic correlation of major mid-Cretaceous paleoceanographic turning points such as Oceanic Anoxic Events, cold snaps, and biotic turnovers with key locations of the high- and low latitudes is missing. Here we present for the first time a high resolution bio- and carbon isotope stratigraphy of the Arctic Albian Christopher Formation of the Sverdrup Basin at Glacier Fiord in the southern part of Axel Heiberg Island, Canadian High Arctic. By using these techniques we developed a high temporal framework to record major environmental changes as it is indicated by the occurrence of glendonites and sandstone intervals of our studied Albian succession. The Albian Christopher Formation is a shale dominated marine unit with a thickness of approximately 1200 m. Several transgressive/ regressive cycles can be recognized by prograding shoreface units that break up mudrock deposition. In addition, glendonites are mainly found in the lower part of the Christopher Formation. Glendonites are pseudomorphs of calcite, after the metastable mineral ikaite, and have been often described from high latitude Permian, Jurassic and Cretaceous marine environments from the Canadian Arctic, Spitsbergen and Australia. The formation of glendonites takes place in the uppermost layer of the sediment and requires near-freezing temperatures, high salinity, and orthophosphate-rich bottom water. Although the presence of glendonites implies a range of paleoenvironmental conditions there is a consensus in the scientific literature that they reflect cooler paleoenvironmental conditions. Preliminary bio- and carbon isotope stratigraphic results suggest that the

  12. Talking Rocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Dale; Corley, Brenda

    1987-01-01

    Discusses some of the ways that rocks can be used to enhance children's creativity and their interest in science. Suggests the creation of a dramatic production involving rocks. Includes basic information on sedimentary, igneous, and metamorphic rocks. (TW)

  13. Talking Rocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Dale; Corley, Brenda

    1987-01-01

    Discusses some of the ways that rocks can be used to enhance children's creativity and their interest in science. Suggests the creation of a dramatic production involving rocks. Includes basic information on sedimentary, igneous, and metamorphic rocks. (TW)

  14. Detrital zircon U-Pb and Hf isotopic data for meta-sedimentary rocks from the Heilongjiang Complex, northeastern China and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yanlin

    2017-04-01

    The Heilongjiang Complex is a blueschist facies metamorphic belt located in the Zhangguangcailing orogen between the Jiamusi and Songliao blocks in Northeast China. This complex has been regarded as an accretionary belt related to the subduction of an intervening oceanic domain between the two blocks. However, the timing of ocean closure and final amalgamation has not been well constrained, with different models arguing for a period of 210-180 Ma or sometime after 140 Ma. This work reports in-situ detrital zircon U-Pb and Hf isotopic analyses of meta-sedimentary rocks from the Heilongjiang Complex. Detrital zircons from seven meta-sedimentary rocks samples yield U-Pb ages spanning from 1690 to 167 Ma, with main populations matching those of multi-phase magmatism in the Jiamusi and Songliao blocks. Several Precambrian age groups (600 Ma, 700 Ma, 900Ma, 960 Ma, 1200Ma, and 1300Ma) are consistent with the inherited zircons from the mafic rocks in the Heilongjiang Complex. A comparison with compiled data of magmatic rocks suggests that the two blocks may have been connected to each other during Paleozoic time. Detrital zircon dating of all siliciclastic rocks yielded the youngest age component of 170 Ma, suggesting that the latest deposition of the mica schists happened at some time after 170 Ma. In addition, the mafic-ultramafic rocks in the Heilongjiang Complex record rifting and ocean development from 275 to 140 Ma. We propose that the Jiamusi and Songliao blocks were once existed as a single block in the Paleozoic, which underwent a rifting event in the Permian to form a rifting basin that was subsequently evolved into an oceanic domain. The closure of the oceanic domain most likely occurred at some time after 140 Ma.

  15. Magnetostratigraphy and Rotation of Pleistocene Sedimentary Rocks in the San Jacinto Fault zone, Western Salton Trough, CA.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Housen, B. A.; Dorsey, R. J.; Janecke, S. U.; Kirby, S. M.; Lutz, A. T.

    2004-12-01

    Pleistocene sedimentary rocks in the San Felipe Hills (SFH) and Borrego Badlands (BB), Salton Trough, are deformed by the diffuse seismogenic San Jacinto fault zone. The Plio-Pleistocene lacustrine Borrego Fm is sharply overlain by the alluvial Ocotillo Fm in the southwest (BB and Ocotillo Badlands) and its finer-grained equivalent (Brawley Fm) in the northeast (SFH). This contact records rapid progradation of alluvium and termination of paleo Borrego Lake in response to initiation or reorganization of the San Jacinto fault. We sampled these units in measured sections at Oil Well Wash (in the SFH) and Beckman Wash (in the BB), and collected a thick composite section that includes all of the Borrego Fm in the southern BB. Sites were located at 10-50 m intervals in each section. Paleomagnetic results from 31 sites in the Oil Well Wash and Beckman Wash sections have well-defined components of magnetization in most samples. A persistent magnetic overprint, and some mineralogical alteration during thermal demagnetization, hampers analysis of magnetization vectors in some sites. Our results indicate that the age of the Ocotillo and Brawley Fms ranges from 0.5-0.6 Ma to 1.0-1.1 Ma, based on the presence of the Brunhes / Matuyama boundary and Jaramillo sub-chron in both sections, and Bishop ash in the BB. The Borrego-Ocotillo contact coincides with the base of the Jaramillo in both sections and in the nearby Ocotillo Badlands section (Brown et al., 1991). This result is consistent with evidence for a depositional hiatus at the contact in the BB section and an erosional disconformity at Oil Well Wash. Sites with well-defined directions and k>16 can be used to determine vertical-axis rotations. In Beckman Wash the tilt-corrected mean is D=360, I=38.2, k=48, \\alpha95=8.1° , N=8, indicating little or no rotation. In Oil Well Wash the tilt-corrected mean is D=8.5, I=61.1, k=51.0, \\alpha95=9.5° , N=6, indicating a cw rotation of 8.5° \\pm$5.7° . Combined, these data lead

  16. Combining high resolution vertical gradients and sequence stratigraphy to delineate hydrogeologic units for a contaminated sedimentary rock aquifer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Jessica R.; Parker, Beth L.; Arnaud, Emmanuelle; Runkel, Anthony C.

    2016-03-01

    Hydrogeologic units (HGUs), representing subsurface contrasts in hydraulic conductivity, form the basis for all conceptual and numerical models of groundwater flow. However, conventionally, delineation of these units relies heavily on data sets indirect with respect to hydraulic properties. Here, we use the spatial and temporal characteristics of the vertical component of hydraulic gradient (i.e., vertical gradient) as the primary line of evidence for delineating HGUs for Cambrian-Ordovician sedimentary rocks at a site in Dane County, Wisconsin. The site includes a 16 km2 area encompassing a 3 km long mixed organic contaminants plume. The vertical gradients are derived from hydraulic head profiles obtained using high resolution Westbay multilevel systems installed at 7 locations along two, orthogonal 4 km long cross-sections and monitoring to depths between 90 and 146 m with an average of 3-4 monitoring zones per 10 m. These vertical gradient cross-sections reveal 11 laterally extensive HGUs with contrasting vertical hydraulic conductivity (Kv). The position and thickness of the Kv contrasts are consistently associated with sequence stratigraphic features (maximum flooding intervals and sequence boundaries) distinguished at the site using cores and borehole geophysical logs. The same sequence stratigraphic features are also traceable across much of the Cambrian-Ordovician aquifer system of the Midwest US. The vertical gradients and sequence stratigraphy were arrived at independently and when combined provide a hydraulically calibrated sequence stratigraphic framework for the site. This framework provides increased confidence in the precise delineation and description of the nature of HGU contacts in each borehole, reduced uncertainty in interpolation of the HGUs between boreholes, and some capability to predict HGU boundaries and thickness in offsite areas where high resolution hydraulic data sets are not available. Consequently, this HGU conceptual model will

  17. North-South Gradients in Carbon Isotopic Compositions of Atlantic Ocean Black Shales: Evidence for Paleohydrologic Influences on Mid-Cretaceous Black Shale Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    Organic del13C values of organic-carbon-rich Albian-Cenomanian-Turonian black shales from a north-south transect of the Atlantic Ocean have been compiled to explore for possible existence of latitudinal patterns. Black shales at equatorial sites have mean del13C values of -28 per mil, whereas black shales at mid-latitude sites have mean del13C values around -25 per mil. The mid-Cretaceous del13C values are routinely lower than those of modern marine sediments. The more negative Cretaceous del13C values generally reflect concentrations of atmospheric CO2 that were four to six times higher than today, but the geographic differences imply a regional overprint on this global feature. Latitudinal differences in oceanic temperature might be a factor, but a low thermal gradient from the poles to the equator during the mid-Cretaceous makes this factor not likely to be significant. Instead, a correspondence between the geographic differences in the organic del13C values of black shales with the modern latitudinal precipitation pattern suggests that differences in precipitation are a more likely factor. Establishment of a strongly salinity-stratified near-surface ocean and magnified delivery of land-derived phosphorus by continental runoff during this time of a magnified hydrologic cycle were evidently significant to deposition of marine black shales. A likely scenario is that the stratification resulted in blooms of nitrogen-fixing bacteria that become the dominant photoautotrophs and thereby stimulated primary production of organic matter. Regional differences in precipitation resulted in different amounts of runoff, consequent stratification, enhancement of primary production, and therefore the different carbon isotopic compositions of the black shales.

  18. [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar ages of Challis volcanic rocks and the initiation of Tertiary sedimentary basins in southwestern Montana

    SciTech Connect

    M'Gonigle, J.W. ); Dalrymple, G.B. )

    1993-10-01

    [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar ages on single sanidine crystals from rhyolitic tuffs and ash flow tuffs within the uppermost and lowermost parts of the volcanic sequence of the Horse Prairie and Medicine Lodge topographic basins, southwestern Montana, show that these volcanic rocks were emplaced between about 48.8[+-]0.2 Ma and 45.9[+-]0.2 Ma, and are correlative with the Eocene Challis Volcanic Group of central Idaho. Sanidine ages on tuffs at the base of the Tertiary lacustrine, paludal, and fluvial sedimentary sequence, which unconformably overlies the volcanic sequence, suggest that sedimentation within an ancestral sedimentary basin that predated the development of the modern Horse Prairie and Medicine Lodge basins began in the middle Eocene. 22 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Detrital zircon U-Pb and Hf isotopic data for meta-sedimentary rocks from the Heilongjiang Complex, northeastern China and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chloe Yanlin; Zhao, Guochun; Sun, Min; Han, Yigui; Liu, Qian; Eizenhöfer, Paul R.; Zhang, Xiaoran; Hou, Wenzhu

    2017-06-01

    The Heilongjiang Complex is a blueschist facies metamorphic belt located within the Zhangguangcailing Orogen between the Jiamusi and Songliao blocks in Northeast China. This complex has been regarded as an accretionary belt related to the subduction of an intervening oceanic domain between the two blocks. However, the timing of ocean closure and final amalgamation has not been well constrained, with different models arguing for a period of 210-180 Ma or sometime after 140 Ma. This work reports in-situ detrital zircon U-Pb and Hf isotopic analyses of meta-sedimentary rocks from the Heilongjiang Complex. Detrital zircons from seven meta-sedimentary rocks samples yield U-Pb ages spanning from 1690 to 167 Ma, with main populations matching those of multi-phase magmatism in the Jiamusi and Songliao blocks. Several Precambrian age groups (600 Ma, 700 Ma, 900 Ma, 960 Ma, 1200 Ma, and 1300 Ma) are consistent with the inherited zircons from the mafic rocks in the Heilongjiang Complex. A comparison with compiled data of magmatic rocks suggests that the two blocks may have been connected to each other during Permian time. Detrital zircon dating of all siliciclastic rocks yielded the youngest age component of 170 Ma, suggesting that the latest deposition of the mica schists happened at some time after 170 Ma. We propose that the Jiamusi and Songliao blocks once existed as a single block around Late Permian, which underwent a rifting event in the Permian to form a rifting basin that was subsequently evolved into an oceanic domain (Heilongjiang Ocean). The closure of the Heilongjiang Ocean occurred after 170 Ma.

  20. Leaching of boron, arsenic and selenium from sedimentary rocks: I. Effects of contact time, mixing speed and liquid-to-solid ratio.

    PubMed

    Tabelin, Carlito Baltazar; Hashimoto, Ayaka; Igarashi, Toshifumi; Yoneda, Tetsuro

    2014-02-15

    Sedimentary rocks of marine origin excavated in tunnel projects were recently identified as potentially hazardous because they could release significant amounts of toxic trace elements when exposed to the environment. This study investigated the leaching characteristics of B, As, Se and the major coexisting ions under various conditions to identify the factors and processes controlling their evolution in the leachate. In addition, we evaluated whether the parameters of the currently used leachability test for excavated rocks were adequate. Although the leachabilities of B, As and Se similarly increased at longer contact times, only those of B and As were influenced by the mixing speed and/or liquid-to-solid ratio (L/S). The majority of trace elements dissolved in the leachate originated from the dissolution of soluble salts formed from seawater of the Cretaceous trapped during the formation of the sedimentary rocks. Moreover, the alkaline pH of the leachates could be attributed to the simultaneous dissolutions at varying degrees of the mineral components of the rocks as well as the precipitation of clay minerals. In the leaching test of excavated rocks for regulatory purposes, the best values of contact time and mixing speed should represent conditions of the highest trace element extractabilities, which in this study were found at longer contact times (>48 h) and the fastest mixing speed (200 rpm). The most appropriate L/S for the leaching test is 10 because it was around this L/S that the extractabilities and leaching concentrations of the trace elements were simultaneously observed at their highest values. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Tectonic and sedimentary evolution from the Late Sinian to Early Cambrian and their control on hydrocarbon source rocks in Tarim Basin, Western China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lin

    2017-04-01

    The lower Cambrian black shale is widely distributed all over the world, but due to the deep buried depth of Cambrian in the Tarim Basin, the black shale, as high-quality source rocks, has never been found in the interior of the basin. Through further survey on outcrops in the periphery of the Tarim Basin, a set of hydrocarbon source rocks with high-quality was found developed at the bottom of the lower Cambrian Yuertusi formation in Tarim basin. Lithology of the source rock is black shale. Its organic carbon (TOC) mainly ranges 2-10%, organic carbon of black shale layer reaches 17%, and the thickness of outcrop is 10-15m in Aksu area. This discovery of hydrocarbon source rocks draws much attention to the oil and gas exploration in Cambrian. The author, integrating with seismic, drilling and geological data, analyzes the tectonic sedimentary evolution in late Sinian-early Cambrian in the basin and its control on formation and distribution of hydrocarbon source rocks in Early Cambrian in this paper. The Nanhua - early Sinian clastic rocks rift basin formed on the basement on Tarim under the control of Rodinia supercontinent tectonic movement. Post-rifting marine carbonate siliceous shale deposited from the late Sinian to Early Cambrian rifting. Wide transgression in Tarim in the late Sinian departed Tarim into two patterns in North and South with the central land as a boundary with structural features: higher topography in middle and lower topography in two sides. There was no change in the pattern of basin during the late Sinian tectonic movement, and the Cambrian sediments deposited and filled the basin in this period. The central ancient land with structural high topography formed angular unconformity, while the basin with low topography formed parallel unconformity. Therefore, the Early Cambrian sedimentary filling in the late Sinian basin overlapped from low topography to high topography. Their distribution patterns were similar, both of which were of great

  2. Aquifer tests and simulation of ground-water flow in Triassic sedimentary rocks near Colmar, Bucks and Montgomery Counties, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Risser, Dennis W.; Bird, Philip H.

    2003-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to evaluate ground-water flow in Triassic sedimentary rocks near Colmar, in Bucks and Montgomery Counties, Pa. The study was conducted to help the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency evaluate remediation alternatives at the North Penn Area 5 Superfund Site near Colmar, where ground water has been contaminated by volatile organic solvents (primarily trichloroethene). The investigation focused on determining the (1) drawdown caused by separately pumping North PennWater Authority wells NP?21 and NP?87, (2) probable paths of groundwater movement under present-day (2000) conditions (with NP?21 discontinued), and (3) areas contributing recharge to wells if pumping from wells NP-21 or NP?87 were restarted and new recovery wells were installed. Drawdown was calculated from water levels measured in observation wells during aquifer tests of NP?21 and NP?87. The direction of ground-water flow was estimated by use of a three-dimensional ground-water-flow model. Aquifer tests were conducted by pumping NP?21 for about 7 days at 257 gallons per minute in June 2000 and NP?87 for 3 days at 402 gallons per minute in May 2002. Drawdown was measured in 45 observation wells during the NP?21 test and 35 observation wells during the NP?87 test. Drawdown in observation wells ranged from 0 to 6.8 feet at the end of the NP?21 test and 0.5 to 12 feet at the end of the NP?87 test. The aquifer tests showed that ground-water levels declined mostly in observation wells that were completed in the geologic units penetrated by the pumped wells. Because the geologic units dip about 27 degrees to the northwest, shallow wells up dip to the southeast of the pumped well showed a good hydraulic connection to the geologic units stressed by pumping. Most observation wells down dip from the pumping well penetrated units higher in the stratigraphic section that were not well

  3. The Río Tinto Basin, Spain: Mineralogy, sedimentary geobiology, and implications for interpretation of outcrop rocks at Meridiani Planum, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Remolar, David C.; Morris, Richard V.; Gruener, John E.; Amils, Ricardo; Knoll, Andrew H.

    2005-11-01

    Exploration by the NASA rover Opportunity has revealed sulfate- and hematite-rich sedimentary rocks exposed in craters and other surface features of Meridiani Planum, Mars. Modern, Holocene, and Plio-Pleistocene deposits of the Río Tinto, southwestern Spain, provide at least a partial environmental analog to Meridiani Planum rocks, facilitating our understanding of Meridiani mineral precipitation and diagenesis, while informing considerations of martian astrobiology. Oxidation, thought to be biologically mediated, of pyritic ore bodies by groundwaters in the source area of the Río Tinto generates headwaters enriched in sulfuric acid and ferric iron. Seasonal evaporation of river water drives precipitation of hydronium jarosite and schwertmannite, while (Mg,Al,Fe 3+)-copiapite, coquimbite, gypsum, and other sulfate minerals precipitate nearby as efflorescences where locally variable source waters are brought to the surface by capillary action. During the wet season, hydrolysis of sulfate salts results in the precipitation of nanophase goethite. Holocene and Plio-Pleistocene terraces show increasing goethite crystallinity and then replacement of goethite with hematite through time. Hematite in Meridiani spherules also formed during diagenesis, although whether these replaced precursor goethite or precipitated directly from groundwaters is not known. The retention of jarosite and other soluble sulfate salts suggests that water limited the diagenesis of Meridiani rocks. Diverse prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms inhabit acidic and seasonally dry Río Tinto environments. Organic matter does not persist in Río Tinto sediments, but biosignatures imparted to sedimentary rocks as macroscopic textures of coated microbial streamers, surface blisters formed by biogenic gas, and microfossils preserved as casts and molds in iron oxides help to shape strategies for astrobiological investigation of Meridiani outcrops.

  4. High-pressure greenschist to blueschist facies transition in the Maimón Formation (Dominican Republic) suggests mid-Cretaceous subduction of the Early Cretaceous Caribbean arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torró, L.; Garcia-Casco, A.; Proenza, J. A.; Blanco-Quintero, I. F.; Gutiérrez-Alonso, G.; Lewis, J. F.

    2016-12-01

    The Maimón Formation (Cordillera Central, Dominican Republic) is formed of metamorphosed bi-modal mafic-felsic volcanic rocks and sedimentary horizons of Early Cretaceous age deposited in the forearc of the nascent Caribbean island arc. Two structural-metamorphic zones depict an inverted metamorphic gradient: the Ozama shear zone, which records intense mylonitic and phyllonitic deformation and ubiquitous metamorphic recrystallization, tectonically overlies the much less deformed and variably recrystallized rocks of the El Altar zone. The presence of ferri-winchite and high-Si phengite, first reported in this paper, in the peak metamorphic assemblage of rocks of the Ozama shear zone (actinolite + phengite + chlorite + epidote + quartz + albite ± ferri-winchite ± stilpnomelane) point to subduction-related metamorphism. Pseudosection calculations and intersection of isopleths indicate peak metamorphic conditions of 8.2 kbar at 380 °C. These figures are consistent with metamorphism in the greenschist/blueschist facies transition, burial depths of 25-29 km and a thermal gradient of 13-16 °C/km. Our new data dispute previous models pointing to metamorphism of Maimón rocks under a steep thermal gradient related to burial under a hot peridotite slice. Instead, we contextualize the metamorphism of the Maimón Formation in a subduction scenario in which a coherent slice of the (warm) Early Cretaceous forearc was engulfed due to intra-arc complexities and regional-scale-driven tectonic processes operating in the late Early Cretaceous. Integration of our findings with previous studies on metamorphic complexes in Hispaniola suggests that a major tectonic event affecting the whole arc system took place at c. 120-110 Ma.

  5. Heterogeneous carbonaceous matter in sedimentary rock lithocomponents causes significant trichloroethylene (TCE) sorption in a low organic carbon content aquifer/aquitard system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choung, Sungwook; Zimmerman, Lisa R.; Allen-King, Richelle M.; Ligouis, Bertrand; Feenstra, Stanley

    2014-10-01

    This study evaluated the effects of heterogeneous thermally altered carbonaceous matter (CM) on trichloroethylene (TCE) sorption for a low fraction organic carbon content (foc) alluvial sedimentary aquifer and aquitard system (foc = 0.046-0.105%). The equilibrium TCE sorption isotherms were highly nonlinear with Freundlich exponents of 0.46-0.58. Kerogen + black carbon was the dominant CM fraction extracted from the sediments and accounted for > 60% and 99% of the total in the sands and silt, respectively. Organic petrological examination determined that the kerogen included abundant amorphous organic matter (bituminite), likely of marine origin. The dark calcareous siltstone exhibited the greatest TCE sorption among aquifer lithocomponents and accounted for most sorption in the aquifer. The results suggest that the source of the thermally altered CM, which causes nonlinear sorption, was derived from parent Paleozoic marine carbonate rocks that outcrop throughout much of New York State. A synthetic aquifer-aquitard unit system (10% aquitard) was used to illustrate the effect of the observed nonlinear sorption on mass storage potential at equilibrium. The calculation showed that > 80% of TCE mass contained in the aquifer was sorbed on the aquifer sediment at aqueous concentration < 1000 μg L- 1. These results show that sorption is likely a significant contributor to the persistence of a TCE groundwater plume in the aquifer studied. It is implied that sorption may similarly contribute to TCE persistence in other glacial alluvial aquifers with similar geologic characteristics, i.e., comprised of sedimentary rock lithocomponents that contain thermally altered CM.

  6. X-ray CT imaging as a scientific tool to study the capillary water absorption in sedimentary rocks used in cultural heritages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberghina, M. F.; Barraco, R.; Brai, M.; Lo Casto, A.; Mazzocchio, A.; Schillaci, T.

    2009-07-01

    This paper proposes the X-Ray CT imaging as appropriate tool for investigating the capillary water absorption in sedimentary rocks. This technique, in fact, provides information useful for deeping the knowledge about of the porosity and the kinetics of the water capillary absorption in porous materials. The possibility to improve in non invasive manner, the understanding of this phenomenon, constitutes a fundamental aspect to take actions in the restoration and conservation of lapideous artifact and monuments from cultural heritages. The investigated sedimentary rocks come from different Sicilian quarries and were used for the building of the Greek temples in the archaeological areas of Agrigento, Selinunte and in the baroque monuments of the Val di Noto area. The image acquisition was carried out at different times after contact with water. The wetting front progression along the height of the sample was evaluated on the basis of the estimated CT attenuation value maps. An average of the CT attenuation values measured by the ROI (Region of Interest) was used to evaluate the mean height of the wetting front, with different CT scans at fixed time intervals after sample wetting, in order to describe the dynamic behaviour of the imbibition process. CT imaging results have shown that the water absorption is highly subject to the sample porous morphology.

  7. Sedimentary connection between rock glaciers and torrential channels: definition, inventory and quantification from a test area in the south-western Swiss Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kummert, Mario; Barboux, Chloé; Delaloye, Reynald

    2017-04-01

    Permafrsot creep is an important sediment transfer process in periglacial alpine hillslopes (Delaloye et al. 2010). Rock glaciers are the visible expression of mountain permafrost creep (Delaloye 2004). Large volumes of rock debris originating from headwalls, moraines and weathering deposits are slowly transported within rock glaciers from their rooting zone to their fronts. In the Alps, most rock glaciers can be considered as sediment traps, because the sediment output at their margin is usually limited (Gärtner-Roer 2012). However, cases of rock glacier supplying torrential channels with sediments have been documented (e.g. Lugon and Stoffel 2010, Delaloye et al. 2013) Such rock glaciers can act as a sediment source for the triggering of gravitational processes propagating further downstream. Moreover, in such configuration the amount of sediment available is not a finite volume but is gradually renewed or increased as the rock glacier advances. These cases are therefore very specific, especially in the perspective of natural hazards assessment and mitigation. However, in the Alps very little is known about such type of rock glaciers. In addition, the sediment transfer rates between the fronts of the rock glaciers and the torrents are often not known. In this context, our study aims at (i) defining better the configurations in which a sedimentary connection exists between rock glaciers and torrential channels, (ii) localizing the cases of active rock glaciers connected to the torrential network and (iii) estimating approximate sediment transfer rates between the fronts and the torrential gullies. For that purpose, an inventory method for the classification of torrential catchments based on the analysis of aerial images and the computation of connectivity indexes have been developped. In addition, sediment transfer rates were estimated taking into account the geometry of the frontal areas and the velocity rates of the rock glaciers derived from DInSAR data. In

  8. Geochemical constraints on the oldest arc rocks of the Arabian-Nubian Shield: The late Mesoproterozoic to late Neoproterozoic (?) Sa'al volcano-sedimentary complex, Sinai, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali-Bik, Mohamed W.; Abd El Rahim, Said H.; Wahab, Wael Abdel; Abayazeed, Salwa D.; Hassan, Safaa M.

    2017-07-01

    The Wadi Sa'al metamorphosed volcano-sedimentary complex represents the deepest exposed stratigraphic levels of the Arabian-Nubian Shield (ANS). Recent isotopic ages (1.12-0.95 Ga, Be'eri-Shlevin et al., 2012) assigned the Sa'al complex as the oldest arc rocks of the ANS (pre-Pan-African?). It encompasses a wide variety of non-consanguineous, late Mesoproterozoic to late Neoproterozoic (?) rock units that preserve a complicated and protracted record of orogenic and tectonic assembly. They experienced regional low-pressure greenschist up to amphibolite facies metamorphism. The tectono-stratigraphic rock units of the Wadi Sa'al complex can be distinguished into two superimposed metavolcanic formations (Agramiya and post-Ra'ayan), separated by the metasedimentary Ra'ayan Formation. Both the Agramiya and post-Ra'ayan metavolcanics comprise basalts, basaltic andesite and rhyolite. The Ra'ayan metasediments encompass metagreywacke, semi-metapelite and metapelite. Geochemical consanguinity, tectonic setting and petrogenesis of the different rock units of the Sa'al complex are addressed. The metavolcanics of the Sa'al complex imply calc-alkaline affinities with subordinate tholeiitic signature and probable island-arc setting. The Ra'ayan metasedimentary rocks were accumulated as fluvial sediments in basins adjacent to their uplifted volcanic protoliths (Agramiya Formation). The detritus was deposited in fresh-water environment. New geological mapping was undertaken for the area using remote sensing and GIS techniques. Advanced Space-borne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) band rationing-based images (b6/b4, b6/b7, and b4/b2) effectively discriminate the different basement rock units of the Wadi Sa'al area from each other.

  9. The late Neoproterozoic to early Cambrian sulphur cycle: an isotopic investigation of sedimentary rocks from the Yangtze platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, T.; Strauss, H.

    2003-04-01

    The sulphur cycle responds to changes in seawater chemistry, biological evolution and tectonic activity. We follow an isotopic approach in order to constrain the state of the ocean/atmosphere system during the late Neoproterozoic and early Cambrian. For this purpose, sedimentary successions from the Yangtze platform, South China, were analysed for their sulphur isotopic composition in different S-bearing phases. The general stratigraphy comprises in ascending order the Doushantuo, Dengying and Niutitang formations. Main lithologies include carbonates, phosphorites, black shales and cherts. The sulphur isotopic composition of the late Neoproterozoic to early Cambrian seawater sulphate ranges from +30 to +35 ‰ as evident from calcium sulphates and trace sulphate in unaltered carbonates and phosphorites (Shields et al., 1999). Sulphur isotopes in chromium reducible and organically bound sulphur are displaced by about +40 ‰ from the seawater sulphate signal, indicating bacterial sulphate reduction. Isotope values range between -16 and +25 ‰ reflecting different environmental conditions, varying from open to closed/limiting conditions in respect to sulphate availability. Pyrite morphology is studied in order to characterize the diagenetic environment. Consistent with a biological origin for the sedimentary pyrite in the Neoproterozoic as well as in the Cambrian (Strauss, 2002) is the positive correlation between sulphide sulphur and organic carbon abundances. The availability of reactive iron is evaluated by means of the degree of pyritization (Raiswell et al., 1988). Raiswell, R. Buckley, F., Berner, R. &Anderson, T. (1988) Degree of pyritization of iron as a paleoenvironmental indicator of bottom-water oxygenation. Journal of Sedimentary Petrology, 58, No.5, 812-819 Shields, G., Strauss, H., Howe, S. &Siegmund, H. (1999) Sulphur isotope composition of sedimentary phosphorites from the basal Cambrian of China: implications for Neoproterozoic-Cambrian biochemical

  10. Nucleation of cracks in sedimentary rocks under non-uniform loading: insights from simultaneous X-ray and neutron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaManna, J.; Syed, A.; Tanino, Y.; Jacobson, D. L.

    2016-12-01

    Imperfections in rocks are sources of localised stress concentrations. These imperfections in rock may be in the form of cracks, mineral heterogeneity, or dislocation in the crystalline lattices of the minerals. These imperfections like fractures can often are the primary conduits for the flow of fluids through rocks. Non-uniform loading can result in the deviation of equilibrium from the initial state, thereby redistributing the stress field. This creates a non-uniform distribution of the strain energy within the rock mass. It has been observed that if local strain energy exceeds the energy required to create new surfaces, cracks may nucleate or propagate. Direct observations especially crack length can inform the correlation between change in potential energy and crack length. The aim of the presented work is to identify the source of initial imperfections, nucleation and propagation of cracks in a typical sandstone (Kirby) under non-uniform loading through direct observations. A combined neutron and X-imaging facility is utilised to image a cylindrical rock sample subjected to axial compressive loading along its longitudinal axis. This paper will discuss the identification of cracks and their distribution within the rock from the image reconstructions and compare the change in crack volume with the change in applied strain energy from direct observations and theoretical estimates.

  11. New tyrannosaur from the mid-Cretaceous of Uzbekistan clarifies evolution of giant body sizes and advanced senses in tyrant dinosaurs

    PubMed Central

    Brusatte, Stephen L.; Averianov, Alexander; Sues, Hans-Dieter; Muir, Amy; Butler, Ian B.

    2016-01-01

    Tyrannosaurids—the familiar group of carnivorous dinosaurs including Tyrannosaurus and Albertosaurus—were the apex predators in continental ecosystems in Asia and North America during the latest Cretaceous (ca. 80–66 million years ago). Their colossal sizes and keen senses are considered key to their evolutionary and ecological success, but little is known about how these features developed as tyrannosaurids evolved from smaller basal tyrannosauroids that first appeared in the fossil record in the Middle Jurassic (ca. 170 million years ago). This is largely because of a frustrating 20+ million-year gap in the mid-Cretaceous fossil record, when tyrannosauroids transitioned from small-bodied hunters to gigantic apex predators but from which no diagnostic specimens are known. We describe the first distinct tyrannosauroid species from this gap, based on a highly derived braincase and a variety of other skeletal elements from the Turonian (ca. 90–92 million years ago) of Uzbekistan. This taxon is phylogenetically intermediate between the oldest basal tyrannosauroids and the latest Cretaceous forms. It had yet to develop the giant size and extensive cranial pneumaticity of T. rex and kin but does possess the highly derived brain and inner ear characteristic of the latest Cretaceous species. Tyrannosauroids apparently developed huge size rapidly during the latest Cretaceous, and their success in the top predator role may have been enabled by their brain and keen senses that first evolved at smaller body size. PMID:26976562

  12. New tyrannosaur from the mid-Cretaceous of Uzbekistan clarifies evolution of giant body sizes and advanced senses in tyrant dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    Brusatte, Stephen L; Averianov, Alexander; Sues, Hans-Dieter; Muir, Amy; Butler, Ian B

    2016-03-29

    Tyrannosaurids--the familiar group of carnivorous dinosaurs including Tyrannosaurus and Albertosaurus--were the apex predators in continental ecosystems in Asia and North America during the latest Cretaceous (ca. 80-66 million years ago). Their colossal sizes and keen senses are considered key to their evolutionary and ecological success, but little is known about how these features developed as tyrannosaurids evolved from smaller basal tyrannosauroids that first appeared in the fossil record in the Middle Jurassic (ca. 170 million years ago). This is largely because of a frustrating 20+ million-year gap in the mid-Cretaceous fossil record, when tyrannosauroids transitioned from small-bodied hunters to gigantic apex predators but from which no diagnostic specimens are known. We describe the first distinct tyrannosauroid species from this gap, based on a highly derived braincase and a variety of other skeletal elements from the Turonian (ca. 90-92 million years ago) of Uzbekistan. This taxon is phylogenetically intermediate between the oldest basal tyrannosauroids and the latest Cretaceous forms. It had yet to develop the giant size and extensive cranial pneumaticity of T. rex and kin but does possess the highly derived brain and inner ear characteristic of the latest Cretaceous species. Tyrannosauroids apparently developed huge size rapidly during the latest Cretaceous, and their success in the top predator role may have been enabled by their brain and keen senses that first evolved at smaller body size.

  13. New tyrannosaur from the mid-Cretaceous of Uzbekistan clarifies evolution of giant body sizes and advanced senses in tyrant dinosaurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brusatte, Stephen L.; Averianov, Alexander; Sues, Hans-Dieter; Muir, Amy; Butler, Ian B.

    2016-03-01

    Tyrannosaurids-the familiar group of carnivorous dinosaurs including Tyrannosaurus and Albertosaurus-were the apex predators in continental ecosystems in Asia and North America during the latest Cretaceous (ca. 80-66 million years ago). Their colossal sizes and keen senses are considered key to their evolutionary and ecological success, but little is known about how these features developed as tyrannosaurids evolved from smaller basal tyrannosauroids that first appeared in the fossil record in the Middle Jurassic (ca. 170 million years ago). This is largely because of a frustrating 20+ million-year gap in the mid-Cretaceous fossil record, when tyrannosauroids transitioned from small-bodied hunters to gigantic apex predators but from which no diagnostic specimens are known. We describe the first distinct tyrannosauroid species from this gap, based on a highly derived braincase and a variety of other skeletal elements from the Turonian (ca. 90-92 million years ago) of Uzbekistan. This taxon is phylogenetically intermediate between the oldest basal tyrannosauroids and the latest Cretaceous forms. It had yet to develop the giant size and extensive cranial pneumaticity of T. rex and kin but does possess the highly derived brain and inner ear characteristic of the latest Cretaceous species. Tyrannosauroids apparently developed huge size rapidly during the latest Cretaceous, and their success in the top predator role may have been enabled by their brain and keen senses that first evolved at smaller body size.

  14. Investigating the stratigraphy and palaeoenvironments for a suite of newly discovered mid-Cretaceous vertebrate fossil-localities in the Winton Formation, Queensland, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Ryan T.; Roberts, Eric M.; Darlington, Vikie; Salisbury, Steven W.

    2017-08-01

    The Winton Formation of central Queensland is recognized as a quintessential source of mid-Cretaceous terrestrial faunas and floras in Australia. However, sedimentological investigations linking fossil assemblages and palaeoenvironments across this unit remain limited. The intent of this study was to interpret depositional environments and improve stratigraphic correlations between multiple fossil localities within the preserved Winton Formation in the Eromanga Basin, including Isisford, Lark Quarry, and Bladensburg National Park. Twenty-three facies and six repeated facies associations were documented, indicating a mosaic of marginal marine to inland alluvial depositional environments. These developed synchronously with the final regression of the Eromanga Seaway from central Australia during the late Albian-early Turonian. Investigations of regional- and local-scale structural features and outcrop, core and well analysis were combined with detrital zircon provenance signatures to help correlate stratigraphy and vertebrate faunas across the basin. Significant palaeoenvironmental differences exist between the lower and upper portions of the preserved Winton Formation, warranting informal subdivisions; a lower tidally influenced fluvial-deltaic member and an upper inland alluvial member. This work further demonstrates that the Isisford fauna is part of the lower member of the preserved Winton Formation; whereas, fossil localities around Winton, including Lark Quarry and Bladensburg National Park, are part of the upper member of the Winton Formation. These results permit a more meaningful framework for both regional and global comparisons of the Winton flora and fauna.

  15. Ejected Sedimentary Rocks of Mud Volcanoes as Indicators of Depositional Environments and of Hydrocarbon Generation within the South Caspian Basin, Azerbaijan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berner, U.; Scheeder, G.; Kus, J.; Köthe, A.; Movsumova, U.

    2009-04-01

    Mud volcanoes are prominent geological features of the South Caspian Basin of Azerbaijan, one of the oldest oil producing regions worldwide. The basin is characterized by extreme sedimentation rates, which lead to the accumulation of large volumes of Mesozoic and Cenozoic sediments. These mostly unconsolidated strata reach thicknesses of up to 20 km and overlay a continental basement in the onshore part. Tectonic forces control the occurrences of mud volcanoes in regions with over-pressured subsurface sediments as mud volcanoes are closely linked to fault systems. The mud volcanoes of Azerbaijan are a surface expression of vertical hydrocarbon migration and offer the chance to investigate the subsurface by means of ejected rocks transported to the surface. These rocks of Mesozoic and Cenozoic sedimentary sequences are potential indicators of the regional hydrocarbon generation. The mud of nineteen volcano cones contained numerous ejected rock fragments, which we use to identify environmental and depositional parameters of the sediments of the Caspian Basin. We also intended to estimate the depth range from which the mud was transported to the surface using organic geochemical parameters. Mircopalaeontological investigations (calcareous nannoplankton) have been performed on selected samples. These analyses suggest that the investigated sediments are of Late Cretaceous to Palaeogene ages and relate to the stratigraphic interval during which the main hydrocarbon source rocks of Azerbaijan have been deposited. Organic geochemical, organic petrographical and mircopalaeontological investigations have been performed on selected samples of nineteen mud volcanoes. Analyses total organic carbon and total sulphur were performed on an elemental analyzer. These analyses suggest that the sediments can be classified as anoxic marine deposits whereas only few are sediments of a lacustrine environment. Bulk source rock information were obtained from RockEval pyrolysis. Resulting

  16. Zinc Enrichments in the Rocks of Gale Crater, Mars Measured by MSL-APXS Reflect Both High Zn in Jake_M Rocks and the Concentration of Zn in Sedimentary Cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, J. A.; Schmidt, M. E.; Gellert, R.; Fisk, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    Zinc enrichments have been discovered by Curiosity's alpha-particle X-ray spectrometer (APXS) in Gale Crater, Mars. Mugearitic Jake_M class rocks have 80-925 ppm Zn (Zn error in APXS accuracy ~16%), which is higher than shergottites (49-90 ppm) [Meyer, 2012] and abraded Adirondack rocks in Gusev Crater (75-117 ppm) [Gellert et al., 2006], but similar to Irvine and Barnhill class rocks in Gusev (230-422 ppm) [Ming et al., 2008]. The source of Jake_M was enriched in Zn, possibly by partial melting of metasomatized mantle [Stolper et al., 2013; Schmidt et al., 2014]. Relative to Jake_M, most clastic rocks encountered in Gale (sols 0-687) are moderately enriched in Zn (500-1900 ppm). Surface alteration is unlikely to cause elevated Zn because soils have lower Zn (310 to 380 ppm). Excluding soils, veins, very dusty rocks, and high-Ni John Klein rocks, Zn correlates with Fe, Mn, Cr, and Ni (r = 0.83, 0.68, 0.72, and 0.67, respectively). The positive relationships suggest that Zn is mobilized with these metals, possibly precipitating in oxide sedimentary cements with Fe-oxides and/or in the Fe-rich amorphous component. In this subset of rocks, Zn does not correlate with Cl, Br, or S; widespread Zn-halogen salts and Zn-sulfides are unlikely. Notable exceptions are the float rocks Et_Then and Secure, which have high FeO (25-27 wt%) but low Zn (~230-490 ppm) and are interpreted to reflect a distinct cementation or rock coating episode. Two Gale targets <1 m apart at the Kimberly outcrop are highly enriched in Zn, demonstrating the localized nature of Zn enrichments: Windjana drill fines (3430-4680 ppm Zn) have high K2O (3.6 wt%), FeO (~26 wt%), MnO (~0.56 wt%), and Ni (~380 ppm); Stephen (~8150 ppm Zn), interpreted to have a MnO-rich (~4.5 wt%) coating, also has high Ni (~1285 ppm), Cl (~3.2 wt%), and Br (~1850 ppm). An igneous origin of the Zn enrichments in Jake M class rocks is likely, and hydrothermal and/or diagenetic processes probably concentrated Zn in the clastic

  17. Petrology, geochemistry, and metamorphic evolution of meta-sedimentary rocks in the Diancang Shan-Ailao Shan metamorphic complex, Southeastern Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fang; Liu, Fulai; Liu, Pinghua; Shi, Jianrong; Cai, Jia

    2016-07-01

    Meta-sedimentary rocks are widely distributed within the Diancang Shan-Ailao Shan metamorphic complex in the Southeastern Tibetan Plateau. Detailed geochemical analyses show that all of them have similar geochemical features. They are enriched in light rare-earth elements (LREEs) and depleted in heavy rare-earth elements (HREEs), with moderately negative Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu∗ = 0.55-0.75). Major and trace element compositions for the meta-sedimentary rocks suggest that the protoliths were probably claystone, siltstone, and greywacke and deposited in an active continental margin. Garnet porphyroblasts in meta-sedimentary rocks have distinct compositional zonation from core to rim. The zonation of garnet in St-Ky-Grt-Bt-Ms schist indicates an increasing P-T trend during garnet growth. In contrast, garnets from (Sil)-Grt-Bt paragneiss show diffusion zoning, implying a decreasing P-T trend. Based on mineral transformations and P-T estimates using conventional geothermobarometers and pseudosection calculations, four metamorphic stages have been determined, including an early prograde metamorphic stage (M1), a peak amphibolite-granulite facies metamorphic stage (M2), a near-isothermal decompression stage (M3), and a late amphibolites-facies retrograde stage (M4). The relic assemblage of Ms + St ± Ky ± Bt ± Kfs + Qz preserved as inclusions in garnet porphyroblasts of the meta-sedimentary rocks belongs to prograde (M1) stage and records P-T conditions of 560-590 °C and 5.5-6.3 kb. Matrix mineral assemblages of Grt + Bt + Ky/Sil + Pl + Qz and Grt + Bt ± Sil + Pl ± Kfs + Qz formed at peak (M2) stage yield P-T conditions of 720-760 °C and 8.0-9.3 kb. M3 is characterized by decompression reactions, dehydration melting of assemblages that include hydrous minerals (e.g., biotite), and partial melting of felsic minerals. The retrograde assemblages is Grt + Bt + Sil + Pl + Qz formed at 650-760 °C and 5.0-7.3 kb. At the amphibolites-facies retrograde (M4) stage, fine

  18. Ground-water system, estimation of aquifer hydraulic properties, and effects of pumping on ground-water flow in Triassic sedimentary rocks in and near Lansdale, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senior, Lisa A.; Goode, Daniel J.

    1999-01-01

    Ground water in Triassic-age sedimentary fractured-rock aquifers in the area of Lansdale, Pa., is used as drinking water and for industrial supply. In 1979, ground water in the Lansdale area was found to be contaminated with trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, and other man-made organic compounds, and in 1989, the area was placed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) National Priority List as the North Penn Area 6 site. To assist the USEPA in the hydrogeological assessment of the site, the U.S. Geological Survey began a study in 1995 to describe the ground-water system and to determine the effects of changes in the well pumping patterns on the direction of ground-water flow in the Lansdale area. This determination is based on hydrologic and geophysical data collected from 1995-98 and on results of the simulation of the regional ground-water-flow system by use of a numerical model.Correlation of natural-gamma logs indicate that the sedimentary rock beds strike generally northeast and dip at angles less than 30 degrees to the northwest. The ground-water system is confined or semi-confined, even at shallow depths; depth to bedrock commonly is less than 20 feet (6 meters); and depth to water commonly is about 15 to 60 feet (5 to 18 meters) below land surface. Single-well, aquifer-interval-isolation (packer) tests indicate that vertical permeability of the sedimentary rocks is low. Multiple-well aquifer tests indicate that the system is heterogeneous and that flow appears primarily in discrete zones parallel to bedding. Preferred horizontal flow along strike was not observed in the aquifer tests for wells open to the pumped interval. Water levels in wells that are open to the pumped interval, as projected along the dipping stratigraphy, are drawn down more than water levels in wells that do not intersect the pumped interval. A regional potentiometric map based on measured water levels indicates that ground water flows from Lansdale towards discharge

  19. Average sedimentary rock rare Earth element patterns and crustal evolution: Some observations and implications from the 3800 Ma ISUA supracrustal belt, West Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dymek, R. F.; Boak, J. L.; Gromet, L. P.

    1983-01-01

    Rare earth element (REE) data is given on a set of clastic metasediments from the 3800 Ma Isua Supracrustal belt, West Greenland. Each of two units from the same sedimentary sequence has a distinctive REE pattern, but the average of these rocks bears a very strong resemblance to the REE pattern for the North American Shale Composite (NASC), and departs considerably from previous estimates of REE patterns in Archaean sediments. The possibility that the source area for the Isua sediments resembled that of the NASC is regarded as highly unlikely. However, REE patterns like that in the NASC may be produced by sedimentary recycling of material yielding patterns such as are found at Isua. The results lead to the following tentative conclusions: (1) The REE patterns for Isua Seq. B MBG indicate the existence of crustal materials with fractionated REE and negative Eu anomalies at 3800 Ma, (2) The average Seq. B REE pattern resembles that of the North American Shale Composite (NASC), (3) If the Seq. B average is truly representative of its crustal sources, then this early crust could have been extensively differentiated. In this regard, a proper understanding of the NASC pattern, and its relationship to post-Archaean crustal REE reservoirs, is essential, (4) The Isua results may represent a local effect.

  20. Geochemistry of the sedimentary rocks from the Nanxiong Basin, South China and implications for provenance, paleoenvironment and paleoclimate at the K/T boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yi; Xia, Bin; Lin, Ge; Cui, Xuejun; Hu, Xiaoqiong; Yan, Pin; Zhang, Faqiang

    2007-04-01

    Cretaceous and Tertiary clastic sedimentary rocks from the Nanxiong Basin, South China have been analyzed to constrain their provenance, depositional climate and environment. Evidence from discrimination diagrams for sedimentary provenance and tectonic setting show that the Nanxiong Basin sediments were derived from typical continental sources. Geochemical signatures (e.g. Eu/Eu *, Th/Ti, La/Ti, Ta/Ti, Yb/Ti and Y/Ti ratios of the claystone) are nearly constant, suggesting the provenance of the Nanxiong Basin remained similar throughout the Late Cretaceous to Early Paleocene (83-56 Ma). In contrast Rb/Ti, Cs/Ti ratios and TOC and CaCO 3 concentrations require an obvious change in climate across the Late Cretaceous and Early Paleocene boundary. Singularly higher CaCO 3 contents and lower TOC values and Rb/Ti, Cs/Ti ratios in the Late Cretaceous indicate that a long period extreme dry climate occurred at that time in South China. Rb/Ti, Cs/Ti ratios and TOC values escalated and CaCO 3 contents decreased in the Early Paleocene suggesting that the climate became relatively wet, which resulted in greater vegetation cover. The lasting extreme dry climate in the Late Cretaceous may provide a clue to the extinction of the dinosaurs in the Nanxiong Basin.

  1. Hg concentrations from Late Triassic and Early Jurassic sedimentary rocks: first order similarities and second order depositional and diagenetic controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yager, J. A.; West, A. J.; Bergquist, B. A.; Thibodeau, A. M.; Corsetti, F. A.; Berelson, W.; Bottjer, D. J.; Rosas, S.

    2016-12-01

    Mercury concentrations in sediments have recently gained prominence as a potential tool for identifying large igneous province (LIP) volcanism in sedimentary records. LIP volcanism coincides with several mass extinctions during the Phanerozoic, but it is often difficult to directly tie LIP activity with the record of extinction in marine successions. Here, we build on mercury concentration data reported by Thibodeau et al. (Nature Communications, 7:11147, 2016) from the Late Triassic and Early Jurassic of New York Canyon, Nevada, USA. Increases in Hg concentrations in that record were attributed to Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) activity in association with the end-Triassic mass extinction. We expand the measured section from New York Canyon and report new mercury concentrations from Levanto, Peru, where dated ash beds provide a discrete chronology, as well as St. Audrie's Bay, UK, a well-studied succession. We correlate these records using carbon isotopes and ammonites and find similarities in the onset of elevated Hg concentrations and Hg/TOC in association with changes in C isotopes. We also find second order patterns that differ between sections and may have depositional and diagenetic controls. We will discuss these changes within a sedimentological framework to further understand the controls on Hg concentrations in sedimentary records and their implications for past volcanism.

  2. Heterogeneous carbonaceous matter in sedimentary rock lithocomponents causes significant trichloroethylene (TCE) sorption in a low organic carbon content aquifer/aquitard system.

    PubMed

    Choung, Sungwook; Zimmerman, Lisa R; Allen-King, Richelle M; Ligouis, Bertrand; Feenstra, Stanley

    2014-10-15

    This study evaluated the effects of heterogeneous thermally altered carbonaceous matter (CM) on trichloroethylene (TCE) sorption for a low fraction organic carbon content (foc) alluvial sedimentary aquifer and aquitard system (foc=0.046-0.105%). The equilibrium TCE sorption isotherms were highly nonlinear with Freundlich exponents of 0.46-0.58. Kerogen+black carbon was the dominant CM fraction extracted from the sediments and accounted for >60% and 99% of the total in the sands and silt, respectively. Organic petrological examination determined that the kerogen included abundant amorphous organic matter (bituminite), likely of marine origin. The dark calcareous siltstone exhibited the greatest TCE sorption among aquifer lithocomponents and accounted for most sorption in the aquifer. The results suggest that the source of the thermally altered CM, which causes nonlinear sorption, was derived from parent Paleozoic marine carbonate rocks that outcrop throughout much of New York State. A synthetic aquifer-aquitard unit system (10% aquitard) was used to illustrate the effect of the observed nonlinear sorption on mass storage potential at equilibrium. The calculation showed that >80% of TCE mass contained in the aquifer was sorbed on the aquifer sediment at aqueous concentration <1000 μgL(-1). These results show that sorption is likely a significant contributor to the persistence of a TCE groundwater plume in the aquifer studied. It is implied that sorption may similarly contribute to TCE persistence in other glacial alluvial aquifers with similar geologic characteristics, i.e., comprised of sedimentary rock lithocomponents that contain thermally altered CM. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Geochemical and detrital zircon studies of meta-sedimentary rocks from the Teletsk and Ulagan blocks, Russian Altai: Implications on their tectonic affinity and geodynamic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming; Sun, Min

    2015-04-01

    A combined whole-rock geochemical and detrital zircon geochronological and Hf-isotope study was conducted on meta-sedimentary sequences of the Teletsk and Ulagan blocks in order to trace their provenance, depositional setting and tectonic affinity. Samples from the Teletsk and Ulagan blocks underwent epidote-amphibole- and greenschist-facies metamorphism, respectively, but all of them show comparable geochemical characteristics. They are characterized by high Al2O3/SiO2 ratios and ICV (Index of Chemical Variability) values, while (Gd/Yb)N ratios and REEs compositions are comparable to those of the upper continental crust, indicating that their protoliths were immature and probably deposited proximal to the source areas without significant sedimentary sorting. The low CIA (Chemical Index of Alteration) values for these samples (47.3-74.5 and 52.5-74.5, respectively) further suggest that the source rocks underwent mild to moderate chemical weathering. All the samples show major elements (e.g., Al2O3/TiO2, TiO2/Fe2O3T, Fe2O3T/Al2O3), REEs concentrations, HFSEs and transition elements compositions between the typical andesites and granites, but deviate from those of basaltic rocks, implying that intermediate-felsic rocks served dominant sources during the sedimentation. These geochemical characteristics are consistent with the continental island arc setting, which is discriminated by the TiO2, Al2O3 and Fe2O3T + MgO concentrations higher than those of passive marginal depositions, but La/Sc, Ti/Zr, La/Th, La/Sc and Zr/Th ratios comparable to those of depositions in continental island arc settings. Two samples from the Teletsk and Ulagan blocks yield similar detrital zircon age spectra, with the most prominent population of ca. 620-470 Ma old and a subordinate one of ca. 943-743 Ma old. Comparison with surrounding tectonic units shows that the Tuva-Mongolian terrane and surrounding island arcs in western Mongolia probably provided substantial sources to the protoliths

  4. Sedimentary environments for the massive formation of the lacustrine organic rich petroleum source rocks of late Cretaceous from Songliao Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhiguang, S.

    2009-12-01

    Songliao Basin is the major oil-bearing and production basin in China and containing two major sets of excellent organic matter rich source rocks developed during the two related short periods of later Cretaceous time. For a long time, these source rocks were considered unquestionably being formed under fresh or brackish lacustrine environment. However, increasing evidence and studies suggest that this may be not the case anymore, as possible marine transgression and much high salinity lacustrine environment has been suggested or implied from a number of recent studies for Songliao Basin. Here, we show our recent extensive organic geochemical studies carried out on the core samples of Nenjiang formation from a newly drilled scientific exploration well of No. 1 in Songliao Basin. The overall evidence of organic matter and biomarkers suggest that: 1) the main source rocks were likely formed under a much saline(even mesosaline) lacustrine environment, as the existence of a number high saline related biomarkers and their ratios such Pr/Ph, MTTCI, α-MTTC/δ-MTTC, α-MTTC /γ-MTTC, Gammacerane/C30hop are in favor of a mesosaline to saline environments; 2) during the major source rocks formation periods, a photic zone oxygen depletion and stratified water column was suggested by the strong occurrence of a series of aryl isoprenoids and Isorenieratane; 3) a general mild to strong reduced sedimentary environments were concluded from the consistent of a number of index. Fig 1 Correlation between MTTCI vs Pr/Ph ratios with indication of salinity fields (after SCHWARK et al., 1998)

  5. Argon broad ion beam tomography in a cryogenic scanning electron microscope: a novel tool for the investigation of representative microstructures in sedimentary rocks containing pore fluid.

    PubMed

    Desbois, G; Urai, J L; Pérez-Willard, F; Radi, Z; Offern, S; Burkart, I; Kukla, P A; Wollenberg, U

    2013-03-01

    The contribution describes the implementation of a broad ion beam (BIB) polisher into a scanning electron microscope (SEM) functioning at cryogenic temperature (cryo). The whole system (BIB-cryo-SEM) provides a first generation of a novel multibeam electron microscope that combines broad ion beam with cryogenic facilities in a conventional SEM to produce large, high-quality cross-sections (up to 2 mm(2)) at cryogenic temperature to be imaged at the state-of-the-art SEM resolution. Cryogenic method allows detecting fluids in their natural environment and preserves samples against desiccation and dehydration, which may damage natural microstructures. The investigation of microstructures in the third dimension is enabled by serial cross-sectioning, providing broad ion beam tomography with slices down